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Sample records for activity glutathione reductase

  1. Uterine glutathione reductase activity: modulation by estrogens and progesterone.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, M; Baiza-Gutman, L A; Pedrón, N N; Hicks, J J

    1999-10-29

    The aim of this study was to determine whether glutathione reductase activity in uterine tissue is regulated by sex hormones. In spayed rats uterine glutathione reductase was significantly increased by exogenous estrogen (P< 0.01), progesterone (P< 0.01) or estrogen plus progesterone (P<0.01). When enzyme activity is expressed per mg protein, daily administration of estrogen or progesterone induces a progressive increase of this enzyme between 24 to 48 h or 24 to 72 h of treatment, respectively. Whereas the combination of both steroids causes an earlier and higher increase in glutathione reductase activity at 24 h of treatment. Estradiol singly or in combination with progesterone induced the highest protein concentration in the uterus. Whereas uterine DNA concentration is only significantly affected by estradiol. Our results suggest that uterine glutathione reductase is regulated by estradiol and progesterone and may be involved in maintaining levels of reduced glutathione in the uterus. This compound may be required for control of the redox state of thiol groups and in detoxification reactions involving H2O2 and electrophylic substances. The antioxidant action of estrogens is partially due to the stimulation of glutathione reductase.

  2. Docking and molecular dynamics studies at trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase active sites.

    PubMed

    Iribarne, Federico; Paulino, Margot; Aguilera, Sara; Murphy, Miguel; Tapia, Orlando

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical docking study on the active sites of trypanothione reductase (TR) and glutathione reductase (GR) with the corresponding natural substrates, trypanothione disulfide (T[S]2) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), is reported. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to check the robustness of the docking results. The energetic results are in agreement with previous experimental findings and show the crossed complexes have lower stabilization energies than the natural ones. To test DOCK3.5, four nitro furanic compounds, previously designed as potentially active anti-chagasic molecules, were docked at the GR and TR active sites with the DOCK3.5 procedure. A good correlation was found between differential inhibitory activity and relative interaction energy (affinity). The results provide a validation test for the use of DOCK3.5 in connection with the design of anti-chagasic drugs.

  3. [Effect of chloditan on the changes of activity of glutathione transferase, glutathione reductase and glutathione content in the adrenal glands and liver in rats].

    PubMed

    Zorich, P A; Tronko, N D; Mikosha, A S

    1994-01-01

    The chloditan (o.p-DDD, mitotane), which causes the destruction of the human and dog adrenal cortex, on the most essential system of xenobiotic metabolism: glutathione-S-transferase--glutathione has been studied. The effect of o,p-DDD on GSH level and activity of glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione reductase which maintain the level of reduced glutathione was analyzed in the adrenal and liver tissue of rats. This species is resistant to adrenocorticolytic action of o,p-DDD. It was shown that feeding of rats weighting 200-240 g with oil solution of o,p-DDD (75 mg daily) for 3 days causes the decrease in activity of glutathione-S-transferase and content of oxidazed glutathione in the adrenals with simultaneous increase of the content of reduced glutathione. The glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione reductase activity in the liver rises under the effect of o,p-DDD, the decrease of the GSH level being observed. The revealed changes may explain the species sensitivity of animals to o,p-DDD.

  4. Regulative roles of glutathione reductase and four glutaredoxins in glutathione redox, antioxidant activity, and iron homeostasis of Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long-Bin; Tang, Li; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2016-07-01

    Multiple glutaredoxins (Grx) and glutathione reductase (Glr) are vital for the thiol-disulfide redox system in budding yeast but generally unexplored in filamentous fungi. Here we characterized the Beauveria bassiana redox system comprising dithiol Grx1, monothiol Grx2-4, Grx-like Grx5, and Glr orthologue. Each grx or glr deletion was compensated by increased transcripts of some other grx genes in normal cultures. Particularly, grx3 compensated the absence of grx1, grx2, grx5, or glr under oxidative stress while its absence was compensated only by undeletable grx4 under normal conditions but by most of other undeleted grx and glr genes in response to menadione. Consequently, the redox state was disturbed in Δglr more than in Δgrx3 but not in Δgrx1/2/5. Superoxide dismutases were more active in normal Δgrx1-3 cultures but less in Δgrx5 or Δglr response to menadione. Total catalase activity increased differentially in all the mutant cultures stressed with or without H2O2 while total peroxidase activity decreased more in the normal or H2O2-stressed culture of Δglr than of Δgrx3. Among the mutants, Δgrx3 showed slightly increased sensitivity to menadione or H2O2; Δglr exhibited greater sensitivity to thiol-oxidizing diamide than thiol-reducing 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as well as increased sensitivity to the two oxidants. Intriguingly, all the mutants grew slower in a Fe(3+)-inclusive medium perhaps due to elevated transcripts of two Fe(3+) transporter genes. More or fewer phenotypes linked with biocontrol potential were altered in four deletion mutants excluding Δgrx5. All the changes were restored by targeted gene complementation. Overall, Grx3 played more critical role than other Grx homologues in the Glr-dependent redox system of the fungal entomopathogen.

  5. Dimethyl Fumarate Induces Glutathione Recycling by Upregulation of Glutathione Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Christina; Dietrich, Michael; Herrmann, Ann-Kathrin; Schacht, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal degeneration in multiple sclerosis has been linked to oxidative stress. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an effective oral therapeutic option shown to reduce disease activity and progression in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. DMF activates the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) leading to increased synthesis of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and prominent neuroprotection in vitro. We previously demonstrated that DMF is capable of raising GSH levels even when glutathione synthesis is inhibited, suggesting enhanced GSH recycling. Here, we found that DMF indeed induces glutathione reductase (GSR), a homodimeric flavoprotein that catalyzes GSSG reduction to GSH by using NADPH as a reducing cofactor. Knockdown of GSR using a pool of E. coli RNase III-digested siRNAs or pharmacological inhibition of GSR, however, also induced the antioxidant response rendering it impossible to verify the suspected attenuation of DMF-mediated neuroprotection. However, in cystine-free medium, where GSH synthesis is abolished, pharmacological inhibition of GSR drastically reduced the effect of DMF on glutathione recycling. We conclude that DMF increases glutathione recycling through induction of glutathione reductase. PMID:28116039

  6. Characterization of thyroidal glutathione reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Raasch, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Glutathione levels were determined in bovine and rat thyroid tissue by enzymatic conjugation with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene using glutathione S-transferase. Bovine thyroid tissue contained 1.31 {+-} 0.04 mM reduced glutathione (GSH) and 0.14 {+-} 0.02 mM oxidized glutathione (GSSG). In the rat, the concentration of GSH was 2.50 {+-} 0.05 mM while GSSG was 0.21 {+-} 0.03 mM. Glutathione reductase (GR) was purified from bovine thyroid to electrophoretic homogeneity by ion exchange, affinity and molecular exclusion chromatography. A molecular weight range of 102-109 kDa and subunit size of 55 kDa were determined for GR. Thyroidal GR was shown to be a favoprotein with one FAD per subunit. The Michaelis constants of bovine thyroidal GR were determined to be 21.8 {mu}M for NADPH and 58.8 {mu}M for GSSG. The effect of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxine (T{sub 4}) on in vivo levels of GR and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were determined in rat thyroid homogenates. Both enzymes were stimulated by TSH treatment and markedly reduced following T{sub 4} treatment. Lysosomal hydrolysis of ({sup 125}I)-labeled and unlabeled thyroglobulin was examined using size exclusion HPLC.

  7. The effects of exogenous glutathione on reduced glutathione level, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities of rats with different ages and gender after whole-body Γ-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Erden Inal, Mine; Akgün, Asiye; Kahraman, Ahmet

    2003-07-01

    Age-and gender-related changes on reduced glutathione (GSH) level, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities in the liver of rat exposed to different dose of whole-body g-ray irradiation were determined. In addition, the effect of administration of exogenous GSH on endogenous GSH levels, GPx and GR activities was investigated. For this aim, male and female rats aged 1 and 5 moths were divided into two groups as g-ray and g-ray+GSH. Both groups were again divided into four groups as irradiated with 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy doses. GSH level and GPx activity did not change with age while GR activity was decreased with age. Gender-dependent changes in GPx and GR activities were observed, but GSH values were not affect by sex. GSH levels, GPx and GR activities were not observed dose-associated changes of g-irradiation. GSH level and GPx activity in the 8Gy group were increased by GSH. GR activities of old male rats were found to be increased by glutathione in the 6 and 8Gy groups. These results indicate that radiation and administration of exogenous GSH affect gender-and age-dependent GSH level, GPx and GR activities in the rats.

  8. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... activity of the enzyme glutathione reductase in serum, plasma, or erythrocytes by such techniques as fluorescence and photometry. The results of this assay are used in the diagnosis of liver disease,...

  9. Rhythms of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in brain of chick and their inhibition by light.

    PubMed

    Pablos, M I; Reiter, R J; Ortiz, G G; Guerrero, J M; Agapito, M T; Chuang, J I; Sewerynek, E

    1998-01-01

    Melatonin was recently shown to be a component of the antioxidative defense system of organisms due to its free radical scavenging and antioxidant activities. Pharmacologically, melatonin stimulates the activity of the peroxide detoxifying enzyme glutathione peroxidase in rat brain and in several tissues of chicks. In this report, we studied the endogenous rhythm of two antioxidant enzymes, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase, in five regions (hippocampus, hypothalamus, striatum, cortex and cerebellum) of chick brain and correlated them with physiological blood melatonin concentrations. Glutathione peroxidase exhibited a marked 24 h rhythm with peak activity in each brain region which had acrophases about 8 h after lights off and about 4 h after the serum melatonin peak was detected. Glutathione reductase activity exhibited similar robust rhythms with the peaks occurring roughly 2 h after those of glutathione peroxidase. We suggest that neural glutathione peroxidase increases due to the rise of nocturnal melatonin levels while glutathione reductase activity rises slightly later possibly due to an increase of its substrate, oxidized glutathione. The exposure of chicks to constant light for 6 days eliminated the melatonin rhythm as well as the peaks in both glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities. These findings suggest that the melatonin rhythm may be related to the nighttime increases in the enzyme activities, although other explanations cannot be excluded.

  10. Red-cell GSH regeneration and glutathione reductase activity in G6PD variants in the Ferrara area.

    PubMed

    Anderson, B B; Carandina, G; Lucci, M; Perry, G M; Vullo, C

    1987-12-01

    Red-cell studies were carried out on three groups of G6PD-deficient subjects with different G6PD variants from the Ferrara area of Northern Italy. Red-cell GSH and activities of G6PD, glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured. A method was developed to measure red-cell GSH regeneration after oxidation of endogenous GSH in whole blood by diamide and only this clearly distinguished the variants from each other and from normal. Regeneration by 1 h was lowest in the Mediterranean variant, 0-10.2% in contrast to 93-98% in normal. A predisposition to a haemolytic crisis after ingestion of fava beans was not clearcut, but subjects appeared to be at risk if GSH regeneration at 1 h was less than 30% of the endogenous level, and red-cell FAD+ was very high indicated by high in vitro GR activity and inhibition by added FAD+. It is suggested that the most informative tests in G6PD deficiency are measurements of GSH regeneration in intact red cells plus GR activity and/or red-cell flavin compounds.

  11. Comparison of inhibitory effects between acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione in human glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Nýdlová, Erika; Vrbová, Martina; Cesla, Petr; Jankovičová, Barbora; Ventura, Karel; Roušar, Tomáš

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen overdose is the most frequent cause of acute liver injury. The main mechanism of acetaminophen toxicity has been attributed to oxidation of acetaminophen. The oxidation product is very reactive and reacts with glutathione generating acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate (APAP-SG). Although this conjugate has been recognized to be generally nontoxic, we have found recently that APAP-SG could produce a toxic effect. Therefore, the aim of our study was to estimate the toxicity of purified APAP-SG by characterizing the inhibitory effect in human glutathione reductase (GR) and comparing that to the inhibitory effect of the natural inhibitor reduced glutathione. We used two types of human GR: recombinant and freshly purified from red blood cells. Our results show that GR was significantly inhibited in the presence of both APAP-SG and reduced glutathione. For example, the enzyme activity of recombinant and purified GR was reduced in the presence of 4 mm APAP-SG (with 0.5 mm glutathione disulfide) by 28% and 22%, respectively. The type of enzyme inhibition was observed to be competitive in the cases of both APAP-SG and glutathione. As glutathione inhibits GR activity in cells under physiological conditions, the rate of enzyme inhibition ought to be weaker in the case of glutathione depletion that is typical of acetaminophen overdose. Notably, however, enzyme activity likely remains inhibited due to the presence of APAP-SG, which might enhance the pro-oxidative status in the cell. We conclude that our finding could reflect some other pathological mechanism that may contribute to the toxicity of acetaminophen.

  12. Low red blood cell glutathione reductase and pyridoxine phosphate oxidase activities not related to dietary riboflavin: selection by malaria?

    PubMed

    Anderson, B B; Giuberti, M; Perry, G M; Salsini, G; Casadio, I; Vullo, C

    1993-05-01

    This study was designed to confirm that low dietary riboflavin does not contribute to the flavin-deficient red blood cells commonly found in subjects in Ferrara Province, northern Italy. In this area it is primarily an inherited characteristic believed to have been selected for by malaria, which was endemic from the 12th century. In parallel with assessment of daily riboflavin intake (DRI), flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent glutathione reductase (EGR) and flavin mononucleotide-dependent pyridoxine phosphate oxidase (PPO) were measured in beta-thalassemic heterozygotes, their normal relatives, and normal spouses (representative of the normal population). In all of these groups there is a high incidence of deficiency of these flavin enzymes. We found that the majority had an adequate riboflavin intake and there was no significant correlation of EGR and PPO activities with DRI. Thus, interpretation of low EGR activity is discussed with reference to studies of EGR done to detect nutritional riboflavin deficiency in countries where there is malnutrition and endemic malaria.

  13. The role of glutathione reductase and related enzymes on cellular redox homoeostasis network.

    PubMed

    Couto, Narciso; Wood, Jennifer; Barber, Jill

    2016-06-01

    In this review article we examine the role of glutathione reductase in the regulation, modulation and maintenance of cellular redox homoeostasis. Glutathione reductase is responsible for maintaining the supply of reduced glutathione; one of the most abundant reducing thiols in the majority of cells. In its reduced form, glutathione plays key roles in the cellular control of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species act as intracellular and extracellular signalling molecules and complex cross talk between levels of reactive oxygen species, levels of oxidised and reduced glutathione and other thiols, and antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione reductase determine the most suitable conditions for redox control within a cell or for activation of programmed cell death. Additionally, we discuss the translation and expression of glutathione reductase in a number of organisms including yeast and humans. In yeast and human cells, a single gene expresses more than one form of glutathione reductase, destined for residence in the cytoplasm or for translocation to different organelles; in plants, however, two genes encoding this protein have been described. In general, insects and kinetoplastids (a group of protozoa, including Plasmodia and Trypanosoma) do not express glutathione reductase or glutathione biosynthetic enzymes. Instead, they express either the thioredoxin system or the trypanothione system. The thioredoxin system is also present in organisms that have the glutathione system and there may be overlapping functions with cross-talk between the two systems. Finally we evaluate therapeutic targets to overcome oxidative stress associated cellular disorders.

  14. The effect of quercetin and galangin on glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Paulíková, Helena; Berczeliová, Elena

    2005-12-01

    Quercetin and galangin can change the activity of glutathione reductase. Quercetin (a catechol structure in the B-ring) and galangin (any hydroxyl group in the B-ring) have different biological activities but, both possess high antioxidant abilities. Quercetin during the antioxidative action, is converted into an oxidized products (o-semiquinone and o-quinone), and subsequently glutathionyl adducts may be formed or SH-enzyme can be inhibited. We have tried to see whether inhibition of glutathione reductase (GR) can be influenced by preincubation of enzyme with NADPH (a creation of reduced form of enzyme, GRH(2)) and whether diaphorase activity of the enzyme is decreased by these flavonoids. The results confirmed that quercetin inhibits GRH(2) and inhibition is reduced by addition of EDTA or N-acetylcysteine. Both of flavonoids have no effect on diaphorase activity of glutathione reductase and this enzyme could increase the production of free radicals by catalysis of reduction of o-quinone during action of quercetin in vivo.

  15. Thioredoxin Glutathione Reductase-Dependent Redox Networks in Platyhelminth Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Mariana; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Platyhelminth parasites cause chronic infections that are a major cause of disability, mortality, and economic losses in developing countries. Maintaining redox homeostasis is a major adaptive problem faced by parasites and its disruption can shift the biochemical balance toward the host. Platyhelminth parasites possess a streamlined thiol-based redox system in which a single enzyme, thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR), a fusion of a glutaredoxin (Grx) domain to canonical thioredoxin reductase (TR) domains, supplies electrons to oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and thioredoxin (Trx). TGR has been validated as a drug target for schistosomiasis. Recent Advances: In addition to glutathione (GSH) and Trx reduction, TGR supports GSH-independent deglutathionylation conferring an additional advantage to the TGR redox array. Biochemical and structural studies have shown that the TR activity does not require the Grx domain, while the glutathione reductase and deglutathionylase activities depend on the Grx domain, which receives electrons from the TR domains. The search for TGR inhibitors has identified promising drug leads, notably oxadiazole N-oxides. Critical Issues: A conspicuous feature of platyhelminth TGRs is that their Grx-dependent activities are temporarily inhibited at high GSSG concentrations. The mechanism underlying the phenomenon and its biological relevance are not completely understood. Future Directions: The functional diversity of Trxs and Grxs encoded in platyhelminth genomes remains to be further assessed to thoroughly understand the TGR-dependent redox network. Optimization of TGR inhibitors and identification of compounds targeting other parasite redox enzymes are good options to clinically develop relevant drugs for these neglected, but important diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 735–745. PMID:22909029

  16. In vitro inhibition of human erythrocyte glutathione reductase by some new organic nitrates.

    PubMed

    Sentürk, Murat; Talaz, Oktay; Ekinci, Deniz; Cavdar, Hüseyin; Küfrevioğlu, Omer Irfan

    2009-07-01

    Glutathione reductase (GR), is responsible for the existence of GSH molecule, a crucial antioxidant against oxidative stress reagents. The antimalarial activities of some redox active compounds are attributed to their inhibition of antioxidant flavoenzyme glutathione reductase, and inhibitors are therefore expected to be useful for the treatment of malaria. Twelve organic nitrate derivatives were synthesized and treated with human erythrocyte GR. The molecules were identified as strong GR inhibitors and novel antimalaria candidates.

  17. The effect of aluminium-stress and exogenous spermidine on chlorophyll degradation, glutathione reductase activity and the photosystem II D1 protein gene (psbA) transcript level in lichen Xanthoria parietina.

    PubMed

    Sen, Gulseren; Eryilmaz, Isil Ezgi; Ozakca, Dilek

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the effects of short-term aluminium toxicity and the application of spermidine on the lichen Xanthoria parietina were investigated at the physiological and transcriptional levels. Our results suggest that aluminium stress leads to physiological processes in a dose-dependent manner through differences in lipid peroxidation rate, chlorophyll content and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) activity in aluminium and spermidine treated samples. The expression of the photosystem II D1 protein (psbA) gene was quantified using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Increased glutathione reductase activity and psbA mRNA transcript levels were observed in the X. parietina thalli that were treated with spermidine before aluminium-stress. The results showed that the application of spermidine could mitigate aluminium-induced lipid peroxidation and chlorophyll degradation on lichen X. parietina thalli through an increase in psbA transcript levels and activity of glutathione reductase (GR) enzymes.

  18. Reduction of mitochondrial protein mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters by human glutathione reductase

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Aaron P.; Cheng, Zishuo; Ding, Huangen

    2015-01-01

    Human mitochondrial outer membrane protein mitoNEET is a newly discovered target of type II diabetes drug pioglitazone. Structurally, mitoNEET is a homodimer with each monomer containing an N-terminal transmembrane alpha helix tethered to mitochondrial outer membrane and a C-terminal cytosolic domain hosting a redox active [2Fe-2S] cluster. Genetic studies have shown that mitoNEET has a central role in regulating energy metabolism in mitochondria. However, specific function of mitoNEET remains largely elusive. Here we find that the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters can be efficiently reduced by Escherichia coli thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase in an NADPH-dependent reaction. Purified human glutathione reductase has the same activity as E. coli thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase to reduce the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters. However, rat thioredoxin reductase, a human thioredoxin reductase homolog that contains selenocysteine in the catalytic center, has very little or no activity to reduce the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters. N-ethylmaleimide, a potent thiol modifier, completely inhibits human glutathione reductase to reduce the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters, indicating that the redox active disulfide in the catalytic center of human glutathione reductase may be directly involved in reducing the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters. Additional studies reveal that the reduced mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters in mouse heart cell extracts can be reversibly oxidized by hydrogen peroxide without disruption of the clusters, suggesting that the mitoNEET [2Fe-2S] clusters may undergo redox transition to regulate energy metabolism in mitochondria in response to oxidative signals. PMID:25645953

  19. Naegleria fowleri: a free-living highly pathogenic amoeba contains trypanothione/trypanothione reductase and glutathione/glutathione reductase systems.

    PubMed

    Ondarza, Raúl N; Hurtado, Gerardo; Tamayo, Elsa; Iturbe, Angélica; Hernández, Eva

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents definitive data showing that the thiol-bimane compound isolated and purified by HPLC from Naegleria fowleri trophozoites unequivocally corresponds by matrix assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight MS, to the characteristic monoprotonated ion of trypanothione-(bimane)(2) [M(+)H(+)] of m/z 1104.57 and to the trypanothione-(bimane) of m/z 914.46. The trypanothione disulfide T(S)(2) was also found to have a molecular ion of m/z 723.37. Additionally HPLC demonstrated that thiol-bimane compounds corresponding to cysteine and glutathione were present in Naegleria. The ion patterns of the thiol-bimane compounds prepared from commercial trypanothione standard, Entamoeba histolytica and Crithidia luciliae are identical to the Naegleria thiol-bimane compound. Partially purified extracts from N. fowleri showed the coexistence of glutathione and trypanothione reductases activities. There is not doubt that the thiol compound trypanothione, which was previously thought to occur only in Kinetoplastida, is also present in the human pathogens E. histolytica and N. fowleri, as well as in the non-pathogenic euglenozoan E. gracilis. The presence of the trypanothione/trypanothione reductase system in N. fowleri creates the possibility of using this enzyme as a new "drug target" for rationally designed drugs to eliminate the parasite, without affecting the human host.

  20. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  1. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  2. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  3. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  4. Fasciola gigantica thioredoxin glutathione reductase: Biochemical properties and structural modeling.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ankita; Kesherwani, Manish; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Tripathi, Timir

    2016-08-01

    Platyhelminth thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR) is a multifunctional enzyme that crosstalk between the conventional thioredoxin (Trx) and glutathione (GSH) system. It has been validated as a potential drug target in blood flukes. In the present study, we have performed a biochemical study on Fasciola gigantica TGR with substrates DTNB and GSSG. The Michaelis constant (Km) with DTNB was found to be 4.34±0.12μM while it was 61.15±1.50μM with GSSG. The kinetic results were compared with the TGR activities of other helminths. FgTGR showed typical hysteretic behavior with GSSG as other TGRs. We also described a homology-based structure of FgTGR. The cofactors (NADPH and FAD) and substrates (GSSG and DTNB) were docked, and two possible binding sites for substrates were identified in a single chain. The substrates were found to bind more favorably in the second site of TrxR domains. We also presented the first report on binding interaction of DTNB with a TGR. DTNB forms H-bond with His204 and Arg450 of chain A, Sec597, and Gly598 from chain B, salt-bridge with Lys124, and numerous other hydrophobic interactions. Helminth TGR represents an important enzyme in the redox and antioxidant system; hence, its inhibition can be used as an effective strategy against liver flukes.

  5. Catalytic cycle of human glutathione reductase near 1 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Berkholz, Donald S.; Faber, H. Richard; Savvides, Savvas N.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Summary Efficient enzyme catalysis depends on exquisite details of structure beyond those resolvable in typical medium- and high-resolution crystallographic analyses. Here we report synchrotron-based cryocrystallographic studies of natural substrate complexes of the flavoenzyme human glutathione reductase (GR) at nominal resolutions between 1.1 and 0.95 Å that reveal new aspects of its mechanism. Compression in the active site causes overlapping van der Waals radii and distortion in the nicotinamide ring of the NADPH substrate, which enhances catalysis via stereoelectronic effects. The bound NADPH and redox-active disulfide are positioned optimally on opposite sides of the flavin for a 1,2-addition across a flavin double bond. The new structures extend earlier observations to reveal that the redox-active disulfide loop in GR is an extreme case of sequential peptide bonds systematically deviating from planarity, a net deviation of 53° across 5 residues. But this apparent strain is not a factor in catalysis as it is present in both oxidized and reduced structures. Intriguingly, the flavin bond lengths in oxidized GR are intermediate between those expected for oxidized and reduced flavin, but we present evidence that this may not be due to the protein environment but instead to partial synchrotron reduction of the flavin by the synchrotron beam. Finally, of more general relevance, we present evidence that the structures of synchrotron-reduced disulfide bonds cannot generally be used as reliable models for naturally reduced disulfide bonds. PMID:18638483

  6. Purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase enzymes from the gill tissue of Lake Van fish and analyzing the effects of some chalcone derivatives on enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Muslum; Aslan, Abdulselam; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Comakli, Veysel; Demirdag, Ramazan; Uzun, Naim

    2016-04-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and glutathione reductase (GR) are metabolically quite important enzymes. Within this study, these two enzymes were purified for the first time from the gills of Lake Van fish. In the purifying process, ammonium sulfate precipitation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography techniques for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, temperature degradation and 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity column chromatography for glutathione reductase enzyme were used. The control of the enzyme purity and determination of molecular weight were done with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. K(M) and V(max) values were determined with Lineweaver-Burk plot. Besides, the effects of some chalcone derivatives on the purified enzymes were analyzed. For the ones showing inhibition effect, % activity-[I] figures were drawn and IC50 values were determined. K(i) value was calculated by using Cheng-Prusoff equation.

  7. Marked differences in drug-induced methemoglobinemia in sheep are not due to RBC glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, reduced glutathione, or methemoglobin reductase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.G.; Guertler, A.T.; Lagutchik, M.S.; Woodard, C.L.; Leonard, D.A.

    1993-05-13

    Benzocaine is a commonly used topical anesthetic that is structurally similar to current candidates for cyanide prophylaxis. Benzocaine induces profound methemoglobinemia in some sheep but not others. After topical benzocaine administration certain sheep respond to form MHb (elevated MHb 16-50% after a 56-280 mg dose, a 2-10 second spray with benzocine), while other phenotypically similar sheep fail to significantly form MHb (less than a 2% increase from baseline). Deficiencies in Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD), reduced glutathione (GSH), and MHb reductase increase the susceptibility to methemoglobinemia in man and animals. Sheep are used as a model for G-6-PD deficiency in man, and differences in this enzyme level could cause the variable response seen in these sheep. Similarly, differences in GSH and MHb reductase could be responsible for the observed differences in MHb formation.

  8. Changes of reduced glutathion, glutathion reductase, and glutathione peroxidase after radiation in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Erden, M; Bor, N M

    1984-04-01

    In this series of experiments the protective action of reduced glutathion due to ionizing radiation has been studied. In the experimental group 18 guinea pigs were exposed to successive radiations of 150 rad 3 or 4 days apart. Total dose given amounted to 750 rad which is the LD50 for guinea pigs. Blood samples were taken 30 min after each exposure. The control series were sham radiated but otherwise treated identically. The cells of the removed blood samples were separated by centrifugation and were subjected to the reduced glutathion stability test. GSSGR, GPer, and LDH enzyme activities were also measured of which the latter served as a marked enzyme. It was found that LDH did not show any alteration after radiation. The reduced glutathion stability test showed a consistent but minor reduction (P greater than 0.05), in the experimental group. GSSGR enzyme activity on the other hand was reduced significantly (from 176.48 +/- 11.32 to 41.34 +/- 1.17 IU/ml of packed erythrocytes, P less than 0.001) in the same group. GPer activity showed a consistent but minor elevation during the early phase of the experimental group. It was later increased significantly beginning after 600 rad total radiation on the fourth session (P less than 0.050).

  9. Copper-dependent inhibition and oxidative inactivation with affinity cleavage of yeast glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Keiko; Tsubouchi, Ryoko; Fukayama, Minoru; Yoshino, Masataka

    2014-06-01

    Effects of copper on the activity and oxidative inactivation of yeast glutathione reductase were analyzed. Glutathione reductase from yeast was inhibited by cupric ion and more potently by cuprous ion. Copper ion inhibited the enzyme noncompetitively with respect to the substrate GSSG and NADPH. The Ki values of the enzyme for Cu(2+) and Cu(+) ion were determined to be 1 and 0.35 μM, respectively. Copper-dependent inactivation of glutathione reductase was also analyzed. Hydrogen peroxide and copper/ascorbate also caused an inactivation with the cleavage of peptide bond of the enzyme. The inactivation/fragmentation of the enzyme was prevented by addition of catalase, suggesting that hydroxyl radical produced through the cuprous ion-dependent reduction of oxygen is responsible for the inactivation/fragmentation of the enzyme. SDS-PAGE and TOF-MS analysis confirmed eight fragments, which were further determined to result from the cleavage of the Met17-Ser18, Asn20-Thr21, Glu251-Gly252, Ser420-Pro421, Pro421-Thr422 bonds of the enzyme by amino-terminal sequencing analysis. Based on the kinetic analysis and no protective effect of the substrates, GSSG and NADPH on the copper-mediated inactivation/fragmentation of the enzyme, copper binds to the sites apart from the substrate-sites, causing the peptide cleavage by hydroxyl radical. Copper-dependent oxidative inactivation/fragmentation of glutathione reductase can explain the prooxidant properties of copper under the in vivo conditions.

  10. Glutathione reductase gsr-1 is an essential gene required for Caenorhabditis elegans early embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Mora-Lorca, José Antonio; Sáenz-Narciso, Beatriz; Gaffney, Christopher J; Naranjo-Galindo, Francisco José; Pedrajas, José Rafael; Guerrero-Gómez, David; Dobrzynska, Agnieszka; Askjaer, Peter; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J; Cabello, Juan; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Glutathione is the most abundant thiol in the vast majority of organisms and is maintained in its reduced form by the flavoenzyme glutathione reductase. In this work, we describe the genetic and functional analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans gsr-1 gene that encodes the only glutathione reductase protein in this model organism. By using green fluorescent protein reporters we demonstrate that gsr-1 produces two GSR-1 isoforms, one located in the cytoplasm and one in the mitochondria. gsr-1 loss of function mutants display a fully penetrant embryonic lethal phenotype characterized by a progressive and robust cell division delay accompanied by an aberrant distribution of interphasic chromatin in the periphery of the cell nucleus. Maternally expressed GSR-1 is sufficient to support embryonic development but these animals are short-lived, sensitized to chemical stress, have increased mitochondrial fragmentation and lower mitochondrial DNA content. Furthermore, the embryonic lethality of gsr-1 worms is prevented by restoring GSR-1 activity in the cytoplasm but not in mitochondria. Given the fact that the thioredoxin redox systems are dispensable in C. elegans, our data support a prominent role of the glutathione reductase/glutathione pathway in maintaining redox homeostasis in the nematode.

  11. Purification and kinetic analysis of cytosolic and mitochondrial thioredoxin glutathione reductase extracted from Taenia solium cysticerci.

    PubMed

    Plancarte, Agustin; Nava, Gabriela

    2015-02-01

    Thioredoxin glutathione reductases (TGRs) (EC 1.8.1.9) were purified to homogeneity from the cytosolic (cTsTGR) and mitochondrial (mTsTGR) fractions of Taenia solium, the agent responsible for neurocysticercosis, one of the major central nervous system parasitic diseases in humans. TsTGRs had a relative molecular weight of 132,000, while the corresponding value per subunit obtained under denaturing conditions, was of 62,000. Specific activities for thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase substrates for both TGRs explored were in the range or lower than values obtained for other platyhelminths and mammalian TGRs. cTsTGR and mTsTGR also showed hydroperoxide reductase activity using hydroperoxide as substrate. Km(DTNB) and Kcat(DTNB) values for cTsTGR and mTsTGR (88 µM and 1.9 s(-1); 45 µM and 12.6 s(-1), respectively) and Km(GSSG) and Kcat(GSSG) values for cTsTGR and mTsTGR (6.3 µM and 0.96 s(-1); 4 µM and 1.62 s(-1), respectively) were similar to or lower than those reported for mammalian TGRs. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that 12 peptides from cTsTGR and seven from mTsTGR were a match for gi|29825896 thioredoxin glutathione reductase [Echinococcus granulosus], confirming that both enzymes are TGRs. Both T. solium TGRs were inhibited by the gold compound auranofin, a selective inhibitor of thiol-dependent flavoreductases (I₅₀ = 3.25, 2.29 nM for DTNB and GSSG substrates, respectively for cTsTGR; I₅₀ = 5.6, 25.4 nM for mTsTGR toward the same substrates in the described order). Glutathione reductase activity of cTsTGR and mTsTGR exhibited hysteretic behavior with moderate to high concentrations of GSSG; this result was not observed either with thioredoxin, DTNB or NADPH. However, the observed hysteretic kinetics was suppressed with increasing amounts of both parasitic TGRs. These data suggest the existence of an effective substitute which may account for the lack of the detoxification enzymes glutathione reductase

  12. Characterization of thioredoxin glutathione reductase in Schiotosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Han, Yanhui; Zhang, Min; Hong, Yang; Zhu, Zhu; Li, Dong; Li, Xiangrui; Fu, Zhiqiang; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2012-09-01

    Schistosomiasis is one of the most prevalent and serious parasitic diseases in the world and remains an important public health problem in China. Screening and discovery of an effective vaccine candidate or new drug target is crucial for the control of this disease. In this study, we cloned a cDNA encoding Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) thioredoxin glutathione reductase (SjTGR) from the cDNA of 42-day-old adult worms. The open reading frame (ORF) of the gene was 1791 base pairs (bp) encoding a protein of 596 amino acids. SjTGR was subcloned into pET-32a (+) and expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) BL21 (DE3). The recombinant protein rSjTGR exhibited enzymatic activity of 5.13U/mg with DTNB as the substrate, and showed strong immunogenecity. Real-time PCR results indicated that SjTGR was expressed at a higher level in 35-day-old schistosome worms in transcript. We vaccinated BALB/c mice with rSjTGR in combination with MONTANIDE™ ISA 206 VG (ISA 206) and observed a 33.50% to 36.51% (P<0.01) decrease in the adult worm burden and a 33.73%to 43.44% (P<0.01) decrease in the number of eggs counted compared to the ISA 206 or blank control groups in two independent vaccination tests. ELISA analysis demonstrated that rSjTGR induced a high level of SjTGR-specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG 2a antibodies and induced elevated production of IFN-γ. This study provides the basis for further investigations into the biological function of SjTGR and further evaluation of the potential use of this molecule as a vaccine candidate or new drug target is warranted.

  13. 1,4-Naphthoquinones and Others NADPH-Dependent Glutathione Reductase-Catalyzed Redox Cyclers as Antimalarial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Belorgey, Didier; Lanfranchi, Don Antoine; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The homodimeric flavoenzyme glutathione reductase catalyzes NADPH-dependent glutathione disulfide reduction. This reaction is important for keeping the redox homeostasis in human cells and in the human pathogen Plasmodium falciparum. Different types of NADPH-dependent disulfide reductase inhibitors were designed in various chemical series to evaluate the impact of each inhibition mode on the propagation of the parasites. Against malaria parasites in cultures the most potent and specific effects were observed for redox-active agents acting as subversive substrates for both glutathione reductases of the Plasmodium-infected red blood cells. In their oxidized form, these redox-active compounds are reduced by NADPH-dependent flavoenzyme-catalyzed reactions in the cytosol of infected erythrocytes. In their reduced forms, these compounds can reduce molecular oxygen to reactive oxygen species, or reduce oxidants like methemoglobin, the major nutrient of the parasite, to indigestible hemoglobin. Furthermore, studies on a fluorinated suicide-substrate of the human glutathione reductase indicate that the glutathione reductase-catalyzed bioactivation of 3-benzylnaphthoquinones to the corresponding reduced 3-benzoyl metabolites is essential for the observed antimalarial activity. In conclusion, the antimalarial lead naphthoquinones are suggested to perturb the major redox equilibria of the targeted cells. These effects result in development arrest of the parasite and contribute to the removal of the parasitized erythrocytes by macrophages. PMID:23116403

  14. Glutathione reductase-mediated synthesis of tellurium-containing nanostructures exhibiting antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Pugin, Benoit; Cornejo, Fabián A; Muñoz-Díaz, Pablo; Muñoz-Villagrán, Claudia M; Vargas-Pérez, Joaquín I; Arenas, Felipe A; Vásquez, Claudio C

    2014-11-01

    Tellurium, a metalloid belonging to group 16 of the periodic table, displays very interesting physical and chemical properties and lately has attracted significant attention for its use in nanotechnology. In this context, the use of microorganisms for synthesizing nanostructures emerges as an eco-friendly and exciting approach compared to their chemical synthesis. To generate Te-containing nanostructures, bacteria enzymatically reduce tellurite to elemental tellurium. In this work, using a classic biochemical approach, we looked for a novel tellurite reductase from the Antarctic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain BNF22 and used it to generate tellurium-containing nanostructures. A new tellurite reductase was identified as glutathione reductase, which was subsequently overproduced in Escherichia coli. The characterization of this enzyme showed that it is an NADPH-dependent tellurite reductase, with optimum reducing activity at 30°C and pH 9.0. Finally, the enzyme was able to generate Te-containing nanostructures, about 68 nm in size, which exhibit interesting antibacterial properties against E. coli, with no apparent cytotoxicity against eukaryotic cells.

  15. Glutathione Reductase-Mediated Synthesis of Tellurium-Containing Nanostructures Exhibiting Antibacterial Properties

    PubMed Central

    Pugin, Benoit; Cornejo, Fabián A.; Muñoz-Díaz, Pablo; Muñoz-Villagrán, Claudia M.; Vargas-Pérez, Joaquín I.; Arenas, Felipe A.

    2014-01-01

    Tellurium, a metalloid belonging to group 16 of the periodic table, displays very interesting physical and chemical properties and lately has attracted significant attention for its use in nanotechnology. In this context, the use of microorganisms for synthesizing nanostructures emerges as an eco-friendly and exciting approach compared to their chemical synthesis. To generate Te-containing nanostructures, bacteria enzymatically reduce tellurite to elemental tellurium. In this work, using a classic biochemical approach, we looked for a novel tellurite reductase from the Antarctic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain BNF22 and used it to generate tellurium-containing nanostructures. A new tellurite reductase was identified as glutathione reductase, which was subsequently overproduced in Escherichia coli. The characterization of this enzyme showed that it is an NADPH-dependent tellurite reductase, with optimum reducing activity at 30°C and pH 9.0. Finally, the enzyme was able to generate Te-containing nanostructures, about 68 nm in size, which exhibit interesting antibacterial properties against E. coli, with no apparent cytotoxicity against eukaryotic cells. PMID:25193000

  16. Glutathione reductase targeted to type II cells does not protect mice from hyperoxic lung injury.

    PubMed

    Heyob, Kathryn M; Rogers, Lynette K; Welty, Stephen E

    2008-12-01

    Exposure of the lung epithelium to reactive oxygen species without adequate antioxidant defenses leads to airway inflammation, and may contribute to lung injury. Glutathione peroxidase catalyzes the reduction of peroxides by oxidation of glutathione (GSH) to glutathione disulfide (GSSG), which can in turn be reduced by glutathione reductase (GR). Increased levels of GSSG have been shown to correlate negatively with outcome after oxidant exposure, and increased GR activity has been protective against hyperoxia in lung epithelial cells in vitro. We tested the hypothesis that increased GR expression targeted to type II alveolar epithelial cells would improve outcome in hyperoxia-induced lung injury. Human GR with a mitochondrial targeting sequence was targeted to mouse type II cells using the SPC promoter. Two transgenic lines were identified, with Line 2 having higher lung GR activities than Line 1. Both transgenic lines had lower lung GSSG levels and higher GSH/GSSG ratios than wild-type. Six-week-old wild-type and transgenic mice were exposed to greater than 95% O2 or room air (RA) for 84 hours. After exposure, Line 2 mice had higher right lung/body weight ratios and lavage protein concentrations than wild-type mice, and both lines 1 and 2 had lower GSSG levels than wild-type mice. These findings suggest that GSSG accumulation in the lung may not play a significant role in the development of hyperoxic lung injury, or that compensatory responses to unregulated GR expression render animals more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury.

  17. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase in the heart of hypergravity-treated and aging rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utko, Natalie

    2005-08-01

    Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GP), and glutathione reductase (GR) were determined in the heart of young and old control and hypergravity (HG) treated male Wistar rats. Relatively small and insignificant changes were observed when comparing enzyme activities in the heart of young and old control rats, whereas HG induced significant decline of SOD and GP in the group of old rats and GR in young animals. Statistically highly significant positive correlation found for SOD and downstream acting catalase in young (r=0.72; P<0.00001) and old rats (r=0,86; P<0.00001) was preserved in HG- treated young animals as well (r=0.66; P<0.02), assuming that SOD-catalase pair could remain functionally related in both aging and HG. However, three-dimensional (3D) non- linear plotting and cluster analysis revealed significant alterations in enzyme relations in the heart of both aging and HG-treated animals.

  18. Increased reactive oxygen species production during reductive stress: The roles of mitochondrial glutathione and thioredoxin reductases.

    PubMed

    Korge, Paavo; Calmettes, Guillaume; Weiss, James N

    2015-01-01

    Both extremes of redox balance are known to cause cardiac injury, with mounting evidence revealing that the injury induced by both oxidative and reductive stress is oxidative in nature. During reductive stress, when electron acceptors are expected to be mostly reduced, some redox proteins can donate electrons to O2 instead, which increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, the high level of reducing equivalents also concomitantly enhances ROS scavenging systems involving redox couples such as NADPH/NADP+ and GSH/GSSG. Here our objective was to explore how reductive stress paradoxically increases net mitochondrial ROS production despite the concomitant enhancement of ROS scavenging systems. Using recombinant enzymes and isolated permeabilized cardiac mitochondria, we show that two normally antioxidant matrix NADPH reductases, glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase, generate H2O2 by leaking electrons from their reduced flavoprotein to O2 when electron flow is impaired by inhibitors or because of limited availability of their natural electron acceptors, GSSG and oxidized thioredoxin. The spillover of H2O2 under these conditions depends on H2O2 reduction by peroxiredoxin activity, which may regulate redox signaling in response to endogenous or exogenous factors. These findings may explain how ROS production during reductive stress overwhelms ROS scavenging capability, generating the net mitochondrial ROS spillover causing oxidative injury. These enzymes could potentially be targeted to increase cancer cell death or modulate H2O2-induced redox signaling to protect the heart against ischemia/reperfusion damage.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of glutathione reductase (GR) genes from rice and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Dipesh Kumar; Gill, Sarvajeet Singh; Yadav, Sandep; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-02-01

    Plant cells and tissues remain always on risk under abiotic and biotic stresses due to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Plants protect themselves against ROS induced oxidative damage by the upregulation of antioxidant machinery. Out of many components of antioxidant machinery, glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2) and glutathione (GSH, γ-Glu-Cys-Gly) play important role in the protection of cell against oxidative damage. In stress condition, the GR helps in maintaining the reduced glutathione pool for strengthening the antioxidative processes in plants. Present study investigates genome wide analysis of GR from rice and Arabidopsis. We were able to identify 3 rice GR genes (LOC_Os02 g56850, LOC_Os03 g06740, LOC_Os10 g28000) and 2 Arabidopsis GR genes (AT3G54660, AT3G24170) from their respective genomes on the basis of their annotation as well as the presence of pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases class-I active site. The evolutionary relationship of the GR genes from rice and Arabidopsis genomes was analyzed using the multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree. This revealed evolutionary conserved pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases class-I active site among the GR protein in rice and Arabidopsis. This study should make an important contribution to our better understanding of the GR under normal and stress condition in plants.

  20. Thioredoxin Glutathione Reductase as a Novel Drug Target: Evidence from Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Xie, ShuYing; Qian, ChunYan; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Wei; Yin, XuRen; Hua, ZiChun; Yu, ChuanXin

    2012-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis remains a major public health concern affecting billions of people around the world. Currently, praziquantel is the only drug of choice for treatment of human schistosomiasis. The emergence of drug resistance to praziquantel in schistosomes makes the development of novel drugs an urgent task. Thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR) enzymes in Schistosoma mansoni and some other platyhelminths have been identified as alternative targets. The present study was designed to confirm the existense and the potential value of TGR as a target for development of novel antischistosomal agents in Schistosoma japonicum, a platyhelminth endemic in Asia. Methods and Findings After cloning the S. japonicum TGR (SjTGR) gene, the recombinant SjTGR selenoprotein was purified and characterized in enzymatic assays as a multifunctional enzyme with thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutaredoxin (Grx) activities. Immunological and bioinformatic analyses confirmed that instead of having separate TrxR and GR proteins in mammalian, S. japonicum only encodes TGR, which performs the functions of both enzymes and plays a critical role in maintaining the redox balance in this parasite. These results were in good agreement with previous findings in Schistosoma mansoni and some other platyhelminths. Auranofin, a known inhibitor against TGR, caused fatal toxicity in S. japonicum adult worms in vitro and reduced worm and egg burdens in S. japonicum infected mice. Conclusions Collectively, our study confirms that a multifunctional enzyme SjTGR selenoprotein, instead of separate TrxR and GR enzymes, exists in S. japonicum. Furthermore, TGR may be a potential target for development of novel agents against schistosomes. This assumption is strengthened by our demonstration that the SjTGR is an essential enzyme for maintaining the thiol-disulfide redox homeostasis of S. japonicum. PMID:22384025

  1. A recombinant thioredoxin-glutathione reductase from Fasciola hepatica induces a protective response in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Maggioli, Gabriela; Silveira, Fernando; Martín-Alonso, José M; Salinas, Gustavo; Carmona, Carlos; Parra, Francisco

    2011-12-01

    Antioxidant systems are fundamental components of host-parasite interactions, and often play a key role in parasite survival. Here, we report the cloning, heterologous expression, and characterization of a thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR) from Fasciola hepatica. The deduced polypeptide sequence of the cloned open reading frame (ORF) confirmed the experimental N-terminus previously determined for a native F. hepatica TGR showing thioredoxin reductase (TR) activity. The sequence revealed the presence of a fusion between a glutaredoxin (Grx) and a TR domain, similar to that previously reported in Schistosoma mansoni and Echinococcus granulosus. The F. hepatica TGR sequence included an additional redox active center (ACUG; U being selenocysteine) located at the C-terminus. The addition of a recombinant selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element in the Escherichia coli expression vector, or the substitution of the native selenocysteine by a cysteine, indicated the relevance of this unusual amino acid residue for the activity of F. hepatica TGR. Rabbit vaccination with recombinant F. hepatica TGR reduced the worm burden by 96.7% following experimental infection, further supporting the relevance of TGR as a promising target for anti Fasciola treatments.

  2. Identification of Thioredoxin Glutathione Reductase Inhibitors That Kill Cestode and Trematode Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Fabiana; Hernández, Paola; Porcal, Williams; López, Gloria V.; Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes; Basika, Tatiana; Carmona, Carlos; Fló, Martín; Maggioli, Gabriela; Bonilla, Mariana; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Boiani, Mariana; Salinas, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic flatworms are responsible for serious infectious diseases that affect humans as well as livestock animals in vast regions of the world. Yet, the drug armamentarium available for treatment of these infections is limited: praziquantel is the single drug currently available for 200 million people infected with Schistosoma spp. and there is justified concern about emergence of drug resistance. Thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR) is an essential core enzyme for redox homeostasis in flatworm parasites. In this work, we searched for flatworm TGR inhibitors testing compounds belonging to various families known to inhibit thioredoxin reductase or TGR and also additional electrophilic compounds. Several furoxans and one thiadiazole potently inhibited TGRs from both classes of parasitic flatworms: cestoda (tapeworms) and trematoda (flukes), while several benzofuroxans and a quinoxaline moderately inhibited TGRs. Remarkably, five active compounds from diverse families possessed a phenylsulfonyl group, strongly suggesting that this moiety is a new pharmacophore. The most active inhibitors were further characterized and displayed slow and nearly irreversible binding to TGR. These compounds efficiently killed Echinococcus granulosus larval worms and Fasciola hepatica newly excysted juveniles in vitro at a 20 µM concentration. Our results support the concept that the redox metabolism of flatworm parasites is precarious and particularly susceptible to destabilization, show that furoxans can be used to target both flukes and tapeworms, and identified phenylsulfonyl as a new drug-hit moiety for both classes of flatworm parasites. PMID:22536349

  3. Identification of thioredoxin glutathione reductase inhibitors that kill cestode and trematode parasites.

    PubMed

    Ross, Fabiana; Hernández, Paola; Porcal, Williams; López, Gloria V; Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes; Basika, Tatiana; Carmona, Carlos; Fló, Martín; Maggioli, Gabriela; Bonilla, Mariana; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Boiani, Mariana; Salinas, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic flatworms are responsible for serious infectious diseases that affect humans as well as livestock animals in vast regions of the world. Yet, the drug armamentarium available for treatment of these infections is limited: praziquantel is the single drug currently available for 200 million people infected with Schistosoma spp. and there is justified concern about emergence of drug resistance. Thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR) is an essential core enzyme for redox homeostasis in flatworm parasites. In this work, we searched for flatworm TGR inhibitors testing compounds belonging to various families known to inhibit thioredoxin reductase or TGR and also additional electrophilic compounds. Several furoxans and one thiadiazole potently inhibited TGRs from both classes of parasitic flatworms: cestoda (tapeworms) and trematoda (flukes), while several benzofuroxans and a quinoxaline moderately inhibited TGRs. Remarkably, five active compounds from diverse families possessed a phenylsulfonyl group, strongly suggesting that this moiety is a new pharmacophore. The most active inhibitors were further characterized and displayed slow and nearly irreversible binding to TGR. These compounds efficiently killed Echinococcus granulosus larval worms and Fasciola hepatica newly excysted juveniles in vitro at a 20 µM concentration. Our results support the concept that the redox metabolism of flatworm parasites is precarious and particularly susceptible to destabilization, show that furoxans can be used to target both flukes and tapeworms, and identified phenylsulfonyl as a new drug-hit moiety for both classes of flatworm parasites.

  4. Purification and properties of glutathione reductase from the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 7119.

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, A; Rivas, J; Losada, M

    1984-01-01

    An NADPH-glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) has been purified 6,000-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity from the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 7119. The purified enzyme exhibits a specific activity of 249 U/mg and is characterized by being a dimeric flavin adenine dinucleotide-containing protein with a ratio of absorbance at 280 nm to absorbance at 462 nm of 5.8, a native molecular weight of 104,000, a Stokes radius of 4.13 nm, and a pI of 4.02. The enzyme activity is inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents and heavy-metal ions, especially in the presence of NADPH, with oxidized glutathione behaving as a protective agent. As is the case with the same enzyme from other sources, the kinetic data are consistent with a branched mechanism. Nevertheless, the cyanobacterial enzyme presents three distinctive features with respect to that isolated from non-photosynthetic organisms: (i) absolute specificity for NADPH, (ii) an alkaline optimum pH value of ca. 9.0, and (iii) strong acidic character of the protein, as estimated by column chromatofocusing. The kinetic parameters are very similar to those found for the chloroplast enzyme, but the molecular weight is lower, being comparable to that of non-photosynthetic microorganisms. A protective function, analogous to that assigned to the chloroplast enzyme, is suggested. Images PMID:6425264

  5. Crystal structure of glutathione reductase Glr1 from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiang; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2007-09-01

    Yeast glutathione (GSH) reductase Glr1 is a dimeric flavo-oxidoreductase involved in cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox regulatory systems. It reduces the oxidized GSH GSSG to the reduced form, GSH with NADPH as electron donor and FAD as coenzyme. Crystal structures and enzymatic mechanisms of GSH reductases from Escherichia coli and Homo sapiens have been well investigated, whereas the structural properties of yeast Glr1 remain unknown. Herein, we overexpressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae Glr1 in Pichia pastoris GS115 and determined its crystal structure at 2.40 A resolution. Although the overall structure and the active site are much conserved, obvious variety was found at the interface of Glr1 monomers when superimposed against the homolog from E. coli or human. The nonconserved C239 is exposed to the solvent and accessible to GSH or GSSG enriched in a microenvironment around the Glr1 molecules, leading to the partial and transient glutathionylation, as primarily identified from the 2Fo-Fc electron density map and further confirmed by biochemical assays. Meanwhile N278 at the vicinity of NADP-binding pocket was artificially glycosylated when heterogeneously overexpressed in P. pastoris. The highly motile oligosaccharide chain linked to N278 of the recombinant Glr1 interferes with the entry of NADPH, which results in a dramatic increase of Km for NAPDH and a significant decrease of turnover number, when compared with the native protein.

  6. A biophysically based mathematical model for the catalytic mechanism of glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Pannala, Venkat R; Bazil, Jason N; Camara, Amadou K S; Dash, Ranjan K

    2013-12-01

    Glutathione reductase (GR) catalyzes the reduction of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) using NADPH as the reducing cofactor, and thereby maintains a constant GSH level in the system. GSH scavenges superoxide (O2(*-)) and hydroxyl radicals (OH) nonenzymatically or by serving as an electron donor to several enzymes involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification. In either case, GSH oxidizes to GSSG and is subsequently regenerated by the catalytic action of GR. Although the GR kinetic mechanism has been extensively studied under various experimental conditions with variable substrates and products, the catalytic mechanism has not been studied in terms of a mechanistic model that accounts for the effects of the substrates and products on the reaction kinetics. The aim of this study is therefore to develop a comprehensive mathematical model for the catalytic mechanism of GR. We use available experimental data on GR kinetics from various species/sources to develop the mathematical model and estimate the associated model parameters. The model simulations are consistent with the experimental observation that GR operates via both ping-pong and sequential branching mechanisms based on relevant concentrations of its reaction substrate GSSG. Furthermore, we show the observed pH-dependent substrate inhibition of GR activity by GSSG and bimodal behavior of GR activity with pH. The model presents a unique opportunity to understand the effects of products on the kinetics of GR. The model simulations show that under physiological conditions, where both substrates and products are present, the flux distribution depends on the concentrations of both GSSG and NADP(+), with ping-pong flux operating at low levels and sequential flux dominating at higher levels. The kinetic model of GR may serve as a key module for the development of integrated models for ROS-scavenging systems to understand protection of cells under normal and oxidative stress

  7. Arsenic trioxide induced indirect and direct inhibition of glutathione reductase leads to apoptosis in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ray, Atish; Chatterjee, Sarmishtha; Mukherjee, Sandip; Bhattacharya, Shelley

    2014-06-01

    Glutathione reductase (GR) is an essential enzyme which maintains the reduced state of a cell. Therefore GR malfunction is closely associated with several disorders related to oxidative damage. The present study reports toxic manifestation of arsenic trioxide in respect of GR leading to apoptosis. Isolated rat hepatocytes exposed to arsenic trioxide were analyzed for GR expression and activity. Arsenic resulted in a time dependent inhibition of GR mediated by the superoxide anion. The cellular demand of functional enzyme is achieved by concomitant rise in gene expression. However, direct inhibition of GR by arsenic trioxide was also evident. Furthermore, arsenic induced free radical mediated inhibition of GR was found to be partially uncompetitive and associated with time dependent decrease in the substrate binding rate. Externalization of phosphatidylserine, nuclear degradation, apoptosis inducing factor leakage, apoptosome formation, caspase activation, DNA damage and break down of PARP suggest consequential induction of apoptosis due to inhibition of GR. The implication of GR was further established from the reduced rate of caspase activation in the arsenic trioxide treated cell, supplemented with complete and incomplete enzyme systems.

  8. Decreased glutathione reductase2 leads to early leaf senescence in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shunhua; Wang, Liang; Yang, Zhipan; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Glutathione reductase (GR) catalyzes the reduction of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) and participates in the ascorbate‐glutathione cycle, which scavenges H2O2. Here, we report that chloroplastic/mitochondrial GR2 is an important regulator of leaf senescence. Seed development of the homozygous gr2 knockout mutant was blocked at the globular stage. Therefore, to investigate the function of GR2 in leaf senescence, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants with decreased GR2 using RNAi. The GR2 RNAi plants displayed early onset of age‐dependent and dark‐ and H2O2‐induced leaf senescence, which was accompanied by the induction of the senescence‐related marker genes SAG12 and SAG13. Furthermore, transcriptome analysis revealed that genes related to leaf senescence, oxidative stress, and phytohormone pathways were upregulated directly before senescence in RNAi plants. In addition, H2O2 accumulated to higher levels in RNAi plants than in wild‐type plants and the levels of H2O2 peaked in RNAi plants directly before the early onset of leaf senescence. RNAi plants showed a greater decrease in GSH/GSSG levels than wild‐type plants during leaf development. Our results suggest that GR2 plays an important role in leaf senescence by modulating H2O2 and glutathione signaling in Arabidopsis. PMID:26031939

  9. Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Noctor, Graham; Queval, Guillaume; Mhamdi, Amna; Chaouch, Sejir; Foyer, Christine H.

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione is a simple sulfur compound composed of three amino acids and the major non-protein thiol in many organisms, including plants. The functions of glutathione are manifold but notably include redox-homeostatic buffering. Glutathione status is modulated by oxidants as well as by nutritional and other factors, and can influence protein structure and activity through changes in thiol-disulfide balance. For these reasons, glutathione is a transducer that integrates environmental information into the cellular network. While the mechanistic details of this function remain to be fully elucidated, accumulating evidence points to important roles for glutathione and glutathione-dependent proteins in phytohormone signaling and in defense against biotic stress. Work in Arabidopsis is beginning to identify the processes that govern glutathione status and that link it to signaling pathways. As well as providing an overview of the components that regulate glutathione homeostasis (synthesis, degradation, transport, and redox turnover), the present discussion considers the roles of this metabolite in physiological processes such as light signaling, cell death, and defense against microbial pathogen and herbivores. PMID:22303267

  10. Diquat induces renal proximal tubule injury in glutathione reductase-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Lynette K. . E-mail: rogersl@ccri.net; Bates, Carlton M.; Welty, Stephen E.; Smith, Charles V.

    2006-12-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with many human diseases, and glutathione (GSH)-dependent processes are pivotal in limiting tissue damage. To test the hypothesis that Gr1{sup a1Neu} (Neu) mice, which do not express glutathione reductase (GR), would be more susceptible than are wild-type mice to ROS-mediated injury, we studied the effects of diquat, a redox cycling toxicant. Neu mice exhibited modest, dose- and time-dependent elevations in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities, 126 {+-} 36 U/l at 2 h after 5 {mu}mol/kg of diquat, but no ALT elevations were observed in diquat-treated C3H/HeN mice for up to 6 h after 50 {mu}mol/kg of diquat. Histology indicated little or no hepatic necrosis in diquat-treated mice of either strain, but substantial renal injury was observed in diquat-treated Neu mice, characterized by brush border sloughing in the proximal tubules by 1 h and tubular necrosis by 2 h after doses of 7.5 {mu}mol/kg. Decreases in renal GSH levels were observed in the Neu mice by 2 h post dose (3.4 {+-} 0.4 vs 0.2 {+-} 0.0 {mu}mol/g tissue at 0 and 50 {mu}mol/kg, respectively), and increases in renal GSSG levels were observed in the Neu mice as early as 0.5 h after 7.5 {mu}mol/kg (105.5 {+-} 44.1 vs 27.9 {+-} 4.8 nmol/g tissue). Blood urea nitrogen levels were elevated by 2 h in Neu mice after doses of 7.5 {mu}mol/kg (Neu vs C3H, 32.8 {+-} 4.1 vs 17.9 {+-} 0.3 mg/dl). Diquat-induced renal injury in the GR-deficient Neu mice offers a useful model for studies of ROS-induced renal necrosis and of the contributions of GR in defense against oxidant-mediated injuries in vivo.

  11. Arabidopsis dehydroascorbate reductase 1 and 2 modulate redox states of ascorbate-glutathione cycle in the cytosol in response to photooxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Noshi, Masahiro; Yamada, Hiroki; Hatanaka, Risa; Tanabe, Noriaki; Tamoi, Masahiro; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2017-03-01

    Ascorbate and glutathione are indispensable cellular redox buffers and allow plants to acclimate stressful conditions. Arabidopsis contains three functional dehydroascorbate reductases (DHAR1-3), which catalyzes the conversion of dehydroascorbate into its reduced form using glutathione as a reductant. We herein attempted to elucidate the physiological role in DHAR1 and DHAR2 in stress responses. The total DHAR activities in DHAR knockout Arabidopsis plants, dhar1 and dhar2, were 22 and 92%, respectively, that in wild-type leaves. Under high light (HL), the levels of total ascorbate and dehydroascorbate were only reduced and increased, respectively, in dhar1. The oxidation of glutathione under HL was significantly inhibited in both dhar1 and dhar2, while glutathione contents were only enhanced in dhar1. The dhar1 showed stronger visible symptoms than the dhar2 under photooxidative stress conditions. Our results demonstrated a pivotal role of DHAR1 in the modulation of cellular redox states under photooxidative stress.

  12. Redox regulation of ascorbate and glutathione by a chloroplastic dehydroascorbate reductase is required for high-light stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Noshi, Masahiro; Hatanaka, Risa; Tanabe, Noriaki; Terai, Yusuke; Maruta, Takanori; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2016-05-01

    Chloroplasts are a significant site for reactive oxygen species production under illumination and, thus, possess a well-organized antioxidant system involving ascorbate. Ascorbate recycling occurs in different manners in this system, including a dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) reaction. We herein investigated the physiological significance of DHAR3 in photo-oxidative stress tolerance in Arabidopsis. GFP-fused DHAR3 protein was targeted to chloroplasts in Arabidopsis leaves. A DHAR3 knockout mutant exhibited sensitivity to high light (HL). Under HL, the ascorbate redox states were similar in mutant and wild-type plants, while total ascorbate content was significantly lower in the mutant, suggesting that DHAR3 contributes, at least to some extent, to ascorbate recycling. Activation of monodehydroascorbate reductase occurred in dhar3 mutant, which might compensate for the lack of DHAR3. Interestingly, glutathione oxidation was consistently inhibited in dhar3 mutant. These findings indicate that DHAR3 regulates both ascorbate and glutathione redox states to acclimate to HL.

  13. The role of thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase in plumbagin-induced, reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Geun Hye; Ryu, Jung Min; Jeon, Yu Jin; Choi, Joonhyeok; Han, Ho Jae; Lee, You-Mie; Lee, Sangkyu; Bae, Jong-Sup; Jung, Jong-Wha; Chang, Woochul; Kim, Lark Kyun; Jee, Jun-Goo; Lee, Min Young

    2015-10-15

    Plumbagin is a secondary metabolite that was first identified in the Plumbago genus of plants. It is a naphthoquinone compound with anti-atherosclerosis, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, contraceptive, cardiotonic, immunosuppressive, and neuroprotective activities. However, the mechanisms of plumbagin's activities are largely unknown. In this study, we examined the effect of plumbagin on HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells as well as LLC lung cancer cells, SiHa cervical carcinoma cells. Plumbagin significantly decreased HepG2 cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, treatment with plumbagin significantly increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-3/7 activity. Using the similarity ensemble approach (SEA)-a state-of-the-art cheminformatic technique-we identified two previously unknown cellular targets of plumbagin: thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and glutathione reductase (GR). This was then confirmed using protein- and cell-based assays. We found that plumbagin was directly reduced by TrxR, and that this reduction was inhibited by the TrxR inhibitor, sodium aurothiomalate (ATM). Plumbagin also decreased the activity of GR. Plumbagin, and the GR inhibitor sodium arsenite all increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and this increase was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) in HepG2 cells. Plumbagin increased TrxR-1 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression and pretreatment with NAC significantly attenuated the plumbagin-induced increase of TrxR-1 and HO-1 expression in HepG2 cells, LLC cells and SiHa cells. Pretreatment with NAC significantly prevented the plumbagin-induced decrease in cell viability in these cell types. In conclusion, plumbagin exerted its anticancer effect by directly interacting with TrxR and GR, and thus increasing intracellular ROS levels.

  14. [The activity of glutathione antioxidant system at melaksen and valdoxan action under experimental hyperthyroidism in rats].

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, M V; Popova, T N; Shul'gin, K K; Popov, S S

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of glutathione antioxidant system activity and diene conjugates content in rats liver and blood serum at the influence of melaksen and valdoxan under experimental hyperthyroidism (EG) has been revealed. It has been established that the activities of glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GP) and glutathione transferase (GT), growing at pathological conditions, change to the side of control value at these substunces introduction. Reduced glutathione content (GSH) at melaxen and valdoxan action increased compared with values under the pathology, that, obviously, could be associated with a reduction of its spending on the detoxication of free radical oxidation (FRO) toxic products. Diene conjugates level in rats liver and blood serum, increasing at experimental hyperthyroidism conditions, under introduction of melatonin level correcting drugs, also approached to the control meaning. Results of the study indicate on positive effect of melaxen and valdoxan on free radical homeostasis, that appears to be accompanied by decrease of load on the glutathione antioxidant system in comparison with the pathology.

  15. Severe generalized glutathione reductase deficiency after antitumor chemotherapy with BCNU" [1,3-bis(chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea].

    PubMed

    Frischer, H; Ahmad, T

    1977-05-01

    Patients receiving BCNU [1,3-bis(2 chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea] acquire a profound deficiency of erythrocytic oxidized glutathione reductase (GSSG-R) within minutes after the first intravenous injection of a single therapeutic dose (75 mg/M.2) of the drug. This effect is not accompanied by changes in the activites of 19 additional erythrocytic enzymes tested, is reproducible in vitro in a dose-related manner, and is not caused by the antitumor agents administered concurrently with the nitrosourea. The inactivation of erythrocytic GSSG-R results in decreased levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), marked GSH instability and disturbed hydrogen peroxide removal with a positibe ascorbate cyanide test and leads to increased susceptibility to oxidative hemolysis, particularly in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-D)-deficient patients. BCNU inhibits GSSG-R irreversibly, probably through alkylation rather than carbamylation, and the reappearance of enzyme activity in vivo after each chemotherapy pulse depends on the capacity of the marrow to release erythrocytes with normal activity formed during the drug-free interval. BCNU inhibits GSSG-R not only in erythrocytes but also in human leukocytes and platelets, as well as in yeast, monkey erythrocytes, and all the organs tested in the mouse. This generalized, severe, and specific GSSG-R deficiency caused by therapeutic doses of BCNU may enhance or mediate the toxic and antitumor effects of the nitrosourea and provides a simple yet sensitive biochemical means of monitoring bone marrow reserve in patients receiving multiple courses of chemotherapy with this agent.

  16. Simultaneous expression of glutathione, thioredoxin-1, and their reductases in nerve transected hypoglossal motor neurons of rat.

    PubMed

    Hama, Isuzu; Nakagomi, Saya; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Kiyama, Hiroshi

    2010-01-08

    Anti-oxidative stress responses are crucial for the survival of nerve-injured motor neurons. Herein, we examined changes in expression of glutathione reductase (GSHr), thioredoxins (TRX1 and TRX2), and thioredoxin reductases (TRXr1 and TRXr2), important constituents of anti-oxidative pathways, following rat hypoglossal nerve transection. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization demonstrated that GSHr, TRX1, and TRXr1 mRNAs were significantly up-regulated during the first few weeks in nerve-injured motor neurons, while TRX2 and TRXr2 mRNAs were unchanged throughout 8 weeks after nerve transection. The up-regulation of GSH, GSHr, TRX1, and TRXr1 proteins in injured neurons was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis. Western blotting also demonstrated up-regulation of GSHr, TRX1, and TRXr1 in injured neurons. These data suggest that the two major redox systems, GSH/GSHr and TRX1/TRXr1, are simultaneously activated in injured neurons, and likely provide protection of injured neurons against oxidative stress.

  17. Purification and characterization of Taenia crassiceps cysticerci thioredoxin: insight into thioredoxin-glutathione-reductase (TGR) substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, J J; Guevara-Flores, A; Rendón, J L; Sosa-Peinado, A; Del Arenal Mena, I P

    2015-04-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is an oxidoreductase central to redox homeostasis in cells and is involved in the regulation of protein activity through thiol/disulfide exchanges. Based on these facts, our goal was to purify and characterize cytosolic thioredoxin from Taenia crassiceps cysticerci, as well as to study its behavior as a substrate of thioredoxin-glutathione reductase (TGR). The enzyme was purified >133-fold with a total yield of 9.7%. A molecular mass of 11.7kDa and a pI of 4.84 were measured. Native electrophoresis was used to identify the oxidized and reduced forms of the monomer as well as the presence of a homodimer. In addition to the catalytic site cysteines, cysticerci thioredoxin contains Cys28 and Cys65 residues conserved in previously sequenced cestode thioredoxins. The following kinetic parameters were obtained for the substrate of TGR: a Km of 3.1μM, a kcat of 10s(-1) and a catalytic efficiency of 3.2×10(6)M(-1)s(-1). The negative patch around the α3-helix of Trx is involved in the interaction with TGR and suggests variable specificity and catalytic efficiency of the reductase toward thioredoxins of different origins.

  18. Functional validation of Phragmites communis glutathione reductase (PhaGR) as an essential enzyme in salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Quan, Geng; Wang, Jing; Han, Huiling; Chen, ShiHua; Guo, ShanLi; Yin, HaiBo

    2015-04-01

    Reed plants (Phragmites communis (Linn.) Trin) are hydrophilic perennial grasses growing in fresh and brackish waters. These plants readily adapt to arid and high salinity conditions; however, their resistance mechanism against abiotic stresses, especially high salinity, is largely unknown. In the present study, we cloned a glutathione reductase gene from P. communis and investigated its role in conferring salt tolerance in reed plants. The expression of PhaGR at the transcriptional level was affected by multiple abiotic stresses including NaCl, Cd(2+), heat, cold, PEG 6000, and abscisic acid (ABA). Furthermore, NaCl and Cd(2+) could increase its expressions at the translational level. NaCl and Cd(2+) also increased the biosynthesis of soluble protein and reduced glutathione (GSH). Reed seedlings that were challenged with NaCl showed higher levels of GR activities, which corroborated our gene expression data. The increase in GR possibly increased the salt tolerance of reed plants through GSH production. Thus, PhaGR is a potential target gene in improving the salt tolerance of crops through genetic manipulation.

  19. Immunization with Fasciola hepatica thioredoxin glutathione reductase failed to confer protection against fasciolosis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Maggioli, Gabriela; Bottini, Gualberto; Basika, Tatiana; Alonzo, Pablo; Salinas, Gustavo; Carmona, Carlos

    2016-07-15

    The liver fluke Fasciola hepatica remains an important agent of food-borne trematode disease producing great economic losses due to its negative effect on productivity of livestock grazing in temperate areas. The prevailing control strategy based on anthelmintic drugs is unsustainable due to widespread resistance hence vaccination appears as an attractive option to pursue. In this study we evaluate the effect of vaccination in calves with a functional recombinant thioredoxin glutathione reductase (rFhTGR) from liver fluke, a critical antioxidant enzyme at the crossroads of the thioredoxin and glutathione metabolism in flatworms. The recombinant enzyme produced in Escherichia coli was tested in two vaccination experiments; in the first trial rFhTGR was administered in combination with Freund́s Incomplete Adjuvant (FIA) in a three-inoculation scheme on weeks 0, 4 and 8; in the second trial rFhTGR was given mixed with Adyuvac 50 or Alum as adjuvants on weeks 0 and 4. In both cases calves were challenged with metacercariae (400 in the first and 500 in the second trial) 2 weeks after the last inoculation. Our results demonstrate that two or three doses of the vaccine induced a non-significant reduction in worm counts of 8.2% (FIA), 3.8% (Adyuvac 50) and 23.0% (Alum) compared to adjuvant controls indicating that rFhTGR failed to induce a protective immunity in challenged calves. All vaccine formulations induced a mixed IgG1/IgG2 response but no booster was observed after challenge. No correlations between antibody titres and worm burdens were found.

  20. Blood selenium concentrations and enzyme activities related to glutathione metabolism in wild emperor geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian; Hoffman, David J.; Schmutz, Joel A.

    2002-01-01

    In 1998, we collected blood samples from 63 emperor geese (Chen canagica) on their breeding grounds on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) in western Alaska, USA. We studied the relationship between selenium concentrations in whole blood and the activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in plasma. Experimental studies have shown that plasma activities of these enzymes are useful biomarkers of selenium-induced oxidative stress, but little information is available on their relationship to selenium in the blood of wild birds. Adult female emperor geese incubating their eggs in mid-June had a higher mean concentration of selenium in their blood and a greater activity of glutathione peroxidase in their plasma than adult geese or goslings that were sampled during the adult flight feathermolting period in late July and early August. Glutathione peroxidase activity was positively correlated with the concentration of selenium in the blood of emperor geese, and the rate of increase relative to selenium was greater in goslings than in adults. The activity of glutathione reductase was greatest in the plasma of goslings and was greater in molting adults than incubating females but was not significantly correlated with selenium in the blood of adults or goslings. Incubating female emperor geese had high selenium concentrations in their blood, accompanied by increased glutathione peroxidase activity consistent with early oxidative stress. These findings indicate that further study of the effects of selenium exposure, particularly on reproductive success, is warranted in this species.

  1. Structural analysis and molecular docking of trypanocidal aryloxy-quinones in trypanothione and glutathione reductases: a comparison with biochemical data.

    PubMed

    Vera, Brenda; Vázquez, Karina; Mascayano, Carolina; Tapia, Ricardo A; Espinosa, Victoria; Soto-Delgado, Jorge; Salas, Cristian O; Paulino, Margot

    2016-07-15

    A set of aryloxy-quinones, previously synthesized and evaluated against Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes cultures, were found more potent and selective than nifurtimox. One of the possible mechanisms of the trypanocidal activity of these quinones could be inhibition of trypanothione reductase (TR). Considering that glutathione reductase (GR) is the equivalent of TR in humans, biochemical, kinetic, and molecular docking studies in TR and GR were envisaged and compared with the trypanocidal and cytotoxic data of a set of aryloxy-quinones. Biochemical assays indicated that three naphthoquinones (Nq-h, Nq-g, and Nq-d) selectively inhibit TR and the TR kinetic analyses indicated that Nq-h inhibit TR in a noncompetitive mechanism. Molecular dockings were performed in TR and GR in the following three putative binding sites: the catalytic site, the dimer interface, and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-binding site. In TR and GR, the aryloxy-quinones were found to exhibit high affinity for a site near it cognate-binding site in a place in which the noncompetitive kinetics could be justified. Taking as examples the three compounds with TR specificity (TRS) (Nq-h, Nq-g, and Nq-d), the presence of a network of contacts with the quinonic ring sustained by the triad of Lys62, Met400', Ser464' residues, seems to contribute hardly to the TRS. Compound Nq-b, a naphthoquinone with nitrophenoxy substituent, proved to be the best scaffold for the design of trypanocidal compounds with low toxicity. However, the compound displayed only a poor and non-selective effect toward TR indicating that TR inhibition is not the main reason for the antiparasitic activity of the aryloxy-quinones.

  2. Nitrate Reductase Regulates Expression of Nitrite Uptake and Nitrite Reductase Activities in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 1

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Aurora; Cárdenas, Jacobo; Fernández, Emilio

    1992-01-01

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants defective at the structural locus for nitrate reductase (nit-1) or at loci for biosynthesis of the molybdopterin cofactor (nit-3, nit-4, or nit-5 and nit-6), both nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were repressed in ammonium-grown cells and expressed at high amounts in nitrogen-free media or in media containing nitrate or nitrite. In contrast, wild-type cells required nitrate induction for expression of high levels of both activities. In mutants defective at the regulatory locus for nitrate reductase (nit-2), very low levels of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were expressed even in the presence of nitrate or nitrite. Both restoration of nitrate reductase activity in mutants defective at nit-1, nit-3, and nit-4 by isolating diploid strains among them and transformation of a structural mutant upon integration of the wild-type nit-1 gene gave rise to the wild-type expression pattern for nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Conversely, inactivation of nitrate reductase by tungstate treatment in nitrate, nitrite, or nitrogen-free media made wild-type cells respond like nitrate reductase-deficient mutants with respect to the expression of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Our results indicate that nit-2 is a regulatory locus for both the nitrite uptake system and nitrite reductase, and that the nitrate reductase enzyme plays an important role in the regulation of the expression of both enzyme activities. PMID:16668656

  3. The unique glutathione reductase from Xanthomonas campestris: Gene expression and enzyme characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Loprasert, Suvit . E-mail: suvit@cri.or.th; Whangsuk, Wirongrong; Sallabhan, Ratiboot; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2005-06-17

    The glutathione reductase gene, gor, was cloned from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli. Its gene expression and enzyme characteristics were found to be different from those of previously studied homologues. Northern blot hybridization, promoter-lacZ fusion, and enzyme assay experiments revealed that its expression, unlike in Escherichia coli, is OxyR-independent and constitutive upon oxidative stress conditions. The deduced amino acid sequence shows a unique NADPH binding motif where the most highly conserved arginine residue, which is critical for NADPH binding, is replaced by glutamine. Interestingly, a search of the available Gor amino acid sequences from various sources, including other Xanthomonas species, revealed that this replacement is specific to the genus Xanthomonas. Recombinant Gor enzyme was purified and characterized, and was found to have a novel ability to use both, NADPH and NADH, as electron donor. A gor knockout mutant was constructed and shown to have increased expression of the organic peroxide-inducible regulator gene, ohrR.

  4. Fumarate Reductase Activity of Streptococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Aue, B. J.; Diebel, R. H.

    1967-01-01

    Some characteristics of a fumarate reductase from Streptococcus faecalis are described. The enzyme had a pH optimum of 7.4; optimal activity was observed when the ionic strength of the phosphate buffer was adjusted to 0.088. The Km value of the enzyme for reduced flavin mononucleotide was 2 × 10−4 m as determined with a 26-fold preparation. In addition to fumarate, the enzyme reduced maleate and mesaconate. No succinate dehydrogenase activity was detected, but succinate did act as an inhibitor of the fumarate reductase activity. Other inhibitors were malonate, citraconate, and trans-, trans-muconate. Metal-chelating agents did not inhibit the enzyme. A limited inhibition by sulfhydryl-binding agents was observed, and the preparations were sensitive to air oxidation and storage. Glycine, alanine, histidine, and possibly lysine stimulated fumarate reductase activity in the cell-free extracts. However, growth in media supplemented with glycine did not enhance fumarate reductase activity. The enzymatic activity appears to be constitutive. PMID:4960892

  5. Selenium concentrations and enzyme activities of glutathione metabolism in wild long-tailed ducks and common eiders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian; Hoffman, David J.; Flint, Paul L.

    2011-01-01

    The relationships of selenium (Se) concentrations in whole blood with plasma activities of total glutathione peroxidase, Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were studied in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) and common eiders (Somateria mollissima) sampled along the Beaufort Sea coast of Alaska, USA. Blood Se concentrations were >8 μg/g wet weight in both species. Linear regression revealed that the activities of total and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase were significantly related to Se concentrations only in long-tailed ducks, raising the possibility that these birds were experiencing early oxidative stress.

  6. Selenium concentrations and enzyme activities of glutathione metabolism in wild long-tailed ducks and common eiders.

    PubMed

    Franson, J Christian; Hoffman, David J; Flint, Paul L

    2011-06-01

    The relationships of selenium (Se) concentrations in whole blood with plasma activities of total glutathione peroxidase, Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were studied in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) and common eiders (Somateria mollissima) sampled along the Beaufort Sea coast of Alaska, USA. Blood Se concentrations were >8 µg/g wet weight in both species. Linear regression revealed that the activities of total and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase were significantly related to Se concentrations only in long-tailed ducks, raising the possibility that these birds were experiencing early oxidative stress.

  7. A Selective Glutathione Probe based on AIE Fluorogen and its Application in Enzymatic Activity Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Xiaoding; Hong, Yuning; Chen, Sijie; Leung, Chris Wai Tung; Zhao, Na; Situ, Bo; Lam, Jacky Wing Yip; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we design and synthesize a malonitrile-functionalized TPE derivative (TPE-DCV), which can react with thiol group through thiol-ene click reaction, leading to the fluorescence change of the system. Combined with the unique AIE property, TPE-DCV can selectively detect glutathione (GSH) but not cysteine or homocysteine. As the cleavage of GSSG with the aid of glutathione reductase produces GSH, which turns on the fluorescence of TPE-DCV, the ensemble of TPE-DCV and GSSG can thus serve as a label-free sensor for enzymatic activity assay of glutathione reductase. We also apply TPE-DCV for the detection of intracellular GSH in living cells.

  8. Activity of the glutathione antioxidant system and NADPH-generating enzymes in blood serum of rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus after administration of melatonin-correcting drugs.

    PubMed

    Agarkov, A A; Popova, T N; Verevkin, A N; Matasova, L V

    2014-06-01

    We studied the effects of epifamin and melaxen on serum content of reduced glutathione and activities of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and NADPH-generating enzymes (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase) in rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The concentration of reduced glutathione was decreased in rats with this disease (by 1.8 times), but increased after treatment with epifamin and melaxen (by 1.6 and 1.7 times, respectively). Activities of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and NADPH-generating enzymes returned to the control level. Correction of melatonin concentration after treatment with the test drugs was probably followed by inhibition of free radical processes. The observed changes were accompanied by normalization of activity of the glutathione antioxidant system and NADPH-generating enzymes required for normal function of this system.

  9. Dietary selenium, glutathione peroxidase activity, and toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, M.Q.; Stohs, S.J.; Murray, W.J.; Birt, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    TCDD has been shown to inhibit selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activity. The role of selenium in TCDD toxicity is not known. The authors have therefore examined the effect of TCDD administration on hepatic glutathione peroxidase, aryl hydrocarbon hydroxlase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione S-transferase activities, glutathione content, and lipid peroxidation in rats fed 0, 0.10, and 2.0 ppm dietary selenium. TCDD treatment significantly inhibited selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase in animals on diets containing 0.10 and 2.0 ppm selenium. The selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activities in rats on 0.10 and 2.0 ppm dietary selenium were 8.3- and 4.7-fold greater than in animals fed a diet containing 0 ppm selenium. TCDD administration enhanced hepatic microsomal lipid peroxidation by factors of 4.0, 4.9, and 9.8 in animals fed diets containing 0, 0.10, and 2.0 ppm selenium, respectively. The administration of a lethal dose of TCDD to rats fed diets containing 0, 0.10, and 2.0 ppm selenium, respectively. The administration of a lethal dose of TCDD to rats fed diets containing 0, 0.10, and 2.0 ppm selenium resulted in 0, 46, and 7% survival, respectively, after 66 d. Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione reductase activities were induced by TCDD. The results indicate that optimum dietary selenium provides partial protection from the toxic effects of TCDD.

  10. Ethanol-induced attenuation of oxidative stress is unable to alter mRNA expression pattern of catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase (GST1A), and superoxide dismutase (SOD3) enzymes in Japanese rice fish (Oryzias latipes) embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minghui; Shariat-Madar, Bahbak; Haron, Mona H; Wu, Mengmeng; Khan, Ikhlas A; Dasmahapatra, Asok K

    2011-01-01

    Although the mechanism of ethanol toxicity during embryogenesis is unknown, our earlier studies on Japanese rice fish (Oryzias latipes) embryos indicated that the effects might be mediated through oxidative stress. In this study we have determined the oxidative stress and the mRNA content of four antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, and superoxide dismutase) during Japanese rice fish embryogenesis (from 0 day post-fertilization to hatching) and after exposing the embryos to ethanol (100 and 300 mM) for 48 h at three stages (0-2, 1-3 and 4-6 days post-fertilization, dpf) of organogenesis. We observed that oxidative stress was minimal in blastula, gastrula or neurula stages, increased gradually with the advancement of morphogenesis and reached its maximum level in hatchlings. The antioxidant enzyme mRNAs were constitutively expressed throughout development; however, the expression pattern was not identical among the enzymes. Catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) mRNAs were minimal in the fertilized eggs, but increased significantly in 1 dpf and then either sharply dropped (SOD) or maintained a steady-state (catalase). Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) was very high in fertilized eggs and sharply dropped 1 dpf and then gradually increased thereafter. Glutathione reductase (GR) maintained a steady-state throughout the development. Ethanol was able to attenuate oxidative stress in embryos exposed only to 300 mM 1-3 dpf; no significant difference with controls was observed in other ethanol-treated groups. The antioxidant enzyme mRNAs also remained unaltered after ethanol treatment. From these data we conclude that the attenuation of oxidative stress by ethanol is probably due to the inhibition of normal growth of the embryos rather than by inhibiting catalase, GST, GR or SOD-dependent activities.

  11. Evaluation of nitrate reductase activity in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.; DeVine, P.J.

    1983-08-01

    Nitrate reductase activity was evaluated by four approaches, using four strains of Rhizobium japonicum and 11 chlorate-resistant mutants of the four strains. It was concluded that in vitro assays with bacteria or bacteroids provide the most simple and reliable assessment of the presence or absence of nitrate reductase. Nitrite reductase activity with methyl viologen and dithionite was found, but the enzyme activity does not confound the assay of nitrate reductase. 18 references

  12. Glutathione Reductase from Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis DSM20451T: Contribution to Oxygen Tolerance and Thiol Exchange Reactions in Wheat Sourdoughs▿

    PubMed Central

    Jänsch, André; Korakli, Maher; Vogel, Rudi F.; Gänzle, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of the glutathione reductase (GshR) activity of Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis DSM20451T on the thiol levels in fermented sourdoughs was determined, and the oxygen tolerance of the strain was also determined. The gshR gene coding for a putative GshR was sequenced and inactivated by single-crossover integration to yield strain L. sanfranciscensis DSM20451TΔgshR. The gene disruption was verified by sequencing the truncated gshR and surrounding regions on the chromosome. The gshR activity of L. sanfranciscensis DSM20451TΔgshR was strongly reduced compared to that of the wild-type strain, demonstrating that gshR indeed encodes an active GshR enzyme. The thiol levels in wheat doughs fermented with L. sanfranciscensis DSM20451 increased from 9 μM to 10.5 μM sulfhydryl/g of dough during a 24-h sourdough fermentation, but in sourdoughs fermented with L. sanfranciscensis DSM20451TΔgshR and in chemically acidified doughs, the thiol levels decreased to 6.5 to 6.8 μM sulfhydryl/g of dough. Remarkably, the GshR-negative strains Lactobacillus pontis LTH2587 and Lactobacillus reuteri BR11 exerted effects on thiol levels in dough comparable to those of L. sanfranciscensis. In addition to the effect on thiol levels in sourdough, the loss of GshR activity in L. sanfranciscensis DSM20451TΔgshR resulted in a loss of oxygen tolerance. The gshR mutant strain exhibited a strongly decreased aerobic growth rate on modified MRS medium compared to either the growth rate under anaerobic conditions or that of the wild-type strain, and aerobic growth was restored by the addition of cysteine. Moreover, the gshR mutant strain was more sensitive to the superoxide-generating agent paraquat. PMID:17496130

  13. Glutathione reductase from Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis DSM20451T: contribution to oxygen tolerance and thiol exchange reactions in wheat sourdoughs.

    PubMed

    Jänsch, André; Korakli, Maher; Vogel, Rudi F; Gänzle, Michael G

    2007-07-01

    The effect of the glutathione reductase (GshR) activity of Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis DSM20451(T) on the thiol levels in fermented sourdoughs was determined, and the oxygen tolerance of the strain was also determined. The gshR gene coding for a putative GshR was sequenced and inactivated by single-crossover integration to yield strain L. sanfranciscensis DSM20451(T)DeltagshR. The gene disruption was verified by sequencing the truncated gshR and surrounding regions on the chromosome. The gshR activity of L. sanfranciscensis DSM20451(T)DeltagshR was strongly reduced compared to that of the wild-type strain, demonstrating that gshR indeed encodes an active GshR enzyme. The thiol levels in wheat doughs fermented with L. sanfranciscensis DSM20451 increased from 9 microM to 10.5 microM sulfhydryl/g of dough during a 24-h sourdough fermentation, but in sourdoughs fermented with L. sanfranciscensis DSM20451(T)DeltagshR and in chemically acidified doughs, the thiol levels decreased to 6.5 to 6.8 microM sulfhydryl/g of dough. Remarkably, the GshR-negative strains Lactobacillus pontis LTH2587 and Lactobacillus reuteri BR11 exerted effects on thiol levels in dough comparable to those of L. sanfranciscensis. In addition to the effect on thiol levels in sourdough, the loss of GshR activity in L. sanfranciscensis DSM20451(T)DeltagshR resulted in a loss of oxygen tolerance. The gshR mutant strain exhibited a strongly decreased aerobic growth rate on modified MRS medium compared to either the growth rate under anaerobic conditions or that of the wild-type strain, and aerobic growth was restored by the addition of cysteine. Moreover, the gshR mutant strain was more sensitive to the superoxide-generating agent paraquat.

  14. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis eliminates the adaptive response of ascitic hepatoma 22 cells to nedaplatin that targets thioredoxin reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yijun; Lu, Hongjuan; Wang, Dongxu; Li, Shengrong; Sun, Kang; Wan, Xiaochun; Taylor, Ethan Will; Zhang, Jinsong

    2012-12-15

    Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) is a target for cancer therapy and the anticancer mechanism of cisplatin involves TrxR inhibition. We hypothesize that the anticancer drug nedaplatin (NDP), an analogue of cisplatin and a second-generation platinum complex, also targets TrxR. Furthermore, we investigate whether the therapeutic efficacy of NDP can be enhanced by simultaneous modulation of 1) TrxR, via NDP, and 2) glutathione (GSH), via the GSH synthesis inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Mice bearing ascitic hepatoma 22 (H22) cells were treated with NDP alone or NDP plus BSO. TrxR activity of H22 cells was inhibited by NDP in a dose-dependent manner. A high correlation between the inhibition of TrxR activity at 6 h and the inhibition of ascitic fluid volume at 72 h was established (r = 0.978, p < 0.01). As an adaptive response, the viable ascitic cancer cells after NDP treatment displayed an enlarged cell phenotype, assembled with several-fold more antioxidant enzymes and GSH-predominant non-protein free thiols. This adaptive response was largely eliminated when BSO was co-administered with NDP, leading to the decimation of the H22 cell population without enhancing renal toxicity, since at this dose, NDP did not inhibit renal TrxR activity. In conclusion, the pharmacological effect of NDP involves TrxR inhibition, and the adaptive response of NDP-treated ascitic H22 cells can be efficiently counteracted by BSO. Simultaneous modulation of TrxR and GSH on ascitic H22 cells using NDP plus BSO greatly enhances therapeutic efficacy as compared with the single modulation of TrxR using NDP alone. -- Highlights: ► Nedaplatin at a pharmacological dose inhibits TrxR in cancer cells but not in kidney. ► The nedaplatin-treated cancer cells exhibit adaptive response. ► Buthionine sulfoximine inhibits glutathione in both cancer cells and kidney. ► Buthionine sulfoximine counteracts the adaptive response to the nedaplatin treatment. ► Buthionine sulfoximine does not

  15. Purification and characterization of glutathione-dependent dehydroascorbate reductase from rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Maellaro, E; Del Bello, B; Sugherini, L; Santucci, A; Comporti, M; Casini, A F

    1994-01-01

    GSH-dependent enzymic reduction of dehydroascorbic acid to ascorbic acid has been studied in rat liver cytosol. After gel filtration of cytosol on Sephadex G-100 SF, dehydroascorbate reductase activity was recovered in two distinct peaks, one corresponding to glutaredoxin (an enzyme already known for its dehydroascorbate reductase activity) and another, much larger one, corresponding to a novel enzyme different from glutaredoxin. The latter was purified to apparent homogeneity. The purification process involved (NH4)2SO4 fractionation, followed by DEAE-Sepharose, Sephadex G-100 SF and Reactive Red chromatography. SDS/PAGE of the purified enzyme in either the presence or absence of 2-mercaptoethanol demonstrated a single protein band of M(r) 31,000. The M(r) determined by both Sephadex G-100 SF chromatography and h.p.l.c. was found to be approx. 48,000. H.p.l.c. of the denatured enzyme gave an M(r) value identical with that obtained by SDS/PAGE (31,000). The apparent Km for dehydroascorbate was 245 microM and the Vmax. was 1.9 mumol/min per mg of protein; for GSH they were 2.8 mM and 4.5 mumol/min per mg of protein respectively. The optimal pH range was 7.5-8.0. Microsequence analysis of the electro-transferred enzyme band showed that the N-terminus is blocked. Data on internal primary structure were obtained from CNBr-and N-chlorosuccinimide-derived fragments. No significative sequence similarity was found to any of the protein sequences contained in the Protein Identification Resource database. Images Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:8042991

  16. Unbalanced Activation of Glutathione Metabolic Pathways Suggests Potential Involvement in Plant Defense against the Gall Midge Mayetiola destructor in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuming; Zhang, Shize; Whitworth, R. Jeff; Stuart, Jeffrey J.; Chen, Ming-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione, γ-glutamylcysteinylglycine, exists abundantly in nearly all organisms. Glutathione participates in various physiological processes involved in redox reactions by serving as an electron donor/acceptor. We found that the abundance of total glutathione increased up to 60% in resistant wheat plants within 72 hours following attack by the gall midge Mayetiola destructor, the Hessian fly. The increase in total glutathione abundance, however, is coupled with an unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways. The activity and transcript abundance of glutathione peroxidases, which convert reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione (GSSG), increased in infested resistant plants. However, the enzymatic activity and transcript abundance of glutathione reductases, which convert GSSG back to GSH, did not change. This unbalanced regulation of the glutathione oxidation/reduction cycle indicates the existence of an alternative pathway to regenerate GSH from GSSG to maintain a stable GSSG/GSH ratio. Our data suggest the possibility that GSSG is transported from cytosol to apoplast to serve as an oxidant for class III peroxidases to generate reactive oxygen species for plant defense against Hessian fly larvae. Our results provide a foundation for elucidating the molecular processes involved in glutathione-mediated plant resistance to Hessian fly and potentially other pests as well. PMID:25627558

  17. Development of a functional assay to detect inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum glutathione reductase utilizing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Burkard, Lexi; Scheuermann, Alexis; Simithy, Johayra; Calderón, Angela I

    2016-04-01

    Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) like most other organisms, has a sophisticated antioxidant system, part of which includes glutathione reductase (GR). GR works by recycling toxic glutathione disulfide to glutathione, thereby reducing reactive oxygen species and making a form of glutathione (GSH) the parasite can use. Inhibition of this enzyme in Pf impedes parasite growth. In addition, it has been confirmed that PfGR is not identical to human GR. Thus, PfGR is an excellent target for antimalarial drug development. A functional assay utilizing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed to specifically identify and evaluate inhibitors of PfGR. Using recombinant PfGR enzyme and 1,4-naphthoquinone (1) as a reference compound and 4-nitrobenzothiadiazole (2) and methylene blue (3) as additional compounds, we quantified the concentration of GSH produced compared with a control to determine the inhibitory effect of these compounds. Our results coincide with that presented in literature: compounds 1-3 inhibit PfGR with IC50 values of 2.71, 8.38, and 19.23 µm, respectively. Good precision for this assay was exhibited by low values of intraday and interday coefficient of variation (3.1 and 2.4%, respectively). Thus, this assay can be used to screen for other potential inhibitors of PfGR quickly and accurately.

  18. Proteomic and activity profiles of ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes in germinating barley embryo.

    PubMed

    Bønsager, Birgit C; Shahpiri, Azar; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    2010-10-01

    Enzymes involved in redox control are important during seed germination and seedling growth. Ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes in barley embryo extracts were monitored both by 2D-gel electrophoresis and activity measurements from 4 to 144 h post imbibition (PI). Strikingly different activity profiles were observed. No ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity was present in mature seeds but activity was detected after 24 h PI and increased 14-fold up to 144 h PI. In contrast, dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) activity was present at 4h PI and first decreased by 9-fold until 72 h PI followed by a 5-fold increase at 144 h PI. Glutathione reductase and monodehydroascorbate reductase activities were also detected at 4 h PI, and showed modest increases of 1.8- and 2.7-fold, respectively, by 144 h PI. The combination of functional analysis with the proteomics approach enabled correlation of the activity profiles and protein abundance. While gel spots containing APX showed intensity changes consistent with the activity profile from 0 to 72 h PI, DHAR spot intensities indicated that post-translational regulation may be responsible for the observed changes in activity. Transcript profiling, 2D-western blotting and mass spectrometric characterization of multiple APX spots demonstrated the presence of APX1 and minor amounts of APX2.

  19. Detoxifying Enzymes at the Cross-Roads of Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Drug Hypersensitivity: Role of Glutathione Transferase P1-1 and Aldose Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J.; Díez-Dacal, Beatriz; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A. G.; Pajares, María A.; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Phase I and II enzymes are involved in the metabolism of endogenous reactive compounds as well as xenobiotics, including toxicants and drugs. Genotyping studies have established several drug metabolizing enzymes as markers for risk of drug hypersensitivity. However, other candidates are emerging that are involved in drug metabolism but also in the generation of danger or costimulatory signals. Enzymes such as aldo-keto reductases (AKR) and glutathione transferases (GST) metabolize prostaglandins and reactive aldehydes with proinflammatory activity, as well as drugs and/or their reactive metabolites. In addition, their metabolic activity can have important consequences for the cellular redox status, and impacts the inflammatory response as well as the balance of inflammatory mediators, which can modulate epigenetic factors and cooperate or interfere with drug-adduct formation. These enzymes are, in turn, targets for covalent modification and regulation by oxidative stress, inflammatory mediators, and drugs. Therefore, they constitute a platform for a complex set of interactions involving drug metabolism, protein haptenation, modulation of the inflammatory response, and/or generation of danger signals with implications in drug hypersensitivity reactions. Moreover, increasing evidence supports their involvement in allergic processes. Here, we will focus on GSTP1-1 and aldose reductase (AKR1B1) and provide a perspective for their involvement in drug hypersensitivity. PMID:27540362

  20. Novel prenylated bichalcone and chalcone from Humulus lupulus and their quinone reductase induction activities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liyan; Zhang, Fuxian; Hu, Zhijuan; Ding, Hui; Tang, Huifang; Ma, Zhongjun; Zhao, Xiaofeng

    2014-03-01

    A new prenylated chalcone xanthohumol M (1), a novel prenylated bichalcone humulusol (2) and six known chalcones (3-8) were found from Humulus lupulus. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods. All the chalcones' electrophilic abilities were assessed by GSH (glutathione) rapid screening, and their QR (quinone reductase) induction activities were evaluated using hepa 1c1c7 cells. The results of electrophilic assay and QR induction activity assay were quite well. New compounds 1 and 2, along with some known prenylated chalcones, displayed certain QR induction activity.

  1. Two interacting binding sites for quinacrine derivatives in the active site of trypanothione reductase – a template for drug design

    PubMed Central

    Saravanamuthu, Ahilan; Vickers, Tim J.; Bond, Charles S.; Peterson, Mark R.; Hunter, William N.; Fairlamb, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Trypanothione reductase is a key enzyme in the trypanothione-based redox metabolism of pathogenic trypanosomes. Since this system is absent in humans, being replaced with glutathione and glutathione reductase, it offers a target for selective inhibition. The rational design of potent inhibitors requires accurate structures of enzyme-inhibitor complexes, but this is lacking for trypanothione reductase. We therefore used quinacrine mustard, an alkylating derivative of the competitive inhibitor quinacrine, to probe the active site of this dimeric flavoprotein. Quinacrine mustard irreversibly inactivates Trypanosoma cruzi trypanothione reductase, but not human glutathione reductase, in a time-dependent manner with a stoichiometry of two inhibitors bound per monomer. The rate of inactivation is dependent upon the oxidation state of trypanothione reductase, with the NADPH-reduced form being inactivated significantly faster than the oxidised form. Inactivation is slowed by clomipramine and a melarsen oxide-trypanothione adduct (both are competitive inhibitors) but accelerated by quinacrine. The structure of the trypanothione reductase-quinacrine mustard adduct was determined to 2.7 Å, revealing two molecules of inhibitor bound in the trypanothione-binding site. The acridine moieties interact with each other through π-stacking effects, and one acridine interacts in a similar fashion with a tryptophan residue. These interactions provide a molecular explanation for the differing effects of clomipramine and quinacrine on inactivation by quinacrine mustard. Synergism with quinacrine occurs as a result of these planar acridines being able to stack together in the active site cleft, thereby gaining an increased number of binding interactions, whereas antagonism occurs with non-planar molecules, such as clomipramine, where stacking is not possible. PMID:15102853

  2. TRAIL-Based High Throughput Screening Reveals a Link between TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis and Glutathione Reductase, a Key Component of Oxidative Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Rozanov, Dmitri; Cheltsov, Anton; Sergienko, Eduard; Vasile, Stefan; Golubkov, Vladislav; Aleshin, Alexander E; Levin, Trevor; Traer, Elie; Hann, Byron; Freimuth, Julia; Alexeev, Nikita; Alekseyev, Max A; Budko, Sergey P; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Spellman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput screen for compounds that induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis identified ML100 as an active chemical probe, which potentiated TRAIL activity in prostate carcinoma PPC-1 and melanoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Follow-up in silico modeling and profiling in cell-based assays allowed us to identify NSC130362, pharmacophore analog of ML100 that induced 65-95% cytotoxicity in cancer cells and did not affect the viability of human primary hepatocytes. In agreement with the activation of the apoptotic pathway, both ML100 and NSC130362 synergistically with TRAIL induced caspase-3/7 activity in MDA-MB-435 cells. Subsequent affinity chromatography and inhibition studies convincingly demonstrated that glutathione reductase (GSR), a key component of the oxidative stress response, is a target of NSC130362. In accordance with the role of GSR in the TRAIL pathway, GSR gene silencing potentiated TRAIL activity in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. Inhibition of GSR activity resulted in the induction of oxidative stress, as was evidenced by an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane after NSC130362 treatment in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. The antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) fully protected MDA-MB-435 cells from cell lysis induced by NSC130362 and TRAIL, thereby further confirming the interplay between GSR and TRAIL. As a consequence of activation of oxidative stress, combined treatment of different oxidative stress inducers and NSC130362 promoted cell death in a variety of cancer cells but not in hepatocytes in cell-based assays and in in vivo, in a mouse tumor xenograft model.

  3. TRAIL-Based High Throughput Screening Reveals a Link between TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis and Glutathione Reductase, a Key Component of Oxidative Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Rozanov, Dmitri; Cheltsov, Anton; Sergienko, Eduard; Vasile, Stefan; Golubkov, Vladislav; Aleshin, Alexander E.; Levin, Trevor; Traer, Elie; Hann, Byron; Freimuth, Julia; Alexeev, Nikita; Alekseyev, Max A.; Budko, Sergey P; Bächinger, Hans Peter; Spellman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput screen for compounds that induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis identified ML100 as an active chemical probe, which potentiated TRAIL activity in prostate carcinoma PPC-1 and melanoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Follow-up in silico modeling and profiling in cell-based assays allowed us to identify NSC130362, pharmacophore analog of ML100 that induced 65-95% cytotoxicity in cancer cells and did not affect the viability of human primary hepatocytes. In agreement with the activation of the apoptotic pathway, both ML100 and NSC130362 synergistically with TRAIL induced caspase-3/7 activity in MDA-MB-435 cells. Subsequent affinity chromatography and inhibition studies convincingly demonstrated that glutathione reductase (GSR), a key component of the oxidative stress response, is a target of NSC130362. In accordance with the role of GSR in the TRAIL pathway, GSR gene silencing potentiated TRAIL activity in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. Inhibition of GSR activity resulted in the induction of oxidative stress, as was evidenced by an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane after NSC130362 treatment in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. The antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) fully protected MDA-MB-435 cells from cell lysis induced by NSC130362 and TRAIL, thereby further confirming the interplay between GSR and TRAIL. As a consequence of activation of oxidative stress, combined treatment of different oxidative stress inducers and NSC130362 promoted cell death in a variety of cancer cells but not in hepatocytes in cell-based assays and in in vivo, in a mouse tumor xenograft model. PMID:26075913

  4. Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: why selenoproteins?

    PubMed

    Gromer, Stephan; Johansson, Linda; Bauer, Holger; Arscott, L David; Rauch, Susanne; Ballou, David P; Williams, Charles H; Schirmer, R Heiner; Arnér, Elias S J

    2003-10-28

    Selenium, an essential trace element for mammals, is incorporated into a selected class of selenoproteins as selenocysteine. All known isoenzymes of mammalian thioredoxin (Trx) reductases (TrxRs) employ selenium in the C-terminal redox center -Gly-Cys-Sec-Gly-COOH for reduction of Trx and other substrates, whereas the corresponding sequence in Drosophila melanogaster TrxR is -Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser-COOH. Surprisingly, the catalytic competence of these orthologous enzymes is similar, whereas direct Sec-to-Cys substitution of mammalian TrxR, or other selenoenzymes, yields almost inactive enzyme. TrxRs are therefore ideal for studying the biology of selenocysteine by comparative enzymology. Here we show that the serine residues flanking the C-terminal Cys residues of Drosophila TrxRs are responsible for activating the cysteines to match the catalytic efficiency of a selenocysteine-cysteine pair as in mammalian TrxR, obviating the need for selenium. This finding suggests that the occurrence of selenoenzymes, which implies that the organism is selenium-dependent, is not necessarily associated with improved enzyme efficiency. Our data suggest that the selective advantage of selenoenzymes is a broader range of substrates and a broader range of microenvironmental conditions in which enzyme activity is possible.

  5. Enhanced silver nanoparticle synthesis by optimization of nitrate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Gopalram, Shubaash; Kalishwaralal, Kalimuthu; Deepak, Venkataraman; Pandian, Sureshbabu Ram Kumar; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2010-01-01

    Nanostructure materials are attracting a great deal of attention because of their potential for achieving specific processes and selectivity, especially in biological and pharmaceutical applications. The generation of silver nanoparticles using optimized nitrate reductase for the reduction of Ag(+) with the retention of enzymatic activity in the complex is being reported. This report involves the optimization of enzyme activity to bring about enhanced nanoparticle synthesis. Response surface methodology and central composite rotary design (CCRD) were employed to optimize a fermentation medium for the production of nitrate reductase by Bacillus licheniformis at pH 8. The four variables involved in the study of nitrate reductase were Glucose, Peptone, Yeast extract and KNO(3). Glucose had a significant effect on nitrate reductase production. The optimized medium containing (%) Glucose: 1.5, Peptone: 1, Yeast extract: 0.35 and KNO(3): 0.35 resulted in a nitrate reductase activity of 452.206 U/ml which is same as that of the central level. The medium A (showing least nitrate reductase activity) and the medium B (showing maximum nitrate reductase activity) were compared for the synthesis. Spectrophotometric analysis revealed that the particles exhibited a peak at 431 nm and the A(431) for the medium B was 2-fold greater than that of the medium A. The particles were also characterized using TEM. The particles synthesized using the optimized enzyme activity ranged from 10 to 80 nm and therefore can be extended to various medicinal applications.

  6. Glutathione Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, David P.; Edwards, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The 55 Arabidopsis glutathione transferases (GSTs) are, with one microsomal exception, a monophyletic group of soluble enzymes that can be divided into phi, tau, theta, zeta, lambda, dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) and TCHQD classes. The populous phi and tau classes are often highly stress inducible and regularly crop up in proteomic and transcriptomic studies. Despite much study on their xenobiotic-detoxifying activities their natural roles are unclear, although roles in defence-related secondary metabolism are likely. The smaller DHAR and lambda classes are likely glutathione-dependent reductases, the zeta class functions in tyrosine catabolism and the theta class has a putative role in detoxifying oxidised lipids. This review describes the evidence for the functional roles of GSTs and the potential for these enzymes to perform diverse functions that in many cases are not “glutathione transferase” activities. As well as biochemical data, expression data from proteomic and transcriptomic studies are included, along with subcellular localisation experiments and the results of functional genomic studies. PMID:22303257

  7. Distribution of Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductase activity among microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kouji; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Yoda, Koji; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Nimura-Matsune, Kaori; Mura, Kiyoshi; Tokue, Chiyoko; Katoh, Tetzuya; Kawasaki, Shinji; Niimura, Youichi

    2004-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin (Prx) constitutes a large family of enzymes found in microorganisms, animals, and plants, but the detection of the activities of Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductases (peroxiredoxin reductases) in cell extracts, and the purification based on peroxide reductase activity, have only been done in bacteria and Trypanosomatidae. A peroxiredoxin reductase (NADH oxidase) from a bacterium, Amphibacillus, displayed only poor activities in the presence of purified Prx from Saccharomyces or Synechocystis, while it is highly active in the presence of bacterial Prx. These results suggested that an enzyme system different from that in bacteria might exist for the reduction of Prx in yeast and cyanobacteria. Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductase activities were detected in cell extracts of Saccharomyces, Synechocystis, and Chlorella, and the enzyme activities of Saccharomyces and Chlorella were induced under vigorously aerated culture conditions and intensive light exposure conditions, respectively. Partial purification of Prx-linked peroxidase from the induced yeast cells indicated that the Prx-linked peroxidase system consists of two protein components, namely, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase. This finding is consistent with the previous report on its purification based on its protein protection activity against oxidation [Chae et al., J. Biol. Chem., 269, 27670-27678 (1994)]. In this study we have confirmed that Prx-linked peroxidase activity are widely distributed, not only in bacteria species and Trypanosomatidae, but also in yeast and photosynthetic microorganisms, and showed reconstitution of the activity from partially purified interspecies components.

  8. Deficiency of two red-cell flavin enzymes in a population in Sardinia: was glutathione reductase deficiency specifically selected for by malaria?

    PubMed

    Anderson, B B; Corda, L; Perry, G M; Pilato, D; Giuberti, M; Vullo, C

    1995-09-01

    In two areas in Italy where malaria was endemic--in the Po delta and Maremma on the west coast--we have found a high prevalence of an inherited flavin-deficient red cell in the normal population, suggesting selection by malaria. This study in Sardinia enabled a direct comparison of red-cell activities of FAD-dependent glutathione reductase (EGR) and FMN-dependent pyridoxine phosphate (PNP) oxidase in an ethnically homogeneous population, between two coastal villages where malaria was endemic from 300 B.C. and two mountain villages with no history of malaria. Both enzyme activities were significantly lower on the coast, and it did not seem that this could be explained by possible small differences in dietary riboflavin. As was thought to be the case in Ferrara and Grosseto, it is probable that a genetically controlled flavin-deficient red cell was selected for by malaria. Low EGR apoenzyme activity was more common on the coast, usually explaining the accompanying low basic EGR activity, and may also have been selected for by malaria. This adds to evidence from others that the mechanism of defence of a flavin-deficient red cell against malaria may be through EGR deficiency. It could also play a part in the protection given by heterozygous beta-thalassemia. The multifactorial protection of the population against malaria is discussed.

  9. Effect of glutathione reductase knockdown in response to UVB-induced oxidative stress in human lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glutathione reductase (GR) plays a critical role in the maintenance of physiological redox status in cells. However, the comprehensive investigations of GR-modulated oxidative stress have not been reported. Methods In the present study, we cultured a human lung adenocarcinoma line CL1-0 and its GR-knockdown derivative CL1-0ΔGR to evaluate their differential responses to UVB-irradiation. Results We identified 18 proteins that showed significant changes under UVB-irradiation in CL1-0ΔGR cells rather than in CL1-0 cells. Several proteins involving protein folding, metabolism, protein biosynthesis and redox regulation showed significant changes in expression. Conclusions In summary, the current study used a comprehensive lung adenocarcinoma-based proteomic approach for the identification of GR-modulated protein expression in response to UVB-irradiation. To our knowledge, this is the first global proteomic analysis to investigate the role of GR under UVB-irradiation in mammalian cell model. PMID:24405781

  10. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of thioredoxin glutathione reductase from Schistosoma japonicum in complex with FAD

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongdong; Wu, Qunfeng; Peng, Yun; Huang, Fuyan; Li, Xun; Chen, Lin; Shi, Dashuang; Zhou, Xiaonong; Fan, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin glutathione reductase from Schistosoma japonicum (SjTGR), a multifunctional enzyme, plays a vital role in antioxidant pathways and is considered to be a potential drug target for the development of antischistosomal chemotherapy. In this study, two constructs of a truncated form of SjTGR without the last two residues (Sec597–Gly598) were cloned, overexpressed and purified using wild-type and codon-optimized genes. Only SjTGR from the wild-type gene was found to form a complex with flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), which could be crystallized in the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 84.185, b = 86.47, c = 183.164 Å, at 295 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. One dimer was present in the crystallographic asymmetric unit and the calculated Matthews coefficient (V M) and solvent content were 2.6 Å3 Da−1 and 52.8%, respectively. Structural determination of SjTGR is in progress using the molecular-replacement method. PMID:24419626

  11. Glutathione reductase: Comparison of steady-state and rapid reaction primary kinetic isotope effects exhibited by the yeast, spinach, and Escherichia coli enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Vanoni, M.A.; Wong, K.K.; Ballou, D.P.; Blanchard, J.S. )

    1990-06-19

    Kinetic parameters for NADPH and NADH have been determined at pH 8.1 for spinach, yeast, and E. coli glutathione reductases. NADPH exhibited low Km values for all enzymes (3-6 microM), while the Km values for NADH were 100 times higher (approximately 400 microM). Under our experimental conditions, the percentage of maximal velocities with NADH versus those measured with NADPH were 18.4, 3.7, and 0.13% for the spinach, yeast, and E. coli enzymes, respectively. Primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects were independent of GSSG concentration between Km and 15Km levels, supporting a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. For each of the three enzymes, NADPH yielded primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on Vmax only, while NADH exhibited primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on both V and V/K. The magnitude of DV/KNADH at pH 8.1 is 4.3 for the spinach enzyme, 2.7 for the yeast enzyme, and 1.6 for the E. coli glutathione reductase. The experimentally determined values of TV/KNADH of 7.4, 4.2, and 2.2 for the spinach, yeast, and E. coli glutathione reductases agree well with those calculated from the corresponding DV/KNADH using the Swain-Schaad expression. This suggests that the intrinsic primary kinetic isotope effect on NADH oxidation is fully expressed. In order to confirm this conclusion, single-turnover experiments have been performed. The measured primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on the enzyme reduction half-reaction using NADH match those measured in the steady state for each of the three glutathione reductases.

  12. Glutathione reductase from Brassica rapa affects tolerance and the redox state but not fermentation ability in response to oxidative stress in genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ho-Sung; Shin, Sun-Young; Kim, Young-Saeng; Kim, Il-Sup

    2012-05-01

    To determine whether the exogenous expression of glutathione reductase (GR) from Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis (BrGR) can reduce the deleterious effects of unfavorable conditions, we constructed a transgenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain bearing the GR gene cloned into the yeast expression vector, pVTU260. BrGR expression was confirmed by semi reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, immunoblotting analysis and an enzyme assay. Ectopic BrGR-expression improved cellular glutathione (GSH) homeostasis after higher GSH accumulation in the transgenic yeast than in the wild-type yeast under H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress. The BrGR-expressing yeast strain induced the activation of metabolic enzymes (Hxt, G6PDH, GAPDH and Ald), antioxidant systems (Gpx, Trx2, Trx3, Trr1, Tsa1 and porin) and molecular chaperones (Hsp104, Hsp90, Hsp70, Hsp42, Hsp26, Grp, Sti1 and Zpr1), which led to lower oxidative protein damage after a reduction in the level of cellular ROS in the BrGR-expressing yeast strain exposed to H(2)O(2) than in the wild-type yeast strain. BrGR-expression increased the ability to adapt and recover from H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress and various stressors, including heat shock, menadione, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, heavy metals, sodium dodecyl sulfate, ethanol and NaCl, but did not affect fermentation capacity. These results suggest that ectopic BrGR expression confers acquired tolerance by improving proteostasis and redox homeostasis through co-activation of various cell rescue proteins against ROS-induced oxidative stress in yeast cells.

  13. Gene Gun Bombardment with DNA-Coated Golden Particles Enhanced the Protective Effect of a DNA Vaccine Based on Thioredoxin Glutathione Reductase of Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yan; Zhao, Bin; Han, Yanhui; Zhang, Juan; Li, Xuezhen; Qiu, Chunhui; Wu, Xiujuan; Hong, Yang; Ai, Dezhou; Lin, Jiaojiao; Fu, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, caused by infection with Schistosoma species, remains an important parasitic zoonosis. Thioredoxin glutathione reductase of Schistosoma japonicum (SjTGR) plays an important role in the development of the parasite and for its survival. Here we present a recombinant plasmid DNA vaccine, pVAX1/SjTGR, to estimate its protection against S. japonicum in BALB/c mice. The DNA vaccine administrated by particle bombardment induced higher protection than by intramuscular injection. All animals vaccinated with pVAX1/SjTGR developed significant specific anti-SjTGR antibodies than control groups. Moreover, animals immunized by gene gun exhibited a splenocyte proliferative response, with an increase in IFN-γ and IL-4. The recombinant plasmid administrated by gene gun achieved a medium protective efficacy of 27.83–38.83% (P < 0.01) of worm reduction and 40.38–44.51% (P < 0.01) of liver egg count reduction. It suggests that different modes of administering a DNA vaccine can influence the protective efficacy induced by the vaccine. Interestingly, from the enzymatic activity results, we found that worms obtained from pVAX1/SjTGR-vaccinated animals expressed lower enzymatic activity than the control group and the antibodies weakened the enzymatic activity of SjTGR in vitro, too. It implies that the high-level antibodies may contribute to the protective effects. PMID:23509820

  14. Conjugation of glutathione and other thiols with bioreductively activated mitomycin C. Effect of thiols on the reductive activation rate.

    PubMed

    Sharma, M; Tomasz, M

    1994-01-01

    Mitomycin C (MC), a clinically used natural antitumor agent, was shown to form three monoconjugates (11a-13a) and two bisconjugates (14a, 15a) with GSH upon reductive activation by rat liver microsomes, purified NADPH-cytochrome c reductase, or NADH-cytochrome c reductase or chemical reduction using H2/PtO2. Rat liver cytosol/NADH activated MC only at acidic pH (5.8), resulting in the formation of a single GSH-MC monoconjugate, 13a. The reductase responsible for cytosolic activation of MC to form this conjugate was DT-diaphorase. GSH itself did not reduce MC, and unreduced MC did not form conjugates with GSH. A moderate catalytic effect by glutathione S-transferase was demonstrated on the cytosol-activated reaction. Mercaptoethanol and N-acetylcysteine gave analogous sets of five MC-thiol conjugates under cytochrome c reductase or H2/PtO2 activation conditions. The structures of all 15 MC-thiol conjugates (five each with GSH, mercaptoethanol, and N-acetylcysteine, respectively) were determined, using 1H-NMR, UV, and mass spectroscopies, combined with analytical chemical and radiolabeling methods. The mechanism of formation of the conjugates features SN2 displacement of the carbamate of the reduced MC by GS-. The MC-GSH conjugates were noncytotoxic to the tumor cells tested. The conjugation of GSH with activated MC is likely to represent detoxication in mammalian cells. As another effect, GSH accelerates the rate of reduction of MC by "slow" reducing agents such as cytochrome c reductases and H2/PtO2. A mechanism is proposed to explain this effect, which involves further reduction of the initially formed MC semiquinone free radical by GSH.

  15. Diphenyl diselenide protects against methylmercury-induced inhibition of thioredoxin reductase and glutathione peroxidase in human neuroblastoma cells: a comparison with ebselen.

    PubMed

    Meinerz, Daiane F; Branco, Vasco; Aschner, Michael; Carvalho, Cristina; Rocha, João Batista T

    2017-04-06

    Exposure to methylmercury (MeHg), an important environmental toxicant, may lead to serious health risks, damaging various organs and predominantly affecting the brain function. The toxicity of MeHg can be related to the inhibition of important selenoenzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). Experimental studies have shown that selenocompounds play an important role as cellular detoxifiers and protective agents against the harmful effects of mercury. The present study investigated the mechanisms by which diphenyl diselenide [(PhSe)2 ] and ebselen interfered with the interaction of mercury (MeHg) and selenoenzymes (TrxR and GPx) in an in vitro experimental model of cultured human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). Our results established that (PhSe)2 and ebselen increased the activity and expression of TrxR. In contrast, MeHg inhibited TrxR activity even at low doses (0.5 μm). Coexposure to selenocompounds and MeHg showed a protective effect of (PhSe)2 on both the activity and expression of TrxR. When selenoenzyme GPx was evaluated, selenocompounds did not alter its activity or expression significantly, whereas MeHg inhibited the activity of GPx (from 1 μm). Among the selenocompounds only (PhSe)2 significantly protected against the effects of MeHg on GPx activity. Taken together, these results indicate a potential use for ebselen and (PhSe)2 against MeHg toxicity. Furthermore, for the first time, we have demonstrated that (PhSe)2 caused a more pronounced upregulation of TrxR than ebselen in neuroblastoma cells, likely reflecting an important molecular mechanism involved in the antioxidant properties of this compound. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. [Effects of melaxen and valdoxan on the activity of glutathione antioxidant system and NADPH-producing enzymes in rat heart under experimental hyperthyroidism conditions].

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, M V; Popova, T N; Shul'gin, K K; Popov, S S

    2013-01-01

    The effects of melaxen and valdoxan on the activity of glutathione antioxidant system and some NADPH-producing enzymes have been studied under conditions of experimental hyperthyroidism in rat heart. Under the action of these drugs, reduced glutathione (GSH) content increased as compared to values observed under the conditions of pathology. It has been established that the activities of glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GP), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and NADP isocitrate dehydrogenase (increased under pathological conditions) change toward the intact control values upon the introduction of both drugs. The influence of melaxen and valdoxan, capable of producing antioxidant effect, leads apparently to the inhibition of free-radical oxidation processes and, as a consequence, the reduction of mobilization degree of the glutathione antioxidant system.

  17. Activity levels and expression of antioxidant enzymes in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in artificially aged rice seed.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guangkun; Xin, Xia; Song, Chao; Chen, Xiaoling; Zhang, Jinmei; Wu, Shuhua; Li, Ruifang; Liu, Xu; Lu, Xinxiong

    2014-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species are the main contributors to seed deterioration. In order to study scavenging systems for reactive oxygen species in aged seed, we performed analyses using western blotting, real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, high-performance liquid chromatography, and antioxidant enzyme activity analyses in artificially aged rice seeds (Oryza sativa L. cv. wanhua no.11). Aging seeds by storing them at 50 °C for 1, 9, or 17 months increased the superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide levels and reduced the germination percentage from 99% to 92%, 55%, and 2%, respectively. The activity levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR), and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) did not change in aged seeds. In contrast, the activity levels of catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) were significantly decreased in aged seeds, as were the expression of catalase and cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase protein. Transcript accumulation analysis showed that specific expression patterns were complex for each of the antioxidant enzyme types in the rice embryos. Overall, the expression of most genes was down-regulated, along with their protein expression. In addition, the reduction in the amount of ascorbate and glutathione was associated with the reduction in scavenging enzymes activity in aged rice embryos. Our data suggest that the depression of the antioxidant system, especially the reduction in the expression of CAT1, APX1 and MDHAR1, may be responsible for the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in artificially aged seed embryos, leading to a loss of seed vigor.

  18. Thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Mustacich, D; Powis, G

    2000-01-01

    The mammalian thioredoxin reductases (TrxRs) are a family of selenium-containing pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases with mechanistic and sequence identity, including a conserved -Cys-Val-Asn-Val-Gly-Cys- redox catalytic site, to glutathione reductases. TrxRs catalyse the NADPH-dependent reduction of the redox protein thioredoxin (Trx), as well as of other endogenous and exogenous compounds. The broad substrate specificity of mammalian TrxRs is due to a second redox-active site, a C-terminal -Cys-SeCys- (where SeCys is selenocysteine), that is not found in glutathione reductase or Escherichia coli TrxR. There are currently two confirmed forms of mammalian TrxRs, TrxR1 and TrxR2, and it is possible that other forms will be identified. The availability of Se is a key factor determining TrxR activity both in cell culture and in vivo, and the mechanism(s) for the incorporation of Se into TrxRs, as well as the regulation of TrxR activity, have only recently begun to be investigated. The importance of Trx to many aspects of cell function make it likely that TrxRs also play a role in protection against oxidant injury, cell growth and transformation, and the recycling of ascorbate from its oxidized form. Since TrxRs are able to reduce a number of substrates other than Trx, it is likely that additional biological effects will be discovered for TrxR. Furthermore, inhibiting TrxR with drugs may lead to new treatments for human diseases such as cancer, AIDS and autoimmune diseases. PMID:10657232

  19. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate enhances key enzymatic activities of hepatic thioredoxin and glutathione systems in selenium-optimal mice but activates hepatic Nrf2 responses in selenium-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ruixia; Wang, Dongxu; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Ke; Chen, Pingping; Yang, Chung S; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-12-01

    Selenium participates in the antioxidant defense mainly through a class of selenoproteins, including thioredoxin reductase. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the most abundant and biologically active catechin in green tea. Depending upon the dose and biological systems, EGCG may function either as an antioxidant or as an inducer of antioxidant defense via its pro-oxidant action or other unidentified mechanisms. By manipulating the selenium status, the present study investigated the interactions of EGCG with antioxidant defense systems including the thioredoxin system comprising of thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase, the glutathione system comprising of glutathione and glutathione reductase coupled with glutaredoxin, and the Nrf2 system. In selenium-optimal mice, EGCG increased hepatic activities of thioredoxin reductase, glutathione reductase and glutaredoxin. These effects of EGCG appeared to be not due to overt pro-oxidant action because melatonin, a powerful antioxidant, did not influence the increase. However, in selenium-deficient mice, with low basal levels of thioredoxin reductase 1, the same dose of EGCG did not elevate the above-mentioned enzymes; intriguingly EGCG in turn activated hepatic Nrf2 response, leading to increased heme oxygenase 1 and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 protein levels and thioredoxin activity. Overall, the present work reveals that EGCG is a robust inducer of the Nrf2 system only in selenium-deficient conditions. Under normal physiological conditions, in selenium-optimal mice, thioredoxin and glutathione systems serve as the first line defense systems against the stress induced by high doses of EGCG, sparing the activation of the Nrf2 system.

  20. Measurement of nitrous oxide reductase activity in aquatic sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.; Paulsen, S.

    1986-01-01

    Denitrification in aquatic sediments was measured by an N/sub 2/O reductase assay. Sediments consumed small added quantities of N/sub 2/O over short periods (a few hours). In experiments with sediment slurries, N/sub 2/O reductase activity was inhibited by 0/sub 2/, C/sub 2/H/sub 2/, heat treatment, and by high levels of nitrate (1 mM) or sulfide (10 mM). However, ambient levels of nitrate (<100 ..mu..M) did not influence activity, and moderate levels (about 150 ..mu..M) induced only a short lag before reductase activity began. Moderate levels of sulfide (<1 mM) had no effect on N/sub 2/O reductase activity. Nitrous oxide reductase displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics in sediments from freshwater, estuarine, and alkaline-saline environments. An in situ assay was devised in which a solution of N/sub 2/O was injected into sealed glass cores containing intact sediment. Two estimates of net rates of denitrification in San Francisco Bay under approximated in situ conditions were 0.009 and 0.041 mmol of N/sub 2/O per m/sup 2/ per h. Addition of chlorate to inhibit denitrification in these intact-core experiments (to estimate gross rates of N/sub 2/O consumption) resulted in approximately a 14% upward revision of estimates of net rates. These results were comparable to an in situ estimate of 0.022 mmol of N/sub 2/O per m/sup 2/ per h made with the acetylene block assay.

  1. Measurement of nitrous oxide reductase activity in aquatic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.; Paulsen, S.

    1986-01-01

    Denitrification in aquatic sediments was measured by an N2O reductase assay. Sediments consumed small added quantities of N2O over short periods (a few hours). In experiments with sediment slurries, N2O reductase activity was inhibited by O2, C2H2, heat treatment, and by high levels of nitrate (1 mM) or sulfide (10 mM). However, ambient levels of nitrate (<100 μM) did not influence activity, and moderate levels (about 150 μM) induced only a short lag before reductase activity began. Moderate levels of sulfide (<1 mM) had no effect on N2O reductase activity. Nitrous oxide reductase displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics in sediments from freshwater (Km = 2.17 μM), estuarine (Km = 14.5 μM), and alkaline-saline (Km = 501 μM) environments. An in situ assay was devised in which a solution of N2O was injected into sealed glass cores containing intact sediment. Two estimates of net rates of denitrification in San Francisco Bay under approximated in situ conditions were 0.009 and 0.041 mmol of N2O per m2 per h. Addition of chlorate to inhibit denitrification in these intact-core experiments (to estimate gross rates of N2O consumption) resulted in approximately a 14% upward revision of estimates of net rates. These results were comparable to an in situ estimate of 0.022 mmol of N2O per m2 per h made with the acetylene block assay.

  2. Identification and characterization of a novel chloroplast/mitochondria co-localized glutathione reductase 3 involved in salt stress response in rice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsung-Meng; Lin, Wan-Rong; Kao, Yun-Ting; Hsu, Yi-Ting; Yeh, Ching-Hui; Hong, Chwan-Yang; Kao, Ching Huei

    2013-11-01

    Glutathione reductases (GRs) are important components of the antioxidant machinery that plants use to respond against abiotic stresses. In rice, one cytosolic and two chloroplastic GR isoforms have been identified. In this work, we describe the cloning and characterization of the full-length cDNA encoding OsGR3, a chloroplast-localized GR that up to now was considered as a non-functional enzyme because of assumed lack of N-terminal conserved domains. The expression of OsGR3 in E. coli validated that it can be translated as a protein with GR activity. OsGR3 shows 76 and 53 % identity with OsGR1 (chloroplastic) and OsGR2 (cytosolic), respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed 2 chloroplastic GRs in Poaceae species, including rice, sorghum and brachypodium, but only one chloroplastic GR in dicots. A plastid transit peptide is located at the N terminus of OsGR3, and genetic transformation of rice with a GR3-GFP fusion construct further confirmed its localization in chloroplasts. Furthermore, OsGR1 and OsGR3 are also targeted to mitochondria, which suggest a combined antioxidant mechanism in both chloroplasts and mitochondria. However, both isoforms showed a distinct response to salinity: the expression of OsGR3 but not OsGR1 was induced by salt stress. In addition, the transcript level of OsGR3 was greatly increased with salicylic acid treatment but was not significantly affected by methyl jasmonate, dehydration or heat shock stress. Our results provide new clues about the possible roles of functional OsGR3 in salt stress and biotic stress tolerance.

  3. The oxido-reductase enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4) governs Salmonella Typhimurium-induced neutrophil transepithelial migration.

    PubMed

    Agbor, Terence A; Demma, Zachary; Mrsny, Randall J; Castillo, Antonio; Boll, Erik J; McCormick, Beth A

    2014-09-01

    Neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leucocytes; PMN) transmigration across mucosal surfaces contributes to dysfunction of epithelial barrier properties, a characteristic underlying many mucosal inflammatory diseases. Using Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) as a prototypic proinflammatory insult, we have previously reported that the eicosanoid hepoxilin A3 (HXA3 ), an endogenous product of 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) activity, is secreted from the apical surface of the intestinal epithelium to establish a chemotactic gradient that guides PMN across the epithelial surface. Since little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms that regulate 12-LOX during S. Typhimurium infection, we investigated this pathway. We found that expression of phospholipid glutathione peroxidase (GPX4), which is known to have an inhibitory effect on 12-LOX activity, is significantly decreased at both the mRNA and protein level during infection with S. Typhimurium. Moreover, employing intestinal epithelial cell monolayers expressing siRNA against GPX4 mRNA, S. Typhimurium-induced PMN migration was significantly increased compared with the non-specific siRNA control cells. Conversely, in cells engineered to overexpress GPX4, S. Typhimurium-induced PMN migration was significantly decreased, which is consistent with the finding that partial depletion of GPX4 by RNAi resulted in a significant increase in HXA3 secretion during S. Typhimurium infection. Mechanistically, although we found Salmonella entry not to be required for the induced decrease in GPX4, the secreted effector, SipA, which is known to induce epithelial responses leading to stimulation of HXA3 , governed the decrease in GPX4 in a process that does not lead to an overall increase in the levels of ROS. Taken together, these results suggest that S. Typhimurium induces apical secretion of HXA3 by decreasing the expression of phospholipid GPX, which in turn leads to an increase in 12-LOX activity, and hence HXA3

  4. Glutathione, glutathione-related enzymes, and oxidative stress in individuals with subacute occupational exposure to lead.

    PubMed

    Dobrakowski, Michał; Pawlas, Natalia; Hudziec, Edyta; Kozłowska, Agnieszka; Mikołajczyk, Agnieszka; Birkner, Ewa; Kasperczyk, Sławomir

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of subacute exposure to lead on the glutathione-related antioxidant defense and oxidative stress parameters in 36 males occupationally exposed to lead for 40±3.2days. Blood lead level in the examined population increased significantly by 359% due to lead exposure. Simultaneously, erythrocyte glutathione level decreased by 16%, whereas the activity of glutathione-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in erythrocytes and leukocytes decreased by 28% and 10%, respectively. Similarly, the activity of glutathione-S-transferase in erythrocytes decreased by 45%. However, the activity of glutathione reductase in erythrocytes and leukocytes increased by 26% and 6%, respectively, whereas the total oxidant status value in leukocytes increased by 37%. Subacute exposure to lead results in glutathione pool depletion and accumulation of lipid peroxidation products; however, it does not cause DNA damage. Besides, subacute exposure to lead modifies the activity of glutathione-related enzymes.

  5. The Thiol Reductase Activity of YUCCA6 Mediates Delayed Leaf Senescence by Regulating Genes Involved in Auxin Redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Mi R.; Jung, In J.; Kang, Sun B.; Park, Hee J.; Kim, Min G.; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Auxin, a phytohormone that affects almost every aspect of plant growth and development, is biosynthesized from tryptophan via the tryptamine, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-pyruvic acid, and indole-3-acetaldoxime pathways. YUCCAs (YUCs), flavin monooxygenase enzymes, catalyze the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) to the auxin (indole acetic acid). Arabidopsis thaliana YUC6 also exhibits thiol-reductase and chaperone activity in vitro; these activities require the highly conserved Cys-85 and are essential for scavenging of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the drought tolerance response. Here, we examined whether the YUC6 thiol reductase activity also participates in the delay in senescence observed in YUC6-overexpressing (YUC6-OX) plants. YUC6 overexpression delays leaf senescence in natural and dark-induced senescence conditions by reducing the expression of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE 12 (SAG12). ROS accumulation normally occurs during senescence, but was not observed in the leaves of YUC6-OX plants; however, ROS accumulation was observed in YUC6-OXC85S plants, which overexpress a mutant YUC6 that lacks thiol reductase activity. We also found that YUC6-OX plants, but not YUC6-OXC85S plants, show upregulation of three genes encoding NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRA, NTRB, and NTRC), and GAMMA-GLUTAMYLCYSTEINE SYNTHETASE 1 (GSH1), encoding an enzyme involved in redox signaling. We further determined that excess ROS accumulation caused by methyl viologen treatment or decreased glutathione levels caused by buthionine sulfoximine treatment can decrease the levels of auxin efflux proteins such as PIN2-4. The expression of PINs is also reduced in YUC6-OX plants. These findings suggest that the thiol reductase activity of YUC6 may play an essential role in delaying senescence via the activation of genes involved in redox signaling and auxin availability. PMID:27242830

  6. [Ligand spectrum of hemoglobin activity of methemoglobin-reductase and hemolytic resistance of erythrocytes during chronic exposure to nitrates].

    PubMed

    Kiiza, D A; Artiukh, V P; Starodub, N F; Khmel'nitskiĭ, G A

    1992-01-01

    It is found that nitrite-ions formed as a result of biotransformation during long term feeding of calves with sodium and potassium nitrates induce changes in some biochemical parameters of blood, including HS-glutathione content in erythrocytes, acid hemolytic resistance of erythrocytes, activity of NAD-dependent methemoglobin-reductase, correlation of ligand forms of hemoglobin and its total content. It is supposed that the observed changes are of an adaptational character and, as a whole, provide for the optimization of both quantitative and qualitative composition of population of erythroid cells at the expense of erythropoiesis intensification.

  7. Roles for glutathione transferases in antioxidant recycling

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, David P; Steel, Patrick G

    2011-01-01

    Uniquely among the plant glutathione transferases, two classes possess a catalytic cysteine capable of performing glutathione-dependent reductions. These are the dehydroascorbate reductases (DHARs) and the lambda-class glutathione transferases (GSTLs). Using immobilized GSTLs probed with crude plant extracts we have identified flavonols as high affinity ligands and subsequently demonstrated a novel glutathione-dependent role for these enzymes in recycling oxidized quercetin. By comparing the activities of DHARs and GSTLs we now propose a unified catalytic mechanism that suggests oxidized anthocyanidins and tocopherols may be alternative polyphenolic substrates of GSTLs. PMID:21778824

  8. Potentiation of the reductase activity of protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) by 19-nortestosterone, bacitracin, fluoxetine, and ammonium sulphate.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Maya Haj; Alvarez, Eva; Cahoreau, Claire; Klett, Danièle; Lecompte, François; Combarnous, Yves

    2011-10-01

    Protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) in the endoplasmic reticulum catalyzes the rearrangement of disulphide bridges during folding of secreted proteins. It binds various molecules that inhibit its activity. But here, we looked for molecules that would potentiate its activity. PDI reductase activity was measured in vitro using di-eosin-oxidized glutathione as substrate. Its classical inhibitor bacitracin was found to exert a biphasic effect: stimulatory at low concentrations (∼10(-6) M) and inhibitory only at higher concentrations (∼10(-4)-10(-3) M). The weak oestrogenic molecule bisphenol A was found to exert a weak inhibitory effect on PDI reductase activity relative to the strong oestrogens, ethynylestradiol, and diethylstilbestrol. Like 19-nortestosterone, fluoxetine was found to exert a potentiating effect on PDI reductase activity and their potentiating effects could be reversed by increasing concentrations of oestrogens. In conclusion, this paper provides the first identification of potentiators of PDI activity that are potential pharmaceuticals against pathologies affecting protein folding such as Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Terpenoids from Diplophyllum taxifolium with quinone reductase-inducing activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Jiao-Zhen; Zhou, Jin-Chuan; Shen, Tao; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Two new ent-prenylaromadendrane-type diterpenoids, diplotaxifols A (1) and B (2), a new ent-eudesmol, ent-eudesma-4(15),11(13)-dien-6α,12-diol (3), eight new eudesmanolides enantiomers (4-11) of the corresponding compounds from higher plants along with four known ent-eudesmanolides (12-15) were isolated from the 95% EtOH extract of Chinese liverwort Diplophyllum taxifolium. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of MS, NMR and IR spectral data, and confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The quinone reductase-inducing activity of the compounds was evaluated.

  10. Increased nitrite reductase activity of fetal versus adult ovine hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Blood, Arlin B.; Tiso, Mauro; Verma, Shilpa T.; Lo, Jennifer; Joshi, Mahesh S.; Azarov, Ivan; Longo, Lawrence D.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Power, Gordon G.

    2009-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nitrite, NO2−, serves as a circulating reservoir of nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity that is activated during physiological and pathological hypoxia. One of the intravascular mechanisms for nitrite conversion to NO is a chemical nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin. The rate of NO production from this reaction is increased when hemoglobin is in the R conformation. Because the mammalian fetus exists in a low-oxygen environment compared with the adult and is exposed to episodes of severe ischemia during the normal birthing process, and because fetal hemoglobin assumes the R conformation more readily than adult hemoglobin, we hypothesized that nitrite reduction to NO may be enhanced in the fetal circulation. We found that the reaction was faster for fetal than maternal hemoglobin or blood and that the reactions were fastest at 50–80% oxygen saturation, consistent with an R-state catalysis that is predominant for fetal hemoglobin. Nitrite concentrations were similar in blood taken from chronically instrumented normoxic ewes and their fetuses but were elevated in response to chronic hypoxia. The findings suggest an augmented nitrite reductase activity of fetal hemoglobin and that the production of nitrite may participate in the regulation of vascular NO homeostasis in the fetus. PMID:19028797

  11. Vitamin K epoxide reductase: homology, active site and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodstadt, Leo; Ponting, Chris P

    2004-06-01

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) recycles reduced vitamin K, which is used subsequently as a co-factor in the gamma-carboxylation of glutamic acid residues in blood coagulation enzymes. VKORC1, a subunit of the VKOR complex, has recently been shown to possess this activity. Here, we show that VKORC1 is a member of a large family of predicted enzymes that are present in vertebrates, Drosophila, plants, bacteria and archaea. Four cysteine residues and one residue, which is either serine or threonine, are identified as likely active-site residues. In some plant and bacterial homologues the VKORC1 homologous domain is fused with domains of the thioredoxin family of oxidoreductases. These might reduce disulfide bonds of VKORC1-like enzymes as a prerequisite for their catalytic activities.

  12. A maize gene encoding an NADPH binding enzyme highly homologous to isoflavone reductases is activated in response to sulfur starvation.

    PubMed

    Petrucco, S; Bolchi, A; Foroni, C; Percudani, R; Rossi, G L; Ottonello, S

    1996-01-01

    we isolated a novel gene that is selectively induced both in roots and shoots in response to sulfur starvation. This gene encodes a cytosolic, monomeric protein of 33 kD that selectively binds NADPH. The predicted polypeptide is highly homologous ( > 70%) to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but the maize protein (IRL for isoflavone reductase-like) belongs to a novel family of proteins present in a variety of plants. Anti-IRL antibodies specifically recognize IFR polypeptides, yet the maize protein is unable to use various isoflavonoids as substrates. IRL expression is correlated closely to glutathione availability: it is persistently induced in seedlings whose glutathione content is about fourfold lower than controls, and it is down-regulated rapidly when control levels of glutathione are restored. This glutathione-dependent regulation indicates that maize IRL may play a crucial role in the establishment of a thiol-independent response to oxidative stress under glutathione shortage conditions.

  13. A maize gene encoding an NADPH binding enzyme highly homologous to isoflavone reductases is activated in response to sulfur starvation.

    PubMed Central

    Petrucco, S; Bolchi, A; Foroni, C; Percudani, R; Rossi, G L; Ottonello, S

    1996-01-01

    we isolated a novel gene that is selectively induced both in roots and shoots in response to sulfur starvation. This gene encodes a cytosolic, monomeric protein of 33 kD that selectively binds NADPH. The predicted polypeptide is highly homologous ( > 70%) to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but the maize protein (IRL for isoflavone reductase-like) belongs to a novel family of proteins present in a variety of plants. Anti-IRL antibodies specifically recognize IFR polypeptides, yet the maize protein is unable to use various isoflavonoids as substrates. IRL expression is correlated closely to glutathione availability: it is persistently induced in seedlings whose glutathione content is about fourfold lower than controls, and it is down-regulated rapidly when control levels of glutathione are restored. This glutathione-dependent regulation indicates that maize IRL may play a crucial role in the establishment of a thiol-independent response to oxidative stress under glutathione shortage conditions. PMID:8597660

  14. Selenium-enriched Agaricus bisporus increases expression and activity of glutathione peroxidase-1 and expression of glutathione peroxidase-2 in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Tebo; Howell, Kate; Dunshea, Frank R; Ng, Ken

    2014-03-01

    The effect of dietary supplementation with Se-enriched Agaricus bisporus on cytosolic gluthathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1), gastrointestinal specific glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPx-2), thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR-1) and selenoprotein P (SeP) mRNA expression and GPx-1 enzyme activity in rat colon was examined. Rats were fed for 5weeks with control diet (0.15μg Se/g feed) or Se-enriched diet fortified with selenised mushroom (1μg Se/g feed). The mRNA expression levels were found to be significantly (P<0.01) up-regulated by 1.65-fold and 2.3-fold for GPx-1 and GPx-2, respectively, but were not significantly different for TrxR-1 and SeP between the 2 diet treatments. The up-regulation of GPx-1 mRNA expression was consistent with GPX-1 activity level, which was significantly (P<0.05) increased by 1.77-fold in rats fed with the Se-enriched diet compared to the control diet. The results showed that selenised A. bisporus can positively increase GPx-1 and GPx-2 gene expression and GPx-1 enzyme activity in rat colon.

  15. The effect of acute high light and low temperature stresses on the ascorbate-glutathione cycle and superoxide dismutase activity in two Dunaliella salina strains.

    PubMed

    Haghjou, Maryam M; Shariati, Mansour; Smirnoff, Nicholas

    2009-03-01

    Dunaliella species accumulate carotenoids and their role in protection against photooxidative stress has been investigated extensively. By contrast, the role of other antioxidants in this alga, has received less attention. Therefore, the components of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle, along with superoxide dismutase (E.C. 1.15.1.1) and peroxidase (E.C. 1.11.1.11) activity were compared in two strains of Dunaliella salina. Strain IR-1 had two-fold higher chlorophyll and beta-carotene concentration than Gh-U. IR-1 had around four-fold higher superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase and pyrogallol peroxidase activities than Gh-U on a protein basis. Ascorbate and glutathione concentrations and redox state did not differ between strains and there was little difference in the activity of ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes (monodehydroascorbate reductase [E.C. 1.6.5.4], dehydroascorbate reductase [E.C. 1.8.5.1] and glutathione reductase [E.C. 1.8.1.7]). The response of these antioxidants to high light and low temperature was assessed by transferring cells from normal growth conditions (28 degrees C, photon flux density of 100 micromol m(-2) s(-1))to 28 degrees C/1200 micromol m(-2) s(-1); 13 degrees C/100 micromol m(-2) s(-1); 13 degrees C/1200 micromol m(-2) s(-1) and 28 degrees C/100 micromol m(-2) s(-1) for 24 h. Low temperature and combined high light-low temperature decreased chlorophyll and beta-carotene in both strains indicating that these treatments cause photooxidative stress. High light, low temperature and combined high light-low temperature treatments increased the total ascorbate pool by 10-50% and the total glutathione pool by 20-100% with no consistent effect on their redox state. Activities of ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes were not greatly affected but all the treatments increased superoxide dismutase activity. It is concluded that D. salina can partially adjust to photooxidative conditions by increasing superoxide dismutase activity, ascorbate

  16. Regulation of Nitrate Reductase Activity in Corn (Zea mays L.) Seedlings by Endogenous Metabolites 1

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, L. E.; Hageman, R. H.

    1967-01-01

    Primary and secondary metabolites of inorganic nitrogen metabolism were evaluated as inhibitors of nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1) induction in green leaf tissue of corn seedlings. Nitrite, nitropropionic acid, ammonium ions, and amino acids were not effective as inhibitors of nitrate reductase activity or synthesis. Increasing α-amino nitrogen and protein content of intact corn seedlings by culture techniques significantly enhanced rather than decreased the potential for induction of nitrate reductase activity in excised seedlings. Secondary metabolites, derived from phenylalanine and tyrosine, were tested as inhibitors of induction of nitrate reductase. Of the 9 different phenylpropanoid compounds tested, only coumarin, trans-cinnamic and trans-o-hydroxycinnamic acids inhibited induction of nitrate reductase. While coumarin alone exhibited a relatively greater inhibitory effect on enzyme induction than on general protein synthesis (the latter measured by incorporation of labeled amino acids), this differential effect may have been dependent upon unequal rates of synthesis and accumulation with respect to the initial levels of nitrate reductase and general proteins. Because of the short half-life of nitrate reductase, inhibitors of protein synthesis in general could still achieve differential regulation of nitrogen metabolism. Coumarin did not inhibit nitrate reductase activity when added directly to the assay mixture at 5 mm. Carbamyl phosphate and its chemical derivative, cyanate, were found to be competitive (with nitrate) inhibitors of nitrate reductase. The data suggest that cyanate is the active inhibitor in the carbamyl phosphate preparations. PMID:16656715

  17. Erythrocyte aldose reductase activity and sorbitol levels in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Satyanarayana, A.; Balakrishna, N.; Ayyagari, Radha; Padma, M.; Viswanath, K.; Petrash, J. Mark

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Activation of polyol pathway due to increased aldose reductase (ALR2) activity has been implicated in the development of diabetic complications including diabetic retinopathy (DR), a leading cause of blindness. However, the relationship between hyperglycemia-induced activation of polyol pathway in retina and DR is still uncertain. We investigated the relationship between ALR2 levels and human DR by measuring ALR2 activity and its product, sorbitol, in erythrocytes. Methods We enrolled 362 type 2 diabetic subjects (T2D) with and without DR and 66 normal subjects in this clinical case-control study. Clinical evaluation of DR in T2D patients was done by fundus examination. ALR2 activity and sorbitol levels along with glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) levels in erythrocytes were determined. Results T2D patients with DR showed significantly higher specific activity of ALR2 as compared to T2D patients without DR. Elevated levels of sorbitol in T2D patients with DR, as compared to T2D patients without DR, corroborated the increased ALR2 activity in erythrocytes of DR patients. However, the increased ALR2 activity was not significantly associated with diabetes duration, age, and HbA1C in both the DR group and total T2D subjects. Conclusions Levels of ALR2 activity as well as sorbitol in erythrocytes may have value as a quantitative trait to be included among other markers to establish a risk profile for development of DR. PMID:18385795

  18. QTL analysis of ferric reductase activity in the model legume lotus japonicus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physiological and molecular studies have demonstrated that iron accumulation from the soil into Strategy I plants can be limited by ferric reductase activity. An initial study of Lotus japonicus ecotypes Miyakojima MG-20 and Gifu B-129 identified significant leaf chlorosis and ferric reductase activ...

  19. [Influence of complex therapy on the activity of glutathione-dependent enzymes of saliva in patients with parodontitis].

    PubMed

    Gavriliuk, L A; Shevchenko, N V; Vartichan, A I; Lysyĭ, L T; Kepnataru, K F; Godorozha, P D

    2008-01-01

    The activities of antioxidative enzymes (glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase) and content of reduced glutathione (GSH), thiocyanate (SCN) and protein were determined in saliva of patients with parodontitis treated with traditional and complex therapy, which additionally included the antihomotoxic preparations Traumeel S ointment, Coenzyme compositum or Lymphomyosot. Inflammation process led to the metabolic disturbances and imbalance of the antioxidative defense system in the patients with parodontitis. The results suggest that complex therapy with the antihomotoxic preparations restored imbalance of the antioxidative defense and was more effective than the traditional therapy alone in the patients with parodontitis. Analysis of interrelation between salivary parameters in patients with parodontitis indicated positive correlation before and after the complex therapy (as an exception there was lack of correlation between content of protein and tiocyanate in the saliva of patients before the beginning of the therapeutic course). So these results reflect activityof pathological process and antioxidant defense imbalance in saliva of patients with parodontitis and may be a basis for recommendation of employment of the complex antihomotoxic therapy as the initial stage of pathological process.

  20. Determination of the specific activities of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and B by capillary electrophoresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method for the determination of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and methionine sulfoxide reductase B activities in mouse liver is described. The method is based on detection of the 4-(dimethylamino)azobenzene-4’-sulfonyl derivative of L-methionine (dabsyl Met), the ...

  1. Structural Basis for Activation of Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Cotruvo, Jr., Joseph A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-12-03

    The class Ib ribonucleotide reductase of Escherichia coli can initiate reduction of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides with either a Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-tyrosyl radical (Y{sm_bullet}) or a Fe{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor in the NrdF subunit. Whereas Fe{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} can self-assemble from Fe{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF and O{sub 2}, activation of Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF requires a reduced flavoprotein, NrdI, proposed to form the oxidant for cofactor assembly by reduction of O{sub 2}. The crystal structures reported here of E. coli Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF and Fe{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF reveal different coordination environments, suggesting distinct initial binding sites for the oxidants during cofactor activation. In the structures of Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF in complex with reduced and oxidized NrdI, a continuous channel connects the NrdI flavin cofactor to the NrdF Mn{sub 2}{sup II} active site. Crystallographic detection of a putative peroxide in this channel supports the proposed mechanism of Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor assembly.

  2. Identification of activators of methionine sulfoxide reductases A and B

    PubMed Central

    Cudic, Predrag; Joshi, Neelambari; Sagher, Daphna; Williams, Brandon T.; Stawikowski, Maciej J.; Weissbach, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    The methionine sulfoxide reductase (Msr) family of enzymes has been shown to protect cells against oxidative damage. The two major Msr enzymes, MsrA and MsrB, can repair oxidative damage to proteins due to reactive oxygen species, by reducing the methionine sulfoxide in proteins back to methionine. A role of MsrA in animal aging was first demonstrated in D. melanogaster where transgenic flies over-expressing recombinant bovine MsrA had a markedly extended life span. Subsequently, MsrA was also shown to be involved in the life span extension in C. elegans. These results supported other studies that indicated up-regulation, or activation, of the normal cellular protective mechanisms that cells use to defend against oxidative damage could be an approach to treat age related diseases and slow the aging process. In this study we have identified, for the first time, compounds structurally related to the natural products fusaricidins that markedly activate recombinant bovine and human MsrA and human MsrB. PMID:26718410

  3. Metabolic activation of the antibacterial agent triclocarban by cytochrome P450 1A1 yielding glutathione adducts.

    PubMed

    Schebb, Nils Helge; Muvvala, Jaya B; Morin, Dexter; Buckpitt, Alan R; Hammock, Bruce D; Rice, Robert H

    2014-07-01

    Triclocarban (3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide; TCC) is an antibacterial agent used in personal care products such as bar soaps. Small amounts of chemical are absorbed through the epidermis. Recent studies show that residues of reactive TCC metabolites are bound covalently to proteins in incubations with keratinocytes, raising concerns about the potential toxicity of this antimicrobial agent. To obtain additional information on metabolic activation of TCC, this study characterized the reactive metabolites trapped as glutathione conjugates. Incubations were carried out with (14)C-labeled TCC, recombinant CYP1A1 or CYP1B1, coexpressed with cytochrome P450 reductase, glutathione-S-transferases (GSH), and an NADPH-generating system. Incubations containing CYP1A1, but not 1B1, led to formation of a single TCC-GSH adduct with a conversion rate of 1% of parent compound in 2 hours. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry and diagnostic fragmentation, the adduct was tentatively identified as 3,4-dichloro-3'-glutathionyl-4'-hydroxycarbanilide. These findings support the hypothesis that TCC is activated by oxidative dehalogenation and oxidation to a quinone imine. Incubations of TCDD-induced keratinocytes with (14)C-TCC yielded a minor radioactive peak coeluting with TCC-GSH. Thus, we conclude that covalent protein modification by TCC in TCDD-induced human keratinocyte incubations is mainly caused by activation of TCC by CYP1A1 via a dehalogenated TCC derivative as reactive species.

  4. Effects of concentrated drinking water injection on glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes in liver of Cyprinus carpio L.

    PubMed

    Elia, Antonia Concetta; Fanetti, Alessia; Dörr, Ambrosius Josef Martin; Taticchi, Maria I

    2008-06-01

    Two drinking water production plants located in North Italy, collecting water from the River Po (Plants 1 and 2) were chosen for this study. Water samples were collected before and after the disinfection process and at two points along the piping system. Water samples were concentrated by the solid-phase extraction system and injected intraperitoneally into specimens of Cyprinus carpio. The concentration of water samples was 3 l/equiv. In order to assess the effects of the water samples on carp liver, total glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes, such as glutathione S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and glyoxalase I, were measured following this treatment for 6 days at two experimental times (3 and 6 days). Both water plant-treated carp showed a general increase of the enzymatic activities of glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione reductase which might be employed as potential biomarkers of oxidative stress induced by disinfected river water. Plant 1-treated carp showed higher glyoxalase I and glutathione levels and lower glutathione peroxidase activity. A depleted level of total glutathione and of glyoxalase I for specimens of water plant 2 (for both experimental times), without correlation with the distances in the pipeline, suggests that river plant water can also lead to potentially adverse effects on selected biochemical parameters in C. carpio.

  5. The Glutathione System of Aspergillus nidulans Involves a Fungus-specific Glutathione S-Transferase*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Ikuo; Shimizu, Motoyuki; Hoshino, Takayuki; Takaya, Naoki

    2009-01-01

    The tripeptide glutathione is involved in cellular defense mechanisms for xenobiotics and reactive oxygen species. This study investigated glutathione-dependent mechanisms in the model organism Aspergillus nidulans. A recombinant dimeric protein of A. nidulans glutathione reductase (GR) contained FAD and reduced oxidized glutathione (GSSG) using NADPH as an electron donor. A deletion strain of the GR gene (glrA) accumulated less intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH), indicating that the fungal GR contributes to GSSG reduction in vivo. Growth of the deletion strain of glrA was temperature-sensitive, and this phenotype was suppressed by adding GSH to the medium. The strain subsequently accumulated more intracellular superoxide, and cell-free respiration activity was partly defective. Growth of the strain decreased in the presence of oxidants, which induced glrA expression 1.5-6-fold. These results indicated that the fungal glutathione system functions as an antioxidant mechanism in A. nidulans. Our findings further revealed an initial proteomic differential display on GR-depleted and wild type strains. Up-regulation of thioredoxin reductase, peroxiredoxins, catalases, and cytochrome c peroxidase in the glrA-deletion strain revealed interplay between the glutathione system and both the thioredoxin system and hydrogen peroxide defense mechanisms. We also identified a hypothetical, up-regulated protein in the GR-depleted strains as glutathione S-transferase, which is unique among Ascomycetes fungi. PMID:19171936

  6. Chromate reductase activity in Streptomyces sp. MC1.

    PubMed

    Polti, Marta A; Amoroso, María J; Abate, Carlos M

    2010-02-01

    Biological transformation of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by enzymatic reduction may provide a less costly and more environmentally friendly approach to remediation. In a previous report a Cr(VI) resistant actinomycete strain, Streptomyces sp. MC1, was able to reduce Cr(VI) present in a synthetic medium, soil extract and soil samples. This is the first time optimal conditions such as pH, temperature, growth phase and electron donor have been elucidated in vitro for Cr(VI) reduction by a streptomycete. Chromate reductase of Streptomyces sp. MC1 is a constitutive enzyme which was mainly associated with biomass and required NAD(P)H as an electron donor. It was active over a broad temperature (19-39 degrees C) and pH (5-8) range, and optimum conditions were 30 degrees C and pH 7. The enzyme was present in supernatant, pellet and cell free extract. Bioremediation with the enzyme was observed in non-compatible cell reproduction systems, conditions frequently found in contaminated environments.

  7. Changes of the thioredoxin system, glutathione peroxidase activity and total antioxidant capacity in rat brain cortex during acute liver failure: modulation by L-histidine.

    PubMed

    Ruszkiewicz, Joanna; Albrecht, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione and thioredoxin are complementary antioxidants in the protection of mammalian tissues against oxidative-nitrosative stress (ONS), and ONS is a principal cause of symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) associated with acute liver failure (ALF). We compared the activities of the thioredoxin system components: thioredoxin (Trx), thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and the expression of the thioredoxin-interacting protein, and of the key glutathione metabolizing enzyme, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the cerebral cortex of rats with ALF induced by thioacetamide (TAA). ALF increased the Trx and TrxR activity without affecting Trip protein expression, but decreased GPx activity in the brains of TAA-treated rats. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of the brain was increased by ALF suggesting that upregulation of the thioredoxin may act towards compensating impaired protection by the glutathione system. Intraperitoneal administration of L-histidine (His), an amino acid that was earlier reported to prevent acute liver failure-induced mitochondrial impairment and brain edema, abrogated most of the acute liver failure-induced changes of both antioxidant systems, and significantly increased TAC of both the control and ALF-affected brain. These observations provide further support for the concept of that His has a potential to serve as a therapeutic antioxidant in HE. Most of the enzyme activity changes evoked by His or ALF were not well correlated with alterations in their expression at the mRNA level, suggesting complex translational or posttranslational mechanisms of their modulation, which deserve further investigations.

  8. Inhibition of carbonyl reductase activity in pig heart by alkyl phenyl ketones.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Yorishige; Narumi, Rika; Shimada, Hideaki

    2007-02-01

    The inhibitory effects of alkyl phenyl ketones on carbonyl reductase activity were examined in pig heart. In this study, carbonyl reductase activity was estimated as the ability to reduce 4-benzoylpyridine to S(-)-alpha-phenyl-4-pyridylmethanol in the cytosolic fraction from pig heart (pig heart cytosol). The order of their inhibitory potencies was hexanophenone > valerophenone > heptanophenone > butyrophenone > propiophenone. The inhibitory potencies of acetophenone and nonanophenone were much lower. A significant relationship was observed between Vmax/Km values for the reduction of alkyl phenyl ketones and their inhibitory potencies for carbonyl reductase activity in pig heart cytosol. Furthermore, hexanophenone was a competitive inhibitor for the enzyme activity. These results indicate that several alkyl phenyl ketones including hexanophenone inhibit carbonyl reductase activity in pig heart cytosol, by acting as substrate inhibitors.

  9. Human endothelial dihydrofolate reductase low activity limits vascular tetrahydrobiopterin recycling.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jennifer; Rangel Filho, Artur; Sethumadhavan, Savitha; Celinska, Joanna; Widlansky, Michael; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette

    2013-10-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH₄) is required for NO synthesis and inhibition of superoxide release from endothelial NO synthase. Clinical trials using BH₄ to treat endothelial dysfunction have produced mixed results. Poor outcomes may be explained by the rapid systemic and cellular oxidation of BH₄. One of the oxidation products of BH₄, 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (7,8-BH₂), is recycled back to BH₄ by dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). This enzyme is ubiquitously distributed and shows a wide range of activity depending on species-specific factors and cell type. Information about the kinetics and efficiency of BH4 recycling in human endothelial cells receiving BH₄ treatment is lacking. To characterize this reaction, we applied a novel multielectrode coulometric HPLC method that enabled the direct quantification of 7,8-BH₂ and BH₄, which is not possible with fluorescence-based methodologies. We found that basal untreated BH₄ and 7,8-BH₂ concentrations in human endothelial cells (ECs) are lower than in bovine and murine endothelioma cells. Treatment of human ECs with BH₄ transiently increased intracellular BH₄ while accumulating the more stable 7,8-BH₂. This was different from bovine or murine ECs, which resulted in preferential BH₄ increase. Using BH₄ diastereomers, 6S-BH₄ and 6R-BH₄, the narrow contribution of enzymatic DHFR recycling to total intracellular BH₄ was demonstrated. Reduction of 7,8-BH₂ to BH₄ occurs at very slow rates in cells and needs supraphysiological levels of 7,8-BH₂, indicating this reaction is kinetically limited. Activity assays verified that human DHFR has very low affinity for 7,8-BH₂ (DHF7,8-BH₂) and folic acid inhibits 7,8-BH₂ recycling. We conclude that low activity of endothelial DHFR is an important factor limiting the benefits of BH4 therapies, which may be further aggravated by folate supplements.

  10. [Glutathione system in erythrocytes and blood plasma in strokes and dyscirculatory encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Kolesnichenko, L S; Kulinski, V I; Shprakh, V V; Bardymov, V V; Verlan, N V; Gubina, L P; Pensionerova, G A; Sergeeva, M P; Stanevich, L M; Filippova, G T

    2007-01-01

    In dyscirculatory encephalopathy and moderate ischemic stroke there are single changes of components of glutathione metabolism. In moderate and severe ischemic stroke frequent and considerable changes have been revealed. Changes in hemorrhagic stroke are also expressed. An increase of activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione transferase is the most typical, rarely the increase of glutathione reductase and GSH is observed. The increase of enzymes activity was absent at the delayed oneset of treatment (more than 3 days) and in severe cases patients who died later. Glutathione system is important in the tolerance to cerebral ischemia.

  11. Short-term oral exposure to aluminium decreases glutathione intestinal levels and changes enzyme activities involved in its metabolism.

    PubMed

    Orihuela, Daniel; Meichtry, Verónica; Pregi, Nicolás; Pizarro, Manuel

    2005-09-01

    To study the effects of aluminium (Al) on glutathione (GSH) metabolism in the small intestine, adult male Wistar rats were orally treated with AlCl3.6H2O at doses of 30, 60, 120 and 200 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) per day, during seven days. Controls received deionized water. At doses above 120 mg/kg b.w., Al produced both a significant reduction of GSH content and an increase of oxidized/reduced glutathione ratio (P < 0.05). The index of oxidative stress of the intestine mucosa in terms of lipid peroxidation evaluated by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances was significantly increased (52%) at higher Al dose used. The duodenal expression of the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 in brush border membranes, determined by Western blot technique, was increased 2.7-fold in rats treated with 200mg AlCl3/kg b.w (P < 0.01). Intestine activities of both GSH-synthase (from 60 mg/kg b.w.) and GSSG-reductase (from 120 mg/kg b.w.) were significantly reduced (26% and 31%, respectively) while glutathione-S-transferase showed to be slightly modified in the Al-treated groups. Conversely, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase activity was significantly increased (P < 0.05) due to the Al treatment. Al reduced in vitro mucosa-to-lumen GSH efflux (P < 0.05). A positive linear correlation between the intestine GSH depletion and reduction of in situ 45Ca intestinal absorption, both produced by Al, was found (r = 0.923, P = 0.038). Taking as a whole, these results show that Al would alter GSH metabolism in small intestine by decreasing its turnover, leading to an unbalance of redox state in the epithelial cells, thus contributing to deteriorate GSH-dependent absorptive functions.

  12. Increased 5. cap alpha. -reductase activity in idiopathic hirsutism

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, P.; Lobo, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro, genital skin 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity (5..cap alpha..-RA) was measured in ten hirsute women with normal androgen levels (idiopathic hirsutism (IH)) and in ten hirsute women with elevated androgen levels (polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO)) in order to determine the influence of secreted androgens on 5..cap alpha..-RA. In vitro 5..cap alpha..-RA was assessed by incubations of skin with /sup 14/C-testosterone (T) for 2 hours, after which steroids were separated and the radioactivity of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 5..cap alpha..-androstane 3..cap alpha..-17..beta..-estradiol (3..cap alpha..-diol) in specific eluates were determined. All androgens were normal in IH with the exception of higher levels of 3..cap alpha..-diol glucuronide which were similar to the levels of PCO. The conversion ratio (CR) of T to DHT in IH and PCO were similar, yet significantly greater than the CR of control subjects. The CR of T to 3..cap alpha..-diol in IH and PCO were similar, yet higher than in control subjects. Serum androgens showed no correlation with 5..cap alpha..-RA, while the CR of T to DHT showed a significant positive correlation with the Ferriman and Gallwey score. The increased 5..cap alpha..-RA in IH appears to be independent of serum androgen levels and is, therefore, an inherent abnormality. The term idiopathic is a misnomer, because hirsutism in these patients may be explained on the basis of increased skin 5..cap alpha..-RA.

  13. Studies on the Glutathione-Dependent Formaldehyde-Activating Enzyme from Paracoccus denitrificans

    PubMed Central

    Hopkinson, Richard J.; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.; Smart, Tristan J.; Rose, Nathan R.; Henry, Luc; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a toxin and carcinogen that is both an environmental pollutant and an endogenous metabolite. Formaldehyde metabolism, which is probably essential for all aerobic cells, likely proceeds via multiple mechanisms, including via a glutathione-dependent pathway that is widely conserved in bacteria, plants and animals. However, it is unclear whether the first step in the glutathione-dependent pathway (i.e. formation of S-hydroxymethylglutathione (HMG)) is enzyme-catalysed. We report studies on glutathione-dependent formaldehyde-activating enzyme (GFA) from Paracoccus denitrificans, which has been proposed to catalyse HMG formation from glutathione and formaldehyde on the basis of studies using NMR exchange spectroscopy (EXSY). Although we were able to replicate the EXSY results, time course experiments unexpectedly imply that GFA does not catalyse HMG formation under standard conditions. However, GFA was observed to bind glutathione using NMR and mass spectrometry. Overall, the results reveal that GFA binds glutathione but does not directly catalyse HMG formation under standard conditions. Thus, it is possible that GFA acts as a glutathione carrier that acts to co-localise glutathione and formaldehyde in a cellular context. PMID:26675168

  14. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  15. Melatonin Reduces Cataract Formation and Aldose Reductase Activity in Lenses of Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rat

    PubMed Central

    Khorsand, Marjan; Akmali, Masoumeh; Sharzad, Sahab; Beheshtitabar, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationship between the high activity of aldose reductase (AR) and diabetic cataract formation has been previously investigated. The purpose of the present study was to determine the preventing effect of melatonin on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic cataract in rats. Methods: 34 adult healthy male Sprague-Dawely rats were divided into four groups. Diabetic control and diabetic+melatonin received a single dose of STZ (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), whereas the normal control and normal+melatonin received vehicle. The melatonin groups were gavaged with melatonin (5 mg/kg) daily for a period of 8 weeks, whereas the rats in the normal control and diabetic control groups received only the vehicle. The rats’ eyes were examined every week and cataract formation scores (0-4) were determined by slit-lamp microscope. At the end of the eighth week, the rats were sacrificed and markers of the polyol pathway and antioxidative (Glutathione, GSH) in their lens were determined. The levels of blood glucose, HbA1c and plasma malondialdhyde (MDA), as a marker of lipid peroxidation, were also measured. Results: Melatonin prevented STZ-induced hyperglycemia by decreased blood glucose and HbA1c levels. Slit lamp examination indicated that melatonin delayed cataract progression in diabetic rats. The results revealed that melatonin feeding increased the GSH levels, decreased the activities of AR and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) and sorbitol formation in catractous lenses as well as plasma MDA content. Conclusion: In summary, for the first time we demonstrated that melatonin delayed the formation and progression of cataract in diabetic rat lenses. PMID:27365552

  16. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate potently inhibits the in vitro activity of hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase[S

    PubMed Central

    Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Spina, Michele; Tran, Chi Nhan; Falconi, Maurizio; Eleuteri, Anna Maria; Angeletti, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) is the rate-controlling enzyme of cholesterol synthesis, and owing to its biological and pharmacological relevance, researchers have investigated several compounds capable of modulating its activity with the hope of developing new hypocholesterolemic drugs. In particular, polyphenol-rich extracts were extensively tested for their cholesterol-lowering effect as alternatives, or adjuvants, to the conventional statin therapies, but a full understanding of the mechanism of their action has yet to be reached. Our work reports on a detailed kinetic and equilibrium study on the modulation of HMGR by the most-abundant catechin in green tea, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Using a concerted approach involving spectrophotometric, optical biosensor, and chromatographic analyses, molecular docking, and site-directed mutagenesis on the cofactor site of HMGR, we have demonstrated that EGCG potently inhibits the in vitro activity of HMGR (Ki in the nanomolar range) by competitively binding to the cofactor site of the reductase. Finally, we evaluated the effect of combined EGCG-statin administration. PMID:21357570

  17. A new cotton SDR family gene encodes a polypeptide possessing aldehyde reductase and 3-ketoacyl-CoA reductase activities.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu; Song, Wen-Qiang; Chen, Fang-Yuan; Qin, Yong-Mei

    2010-03-01

    To understand regulatory mechanisms of cotton fiber development, microarray analysis has been performed for upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). Based on this, a cDNA (GhKCR3) encoding a polypeptide belonging to short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase family was isolated and cloned. It contains an open reading frame of 987 bp encoding a polypeptide of 328 amino acid residues. Following its overexpression in bacterial cells, the purified recombinant protein specifically uses NADPH to reduce a variety of short-chain aldehydes. A fragment between Gly180 and Gly191 was found to be essential for its catalytic activity. Though the GhKCR3 gene shares low sequence similarities to the ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae YBR159w that encodes 3-ketoacyl-CoA reductase (KCR) catalyzing the second step of fatty acid elongation, it was surprisingly able to complement the yeast ybr159wDelta mutant. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed that very long-chain fatty acids, especially C26:0, were produced in the ybr159wDelta mutant cells expressing GhKCR3. Applying palmitoyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA as substrates, GhKCR3 showed KCR activity in vitro. Quantitative real time-PCR analysis indicated GhKCR3 transcripts accumulated in rapidly elongating fibers, roots, and stems. Our results suggest that GhKCR3 is probably a novel KCR contributing to very long-chain fatty acid biosynthesis in plants.

  18. Activation of glutathione peroxidase via Nrf1 mediates genistein's protection against oxidative endothelial cell injury

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Montes, Eva; Pollard, Susan E.; Vauzour, David; Jofre-Montseny, Laia; Rota, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Weinberg, Peter D.; Spencer, Jeremy P.E. . E-mail: j.p.e.spencer@reading.ac.uk

    2006-08-04

    Cellular actions of isoflavones may mediate the beneficial health effects associated with high soy consumption. We have investigated protection by genistein and daidzein against oxidative stress-induced endothelial injury. Genistein but not daidzein protected endothelial cells from damage induced by oxidative stress. This protection was accompanied by decreases in intracellular glutathione levels that could be explained by the generation of glutathionyl conjugates of the oxidised genistein metabolite, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone. Both isoflavones evoked increased protein expression of {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase-heavy subunit ({gamma}-GCS-HS) and increased cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. However, only genistein led to increases in the cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf1 and the increased expression of and activity of glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that genistein-induced protective effects depend primarily on the activation of glutathione peroxidase mediated by Nrf1 activation, and not on Nrf2 activation or increases in glutathione synthesis.

  19. Endothelial human dihydrofolate reductase low activity limits vascular tetrahydrobiopterin recycling

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jennifer; Filho, Artur Rangel; Sethumadhavan, Savitha; Celinska, Joanna; Widlansky, Michael; Vásquez-Vivar, Jeannette

    2013-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is required for NO synthesis and inhibition of superoxide release from eNOS. Clinical trials using BH4 to treat endothelial dysfunction have produced mixed results. Poor outcomes may be explained by the rapid systemic and cellular oxidation of BH4. One of the oxidation products of BH4, 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (7,8-BH2), is recycled back to BH4 by dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). This enzyme is ubiquitously distributed and shows a wide range of activity depending on species-specific factors and cell type. Information about the kinetics and efficiency of BH4 recycling in human endothelial cells receiving BH4 treatment is lacking. To characterize this reaction, we applied a novel multi-electrode coulometric HPLC method that enabled the direct quantification of 7,8-BH2 and BH4 which is not possible with fluorescent-based methodologies. We found that basal untreated BH4 and 7,8-BH2 concentrations in human ECs is lower than bovine and murine endothelioma cells. Treatment of human ECs with BH4 transiently increased intracellular BH4 while accumulating the more stable 7,8-BH2. This was different from bovine or murine ECs that resulted in preferential BH4 increase. Using BH4 diastereomers, 6S-BH4 and 6R-BH4, the narrow contribution of enzymatic DHFR recycling to total intracellular BH4 was demonstrated. Reduction of 7,8-BH2 to BH4 occurs at very slow rates in cells and needs supra-physiological levels of 7,8-BH2, indicating this reaction is kinetically limited. Activity assays verified that hDHFR has very low affinity for 7,8-BH2 (DHF7,8-BH2) and folic acid inhibits 7,8-BH2 recycling. We conclude that low activity of endothelial DHFR is an important factor limiting the benefits of BH4 therapies which may be further aggravated by folate supplements. PMID:23707606

  20. Purification of rat kidney glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and glutathione reductase enzymes using 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity in a single chromatography step.

    PubMed

    Adem, Sevki; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    The enzymes of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD), and glutathione reductase (GR) were purified from rat kidney in one chromatographic step consisting of the use of the 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B by using different elution buffers. This purification procedure was accomplished with the preparation of the homogenate and affinity chromatography on 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B. The purity and subunit molecular weights of the enzymes were checked on SDS-PAGE and purified enzymes showed a single band on the gel. The native molecular weights of the enzymes were found with Sephadex G-150 gel filtration chromatography. Using this procedure, G6PG, having the specific activity of 32 EU/mg protein, was purified 531-fold with a yield of 88%; 6PGD, having the specific activity of 25 EU/mg protein, was purified 494-fold with a yield of 73%; and GR, having the specific activity of 33 EU/mg protein, was purified 477-fold with a yield of 76%. Their native molecular masses were estimated to be 144 kDa for G6PD, 110 kDa for 6PGD, and 121 kDa for GR and the subunit molecular weights were found to be 68, 56, and 61 kDa, respectively. A new modified method to purify G6PD, 6PGD, and GR, namely one chromatographic step using the 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B, is described for the first time in this study. This procedure has several advantages for purification of enzymes, such as, rapid purification, produces high yield, and uses less chemical materials.

  1. Single-bilayer graphene oxide sheet tolerance and glutathione redox system significance assessment in faba bean ( Vicia faba L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjum, Naser A.; Singh, Neetu; Singh, Manoj K.; Shah, Zahoor A.; Duarte, Armando C.; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2013-07-01

    Adsorbents based on single-bilayer graphene oxide sheet (hereafter termed "graphene oxide") are widely used in contaminated environments cleanup which may easily open the avenues for their entry to different environmental compartments, exposure to organisms and their subsequent transfer to human/animal food chain. Considering a common food crop—faba bean ( Vicia faba L.) germinating seedlings as a model plant system, this study assesses the V. faba-tolerance to different concentrations (0, 100, 200, 400, 800, and 1600 mg L-1) of graphene oxide (0.5-5 μm) and evaluates glutathione (γ-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine) redox system significance in this context. The results showed significantly increased V. faba sensitivity under three graphene oxide concentrations (in order of impact: 1,600 > 200 > 100 mg graphene oxide L-1), which was accompanied by decreased glutathione redox (reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione) ratio, reduced glutathione pool, as well as significant and equally elevated activities of glutathione-regenerating (glutathione reductase) and glutathione-metabolizing (glutathione peroxidase; glutathione sulfo-transferase) enzymes. Contrarily, the two graphene oxide concentrations (in order of impact: 800 > 400 graphene oxide mg L-1) yielded promising results; where, significant improvements in V. faba health status (measured as increased graphene oxide tolerance) were clearly perceptible with increased ratio of the reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione, reduced glutathione pool and glutathione reductase activity but decreased activities of glutathione-metabolizing enzymes. It is inferred that V. faba seedlings-sensitivity and/or tolerance to graphene oxide concentrations depends on both the cellular redox state (reduced glutathione-to-oxidized glutathione ratio) and the reduced glutathione pool which in turn are controlled by a finely tuned modulation of the coordination between glutathione-regenerating and glutathione-metabolizing enzymes.

  2. [Change in glutathione content in rat thymocytes under apoptosis induced by H2O2 or irradiation].

    PubMed

    Koval', T V; Nazarova, O O; Matyshevs'ka, O P

    2008-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) content as well as GSH-peroxidase and GSH-reductase activity in isolated rat thymocytes X-irradiated in a dose of 4.5 Gy or treated with 0.1 mM H2O2 were studied in a period preceding the appearance of apoptosis morphological symptoms. The early adaptive response of thymocytes to radiation - increase of both GSH content and glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activity was revealed. On the contrary the rapid fall of GSH level in H2O2-treated thymocytes was observed simultaneousely with glutathione reductase inhibition and enhanced GSH consumption by glutathione peroxidase, this disbalance of GSH-dependent antioxidant system probably facilitates mitochondrial way of apoptosis.

  3. Iron deficiency enhances the levels of ascorbate, glutathione, and related enzymes in sugar beet roots.

    PubMed

    Zaharieva, Tatiana B; Abadía, Javier

    2003-06-01

    The effects of Fe deficiency stress on the levels of ascorbate and glutathione, and on the activities of the enzymes ferric chelate reductase, glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2), ascorbate free-radical reductase (EC 1.6.5.4) and ascorbate peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.11), have been investigated in sugar beet ( Beta vulgaris L.) roots. Plasma membrane vesicles and cytosolic fractions were isolated from the roots of the plants grown in nutrient solutions in the absence or presence of Fe for two weeks. Plants responded to Fe deficiency not only with a 20-fold increase in root ferric chelate reductase activity, but also with moderately increased levels of the general reductants ascorbate (2-fold) and glutathione (1.6-fold). The enzymes of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in roots were also affected by Fe deficiency. Glutathione reductase activity was enhanced 1.4-fold with Fe deficiency, associated to an increased ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione, from 3.1 to 5.2. The plasma membrane fraction from iron-deficient roots showed 1.7-fold higher ascorbate free-radical reductase activity, whereas in the cytosolic fraction the enzyme activity was not affected by Fe deficiency. The activity of the cytosolic hemoprotein ascorbate peroxidase decreased approximately by 50% with Fe deprivation. These results show that sugar beet responds to Fe deficiency with metabolic changes affecting components of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle in root cells. This suggests that the ascorbate-glutathione cycle would play certain roles in the general Fe deficiency stress responses in strategy I plants.

  4. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site

    PubMed Central

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme. PMID:26487708

  5. Enzyme activity of α-chymotrypsin: Deactivation by gold nano-cluster and reactivation by glutathione.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Catherine; Mondal, Tridib; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2017-05-15

    Effect of gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) on the circular dichroism (CD) spectra and enzymatic activity of α-chymotrypsin (ChT) (towards hydrolysis of a substrate, N-succinyl-l-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide) are studied. The CD spectra indicate that on binding to Au-NC, ChT is completely unfolded, resulting in nearly zero ellipticity. α-chymotrypsin (ChT) coated gold nano-clusters exhibit almost no enzymatic activity. Addition of glutathione (GSH) or oxidized glutathione (GSSG) restore the enzyme activity of α-chymotrypsin by 30-45%. ChT coated Au-NC exhibits two emission maxima-one at 480nm (corresponding to Au10) and one at 640nm (Au25). On addition of glutathione (GSH) or oxidized glutathione (GSSG) the emission peak at 640nm vanishes and only one peak at 480nm (Au10) remains. MALDI mass spectrometry studies suggest addition of glutathione (GSH) to α-chymotrypsin capped Au-NCs results in the formation of glutathione-capped Au-NCs and α-chymotrypsin is released from Au-NCs. CD spectroscopy indicates that the conformation of the released α-chymotrypsin is different from that of the native α-chymotrypsin.

  6. Age dependent changes in tissue glutathione depleting activity of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Makar, A.B.; Currie, R.B.

    1986-03-01

    Hepatic glutathione (GSH) plays a major role in protecting the liver against the toxic effects of a variety of chemicals. Decreased GSH can increase liver susceptibility to the toxic actions of such agents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether age or the feeding status of animals alter the steady-state hepatic GSH concentrations. The authors also tested the ability of ethanol to lower GSH under these conditions. Male Sprague-Dawley rats between 3 and 34 weeks of age were used. Animals designed fasted were allowed water, but no food for the 24 hours preceding sacrifice. Six hours before sacrifice, ethanol or saline was injected i.p. The rats were always sacrificed between 12:00 noon and 1:00 P.M. to avoid the effects of diurnal variation of tissue GSH. Glutathione concentrations were determined in the liver using Ellman's reagent. Results indicated that the steady-state hepatic GSH in fed rats increased as a function of age, whereas fasted rats showed minimal changes. The ability of ethanol to lower hepatic GSH also increased with age. In 3 week old rats, GSH decreased 22% while in 34 week old rats it decreased 52%. The authors conclude that both the steady-state concentration of GSH and the GSH-lowering ability of ethanol are highly dependent on the age of as well as on the feeding status of rats.

  7. Circadian variation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity in swine liver and ileum.

    PubMed

    Rogers, D H; Kim, D N; Lee, K T; Reiner, J M; Thomas, W A

    1981-07-01

    The temporal variation of HMG-CoA reductase activity in the liver and intestine of swine was investigated. The thin-layer chromatographic method widely used in the assay of the reductase was successfully applied to the porcine enzymes. Parallel circadian rhythms were demonstrated in both hepatic and ileal reductases from mash-fed animals. Peak activity occurred approximately 6 hr after feeding, 2.7-fold over the basal level in the liver, and 1.6-fold in the ileum. A milk-cholesterol diet caused a marked depression of both rhythms (90% in liver, 50% in ileum); however, the hourly variation in activity persisted in both organs. Cholestyramine was found to elevate hepatic activity (2.7-fold throughout the rhythm) without affecting that of the intestine. Clofibrate had no effect on either enzyme at any time during the cycle despite a 34% reduction in serum cholesterol concentrations.

  8. α-Glucosidase and aldose reductase inhibitory activities from the fruiting body of Phellinus merrillii.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guan-Jhong; Hsieh, Wen-Tsong; Chang, Heng-Yuan; Huang, Shyh-Shyun; Lin, Ying-Chih; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung

    2011-05-25

    The inhibitory activity from the isolated component of the fruiting body Phellinus merrillii (PM) was evaluated against α-glucosidase and lens aldose reductase from Sprague-Dawley male rats and compared to the quercetin as an aldose reductase inhibitor and acarbose as an α-glucosidase inhibitor. The ethanol extracts of PM (EPM) showed the strong α-glucosidase and aldose reductase activities. α-Glucosidase and aldose reductase inhibitors were identified as hispidin (A), hispolon (B), and inotilone (C), which were isolated from EtOAc-soluble fractions of EPM. The above structures were elucidated by their spectra and comparison with the literatures. Among them, hispidin, hispolon, and inotilone exhibited potent against α-glucosidase inhibitor activity with IC(50) values of 297.06 ± 2.06, 12.38 ± 0.13, and 18.62 ± 0.23 μg/mL, respectively, and aldose reductase inhibitor activity with IC(50) values of 48.26 ± 2.48, 9.47 ± 0.52, and 15.37 ± 0.32 μg/mL, respectively. These findings demonstrated that PM may be a good source for lead compounds as alternatives for antidiabetic agents currently used. The importance of finding effective antidiabetic therapeutics led us to further investigate natural compounds.

  9. Decreased glutathione levels and antioxidant enzyme activities in untreated and treated schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Monia; Mechri, Anwar; Othman, Leila Ben; Fendri, Chiraz; Gaha, Lotfi; Kerkeni, Abdelhamid

    2009-10-01

    There is substantial evidence found in the literature that supports the fact that the presence of oxidative stress may play an important role in the physiopathology of schizophrenia. Previous studies have reported the occurrence of impairments in the glutathione levels and the activities of the antioxidant enzymes in patients suffering from schizophrenia. However, most of these studies were performed on treated patients. The present study evaluated treated schizophrenic patients (n=52) along with neuroleptic-free or untreated schizophrenic patients (n=36) and healthy controls (n=46). The blood glutathione levels: total glutathione (GSHt), reduced glutathione (GSHr), and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) as well as the activities of the antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT) were measured. The psychopathology of the patients was assessed through the Clinical Global Impressions-severity (CGI-severity). The tests revealed that in comparison with the healthy controls, the schizophrenic patients showed significantly lower levels of GSHr, SOD, and CAT. Among the schizophrenic patients, the activities of the antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT were recorded to be significantly lower in untreated patients than in the treated ones. In addition, the levels of both GSHt and GSHr were found to be inversely correlated with the obtained CGI-severity score. These results evidently suggest that a decrease in the glutathione levels and the activities of the antioxidant enzymes in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia is not related to neuroleptic treatment and could be considered as a biological indicator of the degree of severity of the symptoms of schizophrenia.

  10. HMG-CoA reductase activity in human liver microsomes: comparative inhibition by statins.

    PubMed

    Dansette, P M; Jaoen, M; Pons, C

    2000-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a number of vastatins, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, in human liver microsomes. HMG-CoA reductase activity was four times lower than the activity in untreated rat liver microsomes. Vastatins could be classified in this in vitro assay in three classes both in human and rat microsomes: the first one including cerivastatin with an IC50 of 6 nM, the second one with atorvastatin and fluvastatin (IC50) between 40 and 100 nM) and the third one containing pravastatin, simvastatin and lovastatin (IC50 between 100 and 300 nM).

  11. ROS-Mediated Inhibition of S-nitrosoglutathione Reductase Contributes to the Activation of Anti-oxidative Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Izabella; Holzmeister, Christian; Wirtz, Markus; Geerlof, Arie; Fröhlich, Thomas; Römling, Gaby; Kuruthukulangarakoola, Gitto T.; Linster, Eric; Hell, Rüdiger; Arnold, Georg J.; Durner, Jörg; Lindermayr, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a signaling molecule in plants being involved in diverse physiological processes like germination, root growth, stomata closing and response to biotic and abiotic stress. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) as a biological NO donor has a very important function in NO signaling since it can transfer its NO moiety to other proteins (trans-nitrosylation). Such trans-nitrosylation reactions are equilibrium reactions and depend on GSNO level. The breakdown of GSNO and thus the level of S-nitrosylated proteins are regulated by GSNO-reductase (GSNOR). In this way, this enzyme controls S-nitrosothiol levels and regulates NO signaling. Here we report that Arabidopsis thaliana GSNOR activity is reversibly inhibited by H2O2 in vitro and by paraquat-induced oxidative stress in vivo. Light scattering analyses of reduced and oxidized recombinant GSNOR demonstrated that GSNOR proteins form dimers under both reducing and oxidizing conditions. Moreover, mass spectrometric analyses revealed that H2O2-treatment increased the amount of oxidative modifications on Zn2+-coordinating Cys47 and Cys177. Inhibition of GSNOR results in enhanced levels of S-nitrosothiols followed by accumulation of glutathione. Moreover, transcript levels of redox-regulated genes and activities of glutathione-dependent enzymes are increased in gsnor-ko plants, which may contribute to the enhanced resistance against oxidative stress. In sum, our results demonstrate that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent inhibition of GSNOR is playing an important role in activation of anti-oxidative mechanisms to damping oxidative damage and imply a direct crosstalk between ROS- and NO-signaling. PMID:27891135

  12. Impact of glutathione supplementation of parenteral nutrition on hepatic methionine adenosyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Elremaly, Wesam; Mohamed, Ibrahim; Rouleau, Thérèse; Lavoie, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Background The oxidation of the methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) by the combined impact of peroxides contaminating parenteral nutrition (PN) and oxidized redox potential of glutathione is suspected to explain its inhibition observed in animals. A modification of MAT activity is suspected to be at origin of the PN-associated liver disease as observed in newborns. We hypothesized that the correction of redox potential of glutathione by adding glutathione in PN protects the MAT activity. Aim To investigate whether the addition of glutathione to PN can reverse the inhibition of MAT observed in animal on PN. Methods Three days old guinea pigs received through a jugular vein catheter 2 series of solutions. First with methionine supplement, (1) Sham (no infusion); (2) PN: amino acids, dextrose, lipids and vitamins; (3) PN-GSSG: PN+10 μM GSSG. Second without methionine, (4) D: dextrose; (5) D+180 μM ascorbylperoxide; (6) D+350 μM H2O2. Four days later, liver was sampled for determination of redox potential of glutathione and MAT activity in the presence or absence of 1 mM DTT. Data were compared by ANOVA, p<0.05. Results MAT activity was 45±4% lower in animal infused with PN and 23±7% with peroxides generated in PN. The inhibition by peroxides was associated with oxidized redox potential and was reversible by DTT. Correction of redox potential (PN+GSSG) or DTT was without effect on the inhibition of MAT by PN. The slope of the linear relation between MAT activity and redox potential was two fold lower in animal infused with PN than in others groups. Conclusion The present study suggests that prevention of peroxide generation in PN and/or correction of the redox potential by adding glutathione in PN are not sufficient, at least in newborn guinea pigs, to restore normal MAT activity. PMID:26722840

  13. Reactivity of 9-aminoacridine drug quinacrine with glutathione limits its antiprion activity.

    PubMed

    Šafařík, Martin; Moško, Tibor; Zawada, Zbigniew; Šafaříková, Eva; Dračínský, Martin; Holada, Karel; Šebestík, Jaroslav

    2016-12-09

    Quinacrine-the drug based on 9-aminoacridine-failed in clinical trials for prion diseases, whereas it was active in in vitro studies. We hypothesize that aromatic nucleophilic substitution at C9 could be contributing factor responsible for this failure because of the transfer of acridine moiety from quinacrine to abundant glutathione. Here, we described the semi-large-scale synthesis of the acridinylated glutathione and the consequences of its formation on biological and biophysical activities. The acridinylated glutathione is one order of magnitude weaker prion protein binder than the parent quinacrine. Moreover, according to log DpH 7.4 , the glutathione conjugate is two orders of magnitude more hydrophilic than quinacrine. Its higher hydrophilicity and higher dsDNA binding potency will significantly decrease its bioavailability in membrane-like environment. The glutathione deactivates quinacrine not only directly but also decreases its bioavailability. Furthermore, the conjugate can spontaneously decompose to practically insoluble acridone, which is precipitated out from the living systems.

  14. A Simple Colorimetric Assay for Specific Detection of Glutathione-S Transferase Activity Associated with DDT Resistance in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Rajatileka, Shavanti; Steven, Andrew; Hemingway, Janet; Ranson, Hilary; Paine, Mark; Vontas, John

    2010-01-01

    Background Insecticide-based methods represent the most effective means of blocking the transmission of vector borne diseases. However, insecticide resistance poses a serious threat and there is a need for tools, such as diagnostic tests for resistance detection, that will improve the sustainability of control interventions. The development of such tools for metabolism-based resistance in mosquito vectors lags behind those for target site resistance mutations. Methodology/Principal Findings We have developed and validated a simple colorimetric assay for the detection of Epsilon class Glutathione transferases (GST)-based DDT resistance in mosquito species, such as Aedes aegypti, the major vector of dengue and yellow fever worldwide. The colorimetric assay is based on the specific alkyl transferase activity of Epsilon GSTs for the haloalkene substrate iodoethane, which produces a dark blue colour highly correlated with AaGSTE2-2-overexpression in individual mosquitoes. The colour can be measured visually and spectrophotometrically. Conclusions/Significance The novel assay is substantially more sensitive compared to the gold standard CDNB assay and allows the discrimination of moderate resistance phenotypes. We anticipate that it will have direct application in routine vector monitoring as a resistance indicator and possibly an important impact on disease vector control. PMID:20824165

  15. A substrate-bound structure of cyanobacterial biliverdin reductase identifies stacked substrates as critical for activity

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Haruna; Hirabayashi, Kei; Nishigaya, Yuki; Kouriki, Haruna; Nakaniwa, Tetsuko; Hagiwara, Yoshinori; Harada, Jiro; Sato, Hideaki; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Asada, Yujiro; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Ken; Fukuyama, Keiichi; Sugishima, Masakazu; Wada, Kei

    2017-01-01

    Biliverdin reductase catalyses the last step in haem degradation and produces the major lipophilic antioxidant bilirubin via reduction of biliverdin, using NAD(P)H as a cofactor. Despite the importance of biliverdin reductase in maintaining the redox balance, the molecular details of the reaction it catalyses remain unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of biliverdin reductase in complex with biliverdin and NADP+. Unexpectedly, two biliverdin molecules, which we designated the proximal and distal biliverdins, bind with stacked geometry in the active site. The nicotinamide ring of the NADP+ is located close to the reaction site on the proximal biliverdin, supporting that the hydride directly attacks this position of the proximal biliverdin. The results of mutagenesis studies suggest that a conserved Arg185 is essential for the catalysis. The distal biliverdin probably acts as a conduit to deliver the proton from Arg185 to the proximal biliverdin, thus yielding bilirubin. PMID:28169272

  16. Linked thioredoxin-glutathione systems in platyhelminths.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Gustavo; Selkirk, Murray E; Chalar, Cora; Maizels, Rick M; Fernández, Cecilia

    2004-07-01

    The thioredoxin and glutathione systems play a central role in thiol-disulfide redox homeostasis in many organisms by providing electrons to essential enzymes, and defence against oxidative stress. These systems have recently been characterized in platyhelminth parasites, and the emerging biochemical scenario is the existence of linked processes with the enzyme thioredoxin glutathione reductase supplying reducing equivalents to both pathways. In contrast to their hosts, conventional thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase enzymes appear to be absent. Analysis of published data and expressed-sequence tag databases indicates the presence of linked thioredoxin-glutathione systems in the cytosolic and mitochondrial compartments of these parasites.

  17. Changes in glutathione redox cycle during diapause determination and termination in the bivoltine silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin-Chuan; Hou, Yi-Sheng; Sima, Yang-Hu

    2014-02-01

    To explore whether glutathione regulates diapause determination and termination in the bivoltine silkworm Bombyx mori, we monitored the changes in glutathione redox cycle in the ovary of both diapause- and nondiapause-egg producers, as well as those in diapause eggs incubated at different temperatures. The activity of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) was detected in ovaries but not in eggs, while neither ovaries nor eggs showed activity of glutathione peroxidase. A lower reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio was observed in the ovary of diapause-egg producers, due to weaker reduction of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to the reduced glutathione (GSH) catalyzed by glutathione reductase (GR) and TrxR. This indicates an oxidative shift in the glutathione redox cycle during diapause determination. Compared with the 25°C-treated diapause eggs, the 5°C-treated diapause eggs showed lower GSH/GSSG ratio, a result of stronger oxidation of GSH catalyzed by thioredoxin peroxidase and weaker reduction of GSSG catalyzed by GR. Our study demonstrated the important regulatory role of glutathione in diapause determination and termination of the bivoltine silkworm.

  18. [Pineal gland glutathione peroxidase activity in rats and its age-associated change].

    PubMed

    Razygraev, A V

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase activity has been studied in the pineal gland (epiphysis) of young and aging female Wistar rats (2-4 and 17-19 month old). For comparison the same activity was studied in the pyramids of medulla oblongata and in the olfactory tubercle. These two brain structures represent white and gray matter respectively. The determination of the activity was performed with H2O2 as a substrate and with 5,5'-dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) for estimation of the decrease of restored form of glutathione concentration. The glutathione peroxidase activity was higher in the pineal gland than in the brain structures used. Pineal glutathione peroxidase activities (micromole of GSH per minute per milligram of protein, M +/- m) in young and old rats were 1,52 +/- 0,07 and 1,27 +/- 0,06 respectively (p<0,05). The potential reason for the declined enzymatic activity found in the aged rats is the age-associated decrease of the selenium content in the pineal gland. The decline found may be one of the reflections of the pineal gland functional involution.

  19. Differential antioxidant and quinone reductase inducing activity of American, Asian, and Siberian ginseng

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antioxidant and quinone reductase (QR) inducing activities of American, Asian, and Siberian ginseng have been reported using various plant materials, solvents, and assays. To directly establish their comparative bioactivity, the effects of extracts obtained from acidified methanol (MeOH), a gas...

  20. Sequence diversity and enzyme activity of ferric-chelate reductase LeFRO1 in tomato.

    PubMed

    Kong, Danyu; Chen, Chunlin; Wu, Huilan; Li, Ye; Li, Junming; Ling, Hong-Qing

    2013-11-20

    Ferric-chelate reductase which functions in the reduction of ferric to ferrous iron on root surface is a critical protein for iron homeostasis in strategy I plants. LeFRO1 is a major ferric-chelate reductase involved in iron uptake in tomato. To identify the natural variations of LeFRO1 and to assess their effect on the ferric-chelate reductase activity, we cloned the coding sequences of LeFRO1 from 16 tomato varieties collected from different regions, and detected three types of LeFRO1 (LeFRO1(MM), LeFRO1(Ailsa) and LeFRO1(Monita)) with five amino acid variations at the positions 21, 24, 112, 195 and 582. Enzyme activity assay revealed that the three types of LeFRO1 possessed different ferric-chelate reductase activity (LeFRO1(Ailsa) > LeFRO1(MM) > LeFRO1(Monita)). The 112th amino acid residue Ala of LeFRO1 is critical for maintaining the high activity of ferric-chelate reductase, because modification of this amino acid resulted in a significant reduction of enzyme activity. Further, we showed that the combination of the amino acid residue Ile at the site 24 with Lys at the site 582 played a positive role in the enzyme activity of LeFRO1. In conclusion, the findings are helpful to understand the natural adaptation mechanisms of plants to iron-limiting stress, and may provide new knowledge to select and manipulate LeFRO1 for improving the iron deficiency tolerance in tomato.

  1. 5 Alpha-reductase inhibitory and antiandrogenic activities of novel steroids in hamster seminal vesicles.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Marisa; Bratoeff, Eugene; Flores, Eugenio; Ramírez, Elena; Calleros, Jorge; Montes, Diana; Quiroz, Alexandra; Heuze, Ivonne

    2002-11-01

    The pharmacological activity of several 16-bromosubstituted trienediones 4 and 5, 16-methyl substituted dienediones 6 and 7 and the 16-methyl substituted trienedione 8 was determined on gonadectomized hamster seminal vesicles by measuring the in vitro conversion of testosterone (T) to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) as 5alpha-reductase inhibitors and also the ability of these steroids to bind to the androgen receptor. Steroids 6 and 7 when injected together with T decreased the weight of the seminal vesicles thus showing an antiandrogenic effect. Compounds 5 and 6 reduced substantially the conversion of T to DHT and therefore can be considered good inhibitors for the enzyme 5alpha-reductase; however both steroids failed to form a complex with the androgen receptor. On the other hand compound 7 which showed a very small inhibitory activity for the enzyme 5alpha-reductase, exhibited a very high affinity for the androgen receptor and thus can be considered an effective antiandrogen. This compound also reduced substantially the weight of the seminal vesicles. Steroids 4 and 8 did not reduce the weight of the seminal vesicles and exhibited a low affinity for the androgen receptor; 8 showed a weak 5alpha-reductase inhibitory activity, whereas 4 exhibited a weak androgenic effect.

  2. Effect of fish oil on glutathione redox system in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sorto-Gomez, Tania E; Ortiz, Genaro G; Pacheco-Moises, Fermín P; Torres-Sanchez, Erandis D; Ramirez-Ramirez, Viridiana; Macias-Islas, Miguel A; de la Rosa, Alfredo Celis; Velázquez-Brizuela, Irma E

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, inflammatory and autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. Dysregulation of glutathione homeostasis and alterations in glutathione-dependent enzyme activities are implicated in the induction and progression of MS. Evidence suggests that Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of fish oil on the activity of glutathione reductase (GR), content of reduced and oxidized glutathione, and GSH/GSSG ratio in MS. 50 patients with relapsing-remitting MS were enrolled. The experimental group received orally 4 g/day of fish oil for 12 months. Fish oil supplementation resulted in a significant increase in n-3 fatty acids and a decrease n-6 fatty acids. No differences in glutathione reductase activity, content of reduced and oxidized glutathione, and GSH/GSSG ratio were found. Conclusion: Glutathione reductase activity was not significantly different between the groups; however, fish oil supplementation resulted in smaller increase in GR compared with control group, suggesting a possible effect on antioxidant defence mechanisms. PMID:27335704

  3. Correlation between Glutathione Peroxidase Activity and Anthropometrical Parameters in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordonez, F. J.; Rosety-Rodriguez, M.

    2007-01-01

    Since we have recently found that regular exercise increased erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activities such as glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in adolescents with Down syndrome, these programs may be recommended. This study was designed to assess the role of anthropometrical parameters as easy, economic and non-invasive biomarkers of GPX. Thirty-one…

  4. Effects of commercial selenium products on glutathione peroxidase activity and semen quality in stud boars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine how dietary supplementation of inorganic and organic selenium affects selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in blood and sperm of sexually mature stud boars. Twenty-four boars of the Large White, Landrace, Pietrain, and Duroc breeds of opt...

  5. Assessment of Antioxidant Enzyme Activity and Mineral Nutrients in Response to NaCl Stress and its Amelioration Through Glutathione in Chickpea.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Vinay; Kumar, Dinesh; Agrawal, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Salinity stress has been reckoned as one of the major threat towards crop productivity as it causes significant decline in the yield. The impact of NaCl stress (0, 1, 10, 50, 100 and 200 mg L(-1)) as well as glutathione (10 mg L(-1)) either alone or in combination has been evaluated on the induction of multiple shoots, antioxidant enzymes' activity, lipid peroxidation, relative permeability, concentration of nutrients, photosynthetic pigments, protein and proline content of nodal segments of chickpea after 14 days of culture. The antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione reductase (GR) were found to be increased under salt stress as well as glutathione-supplemented medium. A significant decrease in the concentrations of chlorophylls a, b, total chlorophyll and carotenoid was observed under salt stress. Concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, carbon, magnesium and sulphur showed an initial increase up to 10 mg L(-1) NaCl, but a decline was seen at higher NaCl levels. Proline content and malondialdehyde concentration were found to be increased under salt stress. Three isoforms of SOD, one of CAT and four of GPX were expressed during native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis. However, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of the stressed nodal explants revealed the over-expression of several polypeptide bands related to NaCl stress. These findings for the first time suggest that glutathione (GSH) helps in ameliorating NaCl stress in nodal explants of chickpea by manipulating various biochemical and physiological responses of plants.

  6. Type I and type II fatty acid biosynthesis in Eimeria tenella: enoyl reductase activity and structure.

    PubMed

    Lu, J Z; Muench, S P; Allary, M; Campbell, S; Roberts, C W; Mui, E; McLeod, R L; Rice, D W; Prigge, S T

    2007-12-01

    Apicomplexan parasites of the genus Eimeria are the major causative agent of avian coccidiosis, leading to high economic losses in the poultry industry. Recent results show that Eimeria tenella harbours an apicoplast organelle, and that a key biosynthetic enzyme, enoyl reductase, is located in this organelle. In related parasites, enoyl reductase is one component of a type II fatty acid synthase (FAS) and has proven to be an attractive target for antimicrobial compounds. We cloned and expressed the mature form of E. tenella enoyl reductase (EtENR) for biochemical and structural studies. Recombinant EtENR exhibits NADH-dependent enoyl reductase activity and is inhibited by triclosan with an IC50 value of 60 nm. The crystal structure of EtENR reveals overall similarity with other ENR enzymes; however, the active site of EtENR is unoccupied, a state rarely observed in other ENR structures. Furthermore, the position of the central beta-sheet appears to block NADH binding and would require significant movement to allow NADH binding, a feature not previously seen in the ENR family. We analysed the E. tenella genomic database for orthologues of well-characterized bacterial and apicomplexan FAS enzymes and identified 6 additional genes, suggesting that E. tenella contains a type II FAS capable of synthesizing saturated, but not unsaturated, fatty acids. Interestingly, we also identified sequences that appear to encode multifunctional type I FAS enzymes, a feature also observed in Toxoplasma gondii, highlighting the similarity between these apicomplexan parasites.

  7. tRNA synthase suppression activates de novo cysteine synthesis to compensate for cystine and glutathione deprivation during ferroptosis.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kenichi; Stockwell, Brent R

    2016-03-01

    Glutathione is a major endogenous reducing agent in cells, and cysteine is a limiting factor in glutathione synthesis. Cysteine is obtained by uptake or biosynthesis, and mammalian cells often rely on either one or the other pathway. Because of the scarcity of glutathione, blockade of cysteine uptake causes oxidative cell death known as ferroptosis. A new study suggests that tRNA synthetase suppression activates the endogenous biosynthesis of cysteine, compensates such cysteine loss, and thus makes cells resistant to ferroptosis.

  8. Synaptic NMDA receptor activity is coupled to the transcriptional control of the glutathione system

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Paul S.; Bell, Karen F.S.; Hasel, Philip; Kaindl, Angela M.; Fricker, Michael; Thomson, Derek; Cregan, Sean P.; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Hardingham, Giles E.

    2015-01-01

    How the brain's antioxidant defenses adapt to changing demand is incompletely understood. Here we show that synaptic activity is coupled, via the NMDA receptor (NMDAR), to control of the glutathione antioxidant system. This tunes antioxidant capacity to reflect the elevated needs of an active neuron, guards against future increased demand and maintains redox balance in the brain. This control is mediated via a programme of gene expression changes that boosts the synthesis, recycling and utilization of glutathione, facilitating ROS detoxification and preventing Puma-dependent neuronal apoptosis. Of particular importance to the developing brain is the direct NMDAR-dependent transcriptional control of glutathione biosynthesis, disruption of which can lead to degeneration. Notably, these activity-dependent cell-autonomous mechanisms were found to cooperate with non-cell-autonomous Nrf2-driven support from astrocytes to maintain neuronal GSH levels in the face of oxidative insults. Thus, developmental NMDAR hypofunction and glutathione system deficits, separately implicated in several neurodevelopmental disorders, are mechanistically linked. PMID:25854456

  9. Glutathione-S-transferase-omega [MMA(V) reductase] knockout mice: Enzyme and arsenic species concentrations in tissues after arsenate administration

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Uttam K.; Zakharyan, Robert A.; Hernandez, Alba; Avram, Mihaela D.; Kopplin, Michael J.; Aposhian, H. Vasken . E-mail: aposhian@u.arizona.edu

    2006-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human carcinogen to which millions of people are exposed via their naturally contaminated drinking water. Its molecular mechanisms of carcinogenicity have remained an enigma, perhaps because arsenate is biochemically transformed to at least five other arsenic-containing metabolites. In the biotransformation of inorganic arsenic, GSTO1 catalyzes the reduction of arsenate, MMA(V), and DMA(V) to the more toxic + 3 arsenic species. MMA(V) reductase and human (hGSTO1-1) are identical proteins. The hypothesis that GST-Omega knockout mice biotransformed inorganic arsenic differently than wild-type mice has been tested. The livers of male knockout (KO) mice, in which 222 bp of Exon 3 of the GSTO1 gene were eliminated, were analyzed by PCR for mRNA. The level of transcripts of the GSTO1 gene in KO mice was 3.3-fold less than in DBA/1lacJ wild-type (WT) mice. The GSTO2 transcripts were about two-fold less in the KO mouse. When KO and WT mice were injected intramuscularly with Na arsenate (4.16 mg As/kg body weight); tissues removed at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 h after arsenate injection; and the arsenic species measured by HPLC-ICP-MS, the results indicated that the highest concentration of the recently discovered and very toxic MMA(III), a key biotransformant, was in the kidneys of both KO and WT mice. The highest concentration of DMA(III) was in the urinary bladder tissue for both the KO and WT mice. The MMA(V) reducing activity of the liver cytosol of KO mice was only 20% of that found in wild-type mice. There appears to be another enzyme(s) other than GST-O able to reduce arsenic(V) species but to a lesser extent. This and other studies suggest that each step of the biotransformation of inorganic arsenic has an alternative enzyme to biotransform the arsenic substrate.

  10. Role of thiol compounds in mammalian melanin pigmentation: Part I. Reduced and oxidized glutathione.

    PubMed

    Benedetto, J P; Ortonne, J P; Voulot, C; Khatchadourian, C; Prota, G; Thivolet, J

    1981-11-01

    Evidence for the postulated role of glutathione reductase in melanin pigmentation has been obtained by determinations of the glutathione concentrations in Tortoiseshell guinea pig skin of different colors (black, yellow, red, and white). As expected, the lowest levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) were found associated with eumelanin type pigmentation, whereas the highest ones were found in the skin with phaeomelanin producing melanocytes. On the other hand, white skin of guinea pig having no active melanocytes showed GSH levels which were intermediate between those of the black and yellow areas. These results are consistent with the view that the activity of the enzyme glutathione reductase, though not primarily related to pigmentation, plays an important role in the regulation and control of the biosynthetic activity of melanocytes leading to various types of melanin pigments.

  11. Evidence for the Presence of the Ascorbate-Glutathione Cycle in Mitochondria and Peroxisomes of Pea Leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, A.; Hernandez, J. A.; Del Rio, L. A.; Sevilla, F.

    1997-01-01

    The presence of the enzymes of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle was investigated in mitochondria and peroxisomes purified from pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaves. All four enzymes, ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11), monodehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.6.5.4), dehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.8.5.1), and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2), were present in mitochondria and peroxisomes, as well as in the antioxidants ascorbate and glutathione. The activity of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes was higher in mitochondria than in peroxisomes, except for APX, which was more active in peroxisomes than in mitochondria. Intact mitochondria and peroxisomes had no latent APX activity, and this remained in the membrane fraction after solubilization assays with 0.2 M KCl. Monodehydroascorbate reductase was highly latent in intact mitochondria and peroxisomes and was membrane-bound, suggesting that the electron acceptor and donor sites of this redox protein are not on the external side of the mitochondrial and peroxisomal membranes. Dehydroascorbate reductase was found mainly in the soluble peroxisomal and mitochondrial fractions. Glutathione reductase had a high latency in mitochondria and peroxisomes and was present in the soluble fractions of both organelles. In intact peroxisomes and mitochondria, the presence of reduced ascorbate and glutathione and the oxidized forms of ascorbate and glutathione were demonstrated by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The ascorbate-glutathione cycle of mitochondria and peroxisomes could represent an important antioxidant protection system against H2O2 generated in both plant organelles. PMID:12223704

  12. Site Directed Mutagenesis of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Glutathione Synthetase Produces an Enzyme with Homoglutathione Synthetase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dworeck, Tamara; Zimmermann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Three different His-tagged, mutant forms of the fission yeast glutathione synthetase (GSH2) were derived by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in E. coli DH5α and affinity purified in a two-step procedure. Analysis of enzyme activity showed that it was possible to shift the substrate specificity of GSH2 from Gly (km 0,19; wild-type) to β-Ala or Ser. One mutation (substitution of Ile471, Cy472 to Met and Val and Ala 485 and Thr486 to Leu and Pro) increased the affinity of GSH2 for β-Ala (km 0,07) and lowered the affinity for Gly (km 0,83), which is a characteristic of the enzyme homoglutathione synthetase found in plants. Substitution of Ala485 and Thr486 to Leu and Pro only, increased instead the affinity of GSH2 for Ser (km 0,23) as a substrate, while affinity to Gly was preserved (km 0,12). This provides a new biosynthetic pathway for hydroxymethyl glutathione, which is known to be synthesized from glutathione and Ser in a reaction catalysed by carboxypeptidase Y. The reported findings provide further insight into how specific amino acids positioned in the GSH2 active site facilitate the recognition of different amino acid substrates, furthermore they support the evolutionary theory that homoglutathione synthetase evolved from glutathione synthetase by a single gene duplication event. PMID:23091597

  13. Purification and characterization of a highly active chromate reductase from endophytic Bacillus sp. DGV19 of Albizzia lebbeck (L.) Benth. actively involved in phytoremediation of tannery effluent-contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, Muthu; Gopal, Judy; Kumaran, Rangarajulu Senthil; Kannan, Vijayaraghavan; Chun, Sechul

    2016-01-01

    Phytoremediation using timber-yielding tree species is considered to be the most efficient method for chromium/tannery effluent-contaminated sites. In this study, we have chosen Albizzia lebbeck, a chromium hyperaccumulator plant, and studied one of its chromium detoxification processes operated by its endophytic bacterial assemblage. Out of the four different groups of endophytic bacteria comprising Pseudomonas, Rhizobium, Bacillus, and Salinicoccus identified from A. lebbeck employed in phytoremediation of tannery effluent-contaminated soil, Bacillus predominated with three species, which exhibited not only remarkable chromium accumulation ability but also high chromium reductase activity. A chromate reductase was purified to homogeneity from the most efficient chromium accumulator, Bacillus sp. DGV 019, and the purified 34.2-kD enzyme was observed to be stable at temperatures from 20°C to 60°C. The enzyme was active over a wide range of pH values (4.0-9.0). Furthermore, the enzyme activity was enhanced with the electron donors NADH, followed by NADPH, not affected by glutathione and ascorbic acid. Cu(2+) enhanced the activity of the purified enzyme but was inhibited by Zn(2+) and etheylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). In conclusion, due to its versatile adaptability the chromate reductase can be used for chromium remediation.

  14. The retinaldehyde reductase activity of DHRS3 is reciprocally activated by retinol dehydrogenase 10 to control retinoid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mark K; Belyaeva, Olga V; Wu, Lizhi; Kedishvili, Natalia Y

    2014-05-23

    The retinoic acid-inducible dehydrogenase reductase 3 (DHRS3) is thought to function as a retinaldehyde reductase that controls the levels of all-trans-retinaldehyde, the immediate precursor for bioactive all-trans-retinoic acid. However, the weak catalytic activity of DHRS3 and the lack of changes in retinaldehyde conversion to retinol and retinoic acid in the cells overexpressing DHRS3 undermine its role as a physiologically important all-trans-retinaldehyde reductase. This study demonstrates that DHRS3 requires the presence of retinol dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10) to display its full catalytic activity. The RDH10-activated DHRS3 acts as a robust high affinity all-trans-retinaldehyde-specific reductase that effectively converts retinaldehyde back to retinol, decreasing the rate of retinoic acid biosynthesis. In turn, the retinol dehydrogenase activity of RDH10 is reciprocally activated by DHRS3. At E13.5, DHRS3-null embryos have ∼4-fold lower levels of retinol and retinyl esters, but only slightly elevated levels of retinoic acid. The membrane-associated retinaldehyde reductase and retinol dehydrogenase activities are decreased by ∼4- and ∼2-fold, respectively, in Dhrs3(-/-) embryos, and Dhrs3(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit reduced metabolism of both retinaldehyde and retinol. Neither RDH10 nor DHRS3 has to be itself catalytically active to activate each other. The transcripts encoding DHRS3 and RDH10 are co-localized at least in some tissues during development. The mutually activating interaction between the two related proteins may represent a highly sensitive and conserved mechanism for precise control over the rate of retinoic acid biosynthesis.

  15. Photosystem I cyclic electron transport: Measurement of ferredoxin-plastoquinone reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Cleland, R E; Bendall, D S

    1992-12-01

    Absorbance changes of ferredoxin measured at 463 nm in isolated thylakoids were shown to arise from the activity of the enzyme ferredoxin-plastoquinone reductase (FQR) in cyclic electron transport. Under anaerobic conditions in the presence of DCMU and an appropriate concentration of reduced ferredoxin, a light-induced absorbance decrease due to further reduction of Fd was assigned to the oxidation of the other components in the cyclic pathway, primarily plastoquinone. When the light was turned off, Fd was reoxidised and this gave a direct quantitative measurement of the rate of cyclic electron transport due to the activity of FQR. This activity was sensitive to the classical inhibitor of cyclic electron transport, antimycin, and also to J820 and DBMIB. Antimycin had no effect on Fd reduction although this was inhibited by stigmatellin. This provides further evidence that there is a quinone reduction site outside the cytochrome bf complex. The effect of inhibitors of ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase and experiments involving the modification of ferredoxin suggest that there may be some role for the reductase as a component of FQR. Contrary to expectations, NADPH2 inhibited FQR activity; ATP and ADP had no effect.

  16. Asymmetric reduction of activated alkenes using an enoate reductase from Gluconobacter oxydans.

    PubMed

    Richter, Nina; Gröger, Harald; Hummel, Werner

    2011-01-01

    A recombinant enoate reductase from Gluconobacter oxydans was heterologously expressed, purified, characterised and applied in the asymmetric reduction of activated alkenes. In addition to the determination of the kinetic properties, the major focus of this work was to utilise the enzyme in the biotransformation of different interesting compounds such as 3,5,5-trimethyl-2-cyclohexen-1,4-dione (ketoisophorone) and (E/Z)-3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienal (citral). The reaction proceeded with excellent stereoselectivities (>99% ee) as well as absolute chemo- and regioselectivity, only the activated C=C bond of citral was reduced by the enoate reductase, while non-activated C=C bond and carbonyl moiety remained untouched. The described strategy can be used for the production of enantiomerically pure building blocks, which are difficult to prepare by chemical means. In general, the results show that the investigated enoate reductase is a promising catalyst for the use in asymmetric C=C bond reductions.

  17. Serum Malondialdehyde Concentration and Glutathione Peroxidase Activity in a Longitudinal Study of Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, María; Muriach, María; Romero, Francisco J.; Villar, Vincent M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The main goal of this study was to evaluate the presence of oxidative damage and to quantify its level in gestational diabetes. Methods Thirty-six healthy women and thirty-six women with gestational diabetes were studied in the three trimesters of pregnancy regarding their levels of oxidative stress markers. These women were diagnosed with diabetes in the second trimester of pregnancy. Blood glucose levels after 100g glucose tolerance test were higher than 190, 165 or 145 mg/dl, 1, 2 or 3 hours after glucose intake. Results The group of women with gestational diabetes had higher serum malondialdehyde levels, with significant differences between groups in the first and second trimester. The mean values of serum glutathione peroxidase activity in the diabetic women were significantly lower in the first trimester. In the group of women with gestational diabetes there was a negative linear correlation between serum malondialdehyde concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in the second and third trimester. Conclusions In this observational and longitudinal study in pregnant women, the alterations attributable to oxidative stress were present before the biochemical detection of the HbA1c increase. Usual recommendations once GD is detected (adequate metabolic control, as well as any other normally proposed to these patients) lowered the concentration of malondialdehyde at the end of pregnancy to the same levels of the healthy controls. Serum glutathione peroxidase activity in women with gestational diabetes increased during the gestational period. PMID:27228087

  18. Effects of mercury on glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes in hares (Lepus europaeus Pallas).

    PubMed

    Linšak, Željko; Linšak, Dijana Tomić; Špirić, Zdravko; Srebočan, Emil; Glad, Marin; Milin, Čedomila

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and evaluate risks of long-term exposure to mercury in hares (Lepus europaeus Pallas), with a chemical-analytical approach evaluating median mass fraction of toxic mercury in the hares organs (liver, kidney, muscle and brain). To obtain better insight into possible effects of mercury, the study included screening of the oxidative status after long term exposure to low concentrations of mercury. Hares organs were analyzed for total mercury concentration by AAS. Glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes status was also investigated. The median mercury concentrations (wet weight) in the liver, kidney, muscle and brain of the hares ranged from 0.058-0.189, 0.138-0.406, 0.013-0.046 and 0.022-0.102 μg/g respectively. Concentration of the glutathione (GSH), glutathione-peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione-reductase (GR) activity increased with the mercury concentration. However, glutathione S-transferase (GST) and superoxide-dismutase (SOD) activity decreased with the mercury concentration. The results of this study show the impact of environmentally absorbed mercury on the antioxidant status of the examined hares. Further research on long-term exposure to low concentrations of mercury is needed.

  19. Major Peptides from Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) Protein Inhibit HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Rosana Aparecida Manólio; Mendonça, Simone; de Castro, Luíla Ívini Andrade; Menezes, Amanda Caroline Cardoso Corrêa Carlos; Arêas, José Alfredo Gomes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the major peptides generated by the in vitro hydrolysis of Amaranthus cruentus protein and to verify the effect of these peptides on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. A protein isolate was prepared, and an enzymatic hydrolysis that simulated the in vivo digestion of the protein was performed. After hydrolysis, the peptide mixture was filtered through a 3 kDa membrane. The peptide profile of this mixture was determined by reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC), and the peptide identification was performed by LC-ESI MS/MS. Three major peptides under 3 kDa were detected, corresponding to more than 90% of the peptides of similar size produced by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sequences identified were GGV, IVG or LVG and VGVI or VGVL. These peptides had not yet been described for amaranth protein nor are they present in known sequences of amaranth grain protein, except LVG, which can be found in amaranth α‑amylase. Their ability to inhibit the activity of HMG-CoA reductase was determined, and we found that the sequences GGV, IVG, and VGVL, significantly inhibited this enzyme, suggesting a possible hypocholesterolemic effect. PMID:25690031

  20. The Biochemical Adaptations of Spotted Wing Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) to Fresh Fruits Reduced Fructose Concentrations and Glutathione-S Transferase Activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong; Kim, A-Young; Jung, Jin Kyo; Donahue, Kelly M; Jung, Chuleui; Choi, Man-Yeon; Koh, Young Ho

    2016-04-01

    Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, is an invasive and economically damaging pest in Europe and North America. The females have a serrated ovipositor that enables them to infest almost all ripening small fruits. To understand the physiological and metabolic basis of spotted wing drosophila food preferences for healthy ripening fruits, we investigated the biological and biochemical characteristics of spotted wing drosophila and compared them with those of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. We found that the susceptibility to oxidative stressors was significantly increased in spotted wing drosophila compared with those of D. melanogaster. In addition, we found that spotted wing drosophila had significantly reduced glutathione-S transferase (GST) activity and gene numbers. Furthermore, fructose concentrations found in spotted wing drosophila were significantly lower than those of D. melanogaster. Our data strongly suggest that the altered food preferences of spotted wing drosophila may stem from evolutionary adaptations to fresh foods accompanied by alterations in carbohydrate metabolism and GST activities.

  1. Testosterone 5alpha-reductase inhibitory active constituents of Piper nigrum leaf.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Noriko; Tokunaga, Masashi; Naruto, Shunsuke; Iinuma, Munekazu; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2007-12-01

    Previously we reported that Piper nigrum leaf extract showed a potent stimulation effect on melanogenesis and that (-)-cubebin (1) and (-)-3,4-dimethoxy-3,4-desmethylenedioxycubebin (2) were isolated as active constituents. As a part of our continuous studies on Piper species for the development of cosmetic hair-care agents, testosterone 5alpha-reductase inhibitory activity of aqueous ethanolic extracts obtained from several different parts of six Piper species, namely Piper nigrum, P. methysticum, P. betle, P. kadsura, P. longum, and P. cubeba, were examined. Among them, the extracts of P. nigrum leaf, P. nigrum fruit and P. cubeba fruit showed potent inhibitory activity. Activity-guided fractionation of P. nigrum leaf extract led to the isolation of 1 and 2. Fruits of P. cubeba contain 1 as a major lignan, thus inhibitory activity of the fruit may be attributable to 1. As a result of further assay on other known constituents of the cited Piper species, it was found that piperine, a major alkaloid amide of P. nigrum fruit, showed potent inhibitory activity, thus a part of the inhibitory activity of P. nigrum fruit may depend on piperine. The 5alpha-reductase inhibitory activities of 1 and piperine were found for the first time. In addition, the P. nigrum leaf extract showed in vivo anti-androgenic activity using the hair regrowth assay in testosterone sensitive male C57Black/6CrSlc strain mice.

  2. Stobadine pretreatment enhances glutathione peroxidase activity in the heart of irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Kováciková, Z; Chorvatovicová, D; Ginter, E

    1997-05-01

    The effect of pretreatment with stobadine (a novel drug with cardioprotective properties) on the activity of glutathione peroxidase was studied in the heart of mice after Co60 irradiation. Exposure to 6.5 Gy caused significant decrease in the activity of the enzyme (p < 0.01). Treatment with stobadine (70.07 mg/kg) 1 or 2 h before irradiation resulted in activity enhancement in comparison with the nonpretreated irradiated group (p < 0.01). We conclude that the radical scavenging mechanism may be involved in the protection exerted by stobadine. The results are in agreement with those obtained by the micronucleus test.

  3. Glutathion S-transferase activity and DDT-susceptibility of Malaysian mosquitos.

    PubMed

    Lee, H L; Chong, W L

    1995-03-01

    Comparative DDT-susceptibility status and glutathion s-transferase (GST) activity of Malaysian Anopheles maculatus, Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti was investigated to ascertain the role of this enzyme in DDT resistance. The standardised WHO dose-mortality bioassay tests were used to determine DDT susceptibility in these mosquitos, whilst GST microassay (Brogdon and Barber, 1990) was conducted to measure the activity of this enzyme in mosquito homogenate. It appeared that DDT susceptibility status of Malaysian mosquitos was not correlated with GST activity.

  4. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) inhibits epithelial sodium channel activity in primary alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Charles A.; Kreiner, Lisa; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Trac, Phi; Johnson, Nicholle M.; Hansen, Jason M.; Brown, Lou Ann

    2015-01-01

    Amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channels (ENaC) regulate fluid balance in the alveoli and are regulated by oxidative stress. Since glutathione (GSH) is the predominant antioxidant in the lungs, we proposed that changes in glutathione redox potential (Eh) would alter cell signaling and have an effect on ENaC open probability (Po). In the present study, we used single channel patch-clamp recordings to examine the effect of oxidative stress, via direct application of glutathione disulfide (GSSG), on ENaC activity. We found a linear decrease in ENaC activity as the GSH/GSSG Eh became less negative (n = 21; P < 0.05). Treatment of 400 μM GSSG to the cell bath significantly decreased ENaC Po from 0.39 ± 0.06 to 0.13 ± 0.05 (n = 8; P < 0.05). Likewise, back-filling recording electrodes with 400 μM GSSG reduced ENaC Po from 0.32 ± 0.08 to 0.17 ± 0.05 (n = 10; P < 0.05), thus implicating GSSG as an important regulatory factor. Biochemical assays indicated that oxidizing potentials promote S-glutathionylation of ENaC and irreversible oxidation of cysteine residues with N-ethylmaleimide blocked the effects of GSSG on ENaC Po. Additionally, real-time imaging studies showed that GSSG impairs alveolar fluid clearance in vivo as opposed to GSH, which did not impair clearance. Taken together, these data show that glutathione Eh is an important determinant of alveolar fluid clearance in vivo. PMID:25713321

  5. Transcriptional activation of glutathione pathways and role of glucose homeostasis during copper imbalance.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Natalia; Rivas, Nicole; del Pozo, Talía; Burkhead, Jason; Suazo, Miriam; González, Mauricio; Latorre, Mauricio

    2015-04-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient for organism health. Dietary changes or pathologies linked to this metal induce changes in intracellular glutathione concentrations. Here, we studied the transcriptional activation of glutathione pathways in Jurkat cell lines, analyzing the effect of change in glucose homeostasis during a physiological and supra-physiological copper exposure. An immortalized line of human T lymphocyte cell line (Jurkat) was exposed to different copper and glucose conditions to mimic concentrations present in human blood. We applied treatments for 6 (acute) and 24 h (sustained) to 2 µM (physiological) or 20 µM (supra-physiological, Wilson disease scenario) of CuSO4 in combination with 25 mg/dL (hypoglycemia), 100 mg/dL (normal) and 200 mg/dL (hyperglycemia, diabetes scenario) of glucose. The results indicate that a physiological concentration of copper exposure does not induce transcriptional changes in the glutathione synthesis pathway after 6 or 24 h. The G6PDH gene (regeneration pathway), however, is induced during a supra-physiological copper condition. This data was correlated with the viability assays, where fluctuation in both glucose conditions (hypo and hyperglycemia scenario) affected Jurkat proliferation when 20 µM of CuSO4 was added to the culture media. Under a copper overload condition, the transcription of a component of glutathione regeneration pathway (G6PDH gene) is activated in cells chronically exposed to a hyperglycemia scenario, indicating that fluctuations in glucose concentration impact the resistance against the metal. Our findings illustrate the importance of glucose homeostasis during copper excess.

  6. Trypanothione Reductase: A Viable Chemotherapeutic Target for Antitrypanosomal and Antileishmanial Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Omar F.

    2007-01-01

    Trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis are two debilitating disease groups caused by parasites of Trypanosoma and Leishmania spp. and affecting millions of people worldwide. A brief outline of the potential targets for rational drug design against these diseases are presented, with an emphasis placed on the enzyme trypanothione reductase. Trypanothione reductase was identified as unique to parasites and proposed to be an effective target against trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis. The biochemical basis of selecting this enzyme as a target, with reference to the simile and contrast to human analogous enzyme glutathione reductase, and the structural aspects of its active site are presented. The process of designing selective inhibitors for the enzyme trypanothione reductase has been discussed. An overview of the different chemical classes of inhibitors of trypanothione reductase with their inhibitory activities against the parasites and their prospects as future chemotherapeutic agents are briefly revealed. PMID:21901070

  7. Genistein inhibits activities of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and lactate dehydrogenase, enzymes which use NADH as a substrate.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Michał; Banecki, Bogdan; Kadziński, Leszek; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Kaźmierkiewicz, Rajmund; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta

    2015-09-25

    Genistein (5, 7-dihydroxy-3- (4-hydroxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one) is a natural isoflavone revealing many biological activities. Thus, it is considered as a therapeutic compound in as various disorders as cancer, infections and genetic diseases. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that genistein inhibits activities of bacterial methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MetF) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Both enzymes use NADH as a substrate, and results of biochemical as well as molecular modeling studies with MetF suggest that genistein may interfere with binding of this dinucleotide to the enzyme. These results have implications for our understanding of biological functions of genistein and its effects on cellular metabolism.

  8. Functional Analysis of Arabidopsis Mutants Points to Novel Roles for Glutathione in Coupling H2O2 to Activation of Salicylic Acid Accumulation and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yi; Chaouch, Sejir; Mhamdi, Amna; Queval, Guillaume; Zechmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Through its interaction with H2O2, glutathione is a candidate for transmission of signals in plant responses to pathogens, but identification of signaling roles is complicated by its antioxidant function. Using a genetic approach based on a conditional catalase-deficient Arabidopsis mutant, cat2, this study aimed at establishing whether GSH plays an important functional role in the transmission of signals downstream of H2O2. Results: Introducing the cad2 or allelic mutations in the glutathione synthesis pathway into cat2 blocked H2O2-triggered GSH oxidation and accumulation. While no effects on NADP(H) or ascorbate were observed, and H2O2-induced decreases in growth were maintained, blocking GSH modulation antagonized salicylic acid (SA) accumulation and SA-dependent responses. Other novel double and triple mutants were produced and compared with cat2 cad2 at the levels of phenotype, expression of marker genes, nontargeted metabolite profiling, accumulation of SA, and bacterial resistance. Most of the effects of the cad2 mutation on H2O2-triggered responses were distinct from those produced by mutations for GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE1 (GR1) or NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES 1 (NPR1), and were linked to compromised induction of ISOCHORISMATE SYNTHASE1 (ICS1) and ICS1-dependent SA accumulation. Innovation: A novel genetic approach was used in which GSH content or antioxidative capacity was independently modified in an H2O2 signaling background. Analysis of new double and triple mutants allowed us to infer previously undescribed regulatory roles for GSH. Conclusion: In parallel to its antioxidant role, GSH acts independently of NPR1 to allow increased intracellular H2O2 to activate SA signaling, a key defense response in plants. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2106–2121. PMID:23148658

  9. Differential cytochrome content and reductase activity in Geospirillum barnesii strain SeS3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stolz, J.F.; Gugliuzza, T.; Switzer, Blum J.; Oremland, R.; Martinez, Murillo F.

    1997-01-01

    The protein composition, cytochrome content, and reductase activity in the dissimilatory selenate-reducing bacterium Geospirillum barnesii strain SeS3, grown with thiosulfate, nitrate, selenate, or fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor, was investigated. Comparison of seven high-molecular-mass membrane proteins (105.3, 90.3, 82.6, 70.2, 67.4, 61.1, and 57.3 kDa) by SDS-PAGE showed that their detection was dependent on the terminal electron acceptor used. Membrane fractions from cells grown on thiosulfate contained a 70.2-kDa c-type cytochrome with absorbance maxima at 552, 522, and 421 nm. A 61.1-kDa c-type cytochrome with absorption maxima at 552, 523, and 423 nm was seen in membrane fractions from cells grown on nitrate. No c-type cytochromes were detected in membrane fractions of either selenate- or fumarate-grown cells. Difference spectra, however, revealed the presence of a cytochrome b554 (absorption maxima at 554, 523, and 422 nm) in membrane fractions from selenate-grown cells and a cytochrome b556 (absorption maxima at 556, 520, and 416 nm) in membrane fractions from fumarate-grown cells. Analysis of reductase activity in the different membrane fractions showed variability in substrate specificity. However, enzyme activity was greatest for the substrate on which the cells had been grown (e.g., membranes from nitrate-grown cells exhibited the greatest activity with nitrate). These results show that protein composition, cytochrome content, and reductase activity are dependent on the terminal electron acceptor used for growth.

  10. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  11. Nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase expression and activity in response to different nitrogen sources in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Balotf, Sadegh; Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Kholdebarin, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the expression and activity of nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.7.1.1), nitrite reductase (NiR, EC 1.7.2.2), glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2), and glutamate synthase (GOGAT, EC 1.4.7.1) in response to potassium nitrate, ammonium chloride, and ammonium nitrate in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings. Plants were grown in standard nutrient solution for 17 days and then subjected to nitrogen starvation for 7 days. The starved plants were supplied with potassium nitrate ammonium nitrate and ammonium chloride (50 mM) for 4 days and the leaves were harvested. The relative expression of NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT as well as the enzyme activities were investigated. Nitrogen starvation caused a significant decrease both in transcript levels and in NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities. Potassium nitrate and ammonium nitrate treatments restored NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT expressions and activities. Ammonium chloride increased only the expressions and activities of GS and GOGAT in a dose-dependent manner. The results of our study highlight the differential effects between the type and the amount of nitrogen salts on NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities in wheat seedlings while potassium nitrate being more effective.

  12. Glyphosate effect on shikimate, nitrate reductase activity, yield, and seed composition in corn.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Krishna N; Bellaloui, Nacer; Zablotowicz, Robert M

    2010-03-24

    When glyphosate is applied to glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, drift to nonglyphosate-resistant (non-GR) crops may cause significant injury and reduce yields. Tools are needed to quantify injury and predict crop losses. In this study, glyphosate drift was simulated by direct application at 12.5% of the recommended label rate to non-GR corn (Zea mays L.) at 3 or 6 weeks after planting (WAP) during two field seasons in the Mississippi delta region of the southeastern USA. Visual plant injury, shikimate accumulation, nitrate reductase activity, leaf nitrogen, yield, and seed composition were evaluated. Effects were also evaluated in GR corn and GR corn with stacked glufosinate-resistant gene at the recommended label rate at 3 and 6 WAP. Glyphosate at 105 g ae/ha was applied once at 3 or 6 weeks after planting to non-GR corn. Glyphosate at 840 (lower label limit) or 1260 (upper label limit) g ae/ha was applied twice at 3 and 6 WAP to transgenic corn. Glyphosate caused injury (45-55%) and increased shikimate levels (24-86%) in non-GR compared to nontreated corn. In non-GR corn, glyphosate drift did not affect starch content but increased seed protein 8-21% while reducing leaf nitrogen reductase activity 46-64%, leaf nitrogen 7-16%, grain yield 49-54%, and seed oil 18-23%. In GR and GR stacked with glufosinate-resistant corn, glyphosate applied at label rates did not affect corn yield, leaf and seed nitrogen, or seed composition (protein, oil, and starch content). Yet, nitrate reductase activity was reduced 5-19% with glyphosate at 840 + 840 g/ha rate and 8-42% with glyphosate at 1260 + 1260 g/ha rate in both GR and GR stacked corn. These results demonstrate the potential for severe yield loss in non-GR corn exposed to glyphosate drift.

  13. Adventitious Arsenate Reductase Activity of the Catalytic Domain of the Human Cdc25B and Cdc25C Phosphatases†

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Sheng, Ju; Ajees, A. Abdul; Mukhopadhyay, Rita; Rosen, Barry P.

    2013-01-01

    A number of eukaryotic enzymes that function as arsenate reductases are homologues of the catalytic domain of the human Cdc25 phosphatase. For example, the Leishmania major enzyme LmACR2 is both a phosphatase and an arsenate reductase, and its structure bears similarity to the structure of the catalytic domain of human Cdc25 phosphatase. These reductases contain an active site C-X5-R signature motif, where C is the catalytic cysteine, the five X residues form a phosphate binding loop, and R is a highly conserved arginine, which is also present in human Cdc25 phosphatases. We therefore investigated the possibility that the three human Cdc25 isoforms might have adventitious arsenate reductase activity. The sequences for the catalytic domains of Cdc25A, -B, and -C were cloned individually into a prokaryotic expression vector, and their gene products were purified from a bacterial host using nickel affinity chromatography. While each of the three Cdc25 catalytic domains exhibited phosphatase activity, arsenate reductase activity was observed only with Cdc25B and -C. These two enzymes reduced inorganic arsenate but not methylated pentavalent arsenicals. Alteration of either the cysteine and arginine residues of the Cys-X5-Arg motif led to the loss of both reductase and phosphatase activities. Our observations suggest that Cdc25B and -C may adventitiously reduce arsenate to the more toxic arsenite and may also provide a framework for identifying other human protein tyrosine phosphatases containing the active site Cys-X5-Arg loop that might moonlight as arsenate reductases. PMID:20025242

  14. Fatty acyl-CoA inhibition of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Faas, F H; Carter, W J; Wynn, J O

    1978-11-22

    The influence of the fatty acyl-CoA thioesters on rat liver microsomal hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity was tested in vitro to determine if the previously demonstrated inhibition of [14C]acetate incorporation into cholesterol is due to inhibition of this rate limiting step in cholesterol synthesis. The polyunsaturated fatty acyl-CoA thioesters caused the greatest inhibition of enzyme activity, 50 micron arachidonoyl-CoA inhibiting 67% and 5 micron inhibiting 22%. 50 micron linoleoyl-CoA inhibited 56% with the more saturated thioesters causing less inhibition. 50--100 micron free fatty acids, free CoA, cholesterol esters, phospholipids, carnitine derivatives, prostaglandins and non-specific detergents caused little or no inhibition of enzyme activity. Kinetic studies revealed the inhibition to be noncompetitive with respect to hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA with a Ki for arachidonoyl CoA of 3.10 micron. Fatty acyl-CoA inhibition of in vitro cholesterol synthesis is due to inhibition of hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity. Variation in intracellular concentrations of fatty acyl-CoA thioesters may signficantly alter cholesterol synthesis.

  15. NADH-dependent decavanadate reductase, an alternative activity of NADP-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase protein.

    PubMed

    Rao, A V; Ramasarma, T

    2000-05-01

    The well known NADP-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) obtained from pig heart was found to oxidize NADH with accompanying consumption of oxygen (NADH:O(2)=1:1) in presence of polyvanadate. This activity of the soluble IDH-protein has the following features common with the previously described membrane-enzymes: heat-sensitive, active only with NADH but not NADPH, increased rates in acidic pH, dependence on concentrations of the enzyme, NADH, decavanadate and metavanadate (the two constituents of polyvanadate), and sensitivity to SOD and EDTA. Utilizing NADH as the electron source the IDH protein was able to reduce decavanadate but not metavanadate. This reduced form of vanadyl (V(IV)) was similar in its eight-band electron spin resonance spectrum to vanadyl sulfate but had a 20-fold higher absorbance at its 700 nm peak. This decavanadate reductase activity of the protein was sensitive to heat and was not inhibited by SOD and EDTA. The IDH protein has the additional enzymic activity of NADH-dependent decavanadate reductase and is an example of "one protein--many functions".

  16. The biological selenium status of livestock in Britain as indicated by sheep erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P H; Berrett, S; Patterson, D S

    1979-03-17

    The reliability of erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity as an indicator of selenium status in livestock is discussed. Based on this measurement, a survey is described of the biological selenium status of sheep on each of 329 farms in Britain. Results showed that 47 per cent of these farms were probably unable to provide grazing livestock with sufficient selenium to maintain blood levels greater than 0.075 microgram per ml. Increased selenium deficiency from the increasing use of home grown feeds as a major constituent of livestock rations may be causally related to the increase of white muscle disease and other selenium responsive diseases in Britain.

  17. Effect of chemical form of selenium on tissue glutathione peroxidase activity in developing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Strength, Ralph; Johnson, Janet; White, Marguerite T.

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis that the stage of development of rats may affect the availability of various forms of selenium for the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) in the rat was experimentally investigated. One experiment evaluated the availability of selenium as selenite or selenomethionine for GSPHx activity during three developmental states in rats: fetus and 7-day old and 14-day old nursing pups. In all tissues studied, GSHPx activity was highest in the 14-day-old pups whose dams were in the selenomethionine group. Rat pups given intraperitoneal selenite had higher liver and kidney GSHPx activity than pups given the same amount of selenium as intraperitoneal selenomethionine. In a second experiment, all dams were fed the same basal diet and pups were weaned to diets containing one of two levels of selenium and one of three forms of selenium (selenite, selenomethionine, or selenocystine). The results also supported the hypothesis these dietary forms of selenium are differentially available for GSHPx activity.

  18. NO Reductase Activity of the Tetraheme Cytochrome c554 of Nitrosomonas europaea

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Anup K.; Hooper, Alan B.; Hendrich, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    The tetraheme cytochrome c554 (cyt c554) from Nitrosomonas europaea is believed to function as an electron-transfer protein from hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO). We show here that cyt c554 also has significant NO reductase activity. The protein contains one high-spin and three low-spin c-type hemes. HAO catalyzed reduction of the cyt c554, ligand binding, intermolecular electron transfer, and kinetics of NO reduction by cyt c554 have been investigated. We detect the formation of a NO-bound ferrous heme species in cyt c554 by EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopies during the HAO catalyzed oxidation of hydroxylamine, indicating that N-oxide intermediates produced from HAO readily bind to cyt c554. In the half-reduced state of cyt c554, we detect a spin interaction between the [FeNO]7 state of heme 2 and the low-spin ferric state of heme 4. We find that ferrous cyt c554 will reduce NO at a rate greater than 16 s−1, which is comparable to rates of other known NO reductases. Carbon monoxide or nitrite are shown not to bind to the reduced protein, and previous results indicate the reactions with O2 are slow and that a variety of ligands will not bind in the oxidized state. Thus, the enzymatic site is highly selective for NO. The NO reductase activity of cyt c554 may be important during ammonia oxidation in N. europaea at low oxygen concentrations to detoxify NO produced by reduction of nitrite or incomplete oxidation of hydroxylamine. PMID:16569009

  19. Arabidopsis nitrate reductase activity is stimulated by the E3 SUMO ligase AtSIZ1

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bong Soo; Song, Jong Tae; Seo, Hak Soo

    2011-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is a small polypeptide that modulates protein activity and regulates hormone signalling, abiotic and biotic responses in plants. Here we show that AtSIZ regulates nitrogen assimilation in Arabidopsis through its E3 SUMO ligase function. Dwarf plants of siz1-2 flower early, show abnormal seed development and have high salicylic acid content and enhanced resistance to bacterial pathogens. These mutant phenotypes are reverted to wild-type phenotypes by exogenous ammonium but not by nitrate, phosphate or potassium. Decreased nitrate reductase activity in siz1-2 plants resulted in low nitrogen concentrations, low nitric oxide production and high nitrate content in comparison with wild-type plants. The nitrate reductases, NIA1 and NIA2, are sumoylated by AtSIZ1, which dramatically increases their activity. Both sumoylated and non-sumoylated NIA1 and NIA2 can form dimers. Our results indicate that AtSIZ1 positively controls nitrogen assimilation by promoting sumoylation of NRs in Arabidopsis. PMID:21772271

  20. Copper removal ability by Streptomyces strains with dissimilar growth patterns and endowed with cupric reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Virginia Helena; Avila, Ana Lucía; Amoroso, María Julia; Abate, Carlos Mauricio

    2008-11-01

    Morphological, physiological and molecular characterization of three copper-resistant actinobacterial strains (AB2A, AB3 and AB5A) isolated from copper-polluted sediments of a drainage channel showed that they belonged to the genus Streptomyces. These characteristics plus their distinctive copper resistance phenotypes revealed considerable divergence among the isolates. Highly dissimilar growth patterns and copper removal efficiency were observed for the selected Streptomyces strains grown on minimal medium (MM) added with 0.5 mM of copper sulfate (MM(Cu)). Strain AB2A showed an early mechanism of copper uptake/retention (80% until day 3), followed by a drastic metal efflux process (days 5-7). In contrast, Streptomyces sp. AB3 and AB5A showed only copper retention phenotypes under the same culture conditions. Particularly, Streptomyces sp. AB5A showed a better efficiency in copper removal (94%), although a longer lag phase was observed for this microorganism grown for 7 days in MM(Cu). Cupric reductase activity was detected in both copper-adapted cells and nonadapted cells of all three strains but this activity was up to 100-fold higher in preadapted cells of Streptomyces sp. AB2A. To our knowledge, this is the first time that cupric reductase activity was demonstrated in Streptomyces strains.

  1. Glutathion peroxidase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities in bovine blood and liver.

    PubMed

    Abd Ellah, Mahmoud Rushdi; Niishimori, Kazuhiro; Goryo, Masanobu; Okada, Keiji; Yasuda, Jun

    2004-10-01

    A total of 46 cattle, including 25 as control, 16 with glycogen degeneration and 5 with severe fatty degeneration were studied. Whole blood and liver tissue specimens were used to measure glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) activities. The present study determined the value of these parameters in diagnosing glycogen and fatty degeneration in cattle from the point of the status of antioxidation and lipid peroxidation. The results showed a significant decrease in hepatic GSH-Px activity and a significant increase in hepatic G6PD activity in cases of fatty degeneration. On the other hand, there were no significant changes in erythrocytic and hepatic GSH-Px and G6PD activities in cases of glycogen degeneration. The results indicated lipoperoxidation process in the liver tissues increased in cases of fatty degeneration. Therefore, supplying animals suffering from fatty liver with sufficient quantities of nutrient antioxidants may be valuable when treatment is considered.

  2. Triazine-benzimidazole hybrids: anticancer activity, DNA interaction and dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Singla, Prinka; Luxami, Vijay; Paul, Kamaldeep

    2015-04-15

    A new series of triazine-benzimidazole hybrids has been synthesized with different substitution of primary and secondary amines at one of the position of triazine in moderate to good yields. These compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory activities over 60 human tumor cell lines at one dose and five dose concentrations. Compounds 6b, 8 and 9 showed broad spectrum of antitumor activities with GI50 values of 9.79, 2.58 and 3.81μM, respectively. DNA binding studies also indicated strong interaction properties of these compounds. These synthesized compounds also showed inhibition of mammalian dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). Compound 6b was depicted as the most active member of DHFR inhibitor with IC50 value of 1.05μM. Molecular modelling studies were used to identify the stabilized interactions of Compound 6b within the active site of enzyme for DHFR.

  3. Enhanced nitrite reductase activity associated with the haptoglobin complexed hemoglobin dimer: functional and antioxidative implications.

    PubMed

    Roche, Camille J; Dantsker, David; Alayash, Abdu I; Friedman, Joel M

    2012-06-30

    The presence of acellular hemoglobin (Hb) within the circulation is generally viewed as a pathological state that can result in toxic consequences. Haptoglobin (Hp), a globular protein found in the plasma, binds with high avidity the αβ dimers derived from the dissociation of Hb tetramer and thus helps clear free Hb. More recently there have been compelling indications that the redox properties of the Hp bound dimer (Hb-Hp) may play a more active role in controlling toxicity by limiting the potential tissue damage caused by propagation of the free-radicals generated within the heme containing globin chains. The present study further examines the potential protective effect of Hp through its impact on the production of nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite through nitrite reductase activity of the Hp bound αβ Hb dimer. The presented results show that the Hb dimer in the Hb-Hp complex has oxygen binding, CO recombination and spectroscopic properties consistent with an Hb species having properties similar to but not exactly the same as the R quaternary state of the Hb tetramer. Consistent with these observations is the finding that the initial nitrite reductase rate for Hb-Hp is approximately ten times that of HbA under the same conditions. These results in conjunction with the earlier redox properties of the Hb-Hp are discussed in terms of limiting the pathophysiological consequences of acellular Hb in the circulation.

  4. Consequence of absence of nitrate reductase activity on photosynthesis in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia plants

    SciTech Connect

    Saux, C.; Lemoine, Y.; Marion-Poll, A.; Valadier, M.H.; Deng, M.; Morot-Gaudry, J.F.

    1987-05-01

    Chlorate-resistant Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (cv Viviani) mutants were found to be deficient in the nitrate reductase apoprotein (NR/sup -/ nia). Because they could not grow with nitrate as sole nitrogen source, they were cultivated as graftings on wild-type Nicotiana tabacum plants. The grafts of mutant plants were chlorotic compared to the grafts of wild type. Mutant leaves did not accumulate nitrogen but contained less malate and more glutamine than wild leaves. They exhibited a slight increase of the proportion of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complexes and a lowering of the efficiency of energy transfer between these complexes and the active centers. After a 3 second /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse, the total /sup 14/C incorporation of the mutant leaves was approximately 20/sup 5/ of that of the control. The /sup 14/C was essentially recovered in ribulose bisphosphate in these plants. It was consistent with a decline of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity observed in the mutant. After a 3 second /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse followed by a 60 second chase with normal CO/sub 2/, /sup 14/C was mainly accumulated in starch which was labeled more in the mutant than in the wild type. These results confirm the observation that in the nitrate reductase deficient leaves, chloroplasts were loaded with large starch inclusions preceding disorganization of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  5. Identification of a Noroxomaritidine Reductase with Amaryllidaceae Alkaloid Biosynthesis Related Activities.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, Matthew B; Holland, Cynthia K; Jez, Joseph M; Kutchan, Toni M

    2016-08-05

    Amaryllidaceae alkaloids are a large group of plant natural products with over 300 documented structures and diverse biological activities. Several groups of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids including the hemanthamine- and crinine-type alkaloids show promise as anticancer agents. Two reduction reactions are required for the production of these compounds: the reduction of norcraugsodine to norbelladine and the reduction of noroxomaritidine to normaritidine, with the enantiomer of noroxomaritidine dictating whether the derivatives will be the crinine-type or hemanthamine-type. It is also possible for the carbon-carbon double bond of noroxomaritidine to be reduced, forming the precursor for maritinamine or elwesine depending on the enantiomer reduced to an oxomaritinamine product. In this study, a short chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase that co-expresses with the previously discovered norbelladine 4'-O-methyltransferase from Narcissus sp. and Galanthus spp. was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli Biochemical analyses and x-ray crystallography indicates that this protein functions as a noroxomaritidine reductase that forms oxomaritinamine from noroxomaritidine through a carbon-carbon double bond reduction. The enzyme also reduces norcraugsodine to norbelladine with a 400-fold lower specific activity. These studies identify a missing step in the biosynthesis of this pharmacologically important class of plant natural products.

  6. Ferric and cupric reductase activities by iron-limited cells of the green alga Chlorella kessleri: quantification via oxygen electrode.

    PubMed

    Weger, Harold G; Walker, Crystal N; Fink, Michael B

    2007-10-01

    The colorimetric Fe2+ indicators bathophenanthroline disulfonic acid (BPDS) and 3-(2-pyridyl)-5,6-bis(4-phenylsulfonic acid)-1,2,4-triazine (FZ) are routinely used to assay for plasma membrane ferric reductase activity in iron-limited algal cells and also in roots from iron-limited plants. Ferric reductase assays using these colorimetric indicators must take into account the fact that Fe3+ chelators (e.g. ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) can also in general bind Fe2+ and may therefore compete with the colorimetric Fe2+ indicators, leading to the potential for underestimation of the ferric reduction rate. Conversely, the presence of BPDS or FZ may also facilitate the reduction of Fe3+ chelates, potentially leading to overestimation of ferric reduction rates. Last, both BPDS and FZ have non-negligible affinities for Fe3+ in addition to their well-known affinities for Fe2+; this leads to potential difficulties in ascertaining whether free and/or chelated Fe3+ are potential substrates for the ferric reductase. Similar issues arise when assaying for cupric reductase activity using the colorimetric Cu+ indicator bathocuproinedisulfonic acid (BCDS). In this paper, we describe an oxygen-electrode-based assay (conducted in darkness) for both ferric and cupric reductase activities that does not use colorimetric indicators. Using this assay system, we show that the plasma membrane metal reductase activity of iron-limited cells of the green alga Chlorella kessleri reduced complexed Fe3+ (i.e. Fe3+ chelates) but did not reduce free (non-chelated) Fe3+, and also reduced free Cu2+ to Cu+, but did not reduce Cu2+ that was part of Cu2+ chelates. We suggest that the potential for reduction of free Fe3+ cannot be adequately assayed using colorimetric assays. As well, the BPDS-based assay system consistently yielded similar estimates of ferric reductase activity compared with the O2-electrode-based assays at relatively low Fe3+ concentration, but higher estimates at higher Fe3

  7. Plasmodium spp. membrane glutathione S-transferases: detoxification units and drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Lisewski, Andreas M.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane glutathione S-transferases from the class of membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism (MAPEG) form a superfamily of detoxification enzymes that catalyze the conjugation of reduced glutathione (GSH) to a broad spectrum of xenobiotics and hydrophobic electrophiles. Evolutionarily unrelated to the cytosolic glutathione S-transferases, they are found across bacterial and eukaryotic domains, for example in mammals, plants, fungi and bacteria in which significant levels of glutathione are maintained. Species of genus Plasmodium, the unicellular protozoa that are commonly known as malaria parasites, do actively support glutathione homeostasis and maintain its metabolism throughout their complex parasitic life cycle. In humans and in other mammals, the asexual intraerythrocytic stage of malaria, when the parasite feeds on hemoglobin, grows and eventually asexually replicates inside infected red blood cells (RBCs), is directly associated with host disease symptoms and during this critical stage GSH protects the host RBC and the parasite against oxidative stress from parasite-induced hemoglobin catabolism. In line with these observations, several GSH-dependent Plasmodium enzymes have been characterized including glutathione reductases, thioredoxins, glyoxalases, glutaredoxins and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs); furthermore, GSH itself have been found to associate spontaneously and to degrade free heme and its hydroxide, hematin, which are the main cytotoxic byproducts of hemoglobin catabolism. However, despite the apparent importance of glutathione metabolism for the parasite, no membrane associated glutathione S-transferases of genus Plasmodium have been previously described. We recently reported the first examples of MAPEG members among Plasmodium spp. PMID:28357217

  8. Discovery of potent and novel S-nitrosoglutathione reductase inhibitors devoid of cytochrome P450 activities.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xicheng; Qiu, Jian; Strong, Sarah A; Green, Louis S; Wasley, Jan W F; Blonder, Joan P; Colagiovanni, Dorothy B; Mutka, Sarah C; Stout, Adam M; Richards, Jane P; Rosenthal, Gary J

    2011-10-01

    The pyrrole based N6022 was recently identified as a potent, selective, reversible, and efficacious S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) inhibitor and is currently undergoing clinical development for the treatment of acute asthma. GSNOR is a member of the alcohol dehydrogenase family (ADH) and regulates the levels of S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) through catabolism of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Reduced levels of GSNO, as well as other nitrosothiols (SNOs), have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including those of the respiratory, cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal systems. Preservation of endogenous SNOs through GSNOR inhibition presents a novel therapeutic approach with broad applicability. We describe here the synthesis and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of novel pyrrole based analogues of N6022 focusing on removal of cytochrome P450 inhibition activities. We identified potent and novel GSNOR inhibitors having reduced CYP inhibition activities and demonstrated efficacy in a mouse ovalbumin (OVA) model of asthma.

  9. Effects of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb, Zn) on fish glutathione metabolism.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, A; Dogan, Z; Kanak, E G; Atli, G; Canli, M

    2015-03-01

    The glutathione metabolism contains crucial antioxidant molecules to defend the organisms against oxidants. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the response of the glutathione metabolism in the liver of freshwater fish Oreochromis niloticus exposed to metals (Cu, Cd, Cr, Pb, Zn) in different periods. Fish were exposed to metals (as 1 μg/mL) individually for 1, 7, and 14 days and subsequently antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, GPX; glutathione reductase, GR and glutathione S-transferase, GST) and glutathione levels (total glutathione, tGSH; reduced glutathione, rGSH; oxidized glutathione, GSSG and GSH/GSSG ratios) in the liver were measured. There was no fish mortality during the experiments, except Cu exposure. The antioxidant enzymes responded differently to metal exposures depending on metal types and exposure durations. GPX activity increased only after Cd exposure, while GST activity increased following 7 days of all metal exposures. However, GR activity did not alter in most cases. Total GSH and GSH/GSSG levels generally decreased, especially after 7 days. Data showed that metal exposures significantly altered the response of antioxidant system parameters, particularly at day 7 and some recovery occurred after 14 days. This study suggests that the response of antioxidant system could help to predict metal toxicity in the aquatic environments and be useful as an "early warning tool" in natural monitoring studies.

  10. Secreted CLIC3 drives cancer progression through its glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase activity

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Fernaud, Juan R.; Ruengeler, Elena; Casazza, Andrea; Neilson, Lisa J.; Pulleine, Ellie; Santi, Alice; Ismail, Shehab; Lilla, Sergio; Dhayade, Sandeep; MacPherson, Iain R.; McNeish, Iain; Ennis, Darren; Ali, Hala; Kugeratski, Fernanda G.; Al Khamici, Heba; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; van den Berghe, Peter V.E.; Cloix, Catherine; McDonald, Laura; Millan, David; Hoyle, Aoisha; Kuchnio, Anna; Carmeliet, Peter; Valenzuela, Stella M.; Blyth, Karen; Yin, Huabing; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Norman, Jim C.; Zanivan, Sara

    2017-01-01

    The secretome of cancer and stromal cells generates a microenvironment that contributes to tumour cell invasion and angiogenesis. Here we compare the secretome of human mammary normal and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). We discover that the chloride intracellular channel protein 3 (CLIC3) is an abundant component of the CAF secretome. Secreted CLIC3 promotes invasive behaviour of endothelial cells to drive angiogenesis and increases invasiveness of cancer cells both in vivo and in 3D cell culture models, and this requires active transglutaminase-2 (TGM2). CLIC3 acts as a glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase that reduces TGM2 and regulates TGM2 binding to its cofactors. Finally, CLIC3 is also secreted by cancer cells, is abundant in the stromal and tumour compartments of aggressive ovarian cancers and its levels correlate with poor clinical outcome. This work reveals a previously undescribed invasive mechanism whereby the secretion of a glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase drives angiogenesis and cancer progression by promoting TGM2-dependent invasion. PMID:28198360

  11. Antimicrobial activity and physical characterization of silver nanoparticles green synthesized using nitrate reductase from Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Gholami-Shabani, Mohammadhassan; Akbarzadeh, Azim; Norouzian, Dariush; Amini, Abdolhossein; Gholami-Shabani, Zeynab; Imani, Afshin; Chiani, Mohsen; Riazi, Gholamhossein; Shams-Ghahfarokhi, Masoomeh; Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi

    2014-04-01

    Nanostructures from natural sources have received major attention due to wide array of biological activities and less toxicity for humans, animals, and the environment. In the present study, silver nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using a fungal nitrate reductase, and their biological activity was assessed against human pathogenic fungi and bacteria. The enzyme was isolated from Fusarium oxysporum IRAN 31C after culturing on malt extract-glucose-yeast extract-peptone (MGYP) medium. The enzyme was purified by a combination of ultrafiltration and ion exchange chromatography on DEAE Sephadex and its molecular weight was estimated by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300. The purified enzyme had a maximum yield of 50.84 % with a final purification of 70 folds. With a molecular weight of 214 KDa, it is composed of three subunits of 125, 60, and 25 KDa. The purified enzyme was successfully used for synthesis of silver nanoparticles in a way dependent upon NADPH using gelatin as a capping agent. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering spectroscopy, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. These stable nonaggregating nanoparticles were spherical in shape with an average size of 50 nm and a zeta potential of -34.3. Evaluation of the antimicrobial effects of synthesized nanoparticles by disk diffusion method showed strong growth inhibitory activity against all tested human pathogenic fungi and bacteria as evident from inhibition zones that ranged from 14 to 25 mm. Successful green synthesis of biologically active silver nanoparticles by a nitrate reductase from F. oxysporum in the present work not only reduces laborious downstream steps such as purification of nanoparticle from interfering cellular components, but also provides a constant source of safe biologically-active nanomaterials with potential application in agriculture and medicine.

  12. Evaluation of Giardia lamblia thioredoxin reductase as drug activating enzyme and as drug target.

    PubMed

    Leitsch, David; Müller, Joachim; Müller, Norbert

    2016-12-01

    The antioxidative enzyme thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) has been suggested to be a drug target in several pathogens, including the protist parasite Giardia lamblia. TrxR is also believed to catalyse the reduction of nitro drugs, e.g. metronidazole and furazolidone, a reaction required to render these compounds toxic to G. lamblia and other microaerophiles/anaerobes. It was the objective of this study to assess the potential of TrxR as a drug target in G. lamblia and to find direct evidence for the role of this enzyme in the activation of metronidazole and other nitro drugs. TrxR was overexpressed approximately 10-fold in G. lamblia WB C6 cells by placing the trxR gene behind the arginine deiminase (ADI) promoter on a plasmid. Likewise, a mutant TrxR with a defective disulphide reductase catalytic site was strongly expressed in another G. lamblia WB C6 cell line. Susceptibilities to five antigiardial drugs, i.e. metronidazole, furazolidone, nitazoxanide, albendazole and auranofin were determined in both transfectant cell lines and compared to wildtype. Further, the impact of all five drugs on TrxR activity in vivo was measured. Overexpression of TrxR rendered G. lamblia WB C6 more susceptible to metronidazole and furazolidone but not to nitazoxanide, albendazole, and auranofin. Of all five drugs tested, only auranofin had an appreciably negative effect on TrxR activity in vivo, albeit to a much smaller extent than expected. Overexpression of TrxR and mutant TrxR had hardly any impact on growth of G. lamblia WB C6, although the enzyme also exerts a strong NADPH oxidase activity which is a source of oxidative stress. Our results constitute first direct evidence for the notion that TrxR is an activator of metronidazole and furazolidone but rather question that it is a relevant drug target of presently used antigiardial drugs.

  13. Alteration in glutathione content and associated enzyme activities in the synaptic terminals but not in the non-synaptic mitochondria from the frontal cortex of Parkinson's disease brains.

    PubMed

    Harish, G; Mahadevan, Anita; Srinivas Bharath, M M; Shankar, S K

    2013-01-01

    Altered redox dynamics contribute to physiological aging and Parkinson's disease (PD). This is reflected in the substantia nigra (SN) of PD patients as lowered antioxidant levels and elevated oxidative damage. Contrary to this observation, we previously reported that non-SN regions such as caudate nucleus and frontal cortex (FC) exhibited elevated antioxidants and lowered mitochondrial and oxidative damage indicating constitutive protective mechanisms in PD brains. To investigate whether the sub-cellular distribution of antioxidants could contribute to these protective effects, we examined the distribution of antioxidant/oxidant markers in the neuropil fractions [synaptosomes, non-synaptic mitochondria and cytosol] of FC from PD (n = 9) and controls (n = 8). In the control FC, all the antioxidant activities [Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), GSH peroxidase (GPx), GSH-S-transferase (GST)] except glutathione reductase (GR) were the highest in cytosol, but several fold lower in mitochondria and much lower in synaptosomes. However, FC synaptosomes from PD brains had significantly higher levels of GSH (p = 0.01) and related enzymes [GPx (p = 0.02), GR (p = 0.06), GST (p = 0.0001)] compared to controls. Conversely, mitochondria from the FC of PD cases displayed elevated SOD activity (p = 0.02) while the GSH and related enzymes were relatively unaltered. These changes in the neuropil fractions were associated with unchanged or lowered oxidative damage. Further, the mitochondrial content in the synaptosomes of both PD and control brains was ≥five-fold lower compared to the non-synaptic mitochondrial fraction. Altered distribution of oxidant/antioxidant markers in the neuropil fractions of the human brain during aging and PD has implications for (1) degenerative and protective mechanisms (2) distinct antioxidant mechanisms in synaptic terminals compared to other compartments.

  14. A comparative study of glutathione and ascorbate metabolism during germination of Pinus pinea L. seeds.

    PubMed

    Tommasi, F; Paciolla, C; de Pinto, M C; De Gara, L

    2001-08-01

    The ascorbate and glutathione systems have been studied during the first stages of germination in orthodox seeds of the gymnosperm Pinus pinea L. (pine). The results indicate that remarkable changes in the content and redox balance of these metabolites occur in both the embryo and endosperm; even if with different patterns for the two redox pairs. Dry seeds are devoid of the ascorbate reduced form (ASC) and contain only dehydroascorbic acid (DHA). By contrast, glutathione is present both in the reduced (GSH) and in the oxidized (GSSG) forms. During imbibition the increase in ASC seems to be mainly caused by the reactivation of its biosynthesis. On the other hand, the GSH rise occurring during the first 24 h seems to be largely due to GSSG reduction, even if GSH biosynthesis is still active in the seeds. The enzymes of the ascorbate--glutathione cycle also change during germination, but in different ways. ASC peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.11) and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) activities progressively rise both in the embryo and in endosperm. These changes are probably required for counteracting production of reactive oxygen species caused by recovery of oxidative metabolism. The two enzymes involved in the ascorbate recycling, ascorbate free radical (AFR) reductase (EC 1.6.5.4) and DHA reductase (EC 1.8.5.1), show different behaviour: the DHA reductase activity decreases, while that of AFR reductase remains unchanged. The relationship between ascorbate and glutathione metabolism and their relevance in the germination of orthodox seeds are also discussed.

  15. Esculetin, a Coumarin Derivative, Inhibits Aldose Reductase Activity in vitro and Cataractogenesis in Galactose-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chan-Sik; Kim, Junghyun; Lee, Yun Mi; Sohn, Eunjin; Kim, Jin Sook

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring coumarin compounds have received substantial attention due to their pharmaceutical effects. Esculetin is a coumarin derivative and a polyphenol compound that is used in a variety of therapeutic and pharmacological strategies. However, its effect on aldose reductase activity remains poorly understood. In this study, the potential beneficial effects of esculetin on lenticular aldose reductase were investigated in galactose-fed (GAL) rats, an animal model of sugar cataracts. Cataracts were induced in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats via a 50% galactose diet for 2 weeks, and groups of GAL rats were orally treated with esculetin (10 or 50 mg/kg body weight). In vehicle-treated GAL rats, lens opacification was observed, and swelling and membrane rupture of the lens fiber cells were increased. Additionally, aldose reductase was highly expressed in the lens epithelium and superficial cortical fibers during cataract development in the GAL rats. Esculetin reduced rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) activity in vitro, and esculetin treatment significantly inhibited lens opacity, as well as morphological alterations, such as swelling, vacuolation and liquefaction of lens fibers, via the inhibition of aldose reductase in the GAL rats. These results indicate that esculetin is a useful treatment for galactose-induced cataracts. PMID:26902086

  16. NADP(+)-dependent dehydrogenase activity of carbonyl reductase on glutathionylhydroxynonanal as a new pathway for hydroxynonenal detoxification.

    PubMed

    Moschini, Roberta; Peroni, Eleonora; Rotondo, Rossella; Renzone, Giovanni; Melck, Dominique; Cappiello, Mario; Srebot, Massimo; Napolitano, Elio; Motta, Andrea; Scaloni, Andrea; Mura, Umberto; Del-Corso, Antonella

    2015-06-01

    An NADP(+)-dependent dehydrogenase activity on 3-glutathionyl-4-hydroxynonanal (GSHNE) was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from a line of human astrocytoma cells (ADF). Proteomic analysis identified this enzymatic activity as associated with carbonyl reductase 1 (EC 1.1.1.184). The enzyme is highly efficient at catalyzing the oxidation of GSHNE (KM 33 µM, kcat 405 min(-1)), as it is practically inactive toward trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and other HNE-adducted thiol-containing amino acid derivatives. Combined mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis of the reaction products revealed that carbonyl reductase oxidizes the hydroxyl group of GSHNE in its hemiacetal form, with the formation of the corresponding 3-glutathionylnonanoic-δ-lactone. The relevance of this new reaction catalyzed by carbonyl reductase 1 is discussed in terms of HNE detoxification and the recovery of reducing power.

  17. Glutathione depletion activates the yeast vacuolar transient receptor potential channel, Yvc1p, by reversible glutathionylation of specific cysteines

    PubMed Central

    Chandel, Avinash; Das, Krishna K.; Bachhawat, Anand K.

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione depletion and calcium influx into the cytoplasm are two hallmarks of apoptosis. We have been investigating how glutathione depletion leads to apoptosis in yeast. We show here that glutathione depletion in yeast leads to the activation of two cytoplasmically inward-facing channels: the plasma membrane, Cch1p, and the vacuolar calcium channel, Yvc1p. Deletion of these channels partially rescues cells from glutathione depletion–induced cell death. Subsequent investigations on the Yvc1p channel, a homologue of the mammalian TRP channels, revealed that the channel is activated by glutathionylation. Yvc1p has nine cysteine residues, of which eight are located in the cytoplasmic regions and one on the transmembrane domain. We show that three of these cysteines, Cys-17, Cys-79, and Cys-191, are specifically glutathionylated. Mutation of these cysteines to alanine leads to a loss in glutathionylation and a concomitant loss in calcium channel activity. We further investigated the mechanism of glutathionylation and demonstrate a role for the yeast glutathione S-transferase Gtt1p in glutathionylation. Yvc1p is also deglutathionylated, and this was found to be mediated by the yeast thioredoxin, Trx2p. A model for redox activation and deactivation of the yeast Yvc1p channel is presented. PMID:27708136

  18. Hexavalent Chromate Reductase Activity in Cell Free Extracts of Penicillium sp.

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo-Rangel, Damaris L.; Cárdenas-González, Juan F.; Martínez-Juárez, Víctor M.; Acosta-Rodríguez, Ismael

    2013-01-01

    A chromium-resistant fungus isolated from contaminated air with industrial vapors can be used for reducing toxic Cr(VI) to Cr(III). This study analyzes in vitro reduction of hexavalent chromium using cell free extract(s) of the fungus that was characterized based on optimal temperature, pH, use of electron donors, metal ions and initial Cr(VI) concentration in the reaction mixture. This showed the highest activity at 37°C and pH 7.0; there is an increase in Cr(VI) reductase activity with addition of NADH as an electron donor, and it was highly inhibited by Hg2+, Ca2+ and Mg2+, and azide, EDTA, and KCN. PMID:24027493

  19. Structural Mechanism of Allosteric Activity Regulation in a Ribonucleotide Reductase with Double ATP Cones.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Renzo; Jonna, Venkateswara Rao; Kumar, Rohit; Nayeri, Niloofar; Lundin, Daniel; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Hofer, Anders; Logan, Derek T

    2016-06-07

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) reduce ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. Their overall activity is stimulated by ATP and downregulated by dATP via a genetically mobile ATP cone domain mediating the formation of oligomeric complexes with varying quaternary structures. The crystal structure and solution X-ray scattering data of a novel dATP-induced homotetramer of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa class I RNR reveal the structural bases for its unique properties, namely one ATP cone that binds two dATP molecules and a second one that is non-functional, binding no nucleotides. Mutations in the observed tetramer interface ablate oligomerization and dATP-induced inhibition but not the ability to bind dATP. Sequence analysis shows that the novel type of ATP cone may be widespread in RNRs. The present study supports a scenario in which diverse mechanisms for allosteric activity regulation are gained and lost through acquisition and evolutionary erosion of different types of ATP cone.

  20. The poplar Phi class glutathione transferase: expression, activity and structure of GSTF1

    PubMed Central

    Pégeot, Henri; Koh, Cha San; Petre, Benjamin; Mathiot, Sandrine; Duplessis, Sébastien; Hecker, Arnaud; Didierjean, Claude; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) constitute a superfamily of enzymes with essential roles in cellular detoxification and secondary metabolism in plants as in other organisms. Several plant GSTs, including those of the Phi class (GSTFs), require a conserved catalytic serine residue to perform glutathione (GSH)-conjugation reactions. Genomic analyses revealed that terrestrial plants have around ten GSTFs, eight in the Populus trichocarpa genome, but their physiological functions and substrates are mostly unknown. Transcript expression analyses showed a predominant expression of all genes both in reproductive (female flowers, fruits, floral buds) and vegetative organs (leaves, petioles). Here, we show that the recombinant poplar GSTF1 (PttGSTF1) possesses peroxidase activity toward cumene hydroperoxide and GSH-conjugation activity toward model substrates such as 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene, benzyl and phenetyl isothiocyanate, 4-nitrophenyl butyrate and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal but interestingly not on previously identified GSTF-class substrates. In accordance with analytical gel filtration data, crystal structure of PttGSTF1 showed a canonical dimeric organization with bound GSH or 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid molecules. The structure of these protein-substrate complexes allowed delineating the residues contributing to both the G and H sites that form the active site cavity. In sum, the presence of GSTF1 transcripts and proteins in most poplar organs especially those rich in secondary metabolites such as flowers and fruits, together with its GSH-conjugation activity and its documented stress-responsive expression suggest that its function is associated with the catalytic transformation of metabolites and/or peroxide removal rather than with ligandin properties as previously reported for other GSTFs. PMID:25566286

  1. Role of the Ascorbate-Glutathione Cycle of Mitochondria and Peroxisomes in the Senescence of Pea Leaves1

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Ana; Hernández, José A.; Pastori, Gabriela; del Río, Luis A.; Sevilla, Francisca

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between H2O2 metabolism and the senescence process using soluble fractions, mitochondria, and peroxisomes from senescent pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaves. After 11 d of senescence the activities of Mn-superoxide dismutase, dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), and glutathione reductase (GR) present in the matrix, and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) activities localized in the mitochondrial membrane, were all substantially decreased in mitochondria. The mitochondrial ascorbate and dehydroascorbate pools were reduced, whereas the oxidized glutathione levels were maintained. In senescent leaves the H2O2 content in isolated mitochondria and the NADH- and succinate-dependent production of superoxide (O2·−) radicals by submitochondrial particles increased significantly. However, in peroxisomes from senescent leaves both membrane-bound APX and MDHAR activities were reduced. In the matrix the DHAR activity was enhanced and the GR activity remained unchanged. As a result of senescence, the reduced and the oxidized glutathione pools were considerably increased in peroxisomes. A large increase in the glutathione pool and DHAR activity were also found in soluble fractions of senescent pea leaves, together with a decrease in GR, APX, and MDHAR activities. The differential response to senescence of the mitochondrial and peroxisomal ascorbate-glutathione cycle suggests that mitochondria could be affected by oxidative damage earlier than peroxisomes, which may participate in the cellular oxidative mechanism of leaf senescence longer than mitochondria. PMID:9847106

  2. Five decades with glutathione and the GSTome.

    PubMed

    Mannervik, Bengt

    2012-02-24

    Uncle Folke inspired me to become a biochemist by demonstrating electrophoresis experiments on butterfly hemolymph in his kitchen. Glutathione became the subject for my undergraduate project in 1964 and has remained a focal point in my research owing to its multifarious roles in the cell. Since the 1960s, the multiple forms of glutathione transferase (GST), the GSTome, were isolated and characterized, some of which were discovered in our laboratory. Products of oxidative processes were found to be natural GST substrates. Examples of toxic compounds against which particular GSTs provide protection include 4-hydroxynonenal and ortho-quinones, with possible links to the etiology of Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and other degenerative conditions. The role of thioltransferase and glutathione reductase in the cellular reduction of disulfides and other oxidized forms of thiols was clarified. Glyoxalase I catalyzes still another glutathione-dependent detoxication reaction. The unusual steady-state kinetics of this zinc-containing enzyme initiated model discrimination by regression analysis. Functional properties of the enzymes have been altered by stochastic mutations based on DNA shuffling and rationally tailored by structure-based redesign. We found it useful to represent promiscuous enzymes by vectors or points in multidimensional substrate-activity space and visualize them by multivariate analysis. Adopting the concept "molecular quasi-species," we describe clusters of functionally related enzyme variants that may emerge in natural as well as directed evolution.

  3. Five Decades with Glutathione and the GSTome

    PubMed Central

    Mannervik, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    Uncle Folke inspired me to become a biochemist by demonstrating electrophoresis experiments on butterfly hemolymph in his kitchen. Glutathione became the subject for my undergraduate project in 1964 and has remained a focal point in my research owing to its multifarious roles in the cell. Since the 1960s, the multiple forms of glutathione transferase (GST), the GSTome, were isolated and characterized, some of which were discovered in our laboratory. Products of oxidative processes were found to be natural GST substrates. Examples of toxic compounds against which particular GSTs provide protection include 4-hydroxynonenal and ortho-quinones, with possible links to the etiology of Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and other degenerative conditions. The role of thioltransferase and glutathione reductase in the cellular reduction of disulfides and other oxidized forms of thiols was clarified. Glyoxalase I catalyzes still another glutathione-dependent detoxication reaction. The unusual steady-state kinetics of this zinc-containing enzyme initiated model discrimination by regression analysis. Functional properties of the enzymes have been altered by stochastic mutations based on DNA shuffling and rationally tailored by structure-based redesign. We found it useful to represent promiscuous enzymes by vectors or points in multidimensional substrate-activity space and visualize them by multivariate analysis. Adopting the concept “molecular quasi-species,” we describe clusters of functionally related enzyme variants that may emerge in natural as well as directed evolution. PMID:22247548

  4. Structure-activity relationship for enantiomers of potent inhibitors of B. anthracis dihydrofolate reductase

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Christina R.; Wakeham, Nancy; Nammalwar, Baskar; Tseitin, Vladimir; Bourne, Philip C.; Barrow, Esther W.; Mylvaganam, Shankari; Ramnarayan, Kal; Bunce, Richard A.; Berlin, K. Darrell; Barrow, William W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial resistance to antibiotic therapies is increasing and new treatment options are badly needed. There is an overlap between these resistant bacteria and organisms classified as likely bioterror weapons. For example, Bacillus anthracis is innately resistant to the anti-folate trimethoprim due to sequence changes found in the dihydrofolate reductase enzyme. Development of new inhibitors provides an opportunity to enhance the current arsenal of anti-folate antibiotics while also expanding the coverage of the anti-folate class. Methods We have characterized inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis dihydrofolate reductase by measuring the Ki and MIC values and calculating the energetics of binding. This series contains a core diaminopyrimidine ring, a central dimethoxybenzyl ring, and a dihydrophthalazine moiety. We have altered the chemical groups extended from a chiral center on the dihydropyridazine ring of the phthalazine moiety. The interactions for the most potent compounds were visualized by X-ray structure determination. Results We find that the potency of individual enantiomers is divergent with clear preference for the S-enantiomer, while maintaining a high conservation of contacts within the binding site. The preference for enantiomers seems to be predicated largely by differential interactions with protein residues Leu29, Gln30 and Arg53. Conclusions These studies have clarified the activity of modifications and of individual enantiomers, and highlighted the role of the less-active R-enantiomer in effectively diluting the more active S-enantiomer in racemic solutions. This directly contributes to the development of new antimicrobials, combating trimethoprim resistance, and treatment options for potential bioterrorism agents. PMID:22999981

  5. Decreased glutathione levels and impaired antioxidant enzyme activities in drug-naive first-episode schizophrenic patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine glutathione levels and antioxidant enzyme activities in the drug-naive first-episode patients with schizophrenia in comparison with healthy control subjects. Methods It was a case-controlled study carried on twenty-three patients (20 men and 3 women, mean age = 29.3 ± 7.5 years) recruited in their first-episode of schizophrenia and 40 healthy control subjects (36 men and 9 women, mean age = 29.6 ± 6.2 years). In patients, the blood samples were obtained prior to the initiation of neuroleptic treatments. Glutathione levels: total glutathione (GSHt), reduced glutathione (GSHr) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and antioxidant enzyme activities: superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) were determined by spectrophotometry. Results GSHt and reduced GSHr were significantly lower in patients than in controls, whereas GSSG was significantly higher in patients. GPx activity was significantly higher in patients compared to control subjects. CAT activity was significantly lower in patients, whereas the SOD activity was comparable to that of controls. Conclusion This is a report of decreased plasma levels of GSHt and GSHr, and impaired antioxidant enzyme activities in drug-naive first-episode patients with schizophrenia. The GSH deficit seems to be implicated in psychosis, and may be an important indirect biomarker of oxidative stress in schizophrenia early in the course of illness. Finally, our results provide support for further studies of the possible role of antioxidants as neuroprotective therapeutic strategies for schizophrenia from early stages. PMID:21810251

  6. Methionine sulfoxide reductase regulates brain catechol-O-methyl transferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Moskovitz, Jackob; Walss-Bass, Consuelo; Cruz, Dianne A; Thompson, Peter M.; Bortolato, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) plays a key role in the degradation of brain dopamine (DA). Specifically, low COMT activity results in higher DA levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), thereby reducing the vulnerability for attentional and cognitive deficits in both psychotic and healthy individuals. COMT activity is markedly reduced by a non-synonymous SNP that generates a valine-to-methionine substitution on the residue 108/158, by means of as-yet incompletely understood posttranslational mechanisms. One posttranslational modification is methionine sulfoxide, which can be reduced by the methionine sulfoxide reductase (Msr) A and B enzymes. We used recombinant COMT proteins (Val/Met108) and mice (wild-type (WT) and MsrA knockout) to determine the effect of methionine oxidation on COMT activity and COMT interaction with Msr, through a combination of enzymatic activity and Western blot assays. Recombinant COMT activity is positively regulated by MsrA, especially under oxidative conditions, while brains of MsrA knockout mice exhibited lower COMT activity (as compared with their WT counterparts). These results suggest that COMT activity may be reduced by methionine oxidation, and point to Msr as a key molecular determinant for the modulation of COMT activity in the brain. The role of Msr in modulating cognitive functions in healthy individuals and schizophrenia patients is yet to be determined. PMID:24735585

  7. Electroconvulsive shock in rats: changes in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Eraković, V; Zupan, G; Varljen, J; Radosević, S; Simonić, A

    2000-03-29

    Seizures trigger a variety of biochemical processes including an influx of extracellular Ca(2+), activation of membrane phospholipases, liberation of free fatty acids, diacylglycerols, eicosanoids, lipid peroxides and free radicals. These lipid metabolites along with abnormal ion homeostasis may be involved in cell injury and cell death. The aim of this study was to determine brain antioxidant enzyme activities in rats with electroconvulsive shock (ECS)-induced seizures. ECS, single or repeated, induced a decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities in various brain regions. The most prominent changes of enzymatic activities were observed in rats that received five ECSs with 24-h recovery period between them. Decreased SOD activity was observed in the frontal cortex of all treated animals except those sacrificed 24 h after single ECS, in the cerebellum of the animals that received repeated ECSs, in the hippocampus of animals that were decapitated 2 h after a single ECS and in the pons-medulla region of rats that received five daily ECSs. Decreased GPX activity was found in all examined brain regions of the rats that received five ECSs, the cortex and hippocampus of rats that were decapitated 2 h after single ECS and the cortex of those that received 10 ECSs with 48 h between them. The results show that neither 24-h nor 48-h recovery period was sufficient for the normalisation of antioxidative enzyme activities after repeated ECS treatment.

  8. Structure-activity relationship of pyrrole based S-nitrosoglutathione reductase inhibitors: carboxamide modification.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xicheng; Qiu, Jian; Strong, Sarah A; Green, Louis S; Wasley, Jan W F; Blonder, Joan P; Colagiovanni, Dorothy B; Stout, Adam M; Mutka, Sarah C; Richards, Jane P; Rosenthal, Gary J

    2012-03-15

    The enzyme S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) is a member of the alcohol dehydrogenase family (ADH) that regulates the levels of S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) through catabolism of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). GSNO and SNOs are implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including those in respiratory, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular systems. The pyrrole based N6022 was recently identified as a potent, selective, reversible, and efficacious GSNOR inhibitor which is currently in clinical development for acute asthma. We describe here the synthesis and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of novel pyrrole based analogs of N6022 focusing on carboxamide modifications on the pendant N-phenyl moiety. We have identified potent and novel GSNOR inhibitors that demonstrate efficacy in an ovalbumin (OVA) induced asthma model in mice.

  9. Utilization of iron-catecholamine complexes involving ferric reductase activity in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Coulanges, V; Andre, P; Ziegler, O; Buchheit, L; Vidon, D J

    1997-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous potentially pathogenic organism requiring iron for growth and virulence. Although it does not produce siderophores, L. monocytogenes is able to obtain iron by using either exogenous siderophores produced by various microorganisms or natural catechol compounds widespread in the environment. In the presence of tropolone, an iron-chelating agent, growth of L. monocytogenes is completely inhibited. However, the growth inhibition can be relieved by the addition of dopamine or norepinephrine under their different isomeric forms, while the catecholamine derivatives 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol and normetanephrine did not relieve the inhibitory effect of tropolone. Preincubation of L. monocytogenes with chlorpromazine and yohimbine did not antagonize the growth-promoting effect of catecholamines in iron-complexed medium. In addition, norepinephrine stimulated the growth-promoting effect induced by human transferrin in iron-limited medium. Furthermore, dopamine and norepinephrine allowed 55Fe uptake by iron-deprived bacterial cells. The uptake of iron was energy dependent, as indicated by inhibition of 55Fe uptake at 0 degrees C as well as by preincubating the bacteria with KCN. Inhibition of 55Fe uptake by L. monocytogenes was also observed in the presence of Pt(II). Moreover, when assessed by a whole-cell ferric reductase assay, reductase activity of L. monocytogenes was inhibited by Pt(II). These data demonstrate that dopamine and norepinephrine can function as siderophore-like compounds in L. monocytogenes owing to their ortho-diphenol function and that catecholamine-mediated iron acquisition does not involve specific catecholamine receptors but acts through a cell-bound ferrireductase activity. PMID:9199450

  10. Responses of carp hepatopancreatic 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase and glutathione-dependent enzymes to organic pollutants -- a field study

    SciTech Connect

    Machala, M.; Nezveda, K.; Ulrich, R.; Petrivalsky, M.; Dusek, L.; Placka, V.; Svobodova, Z.

    1997-07-01

    Modulations of hepatopancreatic activities of cytochrome P450IA (CYPIA) and glutathione-dependent enzymes were investigated in carp collected in five ponds with different levels of contamination. The CYPIA-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity was markedly induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in the sediment at a total concentration of 0.9 mg/kg. Even a low organic contamination increased some of the glutathione-dependent enzymatic activities, namely cytosolic glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, ethacrynic acid and 1,2-epoxy-3-(p-nitrophenoxy)propane, and microsomal glutathione S-transferase. These parameters should be considered as potential tools for the biomonitoring of exposure to chemicals and/or impacts of exposure. An example of a multivariate cluster and discriminant analysis of the obtained analytical and biochemical data proved to be very effective tools for the characterization of the level of contamination.

  11. Amodiaquine failure associated with erythrocytic glutathione in Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Zuluaga, Lina; Pabón, Adriana; López, Carlos; Ochoa, Aleida; Blair, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Objective To establish the relationship between production of glutathione and the therapeutic response to amodiaquine (AQ) monotherapy in Plasmodium falciparum non-complicated malaria patients. Methodology Therapeutic response to AQ was evaluated in 32 patients with falciparum malaria in two townships of Antioquia, Colombia, and followed-up for 28 days. For every patient, total glutathione and enzymatic activity (glutathione reductase, GR, and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, γ-GCS) were determined in parasitized erythrocytes, non-infected erythrocytes and free parasites, on the starting day (day zero, before ingestion of AQ) and on the day of failure (in case of occurrence). Results There was found an AQ failure of 31.25%. Independent of the therapeutic response, on the starting day and on the day of failure, lower total glutathione concentration and higher GR activities in parasitized erythrocytes were found, compared with non-infected erythrocytes (p < 0.003). In addition, only on the day of failure, γ-GCS activity of parasitized erythrocytes was higher, compared with that of healthy erythrocytes (p = 0.01). Parasitized and non-parasitized erythrocytes in therapeutic failure patients (TF) had higher total glutathione on the starting day compared with those of adequate clinical response (ACR) (p < 0.02). Parasitized erythrocytes of TF patients showed lower total glutathione on the failure day, compared with starting day (p = 0.017). No differences was seen in the GR and γ-GCS activities by compartment, neither between the two therapeutic response groups nor between the two treatment days. Conclusion This study is a first approach to explaining P. falciparum therapeutic failure in humans through differences in glutathione metabolism in TF and ACR patients. These results suggest a role for glutathione in the therapeutic failure to antimalarials. PMID:17451604

  12. Phytochemical Analysis of Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb, Its Antioxidant Activity and Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Potential

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Set Byeol; Hwang, Seung Hwan; Suh, Hong-Won; Lim, Soon Sung

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine aldose reductase (AR) inhibitory activity and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity of compounds from Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb (AP). We isolated agrimoniin (AM), four flavonoid glucosides and two flavonoid glucuronides from the n-butanol fraction of AP 50% methanol extract. In addition to isolated compounds, the AR-inhibitory activity and the DPPH free radical scavenging activity of catechin, 5-flavonoids, and 4-flavonoid glucosides (known components of AP) against rat lens AR (RLAR) and DPPH assay were measured. AM showed IC50 values of 1.6 and 13.0 μM against RLAR and DPPH scavenging activity, respectively. Additionally, AM, luteolin-7-O-glucuronide (LGN), quercitrin (QU), luteolin (LT) and afzelin (AZ) showed high inhibitory activity against AR and were first observed to decrease sorbitol accumulation in the rat lens under high-sorbitol conditions ex vivo with inhibitory values of 47.6%, 91.8%, 76.9%, 91.8% and 93.2%, respectively. Inhibition of recombinant human AR by AM, LGN and AZ exhibited a noncompetitive inhibition pattern. Based on our results, AP and its constituents may play partial roles in RLAR and oxidative radical inhibition. Our results suggest that AM, LGN, QU, LT and AZ may potentially be used as natural drugs for treating diabetic complications. PMID:28208627

  13. Activities of nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase in rice seedlings during cyanide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Zhang; Zhang, Fu-Zhong

    2012-07-30

    A study was conducted to investigate activities of nitrate reductase (NR) and glutamine synthetase (GS) in plants during cyanide metabolism. Young rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L. cv. XZX 45) were grown in the nutrient solutions containing KNO(3) or NH(4)Cl and treated with free cyanide (KCN). Cyanide in solutions and in plant materials was analyzed to estimate the phyto-assimilation potential. Activities of NR and GS in different parts of rice seedlings were assayed in vivo. Seedlings grown on NH(4)(+) showed significantly higher relative growth rate than those on NO(3)(-) (p<0.05) in the presence of exogenous cyanide. The metabolic rates of cyanide by seedlings were all positively correlated to the concentrations supplied. A negligible difference was observed between the two treatments with nitrate and ammonium (p>0.05). Enzymatic assays showed that cyanide (≥0.97mg CN L(-1)) impaired NR activity significantly in both roots and shoots (p<0.05). The effect of cyanide on GS activity in roots was more evident at 1.93mg CN L(-1), suggesting that NR activity was more susceptible to change from cyanide application than GS activity. The results observed here suggest that the exogenous cyanide, which to a certain level has a beneficial role in plant nutrition.

  14. Structure-activity relationships for chemical and glutathione S-transferase-catalysed glutathione conjugation reactions of a series of 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Aar, E M; Bouwman, T; Commandeur, J N; Vermeulen, N P

    1996-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute an important class of phase II (de)toxifying enzymes, catalysing the conjugation of glutathione (GSH) with electrophilic compounds. In the present study, Km, kcat and kcat/Km values for the rat GST 1-1-, 3-3-, 4-4- and 7-7-catalysed conjugation reactions between GSH and a series of 10 different 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes, and the second-order rate constants (ks) of the corresponding base-catalysed reactions, were correlated with nine classical physicochemical parameters (electronic, steric and lipophilic) of the substituents and with 16 computer-calculated molecular parameters of the substrates and of the corresponding Meisenheimer complexes with MeS- as a model nucleophile for GS- (charge distributions and several energy values), giving structure-activity relationships. On the basis of an identical dependence of the base-catalysed as well as the GST 1-1- and GST 7-7-catalysed reactions on electronic parameters (among others, Hammett substituent constant sigma p and charge on p-nitro substituents), and the finding that the corresponding reactions catalysed by GSTs 3-3 and 4-4 depend to a significantly lesser extent on these parameters, it was concluded that the Mu-class GST isoenzymes have a rate-determining transition state in the conjugation reaction between 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes and GSH which is different from that of the other two GSTs. Several alternative rate-limiting transition states for GST 3-3 and 4-4 are discussed. Furthermore, based on the obtained structure-activity relationships, it was possible to predict the kcat/Km values of the four GST isoenzymes and the ks of the base-catalysed GSH conjugation of 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzene. PMID:8973562

  15. Antioxidative response of ascorbate-glutathione pathway enzymes and metabolites to desiccation of recalcitrant Acer saccharinum seeds.

    PubMed

    Pukacka, Stanisława; Ratajczak, Ewelina

    2006-12-01

    Ascorbate-glutathione systems were studied during desiccation of recalcitrant seeds of the silver maple (Acer saccharinum L.). The desiccated seeds gradually lost their germination capacity and this was strongly correlated with an increase in electrolyte leakage from seeds. Simultaneously the increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (superoxide radical - O(2)(-*) and hydrogen peroxide - H(2)O(2)) production was observed. The results indicate that remarkable changes in the concentrations and redox status of ascorbate and glutathione occur in embryo axes and cotyledons. After shedding, concentrations of ascorbic acid (ASA) and the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) are higher in embryo axes than in cotyledons and their redox status is high in both embryo parts. Cotyledons in freshly shed seeds are devoid of GSH. At the first stages of desiccation, up to a level of 43% of moisture content, ASA content in embryo axes and GSH content in cotyledons increased. Below this level of moisture content, the antioxidant contents as well as their redox status rapidly decreased. The enzymes of the ascorbate-glutathione pathway: ascorbate peroxidase (APX) (EC 1.11.1.11), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MR) (EC 1.6.5.4), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) (EC 1.8.5.1) and glutathione reductase (GR) (EC 1.6.4.2) increased their activity during desiccation, but mainly in embryonic axes. The changes are probably required for counteracting the production of ROS during desiccation. The relationship between ascorbate and glutathione metabolism and their relevance during desiccation of recalcitrant Acer saccharinum seeds is discussed.

  16. [Effects of Tagetes erecta extracts on glutathione S-transferase and protease activities and protein content in Tetranychus viennensis].

    PubMed

    Shi, Guang-lu; Wang, You-nian; Wang, Hong-lei; Zhao, Li-lin; Liu, Su-qi; Cao, Hui; Yu, Tong-quan; Lu, Ping

    2007-02-01

    With in vivo and in vitro Tagetes erecta roots under light and dark as test materials, this paper studied the effects of their extracts on the glutathione S-transferase and protease activities and protein content in Tetranychus viennensis. The results showed that the chloroform extract of T. erecta roots had the highest light-activated activity, followed by water extract, and methanol extract. After treated with chloroform extract, the glutathione S-transferase and protease activities in T. viennensis increased markedly, while its protein content decreased obviously. The variation degree of T. viennensis protease activity and protein content was significantly higher when the chloroform extract came from the T. erecta roots under light, suggesting that there existed active matters in the extract, which could promote the activation of protease, and thus, the decomposition of protein in T. viennensis. The bioactivity of T. erecta metabolites was mainly of light-activated one.

  17. JS-K, a glutathione/glutathione S-transferase-activated nitric oxide donor of the diazeniumdiolate class with potent antineoplastic activity.

    PubMed

    Shami, Paul J; Saavedra, Joseph E; Wang, Lai Y; Bonifant, Challice L; Diwan, Bhalchandra A; Singh, Shivendra V; Gu, Yijun; Fox, Stephen D; Buzard, Gregory S; Citro, Michael L; Waterhouse, David J; Davies, Keith M; Ji, Xinhua; Keefer, Larry K

    2003-04-01

    We have previously shown that nitric oxide (NO) inhibits growth and induces differentiation and apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia cells, with the HL-60 human myeloid leukemia line being particularly sensitive to NO-mediated cytolysis. With the goal of identifying a prodrug that can target NO to the leukemia cells without inducing NO-mediated systemic hypotension, we have screened a series of O(2)-aryl diazeniumdiolates designed to be stable at physiological pH but to release NO upon reaction with glutathione. O(2)-(2,4-Dinitrophenyl) 1-[(4-ethoxycarbonyl)piperazin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (JS-K) proved to be the most active antiproliferative agent among those tested in HL-60 cells, with an IC(50) of 0.2-0.5 microM. After 5 days of exposure to 0.5 micro M JS-K, HL-60 cells had differentiated and acquired some of the phenotypic features of normal monocytes. One- to 2-day treatment with JS-K at concentrations of 0.5-1 microM resulted in apoptosis induction in a concentration- and caspase-dependent manner. JS-K also inhibited the growth of solid tumor cell lines but to a lesser extent than HL-60 cells. JS-K was administered i.v. to nonobese diabetic-severe combined immune deficient mice at doses of up to 4 micromol/kg without inducing significant hypotension. The growth of s.c. implanted HL-60 cells was reduced by approximately 50% when the mice received i.v. injections three times/week with 4 micromol/kg boluses of JS-K. Histological examination of tumor explants from JS-K-treated animals revealed extensive necrosis. Similar results were seen with s.c. human prostate cancer (PPC-1) xenografts. Our data indicate that JS-K is a promising lead compound for the possible development of a novel class of antineoplastic agents.

  18. Regulation of rat liver hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase by a new class of noncompetitive inhibitors. Effects of dichloroacetate and related carboxylic acids on enzyme activity.

    PubMed Central

    Stacpoole, P W; Harwood, H J; Varnado, C E

    1983-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) markedly reduces circulating cholesterol levels in animals and in patients with combined hyperlipoproteinemia or homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). To investigate the mechanism of its cholesterol-lowering action, we studied the effects of DCA and its hepatic metabolites, glyoxylate and oxalate, on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) obtained from livers of healthy, reverse light-cycled rats. Oral administration of DCA for 4 d decreased HMG CoA reductase activity 46% at a dose of 50 mg/kg per d, and 82% at a dose of 100 mg/kg per d. A 24% decrease in reductase activity was observed as early as 1 h after a single dose of 50 mg/kg DCA. The inhibitory effect of the drug was due to a fall in both expressed enzyme activity and the total number of reductase molecules present. DCA also decreased reductase activity when added to suspensions of isolated hepatocytes. With chronic administration, DCA inhibited 3H2O incorporation into cholesterol by 38% and into triglycerides by 52%. When liver microsomes were incubated with DCA, the pattern of inhibition of reductase activity was noncompetitive for both HMG CoA (inhibition constant [Ki] 11.8 mM) and NADPH (Ki 11.6 mM). Inhibition by glyoxylate was also noncompetitive for both HMG CoA (Ki 1.2 mM) and NADPH (Ki 2.7 mM). Oxalate inhibited enzyme activity only at nonsaturating concentrations of NADPH (Ki 5.6 mM). Monochloroacetate, glycollate, and ethylene glycol, all of which can form glyoxylate, also inhibited reductase activity. Using solubilized and 60-fold purified HMG CoA reductase, we found that the inhibitory effect of glyoxylate was reversible. Furthermore, the inhibition by glyoxylate was an effect exerted on the reductase itself, rather than on its regulatory enzymes, reductase kinase and reductase phosphatase. We conclude that the cholesterol-lowering effect of DCA is mediated, at least in part, by inhibition of endogenous cholesterol

  19. An ene reductase from Clavispora lusitaniae for asymmetric reduction of activated alkenes.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yan; Yu, Hui-Lei; Lin, Guo-Qiang; Xu, Jian-He

    2014-03-05

    A putative ene reductase gene from Clavispora lusitaniae was heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the encoded protein (ClER) was purified and characterized for its biocatalytic properties. This NADPH-dependent flavoprotein was identified with reduction activities toward a diverse range of activated alkenes including conjugated enones, enals, maleimide derivative and α,β-unsaturated carboxylic esters. The purified ClER exhibited a relatively high activity of 7.3 U mg(prot)⁻¹ for ketoisophorone while a remarkable catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)=810 s⁻¹ mM⁻¹) was obtained for 2-methyl-cinnamaldehyde due to the high affinity. A series of prochiral activated alkenes were stereoselectively reduced by ClER furnishing the corresponding saturated products in up to 99% ee. The practical applicability of ClER was further evaluated for the production of (R)-levodione, a valuable chiral compound, from ketoisophorone. Using the crude enzyme of ClER and glucose dehydrogenase (GDH), 500 mM of ketoisophorone was efficiently converted to (R)-levodione with excellent stereoselectivity (98% ee) within 1h. All these positive features demonstrate a high synthetic potential of ClER in the asymmetric reduction of activated alkenes.

  20. Age-related changes of antioxidant enzyme activities, glutathione status and lipid peroxidation in rat erythrocytes after heat stress.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Oğuz; Gümüşlü, Saadet

    2004-08-13

    The aim of this study was to determine whether exposure to heat stress would lead to oxidative stress and whether this effect varied with different exposure periods. We kept 1-, 6- and 12-month-old male Wistar rats at an ambient temperature of either 22 degrees C or 40 degrees C for 3 and 7 days and measured glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD), Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD), catalase (CAT), selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSH-Px) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities and levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) in erythrocytes and determined GSH/GSSG ratio, total glutathione and the redox index. G-6-PD and CAT activities were found to be significantly increased in 1- and 6-month-old rats after 3 and 7 days of heat stress, but G-6-PD activities decreased in 12-month-old rats. Cu, Zn-SOD activity decreased in 1-month-old rats after heat stress, whereas it increased in 6- and 12-month-old rats. GST activity increased in all groups. GSH and total GSH levels and GSH/GSSG ratios decreased in 1- and 6-month-old rats but they increased in 12-month-old rats after heat stress. GSSG levels increased in 1- and 6-month-old rats but decreased in 12-month-old rats after heat stress. TBARS levels increased in all groups. Seven days of stress is more effective in altering enzyme activities and levels of GSH, GSSG and TBARS. When the effects of both heat stress and aging were examined together, it was interesting to note that they mostly influenced G-6-PD activity.

  1. Dichloroacetate- and Trichloroacetate-Induced Modulation of Superoxide Dismutase, Catalase, and Glutathione Peroxidase Activities and Glutathione Level in the livers of Mice after Subacute and Subchronic exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hassoun, Ezdihar A.; Cearfoss, Jacquelyn

    2010-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA) were previously found to induce various levels of oxidative stress in the hepatic tissues of mice after subacute and subchronic exposure. The cells are known to have several protective mechansims against production of oxidative stress by different xenobiotics. To assess the roles of the antioxidant enzymes and glutathione (GSH) in DCA- and TCA-induced oxidative stress, groups of B6C3F1 mice were administered either DCA or TCA at doses of 7.7, 77, 154 and 410 mg/kg/day, by gavage for 4 weeks (4-W) and 13 weeks (13-W), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, as well as GSH were determined in the hepatic tissues. DCA at doses ranging between 7.7-410, and 7.7-77 mg/kg/day, given for 4-W and 13-W, respectively, resulted in either suppression or no change in SOD, CAT and GSH-Px activities, but doses of 154-410 mg DCA/kg/day administered for 13-W were found to result in significant induction of the three enzyme activities. TCA administration on the other hand, resulted in increases in SOD and CAT activities, and suppression of GSH-Px activity in both periods. Except for the DCA doses of 77-154 mg/kg/day administered for 13-W that resulted in significant reduction in GSH levels, all other DCA, as well as TCA treatments produced no changes in GSH. Since these enzymes are involved in the detoxification of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide anion (SA) and H2O2, it is concluded that SA is the main contributor to DCA-induced oxidative stress while both ROS contribute to that of TCA. The increases in the enzyme activities associated with 154-410 mg DCA/kg/day in the 13-W period suggest their role as protective mechanisms contributing to the survival of cells modified in response to those treatments. PMID:21170174

  2. Tomato fruit ascorbic acid content is linked with monodehydroascorbate reductase activity and tolerance to chilling stress.

    PubMed

    Stevens, R; Page, D; Gouble, B; Garchery, C; Zamir, D; Causse, M

    2008-08-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping is a step towards the identification of factors regulating traits such as fruit ascorbic acid content. A previously identified QTL controlling variations in tomato fruit ascorbic acid has been fine mapped and reveals that the QTL has a polygenic and epistatic architecture. A monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) allele is a candidate for a proportion of the increase in fruit ascorbic acid content. The MDHAR enzyme is active in different stages of fruit ripening, shows increased activity in the introgression lines containing the wild-type (Solanum pennellii) allele, and responds to chilling injury in tomato along with the reduced/oxidized ascorbate ratio. Low temperature storage of different tomato introgression lines with all or part of the QTL for ascorbic acid and with or without the wild MDHAR allele shows that enzyme activity explains 84% of the variation in the reduced ascorbic acid levels of tomato fruit following storage at 4 degrees C, compared with 38% at harvest under non-stress conditions. A role is indicated for MDHAR in the maintenance of ascorbate levels in fruit under stress conditions. Furthermore, an increased fruit MDHAR activity and a lower oxidation level of the fruit ascorbate pool are correlated with decreased loss of firmness because of chilling injury.

  3. 1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate-induced cytotoxicity is accompanied by a rapid and drastic modulation of glutathione metabolism.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Mami; Xu, Shenghui; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko; Kennedy, David Opare; Murakami, Akira; Ohigashi, Hajime; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao

    2009-01-01

    The effect of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), an anticarcinogenic compound naturally obtained from rhizomes and seeds of South East Asia plants, on the intracellular concentration of glutathione and the activities of enzymes related to glutathione metabolism was studied in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. We showed in a previous study that ACA induced apoptosis in tumor cells and the cell death was reversed by the addition of N-acetlycysteine or glutathione ethylester. Here we found that ACA caused a rapid decrease in glutathione level in less than 10 min after ACA exposure. At the time, glutathione reductase activity was significantly inhibited and gamma-glutamyl cysteine increased by ACA exposure. These results show that ACA caused the decrease in the intracellular GSH levels in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells, suggesting that ACA-induced decrease of the cellular GSH levels can lead to growth arrest of cancer and enhancement of the efficacy other anticancer drugs.

  4. The effects of selenium on glutathione peroxidase activity and radioprotection in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, A.M.; Murray, J.L.; Dale, P.; Tritz, R.; Grdina, D.J.

    1995-09-05

    The media of representative mammalian cell lines were supplemented with low levels of selenium in the form of sodium selenite in order to investigate the effects of selenium on mammalian cells. Following incubation in 30 nM sodium selenite, these cells were assayed for changes in glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. The cells examined included NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts, PC12 rat sympathetic precursor cells, SupT-1 human lymphocytes, MCF-7{sup adr} human breast carcinoma cells and AA8 Chinese hamster ovary cells. Selenium supplementation resulted in a marginal increase in GPx activity for the NIH 3T3, MCF-7{sup adr} and Supt-1 cells but stimulated GPx activity approximately 5-fold in PC12 and AA8 cells. AA8 cells were selected to evaluate whether selenium supplementation was radioprotective against {sup 60}cobalt gamma irradiation. Protection against radiation-induced mutation was measured by evaluating mutation frequency at the hprt locus. In this assay, preincubation of AA8 CHO cells significantly protected these cells from exposure to 8 Gy.

  5. A novel selenium and copper-containing peptide with both superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xian-Feng; Ji, Yue-Tong; Gao, Gui; Zhu, Xue-Jun; Lv, Shao-Wu; Yan, Fei; Han, Si-Ping; Chen, Xing; Gao, Chang-Cheng; Liu, Junqiu; Luo, Gui-Min

    2010-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT) play crucial roles in balancing the production and decomposition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in living organisms. These enzymes act cooperatively and synergistically to scavenge ROS. In order to imitate the synergism of these enzymes, we designed and synthesized a novel 32-mer peptide (32P) on the basis of the previous 15-mer peptide with GPX activity and a 17-mer peptide with SOD activity. Upon the selenation and chelation of copper, the 32-mer peptide is converted to a new Se- and Cu-containing 32-mer peptide (Se-Cu-32P) and displays both SOD and GPX activities and its kinetics was studied. Moreover, the novel peptide was demonstrated to be able to better protect vero cells from the injury induced by xanthine oxidase (XOD)/xanthine/Fe2+ damage system than its parents. Thus, this bifunctional enzyme imitated the synergism of SOD and GPX and could be a better candidate of therapeutic medicine.

  6. Evaluation of glutathione S-transferase activity in human buccal epithelial dysplasias and squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y K; Lin, L M

    1997-06-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and amount of GST alpha, mu and pi isoforms were measured in 40 patients with histopathologically confirmed oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) and squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa. The results were compared with those of normal mucosa in an equal number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Mean total GST activities were significantly elevated from normal buccal mucosa for mild OED, moderate OED, severe OED and squamous cell carcinoma. GST activity of value approximating 100 nmol/min/mg distinguished between normal and dysplasia, and of value about 400 nmol/min/mg delineated between dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma were observed. GST pi was the predominant class in both the diseased and normal buccal mucosa examined. This class pi GST was present at an intracellular concentration, which was significantly higher in diseased buccal mucosa than in normal buccal mucosa. These results indicated that pi class GST was the major form of this enzyme in the cytosolic fraction of oral mucosa. The severity of OED related to squamous cell carcinoma development seemed to increase concomitantly with an increase in the level of this enzyme. Further studies will validate the role of GST pi estimation in predicting the potential malignancy of OED.

  7. SERS Active Nanobiosensor Functionalized by Self-Assembled 3D Nickel Nanonetworks for Glutathione Detection.

    PubMed

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Sivaprasad; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2017-02-15

    We introduce a "non-noble metal" based SERS active nanobiosensor using a self-assembled 3D hybrid nickel nanonetwork. A tunable biomolecule detector fabricated by a bottom-up approach was functionalized using a multiphoton ionization energy mechanism to create a self-assembled 3D hybrid nickel nanonetwork. The nanonetwork was tested for SERS detection of crystal violet (CV) and glutathione (GSH) at two excitation wavelengths, 532 and 785 nm. The results reveal indiscernible peaks with a limit of detection (LOD) of 1 picomolar (pM) concentration. An enhancement factor (EF) of 9.3 × 10(8) was achieved for the chemical molecule CV and 1.8 × 10(9) for the biomolecule GSH, which are the highest reported values so far. The two results, one being the CV molecule proved that nickel nanonetwork is indeed SERS active and the second being the GSH biomolecule detection at both 532 and 785 nm, confirm that the nanonetwork is a biosensor which has potential for both in vivo and in vitro sensing. In addition, the selectivity and versatility of this biosensor is examined with biomolecules such as l-Cysteine, l-Methionine, and sensing GSH in cell culture medium which mimics the complex biological environment. The functionalized self-assembled 3D hybrid nickel nanonetwork exhibits electromagnetic and charge transfer based SERS activation mechanisms.

  8. Prolactin confers resistance against cisplatin in breast cancer cells by activating glutathione-S-transferase.

    PubMed

    LaPensee, Elizabeth W; Schwemberger, Sandy J; LaPensee, Christopher R; Bahassi, El Mustapha; Afton, Scott E; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2009-08-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle for successful treatment of breast cancer patients. Given that prolactin (PRL) acts as an anti-apoptotic/survival factor in the breast, we postulated that it antagonizes cytotoxicity by chemotherapeutic drugs. Treatment of breast cancer cells with PRL caused variable resistance to taxol, vinblastine, doxorubicin and cisplatin. PRL prevented cisplatin-induced G(2)/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In the presence of PRL, significantly less cisplatin was bound to DNA, as determined by mass spectroscopy, and little DNA damage was seen by gamma-H2AX staining. PRL dramatically increased the activity of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), which sequesters cisplatin in the cytoplasm; this increase was abrogated by Jak and mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors. PRL upregulated the expression of the GSTmu, but not the pi, isozyme. A GST inhibitor abrogated antagonism of cisplatin cytotoxicity by PRL. In conclusion, PRL confers resistance against cisplatin by activating a detoxification enzyme, thereby reducing drug entry into the nucleus. These data provide a rational explanation for the ineffectiveness of cisplatin in breast cancer, which is characterized by high expression of both PRL and its receptor. Suppression of PRL production or blockade of its actions should benefit patients undergoing chemotherapy by allowing for lower drug doses and expanded drug options.

  9. The ocular inflammatory response to endotoxin is not altered when glutathione peroxidase activity is decreased

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, A.M.; McGahan, M.C.; Smith, M.G. )

    1991-03-11

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element and an integral part of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx). GPx is an antioxidant which scavenges both hydroperoxide and lipid peroxides. The purpose of the current study was to determine if decreased GPx activity affects the ocular inflammatory response. New Zealand White rabbits were fed either a purified Se deficient or Se adequate diet for 9 weeks. After 9 weeks, plasma Se levels were 0.151 {plus minus} 0.0130 {mu}g/ml in the deficient diet group compared to 0.217 {plus minus} 0.015 {plus minus} 0.87 U compared with 25.43 {plus minus} 1.77 U in the basal diet group. At this point, ocular inflammation was induced by intravitreal injection of endotoxin. Twenty-four hours later, despite a 40% decrease in plasma and a 30% decrease in intraocular fluid GPx activity, there was no significant difference in inflammatory parameters between the groups. However, it is possible that a further decrease in GPx activity could have some effect on the inflammatory response.

  10. Rapid suppression of 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase activity in keratinocytes by vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ling; Porter, Todd D

    2015-04-01

    7-Dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) serves as the sterol substrate for both cholesterol and vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) synthesis. The pivotal enzyme in these two pathways is 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7), which converts 7DHC to cholesterol. Treatment of adult human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKa) with 10μM cholecalciferol resulted in a rapid decrease in DHCR7 activity (19% of control activity at 2h). This loss of activity was observed only in HEKa cells, a primary cell line cultured from normal human skin, and not in an immortalized skin cell line (HaCaT cells) nor in two hepatoma cell lines. The decrease in DHCR7 activity was not due to direct inhibition or to dephosphorylation of the enzyme, and enzyme protein levels were not decreased. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 had a lesser effect on DHCR7 activity, while 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 had no effect on DHCR7, indicating that the vitamin D receptor is not involved. Treatment with cholecalciferol did not lead to the accumulation of 7-dehydrocholesterol, and a 50% decrease in lanosterol synthesis in these cells suggests that cholecalciferol down-regulates the entire cholesterolgenic pathway. As vitamin D has been reported to be an inhibitor of hedgehog (Hh) signaling through Smo, we tested the effect of cyclopamine, an established inhibitor of the Hh pathway, on DHCR7 activity. Cyclopamine (10μM) also rapidly decreased DHCR7 activity (50% of control activity at 3h), suggesting that vitamin D3 may modulate DHCR7 activity and cholesterol/vitamin D3 synthesis by inhibiting hedgehog signaling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'.

  11. Interaction of glutathione reductase with heavy metal: the binding of Hg(II) or Cd(II) to the reduced enzyme affects both the redox dithiol pair and the flavin.

    PubMed

    Picaud, Thierry; Desbois, Alain

    2006-12-26

    To determine the inhibition mechanism of yeast glutathione reductase (GR) by heavy metal, we have compared the electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the enzyme in its oxidized (Eox) and two-electron reduced (EH2) forms, in the absence and the presence of Hg(II) or Cd(II). The spectral data clearly show a redox dependence of the metal binding. The metal ions do not affect the absorption and RR spectra of Eox. On the contrary, the EH2 spectra, generated by addition of NADPH, are strongly modified by the presence of heavy metal. The absorption changes of EH2 are metal-dependent. On the one hand, the main flavin band observed at 450 nm for EH2 is red-shifted at 455 nm for the EH2-Hg(II) complex and at 451 nm for the EH2-Cd(II) complex. On the other hand, the characteristic charge-transfer (CT) band at 540 nm is quenched upon metal binding to EH2. In NADPH excess, a new CT band is observed at 610 nm for the EH2-Hg(II)-NADPH complex and at 590 nm for EH2-Cd(II)-NADPH. The RR spectra of the EH2-metal complexes are not sensitive to the NADPH concentration. With reference to the RR spectra of EH2 in which the frequencies of bands II and III were observed at 1582 and 1547 cm-1, respectively, those of the EH2-metal complexes are detected at 1577 and 1542 cm-1, indicating an increased flavin bending upon metal coordination to EH2. From the frequency shifts of band III, a concomitant weakening of the H-bonding state of the N5 atom is also deduced. Taking into account the different chemical properties of Hg(II) and Cd(II), the coordination number of the bound metal ion was deduced to be different in GR. A mechanism of the GR inhibition is proposed. It proceeds primarily by a specific binding of the metal to the redox thiol/thiolate pair and the catalytic histidine of EH2. The bound metal ion then acts on the bending of the isoalloxazine ring of FAD as well as on the hydrophobicity of its microenvironment.

  12. Bioactive fraction of Saraca indica prevents diabetes induced cataractogenesis: An aldose reductase inhibitory activity

    PubMed Central

    Somani, Gauresh; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present study was designed to investigate the effect of Saraca indica (SI) flowers extract and different bioactive fraction on in vitro aldose reductase (AR) inhibitory activity, high glucose-induced cataract in goat lens and in vivo streptozotocin (STZ; 45 mg/kg, i.p) induced cataract in rats. Methods: Extract of flowers of SI tested for inhibition against rat lens AR. Furthermore, bioactive fraction was investigated against high glucose-induced opacification of the lens in vitro lens culture and STZ induced diabetic cataract in rats. Identification of the bioactive component was attempted through high-performance thin-layer chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Results: Ethyl acetate fraction of S. indica (EASI) produced maximum inhibition that may be due to high phenolic content. Goat lenses in media containing glucose developed a distinctly opaque ring in 72 h and treatment with EASI fraction lowered lens opacity in 72 h. Prolonged treatment with EASI to STZ-induced diabetic rats inhibited the AR activity and delayed cataract progression in a dose dependent manner. Conclusion: Ethyl acetate fraction of S. indica fraction has potential to inhibit rat lens AR enzyme and prevent cataractogenesis not only in goat lens model (in vitro), but also in STZ induced diabetic rats (in vivo). This study is suggestive of the anticataract activity of EASI fraction that could be attributed to the phytoconstituents present in the same. PMID:25709218

  13. Toward aldehyde and alkane production by removing aldehyde reductase activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M; Atsumi, Shota

    2014-09-01

    Advances in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering have enabled the construction of novel biological routes to valuable chemicals using suitable microbial hosts. Aldehydes serve as chemical feedstocks in the synthesis of rubbers, plastics, and other larger molecules. Microbial production of alkanes is dependent on the formation of a fatty aldehyde intermediate which is converted to an alkane by an aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO). However, microbial hosts such as Escherichia coli are plagued by many highly active endogenous aldehyde reductases (ALRs) that convert aldehydes to alcohols, which greatly complicates strain engineering for aldehyde and alkane production. It has been shown that the endogenous ALR activity outcompetes the ADO enzyme for fatty aldehyde substrate. The large degree of ALR redundancy coupled with an incomplete database of ALRs represents a significant obstacle in engineering E. coli for either aldehyde or alkane production. In this study, we identified 44 ALR candidates encoded in the E. coli genome using bioinformatics tools, and undertook a comprehensive screening by measuring the ability of these enzymes to produce isobutanol. From the pool of 44 candidates, we found five new ALRs using this screening method (YahK, DkgA, GldA, YbbO, and YghA). Combined deletions of all 13 known ALRs resulted in a 90-99% reduction in endogenous ALR activity for a wide range of aldehyde substrates (C2-C12). Elucidation of the ALRs found in E. coli could guide one in reducing competing alcohol formation during alkane or aldehyde production.

  14. Inhibitory effect of a naphthazarin derivative, S64, on heat shock factor (Hsf) activation and glutathione status following hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Park, E M; Lee, I J; Kim, S H; Song, G Y; Park, Y M

    2003-10-01

    The presence of hypoxic cells in solid tumors has long been considered a problem in cancer treatment. Resistance of hypoxic cells to ionizing radiation and anticancer drugs has in part been attributed to changes in altered gene expression by hypoxia. We previously reported an activation of heat shock factor (Hsf) in murine tumor RIF cells following hypoxia and suggested that a subsequent accumulation of heat shock protein(s) (Hsp) is likely to contribute to the malignant progression of hypoxic tumor cells (Baek et al., 2001). In this study, we showed that hypoxia induced a DNA-binding activity of Hsf and activation of hsp70 gene expression in colon cancer Clone A cells, and that a naphthazarin derivative, S64, significantly inhibited the hypoxia-inducible hsp70 gene expression in Clone A cells. We also showed that S64 significantly reduced the cellular glutathione levels in this cell line. Considering the proposed effects of Hsp and glutathione on radiation and chemotherapy sensitivity, we suggest that the inhibitory effects of S64 on Hsf activation and cellular glutathione levels have potentially important clinical implications. We believe that the previously reported in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor effect of S64 (Song et al., 2000a, 2001) might be attributed, at least in part, to its effect on Hsf activation and/or glutathione depletion. We also believe that the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of S64 on Hsf and glutathione level following hypoxia deserve a more rigorous future study, the results of which could offer novel strategy to manipulate the resistance mechanisms of solid tumors.

  15. Exogenous methyl jasmonate treatment increases glucosinolate biosynthesis and quinone reductase activity in kale leaf tissue.

    PubMed

    Ku, Kang-Mo; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Juvik, John A

    2014-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) spray treatments were applied to the kale varieties 'Dwarf Blue Curled Vates' and 'Red Winter' in replicated field plantings in 2010 and 2011 to investigate alteration of glucosinolate (GS) composition in harvested leaf tissue. Aqueous solutions of 250 µM MeJA were sprayed to saturation on aerial plant tissues four days prior to harvest at commercial maturity. The MeJA treatment significantly increased gluconasturtiin (56%), glucobrassicin (98%), and neoglucobrassicin (150%) concentrations in the apical leaf tissue of these genotypes over two seasons. Induction of quinone reductase (QR) activity, a biomarker for anti-carcinogenesis, was significantly increased by the extracts from the leaf tissue of these two cultivars. Extracts of apical leaf tissues had greater MeJA mediated increases in phenolics, glucosinolate concentrations, GS hydrolysis products, and QR activity than extracts from basal leaf tissue samples. The concentration of the hydrolysis product of glucoraphanin, sulforphane was significantly increased in apical leaf tissue of the cultivar 'Red Winter' in both 2010 and 2011. There was interaction between exogenous MeJA treatment and environmental conditions to induce endogenous JA. Correlation analysis revealed that indole-3-carbanol (I3C) generated from the hydrolysis of glucobrassicin significantly correlated with QR activity (r = 0.800, P<0.001). Concentrations required to double the specific QR activity (CD values) of I3C was calculated at 230 µM, which is considerably weaker at induction than other isothiocyanates like sulforphane. To confirm relationships between GS hydrolysis products and QR activity, a range of concentrations of MeJA sprays were applied to kale leaf tissues of both cultivars in 2011. Correlation analysis of these results indicated that sulforaphane, NI3C, neoascorbigen, I3C, and diindolylmethane were all significantly correlated with QR activity. Thus, increased QR activity may be due to combined

  16. Increased Glutathione Synthesis Following Nrf2 Activation by Vanadyl Sulfate in Human Chang Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Areum Daseul; Zhang, Rui; Kang, Kyoung Ah; You, Ho Jin; Hyun, Jin Won

    2011-01-01

    Jeju ground water, containing vanadium compounds, was shown to increase glutathione (GSH) levels as determined by a colorimetric assay and confocal microscopy. To investigate whether the effects of Jeju ground water on GSH were specifically mediated by vanadium compounds, human Chang liver cells were incubated for 10 passages in media containing deionized distilled water (DDW), Jeju ground water (S1 and S3), and vanadyl sulfate (VOSO4). Vanadyl sulfate scavenged superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical and intracellular reactive oxygen species. Vanadyl sulfate effectively increased cellular GSH level and up-regulated mRNA and protein expression of a catalytic subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLC), which is involved in GSH synthesis. The induction of GCLC expression by vanadyl sulfate was found to be mediated by transcription factor erythroid transcription factor NF-E2 (Nrf2), which critically regulates GCLC by binding to the antioxidant response elements (AREs). Vanadyl sulfate treatment increased the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and the accumulation of phosphorylated Nrf2. Extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) contributed to ARE-driven GCLC expression via Nrf2 activation. Vanadyl sulfate induced the expression of the active phospho form of ERK. Taken together, these results suggest that the increase in GSH level by Jeju ground water is, at least in part, due to the effects of vanadyl sulfate via the Nrf2-mediated induction of GCLC. PMID:22272109

  17. Glutathione-S-transferase activity of Fucus spp. as a biomarker of environmental contamination.

    PubMed

    Cairrão, E; Couderchet, M; Soares, A M V M; Guilhermino, L

    2004-12-20

    Coastal zones are important areas from both ecological and economical points of view. However, in the last decades, in several regions of the globe, they have been increasingly impacted by complex discharges of contaminants and by marine traffic accidents. The Portuguese Atlantic coast is particularly exposed to these contaminants due to the proximity of important navigation routes. Several rocky shore organisms have been tested and used as bioindicators of environmental contamination. However, to the best of our knowledge Fucus spp., which are key species in rocky shore communities, have not been used as bioindicators in monitoring studies based on biomarkers. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity of several Fucus species (Fucus ceranoides, Fucus spiralis var. platycarpus, Fucus spiralis var. spiralis and Fucus vesiculosus var. vesiculosus) to discriminate sites with different contamination levels along the Portuguese Northwestern coast, between the Minho river estuary and the Aveiro's Lagoon, as an environmental biomarker. With the exception of F. spiralis var. spiralis, for which a confusing pattern of activity was found requiring further analysis, all the other species and varieties showed higher GST levels in more contaminated sites than in less contaminated ones, indicating that Fucus spp. are suitable for use as bioindicators and their GSTs as biomarkers of environmental contamination in coastal zones and estuaries.

  18. Blood thioredoxin reductase activity, oxidative stress and hematological parameters in painters and battery workers: relationship with lead and cadmium levels in blood.

    PubMed

    Conterato, Greicy M M; Bulcão, Rachel P; Sobieski, Rocheli; Moro, Angela M; Charão, Mariele F; de Freitas, Fernando A; de Almeida, Fernanda L; Moreira, Ana P L; Roehrs, Miguel; Tonello, Raquel; Batista, Bruno L; Grotto, Denise; Barbosa, Fernando; Garcia, Solange C; Emanuelli, Tatiana

    2013-02-01

    Oxidative stress has been shown to be involved in lead and cadmium toxicity. We recently showed that the activity of the antioxidant enzyme thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) is increased in the kidneys of lead-exposed rats. The present study evaluated the blood cadmium and blood lead levels (BLLs) and their relationship with hematological and oxidative stress parameters, including blood TrxR activity in 50 painters, 23 battery workers and 36 control subjects. Erythrocyte δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (δ-ALA-D) activity and its reactivation index were measured as biomarkers of lead effects. BLLs increased in painters, but were even higher in the battery workers group. In turn, blood cadmium levels increased only in the painters group, whose levels were higher than the recommended limit. δ-ALA-D activity was inhibited only in battery workers, whereas the δ-ALA-D reactivation index increased in both exposed groups; both parameters were correlated to BLLs (r = -0.59 and 0.84, P < 0.05), whereas the reactivation index was also correlated to blood cadmium levels (r = 0.27, P < 0.05). The changes in oxidative stress and hematological parameters were distinctively associated with either BLLs or blood cadmium levels, except glutathione-S-transferase activity, which was correlated with both lead (r = 0.34) and cadmium (r = 0.47; P < 0.05). However, TrxR activity did not correlate with any of the metals evaluated. In conclusion, blood TrxR activity does not seem to be a good parameter to evaluate oxidative stress in lead- and cadmium-exposed populations. However, lead-associated changes in biochemical and hematological parameters at low BLLs underlie the necessity of re-evaluating the recommended health-based limits in occupational exposure to this metal.

  19. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity and phytocomponent investigation of Basella alba leaf extract as a treatment for hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Baskaran, Gunasekaran; Salvamani, Shamala; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Pattiram, Parveen Devi; Shukor, Mohd Yunus

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is the key enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that produces cholesterol. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase reduces cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver. Synthetic drugs, statins, are commonly used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Due to the side effects of statins, natural HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed. In this study, 25 medicinal plant methanol extracts were screened for anti-HMG-CoA reductase activity. Basella alba leaf extract showed the highest inhibitory effect at about 74%. Thus, B. alba was examined in order to investigate its phytochemical components. Gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed the presence of phenol 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl), 1-heptatriacotanol, oleic acid, eicosyl ester, naringin, apigenin, luteolin, ascorbic acid, and α-tocopherol, which have been reported to possess antihypercholesterolemic effects. Further investigation of in vivo models should be performed in order to confirm its potential as an alternative treatment for hypercholesterolemia and related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25609924

  20. The Sulfur Oxygenase Reductase from the Mesophilic Bacterium Halothiobacillus neapolitanus Is a Highly Active Thermozyme

    PubMed Central

    Veith, Andreas; Botelho, Hugo M.; Kindinger, Florian; Gomes, Cláudio M.

    2012-01-01

    A biochemical, biophysical, and phylogenetic study of the sulfur oxygenase reductase (SOR) from the mesophilic gammaproteobacterium Halothiobacillus neapolitanus (HnSOR) was performed in order to determine the structural and biochemical properties of the enzyme. SOR proteins from 14 predominantly chemolithoautotrophic bacterial and archaeal species are currently available in public databases. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed that they form a coherent protein family. The HnSOR purified from Escherichia coli after heterologous gene expression had a temperature range of activity of 10 to 99°C with an optimum at 80°C (42 U/mg protein). Sulfite, thiosulfate, and hydrogen sulfide were formed at various stoichiometries in a range between pH 5.4 and 11 (optimum pH 8.4). Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering showed that the HnSOR adopts secondary and quaternary structures similar to those of the 24-subunit enzyme from the hyperthermophile Acidianus ambivalens (AaSOR). The melting point of the HnSOR was ≈20°C lower than that of the AaSOR, when analyzed with CD-monitored thermal unfolding. Homology modeling showed that the secondary structure elements of single subunits are conserved. Subtle changes in the pores of the outer shell and increased flexibility might contribute to activity at low temperature. We concluded that the thermostability was the result of a rigid protein core together with the stabilizing effect of the 24-subunit hollow sphere. PMID:22139503

  1. Expression and Enzyme Activity Detection of a Sepiapterin Reductase Gene from Musca domestica Larva.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan; Pei, Zhihua; Liu, Lei; Wang, Dongfang; Kong, Lingcong; Liu, Shuming; Jiang, Xiuyun; Gao, Yunhang; Ma, Hongxia

    2017-02-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor for aromatic acid hydroxylases and nitric oxide synthase. Sepiapterin reductase (SPR) catalyzes the final steps of BH4 biosynthesis. Studies on SPR from several insects and other organisms have been reported. However, thus far, enzyme activity of SPR in Musca domestica is kept unknown. In this study, 186 differentially expressed genes including SPR gene from Musca domestica (MDSPR) were screened in subtractive cDNA library. The MDSPR gene was cloned, and the recombinant MDSPI16 protein was expressed as a 51-kDa protein in soluble form. The MDSPR exhibited strong activity to the substrate sepiapterin (SP). The values of Vmax and Km of the MDSPR for SP were 6.83 μM/min and 23.48 μM, and the optimum temperature and pH of MDSPR were 50 °C and 4.0, respectively. This study provides new hypotheses and methods for the production of BH4 using insect-derived SPR.

  2. Latent nitrate reductase activity is associated with the plasma membrane of corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, M. R.; Grimes, H. D.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Latent nitrate reductase activity (NRA) was detected in corn (Zea mays L., Golden Jubilee) root microsome fractions. Microsome-associated NRA was stimulated up to 20-fold by Triton X-100 (octylphenoxy polyethoxyethanol) whereas soluble NRA was only increased up to 1.2-fold. Microsome-associated NRA represented up to 19% of the total root NRA. Analysis of microsomal fractions by aqueous two-phase partitioning showed that the membrane-associated NRA was localized in the second upper phase (U2). Analysis with marker enzymes indicated that the U2 fraction was plasma membrane (PM). The PM-associated NRA was not removed by washing vesicles with up to 1.0 M NACl but was solubilized from the PM with 0.05% Triton X-100. In contrast, vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity was not solubilized from the PM by treatment with 0.1% Triton X-100. The results show that a protein capable of reducing nitrate is embedded in the hydrophobic region of the PM of corn roots.

  3. Trypanocidal Activity of Quinoxaline 1,4 Di-N-oxide Derivatives as Trypanothione Reductase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chacón-Vargas, Karla Fabiola; Nogueda-Torres, Benjamin; Sánchez-Torres, Luvia E; Suarez-Contreras, Erick; Villalobos-Rocha, Juan Carlos; Torres-Martinez, Yuridia; Lara-Ramirez, Edgar E; Fiorani, Giulia; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Bolognesi, Maria Laura; Monge, Antonio; Rivera, Gildardo

    2017-02-01

    Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis is a worldwide public health problem. In this work, we evaluated 26 new propyl and isopropyl quinoxaline-7-carboxylate 1,4-di-N-oxide derivatives as potential trypanocidal agents. Additionally, molecular docking and enzymatic assays on trypanothione reductase (TR) were performed to provide a basis for their potential mechanism of action. Seven compounds showed better trypanocidal activity on epimastigotes than the reference drugs, and only four displayed activity on trypomastigotes; T-085 was the lead compound with an IC50 = 59.9 and 73.02 µM on NINOA and INC-5 strain, respectively. An in silico analysis proposed compound T-085 as a potential TR inhibitor with better affinity than the natural substrate. Enzymatic analysis revealed that T-085 inhibits parasite TR non-competitively. Compound T-085 carries a carbonyl, a CF3, and an isopropyl carboxylate group at 2-, 3- and 7-position, respectively. These results suggest the chemical structure of this compound as a good starting point for the design and synthesis of novel trypanocidal derivatives with higher TR inhibitory potency and lower toxicity.

  4. CIPK23 is involved in iron acquisition of Arabidopsis by affecting ferric chelate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qiuying; Zhang, Xinxin; Yang, An; Wang, Tianzuo; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2016-05-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the major limiting factors affecting quality and production of crops in calcareous soils. Numerous signaling molecules and transcription factors have been demonstrated to play a regulatory role in adaptation of plants to iron deficiency. However, the mechanisms underlying the iron deficiency-induced physiological processes remain to be fully dissected. Here, we demonstrated that the protein kinase CIPK23 was involved in iron acquisition. Lesion of CIPK23 rendered Arabidopsis mutants hypersensitive to iron deficiency, as evidenced by stronger chlorosis in young leaves and lower iron concentration than wild-type plants under iron-deficient conditions by down-regulating ferric chelate reductase activity. We found that iron deficiency evoked an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and the elevated Ca(2+) would bind to CBL1/CBL9, leading to activation of CIPK23. These novel findings highlight the involvement of calcium-dependent CBL-CIPK23 complexes in the regulation of iron acquisition. Moreover, mutation of CIPK23 led to changes in contents of mineral elements, suggesting that CBL-CIPK23 complexes could be as "nutritional sensors" to sense and regulate the mineral homeostasis in Arabisopsis.

  5. A Continuous Spectrophotometric Assay for APS Reductase Activity with Sulfite-Selective Probes

    PubMed Central

    Paritala, Hanumantharao; Carroll, Kate S.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (APS) reductase (EC number 1.8.4.10), (APR) catalyzes the first committed step in sulfate reduction for the biosynthesis of essential reduced sulfur-containing biomolecules, such as cysteine, and is essential for survival in the latent phase of TB infection. Despite the importance of APR to Mtb, and other bacterial pathogens, current assay methods depend on use of [35S]-labeled APS or shunt AMP to a coupled-enzyme system. Both methods are cumbersome and require the use of expensive reagents. Here we report the development of a continuous spectrophotometric method for measuring APR activity by using novel sulfite-selective colorimetric or “off-on” fluorescent levulinate-based probes. The APR activity can thus be followed by monitoring the increase in absorbance or fluorescence of the resulting phenolate product. Using this assay, we determined Michelis-Menten kinetic constants (Km, kcat, kcat/Km) and apparent inhibition constant (Ki) for adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP), which compared favorably to values obtained in the gold-standard radioactive assay. The newly developed assay is robust and easy to perform with a simple spectrophotometer. PMID:23711725

  6. S-nitrosation of conserved cysteines modulates activity and stability of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR)

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Damian; Ballard, Keith; Truebridge, Ian; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The free radical nitric oxide (NO•) regulates diverse physiological processes from vasodilation in humans to gas exchange in plants. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is considered a principal nitroso reservoir due to its chemical stability. GSNO accumulation is attenuated by GSNO reductase (GSNOR), a cysteine-rich cytosolic enzyme. Regulation of protein nitrosation is not well understood since NO•-dependent events proceed without discernible changes in GSNOR expression. Because GSNORs contain evolutionarily-conserved cysteines that could serve as nitrosation sites, we examined the effects of treating plant (Arabidopsis thaliana), mammalian (human), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) GSNORs with nitrosating agents in vitro. Enzyme activity was sensitive to nitroso donors, while the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) restored activity, suggesting catalytic impairment was due to S-nitrosation. Protein nitrosation was confirmed by mass spectrometry, by which mono-, di-, and tri-nitrosation were observed, and these signals were sensitive to DTT. GSNOR mutants in specific non-zinc coordinating cysteines were less sensitive to catalytic inhibition by nitroso donors and exhibited reduced nitrosation signals by mass spectrometry. Nitrosation also coincided with decreased tryptophan fluorescence, increased thermal aggregation propensity, and increased polydispersity—properties reflected by differential solvent accessibility of amino acids important for dimerization and the shape of the substrate and coenzyme binding pockets as assessed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Collectively, these data suggest a mechanism for NO• signal transduction in which GSNOR nitrosation and inhibition transiently permit GSNO accumulation. PMID:27064847

  7. Targeted Mutations of Bacillus anthracis Dihydrofolate Reductase Condense Complex Structure-Activity Relationships

    SciTech Connect

    J Beierlein; N Karri; A Anderson

    2011-12-31

    Several antifolates, including trimethoprim (TMP) and a series of propargyl-linked analogues, bind dihydrofolate reductase from Bacillus anthracis (BaDHFR) with lower affinity than is typical in other bacterial species. To guide lead optimization for BaDHFR, we explored a new approach to determine structure-activity relationships whereby the enzyme is altered and the analogues remain constant, essentially reversing the standard experimental design. Active site mutants of the enzyme, Ba(F96I)DHFR and Ba(Y102F)DHFR, were created and evaluated with enzyme inhibition assays and crystal structures. The affinities of the antifolates increase up to 60-fold with the Y102F mutant, suggesting that interactions with Tyr 102 are critical for affinity. Crystal structures of the enzymes bound to TMP and propargyl-linked inhibitors reveal the basis of TMP resistance and illuminate the influence of Tyr 102 on the lipophilic linker between the pyrimidine and aryl rings. Two new inhibitors test and validate these conclusions and show the value of the technique for providing new directions during lead optimization.

  8. Aldose reductase induced by hyperosmotic stress mediates cardiomyocyte apoptosis: differential effects of sorbitol and mannitol.

    PubMed

    Galvez, Anita S; Ulloa, Juan Alberto; Chiong, Mario; Criollo, Alfredo; Eisner, Verónica; Barros, Luis Felipe; Lavandero, Sergio

    2003-10-03

    Cells adapt to hyperosmotic conditions by several mechanisms, including accumulation of sorbitol via induction of the polyol pathway. Failure to adapt to osmotic stress can result in apoptotic cell death. In the present study, we assessed the role of aldose reductase, the key enzyme of the polyol pathway, in cardiac myocyte apoptosis. Hyperosmotic stress, elicited by exposure of cultured rat cardiac myocytes to the nonpermeant solutes sorbitol and mannitol, caused identical cell shrinkage and adaptive hexose uptake stimulation. In contrast, only sorbitol induced the polyol pathway and triggered stress pathways as well as apoptosis-related signaling events. Sorbitol resulted in activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p54 c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and protein kinase B. Furthermore, sorbitol treatment resulting in induction and activation of aldose reductase, decreased expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL, increased DNA fragmentation, and glutathione depletion. Apoptosis was attenuated by aldose reductase inhibition with zopolrestat and also by glutathione replenishment with N-acetylcysteine. In conclusion, our data show that hypertonic shrinkage of cardiac myocytes alone is not sufficient to induce cardiac myocyte apoptosis. Hyperosmolarity-induced cell death is sensitive to the nature of the osmolyte and requires induction of aldose reductase as well as a decrease in intracellular glutathione levels.

  9. Human Aldo-Keto Reductases and the Metabolic Activation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are promiscuous NAD(P)(H) dependent oxidoreductases implicated in the metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These enzymes catalyze the oxidation of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols to the corresponding o-quinones with the concomitant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The PAH o-quinones are Michael acceptors and can form adducts but are also redox-active and enter into futile redox cycles to amplify ROS formation. Evidence exists to support this metabolic pathway in humans. The human recombinant AKR1A1 and AKR1C1–AKR1C4 enzymes all catalyze the oxidation of PAH trans-dihydrodiols to PAH o-quinones. Many human AKRs also catalyze the NADPH-dependent reduction of the o-quinone products to air-sensitive catechols, exacerbating ROS formation. Moreover, this pathway of PAH activation occurs in a panel of human lung cell lines, resulting in the production of ROS and oxidative DNA damage in the form of 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine. Using stable-isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, this pathway of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) metabolism was found to contribute equally with the diol-epoxide pathway to the activation of this human carcinogen in human lung cells. Evaluation of the mutagenicity of anti-B[a]P-diol epoxide with B[a]P-7,8-dione on p53 showed that the o-quinone produced by AKRs was the more potent mutagen, provided that it was permitted to redox cycle, and that the mutations observed were G to T transversions, reminiscent of those observed in human lung cancer. It is concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation of PAH in human lung cell lines and that they may contribute to the causation of human lung cancer. PMID:25279998

  10. Ribonucleotide reductase activity is coupled to DNA synthesis via proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Salguero, Israel; Guarino, Estrella; Shepherd, Marianne E A; Deegan, Tom D; Havens, Courtney G; MacNeill, Stuart A; Walter, Johannes C; Kearsey, Stephen E

    2012-04-24

    Synthesis of deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) is required for both DNA replication and DNA repair and is catalyzed by ribonucleotide reductases (RNR), which convert ribonucleotides to their deoxy forms [1, 2]. Maintaining the correct levels of dNTPs for DNA synthesis is important for minimizing the mutation rate [3-7], and this is achieved by tight regulation of RNR [2, 8, 9]. In fission yeast, RNR is regulated in part by a small protein inhibitor, Spd1, which is degraded in S phase and after DNA damage to allow upregulation of dNTP supply [10-12]. Spd1 degradation is mediated by the activity of the CRL4(Cdt2) ubiquitin ligase complex [5, 13, 14]. This has been reported to be dependent on modulation of Cdt2 levels, which are cell cycle regulated, peaking in S phase, and which also increase after DNA damage in a checkpoint-dependent manner [7, 13]. We show here that Cdt2 level fluctuations are not sufficient to regulate Spd1 proteolysis and that the key step in this event is the interaction of Spd1 with the polymerase processivity factor proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), complexed onto DNA. This mechanism thus provides a direct link between DNA synthesis and RNR regulation.

  11. The transient catalytically competent coenzyme allocation into the active site of Anabaena ferredoxin NADP+ -reductase.

    PubMed

    Peregrina, José Ramón; Lans, Isaías; Medina, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) catalyses the electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP(+) via its flavin FAD cofactor. A molecular dynamics theoretical approach is applied here to visualise the transient catalytically competent interaction of Anabaena FNR with its coenzyme, NADP(+). The particular role of some of the residues identified as key in binding and accommodating the 2'P-AMP moiety of the coenzyme is confirmed in molecular terms. Simulations also indicate that the architecture of the active site precisely contributes to the orientation of the N5 of the FAD isoalloxazine ring and the C4 of the coenzyme nicotinamide ring in the conformation of the catalytically competent hydride transfer complex and, therefore, contributes to the efficiency of the process. In particular, the side chain of the C-terminal Y303 in Anabaena FNR appears key to providing the optimum geometry by reducing the stacking probability between the isoalloxazine and nicotinamide rings, thus providing the required co-linearity and distance among the N5 of the flavin cofactor, the C4 of the coenzyme nicotinamide and the hydride that has to be transferred between them. All these factors are highly related to the reaction efficiency, mechanism and reversibility of the process.

  12. The epimerase activity of anthocyanidin reductase from Vitis vinifera and its regiospecific hydride transfers.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, Mahmoud; Chaudière, Jean; Manigand, Claude; Maugé, Chloé; Bathany, Katell; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Gallois, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) from Vitis vinifera catalyzes an NADPH-dependent double reduction of anthocyanidins producing a mixture of (2S,3R)- and (2S,3S)-flavan-3-ols. At pH 7.5 and 30 degrees C, the first hydride transfer to anthocyanidin is irreversible, and no intermediate is released during catalysis. ANR reverse activity was assessed in the presence of excess NADP(+). Analysis of products by reverse phase and chiral phase HPLC demonstrates that ANR acts as a flavan-3-ol C(3)-epimerase under such conditions, but this is only observed with 2R-flavan-3-ols, not with 2S-flavan-3-ols produced by the enzyme in the forward reaction. In the presence of deuterated coenzyme 4S-NADPD, ANR transforms anthocyanidins into dideuterated flavan-3-ols. The regiospecificity of deuterium incorporation into catechin and afzelechin - derived from cyanidin and pelargonidin, respectively - was analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with electro- spray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS), and it was found that deuterium was always incorporated at C(2) and C(4). We conclude that C(3)-epimerization should be achieved by tautomerization between the two hydride transfers and that this produces a quinone methide intermediate which serves as C(4) target of the second hydride transfer, thereby avoiding any stereospecific modification of carbon 3. The inversion of C(2) stereochemistry required for 'reverse epimerization' suggests that the 2S configuration induces an irreversible product dissociation.

  13. A role for 5alpha-reductase activity in the development of male homosexuality?

    PubMed

    Alias, A G

    2004-12-01

    Higher body hair with lower mesmorphism ratings were observed in Caucasian homosexual men compared with the general male population, reflecting elevated 5alpha-reductase (5alphaR) activity, and higher dihydrotestosterone-to-testosterone (DHT-to-T) ratio, in sharp contrast to 46,XY 5alphaR 2 deficiency subjects, who are often born with ambiguous, or female genitalia, but tend to grow up to be muscular, heterosexual men with very little body hair, or beard. One study also showed them scoring around dull normal IQs. A greater prevalence of liberal body hair growth in men with higher IQs and/or educational levels was also observed in several samples. The exceptions to this statistical trend are too unsettling, however. Nevertheless, the results of a number of published studies, including one showing higher DHT-to-T ratio in homosexual men, done with different objectives over a span of 80 years, together strongly support these findings. Furthermore, in an animal model, "cognitive-enhancing effects" of "5alpha-reduced androgen [metabolites]" were recently demonstrated.

  14. Giardia, Entamoeba, and Trichomonas enzymes activate metronidazole (nitroreductases) and inactivate metronidazole (nitroimidazole reductases).

    PubMed

    Pal, Dibyarupa; Banerjee, Sulagna; Cui, Jike; Schwartz, Aaron; Ghosh, Sudip K; Samuelson, John

    2009-02-01

    Infections with Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, and Trichomonas vaginalis, which cause diarrhea, dysentery, and vaginitis, respectively, are each treated with metronidazole. Here we show that Giardia, Entamoeba, and Trichomonas have oxygen-insensitive nitroreductase (ntr) genes which are homologous to those genes that have nonsense mutations in metronidazole-resistant Helicobacter pylori isolates. Entamoeba and Trichomonas also have nim genes which are homologous to those genes expressed in metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides fragilis isolates. Recombinant Giardia, Entamoeba, and Trichomonas nitroreductases used NADH rather than the NADPH used by Helicobacter, and two recombinant Entamoeba nitroreductases increased the metronidazole sensitivity of transformed Escherichia coli strains. Conversely, the recombinant nitroimidazole reductases (NIMs) of Entamoeba and Trichmonas conferred very strong metronidazole resistance to transformed bacteria. The Ehntr1 gene of the genome project HM-1:IMSS strain of Entamoeba histolytica had a nonsense mutation, and the same nonsense mutation was present in 3 of 22 clinical isolates of Entamoeba. While ntr and nim mRNAs were variably expressed by cultured Entamoeba and Trichomonas isolates, there was no relationship to metronidazole sensitivity. We conclude that microaerophilic protists have bacterium-like enzymes capable of activating metronidazole (nitroreductases) and inactivating metronidazole (NIMs). While Entamoeba and Trichomonas displayed some of the changes (nonsense mutations and gene overexpression) associated with metronidazole resistance in bacteria, these changes did not confer metronidazole resistance to the microaerophilic protists examined here.

  15. Evidence for Increased 5α-Reductase Activity During Early Childhood in Daughters of Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Torchen, Laura C.; Idkowiak, Jan; Fogel, Naomi R.; O'Neil, Donna M.; Shackleton, Cedric H. L.; Arlt, Wiebke

    2016-01-01

    Context: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heritable, complex genetic disease. Animal models suggest that androgen exposure at critical developmental stages contributes to disease pathogenesis. We hypothesized that genetic variation resulting in increased androgen production produces the phenotypic features of PCOS by programming during critical developmental periods. Although we have not found evidence for increased in utero androgen levels in cord blood in the daughters of women with PCOS (PCOS-d), target tissue androgen production may be amplified by increased 5α-reductase activity analogous to findings in adult affected women. It is possible to noninvasively test this hypothesis by examining urinary steroid metabolites. Objective: We performed this study to investigate whether PCOS-d have altered androgen metabolism during early childhood. Design, Setting, and Participants: Twenty-one PCOS-d, 1–3 years old, and 36 control girls of comparable age were studied at an academic medical center. Main Outcome Measures: Urinary steroid metabolites were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Twenty-four hour steroid excretion rates and precursor to product ratios suggestive of 5α-reductase and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were calculated. Results: Age did not differ but weight for length Z-scores were higher in PCOS-d compared to control girls (P = .02). PCOS-d had increased 5α-tetrahydrocortisol:tetrahydrocortisol ratios (P = .04), suggesting increased global 5α-reductase activity. There was no evidence for differences in 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity. Steroid metabolite excretion was not correlated with weight. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that differences in androgen metabolism are present in early childhood in PCOS-d. Increased 5α-reductase activity could contribute to the development of PCOS by amplifying target tissue androgen action. PMID:26990942

  16. Induction of Xylose Reductase and Xylitol Dehydrogenase Activities in Pachysolen tannophilus and Pichia stipitis on Mixed Sugars

    PubMed Central

    Bicho, Paul A.; Runnals, P. Lynn; Cunningham, J. Douglas; Lee, Hung

    1988-01-01

    The induction of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase activities on mixed sugars was investigated in the yeasts Pachysolen tannophilus and Pichia stipitis. Enzyme activities induced on d-xylose served as the controls. In both yeasts, d-glucose, d-mannose, and 2-deoxyglucose inhibited enzyme induction by d-xylose to various degrees. Cellobiose, l-arabinose, and d-galactose were not inhibitory. In liquid batch culture, P. tannophilus utilized d-glucose and d-mannose rapidly and preferentially over d-xylose, while d-galactose consumption was poor and lagged behind that of the pentose sugar. In P. stipitis, all three hexoses were used preferentially over d-xylose. The results showed that the repressibility of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase may limit the potential of yeast fermentation of pentose sugars in hydrolysates of lignocellulosic substrates. PMID:16347538

  17. Residues in the Distal Heme Pocket of Arabidopsis Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobins: Implication for Nitrite Reductase Activity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nitin; Astegno, Alessandra; Chen, Jian; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Dominici, Paola

    2016-04-28

    It is well-established that plant hemoglobins (Hbs) are involved in nitric oxide (NO) metabolism via NO dioxygenase and/or nitrite reductase activity. The ferrous-deoxy Arabidopsis Hb1 and Hb2 (AHb1 and AHb2) have been shown to reduce nitrite to NO under hypoxia. Here, to test the hypothesis that a six- to five-coordinate heme iron transition might mediate the control of the nitrite reduction rate, we examined distal pocket mutants of AHb1 and AHb2 for nitrite reductase activity, NO production and spectroscopic features. Absorption spectra of AHbs distal histidine mutants showed that AHb1 mutant (H69L) is a stable pentacoordinate high-spin species in both ferrous and ferric states, whereas heme iron in AHb2 mutant (H66L) is hexacoordinated low-spin with Lys69 as the sixth ligand. The bimolecular rate constants for nitrite reduction to NO were 13.3 ± 0.40, 7.3 ± 0.5, 10.6 ± 0.8 and 171.90 ± 9.00 M(-1)·s(-1) for AHb1, AHb2, AHb1 H69L and AHb2 H66L, respectively, at pH 7.4 and 25 °C. Consistent with the reductase activity, the amount of NO detected by chemiluminescence was significantly higher in the AHb2 H66L mutant. Our data indicate that nitrite reductase activity is determined not only by heme coordination, but also by a unique distal heme pocket in each AHb.

  18. Residues in the Distal Heme Pocket of Arabidopsis Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobins: Implication for Nitrite Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nitin; Astegno, Alessandra; Chen, Jian; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Dominici, Paola

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that plant hemoglobins (Hbs) are involved in nitric oxide (NO) metabolism via NO dioxygenase and/or nitrite reductase activity. The ferrous-deoxy Arabidopsis Hb1 and Hb2 (AHb1 and AHb2) have been shown to reduce nitrite to NO under hypoxia. Here, to test the hypothesis that a six- to five-coordinate heme iron transition might mediate the control of the nitrite reduction rate, we examined distal pocket mutants of AHb1 and AHb2 for nitrite reductase activity, NO production and spectroscopic features. Absorption spectra of AHbs distal histidine mutants showed that AHb1 mutant (H69L) is a stable pentacoordinate high-spin species in both ferrous and ferric states, whereas heme iron in AHb2 mutant (H66L) is hexacoordinated low-spin with Lys69 as the sixth ligand. The bimolecular rate constants for nitrite reduction to NO were 13.3 ± 0.40, 7.3 ± 0.5, 10.6 ± 0.8 and 171.90 ± 9.00 M−1·s−1 for AHb1, AHb2, AHb1 H69L and AHb2 H66L, respectively, at pH 7.4 and 25 °C. Consistent with the reductase activity, the amount of NO detected by chemiluminescence was significantly higher in the AHb2 H66L mutant. Our data indicate that nitrite reductase activity is determined not only by heme coordination, but also by a unique distal heme pocket in each AHb. PMID:27136534

  19. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.W.; Robinson, H.; Yeung, N.; Gao, Y.-G.; Miner, K. D.; Lei, L.; Lu, Y.

    2010-07-28

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN?-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  20. Introducing a 2-His-1-Glu Nonheme Iron Center into Myoglobin Confers Nitric Oxide Reductase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Y Lin; N Yeung; Y Gao; K Miner; L Lei; H Robinson; Y Lu

    2011-12-31

    A conserved 2-His-1-Glu metal center, as found in natural nonheme iron-containing enzymes, was engineered into sperm whale myoglobin by replacing Leu29 and Phe43 with Glu and His, respectively (swMb L29E, F43H, H64, called Fe{sub B}Mb(-His)). A high resolution (1.65 {angstrom}) crystal structure of Cu(II)-CN{sup -}-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) was determined, demonstrating that the unique 2-His-1-Glu metal center was successfully created within swMb. The Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) can bind Cu, Fe, or Zn ions, with both Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) and Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) exhibiting nitric oxide reductase (NOR) activities. Cu dependent NOR activity was significantly higher than that of Fe in the same metal binding site. EPR studies showed that the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}O catalyzed by these two enzymes resulted in different intermediates; a five-coordinate heme-NO species was observed for Cu(I)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) due to the cleavage of the proximal heme Fe-His bond, while Fe(II)-Fe{sub B}Mb(-His) remained six-coordinate. Therefore, both the metal ligand, Glu29, and the metal itself, Cu or Fe, play crucial roles in NOR activity. This study presents a novel protein model of NOR and provides insights into a newly discovered member of the NOR family, gNOR.

  1. Kinetics of Hydrogen Atom Abstraction from Substrate by an Active Site Thiyl Radical in Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides in all organisms. Active E. coli class Ia RNR is an α2β2 complex that undergoes reversible, long-range proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) over a pathway of redox active amino acids (β-Y122 → [β-W48] → β-Y356 → α-Y731 → α-Y730 → α-C439) that spans ∼35 Å. To unmask PCET kinetics from rate-limiting conformational changes, we prepared a photochemical RNR containing a [ReI] photooxidant site-specifically incorporated at position 355 ([Re]-β2), adjacent to PCET pathway residue Y356 in β. [Re]-β2 was further modified by replacing Y356 with 2,3,5-trifluorotyrosine to enable photochemical generation and spectroscopic observation of chemically competent tyrosyl radical(s). Using transient absorption spectroscopy, we compare the kinetics of Y· decay in the presence of substrate and wt-α2, Y731F-α2 ,or C439S-α2, as well as with 3′-[2H]-substrate and wt-α2. We find that only in the presence of wt-α2 and the unlabeled substrate do we observe an enhanced rate of radical decay indicative of forward radical propagation. This observation reveals that cleavage of the 3′-C–H bond of substrate by the transiently formed C439· thiyl radical is rate-limiting in forward PCET through α and has allowed calculation of a lower bound for the rate constant associated with this step of (1.4 ± 0.4) × 104 s–1. Prompting radical propagation with light has enabled observation of PCET events heretofore inaccessible, revealing active site chemistry at the heart of RNR catalysis. PMID:25353063

  2. The benzimidazole based drugs show good activity against T. gondii but poor activity against its proposed enoyl reductase enzyme target.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Craig; McPhillie, Martin J; Zhou, Ying; Woods, Stuart; Afanador, Gustavo A; Rawson, Shaun; Khaliq, Farzana; Prigge, Sean T; Roberts, Craig W; Rice, David W; McLeod, Rima; Fishwick, Colin W; Muench, Stephen P

    2014-02-01

    The enoyl acyl-carrier protein reductase (ENR) enzyme of the apicomplexan parasite family has been intensely studied for antiparasitic drug design for over a decade, with the most potent inhibitors targeting the NAD(+) bound form of the enzyme. However, the higher affinity for the NADH co-factor over NAD(+) and its availability in the natural environment makes the NADH complex form of ENR an attractive target. Herein, we have examined a benzimidazole family of inhibitors which target the NADH form of Francisella ENR, but despite good efficacy against Toxoplasma gondii, the IC50 for T. gondii ENR is poor, with no inhibitory activity at 1 μM. Moreover similar benzimidazole scaffolds are potent against fungi which lack the ENR enzyme and as such we believe that there may be significant off target effects for this family of inhibitors.

  3. Glutathione S-transferase activity in follicular fluid from women undergoing ovarian stimulation: role in maturation.

    PubMed

    Meijide, Susana; Hernández, M Luisa; Navarro, Rosaura; Larreategui, Zaloa; Ferrando, Marcos; Ruiz-Sanz, José Ignacio; Ruiz-Larrea, M Begoña

    2014-10-01

    Female infertility involves an emotional impact for the woman, often leading to a state of anxiety and low self-esteem. The assisted reproduction techniques (ART) are used to overcome the problem of infertility. In a first step of the in vitro fertilization therapy women are subjected to an ovarian stimulation protocol to obtain mature oocytes, which will result in competent oocytes necessary for fertilization to occur. Ovarian stimulation, however, subjects the women to a high physical and psychological stress, thus being essential to improve ART and to find biomarkers of dysfunction and fertility. GSH is an important antioxidant, and is also used in detoxification reactions, catalysed by glutathione S-transferases (GST). In the present work, we have investigated the involvement of GST in follicular maturation. Patients with fertility problems and oocyte donors were recruited for the study. From each woman follicles at two stages of maturation were extracted at the preovulatory stage. Follicular fluid was separated from the oocyte by centrifugation and used as the enzyme source. GST activity was determined based on its conjugation with 3,4-dichloronitrobenzene and the assay was adapted to a 96-well microplate reader. The absorbance was represented against the incubation time and the curves were adjusted to linearity (R(2)>0.990). Results showed that in both donors and patients GST activity was significantly lower in mature oocytes compared to small ones. These results suggest that GST may play a role in the follicle maturation by detoxifying xenobiotics, thus contributing to the normal development of the oocyte. Supported by FIS/FEDER (PI11/02559), Gobierno Vasco (Dep. Educación, Universiades e Investigación, IT687-13), and UPV/EHU (CLUMBER UFI11/20 and PES13/58). The work was approved by the Ethics Committee of the UPV/EHU (CEISH/96/2011/RUIZLARREA), and performed according to the UPV/EHU and IVI-Bilbao agreement (Ref. 2012/01).

  4. The unique N terminus of the herpes simplex virus type 1 large subunit is not required for ribonucleotide reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Conner, J; Macfarlane, J; Lankinen, H; Marsden, H

    1992-01-01

    Using purified bacterially expressed herpes simplex virus type 1 ribonucleotide reductase large subunit (R1) and the proteolytic enzymes chymotrypsin and trypsin, we have generated stable N-terminal truncations. Chymotrypsin removes 246 amino acids from the amino terminus to produce a fragment (dN246R1) which retains full enzymic activity and affinity for the small subunit (R2). Treatment of R1 with trypsin produces a 120K protein and a cleavage at amino acid residue 305 to produce a fragment (dN305R1) which remains associated with a 33K N-terminal polypeptide. Although this 33K-dN305R1 complex retains full binding affinity for R2 its reductase activity is reduced by approximately 50%. Increasing the concentration of trypsin removes the 33K N-terminal polypeptide resulting in dN305R1 which, when bound to R2, has full ribonucleotide reductase activity. Like R1, dN246R1 and dN305R1 each exist as dimers showing that the first 305 amino acids of R1 are not necessary for dimer formation. These results indicate that, in structural studies of subunit interaction, dN246R1 or dN305R1 can be considered as suitable replacements for intact R1.

  5. Effect of dehydroepiandrosterone derivatives on the activity of 5α-reductase isoenzymes and on cancer cell line PC-3.

    PubMed

    Bratoeff, Eugene; Garrido, Mariana; Ramírez-Apan, Teresa; Heuze, Yvonne; Sánchez, Araceli; Soriano, Juan; Cabeza, Marisa

    2014-11-01

    It is well known that testosterone (T) under the influence of 5α-reductase enzyme is converted to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which causes androgen-dependent diseases. The aim of this study was to synthesize new dehydroepiandrosterone derivatives (3a-e, 4a-i, 6 and 7) having potential inhibitory activity against the 5α-reductase enzyme. This paper also reports the in vivo pharmacological effect of these steroidal molecules. The results from this study showed that all compounds exhibited low inhibitory activity for 5α-reductase type 1 and 2 enzymes and they failed to bind to the androgen receptor. Furthermore, in the in vivo experiment, steroids 3b, 4f, and 4 g showed comparable antiandrogenic activity to that of finasteride; only derivatives 4d and 7 produced a considerable decrease in the weight of the prostate gland of gonadectomized hamsters treated with (T). On the other hand, compounds 4a, f and h showed 100% inhibition of the growth of prostate cancer cell line PC-3, with compound 4 g having a 98.2% antiproliferative effect at 50 μM. The overall data indicated that these steroidal molecules, having an aromatic ester moiety at C-3 (4f-h), could have anticancer properties.

  6. Selenium status, lipid peroxides concentration, and glutathione peroxidase activity in the blood of power station and rubber factory workers.

    PubMed

    Zachara, B A; Wasowicz, W; Sklodowska, M; Gromadzinska, J

    1987-01-01

    Concentration of selenium in whole blood and plasma, lipid peroxides in plasma, and glutathione peroxidase activities in red blood cell hemolysates and plasma were determined in 49 coal power plant workers and in 50 rubber factory workers. The results were compared with those obtained for 58 nonindustrial controls. Whole blood selenium was significantly lower and plasma lipid peroxides were significantly higher in power plant workers when compared to the nonindustrial group. In the rubber factory workers, whole blood selenium and red blood cells and plasma glutathione peroxidase activities were significantly lower than in the control group. Urinary output of selenium was also significantly decreased in rubber factory workers. Slightly elevated lipid peroxides were also observed in that group. It seems reasonable to conclude that the lower blood selenium and decreased urinary output of this element may result from increased loss of selenium with perspiration. No correlation has been observed between selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity and between enzyme activity and lipid peroxides concentration in the industrial group.

  7. Inhibition of type 1 and type 2 5alpha-reductase activity by free fatty acids, active ingredients of Permixon.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, Jean Pierre; Cousse, Henri; Martin, Pierre Marie

    2002-10-01

    In different cell systems, the lipido-sterolic extract of Serenoa repens (LSESr, Permixon inhibits both type 1 and type 2 5alpha-reductase activity (5alphaR1 and 5alphaR2). LSESr is mainly constituted of fatty acids (90+/-5%) essentially as free fatty acids (80%). Among these free fatty acids, the main components are oleic and lauric acids which represent 65% and linoleic and myristic acids 15%. To evaluate the inhibitory effect of the different components of LSESr on 5alphaR1 or 5alphaR2 activity, the corresponding type 1 and type 2 human genes have been cloned and expressed in the baculovirus-directed insect cell expression system Sf9. The cells were incubated at pH 5.5 (5alphaR2) and pH 7.4 (5alphaR1) with 1 or 3nM testosterone in presence or absence of various concentrations of LSESr or of its different components. Dihydrotestosterone formation was measured with an automatic system combining HPLC and an on-line radiodetector. The inhibition of 5alphaR1 and 5alphaR2 activity was only observed with free fatty acids: esterified fatty acids, alcohols as well as sterols assayed were inactive. A specificity of the fatty acids in 5alphaR1 or 5alphaR2 inhibition has been found. Long unsaturated chains (oleic and linolenic) were active (IC(50)=4+/-2 and 13+/-3 microg/ml, respectively) on 5alphaR1 but to a much lesser extent (IC(50)>100 and 35+/-21 microg/ml, respectively) on 5alphaR2. Palmitic and stearic acids were inactive on the two isoforms. Lauric acid was active on 5alphaR1 (IC(50)=17+/-3 microg/ml) and 5alphaR2 (IC(50)=19+/-9 microg/ml). The inhibitory activity of myristic acid was evaluated on 5alphaR2 only and found active on this isoform (IC(50)=4+/-2 microg/ml). The dual inhibitory activity of LSESr on 5alpha-reductase type 1 and type 2 can be attributed to its high content in free fatty acids.

  8. Exogenous Methyl Jasmonate Treatment Increases Glucosinolate Biosynthesis and Quinone Reductase Activity in Kale Leaf Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Kang-Mo; Jeffery, Elizabeth H.; Juvik, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) spray treatments were applied to the kale varieties ‘Dwarf Blue Curled Vates’ and ‘Red Winter’ in replicated field plantings in 2010 and 2011 to investigate alteration of glucosinolate (GS) composition in harvested leaf tissue. Aqueous solutions of 250 µM MeJA were sprayed to saturation on aerial plant tissues four days prior to harvest at commercial maturity. The MeJA treatment significantly increased gluconasturtiin (56%), glucobrassicin (98%), and neoglucobrassicin (150%) concentrations in the apical leaf tissue of these genotypes over two seasons. Induction of quinone reductase (QR) activity, a biomarker for anti-carcinogenesis, was significantly increased by the extracts from the leaf tissue of these two cultivars. Extracts of apical leaf tissues had greater MeJA mediated increases in phenolics, glucosinolate concentrations, GS hydrolysis products, and QR activity than extracts from basal leaf tissue samples. The concentration of the hydrolysis product of glucoraphanin, sulforphane was significantly increased in apical leaf tissue of the cultivar ‘Red Winter’ in both 2010 and 2011. There was interaction between exogenous MeJA treatment and environmental conditions to induce endogenous JA. Correlation analysis revealed that indole-3-carbanol (I3C) generated from the hydrolysis of glucobrassicin significantly correlated with QR activity (r = 0.800, P<0.001). Concentrations required to double the specific QR activity (CD values) of I3C was calculated at 230 µM, which is considerably weaker at induction than other isothiocyanates like sulforphane. To confirm relationships between GS hydrolysis products and QR activity, a range of concentrations of MeJA sprays were applied to kale leaf tissues of both cultivars in 2011. Correlation analysis of these results indicated that sulforaphane, NI3C, neoascorbigen, I3C, and diindolylmethane were all significantly correlated with QR activity. Thus, increased QR activity may be due to

  9. Exposure to Silver Nanoparticles Inhibits Selenoprotein Synthesis and the Activity of Thioredoxin Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Milan; Singh, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Background: Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver (Ag)-based materials are increasingly being incorporated into consumer products, and although humans have been exposed to colloidal Ag in many forms for decades, this rise in the use of Ag materials has spurred interest into their toxicology. Recent reports have shown that exposure to AgNPs or Ag ions leads to oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and reduced cell proliferation. Previous studies have shown that Ag accumulates in tissues as silver sulfides (Ag2S) and silver selenide (Ag2Se). Objectives: In this study we investigated whether exposure of cells in culture to AgNPs or Ag ions at subtoxic doses would alter the effective metabolism of selenium, that is, the incorporation of selenium into selenoproteins. Methods: For these studies we used a keratinocyte cell model (HaCat) and a lung cell model (A549). We also tested (in vitro, both cellular and chemical) whether Ag ions could inhibit the activity of a key selenoenzyme, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). Results: We found that exposure to AgNPs or far lower levels of Ag ions led to a dose-dependent inhibition of selenium metabolism in both cell models. The synthesis of protein was not altered under these conditions. Exposure to nanomolar levels of Ag ions effectively blocked selenium metabolism, suggesting that Ag ion leaching was likely the mechanism underlying observed changes during AgNP exposure. Exposure likewise inhibited TrxR activity in cultured cells, and Ag ions were potent inhibitors of purified rat TrxR isoform 1 (cytosolic) (TrxR1) enzyme. Conclusions: Exposure to AgNPs leads to the inhibition of selenoprotein synthesis and inhibition of TrxR1. Further, we propose these two sites of action comprise the likely mechanism underlying increases in oxidative stress, increases endoplasmic reticulum stress, and reduced cell proliferation during exposure to Ag. PMID:21965219

  10. Synthesis of 3-[(N-carboalkoxy)ethylamino]-indazole-dione derivatives and their biological activities on human liver carbonyl reductase.

    PubMed

    Berhe, Solomon; Slupe, Andrew; Luster, Choice; Charlier, Henry A; Warner, Don L; Zalkow, Leon H; Burgess, Edward M; Enwerem, Nkechi M; Bakare, Oladapo

    2010-01-01

    A series of indazole-dione derivatives were synthesized by the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of appropriate substituted benzoquinones or naphthoquinones and N-carboalkoxyamino diazopropane derivatives. These compounds were evaluated for their effects on human carbonyl reductase. Several of the analogs were found to serve as substrates for carbonyl reductase with a wide range of catalytic efficiencies, while four analogs display inhibitory activities with IC(50) values ranging from 3-5 microM. Two of the inhibitors were studied in greater detail and were found to be noncompetitive inhibitors against both NADPH and menadione with K(I) values ranging between 2 and 11 microM. Computational studies suggest that conformation of the compounds may determine whether the indazole-diones bind productively to yield product or nonproductively to inhibit the enzyme.

  11. Interaction of Product Analogues With the Active Site of Rhodobacter Sphaeroides Dimethyl Sulfoxide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Nelson, K.J.; Harris, H.H.; Doonan, C.J.; Rajagopalan, K.V.; /Saskatchewan U. /Duke U. /Sydney U.

    2007-07-09

    We report a structural characterization using X-ray absorption spectroscopy of Rhodobacter sphaeroides dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase reduced with trimethylarsine, and show that this is structurally analogous to the physiologically relevant dimethylsulfide-reduced DMSO reductase. Our data unambiguously indicate that these species should be regarded as formal MoIV species, and indicate a classical coordination complex of trimethylarsine oxide, with no special structural distortions. The similarity of the trimethylarsine and dimethylsulfide complexes suggests in turn that the dimethylsulfide reduced enzyme possesses a classical coordination of DMSO with no special elongation of the S-O bond, as previously suggested.

  12. Improvement of oxidized glutathione fermentation by thiol redox metabolism engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Aoki, Naoko; Kobayashi, Jyumpei; Kiriyama, Kentaro; Nishida, Keiji; Araki, Michihiro; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-11-01

    Glutathione is a valuable tripeptide widely used in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industries. In industrial fermentation, glutathione is currently produced primarily using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Intracellular glutathione exists in two forms; the majority is present as reduced glutathione (GSH) and a small amount is present as oxidized glutathione (GSSG). However, GSSG is more stable than GSH and is a more attractive form for the storage of glutathione extracted from yeast cells after fermentation. In this study, intracellular GSSG content was improved by engineering thiol oxidization metabolism in yeast. An engineered strain producing high amounts of glutathione from over-expression of glutathione synthases and lacking glutathione reductase was used as a platform strain. Additional over-expression of thiol oxidase (1.8.3.2) genes ERV1 or ERO1 increased the GSSG content by 2.9-fold and 2.0-fold, respectively, compared with the platform strain, without decreasing cell growth. However, over-expression of thiol oxidase gene ERV2 showed almost no effect on the GSSG content. Interestingly, ERO1 over-expression did not decrease the GSH content, raising the total glutathione content of the cell, but ERV1 over-expression decreased the GSH content, balancing the increase in the GSSG content. Furthermore, the increase in the GSSG content due to ERO1 over-expression was enhanced by additional over-expression of the gene encoding Pdi1, whose reduced form activates Ero1 in the endoplasmic reticulum. These results indicate that engineering the thiol redox metabolism of S. cerevisiae improves GSSG and is critical to increasing the total productivity and stability of glutathione.

  13. Dynamics of glutathione regulation in Schistosoma mansoni: correlations with the acute effects of oltipraz

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, D.D.

    1984-01-01

    Glutathione is present in adult Schistosoma mansoni (0.336 +/- 0.012 nmol/mg protein) at significantly lower levels than uninfected host tissues (1.051 +/- 0.013 nmol/mg protein, liver; 0.627 +/- 0.013 nmol/mg protein, kidney). Host hepatic glutathione levels decline significantly during the course of infection, while renal cortical glutathione levels are unaffected. Of the enzymes regulating glutathione utilization, glutathione reductase in the male parasite exhibits a specific activity of 10.3 +/- 4.2 nmol/mg protein, 15% of hepatic values. The apparent glutathione S-transferase activity was 26 +/- 7 ..mu..mol conjugate formed/min/mg protein with p-nitrobenzyl chloride as substrate (13% of hepatic values) and 526 +/- 18 ..mu..mol conjugate formed/min/mg protein with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as substrate (43% of hepatic values). Male schistosomes exhibited negligible glutathione peroxidase activity. Oltipraz, an antischistosomal compound, effected a significant depletion of parasite and host glutathione levels within 1 h of exposure in vivo and in vitro (at 250 mg/kg and 10 ..mu..M, respectively). Host tissue glutathionine levels returned to, or above, control levels by 6 h after oltipraz administration, while parasite glutathione levels remained significantly depressed. Uptake of (/sup 35/S) cysteine or (/sup 35/S) cystine by schistosomes was inhibited by oltipraz. However, the drug did not alter the relative distribution of label once incorporated into the parasite, indicating that the enzymes of glutathione synthesis were not directly inhibited.

  14. Effect of dietary selenium concentration and duration of selenium feeding on hepatic glutathione concentrations in rats

    SciTech Connect

    LeBoeuf, R.A.; Zentner, K.L.; Hoekstra, W.G.

    1985-11-01

    Studies were conducted in rats to determine the effect of dietary selenium (Se) concentration on hepatic glutathione concentrations and enzyme activities associated with the maintenance of the cellular glutathione status. Male rats were fed 0.1, 3.0, or 6.0 ppm Se as Na/sub 2/SeO/sub 3/ for 2, 4, or 6 weeks at which time they were killed and analyses were performed. Both 3.0 and 6.0 ppm Se caused a significant dose-dependent increase in hepatic-reduced glutathione (GSH) by 4 weeks of feeding compared to 0.1 ppm Se. The increase in GSH was preceded by significant, dose-dependent increases in oxidized glutathione (GSSG) as well as the GSSG to GSH ratio. Increases in GSSG and the GSSG to GSH ratio as well as in glutathione reductase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities were observed by 2 weeks of high Se feeding. The current findings substantiate previous results demonstrating effects of high Se on hepatic glutathione concentrations and further suggest that increased cellular GSSG concentrations or the GSSG to GSH ratio caused by 3.0 and 6.0 ppm dietary Se signals for adaptive changes in hepatic glutathione metabolism.

  15. [Induction of glutathione and activation of immune functions by low-dose, whole-body irradiation with gamma-rays].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Shuji

    2006-10-01

    We first examined the relation between the induction of glutathione and immune functions in mice after low-dose gamma-ray irradiation. Thereafter, inhibition of tumor growth by radiation was confirmed in Ehrlich solid tumor (EST)-bearing mice. The total glutathione level of the splenocytes transiently increased soon after irradiation and reached a maximum at around 4 h postirradiation. Thereafter, the level reverted to the 0 h value by 24 h postirradiation. A significantly high splenocyte proliferative response was also recognized 4 h postirradiation. Natural killer (NK) activity was also increased significantly in a similar manner. The time at which the response reached the maximum coincided well with that of maximum total glutathione levels of the splenocytes in the gamma-ray-irradiated mice. Reduced glutathione exogenously added to splenocytes obtained from normal mice enhanced the proliferative response and NK activity in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of radiation on tumor growth was then examined in EST-bearing mice. Repeated low-dose irradiation (0.5 Gy, four times, before and within an early time after inoculation) significantly delayed the tumor growth. Finally, the effect of single low-dose (0.5 Gy), whole-body gamma-ray irradiation on immune balance was examined to elucidate the mechanism underlying the antitumor immunity. The percentage of B cells in blood lymphocytes was selectively decreased after radiation, concomitant with an increase in that of the helper T cell population. The IFN-gamma level in splenocyte culture prepared from EST-bearing mice was significantly increased 48 h after radiation, although the level of IL-4 was unchanged. IL-12 secretion from macrophages was also enhanced by radiation. These results suggest that low-dose gamma-rays induce Th1 polarization and enhance the activities of tumoricidal effector cells, leading to an inhibition of tumor growth.

  16. A steady-state-kinetic model for formaldehyde dehydrogenase from human liver. A mechanism involving NAD+ and the hemimercaptal adduct of glutathione and formaldehyde as substrates and free glutathione as an allosteric activator of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Uotila, L; Mannervik, B

    1979-01-01

    The steady-state kinetics of formaldehyde dehydrogenase from human liver have been explored. Non-linearities were obtained in v-versus-v[S] plots. It was necessary and sufficient to consider two reactants of the equilibrium mixture of formaldehyde, glutathione and their hemimercaptal adduct for a complete description of the kinetics. A random sequential reaction scheme is proposed in which adduct and beta-NAD+ are the substrates. In addition, glutathione can bind to an allosteric regulatory site and only the glutathione-containing enzyme is considered productive. Various alternative reaction models were examined but no simple alterative was superior to the model chosen. The discrimination was largely based on results of non-linear regression analysis. Several S-substituted glutathione derivatives were tested as activators or inhibitors of the enzyme, but all were without effect. Thio-NAD+, nicotinamide--hypoxanthine dinucleotide and 3-acetylpyridine-adenine dinucleotide could substitute for beta-NAD+ as the nucleotide substrate. alpha-NAD+ and ADP-ribose were competitive inhibitors with respect to beta-NAD+ and non-competitive with glutathione and the adduct. When used simultaneously, the inhibitors were linear competitive versus each other, indicating a single nucleotide-binding site or, if more than one, non-co-operative binding sites. PMID:220952

  17. The effect of Alcide, a new antimicrobial drug, on rat blood glutathione and erythrocyte osmotic fragility, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, M S; Scatina, J

    1985-06-01

    Alcide is an antimicrobial drug which has been demonstrated to kill a variety of common pathogenic bacteria as well as fungi, in vitro. This agent is supplied in liquid and gel forms and consists of two parts, one of which contains sodium chlorite, while the other contains lactic acid as the active ingredients. Mixing of the two parts prior to use produces chlorine dioxide (ClO2), a strong oxidizing agent. A dose-dependent decrease in glutathione content and erythrocyte osmotic fragility occurred after incubation of whole blood with Alcide. Glutathione concentration and erythrocyte osmotic fragility approached the control values after 240 min of incubation with Alcide containing 1 mM NaClO2. The addition of exogenous glutathione (50 mg 100 ml-1) or glutathione reductase and NADPH to rat blood in the presence of Alcide returned erythrocyte osmotic fragility to control values. Treatment of rat blood with Alcide did not change glutathione reductase or glutathione peroxidase activities after 1 h of incubation.

  18. Iridoid synthase activity is common among the plant progesterone 5β-reductase family.

    PubMed

    Munkert, Jennifer; Pollier, Jacob; Miettinen, Karel; Van Moerkercke, Alex; Payne, Richard; Müller-Uri, Frieder; Burlat, Vincent; O'Connor, Sarah E; Memelink, Johan; Kreis, Wolfgang; Goossens, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus, the Madagascar periwinkle, synthesizes bioactive monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, including the anti-cancer drugs vinblastine and vincristine. The monoterpenoid branch of the alkaloid pathway leads to the secoiridoid secologanin and involves the enzyme iridoid synthase (IS), a member of the progesterone 5β-reductase (P5βR) family. IS reduces 8-oxogeranial to iridodial. Through transcriptome mining, we show that IS belongs to a family of six C. roseus P5βR genes. Characterization of recombinant CrP5βR proteins demonstrates that all but CrP5βR3 can reduce progesterone and thus can be classified as P5βRs. Three of them, namely CrP5βR1, CrP5βR2, and CrP5βR4, can also reduce 8-oxogeranial, pointing to a possible redundancy with IS (corresponding to CrP5βR5) in secoiridoid synthesis. In-depth functional analysis by subcellular protein localization, gene expression analysis, in situ hybridization, and virus-induced gene silencing indicate that besides IS, CrP5βR4 may also participate in secoiridoid biosynthesis. We cloned a set of P5βR genes from angiosperm plant species not known to produce iridoids and demonstrate that the corresponding recombinant proteins are also capable of using 8-oxogeranial as a substrate. This suggests that IS activity is intrinsic to angiosperm P5βR proteins and has evolved early during evolution.

  19. Iridoid Synthase Activity Is Common among the Plant Progesterone 5β-Reductase Family.

    PubMed

    Munkert, Jennifer; Pollier, Jacob; Miettinen, Karel; Van Moerkercke, Alex; Payne, Richard; Müller-Uri, Frieder; Burlat, Vincent; O'Connor, Sarah E; Memelink, Johan; Kreis, Wolfgang; Goossens, Alain

    2014-09-19

    Catharanthus roseus, the Madagascar periwinkle, synthesizes bioactive monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, among which the anti-cancer drugs vinblastine and vincristine. The monoterpenoid branch of the alkaloid pathway leads to the secoiridoid secologanin and involves the enzyme iridoid synthase (IS), a member of the progesterone 5β-reductase (P5βR) family. IS reduces 8-oxogeranial to iridodial. Through transcriptome mining, we show that IS belongs to a family of six C. roseus P5βR genes. Characterisation of recombinant CrP5βR proteins demonstrates that all but CrP5βR3 can reduce progesterone, and thus can be classified as P5βRs. Three of them, namely CrP5βR1, CrP5βR2 and CrP5βR4, could also reduce 8-oxogeranial, pointing to a possible redundancy with IS (corresponding to CrP5βR5) in secoiridoid synthesis. In depth functional analysis by subcellular protein localisation, gene expression analysis, in situ hybridisation and virus-induced gene silencing, indicates that besides IS, CrP5βR4 may also participate in secoiridoid biosynthesis. Finally, we cloned a set of P5βR genes from angiosperm plant species not known to produce iridoids and demonstrate that the corresponding recombinant proteins are also capable of using 8-oxogeranial as a substrate. This suggests that 'IS activity' is intrinsic to angiosperm P5βR proteins and has evolved early during evolution.

  20. Nitric Oxide (NO) Generation from Heme/Copper Assembly Mediated Nitrite Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hematian, Shabnam; Siegler, Maxime A.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) as a cellular signaling molecule and vasodilator regulates a range of physiological and pathological processes. Nitrite (NO2−) is recycled in vivo to generate nitric oxide, particularly in physiologic hypoxia and ischemia. The cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) binuclear hemea3/CuB active site is one entity known to be responsible for cellular nitrite conversion to nitric oxide. We recently reported that a partially reduced heme/Cu assembly reduces nitrite ion, producing NO; the heme serves as the reductant and cupric ion provides a Lewis Acid interaction with nitrite, facilitating nitrite (N−O) bond cleavage (Hematian et al., J Am Chem Soc 134:18912–18915, 2012). To further investigate this nitrite reductase (NIR) chemistry, copper(II)-nitrito complexes with tri-and tetra-dentate ligands were used in this study, where either O,O'-bidentate or O-unidentate modes of nitrite binding to the cupric center are present. To study the role of the reducing ability of the ferrous heme center, two different tetraarylporphyrinate-iron(II) complexes, one with electron donating para-methoxy peripheral substituents, (TMPP)FeII, and the other with electron withdrawing 2,6-difluorophenyl substituents, (F8)FeII, were employed. The results show that differing nitrite coordination modes to copper(II) ion leads to varying kinetic behavior. Here, also, the ferrous heme is in all cases the source of the reducing equivalent required to take nitrite to nitric oxide, but the reduction ability of the heme center does not play a key role in the observed overall reaction rate. Based on our observations, reaction mechanisms are proposed and discussed in terms of heme/Cu heterobinuclear structures. PMID:24430198

  1. Pivotal role of dihydrofolate reductase knockdown in the anticancer activity of 2-hydroxyoleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Lladó, Victoria; Terés, Silvia; Higuera, Mónica; Álvarez, Rafael; Noguera-Salva, Maria Antònia; Halver, John E.; Escribá, Pablo V.; Busquets, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    α-Hydroxy-9-cis-octadecenoic acid, a synthetic fatty acid that modifies the composition and structure of lipid membranes. 2-Hydroxyoleic acid (HOA) generated interest due to its potent, yet nontoxic, anticancer activity. It induces cell cycle arrest in human lung cancer (A549) cells and apoptosis in human leukemia (Jurkat) cells. These two pathways may explain how HOA induces regression of a variety of cancers. We showed that HOA repressed the expression of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), the enzyme responsible for tetrahydrofolate (THF) synthesis. Folinic acid, which readily produces THF without the participation of DHFR, reverses the antitumor effects of HOA in A549 and Jurkat cells, as well as the inhibitory influence on cyclin D and cdk2 in A549 cells, and on DNA and PARP degradation in Jurkat cells. This effect was very specific, because either elaidic acid (an analog of HOA) or other lipids, failed to alter A549 or Jurkat cell growth. THF is a cofactor necessary for DNA synthesis. Thus, impairment of DNA synthesis appears to be a common mechanism involved in the different responses elicited by cancer cells following treatment with HOA, namely cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. Compared with other antifolates, such as methotrexate, HOA did not directly inhibit DHFR but rather, it repressed its expression, a mode of action that offers certain therapeutic advantages. These results not only demonstrate the effect of a fatty acid on the expression of DHFR, but also emphasize the potential of HOA to be used as a wide-spectrum drug against cancer. PMID:19666584

  2. Nitric oxide generation from heme/copper assembly mediated nitrite reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Hematian, Shabnam; Siegler, Maxime A; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2014-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) as a cellular signaling molecule and vasodilator regulates a range of physiological and pathological processes. Nitrite (NO2 (-)) is recycled in vivo to generate nitric oxide, particularly in physiologic hypoxia and ischemia. The cytochrome c oxidase binuclear heme a 3/CuB active site is one entity known to be responsible for conversion of cellular nitrite to nitric oxide. We recently reported that a partially reduced heme/copper assembly reduces nitrite ion, producing nitric oxide; the heme serves as the reductant and the cupric ion provides a Lewis acid interaction with nitrite, facilitating nitrite (N-O) bond cleavage (Hematian et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134:18912-18915, 2012). To further investigate this nitrite reductase chemistry, copper(II)-nitrito complexes with tridentate and tetradentate ligands were used in this study, where either O,O'-bidentate or O-unidentate modes of nitrite binding to the cupric center are present. To study the role of the reducing ability of the ferrous heme center, two different tetraarylporphyrinate-iron(II) complexes, one with electron-donating para-methoxy peripheral substituents and the other with electron-withdrawing 2,6-difluorophenyl substituents, were used. The results show that differing modes of nitrite coordination to the copper(II) ion lead to differing kinetic behavior. Here, also, the ferrous heme is in all cases the source of the reducing equivalent required to convert nitrite to nitric oxide, but the reduction ability of the heme center does not play a key role in the observed overall reaction rate. On the basis of our observations, reaction mechanisms are proposed and discussed in terms of heme/copper heterobinuclear structures.

  3. Biosynthesis of catalytically active rat testosterone 5. alpha. -reductase in microinjected Xenopus oocytes: Evidence for tissue-specific differences in translatable mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Farkash, Y.; Soreq, H.; Orly, J. )

    1988-08-01

    The enzyme 4-ene-3-ketosteroid-5{alpha}-oxidoreductase plays a key role in androgen-dependent target tissues, where it catalyzes the conversion of testosterone to the biologically active dihydrotestosterone. The regulation of 5{alpha}-reductase expression has not been studied at the molecular level as the enzyme is a membrane protein that is labile in cell-free homogenates. The authors developed a sensitive bioassay of the enzyme activity expressed in Xenopus oocytes microinjected with rat liver and prostate mRNA. After microinjection, incubation of intact oocytes in the presence of ({sup 3}H)testosterone revealed the in ovo appearance of active 5{alpha}-reductase. Polyandenylylated RNA was fractionated by sucrose gradient centrifugation, and the enzymatic activity was shown to be encoded by a 1,600- to 2,000-base-pair fraction of hepatic poly(A){sup +} RNA. 5{alpha}-Reductase mRNA was most efficiently translated when up to 80 ng of RNA was injected per oocyte. In the injected oocytes, 5{alpha}-reductase mRNA was found to be a short-lived molecule whereas its in ovo translatable 5{alpha}-reductase protein exhibited stable enzymatic activity for over 40 hr. Moreover, the levels of translatable tissue-specific 5{alpha}-reductase mRNAs as monitored in the Xenopus oocytes correlated with the variable 5{alpha}-reductase activities in female rat liver, male rat liver, and prostate homogenates. Altogether, these results provide supporting evidence in favor of the transcriptional control of 5{alpha}-reductase expression in rat tissues.

  4. Serenoa repens (Permixon) inhibits the 5alpha-reductase activity of human prostate cancer cell lines without interfering with PSA expression.

    PubMed

    Habib, Fouad K; Ross, Margaret; Ho, Clement K H; Lyons, Valerie; Chapman, Karen

    2005-03-20

    The phytotherapeutic agent Serenoa repens is an effective dual inhibitor of 5alpha-reductase isoenzyme activity in the prostate. Unlike other 5alpha-reductase inhibitors, Serenoa repens induces its effects without interfering with the cellular capacity to secrete PSA. Here, we focussed on the possible pathways that might differentiate the action of Permixon from that of synthetic 5alpha-reductase inhibitors. We demonstrate that Serenoa repens, unlike other 5alpha-reductase inhibitors, does not inhibit binding between activated AR and the steroid receptor-binding consensus in the promoter region of the PSA gene. This was shown by a combination of techniques: assessment of the effect of Permixon on androgen action in the LNCaP prostate cancer cell line revealed no suppression of AR and maintenance of PSA protein expression at control levels. This was consistent with reporter gene experiments showing that Permixon failed to interfere with AR-mediated transcriptional activation of PSA and that both testosterone and DHT were equally effective at maintaining this activity. Our results demonstrate that despite Serenoa repens effective inhibition of 5alpha-reductase activity in the prostate, it did not suppress PSA secretion. Therefore, we confirm the therapeutic advantage of Serenoa repens over other 5alpha-reductase inhibitors as treatment with the phytotherapeutic agent will permit the continuous use of PSA measurements as a useful biomarker for prostate cancer screening and for evaluating tumour progression.

  5. Thioredoxin reductase regulates AP-1 activity as well as thioredoxin nuclear localization via active cysteines in response to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Karimpour, Shervin; Lou, Junyang; Lin, Lilie L; Rene, Luis M; Lagunas, Lucio; Ma, Xinrong; Karra, Sreenivasu; Bradbury, C Matthew; Markovina, Stephanie; Goswami, Prabhat C; Spitz, Douglas R; Hirota, Kiichi; Kalvakolanu, Dhananjaya V; Yodoi, Junji; Gius, David

    2002-09-12

    A recently identified class of signaling factors uses critical cysteine motif(s) that act as redox-sensitive 'sulfhydryl switches' to reversibly modulate specific signal transduction cascades regulating downstream proteins with similar redox-sensitive sites. For example, signaling factors such as redox factor-1 (Ref-1) and transcription factors such as the AP-1 complex both contain redox-sensitive cysteine motifs that regulate activity in response to oxidative stress. The mammalian thioredoxin reductase-1 (TR) is an oxidoreductase selenocysteine-containing flavoprotein that also appears to regulate multiple downstream intracellular redox-sensitive proteins. Since ionizing radiation (IR) induces oxidative stress as well as increases AP-1 DNA-binding activity via the activation of Ref-1, the potential roles of TR and thioredoxin (TRX) in the regulation of AP-1 activity in response to IR were investigated. Permanently transfected cell lines that overexpress wild type TR demonstrated constitutive increases in AP-1 DNA-binding activity as well as AP-1-dependent reporter gene expression, relative to vector control cells. In contrast, permanently transfected cell lines expressing a TR gene with the active site cysteine motif deleted were unable to induce AP-1 activity or reporter gene expression in response to IR. Transient genetic overexpression of either the TR wild type or dominant-negative genes demonstrated similar results using a transient assay system. One mechanism through which TR regulates AP-1 activity appears to involve TRX sub-cellular localization, with no change in the total TRX content of the cell. These results identify a novel function of the TR enzyme as a signaling factor in the regulation of AP-1 activity via a cysteine motif located in the protein.

  6. Overexpression and enhanced specific activity of aldoketo reductases (AKR1B1 & AKR1B10) in human breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Ashok; Kumar, P Uday; Srinivasulu, M; Triveni, B; Sharada, K; Ismail, Ayesha; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash

    2017-02-01

    The incidence of breast cancer in India is on the rise and is rapidly becoming the primary cancer in Indian women. The aldoketo reductase (AKR) family has more than 190 proteins including aldose reductase (AKR1B1) and aldose reductase like protein (AKR1B10). Apart from liver cancer, the status of AKR1B1 and AKR1B10 with respect to their expression and activity has not been reported in other human cancers. We studied the specific activity and expression of AKR1B1 and AKR1B10 in breast non tumor and tumor tissues and in the blood. Fresh post-surgical breast cancer and non-cancer tissues and blood were collected from the subjects who were admitted for surgical therapy. Malignant, benign and pre-surgical chemotherapy samples were evaluated by histopathology scoring. Expression of AKR1B1 and AKR1B10 was carried out by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC) while specific activity was determined spectrophotometrically. The specific activity of AKR1B1 was significantly higher in red blood cells (RBC) in all three grades of primary surgical and post-chemotherapy samples. Specific activity of both AKR1B1 and AKR1B10 increased in tumor samples compared to their corresponding non tumor samples (primary surgical and post-chemotherapy). Immunoblotting and IHC data also indicated overexpression of AKR1B1 in all grades of tumors compared to their corresponding non tumor samples. There was no change in the specific activity of AKR1B1 in benign samples compared to all grades of tumor and non-tumors.

  7. Ethylene could influence ferric reductase, iron transporter, and H+-ATPase gene expression by affecting FER (or FER-like) gene activity.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Carlos; Waters, Brian M; Romera, F Javier; García, María José; Morales, María; Alcántara, Esteban; Pérez-Vicente, Rafael

    2006-01-01

    In previous works, it has been shown, by using ethylene inhibitors and precursors, that ethylene could participate in the regulation of the enhanced ferric reductase activity of Fe-deficient Strategy I plants. However, it was not known whether ethylene regulates the ferric reductase gene expression or other aspects related to this activity. This paper is a study of the effects of ethylene inhibitors and precursors on the expression of the genes encoding the ferric reductases and iron transporters of Arabidopsis thaliana (FRO2 and IRT1) and Lycopersicon esculentum (=Solanum lycopersicum) (FRO1 and IRT1) plants. The effects of ethylene inhibitors and precursors on the activity of the iron reductase and the iron transporter have been examined in parallel. Also studied were the effects of ethylene inhibitors and precursors on the expression of the H(+)-ATPase genes of cucumber (CsHA1 and CsHA2) and the transcription factor genes of tomato (LeFER) and Arabidopsis (AtFRU or AtFIT1, an LeFER homologue) that regulate ferric reductase, iron transporter, and H(+)-ATPse activity. The results obtained suggest that ethylene participates in the regulation of ferric reductase, the iron transporter, and H(+)-ATPase gene expression by affecting the FER (or FER-like) levels.

  8. Vasorelaxing activity of stable powder preparations of dinitrosyl iron complexes with cysteine or glutathione ligands.

    PubMed

    Vanin, Anatoly F; Mokh, Vladimir P; Serezhenkov, Vladimir A; Chazov, Evgeny I

    2007-05-01

    Vasorelaxant activity of new stable powder preparations of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC) with thiol-containing ligands was investigated on rat abdominal aorta rings. The preparations preserve their physicochemical characteristics (EPR and optical absorption) if stored for a long time in dry air (at least half-year). Three preparations of DNIC were tested: diamagnetic dimeric DNIC with glutathione (DNIC-GS 1:2) or cysteine (DNIC-cys 1:2) and paramagnetic monomeric DNIC with cysteine (DNIC-cys 1:20). Being dissolved in physiological solution the preparations induced relaxation of vessel similarly to that by earlier described non-stable DNICs which should be stored in liquid nitrogen. The amplitudes and kinetic characteristics of the relaxation were dependent on the incorporated thiolate ligands. Rapid transient relaxation followed by significant tone recovery to stationary level (plateau) was observed for DNIC-cys 1:2. DNIC-cys 1:20 also induced initial rapid relaxation followed by incomplete tone recovery. DNIC-GS 1:2 induced slow developing and long lasting relaxation. NO scavenger, hydroxocobalamin (2x10(-5)M) eliminated the rapid transitory relaxation induced by DNIC-cys 1:20 and did not influence significantly on the plateau level. SOD increased duration of the DNIC-cys 1:2 and DNIC-cys 1:20 induced relaxation. The addition of 5x10(-5)M DNIC-cys 1:2 or DNIC-cys 1:20 induced long lasting vasorelaxation within 20min and more. However the EPR measurements demonstrated full rapid disappearance (within 1-2min) of both type of DNIC-cys in Krebs medium bubbled with carbogen gas. This was not the case for DNIC-GS 1:2. We suggested that the long lasting vasorelaxation observed during the addition of DNICs-cys was induced by S-nitrosocysteine derived from DNICs-cys and stabilized by EDTA in Krebs medium. The suggestion is in line with the fact that strong ferrous chelator bathophenantroline disulfonate (BPDS) which is capable of rapid degradation of DNICs did not

  9. Altering the redox state of skeletal muscle by glutathione depletion increases the exercise‐activation of PGC‐1α

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Natalie A.; Matsumoto, Aya; Peake, Jonathan M.; Marsh, Susan A.; Peternelj, Tina‐Tinkara; Briskey, David; Fassett, Robert G.; Coombes, Jeff S.; Wadley, Glenn D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the relationship between markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, cell signaling, and antioxidant enzymes by depleting skeletal muscle glutathione with diethyl maleate (DEM) which resulted in a demonstrable increase in oxidative stress during exercise. Animals were divided into six groups: (1) sedentary control rats; (2) sedentary rats + DEM; (3) exercise control rats euthanized immediately after exercise; (4) exercise rats + DEM; (5) exercise control rats euthanized 4 h after exercise; and (6) exercise rats + DEM euthanized 4 h after exercise. Exercising animals ran on the treadmill at a 10% gradient at 20 m/min for the first 30 min. The speed was then increased every 10 min by 1.6 m/min until exhaustion. There was a reduction in total glutathione in the skeletal muscle of DEM treated animals compared to the control animals (P < 0.05). Within the control group, total glutathione was higher in the sedentary group compared to after exercise (P < 0.05). DEM treatment also significantly increased oxidative stress, as measured by increased plasma F2–isoprostanes (P < 0.05). Exercising animals given DEM showed a significantly greater increase in peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ coactivator‐1α (PGC–1α) mRNA compared to the control animals that were exercised (P < 0.05). This study provides novel evidence that by lowering the endogenous antioxidant glutathione in skeletal muscle and inducing oxidative stress through exercise, PGC‐1α gene expression was augmented. These findings further highlight the important role of exercise induced oxidative stress in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25538148

  10. An arsenate reductase homologue possessing phosphatase activity from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam): kinetic studies and characterization.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ya-Hui; Lin, Chao-Yi; Pai, Shou-Hsiung; Huang, Jenq-Kuen; Lin, Chi-Tsai

    2011-04-13

    A cDNA encoding a putative arsenate reductase homologue (IbArsR) was cloned from sweet potato (Ib). The deduced protein showed a high level of sequence homology (16-66%) with ArsRs from other organisms. A 3-D homology structure was created based on AtArsR (PDB code 1T3K ) from Arabidopsis thaliana. The putative active site of protein tyrosine phosphatase (HC(X)(5)R) is conserved in all reported ArsRs. IbArsR was overexpressed and purified. The monomeric nature of the enzyme was confirmed by 15% SDS-PAGE and molecular mass determination of the native enzyme via ESI Q-TOF. The IbArsR lacks arsenate reductase activity but possesses phosphatase activity. The Michaelis constant (K(M)) value for p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) was 11.11 mM. The phosphatase activity was inhibited by 0.5 mM sodium arsenate [As(V)]. The protein's half-life of deactivation at 25 °C was 6.1 min, and its inactivation rate constant K(d) was 1.1 × 10(-1) min(-1). The enzyme was active in a broad pH range from 4.0 to 11.0 with optimum activity at pH 10.0. Phosphatase would remove phosphate group from nucleic acid or dephosphorylation of other enzymes as regulation signaling.

  11. Evaluation of glutathione S-transferase activity as a biomarker of PAH pollution in mudskipper, Boleophthalmus dussumieri, Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Sinaei, Mahmood; Rahmanpour, Shirin

    2013-03-01

    As an attempt to study on the biomarkers types to assess the specification of the pollutants and health status of marine ecosystems, sediments and biota (i.e., Boleophthalmus dussumieri) were collected from the Persian Gulf. The liver glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in mudskipper was higher as compared with that in blood which could be illustrated by high metabolic rate in this organ, its key role in the metabolism of PAHs detoxification and specificity of enzymes composition. The results suggest that the liver GST activity in B. dussumieri was PAH inducible and could be extended as a biomarker of PAH pollution.

  12. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase are equally active in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide in human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gaetani, G.F.; Galiano, S.; Canepa, L.; Ferraris, A.M.; Kirkman, H.N.

    1989-01-01

    Genetic deficiencies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and NADPH predispose affected erythrocytes to destruction from peroxides. Conversely, genetic deficiencies of catalase do not predispose affected erythrocytes to peroxide-induced destruction. These observations have served to strengthen the assumption that the NADPH/glutathione/glutathione peroxidase pathway is the principal means for disposal of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. Recently, however, mammalian catalase was found to have tightly bound NADPH and to require NADPH for the prevention and reversal of inactivation by its toxic substrate (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/). Since both catalase and the glutathione pathway are dependent on NADPH for function, this finding raises the possibility that both mechanisms destroy H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. A comparison of normal and acatalasemic erythrocytes in the present study indicated that catalase accounts for more than half of the destruction of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ when H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is generated at a rate comparable to that which leads to hemolysis in G6PD- deficient erythrocytes.

  13. Expression Patterns of Genes Involved in Ascorbate-Glutathione Cycle in Aphid-Infested Maize (Zea mays L.) Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sytykiewicz, Hubert

    2016-02-23

    Reduced forms of ascorbate (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) are among the most important non-enzymatic foliar antioxidants in maize (Zea mays L.). The survey was aimed to evaluate impact of bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L.) or grain aphid (Sitobion avenae F.) herbivory on expression of genes related to ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle in seedlings of six maize varieties (Ambrozja, Nana, Tasty Sweet, Touran, Waza, Złota Karłowa), differing in resistance to the cereal aphids. Relative expression of sixteen maize genes encoding isoenzymes of ascorbate peroxidase (APX1, APX2, APX3, APX4, APX5, APX6, APX7), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR1, MDHAR2, MDHAR3, MDHAR4), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR1, DHAR2, DHAR3) and glutathione reductase (GR1, GR2) was quantified. Furthermore, effect of hemipterans' attack on activity of APX, MDHAR, DHAR and GR enzymes, and the content of reduced and oxidized ascorbate and glutathione in maize plants were assessed. Seedling leaves of more resistant Z. mays varieties responded higher elevations in abundance of target transcripts. In addition, earlier and stronger aphid-triggered changes in activity of APX, MDHAR, DHAR and GR enzymes, and greater modulations in amount of the analyzed antioxidative metabolites were detected in foliar tissues of highly resistant Ambrozja genotype in relation to susceptible Tasty Sweet plants.

  14. Expression Patterns of Genes Involved in Ascorbate-Glutathione Cycle in Aphid-Infested Maize (Zea mays L.) Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Sytykiewicz, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    Reduced forms of ascorbate (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) are among the most important non-enzymatic foliar antioxidants in maize (Zea mays L.). The survey was aimed to evaluate impact of bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L.) or grain aphid (Sitobion avenae F.) herbivory on expression of genes related to ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle in seedlings of six maize varieties (Ambrozja, Nana, Tasty Sweet, Touran, Waza, Złota Karłowa), differing in resistance to the cereal aphids. Relative expression of sixteen maize genes encoding isoenzymes of ascorbate peroxidase (APX1, APX2, APX3, APX4, APX5, APX6, APX7), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR1, MDHAR2, MDHAR3, MDHAR4), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR1, DHAR2, DHAR3) and glutathione reductase (GR1, GR2) was quantified. Furthermore, effect of hemipterans’ attack on activity of APX, MDHAR, DHAR and GR enzymes, and the content of reduced and oxidized ascorbate and glutathione in maize plants were assessed. Seedling leaves of more resistant Z. mays varieties responded higher elevations in abundance of target transcripts. In addition, earlier and stronger aphid-triggered changes in activity of APX, MDHAR, DHAR and GR enzymes, and greater modulations in amount of the analyzed antioxidative metabolites were detected in foliar tissues of highly resistant Ambrozja genotype in relation to susceptible Tasty Sweet plants. PMID:26907270

  15. Diurnal variation in the fraction of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in the active form in the mammary gland of the lactating rat.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R A; Middleton, B; West, D W

    1986-01-01

    'Expressed' and 'total' activities of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) were measured in freeze-clamped samples of mammary glands from lactating rats at intervals throughout the 24 h light/dark cycle. 'Expressed' activities were measured in microsomal fractions isolated and assayed in the presence of 100 mM-KF. 'Total' activities were determined in microsomal preparations from the same homogenates but washed free of KF and incubated with exogenously added sheep liver phosphoprotein phosphatase before assay. Both 'expressed' and 'total' activities of HMG-CoA reductase underwent a diurnal cycle, which had a major peak 6 h into the light phase and a nadir 15 h later, i.e. 9 h into the dark period. Both activities showed a secondary peak of activity (around 68% of the maximum activity) at the time of changeover from dark to light, with a trough in the value of the 'expressed' activity that was close to the nadir value. 'Expressed' activity was lower than 'total' at all time points, indicating the presence of enzyme molecules inactivated by covalent phosphorylation. Nevertheless the 'expressed'/'total' activity ratio was comparatively constant and varied only between 43% and 75%. Immunotitration of enzyme activity, with antiserum raised in sheep against purified rat liver HMG-CoA reductase, confirmed the presence of both active and inactive forms of the enzyme and indicated that at the peak and nadir the variation in 'expressed' HMG-CoA reductase activity resulted from changes in the total number of enzyme molecules rather than from covalent modification. The sample obtained after 3 h of the light phase exhibited an anomalously low 'total' HMG-CoA reductase activity, which could be increased when Cl- replaced F- in the homogenization medium. The result suggests that at that time the activity of the enzyme could be regulated by mechanisms other than covalent phosphorylation or degradation. PMID:3814075

  16. Conserved active site residues limit inhibition of a copper-containing nitrite reductase by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Tocheva, Elitza I; Eltis, Lindsay D; Murphy, Michael E P

    2008-04-15

    The interaction of copper-containing dissimilatory nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 ( AfNiR) with each of five small molecules was studied using crystallography and steady-state kinetics. Structural studies revealed that each small molecule interacted with the oxidized catalytic type 2 copper of AfNiR. Three small molecules (formate, acetate and nitrate) mimic the substrate by having at least two oxygen atoms for bidentate coordination to the type 2 copper atom. These three anions bound to the copper ion in the same asymmetric, bidentate manner as nitrite. Consistent with their weak inhibition of the enzyme ( K i >50 mM), the Cu-O distances in these AfNiR-inhibitor complexes were approximately 0.15 A longer than that observed in the AfNiR-nitrite complex. The binding mode of each inhibitor is determined in part by steric interactions with the side chain of active site residue Ile257. Moreover, the side chain of Asp98, a conserved residue that hydrogen bonds to type 2 copper-bound nitrite and nitric oxide, was either disordered or pointed away from the inhibitors. Acetate and formate inhibited AfNiR in a mixed fashion, consistent with the occurrence of second acetate binding site in the AfNiR-acetate complex that occludes access to the type 2 copper. A fourth small molecule, nitrous oxide, bound to the oxidized metal in a side-on fashion reminiscent of nitric oxide to the reduced copper. Nevertheless, nitrous oxide bound at a farther distance from the metal. The fifth small molecule, azide, inhibited the reduction of nitrite by AfNiR most strongly ( K ic = 2.0 +/- 0.1 mM). This ligand bound to the type 2 copper center end-on with a Cu-N c distance of approximately 2 A, and was the only inhibitor to form a hydrogen bond with Asp98. Overall, the data substantiate the roles of Asp98 and Ile257 in discriminating substrate from other small anions.

  17. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin improves abnormal brain electrical activity via mechanisms involving eNOS.

    PubMed

    Seker, F B; Kilic, U; Caglayan, B; Ethemoglu, M S; Caglayan, A B; Ekimci, N; Demirci, S; Dogan, A; Oztezcan, S; Sahin, F; Yilmaz, B; Kilic, E

    2015-01-22

    Apart from its repressing effect on plasma lipid levels, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors exert neuroprotective functions in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. In view of these promising observations, we were interested in whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibition would affect epileptiform activity in the brain. To elucidate this issue, atorvastatin, simvastatin and rosuvastatin were administered orally at a dose of 20 mg/kg each for 3 days and their anti-epileptic activities were tested and compared in rats. Epileptiform activity in the brain was induced by an intracortical penicillin G injection. Among HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, simvastatin-treatment was less effective in terms of spike frequency as compared with atorvastatin- and rosuvastatin-treated animals. Atorvastatin treatment reduced spike frequencies and amplitudes significantly throughout the experiment. However, the most pronounced anti-epileptic effect was observed in rosuvastatin-treated animals, which was associated with improved blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, increased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA and decreased expressions of pro-apoptotic p53, Bax and caspase-3 mRNAs. Inhibition of eNOS activity with L-NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) reversed the anti-epileptic effect of rosuvastatin significantly. However, L-NAME did not alter the effect of rosuvastatin on the levels of p53, Bax and caspase-3 mRNA expression. Here, we provide evidence that among HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, rosuvastatin was the most effective statin on the reduction of epileptiform activity, which was associated with improved BBB permeability, increased expression of eNOS and decreased expressions of pro-apoptotic p53, Bax and caspase-3. Our observation also revealed that the anti-epileptic effect of rosuvastatin was dependent on the increased expression level of eNOS. The robust anti-epileptic effect encourages proof-of-concept studies with

  18. Stereospecific micellar electrokinetic chromatography assay of methionine sulfoxide reductase activity employing a multiple layer coated capillary.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qingfu; El-Mergawy, Rabab G; Heinemann, Stefan H; Schönherr, Roland; Jáč, Pavel; Scriba, Gerhard K E

    2013-09-01

    A micellar electrokinetic chromatography method for the analysis of the l-methionine sulfoxide diastereomers employing a successive multiple ionic-polymer layer coated fused-silica capillary was developed and validated in order to investigate the stereospecificity of methionine sulfoxide reductases. The capillary coating consisted of a first layer of hexadimethrine and a second layer of dextran sulfate providing a stable strong cathodic EOF and consequently highly repeatable analyte migration times. The methionine sulfoxide diastereomers, methionine as product as well as β-alanine as internal standard were derivatized by dabsyl chloride and separated using a 35 mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 8.0, containing 25 mM SDS as BGE and a separation voltage of 25 kV. The method was validated in the range of 0.15-2.0 mM with respect to linearity and precision. The LODs of the analytes ranged between 0.04 and 0.10 mM. The assay was subsequently applied to determine the stereospecificity of methionine sulfoxide reductases as well as the enzyme kinetics of human methionine sulfoxide reductase A. Monitoring the decrease of the l-methionine-(S)-sulfoxide Km = 411.8 ± 33.8 μM and Vmax = 307.5 ± 10.8 μM/min were determined.

  19. Characterization of quinol-dependent nitric oxide reductase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus: enzymatic activity and active site structure.

    PubMed

    Terasaka, Erina; Okada, Norihiro; Sato, Nozomi; Sako, Yoshihiko; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Tosha, Takehiko

    2014-07-01

    Nitric oxide reductase (NOR) catalyzes the reduction of nitric oxide to generate nitrous oxide. We recently reported on the crystal structure of a quinol-dependent NOR (qNOR) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus [Y. Matsumoto, T. Tosha, A.V. Pisliakov, T. Hino, H. Sugimoto, S. Nagano, Y. Sugita and Y. Shiro, Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 19 (2012) 238-246], and suggested that a water channel from the cytoplasm, which is not observed in cytochrome c-dependent NOR (cNOR), functions as a pathway transferring catalytic protons. Here, we further investigated the functional and structural properties of qNOR, and compared the findings with those for cNOR. The pH optimum for the enzymatic reaction of qNOR was in the alkaline range, whereas Pseudomonas aeruginosa cNOR showed a higher activity at an acidic pH. The considerably slower reduction rate, and a correlation of the pH dependence for enzymatic activity and the reduction rate suggest that the reduction process is the rate-determining step for the NO reduction by qNOR, while the reduction rate for cNOR was very fast and therefore is unlikely to be the rate-determining step. A close examination of the heme/non-heme iron binuclear center by resonance Raman spectroscopy indicated that qNOR has a more polar environment at the binuclear center compared with cNOR. It is plausible that a water channel enhances the accessibility of the active site to solvent water, creating a more polar environment in qNOR. This structural feature could control certain properties of the active site, such as redox potential, which could explain the different catalytic properties of the two NORs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference.

  20. Effects of SRT and DO on N2O reductase activity in an anoxic-oxic activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Noda, N; Kaneko, N; Mikami, M; Kimochi, Y; Tsuneda, S; Hirata, A; Mizuochi, M; Inamori, Y

    2003-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is emitted from wastewater treatment processes, and is known to be a green house gas contributing to global warming. It is thus important to develop technology that can suppress N2O emission. The effects of sludge retention time (SRT) and dissolved oxygen (DO) on N2O emission in an anoxic-oxic activated sludge system were estimated. Moreover, the microbial community structure in the sludge, which plays an important role in N2O suppression, was clarified based on nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ) gene analysis by molecular biological techniques. The results showed that under low SRT conditions, nitrification efficiency was reduced and the N2O emission rate in the oxic reactors was increased. It was also observed that N2O emission was enhanced under low DO conditions, where the available oxygen is insufficient for nitrification. Moreover, molecular analysis revealed that the clones identified in this study were closely related to Ralstonia eutropha and Paracoccus denitrificans. The fact that the identified sequences are not closely related to known culturable denitrifier nosZ sequences indicates a substantial in situ diversity of denitrifiers contributing to N2O suppression, which are not reflected in the cultivatable fraction of the population. The further application of these new molecular techniques should serve to enhance our knowledge of the microbial community of denitrifying bacteria contributing to N2O suppression in wastewater treatment systems.

  1. Association of mercury and selenium with altered glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress in diving ducks from the San Francisco Bay region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Ohlendorf, H.M.; Marn, C.M.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1998-01-01

    Adult male greater scaup (Aythya marila) (GS), surf scoters (Melanitta perspicillata)(SS), and ruddy ducks (Oxyura jamaicensis) (RD) were collected from Suisun Bay and coastal Tomales Bay in the greater San Francisco Bay area to assess exposure to inorganic contaminants. Hepatic selenium (Se) concentrations were highest in GS (geometric mean = 67 ppm, dw) and SS (119 ppm) in Suisun Bay, whereas hepatic mercury (Hg) was highest (19 ppm) in GS and SS from Tomales Bay. Hepatic Se and Hg were lower in RD and did not differ between locations. Hepatic supernatants were assayed for enzymes related to glutathione metabolism and antioxidant activity including: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-peroxidase), glutathione reductase (GSSG-reductase), and glutathione-S-transferase (GSH-transferase). GSH-peroxidase activity was higher in SS and RD, and G-6-PDH higher in GS and SS from Suisun Bay than Tomales Bay. GSSG-reductase was higher in SS from Suisun Bay. The ratio of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) was greater in all species from Tomales Bay. The following significant relationships were found in one or more species with increasing hepatic Hg concentration: lower body, liver and heart weights; decreased hepatic GSH concentration, G-6-PDH and GSH-peroxidase activities; increased ratio of GSSG to GSH, and increased GSSG-reductase activity. With increasing hepatic Se concentration, GSH-peroxidase increased but GSH decreased. It is concluded that measurement of associated enzymes in conjunction with thiol status may be a useful bioindicator to discriminate between Hg and Se effects. Concentrations of mercury and selenium and variable affected have been associated with adverse effects on reproduction and neurological function in experimental studies with mallards.

  2. Mercuric reductase activity and evidence of broad-spectrum mercury resistance among clinical isolates of rapidly growing mycobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Steingrube, V.A.; Wallace, R.J. Jr.; Steele, L.C.; Pang, Y.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Resistance to mercury was evaluated in 356 rapidly growing mycobacteria belonging to eight taxonomic groups. Resistance to inorganic Hg2+ ranged from 0% among the unnamed third biovariant complex of Mycobacterium fortuitum to 83% among M. chelonae-like organisms. With cell extracts and 203Hg(NO3)2 as the substrate, mercuric reductase (HgRe) activity was demonstrable in six of eight taxonomic groups. HgRe activity was inducible and required NADPH or NADH and a thiol donor for optimai activity. Species with HgRe activity were also resistant to organomercurial compounds, including phenylmercuric acetate. Attempts at intraspecies and intragenus transfer of HgRe activity by conjugation or transformation were unsuccessful. Mercury resistance is common in rapidly growing mycobacteria and appears to function via the same inducible enzyme systems already defined in other bacterial species. This system offers potential as a strain marker for epidemiologic investigations and for studying genetic systems in rapidly growing mycobacteria.

  3. Salinity effects on activity and expression of glutathione S-transferases in white sturgeon and Chinook salmon.

    PubMed

    Donham, Rachel T; Morin, Dexter; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2006-02-01

    This study evaluated the activity and expression of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) detoxification isoenzymes in juvenile white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during acclimation from freshwater (2 per thousand) to estuarine (15 per thousand) salinity conditions. In white sturgeon, GST activity toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) increased significantly (P = 0.005; n = 5) with elevated salinity, but not for the Chinook salmon (P = 0.174; n = 10). GST activity of both sturgeon and salmon toward ethacrynic acid (ETHA) did not significantly change with elevated salinity (P = 0.516 with n = 3, and P = 0.125 with n = 3, respectively). Expression of the GST classes, and hepatic glutathione (GSH) concentration, as determined by HPLC, also did not significantly change with increased salinity. In conclusion, overall GST activity in white sturgeon, but not Chinook salmon, is stimulated by elevated water salinity, thus electrophilic chemicals such as pesticides may be more effectively detoxified by sturgeon as they undergo seaward migration.

  4. Effect of age and environmental factors on semen quality, glutathione peroxidase activity and oxidative parameters in Simmental bulls.

    PubMed

    Balić, I Majić; Milinković-Tur, S; Samardžija, M; Vince, S

    2012-07-15

    Taking into account that semen quality depends on animal age and climate conditions and that oxidative stress has been reported to be a common cause of infertility, the objective of this study was to monitor indicators of oxidative stress and antioxidant protection during four seasonal periods in service bulls of various age to get better insight into the significance of these factors upon evaluating service bull semen. The research was conducted over a year on 19 Simmental service bulls. Animals were divided into two groups according to age; Group I consisted of younger bulls aged two to four yrs (n=9), and Group II was comprised of older bulls aged five to ten yrs (n=10). Semen samples were obtained once in the middle of every seasonal period and blood samples for biochemical analysis were collected by jugular venipuncture immediately after ejaculate collection. The activity of total glutathione peroxidase (T-GSH-Px), selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSH-Px) and selenium-independent glutathione peroxidase (non-Se-GSH-Px), together with the intensity of lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances; TBARS) and oxidative protein damage (protein carbonyl content (PCC)) were measured in seminal plasma. In samples of spermatozoa and blood serum, the activity of Se-GSH-Px and TBARS and PCC concentrations were determined. Older service bulls had significantly higher ejaculate volume in summer in comparison with younger bulls, whereas the number of spermatozoa and progressive motility percentage did not significantly vary with age. Younger animals had lower progressive motility percentage during summer than in spring, with more intensive oxidative processes observed in seminal plasma (TBARS) and spermatozoa (TBARS and PCC). Based on the results presented here, it can be concluded that younger bulls are more sensitive to elevated ambient temperatures during the summer, when intensified prooxidative processes in semen plasma and spermatozoa

  5. Cantharidin Impedes Activity of Glutathione S-Transferase in the Midgut of Helicoverpa armigera Hübner

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rashid Ahmed; Liu, Ji Yuan; Rashid, Maryam; Wang, Dun; Zhang, Ya Lin

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations have implicated glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) as one of the major reasons for insecticide resistance. Therefore, effectiveness of new candidate compounds depends on their ability to inhibit GSTs to prevent metabolic detoxification by insects. Cantharidin, a terpenoid compound of insect origin, has been developed as a bio-pesticide in China, and proves highly toxic to a wide range of insects, especially lepidopteran. In the present study, we test cantharidin as a model compound for its toxicity, effects on the mRNA transcription of a model Helicoverpa armigera glutathione S-transferase gene (HaGST) and also for its putative inhibitory effect on the catalytic activity of GSTs, both in vivo and in vitro in Helicoverpa armigera, employing molecular and biochemical methods. Bioassay results showed that cantharidin was highly toxic to H. armigera. Real-time qPCR showed down-regulation of the HaGST at the mRNA transcript ranging from 2.5 to 12.5 folds while biochemical assays showed in vivo inhibition of GSTs in midgut and in vitro inhibition of rHaGST. Binding of cantharidin to HaGST was rationalized by homology and molecular docking simulations using a model GST (1PN9) as a template structure. Molecular docking simulations also confirmed accurate docking of the cantharidin molecule to the active site of HaGST impeding its catalytic activity. PMID:23528854

  6. Glutathione and lymphocyte activation: a function of ageing and auto-immune disease.

    PubMed

    Fidelus, R K; Tsan, M F

    1987-08-01

    A decline in tissue and serum of glutathione (GSH) content and GSH-metabolizing enzymes with age has been implicated in the increasing susceptibility to carcinogens, disease and drugs which occurs with advanced age. Immunological senescence has been directly associated with increased incidence of cancer and infection with age. The auto-immune diseases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) demonstrate depressed T-cell function together with B-cell hyperactivity. In addition, RA and SLE are chronic inflammatory conditions which have been associated with low serum and erythrocyte GSH concentrations when compared to normal. We hypothesized that augmentation of intracellular GSH concentrations in lymphocytes may enhance immune function in depressed immune states. Our data, using murine animal models for ageing (C57BL/6J) and the RA/SLE-like auto-immune diseases of the MRL/lpr mouse, indicate that intracellular glutathione of splenic lymphocytes does not decline with age or with a chronic inflammatory auto-immune disease. In contrast, immune responsiveness in splenic lymphocytes does decline. We can, however, augment both intracellular GSH concentrations and the immune response of splenic lymphocytes from animals of all ages as well as in those animals with the SLE-like auto-immune disease.

  7. Protein kinase activity associated with the large subunit of herpes simplex virus type 2 ribonucleotide reductase (ICP10).

    PubMed Central

    Chung, T D; Wymer, J P; Smith, C C; Kulka, M; Aurelian, L

    1989-01-01

    The large subunit of the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) ribonucleotide reductase (RR1) is demonstrated to possess serine/threonine-specific kinase activity. Computer-assisted sequence analysis identified regions within the amino terminus of ICP10 that are homologous to the catalytic domain of known protein kinases (PKs). An in vitro kinase assay confirmed the ability of ICP10, immunoprecipitated from either HSV-2-infected cells or from cells transfected with an ICP10 expression vector, to autophosphorylate and transphosphorylate exogenous substrates in the presence of ATP and Mg2+. The HSV-1 RR1 was shown to be negative for PK activity under these conditions. PK activity was localized to a 57-kDa amino-terminal region within ICP10 that lacked RR activity. Images PMID:2545912

  8. Glutathione conjugation and contaminant transformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Field, Jennifer A.; Thurman, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    The recent identification of a novel sulfonated metabolite of alachlor in groundwater and metolachlor in soil is likely the result of glutathione conjugation. Glutathione conjugation is an important biochemical reaction that leads, in the case of alachlor, to the formation of a rather difficult to detect, water-soluble, and therefore highly mobile, sulfonated metabolite. Research from weed science, toxicology, and biochemistry is discussed to support the hypothesis that glutathione conjugation is a potentially important detoxification pathway carried out by aquatic and terrestrial plants and soil microorganisms. A brief review of the biochemical basis for glutathione conjugation is presented. We recommend that multidisciplinary research focus on the occurrence and expression of glutathione and its attendant enzymes in plants and microorganisms, relationships between electrophilic substrate structure and enzyme activity, and the potential exploitation of plants and microorganisms that are competent in glutathione conjugation for phytoremediation and bioremediation.

  9. Unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways suggests potential involvement in plant defense against the gall midge mayetiola destructor in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glutathione, a thiol tripeptide of '-glutamylcysteinylglycine, exists abundantly in nearly all organisms. Glutathione participates in various physiological processes involved in redox reactions by serving as an electron donor/acceptor. In this study, we found that the abundance of total glutathion...

  10. Design, synthesis, and biological activity of diaryl ether inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii enoyl reductase.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gang; Muench, Stephen P; Zhou, Ying; Afanador, Gustavo A; Mui, Ernest J; Fomovska, Alina; Lai, Bo Shiun; Prigge, Sean T; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig W; Hickman, Mark R; Lee, Patty J; Leed, Susan E; Auschwitz, Jennifer M; Rice, David W; McLeod, Rima

    2013-04-01

    Triclosan is a potent inhibitor of Toxoplasma gondii enoyl reductase (TgENR), which is an essential enzyme for parasite survival. In view of triclosan's poor druggability, which limits its therapeutic use, a new set of B-ring modified analogs were designed to optimize its physico-chemical properties. These derivatives were synthesized and evaluated by in vitro assay and TgENR enzyme assay. Some analogs display improved solubility, permeability and a comparable MIC50 value to that of triclosan. Modeling of these inhibitors revealed the same overall binding mode with the enzyme as triclosan, but the B-ring modifications have additional interactions with the strongly conserved Asn130.

  11. [Illumination's effect on the growth and nitrate reductase activity of typical red-tide algae in the East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-mei; Shi, Xiao-yong; Ding, Yan-yan; Tang, Hong-jie

    2013-09-01

    Two typical red-tide algae, Skeletonema costatum and Prorocentrum donghaiense were selected as studied objects. The nitrate reductase activity (NRA) and the growth of the two algae under different illuminations through incubation experiment were studied. The illumination condition was consistent with in situ. Results showed that P. donghaiense and S. costatum could grow normally in the solar radiation ranged from 30-60 W x m(-2), and the growth curve was "S" type. However, when solar radiation was below 9 W x m(-2), the two alga could hardly grow. In the range of 0-60 W x m(-2), three parameters (NRAmax, micro(max), Bf) increased with the increasing of light intensity, indicating that the light intensity can influence the grow of alga indirectly through influencing the nitrate reductase activity. The micro(max) and NRAmax in unite volume of Skeletonema costatum were higher than those of Prorocentrum donghaiense, indicating that Skeletonema costatum can better utilize the nitrate than Prorocentrum donghaiense.

  12. Prolonged fasting increases glutathione biosynthesis in postweaned northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Forman, Henry Jay; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2011-04-15

    Northern elephant seals experience prolonged periods of absolute food and water deprivation (fasting) while breeding, molting or weaning. The postweaning fast in elephant seals is characterized by increases in the renin-angiotensin system, expression of the oxidant-producing protein Nox4, and NADPH oxidase activity; however, these increases are not correlated with increased oxidative damage or inflammation. Glutathione (GSH) is a potent reductant and a cofactor for glutathione peroxidases (GPx), glutathione-S transferases (GST) and 1-cys peroxiredoxin (PrxVI) and thus contributes to the removal of hydroperoxides, preventing oxidative damage. The effects of prolonged food deprivation on the GSH system are not well described in mammals. To test our hypothesis that GSH biosynthesis increases with fasting in postweaned elephant seals, we measured circulating and muscle GSH content at the early and late phases of the postweaning fast in elephant seals along with the activity/protein content of glutamate-cysteine ligase [GCL; catalytic (GCLc) and modulatory (GCLm) subunits], γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), glutathione disulphide reductase (GR), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), GST and PrxVI, as well as plasma changes in γ-glutamyl amino acids, glutamate and glutamine. GSH increased two- to four-fold with fasting along with a 40-50% increase in the content of GCLm and GCLc, a 75% increase in GGT activity, a two- to 2.5-fold increase in GR, G6PDH and GST activities and a 30% increase in PrxVI content. Plasma γ-glutamyl glutamine, γ-glutamyl isoleucine and γ-glutamyl methionine also increased with fasting whereas glutamate and glutamine decreased. Results indicate that GSH biosynthesis increases with fasting and that GSH contributes to counteracting hydroperoxide production, preventing oxidative damage in fasting seals.

  13. GSTP1 Polymorphisms and their Association with Glutathione Transferase and Peroxidase Activities in Patients with Motor Neuron Disease.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, Beata; Kaźmierczak, Beata; Kuźma-Kozakiewicz, Magdalena; Jamrozik, Zygmunt; Barańczyk-Kuźma, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTP1) is a crucial enzyme in detoxification of electrophilic compounds and organic peroxides. Together with Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSHPx) it protects cells against oxidative stress which may be a primary factor implicated in motor neuron disease (MND) pathogenesis. We investigated GSTP1 polymorphisms and their relationship with GST and Se-GSTPx activities in a cohort of Polish patients with MND. Results were correlated with clinical phenotypes. The frequency of genetic variants for GSTP1 exon 5 (I105V) and exon 6 (A114V) was studied in 104 patients and 100 healthy controls using real-time polymerase chain reaction. GST transferase activity was determined in serum with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, its peroxidase activity with cumene hydroperoxide, and Se-GSHPx activity with hydrogen peroxide. There were no differences in the prevalence of GSTP1 polymorphism I105V and A114V between MND and controls, however the occurrence of CT variant in codon 114 was associated with a higher risk for MND. GSTP1 polymorphisms were less frequent in classic ALS than in progressive bulbar palsy. In classic ALS C* (heterozygous I /V and A /V) all studied activities were significantly lower than in classic ALS A* (homozygous I /I and A/A). GST peroxidase activity and Se-GSHPx activity were lower in classic ALS C* than in control C*, but in classic ALS A* Se-GSHPx activity was significantly higher than in control A*. It can be concluded that the presence of GSTP1 A114V but not I105V variant increases the risk of MND, and combined GSTP1 polymorphisms in codon 105 and 114 may result in lower protection of MND patients against the toxicity of electrophilic compounds, organic and inorganic hydroperoxides.

  14. Compensating for the absence of selenocysteine in high-molecular weight thioredoxin reductases: the electrophilic activation hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Lothrop, Adam P; Snider, Gregg W; Flemer, Stevenson; Ruggles, Erik L; Davidson, Ronald S; Lamb, Audrey L; Hondal, Robert J

    2014-02-04

    Mammalian thioredoxin reductase (TR) is a pyridine disulfide oxidoreductase that uses the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec) in place of the more commonly used amino acid cysteine (Cys). Selenium is a Janus-faced element because it is both highly nucleophilic and highly electrophilic. Cys orthologs of Sec-containing enzymes may compensate for the absence of a Sec residue by making the active site Cys residue more (i) nucleophilic, (ii) electrophilic, or (iii) reactive by increasing both S-nucleophilicity and S-electrophilicity. It has already been shown that the Cys ortholog TR from Drosophila melanogaster (DmTR) has increased S-nucleophilicity [Gromer, S., Johansson, L., Bauer, H., Arscott, L. D., Rauch, S., Ballou, D. P., Williams, C. H., Jr., Schrimer, R. H., and Arnér, E. S (2003) Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: Why selenoproteins? Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 100, 12618-12623]. Here we present evidence that DmTR also enhances the electrophilicity of Cys490 through the use of an "electrophilic activation" mechanism. This mechanism is proposed to work by polarizing the disulfide bond that occurs between Cys489 and Cys490 in the C-terminal redox center by the placement of a positive charge near Cys489. This polarization renders the sulfur atom of Cys490 electron deficient and enhances the rate of thiol/disulfide exchange that occurs between the N- and C-terminal redox centers. Our hypothesis was developed by using a strategy of homocysteine (hCys) for Cys substitution in the Cys-Cys redox dyad of DmTR to differentiate the function of each Cys residue. The results show that hCys could substitute for Cys490 with little loss of thioredoxin reductase activity, but that substitution of hCys for Cys489 resulted in a 238-fold reduction in activity. We hypothesize that replacement of Cys489 with hCys destroys an interaction between the sulfur atom of Cys489 and His464 crucial for the proposed electrophilic activation mechanism. This electrophilic activation

  15. [The dynamics of indicators of selenium, glutathione and anti-oxidant defense of blood in patients with anemic cardiomyopathy against the background of treatment with preparations of iron and selenium].

    PubMed

    Goncharova, E V; Govorin, A V; Scherbakova, O A; Chistiakova, M V

    2015-02-01

    The study was carried out on samplings of 46 patients with asiderotic anemia of severe degree and complicated by cardiomyopathy and 16 healthy persons. The content of selenium was analyzed using I.I. Nazarenko technique of detection of mass concentration GOST 19413-89. The content of glutathione in blood was detected using the technique based on capacity of acid-soluble thiol aggregations at interaction with 5,5-dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzene) acid to form a colored compound--thio-2-nitrobenzene acid. The principle of technique of measurement of activity of glutathione peroxidase of blood ervthrocvtes is in capacity of peroxide hydrogen to form a resistant colored complex with molybdenum salts. The technique of detection of activity of glutathione peroxidase is based on its capacity to catalyze reaction of interaction of reduced glutathione with tretbutyl hydro peroxide and on capacity of glutathione reductase to catalyze NADFN-dependent reduction of oxidated glutathione. The principle of technique of detection of activity of superoxiddismutase is based on capacity of enzyme to suppress reaction of reduction of nitro blue tetrazolium with superoxide anion-radical generated in vitro in the system xanthine-xanthineoxidase. The study established decreasing of content of selenium in blood of patients with anemic cardiomyopathy up to 1.8 times as compared with control group. The content of total glutathione in blood of patients was decreased up to 17.7% at the expense of decreasing of level of reduced glutathione up to 18.5%. The study established decreasing of activity of catalase in erythrocytes up to 1.3 times, glutathione peroxidase up to 2.5 times, glutathione reductase up to 2.1 times and superoxiddismutase up to 1.5 times as compared with control group. After the preparations of iron and selenium ware applied to patients with anemic cardiomyopathy the increase of level of selenium in blood up to 80.4% was established. The level of total glutathione increased up to 54

  16. Brazilian nut consumption improves selenium status and glutathione peroxidase activity and reduces atherogenic risk in obese women.

    PubMed

    Cominetti, Cristiane; de Bortoli, Maritsa C; Garrido, Arthur B; Cozzolino, Silvia M F

    2012-06-01

    Studies have shown that there are inverse relationships between nut consumption and the reduction of cardiovascular risk. This study tested the hypothesis that daily consumption of Brazilian nuts would have a positive effect upon selenium (Se) status, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity, lipid profile, and atherogenic risk in severely obese women. Thirty-seven severely obese women each consumed 1 Brazilian nut a day (290 μg of Se a day) for 8 weeks. Blood Se concentrations, total erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity, lipid profile, and Castelli I and II indexes were evaluated before and after the nuts consumption. All the patients were Se deficient at baseline; this deficiency was remedied by the consumption of the Brazilian nut (P < .0001). The intake of Brazilian nuts promoted a significant increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations (P < .00001), which then resulted in a significant improvement of the Castelli I (P < .0002) and II (P < .0004) indexes. This study shows that obese people who implement daily consumption of Brazilian nuts can improve both Se status and lipid profile, especially high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, thereby reducing cardiovascular risks.

  17. Variation of glucosinolates and quinone reductase activity among different varieties of Chinese kale and improvement of glucoraphanin by metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hongmei; Sun, Bo; Miao, Huiying; Cai, Congxi; Xu, Chaojiong; Wang, Qiaomei

    2015-02-01

    The variation of glucosinolates and quinone reductase (QR) activity in fourteen varieties of Chinese kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra Bailey) was investigated in the present study. Results showed that gluconapin (GNA), instead of glucoraphanin (GRA), was the most predominant glucosinolate in all varieties, and QR activity was remarkably positively correlated with the glucoraphanin level. AOP2, a tandem 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, catalyzes the conversion of glucoraphanin to gluconapin in glucosinolate biosynthesis. Here, antisense AOP2 was transformed into Gailan-04, the variety with the highest gluconapin content and ratio of GNA/GRA. The glucoraphanin content and corresponding QR activity were notably increased in transgenic plants, while no significant difference at the level of other main nutritional compounds (total phenolics, vitamin C, carotenoids and chlorophyll) was observed between the transgenic lines and the wide-type plants. Taken together, metabolic engineering is a good practice for improvement of glucoraphanin in Chinese kale.

  18. Evidence that the amino acid residue Cys117 of chloroplastic monodehydroascorbate reductase is involved in its activity and structural stability.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Wu, Qing-Yun; Sun, Yan-Li; Ma, Na-Na; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2010-04-01

    Monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR; EC 1.6.5.4) is crucial for AsA regeneration and essential for maintaining the reduced pool of AsA. And the amino acid residue C117 of chloroplastic MDAR is the conserved cysteine residue in MDAR isoforms. A series mutation of conserved amino acid residue cysteine117 (C117) was constructed to investigate its role in MDAR structural stability and activity. Our study revealed that mutation in this conserved residue could cause pronounced loss of activity and conformational changes. Spectroscopic experiments indicated that these mutations influenced transition from the molten globule intermediate to the native state in folding process. These results suggested that amino acid residue C117 played a relatively important role in keeping MDAR structural stability and activity.

  19. Compensating for the Absence of Selenocysteine in High-Molecular Weight Thioredoxin Reductases: The Electrophilic Activation Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian thioredoxin reductase (TR) is a pyridine disulfide oxidoreductase that uses the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec) in place of the more commonly used amino acid cysteine (Cys). Selenium is a Janus-faced element because it is both highly nucleophilic and highly electrophilic. Cys orthologs of Sec-containing enzymes may compensate for the absence of a Sec residue by making the active site Cys residue more (i) nucleophilic, (ii) electrophilic, or (iii) reactive by increasing both S-nucleophilicity and S-electrophilicity. It has already been shown that the Cys ortholog TR from Drosophila melanogaster (DmTR) has increased S-nucleophilicity [Gromer, S., Johansson, L., Bauer, H., Arscott, L. D., Rauch, S., Ballou, D. P., Williams, C. H., Jr., Schrimer, R. H., and Arnér, E. S (2003) Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: Why selenoproteins? Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 100, 12618–12623]. Here we present evidence that DmTR also enhances the electrophilicity of Cys490 through the use of an “electrophilic activation” mechanism. This mechanism is proposed to work by polarizing the disulfide bond that occurs between Cys489 and Cys490 in the C-terminal redox center by the placement of a positive charge near Cys489. This polarization renders the sulfur atom of Cys490 electron deficient and enhances the rate of thiol/disulfide exchange that occurs between the N- and C-terminal redox centers. Our hypothesis was developed by using a strategy of homocysteine (hCys) for Cys substitution in the Cys-Cys redox dyad of DmTR to differentiate the function of each Cys residue. The results show that hCys could substitute for Cys490 with little loss of thioredoxin reductase activity, but that substitution of hCys for Cys489 resulted in a 238-fold reduction in activity. We hypothesize that replacement of Cys489 with hCys destroys an interaction between the sulfur atom of Cys489 and His464 crucial for the proposed electrophilic activation mechanism. This electrophilic

  20. Evidence for the participation of Cys sub 558 and Cys sub 559 at the active site of mercuric reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.M.; Moore, M.J.; Massey, V.; Williams, C.H. Jr.; Distefano, M.D.; Ballou, D.P.; Walsh, C.T. )

    1989-02-07

    Mercuric reductase, with FAD and a reducible disulfide at the active site, catalyzes the two-electron reduction of Hg(II) by NADPH. Addition of reducing equivalents rapidly produces a spectrally distinct EH{sub 2} form of the enzyme containing oxidized FAD and reduced active site thiols. Formation of EH{sub 2} has previously been reported to require only 2 electrons for reduction of the active site disulfide. The authors present results of anaerobic titrations of mercuric reductase with NADPH and dithionite showing that the equilibrium conversion of oxidized enzyme to EH{sub 2} actually requires 2 equiv of reducing agent or 4 electrons. Kinetic studies conducted both at 4{degree}C and at 25{degree}C indicate that reduction of the active site occurs rapidly, as previously reported; this is followed by a slower reduction of another redox group via reaction with the active site. ({sup 14}C)Iodoacetamide labeling experiments demonstrate that the C-terminal residues, Cys{sub 558} and Cys{sub 559}, are involved in this disulfide. The fluorescence, but not the absorbance, of the enzyme-bound FAD was found to be highly dependent on the redox state of the C-terminal thiols. Thus, E{sub ox} with Cys{sub 558} and Cys{sub 559} as thiols exhibits less than 50% of the fluorescence of E{sub ox} where these residues are present as a disulfide, indicating that the thiols remain intimately associated with the active site. Initial velocity measurements show that the auxiliary disulfide must be reduced before catalytic Hg(II) reduction can occur, consistent with the report of a preactivation phenomenon with NADPH or cysteine. A modified minimal catalytic mechanism is proposed as well as several chemical mechanisms for the Hg(II) reduction step.

  1. Chemical Constituents of Smilax china L. Stems and Their Inhibitory Activities against Glycation, Aldose Reductase, α-Glucosidase, and Lipase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Eun; Kim, Jin Ah; Whang, Wan Kyunn

    2017-03-11

    The search for natural inhibitors with anti-diabetes properties has gained increasing attention. Among four selected Smilacaceae family plants, Smilax china L. stems (SCS) showed significant in vitro anti-glycation and rat lens aldose reductase inhibitory activities. Bioactivity-guided isolation was performed with SCS and four solvent fractions were obtained, which in turn yielded 10 compounds, including one phenolic acid, three chlorogenic acids, four flavonoids, one stilbene, and one phenylpropanoid glycoside; their structures were elucidated using nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. All solvent fractions, isolated compounds, and stem extracts from plants sourced from six different provinces of South Korea were next tested for their inhibitory effects against advanced glycation end products, as well as aldose reductase. α-Glucosidase, and lipase assays were also performed on the fractions and compounds. Since compounds 3, 4, 6, and 8 appeared to be the superior inhibitors among the tested compounds, a comparative study was performed via high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection using a self-developed analysis method to confirm the relationship between the quantity and bioactivity of the compounds in each extract. The findings of this study demonstrate the potent therapeutic efficacy of SCS and its potential use as a cost-effective natural alternative medicine against type 2 diabetes and its complications.

  2. Mutagenesis of the redox-active disulfide in mercuric ion reductase: Catalysis by mutant enzymes restricted to flavin redox chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Distefano, M.D.; Au, K.G.; Walsh, C.T. )

    1989-02-07

    Mercuric reductase, a flavoenzyme that possesses a redox-active cystine, Cys{sub 135}Cys{sub 140}, catalyzes the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) by NADPH. As a probe of mechanism, the authors have constructed mutants lacking a redox-active disulfide by eliminating Cys{sub 135} (Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 140}), Cys{sub 14} (Cys{sub 135}Ala{sub 140}), or both (Ala{sub 135}Ala{sub 140}). Additionally, they have made double mutants that lack Cys{sub 135} (Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 139}Cys{sub 140}) or Cys{sub 140} (Cys{sub 135}Cys{sub 139}Ala{sub 140}) but introduce a new Cys in place of Gly{sub 139} with the aim of constructing dithiol pairs in the active site that do not form a redox-active disulfide. The resulting mutant enzymes all lack redox-active disulfides and are hence restricted to FAD/FADH{sub 2} redox chemistry. Each mutant enzyme possesses unique physical and spectroscopic properties that reflect subtle differences in the FAD microenvironment. Preliminary evidence for the Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 139}Cys{sub 14} mutant enzyme suggests that this protein forms a disulfide between the two adjacent Cys residues. Hg(II) titration experiments that correlate the extent of charge-transfer quenching with Hg(II) binding indicate that the Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 140} protein binds Hg(II) with substantially less avidity than does the wild-type enzyme. All mutant mercuric reductases catalyze transhydrogenation and oxygen reduction reactions through obligatory reduced flavin intermediates at rates comparable to or greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. In multiple-turnover assays which monitored the production of Hg(0), two of the mutant enzymes were observed to proceed through at least 30 turnovers at rates ca. 1000-fold slower than that of wild-type mercuric reductase. They conclude that the Cys{sub 135} and Cys{sub 140} thiols serve as Hg(II) ligands that orient the Hg(II) for subsequent reduction by a reduced flavin intermediate.

  3. Aqueous extracts of selenium-fertilized broccoli increase selenoprotein activity and inhibit DNA single-strand breaks, but decrease the activity of quinone reductase in Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Keck, Anna-Sigrid; Finley, John W

    2006-05-01

    Depending on growth conditions, broccoli may be enriched in the isothiocyanate sulforaphane and/or the mineral selenium (Se); both compounds may play an important role in the reduction of intracellular oxidative stress and chronic disease prevention. Sulforaphane up-regulates transcription of Phase II detoxification proteins (e.g. quinone reductase [QR]), whereas Se is needed for the production of thioredoxin reductase (TR) and glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx1), both of which exhibit antioxidant activity. The objective of the present study was to determine whether the fertilization of broccoli with Se increases the antioxidant ability of broccoli. Hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA single-strand breaks (measured by single cell electrophoresis, Comet assay) and activity of antioxidant enzymes (GPx, TR and QR) were measured in mouse hepatoma cells (Hepa 1c1c7 cells) treated with purified sulforaphane, sodium selenite or extracts of selenized broccoli. When supplied separately as chemically pure substances, sodium selenite was more effective than sulforaphane for reduction of single-strand breaks. Se-fertilized broccoli extracts were the most effective for reduction of DNA single-strand breaks, and extracts that contained 0.71 microM Se and 0.08 microM sulforaphane inhibited 94% of DNA single-strand breaks. A significant positive association (r = 0.81, p = 0.009) between GPx1 activity and inhibition of DNA single-strand breaks as well as a 24h lag time between addition of Se, sulforaphane or broccoli extract and inhibition of single-strand breaks suggests that some of the antioxidant protection is mediated through selenoproteins. Conversely, fertilization of broccoli with Se decreased the ability of broccoli extract to induce QR activity. These results demonstrate that Se and sulforaphane, alone or as a component of broccoli, may help decrease oxidative stress. They further suggest that Se is the most important for decreasing oxidative stress, but maximizing the Se content

  4. Arabidopsis thaliana dehydroascorbate reductase 2: Conformational flexibility during catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodra, Nandita; Young, David; Astolfi Rosado, Leonardo; Pallo, Anna; Wahni, Khadija; de Proft, Frank; Huang, Jingjing; van Breusegem, Frank; Messens, Joris

    2017-02-01

    Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) catalyzes the glutathione (GSH)-dependent reduction of dehydroascorbate and plays a direct role in regenerating ascorbic acid, an essential plant antioxidant vital for defense against oxidative stress. DHAR enzymes bear close structural homology to the glutathione transferase (GST) superfamily of enzymes and contain the same active site motif, but most GSTs do not exhibit DHAR activity. The presence of a cysteine at the active site is essential for the catalytic functioning of DHAR, as mutation of this cysteine abolishes the activity. Here we present the crystal structure of DHAR2 from Arabidopsis thaliana with GSH bound to the catalytic cysteine. This structure reveals localized conformational differences around the active site which distinguishes the GSH-bound DHAR2 structure from that of DHAR1. We also unraveled the enzymatic step in which DHAR releases oxidized glutathione (GSSG). To consolidate our structural and kinetic findings, we investigated potential conformational flexibility in DHAR2 by normal mode analysis and found that subdomain mobility could be linked to GSH binding or GSSG release.

  5. Arabidopsis thaliana dehydroascorbate reductase 2: Conformational flexibility during catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Bodra, Nandita; Young, David; Astolfi Rosado, Leonardo; Pallo, Anna; Wahni, Khadija; De Proft, Frank; Huang, Jingjing; Van Breusegem, Frank; Messens, Joris

    2017-01-01

    Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) catalyzes the glutathione (GSH)-dependent reduction of dehydroascorbate and plays a direct role in regenerating ascorbic acid, an essential plant antioxidant vital for defense against oxidative stress. DHAR enzymes bear close structural homology to the glutathione transferase (GST) superfamily of enzymes and contain the same active site motif, but most GSTs do not exhibit DHAR activity. The presence of a cysteine at the active site is essential for the catalytic functioning of DHAR, as mutation of this cysteine abolishes the activity. Here we present the crystal structure of DHAR2 from Arabidopsis thaliana with GSH bound to the catalytic cysteine. This structure reveals localized conformational differences around the active site which distinguishes the GSH-bound DHAR2 structure from that of DHAR1. We also unraveled the enzymatic step in which DHAR releases oxidized glutathione (GSSG). To consolidate our structural and kinetic findings, we investigated potential conformational flexibility in DHAR2 by normal mode analysis and found that subdomain mobility could be linked to GSH binding or GSSG release. PMID:28195196

  6. Anti-HMG-CoA Reductase, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Amaranthus viridis Leaf Extract as a Potential Treatment for Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Salvamani, Shamala; Gunasekaran, Baskaran; Shukor, Mohd Yunus; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Sabullah, Mohd Khalizan

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are believed to contribute to the pathology of several chronic diseases including hypercholesterolemia (elevated levels of cholesterol in blood) and atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed as synthetic drugs, such as statins, which are known to cause adverse effects on the liver and muscles. Amaranthus viridis (A. viridis) has been used from ancient times for its supposedly medically beneficial properties. In the current study, different parts of A. viridis (leaf, stem, and seed) were evaluated for potential anti-HMG-CoA reductase, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. The putative HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity of A. viridis extracts at different concentrations was determined spectrophotometrically by NADPH oxidation, using HMG-CoA as substrate. A. viridis leaf extract revealed the highest HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory effect at about 71%, with noncompetitive inhibition in Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis. The leaf extract showed good inhibition of hydroperoxides, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO), and ferric ion radicals in various concentrations. A. viridis leaf extract was proven to be an effective inhibitor of hyaluronidase, lipoxygenase, and xanthine oxidase enzymes. The experimental data suggest that A. viridis leaf extract is a source of potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent and may modulate cholesterol metabolism by inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. PMID:27051453

  7. Anti-HMG-CoA Reductase, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Amaranthus viridis Leaf Extract as a Potential Treatment for Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Salvamani, Shamala; Gunasekaran, Baskaran; Shukor, Mohd Yunus; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Sabullah, Mohd Khalizan; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are believed to contribute to the pathology of several chronic diseases including hypercholesterolemia (elevated levels of cholesterol in blood) and atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed as synthetic drugs, such as statins, which are known to cause adverse effects on the liver and muscles. Amaranthus viridis (A. viridis) has been used from ancient times for its supposedly medically beneficial properties. In the current study, different parts of A. viridis (leaf, stem, and seed) were evaluated for potential anti-HMG-CoA reductase, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. The putative HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity of A. viridis extracts at different concentrations was determined spectrophotometrically by NADPH oxidation, using HMG-CoA as substrate. A. viridis leaf extract revealed the highest HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory effect at about 71%, with noncompetitive inhibition in Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis. The leaf extract showed good inhibition of hydroperoxides, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO), and ferric ion radicals in various concentrations. A. viridis leaf extract was proven to be an effective inhibitor of hyaluronidase, lipoxygenase, and xanthine oxidase enzymes. The experimental data suggest that A. viridis leaf extract is a source of potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent and may modulate cholesterol metabolism by inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase.

  8. Glutathione level after long-term occupational elemental mercury exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Kobal, Alfred Bogomir Prezelj, Marija; Horvat, Milena; Krsnik, Mladen; Gibicar, Darija; Osredkar, Josko

    2008-05-15

    Many in vitro and in vivo studies have elucidated the interaction of inorganic mercury (Hg) and glutathione. However, human studies are limited. In this study, we investigated the potential effects of remote long-term intermittent occupational elemental Hg vapour (Hg{sup o}) exposure on erythrocyte glutathione levels and some antioxidative enzyme activities in ex-mercury miners in the period after exposure. The study included 49 ex-mercury miners divided into subgroups of 28 still active, Hg{sup o}-not-exposed miners and 21 elderly retired miners, and 41 controls, age-matched to the miners subgroup. The control workers were taken from 'mercury-free works'. Reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized disulphide glutathione (GSSG) concentrations in haemolysed erythrocytes were determined by capillary electrophoresis, while total glutathione (total GSH) and the GSH/GSSG ratio were calculated from the determined values. Catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR) activities in erythrocytes were measured using commercially available reagent kits, while urine Hg (U-Hg) concentrations were determined by cold vapour atomic absorption (CVAAS). No correlation of present U-Hg levels, GSH, GSSG, and antioxidative enzymes with remote occupational biological exposure indices were found. The mean CAT activity in miners and retired miners was significantly higher (p<0.05) than in the controls. No differences in mean GPx activity among the three groups were found, whereas the mean GR activity was significantly higher (p<0.05) in miners than in retired miners. The mean concentrations of GSH (mmol/g Hb) in miners (13.03{+-}3.71) were significantly higher (p<0.05) than in the control group (11.68{+-}2.66). No differences in mean total GSH, GSSG levels, and GSH/GSSG ratio between miners and controls were found. A positive correlation between GSSG and present U-Hg excretion (r=0.41, p=0.001) in the whole group of ex-mercury miners was observed. The

  9. De novo-designed metallopeptides with type 2 copper centers: modulation of reduction potentials and nitrite reductase activities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fangting; Penner-Hahn, James E; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2013-12-04

    Enzymatic reactions involving redox processes are highly sensitive to the local electrostatic environment. Despite considerable effort, the complex interactions among different influential factors in native proteins impede progress toward complete understanding of the structure-function relationship. Of particular interest is the type 2 copper center Cu(His)3, which may act as an electron transfer center in peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) or a catalytic center in copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR). A de novo design strategy is used to probe the effect of modifying charged amino acid residues around, but not directly bound to, a Cu(His)3 center embedded in three-stranded coiled coils (TRI-H)3 [TRI-H = Ac-G WKALEEK LKALEEK LKALEEK HKALEEK G-NH2]. Specifically, the peptide TRI-EH (=TRI-HK22E) alters an important lysine to glutamate just above the copper binding center. With a series of TRI-EH peptides mutated below the metal center, we use a variety of spectroscopies (EPR, UV-vis, XAS) to show a direct impact on the protonation equilibria, copper binding affinities, reduction potentials, and nitrite reductase activities of these copper-peptide complexes. The potentials at a specific pH vary by 100 mV, and the nitrite reductase activities range over a factor of 4 in rates. We also observe that the affinities, potentials, and catalytic activities are strongly influenced by the pH conditions (pH 5.8-7.4). In general, Cu(II) affinities for the peptides are diminished at low pH values. The interplay among these factors can lead to a 200 mV shift in reduction potential across these peptides, which is determined by the pH-dependent affinities of copper in both oxidation states. This study illustrates the strength of de novo protein design in elucidating the influence of ionizable residues on a particular redox system, an important step toward understanding the factors that govern the properties of this metalloenzyme with a goal of eventually improving the

  10. Chemical constituents from the aerial parts of Aster koraiensis with protein glycation and aldose reductase inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun; Lee, Yun Mi; Lee, Byong Won; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Kim, Jin Sook

    2012-02-24

    Two new eudesmane-type sesquiterpene glucosides, 9β-O-(E-p-hydroxycinnamoyl)-1β,6β-dihydroxy-trans-eudesm-3-en-6-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1) and 9α-O-(E-p-hydroxycinnamoyl)-1α,6α-11-trihydroxy-trans-eudesm-3-en-6-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (2), were isolated by the activity-guidedfractionation of an EtOAc-soluble fraction from the aerial parts of Aster koraiensis. A new dihydrobenzofuran glucoside, (2R,3S)-6-acetyl-2-[1-O-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-2-propenyl]-5-hydroxy-3-methoxy-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran (3), was also isolated, in addition to 15 known compounds. The structures of 1-3 were determined by spectroscopic data interpretation. All of the isolates were evaluated for in vitro inhibitory activity against the formation of advanced glycation end-products and rat lens aldose reductase.

  11. Activity-guided isolation of constituents of Tephrosia purpurea with the potential to induce the phase II enzyme, quinone reductase.

    PubMed

    Chang, L C; Gerhäuser, C; Song, L; Farnsworth, N R; Pezzuto, J M; Kinghorn, A D

    1997-09-01

    An isoflavone, 7,4'-dihydroxy-3',5'-dimethoxyisoflavone (1), and a chalcone, (+)-tephropurpurin (2), both novel compounds, as well as six constituents of known structure, (+)-purpurin (3), pongamol (4), lanceolatin B (5), (-)-maackiain (6), (-)-3-hydroxy-4-methoxy-8,9-methylene-dioxypterocarpan (7), and (-)-medicarpin (8), were obtained as active compounds from Tephrosia purpurea, using a bioassay based on the induction of quinone reductase (QR) activity with cultured Hepa 1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cells. Additionally, three inactive compounds of known structure, 3'-methoxydaidzein, desmoxyphyllin B, and 3,9-dihydroxy-8-methoxycoumestan, were isolated and identified. The structure elucidation of compounds 1 and 2 was carried out by spectral data interpretation.

  12. Characterizing and predicting carboxylic acid reductase activity for diversifying bioaldehyde production.

    PubMed

    Moura, Matthew; Pertusi, Dante; Lenzini, Stephen; Bhan, Namita; Broadbelt, Linda J; Tyo, Keith E J

    2016-05-01

    Chemicals with aldehyde moieties are useful in the synthesis of polymerization reagents, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, flavors, and fragrances because of their high reactivity. However, chemical synthesis of aldehydes from carboxylic acids has unfavorable thermodynamics and limited specificity. Enzymatically catalyzed reductive bioaldehyde synthesis is an attractive route that overcomes unfavorable thermodynamics by ATP hydrolysis in ambient, aqueous conditions. Carboxylic acid reductases (Cars) are particularly attractive, as only one enzyme is required. We sought to increase the knowledge base of permitted substrates for four Cars. Additionally, the Lys2 enzyme family was found to be mechanistically the same as Cars and two isozymes were also tested. Our results show that Cars prefer molecules where the carboxylic acid is the only polar/charged group. Using this data and other published data, we develop a support vector classifier (SVC) for predicting Car reactivity and make predictions on all carboxylic acid metabolites in iAF1260 and Model SEED.

  13. Inhibition of glycation and aldose reductase activity using dietary flavonoids: A lens organ culture studies.

    PubMed

    Patil, Kapil K; Gacche, Rajesh N

    2017-05-01

    On the eve of increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus and related complications, the search for novel, safe and alternatives therapeutic approaches are evolving. In the present investigation, a panel of ten dietary flavonoids such as 4'-methoxyflavanone, formononetin, hesperetin, hesperidin, naringenin, naringin, rutin, diadzin, silibinin and silymarin was evaluated as possible inhibitors of sugar induced cataractogenesis using bovine lens organ culture studies. The effect of selected flavonoids was observed on glycation induced lens opacity, AGE fluorescence, carbonyl group formation (a biomarker of glycation), protein aggregation and aldose reductase (AR) inhibition. The results obtained clearly demonstrate the efficacy of rutin and silibinin as promising leads for inhibition of glycation reaction and amelioration of sugar induced cataractogenesis. The findings of the present study may be useful for designing and development of the novel lead molecules for the management of diabetic cataract.

  14. Design, synthesis, and biological activity of diaryl ether inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii enoyl reductase

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gang; Muench, Stephen P.; Zhou, Ying; Afanador, Gustavo A.; Mui, Ernest J.; Fomovska, Alina; Lai, Bo Shiun; Prigge, Sean T.; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig W.; Hickman, Mark R.; Lee, Patty J.; Leed, Susan E.; Auschwitz, Jennifer M.; Rice, David W.; McLeod, Rima

    2013-01-01

    Triclosan is a potent inhibitor of Toxoplasma gondii enoyl reductase (TgENR), which is an essential enzyme for parasite survival. In view of triclosan’s poor druggability, which limits its therapeutic use, a new set of B-ring modified analogs were designed to optimize its physico-chemical properties. These derivatives were synthesized and evaluated by in vitro assay and TgENR enzyme assay. Some analogs display improved solubility, permeability and a comparable MIC50 value to that of triclosan. Modeling of these inhibitors revealed the same overall binding mode with the enzyme as triclosan, but the Bring modifications have additional interactions with the strongly conserved Asn130. PMID:23453069

  15. FAD binding, cobinamide binding and active site communication in the corrin reductase (CobR)

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Andrew D.; Taylor, Samantha L.; Scott, Alan; Rowe, Michelle L.; Johnson, Christopher M.; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Geeves, Michael A.; Pickersgill, Richard W.; Howard, Mark J.; Warren, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosylcobalamin, the coenzyme form of vitamin B12, is one Nature's most complex coenzyme whose de novo biogenesis proceeds along either an anaerobic or aerobic metabolic pathway. The aerobic synthesis involves reduction of the centrally chelated cobalt metal ion of the corrin ring from Co(II) to Co(I) before adenosylation can take place. A corrin reductase (CobR) enzyme has been identified as the likely agent to catalyse this reduction of the metal ion. Herein, we reveal how Brucella melitensis CobR binds its coenzyme FAD (flavin dinucleotide) and we also show that the enzyme can bind a corrin substrate consistent with its role in reduction of the cobalt of the corrin ring. Stopped-flow kinetics and EPR reveal a mechanistic asymmetry in CobR dimer that provides a potential link between the two electron reduction by NADH to the single electron reduction of Co(II) to Co(I). PMID:24909839

  16. In vitro evaluation of glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-like activity and antioxidant properties of an organoselenium compound.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohammad; Muhammad, Niaz; Naeem, Muhammad; Deobald, Anna Maria; Kamdem, Jean Paul; Rocha, Joao Batista Teixeira

    2015-08-01

    The amine based diselenide, (Z)-N-(4-methylbenzylidene)-1-(2-((2-(1-((E)-4-methyl benzylideneamino)ethyl)phenyl)diselanyl)phenyl)ethanamine ethyl)phenyl) diselanyl) phenyl) ethylimino) methyl)phenol (Compound A) an organoselenium compound that can mimic endogenous antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2 were tested against lipid peroxidation induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and Fe(II) in rat brain, interaction with 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl stable free radical (DPPH) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) like antioxidant activities with H2O2 or tBuOOH as substrates and with PhSH as thiol co-substrates as well as their ability to oxidize thiols were evaluated. From this study, we concluded that Compound A catalyze the reduction of H2O2 with thiol was ∼2-fold more active than (PhSe)2) in both tBuOOH and H2O2 systems when PhSH was used as a substrate. (PhSe)2 exhibited an increased ability to oxidize thiols while Compound A was not a good substrate for the oxidation of thiol used namely DTT and Cystine and showed DPPH radical-scavenging activity, while (PhSe)2 did not present radical scavenging activity. Compound A (amine based diselenide) presented better antioxidant profiles than (PhSe)2 against lipid peroxidation. The results clear showed that nitrogen atom in the Compound A can have a profound effect on their pharmacological properties.

  17. Influence of chemical treatments on glutathione S-transferases of maize with activity towards metolachlor and cinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Cottingham, C K; Hatzios, K K; Meredith, S

    1998-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity extracted from shoots of 3-day-old etiolated seedlings of maize (Zea mays L., Northrup-King 9283 hybrid) and the induction of soluble and membrane-bound GST activity by the safener benoxacor, the herbicide metolachlor and their combination (CGA-180937) were investigated. GST activity extracted from maize shoots was detected in both cytosolic and microsomal fractions and utilized 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), metolachlor, and trans-cinnamic acid (CA) as substrates. Soluble GST activity extracted from maize shoots was greater than microsomal with CDNB or metolachlor as substrate. Membrane-bound GST activity was greater than soluble with cinnamic acid as substrate. Washing the microsomal preparations from maize shoots with Triton X-100 increased GST(CA) activity. Pretreatment with the safener benoxacor or a formulated combination of the herbicide metolachlor with benoxacor induced soluble GST(CDNB), GST(metolachlor) and GST(CA) activities in maize shoots. Benoxacor and CGA-180937 induced also membrane-bound GST(CDNB) and GST(CA) activities in maize shoots, but did not affect membrane-bound GST(metolachlor) activity. These results confirm that maize contains multiple GST isozymes that differ in their substrate specificity and inducibility by safeners or other chemicals.

  18. Relationship of changing delta 4-steroid 5 alpha-reductase activity to (125I)iododeoxyuridine uptake during regeneration of involuted rat prostates

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahara, S.; Higashi, Y.; Takeuchi, S.; Oshima, H. )

    1989-04-01

    To elucidate the phenotypic expression of proliferating prostatic cells, rats were castrated, and the regenerating process of involuted ventral prostates during testosterone propionate (TP) administration was investigated by examining morphology, (5-{sup 125}I)iododeoxyuridine ({sup 125}I-UdR) uptake, DNA content, weight, acid phosphatase, and delta 4-steroid 5 alpha-reductase (5 alpha-reductase) activities. Morphologically, TP treatment initially increased the number of epithelial cells lining glandular lobules and subsequently restored the shape of epithelial cells. {sup 125}I-UdR uptake peaked on Day 3 of TP treatment and stayed at higher levels than for uncastrated controls until Day 14 of treatment. Prostatic weight, protein content, acid phosphatase, and DNA content returned to uncastrated control levels by Day 14 of TP treatment. TP administration markedly stimulated prostatic 5 alpha-reductase activity, which peaked on the Day 5 of treatment and decreased to uncastrated control levels by Day 14 of treatment. It is concluded that TP administration to castrated rats initially induced active mitotic division of the remaining stem cells, followed by formation of differentiated functional epithelial cells. Prostatic 5 alpha-reductase was highly active at the initial phase of active mitotic cell division. The major portion of the increased enzyme activity can be regarded as a phenotypic expression of stem or transient cells of prostatic epithelium.

  19. Selenite-induced variation in glutathione peroxidase activity of three mammalian cell lines: no effect on radiation-induced cell killing or DNA strand breakage

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstroem, B.E.C.; Carlsson, J.; Marklund, S.L.

    1989-02-01

    The selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activities of three mammalian cell lines, HT29, P31, and N-18, cultured in medium with low serum content, increased about 2-, 5-, and 40-fold, respectively, after supplementation with 100 nM selenite. Catalase, CuZn superoxide dismutase, and Mn superoxide dismutase activities were not generally influenced by selenite supplementation, and there was only a minor nonselenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activity in the investigated cell lines. Gamma-irradiated control and selenite-supplemented cells showed no changes in the surviving fractions, as estimated by clonogenic survival or (/sup 3/H)-thymidine uptake, nor were there any significant differences between the two groups in the induction of DNA strand breaks after gamma irradiation under repairing (37 degrees C) or nonrepairing (0 degrees C) conditions. The results suggest that selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase does not contribute significantly to the radiation resistance of cultured mammalian cells.

  20. Transformation of heavy metal fractions on soil urease and nitrate reductase activities in copper and selenium co-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Liang, Dongli; Liu, Juanjuan; Lei, Lingming; Yu, Dasong

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of the distribution, transformation and bioavailability of different fractions of copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) in co-contaminated soils on soil enzymes, providing references for the phytoremediation of contaminated areas and agriculture environmental protection. Pot experiments and laboratory analysis were used to investigate the transformation and bioavailability of additional Cu and Se for pakchoi (Brassica chinensis) in co-contaminated soil. In the uncontaminated soil, Cu mainly existed in residual form, whereas Se was present in residual form and in elemental and organic-sulfide matter-bound form. In the contaminated soil, Cu mainly bound to Fe-Mn oxidates, whereas Se was in exchangeable and carbonates forms. After a month of pakchoi growth, Cu tended to transfer into organic matter-bound fractions, whereas Se tended to bound to Fe-Mn oxidates. The IR (reduced partition index) value of Cu decreased as the concentrations of Cu and Se gradually increased, whereas the IR value of Se decreased as the concentration of Se increased. The IR value before pakchoi planting and after it was harvested was not affected by the concentration of exogenous Cu. Soil urease and nitrate reductase activities were inhibited by Cu and Se pollution either individually or combined in different degrees, following the order nitrate reductase>urease. The significant correlation between the IR value and soil enzyme activities suggests that this value could be used to evaluate the bioavailability of heavy metals in soil. Path analysis showed that the variations in exchangeable Cu and organic-sulfide matter-bound and elemental Se had direct effects on the activities of the two enzymes, suggesting their high bioavailability. Therefore, the IR value and the transformation of metals in soil could be used as indicators in evaluating the bioavailability of heavy metals.

  1. Targeting Ribonucleotide Reductase M2 and NF-κB Activation with Didox to Circumvent Tamoxifen Resistance in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shah, Khyati N; Wilson, Elizabeth A; Malla, Ritu; Elford, Howard L; Faridi, Jesika S

    2015-11-01

    Tamoxifen is widely used as an adjuvant therapy for patients with estrogen receptor (ERα)-positive tumors. However, the clinical benefit is often limited because of the emergence of drug resistance. In this study, overexpression of ribonucleotide reductase M2 (RRM2) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells resulted in a reduction in the effectiveness of tamoxifen, through downregulation of ERα66 and upregulation of the 36-kDa variant of ER (ERα36). We identified that NF-κB, HIF1α, and MAPK/JNK are the major pathways that are affected by RRM2 overexpression and result in increased NF-κB activity and increased protein levels of EGFR, HER2, IKKs, Bcl-2, RelB, and p50. RRM2-overexpressing cells also exhibited higher migratory and invasive properties. Through time-lapse microscopy and protein profiling studies of tamoxifen-treated MCF-7 and T-47D cells, we have identified that RRM2, along with other key proteins, is altered during the emergence of acquired tamoxifen resistance. Inhibition of RRM2 using siRRM2 or the ribonucleotide reductase (RR) inhibitor didox not only eradicated and effectively prevented the emergence of tamoxifen-resistant populations but also led to the reversal of many of the proteins altered during the process of acquired tamoxifen resistance. Because didox also appears to be a potent inhibitor of NF-κB activation, combining didox with tamoxifen treatment cooperatively reverses ER-α alterations and inhibits NF-κB activation. Finally, inhibition of RRM2 by didox reversed tamoxifen-resistant in vivo tumor growth and decreased in vitro migratory and invasive properties, revealing a beneficial effect of combination therapy that includes RRM2 inhibition to delay or abrogate tamoxifen resistance.

  2. Glutathione induces GABA release through P2X7R activation on Müller glia.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Hércules Rezende; Reis, Ricardo A de Melo

    2017-01-01

    The retinal tissue of warm-blooded vertebrates performs surprisingly complex and accurate transduction of visual information. To achieve precision, a multilayered neuroglia structure is established throughout the embryonic development, and the presence of radial Müller (glial) cells ensure differentiation, growth and survival for the neuronal elements within retinal environment. It is assumed that Müller cells serve as a dynamic reservoir of progenitors, capable of expressing transcription factors, differentiating and proliferating as either neuronal or glial cells depending on extrinsic cues. In the postnatal period, Müller glia may re-enter cell cycle and produce new retinal neurons in response to acute damage. In this context, glutathione (GSH), a virtually ubiquitous tripeptide antioxidant, which is found at milimolar concentrations in central glial cells, plays a vital role as a reducing agent, buffering radical oxygen species (ROS) and preventing cell death in severely injured retinal tissues. Despite its antioxidant role, data also point to GSH as a signaling agent, suggesting that GABA release and P2X7R-mediated calcium inwards occur in Müller cells in a GSH-enriched environment. These phenomena indicate a novel mechanistic response to damage in the vertebrate retinal tissue, particularly in neuron-glia networks.

  3. Plasma glutathione peroxidase activity in kidney recipients with and without adverse outcome.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Hajirahimkhan, Athie; Taghizadeh Afshari, Ali; Nourooz-Zadeh, Jaffar

    2012-01-01

    Kidney function is routinely monitored utilizing classic biochemical parameters including serum or plasma creatinine (Cr), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) concentrations. This study demonstrates that the simultaneous assessment of plasma glutathione peroxidase (pGPx) and Cr levels provides a better strategy for the immediate follow-up of kidney function in organ recipients. Kidney recipients (Krs; n = 22) were recruited. Blood sampling schedule commenced at day 1 (pre-transplantation) and post-transplantation days (i.e., everyday from 1 until day 14, and thereafter on days 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, and 56). pGPx was measured spectrophotometrically. Candidates for transplantation exhibited lower pGPx than control subjects (42 ± 24 vs. 143 ± 31 U/L; p < 0.005). In Krs with a stable post-transplant outcome, pGPx increased to a maximum at day 28 (214 ± 61 U/L). In a Kr diagnosed with acute tubulonecrosis, pGPx provided a better predictive value (threefold increase) than Cr. In a Kr diagnosed with acute rejection, the increment in Cr values was found to be more pronounced than in pGPx values. The pGPx test is simple, inexpensive and automatable, and should be a valuable diagnostic tool of kidney function in organ recipients with and without troublesome outcome for the follow-up during hospitalization period.

  4. Environmental stress enhances biosynthesis of flavor precursors, S-3-(hexan-1-ol)-glutathione and S-3-(hexan-1-ol)-L-cysteine, in grapevine through glutathione S-transferase activation

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hironori; Takase, Hideki; Suzuki, Yumiko; Tanzawa, Fumiko; Takata, Ryoji; Fujita, Keiko; Kohno, Minako; Mochizuki, Mai; Suzuki, Shunji; Konno, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    The biosynthesis of S-(3-hexan-1-ol)-glutathione (3MH-S-glut) and S-(3-hexan-l-ol)-L-cysteine (3MH-S-cys), which act as flavour precursors in wines, in Vitis vinifera grapes exposed to various environmental stress conditions is reported here. Ultraviolet (UV-C) irradiation, water deficit, and biological stimulation up-regulated 3MH-S-glut and 3MH-S-cys biosynthesis in grape leaves. 3MH-S-glut and 3MH-S-cys contents in grape berries were increased by cold shock, heat shock, UV-C irradiation, and biological stimulation. The results suggest that environmental stress enhances the biosynthesis of both flavour precursors in grapevine. The transcription of VvGST1, VvGST3, VvGST4, and GGT in grapevine exposed to the stress conditions was increased markedly compared with that in control grapevine. Also, UV irradiation increased GST (glutathione S-transferase) and GGT (γ-glutamyl transferase) enzyme activities in grape berries. Recombinant VvGST3 and VvGST4, but not VvGST1, mediated the synthesis of 3MH-S-glut from reduced glutathione and trans-2-hexenal in vitro. The enzymatic mediation of flavour precursor production is a novel function of plant GSTs and may result in the detoxification of damaged grape cells under stress conditions. PMID:21115666

  5. Synthesis, nitric oxide release, and anti-leukemic activity of glutathione-activated nitric oxide prodrugs: Structural analogues of PABA/NO, an anti-cancer lead compound.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Harinath; Wilde, Thomas C; Citro, Michael L; Goodblatt, Michael M; Keefer, Larry K; Saavedra, Joseph E

    2008-03-01

    Diazeniumdiolate anions and their prodrug forms are reliable sources of nitric oxide (NO) that have generated interest as promising therapeutic agents. A number of structural analogues of O(2)-(2,4-dinitro-5-(4-(N-methylamino)benzoyloxy)phenyl) 1-(N,N-dimethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (PABA/NO), an anti-cancer lead compound that is designed to release NO upon activation by glutathione, were prepared. The nitric oxide release patterns of these O(2)-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) diazeniumdiolates in the presence of glutathione were tested and it was found that in the absence of competing pathways, these compounds release nearly quantitative amounts of NO. The ability of PABA/NO and its structural analogues to inhibit human leukemia cell proliferation was determined and it was found that compounds releasing elevated amounts of NO displayed superior cytotoxic effects.

  6. Inhibition of aldose reductase and anti-cataract action of trans-anethole isolated from Foeniculum vulgare Mill. fruits.

    PubMed

    Dongare, Vandana; Kulkarni, Chaitanya; Kondawar, Manish; Magdum, Chandrakant; Haldavnekar, Vivek; Arvindekar, Akalpita

    2012-05-01

    Foeniculum vulgare fruits are routinely consumed for their carminative and mouth freshening effect. The plant was evaluated for aldose reductase inhibition and anti-diabetic action. Bioguided fractionation using silica gel column chromatography, HPLC, and GC-MS analysis revealed trans-anethole as the bioactive constituent possessing potent aldose reductase inhibitory action, with an IC50 value of 3.8μg/ml. Prolonged treatment with the pet ether fraction of the F. vulgare distillate demonstrated improvement in blood glucose, lipid profile, glycated haemoglobin and other parameters in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Trans-anethole could effectively show anti-cataract activity through the increase in soluble lens protein, reduced glutathione, catalase and SOD activity on in vitro incubation of the eye lens with 55mM glucose. Trans-anethole demonstrated noncompetitive to mixed type of inhibition of lens aldose reductase using Lineweaver Burk plot.

  7. Glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes in rats exposed to dimethoate and/or pyrantel.

    PubMed

    Spodniewska, A

    2014-01-01

    The study was undertaken to examine the effect of single and combined administration of dimethoate (an OP insecticide) and pyrantel embonate (an anthelmintic agent) on the concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH) and the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) in rats. Dimethoate (Group I) was administered to rats at a dose of 1/10 LD50 for 5 consecutive days and pyrantel embonate (Group II) at a dose of 1/5 LD50 for 3 consecutive days. The animals of group III were given both of the mentioned above compounds in the same manner as group I and II, but pyrantel embonate was applied on day 3, 4, and 5 from the beginning of dimethoate intoxication. Material from 6 rats randomly selected from each group was obtained after 3, 6 and 12 hours and 2, 7 and 14 days following the last applied dose of the compounds under study. It was found that application of pyrantel embonate caused only slight changes in the analysed parameters i.e. GSH, GPx and GR. Dimethoate administration caused disturbances in the antioxidative system manifested as a decrease in GSH concentration in the liver (max.--37.7% after 6 hours) and an increase of GPx and GR activities in erythrocytes (max.--21.7% and 29.6% after 3 hours, respectively), compared to the control group. The profile of changes after combined intoxication was similar, but their intensity was higher compared to the group of animals exposed to dimethoate only. Based on current studies, it was concluded that both dimethoate and pyrantel embonate at the applied doses showed a pro-oxidative activity.

  8. Towards a systematic analysis of human short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR): Ligand identification and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Chitra; Oerum, Stephanie; Bray, James; Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Shafqat, Naeem; Yue, Wyatt; Oppermann, Udo

    2015-06-05

    Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) constitute a large, functionally diverse branch of enzymes within the class of NAD(P)(H) dependent oxidoreductases. In humans, over 80 genes have been identified with distinct metabolic roles in carbohydrate, amino acid, lipid, retinoid and steroid hormone metabolism, frequently associated with inherited genetic defects. Besides metabolic functions, a subset of atypical SDR proteins appears to play critical roles in adapting to redox status or RNA processing, and thereby controlling metabolic pathways. Here we present an update on the human SDR superfamily and a ligand identification strategy using differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) with a focused library of oxidoreductase and metabolic ligands to identify substrate classes and inhibitor chemotypes. This method is applicable to investigate structure-activity relationships of oxidoreductases and ultimately to better understand their physiological roles.

  9. Implications and problems in analysing cytotoxic activity of hydroxyurea in combination with a potential inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Nocentini, G; Barzi, A; Franchetti, P

    1990-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of hydroxyurea in combination with 2.2'-bipyridyl-6-carbothioamide (a potential inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase) on P388 murine leukemia is reported. Synergistic activity was studied using various interpretations of the isobologram method and the combination index method. We evaluated the pros and cons of these methods and their overall usefulness. In our opinion, to obtain all possible information from a compound association, it is important to choose a formally correct method that (a) can quantitatively evaluate synergism or antagonism, (b) may offer the possibility of averaging final results, (c) needs a minimal amount of experimental data, and (d) is rapid. Moreover, we emphasize both the utility of testing at least three molar ratios of compound association and the importance of carefully choosing the fractional inhibition used in calculating the combination effect. Such evaluation of drug combinations gives information essential to the preparation of new anticancer drug regimens and to the early assessment of biochemical interactions.

  10. Purification and characterization of a yeast carbonyl reductase for synthesis of optically active (R)-styrene oxide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kizaki, Noriyuki; Sawa, Ikuo; Yano, Miho; Yasohara, Yoshihiko; Hasegawa, Junzo

    2005-01-01

    Optically active styrene oxide derivatives are versatile chiral building blocks. Stereoselective reduction of phenacyl halide to chiral 2-halo-1-phenylethanol is the key reaction of the most economical synthetic route. Rhodotorula glutinis var. dairenensis IFO415 was discovered on screening as a potent microorganism reducing a phenacyl halide to the (R)-form of the corresponding alcohol. An NADPH-dependent carbonyl reductase was purified to homogeneity through four steps from this strain. The relative molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated to be 40,000 on gel filtration and 30,000 on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This enzyme reduced a broad range of carbonyl compounds in addition to phenacyl halides. Some properties of the enzyme and preparation of a chiral styrene oxide using the crude enzyme are reported herein.

  11. Structure-activity relationships of pyrrole based S-nitrosoglutathione reductase inhibitors: pyrrole regioisomers and propionic acid replacement.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xicheng; Qiu, Jian; Strong, Sarah A; Green, Louis S; Wasley, Jan W F; Colagiovanni, Dorothy B; Mutka, Sarah C; Blonder, Joan P; Stout, Adam M; Richards, Jane P; Chun, Lawrence; Rosenthal, Gary J

    2011-06-15

    S-Nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) is a member of the alcohol dehydrogenase family (ADH) that regulates the levels of S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) through catabolism of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). GSNO and SNOs are implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including those in respiratory, cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal systems. The pyrrole based N6022 was recently identified as a potent, selective, reversible, and efficacious GSNOR inhibitor which is currently undergoing clinical development. We describe here the synthesis and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of novel pyrrole based analogues of N6022 focusing on scaffold modification and propionic acid replacement. We identified equally potent and novel GSNOR inhibitors having pyrrole regioisomers as scaffolds using a structure based approach.

  12. Nitrate reductase activity in some subarctic species and UV influence in the foliage of Betula pendula Roth. seedlings.

    PubMed

    Krywult, Marek; Turunen, Minna; Sutinen, Marja-Liisa; Derome, Kirsti; Norokorpi, Yrjö

    2002-02-04

    Nitrate reductase (NR) activity was studied in the foliage of five subarctic species: mature trees of European white birch (Betula pubescens Erch. S.S.), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst), Ericaceous shrub bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.), naturally growing in a forest, and seed-grown silver birch (Betula pendula Roth.) seedlings in an ultraviolet (UV) exclusion field experiment at the Pallas-Ounastunturi National Park in Finnish Lapland (68 degrees N). Mean NR activity ranged from 0 in bilberry to 1477 (S.D. = 277.7) and 1910 (S.D. = 785.4) nmol g(-1) DW h(-1) in mature trees of European white birch and silver birch seedlings, respectively. Significant differences due to UV exclosure treatments were determined for the NR activity of silver birch seedlings (F = 3.62, P= 0.025*) after three growing seasons (191 days) of UV exclusion. The ambient and control silver birch seedlings had or tended to have higher NR activity than those grown under UV exclusion. No relationship was found between the foliage NR activity and total nitrogen content, which ranged from 0.61 to 1.35% per seedling. The present study suggests large differences in NR activity between the species and the induction of NR activity in silver birch seedlings due to ambient UV radiation.

  13. Dimerization and enzymatic activity of fungal 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kristan, Katja; Deluca, Dominga; Adamski, Jerzy; Stojan, Jure; Rižner, Tea Lanišnik

    2005-01-01

    Background 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17β-HSDcl) is a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. SDR proteins usually function as dimers or tetramers and 17β-HSDcl is also a homodimer under native conditions. Results We have investigated here which secondary structure elements are involved in the dimerization of 17β-HSDcl and examined the importance of dimerization for the enzyme activity. Sequence similarity with trihydroxynaphthalene reductase from Magnaporthe grisea indicated that Arg129 and His111 from the αE-helices interact with the Asp121, Glu117 and Asp187 residues from the αE and αF-helices of the neighbouring subunit. The Arg129Asp and His111Leu mutations both rendered 17β-HSDcl monomeric, while the mutant 17β-HSDcl-His111Ala was dimeric. Circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis confirmed the conservation of the secondary structure in both monomers. The three mutant proteins all bound coenzyme, as shown by fluorescence quenching in the presence of NADP+, but both monomers showed no enzymatic activity. Conclusion We have shown by site-directed mutagenesis and structure/function analysis that 17β-HSDcl dimerization involves the αE and αF helices of both subunits. Neighbouring subunits are connected through hydrophobic interactions, H-bonds and salt bridges involving amino acid residues His111 and Arg129. Since the substitutions of these two amino acid residues lead to inactive monomers with conserved secondary structure, we suggest dimerization is a prerequisite for catalysis. A detailed understanding of this dimerization could lead to the development of compounds that will specifically prevent dimerization, thereby serving as a new type of inhibitor. PMID:16359545

  14. Induction of quinone reductase (QR) by withanolides isolated from Physalis pubescens L. (Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Ji, Long; Yuan, Yonglei; Ma, Zhongjun; Chen, Zhe; Gan, Lishe; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Huang, Dongsheng

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, it was demonstrated that the dichloromethane extract of Physalis pubescens L. (DEPP) had weak potential quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity, but an UPLC-ESI-MS method with glutathione (GSH) as the substrate revealed that the DEPP had electrophiles (with an α,β-unsaturated ketone moiety). These electrophiles could induce quinone reductase (QR) activity, which might be attributed to the modification of the highly reactive cysteine residues in Keap1. Herein, four withanolides, including three new compounds physapubescin B (2), physapubescin C (3), physapubescin D (4), together with one known steroidal compound physapubescin (1) were isolated. Structures of these compounds were determined by spectroscopic analysis and that of physapubescin C (3) was confirmed by a combination of molecular modeling and quantum chemical DFT-GIAO calculations. Evaluation of the QR inducing activities of all withanolides indicated potent activities of compounds 1 and 2, which had a common α,β-unsaturated ketone moiety.

  15. Selenium-Enriched Foods Are More Effective at Increasing Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) Activity Compared with Selenomethionine: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham, Emma N.; Hesketh, John E.; Sinclair, Bruce R.; Koolaard, John P.; Roy, Nicole C.

    2014-01-01

    Selenium may play a beneficial role in multi-factorial illnesses with genetic and environmental linkages via epigenetic regulation in part via glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. A meta-analysis was undertaken to quantify the effects of dietary selenium supplementation on the activity of overall GPx activity in different tissues and animal species and to compare the effectiveness of different forms of dietary selenium. GPx activity response was affected by both the dose and form of selenium (p < 0.001). There were differences between tissues on the effects of selenium supplementation on GPx activity (p < 0.001); however, there was no evidence in the data of differences between animal species (p = 0.95). The interactions between dose and tissue, animal species and form were significant (p < 0.001). Tissues particularly sensitive to changes in selenium supply include red blood cells, kidney and muscle. The meta-analysis identified that for animal species selenium-enriched foods were more effective than selenomethionine at increasing GPx activity. PMID:25268836

  16. Adaptation of cytochrome-b5 reductase activity and methaemoglobinaemia in areas with a high nitrate concentration in drinking-water.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S. K.; Gupta, R. C.; Seth, A. K.; Gupta, A. B.; Bassin, J. K.; Gupta, A.

    1999-01-01

    An epidemiological investigation was undertaken in India to assess the prevalence of methaemoglobinaemia in areas with high nitrate concentration in drinking-water and the possible association with an adaptation of cytochrome-b5 reductase. Five areas were selected, with average nitrate ion concentrations in drinking-water of 26, 45, 95, 222 and 459 mg/l. These areas were visited and house schedules were prepared in accordance with a statistically designed protocol. A sample of 10% of the total population was selected in each of the areas, matched for age and weight, giving a total of 178 persons in five age groups. For each subject, a detailed history was documented, a medical examination was conducted and blood samples were taken to determine methaemoglobin level and cytochrome-b5 reductase activity. Collected data were subjected to statistical analysis to test for a possible relationship between nitrate concentration, cytochrome-b5 reductase activity and methaemoglobinaemia. High nitrate concentrations caused methaemoglobinaemia in infants and adults. The reserve of cytochrome-b5 reductase activity (i.e. the enzyme activity not currently being used, but which is available when needed; for example, under conditions of increased nitrate ingestion) and its adaptation with increasing water nitrate concentration to reduce methaemoglobin were more pronounced in children and adolescents. PMID:10534899

  17. Adaptation of cytochrome-b5 reductase activity and methaemoglobinaemia in areas with a high nitrate concentration in drinking-water.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S K; Gupta, R C; Seth, A K; Gupta, A B; Bassin, J K; Gupta, A

    1999-01-01

    An epidemiological investigation was undertaken in India to assess the prevalence of methaemoglobinaemia in areas with high nitrate concentration in drinking-water and the possible association with an adaptation of cytochrome-b5 reductase. Five areas were selected, with average nitrate ion concentrations in drinking-water of 26, 45, 95, 222 and 459 mg/l. These areas were visited and house schedules were prepared in accordance with a statistically designed protocol. A sample of 10% of the total population was selected in each of the areas, matched for age and weight, giving a total of 178 persons in five age groups. For each subject, a detailed history was documented, a medical examination was conducted and blood samples were taken to determine methaemoglobin level and cytochrome-b5 reductase activity. Collected data were subjected to statistical analysis to test for a possible relationship between nitrate concentration, cytochrome-b5 reductase activity and methaemoglobinaemia. High nitrate concentrations caused methaemoglobinaemia in infants and adults. The reserve of cytochrome-b5 reductase activity (i.e. the enzyme activity not currently being used, but which is available when needed; for example, under conditions of increased nitrate ingestion) and its adaptation with increasing water nitrate concentration to reduce methaemoglobin were more pronounced in children and adolescents.

  18. Ferric reductase activity of low molecular weight human milk fraction is associated with enhanced iron solubility and uptake in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Pullakhandam, Raghu; Nair, Madhavan Krishnapillai; Kasula, Sunanda; Kilari, Sreenivasulu; Thippande, Tippeswamy Gowda

    2008-09-19

    It is known that the fractional absorption of extrinsic iron from human milk is higher in infants and adults. A low molecular weight milk fraction has been proposed to increase the bioavailability of iron from human milk. Nevertheless, the mechanisms remained elusive. Here in we demonstrate ferric reductase activity (Km7.73x10(-6)M) in low molecular weight human milk fraction (10kF, filtrate derived from ultra filtration of milk whey through 10kDa cutoff membrane), which increased ferric iron solubility and iron uptake in Caco-2 cells. The 10kF fraction was as effective as ascorbic acid (1:20 iron to ascorbic acid) in increasing the ferric iron solubility and uptake in Caco-2 cells. Further, gel filtration chromatography on peptide column led to co-elution of ferric reductase and iron solubilization activities at an apparent molecular mass of <1500Da. Interestingly, only these fractions containing ferric reductase activity also stimulated the uptake of iron in Caco-2 cells. Thus, it is concluded that human milk possesses ferric reductase activity and is associated with ferric iron solubilization and enhanced absorption.

  19. Glutathione transferases and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Mazzetti, Anna Paola; Fiorile, Maria Carmela; Primavera, Alessandra; Lo Bello, Mario

    2015-03-01

    There is substantial agreement that the unbalance between oxidant and antioxidant species may affect the onset and/or the course of a number of common diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Many studies suggest a crucial role for oxidative stress in the first phase of aging, or in the pathogenesis of various diseases including neurological ones. Particularly, the role exerted by glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes (Glutathione Transferases) in the nervous system appears more relevant, this latter tissue being much more vulnerable to toxins and oxidative stress than other tissues such as liver, kidney or muscle. The present review addresses the question by focusing on the results obtained by specimens from patients or by in vitro studies using cells or animal models related to Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. In general, there is an association between glutathione depletion and Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. In addition, a significant decrease of glutathione transferase activity in selected areas of brain and in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid was found. For some glutathione transferase genes there is also a correlation between polymorphisms and onset/outcome of neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, there is a general agreement about the protective effect exerted by glutathione and glutathione transferases but no clear answer about the mechanisms underlying this crucial role in the insurgence of neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. NITRITE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY OF NON-SYMBIOTIC HEMOGLOBINS FROM ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA†

    PubMed Central

    Tiso, Mauro; Tejero, Jesús; Kenney, Claire; Frizzell, Sheila; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Plant non-symbiotic hemoglobins possess hexa-coordinate heme geometry similar to the heme protein neuroglobin. We recently discovered that deoxygenated neuroglobin converts nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule involved in many processes in plants. We sought to determine whether Arabidopsis thaliana non-symbiotic hemoglobins class 1 and 2 (AHb1 and AHb2) might function as nitrite reductases. We found that the reaction of nitrite with deoxygenated AHb1 and AHb2 generates NO gas and iron-nitrosyl-hemoglobin species. The bimolecular rate constants for nitrite reduction to NO are 19.8 ± 3.2 and 4.9 ± 0.2 M−1s−1, at pH = 7.4 and 25°C, respectively. We determined the pH dependence of these bimolecular rate constants and found a linear correlation with the concentration of protons, indicating the requirement for one proton in the reaction. Release of free NO gas during reaction in anoxic and hypoxic (2% oxygen) conditions was confirmed by chemiluminescence detection. These results demonstrate that deoxygenated AHb1 and AHb2 reduce nitrite to form NO via a mechanism analogous to that observed for hemoglobin, myoglobin and neuroglobin. Our findings suggest that during severe hypoxia and in the anaerobic plant roots, especially in water submerged species, non-symbiotic hemoglobins provide a viable pathway for NO generation via nitrite reduction. PMID:22620259

  1. Exploring the inhibitory activity of Withaferin-A against Pteridine reductase-1 of L. donovani.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Sambamurthy; Veronica, Jalaja; Gundampati, Ravi Kumar; Sundar, Shyam; Maurya, Radheshyam

    2016-12-01

    Withaferin A is an abundant withanolide present in Withania somnifera leaves and to some extent in roots. It has been known for its profound anti-cancer properties, but its role in counteracting the Leishmania donovani infection has to be explored. Pteridine reductase 1 (PTR1) is involved in pteridine salvage and an important enzyme for the parasite growth, which could be targeted for the development of an efficient antileishmanial drug. We employed molecular docking studies to identify the binding mode of withaferin A with PTR1 in silico. We further cloned, expressed, and purified PTR1 of L. donovani and performed the enzyme kinetics using the Michaelis-Menten equation and enzyme inhibition studies with withaferin A by plotting the Lineweaver-Burk graph, which followed an uncompetitive mode of inhibition. We also showed the inhibition of the enzyme in the crude lysate of treated parasites. Thus, our study contributes towards understanding the mode of action of withaferin A against L. donovani parasite.

  2. Variation in cellular glutathione peroxidase activity in lens epithelial cells, transgenics and knockouts does not significantly change the response to H2O2 stress.

    PubMed

    Spector, A; Yang, Y; Ho, Y S; Magnenat, J L; Wang, R R; Ma, W; Li, W C

    1996-05-01

    This investigation examines the contribution of glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx-1) in degrading H2O2 in lens preparations. Rabbit (N/N1003A) and normal and GSHPx-1 transfected mouse (alpha TN4-1) lens epithelial cell lines and normal and GSHPx-1 transgenic and knockout mouse lenses were utilized. GSHPx-1 activity in the cell lines was increased from two-fold to about four-fold, in the lenses from transgenics more than four-fold and the lenses from knockouts had less than 3% of normal GSHPx-1 activity. The transgenic and knockout mice as well as their lenses appeared normal for up to 3 to 4 months, the longest period of observation. The preparations were subjected to oxidative stress by placing them either in a medium containing 120 or 300 microM H2O2 or utilizing photochemical stress where the H2O2 levels normally rise to about 100 microM over a few hours in the presence of a normal lens. With all preparations, it was found that either markedly increasing or eliminating GSHPx-1 activity had only a small effect on the system's ability to metabolize H2O2, 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU), an inhibitor of GSSG reductase (GSSG Red) and 3-aminotriazole (3-AT), an inhibitor of catalase, also had little effect. However, the addition of both inhibitors caused a marked decrease in H2O2 degradation. Examination of the distribution of GSHPx-1 in the lens indicated that the activity per milligram of protein was evenly distributed between the epithelium and the remainder of the lens in the normal lens and was about 1.7-fold greater in the epithelium of transgenic lenses than in the remainder of the lens. Surprisingly, the distribution of GSSG Red was quite different with eight- to ten-fold more activity in the epithelium. Catalase was also found to be concentrated in the epithelium. With H2O2 exposure, a rapid loss of non-protein thiol (NP-thiol) was found in cell cultures and in the epithelia of cultured lenses. However, the remainder of the lens showed little change

  3. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  4. Glutathione S-transferase pi modulates NF-κB activation and pro-inflammatory responses in lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jane T.; Qian, Xi; van der Velden, Jos L.J.; Chia, Shi Biao; McMillan, David H.; Flemer, Stevenson; Hoffman, Sidra M.; Lahue, Karolyn G.; Schneider, Robert W.; Nolin, James D.; Anathy, Vikas; van der Vliet, Albert; Townsend, Danyelle M.; Tew, Kenneth D.; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M.W.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a transcription factor family critical in the activation of pro- inflammatory responses. The NF-κB pathway is regulated by oxidant-induced post-translational modifications. Protein S-glutathionylation, or the conjugation of the antioxidant molecule, glutathione to reactive cysteines inhibits the activity of inhibitory kappa B kinase beta (IKKβ), among other NF-κB proteins. Glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP) is an enzyme that has been shown to catalyze protein S-glutathionylation (PSSG) under conditions of oxidative stress. The objective of the present study was to determine whether GSTP regulates NF-κB signaling, S-glutathionylation of IKK, and subsequent pro-inflammatory signaling. We demonstrated that, in unstimulated cells, GSTP associated with the inhibitor of NF-κB, IκBα. However, exposure to LPS resulted in a rapid loss of association between IκBα and GSTP, and instead led to a protracted association between IKKβ and GSTP. LPS exposure also led to increases in the S-glutathionylation of IKKβ. SiRNA-mediated knockdown of GSTP decreased IKKβ-SSG, and enhanced NF-κB nuclear translocation, transcriptional activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). TLK117, an isotype-selective inhibitor of GSTP, also enhanced LPS-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, suggesting that the catalytic activity of GSTP is important in repressing NF-κB activation. Expression of both wild-type and catalytically-inactive Y7F mutant GSTP significantly attenuated LPS- or IKKβ-induced production of GM-CSF. These studies indicate a complex role for GSTP in modulating NF-κB, which may involve S-glutathionylation of IKK proteins, and interaction with NF-κB family members. Our findings suggest that targeting GSTP is a potential avenue for regulating the activity of this prominent pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory transcription factor. PMID:27058114

  5. Effects of cyanobacterial lipopolysaccharides from microcystis on glutathione-based detoxification pathways in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo.

    PubMed

    Jaja-Chimedza, Asha; Gantar, Miroslav; Mayer, Gregory D; Gibbs, Patrick D L; Berry, John P

    2012-06-01

    Cyanobacteria ("blue-green algae") are recognized producers of a diverse array of toxic secondary metabolites. Of these, the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), produced by all cyanobacteria, remain to be well investigated. In the current study, we specifically employed the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo to investigate the effects of LPS from geographically diverse strains of the widespread cyanobacterial genus, Microcystis, on several detoxifying enzymes/pathways, including glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx)/glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT), and compared observed effects to those of heterotrophic bacterial (i.e., E. coli) LPS. In agreement with previous studies, cyanobacterial LPS significantly reduced GST in embryos exposed to LPS in all treatments. In contrast, GPx moderately increased in embryos exposed to LPS, with no effect on reciprocal GR activity. Interestingly, total glutathione levels were elevated in embryos exposed to Microcystis LPS, but the relative levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH/GSSG) were, likewise, elevated suggesting that oxidative stress is not involved in the observed effects as typical of heterotrophic bacterial LPS in mammalian systems. In further support of this, no effect was observed with respect to CAT or SOD activity. These findings demonstrate that Microcystis LPS affects glutathione-based detoxification pathways in the zebrafish embryo, and more generally, that this model is well suited for investigating the apparent toxicophore of cyanobacterial LPS, including possible differences in structure-activity relationships between heterotrophic and cyanobacterial LPS, and teleost fish versus mammalian systems.

  6. 1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced alterations of glutathione status in immortalized rat dopaminergic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Drechsel, Derek A.; Liang, L.-P.; Patel, Manisha . E-mail: manisha.patel@uchsc.edu

    2007-05-01

    Decreased glutathione levels associated with increased oxidative stress are a hallmark of numerous neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. GSH is an important molecule that serves as an anti-oxidant and is also a major determinant of cellular redox environment. Previous studies have demonstrated that neurotoxins can cause changes in reduced and oxidized GSH levels; however, information regarding steady state levels remains unexplored. The goal of this study was to characterize changes in cellular GSH levels and its regulatory enzymes in a dopaminergic cell line (N27) following treatment with the Parkinsonian toxin, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP{sup +}). Cellular GSH levels were initially significantly decreased 12 h after treatment, but subsequently recovered to values greater than controls by 24 h. However, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels were increased 24 h following treatment, concomitant with a decrease in GSH/GSSG ratio prior to cell death. In accordance with these changes, ROS levels were also increased, confirming the presence of oxidative stress. Decreased enzymatic activities of glutathione reductase and glutamate-cysteine ligase by 20-25% were observed at early time points and partly account for changes in GSH levels after MPP{sup +} exposure. Additionally, glutathione peroxidase activity was increased 24 h following treatment. MPP{sup +} treatment was not associated with increased efflux of glutathione to the medium. These data further elucidate the mechanisms underlying GSH depletion in response to the Parkinsonian toxin, MPP{sup +}.

  7. Critical roles of cellular glutathione homeostasis and jnk activation in andrographolide-mediated apoptotic cell death in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lili; Shen, Kaikai; Jiang, Ping; Morahan, Grant; Wang, Zhengtao

    2011-08-01

    Andrographolide (ANDRO), isolated from the traditional herbal medicine Andrographis paniculata, is reported to have the potential therapeutic effects for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in our previous reports. Here, we investigated the mechanism of ANDRO-mediated apoptotic cell death, focusing on the involvement of cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) homeostasis and c-Jun NH(2) -Terminal kinase (JNK). Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of cellular GSH biosynthesis, significantly augmented ANDRO-induced cytotoxicity in hepatoma Hep3B and HepG2 cells. BSO depleted cellular GSH, and augmented ANDRO-induced apoptosis, inhibition of colony formation and JNK activation in Hep3B cells. All these effects could be reversed by GSH monoethyl ester (GSH.EE), whose deacetylation replenishes cellular GSH. BSO also augmented ANDRO-induced activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-4 (MKK4) and c-Jun, which are all up-stream or down-stream signals of JNK. Further results showed that JNK inhibitor SP600125 and 420116 both reversed ANDRO-induced cytotoxicity, and SP600125 also decreased ANDRO-increased intracellular GSH and GCL activity. Finally, we showed that in nude mice bearing xenografted Hep3B tumors, BSO improved the inhibition of tumor growth by ANDRO. Taken together, our results suggest that there is a crosstalk between JNK activation and cellular GSH homeostasis, and ANDRO targets this to induce cytotoxicity in hepatoma cells.

  8. Glutathione-conjugating and membrane-remodeling activity of GDAP1 relies on amphipathic C-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Nina; Bieniossek, Christoph; Wagner, Konstanze Marion; Elsässer, Hans-Peter; Suter, Ueli; Berger, Imre; Niemann, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the ganglioside-induced differentiation associated protein 1 (GDAP1) cause severe peripheral motor and sensory neuropathies called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. GDAP1 expression induces fission of mitochondria and peroxisomes by a currently elusive mechanism, while disease causing mutations in GDAP1 impede the protein’s role in mitochondrial dynamics. In silico analysis reveals sequence similarities of GDAP1 to glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). However, a proof of GST activity and its possible impact on membrane dynamics are lacking to date. Using recombinant protein, we demonstrate for the first time theta-class-like GST activity for GDAP1, and it’s activity being regulated by the C-terminal hydrophobic domain 1 (HD1) of GDAP1 in an autoinhibitory manner. Moreover, we show that the HD1 amphipathic pattern is required to induce membrane dynamics by GDAP1. As both, fission and GST activities of GDAP1, are critically dependent on HD1, we propose that GDAP1 undergoes a molecular switch, turning from a pro-fission active to an auto-inhibited inactive conformation. PMID:27841286

  9. YNL134C from Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a novel protein with aldehyde reductase activity for detoxification of furfural derived from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xianxian; Tang, Juan; Wang, Xu; Yang, Ruoheng; Zhang, Xiaoping; Gu, Yunfu; Li, Xi; Ma, Menggen

    2015-05-01

    Furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are the two main aldehyde compounds derived from pentoses and hexoses, respectively, during lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment. These two compounds inhibit microbial growth and interfere with subsequent alcohol fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has the in situ ability to detoxify furfural and HMF to the less toxic 2-furanmethanol (FM) and furan-2,5-dimethanol (FDM), respectively. Herein, we report that an uncharacterized gene, YNL134C, was highly up-regulated under furfural or HMF stress and Yap1p and Msn2/4p transcription factors likely controlled its up-regulated expression. Enzyme activity assays showed that YNL134C is an NADH-dependent aldehyde reductase, which plays a role in detoxification of furfural to FM. However, no NADH- or NADPH-dependent enzyme activity was observed for detoxification of HMF to FDM. This enzyme did not catalyse the reverse reaction of FM to furfural or FDM to HMF. Further studies showed that YNL134C is a broad-substrate aldehyde reductase, which can reduce multiple aldehydes to their corresponding alcohols. Although YNL134C is grouped into the quinone oxidoreductase family, no quinone reductase activity was observed using 1,2-naphthoquinone or 9,10-phenanthrenequinone as a substrate, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is genetically distant to quinone reductases. Proteins similar to YNL134C in sequence from S. cerevisiae and other microorganisms were phylogenetically analysed.

  10. Probing the active site of cinnamoyl CoA reductase 1 (Ll-CCRH1) from Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant; Patel, Krunal; Vishwakarma, Rishi Kishore; Srivastava, Sameer; Singh, Somesh; Gaikwad, Sushama; Khan, Bashir M

    2013-09-01

    Lack of three dimensional crystal structure of cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) limits its detailed active site characterization studies. Putative active site residues involved in the substrate/NADPH binding and catalysis for Leucaena leucocephala CCR (Ll-CCRH1; GenBank: DQ986907) were identified by amino acid sequence alignment and homology modeling. Putative active site residues and proximal H215 were subjected for site directed mutagenesis, and mutated enzymes were expressed, purified and assayed to confirm their functional roles. Mutagenesis of S136, Y170 and K174 showed complete loss of activity, indicating their pivotal roles in catalysis. Mutant S212G exhibited the catalytic efficiencies less than 10% of wild type, showing its indirect involvement in substrate binding or catalysis. R51G, D77G, F30V and I31N double mutants showed significant changes in Km values, specifying their roles in substrate binding. Finally, chemical modification and substrate protection studies corroborated the presence Ser, Tyr, Lys, Arg and carboxylate group at the active site of Ll-CCRH1.

  11. Profiles of Glucosinolates, Their Hydrolysis Products, and Quinone Reductase Inducing Activity from 39 Arugula (Eruca sativa Mill.) Accessions.

    PubMed

    Ku, Kang-Mo; Kim, Moo Jung; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Kang, Young-Hwa; Juvik, John A

    2016-08-31

    Glucosinolates, their hydrolysis product concentrations, and the quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity of extracts of leaf tissue were assayed from 39 arugula (Eruca sativa Mill.) accessions. Arugula accessions from Mediterranean countries (n = 16; Egypt, Greece, Italy, Libya, Spain, and Turkey) and Northern Europe (n = 2; Poland and United Kingdom) were higher in glucosinolates and their hydrolysis products, especially glucoraphanin and sulforaphane, compared to those from Asia (n = 13; China, India, and Pakistan) and Middle East Asia (n = 8; Afghanistan, Iran, and Israel). The QR inducing activity was also the highest in Mediterranean and Northern European arugula accessions, possibly due to a significant positive correlation between sulforaphane and QR inducing activity (r = 0.54). No nitrile hydrolysis products were found, suggesting very low or no epithiospecifier protein activity from these arugula accessions. Broad sense heritability (H(2)) was estimated to be 0.91-0.98 for glucoinolates, 0.55-0.83 for their hydrolysis products, and 0.90 for QR inducing activity.

  12. Antitumor Indolequinones Induced Apoptosis in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells via Inhibition of Thioredoxin Reductase and Activation of Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chao; Siegel, David; Newsome, Jeffery; Chilloux, Aurelie; Moody, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Indolequinones (IQs) were developed as potential antitumor agents against human pancreatic cancer. IQs exhibited potent antitumor activity against the human pancreatic cancer cell line MIA PaCa-2 with growth inhibitory IC50 values in the low nanomolar range. IQs were found to induce time- and concentration-dependent apoptosis and to be potent inhibitors of thioredoxin reductase 1 (TR1) in MIA PaCa-2 cells at concentrations equivalent to those inducing growth-inhibitory effects. The mechanism of inhibition of TR1 by the IQs was studied in detail in cell-free systems using purified enzyme. The C-terminal selenocysteine of TR1 was characterized as the primary adduction site of the IQ-derived reactive iminium using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Inhibition of TR1 by IQs in MIA PaCa-2 cells resulted in a shift of thioredoxin-1 redox state to the oxidized form and activation of the p38/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Oxidized thioredoxin is known to activate apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1, an upstream activator of p38/JNK in the MAPK signaling cascade and this was confirmed in our study providing a potential mechanism for IQ-induced apoptosis. These data describe the redox and signaling events involved in the mechanism of growth inhibition induced by novel inhibitors of TR1 in human pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:22147753

  13. HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via geranylgeranylation and RhoA activation

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Haidari, Amr A.; Syk, Ingvar; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Simvastatin blocked CCL17-induced and CCR4-dependent RhoA activation in HT29 cells. • CCL17/CCR4-mediated migration of colon cancer cells was antagonised by simvastatin. • Cell migration recovered by adding Mevalonate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. • Targeting HMG-CoA reductase might be useful to inhibit colon cancer metastasis. - Abstract: Background: Simvastatin is widely used to lower cholesterol levels in patients with cardiovascular diseases, although accumulating evidence suggests that statins, such as simvastatin, also exert numerous anti-tumoral effects. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration. Methods: Migration assays were performed to evaluate CCL17-induced colon cancer cell (HT-29) chemotaxis. In vitro tumor growth and apoptosis were assessed using a proliferation assay and annexin V assay, respectively. Active RhoA protein levels in CCL17-stimulated colon cancer cells were quantified using a G-LISA assay. Results: We found that simvastatin dose-dependently decreased CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Simvastatin had no effect on colon cancer cell proliferation or apoptosis. Inhibition of beta chemokine receptor 4, CCR4, reduced CCL17-evoked activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Moreover, administration of mevalonate reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Interestingly, co-incubation with geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) antagonized the inhibitory impact of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration triggered by CCL17. Moreover, we observed that simvastatin decreased CCL17-induced activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Administration of mevalonate and GGPP reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-provoked RhoA activation in colon cancer cells. Conclusions: Taken together, our findings show for the first time that HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via

  14. Enzymatic Activity of Glutathione S-Transferase and Dental Fluorosis Among Children Receiving Two Different Levels of Naturally Fluoridated Water.

    PubMed

    Bonola-Gallardo, Irvin; Irigoyen-Camacho, María Esther; Vera-Robles, Liliana; Campero, Antonio; Gómez-Quiroz, Luis

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted to measure the activity of the enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST) in saliva and to compare the activity of this enzyme in children with and without dental fluorosis in communities with different concentrations of naturally fluoridated water. A total of 141 schoolchildren participated in this cross-sectional study. Children were selected from two communities: one with a low (0.4 ppm) and the other with a high (1.8 ppm) water fluoride concentration. Dental fluorosis was evaluated by applying the Thylstrup and Fejerskov Index (TFI) criteria. Stimulated saliva was obtained, and fluoride concentration and GST activity were measured. The GST activity was compared among children with different levels of dental fluorosis using multinomial logistic regression models and odds ratios (OR). The mean age of the children was 10.6 (±1.03) years. Approximately half of the children showed dental fluorosis (52.5 %). The average GST activity was 0.5678 (±0.1959) nmol/min/μg. A higher concentration of fluoride in the saliva was detected in children with a higher GST activity (p = 0.039). A multinomial logistic regression model used to evaluate the GST activity and the dental fluorosis score identified a strong association between TFI = 2-3 (OR = 15.44, p = 0.007) and TFI ≥ 4 (OR = 55.40, p = 0.026) and the GST activity level, compared with children showing TFI = 0-1, adjusted for age and sex. Schoolchildren with higher levels of dental fluorosis and a higher fluoride concentration in the saliva showed greater GST activity. The increased GST activity most likely was the result of the body's need to inactivate free radicals produced by exposure to fluoride.

  15. Kinetic and product distribution analysis of NO* reductase activity in Nitrosomonas europaea hydroxylamine oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Kostera, Joshua; Youngblut, Matthew D; Slosarczyk, Jeffrey M; Pacheco, A Andrew

    2008-09-01

    Hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) from the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea normally catalyzes the four-electron oxidation of hydroxylamine to nitrite, which is the second step in ammonia-dependent respiration. Here we show that, in the presence of methyl viologen monocation radical (MV(red)), HAO can catalyze the reduction of nitric oxide to ammonia. The process is analogous to that catalyzed by cytochrome c nitrite reductase, an enzyme found in some bacteria that use nitrite as a terminal electron acceptor during anaerobic respiration. The availability of a reduction pathway to ammonia is an important factor to consider when designing in vitro studies of HAO, and may also have some physiological relevance. The reduction of nitric oxide to ammonia proceeds in two kinetically distinct steps: nitric oxide is first reduced to hydroxylamine, and then hydroxylamine is reduced to ammonia at a tenfold slower rate. The second step was investigated independently in solutions initially containing hydroxylamine, MV(red), and HAO. Both steps show first-order dependence on nitric oxide and HAO concentrations, and zero-order dependence on MV(red) concentration. The rate constants governing each reduction step were found to have values of (4.7 +/- 0.3) x 10(5) and (2.06 +/- 0.04) x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. A second reduction pathway, with second-order dependence on nitric oxide, may become available as the concentration of nitric oxide is increased. Such a pathway might lead to production of nitrous oxide. We estimate a maximum value of (1.5 +/- 0.05) x 10(10) M(-2) s(-1) for the rate constant of the alternative pathway, which is small and suggests that the pathway is not physiologically important.

  16. Structural basis for glutathione-mediated activation of the virulence regulatory protein PrfA in Listeria

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael; Grundström, Christin; Begum, Afshan; Lindberg, Mikael J.; Sauer, Uwe H.; Almqvist, Fredrik; Johansson, Jörgen; Sauer-Eriksson, A. Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Infection by the human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is mainly controlled by the positive regulatory factor A (PrfA), a member of the Crp/Fnr family of transcriptional activators. Published data suggest that PrfA requires the binding of a cofactor for full activity, and it was recently proposed that glutathione (GSH) could fulfill this function. Here we report the crystal structures of PrfA in complex with GSH and in complex with GSH and its cognate DNA, the hly operator PrfA box motif. These structures reveal the structural basis for a GSH-mediated allosteric mode of activation of PrfA in the cytosol of the host cell. The crystal structure of PrfAWT in complex only with DNA confirms that PrfAWT can adopt a DNA binding-compatible structure without binding the GSH activator molecule. By binding to PrfA in the cytosol of the host cell, GSH induces the correct fold of the HTH motifs, thus priming the PrfA protein for DNA interaction. PMID:27930316

  17. Induction of quinone reductase (QR) by withanolides isolated from Physalis angulata L. var. villosa Bonati (Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Hu, Zhijuan; Yu, Liyan; Ma, Zhongjun; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Dan; Zhao, Xiaofeng

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, the EtOAc extract of the persistent calyx of Physalis angulata L. var. villosa Bonati (PA) was tested for its potential quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity with glutathione (GSH) as the substrate using an UPLC-ESI-MS method. The result revealed that the PA had electrophiles that could induce quinone reductase (QR) activity, which might be attributed to the modification of the highly reactive cysteine residues in Keap1. Herein, three new withanolides, compounds 3, 6 and 7, together with four known withanolides, compounds 1, 2, 4 and 5 were isolated from PA extract. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic techniques, including (1)H-, (13)C NMR (DEPT), and 2D-NMR (HMBC, HMQC, (1)H, (1)H-COSY, NOESY) experiments, as well as by HR-MS. All the seven compounds were tested for their QR induction activities towards mouse hepa 1c1c7 cells.

  18. New evidence of similarity between human and plant steroid metabolism: 5alpha-reductase activity in Solanum malacoxylon.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Fabiana; Danza, Giovanna; Guarna, Antonio; Cini, Nicoletta; Racchi, Milvia Luisa; Serio, Mario

    2003-01-01

    The physiological role of steroid hormones in humans is well known, and the metabolic pathway and mechanisms of action are almost completely elucidated. The role of plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids, is less known, but an increasing amount of data on brassinosteroid biosynthesis is showing unexpected similarities between human and plant steroid metabolic pathways. Here we focus our attention on the enzyme 5alpha-reductase (5alphaR) for which a plant ortholog of the mammalian system, DET2, was recently described in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that campestenone, the natural substrate of DET2, is reduced to 5alpha-campestanone by both human 5alphaR isozymes but with different affinities. Solanum malacoxylon, which is a calcinogenic plant very active in the biosynthesis of vitamin D-like molecules and sterols, was used to study 5alphaR activity. Leaves and calli were chosen as examples of differentiated and undifferentiated tissues, respectively. Two separate 5alphaR activities were found in calli and leaves of Solanum using campestenone as substrate. The use of progesterone allowed the detection of both activities in calli. Support for the existence of two 5alphaR isozymes in S. malacoxylon was provided by the differential actions of inhibitors of the human 5alphaR in calli and leaves. The evidence for the presence of two isozymes in different plant tissues extends the analogies between plant and mammalian steroid metabolic pathways.

  19. Ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase: a catalytically active dithiol group links photoreduced ferredoxin to thioredoxin functional in photosynthetic enzyme regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Droux, M.; Miginiac-Maslow, M.; Jacquot, J.P.; Gadal, P.; Crawford, N.A.; Kosower, N.S.; Buchanan, B.B.

    1987-07-01

    The mechanism by which the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system activates the target enzyme, NADP-malate dehydrogenase, was investigated by analyzing the sulfhydryl status of individual protein components with (/sup 14/C)iodoacetate and monobromobimane. The data indicate that ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR)--an iron-sulfur enzyme present in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms--is the first member of a thiol chain that links light to enzyme regulation. FTR possesses a catalytically active dithiol group localized on the 13 kDa (similar) subunit, that occurs in all species investigated and accepts reducing equivalents from photoreduced ferredoxin and transfers them stoichiometrically to the disulfide form of thioredoxin m. The reduced thioredoxin m, in turn, reduces NADP-malate dehydrogenase, thereby converting it from an inactive (S-S) to an active (SH) form. The means by which FTR is able to combine electrons (from photoreduced ferredoxin) with protons (from the medium) to reduce its active disulfide group remains to be determined.

  20. Effect of acetic acid present in bagasse hydrolysate on the activities of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase in Candida guilliermondii.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luanne Helena Augusto; das Graças de Almeida Felipe, Maria; Vitolo, Michele; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves

    2004-11-01

    The first two steps in xylose metabolism are catalyzed by NAD(P)H-dependent xylose reductase (XR) (EC 1.1.1.21) and NAD(P)-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) (EC 1.1.1.9), which lead to xylose-->xylitol-->xylulose conversion. Xylitol has high commercial value, due to its sweetening and anticariogenic properties, as well as several clinical applications. The acid hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse allows the separation of a xylose-rich hemicellulosic fraction that can be used as a substrate for Candida guilliermondii to produce xylitol. However, the hydrolysate contains acetic acid, an inhibitor of microbial metabolism. In this study, the effect of acetic acid on the activities of XR and XDH and on xylitol formation by C. guilliermondii were studied. For this purpose, fermentations were carried out in bagasse hydrolysate and in synthetic medium. The activities of XR and XDH were higher in the medium containing acetic acid than in control medium. Moreover, none of the fermentative parameters were significantly altered during cell culture. It was concluded that acetic acid does not interfere with xylitol formation since the increase in XR activity is proportional to XDH activity, leading to a greater production of xylitol and its subsequent conversion to xylulose.

  1. Cytochrome cb-type nitric oxide reductase with cytochrome c oxidase activity from Paracoccus denitrificans ATCC 35512.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, T; Fukumori, Y

    1996-04-01

    A highly active nitric oxide reductase was purified from Paracoccus denitrificans ATCC 35512, formerly named Thiosphaera pantotropha, which was anaerobically cultivated in the presence of nitrate. The enzyme was composed of two subunits with molecular masses of 34 and 15 kDa and contained two hemes b and one heme c per molecule. Copper was not found in the enzyme. The spectral properties suggested that one of the two hemes b and heme c were in six-coordinated low-spin states and another heme b was in a five-coordinated high-spin state and reacted with carbon monoxide. The enzyme showed high cytochrome c-nitric oxide oxidoreductase activity and formed nitrous oxide from nitric oxide with the expected stoichiometry when P. denitrificans ATCC 35512 ferrocytochrome c-550 was used as the electron donor. The V max and Km values for nitric oxide were 84 micromol of nitric oxide per min/mg of protein and 0.25 microM, respectively. Furthermore, the enzyme showed ferrocytochrome c-550-O2 oxidoreductase activity with a V max of 8.4 micromol of O2 per min/mg of protein and a Km value of 0.9 mM. Both activities were 50% inhibited by about 0.3 mM KCN.

  2. S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) activity is down-regulated during pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, Marta; Mioto, Paulo; Palma, José M; Corpas, Francisco J

    2016-12-27

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) is an annual plant species of great agronomic importance whose fruits undergo major metabolic changes through development and ripening. These changes include emission of volatile organic compounds associated with respiration, destruction of chlorophylls and synthesis of new pigments (red/yellow carotenoids plus xanthophylls and anthocyans) responsible for color shift, protein degradation/synthesis and changes in total soluble reducing equivalents. Previous data have shown that, during the ripening of pepper fruit, an enhancement of protein tyrosine nitration takes place. On the other hand, it is well known that S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) activity can modulate the transnitrosylation equilibrium between GSNO and S-nitrosylated proteins and, consequently, regulate cellular NO homeostasis. In this study, GSNOR activity, protein content and gene expression were analyzed in green and red pepper fruits. The content of S-nitrosylated proteins on diaminofluorescein (DAF) gels was also studied. The data show that, while GSNOR activity and protein expression diminished during fruit ripening, S-nitrosylated protein content increased. Some of the protein candidates for S-nitrosylation identified, such as cytochorme c oxidase and peroxiredoxin II E, have previously been described as targets of this posttranslational modification in other plant species. These findings corroborate the important role played by GSNOR activity in the NO metabolism during the process of pepper fruit ripening.

  3. Identification of flavonoids and flavonoid rhamnosides from Rhododendron mucronulatum for. albiflorum and their inhibitory activities against aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Mok, So-Youn; Lee, Sanghyun

    2013-01-15

    To investigate the therapeutic potential of compounds from natural sources, Rhododendron mucronulatum for. albiflorum flowers (RMAF) and R. mucronulatum flowers (RMF) were tested for inhibition of aldose reductase (AR). The methanol extracts of RMAF and RMF exhibited AR inhibitory activities (IC(50) values 1.07 and 1.29 μg/mL, respectively). The stepwise polarity fractions of RMAF were tested for in vitro inhibition of AR from rat lenses. Of these, the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction exhibited AR inhibitory activity (IC(50) 0.15 μg/mL). A chromatography of the active EtOAc fraction of RMAF led to the isolation of six flavonoids, which were identified by spectroscopic analysis as kaempferol (1), afzelin (2), quercetin (3), quercitrin (4), myricetin (5) and myricitrin (6). Compounds 1-6 exhibited high AR inhibitory activity, with IC(50) values of 0.79, 0.31, 0.48, 0.13, 11.92 and 2.67 μg/mL, respectively. HPLC/UV analysis revealed that the major flavonoids of RMAF and RMF are quercitrin (4) and myricitrin (6). Our results suggest that RMAF containing these six flavonoids could be a useful natural source in the development of a novel AR inhibitory agent against diabetic complications.

  4. Preclinical pharmacokinetic analysis of NOV-002, a glutathione disulfide mimetic.

    PubMed

    Uys, J D; Manevich, Y; Devane, L C; He, L; Garret, T E; Pazoles, C J; Tew, K D; Townsend, D M

    2010-09-01

    NOV-002 is a glutathione disulfide (GSSG) mimetic that is the subject of clinical investigation in oncology indications. GSSG is reduced by glutathione reductase (GR) to form glutathione (GSH), thereby maintaining redox homeostasis. The purpose of the study was to report the pharmacokinetic properties of NOV-002 and evaluate the effect that NOV-002 elicits in redox homeostasis. The pharmacokinetic analysis and tissue distribution of NOV-002 and GSH was evaluated in mice following a dose of 250 mg/kg, i.p. The redox potential and total protein thiol status was calculated. Here we show that NOV-002 is a substrate for GR and that GSH is a primary metabolite. Non-linear pharmacokinetic modeling predicted that the estimated absorption and elimination rate constants correspond to a half-life of approximately 13 min with an AUC of 1.18 μgh/mL, a C(max) of 2.16 μg/ml and a volume of distribution of 42.61 L/kg. In addition, measurement of the redox potential and total protein thiol status indicated the generation of a transient oxidative signal in the plasma compartment after administration of NOV-002. These results indicate that NOV-002 exerts kinetic and dynamic effects in mice consistent with the GSSG component as the active pharmacological constituent of the drug. A longer-lasting decrease in total plasma free thiol content was also seen, suggesting that the oxidative effect of the GSSG from NOV-002 was impacting redox homeostasis.

  5. Effects of Metmyoglobin Reducing Activity and Thermal Stability of NADH-Dependent Reductase and Lactate Dehydrogenase on Premature Browning in Ground Beef.

    PubMed

    Djimsa, Blanchefort A; Abraham, Anupam; Mafi, Gretchen G; VanOverbeke, Deborah L; Ramanathan, Ranjith

    2017-02-01

    Premature browning is a condition wherein ground beef exhibits a well-done appearance before reaching the USDA recommended internal cooked meat temperature of 71.1 °C; however, the mechanism is unclear. The objectives of this study were: (1) to determine the effects of packaging and temperature on metmyoglobin reducing activity (MRA) of cooked ground beef patties and (2) to assess the effects of temperature and pH on thermal stability of NADH-dependent reductase, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and oxymyoglobin (OxyMb) in-vitro. Beef patties (lean: fat = 85:15) were packaged in high-oxygen modified atmosphere (HiOX-MAP) or vacuum (VP) and cooked to either 65 or 71 °C. Internal meat color and MRA of both raw and cooked patties were determined. Purified NADH-dependent reductase and LDH were used to determine the effects of pH and temperature on enzyme activity. MRA of cooked patties was temperature and packaging dependent (P < 0.05). Vacuum packaged patties cooked to 71 °C had greater (P < 0.05) MRA than HiOX-MAP counterparts. Thermal stability of OxyMb, NADH-dependent reductase, and LDH were different and pH-dependent. LDH was able to generate NADH at 84 °C; whereas NADH-dependent reductase was least stable to heat. The results suggest that patties have MRA at cooking temperatures, which can influence cooked meat color.

  6. Schisandrin B protects against carbon tetrachloride toxicity by enhancing the mitochondrial glutathione redox status in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Ip, S P; Poon, M K; Che, C T; Ng, K H; Kong, Y C; Ko, K M

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated the effect of Schisandrin B (Sch B),an active ingredient of the fruit of Schisandra chinensis, on enhancing the hepatic glutathione antioxidant system in mice, as evidenced by the hepatoprotection against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) toxicity. In the present study, the mechanism involved in the hepatoprotection afforded by Sch B treatment was investigated. Treating female Balb/c mice with 1, 3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea, an inhibitor of glutathione reductase (GRD), at a dose of 2 mmol/kg (i.p.) did not abrogate the hepatoprotective action of Sch B in CCl4-treated mice. The result indicates that the increased activity of hepatic GRD is not ascribable to the hepatoprotective action of Sch B. In control mice, the same Sch B treatment regimen caused an enhancement in hepatic mitochondrial glutathione redox status, as indicated by the significant increase and decrease in reduced and oxidized glutathione levels, respectively. While the CCl4 intoxication greatly impaired mitochondrial glutathione redox status, the beneficial effect of Sch B treatment became more evident after CCl4 challenge. Our results strongly suggest that the mechanism of hepatoprotection afforded by Sch B treatment may involve the enhancement of mitochondrial glutathione redox status.

  7. E2F1 promote the aggressiveness of human colorectal cancer by activating the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zejun; Gong, Chaoju; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Xiaomin; Mei, Lingming; Song, Mintao; Qiu, Lanlan; Luo, Shuchai; Zhu, Zhihua; Zhang, Ronghui; Gu, Hongqian; Chen, Xiang

    2015-08-21

    As the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit, the high expression of ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2 (RRM2) induces cancer and contributes to tumor growth and invasion. In several colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines, we found that the expression levels of RRM2 were closely related to the transcription factor E2F1. Mechanistic studies were conducted to determine the molecular basis. Ectopic overexpression of E2F1 promoted RRM2 transactivation while knockdown of E2F1 reduced the levels of RRM2 mRNA and protein. To further investigate the roles of RRM2 which was activated by E2F1 in CRC, CCK-8 assay and EdU incorporation assay were performed. Overexpression of E2F1 promoted cell proliferation in CRC cells, which was blocked by RRM2 knockdown attenuation. In the migration and invasion tests, overexpression of E2F1 enhanced the migration and invasion of CRC cells which was abrogated by silencing RRM2. Besides, overexpression of RRM2 reversed the effects of E2F1 knockdown partially in CRC cells. Examination of clinical CRC specimens demonstrated that both RRM2 and E2F1 were elevated in most cancer tissues compared to the paired normal tissues. Further analysis showed that the protein expression levels of E2F1 and RRM2 were parallel with each other and positively correlated with lymph node metastasis (LNM), TNM stage and distant metastasis. Consistently, the patients with low E2F1 and RRM2 levels have a better prognosis than those with high levels. Therefore, we suggest that E2F1 can promote CRC proliferation, migration, invasion and metastasis by regulating RRM2 transactivation. Understanding the role of E2F1 in activating RRM2 transcription will help to explain the relationship between E2F1 and RRM2 in CRC and provide a novel predictive marker for diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. - Highlights: • E2F1 promotes RRM2 transactivation in CRC cells. • E2F1 promotes the proliferation of CRC cells by activating RRM2. • E2F1 promotes the migration and

  8. Regulation of Endothelial Glutathione by ICAM-1 governs VEGF-A mediated eNOS Activity and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Langston, Will; Chidlow, John H.; Booth, Blake A.; Barlow, Shayne C.; Lefer, David J.; Patel, Rakesh P.; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that inflammatory cell adhesion molecules may modulate endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis through unknown mechanisms. Using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches, herein we reveal a novel redox sensitive mechanism by which ICAM-1 modulates endothelial GSH that controls VEGF-A induced eNOS activity, endothelial chemotaxis, and angiogenesis. In vivo disk angiogenesis assays showed attenuated VEGF-A mediated angiogenesis in ICAM-1−/− mice. Moreover, VEGF-A dependent chemotaxis, eNOS phosphorylation, and nitric oxide (NO) production were impaired in ICAM-1−/− MAEC compared to WT MAEC. Decreasing intracellular GSH in ICAM-1−/− MAEC to levels observed in WT MAEC with 150 μM buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) restored VEGF-A responses. Conversely, GSH supplementation of WT MAEC with 5 mM glutathione ethyl ester (GEE) mimicked defects observed in ICAM-1−/− cells. Deficient angiogenic responses in ICAM-1−/− cells were associated with increased expression of the lipid phosphatase, PTEN, consistent with antagonism of signaling pathways leading to eNOS activation. PTEN expression was also sensitive to GSH status, decreasing or increasing in proportion to intracellular GSH concentrations. These data suggest a novel role for ICAM-1 in modulating VEGF-A induced angiogenesis and eNOS activity through regulation of PTEN expression via modulation of intracellular GSH status. PMID:17291995

  9. [Effects of nitrogen application rate on nitrate reductase activity, nitric oxide content and gas exchange in winter wheat leaves].

    PubMed

    Shangguan, Zhou-Ping

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, the effects of different nitrogen application rates on the nitrate reductase (NR) activity, nitric oxide (NO) content and gas exchange parameters in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) leaves from tillering stage to heading stage and on grain yield were studied. The results showed that the photosynthetic rate (P(n)), transpiration rate (T(r)) and instantaneous water use efficiency (IWUE) of leaves as well as the grain yield were increased with increasing nitrogen application rate first but decreased then, with the values of all these parameters reached the highest in treatment N180. The NR activity increased with increasing nitrogen application rate, and there was a significant linear correlation between NR activity and NO content at tillering and jointing stages (R2 > or = 0.68, n = 15). NO content had a quadratic positive correlation with stomatal conductance (G(s)) (R2 > or = 0.43, n = 15). The lower NO content produced by lower NR activity under lower nitrogen application rate promoted the stoma opened, while the higher NO content produced by higher NR activity under higher nitrogen application rate induced the stoma closed. Although the leaf NO content had a quadratic positive correlation with stomatal conductance (R2 > or = 0.36, n = 15), no remarkable correlation was observed between NR activity and NO content at heading stage, suggesting that nitrogen fertilization could not affect leaf NO content through promoting NR activity, and further more, regulate the stomatal action. Under appropriate nitrogen application the leaf NR activity and NO content were lower, G(s), T(r) and IWUE were higher, and thus, the crop had a better drought-resistant ability, higher P(n), and higher grain yield.

  10. Rational design of broad spectrum antibacterial activity based on a clinically relevant enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Schiebel, Johannes; Chang, Andrew; Shah, Sonam; Lu, Yang; Liu, Li; Pan, Pan; Hirschbeck, Maria W; Tareilus, Mona; Eltschkner, Sandra; Yu, Weixuan; Cummings, Jason E; Knudson, Susan E; Bommineni, Gopal R; Walker, Stephen G; Slayden, Richard A; Sotriffer, Christoph A; Tonge, Peter J; Kisker, Caroline

    2014-06-06

    Determining the molecular basis for target selectivity is of particular importance in drug discovery. The ideal antibiotic should be active against a broad spectrum of pathogenic organisms with a minimal effect on human targets. CG400549, a Staphylococcus-specific 2-pyridone compound that inhibits the enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI), has recently been shown to possess human efficacy for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections, which constitute a serious threat to human health. In this study, we solved the structures of three different FabI homologues in complex with several pyridone inhibitors, including CG400549. Based on these structures, we rationalize the 65-fold reduced affinity of CG400549 toward Escherichia coli versus S. aureus FabI and implement concepts to improve the spectrum of antibacterial activity. The identification of different conformational states along the reaction coordinate of the enzymatic hydride transfer provides an elegant visual depiction of the relationship between catalysis and inhibition, which facilitates rational inhibitor design. Ultimately, we developed the novel 4-pyridone-based FabI inhibitor PT166 that retained favorable pharmacokinetics and efficacy in a mouse model of S. aureus infection with extended activity against Gram-negative and mycobacterial organisms.

  11. A nickel hydride complex in the active site of methyl-coenzyme m reductase: implications for the catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Jeffrey; Finazzo, Cinzia; Piskorski, Rafal; Ebner, Sieglinde; Duin, Evert C; Goenrich, Meike; Thauer, Rudolf K; Reiher, Markus; Schweiger, Arthur; Hinderberger, Dariush; Jaun, Bernhard

    2008-08-20

    Methanogenic archaea utilize a specific pathway in their metabolism, converting C1 substrates (i.e., CO2) or acetate to methane and thereby providing energy for the cell. Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) catalyzes the key step in the process, namely methyl-coenzyme M (CH3-S-CoM) plus coenzyme B (HS-CoB) to methane and CoM-S-S-CoB. The active site of MCR contains the nickel porphinoid F430. We report here on the coordinated ligands of the two paramagnetic MCR red2 states, induced when HS-CoM (a reversible competitive inhibitor) and the second substrate HS-CoB or its analogue CH3-S-CoB are added to the enzyme in the active MCR red1 state (Ni(I)F430). Continuous wave and pulse EPR spectroscopy are used to show that the MCR red2a state exhibits a very large proton hyperfine interaction with principal values A((1)H) = [-43,-42,-5] MHz and thus represents formally a Ni(III)F430 hydride complex formed by oxidative addition to Ni(I). In view of the known ability of nickel hydrides to activate methane, and the growing body of evidence for the involvement of MCR in "reverse" methanogenesis (anaerobic oxidation of methane), we believe that the nickel hydride complex reported here could play a key role in helping to understand both the mechanism of "reverse" and "forward" methanogenesis.

  12. Slow-Onset Inhibition of the FabI Enoyl Reductase from Francisella tularensis: Residence Time and in Vivo Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H.; England, K; Ende, C; Truglio, J; Luckner, S; Reddy, B; Marlenee, N; Knudson, S; Knudson, D; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent and contagious Gram-negative intracellular bacterium that causes the disease tularemia in mammals. The high infectivity and the ability of the bacterium to survive for weeks in a cool, moist environment have raised the possibility that this organism could be exploited deliberately as a potential biological weapon. Fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS-II) is essential for bacterial viability and has been validated as a target for the discovery of novel antibacterials. The FAS-II enoyl reductase ftuFabI has been cloned and expressed, and a series of diphenyl ethers have been identified that are subnanomolar inhibitors of the enzyme with MIC90 values as low as 0.00018 ?g mL-1. The existence of a linear correlation between the Ki and MIC values strongly suggests that the antibacterial activity of the diphenyl ethers results from direct inhibition of ftuFabI within the cell. The compounds are slow-onset inhibitors of ftuFabI, and the residence time of the inhibitors on the enzyme correlates with their in vivo activity in a mouse model of tularemia infection. Significantly, the rate of breakdown of the enzyme-inhibitor complex is a better predictor of in vivo activity than the overall thermodynamic stability of the complex, a concept that has important implications for the discovery of novel chemotherapeutics that normally rely on equilibrium measurements of potency.

  13. A nanotherapy strategy significantly enhances anticryptosporidial activity of an inhibitor of bifunctional thymidylate synthase-dihydrofolate reductase from Cryptosporidium.

    PubMed

    Mukerjee, Anindita; Iyidogan, Pinar; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Cisneros, José A; Czyzyk, Daniel; Ranjan, Amalendu Prakash; Jorgensen, William L; White, A Clinton; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K; Anderson, Karen S

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, a gastrointestinal disease caused by protozoans of the genus Cryptosporidium, is a common cause of diarrheal diseases and often fatal in immunocompromised individuals. Bifunctional thymidylate synthase-dihydrofolate reductase (TS-DHFR) from Cryptosporidium hominis (C. hominis) has been a molecular target for inhibitor design. C. hominis TS-DHFR inhibitors with nM potency at a biochemical level have been developed however drug delivery to achieve comparable antiparasitic activity in Cryptosporidium infected cell culture has been a major hurdle for designing effective therapies. Previous mechanistic and structural studies have identified compound 906 as a nM C. hominis TS-DHFR inhibitor in vitro, having μM antiparasitic activity in cell culture. In this work, proof of concept studies are presented using a nanotherapy approach to improve drug delivery and the antiparasitic activity of 906 in cell culture. We utilized PLGA nanoparticles that were loaded with 906 (NP-906) and conjugated with antibodies to the Cryptosporidium specific protein, CP2, on the nanoparticle surface in order to specifically target the parasite. Our results indicate that CP2 labeled NP-906 (CP2-NP-906) reduces the level of parasites by 200-fold in cell culture, while NP-906 resulted in 4.4-fold decrease. Moreover, the anticryptosporidial potency of 906 improved 15 to 78-fold confirming the utility of the antibody conjugated nanoparticles as an effective drug delivery strategy.

  14. Glutathione S-transferases in human renal cortex and neoplastic tissue: enzymatic activity, isoenzyme profile and immunohistochemical localization.

    PubMed

    Rodilla, V; Benzie, A A; Veitch, J M; Murray, G I; Rowe, J D; Hawksworth, G M

    1998-05-01

    1. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in the cytosol of renal cortex and tumours from eight men and eight women was measured using 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as a substrate. GST activities ranged from 685 to 2192 nmol/min/mg protein in cortex (median 1213) and from non-detectable (minimum 45) to 2424 nmol/min/mg protein in tumours (median 469). The activities in the tumours were lower than those in the normal cortices (p < 0.05). 2. In men, the activity in the cortical cytosol was in all cases higher than that measured in the corresponding tumours (p < 0.05). In women, the difference in activity between cortices and tumours was not significantly different (p > 0.05). 3. The age of the patients ranged from 42 to 81 years (median 62) and was not found to play a role in the levels of GST activity observed in cortex or in renal tumours from either sex. 4. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemical studies confirmed that GST-alpha was the predominant form expressed both in normal cortex and tumour and probably accounted for most of the GST activity present in these samples. GST-mu and GST-phi were expressed in both tumours and normal cortex and, while in some cases the level of expression in the cortices was higher than that found in the tumours, the reverse was also observed. Within the GST-mu class, GST M1/M2 was only detected in one sample (tumour), which showed the highest overall expression of GST-mu. GSTM3 was the predominant isoenzyme of the mu class in normal and tumour tissue, whereas GTM4 and GSTM5 were not detected. 5. These differences could have functional significance where xenobiotics or cytotoxic drugs are specific substrates for the different classes of GSTs.

  15. Altered HBK3 expression affects glutathione and ascorbate metabolism during the early phases of Norway spruce (Picea abies) somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Belmonte, Mark F; Stasolla, Claudio

    2009-10-01

    Plant homeobox genes play an important role in plant development, including embryogenesis. Recently, the function of a class I homeobox of knox 3 gene, HBK3, has been characterized in the conifer Picea abies (L.) Karst (Norway spruce) [8]. During somatic embryogenesis, expression of HBK3 is required for the proper differentiation of proembryogenic masses into somatic embryos. This transition, fundamental for the overall embryogenic process, is accelerated in sense lines over-expressing HBK3 (HBK3-S) but precluded in antisense lines (HBK3-AS) where the expression of this gene is experimentally reduced. Altered HBK3 expression resulted in major changes of ascorbate and glutathione metabolism. During the initial phases of embryogeny the level of reduced GSH was higher in the HBK3-S lines compared to their control counterpart. An opposite profile was observed for the HBK3-AS lines where the glutathione redox state, i.e. GSH/GSH + GSSG, switched towards its oxidized form, i.e. GSSG. Very similar metabolic fluctuations were also measured for ascorbate, especially during the transition of proembryogenic masses into somatic embryos (7 days into hormone-free medium). At this stage the level of reduced ascorbate (ASC) in the HBK3-AS lines was about 75% lower compare to the untransformed line causing a switch of the ascorbate redox state, i.e. ASC/ASC + DHA + AFR, towards its oxidized forms, i.e. DHA + AFR. Changes in activities of several ascorbate and glutathione redox enzymes, including dehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.8.5.1), ascorbate free radical reductase (EC 1.6.5.4) and glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.6.4.2) were responsible for these metabolic differences. Data presented here suggest that HBK3 expression might regulate somatic embryo yield through alterations in glutathione and ascorbate metabolism, which have been previously implicated in controlling embryo development and maturation both in vivo and in vitro.

  16. The glutathione-related detoxication responses to juvenile and ecdysone hormones in Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Tarhan, Leman; Kayalı, Hülya Ayar; Karacali, Sabire

    2013-08-01

    The effect of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH) on the glutathione pathway of the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) was determined by investigating glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione S-transferases (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR) activities as well as reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH and GSSG) content with respect to developmental stage. The continuous decreases of GSH-Px and GST activities dependent on the growth period of G. mellonella occurred in JH and 20E groups over and under their controls, respectively. While the GR activities of G. mellonella showed increases in young pupa (YP) for both control and in old larvae (OL) for the 20E groups after the minimum at these periods, they also increased after old pupa (OP) for the JH group with a maximum in OL period. Although GR activity levels in the JH group were significantly higher compared with controls and 20E groups up to OP period, the activity levels for the control and 20E groups were higher than those of the JH group at adult (AD) and old pupa (OP) periods, respectively. In spite of increases in the GR activity of 20E and control groups of G. mellonella, decreased GSH and increased GSSG levels were observed at aging period. GSH levels in the JH group reached a maximum at prepupa (PP) and then decreased with non-significant changes from OL to AD period. According to the results, GSH and GSSG levels, as well as GSH/GSSG ratios, were below and over control levels in 20E and JH groups, respectively, during all of the investigated developmental stages. On the contrary, the LPO levels were higher than the control for 20E and lower for the JH groups during the developmental period. These results show that while ecdysone hormone has a negative effect on the glutathione-related detoxication capacity of G. mellonella, the juvenile hormone has a positive effect on this process.

  17. Non-covalent forces tune the electron transfer complex between ferredoxin and sulfite reductase to optimize enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju Yaen; Kinoshita, Misaki; Kume, Satoshi; Gt, Hanke; Sugiki, Toshihiko; Ladbury, John E; Kojima, Chojiro; Ikegami, Takahisa; Kurisu, Genji; Goto, Yuji; Hase, Toshiharu; Lee, Young-Ho

    2016-11-01

    Although electrostatic interactions between negatively charged ferredoxin (Fd) and positively charged sulfite reductase (SiR) have been predominantly highlighted to characterize complex formation, the detailed nature of intermolecular forces remains to be fully elucidated. We investigated interprotein forces for the formation of an electron transfer complex between Fd and SiR and their relationship to SiR activity using various approaches over NaCl concentrations between 0 and 400 mM. Fd-dependent SiR activity assays revealed a bell-shaped activity curve with a maximum ∼40-70 mM NaCl and a reverse bell-shaped dependence of interprotein affinity. Meanwhile, intrinsic SiR activity, as measured in a methyl viologen-dependent assay, exhibited saturation above 100 mM NaCl. Thus, two assays suggested that interprotein interaction is crucial in controlling Fd-dependent SiR activity. Calorimetric analyses showed the monotonic decrease in interprotein affinity on increasing NaCl concentrations, distinguished from a reverse bell-shaped interprotein affinity observed from Fd-dependent SiR activity assay. Furthermore, Fd:SiR complex formation and interprotein affinity were thermodynamically adjusted by both enthalpy and entropy through electrostatic and non-electrostatic interactions. A residue-based NMR investigation on the addition of SiR to (15)N-labeled Fd at the various NaCl concentrations also demonstrated that a combination of electrostatic and non-electrostatic forces stabilized the complex with similar interfaces and modulated the binding affinity and mode. Our findings elucidate that non-electrostatic forces are also essential for the formation and modulation of the Fd:SiR complex. We suggest that a complex configuration optimized for maximum enzymatic activity near physiological salt conditions is achieved by structural rearrangement through controlled non-covalent interprotein interactions.

  18. Glutathione S-Transferase Omega 1 Activity Is Sufficient to Suppress Neurodegeneration in a Drosophila Model of Parkinson Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kiyoung; Kim, Song-Hee; Kim, Jaekwang; Kim, Heuijong; Yim, Jeongbin

    2012-01-01

    A loss-of-function mutation in the gene parkin causes a common neurodegenerative disease that may be caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Glutathione S-transferase Omega (GSTO) is involved in cell defense mechanisms, but little is known about the role of GSTO in the progression of Parkinson disease. Here, we report that restoration of Drosophila GSTO1 (DmGSTO1), which is down-regulated in parkin mutants, alleviates some of the parkin pathogenic phenotypes and that the loss of DmGSTO1 function enhances parkin mutant phenotypes. We further identified the ATP synthase β subunit as a novel in vivo target of DmGSTO1. We found that glutathionylation of the ATP synthase β subunit is rescued by DmGSTO1 and that the expression of DmGSTO1 partially restores the activity and assembly of the mitochondrial F1F0-ATP synthase in parkin mutants. Our results suggest a novel mechanism for the protective role of DmGSTO1 in parkin mutants, through the regulation of ATP synthase activity, and provide insight into potential therapies for Parkinson disease neurodegeneration. PMID:22219196

  19. Glutathione peroxidase 3 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae suppresses non-enzymatic proteolysis of glutamine synthetase in an activity-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Lee, Phil Young; Kho, Chang Won; Lee, Do Hee; Kang, Sunghyun; Kang, Seongman; Lee, Sang Chul; Park, Byoung Chul; Cho, Sayeon; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Park, Sung Goo

    2007-10-19

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (Gpx3) is ubiquitously expressed and is important antioxidant enzyme in yeast. It modulates the activities of redox-sensitive thiol proteins, particularly those involved in signal transduction pathway and protein translocation. Through immunoprecipitation/two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (IP-2DE), MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and a pull down assay, we found glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) as a candidate interacting protein with Gpx3. GS is a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism and ammonium assimilation. It has been known that GS is non-enzymatically cleaved by ROS generated by MFO (thiol/ Fe(3+)/O(2) mixed-function oxidase) system. In this study, it is demonstrated that GS interacts with Gpx3 through its catalytic domain both in vivo and in vitro regardless of redox state. In addition, Gpx3 helps to protect GS from inactivation and degradation via oxidative stress in an activity-independent manner. Based on the results, it is suggested that Gpx3 protects GS from non-enzymatic proteolysis, thereby contributing to cell homeostasis when cell is exposed to oxidative stress.

  20. Oxidative status, in vitro iron-induced lipid oxidation and superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities in rhea meat.

    PubMed

    Terevinto, A; Ramos, A; Castroman, G; Cabrera, M C; Saadoun, A

    2010-04-01

    Rhea (Rhea americana) muscles Obturatorius medialis (OM) Iliotibialis lateralis (IL) and Iliofibularis (I), obtained from farmed animals, were evaluated regarding their oxidative/antioxidant status. The mean level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) expressed as malonaldehyde (MDA) content was of 0.84 mg MDA/kg wet tissue for the three muscles. TBARS level was significantly higher in IL than OM and I, with the two latter showing similar levels. The mean level of carbonyl proteins expressed as dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) was 1.59 nmol DNPH mg(-1). Carbonyl protein levels were significantly different (P<0.05) between the three muscles (IL>OM>I). Iron-induced TBARS generation was not significantly different between the three muscles at any time, nor for each muscle during the 5 h of the experiment. Superoxide dismutase activity in IL muscle was significantly higher (P<0.05) than in I muscle. However, the difference between IL and OM muscles was not significant. The differences between the three muscles became not significant when the results were expressed by mg of protein contained in the extract, instead by g of wet tissue. No differences were found for catalase (micromol of discomposed H(2)O(2) min(-1) g(-1) wet tissue or by mg of protein contained in the extract) and glutathione peroxidase (micromol ol of oxidized NADPH min(-1) g(-1) of wet tissue or by mg of protein contained in the extract) activities between the three muscles.

  1. The Nitric Oxide Reductase Mechanism of a Flavo-Diiron Protein: Identification of Active-Site Intermediates and Products

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The unique active site of flavo-diiron proteins (FDPs) consists of a nonheme diiron-carboxylate site proximal to a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor. FDPs serve as the terminal components for reductive scavenging of dioxygen or nitric oxide to combat oxidative or nitrosative stress in bacteria, archaea, and some protozoan parasites. Nitric oxide is reduced to nitrous oxide by the four-electron reduced (FMNH2–FeIIFeII) active site. In order to clarify the nitric oxide reductase mechanism, we undertook a multispectroscopic presteady-state investigation, including the first Mössbauer spectroscopic characterization of diiron redox intermediates in FDPs. A new transient intermediate was detected and determined to be an antiferromagnetically coupled diferrous-dinitrosyl (S = 0, [{FeNO}7]2) species. This species has an exchange energy, J ≥ 40 cm–1 (JS1 ° S2), which is consistent with a hydroxo or oxo bridge between the two irons. The results show that the nitric oxide reductase reaction proceeds through successive formation of diferrous-mononitrosyl (S = 1/2, FeII{FeNO}7) and the S = 0 diferrous-dinitrosyl species. In the rate-determining process, the diferrous-dinitrosyl converts to diferric (FeIIIFeIII) and by inference N2O. The proximal FMNH2 then rapidly rereduces the diferric site to diferrous (FeIIFeII), which can undergo a second 2NO → N2O turnover. This pathway is consistent with previous results on the same deflavinated and flavinated FDP, which detected N2O as a product (HayashiBiochemistry2010, 49, 704020669924). Our results do not support other proposed mechanisms, which proceed either via “super-reduction” of [{FeNO}7]2 by FMNH2 or through FeII{FeNO}7 directly to a diferric-hyponitrite intermediate. The results indicate that an S = 0 [{FeNO}7}]2 complex is a proximal precursor to N–N bond formation and N–O bond cleavage to give N2O and that this conversion can occur without redox participation of the FMN cofactor. PMID:24828196

  2. Involvement of tristetraprolin in transcriptional activation of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase by insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, Gene C.; Edelman, Jeffrey L.; Brooks, Patricia A.

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer siRNAs to tristetraprolin blocks transcription of HMGR in vivo in rat liver. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer siRNAs to tristetraprolin inhibits insulin activation of HMGR transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin acts to rapidly increase tristetraprolin in liver nuclear extracts. -- Abstract: Several AU-rich RNA binding element (ARE) proteins were investigated for their possible effects on transcription of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) in normal rats. Using in vivo electroporation, four different siRNAs to each ARE protein were introduced together with HMGR promoter (-325 to +20) luciferase construct and compared to saline controls. All four siRNAs to tristetraprolin (TTP) completely eliminated transcription from the HMGR promoter construct. Since insulin acts to rapidly increase hepatic HMGR transcription, the effect of TTP siRNA on induction by insulin was tested. The 3-fold stimulation by insulin was eliminated by this treatment. In comparison, siRNA to AU RNA binding protein/enoyl coenzyme A hydratase (AUH) had no effect. These findings indicate a role for TTP in the insulin-mediated activation of hepatic HMGR transcription.

  3. Dissimilatory arsenate reductase activity and arsenate-respiring bacteria in bovine rumen fluid, hamster feces, and the termite hindgut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herbel, M.J.; Switzer, Blum J.; Hoeft, S.E.; Cohen, S.M.; Arnold, L.L.; Lisak, J.; Stolz, J.F.; Oremland, R.S.

    2002-01-01

    Bovine rumen fluid and slurried hamster feces completely reduced millimolar levels of arsenate to arsenite upon incubation under anoxic conditions. This activity was strongly inhibited by autoclaving or aerobic conditions, and partially inhibited by tungstate or chloramphenicol. The rate of arsenate reduction was faster in feces from a population of arsenate-watered (100 ppm) hamsters compared to a control group watered without arsenate. Using radioisotope methods, arsenate reductase activity in hamster feces was also detected at very low concentrations of added arsenate (???10 ??M). Bacterial cultures were isolated from these materials, as well as from the termite hindgut, that grew using H2 as their electron donor, acetate as their carbon source, and arsenate as their respiratory electron acceptor. The three cultures aligned phylogenetically either with well-established enteric bacteria, or with an organism associated with feedlot fecal wastes. Because arsenite is transported across the gut epithelium more readily than arsenate, microbial dissimilatory reduction of arsenate in the gut may promote the body's absorption of arsenic and hence potentiate its toxicity. ?? 2002 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of ethacrynic acid analogues on glutathione-s-transferase P1-1 activity inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guisen; Yu, Tao; Wang, Rui; Wang, Xiaobing; Jing, Yongkui

    2005-06-02

    Ethacrynic acid (EA) is a glutathione-s-transferase pi (GSTP1-1) inhibitor. Fifteen of EA analogues were designed and synthesized and their inhibition on GSTP1-1 activity was tested in lysate of human leukemia HL-60 cells. These compounds were synthesized using substituted phenol as precursors through reacting with 2-chlorocarboxylic acid and acylation. Structure-activity analysis indicates that replacements of chlorides of EA by methyl, bromide, and fluoride at 3' position remain the GSTP1-1 inhibitory effect. The compounds without any substitute at 3' position lose the activity on GSTP1-1 inhibition. These data suggest that the substitution of 3' position of EA is necessary for inhibiting GSTP1-1 activity.

  5. Roles of sedentary aging and lifelong physical activity in exchange of glutathione across exercising human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Michael; Mortensen, Stefan P; Cabo, Helena; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari-Carmen; Viña, Jose; Hellsten, Ylva

    2014-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules with regulatory functions, and in young and adult organisms, the formation of ROS is increased during skeletal muscle contractions. However, ROS can be deleterious to cells when not sufficiently counterbalanced by the antioxidant system. Aging is associated with accumulation of oxidative damage to lipids, DNA, and proteins. Given the pro-oxidant effect of skeletal muscle contractions, this effect of age could be a result of excessive ROS formation. We evaluated the effect of acute exercise on changes in blood redox state across the leg of young (23 ± 1 years) and older (66 ± 2 years) sedentary humans by measuring the whole blood concentration of the reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) forms of the antioxidant glutathione. To assess the role of physical activity, lifelong physically active older subjects (62 ± 2 years) were included. Exercise increased the venous concentration of GSSG in an intensity-dependent manner in young sedentary subjects, suggesting an exercise-induced increase in ROS formation. In contrast, venous GSSG levels remained unaltered during exercise in the older sedentary and active groups despite a higher skeletal muscle expression of the superoxide-generating enzyme NADPH oxidase. Arterial concentration of GSH and expression of antioxidant enzymes in skeletal muscle of older active subjects were increased. The potential impairment in exercise-induced ROS formation may be an important mechanism underlying skeletal muscle and vascular dysfunction with sedentary aging. Lifelong physical activity upregulates antioxidant systems, which may be one of the mechanisms underlying the lack of exercise-induced increase in GSSG.

  6. Tyrosine 8 contributes to catalysis but is not required for activity of rat liver glutathione S-transferase, 1-1.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J.; Barycki, J. J.; Colman, R. F.

    1996-01-01

    Reaction of rat liver glutathione S-transferase, isozyme 1-1, with 4-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoic acid (4-FSB), a xenobiotic substrate analogue, results in a time-dependent inactivation of the enzyme to a final value of 35% of its original activity when assayed at pH 6.5 with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as substrate. The rate of inactivation exhibits a nonlinear dependence on the concentration of 4-FSB from 0.25 mM to 9 mM, characterized by a KI of 0.78 mM and kmax of 0.011 min-1. S-Hexylglutathione or the xenobiotic substrate analogue, 2,4-dinitrophenol, protects against inactivation of the enzyme by 4-FSB, whereas S-methylglutathione has little effect on the reaction. These experiments indicate that reaction occurs within the active site of the enzyme, probably in the binding site of the xenobiotic substrate, close to the glutathione binding site. Incorporation of [3,5-3H]-4-FSB into the enzyme in the absence and presence of S-hexylglutathione suggests that modification of one residue is responsible for the partial loss of enzyme activity. Tyr 8 and Cys 17 are shown to be the reaction targets of 4-FSB, but only Tyr 8 is protected against 4-FSB by S-hexylglutathione. DTT regenerates cysteine from the reaction product of cysteine and 4-FSB, but does not reactivate the enzyme. These results show that modification of Tyr 8 by 4-FSB causes the partial inactivation of the enzyme. The Michaelis constants for various substrates are not changed by the modification of the enzyme. The pH dependence of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction of glutathione with CDNB for the modified enzyme, as compared with the native enzyme, reveals an increase of about 0.9 in the apparent pKa, which has been interpreted as representing the ionization of enzyme-bound glutathione; however, this pKa of about 7.4 for modified enzyme remains far below the pK of 9.1 for the -SH of free glutathione. Previously, it was considered that Tyr 8 was essential for GST catalysis. In contrast, we conclude that

  7. In vitro effect of D-004, a lipid extract of the fruit of the cuban royal palm (Roystonea regia), on prostate steroid 5α-reductase activity

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, L. Yohani; Menéndez, Roberto; Má, Rosa; González, Rosa M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: D-004, a lipid extract of the fruit of the Cuban royal palm (Roystonea regia), has been found to reduce prostatic hyperplasia (PH) induced with testosterone (T), but not PH induced with dihydrotestosterone (DHT), in rodents, suggesting the inhibition of prostate 5α-reductase activity. Objectives: The aims of this study were to assess whether D-004 inhibits prostate 5α-reductase activity in vitro and to examine the effects of D-004 on enzyme kinetics. Methods: This experimental study was conducted at the Pharmacology Department, Center of Natural Products, National Center for Scientific Research, Havana, Cuba. Soluble rat prostate preparations were used as the source of 5α-reductase, and (3H)-DHT production was measured to determine prostate 5α-reductase activity. Cell-free rat prostate homogenates were pre-incubated with carboxymethyl cellulose 2% alone (control tubes) or D-004 (0.24–125 μg/mL) suspended in the vehicle (treated tubes) for 10 minutes prior to adding the labeled substrate (3H)-T Once the reaction was stopped, sterols were extracted with chloroform and aliquots were applied on silica gel plates developed in benzene-acetone (4:1, v/v). Areas containing DHT were scraped and radioactivity was counted. The median inhibitory concentration (IC50) was determined by measuring the conversion of T to DHT The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) and Vmax values before and after adding D-004 were determined in kinetic studies using labeled T (0.5-25 μmol/L). Results: Compared with controls, D-004 significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the enzymatic reaction at doses of 1.95 to 125.0 μg/mL) (all, P < 0.05). The IC50 of D-004 required to inhibit 5a-reductase activity was 2.25 μg/mL. Enzyme inhibition was noncompetitive, since D-004 lowered the Vmax from 15.3 to 10.0 nmol DHT/min · mg−1 protein, while the Km (4.54 μmol/L) was almost unaffected. Conclusions: D-004 dose-dependently and noncompetitively inhibited in vitro 5α-reductase

  8. Post-translational control of nitrate reductase activity responding to light and photosynthesis evolved already in the early vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Nemie-Feyissa, Dugassa; Królicka, Adriana; Førland, Nina; Hansen, Margarita; Heidari, Behzad; Lillo, Cathrine

    2013-05-01

    Regulation of nitrate reductase (NR) by reversible phosphorylation at a conserved motif is well established in higher plants, and enables regulation of NR in response to rapid fluctuations in light intensity. This regulation is not conserved in algae NR, and we wished to test the evolutionary origin of the regulatory mechanism by physiological examination of ancient land plants. Especially a member of the lycophytes is of interest since their NR is candidate for regulation by reversible phosphorylation based on sequence analysis. We compared Selaginella kraussiana, a member of the lycophytes and earliest vascular plants, with the angiosperm Arabidopsis thaliana, and also tested the moss Physcomitrella patens. Interestingly, optimization of assay conditions revealed that S. kraussiana NR used NADH as an electron donor like A. thaliana, whereas P. patens NR activity depended on NADPH. Examination of light/darkness effects showed that S. kraussiana NR was rapidly regulated similar to A. thaliana NR when a differential (Mg(2+) contra EDTA) assay was used to reveal activity state of NR. This implies that already existing NR enzyme was post-translationally activated by light in both species. Light had a positive effect also on de novo synthesis of NR in S. kraussiana, which could be shown after the plants had been exposed to a prolonged dark period (7 days). Daily variations in NR activity were mainly caused by post-translational modifications. As for angiosperms, the post-translational light activation of NR in S. kraussiana was inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1*1-dimethylurea (DCMU), an inhibitor of photosynthesis and stomata opening. Evolutionary, a post-translational control mechanism for NR have occurred before or in parallel with development of vascular tissue in land plants, and appears to be part of a complex mechanisms for coordination of CO2 and nitrogen metabolism in these plants.

  9. Selenium requirements are higher for glutathione peroxidase-1 mRNA than gpx1 activity in rat testis.

    PubMed

    Schriever, Sonja C; Barnes, Kimberly M; Evenson, Jacqueline K; Raines, Anna M; Sunde, Roger A

    2009-05-01

    Selenium (Se) plays a critical role in testis, sperm, and reproduction, and testis Se levels are remarkably maintained in Se deficiency. In most other tissues, Se levels decrease dramatically as do levels of most selenoproteins and levels of a subset of Se-regulated selenoprotein mRNAs. Because of the recent identification of key molecules in the targeted trafficking of Se to the testis, we examined the hierarchy of Se regulation in testis by determining the dietary Se regulation of the full testis selenoproteome in rats fed graded levels of Se (0 to 0.8 microg Se/g) as Na2SeO3 for 28 d. Se status did not significantly affect testis weight or glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) activity (P>0.05). qRT-PCR analysis of selenoprotein mRNA expression revealed that 21 of the 24 selenoprotein mRNAs and ApoER2 mRNA (the selenoprotein P [Sepp1] receptor) were also not regulated significantly by dietary Se status. In contrast, Gpx1 activity decreased to 28% of Se-adequate levels, and mRNA levels for Gpx1, Sepp1, and Sepw1 (selenoprotein W) decreased significantly in Se-deficient rats to 45, 46, and 55%, respectively, of Se-adequate plateau levels. Overlap of hyperbolic Gpx4 activity and Sepw1 mRNA response curves with testis Se concentration, all with minimum dietary Se requirements<0.016 microg Se/g, showed the priority for synthesis of Gpx4. Higher minimum dietary Se requirements of 0.04 microg Se/g for Gpx1 activity and Sepp1 mRNA, and the even higher minimum dietary Se requirement of 0.08 microg Se/g for Gpx1 mRNA, suggest that the hierarchy of these biomarkers reflects distinct, lower priority pools, cell types, and roles for Se within the testis.

  10. Identification and clarification of the role of key active site residues in bacterial glutathione S-transferase zeta/maleylpyruvate isomerase

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Ti; Li, De-Feng; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Application of site-directed mutagenesis to probe the active site residues of glutathione-dependent maleylpyruvate isomerase. {yields} Two conserved residues, Arg8 and Arg176, in zeta class glutathione S-transferases are critical for maleylpyruvate orientation and enolization. {yields} Arg109, found exclusively in NagL, participates in k{sub cat} regulation. {yields} The T11A mutant exhibited a significantly decreased K{sub m} value for glutathione with little impact on maleylpyruvate kinetics. {yields} The Thr11 residue appears to have significance in the evolution of glutathione S-transferase classes. -- Abstract: The maleylpyruvate isomerase NagL from Ralstonia sp. strain U2, which has been structurally characterized previously, catalyzes the isomerization of maleylpyruvate to fumarylpyruvate. It belongs to the class zeta glutathione S-transferases (GSTZs), part of the cytosolic GST family (cGSTs). In this study, site-directed mutagenesis was conducted to probe the functions of 13 putative active site residues. Steady-state kinetic information for mutants in the reduced glutathione (GSH) binding site, suggested that (a) Gln64 and Asp102 interact directly with the glutamyl moiety of glutathione, (b) Gln49 and Gln64 are involved in a potential electron-sharing network that influences the ionization of the GSH thiol. The information also suggests that (c) His38, Asn108 and Arg109 interact with the GSH glycine moiety, (d) His104 has a role in the ionization of the GSH sulfur and the stabilization of the maleyl terminal carboxyl group in the reaction intermediate and (e) Arg110 influences the electron distribution in the active site and therefore the ionization of the GSH thiolate. Kinetic data for mutants altered in the substrate-binding site imply that (a) Arg8 and Arg176 are critical for maleylpyruvate orientation and enolization, and (b) Arg109 (exclusive to NagL) participates in k{sub cat} regulation. Surprisingly, the T11A mutant had a

  11. The biological importance of glutathione peroxidase and peroxiredoxin backup systems in bivalves during peroxide exposure.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Rafael; Mello, Danielle Ferraz; Uliano-Silva, Marcela; Delapedra, Gabriel; Arl, Miriam; Dafre, Alcir Luiz

    2014-10-01

    Organic peroxide elimination in eukaryotes essentially depends on glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and peroxiredoxin (Prx) enzymes, which are supported by their respective electron donors, glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx). This system depends on the ancillary enzymes glutathione reductase (GR) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) to maintain GSH and Trx in their reduced state. This study discusses the biological importance of GR and TrxR in supporting GPx and Prx during cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) exposure in brown mussel Perna perna. ZnCl2 or 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenze (CDNB) was used to decrease GR and TrxR activities in gills, as already reported with mammals and bivalves. ZnCl2 exposure lowered GR activity (28%), impaired the in vivo CHP decomposition and decreased the survival rates under CHP exposure. CDNB decreased GR (54%) and TrxR (73%) activities and induced glutathione depletion (99%), promoting diminished peroxide elimination and survival rates at a greater extent than ZnCl2. CDNB also increased the susceptibility of hemocytes to CHP toxicity. Despite being toxic and causing mortality at longer exposures, short (2 h) exposure to CHP promoted an up regulation of GSH (50 and 100 μM CHP) and protein-thiol (100 μM CHP) levels, which was blocked by ZnCl2 or CDNB pre-exposure. Results highlight the biological importance of GSH, GR and TrxR in supporting GPx and Prx activities, contributing to organic peroxides elimination and mussel survival under oxidative challenges. To our knowledge, this is the first work that demonstrates, albeit indirectly, the biological importance of GPx/GR/GSH and Prx/TrxR/Trx systems on in vivo organic peroxide elimination in bivalves.

  12. Erythrocyte glutathione transferase: a non-antibody biomarker for systemic sclerosis, which correlates with severity and activity of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Fabrini, R; Rosato, E; Gigante, A; Bocedi, A; Cianci, R; Barbano, B; Del Grosso, E; Ricci, F; Zingaretti, V; Salsano, F; Ricci, G

    2013-01-01

    Erythrocyte glutathione transferase (e-GST) is a detoxifying enzyme hyper-expressed in nephropathic patients and used recently as a biomarker for blood toxicity. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is characterized by endothelial dysfunction and fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. Renal involvement is frequent in SSc patients. Here we show that e-GST is hyper-expressed in SSc patients (n=102) and correlates (R2=0.49, P<0.0001) with the Medsger DSS and DAI Valentini indices that quantify the severity and activity of this disease. Interestingly, e-GST does not correlate with the impairment of kidney or other specific organs taken separately. e-GST hyper-expression seems to be linked to the presence of a factor (i.e., toxin) that triggers the autoimmune disease, and not to the damage of specific organs or to oxidative stress. e-GST may be proposed as an innovative non-antibody biomarker for SSc useful to check the progress of this disease and the efficiency of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:23887627

  13. Effect of Dietary Selenomethionine Supplementation on Growth Performance, Tissue Se Concentration, and Blood Glutathione Peroxidase Activity in Kid Boer Goats.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu-xuan; Hou, Jin-xing; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Jian-gang; Liu, Xiao-rui; Zhou, Zhan-qin; Cao, Bin-yun

    2015-10-01

    We used 240 kid Boer goats that were divided into six groups. The control group was fed a basal diet containing 0.05 mg of selenium (Se)/kg dry matter (DM). Trial groups received the basal diet supplemented with 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, or 0.5 mg Se/kg DM (using a commercial selenomethionine product). Trial groups showed an improvement in growth performance (P < 0.05) despite no change in average daily feed intakes (ADFIs) (P > 0.05) compared to the control group A, quadratic model showed a correlation between glutathione peroxidase activity level in whole blood and dietary Se concentration (R(2) = 0.883, P < 0.04). The best linear model showed that increasing concentrations of Se in the blood (R(2) = 0.968, P < 0.001) and muscle (R(2) = 0.942, P < 0.001) corresponded to increasing Se concentrations in feed. Accumulation of Se in different tissues and organs corresponded to increasing Se concentrations in the diet as well as to the total time goats spent feeding on supplemented diet. Kidney and muscle tissues showed the highest and lowest accumulation of Se, respectively. Thus, Se in goat meat can be increased by adding between 0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg of selenomethionine to the diet of goats.

  14. Sunscreen protection against ultraviolet-induced oxidative stress: evaluation of reduced glutathione levels, metalloproteinase secretion, and myeloperoxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Vilela, F M P; Fonseca, Y M; Vicentini, F T M C; Fonseca, M J V

    2013-11-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the skin protection by sunscreens considering the aspects skin penetration, photostability, and protection against erythema and sunburn. However, little is known about the effect of topically applied sunscreen formulations on the antioxidant defense, metalloproteinases, and inflammatory processes of skin in response to UVR exposure. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the use of a cream gel formulation containing the UV filters benzophenone-3, octyl methoxycinnamate, and octyl salicylate to prevent skin damage from a single dose of UVR (2.87 J/cm2). This protective effect was evaluated in vivo by measuring the following biochemical parameters: reduced glutathione levels, secretion of matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloperoxidase activity. The results showed that the sunscreen formulation, despite having sun protection factor (SPF) 15, was not completely effective to protect the skin against GSH depletion, MMP-9 secretion and the inflammatory process induced by UVR. These results demonstrate the importance of analyzing UV-altered biochemical parameters of skin in order to propose new sunscreen formulations that can completely protect skin against UVR-induced damage.

  15. Sulfite reductase protects plants against sulfite toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Brychkova, Galina; Fluhr, Robert; Sagi, Moshe

    2013-02-01

    Plant sulfite reductase (SiR; Enzyme Commission 1.8.7.1) catalyzes the reduction of sulfite to sulfide in the reductive sulfate assimilation pathway. Comparison of SiR expression in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Rheinlands Ruhm') and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants revealed that SiR is expressed in a different tissue-dependent manner that likely reflects dissimilarity in sulfur metabolism between the plant species. Using Arabidopsis and tomato SiR mutants with modified SiR expression, we show here that resistance to ectopically applied sulfur dioxide/sulfite is a function of SiR expression levels and that plants with reduced SiR expression exhibit higher sensitivity than the wild type, as manifested in pronounced leaf necrosis and chlorophyll bleaching. The sulfite-sensitive mutants accumulate applied sulfite and show a decline in glutathione levels. In contrast, mutants that overexpress SiR are more tolerant to sulfite toxicity, exhibiting little or no damage. Resistance to high sulfite application is manifested by fast sulfite disappearance and an increase in glutathione levels. The notion that SiR plays a role in the protection of plants against sulfite is supported by the rapid up-regulation of SiR transcript and activity within 30 min of sulfite injection into Arabidopsis and tomato leaves. Peroxisomal sulfite oxidase transcripts and activity levels are likewise promoted by sulfite application as compared with water injection controls. These results indicate that, in addition to participating in the sulfate assimilation reductive pathway, SiR also plays a role in protecting leaves against the toxicity of sulfite accumulation.

  16. Elevated CO2 levels affect the activity of nitrate reductase and carbonic anhydrase in the calcifying rhodophyte Corallina officinalis

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Laurie C.

    2013-01-01

    The concentration of CO2 in global surface ocean waters is increasing due to rising atmospheric CO2 emissions, resulting in lower pH and a lower saturation state of carbonate ions. Such changes in seawater chemistry are expected to impact calcification in calcifying marine organisms. However, other physiological processes related to calcification might also be affected, including enzyme activity. In a mesocosm experiment, macroalgal communities were exposed to three CO2 concentrations (380, 665, and 1486 µatm) to determine how the activity of two enzymes related to inorganic carbon uptake and nutrient assimilation in Corallina officinalis, an abundant calcifying rhodophyte, will be affected by elevated CO2 concentrations. The activity of external carbonic anhydrase, an important enzyme functioning in macroalgal carbon-concentrating mechanisms, was inversely related to CO2 concentration after long-term exposure (12 weeks). Nitrate reductase, the enzyme responsible for reduction of nitrate to nitrite, was stimulated by CO2 and was highest in algae grown at 665 µatm CO2. Nitrate and phosphate uptake rates were inversely related to CO2, while ammonium uptake was unaffected, and the percentage of inorganic carbon in the algal skeleton decreased with increasing CO2. The results indicate that the processes of inorganic carbon and nutrient uptake and assimilation are affected by elevated CO2 due to changes in enzyme activity, which change the energy balance and physiological status of C. officinalis, therefore affecting its competitive interactions with other macroalgae. The ecological implications of the physiological changes in C. officinalis in response to elevated CO2 are discussed. PMID:23314813

  17. Elevated CO2 levels affect the activity of nitrate reductase and carbonic anhydrase in the calcifying rhodophyte Corallina officinalis.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Laurie C; Straub, Sandra; Bischof, Kai

    2013-02-01

    The concentration of CO(2) in global surface ocean waters is increasing due to rising atmospheric CO(2) emissions, resulting in lower pH and a lower saturation state of carbonate ions. Such changes in seawater chemistry are expected to impact calcification in calcifying marine organisms. However, other physiological processes related to calcification might also be affected, including enzyme activity. In a mesocosm experiment, macroalgal communities were exposed to three CO(2) concentrations (380, 665, and 1486 µatm) to determine how the activity of two enzymes related to inorganic carbon uptake and nutrient assimilation in Corallina officinalis, an abundant calcifying rhodophyte, will be affected by elevated CO(2) concentrations. The activity of external carbonic anhydrase, an important enzyme functioning in macroalgal carbon-concentrating mechanisms, was inversely related to CO(2) concentration after long-term exposure (12 weeks). Nitrate reductase, the enzyme responsible for reduction of nitrate to nitrite, was stimulated by CO(2) and was highest in algae grown at 665 µatm CO(2). Nitrate and phosphate uptake rates were inversely related to CO(2), while ammonium uptake was unaffected, and the percentage of inorganic carbon in the algal skeleton decreased with increasing CO(2). The results indicate that the processes of inorganic carbon and nutrient uptake and assimilation are affected by elevated CO(2) due to changes in enzyme activity, which change the energy balance and physiological status of C. officinalis, therefore affecting its competitive interactions with other macroalgae. The ecological implications of the physiological changes in C. officinalis in response to elevated CO(2) are discussed.

  18. Electrostatic Fields Near the Active Site of Human Aldose Reductase: 2. New Inhibitors and Complications due to Hydrogen Bonds†

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Cohen, Aina E.; Boxer, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Vibrational Stark effect spectroscopy was used to measure electrostatic fields in the hydrophobic region of the active site of human aldose reductase (hALR2). A new nitrile-containing inhibitor was designed and synthesized, and the x-ray structure of its complex, along with cofactor NADP+, with wild-type hALR2 was determined at 1.3 Å resolution. The nitrile is found to be in close proximity to T113, consistent with a hydrogen bond interaction. Two vibrational absorption peaks were observed at room temperature in the nitrile region when the inhibitor binds to wild-type hALR2, indicating that the nitrile probe experiences two different microenvironments, and these could be empirically separated into a hydrogen bonded and non-hydrogen bonded population by comparison with the mutant T113A, where a hydrogen bond to the nitrile is not present. Classical molecular dynamics simulations based on the structure predict a double-peaked distribution in protein electric fields projected along the nitrile probe. The interpretation of these two peaks as a hydrogen bond formation-dissociation process between the probe nitrile group and a nearby amino acid side chain is used to explain the observation of two IR bands, and the simulations were used to investigate the molecular details of this conformational change. Hydrogen bonding complicates the simplest analysis of vibrational frequency shifts as being due solely to electrostatic interactions through the vibrational Stark effect, and the consequences of this complication are discussed. PMID:21859105

  19. Enantioselective Reduction of Citral Isomers in NCR Ene Reductase: Analysis of an Active-Site Mutant Library.

    PubMed

    Kress, Nico; Rapp, Johanna; Hauer, Bernhard

    2017-02-08

    A deeper understanding of the >99 % S-selective reduction of both isomers of citral catalyzed by NCR ene reductase was achieved by active-site mutational studies and docking simulation. Though structurally similar, the E/Z isomers of citral showed a significantly varying selectivity response to introduced mutations. Although it was possible to invert (E)-citral reduction enantioselectivity to ee 46 % (R) by introducing mutation W66A, for (Z)-citral it remained ≥88 % (S) for all single-residue variants. Residue 66 seems to act as a lever for opposite binding modes. This was underlined by a W66A-based double-mutant library that enhanced the (E)-citral derived enantioselectivity to 63 % (R) and significantly lowered the S selectivity for (Z)-citral to 44 % (S). Formation of (R)-citronellal from an (E/Z)-citral mixture is a desire in industrial (-)-menthol synthesis. Our findings pave the way for a rational enzyme engineering solution.

  20. Relationships between silicon content and glutathione peroxidase activity in tissues of rats receiving lithium in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Kiełczykowska, Małgorzata; Musik, Irena; Pasternak, Kazimierz

    2008-02-01

    Lithium salts are widely used in psychiatry, but their presence in organism can result in both beneficial and adverse effects. Silicon, the third most abundant trace element in humans as well as antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx) play important roles in organism. The disturbance of their level can cause severe disorders. The aim of our work was to evaluate the influence of Li2CO3 administration in drinking water for a period of 4 weeks on Si content and GPx activity in the tissues of liver, kidney, brain and femoral muscle in rats. The concentrations of provided solutions were 0.7, 1.4, 2.6, 3.6, 7.1 and 10.7 mmol Li+ x dm-3. GPx activity was decreased versus control as a consequence of Li treatment, particularly in kidney and brain. This effect could be suggested to contribute to renal abnormalities which could occur during Li therapy. Si tissue level was significantly enhanced versus control in liver and femoral muscle in groups receiving high Li doses. In brain no well-marked changes were observed, whereas in kidney we observed the depletion in low-Li-groups, restoration of Si level in higher-Li-groups and unexpected decrease in the highest-Li-group. Positive correlations between Si content and GPx activity in the tissues of kidney (r = 0.677) and brain (r = 0.790) as well as negative correlation (r = -0.819) in femoral muscle were found. We consider that our results give some reason for suggesting that monitoring of silicon level in patients undergoing Li therapy could be recommended. However, more investigations should be performed, particularly regarding the relationships between Si and GPx in blood and urine Si excretion during lithium administration.

  1. Effect of elemental nano-selenium on semen quality, glutathione peroxidase activity, and testis ultrastructure in male Boer goats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Li-guang; Yang, Ru-jie; Yue, Wen-bin; Xun, Wen-juan; Zhang, Chun-xiang; Ren, You-she; Shi, Lei; Lei, Fu-lin

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this experiment is to study the effects of novel elemental nano-selenium in the diet on testicular ultrastructure, semen quality and GSH-Px activity in male goats. Forty-two 2-month-old bucks were offered a total mixed ration which had been supplemented with nano-Se (0.3mg/kg Se) or unsupplemented (the control group only received 0.06mg/kg Se-background), for a period of 12 weeks (from weaning to sexual maturity). Results showed that the testicular Se level, semen glutathione peroxidase and ATPase activity increased significantly in the nano-Se supplementation group compared with control (P<0.05). The semen quality (volume, density, motility and pH) was not affected by added Se in diets, however, the sperm abnormality rate of control bucks was significantly higher than Se supplemented bucks (P<0.05). The testes of 5 goats in each group were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and showed that in Se-deficient bucks the membrane was damaged, and showed the occurrence of abnormalities in the mitochondria of the midpiece of spermatozoa. In conclusion, selenium deficiency resulted in abnormal spermatozoal mitochondria, and supplementation with nano-Se enhanced the testis Se content, testicular and semen GSH-Px activity, protected the membrane system integrity and the tight arrayment of the midpiece of the mitochondria. Further studies are required to research the novel elemental nano-Se with characterization of bioavailability and toxicity in small ruminants.

  2. Serum glutathione S-transferase B1 activity as an index of liver function in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rattenbury, J M; Taylor, C J; Heath, P K; Howie, A F; Beckett, G J

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To evaluate serum glutathione S-transferase B1 (GST B1), a highly sensitive test of hepatocellular function, as a means of identifying liver disease in patients with cystic fib