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Sample records for activity global surface

  1. Global distribution and surface activity of macromolecules in offline simulations of marine organic chemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Ogunro, Oluwaseun O.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Elliott, Scott; ...

    2015-10-13

    Here, organic macromolecules constitute high percentage components of remote sea spray. They enter the atmosphere through adsorption onto bubbles followed by bursting at the ocean surface, and go on to influence the chemistry of the fine mode aerosol. We present a global estimate of mixed-layer organic macromolecular distributions, driven by offline marine systems model output. The approach permits estimation of oceanic concentrations and bubble film surface coverages for several classes of organic compound. Mixed layer levels are computed from the output of a global ocean biogeochemistry model by relating the macromolecules to standard biogeochemical tracers. Steady state is assumed formore » labile forms, and for longer-lived components we rely on ratios to existing transported variables. Adsorption is then represented through conventional Langmuir isotherms, with equilibria deduced from laboratory analogs. Open water concentrations locally exceed one micromolar carbon for the total of protein, polysaccharide and refractory heteropolycondensate. The shorter-lived lipids remain confined to regions of strong biological activity. Results are evaluated against available measurements for all compound types, and agreement is generally quite reasonable. Global distributions are further estimated for both fractional coverage of bubble films at the air-water interface and the two-dimensional concentration excess. Overall, we show that macromolecular mapping provides a novel tool for the comprehension of oceanic surfactant distributions. Results may prove useful in planning field experiments and assessing the potential response of surface chemical behaviors to global change.« less

  2. Global distribution and surface activity of macromolecules in offline simulations of marine organic chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Ogunro, Oluwaseun O.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Elliott, Scott; Frossard, Amanda A.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Letscher, Robert T.; Moore, J. Keith; Russell, Lynn M.; Wang, Shanlin; Wingenter, Oliver W.

    2015-10-13

    Here, organic macromolecules constitute high percentage components of remote sea spray. They enter the atmosphere through adsorption onto bubbles followed by bursting at the ocean surface, and go on to influence the chemistry of the fine mode aerosol. We present a global estimate of mixed-layer organic macromolecular distributions, driven by offline marine systems model output. The approach permits estimation of oceanic concentrations and bubble film surface coverages for several classes of organic compound. Mixed layer levels are computed from the output of a global ocean biogeochemistry model by relating the macromolecules to standard biogeochemical tracers. Steady state is assumed for labile forms, and for longer-lived components we rely on ratios to existing transported variables. Adsorption is then represented through conventional Langmuir isotherms, with equilibria deduced from laboratory analogs. Open water concentrations locally exceed one micromolar carbon for the total of protein, polysaccharide and refractory heteropolycondensate. The shorter-lived lipids remain confined to regions of strong biological activity. Results are evaluated against available measurements for all compound types, and agreement is generally quite reasonable. Global distributions are further estimated for both fractional coverage of bubble films at the air-water interface and the two-dimensional concentration excess. Overall, we show that macromolecular mapping provides a novel tool for the comprehension of oceanic surfactant distributions. Results may prove useful in planning field experiments and assessing the potential response of surface chemical behaviors to global change.

  3. Assessing the Influence of Human Activities on Global Water Resources Using an Advanced Land Surface Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Y.; Hanasaki, N.; Koirala, S.; Kanae, S.; Oki, T.

    2010-12-01

    In order to examine the impact of human intervention on the global hydrological cycle, a Land Surface Model was enhanced with schemes to assess the anthropogenic disturbance on the natural water flow at the global scale. Four different schemes namely; reservoir operation, crop growth, environmental flow, and anthropogenic water withdrawal modules from a state-of-the-art global water resources assessment model called H08 were integrated into an offline version of LSM, Minimal Advance Treatment of Surface Interaction and Runoff (MATSIRO). MATSIRO represents majority of the hydrological processes of water and energy exchange between the land surface and the atmosphere on a physical basis and is designed to be coupled with GCM. The integrated model presented here thus has the capability to simulate both natural and anthropogenic flows of water globally at a spatial resolution of 1°x1°, considering dam operation, domestic, industrial and agricultural water withdrawals and environmental flow requirements. The model can also be coupled with climate models to assess the impact of human activities on the climate system. A simple groundwater scheme was also incorporated and the model can be used to assess the change in water table due to groundwater pumping for irrigation. The model was validated by comparing simulated soil moisture, river discharge and Terrestrial Water Storage Anomaly (TWSA) with observations. The model performs well in simulating TWSA as compared to GRACE observation in different river basins ranging from very wet to very dry. Soil moisture cannot be validated globally because of the lack of validation datasets. For Illinois region, where long term soil moisture observations are available, the model captures the seasonal variation quite well. The simulated global potential irrigation demand is about 1100km3/year, which is within the range of previously published estimates based on various water balance models and LSMs. The model has an advanced option

  4. Diagnostics of a cause-effect relation between solar activity and the Earth's global surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhov, I. I.; Smirnov, D. A.

    2008-06-01

    The influence of solar activity on the Earth’s global surface temperature (GST) was quantified. The method for estimation of the Granger causality was used, with analysis of the improvement of the prediction of one process by using data from another process as compared to autoprediction. Two versions of reconstructions of the solar flux variations associated with solar activity were used, according to Hoyt et al. [1997] for 1680 1992 (data H) and according to Lean et al. [2005] for 1610 2005 (data L). In general, the estimation results for the two reconstructions are reasonably well consistent. A significant influence of solar activity on GST with a positive sign was found for two periods, from the late 19th century to the late 1930s and from the latter half of the 1940s to the early 1990s, with no inertia or time delay. In these periods, up to 8 and 25% of the variance of the GST change, respectively, can be attributed to solar activity variations. The solar influence increased in the 1980s to the early 1990s according to data H and began to decrease in the latter half of the 1980s according to data L.

  5. AQUARIUS: A Passive/Active Microwave Sensor to Monitor Sea Surface Salinity Globally from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David; Lagerloef, Gary S. E.; Colomb, F. Raul; Chao, Yi

    2004-01-01

    Salinity is important for understanding ocean dynamics, energy exchange with the atmosphere and the global water cycle. Existing data is limited and much of the ocean has never even been sampled. Sea surface salinity can be measured remotely by satellite and a three year mission for this purpose called AquariudSAC-D has recently been selected by NASA's Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP) program. The objective is to map the salinity field globally with a spatial resolution of 100 km and a monthly average accuracy of 0.2 psu. The mission, scheduled for launch in 2008, is a partnership of the United States National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) and the Argentine Comision National de Actividades Epaciales (CONAE).

  6. Multi-Scale Response of Global Sea Surface Temperature to Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weng, Hengyi

    1999-01-01

    The variation in the sun output between the maximum and minimum activity over a 11-yr solar cycle is only about 0.1% of the average. Some people believe that even such a small variability in the sun's output is enough to cause our climate change. However, some others have thrown doubts upon such a relationship. Some of the arguments related to this controversial issue can be found in an earlier report by National Research Council (1982). There is a new wave of study about possible solar-climate relationship in the past decade, and the controversial discussion continues. One group still believes in the importance of the sun's role in climate change, while another still discount it with different degrees.

  7. Fall of Global Temperature In The First Half of 21-st Century. Physical-statistical Modeling of Global and Regional Annual Surface Temperatures of Air On The Basis of Energy Model of Atmosphere and Hydrosphere In View of Solar Activity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudovyi, V.; Medvedev, V.; Khorozov, S.; Belogolov, V.

    The energy model of atmosphere and hydrosphere and model of global annual surface temperatures are constructed on the basis of the equations of thermal balance of the upper layers of the Earth. It is supposed, that a major reason of greenhouse effect is the increase of concentration of products of water vapour condensation (sublimation) on account of ionization of the upper layers of an atmosphere by hard radiation at high solar activity. Parameters of the models were defined on the basis of a 300-years observation series of Wolf numbers and 120-years observation series of global annual temperature. The models of annual surface temperatures in various geographical points are constructed on the basis of energy model of the upper layers of the Earth and 50- years series of meteorological observations. The models of annual surface temperatures well explain the global warming during the 20-th century and annual temperature oscillations on a phon of warming trend. The modelling of annual surface temperature changings within several centuries (on the basis of the probable script of solar activity development) shows, that in the first half of the 21-st century global warming, probably, will be replaced by the fall of global temperature. At the end of the 22-nd century this tendency can finish by small glacial period similar to period observed in Europe in 15-18 centuries and most brightly expressed during 1450 -1700 years. The analysis of probable consequences of fall of temperature in Europe on the basis of historical documents is submitted.

  8. Global surface temperatures and the atmospheric electrical circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Colin

    1993-01-01

    To monitor future global temperature trends, it would be extremely useful if parameters nonlinearly related to surface temperature could be found, thereby amplifying any warming signal that may exist. Evidence that global thunderstorm activity is nonlinearly related to diurnal, seasonal and interannual temperature variations is presented. Since global thunderstorm activity is also well correlated with the earth's ionospheric potential, it appears that variations of ionospheric potential, that can be measured at a single location, may be able to supply valuable information regarding global surface temperature fluctuations. The observations presented enable a prediction that a 1 percent increase in global surface temperatures may result in a 20 percent increase in ionospheric potential.

  9. MODIS Global Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Every day the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measures sea surface temperature over the entire globe with high accuracy. This false-color image shows a one-month composite for May 2001. Red and yellow indicates warmer temperatures, green is an intermediate value, while blues and then purples are progressively colder values. The new MODIS sea surface temperature product will be particularly useful in studies of temperature anomalies, such as El Nino, as well as research into how air-sea interactions drive changes in weather and climate patterns. In the high resolution image, notice the amazing detail in some of the regional current patterns. For instance, notice the cold water currents that move from Antarctica northward along South America's west coast. These cold, deep waters upwell along an equatorial swath around and to the west of the Galapagos Islands. Note the warm, wide currents of the Gulf Stream moving up the United States' east coast, carrying Caribbean warmth toward Newfoundland and across the Atlantic toward Western Europe. Note the warm tongue of water extending from Africa's east coast to well south of the Cape of Good Hope. MODIS was launched in December 1999 aboard NASA's Terra satellite. For more details on this and other MODIS data products, please see NASA Unveils Spectacular Suite of New Global Data Products from MODIS. Image courtesy MODIS Ocean Group, NASA GSFC, and the University of Miami

  10. Modeling of global surface air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusakova, M. A.; Karlin, L. N.

    2012-04-01

    A model to assess a number of factors, such as total solar irradiance, albedo, greenhouse gases and water vapor, affecting climate change has been developed on the basis of Earth's radiation balance principle. To develop the model solar energy transformation in the atmosphere was investigated. It's a common knowledge, that part of the incoming radiation is reflected into space from the atmosphere, land and water surfaces, and another part is absorbed by the Earth's surface. Some part of outdoing terrestrial radiation is retained in the atmosphere by greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide) and water vapor. Making use of the regression analysis a correlation between concentration of greenhouse gases, water vapor and global surface air temperature was obtained which, it is turn, made it possible to develop the proposed model. The model showed that even smallest fluctuations of total solar irradiance intensify both positive and negative feedback which give rise to considerable changes in global surface air temperature. The model was used both to reconstruct the global surface air temperature for the 1981-2005 period and to predict global surface air temperature until 2030. The reconstructions of global surface air temperature for 1981-2005 showed the models validity. The model makes it possible to assess contribution of the factors listed above in climate change.

  11. Joint variability of global runoff and global sea surface temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Wolock, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Global land surface runoff and sea surface temperatures (SST) are analyzed to identify the primary modes of variability of these hydroclimatic data for the period 1905-2002. A monthly water-balance model first is used with global monthly temperature and precipitation data to compute time series of annual gridded runoff for the analysis period. The annual runoff time series data are combined with gridded annual sea surface temperature data, and the combined dataset is subjected to a principal components analysis (PCA) to identify the primary modes of variability. The first three components from the PCA explain 29% of the total variability in the combined runoff/SST dataset. The first component explains 15% of the total variance and primarily represents long-term trends in the data. The long-term trends in SSTs are evident as warming in all of the oceans. The associated long-term trends in runoff suggest increasing flows for parts of North America, South America, Eurasia, and Australia; decreasing runoff is most notable in western Africa. The second principal component explains 9% of the total variance and reflects variability of the El Ni??o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and its associated influence on global annual runoff patterns. The third component explains 5% of the total variance and indicates a response of global annual runoff to variability in North Aflantic SSTs. The association between runoff and North Atlantic SSTs may explain an apparent steplike change in runoff that occurred around 1970 for a number of continental regions.

  12. Global lightning activity and climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C.G.

    1993-12-31

    The relationship between global lightning frequencies and global climate change is examined in this thesis. In order to study global impacts of climate change, global climate models or General Circulations Models (GCMs) need to be utilized. Since these models have coarse resolutions many atmospheric phenomena that occur at subgrid scales, such as lightning, need to be parameterized whenever possible. We begin with a simple parameterization used to Simulate total (intracloud and cloud-to-ground) lightning frequencies. The parameterization uses convective cloud top height to approximate lightning frequencies. Then we consider a parameterization for simulating cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning around the globe. This parameterization uses the thickness of the cold cloud sector in thunderstorms (0{degrees}C to cloud top) to calculate the proportion of CG flashes in a particular thunderstorm. We model lightning in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM. We present two climate change scenarios. One for a climate where the solar constant is reduced by 2% (5.9{degrees}C global cooling), and one for a climate with twice the present concentration of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere (4.2{degrees}C global warming). The results imply a 24%/30% decrease/increase in global lightning frequencies for the cooler/warmer climate. The possibility of using the above findings to monitor future global warming is discussed. The earth`s ionospheric potential, which is regulated by global thunderstorm activity, could supply valuable information regarding global surface temperature fluctuations. Finally, we look at the implications of changes in both lightning frequencies and the hydrological cycle, as a result of global warming, on natural forest fires. In the U.S. the annual mean number of lightning fires could increase by 40% while the area burned may increase by 65% in a 2{times}CO{sub 2} climate. On a global scale the largest increase in lightning fires can be expected in the tropics.

  13. Monitoring global monthly mean surface temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trenberth, Kevin E.; Christy, John R.; Hurrell, James W.

    1992-01-01

    The accuracy of the global surface air temperature (SST) estimates for a particular month over the past decade is assessed using all of the in situ observations available today. The sources of noise in the data, the numbers of observations, and the spatial coverage are appraised for the comparison with the climate signal, and different analyzed results are compared to determine their reproducibility. The data are further evaluated by comparing anomalies of near-global monthly mean surface temperatures with those of global satellite channel 2 microwave sounding unit temperatures for 144 months from 1979 to 1990. The results indicate that the inherent noise level in an SST observation is about 1.0 C, and this is compounded when the observation is made in regions of large temperature gradient.

  14. Global modelling of Cryptosporidium in surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, Lucie; Hofstra, Nynke

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Waterborne pathogens that cause diarrhoea, such as Cryptosporidium, pose a health risk all over the world. In many regions quantitative information on pathogens in surface water is unavailable. Our main objective is to model Cryptosporidium concentrations in surface waters worldwide. We present the GloWPa-Crypto model and use the model in a scenario analysis. A first exploration of global Cryptosporidium emissions to surface waters has been published by Hofstra et al. (2013). Further work has focused on modelling emissions of Cryptosporidium and Rotavirus to surface waters from human sources (Vermeulen et al 2015, Kiulia et al 2015). A global waterborne pathogen model can provide valuable insights by (1) providing quantitative information on pathogen levels in data-sparse regions, (2) identifying pathogen hotspots, (3) enabling future projections under global change scenarios and (4) supporting decision making. Material and Methods GloWPa-Crypto runs on a monthly time step and represents conditions for approximately the year 2010. The spatial resolution is a 0.5 x 0.5 degree latitude x longitude grid for the world. We use livestock maps (http://livestock.geo-wiki.org/) combined with literature estimates to calculate spatially explicit livestock Cryptosporidium emissions. For human Cryptosporidium emissions, we use UN population estimates, the WHO/UNICEF JMP sanitation country data and literature estimates of wastewater treatment. We combine our emissions model with a river routing model and data from the VIC hydrological model (http://vic.readthedocs.org/en/master/) to calculate concentrations in surface water. Cryptosporidium survival during transport depends on UV radiation and water temperature. We explore pathogen emissions and concentrations in 2050 with the new Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs) 1 and 3. These scenarios describe plausible future trends in demographics, economic development and the degree of global integration. Results and

  15. Global cloud climatology from surface observations

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.

    1995-09-01

    Surface weather observations from stations on land and ships in the ocean are used to obtain the global distribution, at 5{sup o}x5{sup o} latitude-longitude resolution, of total cloud cover and the average amounts of the different cloud types: cumulus, cumulonimbus, stratus, stratocumulus, nimbostratus, altostratus, altocumulus, cirrus, cirrostratus, cirrocumulus, and fog. Diurnal and seasonal variations are derived, as well as interannual variations and multi-year trends. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  16. The global distribution and dynamics of surface soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McColl, Kaighin A.; Alemohammad, Seyed Hamed; Akbar, Ruzbeh; Konings, Alexandra G.; Yueh, Simon; Entekhabi, Dara

    2017-01-01

    Surface soil moisture has a direct impact on food security, human health and ecosystem function. It also plays a key role in the climate system, and the development and persistence of extreme weather events such as droughts, floods and heatwaves. However, sparse and uneven observations have made it difficult to quantify the global distribution and dynamics of surface soil moisture. Here we introduce a metric of soil moisture memory and use a full year of global observations from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive mission to show that surface soil moisture--a storage believed to make up less than 0.001% of the global freshwater budget by volume, and equivalent to an, on average, 8-mm thin layer of water covering all land surfaces--plays a significant role in the water cycle. Specifically, we find that surface soil moisture retains a median 14% of precipitation falling on land after three days. Furthermore, the retained fraction of the surface soil moisture storage after three days is highest over arid regions, and in regions where drainage to groundwater storage is lowest. We conclude that lower groundwater storage in these regions is due not only to lower precipitation, but also to the complex partitioning of the water cycle by the surface soil moisture storage layer at the land surface.

  17. Decadal modulation of global surface temperature by internal climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Aiguo; Fyfe, John C.; Xie, Shang-Ping; Dai, Xingang

    2015-06-01

    Despite a steady increase in atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs), global-mean surface temperature (T) has shown no discernible warming since about 2000, in sharp contrast to model simulations, which on average project strong warming. The recent slowdown in observed surface warming has been attributed to decadal cooling in the tropical Pacific, intensifying trade winds, changes in El Niño activity, increasing volcanic activity and decreasing solar irradiance. Earlier periods of arrested warming have been observed but received much less attention than the recent period, and their causes are poorly understood. Here we analyse observed and model-simulated global T fields to quantify the contributions of internal climate variability (ICV) to decadal changes in global-mean T since 1920. We show that the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) has been associated with large T anomalies over both ocean and land. Combined with another leading mode of ICV, the IPO explains most of the difference between observed and model-simulated rates of decadal change in global-mean T since 1920, and particularly over the so-called `hiatus' period since about 2000. We conclude that ICV, mainly through the IPO, was largely responsible for the recent slowdown, as well as for earlier slowdowns and accelerations in global-mean T since 1920, with preferred spatial patterns different from those associated with GHG-induced warming or aerosol-induced cooling. Recent history suggests that the IPO could reverse course and lead to accelerated global warming in the coming decades.

  18. Decadal Modulation of Global Surface Temperature By Internal Climate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, A.; Fyfe, J. C.; Xie, S. P.; Dai, X.

    2014-12-01

    Despite a steady increase in atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs), global-mean surface temperature (T) has shown no discernable warming since about 2000, in sharp contrast to model simulations which on average project strong warming. The recent slowdown in observed surface warming has been attributed to decadal cooling in the tropical Pacific, intensifying trade winds, changes in El Niño activity, increasing volcanic activity and decreasing solar irradiance. Earlier periods of arrested warming have been observed but received much less attention than the recent period, and their causes are poorly understood. Here we analyze observed and model-simulated global T fields to quantify the contributions of internal climate variability (ICV) to decadal changes in global-mean T since 1920. We show that the Inter-decadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) has been associated with large T anomalies over both ocean and land since 1920. Combined with another leading mode of ICV, the IPO explains most of the difference between observed and model-simulated rates of decadal change in global-mean T since 1920, and particularly over the so-called "hiatus" period since about 2000. We conclude that ICV, mainly through the IPO, was largely responsible for the recent slowdown, as well as for earlier slowdowns and accelerations in global-mean T since 1920, with preferred spatial patterns different from GHG-induced warming. Recent history suggests that the IPO could reverse course and lead to accelerated global warming in the coming decades.

  19. Global modeling of fresh surface water temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierkens, M. F.; Eikelboom, T.; van Vliet, M. T.; Van Beek, L. P.

    2011-12-01

    Temperature determines a range of water physical properties, the solubility of oxygen and other gases and acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing chemical reaction rates, phytoplankton and zooplankton composition and the presence or absence of pathogens. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism, tolerance to parasites, diseases and pollution and life history. Compared to statistical approaches, physically-based models of surface water temperature have the advantage that they are robust in light of changes in flow regime, river morphology, radiation balance and upstream hydrology. Such models are therefore better suited for projecting the effects of global change on water temperature. Till now, physically-based models have only been applied to well-defined fresh water bodies of limited size (e.g., lakes or stream segments), where the numerous parameters can be measured or otherwise established, whereas attempts to model water temperature over larger scales has thus far been limited to regression type of models. Here, we present a first attempt to apply a physically-based model of global fresh surface water temperature. The model adds a surface water energy balance to river discharge modelled by the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. In addition to advection of energy from direct precipitation, runoff and lateral exchange along the drainage network, energy is exchanged between the water body and the atmosphere by short and long-wave radiation and sensible and latent heat fluxes. Also included are ice-formation and its effect on heat storage and river hydraulics. We used the coupled surface water and energy balance model to simulate global fresh surface water temperature at daily time steps on a 0.5x0.5 degree grid for the period 1970-2000. Meteorological forcing was obtained from the CRU data set, downscaled to daily values with ECMWF

  20. Global trends of measured surface air temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James; Lebedeff, Sergej

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the results of surface air temperature measurements from available meteorological stations for the period of 1880-1985. It is shown that the network of meteorological stations is sufficient to yield reliable long-term, decadal, and interannual temperature changes for both the Northern Hemisphere and the Southern Hemisphere, despite the fact that most stations are located on the continents. The results indicate a global warming of about 0.5-0.7 C in the past century, with warming of similar magnitude in both hemispheres. A strong warming trend between 1965 and 1980 raised the global mean temperature in 1980 and 1981 to the highest level in the period of instrumental records. Selected graphs of the temperature change in each of the eight latitude zones are included.

  1. Monitoring global monthly mean surface temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Trenberth, K.E.; Hurrell, J.W. ); Christy, J.R. )

    1992-12-01

    An assessment is made of how well the monthly mean surface temperatures for the decade of the 1980s are known. The sources of noise in the data, the numbers of observations, and the spatial coverage are appraised for comparison with the climate signal, and different analyzed results are compared to see how reproducible they are. The data are further evaluated by comparing anomalies of near-global monthly mean surface temperatures with those of global satellite channel 2 microwave sounding unit (MSU) temperatures for 144 months from 1979 to 1990. Very distincitve patterns are seen in the correlation coefficients, which range from high (> 0.8) over the extratropical continents of the Northern Hemisphere, to moderate ([approximately] 0.5) over tropical and subtropical land areas, to very low over the southern oceans and tropical western Pacific. The physical difference between the two temperature measurements is one factor in these patterns. The correlation coefficient is a measure of the signal-to-noise ratio, and largest values are found where the climate signal is largest, but the spatial variation in the inherent noise in the surface observations over the oceans is the other major factor in accounting for the pattern. 42 refs., 12 figs., 4 tab.

  2. Exploring global Cryptosporidium emissions to surface water.

    PubMed

    Hofstra, N; Bouwman, A F; Beusen, A H W; Medema, G J

    2013-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium is a major cause of diarrhoea worldwide. This paper presents the first model-based inventory with 0.5 by 0.5 degree resolution of global Cryptosporidium emissions for the year 2000 from humans and animals to surface water. The model is based on nutrient distribution modelling, because the sources and transport of oocysts and nutrients to the surface water are comparable. Total emissions consist of point source emissions from wastewater and nonpoint source emissions by runoff of oocysts in manure from agricultural lands. Results indicate a global emission of 3 × 10(17) oocysts per year, with comparable contributions from point and nonpoint sources. Hot-spot areas for point sources are big cities in China, India and Latin America, while the area with the largest nonpoint source emissions is in China. Uncertainties in the model are large. Main areas for further study are (i) excretion rates of oocysts by humans and animals, (ii) emissions of humans not connected to sewage systems, and (iii) retention of oocysts to determine surface water pathogen concentrations rather than emissions. Our results are useful to health organisations to identify priority areas for further study and intervention.

  3. A global monthly sea surface temperature climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, Dennis J.; Trenberth, Kevin E.; Reynolds, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents a new global 2 deg x 2 deg monthly sea surface temperature (SST) climatology, referred here to as the Shea-Trenberth-Reynolds (STR) climatology, which was derived by modifying a 1950-1979-based SST climatology from the Climate Analysis Center (CAC), by using data from the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set to improve the SST estimates in the regions of the Kuroshio and the Gulf Stream. A comparison of the STR climatology with the Alexander and Mobley SST climatology showed that the STR climatology is warmer in the Northern Hemisphere, and colder poleward of 45 deg S.

  4. Use of surface plasmon resonance for real-time measurements of the global conformational transition in human phenylalanine hydroxylase in response to substrate binding and catalytic activation.

    PubMed

    Flatmark, T; Stokka, A J; Berge, S V

    2001-07-15

    In the present study the optical biosensor technique, based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) phenomenon, was used for real-time measurements of the reversible binding of the pterin cofactor (6R)-l-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and l-phenylalanine (l-Phe) to human phenylalanine hydroxylase (hPAH). When BH(4) (241 Da) was injected over the sensor chip with immobilized tetrameric wt-hPAH a positive DeltaRU response was observed with a square-wave type of sensorgram and a saturable response (about 25 RU/(pmol subunit/mm(2)) with a [S](0.5) value of 5.6 +/- 0.8 microM for the pterin cofactor. The rapid on-and-off rates were, however, not possible to determine. By contrast, when l-Phe (165 Da) was injected a time-dependent increase in RU (up to about 3 min) and a much higher saturable DeltaRU response (about 75 RU/(pmol subunit/mm(2)) at 2 mM l-Phe) than expected (i.e., <5 RU/(pmol subunit/mm(2))) from the low molecular mass of l-Phe were observed in the sensorgram. The half-time for the on-and-off rates were 6 +/- 2 and 9 +/- 1 s, respectively, at 2 mM l-Phe. The steady-state (apparent equilibrium) response revealed a hyperbolic concentration dependence with a [S](0.5) value of 98 +/- 7 microM. The [S](0.5) values of both pterin cofactor and l-Phe were lower than those determined by steady-state enzyme kinetic analysis. Evidence is presented that the DeltaRU response to l-Phe is accounted for by the global conformational transition which occurs in the enzyme upon l-Phe binding, i.e., by the slow reversible transition from a low activity state ("T"-state) to a high activity state ("R"-state) characteristic of this hysteretic enzyme.

  5. Global surface wave tomography using seismic hum.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Kawakatsu, Hitoshi

    2009-10-02

    The development of global surface wave tomography using earthquakes has been crucial to exploration of the dynamic status of Earth's deep. It is naturally believed that only large earthquakes can generate long-period seismic waves that penetrate deep enough into Earth for such exploration. The discovery of seismic hum, Earth's background free oscillations, which are randomly generated by oceanic and/or atmospheric disturbances, now provides an alternative approach. We present results of global upper-mantle seismic tomography using seismic hum and without referring to earthquakes. At periods of 100 to 400 seconds, the phase-velocity anomalies of Rayleigh waves are measured by modeling the observed cross-correlation functions between every pair of stations from among 54 globally distributed seismic stations. The anomalies are then inverted to obtain the three-dimensional S-wave velocity structure in the upper mantle. Our technique provides a new means for exploring the three-dimensional structure of the interior of terrestrial planets with an atmosphere and/or oceans, particularly Mars.

  6. First global WCRP shortwave surface radiation budget dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Charlock, T. P.; Staylor, W. F.; Pinker, R. T.; Laszlo, I.; Ohmura, A.; Gilgen, H.; Konzelman, T.; Dipasquale, R. C.; Moats, C. D.

    1995-01-01

    Shortwave radiative fluxes that reach the earth's surface are key factors that influence atmospheric and oceanic circulations as well as surface climate. Yet, information on these fluxes is meager. Surface site data are generally available from only a limited number of observing stations over land. Much less is known about the large-scale variability of the shortwave radiative fluxes over the oceans, which cover most of the globe. Recognizing the need to produce global-scale fields of such fluxes for use in climate research, the World Climate Research Program has initiated activities that led to the establishment of the Surface Radiation Budget Climatology Project with the ultimate goal to determine various components of the surface radiation budget from satellite data. In this paper, the first global products that resulted from this activity are described. Monthly and daily data on a 280-km grid scale are available. Samples of climate parameters obtainable from the dataset are presented. Emphasis is given to validation and limitations of the results. For most of the globe, satellite estimates have bias values between +/- 20 W/sq m and root mean square (rms) values are around 25 W/sq m. There are specific regions with much larger uncertainties however.

  7. First global WCRP shortwave surface radiation budget dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Charlock, T. P.; Staylor, W. F.; Pinker, R. T.; Laszlo, I.; Ohmura, A.; Gilgen, H.; Konzelman, T.; DiPasquale, R. C.; Moats, C. D.

    1995-01-01

    Shortwave radiative fluxes that reach the Earth's surface are key factors that influence atmospheric and oceanic circulations as well as surface climate. Yet, information on these fluxes is meager. Surface site data are generally available from only a limited number of observing stations over land. Much less is known about the large-scale variability of the shortwave radiative fluxes over the oceans, which cover most of the globe. Recognizing the need to produce global-scale fields of such fluxes for use in climate research, the World Climate Research Program has initiated activities that led to the establishment of the Surface Radiation Budget Climatology Project with the ultimate goal to determine various components of the surface radiation budget from satellite data. In this paper, the first global products that resulted from this activity are described. Monthly and daily data on a 280-km grid scale are available. Samples of climate parameters obtainable from the dataset are presented. Emphasis is given to validation and limitations of the results. For most of the globe, satellite estimates have bias values between +/- 20 W/sq m and rms values are around 25 W/sq m. There are specific regions with much larger uncertainties however.

  8. Active Volcanism on Io: Global Distribution and Variations in Activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes-Gautier, R.; McEwen, A.S.; Smythe, W.B.; Geissler, P.E.; Kamp, L.; Davies, A.G.; Spencer, J.R.; Keszthelyi, L.; Carlson, R.; Leader, F.E.; Mehlman, R.; Soderblom, L.

    1999-01-01

    Io's volcanic activity has been monitored by instruments aboard the Galileo spacecraft since June 28, 1996. We present results from observations by the near-infrared mapping spectrometer (NIMS) for the first 10 orbits of Galileo, correlate them with results from the Solid State Imaging System (SSI) and from groundbased observations, and compare them to what was known about Io's volcanic activity from observations made during the two Voyager flybys in 1979. A total of 61 active volcanic centers have been identified from Voyager, groundbased, and Galileo observations. Of these, 41 are hot spots detected by NIMS and/or SSI. Another 25 locations were identified as possible active volcanic centers, mostly on the basis of observed surface changes. Hot spots are correlated with surface colors, particularly dark and red deposits, and generally anti-correlated with white, SO2-rich areas. Surface features corresponding to the hot spots, mostly calderas or flows, were identified from Galileo and Voyager images. Hot spot temperatures obtained from both NIMS and SSI are consistent with silicate volcanism, which appears to be widespread on Io. Two types of hot spot activity are present: persistent-type activity, lasting from months to years, and sporadic events, which may represent either short-lived activity or low-level activity that occasionally flares up. Sporadic events are not often detected, but may make an important contribution to Io's heat flow and resurfacing. The distribution of active volcanic centers on the surface does not show any clear correlation with latitude, longitude, Voyager-derived global topography, or heat flow patterns predicted by the asthenosphere and deep mantle tidal dissipation models. However, persistent hot spots and active plumes are concentrated toward lower latitudes, and this distribution favors the asthenosphere rather than the deep mantle tidal dissipation model. ?? 1999 Academic Press.

  9. The international surface temperature initiative's global land surface databank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrimore, J. H.; Rennie, J.; Gambi de Almeida, W.; Christy, J.; Flannery, M.; Gleason, B.; Klein-Tank, A.; Mhanda, A.; Ishihara, K.; Lister, D.; Menne, M. J.; Razuvaev, V.; Renom, M.; Rusticucci, M.; Tandy, J.; Thorne, P. W.; Worley, S.

    2013-09-01

    The International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) consists of an end-to-end process for land surface air temperature analyses. The foundation is the establishment of a global land surface Databank. This builds upon the groundbreaking efforts of scientists in the 1980s and 1990s. While using many of their principles, a primary aim is to improve aspects including data provenance, version control, openness and transparency, temporal and spatial coverage, and improved methods for merging disparate sources. The initial focus is on daily and monthly timescales. A Databank Working Group is focused on establishing Stage-0 (original observation forms) through Stage-3 data (merged dataset without quality control). More than 35 sources of data have already been added and efforts have now turned to development of the initial version of the merged dataset. Methods have been established for ensuring to the extent possible the provenance of all data from the point of observation through all intermediate steps to final archive and access. Databank submission procedures were designed to make the process of contributing data as easy as possible. All data are provided openly and without charge. We encourage the use of these data and feedback from interested users.

  10. Mycorrhizal fungi and global land surface models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzostek, E. R.; Fisher, J. B.; Shi, M.; Phillips, R.

    2013-12-01

    In the current generation of Land Surface Models (LSMs), the representation of coupled carbon (C) and nutrient cycles does not account for allocation of C by plants to mycorrhizal fungi in exchange for limiting nutrients. Given that the amount of C transferred to mycorrhizae can exceed 20% of net primary production (NPP), mycorrhizae can supply over half of the nitrogen (N) needed to support NPP, and that large majority of plants form associations with mycorrhizae; integrating these mechanisms into LSMs may significantly alter our understanding of the role of the terrestrial biosphere in mitigating climate change. Here, we present results from the integration of a mycorrhizal framework into a cutting-edge global plant nitrogen model -- Fixation & Uptake of Nitrogen (FUN; Fisher et al., 2010) -- that can be coupled into existing LSMs. In this mycorrhizal framework, the C cost of N acquisition varies as a function of mycorrhizal type with: (1) plants that support arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) benefiting when N is plentiful and (2) plants that support ectomycorrhizae (ECM) benefiting when N is limiting. At the plot scale (15 x 15m), the My-FUN model improved predictions of retranslocation, N uptake, and the amount of C transferred into the soil relative to the base model across 45 plots that vary in mycorrhizal type in Indiana, USA. At the ecosystem scale, when we coupled this new framework into the Community Land Model (CLM-CN), the model estimated lower C uptake than the base model and more accurately predicted C uptake at the Morgan Monroe State Forest AmeriFlux site. These results suggest that the inclusion of a mycorrhizal framework into LSMs will enhance our ability to predict feedbacks between global change and the terrestrial biosphere.

  11. Global circuit response to seasonal variations in global surface air temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Earle R.

    1994-01-01

    Comparisons are made between the seasonal behavior of the global electrical circuit and the surface air temperature for the Tropics and for the globe. Positive correlations between global circuit parameters and temperature are identified on both semiannual and annual timescales. Lightning is the global circuit quantity found most responsive to temperature, with a sensitivity of the order of 10% per 1 C. These findings lend further validity to the use of global circuit measurements as a diagnostic for global change.

  12. Modern average global sea-surface temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweitzer, Peter N.

    1993-01-01

    The data contained in this data set are derived from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Multichannel Sea Surface Temperature data (AVHRR MCSST), which are obtainable from the Distributed Active Archive Center at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif. The JPL tapes contain weekly images of SST from October 1981 through December 1990 in nine regions of the world ocean: North Atlantic, Eastern North Atlantic, South Atlantic, Agulhas, Indian, Southeast Pacific, Southwest Pacific, Northeast Pacific, and Northwest Pacific. This data set represents the results of calculations carried out on the NOAA data and also contains the source code of the programs that made the calculations. The objective was to derive the average sea-surface temperature of each month and week throughout the whole 10-year series, meaning, for example, that data from January of each year would be averaged together. The result is 12 monthly and 52 weekly images for each of the oceanic regions. Averaging the images in this way tends to reduce the number of grid cells that lack valid data and to suppress interannual variability.

  13. Global water cycle and solar activity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Tameemi, Muthanna A.; Chukin, Vladimir V.

    2016-05-01

    The water cycle is the most active and most important component in the circulation of global mass and energy in the Earth system. Furthermore, water cycle parameters such as evaporation, precipitation, and precipitable water vapour play a major role in global climate change. In this work, we attempt to determine the impact of solar activity on the global water cycle by analyzing the global monthly values of precipitable water vapour, precipitation, and the Solar Modulation Potential in 1983-2008. The first object of this study was to calculate global evaporation for the period 1983-2008. For this purpose, we determined the water cycle rate from satellite data, and precipitation/evaporation relationship from 10 years of Planet Simulator model data. The second object of our study was to investigate the relationship between the Solar Modulation Potential (solar activity index) and the evaporation for the period 1983-2008. The results showed that there is a relationship between the solar modulation potential and the evaporation values for the period of study. Therefore, we can assume that the solar activity has an impact on the global water cycle.

  14. Scale-dependency of the global mean surface temperature trend and its implication for the recent hiatus of global warming

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yong; Franzke, Christian L. E.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the global mean surface temperature trend are typically conducted at a single (usually annual or decadal) time scale. The used scale does not necessarily correspond to the intrinsic scales of the natural temperature variability. This scale mismatch complicates the separation of externally forced temperature trends from natural temperature fluctuations. The hiatus of global warming since 1999 has been claimed to show that human activities play only a minor role in global warming. Most likely this claim is wrong due to the inadequate consideration of the scale-dependency in the global surface temperature (GST) evolution. Here we show that the variability and trend of the global mean surface temperature anomalies (GSTA) from January 1850 to December 2013, which incorporate both land and sea surface data, is scale-dependent and that the recent hiatus of global warming is mainly related to natural long-term oscillations. These results provide a possible explanation of the recent hiatus of global warming and suggest that the hiatus is only temporary. PMID:26259555

  15. Scale-dependency of the global mean surface temperature trend and its implication for the recent hiatus of global warming.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong; Franzke, Christian L E

    2015-08-11

    Studies of the global mean surface temperature trend are typically conducted at a single (usually annual or decadal) time scale. The used scale does not necessarily correspond to the intrinsic scales of the natural temperature variability. This scale mismatch complicates the separation of externally forced temperature trends from natural temperature fluctuations. The hiatus of global warming since 1999 has been claimed to show that human activities play only a minor role in global warming. Most likely this claim is wrong due to the inadequate consideration of the scale-dependency in the global surface temperature (GST) evolution. Here we show that the variability and trend of the global mean surface temperature anomalies (GSTA) from January 1850 to December 2013, which incorporate both land and sea surface data, is scale-dependent and that the recent hiatus of global warming is mainly related to natural long-term oscillations. These results provide a possible explanation of the recent hiatus of global warming and suggest that the hiatus is only temporary.

  16. Will surface winds weaken in response to global warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jian; Foltz, Gregory R.; Soden, Brian J.; Huang, Gang; He, Jie; Dong, Changming

    2016-12-01

    The surface Walker and tropical tropospheric circulations have been inferred to slow down from historical observations and model projections, yet analysis of large-scale surface wind predictions is lacking. Satellite measurements of surface wind speed indicate strengthening trends averaged over the global and tropical oceans that are supported by precipitation and evaporation changes. Here we use corrected anemometer-based observations to show that the surface wind speed has not decreased in the averaged tropical oceans, despite its reduction in the region of the Walker circulation. Historical simulations and future projections for climate change also suggest a near-zero wind speed trend averaged in space, regardless of the Walker cell change. In the tropics, the sea surface temperature pattern effect acts against the large-scale circulation slow-down. For higher latitudes, the surface winds shift poleward along with the eddy-driven mid-latitude westerlies, resulting in a very small contribution to the global change in surface wind speed. Despite its importance for surface wind speed change, the influence of the SST pattern change on global-mean rainfall is insignificant since it cannot substantially alter the global energy balance. As a result, the precipitation response to global warming remains ‘muted’ relative to atmospheric moisture increase. Our results therefore show consistency between projections and observations of surface winds and precipitation.

  17. Global surface air temperatures - Update through 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James; Lebedeff, Sergej

    1988-01-01

    Data from meteorological stations show that surface air temperatures in the 1980s are the warmest in the history of instrumental records. The four warmest years on record are all in the 1980s, with the warmest years in the analysis being 1981 and 1987. The rate of warming between the mid-1960s and the present is higher than that which occurrred in the previous period of rapid warming between the 1880s and 1940.

  18. Global scale hydrology - Advances in land surface modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, E.F. )

    1991-01-01

    Research into global scale hydrology is an expanding area that includes researchers from the meteorology, climatology, ecology and hydrology communities. This paper reviews research in this area carried out in the United States during the last IUGG quadrennial period of 1987-1990. The review covers the representation of land-surface hydrologic processes for general circulation models (GCMs), sensitivity analysis of these representations on global hydrologic fields like precipitation, regional studies of climate that have global hydrologic implications, recent field studies and experiments whose aims are the improved understanding of land surface-atmospheric interactions, and the use of remotely sensed data for the further understanding of the spatial variability of surface hydrologic processes that are important at regional and global climate scales. 76 refs.

  19. Global lightning activity and climate change. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C.G.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between global lightning frequencies and global climate change is examined in this thesis. In order to study global impacts of climate change, global climate models or General Circulations Models (GCM`s) need to be utilized. Since these models have coarse resolutions many atmospheric phenomena that occur at subgrid scales, such as lightning, need to be parameterized whenever possible. The first chapter introduces a simple parameterization used to simulate total (intracloud and cloud-to-ground) lightning frequencies. The parameterization uses convective cloud top height to approximate lightning frequencies. The second chapter deals with a parameterization for simulating cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning around the globe. This parameterization uses the thickness of the cold cloud sector in thunderstorms (0 C to cloud top) to calculate the proportion of CG flashes in a particular thunderstorm. The third chapter deals with the modelling of lightning in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM. This chapter presents results from the model`s control run. The fourth chapter presents two climate change scenarios. One for a climate where the solar constant is reduced by 2% (5.9 C global cooling), and one for a climate with twice the present concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere (4.2 C global warming). The results imply a 24% / 30% decrease/increase in global lightning frequencies for the cooler/warmer climate. The fifth chapter considers the possibility of using the above findings to monitor future global warming. The results show that the earth`s ionospheric potential, which is regulated by global thunderstorm activity, could possibly supply valuable information regarding global surface temperature fluctuations. The sixth and final chapter looks at the implications of changes in both lightning frequencies and the hydrological cycle, as a result of global warming, on natural forest fires.

  20. Space activities and global popular music culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, Allison Rae; Collins, Patrick

    During the "space age" era, space activities appear increasingly as a theme in Western popular music, as they do in popular culture generally. In combination with the electronics and tele-communications revolution, "pop/rock" music has grown explosively during the space age to become an effectively global culture. From this base a number of trends are emerging in the pattern of influences that space activities have on pop music. The paper looks at the use of themes and imagery in pop music; the role of space technology in the modern "globalization" of pop music; and current and future links between space activities and pop music culture, including how public space programmes are affected by its influence on popular attitudes.

  1. Active particles on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fily, Yaouen; Baskaran, Aparna; Hagan, Michael

    Active systems have proved to be very sensitive to the geometry of their environment. This is often achieved by spending significant time at the boundary, probing its shape by gliding along it. I will discuss coarse graining the microscopic dynamics of self-propelled particles on a general curved surface to predict the way the density profile on the surface depends on its geometry. Beyond confined active particles, this formalism is a natural starting point to study objects that cannot leave the boundary at all, such as cells crawling on a curved substrate, animals running on uneven ground, or active colloids trapped at an interface.

  2. Global color variations on the Martian surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soderblom, L.A.; Edwards, K.; Eliason, E.M.; Sanchez, E.M.; Charette, M.P.

    1978-01-01

    Surface materials exposed throughout the equatorial region of Mars have been classified and mapped on the basis of spectral reflectance properties determined by the Viking II Orbiter vidicon cameras. Frames acquired at each of three wavelengths (0.45 ?? 0.03 ??m, 0.53 ?? 0.05 ??m, and 0.59 ?? 0.05 ??m) during the approach of Viking Orbiter II in Martian summer (Ls = 105??) were mosaicked by computer. The mosaics cover latitudes 30??N to 63??S for 360?? of longitude and have resolutions between 10 and 20 km per line pair. Image processing included Mercator transformation and removal of an average Martian photometric function to produce albedo maps at three wavelengths. The classical dark region between the equator and ???30??S in the Martian highlands is composed of two units: (i) and ancient unit consisting of topographic highs (ridges, crater rims, and rugged plateaus riddled with small dendritic channels) which is among the reddest on the planet (0.59/0.45 ??m {reversed tilde equals} 3); and (ii) intermediate age, smooth, intercrater volcanic plains displaying numerous mare ridges which are among the least red on Mars (0.59/0.45 ??m {reversed tilde equals} 2). The relatively young shield volcanoes are, like the oldest unit, dark and very red. Two probable eolian deposits are recognized in the intermediate and high albedo regions. The stratigraphically lower unit is intermediate in both color (0.59/ 0.45 ??m {reversed tilde equals} 2.5) and albedo. The upper unit has the highest albedo, is very red (0.59/0.45 ??m {reversed tilde equals} 3), and is apparently the major constituent of the annual dust storms as its areal extent changes from year to year. The south polar ice cap and condensate clouds dominate the southernmost part of the mosaics. ?? 1978.

  3. Global Surface Temperature Change and Uncertainties Since 1861

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Samuel S. P.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this talk is to analyze the warming trend and its uncertainties of the global and hemi-spheric surface temperatures. By the method of statistical optimal averaging scheme, the land surface air temperature and sea surface temperature observational data are used to compute the spatial average annual mean surface air temperature. The optimal averaging method is derived from the minimization of the mean square error between the true and estimated averages and uses the empirical orthogonal functions. The method can accurately estimate the errors of the spatial average due to observational gaps and random measurement errors. In addition, quantified are three independent uncertainty factors: urbanization, change of the in situ observational practices and sea surface temperature data corrections. Based on these uncertainties, the best linear fit to annual global surface temperature gives an increase of 0.61 +/- 0.16 C between 1861 and 2000. This lecture will also touch the topics on the impact of global change on nature and environment. as well as the latest assessment methods for the attributions of global change.

  4. Surface urban heat island across 419 global big cities.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shushi; Piao, Shilong; Ciais, Philippe; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Ottle, Catherine; Bréon, François-Marie; Nan, Huijuan; Zhou, Liming; Myneni, Ranga B

    2012-01-17

    Urban heat island is among the most evident aspects of human impacts on the earth system. Here we assess the diurnal and seasonal variation of surface urban heat island intensity (SUHII) defined as the surface temperature difference between urban area and suburban area measured from the MODIS. Differences in SUHII are analyzed across 419 global big cities, and we assess several potential biophysical and socio-economic driving factors. Across the big cities, we show that the average annual daytime SUHII (1.5 ± 1.2 °C) is higher than the annual nighttime SUHII (1.1 ± 0.5 °C) (P < 0.001). But no correlation is found between daytime and nighttime SUHII across big cities (P = 0.84), suggesting different driving mechanisms between day and night. The distribution of nighttime SUHII correlates positively with the difference in albedo and nighttime light between urban area and suburban area, while the distribution of daytime SUHII correlates negatively across cities with the difference of vegetation cover and activity between urban and suburban areas. Our results emphasize the key role of vegetation feedbacks in attenuating SUHII of big cities during the day, in particular during the growing season, further highlighting that increasing urban vegetation cover could be one effective way to mitigate the urban heat island effect.

  5. A physically based model of global freshwater surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beek, Ludovicus P. H.; Eikelboom, Tessa; Vliet, Michelle T. H.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2012-09-01

    Temperature determines a range of physical properties of water and exerts a strong control on surface water biogeochemistry. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime directly affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism and indirectly through their tolerance to parasites and diseases. Models used to predict surface water temperature range between physically based deterministic models and statistical approaches. Here we present the initial results of a physically based deterministic model of global freshwater surface temperature. The model adds a surface water energy balance to river discharge modeled by the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. In addition to advection of energy from direct precipitation, runoff, and lateral exchange along the drainage network, energy is exchanged between the water body and the atmosphere by shortwave and longwave radiation and sensible and latent heat fluxes. Also included are ice formation and its effect on heat storage and river hydraulics. We use the coupled surface water and energy balance model to simulate global freshwater surface temperature at daily time steps with a spatial resolution of 0.5° on a regular grid for the period 1976-2000. We opt to parameterize the model with globally available data and apply it without calibration in order to preserve its physical basis with the outlook of evaluating the effects of atmospheric warming on freshwater surface temperature. We validate our simulation results with daily temperature data from rivers and lakes (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), limited to the USA) and compare mean monthly temperatures with those recorded in the Global Environment Monitoring System (GEMS) data set. Results show that the model is able to capture the mean monthly surface temperature for the majority of the GEMS stations, while the interannual variability as derived from the USGS and NOAA data was captured reasonably well. Results are poorest for

  6. Active Free Surface Density Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelen, S.

    2016-10-01

    Percolation problems were occupied to many physical problems after their establishment in 1957 by Broadbent and Hammersley. They can be used to solve complex systems such as bone remodeling. Volume fraction method was adopted to set some algorithms in the literature. However, different rate of osteoporosis could be observed for different microstructures which have the same mass density, mechanical stimuli, hormonal stimuli and nutrition. Thus it was emphasized that the bone might have identical porosity with different specific surfaces. Active free surface density of bone refers the used total area for its effective free surface. The purpose of this manuscript is to consolidate a mathematical approach which can be called as “active free surface density maps” for different surface patterns and derive their formulations. Active free surface density ratios were calculated for different Archimedean lattice models according to Helmholtz free energy and they were compared with their site and bond percolation thresholds from the background studies to derive their potential probability for bone remodeling.

  7. High Predictive Skill of Global Surface Temperature a Year Ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folland, C. K.; Colman, A.; Kennedy, J. J.; Knight, J.; Parker, D. E.; Stott, P.; Smith, D. M.; Boucher, O.

    2011-12-01

    We discuss the high skill of real-time forecasts of global surface temperature a year ahead issued by the UK Met Office, and their scientific background. Although this is a forecasting and not a formal attribution study, we show that the main instrumental global annual surface temperature data sets since 1891 are structured consistently with a set of five physical forcing factors except during and just after the second World War. Reconstructions use a multiple application of cross validated linear regression to minimise artificial skill allowing time-varying uncertainties in the contribution of each forcing factor to global temperature to be assessed. Mean cross validated reconstructions for the data sets have total correlations in the range 0.93-0.95,interannual correlations in the range 0.72-0.75 and root mean squared errors near 0.06oC, consistent with observational uncertainties.Three transient runs of the HadCM3 coupled model for 1888-2002 demonstrate quite similar reconstruction skill from similar forcing factors defined appropriately for the model, showing that skilful use of our technique is not confined to observations. The observed reconstructions show that the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) likely contributed to the re-commencement of global warming between 1976 and 2010 and to global cooling observed immediately beforehand in 1965-1976. The slowing of global warming in the last decade is likely to be largely due to a phase-delayed response to the downturn in the solar cycle since 2001-2, with no net ENSO contribution. The much reduced trend in 2001-10 is similar in size to other weak decadal temperature trends observed since global warming resumed in the 1970s. The causes of variations in decadal trends can be mostly explained by variations in the strength of the forcing factors. Eleven real-time forecasts of global mean surface temperature for the year ahead for 2000-2010, based on broadly similar methods, provide an independent test of the

  8. The reliability of global and hemispheric surface temperature records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Philip

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this review article is to discuss the development and associated estimation of uncertainties in the global and hemispheric surface temperature records. The review begins by detailing the groups that produce surface temperature datasets. After discussing the reasons for similarities and differences between the various products, the main issues that must be addressed when deriving accurate estimates, particularly for hemispheric and global averages, are then considered. These issues are discussed in the order of their importance for temperature records at these spatial scales: biases in SST data, particularly before the 1940s; the exposure of land-based thermometers before the development of louvred screens in the late 19th century; and urbanization effects in some regions in recent decades. The homogeneity of land-based records is also discussed; however, at these large scales it is relatively unimportant. The article concludes by illustrating hemispheric and global temperature records from the four groups that produce series in near-real time.

  9. Mapping the global land surface using 1 km AVHRR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lauer, D.T.; Eidenshink, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    The scientific requirements for mapping the global land surface using 1 km advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) data have been set forth by the U.S. Global Change Research Program; the International Geosphere Biosphere Programme (IGBP); The United Nations; the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); the Committee on Earth Observations Satellites; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) mission to planet Earth (MTPE) program. Mapping the global land surface using 1 km AVHRR data is an international effort to acquire, archive, process, and distribute 1 km AVHRR data to meet the needs of the international science community. A network of AVHRR receiving stations, along with data recorded by NOAA, has been acquiring daily global land coverage since April 1, 1992. A data set of over 70,000 AVHRR images is archived and distributed by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) EROS Data Center, and the European Space Agency. Under the guidance of the IGBP, processing standards have been developed for calibration, atmospheric correction, geometric registration, and the production of global 10-day maximum normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) composites. The major uses of the composites are for the study of surface vegetation condition, mapping land cover, and deriving biophysical characteristics of terrestrial ecosystems. A time-series of 54 10-day global vegetation index composites for the period of April 1, 1992 through September 1993 has been produced. The production of a time-series of 33 10-day global vegetation index composites using NOAA-14 data for the period of February 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995 is underway. The data products are available from the USGS, in cooperation with NASA's MTPE program and other international organizations.

  10. Results from Global Land-Surface Data Assimilation Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radakovich, Jon D.; Houser, Paul R.; daSilva, Arlindo; Bosilovich, Michael G.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Realistic representation of the land surface is crucial in global climate modeling (GCM). Recently, the Mosaic land-surface Model (LSM) has been driven off-line using GEOS DAS (Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System) atmospheric forcing, forming the Off-line Land-surface Global Assimilation (OLGA) system. This system provides a computationally efficient test bed for land surface data assimilation. Here, we validate the OLGA simulation of surface processes and the assimilation of ISCCP surface temperatures. Another component of this study as the incorporation of the Physical-space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS) into OLGA, in order to assimilate surface temperature observations from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). To counteract the subsequent forcing of the analyzed skin temperature back to the initial state following the analysis. incremental bias correction (IBC) was included in the assimilation. The IBC scheme effectively removed the time mean bias, but did not remove him in the mean diurnal cycle. Therefore, a diurnal him correction (DBC) scheme was developed, where the time-dependent bias was modeled with a sine wave parameterization. In addition, quality control of the ISCCP data and anisotropic temperature correction were implemented in PSAS. Preliminary results showed a substantial impact from the inclusion of PSAS and DBC that was visible in the surface meteorology fields and energy budget. Also, the monthly mean diurnal cycle from the experiment closely matched the diurnal cycle from the observations.

  11. Results From Global Land-surface Data Assimilation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radakovich, J. D.; Houser, P. R.; da Silva, A.; Bosilovich, M. G.

    2001-05-01

    Realistic representation of the land surface is crucial in global climate modeling (GCM). Recently, the Mosaic land-surface Model (LSM) has been driven off-line using GEOS DAS (Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System) atmospheric forcing, forming the Off-line Land-surface Global Assimilation (OLGA) system. This system provides a computationally efficient test bed for land surface data assimilation. Here, we validate the OLGA simulation of surface processes and the assimilation of ISCCP surface temperatures. Another component of this study was the incorporation of the Physical-space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS) into OLGA, in order to assimilate surface temperature observations from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). To counteract the subsequent forcing of the analyzed skin temperature back to the initial state following the analysis, incremental bias correction (IBC) was included in the assimilation. The IBC scheme effectively removed the time mean bias, but did not remove bias in the mean diurnal cycle. Therefore, a diurnal bias correction (DBC) scheme was developed, where the time-dependent bias was modeled with a sine wave parameterization. In addition, quality control of the ISCCP data and anisotropic temperature correction were implemented in PSAS. Preliminary results showed a substantial impact from the inclusion of PSAS and DBC that was visible in the surface meteorology fields and energy budget. Also, the monthly mean diurnal cycle from the experiment closely matched the diurnal cycle from the observations.

  12. Global Land Surface Emissivity Retrieved From Satellite Ultraspectral IR Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, D. K.; Larar, A. M.; Liu, Xu; Smith, W. L.; Strow, L. L.; Yang, Ping; Schlussel, P.; Calbet, X.

    2011-01-01

    Ultraspectral resolution infrared (IR) radiances obtained from nadir observations provide information about the atmosphere, surface, aerosols, and clouds. Surface spectral emissivity (SSE) and surface skin temperature from current and future operational satellites can and will reveal critical information about the Earth s ecosystem and land-surface-type properties, which might be utilized as a means of long-term monitoring of the Earth s environment and global climate change. In this study, fast radiative transfer models applied to the atmosphere under all weather conditions are used for atmospheric profile and surface or cloud parameter retrieval from ultraspectral and/or hyperspectral spaceborne IR soundings. An inversion scheme, dealing with cloudy as well as cloud-free radiances observed with ultraspectral IR sounders, has been developed to simultaneously retrieve atmospheric thermodynamic and surface or cloud microphysical parameters. This inversion scheme has been applied to the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI). Rapidly produced SSE is initially evaluated through quality control checks on the retrievals of other impacted surface and atmospheric parameters. Initial validation of retrieved emissivity spectra is conducted with Namib and Kalahari desert laboratory measurements. Seasonal products of global land SSE and surface skin temperature retrieved with IASI are presented to demonstrate seasonal variation of SSE.

  13. Divergent surface and total soil moisture projections under global warming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berg, Alexis; Sheffield, Justin; Milly, Paul C.D.

    2017-01-01

    Land aridity has been projected to increase with global warming. Such projections are mostly based on off-line aridity and drought metrics applied to climate model outputs but also are supported by climate-model projections of decreased surface soil moisture. Here we comprehensively analyze soil moisture projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5, including surface, total, and layer-by-layer soil moisture. We identify a robust vertical gradient of projected mean soil moisture changes, with more negative changes near the surface. Some regions of the northern middle to high latitudes exhibit negative annual surface changes but positive total changes. We interpret this behavior in the context of seasonal changes in the surface water budget. This vertical pattern implies that the extensive drying predicted by off-line drought metrics, while consistent with the projected decline in surface soil moisture, will tend to overestimate (negatively) changes in total soil water availability.

  14. Revisiting the global surface energy budgets with maximum-entropy-production model of surface heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Yu; Deng, Yi; Wang, Jingfeng

    2016-10-01

    The maximum-entropy-production (MEP) model of surface heat fluxes, based on contemporary non-equilibrium thermodynamics, information theory, and atmospheric turbulence theory, is used to re-estimate the global surface heat fluxes. The MEP model predicted surface fluxes automatically balance the surface energy budgets at all time and space scales without the explicit use of near-surface temperature and moisture gradient, wind speed and surface roughness data. The new MEP-based global annual mean fluxes over the land surface, using input data of surface radiation, temperature data from National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (NASA CERES) supplemented by surface specific humidity data from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), agree closely with previous estimates. The new estimate of ocean evaporation, not using the MERRA reanalysis data as model inputs, is lower than previous estimates, while the new estimate of ocean sensible heat flux is higher than previously reported. The MEP model also produces the first global map of ocean surface heat flux that is not available from existing global reanalysis products.

  15. Global Surface Ultraviolet Radiation Climatology from TOMS and ERBE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubin, Dan

    1998-01-01

    The overall goal of this project has been to develop a method for calculating the distribution of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) over most of the earth's surface using NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) data, and to use this method to develop a UVR climatology that is useful in the context of the global ozone depletion issue. The research carried out with this support has resulted the following accomplishments: (1) a radioactive transfer method. based on the delta-Eddington approximation, was successfully developed; (2) the method was applied to the five years of overlapping TOMS and ERBE Monthly-Hourly data to examine the impact of global variability in cloud cover on trends in surface UVR; (3) a presentation was made on effects of stratospheric ozone depletion; (4) the radioactive transfer model was finally applied to all daylight hours to make a through study of the global effect of cloud cover;and (6) a five-year global climatology of surface UVR based on all of the research has been prepared for general distribution.

  16. Active and responsive polymer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jilin; Han, Yanchun

    2010-02-01

    A central challenge in polymer science today is creating materials that dynamically alter their structures and properties on demand, or in response to changes in their environment. Surfaces represent an attractive area of focus, since they exert disproportionately large effects on properties such as wettability, adhesiveness, optical appearance, and bioactivity, enabling pronounced changes in properties to be accomplished through subtle changes in interfacial structure or chemistry. In this critical review, we review the recent research progress into active and responsive polymer surfaces. The chief purpose of this article is to summarize the advanced preparation techniques and applications in this field from the past decade. This review should be of interest both to new scientists in this field and the interdisciplinary researchers who are working on "intelligent" polymer surfaces (117 references).

  17. The need for satellite based observations of global surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettenmaier, D.; Alsdorf, D.; Vörösmarty, C.; Birkett, C.

    2003-04-01

    River discharge as well as lake and wetland storage of water are critical elements of land surface hydrology, yet they are poorly observed globally and the prospects for improvement from in-situ networks are bleak. Considering this, our NASA Surface Water working group is focused on the following science and applications questions: (1) What are the observational and data assimilation requirements for measuring natural and manmade surface storage and river discharge that will allow us to (a) understand the land surface branch of the global hydrologic cycle, (b) predict the consequences of global change, and (c) make assessments for water resources management? (2) What are the roles of wetlands, lakes, and rivers (a) as regulators of biogeochemical and constituent cycles (e.g., carbon, nutrients, and sediments) and (b) in creating or ameliorating water-related hazards of relevance to society? Global models of weather and climate could be constrained spatially and temporally by stream discharge and surface storage measurements. Yet this constraint is rarely applied, despite weather and climate modeling results showing that predicted precipitation is often inconsistent with observed discharge. Thus, as satellite missions are developed for global observations of critical hydrologic parameters such as soil moisture (i.e., HYDROS) and precipitation (i.e., GPM), the lack of concomitant measurements of runoff and surface water storage at compatible spatial and temporal scales may well result in inconsistent parameterizations of global hydrologic, weather, and climate models. Although off-river-channel environments, such as wetlands, floodplains, and anabranches (e.g., braided channels) are increasingly recognized for their important roles in delaying continental runoff, in biogeochemical cycling of waterborne constituents, and in trace gas exchange with the atmosphere, these environments are not gauged because flow is diffusive (non-channelized). Rather than fixed station

  18. Global trend analysis of surface CO simulated using the global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model, EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jongmin; Pozzer, Andrea; Lelieveld, Jos

    2013-04-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an important trace gas in tropospheric chemistry. It directly influences the concentration of tropospheric hydroxyl radical (OH), and therefore regulates the lifetimes of various tropospheric trace gases. Since anthropogenic activity produces about 60% of the annual global emission of the tropospheric CO, temporal trend analysis of surface CO is needed to understand the increasing (decreasing) influence of humans on the cleansing capacity of the atmosphere. In this study, the global trend of surface CO from 2001 to 2010 was estimated using the EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy for Atmospheric Chemistry) model. The simulation is based on the emission scenario based on RCP8.5 (Representative Concentration Pathways). The global EMAC simulations of monthly surface CO are evaluated with monthly MOPITT (Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere) observations (i.e. MOP03TM), and the spatial correlations range from 0.87 to 0.97. The simulated trends are compared with the data from a global surface CO monitoring network, the World Data Centre for Greenhouse Gases (WDCGG), which includes also the NOAA/CMDL (Climate Monitoring and Diagnostic Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) Cooperative Air Sampling Network. Over the United States and Western Europe, the significant decreases of surface CO are estimated at -49.7±2.7 and -38.6±2.7 ppbv per decade. In contrast, the surface CO increased by +12.4±10.2 and +7.2±3.7 ppbv per decade over South America and South Africa, respectively.

  19. Modeling global distribution of agricultural insecticides in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, Alessio; Kattwinkel, Mira; Rasmussen, Jes J; Schäfer, Ralf B; Fornaroli, Riccardo; Liess, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Agricultural insecticides constitute a major driver of animal biodiversity loss in freshwater ecosystems. However, the global extent of their effects and the spatial extent of exposure remain largely unknown. We applied a spatially explicit model to estimate the potential for agricultural insecticide runoff into streams. Water bodies within 40% of the global land surface were at risk of insecticide runoff. We separated the influence of natural factors and variables under human control determining insecticide runoff. In the northern hemisphere, insecticide runoff presented a latitudinal gradient mainly driven by insecticide application rate; in the southern hemisphere, a combination of daily rainfall intensity, terrain slope, agricultural intensity and insecticide application rate determined the process. The model predicted the upper limit of observed insecticide exposure measured in water bodies (n = 82) in five different countries reasonably well. The study provides a global map of hotspots for insecticide contamination guiding future freshwater management and conservation efforts.

  20. The atmospheric electric global circuit. [thunderstorm activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasemir, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    The hypothesis that world thunderstorm activity represents the generator for the atmospheric electric current flow in the earth atmosphere between ground and the ionosphere is based on a close correlation between the magnitude and the diurnal variation of the supply current (thunderstorm generator current) and the load current (fair weather air-earth current density integrated over the earth surface). The advantages of using lightning survey satellites to furnish a base for accepting or rejecting the thunderstorm generator hypothesis are discussed.

  1. Spatial correlations of interdecadal variation in global surface temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, Michael E.; Park, Jeffrey

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed spatial correlation patterns of interdecadal global surface temperature variability from an empirical perspective. Using multitaper coherence estimates from 140-yr records, we find that correlations between hemispheres are significant at about 95 percent confidence for nonrandomness for most of the frequency band in the 0.06-0.24 cyc/yr range. Coherence estimates of pairs of 100-yr grid-point temperature data series near 5-yr period reveal teleconnection patterns consistent with known patterns of ENSO variability. Significant correlated variability is observed near 15 year period, with the dominant teleconnection pattern largely confined to the Northern Hemisphere. Peak-to-peak Delta-T is at about 0.5 deg, with simultaneous warming and cooling of discrete patches on the earth's surface. A global average of this pattern would largely cancel.

  2. Global Occurrence and Emission of Rotaviruses to Surface Waters

    PubMed Central

    Kiulia, Nicholas M.; Hofstra, Nynke; Vermeulen, Lucie C.; Obara, Maureen A.; Medema, Gertjan; Rose, Joan B.

    2015-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RV) are the major cause of acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children globally. Waterborne transmission of RV and the presence of RV in water sources are of major public health importance. In this paper, we present the Global Waterborne Pathogen model for RV (GloWPa-Rota model) to estimate the global distribution of RV emissions to surface water. To our knowledge, this is the first model to do so. We review the literature to estimate three RV specific variables for the model: incidence, excretion rate and removal during wastewater treatment. We estimate total global RV emissions to be 2 × 1018 viral particles/grid/year, of which 87% is produced by the urban population. Hotspot regions with high RV emissions are urban areas in densely populated parts of the world, such as Bangladesh and Nigeria, while low emissions are found in rural areas in North Russia and the Australian desert. Even for industrialized regions with high population density and without tertiary treatment, such as the UK, substantial emissions are estimated. Modeling exercises like the one presented in this paper provide unique opportunities to further study these emissions to surface water, their sources and scenarios for improved management. PMID:25984911

  3. The Exploration of Mars: Crew Surface Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhosri, Wisuwat; Cojanis, Philip; Gupta, Madhu; Khopkar, Manasi; Kiely, Aaron; Myers, Michael; Oxnevad, Knut; Sengupta, Anita; Sexton, Adam; Shaw, Don

    1999-01-01

    Surface activities of the first Mars mission crew, as suggested in phase I of the NASA HEDS reference mission, are discussed in this paper. The HEDS reference mission calls for a two phased approach. In phase I, humans supported by robotic systems will explore the Martian surface, collect and analyze geologic, geophysical, and meteorological data, search for potential permanent base sites, and conduct technology verification experiments. In phase II, a Mars base site will be selected, and the building of a permanent human base will be initiated. In this report two complementary architectures are portrayed. First, a permanent base for 3-6 people consisting of an ISRU unit, two nuclear power systems, a green house, and inflatable habitats and laboratories, built inside adobe structures. Second, a reusable, and resupplyable methane propelled very long range type traverse vehicle capable of collecting and analyzing data, and repairing and deploying scientific payloads during its planned 150 days 4800 km traverse. The very long range traverse vehicle will carry smaller rovers, crawlers, blimps, and an air drill capable of quickly reaching depths beyond 100m. The report presents a global vision of human activities on the surface of Mars at a programmatic level. It consists of several vignettes called "concept architectures" We speculate that these activities will facilitate a phase I Mars exploration architecture.

  4. Representing Global Reactive Potential Energy Surfaces Using Gaussian Processes.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Brian; Marshall, Paul; Zhao, Bin; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2017-03-23

    Representation of multidimensional global potential energy surfaces suitable for spectral and dynamical calculations from high-level ab initio calculations remains a challenge. Here, we present a detailed study on constructing potential energy surfaces using a machine learning method, namely, Gaussian process regression. Tests for the (3)A″ state of SH2, which facilitates the SH + H ↔ S((3)P) + H2 abstraction reaction and the SH + H' ↔ SH' + H exchange reaction, suggest that the Gaussian process is capable of providing a reasonable potential energy surface with a small number (∼1 × 10(2)) of ab initio points, but it needs substantially more points (∼1 × 10(3)) to converge reaction probabilities. The implications of these observations for construction of potential energy surfaces are discussed.

  5. Accelerating the search for global minima on potential energy surfaces using machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, S. F.; Garnett, R.; Lo, C. S.

    2016-10-01

    Controlling molecule-surface interactions is key for chemical applications ranging from catalysis to gas sensing. We present a framework for accelerating the search for the global minimum on potential surfaces, corresponding to stable adsorbate-surface structures. We present a technique using Bayesian inference that enables us to predict converged density functional theory potential energies with fewer self-consistent field iterations. We then discuss how this technique fits in with the Bayesian Active Site Calculator, which applies Bayesian optimization to the problem. We demonstrate the performance of our framework using a hematite (Fe2O3) surface and present the adsorption sites found by our global optimization method for various simple hydrocarbons on the rutile TiO2 (110) surface.

  6. The timescales of global surface-ocean connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, Bror F.; Watson, James R.

    2016-04-01

    Planktonic communities are shaped through a balance of local evolutionary adaptation and ecological succession driven in large part by migration. The timescales over which these processes operate are still largely unresolved. Here we use Lagrangian particle tracking and network theory to quantify the timescale over which surface currents connect different regions of the global ocean. We find that the fastest path between two patches--each randomly located anywhere in the surface ocean--is, on average, less than a decade. These results suggest that marine planktonic communities may keep pace with climate change--increasing temperatures, ocean acidification and changes in stratification over decadal timescales--through the advection of resilient types.

  7. The timescales of global surface-ocean connectivity.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Bror F; Watson, James R

    2016-04-19

    Planktonic communities are shaped through a balance of local evolutionary adaptation and ecological succession driven in large part by migration. The timescales over which these processes operate are still largely unresolved. Here we use Lagrangian particle tracking and network theory to quantify the timescale over which surface currents connect different regions of the global ocean. We find that the fastest path between two patches--each randomly located anywhere in the surface ocean--is, on average, less than a decade. These results suggest that marine planktonic communities may keep pace with climate change--increasing temperatures, ocean acidification and changes in stratification over decadal timescales--through the advection of resilient types.

  8. Surface measurements of global warming causing atmospheric constituents in Korea.

    PubMed

    Oh, S N; Youn, Y H; Park, K J; Min, H K; Schnell, R C

    2001-07-01

    The expansion of the industrial economy and the increase of population in Northeast Asian countries have caused much interest in climate monitoring related to global warming. However, new techniques and better platforms for the measurement of global warming and regional databases are still old-fashioned and are not being developed sufficiently. With respect to this agenda, since 1993, at the request of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), to monitor functions of global warming, the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) has set up a Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) Station on the western coast of Korea (Anmyun-do) and has been actively monitoring global warming over Northeast Asia. In addition, atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has been measured for a similar KMA global warming program at Kosan, Cheju Island since 1990. Aerosol and radiation have also been measured at both sites as well as in Seoul. The observations have been analyzed using diagnostics of climate change in Northeast Asia and also have been internationally compared. Results indicate that greenhouse gases are in good statistic agreement with the NOAA/Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) long-term trends of monthly mean concentrations and seasonal cycles. Atmospheric particulate matter has also been analyzed for particular Asian types in terms of optical depth, number concentration and size distribution.

  9. Unabated global surface temperature warming: evaluating the evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, T. R.; Arguez, A.

    2015-12-01

    New insights related to time-dependent bias corrections in global surface temperatures have led to higher rates of warming over the past few decades than previously reported in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (2014). Record high global temperatures in the past few years have also contributed to larger trends. The combination of these factors and new analyses of the rate of temperature change show unabated global warming since at least the mid-Twentieth Century. New time-dependent bias corrections account for: (1) differences in temperatures measured from ships and drifting buoys; (2) improved corrections to ship measured temperatures; and (3) the larger rates of warming in polar regions (particularly the Arctic). Since 1951, the period over which IPCC (2014) attributes over half of the observed global warming to human causes, it is shown that there has been a remarkably robust and sustained warming, punctuated with inter-annual and decadal variability. This finding is confirmed through simple trend analysis and Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD). Trend analysis however, especially for decadal trends, is sensitive to selection bias of beginning and ending dates. EMD has no selection bias. Additionally, it can highlight both short- and long-term processes affecting the global temperature times series since it addresses both non-linear and non-stationary processes. For the new NOAA global temperature data set, our analyses do not support the notion of a hiatus or slowing of long-term global warming. However, sub-decadal periods of little (or no warming) and rapid warming can also be found, clearly showing the impact of inter-annual and decadal variability that previously has been attributed to both natural and human-induced non-greenhouse forcings.

  10. Mapping Impervious Surfaces Globally at 30m Resolution Using Global Land Survey Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeColstoun, Eric Brown; Huang, Chengquan; Tan, Bin; Smith, Sarah Elizabeth; Phillips, Jacqueline; Wang, Panshi; Ling, Pui-Yu; Zhan, James; Li, Sike; Taylor, Michael P.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Tilton, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Impervious surfaces, mainly artificial structures and roads, cover less than 1% of the world's land surface (1.3% over USA). Regardless of the relatively small coverage, impervious surfaces have a significant impact on the environment. They are the main source of the urban heat island effect, and affect not only the energy balance, but also hydrology and carbon cycling, and both land and aquatic ecosystem services. In the last several decades, the pace of converting natural land surface to impervious surfaces has increased. Quantitatively monitoring the growth of impervious surface expansion and associated urbanization has become a priority topic across both the physical and social sciences. The recent availability of consistent, global scale data sets at 30m resolution such as the Global Land Survey from the Landsat satellites provides an unprecedented opportunity to map global impervious cover and urbanization at this resolution for the first time, with unprecedented detail and accuracy. Moreover, the spatial resolution of Landsat is absolutely essential to accurately resolve urban targets such a buildings, roads and parking lots. With long term GLS data now available for the 1975, 1990, 2000, 2005 and 2010 time periods, the land cover/use changes due to urbanization can now be quantified at this spatial scale as well. In the Global Land Survey - Imperviousness Mapping Project (GLS-IMP), we are producing the first global 30 m spatial resolution impervious cover data set. We have processed the GLS 2010 data set to surface reflectance (8500+ TM and ETM+ scenes) and are using a supervised classification method using a regression tree to produce continental scale impervious cover data sets. A very large set of accurate training samples is the key to the supervised classifications and is being derived through the interpretation of high spatial resolution (approx. 2 m or less) commercial satellite data (Quickbird and Worldview2) available to us through the unclassified

  11. Mapping Impervious Surfaces Globally at 30m Resolution Using Landsat Global Land Survey Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown de Colstoun, E.; Huang, C.; Wolfe, R. E.; Tan, B.; Tilton, J.; Smith, S.; Phillips, J.; Wang, P.; Ling, P.; Zhan, J.; Xu, X.; Taylor, M. P.

    2013-12-01

    Impervious surfaces, mainly artificial structures and roads, cover less than 1% of the world's land surface (1.3% over USA). Regardless of the relatively small coverage, impervious surfaces have a significant impact on the environment. They are the main source of the urban heat island effect, and affect not only the energy balance, but also hydrology and carbon cycling, and both land and aquatic ecosystem services. In the last several decades, the pace of converting natural land surface to impervious surfaces has increased. Quantitatively monitoring the growth of impervious surface expansion and associated urbanization has become a priority topic across both the physical and social sciences. The recent availability of consistent, global scale data sets at 30m resolution such as the Global Land Survey from the Landsat satellites provides an unprecedented opportunity to map global impervious cover and urbanization at this resolution for the first time, with unprecedented detail and accuracy. Moreover, the spatial resolution of Landsat is absolutely essential to accurately resolve urban targets such a buildings, roads and parking lots. With long term GLS data now available for the 1975, 1990, 2000, 2005 and 2010 time periods, the land cover/use changes due to urbanization can now be quantified at this spatial scale as well. In the Global Land Survey - Imperviousness Mapping Project (GLS-IMP), we are producing the first global 30 m spatial resolution impervious cover data set. We have processed the GLS 2010 data set to surface reflectance (8500+ TM and ETM+ scenes) and are using a supervised classification method using a regression tree to produce continental scale impervious cover data sets. A very large set of accurate training samples is the key to the supervised classifications and is being derived through the interpretation of high spatial resolution (~2 m or less) commercial satellite data (Quickbird and Worldview2) available to us through the unclassified

  12. Documenting Biophysical Activities on Land Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobron, N.; Pinty, B.; Melin, F.; Taberner, M.; Verstraete, M. M.; Widlowski, J.

    2002-12-01

    The biophysical activities on land surfaces have been documented from spectral measurements made in space for decades. These estimates often were derived from the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, which is simple to compute but very sensitive to perturbations and prone to yield misleading or erroneous results. Advances in the understanding of radiation transfer and availability of higher performance instruments have lead to the development of a new generation of geophysical products poised to provide reliable, accurate information on the state and evolution of terrestrial environments. Specifically, a series of optimized algorithms have been developed to estimate the Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FAPAR) for various instruments. Such an approach allows the synergistic use of FAPAR products derived from different sensors and the construction of global FAPAR time series independent from the life time of these specific sensors. The outline of the methodology will be summarized and the results from an application conducted with SeaWiFS data will be presented.

  13. Stellar activity: Astrophysics relevant to global change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, Bernhard M.

    1994-01-01

    FRESIP will obtain a great deal of data on stellar activity and flares on F, G and K dwarfs. Rotation periods, flare distributions and possibly stellar cycles will emerge. This apparently curiosity-driven research actually has implications for our understanding of global climate change. Significant climate change during the seventeenth-century Maunder Minimum is thought to be related to a change in the solar condition. Recently acquired data from the Greenland Ice-core Project suggest that far greater climate changes on decade time scales may have occurred during the previous interglacial. It is possible that a yet more drastic change in state of the Sun was responsible. We have no relevant solar data, but can begin to explore this possibility by observing an ensemble of solar-like stars.

  14. Global optogenetic activation of inhibitory interneurons during epileptiform activity.

    PubMed

    Ledri, Marco; Madsen, Marita Grønning; Nikitidou, Litsa; Kirik, Deniz; Kokaia, Merab

    2014-02-26

    Optogenetic techniques provide powerful tools for bidirectional control of neuronal activity and investigating alterations occurring in excitability disorders, such as epilepsy. In particular, the possibility to specifically activate by light-determined interneuron populations expressing channelrhodopsin-2 provides an unprecedented opportunity of exploring their contribution to physiological and pathological network activity. There are several subclasses of interneurons in cortical areas with different functional connectivity to the principal neurons (e.g., targeting their perisomatic or dendritic compartments). Therefore, one could optogenetically activate specific or a mixed population of interneurons and dissect their selective or concerted inhibitory action on principal cells. We chose to explore a conceptually novel strategy involving simultaneous activation of mixed populations of interneurons by optogenetics and study their impact on ongoing epileptiform activity in mouse acute hippocampal slices. Here we demonstrate that such approach results in a brief initial action potential discharge in CA3 pyramidal neurons, followed by prolonged suppression of ongoing epileptiform activity during light exposure. Such sequence of events was caused by massive light-induced release of GABA from ChR2-expressing interneurons. The inhibition of epileptiform activity was less pronounced if only parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons were activated by light. Our data suggest that global optogenetic activation of mixed interneuron populations is a more effective approach for development of novel therapeutic strategies for epilepsy, but the initial action potential generation in principal neurons needs to be taken in consideration.

  15. Global structual optimizations of surface systems with a genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Feng-Chuan

    2005-01-01

    Global structural optimizations with a genetic algorithm were performed for atomic cluster and surface systems including aluminum atomic clusters, Si magic clusters on the Si(111) 7 x 7 surface, silicon high-index surfaces, and Ag-induced Si(111) reconstructions. First, the global structural optimizations of neutral aluminum clusters Aln algorithm in combination with tight-binding and first-principles calculations were performed to study the structures of magic clusters on the Si(111) 7 x 7 surface. Extensive calculations show that the magic cluster observed in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments consist of eight Si atoms. Simulated STM images of the Si magic cluster exhibit a ring-like feature similar to STM experiments. Third, a genetic algorithm coupled with a highly optimized empirical potential were used to determine the lowest energy structure of high-index semiconductor surfaces. The lowest energy structures of Si(105) and Si(114) were determined successfully. The results of Si(105) and Si(114) are reported within the framework of highly optimized empirical potential and first-principles calculations. Finally, a genetic algorithm coupled with Si and Ag tight-binding potentials were used to search for Ag-induced Si(111) reconstructions at various Ag and Si coverages. The optimized structural models of √3 x √3, 3 x 1, and 5 x 2 phases were reported using first-principles calculations. A novel model is found to have lower surface energy than the proposed double-honeycomb chained (DHC) model both for Au/Si(111) 5 x 2 and Ag/Si(111) 5 x 2 systems.

  16. Reconstructions of global near-surface temperature change since the mid 19th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morice, Colin; Rayner, Nick; Kennedy, John

    2016-04-01

    Incomplete and non-uniform global observational coverage is a prominent source of uncertainty in instrumental records of global near-surface temperature change. In this study statistical methods are applied to the HadCRUT4 near-surface temperature data set to obtain improved estimates of global near-surface temperature change since the mid 19th century. Methods applied include those that interpolate according to local correlation structure (kriging) and reduced space methods that learn large-scale temperature patterns. The performance of each statistical reconstruction method has been benchmarked in application to a subset of CMIP5 simulations. Model fields are sub-sampled and simulated observational errors added to emulate observational data, permitting assessment of temperature field reconstruction algorithms in controlled tests in which globally complete temperature fields are known. In application to HadCRUT4 data the statistical reconstructions show relatively increased warming in the global average over the 21st century owing to reconstruction of temperatures in high northern latitudes, supporting the findings of Cowtan & Way (2014) and Karl et al. (2015). There is broad agreement between estimates of global and hemispheric changes throughout much of the 20th and 21st century. Agreement is reduced in data sparse periods and regions, notably in the 19th century and in the southern hemisphere. This finding is supported by the results of the climate model based benchmarks and highlights the importance of continued data rescue activities, such as those of the International Surface Temperature Initiative and ACRE. The results of this study will form an addition to the HadCRUT4 global near-surface temperature data set.

  17. Global Intercomparison of 12 Land Surface Heat Flux Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, C.; Prigent, C.; Mueller, B.; Seneviratne, S. I.; McCabe, M. F.; Wood, E. F.; Rossow, W. B.; Balsamo, G.; Betts, A. K.; Dirmeyer, P. A.; Fisher, J. B.; Jung, M.; Kanamitsu, M.; Reichle, R. H.; Reichstein, M.; Rodell, M.; Sheffield, J.; Tu, K.; Wang, K.

    2011-01-01

    A global intercomparison of 12 monthly mean land surface heat flux products for the period 1993-1995 is presented. The intercomparison includes some of the first emerging global satellite-based products (developed at Paris Observatory, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, University of California Berkeley, University of Maryland, and Princeton University) and examples of fluxes produced by reanalyses (ERA-Interim, MERRA, NCEP-DOE) and off-line land surface models (GSWP-2, GLDAS CLM/ Mosaic/Noah). An intercomparison of the global latent heat flux (Q(sub le)) annual means shows a spread of approx 20 W/sq m (all-product global average of approx 45 W/sq m). A similar spread is observed for the sensible (Q(sub h)) and net radiative (R(sub n)) fluxes. In general, the products correlate well with each other, helped by the large seasonal variability and common forcing data for some of the products. Expected spatial distributions related to the major climatic regimes and geographical features are reproduced by all products. Nevertheless, large Q(sub le)and Q(sub h) absolute differences are also observed. The fluxes were spatially averaged for 10 vegetation classes. The larger Q(sub le) differences were observed for the rain forest but, when normalized by mean fluxes, the differences were comparable to other classes. In general, the correlations between Q(sub le) and R(sub n) were higher for the satellite-based products compared with the reanalyses and off-line models. The fluxes were also averaged for 10 selected basins. The seasonality was generally well captured by all products, but large differences in the flux partitioning were observed for some products and basins.

  18. High-resolution mapping of global surface water and its long-term changes.

    PubMed

    Pekel, Jean-François; Cottam, Andrew; Gorelick, Noel; Belward, Alan S

    2016-12-15

    The location and persistence of surface water (inland and coastal) is both affected by climate and human activity and affects climate, biological diversity and human wellbeing. Global data sets documenting surface water location and seasonality have been produced from inventories and national descriptions, statistical extrapolation of regional data and satellite imagery, but measuring long-term changes at high resolution remains a challenge. Here, using three million Landsat satellite images, we quantify changes in global surface water over the past 32 years at 30-metre resolution. We record the months and years when water was present, where occurrence changed and what form changes took in terms of seasonality and persistence. Between 1984 and 2015 permanent surface water has disappeared from an area of almost 90,000 square kilometres, roughly equivalent to that of Lake Superior, though new permanent bodies of surface water covering 184,000 square kilometres have formed elsewhere. All continental regions show a net increase in permanent water, except Oceania, which has a fractional (one per cent) net loss. Much of the increase is from reservoir filling, although climate change is also implicated. Loss is more geographically concentrated than gain. Over 70 per cent of global net permanent water loss occurred in the Middle East and Central Asia, linked to drought and human actions including river diversion or damming and unregulated withdrawal. Losses in Australia and the USA linked to long-term droughts are also evident. This globally consistent, validated data set shows that impacts of climate change and climate oscillations on surface water occurrence can be measured and that evidence can be gathered to show how surface water is altered by human activities. We anticipate that this freely available data will improve the modelling of surface forcing, provide evidence of state and change in wetland ecotones (the transition areas between biomes), and inform water

  19. High-resolution mapping of global surface water and its long-term changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekel, Jean-François; Cottam, Andrew; Gorelick, Noel; Belward, Alan S.

    2016-12-01

    The location and persistence of surface water (inland and coastal) is both affected by climate and human activity and affects climate, biological diversity and human wellbeing. Global data sets documenting surface water location and seasonality have been produced from inventories and national descriptions, statistical extrapolation of regional data and satellite imagery, but measuring long-term changes at high resolution remains a challenge. Here, using three million Landsat satellite images, we quantify changes in global surface water over the past 32 years at 30-metre resolution. We record the months and years when water was present, where occurrence changed and what form changes took in terms of seasonality and persistence. Between 1984 and 2015 permanent surface water has disappeared from an area of almost 90,000 square kilometres, roughly equivalent to that of Lake Superior, though new permanent bodies of surface water covering 184,000 square kilometres have formed elsewhere. All continental regions show a net increase in permanent water, except Oceania, which has a fractional (one per cent) net loss. Much of the increase is from reservoir filling, although climate change is also implicated. Loss is more geographically concentrated than gain. Over 70 per cent of global net permanent water loss occurred in the Middle East and Central Asia, linked to drought and human actions including river diversion or damming and unregulated withdrawal. Losses in Australia and the USA linked to long-term droughts are also evident. This globally consistent, validated data set shows that impacts of climate change and climate oscillations on surface water occurrence can be measured and that evidence can be gathered to show how surface water is altered by human activities. We anticipate that this freely available data will improve the modelling of surface forcing, provide evidence of state and change in wetland ecotones (the transition areas between biomes), and inform water

  20. Micro-Satellite Constellation for Global Surface Water Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apperson, A. T.; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    2011-12-01

    Alsdorf et al. [1] have proposed a Ka band interferometric radar system for global monitoring of surface waters from space. We explore the feasibility of a constellation of micro-satellites with optical sensors measuring the sun's specular reflection by surface waters. Our approach, which is complementary to that of Alsdorf et al., would provide weekly global coverage with a 10m ground spatial resolution if a six micro-satellite constellation used a 0.7° ground swath width and the ADEOS 1 orbital parameters. Optical sensing has three main obstacles; smoke, clouds and canopy structures. The sun's specular reflection provides a signal strength that, from observations, penetrates aerosols with an optical depth approaching 1.0 and provides detection down to perhaps 1/32 of a pixel, which would potentially allow detection of surface waters under many plant canopies. Our system would provide data to help answer Alsdorf's question, "What is the spatial and temporal variability in terrestrial surface water storage, and how can we predict these variations more accurately?" [1] In addition, modifying the arrangement of the satellites in the constellation could potentially provide data on the canopy structure. Including an additional instrument could provide estimates on atmospheric column methane and other estimates of other atmospheric trace gases concentration. [2] [1] D. E. Alsdorf, E. Rodríguez, and D. P. Lettenmaier, "Measuring surface water from space," Rev. Geophys, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 1-24, 2007. [2] North F. Larsen and Knut Stamnes, "Methane detection from space: use of sunglint", Opt. Eng. 45, 016202 (Feb 01, 2006); doi:10.1117/1.2150835

  1. A global surface drifter data set at hourly resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elipot, Shane; Lumpkin, Rick; Perez, Renellys C.; Lilly, Jonathan M.; Early, Jeffrey J.; Sykulski, Adam M.

    2016-05-01

    The surface drifting buoys, or drifters, of the Global Drifter Program (GDP) are predominantly tracked by the Argos positioning system, providing drifter locations with O(100 m) errors at nonuniform temporal intervals, with an average interval of 1.2 h since January 2005. This data set is thus a rich and global source of information on high-frequency and small-scale oceanic processes, yet is still relatively understudied because of the challenges associated with its large size and sampling characteristics. A methodology is described to produce a new high-resolution global data set since 2005, consisting of drifter locations and velocities estimated at hourly intervals, along with their respective errors. Locations and velocities are obtained by modeling locally in time trajectories as a first-order polynomial with coefficients obtained by maximizing a likelihood function. This function is derived by modeling the Argos location errors with t location-scale probability distribution functions. The methodology is motivated by analyzing 82 drifters tracked contemporaneously by Argos and by the Global Positioning System, where the latter is assumed to provide true locations. A global spectral analysis of the velocity variance from the new data set reveals a sharply defined ridge of energy closely following the inertial frequency as a function of latitude, distinct energy peaks near diurnal and semidiurnal frequencies, as well as higher-frequency peaks located near tidal harmonics as well as near replicates of the inertial frequency. Compared to the spectra that can be obtained using the standard 6-hourly GDP product, the new data set contains up to 100% more spectral energy at some latitudes.

  2. Revisit of the Global Surface Energy Balance Using the MEP Model of Surface Heat Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y.; Wang, J.; Park, T. W.; Ming, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The recently proposed model of surface heat fluxes, based on the theory of maximum entropy production (MEP), was used to estimate the global evapotranspiration (ET) and heat fluxes. Compared to bulk transfer models, the MEP model has several remote-sensing-friendly features including fewer input variables, automatic closure of surface energy budget, being independent of bulk gradients of temperature and water vapor, not using wind speed and surface roughness as model parameters, and being less sensitive to uncertainties of input variables and model parameters. The MEP model is formulated for the entire range of soil moisture from dryness to saturation over the land surfaces and has even more advantages over water-snow-ice surfaces compared to traditional methods due to its independence of surface humidity data. The MEP model provides the first global maps of water heat fluxes at ocean surfaces as well as conductive heat fluxes at snow/ice covered polar regions. Ten years of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) earth surface radiation fluxes, surface temperature data products supplemented (when needed) by the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) surface specific humidity data are used to test the MEP model by comparing the MEP based global annual ET and heat fluxes with existing products. The MEP based fluxes over land surfaces agree closely with previous studies. Over the oceans, the MEP modeled ET tends to be lower than previous estimates while those of sensible heat fluxes are in close agreement with previous studies. A counterpart, "off-line" analysis is also carried out using the NOAA GFDL climate model output from a control experiment and a "warming" experiment. Substantial differences in the warming-related changes of ET and Bowen ratio are found over regions such as North Africa and the southwestern U.S. The implications of these differences for understanding trends and variability in regional energy and

  3. Global Monitoring of Martian Surface Albedo Changes from Orbital Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, P.; Enga, M.; Mukherjee, P.

    2013-12-01

    Martian surface changes were first observed from orbit during the Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiter missions. They were found to be caused by eolian processes, produced by deposition of dust during regional and global dust storms and subsequent darkening of the surface through erosion and transportation of dust and sand. The albedo changes accumulated in the 20 years between Viking and Mars Global Surveyor were sufficient to alter the global circulation of winds and the climate of Mars according to model calculations (Fenton et al., Nature 2007), but little was known about the timing or frequency of the changes. Since 1999, we have had the benefit of continuous monitoring by a series of orbiting spacecraft that continues today with Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Odyssey, and Mars Express. Daily synoptic observations enable us to determine whether the surface albedo changes are gradual or episodic in nature and to record the seasons that the changes take place. High resolution images of surface morphology and atmospheric phenomena help identify the physical mechanisms responsible for the changes. From these data, we hope to learn the combinations of atmospheric conditions and sediment properties that produce surface changes on Mars and possibly predict when they will take place in the future. Martian surface changes are particularly conspicuous in low albedo terrain, where even a thin layer of bright dust brightens the surface drastically. Equatorial dark areas are repeatedly coated and recoated by dust, which is later shed from the surface by a variety of mechanisms. An example is Syrtis Major, suddenly buried in bright dust by the global dust storm of 2001. Persistent easterly winds blew much of the dust cover away over the course of the next Martian year, but episodic changes continue today, particularly during southern summer when regional dust storms are rife. Another such region is Solis Planum, south of the Valles Marineris, where changes take place

  4. The timescales of global surface-ocean connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Bror F.; Watson, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Planktonic communities are shaped through a balance of local evolutionary adaptation and ecological succession driven in large part by migration. The timescales over which these processes operate are still largely unresolved. Here we use Lagrangian particle tracking and network theory to quantify the timescale over which surface currents connect different regions of the global ocean. We find that the fastest path between two patches—each randomly located anywhere in the surface ocean—is, on average, less than a decade. These results suggest that marine planktonic communities may keep pace with climate change—increasing temperatures, ocean acidification and changes in stratification over decadal timescales—through the advection of resilient types. PMID:27093522

  5. Mixed quantum-classical equilibrium in global flux surface hopping

    SciTech Connect

    Sifain, Andrew E.; Wang, Linjun; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2015-06-14

    Global flux surface hopping (GFSH) generalizes fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH)—one of the most popular approaches to nonadiabatic molecular dynamics—for processes exhibiting superexchange. We show that GFSH satisfies detailed balance and leads to thermodynamic equilibrium with accuracy similar to FSSH. This feature is particularly important when studying electron-vibrational relaxation and phonon-assisted transport. By studying the dynamics in a three-level quantum system coupled to a classical atom in contact with a classical bath, we demonstrate that both FSSH and GFSH achieve the Boltzmann state populations. Thermal equilibrium is attained significantly faster with GFSH, since it accurately represents the superexchange process. GFSH converges closer to the Boltzmann averages than FSSH and exhibits significantly smaller statistical errors.

  6. The TOAR Database of Global Surface Ozone Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    We constructed a comprehensive database of long-term global surface ozone observations for use in the Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report (TOAR) analyses. Currently, the database contains more than 7000 data records primarily from open access archives, but we are increasingly receiving additional data from various national or state networks or individual researchers which have never before been included in global compilations. Time resolution of ozone data in the archive is hourly. The data are accompanied by detailed metadata with harmonized content. A modern web interface allows easy access and visualisation of the data. Standardized quality control plots are available for each dataset and we are combining fragmented data to allow for longer-term analyses where this is applicable. We are in close contact with the data providers in order to ensure correctness and robustness of th edata and metadata and to keep the database up-to-date. An extensive set of metrics for analysis of health or vegetation impacts and for evaluation of regional and global atmospheric chemistry models will be made available soon. The TOAR database and web interface at Juelich form an essential part of the TOAR initiative and prompts further investigation of the statistical robustness of ozone metrics.

  7. The long-term Global LAnd Surface Satellite (GLASS) product suite and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Our Earth's environment is experiencing rapid changes due to natural variability and human activities. To monitor, understand and predict environment changes to meet the economic, social and environmental needs, use of long-term high-quality satellite data products is critical. The Global LAnd Surface Satellite (GLASS) product suite, generated at Beijing Normal University, currently includes 12 products, including leaf area index (LAI), broadband shortwave albedo, broadband longwave emissivity, downwelling shortwave radiation and photosynthetically active radiation, land surface skin temperature, longwave net radiation, daytime all-wave net radiation, fraction of absorbed photosynetically active radiation absorbed by green vegetation (FAPAR), fraction of green vegetation coverage, gross primary productivity (GPP), and evapotranspiration (ET). Most products span from 1981-2014. The algorithms for producing these products have been published in the top remote sensing related journals and books. More and more applications have being reported in the scientific literature. The GLASS products are freely available at the Center for Global Change Data Processing and Analysis of Beijing Normal University (http://www.bnu-datacenter.com/), and the University of Maryland Global Land Cover Facility (http://glcf.umd.edu). After briefly introducing the basic characteristics of GLASS products, we will present some applications on the long-term environmental changes detected from GLASS products at both global and local scales. Detailed analysis of regional hotspots, such as Greenland, Tibetan plateau, and northern China, will be emphasized, where environmental changes have been mainly associated with climate warming, drought, land-atmosphere interactions, and human activities.

  8. Global Surface Photosynthetic Biosignatures Prior to the Rise of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parenteau, M. N.; Kiang, N. Y.; Blankenship, R. E.; Sanromá, E.; Palle Bago, E.; Hoehler, T. M.; Pierson, B. K.; Meadows, V. S.

    2015-12-01

    The study of potential exoplanet biosignatures -- the global impact of life on a planetary environment -- has been informed primarily by the modern Earth, with little yet explored beyond atmospheric O2 from oxygenic photosynthesis out of chemical equilibrium, and its accompanying planetary surface reflectance feature, the vegetation "red edge" reflectance. However, these biosignatures have only been present for less than half the Earth's history, and recent geochemical evidence suggests that atmospheric O2 may have been at very low - likely undetectable - levels, until 0.8 Ga (Planavsky et al., 2014, Science 346:635-638). Given that our planet was inhabited for very long periods prior to the rise of oxygen, and that a similar period of anoxygenic life may occur on exoplanets, more studies are needed to characterize remotely detectable biosignatures associated with more evolutionarily ancient anoxygenic phototrophs. Our measurements of the surface reflectance spectra of pure cultures of anoxygenic phototrophs revealed "NIR edge(s)" due to absorption of light by bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) pigments. We used the pure culture spectra to deconvolve complex spectra of environmental samples of microbial mats. We observed multiple NIR edges associated with multiple pigments in the mats. We initially expected only to detect the absorption of light by the pigments in the surface layer of the mat. Surprisingly, we detected cyanobacterial Chl a in the surface layer, as well as Bchl c and Bchl a in the anoxygenic underlayers. This suggests that it does not matter "who's on top," as we were able to observe pigments through all mat layers due to their different absorption maxima. The presence of multiple pigments and thus multiple "NIR edges" could signify layered phototrophic communities and possibly strengthen support for the detection of a surface exoplanet biosignature. In general, the proposed work will inform the search for life on exoplanets at a similar stage of evolution

  9. Joint spatiotemporal variability of global sea surface temperatures and global Palmer drought severity index values

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apipattanavis, S.; McCabe, G.J.; Rajagopalan, B.; Gangopadhyay, S.

    2009-01-01

    Dominant modes of individual and joint variability in global sea surface temperatures (SST) and global Palmer drought severity index (PDSI) values for the twentieth century are identified through a multivariate frequency domain singular value decomposition. This analysis indicates that a secular trend and variability related to the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are the dominant modes of variance shared among the global datasets. For the SST data the secular trend corresponds to a positive trend in Indian Ocean and South Atlantic SSTs, and a negative trend in North Pacific and North Atlantic SSTs. The ENSO reconstruction shows a strong signal in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and Indian Ocean regions. For the PDSI data, the secular trend reconstruction shows high amplitudes over central Africa including the Sahel, whereas the regions with strong ENSO amplitudes in PDSI are the southwestern and northwestern United States, South Africa, northeastern Brazil, central Africa, the Indian subcontinent, and Australia. An additional significant frequency, multidecadal variability, is identified for the Northern Hemisphere. This multidecadal frequency appears to be related to the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation (AMO). The multidecadal frequency is statistically significant in the Northern Hemisphere SST data, but is statistically nonsignificant in the PDSI data.

  10. Europa: Characterization and interpretation of global spectral surface units

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, M.L.; McCord, T.B.; Clark, R.N.; Johnson, T.V.; Matson, D.L.; Mosher, J.A.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Voyager global multispectral mosaic of the Galilean satellite Europa (T. V. Johnson, L. A. Soderblom, J. A. Mosher, G. E. Danielson, A. F. Cook, and P. Kupferman, 1983, J. Geophys. Res. 88, 5789-5805) was analyzed to map surface units with similar optical properties (T. B. McCord, M. L. Nelson, R. N. Clark, A. Meloy, W. Harrison, T. V. Johnson, D. L. Matson, J. A. Mosher, and L. Soderblom, 1982, Bull Amer. Astron. Soc. 14, 737). Color assignments in the unit map are indicative of the spectral nature of the unit. The unit maps make it possible to infer extensions of the geologic units mapped by B. K. Lucchitta and L. A. Soderblom (1982, in Satellites of Jupiter, pp. 521-555, Univ. of Arizona Press, Tucson) beyond the region covered in the high-resolution imagery. The most striking feature in the unit maps is a strong hemispheric asymmetry. It is seen most clearly in the ultraviolet/violet albedo ratio image, because the asymmetry becomes more intense as the wavelength decreases. It appears as if the surface has been darkened, most intensely in the center of the trailing hemisphere and decreasing gradually, essentially as the cosine of the angle from the antapex of motion, to a minimum in the center of the leading hemisphere. The cosine pattern suggests that the darkening is exogenic in origin and is interpreted as evidence of alteration of the surface by ion bombardment from the Jovian magnetosphere. ?? 1986.

  11. Fast globally optimal single surface segmentation using regional properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Xin; Wu, Xiaodong

    2010-03-01

    Efficient segmentation of globally optimal surfaces in volumetric images is a central problem in many medical image analysis applications. Intra-class variance has been successfully utilized, for instance, in the Chan-Vese model especially for images without prominent edges. In this paper, we study the optimization problem of detecting a region (volume) bounded by a smooth terrain-like surface, whose intra-class variance is minimized. A novel polynomial time algorithm is developed. Our algorithm is based on the shape probing technique in computational geometry and computes a sequence of O(n) maximum flows in the derived graphs, where n is the size of the input image. Our further investigation shows that those O(n) graphs form a monotone parametric flow network, which enables to solving the optimal region detection problem in the complexity of computing a single maximum flow. The method has been validated on computer-synthetic volumetric images. Its applicability to clinical data sets was demonstrated on 20 3-D airway wall CT images from 6 subjects. The achieved results were highly accurate. The mean unsigned surface positioning error of outer walls of the tubes is 0.258 +/- 0.297mm, given a voxel size of 0.39 x 0.39 x 0.6mm3.

  12. Impact of Atlantic sea surface temperatures on the warmest global surface air temperature of 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Riyu

    2005-03-01

    The year 1998 is the warmest year in the record of instrumental measurements. In this study, an atmospheric general circulation model is used to investigate the role of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in this warmth, with a focus on the role of the Atlantic Ocean. The model forced with the observed global SSTs captures the main features of land surface air temperature anomalies in 1998. A sensitivity experiment shows that in comparison with the global SST anomalies, the Atlantic SST anomalies can explain 35% of the global mean surface air temperature (GMAT) anomaly, and 57% of the land surface air temperature anomaly in 1998. The mechanisms through which the Atlantic Ocean influences the GMAT are likely different from season to season. Possible detailed mechanisms involve the impact of SST anomalies on local convection in the tropical Atlantic region, the consequent excitation of a Rossby wave response that propagates into the North Atlantic and the Eurasian continent in winter and spring, and the consequent changes in tropical Walker circulation in summer and autumn that induce changes in convection over the tropical Pacific. This in turn affects climate in Asia and Australia. The important role of the Atlantic Ocean suggests that attention should be paid not only to the tropical Pacific Ocean, but also to the tropical Atlantic Ocean in understanding the GMAT variability and its predictability.

  13. The global distribution of near-surface hydrogen on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, W. C.; Prettyman, T. H.; Maurice, S.; Bish, D. L.; Vaniman, D. T.; Squyres, Steven W.; Boynton, W. V.; Elphic, R. C.; Funsten, H. O.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Tokar, R. L.; Moore, K. R.

    2004-01-01

    Prime objectives of the neutron spectrometer (NS) component of the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer suite of instruments aboard Mars Odyssey are to identify the major reservoirs of hydrogen on Mars, determine their relative contributions to its total water inventory, and estimate the portion of the current inventory that is near the surface. Although more information is required than is currently available, epithermal neutron currents alone can provide a significant lower bound of hydrogen abundances on Mars. Observations from Viking 1, Viking 2, and Mars Pathfinder positively identified two of these reservoirs. By far the largest near-surface reservoir is comprised of the two residual polar caps, which together are sufficient to cover Mars with a global ocean about 30 m deep. The second is contained in the atmosphere, which if deposited on the surface, would cover Mars with a thin film of water about 10{sup -5} m deep. Although negligible in comparison, the fact that an atmospheric reservoir exists shows that it can provide a conduit that couples transient reservoirs of near-surface water ice. It has long been speculated that Mars has had, and may still retain, a far larger reservoir of water. Topographic features such as rampart craters, collapsed chaotic terrain, massive outflow channels, and valley networks provide strong support for the past existence of large bodies of surface water. Measurements of the areal size and depth of all paleo-water and volcanic features led to an estimate of a total water inventory equivalent to a global ocean that was between 100 and 500 m thick. Measurements of the D/H ratio have allowed predictions that between 5 and 50 m of this inventory was lost to space. Altogether, these estimates lead to between 20 and 465 m of water from the juvenile Martian inventory that is not accounted for. First analyses of Mars Odyssey neutron and gamma-ray data showed that reservoirs of hydrogen do indeed exist poleward of about {+-}50{sup o} latitude. Mars

  14. Long-Range Correlations of Global Sea Surface Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lei; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Scaling behaviors of the global monthly sea surface temperature (SST) derived from 1870–2009 average monthly data sets of Hadley Centre Sea Ice and SST (HadISST) are investigated employing detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The global SST fluctuations are found to be strong positively long-range correlated at all pertinent time-intervals. The value of scaling exponent is larger in the tropics than those in the intermediate latitudes of the northern and southern hemispheres. DFA leads to the scaling exponent α = 0.87 over the globe (60°S~60°N), northern hemisphere (0°N~60°N), and southern hemisphere (0°S~60°S), α = 0.84 over the intermediate latitude of southern hemisphere (30°S~60°S), α = 0.81 over the intermediate latitude of northern hemisphere (30°N~60°N) and α = 0.90 over the tropics 30°S~30°N [fluctuation F(s) ~ sα], which the fluctuations of monthly SST anomaly display long-term correlated behaviors. Furthermore, the larger the standard deviation is, the smaller long-range correlations (LRCs) of SST in the corresponding regions, especially in three distinct upwelling areas. After the standard deviation is taken into account, an index χ = α * σ is introduced to obtain the spatial distributions of χ. There exists an obvious change of global SST in central east and northern Pacific and the northwest Atlantic. This may be as a clue on predictability of climate and ocean variabilities. PMID:27100397

  15. Long-Range Correlations of Global Sea Surface Temperature.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Scaling behaviors of the global monthly sea surface temperature (SST) derived from 1870-2009 average monthly data sets of Hadley Centre Sea Ice and SST (HadISST) are investigated employing detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The global SST fluctuations are found to be strong positively long-range correlated at all pertinent time-intervals. The value of scaling exponent is larger in the tropics than those in the intermediate latitudes of the northern and southern hemispheres. DFA leads to the scaling exponent α = 0.87 over the globe (60°S~60°N), northern hemisphere (0°N~60°N), and southern hemisphere (0°S~60°S), α = 0.84 over the intermediate latitude of southern hemisphere (30°S~60°S), α = 0.81 over the intermediate latitude of northern hemisphere (30°N~60°N) and α = 0.90 over the tropics 30°S~30°N [fluctuation F(s) ~ sα], which the fluctuations of monthly SST anomaly display long-term correlated behaviors. Furthermore, the larger the standard deviation is, the smaller long-range correlations (LRCs) of SST in the corresponding regions, especially in three distinct upwelling areas. After the standard deviation is taken into account, an index χ = α * σ is introduced to obtain the spatial distributions of χ. There exists an obvious change of global SST in central east and northern Pacific and the northwest Atlantic. This may be as a clue on predictability of climate and ocean variabilities.

  16. Generating Ground Reference Data for a Global Impervious Surface Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.; De Colstoun, Eric Brown; Wolfe, Robert E.; Tan, Bin; Huang, Chengquan

    2012-01-01

    We are developing an approach for generating ground reference data in support of a project to produce a 30m impervious cover data set of the entire Earth for the years 2000 and 2010 based on the Landsat Global Land Survey (GLS) data set. Since sufficient ground reference data for training and validation is not available from ground surveys, we are developing an interactive tool, called HSegLearn, to facilitate the photo-interpretation of 1 to 2 m spatial resolution imagery data, which we will use to generate the needed ground reference data at 30m. Through the submission of selected region objects and positive or negative examples of impervious surfaces, HSegLearn enables an analyst to automatically select groups of spectrally similar objects from a hierarchical set of image segmentations produced by the HSeg image segmentation program at an appropriate level of segmentation detail, and label these region objects as either impervious or nonimpervious.

  17. Global surface-based cloud observation for ISCCP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Visual observations of cloud cover are hindered at night due to inadequate illumination of the clouds. This usually leads to an underestimation of the average cloud cover at night, especially for the amounts of middle and high clouds, in climatologies on surface observations. The diurnal cycles of cloud amounts, if based on all the surface observations, are therefore in error, but they can be obtained more accurately if the nighttime observations are screened to select those made under sufficient moonlight. Ten years of nighttime weather observations from the northern hemisphere in December were classified according to the illuminance of moonlight or twilight on the cloud tops, and a threshold level of illuminance was determined, above which the clouds are apparently detected adequately. This threshold corresponds to light from a full moon at an elevation angle of 6 degrees or from a partial moon at higher elevation, or twilight from the sun less than 9 degrees below the horizon. It permits the use of about 38% of the observations made with the sun below the horizon. The computed diurnal cycles of total cloud cover are altered considerably when this moonlight criterion is imposed. Maximum cloud cover over much of the ocean is now found to be at night or in the morning, whereas computations obtained without benefit of the moonlight criterion, as in our published atlases, showed the time of maximum to be noon or early afternoon in many regions. Cloud cover is greater at night than during the day over the open oceans far from the continents, particularly in summer. However, near noon maxima are still evident in the coastal regions, so that the global annual average oceanic cloud cover is still slightly greater during the day than at night, by 0.3%. Over land, where daytime maxima are still obtained but with reduced amplitude, average cloud cover is 3.3% greater during the daytime. The diurnal cycles of total cloud cover we obtain are compared with those of ISCCP for a

  18. Global surface temperature/heat transfer measurements using infrared imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran

    1992-01-01

    A series of studies were conducted to evaluate the use of scanning radiometric infrared imaging systems for providing global surface temperature/heat transfer measurements in support of hypersonic wind tunnel testing. The in situ precision of the technique with narrow temperature span setting over the temperature range of 20 to 200 C was investigated. The precision of the technique over wider temperature span settings was also determined. The accuracy of technique for providing aerodynamic heating rates was investigated by performing measurements on a 10.2-centimeter hemisphere model in the Langley 31-inch Mach 10 tunnel, and comparing the results with theoretical predictions. Data from tests conducted on a generic orbiter model in this tunnel are also presented.

  19. The global topography of Mars and implications for surface evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Solomon, S. C.; Phillips, R. J.; Head, J. W.; Garvin, J. B.; Banerdt, W. B.; Muhleman, D. O.; Pettengill, G. H.; Neumann, G. A.; Lemoine, F. G.; Abshire, J. B.; Aharonson, O.; Brown, C. D.; Hauck, S. A.; Ivanov, A. B.; McGovern, P. J.; Zwally, H. J.; Duxbury, T. C.

    1999-01-01

    Elevations measured by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter have yielded a high-accuracy global map of the topography of Mars. Dominant features include the low northern hemisphere, the Tharsis province, and the Hellas impact basin. The northern hemisphere depression is primarily a long-wavelength effect that has been shaped by an internal mechanism. The topography of Tharsis consists of two broad rises. Material excavated from Hellas contributes to the high elevation of the southern hemisphere and to the scarp along the hemispheric boundary. The present topography has three major drainage centers, with the northern lowlands being the largest. The two polar cap volumes yield an upper limit of the present surface water inventory of 3.2 to 4.7 million cubic kilometers.

  20. Evaluating soil moisture constraints on surface fluxes in land surface models globally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Phil; Gallego-Elvira, Belen; Taylor, Christopher; Folwell, Sonja; Ghent, Darren; Veal, Karen; Hagemann, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture availability exerts a strong control over land evaporation in many regions. However, global climate models (GCMs) disagree on when and where evaporation is limited by soil moisture. Evaluation of the relevant modelled processes has suffered from a lack of reliable, global observations of land evaporation at the GCM grid box scale. Satellite observations of land surface temperature (LST) offer spatially extensive but indirect information about the surface energy partition and, under certain conditions, about soil moisture availability on evaporation. Specifically, as soil moisture decreases during rain-free dry spells, evaporation may become limited leading to increases in LST and sensible heat flux. We use MODIS Terra and Aqua observations of LST at 1 km from 2000 to 2012 to assess changes in the surface energy partition during dry spells lasting 10 days or longer. The clear-sky LST data are aggregated to a global 0.5° grid before being composited as a function dry spell day across many events in a particular region and season. These composites are then used to calculate a Relative Warming Rate (RWR) between the land surface and near-surface air. This RWR can diagnose the typical strength of short term changes in surface heat fluxes and, by extension, changes in soil moisture limitation on evaporation. Offline land surface model (LSM) simulations offer a relatively inexpensive way to evaluate the surface processes of GCMs. They have the benefits that multiple models, and versions of models, can be compared on a common grid and using unbiased forcing. Here, we use the RWR diagnostic to assess global, offline simulations of several LSMs (e.g., JULES and JSBACH) driven by the WATCH Forcing Data-ERA Interim. Both the observed RWR and the LSMs use the same 0.5° grid, which allows the observed clear-sky sampling inherent in the underlying MODIS LST to be applied to the model outputs directly. This approach avoids some of the difficulties in analysing free

  1. An Open and Transparent Databank of Global Land Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennie, J.; Thorne, P.; Lawrimore, J. H.; Gleason, B.; Menne, M. J.; Williams, C.

    2013-12-01

    The International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) consists of an effort to create an end-to-end process for land surface air temperature analyses. The foundation of this process is the establishment of a global land surface databank. The databank builds upon the groundbreaking efforts of scientists who led efforts to construct global land surface datasets in the 1980's and 1990's. A primary aim of the databank is to improve aspects including data provenance, version control, temporal and spatial coverage, and improved methods for bringing dozens of source data together into an integrated dataset. The databank consists of multiple stages, with each successive stage providing a higher level of processing, quality and integration. Currently more than 50 sources of data have been added to the databank. An automated algorithm has been developed that merges these sources into one complete dataset by removing duplicate station records, identifying two or more station records that can be merged into a single record, and incorporating new and unique stations. The program runs iteratively through all the sources which are ordered based upon criteria established by the ISTI. The highest preferred source, known as the target, runs through all the candidate sources, calculating station comparisons that are acceptable for merging. The process is probabilistic in approach, and the final fate of a candidate station is based upon metadata matching and data equivalence criteria. If there is not enough information, the station is withheld for further investigation. The algorithm has been validated using a pseudo-source of stations with a known time of observation bias, and correct matches have been made nearly 95% of the time. The final product, endorsed and recommended by ISTI, contains over 30,000 stations, however slight changes in the algorithm can perturb results. Subjective decisions, such as the ordering of the sources, or changing metadata and data matching thresholds

  2. Perfluoroalkylated substances in the global tropical and subtropical surface oceans.

    PubMed

    González-Gaya, Belén; Dachs, Jordi; Roscales, Jose L; Caballero, Gemma; Jiménez, Begoña

    2014-11-18

    In this study, perfluoroalkylated substances (PFASs) were analyzed in 92 surface seawater samples taken during the Malaspina 2010 expedition which covered all the tropical and subtropical Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. Nine ionic PFASs including C6-C10 perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs), C4 and C6-C8 perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids (PFSAs) and two neutral precursors perfluoroalkyl sulfonamides (PFASAs), were identified and quantified. The Atlantic Ocean presented the broader range in concentrations of total PFASs (131-10900 pg/L, median 645 pg/L, n = 45) compared to the other oceanic basins, probably due to a better spatial coverage. Total concentrations in the Pacific ranged from 344 to 2500 pg/L (median = 527 pg/L, n = 27) and in the Indian Ocean from 176 to 1976 pg/L (median = 329, n = 18). Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) was the most abundant compound, accounting for 33% of the total PFASs globally, followed by perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA, 22%) and perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA, 12%), being the rest of the individual congeners under 10% of total PFASs, even for perfluorooctane carboxylic acid (PFOA, 6%). PFASAs accounted for less than 1% of the total PFASs concentration. This study reports the ubiquitous occurrence of PFCAs, PFSAs, and PFASAs in the global ocean, being the first attempt, to our knowledge, to show a comprehensive assessment in surface water samples collected in a single oceanic expedition covering tropical and subtropical oceans. The potential factors affecting their distribution patterns were assessed including the distance to coastal regions, oceanic subtropical gyres, currents and biogeochemical processes. Field evidence of biogeochemical controls on the occurrence of PFASs was tentatively assessed considering environmental variables (solar radiation, temperature, chlorophyll a concentrations among others), and these showed significant correlations with some PFASs, but explaining small to moderate percentages of variability

  3. The influence of global sea surface temperature variability on the large-scale land surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyrrell, Nicholas L.; Dommenget, Dietmar; Frauen, Claudia; Wales, Scott; Rezny, Mike

    2015-04-01

    In global warming scenarios, global land surface temperatures () warm with greater amplitude than sea surface temperatures (SSTs), leading to a land/sea warming contrast even in equilibrium. Similarly, the interannual variability of is larger than the covariant interannual SST variability, leading to a land/sea contrast in natural variability. This work investigates the land/sea contrast in natural variability based on global observations, coupled general circulation model simulations and idealised atmospheric general circulation model simulations with different SST forcings. The land/sea temperature contrast in interannual variability is found to exist in observations and models to a varying extent in global, tropical and extra-tropical bands. There is agreement between models and observations in the tropics but not the extra-tropics. Causality in the land-sea relationship is explored with modelling experiments forced with prescribed SSTs, where an amplification of the imposed SST variability is seen over land. The amplification of to tropical SST anomalies is due to the enhanced upper level atmospheric warming that corresponds with tropical moist convection over oceans leading to upper level temperature variations that are larger in amplitude than the source SST anomalies. This mechanism is similar to that proposed for explaining the equilibrium global warming land/sea warming contrast. The link of the to the dominant mode of tropical and global interannual climate variability, the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), is found to be an indirect and delayed connection. ENSO SST variability affects the oceans outside the tropical Pacific, which in turn leads to a further, amplified and delayed response of.

  4. Long-range persistence in the global mean surface temperature and the global warming "time bomb"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rypdal, M.; Rypdal, K.

    2012-04-01

    Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) and Maximum Likelihood Estimations (MLE) based on instrumental data over the last 160 years indicate that there is Long-Range Persistence (LRP) in Global Mean Surface Temperature (GMST) on time scales of months to decades. The persistence is much higher in sea surface temperature than in land temperatures. Power spectral analysis of multi-model, multi-ensemble runs of global climate models indicate further that this persistence may extend to centennial and maybe even millennial time-scales. We also support these conclusions by wavelet variogram analysis, DFA, and MLE of Northern hemisphere mean surface temperature reconstructions over the last two millennia. These analyses indicate that the GMST is a strongly persistent noise with Hurst exponent H>0.9 on time scales from decades up to at least 500 years. We show that such LRP can be very important for long-term climate prediction and for the establishment of a "time bomb" in the climate system due to a growing energy imbalance caused by the slow relaxation to radiative equilibrium under rising anthropogenic forcing. We do this by the construction of a multi-parameter dynamic-stochastic model for the GMST response to deterministic and stochastic forcing, where LRP is represented by a power-law response function. Reconstructed data for total forcing and GMST over the last millennium are used with this model to estimate trend coefficients and Hurst exponent for the GMST on multi-century time scale by means of MLE. Ensembles of solutions generated from the stochastic model also allow us to estimate confidence intervals for these estimates.

  5. Miniaturization and globalization of clinical laboratory activities.

    PubMed

    Melo, Murilo R; Clark, Samantha; Barrio, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    Clinical laboratories provide an invaluable service to millions of people around the world in the form of quality diagnostic care. Within the clinical laboratory industry the impetus for change has come from technological development (miniaturization, nanotechnology, and their collective effect on point-of-care testing; POCT) and the increasingly global nature of laboratory services. Potential technological gains in POCT include: the development of bio-sensors, microarrays, genetics and proteomics testing, and enhanced web connectivity. In globalization, prospective opportunities lie in: medical tourism, the migration of healthcare workers, cross-border delivery of testing, and the establishment of accredited laboratories in previously unexplored markets. Accompanying these impressive opportunities are equally imposing challenges. Difficulty transitioning from research to clinical use, poor infrastructure in developing countries, cultural differences and national barriers to global trade are only a few examples. Dealing with the issues presented by globalization and the impact of developing technology on POCT, and on the clinical laboratory services industry in general, will be a daunting task. Despite such concerns, with appropriate countermeasures it will be possible to address the challenges posed. Future laboratory success will be largely dependent on one's ability to adapt in this perpetually shifting landscape.

  6. Satellite monitoring of the global ocean surface during 1987-1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David

    1992-01-01

    Long-term simultaneous global coverage of AVHRR sea surface temperature, SSMI surface wind speed, GEOSAT sea surface height, and ARGOS buoy drift began in 1987. Methodology to create annual atlases of monthly mean distributions is described.

  7. Global Climatology of Surface Precipitation: Role of TRMM and GPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, R. F.; Wang, J.; Gu, G.

    2011-12-01

    An accurate estimate of global and regional precipitation in terms of climatology, inter-annual variations and trends is critical to understand our planet's state in terms of water availability and the impact of climate change phenomena such as global warming. The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) data set has been a highly used satellite and gauge merged product for studies in these areas. Data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), now spanning almost 14 years in length, is considered to be the most accurate satellite estimation of tropical precipitation, due to its passive microwave, radar and combined estimates of surface precipitation. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will follow in TRMM's footsteps, improving the quality of the precipitation estimations even more with improved instrumentation and expanding the latitude range to middle and high latitudes. The development of accurate climatologies and even monthly estimates from these missions will be valuable in themselves, but also presents an opportunity to incorporate their advanced information into merged, long-term observational data sets such as the GPCP analysis. An example of the use of TRMM (and eventually GPM) data in developing a new tropical climatology will be described as the TRMM Composite Climatology (TCC), based on a combination of thirteen years (1998-2010) of various precipitation products (Version 6) from TRMM. The TCC consists of a merger of three selected TRMM rainfall products over both land and ocean to give a "TRMM-best" climatological estimate. Inputs to the composite were selected based on knowledge of the performance of the retrievals, limitations of the algorithms, and the presence of artifacts. In addition to the mean precipitation estimates, the TCC includes the variation among the three estimates at each point to give an estimate of the error in the estimated mean value. Comparison of the TCC with validation data and with the GPCP

  8. The Global Space Geodesy Network: Activities Underway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Michael R.; Ipatov, Alexander; Long, James; Ma, Chopo; Merkowitz, Stephen; Neilan, Ruth; Noll, Carey; Pavlis, Erricos; Shargorodsky, Victor; Stowers, David; Wetzel, Scott

    2014-05-01

    Several initiatives are underway that should make substantial improvement over the next decade to the international space geodesy network as the international community works toward the GGOS 2020 goal of 32 globally distributed Core Sites with co-located VLBI, SLR, GNSS and DORIS. The Russian Space Agency and the Russian Academy of Sciences are moving forward with an implementation of six additional SLR systems and a number of GNSS receivers to sites outside Russia to expand GNSS tracking and support GGOS. The NASA Space Geodesy program has completed its prototype development phase and is now embarking on an implementation phase that is planning for deployment of 6 - 10 core sites in key geographic locations to support the global network. Additional sites are in the process of implementation in Europe and Asia. Site evaluation studies are in progress, looking at some new potential sites and there are ongoing discussions for partnership arrangements with interested agencies for new sites in South America and Africa. Work continues on the site layout design to avoid RF interference issues among co-located instruments and with external communications and media system. The placement of new and upgraded sites is guided by appropriate Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) conducted under the support of the interested international agencies. The results will help optimize the global distribution of core geodetic observatories and they will lead to the improvement of the data products from the future network. During this effort it is also recognized that co-located sites with less than the full core complement will continue to play an important and critical role in filling out the global network and strengthening the connection among the techniques. This talk will give an update on the current state of expansion of the global network and the projection for the network configuration that we forecast over the next 10 years.

  9. Global search algorithms in surface structure determination using photoelectron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, D. A.; Choi, J. I. J.; Woodruff, D. P.

    2012-02-01

    Three different algorithms to effect global searches of the variable-parameter hyperspace are compared for application to the determination of surface structure using the technique of scanned-energy mode photoelectron diffraction (PhD). Specifically, a new method not previously used in any surface science methods, the swarm-intelligence-based particle swarm optimisation (PSO) method, is presented and its results compared with implementations of fast simulated annealing (FSA) and a genetic algorithm (GA). These three techniques have been applied to experimental data from three adsorption structures that had previously been solved by standard trial-and-error methods, namely H2O on TiO2(110), SO2 on Ni(111) and CN on Cu(111). The performance of the three algorithms is compared to the results of a purely random sampling of the structural parameter hyperspace. For all three adsorbate systems, the PSO out-performs the other techniques as a fitting routine, although for two of the three systems studied the advantage relative to the GA and random sampling approaches is modest. The implementation of FSA failed to achieve acceptable fits in these tests.

  10. Fitting the observed changes of global surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtillot, V.; Le Mouël, J.; Kossobokov, V. G.; Gibert, D.; Lopes, F.

    2012-12-01

    The quality of the fit of a trivial or, conversely, delicately-designed model to the observed natural phenomena is the fundamental pillar stone of any forecasting, including forecasting of the Earth's Climate. Using precise mathematical and logical systems outside their range of applicability can be scientifically groundless, unwise, and even dangerous. The temperature data sets are naturally in the basis of any hypothesizing on variability and forecasting the Earth's Climate. Leaving open the question of the global temperature definitions and their determination (T), we have analyzed hemispheric and global monthly temperature anomaly series produced by the Climate Research Unit of the University of East Anglia (CRUTEM4 database) and more recently by the Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature consortium (BEST database). We first fit the data in 1850-2010 with polynomials of degrees 1 to 9 and compare it with exponential fit by the adjusted R-squared criterion that takes into consideration the number of free parameters of the model. In all the cases considered, the adjusted R-squared values for polynomials are larger than for the exponential as soon as the degree exceeds 1 or 2. The polynomial fits become even more satisfactory as soon as degree 5 or 6 is reached. Extrapolations of these trends outside of the data domain show quick divergence. For example, the CRUTEM4vNH fit in the decade 2010-2020, for degrees 2 to 5, rises steeply then, for degrees 6 to 9, reverses to steep decreasing: the reversal in extrapolated trends arises from improved ability to fit the observed "~60-yr" wave in 150 years of data prior to 2010. The extrapolations prior to 1850 are even more erratic, linked with the increased dispersion of the early data. When focusing the analysis of fits on 1900-2010 we find that the apparent oscillations of T can be modeled by a series of linear segments: An optimal fit suggests 4 slope breaks indicating two clear transitions in 1940 and 1975, and two that

  11. Madden Julian Oscillation impacts on global ocean surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Andrew G.; Hendon, Harry H.; Durrant, Tom H.; Hemer, Mark A.

    2015-12-01

    We assess the impact of the tropical Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) on global ocean wind waves using 30 years of wave data from a wave model hindcast that is forced with high resolution surface winds from the NCEP-CFSR reanalysis. We concentrate on the boreal winter season when the MJO has its greatest amplitude and is potentially a source of predictable wave impacts at intra-seasonal lead times. Statistically significant anomalies in significant wave height (Hs), peak wave period (Tp) and zonal wave energy flux (CgE) are found to covary with the intra-seasonal variation of surface zonal wind induced by the MJO as it traverses eastward from the western tropical Indian Ocean to the eastern tropical Pacific. Tp varies generally out of phase with Hs over the life cycle of the MJO, indicating that these MJO-wave anomalies are locally wind-generated rather than remotely generated by ocean swell. Pronounced Hs anomalies develop on the northwest shelf of Australia, where the MJO is known to influence sea level and surface temperatures, and in the western Caribbean Sea and Guatemalan-Panama Seas with enhanced wave anomalies apparent in the vicinity of the Tehuantepec and Papagayo gaps. Significant wave anomalies are also detected in the North Pacific and North Atlantic oceans in connection with the MJO teleconnection to the extratropics via atmospheric wave propagation. The impact in the north Atlantic stems from induction of the high phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) about 1 week after MJO convection traverses the Indian Ocean, and the low phase of the NAO about one week after suppressed convection traverses the Indian Ocean. Strong positive Hs anomalies maximize on the Northern European coast in the positive NAO phase and vice versa for the negative NAO phase. The MJO also influences the occurrence of daily low (below the 5th percentile) and high (above the 95th percentile) wave conditions across the tropics and in the North Pacific and North Atlantic

  12. Mapping International Cancer ActivitiesGlobal Cancer Project Map Launch

    Cancer.gov

    CGH’s Dr. Sudha Sivaram, Dr. Makeda Williams, and Ms. Kalina Duncan have partnered with Drs. Ami Bhatt and Franklin Huang at Global Oncology, Inc. (GO) to develop the Global Cancer Project Map - a web-based tool designed to facilitate cancer research and control activity planning.

  13. International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Programme global emissions inventory activity: Sulfur emissions from volcanoes, current status

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovitz, C.M.

    1995-07-01

    Sulfur emissions from volcanoes are located in areas of volcanic activity, are extremely variable in time, and can be released anywhere from ground level to the stratosphere. Previous estimates of global sulfur emissions from all sources by various authors have included estimates for emissions from volcanic activity. In general, these global estimates of sulfur emissions from volcanoes are given as global totals for an ``average`` year. A project has been initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory to compile inventories of sulfur emissions from volcanoes. In order to complement the GEIA inventories of anthropogenic sulfur emissions, which represent conditions circa specific years, sulfur emissions from volcanoes are being estimated for the years 1985 and 1990.

  14. Gridded global surface ozone metrics for atmospheric chemistry model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofen, E. D.; Bowdalo, D.; Evans, M. J.; Apadula, F.; Bonasoni, P.; Cupeiro, M.; Ellul, R.; Galbally, I. E.; Girgzdiene, R.; Luppo, S.; Mimouni, M.; Nahas, A. C.; Saliba, M.; Tørseth, K.

    2016-02-01

    The concentration of ozone at the Earth's surface is measured at many locations across the globe for the purposes of air quality monitoring and atmospheric chemistry research. We have brought together all publicly available surface ozone observations from online databases from the modern era to build a consistent data set for the evaluation of chemical transport and chemistry-climate (Earth System) models for projects such as the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative and Aer-Chem-MIP. From a total data set of approximately 6600 sites and 500 million hourly observations from 1971-2015, approximately 2200 sites and 200 million hourly observations pass screening as high-quality sites in regionally representative locations that are appropriate for use in global model evaluation. There is generally good data volume since the start of air quality monitoring networks in 1990 through 2013. Ozone observations are biased heavily toward North America and Europe with sparse coverage over the rest of the globe. This data set is made available for the purposes of model evaluation as a set of gridded metrics intended to describe the distribution of ozone concentrations on monthly and annual timescales. Metrics include the moments of the distribution, percentiles, maximum daily 8-hour average (MDA8), sum of means over 35 ppb (daily maximum 8-h; SOMO35), accumulated ozone exposure above a threshold of 40 ppbv (AOT40), and metrics related to air quality regulatory thresholds. Gridded data sets are stored as netCDF-4 files and are available to download from the British Atmospheric Data Centre (doi: 10.5285/08fbe63d-fa6d-4a7a-b952-5932e3ab0452). We provide recommendations to the ozone measurement community regarding improving metadata reporting to simplify ongoing and future efforts in working with ozone data from disparate networks in a consistent manner.

  15. Gridded global surface ozone metrics for atmospheric chemistry model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofen, E. D.; Bowdalo, D.; Evans, M. J.; Apadula, F.; Bonasoni, P.; Cupeiro, M.; Ellul, R.; Galbally, I. E.; Girgzdiene, R.; Luppo, S.; Mimouni, M.; Nahas, A. C.; Saliba, M.; Tørseth, K.; Wmo Gaw, Epa Aqs, Epa Castnet, Capmon, Naps, Airbase, Emep, Eanet Ozone Datasets, All Other Contributors To

    2015-07-01

    The concentration of ozone at the Earth's surface is measured at many locations across the globe for the purposes of air quality monitoring and atmospheric chemistry research. We have brought together all publicly available surface ozone observations from online databases from the modern era to build a consistent dataset for the evaluation of chemical transport and chemistry-climate (Earth System) models for projects such as the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative and Aer-Chem-MIP. From a total dataset of approximately 6600 sites and 500 million hourly observations from 1971-2015, approximately 2200 sites and 200 million hourly observations pass screening as high-quality sites in regional background locations that are appropriate for use in global model evaluation. There is generally good data volume since the start of air quality monitoring networks in 1990 through 2013. Ozone observations are biased heavily toward North America and Europe with sparse coverage over the rest of the globe. This dataset is made available for the purposes of model evaluation as a set of gridded metrics intended to describe the distribution of ozone concentrations on monthly and annual timescales. Metrics include the moments of the distribution, percentiles, maximum daily eight-hour average (MDA8), SOMO35, AOT40, and metrics related to air quality regulatory thresholds. Gridded datasets are stored as netCDF-4 files and are available to download from the British Atmospheric Data Centre (doi:10.5285/08fbe63d-fa6d-4a7a-b952-5932e3ab0452). We provide recommendations to the ozone measurement community regarding improving metadata reporting to simplify ongoing and future efforts in working with ozone data from disparate networks in a consistent manner.

  16. Protein Surface Matching by Combining Local and Global Geometric Information

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Leif; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2012-01-01

    Comparison of the binding sites of proteins is an effective means for predicting protein functions based on their structure information. Despite the importance of this problem and much research in the past, it is still very challenging to predict the binding ligands from the atomic structures of protein binding sites. Here, we designed a new algorithm, TIPSA (Triangulation-based Iterative-closest-point for Protein Surface Alignment), based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. TIPSA aims to find the maximum number of atoms that can be superposed between two protein binding sites, where any pair of superposed atoms has a distance smaller than a given threshold. The search starts from similar tetrahedra between two binding sites obtained from 3D Delaunay triangulation and uses the Hungarian algorithm to find additional matched atoms. We found that, due to the plasticity of protein binding sites, matching the rigid body of point clouds of protein binding sites is not adequate for satisfactory binding ligand prediction. We further incorporated global geometric information, the radius of gyration of binding site atoms, and used nearest neighbor classification for binding site prediction. Tested on benchmark data, our method achieved a performance comparable to the best methods in the literature, while simultaneously providing the common atom set and atom correspondences. PMID:22815760

  17. Communication: Global flux surface hopping in Liouville space

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Linjun E-mail: prezhdo@usc.edu; Prezhdo, Oleg V. E-mail: prezhdo@usc.edu; Sifain, Andrew E.

    2015-11-21

    Recent years have witnessed substantial progress in the surface hopping (SH) formulation of non-adiabatic molecular dynamics. A generalization of the traditional fewest switches SH (FSSH), global flux SH (GFSH) utilizes the gross population flow between states to derive SH probabilities. The Liouville space formulation of FSSH puts state populations and coherences on equal footing, by shifting the hopping dynamics from Hilbert to Liouville space. Both ideas have shown superior results relative to the standard FSSH in Hilbert space, which has been the most popular approach over the past two and a half decades. By merging the two ideas, we develop GFSH in Liouville space. The new method is nearly as straightforward as the standard FSSH, and carries comparable computational expense. Tested with a representative super-exchange model, it gives the best performance among all existing techniques in the FSSH series. The obtained numerical results match almost perfectly the exact quantum mechanical solutions. Moreover, the results are nearly invariant under the choice of a basis state representation for SH, in contrast to the earlier techniques which exhibit notable basis set dependence. Unique to the developed approach, this property is particularly encouraging, because exact quantum dynamics is representation independent. GFSH in Liouville space significantly improves accuracy and applicability of SH for a broad range of chemical and physical processes.

  18. Global analysis of urban surface water supply vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padowski, Julie C.; Gorelick, Steven M.

    2014-10-01

    This study presents a global analysis of urban water supply vulnerability in 71 surface-water supplied cities, with populations exceeding 750 000 and lacking source water diversity. Vulnerability represents the failure of an urban supply-basin to simultaneously meet demands from human, environmental and agricultural users. We assess a baseline (2010) condition and a future scenario (2040) that considers increased demand from urban population growth and projected agricultural demand. We do not account for climate change, which can potentially exacerbate or reduce urban supply vulnerability. In 2010, 35% of large cities are vulnerable as they compete with agricultural users. By 2040, without additional measures 45% of cities are vulnerable due to increased agricultural and urban demands. Of the vulnerable cities in 2040, the majority are river-supplied with mean flows so low (1200 liters per person per day, l/p/d) that the cities experience ‘chronic water scarcity’ (1370 l/p/d). Reservoirs supply the majority of cities facing individual future threats, revealing that constructed storage potentially provides tenuous water security. In 2040, of the 32 vulnerable cities, 14 would reduce their vulnerability via reallocating water by reducing environmental flows, and 16 would similarly benefit by transferring water from irrigated agriculture. Approximately half remain vulnerable under either potential remedy.

  19. Optimizing human activity patterns using global sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, Geoffrey; Hickmann, Kyle S.; Mniszewski, Susan M.; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Hyman, James M.

    2013-12-10

    Implementing realistic activity patterns for a population is crucial for modeling, for example, disease spread, supply and demand, and disaster response. Using the dynamic activity simulation engine, DASim, we generate schedules for a population that capture regular (e.g., working, eating, and sleeping) and irregular activities (e.g., shopping or going to the doctor). We use the sample entropy (SampEn) statistic to quantify a schedule’s regularity for a population. We show how to tune an activity’s regularity by adjusting SampEn, thereby making it possible to realistically design activities when creating a schedule. The tuning process sets up a computationally intractable high-dimensional optimization problem. To reduce the computational demand, we use Bayesian Gaussian process regression to compute global sensitivity indices and identify the parameters that have the greatest effect on the variance of SampEn. Here we use the harmony search (HS) global optimization algorithm to locate global optima. Our results show that HS combined with global sensitivity analysis can efficiently tune the SampEn statistic with few search iterations. We demonstrate how global sensitivity analysis can guide statistical emulation and global optimization algorithms to efficiently tune activities and generate realistic activity patterns. Finally, though our tuning methods are applied to dynamic activity schedule generation, they are general and represent a significant step in the direction of automated tuning and optimization of high-dimensional computer simulations.

  20. Optimizing human activity patterns using global sensitivity analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Fairchild, Geoffrey; Hickmann, Kyle S.; Mniszewski, Susan M.; ...

    2013-12-10

    Implementing realistic activity patterns for a population is crucial for modeling, for example, disease spread, supply and demand, and disaster response. Using the dynamic activity simulation engine, DASim, we generate schedules for a population that capture regular (e.g., working, eating, and sleeping) and irregular activities (e.g., shopping or going to the doctor). We use the sample entropy (SampEn) statistic to quantify a schedule’s regularity for a population. We show how to tune an activity’s regularity by adjusting SampEn, thereby making it possible to realistically design activities when creating a schedule. The tuning process sets up a computationally intractable high-dimensional optimizationmore » problem. To reduce the computational demand, we use Bayesian Gaussian process regression to compute global sensitivity indices and identify the parameters that have the greatest effect on the variance of SampEn. Here we use the harmony search (HS) global optimization algorithm to locate global optima. Our results show that HS combined with global sensitivity analysis can efficiently tune the SampEn statistic with few search iterations. We demonstrate how global sensitivity analysis can guide statistical emulation and global optimization algorithms to efficiently tune activities and generate realistic activity patterns. Finally, though our tuning methods are applied to dynamic activity schedule generation, they are general and represent a significant step in the direction of automated tuning and optimization of high-dimensional computer simulations.« less

  1. Global monitoring of Sea Surface Salinity with Aquarius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagerloef, G. S. E.; LeVine, D. M.; Chao, Yi; Colomb, R.; Nollmann, I.

    2005-01-01

    Aquarius is a microwave remote sensing system designed to obtain global maps of the surface salinity field of the oceans from space. It will be flown on the Aquarius/SAC-D mission, a partnership between the USA (NASA) and Argentina (CONAE) with launch scheduled for late in 2008. The objective of Aquarius is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean. This will provide data to address scientific questions associated with ocean circulation and its impact on climate. For example, salinity is needed to understand the large scale thermohaline circulation, driven by buoyancy, which moves large masses of water and heat around the globe. Of the two variables that determine buoyancy (salinity and temperature), temperature is already being monitored. Salinity is the missing variable needed to understand this circulation. Salinity also has an important role in energy exchange between the ocean and atmosphere, for example in the development of fresh water lenses (buoyant water that forms stable layers and insulates water below from the atmosphere) which alter the air-sea coupling. Aquarius is a combination radiometer and scatterometer (radar) operating at L-band (1.413 GHz for the radiometer and 1.26 GHz for the scatterometer). The primary instrument,for measuring salinity is the radiometer which is able to detect salinity because of the modulation salinity produces on the thermal emission from sea water. This change is detectable at the long wavelength end of the microwave spectrum. The scatterometer will provide a correction for surface roughness (waves) which is one of the greatest unknowns in the retrieval. The sensor will be in a sun-synchronous orbit at about 650 km with equatorial crossings of 6am/6pm. The antenna for these two instruments is a 3 meter offset fed reflector with three feeds arranged in pushbroom fashion looking away from the sun toward the shadow side of the orbit to

  2. The Contribution of Reservoirs to Global Land Surface Water Storage Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Tian; Nijssen, Bart; Gao, Huilin; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    2016-12-21

    Man-made reservoirs play a key role in the terrestrial water system. They alter water fluxes at the land surface and impact surface water storage through water management regulations for diverse purposes such as irrigation, municipal water supply, hydropower generation, and flood control. Although most developed countries have established sophisticated observing systems for many variables in the land surface water cycle, long-term and consistent records of reservoir storage are much more limited and not always shared. Furthermore, most land surface hydrological models do not represent the effects of water management activities. Here, the contribution of reservoirs to seasonal water storage variations is investigated using a large-scale water management model to simulate the effects of reservoir management at basin and continental scales. The model was run from 1948 to 2010 at a spatial resolution of 0.258 latitude–longitude. A total of 166 of the largest reservoirs in the world with a total capacity of about 3900 km3 (nearly 60%of the globally integrated reservoir capacity) were simulated. The global reservoir storage time series reflects the massive expansion of global reservoir capacity; over 30 000 reservoirs have been constructed during the past half century, with a mean absolute interannual storage variation of 89 km3. The results indicate that the average reservoir-induced seasonal storage variation is nearly 700 km3 or about 10%of the global reservoir storage. For some river basins, such as the Yellow River, seasonal reservoir storage variations can be as large as 72%of combined snow water equivalent and soil moisture storage.

  3. How to most effectively expand the global surface ozone observing network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofen, E. D.; Bowdalo, D.; Evans, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Surface ozone observations with modern instrumentation have been made around the world for more than 40 years. Some of these observations have been made as one-off activities with short-term, specific science objectives and some have been made as part of wider networks which have provided a foundational infrastructure of data collection, calibration, quality control, and dissemination. These observations provide a fundamental underpinning to our understanding of tropospheric chemistry, air quality policy, atmosphere-biosphere interactions, etc. brought together eight of these networks to provide a single data set of surface ozone observations. We investigate how representative this combined data set is of global surface ozone using the output from a global atmospheric chemistry model. We estimate that on an area basis, 25 % of the globe is observed (34 % land, 21 % ocean). Whereas Europe and North America have almost complete coverage, other continents, Africa, South America, Australia, and Asia (12-17 %) show significant gaps. Antarctica is surprisingly well observed (78 %). Little monitoring occurs over the oceans, with the tropical and southern oceans particularly poorly represented. The surface ozone over key biomes such as tropical forests and savanna is almost completely unmonitored. A chemical cluster analysis suggests that a significant number of observations are made of polluted air masses, but cleaner air masses whether over the land or ocean (especially again in the tropics) are significantly under-observed. The current network is unlikely to see the impact of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) but may be capable of detecting other planetary-scale signals. Model assessment and validation activities are hampered by a lack of observations in regions where the models differ substantially, as is the ability to monitor likely changes in surface ozone over the next century. Using our methodology we are able to suggest new sites which

  4. Surface-Activated Coupling Reactions Confined on a Surface.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lei; Liu, Pei Nian; Lin, Nian

    2015-10-20

    Chemical reactions may take place in a pure phase of gas or liquid or at the interface of two phases (gas-solid or liquid-solid). Recently, the emerging field of "surface-confined coupling reactions" has attracted intensive attention. In this process, reactants, intermediates, and products of a coupling reaction are adsorbed on a solid-vacuum or a solid-liquid interface. The solid surface restricts all reaction steps on the interface, in other words, the reaction takes place within a lower-dimensional, for example, two-dimensional, space. Surface atoms that are fixed in the surface and adatoms that move on the surface often activate the surface-confined coupling reactions. The synergy of surface morphology and activity allow some reactions that are inefficient or prohibited in the gas or liquid phase to proceed efficiently when the reactions are confined on a surface. Over the past decade, dozens of well-known "textbook" coupling reactions have been shown to proceed as surface-confined coupling reactions. In most cases, the surface-confined coupling reactions were discovered by trial and error, and the reaction pathways are largely unknown. It is thus highly desirable to unravel the mechanisms, mechanisms of surface activation in particular, of the surface-confined coupling reactions. Because the reactions take place on surfaces, advanced surface science techniques can be applied to study the surface-confined coupling reactions. Among them, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are the two most extensively used experimental tools. The former resolves submolecular structures of individual reactants, intermediates, and products in real space, while the latter monitors the chemical states during the reactions in real time. Combination of the two methods provides unprecedented spatial and temporal information on the reaction pathways. The experimental findings are complemented by theoretical modeling. In particular, density

  5. Generating Ground Reference Data for a Global Impervious Surface Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.; deColstoun, Eric Brown; Wolfe, Robert E.; Tan, Bin; Huang, Chengquan

    2012-01-01

    We are engaged in a project to produce a 30m impervious cover data set of the entire Earth for the years 2000 and 2010 based on the Landsat Global Land Survey (GLS) data set. The GLS data from Landsat provide an unprecedented opportunity to map global urbanization at this resolution for the first time, with unprecedented detail and accuracy. Moreover, the spatial resolution of Landsat is absolutely essential to accurately resolve urban targets such as buildings, roads and parking lots. Finally, with GLS data available for the 1975, 1990, 2000, and 2005 time periods, and soon for the 2010 period, the land cover/use changes due to urbanization can now be quantified at this spatial scale as well. Our approach works across spatial scales using very high spatial resolution commercial satellite data to both produce and evaluate continental scale products at the 30m spatial resolution of Landsat data. We are developing continental scale training data at 1m or so resolution and aggregating these to 30m for training a regression tree algorithm. Because the quality of the input training data are critical, we have developed an interactive software tool, called HSegLearn, to facilitate the photo-interpretation of high resolution imagery data, such as Quickbird or Ikonos data, into an impervious versus non-impervious map. Previous work has shown that photo-interpretation of high resolution data at 1 meter resolution will generate an accurate 30m resolution ground reference when coarsened to that resolution. Since this process can be very time consuming when using standard clustering classification algorithms, we are looking at image segmentation as a potential avenue to not only improve the training process but also provide a semi-automated approach for generating the ground reference data. HSegLearn takes as its input a hierarchical set of image segmentations produced by the HSeg image segmentation program [1, 2]. HSegLearn lets an analyst specify pixel locations as being

  6. Global observations and modeling of atmosphere-surface exchange of elemental mercury: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Lin, Che-Jen; Wang, Xun; Sommar, Jonas; Fu, Xuewu; Feng, Xinbin

    2016-04-01

    Reliable quantification of air-surface fluxes of elemental Hg vapor (Hg0) is crucial for understanding mercury (Hg) global biogeochemical cycles. There have been extensive measurements and modeling efforts devoted to estimating the exchange fluxes between the atmosphere and various surfaces (e.g., soil, canopies, water, snow, etc.) in the past three decades. However, large uncertainties remain due to the complexity of Hg0 bidirectional exchange, limitations of flux quantification techniques and challenges in model parameterization. In this study, we provide a critical review on the state of science in the atmosphere-surface exchange of Hg0. Specifically, the advancement of flux quantification techniques, mechanisms in driving the air-surface Hg exchange and modeling efforts are presented. Due to the semi-volatile nature of Hg0 and redox transformation of Hg in environmental media, Hg deposition and evasion are influenced by multiple environmental variables including seasonality, vegetative coverage and its life cycle, temperature, light, moisture, atmospheric turbulence and the presence of reactants (e.g., O3, radicals, etc.). However, the effects of these processes on flux have not been fundamentally and quantitatively determined, which limits the accuracy of flux modeling. We compile an up-to-date global observational flux database and discuss the implication of flux data on the global Hg budget. Mean Hg0 fluxes obtained by micrometeorological measurements do not appear to be significantly greater than the fluxes measured by dynamic flux chamber methods over unpolluted surfaces (p = 0.16, one-tailed, Mann-Whitney U test). The spatiotemporal coverage of existing Hg0 flux measurements is highly heterogeneous with large data gaps existing in multiple continents (Africa, South Asia, Middle East, South America and Australia). The magnitude of the evasion flux is strongly enhanced by human activities, particularly at contaminated sites. Hg0 flux observations in East

  7. Global SOFC activities and evaluation programmes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Noboru

    1994-04-01

    Perhaps there are a few hundred organizations worldwide at present such as universities, research institutes or companies where the research and development of SOFC is carried out, including basic research on materials for SOFCs. This paper, will not refer to the status of basic R&D materials similarities or on a single cell, but will observe developmental activities in Europe, USA and Japan, focusing on the development which has already the stage of fabrication and operation of a SOFC cell stack. Information will also include detailed operation and evaluation of the 25 kW class systems of Westinghouse.

  8. GLOBAL DYNAMICS OF SUBSURFACE SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Jouve, L.; Brun, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    We present three-dimensional numerical simulations of a magnetic loop evolving in either a convectively stable or unstable rotating shell. The magnetic loop is introduced into the shell in such a way that it is buoyant only in a certain portion in longitude, thus creating an {Omega}-loop. Due to the action of magnetic buoyancy, the loop rises and develops asymmetries between its leading and following legs, creating emerging bipolar regions whose characteristics are similar to those of observed spots at the solar surface. In particular, we self-consistently reproduce the creation of tongues around the spot polarities, which can be strongly affected by convection. We further emphasize the presence of ring-shaped magnetic structures around our simulated emerging regions, which we call 'magnetic necklace' and which were seen in a number of observations without being reported as of today. We show that those necklaces are markers of vorticity generation at the periphery and below the rising magnetic loop. We also find that the asymmetry between the two legs of the loop is crucially dependent on the initial magnetic field strength. The tilt angle of the emerging regions is also studied in the stable and unstable cases and seems to be affected both by the convective motions and the presence of a differential rotation in the convective cases.

  9. Immobilization of Active Bacteriophages on Polyhydroxyalkanoate Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chanchan; Sauvageau, Dominic; Elias, Anastasia

    2016-01-20

    A rapid, efficient technique for the attachment of bacteriophages (phages) onto polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) surfaces has been developed and compared to three reported methods for phage immobilization. Polymer surfaces were modified to facilitate phage attachment using (1) plasma treatment alone, (2) plasma treatment followed by activation by 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (sulfo-NHS), (3) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting, or (4) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting with activation by EDC and sulfo-NHS. The impact of each method on the surface chemistry of PHA was investigated using contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Each of the four treatments was shown to result in both increased hydrophilicity and in the modification of the surface functional groups. Modified surfaces were immersed in suspensions of phage T4 for immobilization. The highest level of phage binding was observed for the surfaces modified by plasma treatment alone. The change in chemical bond states observed for surfaces that underwent plasma treatment is suspected to be the cause of the increased binding of active phages. Plasma-treated surfaces were further analyzed through phage-staining and fluorescence microscopy to assess the surface density of immobilized phages and their capacity to capture hosts. The infective capability of attached phages was confirmed by exposing the phage-immobilized surfaces to the host bacteria Escherichia coli in both plaque and infection dynamic assays. Plasma-treated surfaces with immobilized phages displayed higher infectivity than surfaces treated with other methods; in fact, the equivalent initial multiplicity of infection was 2 orders of magnitude greater than with other methods. Control samples - prepared by immersing polymer surfaces in phage suspensions (without prior plasma treatment) - did not show any bacterial growth inhibition, suggesting they did not bind

  10. Global vision systems regulatory and standard setting activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiana, Carlo; Münsterer, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    A number of committees globally, and the Regulatory Agencies they support, are active delivering and updating performance standards for vision system: Enhanced, Synthetic and Combined, as they apply to both Fixed Wing and, more recently, Rotorcraft operations in low visibility. We provide an overview of each committee's present and past work, as well as an update of recent activities and future goals.

  11. Installation Options for the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System in Surface Ships.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    Global Positioning System ( GPS ) is a highly accurate satellite based positioning and navigation system ...RD-A14B 190 INSTALLATION OPTIONS FOR THE NAYSTAR GLOBAL POSITIONING i/i SYSTEM IN SURFACE SHIPS(U) NAYAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA K S AMOS JUN...POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California DTIC CULECTE THESIS INSTALLATION OPTIONS FOR THE NAVSTAR GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM IN SURFACE SHIPS by LaJ Kevin

  12. Global CO2 simulation using GOSAT-based surface CO2 flux estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, H.; Oda, T.; Saito, M.; Valsala, V.; Belikov, D.; Saeki, T.; Saito, R.; Morino, I.; Uchino, O.; Yoshida, Y.; Yokota, Y.; Bril, A.; Oshchepkov, S.; Andres, R. J.; Maksyutov, S.

    2012-04-01

    Investigating the distribution and temporal variability of surface CO2 fluxes is an active research topic in the field of contemporary carbon cycle dynamics. The technique central to this effort is atmospheric inverse modeling with which surface CO2 fluxes are estimated by making corrections to a priori flux estimates such that mismatches between model-predicted and observed CO2 concentrations are minimized. Past investigations were carried out by utilizing CO2 measurements collected in global networks of surface-based monitoring sites. Now, datasets of column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction (XCO2) retrieved from spectral soundings collected by GOSAT are available for complementing the surface-based CO2 observations. These space-based XCO2 data are expected to enhance the spatiotemporal coverage of the existing surface observation network and thus reduce uncertainty associated with the surface flux estimates. We estimated monthly CO2 fluxes in 64 sub-continental regions from a subset of the surface-based GLOBALVIEW CO2 data and the GOSAT FTS SWIR Level 2 XCO2 retrievals. We further simulated CO2 concentrations in 3-D model space using the surface flux estimates obtained. In this presentation, we report the result of a comparison between the simulated CO2 concentrations and independent surface observations. As part of an effort in inter-comparing GOSAT-based surface CO2 flux estimates, we also look at results yielded with XCO2 data retrieved with the PPDF-DOAS algorithm and those made available by the NASA Atmospheric CO2 Observations from Space team. For this study, we used version 08.1 of the National Institute for Environmental Studies atmospheric transport model, which was driven by the Japan Meteorological Agency's JCDAS wind analysis data. The CO2 forward simulations were performed on 2.5° × 2.5° horizontal grids at 32 vertical levels between the surface and the top of the atmosphere. The a priori flux dataset used was comprised of the sum of four

  13. Global surface temperature change analysis based on MODIS data in recent twelve years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, K. B.; Ma, Y.; Tan, X. L.; Shen, X. Y.; Liu, G.; Li, Z. L.; Chen, J. M.; Xia, L.

    2017-01-01

    Global surface temperature change is one of the most important aspects in global climate change research. In this study, in order to overcome shortcomings of traditional observation methods in meteorology, a new method is proposed to calculate global mean surface temperature based on remote sensing data. We found that (1) the global mean surface temperature was close to 14.35 °C from 2001 to 2012, and the warmest and coldest surface temperatures of the global in the recent twelve years occurred in 2005 and 2008, respectively; (2) the warmest and coldest surface temperatures on the global land surface occurred in 2005 and 2001, respectively, and on the global ocean surface in 2010 and 2008, respectively; and (3) in recent twelve years, although most regions (especially the Southern Hemisphere) are warming, global warming is yet controversial because it is cooling in the central and eastern regions of Pacific Ocean, northern regions of the Atlantic Ocean, northern regions of China, Mongolia, southern regions of Russia, western regions of Canada and America, the eastern and northern regions of Australia, and the southern tip of Africa. The analysis of daily and seasonal temperature change indicates that the temperature change is mainly caused by the variation of orbit of celestial body. A big data model based on orbit position and gravitational-magmatic change of celestial body with the solar or the galactic system should be built and taken into account for climate and ecosystems change at a large spatial-temporal scale.

  14. A global tectonic activity map with orbital photographic supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, P. D., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A three part map showing equatorial and polar regions was compiled showing tectonic and volcanic activity of the past one million years, including the present. Features shown include actively spreading ridges, spreading rates, major active faults, subduction zones, well defined plates, and volcanic areas active within the past one million years. Activity within this period was inferred from seismicity (instrumental and historic), physiography, and published literature. The tectonic activity map was used for planning global geodetic programs of satellite laser ranging and very long base line interferometry and for geologic education.

  15. Global Advocacy for Physical Activity (GAPA): global leadership towards a raised profile.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Claire; Shilton, Trevor; Bull, Fiona

    2013-12-01

    Physical inactivity has been recognised by the World Health Organization as one of the leading causes of death due to non-communicable disease (NCD), worldwide. The benefits of action over inactivity can cut across health, environment, transportation, sport, culture and the economy. Despite the evidence, the policies and strategies to increase population-wide participation in physical activity receive insufficient priority from across high, middle and low-income countries; where physical inactivity is a rapidly-emerging issue. There is an increased need for all countries to invest in policies, strategies and supportive environments that inform, motivate and support individuals and communities to be active in ways that are safe, accessible and enjoyable. This commentary presents some recent efforts towards physical activity promotion globally, led by the Global Advocacy for Physical Activity (GAPA). It provides an overview of the background and history of GAPA; describes GAPA and the council's key achievements and milestones; places physical activity promotion within the global NCD agenda; presents GAPA flagships; and reflects on the lessons learned, ingredients for success and the major challenges that remain. The commentary documents insights into the effectiveness and challenges faced by a small non-governmental organisation (NGO) in mounting global advocacy. These lessons may be transferrable to other areas of health promotion advocacy.

  16. Global- and local-scale characterisation of bed surface structure in coarse-grained alluvial rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Mark; Ockelford, Annie; Nguyen, Thao; Wood, Jo; Rice, Steve; Reid, Ian; Tate, Nick

    2013-04-01

    It is widely recognised that adjustments in bed surface grain size (texture) and grain arrangement (structure) exert significant controls on the stability of coarse-grained alluvial rivers. Modifications to bed surface texture and structure occur during active sediment transport and are mediated by the process of mobile armouring which concentrates coarser-than-average particles on the surface and organises them into a variety of grain- and bedform-scale configurations. Textural aspects of surface armouring are well understood to the extent that sediment transport models can be used to predict the size distribution of armours that develop under different sediment supply regimes and shear stresses. Research has also found that the adjustment of bed surface grain size is often patchy and that the development of finer-grained and coarser-grained areas of the bed has important implications for both the rate and grain size of transported sediment. The structural aspects of stream-bed armouring, however, are less well understood, largely because of the difficulty of recognising and characterising bedforms and bed-structures that have dimensions similar to their constituent particles. Moreover, bed structure is generally parameterised using global scale descriptors of the bed surface such that information on the spatial heterogeneity of the structure is lost. The aim of this poster is to characterise the structural characteristics of water-worked river gravels, paying particular attention to quantifying the spatial heterogeneity of those characteristics using local scale descriptors. Results reported from a number of flume experiments designed to simulate the spatio-temporal evolution of bed configurations (surface texture and structure) as the system adjusts to a condition of equilibrium transport are used to evaluate the spatial variability of bed surface structure and explore its significance for modelling sediment transport rates in gravel-bed rivers. Keywords: bed

  17. The place of physical activity in the WHO Global Strategy on Diet and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Adrian; Craig, Cora L

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to reduce the global burden of non-communicable disease, the World Health Organization released a Global Strategy for Diet and Physical Activity in May 2004. This commentary reports on the development of the strategy and its importance specifically for physical activity-related work of NGOs and researchers interested in increasing global physical activity participation. Sparked by its work on global efforts to target non-communicable disease prevention in 2000, the World Health Organization commissioned a global strategy on diet and physical activity. The physical activity interest followed efforts that had led to the initial global "Move for Health Day" in 2002. WHO assembled a reference group for the global strategy, and a regional consultation process with countries was undertaken. Underpinning the responses was the need for more physical activity advocacy; partnerships outside of health including urban planning; development of national activity guidelines; and monitoring of the implementation of the strategy. The consultation process was an important mechanism to confirm the importance and elevate the profile of physical activity within the global strategy. It is suggested that separate implementation strategies for diet and physical activity may be needed to work with partner agencies in disparate sectors (e.g. urban planning for physical activity, agriculture for diet). International professional societies are well situated to make an important contribution to global public health by advocating for the importance of physical activity among risk factors; developing international measures of physical activity and global impacts of inactivity; and developing a global research and intervention agenda. PMID:16120214

  18. The place of physical activity in the WHO Global Strategy on Diet and Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Adrian; Craig, Cora L

    2005-08-24

    In an effort to reduce the global burden of non-communicable disease, the World Health Organization released a Global Strategy for Diet and Physical Activity in May 2004. This commentary reports on the development of the strategy and its importance specifically for physical activity-related work of NGOs and researchers interested in increasing global physical activity participation. Sparked by its work on global efforts to target non-communicable disease prevention in 2000, the World Health Organization commissioned a global strategy on diet and physical activity. The physical activity interest followed efforts that had led to the initial global "Move for Health Day" in 2002. WHO assembled a reference group for the global strategy, and a regional consultation process with countries was undertaken. Underpinning the responses was the need for more physical activity advocacy; partnerships outside of health including urban planning; development of national activity guidelines; and monitoring of the implementation of the strategy. The consultation process was an important mechanism to confirm the importance and elevate the profile of physical activity within the global strategy. It is suggested that separate implementation strategies for diet and physical activity may be needed to work with partner agencies in disparate sectors (e.g. urban planning for physical activity, agriculture for diet). International professional societies are well situated to make an important contribution to global public health by advocating for the importance of physical activity among risk factors; developing international measures of physical activity and global impacts of inactivity; and developing a global research and intervention agenda.

  19. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    SciTech Connect

    Branch; Darren W. , Meyer; Grant D. , Craighead; Harold G.

    2011-05-17

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  20. Global Change. Teaching Activities on Global Change for Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geological Survey (Dept. of Interior), Reston, VA.

    This packet contains a series of teaching guides on global change. The series includes lessons on dendrochronology; land, air, and water; and island living. Included is information such as : laws of straws; where land, air, and water meet; and Earth as home. Each section provides an introductory description of the activity, the purpose of the…

  1. Incorporation of groundwater pumping in a global Land Surface Model with the representation of human impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Yadu N.; Koirala, Sujan; Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Hanasaki, Naota; Longuevergne, Laurent; Kanae, Shinjiro; Oki, Taikan

    2015-01-01

    Observations indicate that groundwater levels are declining in many regions around the world. Simulating such depletion of groundwater at the global scale still remains a challenge because most global Land Surface Models (LSMs) lack the physical representation of groundwater dynamics in general and well pumping in particular. Here we present an integrated hydrologic model, which explicitly simulates groundwater dynamics and pumping within a global LSM that also accounts for human activities such as irrigation and reservoir operation. The model is used to simulate global water fluxes and storages with a particular focus on groundwater withdrawal and depletion in the High Plains Aquifer (HPA) and Central Valley Aquifer (CVA). Simulated global groundwater withdrawal and depletion for the year 2000 are 570 and 330 km3 yr-1, respectively; the depletion agrees better with observations than our previous model result without groundwater representation, but may still contain certain uncertainties and is on the higher side of other estimates. Groundwater withdrawals from the HPA and CVA are ˜22 and ˜9 km3 yr-1, respectively, which are also consistent with the observations of ˜24 and ˜13 km3 yr-1. The model simulates a significant decline in total terrestrial water storage in both regions as caused mainly by groundwater storage depletion. Groundwater table declined by ˜14 cm yr-1 in the HPA during 2003-2010; the rate is even higher (˜71 cm yr-1) in the CVA. These results demonstrate the potential of the developed model to study the dynamic relationship between human water use, groundwater storage, and the entire hydrologic cycle.

  2. Beneath the surface of global change: Impacts of climate change on groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Timothy R.; Taniguchi, Makoto; Kooi, Henk; Gurdak, Jason J.; Allen, Diana M.; Hiscock, Kevin M.; Treidel, Holger; Aureli, Alice

    2011-08-01

    SummaryGlobal change encompasses changes in the characteristics of inter-related climate variables in space and time, and derived changes in terrestrial processes, including human activities that affect the environment. As such, projected global change includes groundwater systems. Here, groundwater is defined as all subsurface water including soil water, deeper vadose zone water, and unconfined and confined aquifer waters. Potential effects of climate change combined with land and water management on surface waters have been studied in some detail. Equivalent studies of groundwater systems have lagged behind these advances, but research and broader interest in projected climate effects on groundwater have been accelerating in recent years. In this paper, we provide an overview and synthesis of the key aspects of subsurface hydrology, including water quantity and quality, related to global change. Adaptation to global change must include prudent management of groundwater as a renewable, but slow-feedback resource in most cases. Groundwater storage is already over-tapped in many regions, yet available subsurface storage may be a key to meeting the combined demands of agriculture, industry, municipal and domestic water supply, and ecosystems during times of shortage. The future intensity and frequency of dry periods combined with warming trends need to be addressed in the context of groundwater resources, even though projections in space and time are fraught with uncertainty. Finally, potential impacts of groundwater on the global climate system are largely unknown. Research to improve our understanding of the joint behaviors of climate and groundwater is needed, and spin-off benefits on each discipline are likely.

  3. Spectropolarimetry of Photosynthetic Pigments as Global Surface Biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, W. B.; Parenteau, M. N.; Blankenship, R. E.; Germer, T. A.; Meadows, V. S.; Telesco, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthesis is an ancient metabolic process on the early Earth. The most primitive phototrophs used reductants such as H2, H2S, and Fe(II) and were widespread in marine, intertidal, and likely continental habitats. These anoxygenic phototrophs were the key primary producers for the first ~1 billion years before the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis at 2.7 Ga. The potential clearly exists for this type of primitive photosynthesis to operate on habitable exoplanets. Anoxygenic phototrophs are not known to emit gases that are uniquely biogenic in origin, so we focus on surface pigments signatures as having the strongest promise to offer identifiable biosignatures for a pre-oxygenic habitable exoplanet. Following our earlier work that showed photosynthetic cyanobacteria yield a polarization signature potentially useful in remote sensing, here we seek to characterize the remotely detectable polarization biosignatures associated with anoxygenic phototrophs. The six major pigments of anoxygenic phototrophs (bacteriochlorophylls [Bchls]) absorb in the near-infrared (NIR) from ~705 - 1040 nm. The lower symmetry of the pigment structure relative to chlorophylls shifts the energy absorption bands to longer wavelengths. As a result, Bchls are well suited to absorbing the relatively higher flux of red and NIR radiation of M dwarf stars, the most abundant type of star in the Galaxy, as well as the plentiful flux of typical main sequence stars. Homochirality is a powerful biosignature, and because of the optical activity of biological molecules, it can, in principle, be remotely observed on macroscopic scales using circular polarization spectroscopy. Bchls and Chls are optically active molecules with several chiral centers, strongly interacting with the incident light. We measured the reflectance and transmission full Stokes polarization spectra of pure cultures of anoxygenic phototrophs and environmental samples of microbial mats, and found strong correlations between

  4. Active Flow Control Stator With Coanda Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guendogdu; Vorreiter; Seume

    2010-01-01

    Active Flow Control increases the permissible aerodynamic loading. Curved surface near the trailing edge ("Coanda surface"): a) increases turning -> higher pressure ratio. b) controls boundary layer separation -> increased surge margin. Objective: Reduce the number of vanes or compressor stages. Constraints: 1. In a real compressor, the vane must still function entirely without blowing. 2. Maintain the flow exit angle of the reference stator despite the resulting increase in stator loading.

  5. Technique for surface oxidation of activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sircar, S.; Golden, T.C.

    1987-10-27

    A method of activating a carbon adsorbent is described, which comprises oxidizing the surface of the carbon adsorbent with a mild oxidizing acid in the presence of a metal oxidation catalyst at an elevated temperature and boiling the mixture of the carbon adsorbent, mild oxidizing acid and metal oxidation catalyst to dryness. Then rinse the surface oxidizing carbon adsorbent with water; and dry the rinsed surface oxidized carbon adsorbent. In a process for the removal of water or carbon dioxide from a gas stream containing water or carbon dioxide of the type wherein the gas stream containing water or carbon dioxide is contacted with a solid phase adsorbent under pressure-swing adsorption or thermal-swing adsorption processing conditions, the improvement is described comprising utilizing an adsorbent produced by the activation of a carbon adsorbent. The activation comprises oxidizing the surface of the carbon adsorbent with a mold oxidizing acid in the presence of a metal oxidation catalyst at an elevated temperature and boiling the mixture of the carbon adsorbent, mild oxidizing acid and metal oxidation catalyst to dryness. Then rinse the surface oxidized carbon adsorbent with water; and dry the rinsed surface oxidized carbon adsorbent.

  6. Forcing a Global, Offline Land Surface Modeling System with Observation-Based Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodell, Matthew; Houser, Paul R.; Jambor, U.; Gottschalck, J.; Radakovich, J.; Arsenault, K.; Meng, C.-J.; Mitchell, K. E.

    2002-01-01

    The Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) drives multiple uncoupled land surface models in order to produce optimal output fields of surface states in near-real time, globally, at 1/4 degree spatial resolution. These fields are then made available for coupled atmospheric model initialization and further research. One of the unique aspects of GLDAS is its ability to ingest both modeled and observation-derived forcing for running global scale land surface models. This paper compares results of runs forced by modeled and observed precipitation and shortwave radiation fields. Differences are examined and the impact of the observations on model skill is assessed.

  7. Optical Activity of Anisotropic Achiral Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Verbiest, T.; Kauranen, M.; Van Rompaey, Y.; Persoons, A. |

    1996-08-01

    Anisotropic achiral surfaces respond differently to left- and right-hand circularly polarized light. This occurs when the orientation of the surface with respect to an otherwise achiral experimental setup makes the total geometry chiral. Such optical activity is demonstrated in second-harmonic generation from an anisotropic thin molecular film. The circular-difference response reverses sign as the handedness of the geometry is reversed and vanishes when the setup possesses a mirror plane. The results are explained within the electric-dipole-allowed second-order surface nonlinearity. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. Active Surfaces and Interfaces of Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiming

    A variety of intriguing surface patterns have been observed on developing natural systems, ranging from corrugated surface of white blood cells at nanometer scales to wrinkled dog skins at millimeter scales. To mimetically harness functionalities of natural morphologies, artificial transformative skin systems by using soft active materials have been rationally designed to generate versatile patterns for a variety of engineering applications. The study of the mechanics and design of these dynamic surface patterns on soft active materials are both physically interesting and technologically important. This dissertation starts with studying abundant surface patterns in Nature by constructing a unified phase diagram of surface instabilities on soft materials with minimum numbers of physical parameters. Guided by this integrated phase diagram, an electroactive system is designed to investigate a variety of electrically-induced surface instabilities of elastomers, including electro-creasing, electro-cratering, electro-wrinkling and electro-cavitation. Combing experimental, theoretical and computational methods, the initiation, evolution and transition of these instabilities are analyzed. To apply these dynamic surface instabilities to serving engineering and biology, new techniques of Dynamic Electrostatic Lithography and electroactive anti-biofouling are demonstrated.

  9. Global data collection and the surveillance of active volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    Data relay systems on existing earth-orbiting satellites provide an inexpensive way to collect environmental data from numerous remote sites around the world. This technology could be used effectively for fundamental monitoring of most of the world's active volcanoes. Such global monitoring would focus attention on the most dangerous volcanoes that are likely to significantly impact the geosphere and the biosphere. ?? 1990.

  10. Global rhythmic activities in hippocampal neural fields and neural coding.

    PubMed

    Ventriglia, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    Global oscillations of the neural field represent some of the most interesting expressions of the hippocampal activity, being related also to learning and memory. To study oscillatory activities of the CA3 field in theta range, a model of this sub-field of Hippocampus has been formulated. The model describes the firing activity of CA3 neuronal populations within the frame of a kinetic theory of neural systems and it has been used for computer simulations. The results show that the propagation of activities induced in the neural field by hippocampal afferents occurs only in narrow time windows confined by inhibitory barrages, whose time-course follows the theta rhythm. Moreover, during each period of a theta wave, the entire CA3 field bears a firing activity with peculiar space-time patterns, a sort of specific imprint, which can induce effects with similar patterns on brain regions driven by the hippocampal formation. The simulation has also demonstrated the ability of medial septum to influence the global activity of the CA3 pyramidal population through the control of the population of inhibitory interneurons. At last, the possible involvement of global population oscillations in neural coding has been discussed.

  11. Changes in Sea Surface Temperature and North Atlantic Hurricane Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, R.; Mahani, S.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2006-05-01

    People of United States from Maine to Texas in the years 1995 to 2005 experienced the highest level of North Atlantic hurricane activity in the reliable collected data and reports in compare with the generally low activity of the previous two decays (1970 to 1994). The greater activity might be a consequence of instantaneous changes in North Atlantic Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and air temperature. This thermal energy of increased Sea Surface Temperature (warm water) is known as tropical cyclone heat potential (TCHP) partly powers a hurricane and has been called hurricane fuel. In primary steps of this research we are trying to examine the association of variation of Sea Surface Temperature (SST), Sea Surface Height (SSH) and air temperature in the past decades with changes in hurricane number, duration and intensity. Preliminary analysis demonstrated that there is correlation between global warming and the occurrence of hurricanes because of the anticipated enhancement of energy available to the storms due to higher sea surface temperatures. The goal is to characterize and specify significant factors on tropical storms to improve the capability of predicting a hurricane and its damages to human lives and the economy. This information can be used to advise strategies for warning and also minimizing the magnitude of hurricane destruction, damages, and life losses.

  12. CLIMATE CHANGE. Possible artifacts of data biases in the recent global surface warming hiatus.

    PubMed

    Karl, Thomas R; Arguez, Anthony; Huang, Boyin; Lawrimore, Jay H; McMahon, James R; Menne, Matthew J; Peterson, Thomas C; Vose, Russell S; Zhang, Huai-Min

    2015-06-26

    Much study has been devoted to the possible causes of an apparent decrease in the upward trend of global surface temperatures since 1998, a phenomenon that has been dubbed the global warming "hiatus." Here, we present an updated global surface temperature analysis that reveals that global trends are higher than those reported by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, especially in recent decades, and that the central estimate for the rate of warming during the first 15 years of the 21st century is at least as great as the last half of the 20th century. These results do not support the notion of a "slowdown" in the increase of global surface temperature.

  13. LOW-LATITUDE CORONAL HOLES, DECAYING ACTIVE REGIONS, AND GLOBAL CORONAL MAGNETIC STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, G. J. D.; Haislmaier, K. J.

    2013-10-01

    We study the relationship between decaying active-region magnetic fields, coronal holes, and the global coronal magnetic structure using Global Oscillations Network Group synoptic magnetograms, Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory extreme-ultraviolet synoptic maps, and coronal potential-field source-surface models. We analyze 14 decaying regions and associated coronal holes occurring between early 2007 and late 2010, 4 from cycle 23 and 10 from cycle 24. We investigate the relationship between asymmetries in active regions' positive and negative magnetic intensities, asymmetric magnetic decay rates, flux imbalances, global field structure, and coronal hole formation. Whereas new emerging active regions caused changes in the large-scale coronal field, the coronal fields of the 14 decaying active regions only opened under the condition that the global coronal structure remained almost unchanged. This was because the dominant slowly varying, low-order multipoles prevented opposing-polarity fields from opening and the remnant active-region flux preserved the regions' low-order multipole moments long after the regions had decayed. Thus, the polarity of each coronal hole necessarily matched the polar field on the side of the streamer belt where the corresponding active region decayed. For magnetically isolated active regions initially located within the streamer belt, the more intense polarity generally survived to form the hole. For non-isolated regions, flux imbalance and topological asymmetry prompted the opposite to occur in some cases.

  14. Global positioning system: a new opportunity in physical activity measurement.

    PubMed

    Maddison, Ralph; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona

    2009-11-04

    Accurate measurement of physical activity is a pre-requisite to monitor population physical activity levels and design effective interventions. Global Positioning System (GPS) technology offers potential to improve the measurement of physical activity. This paper 1) reviews the extant literature on the application of GPS to monitor human movement, with a particular emphasis on free-living physical activity, 2) discusses issues associated with GPS use, and 3) provides recommendations for future research. Overall findings show that GPS is a useful tool to augment our understanding of physical activity by providing the context (location) of the activity and used together with Geographical Information Systems can provide some insight into how people interact with the environment. However, no studies have shown that GPS alone is a reliable and valid measure of physical activity.

  15. Global positioning system: a new opportunity in physical activity measurement

    PubMed Central

    Maddison, Ralph; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona

    2009-01-01

    Accurate measurement of physical activity is a pre-requisite to monitor population physical activity levels and design effective interventions. Global Positioning System (GPS) technology offers potential to improve the measurement of physical activity. This paper 1) reviews the extant literature on the application of GPS to monitor human movement, with a particular emphasis on free-living physical activity, 2) discusses issues associated with GPS use, and 3) provides recommendations for future research. Overall findings show that GPS is a useful tool to augment our understanding of physical activity by providing the context (location) of the activity and used together with Geographical Information Systems can provide some insight into how people interact with the environment. However, no studies have shown that GPS alone is a reliable and valid measure of physical activity. PMID:19887012

  16. New View of the Martian Surface: THEMIS Global Thermal Inertia Mosaic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fergason, R. L.; Christensen, P. R.

    2009-03-01

    We are generating a new global thermal inertia mosaic using THEMIS IR data at 256 m per pixel. This mosaic has facilitated an improved understanding of geologic processes acting on local scales, including the nature of moderate TI surfaces.

  17. Oceanographic basis of the global surface distribution of Prochlorococcus ecotypes.

    PubMed

    Bouman, Heather A; Ulloa, Osvaldo; Scanlan, David J; Zwirglmaier, Katrin; Li, William K W; Platt, Trevor; Stuart, Venetia; Barlow, Ray; Leth, Ole; Clementson, Lesley; Lutz, Vivian; Fukasawa, Masao; Watanabe, Shuichi; Sathyendranath, Shubha

    2006-05-12

    By using data collected during a continuous circumnavigation of the Southern Hemisphere, we observed clear patterns in the population-genetic structure of Prochlorococcus, the most abundant photosynthetic organism on Earth, between and within the three Southern Subtropical Gyres. The same mechanisms that were previously invoked to account for the vertical distribution of ecotypes at local scales accounted for the global (horizontal) patterns we observed. Basin-scale and seasonal variations in the structure and strength of vertical stratification provide a basis for understanding large-scale horizontal distribution in genetic and physiological traits of Prochlorococcus, and perhaps of marine microbial communities in general.

  18. Landsat Imagery Enables Global Studies of Surface Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Landsat 8 is the latest in the NASA-developed series of satellites that have provided a continuous picture of Earth for more than 40 years. Mountain View, California-based Google has incorporated Landsat data into several products, most recently generating a cloud-free view of Earth. Google has also teamed up with researchers at the University of Maryland and Goddard Space Flight Center to create a global survey showing changes in forest cover over many years-the first of its kind.

  19. Bactericidal activity of biomimetic diamond nanocone surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Leanne E; Yang, Yang; Yuen, Muk-Fung; Zhang, Wenjun; Nobbs, Angela H; Su, Bo

    2016-03-17

    The formation of biofilms on implant surfaces and the subsequent development of medical device-associated infections are difficult to resolve and can cause considerable morbidity to the patient. Over the past decade, there has been growing recognition that physical cues, such as surface topography, can regulate biological responses and possess bactericidal activity. In this study, diamond nanocone-patterned surfaces, representing biomimetic analogs of the naturally bactericidal cicada fly wing, were fabricated using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition, followed by bias-assisted reactive ion etching. Two structurally distinct nanocone surfaces were produced, characterized, and the bactericidal ability examined. The sharp diamond nanocone features were found to have bactericidal capabilities with the surface possessing the more varying cone dimension, nonuniform array, and decreased density, showing enhanced bactericidal ability over the more uniform, highly dense nanocone surface. Future research will focus on using the fabrication process to tailor surface nanotopographies on clinically relevant materials that promote both effective killing of a broader range of microorganisms and the desired mammalian cell response. This study serves to introduce a technology that may launch a new and innovative direction in the design of biomaterials with capacity to reduce the risk of medical device-associated infections.

  20. Fine-Resolution Satellite-Based Daily Sea Surface Temperatures over the Global Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    MODAS with latitudinal extent limited to ±80. Note that only the RTG product includes SST in the Caspian Sea and the Sea of Azov . The plot masks SST...Fine-resolution satellite-based daily sea surface temperatures over the global ocean A. B. Kara1 and C. N. Barron1 Received 18 November 2006; revised...13 February 2007; accepted 27 February 2007; published 22 May 2007. [1] The accuracy and relative merits of two sets of daily global sea surface

  1. Global asymptotical stability of continuous-time delayed neural networks without global Lipschitz activation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yong; Tan, Mingjia

    2009-11-01

    This paper investigates the global asymptotic stability of equilibrium for a class of continuous-time neural networks with delays. Based on suitable Lyapunov functionals and the homeomorphism theory, some sufficient conditions for the existence and uniqueness of the equilibrium point are derived. These results extend the previously works without assuming boundedness and Lipschitz conditions of the activation functions and any symmetry of interconnections. A numerical example is also given to show the improvements of the paper.

  2. Global mapping of the elemental composition of the Moon surface with SELENE GRS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Uston, C.; Hasebe, N.

    2007-08-01

    The major objectives of the SELENE mission are to obtain scientific data on lunar origins and evolution, and to develop the technology for future lunar exploration. The scientific data will be also used for exploring the possibility of future utilization of the Moon. The Moon has been observed and explored extensively as the most familiar body. Although the Moon is more thoroughly studied than any other planetary bodies in the solar system, its origin and evolution process are still controversial. The SELENE mission targets are the global characterization of lunar surface and detailed gravimetry. This mission will provide globally the high-quality and high-resolution data on element abundance, mineral assemblage, surface topography, sub-surface structure, magnetic and gravity field, and precession. It aims at better understanding the origin and evolution of the Moon by these observations. Determining the distribution of major and important trace elements in the lunar surface is essential in the lunar science. A lunar chemistry and the relative abundances of refractory and volatile elements provide clues to the conditions which prevailed during the formation of the Moon. Combining planetological studies with elemental study can help improve our understanding of the evolution of the Moon including the Earth. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is well suited for measuring elemental composition in the lunar surface. We present the high resolution Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) for the Japan's lunar explorer SELENE which will cover the whole lunar surface by its polar orbit at a nominal altitude of 100 km. A germanium semiconductor crystal cooled by a Stirling cryocooler to below -180°C, is used as a gamma-ray detector. This GRS has an excellent energy resolution 20 times superior to those used in past lunar missions. Thus, GRS can discriminate the incident gamma-ray energies with high precision and can determine abundances of materials (K, U, Th, O, Mg, Al, Si, Ti, Fe, Ca, H etc

  3. Global fields of soil moisture and land surface evapotranspiration derived from observed precipitation and surface air temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Y.; Walker, G. K.

    1993-01-01

    The global fields of normal monthly soil moisture and land surface evapotranspiration are derived with a simple water budget model that has precipitation and potential evapotranspiration as inputs. The precipitation is observed and the potential evapotranspiration is derived from the observed surface air temperature with the empirical regression equation of Thornthwaite (1954). It is shown that at locations where the net surface radiation flux has been measured, the potential evapotranspiration given by the Thornthwaite equation is in good agreement with those obtained with the radiation-based formulations of Priestley and Taylor (1972), Penman (1948), and Budyko (1956-1974), and this provides the justification for the use of the Thornthwaite equation. After deriving the global fields of soil moisture and evapotranspiration, the assumption is made that the potential evapotranspiration given by the Thornthwaite equation and by the Priestley-Taylor equation will everywhere be about the same; the inverse of the Priestley-Taylor equation is used to obtain the normal monthly global fields of net surface radiation flux minus ground heat storage. This and the derived evapotranspiration are then used in the equation for energy conservation at the surface of the earth to obtain the global fields of normal monthly sensible heat flux from the land surface to the atmosphere.

  4. Surface Hydrology in Global River Basins in the Off-Line Land-Surface GEOS Assimilation (OLGA) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Yang, Runhua; Houser, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    Land surface hydrology for the Off-line Land-surface GEOS Analysis (OLGA) system and Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-1) Data Assimilation System (DAS) has been examined using a river routing model. The GEOS-1 DAS land-surface parameterization is very simple, using an energy balance prediction of surface temperature and prescribed soil water. OLGA uses near-surface atmospheric data from the GEOS-1 DAS to drive a more comprehensive parameterization of the land-surface physics. The two global systems are evaluated using a global river routing model. The river routing model uses climatologic surface runoff from each system to simulate the river discharge from global river basins, which can be compared to climatologic river discharge. Due to the soil hydrology, the OLGA system shows a general improvement in the simulation of river discharge compared to the GEOS-1 DAS. Snowmelt processes included in OLGA also have a positive effect on the annual cycle of river discharge and source runoff. Preliminary tests of a coupled land-atmosphere model indicate improvements to the hydrologic cycle compared to the uncoupled system. The river routing model has provided a useful tool in the evaluation of the GCM hydrologic cycle, and has helped quantify the influence of the more advanced land surface model.

  5. Mechanotransductive surfaces for reversible biocatalysis activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz, Damien; Vogt, Cédric; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Mutterer, Jérôme; Ball, Vincent; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Schaaf, Pierre; Lavalle, Philippe

    2009-09-01

    Fibronectin, like other proteins involved in mechanotransduction, has the ability to exhibit recognition sites under mechanical stretch. Such cryptic sites are buried inside the protein structure in the native fold and become exposed under an applied force, thereby activating specific signalling pathways. Here, we report the design of new active polymeric nanoassembled surfaces that show some similarities to these cryptic sites. These nanoassemblies consist of a first polyelectrolyte multilayer stratum loaded with enzymes and capped with a second polyelectrolyte multilayer acting as a mechanically sensitive nanobarrier. The biocatalytic activity of the film is switched on/off reversibly by mechanical stretching, which exposes enzymes through the capping barrier, similarly to mechanisms involved in proteins during mechanotransduction. This first example of a new class of biologically inspired surfaces should have great potential in the design of various devices aimed to trigger and modulate chemical reactions by mechanical action with applications in the field of microfluidic devices or mechanically controlled biopatches for example.

  6. Global Surface Solar Energy Anomalies Including El Nino and La Nina Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Brown, D. E.; Chandler, W. S.; DiPasquale, R. C.; Ritchey, Nancy A.; Gupta, Shashi K.; Wilber, Anne C.; Kratz, David P.; Stackhouse, Paul W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper synthesizes past events in an attempt to define the general magnitude, duration, and location of large surface solar anomalies over the globe. Surface solar energy values are mostly a function of solar zenith angle, cloud conditions, column atmospheric water vapor, aerosols, and surface albedo. For this study, solar and meteorological parameters for the 10-yr period July 1983 through June 1993 are used. These data were generated as part of the Release 3 Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) activity under the NASA Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) effort. Release 3 SSE uses upgraded input data and methods relative to previous releases. Cloud conditions are based on recent NASA Version-D International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) global satellite radiation and cloud data. Meteorological inputs are from Version-I Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) reanalysis data that uses both weather station and satellite information. Aerosol transmission for different regions and seasons are for an 'average' year based on historic solar energy data from over 1000 ground sites courtesy of Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). These data are input to a new Langley Parameterized Shortwave Algorithm (LPSA) that calculates surface albedo and surface solar energy. That algorithm is an upgraded version of the 'Staylor' algorithm. Calculations are performed for a 280X280 km equal-area grid system over the globe based on 3-hourly input data. A bi-linear interpolation process is used to estimate data output values on a 1 X 1 degree grid system over the globe. Maximum anomalies are examined relative to El Nino and La Nina events in the tropical Pacific Ocean. Maximum year-to-year anomalies over the globe are provided for a 10-year period. The data may assist in the design of systems with increased reliability. It may also allow for better planning for emergency assistance during some atypical events.

  7. Global permittivity mapping of the Martian surface from SHARAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaldo, Luigi; Mège, Daniel; Gurgurewicz, Joanna; Orosei, Roberto; Alberti, Giovanni

    2017-03-01

    SHARAD is a subsurface sounding radar aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, capable of detecting dielectric discontinuities in the subsurface caused by compositional and/or structural changes. Echoes coming from the surface contain information on geometric properties at metre scale and on the permittivity of the upper layers of the Martian crust. A model has been developed to estimate the effect of surface roughness on echo power, depending on statistical parameters such as RMS height and topothesy. Such model is based on the assumption that topography can be characterized as a self-affine fractal, and its use allows the estimation of the dielectric properties of the first few metres of the Martian soil. A permittivity map of the surface of Mars is obtained, covering several large regions across the planet surface. The most significant correspondence with geology is observed at the dichotomy boundary, with high dielectric constant on the highlands side (7 to over 10) and lower on the lowlands side (3 to 7). Other geological correlations are discussed.

  8. A Multiyear Dataset of SSM/I-Derived Global Ocean Surface Turbulent Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Shie, Chung-Lin; Atlas, Robert M.; Ardizzone, Joe; Nelkin, Eric; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, latent heat, and sensible heat over global oceans are essential to weather, climate and ocean problems. Evaporation is a key component of the hydrological cycle and the surface heat budget, while the wind stress is the major forcing for driving the oceanic circulation. The global air-sea fluxes of momentum, latent and sensible heat, radiation, and freshwater (precipitation-evaporation) are the forcing for driving oceanic circulation and, hence, are essential for understanding the general circulation of global oceans. The global air-sea fluxes are required for driving ocean models and validating coupled ocean-atmosphere global models. We have produced a 7.5-year (July 1987-December 1994) dataset of daily surface turbulent fluxes over the global oceans from the Special Sensor microwave/Imager (SSM/I) data. Daily turbulent fluxes were derived from daily data of SSM/I surface winds and specific humidity, National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) sea surface temperatures, and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) air-sea temperature differences, using a stability-dependent bulk scheme. The retrieved instantaneous surface air humidity (with a 25-km resolution) validated well with that of the collocated radiosonde observations over the global oceans. Furthermore, the retrieved daily wind stresses and latent heat fluxes were found to agree well with that of the in situ measurements (IMET buoy, RV Moana Wave, and RV Wecoma) in the western Pacific warm pool during the TOGA COARE intensive observing period (November 1992-February 1993). The global distributions of 1988-94 seasonal-mean turbulent fluxes will be presented. In addition, the global distributions of 1990-93 annual-means turbulent fluxes and input variables will be compared with those of UWM/COADS covering the same period. The latter is based on the COADS (comprehensive ocean-atmosphere data set) and is recognized to be one of the best

  9. Global climate sensitivity to land surface change: The Mid Holocene revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diffenbaugh, Noah S.; Sloan, Lisa C.

    2002-05-01

    Land surface forcing of global climate has been shown both for anthropogenic and non-anthropogenic changes in land surface distribution. Because validation of global climate models (GCMs) is dependent upon the use of accurate boundary conditions, and because changes in land surface distribution have been shown to have effects on climate in areas remote from those changes, we have tested the sensitivity of a GCM to a global Mid Holocene vegetation distribution reconstructed from the fossil record, a first for a 6 ka GCM run. Here we demonstrate that large areas of the globe show statistically significant temperature sensitivity to these land surface changes and that the magnitude of the vegetation forcing is equal to the magnitude of 6 ka orbital forcing, emphasizing the importance of accurate land surface distribution for both model validation and future climate prediction.

  10. Dual Active Surface Heat Flux Gage Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-01-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  11. Dual active surface heat flux gage probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-02-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  12. Global Surface Thermal Inertia Derived from Dawn VIR Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, T. N.; Becker, K. J.; Anderson, J.; Capria, M.; Tosi, F.; Prettyman, T. H.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Palomba, E.; Grassi, D.; Capaccioni, F.; Ammannito, E.; Combe, J.; McCord, T. B.; Li, J. Y.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Comparisons of surface temperatures, derived from Dawn [1] Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR-MS) [2] observations , to thermal models suggest that Vesta generally has a low-thermal-inertia surface, between 25 and 35 J m^-2 K^-1 s^-½, consistent with a thick layer of fine-grain material [3]. Temperatures were calculated using a Bayesian approach to nonlinear inversion as described by Tosi et al. [4]. In order to compare observed temperatures of Vesta to model calculations, several geometric and photometric parameters must be known or estimated. These include local mean solar time, latitude, local slope, bond bolometric albedo, and the effective emissivity at 5μm. Local time, latitude, and local slope are calculated using the USGS ISIS software system [5]. We employ a multi-layered thermal-diffusion model called 'KRC' [6], which has been used extensively in the study of Martian thermophysical properties. This thermal model is easily modified for use with Vesta by replacing the Martian ephemeris input with the Vesta ephemeris and disabling the atmosphere. This model calculates surface temperatures throughout an entire Vesta year for specific sets of slope, azimuth, latitude and elevation, and a range of albedo and thermal-inertia values. The ranges of albedo and thermal inertia values create temperature indices that are closely matched to the dates and times observed by VIR. Based on observed temperatures and best-fit KRC thermal models, estimates of the annual mean surface temperatures were found to range from 176 K - 188 K for flat zenith-facing equatorial surfaces, but these temperatures can drop as low as 112 K for polar-facing slopes at mid-latitudes. [7] In this work, we will compare observed temperatures of the surface of Vesta (using data acquired by Dawn VIR-MS [2] during the approach, survey, high-altitude mapping and departure phases) to model temperature results using the KRC thermal model [5]. Where possible, temperature observations from

  13. Mars Relays Satellite Orbit Design Considerations for Global Support of Robotic Surface Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastrup, Rolf; Cesarone, Robert; Cook, Richard; Knocke, Phillip; McOmber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses orbit design considerations for Mars relay satellite (MRS)support of globally distributed robotic surface missions. The orbit results reported in this paper are derived from studies of MRS support for two types of Mars robotic surface missions: 1) the mars Environmental Survey (MESUR) mission, which in its current definition would deploy a global network of up to 16 small landers, and 2)a Small Mars Sample Return (SMSR) mission, which included four globally distributed landers, each with a return stage and one or two rovers, and up to four additional sets of lander/rover elements in an extended mission phase.

  14. Global surface air temperature variations: 1851-1984

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.D.; Raper, S.C.B.; Kelly, P.M.

    1986-11-01

    Many attempts have been made to combine station surface air temperature data into an average for the Northern Hemisphere. Fewer attempts have been made for the Southern Hemisphere because of the unavailability of data from the Antarctic mainland before the 1950s and the uncertainty of making a hemispheric estimate based solely on land-based analyses for a hemisphere that is 80% ocean. Past estimates have been based largely on data from the World Weather Records (Smithsonian Institution, 1927, 1935, 1947, and U.S. Weather Bureau, 1959-82) and have been made without considerable effort to detect and correct station inhomogeneities. Better estimates for the Southern Hemisphere are now possible because of the availability of 30 years of climatological data from Antarctica. The mean monthly surface air temperature anomalies presented in this package for the than those previously published because of the incorporation of data previously hidden away in archives and the analysis of station homogeneity before estimation.

  15. Comparison of Different Global Information Sources Used in Surface Radiative Flux Calculation: Radiative Properties of the Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Yuanchong; Rossow, William B.; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Direct estimates of surface radiative fluxes that resolve regional and weather-scale variabilty over the whole globe with reasonable accuracy have only become possible with the advent of extensive global, mostly satellite, datasets within the past couple of decades. The accuracy of these fluxes, estimated to be about 10-15 W per square meter is largely limited by the accuracy of the input datasets. The leading uncertainties in the surface fluxes are no longer predominantly induced by clouds but are now as much associated with uncertainties in the surface and near-surface atmospheric properties. This study presents a fuller, more quantitative evaluation of the uncertainties for the surface albedo and emissivity and surface skin temperatures by comparing the main available global datasets from the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer product, the NASA Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Surface Radiation Budget project, the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer project, NOAA Optimum Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Image project. The datasets are, in practice, treated as an ensemble of realizations of the actual climate such that their differences represent an estimate of the uncertainty in their measurements because we do not possess global truth datasets for these quantities. The results are globally representative and may be taken as a generalization of our previous ISCCP-based uncertainty estimates for the input datasets. Surface properties have the primary role in determining the surface upward shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) flux. From this study, the following conclusions are obtained

  16. Constraints on global fire activity vary across a resource gradient.

    PubMed

    Krawchuk, Meg A; Moritz, Max A

    2011-01-01

    We provide an empirical, global test of the varying constraints hypothesis, which predicts systematic heterogeneity in the relative importance of biomass resources to burn and atmospheric conditions suitable to burning (weather/climate) across a spatial gradient of long-term resource availability. Analyses were based on relationships between monthly global wildfire activity, soil moisture, and mid-tropospheric circulation data from 2001 to 2007, synthesized across a gradient of long-term averages in resources (net primary productivity), annual temperature, and terrestrial biome. We demonstrate support for the varying constraints hypothesis, showing that, while key biophysical factors must coincide for wildfires to occur, the relative influence of resources to burn and moisture/weather conditions on fire activity shows predictable spatial patterns. In areas where resources are always available for burning during the fire season, such as subtropical/tropical biomes with mid-high annual long-term net primary productivity, fuel moisture conditions exert their strongest constraint on fire activity. In areas where resources are more limiting or variable, such as deserts, xeric shrublands, or grasslands/savannas, fuel moisture has a diminished constraint on wildfire, and metrics indicating availability of burnable fuels produced during the antecedent wet growing seasons reflect a more pronounced constraint on wildfire. This macro-scaled evidence for spatially varying constraints provides a synthesis with studies performed at local and regional scales, enhances our understanding of fire as a global process, and indicates how sensitivity to future changes in temperature and precipitation may differ across the world.

  17. Understanding global cycling of atmosphere-surface exchangeable pollutants and its implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selin, N. E.; Giang, A.; Song, S.; Pike-thackray, C.; Friedman, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    We combine modeling approaches with data analysis to provide quantitative constraints on the global biogeochemical cycling of pollutants such as mercury (Hg) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs). These pollutants, released by human activities, continue to cycle between land, ocean, and atmosphere surfaces, extending their effective lifetimes in the environment. Measurement data are limited for all of these substances, providing few constraints on the magnitude of surface-atmosphere fluxes and thus the timescales of their cycling. This limits our ability to trace emissions to impacts for these substances, particularly in the context of both ongoing policies and climate change. We present a suite of modeling and analysis tools, including uncertainty analysis, that can provide quantitative constraints on cycling for these data-limited problems, and we illustrate their applicability through examples of Hg and selected POPs. Specifically, we summarize recent insights from inverse modeling of mercury, polynomial chaos-based methods for PAHs. Finally, we assess how uncertainty in timescales affects the entire emissions-to-impacts pathway for atmosphere-surface exchangeable pollutants. We discuss the implications of this analysis for policies under the Stockholm and Minamata Conventions.

  18. An accurate global potential energy surface, dipole moment surface, and rovibrational frequencies for NH(3).

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W; Lee, Timothy J

    2008-12-07

    A global potential energy surface (PES) that includes short and long range terms has been determined for the NH(3) molecule. The singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of connected triple excitations and the internally contracted averaged coupled-pair functional electronic structure methods have been used in conjunction with very large correlation-consistent basis sets, including diffuse functions. Extrapolation to the one-particle basis set limit was performed and core correlation and scalar relativistic contributions were included directly, while the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction was added. Our best purely ab initio PES, denoted "mixed," is constructed from two PESs which differ in whether the ic-ACPF higher-order correlation correction was added or not. Rovibrational transition energies computed from the mixed PES agree well with experiment and the best previous theoretical studies, but most importantly the quality does not deteriorate even up to 10 300 cm(-1) above the zero-point energy (ZPE). The mixed PES was improved further by empirical refinement using the most reliable J=0-2 rovibrational transitions in the HITRAN 2004 database. Agreement between high-resolution experiment and rovibrational transition energies computed from our refined PES for J=0-6 is excellent. Indeed, the root mean square (rms) error for 13 HITRAN 2004 bands for J=0-2 is 0.023 cm(-1) and that for each band is always

  19. A global potential energy surface for ArH2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Walch, Stephen P.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a simple analytic representation of the ArH2 potential energy surface which well reproduces the results of extensive ab initio electronic structure calculations. The analytic representation smoothly interpolates between the dissociated H2 and strong bonding limits. In the fitting process, emphasis is made on accurately reproducing regions of the potential expected to be important for high temperature (ca. 3000 K) collision processes. Overall, the anisotropy and H2 bond length dependence of the analytic representation well reproduce the input data.

  20. A global potential energy surface for ArH2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.; Walch, Stephen P.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a simple analytic representation of the ArH2 potential energy surface which well reproduces the results of extensive ab initio electronic structure calculations. The analytic representation smoothly interpolates between the dissociated H2 and strong bonding limits. In the fitting process, emphasis is made on accurately reproducing regions of the potential expected to be important for high temperature (ca. 3000 K) collision processes. Overall, the anisotropy and H2 bond length dependence of the analytic representation well reproduce the input data.

  1. Asphaltenes as a surface active agent

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, E.Y.; Shields, M.B.; Storm, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    Asphaltene represents the heavy-end materials of the crude oil, conventionally defined via solvent solubility (either heptane or pentane). Chemically, it consists of polynuclear aromatics with the H/C ratio close to unity. Additionally, it contains a great deal of heteroatoms, such as sulfur, nitrogen, nickel, vanadium, etc. Several experiments have revealed the surface activity of asphaltenes in some selected solvents through measurements of their rheology or critical micelle concentrations in these solvents. The asphaltene micelles were found thermodynamically reversible. In a two phase asphaltene/water system, asphaltenes appear to vary their surface activities depending upon the polarity of the aqueous phase. Our recent experiment further showed that asphaltene/water/toluene may form, water-in-oil emulsion under certain conditions.

  2. Are secular correlations between sunspots, geomagnetic activity, and global temperature significant?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, J.J.; Mursula, K.; Tsai, V.C.; Perkins, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have led to speculation that solar-terrestrial interaction, measured by sunspot number and geomagnetic activity, has played an important role in global temperature change over the past century or so. We treat this possibility as an hypothesis for testing. We examine the statistical significance of cross-correlations between sunspot number, geomagnetic activity, and global surface temperature for the years 1868-2008, solar cycles 11-23. The data contain substantial autocorrelation and nonstationarity, properties that are incompatible with standard measures of cross-correlational significance, but which can be largely removed by averaging over solar cycles and first-difference detrending. Treated data show an expected statistically- significant correlation between sunspot number and geomagnetic activity, Pearson p < 10-4, but correlations between global temperature and sunspot number (geomagnetic activity) are not significant, p = 0.9954, (p = 0.8171). In other words, straightforward analysis does not support widely-cited suggestions that these data record a prominent role for solar-terrestrial interaction in global climate change. With respect to the sunspot-number, geomagnetic-activity, and global-temperature data, three alternative hypotheses remain difficult to reject: (1) the role of solar-terrestrial interaction in recent climate change is contained wholly in long-term trends and not in any shorter-term secular variation, or, (2) an anthropogenic signal is hiding correlation between solar-terrestrial variables and global temperature, or, (3) the null hypothesis, recent climate change has not been influenced by solar-terrestrial interaction. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Analysis of 50-y record of surface (137)Cs concentrations in the global ocean using the HAM-global database.

    PubMed

    Inomata, Yayoi; Aoyama, Michio; Hirose, Katsumi

    2009-01-01

    We investigated spatial and temporal variations in (137)Cs concentrations in the surface waters of the global ocean for the period from 1957 to 2005 using the "HAM database - a global version". Based on the 0.5-y average value of (137)Cs concentrations in the surface water in each sea area, we classified the temporal variations into four types. (1) In the North Pacific Ocean where there was high fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests, the rates of decrease in the (137)Cs concentrations changed over the five decades: the rate of decrease from the 1950s to the 1970s was much faster than that after the 1970s, and the (137)Cs concentrations were almost constant after the 1990s. Latitudinal differences in (137)Cs concentrations in the North Pacific Ocean became small with time. (2) In the equatorial Pacific and Indian Oceans, the (137)Cs concentrations varied within a constant range in the 1970s and 1980s, suggesting the advection of (137)Cs from areas of high global fallout in the mid-latitudes of the North Pacific Ocean. (3) In the eastern South Pacific and Atlantic Oceans (south of 40 degrees S), the concentrations decreased exponentially over the five decades. (4) In the Arctic and North Atlantic Oceans, including marginal seas, (137)Cs concentrations were strongly controlled by discharge from nuclear reprocessing plants after the late 1970s. The apparent half-residence times of (137)Cs in the surface waters of the global ocean from 1970 to 2005 ranged from 4.5 to 36.8 years. The apparent half-residence times were longer in the equatorial region and shorter in the higher latitudes. There was no notable difference between the latitudinal distributions of the apparent half-residence times in the Pacific and Indian Oceans. These results suggest that (137)Cs in the North Pacific Ocean is transported to the equatorial, South Pacific, and Indian Oceans by the oceanic circulation.

  4. A global ab initio dipole moment surface for methyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Alec; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Yachmenev, Andrey; Tennyson, Jonathan; Thiel, Walter

    2016-11-01

    A new dipole moment surface (DMS) for methyl chloride has been generated at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ(+d for Cl) level of theory. To represent the DMS, a symmetry-adapted analytic representation in terms of nine vibrational coordinates has been developed and implemented. Variational calculations of the infrared spectrum of CH3Cl show good agreement with a range of experimental results. This includes vibrational transition moments, absolute line intensities of the ν1, ν4, ν5 and 3ν6 bands, and a rotation-vibration line list for both CH335Cl and CH337Cl including states up to J=85 and vibrational band origins up to 4400 cm-1. Across the spectrum band shape and structure are well reproduced and computed absolute line intensities are comparable with highly accurate experimental measurements for certain fundamental bands. We thus recommend the DMS for future use.

  5. Evidence of Lunar Phase Influence on Global Surface Air Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anyamba, Ebby; Susskind, Joel

    2000-01-01

    Intraseasonal oscillations appearing in a newly available 20-year record of satellite-derived surface air temperature are composited with respect to the lunar phase. Polar regions exhibit strong lunar phase modulation with higher temperatures occurs near full moon and lower temperatures at new moon, in agreement with previous studies. The polar response to the apparent lunar forcing is shown to be most robust in the winter months when solar influence is minimum. In addition, the response appears to be influenced by ENSO events. The highest mean temperature range between full moon and new moon in the polar region between 60 deg and 90 deg latitude was recorded in 1983, 1986/87, and 1990/91. Although the largest lunar phase signal is in the polar regions, there is a tendency for meridional equatorward progression of anomalies in both hemispheres so that the warning in the tropics occurs at the time of the new moon.

  6. The EUSTACE project: delivering global, daily information on surface air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morice, C. P.; Rayner, N. A.; Auchmann, R.; Bessembinder, J.; Bronnimann, S.; Brugnara, Y.; Conway, E. A.; Ghent, D.; Good, E.; Herring, K.; Kennedy, J.; Lindgren, F.; Madsen, K. S.; Merchant, C. J.; van der Schrier, G.; Stephens, A.; Tonboe, R. T.; Waterfall, A. M.; Mitchelson, J.; Woolway, I.

    2015-12-01

    Day-to-day variations in surface air temperature affect society in many ways; however, daily surface air temperature measurements are not available everywhere. A global daily analysis cannot be achieved with measurements made in situ alone, so incorporation of satellite retrievals is needed. To achieve this, we must develop an understanding of the relationships between traditional (land and marine) surface air temperature measurements and retrievals of surface skin temperature from satellite measurements, i.e. Land Surface Temperature, Ice Surface Temperature, Sea Surface Temperature and Lake Surface Water Temperature. These relationships can be derived either empirically or with the help of a physical model.Here we discuss the science needed to produce a fully-global daily analysis (or ensemble of analyses) of surface air temperature on the centennial scale, integrating different ground-based and satellite-borne data types. Information contained in the satellite retrievals would be used to create globally-complete fields in the past, using statistical models of how surface air temperature varies in a connected way from place to place. As the data volumes involved are considerable, such work needs to include development of new "Big Data" analysis methods.We will present plans and progress along this road in the EUSTACE project (2015-June 2018), i.e.: • providing new, consistent, multi-component estimates of uncertainty in surface skin temperature retrievals from satellites; • identifying inhomogeneities in daily surface air temperature measurement series from weather stations and correcting for these over Europe; • estimating surface air temperature over all surfaces of Earth from surface skin temperature retrievals; • using new statistical techniques to provide information on higher spatial and temporal scales than currently available, making optimum use of information in data-rich eras.Information will also be given on how interested users can become

  7. Reconstructing Variations of Global Sea-Surface Temperature during the Last Interglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, J. S.; Clark, P. U.; He, F.; Parnell, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The last interglaciation (LIG; ~130-116 ka) was the most recent period in Earth history with higher-than-present global sea level (≥6 m) under similar-to-preindustrial concentrations of atmospheric CO2, suggesting additional feedbacks related to albedo, insolation, and ocean circulation in generating the apparent climatic differences between the LIG and present Holocene. However, our understanding of how much warmer the LIG sea surface was relative to the present interglaciation remains uncertain, with current estimates suggesting from 0°C to 2°C warmer than late-20thcentury average global temperatures. Moreover, the timing, spatial expression, and amplitude of regional and global sea surface temperature variability related to other climate forcing during the LIG are poorly constrained, largely due to uncertainties in age control and proxy temperature reconstructions. An accurate characterization of global and regional temperature change during the LIG can serve as a benchmark for paleoclimate modeling intercomparison projects and help improve understanding of sea-level sensitivity to temperature change. We will present a global compilation (~100 published records) of sea surface temperature (SST) and other climate reconstructions spanning the LIG. Using a Monte Carlo-enabled cross-correlation maximization algorithm to climatostratigraphically align proxy records and then account for both the resulting chronologic and proxy calibration uncertainties with Bayesian statistical inference, our results quantify the spatial timing, amplitude, and uncertainty in estimates of global and regional sea surface temperature change during the LIG and its relation to potential forcings.

  8. Global climate impacts of bioenergy from forests: implications from biogenic CO2 fluxes and surface albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherubini, Francesco; Bright, Ryan; Strømman, Anders

    2013-04-01

    Production of biomass for bioenergy can alter biogeochemical and biogeophysical mechanisms, thus affecting local and global climate. Recent scientific developments mainly embraced impacts from land use changes resulting from area-expanded biomass production, with several extensive insights available. Comparably less attention, however, is given to the assessment of direct land surface-atmosphere climate impacts of bioenergy systems under rotation such as in plantations and forested ecosystems, whereby land use disturbances are only temporary. In this work, we assess bioenergy systems representative of various biomass species (spruce, pine, aspen, etc.) and climatic regions (US, Canada, Norway, etc.), for both stationary and vehicle applications. In addition to conventional greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through life cycle activities (harvest, transport, processing, etc.), we evaluate the contributions to global warming of temporary effects resulting from the perturbation in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration caused by the timing of biogenic CO2 fluxes and in surface reflectivity (albedo). Biogenic CO2 fluxes on site after harvest are directly measured through Net Ecosystem Productivity (NEP) chronosequences from flux towers established at the interface between the forest canopy and the atmosphere and are inclusive of all CO2 exchanges occurring in the forest (e.g., sequestration of CO2 in growing trees, emissions from soil respiration and decomposition of dead organic materials). These primary data based on empirical measurements provide an accurate representation of the forest carbon sink behavior over time, and they are used in the elaboration of high-resolution IRFs for biogenic CO2 emissions. Chronosequence of albedo values from clear-cut to pre-harvest levels are gathered from satellite data (MODIS black-sky shortwave broadband, Collection 5, MCD43A). Following the cause-effect chain from emissions to damages, through radiative forcing and changes

  9. Can standard surface EMG processing parameters be used to estimate motor unit global firing rate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping; Zev Rymer, William

    2004-06-01

    The relations between motor unit global firing rates and established quantitative measures for processing the surface electromyogram (EMG) signals were explored using a simulation approach. Surface EMG signals were simulated using the reported properties of the first dorsal interosseous muscle in man, and the models were varied systematically, using several hypothetical relations between motor unit electrical and force output, and also using different motor unit firing rate strategies. The utility of using different EMG processing parameters to help estimate global motor unit firing rate was evaluated based on their relations to the number of motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) in the simulated surface EMG signals. Our results indicate that the relation between motor unit electrical and mechanical properties, and the motor unit firing rate scheme are all important factors determining the form of the relation between surface EMG amplitude and motor unit global firing rate. Conversely, these factors have less impact on the relations between turn or zero-crossing point counts and the number of MUAPs in surface EMG. We observed that the number of turn or zero-crossing points tends to saturate with the increase in the MUAP number in surface EMG, limiting the utility of these measures as estimates of MUAP number. The simulation results also indicate that the mean or median frequency of the surface EMG power spectrum is a poor indicator of the global motor unit firing rate.

  10. Global Upper Mantle Structure from Finite-Frequency Surface-Wave Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Nolet, G.; Dahlen, F.; Laske, G.

    2004-12-01

    We report global shear-wave velocity structure and radial anisotropy in the upper mantle obtained by finite-frequency surface-wave tomography, based on complete three-dimensional Born sensitivity kernels developed by Zhou et al (2004). Because wavefront healing effects are properly taken into account, finite-frequency surface-wave tomography improves the resolution of small-scale mantle heterogeneities using long-period surface waves. The resulting S-wave velocity models fit the dispersion data better, and show stronger small-scale mantle anomalies compare to traditional ray-theory-based tomographic models. Separate inversions of Love wave (SH-type) and Rayleigh wave (SV-type) dispersion provide insight into the radial anisotropy in the upper mantle. In our model, the globally averaged radial anisotropy is positive (V SH > V SV) (horizontal flow) in the top 220 km, and becomes negative (V SV > V SH) (vertical flow) below 220 km depth. In cratons, both SH and SV velocities show strong fast anomalies down to 250 km depth, and the fast anomalies gradually diminish below 250 km. Radial anisotropy beneath cratons is positive, which largely agrees with a recent global model by Gung et.~al (2003). The old Pacific plate is characterized by strong positive anisotropy with its maximum centered west of Hawaii; this supports an earlier observation on Pacific radial anisotropy by Ekstrom & Dziewonski (1998). The depth extent of mid-ocean ridges and the primary force that drives plate tectonics has been a long-standing question. In our model, ridge anomalies are characterized by strong negative radial anisotropy (vertical flow). Ridge anomalies at fast-spreading centers are stronger than those at slow-spreading centers at shallow depth, but the amount of velocity reduction rapidly decreases below 250 km. However, at slow-spreading centers such as the north Mid-Atlantic ridge (MAR) and East Africa (Red Sea), ridge anomalies extend down at least to the top of the transition zones

  11. Global Seismic Event Detection Using Surface Waves: 15 Possible Antarctic Glacial Sliding Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Shearer, P. M.; Walker, K. T.; Fricker, H. A.

    2008-12-01

    To identify overlooked or anomalous seismic events not listed in standard catalogs, we have developed an algorithm to detect and locate global seismic events using intermediate-period (35-70s) surface waves. We apply our method to continuous vertical-component seismograms from the global seismic networks as archived in the IRIS UV FARM database from 1997 to 2007. We first bandpass filter the seismograms, apply automatic gain control, and compute envelope functions. We then examine 1654 target event locations defined at 5 degree intervals and stack the seismogram envelopes along the predicted Rayleigh-wave travel times. The resulting function has spatial and temporal peaks that indicate possible seismic events. We visually check these peaks using a graphical user interface to eliminate artifacts and assign an overall reliability grade (A, B or C) to the new events. We detect 78% of events in the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) catalog. However, we also find 840 new events not listed in the PDE, ISC and REB catalogs. Many of these new events were previously identified by Ekstrom (2006) using a different Rayleigh-wave detection scheme. Most of these new events are located along oceanic ridges and transform faults. Some new events can be associated with volcanic eruptions such as the 2000 Miyakejima sequence near Japan and others with apparent glacial sliding events in Greenland (Ekstrom et al., 2003). We focus our attention on 15 events detected from near the Antarctic coastline and relocate them using a cross-correlation approach. The events occur in 3 groups which are well-separated from areas of cataloged earthquake activity. We speculate that these are iceberg calving and/or glacial sliding events, and hope to test this by inverting for their source mechanisms and examining remote sensing data from their source regions.

  12. Physically Accurate Soil Freeze-Thaw Processes in a Global Land Surface Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, M.; Haverd, V.

    2013-12-01

    Transfer of energy and moisture in frozen soil, and hence the active layer depth, are strongly influenced by the soil freezing curve which specifies liquid moisture content as a function of temperature. However, the curve is typically not represented in global land surface models, with less physically-based approximations being used instead. In this work, we develop a physically accurate model of soil freeze-thaw processes, suitable for use in a global land surface scheme. We incorporated soil freeze-thaw processes into an existing detailed model for the transfer of heat, liquid water and water vapor in soils, including isotope diagnostics - Soil-Litter-Iso (SLI, Haverd & Cuntz 2010), which has been used successfully for water and carbon balances of the Australian continent (Haverd et al. 2013). A unique feature of SLI is that fluxes of energy and moisture are coupled using a single system of linear equations. The extension to include freeze-thaw processes and snow maintains this elegant coupling, requiring only coefficients in the linear equations to be modified. No impedance factor for hydraulic conductivity is needed because of the formulation by matric flux potential rather than pressure head. Iterations are avoided which results in the same computational speed as without freezing. The extended model is evaluated extensively in stand-alone mode (against theoretical predictions, lab experiments and field data) and as part of the CABLE global land surface scheme. SLI accurately solves the classical Stefan problem of a homogeneous medium undergoing a phase change. The model also accurately reproduces the freezing front, which is observed in laboratory experiments (Hansson et al. 2004). SLI was further tested against observations at a permafrost site in Tibet (Weismüller et al. 2011). It reproduces seasonal thawing and freezing of the active layer to within 3 K of the observed soil temperature and to within 10% of the observed volumetric liquid soil moisture

  13. Physically Accurate Soil Freeze-Thaw Processes in a Global Land Surface Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, Matthias; Haverd, Vanessa

    2014-05-01

    Transfer of energy and moisture in frozen soil, and hence the active layer depth, are strongly influenced by the soil freezing curve which specifies liquid moisture content as a function of temperature. However, the curve is typically not represented in global land surface models, with less physically-based approximations being used instead. In this work, we develop a physically accurate model of soil freeze-thaw processes, suitable for use in a global land surface scheme. We incorporated soil freeze-thaw processes into an existing detailed model for the transfer of heat, liquid water and water vapor in soils, including isotope diagnostics - Soil-Litter-Iso (SLI, Haverd & Cuntz 2010), which has been used successfully for water and carbon balances of the Australian continent (Haverd et al. 2013). A unique feature of SLI is that fluxes of energy and moisture are coupled using a single system of linear equations. The extension to include freeze-thaw processes and snow maintains this elegant coupling, requiring only coefficients in the linear equations to be modified. No impedance factor for hydraulic conductivity is needed because of the formulation by matric flux potential rather than pressure head. Iterations are avoided which results in the same computational speed as without freezing. The extended model is evaluated extensively in stand-alone mode (against theoretical predictions, lab experiments and field data) and as part of the CABLE global land surface scheme. SLI accurately solves the classical Stefan problem of a homogeneous medium undergoing a phase change. The model also accurately reproduces the freezing front, which is observed in laboratory experiments (Hansson et al. 2004). SLI was further tested against observations at a permafrost site in Tibet (Weismüller et al. 2011). It reproduces seasonal thawing and freezing of the active layer to within 3 K of the observed soil temperature and to within 10% of the observed volumetric liquid soil moisture

  14. Global projects and Astronomy awareness activities in Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Suman

    2015-08-01

    Modern astronomy is a crowning achievement of human civilization which inspires teenagers to choose career in science and technology and is a stable of adult education. It is a unique and cost effective tool for furthering sustainable global development because of its technological, scientific and cultural dimensions which allow us to reach with the large portion of the community interact with children and inspire with our wonderful cosmos.Using astronomy to stimulate quality and inspiring education for disadvantaged children is an important goal of Nepal Astronomical Society (NASO) since its inception. NASO is carrying out various awareness activities on its own and in collaboration with national and international organizations like Central Department of Physics Tribhuvan University (TU), International astronomical Union (IAU), Department of Physics Prithvi Narayan Campus Pokhara, Nepal academy of science and technology (NAST), Global Hands on Universe (GHOU), EU- UNAWE and Pokhara Astronomical Society (PAS) to disseminate those activities for the school children and teachers in Nepal. Our experiences working with kids, students, teachers and public in the field of universe Awareness Activities for the school children to minimize the abstruse concept of astronomy through some practical approach and the project like Astronomy for the visually impaired students, Galileo Teacher Training program and International School for young astronomers (ISYA) outskirts will be explained which is believed to play vital role in promoting astronomy and space science activities in Nepal.

  15. Sahel Precipitation Variability and Global Sea Surface Temperature Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, D. E.; Kushnir, Y.; Seager, R.; Goddard, L.; Giannini, A.

    2003-12-01

    In the last 50 years or so, the Sahel region in sub-Saharan Africa has experienced two multi-decadal wet and dry periods separated by a relatively sharp transition. The onset of the dry episode in the Sahel is associated with the start of a significant warming trend in Southern Hemisphere sea surface temperatures (SST) that persisted well into the late 1990's. It has been stipulated, based on general circulation model (GCM) experiments, that the SST rise in the southern ocean basins is the predominant driver of rainfall patterns over the Sahel. Here we support this notion by comparing the observed rate of change in Southern Hemisphere SST with that of Sahel summertime rainfall. We examine the variations in each ocean basin separately and find that the drought pattern is most prominently associated with SST changes in the Indian Ocean, which display maximum warming rates simultaneously with the wet to dry shift in the Sahel. We provide further support to the role of the Indian Ocean using results from GCM integrations forced with observed Indian Ocean SST values and climatological values elsewhere, which effectively recreate the dry Sahel rainfall pattern. While the variations in equatorial Pacific SST associated with El Ni¤o have been found to have an effect on Sahel rainfall during the summer months, their influence does not appear to be significantly connected with the prolonged drought episode. The dry period was accentuated by two severe droughts in the early 1970's and 1980s, which generated very different repercussions for the Sahelian people. The first drought resulted in widespread famine and death while the second more severe drought in 1983-84 generated very few casualties. The political and socioeconomic assessment of these episodes suggests that the extensive loss of life was due to inefficient transportation of supplies to the starving populations. International aid organizations initiated famine protection programs following the 1970's drought that

  16. Sensitivity of Surface Air Quality and Global Mortality to Global, Regional, and Sectoral Black Carbon Emission Reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anenberg, S.; Talgo, K.; Dolwick, P.; Jang, C.; Arunachalam, S.; West, J.

    2010-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), a component of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) released during incomplete combustion, is associated with atmospheric warming and deleterious health impacts, including premature cardiopulmonary and lung cancer mortality. A growing body of literature suggests that controlling emissions may therefore have dual benefits for climate and health. Several studies have focused on quantifying the potential impacts of reducing BC emissions from various world regions and economic sectors on radiative forcing. However, the impacts of these reductions on human health have been less well studied. Here, we use a global chemical transport model (MOZART-4) and a health impact function to quantify the surface air quality and human health benefits of controlling BC emissions. We simulate a base case and several emission control scenarios, where anthropogenic BC emissions are reduced by half globally, individually in each of eight world regions, and individually from the residential, industrial, and transportation sectors. We also simulate a global 50% reduction of both BC and organic carbon (OC) together, since they are co-emitted and both are likely to be impacted by actual control measures. Meteorology and biomass burning emissions are for the year 2002 with anthropogenic BC and OC emissions for 2000 from the IPCC AR5 inventory. Model performance is evaluated by comparing to global surface measurements of PM2.5 components. Avoided premature mortalities are calculated using the change in PM2.5 concentration between the base case and emission control scenarios and a concentration-response factor for chronic mortality from the epidemiology literature.

  17. Global relationships among the earth's radiation budget, cloudiness, volcanic aerosols, and surface temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ardanuy, P.E.; Kyle, H.L.; Hoyt, D. NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD )

    1992-10-01

    Global relationships among the earth's radiation budget, cloudiness, solar constant, volcanic aerosols, and surface temperature are analyzed using data obtained by the Nimbus-7 spacecraft. It was found that these parameters were interrelated on interannual time scales, demonstrating that the interannual variability in the earth's climate (i.e., radiation budget) is detectable and observable by current spaceborne instruments. The degree of global interannual variation is on the order of tenths of percent. 41 refs.

  18. Global relationships among the earth's radiation budget, cloudiness, volcanic aerosols, and surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardanuy, Philip E.; Kyle, H. L.; Hoyt, Douglas

    1992-01-01

    Global relationships among the earth's radiation budget, cloudiness, solar constant, volcanic aerosols, and surface temperature are analyzed using data obtained by the Nimbus-7 spacecraft. It was found that these parameters were interrelated on interannual time scales, demonstrating that the interannual variability in the earth's climate (i.e., radiation budget) is detectable and observable by current spaceborne instruments. The degree of global interannual variation is on the order of tenths of percent.

  19. Geometric effects of global lateral heterogeneity on long-period surface wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, T.; Kanamori, H.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation has the objective to document examples of anomalous long-period surface wave amplitude behavior and to provide a preliminary appraisal of the effects of global lateral heterogeneity on surface wave propagation from a ray theory perspective. Attention is given to remarkable long-period surface wave anomalies described in literature, an equidistance azimuthal plot centered on the Iranian source region, Rayleigh wave and Love wave spectra for the 256-s period arrivals for the Tabas earthquake, constrained moment tensor and fault model inversion solutions ofr Iranian earthquakes, aspects of surface wave ray tracing, and a table of Rayleigh wave amplitude anomalies for Iranian earthquakes. Surface wave ray-tracing calculations for models of global phase velocity variations proposed by Nakanishi and Anderson (1984) are found to show that large-amplitude anomalies will be observed for Love and Rayleigh waves with periods of 100-250 s.

  20. Motility of active fluid drops on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoromskaia, Diana; Alexander, Gareth P.

    2015-12-01

    Drops of active liquid crystal have recently shown the ability to self-propel, which was associated with topological defects in the orientation of active filaments [Sanchez et al., Nature 491, 431 (2013), 10.1038/nature11591]. Here, we study the onset and different aspects of motility of a three-dimensional drop of active fluid on a planar surface. We analyze theoretically how motility is affected by orientation profiles with defects of various types and locations, by the shape of the drop, and by surface friction at the substrate. In the scope of a thin drop approximation, we derive exact expressions for the flow in the drop that is generated by a given orientation profile. The flow has a natural decomposition into terms that depend entirely on the geometrical properties of the orientation profile, i.e., its bend and splay, and a term coupling the orientation to the shape of the drop. We find that asymmetric splay or bend generates a directed bulk flow and enables the drop to move, with maximal speeds achieved when the splay or bend is induced by a topological defect in the interior of the drop. In motile drops the direction and speed of self-propulsion is controlled by friction at the substrate.

  1. The Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA): A database for the worldwide measured surface energy fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Martin; Ohmura, Atsumu; Schär, Christoph; Müller, Guido; Hakuba, Maria Z.; Mystakidis, Stefanos; Arsenovic, Pavle; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2017-02-01

    The Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) is a database for the worldwide measured energy fluxes at the Earth's surface. GEBA is maintained at ETH Zurich (Switzerland) and has been founded in the 1980s by Prof. Atsumu Ohmura. It has continuously been updated and currently contains around 2500 stations with 500`000 monthly mean entries of various surface energy balance components. Many of the records extend over several decades. The most widely measured quantity available in GEBA is the solar radiation incident at the Earth's surface ("global radiation"). The data sources include, in addition to the World Radiation Data Centre (WRDC) in St. Petersburg, data reports from National Weather Services, data from different research networks (BSRN, ARM, SURFRAD), data published in peer-reviewed publications and data obtained through personal communications. Different quality checks are applied to check for gross errors in the dataset. GEBA is used in various research applications, such as for the quantification of the global energy balance and its spatiotemporal variation, or for the estimation of long-term trends in the surface fluxes, which enabled the detection of multi-decadal variations in surface solar radiation, known as "global dimming" and "brightening". GEBA is further extensively used for the evaluation of climate models and satellite-derived surface flux products. On a more applied level, GEBA provides the basis for engineering applications in the context of solar power generation, water management, agricultural production and tourism. GEBA is publicly accessible over the internet via www.geba.ethz.ch.

  2. A survey of Martian dust devil activity using Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Jenny A.; Richardson, Mark I.; Newman, Claire E.; Szwast, Mark A.; Graf, Chelsea; Basu, Shabari; Ewald, Shawn P.; Toigo, Anthony D.; Wilson, R. John

    2005-03-01

    A survey of dust devils using the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide- and narrow-angle (WA and NA) images has been undertaken. The survey comprises two parts: (1) sampling of nine broad regions from September 1997 to July 2001 and (2) a focused seasonal monitoring of variability in the Amazonis region, an active dust devil site, from March 2001 to April 2004. For part 1, dust devils were identified in NA and WA images, and dust devil tracks were identified in NA images. Great spatial variability in dust devil occurrence is highlighted, with Amazonis Planitia being the most active region examined. Other active regions included Cimmerium, Sinai, and Solis. Numerous dust devil tracks, but very few dust devils, were observed in Casius. This may suggest dust devils here occur at local times other than that of the MGS orbit (~2 pm). Alternatively, variations in surface properties may affect the ability of dust devils to leave visible tracks. The seasonal campaign within Amazonis shows a relatively smooth variation of dust devil activity with season, peaking in mid northern summer and falling to zero in southern spring and summer. This pattern of activity correlates well with the boundary layer maximum depth and hence the vigor of convection. Global maps of boundary layer depth and surface temperature do not predict that Amazonis should be especially active, potentially suggesting a role for mesoscale circulations. Measurement of observed dust devils yields heights of up to 8 km and widths in excess of 0.5 km.

  3. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprises at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  4. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T. (Inventor); Book, Michael L. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor); Bell, Joseph L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprising at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  5. Recent global-warming hiatus tied to equatorial Pacific surface cooling.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Yu; Xie, Shang-Ping

    2013-09-19

    Despite the continued increase in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, the annual-mean global temperature has not risen in the twenty-first century, challenging the prevailing view that anthropogenic forcing causes climate warming. Various mechanisms have been proposed for this hiatus in global warming, but their relative importance has not been quantified, hampering observational estimates of climate sensitivity. Here we show that accounting for recent cooling in the eastern equatorial Pacific reconciles climate simulations and observations. We present a novel method of uncovering mechanisms for global temperature change by prescribing, in addition to radiative forcing, the observed history of sea surface temperature over the central to eastern tropical Pacific in a climate model. Although the surface temperature prescription is limited to only 8.2% of the global surface, our model reproduces the annual-mean global temperature remarkably well with correlation coefficient r = 0.97 for 1970-2012 (which includes the current hiatus and a period of accelerated global warming). Moreover, our simulation captures major seasonal and regional characteristics of the hiatus, including the intensified Walker circulation, the winter cooling in northwestern North America and the prolonged drought in the southern USA. Our results show that the current hiatus is part of natural climate variability, tied specifically to a La-Niña-like decadal cooling. Although similar decadal hiatus events may occur in the future, the multi-decadal warming trend is very likely to continue with greenhouse gas increase.

  6. Global changes in biogeochemical cycles in response to human activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Berrien, III; Melillo, Jerry

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of our research was to characterize biogeochemical cycles at continental and global scales in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This characterization applied to both natural ecosystems and those disturbed by human activity. The primary elements of interest were carbon and nitrogen and the analysis sought to quantify standing stocks and dynamic cycling processes. The translocation of major nutrients from the terrestrial landscape to the atmosphere (via trace gases) and to fluvial systems (via leaching, erosional losses, and point source pollution) were of particular importance to this study. Our aim was to develop the first generation of Earth System Models. Our research was organized around the construction and testing of component biogeochemical models which treated terrestrial ecosystem processes, aquatic nutrient transport through drainage basins, and trace gas exchanges at the continental and global scale. A suite of three complementary models were defined within this construct. The models were organized to operate at a 1/2 degree latitude by longitude level of spatial resolution and to execute at a monthly time step. This discretization afforded us the opportunity to understand the dynamics of the biosphere down to subregional scales, while simultaneously placing these dynamics into a global context.

  7. Variations of terrestrial geomagnetic activity correlated to M6+ global seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldi, Gabriele; Cataldi, Daniele; Straser, Valentino

    2013-04-01

    From the surface of the Sun, as a result of a solar flare, are expelled a coronal mass (CME or Coronal Mass Ejection) that can be observed from the Earth through a coronagraph in white light. This ejected material can be compared to an electrically charged cloud (plasma) mainly composed of electrons, protons and other small quantities of heavier elements such as helium, oxygen and iron that run radially from the Sun along the lines of the solar magnetic field and pushing into interplanetary space. Sometimes the CME able to reach the Earth causing major disruptions of its magnetosphere: mashed in the region illuminated by the Sun and expanding in the region not illuminated. This interaction creates extensive disruption of the Earth's geomagnetic field that can be detected by a radio receiver tuned to the ELF band (Extreme Low Frequency 0-30 Hz). The Radio Emissions Project (scientific research project founded in February 2009 by Gabriele Cataldi and Daniele Cataldi), analyzing the change in the Earth's geomagnetic field through an induction magnetometer tuned between 0.001 and 5 Hz (bandwidth in which possible to observe the geomagnetic pulsations) was able to detect the existence of a close relationship between this geomagnetic perturbations and the global seismic activity M6+. During the arrival of the CME on Earth, in the Earth's geomagnetic field are generated sudden and intensive emissions that have a bandwidth including between 0 and 15 Hz, an average duration of 2-8 hours, that preceding of 0-12 hours M6+ earthquakes. Between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2012, all M6+ earthquakes recorded on a global scale were preceded by this type of signals which, due to their characteristics, have been called "Seismic Geomagnetic Precursors" (S.G.P.). The main feature of Seismic Geomagnetic Precursors is represented by the close relationship that they have with the solar activity. In fact, because the S.G.P. are geomagnetic emissions, their temporal modulation depends

  8. Solar total irradiance variations and the global sea surface temperature record

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, G.C. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder )

    1991-02-20

    The record of globally averaged sea surface temperature (SST) over the past 130 years shows a highly significant correlation with the envelope of the 11-year cycle of solar activity over the same period. This correlation could be explained by a variation in the sun's total irradiance (the solar constant) that is in phase with the solar-cycle envelope, supporting and updating an earlier conclusion by Eddy (1976) that such variations could have played a major role in climate change over the past millennium. Measurements of the total irradiance from spacecraft, rockets, and balloons over the past 25 years have provided evidence of long-term variations and have been used to develop a simple linear relationship between irradiance and the envelope of the sunspot cycle. This relationship has been used to force a one-dimensional model of the thermal structure of the ocean, consisting of a 100-m mixed layer coupled to a deep ocean and including a thermohaline circulation. The model was started in the mid-seventeenth century, at the time of the Maunder Minimum of solar activity, and mixed-layer temperatures were calculated at 6-month intervals up to the present. The total range of irradiance values during the period was about 1%, and the total range of SST was about 1C. Cool periods, when temperatures were about 0.5C below present-day values, were found in the early decades of both the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The results can be taken as indicating that solar variability has been an important contributor to global climate variations in recent decades. The growing atmospheric burden of greenhouse gases may well have played an important role in the immediate past.

  9. A Global Scale 30m Water Surface Detection Optimized and Validated for Landsat 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekel, J. F.; Cottam, A.; Clerici, M.; Belward, A.; Dubois, G.; Bartholome, E.; Gorelick, N.

    2014-12-01

    Life on Earth as we know it is impossible without water. Its importance to biological diversity, human well-being and the very functioning of the Earth-system cannot be overstressed, but we have remarkably little detailed knowledge concerning the spatial and temporal distribution of this vital resource. Earth observing satellites operating with high temporal revisits yet moderate spatial resolution have provided global datasets documenting spatial and temporal changes to water bodies on the Earth's surface. Landsat 8 has a data acquisition strategy such that global coverage of all land surfaces now occurs more frequently than from any preceding Landsat mission and provides 30 m resolution data. Whilst not the last word in temporal sampling this presents a basis for mapping and monitoring changes to global surface water resources at unprecedented levels of spatial detail. In this paper we provide a first 30 m resolution global synthesis of surface water occurrence, we document permanent water surfaces, seasonal water surfaces and always-dry surfaces. These products have been derived by optimizing a methodology previously developed for use with moderate resolution MODIS imagery for use with Landsat 8. The approach is based on a transformation of RGB color space into HSV combined with a sequence of cloud, topographic and temperature masks. Analysis at the global scale used the Google Earth Engine platform applied to all Landsat 8 acquisitions between June 2013 and June 2014. Systematic validation is done and demonstrated our ability to map surface water. Our method can be applied to other Landsat missions offering the potential to document changes in surface water over three decades; our study shows examples illustrating the capacity to map new water surfaces and ephemeral water surfaces in addition to the three previous classes. Thanks to an optimized data acquisition strategy, a full-free and open data policy and the processing capacity of the GEE global land

  10. Surface Dust Redistribution on Mars as Observed by the Mars Global Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szwast, M. A.; Richardson, M. I.; Vasavada, A. R.

    2005-01-01

    The global redistribution of dust by the atmosphere is geologically and climatologically important. Dust deposition and removal at the surface represents ongoing sedimentary geology: a vestige of aeolian processes responsible for the concentration of vast dustsheets and potentially for ancient layered units at various locations on Mars. The varying amount of dust on the surface has also long been hypothesized as a factor in determining whether regional or global dust storms occur in a given year. Indeed, the atmosphere has a very short, sub-seasonal time-scale (or memory) and as such, any inter-annual variability in the climate system that is not simply ascribable to stochastic processes, must involve changing conditions on the surface. An excellent, multi-year dataset is provided by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Mars Orbiter Camera Wide Angle imager (MOC-WA). This dataset allows investigation into the degree to which surface dust deposits on Mars really change: over decadal time scales, over the course of the annual cycle, and as a result of global and regional dust storms. The MGS mapping orbit data set extends over almost 3 Martian years at the time of writing. These data sets include one global dust storm and smaller regional storms (one in the first TES mapping year and two in the third).

  11. Global Citizenship Instruction through Active Participation: What Is Being Learned about Global Citizenship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leduc, Rhonda

    2013-01-01

    If the definitions of global citizenship are varied and contestable, how do teachers conceptualize and make meaning of global citizenship when required to teach global citizenship in the classroom? For this study, twenty-nine grade six social studies teachers in British Columbia, Canada, were surveyed on their definitions of global citizenship…

  12. THE CLIMATE-AIR QUALITY SCALE CONTINUUM AND THE GLOBAL EMISSION INVENTORY ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA), a core program activity of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program, develops data and other related information on key chemical emissions to the atmosphere and...

  13. Global Earthquake Activity Rate models based on version 2 of the Global Strain Rate Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, P.; Kreemer, C.; Kagan, Y. Y.; Jackson, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    Global Earthquake Activity Rate (GEAR) models have usually been based on either relative tectonic motion (fault slip rates and/or distributed strain rates), or on smoothing of seismic catalogs. However, a hybrid approach appears to perform better than either parent, at least in some retrospective tests. First, we construct a Tectonic ('T') forecast of shallow (≤ 70 km) seismicity based on global plate-boundary strain rates from version 2 of the Global Strain Rate Map. Our approach is the SHIFT (Seismic Hazard Inferred From Tectonics) method described by Bird et al. [2010, SRL], in which the character of the strain rate tensor (thrusting and/or strike-slip and/or normal) is used to select the most comparable type of plate boundary for calibration of the coupled seismogenic lithosphere thickness and corner magnitude. One difference is that activity of offshore plate boundaries is spatially smoothed using empirical half-widths [Bird & Kagan, 2004, BSSA] before conversion to seismicity. Another is that the velocity-dependence of coupling in subduction and continental-convergent boundaries [Bird et al., 2009, BSSA] is incorporated. Another forecast component is the smoothed-seismicity ('S') forecast model of [Kagan & Jackson, 1994, JGR; Kagan & Jackson, 2010, GJI], which was based on optimized smoothing of the shallow part of the GCMT catalog, years 1977-2004. Both forecasts were prepared for threshold magnitude 5.767. Then, we create hybrid forecasts by one of 3 methods: (a) taking the greater of S or T; (b) simple weighted-average of S and T; or (c) log of the forecast rate is a weighted average of the logs of S and T. In methods (b) and (c) there is one free parameter, which is the fractional contribution from S. All hybrid forecasts are normalized to the same global rate. Pseudo-prospective tests for 2005-2012 (using versions of S and T calibrated on years 1977-2004) show that many hybrid models outperform both parents (S and T), and that the optimal weight on S

  14. Fine-Resolution Satellite-Based Sea Surface Temperatures over the Global Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-22

    sea -ice the Sea of Azov . The plot masks SST in the Great Lakes that coverage. may otherwise included in RTG. [7] These differences between MODAS and...and relative merits of two sets of daily global sea surface temperature (SST) analyses are examined and compared. The 1/81 Modular Ocean Data Analysis...10.1029/2006JC004021, 2007 ore FuN Awtle Fine-resolution satellite-based daily sea surface f!Tr7 1 UTION STATENT-T!T A temperatures over the global

  15. Surface Emissivity Retrieved with Satellite Ultraspectral IR Measurements for Monitoring Global Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.; Schluessel, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Surface and atmospheric thermodynamic parameters retrieved with advanced ultraspectral remote sensors aboard Earth observing satellites are critical to general atmospheric and Earth science research, climate monitoring, and weather prediction. Ultraspectral resolution infrared radiance obtained from nadir observations provide atmospheric, surface, and cloud information. Presented here is the global surface IR emissivity retrieved from Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) measurements under "clear-sky" conditions. Fast radiative transfer models, applied to the cloud-free (or clouded) atmosphere, are used for atmospheric profile and surface parameter (or cloud parameter) retrieval. The inversion scheme, dealing with cloudy as well as cloud-free radiances observed with ultraspectral infrared sounders, has been developed to simultaneously retrieve atmospheric thermodynamic and surface (or cloud microphysical) parameters. Rapidly produced surface emissivity is initially evaluated through quality control checks on the retrievals of other impacted atmospheric and surface parameters. Surface emissivity and surface skin temperature from the current and future operational satellites can and will reveal critical information on the Earth s ecosystem and land surface type properties, which can be utilized as part of long-term monitoring for the Earth s environment and global climate change.

  16. Global Changes in the Sea Ice Cover and Associated Surface Temperature Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comiso, Josefino C.

    2016-06-01

    The trends in the sea ice cover in the two hemispheres have been observed to be asymmetric with the rate of change in the Arctic being negative at -3.8 % per decade while that of the Antarctic is positive at 1.7 % per decade. These observations are confirmed in this study through analyses of a more robust data set that has been enhanced for better consistency and updated for improved statistics. With reports of anthropogenic global warming such phenomenon appears physically counter intuitive but trend studies of surface temperature over the same time period show the occurrence of a similar asymmetry. Satellite surface temperature data show that while global warming is strong and dominant in the Arctic, it is relatively minor in the Antarctic with the trends in sea ice covered areas and surrounding ice free regions observed to be even negative. A strong correlation of ice extent with surface temperature is observed, especially during the growth season, and the observed trends in the sea ice cover are coherent with the trends in surface temperature. The trend of global averages of the ice cover is negative but modest and is consistent and compatible with the positive but modest trend in global surface temperature. A continuation of the trend would mean the disappearance of summer ice by the end of the century but modelling projections indicate that the summer ice could be salvaged if anthropogenic greenhouse gases in the atmosphere are kept constant at the current level.

  17. Global structure search for molecules on surfaces: Efficient sampling with curvilinear coordinates.

    PubMed

    Krautgasser, Konstantin; Panosetti, Chiara; Palagin, Dennis; Reuter, Karsten; Maurer, Reinhard J

    2016-08-28

    Efficient structure search is a major challenge in computational materials science. We present a modification of the basin hopping global geometry optimization approach that uses a curvilinear coordinate system to describe global trial moves. This approach has recently been shown to be efficient in structure determination of clusters [C. Panosetti et al., Nano Lett. 15, 8044-8048 (2015)] and is here extended for its application to covalent, complex molecules and large adsorbates on surfaces. The employed automatically constructed delocalized internal coordinates are similar to molecular vibrations, which enhances the generation of chemically meaningful trial structures. By introducing flexible constraints and local translation and rotation of independent geometrical subunits, we enable the use of this method for molecules adsorbed on surfaces and interfaces. For two test systems, trans-β-ionylideneacetic acid adsorbed on a Au(111) surface and methane adsorbed on a Ag(111) surface, we obtain superior performance of the method compared to standard optimization moves based on Cartesian coordinates.

  18. Global measurements of sea surface temperature, wind speed and atmospheric water content from satellite microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.; Swanson, L.

    1983-01-01

    The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) was launched on the Seasat and Nimbus 7 satellites in 1978. The SMMR has the ability to measure sea surface temperature and wind speed with the aid of microwaves. In addition, the instrument was designed to measure water vapor and cloud liquid water with better spatial resolution than previous microwave radiometers, and to make sea-ice measurements with higher precision. A description is presented of the results of global analyses of sea surface temperature, wind speed, water vapor, and cloud liquid water, taking into account data provided by the SMMR on the Seasat satellite. It is found that the SMMR data show good self-consistency, and can usefully measure global distributions of sea surface temperatures, surface winds, water vapor, and cloud liquid water.

  19. Surface Temperature Assimilation in the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Radakovich, Jon D.; daSilva, Arlindo; Houser, Paul R.; Atlas, Robert M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) is a global land parameterization that uses prescribed meteorology as forcing in order to determine regular gridded land surface states (temperature and moisture) and other properties (e.g. water and heat fluxes). In the present experiment, the assimilation of surface skin temperature is incorporated into the land parameterizations. The meteorological forcing was derived from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-3) Data Assimilation System (DAS) for the full year of 1998 GLDAS can use several land parameterizations, but here we use the Mosaic land surface model and the Common Land Model (CLM). TOVS surface temperature observations are assimilated into GLDAS. The TOVS observations are less frequent that observations used in previous experiments (ISCCP). The purpose of this presentation is to evaluate the impact of the TOVS assimilation on both Mosaic and CLM. We will especially consider the impact of coarse temporal observations on the assimilation and bias correction.

  20. Global structure search for molecules on surfaces: Efficient sampling with curvilinear coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautgasser, Konstantin; Panosetti, Chiara; Palagin, Dennis; Reuter, Karsten; Maurer, Reinhard J.

    2016-08-01

    Efficient structure search is a major challenge in computational materials science. We present a modification of the basin hopping global geometry optimization approach that uses a curvilinear coordinate system to describe global trial moves. This approach has recently been shown to be efficient in structure determination of clusters [C. Panosetti et al., Nano Lett. 15, 8044-8048 (2015)] and is here extended for its application to covalent, complex molecules and large adsorbates on surfaces. The employed automatically constructed delocalized internal coordinates are similar to molecular vibrations, which enhances the generation of chemically meaningful trial structures. By introducing flexible constraints and local translation and rotation of independent geometrical subunits, we enable the use of this method for molecules adsorbed on surfaces and interfaces. For two test systems, trans-β-ionylideneacetic acid adsorbed on a Au(111) surface and methane adsorbed on a Ag(111) surface, we obtain superior performance of the method compared to standard optimization moves based on Cartesian coordinates.

  1. The Global Surface Roughness of 433 Eros from the NEAR-Shoemaker Laser Altimeter (NLR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer Susorney, Hannah Celine; Barnouin, Olivier S.

    2016-10-01

    Surface roughness is the quantitative measure of the change in topography at a given scale. Previous studies have used surface roughness to map geologic units, choose landing sites, and understand the relative contribution of different geologic processes to topography. In this study we focus on understanding how surface roughness is linked to the geologic processes acting on asteroids, with a case study of 433 Eros through the generation of global surface roughness maps. The scale that surface roughness is measured at will dictate the geologic processes studied; the majority of studies of the surface roughness of asteroids have focused on centimeter scale roughness (derived from radar measurements). Spacecraft that rendezvous with asteroids and carry laser altimeters on board provide topographic data that allows surface roughness to be measured at the scale of meters to hundreds of meters.To calculate surface roughness on 433 Eros from 1 m to 300 m, we use the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR)-Shoemaker's laser altimeter (NLR). We measure surface roughness as Root-Mean Square (RMS) deviation, which is simply the RMS difference in height over a given scale. RMS deviation is then used to calculate the Hurst exponent, which quantifies the fractal behavior of the surface and is indicative of the type of geologic processes controlling topography at that scale. The surface roughness on 433 Eros varies regionally, with smaller roughness values where regolith has accumulated, and more elevated roughness values along the walls of large craters or near linear grooves. The roughness seen in crater walls may be evidence for subsurface structures (visible as aligned blocks protruding from the crater walls). The surface roughness of 433 Eros is also remarkably fractal relative to other asteroids and planets. To understand in greater detail the geological origin of the surface roughness and fractal nature of Eros, this study presents the first global maps of surface roughness

  2. Aerosol activation: parameterised versus explicit calculation for global models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tost, H.; Pringle, K.; Metzger, S.; Lelieveld, J.

    2009-04-01

    A key process in studies of the aerosol indirect effects on clouds is the activation of particles into droplets at 100% relative humidity. To model this process in cloud, meteorological and climate models is a difficult undertaking because of the wide range of scales involved. The chemical composition of the atmospheric aerosol, originating from both air pollution and natural sources, substantially impacts the aerosol water uptake and growth due to its hygroscopicity. In this study a comparison of aerosol activation, using state-of-the-art aerosol activation parameterisations, and explicit activation due to hygroscopic growth is performed.For that purpose we apply the GMXe aerosol model - treating both dynamic and thermodynamic aerosol properties - within the EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric chemistry, an atmospheric chemistry general circulation) model. This new aerosol model can explicitely calculate the water uptake of aerosols due to hygroscopicity, allowing the growth of aerosol particles into the regimes of cloud droplets in case of sufficient water vapour availability. Global model simulations using both activation schemes will be presented and compared, elucidating the advantages of each approach.

  3. An authoritative global database for active submarine hydrothermal vent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Stace E.; Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.; Maffei, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    The InterRidge Vents Database is available online as the authoritative reference for locations of active submarine hydrothermal vent fields. Here we describe the revision of the database to an open source content management system and conduct a meta-analysis of the global distribution of known active vent fields. The number of known active vent fields has almost doubled in the past decade (521 as of year 2009), with about half visually confirmed and others inferred active from physical and chemical clues. Although previously known mainly from mid-ocean ridges (MORs), active vent fields at MORs now comprise only half of the total known, with about a quarter each now known at volcanic arcs and back-arc spreading centers. Discoveries in arc and back-arc settings resulted in an increase in known vent fields within exclusive economic zones, consequently reducing the proportion known in high seas to one third. The increase in known vent fields reflects a number of factors, including increased national and commercial interests in seafloor hydrothermal deposits as mineral resources. The purpose of the database now extends beyond academic research and education and into marine policy and management, with at least 18% of known vent fields in areas granted or pending applications for mineral prospecting and 8% in marine protected areas.

  4. Does Titan have an Active Surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R.

    2009-12-01

    ammonia, a compound expected in Titan’s interior. This, combined with the previous evidence from VIMS and RADAR images, creates a strong case for Titan having a presently active surface, possibly due to cryovolcanism. Cassini encountered Titan at very close range on 2008-11-19-13:58 and again on 2008-12-05-12:38. These epochs are called T47 and T48. Comparison of earlier lower resolution data (T5) with the recent T47 and T48 data reveal changes of the surface reflectance and morphology in the Hotei region. This is the first evidence from VIMS that confirms the RADAR report that Hotei Reggio has morphology consistent with volcanic terrain. It has not escaped our attention that ammonia, in association with methane and nitrogen, the principal species of Titan’s atmosphere, closely replicates the environment at the time that live first emerged on earth. If Titan is currently active then these results raise the following questions: What is the full extent of current geologic activity? What are the ongoing processes? Are Titan’s chemical processes today supporting a prebiotic chemistry similar to that under which life evolved on Earth? This work done at JPL under contract with NASA. Refs: [1]R. M. Nelson et al., Icarus 199 (2009) 429-441. [2]R. M. Nelson et al., GRL, VOL. 36, L04202, doi:10.1029/2008GL036206, 2009. [3]S. D. Wall GRL, VOL. 36, L04203, doi:10.1029/2008GL036415, 2009

  5. Global monthly sea surface nitrate fields estimated from remotely sensed sea surface temperature, chlorophyll, and modeled mixed layer depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteaga, Lionel; Pahlow, Markus; Oschlies, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Information about oceanic nitrate is crucial for making inferences about marine biological production and the efficiency of the biological carbon pump. While there are no optical properties that allow direct estimation of inorganic nitrogen, its correlation with other biogeochemical variables may permit its inference from satellite data. Here we report a new method for estimating monthly mean surface nitrate concentrations employing local multiple linear regressions on a global 1° by 1° resolution grid, using satellite-derived sea surface temperature, chlorophyll, and modeled mixed layer depth. Our method is able to reproduce the interannual variability of independent in situ nitrate observations at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series, the Hawaii Ocean Time series, the California coast, and the southern New Zealand region. Our new method is shown to be more accurate than previous algorithms and thus can provide improved information on temporal and spatial nutrient variations beyond the climatological mean at regional and global scales.

  6. A new method to estimate average hourly global solar radiation on the horizontal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Soupir, Michelle L.

    2012-10-01

    A new model, Global Solar Radiation on Horizontal Surface (GSRHS), was developed to estimate the average hourly global solar radiation on the horizontal surfaces (Gh). The GSRHS model uses the transmission function (Tf,ij), which was developed to control hourly global solar radiation, for predicting solar radiation. The inputs of the model were: hour of day, day (Julian) of year, optimized parameter values, solar constant (H0), latitude, and longitude of the location of interest. The parameter values used in the model were optimized at a location (Albuquerque, NM), and these values were applied into the model for predicting average hourly global solar radiations at four different locations (Austin, TX; El Paso, TX; Desert Rock, NV; Seattle, WA) of the United States. The model performance was assessed using correlation coefficient (r), Mean Absolute Bias Error (MABE), Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), and coefficient of determinations (R2). The sensitivities of parameter to prediction were estimated. Results show that the model performed very well. The correlation coefficients (r) range from 0.96 to 0.99, while coefficients of determination (R2) range from 0.92 to 0.98. For daily and monthly prediction, error percentages (i.e. MABE and RMSE) were less than 20%. The approach we proposed here can be potentially useful for predicting average hourly global solar radiation on the horizontal surface for different locations, with the use of readily available data (i.e. latitude and longitude of the location) as inputs.

  7. A Data Gap Analysis and Efforts Towards Improving NOAA's Global Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. M.; Wuertz, D.; Nickl, E.; Banzon, P. V. F.; Gleason, B.; Huang, B.; Lawrimore, J. H.; Menne, M. J.; Rennie, J.; Thorne, P.; Williams, C. N., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of global surface temperature trends from some sources have indicated slowing in the rate of warming over the last decade compared to the long-term warming trend since the industrial revolution. It has been debated whether this recent slowdown is due to natural variability or a missed signal due to gaps in the global observation networks, particularly over the Arctic Region. To examine this more closely, we quantify the impact of data gaps on the global surface temperature trends in several regions of the world (e.g. Polar Regions and the Continents of African and South America), using major global datasets including NOAA's Merged Land-Ocean Temperature dataset (NOAATemp). We also study the impact of the greater observational coverage in a recently released global temperature data set as part of the International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI), and analyze the spatial-temporal variation patterns of the homogenization effect on NOAATemp. A summary of the progress and challenges in filling in grid boxes where observations are sparse over large areas are presented.

  8. Assessing global vegetation activity using spatio-temporal Bayesian modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, Vera L.; van Eck, Christel M.; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Regnier, Pierre A. G.

    2016-04-01

    This work demonstrates the potential of modelling vegetation activity using a hierarchical Bayesian spatio-temporal model. This approach allows modelling changes in vegetation and climate simultaneous in space and time. Changes of vegetation activity such as phenology are modelled as a dynamic process depending on climate variability in both space and time. Additionally, differences in observed vegetation status can be contributed to other abiotic ecosystem properties, e.g. soil and terrain properties. Although these properties do not change in time, they do change in space and may provide valuable information in addition to the climate dynamics. The spatio-temporal Bayesian models were calibrated at a regional scale because the local trends in space and time can be better captured by the model. The regional subsets were defined according to the SREX segmentation, as defined by the IPCC. Each region is considered being relatively homogeneous in terms of large-scale climate and biomes, still capturing small-scale (grid-cell level) variability. Modelling within these regions is hence expected to be less uncertain due to the absence of these large-scale patterns, compared to a global approach. This overall modelling approach allows the comparison of model behavior for the different regions and may provide insights on the main dynamic processes driving the interaction between vegetation and climate within different regions. The data employed in this study encompasses the global datasets for soil properties (SoilGrids), terrain properties (Global Relief Model based on SRTM DEM and ETOPO), monthly time series of satellite-derived vegetation indices (GIMMS NDVI3g) and climate variables (Princeton Meteorological Forcing Dataset). The findings proved the potential of a spatio-temporal Bayesian modelling approach for assessing vegetation dynamics, at a regional scale. The observed interrelationships of the employed data and the different spatial and temporal trends support

  9. A framework for global diurnally-resolved observations of Land Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, D.; Remedios, J.; Pinnock, S.

    2013-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is the radiative skin temperature of the land, and is one of the key parameters in the physics of land-surface processes on regional and global scales. Being a key boundary condition in land surface models, which determine the surface to atmosphere fluxes of heat, water and carbon; thus influencing cloud cover, precipitation and atmospheric chemistry predictions within Global models, the requirement for global diurnal observations of LST is well founded. Earth Observation satellites offer an opportunity to obtain global coverage of LST, with the appropriate exploitation of data from multiple instruments providing a capacity to resolve the diurnal cycle on a global scale. Here we present a framework for the production of global, diurnally resolved, data sets for LST which is a key request from users of LST data. We will show how the sampling of both geostationary and low earth orbit data sets could conceptually be employed to build combined, multi-sensor, pole-to-pole data sets. Although global averages already exist for individual instruments and merging of geostationary based LST is already being addressed operationally (Freitas, et al., 2013), there are still a number of important challenges to overcome. In this presentation, we will consider three of the issues still open in LST remote sensing: 1) the consistency amongst retrievals; 2) the clear-sky bias and its quantification; and 3) merging methods and the propagation of uncertainties. For example, the combined use of both geostationary earth orbit (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO) data, and both infra-red and microwave data are relatively unexplored but are necessary to make the most progress. Hence this study will suggest what is state-of-the-art and how considerable advances can be made, accounting also for recent improvements in techniques and data quality. The GlobTemperature initiative under the Data User Element of ESA's 4th Earth Observation Envelope Programme (2013

  10. A framework for global diurnally-resolved observations of Land Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, Darren; Remedios, John

    2014-05-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is the radiative skin temperature of the land, and is one of the key parameters in the physics of land-surface processes on regional and global scales. Being a key boundary condition in land surface models, which determine the surface to atmosphere fluxes of heat, water and carbon; thus influencing cloud cover, precipitation and atmospheric chemistry predictions within Global models, the requirement for global diurnal observations of LST is well founded. Earth Observation satellites offer an opportunity to obtain global coverage of LST, with the appropriate exploitation of data from multiple instruments providing a capacity to resolve the diurnal cycle on a global scale. Here we present a framework for the production of global, diurnally resolved, data sets for LST which is a key request from users of LST data. We will show how the sampling of both geostationary and low earth orbit data sets could conceptually be employed to build combined, multi-sensor, pole-to-pole data sets. Although global averages already exist for individual instruments and merging of geostationary based LST is already being addressed operationally (Freitas, et al., 2013), there are still a number of important challenges to overcome. In this presentation, we will consider three of the issues still open in LST remote sensing: 1) the consistency amongst retrievals; 2) the clear-sky bias and its quantification; and 3) merging methods and the propagation of uncertainties. For example, the combined use of both geostationary earth orbit (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO) data, and both infra-red and microwave data are relatively unexplored but are necessary to make the most progress. Hence this study will suggest what is state-of-the-art and how considerable advances can be made, accounting also for recent improvements in techniques and data quality. The GlobTemperature initiative under the Data User Element of ESA's 4th Earth Observation Envelope Programme (2013

  11. Global-scale sea surface variability from combined altimetric and tide gauge measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wunsch, Carl

    1991-01-01

    By correcting Geosat altimetric data for a set of line frequencies, and then doing a heavy average in space and time, a set of global maps of sea surface variability is produced over time intervals ranging from three months to two years. These maps are demonstrated to be consistent with the global network of tide gauges and sets of maps incorporating those data into the altimetric estimates are also produced. Tide gauge records too fragmentary for computation of a two-year mean are employed by time-differencing them. An estimate of the global difference of sea level change over one year, on very large space scales, shows the effects of the 1987 El Nino. The spherical harmonic coefficients employed in the computations are then used to estimate the full three-dimensional frequency/wavenumber spectrum of surface circulation variability.

  12. Assessment of contribution of greenhouse gases, water vapour and cloudiness to global surface air temperature changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusakova, Maria; Karlin, Lev N.

    2013-04-01

    A contribution of the basic greenhouse effect components to the changes of global surface air temperature (SAT) has been assessed. The Earth's energy budget and the longwave energy transformation, in particular, were considered to investigate the mechanism of the influence of greenhouse effect (GHE) on global SAT. As is known, some part of the outgoing terrestrial radiation is retained in the atmosphere by greenhouse gases (GHGs) such as CO2, CH4, N2O, water vapour (WV) and cloudiness. The analysis of the changes in global SAT, GHGs and WV concentrations for the period 1984 - 2010 has shown that these parameters have a trend to increase. The research into global cloudiness and the vertical distribution of cloud layers made it possible to trace both positive and negative trends, namely the increase of availability of middle and high clouds has a positive trend while the increase of availability of global clouds and low clouds have a negative trend. Making use of the regression analysis relationships between global SAT and the components of greenhouse effect were obtained. It is shown, that the availability of total clouds and low clouds result in climate cooling, while the availability of middle and high clouds cause the increase of global SAT. The analysis of these parameters made it possible to carry out parameterization of GHE. To identify non-anthropogenic possible reasons of global SAT changes the influence of GHE on global SAT has been analyzed, with El-Nino phenomenon being one of the possible reasons. It has been shown that the GHGs role in global SAT changes is not dominant.

  13. A global, 30-m resolution land-surface water body dataset for 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, M.; Sexton, J. O.; Huang, C.; Song, D. X.; Song, X. P.; Channan, S.; Townshend, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Inland surface water is essential to terrestrial ecosystems and human civilization. The distribution of surface water in space and its change over time are related to many agricultural, environmental and ecological issues, and are important factors that must be considered in human socioeconomic development. Accurate mapping of surface water is essential for both scientific research and policy-driven applications. Satellite-based remote sensing provides snapshots of Earth's surface and can be used as the main input for water mapping, especially in large areas. Global water areas have been mapped with coarse resolution remotely sensed data (e.g., the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)). However, most inland rivers and water bodies, as well as their changes, are too small to map at such coarse resolutions. Landsat TM (Thematic Mapper) and ETM+ (Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus) imagery has a 30m spatial resolution and provides decades of records (~40 years). Since 2008, the opening of the Landsat archive, coupled with relatively lower costs associated with computing and data storage, has made comprehensive study of the dynamic changes of surface water over large even global areas more feasible. Although Landsat images have been used for regional and even global water mapping, the method can hardly be automated due to the difficulties on distinguishing inland surface water with variant degrees of impurities and mixing of soil background with only Landsat data. The spectral similarities to other land cover types, e.g., shadow and glacier remnants, also cause misidentification. We have developed a probabilistic based automatic approach for mapping inland surface water bodies. Landsat surface reflectance in multiple bands, derived water indices, and data from other sources are integrated to maximize the ability of identifying water without human interference. The approach has been implemented with open-source libraries to facilitate processing large

  14. Method for using global optimization to the estimation of surface-consistent residual statics

    DOEpatents

    Reister, David B.; Barhen, Jacob; Oblow, Edward M.

    2001-01-01

    An efficient method for generating residual statics corrections to compensate for surface-consistent static time shifts in stacked seismic traces. The method includes a step of framing the residual static corrections as a global optimization problem in a parameter space. The method also includes decoupling the global optimization problem involving all seismic traces into several one-dimensional problems. The method further utilizes a Stochastic Pijavskij Tunneling search to eliminate regions in the parameter space where a global minimum is unlikely to exist so that the global minimum may be quickly discovered. The method finds the residual statics corrections by maximizing the total stack power. The stack power is a measure of seismic energy transferred from energy sources to receivers.

  15. Regional and global sea-surface temperatures during the last interglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Jeremy S.; Clark, Peter U.; Parnell, Andrew C.; He, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The last interglaciation (LIG, 129 to 116 thousand years ago) was the most recent time in Earth’s history when global mean sea level was substantially higher than it is at present. However, reconstructions of LIG global temperature remain uncertain, with estimates ranging from no significant difference to nearly 2°C warmer than present-day temperatures. Here we use a network of sea-surface temperature (SST) records to reconstruct spatiotemporal variability in regional and global SSTs during the LIG. Our results indicate that peak LIG global mean annual SSTs were 0.5 ± 0.3°C warmer than the climatological mean from 1870 to 1889 and indistinguishable from the 1995 to 2014 mean. LIG warming in the extratropical latitudes occurred in response to boreal insolation and the bipolar seesaw, whereas tropical SSTs were slightly cooler than the 1870 to 1889 mean in response to reduced mean annual insolation.

  16. Ionic surface active compounds in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Sukhapan, Jariya; Brimblecombe, Peter

    2002-04-27

    Surfactants in the atmosphere have several potential roles in atmospheric chemistry. They can form films on aqueous surfaces, which lowers the surface tension and possibly delays water evaporation and gaseous transportation across the aqueous interface. They can also increase the solubility of organic compounds in the aqueous phase. Recently, the decrease of surface tension in cloud growing droplets has been suggested as relevant to increases in the number of droplets of smaller size, potentially enhancing cloud albedo. Natural surfactants in the lung aid gas transfer and influence the dissolution rate of aerosol particles, so surfactants in atmospheric aerosols, once inhaled, may interact with pulmonary surfactants. Ambient aerosols were collected from the edge of Norwich, a small city in a largely agricultural region of England, and analysed for surfactants. Methylene blue, a conventional dye for detecting anionic surfactants, has been used as a colorimetric agent. The concentration of surfactants expressed as methylene blue active substances (MBAS) is in the range of 6-170 pmol m(-3)(air). A negative correlation with chloride aerosol indicates that these surfactants are probably not the well-known surfactants derived from marine spray. A more positive correlation with aerosol nitrate and gaseous NOx supports an association with more polluted inland air masses. The surfactants found in aerosols seem to be relatively strong acids, compared with weaker acids such as the long-chain carboxylic acids previously proposed as atmospheric surfactants. Surfactants from the oxidation of organic materials (perhaps vegetation- or soil-derived) seem a likely source of these substances in the atmosphere.

  17. Thai Youths and Global Warming: Media Information, Awareness, and Lifestyle Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chokriensukchai, Kanchana; Tamang, Ritendra

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the exposure of Thai youths to media information on global warming, the relationship between exposure to global warming information and awareness of global warming, and the relationship between that awareness and lifestyle activities that contribute to global warming. A focus group of eight Thai youths provided information that…

  18. World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ): Global Activity Module

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    The World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) is a comprehensive, mid?term energy forecasting and policy analysis tool used by EIA. WEPS projects energy supply, demand, and prices by country or region, given assumptions about the state of various economies, international energy markets, and energy policies. The Global Activity Module (GLAM) provides projections of economic driver variables for use by the supply, demand, and conversion modules of WEPS . GLAM’s baseline economic projection contains the economic assumptions used in WEPS to help determine energy demand and supply. GLAM can also provide WEPS with alternative economic assumptions representing a range of uncertainty about economic growth. The resulting economic impacts of such assumptions are inputs to the remaining supply and demand modules of WEPS .

  19. Spatially Complete Global Spectral Surface Albedos: Value-Added Datasets Derived from Terra MODIS Land Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moody, Eric G.; King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Gao, Feng

    2004-01-01

    Land surface albedo is an important parameter in describing the radiative properties of the earth s surface as it represents the amount of incoming solar radiation that is reflected from the surface. The amount and type of vegetation of the surface dramatically alters the amount of radiation that is reflected; for example, croplands that contain leafy vegetation will reflect radiation very differently than blacktop associated with urban areas. In addition, since vegetation goes through a growth, or phenological, cycle, the amount of radiation that is reflected changes over the course of a year. As a result, albedo is both temporally and spatially dependant upon global location as there is a distribution of vegetated surface types and growing conditions. Land surface albedo is critical for a wide variety of earth system research projects including but not restricted to remote sensing of atmospheric aerosol and cloud properties from space, ground-based analysis of aerosol optical properties from surface-based sun/sky radiometers, biophysically-based land surface modeling of the exchange of energy, water, momentum, and carbon for various land use categories, and surface energy balance studies. These projects require proper representation of the surface albedo s spatial, spectral, and temporal variations, however, these representations are often lacking in datasets prior to the latest generation of land surface albedo products.

  20. Surface activity of solid particles with extremely rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nonomura, Yoshimune; Komura, Shigeyuki

    2008-01-15

    The solid particles are adsorbed at liquid-liquid interfaces and form self-assembled structures when the particles have suitable wettability to both liquids. Here, we show theoretically how the extreme roughness on the particle surface affects their adsorption properties. In our previous work, we discussed the adsorption behavior of the solid particles with microstructured surfaces using the so-called Wenzel model [Y. Nonomura et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 110 (2006) 13124]. In the present study, the wettability and the adsorbed position of the particles with extremely rough surfaces are studied based on the Cassie-Baxter model. We predict that the adsorbed position and the interfacial energy depend on the interfacial tensions between the solid and liquid phases, the radius of the particle, and the fraction of the particle surface area that is in contact with the external liquid phase. Interestingly, the initial state of the system governs whether the particle is adsorbed at the interface or not. The shape of the particle is also an important factor which governs the adsorbed position. The disk-shaped particle and the spherical particle which is partially covered with the extremely rough surface, i.e. Janus particle, are adsorbed at the liquid-liquid interface in an oriented state. We should consider not only the interfacial tensions, but also the surface structure and the particle shape to control the adsorption behavior of the particle.

  1. Does the global temporal activation differ in triceps surae during standing balance?

    PubMed

    Dos Anjos, F V; Fontanella, F; Gazzoni, M; Vieira, T M M

    2015-08-01

    One of the most important muscular groups which contribute to maintain standing balance is triceps surae. However, it is unclear whether the postural controllers of triceps surae, medial gastrocnemius (MG) and soleus (SOL), have different temporal patterns of activation during upright stance. This paper aimed at evaluating whether the global temporal activation in triceps surae differ among young subjects during standing balance. Nine male volunteers performed two tasks: standing quietly and with voluntary back and forward sways over their ankle. Electromyograms (EMGs) from soleus medial (MSOL) and lateral (LSOL) regions and from MG were sampled with linear arrays of surface electrodes. The percentage of muscle activation in time (i.e. temporal index) was computed for each muscle during upright standing. The results revealed that the medial portion of soleus muscle (MSOL) was activated continuously compared to the lateral portion of soleus (LSOL) and MG, which were activated intermittently. Therefore, the global temporal activation differed among the postural muscles of triceps surae during standing balance.

  2. Quantum Dynamics of Vinylidene Photodetachment on an Accurate Global Acetylene-Vinylidene Potential Energy Surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lifen; Han, Huixian; Ma, Jianyi; Guo, Hua

    2015-08-06

    Vinylidene is a high-energy isomer of acetylene, and the rearrangement of bonds in the two species serves as a prototype for isomerization reactions. Here, a full-dimensional quantum mechanical study of the vinylidene vibration is carried out on a recently developed global acetylene-vinylidene potential energy surface by simulating the photodetachment dynamics of the vinylidene anion. Several low-lying vibrational levels of the anion were first determined on a new ab initio based potential energy surface, and their photoelectron spectra were obtained within the Condon approximation. The vibrational features of the vinylidene isomer are found to agree well with the experiment in both positions and intensities, validating the global acetylene-vinylidene potential energy surface.

  3. Comparison of Surface Ozone At Tor-2 Sites With A Global Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. S.; Solberg, S.; Lindskog, A.; Derwent, R. G.

    Surface ozone concentrations are strongly influenced by local dry deposition rates, particularly when the boundary layer is shallow. This represents a major problem when comparing model output to surface observations, especially from global models with relatively coarse resolution and simplified boundary layer dynamics. To investigate this problem, we have used hourly ozone from stations in the TOR-2 database, and extracted both daytime average and daytime maximum values, and compared these with daily mid-afternoon values calculated by the global model STOCHEM, over the annual cycle. The model also simulates the fraction of ozone at the surface originating in the stratosphere, indicating the likely seasonal cycle in stratospheric contribution at each site, compared to in-situ tropospheric production.

  4. Surface plasmon amplification and active nonreciprocal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami Keshmarzi, Elham; Tait, R. Niall; Berini, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we review our recent work on active plasmonic structures composed of optically pumped dye molecules infiltrated in a polymer host as the cladding of long-range surface plasmon polariton (LRSPP) structures. In particular, concepts for distributed Bragg and distributed feedback (DBR/DFB) lasers, and a spatially non-reciprocal Bragg grating (NRBG) are reviewed. The LRSPP Bragg grating is a fundamental element in these devices which is created by stepping the width of a metal stripe to produce modulation of refractive index. The gain medium in all of these active devices is assumed to be a thin film (~1μm) of polymer (poly (methyl methacrylate)) doped with organic laser dye molecules IR- 140. The gain medium is assumed pumped optically through the top of the devices via 10 ns laser pulses at 810 nm with 500 kW/cm2 power intensity to enable stimulated emission at 880 nm. The maximum material gain coefficient of this medium was measured independently as 68 cm-1.

  5. Global emissions and models of photochemically active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.; Atherton, C.S.; Graedel, T.E.

    1993-05-20

    Anthropogenic emissions from industrial activity, fossil fuel combustion, and biomass burning are now known to be large enough (relative to natural sources) to perturb the chemistry of vast regions of the troposphere. A goal of the IGAC Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) is to provide authoritative and reliable emissions inventories on a 1{degree} {times} 1{degree} grid. When combined with atmospheric photochemical models, these high quality emissions inventories may be used to predict the concentrations of major photochemical products. Comparison of model results with measurements of pertinent species allows us to understand whether there are major shortcomings in our understanding of tropospheric photochemistry, the budgets and transport of trace species, and their effects in the atmosphere. Through this activity, we are building the capability to make confident predictions of the future consequences of anthropogenic emissions. This paper compares IGAC recommended emissions inventories for reactive nitrogen and sulfur dioxide to those that have been in use previously. We also present results from the three-dimensional LLNL atmospheric chemistry model that show how emissions of anthropogenic nitrogen oxides might potentially affect tropospheric ozone and OH concentrations and how emissions of anthropogenic sulfur increase sulfate aerosol loadings.

  6. A 7.5-Year Dataset of SSM/I-Derived Surface Turbulent Fluxes Over Global Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Shie, Chung-Lin; Atlas, Robert M.; Ardizzone, Joe; Nelkin, Eric; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, latent heat, and sensible heat over global oceans are essential to weather, climate and ocean problems. Wind stress is the major forcing for driving the oceanic circulation, while Evaporation is a key component of hydrological cycle and surface heat budget. We have produced a 7.5-year (July 1987-December 1994) dataset of daily, individual monthly-mean and climatological (1988-94) monthly-mean surface turbulent fluxes over the global oceans from measurements of the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) on board the US Defense Meteorological Satellite Program F8, F10, and F11 satellites. It has a spatial resolution of 2.0x2.5 latitude-longitude. Daily turbulent fluxes are derived from daily data of SSM/I surface winds and specific humidity, National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) sea surface temperatures, and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) air-sea temperature differences, using a stability-dependent bulk scheme. The retrieved instantaneous surface air humidity (with a 25-km resolution) IS found to be generally accurate as compared to the collocated radiosonde observations over global oceans. The surface wind speed and specific humidity (latent heat flux) derived from the F10 SSM/I are found to be -encrally smaller (larger) than those retrieved from the F11 SSM/I. The F11 SSM/I appears to have slightly better retrieval accuracy for surface wind speed and humidity as compared to the F10 SSM/I. This difference may be due to the orbital drift of the F10 satellite. The daily wind stresses and latent heat fluxes retrieved from F10 and F11 SSM/Is show useful accuracy as verified against the research quality in si -neasurerrients (IMET buoy, RV Moana Wave, and RV Wecoma) in the western Pacific warm pool during the TOGA COARE Intensive observing period (November 1992-February 1993). The 1988-94 seasonal-mean turbulent fluxes and input variables derived from FS and F11 SSM/Is show reasonable

  7. Trends and drivers in global surface ocean pH over the past 3 decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauvset, S. K.; Gruber, N.; Landschützer, P.; Olsen, A.; Tjiputra, J.

    2015-03-01

    We report global long-term trends in surface ocean pH using a new pH data set computed by combining fCO2 observations from the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) version 2 with surface alkalinity estimates based on temperature and salinity. Trends were determined over the periods 1981-2011 and 1991-2011 for a set of 17 biomes using a weighted linear least squares method. We observe significant decreases in surface ocean pH in ~70% of all biomes and a mean rate of decrease of 0.0018 ± 0.0004 yr-1 for 1991-2011. We are not able to calculate a global trend for 1981-2011 because too few biomes have enough data for this. In half the biomes, the rate of change is commensurate with the trends expected based on the assumption that the surface ocean pH change is only driven by the surface ocean CO2 chemistry remaining in a transient equilibrium with the increase in atmospheric CO2. In the remaining biomes, deviations from such equilibrium may reflect that the trend of surface ocean fCO2 is not equal to that of the atmosphere, most notably in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, or may reflect changes in the oceanic buffer (Revelle) factor. We conclude that well-planned and long-term sustained observational networks are key to reliably document the ongoing and future changes in ocean carbon chemistry due to anthropogenic forcing.

  8. Global biogeophysical interactions between historical deforestation and climate through land surface albedo and interactive ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ye

    2017-02-01

    Deforestation is expanding and accelerating into the remaining areas of undisturbed forest, and the quality of the remaining forests is declining today. Assessing the climatic impacts of deforestation can help to rectify this alarming situation. In this paper, how historical deforestation may affect global climate through interactive ocean and surface albedo is examined using an Earth system model of intermediate complexity (EMIC). Control and anomaly integrations are performed for 1000 years. In the anomaly case, cropland is significantly expanded since AD 1700. The response of climate in deforested areas is not uniform between the regions. In the background of a global cooling of 0.08 °C occurring with cooler surface air above 0.4 °C across 30° N to 75° N from March to September, the surface albedo increase has a global cooling effect in response to global-scale replacement of forests by cropland, especially over northern mid-high latitudes. The northern mid-latitude (30° N-60° N) suffers a prominent cooling in June, suggesting that this area is most sensitive to cropland expansion through surface albedo. Most regions show a consistent trend between the overall cooling in response to historical deforestation and its resulting cooling due to surface albedo anomaly. Furthermore, the effect of the interactive ocean on shaping the climate response to deforestation is greater than that of prescribed SSTs in most years with a maximum spread of 0.05 °C. This difference is more prominent after year 1800 than that before due to the more marked deforestation. These findings show the importance of the land cover change and the land surface albedo, stressing the necessity to analyze other biogeophysical processes of deforestation using interactive ocean.

  9. Assessment of Provisional MODIS-derived Surfaces Related to the Global Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, W. B.; Maiersperger, T. K.; Turner, D. P.; Gower, S. T.; Kennedy, R. E.; Running, S. W.

    2002-12-01

    The global carbon cycle is one of the most important foci of an emerging global biosphere monitoring system. A key component of such a system is the MODIS sensor, onboard the Terra satellite platform. Biosphere monitoring requires an integrated program of satellite observations, Earth-system models, and in situ data. Related to the carbon cycle, MODIS science teams routinely develop a variety of global surfaces such as land cover, leaf area index, and net primary production using MODIS data and functional algorithms. The quality of these surfaces must be evaluated to determine their effectiveness for global biosphere monitoring. A project called BigFoot (http://www.fsl.orst.edu/larse/bigfoot/) is an organized effort across nine biomes to assess the quality of the abovementioned surfaces: (1) Arctic tundra; (2) boreal evergreen needle-leaved forest; temperate (3) cropland, (4) grassland, (5) evergreen needle-leaved forest, and (6) deciduous broad-leaved forest; desert (7) grassland and (8) shrubland; and (9) tropical evergreen broad-leaved forest. Each biome is represented by a site that has an eddy-covariance flux tower that measures water vapor and CO2 fluxes. Flux tower footprints are relatively small-approximately 1 km2. BigFoot characterizes 25 km2 around each tower, using field data, Landsat ETM+ image data, and ecosystem process models. Our innovative field sampling design incorporates a nested spatial series to facilitate geostatistical analyses, samples the ecological variability at a site, and is logistically efficient. Field data are used both to develop site-specific algorithms for mapping/modeling the variables of interest and to characterize the errors in derived BigFoot surfaces. Direct comparisons of BigFoot- and MODIS-derived surfaces are made to help understand the sources of error in MODIS-derived surfaces and to facilitate improvements to MODIS algorithms. Results from four BigFoot sites will be presented.

  10. Has Natural Variability Masked the Expected Increase in Antarctic Surface Mass Balance with Global Warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Previdi, M. J.; Polvani, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    One of the expected and rather paradoxical consequences of anthropogenic global warming is an increase in Antarctic surface mass balance (or net snow accumulation), as robustly simulated by both global and regional climate models. This surface mass balance (SMB) increase occurs because the higher moisture content of a warmer atmosphere leads to increases in precipitation, with this precipitation falling in the form of snow over Antarctica. Despite these robust model projections, however, observations indicate that there has been no significant change in Antarctic SMB during the past several decades. Here, we show that this apparent discrepancy between models and observations can be explained by the fact that the anthropogenic climate change signal is still relatively small compared to the noise associated with natural climate variability. Using an ensemble of 35 global coupled climate models to separate signal and noise, we find that the forced SMB increase due to global warming in recent decades is unlikely to be detectable in a statistical sense as a result of large natural SMB variability on interannual-to-multidecadal timescales. However, our analysis reveals that if the world continues to follow the present trajectory of greenhouse gas emissions, the anthropogenic impact on Antarctic SMB will emerge from natural variability by the middle of the current century. With this, SMB increases over Antarctica will begin to mitigate global sea-level rise, partially offsetting the effects of dynamic ice loss.

  11. Has Natural Variability Masked the Expected Increase in Antarctic Surface Mass Balance with Global Warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Previdi, Michael; Polvani, Lorenzo M.

    2016-04-01

    One of the expected and rather paradoxical consequences of anthropogenic global warming is an increase in Antarctic surface mass balance (or net snow accumulation), as robustly simulated by both global and regional climate models. This surface mass balance (SMB) increase occurs because the higher moisture content of a warmer atmosphere leads to increases in precipitation, with this precipitation falling in the form of snow over Antarctica. Despite these robust model projections, however, observations indicate that there has been no significant change in Antarctic SMB during the past several decades. Here, we show that this apparent discrepancy between models and observations can be explained by the fact that the anthropogenic climate change signal is still relatively small compared to the noise associated with natural climate variability. Using an ensemble of 35 global coupled climate models to separate signal and noise, we find that the forced SMB increase due to global warming in recent decades is unlikely to be detectable in a statistical sense as a result of large natural SMB variability on interannual-to-multidecadal timescales. However, our analysis reveals that if the world continues to follow the present trajectory of greenhouse gas emissions, the anthropogenic impact on Antarctic SMB will emerge from natural variability by the middle of the current century. With this, SMB increases over Antarctica will begin to mitigate global sea-level rise, partially offsetting the effects of dynamic ice loss.

  12. Nitrogenase gene amplicons from global marine surface waters are dominated by genes of non-cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Farnelid, Hanna; Andersson, Anders F; Bertilsson, Stefan; Al-Soud, Waleed Abu; Hansen, Lars H; Sørensen, Søren; Steward, Grieg F; Hagström, Åke; Riemann, Lasse

    2011-04-29

    Cyanobacteria are thought to be the main N(2)-fixing organisms (diazotrophs) in marine pelagic waters, but recent molecular analyses indicate that non-cyanobacterial diazotrophs are also present and active. Existing data are, however, restricted geographically and by limited sequencing depths. Our analysis of 79,090 nitrogenase (nifH) PCR amplicons encoding 7,468 unique proteins from surface samples (ten DNA samples and two RNA samples) collected at ten marine locations world-wide provides the first in-depth survey of a functional bacterial gene and yield insights into the composition and diversity of the nifH gene pool in marine waters. Great divergence in nifH composition was observed between sites. Cyanobacteria-like genes were most frequent among amplicons from the warmest waters, but overall the data set was dominated by nifH sequences most closely related to non-cyanobacteria. Clusters related to Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, and Delta-Proteobacteria were most common and showed distinct geographic distributions. Sequences related to anaerobic bacteria (nifH Cluster III) were generally rare, but preponderant in cold waters, especially in the Arctic. Although the two transcript samples were dominated by unicellular cyanobacteria, 42% of the identified non-cyanobacterial nifH clusters from the corresponding DNA samples were also detected in cDNA. The study indicates that non-cyanobacteria account for a substantial part of the nifH gene pool in marine surface waters and that these genes are at least occasionally expressed. The contribution of non-cyanobacterial diazotrophs to the global N(2) fixation budget cannot be inferred from sequence data alone, but the prevalence of non-cyanobacterial nifH genes and transcripts suggest that these bacteria are ecologically significant.

  13. The Muted Precipitation Increase in Global Warming Simulations: A Surface Evaporation Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, I.; Xie, S.; Ma, J.

    2008-12-01

    Both observations and climate simulations suggest an increase of atmospheric moisture content by 7% per degree surface warming. The simulated precipitation, on the other hand, increases at a much slower rate. This muted response of the hydrological cycle to increased greenhouse gas forcing is investigated from a surface evaporation perspective, using simulations participating in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) under the A1B forcing scenario. A 90-year analysis of surface evaporation based on a standard bulk formula reveals that the following atmospheric changes act to slow down the increase in surface evaporation over ice free oceans: surface relative humidity increases by 1.0%, surface stability, as measured by air-sea temperature difference, increases by 0.2 K, and surface wind speed decreases by 0.02 m/s. As a result of these changes, surface evaporation increases by only 2% per Kelvin of surface warming rather than 7%/K. Particularly the increased surface stability and relative humidity are very robust among models. The potential impact of relative humidity trends on the surface energy budget and temperature is addressed in a set of sensitivity tests with the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3) coupled to a slab ocean model. In these CO2 doubling experiments surface relative humidity is prescribed either from present day or CO2 doubling climatology. The results indicate that the increase in surface relative humidity, through inhibiting latent heat flux, contributes approximately 20% of the total warming under CO2 doubling. Our findings underscore the importance of the air-sea interface in the global warming problem and call for observational efforts to detect and monitor changes in surface relative humidity and stability over the World Ocean.

  14. Automatic 3D liver segmentation based on deep learning and globally optimized surface evolution.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peijun; Wu, Fa; Peng, Jialin; Liang, Ping; Kong, Dexing

    2016-12-21

    The detection and delineation of the liver from abdominal 3D computed tomography (CT) images are fundamental tasks in computer-assisted liver surgery planning. However, automatic and accurate segmentation, especially liver detection, remains challenging due to complex backgrounds, ambiguous boundaries, heterogeneous appearances and highly varied shapes of the liver. To address these difficulties, we propose an automatic segmentation framework based on 3D convolutional neural network (CNN) and globally optimized surface evolution. First, a deep 3D CNN is trained to learn a subject-specific probability map of the liver, which gives the initial surface and acts as a shape prior in the following segmentation step. Then, both global and local appearance information from the prior segmentation are adaptively incorporated into a segmentation model, which is globally optimized in a surface evolution way. The proposed method has been validated on 42 CT images from the public Sliver07 database and local hospitals. On the Sliver07 online testing set, the proposed method can achieve an overall score of [Formula: see text], yielding a mean Dice similarity coefficient of [Formula: see text], and an average symmetric surface distance of [Formula: see text] mm. The quantitative validations and comparisons show that the proposed method is accurate and effective for clinical application.

  15. Automatic 3D liver segmentation based on deep learning and globally optimized surface evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Peijun; Wu, Fa; Peng, Jialin; Liang, Ping; Kong, Dexing

    2016-12-01

    The detection and delineation of the liver from abdominal 3D computed tomography (CT) images are fundamental tasks in computer-assisted liver surgery planning. However, automatic and accurate segmentation, especially liver detection, remains challenging due to complex backgrounds, ambiguous boundaries, heterogeneous appearances and highly varied shapes of the liver. To address these difficulties, we propose an automatic segmentation framework based on 3D convolutional neural network (CNN) and globally optimized surface evolution. First, a deep 3D CNN is trained to learn a subject-specific probability map of the liver, which gives the initial surface and acts as a shape prior in the following segmentation step. Then, both global and local appearance information from the prior segmentation are adaptively incorporated into a segmentation model, which is globally optimized in a surface evolution way. The proposed method has been validated on 42 CT images from the public Sliver07 database and local hospitals. On the Sliver07 online testing set, the proposed method can achieve an overall score of 80.3+/- 4.5 , yielding a mean Dice similarity coefficient of 97.25+/- 0.65 % , and an average symmetric surface distance of 0.84+/- 0.25 mm. The quantitative validations and comparisons show that the proposed method is accurate and effective for clinical application.

  16. Spatially Complete Global Surface Albedos Derived from Terra/MODIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Moody, Eric G.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Platnick, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Spectral land surface albedo is an important parameter for describing the radiative properties of the Earth. Accordingly it reflects the consequences of natural and human interactions, such as anthropogenic, meteorological, and phenological effects, on global and local climatological trends. Consequently, albedos are integral parts in a variety of research areas, such as general circulation models (GCMs), energy balance studies, modeling of land use and land use change, and biophysical, oceanographic, and meteorological studies. , Over five years of land surface anisotropy, diffuse bihemispherical (white-sky) albedo and direct beam directional hemispherical (black-sky) albedo from observations acquired by the MODIS instruments aboard NASA s Terra and Aqua satellite platforms have provided researchers with unprecedented spatial, spectral, and temporal information on the land surface s radiative characteristics. However, roughly 30% of the global land surface, on an annual equal-angle basis, is obscured due to persistent and transient cloud cover, while another 207% is obscured due to ephemeral and seasonal snow effects. This precludes the MOD43B3 albedo products from being directly used in some remote sensing and ground-based applications, climate models, and global change research projects. To provide researchers with the requisite spatially complete global snow-free land surface albedo dataset, an ecosystem-dependent temporal interpolation technique was developed to fill missing or lower quality data and snow covered values from the official MOD43B3 dataset with geophysically realistic values. The method imposes pixel-level and local regional ecosystem-dependent phenological behavior onto retrieved pixel temporal data in such a way as to maintain pixel-level spatial and spectral detail and integrity. The phenological curves are derived from statistics based on the MODIS MOD12Q1 IGBP land cover classification product geolocated with the MOD43B3 data.

  17. Deriving global parameter estimates for the Noah land surface model using FLUXNET and machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, Nathaniel W.; Herman, Jonathan D.; Ek, Michael B.; Wood, Eric F.

    2016-11-01

    With their origins in numerical weather prediction and climate modeling, land surface models aim to accurately partition the surface energy balance. An overlooked challenge in these schemes is the role of model parameter uncertainty, particularly at unmonitored sites. This study provides global parameter estimates for the Noah land surface model using 85 eddy covariance sites in the global FLUXNET network. The at-site parameters are first calibrated using a Latin Hypercube-based ensemble of the most sensitive parameters, determined by the Sobol method, to be the minimum stomatal resistance (rs,min), the Zilitinkevich empirical constant (Czil), and the bare soil evaporation exponent (fxexp). Calibration leads to an increase in the mean Kling-Gupta Efficiency performance metric from 0.54 to 0.71. These calibrated parameter sets are then related to local environmental characteristics using the Extra-Trees machine learning algorithm. The fitted Extra-Trees model is used to map the optimal parameter sets over the globe at a 5 km spatial resolution. The leave-one-out cross validation of the mapped parameters using the Noah land surface model suggests that there is the potential to skillfully relate calibrated model parameter sets to local environmental characteristics. The results demonstrate the potential to use FLUXNET to tune the parameterizations of surface fluxes in land surface models and to provide improved parameter estimates over the globe.

  18. Global observation-based diagnosis of soil moisture control on land surface flux partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego-Elvira, Belen; Taylor, Christopher M.; Harris, Phil P.; Ghent, Darren; Veal, Karen L.; Folwell, Sonja S.

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture plays a central role in the partition of available energy at the land surface between sensible and latent heat flux to the atmosphere. As soils dry out, evapotranspiration becomes water-limited ("stressed"), and both land surface temperature (LST) and sensible heat flux rise as a result. This change in surface behaviour during dry spells directly affects critical processes in both the land and the atmosphere. Soil water deficits are often a precursor in heat waves, and they control where feedbacks on precipitation become significant. State-of-the-art global climate model (GCM) simulations for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) disagree on where and how strongly the surface energy budget is limited by soil moisture. Evaluation of GCM simulations at global scale is still a major challenge owing to the scarcity and uncertainty of observational datasets of land surface fluxes and soil moisture at the appropriate scale. Earth observation offers the potential to test how well GCM land schemes simulate hydrological controls on surface fluxes. In particular, satellite observations of LST provide indirect information about the surface energy partition at 1km resolution globally. Here, we present a potentially powerful methodology to evaluate soil moisture stress on surface fluxes within GCMs. Our diagnostic, Relative Warming Rate (RWR), is a measure of how rapidly the land warms relative to the overlying atmosphere during dry spells lasting at least 10 days. Under clear skies, this is a proxy for the change in sensible heat flux as soil dries out. We derived RWR from MODIS Terra and Aqua LST observations, meteorological re-analyses and satellite rainfall datasets. Globally we found that on average, the land warmed up during dry spells for 97% of the observed surface between 60S and 60N. For 73% of the area, the land warmed faster than the atmosphere (positive RWR), indicating water stressed conditions and increases in sensible heat flux

  19. Data Information for Global Change Studies: NASA's Distributed Active Archive Centers and Cooperating Data Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is an integral part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Earth Science Enterprise (ESE). ESE is a long-term global change research program designed to improve our understanding of the Earth's interrelated processes involving the atmosphere, oceans, land surfaces, and polar regions. Data from EOS instruments and other Earth science measurement systems are useful in understanding the causes and processes of global climate change and the consequences of human activities. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) provides a structure for data management and user services for products derived from EOS satellite instruments and other NASA Earth science data. Within the EOSDIS framework, the Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) have been established to provide expertise in one or more Earth science disciplines. The DAACs and cooperating data centers provide data and information services to support the global change research community. Much of the development of the DAACs has been in anticipation of the enormous amount of data expected from EOS instruments to be launched within the next two decades. Terra, the EOS flagship launched in December 1999, is the first of a series of EOS satellites to carry several instruments with multispectral capabilities. Some data products from these instruments are now available from several of the DAACs. These and other data products can be ordered through the EOS Data Gateway (EDG) and DAAC-specific online ordering systems.

  20. Global Profiling of Carbohydrate Active Enzymes in Human Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Mande, Sharmila S.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Carbohydrate Active enzyme (CAZyme) families, encoded by human gut microflora, play a crucial role in breakdown of complex dietary carbohydrates into components that can be absorbed by our intestinal epithelium. Since nutritional wellbeing of an individual is dependent on the nutrient harvesting capability of the gut microbiome, it is important to understand how CAZyme repertoire in the gut is influenced by factors like age, geography and food habits. Results This study reports a comprehensive in-silico analysis of CAZyme profiles in the gut microbiomes of 448 individuals belonging to different geographies, using similarity searches of the corresponding gut metagenomic contigs against the carbohydrate active enzymes database. The study identifies a core group of 89 CAZyme families that are present across 85% of the gut microbiomes. The study detects several geography/age-specific trends in gut CAZyme repertoires of the individuals. Notably, a group of CAZymes having a positive correlation with BMI has been identified. Further this group of BMI-associated CAZymes is observed to be specifically abundant in the Firmicutes phyla. One of the major findings from this study is identification of three distinct groups of individuals, referred to as 'CAZotypes', having similar CAZyme profiles. Distinct taxonomic drivers for these CAZotypes as well as the probable dietary basis for such trends have also been elucidated. The results of this study provide a global view of CAZyme profiles across individuals of various geographies and age-groups. These results re-iterate the need of a more precise understanding of the role of carbohydrate active enzymes in human nutrition. PMID:26544883

  1. Global and regional surface cooling in a warming climate: a multi-model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhaug, Iselin; Drange, Helge

    2016-06-01

    Instrumental temperature records show that the global climate may experience decadal-scale periods without warming despite a long-term warming trend. We analysed 17 global climate models participating in phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5), identifying the likelihood and duration of periods without warming in the four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6.0 and RCP8.5, together with the preindustrial control and historical simulations. We find that non-warming periods may last 10, 15 and 30 years for RCP8.5, RCP6.0 and RCP4.5, respectively. In the models, anomalous ocean heat uptake and storage are the main factors explaining the decadal-scale surface temperature hiatus periods. The low-latitude East Pacific Ocean is a key region for these variations, acting in tandem with basin-scale anomalies in the sea level pressure. During anomalously cold decades, roughly 35-50 % of the heat anomalies in the upper 700 m of the ocean are located in the Pacific Ocean, and 25 % in the Atlantic Ocean. Decadal-scale ocean heat anomalies, integrated over the upper 700 m, have a magnitude of about 7.5 × 1021 J. This is comparable to the ocean heat uptake needed to maintain a 10 year period without increasing surface temperature under global warming. On sub-decadal time scales the Atlantic, Pacific and Southern Oceans all have the ability to store large amounts of heat, contributing to variations in global surface temperature. The likelihood of decadal-scale non-warming periods decrease with global warming, firstly at the low latitude region stretching eastward from the tropical Atlantic towards the western Pacific. The North Atlantic and Southern Oceans have largest likelihood of non-warming decades in a warming world.

  2. Hyperresolution Global Land Surface Modeling: Meeting a Grand Challenge for Monitoring Earth's Terrestrial Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Eric F.; Roundy, Joshua K.; Troy, Tara J.; van Beek, L. P. H.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.; 4 Blyth, Eleanor; de Roo, Ad; Doell. Petra; Ek, Mike; Famiglietti, James; Gochis, David; van de Giesen, Nick; Houser, Paul; Jaffe, Peter R.; Kollet, Stefan; Lehner, Bernhard; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Sivpalan, Murugesu; Sheffield, Justin; Wade, Andrew; Whitehead, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring Earth's terrestrial water conditions is critically important to many hydrological applications such as global food production; assessing water resources sustainability; and flood, drought, and climate change prediction. These needs have motivated the development of pilot monitoring and prediction systems for terrestrial hydrologic and vegetative states, but to date only at the rather coarse spatial resolutions (approx.10-100 km) over continental to global domains. Adequately addressing critical water cycle science questions and applications requires systems that are implemented globally at much higher resolutions, on the order of 1 km, resolutions referred to as hyperresolution in the context of global land surface models. This opinion paper sets forth the needs and benefits for a system that would monitor and predict the Earth's terrestrial water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles. We discuss six major challenges in developing a system: improved representation of surface-subsurface interactions due to fine-scale topography and vegetation; improved representation of land-atmospheric interactions and resulting spatial information on soil moisture and evapotranspiration; inclusion of water quality as part of the biogeochemical cycle; representation of human impacts from water management; utilizing massively parallel computer systems and recent computational advances in solving hyperresolution models that will have up to 10(exp 9) unknowns; and developing the required in situ and remote sensing global data sets. We deem the development of a global hyperresolution model for monitoring the terrestrial water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles a grand challenge to the community, and we call upon the international hydrologic community and the hydrological science support infrastructure to endorse the effort.

  3. Inclusion of Sea-Surface Temperature Variation in the U.S. Navy Ensemble-Transform Global Ensemble Prediction System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-13

    Inclusion of sea-surface temperature variation in the U.S. Navy ensemble-transform global ensemble prediction system J. G. McLay,1 M. K. Flatau,1 C...Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS) global spectral model to generate a medium-range forecast ensemble. When compared to a control...Navy ensemble-transform global ensemble prediction system, J. Geophys. Res., 117, D19120, doi:10.1029/2011JD016937. 1. Introduction [2] The uppermost

  4. Global scale climate trends associated with variable Atlantic thermohaline transport as inferred from changes in intense hurricane activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, W.M.; Sheaffer, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a review of the most recent 100 years of data of hurricane activity in the tropical Atlantic, and proposes that decadal variations of hurricane activity are but one of a host of observed concurrent global climate trends which may all link to multi-decadal scale variations of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation. The data reviews shows that long term multi-decadal variations in hurricane activity appear to be linked (1) to mode-like variations of regional and global sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and (2) to concurrent trends in global air temperature, pressure anomalies, and atmospheric circulations. Many of these effects extend well beyond the tropical Atlantic. The pre-eminent effect which seems to dominate all others as a unifying process for these multi-decadal changes is variations in the Atlantic thermohaline circulation. A synthesis process is suggested for specifying physically consistent global interactions linking the Atlantic conveyor and decadal trend associations in global climate data. In this way, some of the global data may yield factors which are useful for forecasting the onset and termination of new decadal trends of hurricane activity. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Pressure oscillations on the surface of Gale Crater and coincident observations of global circulation patterns.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Torre Juarez, M.; Kass, D. M.; Haberle, R. M.; Gómez-Elvira, J.; Harri, A. M.; Kleinboehl, A.; Kahanpää, H.; Kahre, M. A.; Lemmon, M. T.; Martín-Torres, J.; Newman, C. E.; Rafkin, S. C.; Rodriguez-Manfredi, J. A.; Peinado, V.; Vasavada, A. R.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The annual cycle of mean diurnal surface pressures observed by Curiosity's Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) has shown oscillations after two Southern Hemispheric storms that occurred before the annual pressure maxima and minima of the dusty season (Ls~250 and 330). The oscillations had a period of ~7 sols and were less visible or absent during the dust free seasons (Ls ~ 0). Martian airborne dust alters the atmosphere's response to solar radiation and the resulting heating profiles. Since the atmospheric circulation responds to thermal forcing by the Sun, atmospheric dust can alter the large-scale circulation. We use coincident global observations by the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) to examine the global circulation. We find that the observed surface pressure oscillations relate to oscillations of the Hadley cell. We also analyze the potential impacts of these coupled oscillations especially as related to traveling waves and thermal tides.

  6. A review of progress towards understanding the transient global mean surface temperature response to radiative perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimori, Masakazu; Watanabe, Masahiro; Shiogama, Hideo; Oka, Akira; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Ohgaito, Rumi; Kamae, Youichi

    2016-12-01

    The correct understanding of the transient response to external radiative perturbation is important for the interpretation of observed climate change, the prediction of near-future climate change, and committed warming under climate stabilization scenarios, as well as the estimation of equilibrium climate sensitivity based on observation data. It has been known for some time that the radiative damping rate per unit of global mean surface temperature increase varies with time, and this inconstancy affects the transient response. Knowledge of the equilibrium response alone is insufficient, but understanding the transient response of the global mean surface temperature has made rapid progress. The recent progress accompanies the relatively new concept of the efficacies of ocean heat uptake and forcing. The ocean heat uptake efficacy associates the temperature response induced by ocean heat uptake with equilibrium temperature response, and the efficacy of forcing compares the temperature response caused by non-CO2 forcing with that by CO2 forcing.

  7. Climate change from the perspective of the surface energy balance and global hydrologic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Ming, Y.; Schwarzkopf, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Major changes have occurred in the radiative drive of the surface since preindustrial times owing to both changes in the emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols. These are to be contrasted with the drive at the top-of-the-atmosphere. Using global climate models and multiple observations of the surface fluxes from various platforms, we discuss how the energy balance has evolved with time and the manner in which this has affected the hydrologic cycle, including an account of the critical uncertainties. We make use of the simulations performed with global climate models and used in the IPCC assessments to diagnose the factors that are principally responsible for the changes, the contrasting atmospheric mechanisms exerted by greenhouse gases and aerosols, and the relative roles of the atmospheric constituents.

  8. A global potential energy surface and dipole moment surface for silane

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, Alec; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Yachmenev, Andrey; Thiel, Walter

    2015-12-28

    A new nine-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) and dipole moment surface (DMS) for silane have been generated using high-level ab initio theory. The PES, CBS-F12{sup HL}, reproduces all four fundamental term values for {sup 28}SiH{sub 4} with sub-wavenumber accuracy, resulting in an overall root-mean-square error of 0.63 cm{sup −1}. The PES is based on explicitly correlated coupled cluster calculations with extrapolation to the complete basis set limit, and incorporates a range of higher-level additive energy corrections to account for core-valence electron correlation, higher-order coupled cluster terms, and scalar relativistic effects. Systematic errors in computed intra-band rotational energy levels are reduced by empirically refining the equilibrium geometry. The resultant Si–H bond length is in excellent agreement with previous experimental and theoretical values. Vibrational transition moments, absolute line intensities of the ν{sub 3} band, and the infrared spectrum for {sup 28}SiH{sub 4} including states up to J = 20 and vibrational band origins up to 5000 cm{sup −1} are calculated and compared with available experimental results. The DMS tends to marginally overestimate the strength of line intensities. Despite this, band shape and structure across the spectrum are well reproduced and show good agreement with experiment. We thus recommend the PES and DMS for future use.

  9. A global potential energy surface and dipole moment surface for silane.

    PubMed

    Owens, Alec; Yurchenko, Sergei N; Yachmenev, Andrey; Thiel, Walter

    2015-12-28

    A new nine-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) and dipole moment surface (DMS) for silane have been generated using high-level ab initio theory. The PES, CBS-F12(HL), reproduces all four fundamental term values for (28)SiH4 with sub-wavenumber accuracy, resulting in an overall root-mean-square error of 0.63 cm(-1). The PES is based on explicitly correlated coupled cluster calculations with extrapolation to the complete basis set limit, and incorporates a range of higher-level additive energy corrections to account for core-valence electron correlation, higher-order coupled cluster terms, and scalar relativistic effects. Systematic errors in computed intra-band rotational energy levels are reduced by empirically refining the equilibrium geometry. The resultant Si-H bond length is in excellent agreement with previous experimental and theoretical values. Vibrational transition moments, absolute line intensities of the ν3 band, and the infrared spectrum for (28)SiH4 including states up to J = 20 and vibrational band origins up to 5000 cm(-1) are calculated and compared with available experimental results. The DMS tends to marginally overestimate the strength of line intensities. Despite this, band shape and structure across the spectrum are well reproduced and show good agreement with experiment. We thus recommend the PES and DMS for future use.

  10. Coral reef bleaching and sea surface temperature anomalies: 1991-1996 global patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Goreau, T.J.; Hayes, R.L.; Strong, A.

    1997-12-31

    Global spatio-temporal patterns of mass coral reef bleaching during the first half of the 1990s continued to show the strong temperature correlations which first became established in the 1980s. Satellite sea surface temperature data and field observations were used to track thermal bleaching events in real time. Most bleaching events followed warm season sea surface temperature anomalies of around +1 degree celsius above historical means. Global bleaching patterns appear to have been strongly affected by worldwide cooling which followed eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. High water temperatures and mass coral reef bleaching took place in the Caribbean, Indian Ocean, and South Pacific in 1991, but there were few thermal anomalies or bleaching events in 1992 and 1993, years which were markedly cooler worldwide. Following the settling of Mount Pinatubo aerosols and resumption of global warming trends, extensive ocean thermal hot spots and bleaching events resumed in the South Pacific, South Atlantic, and Indian Oceans in 1994. Bleaching again took place in hot spots in the Indian Ocean and Caribbean in 1995, and in the South Atlantic, Caribbean, South Pacific, North Pacific, and Persian Gulf in 1996. Coral reefs worldwide are now very close to their upper temperature tolerance limits. This sensitivity, and the fact that the warmest ecosystems have no source of immigrant species pre-adapted to warmer conditions, may make coral reef ecosystems the first to be severely impacted if global temperatures and sea levels remain at current values or increase further.

  11. Assessment of climatic factors influence on interannual changes in the global surface air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusakova, Maria; Karlin, Lev

    2014-05-01

    A model to assess a number of factors such as TSI, albedo, cloudiness and greenhouse gases including water vapour affecting global surface air temperature (SAT) changes has been developed. To develop the model solar energy transformation in the atmosphere and the other radiation fluxes transformation were investigated. It's a common knowledge that some part of the incoming solar energy is reflected into space by the Earth's surface, aerosol and cloud particles. A contribution of these components to changes in the reflected solar energy was assessed on the basis of developed linear parameterization. During the period of 2001 - 2010, clouds were found to be the basic contributor to the changes in reflected shortwave radiation. Some part of outgoing terrestrial radiation is retained in the atmosphere by greenhouse gases, water vapour and cloudiness. A contribution of these components to changes in the absorbed longwave radiation was assessed on the basis of developed linear parameterization. It was estimated that the contribution of water vapour was dominant during the analyzed period. The developed parameterization of global albedo made it possible to assess the contribution of TSI to global SAT changes. Making use of the parameterizations listed above the model has been improved. The model calculations showed that the our projections of global SAT to 2030 were lower than IPCC estimates.

  12. Influence of the morphology on the platinum electrode surface activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, Andreas; Steiger, Beat; Scherer, Günther G.; Wokaun, Alexander

    Polycrystalline Pt electrodes with different surface characteristics were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 0.5 M H 2SO 4. Plane electrodes showed a decrease in electrochemically active surface area while cycling in the hydrogen underpotential region (H upd), in contrast, electrodes roughened by intensive pre-cycling exhibited a stable value for the electrochemically active surface.

  13. Global detailed gravimetric geoid. [based on gravity model derived from satellite tracking and surface gravity data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, S.; Marsh, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    A global detailed gravimetric geoid has been computed by combining the Goddard Space Flight Center GEM-4 gravity model derived from satellite and surface gravity data and surface 1 deg-by-1 deg mean free air gravity anomaly data. The accuracy of the geoid is + or - 2 meters on continents, 5 to 7 meters in areas where surface gravity data are sparse, and 10 to 15 meters in areas where no surface gravity data are available. Comparisons have been made with the astrogeodetic data provided by Rice (United States), Bomford (Europe), and Mather (Australia). Comparisons have also been carried out with geoid heights derived from satellite solutions for geocentric station coordinates in North America, the Caribbean, Europe, and Australia.

  14. Impact of Asian Dust on Global Surface Air Quality and Radiation Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Yu, Hongbin; Ginoux, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Dust originating from Asian deserts and desertification areas can be transported regionally and globally to affect surface air quality, visibility, and radiation budget not only at immediate downwind locations (e.g., eastern Asia) but also regions far away from the sources (e.g., North America). Deposition of Asian dust to the North Pacific Ocean basin influences the ocean productivity. In this study, we will use the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model, remote sensing data form satellite and from the ground-based network, and in-situ data from aircraft and surface observations to address the following questions: - What are the effects of Asian dust on the surface air quality and visibility over Asia and North America? - What are the seasonal and spatial variations of dust deposition to the North Pacific Ocean? How does the Asian dust affect surface radiation budget?

  15. The PyPES library of high quality semi-global potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sibaev, Marat; Crittenden, Deborah L

    2015-11-05

    In this article, we present a Python-based library of high quality semi-global potential energy surfaces for 50 polyatomic molecules with up to six atoms. We anticipate that these surfaces will find widespread application in the testing of new potential energy surface construction algorithms and nuclear ro-vibrational structure theories. To this end, we provide the ability to generate the energy derivatives required for Taylor series expansions to sixth order about any point on the potential energy surface in a range of common coordinate systems, including curvilinear internal, Cartesian, and normal mode coordinates. The PyPES package, along with FORTRAN, C, MATLAB and Mathematica wrappers, is available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/pypes-lib.

  16. Production of global sea surface temperature fields for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory workshop comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilland, J. E.; Njoku, E. G.; Chelton, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is measured from space by the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR), scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR), high resolution infrared sounder (HIRS) and VISSR atmospheric sounder (VAS). Typical accuracies have been reported from 0.5 C regionally to 2.0 C on a global basis. To evaluate the accuracy of the satellite-derived sea surface temperatures, a series of three workshops was organized to provide uniform data reduction and analysis. The analytical techniques used to intercompare satellite and in situ measurements are described in detail. Selected results showed the overall average rms errors were in the range 0.5-1.0 C.

  17. Global geologic context for rock types and surface alteration on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wyatt, M.B.; McSween, H.Y.; Tanaka, K.L.; Head, J. W.

    2004-01-01

    Petrologic interpretations of thermal emission spectra from Mars orbiting spacecraft indicate the widespread occurrence of surfaces having basaltic and either andesitic or partly altered basalt compositions. Global concentration of ice-rich mantle deposits and near-surface ice at middle to high latitudes and their spatial correlation with andesitic or partly altered basalt materials favor the alteration hypothesis. We propose the formation of these units through limited chemical weathering from basalt interactions with icy mantles deposited during periods of high obliquity. Alteration of sediments in the northern lowlands depocenter may have been enhanced by temporary standing bodies of water and ice. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  18. The Need for Global, Satellite-based Observations of Terrestrial Surface Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsdorf, Doug; Lettenmaier, Dennis; Vörösmarty, Charles; NASA Surface Water Working Group

    River discharge as well as lake and wetland storage of water are critical terms in the surface water balance, yet they are poorly observed globally and the prospects for improvement from in-situ networks are bleak [e.g., Shiklomanov et al., 2002; IAHS, 2001; Stokstad, 1999]. Indeed, given our basic need for fresh water, perhaps the most important hydrologic observations that can be made in a basin are of the temporal and spatial variations in discharge. Gauges measuring discharge rely on flow converging from the upstream catchment to a singular in-channel cross-section. This approach has successfully monitored many of the world's densely inhabited and typically heavily engineered basins for well over a century. However, much of the globally significant discharge occurs in sparsely gauged basins, many with vast wetlands that lack flow convergence (e.g., Figures 1 and 2), thus leading to poorly defined values of runoff at local, regional, and continental scales. The Surface Water Working Group is funded by NASA's Terrestrial Hydrology Program and is an outgrowth of a mission planning process summarized in a July 1999 white paper [Vörösmarty et al., 1999]. Based on the white paper and discussions at working group meetings over the last 2 years, we are focused on the following critical hydrologic questions. (1) What are the observational and data assimilation requirements for measuring surface storage and river discharge that will allow us to understand the dynamics of the land surface branch of the global hydrologic cycle, and in particular, to predict the consequences of global change on water resources? (2) What are the roles of wetlands, lakes, and rivers as regulators of biogeochemical cycles (e.g., carbon and nutrients) and in creating or ameliorating water-related hazards of relevance to society?

  19. Linkages Between Multiscale Global Sea Surface Temperature Change and Precipitation Variabilities in the US

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. M.; Weng, Heng-Yi

    1999-01-01

    A growing number of evidence indicates that there are coherent patterns of variability in sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly not only at interannual timescales, but also at decadal-to-inter-decadal timescale and beyond. The multi-scale variabilities of SST anomaly have shown great impacts on climate. In this work, we analyze multiple timescales contained in the globally averaged SST anomaly with and their possible relationship with the summer and winter rainfall in the United States over the past four decades.

  20. Global Solvability of a Free Boundary Three-Dimensional Incompressible Viscoelastic Fluid System with Surface Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Zhifei

    2013-06-01

    Motivated by Beale (Commun Pure Appl Math 34:359-392, 1981; Arch Ration Mech Anal 84:307-352, 1983/1984), we investigate the global well-posedness of a free boundary problem of a three-dimensional incompressible viscoelastic fluid system in an infinite strip and with surface tension on the upper free boundary, provided that the initial data is sufficiently close to the equilibrium state.

  1. Applying downscaled global climate model data to a hydrodynamic surface-water and groundwater model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric; Stefanova, Lydia; Smith, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Precipitation data from Global Climate Models have been downscaled to smaller regions. Adapting this downscaled precipitation data to a coupled hydrodynamic surface-water/groundwater model of southern Florida allows an examination of future conditions and their effect on groundwater levels, inundation patterns, surface-water stage and flows, and salinity. The downscaled rainfall data include the 1996-2001 time series from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting ERA-40 simulation and both the 1996-1999 and 2038-2057 time series from two global climate models: the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamic Laboratory (GFDL). Synthesized surface-water inflow datasets were developed for the 2038-2057 simulations. The resulting hydrologic simulations, with and without a 30-cm sea-level rise, were compared with each other and field data to analyze a range of projected conditions. Simulations predicted generally higher future stage and groundwater levels and surface-water flows, with sea-level rise inducing higher coastal salinities. A coincident rise in sea level, precipitation and surface-water flows resulted in a narrower inland saline/fresh transition zone. The inland areas were affected more by the rainfall difference than the sea-level rise, and the rainfall differences make little difference in coastal inundation, but a larger difference in coastal salinities.

  2. A global assessment of forest surface albedo and its relationships with climate and atmospheric nitrogen deposition.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Stefano; Magnani, Federico; Nolè, Angelo; Van Noije, Twan; Borghetti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We present a global assessment of the relationships between the short-wave surface albedo of forests, derived from the MODIS satellite instrument product at 0.5° spatial resolution, with simulated atmospheric nitrogen deposition rates (Ndep ), and climatic variables (mean annual temperature Tm and total annual precipitation P), compiled at the same spatial resolution. The analysis was performed on the following five forest plant functional types (PFTs): evergreen needle-leaf forests (ENF); evergreen broad-leaf forests (EBF); deciduous needle-leaf forests (DNF); deciduous broad-leaf forests (DBF); and mixed-forests (MF). Generalized additive models (GAMs) were applied in the exploratory analysis to assess the functional nature of short-wave surface albedo relations to environmental variables. The analysis showed evident correlations of albedo with environmental predictors when data were pooled across PFTs: Tm and Ndep displayed a positive relationship with forest albedo, while a negative relationship was detected with P. These correlations are primarily due to surface albedo differences between conifer and broad-leaf species, and different species geographical distributions. However, the analysis performed within individual PFTs, strengthened by attempts to select 'pure' pixels in terms of species composition, showed significant correlations with annual precipitation and nitrogen deposition, pointing toward the potential effect of environmental variables on forest surface albedo at the ecosystem level. Overall, our global assessment emphasizes the importance of elucidating the ecological mechanisms that link environmental conditions and forest canopy properties for an improved parameterization of surface albedo in climate models.

  3. The effects of land surface process perturbations in a global ensemble forecast system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Guo; Zhu, Yuejian; Gong, Jiandong; Chen, Dehui; Wobus, Richard; Zhang, Zhe

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric variability is driven not only by internal dynamics, but also by external forcing, such as soil states, SST, snow, sea-ice cover, and so on. To investigate the forecast uncertainties and effects of land surface processes on numerical weather prediction, we added modules to perturb soil moisture and soil temperature into NCEP's Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFS), and compared the results of a set of experiments involving different configurations of land surface and atmospheric perturbation. It was found that uncertainties in different soil layers varied due to the multiple timescales of interactions between land surface and atmospheric processes. Perturbations of the soil moisture and soil temperature at the land surface changed sensible and latent heat flux obviously, as compared to the less or indirect land surface perturbation experiment from the day-to-day forecasts. Soil state perturbations led to greater variation in surface heat fluxes that transferred to the upper troposphere, thus reflecting interactions and the response to atmospheric external forcing. Various verification scores were calculated in this study. The results indicated that taking the uncertainties of land surface processes into account in GEFS could contribute a slight improvement in forecast skill in terms of resolution and reliability, a noticeable reduction in forecast error, as well as an increase in ensemble spread in an under-dispersive system. This paper provides a preliminary evaluation of the effects of land surface processes on predictability. Further research using more complex and suitable methods is needed to fully explore our understanding in this area.

  4. Generation of the 30 M-Mesh Global Digital Surface Model by Alos Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadono, T.; Nagai, H.; Ishida, H.; Oda, F.; Naito, S.; Minakawa, K.; Iwamoto, H.

    2016-06-01

    Topographical information is fundamental to many geo-spatial related information and applications on Earth. Remote sensing satellites have the advantage in such fields because they are capable of global observation and repeatedly. Several satellite-based digital elevation datasets were provided to examine global terrains with medium resolutions e.g. the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), the global digital elevation model by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER GDEM). A new global digital surface model (DSM) dataset using the archived data of the Panchromatic Remote-sensing Instrument for Stereo Mapping (PRISM) onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS, nicknamed "Daichi") has been completed on March 2016 by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) collaborating with NTT DATA Corp. and Remote Sensing Technology Center, Japan. This project is called "ALOS World 3D" (AW3D), and its dataset consists of the global DSM dataset with 0.15 arcsec. pixel spacing (approx. 5 m mesh) and ortho-rectified PRISM image with 2.5 m resolution. JAXA is also processing the global DSM with 1 arcsec. spacing (approx. 30 m mesh) based on the AW3D DSM dataset, and partially releasing it free of charge, which calls "ALOS World 3D 30 m mesh" (AW3D30). The global AW3D30 dataset will be released on May 2016. This paper describes the processing status, a preliminary validation result of the AW3D30 DSM dataset, and its public release status. As a summary of the preliminary validation of AW3D30 DSM, 4.40 m (RMSE) of the height accuracy of the dataset was confirmed using 5,121 independent check points distributed in the world.

  5. Global Distribution and Variability of Surface Skin and Surface Air Temperatures as Depicted in the AIRS Version-6 Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Lee, Jae N.; Iredell, Lena

    2014-01-01

    In this presentation, we will briefly describe the significant improvements made in the AIRS Version-6 retrieval algorithm, especially as to how they affect retrieved surface skin and surface air temperatures. The global distribution of seasonal 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM local time 12 year climatologies of Ts,a will be presented for the first time. We will also present the spatial distribution of short term 12 year anomaly trends of Ts,a at 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM, as well as the spatial distribution of temporal correlations of Ts,a with the El Nino Index. It will be shown that there are significant differences between the behavior of 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM Ts,a anomalies in some arid land areas.

  6. Experimental evidence that microbial activity lowers the albedo of glacier surfaces: the cryoconite casserole experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musilova, M.; Tranter, M.; Takeuchi, N.; Anesio, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Darkened glacier and ice sheet surfaces have lower albedos, absorb more solar radiation and consequently melt more rapidly. The increase in glacier surface darkening is an important positive feedback to warming global temperatures, leading to ever growing world-wide ice mass loss. Most studies focus primarily on glacial albedo darkening caused by the physical properties of snow and ice surfaces, and the deposition of dark impurities on glaciers. To date, however, the important effects of biological activity have not been included in most albedo reduction models. This study provides the first experimental evidence that microbial activity can significantly decrease the albedo of glacier surfaces. An original laboratory experiment, the cryoconite casserole, was designed to test the microbial darkening of glacier surface debris (cryoconite) under simulated Greenlandic summer conditions. It was found that minor fertilisation of the cryoconite (at nutrient concentrations typical of glacial ice melt) stimulated extensive microbial activity. Microbes intensified their organic carbon fixation and even mined phosphorous out of the glacier surface sediment. Furthermore, the microbial organic carbon production, accumulation and transformation caused the glacial debris to darken further by 17.3% reflectivity (albedo analogue). These experiments are consistent with the hypothesis that enhanced fertilisation by anthropogenic inputs results in substantial amounts of organic carbon fixation, debris darkening and ultimately to a considerable decrease in the ice albedo of glacier surfaces on global scales. The sizeable amounts of microbially produced glacier surface organic matter and nutrients can thus be a vital source of bioavailable nutrients for subglacial and downstream environments.

  7. Global Issues: Activities and Resources for the High School Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, Kenneth A.; Mulloy, Paul T.

    The book is an introduction to teaching about contemporary global concerns in the high school social studies classroom. It contains background and lesson plans for seven units in addition to 39 reproducible student handouts, annotated lists of other good classroom resources, and a guide to sources of teaching materials on global issues. Topics…

  8. Torrential activity facing global change in Southern French Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissak, Candide; Cossart, Etienne; Viel, Vincent; Fort, Monique; Arnaud-Fassetta, Gilles; Carlier, Benoit

    2016-04-01

    Geomorphic activity in a torrential catchment may be highly sporadic, erratic, especially because it depends on the sediment transfers. For a better flood risk management in large river catchments, where torrential tributaries provide significant sediment supply, it is essential to assess the amount of sediment transfers and deposition of such tributaries so that hazard assessment can be apprehended globally. This is one major issue of the SAMCO project (ANR 12 SENV-0004 SAMCO), which was designed for mountain hazard mitigation in a context of Global Change. Here, our objective is to understand how sediment cascades are coupled (or not) with climatic parameters. Here we focus on the Guil River catchment (Queyras, Southern French Alps - 317 km²). This catchment is prone to devastating summer floods (19 events since 1918: June 1957 (> R.I. 100 yr), June 2000 (R.I. 30 yr)...) characterized by considerable sediment transport from tributaries down to the Guil valley, highly facilitated by strong hillslope-channel coupling (≈ 12,000 m3 volume of sediment aggraded during the June 2000 flood event). During the last flood events several infrastructures and buildings were seriously damaged because the Guil River was carrying a large volume of sediments. For risk mitigation some protection equipments were built after the 1957 flood event, but most of them are now poorly maintained and might be not very effective in case of forthcoming flood events, especially if tributaries provide large volumes of sediment. Geomorphic data acquired through fieldwork and archives investigations were carried out to formalize the overall functioning of the sediment cascade. The initial phase of our study consists in identifying sediment sources and storage grounded on geomorphological analysis and mapping. The volumes of the sediment stores were then estimated and sedimentary transfers assessed using Terrestrial Laser Scanning survey (fine grained sediment inputs in the cascade), and the

  9. A prototype Global Drought Information System based on multiple land surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijssen, Bart; Shukla, Shrad; Lin, Chi-Yu; Lettenmaier, Dennis

    2013-04-01

    Droughts are pervasive natural hazards, which cause large economic losses and human suffering. While the absolute magnitude of these losses is greatest in the developed world, the relative impact is much higher in the developing world. Nonetheless, our ability to monitor and predict the development and occurrence of droughts at a global scale in near real-time is limited. This ability is of particular importance in estimating regional crop production and thus current and future prices of agricultural commodities, as well as the implementation of emergency measures in areas where the effects of drought threaten lives and livelihoods. We describe the implementation of a multi-model drought monitoring system, which provides near real-time estimates of soil moisture conditions for the global land areas between 50S and 50N with a latency of about one day. The system is an extension of similar systems developed by both the University of Washington and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction for use in the U.S. Drought Monitor. Global application of the protocols used in the U.S. systems poses new challenges, particularly with respect to the generation of meteorological forcings with which to drive the land surface models used in such a system. The global system we describe uses satellite-based precipitation (as contrasted with gridded station data in the U.S. systems) as well as temperature estimates based on global weather model analysis fields to track the evolution of soil moisture in near real-time at a spatial resolution of 0.5 degree using multiple land surface models. By comparing the modeled, near real-time soil moisture values with the results from long-term retrospective simulations, the model estimates can be placed in historic context (as soil moisture percentiles) and used to monitor the development of droughts around the world. We evaluate the performance of our system for historic droughts, and compare with other drought analyses and analytical

  10. Codominant water control on global interannual variability and trends in land surface phenology and greenness.

    PubMed

    Forkel, Matthias; Migliavacca, Mirco; Thonicke, Kirsten; Reichstein, Markus; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Weber, Ulrich; Carvalhais, Nuno

    2015-09-01

    Identifying the relative importance of climatic and other environmental controls on the interannual variability and trends in global land surface phenology and greenness is challenging. Firstly, quantifications of land surface phenology and greenness dynamics are impaired by differences between satellite data sets and phenology detection methods. Secondly, dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) that can be used to diagnose controls still reveal structural limitations and contrasting sensitivities to environmental drivers. Thus, we assessed the performance of a new developed phenology module within the LPJmL (Lund-Potsdam-Jena managed Lands) DGVM with a comprehensive ensemble of three satellite data sets of vegetation greenness and ten phenology detection methods, thereby thoroughly accounting for observational uncertainties. The improved and tested model allows us quantifying the relative importance of environmental controls on interannual variability and trends of land surface phenology and greenness at regional and global scales. We found that start of growing season interannual variability and trends are in addition to cold temperature mainly controlled by incoming radiation and water availability in temperate and boreal forests. Warming-induced prolongations of the growing season in high latitudes are dampened by a limited availability of light. For peak greenness, interannual variability and trends are dominantly controlled by water availability and land-use and land-cover change (LULCC) in all regions. Stronger greening trends in boreal forests of Siberia than in North America are associated with a stronger increase in water availability from melting permafrost soils. Our findings emphasize that in addition to cold temperatures, water availability is a codominant control for start of growing season and peak greenness trends at the global scale.

  11. Seven-Year SSM/I-Derived Global Ocean Surface Turbulent Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Shie, Chung-Lin; Atlas, Robert M.; Ardizzone, Joe

    2000-01-01

    A 7.5-year (July 1987-December 1994) dataset of daily surface specific humidity and turbulent fluxes (momentum, latent heat, and sensible heat) over global oceans has been retrieved from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) data and other data. It has a spatial resolution of 2.0 deg.x 2.5 deg. latitude-longitude. The retrieved surface specific humidity is generally accurate over global oceans as validated against the collocated radiosonde observations. The retrieved daily wind stresses and latent heat fluxes show useful accuracy as verified by those measured by the RV Moana Wave and IMET buoy in the western equatorial Pacific. The derived turbulent fluxes and input variables are also found to agree generally with the global distributions of annual-and seasonal-means of those based on 4-year (1990-93) comprehensive ocean-atmosphere data set (COADS) with adjustment in wind speeds and other climatological studies. The COADS has collected the most complete surface marine observations, mainly from merchant ships. However, ship measurements generally have poor accuracy, and variable spatial coverages. Significant differences between the retrieved and COADS-based are found in some areas of the tropical and southern extratropical oceans, reflecting the paucity of ship observations outside the northern extratropical oceans. Averaged over the global oceans, the retrieved wind stress is smaller but the latent heat flux is larger than those based on COADS. The former is suggested to be mainly due to overestimation of the adjusted ship-estimated wind speeds (depending on sea states), while the latter is suggested to be mainly due to overestimation of ship-measured dew point temperatures. The study suggests that the SSM/I-derived turbulent fluxes can be used for climate studies and coupled model validations.

  12. Tropical Cyclone Activity in Regional and Grid-Refined Global Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, A.

    2014-12-01

    Most electric power and transmission facilities in Japan operate for half a century or more, so it is important to ensure against general fatigue and damage from extreme weather and climate events. There is therefore a critical demand for useful assessments of the present weather and accurate predictions of future weather and climate. Tropical Cyclones (TCs) are among the most destructive weather phenomenon to the industry. This study compares simulated TC activity in regional climate simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and global climate simulations using the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) specifically to identify the benefits of global variable resolution simulation. Horizontal refinement to approximately 20km grid spacing over the Northwest Pacific is achieved through nesting for WRF and MPAS uses a variable resolution mesh. The ability of these two simulation approaches to capture TC activity is examined in single-year continuous simulations from May 2005 to April 2006. Compared to surface station and satellite derived rainfall datasets, tropical precipitation patterns are reproduced reasonably well by both models, but the annual precipitation totals are overestimated. Similarly, using an automated TC identification and tracking algorithm, results show that both models reproduce well TC genesis regions, tracks, wind-pressure relationships, and intensification rate, but TC frequencies are overestimated by both models. These results indicate that global variable resolution simulation is a suitable tool to study regional climate and TC activity. Future work will use MPAS to simulate longer periods of current and future climate to provide a unique view of the future change TC activity over Japan, tailored to the needs of the electric power industry.

  13. Global surface solar irradiance product derived from SCIAMACHY FRESCO cloud fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Stammes, Piet; Müller, Richard

    The FRESCO cloud retrieval algorithm has been developed as a simple but fast and efficient algorithm for GOME and SCIAMACHY (Koelemeijer et al., 2001; Fournier et al., 2006; Wang et al., 2008). FRESCO employs the O2 A band at 760 nm to retrieve the effective cloud fraction and cloud pressure using a simple Lambertian cloud model. The effective cloud fraction is a combination of geometric cloud fraction and cloud optical thickness, which yield the same reflectance at the top of the atmosphere as the cloud in the scene. It is well-known that clouds reduce the surface solar irradiance. Therefore the all-sky irradiance can be derived from the clear-sky irradiance with a scaling factor related to the cloud index. The cloud index is very similar to the effective cloud fraction by definition. The MAGIC (Mesoscale Atmospheric Global Irradiance Code) software converts the cloud index to the surface solar irradiance using the Heliosat method (Mueller et al. 2009). The MAGIC algorithm is also used by the CM-SAF surface solar irradiance product for clear sky cases. We applied the MAGIC software to FRESCO effective cloud fraction with slight modifications. In this presentation we will show the FRESCO-SSI monthly mean product and the comparison with the BSRN global irradiance data at Cabauw, the Netherlands and surface solar irradiance measurement at Tibetan plateau in China.

  14. Active control of compressible flows on a curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Parikh, P.; Bayliss, A.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of localized, time periodic surface heating and cooling over a curved surface is studied. This is a mechanism for the active control of unstable disturbances by phase cancellation and reinforcement. It is shown that the pressure gradient induced by the curvature significantly enhances the effectiveness of this form of active control. In particular, by appropriate choice of phase, active surface heating can completely stabilize and unstable wave.

  15. Active control of compressible flows on a curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Bayliss, A.; Parikh, P.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of localized, time periodic surface heating and cooling over a curved surface is studied. This is a mechanism for the active control of unstable disturbances by phase cancellation and reinforcement. It is shown that the pressure gradient induced by the curvature significantly enhances the effectiveness of this form of active control. In particular, by appropriate choice of phase, active surface heating can completely stabilize an unstable wave.

  16. The AVHRR component of a long-term global active fire data record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csiszar, I. A.; Giglio, L.; Schroeder, W.; Justice, C. O.

    2010-12-01

    The increased thermal signal in the 3.7 µm channel, together with radiometric measurements in the longwave and shortwave channels, enable the detection of thermal anomalies from AVHRR for a wide range of environmental and observing conditions. The AVHRR has been used worldwide for operational fire monitoring and for research purposes since at least the early 1990s. The long data record of AVHRR makes it an essential part of a long-term, multisensor record of fire activity. Fire Disturbance is an Essential Climate Variable (ECV) defined by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS). Within the Fire Disturbance ECV, active fire occurrence is one of the supplementary variables. General requirements for long-term satellite-based data records for ECVs are articulated in the GCOS Climate Monitoring Principles for satellite measurements, which specify requirements both for observing systems and for product generation and distribution. In this paper we provide an overview of the history of fire monitoring from AVHRR, and the potential and limitations for establishing a long-term data record in the context of the GCOS Climate Monitoring Principles. Major sensor-related challenges include the relatively low saturation level of the 3.7 µm channel, the orbital drift of the early NOAA satellites and pixel geolocation inaccuracies. Additionally, fire detection requires full resolution observations and therefore the globally and systematically available Global Area Coverage (GAC) data are inadequate for global active fire monitoring. The need for the compilation and reprocessing of full resolution measurements from on-board Local Area Coverage (LAC) data and direct-readout High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT) receiving stations is articulated by the Fire Mapping and Monitoring Implementation Team of the Global Observation of Forest and Landcover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) program, in collaboration with the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites. As fire detection

  17. Global-scale surface spectral variations on Titan seen from Cassini/VIMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, J.W.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, L.; Buratti, B.J.; Sotin, C.; Rodriguez, S.; Le, Mouelic S.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.; Nicholson, P.

    2007-01-01

    We present global-scale maps of Titan from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument on Cassini. We map at 64 near-infrared wavelengths simultaneously, covering the atmospheric windows at 0.94, 1.08, 1.28, 1.6, 2.0, 2.8, and 5 ??m with a typical resolution of 50 km/pixel or a typical total integration time of 1 s. Our maps have five to ten times the resolution of ground-based maps, better spectral resolution across most windows, coverage in multiple atmospheric windows, and represent the first spatially resolved maps of Titan at 5 ??m. The VIMS maps provide context and surface spectral information in support of other Cassini instruments. We note a strong latitudinal dependence in the spectral character of Titan's surface, and partition the surface into 9 spectral units that we describe in terms of spectral and spatial characteristics. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Global surface displacement data for assessing variability of displacement at a point on a fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hecker, Suzanne; Sickler, Robert; Feigelson, Leah; Abrahamson, Norman; Hassett, Will; Rosa, Carla; Sanquini, Ann

    2014-01-01

    This report presents a global dataset of site-specific surface-displacement data on faults. We have compiled estimates of successive displacements attributed to individual earthquakes, mainly paleoearthquakes, at sites where two or more events have been documented, as a basis for analyzing inter-event variability in surface displacement on continental faults. An earlier version of this composite dataset was used in a recent study relating the variability of surface displacement at a point to the magnitude-frequency distribution of earthquakes on faults, and to hazard from fault rupture (Hecker and others, 2013). The purpose of this follow-on report is to provide potential data users with an updated comprehensive dataset, largely complete through 2010 for studies in English-language publications, as well as in some unpublished reports and abstract volumes.

  19. Improved Prediction of Quasi-Global Vegetation Conditions Using Remotely-Sensed Surface Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolten, John; Crow, Wade

    2012-01-01

    The added value of satellite-based surface soil moisture retrievals for agricultural drought monitoring is assessed by calculating the lagged rank correlation between remotely-sensed vegetation indices (VI) and soil moisture estimates obtained both before and after the assimilation of surface soil moisture retrievals derived from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) into a soil water balance model. Higher soil moisture/VI lag correlations imply an enhanced ability to predict future vegetation conditions using estimates of current soil moisture. Results demonstrate that the assimilation of AMSR-E surface soil moisture retrievals substantially improve the performance of a global drought monitoring system - particularly in sparsely-instrumented areas of the world where high-quality rainfall observations are unavailable.

  20. A technique for global monitoring of net solar irradiance at the ocean surface. II - Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertock, Beth; Frouin, Robert; Gautier, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    The generation and validation of the first satellite-based long-term record of surface solar irradiance over the global oceans are addressed. The record is generated using Nimbus-7 earth radiation budget (ERB) wide-field-of-view plentary-albedo data as input to a numerical algorithm designed and implemented based on radiative transfer theory. The mean monthly values of net surface solar irradiance are computed on a 9-deg latitude-longitude spatial grid for November 1978-October 1985. The new data set is validated in comparisons with short-term, regional, high-resolution, satellite-based records. The ERB-based values of net surface solar irradiance are compared with corresponding values based on radiance measurements taken by the Visible-Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer aboard GOES series satellites. Errors in the new data set are estimated to lie between 10 and 20 W/sq m on monthly time scales.

  1. Surface tension of the core-crust interface of neutron stars with global charge neutrality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo; Wu, Yuan-Bin; Xue, She-Sheng

    2014-03-01

    It has been shown recently that taking into account strong, weak, electromagnetic, and gravitational interactions, and fulfilling the global charge neutrality of the system, a transition layer will happen between the core and crust of neutron stars, at the nuclear saturation density. We use relativistic mean field theory together with the Thomas-Fermi approximation to study the detailed structure of this transition layer and calculate its surface and Coulomb energy. We find that the surface tension is proportional to a power-law function of the baryon number density in the core bulk region. We also analyze the influence of the electron component and the gravitational field on the structure of the transition layer and the value of the surface tension, to compare and contrast with known phenomenological results in nuclear physics. Based on the above results we study the instability against Bohr-Wheeler surface deformations in the case of neutron stars obeying global charge neutrality. Assuming the core-crust transition at nuclear density ρcore≈2.7×1014 g cm-3, we find that the instability sets the upper limit to the crust density, ρcrustcrit≈1.2×1014 g cm-3. This result implies a nonzero lower limit to the maximum electric field of the core-crust transition surface and makes inaccessible a limit of quasilocal charge neutrality in the limit ρcrust=ρcore. The general framework presented here can be also applied to study the stability of sharp phase transitions in hybrid stars as well as in strange stars, both bare and with outer crust. The results of this work open the way to a more general analysis of the stability of these transition surfaces, accounting for other effects such as gravitational binding, centrifugal repulsion, magnetic field induced by rotating electric field, and therefore magnetic dipole-dipole interactions.

  2. A global database of lake surface temperatures collected by in situ and satellite methods from 1985-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sapna; Gray, Derek K.; Read, Jordan S.; O'Reilly, Catherine M.; Schneider, Philipp; Qudrat, Anam; Gries, Corinna; Stefanoff, Samantha; Hampton, Stephanie E.; Hook, Simon; Lenters, John D.; Livingstone, David M.; McIntyre, Peter B.; Adrian, Rita; Allan, Mathew G.; Anneville, Orlane; Arvola, Lauri; Austin, Jay; Bailey, John; Baron, Jill S.; Brookes, Justin; Chen, Yuwei; Daly, Robert; Dokulil, Martin; Dong, Bo; Ewing, Kye; de Eyto, Elvira; Hamilton, David; Havens, Karl; Haydon, Shane; Hetzenauer, Harald; Heneberry, Jocelyne; Hetherington, Amy L.; Higgins, Scott N.; Hixson, Eric; Izmest'Eva, Lyubov R.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Kangur, Külli; Kasprzak, Peter; Köster, Olivier; Kraemer, Benjamin M.; Kumagai, Michio; Kuusisto, Esko; Leshkevich, George; May, Linda; MacIntyre, Sally; Müller-Navarra, Dörthe; Naumenko, Mikhail; Noges, Peeter; Noges, Tiina; Niederhauser, Pius; North, Ryan P.; Paterson, Andrew M.; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Rigosi, Anna; Rimmer, Alon; Rogora, Michela; Rudstam, Lars; Rusak, James A.; Salmaso, Nico; Samal, Nihar R.; Schindler, Daniel E.; Schladow, Geoffrey; Schmidt, Silke R.; Schultz, Tracey; Silow, Eugene A.; Straile, Dietmar; Teubner, Katrin; Verburg, Piet; Voutilainen, Ari; Watkinson, Andrew; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.; Williamson, Craig E.; Woo, Kara H.

    2015-03-01

    Global environmental change has influenced lake surface temperatures, a key driver of ecosystem structure and function. Recent studies have suggested significant warming of water temperatures in individual lakes across many different regions around the world. However, the spatial and temporal coherence associated with the magnitude of these trends remains unclear. Thus, a global data set of water temperature is required to understand and synthesize global, long-term trends in surface water temperatures of inland bodies of water. We assembled a database of summer lake surface temperatures for 291 lakes collected in situ and/or by satellites for the period 1985-2009. In addition, corresponding climatic drivers (air temperatures, solar radiation, and cloud cover) and geomorphometric characteristics (latitude, longitude, elevation, lake surface area, maximum depth, mean depth, and volume) that influence lake surface temperatures were compiled for each lake. This unique dataset offers an invaluable baseline perspective on global-scale lake thermal conditions as environmental change continues.

  3. A global database of lake surface temperatures collected by in situ and satellite methods from 1985–2009

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sapna; Gray, Derek K; Read, Jordan S; O’Reilly, Catherine M; Schneider, Philipp; Qudrat, Anam; Gries, Corinna; Stefanoff, Samantha; Hampton, Stephanie E; Hook, Simon; Lenters, John D; Livingstone, David M; McIntyre, Peter B; Adrian, Rita; Allan, Mathew G; Anneville, Orlane; Arvola, Lauri; Austin, Jay; Bailey, John; Baron, Jill S; Brookes, Justin; Chen, Yuwei; Daly, Robert; Dokulil, Martin; Dong, Bo; Ewing, Kye; de Eyto, Elvira; Hamilton, David; Havens, Karl; Haydon, Shane; Hetzenauer, Harald; Heneberry, Jocelyne; Hetherington, Amy L; Higgins, Scott N; Hixson, Eric; Izmest’eva, Lyubov R; Jones, Benjamin M; Kangur, Külli; Kasprzak, Peter; Köster, Olivier; Kraemer, Benjamin M; Kumagai, Michio; Kuusisto, Esko; Leshkevich, George; May, Linda; MacIntyre, Sally; Müller-Navarra, Dörthe; Naumenko, Mikhail; Noges, Peeter; Noges, Tiina; Niederhauser, Pius; North, Ryan P; Paterson, Andrew M; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Rigosi, Anna; Rimmer, Alon; Rogora, Michela; Rudstam, Lars; Rusak, James A; Salmaso, Nico; Samal, Nihar R; Schindler, Daniel E; Schladow, Geoffrey; Schmidt, Silke R; Schultz, Tracey; Silow, Eugene A; Straile, Dietmar; Teubner, Katrin; Verburg, Piet; Voutilainen, Ari; Watkinson, Andrew; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A; Williamson, Craig E; Woo, Kara H

    2015-01-01

    Global environmental change has influenced lake surface temperatures, a key driver of ecosystem structure and function. Recent studies have suggested significant warming of water temperatures in individual lakes across many different regions around the world. However, the spatial and temporal coherence associated with the magnitude of these trends remains unclear. Thus, a global data set of water temperature is required to understand and synthesize global, long-term trends in surface water temperatures of inland bodies of water. We assembled a database of summer lake surface temperatures for 291 lakes collected in situ and/or by satellites for the period 1985–2009. In addition, corresponding climatic drivers (air temperatures, solar radiation, and cloud cover) and geomorphometric characteristics (latitude, longitude, elevation, lake surface area, maximum depth, mean depth, and volume) that influence lake surface temperatures were compiled for each lake. This unique dataset offers an invaluable baseline perspective on global-scale lake thermal conditions as environmental change continues. PMID:25977814

  4. A global database of lake surface temperatures collected by in situ and satellite methods from 1985–2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharma, Sapna; Gray, Derek; Read, Jordan S.; O'Reilly, Catherine; Schneider, Philipp; Qudrat, Anam; Gries, Corinna; Stefanoff, Samantha; Hampton, Stephanie; Hook, Simon; Lenters, John; Livingstone, David M.; McIntyre, Peter B.; Adrian, Rita; Allan, Mathew; Anneville, Orlane; Arvola, Lauri; Austin, Jay; Bailey, John E.; Baron, Jill S.; Brookes, Justin D; Chen, Yuwei; Daly, Robert; Ewing, Kye; de Eyto, Elvira; Dokulil, Martin; Hamilton, David B.; Havens, Karl; Haydon, Shane; Hetzenaeur, Harald; Heneberry, Jocelyn; Hetherington, Amy; Higgins, Scott; Hixson, Eric; Izmest'eva, Lyubov; Jones, Benjamin M.; Kangur, Kulli; Kasprzak, Peter; Kraemer, Benjamin; Kumagai, Michio; Kuusisto, Esko; Leshkevich, George; May, Linda; MacIntyre, Sally; Dörthe Müller-Navarra,; Naumenko, Mikhail; Noges, Peeter; Noges, Tiina; Pius Niederhauser,; North, Ryan P.; Andrew Paterson,; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Rigosi, Anna; Rimmer, Alon; Rogora, Michela; Lars Rudstam,; Rusak, James A.; Salmaso, Nico; Samal, Nihar R.; Daniel E. Schindler,; Geoffrey Schladow,; Schmidt, Silke R.; Tracey Schultz,; Silow, Eugene A.; Straile, Dietmar; Teubner, Katrin; Verburg, Piet; Voutilainen, Ari; Watkinson, Andrew; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.; Craig E. Williamson,; Kara H. Woo,

    2015-01-01

    Global environmental change has influenced lake surface temperatures, a key driver of ecosystem structure and function. Recent studies have suggested significant warming of water temperatures in individual lakes across many different regions around the world. However, the spatial and temporal coherence associated with the magnitude of these trends remains unclear. Thus, a global data set of water temperature is required to understand and synthesize global, long-term trends in surface water temperatures of inland bodies of water. We assembled a database of summer lake surface temperatures for 291 lakes collected in situ and/or by satellites for the period 1985–2009. In addition, corresponding climatic drivers (air temperatures, solar radiation, and cloud cover) and geomorphometric characteristics (latitude, longitude, elevation, lake surface area, maximum depth, mean depth, and volume) that influence lake surface temperatures were compiled for each lake. This unique dataset offers an invaluable baseline perspective on global-scale lake thermal conditions as environmental change continues.

  5. A global database of lake surface temperatures collected by in situ and satellite methods from 1985-2009.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sapna; Gray, Derek K; Read, Jordan S; O'Reilly, Catherine M; Schneider, Philipp; Qudrat, Anam; Gries, Corinna; Stefanoff, Samantha; Hampton, Stephanie E; Hook, Simon; Lenters, John D; Livingstone, David M; McIntyre, Peter B; Adrian, Rita; Allan, Mathew G; Anneville, Orlane; Arvola, Lauri; Austin, Jay; Bailey, John; Baron, Jill S; Brookes, Justin; Chen, Yuwei; Daly, Robert; Dokulil, Martin; Dong, Bo; Ewing, Kye; de Eyto, Elvira; Hamilton, David; Havens, Karl; Haydon, Shane; Hetzenauer, Harald; Heneberry, Jocelyne; Hetherington, Amy L; Higgins, Scott N; Hixson, Eric; Izmest'eva, Lyubov R; Jones, Benjamin M; Kangur, Külli; Kasprzak, Peter; Köster, Olivier; Kraemer, Benjamin M; Kumagai, Michio; Kuusisto, Esko; Leshkevich, George; May, Linda; MacIntyre, Sally; Müller-Navarra, Dörthe; Naumenko, Mikhail; Noges, Peeter; Noges, Tiina; Niederhauser, Pius; North, Ryan P; Paterson, Andrew M; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Rigosi, Anna; Rimmer, Alon; Rogora, Michela; Rudstam, Lars; Rusak, James A; Salmaso, Nico; Samal, Nihar R; Schindler, Daniel E; Schladow, Geoffrey; Schmidt, Silke R; Schultz, Tracey; Silow, Eugene A; Straile, Dietmar; Teubner, Katrin; Verburg, Piet; Voutilainen, Ari; Watkinson, Andrew; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A; Williamson, Craig E; Woo, Kara H

    2015-01-01

    Global environmental change has influenced lake surface temperatures, a key driver of ecosystem structure and function. Recent studies have suggested significant warming of water temperatures in individual lakes across many different regions around the world. However, the spatial and temporal coherence associated with the magnitude of these trends remains unclear. Thus, a global data set of water temperature is required to understand and synthesize global, long-term trends in surface water temperatures of inland bodies of water. We assembled a database of summer lake surface temperatures for 291 lakes collected in situ and/or by satellites for the period 1985-2009. In addition, corresponding climatic drivers (air temperatures, solar radiation, and cloud cover) and geomorphometric characteristics (latitude, longitude, elevation, lake surface area, maximum depth, mean depth, and volume) that influence lake surface temperatures were compiled for each lake. This unique dataset offers an invaluable baseline perspective on global-scale lake thermal conditions as environmental change continues.

  6. A modeling study of irrigation effects on global surface water and groundwater resources under a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Guoyong; Huang, Maoyi; Tang, Qiuhong; Leung, L. Ruby

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the effects of irrigation on global water resources by performing and analyzing Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4) simulations driven by downscaled/bias-corrected historical simulations and future projections from five General Circulation Models (GCMs). For each climate scenario, three sets of numerical experiments were performed: (1) a CTRL experiment in which all crops are assumed to be rainfed; (2) an IRRIG experiment in which the irrigation module is activated using surface water (SW) to feed irrigation; and (3) a PUMP experiment in which a groundwater pumping scheme coupled with the irrigation module is activated for conjunctive use of surface water and groundwater (GW) for irrigation. The parameters associated with irrigation and groundwater pumping are calibrated based on a global inventory of census-based water use compiled by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO). Our results suggest that irrigation could lead to two major effects: SW (GW) depletion in regions with irrigation primarily fed by SW (GW), respectively. Furthermore, irrigation depending primarily on SW tends to have larger impacts on low-flow than high-flow conditions, suggesting increased vulnerability to drought. By the end of the 21st century, combined effect of increased irrigation water demand and amplified temporal-spatial variability of water supply may lead to severe local water scarcity for irrigation. Regionally, irrigation has the potential to aggravate/alleviate climate-induced changes of SW/GW although such effects are negligible when averaged globally. Our study highlights the need to account for irrigation effects and sources in assessing regional climate change impacts.

  7. An application of active surface heating for augmenting lift and reducing drag of an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio; Badavi, Forooz F.; Noonan, Kevin W.

    1988-01-01

    Application of active control to separated flow on the RC(6)-08 airfoil at high angle of attack by localized surface heating is numerically simulated by integrating the compressible 2-D nonlinear Navier-Stokes equation solver. Active control is simulated by local modification of the temperature boundary condition over a narrow strip of the upper surface of the airfoil. Both mean and perturbed profiles are favorably altered when excited with the same natural frequency of the shear layer by moderate surface heating for both laminar and turbulent separation. The shear layer is found to be very sensitive to localized surface heating in the vicinity of the separation point. The excitation field at the surface sufficiently altered both the local as well as the global circulation to cause a significant increase in lift and reduction in drag.

  8. Control of the boundary layer separation about an airfoil by active surface heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio; Badavi, Forooz F.; Noonan, Kevin W.

    1988-01-01

    Application of active control to separated flow on the RC(6)-08 airfoil at high angle of attack by localized surface heating is numerically simulated by integrating the compressible two-dimensional nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations solver. Active control is simulated by local modification of the temperature boundary condition over a narrow strip on the upper surface of the airfoil. Both mean and perturbed profiles are favorably altered when excited with the same natural frequency of the shear layer by moderate surface heating for both laminar and turbulent separation. The shear layer is found to be very sensitive to localized surface heating in the vicinity of the separation point. The excitation field at the surface sufficiently altered both the local as well as the global circulation to cause a significant increase in lift and reduction in drag.

  9. Spatially Complete Global Surface Albedos Derived from Terra/MODIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Moody, Eric G.; Platnick, Steven; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2004-01-01

    Spectral land surface albedo is an important parameter for describing the radiative properties of the Earth. Accordingly it reflects the consequences of natural and human interactions, such as anthropogenic, meteorological, and phenological effects, on global and local climatological trends. Consequently, albedos are integral parts in a variety of research areas, such as general circulation models (GCMs), energy balance studies, modeling of land use and land use change, and biophysical, oceanographic, and meteorological studies. Recent production of land surface anisotropy, diffuse bihemispherical (white-sky) albedo and direct beam directional hemispherical (black-sky) albedo from observations acquired by the MODIS instruments aboard NASA s Terra and Aqua satellite platforms have provided researchers with unprecedented spatial, spectral, and temporal information on the land surface's radiative characteristics. Cloud cover, which cutails retrievals, and the presence of ephemeral and seasonal snow limit the snow-free data to approximately half the global land surfaces on an annual equal-angle basis. This precludes the MOD43B3 albedo products from being used in some remote sensing and ground-based applications, climate models, and global change research projects. An ecosystem-dependent temporal interpolation technique is described that has been developed to fill missing or seasonally snow-covered data in the official MOD43B3 albedo product. The method imposes pixel-level and local regional ecosystem-dependent phenological behavior onto retrieved pixel temporal data in such a way as to maintain pixel-level spatial and spectral detail and integrity. The phenological curves are derived from statistics based on the MODIS MOD12Q1 IGBP land cover classification product geolocated with the MOD43B3 data. The resulting snow-free value-added products provide the scientific community with spatially and temporally complete global white- and black-sky surface albedo maps and

  10. Global surface water quality hotspots under climate change and anthropogenic developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vliet, Michelle T. H.; Yearsley, John R.

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades, freshwater usage for various sectors (e.g. agriculture, industry, energy and domestic) has more than doubled. A growing global population will place further demands on water supplies, whereas the availability and quality of water resources will be affected by climate change and human impacts. These developments will increase imbalances between fresh water demand and supply in terms of both water quantity and water quality. Here we discuss a methodology to identify regions of the world where surface water quality is expected to deteriorate under climate change and anthropogenic developments. Our approach integrates global hydrological-water quality modelling, climate and socio-economic scenarios and relations of water quality with physical and socio-economic drivers.

  11. PATTERNS OF ACTIVITY IN A GLOBAL MODEL OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, S. J.; Viall, N. M. E-mail: Nicholeen.M.Viall@nasa.gov

    2016-04-10

    In this work we investigate the global activity patterns predicted from a model active region heated by distributions of nanoflares that have a range of frequencies. What differs is the average frequency of the distributions. The activity patterns are manifested in time lag maps of narrow-band instrument channel pairs. We combine hydrodynamic and forward modeling codes with a magnetic field extrapolation to create a model active region and apply the time lag method to synthetic observations. Our aim is not to reproduce a particular set of observations in detail, but to recover some typical properties and patterns observed in active regions. Our key findings are the following. (1) Cooling dominates the time lag signature and the time lags between the channel pairs are generally consistent with observed values. (2) Shorter coronal loops in the core cool more quickly than longer loops at the periphery. (3) All channel pairs show zero time lag when the line of sight passes through coronal loop footpoints. (4) There is strong evidence that plasma must be re-energized on a timescale comparable to the cooling timescale to reproduce the observed coronal activity, but it is likely that a relatively broad spectrum of heating frequencies are operating across active regions. (5) Due to their highly dynamic nature, we find nanoflare trains produce zero time lags along entire flux tubes in our model active region that are seen between the same channel pairs in observed active regions.

  12. Relationships Between Global Warming and Tropical Cyclone Activity in the Western North Pacific

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    In this work, we investigate the relationships between global warming and tropical cyclone activity in the Western North Pacific (WNP). Our...hypothesis is that global warming impacts on TC activity occur through changes in the large scale environmental factors (LSEFs) known to be important in...averages. Using a least squares fit, we identify global warming signals in both the SST and vertical wind shear data across the WNP. These signals vary

  13. Surface Wind Stresses and Triggering of Global Dust Storms on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischna, Michael A.; Shirley, James H.

    2016-10-01

    Global dust storms on Mars occur during summer in the southern hemisphere, but their occurrence in some years and not in others has stubbornly eluded explanation. Shirley (2016, in review, and at arxiv.org/abs/1605.02707) and Mischna and Shirley (2016, in revision, and at arxiv.org/abs/1602.09137) have demonstrated the role of a so-called "coupling term acceleration" (CTA) in modifying the Mars global circulation through potential exchange of Mars' orbital and rotational momenta. The CTA has been incorporated into the MarsWRF general circulation model (GCM), which reveals distinct changes to the circulation due to the CTA, leading to conditions favorable to GDS formation in all years in which perihelion season GDS were observed, and conditions unfavorable in nearly all other years. These circulation changes reveal themselves, in part, through changes in surface wind stress, which is a strong function of near-surface wind speed. We present additional analysis of these results for the past years with perihelion season GDS (7 in total) showing commonalities in the evolution of surface stresses in the season leading up to GDS initiation. Specifically, the enhancement of surface stress during this pre-storm season, arising from the orbit-spin coupling in years with perihelion season storms, presents some common patterns. Among these are the rate and duration of increase of wind stress, and the minimum level of enhancement from the CTA that is apparently required in these years prior to initiation of a GDS. Previously we assessed changes in surface stress using a simple, dust-free model atmosphere. Here, further, we perform parallel simulations for MY 24-27 using realistic dust profiles from TES limb observations. The inclusion of dust in the GCM modifies atmospheric opacity and will alter global atmospheric temperatures leading to a markedly different atmospheric state. We find that the inclusion of dust in the atmosphere reduces the magnitude of surface stresses as

  14. Requirements for extravehicular activities on the lunar and Martian surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Mariann F.; Schentrup, Susan M.

    1990-01-01

    Basic design reference requirements pertinent to EVA equipment on lunar and martian surfaces are provided. Environmental factors affecting surface EVA are analyzed including gravity, dust, atmospheric conditions, thermal gradients, lightning conditions, and radiation effects, and activities associated with surface EVA are outlined. Environmental and activity effects on EVA equipment are assessed, and emphasis is placed on planetary surface portable life support systems (PLSS), suit development, protection from micrometeoroids, dust, and radiation, food and water supplies, and the extravehicular mobility-unit thermal-control system. Environmental and activity impacts on PLSS design are studied, with focus on base self-sufficiency and reduction in resupply logistics.

  15. Control surface spanwise placement in active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Burken, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    All flutter suppression systems require sensors to detect the movement of the lifting surface and to activate a control surface according to a synthesized control law. Most of the work performed to date relates to the development of control laws based on predetermined locations of sensors and control surfaces. These locations of sensors and control surfaces are determined either arbitrarily, or by means of a trial and error procedure. The aerodynamic energy concept indicates that the sensors should be located within the activated strip. Furthermore, the best chordwise location of a sensor activating a T.E. control surface is around the 65 percent chord location. The best chordwise location for a sensor activating a L.E. surface is shown to lie upstream of the wing (around 20 percent upstream of the leading edge), or alternatively, two sensors located along the same chord should be used.

  16. Think Locally, Act Globally! Linking Local and Global Communities through Democracy and Environment. Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowler, Lorraine

    Designed so that it can be adapted to a wide range of student abilities and institutional settings, this learning module on the human dimensions of global change seeks to: actively engage students in problem solving, challenge them to think critically, invite them to participate in the process of scientific inquiry, and involve them in cooperative…

  17. Global circulation as the main source of cloud activity on Titan.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Sébastien; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Rannou, Pascal; Tobie, Gabriel; Baines, Kevin H; Barnes, Jason W; Griffith, Caitlin A; Hirtzig, Mathieu; Pitman, Karly M; Sotin, Christophe; Brown, Robert H; Buratti, Bonnie J; Clark, Roger N; Nicholson, Phil D

    2009-06-04

    Clouds on Titan result from the condensation of methane and ethane and, as on other planets, are primarily structured by circulation of the atmosphere. At present, cloud activity mainly occurs in the southern (summer) hemisphere, arising near the pole and at mid-latitudes from cumulus updrafts triggered by surface heating and/or local methane sources, and at the north (winter) pole, resulting from the subsidence and condensation of ethane-rich air into the colder troposphere. General circulation models predict that this distribution should change with the seasons on a 15-year timescale, and that clouds should develop under certain circumstances at temperate latitudes ( approximately 40 degrees ) in the winter hemisphere. The models, however, have hitherto been poorly constrained and their long-term predictions have not yet been observationally verified. Here we report that the global spatial cloud coverage on Titan is in general agreement with the models, confirming that cloud activity is mainly controlled by the global circulation. The non-detection of clouds at latitude approximately 40 degrees N and the persistence of the southern clouds while the southern summer is ending are, however, both contrary to predictions. This suggests that Titan's equator-to-pole thermal contrast is overestimated in the models and that its atmosphere responds to the seasonal forcing with a greater inertia than expected.

  18. Global circulation as the main source of cloud activity on Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, S.; Le, Mouelic S.; Rannou, P.; Tobie, G.; Baines, K.H.; Barnes, J.W.; Griffith, C.A.; Hirtzig, M.; Pitman, K.M.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    Clouds on Titan result from the condensation of methane and ethane and, as on other planets, are primarily structured by circulation of the atmosphere. At present, cloud activity mainly occurs in the southern (summer) hemisphere, arising near the pole and at mid-latitudes from cumulus updrafts triggered by surface heating and/or local methane sources, and at the north (winter) pole, resulting from the subsidence and condensation of ethane-rich air into the colder troposphere. General circulation models predict that this distribution should change with the seasons on a 15-year timescale, and that clouds should develop under certain circumstances at temperate latitudes (40??) in the winter hemisphere. The models, however, have hitherto been poorly constrained and their long-term predictions have not yet been observationally verified. Here we report that the global spatial cloud coverage on Titan is in general agreement with the models, confirming that cloud activity is mainly controlled by the global circulation. The non-detection of clouds at latitude 40??N and the persistence of the southern clouds while the southern summer is ending are, however, both contrary to predictions. This suggests that Titans equator-to-pole thermal contrast is overestimated in the models and that its atmosphere responds to the seasonal forcing with a greater inertia than expected. ?? 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of a Pressure Sensitive Paint System for Measuring Global Surface Pressures on Rotorcraft Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.; Lipford, William E.; Wong, Oliver D.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Ingram, JoAnne L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper will describe the results from a proof of concept test to examine the feasibility of using Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) to measure global surface pressures on rotorcraft blades in hover. The test was performed using the U.S. Army 2-meter Rotor Test Stand (2MRTS) and 15% scale swept rotor blades. Data were collected from five blades using both the intensity- and lifetime-based approaches. This paper will also outline several modifications and improvements that are underway to develop a system capable of measuring pressure distributions on up to four blades simultaneously at hover and forward flight conditions.

  20. Nimbus 7 SMMR Derived Seasonal Variations in the Water Vapor, Liquid Water and Surface Winds over the Global Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Short, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Monthly mean distributions of water vapor and liquid water contained in a vertical column of the atmosphere and the surface wind speed were derived from Nimbus Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) observations over the global oceans for the period November 1978 to November 1979. The remote sensing techniques used to estimate these parameters from SMMR are presented to reveal the limitations, accuracies, and applicability of the satellite-derived information for climate studies. On a time scale of the order of a month, the distribution of atmospheric water vapor over the oceans is controlled by the sea surface temperature and the large scale atmospheric circulation. The monthly mean distribution of liquid water content in the atmosphere over the oceans closely reflects the precipitation patterns associated with the convectively and baroclinically active regions. Together with the remotely sensed surface wind speed that is causing the sea surface stress, the data collected reveal the manner in which the ocean-atmosphere system is operating. Prominent differences in the water vapor patterns from one year to the next, or from month to month, are associated with anomalies in the wind and geopotential height fields. In association with such circulation anomalies the precipitation patterns deduced from the meteorological network over adjacent continents also reveal anomalous distributions.

  1. Global composites of surface wind speeds in tropical cyclones based on a 12 year scatterometer database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotz, Bradley W.; Jiang, Haiyan

    2016-10-01

    A 12 year global database of rain-corrected satellite scatterometer surface winds for tropical cyclones (TCs) is used to produce composites of TC surface wind speed distributions relative to vertical wind shear and storm motion directions in each TC-prone basin and various TC intensity stages. These composites corroborate ideas presented in earlier studies, where maxima are located right of motion in the Earth-relative framework. The entire TC surface wind asymmetry is down motion left for all basins and for lower strength TCs after removing the motion vector. Relative to the shear direction, the motion-removed composites indicate that the surface wind asymmetry is located down shear left for the outer region of all TCs, but for the inner-core region it varies from left of shear to down shear right for different basin and TC intensity groups. Quantification of the surface wind asymmetric structure in further stratifications is a necessary next step for this scatterometer data set.

  2. The Martian Surface As Investigated by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, P.; Bandfield, J.; Hamilton, V.; Lane, M.; Ruff, S.; Clark, R.; Hoefen, T.; Peatson, R.; Clancy, T.; Conrath, B.; Kieffer, H.; Mullins, K.; Titus, T.; Kuzmin, R.; Malin, M.; Edgett, K.; Pearl, J.; Smith, M.; Roush, T.

    1998-11-01

    The surface of Mars has been studied using the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument during the initial phases of the Mars Global Surveyor mission. The TES spectra observed from orbit are a complex combination of surface and atmospheric emitted and transmitted energy. These spectra exhibit the signatures of atmospheric dust, water-ice clouds, C02, water vapor, and surface minerals, in varying abundances. Separation of these components is complex and requires careful modeling of the composition, particle size, and temperature of the atmospheric constituents. The abundance of atmospheric dust and water-ice clouds has been determined and can be mapped in space and time. Temperature retrievals have been performed using the 15 micron C02 absorption feature, and used to study the dynamics of the atmosphere. To date several surface components have been identified. The most significant of these is an accumulation of hematite within a localized zone with relatively sharp boundaries approximately 300 km in diameter centered near the equator at 5 W. The hematite discovered by the TES most likely did not form by a ubiquitous surface weathering processes.

  3. Inhibitors for Androgen Receptor Activation Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    new class of chemical therapeutics for treatment of prostate cancer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS X-ray crystallography, high throughput screening, medicinal... treatments because anti-androgen resis- tance usually develops. We conducted functional and x-ray screens to identify compounds that bind the AR surface and...possibility that such compounds could be used for prostate cancer treatment . It is unlikely that natural T3 or Triac concentrations approach levels required

  4. Global estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water balance model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies of global hydrologic cycles, carbon cycles and climate change are greatly facilitated when global estimates of evapotranspiration (E) are available. We have developed an air-relative-humidity-based two-source (ARTS) E model that simulates the surface energy balance, soil water balance, and e...

  5. Comparison of changes in the global magnetic field and spot activity in cycles 21 to 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenko, I. A.

    2016-12-01

    We compare changes in the solar global magnetic field (GMF) given by the distribution of magnetic fields on the source surface and spot activity characterized by Wolf numbers, the number of spots, and their area reflecting the dynamics of local magnetic fields of active regions during cycles 21 to 24 (1976-2015). The results indicate that the changes in the GMF and spot activity have certain differences, both in different cycles generally and in the phases of growth, maximum, and decline in each individual cycle. The maximum and minimum correlations between the GMF and spot activity are observed in cycles 22 and 24, respectively. The maximum correlation is reached in growth phases (cycles 21, 22, and 24) and in the phase of decline (cycle 23), which can be associated with the fact that the phase of decline in cycle 23 is anomalously extended. Almost no correlation between the GMF and spot activity can be found at the phases of the maximum and early beginning of decline in all cycles. This can be associated with structural reorganization and sign change in the GMF.

  6. Going Global Activity Guide: A Project To Educate and Involve American Students in Global Hunger Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Gene; Balakshin, Maria

    Global hunger is one of the most urgent health and social problems the world faces at the beginning of the new millennium. In a world that produces enough food to feed every human being on the planet, there are still some 830 million people who do not get enough food on a daily basis. About 24,000 people die each day from the effects of hunger;…

  7. The Potential Radiative Forcing of Global Land Use and Land Cover Change Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. S.; Mahowald, N. M.; Kloster, S.

    2014-12-01

    Given the expected increase in pressure on land resources over the next century, there is a need to understand the total impacts of activities associated with land use and land cover change (LULCC). Here we quantify these impacts using the radiative forcing metric, including forcings from changes in long-lived greenhouse gases, tropospheric ozone, aerosol effects, and land surface albedo. We estimate radiative forcings from the different agents for historical LULCC and for six future projections using simulations from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Land Model and Community Atmosphere Models and additional offline analyses. When all forcing agents are considered together we show that 45% (+30%, -20%) of the present-day (2010) anthropogenic radiative forcing can be attributed to LULCC. Changes in the emission of non-CO2 greenhouse gases and aerosols from LULCC enhance the total LULCC radiative forcing by a factor of 2 to 3 with respect to the forcing from CO2 alone. In contrast, the non-CO2 forcings from fossil fuel burning are roughly neutral, due largely to the negative (cooling) impact of aerosols from these sources. We partition the global LULCC radiative forcing into three major sources: direct modification of land cover (e.g. deforestation), agricultural activities, and fire regime changes. Contributions from deforestation and agriculture are roughly equal in the present day, while changes to wildfire activity impose a small negative forcing globally. In 2100, deforestation activities comprise the majority of the LULCC radiative forcing for all projections except one (Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5). This suggests that realistic scenarios of future forest area change are essential for projecting the contribution of LULCC to climate change. However, the commonly used RCP land cover change projections all include decreases in global deforestation rates over the next 85 years. To place an upper bound on the potential

  8. A technique for global monitoring of net solar irradiance at the ocean surface. I - Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, Robert; Chertock, Beth

    1992-01-01

    An accurate long-term (84-month) climatology of net surface solar irradiance over the global oceans from Nimbus-7 earth radiation budget (ERB) wide-field-of-view planetary-albedo data is generated via an algorithm based on radiative transfer theory. Net surface solar irradiance is computed as the difference between the top-of-atmosphere incident solar irradiance (known) and the sum of the solar irradiance reflected back to space by the earth-atmosphere system (observed) and the solar irradiance absorbed by atmospheric constituents (modeled). It is shown that the effects of clouds and clear-atmosphere constituents can be decoupled on a monthly time scale, which makes it possible to directly apply the algorithm with monthly averages of ERB planetary-albedo data. Compared theoretically with the algorithm of Gautier et al. (1980), the present algorithm yields higher solar irradiance values in clear and thin cloud conditions and lower values in thick cloud conditions.

  9. Sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes: Mean state and interannual variability

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang

    2013-03-01

    This study examines the sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes (LSP) using an atmospheric general circulation model both uncoupled (with prescribed SSTs) and coupled to an oceanic general circulation model. The emphasis is on the interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes, which have first order influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented by the differences between model simulations, in which two land surface schemes are considered: 1) a simple land scheme that specifies surface albedo and soil moisture availability, and 2) the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB), which allows for consideration of interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical process. Observational datasets are also employed to assess the reality of model-revealed sensitivity. The mean state sensitivity to different LSP is stronger in the coupled mode, especially in the tropical Pacific. Furthermore, seasonal cycle of SSTs in the equatorial Pacific, as well as ENSO frequency, amplitude, and locking to the seasonal cycle of SSTs are significantly modified and more realistic with SSiB. This outstanding sensitivity of the atmosphere-ocean system develops through changes in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. Our results further demonstrate that the direct impact of land-atmosphere interactions on the tropical climate is modified by feedbacks associated with perturbed oceanic conditions ("indirect effect" of LSP). The magnitude of such indirect effect is strong enough to suggest that comprehensive studies on the importance of LSP on the global climate have to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere-ocean interactions.

  10. Activities of the global biosphere as reflected in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ records

    SciTech Connect

    Pearman, G.I.; Hyson, P.

    1980-08-20

    A two-dimensional global diffusion simulation model is used to establish zonal and monthly average net surface fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) which are consistent with the variations in CO/sub 2/ concentration observed at six monitoring stations distributed globally. These fluxes represent the zonally averaged net ecosystem production of primarily terrestrial biosphere. Annually, the global net ecosystem production during the photosynthetically more active season removed 6.8 x 10/sup 12/ kg of carbon from the atmosphere, returning it during the less active winter months. This turnover represents about 14% of the annual continental net primary production of carbon and 0.8% of the total terrestrial biomass. During the growing season, net ecosystem production appears to be relatively independent of latitude in the northern hemisphere (approx. 6 x 10/sup -9/ kg carbon m/sup -2/ s/sup -1/). The model indicates that time correlations between the CO/sub 2/ concentration at different altitudes of the northern hemisphere with the interhemispheric advection of air results in a net interhemispheric CO/sub 2/ flux which becomes zero when the South Pole CO/sub 2/ concentration is on average 0.92 ppmV above that at Mauna Loa, Hawaii. The influence of both the net and the gross atmospheric biospheric exchange of carbon on the atmospheric stable carbon isotope ratio is modeled. On time scales of a year the gross turnover of carbon has an insignificant effect, and all isotopic effects can be related to the net exchanges. It is argued that as with concentration, long-term trends in isotopic composition will be best observed in the southern hemisphere. 43 references, 5 figures, 7 tables.

  11. Activating Digital-Media-Global Literacies and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Heidi Hayes

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author states: "It doesn't matter how many computer-related devices we have in school, what matters is how we employ technology toward a large learning goal, toward a new vision of education." She continues, "When I suggest the cultivation and integration of digital, media, and global literacies, I do so…

  12. Globalization, Democracy, and Social Movements: The Educational Potential of Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hytten, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    In this essay, I explore the contemporary value of John Dewey's conception of democracy to addressing the challenges of neoliberal globalization. I begin by describing his vision of democracy as a way of life that requires habits of experimentalism, pluralism, and hope. I then suggest that contemporary forms of mobilization, resistance, and…

  13. A Global Assessment of Accelerations in Mass Transport of Surface Geophysical Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Heflin, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Mass transport in the Earth's surface geophysical fluid layer has complex spatiotemporal patterns. The GRACE gravity mission provides an unprecedented global capability to monitor this important process with high accuracy and resolution. Accurate assessments of global mass transport patterns and budget also depend critically on changes in degree-1 coefficients (geocenter motion) and in Earth's dynamic oblateness coefficient J2. We combine GRACE measurements, time series of GNSS data, JPL's ECCO ocean bottom pressure model, and high-resolution loose a priori models of mass variation regimes to derive complete spherical harmonic spectra of detrended mass variations up to degree and order 180. Mass accelerations are estimated along with linear, annual, semiannual, and the 161-day tidal aliasing components from coefficient time series. The appropriateness of a priori information and estimate uncertainties are further evaluated by variance component estimation and residual statistics of fitting the time series. During the GRACE data period of 2002.2-2015.0, accelerations in mass transport are geographically uneven with significant positive or negative accelerations in various parts of the world. While Greenland and West Antarctica show strong accelerated mass losses, Alaska and the Arctic Ocean have significant positive accelerations with reversals of earlier mass loss trends. No evidence of non-Arctic global mean sea level acceleration due to mass has been found. Depending on region, some estimated accelerations are also not steady over time due to large irregular and interannual variations.

  14. Application of Global Optimization to the Estimation of Surface-Consistent Residual Statics

    SciTech Connect

    Reister, D.B.; Oblow, E.M.; Barhen, J.; DuBose, J.B.

    1999-10-01

    Since the objective function that is used to estimate surface-consistent residual statics can have many local maxima, a global optimization method is required to find the optimum values for the residual statics. As reported in several recent papers, we had developed a new method (TRUST) for solving global optimization problems and had demonstrated it was superior to all competing methods for a standard set of nonconvex benchmark problems. The residual statics problem can be very large with hundreds or thousands of parameters, and large global optimization problems are much harder to solve than small problems. To solve the very challenging residual statics problem, we have made several significant advances in the mathematical description of the residual statics problem (derivation of two novel stack power bounds and disaggregation of the original problem into a large number of small problems). Using the enhanced version of TRUST, we have performed extensive simulations on a realistic sample problem that had been artificially created by large static disruptions. Our simulations have demonstrated that TRUST can reach many plausible distinct ''solutions'' that could not be discovered by more conventional approaches. An unexpected result was that high values of the stack power may be eliminate cycle skips.

  15. Global mapping of Lithosphere/Asthenosphere Boundary from surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos, G.; Montagner, J.; Beucler, E.; Trampert, J.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Capdeville, Y.; Shapiro, N. M.

    2010-12-01

    The coupling between rigid lithosphere and the weaker underlying asthenosphere is a key point of Plate Tectonics and Mantle dynamics. The characterization of the properties of the Lithosphere/Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB) is essential for understanding the Upper Mantle. Recent studies, using receiver functions for example, provide local constraints. In this study a global view by surface wave tomography is given. A large amount of data from different groups (Harvard, Boulder, Utrecht, Paris) has been collected. There are more than 100,000 phase and group velocicties measurements on the fundamental mode of Rayleigh and Love waves. This global scale dataset in the period range 15s-200s, enables us to investigate the LAB with an approximative lateral resolution of 500km. The regionalization of the path-averaged velocities is performed to extract isotropic and azimuthally anisotropic terms of local velocities. First we derive our own crustal model (taking account of topography-bathymetry, sediments and crustal thickness) by a MonteCarlo inversion with the shorter periods of the data. Second, to estimate the LAB properties and obtain a global map, we choose a very simple parameter space ajusted with the larger periods of the data. We report here a good correlation between oceanic inverted LAB depth (~45km average) and ocean floor age, in the sense of the classical thickening of oceanic lithosphere. The determination of LAB beneath continents is more difficult, shallower depths (~90km average) are found in comparison with heat flux studies.

  16. APOLLO 10: Training for Lunar Surface Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Astronauts train on a mock-up lunar surface, practicing the procedures they will follow on the real thing, and adjusting to the demands of the workload. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 10: 'Green Light for a Lunar Landing''. Part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) APOLLO 10: Manned lunar orbital flight with Thomas P Stafford, John W. Young, and Eugene A. Cernan to test all aspects of an actual manned lunar landing except the landing. Mission Duration 192hrs 3mins 23 sec

  17. Observed and modeled global-ocean turbulence regimes as deduced from surface trajectory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Jenny A. U.; Döös, Kristofer; Ruti, Paolo Michele; Artale, Vincenzo; Coward, Andrew; Brodeau, Laurent

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to follow up and remember the work on Lagrangian diffusion undertaken by Volfango Rupolo, who died prematurely nearly three years ago. It was within this field that he achieved the highest of creativity, and his rather recent 2007 work Rupolo (2007) is undoubtedly the fullest and most important example. In that paper, he identified the utility of the relationship between the acceleration and velocity time scales of Lagrangian trajectories, and he separated these trajectories into four homogenous classes according to their correlation and dispersal properties. This classification is better known as 'trajectories taxonomy' and can be used to characterize and separate different turbulence regimes in the global ocean (Rupolo, 2007). He showed that the Lagrangian time scales could be obtained from the inverse use of Lagrangian Stochastic Models, and proposed a screening method for rationalizing the data analysis using the time scale relationships, and successfully applied it to both drifter and Argo-float observations. In the present study, his data analysis methods have been extended to study and evaluate trajectories from both surface drifters and an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) with different grid resolutions. The drifter data can most accurately be described as quasi-Lagrangian trajectories due to the fact that although the buoy is freely drifting in the horizontal plane, it is anchored at 15 m depth by its drogue, and thus the observed trajectories represent a two-dimensional (2D) approximation of the surrounding flow field. The model trajectories were obtained by analytical computations of the particle advection equation, using the Lagrangian open-source software package TRACMASS, in the near-surface velocity fields from three different configurations of the global NEMO Ocean/Sea-Ice general circulation model. In global-scale ocean modeling, compromises are frequently made in terms of grid resolution and time-averaging of the output

  18. Evaluation of Existing Image Matching Methods for Deriving Glacier Surface Displacements Globally from Optical Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heid, T.; Kääb, A.

    2011-12-01

    Automatic matching of images from two different times is a method that is often used to derive glacier surface velocity. Nearly global repeat coverage of the Earth's surface by optical satellite sensors now opens the possibility for global-scale mapping and monitoring of glacier flow with a number of applications in, for example, glacier physics, glacier-related climate change and impact assessment, and glacier hazard management. The purpose of this study is to compare and evaluate different existing image matching methods for glacier flow determination over large scales. The study compares six different matching methods: normalized cross-correlation (NCC), the phase correlation algorithm used in the COSI-Corr software, and four other Fourier methods with different normalizations. We compare the methods over five regions of the world with different representative glacier characteristics: Karakoram, the European Alps, Alaska, Pine Island (Antarctica) and southwest Greenland. Landsat images are chosen for matching because they expand back to 1972, they cover large areas, and at the same time their spatial resolution is as good as 15 m for images after 1999 (ETM+ pan). Cross-correlation on orientation images (CCF-O) outperforms the three similar Fourier methods, both in areas with high and low visual contrast. NCC experiences problems in areas with low visual contrast, areas with thin clouds or changing snow conditions between the images. CCF-O has problems on narrow outlet glaciers where small window sizes (about 16 pixels by 16 pixels or smaller) are needed, and it also obtains fewer correct matches than COSI-Corr in areas with low visual contrast. COSI-Corr has problems on narrow outlet glaciers and it obtains fewer correct matches compared to CCF-O when thin clouds cover the surface, or if one of the images contains snow dunes. In total, we consider CCF-O and COSI-Corr to be the two most robust matching methods for global-scale mapping and monitoring of glacier

  19. An updated global grid point surface air temperature anomaly data set: 1851--1990

    SciTech Connect

    Sepanski, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Daniels, R.C.

    1991-10-01

    This document presents land-based monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1951--1970 reference period mean) on a 5{degree} latitude by 10{degree} longitude global grid. Monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1957--1975 reference period mean) for the Antarctic (grid points from 65{degree}S to 85{degree}S) are presented in a similar way as a separate data set. The data were derived primarily from the World Weather Records and the archives of the United Kingdom Meteorological Office. This long-term record of temperature anomalies may be used in studies addressing possible greenhouse-gas-induced climate changes. To date, the data have been employed in generating regional, hemispheric, and global time series for determining whether recent (i.e., post-1900) warming trends have taken place. This document also presents the monthly mean temperature records for the individual stations that were used to generate the set of gridded anomalies. The periods of record vary by station. Northern Hemisphere station data have been corrected for inhomogeneities, while Southern Hemisphere data are presented in uncorrected form. 14 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. The complementary role of SMOS sea surface salinity observations for estimating global ocean salinity state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zeting; Cheng, Lijing; Zhu, Jiang; Lin, Renping

    2016-06-01

    Salinity is a key ocean state property, changes in which reveal the variation of the water cycle and the ocean thermohaline circulation. However, prior to this century, in situ salinity observations were extremely sparse, which decreased the reliability of simulations of ocean general circulation by ocean and climate models. In 2009, sea surface salinity (SSS) observations covered the global ocean via the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, and several versions of global SSS products were subsequently released. How can these data benefit model performance? Previous studies found contradictory results. In this work, we assimilated SMOS-SSS data into the LASG/IAP Climate system Ocean Model (LICOM) using the Ensemble Optimum Interpolation (EnOI) assimilation scheme. To assess and quantify the contribution of SMOS-SSS data to model performance, several tests were conducted. The results indicate that the CECOS/CATDS 2010.V02 SMOS-SSS product can significantly improve model simulations of sea surface/subsurface salinity fields. This study provides the basis for the future assimilation of SMOS-SSS data for short-range climate forecasting.

  1. Differential evolution: Global search problem in LEED-IV surface structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, V.B.; Plummer, E.W.

    2015-02-15

    The search process associated with the quantitative theory–experiment comparison in Low Energy Electron Diffraction surface structural analysis can be very time consuming, especially in the case of complex materials with many atoms in the unit cell. Global search algorithms need to be employed to locate the global minimum of the reliability factor in the multi-dimensional structural parameter space. In this study we investigate the use of the Differential Evolution algorithm in Low Energy Electron Diffraction structural analysis. Despite the simplicity of its mechanism the Differential Evolution algorithm presents an impressive performance when applied to ultra-thin films of BaTiO{sub 3}(001) in a theory–theory comparison. A scaling relation of N{sup (1.47} {sup ±} {sup 0.08)} was obtained, where N is the total number of parameters to be optimized. - Highlights: • We investigated the use of the Differential Evolution algorithm (DE) for the LEED search problem. • The DE method was applied to the optimization of the surface structure of the BaTiO{sub 3}(001) ultra-thin films. • A very favorable scaling relation of N{sup 1.47} was obtained, where N is the total number of parameters to be optimized.

  2. Global Assessment of Land Surface Temperature From Geostationary Satellites and Model Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Liu, Q.; Minnis, P.; daSilva, A. M., Jr.; Palikonda, R.; Yost, C. R.

    2012-01-01

    Land surface (or 'skin') temperature (LST) lies at the heart of the surface energy balance and is a key variable in weather and climate models. In this research we compare two global and independent data sets: (i) LST retrievals from five geostationary satellites generated at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and (ii) LST estimates from the quasi-operational NASA GEOS-5 global modeling and assimilation system. The objective is to thoroughly understand both data sets and their systematic differences in preparation for the assimilation of the LaRC LST retrievals into GEOS-5. As expected, mean differences (MD) and root-mean-square differences (RMSD) between modeled and retrieved LST vary tremendously by region and time of day. Typical (absolute) MD values range from 1-3 K in Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude regions to near 10 K in regions where modeled clouds are unrealistic, for example in north-eastern Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, and southern Brazil. Typically, model estimates of LST are higher than satellite retrievals during the night and lower during the day. RMSD values range from 1-3 K during the night to 2-5 K during the day, but are larger over the 50-120 W longitude band where the LST retrievals are derived from the FY2E platform

  3. Episodic nature of continental arc activity since 750 Ma: A global compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenrong; Lee, Cin-Ty A.; Lackey, Jade Star

    2017-03-01

    Continental arcs have been recently hypothesized to outflux large amounts of CO2 compared to island arcs so that global flare-ups in continental arc magmatism might drive long-term greenhouse events. Quantitative testing of this hypothesis, however, has been limited by the lack of detailed studies on the spatial distribution of continental arcs through time. Here, we compile a worldwide database of geological maps and associated literature to delineate the surface exposure of granitoid plutons, allowing reconstruction of how the surface area addition rate of granitoids and the length of continental arcs have varied since 750 Ma. These results were integrated into an ArcGIS framework and plate reconstruction models. We find that the spatial extent of continental arcs is episodic with time and broadly matches the detrital zircon age record. Most vigorous arc magmatism occurred during the 670-480 Ma and the 250-50 Ma when major greenhouse events are recognized. Low continental arc activity characterized most of the Cryogenian, middle-late Paleozoic, and Cenozoic when climate was cold. Our results indicate that plate tectonics is not steady, with fluctuations in the nature of subduction zones possibly related in time to the assembly and dispersal of continents. Our results corroborate the hypothesis that variations in continental arc activity may play a first order role in driving long-term climate change. The dataset presented here provides a quantitative basis for upscaling continental arc processes to explore their effects on mountain building, climate, and crustal growth on a global scale.

  4. Making global map of the solar surface Br from the HMI vector magnetic field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, K.; Liu, Y.; Sun, X.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Centeno, R.; Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.

    2013-06-01

    The Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) has made full-disk vector magnetic field measurements of the Sun with cadence of 12 minutes. The three-component solar surface magnetic field vector data are from the HMI observations with the data process pipeline modules, VFISV (Very Fast Inversion of the Stokes Vector, Borrero et al., 2011) for Milne-Eddington inversion and the minimum-energy disambiguation algorithm (Metcalf 1994, Leka et al, 2009). The models of the global corona and solar wind, such as the PFSS (potential-field source-surface) model and the MHD simulations, often use the maps of solar surface magnetic field, especially the radial component (Br) as the boundary condition. The HMI observation can provide new Br data for these model. Because of weak magnetic signals at the quiet regions of the Sun, the limb darkening, and geometric effects near solar poles, we need to apply an assumption to make a whole-surface map. In this paper, we tested two assumptions for determining Br at weak-field regions. The coronal structures calculated by the PFSS model with the vector-based Br are compared with those with the magnetogram-based Br and the corona observed by the SDO/AIA (Atmospheric Imaging Assembly). In the tested period, CR 2098, the vector-based Br map gives better agreements than the line-of-sight magnetogram data, though we need further investigation for evaluation.

  5. A Global Database of Land Surface Parameters at 1-km Resolution in Meteorological and Climate Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Valéry; Champeaux, Jean-Louis; Chauvin, Fabrice; Meriguet, Christelle; Lacaze, Roselyne

    2003-05-01

    Ecoclimap, a new complete surface parameter global dataset at a 1-km resolution, is presented. It is intended to be used to initialize the soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer schemes (SVATs) in meteorological and climate models (at all horizontal scales). The database supports the `tile' approach, which is utilized by an increasing number of SVATs. Two hundred and fifteen ecosystems representing areas of homogeneous vegetation are derived by combining existing land cover maps and climate maps, in addition to using Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite data. Then, all surface parameters are derived for each of these ecosystems using lookup tables with the annual cycle of the leaf area index (LAI) being constrained by the AVHRR information. The resulting LAI is validated against a large amount of in situ ground observations, and it is also compared to LAI derived from the International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP-2) database and the Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectance (POLDER) satellite. The comparison shows that this new LAI both reproduces values coherent at large scales with other datasets, and includes the high spatial variations owing to the input land cover data at a 1-km resolution. In terms of climate modeling studies, the use of this new database is shown to improve the surface climatology of the ARPEGE climate model.

  6. How well-connected is the surface of the global ocean?

    PubMed

    Froyland, Gary; Stuart, Robyn M; van Sebille, Erik

    2014-09-01

    The Ekman dynamics of the ocean surface circulation is known to contain attracting regions such as the great oceanic gyres and the associated garbage patches. Less well-known are the extents of the basins of attractions of these regions and how strongly attracting they are. Understanding the shape and extent of the basins of attraction sheds light on the question of the strength of connectivity of different regions of the ocean, which helps in understanding the flow of buoyant material like plastic litter. Using short flow time trajectory data from a global ocean model, we create a Markov chain model of the surface ocean dynamics. The surface ocean is not a conservative dynamical system as water in the ocean follows three-dimensional pathways, with upwelling and downwelling in certain regions. Using our Markov chain model, we easily compute net surface upwelling and downwelling, and verify that it matches observed patterns of upwelling and downwelling in the real ocean. We analyze the Markov chain to determine multiple attracting regions. Finally, using an eigenvector approach, we (i) identify the five major ocean garbage patches, (ii) partition the ocean into basins of attraction for each of the garbage patches, and (iii) partition the ocean into regions that demonstrate transient dynamics modulo the attracting garbage patches.

  7. Improving Global Surface Mass Variation Estimates With Multi-Satellite Data Combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Blom, R. G.; Dong, D.; Ivins, E. R.; Owen, S. E.; Oyafuso, F. A.

    2006-05-01

    The GRACE gravity mission is an important milestone toward global high resolution and accurate monitoring of surface mass variations. The spherical harmonic spectra of the variations, however, are not complete without the degree-1 (or equivalently geocenter motion) terms. Also, SLR geocenter motion solutions severely under- sample the center-of-figure of the solid Earth surface due to its small tracking network. To validate and complement gravity data, we compare and combine them with GPS crustal deformation measurements and a TOPEX/JASON data-assimilated ocean bottom pressure (OBP) model to solve for surface mass variations up to degree and order 50, with reduced aid of a priori information. The solutions include geocenter motion estimates with < 0.5 mm annual precision. To further reduce a priori model dependency and improve surface mass variation accuracy, the supplemented GRACE data (plus degree-1 terms) are combined with OBP and GPS data without a priori model. The resulting average oceanic and Antarctic mass variation estimates show nearly a factor of 2 improvements over those derived from the supplemented GRACE solution alone.

  8. An Automated Algorithm to Screen Massive Training Samples for a Global Impervious Surface Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Bin; Brown de Colstoun, Eric; Wolfe, Robert E.; Tilton, James C.; Huang, Chengquan; Smith, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm is developed to automatically screen the outliers from massive training samples for Global Land Survey - Imperviousness Mapping Project (GLS-IMP). GLS-IMP is to produce a global 30 m spatial resolution impervious cover data set for years 2000 and 2010 based on the Landsat Global Land Survey (GLS) data set. This unprecedented high resolution impervious cover data set is not only significant to the urbanization studies but also desired by the global carbon, hydrology, and energy balance researches. A supervised classification method, regression tree, is applied in this project. A set of accurate training samples is the key to the supervised classifications. Here we developed the global scale training samples from 1 m or so resolution fine resolution satellite data (Quickbird and Worldview2), and then aggregate the fine resolution impervious cover map to 30 m resolution. In order to improve the classification accuracy, the training samples should be screened before used to train the regression tree. It is impossible to manually screen 30 m resolution training samples collected globally. For example, in Europe only, there are 174 training sites. The size of the sites ranges from 4.5 km by 4.5 km to 8.1 km by 3.6 km. The amount training samples are over six millions. Therefore, we develop this automated statistic based algorithm to screen the training samples in two levels: site and scene level. At the site level, all the training samples are divided to 10 groups according to the percentage of the impervious surface within a sample pixel. The samples following in each 10% forms one group. For each group, both univariate and multivariate outliers are detected and removed. Then the screen process escalates to the scene level. A similar screen process but with a looser threshold is applied on the scene level considering the possible variance due to the site difference. We do not perform the screen process across the scenes because the scenes might vary due to

  9. Global exponential stability of neural networks with globally Lipschitz continuous activations and its application to linear variational inequality problem.

    PubMed

    Liang, X B; Si, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper investigates the existence, uniqueness, and global exponential stability (GES) of the equilibrium point for a large class of neural networks with globally Lipschitz continuous activations including the widely used sigmoidal activations and the piecewise linear activations. The provided sufficient condition for GES is mild and some conditions easily examined in practice are also presented. The GES of neural networks in the case of locally Lipschitz continuous activations is also obtained under an appropriate condition. The analysis results given in the paper extend substantially the existing relevant stability results in the literature, and therefore expand significantly the application range of neural networks in solving optimization problems. As a demonstration, we apply the obtained analysis results to the design of a recurrent neural network (RNN) for solving the linear variational inequality problem (VIP) defined on any nonempty and closed box set, which includes the box constrained quadratic programming and the linear complementarity problem as the special cases. It can be inferred that the linear VIP has a unique solution for the class of Lyapunov diagonally stable matrices, and that the synthesized RNN is globally exponentially convergent to the unique solution. Some illustrative simulation examples are also given.

  10. Analysis of particulate emissions from tropical biomass burning using a global aerosol model and long-term surface observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddington, Carly L.; Spracklen, Dominick V.; Artaxo, Paulo; Ridley, David A.; Rizzo, Luciana V.; Arana, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    We use the GLOMAP global aerosol model evaluated against observations of surface particulate matter (PM2.5) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) to better understand the impacts of biomass burning on tropical aerosol over the period 2003 to 2011. Previous studies report a large underestimation of AOD over regions impacted by tropical biomass burning, scaling particulate emissions from fire by up to a factor of 6 to enable the models to simulate observed AOD. To explore the uncertainty in emissions we use three satellite-derived fire emission datasets (GFED3, GFAS1 and FINN1). In these datasets the tropics account for 66-84 % of global particulate emissions from fire. With all emission datasets GLOMAP underestimates dry season PM2.5 concentrations in regions of high fire activity in South America and underestimates AOD over South America, Africa and Southeast Asia. When we assume an upper estimate of aerosol hygroscopicity, underestimation of AOD over tropical regions impacted by biomass burning is reduced relative to previous studies. Where coincident observations of surface PM2.5 and AOD are available we find a greater model underestimation of AOD than PM2.5, even when we assume an upper estimate of aerosol hygroscopicity. Increasing particulate emissions to improve simulation of AOD can therefore lead to overestimation of surface PM2.5 concentrations. We find that scaling FINN1 emissions by a factor of 1.5 prevents underestimation of AOD and surface PM2.5 in most tropical locations except Africa. GFAS1 requires emission scaling factor of 3.4 in most locations with the exception of equatorial Asia where a scaling factor of 1.5 is adequate. Scaling GFED3 emissions by a factor of 1.5 is sufficient in active deforestation regions of South America and equatorial Asia, but a larger scaling factor is required elsewhere. The model with GFED3 emissions poorly simulates observed seasonal variability in surface PM2.5 and AOD in regions where small fires dominate, providing

  11. Surface diffusion activation energy determination using ion beam microtexturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossnagel, S. M.; Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The activation energy for impurity atom (adatom) surface diffusion can be determined from the temperature dependence of the spacing of sputter cones. These cones are formed on the surface during sputtering while simultaneously adding impurities. The impurities form clusters by means of surface diffusion, and these clusters in turn initiate cone formation. Values are given for the surface diffusion activation energies for various materials on polycrystalline Cu, Al, Pb, Au, and Ni. The values for different impurity species on each of these substrates are approximately independent of impurity species within the experimental uncertainty, suggesting the absence of strong chemical bonding effects on the diffusion.

  12. Surfaces of Fluorinated Pyridinium Block Copolymers with Enhanced Antibacterial Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan,S.; Ward, R.; Hexemer, A.; Sohn, K.; Lee, K.; Angert, E.; Fischer, D.; Kramer, E.; Ober, C.

    2006-01-01

    Polystyrene-b-poly(4-vinylpyridine) copolymers were quaternized with 1-bromohexane and 6-perfluorooctyl-1-bromohexane. Surfaces prepared from these polymers were characterized by contact angle measurements, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The fluorinated pyridinium surfaces showed enhanced antibacterial activity compared to their nonfluorinated counterparts. Even a polymer with a relatively low molecular weight pyridinium block showed high antimicrobial activity. The bactericidal effect was found to be related to the molecular composition and organization in the top 2-3 nm of the surface and increased with increasing hydrophilicity and pyridinium concentration of the surface.

  13. Global land surface albedo maps from MODIS using the Google Earth Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitraka, Zina; Benas, Nikolaos; Gorelick, Noel; Chrysoulakis, Nektarios

    2016-04-01

    The land surface albedo (LSA) is a critical physical variable, which influences the Earth's climate by affecting the energy budget and distribution in the Earth-atmosphere system. Its role is highly significant in both global and local scales; hence, LSA measurements provide a quantitative means for better constraining global and regional scale climate modelling efforts. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor, on board NASA's Terra and Aqua platforms, provides the parameters needed for the computation of LSA on an 8-day temporal scale and a variety of spatial scales (ranging between 0.5 - 5 km). This dataset was used here for the LSA estimation and its changes over the study area at 0.5 km spatial resolution. More specifically, the MODIS albedo product was used, which includes both the directional-hemispherical surface reflectance (black-sky albedo) and the bi-hemispherical surface reflectance (white-sky albedo). The LSA was estimated for the whole globe on an 8-day basis for the whole time period covered by MODIS acquisitions (i.e. 2000 until today). To estimate LSA from black-sky and white-sky albedos, the fraction of the diffused radiation is needed, a function of the Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT). Required AOT information was acquired from the MODIS AOT product at 1̊ × 1̊ spatial resolution. Since LSA also depends on solar zenith angle (SZA), 8-day mean LSA values were computed as averages of corresponding LSA values for representative SZAs covering the 24-hour day. The estimated LSA was analysed in terms of both spatial and seasonal characteristics, while LSA changes during the period examined were assessed. All computation were performed using the Google Earth Engine (GEE). The GEE provided access to all the MODIS products needed for the analysis without the need of searching or downloading. Moreover, the combination of MODIS products in both temporal and spatial terms was fast and effecting using the GEE API (Application

  14. Impacts of population growth, urbanisation and sanitation changes on global human Cryptosporidium emissions to surface water.

    PubMed

    Hofstra, Nynke; Vermeulen, Lucie C

    2016-10-01

    Cryptosporidium is a pathogenic protozoan parasite and is a leading cause of diarrhoea worldwide. The concentration of Cryptosporidium in the surface water is a determinant for probability of exposure and the risk of disease. Surface water concentrations are expected to change with population growth, urbanisation and changes in sanitation. The objective of this paper is to assess the importance of future changes in population, urbanisation and sanitation on global human emissions of Cryptosporidium to surface water. The GloWPa-Crypto H1 (the Global Waterborne Pathogen model for Human Cryptosporidium emissions version 1) model is presented and run for 2010 and with scenarios for 2050. The new scenarios are based on the Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs) developed for the climate community. The scenarios comprise assumptions on sanitation changes in line with the storylines and population and urbanisation changes from the SSPs. In SSP1 population growth is limited, urbanisation large and sanitation and waste water treatment strongly improve. SSP1* is the same as SSP1, but waste water treatment does not improve. SSP3 sees large population growth, moderate urbanisation and sanitation and waste water treatment fractions that are the same as in 2010. Total global Cryptosporidium emissions to surface water for 2010 are estimated to be 1.6×10(17) oocysts per year, with hotspots in the most urbanised parts of the world. In 2050 emissions are expected to decrease by 24% or increase by 52% and 70% for SSP1, SSP3 and SSP1* respectively. The emissions increase in all scenarios for countries in the Middle East and Africa (MAF) region, while emissions in large parts in Europe decrease in scenarios SSP1 and SSP3. Improving sanitation by connecting the population to sewers, should be combined with waste water treatment, otherwise (SSP1*) emissions in 2050 are expected to be much larger than in a situation with strong population growth and slow development of safe water and

  15. Land Surface Phenology from MODIS: Characterization of the Collection 5 Global Land Cover Dynamics Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguly, Sangram; Friedl, Mark A.; Tan, Bin; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Verma, Manish

    2010-01-01

    Information related to land surface phenology is important for a variety of applications. For example, phenology is widely used as a diagnostic of ecosystem response to global change. In addition, phenology influences seasonal scale fluxes of water, energy, and carbon between the land surface and atmosphere. Increasingly, the importance of phenology for studies of habitat and biodiversity is also being recognized. While many data sets related to plant phenology have been collected at specific sites or in networks focused on individual plants or plant species, remote sensing provides the only way to observe and monitor phenology over large scales and at regular intervals. The MODIS Global Land Cover Dynamics Product was developed to support investigations that require regional to global scale information related to spatiotemporal dynamics in land surface phenology. Here we describe the Collection 5 version of this product, which represents a substantial refinement relative to the Collection 4 product. This new version provides information related to land surface phenology at higher spatial resolution than Collection 4 (500-m vs. 1-km), and is based on 8-day instead of 16-day input data. The paper presents a brief overview of the algorithm, followed by an assessment of the product. To this end, we present (1) a comparison of results from Collection 5 versus Collection 4 for selected MODIS tiles that span a range of climate and ecological conditions, (2) a characterization of interannual variation in Collections 4 and 5 data for North America from 2001 to 2006, and (3) a comparison of Collection 5 results against ground observations for two forest sites in the northeastern United States. Results show that the Collection 5 product is qualitatively similar to Collection 4. However, Collection 5 has fewer missing values outside of regions with persistent cloud cover and atmospheric aerosols. Interannual variability in Collection 5 is consistent with expected ranges of

  16. Hemagglutinating activity in phytopathogenic bacteria surface compounds.

    PubMed

    Serra, M T; Castresana, M C; Tejerina, G

    1987-01-01

    Extracellular components of plant pathogenic bacteria were obtained from their culture medium as well as from the whole cells by using NaCl 1 M, pH 6.0; 20% sucrose dissolved in 0.03 M Tris buffer, pH 8.0; or 0.05 M Na2EDTA. All the extracts from Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli, Pseudomonas solanacearum, and Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica, were assayed for hemagglutinating activity on sheep, rabbit and chicken red blood cells (RBCs). The only active extracts were those obtained by NaCl treatment. They agglutinated sheep and rabbit erythrocytes. Extracts from E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica gave rise to the high agglutination titer on rabbit RBCs. These extracts had the lowest polysaccharide/protein ratio. E. carotovora subsp. carotovora extracts showed only a low titer (18.5 units). The agglutinating activity present in NaCl extracts of the bacteria tested was inhibited by different carbohydrates to various extent. Extracts from E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica appeared to be the most sensitive ones while those of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora least sensitive to the presence of sugar. It is suggested that hemagglutinins observed in plant pathogenic bacteria and those in plant host are similar and that both may, in some way, be involved in the plant-parasite relationship.

  17. Global Night-Time Lights for Observing Human Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hipskind, Stephen R.; Elvidge, Chris; Gurney, K.; Imhoff, Mark; Bounoua, Lahouari; Sheffner, Edwin; Nemani, Ramakrishna R.; Pettit, Donald R.; Fischer, Marc

    2011-01-01

    We present a concept for a small satellite mission to make systematic, global observations of night-time lights with spatial resolution suitable for discerning the extent, type and density of human settlements. The observations will also allow better understanding of fine scale fossil fuel CO2 emission distribution. The NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey recommends more focus on direct observations of human influence on the Earth system. The most dramatic and compelling observations of human presence on the Earth are the night light observations taken by the Defence Meteorological System Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS). Beyond delineating the footprint of human presence, night light data, when assembled and evaluated with complementary data sets, can determine the fine scale spatial distribution of global fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Understanding fossil fuel carbon emissions is critical to understanding the entire carbon cycle, and especially the carbon exchange between terrestrial and oceanic systems.

  18. Mechanisms controlling surface ozone over East Asia: a multiscale study coupling regional and global chemical transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M.; Holloway, T.; Oki, T.; Streets, D. G.; Richter, A.

    2008-12-01

    Mechanisms controlling surface ozone (O3) over East Asia are examined using the regional Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model at two horizontal scales: 81 km and 27 km. Through sensitivity studies and comparison with recently available satellite data and surface measurements in China and Japan, we find that the O3 budget over East Asia shows complex interactions among photochemical production, regional transport, meteorological conditions, burning of agricultural residues, and global inflows. For example, wintertime surface O3 over northern domain is sensitive to boundary conditions derived from the MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related Tracers) global model, whereas summertime O3 budget is controlled by the competitive processes between photochemical production and monsoonal intrusion of low-O3 marine air masses from tropical Pacific. We find that simulated surface O3 for 2001 does not exhibit the same sharp drop in July and August concentrations that is observed at two mountaintop sites (Tai and Hua) for 2004 and Beijing for 1995-2005. CMAQ sensitivity tests with two widely used photochemical schemes demonstrate that over the industrial areas in East Asia north of 30° N, SAPRC99 produces higher values of mean summertime O3 than CBIV, amounting to a difference of 10 ppb. In addition, analysis of NCEP winds and geopotential heights suggests that southwesterly monsoonal intrusion in central east China is weakened in August 2001 as compared with the climatologically mean for 1980-2005. Further examination of the O3 diurnal cycle at nine Japanese sites shows that boundary layer evolution has an important effect on the vertical mixing of ground-level O3, and error in near surface meteorology might contribute to overprediction of nighttime O3 in urban and rural areas. In conclusion, the uncertainties in simulating cloud activities and convection mixing, Asian monsoon circulation, photochemical production, and nighttime cooling explain why CMAQ with 81 km

  19. Global scale variations in sea surface topography determined from satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblinsky, C. J.; Nerem, R. S.; Williamson, R. G.; Klosko, S. M.

    Large scale variations in sea surface topography reflect long-term changes in the ocean circulation and air-sea fluxes. The success of the U.S. Navy's Geosat altimeter mission from 1985 to 1989 has provided the first long-term global measurements from space with the apparent accuracy to observe these phenomena. We have used the observations from Geosat to determine the large scale (wavelengths greater than 1000 km) mean and variable sea surface topography of the ocean relative to the geoid. In this paper we will provide a preliminary discussion of these estimates through comparisons with in situ observations and a description of the most robust signals in the altimeter solutions. A two year time series of sea surface topography has been derived for the global ocean between 60° N and 60° S covering 1987 and 1988. Comparisons with monthly averaged tide gauge observations at 42 island sites show a typical difference of 6 cm rms. There is a strong correlation between the altimetry and in situ measurements when the large scale variations in sea level exceed 6 cm rms (altimeter signal-to-noise ratio greater than 1). Such variations include the monsoon-forced semi-annual undulations of the tropical Indian Ocean, the annual expansion and contraction of the upper ocean in the western sides of mid-latitude basins from seasonal heating, and the interannual wind-forced variations in the tropical Pacific. Interannual trends are also found at midlatitudes, which agree with the in situ measurements, and appear to be of basin scale.

  20. How well will the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission observe global reservoirs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solander, Kurt C.; Reager, John T.; Famiglietti, James S.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate observations of global reservoir storage are critical to understand the availability of managed water resources. By enabling estimates of surface water area and height for reservoir sizes exceeding 250 m2 at a maximum repeat orbit of up to 21 days, the NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission (anticipated launch date 2020) is expected to greatly improve upon existing reservoir monitoring capabilities. It is thus essential that spatial and temporal measurement uncertainty for water bodies is known a priori to maximize the utility of SWOT observations as the data are acquired. In this study, we evaluate SWOT reservoir observations using a three-pronged approach that assesses temporal aliasing, errors due to specific reservoir spatial properties, and SWOT performance over actual reservoirs using a combination of in situ and simulated reservoir observations from the SWOTsim instrument simulator. Results indicate temporal errors to be less than 5% for the smallest reservoir sizes (< 10 km2) with errors less than 0.1% for larger sizes (>100 km2). Surface area and height errors were found to be minimal (area <5%, height <15 cm) above 1 km2 unless the reservoir exhibited a strong elliptical shape with high aspect ratio oriented parallel to orbit, was set in mountainous terrain, or swath coverage fell below 30%. Experiments from six real reservoir test cases generally support these results. By providing a comprehensive blueprint on the observability of reservoirs from SWOT, this study will be have important implications for future applications of SWOT reservoir measurements in global monitoring systems and models.

  1. Influence of Ice Particle Surface Roughening on the Global Cloud Radiative Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Baum, Bryan A.; LEcuyer, Tristan; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Mlawer, Eli J.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Liou, Kuo-Nan

    2013-01-01

    Ice clouds influence the climate system by changing the radiation budget and large-scale circulation. Therefore, climate models need to have an accurate representation of ice clouds and their radiative effects. In this paper, new broadband parameterizations for ice cloud bulk scattering properties are developed for severely roughened ice particles. The parameterizations are based on a general habit mixture that includes nine habits (droxtals, hollow/solid columns, plates, solid/hollow bullet rosettes, aggregate of solid columns, and small/large aggregates of plates). The scattering properties for these individual habits incorporate recent advances in light-scattering computations. The influence of ice particle surface roughness on the ice cloud radiative effect is determined through simulations with the Fu-Liou and the GCM version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG) codes and the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model (CAM, version 5.1). The differences in shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiative effect at both the top of the atmosphere and the surface are determined for smooth and severely roughened ice particles. While the influence of particle roughening on the single-scattering properties is negligible in the LW, the results indicate that ice crystal roughness can change the SW forcing locally by more than 10 W m(exp -2) over a range of effective diameters. The global-averaged SW cloud radiative effect due to ice particle surface roughness is estimated to be roughly 1-2 W m(exp -2). The CAM results indicate that ice particle roughening can result in a large regional SW radiative effect and a small but nonnegligible increase in the global LW cloud radiative effect.

  2. A Multilayer Dataset of SSM/I-Derived Global Ocean Surface Turbulent Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Shie, Chung-Lin; Atlas, Robert M.; Ardizzone, Joe; Nelkin, Eric; Einaud, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A dataset including daily- and monthly-mean turbulent fluxes (momentum, latent heat, and sensible heat) and some relevant parameters over global oceans, derived from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) data, for the period July 1987-December 1994 and the 1988-94 annual and monthly-mean climatologies of the same variables is created. It has a spatial resolution of 2.0deg x 2.5deg latitude-longitude. The retrieved surface air humidity is found to be generally accurate as compared to the collocated radiosonde observations over global oceans. The retrieved wind stress and latent heat flux show useful accuracy as verified against research quality measurements of ship and buoy in the western equatorial Pacific. The 1988-94 seasonal-mean wind stress and latent heat flux show reasonable patterns related to seasonal variations of the atmospheric general circulation. The patterns of 1990-93 annual-mean turbulent fluxes and input variables are generally in good agreement with one of the best global analyzed flux datasets that based on COADS (comprehensive ocean-atmosphere data set) with corrections on wind speeds and covered the same period. The retrieved wind speed is generally within +/-1 m/s of the COADS-based, but is stronger by approx. 1-2 m/s in the northern extratropical oceans. The discrepancy is suggested to be mainly due to higher COADS-modified wind speeds resulting from underestimation of anemometer heights. Compared to the COADS-based, the retrieved latent heat flux and sea-air humidity difference are generally larger with significant differences in the trade wind zones and the ocean south of 40degS (up to approx. 40-60 W/sq m and approx. 1-1.5 g/kg). The discrepancy is believed to be mainly caused by higher COADS-based surface air humidity arising from the overestimation of dew point temperatures and from the extrapolation of observed high humidity southward into data-void regions south of 40degS. The retrieved sensible heat flux is generally within +/-5

  3. Living in a Global Environment. Classroom Activities in Development Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fien, John, Ed.

    Forty classroom activities selected from New Internationalist Calendars published between 1984-1989 were collected. Each activity is presented in the form of a short story about a real-life person and a graphic spread of data consisting of maps, tables, photographs, diagrams, text, and student exercises. These activities have been written to…

  4. VEM on VERITAS - Retrieval of global infrared surface emissivity maps of Venus and expectable retrieval uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappel, David; Arnold, Gabriele; Haus, Rainer; Helbert, Jörn; Smrekar, Suzanne; Hensley, Scott

    2016-04-01

    ('Venus Emissivity, Radio Science, InSAR, Topography, and Spectroscopy') comprises two instruments, VEM ('Venus Emissivity Mapper') and VISAR ('Venus Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar'). This mission will yield a vastly improved data basis with respect to both high SNR Venus nightside radiance measurements at all transparency windows around 1 μm as well as topography maps. The new data will enable the derivation of much more complete and reliable global surface emissivity maps that are required to answer fundamental geologic questions. Here, we discuss the selection of the wavelength ranges covered by the spectral filters of VEM as well as improved estimates of expectable emissivity retrieval errors based on this selection. For this purpose, the locations of the relevant spectral transparency windows are studied with detailed line-by-line radiative transfer simulations in dependence on different spectral line databases. Recent work on VIRTIS-M-IR/VEX measurements indicated the presence of interferences due to ever-varying atmospheric parameters that cannot be derived from radiance measurements with limited spectral information content to be a dominant source of surface emissivity retrieval errors. This work is carried over to the configuration of VEM, and the retrieval pipeline is optimized to minimize such errors. A portion of this work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA.

  5. Plume and surface feature structure and compositional effects on Europa's global exosphere: Preliminary Europa mission predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teolis, B. D.; Wyrick, D. Y.; Bouquet, A.; Magee, B. A.; Waite, J. H.

    2017-03-01

    A Europa plume source, if present, may produce a global exosphere with complex spatial structure and temporal variability in its density and composition. To investigate this interaction we have integrated a water plume source containing multiple organic and nitrile species into a Europan Monte Carlo exosphere model, considering the effect of Europa's gravity in returning plume ejecta to the surface, and the subsequent spreading of adsorbed and exospheric material by thermal desorption and re-sputtering across the entire body. We consider sputtered, radiolytic and potential plume sources, together with surface adsorption, regolith diffusion, polar cold trapping, and re-sputtering of adsorbed materials, and examine the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the exospheric density and composition. These models provide a predictive basis for telescopic observations (e.g. HST, JWST) and planned missions to the Jovian system by NASA and ESA. We apply spacecraft trajectories to our model to explore possible exospheric compositions which may be encountered along proposed flybys of Europa to inform the spatial and temporal relationship of spacecraft measurements to surface and plume source compositions. For the present preliminary study, we have considered four cases: Case A: an equatorial flyby through a sputtered only exosphere (no plumes), Case B: a flyby over a localized sputtered 'macula' terrain enriched in non-ice species, Case C: a south polar plume with an Enceladus-like composition, equatorial flyby, and Case D: a south polar plume, flyby directly through the plume.

  6. Characteristics of surface cyclone forecasts in the Aviation Run of the Global Spectral Model

    SciTech Connect

    Grumm, R.H. )

    1993-03-01

    Results are presented of an evaluation of the performance of the Aviation Run (AVN) of the NMC Global Spectral Model (GSM) in predicting surface cyclones, which was conducted during the autumn of 1990 through the winter of 1992. The results indicated that the finer-resolution T126 GSM produces stronger and deeper cyclones than the old T80 GSM. The errors in AVN position forecasts of surface cyclones were smaller than those found in the NMC Nested Grid Model (NGM). The geographical distribution of the pressure errors were similar to those found in the NGM over eastern North America and the adjacent western Atlantic Ocean. The AVN tended to underpredict the 1000-500-mb thickness over surface cyclones, especially during the first 36 h of the forecast cycle. The T126 AVN forecasts are accurate enough to provide guidance for basic weather forecasts to three days, as has been done for the two-day forecasts for the past 25-30 yr. 19 refs.

  7. The Development and Validation of a New Land Surface Model for Regional and Global Climate Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch-Stieglitz, Marc

    1995-11-01

    A new land-surface scheme intended for use in mesoscale and global climate models has been developed and validated. The ground scheme consists of 6 soil layers. Diffusion and a modified tipping bucket model govern heat and water flow respectively. A 3 layer snow model has been incorporated into a modified BEST vegetation scheme. TOPMODEL equations and Digital Elevation Model data are used to generate baseflow which supports lowland saturated zones. Soil moisture heterogeneity represented by saturated lowlands subsequently impacts watershed evapotranspiration, the partitioning of surface fluxes, and the development of the storm hydrograph. Five years of meteorological and hydrological data from the Sleepers river watershed located in the eastern highlands of Vermont where winter snow cover is significant were then used to drive and validate the new scheme. Site validation data were sufficient to evaluate model performance with regard to various aspects of the watershed water balance, including snowpack growth/ablation, the spring snowmelt hydrograph, storm hydrographs, and the seasonal development of watershed evapotranspiration and soil moisture. By including topographic effects, not only are the main spring hydrographs and individual storm hydrographs adequately resolved, but the mechanisms generating runoff are consistent with current views of hydrologic processes. The seasonal movement of the mean water table depth and the saturated area of the watershed are consistent with site data and the overall model hydroclimatology, including the surface fluxes, seems reasonable.

  8. Proxy-based reconstructions of hemispheric and global surface temperature variations over the past two millennia

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Michael E.; Zhang, Zhihua; Hughes, Malcolm K.; Bradley, Raymond S.; Miller, Sonya K.; Rutherford, Scott; Ni, Fenbiao

    2008-01-01

    Following the suggestions of a recent National Research Council report [NRC (National Research Council) (2006) Surface Temperature Reconstructions for the Last 2,000 Years (Natl Acad Press, Washington, DC).], we reconstruct surface temperature at hemispheric and global scale for much of the last 2,000 years using a greatly expanded set of proxy data for decadal-to-centennial climate changes, recently updated instrumental data, and complementary methods that have been thoroughly tested and validated with model simulation experiments. Our results extend previous conclusions that recent Northern Hemisphere surface temperature increases are likely anomalous in a long-term context. Recent warmth appears anomalous for at least the past 1,300 years whether or not tree-ring data are used. If tree-ring data are used, the conclusion can be extended to at least the past 1,700 years, but with additional strong caveats. The reconstructed amplitude of change over past centuries is greater than hitherto reported, with somewhat greater Medieval warmth in the Northern Hemisphere, albeit still not reaching recent levels. PMID:18765811

  9. Infusing a Global Perspective into the Study of Agriculture: Student Activities Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Robert A., Ed.

    These student activities are designed to be used in a variety of places in the curriculum to provide a global perspective for students as they study agriculture. This document is not a unit of instruction; rather, teachers are encouraged to study the materials and decide which will be helpful in adding a global perspective to the learning…

  10. Surface-active properties of humic and sulfochlorohumic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabova, I.N.; Mustafina, G.A.; Akkulova, Z.G.; Satymbaeva, A.S.

    2009-10-15

    The surface tension of alkaline solutions of humic acids and their sulfochloroderivatives, which are synthesized by sulfonation of chlorohumic acids isolated from coal chlorinated by the electrochemical method, is investigated. It is established that humic compounds possess weak surface activity. Basic adsorption parameters are calculated.

  11. Surface-active materials from Athabasca oil sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschopedis, S. E.; Schulz, K. F.; Speight, J. G.; Morrison, D. N.

    1980-01-01

    Surface-active derivatives can be separated, or chemically-derived, from Athabasca bitumen. These materials have the ability to lower the surface tensions of aqueous solutions as well as substantially reduce the interfacial tensions of aqueous-organic systems. As such, they do appear to have a beneficial effect on bitumen recovery processes.

  12. Characterization of surface active materials derived from farm products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface active materials obtained by chemical modification of plant protein isolates (lupin, barley, oat), corn starches (dextrin, normal, high amylose, and waxy) and soybean oil (soybean oil based polysoaps, SOPS) were investigated for their surface and interfacial properties using axisymmetric dro...

  13. SYNOPTIC GLOBAL REMOTE SENSING OF LAND SURFACE VEGETATION: OVERVIEW OF DAILY DATA QUALITY, CHALLENGES, AND OPPORTUNITIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto-Munoz, A.; Didan, K.

    2009-12-01

    Continuous acquisition of global satellite imagery over the years has contributed to the creation of a long data record from AVHRR, MODIS, TM, SPOT VGT, and other sensors. These records account now for 30+ years, and as the archive grows, it becomes an invaluable source of data for many environmental related studies dealing with trends and changes from local to global scale. Synoptic global remote sensing provides a multitude of land surface state variables and serves as a major foundation for global change research. However, these records are inhibited with problems that need to be accounted for in order to understand the limits and improve the science results derived from these records. The presence of clouds, aerosols, spatial gaps, variable viewing geometry, inconsistent atmosphere corrections, multiple reprocessing, and different sensors characteristics, makes it difficult to obtain frequently high quality data everywhere and every time. Moreover, these issues are location and season dependent making it even more difficult to construct the consistent time series required to study change over time. To evaluate these records, we analyzed 30+ years (1981 to 1999 and 2000 to 2009) of daily global land surface measurements (CMG resolution) from AVHRR (N07, N09, N11 and N14) and MODIS (AQUA and TERRA, Collection 5, C5). We stratified the data based on land cover, latitudinal zone, and season and we examined the daily data quality, including cloud persistence, aerosol loads, data gaps, and an index of reliability that measures how likely an observation is acceptable for research. The aim was to generate aggregate maps of cloud distribution, aerosol levels distribution, and data reliability distribution in both time and space. This information was then converted into an uncertainty measure at the pixel level that indicates how suspect or significant a result could potentially be, depending on its location and season and consequently what geographic locations and times

  14. Surface activity of Corophium volutator: A role for parasites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damsgaard, Jacob Tørring; Mouritsen, Kim N.; Jensen, K. Thomas

    2005-08-01

    In soft-bottom intertidal habitats, the normally infaunal amphipod Corophium volutator is often found active on the sediment surface during low tide, exposed to desiccation and shorebird predation. Here we examine whether such risky behaviour is related to parasite infections. Surface-active and buried C. volutator were collected during a low tide period in the Danish Wadden Sea, and the infection patterns of the two groups were described in relation to sex and size. Surface-active males and females were more heavily infested by microphallid trematodes (four species) than buried specimens of the same sex and size class. Although the density of surfaced amphipods decreased as a function of exposure time, the mean parasite load of those that remained on the surface increased. A narrow size-specific parasite intensity threshold above which the amphipods were always surface active did not exist: heavily infected individuals were also found buried in the substrate. Although likely to be beneficial to the parasites, this suggests that the behavioural alteration is a side-effect of the infections rather than a consequence of direct parasitic manipulation. Besides the presumed mortality associated with the parasite-related surface activity in a range of size-classes, the intensity-size frequency distribution indicated that larger and hence heavily infected hosts are removed from the population. Together it demonstrates that microphallid trematodes impact the population dynamics of C. volutator.

  15. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Applications: Activities, Challenges, and Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschbaum, Dalia; Hou, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international satellite mission to provide nextgeneration observations of rain and snow worldwide every three hours. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) will launch a "Core" satellite carrying advanced instruments that will set a new standard for precipitation measurements from space. The data they provide will be used to unify precipitation measurements made by an international network of partner satellites to quantify when, where, and how much it rains or snows around the world. The GPM mission will help advance our understanding of Earth's water and energy cycles, improve the forecasting of extreme events that cause natural disasters, and extend current capabilities of using satellite precipitation information to directly benefit society. Building upon the successful legacy of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), GPM's next-generation global precipitation data will lead to scientific advances and societal benefits within a range of hydrologic fields including natural hazards, ecology, public health and water resources. This talk will highlight some examples from TRMM's IS-year history within these applications areas as well as discuss some existing challenges and present a look forward for GPM's contribution to applications in hydrology.

  16. Surface modification of active material structures in battery electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Michael; Tikhonov, Konstantin

    2016-02-02

    Provided herein are methods of processing electrode active material structures for use in electrochemical cells or, more specifically, methods of forming surface layers on these structures. The structures are combined with a liquid to form a mixture. The mixture includes a surface reagent that chemically reacts and forms a surface layer covalently bound to the structures. The surface reagent may be a part of the initial liquid or added to the mixture after the liquid is combined with the structures. In some embodiments, the mixture may be processed to form a powder containing the structures with the surface layer thereon. Alternatively, the mixture may be deposited onto a current collecting substrate and dried to form an electrode layer. Furthermore, the liquid may be an electrolyte containing the surface reagent and a salt. The liquid soaks the previously arranged electrodes in order to contact the structures with the surface reagent.

  17. How Much Global Burned Area Can Be Forecast on Seasonal Time Scales Using Sea Surface Temperatures?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yang; Morton, Douglas C.; Andela, Niels; Giglio, Louis; Randerson, James T.

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale sea surface temperature (SST) patterns influence the interannual variability of burned area in many regions by means of climate controls on fuel continuity, amount, and moisture content. Some of the variability in burned area is predictable on seasonal timescales because fuel characteristics respond to the cumulative effects of climate prior to the onset of the fire season. Here we systematically evaluated the degree to which annual burned area from the Global Fire Emissions Database version 4 with small fires (GFED4s) can be predicted using SSTs from 14 different ocean regions. We found that about 48 of global burned area can be forecast with a correlation coefficient that is significant at a p < 0.01 level using a single ocean climate index (OCI) 3 or more months prior to the month of peak burning. Continental regions where burned area had a higher degree of predictability included equatorial Asia, where 92% of the burned area exceeded the correlation threshold, and Central America, where 86% of the burned area exceeded this threshold. Pacific Ocean indices describing the El Nino-Southern Oscillation were more important than indices from other ocean basins, accounting for about 1/3 of the total predictable global burned area. A model that combined two indices from different oceans considerably improved model performance, suggesting that fires in many regions respond to forcing from more than one ocean basin. Using OCI-burned area relationships and a clustering algorithm, we identified 12 hotspot regions in which fires had a consistent response to SST patterns. Annual burned area in these regions can be predicted with moderate confidence levels, suggesting operational forecasts may be possible with the aim of improving ecosystem management.

  18. How much global burned area can be forecast on seasonal time scales using sea surface temperatures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Morton, Douglas C.; Andela, Niels; Giglio, Louis; Randerson, James T.

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale sea surface temperature (SST) patterns influence the interannual variability of burned area in many regions by means of climate controls on fuel continuity, amount, and moisture content. Some of the variability in burned area is predictable on seasonal timescales because fuel characteristics respond to the cumulative effects of climate prior to the onset of the fire season. Here we systematically evaluated the degree to which annual burned area from the Global Fire Emissions Database version 4 with small fires (GFED4s) can be predicted using SSTs from 14 different ocean regions. We found that about 48% of global burned area can be forecast with a correlation coefficient that is significant at a p < 0.01 level using a single ocean climate index (OCI) 3 or more months prior to the month of peak burning. Continental regions where burned area had a higher degree of predictability included equatorial Asia, where 92% of the burned area exceeded the correlation threshold, and Central America, where 86% of the burned area exceeded this threshold. Pacific Ocean indices describing the El Niño-Southern Oscillation were more important than indices from other ocean basins, accounting for about 1/3 of the total predictable global burned area. A model that combined two indices from different oceans considerably improved model performance, suggesting that fires in many regions respond to forcing from more than one ocean basin. Using OCI—burned area relationships and a clustering algorithm, we identified 12 hotspot regions in which fires had a consistent response to SST patterns. Annual burned area in these regions can be predicted with moderate confidence levels, suggesting operational forecasts may be possible with the aim of improving ecosystem management.

  19. Lithosphere/Asthenosphere Boundary depth inferred from global surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos, G.; Montagner, J.-P.; Beucler, E.; Trampert, J.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Capdeville, Y.; Shapiro, N. M.

    2012-04-01

    The coupling between the rigid lithosphere and the weaker underlying asthenosphere is a key point of Plate Tectonics and Mantle dynamics. The characterization of the properties of the Lithosphere/Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB) is essential for understanding the Upper Mantle. Recent studies, using receiver functions for example, provide local constraints. In this study a global view by surface wave tomography is given. A large amount of data from different groups (Harvard, Boulder, Utrecht, Paris) has been collected. There are more than 100,000 phase and group velocities measurements on the fundamental mode of Rayleigh and Love waves. This global scale dataset in the period range 15s-200s, enables us to investigate the LAB with an approximative lateral resolution of 500km. The regionalization of the path-averaged velocities is performed to extract isotropic and azimuthally anisotropic terms of local velocities. We derive our own crustal model (taking account of topography-bathymetry, sediments and crustal thickness) by a MonteCarlo inversion with the shorter periods of the data. A forward estimation of the LAB properties on a global map is provided. We choose a low parametrization (isotropic Vs layers) of the Upper Mantle adjusted with the larger periods of the data by MonteCarlo inversion. Then we present a new tomographic model obtained by inverting the larger periods of phase velocities in the least square sense, including isotropic Vs velocity, radial anisotropy and azimuthal anisotropy. Different proxies for the LAB are builded from this 3D Upper Mantle model, such as the strongest negative Sv velocity gradient or the variation of azimuthal anisotropy fast axis. LAB determination seems consistent in oceanic regions in all of the proxies, presenting a good correlation with ocean floor ages. While the estimated depths beneath continents still unclear depending on the type of parametrizations compared to receiver functions or heat flux studies.

  20. Proxies of Lithosphere/Asthenosphere Boundary from global surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos, G.; Montagner, J.; Beucler, E.; Trampert, J.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Capdeville, Y.; Shapiro, N. M.

    2011-12-01

    The coupling between rigid lithosphere and the weaker underlying asthenosphere is a key point of Plate Tectonics and Mantle dynamics. The characterization of the properties of the Lithosphere/Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB) is essential for understanding the Upper Mantle. Recent studies, using receiver functions for example, provide local constraints. In this study a global view by surface wave tomography is given. A large amount of data from different groups (Harvard, Boulder, Utrecht, Paris) has been collected. There are more than 100,000 phase and group velocities measurements on the fundamental mode of Rayleigh and Love waves. This global scale dataset in the period range 15s-200s, enables us to investigate the LAB with an approximative lateral resolution of 500km. The regionalization of the path-averaged velocities is performed to extract isotropic and azimuthally anisotropic terms of local velocities. We derive our own crustal model (taking account of topography-bathymetry, sediments and crustal thickness) by a MonteCarlo inversion with the shorter periods of the data. A forward estimation of the LAB properties on a global map is provided. We choose a low parametrization (isotropic Vs layers) of the Upper Mantle ajusted with the larger periods of the data by MonteCarlo inversion. Then we present a new tomographic model obtained by inverting the larger periods of phase velocities in the least square sense, including isotropic Vs velocity, radial anisotropy and azimuthal anisotropy. Different proxies for the LAB are builded from this 3D Upper Mantle model, such as the strongest negative Sv velocity gradient or the variation of azimuthal anisotropy fast axis. LAB determination seems consistent in oceanic regions in all of the proxies, presenting a good correlation with ocean floor ages. While the estimated depths beneath continents still unclear depending on the type of parametrizations compared to receiver functions or heat flux studies.

  1. Decadal changes in global surface NOx emissions from multi-constituent satellite data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Kazuyuki; Eskes, Henk; Sudo, Kengo; Folkert Boersma, K.; Bowman, Kevin; Kanaya, Yugo

    2017-01-01

    Global surface emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) over a 10-year period (2005-2014) are estimated from an assimilation of multiple satellite data sets: tropospheric NO2 columns from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2), and Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY), O3 profiles from Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), CO profiles from Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT), and O3 and HNO3 profiles from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) using an ensemble Kalman filter technique. Chemical concentrations of various species and emission sources of several precursors are simultaneously optimized. This is expected to improve the emission inversion because the emission estimates are influenced by biases in the modelled tropospheric chemistry, which can be partly corrected by also optimizing the concentrations. We present detailed distributions of the estimated emission distributions for all major regions, the diurnal and seasonal variability, and the evolution of these emissions over the 10-year period. The estimated regional total emissions show a strong positive trend over India (+29 % decade-1), China (+26 % decade-1), and the Middle East (+20 % decade-1), and a negative trend over the USA (-38 % decade-1), southern Africa (-8.2 % decade-1), and western Europe (-8.8 % decade-1). The negative trends in the USA and western Europe are larger during 2005-2010 relative to 2011-2014, whereas the trend in China becomes negative after 2011. The data assimilation also suggests a large uncertainty in anthropogenic and fire-related emission factors and an important underestimation of soil NOx sources in the emission inventories. Despite the large trends observed for individual regions, the global total emission is almost constant between 2005 (47.9 Tg N yr-1) and 2014 (47.5 Tg N yr-1).

  2. Transition process of abrupt climate change based on global sea surface temperature over the past century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Pengcheng; Hou, Wei; Feng, Guolin

    2016-05-01

    A new detection method has been proposed to study the transition process of abrupt climate change. With this method, the climate system transiting from one stable state to another can be verified clearly. By applying this method to the global sea surface temperature over the past century, several climate changes and their processes are detected, including the start state (moment), persist time, and end state (moment). According to the spatial distribution, the locations of climate changes mainly have occurred in the Indian Ocean and western Pacific before the middle twentieth century, in the 1970s in the equatorial middle-eastern Pacific, and in the middle and southern Pacific since the end of the twentieth century. In addition, the quantitative relationship between the transition process parameters is verified in theory and practice: (1) the relationship between the rate and stability parameters is linear, and (2) the relationship between the rate and change amplitude parameters is quadratic.

  3. Global surface wind and flux fields from model assimilation of Seasat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R.; Busalacchi, A. J.; Kalnay, E.; Bloom, S.; Ghil, M.

    1986-01-01

    Procedures for dealiasing Seasat data and developing global surface wind and latent and sensible heat flux fields are discussed. Seasat data from September 20, 1978 was dealiased using the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) analysis/forecast system. The wind data obtained with the objective GLA forecast model are compared to the data subjectively dealiased by Peteherych et al. (1984) and Hoffman (1982, 1984). The GLA procedure is also verified using simulated Seasat data. The areas of high and low heat fluxes and cyclonic and anticyclonic wind stresses detected in the generated fields are analyzed and compared to climatological fields. It is observed that there is good correlation between the time-averaged analyses of wind stress obtained subjectively and objectively, and the monthly mean wind stress and latent fluxes agree with climatological fields and atmospheric and oceanic features.

  4. A Global Map of Coherent M2 Internal Tide Surface Elevations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, R. D.; Zaron, E. D.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite altimetry reveals small surface waves, with elevations of order 1 cm or smaller, associated with internal tides in the deep ocean. The global satellite data provide an unprecedented picture of such waves, potentially yielding much information about the ocean interior. Accurate knowledge of these waves is also needed for de-tiding altimetry in certain sensitive applications, including the future SWOT mission. Several approaches have been initiated recently to map these tiny waves, usually with some reliance on hydrographic information (e.g., recent work by Dushaw et al., 2011). Here we explore the feasibility of a purely empirical approach which avoids assumptions about stratification or modal wavelengths. A global elevation map is constructed based on tidal analysis of Topex/Poseidon, Jason, ERS-2, Envisat and GFO data. Small (order 5 mm) residuals, with wavelengths much longer than the baroclinic tide, appear unless now-standard along-track high-pass filters are applied, but filtering is shown to cause serious loss of information for east-west propagating waves (given typical track patterns). The technique is probably infeasible for S2 because of Envisat's and ERS's sun-synchronous orbits. Independent data from Cryosat-2 is used to validate the results. Applying our internal-tide 'correction' to Cryosat-2 data confirms a small reduction in variance in expected locations of significant internal tides.

  5. Role of Oxygen as Surface-Active Element in Linear GTA Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadaiah, Nirsanametla; Bag, Swarup

    2013-11-01

    Although the surface-active elements such as oxygen and sulfur have an adverse effect on momentum transport in liquid metals during fusion welding, such elements can be used beneficially up to a certain limit to increase the weld penetration in the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process. The fluid flow pattern and consequently the weld penetration and width change due to a change in coefficient of surface tension from a negative value to a positive value. The present work is focused on the analysis of possible effects of surface-active elements to change the weld pool dimensions in linear GTA welding. A 3D finite element-based heat transfer and fluid flow model is developed to study the effect of surface-active elements on stainless steel plates. A velocity in the order of 180 mm/s due to surface tension force is estimated at an optimum concentration of surface-active elements. Further, the differential evolution-based global optimization algorithm is integrated with the numerical model to estimate uncertain model parameters such as arc efficiency, effective arc radius, and effective values of material properties at high temperatures. The effective values of thermal conductivity and viscosity are estimated to be enhanced nine and seven times, respectively, over corresponding room temperature values. An error analysis is also performed to find out the overall reliability of the computed results, and a maximum reliability of 0.94 is achieved.

  6. Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer experiment: Investigation description and surface science results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, P.R.; Bandfield, J.L.; Hamilton, V.E.; Ruff, S.W.; Kieffer, H.H.; Titus, T.N.; Malin, M.C.; Morris, R.V.; Lane, M.D.; Clark, R.L.; Jakosky, B.M.; Mellon, M.T.; Pearl, J.C.; Conrath, B.J.; Smith, M.D.; Clancy, R.T.; Kuzmin, R.O.; Roush, T.; Mehall, G.L.; Gorelick, N.; Bender, K.; Murray, K.; Dason, S.; Greene, E.; Silverman, S.; Greenfield, M.

    2001-01-01

    The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) investigation on Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) is aimed at determining (1) the composition of surface minerals, rocks, and ices; (2) the temperature and dynamics of the atmosphere; (3) the properties of the atmospheric aerosols and clouds; (4) the nature of the polar regions; and (5) the thermophysical properties of the surface materials. These objectives are met using an infrared (5.8- to 50-??m) interferometric spectrometer, along with broadband thermal (5.1-to 150-??m) and visible/near-IR (0.3- to 2.9-??m) radiometers. The MGS TES instrument weighs 14.47 kg, consumes 10.6 W when operating, and is 23.6 ?? 35.5 ?? 40.0 cm in size. The TES data are calibrated to a 1-?? precision of 2.5-6 ?? 10-8 W cm-2 sr-1/cm-1, 1.6 ?? 10-6 W cm-2 sr-1, and ???0.5 K in the spectrometer, visible/near-IR bolometer, and IR bolometer, respectively. These instrument subsections are calibrated to an absolute accuracy of ???4 ?? 10-8 W cm-2 sr-1/cm-1 (0.5 K at 280 K), 1-2%, and ???1-2 K, respectively. Global mapping of surface mineralogy at a spatial resolution of 3 km has shown the following: (1) The mineralogic composition of dark regions varies from basaltic, primarily plagioclase feldspar and clinopyroxene, in the ancient, southern highlands to andesitic, dominated by plagioclase feldspar and volcanic glass, in the younger northern plains. (2) Aqueous mineralization has produced gray, crystalline hematite in limited regions under ambient or hydrothermal conditions; these deposits are interpreted to be in-place sedimentary rock formations and indicate that liquid water was stable near the surface for a long period of time. (3) There is no evidence for large-scale (tens of kilometers) occurrences of moderate-grained (>50-??m) carbonates exposed at the surface at a detection limit of ???10%. (4) Unweathered volcanic minerals dominate the spectral properties of dark regions, and weathering products, such as clays, have not been observed anywhere above

  7. Global mapping of the surface of Titan through the haze with VIMS onboard Cassini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Cornet, Thomas; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Sotin, Christophe; Barnes, Jason W.; Brown, Robert H.; Lasue, Jérémie; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, Bonnie; Clark, Roger Nelson; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2016-10-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard Cassini observes the surface of Titan through the atmosphere in seven narrow spectral windows in the infrared at 0.93, 1.08, 1.27, 1.59, 2.01, 2.68-2.78, and 4.9-5.1 microns. We have produced a global hyperspectral mosaic at 32 pixels per degrees of the complete VIMS data set of Titan between T0 (July 2004) and T120 (June 2016) flybys. We merged all the data cubes sorted by increasing spatial resolution, with the high resolution images on top of the mosaic and the low resolution images used as background. One of the main challenge in producing global spectral composition maps is to remove the seams between individual frames taken throughout the entire mission. These seams are mainly due to the widely varying viewing angles between data acquired during the different Titan flybys. These angles induce significant surface photometric effects and a strongly varying atmospheric (absorption and scattering) contribution, the scattering of the atmosphere being all the more present than the wavelength is short. We have implemented a series of empirical corrections to homogenize the maps, by correcting at first order for photometric and atmospheric scattering effects. Recently, the VIMS' IR wavelength calibration has been observed to be drifting from a total of a few nm toward longer wavelengths, the drift being almost continuously present over the course of the mission. Whereas minor at first order, this drift has implications on the homogeneity of the maps when trying to fit images taken at the beginning of the mission with images taken near the end, in particular when using channels in the narrowest atmospheric spectral windows. A correction scheme has been implemented to account for this subtle effect.

  8. Modelling the impact of global changes on European summer surface ozone levels at the 2050 horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clain, Gaelle; Szopa, Sophie; Vautard, Robert; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Colette, Augustin

    2013-04-01

    As pointed by the IPCC, climate change and evolution of green house gases emissions in the coming decades are likely to affect regional pollution levels as well as the background ozone levels (Jacob et al., 1999): first, the evolution of climate due to the increase of green house gas emissions is liable to induce modifications of the meteorological parameters of crucial interest for air quality. Secondly, the emissions of air pollutants will be affected by changes in population and energy demands as well as policy aiming to reduce global warming or pollution impacts. In order to assess the relative impact of climate change and change in green house gas emissions, a set of regional simulations is conducted using CHIMERE model (Bessagnet et al., 2009). These simulations account for change in anthropogenic emissions of precursors from future scenarii, global background pollutant levels through appropriate boundary conditions from LMDz-INCA model, and future meteorological conditions reflecting AR5 scenario. For consistency, all these forcings are built on the same scenario: the RCP 8.5 (Representative Concentration Pathways, Riahi et al., 2007) developed in IPCC-AR5 framework for climate projections. The RCP8.5 scenario used in this study is defined by a rising radiative forcing pathway leading to 8.5 W.m-2 in 2100. Long term simulations of summer periods (July 1st to August 31st ) with CHIMERE model are conducted, reproducing present (1995-2005), future (2045-2055) conditions in emissions, climate, and boundary conditions. Mean summer surface ozone levels from each simulated case are compared in order to discriminate the impact of climate and the impact of RCP8.5 scenario emission progression alone on surface ozone levels.

  9. Thinking Globally and Acting Locally: Environmental Education Teaching Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Lori D.; Stapp, William B.

    Provided are teaching activities related to: (1) food production and distribution; (2) energy; (3) transportation; (4) solid waste; (5) chemicals in the environment; (6) resource management; (7) pollution; (8) population; (9) world linkages; (10) endangered species; and (11) lifestyle and environment. The activities, designed to help learners…

  10. Evaluation of representativeness of near-surface winds in station measurements, global and regional reanalysis for Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, Frank; Kaiser-Weiss, Andrea K.; Heene, Vera; Borsche, Michael; Keller, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Within the preparation activities for a European COPERNICUS Climate Change Service (C3S) several ongoing research projects analyse the potential of global and regional model-based climate reanalyses for applications. A user survey in the FP7-project CORE-CLIMAX revealed that surface wind (10 m) is among the most frequently used parameters of global reanalysis products. The FP7 project UERRA (Uncertainties in Ensembles of Regional Re-Analysis) has the focus on regional European reanalysis and the associated uncertainties, also from a user perspective. Especially in the field of renewable energy planning and production there is a need for climatological information across all spatial scales, i.e., from climatology at a certain site to the spatial scale of national or continental renewable energy production. Here, we focus on a comparison of wind measurements of the Germany's meteorological service (Deutscher Wetterdienst, DWD) with global reanalyses of ECWMF and a regional reanalysis for Europe based on DWD's NWP-model COSMO (performed by the Hans-Ertel-Center for Weather Research, University of Bonn). Reanalyses can provide valuable additional information on larger scale variability, e.g. multi-annual variation over Germany. However, changes in the observing system, model errors and biases have to be carefully considered. On the other hand, the ground-based observation networks partly suffer from change of the station distribution, changes in instrumentation, measurements procedures and quality control as well as local changes which might modify their spatial representativeness. All these effects might often been unknown or hard to characterize, although plenty of the meta-data information has been recorded for the German stations. One focus of the presentation will be the added-value of the regional reanalysis.

  11. Land Surface Water and Energy Estimates in the Global MERRA-2 Reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichle, R. H.; Draper, C. S.; Liu, Q.; Koster, R. D.; Mahanama, S. P. P.; De Lannoy, G. J. M.; Girotto, M.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-decadal reanalysis datasets have been widely used to study the global terrestrial water and energy cycles. The driving component of the land surface water budget is the incoming precipitation forcing, which was traditionally generated by the atmospheric general circulation model component of the reanalysis system following the assimilation of atmospheric temperature and humidity observations. The recent CFSR and MERRA-2 reanalysis products, however, essentially use precipitation observations from satellites and/or gauges to force the land surface. This presentation first reviews the approach by which the precipitation observations are introduced in MERRA-2, which relies on a mix of (i) model-generated precipitation at high-latitudes, (ii) a pentad, 2.5 degree satellite product from the NOAA Climate Prediction Center (CPC) over Africa, and (iii) a daily, 0.5 degree, gauge-based CPC precipitation product elsewhere. This approach represents an evolution of the method used in the land-only MERRA-Land reanalysis. Next, the precipitation climatologies and the resulting land surface conditions are evaluated regionally and for the reanalysis time period (1980-present) against available independent observations. MERRA-2 provides generally improved land surface conditions when compared to MERRA, its predecessor. Improvements include enhanced estimates of soil moisture, terrestrial water storage, runoff, screen-level temperature and turbulent fluxes, with MERRA-2 skill metrics generally similar to those of MERRA-Land. But MERRA-2 also suffers from adverse spin-up effects in soil moisture conditions at very high latitudes because of model precipitation bias in this region.

  12. Activities That Reduce Global Anthropogenic Methane Emissions Grant - Closed Announcement FY 2012

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Grant to fund eligible projects for activities that advance near-term, cost-effective methane abatement or recovery and use as a clean energy source, and support the goals of of theGlobal Methane Initiative.

  13. Asphaltene surface activity at oil/water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, E.Y.; Shields, M.B.

    1995-11-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) dynamic surface tension (DST), dynamic interfacial tension (DIFT), and zero shear viscosity were used to study the surface activity of Ratawi asphaltenes in organic solvents, in the asphaltene/water/toluene emulsions and at the toluene/aqueous solution interfaces. In organic solvents, the kinetic process of micellization and the micellar structure are characterized. Their dependence on asphaltene concentration was investigated. The emulsion droplet structure and their capability in water uptake was tested. Also, the enhancement of surface activity of asphaltenes and its potential applications are briefly discussed.

  14. Using the Global Positioning System to monitor dynamic ground deformation networks on potentially active landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Jane L.

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) has many advantages over conventional surveying for landslide disaster prevention and mitigation. Once an initial baseline network of ground markers has been positioned, the re-occupation of survey stations determines ground deformation. This verifies both the boundary of the landslide block and ground surface changes. These changes may take the form of either slow to moderate creep, or massive structural failure. Creep may occur as a precursor to slope failure, either within (i) fresh slopes that do not show any evidence of past collapse, (ii) the existing active landslides and (iii) areas adjacent to existing collapses. Networks are measured using rapid static GPS. The method, which enables many survey stations to be measured in a short time, provides a quick means for determining the three-dimensional map of the ground surface (of the landslide). A study in Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, established an initial baseline network within the Barranco de Tirajana, a basin on Gran Canaria that contains evidence of both ancient and recent landslides. Reoccupation of the network using rapid static GPS revealed a field accuracy of approximately 10 mm; the data indicated that the most recent landslide is currently stable.

  15. Cu Nanowires with Clean Surfaces: Synthesis and Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinmei; Sui, Yongming; Yang, Xinyi; Wei, Yingjin; Zou, Bo

    2016-10-12

    Low activity and high cost of electrocatalysts are the major challenge for the commercialization of the direct fuel cells (DFCs) and biofuel cells. In this work, we demonstrate the desirable "clean surfaces" effect of Cu nanocrystals in electrocatalysis. By a new reaction route of Cu2O nanospheres (Cu2O NSs), Cu nanowires (Cu NWs) with high purity and "clean surfaces" are first obtained under mild conditions. Benefiting from the path directing effects and abundant (100) facets, the as-prepared Cu NWs exhibit a lower overpotential to achieve the methanol electro-oxidation reaction (MOR) than that of analogous Cu nanoparticles (Cu NPs). Moreover, the "clean surfaces" provide more available active sites for the efficient transfer of electrons, enabling the Cu NWs to show their enhanced electrocatalytic activity. In the MOR, forward peak current density for the surface-cleaned Cu NWs is 2839 μA cm(-2), which is ca. 6.45-fold higher than that of the Cu NWs with residual capping molecules on their surface. The "clean surfaces" effect can also be extended to the glucose electro-oxidation reaction (GOR), and the enhancement in specific surface area activity for the Cu NWs is 11.3-fold. This work enhances the electrocatalytic performance of Cu nanocrystals without the need for additional noble metals, which opens up new avenues for utilizing non-noble metals in the DFC or biofuel cell applications.

  16. Surface activation-based nanobonding and interconnection at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howlader, M. M. R.; Yamauchi, A.; Suga, T.

    2011-02-01

    Flip chip nanobonding and interconnect system (NBIS) equipment with high precision alignment has been developed based on the surface activated bonding method for high-density interconnection and MEMS packaging. The 3σ alignment accuracy in the IR transmission system was approximately ±0.2 µm. The performance of the NBIS has been preliminarily investigated through bonding between relatively rough surfaces of copper through silicon vias (Cu-TSVs) and gold-stud bumps (Au-SBs), and smooth surfaces of silicon wafers. The Cu-TSVs of 55 µm diameter and the Au-SBs of 35 µm diameter with ~6-10 nm surface roughness (RMS) were bonded at room temperature after surface activation using an argon fast atom beam (Ar-FAB) under 0.16 N per bump. Silicon wafers of 50 mm diameter with ~0.2 nm RMS surface roughness were bonded without heating after surface activation. Void-free interfaces both in Cu-TSV/Au-SB and silicon/silicon with bonding strength equivalent to bulk fracture of Au and silicon, respectively, were achieved. A few nm thick amorphous layers were observed across the silicon/silicon interface that was fabricated by the Ar-FAB. This study in the interconnection and bonding facilitates the required three-dimensional integration on the same surface for high-density electronic and biomedical systems.

  17. Variability of basin scale water resources indicators derived from global hydrological and land surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Micha; Blyth, Eleanor; Schellekens, Jaap

    2016-04-01

    Global hydrological and land-surface models are becoming increasingly available, and as the resolution of these improves, as well how hydrological processes are represented, so does their potential. These offer consistent datasets at the global scale, which can be used to establish water balances and derive policy relevant indicators in medium to large basins, including those that are poorly gauged. However, differences in model structure, model parameterisation, and model forcing may result in quite different indicator values being derived, depending on the model used. In this paper we explore indicators developed using four land surface models (LSM) and five global hydrological models (GHM). Results from these models have been made available through the Earth2Observe project, a recent research initiative funded by the European Union 7th Research Framework. All models have a resolution of 0.5 arc degrees, and are forced using the same WATCH-ERA-Interim (WFDEI) meteorological re-analysis data at a daily time step for the 32 year period from 1979 to 2012. We explore three water resources indicators; an aridity index, a simplified water exploitation index; and an indicator that calculates the frequency of occurrence of root zone stress. We compare indicators derived over selected areas/basins in Europe, Colombia, Southern Africa, the Indian Subcontinent and Australia/New Zealand. The hydrological fluxes calculated show quite significant differences between the nine models, despite the common forcing dataset, with these differences reflected in the indicators subsequently derived. The results show that the variability between models is related to the different climates types, with that variability quite logically depending largely on the availability of water. Patterns are also found in the type of models that dominate different parts of the distribution of the indicator values, with LSM models providing lower values, and GHM models providing higher values in some

  18. Activities affecting surface water resources: A general overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    In November 1987, P.E.I. signed a federal/provincial work-sharing arrangement on water resource management focusing on groundwater pollution, surface water degradation and estuarine eutrophication. The surface water program was designed to identify current surface water uses and users within 12 major watersheds across the Island containing 26 individual rivers, as well as problems arising due to practices that degrade the quality of surface water and restricts its value to other user groups. This report presents a general overview of the program, covering the general characteristics of the Island; operations in agriculture, fish and wildlife, forestry, recreation, fisheries, and industry; alterations of natural features of waterways; wetlands; additional watershed activities such as hydrometric stations and subdivision development; and activities affecting surface water resources such as sedimentation sources, pollution point sources and instream obstructions.

  19. The Activity of Antimicrobial Surfaces Varies by Testing Protocol Utilized

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Matias D.; Zucchi, Paola C.; Phung, Ann; Leonard, Steven N.; Hirsch, Elizabeth B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Contaminated hospital surfaces are an important source of nosocomial infections. A major obstacle in marketing antimicrobial surfaces is a lack of efficacy data based on standardized testing protocols. Aim We compared the efficacy of multiple testing protocols against several “antimicrobial” film surfaces. Methods Four clinical isolates were used: one Escherichia coli, one Klebsiella pneumoniae, and two Staphylococcus aureus strains. Two industry methods (modified ISO 22196 and ASTM E2149), a “dried droplet”, and a “transfer” method were tested against two commercially available antimicrobial films, one film in development, an untreated control, and a positive (silver) control film. At 2 (only ISO) and 24 hours following inoculation, bacteria were collected from film surfaces and enumerated. Results Compared to untreated films in all protocols, there were no significant differences in recovery on either commercial brand at 2 or 24 hours after inoculation. The silver surface demonstrated significant microbicidal activity (mean loss 4.9 Log10 CFU/ml) in all methods and time points with the exception of 2 hours in the ISO protocol and the transfer method. Using our novel droplet method, no differences between placebo and active surfaces were detected. The surface in development demonstrated variable activity depending on method, organism, and time point. The ISO demonstrated minimal activity at 2 hours but significant activity at 24 hours (mean 4.5 Log10 CFU/ml difference versus placebo). The ASTEM protocol exhibited significant differences in recovery of staphylococci (mean 5 Log10 CFU/ml) but not Gram-negative isolates (10 fold decrease). Minimal activity was observed with this film in the transfer method. Conclusions Varying results between protocols suggested that efficacy of antimicrobial surfaces cannot be easily and reproducibly compared. Clinical use should be considered and further development of representative methods is needed. PMID

  20. A global shear velocity model of the mantle from normal modes and surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    durand, S.; Debayle, E.; Ricard, Y. R.; Lambotte, S.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new global shear wave velocity model of the mantle based on the inversion of all published normal mode splitting functions and the large surface wave dataset measured by Debayle & Ricard (2012). Normal mode splitting functions and surface wave phase velocity maps are sensitive to lateral heterogeneities of elastic parameters (Vs, Vp, xi, phi, eta) and density. We first only consider spheroidal modes and Rayleigh waves and restrict the inversion to Vs, Vp and the density. Although it is well known that Vs is the best resolved parameter, we also investigate whether our dataset allows to extract additional information on density and/or Vp. We check whether the determination of the shear wave velocity is affected by the a priori choice of the crustal model (CRUST2.0 or 3SMAC) or by neglecting/coupling poorly resolved parameters. We include the major discontinuities, at 400 and 670 km. Vertical smoothing is imposed through an a priori gaussian covariance matrix on the model and we discuss the effect of coupling/decoupling the inverted structure above and below the discontinuities. We finally discuss the large scale structure of our model and its geodynamical implications regarding the amount of mass exchange between the upper and lower mantle.

  1. Developing the global exploration roadmap: An example using the humans to the lunar surface theme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, C. R.; Schmidt, G. K.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Carpenter, J. D.

    2014-08-01

    The development of the Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) by 12 space agencies participating in the International Space Exploration Coordination Group broadly outlines a pathway to send humans beyond low Earth orbit for the first time since Apollo. Three themes have emerged: Exploration of a Near-Earth Asteroid, Extended Duration Crew Missions, and Humans to the Lunar Surface. The lack of detail within each of these themes could mean that realizing the goals of the GER would be significantly delayed. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that many of the details needed to fully define and evaluate these themes in terms of scientific rationale, economic viability, and technical feasibility already exist and need to be mapped to the GER. Here, we use the Humans to the Lunar Surface theme as an example to illustrate how this process could work. By mapping documents from a variety of international stakeholders, this process can be used to cement buy-in from the current partners and attract new ones to this effort.

  2. The (FHCl)- molecular anion - Structural aspects, global surface, and vibrational eigenspectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klepeis, Neil E.; East, Allan L. L.; Csaszar, Attila G.; Allen, Wesley D.; Lee, Timothy J.; Schwenke, David W.

    1993-01-01

    State of the art ab initio electronic structure methods have been used to investigate the (FHCl)- molecular anion. It is proposed that the geometric structure and binding energies of the complex are r(e)(H-F) = 0.963 +/- 0.003 A, R(e)(H-Cl) = 1.925 +/- 0.015 A, and D0(HF + Cl(-)) = 21.8 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol. A Morokuma decomposition of the ion-molecular bonding give the following electrostatic, polarization, exchange repulsion, dispersion, and charge-transfer plus higher-order mixing components of the vibrationless complexation energy: -27.3, -5.2, +18.3, -4.5, and -5.0 kcal/mol, respectively. A couples cluster single and doubles global surface is constructed from 208 and 228 energy points for linear and bent configurations, respectively, these being fit to rms errors of only 3.9 and 9.3/cm, respectively, below 8000/cm. Converged J = 0 and J = 1 variational eigenstates of the (FHCl)- surface to near the HF + Cl(-) dissociation threshold are determined. The fundamental vibrational frequencies are found to be nu1 = 247/cm, nu2 = 876/cm, and nu3 = 2884/cm. The complete vibrational eigenspectrum is analyzed.

  3. Warm tropical ocean surface and global anoxia during the mid-Cretaceous period.

    PubMed

    Wilson, P A; Norris, R D

    2001-07-26

    The middle of the Cretaceous period (about 120 to 80 Myr ago) was a time of unusually warm polar temperatures, repeated reef-drowning in the tropics and a series of oceanic anoxic events (OAEs) that promoted both the widespread deposition of organic-carbon-rich marine sediments and high biological turnover. The cause of the warm temperatures is unproven but widely attributed to high levels of atmospheric greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. In contrast, there is no consensus on the climatic causes and effects of the OAEs, with both high biological productivity and ocean 'stagnation' being invoked as the cause of ocean anoxia. Here we show, using stable isotope records from multiple species of well-preserved foraminifera, that the thermal structure of surface waters in the western tropical Atlantic Ocean underwent pronounced variability about 100 Myr ago, with maximum sea surface temperatures 3-5 degrees C warmer than today. This variability culminated in a collapse of upper-ocean stratification during OAE-1d (the 'Breistroffer' event), a globally significant period of organic-carbon burial that we show to have fundamental, stratigraphically valuable, geochemical similarities to the main OAEs of the Mesozoic era. Our records are consistent with greenhouse forcing being responsible for the warm temperatures, but are inconsistent both with explanations for OAEs based on ocean stagnation, and with the traditional view (reviewed in ref. 12) that past warm periods were more stable than today's climate.

  4. Relating Nimbus-7 37 GHz data to global land-surface evaporation, primary productivity and the atmospheric CO2 concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.

    1988-01-01

    Global observations at 37 GHz by the Nimbus-7 SMMR are related to zonal variations of land surface evaporation and primary productivity, as well as to temporal variations of atmospheric CO2 concentration. The temporal variation of CO2 concentration and the zonal variations of evaporation and primary productivity are shown to be highly correlated with the satellite sensor data. The potential usefulness of the 37-GHz data for global biospheric and climate studies is noted.

  5. Abnormal network topographies and changes in global activity: absence of a causal relationship.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Vijay; Tang, Chris C; Ma, Yilong; Spetsieris, Phoebe; Eidelberg, David

    2012-12-01

    Changes in regional brain activity can be observed following global normalization procedures to reduce variability in the data. In particular, spurious regional differences may appear when scans from patients with low global activity are compared to those from healthy subjects. It has thus been suggested that the consistent increases in subcortical activity that characterize the abnormal Parkinson's disease-related metabolic covariance pattern (PDRP) are artifacts of global normalization, and that similar topographies can be identified in scans from healthy subjects with varying global activity. To address this issue, we examined the effects of experimental reductions in global metabolic activity on PDRP expression. Ten healthy subjects underwent ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET in wakefulness and following sleep induction. In all subjects, the global metabolic rate (GMR) declined with sleep (mean -34%, range: -17 to -56%), exceeding the test-retest differences of the measure (p<0.001). By contrast, sleep-wake differences in PDRP expression did not differ from test-retest differences, and did not correlate (R²=0.04) with concurrent declines in global metabolic activity. Indeed, despite significant GMR reductions in sleep, PDRP values remained within the normal range. Likewise, voxel weights on the principal component patterns resulting from combined analysis of the sleep and wake scans did not correlate (R²<0.07) with the corresponding regional loadings on the PDRP topography. In aggregate, the data demonstrate that abnormal PDRP expression is not induced by reductions in global activity. Moreover, significant declines in GMR are not associated with the appearance of PDRP-like spatial topographies.

  6. Active Acetylcholinesterase Immobilization on a Functionalized Silicon Surface.

    PubMed

    Khaldi, K; Sam, S; Gouget-Laemmel, A C; Henry de Villeneuve, C; Moraillon, A; Ozanam, F; Yang, J; Kermad, A; Ghellai, N; Gabouze, N

    2015-08-04

    In this work, we studied the attachment of active acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme on a silicon substrate as a potential biomarker for the detection of organophosphorous (OP) pesticides. A multistep functionalization strategy was developed on a crystalline silicon surface: a carboxylic acid-terminated monolayer was grafted onto a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface by photochemical hydrosilylation, and then AChE was covalently attached through amide bonds using an activation EDC/NHS process. Each step of the modification was quantitatively characterized by ex-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated-total-reflection geometry (ATR-FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The kinetics of enzyme immobilization was investigated using in situ real-time infrared spectroscopy. The enzymatic activity of immobilized acetylcholinesterase enzymes was determined with a colorimetric test. The surface concentration of active AChE was estimated to be Γ = 1.72 × 10(10) cm(-2).

  7. The global surface temperatures of the Moon as measured by the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J.-P.; Paige, D. A.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Sefton-Nash, E.

    2017-02-01

    The Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has been acquiring solar reflectance and mid-infrared radiance measurements nearly continuously since July of 2009. Diviner is providing the most comprehensive view of how regoliths on airless bodies store and exchange thermal energy with the space environment. Approximately a quarter trillion calibrated radiance measurements of the Moon, acquired over 5.5 years by Diviner, have been compiled into a 0.5° resolution global dataset with a 0.25 h local time resolution. Maps generated with this dataset provide a global perspective of the surface energy balance of the Moon and reveal the complex and extreme nature of the lunar surface thermal environment. Our achievable map resolution, both spatially and temporally, will continue to improve with further data acquisition. Daytime maximum temperatures are sensitive to the albedo of the surface and are ∼387-397 K at the equator, dropping to ∼95 K just before sunrise, though anomalously warm areas characterized by high rock abundances can be > 50 K warmer than the zonal average nighttime temperatures. An asymmetry is observed between the morning and afternoon temperatures due to the thermal inertia of the lunar regolith with the dusk terminator ∼30 K warmer than the dawn terminator at the equator. An increase in albedo with incidence angle is required to explain the observed decrease in temperatures with latitude. At incidence angles exceeding ∼40°, topography and surface roughness influence temperatures resulting in increasing scatter in temperatures and anisothermality between Diviner channels. Nighttime temperatures are sensitive to the thermophysical properties of the regolith. High thermal inertia (TI) materials such as large rocks, remain warmer during the long lunar night and result in anomalously warm nighttime temperatures and anisothermality in the Diviner channels. Anomalous maximum and minimum temperatures are

  8. An 800-kyr Record of Global Surface Ocean δ18Oand Implications for Ice Volume-Temperature Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakun, J. D.; Lea, D. W.; Lisiecki, L. E.; Raymo, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    The sequence of feedbacks that characterized 100-kyr glacial cycles of the past million years remains uncertain, hampering an understanding of the interconnections between insolation, ice sheets, greenhouse gas forcing, and climate. Critical to addressing this issue is an accurate interpretation of the marine δ18O record, the main template for the Ice Ages. This study uses a global compilation of 49 paired sea surface temperature-planktonic δ18O records to extract the mean δ18O of surface ocean seawater over the past 800 kyr, which we interpret to dominantly reflect global ice volume. The results indicate that global surface temperature, inferred deep ocean temperature, and atmospheric CO2 decrease early during each glacial cycle in close association with one another, whereas major ice sheet growth occurs later in glacial cycles. These relationships suggest that ice volume may have exhibited a threshold response to global cooling, and that global deglaciations do not occur until after the growth of large ice sheets. This phase sequence also suggests that the ice sheets had relatively little feedback on global cooling. Simple modeling shows that the rate of ice volume change through time is largely determined by the combined influence of insolation, temperature, and ice sheet size, with possible implications for the evolution of glacial cycles over the past three million years.

  9. Spatiotemporal dynamics of surface water networks across a global biodiversity hotspot—implications for conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulbure, Mirela G.; Kininmonth, Stuart; Broich, Mark

    2014-11-01

    The concept of habitat networks represents an important tool for landscape conservation and management at regional scales. Previous studies simulated degradation of temporally fixed networks but few quantified the change in network connectivity from disintegration of key features that undergo naturally occurring spatiotemporal dynamics. This is particularly of concern for aquatic systems, which typically show high natural spatiotemporal variability. Here we focused on the Swan Coastal Plain, a bioregion that encompasses a global biodiversity hotspot in Australia with over 1500 water bodies of high biodiversity. Using graph theory, we conducted a temporal analysis of water body connectivity over 13 years of variable climate. We derived large networks of surface water bodies using Landsat data (1999-2011). We generated an ensemble of 278 potential networks at three dispersal distances approximating the maximum dispersal distance of different water dependent organisms. We assessed network connectivity through several network topology metrics and quantified the resilience of the network topology during wet and dry phases. We identified ‘stepping stone’ water bodies across time and compared our networks with theoretical network models with known properties. Results showed a highly dynamic seasonal pattern of variability in network topology metrics. A decline in connectivity over the 13 years was noted with potential negative consequences for species with limited dispersal capacity. The networks described here resemble theoretical scale-free models, also known as ‘rich get richer’ algorithm. The ‘stepping stone’ water bodies are located in the area around the Peel-Harvey Estuary, a Ramsar listed site, and some are located in a national park. Our results describe a powerful approach that can be implemented when assessing the connectivity for a particular organism with known dispersal distance. The approach of identifying the surface water bodies that act as

  10. Using Surface Curvature to Control the Dimerization of a Surface-Active Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurylowicz, Martin; Giuliani, Maximiliano; Dutcher, John

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the influence of surface geometry on adsorbed proteins promises new possibilities in biophysics, such as topographical catalysis, molecular recognition of geometric cues, and modulations of oligomerization or ligand binding. We have created nano-textured hydrophobic surfaces that are stable in buffer by spin coating polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles (NPs) to form patchy NP monolayers on a PS substrate, yielding flat and highly curved areas on the same sample. Moreover, we have separated surface chemistry from texture by floating a 10 nm thick film of monodisperse PS onto the NP-functionalized surface. Using Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy we have compared in situ the distribution of detachment lengths for proteins on curved surfaces to that measured on flat surfaces. We have shown that β-Lactoglobulin (β-LG), a surface-active protein which helps to stabilize oil droplets in milk, forms dimers on both flat PS surfaces and surfaces with a radius of curvature of 100 nm, whereas β-LG monomers exist for more highly curved surfaces with radii of curvature of 25 and 40 nm. It is surprising that rather large radii of curvature have such a strong influence on proteins whose radius is only ˜2 nm. Furthermore, the transition from dimer to monomer with changes in surface curvature offers promising applications for proteins whose function can be modified by their oligomerization state.

  11. Improving HJ-1B IRS land surface temperature product using ASTER global emissivity database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Hu, T.; Meng, X.; Yongming, D.; Cao, B.; Liu, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a key parameter for hydrological, meteorological, climatological and environmental studies. Currently many operational LST products have been generated using European and American satellite data, i.e., the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). However, few LST product has been produced using Chinese satellite data. Thus, the objective of this study is to generate reliable LST product using Chinese HJ-1B satellite data. The HJ-1B satellite of China, were launched on September 6, 2008, which are used for disaster and environment monitoring. IRS (Infrared Scanner) is one of the key instruments onboard HJ-1B satellite, it can scan the earth every four days, has four spectral bands ranging from the near-infrared to thermal infrared bands (band 1 0.75 - 1.10μm, band 2 1.55-1.75μm, MIR band 3 3.50 - 3.90μm, band 4 10.5-12.5μm) with 720 km swath. It scans ±29° from nadir and the spatial resolution for band1-3 is 150m and 300m for band4. In this study, a single-channel parametric model (SC-PM) algorithm were used to produce 300m LST product from HJ-1B IRS data. The NCEP atmospheric profiles and a parametric model were used for atmospheric correction. In order to improve the accuracy of the land surface emissivity (LSE), the 1km ASTER Global Emissivity Database (GED) and self-developed 5-day 1km vegetation cover product were used for estimating the LSE based on the Vegetation Cover Method. Two years of HJ-1B IRS LST product in Heihe River basin (Gansu province, China) from June 2012 to June 2014 were generated. The LST products were evaluated against ground observations in an arid area of northwest China during the Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (HiWATER) experiment. Four barren surface sites and ten vegetated sites were chosen for the evaluation. The results show that the developed HJ-1B IRS

  12. Global Art: Activities, Projects, and Inventions from Around the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohl, MaryAnn F.; Potter, Jean

    This activity book contains over 130 art ideas from around the world, combining the fun and creativity of art with the mysteries of history, the lure of geography, and the diversity of the cultures of the world. These projects allow children to explore the world through art with a process, not a product, approach to artistic outcome; the process…

  13. An enhanced VIIRS aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrieval algorithm over land using a global surface reflectance ratio database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai; Kondragunta, Shobha; Laszlo, Istvan; Liu, Hongqing; Remer, Lorraine A.; Huang, Jingfeng; Superczynski, Stephen; Ciren, Pubu

    2016-09-01

    The Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite has been retrieving aerosol optical thickness (AOT), operationally and globally, over ocean and land since shortly after S-NPP launch in 2011. However, the current operational VIIRS AOT retrieval algorithm over land has two limitations in its assumptions for land surfaces: (1) it only retrieves AOT over the dark surfaces and (2) it assumes that the global surface reflectance ratios between VIIRS bands are constants. In this work, we develop a surface reflectance ratio database over land with a spatial resolution 0.1° × 0.1° using 2 years of VIIRS top of atmosphere reflectances. We enhance the current operational VIIRS AOT retrieval algorithm by applying the surface reflectance ratio database in the algorithm. The enhanced algorithm is able to retrieve AOT over both dark and bright surfaces. Over bright surfaces, the VIIRS AOT retrievals from the enhanced algorithm have a correlation of 0.79, mean bias of -0.008, and standard deviation (STD) of error of 0.139 when compared against the ground-based observations at the global AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sites. Over dark surfaces, the VIIRS AOT retrievals using the surface reflectance ratio database improve the root-mean-square error from 0.150 to 0.123. The use of the surface reflectance ratio database also increases the data coverage of more than 20% over dark surfaces. The AOT retrievals over bright surfaces are comparable to MODIS Deep Blue AOT retrievals.

  14. Global earthquake catalogs and long-range correlation of seismic activity (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Y.

    2009-12-01

    In view of the long-term seismic activity in the world, homogeneity of a global catalog is indispensable. Lately, Engdahl and Villaseñor (2002) compiled a global earthquake catalog of magnitude (M)7.0 or larger during the last century (1900-1999). This catalog is based on the various existing catalogs such as Abe catalog (Abe, 1981, 1984; Abe and Noguchi, 1983a, b) for the world seismicity (1894-1980), its modified catalogs by Perez and Scholz (1984) and by Pacheco and Sykes (1992), and also the Harvard University catalog since 1975. However, the original surface wave magnitudes of Abe catalog were systematically changed by Perez and Scholz (1984) and Pacheco and Sykes (1992). They suspected inhomogeneity of the Abe catalog and claimed that the two seeming changes in the occurrence rate around 1922 and 1948 resulted from magnitude shifts for some instrumental-related reasons. They used a statistical test assuming that such a series of large earthquakes in the world should behave as the stationary Poisson process (uniform occurrences). It is obvious that their claim strongly depends on their a priori assumption of an independent or short-range dependence of earthquake occurrence. We question this assumption from the viewpoint of long-range dependence of seismicity. We make some statistical analyses of the spectrum, dispersion-time diagrams and R/S for estimating and testing of the long-range correlations. We also attempt to show the possibility that the apparent rate change in the global seismicity can be simulated by a certain long-range correlated process. Further, if we divide the globe into the two regions of high and low latitudes, for example, we have different shapes of the cumulative curves to each other, and the above mentioned apparent change-points disappear from the both regions. This suggests that the Abe catalog shows the genuine seismic activity rather than the artifact of the suspected magnitude shifts that should appear in any wide enough regions

  15. Indium phosphide negative electron affinity photocathodes: Surface cleaning and activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yun

    InP(100) is a very important semi-conductor for many applications. When activated by Cs and oxygen, the InP surface achieves the state of Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) making the Cs+O/InP system a very efficient electron source. Despite many years of study, the chemical cleaning and activation of InP are still not well understood. In our work, we have established an understanding of the basic physics and chemistry for the chemical cleaning and activation of the InP(100) surface. Synchrotron Radiation Photoelectron Spectroscopy is the main technique used in this study because of its high surface sensitivity and ability to identify chemical species present on the surface at each stage of our process. A clean, stoichiometric InP(100) surface is crucial for obtaining high performance of NEA photocathodes. Therefore, the first part of our study focused on the chemical cleaning of InP(100). We found that hydrogen peroxide based solutions alone, originally developed to clean GaAs(100) surfaces and widely used for InP(100), do not result in clean InP(I00) surfaces because oxide is left on the surface. A second cleaning step, which uses acid solutions like HCl or H2SO4, can remove all the oxide and leave a 0.4 ML protective layer of elemental phosphorous on the surface. The elemental phosphorous can be removed by annealing at 330°C and a clean InP(100) surface can be obtained. Cs deposition on InP(100) surface shows clear charge transfer from the Cs ad-atoms to the substrate. When the Cs/InP(100) surface is dosed with oxygen, the charge transfer from the Cs to substrate is reduced and substrate is oxidized. The activation of InP as a NEA photocathode is carried out by an alternating series of steps consisting of Cs deposition and Cs+O co-deposition. Two types of oxygen are found after activation. The first is dissociated oxygen and the other is a di-oxygen species (peroxide or superoxide). The decay of quantum-yield with time and with annealing is studied and changes in

  16. Toward a parameterization of global-scale organic carbon mineralization kinetics in surface marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolpovsky, K.; Dale, A. W.; Wallmann, K.

    2015-06-01

    An empirical function is derived for predicting the rate-depth profile of particulate organic carbon (POC) degradation in surface marine sediments including the bioturbated layer. The rate takes the form of a power law analogous to the Middelburg function. The functional parameters were optimized by simulating measured benthic O2 and NO3- fluxes at 185 stations worldwide using a diagenetic model. The novelty of this work rests with the finding that the vertically resolved POC degradation rate in the bioturbated zone can be determined using a simple function where the POC rain rate is the governing variable. Although imperfect, the model is able to fit 71% of paired O2 and NO3- fluxes to within 50% of measured values. It further provides realistic geochemical concentration-depth profiles, NO3- penetration depths, and apparent first-order POC mineralization rate constants. The model performs less well on the continental shelf due to the high sediment heterogeneity there. When applied to globally resolved maps of rain rate, the model predicts a global denitrification rate of 182 ± 88 Tg yr-1 of N and a POC burial rate of 107 ± 52 Tg yr-1 of C with a mean carbon burial efficiency of 6.1%. These results are in very good agreement with published values. Our proposed function is conceptually simple, requires less parameterization than multi-G-type models, and is suitable for nonsteady state applications. It provides a basis for more accurately simulating benthic nutrient fluxes and carbonate dissolution rates in Earth system models.

  17. Data-driven modeling of surface temperature anomaly and solar activity trends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A novel two-step modeling scheme is used to reconstruct and analyze surface temperature and solar activity data at global, hemispheric, and regional scales. First, the self-organizing map (SOM) technique is used to extend annual modern climate data from the century to millennial scale. The SOM component planes are used to identify and quantify strength of nonlinear relations among modern surface temperature anomalies (<150 years), tropical and extratropical teleconnections, and Palmer Drought Severity Indices (0–2000 years). Cross-validation of global sea and land surface temperature anomalies verifies that the SOM is an unbiased estimator with less uncertainty than the magnitude of anomalies. Second, the quantile modeling of SOM reconstructions reveal trends and periods in surface temperature anomaly and solar activity whose timing agrees with published studies. Temporal features in surface temperature anomalies, such as the Medieval Warm Period, Little Ice Age, and Modern Warming Period, appear at all spatial scales but whose magnitudes increase when moving from ocean to land, from global to regional scales, and from southern to northern regions. Some caveats that apply when interpreting these data are the high-frequency filtering of climate signals based on quantile model selection and increased uncertainty when paleoclimatic data are limited. Even so, all models find the rate and magnitude of Modern Warming Period anomalies to be greater than those during the Medieval Warm Period. Lastly, quantile trends among reconstructed equatorial Pacific temperature profiles support the recent assertion of two primary El Niño Southern Oscillation types. These results demonstrate the efficacy of this alternative modeling approach for reconstructing and interpreting scale-dependent climate variables.

  18. Organism activity levels predict marine invertebrate survival during ancient global change extinctions.

    PubMed

    Clapham, Matthew E

    2017-04-01

    Multistressor global change, the combined influence of ocean warming, acidification, and deoxygenation, poses a serious threat to marine organisms. Experimental studies imply that organisms with higher levels of activity should be more resilient, but testing this prediction and understanding organism vulnerability at a global scale, over evolutionary timescales, and in natural ecosystems remain challenging. The fossil record, which contains multiple extinctions triggered by multistressor global change, is ideally suited for testing hypotheses at broad geographic, taxonomic, and temporal scales. Here, I assess the importance of activity level for survival of well-skeletonized benthic marine invertebrates over a 100-million-year-long interval (Permian to Jurassic periods) containing four global change extinctions, including the end-Permian and end-Triassic mass extinctions. More active organisms, based on a semiquantitative score incorporating feeding and motility, were significantly more likely to survive during three of the four extinction events (Guadalupian, end-Permian, and end-Triassic). In contrast, activity was not an important control on survival during nonextinction intervals. Both the end-Permian and end-Triassic mass extinctions also triggered abrupt shifts to increased dominance by more active organisms. Although mean activity gradually returned toward pre-extinction values, the net result was a permanent ratcheting of ecosystem-wide activity to higher levels. Selectivity patterns during ancient global change extinctions confirm the hypothesis that higher activity, a proxy for respiratory physiology, is a fundamental control on survival, although the roles of specific physiological traits (such as extracellular pCO2 or aerobic scope) cannot be distinguished. Modern marine ecosystems are dominated by more active organisms, in part because of selectivity ratcheting during these ancient extinctions, so on average may be less vulnerable to global change

  19. The EUSTACE project: combining different components of the observing system to deliver global, daily information on surface air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Day-to-day variations in surface air temperature affect society in many ways and are fundamental information for many climate services; however, daily surface air temperature measurements are not available everywhere. A global daily analysis cannot be achieved with measurements made in situ alone, so incorporation of satellite retrievals is needed. To achieve this, we must develop an understanding of the relationships between traditional surface air temperature measurements and retrievals of surface skin temperature from satellite measurements, i.e. Land Surface Temperature, Ice Surface Temperature, Sea Surface Temperature and Lake Surface Water Temperature. Here we reflect on our experience so far within the Horizon 2020 project EUSTACE of using satellite skin temperature retrievals to help us to produce a fully-global daily analysis (or ensemble of analyses) of surface air temperature on the centennial scale, integrating different ground-based and satellite-borne data types and developing new statistical models of how surface air temperature varies in a connected way from place to place. We will present plans and progress along this road in the EUSTACE project (2015-June 2018): - providing new, consistent, multi-component estimation of uncertainty in surface skin temperature retrievals from satellites; - identifying inhomogeneities in daily surface air temperature measurement series from weather stations and correcting for these over Europe; - estimating surface air temperature over all surfaces of Earth from surface skin temperature retrievals; - using new statistical techniques to provide information on higher spatial and temporal scales than currently available, making optimum use of information in data-rich eras. Information will also be given on how interested users can become involved.

  20. The role of dynamic surface tension in cloud droplet activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petters, Markus D.; Suda, Sarah R.; Christensen, Sara I.

    2013-05-01

    We present new data on the cloud droplet forming abilities of two-component particles that contain the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate and sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate. The experiments were designed to test specific predictions made by Kohler theory that accounts for the reduction of surface tension and the partitioning of the surfactant between the interior and the surface of the droplet. We also introduced a pre-humidification step followed by a six minute time delay to test whether dynamic surface tension may lead to kinetic limitations on the partitioning process. Our results confirm previous studies that show that surfactants do not enhance cloud droplet activation relative to what would be predicted from water activity alone. The data obtained with and without time delay were indistinguishable within measurement uncertainty, suggesting that dynamic surface tension does not need to be considered in Kohler theory.

  1. First and second derivative atmospheric CO2, global surface temperature and ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggett, L. M. W.; Ball, D. A.

    2014-11-01

    A significant gap now of some 16 years in length has been shown to exist between the observed global surface temperature trend and that expected from the majority of climate simulations, and this gap is presently continuing to increase. For its own sake, and to enable better climate prediction for policy use, the reasons behind this mismatch need to be better understood. While an increasing number of possible causes have been proposed, the candidate causes have not yet converged. The standard model which is now displaying the disparity has it that temperature will rise roughly linearly with atmospheric CO2. However research also exists showing correlation between the interannual variability in the growth rate of atmospheric CO2 and temperature. Rate of change of CO2 had not been a causative mechanism for temperature because it was concluded that causality ran from temperature to rate of change of CO2. However more recent studies have found little or no evidence for temperature leading rate of change of CO2 but instead evidence for simultaneity. With this background, this paper reinvestigated the relationship between rate of change of CO2 and two of the major climate variables, atmospheric temperature and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Using time series analysis in the form of dynamic regression modelling with autocorrelation correction, it is demonstrated that first-derivative CO2 leads temperature and that there is a highly statistically significant correlation between first-derivative CO2 and temperature. Further, a correlation is found for second-derivative CO2, with the Southern Oscillation Index, the atmospheric-pressure component of ENSO. This paper also demonstrates that both these correlations display Granger causality. It is shown that the first-derivative CO2 and climate model shows no trend mismatch in recent years. These results may contribute to the prediction of future trends for global temperature and ENSO. Interannual variability in the

  2. Regulation of tissue factor coagulant activity on cell surfaces

    PubMed Central

    RAO, L.V.M.; PENDURTHI, U.R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tissue factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein and an essential component of factor VIIa-TF enzymatic complex that triggers activation of the coagulation cascade. Formation of TF-FVIIa complexes on cell surfaces not only trigger the coagulation cascade but also transduce cell signaling via activation of protease-activated receptors. Tissue factor is expressed constitutively on cell surfaces of a variety of extravascular cell types, including fibroblasts and pericytes in and surrounding blood vessel walls and epithelial cells but generally absent on cells that come in contact with blood directly. However, TF expression could be induced in some blood cells, such as monocytes and endothelial cells, following an injury or pathological stimuli. Tissue factor is essential for hemostasis, but aberrant expression of TF leads to thrombosis. Therefore, a proper regulation of TF activity is critical for the maintenance of hemostatic balance and health in general. TF-FVIIa coagulant activity at the cell surface is influenced not only by TF protein expression levels but also independently by a variety of mechanisms, including alterations in membrane phospholipid composition and cholesterol content, thiol-dependent modifications of TF allosteric disulfide bond, and other post-translational modifications of TF. In this article, we critically review key literature on mechanisms by which TF coagulant activity is regulated at the cell surface in the absence of changes in TF protein levels with specific emphasis on recently published data and provide the authors’ perspective on the subject. PMID:23006890

  3. A global potential energy surface for the H2 + OH ↔ H2O + H reaction using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Xu, Xin; Xu, Xin; Zhang, Dong H

    2013-04-21

    A global potential energy surface for the H2 + OH ↔ H2O + H reaction has been constructed using the neural networks method based on ~17,000 ab initio energies calculated at UCCSD(T)-F12a/AVTZ level of theory. Time-dependent wave packet calculations showed that the new potential energy surface is very well converged with respect to the number of ab initio data points, as well as to the fitting process. Various tests revealed that the new surface is considerably more smooth and accurate than the existing YZCL2 and XXZ surfaces, representing the best available potential energy surface for the benchmark four-atom system. Equally importantly, the number of ab initio energies required to obtain the well converged potential energy surface is rather limited, indicating the neural network fitting is a powerful method to construct accurate potential energy surfaces for polyatomic reactions.

  4. Global cortical activity predicts shape of hand during grasping

    PubMed Central

    Agashe, Harshavardhan A.; Paek, Andrew Y.; Zhang, Yuhang; Contreras-Vidal, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies show that the amplitude of cortical field potentials is modulated in the time domain by grasping kinematics. However, it is unknown if these low frequency modulations persist and contain enough information to decode grasp kinematics in macro-scale activity measured at the scalp via electroencephalography (EEG). Further, it is unclear as to whether joint angle velocities or movement synergies are the optimal kinematics spaces to decode. In this offline decoding study, we infer from human EEG, hand joint angular velocities as well as synergistic trajectories as subjects perform natural reach-to-grasp movements. Decoding accuracy, measured as the correlation coefficient (r) between the predicted and actual movement kinematics, was r = 0.49 ± 0.02 across 15 hand joints. Across the first three kinematic synergies, decoding accuracies were r = 0.59 ± 0.04, 0.47 ± 0.06, and 0.32 ± 0.05. The spatial-temporal pattern of EEG channel recruitment showed early involvement of contralateral frontal-central scalp areas followed by later activation of central electrodes over primary sensorimotor cortical areas. Information content in EEG about the grasp type peaked at 250 ms after movement onset. The high decoding accuracies in this study are significant not only as evidence for time-domain modulation in macro-scale brain activity, but for the field of brain-machine interfaces as well. Our decoding strategy, which harnesses the neural “symphony” as opposed to local members of the neural ensemble (as in intracranial approaches), may provide a means of extracting information about motor intent for grasping without the need for penetrating electrodes and suggests that it may be soon possible to develop non-invasive neural interfaces for the control of prosthetic limbs. PMID:25914616

  5. High-speed Imaging of Global Surface Temperature Distributions on Hypersonic Ballistic-Range Projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA-Ames ballistic range provides a unique capability for aerothermodynamic testing of configurations in hypersonic, real-gas, free-flight environments. The facility can closely simulate conditions at any point along practically any trajectory of interest experienced by a spacecraft entering an atmosphere. Sub-scale models of blunt atmospheric entry vehicles are accelerated by a two-stage light-gas gun to speeds as high as 20 times the speed of sound to fly ballistic trajectories through an 24 m long vacuum-rated test section. The test-section pressure (effective altitude), the launch velocity of the model (flight Mach number), and the test-section working gas (planetary atmosphere) are independently variable. The model travels at hypersonic speeds through a quiescent test gas, creating a strong bow-shock wave and real-gas effects that closely match conditions achieved during actual atmospheric entry. The challenge with ballistic range experiments is to obtain quantitative surface measurements from a model traveling at hypersonic speeds. The models are relatively small (less than 3.8 cm in diameter), which limits the spatial resolution possible with surface mounted sensors. Furthermore, since the model is in flight, surface-mounted sensors require some form of on-board telemetry, which must survive the massive acceleration loads experienced during launch (up to 500,000 gravities). Finally, the model and any on-board instrumentation will be destroyed at the terminal wall of the range. For these reasons, optical measurement techniques are the most practical means of acquiring data. High-speed thermal imaging has been employed in the Ames ballistic range to measure global surface temperature distributions and to visualize the onset of transition to turbulent-flow on the forward regions of hypersonic blunt bodies. Both visible wavelength and infrared high-speed cameras are in use. The visible wavelength cameras are intensified CCD imagers capable of integration

  6. Global Analysis of Protein Activities Using Proteome Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Heng; Bilgin, Metin; Bangham, Rhonda; Hall, David; Casamayor, Antonio; Bertone, Paul; Lan, Ning; Jansen, Ronald; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Houfek, Thomas; Mitchell, Tom; Miller, Perry; Dean, Ralph A.; Gerstein, Mark; Snyder, Michael

    2001-09-01

    To facilitate studies of the yeast proteome, we cloned 5800 open reading frames and overexpressed and purified their corresponding proteins. The proteins were printed onto slides at high spatial density to form a yeast proteome microarray and screened for their ability to interact with proteins and phospholipids. We identified many new calmodulin- and phospholipid-interacting proteins; a common potential binding motif was identified for many of the calmodulin-binding proteins. Thus, microarrays of an entire eukaryotic proteome can be prepared and screened for diverse biochemical activities. The microarrays can also be used to screen protein-drug interactions and to detect posttranslational modifications.

  7. A generic rate law for surface-active enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Onder; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2013-09-02

    Many biochemical reactions are confined to interfaces, such as membranes or cell walls. Despite their importance, no canonical rate laws describing the kinetics of surface-active enzymes exist. Combining the approach chosen by Michaelis and Menten 100 years ago with concepts from surface chemical physics, we here present an approach to derive generic rate laws of enzymatic processes at surfaces. We illustrate this by a simple reversible conversion on a surface to stress key differences to the classical case in solution. The available area function, a concept from surface physics which enters the rate law, covers different models of adsorption and presents a unifying perspective on saturation effects and competition between enzymes. A remarkable implication is the direct dependence of the rate of a given enzyme on all other enzymatic species able to bind at the surface. The generic approach highlights general principles of the kinetics of surface-active enzymes and allows to build consistent mathematical models of more complex pathways involving reactions at interfaces.

  8. Control surface spanwise placement in active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Burken, John J.

    1988-01-01

    A method is developed that determines the placement of an active control surface for maximum effectiveness in suppressing flutter. No specific control law is required by this method which is based on the aerodynamic energy concept. It is argued that the spanwise placement of the active controls should coincide with the locations where maximum energy per unit span is fed into the system. The method enables one to determine the distribution, over the different surfaces of the aircraft, of the energy input into the system as a result of the unstable fluttering mode. The method is illustrated using three numerical examples.

  9. Long-Term Global Morphology of Gravity Wave Activity Using UARS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckermann, Stephen D.; Bacmeister, Julio T.; Wu, Dong L.

    1998-01-01

    This is the first quarter's report on research to extract global gravity-wave data from satellite data and to model those observations synoptically. Preliminary analysis of global maps of extracted middle atmospheric temperature variance from the CRISTA instrument is presented, which appear to contain gravity-wave information. Corresponding simulations of global gravity-wave and mountain-wave activity during this mission period are described using global ray-tracing and mountain-wave models, and interesting similarities among simulated data and CRISTA data are noted. Climatological simulations of mesospheric gravity-wave activity using the HWM-03 wind-temperature climatology are also reported, for comparison with UARS MLS data. Preparatory work on modeling of gravity wave observations from space-based platforms and subsequent interpretation of the MLS gravity-wave product are also described. Preliminary interpretation and relation to the research objectives are provided, and further action for the next quarter's research is recommended.

  10. Uncertainties in global ocean surface heat flux climatologies derived from ship observations

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, P.J.; Weare, B.C.

    1995-08-01

    A methodology to define uncertainties associated with ocean surface heat flux calculations has been developed and applied to a revised version of the Oberhuber global climatology, which utilizes a summary of the COADS surface observations. Systematic and random uncertainties in the net oceanic heat flux and each of its four components at individual grid points and for zonal averages have been estimated for each calendar month and the annual mean. The most important uncertainties of the 2{degree} x 2{degree} grid cell values of each of the heat fluxes are described. Annual mean net shortwave flux random uncertainties associated with errors in estimating cloud cover in the tropics yield total uncertainties which are greater than 25 W m{sup {minus}2}. In the northern latitudes, where the large number of observations substantially reduce the influence of these random errors, the systematic uncertainties in the utilized parameterization are largely responsible for total uncertainties in the shortwave fluxes which usually remain greater than 10 W m{sup {minus}2}. Systematic uncertainties dominate in the zonal means because spatial averaging has led to a further reduction of the random errors. The situation for the annual mean latent heat flux is somewhat different in that even for grid point values the contributions of the systematic uncertainties tend to be larger than those of the random uncertainties at most all latitudes. Latent heat flux uncertainties are greater than 20 W m{sup {minus}2} nearly everywhere south of 40{degree}N, and in excess of 30 W m{sup {minus}2} over broad areas of the subtropics, even those with large numbers of observations. Resulting zonal mean latent heat flux uncertainties are largest ({approximately}30 W m{sup {minus}2}) in the middle latitudes and subtropics and smallest ({approximately}10--25 W m{sup {minus}2}) near the equator and over the northernmost regions.

  11. Remote Sensing Global Surface Air Pressure Using Differential Absorption BArometric Radar (DiBAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Harrah, Steven; Lawrence, Wes; Hu, Yongxiang; Min, Qilong

    2016-01-01

    Tropical storms and severe weathers are listed as one of core events that need improved observations and predictions in World Meteorological Organization and NASA Decadal Survey (DS) documents and have major impacts on public safety and national security. This effort tries to observe surface air pressure, especially over open seas, from space using a Differential-absorption BArometric Radar (DiBAR) operating at the 50-55 gigahertz O2 absorption band. Air pressure is among the most important variables that affect atmospheric dynamics, and currently can only be measured by limited in-situ observations over oceans. Analyses show that with the proposed space radar the errors in instantaneous (averaged) pressure estimates can be as low as approximately 4 millibars (approximately 1 millibar under all weather conditions). With these sea level pressure measurements, the forecasts of severe weathers such as hurricanes will be significantly improved. Since the development of the DiBAR concept about a decade ago, NASA Langley DiBAR research team has made substantial progress in advancing the concept. The feasibility assessment clearly shows the potential of sea surface barometry using existing radar technologies. The team has developed a DiBAR system design, fabricated a Prototype-DiBAR (P-DiBAR) for proof-of-concept, conducted lab, ground and airborne P-DiBAR tests. The flight test results are consistent with the instrumentation goals. Observational system simulation experiments for space DiBAR performance based on the existing DiBAR technology and capability show substantial improvements in tropical storm predictions, not only for the hurricane track and position but also for the hurricane intensity. DiBAR measurements will lead us to an unprecedented level of the prediction and knowledge on global extreme weather and climate conditions.

  12. An in situ-satellite blended analysis of global sea surface salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, P.; Boyer, T.; Bayler, E.; Xue, Y.; Byrne, D.; Reagan, J.; Locarnini, R.; Sun, F.; Joyce, R.; Kumar, A.

    2014-09-01

    The blended monthly sea surface salinity (SSS) analysis, called the NOAA "Blended Analysis of Surface Salinity" (BASS), is constructed for the 4 year period from 2010 to 2013. Three data sets are employed as inputs to the blended analysis: in situ SSS measurements aggregated and quality controlled by NOAA/NODC, and passive microwave (PMW) retrievals from both the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Aquarius/SAC-D and the European Space Agency's (ESA) Soil Moisture-Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellites. The blended analysis comprises two steps. First, the biases in the satellite retrievals are removed through probability distribution function (PDF) matching against temporally spatially colocated in situ measurements. The blended analysis is then achieved through optimal interpolation (OI), where the analysis for the previous time step is used as the first guess while the in situ measurements and bias-corrected satellite retrievals are employed as the observations to update the first guess. Cross validations illustrate improved quality of the blended analysis, with reduction in bias and random errors over most of the global oceans as compared to the individual inputs. Large uncertainty, however, remains in high-latitude oceans and coastal regions where the in situ networks are sparse and current-generation satellite retrievals have limitations. Our blended SSS analysis shows good agreements with the NODC in situ-based analysis over most of the tropical and subtropical oceans, but large differences are observed for high-latitude oceans and along coasts. In the tropical oceans, the BASS is shown to have coherent variability with precipitation and evaporation associated with the evolution of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  13. Activity Based Learning in a Freshman Global Business Course: Analyses of Preferences and Demographic Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Mark F.; Guy, Paul W.

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigates pre-business students' reaction to Activity Based Learning in a lower division core required course entitled Introduction to Global Business in the business curriculum at California State University Chico. The study investigates students' preference for Activity Based Learning in comparison to a more traditional…

  14. Educational Activity as a Problem of Adult Education in the Context of Globalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folvarochnyi, Ihor

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the problem of adult education in the context of globalization. The analysis of scientific pedagogical literature devoted to studying of some aspects of educational activity in adult education has been conducted. The problem of public institutions development and activity has been analyzed in the broad context of…

  15. The International Atomic Energy Agency's activities in radiation medicine and cancer: promoting global health through diplomacy.

    PubMed

    Deatsch-Kratochvil, Amanda N; Pascual, Thomas Neil; Kesner, Adam; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Chhem, Rethy K

    2013-02-01

    Global health has been an issue of seemingly low political importance in comparison with issues that have direct bearing on countries' national security. Recently, health has experienced a "political revolution" or a rise in political importance. Today, we face substantial global health challenges, from the spread of infectious disease, gaps in basic maternal and child health care, to the globalization of cancer. A recent estimate states that the "overall lifetime risk of developing cancer (both sexes) is expected to rise from more than one in three to one in two by 2015." These issues pose significant threats to international health security. To successfully combat these grave challenges, the international community must embrace and engage in global health diplomacy, defined by scholars Thomas Novotny and Vicanne Adams as a political activity aimed at improving global health, while at the same time maintaining and strengthening international relations. The IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) is an international organization with a unique mandate to "accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health, and prosperity throughout the world." This article discusses global health diplomacy, reviews the IAEA's program activities in human health by focusing on radiation medicine and cancer, and the peaceful applications of atomic energy within the context of global health diplomacy.

  16. Role of volcanic and anthropogenic aerosols in the recent global surface warming slowdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Doug M.; Booth, Ben B. B.; Dunstone, Nick J.; Eade, Rosie; Hermanson, Leon; Jones, Gareth S.; Scaife, Adam A.; Sheen, Katy L.; Thompson, Vikki

    2016-10-01

    The rate of global mean surface temperature (GMST) warming has slowed this century despite the increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases. Climate model experiments show that this slowdown was largely driven by a negative phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), with a smaller external contribution from solar variability, and volcanic and anthropogenic aerosols. The prevailing view is that this negative PDO occurred through internal variability. However, here we show that coupled models from the Fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project robustly simulate a negative PDO in response to anthropogenic aerosols implying a potentially important role for external human influences. The recovery from the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 also contributed to the slowdown in GMST trends. Our results suggest that a slowdown in GMST trends could have been predicted in advance, and that future reduction of anthropogenic aerosol emissions, particularly from China, would promote a positive PDO and increased GMST trends over the coming years. Furthermore, the overestimation of the magnitude of recent warming by models is substantially reduced by using detection and attribution analysis to rescale their response to external factors, especially cooling following volcanic eruptions. Improved understanding of external influences on climate is therefore crucial to constrain near-term climate predictions.

  17. Global Sea Surface Temperature and Ecosystem Change Across the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veenstra, T. J. T.; Bakker, V. B.; Sangiorgi, F.; Peterse, F.; Schouten, S.; Sluijs, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO) (ca. 17 to 14 Ma) is generally considered as the warmest episode of the Neogene based on deep marine oxygen isotope records and terrestrial plant fossils. To date, however, reasonable resolution high-quality sea surface temperature (SST) proxy records spanning its onset are scarce at best. For the remainder of the MMCO, reliable SST records are absent from the tropics and very scarce in temperate and polar regions. This leaves the question if the MMCO was truly associated with global warming and if this warming was associated with biotic change. We use organic biomarker paleothermometry (Uk'37 and TEX86) to reconstruct SST across the MMCO at four locations along a pole-to-pole transect in the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. Additionally, we use marine palynology (mostly dinoflagellate cysts) to assess ecosystem change at these locations. This study includes the first tropical biomarker-based SST records of the MMCO. Together with new and existing SST records from higher latitudes and the corresponding palynological records, they provide new insights in the temporal and spatial development of the MMCO. Our results indicate that Mid-Miocene warming was most prominent in the Norwegian Sea, showed a more complex, perhaps upwelling-related pattern in a tropical location, and was small in the Southern Hemisphere.

  18. Satellite Stereo Based Digital Surface Model Generation Using Semi Global Matching in Object and Image Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghuffar, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents methodology and evaluation of Digital Surface Models (DSM) generated from satellite stereo imagery using Semi Global Matching (SGM) applied in image space and georeferenced voxel space. SGM is a well known algorithm, used widely for DSM generation from airborne and satellite imagery. SGM is typically applied in the image space to compute disparity map corresponding to a stereo image pair. As a different approach, SGM can be applied directly to the georeferenced voxel space similar to the approach of volumetric multi-view reconstruction techniques. The matching in voxel space simplifies the DSM generation pipeline because the stereo rectification and triangulation steps are not required. For a comparison, the complete pipeline for generation of DSM from satellite pushbroom sensors is also presented. The results on the ISPRS satellite stereo benchmark using Worldview stereo imagery of 0.5m resolution shows that the SGM applied in image space produce slightly better results than its object space counterpart. Furthermore, a qualitative analysis of the results on Worldview-3 stereo and Pleiades tri-stereo images are presented.

  19. Communication: An accurate global potential energy surface for the ground electronic state of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Dawes, Richard E-mail: hguo@unm.edu; Lolur, Phalgun; Li, Anyang; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua E-mail: hguo@unm.edu

    2013-11-28

    We report a new full-dimensional and global potential energy surface (PES) for the O + O{sub 2} → O{sub 3} ozone forming reaction based on explicitly correlated multireference configuration interaction (MRCI-F12) data. It extends our previous [R. Dawes, P. Lolur, J. Ma, and H. Guo, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 081102 (2011)] dynamically weighted multistate MRCI calculations of the asymptotic region which showed the widely found submerged reef along the minimum energy path to be the spurious result of an avoided crossing with an excited state. A spin-orbit correction was added and the PES tends asymptotically to the recently developed long-range electrostatic model of Lepers et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 234305 (2012)]. This PES features: (1) excellent equilibrium structural parameters, (2) good agreement with experimental vibrational levels, (3) accurate dissociation energy, and (4) most-notably, a transition region without a spurious reef. The new PES is expected to allow insight into the still unresolved issues surrounding the kinetics, dynamics, and isotope signature of ozone.

  20. The H(3) (+) rovibrational spectrum revisited with a global electronic potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Velilla, Luis; Lepetit, Bruno; Aguado, Alfredo; Beswick, J Alberto; Paniagua, Miguel

    2008-08-28

    In this paper, we have computed the rovibrational spectrum of the H(3) (+) molecule using a new global potential energy surface, invariant under all permutations of the nuclei, that includes the long range electrostatic interactions analytically. The energy levels are obtained by a variational calculation using hyperspherical coordinates. From the comparison with available experimental results for low lying levels, we conclude that our accuracy is of the order of 0.1 cm(-1) for states localized in the vicinity of equilateral triangular configurations of the nuclei, and changes to the order of 1 cm(-1) when the system is distorted away from equilateral configurations. Full rovibrational spectra up to the H(+)+H(2) dissociation energy limit have been computed. The statistical properties of this spectrum (nearest neighbor distribution and spectral rigidity) show the quantum signature of classical chaos and are consistent with random matrix theory. On the other hand, the correlation function, even when convoluted with a smoothing function, exhibits oscillations which are not described by random matrix theory. We discuss a possible similarity between these oscillations and the ones observed experimentally.

  1. Toward spectroscopically accurate global ab initio potential energy surface for the acetylene-vinylidene isomerization

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Huixian; Li, Anyang; Guo, Hua

    2014-12-28

    A new full-dimensional global potential energy surface (PES) for the acetylene-vinylidene isomerization on the ground (S{sub 0}) electronic state has been constructed by fitting ∼37 000 high-level ab initio points using the permutation invariant polynomial-neural network method with a root mean square error of 9.54 cm{sup −1}. The geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies of acetylene, vinylidene, and all other stationary points (two distinct transition states and one secondary minimum in between) have been determined on this PES. Furthermore, acetylene vibrational energy levels have been calculated using the Lanczos algorithm with an exact (J = 0) Hamiltonian. The vibrational energies up to 12 700 cm{sup −1} above the zero-point energy are in excellent agreement with the experimentally derived effective Hamiltonians, suggesting that the PES is approaching spectroscopic accuracy. In addition, analyses of the wavefunctions confirm the experimentally observed emergence of the local bending and counter-rotational modes in the highly excited bending vibrational states. The reproduction of the experimentally derived effective Hamiltonians for highly excited bending states signals the coming of age for the ab initio based PES, which can now be trusted for studying the isomerization reaction.

  2. Mapping Dust Input to the Global Ocean using Thorium Isotope Measurements in Surface Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienast, S. S.; Winckler, G.; Lippold, J.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2012-12-01

    Dust input into the ocean-atmosphere system has significant ramifications for biogeochemical cycles and global climate. Thorium-232, sometimes referred to as primordial Thorium, is the longest lived (1.4 1010 yrs) isotope in the U-Th decay chain. It is greatly enriched in upper continental crust compared to oceanic crust and mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) like volcanogenic material. In remote areas of the ocean, away from hemipelagic sources of continental material, it is assumed to be of aeolian origin. In conjunction with 230Th-flux normalization, 232Th measurements are thus becoming a promising new proxy for dust accumulation in the present and past ocean. Here, we present a pilot data compilation of previously published 230Th-normalized fluxes of 232Th from a large set of surface sediments originating from the equatorial Pacific, equatorial Atlantic, Southern Ocean, and other areas, complemented by unpublished data. We compare these 232Th fluxes with estimates of present day dust accumulation derived from a coupled atmosphere, land, ocean, and sea-ice model (CCSM-SMOB1). There is excellent agreement between sedimentary and model derived dust fluxes in e.g. the equatorial Atlantic and eastern equatorial Pacific. In the western equatorial Pacific, we observe differences between the sedimentary 232Th record and model estimates. Potential reasons for these discrepancies, and implications for the use of 232Th as dust proxy will be discussed. 1Mahowald et al. . J. Geosphys.Res.111, 2006

  3. Contribution of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation to twentieth-century global surface temperature trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehl, Gerald A.; Hu, Aixue; Santer, Benjamin D.; Xie, Shang-Ping

    2016-11-01

    Longer-term externally forced trends in global mean surface temperatures (GMSTs) are embedded in the background noise of internally generated multidecadal variability. A key mode of internal variability is the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO), which contributed to a reduced GMST trend during the early 2000s. We use a novel, physical phenomenon-based approach to quantify the contribution from a source of internally generated multidecadal variability--the IPO--to multidecadal GMST trends. Here we show that the largest IPO contributions occurred in its positive phase during the rapid warming periods from 1910-1941 and 1971-1995, with the IPO contributing 71% and 75%, respectively, to the difference between the median values of the externally forced trends and observed trends. The IPO transition from positive to negative in the late-1990s contributed 27% of the discrepancy between model median estimates of the forced part of the GMST trend and the observed trend from 1995 to 2013, with additional contributions that are probably due to internal variability outside of the Pacific and an externally forced response from small volcanic eruptions. Understanding and quantifying the contribution of a specific source of internally generated variability--the IPO--to GMST trends is necessary to improve decadal climate prediction skill.

  4. Reliable Support Design for Excavations in Brittle Rock Using a Global Response Surface Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, J. Connor; Diederichs, Mark S.

    2015-03-01

    Spalling damage can pose significant risks during the construction of underground excavations in brittle rock. While deterministic analyses have traditionally been used in the design of these structures, reliability-based design (RBD) methods provide a more rational approach to quantify spalling risk by directly incorporating input uncertainty into the design process and quantifying variable ground response. This paper presents a new RBD approach to evaluate the excavation response and support performance for a tunnel in brittle ground. Guidance for the selection of appropriate parameters for variable brittle materials is provided using a combination of the damage initiation and spalling limit method and theories of microcrack initiation. System performance is then evaluated using a proposed global response surface method (GRSM) coupled with the first-order reliability method, random sampling and finite element analysis. The proposed GRSM provides a computationally efficient way to evaluate the probability of failure for various limit states, allowing for the selection of appropriate design parameters such as minimum bolt length and required bolt capacity during early stages of design. To demonstrate the usefulness of this approach, a preliminary design option for a proposed deep geologic repository located in Canada was assessed. Numerical analyses were completed using finite element modeling to determine the depth of spalling around the excavation and support loads over the range of possible rock mass and in situ stress conditions. The results of these analyses were then used to assess support performance and make support recommendations.

  5. Lithological and Surface Geometry Joint Inversions Using Multi-Objective Global Optimization Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelièvre, Peter; Bijani, Rodrigo; Farquharson, Colin

    2016-04-01

    surfaces are set to a priori values. The inversion is tasked with calculating the geometry of the contact surfaces instead of some piecewise distribution of properties in a mesh. Again, no coupling measure is required and joint inversion is simplified. Both of these inverse problems involve high nonlinearity and discontinuous or non-obtainable derivatives. They can also involve the existence of multiple minima. Hence, one can not apply the standard descent-based local minimization methods used to solve typical minimum-structure inversions. Instead, we are applying Pareto multi-objective global optimization (PMOGO) methods, which generate a suite of solutions that minimize multiple objectives (e.g. data misfits and regularization terms) in a Pareto-optimal sense. Providing a suite of models, as opposed to a single model that minimizes a weighted sum of objectives, allows a more complete assessment of the possibilities and avoids the often difficult choice of how to weight each objective. While there are definite advantages to PMOGO joint inversion approaches, the methods come with significantly increased computational requirements. We are researching various strategies to ameliorate these computational issues including parallelization and problem dimension reduction.

  6. The global surface composition of 67P/CG nucleus by Rosetta/VIRTIS. (I) Prelanding mission phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, Gianrico; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Ciarniello, Mauro; Raponi, Andrea; Tosi, Federico; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Erard, Stéphane; Morvan, Dominique Bockelée; Leyrat, Cedric; Arnold, Gabriele; Schmitt, Bernard; Quirico, Eric; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Migliorini, Alessandra; Capria, Maria Teresa; Palomba, Ernesto; Cerroni, Priscilla; Longobardo, Andrea; Barucci, Antonella; Fornasier, Sonia; Carlson, Robert W.; Jaumann, Ralf; Stephan, Katrin; Moroz, Lyuba V.; Kappel, David; Rousseau, Batiste; Fonti, Sergio; Mancarella, Francesca; Despan, Daniela; Faure, Mathilde

    2016-08-01

    From August to November 2014 the Rosetta orbiter has performed an extensive observation campaign aimed at the characterization of 67P/CG nucleus properties and to the selection of the Philae landing site. The campaign led to the production of a global map of the illuminated portion of 67P/CG nucleus. During this prelanding phase the comet's heliocentric distance decreased from 3.62 to 2.93 AU while Rosetta was orbiting around the nucleus at distances between 100 to 10 km. VIRTIS-M, the Visible and InfraRed Thermal Imaging Spectrometer - Mapping channel (Coradini et al., [2007] Space Sci. Rev., 128, 529-559) onboard the orbiter, has acquired 0.25-5.1 μm hyperspectral data of the entire illuminated surface, e.g. the north hemisphere and the equatorial regions, with spatial resolution between 2.5 and 25 m/pixel. I/F spectra have been corrected for thermal emission removal in the 3.5-5.1 μm range and for surface's photometric response. The resulting reflectance spectra have been used to compute several Cometary Spectral Indicators (CSI): single scattering albedo at 0.55 μm, 0.5-0.8 μm and 1.0-2.5 μm spectral slopes, 3.2 μm organic material and 2.0 μm water ice band parameters (center, depth) with the aim to map their spatial distribution on the surface and to study their temporal variability as the nucleus moved towards the Sun. Indeed, throughout the investigated period, the nucleus surface shows a significant increase of the single scattering albedo along with a decrease of the 0.5-0.8 and 1.0-2.5 μm spectral slopes, indicating a flattening of the reflectance. We attribute the origin of this effect to the partial removal of the dust layer caused by the increased contribution of water sublimation to the gaseous activity as comet crossed the frost-line. The regions more active at the time of these observations, like Hapi in the neck/north pole area, appear brighter, bluer and richer in organic material than the rest of the large and small lobe of the nucleus

  7. Towards Global Simulation of Irrigation in a Land Surface Model: Multiple Cropping and Rice Paddy in Southeast Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; Rodell, Matthew; Ozdogan, Mutlu

    2010-01-01

    Agricultural land use significantly influences the surface water and energy balances. Effects of irrigation on land surface states and fluxes include repartitioning of latent and sensible heat fluxes, an increase in net radiation, and an increase in soil moisture and runoff. We are working on representing irrigation practices in continental- to global-scale land surface simulation in NASA's Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS). Because agricultural practices across the nations are diverse, and complex, we are attempting to capture the first-order reality of the regional practices before achieving a global implementation. This study focuses on two issues in Southeast Asia: multiple cropping and rice paddy irrigation systems. We first characterize agricultural practices in the region (i.e., crop types, growing seasons, and irrigation) using the Global data set of monthly irrigated and rainfed crop areas around the year 2000 (MIRCA2000) dataset. Rice paddy extent is identified using remote sensing products. Whether irrigated or rainfed, flooded fields need to be represented and treated explicitly. By incorporating these properties and processes into a physically based land surface model, we are able to quantify the impacts on the simulated states and fluxes.

  8. A 7.5-Year Dataset of SSM/I-Derived Surface Turbulent Fluxes Over Global Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Shie, Chung-Lin; Atlas, Robert M.; Adizzone, Joe; Nelkin, Eric; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The global air-sea turbulent fluxes are needed for driving ocean models and validating coupled ocean-atmosphere global models. A method was developed to retrieve surface air humidity from the radiances measured by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) Using both SSM/I-retrieved surface wind and air humidity, they computed daily turbulent fluxes over global oceans with a stability-dependent bulk scheme. Based on this method, we have produced Version 1 of Goddard Satellite-Based Surface Turbulent Fluxes (GSSTF) dataset from the SSM/I data and other data. It provides daily- and monthly-mean surface turbulent fluxes and some relevant parameters over global oceans for individual F8, F10, and F11 satellites covering the period July 1987-December 1994. It also provides 1988-94 annual- and monthly-mean climatologies of the same variables, using only F8 and F1 1 satellite data. It has a spatial resolution of 2.0 degrees x 2.5 degrees lat-long and is archived at the NASA/GSFC DAAC. The purpose of this paper is to present an updated assessment of the GSSTF 1.0 dataset.

  9. Impact of model developments on present and future simulations of permafrost in a global land-surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadburn, S. E.; Burke, E. J.; Essery, R. L. H.; Boike, J.; Langer, M.; Heikenfeld, M.; Cox, P. M.; Friedlingstein, P.

    2015-03-01

    There is a large amount of organic carbon stored in permafrost in the northern high latitudes, which may become vulnerable to microbial decomposition under future climate warming. In order to estimate this potential carbon-climate feedback it is necessary to correctly simulate the physical dynamics of permafrost within global Earth System Models (ESMs) and to determine the rate at which it will thaw. Additional new processes within JULES, the land surface scheme of the UK ESM (UKESM), include a representation of organic soils, moss and bedrock, and a modification to the snow scheme. The impact of a higher vertical soil resolution and deeper soil column is also considered. Evaluation against a large group of sites shows the annual cycle of soil temperatures is approximately 25 % too large in the standard JULES version, but this error is corrected by the model improvements, in particular by deeper soil, organic soils, moss and the modified snow scheme. Comparing with active layer monitoring sites shows that the active layer is on average just over 1 m too deep in the standard model version, and this bias is reduced by 70 cm in the improved version. Increasing the soil vertical resolution allows the full range of active layer depths to be simulated, where by contrast with a poorly resolved soil, at least 50% of the permafrost area has a maximum thaw depth at the centre of the bottom soil layer. Thus all the model modifications are seen to improve the permafrost simulations. Historical permafrost area corresponds fairly well to observations in all simulations, covering an area between 14-19 million km2. Simulations under two future climate scenarios show a reduced sensitivity of permafrost degradation to temperature, with the near-surface permafrost lost per degree of warming reduced from 1.5 million km2 °C-1 in the standard version of JULES to between 1.1 and 1.2 million km2 °C-1 in the new model version. However, the near-surface permafrost area is still projected

  10. Impact of model developments on present and future simulations of permafrost in a global land-surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadburn, S. E.; Burke, E. J.; Essery, R. L. H.; Boike, J.; Langer, M.; Heikenfeld, M.; Cox, P. M.; Friedlingstein, P.

    2015-08-01

    There is a large amount of organic carbon stored in permafrost in the northern high latitudes, which may become vulnerable to microbial decomposition under future climate warming. In order to estimate this potential carbon-climate feedback it is necessary to correctly simulate the physical dynamics of permafrost within global Earth system models (ES