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Sample records for activity glutathione peroxidase

  1. Effect of methylmercury on the activity of glutathione peroxidase in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Y.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of methylmercury on the activity of glutathione peroxidase in rat liver was studied in vivo. A daily dose of 10mg methylmercuric chloride/kg body weight was administered subcutaneously to 15 male Wistar rats for 10 days, and the glutathione peroxidase activity in the liver was measured to compare with the control activity. A marked decrease was observed in the glutathione peroxidase activity in the experimental animals, which measured as low as 40% in comparison to that in the control animals. It can be speculated that the inhibition of glutathione peroxidase activity plays a significant role in the development of mercury toxicity and that the protective effect of selenium and vitamin E on the mercury intoxication might be partly due to preserving the glutathione peroxidase activity in the antioxidative defense mechanisms.

  2. Storage of Heparinised Canine Whole Blood for the Measurement of Glutathione Peroxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    van Zelst, Mariëlle; Hesta, Myriam; Gray, Kerry; Janssens, Geert P J

    2016-08-01

    Glutathione peroxidase activity is used as a biomarker of selenium status in dogs. Freshly collected blood samples are usually measured, due to the lack of knowledge on the effect of storing the samples. This study investigated if the analysis of glutathione peroxidase activity in whole blood collected from dogs was affected by storage of between 5 and 164 days. Results indicated that glutathione peroxidase activity was more variable in the freshly analysed samples compared to the stored samples. Although the mean differences between fresh and stored samples were not always equal to zero, this is thought to be caused by the variability of reagent preparation rather than by storage, as no consistent increase or decrease in glutathione peroxidase activity was found. Therefore, it can be concluded that heparinised dog blood samples can be successfully stored up to 164 days before analysis of glutathione peroxidase activity. PMID:26701335

  3. A supramolecular microgel glutathione peroxidase mimic with temperature responsive activity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yanzhen; Jiao, Shufei; Lang, Chao; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-05-21

    Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) protects cells from oxidative damage by scavenging surplus reactive oxygen species (ROS). Commonly, an appropriate amount of ROS acts as a signal molecule in the metabolism. A smart artificial GPx exhibits adjustable catalytic activity, which can potentially reduce the amount of ROS to an appropriate degree and maintain its important physiological functions in metabolism. To construct an optimum and excellent smart artificial GPx, a novel supramolecular microgel artificial GPx (SM-Te) was prepared based on the supramolecular host-guest interaction employing the tellurium-containing guest molecule (ADA-Te-ADA) and the cyclodextrin-containing host block copolymer (poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-[polyacrylamides-co-poly(6-o-(triethylene glycol monoacrylate ether)-β-cyclodextrin)], PPAM-CD) as building blocks. Subsequently, based on these building blocks, SM-Te was constructed and the formation of its self-assembled structure was confirmed by dynamic light scattering, NMR, SEM, TEM, etc. Typically, benefitting from the temperature responsive properties of the PNIPAM scaffold, SM-Te also exhibited similar temperature responsive behaviour. Importantly, the GPx catalytic rates of SM-Te displayed a noticeable temperature responsive characteristic. Moreover, SM-Te exhibited the typical saturation kinetics behaviour of a real enzyme catalyst. It was proved that the changes of the hydrophobic microenvironment and the pore size in the supramolecular microgel network of SM-Te played significant roles in altering the temperature responsive catalytic behaviour. The successful construction of SM-Te not only overcomes the insurmountable disadvantages existing in previous covalent bond crosslinked microgel artificial GPx but also bodes well for the development of novel intelligent antioxidant drugs. PMID:24652520

  4. Activity of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes in workers exposed to lead.

    PubMed

    Kasperczyk, Slawomir; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Ostalowska, Alina; Dziwisz, Maria; Birkner, Ewa

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in erythrocytes in healthy male employees of zinc and lead steelworks who were occupationally exposed to lead over a long period of time (about 15 yr). Workers were divided into two subgroups: the first included employees with low exposure to lead (LL) (n=75) with blood lead level PbB=25-40 microg/dL and the second with high exposure to lead (HL) (n=62) with PbB over 40 microg/dL. Administration workers (n=35) with normal levels of PbB and zinc protoporphyrin in blood (ZPP) in blood were the control group. The activity of GPx significantly increased in LL when compared to the control group (p<0.001) and decreased when compared to the HL group (p=0.036). There were no significant changes in activity of GR in the study population. MDA erythrocyte concentration significantly increased in the HL group compared to the control (p=0.014) and to the LL group (p=0.024). For the people with low exposure to lead (PbB=25-40 microg/dL), the increase of activity of GPx by about 79% in erythrocytes prevented lipid peroxidation and it appears to be the adaptive mechanism against the toxic effect of lead. People with high exposure to lead (with PbB over 40 microg/dL) have shown an increase in MDA concentration in erythrocytes by about 91%, which seems to have resulted from reduced activity of GPx and the lack of increase in activity of GR in blood red cells. PMID:15621928

  5. Activation of glutathione peroxidase via Nrf1 mediates genistein's protection against oxidative endothelial cell injury

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Montes, Eva; Pollard, Susan E.; Vauzour, David; Jofre-Montseny, Laia; Rota, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Weinberg, Peter D.; Spencer, Jeremy P.E. . E-mail: j.p.e.spencer@reading.ac.uk

    2006-08-04

    Cellular actions of isoflavones may mediate the beneficial health effects associated with high soy consumption. We have investigated protection by genistein and daidzein against oxidative stress-induced endothelial injury. Genistein but not daidzein protected endothelial cells from damage induced by oxidative stress. This protection was accompanied by decreases in intracellular glutathione levels that could be explained by the generation of glutathionyl conjugates of the oxidised genistein metabolite, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone. Both isoflavones evoked increased protein expression of {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase-heavy subunit ({gamma}-GCS-HS) and increased cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. However, only genistein led to increases in the cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf1 and the increased expression of and activity of glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that genistein-induced protective effects depend primarily on the activation of glutathione peroxidase mediated by Nrf1 activation, and not on Nrf2 activation or increases in glutathione synthesis.

  6. Effects of commercial selenium products on glutathione peroxidase activity and semen quality in stud boars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine how dietary supplementation of inorganic and organic selenium affects selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in blood and sperm of sexually mature stud boars. Twenty-four boars of the Large White, Landrace, Pietrain, and Duroc breeds of opt...

  7. Correlation between Glutathione Peroxidase Activity and Anthropometrical Parameters in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordonez, F. J.; Rosety-Rodriguez, M.

    2007-01-01

    Since we have recently found that regular exercise increased erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activities such as glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in adolescents with Down syndrome, these programs may be recommended. This study was designed to assess the role of anthropometrical parameters as easy, economic and non-invasive biomarkers of GPX. Thirty-one…

  8. Serum Malondialdehyde Concentration and Glutathione Peroxidase Activity in a Longitudinal Study of Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, María; Muriach, María; Romero, Francisco J.; Villar, Vincent M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The main goal of this study was to evaluate the presence of oxidative damage and to quantify its level in gestational diabetes. Methods Thirty-six healthy women and thirty-six women with gestational diabetes were studied in the three trimesters of pregnancy regarding their levels of oxidative stress markers. These women were diagnosed with diabetes in the second trimester of pregnancy. Blood glucose levels after 100g glucose tolerance test were higher than 190, 165 or 145 mg/dl, 1, 2 or 3 hours after glucose intake. Results The group of women with gestational diabetes had higher serum malondialdehyde levels, with significant differences between groups in the first and second trimester. The mean values of serum glutathione peroxidase activity in the diabetic women were significantly lower in the first trimester. In the group of women with gestational diabetes there was a negative linear correlation between serum malondialdehyde concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in the second and third trimester. Conclusions In this observational and longitudinal study in pregnant women, the alterations attributable to oxidative stress were present before the biochemical detection of the HbA1c increase. Usual recommendations once GD is detected (adequate metabolic control, as well as any other normally proposed to these patients) lowered the concentration of malondialdehyde at the end of pregnancy to the same levels of the healthy controls. Serum glutathione peroxidase activity in women with gestational diabetes increased during the gestational period. PMID:27228087

  9. The content of glutathione and glutathione S-transferases and the glutathione peroxidase activity in rat liver nuclei determined by a non-aqueous technique of cell fractionation.

    PubMed Central

    Soboll, S; Gründel, S; Harris, J; Kolb-Bachofen, V; Ketterer, B; Sies, H

    1995-01-01

    Hepatocellular nuclei require glutathione, glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPx) for intranuclear protection against damage from electrophiles or products of active oxygen. Data so far available from the literature on nuclei isolated in aqueous systems range from glutathione, GSTs and GPx either being absent altogether to being present in quantities in excess of those in the cytoplasm. This paper describes a small-scale preparation of a nuclear fraction from rat liver by a non-aqueous technique, designed to retain nuclear water-soluble molecules in situ, since low-molecular-mass compounds can diffuse freely into other compartments during aqueous separation. This non-aqueous procedure shows the nucleus to contain glutathione at 8.4 mM and soluble GSTs at 38 micrograms/mg of protein, the enrichment over the homogenate being 1.2-1.4-fold. Se-dependent GPx activity was also present in the nucleus (56 m-units/mg), although with slightly lower activity than in the homogenate (0.7-fold). Images Figure 1 PMID:7487946

  10. Selenium-enriched Agaricus bisporus increases expression and activity of glutathione peroxidase-1 and expression of glutathione peroxidase-2 in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Tebo; Howell, Kate; Dunshea, Frank R; Ng, Ken

    2014-03-01

    The effect of dietary supplementation with Se-enriched Agaricus bisporus on cytosolic gluthathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1), gastrointestinal specific glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPx-2), thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR-1) and selenoprotein P (SeP) mRNA expression and GPx-1 enzyme activity in rat colon was examined. Rats were fed for 5weeks with control diet (0.15μg Se/g feed) or Se-enriched diet fortified with selenised mushroom (1μg Se/g feed). The mRNA expression levels were found to be significantly (P<0.01) up-regulated by 1.65-fold and 2.3-fold for GPx-1 and GPx-2, respectively, but were not significantly different for TrxR-1 and SeP between the 2 diet treatments. The up-regulation of GPx-1 mRNA expression was consistent with GPX-1 activity level, which was significantly (P<0.05) increased by 1.77-fold in rats fed with the Se-enriched diet compared to the control diet. The results showed that selenised A. bisporus can positively increase GPx-1 and GPx-2 gene expression and GPx-1 enzyme activity in rat colon. PMID:24176350

  11. Effect of chemical form of selenium on tissue glutathione peroxidase activity in developing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Strength, Ralph; Johnson, Janet; White, Marguerite T.

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis that the stage of development of rats may affect the availability of various forms of selenium for the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) in the rat was experimentally investigated. One experiment evaluated the availability of selenium as selenite or selenomethionine for GSPHx activity during three developmental states in rats: fetus and 7-day old and 14-day old nursing pups. In all tissues studied, GSHPx activity was highest in the 14-day-old pups whose dams were in the selenomethionine group. Rat pups given intraperitoneal selenite had higher liver and kidney GSHPx activity than pups given the same amount of selenium as intraperitoneal selenomethionine. In a second experiment, all dams were fed the same basal diet and pups were weaned to diets containing one of two levels of selenium and one of three forms of selenium (selenite, selenomethionine, or selenocystine). The results also supported the hypothesis these dietary forms of selenium are differentially available for GSHPx activity.

  12. Carbamazepine-induced hemolytic and aplastic crises associated with reduced glutathione peroxidase activity of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masaki; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Hatakeyama, Naoki; Kubo, Noriaki; Tachi, Nobutada; Kanno, Hitoshi; Fujii, Hisaichi; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2007-11-01

    Although pure red cell aplasia is a well-known side effect of carbamazepine treatment, intravascular hemolytic anemia is rare. We describe a 5-year-old boy who developed concurrent intravascular hemolytic anemia and erythroblastopenia, probably due to carbamazepine. Carbamazepine treatment was subsequently discontinued, and the patient was treated with red blood cell transfusions, haptoglobin, and methylprednisolone. His hematologic abnormalities were almost fully recovered within 2 weeks. Examination of the patient's and mother's erythrocyte enzyme activities revealed mildly decreased erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity. We speculate that patients with reduced GSH-Px activity are at a high risk of developing carbamazepine-induced hemolytic crisis and/or aplastic crisis. PMID:18055338

  13. Inactivation of glutathione peroxidase activity contributes to UV-induced squamous cell carcinoma formation.

    PubMed

    Walshe, Jennifer; Serewko-Auret, Magdalena M; Teakle, Ngari; Cameron, Sarina; Minto, Kelly; Smith, Louise; Burcham, Philip C; Russell, Terry; Strutton, Geoffrey; Griffin, Anthony; Chu, Fong-Fong; Esworthy, Stephen; Reeve, Vivienne; Saunders, Nicholas A

    2007-05-15

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (CSCC) are a common malignancy of keratinocytes that arise in sites of the skin exposed to excessive UV radiation. In the present study, we show that human SCC cell lines, preneoplastic solar keratoses (SK), and CSCC are associated with perturbations in glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity and peroxide levels. Specifically, we found that two of three SKs and four of five CSCCs, in vivo, were associated with decreased GPX activity and all SKs and CSCCs were associated with an elevated peroxide burden. Given the association of decreased GPX activity with CSCC, we examined the basis for the GPX deficiency in the CSCCs. Our data indicated that GPX was inactivated by a post-translational mechanism and that GPX could be inactivated by increases in intracellular peroxide levels. We next tested whether the decreased peroxidase activity coupled with an elevated peroxidative burden might contribute to CSCC formation in vivo. This was tested in Gpx1(-/-) and Gpx2(-/-) mice exposed to solar-simulated UV radiation. These studies showed that Gpx2 deficiency predisposed mice to UV-induced CSCC formation. These results suggest that inactivation of GPX2 in human skin may be an early event in UV-induced SCC formation. PMID:17510403

  14. A redox-dependent dimerization switch regulates activity and tolerance for reactive oxygen species of barley seed glutathione peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Navrot, Nicolas; Skjoldager, Nicklas; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Svensson, Birte; Hägglund, Per

    2015-05-01

    Monomeric and dimeric forms of recombinant barley (Hordeum vulgare subsp. vulgare) glutathione peroxidase 2 (HvGpx2) are demonstrated to display distinctly different functional properties in vitro. Monomeric HvGpx2 thus has five fold higher catalytic efficiency than the dimer towards tert-butyl hydroperoxide, but is more sensitive to inactivation by hydrogen peroxide. Treatment of the monomer with hydrogen peroxide results in dimer formation. This observed new behavior of a plant glutathione peroxidase suggests a mechanism involving a switch from a highly catalytically competent monomer to a less active, but more oxidation-resistant dimer. PMID:25796076

  15. The effects of selenium on glutathione peroxidase activity and radioprotection in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, A.M.; Murray, J.L.; Dale, P.; Tritz, R.; Grdina, D.J.

    1995-09-05

    The media of representative mammalian cell lines were supplemented with low levels of selenium in the form of sodium selenite in order to investigate the effects of selenium on mammalian cells. Following incubation in 30 nM sodium selenite, these cells were assayed for changes in glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. The cells examined included NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts, PC12 rat sympathetic precursor cells, SupT-1 human lymphocytes, MCF-7{sup adr} human breast carcinoma cells and AA8 Chinese hamster ovary cells. Selenium supplementation resulted in a marginal increase in GPx activity for the NIH 3T3, MCF-7{sup adr} and Supt-1 cells but stimulated GPx activity approximately 5-fold in PC12 and AA8 cells. AA8 cells were selected to evaluate whether selenium supplementation was radioprotective against {sup 60}cobalt gamma irradiation. Protection against radiation-induced mutation was measured by evaluating mutation frequency at the hprt locus. In this assay, preincubation of AA8 CHO cells significantly protected these cells from exposure to 8 Gy.

  16. Inhibition of Cellular Methyltransferases Promotes Endothelial Cell Activation by Suppressing Glutathione Peroxidase 1 Protein Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Madalena; Florindo, Cristina; Kalwa, Hermann; Silva, Zélia; Turanov, Anton A.; Carlson, Bradley A.; de Almeida, Isabel Tavares; Blom, Henk J.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Michel, Thomas; Castro, Rita; Loscalzo, Joseph; Handy, Diane E.

    2014-01-01

    S-Adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) is a negative regulator of most methyltransferases and the precursor for the cardiovascular risk factor homocysteine. We have previously identified a link between the homocysteine-induced suppression of the selenoprotein glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx-1) and endothelial dysfunction. Here we demonstrate a specific mechanism by which hypomethylation, promoted by the accumulation of the homocysteine precursor SAH, suppresses GPx-1 expression and leads to inflammatory activation of endothelial cells. The expression of GPx-1 and a subset of other selenoproteins is dependent on the methylation of the tRNASec to the Um34 form. The formation of methylated tRNASec facilitates translational incorporation of selenocysteine at a UGA codon. Our findings demonstrate that SAH accumulation in endothelial cells suppresses the expression of GPx-1 to promote oxidative stress. Hypomethylation stress, caused by SAH accumulation, inhibits the formation of the methylated isoform of the tRNASec and reduces GPx-1 expression. In contrast, under these conditions, the expression and activity of thioredoxin reductase 1, another selenoprotein, is increased. Furthermore, SAH-induced oxidative stress creates a proinflammatory activation of endothelial cells characterized by up-regulation of adhesion molecules and an augmented capacity to bind leukocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that SAH accumulation in endothelial cells can induce tRNASec hypomethylation, which alters the expression of selenoproteins such as GPx-1 to contribute to a proatherogenic endothelial phenotype. PMID:24719327

  17. Selenium levels and Glutathione peroxidase activity in the plasma of patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    González de Vega, Raquel; Fernández-Sánchez, María Luisa; Fernández, Juan Carlos; Álvarez Menéndez, Francisco Vicente; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2016-09-01

    Selenium, an essential trace element, is involved in the complex system of defense against oxidative stress through selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidases (GPx) and other selenoproteins. Because of its antioxidant properties, selenium or its selenospecies at appropriate levels could hinder oxidative stress and so development of diabetes. In this vein, quantitative speciation of selenium in human plasma samples from healthy and diabetic patients (controlled and non-controlled) was carried out by affinity chromatography (AF) coupled on-line to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and isotope dilution analysis (IDA). Similarly, it is well known that patients with diabetes who exhibit poor control of blood glucose show a decreased total antioxidant activity. Thus, we evaluated the enzymatic activity of GPx in diabetic and healthy individuals, using the Paglia and Valentine enzymatic method, observing a significant difference (p<0.05) between the three groups of assayed patients (healthy (n=24): 0.61±0.11U/ml, controlled diabetic (n=38): 0.40±0.12U/ml and non-controlled diabetic patients (n=40): 0.32±0.09U/ml). Our results show that hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic patients compared with healthy controls. What is more, glycation of GPx experiments demonstrated that it is the degree of glycation of the selenoenzyme (another species of the Se protein) what actually modulates its eventual activity against ROS in type II diabetes mellitus patients. PMID:27473831

  18. Unglycosylated recombinant human glutathione peroxidase 3 mutant from Escherichia coli is active as a monomer.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Yu, Yang; Xing, Ruiqing; Guo, Xiao; Liu, Dali; Wei, Jingyan; Song, Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) is a glycosylated member of GPx family and can catalyze the reaction of different types of peroxides with GSH to form their corresponding alcohols in vitro. The active center of GPx3 is selenocysteine (Sec), which is incorporated into proteins by a specific mechanism. In this study, we prepared a recombinant human GPx3 (rhGPx3) mutant with all Cys changed to Ser from a Cys auxotrophic strain of E. coli, BL21(DE3)cys. Although lacking post-translational modification, rhGPx3 mutant still retained the ability to reduce H2O2 and PLPC-OOH. Study on the quaternary structure suggested that rhGPx3 mutant existed as a monomer in solution, which is different from native tetrameric GPx3. Loss of the catalytic activity was considered to be attributed to both the absence of glycosylation and the failure of the tetramer. Further analysis was performed to compare the structures of rhGPx3 and GPx4 mutant, which were quite similar except for oligomerization loop. The differences of amino acid composition and electrostatic potentials on the oligomerization loop may affect the binding of large substrates to rhGPx3 mutant. This research provides an important foundation for biosynthesis of functionally selenium-containing GPx3 mutant in E.coli. PMID:25331785

  19. Depression in pregnancy is associated with decreased glutathione peroxidase activity in fetal cord blood.

    PubMed

    Camkurt, Mehmet Akif; Fındıklı, Ebru; Bakacak, Murat; Karaaslan, Mehmet Fatih; Tolun, Fatma İnanç; Tuman, Taha Can

    2016-08-01

    The investigation of fetal cord blood (FCB) during child delivery has created a novel topic in the field of psychiatric research. The umbilical vein receives nutrients and oxygen from the mother's circulation and transports them to the fetal circulation. Investigating fetal cord blood during delivery is beneficial for understanding the fetal environment. Depression in pregnancy is associated with medical and emotional burdens. In this study, we aimed to investigate glutathione peroxidase (Gpx) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the FCB of depressed mothers and healthy controls. Our study included 45 depressed mothers and 59 healthy controls. The FCB samples were collected from the umbilical vein during delivery. We found that Gpx levels were significantly decreased in the FCB of depressed mothers than healthy controls, medians were 0.14 U/ml and 0.16 U/ml respectively, Z: -3.567 and p < 0.001. MPO levels were similar in both groups, medians were 1.0 U/L and 1.2 U/L respectively, Z: -1.837 and p:0.066. Depression in pregnancy may be associated with decreased antioxidant levels, and this condition may cause an oxidative load, which may lead to improper brain development. Future studies should be performed in larger samples to clarify our preliminary results. PMID:27174401

  20. Pyridoxine-derived organoselenium compounds with glutathione peroxidase-like and chain-breaking antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay P; Poon, Jia-Fei; Butcher, Ray J; Engman, Lars

    2014-09-22

    One of the vitamin B6 vitamers, pyridoxine, was modified to incorporate selenium in various oxidation states in place of the methyl group in position 2. Such compounds were conveniently accessed by treatment of bis-4,5-(carboethoxy)-2-iodo-3-pyridinol with disodium diselenide and LiAlH4 -reduction. After work-up, selone 7 was isolated in good yield as an air-stable crystalline material. Hydrogen bonding to the neighboring hydroxyl group, as revealed by the short intramolecular Se⋅⋅⋅H distance in the crystal structure is likely to provide extra stabilization to the compound. Computational studies showed that selone 7 is more stable than the corresponding selenol tautomer by 12.2 kcal mol(-1) . Hydrogen peroxide oxidation of the selone 7 afforded diselenide 12, and, on further oxidation, seleninic acid 13. Treatment of the seleninic acid with thiophenol provided an isolable selenosulfide 14. The glutathione peroxidase-like properties of the pyridoxine-derived compounds were assessed by using the coupled reductase method. Seleninic acid 13 was found to be twofold more active than ebselen. The chain-breaking capacity of the pyridoxine compounds were studied in a water/chlorobenzene membrane model containing linoleic acid as an oxidizable substrate and N-acetylcysteine as a thiol reducing agent. Diselenide 15 could match α-tocopherol when it comes to reactivity towards peroxyl radicals and inhibition time. PMID:25123932

  1. Selenium status, lipid peroxides concentration, and glutathione peroxidase activity in the blood of power station and rubber factory workers

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, B.A.; Wasowicz, W.; Sklodowska, M.; Gromadzinska, J.

    1987-07-01

    Concentration of selenium in whole blood and plasma, lipid peroxides in plasma, and glutathione peroxidase activities in red blood cell hemolysates and plasma were determined in 49 coal power plant workers and in 50 rubber factory workers. The results were compared with those obtained for 58 nonindustrial controls. Whole blood selenium was significantly lower and plasma lipid peroxides were significantly higher in power plant workers when compared to the nonindustrial group. In the rubber factory workers, whole blood selenium and red blood cells and plasma glutathione peroxidase activities were significantly lower than in the control group. Urinary output of selenium was also significantly decreased in rubber factory workers. Slightly elevated lipid peroxides were also observed in that group. It seems reasonable to conclude that the lower blood selenium and decreased urinary output of this element may result from increased loss of selenium with perspiration. No correlation has been observed between selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity and between enzyme activity and lipid peroxides concentration in the industrial group.

  2. Glutathione peroxidase activity and chemical forms of selenium in tissues of rats given selenite or selenomethionine

    SciTech Connect

    Beilstein, M.A.; Whanger, P.D.

    1988-05-01

    Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity and deposition of selenium (Se) were examined in tissues of rats given dietary Se for 7 wk as either selenite or selenomethionine (SeMet) with 75Se radiotracer of the same chemical form. On the basis of Se:75Se ratio, all tissues of the rats fed selenite were equilibrated with the dietary source, but tissues of the SeMet fed animals maintained a ratio of Se:75Se greater than the dietary ratio. Deposition of dietary Se and 75Se was higher in most tissues of rats fed SeMet. Muscle 75Se was the largest single tissue pool of 75Se in both groups accounting for one-third of recovered 75Se in the rats fed selenite, and one-half of recovered 75Se in the rats fed SeMet. Tissue GPx activities were not different between the two dietary groups. The proportion of Se as GPx in tissues was highest in erythrocytes of the rats fed selenite (.81) and lowest in testes and epididymides of the rats fed SeMet (.009). The proportion of Se present in cytosolic GPx was consistently higher in tissues of rats fed selenite. Erythrocytes of the rats fed SeMet had more 75Se associated with hemoglobin, and muscle cytosols of the rats fed selenite had more 75Se associated with the G-protein. The proportion of 75Se as SeMet determined by ion exchange chromatography of tissue hydrolysates was higher in tissues of rats fed SeMet (highest in muscle and hemoglobin, 70%, and lowest in testes, 16%). In contrast, selenocysteine was the predominant form of Se present in tissues of rats given selenite. These results indicate that the form of Se administered will influence the form in the tissues, the percentage of Se with GPx and the body burden of Se.

  3. Selenium, glutathione peroxidase and other selenoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Selenium, as essential trace element, has long been associated with protein. The essentiality of selenium is partially understood as glutathione peroxidase contains an essential selenocysteine. Glutathione peroxidase has been purified from many tissues including rat liver. An estimated molecular weight of 105,000 was obtained for glutathione peroxidase by comparison to standards. A subunit size of 26,000 was obtained by SDS-gel electrophoresis. Glutathione peroxidase is not the only selenoprotein in the rat. In seven rat tissues examined, there were many different subunit sizes and change groups representing between 9 and 23 selenoproteins. Selenocysteine in glutathione peroxidase accounts for ca. 36% of the selenium in the rat. The mode of synthesis of glutathione peroxidase and the other selenoproteins is not understood. Glutathione peroxidase is strongly and reversibly inhibited by mercaptocarboxylic acids and other mercaptans, including some used as slow-acting drugs for the symtomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The mechanism and chemistry of this inhibition is discussed. This inhibition may provide a link between selenium and arthritis.

  4. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase are equally active in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide in human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gaetani, G.F.; Galiano, S.; Canepa, L.; Ferraris, A.M.; Kirkman, H.N.

    1989-01-01

    Genetic deficiencies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and NADPH predispose affected erythrocytes to destruction from peroxides. Conversely, genetic deficiencies of catalase do not predispose affected erythrocytes to peroxide-induced destruction. These observations have served to strengthen the assumption that the NADPH/glutathione/glutathione peroxidase pathway is the principal means for disposal of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. Recently, however, mammalian catalase was found to have tightly bound NADPH and to require NADPH for the prevention and reversal of inactivation by its toxic substrate (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/). Since both catalase and the glutathione pathway are dependent on NADPH for function, this finding raises the possibility that both mechanisms destroy H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. A comparison of normal and acatalasemic erythrocytes in the present study indicated that catalase accounts for more than half of the destruction of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ when H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is generated at a rate comparable to that which leads to hemolysis in G6PD- deficient erythrocytes.

  5. Magnesium Deficiency and High Light Intensity Enhance Activities of Superoxide Dismutase, Ascorbate Peroxidase, and Glutathione Reductase in Bean Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Ismail; Marschner, Horst

    1992-01-01

    The influence of varied Mg supply (10-1000 micromolar) and light intensity (100-580 microeinsteins per square meter per second) on the concentrations of ascorbate (AsA) and nonprotein SH-compounds and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.11) and the H2O2 scavenging enzymes, AsA peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7), dehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.8.5.1), and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) were studied in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaves over a 13-day period. The concentrations of AsA and SH-compounds and the activities of SOD and H2O2 scavenging enzymes increased with light intensity, in particular in Mg-deficient leaves. Over the 12-day period of growth for a given light intensity, the concentrations of AsA and SH-compounds and the activities of these enzymes remained more or less constant in Mg-sufficient leaves. In contrast, in Mg-deficient leaves, a progressive increase was recorded, particularly in concentrations of AsA and activities of AsA peroxidase and glutathione reductase, whereas the activities of guaiacol peroxidase and catalase were only slightly enhanced. Partial shading of Mg-deficient leaf blades for 4 days prevented chlorosis, and the activities of the O2.− and H2O2 scavenging enzymes remained at a low level. The results demonstrate the role of both light intensity and Mg nutritional status on the regulation of O2.− and H2O2 scavenging enzymes in chloroplasts. PMID:16668779

  6. Effect of a Bromo Substituent on the Glutathione Peroxidase Activity of a Pyridoxine-like Diselenide.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay P; Poon, Jia-Fei; Butcher, Ray J; Lu, Xi; Mestres, Gemma; Ott, Marjam Karlsson; Engman, Lars

    2015-08-01

    In search for better mimics of the glutathione peroxidase enzymes, pyridoxine-like diselenides 6 and 11, carrying a 6-bromo substituent, were prepared. Reaction of 2,6-dibromo-3-pyridinol 5 with sodium diselenide provided 6 via aromatic nucleophilic substitution of the 2-bromo substituent. LiAlH4 caused reduction of all four ester groups and returned 11 after acidic workup. The X-ray structure of 6 showed that the dipyridyl diselenide moiety was kept in an almost planar, transoid conformation. According to NBO-analysis, this was due to weak intramolecular Se···O (1.1 kcal/mol) and Se···N-interactions (2.5 kcal/mol). That the 6-bromo substituent increased the positive charge on selenium was confirmed by NPA-analysis and seen in calculated and observed (77)Se NMR-shifts. Diselenide 6 showed a more than 3-fold higher reactivity than the corresponding des-bromo compound 3a and ebselen when evaluated in the coupled reductase assay. Experiments followed for longer time (2 h) confirmed that diselenide 6 is a better GPx-catalyst than 11. On the basis of (77)Se-NMR experiments, a catalytic mechanism for diselenide 6 was proposed involving selenol, selenosulfide and seleninic acid intermediates. At low concentration (10 μM) where it showed only minimal toxicity, it could scavenge ROS produced by MNC- and PMNC-cells more efficiently than Trolox. PMID:26133764

  7. Enhanced Glutathione Peroxidase Activity of Water-Soluble and Polyethylene Glycol-Supported Selenides, Related Spirodioxyselenuranes, and Pincer Selenuranes.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Nicole M R; Press, David J; Mayder, Don M; Garnica, Pablo; Doyle, Lisa M; Back, Thomas G

    2016-09-01

    Diaryl selenides containing o-hydroxymethylene substituents function as peroxide-destroying mimetics of the antioxidant selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx), via oxidation to the corresponding spirodioxyselenuranes with hydrogen peroxide and subsequent reduction back to the original selenides with glutathione. Parent selenides with 3-hydroxypropyl or 2,3-dihydroxypropyl groups produced the novel compounds 10 and 11, respectively, with greatly improved aqueous solubility and catalytic activity. The phenolic derivative 28 displayed similarly ameliorated properties and also modest radical-inhibiting antioxidant activity, as evidenced by an assay based on phenolic hydrogen atom transfer to the stable free radical DPPH. In contrast, several selenides that afford pincer selenuranes (e.g., 20 and 21) instead of spiroselenuranes upon oxidation showed inferior catalytic activity. Several selenide analogues were attached to polyethylene glycol (PEG) oligomers, as PEG substituents can improve water solubility and bioavailability, while retarding clearance. Again, the PEG derivatives afforded remarkable activity when oxidation generated spirodioxyselenuranes and diminished activity when pincer compounds were produced. Several such compounds proved to be ca. 10- to 100-fold catalytically superior to the diaryl selenides and their spirodioxyselenurane counterparts investigated previously. Finally, an NMR-based assay employing glutathione in D2O was designed to accommodate the faster reacting water-soluble mimetics and to more closely duplicate in vivo conditions. PMID:27525346

  8. Microsomal glutathione S-transferase A1-1 with glutathione peroxidase activity from sheep liver: molecular cloning, expression and characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, K S; Reddy, P V; Gumpricht, E; Hildenbrandt, G R; Scholz, R W; Sordillo, L M; Reddy, C C

    2001-01-01

    A 25 kDa subunit of glutathione S-transferase (GST) from sheep liver microsomes (microsomal GSTA1-1) with a significant selenium-independent glutathione peroxidase activity has been isolated and characterized. Several analytical criteria, including EDTA stripping, protease protection assay and extraction with alkaline Na(2)CO(3), indicate that the microsomal GSTA1-1 is associated with the inner microsomal membrane. The specific cDNA nucleotide sequence reveals that the enzyme is made up of 222 amino acid residues and shares approx. 73-83% sequence similarity to Alpha-class GSTs from different species. The molecular mass, as determined by electrospray mass ionization, is 25611.3 Da. The enzyme is distinct from the previously reported rat liver microsomal GST in both amino acid sequence and catalytic properties [Morgenstern, Guthenberg and DePierre (1982) Eur. J. Biochem. 128, 243-248]. The microsomal GSTA1-1 differs from the sheep liver cytosolic GSTs, reported previously from this laboratory, in its substrate specificity profile and molecular mass [Reddy, Burgess, Gong, Massaro and Tu (1983) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 224, 87-101]. In addition to catalysing the conjugation of 4-hydroxynonenal with GSH, the enzyme also exhibits significant glutathione peroxidase activity towards physiologically relevant fatty acid hydroperoxides, such as linoleic and arachidonic acid hydroperoxides, as well as phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide, but not with H(2)O(2). Thus the microsomal GSTA1-1 isoenzyme might have an important role in the protection of biological membranes against oxidative damage. PMID:11716762

  9. In vitro evaluation of glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-like activity and antioxidant properties of an organoselenium compound.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohammad; Muhammad, Niaz; Naeem, Muhammad; Deobald, Anna Maria; Kamdem, Jean Paul; Rocha, Joao Batista Teixeira

    2015-08-01

    The amine based diselenide, (Z)-N-(4-methylbenzylidene)-1-(2-((2-(1-((E)-4-methyl benzylideneamino)ethyl)phenyl)diselanyl)phenyl)ethanamine ethyl)phenyl) diselanyl) phenyl) ethylimino) methyl)phenol (Compound A) an organoselenium compound that can mimic endogenous antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2 were tested against lipid peroxidation induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and Fe(II) in rat brain, interaction with 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl stable free radical (DPPH) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) like antioxidant activities with H2O2 or tBuOOH as substrates and with PhSH as thiol co-substrates as well as their ability to oxidize thiols were evaluated. From this study, we concluded that Compound A catalyze the reduction of H2O2 with thiol was ∼2-fold more active than (PhSe)2) in both tBuOOH and H2O2 systems when PhSH was used as a substrate. (PhSe)2 exhibited an increased ability to oxidize thiols while Compound A was not a good substrate for the oxidation of thiol used namely DTT and Cystine and showed DPPH radical-scavenging activity, while (PhSe)2 did not present radical scavenging activity. Compound A (amine based diselenide) presented better antioxidant profiles than (PhSe)2 against lipid peroxidation. The results clear showed that nitrogen atom in the Compound A can have a profound effect on their pharmacological properties. PMID:25862122

  10. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase mimics

    PubMed Central

    Day, Brian J.

    2009-01-01

    Overproduction of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide (O2−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are increasingly implicated in human disease and aging. ROS are also being explored as important modulating agents in a number of cell signaling pathways. Earlier work has focused on development of small catalytic scavengers of O2−, commonly referred to as superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetics. Many of these compounds also have substantial abilities to catalytically scavenge H2O2 and peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Peroxides have been increasingly shown to disrupt cell signaling cascades associated with excessive inflammation associated with a wide variety of human diseases. Early studies with enzymatic scavengers like SOD frequently reported little or no beneficial effect in biologic models unless SOD was combined with catalase or a peroxidase. Increasing attention has been devoted to developing catalase or peroxidase mimetics as a way to treat overt inflammation associated with the pathophysiology of many human disorders. This review will focus on recent development of catalytic scavengers of peroxides and their potential use as therapeutic agents for pulmonary, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and inflammatory disorders. PMID:18948086

  11. Effect of Selenium Supplementation on Glutathione Peroxidase Enzyme Activity in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sedighi, Omid; Zargari, Mehryar; Varshi, Gharmohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Plasma selenium (Se) concentration and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Pxs) enzyme activity of the patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are usually lower than healthy individuals; however, the effect of Se supplementation on the GSH-Pxs activity in those patients remains unclear. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of Se supplementation on plasma Se concentration and red blood cell (RBC) GSH-Pxs activity in patients with different stages of CKD. Patients and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, forty-five patients with CKD who attended in a nephrology clinic were recruited. The patients were randomly allocated into three groups according to their creatinine clearance rate and were supplemented with daily Se 200 mcg for three months. Plasma Se concentration and RBC GSH-Pxs activity were measured in each patient at the beginning and at the end of the study. This clinical trial was registered in the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (www.irct.ir) with registration number ID of IRCT201305318501N2. Results: Plasma Se concentration and RBC GSH-Pxs activity increased significantly in all three groups of patients with CKD (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences between three groups regarding baseline plasma Se (P = 0.268) and RBC GSH-Pxs activity (P = 0.741). Conclusions: Se supplementation can increase plasma Se concentration and RBC GSH-Pxs activity in patients with different stages of CKD. PMID:25032143

  12. Selenium-Enriched Foods Are More Effective at Increasing Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) Activity Compared with Selenomethionine: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham, Emma N.; Hesketh, John E.; Sinclair, Bruce R.; Koolaard, John P.; Roy, Nicole C.

    2014-01-01

    Selenium may play a beneficial role in multi-factorial illnesses with genetic and environmental linkages via epigenetic regulation in part via glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. A meta-analysis was undertaken to quantify the effects of dietary selenium supplementation on the activity of overall GPx activity in different tissues and animal species and to compare the effectiveness of different forms of dietary selenium. GPx activity response was affected by both the dose and form of selenium (p < 0.001). There were differences between tissues on the effects of selenium supplementation on GPx activity (p < 0.001); however, there was no evidence in the data of differences between animal species (p = 0.95). The interactions between dose and tissue, animal species and form were significant (p < 0.001). Tissues particularly sensitive to changes in selenium supply include red blood cells, kidney and muscle. The meta-analysis identified that for animal species selenium-enriched foods were more effective than selenomethionine at increasing GPx activity. PMID:25268836

  13. Mitochondrial oxidative stress is modulated by oleic acid via an epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent activation of glutathione peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Carine; Augé, Nathalie; Frisach, Marie-Françoise; Casteilla, Louis; Salvayre, Robert; Nègre-Salvayre, Anne

    2002-01-01

    Mitochondria generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) under various pathophysiological conditions. In isolated mitochondria, fatty acids (FA) exhibit an uncoupling effect of the respiratory activity and modulate ROS generation. The effect of FA on intact cultured cells remains to be elucidated. The present study reports that FA (buffered by BSA) decrease the level of cellular ROS generated by the mitochondrial respiratory chain in cultured cells incubated with antimycin A. Both saturated and unsaturated FA are effective. This fatty acid-induced antioxidant effect does not result from a decrease in ROS production, but is subsequent to cellular glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activation and enhanced ROS degradation. This fatty acid-induced GPx activation is mediated through epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling, since this response is (i) abrogated by the EGFR inhibitor AG1478 or by a defect in EGFR (in EGFR-deficient B82L fibroblasts), (ii) restored in B82LK+ cells expressing EGFR and (iii) mimicked by epidermal growth factor. These findings indicate that FA contribute to enhance cellular antioxidant defences against mitochondrial oxidative stress through EGFR-dependent GPx activation. PMID:12153397

  14. Effect of Dietary Selenomethionine Supplementation on Growth Performance, Tissue Se Concentration, and Blood Glutathione Peroxidase Activity in Kid Boer Goats.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu-xuan; Hou, Jin-xing; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Jian-gang; Liu, Xiao-rui; Zhou, Zhan-qin; Cao, Bin-yun

    2015-10-01

    We used 240 kid Boer goats that were divided into six groups. The control group was fed a basal diet containing 0.05 mg of selenium (Se)/kg dry matter (DM). Trial groups received the basal diet supplemented with 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, or 0.5 mg Se/kg DM (using a commercial selenomethionine product). Trial groups showed an improvement in growth performance (P < 0.05) despite no change in average daily feed intakes (ADFIs) (P > 0.05) compared to the control group A, quadratic model showed a correlation between glutathione peroxidase activity level in whole blood and dietary Se concentration (R(2) = 0.883, P < 0.04). The best linear model showed that increasing concentrations of Se in the blood (R(2) = 0.968, P < 0.001) and muscle (R(2) = 0.942, P < 0.001) corresponded to increasing Se concentrations in feed. Accumulation of Se in different tissues and organs corresponded to increasing Se concentrations in the diet as well as to the total time goats spent feeding on supplemented diet. Kidney and muscle tissues showed the highest and lowest accumulation of Se, respectively. Thus, Se in goat meat can be increased by adding between 0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg of selenomethionine to the diet of goats. PMID:25813835

  15. Association between ETFA genotype and activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase in cryopreserved sperm of Holstein-Friesian bulls.

    PubMed

    Hering, D M; Lecewicz, M; Kordan, W; Kamiński, S

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether C/T missense mutation within the ETFA gene is associated with sperm antioxidant enzymatic activity. One hundred and twenty Holstein-Friesian bulls were genotyped by the PCR-RFLP technique (MwoI). Commercial straws of frozen-thawed semen were used to evaluate the activity of three antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Among all bulls investigated, genotype CT was the most frequent (44.2%), in comparison with CC (42.5%) and TT (13.3%). Significant differences in glutathione peroxidase activity were observed between homozygous individuals (CC vs TT) with heterozygous CT having intermediate values. Dismutase activity was significantly associated with ETFA genotype, although only bulls with the CT genotype were significantly different from bulls carrying the CC genotype. The activity of catalase showed a similar trend (but was not statistically significant). In conclusion, we found that bulls with the ETFA TT genotype produce sperm with the highest glutathione peroxidase activity and can therefore be more efficiently protected from reactive oxygen. The mechanism of this interaction needs to be elucidated in future research. PMID:25472694

  16. Is the protein surrounding the active site critical for hydrogen peroxide reduction by selenoprotein glutathione peroxidase? An ONIOM study.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Rajeev; Vreven, Thom; Frisch, Michael J; Morokuma, Keiji; Musaev, Djamaladdin G

    2006-07-13

    In this ONIOM(QM:MM) study, we evaluate the role of the protein surroundings in the mechanism of H2O2 reduction catalyzed by the glutathione peroxidase enzyme, using the whole monomer (3113 atoms in 196 amino acid residues) as a model. A new optimization scheme that allows the full optimization of transition states for large systems has been utilized. It was found that in the presence of the surrounding protein the optimized active site structure bears a closer resemblance to the one in the X-ray structure than that without the surrounding protein. H2O2 reduction occurs through a two-step mechanism. In the first step, the selenolate anion (E-Se(-)) formation occurs with a barrier of 16.4 kcal/mol and is endothermic by 12.0 kcal/mol. The Gln83 residue plays the key role of the proton abstractor, which is in line with the experimental suggestion. In the second step, the O-O bond is cleaved, and selenenic acid (R-Se-OH) and a water molecule are formed. The calculated barrier for this process is 6.0 kcal/mol, and it is exothermic by 80.9 kcal/mol. The overall barrier of 18.0 kcal/mol for H2O2 reduction is in reasonable agreement with the experimentally measured barrier of 14.9 kcal/mol. The protein surroundings has been calculated to exert a net effect of only 0.70 kcal/mol (in comparison to the "active site only" model including solvent effects) on the overall barrier, which is most likely due to the active site being located at the enzyme surface. PMID:16821888

  17. Relationships between silicon content and glutathione peroxidase activity in tissues of rats receiving lithium in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Kiełczykowska, Małgorzata; Musik, Irena; Pasternak, Kazimierz

    2008-02-01

    Lithium salts are widely used in psychiatry, but their presence in organism can result in both beneficial and adverse effects. Silicon, the third most abundant trace element in humans as well as antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx) play important roles in organism. The disturbance of their level can cause severe disorders. The aim of our work was to evaluate the influence of Li2CO3 administration in drinking water for a period of 4 weeks on Si content and GPx activity in the tissues of liver, kidney, brain and femoral muscle in rats. The concentrations of provided solutions were 0.7, 1.4, 2.6, 3.6, 7.1 and 10.7 mmol Li+ x dm-3. GPx activity was decreased versus control as a consequence of Li treatment, particularly in kidney and brain. This effect could be suggested to contribute to renal abnormalities which could occur during Li therapy. Si tissue level was significantly enhanced versus control in liver and femoral muscle in groups receiving high Li doses. In brain no well-marked changes were observed, whereas in kidney we observed the depletion in low-Li-groups, restoration of Si level in higher-Li-groups and unexpected decrease in the highest-Li-group. Positive correlations between Si content and GPx activity in the tissues of kidney (r = 0.677) and brain (r = 0.790) as well as negative correlation (r = -0.819) in femoral muscle were found. We consider that our results give some reason for suggesting that monitoring of silicon level in patients undergoing Li therapy could be recommended. However, more investigations should be performed, particularly regarding the relationships between Si and GPx in blood and urine Si excretion during lithium administration. PMID:17447120

  18. The influence of atmospheric chromium on selenium content and glutathione peroxidase activity in blood of tannery workers.

    PubMed Central

    Gromadzińska, J; Wasowicz, W; Sklodowska, M; Bulikowski, W; Rydzyński, K

    1996-01-01

    The concentration of selenium and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were determined in blood of 34 workers of a tannery in Gniezno, Poland, who worked in an area containing chromium compounds. Fourteen workers were exposed to chromium compounds at concentrations of 0.11 +/- 0.07 mg Cr/m3 (mean +/- SD) and 20 at concentrations 5-10 times lower i.e., 0.022 +/- 0.009 mg Cr/m3. Excretion of Se in urine was measured in all of the investigated workers. Decreased Se concentration in whole blood and blood plasma and elevated TBARS concentration in blood plasma were found in the whole group of investigated tanners as compared to controls. Tanners working in areas with high chromium concentrations had a statistically significant decrease in Se concentration in blood and plasma and decreased urinary excretion of the microelement as compared with other tanners. TBARS concentration was 2.5 times lower in workers exposed to higher chromium concentrations (p < 0.005) than in other workers. Positive linear correlations were found between the concentration of Se in blood and the amount of the element excreted in urine (r = 0.48; p < 0.005), the concentration of Se in blood plasma and in urine (r = 0.46; p < 0.01), and the concentration of Se in blood and erythrocyte GSH-Px activity (r = 0.42; p < 0.02). The observed differences between Se concentration in blood and urine of tannery workers and people who are not employed in the industry may indicate a kind of specific adaptation of the body to the working environment containing chromium compounds. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:9118872

  19. Selenium dependent glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity in the retina of preterm human infants

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, H.; Hittner, H.; Barron, S.; Mehta, R.; Kretzer, F.

    1986-03-01

    GSH-Px activity was determined in the retina of 15 preterm human neonates with gestational ages of 17-28 weeks and birth weights of 120 to 960 g. GSH-Px activity was measured using the coupled assay. The infants survived from 0.5 to 9 hours after parturition. The retinas were removed within 3 hours of autopsy. Through electronmicroscopy, there was verification that the entire retina was removed and no contamination of other eye tissues occurred. After removal, the retinas were immediately dissolved in phosphate buffered pH 7.0 saline for assay of GSH-Px activity. The mean GSH-Px activity was 19.44 +/- 6.44 with a range of 11.1 to 32.8 units NAPH/sub 2/ oxidized/min/g protein. There was a negative correlation between birth weight and GSH-Px activity (r = -0.86) and between week of gestation and GSH-Px activity (r = -0.91). The neonatal retina GSH-Px activity was 2 to 15 times higher than found in adult retinas. Thus, this research demonstrates that selenium dependent GSH-Px activity is elevated in the preterm neonate's retina which indicates that retina GSH-Px activity may be an important antioxidation system in the premature neonate.

  20. Glutathione peroxidase 1 deficiency attenuates concanavalin A-induced hepatic injury by modulation of T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, D H; Son, D J; Park, M H; Yoon, D Y; Han, S B; Hong, J T

    2016-01-01

    Concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis model is well-established experimental T cell-mediated liver disease. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is associated with T-cell activation and proliferation, but continued ROS exposure induces T-cell hyporesponsiveness. Because glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1) is an antioxidant enzyme and is involved in T-cell development, we investigated the role of Gpx1 during Con A-induced liver injury in Gpx1 knockout (KO) mice. Male wild-type (WT) mice and Gpx1 KO mice were intravenously injected with Con A (10 mg/kg), and then killed after 8 h after Con A injection. Serum levels of aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase were measured to assess hepatic injury. To identify that Gpx1 affects T cell-mediated inflammation, we pretreated Gpx1 inhibitor to Human Jurkat T cells then treated Con A. Con A-induced massive liver damage in WT mice but its damage was attenuated in Gpx1 KO mice. Con A-induced Th1 cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-2 were also decreased in the liver and spleen of Gpx1 KO mice compared with WT mice. In Jurkat T cells, Con A-induced mRNA levels of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α were downregulated by pretreatment of Gpx inhibitor, mercaptosuccinic acid. We also observed that Gpx1 KO mice showed increasing oxidative stress in the liver and spleen compared with WT mice. These results suggest that Gpx1 deficiency attenuates Con A-induced liver injury by induction of T-cell hyporesponsiveness through chronic ROS exposure. PMID:27124582

  1. Effects of dietary selenium supplementation on tissue selenium distribution and glutathione peroxidase activity in Chinese Ring necked Pheasants.

    PubMed

    Juniper, D T; Bertin, G

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the concentration of total selenium (Se) and the proportions of total Se comprised as selenomethionine (SeMet) and selenocysteine (SeCys) in the postmortem tissues of female pheasants (Phasianus Colchicus Torquator) offered diets that contained graded additions of selenised-enriched yeast (SY) or a single comparative dose of sodium selenite (SS). Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and tissue glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity of breast (Pectoralis Major) were assessed at 0 and 5 days postmortem. A total of 216 female pheasant chicks were enrolled into the study. Twenty-four birds were euthanased at the start of the study, and samples of blood, breast muscle, leg muscle (M. Peroneus Longus and M. Gastrocnemius), heart, liver, kidney and gizzard were collected for determination of total Se. Remaining birds were blocked by live weight and randomly allocated to one of four dietary treatments (n = 48 birds/treatment) that either differed in Se source (SY v. SS) or dose (control (0.17 mg total Se/kg), SY-L and SS-L (0.3 mg/kg total Se as SY and SS, respectively) and SY-H (0.45 mg total Se/kg)). Following 42 and 91 days of treatment, 24 birds per treatment were euthanased, and samples of blood, breast muscle, leg muscle, heart, liver, kidney and gizzard were retained for determination of total Se and the proportion of total Se comprised as SeMet or SeCys. Whole blood GSH-Px activity was determined at each time point. Tissue GSH-Px activity and TBARS were determined in breast tissue at the end of the study. There were increases in both blood and tissues to the graded addition of SY to the diet (P < 0.001), but the same responses were not apparent with the blood and tissues of selenite-supplemented birds receiving a comparable dose (SY-L v. SS-L). Although there were differences between tissue types in the distribution of SeMet and SeCys, there were few differences between treatments. There were effects of

  2. Serine incorporation into the selenocysteine moiety of glutathione peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Sunde, R.A.; Evenson, J.K.

    1987-01-15

    The selenium in mammalian glutathione peroxidase is present as a selenocysteine ((Se)Cys) moiety incorporated into the peptide backbone 41-47 residues from the N-terminal end. To study the origin of the skeleton of the (Se)Cys moiety, we perfused isolated rat liver with /sup 14/C- or /sup 3/H-labeled amino acids for 4 h, purified the GSH peroxidase, derivatized the (Se)Cys in GSH peroxidase to carboxymethylselenocysteine ((Se)Cys(Cm)), and determined the amino acid specific activity. Perfusion with (/sup 14/C)cystine resulted in (/sup 14/C)cystine incorporation into GSH peroxidase without labeling (Se)Cys(Cm), indicating that cysteine is not a direct precursor for (Se)Cys. (/sup 14/C)Serine perfusion labeled serine, glycine (the serine hydroxymethyltransferase product), and (Se)Cys(Cm) in purified GSH peroxidase, whereas (3-3H)serine perfusion only labeled serine and (Se)Cys(Cm), thus demonstrating that the (Se)Cys in GSH peroxidase is derived from serine. The similar specific activities of serine and (Se)Cys(Cm) strongly suggest that the precursor pool of serine used for (Se) Cys synthesis is the same or similar to the serine pool used for acylation of seryl-tRNAs.

  3. Effect of selenium-enriched probiotics on laying performance, egg quality, egg selenium content, and egg glutathione peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Cuiling; Zhao, Yuxin; Liao, Shengfa F; Chen, Fu; Qin, Shunyi; Wu, Xianshi; Zhou, Hong; Huang, Kehe

    2011-11-01

    A 35-day experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of selenium-enriched probiotics (SP) on laying performance, egg quality, egg selenium (Se) content, and egg glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity. Five hundred 58-week-old Rohman laying hens were randomly allotted to 5 dietary treatments of 100 each. Each treatment had 5 replicates, and each replicate had 5 cages with 4 hens per cage. The SP was supplemented to a corn-soybean-meal basal diet at 3 different levels that supplied total Se at 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/kg. The basal diet served as a blank control, while the basal diet with supplemental probiotics served as a probiotics control. The results showed that dietary SP supplementation not only increased (p < 0.05) the rate of egg laying, day egg weight, mean egg weight, egg Se content, and egg GPX activity but also decreased (p < 0.05) the feed:egg ratio and egg cholesterol content. The egg Se content was gradually increased (p < 0.05) along with the increasing level of dietary Se. The SP supplementation also slowed down (p < 0.05) the drop of Haugh units (HU) of eggs stored at room temperature. The egg GPX activity had a positive correlation (p < 0.01) with egg Se content and a negative correlation (p < 0.01) with egg HU drop. These results suggested that Se contents, GPX activity, and HU of eggs were affected by the dietary Se level, whereas the egg-laying performance and egg cholesterol content were affected by the dietary probiotics. It was concluded that this SP is an effective feed additive that combines the organic Se benefit for hen and human health with the probiotics benefit for laying hen production performance. It was also suggested that the eggs from hens fed this SP can serve as a nutraceutical food with high Se and low cholesterol contents for both healthy people and patients with hyperlipidemia, fatty liver, or cardiovascular disease. PMID:21942342

  4. Temperature-driven switching of the catalytic activity of artificial glutathione peroxidase by the shape transition between the nanotubes and vesicle-like structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Zou, Huixin; Dong, Zeyuan; Zhou, Lipeng; Li, Jiaxi; Luo, Quan; Zhu, Junyan; Xu, Jiayun; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-04-15

    Smart supramolecular nanoenzymes with temperature-driven switching property have been successfully constructed by the self-assembly of supra-amphiphiles formed by the cyclodextrin-based host-guest chemistry. The self-assembled nanostructures were catalyst-functionalized and thermosensitively-functionalized through conveniently linking the catalytic center of glutathione peroxidase and thermosensitive polymer to the host cyclodextrin molecules.The ON-OFF switches for the peroxidase activity by reversible transformation of nanostructures from tube to sphere have been achieved through changing the temperature. We anticipate that such intelligent enzyme mimics could be developed to use in an antioxidant medicine with controlled catalytic efficiency according to the needs of the human body in the future. PMID:24654792

  5. Glutathione peroxidase 4 prevents necroptosis in mouse erythroid precursors

    PubMed Central

    Canli, Özge; Alankuş, Yasemin B.; Grootjans, Sasker; Vegi, Naidu; Hültner, Lothar; Hoppe, Philipp S.; Schroeder, Timm; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bornkamm, Georg W.

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining cellular redox balance is vital for cell survival and tissue homoeostasis because imbalanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may lead to oxidative stress and cell death. The antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) is a key regulator of oxidative stress–induced cell death. We show that mice with deletion of Gpx4 in hematopoietic cells develop anemia and that Gpx4 is essential for preventing receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3)-dependent necroptosis in erythroid precursor cells. Absence of Gpx4 leads to functional inactivation of caspase 8 by glutathionylation, resulting in necroptosis, which occurs independently of tumor necrosis factor α activation. Although genetic ablation of Rip3 normalizes reticulocyte maturation and prevents anemia, ROS accumulation and lipid peroxidation in Gpx4-deficient cells remain high. Our results demonstrate that ROS and lipid hydroperoxides function as not-yet-recognized unconventional upstream signaling activators of RIP3-dependent necroptosis. PMID:26463424

  6. Modulation of the Activities of Catalase, Cu-Zn, Mn Superoxide Dismutase, and Glutathione Peroxidase in Adipocyte from Ovariectomised Female Rats with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Rebeca Cambray; Zuñiga-Muñoz, Alejandra; Guarner Lans, Verónica; Díaz-Díaz, Eulises; Tena Betancourt, Carlos Alberto; Pérez-Torres, Israel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between estrogen removal, antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress generated by obesity in a MS female rat model. Thirty two female Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: Control (C), MS, MS ovariectomized (Ovx), and MS Ovx plus estradiol (E2). MS was induced by administering 30% sucrose to drinking water for 24 weeks. After sacrifice, intra-abdominal fat was dissected; adipocytes were isolated and lipid peroxidation, non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity, and the activities of Cu-Zn and Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were determined. There were no significant differences in the activities of Cu-Zn, Mn SOD, CAT, and GPx between the C and MS groups, but in the MS Ovx group there was a statistically significant decrease in the activities of these enzymes when compared to MS and MS Ovx+E2. The increased lipid peroxidation and nonenzymatic antioxidant capacity found in MS Ovx was significantly decreased when compared to MS and MS Ovx+E2. In conclusion, the removal of E2 by ovariectomy decreases the activity of the antioxidant enzymes in the intra-abdominal tissue of MS female rats; this is reflected by increased lipid peroxidation and decreased nonenzymatic antioxidant capacity. PMID:24987414

  7. Mimicking the lipid peroxidation inhibitory activity of phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (GPx4) by using fatty acid conjugates of a water-soluble selenolane.

    PubMed

    Iwaoka, Michio; Katakura, Arisa; Mishima, Jun; Ishihara, Yoshimi; Kunwar, Amit; Priyadarsini, Kavirayani Indira

    2015-01-01

    A series of fatty acid conjugates of trans-3,4-dihydroxy-1-selenolane (DHS) were synthesized by reacting DHS with appropriate acid chlorides. The obtained monoesters were evaluated for their antioxidant capacities by the lipid peroxidation assay using a lecithin/cholesterol liposome as a model system. The observed antioxidant capacities against accumulation of the lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH) increased with increasing the alkyl chain length and became saturated for dodecanoic acid (C12) or higher fatty acid monoesters, for which the capacities were much greater than those of DHS, its tridecanoic acid (C13) diester, and PhSeSePh. On the other hand, the bacteriostatic activity of myristic acid (C14) monoester, evaluated through the colony formation assay using Bacillus subtilis, indicated that it has higher affinity to bacterial cell membranes than parent DHS. Since DHS-fatty acid conjugates would inhibit lipid peroxidation through glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-like 2e- mechanism, higher fatty acid monoesters of DHS can mimic the function of GPx4, which interacts with LOOH to reduce it to harmless alcohol (LOH). Importance of the balance between hydrophilicity and lipophilicity for the design of effective GPx4 mimics was suggested. PMID:26198222

  8. Effect of variable glutathione peroxidase activity on H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-related cytotoxicity in cultured aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ody, C.; Junod, A.F.

    1985-10-01

    Primary cultures of porcine aortic endothelial cells were used to assess the effects of O/sub 2/ intermediates produced by 10-40 mU/ml xanthine oxidase (XO; +2 mM hypoxanthine) or 25-100 mU/ml glucose oxidase (GO; +5 mM glucose). A 60-min incubation in the presence of the enzyme systems resulted in a dose-dependent toxic effect with evidence of cytolysis (increased LDH release) and cell loss (decrease in DNA and protein content), when these indexes were measured 24 hr after completion of the enzyme reaction. Decreased (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into DNA was the most sensitive index of cell dysfunction for both enzyme systems. The effects of various scavengers and enzymes indicated that H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ was the main O/sub 2/ intermediate involved in the cytotoxicity resulting from the XO-hypoxanthine reaction. Increased glutathione peroxidase activity associated with the addition of 2 x 10/sup -7/ M selenomethionine to culture medium had a partial protective effect which could be related to an increased rate of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ degradation. Evidence for increased DNA synthesis after injury was found in cells previously exposed to XO-hypoxanthine, the degree of increase in (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation being dependent on the intensity of the initial cytotoxicity.

  9. Glutathione peroxidase-1 protects from CD95-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gouaze, Valerie; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Cuvillier, Olivier; Malagarie-Cazenave, Sophie; Frisach, Marie-Francoise; Mirault, Marc-Edouard; Levade, Thierry

    2002-11-01

    Through the induction of apoptosis, CD95 plays a crucial role in the immune response and the elimination of cancer cells. Ligation of CD95 receptor activates a complex signaling network that appears to implicate the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study investigated the place of ROS production in CD95-mediated apoptosis and the role of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx1). Anti-CD95 antibodies triggered an early generation of ROS in human breast cancer T47D cells that was blocked by overexpression of GPx1 and inhibition of initiator caspase activation. Enforced expression of GPx1 also resulted in inhibition of CD95-induced effector caspase activation, DNA fragmentation, and apoptotic cell death. Resistance to CD95-mediated apoptosis was not due to an increased expression of anti-apoptotic molecules and could be reversed by glutathione-depleting agents. In addition, whereas the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL prevented CD95-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, it did not inhibit the early ROS production. Moreover, Bcl-xL but not GPx1 overexpression could suppress the staurosporine-induced late generation of ROS and subsequent cell death. Altogether, these findings suggest that GPx1 functions upstream of the mitochondrial events to inhibit the early ROS production and apoptosis induced by CD95 ligation. Finally, transgenic mice overexpressing GPx1 were partially protected from the lethal effect of anti-CD95, underlying the importance of peroxide formation (and GPx1) in CD95-triggered apoptosis. PMID:12221075

  10. Expression of glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase pi in canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glutathione (GSH) is one of the most important agents of the antioxidant defense system of the cell because, in conjunction with the enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione S transferase pi (GSTpi), it plays a central role in the detoxification and biotransformation of chemotherapeutic drugs. This study evaluated the expression of GSH and the GSH-Px and GSTpi enzymes by immunohistochemistry in 30 canine mammary tumors, relating the clinicopathological parameters, clinical outcome and survival of the bitches. In an in vitro study, the expression of the genes glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLC) and glutathione synthetase (GSS) that synthesize GSH and GSH-Px gene were verified by qPCR and subjected to treatment with doxorubicin, to check the resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy. Results The immunohistochemical expression of GSH, GSH-Px and GSTpi was compared with the clinical and pathological characteristics and the clinical outcome in the bitches, including metastasis and death. The results showed that high immunoexpression of GSH was correlated to the absence of tumor ulceration and was present in dogs without metastasis (P < 0.05). There was significant correlation of survival with the increase of GSH (P < 0.05). The expression of the GSH-Px and GSTpi enzymes showed no statistically significant correlation with the analyzed variables (p > 0.05). The analysis of the relative expression of genes responsible for the synthesis of GSH (GCLC and GSS) and GSH-Px by quantitative PCR was done with cultured cells of 10 tumor fragments from dogs with mammary tumors. The culture cells showed a decrease in GCLC and GSS expression when compared with no treated cells (P < 0.05). High GSH immunoexpression was associated with better clinical outcomes. Conclusion Therefore, high expression of the GSH seems to play an important role in the clinical outcome of patients with mammary tumors and suggest its use as prognostic marker. The in

  11. Sex- and age-dependent activity of glutathione peroxidase in reproductive organs in pre- and post-pubertal cattle in relation to total antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Kankofer, M; Wawrzykowski, J; Giergiel, M

    2013-08-01

    Antioxidative/oxidative balance is crucial for proper functioning of cells and tissues. It is suggested that this balance can be partly controlled by sex steroid hormones and in consequence can exhibit age- and sex-related dependency. The aim of present study was to describe sex- and age-related changes in the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) with respect to total antioxidant activity (TAC) in reproductive organs of cattle. Biological samples were collected from slaughterhouse and comprised of ovaries, uterus, testes as well as livers as reference tissue. Animals were divided into group of bulls (aged between 13 and 24 months; n = 12), cows (aged between 14 and 27 months; n = 12) and female calves (aged between 2 weeks and 2 months; n = 12). Examined parameters were determined spectrophotometrically and the presence of GSH-Px isoform was confirmed by Western blotting technique. Activity of GSH-Px in genital tissues regardless of sex was significantly higher than in livers, while TAC showed opposite relationship. The differences in antioxidative parameters between testes and mature ovaries (e.g. GSH-Px-1.42 ± 0.47 nkat/mg prot vs. 1.08 ± 0.24 and 1.15 ± 0.23) were noticed as well as in chosen values between cows and female calves. Western blotting allowed the detection of cytosolic GSH-Px in all examined tissues with molecular weight around 21 kDa as monomer and around 84 kDa as tetramer depending on conditions of electrophoresis. The results may confirm the influence and regulatory role of sex steroid hormones on GSH-Px activity because the alterations were sex and age dependent. PMID:23740597

  12. Effect of polyphenols extracted from tamarind ( Tamarindus indica L.) seed coat on pathophysiological changes and red blood cell glutathione peroxidase activity in heat-stressed broilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aengwanich, Worapol; Suttajit, Maitree

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of polyphenols extracted from the tamarind seed coat (PETSC) on glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, red blood cell parameters and bilirubin in heat-stressed broilers. One hundred forty-seven broilers, 18-days old were divided into two groups. In group 1, broilers were maintained at an environmental temperature of 26 ± 2 °C throughout the experimental period. In group 2, the broilers were maintained at 38 ± 2 °C (cyclic temperature: 26 ± 2 °C; -38 ± 2 °C; and -26 ± 2 °C, and broilers were maintained at 38 ± 2 °C for 6 h/ day) and received PETSC at a concentration of 0, 100, 200, 300, 400 or 500 mg/kg in their diet ad libitum. Parameters were investigated on days 1, 7, 14 and 21 of the experimental period. Results showed that GPx activity of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg of PETSC in their diet was lower ( P < 0.05) than that in broilers fed the other concentrations. The mean total red blood cell count and hemoglobin concentration of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg PETSC was higher ( P < 0.05) than those in broilers in group 1 and those fed the other concentrations. The mean bilirubin level in the excreta of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg of PETSC was lower ( P < 0.05) than that in broilers that received 0, 300, 400 and 500 mg/kg of PETSC. This showed that PETSC could reduce GPx activity and bilirubin in feces, and increase red blood cell parameters in heat-stressed broilers.

  13. Effect of polyphenols extracted from tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) seed coat on pathophysiological changes and red blood cell glutathione peroxidase activity in heat-stressed broilers.

    PubMed

    Aengwanich, Worapol; Suttajit, Maitree

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of polyphenols extracted from the tamarind seed coat (PETSC) on glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, red blood cell parameters and bilirubin in heat-stressed broilers. One hundred forty-seven broilers, 18-days old were divided into two groups. In group 1, broilers were maintained at an environmental temperature of 26 ± 2 °C throughout the experimental period. In group 2, the broilers were maintained at 38 ± 2 °C (cyclic temperature: 26 ± 2 °C; -38 ± 2 °C; and -26 ± 2 °C, and broilers were maintained at 38 ± 2 °C for 6 h/ day) and received PETSC at a concentration of 0, 100, 200, 300, 400 or 500 mg/kg in their diet ad libitum. Parameters were investigated on days 1, 7, 14 and 21 of the experimental period. Results showed that GPx activity of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg of PETSC in their diet was lower (P < 0.05) than that in broilers fed the other concentrations. The mean total red blood cell count and hemoglobin concentration of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg PETSC was higher (P < 0.05) than those in broilers in group 1 and those fed the other concentrations. The mean bilirubin level in the excreta of heat-stressed broilers that received 100 mg/kg of PETSC was lower (P < 0.05) than that in broilers that received 0, 300, 400 and 500 mg/kg of PETSC. This showed that PETSC could reduce GPx activity and bilirubin in feces, and increase red blood cell parameters in heat-stressed broilers. PMID:22434485

  14. Changes of reduced glutathion, glutathion reductase, and glutathione peroxidase after radiation in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Erden, M.; Bor, N.M.

    1984-04-01

    In this series of experiments the protective action of reduced glutathion due to ionizing radiation has been studied. In the experimental group 18 guinea pigs were exposed to successive radiations of 150 rad 3 or 4 days apart. Total dose given amounted to 750 rad which is the LD50 for guinea pigs. Blood samples were taken 30 min after each exposure. The control series were sham radiated but otherwise treated identically. The cells of the removed blood samples were separated by centrifugation and were subjected to the reduced glutathion stability test. GSSGR, GPer, and LDH enzyme activities were also measured of which the latter served as a marked enzyme. It was found that LDH did not show any alteration after radiation. The reduced glutathion stability test showed a consistent but minor reduction (P greater than 0.05), in the experimental group. GSSGR enzyme activity on the other hand was reduced significantly (from 176.48 +/- 11.32 to 41.34 +/- 1.17 IU/ml of packed erythrocytes, P less than 0.001) in the same group. GPer activity showed a consistent but minor elevation during the early phase of the experimental group. It was later increased significantly beginning after 600 rad total radiation on the fourth session (P less than 0.050).

  15. Selenium reduces the proapoptotic signaling associated to NF-kappaB pathway and stimulates glutathione peroxidase activity during excitotoxic damage produced by quinolinate in rat corpus striatum.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, Abel; Vázquez-Román, Beatriz; La Cruz, Verónica Pérez-De; González-Cortés, Carolina; Trejo-Solís, Ma Cristina; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Jara-Prado, Aurelio; Guevara-Fonseca, Jorge; Ali, Syed F

    2005-12-15

    Quinolinate (QUIN) neurotoxicity has been attributed to degenerative events in nerve tissue produced by sustained activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) and oxidative stress. We have recently described the protective effects that selenium (Se), an antioxidant, produces on different markers of QUIN-induced neurotoxicity (Santamaría et al., 2003, J Neurochem 86:479-488.). However, the mechanisms by which Se exerts its protective actions remain unclear. Since some of these events are thought to be related with inhibition of deadly molecular cascades through the activation of antioxidant selenoproteins, in this study we investigated the effects of Se on QUIN-induced cell damage elicited by the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway, as well as the time-course response of striatal glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. Se (sodium selenite, 0.625 mg/kg/day, i.p.) was administered to rats for 5 days, and 120 min after the last administration, animals received a single striatal injection of QUIN (240 nmol/mul). Twenty-four hours later, their striata were tested for the expression of IkappaB-alpha (the NF-kappaB cytosolic binding protein), the immunohistochemical expression of NF-kappaB (evidenced as nuclear expression of P65), caspase-3-like activation, and DNA fragmentation. Additional groups were killed at 2, 6, and 24 h for measurement of GPx activity. Se reduced the QUIN-induced decrease in IkappaB-alpha expression, evidencing a reduction in its cytosolic degradation. Se also prevented the QUIN-induced increase in P65-immunoreactive cells, suggesting a reduction of NF-kappaB nuclear translocation. Caspase-3-like activation and DNA fragmentation produced by QUIN were also inhibited by Se. Striatal GPx activity was stimulated by Se at 2 and 6 h, but not at 24 h postlesion. Altogether, these data suggest that the protective effects exerted by Se on QUIN-induced neurotoxicity are partially mediated by the inhibition of proapoptotic events underlying Ikappa

  16. Identification and characterization of a selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase in Setaria cervi

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anchal; Rathaur, Sushma . E-mail: sushmarathaur@yahoo.com

    2005-06-17

    Setaria cervi a bovine filarial parasite secretes selenium glutathione peroxidase during in vitro cultivation. A significant amount of enzyme activity was detected in the somatic extract of different developmental stages of the parasite. Among different stages, microfilariae showed a higher level of selenium glutathione peroxidase activity followed by males then females. However, when the activity was compared in excretory secretory products of these stages males showed higher activity than microfilariae and female worms. The enzyme was purified from female somatic extract using a combination of glutathione agarose and gel filtration chromatography, which migrated as a single band of molecular mass {approx}20 kDa. Selenium content of purified enzyme was estimated by atomic absorption spectroscopy and found to be 3.5 ng selenium/{mu}g of protein. Further, inhibition of enzyme activity by potassium cyanide suggested the presence of selenium at the active site of enzyme. This is the first report of identification of selenium glutathione peroxidase from any filarial parasite.

  17. Glutathione peroxidase in yeast. Presence of the enzyme and induction by oxidative conditions.

    PubMed

    Galiazzo, F; Schiesser, A; Rotilio, G

    1987-09-30

    The presence of glutathione peroxidase activity is reported for the first time for a wild type strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both forms of enzyme, i.e. that specifically active toward H2O2 alone and that decomposing also organic peroxides, were found to be present. The H2O2 specific form disappeared when cells were grown in the absence of oxygen, while the other form was much increased under the same conditions. Addition of copper to the culture greatly increased both forms. The results show that glutathione peroxidase is to be included, as an important component that is also highly responsive to oxidative environments, in the enzyme defense system of yeast against oxidative damage. PMID:3311044

  18. Lead concentration and the level of glutathione, glutathione S-transferase, reductase and peroxidase in the blood of some occupational workers from Irbid City, Jordan.

    PubMed

    Hunaiti, A; Soud, M; Khalil, A

    1995-08-18

    Blood samples were collected from 263 lead-exposed suspected males living in Irbid area in the northern part of Jordan. The blood lead concentrations in the samples were determined by atomic absorption and were related to the type of work performed by the workers. The blood lead concentration was higher in metal casters, 41.6, and radiator welders, 32,8 micrograms/dl, compared to non-suspected lead-exposed university students, 5.7 micrograms/dl. Workers such as mechanics, bus drivers, car painters and gas station workers showed slightly higher but not significant blood lead. The blood glutathione content and the activities of glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase were also determined in non-suspected subjects and in those with occupational exposure to lead. With increasing blood lead concentration, glutathione content decreases as well as the activities of the glutathione utilizing enzymes. PMID:7569882

  19. Interplay between Superoxide Dismutase, Glutathione Peroxidase, and Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma Polymorphisms on the Risk of End-Stage Renal Disease among Han Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Chen, Yen-Ching; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Fang, Cheng-Chung; Chang, Chen-Chih; Yen, Chung-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of antioxidants, including superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1), play an important role in the risk for cancer and metabolic disorders. However, little is known regarding the effect of antioxidant SNPs on renal events. Methods. We prospectively enrolled multicenter patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and those without chronic kidney disease (CKD) of Han Chinese origin, with SOD2 (Val16Ala), GPX1 (Pro197Leu), and PPAR-γ (Pro12Ala, C161T) genotyped. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the significant risk determinants for ESRD. Results. Compared to ESRD patients, non-CKD subjects were more likely to have T allele at SOD2 Val16Ala (p = 0.036) and CC genotype at PPAR-γ Pro12Ala (p = 0.028). Regression analysis showed that TT genotype of SOD2 Val16Ala conferred significantly lower ESRD risk among patients without diabetes (odds ratio 0.699; p = 0.018). GPX1 SNP alone did not alter the risk. We detected significant interactions between SNPs including PPAR-γ Pro12Ala, C161T, and GPX1 regarding the risk of ESRD. Conclusion. This is the first and largest study on the association between adverse renal outcomes and antioxidant SNPs among Han Chinese population. Determination of SOD2 and PPAR-γ SNPs status might assist in ESRD risk estimation. PMID:26881045

  20. Peroxiredoxin 6 homodimerization and heterodimerization with glutathione S-transferase pi are required for its peroxidase but not phospholipase A2 activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Suiping; Sorokina, Elena M; Harper, Sandra; Li, Haitao; Ralat, Luis; Dodia, Chandra; Speicher, David W; Feinstein, Sheldon I; Fisher, Aron B

    2016-05-01

    Peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6) is a unique 1-Cys member of the peroxiredoxin family with both GSH peroxidase and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activities. It is highly expressed in the lung where it plays an important role in antioxidant defense and lung surfactant metabolism. Glutathionylation of Prdx6 mediated by its heterodimerization with GSH S-transferase π (πGST) is required for its peroxidatic catalytic cycle. Recombinant human Prdx6 crystallizes as a homodimer and sedimentation equilibrium analysis confirmed that this protein exists as a high affinity dimer in solution. Based on measurement of molecular mass, dimeric Prdx6 that was oxidized to the sulfenic acid formed a sulfenylamide during storage. After examination of the dimer interface in the crystal structure, we postulated that the hydrophobic amino acids L145 and L148 play an important role in homodimerization of Prdx6 as well as in its heterodimerization with πGST. Oxidation of Prdx6 also was required for its heterodimerization. Sedimentation equilibrium analysis and the Duolink proximity ligation assay following mutation of the L145 and L148 residues of Prdx6 to Glu indicated greatly decreased dimerization propensity reflecting the loss of hydrophobic interactions between the protein monomers. Peroxidase activity was markedly reduced by mutation at either of the Leu sites and was essentially abolished by the double mutation, while PLA2 activity was unaffected. Decreased peroxidase activity following mutation of the interfacial leucines presumably is mediated via impaired heterodimerization of Prdx6 with πGST that is required for reduction and re-activation of the oxidized enzyme. PMID:26891882

  1. MEASUREMENT OF SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE, CATALASE, AND GLUTATHIONE PEROXIDASE IN CULTURED CELLS AND TISSUE

    PubMed Central

    Weydert, Christine J.; Cullen, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Cells contain a large number of antioxidants to prevent or repair the damage caused by ROS, as well as to regulate redox-sensitive signaling pathways General protocols are described to measure the antioxidant enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. The SODs convert superoxide radical into hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen, while the catalase and peroxidases convert hydrogen peroxide into water. In this way, two toxic species, superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide, are converted to the harmless product water. Western blots, activity gels and activity assays are various methods used to determine protein and activity in both cells and tissue depending on the amount of protein needed for each assay. Other techniques including immunohistochemistry and immunogold can further evaluate the levels of the various antioxidant enzymes in tissue and cells. In general, these assays require 24 to 48 hours to complete. PMID:20057381

  2. Atherogenic diets exacerbate colitis in mice deficient in glutathione peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiang; Esworthy, R. Steven; Kim, Byung-Wook; Synold, Timothy W.; Smith, David D.; Chu, Fong-Fong

    2010-01-01

    The pro-inflammatory effect of high-fat diet has been observed beyond the cardiovascular system, but there is little evidence to support its role in triggering inflammatory bowel disease. GPx1/2-double knockout (DKO) mice deficient in two intracellular glutathione peroxidases, GPx1 and GPx2, on a C57BL/6 (B6) background, have mild ileocolitis on a conventional chow. We fed B6 DKO mice two atherogenic diets to test the dietary effect on atherosclerosis and ileocolitis. Both atherogenic diets have high cholesterol, the Chol+/CA diet has cholic acid (CA) and the Chol+ diet has no CA. The Chol+/CA diet induced severe colitis, but not ileitis, in the DKO mice compared with Chol+ and a Chol- control diet. On the Chol+/CA diet, the wild-type (WT) mice had similar levels of aortic lesions and hypercholesterolemia as DKO mice did, but had no intestinal pathology. The diet-associated inflammatory responses in the DKO mice included increase of colonic pro-inflammatory serum amyloid A 3 expression, plasma lipopolysaccharide and TNF-α levels. The Chol+/CA diet has lowered the expression of unfolded protein response genes, ATF6, CHOP, unspliced XbpU and Grp78/Bip, in WT and DKO mice on the Chol- diet. Thus, we conclude that cholesterol diet weakens colon unfolded protein response, which can aggravate spontaneous colitis leading to gut barrier breakdown. GPx has no impact on atherosclerosis without ultra-hypercholesterolemia. PMID:20848490

  3. Function of glutathione peroxidases in legume root nodules.

    PubMed

    Matamoros, Manuel A; Saiz, Ana; Peñuelas, Maria; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Mulet, Jose M; Barja, Maria V; Rouhier, Nicolas; Moore, Marten; James, Euan K; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Becana, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (Gpxs) are antioxidant enzymes not studied so far in legume nodules, despite the fact that reactive oxygen species are produced at different steps of the symbiosis. The function of two Gpxs that are highly expressed in nodules of the model legume Lotus japonicus was examined. Gene expression analysis, enzymatic and nitrosylation assays, yeast cell complementation, in situ mRNA hybridization, immunoelectron microscopy, and LjGpx-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions were used to characterize the enzymes and to localize each transcript and isoform in nodules. The LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 genes encode thioredoxin-dependent phospholipid hydroperoxidases and are differentially regulated in response to nitric oxide (NO) and hormones. LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 are nitrosylated in vitro or in plants treated with S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Consistent with the modification of the peroxidatic cysteine of LjGpx3, in vitro assays demonstrated that this modification results in enzyme inhibition. The enzymes are highly expressed in the infected zone, but the LjGpx3 mRNA is also detected in the cortex and vascular bundles. LjGpx1 is localized to the plastids and nuclei, and LjGpx3 to the cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum. Based on yeast complementation experiments, both enzymes protect against oxidative stress, salt stress, and membrane damage. It is concluded that both LjGpxs perform major antioxidative functions in nodules, preventing lipid peroxidation and other oxidative processes at different subcellular sites of vascular and infected cells. The enzymes are probably involved in hormone and NO signalling, and may be regulated through nitrosylation of the peroxidatic cysteine essential for catalytic function. PMID:25740929

  4. Function of glutathione peroxidases in legume root nodules

    PubMed Central

    Matamoros, Manuel A.; Saiz, Ana; Peñuelas, Maria; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Mulet, Jose M.; Barja, Maria V.; Rouhier, Nicolas; Moore, Marten; James, Euan K.; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Becana, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (Gpxs) are antioxidant enzymes not studied so far in legume nodules, despite the fact that reactive oxygen species are produced at different steps of the symbiosis. The function of two Gpxs that are highly expressed in nodules of the model legume Lotus japonicus was examined. Gene expression analysis, enzymatic and nitrosylation assays, yeast cell complementation, in situ mRNA hybridization, immunoelectron microscopy, and LjGpx-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions were used to characterize the enzymes and to localize each transcript and isoform in nodules. The LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 genes encode thioredoxin-dependent phospholipid hydroperoxidases and are differentially regulated in response to nitric oxide (NO) and hormones. LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 are nitrosylated in vitro or in plants treated with S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Consistent with the modification of the peroxidatic cysteine of LjGpx3, in vitro assays demonstrated that this modification results in enzyme inhibition. The enzymes are highly expressed in the infected zone, but the LjGpx3 mRNA is also detected in the cortex and vascular bundles. LjGpx1 is localized to the plastids and nuclei, and LjGpx3 to the cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum. Based on yeast complementation experiments, both enzymes protect against oxidative stress, salt stress, and membrane damage. It is concluded that both LjGpxs perform major antioxidative functions in nodules, preventing lipid peroxidation and other oxidative processes at different subcellular sites of vascular and infected cells. The enzymes are probably involved in hormone and NO signalling, and may be regulated through nitrosylation of the peroxidatic cysteine essential for catalytic function. PMID:25740929

  5. Glutamate dehydrogenase 1 signals through antioxidant glutathione peroxidase 1 to regulate redox homeostasis and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lingtao; Li, Dan; Alesi, Gina N.; Fan, Jun; Kang, Hee-Bum; Lu, Zhou; Boggon, Titus J.; Jin, Peng; Yi, Hong; Wright, Elizabeth R.; Duong, Duc; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Egnatchik, Robert; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Magliocca, Kelly R.; He, Chuan; Arellano, Martha L.; Khoury, Hanna J.; Shin, Dong M.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Kang, Sumin

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY How mitochondrial glutaminolysis contributes to redox homeostasis in cancer cells remains unclear. Here we report that the mitochondrial enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) is commonly upregulated in human cancers. GDH1 is important for redox homeostasis in cancer cells by controlling the intracellular levels of its product alpha-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and subsequent metabolite fumarate. Mechanistically, fumarate binds to and activates a ROS scavenging enzyme glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx1). Targeting GDH1 by shRNA or a small molecule inhibitor R162 resulted in imbalanced redox homeostasis, leading to attenuated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. PMID:25670081

  6. Glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) and ferroptosis: what's so special about it?

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Marcus; Friedmann Angeli, José Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The system XC−/glutathione/glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) axis pivotally controls ferroptosis, a recently described form of regulated non-apoptotic cell death. Compelling evidence has established that this route of cell death is not only of high relevance for triggering cancer cell death, but also proves to be amenable for therapeutic intervention to halt ischemia/reperfusion-related diseases. PMID:27308484

  7. The role of mitochondrial phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong

    Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PhGPx) is a unique selenoenzyme that directly detoxifies lipid hydroperoxides in situ . It therefore plays an important role in the protection of cellular membranes. PhGPx is expressed in most mammalian tissues. It is present as a mitochondrial form (L-PhGPx) and a cytosolic form (S-PhGPx). Overexpression of PhGPx has been shown to significantly protect cells from oxidative damage. The hypothesis of this thesis is that mitochondrial PhGPx (L-PhGPx) may play an important role in the resistance of cells to certain oxidative stress- mediated cancer therapies. A human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cell line was used as a cell model system in this research. It was stably transfected with human L-PhGPx sense cDNA. Four clones (P-1, P-2, P-3, and P-4) with 3- to 7-fold increases in PhGPx activity were selected for study. Overexpression of L-PhGPx did not significantly influence other cellular antioxidants, including superoxide dismutases, cytosolic glutathione peroxidase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione. However, L-PhGPx did decrease the rate of cell growth. Cell plating efficiency was inversely correlated with effective PhGPx activity, which is defined as the product of cellular PhGPx activity and total glutathione. The biological functions of L-PhGPx have been investigated in cancer treatment, including photodynamic therapy (PDT) and hyperthermia (HT). Both PDT and HT can induce oxidative stress. Overexpression of L-PhGPx in MCF-7 cells significantly increased the resistance of cells to PDT- and HT-mediated cytotoxicity. The effective PhGPx activity had a remarkable inverse linear correlation (r = -0.80) to the rate of removal of lipid hydroperoxides in living cells, and correlated positively with cell survival after photooxidation (r = 0.91). L-PhGPx protected mitochondrial function by preserving the mitochondrial membrane potential. These data demonstrate that L-PhGPx provides significant protection against

  8. Fully-branched hyperbranched polymers with a diselenide core as glutathione peroxidase mimics.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; Chen, Junyi; Xu, Huaping; Van Oosterwijck, Chantal; Zhang, Xi; Dehaen, Wim; Smet, Mario

    2012-05-14

    A novel glutathione peroxidase (GPx) mimic has been prepared by incorporation of a selenium-based catalytic unit into the focal point of a fully-branched hyperbranched polymer. First, an AB(2) monomer consisting of isatin and an electron rich aromatic moiety was polycondensed in the presence of 5-nitroisatin as a core reagent, resulting in a polymer with 100% degree of branching. The latter was coupled to the catalytically active moiety, Br(CH(2))(5) SeSe(CH(2))(5) Br, by nucleophilic substitution of the bromides by the residual amide groups of the incorporated nitroisatin core. The obtained polymer has demonstrated prominent GPx activity as desired, which could be attributed to the hydrophobic, densely branched and core-shell structure of the polymer surrounding the catalytic center. PMID:22434542

  9. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) locus 12: is glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPX1) the relevant gene?

    PubMed

    Häuser, F; Rossmann, H; Laubert-Reh, D; Wild, P S; Zeller, T; Müller, C; Neuwirth, S; Blankenberg, S; Lackner, K J

    2015-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified and repeatedly confirmed the association of rs3197999 in MST1 with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the underlying pathophysiology remains unclear. rs3197999 is a non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism which modifies the function of macrophage stimulating protein-1 (MST1). We show by haplotyping that rs3197999 is in linkage disequilibrium with rs1050450 in GPX1, with almost complete cosegregation of the minor alleles. As shown by immunoassay, rs3197999 influences the MST-1 level in serum. But also rs1050450 causes an amino acid exchange in glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx-1) and reduced activity of this antioxidant enzyme. The association of GPx deficiency and IBD in mice was already shown. We propose that GPx-1 is a better candidate than MST1 for the pathophysiologic link between IBD locus 12 and IBD. PMID:26355565

  10. Impaired fornix-hippocampus integrity is linked to peripheral glutathione peroxidase in early psychosis.

    PubMed

    Baumann, P S; Griffa, A; Fournier, M; Golay, P; Ferrari, C; Alameda, L; Cuenod, M; Thiran, J-P; Hagmann, P; Do, K Q; Conus, P

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence implicate the fornix-hippocampus circuit in schizophrenia. In early-phase psychosis, this circuit has not been extensively investigated and the underlying mechanisms affecting the circuit are unknown. The hippocampus and fornix are vulnerable to oxidative stress at peripuberty in a glutathione (GSH)-deficient animal model. The purposes of the current study were to assess the integrity of the fornix-hippocampus circuit in early-psychosis patients (EP), and to study its relationship with peripheral redox markers. Diffusion spectrum imaging and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to assess the fornix and hippocampus in 42 EP patients compared with 42 gender- and age-matched healthy controls. Generalized fractional anisotropy (gFA) and volumetric properties were used to measure fornix and hippocampal integrity, respectively. Correlation analysis was used to quantify the relationship of gFA in the fornix and hippocampal volume, with blood GSH levels and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. Patients compared with controls exhibited lower gFA in the fornix as well as smaller volume in the hippocampus. In EP, but not in controls, smaller hippocampal volume was associated with high GPx activity. Disruption of the fornix-hippocampus circuit is already present in the early stages of psychosis. Higher blood GPx activity is associated with smaller hippocampal volume, which may support a role of oxidative stress in disease mechanisms. PMID:27459724

  11. Glutathione peroxidase's reaction intermediate selenenic acid is stabilized by the protein microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Liu, Jun; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2014-11-01

    Selenenic acids are highly reactive intermediates of selenoproteins' enzymatic reactions. Knowledge of how the protein environment protects and stabilizes them is fundamental not only to descriptions of selenoproteins' reactivity but also potentially for proteomics and therapeutics. However, selenenic acids are considered particularly short-lived and are not yet identified in wild-type selenoproteins. Here, we report trapping the selenenic acid in glutathione peroxidase, an antioxidant enzyme that efficiently eliminates hydroperoxides. It has long been thought that selenium-containing glutathione peroxidases form a selenenic acid intermediate. However, this putative species has eluded detection. Here, we report its identification. The selenenic acid in bovine glutathione peroxidase 1 was chemically trapped using dimedone, an alkylating agent specific to sulfenic and selenenic acids. The alkylation of the catalytic selenocysteine was verified by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. In the presence of glutathione, the selenocysteine was not alkylated because the selenenic acid condenses faster with glutathione than the alkylation reaction. In the absence of thiols, the selenenic acid was surprisingly long-lived with 95% of the protein still able to react with dimedone 10 min after hydrogen peroxide was removed, indicating that the protein environment stabilizes the selenenic acid by shielding it from reactive groups in the protein. After 30 min, the selenocysteine was no longer modified but became accessible once the protein was exposed to reducing agents. This suggests that the selenenic acid reacted with a protein's amide or amine to form a selenylamide bond. Such a modification may play a role in protecting glutathione peroxidase׳' reactivity. PMID:25124921

  12. Bioaccumulation of PCB-153 and effects on molecular biomarkers acetylcholinesterase, glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione peroxidase in Mytilus galloprovincialis mussels.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Liñán, Leticia; Bellas, Juan; Soriano, José Antonio; Concha-Graña, Estefanía; Muniategui, Soledad; Beiras, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    In this study, PCB-153 bioaccumulation kinetics and concentration-response experiments were performed employing wild Mytilus galloprovincialis mussels. In addition, the activity of three enzymatic biomarkers: glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), were measured in the mussel gills. The experimental data fitted well to an asymptotic accumulation model with a high bioconcentration factor (BCF) of 9324 L kg(-1) and a very limited depuration capacity, described by a low excretion rate coefficient (Kd = 0.083 d(-1)). This study reports by first time in mussels significant inhibition of GST activity and significant induction of GPx activity as a result of exposure to dissolved PCB-153. In contrast, AChE activity was unaffected at all concentrations and exposure times tested. The effects on both enzymes are time-dependent, which stresses the difficulties inherent to the use of these biomarkers in chemical pollution monitoring programs. PMID:27176625

  13. Effects of supplementation with two sources and two levels of copper on meat lipid oxidation, meat colour and superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase enzyme activities in Nellore beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Correa, Lísia Bertonha; Zanetti, Marcus Antonio; Del Claro, Gustavo Ribeiro; de Paiva, Fernanda Alves; da Luz e Silva, Saulo; Netto, Arlindo Saran

    2014-10-28

    In the present study, thirty-five Nellore bulls were used to determine the effects of two levels and two sources (organic and inorganic) of Cu supplementation on the oxidative stability of lipids, measured by the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) test, meat colour and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) enzyme activities. The following treatments were used: (1) control (C) - basal diet without supplementation of Cu (7 mg Cu/kg DM); (2) I10 - basal diet supplemented with 10 mg Cu/kg DM in the form of copper sulphate (inorganic form); (3) I40 - basal diet supplemented with 40 mg Cu/kg DM in the form of copper sulphate; (4) O10 - basal diet supplemented with 10 mg Cu/kg DM in the form of copper proteinate (organic form); (5) O40 - basal diet supplemented with 40 mg Cu/kg DM in the form of copper proteinate. Lipid oxidation was determined in meat samples exposed to display, modified atmosphere (MA) and vacuum packaging (VC) conditions and in liver samples using the TBARS test. These samples were also evaluated for meat discolouration after exposure to air. The activities of SOD and GSH-Px enzymes were determined in liver samples. In display, MA and VC conditions, the TBARS values of samples from animals supplemented with 40 mg Cu/kg DM were lower than those of samples from control animals. There was no effect of treatment on the colour variables (L*, a*, b*). There was also no significant effect of treatment on hepatic TBARS concentrations and GSH-Px activity. Supplementation with Cu at 40 mg/kg, regardless of the source, induced higher hepatic SOD activity compared with the control treatment. In conclusion, Cu supplementation improved the oxidative stability of lipids in samples exposed to display, MA and VC conditions, demonstrating the antioxidant effect of this mineral. PMID:25313573

  14. Relationship between oxidizable fatty acid content and level of antioxidant glutathione peroxidases in marine fish

    PubMed Central

    Grim, Jeffrey M.; Hyndman, Kelly A.; Kriska, Tamas; Girotti, Albert W.; Crockett, Elizabeth L.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Biological membranes can be protected from lipid peroxidation by antioxidant enzymes including catalase (CAT) and selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidases 1 and 4 (GPx1 and GPx4). Unlike GPx1, GPx4 can directly detoxify lipid hydroperoxides in membranes without prior action of phospholipase A2. We hypothesized that (1) GPx4 is enhanced in species that contain elevated levels of highly oxidizable polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and (2) activities of antioxidant enzymes are prioritized to meet species-specific oxidative stresses. In this study we examined (i) activities of the oxidative enzyme citrate synthase (CS) and antioxidant (CAT, GPx1 and GPx4) enzymes, (ii) GPx4 protein expression, and (iii) phospholipid composition in livers of five species of marine fish (Myxine glutinosa, Petromyzon marinus, Squalus acanthias, Fundulus heteroclitus and Myoxocephalus octodecemspinosus) that contain a range of PUFA. GPx4 activity was, on average, 5.8 times higher in F. heteroclitus and S. acanthias than in the other three marine fish species sampled. Similarly, activities of CAT and GPx1 were highest in S. acanthias and F. heteroclitus, respectively. GPx4 activity for all species correlates with membrane unsaturation, as well as oxidative activity as indicated by CS. These data support our hypothesis that GPx4 level in marine fish is a function, at least in part, of high PUFA content in these animals. GPx1 activity was also correlated with membrane unsaturation, indicating that marine species partition resources among glutathione-dependent defenses for protection from the initial oxidative insult (e.g. H2O2) and to repair damaged lipids within biological membranes. PMID:22031739

  15. Signaling role of phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPX) accompanying sensing of NaCl stress in etiolated sunflower seedling cotyledons

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Prachi; Bhatla, Satish C

    2014-01-01

    Sunflower seedlings subjected to 120 mM NaCl stress exhibit high total peroxidase activity, differential expression of its isoforms and accumulation of lipid hydroperoxides. This coincides with high specific activity of phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPX) in the 10,000g supernatant from the homogenates of 2–6 d old seedling cotyledons. An upregulation of PHGPX activity by NaCl is evident from Western blot analysis. Confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) analysis of sections of cotyledons incubated with anti-GPX4 (PHGPX) antibody highlights an enhanced cytosolic accumulation of PHGPX, particularly around the secretory canals. Present work, thus, highlights sensing of NaCl stress in sunflower seedlings in relation with lipid hydroperoxide accumulation and its scavenging through an upregulation of PHGPX activity in the cotyledons. PMID:25517199

  16. p53-induced Gene 3 Mediates Cell Death Induced by Glutathione Peroxidase 3*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Luo, Katherine; Tan, Lang-Zhu; Ren, Bao-Guo; Gu, Li-Qun; Michalopoulos, George; Luo, Jian-Hua; Yu, Yan P.

    2012-01-01

    Expression of glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) is down-regulated in a variety of human malignancies. Both methylation and deletion of GPx3 gene underlie the alterations of GPx3 expression in prostate cancer. A strong correlation between the down-regulation of GPx3 expression and progression of prostate cancer and the suppression of prostate cancer xenografts in SCID mice by forced expression of GPx3 suggests a tumor suppression role of GPx3 in prostate cancer. However, the mechanism of GPx3-mediated tumor suppression remains unclear. In this report, GPx3 was found to interact directly with p53-induced gene 3 (PIG3). Forced overexpression of GPx3 in prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3 as well as immortalized prostate epithelial cells RWPE-1 increased apoptotic cell death. Expression of GPx3x73c, a peroxidase-negative OPAL codon mutant, in DU145 and PC3 cells also increased cell death. The induced expression of GPx3 in DU145 and PC3 cells resulted in an increase in reactive oxygen species and caspase-3 activity. These activities were abrogated by either knocking down PIG3 or mutating the PIG3 binding motif in GPx3 or binding interference from a peptide corresponding to PIG3 binding motif in GPx3. In addition, UV-treated RWPE-1 cells underwent apoptotic death, which was partially prevented by knocking down GPx3 or PIG3, suggesting that GPx3-PIG3 signaling is critical for UV-induced apoptosis. Taken together, these results reveal a novel signaling pathway of GPx3-PIG3 in the regulation of cell death in prostate cancer. PMID:22461624

  17. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of glutathione peroxidase Gpx3 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhu; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2006-06-01

    The glutathione peroxidase Gpx3 from the yeast S. cerevisiae has been overexpressed, purified, crystallized and diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution. Gpx3 is a monomer in solution which is different from its counterparts in mammals. The glutathione peroxidase Gpx3 from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Both gel-filtration and dynamic light-scattering (DLS) results indicate that Gpx3 is a monomer in solution at a concentration of about 2 mg ml{sup −1}, whereas glutathione peroxidases are normally tetrameric or dimeric. X-ray diffraction data from a single crystal of Gpx3 have been collected to 2.6 Å resolution. The crystals are triclinic and belong to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.187, b = 43.372, c = 56.870 Å, α = 71.405, β = 73.376, γ = 89.633°. There are two Gpx3 monomers in a crystallographic asymmetric unit. Preliminary analyses show that the yeast Gpx3 is quite different from those of mammals.

  18. Construction of a smart microgel glutathione peroxidase mimic based on supramolecular self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yanzhen; Jiao, Shufei; Zhang, Ruirui; Hu, Xiaoxi; Shi, Zhongfeng; Huang, Zuqiang

    2015-07-14

    In an effort to construct smart artificial glutathione peroxidase (GPx) featuring high catalytic activity in an efficient preparation process, an artificial microgel GPx (PPAM-ADA-Te) has been prepared using a supramolecular host-guest self-assembly technique. Herein, 6,6'-telluro-bis(6-deoxy-β-cyclodextrin) (CD-Te-CD) was selected as a tellurium-containing host molecule, which also served as the crosslinker for the scaffold of the supramolecular microgel. And an adamantane-containing block copolymer (PPAM-ADA) was designed and synthesized as a guest building block copolymer. Subsequently, PPAM-ADA-Te was constructed through the self-assembly of CD-Te-CD and PPAM-ADA. The formation of this self-assembled construct was confirmed by dynamic light scattering, NMR, SEM and TEM. Notably, PPAM-ADA-Te not only exhibits a significant temperature responsive catalytic activity, but also features the characteristic saturation kinetics behaviour similar to that of a natural enzyme catalyst. We demonstrate in this paper that both the hydrophobic microenvironment and the crosslinker in this supramolecular microgel network played significant roles in enhancing and altering the temperature responsive catalytic behaviour. The successful construction of PPAM-ADA-Te not only provides a novel method for the preparation of microgel artificial GPx with high catalytic activity but also provides properties suitable for the future development of intelligent antioxidant drugs. PMID:26053236

  19. Expression and characterization of a phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase gene in Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; He, Yuan; He, L I; Zong, Hongying; Cai, Guobin

    2015-11-01

    Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx, GPx4) is a major antioxidant enzyme, which plays unique roles in the protection of cells against oxidative stress by catalysing reduction of lipid hydroperoxides. We isolated and characterized a full-length cDNA sequence encoding GPx gene from a blood fluke, Schistosoma japonicum (designated SjGPx), which contained an in-frame TGA codon for selenocysteine (Sec) and a concurrent Sec insertion sequence in its 3'-untranslated region. Protein encoded by SjGPx demonstrated a primary structure characteristic to the PHGPx family, including preservation of catalytic domains and absence of the subunit interaction domains. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting showed that the SjGPx was mainly expressed in the female adults and eggs. RNA interference approach was employed to investigate the effects of knockdown of SjGPx. SjGPx expression level was significantly reduced on the 5th day post-RNAi. Significantly reduction in GPx enzyme activities, as well as obvious changes in morphology of intrauterine eggs followed the reduction in SjGPx transcript level. We observed a 63·04% reduction in GPx activity and the eggs severely deformed. Our results revealed that SjGPx protein might be involved in the provision of enzyme activity during egg production. PMID:26283515

  20. Dopamine quinone modifies and decreases the abundance of the mitochondrial selenoprotein glutathione peroxidase 4.

    PubMed

    Hauser, David N; Dukes, April A; Mortimer, Amanda D; Hastings, Teresa G

    2013-12-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are known to contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Dopaminergic neurons may be more sensitive to these stressors because they contain dopamine (DA), a molecule that oxidizes to the electrophilic dopamine quinone (DAQ) which can covalently bind nucleophilic amino acid residues such as cysteine. The identification of proteins that are sensitive to covalent modification and functional alteration by DAQ is of great interest. We have hypothesized that selenoproteins, which contain a highly nucleophilic selenocysteine residue and often play vital roles in the maintenance of neuronal viability, are likely targets for the DAQ. Here we report the findings of our studies on the effect of DA oxidation and DAQ on the mitochondrial antioxidant selenoprotein glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4). Purified GPx4 could be covalently modified by DAQ, and the addition of DAQ to rat testes lysate resulted in dose-dependent decreases in GPx4 activity and monomeric protein levels. Exposing intact rat brain mitochondria to DAQ resulted in similar decreases in GPx4 activity and monomeric protein levels as well as detection of multiple forms of DA-conjugated GPx4 protein. Evidence of both GPx4 degradation and polymerization was observed following DAQ exposure. Finally, we observed a dose-dependent loss of mitochondrial GPx4 in differentiated PC12 cells treated with dopamine. Our findings suggest that a decrease in mitochondrial GPx4 monomer and a functional loss of activity may be a contributing factor to the vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. PMID:23816523

  1. Construction of a highly stable artificial glutathione peroxidase on a protein nanoring.

    PubMed

    Miao, Lu; Zhang, Xiyu; Si, Chengye; Gao, Yuzhou; Zhao, Linlu; Hou, Chunxi; Shoseyov, Oded; Luo, Quan; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-01-14

    Stable Protein One (SP1) is a boiling-stable oligomeric protein. The unique characteristics of SP1 offer a scaffold to design artificial enzymes against extreme temperature. Here, an efficient antioxidase is successfully constructed on the ring-shaped SP1 homododecamer. By means of computational design and genetic engineering, the active center of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), selenocysteine (Sec), is introduced to the SP1 monomer surface, and the self-assembly properties of the protein monomer lead to a ring-shaped SP1 with homododecamer catalytic selenium centers. This artificial selenoenzyme exhibits high GPx catalytic activity and shows a typical ping-pong kinetic mechanism. Moreover, it has a significantly broader temperature range and high thermostability. Owing to having multi-GPx active centers on a SP1 oligomer, this selenium-containing biomacromolecule exerts an excellent capability to protect cells from oxidative damage at the mitochondrial level. This strategy represents a new way to develop thermostable artificial nanoenzymes for some specific applications. PMID:24264596

  2. Peroxidase and peroxidase-oxidase activities of isolated human myeloperoxidases.

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, B E; Domeij, K; Lindvall, S; Rydell, G

    1987-01-01

    Isolated neutrophils from healthy donors were used for the isolation of four highly purified forms of myeloperoxidase as determined by spectral (A430/A280 ratio 0.80-0.87) and enzyme-activity measurements. Although the myeloperoxidases exhibited different elution profiles on cation-exchange chromatography, gel filtration indicated similar relative molecular masses. When these forms were assayed for peroxidase and peroxidase-oxidase activities with several substrates, they all exhibited virtually the same specific activities. These results suggest that possible functional differences between the enzymes may be related to differences in their sites of action rather than to differences in enzyme activity. Myeloperoxidase from a patient with chronic myeloid leukaemia also revealed a similar heterogeneity on cation-exchange chromatography. However, this myeloperoxidase contained in addition one form with a lower and one form with a higher relative molecular mass, as indicated by gel-filtration chromatography. PMID:3036098

  3. Inhibition of Glutathione Peroxidase Mediates the Collateral Sensitivity of Multidrug-resistant Cells to Tiopronin*

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew D.; Marshall, Travis S.; Kwit, Alexandra D. T.; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M.; Dulcey, Andrés E.; Madigan, James P.; Pluchino, Kristen M.; Goldsborough, Andrew S.; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Griffiths, Gary L.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major obstacle to the successful chemotherapy of cancer. MDR is often the result of overexpression of ATP-binding cassette transporters following chemotherapy. A common ATP-binding cassette transporter that is overexpressed in MDR cancer cells is P-glycoprotein, which actively effluxes drugs against a concentration gradient, producing an MDR phenotype. Collateral sensitivity (CS), a phenomenon of drug hypersensitivity, is defined as the ability of certain compounds to selectively target MDR cells, but not the drug-sensitive parent cells from which they were derived. The drug tiopronin has been previously shown to elicit CS. However, unlike other CS agents, the mechanism of action was not dependent on the expression of P-glycoprotein in MDR cells. We have determined that the CS activity of tiopronin is mediated by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and that CS can be reversed by a variety of ROS-scavenging compounds. Specifically, selective toxicity of tiopronin toward MDR cells is achieved by inhibition of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and the mode of inhibition of GPx1 by tiopronin is shown in this report. Why MDR cells are particularly sensitive to ROS is discussed, as is the difficulty in exploiting this hypersensitivity to tiopronin in the clinic. PMID:24930045

  4. Screening Actinomycetes for Extracellular Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, D. K.; Iqbal, M.; Miller, P.; McCarthy, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    A diverse collection of actinomycete strains were screened for production of extracellular peroxidase activity by adapting a chemiluminescence analysis system developed for horseradish peroxidase-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Extracellular peroxidase activity was found to be common but quantitatively variable, and this rapid and sensitive screening system permitted identification of a small group of high-producing strains. A range of spectrophotometric assays were compared for the measurement of peroxidase activity in concentrated culture supernatants of two selected thermophilic streptomycetes. Of these, the peroxide-dependent oxidation of 2,4-dichlorophenol was identified as the most robust and reproducible assay for quantitative studies. PMID:16535344

  5. p,p'-DDE damages spermatogenesis via phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase depletion and mitochondria apoptosis pathway.

    PubMed

    Quan, Chao; Shi, Yuqin; Wang, Can; Wang, Chengmin; Yang, Kedi

    2016-05-01

    One, 1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethylene (p,p'-DDE), the major metabolite of 2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (DDT), is a known persistent organic pollutant (POPs) and male reproductive toxicant. However, the mechanism by which p,p'-DDE exposure causes male reproductive toxicity remains unknown. The objective of this study was to elucidate some mechanisms involved in this process, including the mitochondria apoptosis pathway and the role of phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx). Puberty male SD rats were given different doses of p,p'-DDE (0, 20, 60, 100 mg/kg body weight), after the treatment, the semen quality was evaluated. Western blotting was used to detect the PHGPx protein expression. Furthermore, real-time PCR was used to analyze the genetic expression of PHGPx, Bax, Cytochrom C (Cyt C), Apaf-1, and caspase-3 in the testis. Results indicated that after the exposure, sperm malformation rate showed a significant rise compared with the control group, and meanwhile, the sperm density and sperm motility parameters were reduced to some extent in different treated groups. The mitochondria apoptosis pathway was activated. And remarkably, the expression of PHGPx protein was greatly reduced by the exposure. We conclude that p,p'-DDE can damage spermatogenesis via PHGPx depletion and mitochondria apoptosis pathway. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 593-600, 2016. PMID:25410718

  6. Cloning a glutathione peroxidase gene from Nelumbo nucifera and enhanced salt tolerance by overexpressing in rice.

    PubMed

    Diao, Ying; Xu, Huaxue; Li, Guolin; Yu, Aiqing; Yu, Xia; Hu, Wanling; Zheng, Xingfei; Li, Shaoqing; Wang, Youwei; Hu, Zhongli

    2014-08-01

    A full-length cDNA clone encoding an 866 bp-length glutathione peroxidase protein (NnGPX) was isolated from lotus (Nelumbo nucifera L.). The deduced amino acid sequence of the NnGPX gene had significant homology with ATGPX6. A 3D structural model of the NnGPX was constructed by homology modeling. The cloned NnGPX gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and a fusion protein of about 40 kDa was detected after isopropyl thiogalactoside induction. Under different concentrations of Na2SeO3 treatments, NnGPX was found to be an enzyme that does not contain selenium. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the NnGPX gene was expressed in all organs of lotus, and its high expression mainly occurred in organs with active metabolisms. NnGPX transcript increased remarkably in response to cold, heat, mechanical damage, and salt treatment. Subsequently, the NnGPX gene was introduced in Oryza sativa cv. Yuetai B. PCR results verified the integration of this gene into the genome of rice and reverse transcription-PCR verified that this gene had been expressed in transgenic rice. The transgenic plants were significantly more tolerant to salt stress compared with the wild-type. PMID:24715609

  7. Identification of methionine as a possible precursor to the selenocysteine catalytic site of glutathione peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.K.

    1985-01-01

    The selenium (Se) moiety of glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) occurs as selenocysteine and is present at the catalytic active site of the enzyme which catalyzes the reduction of hydrogen peroxides and lipid peroxides. The presence of this unusual amino acid at the active site raises the question as to the origin of the carbon skeleton of Se-cysteine. ICR Swiss mice were fed a Se deficient diet for 50 days and then were fed a Se adequate diet (1 ppm Se as SeO/sub 3/). Mice were i.p. injected with either (U-/sup 14/C) methionine, serine, or alanine (0.5 ..mu..Ci/0.1 ml/mouse/day) for 25 days. Recovered GSHPx activity in liver and blood was carboxymethylated (CM) with iodoacetic acid. CM-GSHPx was partially purified by column chromatography. /sup 14/C-GSHPx fractions were collected, lyophilized, and hydrolyzed. /sup 14/C-amino acids were separated by TLC and ion-exchange chromatography. TLC (phenol, cyclohexane, acetic acid, and water (90;6.5;3.5;8)) revealed a GSHPx /sup 14/C-amino acid derived from U-/sup 14/C-methionine, but not from serine or alanine corresponding to CM-selenocysteine (R/sub f/; 0.16). Ion-exchange chromatography of U-/sup 14/C-methionine labeled GSHPx hydrolyzate revealed two radio carbon ninhydrin positive peaks corresponding to /sup 14/C-CM-selenocysteine and /sup 14/C-methionine. No corresponding /sup 14/C-labeled peaks were observed for CM-selenocysteine derived from U-/sup 14/C serine or alanine. The results suggest that methionine may contribute a portion of the carbon skeleton to selenocysteine which may include an alternative metabolic pathway. Animal studies demonstrated that GSHPx activity is increased by methionine supplementation may be due to its contribution of carbon source to the catalytic site of the enzyme.

  8. Selenium concentrations and enzyme activities of glutathione metabolism in wild long-tailed ducks and common eiders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian; Hoffman, David J.; Flint, Paul L.

    2011-01-01

    The relationships of selenium (Se) concentrations in whole blood with plasma activities of total glutathione peroxidase, Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were studied in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) and common eiders (Somateria mollissima) sampled along the Beaufort Sea coast of Alaska, USA. Blood Se concentrations were >8 μg/g wet weight in both species. Linear regression revealed that the activities of total and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase were significantly related to Se concentrations only in long-tailed ducks, raising the possibility that these birds were experiencing early oxidative stress.

  9. Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase induces a delay in G1 of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong P; Schafer, Freya Q; Goswami, Prabhat C; Oberley, Larry W; Buettner, Garry R

    2003-06-01

    Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PhGPx) is an antioxidant enzyme that reduces cellular phospholipid hydroperoxides (PLOOHs) to alcohols. Cellular peroxide tone has been implicated in cell growth and differentiation. By reducing the PLOOH level in the cell membrane, PhGPx regulates the peroxide tone and thereby might be involved in cell growth. We hypothesized that overexpression of PhGPx in human breast cancer cells would decrease their growth rate. We stably transfected MCF-7 cells (Wt) with L-PhGPx and measured cell doubling time, plating efficiency, and cell cycle phase transit times. P-4 cells (8-fold increase in PhGPx activity) showed a 2-fold increase in doubling time; doubling time increased directly with PhGPx activity (r = 0.95). The higher the PhGPx activity, the lower the plating efficiency (r = -0.86). The profile of other antioxidant enzymes was unchanged. Overexpression of PhGPx lowered the steady-state level of PLOOH (by > 60%). Results from bromodeoxyuridine pulse-chase experiments and flow cytometry indicate that PhGPx induced a delay in MCF-7 proliferation that was primarily due to a slower progression from G1 to S. These results support the hypothesis that PhGPx plays a regulatory role in the progression of MCF-7 cells from G1 to S possibly by regulating the steady-state levels of PLOOH. These data suggest that PhGPx can lower the peroxide tone, which might change the cellular redox environment resulting in a delay in G1 transit. Thus, PhGPx could be an important factor in cell growth. PMID:12868489

  10. Identification of a selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase in the blood-sucking insect Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Dias, Felipe A; Gandara, Ana C P; Perdomo, Hugo D; Gonçalves, Renata S; Oliveira, Carolina R; Oliveira, Raquel L L; Citelli, Marta; Polycarpo, Carla R; Santesmasses, Didac; Mariotti, Marco; Guigó, Roderic; Braz, Gloria R; Missirlis, Fanis; Oliveira, Pedro L

    2016-02-01

    The selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (SeGPx) is a well-studied enzyme that detoxifies organic and hydrogen peroxides and provides cells or extracellular fluids with a key antioxidant function. The presence of a SeGPx has not been unequivocally demonstrated in insects. In the present work, we identified the gene and studied the function of a Rhodnius prolixus SeGPx (RpSeGPx). The RpSeGPx mRNA presents the UGA codon that encodes the active site selenocysteine (Sec) and a corresponding Sec insertion sequence (SECIS) in the 3' UTR region. The encoded protein includes a signal peptide, which is consistent with the high levels of GPx enzymatic activity in the insect's hemolymph, and clusters phylogenetically with the extracellular mammalian GPx03. This result contrasts with all other known insect GPxs, which use a cysteine residue instead of Sec and cluster with the mammalian phospholipid hydroperoxide GPx04. RpSeGPx is widely expressed in insect organs, with higher expression levels in the fat body. RNA interference (RNAi) was used to reduce RpSeGPx gene expression and GPx activity in the hemolymph. Adult females were apparently unaffected by RpSeGPx RNAi, whereas first instar nymphs showed a three-day delay in ecdysis. Silencing of RpSeGPx did not alter the gene expression of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, xanthine dehydrogenase and a cysteine-GPx, but it reduced the levels of the dual oxidase and NADPH oxidase 5 transcripts that encode for enzymes releasing extracellular hydrogen peroxide/superoxide. Collectively, our data suggest that RpSeGPx functions in the regulation of extracellular (hemolymph) redox homeostasis of R. prolixus. PMID:26392061

  11. Glutathione Peroxidase Level in Patients with Vitiligo: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bi-huan; Shi, Meihui; Chen, Hongqiang; Cui, Shaoshan; Gao, Xing-Hua; Chen, Hong-Duo

    2016-01-01

    Abnormality of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) is involved in the etiology and pathogenesis of vitiligo. However, the results were controversial. Aim. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to compare the levels of GPx between vitiligo patients and healthy controls. Methods. Relevant published articles were searched according to eligibility criteria. A meta-analysis was conducted to pool estimates of the standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Results. Twenty-three studies with a total of 1076 vitiligo patients and 770 healthy controls were included. The pooled meta-analysis showed that patients with vitiligo had equivalent levels of GPx with the healthy controls (SMD = −0.47, 95% CI: −1.03 to 0.08, and p = 0.095). Further subgroup analysis showed that the GPx levels of Asian patients or segmental vitiligo patients were, respectively, lower than those of healthy controls (Asian: SMD = −0.47, 95% CI: −1.08 to 0.14, and p = 0.001; segmental: SMD = −3.59, 95% CI: −6.38 to −0.80, and p = 0.012). Furthermore, the GPx levels in serum/plasma were significantly decreased in either stable or active vitiligo patients, comparing to healthy controls (stable: SMD = −2.01, 95% CI: −3.52 to −0.49, and p = 0.009; active: SMD = −2.34, 95% CI: −4.07 to −0.61, and p = 0.008). Conclusion. This meta-analysis showed a significant association between low GPx level and vitiligo. PMID:27218102

  12. Effect of Zirconium Dioxide Nanoparticles on Glutathione Peroxidase Enzyme in PC12 and N2a Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Asadpour, Elham; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Boroushaki, Mohammad Taher

    2014-01-01

    Today, special attention is paid to the use of zirconium dioxide nanoparticle (nano-ZrO2), a neutral bioceramic metal, particularly for drug and gene delivery in medicine. However, there are some reports implying that use of nano-ZrO2 is associated with cytotoxic effects like inhibiting the cell proliferation, DNA damage and apoptosis. In the present study, we examined whether nano-ZrO2 alters cell viability and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in two neuronal cell lines. The PC12 and N2a cells were cultured in the absence or presence of varying concentrations (31.25-2000 µg/mL) of nano-ZrO2 for 12, 24 or 48 h. The cell viability was evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay and GPx activity was determined by quantifying the rate of oxidation of the reduced glutathione to the oxidized glutathione. Nano-ZrO2 caused a significant reduction in cell viability and GPx activity after 12, 24 and 48 h, as compared with control group. These effects were concentration dependent and started from 250 µg/mL. The present study demonstrated that nano-ZrO2, at concentrations of > 250 µg/mL, has antiproliferative effects via reducing the cell defense mechanism against oxidative stress. PMID:25587301

  13. [Ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes activity in Zea mays leaves under salinity and treatment by adaptogenic compounds].

    PubMed

    Konturs'ka, O O; Palladina, T O

    2012-01-01

    The effect of different salinity levels and synthetic compounds treatments on ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes activity in maize leaves has been investigated. One-day seedlings exposition with 0.05 M NaCl increased ascorbate peroxidase activity, whereas 10-day exposition did not affect it. However the exposition with 0.1 M NaCl, which is extreme for maize, decreased ascorbate peroxidase activity in leaves during 10 days. On the other hand glutathione reductase activity in leaves increased under both salt concentrations. Seeds treatments with Methyure and Ivine increased ascorbate peroxidase activity in the leaves of seedlings under 0.1 M NaCl, but did not affect glutathione reductase activity as compared to the salt control. The results obtained have shown differences of ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes responses to salt exposition of seedlings and the effects of adaptogenic compounds on the ascorbate-glutathione cycle via ascorbate peroxidase activation. PMID:23387279

  14. Epigenetic and Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Glutathione Peroxidase 3 in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    An, Byung Chull; Jung, Nak-Kyun; Park, Chun Young; Oh, In-Jae; Choi, Yoo-Duk; Park, Jae-Il; Lee, Seung-won

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3), an antioxidant enzyme, acts as a modulator of redox signaling, has immunomodulatory function, and catalyzes the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). GPx3 has been identified as a tumor suppressor in many cancers. Although hyper-methylation of the GPx3 promoter has been shown to down-regulate its expression, other mechanisms by which GPx3 expression is regulated have not been reported. The aim of this study was to further elucidate the mechanisms of GPx3 regulation. GPx3 gene analysis predicted the presence of ten glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) on the GPx3 gene. This result prompted us to investigate whether GPx3 expression is regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which is implicated in tumor response to chemotherapy. The corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) was used to examine the possible relationship between GR and GPx3 expression. Dex significantly induced GPx3 expression in H1299, H1650, and H1975 cell lines, which exhibit low levels of GPx3 expression under normal conditions. The results of EMSA and ChIP-PCR suggest that GR binds directly to GRE 6 and 7, both of which are located near the GPx3 promoter. Assessment of GPx3 transcription efficiency using a luciferase reporter system showed that blocking formation of the GR-GRE complexes reduced luciferase activity by 7–8-fold. Suppression of GR expression by siRNA transfection also induced down-regulation of GPx3. These data indicate that GPx3 expression can be regulated independently via epigenetic or GR-mediated mechanisms in lung cancer cells, and suggest that GPx3 could potentiate glucocorticoid (GC)-mediated anti-inflammatory signaling in lung cancer cells. PMID:27484907

  15. Epigenetic and Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Glutathione Peroxidase 3 in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    An, Byung Chull; Jung, Nak-Kyun; Park, Chun Young; Oh, In-Jae; Choi, Yoo-Duk; Park, Jae-Il; Lee, Seung-Won

    2016-08-31

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3), an antioxidant enzyme, acts as a modulator of redox signaling, has immunomodulatory function, and catalyzes the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). GPx3 has been identified as a tumor suppressor in many cancers. Although hyper-methylation of the GPx3 promoter has been shown to down-regulate its expression, other mechanisms by which GPx3 expression is regulated have not been reported. The aim of this study was to further elucidate the mechanisms of GPx3 regulation. GPx3 gene analysis predicted the presence of ten glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) on the GPx3 gene. This result prompted us to investigate whether GPx3 expression is regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which is implicated in tumor response to chemotherapy. The corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) was used to examine the possible relationship between GR and GPx3 expression. Dex significantly induced GPx3 expression in H1299, H1650, and H1975 cell lines, which exhibit low levels of GPx3 expression under normal conditions. The results of EMSA and ChIP-PCR suggest that GR binds directly to GRE 6 and 7, both of which are located near the GPx3 promoter. Assessment of GPx3 transcription efficiency using a luciferase reporter system showed that blocking formation of the GR-GRE complexes reduced luciferase activity by 7-8-fold. Suppression of GR expression by siRNA transfection also induced down-regulation of GPx3. These data indicate that GPx3 expression can be regulated independently via epigenetic or GR-mediated mechanisms in lung cancer cells, and suggest that GPx3 could potentiate glucocorticoid (GC)-mediated anti-inflammatory signaling in lung cancer cells. PMID:27484907

  16. Engineering Ascorbate Peroxidase Activity Into Cytochrome C Peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Meharenna, Y.T.; Oertel, P.; Bhaskar, B.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-05-26

    Cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) have very similar structures, and yet neither CCP nor APX exhibits each others activities with respect to reducing substrates. APX has a unique substrate binding site near the heme propionates where ascorbate H-bonds with a surface Arg and one heme propionate (Sharp et al. (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 303--307). The corresponding region in CCP has a much longer surface loop, and the critical Arg residue that is required for ascorbate binding in APX is Asn in CCP. In order to convert CCP into an APX, the ascorbate-binding loop and critical arginine were engineered into CCP to give the CCP2APX mutant. The mutant crystal structure shows that the engineered site is nearly identical to that found in APX. While wild-type CCP shows no APX activity, CCP2APX catalyzes the peroxidation of ascorbate at a rate of {approx}12 min{sup -1}, indicating that the engineered ascorbate-binding loop can bind ascorbate.

  17. A novel glutathione-S transferase immunosensor based on horseradish peroxidase and double-layer gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dingqiang; Lu, Fuping; Pang, Guangchang

    2016-06-01

    GSTs, a biotransformation enzyme group, can perform metabolism, drug transfer and detoxification functions. Rapid detection of the GSTs with more sensitive approaches is of great importance. In the current study, a novel double-layer gold nanoparticles-electrochemical immunosensor electrode (DGN-EIE) immobilized with Glutathione S-Transferase (GST) antibody derived from Balb/c mice was developed. To increase the fixed quantity of antibodies and electrochemical signal, an electrochemical biosensing signal amplification system was utilized with gold nanoparticles-thionine-chitosan absorbing horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In addition, transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to characterize the nanogold solution. To evaluate the quality of DGN-EIE, the amperometric I-t curve method was applied to determine the GST in PBS. The results showed that the response current had a good linear correlation with the GST concentration ranged from 0.1-10(4) pg/mL. The lowest detection limit was found at 0.03 pg/mL(S/N = 3). The linear equation was deduced as △I/% = 7.386lgC + 22.36 (R(2) = 0.998). Moreover, it was validated with high sensitivity and reproducibility. Apparently, DGN-EIE may be a very useful tool for monitoring the GST. PMID:27220630

  18. Glutathione Peroxidase-3 Deficiency Promotes Platelet-dependent Thrombosis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Richard C.; Mahoney, Christopher E.; Anderson, Laura (Coleman); Ottaviano, Filomena; Croce, Kevin; Leopold, Jane A.; Zhang, Yingyi; Tang, Shiow-Shih; Handy, Diane E.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Background Glutathione peroxidase-3 (GPx-3) is a selenocysteine-containing plasma protein that scavenges reactive oxygen species in the extracellular compartment. A deficiency of this enzyme has been associated with platelet-dependent thrombosis, and a promoter haplotype with reduced function has been associated with stroke risk in young individuals. Methods and Results We recently developed a genetic mouse model to assess platelet function in hemostasis and thrombosis in the setting of GPx-3 deficiency. GPx-3(−/−) mice showed an attenuated bleeding time compared with wild-type mice. Platelet aggregation studies revealed an enhanced aggregation response to the agonist ADP in GPx-3(−/−) compared to wild-type mice. We also found an increase in the plasma levels of soluble P-selectin and a decrease in plasma cyclic GMP in GPx-3(−/−) mice compared with wild-type mice. ADP was infused into the right ventricle of mice to induce platelet aggregation in the pulmonary vasculature, and produced a more robust platelet activation response in the GPx-3(−/−) mice than in wild-type mice; histological sections from the pulmonary vasculature of GPx-3(−/−) compared with wild-type mice show increased platelet-rich thrombi and a higher percentage of occluded vessels. Endothelial function studies using a cremaster muscle preparation revealed dysfunction in the GPx-3(−/−) compared to wild-type mice. Using a no-flow ischemia-reperfusion stroke model, GPx-3(−/−) mice had significantly larger cerebral infarctions compared with wild-type mice. To investigate the effect of platelet inhibition on stroke size in GPx-3 deficiency, we found that clopidogrel treatment reduced stroke size significantly in GPx-3(−/−) mice compared with vehicle-treated controls. To assess the neuroprotective role of antioxidants in this model, we found that MnTBAP treatment reduced stroke size in GPx-3(−/−) mice compared with vehicle-treated controls. Conclusions These findings

  19. An extracytoplasmic function sigma factor-dependent periplasmic glutathione peroxidase is involved in oxidative stress response of Shewanella oneidensis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dai, Jingcheng; Wei, Hehong; Tian, Chunyuan; Damron, Fredrick; Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacteria use alternative sigma factors (σs) to regulate condition-specific gene expression for survival and Shewanella harbors multiple ECF (extracytoplasmic function) σ genes and cognate anti-sigma factor genes. Here we comparatively analyzed two of the rpoE-like operons in the strain MR-1: rpoE-rseA-rseB-rseC and rpoE2-chrR. Results: RpoE was important for bacterial growth at low and high temperatures, in the minimal medium, and high salinity. The degP/htrA orthologue, required for growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at high temperature, is absent in Shewanella, while the degQ gene is RpoE-regulated and is required for bacterial growth at high temperature. RpoE2 was essentialmore » for the optimal growth in oxidative stress conditions because the rpoE2 mutant was sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and paraquat. The operon encoding a ferrochelatase paralogue (HemH2) and a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase (PgpD) was identified as RpoE2-dependent. PgpD exhibited higher activities and played a more important role in the oxidative stress responses than the cytoplasmic glutathione peroxidase CgpD under tested conditions. The rpoE2-chrR operon and the identified regulon genes, including pgpD and hemH2, are coincidently absent in several psychrophilic and/or deep-sea Shewanella strains. Conclusion: In S. oneidensis MR-1, the RpoE-dependent degQ gene is required for optimal growth under high temperature. The rpoE2 and RpoE2-dependent pgpD gene encoding a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase are involved in oxidative stress responses. But rpoE2 is not required for bacterial growth at low temperature and it even affected bacterial growth under salt stress, indicating that there is a tradeoff between the salt resistance and RpoE2-mediated oxidative stress responses.« less

  20. An extracytoplasmic function sigma factor-dependent periplasmic glutathione peroxidase is involved in oxidative stress response of Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Jingcheng; Wei, Hehong; Tian, Chunyuan; Damron, Fredrick; Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacteria use alternative sigma factors (σs) to regulate condition-specific gene expression for survival and Shewanella harbors multiple ECF (extracytoplasmic function) σ genes and cognate anti-sigma factor genes. Here we comparatively analyzed two of the rpoE-like operons in the strain MR-1: rpoE-rseA-rseB-rseC and rpoE2-chrR. Results: RpoE was important for bacterial growth at low and high temperatures, in the minimal medium, and high salinity. The degP/htrA orthologue, required for growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at high temperature, is absent in Shewanella, while the degQ gene is RpoE-regulated and is required for bacterial growth at high temperature. RpoE2 was essential for the optimal growth in oxidative stress conditions because the rpoE2 mutant was sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and paraquat. The operon encoding a ferrochelatase paralogue (HemH2) and a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase (PgpD) was identified as RpoE2-dependent. PgpD exhibited higher activities and played a more important role in the oxidative stress responses than the cytoplasmic glutathione peroxidase CgpD under tested conditions. The rpoE2-chrR operon and the identified regulon genes, including pgpD and hemH2, are coincidently absent in several psychrophilic and/or deep-sea Shewanella strains. Conclusion: In S. oneidensis MR-1, the RpoE-dependent degQ gene is required for optimal growth under high temperature. The rpoE2 and RpoE2-dependent pgpD gene encoding a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase are involved in oxidative stress responses. But rpoE2 is not required for bacterial growth at low temperature and it even affected bacterial growth under salt stress, indicating that there is a tradeoff between the salt resistance and RpoE2-mediated oxidative stress responses.

  1. Role of glutathione peroxidase in the radiation response of mouse kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, G.N.; Joiner, M.C.; Joiner, B.; Johns, H.; Stratford, M.R.

    1989-05-01

    Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) has been implicated in mediating the radioprotective effects of glutathione (GSH). This hypothesis was tested in vivo by determining the effect of GSH-Px depletion on the radiation response of murine kidneys. Renal GSH-Px levels were depleted to 17% of control values by feeding animals a selenium deficient diet for 6 weeks; this had no significant effect on renal levels of GSH or GSH-S-transferase (GST). However, we also tested the effect of direct depletion of GSH to 3-4% of control values, using a combination of DL-buthionine sulphoximine (BSO) and diethyl maleate (DEM). Kidneys with normal or depleted levels of GSH-Px and/or GSH were irradiated with 240kVp X rays (2 fractions, 7 days apart to minimize intestinal injury). Mice breathed 7% oxygen during irradiation. Renal damage was assessed at 20, 25, and 32 weeks after the first fraction of X rays, in terms of reduced hematocrit and renal clearance of /sup 51/Cr-EDTA. Depletion of GSH-Px levels to 17% of control did not alter renal radiosensitivity, but depletion of GSH to 3-4% of control values radiosensitized the kidney by a factor of 1.4. Depletion of both GSH and GSH-Px together did not radiosensitize the kidney any more than was achieved by GSH depletion alone.

  2. Blood selenium concentrations and enzyme activities related to glutathione metabolism in wild emperor geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Hoffman, D.J.; Schmutz, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    In 1998, we collected blood samples from 63 emperor geese (Chen canagica) on their breeding grounds on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) in western Alaska, USA. We studied the relationship between selenium concentrations in whole blood and the activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in plasma. Experimental studies have shown that plasma activities of these enzymes are useful biomarkers of selenium-induced oxidative stress, but little information is available on their relationship to selenium in the blood of wild birds. Adult female emperor geese incubating their eggs in mid-June had a higher mean concentration of selenium in their blood and a greater activity of glutathione peroxidase in their plasma than adult geese or goslings that were sampled during the adult flight feathera??molting period in late July and early August. Glutathione peroxidase activity was positively correlated with the concentration of selenium in the blood of emperor geese, and the rate of increase relative to selenium was greater in goslings than in adults. The activity of glutathione reductase was greatest in the plasma of goslings and was greater in molting adults than incubating females but was not significantly correlated with selenium in the blood of adults or goslings. Incubating female emperor geese had high selenium concentrations in their blood, accompanied by increased glutathione peroxidase activity consistent with early oxidative stress. These findings indicate that further study of the effects of selenium exposure, particularly on reproductive success, is warranted in this species.

  3. Blood selenium concentrations and enzyme activities related to glutathione metabolism in wild emperor geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Hoffman, D.J.; Schmutz, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    In 1998, we collected blood samples from 63 emperor geese (Chen canagica) on their breeding grounds on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) in western Alaska, USA. We studied the relationship between selenium concentrations in whole blood and the activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in plasma. Experimental studies have shown that plasma activities of these enzymes are useful biomarkers of selenium-induced oxidative stress, but little information is available on their relationship to selenium in the blood of wild birds. Adult female emperor geese incubating their eggs in mid-June had a higher mean concentration of selenium in their blood and a greater activity of glutathione peroxidase in their plasma than adult geese or goslings that were sampled during the adult flight feathermolting period in late July and early August. Glutathione peroxidase activity was positively correlated with the concentration of selenium in the blood of emperor geese, and the rate of increase relative to selenium was greater in goslings than in adults. The activity of glutathione reductase was greatest in the plasma of goslings and was greater in molting adults than incubating females but was not significantly correlated with selenium in the blood of adults or goslings. Incubating female emperor geese had high selenium concentrations in their blood, accompanied by increased glutathione peroxidase activity consistent with early oxidative stress. These findings indicate that further study of the effects of selenium exposure, particularly on reproductive success, is warranted in this species.

  4. Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Noctor, Graham; Queval, Guillaume; Mhamdi, Amna; Chaouch, Sejir; Foyer, Christine H.

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione is a simple sulfur compound composed of three amino acids and the major non-protein thiol in many organisms, including plants. The functions of glutathione are manifold but notably include redox-homeostatic buffering. Glutathione status is modulated by oxidants as well as by nutritional and other factors, and can influence protein structure and activity through changes in thiol-disulfide balance. For these reasons, glutathione is a transducer that integrates environmental information into the cellular network. While the mechanistic details of this function remain to be fully elucidated, accumulating evidence points to important roles for glutathione and glutathione-dependent proteins in phytohormone signaling and in defense against biotic stress. Work in Arabidopsis is beginning to identify the processes that govern glutathione status and that link it to signaling pathways. As well as providing an overview of the components that regulate glutathione homeostasis (synthesis, degradation, transport, and redox turnover), the present discussion considers the roles of this metabolite in physiological processes such as light signaling, cell death, and defense against microbial pathogen and herbivores. PMID:22303267

  5. Catalytic reduction of graphene oxide nanosheets by glutathione peroxidase mimetics reveals a new structural motif in graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Vernekar, Amit A; Mugesh, Govindasamy

    2013-12-01

    A catalytic reduction of graphene oxide (GO) by glutathione peroxidase (GPx) mimics is reported. This study reveals that GO contains peroxide functionalities, in addition to the epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxylic acid groups that have been identified earlier. It also is shown that GO acts as a peroxide substrate in the GPx-like catalytic activity of organoselenium/tellurium compounds. The reaction of tellurol, generated from the corresponding ditelluride, reduces GO through the glutathione (GSH)-mediated cleavage of the peroxide linkage. The mechanism of GO reduction by the tellurol in the presence of GSH involves the formation of a tellurenic acid and tellurenyl sulfide intermediates. Interestingly, the GPx mimics also catalyze the decarboxylation of the carboxylic acid functionality in GO at ambient conditions. Whereas the selenium/tellurium-mediated catalytic reduction/decarboxylation of GO may find applications in bioremediation processes, this study suggests that the modification of GO by biologically relevant compounds such as redox proteins must be taken into account when using GO for biomedical applications because such modifications can alter the fundamental properties of GO. PMID:24281813

  6. SELENIUM CONCENTRATIONS AND GLULATHIONE PEROXIDASE ACTIVITIES IN A POPULATION EXPOSED TO SELENIUM VIA DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selenium concentrations in blood, urine, hair, and tap water were determined in samples obtained from individuals exposed to varying amounts of the element via water from home wells. Glutathione peroxidase activities were also determined on the blood samples. Correlations of bloo...

  7. Roles of catalase and glutathione peroxidase in the tolerance of a pulmonate gastropod to anoxia and reoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Welker, Alexis F; Moreira, Daniel C; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2016-07-01

    Humans and most mammals suffer severe damage when exposed to ischemia and reperfusion episodes due to an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In contrast, several hypoxia/anoxia-tolerant animals survive very similar situations. We evaluated herein the redox metabolism in the anoxia-tolerant land snail Helix aspersa after catalase inhibition by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (ATZ) injection during a cycle of wide and abrupt change in oxygen availability. The exposure to anoxia for 5 h caused a change of only one of several parameters related to free radical metabolism: a rise in selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GPX) activity in muscle of both saline- and ATZ-injected animals (by 1.9- and 1.8-fold, respectively). Catalase suppression had no effect in animals under normoxia or anoxia. However, during reoxygenation catalase suppression kept high levels of muscle Se-GPX activity (twofold higher than in saline-injected snails up to 30 min reoxygenation) and induced the increase in hepatopancreas SOD activity (by 22 %), indicating higher levels of ROS in both organs than in saline-injected animals. Additionally, catalase-suppressed snails showed 12 % higher levels of carbonyl protein-a sign of mild oxidative stress-in muscle during reoxygenation than those animals with intact catalase. No changes were observed in glutathione parameters (GSH, GSSG and GSSG:GSH ratio), TBARS, and GST activity in any of the experimental groups, in both organs. These results indicate that catalase inhibition inflicts changes in the free radical metabolism during reoxygenation, prompting a stress-response that is a reorganization in other enzymatic antioxidant defenses to minimize alterations in the redox homeostasis in land snails. PMID:27062029

  8. Selenium and its relationship with selenoprotein P and glutathione peroxidase in children and adolescents with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Nourbakhsh, Mitra; Ahmadpour, Fatemeh; Chahardoli, Behnam; Malekpour-Dehkordi, Zahra; Nourbakhsh, Mona; Hosseini-Fard, Seyed Reza; Doustimotlagh, Amirhossein; Golestani, Abolfazl; Razzaghy-Azar, Maryam

    2016-03-01

    The essential trace element selenium (Se) is required for thyroid hormone synthesis and metabolism. Selenoproteins contain selenocysteine and are responsible for biological functions of selenium. Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) is one of the major selenoproteins which protects the thyroid cells from oxidative damage. Selenoprotein P (SePP) is considered as the plasma selenium transporter to tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum Se and SePP levels, and GPx activity in erythrocytes of children and adolescents with treated Hashimoto's thyroiditis, hypothyroidism, and normal subjects. Blood samples were collected from 32 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 20 with hypothyroidism, and 25 matched normal subjects. All the patients were under treatment with levothyroxine and at the time of analysis all of the thyroid function tests were normal. GPx enzyme activity was measured by spectrophotometry at 340 nm. Serum selenium levels were measured by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption. SePP, TPOAb (anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody), and TgAb (anti-thyroglobulin antibody) were determined by ELISA kits. T4, T3, T3 uptake and TSH were also measured. Neither GPx activity nor SePP levels were significantly different in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis or hypothyroidism compared to normal subjects. Although GPx and SePP were both lower in patients with hypothyroidism compared to those with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and normal subjects but the difference was not significant. Serum Se levels also did not differ significantly in patients and normal subjects. We did not find any correlation between GPx or SePP with TPOAb or TgAb but SePP was significantly correlated with Se. Results show that in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis or hypothyroidism who have been under treatment with levothyroxine and have normal thyroid function tests, the GPx, SePP and Se levels are not significantly different. PMID:26854239

  9. Variations in the distribution of selenium between erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase and hemoglobin in different human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Whanger, P.D.; Robinson, M.F.; Feldman, E.B.; Beilstein, M.A.; Butler, J.A.

    1986-03-01

    The majority of erythrocyte (RBC) selenium (Se) is associated with glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in animals, but most of it is with hemoglobin (Hb) in human RBCs. Dietary forms of Se may influence this distribution since a rat study showed that selenite promoted the deposition of Se in GPx but selenomethionine (SeMet) resulted in greater amounts with Hb. Three different populations of people were chosen to investigate some possible reasons for the Se distribution in human RBC proteins. An average of 12% of the RBC Se (0.71 ng Se/mg Hb) was associated with GPx in people living in Oregon, but nearly 30% of the Se was associated with GPx in RBC (0.26 ng Se/mg Hb) from New Zealanders. Georgia residents with low RBC Se levels (0.35 ng Se/mg Hb) had 38% of the Se associated with GPx as compared to 29% for those with higher RBC levels (0.56 ng Se/mg Hb). In a third group of people the amount of Se tended to be higher in RBC GPx from non-vegetarian OSU students than from vegetarians. The predominant form of Se in meat appears to be selenocysteine, which is metabolized similarly to selenite, and presumably contributes to this difference since many plant foods contain Se as SeMet. These are examples of many possible factors affecting the relative distribution of Se in human RBC proteins.

  10. Glutathione-peroxidase-1 null muscle progenitor cells are globally defective.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sukkyoo; Shin, H Stella; Shireman, Paula K; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Van Remmen, Holly; Csete, Marie E

    2006-10-01

    Mice lacking glutathione peroxidase-1 (Gpx1) have decreased resistance to systemically administered oxidants as well as infections, and sustain increased damage after ischemia-reperfusion injuries. However, stem or progenitor cell function in these animals has not been studied. We characterized patterns of proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation of primary muscle progenitor cells (myoblasts) from Gpx1(-/-) mice. Myoblasts are the transit amplifying compartment of skeletal muscle. All aspects of myoblast biology are negatively affected by deletion of Gpx1. In particular, passaged, proliferating Gpx1(-/-) myoblasts, when induced to differentiate into fused multinucleated myotubes, show significant impairment, and form only a few immature myotubes. This defect occurs despite increased expression of the core regulators of muscle differentiation, the myogenic basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, in the Gpx1(-/-) myoblasts. Furthermore, Gpx1(-/-) myoblasts exhibited decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis compared to wild-type cells. In vivo, muscle fiber areas are decreased in Gpx1(-/-) vs wild-type mice. These data suggest that Gpx1 is important for adult muscle progenitor cell function at many levels, is necessary for integrity of muscle differentiation, and that quiescent resident stem cell populations may be particularly vulnerable to peroxide-mediated damage. PMID:16962942

  11. Glutathione Peroxidase-1 in Health and Disease: From Molecular Mechanisms to Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Lubos, Edith; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, are generated in all cells by mitochondrial and enzymatic sources. Left unchecked, these reactive species can cause oxidative damage to DNA, proteins, and membrane lipids. Glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1) is an intracellular antioxidant enzyme that enzymatically reduces hydrogen peroxide to water to limit its harmful effects. Certain reactive oxygen species, such as hydrogen peroxide, are also essential for growth factor-mediated signal transduction, mitochondrial function, and maintenance of normal thiol redox-balance. Thus, by limiting hydrogen peroxide accumulation, GPx-1 also modulates these processes. This review explores the molecular mechanisms involved in regulating the expression and function of GPx-1, with an emphasis on the role of GPx-1 in modulating cellular oxidant stress and redox-mediated responses. As a selenocysteine-containing enzyme, GPx-1 expression is subject to unique forms of regulation involving the trace mineral selenium and selenocysteine incorporation during translation. In addition, GPx-1 has been implicated in the development and prevention of many common and complex diseases, including cancer and cardiovascular disease. This review discusses the role of GPx-1 in these diseases and speculates on potential future therapies to harness the beneficial effects of this ubiquitous antioxidant enzyme. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1957–1997. PMID:21087145

  12. Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx) expression is downregulated in poorly differentiated breast invasive ductal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cejas, P; García-Cabezas, M A; Casado, E; Belda-Iniesta, C; De Castro, J; Fresno, J A; Sereno, M; Barriuso, J; Espinosa, E; Zamora, P; Feliu, J; Redondo, A; Hardisson, D A; Renart, J; González-Barón, M

    2007-06-01

    Phospholipid Hydroperoxide Glutathione Peroxidase (PHGPx) is the only known enzyme able to reduce lipid peroxides bound to cell membranes. Moreover it has been involved in apoptosis and can influence intracellular signaling. To investigate the possible relationship between PHGPx and human cancer we have quantified PHGPx expression levels by real-time quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry in tissue samples of human breast invasive ductal carcinoma from 34 patients compared with their own controls of benign breast tissue. PHGPx expression levels were compared with the clinical and pathological data of these patients. The results showed that PHGPx expression levels are downregulated in poorly differentiated (grade 3) breast invasive ductal carcinoma (P = 0.0043). PHGPx expression levels decreased gradually with tumor grade from grade 1 to grade 3. We also found a downregulation of PHGPx in cases that showed p53 accumulation compared with cases without p53 immunostaining (P = 0.0011). PHGPx was also downregulated in cases without progesterone receptors (PR) immunostaining compared with cases with PR immunostaining (P = 0.0165). Grade 3, p53 immunostaining and absence of PR immunostaining are poor prognostic factors. These results suggest that PHGPx downregulation could be related with a poorer prognosis in breast invasive ductal carcinoma. PMID:17516241

  13. Selenium and glutathione peroxidase reference values in whole blood and plasma of a reference population living in Valencia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Alegría, A; Barberá, R; Clemente, G; Farré, R; García, M J; Lagarda, M J

    1996-12-01

    In order to assess the reference values for selenium nutritional status, adequate indicators (selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity) were determined in whole blood and blood derivates of a healthy population (n = 287) from the province of Valencia, Spain. The reference population was selected by applying preestablished criteria. Selenium in whole blood and plasma was measured by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS), with a deuterium correction, after addition of Pd/Mg(NO3)2 as the matrix modifier and appropriate dilution. Accuracy was checked by means of a reference material (Seronorm Trace Metals serum and whole blood). The population's reference intervals for selenium content at a 95% confidence level were: 53.03-108.96 and 66.71-119.4 mg/L for plasma and whole blood selenium concentration respectively. GPX activity was measured using a modification of the Paglia and Valentine method, and the reference intervals obtained ranged from 196 to 477 U/L in plasma, from 49 to 93 U/gHb in erythrocytes and from 52 to 96 U/gHb in whole blood. The only statistically significant differences detected between men and women are for to the GPX activity in whole blood. The results obtained are in the range of values found by others authors in healthy populations residing in different European countries. PMID:9021673

  14. In Vitro Effect of Sodium Fluoride on Malondialdehyde Concentration and on Superoxide Dismutase, Catalase, and Glutathione Peroxidase in Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Salinas, José; García-Ortíz, Liliana; Morales González, José A.; Hernández-Rodríguez, Sergio; Ramírez-García, Sotero; Núñez-Ramos, Norma R.; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to describe the in vitro effect of sodium fluoride (NaF) on the specific activity of the major erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes, as well as on the membrane malondialdehyde concentration, as indicators of oxidative stress. For this purpose, human erythrocytes were incubated with NaF (0, 7, 28, 56, and 100 μg/mL) or NaF (100 μg/mL) + vitamin E (1, 2.5, 5 and 10 μg/mL). The malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration on the surface of the erythrocytes was determined, as were the enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GlPx). Our results demonstrated that erythrocytes incubated with increasing NaF concentrations had an increased MDA concentration, along with decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes. The presence of vitamin E partially reversed the toxic effects of NaF on erythrocytes. These findings suggest that NaF induces oxidative stress in erythrocytes in vitro, and this stress is partially reversed by the presence of vitamin E. PMID:24223512

  15. Molecular cloning and characterization of a phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase gene from a blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; He, Yuan; He, Li; Zong, Hong-Ying; Cai, Guo-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx) is a major antioxidant enzyme and plays critical roles in the protection of cells against oxidative stress by catalysing reduction of lipid hydroperoxides. A full-length cDNA sequence corresponding to GPx gene from Schistosoma japonicum (designated SjGPx) was isolated and characterized. SjGPx contained an in-frame TGA codon for selenocysteine (Sec) and a concurrent Sec insertion sequence in its 3'-untranslated region. Protein encoded by SjGPx demonstrated a primary structure characteristic to the PHGPx family, including preservation of catalytic domains and absence of the subunit interaction domains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the SjGPx was highly related to the other PHGPx-related members, and clustered into the trematode subclade II. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR and western blotting showed that the SjGPx was mainly expressed in the female adults and eggs. RNA interference was employed to investigate the effects of knockdown of SjGPx. SjGPx expression level was significantly reduced on the 5th day post-RNAi. We observed a 53.86% reduction in total GPx activity and the eggs severely deformed. Oxidative stimulation of viable worms with H2O2 or paraquat resulted in 1.6- to 2.1-fold induction of the GPx activity. Our results revealed that the SjGPx protein is selenium-dependent PHGPx, which might actively participate in the detoxification of oxidative damage during egg production. PMID:26484892

  16. Cytochrome bd Displays Significant Quinol Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Attar, Sinan; Yu, Yuanjie; Pinkse, Martijn; Hoeser, Jo; Friedrich, Thorsten; Bald, Dirk; de Vries, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome bd is a prokaryotic terminal oxidase that catalyses the electrogenic reduction of oxygen to water using ubiquinol as electron donor. Cytochrome bd is a tri-haem integral membrane enzyme carrying a low-spin haem b558, and two high-spin haems: b595 and d. Here we show that besides its oxidase activity, cytochrome bd from Escherichia coli is a genuine quinol peroxidase (QPO) that reduces hydrogen peroxide to water. The highly active and pure enzyme preparation used in this study did not display the catalase activity recently reported for E. coli cytochrome bd. To our knowledge, cytochrome bd is the first membrane-bound quinol peroxidase detected in E. coli. The observation that cytochrome bd is a quinol peroxidase, can provide a biochemical basis for its role in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide and may explain the frequent findings reported in the literature that indicate increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and decreased virulence in mutants that lack the enzyme. PMID:27279363

  17. Cis-acting elements are required for selenium regulation of glutathione peroxidase-1 mRNA levels.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, S L; Sunde, R A

    1998-01-01

    Classical glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) mRNA levels can decrease to less than 10% in selenium (Se)-deficient rat liver. The cis-acting nucleic acid sequence requirements for Se regulation of GPX1 mRNA levels were studied by transfecting Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with GPX1 DNA constructs in which specific regions of the GPX1 gene were mutated, deleted, or replaced by comparable regions from unregulated genes such as phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (GPX4). For each construct, stable transfectants were pooled two weeks after transfection, divided into Se-deficient (2 nM Se) or Se-adequate (200 nM Se) medium, and grown for an additional four days. On day of harvest, Se-deficient GPX1 and GPX4 activities averaged 13 +/- 2% and 15 +/- 2% of Se adequate levels, confirming that cellular Se status was dramatically altered by Se supplementation. RNA was isolated from replicate plates of cells and transfected mRNA levels were specifically determined by RNase protection assay. Analysis of chimeric GPX1/GPX4 constructs showed that the GPX4 3'-UTR can completely replace the GPX1 3'-UTR in Se regulation of GPX1 mRNA. We did not find any GPX1 coding regions that could be replaced by the corresponding GPX4 coding regions without diminishing or eliminating Se regulation of the transfected GPX1 mRNA. Further analysis of the GPX1 coding region demonstrated that the GPX1 Sec codon (UGA) and the GPX1 intron sequences are required for full Se regulation of transfected GPX1 mRNA levels. Mutations that moved the GPX1 Sec codon to three different positions within the GPX1 coding region suggest that the mechanism for Se regulation of GPX1 mRNA requires a Sec codon within exon 1. Lastly, we found that addition of the GPX1 3'-UTR to beta-globin mRNA can convey significant Se regulation to beta-globin mRNA levels when a UGA codon is placed within exon 1. We conclude that Se regulation of GPX1 mRNA requires a functional selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) in the 3

  18. Glutathione peroxidase 3 localizes to the epithelial lining fluid and the extracellular matrix in interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Schamberger, Andrea C; Schiller, Herbert B; Fernandez, Isis E; Sterclova, Martina; Heinzelmann, Katharina; Hennen, Elisabeth; Hatz, Rudolf; Behr, Jürgen; Vašáková, Martina; Mann, Matthias; Eickelberg, Oliver; Staab-Weijnitz, Claudia A

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant antioxidant activity and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) are hallmarks of interstitial lung diseases (ILD). It is known that oxidative stress alters the ECM, but extracellular antioxidant defence mechanisms in ILD are incompletely understood. Here, we extracted abundance and detergent solubility of extracellular antioxidant enzymes from a proteomic dataset of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in mice and assessed regulation and distribution of glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPX3) in murine and human lung fibrosis. Superoxide dismutase 3 (Sod3), Gpx3, and Gpx activity were increased in mouse BALF during bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis. In lung tissue homogenates, Gpx3, but not Sod3, was upregulated and detergent solubility profiling indicated that Gpx3 associated with ECM proteins. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that Gpx3 was expressed by bronchial epithelial cells and interstitial fibroblasts and localized to the basement membrane and interstitial ECM in lung tissue. As to human ILD samples, BALF of some patients contained high levels of GPX3, and GPX3 was upregulated in lung homogenates from IPF patients. GPX3 expression in primary human bronchial epithelial cells and lung fibroblasts was downregulated by TNF-α, but more variably regulated by TGF-β1 and menadione. In conclusion, the antioxidant enzyme GPX3 localizes to lung ECM and is variably upregulated in ILD. PMID:27435875

  19. Glutathione peroxidase 3 localizes to the epithelial lining fluid and the extracellular matrix in interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Schamberger, Andrea C.; Schiller, Herbert B.; Fernandez, Isis E.; Sterclova, Martina; Heinzelmann, Katharina; Hennen, Elisabeth; Hatz, Rudolf; Behr, Jürgen; Vašáková, Martina; Mann, Matthias; Eickelberg, Oliver; Staab-Weijnitz, Claudia A.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant antioxidant activity and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) are hallmarks of interstitial lung diseases (ILD). It is known that oxidative stress alters the ECM, but extracellular antioxidant defence mechanisms in ILD are incompletely understood. Here, we extracted abundance and detergent solubility of extracellular antioxidant enzymes from a proteomic dataset of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in mice and assessed regulation and distribution of glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPX3) in murine and human lung fibrosis. Superoxide dismutase 3 (Sod3), Gpx3, and Gpx activity were increased in mouse BALF during bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis. In lung tissue homogenates, Gpx3, but not Sod3, was upregulated and detergent solubility profiling indicated that Gpx3 associated with ECM proteins. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that Gpx3 was expressed by bronchial epithelial cells and interstitial fibroblasts and localized to the basement membrane and interstitial ECM in lung tissue. As to human ILD samples, BALF of some patients contained high levels of GPX3, and GPX3 was upregulated in lung homogenates from IPF patients. GPX3 expression in primary human bronchial epithelial cells and lung fibroblasts was downregulated by TNF-α, but more variably regulated by TGF-β1 and menadione. In conclusion, the antioxidant enzyme GPX3 localizes to lung ECM and is variably upregulated in ILD. PMID:27435875

  20. GLUTATHIONE PEROXIDASE-1 PLAYS A MAJOR ROLE IN PROTECTING AGAINST ANGIOTENSIN II-INDUCED VASCULAR DYSFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Chrissobolis, Sophocles; Didion, Sean P.; Kinzenbaw, Dale A.; Schrader, Laura I.; Dayal, Sanjana; Lentz, Steven R.; Faraci, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Levels of reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), increase in blood vessels during hypertension and in response to angiotensin II (Ang II). Although glutathione peroxidases (GPx) are known to metabolize H2O2, the role of GPx during hypertension is poorly defined. We tested the hypothesis that GPx-1 protects against Ang II-induced endothelial dysfunction. Responses of carotid arteries from Gpx1-deficient (Gpx1 +/− and Gpx1 −/−) and Gpx1 transgenic (Tg) mice, and their respective littermate controls, were examined in vitro following overnight incubation with either vehicle or Ang II. Under control conditions, relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh, an endothelium-dependent agonist) was similar in control, Gpx1 +/−, and Gpx1 Tg mice, whereas in Gpx1 −/− mice, responses to ACh were impaired. In control mice, ACh-induced vasorelaxation was not affected by 1 nmol/L Ang II. In contrast, relaxation to ACh in arteries from Gpx1 +/− mice was inhibited by ~60% following treatment with 1 nmol/L Ang II, indicating Gpx1 haploinsufficiency markedly enhances Ang II-induced endothelial dysfunction. A higher concentration of Ang II (10 nmol/L) selectively impaired relaxation to ACh in arteries from control mice, and this effect was prevented in arteries from Gpx1 Tg mice, or arteries from control mice treated with PEG-catalase (which degrades H2O2). Thus, genetic and pharmacological evidence suggests a major role for GPx-1 and H2O2 in Ang II-induced effects on vascular function. PMID:18299484

  1. Distribution of glutathione peroxidase 1 in liver tissues of healthy and diabetic rats treated with capsaisin.

    PubMed

    Deprem, T; Yıldız, S E; Sari, E K; Bingol, S A; Tasci, S K; Aslan, S; Sozmen, M; Nur, G

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the immunohistochemical localization of glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx 1) and the structural changes that occur in the livers of healthy and diabetic rats that were treated with capsaisin (CAP). Fifty female rats were divided into five groups: group 1, sham; group 2, untreated control; group 3, CAP-treated; group 4, streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic; group 5, STZ diabetic + CAP-treated. STZ was administered to groups 4 and 5; after verifying diabetes, CAP was administered daily for 2 weeks to groups 3 and 5. Diffuse, microvesicular and some macrovesicular fatty degeneration were observed in the cytoplasms of hepatocytes in the livers of the diabetic group. In the CAP-treated diabetic group, fat degeneration in the livers decreased slightly by day 7. Irregularity of the external contours of nuclei of the hepatocytes, swelling of the nuclei, and slight anisocytosis and anisokaryosis were observed in the hepatocytes of the diabetic group. In the CAP-treated diabetic groups, the severity of anisocytosis and anisokaryosis decreased slightly by day 7. In all groups, GPx 1 showed similar immunolocalization, but in the diabetic and diabetic + CAP groups, GPx 1 immunoreactivity was less than in the other groups. GPx 1 immunoreactivity in the CAP-treated diabetic group was weaker than in the diabetic group. In all groups, GPx 1 immunoreactivity was diffusely cytoplasmic in some of the hepatocytes, and diffusely cytoplasmic and diffusely nuclear in other hepatocytes. Also, GPx 1 immunoreactivity in the liver was more intense in the hepatocytes around Kiernan's space. We found that CAP caused a decrease in GPx 1. PMID:24867493

  2. High Glutathione and Glutathione Peroxidase-2 Levels Mediate Cell-Type-Specific DNA Damage Protection in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dannenmann, Benjamin; Lehle, Simon; Hildebrand, Dominic G.; Kübler, Ayline; Grondona, Paula; Schmid, Vera; Holzer, Katharina; Fröschl, Mirjam; Essmann, Frank; Rothfuss, Oliver; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pluripotent stem cells must strictly maintain genomic integrity to prevent transmission of mutations. In human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), we found that genome surveillance is achieved via two ways, namely, a hypersensitivity to apoptosis and a very low accumulation of DNA lesions. The low apoptosis threshold was mediated by constitutive p53 expression and a marked upregulation of proapoptotic p53 target genes of the BCL-2 family, ensuring the efficient iPSC removal upon genotoxic insults. Intriguingly, despite the elevated apoptosis sensitivity, both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA lesions induced by genotoxins were less frequent in iPSCs compared to fibroblasts. Gene profiling identified that mRNA expression of several antioxidant proteins was considerably upregulated in iPSCs. Knockdown of glutathione peroxidase-2 and depletion of glutathione impaired protection against DNA lesions. Thus, iPSCs ensure genomic integrity through enhanced apoptosis induction and increased antioxidant defense, contributing to protection against DNA damage. PMID:25937369

  3. High glutathione and glutathione peroxidase-2 levels mediate cell-type-specific DNA damage protection in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dannenmann, Benjamin; Lehle, Simon; Hildebrand, Dominic G; Kübler, Ayline; Grondona, Paula; Schmid, Vera; Holzer, Katharina; Fröschl, Mirjam; Essmann, Frank; Rothfuss, Oliver; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus

    2015-05-12

    Pluripotent stem cells must strictly maintain genomic integrity to prevent transmission of mutations. In human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), we found that genome surveillance is achieved via two ways, namely, a hypersensitivity to apoptosis and a very low accumulation of DNA lesions. The low apoptosis threshold was mediated by constitutive p53 expression and a marked upregulation of proapoptotic p53 target genes of the BCL-2 family, ensuring the efficient iPSC removal upon genotoxic insults. Intriguingly, despite the elevated apoptosis sensitivity, both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA lesions induced by genotoxins were less frequent in iPSCs compared to fibroblasts. Gene profiling identified that mRNA expression of several antioxidant proteins was considerably upregulated in iPSCs. Knockdown of glutathione peroxidase-2 and depletion of glutathione impaired protection against DNA lesions. Thus, iPSCs ensure genomic integrity through enhanced apoptosis induction and increased antioxidant defense, contributing to protection against DNA damage. PMID:25937369

  4. Status of antioxidant enzyme: glutathione peroxidase and total polyphenol level in plasma of Tunisian patients suffering from colorectal and gastric cancer: interaction with clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Baroudi, Olfa; Younes, Sonia Ben; Mézlini, Amel; Bignon, Yves Jean; Medimeg, Imen; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Gaiied, Amel Ben Ammar E L; Ellouz, Soufia Chabchoub

    2013-12-01

    In our case-control study, we measure the antioxidant status by dosing enzymes involved in oxidant stress in plasma of patients with colorectal and gastric cancer, and in the second step, we investigate the impact of chemotherapy before and after surgery on plasma antioxidant status and polyphenols in patients. Blood serum was collected from patients with stomach and colorectal cancer before conventional treatment, and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPX) enzyme activities and total polyphenols were determined by spectrophotometric methods. In our study, we found a significant decrease in glutathione peroxidase activity in plasma of patients compared with controls (P = 0.02), although we did not find a significant association between total polyphenols and 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) or ABTS in plasma of colorectal and stomach cancer compared with control; furthermore, we observed no significant difference in the average plasma polyphenols in patients treated with chemotherapy before and after surgery. We have shown the decrease in GSHPX activity in plasma of cases with colorectal and gastric cancer, and this decrease reflects that the oxidative stress is associated with tumor tract and related to oxidative metabolism; however, no association was found between total polyphenols and ABTS in our study. PMID:24072511

  5. Distribution of superoxide dismutase 1 and glutathione peroxidase 1 in the cyclic canine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Santos, Celso; Pires, Maria Dos Anjos; Santos, Dario; Payan-Carreira, Rita

    2016-08-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) are two important antioxidant enzymes involved in tissue homeostasis by protecting cells and tissues from an accumulation of reactive oxygen species. Information concerning antioxidant enzymes in the canine uterus is almost inexistent. This work intends to establish the pattern of distribution of SOD1 and GPx1 immunoreaction in canine endometrium throughout the estrous cycle, using 46 endometrium samples of healthy dogs representing different cycle stages (anestrus-10, proestrus-10, estrus-10, early diestrus-7, and diestrus-9). SOD1 distribution in canine endometrium showed cyclic variations (P ≤ 0.001), with higher immunoscores in the progesterone-associated stages. Changing immunoreaction also concerned the different epithelial structures considered (surface epithelium, superficial glandular epithelium, and deep glandular epithelium) (P ≤ 0.001), but it was always higher than in the stroma (P ≤ 0.001). Deep glandular epithelial cells usually showed higher scores of immunoreaction compared with the other epithelial cells. Interestingly, in epithelial cells, distinct subcellular patterns for SOD1 were seen: the nuclear labeling was observed in estrus and early diestrus (P ≤ 0.001), whereas an apical reinforcement was observed in estrus (P = 0.011) in the glandular epithelia but not in the surface epithelia. In general, GPx1 distribution in canine endometrium remained relatively unchanged throughout the estrous cycle (P = 0.169) despite the slight decrease observed from proestrus to early diestrus. The highest scores were found in anestrus and diestrus (P < 0.05), varying with of the structure considered. An apical reinforcement pattern was also found for this molecule, which peaked in proestrus and estrus (P < 0.005). In summary, the present study showed that SOD1 and GPx1 are consistently distributed in the canine endometrium. The cyclic changes registered for both molecules

  6. Design and Synthesis of a Mitochondria-Targeted Mimic of Glutathione Peroxidase, MitoEbselen-2, as a Radiation Mitigator

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) triggers mitochondrial overproduction of H2O2 and accumulation of lipid hydroperoxides leading to the induction of apoptotic and necroptotic cell death pathways. Given the high catalytic efficiency of the seleno-enzyme glutathione peroxidase (Gpx) toward reduction of lipid hydroperoxides and H2O2, we tested the potential of mitochondria-targeted derivatives of ebselen to mitigate the deleterious effects of IR. We report that 2-[[2-[4-(3-oxo-1,2-benzoselenazol-2-yl)phenyl]acetyl]amino]ethyl-triphenyl-phosphonium chloride (MitoPeroxidase 2) was effective in reducing lipid hydroperoxides, preventing apoptotic cell death, and, when administered 24 h postirradiation, increased the survival of mice exposed to whole body γ-irradiation. PMID:25530831

  7. Blood haematology, serum thyroid hormones and glutathione peroxidase status in kacang goats fed inorganic iodine and selenium supplemented diets.

    PubMed

    Aghwan, Z A; Sazili, A Q; Alimon, A R; Goh, Y M; Hilmi, M

    2013-11-01

    The effects of dietary supplementation of selenium (Se), iodine (I), and a combination of both on the blood haematology, serum free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) hormones and glutathione peroxidase enzyme (GSH-Px) activity were examined on twenty four (7 to 8 months old, 22±1.17 kg live weight) Kacang crossbred male goats. Animals were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments (6 animals in each group). Throughout 100 d of feeding trial, the animals of control group (CON) received a basal diet, while the other three groups were offered basal diet supplemented with 0.6 mg/kg diet DM Se (SS), or 0.6 mg/kg diet DM I (PI), or a combination of both Se and I, each at 0.6 mg/kg diet DM (SSPI). The haematological attributes which are haemoglobin (Hb), red blood cell (RBC), packed cell volume (PCV), mean cell volume (MCV), white blood cells (WBC), band neutrophils (B Neut), segmented neutrophils (S Neut), lymphocytes (Lymph), monocytes (Mono), eosinophils (Eosin) and basophils (Baso) were similar among the four treatment groups, while serum levels of Se and I increased significantly (p<0.05) in the supplemented groups. The combined dietary supplementation of Se and I (SSPI) significantly increased serum FT3 in the supplemented animals. Serum GSH-Px activity increased significantly in the animals of SS and SSPI groups. It is concluded that the dietary supplementation of inorganic Se and I at a level of 0.6 mg/kg DM increased serum Se and I concentration, FT3 hormone and GSH-Px activity of Kacang crossbred male goats. PMID:25049744

  8. Blood Haematology, Serum Thyroid Hormones and Glutathione Peroxidase Status in Kacang Goats Fed Inorganic Iodine and Selenium Supplemented Diets

    PubMed Central

    Aghwan, Z. A.; Sazili, A. Q.; Alimon, A. R.; Goh, Y. M.; Hilmi, M.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of dietary supplementation of selenium (Se), iodine (I), and a combination of both on the blood haematology, serum free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) hormones and glutathione peroxidase enzyme (GSH-Px) activity were examined on twenty four (7 to 8 months old, 22±1.17 kg live weight) Kacang crossbred male goats. Animals were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments (6 animals in each group). Throughout 100 d of feeding trial, the animals of control group (CON) received a basal diet, while the other three groups were offered basal diet supplemented with 0.6 mg/kg diet DM Se (SS), or 0.6 mg/kg diet DM I (PI), or a combination of both Se and I, each at 0.6 mg/kg diet DM (SSPI). The haematological attributes which are haemoglobin (Hb), red blood cell (RBC), packed cell volume (PCV), mean cell volume (MCV), white blood cells (WBC), band neutrophils (B Neut), segmented neutrophils (S Neut), lymphocytes (Lymph), monocytes (Mono), eosinophils (Eosin) and basophils (Baso) were similar among the four treatment groups, while serum levels of Se and I increased significantly (p<0.05) in the supplemented groups. The combined dietary supplementation of Se and I (SSPI) significantly increased serum FT3 in the supplemented animals. Serum GSH-Px activity increased significantly in the animals of SS and SSPI groups. It is concluded that the dietary supplementation of inorganic Se and I at a level of 0.6 mg/kg DM increased serum Se and I concentration, FT3 hormone and GSH-Px activity of Kacang crossbred male goats. PMID:25049744

  9. Glutathione Peroxidase of Pennisetum glaucum (PgGPx) Is a Functional Cd2+ Dependent Peroxiredoxin that Enhances Tolerance against Salinity and Drought Stress

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Tahmina; Manna, Mrinalini; Reddy, Malireddy K.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) arise in the plant system due to inevitable influence of various environmental stimuli. Glutathione peroxidases are one of the important ROS scavengers inside the cell. A glutathione peroxidase (PgGPx) gene was previously found from Pennisetum glauccum abiotic stressed cDNA library. Enzyme kinetics data revealed that PgGPx possessed preference towards thioredoxin rather than glutathione as electron donor and thus belongs to the functional peroxiredoxin group. Moreover, its activity was found to be dependent on divalent cations, especially Cd2+ and homology model showed the presence of Cd2+ binding site in the protein. Site directed mutagenesis study of PgGPx protein revealed the vital role of two conserved Cysteine residues for its enzymatic activity and structural folding. Expression analysis suggested that PgGPx transcript is highly up-regulated in response to salinity and drought stresses. When expressed ectopically, PgGPx showed enhanced tolerance against multiple abiotic stresses in prokaryotic E. coli and model plant, rice. Transgenic rice plants showed lesser accumulation of MDA and H2O2; and higher accumulation of proline as compared to wild type (WT) plants in response to both salinity and drought stresses that clearly indicates suppression of lipid peroxidation and ROS generation in transgenic lines. Moreover, transgenic plants maintained better photosynthesis efficiency and higher level of antioxidant enzyme activity as compared to WT plants under stress conditions. These results clearly indicate the imperative role of PgGPx in cellular redox homeostasis under stress conditions, leading to the maintenance of membrane integrity and increased tolerance towards oxidative stress. PMID:26600014

  10. Identification of a novel putative non-selenocysteine containing phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (NPGPx) essential for alleviating oxidative stress generated from polyunsaturated fatty acids in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Utomo, Ahmad; Jiang, Xianzhi; Furuta, Saori; Yun, Jeanho; Levin, David S; Wang, Yi-Chun J; Desai, Kartiki V; Green, Jeffrey E; Chen, Phang-Lang; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2004-10-15

    A dramatic reduction in the expression of a novel phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx), which incorporates cysteine instead of selenocysteine in the conserved catalytic motif was observed in a microarray analysis using cDNAs amplified from mRNA of Brca1-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts. This non-selenocysteine PHGPx named NPGPx is a cytoplasmic protein with molecular mass of approximately 22 kDa and has little detectable glutathione peroxidase activity in vitro. Ectopic expression of NPGPx in Brca1-null cells that were sensitive to oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide conferred a similar resistance level to that of the wild-type cells, suggesting the importance of this protein in reducing oxidative stress. Expression of NPGPx was found in many tissues, including developing mammary gland. However, the majority of breast cancer cell lines studied (11 of 12) expressed very low or undetectable levels of NPGPx irrespective of BRCA1 status. Re-expression of NPGPx in breast cancer lines, MCF-7 and HCC1937, which have very little or no endogenous NPGPx, induced resistance to eicosapentaenoic acid (an omega-3 type of polyunsaturated fatty acid)-mediated cell death. Conversely, inhibition of the expression of NPGPx by the specific small interfering RNA in HS578T breast cancer cells that originally express substantial amounts of endogenous NPGPx increased their sensitivity to eicosapentaenoic acid-mediated cell death. Thus, NPGPx plays an essential role in breast cancer cells in alleviating oxidative stress generated from polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism. PMID:15294905

  11. Identification and Comparative Analysis of H2O2-Scavenging Enzymes (Ascorbate Peroxidase and Glutathione Peroxidase) in Selected Plants Employing Bioinformatics Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ozyigit, Ibrahim I.; Filiz, Ertugrul; Vatansever, Recep; Kurtoglu, Kuaybe Y.; Koc, Ibrahim; Öztürk, Münir X.; Anjum, Naser A.

    2016-01-01

    Among major reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exhibits dual roles in plant metabolism. Low levels of H2O2 modulate many biological/physiological processes in plants; whereas, its high level can cause damage to cell structures, having severe consequences. Thus, steady-state level of cellular H2O2 must be tightly regulated. Glutathione peroxidases (GPX) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) are two major ROS-scavenging enzymes which catalyze the reduction of H2O2 in order to prevent potential H2O2-derived cellular damage. Employing bioinformatics approaches, this study presents a comparative evaluation of both GPX and APX in 18 different plant species, and provides valuable insights into the nature and complex regulation of these enzymes. Herein, (a) potential GPX and APX genes/proteins from 18 different plant species were identified, (b) their exon/intron organization were analyzed, (c) detailed information about their physicochemical properties were provided, (d) conserved motif signatures of GPX and APX were identified, (e) their phylogenetic trees and 3D models were constructed, (f) protein-protein interaction networks were generated, and finally (g) GPX and APX gene expression profiles were analyzed. Study outcomes enlightened GPX and APX as major H2O2-scavenging enzymes at their structural and functional levels, which could be used in future studies in the current direction. PMID:27047498

  12. Identification and Comparative Analysis of H2O2-Scavenging Enzymes (Ascorbate Peroxidase and Glutathione Peroxidase) in Selected Plants Employing Bioinformatics Approaches.

    PubMed

    Ozyigit, Ibrahim I; Filiz, Ertugrul; Vatansever, Recep; Kurtoglu, Kuaybe Y; Koc, Ibrahim; Öztürk, Münir X; Anjum, Naser A

    2016-01-01

    Among major reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exhibits dual roles in plant metabolism. Low levels of H2O2 modulate many biological/physiological processes in plants; whereas, its high level can cause damage to cell structures, having severe consequences. Thus, steady-state level of cellular H2O2 must be tightly regulated. Glutathione peroxidases (GPX) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) are two major ROS-scavenging enzymes which catalyze the reduction of H2O2 in order to prevent potential H2O2-derived cellular damage. Employing bioinformatics approaches, this study presents a comparative evaluation of both GPX and APX in 18 different plant species, and provides valuable insights into the nature and complex regulation of these enzymes. Herein, (a) potential GPX and APX genes/proteins from 18 different plant species were identified, (b) their exon/intron organization were analyzed, (c) detailed information about their physicochemical properties were provided, (d) conserved motif signatures of GPX and APX were identified, (e) their phylogenetic trees and 3D models were constructed, (f) protein-protein interaction networks were generated, and finally (g) GPX and APX gene expression profiles were analyzed. Study outcomes enlightened GPX and APX as major H2O2-scavenging enzymes at their structural and functional levels, which could be used in future studies in the current direction. PMID:27047498

  13. Attenuation of experimental colitis in glutathione peroxidase 1 and catalase double knockout mice through enhancing regulatory T cell function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Ran; Lee, Anbok; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Kie, Jeong-Hae; Lim, Woosung; Lee, Hyeon Kook; Moon, Byung-In; Seoh, Ju-Young

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the progression of inflammatory diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Meanwhile, several studies suggested the protective role of ROS in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, and it was recently reported that dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis was attenuated in mice with an elevated level of ROS due to deficiency of peroxiredoxin II. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are critical in the prevention of IBD and Treg function was reported to be closely associated with ROS level, but it has been investigated only in lowered levels of ROS so far. In the present study, in order to clarify the relationship between ROS level and Treg function, and their role in the pathogenesis of IBD, we investigated mice with an elevated level of ROS due to deficiency of both glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-1 and catalase (Cat) for the susceptibility of DSS-induced colitis in association with Treg function. The results showed that DSS-induced colitis was attenuated and Tregs were hyperfunctional in GPx1-/- × Cat-/- mice. In vivo administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) aggravated DSS-induced colitis and decreased Treg function to the level comparable to WT mice. Attenuated Th17 cell differentiation from naïve CD4+ cells as well as impaired production of IL-6 and IL-17A by splenocytes upon stimulation suggested anti-inflammatory tendency of GPx1-/- × Cat-/- mice. Suppression of Stat3 activation in association with enhancement of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and FoxP3 expression might be involved in the immunosuppressive mechanism of GPx1-/- × Cat-/- mice. Taken together, it is implied that ROS level is critical in the regulation of Treg function, and IBD may be attenuated in appropriately elevated levels of ROS. PMID:24743300

  14. Effect of tocotrienol on the activities of cytosolic glutathione-dependent enzymes in rats treated with 2-acetylaminofluorene.

    PubMed

    Shamaan, N A; Wan Ngah, W Z; Ibrahim, R; Jarien, Z; Top, A G; Abdul Kadir, K

    1993-04-01

    The effect of tocotrienol on the activities of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in rats given 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) was investigated over a 20 week period. Liver and kidney GST and liver GR activities were significantly increased after AAF administration. Kidney GPx activities were significantly affected; activity assayed with cumene hydroperoxide (cu-OOH) was increased but activity assayed with H2O2 was reduced. Supplementation of the diet with tocotrienol in the AAF-treated rats reduced the increase in enzyme activities. Tocotrienol on its own had no effect on the enzyme activities. PMID:8471073

  15. Maneb disturbs expression of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, increases reactive oxygen species production, and induces genotoxicity in liver of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ben Amara, Ibtissem; Ben Saad, Hajer; Hamdaoui, Latifa; Karray, Aida; Boudawara, Tahia; Ben Ali, Yassine; Zeghal, Najiba

    2015-08-01

    Maneb (MB), a fungicide largely used in agriculture throughout the world including Tunisia, protects many vegetables, fruits and field crops against a wide spectrum of fungal diseases. However there is a lack of informations regarding the risks arising from MB exposure on non target organisms, especially mammals. The aim of this study was to investigate the morphological, biochemical and molecular aspects of liver injury after exposure of mice to MB. Four doses of MB corresponding to 1/8 (group D1), 1/6 (group D2), 1/4 (group D3), and 1/2 (group D4) of lethal dose (DL50 = 1500 mg/kg body weight) were administered to adult mice. Oxidative stress parameters were also objectified by molecular and histological endpoints in the liver. Maneb caused hepatotoxicity as characterized by the significant increase in the levels of malondialdehyde and protein oxidation marker, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP). The activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and the levels of glutathione decreased significantly in all treated mice, while vitamin C levels decreased only in group D4. We also noted a significant decrease in gene expression of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase enzymes. Maneb caused nucleic acids degradation testifying its genotoxicity. Yet, biochemical markers in plasma showed a decrease in total protein and an increase in aspartate, alanine amino transferases and bilirubin levels in all treatment groups. Moreover, plasma levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol significantly increased, while those of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol decreased. These biochemical alterations were correlated with significantly histological changes. Our data showed, for the first time, that intraperitoneal injection of very high non environmentally relevant MB concentrations to adult mice resulted in oxidative stress leading to hepatotoxicity and the impairment of defense systems, confirming the

  16. ATP-enhanced peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shah, Juhi; Purohit, Rahul; Singh, Ragini; Karakoti, Ajay Singh; Singh, Sanjay

    2015-10-15

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are known to possess intrinsic biological peroxidase-like activity that has applications in development of numerous biosensors. The reactivity of the Au atoms at the surface of AuNPs is critical to the performance of such biosensors, yet little is known about the effect of biomolecules and ions on the peroxidase-like activity. In this work, the effect of ATP and other biologically relevant molecules and ions over peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs are described. Contrary to the expectation that nanoparticles exposed to biomolecules may lose the catalytic property, ATP and ADP addition enhanced the peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs. The catalytic activity was unaltered by the addition of free phosphate, sulphate and carbonate anions however, addition of ascorbic acid to the reaction mixture diminished the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs, even in the presence of ATP and ADP. In contrast to AuNPs, ATP did not synergize and improve the peroxidase activity of the natural peroxidase enzyme, horseradish peroxidase. PMID:26111515

  17. Blood glutathione peroxidase-1 mRNA levels can be used as molecular biomarkers to determine dietary selenium requirements in rats.

    PubMed

    Sunde, Roger A; Thompson, Kevin M; Evenson, Jacqueline K; Thompson, Britta M

    2009-11-01

    Transcript (mRNA) levels are increasingly being used in medicine as molecular biomarkers for disease and disease risk, including use of whole blood as a target tissue for analysis. Development of blood molecular biomarkers for nutritional status, too, has potential application that parallels opportunities in medicine, including providing solid data for individualized nutrition. We previously reported that blood glutathione peroxidase-1 (Gpx1) mRNA was expressed at levels comparable to major tissues in rats and humans. To determine the efficacy of using blood Gpx1 mRNA to assess selenium (Se) status and requirements, we fed graded levels of Se (0-0.3 microg Se/g as selenite) to weanling male rats. Se status was determined by liver Se concentration and selenoenzyme activity, and selenoprotein mRNA abundance in liver and blood was determined by ribonuclease protection analysis. Liver Se and plasma glutathione peroxidase-3 and liver Gpx1 activities indicated that minimal Se requirements were at 0.08 microg Se/g diet. When total RNA was isolated from whole blood, Gpx1 mRNA in Se-deficient rats decreased to 10% of levels in Se-adequate (0.2 microg Se/g diet) rats. With Se supplementation, blood Gpx1 mRNA levels increased sigmoidally to a plateau with a minimum Se requirement of 0.08 microg Se/g diet, whereas glutathione peroxidase-4 mRNA levels were unaffected. Similarly, Gpx1 mRNA in RNA isolated from fractionated red blood cells decreased in Se-deficient rats to 23% of Se-adequate levels, with a minimum Se requirement of 0.09 microg Se/g diet. Additional studies showed that the preponderance of whole blood Gpx1 mRNA arises from erythroid cells, most likely reticulocytes and young erythrocytes. In summary, whole blood selenoprotein mRNA levels can be used as molecular biomarkers for assessing Se requirements, illustrating that whole blood has potential as a target tissue in development of molecular biomarkers for use in nutrition as well as in medicine. PMID:19855070

  18. Effects of polymorphisms in vitamin E-, vitamin C-, and glutathione peroxidase-related genes on serum biomarkers and associations with glaucoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To study the association of selected polymorphism in genes related to vitamin E, vitamin C, and glutathione peroxidase with these biomarkers and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) risk. A case-control study matched for age, sex, and bodyweight was undertaken. Two hundred fifty POAG cases and 250 con...

  19. Molecular characterization of two glutathione peroxidase genes of Panax ginseng and their expression analysis against environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Jin; Jang, Moon-Gi; Noh, Hae-Yong; Lee, Hye-Jin; Sukweenadhi, Johan; Kim, Jong-Hak; Kim, Se-Yeong; Kwon, Woo-Saeng; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2014-02-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (GPXs) are a group of enzymes that protect cells against oxidative damage generated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). GPX catalyzes the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or organic hydroperoxides to water or alcohols by reduced glutathione. The presence of GPXs in plants has been reported by several groups, but the roles of individual members of this family in a single plant species have not been studied. Two GPX cDNAs were isolated and characterized from the embryogenic callus of Panax ginseng. The two cDNAs had an open reading frame (ORF) of 723 and 681bp with a deduced amino acid sequence of 240 and 226 residues, respectively. The calculated molecular mass of the matured proteins are approximately 26.4kDa or 25.7kDa with a predicated isoelectric point of 9.16 or 6.11, respectively. The two PgGPXs were elevated strongly by salt stress and chilling stress in a ginseng seedling. In addition, the two PgGPXs showed different responses against biotic stress. The positive responses of PgGPX to the environmental stimuli suggested that ginseng GPX may help to protect against environmental stresses. PMID:24269671

  20. Two wheat glutathione peroxidase genes whose products are located in chloroplasts improve salt and H2O2 tolerances in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Chao-Zeng; Zhao, Lei; Yin, Li-Juan; Chen, Ming; Wang, Qing-Yu; Li, Lian-Cheng; Xu, Zhao-Shi; Ma, You-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is capable of damaging effects on numerous cellular components. Glutathione peroxidases (GPXs, EC 1.11.1.9) are key enzymes of the antioxidant network in plants. In this study, W69 and W106, two putative GPX genes, were obtained by de novo transcriptome sequencing of salt-treated wheat (Triticum aestivum) seedlings. The purified His-tag fusion proteins of W69 and W106 reduced H2O2 and t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP) using glutathione (GSH) or thioredoxin (Trx) as an electron donor in vitro, showing their peroxidase activity toward H2O2 and toxic organic hydroperoxide. GFP fluorescence assays revealed that W69 and W106 are localized in chloroplasts. Quantitative real-time PCR (Q-RT-PCR) analysis showed that two GPXs were differentially responsive to salt, drought, H2O2, or ABA. Isolation of the W69 and W106 promoters revealed some cis-acting elements responding to abiotic stresses. Overexpression of W69 and W106 conferred strong tolerance to salt, H2O2, and ABA treatment in Arabidopsis. Moreover, the expression levels of key regulator genes (SOS1, RbohD and ABI1/ABI2) involved in salt, H2O2 and ABA signaling were altered in the transgenic plants. These findings suggest that W69 and W106 not only act as scavengers of H2O2 in controlling abiotic stress responses, but also play important roles in salt and ABA signaling. PMID:24098330

  1. Blood glutathione status and activity of glutathione-metabolizing antioxidant enzymes in erythrocytes of young trotters in basic training.

    PubMed

    Janiak, M; Suska, M; Dudzińska, W; Skotnicka, E

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate response of blood glutathione status and activity of glutathione-metabolizing antioxidant enzymes in erythrocytes of young trotters in basic training. Nine untrained trotters (aged 16-20 months) were exposed to a 4-month training program based on exercises at low-to-moderate intensity. The conditioning consisted of breaking the horses and running them on distances varying from 4 to 40 km a week. The workloads were increased on a 3-week basis. Exercise intensity was monitored by measuring heart rate and blood lactate. Blood samples were collected at rest, before (RES0) and after (RESt) the conditioning period; moreover, on the latter occasion (on day 112 of training), the blood was also taken immediately after the routine exercise (EXE0) and 60 min thereafter (EXE60). The whole blood samples were analysed for the concentration of reduced, oxidized and total glutathione (GSH, GSSG and TGSH, respectively), while the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione-disulfide reductase (GR) were determined in haemolysates. Additionally, the erythrocytic concentrations of oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and its phosphate (NADP(+)) were measured. All investigated parameters except NAD(+) and reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio (GSH/GSSG) changed during the training period. Following the effortm GPX, NADP(+) and GSH/GSSG were significantly lower (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, p < 0.001, respectively) while GSSG was markedly higher than at rest (RESt). The drop in NADP(+), low GSH/GSSG and high GSSG concentration were sustained at EXE60. Glutathione-disulfide reductase activity was higher after the workout but only at EXE60 the increase in activity was significant. Despite the activities of the GSH-GSSG cycle, enzymes were considerably higher after the training period, the elevated concentration of GSSG and significantly lower GSH/GSSG ratio in the post-exercise measurements suggest that production of reactive oxygen

  2. Is Peroxiredoxin II's peroxidase activity strongly inhibited in human erythrocytes?

    PubMed

    Benfeitas, Rui; Selvaggio, Gianluca; Antunes, Fernando; Coelho, Pedro; Salvador, Armindo

    2014-10-01

    H2O2 elimination in human erythrocytes is mainly carried out by catalase (Cat), glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) and the more recently discovered peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2). However, the contribution of Prx2 to H2O2 consumption is still unclear. Prx2's high reactivity with H2O2 (kPrx2=10×10(7) M(-1)s(-1), kCat =7×10(7) M(-1)s(-1), kGPx1 =4×10(7) M(-1)s(-1)) and high abundance ([Prx2]= 570µM, [Cat]= 32µM, [GPx1]= 1µM) suggest that under low H2O2 supply rates it should consume >99% of the H2O2. However, extensive evidence indicates that in intact erythrocytes Prx2 contributes no more than Cat to H2O2 consumption. In order for this to be attained, Prx2's effective rate constant with H2O2would have to be just ~10(5) M(-1)s(-1), much lower than that determined in multiple experiments with the purified proteins. Nevertheless, nearly all Prx2 is oxidized within 1min of exposing erythrocytes to a H2O2 bolus, which is inconsistent with an irreversible inhibition. A mathematical model of the H2O2 metabolism in human erythrocytes [Benfeitas et al. (2014) Free Radic. Biol. Med.] where Prx2 either has a low kPrx2 or is subject to a strong (>99%) but readily reversible inhibition achieves quantitative agreement with detailed experimental observations of the responses of the redox status of Prx2 in human erythrocytes and suggests functional advantages of this design (see companion abstract). By contrast, a variant where Prx2 is fully active with kPrx2=10(8) M(-1)s(-1) shows important qualitative discrepancies. Altogether, these results suggest that Prx2's peroxidase activity is strongly inhibited in human erythrocytes. We acknowledge fellowship SFRH/BD/51199/2010, grants PEst-C/SAU/LA0001/2013-2014, PEst-OE/QUI/UI0612/2013, PEst-OE/QUI/UI0313/2014, and FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-020978 (PTDC/QUI-BIQ/119657/2010) co-financed by FEDER through the COMPETE program and by FCT. PMID:26461310

  3. Measurement of glutathione in activated sludges.

    PubMed

    Dziurla, M A; Leroy, P; Strünkmann, G W; Salhi, M; Lee, D U; Camacho, P; Heinz, V; Müller, J A; Paul, E; Ginestet, Ph; Audic, J M; Block, J C

    2004-01-01

    Thermal, electric, mechanical or oxidative stress seem a promising way to reduce the production of excess activated sludge during biological wastewater treatment. However, the adaptation and the resistance of the sludge microbial ecosystem to stress conditions is a major question as it may definitively limit the effect of some treatments. Defence mechanisms developed by aerobic organisms, in particular, in response to oxidative stress involve various antioxidant activities and compounds such as glutathione. An HPLC method was developed for measuring reduced and total glutathione (GSH and GSHt) in perchloric acid sludge extracts. The method was sensitive, highly specific and validated for linearity, precision and recovery. Considering the extraction yield and the oxidation of GSH during extract storage, the measured GSH concentration was estimated to represent 60% of the GSH content from activated sludges. GSHt ranged from 0.32 to 3.34micromolg(-1) volatile solids and the GSH/GSHt ratio ranged from 32% to 91%. Measurements performed on sludges stressed in precise conditions selected to reach a reduction of sludge production showed a decrease of GSH and GSHt concentrations with thermal, mechanical, electric and ozone stress. PMID:14630122

  4. Reaction kinetics and targeting to cellular glutathione S-transferase of the glutathione peroxidase mimetic PhSeZnCl and its d,l-polylactide microparticle formulation

    PubMed Central

    Bartolini, D.; Piroddi, M.; Tidei, C.; Giovagnoli, S.; Pietrella, D.; Manevich, Y.; Tew, K.D.; Giustarini, D.; Rossi, R.; Townsend, D.M.; Santi, C.; Galli, F.

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic properties and cellular effects of the glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-mimetic compound PhSeZnCl or its d,l-lactide polymer microencapsulation form (M-PhSeZnCl) were investigated and compared with the prototypical Se-organic compounds ebselen and diselenide (PhSe)2. PhSeZnCl was confirmed to catalyze the ping-pong reaction of GPx with higher Vmax than ebselen and (PhSe)2, but the catalytic efficiency calculated for the cosubstrates glutathione (GSH) and H2O2, and particularly the high reactivity against thiols (lowest KM for GSH in the series of test molecules), suggested poor biological applicability of PhSeZnCl as a GPx mimetic. Cytotoxicity of PhSeZnCl was demonstrated in various cancer cell lines via increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, depletion of intracellular thiols, and induction of apoptosis. Experiments carried out in GSH S-transferase P (GSTP)-overexpressing K562 human erythroleukemia cells and in GSTP1-1-knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) demonstrated that this cytosolic enzyme represents a preferential target of the redox disturbances produced by this Se-compound with a key role in controlling H2O2 generation and the perturbation of stress/survival kinase signaling. Microencapsulation was adopted as a strategy to control the thiol reactivity and oxidative stress effects of PhSeZnCl, then assessing applications alternative to anticancer. The uptake of this “depowered” GPx-mimetic formulation, which occurred through an endocytosis-like mechanism, resulted in a marked reduction of cytotoxicity. In MCF-7 cells transfected with different allelic variants of GSTP, M-PhSeZnCl lowered the burst of cellular ROS induced by the exposure to extracellular H2O2, and the extent of this effect changed between the GSTP variants. Microencapsulation is a straightforward strategy to mitigate the toxicity of thiol-reactive Se-organic drugs that enhanced the antioxidant and cellular protective effects of PhSeZnCl. A mechanistic linkage

  5. High-resolution imaging of selenium in kidneys: a localized selenium pool associated with glutathione peroxidase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Malinouski, M.; Kehr, S.; Finney, L.; Vogt, S.; Carlson, B.A.; Seravalli, J.; Jin, R.; Handy, D.E.; Park, T.J.; Loscalzo, J.; Hatfield, D.L.; Gladyshev, V.N.

    2012-04-17

    Recent advances in quantitative methods and sensitive imaging techniques of trace elements provide opportunities to uncover and explain their biological roles. In particular, the distribution of selenium in tissues and cells under both physiological and pathological conditions remains unknown. In this work, we applied high-resolution synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to map selenium distribution in mouse liver and kidney. Liver showed a uniform selenium distribution that was dependent on selenocysteine tRNA{sup [Ser]Sec} and dietary selenium. In contrast, kidney selenium had both uniformly distributed and highly localized components, the latter visualized as thin circular structures surrounding proximal tubules. Other parts of the kidney, such as glomeruli and distal tubules, only manifested the uniformly distributed selenium pattern that co-localized with sulfur. We found that proximal tubule selenium localized to the basement membrane. It was preserved in Selenoprotein P knockout mice, but was completely eliminated in glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) knockout mice, indicating that this selenium represented GPx3. We further imaged kidneys of another model organism, the naked mole rat, which showed a diminished uniformly distributed selenium pool, but preserved the circular proximal tubule signal. We applied XFM to image selenium in mammalian tissues and identified a highly localized pool of this trace element at the basement membrane of kidneys that was associated with GPx3. XFM allowed us to define and explain the tissue topography of selenium in mammalian kidneys at submicron resolution.

  6. Effect of subcutaneous selenium injection and supplementary selenium source on blood selenium and glutathione peroxidase in feedlot heifers

    PubMed Central

    Chorfi, Younes; Girard, Vincent; Fournier, Alain; Couture, Yvon

    2011-01-01

    This study measured the effect on glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and selenium (Se) in whole blood and plasma associated with subcutaneous Se injections in beef heifers fed organic or inorganic Se. Heifers (n = 120) were randomly divided into 2 groups, 1 of which received subcutaneous Se injections. Both groups were given the same total mixed ration with 3 mg of organic or inorganic Se daily. Until week 2, heifers that had received Se injections showed higher concentrations of plasma Se and GSH-Px and whole blood Se (P < 0.001) than those having had no injections. Concentrations of plasma Se and GSH-Px were higher in the group receiving organic Se than the group receiving inorganic Se. Whole blood GSH-Px concentrations increased significantly (P < 0.001) throughout a 12-week period but were not affected by Se source. Combination of Se injections and supplementation could help maintain normal Se and GSH-Px blood status in beef heifers during the first few weeks in the feedlot. PMID:22467963

  7. Increases of Catalase and Glutathione Peroxidase Expressions by Lacosamide Pretreatment Contributes to Neuroprotection Against Experimentally Induced Transient Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Young; Park, Joon Ha; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich Na; Lee, Yun Lyul; Kim, In Hye; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Lee, Jae-Chul; Won, Moo-Ho; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Yan, Bing Chun; Hwang, In Koo; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kim, Young-Myeong; Kim, Sung Koo

    2016-09-01

    Lacosamide is a new antiepileptic drug which is widely used to treat partial-onset seizures. In this study, we examined the neuroprotective effect of lacosamide against transient ischemic damage and expressions of antioxidant enzymes such as Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1), Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD2), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) region following 5 min of transient global cerebral ischemia in gerbils. We found that pre-treatment with 25 mg/kg lacosamide protected CA1 pyramidal neurons from transient global cerebral ischemic insult using hematoxylin-eosin staining and neuronal nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry. Transient ischemia dramatically changed expressions of SOD1, SOD2 and GPX, not CAT, in the CA1 pyramidal neurons. Lacosamide pre-treatment increased expressions of CAT and GPX, not SOD1 and 2, in the CA1 pyramidal neurons compared with controls, and their expressions induced by lacosamide pre-treatment were maintained after transient cerebral ischemia. In brief, pre-treatment with lacosamide protected hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons from ischemic damage induced by transient global cerebral ischemia, and the lacosamide-mediated neuroprotection may be closely related to increases of CAT and GPX expressions by lacosamide pre-treatment. PMID:27209305

  8. High-Resolution Imaging of Selenium in Kidneys: A Localized Selenium Pool Associated with Glutathione Peroxidase 3

    PubMed Central

    Malinouski, Mikalai; Kehr, Sebastian; Finney, Lydia; Vogt, Stefan; Carlson, Bradley A.; Seravalli, Javier; Jin, Richard; Handy, Diane E.; Park, Thomas J.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Hatfield, Dolph L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Recent advances in quantitative methods and sensitive imaging techniques of trace elements provide opportunities to uncover and explain their biological roles. In particular, the distribution of selenium in tissues and cells under both physiological and pathological conditions remains unknown. In this work, we applied high-resolution synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to map selenium distribution in mouse liver and kidney. Results: Liver showed a uniform selenium distribution that was dependent on selenocysteine tRNA[Ser]Sec and dietary selenium. In contrast, kidney selenium had both uniformly distributed and highly localized components, the latter visualized as thin circular structures surrounding proximal tubules. Other parts of the kidney, such as glomeruli and distal tubules, only manifested the uniformly distributed selenium pattern that co-localized with sulfur. We found that proximal tubule selenium localized to the basement membrane. It was preserved in Selenoprotein P knockout mice, but was completely eliminated in glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) knockout mice, indicating that this selenium represented GPx3. We further imaged kidneys of another model organism, the naked mole rat, which showed a diminished uniformly distributed selenium pool, but preserved the circular proximal tubule signal. Innovation: We applied XFM to image selenium in mammalian tissues and identified a highly localized pool of this trace element at the basement membrane of kidneys that was associated with GPx3. Conclusion: XFM allowed us to define and explain the tissue topography of selenium in mammalian kidneys at submicron resolution. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 185–192. PMID:21854231

  9. The importance of Arabidopsis glutathione peroxidase 8 for protecting Arabidopsis plant and E. coli cells against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Gaber, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (GPXs) are major family of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzymes. Recently, database analysis of the Arabidopsis genome revealed a new open-reading frame, thus increasing the total number of AtGPX gene family to eight (AtGPX1-8). The effect of plant hormones like; i. e. salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), abscisic acid (ABA), indoleacetic acid (IAA), and mannitol on the expression of the genes confirm that the AtGPX genes family is regulated by multiple signaling pathways. The survival rate of AtGPX8 knockout plants (KO8) was significantly decreased under heat stress compared with the wild type. Moreover, the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein oxidation was significantly increased in the KO8 plant cells under heat stress. Results indicating that the deficiency of AtGPX8 accelerates the progression of oxidative stress in KO8 plants. On the other hand, the overexpression of AtGPX8 in E. coli cells enhance the growth of the recombinant enzyme on media supplemented with 0.2 mM cumene hydroperoxide, 0.3 mM H 2O 2 or 600 mM NaCl. PMID:24217216

  10. Inverse Association of Plasma Level of Glutathione Peroxidase with Liver Fibrosis in Chronic Hepatitis B: Potential Role of Iron

    PubMed Central

    Moossavi, Shirin; Besharat, Sima; Sharafkhah, Maryam; Ghanbari, Reza; Sharifi, Amrollah; Rezanejad, Parisa; Pourshams, Akram; Poustchi, Hossein; Mohamadkhani, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Oxidative stress has a major pathogenic role for liver damage following chronic hepatitis B. Glutathione peroxidase (Gpx) is necessary in oxidative state mechanism that is generally down-regulated by Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. On the other hand, disorders of iron homeostasis have been found out in HBV infected patients. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the interplay of Gpx and serum iron on clinical and virological features of patients with chronic HBV infection. METHODS One hundred and fifty adult, treatment-naïve, patients with chronic hepatitis B were randomly designated from an ongoing cohort of patients with HBV. Plasma Gpx1 concentration and HBV DNA quantity were measured. Liver stiffness was measured by transient elastography. RESULTS Serum iron had a positive association with HBV DNA count in the total population. Serum iron was not associated with liver stiffness. However, HBV DNA was significantly associated with liver stiffness only in male patients. Serum Gpx was inversely associated with liver stiffness. Serum iron and Gpx had indirect effects on liver stiffness via HBV DNA count. We observed dissimilar effects of serum iron on HBV DNA and Gpx on liver stiffness in male and female patients. CONCLUSION We identified interplay of serum iron and Gpx1 in relation to level of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B. Our results propose that oxidative stress and serum iron are differentially implicated in the progression of chronic hepatitis B in male and female patients. PMID:27252819

  11. Peroxidase activation of cytoglobin by anionic phospholipids: Mechanisms and consequences.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Jesús; Kapralov, Alexandr A; Baumgartner, Matthew P; Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney E; Anthonymutu, Tamil S; Vlasova, Irina I; Camacho, Carlos J; Gladwin, Mark T; Bayir, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian E

    2016-05-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) is a hexa-coordinated hemoprotein with yet to be defined physiological functions. The iron coordination and spin state of the Cygb heme group are sensitive to oxidation of two cysteine residues (Cys38/Cys83) and/or the binding of free fatty acids. However, the roles of redox vs lipid regulators of Cygb's structural rearrangements in the context of the protein peroxidase competence are not known. Searching for physiologically relevant lipid regulators of Cygb, here we report that anionic phospholipids, particularly phosphatidylinositolphosphates, affect structural organization of the protein and modulate its iron state and peroxidase activity both conjointly and/or independently of cysteine oxidation. Thus, different anionic lipids can operate in cysteine-dependent and cysteine-independent ways as inducers of the peroxidase activity. We establish that Cygb's peroxidase activity can be utilized for the catalysis of peroxidation of anionic phospholipids (including phosphatidylinositolphosphates) yielding mono-oxygenated molecular species. Combined with the computational simulations we propose a bipartite lipid binding model that rationalizes the modes of interactions with phospholipids, the effects on structural re-arrangements and the peroxidase activity of the hemoprotein. PMID:26928591

  12. Glutathione cycle in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Biljak, Vanja Radisić; Rumora, Lada; Cepelak, Ivana; Pancirov, Dolores; Popović-Grle, Sanja; Sorić, Jasna; Grubisić, Tihana Zanić

    2010-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic inflammation and oxidant/antioxidant imbalance. Glutathione is the most abundant cellular low-molecular weight thiol and the glutathione redox cycle is the fundamental component of the cellular antioxidant defence system. Concentration of total glutathione and catalytic activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase were determined in peripheral blood of patients (n = 109) and healthy subjects (n = 51). Concentration of total glutathione in patients was not changed in comparison to healthy controls. However, we found statistically significant difference between patients with moderate and severe disease stages. Glutathione reductase activity was increased, while glutathione proxidase activity was decreased in the patients with COPD, when compared to healthy controls. We found no significant difference in glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities between stages. Patients who smoked had lower concentration of total glutathione compared with former smokers and never-smoking patients. Lung function parameters were inversely associated with glutathione level. Evidence is presented for differential modulation of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities in peripheral blood of patients with stable COPD. We suppose that in addition to glutathione biosynthesis, glutathione reductase-dependent regulation of the glutathione redox state is vital for protection against oxidative stress. PMID:20648694

  13. Preventive (myoglobin, transferrin) and scavenging (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) anti-oxidative properties of raw liquid extract of Morinda lucida leaf in the traditional treatment of Plasmodium infection

    PubMed Central

    Olaniyan, Mathew Folaranmi; Babatunde, Elizabeth Moyinoluwa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Liquid extract of Morinda lucida leaf has been demonstrated to have antiplasmodial activities. Some phytochemicals act as preventive and or scavenging antioxidants. This study aimed to investigate the preventative and scavenging properties of the raw liquid extract of M. lucida leaf using plasma myoglobin, transferrin, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione (GSH) peroxidase. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight Plasmodium-infected patients aged 29-47 years that have not been treated with any antimalaria medication but have decided to be treated traditionally using M. lucida leaf extract were recruited from 15 traditional homes in ATISBO, Saki-East, and Saki-West local government areas of Oke-Ogun — the Northern part of Oyo State-Nigeria. Identification of Plasmodium in the blood of the test and normal control subjects were carried out by Giemsha thick film technique. Packed cell volume, total bile acids, blood glucose, blood pressure, plasma myoglobin, transferrin, SOD, and GSH peroxidase (GPx) were evaluated in the normal control subjects and in the Plasmodium-infected patients before and after the treatment with raw liquid extract of M. lucida leaf. Results: A significant (P < 0.05) biochemical alterations were observed in the plasma values of transferrin, SOD, and GPx in the Plasmodium-infected patients when compared with the normal control subjects and after treatment with the raw liquid extract of M. lucida leaf. Conclusion: Our study supports the possible preventative and scavenging antioxidative effect of the raw liquid extract of M. lucida leaf in the traditional treatment of Plasmodium infection. PMID:27003969

  14. Modular evolution of glutathione peroxidase genes in association with different biochemical properties of their encoded proteins in invertebrate animals

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Young-An; Cai, Guo-Bin; Kim, Seon-Hee; Zo, Young-Gun; Kong, Yoon

    2009-01-01

    Background Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidases (PHGPx), the most abundant isoforms of GPx families, interfere directly with hydroperoxidation of lipids. Biochemical properties of these proteins vary along with their donor organisms, which has complicated the phylogenetic classification of diverse PHGPx-like proteins. Despite efforts for comprehensive analyses, the evolutionary aspects of GPx genes in invertebrates remain largely unknown. Results We isolated GPx homologs via in silico screening of genomic and/or expressed sequence tag databases of eukaryotic organisms including protostomian species. Genes showing strong similarity to the mammalian PHGPx genes were commonly found in all genomes examined. GPx3- and GPx7-like genes were additionally detected from nematodes and platyhelminths, respectively. The overall distribution of the PHGPx-like proteins with different biochemical properties was biased across taxa; selenium- and glutathione (GSH)-dependent proteins were exclusively detected in platyhelminth and deuterostomian species, whereas selenium-independent and thioredoxin (Trx)-dependent enzymes were isolated in the other taxa. In comparison of genomic organization, the GSH-dependent PHGPx genes showed a conserved architectural pattern, while their Trx-dependent counterparts displayed complex exon-intron structures. A codon for the resolving Cys engaged in reductant binding was found to be substituted in a series of genes. Selection pressure to maintain the selenocysteine codon in GSH-dependent genes also appeared to be relaxed during their evolution. With the dichotomized fashion in genomic organizations, a highly polytomic topology of their phylogenetic trees implied that the GPx genes have multiple evolutionary intermediate forms. Conclusion Comparative analysis of invertebrate GPx genes provides informative evidence to support the modular pathways of GPx evolution, which have been accompanied with sporadic expansion/deletion and exon

  15. Glutathione peroxidase-deficient mice are more susceptible to neutrophil-mediated hepatic parenchymal cell injury during endotoxemia: importance of an intracellular oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, H; Ho, Y S; Fisher, M A; Lawson, J A; Farhood, A

    1999-02-01

    Neutrophils contribute to hepatocellular injury in a number of acute inflammatory reactions. However, the molecular mechanism of parenchymal cell injury remains controversial. To address the issue of whether or not reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important in the injury process, we used the galactosamine/endotoxin (Gal/ET) model of acute liver failure, which involves a neutrophil-mediated parenchymal cell injury. In C3Heb/FeJ mice, Gal/ET induced a significant increase of hepatic and plasma levels of glutathione disulfide (GSSG), an indicator of oxidant stress, selectively during the neutrophil-mediated injury phase. In glutathione peroxidase-deficient mice (Gpx1(-/-)), Gal/ET or Gal/tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) caused more severe neutrophil-mediated liver injury compared with wild-type animals. However, there was no significant difference in other critical parameters, e.g., activation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), parenchymal cell apoptosis, and neutrophil sequestration in the liver. Our results suggest that neutrophil-derived ROS are responsible for an intracellular oxidant stress in hepatocytes after Gal/ET treatment. Because of the higher susceptibility of Gpx1(-/-) mice to a neutrophil-mediated injury, we conclude that peroxides generated by neutrophils diffused into hepatocytes and contributed to parenchymal cell death in vivo. Thus, strengthening defense mechanisms against ROS in target cells can attenuate excessive inflammatory injury without affecting host defense reactions. PMID:9918921

  16. Response of selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase in the freshwater bivalve Anodonta woodiana exposed to 2,4-dichlorophenol,2,4,6-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xichao; Hua, Chunxiu; Xue, Shipeng; Shi, Bingqin; Gui, Gaixia; Zhang, Dongxian; Wang, Xiying; Guo, Lianghong

    2016-08-01

    2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), and pentachlorophenol (PCP) pose a health risk to aquatic organism and humans, and are recognized as persistent priority pollutants. Selenium dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GPx) belongs to the family of selenoprotein, which acts mainly as an antioxidant role in the cellular defense system. In the current study, a Se-GPx full length cDNA was cloned from Anodonta woodiana and named as AwSeGPx. It had a characteristic codon at 165TGA167 that corresponds to selenocysteine(Sec) amino acid as U44. The full length cDNA consists of 870 bp, an open reading frame (ORF) of 585 bp encoded a polypeptide of 195 amino in which conserved domain (68LGFPCNQF75) and a glutathione peroxide-1 GPx active site (32GKVILVENVASLUGTT47) were observed. Additionally, the eukaryotic selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) was conserved in the 3'UTR. The AwSeGPx amino acid sequence exhibited a high similarity with that of other Se-GPx. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that AwSeGPx mRNA had a widely distribution, but the highest level was observed in hepatopancreas. AwSeGPx mRNA expression was significantly up-regulated in hepatopancreas, gill and hemocytes after 2,4-DCP, 2,4,6-TCP and PCP exposure. Under similar environment, clams A. woodiana showed a more sensitive to PCP than that of 2,4-DCP and 2,4,6-TCP. These results indicate that AwSeGPx plays a protective role in eliminating oxidative stress derived from 2,4-DCP, 2,4,6-TCP and PCP treatment. PMID:27291351

  17. Effect of dietary fat on plasma glutathione peroxidase levels and intestinal absorption of /sup 75/Se-labeled sodium selenite in chicks

    SciTech Connect

    Mutanen, M.L.; Mykkaenen, H.M.

    1984-05-01

    The effect of dietary fat on the availability of selenium was investigated in chicks fed either 4 or 20% butter, olive oil, rape oil, corn oil or sunflower oil in the diet for 3 weeks after hatching. Plasma glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity was used as an indicator of the body selenium status. In addition, the intestinal absorption of sodium selenite (/sup 75/Se-labeled) was determined by using both the in vivo ligated loop procedure and oral administration of the isotope. The plasma GSH-Px levels increased with increasing proportion of the polyunsaturated fatty acids in the diet. Increasing the amount of fat from 4 to 20% significantly enhanced the GSH-Px activity in the groups receiving butter or olive oil, but had no effect in animals fed the unsaturated fats. The absorption of (/sup 75/Se)selenite from the ligated duodenal loops tended to be reduced in chicks fed corn oil or sunflower oil as compared to the animals receiving butter in their diet. On the other hand, the type of dietary fat did not appear to affect the absorption of the orally administered selenite. The present study demonstrates that the type of dietary fat can affect the plasma GSH-Px levels in chicks without altering the intestinal absorption of selenite. However, the results on the absorption of the intraduodenally injected sodium selenite suggest that dietary fat plays some role in the intestinal transport of selenium.

  18. Detection of glutathione transferase activity on polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Ricci, G; Lo Bello, M; Caccuri, A M; Galiazzo, F; Federici, G

    1984-12-01

    A simple and sensitive assay for glutathione transferase activity on polyacrylamide gel is described. The method is based on the fast reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium salt by glutathione. Blue insoluble formazan colors the gel except in the glutathione transferase area. The stable and defined colorless zone is still detectable with 0.005 unit enzyme. This technique has been successfully applied with enzyme preparations of human heart and other tissues. PMID:6532239

  19. The design of redox active thiol peroxidase mimics: Dihydrolipoic acid recognition correlates with cytotoxicity and prooxidant action.

    PubMed

    Zadehvakili, B; McNeill, S M; Fawcett, J P; Giles, G I

    2016-03-15

    Redox active molecules containing organoselenium or organotellurium groups catalyse the oxidation of cellular thiols by hydrogen peroxide and are currently being developed as therapeutic agents. Potentially these synthetic thiol peroxidase (TPx) mimics can protect cells from oxidative stress by catalysing the reduction of reactive oxygen species by the cellular thiol glutathione, an activity which mimics the function of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase. Alternatively they can act as prooxidants by catalysing the oxidation of essential thiol species within the cell. However the structure-activity relationships which determine the choice of thiol substrate, and hence the overall antioxidant or prooxidant outcome of drug administration, remain unknown. We report the first study that relates the pharmacological properties of TPx mimics with their solubility and catalytic activity using different thiol substrates. We used a series of structurally related compounds PhMCnH2n+1 (M=Se, Te; n=4-7) and investigated their ability to catalyse the oxidation of the cellular thiols glutathione and dihydrolipoic acid by hydrogen peroxide. The resulting rate constants (kobs) were then related to compound cytotoxicity and antioxidant versus prooxidant action in A549 cancer cells. The results show that the dihydrolipoic acid kobs values correlate with both cytotoxicity and prooxidant function. This enabled us to define a relationship, IC50=10+280e(-5(DHLA) (kobs)), which allows the prediction of TPx mimic cytotoxicity. In contrast, hydrophobicity and glutathione kobs were unrelated to the compounds' redox pharmacology. PMID:26801688

  20. Dietary fish oil replacement with canola oil up-regulates glutathione peroxidase 1 gene expression in yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi).

    PubMed

    Bowyer, Jenna N; Rout-Pitt, Nathan; Bain, Peter A; Stone, David A J; Schuller, Kathryn A

    2012-08-01

    The marine carnivore yellowtail kingfish (YTK, Seriola lalandi) was fed diets containing 5% residual fish oil (from the dietary fish meal) plus either 20% fish oil (FO), 20% canola oil (CO), 20% poultry oil (PO), 10% fish oil plus 10% canola oil (FO/CO) or 10% fish oil plus 10% poultry oil (FO/PO) and the effects on fish growth and hepatic expression of two glutathione peroxidase (GPx 1 and GPx 4) and two peroxiredoxin (Prx 1 and Prx 4) antioxidant genes were investigated. Partial (50%) replacement of the added dietary fish oil with poultry oil significantly improved fish growth whereas 100% replacement with canola oil significantly depressed fish growth. The fatty acid profiles of the fish fillets generally reflected those of the dietary oils except that there was apparent selective utilization of palmitic acid (16:0) and oleic acid (18:1n-9) and apparent selective retention of eicospentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3). The Prx 1 and 4 genes were expressed at 10- and 100-fold the level of the GPx 4 and 1 genes, respectively, and at one-tenth the level of the highly expressed β-actin reference gene. Dietary fish oil replacement with canola oil significantly up-regulated GPx 1 gene expression and there was a non-significant tendency towards down-regulation of Prx 1 and Prx 4. The results are discussed in terms of the effects of fish oil replacement on the peroxidation index of the diets and the resulting effects on the target antioxidant enzymes. PMID:22521527

  1. Identification and characterization of two phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase genes from the Mediterranean species of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci complex.

    PubMed

    Jiu, Min; Li, Jun-Min; Gao, Xian-Long; Wang, Lun-Ji; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2015-05-01

    Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidases (PHGPXs) are essential enzymes of the cellular antioxidant defense system during insect-plant interactions. However, little attention has been devoted to the functional characterization of PHGXPs in the whitefly Bemisia tabaci. Here, we report the identification and characterization of two PHGPX genes, designated as BtQ-PHGPX1 and BtQ-PHGPX2 from the Mediterranean species of the B. tabaci complex. Sequence analysis indicated that the length of BtQ-PHGPX1 is of 942 bp with a 729 bp open-reading frame (ORF) encoding 242 amino acids, and BtQ-PHGPX2 is of 699 bp with a 567 bp ORF encoding 188 amino acids. Sequence alignment analysis showed that BtQ-PHGPX1 and BtQ-PHGPX2 shared high similarity with other known PHGPXs. The NVASXCGXT, FPCNQFXXQEPG, and IKWNFXKFLV surrounded the reactive cysteine, glutamine, and tryptophan residues, respectively. Recombinant BtQ-PHGPX1 and BtQ-PHGPX2 were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis with whiteflies of different development stages showed that the mRNA levels of BtQ-PHGPX2 were significantly higher in larvae than in other stages. The mRNA levels of BtQ-PHGPX2 were significantly higher than BtQ-PHGPX1 during all the developmental stages. The mRNA levels of BtQ-PHGPX1 and BtQ-PHGPX2 in female adults were relatively higher than in male adults. The expression of BtQ-PHGPX1 and BtQ-PHGPX2 was induced by the insecticide imidacloprid. These results suggest that BtQ-PHGPX1 and BtQ-PHGPX2 may participate in detoxification of oxidative hazards in B. tabaci. PMID:25639712

  2. Glutathione peroxidase 1 expression, malondialdehyde levels and histological alterations in the liver of Acrossocheilus fasciatus exposed to cadmium chloride.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Di; Sheng, Zhang; Wang, You-Fa; Han, Ying-Li; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Jun-Quan

    2016-03-10

    Cadmium (Cd) is known as a widespread pollutant in aquatic environment. The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is attributed to Cd exposure, which may affect the growth, development and physiological metabolism of aquatic organisms. In response to these unfavorable damages, antioxidant systems have been developed to protect against oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the expression pattern of glutathione peroxidase 1 genes (GPx-1a and GPx-1b) in the liver of Acrossocheilus fasciatus after Cd administration. Total RNA extraction, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) were performed in order to clone the A. fasciatus GPx-1a and GPx-1b full-length cDNA sequences and partial fragment of β-actin cDNA from the liver for the first time. Tissue-specific expression analysis proved that GPx-1 genes were widely expressed in the liver, kidney, gill, testis, muscle, spleen, heart and brain. The changes of GPx-1 mRNA and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the liver treated with Cd were measured. In addition, the acute toxic effects of Cd on the microstructure of the liver were studied using light microscopy. These results suggest that GPx-1, MDA and liver histology which represent molecular, biochemical and histological levels, can be used as potential biomarkers to monitor Cd pollution. The overall findings also highlight the potential use of those three bio-indicators combined together as a multi-level tool (molecular, biochemical and histological levels) when monitoring Cd contamination and other possible exogenetic pollutants in aquatic environment. PMID:26707212

  3. Activities of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and erythrocyte glutathione dependent enzymes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients and normal controls.

    PubMed

    Ngah, W Z; Shamaan, N A; Said, M H; Azhar, M T

    1993-01-01

    Plasma gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (gamma-GT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities were determined in normal and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. No difference in enzyme activities was observed in the three major races of the Malaysian population, i.e. Malay, Chinese and Indian patients. However, plasma gamma-GT, erythrocyte glutathione S-transferase (GST) and GPx activities were significantly increased in all NPC patients, while GR activity remained unchanged. Patients with elevated plasma gamma-GT activities also had increased GST and GPx activities. Plasma gamma-GT and GPx activities were then found to be affected by treatment. Patients with plasma gamma-GT activity greater than 70 IU/l had very poor prognoses but patients with decreased gamma-GT activities were found to be in remission. PMID:8105826

  4. Effect of hypoxic cell radiosensitizers on glutathione level and related enzyme activities in isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Noguchi, K.; Hattori, T.; Igarashi, T.; Ueno, K.; Satoh, T.; Kitagawa, H.; Hori, H.; Shibata, T.; Inayama, S.

    1985-08-19

    A comparative study of the effect of misonidazole and novel radiosensitizers on glutathione (GSH) levels and related enzyme activities in isolated rat hepatocytes was performed. Incubation of hepatocytes with 5 mM radiosensitizers led to a decrease in the intracellular GSH level. The most pronounced decrease in cellular GSH was evoked by 2,4-dinitromidazole-1-ethanol (DNIE); after incubation for only 15 min, GSH was hardly detected. DNIE-mediated GSH loss was dependent upon its concentration. DNIE reacted with GSH nonenzymatically as well as with diethylmaleate, while misonidazole and 1-methyl-2-methyl-sulfinyl-5-methoxycarbonylimidazole (KIH-3) did not. Addition of partially purified glutathione S-transferase (GST) did not enhance DNIE-mediated GSH loss in a cell-free system. DNIE inhibited glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), GST, and glutathione reductase (GSSG-R) activities in hepatocytes, while misonidazole and KIH-3 did not. GSH-Px activity assayed with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ as substrate was the most inhibited. Inhibition of GSH-Px activity assayed with cumene hydroperoxide as substrate and GST was less than that of GSH-Px assayed with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ as substrate. GSSG-R activity was decreased by DNIE, but not significantly. Incubation of purified GSH-Px with DNIE resulted in a little change in the activity when assayed with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ as substrate. 26 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  5. Catalase-peroxidases (KatG) exhibit NADH oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul; Wiseman, Ben; Deemagarn, Taweewat; Donald, Lynda J; Duckworth, Harry W; Carpena, Xavi; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C

    2004-10-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatG) produced by Burkholderia pseudomallei, Escherichia coli, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalyze the oxidation of NADH to form NAD+ and either H2O2 or superoxide radical depending on pH. The NADH oxidase reaction requires molecular oxygen, does not require hydrogen peroxide, is not inhibited by superoxide dismutase or catalase, and has a pH optimum of 8.75, clearly differentiating it from the peroxidase and catalase reactions with pH optima of 5.5 and 6.5, respectively, and from the NADH peroxidase-oxidase reaction of horseradish peroxidase. B. pseudomallei KatG has a relatively high affinity for NADH (Km=12 microm), but the oxidase reaction is slow (kcat=0.54 min(-1)) compared with the peroxidase and catalase reactions. The catalase-peroxidases also catalyze the hydrazinolysis of isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INH) in an oxygen- and H2O2-independent reaction, and KatG-dependent radical generation from a mixture of NADH and INH is two to three times faster than the combined rates of separate reactions with NADH and INH alone. The major products from the coupled reaction, identified by high pressure liquid chromatography fractionation and mass spectrometry, are NAD+ and isonicotinoyl-NAD, the activated form of isoniazid that inhibits mycolic acid synthesis in M. tuberculosis. Isonicotinoyl-NAD synthesis from a mixture of NAD+ and INH is KatG-dependent and is activated by manganese ion. M. tuberculosis KatG catalyzes isonicotinoyl-NAD formation from NAD+ and INH more efficiently than B. pseudomallei KatG. PMID:15280362

  6. The peroxidase activity of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD/SOD2)

    PubMed Central

    Ansenberger-Fricano, Kristine; Ganini, Douglas da Silva; Mao, Mao; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Dallas, Shannon; Mason, Ronald P.; Stadler, Krisztian; Santos, Janine H.; Bonini, Marcelo G.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is an integral mitochondrial protein known as a first line antioxidant defense against superoxide radical anions produced as by-products of the electron transport chain. Recent studies have shaped the idea that by regulating the mitochondrial redox status and H2O2 outflow, MnSOD acts as a fundamental regulator of cellular proliferation, metabolism and apoptosis thereby assuming roles that extend far beyond its proposed antioxidant functions. Accordingly, allelic variations of MnSOD that have been shown to augment levels of MnSOD in mitochondria result in a 10-fold increase in prostate cancer risk. In addition, epidemiologic studies indicate that reduced glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity along with increases in H2O2 further increase cancer risk in the face MnSOD overexpression. These facts led us to hypothesize that, like the Cu, Zn-counterpart, MnSOD may work as a peroxidase, utilizing H2O2 to promote mitochondrial damage, a known cancer risk factor. Here we report that MnSOD indeed possesses peroxidase activity that manifests in mitochondria when the enzyme is overexpressed. PMID:22982047

  7. Translational regulation of glutathione peroxidase 4 expression through guanine-rich sequence-binding factor 1 is essential for embryonic brain development

    PubMed Central

    Ufer, Christoph; Wang, Chi Chiu; Fähling, Michael; Schiebel, Heike; Thiele, Bernd J.; Billett, E. Ellen; Kuhn, Hartmut; Borchert, Astrid

    2008-01-01

    Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (GPx4) is a moonlighting selenoprotein, which has been implicated in basic cell functions such as anti-oxidative defense, apoptosis, and gene expression regulation. GPx4-null mice die in utero at midgestation, and developmental retardation of the brain appears to play a major role. We investigated post-transcriptional mechanisms of GPx4 expression regulation and found that the guanine-rich sequence-binding factor 1 (Grsf1) up-regulates GPx4 expression. Grsf1 binds to a defined target sequence in the 5′-untranslated region (UTR) of the mitochondrial GPx4 (m-GPx4) mRNA, up-regulates UTR-dependent reporter gene expression, recruits m-GPx4 mRNA to translationally active polysome fractions, and coimmunoprecipitates with GPx4 mRNA. During embryonic brain development, Grsf1 and m-GPx4 are coexpressed, and functional knockdown (siRNA) of Grsf1 prevents embryonic GPx4 expression. When compared with mock controls, Grsf1 knockdown embryos showed significant signs of developmental retardations that are paralleled by apoptotic alterations (TUNEL staining) and massive lipid peroxidation (isoprostane formation). Overexpression of m-GPx4 prevented the apoptotic alterations in Grsf1-deficient embryos and rescued them from developmental retardation. These data indicate that Grsf1 up-regulates translation of GPx4 mRNA and implicate the two proteins in embryonic brain development. PMID:18593884

  8. Glutathione peroxidase response in tissues of rats fed diets containing fish protein concentrate prepared from shark flesh of known mercury and selenium contents

    SciTech Connect

    Thrower, S.J.; Andrewartha, K.A.

    1981-01-01

    Studies have been reported using experimental animals and synthetic diets containing selenium and mercury compounds to demonstrate detoxification of mercury by selenium. The mechanism of detoxification remains obscure. Most experiments have involved the use of high levels of both elements and relied on the observation of gross symptoms. The measurement of enzyme systems may be useful in detecting effects of mercury at a lower, subclinical level and in elucidating the biochemistry of mercury/selenium interactions. The activity of the selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in rats is dependent on dietary selenium and attempts have been made to use this enzyme as an indicator of mercury/selenium interactions. The research described in this paper was designed to investigate the effect of mercury, in the form and amounts which occur naturally in seafood, on the availability of selenium at levels approximating the nutritional requirement. In anticipation of mercury lowering the GSH-Px response a range of selenium concentrations was used, from nutritional deficiency to three times the nutritional requirement.

  9. Repeated exposure to far infrared ray attenuates acute restraint stress in mice via inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway by induction of glutathione peroxidase-1.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thai-Ha Nguyen; Mai, Huynh Nhu; Shin, Eun-Joo; Nam, Yunsung; Nguyen, Bao Trong; Lee, Yu Jeung; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Tran, Hoang-Yen Phi; Cho, Eun-Hee; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Lei, Xin Gen; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Nam Hun; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to far-infrared ray (FIR) has been shown to exert beneficial effects on cardiovascular and emotional disorders. However, the precise underlying mechanism mediated by FIR remains undetermined. Since restraint stress induces cardiovascular and emotional disorders, the present study investigated whether exposure to FIR affects acute restraint stress (ARS) in mice. c-Fos-immunoreactivity (IR) was significantly increased in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN) and dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) in response to ARS. The increase in c-Fos-IR parallels that in oxidative burdens in the hypothalamus against ARS. Exposure to FIR significantly attenuated increases in the c-Fos-IR, oxidative burdens and corticosterone level. ARS elicited decreases in GSH/GSSG ratio, cytosolic Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD-1), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR) activities. FIR-mediated attenuation was particularly observed in ARS-induced decrease in GPx, but not in SOD-1 or GR activity. Consistently, ARS-induced decreases in GPx-1-immunoreactivity in PVN and DMH, and decreases in GPx-1 expression in the hypothalamus were significantly attenuated by FIR. ARS-induced significant increases in phosphorylation of JAK2/STAT3, and nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity of NFκB were observed in the hypothalamus. Exposure to FIR selectively attenuated phosphorylation of JAK2/STAT3, but did not diminish nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity of NFκB, suggesting that JAK2/STAT3 constitutes a critical target for FIR-mediated pharmacological potential. ARS-induced increase in c-Fos-IR in the PVN and DMH of non-transgenic mice was significantly attenuated by FIR exposure or JAK2/STAT3 inhibitor AG490. GPx-1 overexpressing transgenic mice significantly protected increases in the c-Fos-IR and corticosterone level induced by ARS. However, neither FIR exposure nor AG490 significantly affected attenuations by genetic overexpression of GPx-1

  10. Transcriptional up-regulation of the mouse cytosolic glutathione peroxidase gene in erythroid cells is due to a tissue-specific 3' enhancer containing functionally important CACC/GT motifs and binding sites for GATA and Ets transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    O'Prey, J; Ramsay, S; Chambers, I; Harrison, P R

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear run-on experiments have shown that the high level of expression of the mouse cytosolic glutathione peroxidase mRNA in erythroid cells is due to up-regulation of the gene at the transcriptional level. Studies of the chromatin structure around the cytosolic glutathione peroxidase gene have revealed a series of DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSS) in the 3' flanking region of the gene in erythroid and other high-expression tissues that are lacking in low-expression cells, in addition to a DHSS over the promoter region in both high- and low-expression tissues. Functional transfection experiments have demonstrated that one of the 3' DHSS regions functions as an enhancer in erythroid cells but not in a low-expression epithelial cell line; and site-directed mutagenesis and footprinting experiments reveal that the activity of the erythroid cell-specific enhancer requires a cluster of binding sites for the CACC/GT box factors and the GATA and Ets families of transcription factors. Images PMID:8413228

  11. Functional analysis of the role of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the ROS signaling pathway, hyphal branching and the regulation of ganoderic acid biosynthesis in Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenyang; Shi, Liang; Chen, Dongdong; Ren, Ang; Gao, Tan; Zhao, Mingwen

    2015-09-01

    Ganoderma lucidum, a hallmark of traditional Chinese medicine, has been widely used as a pharmacologically active compound. Although numerous research studies have focused on the pharmacological mechanism, fewer studies have explored the basic biological features of this species, restricting the further development and application of this important mushroom. Because of the ability of this mushroom to reduce and detoxify the compounds produced by various metabolic pathways, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) is one of the most important antioxidant enzymes with respect to ROS. Although studies in both animals and plants have suggested many important physiological functions of GPx, there are few systematic research studies concerning the role of this enzyme in fungi, particularly in large basidiomycetes. In the present study, we cloned the GPx gene and created GPx-silenced strains by the down-regulation of GPx gene expression using RNA interference. The results indicated an essential role for GPx in controlling the intracellular H2O2 content, hyphal branching, antioxidant stress tolerance, cytosolic Ca(2+) content and ganoderic acid biosynthesis. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that GPx is regulated by intracellular H2O2 levels and suggested that crosstalk occurs between GPx and intracellular H2O2. Moreover, evidence was obtained indicating that GPx regulation of hyphal branching via ROS might occur independently of the cytosolic Ca(2+) content. Further mechanistic investigation also revealed that the effects of GPx on ganoderic acid synthesis via ROS are regulated by the cytosolic Ca(2+) content. Taken together, these findings indicate that ROS have a complex influence on growth, development and secondary metabolism in fungi and that GPx serves an important function. The present study provides an excellent framework to identify GPx functions and highlights a role for this enzyme in ROS regulation. PMID:26216672

  12. Specificity of an HPETE peroxidase from rat PMN

    SciTech Connect

    Skoog, M.T.; Nichols, J.S.; Harrison, B.L.; Wiseman, J.S.

    1988-09-01

    The 15,000xg supernatant of sonicated rat PMN contains 5-lipoxygenase that converts arachidonic acid to 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HPETE) and leukotriene A4 and an HPETE peroxidase that catalyzes reduction of the 5-HPETE. The specificity of this HPETE peroxidase for peroxides, reducing agents, and inhibitors has been characterized to distinguish this enzyme from other peroxidase activities. In addition to 5-HPETE, the HPETE peroxidase will catalyze reduction of 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid, and 15-hydroperoxy-8,11,13-eicosatrienoic acid, but not cumene or t-butylhydroperoxides. The HPETE peroxidase accepted 5 of 11 thiols tested as reducing agents. However, glutathione is greater than 15 times more effective than any other thiol tested. Other reducing agents, ascorbate, NADH, NADPH, phenol, p-cresol, and homovanillic acid, were not accepted by HPETE peroxidase. This enzyme is not inhibited by 10 mM KCN, 2 mM aspirin, 2 mM salicylic acid, or 0.5 mM indomethacin. When 5-(14C)HPETE is generated from (14C)arachidonic acid in the presence of unlabeled 5-HPETE and the HPETE peroxidase, the 5-(14C)HETE produced is of much lower specific activity than the (14C)arachidonic acid. This indicates that the 5-(14C)HPETE leaves the active site of 5-lipoxygenase and mixes with the unlabeled 5-HPETE in solution prior to reduction and is a kinetic demonstration that 5-lipoxygenase has no peroxidase activity. Specificity for peroxides, reducing agents, and inhibitors differentiates HPETE peroxidase from glutathione peroxidase, phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase, a 12-HPETE peroxidase, and heme peroxidases. The HPETE peroxidase could be a glutathione S-transferase selective for fatty acid hydroperoxides.

  13. Colorimetric Glucose Assay Based on Magnetic Particles Having Pseudo-peroxidase Activity and Immobilized Glucose Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Martinkova, Pavla; Opatrilova, Radka; Kruzliak, Peter; Styriak, Igor; Pohanka, Miroslav

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic particles (MPs) are currently used as a suitable alternative for peroxidase in the construction of novel biosensors, analytic and diagnostic methods. Their better chemical and thermal stabilities predestine them as appropriate pseudo-enzymatic catalysts. In this point of view, our research was focused on preparation of simply and fast method for immobilization of glucose oxidase onto surface of MPs with peroxidase-like activity. Spectrophotometric method (wavelength 450 nm) optimized for glucose determination using modified MPs has been successfully developed. Concentration curve for optimization of method was assayed, and Michaelis-Menten constant (K m) calculated, maximum reaction rate (V max), limit of detection, and correlation coefficient were determined to be 0.13 mmol/l (2.34 mg/dl), 1.79 pkat, 3.74 µmol/l (0.067 mg/dl), and 0.996, respectively. Interferences of other sugars such as sucrose, sorbitol, deoxyribose, maltose, and fructose were determined as well as effect of substances presenting in plasma (ascorbic acid, reduced glutathione, trolox, and urea). Results in comparison with positive and negative controls showed no interferences of the other sugars and no influence of plasma substances to measuring of glucose. The constructed method showed corresponding results with linear dependence and a correlation coefficient of 0.997. Possibility of repeated use of modified MPs was successfully proved. PMID:27041274

  14. [Thiol peroxidase activities in rat blood plasma determined with hydrogen peroxide and 5,5`-dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)].

    PubMed

    Razygraev, A V; Taborskaya, K I; Petrosyan, M A; Tumasova, Zh N

    2016-05-01

    Earlier it has been shown that extracellular glutathione peroxidase (GPx3) from human plasma is able to use cysteine (Cys-SH) instead of glutathione (GSH) as a thiol substrate. In the present study, the ability of rat plasma to utilize not only GSH, but also Cys-SH and homocysteine (Hcy-SH), in the thiol peroxidase reaction has been confirmed. The molar ratio between thiol and H2O2 in the catalyzed reaction was 2:1. The specific activity increased with fractionation of proteins. At a fixed thiol concentration of 0.23 mM, the saturation by H2O2 with vmax app of 100, 128, and 132 nmol H2O2 / s per 1 ml of plasma was found for DL-Cys-SH, L-GSH, and DL-Hcy-SH, respectively. Rank distributions of activities towards all three thiol substrates within plasma protein fractions are fully identical (the probability of random full coincidence was less than 0.01). The statistical analysis confirms that Cys-SH peroxidase, Hcy-SH peroxidase, and GSH peroxidase activities are closely associated with each other. The most probable outcome of this result is the ability of rat GPx3 to utilize all three thiols as substrates for oxidation. Probably, thiol peroxidase is a participant of formation of plasma cystine (Cys-SS-Cys) from Cys-SH in plasma. If the forms of Hcy exhibit different toxic effects, it can be suggested that thiol peroxidase regulates Hcy toxicity in hyperhomocysteinemia through Hcy-SH oxidation to homocystine (Hcy-SS-Hcy). PMID:27562997

  15. Two variants of selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase from the disk abalone Haliotis discus discus: Molecular characterization and immune responses to bacterial and viral stresses.

    PubMed

    Bathige, S D N K; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Godahewa, G I; Thulasitha, William Shanthakumar; Whang, Ilson; Won, Seung Hwan; Kim, Chul; Lee, Jehee

    2015-08-01

    Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) is an essential member of the antioxidant systems of living organisms and may be involved in immune defense against pathogenic invasion. In the current study, two selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidases (AbSeGPxs) that shared 54.3% identity were identified from the disk abalone Haliotis discus discus. The open reading frames (ORFs) of AbSeGPx-a and AbSeGPx-b coded for 222 and 220 amino acids, respectively, with a characteristic selenocysteine residue encoded by an opal stop codon (TGA). The conserved selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element was predicted in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of both isoforms, and they were found to form two stem-loop structures. Amino acid comparison and phylogenetic studies revealed that the AbSeGPxs were closely related to those in other mollusk species and were evolutionarily distinct from those of other taxonomic groups. The SYBR Green qPCR was employed in investigating the transcripts of AbSeGPxs. The expression of AbSeGPxs mRNA was examined in different embryonic developmental stages and differential expression patterns for AbSeGPx-a and AbSeGPx-b were noted. Meanwhile, the highest expression of AbSeGPxs was detected in the hepatopancreas of healthy adult animals. Next, transcriptional levels were profiled in hemocytes of adults to determine the immune responses of AbSeGPxs to microbial infections. The results revealed the significant up-regulation of AbSeGPx-a in a time-dependent manner after bacterial (Listeria monocytogenes and Vibrio parahaemolyticus) and viral (viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus) infections. Consequently, these findings indicate that AbSeGPx-a and AbSeGPx-b might be involved in the embryonic development of disk abalone and the regulation of immune defense system of adult animals. PMID:26025184

  16. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Reduces Oxidative Injury via Glutathione Activity in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shoulong; Yu, Kun; Wu, Qian; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Baolu; Liu, Guoshi; Liu, Yixun; Lian, Zhengxing

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important sensor of Gram-negative bacteria and can trigger activation of the innate immune system. Increased activation of TLR4 can lead to the induction of oxidative stress. Herein, the pathway whereby TLR4 affects antioxidant activity was studied. In TLR4-overexpressing sheep, TLR4 expression was found to be related to the integration copy number when monocytes were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Consequently, production of malondialdehyde (MDA) was increased, which could increase the activation of prooxidative stress enzymes. Meanwhile, activation of an antioxidative enzyme, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), was increased. Real-time PCR showed that expression of activating protein-1 (AP-1) and the antioxidative-related genes was increased. By contrast, the expression levels of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and catalase (CAT) were reduced. In transgenic sheep, glutathione (GSH) levels were dramatically reduced. Furthermore, transgenic sheep were intradermally injected with LPS in each ear. The amounts of inflammatory infiltrates were correlated with the number of TLR4 copies that were integrated in the genome. Additionally, the translation of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) was increased. Our findings indicated that overexpression of TLR4 in sheep could ameliorate oxidative injury through GSH secretion that was induced by LPS stimulation. Furthermore, TLR4 promoted γ-GCS translation through the AP-1 pathway, which was essential for GSH synthesis. PMID:26640618

  17. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Reduces Oxidative Injury via Glutathione Activity in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shoulong; Yu, Kun; Wu, Qian; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Baolu; Liu, Guoshi; Liu, Yixun; Lian, Zhengxing

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important sensor of Gram-negative bacteria and can trigger activation of the innate immune system. Increased activation of TLR4 can lead to the induction of oxidative stress. Herein, the pathway whereby TLR4 affects antioxidant activity was studied. In TLR4-overexpressing sheep, TLR4 expression was found to be related to the integration copy number when monocytes were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Consequently, production of malondialdehyde (MDA) was increased, which could increase the activation of prooxidative stress enzymes. Meanwhile, activation of an antioxidative enzyme, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), was increased. Real-time PCR showed that expression of activating protein-1 (AP-1) and the antioxidative-related genes was increased. By contrast, the expression levels of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and catalase (CAT) were reduced. In transgenic sheep, glutathione (GSH) levels were dramatically reduced. Furthermore, transgenic sheep were intradermally injected with LPS in each ear. The amounts of inflammatory infiltrates were correlated with the number of TLR4 copies that were integrated in the genome. Additionally, the translation of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) was increased. Our findings indicated that overexpression of TLR4 in sheep could ameliorate oxidative injury through GSH secretion that was induced by LPS stimulation. Furthermore, TLR4 promoted γ-GCS translation through the AP-1 pathway, which was essential for GSH synthesis. PMID:26640618

  18. Thioltransferase activity of bovine lens glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed Central

    Dal Monte, M; Cecconi, I; Buono, F; Vilardo, P G; Del Corso, A; Mura, U

    1998-01-01

    A Mu-class glutathione S-transferase purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from bovine lens displayed thioltransferase activity, catalysing the transthiolation reaction between GSH and hydroxyethyldisulphide. The thiol-transfer reaction is composed of two steps, the formation of GSSG occurring through the generation of an intermediate mixed disulphide between GSH and the target disulphide. Unlike glutaredoxin, which is only able to catalyse the second step of the transthiolation process, glutathioneS-transferase catalyses both steps of the reaction. Data are presented showing that bovine lens glutathione S-transferase and rat liver glutaredoxin, which was used as a thioltransferase enzyme model, can operate in synergy to catalyse the GSH-dependent reduction of hydroxyethyldisulphide. PMID:9693102

  19. Zonal Changes in Ascorbate and Hydrogen Peroxide Contents, Peroxidase, and Ascorbate-Related Enzyme Activities in Onion Roots1

    PubMed Central

    del Carmen Córdoba-Pedregosa, María; Córdoba, Francisco; Villalba, José Manuel; González-Reyes, José Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Onion (Allium cepa) roots growing hydroponically show differential zonal values for intra- (symplastic) and extra- (apoplastic) cellular ascorbate (ASC) and dehydroascorbate (DHA) contents and for related enzyme activities. In whole roots, ASC and DHA concentrations were higher in root apex and meristem and gradually decreased toward the root base. Guaiacol peroxidase, ASC peroxidase, monodehydroascorbate oxidoreductase, DHA reductase, catalase, and glutathione reductase activities showed differential activity patterns depending on the zone of the root and their apoplastic or symplastic origin. An in vivo staining of peroxidase activity also revealed a specific distribution pattern along the root axis. Using electron microscopy, hydrogen peroxide was found at different locations depending on the root zone but was mainly located in cell walls from epidermal and meristematic cells and in cells undergoing lignification. A balanced control of all of these molecules seems to exist along the root axis and may be directly related to the mechanisms in which the ASC system is involved, as cell division and elongation. The role of ASC on growth and development in relation to its presence at the different zones of the root is discussed. PMID:12586893

  20. Reduced mitochondrial and ascorbate-glutathione activity after artificial ageing in soybean seed.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xia; Tian, Qian; Yin, Guangkun; Chen, Xiaoling; Zhang, Jinmei; Ng, Sophia; Lu, Xinxiong

    2014-01-15

    The effect of artificial ageing on the relationship between mitochondrial activities and the antioxidant system was studied in soybean seeds (Glycine max L. cv. Zhongdou No. 27). Ageing seeds for 18d and 41d at 40°C reduced germination from 99% to 52% and 0%, respectively. In comparison to the control, malondialdehyde content and leachate conductivity in aged seeds increased and were associated with membrane damage. Transmission electron microscopy and Percoll density gradient centrifugation showed that aged seeds mainly contained poorly developed mitochondria in which respiration and marker enzymes activities were significantly reduced. Heavy mitochondria isolated from the interface of the 21% and 40% Percoll were analyzed. Mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes activities including superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, monodehydroascorbate reductase, and dehydroascorbate reductase were significantly reduced in aged seeds. A decrease in total ascorbic acid (ASC) and glutathione (GSH) content as well as the reduced/oxidized ratio of ASC and GSH in mitochondria with prolonged ageing showed that artificial ageing reduced ASC-GSH cycle activity. These results suggested an elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in the aged seeds, which was confirmed by measurements of superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide levels. We conclude that mitochondrial dysfunction in artificially aged seeds is due to retarded mitochondrial and ASC-GSH cycle activity and elevated ROS accumulation. PMID:24331429

  1. The glutathione peroxidase-mediated reactive oxygen species resistance, fungicide sensitivity and cell wall construction in the citrus fungal pathogen Alternaria alternata.

    PubMed

    Yang, Siwy Ling; Yu, Pei-Ling; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2016-03-01

    The ability to detoxify reactive oxygen species (ROS) is critical for pathogenicity in the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria alternata. We report a glutathione peroxidase 3 (AaGPx3) involved in the complex signalling network that is essential for the detoxification of cellular stresses induced by ROS and for A. alternata pathogenesis in citrus. AaGPx3 deletion mutants displayed increased sensitivity to H2 O2 and many ROS-generating compounds. AaGPx3 is required for correct fungal development as the AaGPx3 mutant strains showed a severe reduction in conidiation. AaGPx3 mutants accumulated higher chitin content than the wild-type and were less sensitive to the cell wall-targeting compounds calcofluor white and Congo red, as well as the fungicides fludioxonil and vinclozolin, suggesting a role of the glutathione systems in fungal cell wall construction. Virulence assays revealed that AaGPx3 is required for full virulence. The expression of AaGPx3 was downregulated in fungal strains carrying defective NADPH oxidase (Nox) or the oxidative stress responsive regulators YAP1 and HOG1, all implicated in ROS resistance. These results further support the important role of ROS detoxification during A. alternata pathogenesis in citrus. Overall, our study provides genetic evidence to define the central role of AaGPx3 in the biological and pathological functions of A. alternata. PMID:26567914

  2. Molecular cloning and expression study of pi-class glutathione S-transferase (pi-GST) and selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GPx) transcripts in the freshwater bivalve Dreissena polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Doyen, Périne; Bigot, Aurélie; Vasseur, Paule; Rodius, François

    2008-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GST) and glutathione peroxidases (GPx) are essential components of cellular detoxification systems. We identified GST and GPx transcripts in the freshwater bivalve Dreissena polymorpha, their full-length coding sequences were obtained by reverse-transcription PCR using degenerated primers followed by 5' and 3' RACE-PCR (rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR). The cDNA identified encoded proteins of 205 and 243 amino acids corresponding respectively to a pi-class GST and a selenium-dependent GPx. The comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences with GST and GPx from other species showed that the residues essential to the enzymatic function of these two proteins are highly conserved. We studied their expression pattern in the digestive gland, the gills and the excretory system of D. polymorpha. The results showed that pi-GST mRNA expression is higher in the digestive gland than in the gills or the excretory system. Se-GPx transcripts are expressed at high, medium and very low levels in the digestive gland, the excretory system and the gills, respectively. PMID:17827073

  3. Intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lizeng; Zhuang, Jie; Nie, Leng; Zhang, Jinbin; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning; Wang, Taihong; Feng, Jing; Yang, Dongling; Perrett, Sarah; Yan, Xiyun

    2007-09-01

    Nanoparticles containing magnetic materials, such as magnetite (Fe3O4), are particularly useful for imaging and separation techniques. As these nanoparticles are generally considered to be biologically and chemically inert, they are typically coated with metal catalysts, antibodies or enzymes to increase their functionality as separation agents. Here, we report that magnetite nanoparticles in fact possess an intrinsic enzyme mimetic activity similar to that found in natural peroxidases, which are widely used to oxidize organic substrates in the treatment of wastewater or as detection tools. Based on this finding, we have developed a novel immunoassay in which antibody-modified magnetite nanoparticles provide three functions: capture, separation and detection. The stability, ease of production and versatility of these nanoparticles makes them a powerful tool for a wide range of potential applications in medicine, biotechnology and environmental chemistry.

  4. Activation of lignin peroxidase in organic media by reversed micelles.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masayuki; Michizoe, Junji; Oakazaki, Shin-Ya; Furusaki, Shintaro; Goto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Hiroo; Wariishi, Hiroyuki

    2004-11-20

    Activation of lignin peroxidase (LIP) in an organic solvent by reversed micelles was investigated. Bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate sodium salt (AOT) was used as a surfactant to form a reversed micelle. Lyophilized LIP from an optimized aqueous solution exhibited no enzymatic activity in any organic solvents examined in this study; however, LIP was catalytically active by being entrapped in the AOT reversed micellar solution. LIP activity in the reversed micelle was enhanced by optimizing either the preparation or the operation conditions, such as water content and pH in water pools of the reversed micelle and the reaction temperature. Stable activity was obtained in isooctane because of the stability of the reversed micelle. The optimal pH was 5 in the reversed micellar system, which shifted from pH 3 in the aqueous solution. The degradation reaction of several environmental pollutants was attempted using LIP hosted in the AOT reversed micelle. Degradation achieved after a 1-h reaction reached 81%, 50%, and 22% for p-nonylphenol, bisphenol A, and 2,4-dichlorophenol, respectively. This is the first report on the utilization of LIP in organic media. PMID:15459910

  5. Peroxidase synthesis and activity in the interaction of soybean with Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. glycinea (Pmg)

    SciTech Connect

    Chibbar, R.N.; Esnault, R.; Lee, D.; van Huystee, R.B.; Ward, E.W.B.

    1986-04-01

    Changes, in peroxidase (EC1.11.1.7) have been reported following infection. However, determinations of biosynthesis of quantities of the peroxidase protein molecule have not been madeexclamation In this study hypocotyl of soybean seedlings (Glycine max; cv Harosoy, susceptible; cv Harosoy 63, resistant) were inoculated with zoospores of Pmg. Incorporation of /sup 35/S-methionine (supplied with inoculum) in TCA precipitates was measured. Peroxidase synthesis was measured by immuno precipitation using antibodies against a cationic and an anionic peroxidase derived from peanut cells. Specific peroxidase activity increased rapidly from 5 to 9 h following infection in the resistant reaction but not in the susceptible reaction or the water controls. There was increased synthesis of the anionic peroxidase but not of the cationic peroxidase in the resistant reaction. The anionic peroxidase did not increase in the susceptible until 15 h. The ratio of peroxidase synthesis to total protein synthesis decreased in inoculated tissues compared to control. Peroxidase synthesis is, therefore, a relative minor host response to infection.

  6. Ascorbate Peroxidase and Catalase Activities and Their Genetic Regulation in Plants Subjected to Drought and Salinity Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Sofo, Adriano; Scopa, Antonio; Nuzzaci, Maria; Vitti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an important relatively stable non-radical reactive oxygen species (ROS) is produced by normal aerobic metabolism in plants. At low concentrations, H2O2 acts as a signal molecule involved in the regulation of specific biological/physiological processes (photosynthetic functions, cell cycle, growth and development, plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses). Oxidative stress and eventual cell death in plants can be caused by excess H2O2 accumulation. Since stress factors provoke enhanced production of H2O2 in plants, severe damage to biomolecules can be possible due to elevated and non-metabolized cellular H2O2. Plants are endowed with H2O2-metabolizing enzymes such as catalases (CAT), ascorbate peroxidases (APX), some peroxiredoxins, glutathione/thioredoxin peroxidases, and glutathione sulfo-transferases. However, the most notably distinguished enzymes are CAT and APX since the former mainly occurs in peroxisomes and does not require a reductant for catalyzing a dismutation reaction. In particular, APX has a higher affinity for H2O2 and reduces it to H2O in chloroplasts, cytosol, mitochondria and peroxisomes, as well as in the apoplastic space, utilizing ascorbate as specific electron donor. Based on recent reports, this review highlights the role of H2O2 in plants experiencing water deficit and salinity and synthesizes major outcomes of studies on CAT and APX activity and genetic regulation in drought- and salt-stressed plants. PMID:26075872

  7. Calcium promotes activity and confers heat stability on plant peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Plieth, Christoph; Vollbehr, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate how peroxidase (PO) activities and their heat stability correlate with the availability of free Ca2+ ions. Calcium ions work as a molecular switch for PO activity and exert a protective function, rendering POs heat stable. The concentration ranges of these two activities differ markedly. POs are activated by µM Ca2+ concentration ranges, whereas heat stabilization is observed in the nM range. This suggests the existence of different Ca2+ binding sites. The heat stability of POs depends on the source plant species. Terrestrial plants have POs that exhibit higher temperature stability than those POs from limnic and marine plants. Different POs from a single species can differ in terms of heat stability. The abundance of different POs within a plant is dependent on age and developmental stage. The heat stability of a PO does not necessarily correlate with the maximum temperature the source species is usually exposed to in its natural habitat. This raises questions on the role of POs in the heat tolerance of plants. Consequently, detailed investigations are needed to identify and characterize individual POs, with regard to their genetic origin, subcellular expression, tissue abundance, developmental emergence and their functions in innate and acquired heat tolerance. PMID:22580695

  8. Oxidation of pharmaceutically active compounds by a ligninolytic fungal peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Eibes, Gemma; Debernardi, Gianfranco; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Moreira, M Teresa; Lema, Juan M

    2011-06-01

    Pharmaceuticals are an important group of emerging pollutants with increasing interest due to their rising consumption and the evidence for ecotoxicological effects associated to trace amounts in aquatic environments. In this paper, we assessed the potential degradation of a series of pharmaceuticals: antibiotics (sulfamethoxazole), antidepressives (citalopram hydrobromide and fluoxetine hydrochloride), antiepileptics (carbamazepine), anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac and naproxen) and estrogen hormones (estrone, 17β-estradiol, 17α-ethinylestradiol) by means of a versatile peroxidase (VP) from the ligninolytic fungus Bjerkandera adusta. The effects of the reaction conditions: VP activity, organic acid concentration and H(2)O(2) addition rate, on the kinetics of the VP based oxidation system were evaluated. Diclofenac and estrogens were completely degraded after only 5-25 min even with a very low VP activity (10 U l(-1)). High degradation percentages (80%) were achieved for sulfamethoxazole and naproxen. Low or undetectable removal yields were observed for citalopram (up to 18%), fluoxetine (lower than 10%) and carbamazepine (not degraded). PMID:20972884

  9. Selective oxidation of enzyme extracts for improved quantification of peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu; Penner, Michael H

    2015-05-01

    Natural components endogenous to plant material extracts often interfere with traditional peroxidase assays by reducing the oxidized product generated as a result of the peroxidase-catalyzed reaction. This leads to an underestimation of peroxidase activity when the oxidized product provides the signal for enzyme activity quantification. This article describes a relatively simple way to alleviate complications arising due to the presence of such confounding compounds. The method is based on using 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) as the reducing substrate. The oxidized product of the reaction is ABTS(+), the accumulation of which can be followed spectrophotometrically. It is shown here that one can selectively inactivate the endogenous compounds that confound the peroxidase assay by treating the enzyme preparation with the oxidized product itself, ABTS(+), prior to initiating the quantification assay. This approach is selective for those compounds likely to interfere with peroxidase quantification. The presented method is shown to alleviate the complications associated with lag phases typical of plant extract peroxidase assays and, thus, to more accurately reflect total peroxidase activity. The presented assay is expected to be applicable to the wide range of biological systems for which the determination of peroxidase activity is desired. PMID:25640588

  10. Horseradish peroxidase and chitosan: activation, immobilization and comparative results.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Saleh A; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L; Kumosani, Taha A; El-Shishtawy, Reda M

    2013-09-01

    Recently, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was immobilized on activated wool and we envisioned that the use of chitosan would be interesting instead of wool owing to its simple chemical structure, abundant nature and biodegradability. In this work, HRP was immobilized on chitosan crosslinked with cyanuric chloride. FT-IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize immobilized HRP. The number of ten reuses of immobilized HRP has been detected. The pH was shifted from 5.5 for soluble HRP to 5.0 for immobilized enzyme. The soluble HRP had an optimum temperature of 30 °C, which was shifted to 35 °C for immobilized enzyme. The soluble HRP and immobilized HRP were thermal stable up to 35 and 45 °C, respectively. The apparent kinetic constant values (K(m)) of soluble HRP and chitosan-HRP were 35 mM and 40 mM for guaiacol and 2.73 mM and 5.7 mM for H2O2, respectively. Immobilization of HRP partially protected them from metal ions compared to soluble enzyme. The chitosan-HRP was remarkably more stable against urea, Triton X-100 and organic solvents. Chitosan-HRP exhibited large number of reuses and more resistance to harmful compounds compared with wool-HRP. On the basis of results obtained in the present study, chitosan-HRP could be employed in bioremediation application. PMID:23769933

  11. Regulative roles of glutathione reductase and four glutaredoxins in glutathione redox, antioxidant activity, and iron homeostasis of Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long-Bin; Tang, Li; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2016-07-01

    Multiple glutaredoxins (Grx) and glutathione reductase (Glr) are vital for the thiol-disulfide redox system in budding yeast but generally unexplored in filamentous fungi. Here we characterized the Beauveria bassiana redox system comprising dithiol Grx1, monothiol Grx2-4, Grx-like Grx5, and Glr orthologue. Each grx or glr deletion was compensated by increased transcripts of some other grx genes in normal cultures. Particularly, grx3 compensated the absence of grx1, grx2, grx5, or glr under oxidative stress while its absence was compensated only by undeletable grx4 under normal conditions but by most of other undeleted grx and glr genes in response to menadione. Consequently, the redox state was disturbed in Δglr more than in Δgrx3 but not in Δgrx1/2/5. Superoxide dismutases were more active in normal Δgrx1-3 cultures but less in Δgrx5 or Δglr response to menadione. Total catalase activity increased differentially in all the mutant cultures stressed with or without H2O2 while total peroxidase activity decreased more in the normal or H2O2-stressed culture of Δglr than of Δgrx3. Among the mutants, Δgrx3 showed slightly increased sensitivity to menadione or H2O2; Δglr exhibited greater sensitivity to thiol-oxidizing diamide than thiol-reducing 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as well as increased sensitivity to the two oxidants. Intriguingly, all the mutants grew slower in a Fe(3+)-inclusive medium perhaps due to elevated transcripts of two Fe(3+) transporter genes. More or fewer phenotypes linked with biocontrol potential were altered in four deletion mutants excluding Δgrx5. All the changes were restored by targeted gene complementation. Overall, Grx3 played more critical role than other Grx homologues in the Glr-dependent redox system of the fungal entomopathogen. PMID:26969041

  12. Differential activity and structure of highly similar peroxidases. Spectroscopic, crystallographic, and enzymatic analyses of lignifying Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase A2 and horseradish peroxidase A2.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, K L; Indiani, C; Henriksen, A; Feis, A; Becucci, M; Gajhede, M; Smulevich, G; Welinder, K G

    2001-09-18

    Anionic Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase ATP A2 was expressed in Escherichia coli and used as a model for the 95% identical commercially available horseradish peroxidase HRP A2. The crystal structure of ATP A2 at 1.45 A resolution at 100 K showed a water molecule only 2.1 A from heme iron [Ostergaard, L., et al. (2000) Plant Mol. Biol. 44, 231-243], whereas spectroscopic studies of HRP A2 in solution at room temperature [Feis, A., et al. (1998) J. Raman Spectrosc. 29, 933-938] showed five-coordinated heme iron, which is common in peroxidases. Presented here, the X-ray crystallographic, single-crystal, and solution resonance Raman studies at room temperature confirmed that the sixth coordination position of heme iron of ATP A2 is essentially vacant. Furthermore, electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy showed that the heme environments of recombinant ATP A2 and glycosylated plant HRP A2 are indistinguishable at neutral and alkaline pH, from room temperature to 12 K, and are highly flexible compared with other plant peroxidases. Ostergaard et al. (2000) also demonstrated that ATP A2 expression and lignin formation coincide in Arabidopsis tissues, and docking of lignin precursors into the substrate binding site of ATP A2 predicted that coniferyl and p-coumaryl alcohols were good substrates. In contrast, the additional methoxy group of the sinapyl moiety gave rise to steric hindrance, not only in A2 type peroxidases but also in all peroxidases. We confirm these predictions for ATP A2, HRP A2, and HRP C. The specific activity of ATP A2 was lower than that of HRP A2 (pH 4-8), although a steady-state study at pH 5 demonstrated very little difference in their rate constants for reaction with H2O2 (k1 = 1.0 microM(-1) x s(-1). The oxidation of coniferyl alcohol, ferulic, p-coumaric, and sinapic acids by HRP A2, and ATP A2, however, gave modest but significantly different k3 rate constants of 8.7 +/- 0.3, 4.0 +/- 0.2, 0.70 +/- 0.03, and 0.04 +/- 0.2 microM(-1) x

  13. A Stable Bacterial Peroxidase with Novel Halogenating Activity and an Autocatalytically Linked Heme Prosthetic Group*

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Markus; Gruber, Clemens; Bellei, Marzia; Pirker, Katharina F.; Zamocky, Marcel; Kroiss, Daniela; Teufer, Stefan A.; Hofbauer, Stefan; Soudi, Monika; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Obinger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Reconstructing the phylogenetic relationships of the main evolutionary lines of the mammalian peroxidases lactoperoxidase and myeloperoxidase revealed the presence of novel bacterial heme peroxidase subfamilies. Here, for the first time, an ancestral bacterial heme peroxidase is shown to possess a very high bromide oxidation activity (besides conventional peroxidase activity). The recombinant protein allowed monitoring of the autocatalytic peroxide-driven formation of covalent heme to protein bonds. Thereby, the high spin ferric rhombic heme spectrum became similar to lactoperoxidase, the standard reduction potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple shifted to more positive values (−145 ± 10 mV at pH 7), and the conformational and thermal stability of the protein increased significantly. We discuss structure-function relationships of this new peroxidase in relation to its mammalian counterparts and ask for its putative physiological role. PMID:23918925

  14. Involvement of Antibiotic Efflux Machinery in Glutathione-Mediated Decreased Ciprofloxacin Activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Manish; Subramanian, Mahesh; Kumar, Ranjeet; Jass, Jana; Jawali, Narendra

    2016-07-01

    We have analyzed the contribution of different efflux components to glutathione-mediated abrogation of ciprofloxacin's activity in Escherichia coli and the underlying potential mechanism(s) behind this phenomenon. The results indicated that glutathione increased the total active efflux, thereby partially contributing to glutathione-mediated neutralization of ciprofloxacin's antibacterial action in E. coli However, the role of glutathione-mediated increased efflux becomes evident in the absence of a functional TolC-AcrAB efflux pump. PMID:27139480

  15. Effect of Myomectomy on Endometrial Glutathione Peroxidase 3 (GPx3) and Glycodelin mRNA Expression at the Time of the Implantation Window

    PubMed Central

    Farimani Sanoee, Marzieh; Alizamir, Tahereh; Faramarzi, Shamila; Saidijam, Massoud; Yadegarazari, Reza; Shabab, Nooshin; Rastgoo Haghi, Alireza; Alizadeh, Zohreh

    2014-01-01

    Background: In fertile women, glycodelin and glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) genes expression rises during the luteal phase, with a peak occurring during the implantation window. The expression of these genes decreases in women with myomas. To determine whether myomectomy would reverse glycodelin and GPx3 expression, we evaluated the transcript levels of these genes in the endometrium of patients before and after myomectomy. Methods: Expression of glycodelin and GPx3 genes were examined prospectively during the midluteal phase in the endometrium obtained from infertile women with myoma (n = 12) before and three months after myomectomy. Endometrial expression of these genes was evaluated using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Results: Endometrial glycodelin mRNA expression levels (normalized to 18S rRNA expression) were increased significantly in endometrium of patients after myomectomy (P = 0.02). GPx3 mRNA expression was increased insignificantly after myomectomy (P = 0.43). Conclusion: The results showed that myomectomy increased endometrial glycodelin (significantly) and GPx3 (not significantly) gene expression after 3 months. Study at different times and detecting expression of these genes can reveal more details. Iran. PMID:24518545

  16. Influence of organophosphorus pesticides on peroxidase and chlorination activity of human myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara; Momić, Tatjana; Radojević, Miloš M; Vasić, Vesna

    2013-09-01

    Inhibitory effects of five organophosphorus pesticides (diazinon, malathion, chlorpyrifos, azinphos-methyl and phorate) and their oxo-analogs on human myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were investigated. While inspecting separately peroxidase and chlorination activity, it was observed that investigated OPs affect peroxidase activity, but not chlorination activity. Among investigated pesticides, malathion and malaoxon have showed the highest power to inhibit MPO peroxidase activity with IC50 values of the order of 3×10(-7) and 5×10(-9) M, respectively. It was proposed that inhibition trend is rendered by molecular structure which invokes steric hindrance for OPs interaction with MPO active center responsible for peroxidase activity. In addition, it was concluded that physiological function of MPO is not affected by any of the investigated OPs. PMID:25149236

  17. Selection for low or high primary dormancy in Lolium rigidum Gaud seeds results in constitutive differences in stress protein expression and peroxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Goggin, Danica E.; Powles, Stephen B.; Steadman, Kathryn J.

    2011-01-01

    Seed dormancy in wild Lolium rigidum Gaud (annual ryegrass) populations is highly variable and not well characterized at the biochemical level. To identify some of the determinants of dormancy level in these seeds, the proteomes of subpopulations selected for low and high levels of primary dormancy were compared by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of extracts from mature, dry seeds. High-dormancy seeds showed higher expression of small heat shock proteins, enolase, and glyoxalase I than the low-dormancy seeds. The functional relevance of these differences in protein expression was confirmed by the fact that high-dormancy seeds were more tolerant to high temperatures imposed at imbibition and had consistently higher glyoxalase I activity over 0–42 d dark stratification. Higher expression of a putative glutathione peroxidase in low-dormancy seeds was not accompanied by higher activity, but these seeds had a slightly more oxidized glutathione pool and higher total peroxidase activity. Overall, these biochemical and physiological differences suggest that L. rigidum seeds selected for low dormancy are more prepared for rapid germination via peroxidase-mediated cell wall weakening, whilst seeds selected for high dormancy are constitutively prepared to survive environmental stresses, even in the absence of stress during seed development. PMID:20974739

  18. Peroxidase activity in cotton cell culture infected with Verticillium dahliae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In our studies with cotton, we have shown that the plant’s induced anionic peroxidases bind to chitin, which is a component of the cell wall of the plant pathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae. In binding to the cell wall surface, they disrupt the integrity of the pathogen’s cell wall. Thus, these...

  19. Peroxidase activity in Aloe barbadensis commercial gel: probable role in skin protection.

    PubMed

    Esteban, A; Zapata, J M; Casano, L; Martín, M; Sabater, B

    2000-12-01

    A basic peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) (pl around 9.0) has been identified in commercial gel of Aloe barbadensis. In vivo, the activity is localised in the vascular system of inner aqueous leaf parenchyma. Some relevant properties of this basic peroxidase of Aloe have been investigated in leaf extract and in commercial gel where it is notably stable. The acid optimum pH (5.0) for activity and the low KM for H2O2 (0.14 mM) suggest that, when topically applied, Aloe peroxidase may scavenge H2O2 in skin surface. PMID:11199129

  20. The poplar Phi class glutathione transferase: expression, activity and structure of GSTF1

    PubMed Central

    Pégeot, Henri; Koh, Cha San; Petre, Benjamin; Mathiot, Sandrine; Duplessis, Sébastien; Hecker, Arnaud; Didierjean, Claude; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) constitute a superfamily of enzymes with essential roles in cellular detoxification and secondary metabolism in plants as in other organisms. Several plant GSTs, including those of the Phi class (GSTFs), require a conserved catalytic serine residue to perform glutathione (GSH)-conjugation reactions. Genomic analyses revealed that terrestrial plants have around ten GSTFs, eight in the Populus trichocarpa genome, but their physiological functions and substrates are mostly unknown. Transcript expression analyses showed a predominant expression of all genes both in reproductive (female flowers, fruits, floral buds) and vegetative organs (leaves, petioles). Here, we show that the recombinant poplar GSTF1 (PttGSTF1) possesses peroxidase activity toward cumene hydroperoxide and GSH-conjugation activity toward model substrates such as 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene, benzyl and phenetyl isothiocyanate, 4-nitrophenyl butyrate and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal but interestingly not on previously identified GSTF-class substrates. In accordance with analytical gel filtration data, crystal structure of PttGSTF1 showed a canonical dimeric organization with bound GSH or 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid molecules. The structure of these protein-substrate complexes allowed delineating the residues contributing to both the G and H sites that form the active site cavity. In sum, the presence of GSTF1 transcripts and proteins in most poplar organs especially those rich in secondary metabolites such as flowers and fruits, together with its GSH-conjugation activity and its documented stress-responsive expression suggest that its function is associated with the catalytic transformation of metabolites and/or peroxide removal rather than with ligandin properties as previously reported for other GSTFs. PMID:25566286

  1. The poplar Phi class glutathione transferase: expression, activity and structure of GSTF1.

    PubMed

    Pégeot, Henri; Koh, Cha San; Petre, Benjamin; Mathiot, Sandrine; Duplessis, Sébastien; Hecker, Arnaud; Didierjean, Claude; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) constitute a superfamily of enzymes with essential roles in cellular detoxification and secondary metabolism in plants as in other organisms. Several plant GSTs, including those of the Phi class (GSTFs), require a conserved catalytic serine residue to perform glutathione (GSH)-conjugation reactions. Genomic analyses revealed that terrestrial plants have around ten GSTFs, eight in the Populus trichocarpa genome, but their physiological functions and substrates are mostly unknown. Transcript expression analyses showed a predominant expression of all genes both in reproductive (female flowers, fruits, floral buds) and vegetative organs (leaves, petioles). Here, we show that the recombinant poplar GSTF1 (PttGSTF1) possesses peroxidase activity toward cumene hydroperoxide and GSH-conjugation activity toward model substrates such as 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene, benzyl and phenetyl isothiocyanate, 4-nitrophenyl butyrate and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal but interestingly not on previously identified GSTF-class substrates. In accordance with analytical gel filtration data, crystal structure of PttGSTF1 showed a canonical dimeric organization with bound GSH or 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid molecules. The structure of these protein-substrate complexes allowed delineating the residues contributing to both the G and H sites that form the active site cavity. In sum, the presence of GSTF1 transcripts and proteins in most poplar organs especially those rich in secondary metabolites such as flowers and fruits, together with its GSH-conjugation activity and its documented stress-responsive expression suggest that its function is associated with the catalytic transformation of metabolites and/or peroxide removal rather than with ligandin properties as previously reported for other GSTFs. PMID:25566286

  2. Inhibition of Peroxidase Activity of Cytochrome c: De Novo Compound Discovery and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Bakan, Ahmet; Kapralov, Alexandr A.; Bayir, Hulya; Hu, Feizhou; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c (cyt c) release from mitochondria is accepted to be the point of no return for eliciting a cascade of interactions that lead to apoptosis. A strategy for containing sustained apoptosis is to reduce the mitochondrial permeability pore opening. Pore opening is enhanced by peroxidase activity of cyt c gained upon its complexation with cardiolipin in the presence of reactive oxygen species. Blocking access to the heme group has been proposed as an effective intervention method for reducing, if not eliminating, the peroxidase activity of cyt c. In the present study, using a combination of druggability simulations, pharmacophore modeling, virtual screening, and in vitro fluorescence measurements to probe peroxidase activity, we identified three repurposable drugs and seven compounds that are validated to effectively inhibit the peroxidase activity of cyt c. PMID:26078313

  3. Glutathione Peroxidase 5 Is Expressed by the Entire Pig Male Genital Tract and Once in the Seminal Plasma Contributes to Sperm Survival and In Vivo Fertility.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Isabel; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Perez-Patiño, Cristina; Vicente-Carrillo, Alejandro; Parrilla, Inmaculada; Ceron, Jose J; Martinez, Emilio A; Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto; Roca, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase-5 (GPX5) is an H2O2-scavenging enzyme identified in boar seminal plasma (SP). This study attempted to clarify its origin and role on sperm survival and fertility after artificial insemination (AI). GPX5 was expressed (Western blot and immunocytochemistry using a rabbit primary polyclonal antibody) in testes, epididymis and accessory sex glands (6 boars). SP-GPX5 concentration differed among boars (11 boars, P < 0.001), among ejaculates within boar (44 ejaculates, P < 0.001) and among portions within ejaculate (15 ejaculates). The first 10 mL of the sperm rich fraction (SRF, sperm-peak portion) had a significantly lower concentration (8.87 ± 0.78 ng/mL) than the rest of the SRF and the post-SRF (11.66 ± 0.79 and 12.37 ± 0.79 ng/mL, respectively, P < 0.005). Sperm motility of liquid-stored semen AI-doses (n = 44, at 15-17°C during 72h) declined faster in AI-doses with low concentrations of SP-GPX5 compared to those with high-levels. Boars (n = 11) with high SP-GPX5 showed higher farrowing rates and litter sizes than those with low SP-GPX5 (a total of 5,275 inseminated sows). In sum, GPX5 is widely expressed in the boar genital tract and its variable presence in SP shows a positive relationship with sperm quality and fertility outcomes of liquid-stored semen AI-doses. PMID:27627110

  4. Sex-specific associations of variants in regulatory regions of NADPH oxidase-2 (CYBB) and glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4) genes with kidney disease in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, M B; Patente, T A; Mohammedi, K; Queiroz, M S; Azevedo, M J; Canani, L H; Parisi, M C; Marre, M; Velho, G; Corrêa-Giannella, M L

    2013-10-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy. The superoxide-generating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase 2 (NOX2, encoded by the CYBB gene) and the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4) play opposing roles in the balance of cellular redox status. In the present study, we investigated associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the regulatory regions of CYBB and GPX4 with kidney disease in patients with type 1 diabetes. Two functional SNPs, rs6610650 (CYBB promoter region, chromosome X) and rs713041 (GPX4 3'untranslated region, chromosome 19), were genotyped in 451 patients with type 1 diabetes from a Brazilian cohort (diabetic nephropathy: 44.6%) and in 945 French/Belgian patients with type 1 diabetes from Genesis and GENEDIAB cohorts (diabetic nephropathy: 62.3%). The minor A-allele of CYBB rs6610650 was associated with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in Brazilian women, and with the prevalence of established/advanced nephropathy in French/Belgian women (odds ratio 1.75, 95% CI 1.11-2.78, p = 0.016). The minor T-allele of GPX4 rs713041 was inversely associated with the prevalence of established/advanced nephropathy in Brazilian men (odds ratio 0.30, 95% CI 0.13-0.68, p = 0.004), and associated with higher eGFR in French/Belgian men. In conclusion, these heterogeneous results suggest that neither CYBB nor GPX4 are major genetic determinants of diabetic nephropathy, but nevertheless, they could modulate in a gender-specific manner the risk for renal disease in patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:23919599

  5. Effects of Elevated Cytosolic Glutathione Reductase Activity on the Cellular Glutathione Pool and Photosynthesis in Leaves under Normal and Stress Conditions.

    PubMed

    Foyer, C; Lelandais, M; Galap, C; Kunert, K J

    1991-11-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var Samsun) was transformed using the bacterial gor gene coding for the enzyme glutathione reductase. Transgenic plants were selected by their kanamycin resistence and expression of the bacterial gor gene. After separation by isoelectric focusing techniques, leaf extracts from transgenic plants having both native and bacterial glutathione reductase activity gave, in addition to the six bands of the native enzyme, two further closely running isoenzymes. These additional bands originating from the expression of the bacterial gor gene were nonchloroplastic. Leaves from transgenic plants had two- to 10-fold higher glutathione reductase activity than non-transgenic controls. The amount of extractable glutathione reductase activity obtained in transgenic plants was dependent on leaf age and the conditions to which leaves were exposed. Both light and exposure to methylviologen increased leaf glutathione reductase activity. Elevated levels of cytosolic glutathione reductase activity in transgenic plants had no effect on the amount or reduction state of the reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione pool under optimal conditions or oxidative conditions induced by methylviologen. The glutathione pool was unaltered despite the oxidation-dependent loss of CO(2) assimilation and oxidation of enzymes involved in photosynthesis. However, the reduction state of the ascorbate pool was greater in transgenic plants relative to nontransgenic controls following illumination of methylviologen-treated leaf discs. Therefore, we conclude that in the natural state glutathione reductase is present in tobacco at levels above those required for maximal operation of the ascorbate-glutathione pathway. PMID:16668524

  6. Age-Related Changes in Antioxidant and Glutathione S-Transferase Enzyme Activities in the Asian Clam.

    PubMed

    Vranković, J

    2016-03-01

    Aging is accompanied by increased production of free oxygen radicals and impairment of normal cellular functions. The aim of this work was to provide preliminary data on age-related differences in the activities of antioxidant enzymes and phase II biotransformation enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST) in a wild population of the Asian clam Corbicula fluminea. The antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), and GST were assessed in visceral mass of four age classes (0+-, 1+-, 2+-, and 3+-year-old) of C. fluminea clams. Age-related changes were seen in antioxidant enzyme status: levels of total SOD (totSOD) (P < 0.05), MnSOD, and CuZnSOD (P < 0.05) activities increased progressively during aging from younger to older clams. Changes in CAT and GR activities with advancing age were found, the levels being the highest in age class II, then being lower in age classes III and IV (P < 0.05). Activities of GPX and GST were lower in the senescent individuals (2+- and 3+-year-old clams) compared with young individuals (0+- and 1+-year-old clams). Overall, the decline of glutathione-dependent enzyme activities, coupled with higher and lower activities of totSOD and CAT, respectively, as the individual grows older, may render the older animals more susceptible to oxidative stress. Data reported here are not intended to be exhaustive since they concern only age/size structure of the population at one locality, so more detailed studies on both the developmental stages and levels of antioxidant enzymes of this new alien species in Serbian rivers are required. PMID:27262191

  7. Effects of cold stress on glutathione and related enzymes in rat erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Hideki; Kondo, Takahito; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Tagami, Sei-Ichi; Kuroshima, Akihiro; Kawakami, Yoshikazu

    1991-06-01

    Effects of acute and chronic cold stress on glutathione and related enzymes in rat erythrocytes were investigated. Blood from both cold-acclimated (CA) and cold-adapted (CG) rats had significantly lower concentrations of glutathione than blood from control animals. Superoxide dismutase activity was increased significantly in CA rats and tended to rise in CG rats. Activity of glutathione peroxidase in erythrocytes was inconsistent in that it tended to increase in CA rats but decreased significantly in CG rats. The results may imply that CG rats suffered deleterious effects of hydrogen peroxide. On the other hand, there were marked decreases in glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities in acutely cold-exposed rats in conjunction with unchanged levels of glutathione. In all treatments the state of riboflavin metabolism was estimated to be adequate, since no increases were observed in the erythrocyte glutathione reductase activity coefficient.

  8. Role of nitric oxide synthase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase in radiation-induced decrease in norepinephrine release

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.

    1994-11-17

    Although the central nervous system (CNS) is considered to be relatively resistant to the direct effects of ionizing radiation, the dose and the time elapsed after radiation exposure can have a complex effect on the CNS. The hippocampus is important in critical functions such as learning, memory, and motor performance, and these functions are impaired after exposure to ionizing radiation. Noradrenergic systems are important in mediating arousal, food intake, and to some extent motor functions. Histofluorescence and immunohistochemical techniques have shown noradrenergic pathways in the hippocampus. Several factors can contribute to acute nervous system damage in vivo: (1) reduced systemic blood pressure following exposure to 25-100 Gy of gamma radiation, (2) decreased cerebral blood flow in various regions of the brain, including the hippocampus, (3) ischemia produced by the decreased blood flow, which is likely to affect neuronal activity; (4) free radical generation with resulting oxygen radicals implicated in cell damage following ischemia; (5) brain ischemia-induced release of an excessive amount of glutamate in the hippocampus, which acts on nitric oxide (NO) synthase to form NO through N-methvl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, causing toxic effects.

  9. Proton NMR investigation of the heme active site structure of an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase that mimics manganese peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Lu, Y

    1999-07-13

    The heme active site structure of an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase [MnCcP; see Yeung, B. K., et al. (1997) Chem. Biol. 4, 215-221] that closely mimics manganese peroxidase (MnP) has been characterized by both one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. All hyperfine-shifted resonances from the heme pocket as well as resonances from catalytically relevant amino acid residues in the congested diamagnetic envelope have been assigned. From the NMR spectral assignment and the line broadening pattern of specific protons in NOESY spectra of MnCcP, the location of the engineered Mn(II) center is firmly identified. Furthermore, we found that the creation of the Mn(II)-binding site in CcP resulted in no detectable structural changes on the distal heme pocket of the protein. However, notable structural changes are observed at the proximal side of the heme cavity. Both CepsilonH shift of the proximal histidine and (15)N shift of the bound C(15)N(-) suggest a weaker heme Fe(III)-N(His) bond in MnCcP compared to WtCcP. Our results indicate that the engineered Mn(II)-binding site in CcP resulted in not only a similar Mn(II)-binding affinity and improved MnP activity, but also weakened the Fe(III)-N(His) bond strength of the template protein CcP so that its bond strength is similar to that of the target protein MnP. The results presented here help elucidate the impact of designing a metal-binding site on both the local and global structure of the enzyme, and provide a structural basis for engineering the next generation of MnCcP that mimics MnP more closely. PMID:10413489

  10. Cell free glutathione synthesizing activity of mercury resistant bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Gachhui, R.; Pahan, K.; Ray, S., R.; Chaudhuri, J.; Mandal, A. )

    1991-03-01

    Reduced glutathione (GSH) is present in all living cells and is known to have a generalized role in protecting the cells from heavy metal toxicity. Depletion of both GSH and glutathione reductase (GR) level upon treatment with mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) is reported in various organs of rat. However, the effect of HgCl{sub 2} on glutathione level in bacterial system is not known. In the present communication, the authors report the results of their investigation on the glutathione status in mercury resistant bacterial cells exposed to HgCl{sub 2}.

  11. Manganese peroxidase gene transcription in Phanerochaete chrysosporium: Activation by manganese

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.; Alic, M. Gold, M.H. )

    1991-07-01

    The expression of manganese peroxidase in nitrogen-limited cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium is dependent on Mn, and initial work suggested that Mn regulates transcription of the mnp gene. In this study, using Northern (RNA) blot analysis of kinetic, dose-response, and inhibitor experiments, the authors demonstrate unequivocally that Mn regulates mnp gene transcription. The amount of mnp mRNA in cells of 4-day-old nitrogen-limited cultures is a direct function of the concentration of Mn in the culture medium up to a maximum of 180 {mu}M. Addition of Mn to nitrogen-limited Mn-deficient secondary metabolic (4-, 5-, and 6-day-old) cultures results in the appearance of mnp mRNA within 40 min. The appearance of this message is completely inhibited by the RNA synthesis inhibitor dactinomycin but not by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Furthermore, the amount of mnp mRNA produced is a direct function of the concentration of added Mn. In contrast, addition of Mn to low-nitrogen Mn-deficient 2- or 3-day-old cultures does not result in the appearance of mnp mRNA. Manganese peroxidase protein is detected by specific immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of poly(A) RNA isolated from Mn-supplemented (but nor from Mn-deficient) cells. All of these results demonstrate that Mn, the substrate for the enzyme, regulates mnp gene transcription via a growth-stage-specific and concentration-dependent mechanism.

  12. Activity and Isoenzyme Profile of Peroxidase as Affected by Microgravity Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnatska, V. V.; Gladun, H. O.; Padalko, S. F.

    2008-06-01

    To investigate microgravity (clinorotation) effect on activity and isoenzyme pattern of peroxidase the culture of primary explants of potato tubers with normal activation of proliferation in vitro, explants inoculated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens(A.t.), where crown-gall tumors were formed and dormant potato tubers were used. Substantial decrease of total peroxidase activity after one day-clinorotation of potato explants, normal and inoculated with A.t., was revealed. Seven day- clinorotation resulted in the decreased peroxidase activity in normal clinorotated explants, while peroxidase activity in clinorotated explants, inoculated with A.t., returned to the level of its stationary control. When peroxidase of potato explants was analyzed by PAGE, the result obtained show the decrease in activity of one electrophoretic fractions with low migrating mobility and two fractions with moderate mobility in clinorotated explants, normal and with crown gall, as compared with the ones in stationary conditions. The decrease in activity of these fractions under microgravity was less pronounced in explants with crown-galls.

  13. 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol mediated increases in extracellular peroxidase activity in three species of Lemnaceae.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Dilip K; Scannell, Gillian; Akhmetov, Nurlan; Fitzpatrick, Dara; Jansen, Marcel A K

    2010-11-01

    Chlorinated phenols, or chlorophenols, are persistent priority pollutants that are widespread in the environment. Class III peroxidases are well-characterised plant enzymes that can catalyse the oxidative dechlorination of chlorophenols. Expression of these enzymes by plants is commonly associated with plant stress, therefore limiting scope for phytoremediation. In this study, we have quantitatively compared peroxidase activity and phytotoxicity as a function of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) concentration in three species of Lemnaceae; Lemna minor, Lemna gibba and Landoltia punctata. Effects of TCP on the growth rates of the three species differed considerably with L. punctata being the most tolerant species. TCP also affected photosynthetic parameters, causing a decrease in open photosystem II reaction centres (qP) and, in L. punctata only, a decrease in non-photochemical quenching (qN). In parallel, TCP exposure resulted in increased peroxidase activity in all three species. Peroxidase activity in L. minor and L. gibba displayed an inverse relationship with biomass accumulation, i.e. the more growth reduction the more peroxidase activity. In contrast, induction of peroxidase activity in L. punctata was bi-phasic, with a TCP-induced activity peak at concentrations that had no major effect on growth, and further induction under phytotoxic concentrations. The mechanism by which L. punctata recognises and responds to low concentrations of an anthropogenic compound, in the absence of wide-ranging stress, remains enigmatic. However, we conclude that this "window" of peroxidase production in the absence of major growth inhibition offers potential for the development of sustainable, peroxidise-mediated phytoremediation systems. PMID:20810175

  14. Phenylbutazone Oxidation via Cu,Zn-SOD Peroxidase Activity: An EPR Study.

    PubMed

    Aljuhani, Naif; Whittal, Randy M; Khan, Saifur R; Siraki, Arno G

    2015-07-20

    We investigated the effect of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD)-peroxidase activity on the oxidation of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug phenylbutazone (PBZ). We utilized electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to detect free radical intermediates of PBZ, UV-vis spectrophotometry to monitor PBZ oxidation, oxygen analysis to determine the involvement of C-centered radicals, and LC/MS to determine the resulting metabolites. Using EPR spectroscopy and spin-trapping with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO), we found that the spin adduct of CO3(•-) (DMPO/(•)OH) was attenuated with increasing PBZ concentrations. The resulting PBZ radical, which was assigned as a carbon-centered radical based on computer simulation of hyperfine splitting constants, was trapped by both DMPO and MNP spin traps. Similar to Cu,Zn-SOD-peroxidase activity, an identical PBZ carbon-centered radical was also detected with the presence of both myeloperoxidase (MPO/H2O2) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP/H2O2). Oxygen analysis revealed depletion in oxygen levels when PBZ was oxidized by SOD peroxidase-activity, further supporting carbon radical formation. In addition, UV-vis spectra showed that the λmax for PBZ (λ = 260 nm) declined in intensity and shifted to a new peak that was similar to the spectrum for 4-hydroxy-PBZ when oxidized by Cu,Zn-SOD-peroxidase activity. LC/MS evidence supported the formation of 4-hydroxy-PBZ when compared to that of a standard, and 4-hydroperoxy-PBZ was also detected in significant yield. These findings together indicate that the carbonate radical, a product of SOD peroxidase activity, appears to play a role in PBZ metabolism. Interestingly, these results are similar to findings from heme peroxidase enzymes, and the context of this metabolic pathway is discussed in terms of a mechanism for PBZ-induced toxicity. PMID:26090772

  15. Effect of Low and Very Low Doses of Simple Phenolics on Plant Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Malarczyk, Elżbieta; Kochmańska-Rdest, Janina; Paździoch-Czochra, Marzanna

    2004-01-01

    Changes in the activity of horseradish peroxidase resulting from an addition of ethanol water dilutions of 19 phenolic compounds were observed. For each compound, the enzyme activity was plotted against the degree of dilution expressed as n = –log100 (mol/L) in the range 0 ≤ n ≥ 20. All the curves showed sinusoidal activity, more or less regular, with two to four peaks on average. Each analyzed compound had a characteristic sinusoidal shape, which was constant for samples of peroxidase from various commercial firms. This was clearly visible after function fitting to experimental results based on the Marquadt–Levenberg algorithm using the least-squares method. Among the 19 phenolics, the highest amplitudes were observed for phenol and iso- and vanillate acids and aldehydes. The specific character of each of the analyzed curves offers a possibility of choosing proper dilutions of phenolic compound for activating or inhibiting of peroxidase activity. PMID:19330128

  16. Cytochrome c peroxidase activity of heme bound amyloid β peptides.

    PubMed

    Seal, Manas; Ghosh, Chandradeep; Basu, Olivia; Dey, Somdatta Ghosh

    2016-09-01

    Heme bound amyloid β (Aβ) peptides, which have been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), can catalytically oxidize ferrocytochrome c (Cyt c(II)) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The rate of catalytic oxidation of Cyt(II) c has been found to be dependent on several factors, such as concentration of heme(III)-Aβ, Cyt(II) c, H2O2, pH, ionic strength of the solution, and peptide chain length of Aβ. The above features resemble the naturally occurring enzyme cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) which is known to catalytically oxidize Cyt(II) c in the presence of H2O2. In the absence of heme(III)-Aβ, the oxidation of Cyt(II) c is not catalytic. Thus, heme-Aβ complex behaves as CCP. PMID:27270708

  17. Fast and Specific Assessment of the Halogenating Peroxidase Activity in Leukocyte-enriched Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, Jörg; Schwarz, Pauline; Bäcker, Ingo; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a protocol for the quick and standardized enrichment of leukocytes from small whole blood samples is described. This procedure is based on the hypotonic lysis of erythrocytes and can be applied to human samples as well as to blood of non-human origin. The small initial sample volume of about 50 to 100 µl makes this method applicable to recurrent blood sampling from small laboratory animals. Moreover, leukocyte enrichment is achieved within minutes and with low material efforts regarding chemicals and instrumentation, making this method applicable in multiple laboratory environments. Standardized purification of leukocytes is combined with a highly selective staining method to evaluate halogenating peroxidase activity of the heme peroxidases, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), i.e., the formation of hypochlorous and hypobromous acid (HOCl and HOBr). While MPO is strongly expressed in neutrophils, the most abundant immune cell type in human blood as well as in monocytes, the related enzyme EPO is exclusively expressed in eosinophils. The halogenating activity of these enzymes is addressed by using the almost HOCl- and HOBr-specific dye aminophenyl fluorescein (APF) and the primary peroxidase substrate hydrogen peroxide. Upon subsequent flow cytometry analysis all peroxidase-positive cells (neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils) are distinguishable and their halogenating peroxidase activity can be quantified. Since APF staining may be combined with the application of cell surface markers, this protocol can be extended to specifically address leukocyte sub-fractions. The method is applicable to detect HOCl and HOBr production both in human and in rodent leukocytes. Given the widely and diversely discussed immunological role of these enzymatic products in chronic inflammatory diseases, this protocol may contribute to a better understanding of the immunological relevance of leukocyte-derived heme peroxidases. PMID:27501318

  18. Michaelis-Menten Kinetics and the Activation Energy Relate Soil Peroxidase Kinetics to the Lignin Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triebwasser-Freese, D.; Tharayil, N.; Preston, C. M.; Gerard, P.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that lignin exhibit a turnover rate of less than 6 years, suggesting that the enzymatic mechanisms mediating the decay of lignin are less understood. One factor that could be affecting the mean residence time of lignin in the soil is the catalytic efficiency of soil oxidoreductase enzymes. We characterized the spatial and seasonal transitions in the Michaelis-Menten kinetics and activation energy of the soil oxidoreductase enzyme, peroxidase, across three ecosystems of differing litter chemistries- pine, deciduous forest, and a cultivated field- and associate it to the soil lignin chemistries. To interpret the combined effect of Vmax and Km, the two parameters were integrated into one term which we defined as the catalytic efficiency. Generally, the peroxidases in pine soils exhibited the highest Vmax and Km, resulting in the lowest catalytic efficiency, followed by that in the deciduous soils. Meanwhile, the agricultural soils which exhibited the lowest Vmax and Km contained the highest catalytic efficiency of peroxidase. Through linear regression analysis of the kinetic parameters to the soil lignin chemistry, we discerned that the catalytic efficiency term best associated to the lignin monomer ratios (C/V, P/V, and SCV/V). The Activation Energy of peroxidase varied by depth, and seasons across the ecosystems. However, the Activation Energy of peroxidase did not relate to the lignin chemistry or quantity. Collectively, our results show that although the peroxidase Vmax and Km in the phenolic-poor soils are low, the degradation efficiency of peroxidases in this soils can be equivalent or exceed that of phenolic-rich soils. This study, through the characterization of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, provides a new insight into the mechanisms that could moderate the decomposition of lignin in soils.

  19. In vitro glutathione peroxidase mimicry of ebselen is linked to its oxidation of critical thiols on key cerebral suphydryl proteins - A novel component of its GPx-mimic antioxidant mechanism emerging from its thiol-modulated toxicology and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Kade, I J; Balogun, B D; Rocha, J B T

    2013-10-25

    The antioxidant mechanism of ebselen in rats brain is largely linked with its glutathione peroxidase (GPx) rather than its peroxiredoxin mimicry ability. However, the precise molecular dynamics between the GPx-mimicry of ebselen and thiol utilization is yet to be fully clarified and thus still open. Herein, we investigated the influence of dithiothreitol (DTT) on the antioxidant action of ebselen against oxidant-induced cerebral lipid peroxidation and deoxyribose degradation. Furthermore, the critical inhibitory concentrations of ebselen on the activities of sulphydryl enzymes such as cerebral sodium pump, δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δ-ALAD) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were also investigated. We observe that ebselen (at ≥42 μM) markedly inhibited lipid peroxidation in the presence and absence of DTT, whereas it inhibited deoxyribose degradation only in the presence of DTT. Furthermore, under in vitro conditions, ebselen inhibited the thiol containing enzymes; cerebral sodium pump (at ≥40 μM), δ-ALAD (≥10 μM) and LDH (≥1 μM) which were either prevented or reversed by DTT. However, the inhibition of the activities of these sulphydryl proteins in diabetic animals was prevented by ebselen. Summarily, it is apparent that the effective in vitro inhibitory doses of ebselen on the activity of the sulphydryl proteins are far less than its antioxidant doses. In addition, the presence of DTT is evidently a critical requirement for ebselen to effect its antioxidant action against deoxyribose degeradation and not lipid peroxidation. Consequently, we conclude that ebselen possibly utilizes available thiols on sulphydryl proteins to effect its GPx mimicry antioxidant action against lipid peroxidation in rat brain homogenate. PMID:23933410

  20. Effects of concentrated drinking water injection on glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes in liver of Cyprinus carpio L.

    PubMed

    Elia, Antonia Concetta; Fanetti, Alessia; Dörr, Ambrosius Josef Martin; Taticchi, Maria I

    2008-06-01

    Two drinking water production plants located in North Italy, collecting water from the River Po (Plants 1 and 2) were chosen for this study. Water samples were collected before and after the disinfection process and at two points along the piping system. Water samples were concentrated by the solid-phase extraction system and injected intraperitoneally into specimens of Cyprinus carpio. The concentration of water samples was 3 l/equiv. In order to assess the effects of the water samples on carp liver, total glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes, such as glutathione S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and glyoxalase I, were measured following this treatment for 6 days at two experimental times (3 and 6 days). Both water plant-treated carp showed a general increase of the enzymatic activities of glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione reductase which might be employed as potential biomarkers of oxidative stress induced by disinfected river water. Plant 1-treated carp showed higher glyoxalase I and glutathione levels and lower glutathione peroxidase activity. A depleted level of total glutathione and of glyoxalase I for specimens of water plant 2 (for both experimental times), without correlation with the distances in the pipeline, suggests that river plant water can also lead to potentially adverse effects on selected biochemical parameters in C. carpio. PMID:18457861

  1. MECHANISMS OF THE STIMULATION OF RAT UTERINE PEROXIDASE ACTIVITY BY METHOXYCHLOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methoxychlor (MXC), a pro-estrogenic pesticide, has adverse effects on fertility and affects the rat uterus directly via its active metabolite HPTE. terine peroxidase, a marker of estrogen action, was used to probe the mechanisms through which MXC exerts its activity on the uteru...

  2. Glutathione recycling and antioxidant enzyme activities in erythrocytes of term and preterm newborns at birth.

    PubMed

    Frosali, Simona; Di Simplicio, Paolo; Perrone, Serafina; Di Giuseppe, Danila; Longini, Mariangela; Tanganelli, Donatella; Buonocore, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    We previously demonstrated a high susceptibility of neonatal red blood cells (RBC) to oxidative stress at birth. The aim of this study was to compare the RBC antioxidant capacity and redox cycle enzyme activities as well as glutathione (GSH) recycling in full-term and preterm infants at birth and in normal adults. GSH and GSH disulfide (GSSG) concentrations, GSH/GSSG ratio, and the activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH), GSH peroxidase, GSH reductase (GR), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and hexokinase (HK) were measured in RBC of 25 healthy adults and 56 newborns (23 term, 33 preterm) at birth. The GSH recycling was measured in adult and newborn RBC exposed to oxidative stress (1 mM tert-butylhydroperoxide). The RBC of term and preterm babies showed higher GSH, GSSG, G-6-PDH, GR, and HK levels/activities and lower GSH/GSSG ratios and higher GSH-recycling rates than those of adults. In preterm babies significant correlations were found between G-6-PDH and CAT, GSH, GSH/GSSG ratio, and GSSG (r = -0.67, r = 0.71, r = -0.66, p < 0.01; r = 0.71, p < 0.05, respectively). In term newborns, statistically significant correlations were observed between G-6-PDH and CAT, SOD, and GSH (r = -0.65, r = -0.65, r = -0.69, p < 0.01, respectively). The results indicate the central role of the G-6-PDH activity in antioxidant defenses. We speculate that preterm babies have prompter involvement of antioxidant defenses than term babies. PMID:14707431

  3. Interaction between vitamin B6 and source of selenium on the response of the selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase system to oxidative stress induced by oestrus in pubertal pig.

    PubMed

    Dalto, Danyel Bueno; Roy, Mélanie; Audet, Isabelle; Palin, Marie-France; Guay, Frédéric; Lapointe, Jérôme; Matte, J Jacques

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to assess the interaction between vitamin B6 and selenium (Se) for the flow of Se towards the Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPX) system in response to oxidative stress naturally induced by oestrus in a pubertal pig model. At first oestrus, forty-five gilts were randomly assigned to the experimental diets (n=9/group): basal diet (CONT); CONT+0.3mg/kg of Na-selenite (MSeB60); MSeB60+10mg/kg of HCl-B6 (MSeB610); CONT+0.3mg/kg of Se-enriched yeast (OSeB60); and OSeB60+10mg/kg of HCl-B6 (OSeB610). Blood samples were collected at each oestrus (long-term profiles), and daily from day -4 to +3 (slaughter) of the fourth oestrus (peri-oestrus profiles) after which liver, kidneys, and ovaries were collected. For long-term profiles, CONT had lower blood Se than Se-supplemented gilts (p<0.01) and OSe was higher than MSe (p<0.01). Lower erythrocyte pyridoxal-5-phosphate was found in B60 than B610 (p<0.01). No treatment effect was observed on GPX activity. For peri-oestrus profiles, treatment effects were similar to long-term profiles. Treatment effects on liver Se were similar to those for long-term blood Se profiles and OSe had higher renal Se concentrations than MSe gilts (p<0.01). Gene expressions of GPX1, GPX3, GPX4, and selenocysteine lyase in liver and kidney were greatest in OSeB610 gilts (p<0.05). These results suggest that dietary B6 modulate the metabolic pathway of OSe towards the GPX system during the peri-oestrus period in pubertal pigs. PMID:26302908

  4. Structure of a mitochondrial cytochrome c conformer competent for peroxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Levi J.; Mou, Tung-Chung; Jeakins-Cooley, Margaret E.; Sprang, Stephen R.; Bowler, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    At the onset of apoptosis, the peroxidation of cardiolipin at the inner mitochondrial membrane by cytochrome c requires an open coordination site on the heme. We report a 1.45-Å resolution structure of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c with the Met80 heme ligand swung out of the heme crevice and replaced by a water molecule. This conformational change requires modest adjustments to the main chain of the heme crevice loop and is facilitated by a trimethyllysine 72-to-alanine mutation. This mutation also enhances the peroxidase activity of iso-1-cytochrome c. The structure shows a buried water channel capable of facilitating peroxide access to the active site and of moving protons produced during peroxidase activity to the protein surface. Alternate positions of the side chain of Arg38 appear to mediate opening and closing of the buried water channel. In addition, two buried water molecules can adopt alternate positions that change the network of hydrogen bonds in the buried water channel. Taken together, these observations suggest that low and high proton conductivity states may mediate peroxidase function. Comparison of yeast and mammalian cytochrome c sequences, in the context of the steric factors that permit opening of the heme crevice, suggests that higher organisms have evolved to inhibit peroxidase activity, providing a more stringent barrier to the onset of apoptosis. PMID:24760830

  5. Aqueous synthesis of porous platinum nanotubes at room temperature and their intrinsic peroxidase-like activity.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kai; Lv, Zhicheng; Chen, Kun; Huang, Liang; Wang, Jing; Shao, Feng; Wang, Yanjun; Han, Heyou

    2013-07-11

    Platinum nanotubes (PtNTs) exhibiting high porosity were constructed by sacrificing the exterior of tellurium nanowires (TeNWs) and disintegrating the inner part spontaneously in aqueous solution at room temperature, in which the Kirkendall effect may play an important role. The present PtNTs exhibited intrinsic peroxidase-like activity in the presence of H2O2. PMID:23598712

  6. Understanding the formation of CuS concave superstructures with peroxidase-like activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Weiwei; Jia, Huimin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Lei, Yan; Li, Jing; Zhao, Hongxiao; Mi, Liwei; Zhang, Lizhi; Zheng, Zhi

    2012-05-01

    Copper sulfide (CuS) concave polyhedral superstructures (CPSs) have been successfully prepared in an ethanolic solution by a simple solvothermal reaction without the use of surfactants or templates. Two typical well defined, high symmetry CuS concave polyhedrons, forming a concave truncated cuboctahedron and icosahedron were prepared. The effect of the reaction time, temperature and different Cu ion and sulfur sources on the formation of CuS CPSs were investigated and a possible formation mechanism was proposed and discussed based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. More importantly, we found, for the first time, that the CuS CPSs exhibit intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, as they can quickly catalyze the oxidation of typical horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrates, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and o-phenylenediamine (OPD), in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In addition to the recent discoveries regarding peroxidase mimetics on Fe3O4 NPs and carbon nanostructures, our findings suggest a new kind of candidate for peroxidase mimics. This may open up a new application field of CuS micro-nano structures in biodetection, biocatalysis and environmental monitoring.Copper sulfide (CuS) concave polyhedral superstructures (CPSs) have been successfully prepared in an ethanolic solution by a simple solvothermal reaction without the use of surfactants or templates. Two typical well defined, high symmetry CuS concave polyhedrons, forming a concave truncated cuboctahedron and icosahedron were prepared. The effect of the reaction time, temperature and different Cu ion and sulfur sources on the formation of CuS CPSs were investigated and a possible formation mechanism was proposed and discussed based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. More importantly, we found, for the first time, that the CuS CPSs exhibit intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, as they can quickly catalyze the oxidation of typical horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrates, 3

  7. Activity and isoforms of peroxidases, lignin and anatomy, during adventitious rooting in cuttings of Ebenus cretica L.

    PubMed

    Syros, Thomas; Yupsanis, Traianos; Zafiriadis, Helias; Economou, Athanasios

    2004-01-01

    Adventitious rooting of Ebenus cretica cuttings was studied in order to examine a) the rooting ability of different genotypes in relation to electrophoretic patterns of peroxidases. b) the activity and electrophoretic patterns of soluble and wall ionically bound peroxidases, the lignin content and anatomical changes in the control and IBA treated cuttings of and genotypes in the course of adventitious root formation. In addition, a fraction of soluble cationic peroxidases was separated by gel filtration chromatography from the total soluble peroxidases of a genotype. No rooting occurred in cuttings without IBA-treatment. In both genotypes, electrophoretic patterns of soluble anionic peroxidases revealed two common peroxidase isoforms, while a fast-migrating anionic peroxidase isoform (A3) appeared only in genotypes. Both genotypes showed similar patterns of soluble, as well as wall ionically bound cationic peroxidase isoforms. The number of isoforms was unchanged during the rooting process (induction, initiation and expression phase) but an increase in peroxidase activity (initiation phase) followed by decrease has been found in IBA-treated cuttings. During initiation phase the lignin content was almost similar to that on day 0 in genotype while it was reduced at by about 50% in genotype at the respective time. Microscopic observations revealed anatomical differences between genotypes. According to this study, the and genotypes display differences in anatomy, lignin content, activity of soluble peroxidases and the electrophoretic patterns of soluble anionic peroxidase isoforms. The A3-anionic peroxidase isoform could be used as biochemical marker to distinguish and genotypes of E. cretica and seems to be correlated to lignin synthesis in rooting process. PMID:15002666

  8. Extension of polyphenolics by CWPO-C peroxidase mutant containing radical-robust surface active site.

    PubMed

    Pham, L T Mai; Kim, S Jin; Ahn, U Suk; Choi, J Weon; Song, B Keun; Kim, Y Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Expressed as insoluble forms in Escherichia coli, native cationic cell wall peroxidase (CWPO-C) from the poplar tree and mutant variants were successfully reactivated via refolding experiments and used to elucidate the previously presumed existence of an electron transfer (ET) pathway in the CWPO-C structure. Their catalytic properties were fully characterized through various analyses including steady-state kinetic, direct oxidation of lignin macromolecules and their respective stabilities during the polymerization reactions. The analysis results proved that the 74th residue on the CWPO-C surface plays an important role in catalyzing the macromolecules via supposed ET mechanism. By comparing the residual activities of wild-type CWPO-C and mutant 74W CWPO-C after 3 min, mutation of tyrosine 74 residue to tryptophan increased the radical resistance of peroxidase up to ten times dramatically while maintaining its capability to oxidize lignin macromolecules. Furthermore, extension of poly(catechin) as well as lignin macromolecules with CWPO-C Y74W mutant clearly showed that this radical-resistant peroxidase mutant can increase the molecular weight of various kinds of polyphenolics by using surface-located active site. The anti-oxidation activity of the synthesized poly(catechin) was confirmed by xanthine oxidase assay. The elucidation of a uniquely catalytic mechanism in CWPO-C may improve the applicability of the peroxidase/H2O2 catalyst to green polymer chemistry. PMID:24122664

  9. Catalase-peroxidase (Mycobacterium tuberculosis KatG) catalysis and isoniazid activation.

    PubMed

    Chouchane, S; Lippai, I; Magliozzo, R S

    2000-08-15

    Resonance Raman spectra of native, overexpressed M. tuberculosis catalase-peroxidase (KatG), the enzyme responsible for activation of the antituberculosis antibiotic isoniazid (isonicotinic acid hydrazide), have confirmed that the heme iron in the resting (ferric) enzyme is high-spin five-coordinate. Difference Raman spectra did not reveal a change in coordination number upon binding of isoniazid to KatG. Stopped-flow spectrophotometric studies of the reaction of KatG with stoichiometric equivalents or small excesses of hydrogen peroxide revealed only the optical spectrum of the ferric enzyme with no hypervalent iron intermediates detected. Large excesses of hydrogen peroxide generated oxyferrous KatG, which was unstable and rapidly decayed to the ferric enzyme. Formation of a pseudo-stable intermediate sharing optical characteristics with the porphyrin pi-cation radical-ferryl iron species (Compound I) of horseradish peroxidase was observed upon reaction of KatG with excess 3-chloroperoxybenzoic acid, peroxyacetic acid, or tert-butylhydroperoxide (apparent second-order rate constants of 3.1 x 10(4), 1.2 x 10(4), and 25 M(-1) s(-1), respectively). Identification of the intermediate as KatG Compound I was confirmed using low-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Isoniazid, as well as ascorbate and potassium ferrocyanide, reduced KatG Compound I to the ferric enzyme without detectable formation of Compound II in stopped-flow measurements. This result differed from the reaction of horseradish peroxidase Compound I with isoniazid, during which Compound II was stably generated. These results demonstrate important mechanistic differences between a bacterial catalase-peroxidase and the homologous plant peroxidases and yeast cytochrome c peroxidase, in its reactions with peroxides as well as substrates. PMID:10933818

  10. Lignin Peroxidase Activity Is Not Important in Biological Bleaching and Delignification of Unbleached Kraft Pulp by Trametes versicolor

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, Frederick S.

    1992-01-01

    The discovery in 1983 of fungal lignin peroxidases able to catalyze the oxidation of nonphenolic aromatic lignin model compounds and release some CO2 from lignin has been seen as a major advance in understanding how fungi degrade lignin. Recently, the fungus Trametes versicolor was shown to be capable of substantial decolorization and delignification of unbleached industrial kraft pulps over 2 to 5 days. The role, if any, of lignin peroxidase in this biobleaching was therefore examined. Several different assays indicated that T. versicolor can produce and secrete peroxidase proteins, but only under certain culture conditions. However, work employing a new lignin peroxidase inhibitor (metavanadate ions) and a new lignin peroxidase assay using the dye azure B indicated that secreted lignin peroxidases do not play a role in the T. versicolor pulp-bleaching system. Oxidative activity capable of degrading 2-keto-4-methiolbutyric acid (KMB) appeared unique to ligninolytic fungi and always accompanied pulp biobleaching. PMID:16348775

  11. Effects of fraxetin on glutathione redox status.

    PubMed

    Martín-Aragón, S; Benedí, J M; Villar, A M

    1997-01-01

    We have evaluated the effects of an oral treatment of mice with fraxetin (25 mg/kg for 30 days) on the glutathione system (GSH, GSSG, and GSSG/GSH ratio as stress index), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in liver supernatants from male C57BL/6J mice (18-month old). A significant antioxidant effect in vivo was found under this treatment by a decrease in the GSSG/GSH ratio and an increased activity of GR compared with the control mice. GSSG rate and GSSG/GSH ratio were correlated with the decline of GPx++ activity. Our results of increased GR activity could be considered as a supercompensation in glutathione redox status that involves a decrease in the accumulation of GSSG, as well as, in GSSG/GSH ratio. Finally, we suggest that this possible mechanism of supercompensation could lead to an enhancement in the average life span. PMID:9162171

  12. Glutathione S-transferase activity and glutathione S-transferase mu expression in subjects with risk for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Szarka, C E; Pfeiffer, G R; Hum, S T; Everley, L C; Balshem, A M; Moore, D F; Litwin, S; Goosenberg, E B; Frucht, H; Engstrom, P F

    1995-07-01

    The glutathione S-transferases (alpha, mu, and pi), a family of Phase II detoxication enzymes, play a critical role in protecting the colon mucosa by catalyzing the conjugation of dietary carcinogens with glutathione. We investigated the efficacy of using the glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity of blood lymphocytes and GST-mu expression as biomarkers of risk for colorectal cancer. GST activity was measured in the blood lymphocytes of control individuals (n = 67) and in the blood lymphocytes (n = 60) and colon tissue (n = 34) of individuals at increased risk for colon cancer. Total GST activity was determined spectrophotometrically with the use of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as a substrate. The ability to express the um subclass of GST was determined with the use of an ELISA. Although interindividual variability in the GST activity of blood lymphocytes was greater than 8-fold (range, 16.7-146.8 nmol/min/mg), the GST activity of blood lymphocytes and colon tissue within an individual was constant over time and was unrelated to sex, age, or race. The GST activity of blood lymphocytes from high-risk individuals was significantly lower than that of blood lymphocytes from control individuals (P < or = 0.004). No association was observed between the frequency of GST-mu phenotype and risk for colorectal cancer. Blood lymphocytes from high-risk individuals unable to express GST-mu had lower levels of GST activity than did those from control subjects with the GST-mu null phenotype; however, this difference was significant in male subjects only (P < or = 0.006). Analysis of paired samples of blood lymphocytes and colon tissue indicated a strong correlation between the GST activity of the two tissue types (Spearman's rank correlation, r = 0.87; P < or = 0.0001). The GST activity of blood lymphocytes may be used to identify high-risk individuals with decreased protection from this Phase II detoxication enzyme who may benefit from clinical trials evaluating GST modulators

  13. Temporal leakage of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase and loss of two low-molecular-weight forms of glutathione peroxidase-1 from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) sperm after freezing and thawing.

    PubMed

    Kar, Senjuti; Divyashree, Bannur C; Roy, Sudhir C

    2015-03-01

    The postthaw motility and fertility of frozen-thawed buffalo spermatozoa are substantially low as compared with those of cattle sperm. The sperm motility and fertility have been positively correlated with the antioxidant enzyme activities of human and canine sperm. However, the extent of antioxidant enzyme loss during cryopreservation, although reported for human and cattle sperm, is still not clear for buffalo sperm. Thus, in the present study, an attempt was made to determine the activities of various antioxidant enzymes in buffalo spermatozoa cryopreserved for various durations (0, 30, and 60 days) and the mechanism of antioxidant enzyme loss, if any, during the process. Total superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of cryopreserved sperm decreased and that of extended seminal plasma increased progressively with the increase in duration of cryopreservation indicating the possible time-dependent leakage of these enzymes from cryopreserved sperm into the extended seminal plasmas. The catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) enzyme activities could not be detected in buffalo sperm but could be detected in fresh and extended seminal plasmas. Total GPx activities of extended seminal plasma decreased progressively with the increase in duration of cryopreservation. To confirm the presence of these enzymes at protein levels, specific antioxidant enzymes such as Cu,Zn SOD of 16 kDa and three molecular weight forms (57.7, 40.9, and 26.05 kDa) of GPx-1 were detected in buffalo sperm by Western blot. Furthermore, the intensities of 16-kDa Cu,Zn SOD in 60-day cryopreserved sperm and those of two low-molecular-weight forms of GPx-1 (40.9 and 26.05 kDa) in 30-day cryopreserved sperm decreased significantly (P < 0.05) as compared with those of noncryopreserved (0-day cryopreserved) sperm indicating selective and temporal leakage of only low-molecular-weight antioxidant proteins in the initial phase. However, all the mentioned GPx-1 forms disappeared in 60-day

  14. Studies on the Glutathione-Dependent Formaldehyde-Activating Enzyme from Paracoccus denitrificans

    PubMed Central

    Hopkinson, Richard J.; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.; Smart, Tristan J.; Rose, Nathan R.; Henry, Luc; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a toxin and carcinogen that is both an environmental pollutant and an endogenous metabolite. Formaldehyde metabolism, which is probably essential for all aerobic cells, likely proceeds via multiple mechanisms, including via a glutathione-dependent pathway that is widely conserved in bacteria, plants and animals. However, it is unclear whether the first step in the glutathione-dependent pathway (i.e. formation of S-hydroxymethylglutathione (HMG)) is enzyme-catalysed. We report studies on glutathione-dependent formaldehyde-activating enzyme (GFA) from Paracoccus denitrificans, which has been proposed to catalyse HMG formation from glutathione and formaldehyde on the basis of studies using NMR exchange spectroscopy (EXSY). Although we were able to replicate the EXSY results, time course experiments unexpectedly imply that GFA does not catalyse HMG formation under standard conditions. However, GFA was observed to bind glutathione using NMR and mass spectrometry. Overall, the results reveal that GFA binds glutathione but does not directly catalyse HMG formation under standard conditions. Thus, it is possible that GFA acts as a glutathione carrier that acts to co-localise glutathione and formaldehyde in a cellular context. PMID:26675168

  15. Changes in biosynthesis and metabolism of glutathione upon ochratoxin A stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhao, Weiwei; Hao, Junran; Xu, Wentao; Luo, Yunbo; Wu, Weihong; Yang, Zhuojun; Liang, Zhihong; Huang, Kunlun

    2014-06-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most toxic mycotoxins, which is toxic to plants and simulates oxidative stress. Glutathione is an important antioxidant in plants and is closely associated with detoxification in cells. We have previously shown that OTA exposure induces obvious expression differences in genes associated with glutathione metabolism. To characterize glutathione metabolism and understand its role in OTA phytotoxicity, we observed the accumulation of GSH in the detached leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana under OTA treatment. OTA stimulated a defense response through enhancing glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase activities, and the transcript levels of these enzymes were increased to maintain the total glutathione content. Moreover, the level of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) was increased and the ascorbate-glutathione cycle fluctuated in response to OTA. The depletion of glutathione using buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, inhibitor of glutamate-cysteine ligase) had no profound effect on OTA toxicity, as glutathione was regenerated through the ascorbate-glutathione cycle to maintain the total glutathione content. The ROS, MDA and GSH accumulation was significantly affected in the mutant gsh1, gr1 and gpx2 after treatment with OTA, which indicated that glutathione metabolism is directly involved in the oxidative stress response of Arabidopsis thaliana subjected to OTA. In conclusion, date demonstrate that glutathione-associated metabolism is closely related with OTA stress and glutathione play a role in resistance of Arabidopsis subjected to OTA. PMID:24662377

  16. Changes in thyroid peroxidase activity in response to various chemicals.

    PubMed

    Song, Mee; Kim, Youn-Jung; Park, Yong-Keun; Ryu, Jae-Chun

    2012-08-01

    Thyroperoxidase (TPO) is a large heme-containing glycoprotein that catalyzes the transfer of iodine to thyroglobulin during thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis. Previously, we established an in vitro assay for TPO activity based on human recombinant TPO (hrTPO) stably transfected into human follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC-238) cells. It is important to determine whether environmental chemicals can disrupt TPO activity because it is an important factor in the TH axis. In this study, we used our assay to examine the changes in TPO activity in response to various chemicals, including benzophenones (BPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Overall, BPs, PAHs, and POPs slightly altered TPO activity at low doses, as compared with the positive controls methimazole (MMI), genistein, and 2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxy BP. Benzophenone, benzhydrol, 3-methylchloranthracene, pyrene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(e)pyrene, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and heptachlor decreased TPO activity, while 2,4-dihydroxy BP, 2,2'-dihydroxy-4-methoxy BP, and dibenzo(a,h)anthracene increased TPO activity. From these data, we can predict the disruption of TPO activity by various chemicals as a sensitive TH end point. TPO activity should be considered when enacting measures to regulate environmental exposure to thyroid-disrupting chemicals. PMID:22699773

  17. Assessment of Antioxidant Enzyme Activity and Mineral Nutrients in Response to NaCl Stress and its Amelioration Through Glutathione in Chickpea.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Vinay; Kumar, Dinesh; Agrawal, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Salinity stress has been reckoned as one of the major threat towards crop productivity as it causes significant decline in the yield. The impact of NaCl stress (0, 1, 10, 50, 100 and 200 mg L(-1)) as well as glutathione (10 mg L(-1)) either alone or in combination has been evaluated on the induction of multiple shoots, antioxidant enzymes' activity, lipid peroxidation, relative permeability, concentration of nutrients, photosynthetic pigments, protein and proline content of nodal segments of chickpea after 14 days of culture. The antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione reductase (GR) were found to be increased under salt stress as well as glutathione-supplemented medium. A significant decrease in the concentrations of chlorophylls a, b, total chlorophyll and carotenoid was observed under salt stress. Concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, carbon, magnesium and sulphur showed an initial increase up to 10 mg L(-1) NaCl, but a decline was seen at higher NaCl levels. Proline content and malondialdehyde concentration were found to be increased under salt stress. Three isoforms of SOD, one of CAT and four of GPX were expressed during native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis. However, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of the stressed nodal explants revealed the over-expression of several polypeptide bands related to NaCl stress. These findings for the first time suggest that glutathione (GSH) helps in ameliorating NaCl stress in nodal explants of chickpea by manipulating various biochemical and physiological responses of plants. PMID:26440314

  18. IN VITRO INHIBITION OF GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE BY ARSENOTRI-GLUTATHIONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenotriglutathione, a product of the reduction of arsenate and the complexation of arsenite by glutathione, is a mixed type inhibitor of the reduction of glutathione disulfide by purified yeast glutathione reductase or the glutathione reductase activity in rabbit erythrocyte ly...

  19. Understanding the formation of CuS concave superstructures with peroxidase-like activity.

    PubMed

    He, Weiwei; Jia, Huimin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Lei, Yan; Li, Jing; Zhao, Hongxiao; Mi, Liwei; Zhang, Lizhi; Zheng, Zhi

    2012-06-01

    Copper sulfide (CuS) concave polyhedral superstructures (CPSs) have been successfully prepared in an ethanolic solution by a simple solvothermal reaction without the use of surfactants or templates. Two typical well defined, high symmetry CuS concave polyhedrons, forming a concave truncated cuboctahedron and icosahedron were prepared. The effect of the reaction time, temperature and different Cu ion and sulfur sources on the formation of CuS CPSs were investigated and a possible formation mechanism was proposed and discussed based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. More importantly, we found, for the first time, that the CuS CPSs exhibit intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, as they can quickly catalyze the oxidation of typical horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrates, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and o-phenylenediamine (OPD), in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In addition to the recent discoveries regarding peroxidase mimetics on Fe(3)O(4) NPs and carbon nanostructures, our findings suggest a new kind of candidate for peroxidase mimics. This may open up a new application field of CuS micro-nano structures in biodetection, biocatalysis and environmental monitoring. PMID:22552534

  20. Peroxidase activity as an indicator of exposure of wetland seedlings to metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, H.D.; Klaine, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The enzyme peroxidase has been found to increase quantitatively in several aquatic plant species in response to increasing exposure to various contaminants. In this study, a number of wetland species are tested for their usefulness as bioindicators of metal exposure using the peroxidase assay. Woody species tested include Liquidambar styraciflua (sweetgum), Fraxinus pennsylvanica (green ash), and Cephalanthus occidentalis (buttonbush), while herbaceous species include Saururus cernuus (lizard`s tail) and Sparganium americanum (bur-reed). The assay has been optimized for all of these species. In all cases the pH optimum has been found to be either 5.5 or 6.0 and the substrate optimum is 2.8 or 1.4mM hydrogen peroxide. There is considerable variation in baseline peroxidase activity among the species when tested under their optimal assay conditions. These species are being dosed with copper, nickel, and cadmium in order to determine whether a response elicited. Seedlings will be dosed using both petri dish culture conditions and test tubes filled with vermiculite and sand combinations. The peroxidase response will be compared to germination and root elongation endpoints. Lettuce (Lactuca saliva) and radish (Raphanus sativus) are being tested alongside the wetland species as reference organisms for which background data is available. The wetland species tested in the present study have rarely if ever been used in toxicological studies.

  1. Comparative analysis of lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase activity on coniferous and deciduous wood using ToF-SIMS.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Jacqueline; Goacher, Robyn E; Abou-Zaid, Mamdouh; Master, Emma R

    2016-09-01

    White-rot fungi are distinguished by their ability to efficiently degrade lignin via lignin-modifying type II peroxidases, including manganese peroxidase (MnP) and lignin peroxidase (LiP). In the present study, time-of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to evaluate lignin modification in three coniferous and three deciduous wood preparations following treatment with commercial preparations of LiP and MnP from two different white-rot fungi. Percent modification of lignin was calculated as a loss of intact methoxylated lignin over nonfunctionalized aromatic rings, which is consistent with oxidative cleavage of methoxy moieties within the lignin structure. Exposure to MnP resulted in greater modification of lignin in coniferous compared to deciduous wood (28 vs. 18 % modification of lignin); and greater modification of G-lignin compared to S-lignin within the deciduous wood samples (21 vs. 12 %). In contrast, exposure to LiP resulted in similar percent modification of lignin in all wood samples (21 vs 22 %), and of G- and S-lignin within the deciduous wood (22 vs. 23 %). These findings suggest that the selected MnP and LiP may particularly benefit delignification of coniferous and deciduous wood, respectively. Moreover, the current analysis further demonstrates the utility of ToF-SIMS for characterizing enzymatic modification of lignin in wood fibre along with potential advantages over UV and HPCL-MS detection of solubilized delignification products. PMID:27138198

  2. Cationic Peptide Conjugation Enhances the Activity of Peroxidase-Mimicking DNAzymes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lu; Zhou, Zhaojuan; Feng, Mengli; Tong, Aijun; Xiang, Yu

    2016-03-16

    Peroxidase-mimicking DNAzymes containing G-quadruplex structures are widely applied in chemistry as catalysts and signal amplification for biosensing. Enhancing the catalytic activity of these DNAzymes can therefore improve the performance of many catalysts and biosensors using them. In this work, we synthesized cationic peptide conjugates of peroxidase-mimicking DNAzymes, which were found to exhibit both enhanced peroxidase and oxidase activities up to 4-fold and 3-fold compared with the original DNAzymes, respectively. Further investigation suggested that the enhanced activity was ascribed to the stabilization of parallel DNA G-quadruplex structures and hemin binding by the cationic peptide covalently attached to the DNAzyme. Such a mechanism of activity enhancement was successfully utilized for biosensing applications with improved sensitivity and broadened target range. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection in K(+)-free solutions by the DNAzyme-peptide conjugate showed 2-fold sensitivity enhancement over the unmodified DNAzyme under the same condition, and the activity switch by target-induced cleavage of the DNAzyme-peptide conjugate was also used for the detection of caspase 3 protease with enzymatic amplification in homogeneous solutions. PMID:26751843

  3. Immobilization of peroxidase enzyme onto the porous silicon structure for enhancing its activity and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahare, Padmavati; Ayala, Marcela; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Agrawal, Vivechana

    2014-08-01

    In this work, a commercial peroxidase was immobilized onto porous silicon (PS) support functionalized with 3-aminopropyldiethoxysilane (APDES) and the performance of the obtained catalytic microreactor was studied. The immobilization steps were monitored and the activity of the immobilized enzyme in the PS pores was spectrophotometrically determined. The enzyme immobilization in porous silicon has demonstrated its potential as highly efficient enzymatic reactor. The effect of a polar organic solvent (acetonitrile) and the temperature (up to 50°C) on the activity and stability of the biocatalytic microreactor were studied. After 2-h incubation in organic solvent, the microreactor retained 80% of its initial activity in contrast to the system with free soluble peroxidase that lost 95% of its activity in the same period of time. Peroxidase immobilized into the spaces of the porous silicon support would be perspective for applications in treatments for environmental security such as removal of leached dye in textile industry or in treatment of different industrial effluents. The system can be also applied in the field of biomedicine.

  4. Immobilization of peroxidase enzyme onto the porous silicon structure for enhancing its activity and stability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a commercial peroxidase was immobilized onto porous silicon (PS) support functionalized with 3-aminopropyldiethoxysilane (APDES) and the performance of the obtained catalytic microreactor was studied. The immobilization steps were monitored and the activity of the immobilized enzyme in the PS pores was spectrophotometrically determined. The enzyme immobilization in porous silicon has demonstrated its potential as highly efficient enzymatic reactor. The effect of a polar organic solvent (acetonitrile) and the temperature (up to 50°C) on the activity and stability of the biocatalytic microreactor were studied. After 2-h incubation in organic solvent, the microreactor retained 80% of its initial activity in contrast to the system with free soluble peroxidase that lost 95% of its activity in the same period of time. Peroxidase immobilized into the spaces of the porous silicon support would be perspective for applications in treatments for environmental security such as removal of leached dye in textile industry or in treatment of different industrial effluents. The system can be also applied in the field of biomedicine. PMID:25221454

  5. Detection of the halogenating activity of heme peroxidases in leukocytes by aminophenyl fluorescein.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, J; Remmler, J; Zschaler, J; Arnhold, J

    2015-06-01

    The formation of hypochlorous and hypobromous acids by heme peroxidases is a key property of certain immune cells. These products are not only involved in defense against pathogenic microorganisms and in regulation of inflammatory processes, but contribute also to tissue damage in certain pathologies. After a short introduction about experimental approaches for the assessment of the halogenating activity in vitro and in cell suspensions, we are focusing on novel applications of fluorescent dye systems to detect the formation of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in leukocytes. Special attention is directed to properties and applications of the non-fluorescent dye aminophenyl fluorescein that is converted by HOCl, HOBr, and other strong oxidants to fluorescein. This dye allows the detection of the halogenating activity in samples containing free myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase as well as in intact granulocytes using fluorescence spectroscopy and flow cytometry, respectively. PMID:25536418

  6. Glutathione cycle activity and pyridine nucleotide levels in oxidant-induced injury of cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schraufstätter, I U; Hinshaw, D B; Hyslop, P A; Spragg, R G; Cochrane, C G

    1985-01-01

    Exposure of target cells to a bolus of H2O2 induced cell lysis after a latent period of several hours, which was prevented only when the H2O2 was removed within the first 30 min of injury by addition of catalase. This indicated that early metabolic events take place that are important in the fate of the cell exposed to oxidants. In this study, we described two early and independent events of H2O2-induced injury in P388D1 macrophagelike tumor cells: activation of the glutathione cycle and depletion of cellular NAD. Glutathione cycle and hexose monophosphate shunt (HMPS) were activated within seconds after the addition of H2O2. High HMPS activity maintained glutathione that was largely reduced. However, when HMPS activity was inhibited--by glucose depletion or by incubation at 4 degrees C--glutathione remained in the oxidized state. Total pyridine nucleotide levels were diminished when cells were exposed to H2O2, and the breakdown product, nicotinamide, was recovered in the extracellular medium. Intracellular NAD levels fell by 80% within 20 min of exposure of cells to H2O2. The loss of NADP(H) and stimulation of the HMPS could be prevented when the glutathione cycle was inhibited by either blocking glutathione synthesis with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) or by inhibiting glutathione reductase with (1,3-bis) 2 chlorethyl-1-nitrosourea. The loss of NAD developed independently of glutathione cycle and HMPS activity, as it also occurred in BSO-treated cells. PMID:3840176

  7. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site.

    PubMed

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme. PMID:26487708

  8. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site

    PubMed Central

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme. PMID:26487708

  9. The Molecular Mechanism of the Catalase-like Activity in Horseradish Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Campomanes, Pablo; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Rovira, Carme

    2015-09-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is one of the most relevant peroxidase enzymes, used extensively in immunochemistry and biocatalysis applications. Unlike the closely related catalase enzymes, it exhibits a low activity to disproportionate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The origin of this disparity remains unknown due to the lack of atomistic information on the catalase-like reaction in HRP. Using QM(DFT)/MM metadynamics simulations, we uncover the mechanism for reduction of the HRP Compound I intermediate by H2O2 at atomic detail. The reaction begins with a hydrogen atom transfer, forming a peroxyl radical and a Compound II-like species. Reorientation of the peroxyl radical in the active site, concomitant with the transfer of the second hydrogen atom, is the rate-limiting step, with a computed free energy barrier (18.7 kcal/mol, ∼ 6 kcal/mol higher than the one obtained for catalase) in good agreement with experiments. Our simulations reveal the crucial role played by the distal pocket residues in accommodating H2O2, enabling formation of a Compound II-like intermediate, similar to catalases. However, out of the two pathways for Compound II reduction found in catalases, only one is operative in HRP. Moreover, the hydrogen bond network in the distal side of HRP compensates less efficiently than in catalases for the energetic cost required to reorient the peroxyl radical at the rate-determining step. The distal Arg and a water molecule in the "wet" active site of HRP have a substantial impact on the reaction barrier, compared to the "dry" active site in catalase. Therefore, the lower catalase-like efficiency of heme peroxidases compared to catalases can be directly attributed to the different distal pocket architecture, providing hints to engineer peroxidases with a higher rate of H2O2 disproportionation. PMID:26274391

  10. Direct electrochemical detection of kanamycin based on peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunshuai; Liu, Chang; Luo, Jibao; Tian, Yaping; Zhou, Nandi

    2016-09-14

    An enzyme-free, ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of kanamycin residue was achieved based on mimetic peroxidase activity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and target-induced replacement of the aptamer. AuNPs which were synthesized using tyrosine as a reducing and capping agent, exhibited mimetic peroxidase activity. In the presence of kanamycin-specific aptamer, however, the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) adsorbed on the surface of AuNPs via the interaction between the bases of ssDNA and AuNPs, and therefore blocked the catalytic site of AuNPs, and inhibited their peroxidase activity. While in the presence of target kanamycin, it bound with the adsorbed aptamer on AuNPs with high affinity, exposed the surface of AuNPs and recovered the peroxidase activity. Then AuNPs catalyzed the reaction between H2O2 and reduced thionine to produce oxidized thionine. The latter exhibited a distinct reduction peak on gold electrode in differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), and could be utilized to quantify the concentration of kanamycin. Under the optimized conditions, the proposed electrochemical assay showed an extremely high sensitivity towards kanamycin, with a linear relationship between the peak current and the concentration of kanamycin in the range of 0.1-60 nM, and a detection limit of 0.06 nM. Moreover, the established approach was successfully applied in the detection of kanamycin in honey samples. Therefore, the proposed electrochemical assay has great potential in the fields of food quality control and environmental monitoring. PMID:27566341

  11. Quinone-mediated microbial synthesis of reduced graphene oxide with peroxidase-like activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangfei; Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Jiti; Wang, Aijie; Wang, Jing; Jin, Ruofei; Lv, Hong

    2013-12-01

    The effects of different quinones on graphene oxide (GO) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the peroxidase activity of the resultant reduced graphene oxide (QRGO) were studied. The presence of 100 μM anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS), anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate and 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone could lead to 1.6-2.8-fold increase in GO reduction rate, whereas anthraquinone-2-carboxylate slowed down the reduction. The stimulating effects of AQS increased with the increase of its concentration (10-100 μM). The mediated effects were proved by direct GO reduction by microbially reduced AQS. The mediated reduction of GO to QRGO was characterized by UV-vis, XRD, FTIR, Raman spectra, XPS, TEM and AFM, respectively. The as-prepared QRGO possessed peroxidase-like activity, which could catalyze the oxidation of 3,3'5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine by H2O2, and followed Michealis-Menten kinetics. A colorimetric sensor for quantitative determination of glucose based on the peroxidase activity of QRGO was developed over a range of 1-120 μM with a detection limit of 1 μM. PMID:24140856

  12. Characterization of structure and activity of garlic peroxidase (POX(1B)).

    PubMed

    El Ichi, Sarra; Miodek, Anna; Sauriat-Dorizon, Hélène; Mahy, Jean-Pierre; Henry, Céline; Marzouki, Mohamed Nejib; Korri-Youssoufi, Hafsa

    2011-01-01

    Structural characterization and study of the activity of new POX(1B) protein from garlic which has a high peroxidase activity and can be used as a biosensor for the detection of hydrogen peroxide and phenolic compounds were performed and compared with the findings for other heme peroxidases. The structure-function relationship was investigated by analysis of the spectroscopic properties and correlated to the structure determined by a new generation of high-performance hybrid mass spectrometers. The reactivity of the enzyme was analyzed by studies of the redox activity toward various ligands and the reactivity with various substrates. We demonstrated that, in the case of garlic peroxidase, the heme group is pentacoordinated, and has an histidine as a proximal ligand. POX(1B) exhibited a high affinity for hydrogen peroxide as well as various reducing cosubstrates. In addition, high enzyme specificity was demonstrated. The k(cat) and K(M) values were 411 and 400 mM(-1) s(-1) for 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine and 2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), respectively. Furthermore, the reduction of nitro compounds in the presence of POX(1B) was demonstrated by iron(II) nitrosoalkane complex assay. In addition, POX(1B) showed a great potential for application for drug metabolism since its ability to react with 1-nitrohexane in the presence of sodium dithionite was demonstrated by the appearance of a characteristic Soret band at 411 nm. The high catalytic efficiency obtained in the case of the new garlic peroxidase (POX(1B)) is suitable for the monitoring of different analytes and biocatalysis. PMID:21042820

  13. Construction of a Fusion Enzyme Exhibiting Superoxide Dismutase and Peroxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    Sharapov, M G; Novoselov, V I; Ravin, V K

    2016-04-01

    A chimeric gene construct encoding human peroxiredoxin 6 and Mn-superoxide dismutase from Escherichia coli was developed. Conditions for expression of the fusion protein in E. coli cell were optimized. Fusing of the enzymes into a single polypeptide chain with peroxiredoxin 6 at the N-terminus (PSH) did not affect their activities. On the contrary, the chimeric protein with reverse order of enzymes (SPH) was not obtained in a water-soluble active form. The active chimeric protein (PSH) exhibiting both peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities was prepared and its physicochemical properties were characterized. PMID:27293100

  14. Active Site Structure and Peroxidase Activity of Oxidatively Modified Cytochrome c Species in Complexes with Cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Capdevila, Daiana A; Oviedo Rouco, Santiago; Tomasina, Florencia; Tortora, Verónica; Demicheli, Verónica; Radi, Rafael; Murgida, Daniel H

    2015-12-29

    We report a resonance Raman and UV-vis characterization of the active site structure of oxidatively modified forms of cytochrome c (Cyt-c) free in solution and in complexes with cardiolipin (CL). The studied post-translational modifications of Cyt-c include methionine sulfoxidation and tyrosine nitration, which lead to altered heme axial ligation and increased peroxidase activity with respect to those of the wild-type protein. In spite of the structural and activity differences between the protein variants free in solution, binding to CL liposomes induces in all cases the formation of a spectroscopically identical bis-His axial coordination conformer that more efficiently promotes lipid peroxidation. The spectroscopic results indicate that the bis-His form is in equilibrium with small amounts of high-spin species, thus suggesting a labile distal His ligand as the basis for the CL-induced increase in enzymatic activity observed for all protein variants. For Cyt-c nitrated at Tyr74 and sulfoxidized at Met80, the measured apparent binding affinities for CL are ∼4 times larger than for wild-type Cyt-c. On the basis of these results, we propose that these post-translational modifications may amplify the pro-apoptotic signal of Cyt-c under oxidative stress conditions at CL concentrations lower than for the unmodified protein. PMID:26620444

  15. Visual detection of blood glucose based on peroxidase-like activity of WS2 nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tianran; Zhong, Liangshuang; Song, Zhiping; Guo, Liangqia; Wu, Hanyin; Guo, Qingquan; Chen, Ying; Fu, FengFu; Chen, Guonan

    2014-12-15

    Tungsten disulfide (WS2) nanosheets were discovered to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and catalyze the peroxidase substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) to produce a color reaction in the presence of H2O2. Based on this finding, a colorimetric method and a portable test kit for the visual detection of blood glucose have been developed by using glucose oxidase (GOx) and WS2 nanosheets-catalyzed reactions. The linear range for glucose was ranged from 5 to 300 μM (R(2)=0.999) with the detection limit of 2.9 μM. The portable test kit was successfully evaluated glucose levels in serum samples from normal persons and diabetes persons by the observable color change from pale yellow to yellow-green, blue-green. PMID:25032681

  16. Emerging pollutants and plants--Metabolic activation of diclofenac by peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Huber, Christian; Preis, Martina; Harvey, Patricia J; Grosse, Sylvia; Letzel, Thomas; Schröder, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Human pharmaceuticals and their residues are constantly detected in our waterbodies, due to poor elimination rates, even in the most advanced waste water treatment plants. Their impact on the environment and human health still remains unclear. When phytoremediation is applied to aid water treatment, plants may transform and degrade xenobiotic contaminants through phase I and phase II metabolism to more water soluble and less toxic intermediates. In this context, peroxidases play a major role in activating compounds during phase I via oxidation. In the present work, the ability of a plant peroxidase to oxidize the human painkiller diclofenac was confirmed using stopped flow spectroscopy in combination with LC-MS analysis. Analysis of an orange colored product revealed the structure of the highly reactive Diclofenac-2,5-Iminoquinone, which may be the precursor of several biological conjugates and breakdown products in planta. PMID:26741549

  17. Colorimetric detection of Shewanella oneidensis based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Junlin; Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Junhua

    2014-06-01

    Rapid detection and enumeration of target microorganisms is considered as a powerful tool for monitoring bioremediation process that typically involves cleaning up polluted environments with functional microbes. A novel colorimetric assay is presented based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity for rapidly detecting Shewanella oneidensis, an important model organism for environmental bioremediation because of its remarkably diverse respiratory abilities. Analyte bacteria captured on the immunomagnetic beads provided a bacterial out-membrane peroxidase-amplified colorimetric readout of the immunorecognition event by oxidizing 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the present of hydrogen peroxide. The high-efficiency of immunomagnetic capture and signal amplification of peroxidase activity offers an excellent detection performance with a wide dynamic range between 5.0 × 103 and 5.0 × 106 CFU/mL toward target cells. Furthermore, this method was demonstrated to be feasible in detecting S. oneidensis cells spiked in environmental samples. The proposed colorimetric assay shows promising environmental applications for rapid detection of target microorganisms.

  18. Colorimetric detection of Shewanella oneidensis based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Junlin; Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Junhua

    2014-01-01

    Rapid detection and enumeration of target microorganisms is considered as a powerful tool for monitoring bioremediation process that typically involves cleaning up polluted environments with functional microbes. A novel colorimetric assay is presented based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity for rapidly detecting Shewanella oneidensis, an important model organism for environmental bioremediation because of its remarkably diverse respiratory abilities. Analyte bacteria captured on the immunomagnetic beads provided a bacterial out-membrane peroxidase-amplified colorimetric readout of the immunorecognition event by oxidizing 3, 3′, 5, 5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the present of hydrogen peroxide. The high-efficiency of immunomagnetic capture and signal amplification of peroxidase activity offers an excellent detection performance with a wide dynamic range between 5.0 × 103 and 5.0 × 106 CFU/mL toward target cells. Furthermore, this method was demonstrated to be feasible in detecting S. oneidensis cells spiked in environmental samples. The proposed colorimetric assay shows promising environmental applications for rapid detection of target microorganisms. PMID:24898751

  19. Effect of architecture on the activity of glucose oxidase/horseradish peroxidase/carbon nanoparticle conjugates.

    PubMed

    Ciaurriz, Paula; Bravo, Ernesto; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2014-01-15

    We investigate the activity of glucose oxidase (GOx) together with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on carbon nanoparticles (CNPs). Because GOx activity relies on HRP, we probe how the arrangement of the enzymes on the CNPs affects enzymatic behavior. Colorimetric assays to probe activity found that the coupling strategy affects activity of the bienzyme-nanoparticle complex. GOx is more prone than HRP to denaturation on the CNP surface, where its activity is compromised, while HRP activity is enhanced when interfaced to the CNP. Thus, arrangements where HRP is directly on the surface of the CNP and GOx is not are more favorable for overall activity. Coverage also influenced activity of the bienzyme complex, but performing the conjugation in the presence of glucose did not improve GOx activity. These results show that the architecture of the assembly is an important factor in optimization of nanoparticle-protein interfaces. PMID:24231087

  20. Unusually high thermal stability and peroxidase activity of cytochrome c in ionic liquid colloidal formulation.

    PubMed

    Bharmoria, Pankaj; Kumar, Arvind

    2016-01-11

    Ionic liquid (IL) surfactant choline dioctylsulfosuccinate, [Cho][AOT], formed polydispersed vesicular structures in the IL, ethylmethylimidazolium ethylsulfate, [C2mim][C2OSO3]. Cytochrome c dissolved in such a colloidal medium has shown very high peroxidase activity (∼2 times to that in neat IL and ∼4 times to that in an aqueous buffer). Significantly, the enzyme retained both structural stability and functional activity in IL colloidal solutions up to 180 °C, demonstrating the suitability of the system as a high temperature bio-catalytic reactor. PMID:26529242

  1. Changes in the activity of ascorbate peroxidase under anaerobiosis in cocoyam (Colocasia esculenta).

    PubMed

    Chibueze, Nwose

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the activity of ascorbate peroxidase in the cormels of cocoyam (Colocasia esculenta var. antiquorum) immediately after harvest and in storage under anaerobiosis for one and three weeks, respectively. During stress condition in plants, hydrogen peroxide is released and mechanisms to detoxify it must be maintained. The cocoyam tubers that were neither damaged nor affected by disease were harvested from a local farm in Ugbogui, Ovia North Local Government Area in Edo State, Nigeria. The selected cocoyam tubers were peeled manually, washed with ice cold water and cut into pieces. The root tissues (50 g) were homogenised with 100 mL of ice cold 0.05 M phosphate buffer. The extract obtained was clarified by centrifugation for 15 min at 8000 g at 4 degrees C. Ascorbate-peroxidising activity was assayed using the initial rate of decrease in ascorbate concentration as measured by its absorbance at 290 nm using Milton Roy Spectron 21D. Results showed the weight of the cormels decreased all through during storage. Immediately after harvest the activity of ascorbate peroxidase was 15.49 unit mL(-1) with a significant increase (p < 0.05) after one week to 73.05 U mL(-1). Thereafter there was a significant decrease in activity of the enzyme after three weeks of storage to 33.33 U mL(-1). This increase in activity of ascorbate peroxidase after three weeks of storage may be related to increase in response to various biotic stresses. Therefore, manipulation of the capacity of cocoyam to tolerate anaerobiosis is a function of its ability to modulate the antioxidant enzymes' armory in case of need. PMID:24783794

  2. Nanostructures for peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M.; Prieto, Tatiana; Nantes, Iseli L.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese, and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design, and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting, and reusability. PMID:26389124

  3. Nanostructures for peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M; Prieto, Tatiana; Nantes, Iseli L

    2015-01-01

    Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese, and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design, and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting, and reusability. PMID:26389124

  4. Novel tungsten carbide nanorods: an intrinsic peroxidase mimetic with high activity and stability in aqueous and organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Yan, Ya; Xia, Bao-Yu; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Wang, Xin

    2014-04-15

    Tungsten carbide nanorods (WC NRs) are demonstrated for the first time to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity towards typical peroxidase substrates, such as 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and ο-phenylenediamine (OPD) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The reactions catalyzed by these nanorods follow the Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The excellent catalytic performance of WC NRs could be attributed to their intrinsic catalytic activity to efficiently accelerate the electron-transfer process and facilitate the decomposition of H2O2 to generate more numbers of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based upon the strong peroxidase-like activity of these WC NRs, a colorimetric sensor for H2O2 is designed, which provides good response towards H2O2 concentration over a range of 2×10(-7)-8×10(-5) M with a detection limit of 60 nM. Moreover, the peroxidase-like activities of WC NRs with TMB as the substrate are investigated in both protic and aprotic organic media, showing different colorimetric reactions from that performed in aqueous solutions. In comparison with the natural horse radish peroxidase, WC NR exhibits excellent robustness of catalytic activity and considerable reusability, thus making it a promising mimic of peroxidase catalysts. PMID:24325981

  5. Cell Wall Free Space of Cucumis Hypocotyls Contains NAD and a Blue Light-Regulated Peroxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    Shinkle, J R; Swoap, S J; Simon, P; Jones, R L

    1992-04-01

    Solutions were obtained from the cell wall free space of red light-grown cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) hypocotyl sections by a low-speed centrifugation technique. The centrifugate contained NAD and peroxidase but no detectable cytoplasmic contamination, as indicated by the absence of the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from the cell wall solution. Peroxidase activity centrifuged from the cell wall of red light-grown cucumber hypocotyl section could be resolved into at least three cathodic isoforms and two anodic isoforms by isoelectric focusing. Treatment of red light-grown cucumber seedlings with a 10-minute pulse of high-intensity blue light increased the level of cell wall peroxidase by about 60% and caused a qualitative change in the anodic isoforms of this enzyme. The increase in peroxidase activity was detectable within 25 minutes after the start of the blue light pulse, was maximal at 35 minutes, and declined to control levels by 45 minutes of irradiation. The inhibitory effect of blue light on hypocotyl elongation was more rapid than the effect of blue light on total wall peroxidase activity, leading to the conclusion that growth and peroxidase activity are not causally related. PMID:16668797

  6. Cell Wall Free Space of Cucumis Hypocotyls Contains NAD and a Blue Light-Regulated Peroxidase Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Shinkle, James R.; Swoap, Steven J.; Simon, Patrice; Jones, Russell L.

    1992-01-01

    Solutions were obtained from the cell wall free space of red light-grown cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) hypocotyl sections by a low-speed centrifugation technique. The centrifugate contained NAD and peroxidase but no detectable cytoplasmic contamination, as indicated by the absence of the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from the cell wall solution. Peroxidase activity centrifuged from the cell wall of red light-grown cucumber hypocotyl section could be resolved into at least three cathodic isoforms and two anodic isoforms by isoelectric focusing. Treatment of red light-grown cucumber seedlings with a 10-minute pulse of high-intensity blue light increased the level of cell wall peroxidase by about 60% and caused a qualitative change in the anodic isoforms of this enzyme. The increase in peroxidase activity was detectable within 25 minutes after the start of the blue light pulse, was maximal at 35 minutes, and declined to control levels by 45 minutes of irradiation. The inhibitory effect of blue light on hypocotyl elongation was more rapid than the effect of blue light on total wall peroxidase activity, leading to the conclusion that growth and peroxidase activity are not causally related. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:16668797

  7. Peroxidase-like oxidative activity of a manganese-coordinated histidyl bolaamphiphile self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2015-10-01

    A peroxidase-like catalyst was constructed through the self-assembly of histidyl bolaamphiphiles coordinated to Mn2+ ions. The prepared catalyst exhibited oxidation activity for the organic substrate o-phenylenediamine (OPD) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The histidyl bolaamphiphiles of bis(N-alpha-amido-histidine)-1,7-heptane dicarboxylates self-assembled to make spherical structures in an aqueous solution. Subsequent association of Mn2+ ions with the histidyl imidazoles in the self-assembly produced catalytic active sites. The optimal Mn2+ ion concentration was determined and coordination of the Mn2+ ion with multiple histidine imidazoles was investigated using spectroscopy analysis. The activation energy of the produced catalysts was 55.0 kJ mol-1, which was comparable to other peroxidase-mimetic catalysts. A detailed kinetics study revealed that the prepared catalyst followed a ping-pong mechanism and that the turnover reaction was promoted by increasing the substrate concentration. Finally, application of the prepared catalyst for glucose detection was demonstrated through cascade enzyme catalysis. This study demonstrated a facile way to prepare an enzyme-mimetic catalyst through the self-assembly of an amphiphilic molecule containing amino acid segments.A peroxidase-like catalyst was constructed through the self-assembly of histidyl bolaamphiphiles coordinated to Mn2+ ions. The prepared catalyst exhibited oxidation activity for the organic substrate o-phenylenediamine (OPD) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The histidyl bolaamphiphiles of bis(N-alpha-amido-histidine)-1,7-heptane dicarboxylates self-assembled to make spherical structures in an aqueous solution. Subsequent association of Mn2+ ions with the histidyl imidazoles in the self-assembly produced catalytic active sites. The optimal Mn2+ ion concentration was determined and coordination of the Mn2+ ion with multiple histidine imidazoles was investigated using spectroscopy

  8. Impact of glutathione supplementation of parenteral nutrition on hepatic methionine adenosyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Elremaly, Wesam; Mohamed, Ibrahim; Rouleau, Thérèse; Lavoie, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Background The oxidation of the methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) by the combined impact of peroxides contaminating parenteral nutrition (PN) and oxidized redox potential of glutathione is suspected to explain its inhibition observed in animals. A modification of MAT activity is suspected to be at origin of the PN-associated liver disease as observed in newborns. We hypothesized that the correction of redox potential of glutathione by adding glutathione in PN protects the MAT activity. Aim To investigate whether the addition of glutathione to PN can reverse the inhibition of MAT observed in animal on PN. Methods Three days old guinea pigs received through a jugular vein catheter 2 series of solutions. First with methionine supplement, (1) Sham (no infusion); (2) PN: amino acids, dextrose, lipids and vitamins; (3) PN-GSSG: PN+10 μM GSSG. Second without methionine, (4) D: dextrose; (5) D+180 μM ascorbylperoxide; (6) D+350 μM H2O2. Four days later, liver was sampled for determination of redox potential of glutathione and MAT activity in the presence or absence of 1 mM DTT. Data were compared by ANOVA, p<0.05. Results MAT activity was 45±4% lower in animal infused with PN and 23±7% with peroxides generated in PN. The inhibition by peroxides was associated with oxidized redox potential and was reversible by DTT. Correction of redox potential (PN+GSSG) or DTT was without effect on the inhibition of MAT by PN. The slope of the linear relation between MAT activity and redox potential was two fold lower in animal infused with PN than in others groups. Conclusion The present study suggests that prevention of peroxide generation in PN and/or correction of the redox potential by adding glutathione in PN are not sufficient, at least in newborn guinea pigs, to restore normal MAT activity. PMID:26722840

  9. S-Nitrosylation Positively Regulates Ascorbate Peroxidase Activity during Plant Stress Responses1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huanjie; Mu, Jinye; Chen, Lichao; Feng, Jian; Hu, Jiliang; Li, Lei; Zhou, Jian-Min; Zuo, Jianru

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are two classes of key signaling molecules involved in various developmental processes and stress responses in plants. The burst of NO and ROS triggered by various stimuli activates downstream signaling pathways to cope with abiotic and biotic stresses. Emerging evidence suggests that the interplay of NO and ROS plays a critical role in regulating stress responses. However, the underpinning molecular mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we show that NO positively regulates the activity of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase1 (APX1). We found that S-nitrosylation of APX1 at cysteine (Cys)-32 enhances its enzymatic activity of scavenging hydrogen peroxide, leading to the increased resistance to oxidative stress, whereas a substitution mutation at Cys-32 causes the reduction of ascorbate peroxidase activity and abolishes its responsiveness to the NO-enhanced enzymatic activity. Moreover, S-nitrosylation of APX1 at Cys-32 also plays an important role in regulating immune responses. These findings illustrate a unique mechanism by which NO regulates hydrogen peroxide homeostasis in plants, thereby establishing a molecular link between NO and ROS signaling pathways. PMID:25667317

  10. Glutathione-related factors are not correlated with sensitivity of human tumour cells to actinomycin D.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Yang, E B; Zhao, Y N; Wong, K P; Mack, P

    2000-02-28

    Glutathione (GSH) contents and activities of glutathione S-transferases (GST), glutathione reductase (GSH-RD), glutathione peroxidase (GSHpx) and glutathione conjugate export pump (GS-X pump) were determined in eight human tumour cell lines with different sensitivities to melphalan, a substrate of glutathione conjugation, and actinomycin D which has not been shown to be detoxified by glutathione-related mechanisms. Chang liver cells with highest GSH content and highest activities of GST, GSH-RD, GSHpx and GS-X pump were found to be most resistant to melphalan. Statistical analysis showed significant correlations between sensitivities of the human tumour cells to melphalan and the glutathione-related factors (r = 0.72-0.79; except for GST, r = 0.65, P = 0.08), while there were no significant correlations observed between sensitivities of the human tumour cells to actinomycin D and all the glutathione-related factors tested (r = -0.25-0.14). Significant correlations of the glutathione-related factors to resistance of human tumour cells to melphalan, a substrate of glutathione conjugation, but not to resistance of the human tumour cells to actinomycin D which has not been shown to be detoxified by glutathione-related mechanisms suggested that glutathione-related mechanisms contribute to drug resistance by increased detoxification of the drugs involved. PMID:10737727

  11. Peroxidase-like activity of mesoporous silica encapsulated Pt nanoparticle and its application in colorimetric immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhifei; Yang, Xia; Yang, Jingjing; Jiang, Yanyun; He, Nongyue

    2015-03-01

    Nanomaterial-based artificial enzymes have received great attention in recent year due to their potential application in immunoassay techniques. However, such potential is usually limited by poor dispersion stability or low catalytic activity induced by the capping agent essentially required in the synthesis. In an attempt to address these challenges, here, we studied the novel Pt nanoparticles (NPs) based peroxidase-like mimic by encapsulating Pt NP in mesoporous silica (Pt@mSiO2 NPs). Compared with other nanomaterial-based artificial enzymes, the obtained Pt@mSiO2 NPs not only exhibit high peroxidase-like activity but also have good dispersion stability in buffer saline solution when grafted with spacer PEG. Results show that when the thickness of silica shell is about 9 nm the resulting Pt@mSiO2 NPs exhibit the catalytic activity similar to that of Pt NPs, which is approximately 26 times higher than that of Fe3O4 NPs (in terms of Kcat for H2O2). Due to the protection of silica shell, the subsequent surface modification with antibody has little effect on their catalytic activity. The analytical performance of this system in detecting hCG shows that after 5 min incubation the limit of detection can reach 10 ng mL(-1) and dynamic linear working range is 5-200 ng mL(-1). Our findings pave the way for design and development of novel artificial enzyme labeling. PMID:25682428

  12. A Simple Colorimetric Assay for Specific Detection of Glutathione-S Transferase Activity Associated with DDT Resistance in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Rajatileka, Shavanti; Steven, Andrew; Hemingway, Janet; Ranson, Hilary; Paine, Mark; Vontas, John

    2010-01-01

    Background Insecticide-based methods represent the most effective means of blocking the transmission of vector borne diseases. However, insecticide resistance poses a serious threat and there is a need for tools, such as diagnostic tests for resistance detection, that will improve the sustainability of control interventions. The development of such tools for metabolism-based resistance in mosquito vectors lags behind those for target site resistance mutations. Methodology/Principal Findings We have developed and validated a simple colorimetric assay for the detection of Epsilon class Glutathione transferases (GST)-based DDT resistance in mosquito species, such as Aedes aegypti, the major vector of dengue and yellow fever worldwide. The colorimetric assay is based on the specific alkyl transferase activity of Epsilon GSTs for the haloalkene substrate iodoethane, which produces a dark blue colour highly correlated with AaGSTE2-2-overexpression in individual mosquitoes. The colour can be measured visually and spectrophotometrically. Conclusions/Significance The novel assay is substantially more sensitive compared to the gold standard CDNB assay and allows the discrimination of moderate resistance phenotypes. We anticipate that it will have direct application in routine vector monitoring as a resistance indicator and possibly an important impact on disease vector control. PMID:20824165

  13. Crystal Structure of Two Anti-Porphyrin Antibodies with Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Maréchal, Jean-Didier; Bahloul, Amel; Sari, Marie-Agnès; Mahy, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    We report the crystal structures at 2.05 and 2.45 Å resolution of two antibodies, 13G10 and 14H7, directed against an iron(III)-αααβ-carboxyphenylporphyrin, which display some peroxidase activity. Although these two antibodies differ by only one amino acid in their variable λ-light chain and display 86% sequence identity in their variable heavy chain, their complementary determining regions (CDR) CDRH1 and CDRH3 adopt very different conformations. The presence of Met or Leu residues at positions preceding residue H101 in CDRH3 in 13G10 and 14H7, respectively, yields to shallow combining sites pockets with different shapes that are mainly hydrophobic. The hapten and other carboxyphenyl-derivatized iron(III)-porphyrins have been modeled in the active sites of both antibodies using protein ligand docking with the program GOLD. The hapten is maintained in the antibody pockets of 13G10 and 14H7 by a strong network of hydrogen bonds with two or three carboxylates of the carboxyphenyl substituents of the porphyrin, respectively, as well as numerous stacking and van der Waals interactions with the very hydrophobic CDRH3. However, no amino acid residue was found to chelate the iron. Modeling also allows us to rationalize the recognition of alternative porphyrinic cofactors by the 13G10 and 14H7 antibodies and the effect of imidazole binding on the peroxidase activity of the 13G10/porphyrin complexes. PMID:23240001

  14. Airway Peroxidases Catalyze Nitration of the β2-Agonist Salbutamol and Decrease Its Pharmacological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sallans, Larry; Macha, Stephen; Brown, Kari; McGraw, Dennis W.; Kovacic, Melinda Butsch; Britigan, Bradley E.

    2011-01-01

    β2-Agonists are the most effective bronchodilators for the rapid relief of asthma symptoms, but for unclear reasons, their effectiveness may be decreased during severe exacerbations. Because peroxidase activity and nitrogen oxides are increased in the asthmatic airway, we examined whether salbutamol, a clinically important β2-agonist, is subject to potentially inactivating nitration. When salbutamol was exposed to myeloperoxidase, eosinophil peroxidase or lactoperoxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitrite (NO2−), both absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry indicated formation of a new metabolite with features expected for the nitrated drug. The new metabolites showed an absorption maximum at 410 nm and pKa of 6.6 of the phenolic hydroxyl group. In addition to nitrosalbutamol (m/z 285.14), a salbutamol-derived nitrophenol, formed by elimination of the formaldehyde group, was detected (m/z 255.13) by mass spectrometry. It is noteworthy that the latter metabolite was detected in exhaled breath condensates of asthma patients receiving salbutamol but not in unexposed control subjects, indicating the potential for β2-agonist nitration to occur in the inflamed airway in vivo. Salbutamol nitration was inhibited in vitro by ascorbate, thiocyanate, and the pharmacological agents methimazole and dapsone. The efficacy of inhibition depended on the nitrating system, with the lactoperoxidase/H2O2/NO2− being the most affected. Functionally, nitrated salbutamol showed decreased affinity for β2-adrenergic receptors and impaired cAMP synthesis in airway smooth muscle cells compared with the native drug. These results suggest that under inflammatory conditions associated with asthma, phenolic β2-agonists may be subject to peroxidase-catalyzed nitration that could potentially diminish their therapeutic efficacy. PMID:20974700

  15. A Selective Glutathione Probe based on AIE Fluorogen and its Application in Enzymatic Activity Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Xiaoding; Hong, Yuning; Chen, Sijie; Leung, Chris Wai Tung; Zhao, Na; Situ, Bo; Lam, Jacky Wing Yip; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we design and synthesize a malonitrile-functionalized TPE derivative (TPE-DCV), which can react with thiol group through thiol-ene click reaction, leading to the fluorescence change of the system. Combined with the unique AIE property, TPE-DCV can selectively detect glutathione (GSH) but not cysteine or homocysteine. As the cleavage of GSSG with the aid of glutathione reductase produces GSH, which turns on the fluorescence of TPE-DCV, the ensemble of TPE-DCV and GSSG can thus serve as a label-free sensor for enzymatic activity assay of glutathione reductase. We also apply TPE-DCV for the detection of intracellular GSH in living cells.

  16. A Selective Glutathione Probe based on AIE Fluorogen and its Application in Enzymatic Activity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Xiaoding; Hong, Yuning; Chen, Sijie; Leung, Chris Wai Tung; Zhao, Na; Situ, Bo; Lam, Jacky Wing Yip; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we design and synthesize a malonitrile-functionalized TPE derivative (TPE-DCV), which can react with thiol group through thiol-ene click reaction, leading to the fluorescence change of the system. Combined with the unique AIE property, TPE-DCV can selectively detect glutathione (GSH) but not cysteine or homocysteine. As the cleavage of GSSG with the aid of glutathione reductase produces GSH, which turns on the fluorescence of TPE-DCV, the ensemble of TPE-DCV and GSSG can thus serve as a label-free sensor for enzymatic activity assay of glutathione reductase. We also apply TPE-DCV for the detection of intracellular GSH in living cells. PMID:24603274

  17. Regulation of the activity of Korean radish cationic peroxidase promoter during dedifferentiation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soung Soo; Choi, Suh-Yeon; Park, Jin-Hyoun; Lee, Dong Ju

    2004-12-01

    Studies of the regulation of the activity of the Korean radish cationic peroxidase (KRCP) promoter during dedifferentiation and redifferentiation are reported here. Histochemical staining with 5-bromo-4-chloro-indolyl glucuronide (X-gluc) showed that only dedifferentiated marginal cells of leaf discs of the transgenic plants, but not of the interior region, were stained blue, as leaf discs were incubated on dedifferentiation-inducing medium from 5 days after callus induction (DACI). The levels of cationic peroxidase activity and of KRCP transcripts in Korean radish seedlings (Raphanus sativus L. F1 Handsome Fall) were also upregulated by a low ratio of cytokinin to auxin, but not by high concentrations of cytokinin. To identify important cis-regulatory regions controlling callus-specific expression, a series of 5' promoter deletions was carried out with KRCP::GUS gene fusion systems. The data suggest that at least two positively regulatory regions are involved in the KRCP::GUS expression during dedifferentiation induced by a low ratio of cytokinin to auxin: one from -471 to -242 and another from -241 to +196. GUS expression, however, was quickly decreased to a basal level during regeneration of root and shoot. Thus, the downstream region between +197 and +698 seems to be enough to suppress GUS expression of all constructs during regeneration. We further show that the 142-bp fragment (-471 to -328) has at least one cis-element to bind to the nuclear proteins from Korean radish seedlings induced by dedifferentiation. PMID:15596095

  18. Peroxidase-like activity of apoferritin paired gold clusters for glucose detection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xin; Sun, Cuiji; Guo, Yi; Nie, Guangjun; Xu, Li

    2015-02-15

    The discovery and application of noble metal nanoclusters have received considerable attention. In this paper, we reported that apoferritin paired gold clusters (Au-Ft) could efficiently catalyze oxidation of 3.3',5.5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) by H2O2 to produce a blue color reaction. Compared with natural enzyme, Au-Ft exhibited higher activity near acidic pH and could be used over a wide range of temperatures. Apoferritin nanocage enhanced the reaction activity of substrate TMB by H2O2. The reaction catalyzed by Au-Ft was found to follow a typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The kinetic parameters exhibited a lower K(m) value (0.097 mM) and a higher K(cat) value (5.8 × 10(4) s(-1)) for TMB than that of horse radish peroxidase (HRP). Base on these findings, Au-Ft, acting as a peroxidase mimetic, performed enzymatic spectrophotometric analysis of glucose. This system exhibited acceptable reproducibility and high selectivity in biosening, suggesting that it could have promising applications in the future. PMID:25218100

  19. ENHANCING FUNGICIDAL ACTIVITY OF FLUDIOXONIL BY DISRUPTING CELLULAR GLUTATHIONE HOMEOSTASIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungicidal activity of fludioxonil, a phenylpyrrole fungicide, is elevated by co-application with the aspirin/salicylic acid metabolite, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHBA). Fludioxonil fungicidal activity is potentiated through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway regulating osmotic...

  20. Comparison of the peroxidase-like activity of unmodified, amino-modified, and citrate-capped gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Chen, Wei; Liu, Ai-Lin; Hong, Lei; Deng, Hao-Hua; Lin, Xin-Hua

    2012-04-10

    The origin of the peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles and the impact of surface modification are studied. Furthermore, some influencing factors, such as fabrication process, redox property of the modifier, and charge property of the substrate, are investigated. Compared to amino-modified or citrate-capped gold nanoparticles, unmodified gold nanoparticles show significantly higher catalytic activity toward peroxidase substrates, that is, the superficial gold atoms are a contributing factor to the observed peroxidase-like activity. The different catalytic activities of amino-modified and citrate-capped gold nanoparticles toward 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) show that the charge characteristics of the nanoparticles and the substrate also play an important role in the catalytic reactions. PMID:22383315

  1. Synaptic NMDA receptor activity is coupled to the transcriptional control of the glutathione system

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Paul S.; Bell, Karen F.S.; Hasel, Philip; Kaindl, Angela M.; Fricker, Michael; Thomson, Derek; Cregan, Sean P.; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Hardingham, Giles E.

    2015-01-01

    How the brain's antioxidant defenses adapt to changing demand is incompletely understood. Here we show that synaptic activity is coupled, via the NMDA receptor (NMDAR), to control of the glutathione antioxidant system. This tunes antioxidant capacity to reflect the elevated needs of an active neuron, guards against future increased demand and maintains redox balance in the brain. This control is mediated via a programme of gene expression changes that boosts the synthesis, recycling and utilization of glutathione, facilitating ROS detoxification and preventing Puma-dependent neuronal apoptosis. Of particular importance to the developing brain is the direct NMDAR-dependent transcriptional control of glutathione biosynthesis, disruption of which can lead to degeneration. Notably, these activity-dependent cell-autonomous mechanisms were found to cooperate with non-cell-autonomous Nrf2-driven support from astrocytes to maintain neuronal GSH levels in the face of oxidative insults. Thus, developmental NMDAR hypofunction and glutathione system deficits, separately implicated in several neurodevelopmental disorders, are mechanistically linked. PMID:25854456

  2. Cytochrome P450 peroxidase/peroxygenase mediated xenobiotic metabolic activation and cytotoxicity in isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Anari, M R; Khan, S; Liu, Z C; O'Brien, P J

    1995-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) can utilize organic hydroperoxides and peracids to support hydroxylation and dealkylation of various P450 substrates. However, the biological significance of this P450 peroxygenase/peroxidase activity in the bioactivation of xenobiotics in intact cells has not been demonstrated. We have shown that tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP) markedly enhances 3-20-fold the cytotoxicity of various aromatic hydrocarbons and their phenolic metabolites. The tBHP-enhanced hepatocyte cytotoxicity of 4-nitroanisole (4-NA) and 4-hydroxyanisole (4-HA) was also accompanied by an increase in the hepatocyte O-demethylation of 4-NA and 4-HA up to 7.5- and 21-fold, respectively. Hepatocyte GSH conjugation by 4-HA was also markedly increased by tBHP. An LC/MS analysis of the GSH conjugates identified hydroquinone-GSH and 4-methoxy-catechol:GSH conjugates as the predominant adducts. Pretreatment of hepatocytes with P450 inhibitors, e.g., phenylimidazole, prevented tBHP-enhanced 4-HA metabolism, GSH depletion, and cytotoxicity. In conclusion, hydroperoxides can therefore be used by intact cells to support the bioactivation of xenobiotics through the P450 peroxidase/peroxygenase system. PMID:8605292

  3. Detection of glucose based on the peroxidase-like activity of reduced state carbon dots.

    PubMed

    Long, Yijuan; Wang, Xiliang; Shen, Dongjun; Zheng, Huzhi

    2016-10-01

    It was found that reduced state carbon dots (r-CDs) possessed intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, and could catalytically oxidize 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) by H2O2 to produce a color reaction. The effects of temperature, pH, incubating time and the concentration of H2O2 and TMB on catalytic activity of r-CDs were investigated. Finally we calculated the kinetic constant was ca. 0.00729min(-1) and applied r-CDs to glucose sensing by coupling glucose oxidase. As low as 2µM H2O2 could be detected with a linear range from 0.010 to 0.40mM via this method. This study offered a simple, sensitive, and high selectivity method for glucose determination even in serum. PMID:27474288

  4. Staining electrophoretic gels for laccase and peroxidase activity using 1,8-diaminonaphthalene.

    PubMed

    Hoopes, J T; Dean, J F

    2001-06-01

    A new chromogenic substrate for laccases and peroxidases, 1,8-diaminonapthalene, was used to detect phenoloxidase activity in gels after SDS-PAGE. This substrate has several advantages over other widely used phenoloxidase stains in that it is inexpensive, and the oxidized product has both high molar absorptivity and very low solubility. Furthermore, neither the substrate nor the product is known to have toxicity problems of the type associated with many other phenoloxidase stains. The sensitivity of detection using 1,8-diaminonapthalene was comparable to that obtained using the most sensitive stains commonly used for phenoloxidases, e.g., 3,3-diaminobenzidine, and was close to that attainable for protein detection using silver staining. Zymograms developed with 1,8-diaminonapthalene can be used with video densitometry to monitor the specific enzymatic activity of phenoloxidases during enzyme purification. PMID:11373084

  5. Ferromagnetic nanoparticles with peroxidase-like activity enhance the cleavage of biological macromolecules for biofilm elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GaoCurrent Address: University Of Pennsylvania, School Of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia, Pa 19104, Usa. E.-Mail: Gaoliz@Dental. Upenn. Edu, Lizeng; Giglio, Krista M.; Nelson, Jacquelyn L.; Sondermann, Holger; Travis, Alexander J.

    2014-02-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a ``green chemical'' that has various cleaning and disinfectant uses, including as an anti-bacterial agent for hygienic and medical treatments. However, its efficacy is limited against biofilm-producing bacteria, because of poor penetration into the protective, organic matrix. Here we show new applications for ferromagnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4, MNPs) with peroxidase-like activity in potentiating the efficacy of H2O2 in biofilm degradation and prevention. Our data show that MNPs enhanced oxidative cleavage of biofilm components (model nucleic acids, proteins, and oligosaccharides) in the presence of H2O2. When challenged with live, biofilm-producing bacteria, the MNP-H2O2 system efficiently broke down the existing biofilm and prevented new biofilms from forming, killing both planktonic bacteria and those within the biofilm. By enhancing oxidative cleavage of various substrates, the MNP-H2O2 system provides a novel strategy for biofilm elimination, and other applications utilizing oxidative breakdown.Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a ``green chemical'' that has various cleaning and disinfectant uses, including as an anti-bacterial agent for hygienic and medical treatments. However, its efficacy is limited against biofilm-producing bacteria, because of poor penetration into the protective, organic matrix. Here we show new applications for ferromagnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4, MNPs) with peroxidase-like activity in potentiating the efficacy of H2O2 in biofilm degradation and prevention. Our data show that MNPs enhanced oxidative cleavage of biofilm components (model nucleic acids, proteins, and oligosaccharides) in the presence of H2O2. When challenged with live, biofilm-producing bacteria, the MNP-H2O2 system efficiently broke down the existing biofilm and prevented new biofilms from forming, killing both planktonic bacteria and those within the biofilm. By enhancing oxidative cleavage of various substrates, the MNP-H2O2 system provides a novel

  6. The role of glutathione in lymphocyte activation and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Messina, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    The object of this work was to establish the requirement for GSH and cystine during the activation and proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In the author's initial experiments the intracellular GSH content of PBMC was altered by continuous culture or pretreatment with BSO, a specific inhibitor of GSH synthesis. His results demonstrate that, continuous culture of mitogen stimulated PBMC in the presence of BSO inhibited entry into S-phase of the cell cycle and produced a simultaneous decrease in intracellular GSH. The influence of BSO on early activation events were determined by BSO pretreatment. Extensive depletion (>90%) of the intracellular GSH level prior to mitogenic stimulation did not impair the ability of these cells to produce IL-2 and express IL-2R, indicating that GSH may not be involved in the generation and response to early activation signals. Furthermore, the removal of BSO from these cultures rapidly reversed its inhibitory effects on DNA and GSH synthesis. Cystine transport activities and metabolism by PBMC were characterized in order to examine its contributions to intracellular GSH and early activation proteins. In spite of the ability of cystine to sustain the proliferative response of PBMC, differences in the kinetics of cystine and cysteine uptake indicated that separate transport systems may be operational. Treatment with 2ME enhanced cystine uptake, but lowered the proliferative responses of these cells. Metabolic studies with ({sup 35}S) cystine demonstrated that mitogen stimulation of PBMC enhance cystine uptake.

  7. A comparison of erythrocyte glutathione S-transferase activity from human foetuses and adults.

    PubMed Central

    Strange, R C; Johnston, J D; Coghill, D R; Hume, R

    1980-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase activity was measured in partially purified haemolysates of erythrocytes from human foetuses and adults. Enzyme activity was present in erythrocytes obtained between 12 and 40 weeks of gestation. The catalytic properties of the enzyme from foetal cells were similar to those of the enzyme from adult erythrocytes, indicating that probably only one form of the erythrocytes enzyme exists throughout foetal and adult life. PMID:7396875

  8. Peroxidase Activity and Involvement in the Oxidative Stress Response of Roseobacter denitrificans Truncated Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaya; Barbeau, Xavier; Bilimoria, Astha; Lagüe, Patrick; Couture, Manon; Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Roseobacter denitrificans is a member of the widespread marine Roseobacter genus. We report the first characterization of a truncated hemoglobin from R. denitrificans (Rd. trHb) that was purified in the heme-bound form from heterologous expression of the protein in Escherichia coli. Rd. trHb exhibits predominantly alpha-helical secondary structure and absorbs light at 412, 538 and 572 nm. The phylogenetic classification suggests that Rd. trHb falls into group II trHbs, whereas sequence alignments indicate that it shares certain important heme pocket residues with group I trHbs in addition to those of group II trHbs. The resonance Raman spectra indicate that the isolated Rd. trHb contains a ferric heme that is mostly 6-coordinate low-spin and that the heme of the ferrous form displays a mixture of 5- and 6-coordinate states. Two Fe-His stretching modes were detected, notably one at 248 cm-1, which has been reported in peroxidases and some flavohemoglobins that contain an Fe-His-Asp (or Glu) catalytic triad, but was never reported before in a trHb. We show that Rd. trHb exhibits a significant peroxidase activity with a (kcat/Km) value three orders of magnitude higher than that of bovine Hb and only one order lower than that of horseradish peroxidase. This enzymatic activity is pH-dependent with a pKa value ~6.8. Homology modeling suggests that residues known to be important for interactions with heme-bound ligands in group II trHbs from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Bacillus subtilis are pointing toward to heme in Rd. trHb. Genomic organization and gene expression profiles imply possible functions for detoxification of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in vivo. Altogether, Rd. trHb exhibits some distinctive features and appears equipped to help the bacterium to cope with reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and/or to operate redox biochemistry. PMID:25658318

  9. Different peroxidase activities and expression of abiotic stress-related peroxidases in apical root segments of wheat genotypes with different drought stress tolerance under osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Csiszár, Jolán; Gallé, Agnes; Horváth, Edit; Dancsó, Piroska; Gombos, Magdolna; Váry, Zsolt; Erdei, László; Györgyey, János; Tari, Irma

    2012-03-01

    One-week-old seedlings of Triticum aestivum L. cv. Plainsman V, a drought tolerant; and Cappelle Desprez, a drought sensitive wheat cultivar were subjected gradually to osmotic stress using polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000) reaching 400 mOsm on the 11th day. Compared to controls cv. Plainsman V maintained the root growth and relative water content of root tissues, while these parameters were decreased in the drought sensitive cv. Cappelle Desprez under PEG-mediated osmotic stress. Simultaneously, H(2)O(2) content in 1-cm-long apical segment of roots comprising the proliferation and elongation zone, showed a transient increase in cv. Plainsman V and a permanent raise in cv. Cappelle Desprez. Measurements of the transcript levels of selected class III peroxidase (TaPrx) coding sequences revealed significant differences between the two cultivars on the 9th day, two days after applying 100 mOsm PEG. The abundance of TaPrx04 transcript was enhanced transitionally in the root apex of cv. Plainsman V but decreased in cv. Cappelle Desprez under osmotic stress while the expression of TaPrx01, TaPrx03, TaPrx19, TaPrx68, TaPrx107 and TaPrx109-C decreased to different extents in both cultivars. After a transient decrease, activities of soluble peroxidase fractions of crude protein extracts rose in both cultivars on day 11, but the activities of cell wall-bound fractions increased only in cv. Cappelle Desprez under osmotic stress. Parallel with high H(2)O(2) content of the tissues, certain isoenzymes of covalently bound fraction in cv. Cappelle Desprez showed increased activity suggesting that they may limit the extension of root cell walls in this cultivar. PMID:22305075

  10. Analysis of the Peroxidase Activity of Rice (Oryza Sativa) Recombinant Hemoglobin 1: Implications for the In Vivo Function of Hexacoordinate Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobins in Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In plants, it has been proposed that hexacoordinate (class 1) non-symbiotic Hbs (nsHb-1) function in vivo as peroxidases. However, little is known about the peroxidase activity of nsHb-1. We evaluated the peroxidase activity of rice recombinant Hb1 (a nsHb-1) by using the guaiacol/H2O2 system at pH ...

  11. L-carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) and carcinine (beta-alanylhistamine) act as natural antioxidants with hydroxyl-radical-scavenging and lipid-peroxidase activities.

    PubMed Central

    Babizhayev, M A; Seguin, M C; Gueyne, J; Evstigneeva, R P; Ageyeva, E A; Zheltukhina, G A

    1994-01-01

    Carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) and carcinine (beta-alanylhistamine) are natural imidazole-containing compounds found in the non-protein fraction of mammalian tissues. Carcinine was synthesized by an original procedure and characterized. Both carnosine and carcinine (10-25 mM) are capable of inhibiting the catalysis of linoleic acid and phosphatidylcholine liposomal peroxidation (LPO) by the O2(-.)-dependent iron-ascorbate and lipid-peroxyl-radical-generating linoleic acid 13-monohydroperoxide (LOOH)-activated haemoglobin systems, as measured by thiobarbituric-acid-reactive substance. Carcinine and carnosine are good scavengers of OH. radicals, as detected by iron-dependent radical damage to the sugar deoxyribose. This suggests that carnosine and carcinine are able to scavenge free radicals or donate hydrogen ions. The iodometric, conjugated diene and t.l.c. assessments of lipid hydroperoxides (13-monohydroperoxide linoleic acid and phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide) showed their efficient reduction and deactivation by carnosine and carcinine (10-25 mM) in the liberated and bound-to-artificial-bilayer states. This suggests that the peroxidase activity exceeded that susceptible to direct reduction with glutathione peroxidase. Imidazole, solutions of beta-alanine, or their mixtures with peptide moieties did not show antioxidant potential. Free L-histidine and especially histamine stimulated iron (II) salt-dependent LPO. Due to the combination of weak metal chelating (abolished by EDTA), OH. and lipid peroxyl radicals scavenging, reducing activities to liberated fatty acid and phospholipid hydroperoxides, carnosine and carcinine appear to be physiological antioxidants able to efficiently protect the lipid phase of biological membranes and aqueous environments. PMID:7998987

  12. Platelet-activating factor induces eosinophil peroxidase release from purified human eosinophils.

    PubMed Central

    Kroegel, C; Yukawa, T; Dent, G; Chanez, P; Chung, K F; Barnes, P J

    1988-01-01

    The degranulation response of purified human eosinophils to platelet-activating factor (PAF) has been studied. PAF induced release of eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and beta-glucuronidase from highly purified human eosinophils with an EC50 of 0.9 nM. The order of release was comparable with that induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). The new specific PAF antagonist 3-[4-(2-chlorophenyl)-9-methyl-H-thieno[3,2-f] [1,2,4]triazolo-[4,3a][1,4]-diazepin-2-yl](4-morpholinyl)- 1-propane-one (WEB 2086) inhibited the PAF-induced enzyme release by human eosinophils in a dose-dependent manner. The viability of eosinophils were unaffected both by PAF and WEB 2086. The results suggest that PAF may amplify allergic and inflammatory reactions by release of preformed proteins from eosinophil granules. PMID:3410498

  13. Apocynin increases glutathione synthesis and activates AP-1 in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lapperre, T S; Jimenez, L A; Antonicelli, F; Drost, E M; Hiemstra, P S; Stolk, J; MacNee, W; Rahman, I

    1999-01-25

    Apocynin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone) is a potent intracellular inhibitor of superoxide anion production in neutrophils. In this study, we studied the effect of apocynin on the regulation of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and activation of the transcription factor AP-I in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549). Apocynin enhanced intracellular GSH by increasing gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase activity in A549 cells. Apocynin also increased the expression of gamma-GCS heavy subunit mRNA. This was associated with increased AP-1 DNA binding as measured by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay. These data indicate that apocynin displays antioxidant properties, in part, by increasing glutathione synthesis through activation of AP-1. PMID:9989612

  14. pH-induced quaternary assembly of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin: the monomer exhibits better peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Yubin; Xu, Haoran; Wu, Lei; Cao, Yufeng; Zhao, Haifeng; Li, Zhengqiang

    2013-10-01

    pH-dependent (pH6.0-8.0) quaternary structural changes of ferric Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) have been investigated using dynamic light scattering. The VHb exhibits a monomeric state under neutral conditions at pH7.0, while the protein forms distinct homodimeric species at pH6.0 and 8.0, respectively. The dissociation constant obtained using the Bio-Layer Interferometry technology indicates that, at pH7.0, the monomer-monomer dissociation of VHb is about 6-fold or 5-fold higher (KD=6.34μM) compared with that at slightly acidic pH (KD=1.05μM) or slightly alkaline pH (KD=1.22μM). The pH-dependent absorption spectra demonstrate that the heme microenvironment of VHb is sensitive to the changes of pH value. The maximum absorption band of heme group of VHb shifts from 402nm to 407nm when pH changes from 6.0 to 8.0. In addition, the fluorescence emission spectra of VHb, taken at excitation wavelength of 295nm, suggest that the single Trp122 fluorescence quantum yields in VHb are decreased due to the formation of the homodimeric species. However, the circular dichroism spectra data display that the secondary structures of VHb are little affected by pH transitions. The pH-dependent peroxidase activity of VHb was also investigated in this study. The optimum pH for VHb using 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) as substrate is 7.0, which implies that the monomer state of VHb would exhibit better peroxidase activity than the homodimeric species of VHb at pH6.0 and 8.0. PMID:23886679

  15. The impact of thiol peroxidases on redox regulation.

    PubMed

    Flohé, Leopold

    2016-01-01

    The biology of glutathione peroxidases and peroxiredoxins is reviewed with emphasis on their role in metabolic regulation. Apart from their obvious function in balancing oxidative challenge, these thiol peroxidases are not only implicated in orchestrating the adaptive response to oxidative stress, but also in regulating signaling triggered by hormones, growth factors and cytokines. The mechanisms presently discussed comprise dampening of redox-sensitive regulatory processes by elimination of hydroperoxides, suppression of lipoxygenase activity, committing suicide to save H2O2 for signaling, direct binding to receptors or regulatory proteins in a peroxidase activity-independent manner, or acting as sensors for hydroperoxides and as transducers of oxidant signals. The various mechanistic proposals are discussed in the light of kinetic data, which unfortunately are scarce. Taking into account pivotal criteria of a meaningful regulatory circuit, kinetic plausibility and specificity, the mechanistic concepts implying a direct sensor/transducer function of the thiol peroxidases appear most appealing. With rate constants for the reaction with hydroperoxide of 10(5)-10(8) M(-1) s(-1), thiol peroxidases are qualified as kinetically preferred hydroperoxide sensors, and the ability of the oxidized enzymes to react with defined protein thiols lends specificity to the transduction process. The versatility of thiol peroxidases, however, allows multiple ways of interaction with regulatory pathways. PMID:26291534

  16. Fluorometric microplate assay to measure glutathione S-transferase activity in insects and mites using monochlorobimane.

    PubMed

    Nauen, Ralf; Stumpf, Natascha

    2002-04-15

    Elevated levels of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play a major role as a mechanism of resistance to insecticides and acaricides in resistant pest insects and mites, respectively. Such compounds are either detoxicated directly via phase I metabolism or detoxicated by phase II metabolism of metabolites as formed by microsomal monooxygenases. Here we used monochlorobimane (MCB) as an artificial substrate and glutathione to determine total GST activity in equivalents of single pest insects and spider mites in a sensitive 96-well plate-based assay system by measuring the enzymatic conversion of MCB to its fluorescent bimane-glutathione adduct. The differentiation by their GST activity between several strains of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae), with different degrees of resistance to numerous acaricides was more sensitive with MCB compared to the commonly used substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Compared to an acaricide-susceptible reference strain, one field population of T. urticae showed a more than 10-fold higher GST activity measured with MCB, in contrast to a less than 2-fold higher activity when CDNB was used. Furthermore, we showed that GST activity can be sensitively assessed with MCB in homogenates of pest insects such as Heliothis virescens, Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae), and Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae). PMID:11950219

  17. Magnetic resonance spectral characterization of the heme active site of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lukat, G.S.; Rodgers, K.R.; Jabro, M.N.; Goff, H.M. )

    1989-04-18

    Examination of the peroxidase isolated from the inkcap Basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus shows that the 42,000-dalton enzyme contains a protoheme IX prosthetic group. Reactivity assays and the electronic absorption spectra of native Coprinus peroxidase and several of its ligand complexes indicate that this enzyme has characteristics similar to those reported for horseradish peroxidase. In this paper, the authors characterize the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-oxidized forms of Coprinus peroxidase compounds I, II, and III by electronic absorption and magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of this Coprinus peroxidase indicate the presence of high-spin Fe(III) in the native protein and a number of differences between the heme site of Coprinus peroxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Carbon-13 (of the ferrous CO adduct) and nitrogen-15 (of the cyanide complex) NMR studies together with proton NMR studies of the native and cyanide-complexed Caprinus peroxidase are consistent with coordination of a proximal histidine ligand. The EPR spectrum of the ferrous NO complex is also reported. Protein reconstitution with deuterated hemin has facilitated the assignment of the heme methyl resonances in the proton NMR spectrum.

  18. Glutathione transferase activity and formation of macromolecular adducts in two cases of acute methyl bromide poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, R; Rambourg-Schepens, M O; Müller, A; Hallier, E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the activity of glutathione transferase and to measure the S-methylcysteine adducts in blood proteins, after acute inhalation exposure to methyl bromide. To examine the influence of the polymorphism of glutathione-S-transferase theta (GSTT1) on the neurotoxicity of methyl bromide. METHODS: Two workers acutely exposed to methyl bromide with inadequate respiratory protective devices were poisoned. Seven weeks after the accident, blood samples were drawn from both patients, for measurement of glutathione transferase activity in erythrocytes (conjugator status--that is, GSTT1 phenotype) and measurement of binding products of methyl bromide with blood proteins. Conjugator status was determined by a standard procedure. The binding product of methyl bromide, S-methylcysteine, was measured in globin and albumin. RESULTS: Duration and intensity of exposure were identical for both patients as they worked together with the same protective devices and with similar physical effort. However, one patient had very severe poisoning, whereas the other only developed mild neurotoxic symptoms. The first patient was a "conjugator" with normal glutathone transferase activity, whereas this activity was undetectable in the erythrocytes of the second patient, who consequently had higher concentrations of S-methylcysteine adduct in albumin (149 v 91 nmol/g protein) and in globin (77 v 30 nmol/g protein). CONCLUSIONS: Methyl bromide is genotoxic and neurotoxic. Its genotoxicity seems to be the consequence of the alkylating activity of the parent compound, and conjugation to glutathione has a protective effect. The data presented here suggest a different mechanism for methyl bromide neurotoxicity which could be related to the transformation of methylglutathione into toxic metabolites such as methanethiol and formaldehyde. If such metabolites are the ultimate toxic species, N-acetylcysteine treatment could have a toxifying rather than a detoxifying effect. PMID:8704864

  19. A 14.7 kDa Protein from Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida (Named FTN_1133), Involved in the Response to Oxidative Stress Induced by Organic Peroxides, Is Not Endowed with Thiol-Dependent Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Meireles, Diogo de Abreu; Alegria, Thiago Geronimo Pires; Alves, Simone Vidigal; Arantes, Carla Rani Rocha; Netto, Luis Eduardo Soares

    2014-01-01

    Francisella genus comprises Gram-negative facultative intracellular bacteria that are among the most infectious human pathogens. A protein of 14.7 KDa named as FTN_1133 was previously described as a novel hydroperoxide resistance protein in F. tularensis subsp. novicida, implicated in organic peroxide detoxification and virulence. Here, we describe a structural and biochemical characterization of FTN_1133. Contrary to previous assumptions, multiple amino acid sequence alignment analyses revealed that FTN_1133 does not share significant similarity with proteins of the Ohr/OsmC family or any other Cys-based, thiol dependent peroxidase, including conserved motifs around reactive cysteine residues. Circular dichroism analyses were consistent with the in silico prediction of an all-α-helix secondary structure. The pKa of its single cysteine residue, determined by a monobromobimane alkylation method, was shown to be 8.0±0.1, value that is elevated when compared with other Cys-based peroxidases, such as peroxiredoxins and Ohr/OsmC proteins. Attempts to determine a thiol peroxidase activity for FTN_1133 failed, using both dithiols (DTT, thioredoxin and lipoamide) and monothiols (glutathione or 2-mercaptoethanol) as reducing agents. Heterologous expression of FTN_1133 gene in ahpC and oxyR mutants of E. coli showed no complementation. Furthermore, analysis of FTN_1133 protein by non-reducing SDS-PAGE showed that an inter-molecular disulfide bond (not detected in Ohr proteins) can be generated under hydroperoxide treatment, but the observed rates were not comparable to those observed for other thiol-dependent peroxidases. All the biochemical and structural data taken together indicated that FTN_1133 displayed distinct characteristics from other thiol dependent peroxidases and, therefore, suggested that FTN_1133 is not directly involved in hydroperoxide detoxification. PMID:24959833

  20. Catalytic properties, localization, and in vivo role of Px IV, a novel tryparedoxin peroxidase of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ilon; Bogacz, Marta; Schaffroth, Corinna; Dirdjaja, Natalie; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise

    2016-06-01

    Px IV is a distant relative of the known glutathione peroxidase-type enzymes of African trypanosomes. Immunofluorescence microscopy of bloodstream cells expressing C-terminally Myc6-tagged Px IV revealed a mitochondrial localization. Recombinant Px IV possesses very low activity as glutathione peroxidase but catalyzes the trypanothione/tryparedoxin-dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide and, even more efficiently, of arachidonic acid hydroperoxide. Neither overexpression in bloodstream cells nor the deletion of both alleles in bloodstream or procyclic parasites affected the in vitro proliferation. Trypanosoma brucei Px IV shares 58% of all residues with TcGPXII. The orthologous enzymes have in common their substrate preference for fatty acid hydroperoxides. However, the T. cruzi protein has been reported to be localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and to be specific for glutathione as reducing agent. Taken together, our data show that Px IV is a low abundant tryparedoxin peroxidase of T. brucei that is not essential, at least under culture conditions. PMID:27262262

  1. Radiographic changes and lung function in relation to activity of the glutathione transferases theta and mu among asbestos cement workers.

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, K; Rannug, A; Alexandrie, A K; Warholm, M; Rylander, L; Hagmar, L

    1995-05-01

    Experimental data indicate that active oxygen species may be casually involved in the development of asbestos-related disease. Thus, it was hypothesized that individual differences in glutathione transferase activity, which may affect the ability to inactivate molecules formed in relation to oxidative stress, could influence the biological response to asbestos exposure. We could, however, not demonstrate an increased risk for radiographic changes or reduced lung function among asbestos cement workers deficient for glutathione transferase theta (GSTT1), glutathione transferase mu (GSTM1), or having a combined deficiency of enzyme activity. PMID:7618163

  2. Cardiolipin Switch in Mitochondria: Shutting off the Reduction of Cytochrome c and Turning on the Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Basova, Liana V.; Kurnikov, Igor V.; Wang, Lei; Ritov, Vladimir B.; Belikova, Natalia A.; Vlasova, Irina I.; Pacheco, Andy A.; Winnica, Daniel E.; Peterson, Jim; Bayir, Hülya; Waldeck, David H.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2012-01-01

    Upon interaction with anionic phospholipids, particularly mitochondria-specific cardiolipin (CL), cytochrome c (cyt c) loses its tertiary structure and its peroxidase activity dramatically increases. CL induced peroxidase activity of cyt c has been found to be important for selective CL oxidation in cells undergoing programmed death. During apoptosis, the peroxidase activity and the fraction of CL-bound cyt c markedly increases suggesting that CL may act as a switch to regulate cyt c’s mitochondrial functions. Using cyclic voltammetry and equilibrium redox-titrations, we show that the redox potential of cyt c shifts negatively by 350–400 mV upon binding to CL-containing membranes. Consequently, functions of cyt c as an electron transporter and cyt c reduction by Complex III are strongly inhibited. Further, CL/cyt c complexes are not effective in scavenging superoxide anions and are not effectively reduced by ascorbate. Thus, both redox properties and functions of cyt c change upon interaction with CL in the mitochondrial membrane, diminishing cyt c’s electron donor/acceptor role and stimulating its peroxidase activity. PMID:17319652

  3. [Activity of salivary glutathione-dependent enzymes in patients with periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Gavriliuk, L A; Shevchenko, N V; Spineĭ, A F; Vartichan, A I; Godorozha, P D; Lysyĭ, L T

    2008-07-01

    Forty-five patients aged 20-47 years who had mild, moderate, or severe periodontitis and 32 healthy individuals (a control group) were studied during 10-15-day treatment with traditional therapy and combined therapy including the traditional approach and the antihomotoxic agent Traumeel S ointment as a supplement. Increased free radical generation and lipid peroxidation were considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Salivary indices are a reflection of a patient's metabolic state and have clinical diagnostic values in patients with oral tissue inflammation. The activities of antioxidative enzymes (glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) and the content of reduced glutathione (GSH) were determined in the saliva of patients with periodontitis during traditional and complex (traditional + Traumeel S) therapies. Inflammation led to metabolic disturbances and antioxidative defense system imbalance in patients with periodontitis. The findings suggest that the complex therapy with Traumeel S restored antioxidative defense balance and it was more effective than the traditional therapy in patients with periodontitis. An analysis showed a direct correlation between the activity of antioxidative enzymes and clinical characteristics of the disease. These results reflect the activity of a pathological process and the imbalance of antioxidative defense in patients with periodontitis. PMID:18756728

  4. Possible peroxidase active site environment in amyloidogenic proteins: Native monomer or misfolded-oligomer; which one is susceptible to the enzymatic activity, with contribution of heme?

    PubMed

    Khodarahmi, Reza; Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Khodarahmi, Sina; Ghadami, Seyyed Abolghasem; Mostafaie, Ali

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid states of many proteins complex with heme and exhibit significant non-specific peroxidase activity, compared to free heme. Neurotransmitter deficiency, generation of neurotoxins, altered activity/metabolism of key enzymes and cellular DNA damage are possible evidences highlighting the importance of the uncontrollable peroxidase activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-involved brain cells. Despite extensive experimental work was carried out on this field, discrepancy on chronological precedence of amyloid aggregation and oxidative reactions as well as the mechanism involved in the peroxidase-induced oxidative stress is still not completely understood. In this study, we highlight further that heme cofactor readily complexes with structural intermediates of amyloid aggregates of ovalbumin, lactoglobulin and crystallin and report the ability of "heme-amyloid aggregate/oligomer") to produce peroxidase-like active site. Histidine side chains are also proposed as both distal and proximal residues required for proper function of these peroxidase systems. Taking uncontrollable peroxidase activity of "Aβ-heme" complex into account, it appears that this process, as a new opened dimension in AD pathologic research, provides structural/mechanistic basis for more efficient therapeutic strategies against neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26123814

  5. Catalase-like activity of horseradish peroxidase: relationship to enzyme inactivation by H2O2.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ruiz, J; Arnao, M B; Hiner, A N; García-Cánovas, F; Acosta, M

    2001-01-01

    H2O2 is the usual oxidizing substrate of horseradish peroxidase C (HRP-C). In the absence in the reaction medium of a one-electron donor substrate, H2O2 is able to act as both oxidizing and reducing substrate. However, under these conditions the enzyme also undergoes a progressive loss of activity. There are several pathways that maintain the activity of the enzyme by recovering the ferric form, one of which is the decomposition of H2O2 to molecular oxygen in a similar way to the action of catalase. This production of oxygen has been kinetically characterized with a Clark-type electrode coupled to an oxygraph. HRP-C exhibits a weak catalase-like activity, the initial reaction rate of which is hyperbolically dependent on the H2O2 concentration, with values for K(2) (affinity of the first intermediate, compound I, for H2O2) and k(3) (apparent rate constant controlling catalase activity) of 4.0 +/- 0.6 mM and 1.78 +/- 0.12 s(-1) respectively. Oxygen production by HRP-C is favoured at pH values greater than approx. 6.5; under similar conditions HRP-C is also much less sensitive to inactivation during incubations with H2O2. We therefore suggest that this pathway is a major protective mechanism of HRP-C against such inactivation. PMID:11171085

  6. Caribbean yellow band disease compromises the activity of catalase and glutathione S-transferase in the reef-building coral Orbicella faveolata exposed to anthracene.

    PubMed

    Montilla, Luis Miguel; Ramos, Ruth; García, Elia; Cróquer, Aldo

    2016-05-01

    Healthy and diseased corals are threatened by different anthropogenic sources, such as pollution, a problem expected to become more severe in the near future. Despite the fact that coastal pollution and coral diseases might represent a serious threat to coral reef health, there is a paucity of controlled experiments showing whether the response of diseased and healthy corals to xenobiotics differs. In this study, we exposed healthy and Caribbean yellow band disease (CYBD)-affected Orbicella faveolata colonies to 3 sublethal concentrations of anthracene to test if enzymatic responses to this hydrocarbon were compromised in CYBD-affected tissues. For this, a 2-factorial fully orthogonal design was used in a controlled laboratory bioassay, using tissue condition (2 levels: apparently healthy and diseased) and pollutant concentration (4 levels: experimental control, 10, 30 and 100 ppb concentration) as fixed factors. A permutation-based ANOVA (PERMANOVA) was used to test the effects of condition and concentration on the specific activity of 3 enzymatic biomarkers: catalase, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase. We found a significant interaction between the concentration of anthracene and the colony condition for catalase (Pseudo-F = 3.84, df = 3, p < 0.05) and glutathione S-transferase (Pseudo-F = 3.29, df = 3, p < 0.05). Moreover, our results indicated that the enzymatic response to anthracene in CYBD-affected tissues was compromised, as the activity of these enzymes decreased 3- to 4-fold compared to healthy tissues. These results suggest that under a potential scenario of increasing hydrocarbon coastal pollution, colonies of O. faveolata affected with CYBD might become more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of chemical pollution. PMID:27137073

  7. Selenium-enriched Agaricus bisporus mushroom protects against increase in gut permeability ex vivo and up-regulates glutathione peroxidase 1 and 2 in hyperthermally-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Tebo; Dunshea, Frank Rowland; Howell, Kate; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Rivera, Leni Rose; Furness, John Barton; Ng, Ken

    2014-06-01

    Dietary effects of organic Se supplementation in the form of Se-enriched Agaricus bisporus mushroom on ileal mucosal permeability and antioxidant selenoenzymes status in heat induced oxidative stress in rats were evaluated. Acute heat stress (40 °C, 21% relative humidity, 90 min exposure) increased ileum baseline short circuit current (Isc; 2.40-fold) and epithelial conductance (Ge; 2.74-fold). Dietary supplementation with Se-enriched A. bisporus (1 µg Se/g feed) reduced (p < 0.05) ileum Isc and Ge during heat stress to 1.74 and 1.91 fold, respectively, indicating protection from heat stress-induced mucosal permeability increase. The expression of ileum glutathione peroxidase (GPx-) 1 and 2 mRNAs were up-regulated (p < 0.05) by 1.90 and 1.87-fold, respectively, for non-heat stress rats on the Se-enriched diet relative to the control. The interplay between heat stress and dietary Se is complex. For rats on the control diet, heat stress alone increased ileum expression of GPx-1 (2.33-fold) and GPx-2 (2.23-fold) relative to thermoneutral conditions. For rats on the Se-enriched diet, heat stress increased (p < 0.05) GPx-1 expression only. Rats on Se-enriched + α-tocopherol diet exhibited increased expression of both genes (p < 0.05). Thus, dietary Se-enriched A. bisporus protected against increase in ileum permeability and up-regulated GPx-1 and GPx-2 expression, selenoenzymes relevant to mitigating oxidative stress. PMID:24962481

  8. Potent antioxidative and antigenotoxic activity in aqueous extract of Japanese rice bran--association with peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Higashi-Okai, Kiyoka; Kanbara, Keiko; Amano, Kanako; Hagiwara, Akiko; Sugita, Chie; Matsumoto, Norie; Okai, Yasuji

    2004-08-01

    To estimate the preventive potential of Japanese rice bran (Oryza sativa japonica) against the oxygen radical-related chronic diseases such as cardio-vascular diseases and cancer, antioxidative and antigenotoxic activities of the rice bran extracts were analyzed by using assay systems for lipid peroxidation and genotoxin-induced umu gene expression. When effects of the rice bran extracts under different extraction conditions on hydroperoxide generation from auto-oxidized linoleic acid were examined using aluminum chloride method, the water extract showed strong antioxidant activity, but the methanol and acetone extracts did not exhibit significant activity. The water extract of rice bran was divided into the ethanol-precipitable (EP) and supernatant fractions, and EP fraction showed the dominant antioxidant activity, but the supernatant fraction did not exhibit significant antioxidant activity. When the effect of EP fraction on umu C gene expression in SOS response associated with DNA damage in Salmonella typhimurium (TA 1535/pSK 1002) induced by 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-1) was analyzed, it showed a dose-dependent suppressive activity against Trp-P-1-induced umu C gene expression. The bio-chemical analysis of EP fraction indicates that the major antioxidative and antigenotoxic activity of EP fraction is associated with a proteinous component with the molecular weight of more than 30 KDa. As a possible active principle for the antioxidative and antigenotoxic activity in EP fraction, the strong activity of an oxygen radical-scavenging enzyme, peroxidase was detected, and the purified horseradish peroxidase also caused the similar antioxidative and antigenotoxic activities. The significance of this finding is discussed from the viewpoint of the preventive role of rice bran against oxygen radical-related chronic diseases. PMID:15476307

  9. An intramolecular disulfide bond designed in myoglobin fine-tunes both protein structure and peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei-Bin; Yuan, Hong; Zhou, Hu; Gao, Shu-Qin; Nie, Chang-Ming; Tan, Xiangshi; Wen, Ge-Bo; Lin, Ying-Wu

    2016-06-15

    Disulfide bond plays crucial roles in stabilization of protein structure and in fine-tuning protein functions. To explore an approach for rational heme protein design, we herein rationally introduced a pair of cysteines (F46C/M55C) into the scaffold of myoglobin (Mb), mimicking those in native neuroglobin. Molecular modeling suggested that it is possible for Cys46 and Cys55 to form an intramolecular disulfide bond, which was confirmed experimentally by ESI-MS analysis, DTNB reaction and CD spectrum. Moreover, it was shown that the spontaneously formed disulfide bond of Cys46-Cys55 fine-tunes not only the heme active site structure, but also the protein functions. The substitution of Phe46 with Ser46 in F46S Mb destabilizes the protein while facilitates H2O2 activation. Remarkably, the formation of an intramolecular disulfide bond of Cys46-Cys55 in F46C/M55C Mb improves the protein stability and regulates the heme site to be more favorable for substrate binding, resulting in enhanced peroxidase activity. This study provides valuable information of structure-function relationship for heme proteins regulated by an intramolecular disulfide bond, and also suggests that construction of such a covalent bond is useful for design of functional heme proteins. PMID:27117233

  10. Autoantibodies to thyroid peroxidase in patients with chronic thyroiditis: effect of antibody binding on enzyme activities.

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Y; Hiyama, Y; Shimojo, N; Niimi, H; Nakajima, H; Hosoya, T

    1986-01-01

    Using thyroid peroxidase (TPO), which was purified from the thyroid of patients with Graves' disease, we attempted to determine whether sera from patients with chronic thyroiditis contained antibodies to the enzyme. When the binding was tested by ELISA, sera from patients with chronic thyroiditis revealed high binding activities to TPO. When TPO was incubated with IgG from sera followed by treatment with protein A-Sepharose and centrifugation, the remaining TPO activities in the supernatant fraction were lower in most of the patients, as compared to normal controls. Moreover, IgG purified by DEAE-cellulose chromatography from sera in patients interfered with the TPO activities. Titres of anti-TPO antibodies correlated well with those of anti-microsome antibodies. These results indicate the presence of autoantibodies to TPO in sera of most patients with chronic thyroiditis and that TPO may be one component of microsome antigen complexes recognized by the autoantibodies. Studies on the inhibition of TPO by IgG isolated from sera of patients using guaiacol and iodide assays revealed that at least three epitopes of TPO molecule were recognized by autoantibodies and that the antigenic determinants on TPO molecule recognized by autoantibodies could be heterogeneous in patients. PMID:2430744

  11. Temperature dependence of the activity of polyphenol peroxidases and polyphenol oxidases in modern and buried soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushev, A. V.; Kuznetsova, I. N.; Blagodatskaya, E. V.; Blagodatsky, S. A.

    2014-05-01

    Under conditions of the global climate warming, the changes in the reserves of soil humus depend on the temperature sensitivities of polyphenol peroxidases (PPPOs) and polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). They play an important role in lignin decomposition, mineralization, and humus formation. The temperature dependence of the potential enzyme activity in modern and buried soils has been studied during incubation at 10 or 20°C. The experimental results indicate that it depends on the availability of the substrate and the presence of oxygen. The activity of PPOs during incubation in the absence of oxygen for two months decreases by 2-2.5 times, which is balanced by an increase in the activity of PPPOs by 2-3 times. The increase in the incubation temperature to 20°C and the addition of glucose accelerates this transition due to the more abrupt decrease in the activity of PPOs. The preincubation of the soil with glucose doubles the activity of PPPOs but has no significant effect on the activity of PPOs. The different effects of temperature on two groups of the studied oxidases and the possibility of substituting enzymes by those of another type under changing aeration conditions should be taken into consideration in predicting the effect of the climate warming on the mineralization of the soil organic matter. The absence of statistically significant differences in the enzymatic activity between the buried and modern soil horizons indicates the retention by the buried soil of some of its properties (soil memory) and the rapid restoration of high enzymatic activity during the preincubation.

  12. Photoactivation of hypericin down-regulates glutathione S-transferase activity in nasopharyngeal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Du, H Y; Olivo, M; Tan, B K H; Bay, B H

    2004-04-30

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new modality of treatment for cancer. Hypericin is a photosensitizer, which is known to generate reactive oxygen species upon activation with light. We observed that photoactivated hypericin induces the generation of reactive oxygen intermediates in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) cells in vitro. There was also significant reduction of Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in HK1 and CNE-2 NPC cells and in tumor tissues from the NPC/HK1 murine tumor model by hypericin-mediated PDT. As antioxidants protect cells against phototoxicity, down-regulation of GST activity would potentiate the efficacy of hypericin-PDT treatment. PMID:15072826

  13. Glutathion S-transferase activity and DDT-susceptibility of Malaysian mosquitos.

    PubMed

    Lee, H L; Chong, W L

    1995-03-01

    Comparative DDT-susceptibility status and glutathion s-transferase (GST) activity of Malaysian Anopheles maculatus, Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti was investigated to ascertain the role of this enzyme in DDT resistance. The standardised WHO dose-mortality bioassay tests were used to determine DDT susceptibility in these mosquitos, whilst GST microassay (Brogdon and Barber, 1990) was conducted to measure the activity of this enzyme in mosquito homogenate. It appeared that DDT susceptibility status of Malaysian mosquitos was not correlated with GST activity. PMID:8525405

  14. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) inhibits epithelial sodium channel activity in primary alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Charles A.; Kreiner, Lisa; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Trac, Phi; Johnson, Nicholle M.; Hansen, Jason M.; Brown, Lou Ann

    2015-01-01

    Amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channels (ENaC) regulate fluid balance in the alveoli and are regulated by oxidative stress. Since glutathione (GSH) is the predominant antioxidant in the lungs, we proposed that changes in glutathione redox potential (Eh) would alter cell signaling and have an effect on ENaC open probability (Po). In the present study, we used single channel patch-clamp recordings to examine the effect of oxidative stress, via direct application of glutathione disulfide (GSSG), on ENaC activity. We found a linear decrease in ENaC activity as the GSH/GSSG Eh became less negative (n = 21; P < 0.05). Treatment of 400 μM GSSG to the cell bath significantly decreased ENaC Po from 0.39 ± 0.06 to 0.13 ± 0.05 (n = 8; P < 0.05). Likewise, back-filling recording electrodes with 400 μM GSSG reduced ENaC Po from 0.32 ± 0.08 to 0.17 ± 0.05 (n = 10; P < 0.05), thus implicating GSSG as an important regulatory factor. Biochemical assays indicated that oxidizing potentials promote S-glutathionylation of ENaC and irreversible oxidation of cysteine residues with N-ethylmaleimide blocked the effects of GSSG on ENaC Po. Additionally, real-time imaging studies showed that GSSG impairs alveolar fluid clearance in vivo as opposed to GSH, which did not impair clearance. Taken together, these data show that glutathione Eh is an important determinant of alveolar fluid clearance in vivo. PMID:25713321

  15. Deficiency of glutathione transferase zeta causes oxidative stress and activation of antioxidant response pathways.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Anneke C; Matthaei, Klaus I; Lim, Cindy; Taylor, Matthew C; Cappello, Jean Y; Hayes, John D; Anders, M W; Board, Philip G

    2006-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) zeta (GSTZ1-1) plays a significant role in the catabolism of phenylalanine and tyrosine, and a deficiency of GSTZ1-1 results in the accumulation of maleylacetoacetate and its derivatives maleylacetone (MA) and succinylacetone. Induction of GST subunits was detected in the liver of Gstz1(-/-) mice by Western blotting with specific antisera and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of glutathione affinity column-purified proteins. The greatest induction was observed in members of the mu class. Induction of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 and the catalytic and modifier subunits of glutamate-cysteine ligase was also observed. Many of the enzymes that are induced in Gstz1(-/-) mice are regulated by antioxidant response elements that respond to oxidative stress via the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway. It is significant that diminished glutathione concentrations were also observed in the liver of Gstz1(-/-) mice, which supports the conclusion that under normal dietary conditions, the accumulation of electrophilic intermediates such as maleylacetoacetate and MA results in a high level of oxidative stress. Elevated GST activities in the livers of Gstz1(-/-) mice suggest that GSTZ1-1 deficiency may alter the metabolism of some drugs and xenobiotics. Gstz1(-/-) mice given acetaminophen demonstrated increased hepatotoxicity compared with wild-type mice. This toxicity may be attributed to the increased GST activity or the decreased hepatic concentrations of glutathione, or both. Patients with acquired deficiency of GSTZ1-1 caused by therapeutic exposure to dichloroacetic acid for the clinical treatment of lactic acidosis may be at increased risk of drug- and chemical-induced toxicity. PMID:16278372

  16. Glutathione redox cycle dysregulation in Huntington's disease knock-in striatal cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Márcio; Rosenstock, Tatiana R; Cunha-Oliveira, Teresa; Ferreira, Ildete L; Oliveira, Catarina R; Rego, A Cristina

    2012-11-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a CAG repeat disorder affecting the HD gene, which encodes for huntingtin (Htt) and is characterized by prominent cell death in the striatum. Oxidative stress was previously implicated in HD neurodegeneration, but the role of the major endogenous antioxidant system, the glutathione redox cycle, has been less studied following expression of full-length mutant Htt (FL-mHtt). Thus, in this work we analyzed the glutathione system in striatal cells derived from HD knock-in mice expressing mutant Htt versus wild-type cells. Mutant cells showed increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caspase-3 activity, which were significantly prevented following treatment with glutathione ethyl ester. Interestingly, mutant cells exhibited an increase in intracellular levels of both reduced and oxidized forms of glutathione, and enhanced activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GRed). Furthermore, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT) activities were also increased in mutant cells. Nevertheless, glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) and glutathione synthetase (GS) activities and levels of GCL catalytic subunit were decreased in cells expressing FL-mHtt, highly suggesting decreased de novo synthesis of glutathione. Enhanced intracellular total glutathione, despite decreased synthesis, could be explained by decreased extracellular glutathione in mutant cells. This occurred concomitantly with decreased mRNA expression levels and activity of the multidrug resistance protein 1 (Mrp1), a transport protein that mediates cellular export of glutathione disulfide and glutathione conjugates. Additionally, inhibition of Mrp1 enhanced intracellular GSH in wild-type cells only. These data suggest that FL-mHtt affects the export of glutathione by decreasing the expression of Mrp1. Data further suggest that boosting of GSH-related antioxidant defense mechanisms induced by FL-mHtt is insufficient to

  17. Construction and Characterization of Vitreoscilla Hemoglobin (VHb) with Enhanced Peroxidase Activity for Efficient Degradation of Textile Dye.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zidong; Li, Wei; Li, Haichao; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yuebin; Cao, Yufeng; Ma, Jianzhang; Li, Zhengqiang

    2015-09-01

    Pollution resulting from the discharge of textile dyes into water systems has become a major global concern. Because peroxidases are known for their ability to decolorize and detoxify textile dyes, the peroxidase activity of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) has recently been studied. It is found that VHb and variants of this enzyme show great promise for enzymatic decolorization of dyes and may play a role in achieving their successful removal from industrial wastewater. The level of VHb peroxidase activity correlates with two amino acid residues present within the conserved distal pocket, at positions 53 and 54. In this work, sitedirected mutagenesis of these residues was performed and resulted in improved VHb peroxidase activity. The double mutant, Q53H/P54C, shows the highest dye decolorization and removal efficiency, with 70% removal efficiency within 5 min. UV spectral studies of Q53H/P54C reveals a more compact structure and an altered porphyrin environment (λSoret = 413 nm) relative to that of wild-type VHb (λSoret = 406), and differential scanning calorimetry data indicate that the VHb variant protein structure is more stable. In addition, circular dichroism spectroscopic studies indicate that this variant's increased protein structural stability is due to an increase in helical structure, as deduced from the melting temperature, which is higher than 90°C. Therefore, the VHb variant Q53H/P54C shows promise as an excellent peroxidase, with excellent dye decolorization activity and a more stable structure than wild-type VHb under high-temperature conditions. PMID:25907068

  18. Peroxidase(s) in Environment Protection

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Neelam; Kanwar, Shamsher S.

    2013-01-01

    Industrial discharges of untreated effluents into water bodies and emissions into air have deteriorated the quality of water and air, respectively. The huge amount of pollutants derived from industrial activities represents a threat for the environment and ecologic equilibrium. Phenols and halogenated phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDC), pesticides, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), industrial dyes, and other xenobiotics are among the most important pollutants. Peroxidases are enzymes that are able to transform a variety of compounds following a free radical mechanism, thereby yielding oxidized or polymerized products. The peroxidase transformation of these pollutants is accompanied by a reduction in their toxicity, due to loss of biological activity, reduction in the bioavailability, or the removal from aqueous phase, especially when the pollutant is found in water. The review describes the sources of peroxidases, the reactions catalyzed by them, and their applications in the management of pollutants in the environment. PMID:24453894

  19. The status of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, vitamins A, C, E and malondialdehyde in patients with cardiovascular disease in Zahedan, Southeast Iran.

    PubMed

    Karajibani, Mansour; Hashemi, Mohammad; Montazerifar, Farzaneh; Bolouri, Ahmad; Dikshit, Madhurima

    2009-08-01

    Growing evidence has demonstrated that oxidative stress and increased altered oxygen utilization contribute to atherogenesis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) progression. Antioxidants protect the body from damage caused by free radicals. The objective of this study was to determine antioxidants status in CVD patients. This cross-sectional study was performed on 71 patients clinically diagnosed with CVD and 63 healthy individuals. Plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) level was measured for lipid peroxidation product and erythrocyte SOD and GPx activities as enzymatic antioxidants. The serum levels of vitamins A and E were assayed using HPLC and vitamin C by the photometric method. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was measured using the ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) method. The results showed a significant reduction in antioxidant status (enzymatic and non-enzymatic) with a concomitant increase in the concentrations of lipid peroxidation products in CVD patients. There was a significant inverse correlation among TAC, SOD, GPx and vitamin C with MDA. It can be concluded that the antioxidant defense system plays an important role in preventing the development and progression of CVD with the ability to control oxidative stress. PMID:19763031

  20. Impact of afforestation on peroxidase activity and iron ions in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meysner, T.; Szajdak, L.

    2009-04-01

    Oxidation-reduction reactions play a key role in ecologically important biogeochemical processes in soil and influence on soil chemical and physical properties. For understanding of processes in soil system the direction of oxidation and reduction processes is needed. Researches were carried out in the afforestation as biogeochemical barrier and adjoining cultivated field located in the Agroecological Landscape Park in Turew (40 km south of Poznań, West Polish Lowland). This afforestation was created approximately 200 years ago and includes mainly of Robinia pseudacacia. It is 2 kilometres long and 36 meters wide. The accumulation of organic matter level achieves a depth of 15 cm. Times of sampling were collected from June to November in 2008 from the layer at 0-20 cm depth. Five soil samples from each site were pooled together to give the so-called average mixed sample. The peroxidase activity in soils was determined by Bartha and Bordeleau method, ferrous ions by phenanthroline and ferric ions by thiocyanate method. The dissolved organic carbon and a total organic carbon were estimated using analyzer TOC-5050A facilities, Solid Sample Module SSM-5000A, Shimadzu, Japan. As is well known, the role of enzymes in coupling reactions leading to polymerization is limited to the oxidation of the substrates. Peroxidase catalyzes the oxidation of phenols and aromatic amines in the presence of hydrogen peroxide as an electron acceptor in the reactions. This study showed that the peroxidase activities were higher in the soils under afforestation (from 14.16ṡ10-4 to 126.16ṡ10-4μmolṡh-1ṡg-1) than under cultivated field (from 0.76ṡ10-4 to 2.75ṡ10-4μmolṡh-1ṡg-1) during whole period of sampling. Its many chemical conversions are due to its two valence states, ferrous and ferric ions as well as the range of oxidation-reduction potentials associated with transition in various iron-containing compounds. It was observed that the concentrations of total iron ranged

  1. A preliminary study on the antibacterial mechanism of Tegillarca granosa hemoglobin by derived peptides and peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yongbo; Wang, Juanjuan; Li, Chenghua; Li, Peifen; Wang, Sufang; Lin, Zhihua

    2016-04-01

    The blood clam, Tegillarca granosa, is one of the few bivalve molluscs containing hemoglobin (Hb). In the present study, we purified two types of T. granosa hemoglobin, Tg-HbI and Tg-HbII, using size exclusion chromatography and measured their antibacterial and peroxidase activities. We also tested antibacterial activities of peptides prepared by trypsin digestion of purified Tg-Hb and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography purification. Purified Tg-HbI and Tg-HbII showed antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus subtilis, and Bacillus firmus, with differences in minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), but lacked antibacterial activity against Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio harveyi and Staphylococcus aureus. In contrast, 7 Tg-Hb derived peptides exhibited varying degrees of antibacterial activity against V. alginolyticus (MICs: 12-200 μg/ml), V. parahaemolyticus (11-100 μg/ml) and V. harveyi (1-200 μg/ml). The antibacterial activity of Hb derived peptides was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. In addition, peroxidase activity was detected in Tg-HbI and Tg-HbII. The results indicated that in addition to functioning as a respiratory protein T. granosa hemoglobins likely play a role in host antibacterial defense probably via a peroxidase activity of native molecules and some internal peptides released from the proteins. PMID:26876330

  2. Variations of respiratory activity and glutathione in activated sludges exposed to low ozone doses.

    PubMed

    Dziurla, M A; Salhi, M; Leroy, P; Paul, E; Ginestet, Ph; Block, J C

    2005-07-01

    Ozonation is one of the most effective treatments for reducing the production of activated sludges in wastewater treatment plants. However, because microorganisms are present in the form of microcolonies, some bacteria may be exposed to sub-lethal ozone doses that could lead to adaptation and resistance to further exposition to oxidative treatment. This represents a major question as it may limit the effect of the treatment, especially when low ozone doses are applied. The critical ozone dosage, defined as the lowest specific transferred ozone concentration leading to a decrease in the maximum oxygen uptake rate was estimated to range between 0.9 and 13.6mg O(3)g(-1) COD(sludges), according to the sludges tested. The lowest ozone dosage leading to the decrease of GSH and GSHt concentrations could be estimated to be lower than 10mg O(3)g(-1) COD(sludges) for GSH, and close to 10mg O(3)g(-1) COD(sludges) for GSHt. After sludge exposure to low ozone doses, no higher amounts of glutathione were synthesized, suggesting that no development of resistance to ozonation occurred after sludge treatment with low ozone doses. PMID:15972223

  3. Induction of glutathione-S-transferase activity by antioxidants in hepatocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Chen, L H; Shiau, C C

    1989-01-01

    Twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the study. Six rats were injected with benzo(a)pyrene (BP); the other six rats served as the control. Twenty-four hours after injection, hepatocytes were isolated and cultured. The cultured plates were divided into 5 groups and treated with absolute ethanol (control), butylated hydroxytoluene, vitamin E, ascorbic acid or vitamin Elascorbic acid. After 48 hours, the hepatocytes were harvested for enzyme activation determination. With both control and BP-injected rats, each antioxidant treatment significantly increased glutathione-S-transferase activity. The results suggest that antioxidants may have a detoxifying effect against BP-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:2817788

  4. A V2O3-ordered mesoporous carbon composite with novel peroxidase-like activity towards the glucose colorimetric assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lei; Zeng, Lingxing; Wei, Mingdeng; Li, Chang Ming; Liu, Aihua

    2015-07-01

    It is of great scientific and practical significance to explore inorganic mimetic enzymes to replace natural enzymes due to their instability and high cost. Herein we present an interesting discovery that a V2O3-ordered mesoporous carbon composite (V2O3-OMC) has a novel peroxidase-like activity towards fast redox reaction of typical peroxidase substrates H2O2 and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS). Due to the small size effect and large surface area of V2O3 nanoparticles supported by OMC, V2O3-OMC exhibited excellent catalytic performance with a kcat of 1.28 × 104 s-1, KM (ABTS) of 0.067 mM and KM (H2O2) of 0.16 mM, and a significantly higher catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM) towards the oxidation of ABTS in comparison with the natural peroxidases. Furthermore, the Ping-pong BiBi mechanism was proposed to explain the catalytic reaction by V2O3-OMC. Based on this highly active biomimetic peroxidase and the colorimetric detection of H2O2, a facile analytical method was developed to detect glucose by using V2O3-OMC and glucose oxidase, which had a wide linear range (0.01-4 mM glucose), good selectivity and reliability for successful detection of various real samples. Thus, the novel V2O3-OMC peroxidase mimetic holds great promise for broad potential applications.It is of great scientific and practical significance to explore inorganic mimetic enzymes to replace natural enzymes due to their instability and high cost. Herein we present an interesting discovery that a V2O3-ordered mesoporous carbon composite (V2O3-OMC) has a novel peroxidase-like activity towards fast redox reaction of typical peroxidase substrates H2O2 and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS). Due to the small size effect and large surface area of V2O3 nanoparticles supported by OMC, V2O3-OMC exhibited excellent catalytic performance with a kcat of 1.28 × 104 s-1, KM (ABTS) of 0.067 mM and KM (H2O2) of 0.16 mM, and a

  5. Inhibition of liver glutathione S-transferase activity in rats by hypolipidemic drugs related or unrelated to clofibrate.

    PubMed

    Foliot, A; Touchard, D; Mallet, L

    1986-05-15

    The effects of in vivo administration of six hypolipidemic drugs on rat liver glutathione S-transferase activity were compared. This activity was measured with sulfobromophthalein (BSP), 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB) or 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as substrate. Except for the nicotinic acid derivative ethanolamine oxiniacate, all the compounds tested significantly reduced it, whether or not they were related to clofibrate. The hepatic glutathione concentration either remained unchanged or only increased slightly after treatment with the various drugs. When measured, the maximal excretion rate of bile BSP dropped significantly, but not that of phenol-3,6-dibromophthalein (DBSP). Hepatic dye uptake and storage were not impaired. These results show that hypolipidemic drugs of the peroxisome proliferator type inhibit rat liver glutathione S-transferase activity and may reduce transport of anions conjugated with glutathione before excretion. PMID:3707598

  6. A V₂O₃-ordered mesoporous carbon composite with novel peroxidase-like activity towards the glucose colorimetric assay.

    PubMed

    Han, Lei; Zeng, Lingxing; Wei, Mingdeng; Li, Chang Ming; Liu, Aihua

    2015-07-21

    It is of great scientific and practical significance to explore inorganic mimetic enzymes to replace natural enzymes due to their instability and high cost. Herein we present an interesting discovery that a V2O3-ordered mesoporous carbon composite (V2O3-OMC) has a novel peroxidase-like activity towards fast redox reaction of typical peroxidase substrates H2O2 and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS). Due to the small size effect and large surface area of V2O3 nanoparticles supported by OMC, V2O3-OMC exhibited excellent catalytic performance with a k(cat) of 1.28 × 10(4) s(-1), K(M) (ABTS) of 0.067 mM and K(M) (H2O2) of 0.16 mM, and a significantly higher catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(M)) towards the oxidation of ABTS in comparison with the natural peroxidases. Furthermore, the Ping-pong BiBi mechanism was proposed to explain the catalytic reaction by V2O3-OMC. Based on this highly active biomimetic peroxidase and the colorimetric detection of H2O2, a facile analytical method was developed to detect glucose by using V2O3-OMC and glucose oxidase, which had a wide linear range (0.01-4 mM glucose), good selectivity and reliability for successful detection of various real samples. Thus, the novel V2O3-OMC peroxidase mimetic holds great promise for broad potential applications. PMID:26099042

  7. Biogenic magnetic nanoparticles from Burkholderia sp. YN01 exhibiting intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and their applications.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yu; Li, Na; Mu, Jianshuai; Zhou, Runhong; Xu, Yan; Cui, Daizong; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Min

    2015-01-01

    A novel bacterial strain containing biogenic magnetic nanoparticles (BMNPs) was isolated from the sediments of Songhua River in Harbin, China, and was identified as Burkholderia sp. YN01. Extracted BMNPs from YN01 were characterized as pure face-centered cubic Fe3O4 with an average size of 80 nm through transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The hysteresis parameters of the BMNP samples such as Bc and Bcr and ratios Mrs/Ms were deduced as 35.6 mT, 43.2 mT, and 0.47, respectively, indicating that the BMNPs exhibit a ferromagnetic behavior. This is the first report concerning on biogenic Fe3O4 NPs produced in Burkholderia genus. Significantly, the BMNPs were proved to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity that could catalyze the oxidation of peroxidase substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H2O2. Kinetic analysis indicates that the catalytic behavior is in accord with typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics and follows ping-pong mechanism. The catalytic constants (K cat) were 6.5 × 10(4) s(-1) and 0.78 × 10(4) s(-1) with H2O2 and TMB as substrate, respectively, which was higher than that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy experiments showed that the BMNPs could catalyze H2O2 to produce hydroxyl radicals. The origin of peroxidase-like activity is also associated with their ability to transfer electron between electrode and H2O2 according to an electrochemical study. As a novel peroxidase mimetic, the BMNPs were employed to offer a simple, sensitive, and selective colorimetric method for H2O2 and glucose determination, and the BMNPs could efficiently catalyze the degradation of phenol and Congo red dye. PMID:25030455

  8. Amino acids-incorporated nanoflowers with an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhuo-Fu; Wang, Zhi; Zhang, Ye; Ma, Ya-Li; He, Cheng-Yan; Li, Heng; Chen, Lei; Huo, Qi-Sheng; Wang, Lei; Li, Zheng-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Functional molecules synthesized by self-assembly between inorganic salts and amino acids have attracted much attention in recent years. A simple method is reported here for fabricating hybrid organic–inorganic nanoflowers using copper (II) ions as the inorganic component and natural amino acids as the organic component. The results indicate that the interactions between amino acid and copper ions cause the growth of the nanoflowers composed by C, N, Cu, P and O elements. The Cu ions and Cu(AA)n complexes containing Cu-O bond are present in the nanoflowers. The nanoflowers have flower-like porous structure dominated by the R groups of amino acids with high surface-to-volume ratios, which is beneficial for exerting its peroxidase-like activity depending on Fenton-like reaction mechanism with ABTS and Rhodamine B as the substrates. It is expected that the nanoflowers hold great promise as enzyme mimics for application in the field of biosensor, bioanalysis and biocatalysis. PMID:26926099

  9. Colorimetric cholesterol sensor based on peroxidase like activity of zinc oxide nanoparticles incorporated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Akhtar; Haider, Waqar; Raza, Yousuf; Marty, Jean Louis

    2015-10-01

    A sensitive and selective colorimetric method based on the incorporation of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was shown to posses synergistic peroxidase like activity for the detection of cholesterol. The proposed nanocomposite catalyzed the oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to produce a green colored product which can be monitored at 405 nm. H2O2 is the oxidative product of cholesterol in the presence of cholesterol oxidase. Therefore, the oxidation of cholesterol can be quantitatively related to the colorimetric response by combining these two reactions. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the colorimetric response was proportional to the concentration of cholesterol in the range of 0.5-500 nmol/L, with a detection limit of 0.2 nmol/L. The applicability of the proposed assays was demonstrated for the determination of cholesterol in milk powder samples with good recovery results. PMID:26078143

  10. Molecular Crowding Affects the Conformational Fluctuations, Peroxidase Activity, and Folding Landscape of Yeast Cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Paul, Simanta Sarani; Sil, Pallabi; Chakraborty, Ritobrita; Haldar, Shubhasis; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2016-04-26

    To understand how a protein folds and behaves inside living cells, the effects of synthetic crowding media on protein folding, function, stability, and association have been studied in detail. Because the effect of excluded volume is more prominent in an extended state than in the native protein, a majority of these studies have been conducted in the unfolded state of different model proteins. Here, we have used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and other biophysical methods to investigate the effect of crowding agents Ficoll70 and Dextran70 on the nativelike state of cytochrome c from yeast. Yeast cytochrome c (y-cytc) contains a substantial expanded state in its native folded condition, which is present in equilibrium with a compact conformer in aqueous buffer. We have found that the crowding medium affects the native state equilibrium between compact and expanded states, shifting its population toward the compact conformer. As a result, the peroxidase activity of y-cytc decreases. Urea-induced protein stability measurements show that the compaction destabilizes the protein due to charge repulsions between similar charged clusters. Interestingly, the time constant of conformational fluctuations between the compact and expanded conformers has been found to increase in the crowded milieu, suggesting a crucial role of the solution microviscosity. PMID:27050502

  11. Amino acids-incorporated nanoflowers with an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhuo-Fu; Wang, Zhi; Zhang, Ye; Ma, Ya-Li; He, Cheng-Yan; Li, Heng; Chen, Lei; Huo, Qi-Sheng; Wang, Lei; Li, Zheng-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Functional molecules synthesized by self-assembly between inorganic salts and amino acids have attracted much attention in recent years. A simple method is reported here for fabricating hybrid organic-inorganic nanoflowers using copper (II) ions as the inorganic component and natural amino acids as the organic component. The results indicate that the interactions between amino acid and copper ions cause the growth of the nanoflowers composed by C, N, Cu, P and O elements. The Cu ions and Cu(AA)n complexes containing Cu-O bond are present in the nanoflowers. The nanoflowers have flower-like porous structure dominated by the R groups of amino acids with high surface-to-volume ratios, which is beneficial for exerting its peroxidase-like activity depending on Fenton-like reaction mechanism with ABTS and Rhodamine B as the substrates. It is expected that the nanoflowers hold great promise as enzyme mimics for application in the field of biosensor, bioanalysis and biocatalysis.

  12. Ferromagnetic nanoparticles with peroxidase-like activity enhance the cleavage of biological macromolecules for biofilm elimination

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lizeng; Giglio, Krista M.; Nelson, Jacquelyn L.; Sondermann, Holger; Travis, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a “green chemical” that has various cleaning and disinfectant uses, including as an anti-bacterial agent for hygienic and medical treatments. However, its efficacy is limited against biofilm-producing bacteria, because of poor penetration of the protective, organic matrix. Here we show new applications for ferromagnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4, MNP) with peroxidase-like activity in potentiating the efficacy of H2O2 in biofilm degradation and prevention. Our data show that MNP enhanced oxidative cleavage of biofilm components (model nucleic acids, proteins, and oligosaccharides) in the presence of H2O2. When challenged with live, biofilm-producing bacteria, the MNP-H2O2 system efficiently broke down existing biofilm and prevented new biofilm from forming, killing both planktonic bacteria and those within biofilm. By enhancing oxidative cleavage of various substrates, the MNP-H2O2 system provides a novel strategy for biofilm elimination, and other applications utilizing oxidative breakdown. PMID:24468900

  13. The ligninolytic peroxidases in the genus Pleurotus: divergence in activities, expression, and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Knop, Doriv; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2015-02-01

    Mushrooms of the genus Pleurotus are comprised of cultivated edible ligninolytic fungi with medicinal properties and a wide array of biotechnological and environmental applications. Like other white-rot fungi (WRF), they are able to grow on a variety of lignocellulosic biomass substrates and degrade both natural and anthropogenic aromatic compounds. This is due to the presence of the non-specific oxidative enzymatic systems, which are mainly consisted of lacasses, versatile peroxidases (VPs), and short manganese peroxidases (short-MnPs). Additional, less studied, peroxidase are dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) and heme-thiolate peroxidases (HTPs). During the past two decades, substantial information has accumulated concerning the biochemistry, structure and function of the Pleurotus ligninolytic peroxidases, which are considered to play a key role in many biodegradation processes. The production of these enzymes is dependent on growth media composition, pH, and temperature as well as the growth phase of the fungus. Mn(2+) concentration differentially affects the expression of the different genes. It also severs as a preferred substrate for these preoxidases. Recently, sequencing of the Pleurotus ostreatus genome was completed, and a comprehensive picture of the ligninolytic peroxidase gene family, consisting of three VPs and six short-MnPs, has been established. Similar enzymes were also discovered and studied in other Pleurotus species. In addition, progress has been made in the development of molecular tools for targeted gene replacement, RNAi-based gene silencing and overexpression of genes of interest. These advances increase the fundamental understanding of the ligninolytic system and provide the opportunity for harnessing the unique attributes of these WRF for applied purposes. PMID:25503316

  14. Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase on amidoximated acrylic polymer activated by cyanuric chloride.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Saleh A; Al-Ghamdi, Saeed S; El-Shishtawy, Reda M

    2016-10-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was immobilized on amidoximated acrylic fabric after being activated with cyanuric chloride. FT-IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize fabrics. The maximum immobilization efficiency of HRP (70%) was detected at 4% cyanuric chloride and pH 7.0. The immobilized enzyme retained 45% of its initial activity after ten reuses. The immobilization of enzyme on the carrier is saturated after 6h of incubation time. The pH was shifted from 7.0 for soluble HRP to 7.5-8.0 for the immobilized enzyme. The soluble HRP and immobilized HRP had the same optimum activity at 40°C. The immobilized HRP is more thermal stable than soluble HRP. Substrate analogues were oxidized by immobilized HRP with higher efficiencies than those of soluble HRP. Km values of the soluble HRP and the immobilized HRP were 31 and 37mM for guiacol and 5.0 and 7.8mM for H2O2, respectively. The immobilized HRP had higher efficiency for removal of phenol than that of soluble HRP. The immobilized HRP had higher resistance toward heavy metal ions compared to the soluble enzyme. The immobilized HRP was more stable against high concentration of urea, Triton X-100 and isopropanol. The immobilized HRP exhibited high resistance to proteolysis by trypsin than soluble enzyme. In conclusion, the immobilized HRP could be used as a potential efficient catalyst for the removal of aromatic pollutants from wastewater. PMID:27264646

  15. Nitric oxide activates superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase to repress the cell death induced by wounding.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Ching; Jih, Pei-Ju; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Lin, Jeng-Shane; Chang, Ling-Lan; Shen, Yu-Hsing; Jeng, Shih-Tong

    2011-10-01

    Wounding caused by rain, wind, and pathogen may lead plants to onset defense response. Previous studies indicated that mechanical wounding stimulates plants to generate nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). In this study, the functions of NO and H(2)O(2) after wounding in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas cv. Tainung 57) was further analyzed. Mechanical wounding damaged cells and resulted in necrosis, but the presence of NO donors or NO scavenger might reduce or enhance the cell death caused by wounding, respectively. The amount of H(2)O(2) induced by wounding was also decreased or increased when plants were incubated with NO donors or NO scavenger, individually. These results indicate that NO may regulate H(2)O(2) generation to affect cell death. NO-induced proteins isolated from two-dimensional electrophoresis were identified to be Copper/Zinc superoxide dismutases (CuZnSODs). The activities of CuZnSODs and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) could be enhanced by NO. In addition, the expression of CuZnSOD and APX was induced by wounding via NO, and their expression was further stimulated by NO through the generation of cGMP. The influx of calcium ions and the activity of NADPH oxidase were also involved in the NO signal transduction pathway inducing APX expression. Collectively, the generation of H(2)O(2) in wounded plants might trigger cell death. Meanwhile, the production of NO induced by wounding stimulated signal transducers including cGMP, calcium ions, and H(2)O(2) to activate CuZnSOD and APX, which further decreased H(2)O(2) level and reduced the cell death caused by wounding. PMID:21833542

  16. Glutathione system in young spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, S K; Arunkumar, Sundaram; Sirajudeen, K N S; Singh, H J

    2010-12-01

    Glutathione (GSH) forms a part of the antioxidant system that plays a vital role in preventing oxidative stress, and an imbalance in the oxidant/antioxidant system has been linked to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The aim of this study was to investigate the status of the GSH system in the kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Components of the GSH system, including glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and total GSH content, were measured in the kidneys of 4, 6, 8, 12, and 16 weeks old SHR and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Systolic blood pressure of SHR was significantly higher from the age of 6 weeks onwards compared with age-matched WKY rats. GPx activity in the SHR was significantly lower from the age of 8 weeks onwards when compared to that in age-matched WKY rats. No significant differences were evident in the GPx-1 protein abundance, and its relative mRNA levels, GR, GST activity, and total GSH content between SHR and age-matched WKY rats. The lower GPx activity suggests of an impairment of the GSH system in the SHR, which might be due to an abnormality in its protein rather than non-availability of a cofactor. Its role in the development of hypertension in SHR however remains unclear. PMID:20680541

  17. Peroxidase activity stabilization of cytochrome P450(BM3) by rational analysis of intramolecular electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Limón, Abraham; Águila, Sergio; Ayala, Marcela; Batista, Cesar V; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2013-05-01

    Combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations were used to explore the electron pathway involved in the suicide inactivation of cytochrome P450BM3 from Bacillus megaterium. The suicide inactivation is a common phenomenon observed for heme peroxidases, in which the enzyme is inactivated as a result of self-oxidation mediated by highly oxidizing enzyme intermediates formed during the catalytic cycle. The selected model was a mutant comprising only the heme domain (CYPBM3 21B3) that had been previously evolved to efficiently catalyze hydroxylation reactions with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as electron acceptor. An extensive mapping of residues involved in electron transfer routes was obtained from density functional calculations on activated heme (i.e. Compound I) and selected amino acid residues. Identification of oxidizable residues (electron donors) was performed by selectively activating/deactivating different quantum regions. This method allowed a rational identification of key oxidizable targets in order to replace them for less oxidizable residues by site-directed mutagenesis. The residues W96 and F405 were consistently predicted by the QM/MM electron pathway to hold high spin density; single and double mutants of P450BM3 on these positions (W96A, F405L, W96A/F405L) resulted in a more stable variants in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, displaying a similar reaction rate than P450BM3 21B3. Furthermore, mass spectrometry confirmed these oxidation sites and corroborated the possible routes described by QM/MM electron transfer (ET) pathways. PMID:23425936

  18. Chemical Engineering of Enzymes: Altered Catalytic Activity, Predictable Selectivity and Exceptional Stability of the Semisynthetic Peroxidase Seleno-Subtilisin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häring, Dietmar; Schreier, Peter

    The increasing demand for enzymes as highly selective, mild, and environmentally benign catalysts is often limited by the lack of an enzyme with the desired catalytic activity or substrate selectivity and by their instability in biotechnological processes. The previous answers to these problems comprised genetically engineered enzymes and several classes of enzyme mimics. Here we describe the potential of chemical enzyme engineering: native enzymes can be modified by merely chemical means and basic equipment yielding so-called semisynthetic enzymes. Thus, the high substrate selectivity of the enzymatic peptide framework is combined with the catalytic versatility of a synthetic active site. We illustrate the potential of chemically engineered enzymes with the conception of the semisynthetic peroxidase seleno-subtilisin. First, the serine endoprotease subtilisin was crystallized and cross-linked with glutaraldehyde to give cross-linked enzyme crystals which were found to be insoluble in water or organic solvents and highly stable. Second, serine 221 in the active site (Enz-OH) was chemically converted into an oxidized derivative of selenocystein (Enz-SeO2H). As a consequence, the former proteolytic enzyme gained peroxidase activity and catalyzed the selective reduction of hydroperoxides. Due to the identical binding sites of the semisynthetic peroxidase and the protease, the substrate selectivity of seleno-subtilisin was predictable in view of the well-known selectivity of subtilisin.

  19. Chemical form of selenium affects its uptake, transport and glutathione peroxidase activity in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining the effect of selenium (Se) chemical form on uptake and transport in human intestinal cells is critical to assess Se bioavailability. In the present study, we measured the uptake and transport of various Se compounds in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. We found that two sources...

  20. Effects of antioxidants on glutathione-S-transferase activities in hepatocyte culture

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.H. )

    1991-03-15

    Hepatocyte cultures from control rats and rats injected with 3-methylcholanthrene(3-MC) were used to study the effects of antioxidants on the activity of glutathione-S-transferases (GSH-S-T). This group of enzymes catalyzes conjugation of xenobiotics or their metabolites with reduced glutathione and plays an important role in detoxification of xenobiotics. In Experiment 1, treatment of hepatocyte cultures from both control and 3-MC-injected rats with 25 {mu}M or 50 {mu}M butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) for 24 hours or 48 hours significantly increased GSH-S-T activity with I-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as the substrate. In Experiment 2, treatment of hepatocytes from both control and 3-MC-treated rats with 25 {mu}M ethoxyquin or vitamin E, but not vitamin A or ascorbic acid, significantly increased GSH-S-T activity when CDNB, 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene or p-nitrobenzyl chloride was used as the substrate, respectively. The results suggested that BHA, ethoxyquin and vitamin E may have detoxification effects against 3-MC-induced carcinogenesis.

  1. Antioxidant activity evaluation by physiologically relevant assays based on haemoglobin peroxidase activity and cytochrome c-induced oxidation of liposomes.

    PubMed

    Mot, Augustin C; Bischin, Cristina; Muresan, Bianca; Parvu, Marcel; Damian, Grigore; Vlase, Laurian; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2016-06-01

    Two new protocols for exploring antioxidant-related chemical composition and reactivity are described: one based on a chronometric variation of a haemoglobin ascorbate peroxidase assay and one based on cytochrome c-induced oxidation of lecithin liposomes. Detailed accounts are given on their design, application, critical correlations with established methods and mechanisms. These assays are proposed to be physiologically relevant and bring new information regarding a real sample, both qualitative and quantitative. The well-known assays used for evaluation of antioxidant (re)activity are revisited and compared with these new methods. Extracts of the Hedera helix L. are examined as test case, with focus on seasonal variation and on leaf, fruit and flower with respect to chromatographic, spectroscopic and reactivity properties. According to the set of assays performed, winter are the most antioxidant, followed by summer leaves, and then by flowers and fruits. PMID:26208459

  2. Biocatalytic properties of a peroxidase-active cell-free extract from onion solid wastes: caffeic acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    El Agha, Ayman; Abbeddou, Souheila; Makris, Dimitris P; Kefalas, Panagiotis

    2009-04-01

    The exploitation of food residual sources consists of a major factor in reducing the polluting load of food industry wastes and developing novel added-value products. Plant food residues including trimmings and peels might contain a range of enzymes capable of transforming bio-organic molecules with potential phytotoxicity, including hydrolases, peroxidases and polyphenoloxidases. Although the use of bacterial and fungal enzymes has gained interest in studies pertaining to bioremediation applications, plant enzymes have been given less attention or even disregarded. In this view, this study aimed at the investigating the use of a crude peroxidase preparation from onion solid by-products for oxidising caffeic acid, a widespread o-diphenol, whose various derivatives may occur in food industry wastes, such as olive mill waste waters. Increased enzyme activity was observed at a pH value of 5, but considerable activity was also retained for pH up to 7. Favourable temperatures for increased activity varied between 20 degrees C and 40 degrees C, 30 degrees C being the optimal. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of a homogenate/H(2)O(2)-treated caffeic acid solution revealed the existence of a tetramer as major oxidation product. Based on the data generated, a putative pathway for the formation of the peroxidase-mediated caffeic acid tetramer was proposed. PMID:18670892

  3. Association of mercury and selenium with altered glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress in diving ducks from the San Francisco Bay region, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.J.; Pendleton, G.W.; Ohlendorf, H.M.; Marn, C.M.

    1998-02-01

    Adult male greater scaup (Aythya marila), surf scoters (Melanitta perspicillata), and ruddy ducks (Oxyura jamaicensis) were collected from Suisun Bay and coastal Tomales Bay in the greater San Francisco Bay area to assess exposure to inorganic contaminants. Hepatic Se concentrations were highest in greater scaup and surf scoters in Suisun Bay, whereas hepatic Hg was highest in greater scaup and surf scoters from Tomales Bay. Hepatic Se and Hg were lower in ruddy ducks and did not differ between locations. Hepatic supernatants were assayed for enzymes related to glutathione metabolism and antioxidant activity, including glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH peroxidase), glutathione reductase (GSSG reductase), and glutathione-S-transferase (GSH transferase). Glutathione peroxidase activity was higher in surf scoters and ruddy ducks, and G-6-PDH was higher in greater scaup and surf scoters from Suisun Bay than Tomales Bay. Glutathione reductase (GSSG) was higher in SS from Suisun Bay. The ratio of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) was greater in all species from Tomales Bay. The following significant relationships were found in one or more species with increasing hepatic Hg concentration; lower body, liver, and heart weights; decreased hepatic GSH concentration and G-6-PDH and GSH peroxidase activities; increased ratio of GSSG to GSH; and increased GSSG reductase activity. With increasing hepatic Se concentration, GSH peroxidase increased, but GSH decreased. It is concluded that measurement of associated enzymes in conjunction with thiol status may be a useful bioindicator to discriminate between Hg and Se effects. Concentrations of Hg and Se and the above variables affected have been associated with adverse effects on reproduction and neurological function in experimental studies with mallards.

  4. Peroxidase-like activity of the Co3O4 nanoparticles used for biodetection and evaluation of antioxidant behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Huimin; Yang, Dongfang; Han, Xiangna; Cai, Junhui; Liu, Haiying; He, Weiwei

    2016-03-01

    Nanostructured enzyme mimics are of great interest as promising alternatives to artificial enzymes for biomedical and catalytic applications. Studying the chemical interactions between antioxidants and nano-enzymes may result in a better understanding of the antioxidant capability of antioxidants and may help improve the function of artificial enzymes to better mimic natural enzymes. In this study, using Co3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) as peroxidase mimics to catalyze the oxidation of chromophoric substrates by H2O2, we developed a platform that acts as a biosensor for hydrogen peroxide and glucose and that can study the inhibitory effects of natural antioxidants on peroxidase mimics. This method can be applied specifically to glucose detection in real samples. Three natural antioxidants, gallic acid (GA), tannic acid (TA), and ascorbic acid (AA), were compared for their antioxidant capabilities. We found that these three antioxidants efficiently inhibit peroxidase-like activity with concentration dependence. The antioxidants showed different efficiencies, in the following order: tannic acid > gallic acid > ascorbic acid. They also showed distinct modes of inhibition based on different interaction mechanisms. This study serves as a proof-of-concept that nano-enzyme mimics can be used to evaluate antioxidant capabilities and to screen enzyme inhibitors.Nanostructured enzyme mimics are of great interest as promising alternatives to artificial enzymes for biomedical and catalytic applications. Studying the chemical interactions between antioxidants and nano-enzymes may result in a better understanding of the antioxidant capability of antioxidants and may help improve the function of artificial enzymes to better mimic natural enzymes. In this study, using Co3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) as peroxidase mimics to catalyze the oxidation of chromophoric substrates by H2O2, we developed a platform that acts as a biosensor for hydrogen peroxide and glucose and that can study the

  5. Catalytic activity and thermal stability of horseradish peroxidase encapsulated in self-assembled organic nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qin; Kim, Youngchan; Bassim, Nabil; Raman, Nisha; Collins, Greg E

    2016-03-21

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was encapsulated in self-assembled lithocholic acid (LCA) based organic nanotubes and its catalytic activity before and after thermal treatment was measured for comparison with free HRP. The apparent kcat (kcat/Km) for nanotube encapsulated HRP remained almost the same before and after thermal treatment, reporting an average value of 3.7 ± 0.4 μM(-1) s(-1). The apparent kcat value for free HRP decreased from 14.8 ± 1.3 μM(-1) s(-1) for samples stored at 4 °C to 2.4 ± 0.1 μM(-1) s(-1) after thermal treatment for 8 h at 55 °C. The Michaelis-Menten constants, Km, determined for encapsulated HRP and free HRP were relatively unperturbed by storage conditions at 4 °C or thermally treated at 55 °C for varying time periods from 2-8 h, with encapsulated HRP having a slightly higher Km than free HRP (13.4 ± 0.9 μM versus 11.7 ± 0.4 μM). The amount of HRP encapsulated in LCA nanotubes increased dramatically when the mixture of HRP and LCA nanotubes was brought to an elevated temperature. Within 4 h of thermal treatment at 55 °C, the amount of HRP encapsulated by the LCA nanotubes was more than 4 times the amount of HRP encapsulated when equilibrated at 4 °C for 7 days. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that the higher degree of exposure of hydrophobic residues in HRP at elevated temperatures enhances the hydrophobic interaction between HRP and the nanotube wall, resulting in the increased amount of HRP surface adsorption and, hence, the overall amount of encapsulation inside the nanotubes. PMID:26953357

  6. Effects of curcumin on cytochrome P450 and glutathione S-transferase activities in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Oetari, S; Sudibyo, M; Commandeur, J N; Samhoedi, R; Vermeulen, N P

    1996-01-12

    The stability of curcumin, as well as the interactions between curcumin and cytochrome P450s (P450s) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) in rat liver, were studied. Curcumin is relatively unstable in phosphate buffer at pH 7.4. The stability of curcumin was strongly improved by lowering the pH or by adding glutathione (GSH), N-acetyl L-cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, rat liver microsomes, or rat liver cytosol. Curcumin was found to be a potent inhibitor of rat liver P450 1A1/1A2 measured as ethoxyresorufin deethylation (EROD) activity in beta-naphthoflavone (beta NF)-induced microsomes, a less potent inhibitor of P450 2B1/2B2, measured as pentoxyresorufin depentylation (PROD) activity in phenobarbital (PB)-induced microsomes and a weak inhibitor of P450 2E1, measured as p-nitrophenol (PNP) hydroxylation activity in pyrazole-induced microsomes. Ki values were 0.14 and 76.02 microM for the EROD- and PROD-activities, respectively, and 30 microM of curcumin inhibited only 9% of PNP-hydroxylation activity. In ethoxyresorufin deethylation (EROD) and pentoxyresorufin depentylation (PROD) experiments, curcumin showed a competitive type of inhibition. Curcumin was also a potent inhibitor of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in cytosol from liver of rats treated with phenobarbital (PB), beta-naphthoflavone (beta NF) and pyrazole (Pyr), when measured towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as substrate. In liver cytosol from rats treated with phenobarbital (PB), curcumin inhibited GST activity in a mixed-type manner with a Ki of 5.75 microM and Ki of 12.5 microM. In liver cytosol from rats treated with pyrazole (Pyr) or beta-naphthoflavone (beta NF), curcumin demonstrated a competitive type of inhibition with Ki values of 1.79 microM and 2.29 microM, respectively. It is concluded that these strong inhibitory properties of curcumin towards P450s and GSTs, in addition to its well-known antioxidant activity, may help explain the previously observed anticarcinogenic

  7. Naked-eye sensitive ELISA-like assay based on gold-enhanced peroxidase-like immunogold activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shasha; Chen, Zhaopeng; Choo, Jaebum; Chen, Lingxin

    2016-02-01

    A naked-eye sensitive ELISA-like assay was developed based on gold-enhanced peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Using human IgG (H-IgG) as an analytical model, goat anti-human IgG antibody (anti-IgG) adsorbed on microtiter plate and AuNPs-labeled anti-IgG acted as capture antibody and detection antibody, respectively. Because the surfaces of AuNPs were blocked by protein molecules, the peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs was almost inhibited, evaluated by the catalytic oxidation of peroxidase enzyme substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), which could produce a bright blue color in the presence of H2O2. Fortunately, the catalytic ability of AuNPs was dramatically increased by the deposition of gold due to the formation of a new gold shell on immunogold. Under optimal reaction conditions, the colorimetric immunoassay presented a good linear relationship in the range of 0.7-100 ng/mL and the limit of detection (LOD) of 0.3 ng/mL calculated by 3σ/S for UV-vis detection, and obtained LOD of 5 ng/mL for naked-eye detection. The obtained results were competitive with conventional sandwich ELISA with the LOD of 1.6 ng/mL. Furthermore, this developed colorimetric immunoassay was successfully applied to diluted human serum and fetal bovine serum samples, and predicted a broad prospect for the use of peroxidase-like activity involving nanomaterials in bioassay and diagnostics. PMID:26677026

  8. Sesquiterpene lactones: Mechanism of antineoplastic activity; relationship of cellular glutathione to cytotoxicity; and disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Grippo, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    Helenalin, a sesquiterpene lactone, inhibited the growth of P388 lymphocytic and L1210 lymphoid leukemia, and Ehrlich ascites and KB carcinoma cells. The L1210 leukemia cells were most sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of helenalin. Helenalin's antineoplastic effects were due to inhibition of DNA synthesis by suppressing the activities of enzymes involved in this biosynthetic pathway; i.e., IMP dehydrogenase, ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase, thioredoxin complex, GSH disulfide oxidoreductase and DNA polymerase {alpha} activities. The relationship of reduced glutathione (GSH) to the cytotoxic effects of helanalin was evaluated. L1210 cells, which were more sensitive to helenalin's toxicity, contained lower basal concentrations of GSH. Helenalin decreased the concentration of reduced glutathione in both L1210 and P388 leukemia cells. Concurrent administration of helanalin with agents reported to raise GSH concentrations did not substantially effect GSH levels, nor were survival times of tumor-bearing mice enhanced. Following intraperitoneal administration of {sup 3}H-plenolin, no radioactive drug and/or metabolite was sequestered in the organs of BDF{sub 1} mice. Approximately 50% of {sup 3}H-plenolin and/or its metabolites were eliminated via urine while lesser amounts of radioactive drug and/or metabolites were eliminated in the feces.

  9. Glutathione-dependent extracellular ferric reductase activities in dimorphic zoopathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Zarnowski, Robert; Woods, Jon P.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, extracellular glutathione-dependent ferric reductase (GSH-FeR) activities in different dimorphic zoopathogenic fungal species were characterized. Supernatants from Blastomyces dermatitidis, Histoplasma capsulatum, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii strains grown in their yeast form were able to reduce iron enzymically with glutathione as a cofactor. Some variations in the level of reduction were noted amongst the strains. This activity was stable in acidic, neutral and slightly alkaline environments and was inhibited when trivalent aluminium and gallium ions were present. Using zymography, single bands of GSH-FeRs with apparent molecular masses varying from 430 to 460 kDa were identified in all strains. The same molecular mass range was determined by size exclusion chromatography. These data demonstrate that dimorphic zoopathogenic fungi produce and secrete a family of similar GSH-FeRs that may be involved in the acquisition and utilization of iron. Siderophore production by these and other fungi has sometimes been considered to provide a full explanation of iron acquisition in these organisms. Our work reveals an additional common mechanism that may be biologically and pathogenically important. Furthermore, while some characteristics of these enzymes such as extracellular location, cofactor utilization and large size are not individually unique, when considered together and shared across a range of fungi, they represent an important novel physiological feature. PMID:16000713

  10. A Redundant Role of Human Thyroid Peroxidase Propeptide for Cellular, Enzymatic, and Immunological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Góra, Monika; Buckle, Ashley M.; Porebski, Benjamin T.; Kemp, E. Helen; Sutton, Brian J.; Czarnocka, Barbara; Banga, J. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is a dimeric membrane-bound enzyme of thyroid follicular cells, responsible for thyroid hormone biosynthesis. TPO is also a common target antigen in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). With two active sites, TPO is an unusual enzyme, and thus there is much interest in understanding its structure and role in AITD. Homology modeling has shown TPO to be composed of different structural modules, as well as a propeptide sequence. During the course of studies to obtain homogeneous preparations of recombinant TPO for structural studies, we investigated the role of the large propeptide sequence in TPO. Methods: An engineered recombinant human TPO preparation expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells lacking the propeptide (TPOΔpro; amino acid residues 21–108) was characterized and its properties compared to wild-type TPO. Plasma membrane localization was determined by cell surface protein biotinylation, and biochemical studies were performed to evaluate enzymatic activity and the effect of deglycosylation. Immunological investigations using autoantibodies from AITD patients and other epitope-specific antibodies that recognize conformational determinants on TPO were evaluated for binding to TPOΔpro by flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Molecular modeling and dynamics simulation of TPOΔpro comprising a dimer of myeloperoxidase-like domains was performed in order to investigate the impact of propeptide removal and the role of glycosylation. Results: The TPOΔpro was expressed on the cell surface at comparable levels to wild-type TPO. The TPOΔpro was enzymatically active and recognized by patients' autoantibodies and a panel of epitope-specific antibodies, confirming structural integrity of the two major conformational determinants recognized by autoantibodies. Faithful intracellular trafficking and N-glycosylation of TPOΔpro was also maintained. Molecular modeling and dynamics

  11. Abolishing activity against ascorbate in a cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase from switchgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is being developed as a bioenergy species. Recently an early version of its genome has been released permitting a route to the cloning and analysis of key proteins. Ascorbate peroxidases (APx) are an important part of the antioxidant defense system of plant cells a...

  12. Endogenous peroxidase activity in brush cell-like cells in the large intestine of the bullfrog tadpole, Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, K; Ichikawa, Y; Nakamura, I

    1983-01-01

    A special cell type was identified in the mucosal epithelium of the large intestine of the tadpole of the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana. It is a slender, columnar cell, with a dark, basally situated nucleus. By electron microscopy the cell displays prominent bundles of filaments emerging from each microvillus and extending deep into the cytoplasm without ending in the terminal web. It has longer and more crowded microvilli than the absorptive cell. The specialized cell is also characterized by the presence of many apical vesicles and numerous subapical dense bodies. These cytological features suggest that it may be a brush cell (Rhodin and Dalhamn 1956). These cells displayed endogenous peroxidase activity in smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum, in the well-developed Golgi apparatus and in apical vesicles. Furthermore, peroxidase reaction product was frequently observed on their luminal surface membrane. These findings suggest that the brush cell in the large intestine of the bullfrog tadpole may be a secretory cell. PMID:6601990

  13. Stimulation of Ligninolytic Peroxidase Activity by Nitrogen Nutrients in the White Rot Fungus Bjerkandera sp. Strain BOS55

    PubMed Central

    Kaal, Erwin E. J.; de Jong, Ed; Field, Jim A.

    1993-01-01

    Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55, a newly isolated wild-type white rot fungus, produced lignin peroxidase (LiP) in nitrogen (N)-sufficient glucose-peptone medium, whereas no LiP was detectable in N-limited medium. The production of LiP was induced by the peptide-containing components of this medium and also by soy bean protein. Furthermore, the production of manganese-dependent peroxidase was stimulated by organic N sources, although lower production was also evident in N-limited medium. Further research showed that the induction of LiP depended on the combination of pH and the type of N source. An amino acid mixture and ammonium induced LiP only at either pH 6 or 7.3, respectively. Peptone induced LiP activity at all pH values tested; however, the highest activity was observed at pH 7.3. The results presented here indicate that Bjerkandera spp. are distinct from the model white rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, which produces ligninolytic peroxidases in response to N limitation. PMID:16349104

  14. Active transport of glutathione S-conjugate in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Wong, K P

    1996-11-12

    The formation of the glutathione S-conjugate of monochlorobimane (GSH-bimane) in human colon adenocarcinoma cells was identified by HPLC-fluorimetry and its transport from the cells was found to be temperature-sensitive, saturable and ATP-dependent. The apparent K(m) and Vmax values were 2.4 +/- 0.5 nmol GSH-bimane/10(6) cells and 0.5 +/- 0.1 nmol GSH-bimane/min per 10(6) cells, respectively. This active transport of GSH-bimane was inhibited by low micromolar concentrations of classical uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation, namely carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP). The efflux of GSH-bimane was competitively inhibited by chlorambucil (CMB) and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), two other substrates of GST. This study demonstrates the presence and kinetic measurements of the glutathione S-conjugate export (GS-X) pump in human colon cancer cells, an export pump whose function has been implicated in the phenomenon of multidrug resistance. PMID:8950221

  15. Studies on Polyphenol Content, Activities and Isozymes of Polyphenol Oxidase and Peroxidase During Air-Curing in Three Tobacco Types 1

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, S. J.; Calvert, J.

    1969-01-01

    The change in polyphenol content in the primed leaves of burley, flue-cured, and Turkish tobaccos during air-curing was related to the activities and isozymes of polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase. The quantity of chlorogenic acid was rapidly reduced during the first week of curing. The decrease in rutin content during curing was less significant, especially when the concentration of chlorogenic acid was high in leaf tissues. This result was further confirmed by in vitro assays with partially purified tobacco polyphenol oxidase. The polyphenol oxidase activity did not differ at any stage of curing in the 3 tobaccos. When the activity was measured by the oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine it rose rapidly during the first day of curing and then decreased sharply so that in the fully cured leaf only 15% activity remained. The increase in activity was not observed when chlorogenic acid was used as the substrate. A similar level of peroxidase activity was found in the 3 tobaccos before curing. Peroxidase activities increased rapidly during the first 24 hr of curing, declined thereafter, and remained highest in the flue-cured tobacco, less in the Turkish line, and least in the burley at the end of curing process. By polyacrylamide gel block electrophoresis, 10 peroxidase isozyme bands, 2 cationic and 8 anionic, appeared identical in all 3 tobaccos. When catechol replaced benzidine-2 HCl as the electron donor, 1 cationic and 2 anionic peroxidase isozymes did not form. Of interest is that the same 10 peroxidase isozyme bands also exhibited polyphenol oxidase activities when treated with 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine or chlorogenic acid. Results suggest that in the crude tobacco leaf extract the peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase may associate as protein complexes, and peroxidase isozymes may differ in electron-donor requirements. Isozyme patterns for both oxidases at various curing intervals differed only quantitatively. Images PMID:16657046

  16. Peroxidase-like activity of the Co3O4 nanoparticles used for biodetection and evaluation of antioxidant behavior.

    PubMed

    Jia, Huimin; Yang, Dongfang; Han, Xiangna; Cai, Junhui; Liu, Haiying; He, Weiwei

    2016-03-21

    Nanostructured enzyme mimics are of great interest as promising alternatives to artificial enzymes for biomedical and catalytic applications. Studying the chemical interactions between antioxidants and nano-enzymes may result in a better understanding of the antioxidant capability of antioxidants and may help improve the function of artificial enzymes to better mimic natural enzymes. In this study, using Co3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) as peroxidase mimics to catalyze the oxidation of chromophoric substrates by H2O2, we developed a platform that acts as a biosensor for hydrogen peroxide and glucose and that can study the inhibitory effects of natural antioxidants on peroxidase mimics. This method can be applied specifically to glucose detection in real samples. Three natural antioxidants, gallic acid (GA), tannic acid (TA), and ascorbic acid (AA), were compared for their antioxidant capabilities. We found that these three antioxidants efficiently inhibit peroxidase-like activity with concentration dependence. The antioxidants showed different efficiencies, in the following order: tannic acid > gallic acid > ascorbic acid. They also showed distinct modes of inhibition based on different interaction mechanisms. This study serves as a proof-of-concept that nano-enzyme mimics can be used to evaluate antioxidant capabilities and to screen enzyme inhibitors. PMID:26911916

  17. Significance of Polymorphisms and Expression of Enzyme-Encoding Genes Related to Glutathione in Hematopoietic Cancers and Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zmorzyński, Szymon; Świderska-Kołacz, Grażyna; Koczkodaj, Dorota; Filip, Agata Anna

    2015-01-01

    Antioxidant compounds such as glutathione and its enzymes have become the focus of attention of medical sciences. Glutathione, a specific tripeptide, is involved in many intercellular processes. The glutathione concentration is determined by the number of GAG repeats in gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase. GAG polymorphisms are associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia, berylliosis, diabetes, lung cancer, and nasopharyngeal tumors. Cancer cells with high glutathione concentration are resistant to chemotherapy treatment. The oxidized form of glutathione is formed by glutathione peroxidases (GPXs). The changes in activity of GPX1, GPX2, and GPX3 isoforms may be associated with the development of cancers, for example, prostate cancer or even colon cancer. Detoxification of glutathione conjugates is possible due to activity of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). Polymorphisms in GSTM1, GSTP1, and GSTO1 enzymes increase the risk of developing breast cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma. Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidases (GGTs) are responsible for glutathione degradation. Increased activity of GGT correlates with adverse prognosis in patients with breast cancer. Studies on genes encoding glutathione enzymes are continued in order to determine the correlation between DNA polymorphisms in cancer patients. PMID:26682223

  18. Chcanges in Germinability and Activities of Polyphenol Oxidase and Peroxidase in Seeds of Pentaclethramacrophylla During Lowtemperature Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udosen, I. R.; Nkang, A. E.; Sam, S. M.

    2012-07-01

    Activities of peroxidase (POD) and polyphenol Oxidase (PPO) were investigated in seeds of Pentaclethramacrophylla during low temperature treatment. The seeds from the small-sized fruits (variety A) and those of the big-sized fruits (variety B) showed high germination, with maximum germination values ranging between 60 ñ 90%. Low temperature treatment did not significantly (P< 0.5) affect maximum germination values. Activities of POD and PPO increased initially (2-4 days) but declined with prolonged (6ñ8 days) low temperature treatment.

  19. Insight into the mechanism revealing the peroxidase mimetic catalytic activity of quaternary CuZnFeS nanocrystals: colorimetric biosensing of hydrogen peroxide and glucose.

    PubMed

    Dalui, Amit; Pradhan, Bapi; Thupakula, Umamahesh; Khan, Ali Hossain; Kumar, Gundam Sandeep; Ghosh, Tanmay; Satpati, Biswarup; Acharya, Somobrata

    2015-05-21

    Artificial enzyme mimetics have attracted immense interest recently because natural enzymes undergo easy denaturation under environmental conditions restricting practical usefulness. We report for the first time chalcopyrite CuZnFeS (CZIS) alloyed nanocrystals (NCs) as novel biomimetic catalysts with efficient intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. Novel peroxidase activities of CZIS NCs have been evaluated by catalytic oxidation of the peroxidase substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). CZIS NCs demonstrate the synergistic effect of elemental composition and photoactivity towards peroxidase-like activity. The quaternary CZIS NCs show enhanced intrinsic peroxidase-like activity compared to the binary NCs with the same constituent elements. Intrinsic peroxidase-like activity has been correlated with the energy band position of CZIS NCs extracted using scanning tunneling spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Kinetic analyses indicate Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetic model catalytic behavior describing the rate of the enzymatic reaction by correlating the reaction rate with substrate concentration. Typical color reactions arising from the catalytic oxidation of TMB over CZIS NCs with H2O2 have been utilized to establish a simple and sensitive colorimetric assay for detection of H2O2 and glucose. CZIS NCs are recyclable catalysts showing high efficiency in multiple uses. Our study may open up the possibility of designing new photoactive multi-component alloyed NCs as enzyme mimetics in biotechnology applications. PMID:25921601

  20. The structure and peroxidase activity of a 33-kDa catalase-related protein from Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pakhomova, Svetlana; Gao, Benlian; Boeglin, William E; Brash, Alan R; Newcomer, Marcia E

    2009-01-01

    True catalases are tyrosine-liganded, usually tetrameric, hemoproteins with subunit sizes of ∼55–84 kDa. Recently characterized hemoproteins with a catalase-related structure, yet lacking in catalatic activity, include the 40–43 kDa allene oxide synthases of marine invertebrates and cyanobacteria. Herein, we describe the 1.8 Å X-ray crystal structure of a 33 kDa subunit hemoprotein from Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (annotated as MAP-2744c), that retains the core elements of the catalase fold and exhibits an organic peroxide-dependent peroxidase activity. MAP-2744c exhibits negligible catalatic activity, weak peroxidatic activity using hydrogen peroxide (20/s) and strong peroxidase activity (∼300/s) using organic hydroperoxides as co-substrate. Key amino acid differences significantly impact prosthetic group conformation and placement and confer a distinct activity to this prototypical member of a group of conserved bacterial “minicatalases”. Its structural features and the result of the enzyme assays support a role for MAP-2744c and its close homologues in mitigating challenge by a variety of reactive oxygen species. PMID:19827095

  1. Short-term effects of T-2 toxin exposure on some lipid peroxide and glutathione redox parameters of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Bócsai, A; Pelyhe, Cs; Zándoki, E; Ancsin, Zs; Szabó-Fodor, J; Erdélyi, M; Mézes, M; Balogh, K

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the short-term effects of T-2 toxin exposure (3.09 mg/kg feed) on lipid peroxidation and glutathione redox system of broiler chicken. A total of 54 Cobb 500 cockerels were randomly distributed to two experimental groups at 21 days of age. Samples (blood plasma, red blood cell, liver, kidney and spleen) were collected every 12 h during a 48-h period. The results showed that the initial phase of lipid peroxidation, as measured by conjugated dienes and trienes in the liver, was continuously, but not significantly higher in T-2 toxin-dosed birds than in control birds. The termination phase of lipid peroxidation, as measured by malondialdehyde, was significantly higher in liver and kidney as a result of T-2 toxin exposure at the end of the experimental period (48th hour). The glutathione redox system activated shortly after starting the T-2 toxin exposure, which is supported by the significantly higher concentration of reduced glutathione and glutathione peroxidase activity in blood plasma at 24 and 48 h, in liver at 12, 24 and 36 h, and in kidney and spleen at 24 h. These results suggest that T-2 toxin, or its metabolites, may be involved in the generation of reactive oxygen substances which causes an increase in lipid peroxidation, and consequently activates the glutathione redox system, namely synthesis of reduced glutathione and glutathione peroxidase. PMID:26412027

  2. Peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles stabilized by hyperbranched polyglycidol derivatives over a wide pH range.

    PubMed

    Drozd, Marcin; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Parzuchowski, Paweł; Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, Marta; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2015-12-11

    The aim of this work was to carry out comparative studies on the peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) stabilized with low molecular weight hyperbranched polyglycidol (HBPG-OH) and its derivative modified with maleic acid residues (HBPG-COOH). The influence of the stabilizer to gold precursor ratio on the size and morphology of nanoparticles obtained was checked, and prepared nanoparticles were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results indicated the divergent effect of increasing the concentration of stabilizers (HBPG-OH or HBPG-COOH) on the size of the nanostructures obtained. The gold nanoparticles obtained were characterized as having intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and the mechanism of catalysis in acidic and alkaline mediums was consistent with the standard Michaelis-Menten kinetics, revealing a strong affinity of AuNPs with 2, 2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), and significantly lower affinity towards phenol. By comparing the kinetic parameters, a negligible effect of polymeric ligand charge on activity against various types of substrates (anionic or cationic) was indicated. The superiority of steric stabilization via the application of tested low-weight hyperbranched polymers over typical stabilizers in preventing salt-induced aggregation and maintaining high catalytic activity in time was proved. The applied hyperbranched stabilizers provide a good tool for manufacturing gold-based nanozymes, which are highly stable and active over a wide pH range. PMID:26567596

  3. Glutathione and GSH-dependent enzymes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells in response to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Boehme, D.S.; Hotchkiss, J.A.; Henderson, R.F. )

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if in vivo ozone exposure results in elevations in the levels of glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes in cells derived from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Our hypothesis was that, as part of a defense mechanism against oxygen toxicity, such cells would have increased levels of glutathione (GSH) in response to an oxidant stress. Female F344/N rats were exposed to 0.8 ppm ozone, 6 hr/day, for 1, 3, or 7 days, after which cells were collected by lung lavage. The GSH and GSH-peroxidase activity per milligram of protein in the cellular fraction, both necessary for reducing cellular peroxides, were elevated after 3 days of ozone exposure. After 7 days of exposure, cellular GSH had returned to control values, but the activity of glutathione reductase, the enzyme that reduces oxidized glutathione to GSH, was increased. Extracellular GSH concentration and glutathione reductase activity in BALF were also increased after 7 days of exposure. The total glutathione equivalents (GSH and GSSG, both cellular and extracellular) in BALF increased throughout the 7-day exposure, with GSH increasing first in the cells, and then in the extracellular fluid. This study demonstrated that the glutathione anti-oxidant system of BALF cells is stimulated by exposure to ozone. This response may serve to protect cells from the toxic effects of oxidant stress.

  4. Platinum nanocatalysts loaded on graphene oxide-dispersed carbon nanotubes with greatly enhanced peroxidase-like catalysis and electrocatalysis activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hua; Li, Shuai; Si, Yanmei; Zhang, Ning; Sun, Zongzhao; Wu, Hong; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-06-01

    A powerful enzymatic mimetic has been fabricated by employing graphene oxide (GO) nanocolloids to disperse conductive carbon supports of hydrophobic carbon nanotubes (CNTs) before and after the loading of Pt nanocatalysts. The resulting GOCNT-Pt nanocomposites could present improved aqueous dispersion stability and Pt spatial distribution. Unexpectedly, they could show greatly enhanced peroxidase-like catalysis and electrocatalysis activities in water, as evidenced in the colorimetric and electrochemical investigations in comparison to some inorganic nanocatalysts commonly used. Moreover, it is found that the new enzyme mimetics could exhibit peroxidase-like catalysis activity comparable to natural enzymes; yet, they might circumvent some of their inherent problems in terms of catalysis efficiency, electron transfer, environmental stability, and cost effectiveness. Also, sandwiched electrochemical immunoassays have been successfully conducted using GOCNT-Pt as enzymatic tags. Such a fabrication avenue of noble metal nanocatalysts loaded on well-dispersed conductive carbon supports should be tailored for the design of different enzyme mimics promising the extensive catalysis applications in environmental, medical, industrial, and particularly aqueous biosensing fields.A powerful enzymatic mimetic has been fabricated by employing graphene oxide (GO) nanocolloids to disperse conductive carbon supports of hydrophobic carbon nanotubes (CNTs) before and after the loading of Pt nanocatalysts. The resulting GOCNT-Pt nanocomposites could present improved aqueous dispersion stability and Pt spatial distribution. Unexpectedly, they could show greatly enhanced peroxidase-like catalysis and electrocatalysis activities in water, as evidenced in the colorimetric and electrochemical investigations in comparison to some inorganic nanocatalysts commonly used. Moreover, it is found that the new enzyme mimetics could exhibit peroxidase-like catalysis activity comparable to natural

  5. Hemozymes peroxidase activity of artificial hemoproteins constructed from the Streptomyces lividans xylanase A and iron(III)-carboxy-substituted porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Ricoux, Rémy; Dubuc, Roger; Dupont, Claude; Marechal, Jean-Didier; Martin, Aurore; Sellier, Marion; Mahy, Jean-Pierre

    2008-04-01

    To develop artificial hemoproteins that could lead to new selective oxidation biocatalysts, a strategy based on the insertion of various iron-porphyrin cofactors into Xylanase A (Xln10A) was chosen. This protein has a globally positive charge and a wide enough active site to accommodate metalloporphyrins that possess negatively charged substituents such as microperoxidase 8 (MP8), iron(III)-tetra-alpha4-ortho-carboxyphenylporphyrin (Fe(ToCPP)), and iron(III)-tetra-para-carboxyphenylporphyrin (Fe(TpCPP)). Coordination chemistry of the iron atom and molecular modeling studies showed that only Fe(TpCPP) was able to insert deeply into Xln10A, with a KD value of about 0.5 microM. Accordingly, Fe(TpCPP)-Xln10A bound only one imidazole molecule, whereas Fe(TpCPP) free in solution was able to bind two, and the UV-visible spectrum of the Fe(TpCPP)-Xln10A-imidazole complex suggested the binding of an amino acid of the protein on the iron atom, trans to the imidazole. Fe(TpCPP)-Xln10A was found to have peroxidase activity, as it was able to catalyze the oxidation of typical peroxidase cosubstrates such as guaiacol and o-dianisidine by H2O2. With these two cosubstrates, the KM value measured with the Fe(TpCPP)-Xln10A complex was higher than those values observed with free Fe(TpCPP), probably because of the steric hindrance and the increased hydrophobicity caused by the protein around the iron atom of the porphyrin. The peroxidase activity was inhibited by imidazole, and a study of the pH dependence of the oxidation of o-dianisidine suggested that an amino acid with a pKA of around 7.5 was participating in the catalysis. Finally, a very interesting protective effect against oxidative degradation of the porphyrin was provided by the protein. PMID:18324756

  6. Structure-activity relationships for chemical and glutathione S-transferase-catalysed glutathione conjugation reactions of a series of 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Aar, E M; Bouwman, T; Commandeur, J N; Vermeulen, N P

    1996-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute an important class of phase II (de)toxifying enzymes, catalysing the conjugation of glutathione (GSH) with electrophilic compounds. In the present study, Km, kcat and kcat/Km values for the rat GST 1-1-, 3-3-, 4-4- and 7-7-catalysed conjugation reactions between GSH and a series of 10 different 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes, and the second-order rate constants (ks) of the corresponding base-catalysed reactions, were correlated with nine classical physicochemical parameters (electronic, steric and lipophilic) of the substituents and with 16 computer-calculated molecular parameters of the substrates and of the corresponding Meisenheimer complexes with MeS- as a model nucleophile for GS- (charge distributions and several energy values), giving structure-activity relationships. On the basis of an identical dependence of the base-catalysed as well as the GST 1-1- and GST 7-7-catalysed reactions on electronic parameters (among others, Hammett substituent constant sigma p and charge on p-nitro substituents), and the finding that the corresponding reactions catalysed by GSTs 3-3 and 4-4 depend to a significantly lesser extent on these parameters, it was concluded that the Mu-class GST isoenzymes have a rate-determining transition state in the conjugation reaction between 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes and GSH which is different from that of the other two GSTs. Several alternative rate-limiting transition states for GST 3-3 and 4-4 are discussed. Furthermore, based on the obtained structure-activity relationships, it was possible to predict the kcat/Km values of the four GST isoenzymes and the ks of the base-catalysed GSH conjugation of 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzene. PMID:8973562

  7. Multifunctional Janus hematite-silica nanoparticles: mimicking peroxidase-like activity and sensitive colorimetric detection of glucose.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chang; Liu, Xiangjiang; Li, Yunfeng; Yu, Fang; Tang, Longhua; Hu, Yanjie; Ying, Yibin

    2015-07-22

    The design and engineering of multifunctional nanostructures with multiple components and synergistic properties are in urgent demand for variety of acceptable biosensing platforms, enabling users to fulfill multiple tasks in a single nanosystem. Herein, we report using an asymmetric hematite-silica hybrid of Janus γ-Fe2O3/SiO2 nanoparticles (JFSNs) as a multifunctional biosensing platform for sensitive colorimetric detection of H2O2 and glucose. It was demonstrated that JFSNs exhibit an intrinsic peroxidase-like catalytic activity. Compared with natural enzyme, JFSNs nanoenzymes could be used over a wider range of pH and temperatures and were more stable over time. Importantly, besides its excellent catalytic activity, the asymmetric properties of the Janus nanoparticle enable it to form the multiple functional utilities for various biosensing applications, including the ease of surface modification without deactivation of catalytic activity and recoverable use by magnetic separation. Thus, we utilized JFSNs with glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilization for glucose-sensitive colorimetric detection, which exhibited both catalytic activity of glucose oxidase and peroxidase with high selectivity and acceptable reproducibility. By combining these two analysis systems into Janus particles, an all-in-one and reusable sensor for blood glucose was formed and has the capability for determination of glucose in complex samples such as serum. These results suggest that such Janus nanosystems have the potential to construct robust nanoarchitecture with multiple functionalities for various biosensing applications. PMID:26110779

  8. Three-Dimensional Graphene Supported Bimetallic Nanocomposites with DNA Regulated-Flexibly Switchable Peroxidase-Like Activity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fang; Zhao, Huimin; Zang, Hongmei; Ye, Fei; Quan, Xie

    2016-04-20

    A synergistic bimetallic enzyme mimetic catalyst, three-dimensional (3D) graphene/Fe3O4-AuNPs, was successfully fabricated which exhibited flexibly switchable peroxidase-like activity. Compared to the traditional 2D graphene-based monometallic composite, the introduced 3D structure, which was induced by the addition of glutamic acid, and bimetallic anchoring approach dramatically improved the catalytic activity, as well as the catalysis velocity and its affinity for substrate. Herein, Fe3O4NPs acted as supporters for AuNPs, which contributed to enhance the efficiency of electron transfer. On the basis of the measurement of Mott-Schottky plots of graphene and metal anchored hybrids, the catalysis mechanism was elucidated by the decrease of Fermi level resulted from the chemical doping behavior. Notably, the catalytic activity was able to be regulated by the adsorption and desorption of single-stranded DNA molecules, which laid a basis for its utilization in the construction of single-stranded DNA-based colorimetric biosensors. This strategy not only simplified the operation process including labeling, modification, and imprinting, but also protected the intrinsic affinity between the target and biological probe. Accordingly, based on the peroxidase-like activity and its controllability, our prepared nanohybrids was successfully adopted in the visualized and label-free sensing detections of glucose, sequence-specific DNA, mismatched nucleotides, and oxytetracycline. PMID:27018504

  9. Glutathione depletion impairs transcriptional activation of heat shock genes in primary cultures of guinea pig gastric mucosal cells.

    PubMed

    Rokutan, K; Hirakawa, T; Teshima, S; Honda, S; Kishi, K

    1996-05-15

    When primary cultures of guinea pig gastric mucosal cells were exposed to heat (43 degree C), ethanol, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), or diamide, heat shock proteins (HSP90, HSP70, HSP60, and HSC73) were rapidly synthesized. The extent of each HSP induction varied with the type of stress. Ethanol, H2O2, and diamide increased the syntheses of several other undefined proteins besides the HSPs. However, none of these proteins were induced by exposure to heat or the reagents, when intracellular glutathione was depleted to <10% of the control level by pretreatment with DL-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine. Gel mobility shift assay using a synthetic oligonucleotide coding HSP70 heat shock element showed that glutathione depletion inhibited the heat- and the reagent-initiated activation of the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and did not promote the expression of HSP70 mRNA. Immunoblot analysis with antiserum against HSF1 demonstrated that the steady-state level of HSF1 was not changed in glutathione-depleted cells, but glutathione depletion inhibited the nuclear translocation of HSF1 after exposure to heat stress. These results suggest that intracellular glutathione may support early and important biochemical events in the acquisition by gastric mucosal cells of an adaptive response to irritants. PMID:8636403

  10. Structural Re-arrangement and Peroxidase Activation of Cytochrome c by Anionic Analogues of Vitamin E, Tocopherol Succinate and Tocopherol Phosphate*

    PubMed Central

    Yanamala, Naveena; Kapralov, Alexander A.; Djukic, Mirjana; Peterson, Jim; Mao, Gaowei; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Stoyanovsky, Detcho A.; Stursa, Jan; Neuzil, Jiri; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome c is a multifunctional hemoprotein in the mitochondrial intermembrane space whereby its participation in electron shuttling between respiratory complexes III and IV is alternative to its role in apoptosis as a peroxidase activated by interaction with cardiolipin (CL), and resulting in selective CL peroxidation. The switch from electron transfer to peroxidase function requires partial unfolding of the protein upon binding of CL, whose specific features combine negative charges of the two phosphate groups with four hydrophobic fatty acid residues. Assuming that other endogenous small molecule ligands with a hydrophobic chain and a negatively charged functionality may activate cytochrome c into a peroxidase, we investigated two hydrophobic anionic analogues of vitamin E, α-tocopherol succinate (α-TOS) and α-tocopherol phosphate (α-TOP), as potential inducers of peroxidase activity of cytochrome c. NMR studies and computational modeling indicate that they interact with cytochrome c at similar sites previously proposed for CL. Absorption spectroscopy showed that both analogues effectively disrupt the Fe-S(Met80) bond associated with unfolding of cytochrome c. We found that α-TOS and α-TOP stimulate peroxidase activity of cytochrome c. Enhanced peroxidase activity was also observed in isolated rat liver mitochondria incubated with α-TOS and tBOOH. A mitochondria-targeted derivative of TOS, triphenylphosphonium-TOS (mito-VES), was more efficient in inducing H2O2-dependent apoptosis in mouse embryonic cytochrome c+/+ cells than in cytochrome c−/− cells. Essential for execution of the apoptotic program peroxidase activation of cytochrome c by α-TOS may contribute to its known anti-cancer pharmacological activity. PMID:25278024

  11. Elevated ROS-scavenging enzymes contribute to acclimation to UV-B exposure in transplastomic tobacco plants, reducing the role of plastid peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Czégény, Gyula; Le Martret, Bénédicte; Pávkovics, Dóra; Dix, Philip J; Hideg, Éva

    2016-08-20

    Leaf peroxidases play a key role in the successful acclimation of plants to low UV-B doses. The aim of the present study was to examine whether selective enhancement of alternative chloroplast antioxidant pathways achieved by chloroplast transformation affected the need for peroxidase defense. Transplastomic tobacco lines expressing glutathione reductase in combination with either dehydroascorbate reductase or glutathione-S-transferase in their plastids exhibited better tolerance to supplemental UV-B than wild type plants. After 10days UV treatment, both the maximum and effective quantum yields of PSII decreased in the wild type by 10% but were unaffected in either of the transformed lines. Activities of total peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase, in addition to dehydroascorbate reductase and gluthatione-S-transferase, were increased by UV in all lines. Gluthatione reductase activity was unaffected by UV in the transplastomic line engineered to have a higher constitutive level of this enzyme, but increased in the two other genotypes. However, the observed more successful acclimation required less activation of peroxidases in the doubly transformed plants than in the wild type and less increase in non-enzymatic hydroxyl radical neutralization in the dehydroascorbate reductase plus glutathione reductase fortified plants than in either of the other lines. These results highlight the fundamental role of efficient glutathione, and especially ascorbate, recycling in the chloroplast in response to exposure of plants to UV-B. They also identify chloroplast localized peroxidases among the large variety of leaf peroxidases as essential elements of defense, supporting our earlier hypothesis on hydrogen peroxide UV-B photo-cleavage as the primary mechanism behind damage. PMID:27448725

  12. Prolactin confers resistance against cisplatin in breast cancer cells by activating glutathione-S-transferase.

    PubMed

    LaPensee, Elizabeth W; Schwemberger, Sandy J; LaPensee, Christopher R; Bahassi, El Mustapha; Afton, Scott E; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2009-08-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle for successful treatment of breast cancer patients. Given that prolactin (PRL) acts as an anti-apoptotic/survival factor in the breast, we postulated that it antagonizes cytotoxicity by chemotherapeutic drugs. Treatment of breast cancer cells with PRL caused variable resistance to taxol, vinblastine, doxorubicin and cisplatin. PRL prevented cisplatin-induced G(2)/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In the presence of PRL, significantly less cisplatin was bound to DNA, as determined by mass spectroscopy, and little DNA damage was seen by gamma-H2AX staining. PRL dramatically increased the activity of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), which sequesters cisplatin in the cytoplasm; this increase was abrogated by Jak and mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors. PRL upregulated the expression of the GSTmu, but not the pi, isozyme. A GST inhibitor abrogated antagonism of cisplatin cytotoxicity by PRL. In conclusion, PRL confers resistance against cisplatin by activating a detoxification enzyme, thereby reducing drug entry into the nucleus. These data provide a rational explanation for the ineffectiveness of cisplatin in breast cancer, which is characterized by high expression of both PRL and its receptor. Suppression of PRL production or blockade of its actions should benefit patients undergoing chemotherapy by allowing for lower drug doses and expanded drug options. PMID:19443905

  13. Combined effect of Cd and Pb spiked field soils on bioaccumulation, DNA damage, and peroxidase activities in Trifolium repens.

    PubMed

    Lanier, C; Bernard, F; Dumez, S; Leclercq, J; Lemière, S; Vandenbulcke, F; Nesslany, F; Platel, A; Devred, I; Cuny, D; Deram, A

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the combined effects of Cd and Pb on accumulation and genotoxic potential in white clover (Trifolium repens). For this purpose, T. repens was exposed to contaminated soils (2.5-20 mg kg(-1) cadmium (Cd), 250-2000 mg kg(-1) lead (Pb) and a mixture of these two heavy metals) for 3, 10 and 56 days. The resulting bioaccumulation of Cd and Pb, DNA damage (comet assay) and peroxidase activities (APOX and GPOX) were determined. The exposure time is a determinant factor in experiments designed to measure the influence of heavy metal contamination. The accumulation of Cd or Pb resulting from exposure to the two-metal mixture does not appear to depend significantly on whether the white clover is exposed to soil containing one heavy metal or both. However, when T. repens is exposed to a Cd/Pb mixture, the percentage of DNA damage is lower than when the plant is exposed to monometallic Cd. DNA damage is close to that observed in the case of monometallic Pb exposure. Peroxidase activity cannot be associated with DNA damage under these experimental conditions. PMID:26396009

  14. Isoniazid-resistance conferring mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis KatG: Catalase, peroxidase, and INH-NADH adduct formation activities

    PubMed Central

    Cade, Christine E; Dlouhy, Adrienne C; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Salas-Castillo, Saida Patricia; Ghiladi, Reza A

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalase-peroxidase (KatG) is a bifunctional hemoprotein that has been shown to activate isoniazid (INH), a pro-drug that is integral to frontline antituberculosis treatments. The activated species, presumed to be an isonicotinoyl radical, couples to NAD+/NADH forming an isoniazid-NADH adduct that ultimately confers anti-tubercular activity. To better understand the mechanisms of isoniazid activation as well as the origins of KatG-derived INH-resistance, we have compared the catalytic properties (including the ability to form the INH-NADH adduct) of the wild-type enzyme to 23 KatG mutants which have been associated with isoniazid resistance in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. Neither catalase nor peroxidase activities, the two inherent enzymatic functions of KatG, were found to correlate with isoniazid resistance. Furthermore, catalase function was lost in mutants which lacked the Met-Tyr-Trp crosslink, the biogenic cofactor in KatG which has been previously shown to be integral to this activity. The presence or absence of the crosslink itself, however, was also found to not correlate with INH resistance. The KatG resistance-conferring mutants were then assayed for their ability to generate the INH-NADH adduct in the presence of peroxide (t-BuOOH and H2O2), superoxide, and no exogenous oxidant (air-only background control). The results demonstrate that residue location plays a critical role in determining INH-resistance mechanisms associated with INH activation; however, different mutations at the same location can produce vastly different reactivities that are oxidant-specific. Furthermore, the data can be interpreted to suggest the presence of a second mechanism of INH-resistance that is not correlated with the formation of the INH-NADH adduct. PMID:20054829

  15. A cytochrome c peroxidase from Pseudomonas nautica 617 active at high ionic strength: expression, purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Alves, T; Besson, S; Duarte, L C; Pettigrew, G W; Girio, F M; Devreese, B; Vandenberghe, I; Van Beeumen, J; Fauque, G; Moura, I

    1999-10-12

    Cytochrome c peroxidase was expressed in cells of Pseudomonas nautica strain 617 grown under microaerophilic conditions. The 36.5 kDa dihaemic enzyme was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity in three chromatographic steps. N-terminal sequence comparison showed that the Ps. nautica enzyme exhibits a high similarity with the corresponding proteins from Paracoccus denitrificans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. UV-visible spectra confirm calcium activation of the enzyme through spin state transition of the peroxidatic haem. Monohaemic cytochrome c(552) from Ps. nautica was identified as the physiological electron donor, with a half-saturating concentration of 122 microM and allowing a maximal catalytic centre activity of 116,000 min(-1). Using this cytochrome the enzyme retained the same activity even at high ionic strength. There are indications that the interactions between the two redox partners are mainly hydrophobic in nature. PMID:10525144

  16. Bio-based Wrinkled Surfaces Harnessed from Biological Design Principles of Wood and Peroxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Hironori; Okuda, Noriko; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Morimoto, Minoru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Rojas, Orlando J

    2015-11-01

    A new and simple approach for surface wrinkling inspired by polymer assemblies in wood fibers is introduced. A hard skin is synthesized on a linear polysaccharide support that resembles the structural units of the cell wall. This skin, a wood mimetic layer, is produced through immersion in a solution containing phenolic precursor and subsequent surface reaction by horseradish peroxidase. A patterned surface with micron-scale wrinkles is formed upon drying and as a result of inhomogeneous shrinkage. We demonstrate that the design of the wrinkled surfaces can be controlled by the molecular structure of the phenolic precursor, temperature, and drying stress. It is noteworthy that this is a totally bio-based system involving green materials and processes. PMID:26489384

  17. The circadian clock regulates rhythmic activation of the NRF2/glutathione-mediated antioxidant defense pathway to modulate pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pekovic-Vaughan, Vanja; Gibbs, Julie; Yoshitane, Hikari; Yang, Nan; Pathiranage, Dharshika; Guo, Baoqiang; Sagami, Aya; Taguchi, Keiko; Bechtold, David; Loudon, Andrew; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Chan, Jefferson; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Fukada, Yoshitaka; Meng, Qing-Jun

    2014-03-15

    The disruption of the NRF2 (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2)/glutathione-mediated antioxidant defense pathway is a critical step in the pathogenesis of several chronic pulmonary diseases and cancer. While the mechanism of NRF2 activation upon oxidative stress has been widely investigated, little is known about the endogenous signals that regulate the NRF2 pathway in lung physiology and pathology. Here we show that an E-box-mediated circadian rhythm of NRF2 protein is essential in regulating the rhythmic expression of antioxidant genes involved in glutathione redox homeostasis in the mouse lung. Using an in vivo bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis model, we reveal a clock "gated" pulmonary response to oxidative injury, with a more severe fibrotic effect when bleomycin was applied at a circadian nadir in NRF2 levels. Timed administration of sulforaphane, an NRF2 activator, significantly blocked this phenotype. Moreover, in the lungs of the arrhythmic Clock(Δ19) mice, the levels of NRF2 and the reduced glutathione are constitutively low, associated with increased protein oxidative damage and a spontaneous fibrotic-like pulmonary phenotype. Our findings reveal a pivotal role for the circadian control of the NRF2/glutathione pathway in combating oxidative/fibrotic lung damage, which might prompt new chronotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of human lung diseases, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24637114

  18. The circadian clock regulates rhythmic activation of the NRF2/glutathione-mediated antioxidant defense pathway to modulate pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Pekovic-Vaughan, Vanja; Gibbs, Julie; Yoshitane, Hikari; Yang, Nan; Pathiranage, Dharshika; Guo, Baoqiang; Sagami, Aya; Taguchi, Keiko; Bechtold, David; Loudon, Andrew; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Chan, Jefferson; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T.J.; Fukada, Yoshitaka; Meng, Qing-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The disruption of the NRF2 (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2)/glutathione-mediated antioxidant defense pathway is a critical step in the pathogenesis of several chronic pulmonary diseases and cancer. While the mechanism of NRF2 activation upon oxidative stress has been widely investigated, little is known about the endogenous signals that regulate the NRF2 pathway in lung physiology and pathology. Here we show that an E-box-mediated circadian rhythm of NRF2 protein is essential in regulating the rhythmic expression of antioxidant genes involved in glutathione redox homeostasis in the mouse lung. Using an in vivo bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis model, we reveal a clock “gated” pulmonary response to oxidative injury, with a more severe fibrotic effect when bleomycin was applied at a circadian nadir in NRF2 levels. Timed administration of sulforaphane, an NRF2 activator, significantly blocked this phenotype. Moreover, in the lungs of the arrhythmic ClockΔ19 mice, the levels of NRF2 and the reduced glutathione are constitutively low, associated with increased protein oxidative damage and a spontaneous fibrotic-like pulmonary phenotype. Our findings reveal a pivotal role for the circadian control of the NRF2/glutathione pathway in combating oxidative/fibrotic lung damage, which might prompt new chronotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of human lung diseases, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24637114

  19. Site-directed mutagenesis of tobacco anionic peroxidase: Effect of additional aromatic amino acids on stability and activity.

    PubMed

    Poloznikov, A A; Zakharova, G S; Chubar, T A; Hushpulian, D M; Tishkov, V I; Gazaryan, I G

    2015-08-01

    Tobacco anionic peroxidase (TOP) is known to effectively catalyze luminol oxidation without enhancers, in contrast to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). To pursue structure-activity relationship studies for TOP, two amino acids have been chosen for mutation, namely Thr151, close to the heme plane, and Phe140 at the entrance to the active site pocket. Three mutant forms TOP F140Y, T151W and F140Y/T151W have been expressed in Escherichia coli, and reactivated to yield active enzymes. Single-point mutations introducing additional aromatic amino acid residues at the surface of TOP exhibit a significant effect on the enzyme catalytic activity and stability as judged by the results of steady-state and transient kinetics studies. TOP T151W is up to 4-fold more active towards a number of aromatic substrates including luminol, whereas TOP F140Y is 2-fold more stable against thermal inactivation and 8-fold more stable in the reaction course. These steady-state observations have been rationalized with the help of transient kinetic studies on the enzyme reaction with hydrogen peroxide in a single turnover regime. The stopped-flow data reveal (a) an increased stability of F140Y Compound I towards hydrogen peroxide, and thus, a higher operational stability as compared to the wild-type enzyme, and (b) a lesser leakage of oxidative equivalents from TOP T151W Compound I resulting in the increased catalytic activity. The results obtained show that TOP unique properties can be further improved for practical applications by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:25957835

  20. Depollution potential of three macrophytes: exudated, wall-bound and intracellular peroxidase activities plus intracellular phenol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Larue, Camille; Korboulewsky, Nathalie; Wang, Runying; Mévy, Jean-Philippe

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of three macrophyte species (Iris pseudacorus, Typha latifolia and Phragmites australis) for detoxication of xenobiotics, and to study their variations with seasons or concentrations of sewage sludge from the food industry. For this purpose, some aspects of the green liver concept were explored through peroxidase measurements in three compartments in roots: intracellular, cell wall and extracellular. In addition, phenol concentrations were also measured in order to assess heavy metal detoxication potential. Enzyme activities and phenol concentrations were overall lower in winter according to the phenological stages and some sludge effects occurred. Results show that P. australis roots exuded and contained more peroxidase in all seasons: 17 U/g (1373 U/g protein), 0.8 U/g (613 U/g protein) and 4.8 U/g (1329 U/g protein) in intracellular compartments, cell wall and exudates, respectively. In contrast, the highest phenol concentration was found in I. pseudacorus roots: 3.58 mg eq. [corrected] gallic acid/g. Hence, in constructed wetlands, P. australis is suitable for organic waste water treatment, while I. pseudacorus should be used in the case of waters highly charged with heavy metals. PMID:20570142

  1. Association of mercury and selenium with altered glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress in diving ducks from the San Francisco Bay region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Ohlendorf, H.M.; Marn, C.M.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1998-01-01

    Adult male greater scaup (Aythya marila) (GS), surf scoters (Melanitta perspicillata)(SS), and ruddy ducks (Oxyura jamaicensis) (RD) were collected from Suisun Bay and coastal Tomales Bay in the greater San Francisco Bay area to assess exposure to inorganic contaminants. Hepatic selenium (Se) concentrations were highest in GS (geometric mean = 67 ppm, dw) and SS (119 ppm) in Suisun Bay, whereas hepatic mercury (Hg) was highest (19 ppm) in GS and SS from Tomales Bay. Hepatic Se and Hg were lower in RD and did not differ between locations. Hepatic supernatants were assayed for enzymes related to glutathione metabolism and antioxidant activity including: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-peroxidase), glutathione reductase (GSSG-reductase), and glutathione-S-transferase (GSH-transferase). GSH-peroxidase activity was higher in SS and RD, and G-6-PDH higher in GS and SS from Suisun Bay than Tomales Bay. GSSG-reductase was higher in SS from Suisun Bay. The ratio of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) was greater in all species from Tomales Bay. The following significant relationships were found in one or more species with increasing hepatic Hg concentration: lower body, liver and heart weights; decreased hepatic GSH concentration, G-6-PDH and GSH-peroxidase activities; increased ratio of GSSG to GSH, and increased GSSG-reductase activity. With increasing hepatic Se concentration, GSH-peroxidase increased but GSH decreased. It is concluded that measurement of associated enzymes in conjunction with thiol status may be a useful bioindicator to discriminate between Hg and Se effects. Concentrations of mercury and selenium and variable affected have been associated with adverse effects on reproduction and neurological function in experimental studies with mallards.

  2. Peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles stabilized by hyperbranched polyglycidol derivatives over a wide pH range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, Marcin; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Parzuchowski, Paweł; Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, Marta; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to carry out comparative studies on the peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) stabilized with low molecular weight hyperbranched polyglycidol (HBPG-OH) and its derivative modified with maleic acid residues (HBPG-COOH). The influence of the stabilizer to gold precursor ratio on the size and morphology of nanoparticles obtained was checked, and prepared nanoparticles were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results indicated the divergent effect of increasing the concentration of stabilizers (HBPG-OH or HBPG-COOH) on the size of the nanostructures obtained. The gold nanoparticles obtained were characterized as having intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and the mechanism of catalysis in acidic and alkaline mediums was consistent with the standard Michaelis-Menten kinetics, revealing a strong affinity of AuNPs with 2, 2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 3, 3‧, 5, 5‧-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), and significantly lower affinity towards phenol. By comparing the kinetic parameters, a negligible effect of polymeric ligand charge on activity against various types of substrates (anionic or cationic) was indicated. The superiority of steric stabilization via the application of tested low-weight hyperbranched polymers over typical stabilizers in preventing salt-induced aggregation and maintaining high catalytic activity in time was proved. The applied hyperbranched stabilizers provide a good tool for manufacturing gold-based nanozymes, which are highly stable and active over a wide pH range.

  3. Immunohistochemical localization and activity of glutathione transferase zeta (GSTZ1-1) in rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Lantum, Hoffman B M; Baggs, Raymond B; Krenitsky, Daria M; Board, Philip G; Anders, M W

    2002-06-01

    Glutathione transferase zeta (GSTZ1-1) catalyzes the biotransformation of a range of alpha-haloacids, including dichloroacetic acid (DCA), and the penultimate step in the tyrosine degradation pathway. DCA is a rodent carcinogen and a common drinking water contaminant. DCA also causes multiorgan toxicity in rodents and dogs. The objective of this study was to determine the expression and activities of GSTZ1-1 in rat tissues with maleylacetone and chlorofluoroacetic acid as substrates. GSTZ1-1 protein was detected in most tissues by immunoblot analysis after immunoprecipitation of GSTZ1-1 and by immunohistochemical analysis; intense staining was observed in the liver, testis, and prostate; moderate staining was observed in the brain, heart, pancreatic islets, adrenal medulla, and the epithelial lining of the gastrointestinal tract, airways, and bladder; and sparse staining was observed in the renal juxtaglomerular regions, skeletal muscle, and peripheral nerve tissue. These patterns of expression corresponded to GSTZ1-1 activities in the different tissues with maleylacetone and chlorofluoroacetic acid as substrates. Specific activities ranged from 258 +/- 17 (liver) to 1.1 +/- 0.4 (muscle) nmol/min/mg of protein with maleylacetone as substrate and from 4.6 +/- 0.89 (liver) to 0.09 +/- 0.01 (kidney) nmol/min/mg of protein with chlorofluoroacetic acid as substrate. Rats given DCA had reduced amounts of immunoreactive GSTZ1-1 protein and activities of GSTZ1-1 in most tissues, especially in the liver. These findings indicate that the DCA-induced inactivation of GSTZ1-1 in different tissues may result in multiorgan disorders that may be associated with perturbed tyrosine metabolism. PMID:12019185

  4. CHANGES IN GLUTATHIONE SYSTEM AND LIPID PEROXIDATION IN RAT BLOOD DURING THE FIRST HOUR AFTER CHLORPYRIFOS EXPOSURE.

    PubMed

    Rosalovsky, V P; Grabovska, S V; Salyha, Yu T

    2015-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a highly toxic organophosphate compound, widely used as an active substance of many insecticides. Along with the anticholinesterase action, CPF may affect other biochemical mechanisms, particularly through disrupting pro- and antioxidant balance and inducing free-radical oxidative stress. Origins and occurrence of these phenomena are still not fully understood. The aim of our work was to investigate the effects of chlorpyrifos on key parameters of glutathione system and on lipid peroxidation in rat blood in the time dynamics during one hour after exposure. We found that a single exposure to 50 mg/kg chlorpyrifos caused a linear decrease in butyryl cholinesterase activity, increased activity of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase, alterations in the levels of glutathione, TBA-active products and lipid hydroperoxides during 1 hour after poisoning. The most significant changes in studied parameters were detected at the 15-30th minutes after chlorpyrifos exposure. PMID:26717603

  5. The glutathione synthesis inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine synergistically enhanced melphalan activity against preclinical models of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Tagde, A; Singh, H; Kang, M H; Reynolds, C P

    2014-01-01

    Melphalan (L-PAM) has been an integral part of multiple myeloma (MM) treatment as a conditioning regimen before stem cell transplant (SCT). After initial response, most treated patients experience relapse with an aggressive phenotype. Increased glutathione (GSH) in MM may mediate resistance to L-PAM. We demonstrated that the GSH synthesis inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) synergistically enhanced L-PAM activity (inducing 2-4 logs of cell kill) against nine MM cell lines (also in the presence of marrow stroma or cytokines) and in seven primary MM samples (combination indices <1.0). In MM cell lines, BSO significantly (P<0.05) depleted GSH, increased L-PAM-induced single-strand DNA breaks, mitochondrial depolarization, caspase cleavage and apoptosis. L-PAM depleted GSH, but GSH rapidly recovered in a L-PAM-resistant MM cell line unless also treated with BSO. Treatment with N-acetylcysteine antagonized BSO+L-PAM cytotoxicity without increasing GSH. In human MM xenografted into beige-nude-xid mice, BSO significantly depleted MM intracellular GSH and significantly increased apoptosis compared with L-PAM alone. BSO+L-PAM achieved complete responses (CRs) in three MM xenograft models including maintained CRs >100 days, and significantly increased the median event-free survival relative to L-PAM alone. Combining BSO with L-PAM warrants clinical testing in advanced MM. PMID:25036800

  6. Metals content of Glossoscolex paulistus extracellular hemoglobin: Its peroxidase activity and the importance of these ions in the protein stability.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Celia S; Biazin, Ezer; Carvalho, Francisco A O; Tabak, Marcel; Bachega, José F R

    2016-08-01

    In this work we investigate the presence of divalent cations bound to the Glossoscolex paulistus (HbGp) hemoglobin and their effect over the protein stability and the peroxidase (POD) activity. Atomic absorption studies show that the HbGp iron content is consistent with the presence of 144 ions per protein. Moreover, using iron as a reference, the content of calcium was estimated as 30±4 ions per protein, independently of the EDTA pre-treatment or not prior to the acidic treatment performed in the protein digestion. The zinc content was 14±2 ions in the absence of EDTA pre-treatment, and 3±1 ions per protein in the presence of EDTA pre-treatment, implying the presence of one zinc ion per protomer (1/12 of the whole molecule). Finally, the copper concentration is negligible. Different from the vertebrate hemoglobins, where the effectors are usually organic anions, the hexagonal bilayer hemoglobins have as effectors inorganic cations that increase the oxygen affinity and stabilize the structure. Previous studies have suggested that the presence of divalent cations, such as copper and zinc, is related to the different types of antioxidant enzymatic activities as the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity shown by giant hemoglobin from Lumbricus terrestris (HbLt). Recently, studies on HbGp crystal structure have confirmed the presence of Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) binding sites. The Ca(2+) sites are similar as observed in the HbLt crystal structure. Otherwise, the Zn(2+) sites have no relation with those observed in Cu/Zn SODs. Our peroxidase assays with guaiacol confirm the POD activity and the effect of the zinc ions for HbGp. Our present results on HbGp metal content and their stability effects is the first step to understand the role of these cations in HbGp function in the future. PMID:27221949

  7. Activation of family C G-protein-coupled receptors by the tripeptide glutathione.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minghua; Yao, Yi; Kuang, Donghui; Hampson, David R

    2006-03-31

    The Family C G-protein-coupled receptors include the metabotropic glutamate receptors, the gamma-aminobutyric acid, type B (GABAB) receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), which participates in the regulation of calcium homeostasis in the body, and a diverse group of sensory receptors that encompass the amino acid-activated fish 5.24 chemosensory receptor, the mammalian T1R taste receptors, and the V2R pheromone receptors. A common feature of Family C receptors is the presence of an amino acid binding site. In this study, a preliminary in silico analysis of the size and shape of the amino acid binding pocket in selected Family C receptors suggested that some members of this family could accommodate larger ligands such as peptides. Subsequent screening and docking experiments identified GSH as a potential ligand or co-ligand at the fish 5.24 receptor and the rat CaSR. These in silico predictions were confirmed using an [3H]GSH radioligand binding assay and a fluorescence-based functional assay performed on wild-type and chimeric receptors. Glutathione was shown to act as an orthosteric agonist at the 5.24 receptor and as a potent enhancer of calcium-induced activation of the CaSR. Within the mammalian receptors, this effect was specific to the CaSR because GSH neither directly activated nor potentiated other Family C receptors including GPRC6A (the putative mammalian homolog of the fish 5.24 receptor), the metabotropic glutamate receptors, or the GABAB receptor. Our findings reveal a potential new role for GSH and suggest that this peptide may act as an endogenous modulator of the CaSR in the parathyroid gland where this receptor is known to control the release of parathyroid hormone, and in other tissues such as the brain and gastrointestinal tract where the role of the calcium receptor appears to subserve other, as yet unknown, physiological functions. PMID:16455645

  8. Insight into the mechanism revealing the peroxidase mimetic catalytic activity of quaternary CuZnFeS nanocrystals: colorimetric biosensing of hydrogen peroxide and glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalui, Amit; Pradhan, Bapi; Thupakula, Umamahesh; Khan, Ali Hossain; Kumar, Gundam Sandeep; Ghosh, Tanmay; Satpati, Biswarup; Acharya, Somobrata

    2015-05-01

    Artificial enzyme mimetics have attracted immense interest recently because natural enzymes undergo easy denaturation under environmental conditions restricting practical usefulness. We report for the first time chalcopyrite CuZnFeS (CZIS) alloyed nanocrystals (NCs) as novel biomimetic catalysts with efficient intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. Novel peroxidase activities of CZIS NCs have been evaluated by catalytic oxidation of the peroxidase substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). CZIS NCs demonstrate the synergistic effect of elemental composition and photoactivity towards peroxidase-like activity. The quaternary CZIS NCs show enhanced intrinsic peroxidase-like activity compared to the binary NCs with the same constituent elements. Intrinsic peroxidase-like activity has been correlated with the energy band position of CZIS NCs extracted using scanning tunneling spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Kinetic analyses indicate Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetic model catalytic behavior describing the rate of the enzymatic reaction by correlating the reaction rate with substrate concentration. Typical color reactions arising from the catalytic oxidation of TMB over CZIS NCs with H2O2 have been utilized to establish a simple and sensitive colorimetric assay for detection of H2O2 and glucose. CZIS NCs are recyclable catalysts showing high efficiency in multiple uses. Our study may open up the possibility of designing new photoactive multi-component alloyed NCs as enzyme mimetics in biotechnology applications.Artificial enzyme mimetics have attracted immense interest recently because natural enzymes undergo easy denaturation under environmental conditions restricting practical usefulness. We report for the first time chalcopyrite CuZnFeS (CZIS) alloyed nanocrystals (NCs) as novel biomimetic catalysts with efficient intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. Novel peroxidase activities of CZIS NCs have been

  9. Glutathione S-transferase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activities in cultured rat hepatocytes treated with tocotrienol and tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Ong, F B; Wan Ngah, W Z; Shamaan, N A; Md Top, A G; Marzuki, A; Khalid, A K

    1993-09-01

    1. The effect of tocotrienol and tocopherol on glutathione S-transferase (GST) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activities in cultured rat hepatocytes were investigated. 2. Tocotrienol and tocopherol significantly decreased GGT activities at 5 days in culture but tocotrienol also significantly decreased GGT activities at 1-2 days. 3. Tocotrienol and tocopherol treatment significantly decreased GST activities at 3 days compared to the control but tocotrienol also decreased GST activities at 1-3 days. 4. Tocotrienol showed a more pronounced effect at a dosage of greater than 50 microM tocotrienol at 1-3 days in culture compared to the control. PMID:7903615

  10. Dynamics of glutathione regulation in Schistosoma mansoni: correlations with the acute effects of oltipraz

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, D.D.

    1984-01-01

    Glutathione is present in adult Schistosoma mansoni (0.336 +/- 0.012 nmol/mg protein) at significantly lower levels than uninfected host tissues (1.051 +/- 0.013 nmol/mg protein, liver; 0.627 +/- 0.013 nmol/mg protein, kidney). Host hepatic glutathione levels decline significantly during the course of infection, while renal cortical glutathione levels are unaffected. Of the enzymes regulating glutathione utilization, glutathione reductase in the male parasite exhibits a specific activity of 10.3 +/- 4.2 nmol/mg protein, 15% of hepatic values. The apparent glutathione S-transferase activity was 26 +/- 7 ..mu..mol conjugate formed/min/mg protein with p-nitrobenzyl chloride as substrate (13% of hepatic values) and 526 +/- 18 ..mu..mol conjugate formed/min/mg protein with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as substrate (43% of hepatic values). Male schistosomes exhibited negligible glutathione peroxidase activity. Oltipraz, an antischistosomal compound, effected a significant depletion of parasite and host glutathione levels within 1 h of exposure in vivo and in vitro (at 250 mg/kg and 10 ..mu..M, respectively). Host tissue glutathionine levels returned to, or above, control levels by 6 h after oltipraz administration, while parasite glutathione levels remained significantly depressed. Uptake of (/sup 35/S) cysteine or (/sup 35/S) cystine by schistosomes was inhibited by oltipraz. However, the drug did not alter the relative distribution of label once incorporated into the parasite, indicating that the enzymes of glutathione synthesis were not directly inhibited.

  11. The catalytic activity of Ag2S-montmorillonites as peroxidase mimetic toward colorimetric detection of H2O2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingyun; Jiang, Yanling; Zhang, Leyou; Zhou, Xinpei; Lv, Xintian; Ding, Yanyuan; Sun, Lifang; Chen, Pengpeng; Yin, Hailiang

    2016-08-01

    Nanocomposites based on silver sulfide (Ag2S) and Ca-montmorillonite (Ca(2+)-MMT) were synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method. The nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR). The as-prepared Ag2S-MMT nanocomposites were firstly demonstrated to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and could rapidly catalytically oxidize the substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H2O2 to produce a blue product which can be seen by the naked eye in only one minute. The experimental results revealed that the Ag2S-MMT nanocomposites exhibit higher thermal durance. Based on the TMB-H2O2 catalyzed color reaction, the Ag2S-MMT nanocomposites were exploited as a new type of biosensor for detection and estimation of H2O2 through a simple, cheap and selective colorimetric method. PMID:27157733

  12. Improvement on the thermal stability and activity of plant cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase 1 by tailing hyper-acidic fusion partners.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengru; Gong, Ming; Yang, Yumei; Li, Xujuan; Wang, Haibo; Zou, Zhurong

    2015-04-01

    Cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase 1 (APX1) plays a crucial role in regulating the level of plant cellular reactive oxygen species and its thermolability is proposed to cause plant heat-susceptibility. Herein, several hyper-acidic fusion partners, such as the C-terminal peptide tails, were evaluated for their effects on the thermal stability and activity of APX1 from Jatropha curcas and Arabidopsis. The hyper-acidic fusion partners efficiently improved the thermostability and prevented thermal inactivation of APX1 in both plant species with an elevated heat tolerance of at least 2 °C. These hyper-acidified thermostable APX1 fusion variants are of considerable biotechnological potential and can provide a new route to enhance the heat tolerance of plant species especially of inherent thermo-sensitivity. PMID:25515798

  13. Regulation of thyroid peroxidase activity by thyrotropin, epidermal growth factor and phorbol ester in porcine thyroid follicles cultured in suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Kikuo; Hiraiwa, Masaki; Emoto, Tatsushi; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Shimoda, Shin-Ichi ); Ohmori, Takeshi; Koizumi, Narumi; Hosoya, Toichiro )

    1989-01-01

    The activity of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) in porcine follicles cultured for 96 h in suspension with five hormones (5H) still attained over 50% of that in the freshly isolated follicles. On the other hand, the activity in those cultured with 5H + TSH (6H) was several times higher than that cultured with 5H after 96 h, although an initial decrease of TPO activity during the first 24 h of culture was observed in both conditions. The ability of follicles to metabolize iodide when cultured with 6H for 96 h was also several times higher than that of those cultured with 5H. The half-maximal dose of TSH for stimulation of TPO activity and iodide metabolism was 0.03 - 0.04 mU/ml and the effect was mediated by cAMP. These results indicate that in porcine thyroid follicles in primary suspension culture, TPO activity as well as the ability of iodide metabolism is induced by chronic TSH stimulation. In addition, epidermal growth factor and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate completely inhibited TSH stimulation on both activities and also basal (5H) activity of iodide metabolism.

  14. Lignin-degrading peroxidases of Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Cai, D; Tien, M

    1993-07-01

    Lignin and manganese peroxidases are secreted by the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium during secondary metabolism. These enzymes play major roles in lignin degradation. The active site amino acid sequence of these lignin-degrading peroxidases is similar to that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP). The mechanism by which they oxidize substrates also appears to be the similar. pH has a similar effect on lignin peroxidase compound I formation as on HRP or CcP; however, the pKa controlling compound I formation for lignin peroxidase appears to be much lower. Lignin-degrading peroxidases are able to catalyze the oxidation of substrates with high redox potential. This unique ability is consistent with a heme active site of low electron density, which is indicated by high redox potential. PMID:7763834

  15. Balneotherapy and platelet glutathione metabolism in type II diabetic patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Agishi, Yuko

    1996-09-01

    Effects of balneotherapy on platelet glutathione metabolism were investigated in 12 type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. Levels of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) on admission were well correlated with those of fasting plasma glucose (FPG; r=0.692, P<0.02). After 4 weeks of balneotherapy, the mean level of GSH showed no changes; however, in well-controlled patients (FPG <150 mg/dl), the level increased ( P<0.01) and in poorly controlled patients (FPG >150 mg/dl), the value decreased ( P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities and the levels of FPG ( r=-0.430, P<0.05). After balneotherapy, the activity increased in 5 patients, decreased in 3 patients and showed no changes (alteration within ±3%) in all the other patients. From these findings in diabetic patients we concluded: (1) platelet GSH synthesis appeared to be induced in response to oxidative stress; (2) lowered GPX activities indicated that the antioxidative defense system was impaired; and (3) platelet glutathione metabolism was partially improved by 4 weeks balneotherapy, an effect thought to be dependent on the control status of plasma glucose levels. It is suggested that balneotherapy is beneficial for patients whose platelet antioxidative defense system is damaged, such as those with diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease.

  16. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  17. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  19. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  20. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864... peroxidase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte peroxidase test is a device used to distinguish certain... peroxidase activity as evidenced by staining. The results of this test are used in the differential...

  1. Access channel residues Ser315 and Asp137 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalase-peroxidase (KatG) control peroxidatic activation of the pro-drug isoniazid

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiangbo; Hersleth, Hans-Petter; Zhu, Janan; Andersson, K. Kristoffer; Magliozzo, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Peroxidatic activation of the anti-tuberculosis pro-drug isoniazid by Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalase-peroxidase (KatG) is regulated by gating residues of a heme access channel. The steric restriction at the bottleneck of this channel is alleviated by replacement of residue Asp137 with Ser, according to crystallographic and kinetic studies. PMID:24185282

  2. [Catalytic activity and the stability of horseradish peroxidase increase as a result of its incorporation into a polyelectrolyte complex with chitosan].

    PubMed

    Veselova, I A; Koreĭko, A V; Shekhovtsova, T N

    2009-01-01

    The incorporation of horseradish peroxidase into polyelectrolyte complexes with chitosans of different molecular weights (MW 5-150 kDa) yielded highly active and stable enzyme preparations. As a result of the selection of optimal conditions for the formation of peroxidase-chitosan complexes, it was found that 0.1% chitosan with a MW of 10 kDa had the strongest activatory effect on peroxidase (activation degree, > 70%) in the reaction of o-dianisidine oxidation by hydrogen peroxide. The complex formed by 0.001% chitosan with a molecular weight of 150 kDa was most stable: when immobilized on foamed polyurethane, it retained at least 50% of the initial activity for 550 days. The highest catalytic activity was exhibited in a 0.05 M phthalate buffer (pH 5.9-6.2) by the complex containing 0.006-0.009% chitosan in the indicator reaction. The activatory effect of the polysaccharide on the enzyme was determined by its influence on the binding and conversion of the reducting substrate peroxidase. PMID:19382699

  3. Structure of Thermobifida fusca DyP-type peroxidase and activity towards Kraft lignin and lignin model compounds.

    PubMed

    Rahmanpour, Rahman; Rea, Dean; Jamshidi, Shirin; Fülöp, Vilmos; Bugg, Timothy D H

    2016-03-15

    A Dyp-type peroxidase enzyme from thermophilic cellulose degrader Thermobifida fusca (TfuDyP) was investigated for catalytic ability towards lignin oxidation. TfuDyP was characterised kinetically against a range of phenolic substrates, and a compound I reaction intermediate was observed via pre-steady state kinetic analysis at λmax 404 nm. TfuDyP showed reactivity towards Kraft lignin, and was found to oxidise a β-aryl ether lignin model compound, forming an oxidised dimer. A crystal structure of TfuDyP was determined, to 1.8 Å resolution, which was found to contain a diatomic oxygen ligand bound to the heme centre, positioned close to active site residues Asp-203 and Arg-315. The structure contains two channels providing access to the heme cofactor for organic substrates and hydrogen peroxide. Site-directed mutant D203A showed no activity towards phenolic substrates, but reduced activity towards ABTS, while mutant R315Q showed no activity towards phenolic substrates, nor ABTS. PMID:26901432

  4. DNA interaction, SOD, peroxidase and nuclease activity studies of iron complex having ligand with carboxamido nitrogen donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Kaushik; Tyagi, Nidhi; Kumar, Hemant; Rathi, Sweety

    2015-07-01

    Complex (Et3HN)[FeIII(bpb)Cl2], 1 {where H2bpb: N,N‧-(1,2-phenylene)bis(pyridine-2-carboxamide)} was synthesized and characterized by reported procedure (Yang et al., 1991). Complex 1 was found to be effective in superoxide scavenging activity and an IC50 value of 4.1 μM was obtained in xanthine-xanthine oxidase nitro blue tetrazolium assay. Peroxidase-like activity of this complex was determined by the oxidation of 2,2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS). DNA interaction studies of complex 1 showed binding of DNA through external or groove binding. Complex 1 exhibited chemical nuclease activity in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and cleaved supercoiled pBR322 DNA to its linear and nicked circular form at physiological pH. Mechanistic studies indicated possible role of hydroxyl radical (radOH) species in DNA cleavage activity via hydroperoxo intermediate: [FeIIIsbnd OOH-]2+ → [FeIVdbnd O]2+ + radOH.

  5. Glutathione S-transferase activity in follicular fluid from women undergoing ovarian stimulation: role in maturation.

    PubMed

    Meijide, Susana; Hernández, M Luisa; Navarro, Rosaura; Larreategui, Zaloa; Ferrando, Marcos; Ruiz-Sanz, José Ignacio; Ruiz-Larrea, M Begoña

    2014-10-01

    Female infertility involves an emotional impact for the woman, often leading to a state of anxiety and low self-esteem. The assisted reproduction techniques (ART) are used to overcome the problem of infertility. In a first step of the in vitro fertilization therapy women are subjected to an ovarian stimulation protocol to obtain mature oocytes, which will result in competent oocytes necessary for fertilization to occur. Ovarian stimulation, however, subjects the women to a high physical and psychological stress, thus being essential to improve ART and to find biomarkers of dysfunction and fertility. GSH is an important antioxidant, and is also used in detoxification reactions, catalysed by glutathione S-transferases (GST). In the present work, we have investigated the involvement of GST in follicular maturation. Patients with fertility problems and oocyte donors were recruited for the study. From each woman follicles at two stages of maturation were extracted at the preovulatory stage. Follicular fluid was separated from the oocyte by centrifugation and used as the enzyme source. GST activity was determined based on its conjugation with 3,4-dichloronitrobenzene and the assay was adapted to a 96-well microplate reader. The absorbance was represented against the incubation time and the curves were adjusted to linearity (R(2)>0.990). Results showed that in both donors and patients GST activity was significantly lower in mature oocytes compared to small ones. These results suggest that GST may play a role in the follicle maturation by detoxifying xenobiotics, thus contributing to the normal development of the oocyte. Supported by FIS/FEDER (PI11/02559), Gobierno Vasco (Dep. Educación, Universiades e Investigación, IT687-13), and UPV/EHU (CLUMBER UFI11/20 and PES13/58). The work was approved by the Ethics Committee of the UPV/EHU (CEISH/96/2011/RUIZLARREA), and performed according to the UPV/EHU and IVI-Bilbao agreement (Ref. 2012/01). PMID:26461371

  6. Effects of mercury and selenium on glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress in mallard ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.

    1998-01-01

    Earlier studies reported on the toxicity and related oxidative stress of different forms of Se, including seleno-D,L-methionine, in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). This study compares the effects of Se (seleno-D,L-methionine) and Hg (methylmercury chloride) separately and in combination. Mallard drakes received one of the following diets: untreated feed (controls), or feed containing 10 ppm Se, 10 ppm Hg, or 10 ppm Se in combination with 10 ppm Hg. After 10 weeks, blood, liver, and brain samples were collected for biochemical assays. The following clinical and biochemical alterations occurred in response to mercury exposure: hematocrit and hemoglobin concentrations decreased; activities of the enzymes glutathione (GSH) peroxidase (plasma and liver), glutathione-S-transferase (liver), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) (liver and brain) decreased; hepatic oxidized glutathione (GSSG) concentration increased relative to reduced glutathione (GSH); and lipid peroxidation in the brain was evident as detected by increased thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS). Effects of Se alone included increased hepatic GSSG reductase activity and brain TBARS concentration. Se in combination with Hg partially or totally alleviated effects of Hg on GSH peroxidase, G-6-PDH, and GSSG. These findings are compared in relation to field observations for diving ducks and other aquatic birds. It is concluded that since both Hg and excess Se can affect thiol status, measurement of associated enzymes in conjunction with thiol status may be a useful bioindicator to discriminate between Hg and Se effects. The ability of Se to restore the activities of G-6-PDH, GSH peroxidase, and glutathione status involved in antioxidative defense mechanisms may be crucial to biological protection from the toxic effects of methyl mercury.

  7. Seeing diabetes: visual detection of glucose based on the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of MoS2 nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tianran; Zhong, Liangshuang; Guo, Liangqia; Fu, Fengfu; Chen, Guonan

    2014-09-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted increasing research interest recently due to its unique physical, optical and electrical properties, correlated with its 2D ultrathin atomic-layered structure. Until now, however, great efforts have focused on its applications such as lithium ion batteries, transistors, and hydrogen evolution reactions. Herein, for the first time, MoS2 nanosheets are discovered to possess an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and can catalytically oxidize 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) by H2O2 to produce a color reaction. The catalytic activity follows the typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics and is dependent on temperature, pH, H2O2 concentration, and reaction time. Based on this finding, a highly sensitive and selective colorimetric method for H2O2 and glucose detection is developed and applied to detect glucose in serum samples. Moreover, a simple, inexpensive, instrument-free and portable test kit for the visual detection of glucose in normal and diabetic serum samples is constructed by utilizing agarose hydrogel as a visual detection platform.Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted increasing research interest recently due to its unique physical, optical and electrical properties, correlated with its 2D ultrathin atomic-layered structure. Until now, however, great efforts have focused on its applications such as lithium ion batteries, transistors, and hydrogen evolution reactions. Herein, for the first time, MoS2 nanosheets are discovered to possess an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and can catalytically oxidize 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) by H2O2 to produce a color reaction. The catalytic activity follows the typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics and is dependent on temperature, pH, H2O2 concentration, and reaction time. Based on this finding, a highly sensitive and selective colorimetric method for H2O2 and glucose detection is developed and applied to detect glucose in serum samples. Moreover, a simple, inexpensive

  8. Hepatic glutathione and glutathione S-transferase in selenium deficiency and toxicity in the chick

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y. S.

    1989-01-01

    First, the hepatic activity of GSH-T{sub CDNB} was increased only under conditions of severe oxidative stress produced by combined Se- and vitamin E (VE)-deficiency, indicating that VE also affects GSH metabolism. Second, the incorporation of {sup 35}S-methionine into GSH and protein was about 4- and 2-fold higher, respectively, in Se- and VE-deficient chick hepatocytes as compared to controls. Third, chicks injected with the glutathione peroxidase (SeGSHpx) inhibitor, aurothioglucose (AuTG), showed increase hepatic GSH-T{sub CDNB} activity and plasma GSH concentration regardless of their Se status. Fourth, the effect of ascorbic acid (AA), on GSH metabolism was studied. Chicks fed 1000 ppm AA showed decreased hepatic GSH concentration compared to chicks fed no AA in a Se- and VE-deficient diet. Fifth, chicks fed excess Se showed increase hepatic activity of GSH-T{sub CDNB} and GSH concentration regardless of VE status.

  9. Copper-incorporated SBA-15 with peroxidase-like activity and its application for colorimetric detection of glucose in human serum.

    PubMed

    Mu, Jianshuai; He, Yun; Wang, Yan

    2016-02-01

    The copper incorporated SBA-15 (Cu-SBA-15) materials with different amount of Cu in framework were synthesized, and the products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and N2 adsorption/desorption. The Cu contents incorporated into the framework of SBA-15 were measured by inductively coupling plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). Cu-SBA-15 samples were found to exhibit the peroxidase-like activity, similar to the natural peroxidase. The effect of various parameters such as the content of Cu incorporated, pH and temperature on the peroxidase-like activity was studied. Based on the peroxidase-like activity, the Cu-SBA-15 was applied to the determination of H2O2. The linear range for detecting H2O2 was from 0.8 to 60mM with a detection limit of 3.7 µM. Coupled with glucose oxidase, the Cu-SBA-15 was successfully used for the determination of glucose with the linear range of 2-80 mM and a detection limit of 5.4 µM. The determination of glucose in human serum showed high accuracy, good reproducibility, as well as high selectivity against uric acid, ascorbic acid, dopamine and glucose analogs including fructose, maltose and lactose. PMID:26653419

  10. Structures of K42N and K42Y sperm whale myoglobins point to an inhibitory role of distal water in peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxue; Lovelace, Leslie L; Sun, Shengfang; Dawson, John H; Lebioda, Lukasz

    2014-11-01

    Sperm whale myoglobin (Mb) functions as an oxygen-storage protein, but in the ferric state it possesses a weak peroxidase activity which enables it to carry out H2O2-dependent dehalogenation reactions. Hemoglobin/dehaloperoxidase from Amphitrite ornata (DHP) is a dual-function protein represented by two isoproteins DHP A and DHP B; its peroxidase activity is at least ten times stronger than that of Mb and plays a physiological role. The `DHP A-like' K42Y Mb mutant (K42Y) and the `DHP B-like' K42N mutant (K42N) were engineered in sperm whale Mb to mimic the extended heme environments of DHP A and DHP B, respectively. The peroxidase reaction rates increased ∼3.5-fold and ∼5.5-fold in K42Y and K42N versus Mb, respectively. The crystal structures of the K42Y and K42N mutants revealed that the substitutions at position 42 slightly elongate not only the distances between the distal His55 and the heme iron but also the hydrogen-bonding distances between His55 and the Fe-coordinated water. The enhanced peroxidase activity of K42Y and K42N thus might be attributed in part to the weaker binding of the axial water molecule that competes with hydrogen peroxide for the binding site at the heme in the ferric state. This is likely to be the mechanism by which the relationship `longer distal histidine to Fe distance - better peroxidase activity', which was previously proposed for heme proteins by Matsui et al. (1999) (J. Biol. Chem. 274, 2838-2844), works. Furthermore, positive cooperativity in K42N was observed when its dehaloperoxidase activity was measured as a function of the concentration of the substrate trichlorophenol. This serendipitously engineered cooperativity was rationalized by K42N dimerization through the formation of a dityrosine bond induced by excess H2O2. PMID:25372675

  11. Fast detection of peroxidase (POD) activity in tomato leaves which infected with Botrytis cinerea using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Wenwen; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Chu; Bao, Yidan; Yu, Jiajia; He, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Tomatoes are cultivated around the world and gray mold is one of its most prominent and destructive diseases. An early disease detection method can decrease losses caused by plant diseases and prevent the spread of diseases. The activity of peroxidase (POD) is very important indicator of disease stress for plants. The objective of this study is to examine the possibility of fast detection of POD activity in tomato leaves which infected with Botrytis cinerea using hyperspectral imaging data. Five pre-treatment methods were investigated. Genetic algorithm-partial least squares (GA-PLS) was applied to select optimal wavelengths. A new fast learning neural algorithm named extreme learning machine (ELM) was employed as multivariate analytical tool in this study. 21 optimal wavelengths were selected by GA-PLS and used as inputs of three calibration models. The optimal prediction result was achieved by ELM model with selected wavelengths, and the r and RMSEP in validation were 0.8647 and 465.9880 respectively. The results indicated that hyperspectral imaging could be considered as a valuable tool for POD activity prediction. The selected wavelengths could be potential resources for instrument development.

  12. Fortilin potentiates the peroxidase activity of Peroxiredoxin-1 and protects against alcohol-induced liver damage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Abhijnan; Pinkaew, Decha; Doan, Hung Q.; Jacob, Reed B.; Verma, Sunil K.; Friedman, Hana; Peterson, Alan C.; Kuyumcu-Martinez, Muge N.; McDougal, Owen M.; Fujise, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Fortilin, a pro-survival molecule, inhibits p53-induced apoptosis by binding to the sequence-specific DNA-binding domain of the tumor suppressor protein and preventing it from transcriptionally activating Bax. Intriguingly, fortilin protects cells against ROS-induced cell death, independent of p53. The signaling pathway through which fortilin protects cells against ROS-induced cell death, however, is unknown. Here we report that fortilin physically interacts with the antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin-1 (PRX1), protects it from proteasome-mediated degradation, and keeps it enzymatically active by blocking its deactivating phosphorylation by Mst1, a serine/threonine kinase. At the whole animal level, the liver-specific overexpression of fortilin reduced PRX1 phosphorylation in the liver, enhanced PRX1 activity, and protected the transgenic animals against alcohol-induced, ROS-mediated, liver damage. These data suggest the presence of a novel oxidative-stress-handling pathway where the anti-p53 molecule fortilin augments the peroxidase PRX1 by protecting it against degradation and inactivation of the enzyme. Fortilin-PRX1 interaction in the liver could be clinically exploited further to prevent acute alcohol-induced liver damage in humans. PMID:26726832

  13. Peroxidase-active cell free extract from onion solid wastes: biocatalytic properties and putative pathway of ferulic acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    El Agha, Ayman; Makris, Dimitris P; Kefalas, Panagiotis

    2008-09-01

    The exploitation of food residuals can be a major contribution in reducing the polluting load of food industry waste and in developing novel added-value products. Plant food residues including trimmings and peels might contain a range of enzymes capable of transforming bioorganic molecules, and thus they may have potential uses in several biocatalytic processes, including green organic synthesis, modification of food physicochemical properties, bioremediation, etc. Although the use of bacterial and fungal enzymes has gained attention in studies pertaining to biocatalytic applications, plant enzymes have been given less consideration or even disregarded. Therefore, we investigated the use of a crude peroxidase preparation from solid onion by-products for oxidizing ferulic acid, a widespread phenolic acid, various derivatives of which may occur in food wastes. The highest enzyme activity was observed at a pH value of 4, but considerable activity was retained up to a pH value of 6. Favorable temperatures for increased activity varied between 20-40 degrees C, 30 degrees C being the optimal. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of a homogenate/H(2)O(2)-treated ferulic acid solution showed the formation of a dimer as a major oxidation product. PMID:18930006

  14. Altering the redox state of skeletal muscle by glutathione depletion increases the exercise-activation of PGC-1α.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Natalie A; Matsumoto, Aya; Peake, Jonathan M; Marsh, Susan A; Peternelj, Tina-Tinkara; Briskey, David; Fassett, Robert G; Coombes, Jeff S; Wadley, Glenn D

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the relationship between markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, cell signaling, and antioxidant enzymes by depleting skeletal muscle glutathione with diethyl maleate (DEM) which resulted in a demonstrable increase in oxidative stress during exercise. Animals were divided into six groups: (1) sedentary control rats; (2) sedentary rats + DEM; (3) exercise control rats euthanized immediately after exercise; (4) exercise rats + DEM; (5) exercise control rats euthanized 4 h after exercise; and (6) exercise rats + DEM euthanized 4 h after exercise. Exercising animals ran on the treadmill at a 10% gradient at 20 m/min for the first 30 min. The speed was then increased every 10 min by 1.6 m/min until exhaustion. There was a reduction in total glutathione in the skeletal muscle of DEM treated animals compared to the control animals (P < 0.05). Within the control group, total glutathione was higher in the sedentary group compared to after exercise (P < 0.05). DEM treatment also significantly increased oxidative stress, as measured by increased plasma F2-isoprostanes (P < 0.05). Exercising animals given DEM showed a significantly greater increase in peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) mRNA compared to the control animals that were exercised (P < 0.05). This study provides novel evidence that by lowering the endogenous antioxidant glutathione in skeletal muscle and inducing oxidative stress through exercise, PGC-1α gene expression was augmented. These findings further highlight the important role of exercise induced oxidative stress in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25538148

  15. Protective role of intracellular glutathione against ethanol-induced damage in cultured rat gastric mucosal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mutoh, H.; Hiraishi, H.; Ota, S.; Yoshida, H.; Ivey, K.J.; Terano, A.; Sugimoto, T. )

    1990-06-01

    This study investigated whether intracellular glutathione is cytoprotective against ethanol-induced injury to cultured rat gastric mucosal cells in vitro. Secondly, it investigated whether reduced glutathione or oxidized glutathione is responsible for this cytoprotection. Cytolysis was quantified by measuring 51Cr release from prelabeled cells. Concentrations of ethanol greater than 12% caused cell damage and increased 51Cr release in a dose-dependent and time-related fashion. When a substrate for glutathione synthesis, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, was provided to cultured cells for 4 h before challenge with ethanol, cytolysis was significantly decreased corresponding with an increase in cellular glutathione content. Pretreatment with diethyl maleate, which depletes reduced glutathione without forming oxidized glutathione, potentiated ethanol-induced cell damage in a dose-dependent manner with the decrease of cellular glutathione content. The administration of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (which is specifically reduced by glutathione peroxidase to generate oxidized glutathione from reduced glutathione) or diamide (which nonenzymatically oxidizes reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione) enhanced ethanol injury. We conclude that in cultured gastric mucosal cells, (a) intracellular glutathione maintains integrity of gastric mucosal cells against ethanol in vitro; and (b) reduced glutathione rather than oxidized glutathione is responsible for this cytoprotection. We postulate that the presence of reduced glutathione is essential to allow glutathione peroxidase to catalyze the ethanol-generated toxic oxygen radical, hydrogen peroxide.

  16. Mechanistic study of CuZn-SOD from Ipomoea carnea mutated at dimer interface: enhancement of peroxidase activity upon monomerization.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Panchanand; Dixit, Anshuman; Ray, Mamata; Sabat, Surendra Chandra

    2014-02-01

    The enzymatically active monomeric form of CuZn-superoxide dismutase has always been of interest to decipher the structure-function relationship in this class of enzymes. In the present study, spectroscopic and enzymatic characteristics of the dimeric and monomeric forms of recombinant Ipomoea carnea CuZn-superoxide dismutase were made to decipher their stability and altered catalytic properties. The monomeric form of protein was produced through site directed mutagenesis by replacing a conserved hydrophobic leucine with a polar lysine residue at the dimer-interface. Spectral characteristics of both the forms (monomer and dimer) showed the presence of novel electronic transitions. Superoxide scavenging activity of the mutated form was reduced to nearly half of the activity found in the native enzyme. Concomitantly, compared to native form the mutated enzyme showed an increase in peroxidase activity. High temperature dependent circular dichroism spectral analysis, differential scanning calorimetric profile, and the measurement of temperature dependent superoxide scavenging activity indicated an increased susceptibility of the mutated form to higher temperature as compared to the native form. The inhibitor studies like hydrogen peroxide, diethyldithiocarbamate and phenylglyoxal also indicate higher susceptibility, which might be due to, altered arrangement of active site residues as a consequence of the mutation. Molecular modeling and MD simulation studies further indicated that this specific mutation induces loss of hydrophobic interaction at dimer interface, resulting in the observed instability of the dimeric form. Increased peroxidative activity of the enzyme, upon monomerization may have physiological implication essentially in presence of high concentration of H2O2, as in case of plant cells specifically under stress conditions. PMID:24513093

  17. The peroxidase/catalase-like activities of MFe₂O₄ (M=Mg, Ni, Cu) MNPs and their application in colorimetric biosensing of glucose.

    PubMed

    Su, Li; Qin, Wenjie; Zhang, Huige; Rahman, Zia Ur; Ren, Cuiling; Ma, Sudai; Chen, Xingguo

    2015-01-15

    MFe2O4 (M=Mg, Ni, Cu) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were found to have catalytic activities similar to those of biological enzymes such as catalase and peroxidase. These nanomaterials, as bifunctional catalase/peroxidases (KatGs), not only could catalyze H2O2 to produce hydroxyl radicals, which oxidized peroxidase substrate to produce color, but also could catalyze the decomposition reaction of H2O2 into water and oxygen directly in the same condition through the catalase-like activity. And it was also found that the amount of generated hydroxyl radicals and oxygen was related to the concentration of MFe2O4 (M=Mg, Ni, Cu) MNPs. The peroxidase-like catalytic behavior of MFe2O4 MNPs was analyzed in detail. Under the optimized conditions, NiFe2O4 MNPs were used as a colorimetric biosensor for the detection of 9.4×10(-7)-2.5×10(-5) mol L(-1) glucose with a limit of detection (LOD) of 4.5×10(-7) mol L(-1). The sensor was successfully applied to glucose detection in urine sample. PMID:25127473

  18. Effects of aqueous eucalyptus extracts on seed germination, seedling growth and activities of peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase in three wheat cultivar seedlings (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Ziaebrahimi, L; Khavari-Nejad, R A; Fahimi, H; Nejadsatari, T

    2007-10-01

    Evaluation of allelopathic effects of this plant on other near cultivations especially wheat is the aim of this study. Effects of water extracts of eucalyptus leaves examined on germination and growth of three wheat cultivar seeds and seedlings. Results showed that: germination percentage strongly decreased, leaf and root lengths also affected and dry and wet weights of both roots and shoots showed similar change patterns. Activities of peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase as antioxidant enzymes in roots and shoots measured. Activity of peroxidases increased in stress conditions and roots showed more increased enzyme activity than leaves. Activity of polyphenoloxidases increased only in one of three cultivars and again roots showed more activity of this enzyme in response to eucalyptus extract. Suggest that detoxification process were conducted mainly in roots of seedlings. PMID:19090161

  19. Oxidative stress protection and glutathione metabolism in response to hydrogen peroxide and menadione in riboflavinogenic fungus Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, S; Chandra, T S

    2014-11-01

    Ashbya gossypii is a plant pathogen and a natural overproducer of riboflavin and is used for industrial riboflavin production. A few literature reports depict a link between riboflavin overproduction and stress in this fungus. However, the stress protection mechanisms and glutathione metabolism are not much explored in A. gossypii. In the present study, an increase in the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase was observed in response to hydrogen peroxide and menadione. The lipid peroxide and membrane lipid peroxide levels were increased by H2O2 and menadione, indicating oxidative damage. The glutathione metabolism was altered with a significant increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione S transferase (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR) and a decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) levels in the presence of H2O2 and menadione. Expression of the genes involved in stress mechanism was analyzed in response to the stressors by semiquantitative RT-PCR. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of CTT1, SOD1, GSH1, YAP1, and RIB3 were increased by H2O2 and menadione, indicating the effect of stress at the transcriptional level. A preliminary bioinformatics study for the presence of stress response elements (STRE)/Yap response elements (YRE) depicted that the glutathione metabolic genes, stress genes, and the RIB genes hosted either STRE/YRE, which may enable induction of these genes during stress. PMID:25178419

  20. Catalytic activity and stability of glucose oxidase/horseradish peroxidase co-confined in macroporous silica foam.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaodong; Li, Ying; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Yu, Jiachao; Qian, Jing; Liu, Songqin

    2012-12-21

    Investigation of the catalytic activity and stability of enzymes in confined nano/microspace provides valuable contributions to the fundamental understanding of biological reactions taking place on a mesoscopic scale within confined spaces. In this paper, macroporous silica foam (MSF) is used as a nanoreactor to co-confine glucose oxidase (GOD) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Then, the enzymatic cascade reactions, which act in tandem inside nanoreactors, for oxidation of glucose and 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) were studied. The catalytic kinetic parameters of apparent Michaelis constant (K(m)(app)) and maximum rate (V(max)) were obtained from Lineweaver-Burk plot by UV-vis spectrometry. Results showed that the catalytic activity of the co-confined enzymes is reduced compared to that of free enzymes in solution at room temperature. The stabilities of co-confined enzymes in denaturing agents, such as guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) and urea, were higher than those of free enzymes in solution. When employing a co-confined bienzyme system as a biosensor for the detection of glucose, a wider linear range of glucose was obtained for the co-confined bienzyme system than for free enzymes in solution. PMID:23096254

  1. Gpx1 is a stationary phase-specific thioredoxin peroxidase in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Si-Young; Song, Ji-Yoon; Kwon, Eun-Soo; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2008-02-29

    The genome sequence of Schizosaccharomyces pombe reveals only one gene for a putative glutathione peroxidase (gpx1{sup +}). The Gpx1 protein has a peroxidase activity but preferred thioredoxin to glutathione as an electron donor when examined in vitro and in vivo, and therefore is a thioredoxin peroxidase. Besides H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, it can reduce alkyl and phospholipid hydroperoxides. Expression of the gpx1 gene was elevated at the stationary phase, and we found that it supported long-term survival of S. pombe. The mutant also exhibited some defect in the activity of aconitase, an oxidation-labile Fe-S enzyme in mitochondria. Activity of sulfite reductase, a labile Fe-S enzyme in the cytosol, was also dramatically lowered in the mutant in the stationary phase. The Gpx1 protein, without any obvious targeting sequence, was localized in mitochondria as well as in the cytosol. Therefore, Gpx1 must serve to ensure optimal mitochondrial function and cytosolic environment, especially in the stationary phase.

  2. Cadmium-induced membrane lipid peroxidation and changes in antioxidant enzyme activities and peroxidase isoforms in Jerusalem artichoke seedlings.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi-Ming; Chen, Yan-Zhen; Liang, Yang-Lin; Xu, Mei-Yan; Xu, Xiang-Ming

    2007-08-01

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) seedlings cultured in sandy media were treated with Hoagland nutrition solution with different concentrations of Cd(NO(3))(2) from 0 to 400 micromol/L. After 50 days' treatment, Cd accumulation, activities of peroxidase (POD, EC 1.11.1.7), superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1), catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6) were measured and electrophoretograms of POD isoenzymes were analyzed. The accumulation of Cd in seedlings increased from Cd 50-100 micromol/L, after which further increases in Cd concentration resulted in only small increases in accumulation of Cd in seedlings. MDA content was markedly higher than control values indicating the enhanced membrane lipid peroxidation in roots and leaves. POD activities in leaf and root extracts increased with an increase of Cd concentration from 0 to 50 and 100 micromol/L and then decreased with further increases to 200 and 400 micromol/L. Under moderate Cd level of 50-200 micromol/L, SOD activities in leaf and root extracts increased whereas with a higher Cd level of 400 micromol/L marked inhibitions in enzyme activities were observed. With increase in Cd concentration marked elevations in CAT activities in leaves and roots were observed. Results of electrophoresis show that the alteration of POD isoenzyme was noticeable to Cd and an additional POD isoenzyme LP10 appeared. It is suggested that POD isoenzyme of Jerusalem artichoke seedlings could be used as bioindicator for soil contamination by Cd. PMID:17675753

  3. Catalytic activity of lignin peroxidase and partition of veratryl alcohol in AOT/isooctane/toluene/water reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Huang, Xirong; Li, Yuezhong; Qu, Yinbo; Gao, Peiji

    2006-04-01

    The activity of lignin peroxidase (LiP) and the partition of its optimum substrate veratryl alcohol (VA) in sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT)/isooctane/toluene/water reverse micelles were studied in this paper to understand the microheterogeneous effect of the medium on the catalytic properties of LiP hosted in the reverse micelle. Results showed that LiP from Phanerochaete chrysosporium could express its activity in the reverse micelles, but its activity depended, to a great extent, on the composition of the reverse micelles. Optimum activity occurred at a molar ratio of water to AOT (omega0) of 11, a pH value of 3.6, and a volume ratio of isooctane to toluene of 7-9. Under optimum conditions, the half-life of LiP was circa 12 h. The dependence of LiP activity on the volume fraction of water in the medium (theta), at a constant omega0 value of 11, indicated that VA was mainly solubilized in the pseudophase of the reverse micelle. Based on the pseudobiphasic model and the corresponding kinetic method, a linear line can be obtained in a plot of apparent Michaelis constant of VA vs theta, and the partition coefficient of VA between the pseudophase and the organic solvent phase was determined to be 35.8, which was higher than that (22.3) between bulk water and the corresponding mixed organic solvent. H2O2 inhibited LiP at concentrations higher than 80 microM; this concentration value seems to be different from that in aqueous solution (about 3 mM). The differences mentioned above should be ascribed to the microheterogeneity and the interface of the AOT reverse micelle. PMID:16080008

  4. Heat Stress- and Heat Shock Transcription Factor-Dependent Expression and Activity of Ascorbate Peroxidase in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Panchuk, Irina I.; Volkov, Roman A.; Schöffl, Friedrich

    2002-01-01

    To find evidence for a connection between heat stress response, oxidative stress, and common stress tolerance, we studied the effects of elevated growth temperatures and heat stress on the activity and expression of ascorbate peroxidase (APX). We compared wild-type Arabidopsis with transgenic plants overexpressing heat shock transcription factor 3 (HSF3), which synthesize heat shock proteins and are improved in basal thermotolerance. Following heat stress, APX activity was positively affected in transgenic plants and correlated with a new thermostable isoform, APXS. This enzyme was present in addition to thermolabile cytosolic APX1, the prevalent isoform in unstressed cells. In HSF3-transgenic plants, APXS activity was detectable at normal temperature and persisted after severe heat stress at 44°C. In nontransgenic plants, APXS was undetectable at normal temperature, but could be induced by moderate heat stress. The mRNA expression profiles of known and three new Apx genes were determined using real-time PCR. Apx1 and Apx2 genes encoding cytosolic APX were heat stress and HSF dependently expressed, but only the representations of Apx2 mRNA met the criteria that suggest identity between APXS and APX2: not expressed at normal temperature in wild type, strong induction by heat stress, and HSF3-dependent expression in transgenic plants. Our data suggest that Apx2 is a novel heat shock gene and that the enzymatic activity of APX2/APXS is required to compensate heat stress-dependent decline of APX1 activity in the cytosol. The functional roles of modulations of APX expression and the interdependence of heat stress and oxidative stress response and signaling mechanisms are discussed. PMID:12068123

  5. [Individual and joint stress of lead and mercury on growth, glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes of Scenedesmus quadricauda].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhu, Lin; Liu, Shuo

    2009-01-01

    To understand the toxicity mechanisms of mixed heavy metals on aquatic plant, indicators of algea growth rate,content of reduced glutathione (GSH), activities of glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) of green algae, Scenedesmus quadricauda were measured to analyze the individual and joint toxic effects of lead and mercury. The results show that the 96h EC50 of algae growth inhibition by lead [Pb(NO3)2] and mercury (HgCl2) are 0.6789 mg/L and 0.1401 mg/L respectively. After 12 h individual and joint lead and mercury exposure, the content of GSH in alga cells is decreased to about 70% of the level of the control, and keeps a steady level with the increase of the exposure concentration. The GST activities are increased to a peak in lower concentration groups and then decrease with the increase of the exposure concentration. Indeed,the higher concentration of lead and mercury combined-poisoning can inhibit the activities of GST significantly, with 13.04% inhibitory rate. The activity of GPx is almost suppressed continuously with the increase of the exposure concentration, and the lowest activity is only 38.77% of the control. The toxic action of the mixture of Pb and Hg on growth inhibition,GSH content,activities of GST and activities of GPx for Scenedesmus quadricauda are addition. PMID:19353889

  6. Nitric oxide reacts with intracellular glutathione and activates the hexose monophosphate shunt in human neutrophils: evidence for S-nitrosoglutathione as a bioactive intermediary.

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, R M; Levartovsky, D; Leszczynska-Piziak, J; Yegudin, J; Abramson, S B

    1994-01-01

    We performed experiments to determine whether nitric oxide promoted the formation of intracellular S-nitrosothiol adducts in human neutrophils. At concentrations sufficient to inhibit chemoattractant-induced superoxide anion production, nitric oxide caused a depletion of measurable intracellular glutathione as determined by both the monobromobimane HPLC method and the glutathione reductase recycling assay. The depletion of glutathione could be shown to be due to the formation of intracellular S-nitrosoglutathione as indicated by the ability of sodium borohydride treatment of cytosol to result in the complete recovery of measurable glutathione. The formation of intracellular S-nitrosylated compounds was confirmed by the capacity of cytosol derived from nitric oxide-treated cells to ADP-ribosylate glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Depletion of intracellular glutathione was accompanied by a rapid and concomitant activation of the hexose monophosphate shunt (HMPS) following exposure to nitric oxide. Kinetic studies demonstrated that nitric oxide-dependent activation of the HMPS was reversible and paralleled nitric oxide-induced glutathione depletion. Synthetic preparations of S-nitrosoglutathione shared with nitric oxide the capacity to inhibit superoxide anion production and activate the HMPS. These data suggest that nitric oxide may regulate cellular functions via the formation of intracellular S-nitrosothiol adducts and the activation of the HMPS. Images PMID:8170969

  7. Flaxseed Protects Against Diabetes-Induced Glucotoxicity by Modulating Pentose Phosphate Pathway and Glutathione-Dependent Enzyme Activities in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gök, Müslüm; Ulusu, Nuray N; Tarhan, Nilay; Tufan, Can; Ozansoy, Gülgün; Arı, Nuray; Karasu, Çimen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) intake on general metabolism, pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and glutathione-dependent enzymes in diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin injection (40 mg/kg, i.p.) and the enzyme activities were determined spectrophotometrically. Diabetic and control rats were divided in two subgroups, one untreated, and one treated with flaxseed (0.714 g/kg body weight/day; orally) for 12 weeks. Flaxseed ameliorated decreased body weight (p < .05) and increased blood glucose (p < .001), triglyceride (p < .001), ALT (p < .001) and AST (p < .001) in diabetic rats. Diabetes resulted in increased glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) (p < .05) and decreased glutathione-S-transferase (GST) (p < .01), but unchanged 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) and glutathione reductase (GR) in the brain of rats. These alterations were partially improved by flaxseed in comparison to diabetic untreated group (p < .05). G6PD, 6PGD, GR were elevated (p < .001), while GST unchanged in the lung of diabetic untreated group compared to control. Flaxseed partially prevented the increase in 6PGD (p < .05) and GR (p < .01), but unaffected G6PD in the lung of diabetic rats. G6PD (p < .001), 6PGD (p < .05), GR (p < .001) were augmented, while GST showed a significant (p < .001) depletion in the pancreas of diabetic untreated rats compared to control. Diabetic alterations observed in pancreatic enzyme activities were significantly prevented by flaxseed. Furthermore, a remarkable decrease in 6PGD (p < .001) and an increase in G6PD (threefold of control) were found in the lens of diabetic untreated group that were completely prevented by flaxseed (p < .001). Flaxseed has beneficial effects against diabetes-induced glucotoxicity by modulating G6PD, 6PGD, GR and GST activities in tissues. PMID:26317558

  8. The role played by acid and basic centers in the activity of biomimetic catalysts of the catalase, peroxidase, and monooxidase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magerramov, A. M.; Nagieva, I. T.

    2010-11-01

    The acid-basic centers of heterogeneous carriers of catalase, peroxidase, and monooxigenase biomimetics, in particular, iron protoporphyrin deposited on active or neutral aluminum magnesium silicate, were studied. The catalytic activity of biomimetics was stabilized, which allowed us not only to synthesize fairly effective biomimetics but also to clarify certain details of the mechanism of their action and perform a comparative analysis of the functioning of biomimetics and the corresponding enzymes.

  9. Immobilization of aptamer-modified gold nanoparticles on BiOCl nanosheets: Tunable peroxidase-like activity by protein recognition.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Lun; Lien, Chia-Wen; Wang, Chia-Wei; Harroun, Scott G; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2016-01-15

    A self-assembled nanocomposite is prepared from an aqueous mixture of aptamer-modified gold nanoparticles (Apt-Au NPs), bismuth ions and chloride ions. The Apt-Au NPs are immobilized on bismuth oxychloride (BiOCl) nanosheets in situ to form Apt-Au NPs/BiOCl nanocomposites. The as-prepared nanocomposites exhibit high peroxidase-like activity for the catalytic conversion of Amplex Red (AR) to fluorescent resorufin in the presence of H2O2. The catalytic activity of Apt-Au NPs/BiOCl nanocomposites is at least 90-fold higher than that of Apt-Au NPs or BiOCl nanosheets, revealing synergistic effects on their activity. The catalytic activity of Apt-Au NPs/BiOCl nanocomposites is suppressed by vascular endothelial growth factor-A165 (VEGF-A165) molecules that specifically interact with the aptamer units (Del-5-1 and v7t-1) on the nanocomposite surface. The AR/H2O2-Apt-Au NPs/BiOCl nanocomposites probe shows high selectivity (>1000-fold over other proteins) and sensitivity (detection limit ~0.5nM) for the detection of VEGF-A165. Furthermore, the probe is employed for the detection of VEGF isoforms and for the study of interactions between VEGF and VEGF receptors. The practicality of this simple, rapid, cost-effective probe is validated by the analysis of VEGF-A165 in cell culture media, showing its great potential for the analysis of VEGF in biological samples. PMID:26318787

  10. Kinetin increases chromium absorption, modulates its distribution, and changes the activity of catalase and ascorbate peroxidase in Mexican Palo Verde

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yong; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Lopez-Moreno, Martha L.; Ren, Minghua; Saupe, Geoffrey; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2015-01-01

    This report shows, for the first time, the effectiveness of the phytohormone kinetin (KN) in increasing Cr translocation from roots to stems in Mexican Palo Verde. Fifteen-day-old seedlings, germinated in soil spiked with Cr(III) and (VI) at 60 and 10 mg kg−1, respectively, were watered every other day for 30 days with a KN solution at 250 μM. Samples were analyzed for catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APOX) activities, Cr concentration, and Cr distribution in tissues. Results showed that KN reduced CAT but increased APOX in the roots of Cr(VI)-treated plants. In the leaves, KN reduced both CAT and APOX in Cr(III) but not in Cr(VI)-treated plants. However, KN increased total Cr concentration in roots, stems, and leaves by 45%, 103%, and 72%, respectively, compared to Cr(III) alone. For Cr(VI), KN increased Cr concentrations in roots, stems, and leaves, respectively, by 53%, 129%, and 168%, compared to Cr(VI) alone. The electron probe microanalyzer results showed that Cr was mainly located at the cortex section in the root, and Cr distribution was essentially homogenous in stems. However, proven through X-ray images, Cr(VI)-treated roots and stems had more Cr accumulation than Cr(III) counterparts. KN increased the Cr translocation from roots to stems. PMID:21174467

  11. Mitogen-activated protein kinase p38b interaction with delta class glutathione transferases from the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wongtrakul, Jeerang; Sukittikul, Suchada; Saisawang, Chonticha; Ketterman, Albert J

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a family of multifunctional enzymes involved in xenobiotic biotransformation, drug metabolism, and protection against oxidative damage. The p38b mitogen-activated protein kinase is involved in cellular stress response. This study screened interactions between Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae) Delta class glutathione transferases (DmGSTs) and the D. melanogaster p38b MAPK. Therefore, 12 DmGSTs and p38b kinase were obtained as recombinant proteins. The study showed that DmGSTD8 and DmGSTD11b significantly increased p38b activity toward ATF2 and jun, which are transcription factor substrates. DmGSTD3 and DmGSTD5 moderately increased p38b activity for jun. In addition, GST activity in the presence of p38b was also measured. It was found that p38b affected substrate specificity toward CDNB (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) and DCNB (1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene) of several GST isoforms, i.e., DmGSTD2, DmGSTD5, DmGSTD8, and DmGSTD11b. The interaction of a GST and p38b can affect the substrate specificity of either enzyme, which suggests induced conformational changes affecting catalysis. Similar interactions do not occur for all the Delta enzymes and p38b, which suggests that these interactions could be specific. PMID:23438069

  12. Chemical forms of selenium affect glutatione peroxidase activity in human Caco-2 cell model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bioavailability of selenium (Se) is complicated because there are multiple naturally occurring chemical forms of this element in nature. Assessing the ability of a Se source to restore GPX1 activity in laboratory animals and humans is the most commonly used method. To search for an alternative (...

  13. Prolonged fasting increases glutathione biosynthesis in postweaned northern elephant seals

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Forman, Henry Jay; Crocker, Daniel E.; Ortiz, Rudy M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Northern elephant seals experience prolonged periods of absolute food and water deprivation (fasting) while breeding, molting or weaning. The postweaning fast in elephant seals is characterized by increases in the renin–angiotensin system, expression of the oxidant-producing protein Nox4, and NADPH oxidase activity; however, these increases are not correlated with increased oxidative damage or inflammation. Glutathione (GSH) is a potent reductant and a cofactor for glutathione peroxidases (GPx), glutathione-S transferases (GST) and 1-cys peroxiredoxin (PrxVI) and thus contributes to the removal of hydroperoxides, preventing oxidative damage. The effects of prolonged food deprivation on the GSH system are not well described in mammals. To test our hypothesis that GSH biosynthesis increases with fasting in postweaned elephant seals, we measured circulating and muscle GSH content at the early and late phases of the postweaning fast in elephant seals along with the activity/protein content of glutamate-cysteine ligase [GCL; catalytic (GCLc) and modulatory (GCLm) subunits], γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), glutathione disulphide reductase (GR), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), GST and PrxVI, as well as plasma changes in γ-glutamyl amino acids, glutamate and glutamine. GSH increased two- to four-fold with fasting along with a 40–50% increase in the content of GCLm and GCLc, a 75% increase in GGT activity, a two- to 2.5-fold increase in GR, G6PDH and GST activities and a 30% increase in PrxVI content. Plasma γ-glutamyl glutamine, γ-glutamyl isoleucine and γ-glutamyl methionine also increased with fasting whereas glutamate and glutamine decreased. Results indicate that GSH biosynthesis increases with fasting and that GSH contributes to counteracting hydroperoxide production, preventing oxidative damage in fasting seals. PMID:21430206

  14. Short-term oral exposure to aluminium decreases glutathione intestinal levels and changes enzyme activities involved in its metabolism.

    PubMed

    Orihuela, Daniel; Meichtry, Verónica; Pregi, Nicolás; Pizarro, Manuel

    2005-09-01

    To study the effects of aluminium (Al) on glutathione (GSH) metabolism in the small intestine, adult male Wistar rats were orally treated with AlCl3.6H2O at doses of 30, 60, 120 and 200 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day, during seven days. Controls received deionized water. At doses above 120 mg/kg b.w., Al produced both a significant reduction of GSH content and an increase of oxidized/reduced glutathione ratio (P < 0.05). The index of oxidative stress of the intestine mucosa in terms of lipid peroxidation evaluated by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances was significantly increased (52%) at higher Al dose used. The duodenal expression of the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 in brush border membranes, determined by Western blot technique, was increased 2.7-fold in rats treated with 200mg AlCl3/kg b.w (P < 0.01). Intestine activities of both GSH-synthase (from 60 mg/kg b.w.) and GSSG-reductase (from 120 mg/kg b.w.) were significantly reduced (26% and 31%, respectively) while glutathione-S-transferase showed to be slightly modified in the Al-treated groups. Conversely, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity was significantly increased (P < 0.05) due to the Al treatment. Al reduced in vitro mucosa-to-lumen GSH efflux (P < 0.05). A positive linear correlation between the intestine GSH depletion and reduction of in situ 45Ca intestinal absorption, both produced by Al, was found (r = 0.923, P = 0.038). Taking as a whole, these results show that Al would alter GSH metabolism in small intestine by decreasing its turnover, leading to an unbalance of redox state in the epithelial cells, thus contributing to deteriorate GSH-dependent absorptive functions. PMID:16084594

  15. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of horseradish peroxidase isoenzymes: correlation of distinctive spectra with isoenzyme specific activities.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Vergara, E; Meyer, M; Goff, H M

    1985-11-01

    High-resolution proton NMR spectra are reported for the paramagnetic ferric native and cyano complexes of the five major horseradish root peroxidase (HRP) isoenzymes (A1, A2, A3, B, and C). Axial imidazole resonances are observed in the native and cyano-complex spectra of all the isoenzymes, thus indicating the presence of a common axial histidine ligand. Proton NMR spectra outside the usual diamagnetic region are identical for sets of A1 and A2 isoenzymes and for the B and C isoenzyme set. Variation in heme residue chemical shift positions may be controlled in part by porphyrin vinyl side chain-protein interactions. Diverse upfield spectra among the isoenzymes reflect amino acid substitutions and/or conformational differences near the prosthetic group, as signals in this region must result from amino acid residues in proximity to the heme center. Acid-base dependence studies reveal an "alkaline" transition that converts the native high-spin iron (III) porphyrin to the low-spin state. The transition occurs at pH 9.3, 9.4, 9.8, and 10.9 for respective HRP A1, A2, A3, and C isoenzymes, respectively. Significantly, this ordering also reflects specific activities for the isoenzymes in the order A1 = A2 greater than A3 greater than B = C. Identical proton NMR spectra for A1/A2 and B/C isoenzyme sets parallel equivalent specific activities for members of a particular set. Proton NMR spectra thus appear to be highly sensitive to protein modifications that affect catalytic activity. PMID:4084538

  16. Cantharidin Impedes Activity of Glutathione S-Transferase in the Midgut of Helicoverpa armigera Hübner.

    PubMed

    Khan, Rashid Ahmed; Liu, Ji Yuan; Rashid, Maryam; Wang, Dun; Zhang, Ya Lin

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations have implicated glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) as one of the major reasons for insecticide resistance. Therefore, effectiveness of new candidate compounds depends on their ability to inhibit GSTs to prevent metabolic detoxification by insects. Cantharidin, a terpenoid compound of insect origin, has been developed as a bio-pesticide in China, and proves highly toxic to a wide range of insects, especially lepidopteran. In the present study, we test cantharidin as a model compound for its toxicity, effects on the mRNA transcription of a model Helicoverpa armigera glutathione S-transferase gene (HaGST) and also for its putative inhibitory effect on the catalytic activity of GSTs, both in vivo and in vitro in Helicoverpa armigera, employing molecular and biochemical methods. Bioassay results showed that cantharidin was highly toxic to H. armigera. Real-time qPCR showed down-regulation of the HaGST at the mRNA transcript ranging from 2.5 to 12.5 folds while biochemical assays showed in vivo inhibition of GSTs in midgut and in vitro inhibition of rHaGST. Binding of cantharidin to HaGST was rationalized by homology and molecular docking simulations using a model GST (1PN9) as a template structure. Molecular docking simulations also confirmed accurate docking of the cantharidin molecule to the active site of HaGST impeding its catalytic activity. PMID:23528854

  17. Cantharidin Impedes Activity of Glutathione S-Transferase in the Midgut of Helicoverpa armigera Hübner

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rashid Ahmed; Liu, Ji Yuan; Rashid, Maryam; Wang, Dun; Zhang, Ya Lin

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations have implicated glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) as one of the major reasons for insecticide resistance. Therefore, effectiveness of new candidate compounds depends on their ability to inhibit GSTs to prevent metabolic detoxification by insects. Cantharidin, a terpenoid compound of insect origin, has been developed as a bio-pesticide in China, and proves highly toxic to a wide range of insects, especially lepidopteran. In the present study, we test cantharidin as a model compound for its toxicity, effects on the mRNA transcription of a model Helicoverpa armigera glutathione S-transferase gene (HaGST) and also for its putative inhibitory effect on the catalytic activity of GSTs, both in vivo and in vitro in Helicoverpa armigera, employing molecular and biochemical methods. Bioassay results showed that cantharidin was highly toxic to H. armigera. Real-time qPCR showed down-regulation of the HaGST at the mRNA transcript ranging from 2.5 to 12.5 folds while biochemical assays showed in vivo inhibition of GSTs in midgut and in vitro inhibition of rHaGST. Binding of cantharidin to HaGST was rationalized by homology and molecular docking simulations using a model GST (1PN9) as a template structure. Molecular docking simulations also confirmed accurate docking of the cantharidin molecule to the active site of HaGST impeding its catalytic activity. PMID:23528854

  18. Metabolic Activation of the Antibacterial Agent Triclocarban by Cytochrome P450 1A1 Yielding Glutathione Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Muvvala, Jaya B.; Morin, Dexter; Buckpitt, Alan R.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Rice, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Triclocarban (3,4,4′-trichlorocarbanilide; TCC) is an antibacterial agent used in personal care products such as bar soaps. Small amounts of chemical are absorbed through the epidermis. Recent studies show that residues of reactive TCC metabolites are bound covalently to proteins in incubations with keratinocytes, raising concerns about the potential toxicity of this antimicrobial agent. To obtain additional information on metabolic activation of TCC, this study characterized the reactive metabolites trapped as glutathione conjugates. Incubations were carried out with 14C-labeled TCC, recombinant CYP1A1 or CYP1B1, coexpressed with cytochrome P450 reductase, glutathione-S-transferases (GSH), and an NADPH-generating system. Incubations containing CYP1A1, but not 1B1, led to formation of a single TCC-GSH adduct with a conversion rate of 1% of parent compound in 2 hours. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry and diagnostic fragmentation, the adduct was tentatively identified as 3,4-dichloro-3′-glutathionyl-4′-hydroxycarbanilide. These findings support the hypothesis that TCC is activated by oxidative dehalogenation and oxidation to a quinone imine. Incubations of TCDD-induced keratinocytes with 14C-TCC yielded a minor radioactive peak coeluting with TCC-GSH. Thus, we conclude that covalent protein modification by TCC in TCDD-induced human keratinocyte incubations is mainly caused by activation of TCC by CYP1A1 via a dehalogenated TCC derivative as reactive species. PMID:24733789

  19. Metabolic activation of the antibacterial agent triclocarban by cytochrome P450 1A1 yielding glutathione adducts.

    PubMed

    Schebb, Nils Helge; Muvvala, Jaya B; Morin, Dexter; Buckpitt, Alan R; Hammock, Bruce D; Rice, Robert H

    2014-07-01

    Triclocarban (3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide; TCC) is an antibacterial agent used in personal care products such as bar soaps. Small amounts of chemical are absorbed through the epidermis. Recent studies show that residues of reactive TCC metabolites are bound covalently to proteins in incubations with keratinocytes, raising concerns about the potential toxicity of this antimicrobial agent. To obtain additional information on metabolic activation of TCC, this study characterized the reactive metabolites trapped as glutathione conjugates. Incubations were carried out with (14)C-labeled TCC, recombinant CYP1A1 or CYP1B1, coexpressed with cytochrome P450 reductase, glutathione-S-transferases (GSH), and an NADPH-generating system. Incubations containing CYP1A1, but not 1B1, led to formation of a single TCC-GSH adduct with a conversion rate of 1% of parent compound in 2 hours. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry and diagnostic fragmentation, the adduct was tentatively identified as 3,4-dichloro-3'-glutathionyl-4'-hydroxycarbanilide. These findings support the hypothesis that TCC is activated by oxidative dehalogenation and oxidation to a quinone imine. Incubations of TCDD-induced keratinocytes with (14)C-TCC yielded a minor radioactive peak coeluting with TCC-GSH. Thus, we conclude that covalent protein modification by TCC in TCDD-induced human keratinocyte incubations is mainly caused by activation of TCC by CYP1A1 via a dehalogenated TCC derivative as reactive species. PMID:24733789

  20. Unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways suggests potential involvement in plant defense against the gall midge mayetiola destructor in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glutathione, a thiol tripeptide of '-glutamylcysteinylglycine, exists abundantly in nearly all organisms. Glutathione participates in various physiological processes involved in redox reactions by serving as an electron donor/acceptor. In this study, we found that the abundance of total glutathion...

  1. Selenoprotein M gene expression, peroxidases activity and hydrogen peroxide concentration are differentially regulated in gill and hepatopancreas of the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei during hypoxia and reoxygenation.

    PubMed

    García-Triana, Antonio; Peregrino-Uriarte, Alma Beatriz; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria

    2016-09-01

    In many organisms, episodes of low O2 concentration (hypoxia) and the subsequent rise of O2 concentration (reoxygenation) result in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress. Selenoprotein M (SelM), is a selenocysteine containing protein with redox activity involved in the antioxidant response. It was previously shown that in the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, the silencing of SelM by RNAi decreased peroxidase activity in gill. In this work, we report the structure of the SelM gene (LvSelM) and its relative expression in hepatopancreas and gill after 24h of hypoxia followed by 1h of reoxygenation. The gene is composed by four exons interrupted by tree introns. In gills and hepatopancreas, SelM expression increased after 24h of hypoxia followed by 1h of reoxygenation, while peroxidases activity diminished in hepatopancreas but increased in gills. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration was higher in hepatopancreas in response to hypoxia for 6h and did not change after 24 of hypoxia followed by reoxygenation; conversely, no change was detected in gill. SelM appears to be a key enzyme in gill oxidative stress regulation, since the higher expression is associated with an increase in peroxidases activity while maintaining H2O2 concentration. In contrast, in hepatopancreas there is a higher expression after hypoxia and reoxygenation for 24h, but peroxidases activity was lower and the change in H2O2 occurred after 6h of hypoxia and this level was maintained during reoxygenation. PMID:27112516

  2. Effects of thermal treatments and storage on pectin methylesterase and peroxidase activity in freshly squeezed orange juice.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Angelika R; Förch, Kirsten; Neidhart, Sybille; Wolf, Gudrun; Carle, Reinhold

    2008-07-23

    A specific indicator of freshness, allowing routine distinction between freshly squeezed orange juices (FSOJs) and FSOJ-like products, was to be identified. Using the Actijoule unit of a tubular heater at a flow rate of 60 L/h, FSOJs from Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck cv. Valencia Late were continuously heated on a pilot plant scale at six different temperatures (42-92 degrees C), followed by continuous cooling to ambient temperature and subsequent filling into sterilized glass jars. The cloud stability and residual activities of pectin methylesterase (PE) and peroxidase (POD) were monitored over the storage at 4 degrees C for up to 62 days, thus considering the storage conditions of FSOJs in retail markets. As shown by the viable microbial counts throughout storage, microbial activity was insignificant due to good sanitary practice, thus proving that the enzyme activities detected were of plant origin. The juices processed at temperatures > or =62 degrees C were characterized by minor residual activities. When exposed to temperatures <62 degrees C in the genuine acidic matrix of the juices, the heat stability of PE exceeded that of POD. Compared with the aforementioned samples, the juice processed at 52 degrees C with a residual PE activity of 33.8% was hardly inferior in terms of cloud stability within the first 14 days. After the juice was processed at 42 degrees C, rapid clarification occurred within the first 8 days, consistent with undetectable PE deactivation. Hence, only the range of approximately 50-60 degrees C is relevant in minimal heat-processing for the retention of cloud stability within the short turnover period of FSOJ-like products, with partial PE and POD deactivation being already sufficient to distinguish those juices from FSOJs. Irrespective of the previous thermal treatment, the total PE activity remained nearly constant during storage, whereas the POD activity rapidly declined to minor levels after 20 days. Consequently, as to the future

  3. Effect of ovariectomy and sex hormone replacement on glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes in rat hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hambali, Z; Ngah, W Z; Wahid, S A; Kadir, K A

    1995-01-01

    The effects of ovariectomy and hormone replacement in control and carcinogen treated female rats were investigated by measuring whole blood and liver glutathione (WGSH, HGSH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GRx) and histological evaluation. Hepatocarcinogenesis was induced by diethylnitrosamine and 2-acetylaminofluorene. In control rats not receiving carcinogen, ovariectomy significantly increased the GST and GRx activities. Replacement with either estrogen or progesterone reduced the GST activities to below intact female values whereas replacement of both hormones together brought the GST activities to that of intact females. GRx activities were brought to intact female values by replacement with estrogen or progesterone, either singly or in combination. Neither ovariectomy nor sex hormone/s replacement influenced the levels of WGSH, HGSH and GPx activities. Carcinogen administration to intact rats increased all the parameters measured. Ovariectomized rats treated with carcinogen showed lower GPx and GRx activities at 2 mths. However, replacement with either progesterone or combined estrogen and progesterone increased GPx and GRx activities to original values. On the other hand GST and GPx activities in ovariectomized rats which had carcinogen treatment were lower than intact rats after 5 mths. Replacement with hormones either singly or both brought GST and GPx activities up to intact rat levels receiving carcinogen. The levels of WGSH, HGSH and GRx activities (5 mths) in carcinogen treated rats were not influenced by ovariectomy and/or hormone/s replacement. The results from this study suggested that ovariectomy reduced the severity of hepatocarcinogenesis which was restored by sex hormone/s replacement. PMID:7603748

  4. Msn2p/Msn4p act as a key transcriptional activator of yeast cytoplasmic thiol peroxidase II.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung-Keun; Cha, Mee-Kyung; Choi, Yong-Soo; Kim, Won-Cheol; Kim, Il-Han

    2002-04-01

    We observed that the transcription of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytoplasmic thiol peroxidase type II (cTPx II) (YDR453C) is regulated in response to various stresses (e.g. oxidative stress, carbon starvation, and heat-shock). It has been suggested that both transcription-activating proteins, Yap1p and Skn7p, regulate the transcription of cTPx II upon exposure to oxidative stress. However, a dramatic loss of transcriptional response to various stresses in yeast mutant strains lacking both Msn2p and Msn4p suggests that the transcription factors act as a principal transcriptional activator. In addition to two Yap1p response elements (YREs), TTACTAA and TTAGTAA, the presence of two stress response elements (STREs) (CCCCT) in the upstream sequence of cTPx II also suggests that Msn2p/Msn4p could control stress-induced expression of cTPx II. Analysis of the transcriptional activity of site-directed mutagenesis of the putative STREs (STRE1 and STRE2) and YREs (TRE1 and YRE2) in terms of the activity of a lacZ reporter gene under control of the cTPx II promoter indicates that STRE2 acts as a principal binding element essential for transactivation of the cTPx II promoter. The transcriptional activity of the cTPx II promoter was exponentially increased after postdiauxic growth. The transcriptional activity of the cTPx II promoter is greatly increased by rapamycin. Deletion of Tor1, Tor2, Ras1, and Ras2 resulted in a considerable induction when compared with their parent strains, suggesting that the transcription of cTPx II is under negative control of the Ras/cAMP and target of rapamycin signaling pathways. Taken together, these results suggest that cTPx II is a target of Msn2p/Msn4p transcription factors under negative control of the Ras-protein kinase A and target of rapamycin signaling pathways. Furthermore, the accumulation of cTPx II upon exposure to oxidative stress and during the postdiauxic shift suggests an important antioxidant role in stationary phase yeast cells

  5. Heterologous Expression of Peroxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Weert, Sandra; Lokman, B. Christien

    The industrial importance of peroxidases has led to much research in the past two decades on the development of a cost effective and efficient production process for peroxidases. Unfortunately, even today, no clear answers can be given to questions such as (1) should the peroxidase be expressed in bacteria, yeast, or fungi? (2) which is the optimal production strain (e.g., protease deficient, heme overproducing)? (3) which expression vector should be chosen? and (4) what purification method should be used? Strategies that have proven successful for one peroxidase can fail for another one; for each individual peroxidase, a new strategy has to be developed. This chapter gives an overview of the heterologous production of heme containing peroxidases in various systems. It focuses on the heterologous production of fungal peroxidases as they have been subject of considerable research for their industrial and environmental applications. An earlier study has also been performed by Conesa et al. [1] and is extended with recent proceedings.

  6. Glutathione level after long-term occupational elemental mercury exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Kobal, Alfred Bogomir Prezelj, Marija; Horvat, Milena; Krsnik, Mladen; Gibicar, Darija; Osredkar, Josko

    2008-05-15

    Many in vitro and in vivo studies have elucidated the interaction of inorganic mercury (Hg) and glutathione. However, human studies are limited. In this study, we investigated the potential effects of remote long-term intermittent occupational elemental Hg vapour (Hg{sup o}) exposure on erythrocyte glutathione levels and some antioxidative enzyme activities in ex-mercury miners in the period after exposure. The study included 49 ex-mercury miners divided into subgroups of 28 still active, Hg{sup o}-not-exposed miners and 21 elderly retired miners, and 41 controls, age-matched to the miners subgroup. The control workers were taken from 'mercury-free works'. Reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized disulphide glutathione (GSSG) concentrations in haemolysed erythrocytes were determined by capillary electrophoresis, while total glutathione (total GSH) and the GSH/GSSG ratio were calculated from the determined values. Catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR) activities in erythrocytes were measured using commercially available reagent kits, while urine Hg (U-Hg) concentrations were determined by cold vapour atomic absorption (CVAAS). No correlation of present U-Hg levels, GSH, GSSG, and antioxidative enzymes with remote occupational biological exposure indices were found. The mean CAT activity in miners and retired miners was significantly higher (p<0.05) than in the controls. No differences in mean GPx activity among the three groups were found, whereas the mean GR activity was significantly higher (p<0.05) in miners than in retired miners. The mean concentrations of GSH (mmol/g Hb) in miners (13.03{+-}3.71) were significantly higher (p<0.05) than in the control group (11.68{+-}2.66). No differences in mean total GSH, GSSG levels, and GSH/GSSG ratio between miners and controls were found. A positive correlation between GSSG and present U-Hg excretion (r=0.41, p=0.001) in the whole group of ex-mercury miners was observed. The

  7. NADPH oxidase inhibitor, apocynin, improves renal glutathione status in Zucker diabetic fatty rats: a comparison with melatonin.

    PubMed

    Winiarska, Katarzyna; Focht, Dorota; Sierakowski, Bartosz; Lewandowski, Krystian; Orlowska, Marta; Usarek, Michal

    2014-07-25

    Apocynin (4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxyacetophenone) is the most commonly used NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor. However, its application raises serious controversies, as the compound has been reported to reveal some prooxidative effects. The aim of this study was to elucidate apocynin action on glutathione, the main intracellular antioxidant, metabolism in kidneys of Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat, a well established model of diabetes type 2. Additionally, apocynin effects were compared with those of melatonin. The experiments were performed on five groups of animals: (1) untreated lean (?/+) ZDF rats, (2) ZDF ?/+ rats treated with apocynin (2 g/l) in drinking water, (3) untreated obese diabetic (fa/fa) ZDF rats, (4) ZDF fa/fa rats treated with apocynin (2 g/l) in drinking water, and (5) ZDF fa/fa rats treated with melatonin (20 mg/l) in drinking water. After 8weeks of the treatment, the following parameters were measured in kidneys: NADPH oxidase activity, the rate of hydroxyl free radicals (HFR) production, GSH and GSSG content and the activities of the enzymes of glutathione metabolism: γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GCS), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Compared to ?/+ controls, ZDF fa/fa rats exhibited increased Nox activity, accelerated HFR generation and dramatically lowered GSH/GSSG ratio accompanied by increased GPx and diminished GCS activities. In case of diabetic animals, apocynin treatment resulted in attenuation of both Nox activity and HFR production, restoration of control GSH/GSSG ratio (due to both an increase in GSH and a decline in GSSG content), normalization of GPx activity and a slight increase in GCS activity. Similar observations were made upon melatonin application to ZDF fa/fa rats. Thus, it is concluded that, in the diabetic model studied, apocynin extends a beneficial effect on renal glutathione homeostasis. The mechanism of this phenomenon involves attenuation of glutathione peroxidase activity, which is

  8. Independent evolution of four heme peroxidase superfamilies.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Nicolussi, Andrea; Soudi, Monika; Pirker, Katharina F; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2015-05-15

    Four heme peroxidase superfamilies (peroxidase-catalase, peroxidase-cyclooxygenase, peroxidase-chlorite dismutase and peroxidase-peroxygenase superfamily) arose independently during evolution, which differ in overall fold, active site architecture and enzymatic activities. The redox cofactor is heme b or posttranslationally modified heme that is ligated by either histidine or cysteine. Heme peroxidases are found in all kingdoms of life and typically catalyze the one- and two-electron oxidation of a myriad of organic and inorganic substrates. In addition to this peroxidatic activity distinct (sub)families show pronounced catalase, cyclooxygenase, chlorite dismutase or peroxygenase activities. Here we describe the phylogeny of these four superfamilies and present the most important sequence signatures and active site architectures. The classification of families is described as well as important turning points in evolution. We show that at least three heme peroxidase superfamilies have ancient prokaryotic roots with several alternative ways of divergent evolution. In later evolutionary steps, they almost always produced highly evolved and specialized clades of peroxidases in eukaryotic kingdoms with a significant portion of such genes involved in coding various fusion proteins with novel physiological functions. PMID:25575902

  9. A one-pot and in situ synthesis of CuS-graphene nanosheet composites with enhanced peroxidase-like catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Nie, Guangdi; Zhang, Liang; Lu, Xiaofeng; Bian, Xiujie; Sun, Weining; Wang, Ce

    2013-10-14

    CuS-graphene nanosheet (GNS) composites with well-defined morphology have been successfully fabricated via a simple one-pot hydrothermal route by using thioacetamide (TAA) as both the sulfur source and reducing agent. The as-prepared CuS-GNS composites with an appropriate content of graphene exhibited an even higher peroxidase-like catalytic activity than pristine CuS nanoparticles in acetate buffer solution (pH = 4.0), which provided a facile method for the colorimetric detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). It was calculated that H2O2 could be detected as low as 1.2 μM (S/N = 3) with a wide linear range from 2.0 to 20.0 μM (R(2) = 0.992), indicating that the as-prepared catalyst as an artificial peroxidase is promising for application in biosensors and environmental monitoring. PMID:23933916

  10. Environmental stress enhances biosynthesis of flavor precursors, S-3-(hexan-1-ol)-glutathione and S-3-(hexan-1-ol)-L-cysteine, in grapevine through glutathione S-transferase activation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hironori; Takase, Hideki; Suzuki, Yumiko; Tanzawa, Fumiko; Takata, Ryoji; Fujita, Keiko; Kohno, Minako; Mochizuki, Mai; Suzuki, Shunji; Konno, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    The biosynthesis of S-(3-hexan-1-ol)-glutathione (3MH-S-glut) and S-(3-hexan-l-ol)-L-cysteine (3MH-S-cys), which act as flavour precursors in wines, in Vitis vinifera grapes exposed to various environmental stress conditions is reported here. Ultraviolet (UV-C) irradiation, water deficit, and biological stimulation up-regulated 3MH-S-glut and 3MH-S-cys biosynthesis in grape leaves. 3MH-S-glut and 3MH-S-cys contents in grape berries were increased by cold shock, heat shock, UV-C irradiation, and biological stimulation. The results suggest that environmental stress enhances the biosynthesis of both flavour precursors in grapevine. The transcription of VvGST1, VvGST3, VvGST4, and GGT in grapevine exposed to the stress conditions was increased markedly compared with that in control grapevine. Also, UV irradiation increased GST (glutathione S-transferase) and GGT (γ-glutamyl transferase) enzyme activities in grape berries. Recombinant VvGST3 and VvGST4, but not VvGST1, mediated the synthesis of 3MH-S-glut from reduced glutathione and trans-2-hexenal in vitro. The enzymatic mediation of flavour precursor production is a novel function of plant GSTs and may result in the detoxification of damaged grape cells under stress conditions. PMID:21115666

  11. Synthesis, Nitric Oxide Release, and Anti-Leukemic Activity of Glutathione-Activated Nitric Oxide Prodrugs: Structural Analogues of PABA/NO, an Anti-Cancer Lead Compound

    PubMed Central

    Chakrapani, Harinath; Wilde, Thomas C.; Citro, Michael L.; Goodblatt, Michael M.; Keefer, Larry K.; Saavedra, Joseph E.

    2008-01-01

    Diazeniumdiolate anions and their prodrug forms are reliable sources of nitric oxide (NO) that have generated interest as promising therapeutic agents. A number of structural analogues of O2-(2,4-dinitro-5-(4-(N-methylamino)benzoyloxy)phenyl) 1-(N,N-dimethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (PABA/NO), an anti-cancer lead compound that is designed to release NO upon activation by glutathione, were prepared. The nitric oxide release patterns of these O2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) diazeniumdiolates in the presence of glutathione were tested and it was found that in the absence of competing pathways, these compounds release nearly quantitative amounts of NO. The ability of PABA/NO and its structural analogues to inhibit human leukemia cell proliferation was determined and it was found that compounds releasing elevated amounts of NO displayed superior cytotoxic effects. PMID:18060792

  12. High-yield production of manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and versatile peroxidase in Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Coconi-Linares, Nancy; Magaña-Ortíz, Denis; Guzmán-Ortiz, Doralinda A; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M; Gómez-Lim, Miguel A

    2014-11-01

    The white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium secretes extracellular oxidative enzymes during secondary metabolism, but lacks versatile peroxidase, an enzyme important in ligninolysis and diverse biotechnology processes. In this study, we report the genetic modification of a P. chrysosporium strain capable of co-expressing two endogenous genes constitutively, manganese peroxidase (mnp1) and lignin peroxidase (lipH8), and the codon-optimized vpl2 gene from Pleurotus eryngii. For this purpose, we employed a highly efficient transformation method based on the use of shock waves developed by our group. The expression of recombinant genes was verified by PCR, Southern blot, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), and assays of enzymatic activity. The production yield of ligninolytic enzymes was up to four times higher in comparison to previously published reports. These results may represent significant progress toward the stable production of ligninolytic enzymes and the development of an effective fungal strain with promising biotechnological applications. PMID:25269601

  13. Evidence that human class Theta glutathione S-transferase T1-1 can catalyse the activation of dichloromethane, a liver and lung carcinogen in the mouse. Comparison of the tissue distribution of GST T1-1 with that of classes Alpha, Mu and Pi GST in human.

    PubMed Central

    Sherratt, P J; Pulford, D J; Harrison, D J; Green, T; Hayes, J D

    1997-01-01

    The cDNA encoding human glutathione S-transferase (GST) T1 has been expressed as two recombinant forms in Escherichia coli that could be purified by affinity chromatography on either IgG-Sepharose or nickel-agarose; one form of the transferase was synthesized from the pALP 1 expression vector as a Staphylococcus aureus protein A fusion, whereas the other form was synthesized from the pET-20b expression vector as a C-terminal polyhistidine-tagged recombinant. The yields of the two purified recombinant proteins from E. coli cultures were approx. 15 mg/l for the protein A fusion and 25 mg/l for the C-terminal polyhistidine-tagged GST T1-1. The purified recombinant proteins were catalytically active, although the protein A fusion was typically only 5-30% as active as the histidine-tagged GST. Both recombinant forms could catalyse the conjugation of glutathione with the model substrates 1,2-epoxy-3-(4'-nitrophenoxy)propane,4-nitrobenzyl chloride and 4-nitrophenethyl bromide but were inactive towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, ethacrynic acid and 1-menaphthyl sulphate. Recombinant human GST T1-1 was found to exhibit glutathione peroxidase activity and could catalyse the reduction of cumene hydroperoxide. In addition, recombinant human GST T1-1 was found to conjugate glutathione with dichloromethane, a pulmonary and hepatic carcinogen in the mouse. Immunoblotting with antibodies raised against different transferase isoenzymes showed that GST T1-1 is expressed in a large number of human organs in a tissue-specific fashion that differs from the pattern of expression of classes Alpha, Mu and Pi GST. Most significantly, GST T1-1 was found in only low levels in human pulmonary soluble extract of cells, suggesting that in man the lung has little capacity to activate the volatile dichloromethane. PMID:9307035

  14. Peroxidases identified in a subtractive cDNA library approach show tissue-specific transcript abundance and enzyme activity during seed germination of Lepidium sativum

    PubMed Central

    Linkies, Ada; Schuster-Sherpa, Uta; Tintelnot, Stefanie; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard; Müller, Kerstin

    2010-01-01

    The micropylar endosperm is a major regulator of seed germination in endospermic species, to which the close Brassicaceae relatives Arabidopsis thaliana and Lepidium sativum (cress) belong. Cress seeds are about 20 times larger than the seeds of Arabidopsis. This advantage was used to construct a tissue-specific subtractive cDNA library of transcripts that are up-regulated late in the germination process specifically in the micropylar endosperm of cress seeds. The library showed that a number of transcripts known to be up-regulated late during germination are up-regulated in the micropylar endosperm cap. Detailed germination kinetics of SALK lines carrying insertions in genes present in our library showed that the identified transcripts do indeed play roles during germination. Three peroxidases were present in the library. These peroxidases were identified as orthologues of Arabidopsis AtAPX01, AtPrx16, and AtPrxIIE. The corresponding SALK lines displayed significant germination phenotypes. Their transcripts were quantified in specific cress seed tissues during germination in the presence and absence of ABA and they were found to be regulated in a tissue-specific manner. Peroxidase activity, and particularly its regulation by ABA, also differed between radicles and micropylar endosperm caps. Possible implications of this tissue-specificity are discussed. PMID:19884228

  15. Mimicking peroxidase activity by a polymer-supported oxidovanadium(IV) Schiff base complex derived from salicylaldehyde and 1,3-diamino-2-hydroxypropane.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Mannar R; Chaudhary, Nikita; Avecilla, Fernando; Correia, Isabel

    2015-06-01

    The polymer-supported oxidovanadium(IV) complex PS-[V(IV)O(sal-dahp)] (2) (PS=chloromethylated polystyrene crosslinked with 5% divinylbenzene, and H3sal-dahp=dibasic pentadentate ligand derived from salicylaldehyde and 1,3-diamino-2-hydroxypropane) was prepared from the corresponding monomeric oxidovanadium(IV) complex [V(IV)O(Hsal-dahp)(DMSO)] (1), characterized and successfully used as catalyst for the peroxidase-like oxidation of pyrogallol. The oxidation of pyrogallol to purpurogallin with PS-[V(IV)O(sal-dahp)] (2) was achieved under mild conditions at pH7 buffered solution. Plausible intermediate species formed during peroxidase mimicking experiments are proposed, by studying the model complex [V(IV)O(Hsal-dahp)(DMSO)] (1) by UV-visible and (51)V NMR spectroscopies. The high peroxidase mimicking ability of polymer-supported complex 2, its stability in a wide pH range, the easy separation from the reaction media, and the reusability without considerable decrease in activity, suggest that this heterogeneous catalyst has high potential for application in sustainable industrial catalysis. PMID:25747150

  16. Effects of cyanobacterial lipopolysaccharides from microcystis on glutathione-based detoxification pathways in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo.

    PubMed

    Jaja-Chimedza, Asha; Gantar, Miroslav; Mayer, Gregory D; Gibbs, Patrick D L; Berry, John P

    2012-06-01

    Cyanobacteria ("blue-green algae") are recognized producers of a diverse array of toxic secondary metabolites. Of these, the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), produced by all cyanobacteria, remain to be well investigated. In the current study, we specifically employed the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo to investigate the effects of LPS from geographically diverse strains of the widespread cyanobacterial genus, Microcystis, on several detoxifying enzymes/pathways, including glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx)/glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT), and compared observed effects to those of heterotrophic bacterial (i.e., E. coli) LPS. In agreement with previous studies, cyanobacterial LPS significantly reduced GST in embryos exposed to LPS in all treatments. In contrast, GPx moderately increased in embryos exposed to LPS, with no effect on reciprocal GR activity. Interestingly, total glutathione levels were elevated in embryos exposed to Microcystis LPS, but the relative levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH/GSSG) were, likewise, elevated suggesting that oxidative stress is not involved in the observed effects as typical of heterotrophic bacterial LPS in mammalian systems. In further support of this, no effect was observed with respect to CAT or SOD activity. These findings demonstrate that Microcystis LPS affects glutathione-based detoxification pathways in the zebrafish embryo, and more generally, that this model is well suited for investigating the apparent toxicophore of cyanobacterial LPS, including possible differences in structure-activity relationships between heterotrophic and cyanobacterial LPS, and teleost fish versus mammalian systems. PMID:22822454

  17. Activity Assay of Glutathione S-Transferase (GSTs) Enzyme as a Diagnostic Biomarker for Liver Hydatid Cyst in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    MOATAMEDI POUR, Lila; FARAHNAK, Ali; MOLAEI RAD, Mohamadbagher; GOLMOHAMADI, Taghi; ESHRAGHIAN, Mohamadreza

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to detect the Glutathione S-Transferase(GST) enzyme activity of healthy / cystic liver as a diagnostic biomarker for hydatidosis. In order to compare with liver tissue, the level of the GSTs enzyme activity of parasite was also determined. Methods Parasites were collected from sheep liver tissue with hydatid cysts at a local abattoir and washed with PBS buffer. Collected parasites and liver tissues were sonicated or homogenized respectively. Extract solution samples were centrifuged and stored at - 20°C. GST enzyme activities were measured in the extract of parasite and liver tissue samples (healthy and infected livers). Protein amounts and protein bands were detected using Bradford and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) methods respectively. To determine significant difference between two groups, two-sample t-test was performed. Results GST specific activities of healthy / infected livers and parasites were estimated 304, 1297 and 146 U/ml/mg respectively. Significant higher GST specific activities in cystic liver than healthy liver was observed (P <0.05). T-test analysis showed GST activity of parasite was lower than healthy liver tissue. SDS-PAGE showed GST protein bands with 24 kDa in parasite samples and25 kDa in liver tissues. Conclusion GST activity incystic liver tissue could be concerned as a biomarker for hydatid cyst diagnosis with other hydatid disease parameters. PMID:25909067

  18. 1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced alterations of glutathione status in immortalized rat dopaminergic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Drechsel, Derek A.; Liang, L.-P.; Patel, Manisha . E-mail: manisha.patel@uchsc.edu

    2007-05-01

    Decreased glutathione levels associated with increased oxidative stress are a hallmark of numerous neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. GSH is an important molecule that serves as an anti-oxidant and is also a major determinant of cellular redox environment. Previous studies have demonstrated that neurotoxins can cause changes in reduced and oxidized GSH levels; however, information regarding steady state levels remains unexplored. The goal of this study was to characterize changes in cellular GSH levels and its regulatory enzymes in a dopaminergic cell line (N27) following treatment with the Parkinsonian toxin, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP{sup +}). Cellular GSH levels were initially significantly decreased 12 h after treatment, but subsequently recovered to values greater than controls by 24 h. However, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels were increased 24 h following treatment, concomitant with a decrease in GSH/GSSG ratio prior to cell death. In accordance with these changes, ROS levels were also increased, confirming the presence of oxidative stress. Decreased enzymatic activities of glutathione reductase and glutamate-cysteine ligase by 20-25% were observed at early time points and partly account for changes in GSH levels after MPP{sup +} exposure. Additionally, glutathione peroxidase activity was increased 24 h following treatment. MPP{sup +} treatment was not associated with increased efflux of glutathione to the medium. These data further elucidate the mechanisms underlying GSH depletion in response to the Parkinsonian toxin, MPP{sup +}.

  19. Redox Potential of Peroxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Marcela

    Redox potential of peroxidases greatly influences the range of oxidizable substrates: in principle, peroxidases may only catalyze the oxidation of substrates with lower redox potential. There is substantial information on the factors that modulate the redox potential of heme proteins. Both theoretical and experimental evidence highlight the most significant contributions arising from the interaction of heme iron with the axial ligands, as well as the electrostatic interactions surrounding the heme group. However, for different proteins, the factors contribute to different extents. Understanding the electrochemistry of heme peroxidases is fundamental in order to design enhanced biocatalysts. In this chapter, current knowledge of the forces influencing redox potential of heme peroxidases is reviewed.

  20. Variants of glutathione s-transferase pi 1 exhibit differential enzymatic activity and inhibition by heavy metals

    PubMed Central

    Goodrich, Jaclyn M.; Basu, Niladri

    2012-01-01

    Nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in glutathione s-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1; Ile/Val 105, Ala/Val 114) have been associated with altered toxicant metabolism in epidemiological cohorts. We explored the impact of GSTP1 genotype on enzyme kinetics and heavy metal inhibition in vitro. Four GSTP1 allozymes (105/114: Ile/Ala, Val/Ala, Ile/Val, Val/Val) were expressed in and purified from E. coli. Enzyme activity assays quantifying the rate of glutathione conjugation with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) revealed significant differences in kinetic parameters depending on genotype (p<0.01). Allozymes with Ile105 had better catalytic efficiency and greater affinity for CDNB (mean ±SEM: Ile105 Ala114 Km= 0.33±0.07 mM vs. Val105 Ala114 Km=1.15±0.07 mM). Inhibition of GSTP1 activity by heavy metals was assessed following treatment with mercury (inorganic- HgCl2, methylmercury- MeHg), selenium, cadmium, lead, arsenic, and manganese. All allozymes were inhibited by HgCl2 (IC50 range: 24.1–172 μM), MeHg (93.9–480 μM), and selenium (43.7–62.8 μM). Genotype significantly influenced the potency of mercury with GSTP1 Ile105 Val114 the least sensitive and Val105 Ala114 the most sensitive to inhibition by HgCl2 and MeHg. Overall, genotype of two nonsynonymous polymorphisms in GSTP1 influenced enzyme kinetics pertaining to an electrophilic substrate and inhibition by two mercury species. PMID:22401947