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Sample records for activity ground deformation

  1. Space-based monitoring of ground deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobakht Ersi, Fereydoun; Safari, Abdolreza; Gamse, Sonja

    2016-07-01

    Ground deformation monitoring is valuable to understanding of the behaviour of natural phenomena. Space-Based measurement systems such as Global Positioning System are useful tools for continuous monitoring of ground deformation. Ground deformation analysis based on space geodetic techniques have provided a new, more accurate, and reliable source of information for geodetic positioning which is used to detect deformations of the Ground surface. This type of studies using displacement fields derived from repeated measurments of space-based geodetic networks indicates how crucial role the space geodetic methods play in geodynamics. The main scope of this contribution is to monitor of ground deformation by obtained measurements from GPS sites. We present ground deformation analysis in three steps: a global congruency test on daily coordinates of permanent GPS stations to specify in which epochs deformations occur, the localization of the deformed GPS sites and the determination of deformations.

  2. Preliminary results of ESA Category-1 Project 5834 "Application of DInSAR technique to areas of active ground deformations"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, B.; D'Auria, L.

    2009-04-01

    We have established a processing chain of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data for identification and parametrisation of deformation sources in areas of active ground deformation (e.g. seismogenic areas, volcanic districts). SAR data from European Space Agency (ESA) satellites ERS-2 and ENVISAT are used. SAR and InSAR data processing LEVEL 0 SAR data are focussed to Single Look Complex (SLC) through ROI_PAC (Copyright 2002-2008, Caltech/Jet Propulsion Laboratory). We perform an advanced data processing using Doris (Kampes and Usai, 1999) a single program that can do most common steps of the interferometric radar processing starting from SLC data to generation of interferometric products and geocoding. Unwrapping of interferometric phase is performed using the public domain software snaphu (Chen and Zebker, 2001). Modeling of deformation sources We propose a novel inversion approach base on non-linear inversion. The forward modeling is provided by the semi-analytic deformation model for point sources and finite faults. The parameters of the fault (center position, width, height, rake and seismic moment) are inverted using a combination of non-linear optimization algorithms (as Monte-Carlo, Nelder&Mead Simplex and Simulated Annealing). The misfit function defined for the optimization is based on the L2 norm of the error weighted by the coherence of the considered spatial point. Test datasets To test our modeling procedure we chose three different study areas, refer to mainly strike-slip seismogenic sources with different orientation to respect satellite Line Of Sight (LOS): December 26 2003 Iranian earthquake (Bam e.), data from both ascending and descending passes of ENVISAT ASAR narrow swath IS2 (RAW and SLCs); August 17 1999 Turkey earthquake (Izmit e.), data from both ascending and descending passes of ERS-2 AMI SAR (SLCs); June 17-21 2000 Iceland earthquakes, data from both ascending and descending passes of ERS-2 AMI SAR (SLCs). Tests carried over real

  3. Thermomechanics of shallow magma chamber pressurization: Implications for the assessment of ground deformation data at active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, P. M.; de Silva, S. L.; Grosfils, E. B.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we utilize thermomechanical models to investigate how magma chambers overpressurize as the result of either magmatic recharge or volatile exsolution. By implementing an adaptive reservoir boundary condition we are able to track how overpressure dissipates as the magma chamber expands to accommodate internal volume changes. We find that the size of the reservoir greatly impacts the resultant magma chamber overpressure. In particular, overpressure estimates for small to moderate-sized reservoirs (1-10 km3) are up to 70% lower than previous analytical predictions. We apply our models to Santorini volcano in Greece where recent seismic activity and ground deformation observations suggested the potential for eruption. The incorporation of an adaptive boundary condition reproduces Mogi flux estimates and suggests that the magma reservoir present at Santorini may be quite large. Furthermore, model results suggest that if the magma chamber is >100 km3, overpressures generated due to the high magma flux may not exceed the strength of the host rock, thus requiring an additional triggering mechanism for eruption. Although the adaptive boundary condition approach does not calculate the internal evolution of the magma reservoir, it represents a fundamental step forward from elastic Mogi models and fixed boundary solutions on which future investigations of the evolution of the magma can be built.

  4. Ground deformation from ground-based SAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarchi, Dario; Casagli, Nicola; Fortuny-Guasch, Joaquim; Guerri, Letizia; Antonello, Giuseppe; Leva, Davide

    An in-depth analysis of the last two images acquired by the ground-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar system installed on Stromboli before the 5 April 2003 explosion allowed us to detect the precursory signals of the explosion related to ground deformation. In particular, it was possible to estimate the exact time of the explosion through the time domain analysis of raw data from the radar acquisition. This was interrupted by a blackout that occurred a few seconds after the event. The explosion onset time corresponds to a clear change in the intensity of the backscattered energy, related to the dense volcanic plume emission from the Crater. In addiction, the use of a particular interferometric processing technique for the last two acquisitions, consisting of the selection of synthetic sub-apertures from the main ones and creating with these a sequence of interferograms with a higher temporal resolution, detected precursory deformations starting 2 min before the explosion. These observations indicate the occurrence of an elastic deformation of a centimeter amplitude that affected the volcanic edifice progressively from the Crater down to the Sciara del Fuoco depression.

  5. Study of the deformation mechanism of the Gaoliying ground fissure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, G.; Wang, H.; Luo, Y.; Guo, H.

    2015-11-01

    The Gaoliying ground fissure in Beijing has caused building cracking and road damage, and has seriously influenced city construction. Based on investigations and trenching, the influences of the fault and the variation of groundwater levels on the formation mechanism of the Gaoliying ground fissure were investigated by using FLAC3D. The results indicated that (1) the surface location of Gaoliying fissure is controlled by the underlying normal fault activity, and over pumping further exacerbates development of the ground fissure; (2) when the groundwater level declines, obvious differential settlement occurs at both sides of the ground fissure, in which greater settlement occurs in the vicinity of the hanging wall, the greater the distance from the hanging wall, the smaller the ground subsidence, however smaller ground subsidence occurs in the vicinity of the footwall, the greater the distance from the footwall, the greater the ground subsidence; (3) the vertical velocity of the ground fissure triggered by the fault activity and groundwater decline ranges from 15.5 to 18.3 mm a-1, which is basically in line with the monitoring data. The fault activity contributes about 28-39 %, and the groundwater contributes about 61-72 % to the deformation of the ground fissure, respectively.

  6. Experimental modelling of ground deformation associated with shallow magma intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, O.

    2012-04-01

    Active volcanoes experience ground deformation as a response to the dynamics of underground magmatic systems. The analysis of ground deformation patterns may provide important constraints on the dynamics and shape of the underlying volcanic plumbing systems. Nevertheless, these analyses usually take into account simplistic shapes (sphere, dykes, sills) and the results cannot be verified as the modelled systems are buried. In this contribution, I will present new results from experimental models of magma intrusion, in which both the evolution of ground deformation during intrusion and the shape of the underlying intrusion are monitored in 3D. The models consisted of a molten vegetable oil, simulating low viscosity magma, injected into cohesive fine-grained silica flour, simulating the brittle upper crust; oil injection resulted is sheet intrusions (dykes, sills and cone sheets). The initial topography in the models was flat. While the oil was intruding, the surface of the models slightly lifted up to form a smooth relief, which was mapped through time. After an initial symmetrical development, the uplifted area developed asymmetrically; at the end of the experiments, the oil always erupted at the steepest edge of the uplifted area. After the experiment, the oil solidified, the intrusion was excavated and the shape of its top surface mapped. The comparison between the uplifted zone and the underlying intrusions showed that (1) the complex shapes of the uplifted areas reflected the complex shapes of the underlying intrusions, (2) the time evolution of the uplifted zone was correlated with the evolution of the underlying intrusion, and (3) the early asymmetrical evolution of the uplifted areas can be used to predict the location of the eruption of the oil. The experimental results also suggest that complex intrusion shapes (inclined sheet, cone sheet, complex sill) may have to be considered more systematically in analyses of ground deformation patterns on volcanoes.

  7. Experimental modelling of ground deformation associated with shallow magma intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, Olivier

    2012-02-01

    Active volcanoes experience ground deformation as a response to the dynamics of underground magmatic systems. The analysis of ground deformation patterns may provide important constraints on the dynamics and shape of the underlying volcanic plumbing systems. Nevertheless, these analyses usually take into account simplistic shapes (sphere, dykes, sills) and the results cannot be verified as the modelled systems are buried. In this paper, I present new results from experimental models of magma intrusion, in which both the evolution of ground deformation during intrusion and the shape of the underlying intrusion are monitored. The models consisted of a molten vegetable oil, simulating low viscosity magma, injected into cohesive fine-grained silica flour, simulating the brittle upper crust; oil injection resulted is sheet intrusions (dykes, sills and cone sheets). The initial topography in the models was flat. While the oil was intruding, the surface of the models slightly lifted up to form a smooth relief, which was mapped through time. After an initial symmetrical development, the uplifted area developed asymmetrically; at the end of the experiments, the oil always erupted at the steepest edge of the uplifted area. After the experiment, the oil solidified, the intrusion was excavated and the shape of its top surface mapped. The comparison between the uplifted zone and the underlying intrusions showed that (1) the complex shapes of the uplifted areas reflected the complex shapes of the underlying intrusions, (2) the time evolution of the uplifted zone was correlated with the evolution of the underlying intrusion, and (3) the early asymmetrical evolution of the uplifted areas can be used to predict the location of the eruption of the oil. The experimental results also suggest that complex intrusion shapes (inclined sheet, cone sheet, complex sill) may have to be considered more systematically in the analyses of ground deformation patterns on volcanoes.

  8. Ground Deformation Extraction Using Visible Images and LIDAR Data in Mining Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenmin; Wu, Lixin

    2016-06-01

    Recognition and extraction of mining ground deformation can help us understand the deformation process and space distribution, and estimate the deformation laws and trends. This study focuses on the application of ground deformation detection and extraction combining with high resolution visible stereo imagery, LiDAR observation point cloud data and historical data. The DEM in large mining area is generated using high-resolution satellite stereo images, and ground deformation is obtained through time series analysis combined with historical DEM data. Ground deformation caused by mining activities are detected and analyzed to explain the link between the regional ground deformation and local deformation. A district of covering 200 km2 around the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun of Liaoning province, a city located in the Northeast China is chosen as the test area for example. Regional and local ground deformation from 2010 to 2015 time series are detected and extracted with DEMs derived from ZY-3 images and LiDAR point DEMs in the case study. Results show that the mean regional deformation is 7.1 m of rising elevation with RMS 9.6 m. Deformation of rising elevation and deformation of declining elevation couple together in local area. The area of higher elevation variation is 16.3 km2 and the mean rising value is 35.8 m with RMS 15.7 m, while the deformation area of lower elevation variation is 6.8 km2 and the mean declining value is 17.6 m with RMS 9.3 m. Moreover, local large deformation and regional slow deformation couple together, the deformation in local mining activities has expanded to the surrounding area, a large ground fracture with declining elevation has been detected and extracted in the south of West Open Pit Mine, the mean declining elevation of which is 23.1 m and covering about 2.3 km2 till 2015. The results in this paper are preliminary currently; we are making efforts to improve more precision results with invariant ground control data for validation.

  9. A Study of Ground Deformation in the Guangzhou Urban Area with Persistent Scatterer Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qing; Lin, Hui; Jiang, Liming; Chen, Fulong; Cheng, Shilai

    2009-01-01

    The Interferometric Point Target Analysis (IPTA) technique and Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) images acquired over Hong Kong from 2007–2008 were used to detect ground deformation in the urban area of Guangzhou city in South China. A ground deformation rate map with scattered distribution of point targets shows the maximum subsidence (rise) rate as high as -26 to -20 mma-1 (16–21 mma-1), implying that the study area is an active zone for ground deformation. Based on the point target map, a contour ground deformation rate map is generated. The map shows three major subsidence zones located in the middle-west, the east, and the southwest of the study area, respectively. All the six ground collapse accidents that occurred in 2007–2008 fall within the subsidence zones, qualitatively validating the IPTA results. Ground subsidence and geological conditions on Datansha Island are examined. The results indicate that the local geological conditions, such as limestone Karst geomorphology as well as silt layers characterized by high water content, high void ratio, high compressibility, low bearing capacity and low shear strength, and underground engineering projects are responsible for ground subsidence and ground collapse accidents occurred there. PMID:22389613

  10. Nuclear ground-state masses and deformations: FRDM(2012)

    DOE PAGES

    Moller, P.; Sierk, A. J.; Ichikawa, T.; Sagawa, H.

    2016-03-25

    Here, we tabulate the atomic mass excesses and binding energies, ground-state shell-plus-pairing corrections, ground-state microscopic corrections, and nuclear ground-state deformations of 9318 nuclei ranging from 16O to A=339. The calculations are based on the finite-range droplet macroscopic and the folded-Yukawa single-particle microscopic nuclear-structure models, which are completely specified. Relative to our FRDM(1992) mass table in Möller et al. (1995), the results are obtained in the same model, but with considerably improved treatment of deformation and fewer of the approximations that were necessary earlier, due to limitations in computer power. The more accurate execution of the model and the more extensivemore » and more accurate experimental mass data base now available allow us to determine one additional macroscopic-model parameter, the density-symmetry coefficient LL, which was not varied in the previous calculation, but set to zero. Because we now realize that the FRDM is inaccurate for some highly deformed shapes occurring in fission, because some effects are derived in terms of perturbations around a sphere, we only adjust its macroscopic parameters to ground-state masses.« less

  11. Nuclear ground-state masses and deformations: FRDM(2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, P.; Sierk, A. J.; Ichikawa, T.; Sagawa, H.

    2016-05-01

    We tabulate the atomic mass excesses and binding energies, ground-state shell-plus-pairing corrections, ground-state microscopic corrections, and nuclear ground-state deformations of 9318 nuclei ranging from 16O to A = 339. The calculations are based on the finite-range droplet macroscopic and the folded-Yukawa single-particle microscopic nuclear-structure models, which are completely specified. Relative to our FRDM(1992) mass table in Möller et al. (1995), the results are obtained in the same model, but with considerably improved treatment of deformation and fewer of the approximations that were necessary earlier, due to limitations in computer power. The more accurate execution of the model and the more extensive and more accurate experimental mass data base now available allow us to determine one additional macroscopic-model parameter, the density-symmetry coefficient L, which was not varied in the previous calculation, but set to zero. Because we now realize that the FRDM is inaccurate for some highly deformed shapes occurring in fission, because some effects are derived in terms of perturbations around a sphere, we only adjust its macroscopic parameters to ground-state masses.

  12. Evidence of active ground deformation on the mid-ocean ridge: Axial seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge, April-June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, C.G. )

    1990-08-10

    Since September 1987 a precision bottom pressure recorder (BPR) has been deployed within the summit caldera of Axial seamount. The instrument is capable of measuring pressure of 1 mbar resolution and recording these measurements at 64 samples per hour for up to 15 months. Any significant change in the pressure record should indicate a change of depth associated with vertical ground movement, commonly indicative of active inflation or deflation of underlying magma bodies. Results from the first 9 months of the BPR deployment revealed a significant change in pressure, which is interpreted to represent a 15-cm subsidence of the caldera floor during two 2- to 3-week periods in April-June 1988. Also during these periods, an anomalous decline in temperature at the site was recorded that is correlated with an apparent increase in current velocity at the Axial Seamount Hydrothermal Emissions Study (ASHES) vent field, suggesting vigorous advection of cold water into the caldera. Concurrent oceanographic data from Geosat and from current meter arrays do not indicate any large-scale oceanographic phenomena capable of generating these simultaneous events. One mechanism to explain simultaneous ground subsidence and temperature decline at the caldera center and increased bottom current at the caldera margin is the generation of a buoyant parcel of heated water in response to the intrusion or the eruption of magma associated with volcanic deflation. Similar volcanic events also may have generated large midwater plumes that have been described previously along the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge.

  13. InSAR Detection of Ground Deformation in Megalopolises of Pearl River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qing

    Megalopolises in the Pearl River Delta, including Guangzhou and Hong Kong, have experienced various degree of ground subsidence. The causes can be divided into two categories: natural subsidence and the human-induced subsidence. Monitoring the ground subsidence can not only help people to find out the distributions in both spatial and temporal fields, but also guide people to minimize the hazard ahead. Thus, it is significant to monitor the ground subsidence accurately, timely and frequently. This dissertation research uses the Environmental Satellite Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ENVISAT ASAR) data received at the Chinese University of Hong Kong Satellite Remote Sensing Receiving Station and SAR Interferometry (InSAR) technology as a powerful tool for large-scale ground deformation monitoring in Guangzhou and Hong Kong areas. Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) method is used to detect ground deformation in the urban area of Guangzhou city. A ground deformation rate map with scattered distribution of point targets shows the maximum subsidence (rise) rate as high as -26 to -20 mma-1 (16-21 mma-1 ), implying that the study area is an active zone for ground deformation. Based on the point target map, a contour ground deformation rate map is generated. All the six ground collapse accidents that occurred in 2007-2008 fall within the subsidence zones, qualitatively validating the IPTA results. Ground subsidence and geological conditions on Datansha Island are examined. The results indicate that the local geological conditions and underground engineering projects are responsible for ground subsidence and ground collapse accidents occurred there. To interpret the distribution of active ground subsidence zones, a local geological map is used as a reference for generating a series of thematic maps. The results show that geological faults, rock distribution, over-development, and underground engineering projects may be four factors leading to the distribution of

  14. Ground Deformation Mapping of Houston-Galveston, Texas Using InSAR Time-Series Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    QU, F.; Lu, Z.; Bawden, G. W.; Kim, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Houston-Galveston region in Texas has been subsiding due to the combined effects of groundwater withdrawal, hydrocarbon extraction, soil compaction, and active faulting. This human- and partially nature-induced ground deformation has gradually threatened the stability of urban infrastructure and caused the loss of wetland habitat along the Gulf of Mexico. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) exploiting multiple SAR images has the capability of obtaining ground motions in high spatial resolution over large coverage. In this study, ERS-1/2 (1993-2000), ENVISAT (2004-2010), and ALOS (2007-2011) datasets are used to unravel the characteristics of ground deformation from 1993 to 2011 over the Houston-Galveston area. The persistent scatterer InSAR (PSInSAR) time-series analysis technique is employed to estimate the spatial and temporal variations of ground motions during 20 years. The ERS-1/2 PSInSAR products have measured subsidence (up to 5 cm/yr) in the northwest Houston area as well as a slight uplift (1 cm/yr) in the southeast region from 1993 to 2000. The subsidence rate (up to 2 cm/yr) between 2004 and 2011 has been obtained from ENVISAT and ALOS data. Our results indicate that the pattern of ground deformation was nearly concentric around the location of intense groundwater withdrawal and the subsiding area has been shrinking and migrating toward the northeast after 2000. In addition, an approximately 2 cm of differential subsidence across faults are observed. Presence of faults can induce localized surface displacements, aggravate localized subsidence, discontinue the integrity of ground water flow, and limit the horizontal spread of subsidence funnels. Finally, our long-term measurement of ground deformation has also been validated by GPS observations in study area.

  15. Precursory acoustic signals and ground deformation in volcanic explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D. C.; Kim, K.; Anderson, J.; Lees, J. M.; Taddeucci, J.; Graettinger, A. H.; Sonder, I.; Valentine, G.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate precursory acoustic signals that appear prior to volcanic explosions in real and experimental settings. Acoustic records of a series of experimental blasts designed to mimic maar explosions show precursory energy 0.02 to 0.05 seconds before the high amplitude overpressure arrival. These blasts consisted of 1 to 1/3 lb charges detonated in unconsolidated granular material at depths between 0.5 and 1 m, and were performed during the Buffalo Man Made Maars experiment in Springville, New York, USA. The preliminary acoustic arrival is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower in amplitude compared to the main blast wave. The waveforms vary from blast to blast, perhaps reflecting the different explosive yields and burial depths of each shot. Similar arrivals are present in some infrasound records at Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala, where they precede the main blast signal by about 2 seconds and are about 1 order of magnitude weaker. Precursory infrasound has also been described at Sakurajima volcano, Japan (Yokoo et al, 2013; Bull. Volc. Soc. Japan, 58, 163-181) and Suwanosejima volcano, Japan (Yokoo and Iguchi, 2010; JVGR, 196, 287-294), where it is attributed to rapid deformation of the vent region. Vent deformation has not been directly observed at these volcanoes because of the difficulty of visually observing the crater floor. However, particle image velocimetry of video records at Santiaguito has revealed rapid and widespread ground motion just prior to eruptions (Johnson et al, 2008; Nature, 456, 377-381) and may be the cause of much of the infrasound recorded at that volcano (Johnson and Lees, 2010; GRL, 37, L22305). High speed video records of the blasts during the Man Made Maars experiment also show rapid deformation of the ground immediately before the explosion plume breaches the surface. We examine the connection between source yield, burial depths, ground deformation, and the production of initial acoustic phases for each simulated maar explosion. We

  16. Holocene intracontinental deformation of the northern North China Plain: Evidence of tectonic ground fissures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liqing; Li, Sanzhong; Cao, Xianzhi; Somerville, I. D.; Suo, Yanhui; Liu, Xin; Dai, Liming; Zhao, Shujuan; Guo, Lingli; Wang, Pengcheng; Cao, Huahua

    2016-04-01

    Following the collecting and analyzing of field data on the geometry and kinematics characteristics of ground fissures in the northern North China Plain (NNCP), this paper shows that en échelon ground fissures or tectonic ground fissures with a length of several meters to tens of kilometers extending along active faults are possibly controlled by underlying active faults. There are two groups of tectonic ground fissures developed in the NNCP. One group consists of ENE-trending "right-stepping" ground fissures, some of which have a component of sinistral motion. The other group is NNE-trending "left-stepping" ground fissures with dextral motion. A large amount of data from trenches, boreholes and seismic exploration reflect that they are active-faulting-related. The NNW-trending regional extensional stress field and the reactivation of pre-existing faults are the major factors controlling ground fissures. Data from the Quaternary sedimentary records, deep incised valleys, the distribution of earthquakes and ground fissures, and our field work show that the Holocene intracontinental deformation of the NNCP is characterized by intense faulting and northwestward tilting, which may be related to a NNW-SSE-oriented tensional stress field in the shallow crust and asthenospheric upwelling in the mantle.

  17. Monitoring on Xi'an ground fissures deformation with TerraSAR-X data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, C.; Zhang, Q.; Zhu, W.; Lu, Zhiming

    2012-01-01

    Owing to the fine resolution of TerraSAR-X data provided since 2007, this paper applied 6 TerraSAR data (strip mode) during 3rd Dec. 2009 to 23rd Mar. 2010 to detect and monitor the active fissures over Xi'an region. Three themes have been designed for high precision detection and monitoring of Xi'an-Chang'an fissures, as small baseline subsets (SBAS) to test the atmospheric effects of differential interferograms pair stepwise, 2-pass differential interferogram with very short baseline perpendicular to generate the whole deformation map with 44 days interval, and finally, corner reflector (CR) technique was used to closely monitor the relative deformation time series between two CRs settled crossing two ground fissures. Results showed that TerraSAR data are a good choice for small-scale ground fissures detection and monitoring, while special considerations should be taken for their great temporal and baseline decorrelation. Secondly, ground fissures in Xi'an were mostly detected at the joint section of stable and deformable regions. Lastly, CR-InSAR had potential ability to monitor relative deformation crossing fissures with millimeter precision.

  18. Observations of coupled seismicity and ground deformation at El Hierro Island (2011-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    New insights into the magma storage and evolution at oceanic island volcanoes are now being achieved using remotely sensed space geodetic techniques, namely satellite radar interferometry. Differential radar interferometry is a technique tracking, at high spatial resolution, changes in the travel-time (distance) from the satellites to the ground surface, having wide applications in Earth sciences. Volcanic activity usually is accompanied by surface ground deformation. In many instances, modelling of surface deformation has the great advantage to estimate the magma volume change, a particularly interesting parameter prior to eruptions. Jointly interpreted with petrology, degassing and seismicity, it helps to understand the crustal magmatic systems as a whole. Current (and near-future) radar satellite missions will reduce the revisit time over global sub-aerial volcanoes to a sub-weekly basis, which will increase the potential for its operational use. Time series and filtering processing techniques of such streaming data would allow to track subsurface magma migration with high precision, and frequently update over vast areas (volcanic arcs, large caldera systems, etc.). As an example for the future potential monitoring scenario, we analyze multiple satellite radar data over El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain) to measure and model surface ground deformation. El Hierro has been active for more than 3 years (2011 to 2014). Initial phases of the unrest culminated in a submarine eruption (late 2011 - early 2012). However, after the submarine eruption ended, its magmatic system still active and affected by pseudo-regular energetic seismic swarms, accompanied by surface deformation without resumed eruptions. Such example is a great opportunity to understand the crustal magmatic systems in low magma supply-rate oceanic island volcanoes. This new approach to measure surface deformation processes is yielding an ever richer level of information from volcanology to

  19. A preliminary study on surface ground deformation near shallow foundation induced by strike-slip faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Pei-Syuan; Lin, Ming-Lang

    2016-04-01

    According to investigation of recent earthquakes, ground deformation and surface rupture are used to map the influenced range of the active fault. The zones of horizontal and vertical surface displacements and different features of surface rupture are investigated in the field, for example, the Greendale Fault 2010, MW 7.1 Canterbury earthquake. The buildings near the fault rotated and displaced vertically and horizontally due to the ground deformation. Besides, the propagation of fault trace detoured them because of the higher rigidity. Consequently, it's necessary to explore the ground deformation and mechanism of the foundation induced by strike-slip faulting for the safety issue. Based on previous study from scaled analogue model of strike-slip faulting, the ground deformation is controlled by material properties, depth of soil, and boundary condition. On the condition controlled, the model shows the features of ground deformation in the field. This study presents results from shear box experiment on small-scale soft clay models subjected to strike-slip faulting and placed shallow foundations on it in a 1-g environment. The quantifiable data including sequence of surface rupture, topography and the position of foundation are recorded with increasing faulting. From the result of the experiment, first en echelon R shears appeared. The R shears rotated to a more parallel angle to the trace and cracks pulled apart along them with increasing displacements. Then the P shears crossed the basement fault in the opposite direction appears and linked R shears. Lastly the central shear was Y shears. On the other hand, the development of wider zones of rupture, higher rising surface and larger the crack area on surface developed, with deeper depth of soil. With the depth of 1 cm and half-box displacement 1.2 cm, en echelon R shears appeared and the surface above the fault trace elevated to 1.15 mm (Dv), causing a 1.16 cm-wide zone of ground-surface rupture and deformation

  20. Spatio-temporal evolution of aseismic ground deformation in the Mexicali Valley (Baja California, Mexico) from 1993 to 2010, using differential SAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarychikhina, O.; Glowacka, E.

    2015-11-01

    Ground deformation in Mexicali Valley, Baja California, Mexico, the southern part of the Mexicali-Imperial valley, is influenced by active tectonics and human activity, mainly that of geothermal fluid extraction in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field. Significant ground deformation, mainly subsidence (~ 18 cm yr-1), and related ground fissures cause severe damage to local infrastructure. The technique of Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) has been demonstrated to be a very effective remote sensing tool for accurately measuring the spatial and temporal evolution of ground displacements over broad areas. In present study ERS-1/2 SAR and ENVISAT ASAR images acquired between 1993 and 2010 were used to perform a historical analysis of aseismic ground deformation in Mexicali Valley, in an attempt to evaluate its spatio-temporal evolution and improve the understanding of its dynamic. For this purpose, the conventional 2-pass DInSAR was used to generate interferograms which were used in stacking procedure to produce maps of annual aseismic ground deformation rates for different periods. Differential interferograms that included strong co-seismic deformation signals were not included in the stacking and analysis. The changes in the ground deformation pattern and rate were identified. The main changes occur between 2000 and 2005 and include increasing deformation rate in the recharge zone and decreasing deformation rate in the western part of the CPGF production zone. We suggested that these changes are mainly caused by production development in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field.

  1. Coupling of Activity at Neighbouring Volcanoes in Iceland: Ground Deformation and Activity at the Bárðarbunga-Tungnafellsjökull and Eyjafjallajökull-Katla Volcano Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, M.; Heimisson, E. R.; Sigmundsson, F.; Hooper, A. J.; Ofeigsson, B.; Vogfjord, K. S.; Arnadottir, T.; Dumont, S.; Drouin, V.; Bagnardi, M.; Spaans, K.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Friðriksdóttir, H. M.; Jonsdottir, K.; Guðmundsson, G.; Hensch, M.; Hjaltadottir, S.; Hjartardottir, A. R.; Einarsson, P.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Hognadottir, T.; Lafemina, P.; Geirsson, H.; Sturkell, E.; Magnússon, E.

    2015-12-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques are used to generate a time series of high-resolution deformation measurements, in the vicinity of two pairs of closely spaced volcanoes in Iceland: Bárðarbunga and Tungnafellsjökull, as well as Eyjafjallajökull and Katla. Following the declaration of Icelandic Volcanoes as a Permanent Geohazard Supersite in 2013, a considerable amount of SAR data was made available for both past and future satellite acquisitions, including new X-band images and historic C-band images. InSAR time series have been formed using these data and compared to other geodetic and microseismic measurements to determine the most likely processes responsible for recently observed deformation and/or seismicity. A comprehensive network of seismometers and continuous GPS stations are already deployed at these volcanoes and a series of campaign GPS measurements have been undertaken since 2010. We present an overview of the temporal variation in InSAR observations and these complementary field based measurements at Bárðarbunga and Tungnafellsjökull from 2014-2015 (covering the recent eruption at Holuhraun and contemporaneous slow collapse of the Bárðarbunga caldera), and Eyjafjallajökull and Katla volcanoes from 2010 onwards, after the 2010 explosive eruption of Eyjafjallajökull. We undertake a joint InSAR-GPS inversion using a Markov-chain Monte Carlo approach. The best-fit source geometries responsible for both the inflation of a 50 km long dyke and simultaneous deflation of the Bárðarbunga central volcano during the 2014-2015 unrest and eruption are found. Using these we calculate the stress changes associated with the Bárðarbunga deformation events and compare our results to the location of earthquake swarms in the vicinity of neighbouring Tungnafellsjökull, where seismic activity increased significantly following the onset of unrest at Bárðarbunga in August 2014. We also determine the optimal source parameters for

  2. PSP SAR interferometry monitoring of ground and structure deformations in the archeological site of Pompeii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Mario; Francioni, Elena; Paglia, Luca; Minati, Federico; Margottini, Claudio; Spizzichino, Daniele; Trigila, Alessandro; Iadanza, Carla; De Nigris, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The "Major Project Pompeii" (MPP) is a great collective commitment of different institututions and people to set about solving the serious problem of conservation of the largest archeological sites in the world. The ancient city of Pompeii with its 66 hectares, 44 of which are excaveted, is divided into 9 regiones (district), subdivided in 118 insulae (blocks) and almost 1500 domus (houses), and is Unesco site since 1996. The Italian Ministry for Heritage and Cultural Activities and Tourism (MiBACT) and Finmeccanica Group have sealed an agreement whereby the Finmeccanica Group will donate innovative technologies and services for monitoring and protecting the archaeological site of Pompeii. Moreover, the Italian Institute for Environment Protection and Research (ISPRA) - Geological Survey of Italy, was also involved to support the ground based analysis and interpretation of the measurements provided by the industrial team, in order to promote an interdisciplinary approach. In this work, we will focus on ground deformation measurements obtained by satellite SAR interferometry and on their interpretation. The satellite monitoring service is based on the processing of COSMO-SkyMed Himage data by the e-Geos proprietary Persistent Scatterer Pair (PSP) SAR interferometry technology. The PSP technique is a proven SAR interferometry method characterized by the fact of exploiting in the processing only the relative properties between close points (pairs) in order to overcome atmospheric artifacts (which are one of the main problems of SAR interferometry). Validations analyses showed that this technique applied to COSMO-SkyMed Himage data is able to retrieve very dense (except of course on vegetated or cultivated areas) millimetric deformation measurements with sub-metric localization. By means of the COSMO-SkyMed PSP SAR interferometry processing, a historical analysis of the ground and structure deformations occurred over the entire archaeological site of Pompeii in the

  3. Lightweight deformable mirrors for ground- and space-based imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrew, Sarah

    2006-08-01

    The next generation of ground- and space-based astronomical observatories will generate an increased requirement for lightweight and robust deformable optics. In space ultra-lightweight actively controlled mirrors will enable a continuing increase of aperture sizes, whilst large adaptive mirrors will become increasingly standard features in the optical design of adaptive optics-optimised Extremely Large Telescopes on the ground. This thesis presents results from a project to design, manufacture and test a prototype active mirror in a nickel-carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP), which has been suggested in the literature to be a promising candidate material for such applications. Extensive finite element analysis results from gravitational sag and thermal models, as well as finite element-based predictions of the central actuator influence function profile, are presented. The main problems were encountered as a result of the in-mold nickel coating process, which resulted in residual form errors, and poor design of the support structures, leading to deterioration of the mirror surface quality. No fundamental reason ruling this material out for the use of precision deformable optics was identified. The finite element analysis results show significant promise for increased use of the method in optical design, as well as in integrated optical simulations for Extremely Large Telescopes.

  4. Reciprocating motion of active deformable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarama, M.; Ohta, T.

    2016-05-01

    Reciprocating motion of an active deformable particle in a homogeneous medium is studied theoretically. For generality, we employ a simple model derived from symmetry considerations for the center-of-mass velocity and elliptical and triangular deformations in two dimensions. We carry out, for the first time, a systematic investigation of the reciprocating motion of a self-propelled particle. It is clarified that spontaneous breaking of the front-rear asymmetry is essential for the reciprocating motion. Moreover, two routes are found for the formation of the reciprocating motion. One is a bifurcation from a motionless stationary state. The other is destabilisation of an oscillatory rectilinear motion.

  5. Determination of Visual Figure and Ground in Dynamically Deforming Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barenholtz, Elan; Feldman, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    Figure/ground assignment--determining which part of the visual image is foreground and which background--is a critical step in early visual analysis, upon which much later processing depends. Previous research on the assignment of figure and ground to opposing sides of a contour has almost exclusively involved static geometric factors--such as…

  6. IESID: Automatic system for monitoring ground deformation on the Deception Island volcano (Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Páez, Raúl; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; de Gil, Amós

    2012-11-01

    When establishing the relative distance between two GNSS-GPS stations with sub-centimeter accuracy, it is necessary to have auxiliary data, some of which can only be collected some time after the moment of measurement. However, for monitoring highly-active geodynamic areas, such as volcanoes and landslides, data precision is not as essential as rapid availability, processing of data in real-time, and fast interpretation of the results. This paper describes the development of an integrated automatic system for monitoring volcanic deformation in quasi real-time, applied to the Deception volcano (Antarctica). This experimental system integrates two independent modules that enable researchers to monitor and control the status of the GNSS-GPS stations, and to determine a surface deformation parameter. It comprises three permanent stations, one of which serves as the reference for assessing the relative distance in relation to the other two. The availability of GNSS-GPS data in quasi real-time is achieved by means of a WiFi infrastructure and automated data processing. This system provides, in quasi real-time, a time series of varying distances that tells us the extent to which any ground deformation is taking place.

  7. Ground deformation model for Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) from TEGETEIDE GNSS stations observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, A.; Carmona, J.; Fernández-Ros, A.; Pérez-Peña, A.; Ortiz, R.; Berrocoso, M.

    2009-04-01

    TEGETEIDE GNSS network is composed of seven benchmarks distributed over Tenerife Island, two of them are permanent stations. The whole network has been observed periodically from 2005 at least twice a year. Processed data using Bernese 5.0 software indicates different vector displacement pattern, as in magnitude as in direction, which expected from the African plate movement, suggesting the activity of other geodynamic process in the Island. The TEGETEIDE ground deformation model suggest the action not only the tectonics, but also the volcanic activity in an island where during 2004 a reawakening of the Teide volcano was detected. In this sense, the use of precise space-geodetic techniques to study the present-day dynamics of Tenerife is essential for a better knowledge and forecasting of the volcanic evolution during periods of crises, in an island of one million inhabitants and 5 million tourists a year.

  8. Mapping ground surface deformation using temporarily coherent point SAR interferometry: Application to Los Angeles Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, L.; Lu, Zhiming; Ding, X.; Jung, H.-S.; Feng, G.; Lee, C.-W.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-temporal interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is an effective tool to detect long-term seismotectonic motions by reducing the atmospheric artifacts, thereby providing more precise deformation signal. The commonly used approaches such as persistent scatterer InSAR (PSInSAR) and small baseline subset (SBAS) algorithms need to resolve the phase ambiguities in interferogram stacks either by searching a predefined solution space or by sparse phase unwrapping methods; however the efficiency and the success of phase unwrapping cannot be guaranteed. We present here an alternative approach - temporarily coherent point (TCP) InSAR (TCPInSAR) - to estimate the long term deformation rate without the need of phase unwrapping. The proposed approach has a series of innovations including TCP identification, TCP network and TCP least squares estimator. We apply the proposed method to the Los Angeles Basin in southern California where structurally active faults are believed capable of generating damaging earthquakes. The analysis is based on 55 interferograms from 32 ERS-1/2 images acquired during Oct. 1995 and Dec. 2000. To evaluate the performance of TCPInSAR on a small set of observations, a test with half of interferometric pairs is also performed. The retrieved TCPInSAR measurements have been validated by a comparison with GPS observations from Southern California Integrated GPS Network. Our result presents a similar deformation pattern as shown in past InSAR studies but with a smaller average standard deviation (4.6. mm) compared with GPS observations, indicating that TCPInSAR is a promising alternative for efficiently mapping ground deformation even from a relatively smaller set of interferograms. ?? 2011.

  9. Implementing ground surface deformation tools to characterize field-scale properties of a fractured aquifer during a short hydraulic test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuite, Jonathan; Longuevergne, Laurent; Bour, Olivier; Boudin, Frédérick; Durand, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    In naturally fractured reservoirs, fluid flow is governed by the structural and hydromechanical properties of fracture networks or conductive fault zones. In order to ensure a sustained exploitation of resources or to assess the safety of underground storage, it is necessary to evaluate these properties. As they generally form highly heterogeneous and anisotropic reservoirs, fractured media may be well characterized by means of several complementary experimental methods or sounding techniques. In this framework, the observation of ground deformation has been proved useful to gain insight of a fractured reservoir's geometry and hydraulic properties. Commonly, large conductive structures like faults can be studied from surface deformation from satellite methods at monthly time scales, whereas meter scale fractures have to be examined under short-term in situ experiments using high accuracy intruments like tiltmeters or extensometers installed in boreholes or at the ground's surface. To the best of our knowledge, the feasability of a field scale (~ 100 m) characterization of a fractured reservoir with geodetic tools in a short term experiment has not yet been addressed. In the present study, we implement two complementary ground surface geodetic tools, namely tiltmetry and optical leveling, to monitor the deformation induced by a hydraulic recovery test at the Ploemeur hydrological observatory (France). Employing a simple purely elastic modeling approach, we show that the joint use of time constraining data (tilt) and spatially constraining data (vertical displacement) makes it possible to evaluate the geometry (dip, root depth and lateral extent) and the storativity of a hydraulically active fault zone, in good agreement with previous studies. Hence we demonstrate that the adequate use of two complementary ground surface deformation methods offer a rich insight of large conductive structure's properties using a single short term hydraulic load. Ground surface

  10. Integrated monitoring system for ground deformation hazard assessment in Telese Terme (Benevento province, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessitore, S.; Castiello, G.; Fedi, M.; Florio, G.; Fuschini, V.; Ramondini, M.; Calcaterra, D.

    2012-04-01

    TeleseTerme plain is characterized by a very articulated stratigraphy (levels of travertine, fluvial-marshy and pyroclastic deposits), that allows the occurrence of underground water circulation with overlapping aquifers. These aquifers are locally in pressure and, because of chemical characteristics and physical properties of the water, they may activate processes of accelerated travertine's corrosion; the consequence is the formation of cavity along the ground water's preferential flow paths, and the activation of subsidence and sinkholes phenomena. In particular test area includes two zones, where in 2002 and 2006 occurred two sinkholes events, classified as "piping sinkholes". The hazard evaluation was carried out trhought an integrated monitoring system, based on "traditional" techniques conduced "in situ", as geological-geomorphological and geophysical (microgravity) surveys, integrated by the most innovative techniques of Remote sensing interferometry(Advanced DInSAR Interferometry Techniques). The last allow to evaluate the ground deformation, characterized by a predominantvertical component (typical deformation of sinkholes and subsidence phenomena), and are well suited to operate a continuous and long monitoring ofvery extended areas. Through an initial analysis of the Permanent Scatterers available in the Telese municipality, we found the envelopes of the areal that contain PS with negative and positive mean velocities; these velocities showed the presence of a possible phenomenon of subsidence detected by ERS and ENVISAT satellites. Through interferometric processing of ENVISAT images, the soil deformations of 2002-2010 year sare evaluated and compared with the data obtainedby survey took "in situ" during the same period. The knowledge of the deformation's evolution of the area made it possible to organize a more focused future monitoring through traditional techniques of relief (with the help of geophysical methodologies). Since the zone affected by

  11. Deformation Monitoring of AN Active Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapchuk, A.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of low frequency earthquakes, slow slip events and other deformation phenomena, new for geophysics, change our understanding of how the energy accumulated in the Earth's crust do release. The new geophysical data make one revise the underlying mechanism of geomechanical processes taking place in fault zones. Conditions for generating different slip modes are still unclear. The most vital question is whether a certain slip mode is intrinsic for a fault or may be controlled by external factors. This work presents the results of two and a half year deformation monitoring of a discontinuity in the zone of the Main Sayanskiy Fault. Main Sayanskiy Fault is right-lateral strike-slip fault. Observations were performed in the tunnel of Talaya seismic station (TLY), Irkutsk region, Russia. Measurements were carried out 70 m away from the entrance of the tunnel, the thickness of overlying rock was about 30 m. Inductive sensors of displacement were mounted at the both sides of a discontinuity, which recorded three components of relative fault side displacement with the accuracy of 0.2 mcm. Temperature variation inside the tunnel didn't exceed 0.5oC during the all period of observations. Important information about deformation properties of an active fault was obtained. A pronounced seasonality of deformation characteristics of discontinuity is observed in the investigated segment of rock. A great number of slow slip events with durations from several hours to several weeks were registered. Besides that alterations of fault deformation characteristics before the megathrust earthquake M9.0 Tohoku Oki 11 March 2011 and reaction to the event itself were detected. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (grant no. 14-17-00719).

  12. Ground-State Band and Deformation of the Z = 102 Isotope N {sup 254}

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, P.; Khoo, T.L.; Lister, C.J.; Seweryniak, D.; Ahmad, I.; Alcorta, M.; Carpenter, M.P.; Cizewski, J.A.; Davids, C.N.; Gervais, G.; Greene, J.P.; Henning, W.F.; Janssens, R.V.; Lauritsen, T.; Siem, S.; Sonzogni, A.A.; Sullivan, D.; Uusitalo, J.; Wiedenhoever, I.; Amzal, N.; Butler, P.A.; Chewter, A.J.; Greenlees, P.T.; Herzberg, R.; Jones, G.D.; Cizewski, J.A.; Ding, K.Y.; Fotiades, N.; Fox, J.D.; Korten, W.; Vetter, K.; Siem, S.

    1999-01-01

    The ground-state band of the Z=102 isotope {sup 254}No has been identified up to spin 14, indicating that the nucleus is deformed. The deduced quadrupole deformation, {beta}=0.27 , is in agreement with theoretical predictions. These observations confirm that the shell-correction energy responsible for the stability of transfermium nuclei is partly derived from deformation. The survival of {sup 254}No up to spin 14 means that its fission barrier persists at least up to that spin. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society }

  13. Removal of systematic seasonal atmospheric signal from interferometric synthetic aperture radar ground deformation time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, Sergey V.; Trishchenko, Alexander P.; Tiampo, Kristy; González, Pablo J.; Zhang, Yu; Fernández, José

    2014-09-01

    Applying the Multidimensional Small Baseline Subset interferometric synthetic aperture radar algorithm to about 1500 Envisat and RADARSAT-2 interferograms spanning 2003-2013, we computed time series of ground deformation over Naples Bay Area in Italy. Two active volcanoes, Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei, are located in this area in close proximity to the densely populated city of Naples. For the first time, and with remarkable clarity, we observed decade-long elevation-dependent seasonal oscillations of the vertical displacement component with a peak-to-peak amplitude of up to 3.0 cm, substantially larger than the long-term deformation rate (<0.6 cm/yr). Analysis, utilizing surface weather and radiosonde data, linked observed oscillations with seasonal fluctuations of water vapor, air pressure, and temperature in the lower troposphere. The modeled correction is in a good agreement with observed results. The mean, absolute, and RMS differences are 0.014 cm, 0.073 cm, and 0.087 cm, respectively. Atmospherically corrected time series confirmed continuing subsidence at Vesuvius previously observed by geodetic techniques.

  14. Viscoelastic deformation near active plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Model deformations near the active plate boundaries of Western North America using space-based geodetic measurements as constraints are discussed. The first six months of this project were spent gaining familarity with space-based measurements, accessing the Crustal Dynamics Data Information Computer, and building time independent deformation models. The initial goal was to see how well the simplest elastic models can reproduce very long base interferometry (VLBI) baseline data. From the Crustal Dynamics Data Information Service, a total of 18 VLBI baselines are available which have been surveyed on four or more occasions. These data were fed into weighted and unweighted inversions to obtain baseline closure rates. Four of the better quality lines are illustrated. The deformation model assumes that the observed baseline rates result from a combination of rigid plate tectonic motions plus a component resulting from elastic strain build up due to a failure of the plate boundary to slip at the full plate tectonic rate. The elastic deformation resulting from the locked plate boundary is meant to portray interseismic strain accumulation. During and shortly after a large interplate earthquake, these strains are largely released, and points near the fault which were previously retarded suddenly catch up to the positions predicted by rigid plate models. Researchers judge the quality of fit by the sum squares of weighted residuals, termed total variance. The observed baseline closures have a total variance of 99 (cm/y)squared. When the RM2 velocities are assumed to model the data, the total variance increases to 154 (cm/y)squared.

  15. Ground Deformation Measurement with SAR Interferometry - Exupéry Project WP2 Space Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Xiaoying; Eineder, Michael; Minet, Christian

    2010-05-01

    As one of major natural hazards volcanic unrest and volcanic eruption are gaining more attention nowadays. The Exupéry project aimed at setting-up an Early Response System (VFRS) for volcanic activity was funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Within Work Package 2 'Space Based Observations' SAR interferometry is used for monitoring the ground deformation. In comparison with conventional monitoring techniques like GPS the surface changes can be directly detected by using 2 SAR images from different acquisition times and an external DEM. Persistent scatterer SAR interferometry (PSI) method is applied by using a stack of interferograms with common master image. Instead of whole SAR scene only the coherent scatterers during whole acquisition duration are selected and its phase measurements are used to estimate modelled parameters such as deformation velocity, DEM error and atmospheric distortions. In mountainous area backscatterers are decorrelated during the time because of vegetation. To ensure the coherence corner reflector (CR) is used to get stable backscattering. To test the whole system a campaign was carried out during April to August 2009. Two CRs were installed for TerraSAR-X satellite on the test site Lagoa do Fogo volcano. During the campaign 11 strip-map scenes were gathered consequently. Post-processed interferograms as well as the coherence maps were delivered to database center in Hannover and would be published in project website. Time series analysis with coherent scatterers from the stacking was applied in order to detect complex deformation from mountainous area. The CRs were successfully detected in SAR image and will be used as reference points in PSI processing. At the end the interferograms computed from different wavelengths will be compared in this area.

  16. Active Beam Shaping System and Method Using Sequential Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A. (Inventor); Pueyo, Laurent A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active optical beam shaping system includes a first deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept an entrance beam of light and to provide a first reflected beam of light, a second deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept the first reflected beam of light from the first deformable mirror and to provide a second reflected beam of light, and a signal processing and control system configured to communicate with the first and second deformable mirrors. The first deformable mirror, the second deformable mirror and the signal processing and control system together provide a large amplitude light modulation range to provide an actively shaped optical beam.

  17. Evolution of Deformation Studies on Active Hawaiian Volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Decker, Robert; Okamura, Arnold; Miklius, Asta; Poland, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Everything responds to pressure, even rocks. Deformation studies involve measuring and interpreting the changes in elevations and horizontal positions of the land surface or sea floor. These studies are variously referred to as geodetic changes or ground-surface deformations and are sometimes indexed under the general heading of geodesy. Deformation studies have been particularly useful on active volcanoes and in active tectonic areas. A great amount of time and energy has been spent on measuring geodetic changes on Kilauea and Mauna Loa Volcanoes in Hawai`i. These changes include the build-up of the surface by the piling up and ponding of lava flows, the changes in the surface caused by erosion, and the uplift, subsidence, and horizontal displacements of the surface caused by internal processes acting beneath the surface. It is these latter changes that are the principal concern of this review. A complete and objective review of deformation studies on active Hawaiian volcanoes would take many volumes. Instead, we attempt to follow the evolution of the most significant observations and interpretations in a roughly chronological way. It is correct to say that this is a subjective review. We have spent years measuring and recording deformation changes on these great volcanoes and more years trying to understand what makes these changes occur. We attempt to make this a balanced as well as a subjective review; the references are also selective rather than exhaustive. Geodetic changes caused by internal geologic processes vary in magnitude from the nearly infinitesimal - one micron or less, to the very large - hundreds of meters. Their apparent causes also are varied and include changes in material properties and composition, atmospheric pressure, tidal stress, thermal stress, subsurface-fluid pressure (including magma pressure, magma intrusion, or magma removal), gravity, and tectonic stress. Deformation is measured in units of strain or displacement. For example, tilt

  18. Pre-eruptive ground deformation of Azerbaijan mud volcanoes detected through satellite radar interferometry (DInSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonielli, Benedetta; Monserrat, Oriol; Bonini, Marco; Righini, Gaia; Sani, Federico; Luzi, Guido; Feyzullayev, Akper A.; Aliyev, Chingiz S.

    2014-12-01

    Mud volcanism is a process that leads to the extrusion of subsurface mud, fragments of country rocks, saline waters and gases. This mechanism is typically linked to hydrocarbon traps, and the extrusion of this material builds up a variety of conical edifices with a similar morphology to those of magmatic volcanoes, though smaller in size. The Differential Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) technique has been used to investigate the ground deformation related to the activity of the mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan. The analysis of a set of wrapped and unwrapped interferograms, selected according to their coherence, allowed the detection of significant superficial deformation related to the activity of four mud volcanoes. The ground displacement patterns observed during the period spanning from October 2003 to November 2005 are dominated by uplift, which reach a cumulative value of up to 20 and 10 cm at the Ayaz-Akhtarma and Khara-Zira Island mud volcanoes, respectively. However, some sectors of the mud volcano edifices are affected by subsidence, which might correspond to deflation zones that coexist with the inflation zones characterized by the dominant uplift. Important deformation events, caused by fluid pressure and volume variations, have been observed both (1) in connection with main eruptive events in the form of pre-eruptive uplift, and (2) in the form of short-lived deformation pulses that interrupt a period of quiescence. Both deformation patterns show important similarities to those identified in some magmatic systems. The pre-eruptive uplift has been observed in many magmatic volcanoes as a consequence of magma intrusion or hydrothermal fluid injection. Moreover, discrete short-duration pulses of deformation are also experienced by magmatic volcanoes and are repeated over time as multiple inflation and deflation events.

  19. Ground deformations and volcanic processes as imaged by CGPS data at Mt. Etna (Italy) between 2003 and 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Valentina; Mattia, Mario; Aloisi, Marco; Palano, Mimmo; Cannavò, Flavio; Holt, William E.

    2012-07-01

    We analyze the kinematic and crustal deformations of Mt. Etna from 2003 to 2008 as imaged by the Mt. Etna continuous GPS (CGPS) network (Etn@net). Through a careful analysis of GPS time series, six coherent phases of crustal deformations have been identified, three inflation phases and three deflation phases, superimposed on a major inflation of the volcanic edifice since 2001. The inversions of GPS velocities have enabled: 1) a better understanding of the evolution of the volcanic sources acting beneath the volcano; 2) analysis of the strain rate patterns; and 3) a delineation of potential coupling between volcanic sources and the observed ground deformations. The modeling of the pressure sources has shown a separation between inflation and deflation sources. The deflation sources show an upward migration, from 5.5 toward 2.0 km (b.s.l.), while the inflation sources are located within 5.5 and 4.0 km (b.s.l.). Our results indicate that the kinematic and ground deformations of the mid-upper eastern flank are driven by the interplay between the effect of the magmatic sources and a southeastward motion. Furthermore, clockwise rotations have been detected that prevailed over the eastern motion of the flank during the inflation phases preceding the 2004-2005 and 2006 eruptions. Finally, the accordance between the higher geodetic shear strain rates and the area with the highest seismic energy release shows that measured geodetic shear strain rates can provide useful information on the potential occurrence of seismic activity.

  20. Evolution of Ground Deformation Zone on Normal Fault Using Distinct Element Method and Centrifuge Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Jhen-Yi; Chang, Yu-Yi; Lee, Chung-Jung; Lin, Ming-Lang

    2015-04-01

    The depth and character of the overlying earth deposit contribute to fault rupture path. For cohesive soil, for instance, clay, tension cracks on the ground happen during faulting, limiting the propagation of fracture in soil mass. The cracks propagate downwards while the fracture induced by initial displacement of faulting propagates upwards. The connection of cracks and fracture will form a plane that is related to tri-shear zone. However the mechanism of the connection has not been discussed thoroughly. By obtaining the evolution of ground deformation zone we can understand mechanism of fault propagation and crack-fracture connection. A series of centrifuge tests and numerical modeling are conducted at this study with acceleration conditions of 40g, 50g, 80g and dip angle of 60° on normal faulting. The model is with total overburden thick, H, 0.2m, vertical displacement of moving wall, ∆H. At the beginning, hanging wall and the left-boundary wall moves along the plane of fault. When ∆H/H equals to 25%, both of the walls stop moving. We then can calculate the width of ground deformation in different depth of each model by a logic method. Models of this study consist of two different type overburden material to simulate sand and clay in situ. Different from finite element method, with application of distinct element method the mechanism of fault propagation in soil mass and the development of ground deformation zone can be observed directly in numerical analysis of faulting. The information of force and deformation in the numerical model are also easier to be obtained than centrifuge modeling. Therefore, we take the results of centrifuge modeling as the field outcrop then modify the micro-parameter of numerical analysis to make sure both of them have the same attitude. The results show that in centrifuge modeling narrower ground deformation zone appears in clayey overburden model as that of sandy overburden model is wider on footwall. Increasing the strength

  1. A persistent scatterer method for retrieving accurate InSAR ground deformation map over vegetation-decorrelated areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Zebker, H. A.; Knight, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    InSAR is commonly used to measure surface deformation between different radar passes at cm-scale accuracy and m-scale resolution. However, InSAR measurements are often decorrelated due to vegetation growth, which greatly limits high quality InSAR data coverage. Here we present an algorithm for retrieving InSAR deformation measurements over areas with significant vegetation decorrelation through the use of adaptive interpolation between persistent scatterer (PS) pixels, those points at which surface scattering properties do not change much over time and thus decorrelation artifacts are minimal. The interpolation filter restores phase continuity in space and greatly reduces errors in phase unwrapping. We apply this algorithm to process L-band ALOS interferograms acquired over the San Luis Valley, Colorado and the Tulare Basin, California. In both areas, groundwater extraction for irrigation results in land deformation that can be detected using InSAR. We show that the PS-based algorithm reduces the artifacts from vegetation decorrelation while preserving the deformation signature. The spatial sampling resolution achieved over agricultural fields is on the order of hundreds of meters, usually sufficient for groundwater studies. The improved InSAR data allow us further to reconstruct the SBAS ground deformation time series and transform the measured deformation to head levels using the skeletal storage coefficient and time delay constant inferred from a joint InSAR-well data analysis. The resulting InSAR-head and well-head measurements in the San Luis valley show good agreement with primary confined aquifer pumping activities. This case study demonstrates that high quality InSAR deformation data can be obtained over vegetation-decorrrelated region if processed correctly.

  2. Deformation of subglacial till near ice-sheet grounding zones: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowal, K. N.; Worster, G.

    2015-12-01

    Large-scale ice-sheet dynamics pivot on the deformation and transport of subglacial sediment through changes in the basal sliding velocities of glaciers. Such unconsolidated, water-saturated glacigenic sediment, or till, is found to accumulate into sedimentary wedges, or till-deltas, in grounding zones separating floating ice shelves from grounded ice streams. In addition to affecting glacial slip, such sedimentation may serve to stabilise ice sheets against grounding-line retreat in response to rising sea levels. We present a fluid-mechanical explanation of the formation of these wedges in terms of the jump in hydrostatic loading and unloading of till across the grounding zone, and we compare our findings with geophysical data of sedimentary wedge formation at the modern-day grounding zone of Whillans Ice Stream, West Antarctica. We develop a theoretical model of wedge formation in which we treat both ice and till as viscous fluids spreading under gravity into an inviscid ocean and find that a similar wedge of underlying fluid accumulates around the grounding line in our series of fluid-mechanical laboratory experiments. The experiments were performed in a confined channel geometry. We extend our theory to unconfined geometries in which till deformation is resisted dominantly by vertical shear stresses and the flow of the overlying ice is resisted dominantly either by vertical shear stresses between the ice and till or by extensional stresses characteristic of floating ice shelves and shelfy streams. The former is relevant to less-lubricated, grounded ice sheets whereas the latter is relevant to well-lubricated ice streams, sliding over soft, deformable till of low viscosity and appreciable thickness. We formulate a local condition relating wedge slopes in each of the three scenarios and find a reasonable agreement with geophysical data.

  3. Signature of magmatic processes in ground deformation signals from Phlegraean Fields (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagagli, Matteo; Montagna, Chiara Paola; Longo, Antonella; Papale, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Ground deformation signals such as dilatometric and tiltmetric ones, are nowadays well studied from the vulcanological community all over the world. These signals can be used to retrieve information on volcanoes state and to study the magma dynamics in their plumbing system. We compared synthetic signals in the Very Long Period (VLP, 10-2 - 10-1 Hz) and Ultra Long Period (ULP, 10-4 - 10-2 Hz) bands obtained from the simulation of magma mixing in shallow reservoirs ([3],[4]) with real data obtained from the dilatometers and tiltmeters network situated in the Phlegraean Fields near Naples (Italy), in order to define and constrain the relationships between them. Analyses of data from the October 2006 seismic swarm in the area show that the frequency spectrum of the synthetics is remarkably similar to the transient present in the real signals. In depth studies with accurated techniques for spectral analysis (i.e wavelet transform) and application of this method to other time windows have identified in the bandwidth around 10-4Hz (between 1h30m and 2h45m) peaks that are fairly stable and independent from the processing carried out on the full-band signal. These peaks could be the signature of ongoing convection at depth. It is well known that re-injection of juvenile magmas can reactivate the eruption dynamics ([1],[2]), thus being able to define mixing markers and detect them in the ground deformation signals is a relevant topic in order to understand the dynamics of active and quiescent vulcanoes and to eventually improve early-warning methods for impending eruptions. [1] Arienzo, I. et al. (2010). "The feeding system of Agnano-Monte Spina eruption (Campi Flegrei, Italy): dragging the past into present activity and future scenarios". In: Chemical Geology 270.1, pp. 135-147. [2] Bachmann, Olivier and George Bergantz (2008). "The magma reservoirs that feed supereruptions". In: Elements 4.1, pp. 17-21. [3] Longo, Antonella et al. (2012). "Magma convection and mixing

  4. Ground deformation in the Rio-Antirio area, Corinth Gulf, Greece, based on PS images interferometry and potential related geo-hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakogianni, G.; Foumelis, M.; Papadopoulos, G. A.; Parcharidis, I.

    2009-04-01

    Ground deformation is the surface expression of various physical processes such as landslides, ground subsidence and earthquakes. Construction and operation of engineering structures in urban or in rural areas can be affected seriously by ground conditions leading to casualties and economic losses. We focus at the example of the new bridge Rio-Antirrio, an important infrastructure which is the longest cable stayed bridge all over the world. Being of a length of 2,250 m it is located in the strait at the northwest edge of Peloponnese, connecting the Gulf of Corinth and the Gulf of Patras, in central Greece. This important bridge facilitates the transportation between Greece and the Western Europe through the Patra's harbor. The area of the strait is characterized by a variety of natural hazards like the absence of stiff seabed, strong seismic activity, tectonic movements, which make the area highly susceptible to ground deformation and the bridge an element at risk. The aim of this paper is to study the observed ground deformation in the area of Rio-Antirrio and interpret the potential causes of the deformation. We combine results of the PS interferometry (IPTA method) covering the period from 1992 to the present using ERS1 & 2 scenes and ENVISAT with seismicity data, active tectonics, slope failure, coastal sediment compaction, hydrology and seabed stability. Hazard assessment, prevention and mitigation are discussed under the light of the results in a scheme which includes the exposure item (bridge), hazard (multi-source induced ground stability) and risk (possible impact).

  5. Coupled reservoir-geomechanical analysis of CO2 injection and ground deformations at In Salah, Algeria

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.; Vasco, D.W.; Myer, L.

    2009-11-01

    In Salah Gas Project in Algeria has been injecting 0.5-1 million tonnes CO{sub 2} per year over the past five years into a water-filled strata at a depth of about 1,800 to 1,900 m. Unlike most CO{sub 2} storage sites, the permeability of the storage formation is relatively low and comparatively thin with a thickness of about 20 m. To ensure adequate CO{sub 2} flow-rates across the low-permeability sand-face, the In Salah Gas Project decided to use long-reach (about 1 to 1.5 km) horizontal injection wells. In an ongoing research project we use field data and coupled reservoir-geomechanical numerical modeling to assess the effectiveness of this approach and to investigate monitoring techniques to evaluate the performance of a CO{sub 2}-injection operation in relatively low permeability formations. Among the field data used are ground surface deformations evaluated from recently acquired satellite-based inferrometry (InSAR). The InSAR data shows a surface uplift on the order of 5 mm per year above active CO{sub 2} injection wells and the uplift pattern extends several km from the injection wells. In this paper we use the observed surface uplift to constrain our coupled reservoir-geomechanical model and conduct sensitivity studies to investigate potential causes and mechanisms of the observed uplift. The results of our analysis indicates that most of the observed uplift magnitude can be explained by pressure-induced, poro-elastic expansion of the 20 m thick injection zone, but there could also be a significant contribution from pressure-induced deformations within a 100 m thick zone of shaly sands immediately above the injection zone.

  6. Geophysical Monitoring of Ground Surface Deformation Associated with a Confined Aquifer Storage and Recovery Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Bonneville, Alain; Heggy, Essam; Strickland, Christopher E.; Normand, Jonathan; Dermond, Jeffrey A.; Fang, Yilin; Sullivan, E. C.

    2015-08-11

    A main issue in the storage of large volumes of fluids, mainly water and CO2, in the deep subsurface is to determine their field-scale-induced displacements and consequences on the mechanical behavior of the storage reservoir and surroundings. A quantifiable estimation of displacement can be made by combining the robust, cost-effective, and repeatable geophysical techniques of micro-gravimetry, differential global positioning system (DGPS), and differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR). These techniques were field tested and evaluated in an active large-volume aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project in Pendleton, Oregon, USA, where three ASR wells are injecting up to 1.9 million m3/yr-1 into basalt aquifers to a depth of about 150 m. Injection and recovery of water at the wells was accompanied by significant gravity anomalies and vertical deformation of the ground surface localized to the immediate surroundings of the injection wells as evidenced by DGPS and gravity measurements collected in 2011. At a larger scale, and between 2011 and 2013, DInSAR monitoring of the Pendleton area suggests the occurrence of sub-centimetric deformation in the western part of the city and close to the injection locations associated with the ASR cycle. A numerical simulation of the effect of the water injection gives results in good agreement with the observations and confirms the validity of the approach, which could be deployed in similar geological contexts to look at the mechanical effects of water and gas injections. The gravity signal reflects deep phenomena and gives additional insight into the repartition of fluids in the subsurface.

  7. Geophysical Monitoring of Ground Surface Deformation Associated with a Confined Aquifer Storage and Recovery Operation

    DOE PAGES

    Bonneville, Alain; Heggy, Essam; Strickland, Christopher E.; Normand, Jonathan; Dermond, Jeffrey A.; Fang, Yilin; Sullivan, E. C.

    2015-08-11

    A main issue in the storage of large volumes of fluids, mainly water and CO2, in the deep subsurface is to determine their field-scale-induced displacements and consequences on the mechanical behavior of the storage reservoir and surroundings. A quantifiable estimation of displacement can be made by combining the robust, cost-effective, and repeatable geophysical techniques of micro-gravimetry, differential global positioning system (DGPS), and differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR). These techniques were field tested and evaluated in an active large-volume aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project in Pendleton, Oregon, USA, where three ASR wells are injecting up to 1.9 million m3/yr-1more » into basalt aquifers to a depth of about 150 m. Injection and recovery of water at the wells was accompanied by significant gravity anomalies and vertical deformation of the ground surface localized to the immediate surroundings of the injection wells as evidenced by DGPS and gravity measurements collected in 2011. At a larger scale, and between 2011 and 2013, DInSAR monitoring of the Pendleton area suggests the occurrence of sub-centimetric deformation in the western part of the city and close to the injection locations associated with the ASR cycle. A numerical simulation of the effect of the water injection gives results in good agreement with the observations and confirms the validity of the approach, which could be deployed in similar geological contexts to look at the mechanical effects of water and gas injections. The gravity signal reflects deep phenomena and gives additional insight into the repartition of fluids in the subsurface.« less

  8. The mechanics of ground deformation precursory to dome-building extrusions at Mount St. Helens 1981-1982.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, W.W.; Archuleta, R.J.; Swanson, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Detailed monitoring at Mount St. Helens since 1980 has enabled prediction of the intermittent eruptive activity (mostly dome growth) with unprecedented success. During 1981 and 1982, accelerating deformation of the crater floor around the vent (including radial cracks, thrust faults, and ground tilt) was the earliest indicator of impending activity. The magnitude of the shear stress required to match observed dipslacements (1-7 MPa) is inversely proportional to the conduit diameter (estimated to be 25-100 m). The most probable source of this shear stress is the flow of viscous magma up to the conduit and into the lava dome. A model is proposed in which the accelerating deformation, beginning as much as 4 weeks before extrusions, is caused by the increasing velocity of ascending magma in the conduit. This model is examined by using deformation data of the dome before four extrusions in 1981 and 1982 to estimate the volumetric flow rate through the conduit. This flow rate and an estimate of the effective viscosity of the magma enable calculation of an ascent velocity and an applied shear stress that, again, depend on the conduit diameter. The results of these calculations are consistent with the finite element experiments and show that the proposed model is feasible. Precursory deformation like that measured at Mount St. Helens should be observable at similar volcanoes elsewhere because it is caused by the fundamental process of magma ascent.-from Authors

  9. InSAR Assessment of Ground Deformations in Shoreline Urban Areas Associated to Hydraulic Head Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, J.; Heggy, E.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring ground deformations in highly dense populated shoreline and lowlands areas such as Montreal is crucial for the sustainable development of urban infrastructures. Montreal already undergoes house foundations damages with a density of 8 repairs per square kilometer, especially over clay deposits such as in the Plateau neighborhood with a density of 89 repairs/km2. Using Radarsat-2 C-Band SAR interferometry, we observe a 3-5 mm ground LOS displacement variation temporally out-phased by three months relative to the 2 meter subartesian aquifer hydraulic head and river level variations, over a 60 km2 zone located in the central part of the Montreal Island in eastern Canada, from 2008 to 2010. Using ascending and descending SAR acquisition mode we extract the vertical component of the LOS velocities and observe secular displacements relative to a unconfined aquifer. These displacements are 2 mm/year subsidence on the minor topographic high, associated with evapotranspiration. We also observe ground water recharge and ~1 mm/year uplift downhill related to ground water discharge from deep regional aquifer enhanced with a faults system and shallow local aquifer arising from transmissivity. Displacements observed during this two year study are small but they are significant if integrated over the average lifetime of a house. We conclude that hydraulic head is related to the observed ground deformation in most of the areas of Montreal. Moreover, wetter climate conditions forecast for this area will definitely increase the aquifer dynamics; thus, more ground deformations are foreseen and have to be considered in future infrastructure design standards.

  10. Characterization of Ground Deformation above AN Urban Tunnel by Means of Insar Time Series Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, A.; Iannacone, J.; Falorni, G.; Berti, M.; Corsini, A.

    2013-12-01

    Ground deformation produced by tunnel excavation in urban areas can cause damage to buildings and infrastructure. In these contexts, monitoring systems are required to determine the surface area affected by displacement and the rates of movement. Advanced multi-image satellite-based InSAR approaches are uniquely suited for this purpose as they provide an overview of the entire affected area and can measure movement rates with millimeter precision. Persistent scatterer approaches such as SqueeSAR™ use reflections off buildings, lampposts, roads, etc to produce a high-density point cloud in which each point has a time series of deformation spanning the period covered by the imagery. We investigated an area of about 10 km2 in North Vancouver, (Canada) where the shaft excavation of the Seymour-Capilano water filtration plant was started in 2004. As part of the project, twin tunnels in bedrock were excavated to transfer water from the Capilano Reservoir to the treatment plant. A radar dataset comprising 58 images (spanning March 2001 - June 2008) acquired by the Radarsat-1 satellite and covering the period of excavation was processed with the SqueeSAR™ algorithm (Ferretti et al., 2011) to assess the ground deformation caused by the tunnel excavation. To better characterize the deformation in the time and space domains and correlate ground movement with excavation, an in-depth time series analysis was carried out. Berti et al. (2013) developed an automatic procedure for the analysis of InSAR time series based on a sequence of statistical tests. The tool classifies time series into six distinctive types (uncorrelated; linear; quadratic; bilinear; discontinuous without constant velocity; discontinuous with change in velocity) which can be linked to different physical phenomena. It also provides a series of descriptive parameters which can be used to characterize the temporal changes of ground motion. We processed the movement time series with PSTime to determine the

  11. The 1997 Umbria-Marche (Italy) earthquake sequence: Relationship between ground deformation and seismogenic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinti, F. R.; Cucci, L.; Marra, F.; Montone, P.

    A field survey performed during the 1997 Umbria-Marche earthquake sequence led us to recognize ground and pavement ruptures associated with the three largest shocks (Mw ≥ 5.7). The ruptures are concentrated in narrow bands that, in part, are on and near previously mapped high-angle normal faults. The geometry of the ground deformation is consistent with the NE-trending extension indicated by CMT focal solutions of the mainshocks. The distribution of aftershocks suggests that the three mainshocks occurred on ∼40° SW-dipping normal faults. Geological investigations, modelling of expected coseismic elevation changes, and seismic data, suggest that the surface deformation is not the direct result of primary rupture of faults at depth.

  12. Ground deformation across the Corinth rift from 22 years of GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briole, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    shows a co-seismic displacement in January 2010. The extension rate at all stations except Efpalio is steady over the ten years period. The velocities determined at approximately a hundred network points (1st order and 2nd order observed twice or more) show no temporal variation during the sampled period except the co-seismic of the large 1995 Aigion earthquake. The southern side of the rift behaves as a rigid body with less than 1mm/yr internal deformation except around the Psathopirgos fault. Most of the extension, more than 12 mm/yr at the longitude of Trizonia, occurs offshore in the centre of the rift. The northern side of the rift is less rigid, with 3 mm/yr accommodated between Trizonia and Lidoriki. The points located along the northern shore between Nafpaktos and Itea show a westward (or clockwise) component with respect to the overall velocity field. No significant deformation is observed in the area located between Nafpaktos and the eastern termination of the Trichonis lake and the block located between Etoliko, Thermo, Lidoriki and Nafpaktos has less than 1mm/yr internal deformation. At the western termination of the Psathopirgos fault both GPS and SAR interferometry show the existence of localized deformation in the first few kilometres inland that becomes progressively dominated by right lateral strike slip corresponding probably to the northern termination of the crustal discontinuity activated more to the southwest during the M=6.4 June 8, 2008 Andravida earthquake. No vertical motion is detected at campaign points except at the Drepano lighthouse northwest of the Psathopirgos fault. Further steps forward in the knowledge of the deformation of this exceptional area during the next few decades require among others the deployment of a few ten of permanent GPS stations across the main actives structures on both sides of the rift and at its western termination around Patras, a complete analysis of the available and future InSAR data and fusion with the GPS

  13. MetaSensing's FastGBSAR: ground based radar for deformation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rödelsperger, Sabine; Meta, Adriano

    2014-10-01

    The continuous monitoring of ground deformation and structural movement has become an important task in engineering. MetaSensing introduces a novel sensor system, the Fast Ground Based Synthetic Aperture Radar (FastGBSAR), based on innovative technologies that have already been successfully applied to airborne SAR applications. The FastGBSAR allows the remote sensing of deformations of a slope or infrastructure from up to a distance of 4 km. The FastGBSAR can be setup in two different configurations: in Real Aperture Radar (RAR) mode it is capable of accurately measuring displacements along a linear range profile, ideal for monitoring vibrations of structures like bridges and towers (displacement accuracy up to 0.01 mm). Modal parameters can be determined within half an hour. Alternatively, in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) configuration it produces two-dimensional displacement images with an acquisition time of less than 5 seconds, ideal for monitoring areal structures like dams, landslides and open pit mines (displacement accuracy up to 0.1 mm). The MetaSensing FastGBSAR is the first ground based SAR instrument on the market able to produce two-dimensional deformation maps with this high acquisition rate. By that, deformation time series with a high temporal and spatial resolution can be generated, giving detailed information useful to determine the deformation mechanisms involved and eventually to predict an incoming failure. The system is fully portable and can be quickly installed on bedrock or a basement. The data acquisition and processing can be fully automated leading to a low effort in instrument operation and maintenance. Due to the short acquisition time of FastGBSAR, the coherence between two acquisitions is very high and the phase unwrapping is simplified enormously. This yields a high density of resolution cells with good quality and high reliability of the acquired deformations. The deformation maps can directly be used as input into an Early

  14. SqueeSAR™ and GPS ground deformation monitoring of Santorini Volcano (1992-2012): Tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagios, E.; Sakkas, V.; Novali, F.; Bellotti, F.; Ferretti, A.; Vlachou, K.; Dietrich, V.

    2013-05-01

    The Santorini Volcanic Complex (SVC) has been in a dormant state for the last 60 years until January 2011 when upward influx of magma reawakened the volcano with intense radial ground deformation and inter-caldera seismicity that lasted until January 2012 but declined afterwards. This paper aims to study the ground deformation and the inferred tectonic implications of the SVC for the period 1992-2012 mainly based on the SqueeSAR™ technique and DGPS campaign results of our local network which incorporates available data on Internet from several continuous GPS stations established on the island. The spatial deformation of the SVC during the quiet period 1992-2010 was deduced by joint analysis of ERS1 and 2 and ENVISAT. It was found that the intra caldera Palaea Kammeni shield volcano was being uplifted (2-3 mm/yr) with increasing rate, whilst the adjacent Nea Kammeni shield volcano was being subsided (up to 6 mm/yr) with increasing rate. The rest of the SVC showed a velocity field varying from - 1 to + 2 mm/yr, indicating a rather linear deformation during that period. The results from the GPS network are in full agreement with the SqueeSAR results. Based on the results of SqueeSAR analysis of 12 ENVISAT images, and DGPS/CGPS data to end 2012, the deformation for the unrest period 2011-2012 was non-linear being characterized by strong radial deformation in the northern part of the caldera (50-120 mm/yr), and accelerating values (> 130 mm/yr2). Combined GPS/SqueeSAR Mogi modeling indicated a source located north of Nea Kammeni at a shallow depth. However, a progressively decreasing rate in deformation was noted at most GPS/CGPS station components after January 2012, indicating magma settlement consistent with the constantly decreasing rate of the inter-caldera seismicity. The faulting features seem to have a key role in the evolution of the deformation, which continues up the end 2012, but at a very low level.

  15. Liquefaction, ground oscillation, and soil deformation at the Wildlife Array, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, T.L.; Youd, T.L.

    2007-01-01

    Excess pore-water pressure and liquefaction at the Wildlife Liquefaction Array in 1987 were caused by deformation associated with both high-frequency strong ground motion and 5.5-second-period Love waves. The Love waves produced large (???1.5%) cyclic shear strains well after the stronger high-frequency ground motion abated. These cyclic strains generated approximately from 13 to 35% of the excess pore-water pressure in the liquefied layer and caused excess pore-water pressures ultimately to reach effective overburden stress. The deformation associated with the Love waves explains the "postearthquake" increase of pore-water pressure that was recorded at the array. This explanation suggests that conventional methods for predicting liquefaction based on peak ground acceleration are incomplete and may need to consider cyclic strains associated with long-period surface waves. A post-earthquake survey of an inclinometer casing indicated permanent shear strain associated with lateral spreading primarily occurred in the upper part of the liquefied layer. Comparison of cone penetration test soundings conducted after the earthquake with pre-earthquake soundings suggests sleeve friction increased. Natural lateral variability of the liquefied layer obscured changes in tip resistance despite a ???1% reduction in volume. The large oscillatory motion associated with surface waves explains ground oscillation that has been reported at some liquefaction sites during earthquakes.

  16. Long-range ground deformation monitoring by InSAR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokugawa, S.; Nakamura, T.

    2015-11-01

    InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) analysis is an effective technique to map 3-dimensional surface deformation with high spatial resolution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capability of InSAR analysis when applied to ground monitoring of an environmental disaster. We performed a time series InSAR analysis using ENVISAT/ASAR and ALOS/PALSAR data and commercial software to investigate subsidence around the Kanto District of Japan. We also investigated techniques for efficient early detection of landslides in Kyushu using time series analysis that incorporated synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. ENVISAT/ASAR data acquired from 2003-2010 and ALOS/PALSAR data acquired from 2006-2011 were used to detect poorly expressed geomorphological deformation by conducting time series analyses of periodically acquired SAR data. In addition, to remove noise caused by geographical feature stripes or phase retardation, we applied median filtering, histogram extraction processing, and clarification of the displacement with a Laplacian filter. The main functions of the InSAR time series analysis are the calculation of phase differences between two images and the inversion with smoothness constraint for the estimation of deformation along the line of sight. The results enabled us to establish criteria for the selection of suitable InSAR data pairs, and provided the final error estimation of the derived surface deformation. The results of the analysis in the Kanto District suggested that localized areas of uplift and subsidence have occurred at irregular intervals in this area. Furthermore, the method offers the possibility of early warning of environmental disasters such as landslide and abrupt subsidence. Our results confirm the effectiveness of InSAR analysis for the monitoring of ground deformation over wide areas via the detection of localized subsidence and landslides.

  17. Active Deformation of Etna Volcano Combing IFSAR and GPS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The surface deformation of an active volcano is an important indicator of its eruptive state and its hazard potential. Mount Etna volcano in Sicily is a very active volcano with well documented eruption episodes.

  18. Ground deformation associated with the March 1996 earthquake swarm at Akutan volcano, Alaska, revealed by satellite radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Wicks, C.; Power, J.A.; Dzurisin, D.

    2000-01-01

    In March 1996 an intense swarm of volcano-tectonic earthquakes (???3000 felt by local residents, Mmax = 5.1, cumulative moment of 2.7 ??1018 N m) beneath Akutan Island in the Aleutian volcanic arc, Alaska, produced extensive ground cracks but no eruption of Akutan volcano. Synthetic aperture radar interferograms that span the time of the swarm reveal complex island-wide deformation: the western part of the island including Akutan volcano moved upward, while the eastern part moved downward. The axis of the deformation approximately aligns with new ground cracks on the western part of the island and with Holocene normal faults that were reactivated during the swarm on the eastern part of the island. The axis is also roughly parallel to the direction of greatest compressional stress in the region. No ground movements greater than 2.83 cm were observed outside the volcano's summit caldera for periods of 4 years before or 2 years after the swarm. We modeled the deformation primarily as the emplacement of a shallow, east-west trending, north dipping dike plus inflation of a deep, Mogi-type magma body beneath the volcano. The pattern of subsidence on the eastern part of the island is poorly constrained. It might have been produced by extensional tectonic strain that both reactivated preexisting faults on the eastern part of the island and facilitated magma movement beneath the western part. Alternatively, magma intrusion beneath the volcano might have been the cause of extension and subsidence in the eastern part of the island. We attribute localized subsidence in an area of active fumaroles within the Akutan caldera, by as much as 10 cm during 1992-1993 and 1996-1998, to fluid withdrawal or depressurization of the shallow hydrothermal system. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Deformation-induced changes in hydraulic head during ground-water withdrawal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsieh, Paul A.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water withdrawal from a confined or semiconfined aquifer causes three-dimensional deformation in the pumped aquifer and in adjacent layers (overlying and underlying aquifers and aquitards). In response to the deformation, hydraulic head in the adjacent layers could rise or fall almost immediately after the start of pumping. This deformation-induced effect suggest that an adjacent layer undergoes horizontal compression and vertical extension when pumping begins. Hydraulic head initially drops in a region near the well and close to the pumped aquifer, but rises outside this region. Magnitude of head change varies from a few centimeters to more than 10 centimeters. Factors that influence the development of deformation-induced effects includes matrix rigidity (shear modulus), the arrangement of aquifer and aquitards, their thicknesses, and proximity to land surface. Induced rise in hydraulic head is prominent in an aquitard that extends from land surface to a shallow pumped aquifer. Induced drop in hydraulic head is likely observed close to the well in an aquifer that is separated from the pumped aquifer by a relatively thin aquitard. Induced effects might last for hours in an aquifer, but could persist for many days in an aquitard. Induced effects are eventually dissipated by fluid flow from regions of higher head to regions of lower head, and by propagation of drawdown from the pumped aquifer into adjacent layers.

  20. Magnificent Ground Water Connection. [Sample Activities].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    Water conservation and usage is an important concept in science. This document, geared specifically to New England, provides many activities for protecting and discussing ground water situations. Sample activities for grades K-6 include: (1) All the Water in the World; (2) The Case of the Disappearing Water; (3) Deep Subjects--Wells and Ground…

  1. The impact of new generation SAR sensors in ground deformation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansosti, E.

    2012-04-01

    Most of the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite missions launched in the last two decades, e.g., ERS, ENVISAT, RADARSAT-1, ALOS-1, have been recently completed or are approaching the end of their lifetime. They have given a strong contribution to geophysical analyses in many fileds, mostly due to the capability of measuring ground deformation through Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) techniques. Based on this experience, a "second generation" of SAR sensors have been recently launched (TerraSAR-X, Cosmo-SkyMed, RADARSAT-2) and/or will be launched in the near future (Sentinel, ALOS-2). Although some of them differ for the operating band, all these new systems exhibit a common characteristics: a reduced repeat time with respect to previous generation sensors and, for most of them, an improved ground resolution. While these two characteristics, improved ground resolution and reduced repeat time, are in general highly desirable, they undoubtedly induce an significant increase of the computational load and data storage needed to process data, especially when the generation of time series is in order. However, when the deformation information is to be inverted in order to estimate some geophysical parameters (source position and strength, for example) through mathematical models, both in the case of numerical and analytical modeling, the information increase is not always fully utilized. For instance, most of the current inversion procedures includes some kind of spatial undersampling of the data (decimation, quad-tree, etc.) to reduce the data to an amount manageable by the inversion routines. Moreover, temporal modeling is rarely performed. In this talk we analyze the impact of the second generation SAR data on the geophysical interpretation of the deformation phenomena. We compare results obtained by processing the data at different spatial and temporal scales to highlight the possible differences in the corresponding geophysical interpretation. We use

  2. {alpha} decays to ground and excited states of heavy deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, V. Yu.; Khudenko, A. A.

    2009-09-15

    The experimental data for {alpha}-decay half-lives to ground and excited states of deformed nuclei with 222{<=}A{<=}252 and 88{<=}Z{<=}102 are analyzed in the framework of the unified model for {alpha} decay and {alpha} capture. The branching ratios to excited states depend on the energy and the angular momentum of the {alpha} particle. The evaluated branching ratios for 0{sub g.s.}{sup +}{yields}0{sub g.s.}{sup +},2{sup +},4{sup +} {alpha} transitions in even-even nuclei agree with the experimental data. The experimental and calculated branching ratios for {alpha} transitions into more highly excited states are similar.

  3. A Ground Deformation Monitoring Approach to Understanding Magma Chamber Systems and Eruptive Cycles of Mount Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, S.; Clarke, A.

    2005-05-01

    Mount Cameroon is a 13,400ft basanite volcano on the passive margin of West Africa. It has erupted seven times in the past century making it one of the most active volcanoes in Africa. Most recently Mount Cameroon erupted in 1999 and 2000 first issuing strombolian explosions from vents near the summit, and later erupting effusively from a fissure running southwest from the summit (Suh et al., 2003). Prior to 2004, the only monitoring equipment on Mount Cameroon was a small seismometer network installed following the 1982 eruption. By 1999 only a single seismometer in the network was functional. Seismic activity did not rise above background levels until the few days immediately preceding the eruption. In an effort to raise awareness of the volcano's condition and provide a more efficient warning of impending eruptions we have begun constructing a ground deformation network on Mount Cameroon. The new network currently consists of two Applied Geomechanics 711-2A(4X) biaxial tiltmeters capable of resolving 0.1 microradians of tilt. One station is located approximately 500 m from the 2000 summit vent, and the other is approximately 1km away from the central fissure approximately 5km southwest of the 2000 summit vent. Three primary processes could precede eruptions at Mt. Cameroon, offering the opportunity for detection and prediction by our network. These processes are magma chamber pressurization, magma ascent via a central conduit, and/or propagation of magma along the central fissure. Magma chamber location, if a significant chamber exists, is poorly constrained, however, previous petrologic studies on Mount Cameroon (Suh et al., 2003; Fitton et al., 1983) suggest Mount Cameroon magmas originate at a depth less than 40km. Published seismic data (Ambeh, 1989) contains evidence of magmatic activity and possible chambers at depths ranging from 10km to 70km. Preliminary calculations using a simple Mogi model suggest deformation caused by pressurization of a large

  4. Extreme ground-state deformation of the N = Z nucleus 76Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemasson, A.; Iwasaki, H.; Morse, C.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Berryman, J.; Gade, A.; McDaniel, S.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Stroberg, S.; Weisshaar, D.; Wimmer, K.; Winkler, R.; Dewald, A.; Fransen, C.; Nichols, A.; Wadsworth, R.

    2011-10-01

    The shape of the atomic nucleus is determined by the interplay of macroscopic and microscopic effects within this quantum mechanical many-body system. Self-conjugate nuclei give an opportunity to study the role of np correlations in deformation and have attracted a great interest due to drastic shape evolution along the N = Z line. Strong ground-state deformation is expected to occur for N = Z nuclei above Z = 36 from the 2+ energy systematic as well as from theoretical predictions. Reduced transition strengths B(E2) can guide our understanding of the onset of collectivity along N = Z line. Here, we report on the first determination of B(E2; 2+ -->0+) for the N = Z = 38 nucleus 76Sr obtained from the measurement of the 2+ state lifetime using a line shape technique. 76Sr nuclei were produced at the NSCL in charge exchange reaction from fast secondary 76Rb beam. γ-rays emitted at the reaction target position were measured with the SeGA HPGe array in coincidence with reaction residues detected in the S800 spectrometer. Results will be discussed in the light of available data and theoretical predictions to provide insight into the evolution of shell structure and deformation in this region.

  5. Measuring ground deformations with 1-Hz GPS data: the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake (preliminary report)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwan, Meilano; Kimata, Fumiaki; Hirahara, Kazuro; Sagiya, Takeshi; Yamagiwa, Atsushi

    2004-03-01

    We analyzed 1-Hz GPS data observed at 14 stations of the GPS Earth Observation Network (GEONET) of the Geographical Survey Institute, Japan, associated with the 2003 M JMA 8.1 Tokachi-oki earthquake, which occurred at the Kurile Trench. The GPS stations are located 70-240 km away from the epicenter. GPS data clearly captured rapid co-seismic ground displacements. At a GPS station 70 km away from the epicenter, coseismic displacements started 15 seconds after the origin time, and after 40 seconds at the stations 240 km away. Observed displacement amplitude exceeded 20 cm at GPS sites 240 km away from the epicenter. Displacement amplitudes attenuate with time and distance from the epicenter, oscillating with periods of 40-60 seconds. We compared the 1-Hz GPS data and displacement seismogram integrated from strong ground motion data, which showed fairly good agreements. In spite of careful screening of 1-Hz GPS data during 30 minutes preceding the main shock, no significant preseismic deformation over 1 cm in the horizontal components was recorded. 30 second sampling GPS data at 14 sites during 20 hours preceding the main shock did not show any significant pre-seismic deformation, either. These results indicate that pre-seismic strain change, if any, was smaller than 0.5-1.0×10-7 before the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake.

  6. Geomorphic response to tectonically-induced ground deformation in the Wabash Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fraser, G.S.; Thompson, T.A.; Olyphant, G.A.; Furer, L.; Bennett, S.W.

    1997-01-01

    Numerous low- to moderate-intensity earthquakes have been recorded in a zone of diffuse modern seismicity in southwest Indiana, southeast Illinois, and northernmost Kentucky. Structural elements within the zone include the Wabash Valley Fault System, the LaSalle Anticlinal Belt in western Illinois, and the Rough Creek-Shawneetown Fault System in northern Kentucky. The presence of seismically-induced liquefaction features in the near-surface alluvial sediments in the region indicates that strong ground motion has occurred in the recent geological past, but because the glacial and alluvial sediments in the Wabash Valley appear to be otherwise undisturbed, post-Paleozoic ground deformation resulting from movement on these structural elements has not yet been documented. Morphometric analysis of the land surface, detailed mapping of geomorphic elements in the valley, reconnaissance drilling of the Holocene and Pleistocene alluvium, and structural analysis of the bedrock underlying the valley were used to determine whether the geomorphology of the valley and the patterns of alluviation of the Wabash River were affected by surface deformation associated with the seismic zone during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. Among the observed features in the valley that can be attributed to deformation are: (1) tilting of the modern land surface to the west, (2) preferred channel migration toward the west side of the valley, with concomitant impact on patterns of soil development and sedimentation rate, (3) a convex longitudinal profile of the Wabash River where it crosses the LaSalle Anticlinal Belt, and (4) increased incision of the river into its floodplain downstream from the anticlinal belt.

  7. Terrestrial and Airborne LIDAR: Comparison of Coincident Datasets for Measuring Ground Deformation and Topographic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayen, R. E.; Stewart, J. P.; Lembo, A. J.; Hu, J.; Davis, C. A.; Hogue, T.; Collins, B. D.; Minasian, D.; Louis-Kayen, N. M.; O'Rourke, T. D.

    2009-05-01

    We present the results from a controlled study on the use of pulse-based terrestrial lidar and phase-based airborne lidar to detect topographic change and ground deformation in areas of earthquake- and storm- induced landslides. Terrestrial and airborne lidar scans were performed at three sites in Los Angeles County and their accuracy was gauged using coincident total station survey measurements as the control. The study was supported by the Multidisciplinary Center for Earthquake Engineering Research (MCEER), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP). Horizontal accuracy was evaluated through the measurement of Northing and Easting residuals, standardized to WGS84. Assessment of accuracy was made on lengths and heights of well-defined objects in the lidar scans, such as LADWP buildings and water tanks. The bias and dispersion of lidar height measurements, standardized to NGVD88, were assessed at the Mulholland Tank adjacent to Hollywood Reservoir, the Owens Aqueduct Penstock at Power Plant 2 (PP2) in San Francisquito Canyon, and a flat un-vegetated site near the Los Angeles Reservoir before and after carefully measured trenching. At the vegetated slopes near PP2 and the Hollywood Reservoir site, airborne lidar showed minimal elevation bias and a standard deviation of approximately 50 cm, whereas terrestrial lidar demonstrated large bias and dispersion (on order of meters) due to the inability of ground-based lidar to penetrate heavy vegetation. Both systems were able to assess heights and lengths on unobstructed man made structures at the sub-decimeter scale. At the trench site, airborne lidar showed decimeter scale bias of -23.6 cm for flat ground to -8.7 cm for trenched ground, and dispersion of 5.6 for flat ground to 20 cm for trenched ground. Terrestrial lidar was nearly unbiased (~0 cm for flat or trenched ground) and with very low dispersion of 4.1 and 6.5 cm for flat and trenched ground, respectively

  8. Fiber-Reinforced Rocks Akin to Roman Concrete Help Explain Ground Deformation at Campi Flegrei Caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanorio, Tiziana; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn

    2016-04-01

    The caldera of Campi Flegrei is one of the active hydrothermal systems of the Mediterranean region experiencing notable unrest episodes in a densely populated area. During the last crisis of 1982-1984, nearly 40,000 people were evacuated for almost two years from the main town of Pozzuoli, the Roman Puteoli, due to the large uplifts (~2 m over two years) and the persistent seismic activity. The evacuation severely hampered the economy and the social make-up of the community, which included the relocation of schools and commercial shops as well as the harbor being rendered useless for docking. Despite the large uplifts, the release of strain appears delayed. Seismicity begins and reaches a magnitude of 4.0 only upon relatively large uplifts (~ 70-80 cm) contrary to what is generally observed for calderas exhibiting much lower deformation levels. Over and above the specific mechanism causing the unrest and the lack of identification of a shallow magmatic reservoir (< 4 km) by seismic data, there is a core question of how the subsurface rocks of Campi Flegrei withstand a large strain and have high strength. We performed a series of direct measurements on deep well cores by combining high-resolution microstructural and mineralogical analyses with the elastic and mechanical properties of well cores from the deep wells drilled in the area right before the unrest of 1982-1984 - San Vito (SV1 and SV2) and Mofete (MF1, MF2, MF5). The rock physics analysis of the well cores provides evidence for the existence of two horizons, above and below the seismogenic area, underlying a natural, coupled process. The basement is a calc-silicate rock housing hydrothermal decarbonation reactions, which provide lime-rich fluids. The caprock above the seismogenic area has a pozzolanic composition and a fibril-rich matrix made of intertwining filaments of ettringite and tobemorite, resulting from lime-pozzolanic reactions. These findings provide evidence for a natural process reflecting that

  9. Joint Inversions of Gas Emissions and Ground Deformation During and Following Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, M.; McCormick, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are associated with complex, time-dependent gas emissions and ground deformation. Observations of such signals are a primary gauge of eruption mechanisms, progress and cessation and as such, are critical for hazard assessment. It is often the case that gas emissions and deformation continue for months to years after the end of an eruption. Interpretation of such signals are critical for making decisions about whether an eruption may be considered over or not, yet very little is understood about the processes behind them and how they are coupled. However, the link between the deformation measured and the gases emitted during and after eruptions is fundamental. It has long been recognised that the presence of exsolved fluids enhances magma compressibility, leading to smaller-than-expected syn-eruptive volume changes observed at the surface (by InSAR or by GPS networks). The fluid phase present in the magma prior to eruption contains an assemblage of volatile species, most of which we are able to measure at the surface. Our improved understanding of volatile saturation in silicate melts and the availability of thermodynamic models to predict the partitioning of sulfur between fluid and melt means that coupled interpretations of gas emissions and deformation are now possible, given independent estimates of erupted volumes and other intrinsic parameters such as pressure, temperature and oxygen fugacity. We illustrate, using a well constrained example of a prolonged, multi-episode eruption, the utility in developing coupled models to describe volume changes and outgassing processes with a view to enhancing our ability to interpret these critical monitoring data streams.

  10. InSAR analysis of ground deformation over the Istanbul Area in the framework of the FP7 MARsite Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Stefano; Bonano, Manuela; Nobile, Adriano; Merryman Boncori, John Peter; Manzo, Mariarosaria; Solaro, Giuseppe; Moro, Marco; Saroli, Michele

    2015-04-01

    , showing a mainly linear deformation trend with a velocity of about 1 cm/yr. We started a detailed investigation of the causes of the detected local deformation. We used a stereo pair of very high resolution (0.6 m) satellite images (Pleiades satellite) to carry out a photogeological interpretation which allowed us to identify and characterize various gravitational phenomena in the Avcilar peninsula. The identified gravitational elements are represented by flows, complex landslides, translations and paleolandslides. They have been classified in certain, inferred and quiescent. We identified linear elements associated with landslides, as escarpments and paleo-escarpments over a trench associated to a deep-seated gravitational slope deformation. Terraces, paleo-terraces, counterslope terraces, solifluctions and unmapped landslides were also identified. The comparison of the identified morphological features with the present ground deformation rates allowed to identify and characterise the active gravitational movements.

  11. New design deforming controlling system of the active stressed lap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Li; Wang, Daxing

    2008-07-01

    A 450mm diameter active stressed lap has been developed in NIAOT by 2003. We design a new lap in 2007. This paper puts on emphases on introducing the new deforming control system of the lap. Aiming at the control characteristic of the lap, a new kind of digital deforming controller is designed. The controller consists of 3 parts: computer signal disposing, motor driving and force sensor signal disposing. Intelligent numeral PID method is applied in the controller instead of traditional PID. In the end, the result of new deformation are given.

  12. Experimental dynamic deformation analysis of active stressed lap.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongshen; Li, Xiaojin; Fan, Bin; Zeng, Zhige

    2016-02-20

    We introduce a method to measure the dynamic surface deformation of an active stressed lap for fabricating a 4  mf/1.5  mirror. Lap surface accuracy working in some typical deformation velocities is put forward. Experimental results indicate that dynamic lap surface accuracy is worse than that of a static surface, and dynamic surface accuracy gets worse if deformation velocity increases, while the difference of lap surface error RMS is less than 1 μm. An optimization of the processing strategy is feasible through changing the deformation velocity of the active stressed lap depending on the processing schedule. After optimizing the grinding and polishing strategy, efficiency is expected to have a significant increase. PMID:26906568

  13. Numerical models for ground deformation and gravity changes during volcanic unrest: simulating the hydrothermal system dynamics of a restless caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coco, A.; Gottsmann, J.; Whitaker, F.; Rust, A.; Currenti, G.; Jasim, A.; Bunney, S.

    2016-04-01

    Ground deformation and gravity changes in restless calderas during periods of unrest can signal an impending eruption and thus must be correctly interpreted for hazard evaluation. It is critical to differentiate variation of geophysical observables related to volume and pressure changes induced by magma migration from shallow hydrothermal activity associated with hot fluids of magmatic origin rising from depth. In this paper we present a numerical model to evaluate the thermo-poroelastic response of the hydrothermal system in a caldera setting by simulating pore pressure and thermal expansion associated with deep injection of hot fluids (water and carbon dioxide). Hydrothermal fluid circulation is simulated using TOUGH2, a multicomponent multiphase simulator of fluid flows in porous media. Changes in pore pressure and temperature are then evaluated and fed into a thermo-poroelastic model (one-way coupling), which is based on a finite-difference numerical method designed for axi-symmetric problems in unbounded domains.

    Informed by constraints available for the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy), a series of simulations assess the influence of fluid injection rates and mechanical properties on the hydrothermal system, uplift and gravity. Heterogeneities in hydrological and mechanical properties associated with the presence of ring faults are a key determinant of the fluid flow pattern and consequently the geophysical observables. Peaks (in absolute value) of uplift and gravity change profiles computed at the ground surface are located close to injection points (namely at the centre of the model and fault areas). Temporal evolution of the ground deformation indicates that the contribution of thermal effects to the total uplift is almost negligible with respect to the pore pressure contribution during the first years of the unrest, but increases in time and becomes dominant after a long period of the simulation. After a transient increase over the first years of

  14. InSAR observations of ground surface deformation and lava flow emplacement at Pacaya volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, L. N.; Lu, Z.; Oommen, T.

    2015-12-01

    Pacaya volcano is a persistently active basaltic cone complex located in the Central American Volcanic Arc in Guatemala. In May, 2010, violent VEI-3 eruptions caused significant topographic changes to the edifice, including the dispersion of ~20 cm of tephra and ash on the cone, the emplacement of a ~5.4 km long lava flow, and 3 m of co-eruptive movement of the southwest flank. For this study, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) images (interferograms) processed from both spaceborne Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) and aerial Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) data were used to measure post-eruptive deformation events. Interferograms suggest four distinct deformation processes after the May 2010 eruption: (1) magma intrusion near the vents of the 2010 lava flow; (2) subsidence of the 2010 lava flow; (3) slow deflation of an elongated magma source near the summit, and; (4) settlement of the material involved in the co-eruptive slope movement. Our results provide insights into Pacaya's complex magmatic plumbing system and the postemplacement behavior of lava flows. The detection of several different deformation events emphasizes the utility of measuring volcanic deformation using high-resolution remote sensing techniques with broad spatial coverage.

  15. Active compressive intraoceanic deformation: early stages of ophiolites emplacement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Delescluse, Matthias; Montési, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    Oceanic lithosphere is strong and continental lithosphere is weak. As a result, there is relatively little deformation in the oceanic domain away from plate boundaries. However, the interior of oceanic lithosphere does deform when highly stressed. We review here places where intraoceanic compression is at work. In the more than 30 years since the first observations of active compressive intraplate deformation in the Central Indian Ocean through seismic profiling (Eittreim et al., 1972), compressive deformation has been identified in a variety of other oceanic tectonic settings: as a result of small differential motion between large plates (between North America and South America in the Central Atlantic; between Eurasia and Nubia offshore Gibraltar; between Macquarie and Australia plates in the Southern Ocean), within back-arcs (northwest Celebes Sea, Okushiri Ridge in the Japan Sea, on the eastern border of the Caroline plate), and ahead of subduction (Zenisu Ridge off Nankai Trough). Deformation appears to be more diffuse when larger plates are involved, and more localized for younger plates, perhaps in relation with the increasing rigidity of oceanic plates with age. The best example of diffuse deformation studied so far remains the Central Indian Ocean. Numerous marine data have been collected in this area, including shallow and deep seismic, heat flow measurements, multibeam bathymetry. The present-day deformation field has been modeled using GPS and earthquakes as far field and near field constraints respectively. Reactivation of the oceanic fabric (including for portions of the Indo-Australian plate which are now in subduction as evidenced by the September 2009 Padang earthquake), selective fault abandonment (Delescluse et al., 2008) and serpentinization (Delescluse and Chamot-Rooke, 2008) are some of the important processes that shape the present-day pattern of deformation. These rare intraplate deformation areas constitute excellent natural laboratories to

  16. Application of terrestrial laser scanning for detection of ground surface deformation in small mud volcano (Murono, Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Yuichi S.; Kusumoto, Shigekazu; Matta, Nobuhisa

    2016-07-01

    We perform terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to detect changes in surface morphology of a mud volcano in Murono, north-central Japan. The study site underwent significant deformation by a strong earthquake in 2011, and the surface deformation has continued in the following years. The point cloud datasets were obtained by TLS at three different times in 2011, 2013 and 2014. Those point clouds were aligned by cloud-based registration, which minimizes the closest point distance of point clouds of unchanged ground features, and the TLS-based point cloud data appear to be suitable for detecting centimeter-order deformations in the central domain of the mud volcano, as well as for measurements of topographic features including cracks of paved ground surface. The spatial patterns and accumulative amount of the vertical deformation during 2011-2014 captured by TLS correspond well with those previously reported based on point-based leveling surveys, supporting the validity of TLS survey.

  17. Deformation invariant bounding spheres for dynamic active constraints in surgery.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, Stuart A; Rodriguez Y Baena, Ferdinando

    2014-04-01

    Active constraints are collaborative robot control strategies, which can be used to guide a surgeon or protect delicate tissue structures during robot-assisted surgery. Tissue structures of interest often move and deform throughout a surgical intervention, and therefore, dynamic active constraints, which adapt and conform to these changes, are required. A fundamental element of an active constraint controller is the computation of the geometric relationship between the constraint geometry and the surgical instrument. For a static active constraint, there are a variety of computationally efficient methods for computing this relative configuration; however, for a dynamic active constraint, it becomes significantly more challenging. Deformation invariant bounding spheres are a novel bounding volume formulation, which can be used within a hierarchy to allow efficient proximity queries within dynamic active constraints. These bounding spheres are constructed in such a way that as the surface deforms, they do not require time-consuming rebuilds or updates, rather they are implicitly updated and continue to represent the underlying geometry as it changes. Experimental results show that performing proximity queries with deformation invariant bounding sphere hierarchies is faster than common methods from the literature when the deformation rate is within the range expected from conventional imaging systems. PMID:24622983

  18. Ground deformation of the western rift of Corinth observed by means of PSI, SBAS and DInSAR methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Panagiotis; Briole, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    The rift of Corinth has been long identified as a site of major importance in Europe due to its intense tectonic activity. It is one of the world's most rapidly extending continental regions and it has one of the highest seismicity rates in the Euro-Mediterranean region. It produces in average, an earthquake of magnitude 6 per century. The GPS studies conducted since 1990 indicate a north-south extension rate across the rift of ~1.5 cm year-1 around its western termination. Geological evidences show that the south coast of the rift is uplifting whereas the north part is subsiding. The western termination of the rift in the Patras broader area presents a major scientific and socio-economic importance, with the Psathopyrgos and the Rion-Patras faults being located very close to the city of Patras. The first DInSAR studies were carried out using SAR/ERS data after the Ms= 6.2 June 15, 1995 Aigion earthquake and contributed to its characterization. More recently the ground deformation of the area has been measured using a series of ASAR/ENVISAT, PALSAR/ALOS and RASARSAT-2 acquisitions. All datasets were processed by means of PSI (Persistent Scatterers Interferometry), SBAS (Small Baseline SubSet) and DInSAR (Differential Interferometry with SAR) methodologies. In addition to widely used tools (DIAPASON, ROI-PAC, STAMPS e.t.c.) in-house procedures and tools have been developed in order to exploit of the synergy of multiple characteristics/properties (frequency, viewing angles, sides, etc) of the SAR acquisitions aiming to the minimisation of the noise components. We verified the agreement between GPS and PSI/SBAS velocities at the location of the five permanent GPS stations operated in the rift since ten years. Ground deformations are visible at various scales and at various places in the produced PSI/SBAS maps and several known faults exhibit ground deformation around them with no earthquake occurred during the observations period: (a) On 18th and 22nd of January 2010

  19. The ground deformation field induced by a listric thrust fault with an overburden soil layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Shaogang; Cai, Yong'en

    2013-12-01

    The surface deformation field induced by a listric thrust fault with a thick, overburden soil layer is studied in this paper by the finite element method (FEM). The results show: (a) The maximum slip induced by the buried fault is not located at upper tip of the fault, but below it. (b) The vertical displacement changes remarkably near the fault, forming a fault scarp. With the increase of the soil layer thickness, the height of the scarp is decreased for the same earthquake magnitude. (c) The strong strain zone on the surface is localized near the projection of the fault tip on the ground surface. The horizontal strains in the zone are in tension above the hanging wall and in compression above the foot wall, and the vertical strains in the zone are vice versa, which is favorable for tensileshear, compression-shear fissures above hanging wall and foot wall, respectively.

  20. Monocytic Cells Become Less Compressible but More Deformable upon Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ravetto, Agnese; Wyss, Hans M.; Anderson, Patrick D.; den Toonder, Jaap M. J.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Monocytes play a significant role in the development of atherosclerosis. During the process of inflammation, circulating monocytes become activated in the blood stream. The consequent interactions of the activated monocytes with the blood flow and endothelial cells result in reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins, in particular of the microfilament structure, and concomitant changes in cell shape and mechanical behavior. Here we investigate the full elastic behavior of activated monocytes in relation to their cytoskeletal structure to obtain a better understanding of cell behavior during the progression of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Methods and Results The recently developed Capillary Micromechanics technique, based on exposing a cell to a pressure difference in a tapered glass microcapillary, was used to measure the deformation of activated and non-activated monocytic cells. Monitoring the elastic response of individual cells up to large deformations allowed us to obtain both the compressive and the shear modulus of a cell from a single experiment. Activation by inflammatory chemokines affected the cytoskeletal organization and increased the elastic compressive modulus of monocytes with 73–340%, while their resistance to shape deformation decreased, as indicated by a 25–88% drop in the cell’s shear modulus. This decrease in deformability is particularly pronounced at high strains, such as those that occur during diapedesis through the vascular wall. Conclusion Overall, monocytic cells become less compressible but more deformable upon activation. This change in mechanical response under different modes of deformation could be important in understanding the interplay between the mechanics and function of these cells. In addition, our data are of direct relevance for computational modeling and analysis of the distinct monocytic behavior in the circulation and the extravascular space. Lastly, an understanding of the changes of monocyte

  1. The interplay between deformation and volcanic activity: new data from the central sector of the Campi Flegrei caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaia, Roberto; Sabatino, Ciarcia; Enrico, Iannuzzi; Ernesto, Prinzi; D'Assisi, Tramparulo Francesco; Stefano, Vitale

    2016-04-01

    The new excavation of a tunnel in the central sector of the Campi Flegrei caldera allowed us to collect new stratigraphic and structural data shedding light on the volcano-tectonic evolution of the last 10 ka. The analyzed sequences are composed by an alternation of volcanic, lacustrine, fluvial and marine sediments hosting several deformation structures such as faults, sedimentary dykes and fractures. A review of available well log togheter with the new data were used to perform a 3D reconstruction of paleo-surfaces resulted after the main volcanic and deformation episodes. Results show as the paleo-morphology was strictly controlled by faults and fractures that formed meso-scale channels and depressions subsequently filled by tephra and volcanoclastic sediments. The measured structures indicate an extensional deformation accompanying the ground uplift occurred in various stages of the caldera evolution. Stratigraphic relationships between structures and volcanic deposits further constrain the timing of the deformation phases. Presently an unrest phase of the Campi Flegrei caldera is marked by variations of different parameters such as ground deformation activities well recorded by GPS data, topographic leveling and satellite surveys. The results of this study provide further insight into the long term deformation pattern of the caldera and provide a key to interpret the ground deformation scenarios accompanying a possible resumption of volcanism.

  2. Sequential data assimilation strategies for utilizing ground deformation data to assess rapidly evolving magma reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, P. M.; Pettijohn, J. C.; Zhan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Classic inversion and joint inversion schemes for analyzing ground deformation data are limited in their ability to provide model forecasts and track the temporal dynamics of a volcano experiencing unrest. Sequential data assimilation techniques, such as the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF; Evensen, 1994), estimate the instantaneous state of a dynamic system in a time-forward fashion by updating the model of a system whenever observations become available. The EnKF method uses a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach to estimate the covariance matrix in the Kalman filter and also tracks model parameters concurrently at a fraction of the computational cost of the Kalman filter (Kalman, 1960) and Extended Kalman Filter (Schmidt, 1966). In this investigation, we build upon Gregg and Pettijohn (2015) to test the performance of the EnKF for assimilating multiple, disparate ground deformation datasets (InSAR, GPS, leveling, and EDM) to provide model forecasts of a volcano exhibiting rapid variations in surface deformation. Specifically, the EnKF is applied to a hypothetical volcano experiencing both inflation and deflation to determine how quickly the EnKF is able to respond to changes in the magma chamber source given a particular set of surface observations. Of interest is how the EnKF responds to limitations imposed by the spatial and temporal resolution of the observations as well as data uncertainties. A series of synthetic tests is run to compare EnKF functionality with individual and multiple dataset assimilation. As the EnKF is model-independent, we test the performance of the EnKF with both time-forward viscoelastic finite element models as well as classic elastic analytical models. References: Evensen, G. (1994), Sequential data assimilation with a nonlinear quasi-geostrophic model using Monte Carlo methods to forecast error statistics, JGR, doi:10.1029/94jc00572. Gregg, P. M., and Pettijohn, J. C. (2015), A multi-data stream assimilation framework for the assessment

  3. Phantom-based ground-truth generation for cerebral vessel segmentation and pulsatile deformation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schetelig, Daniel; Säring, Dennis; Illies, Till; Sedlacik, Jan; Kording, Fabian; Werner, René

    2016-03-01

    Hemodynamic and mechanical factors of the vascular system are assumed to play a major role in understanding, e.g., initiation, growth and rupture of cerebral aneurysms. Among those factors, cardiac cycle-related pulsatile motion and deformation of cerebral vessels currently attract much interest. However, imaging of those effects requires high spatial and temporal resolution and remains challenging { and similarly does the analysis of the acquired images: Flow velocity changes and contrast media inflow cause vessel intensity variations in related temporally resolved computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography data over the cardiac cycle and impede application of intensity threshold-based segmentation and subsequent motion analysis. In this work, a flow phantom for generation of ground-truth images for evaluation of appropriate segmentation and motion analysis algorithms is developed. The acquired ground-truth data is used to illustrate the interplay between intensity fluctuations and (erroneous) motion quantification by standard threshold-based segmentation, and an adaptive threshold-based segmentation approach is proposed that alleviates respective issues. The results of the phantom study are further demonstrated to be transferable to patient data.

  4. The 11 March 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake : from GPS ground deformations to ionospheric perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, L. M.; Lognonne, P.; Nocquet, J.; Sladen, A.; Astafyeva, E.; Occhipinti, G.; Kherani, A.; Coïsson, P.; Bosser, P.; Vergnolle, M.; Kobayashi, N.; Mann, M.; Munekane, H.; Cappa, F.

    2011-12-01

    The 2011 Mw=9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake and tsunami occurred offshore the northeast coast of Japan, in one of the best instrumented region of the world. In particular, the country is covered by a very dense network, called GEONET, made of about a thousand 1 Hz permanent GPS (Global Positioning System) stations. Those stations allow not only precise measurements of ground deformations but also radio sounding of the ionosphere through Total Electron Content (TEC) measurements. The coseismic ionospheric disturbances are now routinely observed after strong and shallow earthquakes. After the great Tohoku-Oki earthquake, preliminary results using the GPS-TEC technique and worldwide GPS receivers showed that the atmosphere resonated with an impressive variety of modes. Indeed, vertical displacements of the ground and sea surface launched acoustic-gravity waves above the epicentral region up to teleseismic distance. In turn, the vibrations of the neutral atmosphere shook the ionosphere plasma to induce changes of the TEC. Here, we propose a detailed and comprehensive description of those modes based on the analysis of the GEONET GPS data. Our study takes advantage of the 1-Hz sampling rate of the GPS stations, critical in the near-field for detecting fast propagating waves, but also to enhance the signal to noise ratio and prevents aliasing effects. In the first place, we will present a comparison of the ionospheric perturbations and the vertical ground deformation, either as it is measured on land or as it is predicted offshore. Then, we will report on our progress to model the coseismic ionospheric perturbations, and in particular, on the development of numerical methods to model the coupling mechanisms between the solid earth, the ocean, the neutral atmosphere and the ionosphere plasma. There, acoustic-gravity waves are first modeled using normal modes summation or spectral methods for solving hydrodynamic equations and subsequent ionospheric plasma fluctuations are

  5. GPS analysis of ground surface deformation in response to 2011 drought in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karegar, M. A.; Dixon, T. H.; Malservisi, R.

    2014-12-01

    A precise process and analysis of a dense network of CGPS observations are used to infer the long term and seasonal deformation patterns of ground surface over the state of Texas. The state covers 9 major aquifers which supply more than 50 percent of the water utilized in the state and spread over ~75% of the state area. Pumping of groundwater from many aquifers for irrigation, industrial and human consumption has resulted in a significant water level declines, and in many areas caused long term ground surface subsidence. While more than 70 percent of GPS sites, located on the top of aquifers, experience subsidence, the remained sites located outside the aquifers present significant uplift as a result of elastic response to the changes in loading due to soil moisture and surface water. However, a significant episodic uplift (up 6 mm/yr) from 2010 to 2012 appears in all GPS time series corresponding to 2011 extreme drought in Texas and adjacent states. Such episodic uplift is inferred as an elastic response of ground surface to reduced surface load. While most of drought indicators rely on precipitation index, soil moisture model, satellite vegetation health index and streamflow data, we suggest using regional CGPS vertical displacement as a further proxy for the indication of a drought. Inverting the vertical displacement from GPS it is possible to estimate total water storage including the portion of groundwater storage. In this abstract, the uplifts during drought period are inverted to derive total water storage loss using load Green's function. The GPS-based estimate of water loss is compared with GRACE-based and Land Surface Models estimates of total water storage (e.g. NLDAS and GLDAS). The limitations and uncertainty associated with each technique are discussed.

  6. Persistent Scatterer Interferometry analysis of ground deformation in the Po Plain (Piacenza-Reggio Emilia sector, Northern Italy): seismo-tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonielli, Benedetta; Monserrat, Oriol; Bonini, Marco; Cenni, Nicola; Devanthéry, Núria; Righini, Gaia; Sani, Federico

    2016-08-01

    This work aims to explore the ongoing tectonic activity of structures in the outermost sector of the Northern Apennines, which represents the active leading edge of the thrust belt and is dominated by compressive deformation. We have applied the Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) technique to obtain new insights into the present-day deformation pattern of the frontal area of the Northern Apennine. PSI has proved to be effective in detecting surface deformation of wide regions involved in low tectonic movements. We used 34 Envisat images in descending geometry over the period of time between 2004 and 2010, performing about 300 interferometric pairs. The analysis of the velocity maps and of the PSI time-series has allowed to observe ground deformation over the sector of the Po Plain between Piacenza and Reggio Emilia. The time-series of permanent GPS stations located in the study area, validated the results of the PSI technique, showing a good correlation with the PS time-series. The PS analysis reveals the occurrence of a well-known subsidence area on the rear of the Ferrara arc, mostly connected to the exploitation of water resources. In some instances, the PS velocity pattern reveals ground uplift (with mean velocities ranging from 1 to 2.8 mm yr-1) above active thrust-related anticlines of the Emilia and Ferrara folds, and part of the Pede-Apennine margin. We hypothesize a correlation between the observed uplift deformation pattern and the growth of the thrust-related anticlines. As the uplift pattern corresponds to known geological features, it can be used to constrain the seismo-tectonic setting, and a working hypothesis may involve that the active Emilia and Ferrara thrust folds would be characterized by interseismic periods possibly dominated by aseismic creep.

  7. Multitemporal InSAR analysis at Betic-Rif arc: transient and steady state ground deformation style varieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, J.; Gonzalez, P.

    2010-12-01

    We present results of the analysis of multitemporal Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) at the Betics-Rif arc. We exploited a collected database with more than 400 SAR images from ERS and ENVISAT satellites from 6 descending tracks in South Spain and one ascending and one descending track in Northern Morocco (Alhucemas/Al-hoceima area). We compute time series of displacements, taking care on the occurrence of significant shallow earthquakes (clear temporal discontinuities) at the phase-screen atmospheric filter step. Ground deformation velocity maps indicate a large variety in ground deformation styles from clear anthropogenic to step-wise and steady-state tectonic motions. Here, we present preliminary results of significant deformation occurring at several places along the internal zone of the arc, which guarantee discussion and foster later investigations.

  8. Possible magma intrusion revealed by temporal gravity, ground deformation and ground temperature observations at Mount Komagatake (Hokkaido) during the 1996-1998 crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Mori, Hitoshi; Okada, Hiromu

    2000-12-01

    Mount Komagatake (1131m above sea level) is a subduction-related active volcano in Hokkaido (Japan), where two phreatic eruptions occurred in 1996 March and 1998 October, after 54years of dormancy. We analyse four sessions of geodetic, microgravity and ground temperature observations made over a two-year period. From November 1996 to May 1997, neither significant gravity nor significant elevation changes (GPS or levelling) were observed. From May 1997 to November 1997, we observed a slight subsidence (1-2cm) and contraction (within 1cm) of the edifice, a gravity increase (15-30 μgal) at the benchmarks inside the 2km wide summit crater, and a local temperature increase, of 15-20°C, at the summit crater. From November 1997 to May 1998, we observed an edifice-wide gravity increase of about 15µgal, with no significant elevation change for benchmarks outside the summit crater. Besides this edifice-scale variation, we recorded a subsidence of about 5-6cm and apparently no change of gravity inside the summit crater. We inverted our data using models of increasing complexity. Elastic models are able to explain our deformation observations, but they cannot explain either the gravity data or the temperature observations satisfactorily. We introduced both an isothermal and a non-isothermal porous medium filled with fluids to model deformation and gravity variations, and we used a fissure model to invert the temperature anomaly. Our observations are consistent with a model of underground shallow-water evaporation occurring as a result of heat rising from a hot and dense body (density contrast of 200kgm-3) of about 1011 kg at 4-5km depth. This interpretation suggests a possible intrusion of a magmatic body within the edifice.

  9. Potentials of L-band ALOS interferometry for the measurement of ground deformations at Etna volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briole, P.; Panagiotis, E.; Puglisi, G.; Guglielmino, F.; Bonforte, A.; Murakami, M.

    2009-04-01

    Using eleven ascending PALSAR scenes acquired by the Japanese satellite ALOS over Etna, between January 2007 and September 2008, we produced a series of interferograms covering the volcano and surroundings, by using ROI-PAC software. We compare our results with ENVISAT interferograms covering the same period. The coherence is significantly higher than C-band and it is particularly high in the inhabited areas and on lava flows emplaced during last centuries, where local subsidence is observed on the most recent ones; important improvements in the coherency are also achieved on forested areas. L-band interferometric pairs having large baselines, up to 3 km, are still usable but the coherency significantly fall off, as the baseline increases. Deformation patterns are well measured, and the use of L-band dataset is particular useful in those cases where the coherency in C-band is usually low. This is the case, for instance, of the north-eastern sector of the volcano, where the large forested area made difficult to measure the important ground deformations produced by the dynamic of the Pernicana Fault and the NE Rift zone. The known left lateral strike slip creep across the Pernicana fault is, indeed, well mapped. It can be quantified over the observation interval along the entire fault and compared with the GPS measurements. In the next years, we hope that the acquisition plan of ALOS will permit the capture of more PALSAR scene with the same sensor and orbit parameters. This will constitute a new and exceptional data base, crucial for the knowledge of the dynamics of Etna.

  10. Finite Element Modeling of Ground Deformation and Gravity Data Observed at Mt Etna During the 1993-1997 Inflation Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganci, G.; Currenti, G.; Del Negro, C.

    2006-12-01

    Elastic finite element models are applied to investigate the effects of topography and medium heterogeneities on the surface deformation and the gravity field produced by volcanic pressure sources. Changes in the gravity field cannot be interpreted only in terms of gain of mass disregarding the deformations of the rocks surrounding the source. Contributions to gravity variations depend also on surface and subsurface mass redistribution driven by dilation of the volcanic source. Both ground deformation and gravity changes were firstly evaluated by solving a coupled axial symmetric problem to estimate the effects of topography and medium heterogeneities. Numerical results show significant discrepancies in the ground deformation and gravity field compared to those predicted by analytical solutions, which disregard topography, elastic heterogeneities and density subsurface structures. With this in mind, we reviewed the expected gravity changes accompanying the 1993- 1997 inflation phase on Mt Etna by setting up a fully 3D finite element model in which we used the real topography of Etna volcano to include the geometry and seismic tomography data to infer crustal heterogeneities. The inflation phase was clearly detected by different geodetic techniques (EDM, GPS, SAR and leveling data) that showed a uniform expansion of the overall volcano edifice. When the gravity data are integrated with ground deformation data and a coupled modeling is solved, a mass intrusion is expected at depth to justify both ground deformation and gravity observation. Our findings highlighted two main points. Firstly, geodetic and gravity data, which independently reflect the state of volcano, need to be jointly modeled in order to obtain a reliable estimate of the depth and density of the intrusion. Secondly, the application of finite element methods allows for a more accurate modeling procedure, which might provide sensible insight into volcanic source definition.

  11. Comparison of Ground Deformation Measurements and Atmospheric Artifacts Using Insar Cosmo-Skymed and GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbini, S.; Prati, C.; Errico, M.; Novali, F.; Santi, E.

    2012-12-01

    Integrating and exploiting the synergetic combination of the InSAR and GPS techniques allows overcoming the limitations inherent in the use of each technique alone. GPS-based estimates of tropospheric delays may contribute in obtaining better corrections of the wet tropospheric path delay in InSAR signals. This will enhance the coherence and will allow the application of InSAR in a wider range of applications. The test area chosen for the comparison between InSAR and GPS data is in northeastern Italy, in particular, in the city of Bologna (urbanized area) and in the surroundings of Medicina (agricultural area). In these sites, two permanent GPS stations (EUREF EPN sites) of the University of Bologna are operational since mid 1999 (BOLG) and 1996 (MSEL) respectively. The InSAR data used are the COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) images made available by the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The Permanent Scatterers (PS) technique was applied to a number of repeated CSK strip map SAR images acquired over a 40x40 square km area encompassing the two towns mentioned above. The results of this work demonstrate, on the one hand, the CSK capabilities to operate in a repeated interferometric survey mode for measuring ground deformation with millimeter accuracy in different environments. On the other, the comparison of the differential height between the two stations derived with the GPS and the InSAR data, using both acquisition geometries, is satisfactory. Elevation, ground deformation and atmospheric artifacts were estimated in correspondence of the identified PS and compared with the GPS measurements carried out at the same acquisition time by the permanent stations at Bologna and Medicina. The comparison of the differential height between the two stations shows the sensitivity of the GPS height solution to the length of the observation interval. The vertical dispersion achieved by GPS is higher than that achieved by PS InSAR, as expected; however, a similar linear trend appears in the

  12. Dynamics of a deformable active particle under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Tarama, Mitsusuke; Menzel, Andreas M; ten Hagen, Borge; Wittkowski, Raphael; Ohta, Takao; Löwen, Hartmut

    2013-09-14

    The motion of a deformable active particle in linear shear flow is explored theoretically. Based on symmetry considerations, we propose coupled nonlinear dynamical equations for the particle position, velocity, deformation, and rotation. In our model, both, passive rotations induced by the shear flow as well as active spinning motions, are taken into account. Our equations reduce to known models in the two limits of vanishing shear flow and vanishing particle deformability. For varied shear rate and particle propulsion speed, we solve the equations numerically in two spatial dimensions and obtain a manifold of different dynamical modes including active straight motion, periodic motions, motions on undulated cycloids, winding motions, as well as quasi-periodic and chaotic motions induced at high shear rates. The types of motion are distinguished by different characteristics in the real-space trajectories and in the dynamical behavior of the particle orientation and its deformation. Our predictions can be verified in experiments on self-propelled droplets exposed to a linear shear flow.

  13. New constraints on the active tectonic deformation of the Aegean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nyst, M.; Thatcher, W.

    2004-01-01

    Site velocities from six separate Global Positioning System (GPS) networks comprising 374 stations have been referred to a single common Eurasia-fixed reference frame to map the velocity distribution over the entire Aegean. We use the GPS velocity field to identify deforming regions, rigid elements, and potential microplate boundaries, and build upon previous work by others to initially specify rigid elements in central Greece, the South Aegean, Anatolia, and the Sea of Marmara. We apply an iterative approach, tentatively defining microplate boundaries, determining best fit rigid rotations, examining misfit patterns, and revising the boundaries to achieve a better match between model and data. Short-term seismic cycle effects are minor contaminants of the data that we remove when necessary to isolate the long-term kinematics. We find that present day Aegean deformation is due to the relative motions of four microplates and straining in several isolated zones internal to them. The RMS misfit of model to data is about 2-sigma, very good when compared to the typical match between coseismic fault models and GPS data. The simplicity of the microplate description of the deformation and its good fit to the GPS data are surprising and were not anticipated by previous work, which had suggested either many rigid elements or broad deforming zones that comprise much of the Aegean region. The isolated deforming zones are also unexpected and cannot be explained by the kinematics of the microplate motions. Strain rates within internally deforming zones are extensional and range from 30 to 50 nanostrain/year (nstrain/year, 10-9/year), 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than rates observed across the major microplate boundaries. Lower strain rates may exist elsewhere withi the microplates but are only resolved in Anatolia, where extension of 13 ?? 4 nstrain/ year is required by the data. Our results suggest that despite the detailed complexity of active continental deformation

  14. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry Analysis of Ground Deformation within the Coso Geothermal Site, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brawner, Erik

    Earth's surface movement may cause as a potential hazard to infrastructure and people. Associated earthquake hazards pose a potential side effect of geothermal activity. Modern remote sensing techniques known as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) can measure surface change with a high degree of precision to mm scale movements. Previous work has identified a deformation anomaly within the Coso Geothermal site in eastern California. Surface changes have not been analyzed since the 1990s, allowing a decade of geothermal production impact to occur since previously assessed. In this study, InSAR data was acquired and analyzed between the years 2005 and 2010. Acquired by the ENVISAT satellite from both ascending and descending modes. This provides an independent dataset from previous work. Incorporating data generated from a new sensor covering a more modern temporal study period. Analysis of this time period revealed a subsidence anomaly in correlation with the extents of the geothermal production area under current operation. Maximum subsidence rates in the region reached approximately 3.8 cm/yr. A similar rate assessed from previous work throughout the 1990s. The correlation of subsidence patterns suggests a linear source of deformation from measurements spanning multiple decades. Regions of subsidence branch out from the main anomaly to the North-Northeast and to the South where additional significant peaks of subsidence occurring. The extents of the deformation anomaly directly correlate with the dispersal of geothermal production well site locations. Depressurization within the geothermal system provides a leading cause to surface subsidence from excessive extraction of hydrothermal fluids. As a result of minimal reinjection of production fluids.

  15. 3D time dependent thermo-fluid dynamic model of ground deformation at Campi Flegrei caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaldo, R.; Tizzani, P.; Manconi, A.; Manzo, M.; Pepe, S.; Pepe, A.; Lanari, R.

    2012-04-01

    In active volcanic areas deformation signals are generally characterized by non-linear spatial and temporal variations [Tizzani P. et al., 2007]. This behaviour has been revealed in the last two decades by the so-called advanced DInSAR processing algorithms, developed to analyze surface deformation phenomena [Berardino P. et al., 2002; Ferretti C. et al., 2001]. Notwithstanding, most of the inverse modelling attempts to characterize the evolution of the volcanic sources are based on the assumption that the Earth's crust behaves as a homogeneous linear elastic material. However, the behaviour of the upper lithosphere in thermally anomalous regions (as active volcanoes are) might be well described as a non-Newtonian fluid, where some of the material proprieties of the rocks (i.e., apparent viscosities) can change over time [Pinkerton H. et al., 1995]. In this context, we considered the thermal proprieties and mechanical heterogeneities of the upper crust in order to develop a new 3D time dependent thermo-fluid dynamic model of Campi Flegrei (CF) caldera, Southern Italy. More specifically, according to Tizzani P. et al. (2010), we integrated in a FEM environment geophysical information (gravimetric, seismic, and borehole data) available for the considered area and performed two FEM optimization procedures to constrain the 3D distribution of unknown physical parameters (temperature and viscosity distributions) that might help explaining the data observed at surface (geothermal wells and DInSAR measurements). First, we searched for the heat production, the volume source distribution and surface emissivity parameters providing the best-fit of the geothermal profiles data measured at six boreholes [Agip ESGE, 1986], by solving the Fourier heat equation over time (about 40 kys). The 3D thermal field resulting from this optimization was used to calculate the 3D brittle-ductile transition. This analysis revealed the presence of a ductile region, located beneath the centre of

  16. Interseismic deformations along Ecuador active fault systems: Contribution of space-borne SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champenois, J.; Audin, L.; Baize, S.; Nocquet, J.; Alvarado, A.

    2013-05-01

    Located in the Northern Andes along the active subduction zone of the Nazca plate beneath the South American continent, Ecuador is highly exposed to seismic hazard. Up to now, numerous multidisciplinary studies for the last ten years focused on the seismicity related to the subduction, whereas few investigations concentrated on the crustal seismicity in the upper plate (through few strong events like the 1797 Riobamba earthquake, ML 8.3, 12.000 deaths). The faults that are responsible of these earthquakes are poorly known in term of slip rate and in some cases are even not identified yet. To address this issue and compare the interseismic data to the geomorphological long term signature of active faulting we propose to use multi-temporal Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) methods.Using these cost-effective techniques, we are able to investigate surface interseismic deformation with an unprecedented spatial density of measurements (highly superior to Global Positioning System network density). This study presents preliminary results of tectonic surface deformation using ERS (1993-2000) and Envisat (2002-2010) SAR data in the Inter Andean Valley and along the eastern border of the North Andean Block, where is accommodated the relative displacement between the North Andean Block and South America plate (~ 8 mm/yr). We generated average velocity maps and consistent time-series of displacements with values measured along the line of sight of the radar. Resulting maps of ground displacements are calibrated by GPS data in order to provide a homogeneous database. These preliminary results show large scale deformation localized on some major fault systems in the Inter Andean Valley (from Quito to north of Cuenca) and allow an updating of the active faults map. Moreover, these InSAR results permit detecting and quantifying ground deformation due to volcanic unrest.

  17. Ground deformation at Merapi Volcano, Java, Indonesia: distance changes, June 1988-October 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, K.D.; Voight, B.; ,; ,; ,; Casadevall, T.J.

    2000-01-01

    Edifice deformations are reported here for the period 1988–1995 at Merapi volcano, one of the most active and dangerous volcanoes in Indonesia. The study period includes a major resumption in lava effusion in January 1992 and a major dome collapse in November 1994. The data comprise electronic distance measurements (EDM) on a summit trilateration network, slope distance changes measured to the upper flanks, and other data collected from 1988 to 1995. A major consequence of this study is the documentation of a significant 4-year period of deformation precursory to the 1992 eruption. Cross-crater strain rates accelerated from less than 3×10−6/day between 1988 and 1990 to more than 11×10−6/day just prior to the January 1992 activity, representing a general, asymmetric extension of the summit during high-level conduit pressurization. After the vent opened and effusion of lava resumed, strain occurred at a much-reduced rate of less than 2×10−6/day. EDM measurements between lower flank benchmarks and the upper edifice indicate displacements as great as 1 m per year over the four years before the 1992 eruption. The Gendol breach, a pronounced depression formed by the juxtaposition of old lava coulées on the southeast flank, functioned as a major displacement discontinuity. Since 1993, movements have generally not exceeded the 95% confidence limits of the summit network. Exceptions to this include 12 cm outward movement for the northwest crater rim in 1992–1993, probably from loading by newly erupted dome lava, and movements as much as 7 cm on the south flank between November 1994 and September 1995. No short-term precursors were noted before the November 1994 lava dome collapse, but long-term adjustments of crater geometry accompanied lava dome growth in 1994. Short-term 2-cm deflation of the edifice occurred following the November 1994 dome collapse.

  18. Crustal deformation and volcanism at active plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geirsson, Halldor

    Most of Earth's volcanoes are located near active tectonic plate boundaries, where the tectonic plates move relative to each other resulting in deformation. Likewise, subsurface magma movement and pressure changes in magmatic systems can cause measurable deformation of the Earth's surface. The study of the shape of Earth and therefore studies of surface deformation is called geodesy. Modern geodetic techniques allow precise measurements (˜1 mm accuracy) of deformation of tectonic and magmatic systems. Because of the spatial correlation between tectonic boundaries and volcanism, the tectonic and volcanic deformation signals can become intertwined. Thus it is often important to study both tectonic and volcanic deformation processes simultaneously, when one is trying to study one of the systems individually. In this thesis, I present research on crustal deformation and magmatic processes at active plate boundaries. The study areas cover divergent and transform plate boundaries in south Iceland and convergent and transform plate boundaries in Central America, specifically Nicaragua and El Salvador. The study is composed of four main chapters: two of the chapters focus on the magma plumbing system of Hekla volcano, Iceland and the plate boundary in south Iceland; one chapter focuses on shallow controls of explosive volcanism at Telica volcano, Nicaragua; and the fourth chapter focuses on co- and post-seismic deformation from a Mw = 7.3 earthquake which occurred offshore El Salvador in 2012. Hekla volcano is located at the intersection of a transform zone and a rift zone in Iceland and thus is affected by a combination of shear and extensional strains, in addition to co-seismic and co-rifting deformation. The inter-eruptive deformation signal from Hekla is subtle, as observed by a decade (2000-2010) of GPS data in south Iceland. A simultaneous inversion of this data for parameters describing the geometry and source characteristics of the magma chamber at Hekla, and

  19. Sill emplacement and corresponding ground deformation processes at the Alu-Dalafilla volcanic centre in the Danakil Depression, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Craig; Bastow, Ian; Hetherington, Rachel; van Wyk de Vries, Ben; Jackson, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    evaporitic host rock sequence. Important consequences of the shift to sill-dominated magmatism in the Danakil Depression include: (i) roof uplift induced by sill intrusion may not directly relate to the emplaced magma volume if intrusion promotes ductile deformation of the host evaporitic sequence (Schofield et al. 2014), implying that InSAR studies of ground deformation, crucial to volcanic hazard assessment, may under-estimate intruded magma volumes; and (ii) sill volumes are not incorporated into total melt volume estimates, which are used to constrain lithospheric processes active during continental break-up.

  20. Temporal evolution of continental lithospheric strength in actively deforming regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.; Pollitz, F.F.

    2008-01-01

    It has been agreed for nearly a century that a strong, load-bearing outer layer of earth is required to support mountain ranges, transmit stresses to deform active regions and store elastic strain to generate earthquakes. However the dept and extent of this strong layer remain controversial. Here we use a variety of observations to infer the distribution of lithospheric strength in the active western United States from seismic to steady-state time scales. We use evidence from post-seismic transient and earthquake cycle deformation reservoir loading glacio-isostatic adjustment, and lithosphere isostatic adjustment to large surface and subsurface loads. The nearly perfectly elastic behavior of Earth's crust and mantle at the time scale of seismic wave propagation evolves to that of a strong, elastic crust and weak, ductile upper mantle lithosphere at both earthquake cycle (EC, ???10?? to 103 yr) and glacio-isostatic adjustment (GIA, ???103 to 104 yr) time scales. Topography and gravity field correlations indicate that lithosphere isostatic adjustment (LIA) on ???106-107 yr time scales occurs with most lithospheric stress supported by an upper crust overlying a much weaker ductile subtrate. These comparisons suggest that the upper mantle lithosphere is weaker than the crust at all time scales longer than seismic. In contrast, the lower crust has a chameleon-like behavior, strong at EC and GIA time scales and weak for LIA and steady-state deformation processes. The lower crust might even take on a third identity in regions of rapid crustal extension or continental collision, where anomalously high temperatures may lead to large-scale ductile flow in a lower crustal layer that is locally weaker than the upper mantle. Modeling of lithospheric processes in active regions thus cannot use a one-size-fits-all prescription of rheological layering (relation between applied stress and deformation as a function of depth) but must be tailored to the time scale and tectonic

  1. Unified Methodology for Detecting Trend Changes and Outliers in Time Series: application to Ground Deformation in the Virunga Volcanic Province.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjona, A.; d'Oreye, N.

    2014-12-01

    Detecting trend changes and outliers are common needs in applied time series analysis. Here we propose a tool combining various robust methods to perform simultaneously these two tasks. Such a unified tool is well adapted to the analysis of extensive databases. We use it to analyze ground deformations associated to volcanic activity in the Virunga Volcanic Province. Trend changes are estimated using weighted moving average filter, locally weighted scatterplot smoothers and smoothing splines. Significance of detected trend changes is estimated using parametric and non-parametric statistical tests such as Mann-Kendall, Spearmans Rho and Pearson correlation methods. Outliers are detected using both standardized residuals from best-fit model and Chebyshev's inequality. On one side observations that have a studentized residual outside the ± 2 range are considered statistically significant at the 95% a level and potential outliers. On the other hand Chebyshev's inequality gives a bound of what percentage of the data falls outside of k standard deviations from the mean calculating upper and lower outlier detection limits. When multiple components of displacements are available (such as vertical, North-South and East-West GPS time series), the outliers detection is performed on each component separately, then jointly. The effectiveness of the tool is demonstrated by analyzing 5 years of data recorded by the permanent GNSS volcano monitoring network in Goma as well as the extensive amount of MSBAS Multidimensional InSAR time series (Samsonov and dOreye, 2012) recorded in the Virunga during 2003-2013 time period.

  2. Quantitative models for magma degassing and ground deformation (bradyseism) at Campi Flegrei, Italy: Implications for future eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodnar, R.J.; Cannatelli, C.; de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.; Belkin, H.E.; Milia, A.

    2007-01-01

    Campi Flegrei (Phlegrean Fields) is an active volcanic center near Naples, Italy. Numerous eruptions have occurred here during the Quaternary, and repeated episodes of slow vertical ground movement (bradyseism) have been documented since Roman times. Here, we present a quantitative model that relates deformation episodes to magma degassing and fracturing at the brittle-ductile transition in a magmatic-hydrothermal enviromnent. The model is consistent with field and laboratory observations and predicts that uplift between 1982 and 1984 was associated with crystallization of ???0.83 km3 of H2O-saturated magma at 6 km depth. During crystallization, ???6.2 ?? 1010 kg of H2O and 7.5 ?? 108 kg of CO2, exsolved from the magma and generated ???7 ?? 1015 J of mechanical (P??V) energy to drive the observed uplift. For comparison, ???1017 J of thermal energy was released during the 18 May 1980 lateral blast at Mount St. Helens. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  3. Ground deformation monitoring using small baseline DInSAR technique: A case study in Taiyuan City from 2003 to 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, H.-A.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Chen, X.-Y.; Lu, T.; Du, J.; Sun, Z.-H.; Sun, G.-T.

    2011-01-01

    DInSAR technique based on time series of SAR images has been very popular to monitor ground stow deformation in recent years such as permanent scatterers (PS) method small baseline subsets (SBAS) method and coherent targets (CT) method. By taking advantage of PS method and CT method in this paper small baseline DTnSAR technique is used to investigate the ground deformation of Taiyuan City Shanxi Province from 2003 to 2009 by using 23 ENVISAT ASAR images. The experiment results demonstrate that: (1) during this period four significant subsidence centers have been developed in Taiyuan namely Xiayuan Wujiabu Xiaodian Sunjiazhai. The largest subsidence center is Sunjiazhai with an average subsidence rate of -77. 28 mm/a; (2) The subsidence of the old center Wanbolin has sHowed down. And the subsidence in the northern region has stopped and some areas even rebounded. (3) The change of subsidence centers indicates that the control measures of "closing wells and reducing exploitation" taken by the Taiyuan government has achieved initial effects. (4) The experiment results have been validated with leveling data and the acouracy is 2. 90 mm which shows that the small baseline DInSAR technique can be used to monitor urban ground deformation.

  4. A persistent scatterer interpolation for retrieving accurate ground deformation over InSAR-decorrelated agricultural fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingyi; Zebker, Howard A.; Knight, Rosemary

    2015-11-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is a radar remote sensing technique for measuring surface deformation to millimeter-level accuracy at meter-scale resolution. Obtaining accurate deformation measurements in agricultural regions is difficult because the signal is often decorrelated due to vegetation growth. We present here a new algorithm for retrieving InSAR deformation measurements over areas with severe vegetation decorrelation using adaptive phase interpolation between persistent scatterer (PS) pixels, those points at which surface scattering properties do not change much over time and thus decorrelation artifacts are minimal. We apply this algorithm to L-band ALOS interferograms acquired over the San Luis Valley, Colorado, and the Tulare Basin, California. In both areas, the pumping of groundwater for irrigation results in deformation of the land that can be detected using InSAR. We show that the PS-based algorithm can significantly reduce the artifacts due to vegetation decorrelation while preserving the deformation signature.

  5. Ground deformation of Tenerife volcano island revealed by 1992-2005 DInSAR time series:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tizzani, P.

    2009-04-01

    We study the state of deformation of Tenerife Island using Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR). We apply the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) DInSAR algorithm to radar images acquired from 1992 to 2005 by ERS sensors to determine the deformation rate distribution and the time series for the coherent pixels identified in the island. Our analysis reveals that the summit area of the volcanic edifice is characterized by a continuous subsidence extending well beyond Las Cañadas caldera rim and corresponding to the intrusive core of the island. These results, coupled with GPS ones, structural and geological information and deformation modelling, suggest that the intrusive complex is subsiding into a weak lithosphere and that the volcanic edifice is in a state of compression. We also detect more localized deformation patterns correlated with water table changes and variations in the time deformation associated with the seismic crisis in 2004.

  6. Estimating Active Layer Thickness from Remotely Sensed Surface Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Schaefer, K. M.; Zhang, T.; Wahr, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    We estimate active layer thickness (ALT) from remotely sensed surface subsidence during thawing seasons derived from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements. Ground ice takes up more volume than ground water, so as the soil thaws in summer and the active layer deepens, the ground subsides. The volume of melted ground water during the summer thaw determines seasonal subsidence. ALT is defined as the maximum thaw depth at the end of a thawing season. By using InSAR to measure surface subsidence between the start and end of summer season, one can estimate the depth of thaw over a large area (typically 100 km by 100 km). We developed an ALT retrieval algorithm integrating InSAR-derived surface subsidence, observed soil texture, organic matter content, and moisture content. We validated this algorithm in the continuous permafrost area on the North Slope of Alaska. Based on InSAR measurements using ERS-1/2 SAR data, our estimated values match in situ measurements of ALT within 1--10 cm at Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) sites within the study area. The active layer plays a key role in land surface processes in cold regions. Current measurements of ALT using mechanical probing, frost/thaw tubes, or inferred from temperature measurements are of high quality, but limited in spatial coverage. Using InSAR to estimate ALT greatly expands the spatial coverage of ALT observations.

  7. Deformation across the seismic cycle in tectonically active regions: Imaging, modeling, and interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, William Douglas

    Images of surface displacements in response to tectonic forces can provide independent, spatially dense observations that assist in understanding sub-surface processes. When considered independently or augmented with more traditional observations of active tectonics such as seismicity and ground mapping, these measurements provide constraints on spatially and temporally variable fault behavior across the seismic cycle. Models of fault behavior inferred from these observations in turn allow us to address topics in geologic hazards assessment, the long- and short-term character of strain in deforming regions, and the interactions between faults throughout the crust. In this dissertation, I use remotely sensed observations of ground displacements from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to approach several problems related to earthquake and aseismic fault slip. I establish image processing and inverse methods for better detailing subsurface fault slip and apply these to the 2010-2011 Canterbury, New Zealand sequence. Then, I focus on the active tectonics of the Zagros Mountains in southern Iran. There, I show through orogen-wide InSAR time series analysis that active strain is accommodated across the width of the mountain belt. I also use a combination of InSAR, local seismicity, and structural modeling to demonstrate that strain is vertically partitioned within the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt, with earthquakes controlling deformation in the underlying basement while the overlying sedimentary section shortens in transient, earthquake-triggered aseismic slip events. In certain examples, these aseismic slip events directly contribute to the growth of fault-bend folds. I use these inferences to explore a previously noted discrepancy between observed shortening and that which is expected from known earthquakes. I show that the earthquakes and short-term aseismic slip cannot account for this discrepancy, and that additional deformation mechanisms must be

  8. Rapid dike intrusion into Sakurajima volcano on August 15, 2015, as detected by multi-parameter ground deformation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, Kohei; Iguchi, Masato; Tameguri, Takeshi

    2016-04-01

    We present observations of ground deformation at Sakurajima in August 2015 and model the deformation using a combination of GNSS, tilt and strain data in order to interpret a rapid deformation event on August 15, 2015. The pattern of horizontal displacement during the period from August 14 to 16, 2015, shows a WNW-ESE extension, which suggests the opening of a dike. Using a genetic algorithm, we obtained the position, dip, strike length, width and opening of a dislocation source based on the combined data. A nearly vertical dike with a NNE-SSW strike was found at a depth of 1.0 km below sea level beneath the Showa crater. The length and width are 2.3 and 0.6 km, respectively, and a dike opening of 1.97 m yields a volume increase of 2.7 × 106 m3. 887 volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes beside the dike suggest that the rapid opening of the dike caused an accumulation of strain in the surrounding rocks, and the VT earthquakes were generated to release this strain. Half of the total amount of deformation was concentrated between 10:27 and 11:54 on August 15. It is estimated that the magma intrusion rate was 1 × 106 m3/h during this period. This is 200 times larger than the magma intrusion rate prior to one of the biggest eruptions at the summit crater of Minami-dake on July 24, 2012, and 2200 times larger than the average magma intrusion rate during the period from October 2011 to March 2012. The previous Mogi-type ground deformation is considered to be a process of magma accumulation in preexisting spherical reservoirs. Conversely, the August 2015 event was a dike intrusion and occurred in a different location to the preexisting reservoirs. The direction of the opening of the dike coincides with the T-axes and direction of faults creating a graben structure.

  9. Ground deformation at Campi Flegrei caldera using long water pipe tiltmeters and sea level gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, R.; Capuano, P.; Tammaro, U.; Bilham, R.

    2012-04-01

    Campi Flegrei is a caldera complex located in the Campanian plain region of southern Italy, 15 km west of the city of Naples, and forms part of the Roman co-magmatic province which is a volcanic chain that characterizes the western coast of the country. The Campi Flegrei caldera was generated by several collapses produced by strong explosive eruptions. The main caldera at Campi Flegrei is 12 - 15km across and its rim is thought to have been formed during the catastrophic eruption, occurred 39 ky ago ca. which produced a deposit referred to as the Campanian Ignimbrite. Campi Flegrei area periodically experiences significant unrest episodes which include ground deformations, the so-called "bradisismo", recorded both by marine terraces, archaeological record and harbour structures. Following the last eruption (Monte Nuovo, 1538) a general subsidence has been interrupted by episodes of uplift, the most recent of which occurred in 1970-72 and 1982-84. In the past decade subsidence has been arrested and has been replaced by intermittent episodes of inflation with short time duration and various maximum amplitude. They occurred in 1989, 1994, 2000, 2004, 2005-06, 2009 and 2011 with duration of few months and maximum amplitude ranging between 3 and 11 cm. Since 2008 an array of water-pipe tiltmeters with lengths between 28 m and 278 m in tunnels on the flanks of the region of maximum inflation has been installed to avoid problems common to the traditional tiltmeters. The tiltmeters record inflation episodes upon which are superimposed local load tides, with amplitudes roughly an order of magnitude greater than the solid Earth body tides. In addition to the tides, the tiltmeters record a line spectrum of seiches in the Bay of Naples and in the Tyrrenian sea. We use data recorded by three tide gauges in the Bay of Pozzuoli to compare water pipe data with sea level to extract astronomical tidal components and seiches periods particularly between 20 minutes and 56 minutes that

  10. Real Time Tracking of Magmatic Intrusions by means of Ground Deformation Modeling during Volcanic Crises.

    PubMed

    Cannavò, Flavio; Camacho, Antonio G; González, Pablo J; Mattia, Mario; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Fernández, José

    2015-06-09

    Volcano observatories provide near real-time information and, ultimately, forecasts about volcano activity. For this reason, multiple physical and chemical parameters are continuously monitored. Here, we present a new method to efficiently estimate the location and evolution of magmatic sources based on a stream of real-time surface deformation data, such as High-Rate GPS, and a free-geometry magmatic source model. The tool allows tracking inflation and deflation sources in time, providing estimates of where a volcano might erupt, which is important in understanding an on-going crisis. We show a successful simulated application to the pre-eruptive period of May 2008, at Mount Etna (Italy). The proposed methodology is able to track the fast dynamics of the magma migration by inverting the real-time data within seconds. This general method is suitable for integration in any volcano observatory. The method provides first order unsupervised and realistic estimates of the locations of magmatic sources and of potential eruption sites, information that is especially important for civil protection purposes.

  11. Real Time Tracking of Magmatic Intrusions by means of Ground Deformation Modeling during Volcanic Crises

    PubMed Central

    Cannavò, Flavio; Camacho, Antonio G.; González, Pablo J.; Mattia, Mario; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Fernández, José

    2015-01-01

    Volcano observatories provide near real-time information and, ultimately, forecasts about volcano activity. For this reason, multiple physical and chemical parameters are continuously monitored. Here, we present a new method to efficiently estimate the location and evolution of magmatic sources based on a stream of real-time surface deformation data, such as High-Rate GPS, and a free-geometry magmatic source model. The tool allows tracking inflation and deflation sources in time, providing estimates of where a volcano might erupt, which is important in understanding an on-going crisis. We show a successful simulated application to the pre-eruptive period of May 2008, at Mount Etna (Italy). The proposed methodology is able to track the fast dynamics of the magma migration by inverting the real-time data within seconds. This general method is suitable for integration in any volcano observatory. The method provides first order unsupervised and realistic estimates of the locations of magmatic sources and of potential eruption sites, information that is especially important for civil protection purposes. PMID:26055494

  12. Real Time Tracking of Magmatic Intrusions by means of Ground Deformation Modeling during Volcanic Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannavò, Flavio; Camacho, Antonio G.; González, Pablo J.; Mattia, Mario; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Fernández, José

    2015-06-01

    Volcano observatories provide near real-time information and, ultimately, forecasts about volcano activity. For this reason, multiple physical and chemical parameters are continuously monitored. Here, we present a new method to efficiently estimate the location and evolution of magmatic sources based on a stream of real-time surface deformation data, such as High-Rate GPS, and a free-geometry magmatic source model. The tool allows tracking inflation and deflation sources in time, providing estimates of where a volcano might erupt, which is important in understanding an on-going crisis. We show a successful simulated application to the pre-eruptive period of May 2008, at Mount Etna (Italy). The proposed methodology is able to track the fast dynamics of the magma migration by inverting the real-time data within seconds. This general method is suitable for integration in any volcano observatory. The method provides first order unsupervised and realistic estimates of the locations of magmatic sources and of potential eruption sites, information that is especially important for civil protection purposes.

  13. Real Time Tracking of Magmatic Intrusions by means of Ground Deformation Modeling during Volcanic Crises.

    PubMed

    Cannavò, Flavio; Camacho, Antonio G; González, Pablo J; Mattia, Mario; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Fernández, José

    2015-01-01

    Volcano observatories provide near real-time information and, ultimately, forecasts about volcano activity. For this reason, multiple physical and chemical parameters are continuously monitored. Here, we present a new method to efficiently estimate the location and evolution of magmatic sources based on a stream of real-time surface deformation data, such as High-Rate GPS, and a free-geometry magmatic source model. The tool allows tracking inflation and deflation sources in time, providing estimates of where a volcano might erupt, which is important in understanding an on-going crisis. We show a successful simulated application to the pre-eruptive period of May 2008, at Mount Etna (Italy). The proposed methodology is able to track the fast dynamics of the magma migration by inverting the real-time data within seconds. This general method is suitable for integration in any volcano observatory. The method provides first order unsupervised and realistic estimates of the locations of magmatic sources and of potential eruption sites, information that is especially important for civil protection purposes. PMID:26055494

  14. Active Printed Materials for Complex Self-Evolving Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raviv, Dan; Zhao, Wei; McKnelly, Carrie; Papadopoulou, Athina; Kadambi, Achuta; Shi, Boxin; Hirsch, Shai; Dikovsky, Daniel; Zyracki, Michael; Olguin, Carlos; Raskar, Ramesh; Tibbits, Skylar

    2014-12-01

    We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated models are designed and printed as static objects. Here, we introduce a novel approach for simulating and fabricating self-evolving structures that transform into a predetermined shape, changing property and function after fabrication. The new locally coordinated bending primitives combine into a single system, allowing for a global deformation which can stretch, fold and bend given environmental stimulus.

  15. Active printed materials for complex self-evolving deformations.

    PubMed

    Raviv, Dan; Zhao, Wei; McKnelly, Carrie; Papadopoulou, Athina; Kadambi, Achuta; Shi, Boxin; Hirsch, Shai; Dikovsky, Daniel; Zyracki, Michael; Olguin, Carlos; Raskar, Ramesh; Tibbits, Skylar

    2014-12-18

    We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated models are designed and printed as static objects. Here, we introduce a novel approach for simulating and fabricating self-evolving structures that transform into a predetermined shape, changing property and function after fabrication. The new locally coordinated bending primitives combine into a single system, allowing for a global deformation which can stretch, fold and bend given environmental stimulus.

  16. A Blind Test Experiment in Volcano Geodesy: a Benchmark for Inverse Methods of Ground Deformation and Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, Luca; Fernandez, Jose; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Rivalta, Eleonora; Camacho, Antonio; Nikkhoo, Mehdi; Walter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The inversion of ground deformation and gravity data is affected by an intrinsic ambiguity because of the mathematical formulation of the inverse problem. Current methods for the inversion of geodetic data rely on both parametric (i.e. assuming a source geometry) and non-parametric approaches. The former are able to catch the fundamental features of the ground deformation source but, if the assumptions are wrong or oversimplified, they could provide misleading results. On the other hand, the latter class of methods, even if not relying on stringent assumptions, could suffer from artifacts, especially when dealing with poor datasets. In the framework of the EC-FP7 MED-SUV project we aim at comparing different inverse approaches to verify how they cope with basic goals of Volcano Geodesy: determining the source depth, the source shape (size and geometry), the nature of the source (magmatic/hydrothermal) and hinting the complexity of the source. Other aspects that are important in volcano monitoring are: volume/mass transfer toward shallow depths, propagation of dikes/sills, forecasting the opening of eruptive vents. On the basis of similar experiments already done in the fields of seismic tomography and geophysical imaging, we have devised a bind test experiment. Our group was divided into one model design team and several inversion teams. The model design team devised two physical models representing volcanic events at two distinct volcanoes (one stratovolcano and one caldera). They provided the inversion teams with: the topographic reliefs, the calculated deformation field (on a set of simulated GPS stations and as InSAR interferograms) and the gravity change (on a set of simulated campaign stations). The nature of the volcanic events remained unknown to the inversion teams until after the submission of the inversion results. Here we present the preliminary results of this comparison in order to determine which features of the ground deformation and gravity source

  17. Recent ground deformation of Taiyuan basin (China) investigated with C-, L-, and X-bands SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wu; Zhang, Qin; Ding, Xiaoli; Zhao, Chaoying; Yang, Chengsheng; Qu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    C-, L- and X-bands Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images acquired from November 2006 to June 2011 were processed with Small BAseline Subset DInSAR (SBAS-DInSAR) technique to investigate spatial and temporal variations in deformation over Taiyuan basin, China. The annual deformation rate, created by integrating C-, L- and X-bands interferograms, revealed severe subsidence regions in the basin, where the average subsidence exceeded 10 cm/y and the maximum subsidence reached to 24 cm/y. Meanwhile, it was found that shapes of these subsidence areas were characterized as either subsiding bowls or elongated subsiding belts, implying an intimate connection among groundwater exploration, ground subsidence and faults. Additionally, significant differences in displacement were identified near the faults. This phenomenon could be explained that faults acted as barriers to groundwater flow, impeding the horizontal propagation of fluid-pressure changes and therefore creating groundwater level difference across them. Furthermore, the time series of deformation maps presented inconspicuous nonlinear periodic variations, which might be caused by the seasonal groundwater level fluctuations. In view of the poor water resource and presented features of subsidence over the study area, we deduced that excessive pumping of groundwater was the dominant process driving land subsidence. Our results could provide scientific evidence on a sound management of ground water pumping to mitigate potential damages on infrastructures and environments.

  18. Vertical Ground Deformation Detected by the Leveling and the Tidal Observation in Tokai Region, Central Japan in 1980 - 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, K.; Kimata, F.; Fujii, N.

    2003-12-01

    Great earthquakes more than M8 have occurred along the Suruga-Nankai subduction zone of the Philippine Sea Plate (PHS), southeast Japan, every 100 to 150 years. The last events are 1944 M7.9 Tonankai and 1946 M8.0 Nankai earthquakes. Interseismic subsidence is detected along the subduction zone from the precise leveling and tide gauge. Discussion of the occurrence of great earthquake in near feature brought the expanding the measurements and observation of earthquake and ground deformation in Tokai region. Whereas nation-wide dense GPS network (GEONET) makes clear of the ground deformation of contraction in west-northwestward contraction and east-southeastward tilting in Tokai region, no northwestward horizontal displacements are observed since 2001 in the western Tokai region. Slow slip event (SSE) toward trough is discussed (Ozawa et al., 2002). Precise leveling and line length measurements also suggest the episodic changes with time interval of 4-5 years in the late 20 years (Kimata and Yamauchi, 1999; Kimata et al., 2001). Moreover pre-seismic ground tilt is suggested in the same area of the 2001 Tokai SSE from the leveling of the day in 1944 Tonankai Earthquake. Meanwhile pre-seismic slip is estimated in the SSE area from the numerical experiment of rock crusher (Kato, 2003). We discuss the episodic change of the ground deformation and the recurrence of the SSE in Tokai region with more detail from the vertical ground deformation detected by precise leveling and tide gauge in the period from 1980 to 2002. Geographical Survey Institute of Japan (GSI) has repeated the precise leveling in Tokai region every year since 1980. Tide gauge measurements have also been continued at more than 10 sites in Tokai region by GSI, Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) and Aichi prefecture (AP). Time series of vertical movements at the benchmarks are analyzed by spline function and Annual relative sea levels at tide stations are corrected (Savage and Thatcher, 1992). The 2001 Tokai

  19. Deformed Shape Calculation of a Full-Scale Wing Using Fiber Optic Strain Data from a Ground Loads Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutte, Christine V.; Ko, William L.; Stephens, Craig A.; Bakalyar, John A.; Richards, W. Lance

    2011-01-01

    A ground loads test of a full-scale wing (175-ft span) was conducted using a fiber optic strain-sensing system to obtain distributed surface strain data. These data were input into previously developed deformed shape equations to calculate the wing s bending and twist deformation. A photogrammetry system measured actual shape deformation. The wing deflections reached 100 percent of the positive design limit load (equivalent to 3 g) and 97 percent of the negative design limit load (equivalent to -1 g). The calculated wing bending results were in excellent agreement with the actual bending; tip deflections were within +/- 2.7 in. (out of 155-in. max deflection) for 91 percent of the load steps. Experimental testing revealed valuable opportunities for improving the deformed shape equations robustness to real world (not perfect) strain data, which previous analytical testing did not detect. These improvements, which include filtering methods developed in this work, minimize errors due to numerical anomalies discovered in the remaining 9 percent of the load steps. As a result, all load steps attained +/- 2.7 in. accuracy. Wing twist results were very sensitive to errors in bending and require further development. A sensitivity analysis and recommendations for fiber implementation practices, along with, effective filtering methods are included

  20. Grounds for Movement: Green School Grounds as Sites for Promoting Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyment, J. E.; Bell, A. C.

    2008-01-01

    An environmental factor of particular importance to children's physical activity levels appears to be the presence of parks and open space. Thus, in promoting children's health, school grounds merit consideration as a potential setting for intervention. This paper explores how "green" school grounds, which contain a greater diversity of…

  1. Thermally Induced Deformation in Metallic Glass: the Activations and Relaxations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yue; Iwashita, Takuya; Egami, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    Thermally induced deformation in metallic glasses was investigated by sampling the potential energy landscape (PEL) and probing the changes in the atomic properties (e.g. energy, displacement, stress). The complete deformation processes consist of two stages: the activation (i.e. trigger, from initial minima to nearby saddle states on PEL), and relaxation (i.e. from saddle states to final minima on PEL). We show that the activation stages are triggered by local rearrangements of a small number of atoms, typically 5 atoms in average. Surprisingly, the individual triggers are invariant of the cooling history or elastic structure of the system. However, the organizations between different trigger centers can be varied and are related to the overall stability of the system. On the other hand, relaxation stages consist of two branches, a localized branch, and a cascade branch. While the localized branch is insensitive to the cooling history the system, the cascade branch is highly related with the processing conditions. In particular, for a faster quenched system, the cascade relaxation is found more prominent than in a slowly quenched system. The work is supported by Department of Energy.

  2. Ground Deformation Analysis of Blast-Induced Liquefaction at a Simulated Airport Infrastructure Using High Resolution 3D Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minasian, D.; Kayen, R.; Ashford, S.; Kawamata, Y.; Sugano, T.

    2008-12-01

    In October 2007, the Port and Airport Research Institute (PARI) of the Japan Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transportation conducted a large-scale blast-induced liquefaction experiment in Ishikari, Hokkaido, Japan. Approximately 24,000 m2 of ground was liquefied using controlled blasting techniques to investigate the performance of airport infrastructure. The USGS and Oregon State University participated in the study and measured topographic changes in ground level using 3D laser scanning techniques (terrestrial lidar), as well as changes in shear wave velocity of the between the pre- and post-liquefied soil. This poster focuses on the lidar results. The overall objective of the PARI experiment is to assess the performance of airport infrastructure subjected to liquefaction. Specifically, the performance of pipelines and large concrete utility raceways located beneath runway pavements is of interest, as well as the performance of pavements and embankments with and without soil improvement techniques. At the site, 5-7 m of loose silty sand was placed as hydraulic fill on natural alluvial sand as an expansion of the Ishikari port facility. On a portion of the liquefied site, three 20 m by 50 m test sections were constructed to investigate the performance of improved ground beneath asphalt runways, concrete runway aprons, and open areas. Pipelines and concrete utility conduits were also buried in each section. The three ground improvement techniques investigated were sand-cement mixing, vertical drains, and colloidal silica injection. The PARI experiment provided an excellent opportunity to conduct terrestrial lidar measurements - a revolutionary tool for accurate characterization of fine-scale changes of topography and identification of subtle deformations. Lidar was used for characterizing post-blast deformations both immediately after the charges were used, and subsequently over time at intervals of 2 days, 4 days, and 5 months after blasting. Settlement

  3. Correcting Thermal Deformations in an Active Composite Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Samuel C.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Wilkie, William K.

    2011-01-01

    Large, high-precision composite reflectors for future space missions are costly to manufacture, and heavy. An active composite reflector capable of adjusting shape in situ to maintain required tolerances can be lighter and cheaper to manufacture. An active composite reflector testbed was developed that uses an array of piezoelectric composite actuators embedded in the back face sheet of a 0.8-m reflector panel. Each individually addressable actuator can be commanded from 500 to +1,500 V, and the flatness of the panel can be controlled to tolerances of 100 nm. Measuring the surface flatness at this resolution required the use of a speckle holography interferometer system in the Precision Environmental Test Enclosure (PETE) at JPL. The existing testbed combines the PETE for test environment stability, the speckle holography system for measuring out-of-plane deformations, the active panel including an array of individually addressable actuators, a FLIR thermal camera to measure thermal profiles across the reflector, and a heat source. Use of an array of flat piezoelectric actuators to correct thermal deformations is a promising new application for these actuators, as is the use of this actuator technology for surface flatness and wavefront control. An isogrid of these actuators is moving one step closer to a fully active face sheet, with the significant advantage of ease in manufacturing. No extensive rib structure or other actuation backing structure is required, as these actuators can be applied directly to an easy-to-manufacture flat surface. Any mission with a surface flatness requirement for a panel or reflector structure could adopt this actuator array concept to create lighter structures and enable improved performance on orbit. The thermal environment on orbit tends to include variations in temperature during shadowing or changes in angle. Because of this, a purely passive system is not an effective way to maintain flatness at the scale of microns over several

  4. A model of earthquake triggering probabilities and application to dynamic deformations constrained by ground motion observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Felzer, K.

    2008-01-01

    We have used observations from Felzer and Brodsky (2006) of the variation of linear aftershock densities (i.e., aftershocks per unit length) with the magnitude of and distance from the main shock fault to derive constraints on how the probability of a main shock triggering a single aftershock at a point, P(r, D), varies as a function of distance, r, and main shock rupture dimension, D. We find that P(r, D) becomes independent of D as the triggering fault is approached. When r ??? D P(r, D) scales as Dm where m-2 and decays with distance approximately as r-n with n = 2, with a possible change to r-(n-1) at r > h, where h is the closest distance between the fault and the boundaries of the seismogenic zone. These constraints may be used to test hypotheses about the types of deformations and mechanisms that trigger aftershocks. We illustrate this using dynamic deformations (i.e., radiated seismic waves) and a posited proportionality with P(r, D). Deformation characteristics examined include peak displacements, peak accelerations and velocities (proportional to strain rates and strains, respectively), and two measures that account for cumulative deformations. Our model indicates that either peak strains alone or strain rates averaged over the duration of rupture may be responsible for aftershock triggering.

  5. Chronology of the seismic and ground deformation precursors of the 2014 Fogo Volcano - Cape Verde Islands - eruption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, S. J.; Faria, B. V. E.

    2015-12-01

    The most recent eruption of Fogo Volcano, Cape Verde Islands started on the 23 November 2014 at 10h15 (CVT), after 19 years of quiescence. Several months before the begging of the eruption, the seismic activity started to deviate from the baseline, with the appearance of a class of events that was not recorded before then. This activity was characterized by a significant number of instrumentally detected, very low magnitude seismic events, sometimes more than 100 per day. In September those events became more energetic and analysis indicated that they could be of volcano-tectonic (VT) origin. The first VT event to be located was on 4 October with a 2.5 local magnitude: it was located slightly to the south of the middle of the island at between 15.5 and 16 km depth. This was deeper than normal for background VT events and coincided with the depth of last magma equilibration in the 1995 eruption. It was therefore interpreted as a possible precursor of an eruption: thus the alert level was raised to level 2, and the civil protection authorities were informed. On the following weeks the rate of VT events slightly increased and the focal depths became shallower. Very sporadic harmonic volcano tremor episodes and very few and weak long-period events were also recorded. From about the 15 to 21 November, the VT activity rate oscillated, and hypocentres tended to gather in the vicinity of an inferred dike emplacement and at shallower depth - 6 to 5 km b.s.l. On the first hours of the 22 November seismic rate increased from 3 to 6 events per hour and the events became more energetic. After 19h30 (CVT), when the magma reached the ductile-brittle transition zone (5 to 4 km b.s.l), the seismic rate increased again to more than one event per minute; earthquake magnitudes increased as well. At about 03h00 (CVT) the tilt records shown a prominent ground deformation. Continuous volcanic tremor started only one to half an hour before the start of the eruption.

  6. Perceiving Object Shape from Specular Highlight Deformation, Boundary Contour Deformation, and Active Haptic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Jacob R.; Thomason, Kelsey E.; Ronning, Cecilia; Behari, Kriti; Kleinman, Kayla; Calloway, Autum B.; Lamirande, Davora

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that motion facilitates the visual perception of solid object shape, particularly when surface texture or other identifiable features (e.g., corners) are present. Conventional models of structure-from-motion require the presence of texture or identifiable object features in order to recover 3-D structure. Is the facilitation in 3-D shape perception similar in magnitude when surface texture is absent? On any given trial in the current experiments, participants were presented with a single randomly-selected solid object (bell pepper or randomly-shaped “glaven”) for 12 seconds and were required to indicate which of 12 (for bell peppers) or 8 (for glavens) simultaneously visible objects possessed the same shape. The initial single object’s shape was defined either by boundary contours alone (i.e., presented as a silhouette), specular highlights alone, specular highlights combined with boundary contours, or texture. In addition, there was a haptic condition: in this condition, the participants haptically explored with both hands (but could not see) the initial single object for 12 seconds; they then performed the same shape-matching task used in the visual conditions. For both the visual and haptic conditions, motion (rotation in depth or active object manipulation) was present in half of the trials and was not present for the remaining trials. The effect of motion was quantitatively similar for all of the visual and haptic conditions–e.g., the participants’ performance in Experiment 1 was 93.5 percent higher in the motion or active haptic manipulation conditions (when compared to the static conditions). The current results demonstrate that deforming specular highlights or boundary contours facilitate 3-D shape perception as much as the motion of objects that possess texture. The current results also indicate that the improvement with motion that occurs for haptics is similar in magnitude to that which occurs for vision. PMID:26863531

  7. Perceiving Object Shape from Specular Highlight Deformation, Boundary Contour Deformation, and Active Haptic Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Norman, J Farley; Phillips, Flip; Cheeseman, Jacob R; Thomason, Kelsey E; Ronning, Cecilia; Behari, Kriti; Kleinman, Kayla; Calloway, Autum B; Lamirande, Davora

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that motion facilitates the visual perception of solid object shape, particularly when surface texture or other identifiable features (e.g., corners) are present. Conventional models of structure-from-motion require the presence of texture or identifiable object features in order to recover 3-D structure. Is the facilitation in 3-D shape perception similar in magnitude when surface texture is absent? On any given trial in the current experiments, participants were presented with a single randomly-selected solid object (bell pepper or randomly-shaped "glaven") for 12 seconds and were required to indicate which of 12 (for bell peppers) or 8 (for glavens) simultaneously visible objects possessed the same shape. The initial single object's shape was defined either by boundary contours alone (i.e., presented as a silhouette), specular highlights alone, specular highlights combined with boundary contours, or texture. In addition, there was a haptic condition: in this condition, the participants haptically explored with both hands (but could not see) the initial single object for 12 seconds; they then performed the same shape-matching task used in the visual conditions. For both the visual and haptic conditions, motion (rotation in depth or active object manipulation) was present in half of the trials and was not present for the remaining trials. The effect of motion was quantitatively similar for all of the visual and haptic conditions-e.g., the participants' performance in Experiment 1 was 93.5 percent higher in the motion or active haptic manipulation conditions (when compared to the static conditions). The current results demonstrate that deforming specular highlights or boundary contours facilitate 3-D shape perception as much as the motion of objects that possess texture. The current results also indicate that the improvement with motion that occurs for haptics is similar in magnitude to that which occurs for vision. PMID:26863531

  8. Lifetime measurements of the first 2+ states in 104,106Zr: Evolution of ground-state deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, F.; Bruce, A. M.; Sumikama, T.; Nishizuka, I.; Nishimura, S.; Doornenbal, P.; Lorusso, G.; Söderström, P.-A.; Watanabe, H.; Daido, R.; Patel, Z.; Rice, S.; Sinclair, L.; Wu, J.; Xu, Z. Y.; Yagi, A.; Baba, H.; Chiga, N.; Carroll, R.; Didierjean, F.; Fang, Y.; Fukuda, N.; Gey, G.; Ideguchi, E.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Kameda, D.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Kubo, T.; Lalkovski, S.; Li, Z.; Lozeva, R.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Podolyák, Zs.; Regan, P. H.; Roberts, O. J.; Sakurai, H.; Schaffner, H.; Simpson, G. S.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Tanaka, M.; Taprogge, J.; Werner, V.; Wieland, O.

    2015-11-01

    The first fast-timing measurements from nuclides produced via the in-flight fission mechanism are reported. The lifetimes of the first 2+ states in 104,106Zr nuclei have been measured via β-delayed γ-ray timing of stopped radioactive isotope beams. An improved precision for the lifetime of the 21+ state in 104Zr was obtained, τ (21+) =2.90-20+25 ns, as well as a first measurement of the 21+ state in 106Zr, τ (21+) =2.60-15+20 ns, with corresponding reduced transition probabilities of B (E2 ; 21+ → 0g.s.+) = 0.39 (2) e2b2 and 0.31 (1) e2b2, respectively. Comparisons of the extracted ground-state deformations, β2 = 0.39 (1) (104Zr) and β2 = 0.36 (1) (106Zr) with model calculations indicate a persistence of prolate deformation. The data show that 104Zr is the most deformed of the neutron-rich Zr isotopes measured so far.

  9. Coseismic ground deformation of the 6 April 2009 L'Aquila earthquake (central Italy, Mw6.3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boncio, P.; Pizzi, A.; Brozzetti, F.; Pomposo, G.; Lavecchia, G.; Di Naccio, D.; Ferrarini, F.

    2010-03-01

    We provide field data of coseismic ground deformation related to the 6 April Mw 6.3 L'Aquila normal faulting earthquake. Three narrow fracture zones were mapped: Paganica-Colle Enzano (P-E), Mt. Castellano-Mt. Stabiata (C-S) and San Gregorio (SG). These zones define 13 km of surface ruptures that strike at 130-140°. We mapped four main types of ground deformation (free faces on bedrock fault scarps, faulting along synthetic splays and fissures with or without slip) that are probably due to the near-surface lithology of the fault walls and the amount of slip that approached the surface coseismically. The P-E and C-S zones are characterized by downthrow to the SW (up to 10 cm) and opening (up to 12 cm), while the SG zone is characterized only by opening. Afterslip throw rates of 0.5-0.6 mm/day were measured along the Paganica fault, where paleoseismic evidence reveals recurring paleo-earthquakes and post-24.8 kyr slip-rate ≥ 0.24 mm/yr.

  10. Ground Deformation Monitoring in Qingdao Coastal Areas by Time-Series Terrasar-X Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, A. Y.; Qiao, X.; Li, D.

    2016-06-01

    As a new generation of high resolution and short revisit period of radar satellite, TerraSAR-X is not only able to meet the requirements of monitoring large scale surface subsidence, but also make it possible to monitor the small deformation of the short period. This articles takes the coastal areas of the west coast of Qingdao as the research object. With Small baselines subsets interferometry synthetic aperture radar (SBASI), this paper obtained the period the average annual rate of change from the time series analysis of TerraSAR-X data from April 2015 to October 2014.In order to enrich the historical deformation data of the study area, it analyse the time series of ALOS images from December 2010 to October 2008 with the same method. Finally,it analyse and demonstrate the experimental results.

  11. The influence of geologic structures on deformation due to ground water withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Burbey, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    A 62 day controlled aquifer test was conducted in thick alluvial deposits at Mesquite, Nevada, for the purpose of monitoring horizontal and vertical surface deformations using a high-precision global positioning system (GPS) network. Initial analysis of the data indicated an anisotropic aquifer system on the basis of the observed radial and tangential deformations. However, new InSAR data seem to indicate that the site may be bounded by an oblique normal fault as the subsidence bowl is both truncated to the northwest and offset from the pumping well to the south. A finite-element numerical model was developed using ABAQUS to evaluate the potential location and hydromechanical properties of the fault based on the observed horizontal deformations. Simulation results indicate that for the magnitude and direction of motion at the pumping well and at other GPS stations, which is toward the southeast (away from the inferred fault), the fault zone (5 m wide) must possess a very high permeability and storage coefficient and cross the study area in a northeast-southwest direction. Simulated horizontal and vertical displacements that include the fault zone closely match observed displacements and indicate the likelihood of the presence of the inferred fault. This analysis shows how monitoring horizontal displacements can provide valuable information about faults, and boundary conditions in general, in evaluating aquifer systems during an aquifer test.

  12. The influence of geologic structures on deformation due to ground water withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Burbey, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    A 62 day controlled aquifer test was conducted in thick alluvial deposits at Mesquite, Nevada, for the purpose of monitoring horizontal and vertical surface deformations using a high-precision global positioning system (GPS) network. Initial analysis of the data indicated an anisotropic aquifer system on the basis of the observed radial and tangential deformations. However, new InSAR data seem to indicate that the site may be bounded by an oblique normal fault as the subsidence bowl is both truncated to the northwest and offset from the pumping well to the south. A finite-element numerical model was developed using ABAQUS to evaluate the potential location and hydromechanical properties of the fault based on the observed horizontal deformations. Simulation results indicate that for the magnitude and direction of motion at the pumping well and at other GPS stations, which is toward the southeast (away from the inferred fault), the fault zone (5 m wide) must possess a very high permeability and storage coefficient and cross the study area in a northeast-southwest direction. Simulated horizontal and vertical displacements that include the fault zone closely match observed displacements and indicate the likelihood of the presence of the inferred fault. This analysis shows how monitoring horizontal displacements can provide valuable information about faults, and boundary conditions in general, in evaluating aquifer systems during an aquifer test. PMID:18194320

  13. Horizontal ground deformation patterns and magma storage during the Puu Oo eruption of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii: episodes 22-42

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffmann, J.P.; Ulrich, G.E.; Garcia, M.O.

    1990-01-01

    Horizontal ground deformation measurements were made repeatedly with an electronic distance meter near the Puu Oo eruption site approximately perpendicular to Kilauea's east rift zone (ERZ) before and after eruptive episodes 22-42. Line lengths gradually extended during repose periods and rapidly contracted about the same amount following eruptions. The repeated extension and contraction of the measured lines are best explained by the elastic response of the country rock to the addition and subsequent eruption of magma from a local reservoir. The deformation patterns are modeled to constrain the geometry and location of the local reservoir near Puu Oo. The observed deformation is consistent with deformation patterns that would be produced by the expansion of a shallow, steeply dipping dike just uprift of Puu Oo striking parallel to the trend of the ERZ. The modeled dike is centered about 800 m uprift of Puu Oo. Its top is at a depth of 0.4 km, its bottom at about 2.9 km, and the length is about 1.6 km; the dike strikes N65?? E and dips at about 87??SE. The model indicates that the dike expanded by 11 cm during repose periods, for an average volumetric expansion of nearly 500 000 m3. The volume of magma added to the dike during repose periods was variable but correlates positively with the volume of erupted lava of the subsequent eruption and represents about 8% of the new lava extruded. Dike geometry and expansion values are used to estimate the pressure increase near the eruption site due to the accumulation of magma during repose periods. On average, vent pressures increased by about 0.38 MPa during the repose periods, one-third of the pressure increase at the summit. The model indicates that the dikelike body below Puu Oo grew in volume from 3 million cubic meters (Mm3) to about 10-12 Mm3 during the series of eruptions. The width of this body was probably about 2.5-3.0 m. No net long-term deformation was detected along the measured deformation lines. ?? 1990

  14. Grounds for movement: green school grounds as sites for promoting physical activity.

    PubMed

    Dyment, J E; Bell, A C

    2008-12-01

    An environmental factor of particular importance to children's physical activity levels appears to be the presence of parks and open space. Thus, in promoting children's health, school grounds merit consideration as a potential setting for intervention. This paper explores how 'green' school grounds, which contain a greater diversity of landscaping and design features, affect the quantity and quality of physical activity among elementary school children. Teachers, parents and administrators associated with 59 schools across Canada completed questionnaires (n = 105). Analysis reveals that through greening, school grounds diversify the play repertoire, creating opportunities for boys and girls of all ages, interests and abilities to be more physically active. Complementing the rule-bound, competitive games supported by asphalt and turf playing fields, green school grounds invite children to jump, climb, dig, lift, rake, build, role play and generally get moving in ways that nurture all aspects of their health and development. Of particular significance is the potential to encourage moderate and light levels of physical activity by increasing the range of enjoyable, non-competitive, open-ended forms of play at school. Seen in this light, green school grounds stand to be an important intervention to be included in school health promotion initiatives.

  15. General considerations for a Sentinel-1 constellation InSAR time series processing chain for ground deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, P. J.; Wright, T. J.; Hooper, A. J.; Walters, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Sentinel-1A was launched on April 3rd, 2014. It is the first satellite of a European Space Agency (ESA) constellation that promises to revolutionize measurement of deformation of the Earth's surface. The constellation is designed to acquire data globally as frequently as every 6 days on the same orbital pass, and every 3 days in alternating ascending and descending orbits over the same regions. This data acquisition plan is possible due to a much larger swath coverage than previous SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) sensors. In addition, all observations from Copernicus, the European Commission Earth Observation program, have a liberal data policy, which will enable full exploitation of the archived Sentinel-1 big data, both for scientific and commercial use.Sentinel-1, and similar future constellations, shape a new landscape in the way that InSAR data have traditionally been processed. We have started to develop a completely new re-engineered and adapted InSAR time series processing approach, which efficiently processes the data from this new type of SAR constellation, with the goal to deliver ground deformation products with the highest possible precision. In summary, the proposed system approach will require the development of an automatic, almost unsupervised, system that integrates methods to obtain time-dependent surface deformation estimates and correction products for atmospheric noise and refined orbits. The ground velocity maps will ideally meet the desired precision of 1 mm/yr / 100 km to measure strain-rates (10 nanostrain/yr) at a comparable level of precision to current existing sparse regional GPS measurement networks.In this communication, we describe the different steps we have adopted to partially solve: 1) coregistration of TOPS (Terrain Observation with Progressive Scans) SAR images to enable interferometry, 2) how to manage the ambiguity between ground motion in azimuth and in line-of-sight for TOPS InSAR, 3) how to process efficiently newly

  16. Mismatch Between Interseismic Ground Deformation and Paleoseismic/Paleogeodetic Observations, Humboldt Bay, Northern California, Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, J. R.; Williams, T. B.; Leroy, T. H.; Anderson, J. K.; Weldon, R. J.; Gilkerson, W.

    2011-12-01

    Observations made by Plafker in Chile (1960) and Alaska (1964) show that vertical deformation during earthquakes is generally opposite in sense of motion compared to interseismic deformation. This elastic rebound theory drives estimates of potential coseismic deformation on the Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ). Similar to other coastal marshes along the CSZ, paleoseismic investigations around Humboldt Bay reveal evidence of coseismic subsidence for the past 4 ka. Tide gage data obtained from NOAA tide gages, as well as 'campaign' style tide gages, are used to infer interseismic ground deformation. Tide gage data from Crescent City and Humboldt Bay are compared to each other and also compared to estimates of eustatic sea-level rise to estimate rates of land-level change. Earthscope and USGS GPS permanent site data are also used to evaluate vertical interseismic deformation in this region. These rates of land-level change are then compared to paleoseismic proxies for vertical land-level change. Cores collected for master's theses research at Humboldt State University were used to compile an earthquake history for the Humboldt Bay region. Some cores in Mad River and Hookton sloughs were used to evaluate magnitudes of coseismic subsidence by comparing diatom and foraminiferid assemblages associated with lithologic contacts (paleogeodesy). Minimum estimates of paleosubsidence for earthquakes range from 0.3 to 2.6 meters. Subtracting eustatic sea-level rise (~2.3 mm/yr, 1977-2010) from Crescent City (CC) and North Spit (NS) relative sea-level rates reveals that CC is uplifting at ~3mm/yr and NS is subsiding at ~2.5 mm/yr. GPS vertical deformation reveals similar rates of ~3 mm/yr of uplift and ~2 mm/yr of subsidence in these two locations. GPS based subsidence rates show a gradient of subsidence between Trinidad (in the north) to Cape Mendocino (in the south). The spatial region of ongoing subsidence reveals the depth of locking of the CSZ fault (differently from previous

  17. Geometric Aspects of Ground Augmentation of Satellite Networks for the Needs of Deformation Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protaziuk, Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    Satellite measurements become competitive in many tasks of engineering surveys, however, in many requiring applications possibilities to apply such solutions are still limited. The possibility to widely apply satellite technologies for displacements measurements is related with new challenges; the most important of them relate to increasing requirements concerning the accuracy, reliability and continuity of results of position determination. One of the solutions is a ground augmentation of satellite network, which intention is to improve precision of positioning, ensure comparable accuracy of coordinates and reduce precision fluctuations over time. The need for augmentation of GNSS is particularly significant in situations: where the visibility of satellites is poor because of terrain obstacles, when the determined position is not precise enough or a satellites constellation does not allow for reliable positioning. Ground based source/sources of satellite signal placed at a ground, called pseudosatellites, or pseudolites were intensively investigated during the last two decades and finally were developed into groundbased, time-synchronized transceivers, that can transmit and receive a proprietary positioning signal. The paper presents geometric aspects of the ground based augmentation of the satellite networks using various quality measures of positioning geometry, which depends on access to the constellation of satellites and the conditions of the observation environment. The issue of minimizing these measures is the key problem that allows to obtain the position with high accuracy. For this purpose, the use of an error ellipsoid is proposed and compared with an error ellipse. The paper also describes the results of preliminary accuracy analysis obtained at test area and a comparison of various measures of the quality of positioning geometry.

  18. Stress Changes and Deformation Monitoring of Longwall Coal Pillars Located in Weak Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bin; Zhang, Zhenyu; Kuang, Tiejun; Liu, Jinrong

    2016-08-01

    Coal pillar stability is strongly influenced by the site-specific geological and geotechnical conditions. Many geological structures such as faults, joints, or rock intrusions can be detrimental to mining operations. In order to evaluate the performance of coal pillars under weak roof degraded by igneous rock intrusion, stress and deformation monitoring was conducted in the affected tailgate areas of Nos. 8208 and 8210 longwalls in Tashan coal mine, Shanxi Province, China. The measurements in the 8208 longwall tailgate showed that the mining-induced stresses in 38-m-wide coal chain pillars under the overburden depth of 300-500 m started to increase at about 100 m ahead of the 8208 longwall working face and reached its peak level at approximately 50 m ahead of the longwall face. The peak stress of 9.16 MPa occurred at the depth of 8-9 m into the pillar from the tailgate side wall. In comparison, disturbance of the headgate block pillar area was negligible, indicating the difference of abutment pressure distribution between the tailgate and headgate sites where the adjacent unmined longwall block carried most of the overburden load. However, when the longwall face passed the headgate monitoring site by 360-379 m, the pillar stress increased to a peak value of 21.4 MPa at the pillar depth of 13 m from the gob side mainly due to stress redistribution in the chain pillar. In contrast to the headgate, at the tailgate side, the adjacent goaf was the dominant triggering factor for high stress concentrations in the chain pillar. Convergence measurements in the tailgate during longwall mining further indicated the evolution characteristics of coal pillar deformation, clearly showing that the gateroad deformation is mainly induced by the longwall extraction it serves. When predicting the future pillar loads from the monitored data, two stress peaks appeared across the 38-m-wide tailgate coal pillar, which are separated by the lower stress area within the pillar center. This

  19. Multiphysics numerical models of resurgent calderas ground deformation: The 1982-2010 Campi Flegrei (Southern Italy) case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tizzani, Pietro

    2013-04-01

    Ground deformation signals in caldera region are the expression of near-surface and/or deep-seated physical processes. As most of the geophysical analysis, the interpretation of the deformation data is usually performed setting up inverse problems, which often use Monte Carlo optimization techniques like the Simulated Annealing and the Genetic Algorithm, in order to constrain the nature of the causative sources at depth. Usually, these methods exploit the problem's solution space by iterating forward analytical models, which consider simplified geometries and homogeneous linear elastic material properties. However, several recent studies have shown that oversimplified forward models may lead to misinterpretations of the retrieved source parameters. To overcome these limitations we consider the Finite Element (FE) method as a powerful numerical tool that allows implementing models with complex geometries, material heterogeneities, as well as time dependent physical processes. For this reason, FE models are a suitable candidate to fill the gap between the accuracy achieved on the observation of ground deformation in volcanic areas and the models used for its interpretation. In this context, we investigate the driving forces responsible of the long-term ground deformation of the Campi Flegrei (CF) caldera, Southern Italy, during the 1982-2010 time interval. To this purpose, we propose a new multiphysics numerical model that takes into account both the mechanical heterogeneities of the crust and the thermal conditions of geothermal system beneath the volcano. We perform a numerical Chain Rule Optimization Procedure (CROP) in a FEM environment, that considers different physical contexts linked along a common evolution line: starting from the thermal proprieties and mechanical heterogeneities of the upper crust, we develop a 3D time dependent thermo-fluid dynamic model of CF caldera. More specifically, by carrying out two subsequent optimization procedures based on

  20. Can we infer the magma overpressure threshold before an eruption? Insights from ground deformation time series and numerical modeling of reservoir failure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, F.; Gregg, P. M.; Amelug, F.

    2015-12-01

    Overpressure within a magma chamber is a key parameter to understanding the onset of an eruption. Recent investigations indicate that surface inflation at a volcanic edifice does not always precede eruption (Chaussard and Amelung, 2012; Biggs et al., 2014), suggesting that the overpressure threshold may differ between volcanoes. To understand the failure conditions of a magma reservoir, mechanical models were developed to quantify the range of overpressure affordable in a reservoir for a given situation. Even if the choice of the failure criterion is still debated, most investigators agree that the overpressure required to fail the magma reservoir is at first order a function of the crustal stress field and the shape of the magma reservoir. Radar interferometry (InSAR) provides a large dataset of ground deformation worldwide, but many of these InSAR studies continue to use point or dislocation sources (Mogi, Okada) to explain deformation on volcanoes. Even if these simple solutions often fit the data and estimate the depth and the volume change of the source of deformation, key parameters such as the magma overpressure or the mechanical properties of the rocks cannot be derived. We use mechanical numerical models of reservoir failure combined with ground deformation data. It has been observed that volume change before an eruption can easily range one or two order of magnitude from 1-100x106 m3. The first goal of this study is to understand which parameter(s) control the critical volume changes just before the failure of the reservoir. First, a parametric study is performed to quantify the effect of the geometry of the reservoir (radius, depth), the local stress (compressive/extensive) and even the crust rheology (elastic/viscoelastic). We then compare modeling results with several active volcanoes where long time series of volume change are available: Okmok and Westdahl in Alaska, Sinabung and Agung in Indonesia and Galapagos. For each case, the maximum

  1. Kondo effects in a triangular triple quantum dot II: ground-state properties for deformed configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, Akira; Amaha, Shinichi; Nisikawa, Yunori; Hewson, A. C.; Tarucha, Seigo; Numata, Takahide

    2010-03-01

    We study transport through a triangular triple quantum dot (TTQD) connected to two noninteracting leads, using the numerical renormalization group. The system has been theoretically revealed to show a variety of Kondo effects depending on the electron filling of the triangle [1]. For instance, the SU(4) Kondo effect takes place at three-electron filling, and a two-stage Kondo screening of a high-spin S=1 Nagaoka state takes place at four-electron filling. Because of the enhanced freedom in the configurations, however, the large parameter space of the TTQD still has not been fully explored, especially for large deformations. We report the effects of the inhomogeneity in the inter-dot couplings and the level positions in a wide region of the filling. [1] T. Numata, Y. Nisikawa, A. Oguri, and A. C. Hewson: PRB 80, 155330 (2009).

  2. Volcano seismicity and ground deformation unveil the gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics of a volcanic eruption.

    PubMed

    Ripepe, Maurizio; Donne, Dario Delle; Genco, Riccardo; Maggio, Giuseppe; Pistolesi, Marco; Marchetti, Emanuele; Lacanna, Giorgio; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Poggi, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Effusive eruptions are explained as the mechanism by which volcanoes restore the equilibrium perturbed by magma rising in a chamber deep in the crust. Seismic, ground deformation and topographic measurements are compared with effusion rate during the 2007 Stromboli eruption, drawing an eruptive scenario that shifts our attention from the interior of the crust to the surface. The eruption is modelled as a gravity-driven drainage of magma stored in the volcanic edifice with a minor contribution of magma supplied at a steady rate from a deep reservoir. Here we show that the discharge rate can be predicted by the contraction of the volcano edifice and that the very-long-period seismicity migrates downwards, tracking the residual volume of magma in the shallow reservoir. Gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics explain the initially high discharge rates observed during eruptive crises and greatly influence our ability to predict the evolution of effusive eruptions.

  3. Volcano seismicity and ground deformation unveil the gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics of a volcanic eruption.

    PubMed

    Ripepe, Maurizio; Donne, Dario Delle; Genco, Riccardo; Maggio, Giuseppe; Pistolesi, Marco; Marchetti, Emanuele; Lacanna, Giorgio; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Poggi, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Effusive eruptions are explained as the mechanism by which volcanoes restore the equilibrium perturbed by magma rising in a chamber deep in the crust. Seismic, ground deformation and topographic measurements are compared with effusion rate during the 2007 Stromboli eruption, drawing an eruptive scenario that shifts our attention from the interior of the crust to the surface. The eruption is modelled as a gravity-driven drainage of magma stored in the volcanic edifice with a minor contribution of magma supplied at a steady rate from a deep reservoir. Here we show that the discharge rate can be predicted by the contraction of the volcano edifice and that the very-long-period seismicity migrates downwards, tracking the residual volume of magma in the shallow reservoir. Gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics explain the initially high discharge rates observed during eruptive crises and greatly influence our ability to predict the evolution of effusive eruptions. PMID:25980642

  4. The Model Experiments and Finite Element Analysis on Deformation and Failure by Excavation of Grounds in Foregoing-roof Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotokoba, Yasumasa; Okajima, Kenji; Iida, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Tadatsugu

    We propose the trenchless box culvert construction method to construct box culverts in small covering soil layers while keeping roads or tracks open. When we use this construction method, it is necessary to clarify deformation and shear failure by excavation of grounds. In order to investigate the soil behavior, model experiments and elasto-plactic finite element analysis were performed. In the model experiments, it was shown that the shear failure was developed from the end of the roof to the toe of the boundary surface. In the finite element analysis, a shear band effect was introduced. Comparing the observed shear bands in model experiments with computed maximum shear strain contours, it was found that the observed direction of the shear band could be simulated reasonably by the finite element analysis. We may say that the finite element method used in this study is useful tool for this construction method.

  5. Sensing surface mechanical deformation using active probes driven by motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nitta, Takahiro; Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Sada, Kazuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Studying mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials has been challenging due to the difficulty in separating surface deformation from the bulk elasticity of the materials. Here, we introduce a new approach for studying the surface mechanical deformation of a soft material by utilizing a large number of self-propelled microprobes driven by motor proteins on the surface of the material. Information about the surface mechanical deformation of the soft material is obtained through changes in mobility of the microprobes wandering across the surface of the soft material. The active microprobes respond to mechanical deformation of the surface and readily change their velocity and direction depending on the extent and mode of surface deformation. This highly parallel and reliable method of sensing mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials is expected to find applications that explore surface mechanics of soft materials and consequently would greatly benefit the surface science. PMID:27694937

  6. Sensing surface mechanical deformation using active probes driven by motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nitta, Takahiro; Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Sada, Kazuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2016-10-01

    Studying mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials has been challenging due to the difficulty in separating surface deformation from the bulk elasticity of the materials. Here, we introduce a new approach for studying the surface mechanical deformation of a soft material by utilizing a large number of self-propelled microprobes driven by motor proteins on the surface of the material. Information about the surface mechanical deformation of the soft material is obtained through changes in mobility of the microprobes wandering across the surface of the soft material. The active microprobes respond to mechanical deformation of the surface and readily change their velocity and direction depending on the extent and mode of surface deformation. This highly parallel and reliable method of sensing mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials is expected to find applications that explore surface mechanics of soft materials and consequently would greatly benefit the surface science.

  7. July 1973 ground survey of active Central American volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoiber, R. E. (Principal Investigator); Rose, W. I., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Ground survey has shown that thermal anomalies of various sizes associated with volcanic activity at several Central American volcanoes should be detectable from Skylab. Anomalously hot areas of especially large size (greater than 500 m in diameter) are now found at Santiaguito and Pacaya volcanoes in Guatemala and San Cristobal in Nicaragua. Smaller anomalous areas are to be found at least seven other volcanoes. This report is completed after ground survey of eleven volcanoes and ground-based radiation thermometry mapping at these same points.

  8. Railway deformation detected by DInSAR over active sinkholes in the Ebro Valley evaporite karst, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galve, J. P.; Castañeda, C.; Gutiérrez, F.

    2015-11-01

    Subsidence was measured for the first time on railway tracks in the central sector of Ebro Valley (NE Spain) using Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) techniques. This area is affected by evaporite karst and the analysed railway corridors traverse active sinkholes that produce deformations in these infrastructures. One of the railway tracks affected by slight settlements is the Madrid-Barcelona high-speed line, a form of transport infrastructure highly vulnerable to ground deformation processes. Our analysis based on DInSAR measurements and geomorphological surveys indicates that this line shows dissolution-induced subsidence and compaction of anthropogenic deposits (infills and embankments). Significant sinkhole-related subsidence was also measured by DInSAR techniques on the Castejón-Zaragoza conventional railway line. This study demonstrates that DInSAR velocity maps, coupled with detailed geomorphological surveys, may help in the identification of the railway track sections that are affected by active subsidence.

  9. Active control landing gear for ground loads alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    An active landing gear has been created by connecting the hydraulic piston in an oleo strut to a hydraulic supply. A controller modulates the pressure in the oleo to achieve the desired dynamic characteristics. Tests on ground rigs (documented by a film) have demonstrated the successful alleviation of induced structural ground loads and the next step will be a flight test using a fighter aircraft.

  10. Ground deformation cycles participating with sub-Plinian, Vulcanian eruptions, and a magma effusive stage at Kirishima volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeo, M.; Maehara, Y.; Ohminato, T.; Ichihara, M.; Oikawa, J.

    2012-12-01

    Volcanoes display several kinds of explosive eruptions, such as Plinian, sub-Plinian, Vulcanian, and Strombolian eruptions. The ground deformation data participating in explosive eruptions yield a fruitful knowledge about the dynamics of explosive eruptions. In this paper, we present tilt motions, near a summit crater during the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake, Kirishima volcanoes, participated with the different kinds of volcanic activities, and make clear the characteristics of tilt motions and time sequences. The beginning period of volcanic activity at Shimoe-dake volcano in 2001 is divided into three different stages: the sub-Plinian stage (26-27 January 2011), the magma effusive stage (28-31 January 2011), and the Vulcanian stage (1-7 February 2011). During these three distinct stages, different kinds of tilt motions were observed participating with these activities. The sub-Plinian and the Vulcanian eruptions were preceded by inflations directed to the summit. A time sequence of the tilt ratio between NS component at KISH and that at SMN represents a gradual increment approaching the first sub-Plinian eruption on 26 January 2011: from 0.3 at 14:30 to 0.4 at 14:40. Employing a cylindrical pressure source in a conduit and taking into account the topography of Shinmoe-dake volcano in a calculation of tilts [Maeda et al., 2011], it became clear that the gradual increment of tilt ratio from 0.3 to 0.4 corresponds to the deepening of the source depth from 810 m to 710 m above sea level. The inflation-deflation cycles with the typical period of one hour were also recorded during the magma effusive stage; these cycles synchronized with volcanic tremors or long-period events in the last term of this stage. Almost all Vulcanian eruptions are preceded by step-like inflations. The tilt motions represented various time sequences after the inflations halted: no distinct tilt change until the Vulcanian eruption, gradual deflation preceding the Vulcanian eruption, and

  11. Synergy of ASAR and RADARSAT-2 ultra-fine acquisitions for ground deformation monitoring by means of DInSAR and PSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Panagiotis; Briole, Pierre; Sykioti, Olga

    2010-05-01

    consideration the raised seismisity of the area. The Psathopyrgos fault zone as well as the Rion-Patras transfer fault zone are investigated for any detectable ground deformations that could be indications/precursors or inter-seismic accumulation processes before a main event. The city of Patras are investigated for any detectable ground/buildings deformation due to human interventions or geophysical processes. The potential of Rion-Antirion bridge monitoring for any detectable deformation as well as the surrounding ground on the two edges of it, are also investigated and assessed. The study area presents major difficulties for DInSAR/PSI applications, due to its intense vegetation coverage and high topography presenting various facets, varying high slopes and shadowing effects. Moreover its intense topography in conjunction with its location between Aegean and Ionian seas is leading to high precipitation rates and extend cloud coverage. All these characteristics of the study area contribute to high decorrelation of the interferometric products. For the estimation of the ocuured deformations a series of ASAR/ENVISAT (image swath 2) data are processed by means of PSI and DInSAR techniques, but RADARSAT-2 (ultra-fine beam mode) data are processed only by means of DInSAR technique due to its lack of historical data. The processing will be carried out exploiting commercial and in-house software. The medium and high ground resolution added value products of the acquired data are combined in the thematic level.

  12. Direct experimental evidence for a multiparticle-hole ground state configuration of deformed 33Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Ushasi; Rahaman, A.; Aumann, T.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Boretzky, K.; Caesar, C.; Carlson, B. V.; Catford, W. N.; Chakraborty, S.; Chartier, M.; Cortina-Gil, D.; de Angelis, G.; Diaz Fernandez, P.; Emling, H.; Ershova, O.; Fraile, L. M.; Geissel, H.; Gonzalez-Diaz, D.; Jonson, B.; Johansson, H.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Langer, C.; Le Bleis, T.; Leifels, Y.; Marganiec, J.; Münzenberg, G.; Najafi, M. A.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Panin, V.; Paschalis, S.; Plag, R.; Reifarth, R.; Ricciardi, V.; Rossi, D.; Scheit, H.; Scheidenberger, C.; Simon, H.; Taylor, J. T.; Togano, Y.; Typel, S.; Volkov, V.; Wagner, A.; Wamers, F.; Weick, H.; Weigand, M.; Winfield, J. S.; Yakorev, D.; Zoric, M.

    2016-09-01

    The first direct experimental evidence of a multiparticle-hole ground state configuration of the neutron-rich 33Mg isotope has been obtained via intermediate energy (400 A MeV) Coulomb dissociation measurement. The major part ˜(70 ±13 )% of the cross section is observed to populate the excited states of 32Mg after the Coulomb breakup of 33Mg. The shapes of the differential Coulomb dissociation cross sections in coincidence with different core excited states favor that the valence neutron occupies both the s1 /2 and p3 /2 orbitals. These experimental findings suggest a significant reduction and merging of s d -p f shell gaps at N ˜20 and 28. The ground state configuration of 33Mg is predominantly a combination of 32Mg(3.0 ,3.5 MeV ;2-,1-) ⨂νs1/2 , 32Mg(2.5 MeV ;2+) ⨂νp3/2 , and 32Mg(0 ;0+) ⨂νp3/2 . The experimentally obtained quantitative spectroscopic information for the valence neutron occupation of the s and p orbitals, coupled with different core states, is in agreement with Monte Carlo shell model (MCSM) calculation using 3 MeV as the shell gap at N =20 .

  13. Insar and Finite Element Analysis of Ground Deformation at Lake Urmia Causeway (luc), Northwest Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshiri, R.; Motagh, M.; Baes, M.; Sharifi, M. A.

    2013-09-01

    Precise long-term deformation monitoring of causeways and bridges is of vital task for maintenance and management work related to transportation safety. In this study, we analyse the settlement of Lake Urmia Causeway (LUC), northwest Iran, using observations from InSAR and Finite Element Model (FEM) simulation. For InSAR processing, we analyse 58 SAR images of ENVISAT, ALOS and TerraSAR-X (TSX) using the SBAS technique to assess the settlement of embankments in the years 2003-2013. The InSAR results show deflation on both embankments with a peak velocity of > 5 cm/year in the satellite Line Of Sight (LOS) direction. The InSAR observations are then used to construct a settlement compaction model for the cross section at the distance of 4 km from the most western edge of the causeway, using a 2D Finite Element Model. Our FEM results suggest that settlement of the embankments will continue in the future due to consolidation phenomenon.

  14. Monitoring ground deformation in the Hangjiahu Plain using InSAR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hong'an; Zhang, Yonghong; Luo, Guangfei; Mao, Weihua; Kang, Yonghui; Zhu, Yanmin

    2015-12-01

    Affected by over-exploration of groundwater for a long time, the Hangjiahu Plain in Zhejiang province, southeast of China, has suffering serious ground subsidence during the past several decades. In this paper, we investigate the time series InSAR technique for the generation of subsidence maps over this plain. 25 Radarsat-2 images acquired from Jan 2012 to Nov 2014 are used. The results show that serious subsidence has taken place in the north and southeast of Jiaxing, the east and north of Huzhou, and the north of Hangzhou. Meanwhile some rebound occurs in the east of Jiaxing and the southeast of Huzhou. The results are compared with 35 levelling measurements. The standard deviation of the error between the two data is 3.01mm, which demonstrate that time series InSAR technique has good accuracy for subsidence monitoring.

  15. Mechanics of dielectric elastomer-activated deformable transmission grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Zhou, Jinxiong; Sun, Wenjie; Wu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Ling

    2014-09-01

    Laminating a thin layer of elastomeric grating on the surface of a prestretched dielectric elastomer (DE) membrane forms a basic design of electrically tunable transmission grating. We analyze the inhomogeneous deformation of a circular multiple-region configuration. Variation of the geometric and material parameters, as well as of the critical condition determined by loss of tension instability, is probed to aid the design of a DE-based deformable grating. The predicted changes in the grating period agree substantially with the experimental results reported by Aschwanden et al (Aschwanden et al 2007 IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 19 1090).

  16. Active control landing gear for ground load alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.; Morris, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    Results of analytical and experimental investigations of a series-hydraulic active control landing gear show that such a gear is feasible when using existing hardware and is very effective in reducing loads, relative to those generated by a conventional (passive year) gear, transmitted to the airframe during ground operations. Analytical results obtained from an active gear, flexible aircraft, take-off and landing analysis are in good agreement with experimental data and indicate that the analysis is a valid tool for study and initial design of series-hydraulic active control landing gears. An analytical study of a series-hydraulic active control main landing gear on an operational supersonic airplane shows that the active gear has the potential for improving the dynamic response of the aircraft and significantly reducing structural fatigue damage during ground operations.

  17. Modeling crustal deformation near active faults and volcanic centers: a catalog of deformation models and modeling approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, Maurizio; ,; Peter, F.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-01-01

    This manual provides the physical and mathematical concepts for selected models used to interpret deformation measurements near active faults and volcanic centers. The emphasis is on analytical models of deformation that can be compared with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), leveling surveys, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal, and horizontal penny-shaped geometries in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. Vertical dikes and faults are described following the mathematical notation for rectangular dislocations in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. All the analytical expressions were verified against numerical models developed by use of COMSOL Multyphics, a Finite Element Analysis software (http://www.comsol.com). In this way, typographical errors present were identified and corrected. Matlab scripts are also provided to facilitate the application of these models.

  18. Multi-temporal interferometric monitoring of ground deformations in Haiti with COSMO/SkyMed HIMAGE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutricato, R.; Wasowski, J.; Chiaradia, M.; Piard, B. E.; Généa, S.

    2013-12-01

    The catastrophic Mw=7.0 shallow earthquake of 12 January 2010 that struck Haiti have led to numerous studies focused on the geodynamics of the region. In particular, the co-seismic fault mechanism of the 2010 Haiti earthquake as well as post-seismic deformations have been investigated through SAR interferometry (InSAR) techniques, thanks to the availability of satellite SAR sensors operating in different radar bands (ENVISAT ASAR, ALOS PALSAR, TerraSAR-X, COSMO/SkyMed). Moreover, advanced multitemporal SAR interferometry (MTI) based on COSMO/SkyMED (CSK) data is well suited for the detection and monitoring of post-seismic ground or structural instabilities. Indeed, with its short revisit time (up to 4 days) CSK allows building interferometric stacks much faster than previous satellite missions, like ERS/ENVISAT. Here we report the first outcomes of the MTI investigation based on high resolution (3 m) CSK data, conducted in the framework of a scientific collaboration between the Centre National de l'Information Géo-Spatiale (CNIGS) of Haiti and the Department of Physics (DIF) of the University of Bari, Italy. We rely on a stack of 89 CSK data (image mode: HIMAGE; polarization: HH; look side: right; pass direction: ascending; beam: H4-0A) acquired by the Italian Space Agency (ASI) over the Port-au-Prince (PaP) metropolitan and surrounding areas that were severely hit by the 2010 earthquake. CSK acquisitions span the period June 2011 ÷ February 2013, which is sufficient for detecting and monitoring significant ground instabilities. The MTI results were obtained through the application of the SPINUA processing chain, a Persistent Scatterers Interferometry (PSI)-like technique. In particular, we detected significant subsidence phenomena affecting river deltas and coastal areas of the PaP and Carrefour region. The maximum rate of subsidence movements exceed few cm/yr and this implies increasing flooding (or tsunami) hazard. Furthermore, maximum subsidence rates were

  19. Integrating Multiple Space Ground Sensors to Track Volcanic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Davies, Ashley; Doubleday, Joshua; Tran, Daniel; Jones, Samuel; Kjartansson, Einar; Thorsteinsson, Hrobjartur; Vogfjord, Kristin; Guomundsson, Magnus; Thordarson, Thor; Mandl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Volcanic activity can occur with little or no warning. Increasing numbers of space borne assets can enable coordinated measurements of volcanic events to enhance both scientific study and hazard response. We describe the use of space and ground measurements to target further measurements as part of a worldwide volcano monitoring system. We utilize a number of alert systems including the MODVOLC, GOESVOLC, US Air Force Weather Advisory, and Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) alert systems. Additionally we use in-situ data from ground instrumentation at a number of volcanic sites, including Iceland.

  20. QPNM calculation for the ground state magnetic moments of odd-mass deformed nuclei: 157-167Er isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakut, H.; Guliyev, E.; Guner, M.; Tabar, E.; Zenginerler, Z.

    2012-08-01

    A new microscopic method has been developed in the framework of the Quasiparticle-Phonon Nuclear Model (QPNM) in order to investigate spin polarization effects on the magnetic properties such as magnetic moment, intrinsic magnetic moment and effective gs factor of the ground state of odd-mass 157-167Er isotopes. The calculations were performed using both Tamm-Dancoff Approximation (TDA) and Quasiparticle Random-Phase Approximation (QRPA). Reasonably good agreement has been obtained between the QRPA results and the relevant experimental data. Furthermore the variation of the intrinsic magnetic moment gK values with the mass number A exhibits similar behavior for both theoretical and experimental results. From the compression of the calculated intrinsic magnetic moment values with the experimental data the spin-spin interaction parameter has been found as χ=(30/A) MeV for odd-mass 157-167Er isotopes. Our results clarify the possibility of using this new method to describe the magnetic properties of odd-mass deformed nuclei.

  1. Mouthpart deformities and nucleolus activity in field-collected Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Meregalli, G; Bettinetti, R; Pluymers, L; Vermeulen, A C; Rossaro, B; Ollevier, F

    2002-05-01

    Chironomid mouthpart deformities and aberrations of their polytenic chromosomes are sublethal responses to toxic stress. These endpoints have been used in several cases as bioindications for sediment pollution. In the present study we aimed to establish whether there was an association between mouthpart deformities and nucleolus activity in the polytenic chromosomes. Such information could be useful to gain insight into the mechanisms involved in the occurrence of mouthpart deformities and their consequences on the larvae. Third-instar larvae of Chironomus riparius were collected at a site downstream of a sewage treatment plant mostly contaminated by pesticides. Larvae were then raised in the laboratory in aquaria containing sediment and water from the study location. During a 16-day period, larvae ready to molt to the fourth instar were reared individually. Within a few hours of their molt, the larvae were preserved. The presence of mouthpart deformities (mentum, mandibles, and pecten epipharyngis) and the percentage of active nucleoli were assessed. Those larvae presenting mentum deformities had a significantly higher incidence of active nucleoli in their polytenic chromosomes than nondeformed larvae. Because a high number of active nucleoli generally indicates increased rRNA synthesis, deformed larvae seemed to exhibit a higher protein synthesis than normal individuals. The synthesis of additional proteins may increase deformed larva tolerance to toxicants. PMID:11994780

  2. Ground-based multi-view photogrammetry for the monitoring of landslide deformation and erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, André; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Allemand, Pascal; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Marc; Skupinski, Grzegorz; Delacourt, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Recent advances in multi-view photogrammetry have resulted in a new class of algorithms and software tools for more automated surface reconstruction. These new techniques have a great potential to provide topographic information for geoscience applications at significantly lower costs than classical topographic and laser scanning surveys. Based on several open-source libraries for multi-view stereo-photogrammetry and Structure-from-Motion, we investigate the accuracy that can be obtained from different processing pipelines for the 3D surface reconstruc- tion of landslides and the detection of changes over time. Two different algorithms for point-cloud comparison are tested and the accuracy of the resulting models is assessed against terrestrial and airborne LiDAR point clouds. Change detection over a period of more than two years allows a detailed assessment of the seasonal dynamics of the landslide; the possibility to estimate sediment volumes, as well as the quantification of the 3D displacement at most active parts of the landslide. Compared to LiDAR point clouds, the root-mean squared error of the photogrammetric point clouds did generally not exceed 0.2 m for the reconstruction of the entire landslide and 0.06 m for the reconstruction of the main scarp. We show that at the slope scale terrestrial multi-view photogrammetry is sufficiently accurate to detect surface changes in the range of decimeters. Thus, the technique currently remains less precise than terrestrial laser scanning or differential satellite positioning systems but provides spatially distributed information at significant lower costs and is, therefore, valuable for many practical landslide investigations. Algorithm parameters and the image acquisition protocols are found to have important impacts on the quality of the results and are discussed in detail. Our findings suggest that a relative precision of 1:500 and better is possible. The results of the change detection show a strong seasonality

  3. Active deformation in Western Turkey: new GPS observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocquet, J.; Aktug, B.; Parsons, B.; Cingoz, A.; England, P.; Erkan, Y.; Soyer, N.; Akdeniz, H.; Kilicoglu, A.

    2007-12-01

    How the continents deform remains a matter of debate. One view postulates that continental deforming zones are comprised of a limited numbers of rigid (elastic) microplates. If true, the surface motion can then be described by the relative rotation of blocks, and strain should be localized along the major faults separating the blocks. An alternative view is that the deformation at depth is distributed over wide areas, can be modelled by a viscous flow responding to boundary conditions applied on it and gravitational potential energy gradients related to variations in topography, and the surface strain simply reflects this deformation. Western Turkey is a region of crustal extension, part of the Nubia/Eurasia plate boundary. Its kinematics is often modelled by the relative motion of a small number of rigid blocks (Nyst & Thatcher, 2005, Reilinger et al., 2006). However, until now, the limited number of GPS velocity vectors available has prevented a detailed examination of which is the more appropriate description. We present a new geodetic velocity field including ~100 sites from the longitude the Central Anatolian plateau to the Aegean coast, derived from a combination of campaigns carried out between 1997 and 2006, and continuous GPS operating since 2003, which we use to test the different models. While the kinematics of the area can be correctly modelled by a block model, a good fit to the velocity field requires blocks with sizes smaller than 100 km and still fails to adequately predict the strain rate observed within blocks . Alternatively, we test an approach where the lithosphere is modelled as a thin viscous sheet, responding to the gravitational potentiel energy contrast between the high plateau of eastern Turkey to the east and the subduction along the Hellenic trench in the southwest. The simplistic model has only one free parameter (the force applied by the subducting oceanic lithosphere on the Aegean ), but provides a good agreement with the observed

  4. Active fibers: matching deformable tract templates to diffusion tensor images.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Ilya; Shattuck, David W; Stein, Jason L; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M; Toga, Arthur W

    2009-08-01

    Reliable quantitative analysis of white matter connectivity in the brain is an open problem in neuroimaging, with common solutions requiring tools for fiber tracking, tractography segmentation and estimation of intersubject correspondence. This paper proposes a novel, template matching approach to the problem. In the proposed method, a deformable fiber-bundle model is aligned directly with the subject tensor field, skipping the fiber tracking step. Furthermore, the use of a common template eliminates the need for tractography segmentation and defines intersubject shape correspondence. The method is validated using phantom DTI data and applications are presented, including automatic fiber-bundle reconstruction and tract-based morphometry.

  5. Deformation of partially pumped active mirrors for high average-power diode-pumped solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Albach, Daniel; LeTouzé, Geoffroy; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe

    2011-04-25

    We discuss the deformation of a partially pumped active mirror amplifier as a free standing disk, as implemented in several laser systems. We rely on the Lucia laser project to experimentally evaluate the analytical and numerical deformation models. PMID:21643092

  6. Joint use of long water pipe tiltmeters and sea level gauges for monitoring ground deformation at Campi Flegrei caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, Roberto; Capuano, Paolo; Tammaro, Umberto; Bilham, Roger

    2014-05-01

    The Campi Flegrei caldera, located in the Campanian Plain, Southern Italy, 15 km west of the city of Naples, is a nested, resurgent, and restless structure in the densely inhabited Neapolitan area. The main caldera at Campi Flegrei is 12 - 15 km across and its rim is thought to have been formed during the catastrophic eruption, occurred 39 ky ago ca., which produced a deposit referred to as the Campanian Ignimbrite. The volcanic hazards posed by this caldera and the related risk are extremely high, because of its explosive character and the about 1.5 million people living within the caldera. Campi Flegrei area periodically experiences significant unrest episodes which include ground deformations, the so-called 'bradisismo'. Following the last eruption (Monte Nuovo, 1538) a general subsidence has been interrupted by episodes of uplift, the most recent of which occurred in 1970-72 and 1982-84. Since 1950 the caldera is showing signs of unrest with ground uplift, seismicity, and composition variation of fumarole fluids. In particular, subsidence has been replaced by intermittent episodes of inflation with short time duration and various maximum amplitude. They occurred in 1989, 1994, 2000, 2005-06, 2008-09 and 2011-2014 with duration of few months and maximum amplitude ranging between 3 and 18 cm., approximately. In the last years an array of water-pipe tiltmeters with lengths between 28 m and 278 m in tunnels on the flanks of the region of maximum inflation has been installed to avoid problems common to the traditional tiltmeters. The tiltmeters record inflation episodes upon which are superimposed local load tides and the effects of the seiches in the Bay of Naples and in the Tyrrhenian sea. We use data recorded by three tide gauges in the Bay of Pozzuoli (Pozzuoli, Miseno, Nisida) to compare water pipe data with sea level to extract astronomical tidal components (diurnal and semidiurnal) and seiches periods (particularly between 20 minutes and 56 minutes) that

  7. Preliminary atlas of active shallow tectonic deformation in the Puget Lowland, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, Elizabeth A.; Haugerud, Ralph A.; Sherrod, Brian L.; Weaver, Craig S.; Pratt, Thomas L.; Blakely, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    This atlas presents an up-to-date map compilation of the geological and geophysical observations that underpin interpretations of active, surface-deforming faults in the Puget Lowland, Washington. Shallow lowland faults are mapped where observations of deformation from paleoseismic, seismic-reflection, and potential-field investigations converge. Together, results from these studies strengthen the identification and characterization of regional faults and show that as many as a dozen shallow faults have been active during the Holocene. The suite of maps presented in our atlas identifies sites that have evidence of deformation attributed to these shallow faults. For example, the paleoseismic-investigations map shows where coseismic surface rupture and deformation produced geomorphic scarps and deformed shorelines. Other maps compile results of seismic-reflection and potential-field studies that demonstrate evidence of deformation along suspected fault structures in the subsurface. Summary maps show the fault traces derived from, and draped over, the datasets presented in the preceding maps. Overall, the atlas provides map users with a visual overview of the observations and interpretations that support the existence of active, shallow faults beneath the densely populated Puget Lowland.

  8. PMCA activity and membrane tubulin affect deformability of erythrocytes from normal and hypertensive human subjects.

    PubMed

    Monesterolo, Noelia E; Nigra, Ayelen D; Campetelli, Alexis N; Santander, Verónica S; Rivelli, Juan F; Arce, Carlos A; Casale, Cesar H

    2015-11-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated formation of a complex between acetylated tubulin and brain plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA), and the effect of the lipid environment on structure of this complex and on PMCA activity. Deformability of erythrocytes from hypertensive human subjects was reduced by an increase in membrane tubulin content. In the present study, we examined the regulation of PMCA activity by tubulin in normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes, and the effect of exogenously added diacylglycerol (DAG) and phosphatidic acid (PA) on erythrocyte deformability. Some of the key findings were that: (i) PMCA was associated with tubulin in normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes, (ii) PMCA enzyme activity was directly correlated with erythrocyte deformability, and (iii) when tubulin was present in the erythrocyte membrane, treatment with DAG or PA led to increased deformability and associated PMCA activity. Taken together, our findings indicate that PMCA activity is involved in deformability of both normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes. This rheological property of erythrocytes is affected by acetylated tubulin and its lipid environment because both regulate PMCA activity.

  9. Ground Deformation in the Very Near Fault Region during the Mw 6.0 West Napa Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, N.; Sitar, N.; Bray, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Mw 6.0 West Napa earthquake on August 24, 2014 provides a unique case history to study very near fault deformation in infrastructure. Initial reconnaissance of the residential neighborhoods in the Browns Valley area in western Napa following the earthquake noted extensive zones of surface deformation, consisting of compression features including buckled sidewalks, curbs and pavement. Whereas some deformation was associated with surface faulting, much of the observed deformation consisted of these compressional features, which occurred away from surface faulting, could not be attributed to any particular faulting mechanism. One neighborhood with significant effects of surface faulting and well expressed compressive features was chosen for detailed mapping over a three day period, August 26 to 28, 2014. Specifically, compression and extension features along streets and sidewalks parallel to the fault trace and along cross streets roughly orthogonal to the fault trace were measured in detail. A summary of the observations and recordings, as well as the potential deformation mechanisms, are discussed.

  10. Closure Plan for Active Low Level Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    2000-11-16

    This plan has been prepared in response to direction from the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of the plan is to define approaches that will be implemented to ensure protection of the public and the environment when active Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBGs) at the Hanford Site are closed. Performance assessments for active burial grounds in the 200 East and West 200 Areas provide current estimates of potential environmental contamination and doses to the ''maximum exposed individual'' from burial ground operation and closure and compare dose estimates to performance objective dose limits for the facilities. This is an Operational Closure Plan. The intent of the guidance in DOE Order 435.1 is that this plan will be a living document, like the facility performance assessments, and will be revised periodically through the operational life of the LLBGs to reflect updated information on waste inventory. management practices, facility transition planning, schedule dates, assessments of post-closure performance, and environmental consequences. Out year dates identified in this plan are tentative. A Final Closure Plan will be prepared in the future when the timing and extent of closure-related activities for LLBGs can be established with greater certainty. After current operations at the LLBGs are concluded, this plan proposes transitioning of these facilities to the Environmental Restoration Program. This action will enable the Environmental Restoration Program to design and implement consistent and coordinated final remedial actions for active and inactive LLBGs. Active and inactive burial grounds in the 200 West and 200 East Areas are commingled. This plan describes approaches that will be implemented during Interim Closure, Final Closure, and Institutional Control Periods to prepare LLBGs for surface barriers, and the construction of barriers, as well as the scope of inspection, monitoring and maintenance practices that will be performed during and after closure

  11. The role of mechanical heterogeneities in evaporite sequence during deformation initiated by basement fault activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamuszek, Marta; Dabrowski, Marcin; Burliga, Stanisław

    2016-04-01

    Kłodawa Salt Structure (KSS) situated in the centre of the Polish Zechstein Basin started to rise above a basement fault in the Early Triassic. Geological studies of the KSS revealed significant differences in the deformation patterns between the PZ1-PZ2 (intensely deformed) and PZ3-PZ4 (less deformed) cycle evaporites. These two older and two younger cycle evaporite complexes are separated by the thick Main Anhydrite (A3) bed. We use numerical simulations to assess the impact of a thick anhydrite bed on intrasalt deformation. In our models, the overburden consists of clastic sediments. A normal fault located in the rigid basement beneath the salt is activated due to model extension. At the same time, the sedimentation process takes place. The evaporites consist of a salt bed intercalated with a thick anhydrite layer of varying position and geometry. To understand the role of anhydrite layer, we run comparative simulations, in which no anhydrite layer is present. In the study, we use our own numerical codes implemented in MATLAB combined with the MILAMIN and MUTILS numerical packages. Our investigations revealed a significant influence of the anhydrite on deformation style in the evaporate series. The supra-anhydrite domain is characterized by weaker deformation and lower rates of salt flow in comparison to the sub-anhydrite domain. The highest contrast in the rate of salt flow between the two domains is observed in the case of the anhydrite layer situated close to the bottom of the salt complex. The thick anhydrite layer additionally diminishes the deformation rate in the supra-anhydrite domain and can lead to detachment of the basement deformation from its overlay. Our numerical simulations showed that the presence of the A3 Main Anhydrite bed could be the dominant factor responsible for the decoupling of deformation in the KSS salt complex.

  12. Identification and Active Exploration of Deformable Object Boundary Constraints through Robotic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Boonvisut, Pasu; Cavusoglu, M. Cenk

    2014-01-01

    Robotic motion planning algorithms for manipulation of deformable objects, such as in medical robotics applications, rely on accurate estimations of object deformations that occur during manipulation. An estimation of the tissue response (for off-line planning or real-time on-line re-planning), in turn, requires knowledge of both object constitutive parameters and boundary constraints. In this paper, a novel algorithm for estimating boundary constraints of deformable objects from robotic manipulation data is presented. The proposed algorithm uses tissue deformation data collected with a vision system, and employs a multi-stage hill climbing procedure to estimate the boundary constraints of the object. An active exploration technique, which uses an information maximization approach, is also proposed to extend the identification algorithm. The effects of uncertainties on the proposed methods are analyzed in simulation. The results of experimental evaluation of the methods are also presented. PMID:25684836

  13. The secret life of ground squirrels: accelerometry reveals sex-dependent plasticity in above-ground activity

    PubMed Central

    Wilsterman, Kathryn; Zhang, Victor; Moore, Jeanette; Barnes, Brian M.; Buck, C. Loren

    2016-01-01

    The sexes differ in how and when they allocate energy towards reproduction, but how this influences phenotypic plasticity in daily activity patterns is unclear. Here, we use collar-mounted light loggers and triaxial accelerometers to examine factors that affect time spent above ground and overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA), an index of activity-specific energy expenditure, across the active season of free-living, semi-fossorial arctic ground squirrels (Urocitellus parryii). We found high day-to-day variability in time spent above ground and ODBA with most of the variance explained by environmental conditions known to affect thermal exchange. In both years, females spent more time below ground compared with males during parturition and early lactation; however, this difference was fourfold larger in the second year, possibly, because females were in better body condition. Daily ODBA positively correlated with time spent above ground in both sexes, but females were more active per unit time above ground. Consequently, daily ODBA did not differ between the sexes when females were early in lactation, even though females were above ground three to six fewer hours each day. Further, on top of having the additional burden of milk production, ODBA data indicate females also had fragmented rest patterns and were more active during late lactation. Our results indicate that sex differences in reproductive requirements can have a substantial influence on activity patterns, but the size of this effect may be dependent on capital resources accrued during gestation. PMID:27703706

  14. Study to eliminate ground resonance using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.

    1984-01-01

    The effectiveness of active control blade feathering in increasing rotor body damping and the possibility to eliminate ground resonance instabilities were investigated. An analytical model representing rotor flapping and lead-lag degrees of freedom and body pitch, roll, longitudinal and lateral motion is developed. Active control blade feathering is implemented as state variable feedback through a conventional swashplate. The influence of various feedback states, feedback gain, and weighting between the cyclic controls is studied through stability and response analyses. It is shown that blade cyclic inplane motion, roll rate and roll acceleration feedback can add considerable damping to the system and eliminate ground resonance instabilities, which the feedback phase is also a powerful parameter, if chosen properly, it maximizes augmentation of the inherent regressing lag mode damping. It is shown that rotor configuration parameters, like blade root hinge offset, flapping stiffness, and precone considerably influence the control effectiveness. It is found that active control is particularly powerful for hingeless and bearingless rotor systems.

  15. Detection and Analysis of Deep Seated Gravitational Slope Deformation and Relations with the Active Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, M.; Saroli, M.; Lancia, M.; Albano, M.; Lo Sardo, L.; Stramondo, S.

    2015-12-01

    Modern geomorphological investigations focused on the definition of major factors conditioning the landscape evolution. The interaction of some of these factors as the litho-structural setting, the local relief, the tectonic activity, the climatic conditions and the seismicity plays a key-role in determining large scale slope instability phenomena which display the general morphological features of deep seated gravitational deformations (DSGD). The present work aims to detect the large scale gravitational deformation and relations with the active tectonics affecting the Abruzzo Region and to provide a description of the morphologic features of the deformations by means of aerial photograph interpretation, geological/geomorphological field surveys and DInSAR data. The investigated areas are morphologically characterized by significant elevation changes due to the presence of high mountain peaks, separated from surrounding depressed areas by steep escarpments, frequently represented by active faults. Consequently, relief energy favours the development of gravity-driven deformations. These deformations seem to be superimposed on and influenced by the inherited structural and tectonic pattern, related to the sin- and post-thrusting evolution. The morphological evidences of these phenomena, are represented by landslides, sackungen or rock-flows, lateral spreads and block slides. DInSAR analysis measured deformation of the large scale gravitative phenomena previously identified through aerial-photo analysis. DSGD may evolve in rapid, catastrophic mass movements and this paroxistic evolution of the deformations may be triggered by high magnitude seismic events. These assumptions point out the great importance of mapping in detail large scale slope instability phenomena in relation to the active faults, in a perspective of land-use planning such as the Abruzzo Region characterized by a high magnitude historical seismicity.

  16. Active zone impact on deformation state of non-rigid pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandula, Ján

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with the design of non-rigid pavement, with emphasis on the effect of active zone on its deformation state. The concepts of determination of active zone are described. The results of numerical modelling of pavement laying on elastic subgrade are presented in the paper

  17. 2D and 3D Ground Penetrating Radar monitoring of a reinforced concrete asphalt plate affected by mechanical deformation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavusi, M.; Dumoulin, J.; Loperte, A.; Rizzo, E.; Soldovieri, F.

    2012-04-01

    The main facility of Hydrogeosite Laboratory of the Italian National Research Council (Marsico Nuovo, CNR) is a 3m x 7m x 10m reinforced concrete pool filled by siliceous sand designed for hydrologic experiments. One of its peculiarities is the possibility to vary the water table depth by using a proper hydraulic system [1]. In the framework of the FP7 ISTIMES project (Integrated System for Transport Infrastructure surveillance and Monitoring by Electromagnetic Sensing), a 3m x 3m layered structure has been purposely built and placed in the pool of the Hydrogeosite Laboratory with the aim to carry out a long term monitoring, by using jointly several electromagnetic sensing technologies, during two different phases simulating the rising of the water table and a mechanical solicitation. Several layers composed the structure from the top to the bottom, such as: 5 cm of asphalt; 5-10 cm of reinforced concrete; 20-25 cm of conglomerate, 55 cm of sand. Moreover, in the sand layer, three (metallic and plastic) pipes of different size were buried to simulate utilities. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) surveys were performed by using a the GSSI SIR 3000 system equipped with 400 MHz and 1500 MHz central frequency antennas. Surveys carried out by means of 400 MHz antenna allowed to detect and localize the three pipes (one in plastic and two in metal) and to investigate the effects of the sand water content on their radar signature. Surveys carried out by using 1500 MHz antenna were focused to characterize the shallower layers of the structure. The Hydrogeosite experiment consisted in following stages: • Arising of a water table by infiltration from the bottom; • Water gravity infiltration condescendingly; • Infiltration by peristaltic pump in the very shallow layers of the structure; • Water table drawdown; • Mechanical structure deformation; • Asphalt plate restoration after mechanical solicitation. After each stage a series of GPR surveys was performed. Moreover

  18. Cyclic mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast proliferation and autocrine growth factor activity.

    PubMed

    Bishop, J E; Mitchell, J J; Absher, P M; Baldor, L; Geller, H A; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Hamblin, M J; Vacek, P; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    Cellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia and increased extracellular matrix deposition are features of tissue hypertrophy resulting from increased work load. It is known, for example, that mechanical forces play a critical role in lung development, cardiovascular remodeling following pressure overload, and skeletal muscle growth. The mechanisms involved in these processes, however, remain unclear. Here we examined the effect of mechanical deformation on fibroblast function in vitro. IMR-90 human fetal lung fibroblasts grown on collagen-coated silastic membranes were subjected to cyclical mechanical deformation (10% increase in culture surface area; 1 Hz) for up to 5 days. Cell number was increased by 39% after 2 days of deformation (1.43 +/- .01 x 10(5) cells/membrane compared with control, 1.03 +/- 0.02 x 10(5) cells; mean +/- SEM; P < 0.02) increasing to 163% above control by 4 days (2.16 +/- 0.16 x 10(5) cells compared with 0.82 +/- 0.03 x 10(5) cells; P < 0.001). The medium from mechanically deformed cells was mitogenic for IMR-90 cells, with maximal activity in the medium from cells mechanically deformed for 2 days (stimulating cell replication by 35% compared with media control; P < 0.002). These data suggest that mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast replication and that this effect is mediated by the release of autocrine growth factors.

  19. Ground deformation associated with the precursory unrest and early phases of the January 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cervelli, P.F.; Fournier, T.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Power, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    On January 11, 2006 Augustine Volcano erupted after nearly 20 years of quiescence. Global Positioning System (GPS) instrumentation at Augustine, consisting of six continuously recording, telemetered receivers, measured clear precursory deformation consistent with a source of inflation or pressurization beneath the volcano's summit at a depth of around sea level. Deformation began in early summer 2005, and was preceded by a subtle, but distinct, increase in seismicity, which began in May 2005. After remaining more or less constant, deformation rates accelerated on at least three stations beginning in late November 2005. After this date, GPS data suggest the upward propagation of a small dike into the edifice, which, based on the style of deformation and high levels of gas emission, appears to have ascended to shallow levels by mid-December 2005, about four weeks before the eruption began.

  20. Crustal deformation at very long baseline interferometry sites due to seasonal air-mass and ground water variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolz, A.; Larden, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    The seasonal deformation normal to the Earth's surface was calculated at stations involved or interested in very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) geodesy and at hypothetical sites in Australia and Brazil using global atmospheric pressure data, values for groundwater storage, and load Love numbers deduced from current Earth models. It was found that the annual range of deformation approached the centimeter level measuring potential of the VLBI technqiue at Greenbank, Haystack, and the Brazil site.

  1. Ground surface deformation patterns, magma supply, and magma storage at Okmok volcano, Alaska, from InSAR analysis: 1. Intereruption deformation, 1997-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhong; Dzurisin, Daniel; Biggs, Juliet; Wicks, Charles; McNutt, Steve

    2010-05-01

    Starting soon after the 1997 eruption at Okmok volcano and continuing until the start of the 2008 eruption, magma accumulated in a storage zone centered ˜3.5 km beneath the caldera floor at a rate that varied with time. A Mogi-type point pressure source or finite sphere with a radius of 1 km provides an adequate fit to the deformation field portrayed in time-sequential interferometric synthetic aperture radar images. From the end of the 1997 eruption through summer 2004, magma storage increased by 3.2-4.5 × 107 m3, which corresponds to 75-85% of the magma volume erupted in 1997. Thereafter, the average magma supply rate decreased such that by 10 July 2008, 2 days before the start of the 2008 eruption, magma storage had increased by 3.7-5.2 × 107 m3 or 85-100% of the 1997 eruption volume. We propose that the supply rate decreased in response to the diminishing pressure gradient between the shallow storage zone and a deeper magma source region. Eventually the effects of continuing magma supply and vesiculation of stored magma caused a critical pressure threshold to be exceeded, triggering the 2008 eruption. A similar pattern of initially rapid inflation followed by oscillatory but generally slowing inflation was observed prior to the 1997 eruption. In both cases, withdrawal of magma during the eruptions depressurized the shallow storage zone, causing significant volcano-wide subsidence and initiating a new intereruption deformation cycle.

  2. Ground surface deformation patterns, magma supply, and magma storage at Okmok volcano, Alaska, from InSAR analysis: 1. Intereruption deformation, 1997–2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Dzurisin, Daniel; Biggs, Juliet; Wicks, Charles; McNutt, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Starting soon after the 1997 eruption at Okmok volcano and continuing until the start of the 2008 eruption, magma accumulated in a storage zone centered ~3.5 km beneath the caldera floor at a rate that varied with time. A Mogi-type point pressure source or finite sphere with a radius of 1 km provides an adequate fit to the deformation field portrayed in time-sequential interferometric synthetic aperture radar images. From the end of the 1997 eruption through summer 2004, magma storage increased by 3.2–4.5 × 107 m3, which corresponds to 75–85% of the magma volume erupted in 1997. Thereafter, the average magma supply rate decreased such that by 10 July 2008, 2 days before the start of the 2008 eruption, magma storage had increased by 3.7–5.2 × 107 m3 or 85–100% of the 1997 eruption volume. We propose that the supply rate decreased in response to the diminishing pressure gradient between the shallow storage zone and a deeper magma source region. Eventually the effects of continuing magma supply and vesiculation of stored magma caused a critical pressure threshold to be exceeded, triggering the 2008 eruption. A similar pattern of initially rapid inflation followed by oscillatory but generally slowing inflation was observed prior to the 1997 eruption. In both cases, withdrawal of magma during the eruptions depressurized the shallow storage zone, causing significant volcano-wide subsidence and initiating a new intereruption deformation cycle.

  3. Observing active deformation of volcanoes in North America: Geodetic data from the Plate Boundary Observatory and associated networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskas, C. M.; Phillips, D. A.; Mattioli, G. S.; Meertens, C. M.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Enders, M.; Feaux, K.; Mencin, D.; Baker, S.; Lisowski, M.; Smith, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), operated by UNAVCO, records deformation of the geologically diverse North America western plate boundary, with subnetworks of instruments concentrated at selected active and potentially active volcanoes. These sensors record deformation and earthquakes and allow monitoring agencies and researchers to analyze changes in ground motion and seismicity. The intraplate volcanoes at Yellowstone and Long Valley are characterized by uplift/subsidence cycles, high seismicity, and hydrothermal activity but there have been no historic eruptions at either volcano. PBO maintains dense GPS networks of 20-25 stations at each of these volcanoes, with an additional 5 boreholes at Yellowstone containing tensor strainmeters, short-period seismometers, and borehole tiltmeters. Subduction zone volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc have had multiple historic eruptions, and PBO maintains equipment at Augustine (8 GPS), Akutan (8 GPS, 4 tiltmeters), and Unimak Island (14 GPS, 8 tiltmeters). The Unimak stations are at the active Westdahl and Shishaldin edifices and the nearby, inactive Isanotski volcano. In the Cascade Arc, PBO maintains networks at Mount St. Helens (15 GPS, 4 borehole strainmeters and seismometers, 8 borehole tiltmeters), Shasta (7 GPS, 1 borehole strainmeter and seismometer), and Lassen Peak (8 GPS). Data from many of these stations in the Pacific Northwest and California are also provided as realtime streams of raw and processed data. Real-time GPS data, along with high-rate GPS data, will be an important new resource for detecting and studying future rapid volcanic deformation events and earthquakes. UNAVCO works closely with the USGS Volcano Hazards Program, archiving data from USGS GPS stations in Alaska, Cascadia, and Long Valley. The PBO and USGS networks combined provide more comprehensive coverage than PBO alone, particularly of the Cascade Arc, where the USGS maintains a multiple instruments near each volcano. Ground

  4. Railway deformation detected by DInSAR over active sinkholes in the Ebro Valley evaporite karst, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galve, J. P.; Castañeda, C.; Gutiérrez, F.

    2015-06-01

    Previously not measured subsidence on railway tracks was detected using DInSAR displacement maps produced for the central sector of Ebro Valley (NE Spain). This area is affected by evaporite karst and the analyzed railway corridors traverse active sinkholes that produce deformations in these infrastructures. One of the railway tracks affected by slight settlements corresponds to the Madrid-Barcelona high-speed line, a transport infrastructure highly vulnerable to ground deformation processes. Our analysis based on DInSAR measurements and geomorphological surveys indicate that this line show dissolution-induced subsidence and compaction of anthropogenic deposits (infills and embankments). By using DInSAR techniques, it was also measured the significant subsidence related to the activity of sinkholes in the Castejón-Zaragoza conventional railway line. Thus, this study demonstrate that DInSAR velocity maps coupled with detailed geomorphological surveys may help in the identification of the sectors of railway tracks that may compromise the safety of travellers.

  5. Cold Season Ground Validation Activities in support of GPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudak, D. R.; Petersen, W. A.

    2012-12-01

    A fundamental component of the next-generation global precipitation data products that will be addressed by the GPM mission is the hydrologic cycle at higher latitudes. In this respect, falling snow represents a primary contribution to regional atmospheric and terrestrial water budgets. The current study provides provide information on the precipitation microphysics and processes associated with cold season precipitation and precipitating cloud systems across multiple scales. It also addresses the ability of in-situ ground-based sensors as well as multi-frequency active and passive microwave sensors to detect and estimate falling snow, and more generally to contribute to our knowledge and understanding of the complete global water cycle. The work supports the incorporation of appropriate physics into GPM snowfall retrieval algorithms and the development of improved ground validation techniques for GPM product evaluation. Important information for developing GPM falling snow retrieval algorithms will be provided by a field campaign that took place in the winter of 2011/12 in the Great Lakes area of North America, termed the GPM Cold Season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx). GCPEx represented a collaboration among the NASA, Environment Canada (EC), the Canadian Space Agency and several US, Canadian and European universities. The data collection strategy for GCPEx was coordinated, stacked high-altitude and in-situ cloud aircraft missions sampling within a broader network of ground-based volumetric observations and measurements. The NASA DSC-8 research aircraft provided a platform for the downward-viewing dual-frequency radar and multi-frequency radiometer observations. The University of North Dakota Citation and the Canadian NRC Convair-580 aircraft provided in-situ profiles of cloud and precipitation microphysics using a suite of optical array probes and bulk measurement instrumentation. Ground sampling was focused about a densely-instrumented central location that is

  6. Hot fluid migration: an efficient source of ground deformation: application to the 1982 1985 crisis at Campi Flegrei-Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonafede, Maurizio

    1991-08-01

    Some solutions of the forced heat advection problem in compressible media are worked out employing a perturbative approach and their implication for thermoelastic deformation are discussed. A sharp temperature front, which migrates at a speed in the order of Darcy flow rate, develops in the medium, giving rise to significant deformation via thermal expansion. A thermally induced pressure source accompanies the temperature front, which may be significant only in very high temperature cases. Results are applied to interpreting the uplift episode of 1982-1984 at Campi Flegrei (C.F.), near Naples, Italy. A mechanism is envisaged for uplift at Campi Flegrei in which a sudden connection is established between a deep, hot, high-pressure fluid reservoir and a shallow, relatively cold, low-pressure aquifer. The inclusion of fluid migration in the deformation model allows simple explanations of several geochemical and geophysical observations made during the bradyseismic crisis. It appears that the proposed mechanism may explain the large observed uplift, without requiring unreasonable pressure increase within the magma chamber. Furthermore, the deformation source may be allowed to be shallower than the magma chamber, as required by any reasonable deformation model at C.F.

  7. Modeling of Morelia Fault Earthquake (Mw=5.4) source fault parameters using the coseismic ground deformation and groundwater level changes data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarychikhina, O.; Glowacka, E.; Mellors, R. J.; Vázquez, R.

    2009-12-01

    On 24 May 2006 at 04:20 (UTC) a moderate-size (Mw=5.4) earthquake struck the Mexicali Valley, Baja California, México, roughly 30 km to the southeast of the city of Mexicali, in the vicinity of the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field (CPGF). The earthquake occurred on the Morelia fault, one of the east-dipping normal faults in the Mexicali Valley. Locally, this earthquake was strongly felt and caused minor damage. The event created 5 km of surface rupture and down-dip displacements of up to 25-30 cm were measured at some places along this surface rupture. Associated deformation was measured by vertical crackmeter, leveling profile, and Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (D-InSAR). A coseismic step-like groundwater level change was detected at 7 wells. The Mw=5.4 Morelia Fault earthquake had significant scientific interest, first, because of surprisingly strong effects for an earthquake of such size; second, the variability of coseismic effects data from different ground-based and space-based techniques which allows to the better constrain of the source fault parameters. Source parameters for the earthquake were estimated using forward modeling of both surface deformation data and static volume strain change (inferred from coseismic changes in groundwater level). All ground deformation data was corrected by anthropogenic component caused by the geothermal fluid exploitation in the CPGF. Modeling was based on finite rectangular fault embedded in an elastic media. The preferred fault model has a strike, rake, and dip of (48°, -89°, 45°) and has a length of 5.2 km, width of 6.7 km, and 34 cm of uniform slip. The geodetic moment, based on the modeled fault parameters, is 1.18E+17 Nm. The model matches the observed surface deformation, expected groundwater level changes, and teleseismic moment reasonably well and explains in part why the earthquake was so strongly felt in the area.

  8. A deformable lung tumor tracking method in fluoroscopic video using active shape models: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qianyi; Hamilton, Russell J; Schowengerdt, Robert A; Jiang, Steve B

    2007-09-01

    A dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) can be used to track a moving target during radiotherapy. One of the major benefits for DMLC tumor tracking is that, in addition to the compensation for tumor translational motion, DMLC can also change the aperture shape to conform to a deforming tumor projection in the beam's eye view. This paper presents a method that can track a deforming lung tumor in fluoroscopic video using active shape models (ASM) (Cootes et al 1995 Comput. Vis. Image Underst. 61 38-59). The method was evaluated by comparing tracking results against tumor projection contours manually edited by an expert observer. The evaluation shows the feasibility of using this method for precise tracking of lung tumors with deformation, which is important for DMLC-based real-time tumor tracking.

  9. Active range of motion outcomes after reconstruction of burned wrist and hand deformities.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Ahmed M; Mahboub, Tarek A; Ibrahim Fouad, Amr; Azari, Kodi; Khalil, Haitham H; McCarthy, James E

    2016-06-01

    This works aim is to evaluate the efficacy of skin grafts and flaps in reconstruction of post-burn hand and wrist deformities. A prospective study of 57 burn contractures of the wrist and dorsum of the hand was performed. Flaps were used only if there was a non-vascularized structure after contracture release, otherwise a skin graft was used. Active range of motion (ROM) was used to assess hand function. The extension deformity cohort uniformly underwent skin graft following contracture release with a mean improvement of 71 degrees (p<0.0001). The flexion deformity cohort was treated with either skin grafts (8 patients) or flaps (9 patients) with a mean improvement of 44 degrees (p<0.0001). Skin grafts suffice for dorsal hand contractures to restore functional wrist ROM. For flexion contractures, flaps were more likely for contractures >6 months. Early release of burn contracture is advisable to avoid deep structure contracture.

  10. Use of polyurethane foam deformation sensor to record respiratory activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredov, V. I.; Baranov, V. S.

    1980-05-01

    The sensor developed has some substantial advantages over other known types. It is highly sensitive over a wide range of strain loads. The level of the output signal is linearly related to the force exerted on it, and it is sufficient for direct recording without using amplifiers of electric signals. The sensor is based on elastic, spongy material, polyurethane foam (porolon) with current-conducting material on the pore surface, current-conducting carbon black or electrode paste. The elastic properties of the sensor are built in the actual base of the strain-sensitive element, which simplifies the construction substantially and increases the reliability of the unit. In order to test the possibility of using this sensor to examine respiratory function, human pneumograms were recorded with the subject in a calm state along with the respiratory activity of experimental animals (dogs). Samples of the respiratory curve are shown. The simplicity of design of the sensor makes it possible to use it in various physiological experiments.

  11. Ground deformations along Ionian coastline of the northern Calabria (Southern Italy) from Capo Trionto to Capo Colonna detected by InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollrath, Andreas; Cianflone, Giuseppe; Bignami, Christian; Brunori, Carlo Alberto; Dominici, Rocco; Zucca, Francesco; Stramondo, Salvatore; Baldi, Paolo; Fabris, Massimo; Sepe, Vincenzo; Anzidei, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The study area is located along the Ionian coast of the northern Calabrian Arc, in correspondence of the Crotone and Spartivento fore-arc basins. The investigated coastal area represents the western margin of the Gulf of Taranto. The seafloor of this sector has been investigated by several authors during the last three decades and is characterized by numerous submarine depositional systems strictly related to main drainage basins which feed into the Ionian Sea. Northward, the area is limited by the Corigliano Canyon which connects the continental shelf with the Taranto Valley and separates the Cariati and Cirò Ridges. The latter is bounded, along its southern side, by the NW-SE trending Alice Canyon which reaches the inner continental shelf offshore Punta Alice and is not related to an onshore drainage system. Southward, the wide Neto-Lipuda Canyons system originates close to the coastline and is connected to the Neto and Lipuda Rivers. Toward South, this system is separated from the Esaro Canyon by the Luna-Hera Lacinia High. The southernmost canyon is connected to the Esaro River and runs subparallel to the coastline. Previous authors have been highlighted ground deformations, with sometimes associated km-long surface fractures and damages to buildings, in the Cirò coastal plain and in the area southward from Crotone. The cause of these deformation is attributed to megaslides. The multi-temporal (1958, 1985, 1998, 2008) analysis of the coastline variations shows a general erosive trend characterized by m and dm coastline retreats. We applied the multi-temporal StaMPS SBAS technique for two SAR datasets, one acquired from 2003 up to 2010 by Envisat ASAR instrument, and another from 1995 up to 2000 from the ERS satellite (ESA, European Space Agency) to investigate ground displacements in the studied coastal area. The Up component (recording the vertical ground deformation) allows to identify the main subsidence areas in correspondence of the Capo Colonna

  12. Deformation of the Calabrian Arc subduction complex and its relation to STEP activity at depth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonia, Alina; Wortel, Rinus; Nijholt, Nicolai; Govers, Rob; Torelli, Luigi

    2015-04-01

    Propagating tear faults at the edge of subducted slabs ("Subduction transform edge propagator", STEP) are an intrinsic part of lithospheric plate dynamics. The surface expression of a STEP is generally not known yet, and is expected to vary significantly from one region to the other. We choose the Sicily -Calabria-Ionian Sea region, of which the lithosphere-upper mantle structure has the characteristics of a STEP zone, as a study area. The area has a very prominent accretionary wedge, the formation and subsequent deformation of which presumably were affected by the STEP activity at depth. In this contribution, we use seismic data on the near surface structure and deformation in combination with numerical model results to investigate the relation between deep STEP activity and near surface expression. Prominent features in the surface tectonics are the Malta escarpment (with predominantly normal faulting), the newly identified Ionian Fault and Alfeo-Etna fault system, and a distinct longitudinal division of the wedge into a western and an eastern lobe (Polonia et al., Tectonics, 2011). The two lobes are characterized by different structural style, deformation rates and basal detachment depths. Numerical model results indicate that the regional lithospheric structure, such as the orientation of the eastern passive (albeit subsequently activated) margin of Sicily relative to the Calabrian subduction zone, has a profound effect on possible fault activity along the Malta escarpment. Fault activity along the above primary fault structures may have varied in time, implying the possibility of intermittent activity. Interpreting seismicity in the context of a possible STEP, and the accompanying deformation zone at or near the surface, is not (yet) straightforward. Although direct evidence for recognizing all aspects of STEP activity is - as usual - lacking, a comparison with two well-known STEP regions, the northern part of the Tonga subduction zone and southern part of the

  13. NASA SPoRT GOES-R Proving Ground Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Fuell, Kevin K.; Jedloec, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program is a partner with the GOES-R Proving Ground (PG) helping prepare forecasters understand the unique products to come from the GOES-R instrument suite. SPoRT is working collaboratively with other members of the GOES-R PG team and Algorithm Working Group (AWG) scientists to develop and disseminate a suite of proxy products that address specific forecast problems for the WFOs, Regional and National Support Centers, and other NOAA users. These products draw on SPoRT s expertise with the transition and evaluation of products into operations from the MODIS instrument and the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA). The MODIS instrument serves as an excellent proxy for the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) that will be aboard GOES-R. SPoRT has transitioned and evaluated several multi-channel MODIS products. The true and false color products are being used in natural hazard detection by several SPoRT partners to provide better observation of land features, such as fires, smoke plumes, and snow cover. Additionally, many of SPoRT s partners are coastal offices and already benefit from the MODIS sea surface temperature composite. This, along with other surface feature observations will be developed into ABI proxy products for diagnostic use in the forecast process as well as assimilation into forecast models. In addition to the MODIS instrument, the NALMA has proven very valuable to WFOs with access to these total lightning data. These data provide situational awareness and enhanced warning decision making to improve lead times for severe thunderstorm and tornado warnings. One effort by SPoRT scientists includes a lightning threat product to create short-term model forecasts of lightning activity. Additionally, SPoRT is working with the AWG to create GLM proxy data from several of the ground based total lightning networks, such as the NALMA. The evaluation will focus on the vastly improved spatial

  14. Active crustal deformation in the Jalisco block, Mexico: evidence for a great historical earthquake in the 16th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Gerardo; García-Acosta, Virginia; Gaulon, Roland

    1994-06-01

    On December 27th, 1568, a large earthquake occurred to the southwest of Guadalajara, Mexico, near the northeastern corner of the Jalisco block, in an area where no great earthquakes have been reported before. It caused heavy damage in the region where the Colima and Tepic-Zacoalco grabens intersect. Many churches, houses and convents in the neighboring towns collapsed and severe deformation of the ground was observed in the area. Landslides apparently dammed the Ameca River for several days and the opening of large cracks was reported in the lowlands. The flow of natural springs and the level of Lake Zacoalco changed dramatically after the earthquake. All of these reports strongly suggest that a local fault was the source of this large and destructive earthquake. Based on the intensity data inferred from the historical reports, the 1568 event is perhaps the largest earthquake to date in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Compared to other well documented, large earthquakes that occurred in the volcanic belt in 1875, 1912 and 1920, the magnitude appears to be greater than 7.0 ( MW). The Jalisco block is presumed to be rifting away from the North American plate. The Colima and Tepic-Zacoalco grabens, which bound the Jalisco block to the east and north, respectively, are apparently the boundaries where rifting is taking place in a complex and highly faulted environment. Based on the data available, it is impossible to identify the specific fault ruptured during the earthquake unequivocally. However, the occurrence of this large event in 1568 confirms that active deformation is still taking place in the Jalisco block. The apparently long recurrence times of these large events suggest that tectonic deformation is slow.

  15. Grounding Abstractness: Abstract Concepts and the Activation of the Mouth

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Anna M.; Zarcone, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    One key issue for theories of cognition is how abstract concepts, such as freedom, are represented. According to the WAT (Words As social Tools) proposal, abstract concepts activate both sensorimotor and linguistic/social information, and their acquisition modality involves the linguistic experience more than the acquisition of concrete concepts. We report an experiment in which participants were presented with abstract and concrete definitions followed by concrete and abstract target-words. When the definition and the word matched, participants were required to press a key, either with the hand or with the mouth. Response times and accuracy were recorded. As predicted, we found that abstract definitions and abstract words yielded slower responses and more errors compared to concrete definitions and concrete words. More crucially, there was an interaction between the target-words and the effector used to respond (hand, mouth). While responses with the mouth were overall slower, the advantage of the hand over the mouth responses was more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts. The results are in keeping with grounded and embodied theories of cognition and support the WAT proposal, according to which abstract concepts evoke linguistic-social information, hence activate the mouth. The mechanisms underlying the mouth activation with abstract concepts (re-enactment of acquisition experience, or re-explanation of the word meaning, possibly through inner talk) are discussed. To our knowledge this is the first behavioral study demonstrating with real words that the advantage of the hand over the mouth is more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts, likely because of the activation of linguistic information with abstract concepts. PMID:27777563

  16. Joint influence of transmural heterogeneities and wall deformation on cardiac bioelectrical activity: A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Colli Franzone, P; Pavarino, L F; Scacchi, S

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate, by means of numerical simulations, the influence of myocardial deformation due to muscle contraction and relaxation on the cardiac repolarization process in presence of transmural intrinsic action potential duration (APD) heterogeneities. The three-dimensional electromechanical model considered consists of the following four coupled components: the quasi-static transversely isotropic finite elasticity equations for the deformation of the cardiac tissue; the active tension model for the intracellular calcium dynamics and cross-bridge binding; the anisotropic Bidomain model for the electrical current flow through the deforming cardiac tissue; the membrane model of ventricular myocytes, including stretch-activated channels. The numerical simulations are based on our finite element parallel solver, which employs Multilevel Additive Schwarz preconditioners for the solution of the discretized Bidomain equations and Newton-Krylov methods for the solution of the discretized non-linear finite elasticity equations. Our findings show that: (i) the presence of intrinsic transmural cellular APD heterogeneities is not fully masked by electrotonic current flow or by the presence of the mechanical deformation; (ii) despite the presence of transmural APD heterogeneities, the recovery process follows the activation sequence and there is no significant transmural repolarization gradient; (iii) with or without transmural APD heterogeneities, epicardial electrograms always display the same wave shape and discordance between the polarity of QRS complex and T-wave; (iv) the main effects of the mechanical deformation are an increase of the dispersion of repolarization time and APD, when computed over the total cardiac domain and over the endo- and epicardial surfaces, while there is a slight decrease along the transmural direction. PMID:27545966

  17. Active deformation analysis and evaluation of earthquake hazard in Gafsa region (Southern Atlas of Tunisia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrouni, Nejib; Bouaziz, Samir; Soumaya, Abdelkader; Ben Ayed, Noureddine; Attafi, Khereddine

    2013-04-01

    The Southern Atlas of Tunisia constitutes the transition between Atlas fold and the Northern edge of the Saharan platform. The general direction is near to E-W deflected to N060 whose structural style and geometry of deformation still complex. This domain is Southern part of the seismic zone bordering the Northern African plate as indicated by the large seismic events that occurred periodically. The Gafsa area, more particularly concerned by seismic risk, is bordered to the North by the NW-SE trending "Gafsa Fault" and has significant seismic. The most active tectonic are related to the reactivating of pre-existing NW-SE and E-W trending strike-slip faulting. We will set up the network in the active zone of Gafsa surroundings, in order to cover the area of aftershocks (co-seismic surface rupture) of May 22, 1972 and December 27, 1985 (Ms=4.2) in Gafsa and November 7, 1989 (Ms=4.4) in Metlaoui, December 8, 2010 and in Sidi Aich (Ms=3.66). Paleostress and calculated focal mechanism solutions for the earthquakes show that the active stress field is a NW-SE trending compression. Damage and surface effects of land and urban areas caused by these events demonstrate the vulnerability of cities in the region of Gafsa to seismic activities. The analyses of recent and active deformation in this region has allowed the assessment of urban seismic hazard and take stock seismic zones embedded in a distorted geographic information system (GIS) in close relationship with the regional tectonic setting. This assessment has provided crucial information on the neotectonic deformation and seismotectonics of Gafsa region and its surrounding which affects remote orogenic dynamics and the current state of the North African margin. In particular, the comparison between the deformations and quantified seismic activity has also assessed the risk and the regional seismic hazard and develop a seismotectonic zoning.

  18. Thrust faulting and 3D ground deformation of the 3 July 2015 Mw 6.4 Pishan, China earthquake from Sentinel-1A radar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianbao; Shen, Zheng-Kang; Li, Tao; Chen, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Boosted by the launch of Sentinel-1A radar satellite from the European Space Agency (ESA), we now have the opportunity of fast, full and multiple coverage of the land based deformation field of earthquakes. Here we use the data to investigate a strong earthquake struck Pishan, western China on July 3, 2015. The earthquake fault is blind and no ground break features are found on-site, thus Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data give full play to its technical advantage for the recovery of coseismic deformation field. By using the Sentinel-1A radar data in the Interferometric Wide Swath mode, we obtain 3 tracks of InSAR data over the struck region, and resolve the 3D ground deformation generated by the earthquake. Then the Line-of-Sight (LOS) InSAR data are inverted for the slip-distribution of the seismogenic fault. The final model shows that the earthquake is completely blind with pure-thrust motion. The maximum slip is ~ 0.48 m at a depth of ~ 7 km, consistent with the depth estimate from seismic reflection data. In particular, the inverted model is also compatible with a south-dipping fault ramp among a group of fault interfaces detected by the seismic reflection profile over the region. The seismic moment obtained equals to a Mw 6.4 earthquake. The Pishan earthquake ruptured the frontal part of the thrust ramps under the Slik anticline, and unloaded the coulomb stress of them. However, it may have loaded stress to the back-thrust above the thrust ramps by ~ 1-4 bar, and promoted it for future failure. Moreover, the stress loading on the west side of the earthquake fault is much larger than that on the east side, indicating a higher risk for failure to the west of the Zepu fault.

  19. Ground Deformation Associated with the 2004-2005 Dome-building Eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzurisin, D.; Lisowski, M.; Schilling, S. P.; Lahusen, R. G.; Sherrod, D. R.; Iwatsubo, E. Y.; Diefenbach, A.; Thompson, S. K.

    2005-12-01

    Following nearly 18 years of eruptive quiescence, a new dacite lava dome began growing in the crater at Mount St. Helens in October 2004. Extrusion was preceded by an intense swarm of shallow earthquakes starting on September 23, by several small explosions starting on October 1, and by remarkable uplift of the south crater floor and glacier. The resulting welt, which was first identified in air photos on September 27, was 450 m wide and 100 m high on October 11 when the first new lava emerged from it. Campaign-style GPS surveys in 2000 and 2003 of a 50-station network concentrated within 10 km of the volcano's summit, but extending more than 30 km radially and covering an area of more than 7400 km2, revealed no surface deformation indicative of magmatic inflation or deflation. A single-frequency continuous GPS station on the 1980-1986 lava dome and annual GPS surveys of points on the dome and surrounding crater floor showed only subsidence of the dome at rates of a few cm/yr, which we attribute to cooling and compaction. A continuous GPS station (JRO1) located 9 km NNW of the vent abruptly started moving toward the volcano, suggesting deflation of a deep magma reservoir, concurrent with the onset of seismicity. Southward motion of JRO1, which is distinctly different from the regional trend of clockwise block rotation in SW Washington, gradually slowed from ~0.5 mm/d before emergence of the new dome to an average of ~0.04 mm/d during the first 11 months of continuous extrusion. Meanwhile, the extrusion rate was relatively steady at ~2 m3/s. Taken together, the JRO1 GPS and extrusion-rate results indicate that the crustal magma reservoir feeding the eruption is being replenished. Twelve new continuous GPS stations were installed on or near the volcano starting in October 2004 by the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory and UNAVCO Inc., the latter representing the Plate Boundary Observatory. Like JRO1, these stations moved mostly toward the volcano during the ensuing 11

  20. Observations of Seafloor Deformation and Methane Venting within an Active Fault Zone Offshore Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K.; Lundsten, E. M.; Paull, C. K.; Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H. J.; Brewer, P. G.; Vrijenhoek, R.; Lundsten, L.

    2013-12-01

    Detailed mapping surveys of the floor and flanks of the Santa Monica Basin, San Pedro Basin, and San Diego Trough were conducted during the past seven years using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) built and operated by MBARI specifically for seafloor mapping. The AUV collected data provide up to 1 m resolution multibeam bathymetric grids with a vertical precision of 0.15 m. Along with high-resolution multibeam, the AUV also collects chirp seismic reflection profiles. Structures within the uppermost 10-20 m of the seafloor, which in the surveys presented here is composed of recent sediment drape, can typically be resolved in the sub-bottom reflectors. Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives allowed for ground-truth observations and sampling within the surveyed areas. The objectives of these dives included finding evidence of recent seafloor deformation and locating areas where chemosynthetic biological communities are supported by fluid venting. Distinctive seafloor features within an active fault zone are revealed in unprecedented detail in the AUV generated maps and seismic reflection profiles. Evidence for recent fault displacements include linear scarps which can be as small as 20 cm high but traceable for several km, right lateral offsets within submarine channels and topographic ridges, and abrupt discontinuities in sub-bottom reflectors, which in places appear to displace seafloor sediments. Several topographic highs that occur within the fault zone appear to be anticlines related to step-overs in these faults. These topographic highs are, in places, topped with circular mounds that are up to 15 m high and have ~30° sloping sides. The crests of the topographic highs and the mounds both have distinctive rough morphologies produced by broken pavements of irregular blocks of methane-derived authigenic carbonates, and by topographic depressions, commonly more than 2 m deep. These areas of distinctive rough topography are commonly associated with living

  1. Evidence of ongoing crustal deformation related to magmatic activity near Socorro, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, S.; Brown, L.; Reilinger, R.

    1986-01-01

    Leveling measurements conducted in 1980-1981 by the National Geodetic Survey in the Socorro area of the Rio Grande rift are analyzed. Crustal uplift related to magma inflation in the midcrustal magma body is detected; an uplift of 0.18 cm/yr is measured for the time between 1951-1980. The survey data of 1911 and 1959 are compared to the present data and good correlation is observed. The systematic leveling errors including height-dependence and refraction errors are studied. The 30-km-wide subsidence in the area is examined. The spatial correlation between seismic activity, the Socorro magma body, and crustal deformation in Socorro is investigated. The crustal movement from magma reservior activities is modeled using the formulations of Dieterich and Decker (1975). The modeling of the deformation reveals that the movement in the Socorro area is associated with the 19-km deep Socorro magma body.

  2. New results on ground deformation in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin (southern Poland) obtained during the DORIS Project (EU-FP 7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graniczny, Marek; Colombo, Davide; Kowalski, Zbigniew; Przyłucka, Maria; Zdanowski, Albin

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents application of satellite interferometric methods (persistent scatterer interferometric synthetic aperture radar (PSInSAR™) and differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR)) for observation of ground deformation in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin (USCB) in Southern Poland. The presented results were obtained during the DORIS project (EC FP 7, Grant Agreement n. 242212, www.doris-project.eu). Several InSAR datasets for this area were analysed. Most of them were processed by Tele-Rilevamento Europa - T.R.E. s.r.l. Italy. Datasets came from different SAR satellites (ERS 1 and 2, Envisat, ALOS- PALSAR and TerraSAR-X) and cover three different SAR bands (L, C and X). They were processed using both InSAR techniques: DInSAR, where deformations are presented as interferometric fringes on the raster image, and PSInSAR, where motion is indentified on irregular set of persistent scatterer (PS) points. Archival data from the C-band European Space Agency satellites ERS and ENVISAT provided information about ground movement since 1992 until 2010 in two separate datasets (1992-2000 and 2003-2010). Two coal mines were selected as examples of ground motion within inactive mining areas: Sosnowiec and Saturn, where mining ceased in 1995 and 1997, respectively. Despite well pumping after closure of the mines, groundwater rose several dozen meters, returning to its natural horizon. Small surface uplift clearly indicated on satellite interferometric data is related to high permeability of the hydrogeological subregion and insufficient water withdrawal from abandoned mines. The older 1992-2000 PSInSAR dataset indicates values of ground motion ranging from -40.0 to 0.0 mm. The newer 2003-2010 dataset shows values ranging from -2.0 to +7.0 mm. This means that during this period of time subsidence was less and uplift greater in comparison to the older dataset. This is even more evident in the time series of randomly selected PS points from both coal

  3. Monitoring Hippocampus Electrical Activity In Vitro on an Elastically Deformable Microelectrode Array

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhe; Graudejus, Oliver; Tsay, Candice; Lacour, Stéphanie P.; Wagner, Sigurd

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Interfacing electronics and recording electrophysiological activity in mechanically active biological tissues is challenging. This challenge extends to recording neural function of brain tissue in the setting of traumatic brain injury (TBI), which is caused by rapid (within hundreds of milliseconds) and large (greater than 5% strain) brain deformation. Interfacing electrodes must be biocompatible on multiple levels and should deform with the tissue to prevent additional mechanical damage. We describe an elastically stretchable microelectrode array (SMEA) that is capable of undergoing large, biaxial, 2-D stretch while remaining functional. The new SMEA consists of elastically stretchable thin metal films on a silicone membrane. It can stimulate and detect electrical activity from cultured brain tissue (hippocampal slices), before, during, and after large biaxial deformation. We have incorporated the SMEA into a well-characterized in vitro TBI research platform, which reproduces the biomechanics of TBI by stretching the SMEA and the adherent brain slice culture. Mechanical injury parameters, such as strain and strain rate, can be precisely controlled to generate specific levels of damage. The SMEA allowed for quantification of neuronal function both before and after injury, without breaking culture sterility or repositioning the electrodes for the injury event, thus enabling serial and long-term measurements. We report tests of the SMEA and an initial application to study the effect of mechanical stimuli on neuron function, which could be employed as a high-content, drug-screening platform for TBI. PMID:19594385

  4. EFFECT OF GROUND-WATER REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES ON INDIGENOUS MICROFLORA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), working with the Interagency DNAPL Consortium, completed an independent evaluation of microbial responses to ground-water remediation technology demonstrations at Launch Pad 34 at Cape Canaveral Air Station in Brevard Count...

  5. Comparison of epicardial deformation in passive and active isolated rabbit hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Andrew; Tang, Liang; Chiang, Fu-Pen; Lin, Shien-Fong

    2007-02-01

    Mechanical deformation of isolated rabbit hearts through passive inflation techniques have been a viable form of replicating heart motion, but its relation to the heart's natural active contractions remain unclear. The mechanical properties of the myocardium may show diverse characteristics while in tension and compression. In this study, epicardial strain was measured with the assistance of computer-aided speckle interferometry (CASI)1. CASI tracks the movement of clusters of particles for measuring epicardial deformation. The heart was cannulated and perfused with Tyrode's solution. Silicon carbide particles were applied onto the myocardium to form random speckle pattern images while the heart was allowed to actively contract and stabilize. High resolution videos (1000x1000 pixels) of the left ventricle were taken with a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) camera as the heart was actively contracting through electrical pacing at various cycle lengths between 250-800 ms. A latex balloon was then inserted into the left ventricle via left atrium and videos were taken as the balloon was repeatedly inflated and deflated at controlled volumes (1-3 ml/cycle). The videos were broken down into frames and analyzed through CASI. Active contractions resulted in non-uniform circular epicardial and uniaxial contractions at different stages of the motion. In contrast, the passive heart demonstrated very uniform expansion and contraction originating from the source of the latex balloon. The motion of the active heart caused variations in deformation, but in comparison to the passive heart, had a more enigmatic displacement field. The active heart demonstrated areas of large displacement and others with relatively no displacement. Application of CASI was able to successfully distinguish the motions between the active and passive hearts.

  6. Active control of shocks and sonic boom ground signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagiz, Bedri

    The manipulation of a flow field to obtain a desired change is a much heightened subject. Active flow control has been the subject of the major research areas in fluid mechanics for the past two decades. It offers new solutions for mitigation of shock strength, sonic boom alleviation, drag minimization, reducing blade-vortex interaction noise in helicopters, stall control and the performance maximization of existing designs to meet the increasing requirements of the aircraft industries. Despite the wide variety of the potential applications of active flow control, the majority of studies have been performed at subsonic speeds. The active flow control cases were investigated in transonic speed in this study. Although the active flow control provides significant improvements, the sensibility of aerodynamic performance to design parameters makes it a nontrivial and expensive problem, so the designer has to optimize a number of different parameters. For the purpose of gaining understanding of the active flow control concepts, an automated optimization cycle process was generated. Also, the optimization cycle reduces cost and turnaround time. The mass flow coefficient, location, width and angle were chosen as design parameters to maximize the aerodynamic performance of an aircraft. As the main contribution of this study, a detailed parametric study and optimization process were presented. The second step is to appraise the practicability of weakening the shock wave and thereby reducing the wave drag in transonic flight regime using flow control devices such as two dimensional contour bump, individual jet actuator, and also the hybrid control which includes both control devices together, thereby gaining the desired improvements in aerodynamic performance of the air-vehicle. After this study, to improve the aerodynamic performance, the flow control and shape parameters are optimized separately, combined, and in a serial combination. The remarkable part of all these

  7. Projection Moire Interferometry for Rotorcraft Applications: Deformation Measurements of Active Twist Rotor Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Soto, Hector L.; South, Bruce W.

    2002-01-01

    Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) has been used during wind tunnel tests to obtain azimuthally dependent blade bending and twist measurements for a 4-bladed Active Twist Rotor (ATR) system in simulated forward flight. The ATR concept offers a means to reduce rotor vibratory loads and noise by using piezoelectric active fiber composite actuators embedded in the blade structure to twist each blade as they rotate throughout the rotor azimuth. The twist imparted on the blades for blade control causes significant changes in blade loading, resulting in complex blade deformation consisting of coupled bending and twist. Measurement of this blade deformation is critical in understanding the overall behavior of the ATR system and the physical mechanisms causing the reduction in rotor loads and noise. PMI is a non-contacting, video-based optical measurement technique capable of obtaining spatially continuous structural deformation measurements over the entire object surface within the PMI system field-of-view. When applied to rotorcraft testing, PMI can be used to measure the azimuth-dependent blade bending and twist along the full span of the rotor blade. This paper presents the PMI technique as applied to rotorcraft testing, and provides results obtained during the ATR tests demonstrating the PMI system performance. PMI measurements acquired at select blade actuation conditions generating minimum and maximum rotor loads are provided to explore the interrelationship between rotor loads, blade bending, and twist.

  8. On interrelation between seismic activity and the Earth crust deformations of Vrancea zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dultsev, A.; Pronyshyn, R.; Siejka, Z.; Serant, O.; Tretyak, K.; Zablotskyj, F.

    2009-04-01

    An investigated territory covers the whole seismically active zone of Vrancea mountains (Romania). It is located between 43° and 47° parallels in latitude and 23° and 29° meridians in longitude. The weekly solutions of coordinates of six permanent stations (BACA, BAIA, BUCU, COST, DEVA, IGEO) allocated on the territories of Romania and Moldova have been used as the initial data for carrying out of the investigations. These initial data were obtained during 2007-2008. The results of determination of the earthquake parameters (coordinates, focal depth, magnitude and energy) have been obtained from a network of seismic stations. An analysis of the temporal earthquake distribution in 2007-2008 showed the alternation of the periods of seismic activity and its absence. The duration of these periods ranges from one to three weeks. The Earth crust deformation parameters between the recurrent periods of seismic activity and its absence have been calculated on basis of weekly solutions for the territory bounded by GPS-permanent stations. The accumulative values of the earthquake energy and magnitude were calculated for the periods of seismic activity. It had been ascertained that the territory of Vrancea zone undergoes the permanent stretching into northeast and southwest directions as well as the compressing into northwest and southeast ones. In fact, the more fast attenuation of the seismic waves occurs in the direction of the contraction axis and the slowest attenuation of ones occurs in the direction of the axis of elongation. The parameters of total amplitude and earthquake energy in the periods of seismic activity have high-degree correlation with difference of the deformations of next periods of seismic activity and its absence. It enables to predict a change of the deformation increment in the zone of earthquake focuses of Vrancea territory by means of the earthquake total force.

  9. Active faults in the deformation zone off Noto Peninsula, Japan, revealed by high- resolution seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Okamura, Y.; Murakami, F.; Kimura, H.; Ikehara, K.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, a lot of earthquakes occur in Japan. The deformation zone which many faults and folds have concentrated exists on the Japan Sea side of Japan. The 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake (MJMA 6.9) and 2007 Chuetsu-oki Earthquake (MJMA 6.8) were caused by activity of parts of faults in this deformation zone. The Noto Hanto Earthquake occurred on 25 March, 2007 under the northwestern coast of Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. This earthquake is located in Quaternary deformation zone that is continued from northern margin of Noto Peninsula to southeast direction (Okamura, 2007a). National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) carried out high-resolution seismic survey using Boomer and 12 channels short streamer cable in the northern part off Noto Peninsula, in order to clarify distribution and activities of active faults in the deformation zone. A twelve channels short streamer cable with 2.5 meter channel spacing developed by AIST and private corporation is designed to get high resolution seismic profiles in shallow sea area. The multi-channel system is possible to equip on a small fishing boat, because the data acquisition system is based on PC and the length of the cable is short and easy to handle. Moreover, because the channel spacing is short, this cable is very effective for a high- resolution seismic profiling survey in the shallow sea, and seismic data obtained by multi-channel cable can be improved by velocity analysis and CDP stack. In the northern part off Noto Peninsula, seismic profiles depicting geologic structure up to 100 meters deep under sea floor were obtained. The most remarkable reflection surface recognized in the seismic profiles is erosion surface at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In the western part, sediments about 30 meters (40 msec) thick cover the erosional surface that is distributed under the shelf shallower than 100m in depth and the sediments thin toward offshore and east. Flexures like deformation in

  10. The surface geometry of inherited joint and fracture trace patterns resulting from active and passive deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podwysocki, M. H.; Gold, D. P.

    1974-01-01

    Hypothetical models are considered for detecting subsurface structure from the fracture or joint pattern, which may be influenced by the structure and propagated to the surface. Various patterns of an initially orthogonal fracture grid are modeled according to active and passive deformation mechanisms. In the active periclinal structure with a vertical axis, fracture frequency increased both over the dome and basin, and remained constant with decreasing depth to the structure. For passive periclinal features such as a reef or sand body, fracture frequency is determined by the arc of curvature and showed a reduction over the reefmound and increased over the basin.

  11. A piece of cake: the ground-state energies in γ i -deformed = 4 SYM theory at leading wrapping order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokken, Jan; Sieg, Christoph; Wilhelm, Matthias

    2014-09-01

    In the non-supersymmetric γi-deformed = 4 SYM theory, the scaling dimensions of the operators tr[ Z L ] composed of L scalar fields Z receive finite-size wrapping and prewrapping corrections in the 't Hooft limit. In this paper, we calculate these scaling dimensions to leading wrapping order directly from Feynman diagrams. For L ≥ 3, the result is proportional to the maximally transcendental `cake' integral. It matches with an earlier result obtained from the integrability-based Lüscher corrections, TBA and Y-system equations. At L = 2, where the integrability-based equations yield infinity, we find a finite rational result. This result is renormalization-scheme dependent due to the non-vanishing β-function of an induced quartic scalar double-trace coupling, on which we have reported earlier. This explicitly shows that conformal invariance is broken — even in the 't Hooft limit. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Removal of daytime thermal deformations in the GBT active surface via out-of-focus holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, T. R.; Mello, M.; Nikolic, B.; Mason, B. S.; Schwab, F. R.; Ghigo, F. D.; Dicker, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    The 100-m diameter Green Bank Telescope (GBT) was built with an active surface of 2209 actuators in order to achieve and maintain an accurate paraboloidal shape. While much of the large-scale gravitational deformation of the surface can be described by a finite element model, a significant uncompensated gravitational deformation exists. In recent years, the elevation-dependence of this residual deformation has been successfully measured during benign nighttime conditions using the out-of-focus (OOF) holography technique (Nikolic et al, 2007, A&A 465, 685). Parametrized by a set of Zernike polynomials, the OOF model correction was implemented into the active surface and has been applied during all high frequency observations since Fall 2006, yielding a consistent gain curve that is constant with elevation. However, large-scale thermal deformation of the surface has remained a problem for daytime high-frequency observations. OOF holography maps taken throughout a clear winter day indicate that surface deformations become significant whenever the Sun is above 10 degrees elevation, but that they change slowly while tracking a single source. In this paper, we describe a further improvement to the GBT active surface that allows an observer to measure and compensate for the thermal surface deformation using the OOF technique. In order to support high-frequency observers, "AutoOOF" is a new GBT Astrid procedure that acquires a quick set of in-focus and out-of-focus on-the-fly continuum maps on a quasar using the currently active receiver. Upon completion of the maps, the data analysis software is launched automatically which produces and displays the surface map along with a set of Zernike coefficients. These coefficients are then sent to the active surface manager which combines them with the existing gravitational Zernike terms and FEM in order to compute the total active surface correction. The end-to-end functionality has been tested on the sky at Q-Band and Ka

  13. The unrest of the San Miguel volcano (El Salvador, Central America): installation of the monitoring network and observed volcano-tectonic ground deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonforte, Alessandro; Hernandez, Douglas Antonio; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Handal, Louis; Polío, Cecilia; Rapisarda, Salvatore; Scarlato, Piergiorgio

    2016-08-01

    On 29 December 2013, the Chaparrastique volcano in El Salvador, close to the town of San Miguel, erupted suddenly with explosive force, forming a column more than 9 km high and projecting ballistic projectiles as far as 3 km away. Pyroclastic density currents flowed to the north-northwest side of the volcano, while tephras were dispersed northwest and north-northeast. This sudden eruption prompted the local Ministry of Environment to request cooperation with Italian scientists in order to improve the monitoring of the volcano during this unrest. A joint force, made up of an Italian team from the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia and a local team from the Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales, was organized to enhance the volcanological, geophysical and geochemical monitoring system to study the evolution of the phenomenon during the crisis. The joint team quickly installed a multiparametric mobile network comprising seismic, geodetic and geochemical sensors (designed to cover all the volcano flanks from the lowest to the highest possible altitudes) and a thermal camera. To simplify the logistics for a rapid installation and for security reasons, some sensors were colocated into multiparametric stations. Here, we describe the prompt design and installation of the geodetic monitoring network, the processing and results. The installation of a new ground deformation network can be considered an important result by itself, while the detection of some crucial deforming areas is very significant information, useful for dealing with future threats and for further studies on this poorly monitored volcano.

  14. The Isospin Admixture of The Ground State and The Properties of The Isobar Analog Resonances In Deformed Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Aygor, H. Ali; Maras, Ismail; Cakmak, Necla; Selam, Cevad

    2008-11-11

    Within quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA), Pyatov-Salamov method for the self-consistent determination of the isovector effective interaction strength parameter, restoring a broken isotopic symmetry for the nuclear part of the Hamiltonian, is used. The isospin admixtures in the ground state of the parent nucleus, and the isospin structure of the isobar analog resonance (IAR) state are investigated by including the pairing correlations between nucleons for {sup 72-80}Kr isotopes. Our results are compared with the spherical case and with other theoretical results.

  15. Failure and deformation mechanisms at macro- and nano-scales of alkali activated clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar Das, Pradip; Bhattacharya, Manjima; Chanda, Dipak Kr; Dalui, Srikanta; Acharya, Saikat; Ghosh, Swapankumar; Mukhopadhyay, Anoop Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Here we report two qualitative models on failure and deformation mechanisms at macro- and nano-scales of alkali activated clay (AACL), a material of extraordinary importance as a low cost building material. The models were based on experimental data of compressive failure and nanoindentation response of the AACL materials. A 420% improvement in compressive strength (σ c) of the AACL was achieved after 28 days (d) of curing at room temperature and it correlated well with the decrements in the residual alkali and pH concentrations with the increase in curing time. Based on extensive post-mortem FE-SEM examinations, a schematic model for the compressive failure mechanism of AACL was proposed. In addition, the nanoindentation results of AACL provided the first ever experimental evidence of the presence of nano-scale plasticity and a nano-scale contact deformation resistance that increased with the applied load. These results meant the development of a unique strain tolerant microstructure in the AACL of Indian origin. The implications of these new observations were discussed in terms of a qualitative model based on the deformation of layered clay structure.

  16. Sensitivity of grounding line dynamics to viscoelastic deformation of the solid Earth: Inferences from a fully coupled ice sheet - solid Earth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, H.; Sasgen, I.; Thoma, M.; Klemann, V.; Grosfeld, K.; Martinec, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The interactions of ice sheets with the sea level and the solid Earth are important factors for the stability of the ice shelves and the tributary inland ice (e.g. Thomas and Bentley, 1978; Gomez et al, 2012). First, changes in ice extent and ice thickness induce viscoelastic deformation of the Earth surface and Earth's gravity field. In turn, global and local changes in sea level and bathymetry affect the grounding line and, subsequently, alter the ice dynamic behaviour. Here, we investigate these feedbacks for a synthetic ice sheet configuration as well as for the Antarctic ice sheet using a three-dimensional thermomechanical ice sheet and shelf model, coupled to a viscoelastic solid-Earth and gravitationally self-consistent sea-level model. The respective ice sheet undergoes a forcing from rising sea level, warming ocean, and/or changing surface mass balance. The coupling is realized by exchanging ice thickness, Earth surface deformation, and sea level periodically. We apply several sets of viscoelastic Earth parameters to our coupled model, e.g. simulating a low-viscous upper mantle present at the Antarctic Peninsula (Ivins et al., 2011). Special focus of our study lies on the evolution of Earth surface deformation and local sea level changes, as well as on the accompanying grounding line evolution. N. Gomez, D. Pollard, J. X. Mitrovica, P. Huybers, and P. U. Clark 2012. Evolution of a coupled marine ice sheet-sea level model, J. Geophys. Res., 117, F01013, doi:10.1029/2011JF002128. E. R. Ivins, M. M. Watkins, D.-N. Yuan, R. Dietrich, G. Casassa, and A. Rülke 2011. On-land ice loss and glacial isostatic adjustment at the Drake Passage: 2003-2009, J. Geophys. Res. 116, B02403, doi: 10.1029/2010JB007607 R. H. Thomas and C. R. Bentley 1978. A model for Holocene retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, Quaternary Research, 10 (2), pages 150-170, doi: 10.1016/0033-5894(78)90098-4.

  17. Assessment of Tungsten Content on Tertiary Creep Deformation Behavior of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, Kinkar

    2015-10-01

    Tertiary creep deformation behavior of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels having different tungsten contents has been assessed. Creep tests were carried out at 823 K (550 °C) over a stress range of 180 to 260 MPa on three heats of the RAFM steel (9Cr-W-0.06Ta-0.22V) with tungsten content of 1, 1.4, and 2.0 wt pct. With creep exposure, the steels exhibited minimum in creep rate followed by progressive increase in creep rate until fracture. The minimum creep rate decreased, rupture life increased, and the onset of tertiary stage of creep deformation delayed with the increase in tungsten content. The tertiary creep behavior has been assessed based on the relationship, , considering minimum creep rate () instead of steady-state creep rate. The increase in tungsten content was found to decrease the rate of acceleration of tertiary parameter ` p.' The relationships between (1) tertiary parameter `p' with minimum creep rate and time spent in tertiary creep deformation and (2) the final creep rate with minimum creep rate revealed that the same first-order reaction rate theory prevailed in the minimum creep rate as well as throughout the tertiary creep deformation behavior of the steel. A master tertiary creep curve of the steels has been developed. Scanning electron microscopic investigation revealed enhanced coarsening resistance of carbides in the steel on creep exposure with increase in tungsten content. The decrease in tertiary parameter ` p' with tungsten content with the consequent decrease in minimum creep rate and increase in rupture life has been attributed to the enhanced microstructural stability of the steel.

  18. Active deformation in the northern Sierra de Valle Fértil, Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Gustavo; Alvarado, Patricia; Fosdick, Julie C.; Perucca, Laura; Saez, Mauro; Venerdini, Agostina

    2015-12-01

    The Western Sierras Pampeanas region in the San Juan Province is characterized by thick-skinned deformation with approximately N-S trending ranges of average heights of 2500 m and a high frequency occurrence of seismic activity. Its location to the east of the mainly thin-skinned tectonics of the Argentine Precordillera fold-and-thrust belt suggests that at 30°S, deformation is concentrated in a narrow zone involving these two morphostructural units. In this paper, we present new apatite (U-Th)/He results (AHe) across the northern part of the Sierra de Valle Fértil (around 30°S) and analyze them in a framework of thermochronologic available datasets. We found Pliocene AHe results for Carboniferous and Triassic strata in the northern Sierra de Valle Fértil consistent with the hypothesis of recent cooling and inferred erosional denudation concentrated along the northern end of this mountain range. Our analysis shows that this northern region may have evolved under different conditions than the central part of the Sierra de Valle Fértil. Previous studies have observed AHe ages consistent with Permian through Cretaceous cooling, indicating the middle part of the Sierra de Valle Fértil remained near surface before the Pampean slab subduction flattening process. Those studies also obtained ˜5 My cooling ages in the southern part of the Sierra de Valle Fértil, which are similar to our results in the northern end of the range. Taken together, these results suggest a pattern of young deformation in the northern and southern low elevation ends of the Sierra de Valle Fértil consistent with regions of high seismic activity, and Quaternary active faulting along the western-bounding thrust fault of the Sierra de Valle Fértil.

  19. Batholith Construction In Actively Deforming Crust, Coast Mountains Batholith, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusmore, M. E.; Woodsworth, G. J.; Gehrels, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    Stikinia east of the YTT. Western Stikinia has NE-directed thrust faults, dextral faults and a >100 km long dextral reverse fault. Metamorphism locally produced amphibolite gneiss and NW-trending folds. This phase of transpression ended ~ca 74 Ma, marking the end of orogen-wide deformation. Subsequent deformation and magmatism are restricted to western Stikinia, coincident with the magmatic front. Between 69 and 55 Ma, N-directed shortening and exhumation of gneiss took place in restraining bend on a dextral shear zone. From ~65-53 Ma, the Coast shear zone was the locus of magmatism and reverse slip. Overall, the history of this part of the batholith shows: 1) the batholith formed in actively deforming and thickening crust within a contractional to transpressive setting. 2) Deformation and magmatism are widespread ~100-75 Ma, becoming more focused from 70-55 Ma. Crustal thickening was broadly coeval with magmatic fluxes at 120-88 and 65-55 Ma. 3) major crustal extension (55-50 Ma) and voluminous 52-48 Ma plutons present farther north are absent, suggesting a link between this magmatism and crustal extension.

  20. GPS constraints on active deformation in the Isparta Angle region of SW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiryakioğlu, İbrahim; Floyd, Michael; Erdoğan, Saffet; Gülal, Engin; Ergintav, Semih; McClusky, Simon; Reilinger, Robert

    2013-12-01

    We use survey and continuous GPS observations during the period 1997-2010 to investigate active deformation in the Isparta Angle region of SW Anatolia, Turkey. This region, bordered by the Fethiye Burdur Fault Zone (FBFZ) in the west and the SE extension of the Aksehir Simav Fault Zone (AKSFZ) in the east, accommodates a part of the active deformation of W Turkey. Our results show that the Isparta Angle region rotates counter-clockwise (CCW) with respect to Anatolia. Both the FBFZ and the AKSFZ are predominantly transtensional boundaries that accommodate southward motion of the Isparta region with respect to Anatolia. The FBFZ has left-lateral strike-slip behaviour along its SW segment that changes to right-lateral strike-slip along its NE extension. This change in the sense of strike-slip motion is accommodated by extension on a NW-SE striking normal fault system that is associated with the Menderes Graben system. Transtensional fault systems along the boundaries of the Isparta Angle with Anatolia are inconsistent with extrusion models for present-day southward motion. An increase in motion rates towards the Hellenic and Cyprus arc subduction systems, and CCW of the Isparta region, supports dynamic models involving active rollback of the subducting African Plate, toroidal mantle flow around the eastern edge of the subducting African slab near the Hellenic arc/Florence Rise junction, and/or gravitational collapse of the overriding Anatolia Plate.

  1. Attenuation Properties of Fontainebleau Sandstone During True-Triaxial Deformation using Active and Passive Ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfellow, S. D.; Tisato, N.; Ghofranitabari, M.; Nasseri, M. H. B.; Young, R. P.

    2015-11-01

    Active and passive ultrasonic methods were used to study the evolution of attenuation properties in a sample of Fontainebleau sandstone during true-triaxial deformation. A cubic sample of Fontainebleau sandstone (80 mm × 80 mm × 80 mm) was deformed under true-triaxial stresses until failure. From the stress state: σ _3 = 5 MPa and σ _1 = σ _2 = 35 MPa, σ _1 was increased at a constant displacement rate until the specimen failed. Acoustic emission (AE) activity was monitored by 18 piezoelectric sensors and bandpass filtered between 100 kHz and 1 MHz. A source location analysis was performed on discrete AE data harvested from the continuous record where 48,502 events were locatable inside the sample volume. AE sensors were sequentially pulsed during periodic P-wave surveys among 135 raypaths. Analytical solutions for Biot, squirt flow, viscous shear, and scattering attenuation were used to discuss to observed attenuation at various stages of the experiment. We concluded that initial attenuation anisotropy was stress induced and resulted from friction and squirt flow. Later attenuation of the high-frequency spectrum was attributed to scattering as a result of the formation of large macroscopic vertical fractures. Passive (AE) ultrasonic data produced similar information to that from active data but with enhanced temporal and spacial resolution.

  2. Distribution of deformation on an active normal fault network, NW Corinth Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Mary; Meyer, Nicolas; Boiselet, Aurélien; Lambotte, Sophie; Scotti, Oona; Lyon-Caen, Hélène; Briole, Pierre; Caumon, Guillaume; Bernard, Pascal

    2013-04-01

    Over the last 20-25 years, geodetic measurements across the Gulf of Corinth have recorded high extension rates varying from 1.1 cm/a in the east to a maximum of 1.6 cm/a in the west. Geodetic studies also show that current deformation is confined between two relatively rigid blocks defined as Central Greece (to the north) and the Peloponnesus to the south. Active north dipping faults (<1 Ma) define the south coast of the subsiding Gulf, while high seismicity (major earthquakes and micro-seismicity) is concentrated at depth below and to the north of the westernmost Gulf. How is this intense deformation distributed in the upper crust? Our objectives here are (1) to propose two models for the distribution of deformation in the upper crust in the westernmost rift since 1 Ma, and (2) to place the tectonic behaviour of the western Gulf in the context of longer term rift evolution. Over 20 major active normal faults have been identified in the CRL area based specific characteristics (capable of generating earthquakes M> 5.5, active in the last 1 M yrs, slip rate >0.5 mm/a). Because of the uncertainty related to fault geometry at depth two models for 3D fault network geometry in the western rift down to 10 km were constructed using all available geophysical and geological data. The first model assumes planar fault geometries while the second uses listric geometries for major faults. A model for the distribution of geodetically-defined extension on faults is constructed along five NNE-SSW cross sections using a variety of data and timescales. We assume that the role of smaller faults in accommodating deformation is negligible so that extension is fully accommodated on the identified major faults. Uncertainties and implications are discussed. These models provide estimates of slip rate for each fault that can be used in seismic hazard models. A compilation of onshore and offshore data shows that the western Gulf is the youngest part of the Corinth rift having initiated

  3. Feasibility study of a RADARSAT-1 and 2 cross InSAR mission to measure topography and ground deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabus, B.; McCardle, A.

    2006-12-01

    InSAR users have voiced interest in assessing the potential cross InSAR capability of a planned joint mission of RADARSAT-1 with its successor satellite RADARSAT-2 to be launched in spring 2007. The motivation is similar than for ESA's joint mission of ERS and ENVISAT, where both satellites follow the same ground track with a time difference of 30 min. The latter mission has seen application demonstrations for measuring coastal topography and fast ground motion with cross InSAR. Cross InSAR between RADARSAT-1 and 2 is complicated by two factors: (i) RADARSAT-2 will have a frequency offset of 105 MHz with respect to RADARSAT-1 and (ii) RADARSAT-2 will be yaw steered while RADARSAT-1 is not. The range spectral shift associated with the frequency offset is three times larger than that between ERS-2 and ENVISAT (30 MHz frequency offset), however this disadvantage is partially offset by the considerably larger bandwidth of the RADARSAT satellites (100 MHz for RADARSAST-2). Nevertheless, the much larger spatial baseline necessary to achieve spectral overlap in range effectively translates into a smaller latitude range where conditions for cross InSAR could be met. Decorrelation with variations of surface slope will also be more severe than for the ERS-ENVISAT case. A bigger problem, however is to achieve azimuth spectral overlap in the face of significant squint angles for the RADARSAT-1 satellite. Squint is due to a superposition of the rotational velocity of the earth surface onto the motion vector of the spacecraft (ERS-2 and ENVISAT both compensate for this effect through yaw steering, and so will RADARSAT-2). Squint angle is about 4 degrees at the equator and goes to zero at the latitudes where the satellite turns (~80 degrees north and south). The small opening angle of the radar illumination cone (0.3 degrees) will likely limit the latitude band of natural azimuth spectral overlap to ~ few degrees off the turning latitude. This study will analyze the spectral

  4. Exhumed analogues of seismically active carbonate-bearing thrusts: fault architecture and deformation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesei, T.; Collettini, C.; Viti, C.; Barchi, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    In May 2012 a M = 5.9 earthquake followed by a long aftershock sequence struck the Northern Italy. The sequence occurred at 4-10 km depth within the active front of Northern Apennines Prism and the major events nucleate within, or propagate through, a thick sequence of carbonates. In an inner sector of the Northern Apennines, ancient carbonate-bearing thrusts exposed at the surface, represent exhumed analogues of structures generating seismicity in the active front. Here we document fault architecture and deformation mechanisms of three regional carbonate bearing thrusts with displacement of several kilometers and exhumation in the range of 1-4 km. Fault zone structure and deformation mechanisms are controlled by the lithology of the faulted rocks. In layered limestones and marly-limestones the fault zone is up to 200 m thick and is characterized by intense pressure solution. In massive limestones the deformation generally occurs along thin and sharp slip planes that are in contact with fault portions affected by either cataclasis or pressure solution. SEM and TEM observations show that pressure solution surfaces, made of smectite lamellae, with time tend to form an interconnected network affected by frictional sliding. Sharp slipping planes along massive limestones show localization along Y shear planes that separate an extremely comminuted cataclasites from an almost undeformed protolith. The comparison of the three shear zones depicts a fault zone structure extremely heterogeneous as the result of protolith lithology, geometrical complexities and the presence of inherited structures. We observe the competition between brittle (cataclasis, distributed frictional sliding along phyllosilicates and extremely localized slip within carbonates) and pressure solution processes, that suggest a multi-mode of slip behaviour. Extreme localization along carbonate-bearing Y shear planes is our favorite fault zone feature representing past seismic ruptures along the studied

  5. Ongoing Active Deformation Processes at Fernandina Volcano (Galapagos) Detected via Multi-Orbit COSMO-SkyMed SAR Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, Susi; Castaldo, Raffaele; De Luca, Claudio; Casu, Francesco; Tizzani, Pietro; Sansosti, Eugenio

    2014-05-01

    Fernandina Volcano, Galápagos (Ecuador), has experienced several uplift and eruption episodes over the last twenty-two years. The ground deformation between 2002 and 2006 was interpreted as the effect of an inflation phenomenon of two separate magma reservoirs beneath the caldera. Moreover, the uplift deformation occurred during the 2005 eruption was concentrated near the circumferential eruptive fissures, while being superimposed on a broad subsidence centred on the caldera. The geodetic studies emphasized the presence of two sub volcanic lateral intrusions from the central storage system in December 2006 and August 2007. The latest eruption in 2009 was characterized by lava flows emitted from the SW radial fissures. We analyze the spatial and temporal ground deformation between March 2012 and July 2013, by using data acquired by COSMO-SkyMed X-band constellation along both ascending and descending orbits and by applying advanced InSAR techniques. In particular, we use the SBAS InSAR approach and combine ascending and descending time series to produce vertical and East-West components of the mean deformation velocity and deformation time series. Our analysis revealed a new uplift phenomenon due to the stress concentration inside the shallow magmatic system of the volcano. In particular, the vertical mean velocity map shows that the deformation pattern is concentrated inside caldera region and is characterized by strongly radial symmetry with a maximum displacement of about 20 cm in uplift; an axial symmetry is also observed in the EW horizontal mean velocity map, showing a maximum displacement of about +12 cm towards East for the SE flank, and -12 cm towards West for the NW flank of the volcano. Moreover, the deformation time series show a rather linear uplift trend from March to September 2012, interrupted by a low deformation rate interval lasting until January 2013. After this stage, the deformation shows again a linear behaviour with an increased uplift rate

  6. 10Be surface exposure dating reveals strong active deformation in the central Andean backarc interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Morabito, Ezequiel; Terrizzano, Carla; Zech, Roland; Willett, Sean; Yamin, Marcela; Haghipour, Negar; Wuethrich, Lorenz; Christl, Marcus; María Cortes, José; Ramos, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the deformation associated with active thrust wedges is essential to evaluate seismic hazard. How is active faulting distributed throughout the wedge, and how much deformation is taken up by individual structures? We address these questions for our study region, the central Andean backarc of Argentina. We combined a structural and geomorphological approach with surface exposure dating (10Be) of alluvial fans and strath terraces in two key localities at ~32° S: the Cerro Salinas, located in the active orogenic front of the Precordillera, and the Barreal block in the interior of the Andean mountain range. We analysed 22 surface samples and 6 depth profiles. At the thrust front, the oldest terrace (T1) yields an age of 100-130 ka, the intermediate terrace (T2) between 40-95 ka, and the youngest terrace (T3) an age of ~20 ka. In the Andean interior, T1´ dates to 117-146 ka, T2´ to ~70 ka, and T3´ to ~20 ka, all calculations assuming negligible erosion and using the scaling scheme for spallation based on Lal 1991, Stone 2000. Vertical slip rates of fault offsets are 0.3-0.5 mm/yr and of 0.6-1.2 mm/yr at the thrust front and in the Andean interior, respectively. Our results highlight: i) fault activity related to the growth of the Andean orogenic wedge is not only limited to a narrow thrust front zone. Internal structures have been active during the last 150 ka, ii) deformation rates in the Andean interior are comparable or even higher that those estimated and reported along the emerging thrust front, iii) distribution of active faulting seems to account for unsteady state conditions, and iv) seismic hazards may be more relevant in the internal parts of the Andean orogen than assumed so far. References Lal, D., 1991: Cosmic ray labeling of erosion surfaces: In situ nuclide production rates and erosion models. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 104: 424-439. Stone, J.O., 2000: Air pressure and cosmogenic isotope production. Journal of Geophysical

  7. Investigation of the Deformation Activation Volume of an Ultrafinegrained Ti50Ni50 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunderov, D. V.; Churakova, A. A.; Lukianov, A. V.; Prokofiev, E. A.; Prokoshkin, S. D.; Kreizberg, A. Yu.; Raab, G. I.; Sabirov, I. N.

    2015-10-01

    The mechanical properties, strain rate sensitivity (m) and deformation activation volume (ΔV) are investigated at the experimental temperatures from 20 to 400°C in a Ti50Ni50 alloy in a coarse-grained (CG) state with the austenite grain size D = 200 μm and in an ultrafine-grained (UFG) state with D = 700 μm following an ECAP treatment. It is observed that this treatment improves the yield strength of the alloy compared to its CG-state. The strain rate sensitivity, m, is found to be by a factor of 1.5-2 higher than that of CG-specimens; it increases with the temperature in both states of the material. As the temperature of the material in tension increases up to Т = 150-250°C, parameter ΔV increases to its maximum and with a further growth of the experimental temperature to 400°C, parameter ΔV decreases. The deformation activation volume of the alloy in the UFG-state is by a factor of 2-4 larger than that in the CG-state for the same experimental temperatures.

  8. Active salt deformation and rapid, transient incision along the Colorado River near Moab, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochems, Andrew P.; Pederson, Joel L.

    2015-04-01

    In certain settings, erosion is driven by and balanced with tectonic uplift, but the evolution of many landscapes is dominated by other factors such as geologic substrate, drainage history, and transient incision. The Colorado Plateau is an example where these controls are debated and where salt deformation is hypothesized to be locally active and driven by differential unloading, although this is unconfirmed and unquantified in most places. We use luminescence-dated Colorado River terraces upstream of Moab, Utah, to quantify rates of salt-driven subsidence and uplift at the local scale. Active deformation in the study area is also supported by patterns of concavity along tributary drainages crossing salt structures. Subsidence in Professor Valley at a time-averaged rate of ~500 m/Myr (meters/million years) is superimposed upon rapid bedrock incision rates that increase from ~600 to ~900 m/Myr upstream through the study area. Such high rates are unexpected given the absence of sources of regional tectonic uplift here. Instead, the incision rate pattern across the greater area is consistent with a transient signal, perhaps still from ancient drainage integration through Grand Canyon far downstream, and then amplified by unloading at both the broad regional scale and at the local canyon scale.

  9. The unrest of S. Miguel volcano (El Salvador, CA): installation of the monitoring network and observed volcano-tectonic ground deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonforte, A.; Hernandez, D.; Gutiérrez, E.; Handal, L.; Polío, C.; Rapisarda, S.; Scarlato, P.

    2015-10-01

    On 29 December 2013, the Chaparrastique volcano in El Salvador, close to the town of S. Miguel, erupted suddenly with explosive force, forming a more than 9 km high column and projecting ballistic projectiles as far as 3 km away. Pyroclastic Density Currents flowed to the north-northwest side of the volcano, while tephras were dispersed northwest and north-northeast. This sudden eruption prompted the local Ministry of Environment to request cooperation with Italian scientists in order to improve the monitoring of the volcano during this unrest. A joint force made up of an Italian team from the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia and a local team from the Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales was organized to enhance the volcanological, geophysical and geochemical monitoring system to study the evolution of the phenomenon during the crisis. The joint team quickly installed a multi-parametric mobile network comprising seismic, geodetic and geochemical sensors, designed to cover all the volcano flanks from the lowest to the highest possible altitudes, and a thermal camera. To simplify the logistics for a rapid installation and for security reasons, some sensors were co-located into multi-parametric stations. Here, we describe the prompt design and installation of the geodetic monitoring network, the processing and results. The installation of a new ground deformation network can be considered an important result by itself, while the detection of some crucial deforming areas is very significant information, useful for dealing with future threats and for further studies on this poorly monitored volcano.

  10. Inelastic deformation demands of regular steel frames subjected to pulse-like near-fault ground shakings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siahpolo, Navid; Gerami, Mohsen; Vahdani, Reza

    2016-09-01

    Evaluating the capability of elastic Load Patterns (LPs) including seismic codes and modified LPs such as Method of Modal Combination (MMC) and Upper Bound Pushover Analysis (UBPA) in estimating inelastic demands of non deteriorating steel moment frames is the main objective of this study. The Static Nonlinear Procedure (NSP) is implemented and the results of NSP are compared with Nonlinear Time History Analysis (NTHA). The focus is on the effects of near-fault pulselike ground motions. The primary demands of interest are the maximum floor displacement, the maximum story drift angle over the height, the maximum global ductility, the maximum inter-story ductility and the capacity curves. Five types of LPs are selected and the inelastic demands are calculated under four levels of inter-story target ductility ( μ t) using OpenSees software. The results show that the increase in μ t coincides with the migration of the peak demands over the height from the top to the bottom stories. Therefore, all LPs estimate the story lateral displacement accurately at the lower stories. The results are almost independent of the number of stories. While, the inter-story drift angle (IDR) obtained from MMC method has the most appropriate accuracy among the other LPs. Although, the accuracy of this method decreases with increasing μ t so that with increasing number of stories, IDR is smaller or greater than the values resulted from NTHA depending on the position of captured results. In addition, increasing μ t decreases the accuracy of all LPs in determination of critical story position. In this case, the MMC method has the best coincidence with distribution of inter-story ductility over the height.

  11. Active and long-lived permanent forearc deformation driven by the subduction seismic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aron Melo, Felipe Alejandro

    I have used geological, geophysical and engineering methods to explore mechanisms of upper plate, brittle deformation at active forearc regions. My dissertation particularly addresses the permanent deformation style experienced by the forearc following great subduction ruptures, such as the 2010 M w8.8 Maule, Chile and 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku, Japan earthquakes. These events triggered large, shallow seismicity on upper plate normal faults above the rupture reaching Mw7.0. First I present new structural data from the Chilean Coastal Cordillera over the rupture zone of the Maule earthquake. The study area contains the Pichilemu normal fault, which produced the large crustal aftershocks of the megathrust event. Normal faults are the major neotectonic structural elements but reverse faults also exist. Crustal seismicity and GPS surface displacements show that the forearc experiences pulses of rapid coseismic extension, parallel to the heave of the megathrust, and slow interseismic, convergence-parallel shortening. These cycles, over geologic time, build the forearc structural grain, reactivating structures properly-oriented respect to the deformation field of each stage of the interplate cycle. Great subduction events may play a fundamental role in constructing the crustal architecture of extensional forearc regions. Static mechanical models of coseismic and interseismic upper plate deformation are used to explore for distinct features that could result from brittle fracturing over the two stages of the interplate cycle. I show that the semi-elliptical outline of the first-order normal faults along the Coastal Cordillera may define the location of a characteristic, long-lived megathrust segment. Finally, using data from the Global CMT catalog I analyzed the seismic behavior through time of forearc regions that have experienced great subduction ruptures >Mw7.7 worldwide. Between 61% and 83% of the cases where upper plate earthquakes exhibited periods of increased seismicity

  12. On the energy conservation during the active deformation in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Zhong, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we examined the energy conservation for the current schemes of applying active deformation in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Specifically, two methods are examined. One is scaling the dimension of the simulation box and the atom positions via an affine transformation, suitable for the periodic system. The other is moving the rigid walls that interact with the atoms in the system, suitable for the non-periodic system. Based on the calculation of the external work and the internal energy change, we present that the atom velocities also need to be updated in the first deformation method; otherwise the energy conservation cannot be satisfied. The classic updating scheme is examined, in which any atom crossing the periodic boundary experiences a velocity delta that is equal to the velocity difference between the opposite boundaries. In addition, a new scheme which scales the velocities of all the atoms according to the strain increment is proposed, which is more efficient and realistic than the classic scheme. It is also demonstrated that the Virial stress instead of its interaction part is the correct stress definition that corresponds to Cauchy stress in the continuum mechanics.

  13. GPS-derived ground deformation (2005-2014) within the Gulf of Mexico region referred to a stable Gulf of Mexico reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiangbo; Wang, Guoquan

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates current ground deformation derived from the GPS geodesy infrastructure in the Gulf of Mexico region. The positions and velocity vectors of 161 continuous GPS (CGPS) stations are presented with respect to a newly established local reference frame, the Stable Gulf of Mexico Reference Frame (SGOMRF). Thirteen long-term (> 5 years) CGPS are used to realize the local reference frame. The root mean square (RMS) of the velocities of the 13 SGOMRF reference stations achieves 0.2 mm yr-1 in the horizontal and 0.3 mm yr-1 in the vertical directions. GPS observations presented in this study indicate significant land subsidence in the coastal area of southeastern Louisiana, the greater Houston metropolitan area, and two cities in Mexico (Aguascalientes and Mexico City). The most rapid subsidence is recorded at the Mexico City International airport, which is up to 26.6 cm yr-1 (2008-2014). Significant spatial variation of subsidence rates is observed in both Mexico City and the Houston area. The overall subsidence rate in the Houston area is decreasing. The subsidence rate in southeastern Louisiana is relatively smaller (4.0-6.0 mm yr-1) but tends to be steady over time. This poses a potential threat to the safety of coastal infrastructure in the long-term.

  14. Regulation of glucokinase activity in liver of hibernating ground squirrel Spermophilus undulatus.

    PubMed

    Khu, L Ya; Storey, K B; Rubtsov, A M; Goncharova, N Yu

    2014-07-01

    The kinetic properties of glucokinase (GLK) from the liver of active and hibernating ground squirrels Spermophilus undulatus have been studied. Entrance of ground squirrels into hibernation from their active state is accompanied by a sharp decrease in blood glucose (Glc) level (from 14 to 2.9 mM) and with a significant (7-fold) decrease of GLK activity in the liver cytoplasm. Preparations of native GLK practically devoid of other molecular forms of hexokinase were obtained from the liver of active and hibernating ground squirrels. The dependence of GLK activity upon Glc concentration for the enzyme from active ground squirrel liver showed a pronounced sigmoid character (Hill coefficient, h=1.70 and S0.5=6.23 mM; the experiments were conducted at 25°C in the presence of enzyme stabilizers, K+ and DTT). The same dependence of enzyme activity on Glc concentration was found for GLK from rat liver. However, on decreasing the temperature to 2°C (simulation of hibernation conditions), this dependency became almost hyperbolic (h=1.16) and GLK affinity for substrate was reduced (S0.5=23 mM). These parameters for hibernating ground squirrels (body temperature 5°C) at 25°C were found to be practically equal to the corresponding values obtained for GLK from the liver of active animals (h=1.60, S0.5=9.0 mM, respectively); at 2°C sigmoid character was less expressed and affinity for Glc was drastically decreased (h=1.20, S0.5=45 mM). The calculations of GLK activity in the liver of hibernating ground squirrels based on enzyme kinetic characteristics and seasonal changes in blood Glc concentrations have shown that GLK activity in the liver of hibernating ground squirrels is decreased about 5500-fold.

  15. Constraints and conundrums resulting from ground-deformation measurements made during the 2004-2005 dome-building eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington: Chapter 14 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Lisowski, Michael; Poland, Michael P.; Sherrod, David R.; LaHusen, Richard G.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Lack of precursory inflation suggests that the volcano was poised to erupt magma already stored in a crustal reservoir when JRO1 was installed in 1997. Trilateration and campaign GPS data indicate surface dilatation, presumably caused by reservoir expansion between 1982 and 1991, but no measurable deformation between 1991 and 2003. We conclude that all three of the traditionally reliable eruption precursors (seismicity, ground deformation, and volcanic gas emission) failed to provide warning that an eruption was imminent until a few days before a visible welt appeared at the surface--a situation reminiscent of the 1980 north-flank bulge at Mount St. Helens.

  16. InSAR Measurements of Ground Deformation Related to the 2003, May 21 Mw = 6.8 Zemmouri, Algeria Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicks, C. W.; Meghraoui, M.; Lu, Z.; Lin, J.; Cakir, Z.; Stein, R.; Belabbes, S.; Maouche, S.

    2004-12-01

    The Mw=6.8 Zemmouri earthquake was the largest earthquake felt in the region around Algiers since 1716. The quake occurred on a thrust fault within a system of folds and thrusts in northern Africa resulting from convergence between the African and Eurasian plates. Modern seismicity in the Atlas Mountains of northern Africa indicates that this fold and thrust belt is active, although the partitioning of strain within the belt is poorly understood. Because of the high population density in northern Algeria and tragic loss of life resulting from the Zemmouri earthquake, it is important to use all seismological, geodetic, and stress analysis tools available to study this earthquake and analyze its implications for future seismic hazards. We have processed and are analyzing the InSAR data from the Canadian Space Agency RADARSAT-1 satellite. We gained access to the data through the Alaska Satellite Facility with support from NASA and the Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance. The data reveal the two-patch nature of the rupture associated with the Zemmouri earthquake. This is in general agreement with field work by Meghraoui et al. (GRL, in press) that used shoreline uplift, GPS, and leveling measurements to show that the Zemmouri rupture occurred on two patches, one east and one west of the epicenter. Although InSAR coherence in the area around the epicenter is poor, as much as 0.45 m of InSAR measured uplift can be seen in the area of Boumerdes in the patch west of the epicenter. This is the same area where Meghraoui et al. measured shoreline uplift that was generally between 0.4 and 0.6 m, but as much as ~0.8 m. We are incorporating the disparate data sets and investigating how the addition of InSAR data might offer improvement over models derived from field data alone. We have also calculated patterns of stress transfer caused by the 2003 Zemmouri earthquake. Preliminary results reveal that the Zemmouri quake increased stresses on the thrust fault system in the

  17. Quaternary grabens in southernmost Illinois: Deformation near an active intraplate seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, W.J.; Denny, F.B.; Follmer, L.R.; Masters, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Narrow grabens displace Quaternary sediments near the northern edge of the Mississippi Embayment in extreme southern Illinois, east-central United States. Grabens are part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC), which has been recurrently active throughout Phanerozoic time. The FAFC strikes directly toward the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), scene of some of the largest intra-plate earthquakes in history. The NMSZ and FAFC share origin in a failed Cambrian rift (Reelfoot Rift). Every major fault zone of the FAFC in Illinois exhibits Quaternary displacement. The structures appear to be strike-slip pull-apart grabens, but the magnitude and direction of horizontal slip and their relationship to the current stress field are unknown. Upper Tertiary strata are vertically displaced more than 100 m, Illinoian and older Pleistocene strata 10 to 30 m, and Wisconsinan deposits 1 m or less. No Holocene deformation has been observed. Average vertical slip rates are estimated at 0.01 to 0.03 mm/year, and recurrence intervals for earthquakes of magnitude 6 to 7 are on the order of 10,000s of years for any given fault. Previous authors remarked that the small amount of surface deformation in the New Madrid area implies that the NMSZ is a young feature. Our findings show that tectonic activity has shifted around throughout the Quaternary in the central Mississippi Valley. In addition to the NMSZ and southern Illinois, the Wabash Valley (Illinois-Indiana), Benton Hills (Missouri), Crowley's Ridge (Arkansas-Missouri), and possibly other sites have experienced Quaternary tectonism. The NMSZ may be only the latest manifestation of seismicity in an intensely fractured intra-plate region.

  18. Subscale Validation of the Subsurface Active Filtration of Exhaust (SAFE) Approach to the NTP Ground Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, William M.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Bulman, Mel; Joyner, Russell; Martin, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) has been recognized as an enabling technology for missions to Mars and beyond. However, one of the key challenges of developing a nuclear thermal rocket is conducting verification and development tests on the ground. A number of ground test options are presented, with the Sub-surface Active Filtration of Exhaust (SAFE) method identified as a preferred path forward for the NTP program. The SAFE concept utilizes the natural soil characteristics present at the Nevada National Security Site to provide a natural filter for nuclear rocket exhaust during ground testing. A validation method of the SAFE concept is presented, utilizing a non-nuclear sub-scale hydrogen/oxygen rocket seeded with detectible radioisotopes. Additionally, some alternative ground test concepts, based upon the SAFE concept, are presented. Finally, an overview of the ongoing discussions of developing a ground test campaign are presented.

  19. Influence of thermally activated processes on the deformation behavior during low temperature ECAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, S.; Scholze, M.; F-X Wagner, M.

    2016-03-01

    High strength aluminum alloys are generally hard to deform. Therefore, the application of conventional severe plastic deformation methods to generate ultrafine-grained microstructures and to further increase strength is considerably limited. In this study, we consider low temperature deformation in a custom-built, cooled equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) tool (internal angle 90°) as an alternative approach to severely plastically deform a 7075 aluminum alloy. To document the maximum improvement of mechanical properties, these alloys are initially deformed from a solid solution heat-treated condition. We characterize the mechanical behavior and the microstructure of the coarse grained initial material at different low temperatures, and we analyze how a tendency for the PLC effect and the strain-hardening rate affect the formability during subsequent severe plastic deformation at low temperatures. We then discuss how the deformation temperature and velocity influence the occurrence of PLC effects and the homogeneity of the deformed ECAP billets. Besides the mechanical properties and these microstructural changes, we discuss technologically relevant processing parameters (such as pressing forces) and practical limitations, as well as changes in fracture behavior of the low temperature deformed materials as a function of deformation temperature.

  20. [Seasonal peculiarities of the ground squirrel (Spermophilus undulatus) and Wistar rats circadian activity].

    PubMed

    Semenova, T P; Spiridonova, L A; Zakharova, N M

    2014-09-01

    The seasonal peculiarities of the circadian activity of hibernator, Yakutian long tail ground squirrels (S. undulatus) (n = 35) and non hibernator, Wistar rats (n = 35), were studied. The locomotor activity was registered in each subject individually during 5-17 days by means of "Animex" in the different periods of annual cycle. It was shown that ground squirrels were animals with daily type of activity. On the contrary, the Wistar rats demonstrated nocturne type of locomotors activity. The active period in rats was longer than in ground squirrels. It included not only at night, but morning time in spring, and daytime--in summer. The circadian differences between hibernators and non-hibernators were kept during all annual cycle at night time, but in daytime--only in spring and summer time.

  1. Land-subsidence and ground-water storage monitoring in the Tucson Active Management Area, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pool, Don R.; Winster, Daniel; Cole, K.C.

    2000-01-01

    The Tucson Active Management Area (TAMA) comprises two basins--Tucson Basin and Avra Valley. The TAMA has been directed by Arizona ground-water law to attain an annual balance between groundwater withdrawals and recharge by the year 2025. This balance is defined by the statute as "safe yield." Current ground-water withdrawals exceed recharge, resulting in conditions of ground-water overdraft, which causes removal of water from ground-water storage and subsidence of the land surface. Depletion of storage and associated land subsidence will not be halted until all discharge from the system, both natural and human induced, is balanced by recharge. The amount of the ground-water overdraft has been difficult to estimate until recently because it could not be directly measured. Overdraft has been estimated using indirect water-budget methods that rely on uncertain estimates of recharge. As a result, the status of the ground-water budget could not be known with great certainty. Gravity methods offer a means to directly measure ground-water overdraft through measurement of changes in the gravitational field of the Earth that are caused by changes in the amount of water stored in the subsurface. Changes in vertical position also affect the measured gravity value and thus subsidence also must be monitored. The combination of periodic observations of gravity and vertical positions provide direct measures of changes in stored ground water and land subsidence.

  2. Active deformation processes of the Northern Caucasus deduced from the GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milyukov, Vadim; Mironov, Alexey; Rogozhin, Eugeny; Steblov, Grigory; Gabsatarov, Yury

    2015-04-01

    The Northern Caucasus, as a part of the Alpine-Himalayan mobile belt, is a zone of complex tectonics associated with the interaction of the two major tectonic plates, Arabian and Eurasian. The first GPS study of the contemporary geodynamics of the Caucasus mountain system were launched in the early 1990s in the framework of the Russia-US joint project. Since 2005 observations of the modern tectonic motion of the Northern Caucasus are carried out using the continuous GPS network. This network encompasses the territory of three Northern Caucasian Republics of the Russian Federation: Karachay-Cherkessia, Kabardino-Balkaria, and North Ossetia. In the Ossetian part of the Northern Caucasus the network of GPS survey-mode sites has been deployed as well. The GPS velocities confirm weak general compression of the Northern Caucasus with at the rate of about 1-2 mm/year. This horizontal motion at the boundary of the Northern Caucasus with respect to the Eurasian plate causes the higher seismic and tectonic activity of this transition zone. This result confirms that the source of deformation of the Northern Caucasus is the sub-meridional drift of the Arabian plate towards the adjacent boundary of the Eastern European part of the Eurasian lithospheric plate. The concept of such convergence implies that the Caucasian segment of the Alpine-Himalayan mobile belt is under compression, the layers of sedimentary and volcanic rocks are folded, the basement blocks are subject to shifts in various directions, and the upper crust layers are ruptured by reverse faults and thrusts. Weak deviation of observed velocities from the pattern corresponding to homogeneous compression can also be revealed, and numerical modeling of deformations of major regional tectonic structures, such as the Main Caucasus Ridge, can explain this. The deformation tensor deduced from the velocity field also exhibits the sub-meridional direction of the major compressional axes which coincides with the direction of

  3. Analysis of ground reaction force and electromyographic activity of the gastrocnemius muscle during double support.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Andreia S P; Santos, Rubim; Oliveira, Francisco P M; Carvalho, Paulo; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2012-05-01

    Mechanisms associated with energy expenditure during gait have been extensively researched and studied. According to the double-inverted pendulum model energy expenditure is higher during double support, as lower limbs need to work to redirect the centre of mass velocity. This study looks into how the ground reaction force of one limb affects the muscle activity required by the medial gastrocnemius of the contralateral limb during step-to-step transition. Thirty-five subjects were monitored as to the medial gastrocnemius electromyographic activity of one limb and the ground reaction force of the contralateral limb during double support. After determination of the Pearson correlation coefficient (r), a moderate correlation was observed between the medial gastrocnemius electromyographic activity of the dominant leg and the vertical (Fz) and anteroposterior (Fy) components of ground reaction force of the non-dominant leg (r = 0.797, p < 0.000 1; r = -0.807, p < 0.000 1). A weak and moderate correlation was observed between the medial gastrocnemius electromyographic activity of the non-dominant leg and the Fz and Fy of the dominant leg, respectively (r = 0.442, p = 0.018; r = -0.684 p < 0.000 1). The results obtained suggest that during double support, ground reaction force is associated with the electromyographic activity of the contralateral medial gastrocnemius and that there is an increased dependence between the ground reaction force of the non-dominant leg and the electromyographic activity of the dominant medial gastrocnemius. PMID:22720393

  4. National water-information clearinghouse activities; ground-water perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haupt, C.A.; Jensen, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) has functioned for many years as an informal clearinghouse for water resources information, enabling users to access groundwater information effectively. Water resources clearinghouse activities of the USGS are conducted through several separate computerized water information programs that are involved in the collection, storage, retrieval, and distribution of different types of water information. The following USGS programs perform water information clearinghouse functions and provide the framework for a formalized National Water-Information Clearinghouse: (1) The National Water Data Exchange--a nationwide confederation of more than 300 Federal, State, local, government, academic, and private water-oriented organizations that work together to improve access to water data; (2) the Water Resources Scientific Information Center--acquires, abstracts, and indexes the major water-resources-related literature of the world, and provides this information to the water resources community; (3) the Information Transfer Program--develops innovative approaches to transfer information and technology developed within the USGS to audiences in the public and private sectors; (4) the Hydrologic Information Unit--provides responses to a variety of requests, both technical and lay-oriented, for water resources information , and helps efforts to conduct water resources research; (5) the Water Data Storage and Retrieval System--maintains accessible computerized files of hydrologic data collected nationwide, by the USGS and other governmental agencies, from stream gaging stations, groundwater observation wells, and surface- and groundwater quality sampling sites; (6) the Office of Water Data Coordination--coordinate the water data acquisition activities of all agencies of the Federal Government, and is responsible for the planning, design, and inter-agency coordination of a national water data and information network; and (7) the Water Resources Research

  5. Structural deformation measurement via efficient tensor polynomial calibrated electro-active glass targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gugg, Christoph; Harker, Matthew; O'Leary, Paul

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the physical setup and mathematical modelling of a device for the measurement of structural deformations over large scales, e.g., a mining shaft. Image processing techniques are used to determine the deformation by measuring the position of a target relative to a reference laser beam. A particular novelty is the incorporation of electro-active glass; the polymer dispersion liquid crystal shutters enable the simultaneous calibration of any number of consecutive measurement units without manual intervention, i.e., the process is fully automatic. It is necessary to compensate for optical distortion if high accuracy is to be achieved in a compact hardware design where lenses with short focal lengths are used. Wide-angle lenses exhibit significant distortion, which are typically characterized using Zernike polynomials. Radial distortion models assume that the lens is rotationally symmetric; such models are insufficient in the application at hand. This paper presents a new coordinate mapping procedure based on a tensor product of discrete orthogonal polynomials. Both lens distortion and the projection are compensated by a single linear transformation. Once calibrated, to acquire the measurement data, it is necessary to localize a single laser spot in the image. For this purpose, complete interpolation and rectification of the image is not required; hence, we have developed a new hierarchical approach based on a quad-tree subdivision. Cross-validation tests verify the validity, demonstrating that the proposed method accurately models both the optical distortion as well as the projection. The achievable accuracy is e <= +/-0.01 [mm] in a field of view of 150 [mm] x 150 [mm] at a distance of the laser source of 120 [m]. Finally, a Kolmogorov Smirnov test shows that the error distribution in localizing a laser spot is Gaussian. Consequently, due to the linearity of the proposed method, this also applies for the algorithm's output. Therefore, first

  6. Active anthropogenic and surface salt deformation measured by InSAR, northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon, C.; Webb, A. G.; Lasserre, C.; Doin, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the global occurrence of salt, very few salt bodies outcrop and are presently preserved at the surface. Because of this much of our knowledge on salt structures is sourced from subsurface imaging and modeling and less from field based studies. Using interferometry of synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) we monitor surface displacements across four surface salt outcrops in the western margin of the Kuqa fold-thrust belt of Xinjiang Province, China. An InSAR time series was constructed from 40 Envisat ASAR C-band images between June 2003 and October 2010. Interferometric processing was completed using the New Small Baseline Algorithm Subset (NSBAS). These poorly studied salt structures provide a fresh opportunity to study how salt behaves on the surface. The salt bodies outcrop along an active intracontinental thrust system between the Tian Shan and Tarim basin to the south. The four surface namakiers (salt glaciers) were analyzed in this study include: the Quele, Awate, Bozidun, and an unnamed structure referred to as the Western namakier. The ~35 km long Quele namakier is a line-sourced structure advancing along the Quele salt thrust. The other three namakiers range between ~1-3 km long and are point-sourced structures. The namakiers studied display non-steady deformation with rates of displacement varying between uplifts of up to +4 cm/yr and subsidence rates of -4 cm/yr. Additionally, the Kuqa fold-thrust belt hosts a number of hydrocarbon fields and InSAR measurements detect significant anthropogenic deformation associated with hydrocarbon extraction and fluid injection.

  7. Quaternary deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.D. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Displaced or deformed rock units and landforms record the past 2 m.y. of faulting, folding, uplift, and subsidence in California. Properly interpreted, such evidence provides a quantitative basis for predicting future earthquake activity and for relating many diverse structures and landforms to the 5 cm/yr of horizontal motion at the boundary between the North American and Pacific plates. Modern techniques of geologic dating and expanded research on earthquake hazards have greatly improved our knowledge of the San Andreas fault system. Much of this new knowledge has been gained since 1965, and that part which concerns crustal deformation during the past 2 m.y. is briefly summarized here.

  8. Promoting physical activity: fertile ground for rehabilitation psychology.

    PubMed

    Uswatte, Gitendra

    2013-02-01

    Comments on the article by Schmacher et al. (see record 2013-06066-009). Readers of Rehabilitation Psychology might be surprised, or maybe even alarmed, to find an article on promoting physical activity in able-bodied people between the covers of their latest issue. This commentary contends that this area of research and practice might be one into which rehabilitation psychologists want to venture. Schumacher and coworkers describe a field test (N = 216) of a token system for reinforcing stair taking. The setting was an eight-story office building housing a single company in a midsized city in the southeastern United States. Schumacher et al. report an increase from 39 stair transactions per day by all study participants in the 6 months before implementation of the intervention to 301 transactions in the 6 months after the implementation of the intervention, which represents a 600% increase. The cost of the intervention was only $17 per person. Although replication of these results in a study with additional sources of control would increase confidence in the validity of the findings, the size of the gains in stair taking, the number of participants in the study, the length of the baseline and implementation periods, and the objective measurement of outcome warrant attention. PMID:23438004

  9. Promoting physical activity: fertile ground for rehabilitation psychology.

    PubMed

    Uswatte, Gitendra

    2013-02-01

    Comments on the article by Schmacher et al. (see record 2013-06066-009). Readers of Rehabilitation Psychology might be surprised, or maybe even alarmed, to find an article on promoting physical activity in able-bodied people between the covers of their latest issue. This commentary contends that this area of research and practice might be one into which rehabilitation psychologists want to venture. Schumacher and coworkers describe a field test (N = 216) of a token system for reinforcing stair taking. The setting was an eight-story office building housing a single company in a midsized city in the southeastern United States. Schumacher et al. report an increase from 39 stair transactions per day by all study participants in the 6 months before implementation of the intervention to 301 transactions in the 6 months after the implementation of the intervention, which represents a 600% increase. The cost of the intervention was only $17 per person. Although replication of these results in a study with additional sources of control would increase confidence in the validity of the findings, the size of the gains in stair taking, the number of participants in the study, the length of the baseline and implementation periods, and the objective measurement of outcome warrant attention.

  10. Deformation twinning activated α --> ω transformation in titanium under shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Hongxiang; Lookman, Turab

    Materials dynamics, especially the behavior of solids under extreme compression, is a topic of broad scientific and technological interest. However, less is known of the role of grain boundary structures on the shock response of hexagonal-close-packed metals. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study deformation mechanisms in shock compressed Ti bicrystals containing three types of grain boundary (GB) microstructures, i.e., coherent twin boundaries (CTBs), symmetric incoherent twin boundaries (ITB) and {1-210}asymmetric tilt grain boundaries. Our results show that both dislocation activity and the α -> ω phase transformation in Ti are sensitive to the GB characteristics. In particular, we find that the elastic shock wave can readily trigger the α -> ω transformation at CTBs but not at the other two GBs, and the activation of the α -> ω transformation at CTBs leads to considerable wave attenuation (i.e., the elastic precursor decay). Combined with first principle calculations, we find that CTBs can facilitate the overcoming of the energy barrier for the α -> ω transformation. Our findings have potential implications for interface engineering and materials design under extreme conditions.

  11. Microearthquake activity, lithospheric structure, and deformation modes at an amagmatic ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Florian; Schlindwein, Vera

    2016-07-01

    While nascent oceanic lithosphere at slow to fast spreading mid-ocean ridges (MOR) is relatively well studied, much less is known about the lithospheric structure and properties at ultraslow MORs. Here we present microearthquake data from a 1 year ocean bottom seismometer deployment at the amagmatic, oblique supersegment of the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. A refraction seismic experiment was performed to constrain upper lithosphere P-velocities and results were used to construct a 1D velocity model for earthquake location. Earthquake foci were located individually and subsequently relocated relative to each other to sharpen the image of seismically active structures. Frequent earthquake activity extends to 31 km beneath the seafloor, indicating an exceptionally thick brittle lithosphere and an undulating brittle-ductile transition that implies significant variations in the along-axis thermal structure of the lithosphere. We observe a strong relation between petrology, microseismicity distribution, and topography along the ridge axis: Peridotite-dominated areas associate with deepest hypocenters, vast volumes of lithosphere that deforms aseismically as a consequence of alteration, and the deepest axial rift valley. Areas of basalt exposure correspond to shallower hypocenters, shallower and more rugged axial seafloor. Focal mechanisms deviate from pure extension and are spatially variable. Earthquakes form an undulating band of background seismicity and do not delineate discrete detachment faults as common on slow spreading ridges. Instead, the seismicity band sharply terminates to the south, immediately beneath the rift boundary. Considering the deep alteration, large steep boundary faults might be present but are entirely aseismic.

  12. Can deep seated gravitational slope deformations be activated by regional tectonic strain: First insights from displacement measurements in caves from the Eastern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroň, Ivo; Plan, Lukas; Grasemann, Bernhard; Mitroviċ, Ivanka; Lenhardt, Wolfgang; Hausmann, Helmut; Stemberk, Josef

    2016-04-01

    Tectonic elastic strain and ground deformations are documented as the most remarkable environmental phenomena occurring prior to local earthquakes in tectonically active areas. The question arises if such strain would be able to trigger mass movements. We discuss a directly observed fault slip and a subsequent minor activation of a deep-seated gravitational slope deformation prior to the M = 3 Bad Fischau earthquake between end of November and early December 2013 in NE Austria. The data originate from two faults in the Emmerberg and Eisenstein Caves in the transition zone between the Eastern Alps and the Vienna Basin, monitored in the framework of the FWF "Speleotect" project. The fault slips have been observed at the micrometer-level by means of an opto-mechanical 3D crack gauge TM-71. The discussed event started with the fault activation in the Emmerberg Cave on 25 November 2013 recorded by measurements of about 2 μm shortening and 1 μm sinistral parallel slip, which was fully in agreement with the macroscopically documented past fault kinematics. One day later, the mass (micro) movement activated on the opposite side of the mountain ridge in the Eisenstein Cave and it continued on three consecutive days. Further, the fault in the Emmerberg Cave experienced also a subsequent gravitational relaxation on 2/3 December 2013, when the joint opened and the southern block subsided towards the valley, while the original sinistral displacement remained irreversible. The process was followed by the M = 3 earthquake in Bad Fischau on 11 December 2013. Our data suggest that tectonic strain could play a higher role on the activation of slow mass movements in the area than expected. Although we cannot fully exclude the co-activation of the mass movement in the Eisenstein Cave by water saturation, the presented data bring new insight into recent geodynamics of the Eastern Alps and the Vienna Basin. For better interpretations and conclusions however, we need a much longer

  13. Active deformation of the Congo intracratonic basin and its eastern margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everaerts, Michel; Delvaux, Damien; Beoka, Ateba

    2015-04-01

    The Congo basin, one of the largest intracontinental sedimentary basin in the world, developed in Central Africa since the early Neoproterozoic during successive tectonically controlled stages. It formed over an heterogeneous basement as highlighted by aeromagnetic data, composed of Archean cores welded by Proterozoic mobile belts. It contains an average of 4 km and locally up to 8 km of Neoproterozoic to Mesozoic sediments. Since late Mesozoic (Cenomanian), it was submitted to intraplate stresses due to the action of ridge-push forces related to the spreading of the South Atlantic. As a result, most part of the basin entered in an erosional stage while only a small part is still accumulating sediments. Active deformation of this vast region (5°N-11°S and 12-27°E) is indicated by a certain level of seismic activity, with about 270 earthquakes instrumentally recorded with magnitudes ranging from 2.2 to 5.5 inside the basin and up to up to 6.3 along its NW (Gabon) and NW (Katanga) margins. The dozen available focal mechanisms indicate that the basin is under ENE-WSW horizontal compression, under a compressional regime in its center and strike-slip regime along its northern and western margins. Low-angle slickensided fault planes are observed in the Samba cored well, constraining the onset of the recent compressional setting in the late Albian, at a time when South America was already separated from Africa and the South Atlantic Ridge was already functioning. Although subtle, recent tectonic deformations (faulting and buckling undulations) can also be inferred from the reflection seismic profiles and the topography and river network. The overall neotectonic picture is inferred as reflecting the development of compressional tectonic instabilities in the basin fill and its margins under the action of intraplate stress field and the control of the basement heterogeneity. This is a contribution to preparation of the Seismotectonic Map of Africa by the working group of

  14. Faults Activities And Crustal Deformation near Hualien City, eastern Taiwan Analysed By Persistent Scatterer InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Lin, M.; Yen, J.; Chang, C.

    2008-12-01

    Hualien is located in eastern part of Taiwan, and is the collision boundary in the northern of Huatung Longitudinal Valley between the Philippine Sea tectonic plate and Eurasian tectonic plate(Biq, 1981; Barrier and Angelier, 1986). There are several active faults, such as Milun fault, Beipu fault and Minyi fault, pass through the Hualien city, and create many crustal deformation. According to previous researches (Hsu, 1956; Lin, 1962; Yu, 1997) we know Milun fault is a thrust and left lateral fault, and the fault plane incline to east. Minyi fault also is a left lateral and a slight reverse fault, but it's fault plane incline to west. (Chang, 1994; Yu, 1997) We applied the Persistent Scatterer Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PSInSAR, Hooper, 2007) to observe temporally-variable processes of Hualien city between 2004 to 2008. At the same time, precise leveling and GPS data were taken for the auxiliary data to verify the deformation rate and pattern in this area. In the Hualien city area, our observation showed that the active faults separate this area into several distinct blocks. Most of the blocks moved slowly, but the hanging wall of the Milun fault decreases 5- 8mm in line of sight (LOS) direction between 15 May 2004 to 24 Feb 2007, then increases 3-6mm in LOS between 1 Dec 2007 to 5 Jan 2008. The deformation reversed its direction in 2007. The western surface of Hualien City displays continuous deformation about 1.5-2mm/yr , which spread along the Beipu fault. Our preliminary investigation indicated that between late 2004 and middle 2005 there had been an abrupt increase in seismicity, which coincided with PSInSAR observation of a large displacement. The distribution of shallow source earthquakes correlate with the area with large deformation. Our following works include continuing observation of the Hualien City, and decipher the relationship between earthquakes and surface deformation, and model the fault action in Hualien City with time series.

  15. Observing ground surface change series at active volcanoes in Indonesia using backscattering intensity of SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saepuloh, Asep; Trianaputri, Mila Olivia

    2015-04-01

    Indonesia contains 27 active volcanoes passing the West through the East part. Therefore, Indonesia is the most hazard front due to the volcanic activities. To obtain the new precursory signals leading to the eruptions, we applied remote sensing technique to observe ground surface change series at the summit of Sinabung and Kelud volcanoes. Sinabung volcano is located at Karo Region, North Sumatra Province. This volcano is a strato volcano type which is re-activated in August 2010. The eruption continues to the later years by ejecting volcanic products such as lava, pyroclastic flow, and ash fall deposits. This study is targeted to observe ground surface change series at the summit of Sinabung volcano since 2007 to 2011. In addition, we also compared the summit ground surface changes after the eruptions of Kelud volcano in 2007. Kelud volcano is also strato volcano type which is located at East Java, Indonesia. The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) remotely sensed technology makes possible to observe rapidly a wide ground surface changes related to ground surface roughness. Detection series were performed by extracting the backscattering intensity of the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) onboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS). The intensity values were then calculated using a Normalized Radar Cross-Section (NRCS). Based on surface roughness criterion at the summit of Sinabung volcano, we could observe the ground surface changes prior to the early eruption in August 2010. The continuous increment of NRCS values showed clearly at window size 3×3 pixel of the summit of Sinabung volcano. The same phenomenon was also detected at the summit of Kelud volcano after the 2007 eruptions. The detected ground surface changes were validated using optical Landsat-8, backscattering intensity ratio for volcanic products detection, and radial component of a tilt-meter data.

  16. Active oil-water interfaces: buckling and deformation of oil drops by bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Gabriel; Stocker, Roman

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria are unicellular organisms that seek nutrients and energy for growth, division, and self-propulsion. Bacteria are also natural colloidal particles that attach and self-assemble at liquid-liquid interfaces. Here, we present experimental results on active oil-water interfaces that spontaneously form when bacteria accumulate or grow on the interface. Using phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, we simultaneously observed the dynamics of adsorbed Alcanivorax bacteria and the oil-water interface within microfluidic devices. We find that, by growing and dividing, adsorbed bacteria form a jammed monolayer of cells that encapsulates the entire oil drop. As bacteria continue to grow at the interface, the drop buckles and the interface undergoes strong deformations. The bacteria act to stabilize non-equilibrium shapes of the oil-phase such wrinkling and tubulation. In addition to presenting a natural example of a living interface, these findings shape our understanding of microbial degradation of oil and may have important repercussions on engineering interventions for oil bioremediation.

  17. Tectonic history and thrust-fold deformation style of seismically active structures near Coalinga

    SciTech Connect

    Namson, J.S. ); Davis, T.L.; Lagoe, M.B.

    1990-01-01

    The stratigraphy of the Coalinga region can be divided into tectostratigraphic facies whose boundaries delineate two major tectonic events - one in the mid-Cenozoic (38-17 Ma) and one in the late Cenozoic (less than 3 Ma). The succession of these tectostratigraphic facies, and an integration of geology, subsurface well data, a seismic-reflection profile, and earthquake seismicity on a retrodeformable cross section, yield a model for the tectonic evolution of the Coalinga region. This model suggests that the structural style of both deformational events is characteristic of fold and thrust belts. The model also indicates that the causative fault of the May 2 earthquake is a ramped thrust. The results of this study, in combination with regional geologic relations, suggest that the Coalinga region is part of an active fold and thrust belt which borders the west and south sides of the San Joaquin Valley. The potential for future earthquakes due to movement of other blind thrust faults within this belt should be evaluated.

  18. Ground reaction forces, kinematics, and muscle activations during the windmill softball pitch.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gretchen D; Plummer, Hillary

    2011-07-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine quantitatively ground reaction forces, kinematics, and muscle activations during the windmill softball pitch, and to determine relationships between knee valgus and muscle activations, ball velocity and muscle activation as well as ball velocity and ground reaction forces. It was hypothesized that there would be an inverse relationship between degree of knee valgus and muscle activation, a direct relationship between ground reaction forces and ball velocity, and non-stride leg muscle activations and ball velocity. Ten female windmill softball pitchers (age 17.6 ± 3.47 years, stature 1.67 ± 0.07 m, weight 67.4 ± 12.2 kg) participated. Dependent variables were ball velocity, surface electromyographic (sEMG), kinematic, and kinetic data while the participant was the independent variable. Stride foot contact reported peak vertical forces of 179% body weight. There were positive relationships between ball velocity and ground reaction force (r = 0.758, n = 10, P = 0.029) as well as ball velocity and non-stride leg gluteus maximus (r = 0.851, n = 10, P = 0.007) and medius (r = 0.760, n = 10, P = 0.029) muscle activity, while there was no notable relationship between knee valgus and muscle activation. As the windmill softball pitcher increased ball velocity, her vertical ground reaction forces also increased. Proper conditioning of the lumbopelvic-hip complex, including the gluteals, is essential for injury prevention. From the data presented, it is evident that bilateral strength and conditioning of the gluteal muscle group is salient in the windmill softball pitch as an attempt to decrease incidence of injury.

  19. Microtopographic and depth controls on active layer chemistry in Arctic polygonal ground

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Brent D.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Graham, David E.; Gu, Baohua; Hubbard, Susan S.; Liang, Liyuan; Wu, Yuxin; Heikoop, J. M.; Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Wilson, Cathy; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-03-24

    Polygonal ground is a signature characteristic of Arctic lowlands, and carbon release from permafrost thaw can alter feedbacks to Arctic ecosystems and climate. This study describes the first comprehensive spatial examination of active layer biogeochemistry that extends across high- and low-centered, ice wedge polygons, their features, and with depth. Water chemistry measurements of 54 analytes were made on surface and active layer pore waters collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA. Significant differences were observed between high- and low-centered polygons suggesting that polygon types may be useful for landscape-scale geochemical classification. However, differences were found for polygon features (centers and troughs) for analytes that were not significant for polygon type, suggesting that finer-scale features affect biogeochemistry differently from polygon types. Depth variations were also significant, demonstrating important multidimensional aspects of polygonal ground biogeochemistry. These results have major implications for understanding how polygonal ground ecosystems function, and how they may respond to future change.

  20. Microtopographic and depth controls on active layer chemistry in Arctic polygonal ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, B. D.; Throckmorton, H. M.; Graham, D. E.; Gu, B.; Hubbard, S. S.; Liang, L.; Wu, Y.; Heikoop, J. M.; Herndon, E. M.; Phelps, T. J.; Wilson, C. J.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2015-03-01

    Polygonal ground is a signature characteristic of Arctic lowlands, and carbon release from permafrost thaw can alter feedbacks to Arctic ecosystems and climate. This study describes the first comprehensive spatial examination of active layer biogeochemistry that extends across high- and low-centered, ice wedge polygons, their features, and with depth. Water chemistry measurements of 54 analytes were made on surface and active layer pore waters collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA. Significant differences were observed between high- and low-centered polygons suggesting that polygon types may be useful for landscape-scale geochemical classification. However, differences were found for polygon features (centers and troughs) for analytes that were not significant for polygon type, suggesting that finer-scale features affect biogeochemistry differently from polygon types. Depth variations were also significant, demonstrating important multidimensional aspects of polygonal ground biogeochemistry. These results have major implications for understanding how polygonal ground ecosystems function, and how they may respond to future change.

  1. Activated carbon derived from waste coffee grounds for stable methane storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, K. Christian; Baek, Seung Bin; Lee, Wang-Geun; Meyyappan, M.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2015-09-01

    An activated carbon material derived from waste coffee grounds is shown to be an effective and stable medium for methane storage. The sample activated at 900 °C displays a surface area of 1040.3 m2 g-1 and a micropore volume of 0.574 cm3 g-1 and exhibits a stable CH4 adsorption capacity of ˜4.2 mmol g-1 at 3.0 MPa and a temperature range of 298 ± 10 K. The same material exhibits an impressive hydrogen storage capacity of 1.75 wt% as well at 77 K and 100 kPa. Here, we also propose a mechanism for the formation of activated carbon from spent coffee grounds. At low temperatures, the material has two distinct types with low and high surface areas; however, activation at elevated temperatures drives off the low surface area carbon, leaving behind the porous high surface area activated carbon.

  2. EMG activities and ground reaction forces during fatigued and nonfatigued sprinting.

    PubMed

    Nummela, A; Rusko, H; Mero, A

    1994-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate EMG activities and ground reaction forces during fatigued and nonfatigued running. Ten male sprint runners volunteered to run a maximal 20-m speed test, a 400-m time trial, and submaximal 20-m runs at the average speed of the first 100 m of the 400 m. During the latter stage of each run, ground reaction forces and EMG activity of four leg muscles were recorded. EMG activities were time averaged during three phases of running: preactivation, braking, and propulsion phase. The resultant ground reaction forces both in the braking (P < 0.001) and in the propulsion phase (P < 0.01) were greater in the maximal and submaximal 20 m than at the end of the 400 m. The averaged EMG during the braking phase (P < 0.01) and during the total ground phase (P < 0.05) was smaller in the submaximal 20 m than at the end of the 400 m. On the other hand the averaged EMG was greater during the maximal 20 m than at the end of the 400 m during the propulsion phase (P < 0.001) and during the total ground phase (P < 0.05). In addition, the more the preactivity increased the less the resultant ground reaction force decreased in the braking phase during the 400 m run (r = 0.77, P < 0.05). It was concluded that the role of the increased neural activation was to compensate for muscular fatigue and the preactivation had an important role in maintaining force production during the 400-m run. In addition, the fatigue was different in each working muscle. PMID:8007809

  3. Slow slip events estimated from ground deformation and seismic wave velocity structure estimated from seismic wave tomography in the Tokai region, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, F.; Ohota, Y.; Negishi, H.; Matsubara, M.

    2004-12-01

    Ohota et al. (2004) estimated the fault model of the 2001 Tokai slow slip event based on the re-processing GPS data comparing the ground deformation in 1997-2000. From their discussion, in the period of slow slip event, interplate coupling is tightly remained in the depth of 10-25 km in the plate boundary in the Tokai region. Forward slip consisting of slow slip event is ongoing with a rate of 3 cm/yr at the depth of 25-40 km in the plate boundary. The slow slip event fault locates outside of the 1944 Tonankai earthquake fault model by Tanioka and Satake (2002). It suggests that slow slip event is occurred outside of asperity area of historical large earthquakes along the Nankai Trough. Recently dense seismological network is constructed and seismic wave velocity structure are discussed with detail from the seismic wave tomography method (Matsubara et al.,2004; Kamiya and Kobayashi, 2004). According to their resolution, the low Vp and Vs layer is estimated in the 25-40 km depth of the plate boundary between the Philippine Sea plate and Eurasian plate in the Tokai region. Precisely we discus the location of low Vp and Vs layers, it is located upper part pf the plate boundary with width of 10km, which is corresponded to the lower continental crust..It is located just under northern area of Lake Hamana and Mikawa Bay. Kodaira et al.(2004), they conclude that high Vp/Vs ration distributed in subducting upper ocean crust around 30 km depth of the plate boundary is a occurrence mechanism of the 2001 Tokai slow slip event. From our research, the rate of Vp/Vs in upper part of the subducting oceanic crust is changing with the depth of the plate boundary. Until 25 km depth, velocities of P-wave and S-wave are not low, and the rate Vp/Vs is normal. At depth of 25 - 40 km, velocities of P-wave and S-wave are decreasing, and the rate Vp/Vs is increasing. The depth of high rate is correspond the slow slip fault estimated by Ohota et al.(2004) and hypocenters of unvolcanic low

  4. Structural deformation and sedimentation in an active Caldera, Rabaul, Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, H. Gary; Tiffin, D.L.; McKee, C.O.

    1986-01-01

    Recent seismic and tectonic activity in Rabaul Caldera, Papua New Guinea, suggests that magma is accumulating at a shallow depth beneath this partially submerged structure and that a new volcano may be developing. Changes in onshore elevation since 1971 (as much as 2 m on south Matupit Island) indicate that rapid and large-scale uplifts have occurred on the seafloor near the center of the caldera. The frequency of seismic events within the caldera has also increased during this period. Earthquake locations define an elliptical ring surrounding the center of this uplift within the caldera. A marine geophysical survey in 1982 by the U.S. Geological Survey's R/V "S.P. Lee" in Rabaul Caldera shows the development of a bulge in the seafloor near the center of the caldera. High-resolution seismic reflection profiles show that this bulge consists of two domal uplifts bounded and separated by two major north-south-trending fault zones. Deformed sediments overlie these zones; a prominent slump flanks the area of the bulge. Five major acoustic units were identified in the seismic reflection profiles: an acoustic basement and four sedimentary units consisting of irregularly layered, cross-layered, contorted, and well-layered sequences. The acoustic basement is probably composed of crystalline volcanic rocks, and the layered acoustic units are probably sediments, primarily ash deposited in different environments. The cross-layered, irregularly layered, and contorted units appear to have been deposited in a dynamic environment subjected to strong currents, seismicity, and/or mass wasting, while the well-layered units were deposited in a low-energy environment. Locally, well-layered sequences interfinger with the other sedimentary units, indicating a transitional environment that alternated between high-energy and low-energy depositional processes. A submarine channel cuts most of the acoustic units and appears to be the conduit for sediment transport out of the caldera; it

  5. A High-Performance Deformable Mirror with Integrated Driver ASIC for Space Based Active Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Chris

    Direct imaging of exoplanets is key to fully understanding these systems through spectroscopy and astrometry. The primary impediment to direct imaging of exoplanets is the extremely high brightness ratio between the planet and its parent star. Direct imaging requires a technique for contrast suppression, which include coronagraphs, and nulling interferometers. Deformable mirrors (DMs) are essential to both of these techniques. With space missions in mind, Microscale is developing a novel DM with direct integration of DM and its electronic control functions in a single small envelope. The Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) is key to the shrinking of the electronic control functions to a size compatible with direct integration with the DM. Through a NASA SBIR project, Microscale, with JPL oversight, has successfully demonstrated a unique deformable mirror (DM) driver ASIC prototype based on an ultra-low power switch architecture. Microscale calls this the Switch-Mode ASIC, or SM-ASIC, and has characterized it for a key set of performance parameters, and has tested its operation with a variety of actuator loads, such as piezo stack and unimorph, and over a wide temperature range. These tests show the SM-ASIC's capability of supporting active optics in correcting aberrations of a telescope in space. Microscale has also developed DMs to go with the SM-ASIC driver. The latest DM version produced uses small piezo stack elements in an 8x8 array, bonded to a novel silicon facesheet structure fabricated monolithically into a polished mirror on one side and mechanical linkage posts that connect to the piezoelectric stack actuators on the other. In this Supporting Technology proposal we propose to further develop the ASIC-DM and have assembled a very capable team to do so. It will be led by JPL, which has considerable expertise with DMs used in Adaptive Optics systems, with high-contrast imaging systems for exoplanet missions, and with designing DM driver

  6. Automatic corpus callosum segmentation using a deformable active Fourier contour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachet, Clement; Yvernault, Benjamin; Bhatt, Kshamta; Smith, Rachel G.; Gerig, Guido; Cody Hazlett, Heather; Styner, Martin

    2012-03-01

    The corpus callosum (CC) is a structure of interest in many neuroimaging studies of neuro-developmental pathology such as autism. It plays an integral role in relaying sensory, motor and cognitive information from homologous regions in both hemispheres. We have developed a framework that allows automatic segmentation of the corpus callosum and its lobar subdivisions. Our approach employs constrained elastic deformation of flexible Fourier contour model, and is an extension of Szekely's 2D Fourier descriptor based Active Shape Model. The shape and appearance model, derived from a large mixed population of 150+ subjects, is described with complex Fourier descriptors in a principal component shape space. Using MNI space aligned T1w MRI data, the CC segmentation is initialized on the mid-sagittal plane using the tissue segmentation. A multi-step optimization strategy, with two constrained steps and a final unconstrained step, is then applied. If needed, interactive segmentation can be performed via contour repulsion points. Lobar connectivity based parcellation of the corpus callosum can finally be computed via the use of a probabilistic CC subdivision model. Our analysis framework has been integrated in an open-source, end-to-end application called CCSeg both with a command line and Qt-based graphical user interface (available on NITRC). A study has been performed to quantify the reliability of the semi-automatic segmentation on a small pediatric dataset. Using 5 subjects randomly segmented 3 times by two experts, the intra-class correlation coefficient showed a superb reliability (0.99). CCSeg is currently applied to a large longitudinal pediatric study of brain development in autism.

  7. Measuring active deformation of the Yakima fold and thrust belt using GPS and InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalzle, G. M.; Baker, M. S.; McCaffrey, R.; King, R. W.; Osmanoglu, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Yakima fold-thrust belt (YFTB; also known as Yakima Fold Belt), forming the distinct geomorphology of northernmost Oregon and south-central Washington, is one of the few actively deforming fold and thrust belts in the conterminous United States. Although controversial, currently available data suggest that the YFTB is "thick-skinned", i.e., its faults penetrate the seismogenic layer, allowing for large (~M7) earthquakes. The YFTB is bisected by the Olympic-Wallowa Lineament (OWL) that runs from eastern Washington into the highly populated Puget Sound. Together, the YFTB and OWL make up the boundary between the clockwise rotating Oregon block and eastern Washington, which is largely moving with the North American plate. Paleomagnetic data suggest that Oregon has been rotating at its present (GPS-derived) rate for more than 15 million years with the predicted consequence of a long history of shortening across the YFTB. GPS data obtained over the past ~20 years indicate a NE-directed shortening strain rate of about 9 x 10^-9 /yr, but how this strain is partitioned across the YFTB is unclear due to the sparse locations of GPS sites. We use Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data to examine the degree to which strain rates are localized or distributed within this continental thrust belt, shedding light on the controversy regarding the behavior of the continental lithosphere under contraction. These data are compared to local seismicity, gravity surveys, recent high-resolution aeromagnetic work and paleoseismic studies.

  8. Improving active seismic isolation in aLIGO using a ground rotation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswara, Krishna; Hagedorn, Charles; Ross, Michael; Gundlach, Jens

    2016-03-01

    The active seismic isolation in Advanced LIGO achieves a factor of 10 -104 isolation from ground displacement in the frequency range from 0.1-10 Hz enabling stable low noise interferometer operation. It uses seismometers on the ground and the optics platform in feedback loops to reduce the transmission of ground motion to the platform. However, due to the inability of a seismometer to distinguish between horizontal acceleration and rotation (coupling through gravity), wind-induced tilt limits the performance of the active isolation in the 10-500 mHz frequency range, thereby reducing the duty-cycle of the detectors. We describe a ground rotation sensor, consisting of a low frequency beam-balance and an autocollimator readout with better than 0.4 nrad/rt(Hz) sensitivity above 10 mHz, which can be used to subtract tilt-noise from a horizontal seismometer, thus improving the active seismic isolation system. This work was supported by NSF Grant: 1306613.

  9. MAGNETIC LIQUID DEFORMABLE MIRRORS FOR ASTRONOMICAL APPLICATIONS: ACTIVE CORRECTION OF OPTICAL ABERRATIONS FROM LOWER-GRADE OPTICS AND SUPPORT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Borra, E. F.

    2012-08-01

    Deformable mirrors are increasingly used in astronomy. However, they still are limited in stroke for active correction of high-amplitude optical aberrations. Magnetic liquid deformable mirrors (MLDMs) are a new technology that has the advantages of high-amplitude deformations and low costs. In this paper, we demonstrate extremely high strokes and interactuator strokes achievable by MLDMs which can be used in astronomical instrumentation. In particular, we consider the use of such a mirror to suggest an interesting application for the next generation of large telescopes. We present a prototype 91 actuator deformable mirror made of a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid). This mirror uses a technique that linearizes the response of such mirrors by superimposing a large and uniform magnetic field on the magnetic field produced by an array of small coils. We discuss experimental results that illustrate the performance of MLDMs. A most interesting application of MLDMs comes from the fact they could be used to correct the aberrations of large and lower optical quality primary mirrors held by simple support systems. We estimate basic parameters of the needed MLDMs, obtaining reasonable values.

  10. Seasonal variation in daily activity patterns of free-ranging European ground squirrels (Spermophilus citellus).

    PubMed

    Everts, Lammina G; Strijkstra, Arjen M; Hut, Roelof A; Hoffmann, Ilse E; Millesi, Eva

    2004-01-01

    Daily aboveground activity of European ground squirrels (Spermophilus citellus) in their natural habitat was recorded with a visual scanning procedure during the active seasons of 1992 and 1993. Activity patterns were analyzed with respect to time of year and to the animal's reproductive state. Aboveground activity started on average 3.9 h (SD 0.6 h, n = 37 days) after civil twilight at dawn and ended on average 3.2 h (SD 0.9 h, n = 37 days) before civil twilight at dusk. Between onset and offset of activity, 54% was spent aboveground, of which 73% was spent foraging. Activity patterns were influenced by photoperiod, rainfall, and by reproductive state. During mating, reproductively active males started activity earlier than females and reproductively inactive males. For females, time spent foraging was high during lactation. The midpoint of daily activity was at 12:16 h (SD 0.37 h, n = 37 days). Activity patterns of European ground squirrels thus appear robustly positioned in the middle of the photoperiod. PMID:15129824

  11. Experimental Deformation of Olivine Single Crystal at Mantle P and T: Pressure Effect on Olivine Dislocation Slip-System Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, R.; Girard, J.; Chen, J.; Amiguet, E.

    2008-12-01

    Seismic velocity anisotropies observed in the upper mantle are interpreted from lattice preferred orientations (LPO) produced experimentally in olivine, which depends on the dominant dislocation slip systems. At low pressure P<3 GPa, mantle temperature (T) and in dry conditions, olivine [100] dislocation slip dominates the less active [001] slip. This tends to align crystal fast velocity [100] axis with the principal shear direction. Yet recent high-pressure deformation experiments (Couvy et al., 2004, EJM, 16, 877; Raterron et al., 2007, Am. Min., 92, 1436; Raterron et al., 2008, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2008.07.026) show that [001](010) slip system dominates [100](010) system in the (P,T) range of the deep upper mantle. This may promote a shear-parallel slow-velocity [001] axis and may explain the seismic-velocity attenuation observed at depth >200 km (Mainprice et al., 2005, Nature, 433, 731). In order to further constrain the effect of P on olivine slip system activities, which is classically quantified by the activation volume V* in power creep laws, deformation experiments were carried out in poor water condition, at P>5 GPa and T=1400°C, on pure forsterite (Fo100) and San Carlos olivine crystals, using the Deformation-DIA apparatus at the X17B2 beamline of the NSLS (Upton, NY). Ten crystals were oriented in order to active either [100] slip alone or [001] slip alone in (010) plane, or both [100](001) and [001](100) systems together. Constant applied stress σ <300 MPa and specimen strain rates were monitored in situ using time-resolved x-ray diffraction and radiography, respectively, for a total of 27 investigated steady state conditions. The obtained rheological data were compared with data previously obtained in comparable T and σ conditions, but at room P, by Darot and Gueguen (1981, JGR, 86, 6219) for Fo100 and by Bai et al. (1991, JGR, 96, 2441) for San Carlos olivine. This new set of data confirms previous deformation data

  12. Relationships Between Muscle Activity and Anteroposterior Ground Reaction Forces in Hemiparetic Walking

    PubMed Central

    Turns, Lindsey J.; Neptune, Richard R.; Kautz, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine relationships between muscle activity and propulsive impulse in hemiparetic walking. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Gait analysis laboratory. Participants Forty-nine poststroke patients with chronic hemiparesis, stratified into hemiparetic severity subgroups based on Brunnstrom stages of motor recovery, walking at their self-selected speed. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Percent of muscle activity in the paretic and nonparetic legs and net anteroposterior (AP) ground reaction force impulse (ie, the time integral of the AP ground reaction force) within 4 regions of the stance phase (first double support, first and second halves of single support, and second double support). Results Medial gastrocnemius and soleus muscle activity correlated positively with paretic propulsion in the second half of single support and double support across all subjects and subjects grouped by hemiparetic severity. Tibialis anterior correlated negatively with paretic propulsion during preswing across all subjects and for subjects with moderate and severe hemiparesis. Rectus femoris activity also correlated negatively with preswing propulsion for the severe group. Uniarticular knee extensor activity correlated only with increased paretic braking in the first double-support phase for the severe hemiparesis group. Nonparetic leg muscle activity correlated with propulsive impulses across all subjects, but not within the severe group exclusively. Conclusions Paretic propulsion is strongly associated with increased plantarflexor activity and also negatively associated with increased leg flexor activity, especially in the severe hemiparesis group. These results suggest that exaggerated flexor muscle activity may counteract the effects of the plantarflexors by offloading the leg and interfering with the limb’s ability to generate appropriate AP ground reaction forces. There is also evidence for specific relationships between paretic braking and

  13. Active deformation of the northern front of the Eastern Great Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niviere, Bertrand; Gagala, Lukasz; Callot, Jean-Paul; Regard, Vincent; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude

    2016-04-01

    The Arabia-Eurasia collision involved a mosaic of island arcs and microcontinents. Their accretion to the complex paleogeographic margin of Neotethys was marked by numerous collisional events. The Greater Caucasus constitute the northernmost tectonic element of this tectonic collage, developed as a back arc extensional zone now inverted, which relationships to the onset of Arabia-Eurasia continental collision and/or to the reorganization of the Arabia-Eurasia plate boundary at ˜5 Ma remain controversial. Structurally, the Greater Caucasus are a former continental back arc rift, now the locus of ongoing continental shortening. Modern geodetic observations suggest that in the west, the strain north of the Armenian Plateau is accommodated almost exclusively along the margins of the Greater Caucasus. This differs from regions further east where strain accommodation is distributed across both the Lesser and Greater Caucasus, and within the Greater Caucasus range, with a unique southward vergence. We question here the amount and mechanisms by which the Eastern Greater Caucasus accommodate part of the Arabia-Eurasia convergence. Morphostructural analysis of the folded late Pleistocene marine terrace along the northern slope of the Eastern Greater Caucasus evidences an on going tectonic activity in the area where GPS measurements record no motion. Most of the recent foreland deformation is accommodated by south-vergent folds and thrust, i. e. opposite to the vergence of the Caucasus frontal northern thrust. A progressive unconformity in the folded beds shows that it was already active during the late Pliocene. Cosmogenic dating of the terrace and kinematic restoration of the remnant terrace, linked to the subsurface geology allows for the estimation of a shortening rate ranging from a few mm/yr to 1 cm/yr over the last 5 Myr along the greater Caucasus northern front. Thus more than one third of the shortening between the Kura block / Lesser Caucasus domain and the Stable

  14. Decrease in red blood cell deformability is associated with a reduction in RBC-NOS activation during storage.

    PubMed

    Grau, Marijke; Friederichs, Petra; Krehan, Sebastian; Koliamitra, Christina; Suhr, Frank; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2015-07-16

    During storage, red blood cells (RBC) become more susceptible to hemolysis and it has also been shown that RBC deformability, which is influenced by RBC nitric oxide synthase (RBC-NOS) activity, decreases during blood storage while a correlation between these two parameters under storage conditions has not been investigated so far. Therefore, blood from 15 male volunteers was anticoagulated, leuko-reduced and stored as either concentrated RBC or RBC diluted in saline-adenine-glucose-mannitol (SAGM) for eight weeks at 4°C and results were compared to data obtained from freshly drawn blood. During storage, decrease of RBC deformability was related to increased mean cellular volume and increased cell lysis but also to a decrease in RBC-NOS activation. The changes were more pronounced in concentrated RBC than in RBC diluted in SAGM suggesting that the storage method affects the quality of blood. These data shed new light on mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of storage lesion and reveal that RBC-NOS activation and possibly nitric oxide production in RBC are key elements that are influenced by storage and in turn alter deformability. Further studies should therefore also focus on improving these parameters during storage to improve the quality of stored blood with respect to blood transfusion.

  15. Definition of the time-space propagation of ground deformation of the instable Eastern Flank of Mt.Etna between 2007 and 2010 from ALOS PALSAR InSAR data and comparison with CGPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandura, Danila; Cannavò, Flavio; Aloisi, Marco; Bruno, Valentina; Mattia, Mario; Weigmuller, Urs

    2013-04-01

    In this work we apply techniques of image processing to analyze 19 ALOS PALSAR images covering the time interval between 27 January 2007 and 07 may 2010 in order to analyze the time-space propagation of the ground deformation at the Eastern Flank of Mt. Etna. The proposed methodology compares one image to another, with the aim to find changes in the spatial location of deformation. This allows us to estimate the direction and the amplitude of the time-space propagation of ground deformation calculating a pre-defined distance between two Gaussian distributions. The main result of this kind of analysis is the confirm that the instable Eastern Flank of Mt. Etna is undergoing to an effect of rotation. In particular our work shows an area of clockwise rotation which extends in the eastern flank, bounded approximately to the North by the North-East Rift and the Pernicana fault system, to the North-East by the Ripe della Naca fault scarps and to the East by the Timpe fault system. In correspondence with these structures the rotation reverses and becomes counter-clockwise. These effects of rotations are strongly controlled by the main tectonic features acting as real barriers to the propagation of the deformation. Finally we have compared these results with the analysis of the strain parameters calculated starting from the CGPS data of the 38-stations "Etna@net" network, covering the same time span of the ALOS data. This comparison has also confirmed the presence of a main rotation of the eastern flank and the difference of motion between different sectors of this instable flank.

  16. Regolith Activation on the Lunar Surface and Its Ground Test Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the surfaces of lunar regolith particles can occur through interactions with solar electromagnetic radiation, solar and galactic particle radiation and micrometeoroid bombardment. An attempt has been made to quantify the relative importance of each of those effects. The effects of these activated surfaces may be to enhance the adhesion and toxicity of the particles. Also key to the importance of activation is the lifetimes of activated states in various environments which is controlled by their passivation rate as well as their activation rate. Although techniques exist to characterize the extent of activation of particles in biological system, it is important to be able to quantify the activation state on the lunar surface, in ground-test vacuum systems, and in habitat atmospheres as well.

  17. SPoRT's Participation in the GOES-R Proving Ground Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary; Fuell, Kevin; Smith, Matthew; Stano, Geoffrey; Molthan, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The next generation geostationary satellite, GOES-R, will carry two new instruments with unique atmospheric and surface observing capabilities, the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), to study short-term weather processes. The ABI will bring enhanced multispectral observing capabilities with frequent refresh rates for regional and full disk coverage to geostationary orbit to address many existing and new forecast challenges. The GLM will, for the first time, provide the continuous monitoring of total lightning flashes over a hemispherical region from space. NOAA established the GOES-R Proving Ground activity several years ago to demonstrate the new capabilities of these instruments and to prepare forecasters for their day one use. Proving Ground partners work closely with algorithm developers and the end user community to develop and transition proxy data sets representing GOES-R observing capabilities. This close collaboration helps to maximize refine algorithms leading to the delivery of a product that effectively address a forecast challenge. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program has been a participant in the NOAA GOES-R Proving Ground activity by developing and disseminating selected GOES-R proxy products to collaborating WFOs and National Centers. Established in 2002 to demonstrate the weather and forecasting application of real-time EOS measurements, the SPoRT program has grown to be an end-to-end research to operations activity focused on the use of advanced NASA modeling and data assimilation approaches, nowcasting techniques, and unique high-resolution multispectral data from EOS satellites to improve short-term weather forecasts on a regional and local scale. Participation in the Proving Ground activities extends SPoRT s activities and taps its experience and expertise in diagnostic weather analysis, short-term weather forecasting, and the transition of research and experimental

  18. SPoRT's Participation in the GOES-R Proving Ground Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlovec, G.; Fuell, K.; Smith, M. R.; Stano, G. T.; Molthan, A.

    2011-12-01

    The next generation geostationary satellite, GOES-R, will carry two new instruments with unique atmospheric and surface observing capabilities, the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), to study short-term weather processes. The ABI will bring enhanced multispectral observing capabilities with frequent refresh rates for regional and full disk coverage to geostationary orbit to address many existing and new forecast challenges. The GLM will, for the first time, provide the continuous monitoring of total lightning flashes over a hemispherical region from space. NOAA established the GOES-R Proving Ground activity several years ago to demonstrate the new capabilities of these instruments and to prepare forecasters for their day one use. Proving Ground partners work closely with algorithm developers and the end user community to develop and transition proxy data sets representing GOES-R observing capabilities. This close collaboration helps to maximize refine algorithms leading to the delivery of a product that effectively address a forecast challenge. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program has been a participant in the NOAA GOES-R Proving Ground activity by developing and disseminating selected GOES-R proxy products to collaborating WFOs and National Centers. Established in 2002 to demonstrate the weather and forecasting application of real-time EOS measurements, the SPoRT program has grown to be an end-to-end research to operations activity focused on the use of advanced NASA modeling and data assimilation approaches, nowcasting techniques, and unique high-resolution multispectral data from EOS satellites to improve short-term weather forecasts on a regional and local scale. Participation in the Proving Ground activities extends SPoRT's activities and taps its experience and expertise in diagnostic weather analysis, short-term weather forecasting, and the transition of research and experimental

  19. System safety activities supporting an aero-space plane ground support technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Steven F.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of the specific system safety activities required to support the ground support technology program associated with the design of an aerospace plane. Safe zones must be assessed to ensure that explosive safety requirements are attained to protect the vehicle, personnel, and support and operational facilities. Attention is given to the specific and unique design requirements connected with the utilization of cryogenic fuels as they apply to the design and development of an aerospace plane.

  20. Active deformations of the Jura arc inferred by GPS and seismotectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, Mickael; Sue, Christian; Walpersdorf, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The Jura Mountain is the most recent expression of the alpine orogeny. At the northern end of the western Alps, its recent deformation is still a matter of debates. GPS data available in the Jura bear witness of disagreement between studies, as interpretations vary from uplifted belt to arc-parallel extension (Walpersdorf, et al., 2006) and very slow horizontal movements. Moreover, the traditionally accepted model of an active collisional activity of the Jura, in the dynamic continuity of the Alps, rises up the matter of its geodynamic origin. Indeed, the European Alps are in a post-collisional regime characterized by isostatic-related extension and uplift driven by interaction between buoyancy forces and erosional dynamics (e.g. Sue et al. 2007; Champagnac, et al., 2007; Vernant, et al., 2013.). We present a reappraisal of published focal mechanisms combined with a new GPS solution over the entire arc and surrounding areas. Although the Jura presents a low seismic activity, 53 focal mechanisms over the Jura have been inverted in order to infer the current stress field. Anyhow, we tested several combinations of f.m. inversions, by structural zones, in order to test the regional stress stability. It appears that the current stress field is very stable all over the arc, and following our different sub-datasets. Indeed, the stress field shows a stable near horizontal NW-SE-oriented s1, associated to a NE-SW-oriented s3. Therefore, the structural arc of the Jura seems to have very low or no impact in terms of current stress. Complementarily, we present preliminary velocity and strain fields from a GPS network composed of 25 permanent stations implemented between 1998 and 2014 all around the Jura arc. Indeed, we also integrated the recent GPS-JURA station (OSU THETA Besançon), but they are still too young to accurately constrain the strain of the belt. Preliminary results exhibit very slow velocities across the arc in term of baselines evolution, with infra

  1. Crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Kristine M.

    1995-07-01

    Geodetic measurements of crustal deformation provide direct tests of geophysical models which are used to describe the dynamics of the Earth. Although geodetic observations have been made throughout history, only in the last several hundred years have they been sufficiently precise for geophysical studies. In the 19th century, these techniques included leveling and triangulation. Approximately 25 years ago, trilateration measurements were initiated by the USGS (United States Geological Survey) to monitor active faults in the United States. Several years later, NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) begin an effort to measure plate tectonic motions on a global scale, using space geodetic techniques, VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) and SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging). The period covered by this report to the IUGG, 1991-1994, was a transition period in the field of crustal deformation. Trilateration measurements (previously the backbone of measurements across plate boundaries in the western United States and Alaska) have been abandoned. This system was labor-intensive, involved highly trained crews to carry out the observations, and only measured the length between sites. In addition, NASA drastically cut the budgets for VLBI and SLR during this period. Fixed site VLBI systems are still operational, but mobile VLBI measurements in North America have ceased. SLR measurements continue on a global scale, but the remaining crustal deformation measurements are now being made with the Global Positioning System (GPS). Nonetheless, because of the time scales involved, older geodetic data (including leveling, triangulation, and trilateration) continue to be important for many geophysical studies.

  2. Volumetric deformation of live cells induced by pressure-activated cross-membrane ion transport.

    PubMed

    Hui, T H; Zhou, Z L; Qian, J; Lin, Y; Ngan, A H W; Gao, H

    2014-09-12

    In this work, we developed a method that allows precise control over changes in the size of a cell via hydrostatic pressure changes in the medium. Specifically, we show that a sudden increase, or reduction, in the surrounding pressure, in the physiologically relevant range, triggers cross-membrane fluxes of sodium and potassium ions in leukemia cell lines K562 and HL60, resulting in reversible volumetric deformation with a characteristic time of around 30 min. Interestingly, healthy leukocytes do not respond to pressure shocks, suggesting that the cancer cells may have evolved the ability to adapt to pressure changes in their microenvironment. A model is also proposed to explain the observed cell deformation, which highlights how the apparent viscoelastic response of cells is governed by the microscopic cross-membrane transport.

  3. Volumetric Deformation of Live Cells Induced by Pressure-Activated Cross-Membrane Ion Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, T. H.; Zhou, Z. L.; Qian, J.; Lin, Y.; Ngan, A. H. W.; Gao, H.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we developed a method that allows precise control over changes in the size of a cell via hydrostatic pressure changes in the medium. Specifically, we show that a sudden increase, or reduction, in the surrounding pressure, in the physiologically relevant range, triggers cross-membrane fluxes of sodium and potassium ions in leukemia cell lines K562 and HL60, resulting in reversible volumetric deformation with a characteristic time of around 30 min. Interestingly, healthy leukocytes do not respond to pressure shocks, suggesting that the cancer cells may have evolved the ability to adapt to pressure changes in their microenvironment. A model is also proposed to explain the observed cell deformation, which highlights how the apparent viscoelastic response of cells is governed by the microscopic cross-membrane transport.

  4. Ground state destabilization by anionic nucleophiles contributes to the activity of phosphoryl transfer enzymes.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Logan D; Fenn, Tim D; Herschlag, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Enzymes stabilize transition states of reactions while limiting binding to ground states, as is generally required for any catalyst. Alkaline Phosphatase (AP) and other nonspecific phosphatases are some of Nature's most impressive catalysts, achieving preferential transition state over ground state stabilization of more than 10²²-fold while utilizing interactions with only the five atoms attached to the transferred phosphorus. We tested a model that AP achieves a portion of this preference by destabilizing ground state binding via charge repulsion between the anionic active site nucleophile, Ser102, and the negatively charged phosphate monoester substrate. Removal of the Ser102 alkoxide by mutation to glycine or alanine increases the observed Pi affinity by orders of magnitude at pH 8.0. To allow precise and quantitative comparisons, the ionic form of bound P(i) was determined from pH dependencies of the binding of Pi and tungstate, a P(i) analog lacking titratable protons over the pH range of 5-11, and from the ³¹P chemical shift of bound P(i). The results show that the Pi trianion binds with an exceptionally strong femtomolar affinity in the absence of Ser102, show that its binding is destabilized by ≥10⁸-fold by the Ser102 alkoxide, and provide direct evidence for ground state destabilization. Comparisons of X-ray crystal structures of AP with and without Ser102 reveal the same active site and P(i) binding geometry upon removal of Ser102, suggesting that the destabilization does not result from a major structural rearrangement upon mutation of Ser102. Analogous Pi binding measurements with a protein tyrosine phosphatase suggest the generality of this ground state destabilization mechanism. Our results have uncovered an important contribution of anionic nucleophiles to phosphoryl transfer catalysis via ground state electrostatic destabilization and an enormous capacity of the AP active site for specific and strong recognition of the phosphoryl group in

  5. InSAR analysis of surface deformation over permafrost to estimate active layer thickness based on one-dimensional heat transfer model of soils.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiwei; Zhao, Rong; Hu, Jun; Wen, Lianxing; Feng, Guangcai; Zhang, Zeyu; Wang, Qijie

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method to estimate active layer thickness (ALT) over permafrost based on InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) observation and the heat transfer model of soils. The time lags between the periodic feature of InSAR-observed surface deformation over permafrost and the meteorologically recorded temperatures are assumed to be the time intervals that the temperature maximum to diffuse from the ground surface downward to the bottom of the active layer. By exploiting the time lags and the one-dimensional heat transfer model of soils, we estimate the ALTs. Using the frozen soil region in southern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) as examples, we provided a conceptual demonstration of the estimation of the InSAR pixel-wise ALTs. In the case study, the ALTs are ranging from 1.02 to 3.14 m and with an average of 1.95 m. The results are compatible with those sparse ALT observations/estimations by traditional methods, while with extraordinary high spatial resolution at pixel level (~40 meter). The presented method is simple, and can potentially be used for deriving high-resolution ALTs in other remote areas similar to QTP, where only sparse observations are available now. PMID:26480892

  6. InSAR analysis of surface deformation over permafrost to estimate active layer thickness based on one-dimensional heat transfer model of soils

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiwei; Zhao, Rong; Hu, Jun; Wen, Lianxing; Feng, Guangcai; Zhang, Zeyu; Wang, Qijie

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method to estimate active layer thickness (ALT) over permafrost based on InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) observation and the heat transfer model of soils. The time lags between the periodic feature of InSAR-observed surface deformation over permafrost and the meteorologically recorded temperatures are assumed to be the time intervals that the temperature maximum to diffuse from the ground surface downward to the bottom of the active layer. By exploiting the time lags and the one-dimensional heat transfer model of soils, we estimate the ALTs. Using the frozen soil region in southern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) as examples, we provided a conceptual demonstration of the estimation of the InSAR pixel-wise ALTs. In the case study, the ALTs are ranging from 1.02 to 3.14 m and with an average of 1.95 m. The results are compatible with those sparse ALT observations/estimations by traditional methods, while with extraordinary high spatial resolution at pixel level (~40 meter). The presented method is simple, and can potentially be used for deriving high-resolution ALTs in other remote areas similar to QTP, where only sparse observations are available now. PMID:26480892

  7. Persistent inflation at Aira caldera accompanying explosive activity at Sakurajima volcano: Constraining deformation source parameters from Finite Element inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, James; Gottsmann, Jo; Iguchi, Masato; Nakamichi, Haruhisa

    2015-04-01

    Aira caldera is located within Kagoshima Bay at the southern end of Kyushu, Japan. Sakurajima is an active post-caldera andesitic stratovolcano that sits on the caldera's southern rim. Despite frequent Vulcanian-type explosive activity, the area is experiencing continued uplift at a maximum rate of approximately 1.5 cm/yr with a footprint of 40 km, indicating that magma is being supplied faster than it is erupted. This is of particular concern as the amplitude of deformation is approaching the level inferred prior to the 1914 VEI 4 eruption. Using GPS data from 1996 - 2007 we explore causes for the uplift. To solve for the optimum deformation source parameters we use an inverse Finite Element method accounting for three-dimensional material heterogeneity (inferred from seismic tomography) and the surrounding topography of the region. The same inversions are also carried out using Finite Element models that incorporate simplified homogeneous or one-dimensional subsurface material properties, with and without topography. Results from the comparison of the six different models show statistically significant differences in the inferred deformation sources. This indicates that both subsurface heterogeneity and surface topography are essential in geodetic modelling to extract the most realistic deformation source parameters. The current best-fit source sits within a seismic low-velocity zone in the north-east of the caldera at a depth of approximately 14 km with a volume increase of 1.2 x 108 m3. The source location underlies a region of active underwater fumaroles within the Wakamiko crater and differs significantly from previous analytical modelling results. Seismic data further highlights areas of high seismic attenuation as well as large aseismic zones, both of which could allude to inelastic behaviour and a significant heat source at depth. To integrate these observations, subsequent forward Finite Element models will quantify the importance of rheology and

  8. Active intraplate deformation as geodynamic responses to oblique shallow subduction of a flat slab: example from central and southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Sato, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    Subduction of a flat slab has been recognized as one of the primary driving mechanism of wide intracontinental subsidence farther away from the subduction leading edge in many subduction margins. In most cases, however, quantitative and qualitative limitations on chronological constraints prevent comprehensive understanding of these geodynamic linkages. In this study, we show distinct, geologic and seismic evidence for spatial and temporal correlation between plate subduction and intercontinental deformation, mainly driven by dynamic interaction between subducting Philippine Sea (PHS) plate and overriding continental crusts of central and southwest Japan (Eurasian plate) along the Nankai-Tonankai subduction zone since Pliocene. Based on analyses of Pliocene to Pleistocene tectonic histories by use of rich dataset of Neogene stratigraphy, drainage network evolution, and shallow to deep seismic reflection profiles, depocenters of wide sedimentary basins and active thrusting have migrated northward since ca. 5 Ma to present from forearc to backarc of the southwest Japan arc. Median tectonic line, active dextral strike-slip fault as a forearc sliver along the Nankai, is located north of the upward extension of the downdip limit of the interseismic locked zone. Southwest Japan north of the MTL, underlain by the subducting slab with steady state slip (Nakanishi et al., 2002; Kodaira et al., 2004), appears tectonically less inactive than central Japan and has behaved as a less deformed rigid block. Contrastingly, Quaternary active intraplate deformation has been prominent north of the inactive MTL above a shallow flat segment of the PHS plate along the Tonankai. Deep seismic reflection profile images upward corrugated very shallow PHS slab being contact with continental lower crust beneath actively deforming area. We interpreted temporal and spatial correlation of oblique subduction of the shallow and flat, corrugated PHS slab as an essential mechanical role to enhance

  9. Correction of an active space telescope mirror using a deformable mirror in a woofer-tweeter configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Matthew R.; Kim, Jae Jun; Agrawal, Brij N.

    2016-04-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School's segmented mirror telescope (SMT) was developed using prototype silicon carbide active hybrid mirror technology to demonstrate lower cost and rapid manufacture of primary mirror segments for a space telescope. The developmental mirror segments used too few actuators limiting the ability to adequately correct the surface figure error. To address the unintended shortfall of the developmental mirrors, a deformable mirror is added to the SMT and control techniques are developed. The control techniques are similar to woofer-tweeter adaptive optics, where the SMT segment represents the woofer and the deformable mirror represents the tweeter. The optical design of an SMT woofer-tweeter system is presented, and the impacts of field angle magnification on the placement and size of the deformable mirror are analyzed. A space telescope woofer-tweeter wavefront control technique is proposed using a global influence matrix and closed-loop constrained minimization controller. The control technique simultaneously manipulates the woofer and tweeter mirrors. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate a significant improvement in wavefront error of the primary mirror and the control technique shows significant wavefront error improvement compared to sequentially controlling the woofer and tweeter mirrors.

  10. dMODELS: A MATLAB software package for modeling crustal deformation near active faults and volcanic centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Cervelli, Peter F.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a MATLAB software package for the most common models used to interpret deformation measurements near faults and active volcanic centers. The emphasis is on analytical models of deformation that can be compared with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS), InSAR, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal and sill-like magma chambers in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. Dikes and faults are described following the mathematical notation for rectangular dislocations in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. All the expressions have been checked for typographical errors that might have been present in the original literature, extended to include deformation and strain within the Earth's crust (as opposed to only the Earth's surface) and verified against finite element models. A set of GPS measurements from the 2006 eruption at Augustine Volcano (Alaska) is used to test the software package. The results show that the best fit source to the GPS data is a spherical intrusion (ΔV=5×10 km3), about 880 m beneath the volcano's summit.

  11. Evaluation of stiffness and plastic deformation of active ceramic self-ligating bracket clips after repetitive opening and closure movements

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Grace Kelly Martins; Roque, Juliano Alves; Segundo, Aguinaldo Silva Garcez; Suzuki, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess whether repetitive opening and closure of self-ligating bracket clips can cause plastic deformation of the clip. METHODS: Three types of active/interactive ceramic self-ligating brackets (n = 20) were tested: In-Ovation C, Quicklear and WOW. A standardized controlled device performed 500 cycles of opening and closure movements of the bracket clip with proper instruments and techniques adapted as recommended by the manufacturer of each bracket type. Two tensile tests, one before and one after the repetitive cycles, were performed to assess the stiffness of the clips. To this end, a custom-made stainless steel 0.40 x 0.40 mm wire was inserted into the bracket slot and adapted to the universal testing machine (EMIC DL2000), after which measurements were recorded. On the loading portion of the loading-unloading curve of clips, the slope fitted a first-degree equation curve to determine the stiffness/deflection rate of the clip. RESULTS: The results of plastic deformation showed no significant difference among bracket types before and after the 500 cycles of opening and closure (p = 0.811). There were significant differences on stiffness among the three types of brackets (p = 0.005). The WOW bracket had higher mean values, whereas Quicklear bracket had lower values, regardless of the opening/closure cycle. CONCLUSION: Repetitive controlled opening and closure movements of the clip did not alter stiffness or cause plastic deformation. PMID:26352844

  12. Effect of Tungsten on Primary Creep Deformation and Minimum Creep Rate of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, Kinkar; Mathew, M. D.

    2014-10-01

    Effect of tungsten on transient creep deformation and minimum creep rate of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel has been assessed. Tungsten content in the 9Cr-RAFM steel has been varied between 1 and 2 wt pct, and creep tests were carried out over the stress range of 180 and 260 MPa at 823 K (550 °C). The tempered martensitic steel exhibited primary creep followed by tertiary stage of creep deformation with a minimum in creep deformation rate. The primary creep behavior has been assessed based on the Garofalo relationship, , considering minimum creep rate instead of steady-state creep rate . The relationships between (i) rate of exhaustion of transient creep r' with minimum creep rate, (ii) rate of exhaustion of transient creep r' with time to reach minimum creep rate, and (iii) initial creep rate with minimum creep rate revealed that the first-order reaction-rate theory has prevailed throughout the transient region of the RAFM steel having different tungsten contents. The rate of exhaustion of transient creep r' and minimum creep rate decreased, whereas the transient strain ɛ T increased with increase in tungsten content. A master transient creep curve of the steels has been developed considering the variation of with . The effect of tungsten on the variation of minimum creep rate with applied stress has been rationalized by invoking the back-stress concept.

  13. Active deformation and engineering analysis of CFRP mirror of various lay-up sequences within quasi-isotropic laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chunmei; Yu, Xia; Guo, Peiji

    2014-08-01

    A regularization stiffness coefficient method was verified further to optimize lay-up sequences of quasi-isotropic laminates for carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite mirrors. Firstly, the deformation due to gravity of 1G and temperature difference of 20-100°C and the modal were analyzed by finite element method (FEM). Secondly, the influence of angle error of ply stacking on quasi-isotropic of bending stiffness was evaluated. Finally, an active support system of 49 actuators in circular arrangement is designed for a 500mm CFRP mirror, and its goal is to deform the spherical CFRP mirror to a parabolic. Therefore, the response functions of the actuators were gotten, and the surface form errors and stresses were calculated and analyzed. The results show that the CFRP mirrors designed by the method have a better symmetrical bending deformation under gravity and thermal load and a higher fundamental frequency, and the larger n the better symmetry (for π/n quasi-isotropic laminates); the method reduces the sensitivity to misalignment of ply orientation for symmetric bending, and the mirror's maximum von Mises stress and maximum shear stress are less compared to those laminates not optimized in lay-up sequence.

  14. Mechanics of Magnetostrictive Thin Film Deformation and its Application in Active X-ray Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoli

    High quality imaging system of telescopes in astronomy requires innovations to remove or correct the mid-spatial frequency (MSF) ripples on the mirror surface of lightweight optics. When the telescope is sent to the space, its launch mass is the key point to limit its collecting area. Therefore, the lightweight optics (100-150 mum thick electroplated nickel/cobalt, or 200-400 mum thick glass) is considered to be employed. However, the surface profile of the thin optical surface can't be polished to extremely high accuracy. Instead, the profile is expected to be corrected by applying voltage or magnetic field to drive the coating of smart materials (piezo or magnetostrictive materials) on the back side of the mirrors. During the process, the surface profile correction by the local stress on the 2-d surface is challenging. Both the measurements and the theoretical prediction of the surface profiles after correction are investigated. As a first step in the development of tools to predict the deformation of the coated glass strip samples (20x5x0.1 mm), one commercial magnetically smart material (MSM) was deposited on the samples by the magnetron sputtering method. One experimental setup was established to measure the deflections of these coated samples under an external magnetic field by Zygo NewView white light interferometry (WLI). These deflections agreed well with the results from the developed analytical and numerical analysis under various magnetic field strengths. In the further research, more efforts were made to analyze the full three-dimensional deformation behavior of MSM thin films on a square glass sample (50x50x0.2 mm). With the magnetic field applied, the 2-d surface profile of the coated glass sample was measured by WLI. To better study the deformation of the sample coated with MSMs, a finite element method (FEM) and a theoretical model were developed to predict the deformation of the sample with local misfit strains. The results calculated form the FEM

  15. Microtopographic and depth controls on active layer chemistry in Arctic polygonal ground

    DOE PAGES

    Newman, Brent D.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Graham, David E.; Gu, Baohua; Hubbard, Susan S.; Liang, Liyuan; Wu, Yuxin; Heikoop, J. M.; Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; et al

    2015-03-24

    Polygonal ground is a signature characteristic of Arctic lowlands, and carbon release from permafrost thaw can alter feedbacks to Arctic ecosystems and climate. This study describes the first comprehensive spatial examination of active layer biogeochemistry that extends across high- and low-centered, ice wedge polygons, their features, and with depth. Water chemistry measurements of 54 analytes were made on surface and active layer pore waters collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA. Significant differences were observed between high- and low-centered polygons suggesting that polygon types may be useful for landscape-scale geochemical classification. However, differences were found for polygon features (centers and troughs) formore » analytes that were not significant for polygon type, suggesting that finer-scale features affect biogeochemistry differently from polygon types. Depth variations were also significant, demonstrating important multidimensional aspects of polygonal ground biogeochemistry. These results have major implications for understanding how polygonal ground ecosystems function, and how they may respond to future change.« less

  16. Sequential growth of deformation bands in carbonate grainstones in the hangingwall of an active growth fault: Implications for deformation mechanisms in different tectonic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotevatn, Atle; Thorsheim, Elin; Bastesen, Eivind; Fossmark, Heidi S. S.; Torabi, Anita; Sælen, Gunnar

    2016-09-01

    Deformation bands in porous sandstones have been extensively studied for four decades, whereas comparatively less is known about deformation bands in porous carbonate rocks, particularly in extensional settings. Here, we investigate porous grainstones of the Globigerina Limestone Formation in Malta, which contain several types of deformation bands in the hangingwall of the Maghlaq Fault: (i) bed-parallel pure compaction bands (PCB); (ii) pressure solution-dominated compactive shear bands (SCSB) and iii) cataclasis-dominated compactive shear bands (CCSB). Geometric and kinematic analyses show that the bands formed sequentially in the hangingwall of the evolving Maghlaq growth fault. PCBs formed first due to fault-controlled subsidence and vertical loading; a (semi-)tectonic control on PCB formation is thus documented for the first time in an extensional setting. Pressure solution (dominating SCSBs) and cataclasis (dominating CCSBs) appear to have operated separately, and not in concert. Our findings therefore suggest that, in some carbonate rocks, cataclasis within deformation bands may develop irrespective of whether pressure solution processes are involved. We suggest this may be related to stress state, and that whereas pressure solution is a significant facilitator of grain size reduction in contractional settings, grain size reduction within deformation bands in extensional settings is less dependent on pressure solution processes.

  17. Ground subsidence and associated ground fracturing in urban areas: InSAR monitoring of active tectonic structures (Ciudad Guzman, Colima Graben - Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bignami, C.; Brunori, C.; Zucca, F.; Groppelli, G.; Norini, G.; Hernandez, N. D.; Stramondo, S.

    2013-12-01

    This study focuses on the observation of a creeping phenomenon that produces subsidence of the Zapotlan basin and ground fracturing in correspondence of the Ciudad Guzmàn (Jalisco - Mexico). The September 21, 2012, the Ciudad Guzmàn has been struck by a phenomenon of ground fracturing of about 1.5 km of length. This event caused the deformation of the roads and the damage of 30 houses, of which eight have been declared uninhabitable. The alignment of fractures is coincident with the escarpments produced in September 19, 1985, in the Ciudad Guzman urban area, when a strong earthquake, magnitude 8.1, struck the Mexican area, causing the deaths of at least 10,000 people and serious damage in Mexico City. In Ciudad Guzmán, about 60% of the buildings were destroyed, with about 50 loss of life. The city is located in the Zapotlan basin (northern Colima graben), a wide tectonic depression where the depth of the infilling sediments is about 1 km. This subsidence cannot be measured outside the urbanized area, but it can be considered as a deformation mechanism of the central part of the basin. In order to detect and mapping the spatio-temporal features of the processes that led to this event, we applied InSAR multi-temporal techniques to analyze a dataset of ENVISAT satellite SAR images, acquired in a time span between 2003-2010. InSAR techniques detect a subsidence of the north-western part of Ciudad Guzmàn of about 15 mm/yr in the time interval 2003-2010. The displacement occurred in September 21, 2012, was detected using two RadarSAT2 acquisitions (2012-03-22 and 2013-03-17). The explanation of surface movements based on interferometric results, ground data and geological field observations, allowed confirming surface effect due to the overexploitation of the aquifers and highlights a subsidence due to anthropogenic causes coupled to buried tectonic structures.

  18. Imaging active faults in a region of distributed deformation from joint focal mechanism and hypocenter clustering: Application to western Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custodio, S.; Lima, V.; Vales, D.; Carrilho, F.; Cesca, S.

    2015-12-01

    Mainland Portugal, on the SW edge of the European continent, is located directly north of the boundary between the Eurasian and Nubian plates. It lies in a region of slow lithospheric deformation, which has generated some of the largest earthquakes in Europe, both intraplate (mainland) and interplate (offshore). The seismicity of mainland Portugal and its adjacent offshore has been repeatedly classified as diffuse. We analyse the instrumental earthquake catalog for western Iberia, enriched with data from recent dense broadband deployments. We show that although the plate boundary south of Portugal is diffuse, in that deformation is accommodated along several distributed faults rather than along one long linear plate boundary, the seismicity itself is not diffuse. Rather, when located using high quality data, earthquakes collapse into well-defined clusters and lineations. We then present a new joint focal mechanism and hypocenter cluster algorithm that is able to extract coherent information between hypocenter locations and focal mechanisms. We apply the method to the Azores-western Mediterranean region, with emphasis on western Iberia. In addition to identifying well-known seismo-tectonic features, the joint clustering algorithm identifies eight new clusters of earthquakes with a good match between the directions of epicentre lineations and focal mechanism fault planes. These clusters may signal single active faults or wider fault zones accommodating a consistent type of faulting. Mainland Portugal is dominated by strike-slip faulting, consistent with the NNE-SSW and WNW-ESE oriented lineations. The region offshore SW Iberia displays clusters that are either predominantly strike-slip or reverse, indicating slip partitioning. This work shows that the study of low-magnitude earthquakes using dense seismic deployments is a powerful tool to study lithospheric deformation in slowly deforming regions, where high-magnitude earthquakes occur with long recurrence intervals.

  19. Ground-water recharge through active sand dunes in northwestern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Most water-resource investigations in semiarid basins of the Great Basin in western North America conclude that ground-water recharge from direct precipitation on the valley floor is negligible. However, many of these basins contain large areas covered by unvegetated, active sand dunes that may act as conduits for ground-water recharge. The potential for this previously undocumented recharge was investigated in an area covered by sand dunes in Desert Valley, northwestern Nevada, using a deep percolation model. The model uses daily measurements of precipitation and temperature to determine energy and moisture balance, from which estimates of long-term mean annual recharge are made. For the study area, the model calculated a mean annual recharge rate of as much as 1.3 inches per year, or 17 percent of the long-term mean precipitation. Model simulations also indicate that recharge would be virtually zero if the study area were covered by vegetation rather than dunes.

  20. Suspension of mitotic activity in dentate gyrus of the hibernating ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Popov, Victor I; Kraev, Igor V; Ignat'ev, Dmitri A; Stewart, Michael G

    2011-01-01

    Neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian hippocampus, a region of the brain important for learning and memory. Hibernation in Siberian ground squirrels provides a natural model to study mitosis as the rapid fall in body temperature in 24 h (from 35-36°C to +4-6°C) permits accumulation of mitotic cells at different stages of the cell cycle. Histological methods used to study adult neurogenesis are limited largely to fixed tissue, and the mitotic state elucidated depends on the specific phase of mitosis at the time of day. However, using an immunohistochemical study of doublecortin (DCX) and BrdU-labelled neurons, we demonstrate that the dentate gyrus of the ground squirrel hippocampus contains a population of immature cells which appear to possess mitotic activity. Our data suggest that doublecortin-labelled immature cells exist in a mitotic state and may represent a renewable pool for generation of new neurons within the dentate gyrus.

  1. Character and origins of ground rupturing and ground deformation during the 28 June 1992 Landers, California earthquake (as well as the 1989 Loma Prieta and 1994 Northridge earthquakes). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.M.

    1996-09-17

    The overall objective of the research has been to understand the form and significance of surface rupture produced by earthquakes. Specific objectives are to describe fracturing and other manifestations of broad belts of ground rupture during the Landers earthquake and to mechanically analyze the structures that form along the belts. The author has learned much about ground rupture during earthquakes, even though he has studied only three earthquakes to date: Loma Prieta, Landers and Northridge.

  2. Deep soil compaction as a method of ground improvement and to stabilization of wastes and slopes with danger of liquefaction, determining the modulus of deformation and shear strength parameters of loose rock.

    PubMed

    Lersow, M

    2001-01-01

    For the stabilization of dumps with the construction of hidden dams and for building ground improvement, for instance for traffic lines over dumps, nearly all applied compaction methods have the aim to reduce the pore volume in the loose rock. With these methods, a homogenization of the compacted loose rock will be obtained too. The compaction methods of weight compaction by falling weight, compaction by vibration and compaction by blasting have been introduced, and their applications and efficiencies have been shown. For the estimation of the effective depth of the compaction and for a safe planning of the bearing layer, respectively, the necessary material parameters have to be determined for each deep compaction method. Proposals for the determination of these parameters have been made within this paper. In connection with the stabilization of flow-slide-prone dump slopes, as well as for the improvement of dump areas for the use as building ground, it is necessary to assess the deformation behavior and the bearing capacity. To assess the resulting building ground improvement, deformation indexes (assessment of the flow-prone layer) and strength indexes (assessment of the bearing capacity) have to be determined with soil mechanical tests. Förster and Lersow, [Patentschrift DE 197 17 988. Verfahren, auf der Grundlage last- und/oder weggesteuerter Plattendruckversuche auf der Bohrlochsohle, zur Ermittlung des Spannungs-Verformungs-Verhaltens und/oder von Deformationsmoduln und/oder von Festigkeitseigenschaften in verschiedenen Tiefen insbesondere von Lockergesteinen und von Deponiekörpern in situ; Förster W, Lersow M. Plattendruckversuch auf der Bohrlochsohle, Ermittlung des Spannungs-Verformungs-Verhaltens von Lockergestein und Deponiematerial Braunkohle--Surface Mining, 1998;50(4): 369-77; Lersow M. Verfahren zur Ermittlung von Scherfestigkeitsparametern von Lockergestein und Deponiematerial aus Plattendruckversuchen auf der Bohrlochsohle. Braunkohle

  3. Increased Na+/Ca2+ exchanger activity promotes resistance to excitotoxicity in cortical neurons of the ground squirrel (a Hibernator).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan-Juan; Gao, Shan; Jing, Jun-Zhan; Zhu, Ming-Yue; Zhou, Chen; Chai, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Ground squirrel, a hibernating mammalian species, is more resistant to ischemic brain stress than rat. Gaining insight into the adaptive mechanisms of ground squirrels may help us design treatment strategies to reduce brain damage in patients suffering ischemic stroke. To understand the anti-stress mechanisms in ground squirrel neurons, we studied glutamate toxicity in primary cultured neurons of the Daurian ground squirrel (Spermophilus dauricus). At the neuronal level, for the first time, we found that ground squirrel was more resistant to glutamate excitotoxicity than rat. Mechanistically, ground squirrel neurons displayed a similar calcium influx to the rat neurons in response to glutamate or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) perfusion. However, the rate of calcium removal in ground squirrel neurons was markedly faster than in rat neurons. This allows ground squirrel neurons to maintain lower level of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) upon glutamate insult. Moreover, we found that Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) activity was higher in ground squirrel neurons than in rat neurons. We also proved that overexpression of ground squirrel NCX2, rather than NCX1 or NCX3, in rat neurons promoted neuron survival against glutamate toxicity. Taken together, our results indicate that ground squirrel neurons are better at maintaining calcium homeostasis than rat neurons and this is likely achieved through the activity of ground squirrel NCX2. Our findings not only reveal an adaptive mechanism of mammalian hibernators at the cellular level, but also suggest that NCX2 of ground squirrel may have therapeutic value for suppressing brain ischemic damage.

  4. Active crustal deformation of the El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ) using GPS data: Implications in seismic hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staller, Alejandra; Benito, Belen; Jesús Martínez-Díaz, José; Hernández, Douglas; Hernández-Rey, Román; Alonso-Henar, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    El Salvador, Central America, is part of the Chortis block in the northwestern boundary of the Caribbean plate. This block is interacting with a diffuse triple junction point with the Cocos and North American plates. Among the structures that cut the Miocene to Pleistocene volcanic deposits stands out the El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ): It is oriented in N90º-100ºE direction, and it is composed of several structural segments that deform Quaternary deposits with right-lateral and oblique slip motions. The ESFZ is seismically active and capable of producing earthquakes such as the February 13, 2001 with Mw 6.6 (Martínez-Díaz et al., 2004), that seriously affected the population, leaving many casualties. This structure plays an important role in the tectonics of the Chortis block, since its motion is directly related to the drift of the Caribbean plate to the east and not with the partitioning of the deformation of the Cocos subduction (here not coupled) (Álvarez-Gómez et al., 2008). Together with the volcanic arc of El Salvador, this zone constitutes a weakness area that allows the motion of forearc block toward the NW. The geometry and the degree of activity of the ESFZ are not studied enough. However their knowledge is essential to understand the seismic hazard associated to this important seismogenic structure. For this reason, since 2007 a GPS dense network was established along the ESFZ (ZFESNet) in order to obtain GPS velocity measurements which are later used to explain the nature of strain accumulation on major faults along the ESFZ. The current work aims at understanding active crustal deformation of the ESFZ through kinematic model. The results provide significant information to be included in a new estimation of seismic hazard taking into account the major structures in ESFZ.

  5. Ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) diversity, activity density, and community structure in a diversified agroecosystem.

    PubMed

    Hummel, J D; Dosdall, L M; Clayton, G W; Harker, K N; O'Donovan, J T

    2012-02-01

    Diversity and abundance of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) can be enhanced in vegetable and field intercropping systems, but the complexity of polycultures precludes the application of generalized assumptions of effects for novel intercropping combinations. In a field experiment conducted at Lacombe and Ellerslie, Alberta, Canada, in 2005 and 2006, we investigated the effects of intercropping canola (Brassica napus L.) with wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) on the diversity and community structure of carabid beetles, and on the activity density responses of individual carabid species. Shannon-Wiener diversity index scores and species evenness increased significantly as the proportion of wheat comprising total crop plant populations increased in one site-year of the study, indicating a positive response to enhanced crop plant species evenness in the intercrops, and in that same site-year, ground beetle communities in intercrops shifted to more closely approximate those in wheat monocultures as the percentage of wheat in the intercrops increased. Individual carabid species activity densities showed differing responses to intercropping, although activity densities of some potential root maggot (Delia spp.) (Diptera: Anthomyiidae) predators were greater in intercrops with high proportions of wheat than in canola monocultures. The activity density of Pterostichus melanarius (Illiger), the most abundant species collected, tended to be greater in canola monocultures than high-wheat intercrops or wheat monocultures. We conclude that intercrops of canola and wheat have the potential to enhance populations of some carabid species, therefore possibly exerting increased pressure on some canola insect pests.

  6. Opposing Activity Changes in AMP Deaminase and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in the Hibernating Ground Squirrel

    PubMed Central

    Cicerchi, Christina; Garcia, Gabriela E.; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A.; Trostel, Jessica; Jain, Swati; Mant, Colin T.; Rivard, Christopher J.; Ishimoto, Takuji; Shimada, Michiko; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Jani, Alkesh; Stenvinkel, Peter; Martin, Sandra L.; Johnson, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Hibernating animals develop fatty liver when active in summertime and undergo a switch to a fat oxidation state in the winter. We hypothesized that this switch might be determined by AMP and the dominance of opposing effects: metabolism through AMP deaminase (AMPD2) (summer) and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (winter). Liver samples were obtained from 13-lined ground squirrels at different times during the year, including summer and multiples stages of winter hibernation, and fat synthesis and β-fatty acid oxidation were evaluated. Changes in fat metabolism were correlated with changes in AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid (downstream product of AMPD2), as well as changes in AMPK and intrahepatic β-hydroxybutyrate (a marker of fat oxidation). Hepatic fat accumulation occurred during the summer with relatively increased enzymes associated with fat synthesis (FAS, ACL and ACC) and decreased enoyl CoA hydratase (ECH1) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A), rate limiting enzymes of fat oxidation. In summer, AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid levels were high and hepatic AMPK activity was low. In contrast, the active phosphorylated form of AMPK and β-hydroxybutyrate both increased during winter hibernation. Therefore, changes in AMPD2 and AMPK activity were paralleled with changes in fat synthesis and fat oxidation rates during the summer-winter cycle. These data illuminate the opposing forces of metabolism of AMP by AMPD2 and its availability to activate AMPK as a switch that governs fat metabolism in the liver of hibernating ground squirrel. PMID:25856396

  7. Opposing activity changes in AMP deaminase and AMP-activated protein kinase in the hibernating ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Lanaspa, Miguel A; Epperson, L Elaine; Li, Nanxing; Cicerchi, Christina; Garcia, Gabriela E; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A; Trostel, Jessica; Jain, Swati; Mant, Colin T; Rivard, Christopher J; Ishimoto, Takuji; Shimada, Michiko; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Jani, Alkesh; Stenvinkel, Peter; Martin, Sandra L; Johnson, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Hibernating animals develop fatty liver when active in summertime and undergo a switch to a fat oxidation state in the winter. We hypothesized that this switch might be determined by AMP and the dominance of opposing effects: metabolism through AMP deaminase (AMPD2) (summer) and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (winter). Liver samples were obtained from 13-lined ground squirrels at different times during the year, including summer and multiples stages of winter hibernation, and fat synthesis and β-fatty acid oxidation were evaluated. Changes in fat metabolism were correlated with changes in AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid (downstream product of AMPD2), as well as changes in AMPK and intrahepatic β-hydroxybutyrate (a marker of fat oxidation). Hepatic fat accumulation occurred during the summer with relatively increased enzymes associated with fat synthesis (FAS, ACL and ACC) and decreased enoyl CoA hydratase (ECH1) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A), rate limiting enzymes of fat oxidation. In summer, AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid levels were high and hepatic AMPK activity was low. In contrast, the active phosphorylated form of AMPK and β-hydroxybutyrate both increased during winter hibernation. Therefore, changes in AMPD2 and AMPK activity were paralleled with changes in fat synthesis and fat oxidation rates during the summer-winter cycle. These data illuminate the opposing forces of metabolism of AMP by AMPD2 and its availability to activate AMPK as a switch that governs fat metabolism in the liver of hibernating ground squirrel.

  8. Adsorption properties of biomass-based activated carbon prepared with spent coffee grounds and pomelo skin by phosphoric acid activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaodong; Ouyang, Feng

    2013-03-01

    Activated carbon prepared from spent coffee grounds and pomelo skin by phosphoric acid activation had been employed as the adsorbent for ethylene and n-butane at room temperature. Prepared activated carbon was characterized by means of nitrogen adsorption-desorption, X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscope. It was confirmed that pore structure played an important role during the adsorption testes. Adsorption isotherms of ethylene and n-butane fitted well with Langmuir equation. The prepared samples owned better adsorption capacity for n-butane than commercial activated carbon. Isosteric heats of adsorptions at different coverage were calculated through Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Micropore filling effect was explained in a thermodynamic way.

  9. Removal of micropollutants with coarse-ground activated carbon for enhanced separation with hydrocyclone classifiers.

    PubMed

    Otto, N; Platz, S; Fink, T; Wutscherk, M; Menzel, U

    2016-01-01

    One key technology to eliminate organic micropollutants (OMP) from wastewater effluent is adsorption using powdered activated carbon (PAC). To avoid a discharge of highly loaded PAC particles into natural water bodies a separation stage has to be implemented. Commonly large settling tanks and flocculation filters with the application of coagulants and flocculation aids are used. In this study, a multi-hydrocyclone classifier with a downstream cloth filter has been investigated on a pilot plant as a space-saving alternative with no need for a dosing of chemical additives. To improve the separation, a coarser ground PAC type was compared to a standard PAC type with regard to elimination results of OMP as well as separation performance. With a PAC dosing rate of 20 mg/l an average of 64.7 wt% of the standard PAC and 79.5 wt% of the coarse-ground PAC could be separated in the hydrocyclone classifier. A total average separation efficiency of 93-97 wt% could be reached with a combination of both hydrocyclone classifier and cloth filter. Nonetheless, the OMP elimination of the coarse-ground PAC was not sufficient enough to compete with the standard PAC. Further research and development is necessary to find applicable coarse-grained PAC types with adequate OMP elimination capabilities.

  10. Removal of micropollutants with coarse-ground activated carbon for enhanced separation with hydrocyclone classifiers.

    PubMed

    Otto, N; Platz, S; Fink, T; Wutscherk, M; Menzel, U

    2016-01-01

    One key technology to eliminate organic micropollutants (OMP) from wastewater effluent is adsorption using powdered activated carbon (PAC). To avoid a discharge of highly loaded PAC particles into natural water bodies a separation stage has to be implemented. Commonly large settling tanks and flocculation filters with the application of coagulants and flocculation aids are used. In this study, a multi-hydrocyclone classifier with a downstream cloth filter has been investigated on a pilot plant as a space-saving alternative with no need for a dosing of chemical additives. To improve the separation, a coarser ground PAC type was compared to a standard PAC type with regard to elimination results of OMP as well as separation performance. With a PAC dosing rate of 20 mg/l an average of 64.7 wt% of the standard PAC and 79.5 wt% of the coarse-ground PAC could be separated in the hydrocyclone classifier. A total average separation efficiency of 93-97 wt% could be reached with a combination of both hydrocyclone classifier and cloth filter. Nonetheless, the OMP elimination of the coarse-ground PAC was not sufficient enough to compete with the standard PAC. Further research and development is necessary to find applicable coarse-grained PAC types with adequate OMP elimination capabilities. PMID:27232411

  11. Measurement of energetic radiation caused by thunderstorm activities by a sounding balloon and ground observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, T.

    2015-12-01

    Energetic radiation caused by thunderstorm activity is observed at various places, such as the ground, high mountain areas, and artificial satellites. In order to investigate the radiation source and its energy distribution, we measured energetic radiation by a sounding balloon, and the ground observation. On the measurement inside/above the thundercloud, we conducted a sounding observation using a radiosonde mounted two GM tubes (for gamma-rays, and for beta/gamma-rays), in addition to meteorological instruments. The balloon passed through a region of strong echoes in a thundercloud shown by radar image, at which time an increase in counting rate of the GM tube about 2 orders of magnitude occurred at the altitude from 5 km to 7.5 km. Furthermore, the counting rate of two GM tubes indicated the tendency different depending on movement of a balloon. This result suggests that the ratio for the gamma-rays (energetic photons) of the beta-rays (energetic electrons) varies according to the place in the thundercloud. Furthermore, we carried out a ground observation of the energetic gamma rays during winter thunderstorm at a coastal area facing the Sea of Japan. Two types of the energetic radiation have been observed at this time. We report the outline of these measurements and analysis in the session of the AGU meeting.

  12. DC resistivity tomography applied to monitoring active layer environments below patterned ground in Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tatsuya; Juliussen, Hâvard; Matsuoka, Norikazu; Christiansen, Hanne H.

    2010-05-01

    starts, the difference in resistivity variations is intensified between the two sites. Resistivity profiles at the mud-boil site show a high resistivity zone slowly descending from the ground surface, which is likely to reflect a decrease in unfrozen water content rather than the freezing front invasion. Time-lapse analyses reveal that the resistivity increased conspicuously just below the mud boils in autumn during freeze up, which indicates the growth of ice lenses as observed in frozen soil cores obtained in the spring of 2009. Another characteristic feature is low resistivity spots located just below the near-surface high resistivity zone, implying the migration of unfrozen water toward the ice segregation formation area. In contract to the seasonal analyses of the mud-boil site, the ice-wedge site shows resistivity profiles lacking changes in resistivity until the ground surface temperature decreases to a few degrees below zero during freeze up. This is probably due to weak ice segregation activity as shown in frozen soil cores lacking visible ice lenses. Time-lapse analyses show increasing resistivity beneath snow-free ramparts, which reflects both preferential cooling from the exposed ramparts and a decrease in unfrozen water content during freeze up. A time series of resistivity profiles show seasonal variations and site-specific characteristics, especially after the onset of seasonal freezing. However, resistivity profile acquisitions were limited to early October due to poor grounding even though monitoring sensors had been indicating further frost heaving by ice segregation and a decrease in unfrozen water content in the grounds.

  13. High resolution deformation measurements at active volcanoes: a new remote sensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hort, M. K.; Scharff, L.; Gerst, A.; Meier, K.; Falk, S.; Peters, G.; Ripepe, M.

    2013-12-01

    It is known from observations at different volcanoes using ULP seismic observations that the volcanic edifice deforms slightly prior to an eruption. It can be expected that immediately prior to an eruption the largest deformation should occur in the vicinity of the vent. However, placing instruments at the vent is impossible as they will be destroyed during an eruption. Here we present new, high temporal resolution (up to 300Hz) deformation measurement that utilizes the phase information of a frequency modulated Doppler radar system. We decompose the Doppler signal into two parts, one part which allows us to measure speeds significantly above 0.5m/s (i.e. the movement of volcanic ash and clasts). The other part utilizes the slow phase changes of the signal reflected from non-moving objects, i.e. the volcanic edifice. This signal is used to measure very slow and longer term deformations, which are the main subject of this study. The method has been tested measuring the displacement of high rise buildings during strong winds. It can be shown that displacements down to 50 μm can be resolved without a problem. We apply this method to different data sets collected at Stromboli volcano, Italy, as well as Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala. At Stromboli we observed the NE crater once in 2008 and once in 2011. During both campaigns we observe on average a displacement between 1 and 5mm before different eruptions. This displacement can be interpreted as a widening of the conduit prior to an eruption. In a couple of cases even an oscillatory movement is observed with frequencies of about 0.5Hz. Finite element modeling of the rise of a pressurized slug indicates that deformations at the crater rim on the order of a 1mm or less are certainly reasonable. In the case of Santiaguito volcano prior to an eruption we observe a pre eruptive displacement 5-15mm and after the end of an eruption a displacement of up to 1m before the next eruption occurs. This can be interpreted as in

  14. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of the large deformation bending and folding behavior of magneto-active elastomer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, Robert; Roche, Juan; Lofland, Samuel E.; vonLockette, Paris R.

    2014-09-01

    This work seeks to provide a framework for the numerical simulation of magneto-active elastomer (MAE) composite structures for use in origami engineering applications. The emerging field of origami engineering employs folding techniques, an array of crease patterns traditionally on a single flat sheet of paper, to produce structures and devices that perform useful engineering operations. Effective means of numerical simulation offer an efficient way to optimize the crease patterns while coupling to the performance and behavior of the active material. The MAE materials used herein are comprised of nominally 30% v/v, 325 mesh barium hexafarrite particles embedded in Dow HS II silicone elastomer compound. These particulate composites are cured in a magnetic field to produce magneto-elastic solids with anisotropic magnetization, e.g. they have a preferred magnetic axis parallel to the curing axis. The deformed shape and/or blocked force characteristics of these MAEs are examined in three geometries: a monolithic cantilever as well as two- and four-segment composite accordion structures. In the accordion structures, patches of MAE material are bonded to a Gelest OE41 unfilled silicone elastomer substrate. Two methods of simulation, one using the Maxwell stress tensor applied as a traction boundary condition and another employing a minimum energy kinematic (MEK) model, are investigated. Both methods capture actuation due to magnetic torque mechanisms that dominate MAE behavior. Comparison with experimental data show good agreement with only a single adjustable parameter, either an effective constant magnetization of the MAE material in the finite element models (at small and moderate deformations) or an effective modulus in the minimum energy model. The four-segment finite element model was prone to numerical locking at large deformation. The effective magnetization and modulus values required are a fraction of the actual experimentally measured values which suggests a

  15. Quantification of Cyclic Ground Reaction Force Histories During Daily Activity in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, G. A.; Whalen, R. T.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical models and experimental studies of bone remodeling suggest that bone density and structure are influenced by local cyclic skeletal tissue stress and strain histories. Estimation of long-term loading histories in humans is usually achieved by assessment of physical activity level by questionnaires, logbooks, and pedometers, since the majority of lower limb cyclic loading occurs during walking and running. These methods provide some indication of the mechanical loading history, but fail to consider the true magnitude of the lower limb skeletal forces generated by various daily activities. These techniques cannot account for individual gait characteristics, gait speed, and unpredictable high loading events that may influence bone mass significantly. We have developed portable instrumentation to measure and record the vertical component of the ground reaction force (GRFz) during normal daily activity. This equipment allows long-term quantitative monitoring of musculoskeletal loads, which in conjunction with bone mineral density assessments, promises to elucidate the relationship between skeletal stresses and bone remodeling.

  16. Method and Apparatus for Monitoring of Daily Activity in Terms of Ground Reaction Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Robert T. (Inventor); Breit, Gregory A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A device to record and analyze habitual daily activity in terms of the history of gait-related musculoskeletal loading is disclosed. The device consists of a pressure-sensing insole placed into the shoe or embedded in a shoe sole, which detects contact of the foot with the ground. The sensor is coupled to a portable battery-powered digital data logger clipped to the shoe or worn around the ankle or waist. During the course of normal daily activity, the system maintains a record of time-of-occurrence of all non-spurious foot-down and lift-off events. Off line, these data are filtered and converted to a history of foot-ground contact times, from which measures of cumulative musculoskeletal loading, average walking- and running-specific gait speed, total time spent walking and running, total number of walking steps and running steps, and total gait-related energy expenditure are estimated from empirical regressions of various gait parameters to the contact time reciprocal. Data are available as cumulative values or as daily averages by menu selection. The data provided by this device are useful for assessment of musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health and risk factors associated with habitual patterns of daily activity.

  17. Auditory Power-Law Activation Avalanches Exhibit a Fundamental Computational Ground State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, Ruedi; Gomez, Florian

    2016-07-01

    The cochlea provides a biological information-processing paradigm that we are only beginning to understand in its full complexity. Our work reveals an interacting network of strongly nonlinear dynamical nodes, on which even a simple sound input triggers subnetworks of activated elements that follow power-law size statistics ("avalanches"). From dynamical systems theory, power-law size distributions relate to a fundamental ground state of biological information processing. Learning destroys these power laws. These results strongly modify the models of mammalian sound processing and provide a novel methodological perspective for understanding how the brain processes information.

  18. Auditory Power-Law Activation Avalanches Exhibit a Fundamental Computational Ground State.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Ruedi; Gomez, Florian

    2016-07-15

    The cochlea provides a biological information-processing paradigm that we are only beginning to understand in its full complexity. Our work reveals an interacting network of strongly nonlinear dynamical nodes, on which even a simple sound input triggers subnetworks of activated elements that follow power-law size statistics ("avalanches"). From dynamical systems theory, power-law size distributions relate to a fundamental ground state of biological information processing. Learning destroys these power laws. These results strongly modify the models of mammalian sound processing and provide a novel methodological perspective for understanding how the brain processes information.

  19. Auditory Power-Law Activation Avalanches Exhibit a Fundamental Computational Ground State.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Ruedi; Gomez, Florian

    2016-07-15

    The cochlea provides a biological information-processing paradigm that we are only beginning to understand in its full complexity. Our work reveals an interacting network of strongly nonlinear dynamical nodes, on which even a simple sound input triggers subnetworks of activated elements that follow power-law size statistics ("avalanches"). From dynamical systems theory, power-law size distributions relate to a fundamental ground state of biological information processing. Learning destroys these power laws. These results strongly modify the models of mammalian sound processing and provide a novel methodological perspective for understanding how the brain processes information. PMID:27472144

  20. Haglund's Deformity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Haglund’s Deformity? Haglund’s deformity is a bony enlargement on the back of the heel. The soft ... the Achilles tendon becomes irritated when the bony enlargement rubs against shoes. This often leads to painful ...

  1. Ground surface deformation patterns, magma supply, and magma storage at Okmok volcano, Alaska, from InSAR analysis: 2. Coeruptive deflation, July-August 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhong; Dzurisin, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    A hydrovolcanic eruption near Cone D on the floor of Okmok caldera, Alaska, began on 12 July 2008 and continued until late August 2008. The eruption was preceded by inflation of a magma reservoir located beneath the center of the caldera and ˜3 km below sea level (bsl), which began immediately after Okmok's previous eruption in 1997. In this paper we use data from several radar satellites and advanced interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques to produce a suite of 2008 coeruption deformation maps. Most of the surface deformation that occurred during the eruption is explained by deflation of a Mogi-type source located beneath the center of the caldera and 2-3 km bsl, i.e., essentially the same source that inflated prior to the eruption. During the eruption the reservoir deflated at a rate that decreased exponentially with time with a 1/e time constant of ˜13 days. We envision a sponge-like network of interconnected fractures and melt bodies that in aggregate constitute a complex magma storage zone beneath Okmok caldera. The rate at which the reservoir deflates during an eruption may be controlled by the diminishing pressure difference between the reservoir and surface. A similar mechanism might explain the tendency for reservoir inflation to slow as an eruption approaches until the pressure difference between a deep magma production zone and the reservoir is great enough to drive an intrusion or eruption along the caldera ring-fracture system.

  2. Source mechanism analysis of strong mining induced seismic event and its influence on ground deformation observed by InSAR technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzinski, Lukasz; Mirek, Katarzyna; Mirek, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    On April 17th, 2015 a strong shallow seismic event M4.0 struck a mining panel in the Wujek-Slask coal mine, southern Poland. The event was widely felt, followed with rockburst and caused a strong damages inside mining corridors. Unfortunately two miners are trapped by tunnels collapse. Full Moment Tensor (MT) estimated with regional broad-band signals shows that the event was characterized with very high isotropic (implosive) part. Mining inspections verified the occurrence of a rockfall and floor uplift. Very shallow foci depth (less than 1000m) and collapse - like MT solution suggest that event could be responsible for surface deformation in the vicinity of epicenter. To verified this issue we used the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar technique (InSAR). The InSAR relies on measuring phase differences between two SAR images (radarograms). The measured differences may be computed into a single interferometric image. i.e. an interferogram. Interferogram computed from two radarograms of the same terrain taken at different time allows detecting changes in elevation of the terrain. Two SAR scenes acquired by Sentinel-1 satellite (European Space Agency) were processed to obtain the interferogram covered study area (12.04.2015 and 24.04.2015). 12 days interval differential interferogram shows distinctive concentric feature which indicate subsidence trough. Subsidence pattern shows 1 cycle of deformation corresponding with about 2.5 cm subsidence. The InSAR solution support the reliability of very strong implosive MT part.

  3. Ground surface deformation patterns, magma supply, and magma storage at Okmok volcano, Alaska, from InSAR analysis: 2. Coeruptive deflation, July-August 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Dzurisin, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A hydrovolcanic eruption near Cone D on the floor of Okmok caldera, Alaska, began on 12 July 2008 and continued until late August 2008. The eruption was preceded by inflation of a magma reservoir located beneath the center of the caldera and ~3 km below sea level (bsl), which began immediately after Okmok's previous eruption in 1997. In this paper we use data from several radar satellites and advanced interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques to produce a suite of 2008 coeruption deformation maps. Most of the surface deformation that occurred during the eruption is explained by deflation of a Mogi-type source located beneath the center of the caldera and 2–3 km bsl, i.e., essentially the same source that inflated prior to the eruption. During the eruption the reservoir deflated at a rate that decreased exponentially with time with a 1/e time constant of ~13 days. We envision a sponge-like network of interconnected fractures and melt bodies that in aggregate constitute a complex magma storage zone beneath Okmok caldera. The rate at which the reservoir deflates during an eruption may be controlled by the diminishing pressure difference between the reservoir and surface. A similar mechanism might explain the tendency for reservoir inflation to slow as an eruption approaches until the pressure difference between a deep magma production zone and the reservoir is great enough to drive an intrusion or eruption along the caldera ring-fracture system.

  4. GOES-R Proving Ground Activities at the NASA Short-Term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    SPoRT is actively involved in GOES-R Proving Ground activities in a number of ways: (1) Applying the paradigm of product development, user training, and interaction to foster interaction with end users at NOAA forecast offices national centers. (2) Providing unique capabilities in collaboration with other GOES-R Proving Ground partners (a) Hybrid GOES-MODIS imagery (b) Pseudo-GLM via regional lightning mapping arrays (c) Developing new RGB imagery from EUMETSAT guidelines

  5. Patterned ground as an indicator of periglacial activity in and around Lomonosov Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Alex; Balme, Matt; Patel, Manish; Hagermann, Axel

    2014-05-01

    A survey of the northern plains of Mars has been conducted to catalogue the distribution of possible periglacial landforms across several large study areas in Acidalia, Utopia and Arcadia Planitiae.. Several hundred HiRISE and CTX images have been surveyed, looking for features indicative of a periglacial environment; patterned ground, solifluction features and scalloped depressions. Non-sorted patterned ground is fairly common across the Northern Plains of Mars where nets of fracture polygons are common at mid to high latitudes. These features are most likely the result of contraction cracking due to temperature changes. The occurrence of fracture polygons is in keeping with the cold, dry environment of Mars. Analogous features on Earth are found in some of the coldest and driest regions of the planet. However other types of patterned ground, such as sorted circles and stripes, tend to occur in warmer and wetter environments as sorted patterned ground is the result of the repeated freezing and thawing of the permafrost active layer. These features require the action of liquid water during the warmer months of the year and are characteristic of a periglacial environment. Such features would not be expected to be as common on Mars, where the surface temperature is only warm enough for water to exist in a liquid state for short periods of time in isolated areas which receive high levels of insolation. Prior studies (e.g. Gallagher et al., 2011, Icarus.) have observed features which appear to be morphologically similar to sorted patterned ground. It is possible that unusual sites where boulders appear organised into stripes and networks could be analogous to these terrestrial periglacial features. Determining where such features occur on Mars could have important implications for understanding the martian environment. Lomonosov Crater, located at 64.9 degrees N, 9.3 degrees W in the northern reaches of Acidalia Planitia, is a 150 km diameter crater surrounded by the

  6. Isolating active orogenic wedge deformation in the southern Subandes of Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jonathan R.; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Foster, James H.; Bevis, Michael; Echalar, Arturo; Caccamise, Dana; Heck, Jacob; Kendrick, Eric; Ahlgren, Kevin; Raleigh, David; Smalley, Robert; Vergani, Gustavo

    2016-08-01

    A new GPS-derived surface velocity field for the central Andean backarc permits an assessment of orogenic wedge deformation across the southern Subandes of Bolivia, where recent studies suggest that great earthquakes (>Mw 8) are possible. We find that the backarc is not isolated from the main plate boundary seismic cycle. Rather, signals from subduction zone earthquakes contaminate the velocity field at distances greater than 800 km from the Chile trench. Two new wedge-crossing velocity profiles, corrected for seasonal and earthquake affects, reveal distinct regions that reflect (1) locking of the main plate boundary across the high Andes, (2) the location of and loading rate at the back of orogenic wedge, and (3) an east flank velocity gradient indicative of décollement locking beneath the Subandes. Modeling of the Subandean portions of the profiles indicates along-strike variations in the décollement locked width (WL) and wedge loading rate; the northern wedge décollement has a WL of ~100 km while accumulating slip at a rate of ~14 mm/yr, whereas the southern wedge has a WL of ~61 km and a slip rate of ~7 mm/yr. When compared to Quaternary estimates of geologic shortening and evidence for Holocene internal wedge deformation, the new GPS-derived wedge loading rates may indicate that the southern wedge is experiencing a phase of thickening via reactivation of preexisting internal structures. In contrast, we suspect that the northern wedge is undergoing an accretion or widening phase primarily via slip on relatively young thrust-front faults.

  7. Active deformation in Zagros-Makran transition zone inferred from GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, R.; Chery, J.; Tatar, M.; Vernant, Ph.; Abbassi, M.; Masson, F.; Nilforoushan, F.; Doerflinger, E.; Regard, V.; Bellier, O.

    2006-04-01

    The Bandar Abbas-Strait of Hormuz zone is considered as a transition between the Zagros collision and the Makran oceanic subduction. We used GPS network measurements collected in 2000 and 2002 to better understand the distribution of the deformation between the collision zone and the Makran subduction. Analysing the GPS velocities, we show that transfer of the deformation is mainly accommodated along the NNW-SSE-trending reverse right-lateral Zendan-Minab-Palami (ZMP) fault system. The rate is estimated to 10 +/- 3 mm yr-1 near the faults. Assuming that the ZMP fault system transfers the motion between the Makran-Lut Block and the Arabian plate, we estimate to 15 mm yr-1 and 6 mm yr-1, respectively, the dextral strike-slip and shortening components of the long-term transpressive displacement. Our geodetic measurements suggest also a 10-15 km locking depth for the ZMP fault system. The radial velocity pattern and the orientation of compressive strain axes around the straight of Hormuz is probably the consequence of the subducting Musandam promontory. The N-S Jiroft-Sabzevaran (JS) fault system prolongates southwards the dextral shear motion of the Nayband-Gowk (NG) fault system at an apparent rate of 3.1 +/- 2.5 mm yr-1. The change from strong to weak coupling for underthrusting the Arabian plate beneath the Zagros (strong) and the Makran (weak) may explain the dextral motion along the ZMP, JS/NG and Neh-Zahedan fault systems which transfer the convergence from a broad zone in the western Iran (Zagros, Tabriz fault system, Alborz, Caucasus and Caspian sea surroundings) to Makran subduction.

  8. Fluvial Record of Active Deformation Along the Canyon River Fault in the Wynoochee River Valley, WA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delano, J.; Amos, C. B.; Loveless, J. P.; Rittenour, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Ongoing uplift of the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State represents unknown contributions from Cascadia subduction zone processes, including earthquakes, interseismic deformation, aseismic slow slip events, and north-south shortening of the North American plate focused on upper plate faults. The relationship between upper plate faults and Cascadia subduction is poorly understood, as is the seismic hazard posed by these structures to the greater Puget Sound region. The Wynoochee River is a south-flowing drainage in the southern Olympic Mountains bisected by a previously uncharacterized section of the Canyon River reverse fault. In this study we utilize high-resolution aerial lidar and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of offset fluvial terraces to determine the kinematics and slip rate of the Canyon River fault over the late Quaternary. In combination with surficial geologic mapping and differential GPS surveys of terrace straths observed in the field, we also determine incision rates along the Wynoochee River from OSL dates. Our mapping reveals eight generations of fluvial and glaciofluvial terraces, with twenty-one pending ages from OSL sampling of fluvial sands intercalated with outwash and river gravels. Additionally, we compare our slip rate results with a boundary element model, estimating the stress on the Canyon River fault over the recent decades, as constrained by GPS data from the Cascadia subduction zone. Preliminary results indicate that the Canyon River fault is a long-lived feature with south-side-up and left-lateral displacement. Taken together, our results enable comparison of deformation rates constrained by short-term, geodetic data with those acting over longer-term geologic time scales.

  9. Temperature adaptation of active sodium-potassium transport and of passive permeability in erythrocytes of ground squirrels.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimzey, S. L.; Willis, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    Unidirectional active and passive fluxes of K-42 and Na-24 were measured in red blood cells of ground squirrels (hibernators) and guinea pigs (nonhibernators). As the temperature was lowered, ?active' (ouabain-sensitive) K influx and Na efflux were more considerably diminished in guinea pig cells than in those of ground squirrels. The fraction of total K influx which is ouabain-sensitive in red blood cells of ground squirrels was virtually constant at all temperatures, whereas it decreased abruptly in guinea pig cells as temperature was lowered.

  10. Structure modulated electrostatic deformable mirror for focus and geometry control.

    PubMed

    Nam, Saekwang; Park, Suntak; Yun, Sungryul; Park, Bongje; Park, Seung Koo; Kyung, Ki-Uk

    2016-01-11

    We suggest a way to electrostatically control deformed geometry of an electrostatic deformable mirror (EDM) based on geometric modulation of a basement. The EDM is composed of a metal coated elastomeric membrane (active mirror) and a polymeric basement with electrode (ground). When an electrical voltage is applied across the components, the active mirror deforms toward the stationary basement responding to electrostatic attraction force in an air gap. Since the differentiated gap distance can induce change in electrostatic force distribution between the active mirror and the basement, the EDMs are capable of controlling deformed geometry of the active mirror with different basement structures (concave, flat, and protrusive). The modulation of the deformed geometry leads to significant change in the range of the focal length of the EDMs. Even under dynamic operations, the EDM shows fairly consistent and large deformation enough to change focal length in a wide frequency range (1~175 Hz). The geometric modulation of the active mirror with dynamic focus tunability can allow the EDM to be an active mirror lens for optical zoom devices as well as an optical component controlling field of view.

  11. Creep Deformation and Rupture Behavior of Single- and Dual-Pass 316LN Stainless-Steel-Activated TIG Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayanand, V. D.; Vasudevan, M.; Ganesan, V.; Parameswaran, P.; Laha, K.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    Creep deformation and rupture behavior of single-pass and dual-pass 316LN stainless steel (SS) weld joints fabricated by an autogenous activated tungsten inert gas welding process have been assessed by performing metallography, hardness, and conventional and impression creep tests. The fusion zone of the single-pass joint consisted of columnar zones adjacent to base metals with a central equiaxed zone, which have been modified extensively by the thermal cycle of the second pass in the dual-pass joint. The equiaxed zone in the single-pass joint, as well as in the second pass of the dual-pass joint, displayed the lowest hardness in the joints. In the dual-pass joint, the equiaxed zone of the first pass had hardness comparable to the columnar zone. The hardness variations in the joints influenced the creep deformation. The equiaxed and columnar zone in the first pass of the dual-pass joint was more creep resistant than that of the second pass. Both joints possessed lower creep rupture life than the base metal. However, the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint was about twofolds more than that of the single-pass joint. Creep failure in the single-pass joint occurred in the central equiaxed fusion zone, whereas creep cavitation that originated in the second pass was blocked at the weld pass interface. The additional interface and strength variation between two passes in the dual-pass joint provides more restraint to creep deformation and crack propagation in the fusion zone, resulting in an increase in the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint. Furthermore, the differences in content, morphology, and distribution of delta ferrite in the fusion zone of the joints favors more creep cavitation resistance in the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint with the enhancement of creep rupture life.

  12. Finding year-long activity cycles in ground-based and space-borne photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vida, Krisztián; Oláh, Katalin; Szabó, Róbert

    2015-08-01

    Using long­term ground­based photometry of fast­rotating M­-dwarfs (EY Dra, V405 And, GSC 3377­0296 and V374 Peg), all with rotational periods near 0.5 day, but with different internal structures, we found activity cycles in the form of long-­term brightness changes, on the time scales of about one year. Using the cycling stars as templates, we searched for similar, fast rotating (P < 1d), active, late­-type targets in the Kepler Input Catalogue. Analysing the light curves of these 39 stars, we found hints of 300­-900 day­-long cycles in 9 cases detecting small variations in the rotation periods caused by differential rotation and the changing spot emergence latitudes over the cycle (i.e., the butterfly diagram).

  13. New insights into the active deformation of accretionary prisms: examples from the Western Makran, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penney, Camilla; Copley, Alex; Oveisi, Benham

    2016-04-01

    The Makran subduction zone, along the southern coasts of Iran and Pakistan, hosts one of the largest exposed accretionary wedges in the world. The western Makran has been characterised by a lack of shallow and thrust seismicity in both the instrumental and historical periods. The Mw 6.1 2013 Minab earthquake thus provides a rare opportunity to study the deformation of the accretionary wedge in the transition region between continent-continent collision, in the Zagros, and oceanic subduction, in the Makran. We study the source parameters and slip distribution of this earthquake using seismology, geodesy and field observations. We observe left-lateral strike-slip motion on a fault striking ENE-WSW; approximately perpendicular to the faults of the Minab-Zendan-Palami fault zone, the main structure previously thought to accommodate the right-lateral shear between the Zagros and the Makran. The fault that ruptured in 2013 is one of a series of approximately E-W striking left-lateral faults visible in the geology and geomorphology. These accommodate a velocity field equivalent to right-lateral shear on N-S striking planes by clockwise rotations about vertical axes. The longitudinal range of shear in the western Makran is likely to be controlled by the distance over which the underthrusting Arabian lithosphere deepens in the transition from continent-continent collision to oceanic subduction. The lack of observed megathrust seismicity in the western Makran has led to assertions that the convergence in this region may be aseismic, in contrast to the eastern Makran, which experienced an Mw8.1 earthquake in 1945. The right-lateral Sistan Suture Zone, which runs ~N-S along the Iran-Afghanistan border to the north of the Makran, appears to separate these regimes. However, right-lateral faulting is not observed south of ~27°N, within the wedge. The Minab earthquake and the 2013 Balochistan earthquake show that the Makran accretionary wedge is dominated by strike-slip faulting

  14. Active Deformation in the Zagros-Makran Transition Zone Inferred From GPS, Tectonic and Seismological Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, R.; Shabanian, E.; Regard, V.; Yaminifard, F.; Vernant, P.; Nilforoushan, F.; Abbassi, M.; Chery, J.; Tatar, M.; Doerflinger, E.; Peyret, M.; Daignières, M.; Bellier, O.; Hatzfeld, D.; Mokhtari, M.

    2002-12-01

    The present-day N-S convergence between the Arabian and the Eurasian plates is accommodated in Southern Iran along the Zagros fold and thrust belt (with a shortening of ~8 mm/yr)and by the subduction of the Oman oceanic lithosphere beneath the Makran (with a rate of 18mm/yr). The Bandar Abbas-Strait of Hormuz zone is considered as a transition between the Zagros continental collision and the Makran oceanic subduction. In this area, the strain is mainly accommodated along the NNW-SSE trending reverse right lateral Minab-Zendan-Palami faults and along the N-S trending faults of Sarduiyeh, Jiroft and Sabzevaran. We used GPS network measurements (carried out in 2000 and 2002) to better understand how the deformation is distributed between between the Zagros continental collision and the Makran oceanic subduction. The analysis of the velocities (together with the measurements of the global network of Iran) leads to the following conclusions : - The rate of shortening in the Eastern Zagros is < 8mm/yr. It is < 5 mm/yr between the coast and the Main Zagros Thrust. - The horizontal residual velocities of the coastal sites in Zagros relative to Musandan are < 3mm/yr, evidencing for a small deformation in the Persian Gulf. - Across the Minab-Zendan-Palami faults system GPS measurements are consistent with a N-S trending reverse right lateral motion at rate of ~ 10 mm/yr. - West of the Lut block at the latitude of Khanuj, the N-S trending Sarduiyeh-Jiroft-Sabzevaran fault system is characterized by a 2 mm/yr right strike slip motion. Local seismicity is located at an unusual depth down to 35 km. Little is associated with the Minab-Zendan-Palami faults strike slip faults. They rather suggest that they are associated with a complex transition between the Zagros collision and the Makran subduction. Times delays also suggest a large heterogeneity in the crust across the fault system. These measurements support the model that the convergence from the collision to the subduction is

  15. Characterization of Activity at Loki from Galileo and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, R. R.; Lopes, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    While Loki is the most active volcanic center on Io, major questions remain concerning the nature of that activity. Rathbun et al. showed that the activity was semi-periodic, and suggested it was due to a resurfacing wave which swept across a lava lake as the crust cooled and become unstable. However in 2001 new observations showed that an intermediate level, less periodic mode of activity had apparently begun. Galileo-NIMS observations of Loki clearly show that the highest temperatures are found near the edge of the patera, consistent with disruption of a lava lake at the margins. NIMS observations also show gradients in temperature across the patera which, when modeled in terms of lava cooling models, are generally consistent with ages expected for the resurfacing wave but may also be consistent with spreading flows. We present a further analysis of NIMS data from I24 and I32 which help define the nature of the temperature variations present in Loki patera, along with Galileo-SSI images from the G1-I32 flybys which show albedo changes apparently correlated with the "periodic" activity measured from ground-based observations.

  16. The variety of subaerial active salt deformations in the Kuqa fold-thrust belt (China) constrained by InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colón, Cindy; Webb, A. Alexander G.; Lasserre, Cécile; Doin, Marie-Pierre; Renard, François; Lohman, Rowena; Li, Jianghai; Baudoin, Patrick F.

    2016-09-01

    Surface salt bodies in the western Kuqa fold-thrust belt of northwestern China allow study of subaerial salt kinematics and its possible correlations with weather variations. Ephemeral subaerial salt exposure during the evolution of a salt structure can greatly impact the subsequent development and deformation of its tectonic setting. Here, we present a quantitative time-lapse survey of surface salt deformation measured from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) using Envisat radar imagery acquired between 2003 and 2010. Time series analysis and inspection of individual interferograms confirm that the majority of the salt bodies in western Kuqa are active, with significant InSAR observable displacements at 3 of 4 structures studied in the region. Subaerial salt motion toward and away from the satellite at rates up to 5 mm/yr with respect to local references. Rainfall measurements from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and temperature from a local weather station are used to test the relationship between seasonality and surface salt motion. We observe decoupling between surface salt motion and seasonality and interpret these observations to indicate that regional and local structural regimes exert primary control on surface salt displacement rates.

  17. Control and network system of force actuators for deformable mirror active optics in LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengtao; Zhang, Zhenchao; Wang, You

    2007-12-01

    The reflecting Schmidt plate M A of LAMOST consists of 24 segmented hexagonal sub-mirrors. Each sub-mirror is 25mm thick and 1.1m in diagonal. There are 34 force actuators on the back of one sub-mirror which need to be controlled to offer precise load to create correct mirror deformation. This paper presents the control method and network configuration of force actuators for one sub-mirror. Master computer running Windows NT operation system and slave controllers running DOS operation system are connected together via Ethernet local area network (ELAN) by means of TCP/IP protocol. Adopting five slave controllers, 34 force actuators are combined into a distributed system. Master computer controls five slave controllers and five slave controllers operate 34 force actuators. Master computer communicates with slave controllers normally, which receives state of each force actuator from slave controllers and sends instructions to slave controllers via Ethernet LAN. Each slave controller operates 8 force actuators to offer correct load. Axial load capacity of force actuator is +/-150N (pull and push) with accuracy RMS <=0.05N. Force sensor is used as close-loop feedback apparatus to detect the micro load of the actuator.

  18. Optically-Activated GaAs Switches for Ground Penetrating Radar and Firing Set Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Aurand, J.; Brown, D.J.; Carin, L.; Denison, G.J.; Helgeson, W.D.; Loubriel, G.M.; Mar, A.; O'Malley, M.W.; Rinehart, L.F.; Zutavern, F.J.

    1999-07-14

    Optically activated, high gain GaAs switches are being tested for many different applications. TWO such applications are ground penetrating radar (GPR) and firing set switches. The ability of high gain GaAs Photoconductive Semiconductor Switches (PCSs) to deliver fast risetime pulses makes them suitable for their use in radars that rely on fast impulses. This type of direct time domain radar is uniquely suited for the detection of buried items because it can operate at low frequency, high average power, and close to the ground, greatly increasing power on target. We have demonstrated that a PCSs based system can be used to produce a bipolar waveform with a total duration of about 6 ns and with minimal ringing. Such a pulse is radiated and returns from a 55 gallon drum will be presented. For firing sets, the switch requirements include small size, high current, dc charging, radiation hardness and modest longevity. We have switched 1 kA at 1 kV and 2.8 kA at 3 kV dc charge.

  19. Constraining deformation history and recent activity along the Tuz Gölü fault zone, Central Anatolia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krystopowicz, N. J.; Schoenbohm, L. M.; Cosca, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    The 200 km long, dextral, transtensive Tuz Gölü fault zone is a prominent northwest-striking feature in Central Anatolia. It is one of the most significant structures in Central Anatolia in that it lies within the transition zone between the Western Anatolian Extensional Province and the Eastern Anatolian Contractional Province; its study therefore offers valuable insight into how Central Anatolia is affected by lateral extrusion related to collision in the east, and gravitational pull forces associated with subduction in the west. Proposals for the initiation of the Tuz Gölü fault zone range from Cretaceous to Neogene times, and the amount of recent activity along this fault system remains poorly constrained. Furthermore, potential basinward migration of deformation into the Tuz Gölü basin poses the question as to whether or not this fault system is active in the Holocene. Previous work suggests that migration of deformation towards the basin interior may be related to lithospheric-scale processes such as plateau development, microplate extrusion, or the onset of crustal thinning associated with slab-tear propagation in subducting African lithosphere. In this study, we use a combination of paleostress and morpho-tectonic analysis to further delineate the segmentation and present activity of the Tuz Gölü fault zone. Paleostress analysis offers insight into the deformation history of the region as well as the modern-day stress regime. We conducted a morphometric analysis of over 300 drainage basins along the range-front, which reveal variations that characterize the unique development of numerous fault strands in the region. Statistical analysis of hypsometric curves, systematic variation in basin morphology and orientation, as well as changes in mountain-front sinuosity reveal fault segmentation. Additionally, field mapping and Ar-Ar dating of offset lava flows from the Hasan Dag Volcano quantitatively constrain slip-rates in the southeastern portion of the

  20. PS-InSAR measurements at the most active volcanoes in Iceland: role of the GEO supersite initiative in deformation monitoring at Bárðarbunga, Askja, Hekla, Katla and Eyjafjallajökull volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Michelle; Dumont, Stéphanie; Drouin, Vincent; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Spaans, Karsten; Hooper, Andrew; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Árnadóttir, Þóra; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Michalczewska, Karolina; Hjaltadóttir, Sigurlaug; María Friðriksdóttir, Hildur; Rut Hjartardóttir, Ásta; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Vogfjörd, Kristín; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Hensch, Martin; Guðmundsson, Gunnar; Geirsson, Halldór; Sturkell, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of a time series of ground deformation measurements at active volcanoes can provide an improved understanding of sub-volcanic and sub-aerial processes; including those related to magmatic, hydrothermal and structural development. Interpreting a long time series may also help determine background behavior, and identify any deviations from this, including the migration of new melt. We use Persistent Scatterer Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PS-InSAR) techniques to generate a time series of high-resolution deformation measurements, in the vicinity of the most active volcanoes in Iceland: Bárðarbunga, Askja, Hekla, Katla and Eyjafjallajökull and compare these to other geodetic measurements. A comprehensive network of continuous GPS stations is already deployed at these volcanoes and a series of campaign GPS measurements are routinely undertaken each summer. InSAR observations are complementary to these field based measurements and their high spatial resolution assists in resolving the geometry of the deformation field hence gaining improved constraints on the inferred source. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites has recently declared Iceland a Permanent Geohazard Supersite, based on its propensity for relatively frequent eruptions and their potentially hazardous, long ranging effects. The recent Supersite award ensures a considerable amount of SAR data is made available for both past and future satellite acquisitions, including new X-band images (acquired by TerraSAR-X and Cosmo-SkyMed satellites), and historic C-band images from ERS and ENVISAT. We present a series of long-term deformation measurements for Hekla, Katla, Eyjafjallajökull and Askja volcanoes, derived using PS-InSAR techniques, and include recent interferograms spanning the 2014 unrest and eruption within the Bárðarbunga volcanic system. InSAR and tilt measurements at Hekla indicate renewed melt supply to a sub-volcanic reservoir after the last eruption in 2000. Recent

  1. Influence of a moderate physical activity intervention on red cell deformability in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Basit; Ferrari, Nina; Montiel, Georgina; Bloch, Wilhelm; Raabe-Oetker, Anke; Skrobala, Nina; Brixius, Klara

    2013-07-01

    The present study investigates whether a moderate physical activity intervention may alter red cell deformability (RCD) of patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Subjects (n = 10; age: 62 ± 4; body-mass index (BMI): 25.8 ± 7.5) performed a training regimen for 10 weeks. In the beginning of the study and after the training period, COPD patients underwent a WHO cycle ergometry test. Venous blood samples were taken before (T0), immediately after (T1) and 30 min after (T2) the intervention. RCD was measured with the laser-assisted optical rotational cell analyzer (LORCA). Significant improvements of the RCD were detected. The semi-maximal shear stress increased significantly. Acute exhaustion had no effect on RCD. Thus, the training period of 10 weeks influenced RCD.

  2. Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru

    2012-09-04

    This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

  3. Active Ground Optical Remote Sensing for Improved Monitoring of Seedling Stress in Nurseries

    PubMed Central

    Eitel, Jan U. H.; Keefe, Robert F.; Long, Dan S.; Davis, Anthony S.; Vierling, Lee A.

    2010-01-01

    Active ground optical remote sensing (AGORS) devices mounted on overhead irrigation booms could help to improve seedling quality by autonomously monitoring seedling stress. In contrast to traditionally used passive optical sensors, AGORS devices operate independently of ambient light conditions and do not require spectral reference readings. Besides measuring red (590–670 nm) and near-infrared (>760 nm) reflectance AGORS devices have recently become available that also measure red-edge (730 nm) reflectance. We tested the hypothesis that the additional availability of red-edge reflectance information would improve AGORS of plant stress induced chlorophyll breakdown in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). Our results showed that the availability of red-edge reflectance information improved AGORS estimates of stress induced variation in chlorophyll concentration (r2 > 0.73, RMSE < 1.69) when compared to those without (r2 = 0.57, RMSE = 2.11). PMID:22319275

  4. Ground-based activities in preparation of SELENE ISS experiment on self-rewetting fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savino, R.; Abe, Y.; Castagnolo, D.; Celata, G. P.; Kabov, O.; Kawaji, M.; Sato, M.; Tanaka, K.; Thome, J. R.; Van Vaerenbergh, S.

    2011-12-01

    SELENE (SELf rewetting fluids for thermal ENErgy management) is a microgravity experiment proposed to the European Space Agency (ESA) in response to the Announcement of Opportunities for Physical Sciences. Main objectives of the microgravity research onboard ISS include the quantitative investigation of heat transfer performances of "self-rewetting fluids" and "nano self-rewetting fluids" in model heat pipes and validation of adequate theoretical and numerical modelling able to predict their behaviour in microgravity conditions. This article summarizes the results of ground-based research activities in preparation of the microgravity experiments. They include: 1) thermophysical properties measurements; 2) study of thermo-soluto-capillary effects in micro-channels; 3) numerical modelling; 4) thermal and concentration distribution measurements with optical (e.g. interferometric) and intrusive techniques; 5) surface tension-driven effects and thermal performances test on different capillary structures and heat pipes; 6) breadboards development and support to definition of scientific requirements.

  5. Space-born and ground-based observations of a solar active region and a flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiuderi Drago, F.

    Observational data of the active solar region AR 2490 are discussed with an eye to underlying physical processes. Ground- and spaceborne measurements were made by radio, optical, and XUV instrumentation. A double structure observed at 6 and 20 cm wavelengths was overlying a sunspot group which displayed north polarity. The 6 cm emission was attributed to free-free emission, while the 20 cm feature was thought to be caused by gyroresonance absorption. An analytical formulation was developed which described the thermal component for maximum X ray intensities. A flare observed on June 10, 1980 was detected on H-alpha and C IV spectrographic bands. The origin of the emissions was fixed at the two feet of the X ray loop, with a radio emission coming from the top of the loop.

  6. Active suspension design for a Large Space Structure ground test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Thomas J. H.; Schlegel, Clemens

    1993-01-01

    The expected future high performance requirements for Large Space Structures (LSS) enforce technology innovations such as active vibration damping techniques e.g., by means of structure sensors and actuators. The implementation of new technologies like that requires an interactive and integrated structural and control design with an increased effort in hardware validation by ground testing. During the technology development phase generic system tests will be most important covering verification and validation aspects up to the preparation and definition of relevant space experiments. For many applications using advanced designs it is deemed necessary to improve existing testing technology by further reducing disturbances and gravity coupling effects while maintaining high performance reliability. A key issue in this context is the improvement of suspension techniques. The ideal ground test facility satisfying these requirements completely will never be found. The highest degree of reliability will always be obtained by passive suspension methods taking into account severe performance limitations such as non-zero rigid body modes, restriction of degrees of freedom of motion and frequency response limitations. Passive compensation mechanisms, e.g., zero-spring-rate mechanisms, either require large moving masses or they are limited with respect to low-frequency performance by friction, stiction or other non-linear effects. With active suspensions these limitations can be removed to a large extent thereby increasing the range of applications. Despite an additional complexity which is associated with a potential risk in reliability their development is considered promising due to the amazing improvement of real-time control technology which is still continuing.

  7. School grounds and physical activity: Associations at secondary schools, and over the transition from primary to secondary schools.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Flo; van Sluijs, Esther M F; Corder, Kirsten; Jones, Andy

    2016-05-01

    This paper aims to further understanding of the physical environments of secondary schools and their associations with young peoples' physical activity. Accelerometer-derived physical activity measurements from 299 participants in the SPEEDY study (Norfolk, UK) were obtained from baseline measurements (age 9-10y) and +4y follow-up. These were linked to objective measures of primary and secondary school environments as measured by the SPEEDY grounds audit tool. We saw considerable differences in the nature of school grounds between primary and secondary schools. Cross-sectional associations were seen between active travel provision scores and commuting time moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) for 13-14 year old boys and adolescents living further from school. However, few associations were seen between changes in school grounds scores and changes in school-based MVPA.

  8. School grounds and physical activity: Associations at secondary schools, and over the transition from primary to secondary schools.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Flo; van Sluijs, Esther M F; Corder, Kirsten; Jones, Andy

    2016-05-01

    This paper aims to further understanding of the physical environments of secondary schools and their associations with young peoples' physical activity. Accelerometer-derived physical activity measurements from 299 participants in the SPEEDY study (Norfolk, UK) were obtained from baseline measurements (age 9-10y) and +4y follow-up. These were linked to objective measures of primary and secondary school environments as measured by the SPEEDY grounds audit tool. We saw considerable differences in the nature of school grounds between primary and secondary schools. Cross-sectional associations were seen between active travel provision scores and commuting time moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) for 13-14 year old boys and adolescents living further from school. However, few associations were seen between changes in school grounds scores and changes in school-based MVPA. PMID:26922516

  9. Oxygen uptake, muscle activity and ground reaction force during water aerobic exercises.

    PubMed

    Alberton, C L; Pinto, S S; Cadore, E L; Tartaruga, M P; Kanitz, A C; Antunes, A H; Finatto, P; Kruel, L F M

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to compare the oxygen uptake (VO2), the muscle activity of lower limbs, and the vertical ground reaction force (V-GRF) of women performing water aerobic exercises at different intensities. 12 young women performed the experimental protocol, which consisted of 3 water exercises (stationary running [SR], frontal kick [FK] and cross country skiing [CCS]) at 3 intensities (first and second ventilatory thresholds and maximum effort). A two-way repeated measures ANOVA was used. Regarding VO2, different responses between intensities (p<0.001) were found, and values between exercises were similar. For electromyographic activity (EMG), differences between intensities for all muscles (p<0.001) were found. Greater EMG signals were observed in the FK compared to SR for rectus femoris, semitendinosus, vastus lateralis and biceps femoris muscles (p<0.05). Regarding V-GRF, there was an increase in the V-GRF at greater intensities compared to the first ventilatory threshold (p=0.001). In addition, lower values were found during CCS compared to the SR and FK exercises (p<0.001). Thus, greater cardiorespiratory and neuromuscular responses were observed with increasing intensity. Exercises such as CCS could be used to attenuate the V-GRF; if the purpose is to reduce the muscular activity of lower limbs at a specific intensity, SR could be recommended.

  10. Kinematics of active deformation in the Sulaiman Lobe and Range, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, M.; Shen-Tu, B.; Holt, W. E.; Davis, D. M.

    2000-06-01

    The western margin of the Indian plate is highly oblique to the direction of convergence between India and Asia and represents an excellent example of large-scale oblique continent-continent collision. Determining the strain field in western Pakistan and how it relates to the plate motion and plate margin geometry affords an exceptional opportunity for understanding oblique margin processes in general. Through the inversion of regional and teleseismic body waves, we have determined the source parameters of 10 moderate-sized earthquakes that occurred between 1964 and 1985 in and around the Sulaiman Range, Pakistan. The earthquakes are dominantly thrust events with slip vectors that are approximately perpendicular to the lobate Sulaiman mountain front. Slip vector orientations rotate 60°-70° from a N-S to a WNW-ESE direction of compression, consistent with the geometries of the complex, festoon-shaped mountain belts of this margin. We have estimated the spatial variation of the horizontal strain rate and velocity fields within Sulaiman using vertically averaged models that accommodate plate motion constraints within a deforming layer. The most important factors determining the style of strain rotation in the Sulaiman Lobe and Range are the presence of pure strike-slip motion along the Chaman Fault, and the relatively rigid and undeformed Katawaz Basin that is therefore allowed to translate obliquely relative to India. This same conclusion is obtained using either a three-dimensional, frictional, analogue model with significant basal tractions or a thin sheet viscous numerical model without basal tractions. Thrusting in a predominantly NW-SE direction in the Sulaiman Range accommodates 5-14 mm/yr of N-S motion between India-Eurasia and 3-6 mm/yr of E-W shortening. Seismic moment release this century within the India-Eurasia plate boundary zone, west of the western Himalayan Syntaxis, constitutes roughly 40% of the expected total seismic moment release for this time

  11. Prediction of ground reaction forces and moments during various activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Fluit, R; Andersen, M S; Kolk, S; Verdonschot, N; Koopman, H F J M

    2014-07-18

    Inverse dynamics based simulations on musculoskeletal models is a commonly used method for the analysis of human movement. Due to inaccuracies in the kinematic and force plate data, and a mismatch between the model and the subject, the equations of motion are violated when solving the inverse dynamics problem. As a result, dynamic inconsistency will exist and lead to residual forces and moments. In this study, we present and evaluate a computational method to perform inverse dynamics-based simulations without force plates, which both improves the dynamic consistency as well as removes the model׳s dependency on measured external forces. Using the equations of motion and a scaled musculoskeletal model, the ground reaction forces and moments (GRF&Ms) are derived from three-dimensional full-body motion. The method entails a dynamic contact model and optimization techniques to solve the indeterminacy problem during a double contact phase and, in contrast to previously proposed techniques, does not require training or empirical data. The method was applied to nine healthy subjects performing several Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and evaluated with simultaneously measured force plate data. Except for the transverse ground reaction moment, no significant differences (P>0.05) were found between the mean predicted and measured GRF&Ms for almost all ADLs. The mean residual forces and moments, however, were significantly reduced (P>0.05) in almost all ADLs using our method compared to conventional inverse dynamic simulations. Hence, the proposed method may be used instead of raw force plate data in human movement analysis using inverse dynamics.

  12. Environmental assessment of ground water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming. Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This document is an environmental assessment of the Spook, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. It analyzes the impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action for ground water compliance. The proposed action is to comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for the UMTRA Project sites (40 CFR Part 192) by meeting supplemental standards based on the limited use ground water at the Spook site. This proposed action would not require site activities, including ground water monitoring, characterization, or institutional controls. Ground water in the uppermost aquifer was contaminated by uranium processing activities at the Spook site, which is in Converse County, approximately 48 miles (mi) (77 kilometers [km]) northeast of Casper, Wyoming. Constituents from the site infiltrated and migrated into the uppermost aquifer, forming a plume that extends approximately 2500 feet (ft) (800 meters [m]) downgradient from the site. The principal site-related hazardous constituents in this plume are uranium, selenium, and nitrate. Background ground water in the uppermost aquifer at the site is considered limited use. It is neither a current nor a potential source of drinking water because of widespread, ambient contamination that cannot be cleaned up using treatment methods reasonably employed in public water supply systems (40 CFR {section} 192.11 (e)). Background ground water quality also is poor due to first, naturally occurring conditions (natural uranium mineralization associated with an alteration front), and second, the effects of widespread human activity not related to uranium milling operations (uranium exploration and mining activities). There are no known exposure pathways to humans, animals, or plants from the contaminated ground water in the uppermost aquifer because it does not discharge to lower aquifers, to the surface, or to surface water.

  13. Estimating Youth Locomotion Ground Reaction Forces Using an Accelerometer-Based Activity Monitor

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Jennifer M.; Hawkins, David A.; Beckett, Laurel

    2012-01-01

    To address a variety of questions pertaining to the interactions between physical activity, musculoskeletal loading and musculoskeletal health/injury/adaptation, simple methods are needed to quantify, outside a laboratory setting, the forces acting on the human body during daily activities. The purpose of this study was to develop a statistically based model to estimate peak vertical ground reaction force (pVGRF) during youth gait. 20 girls (10.9±0.9 years) and 15 boys (12.5±0.6 years) wore a Biotrainer AM over their right hip. Six walking and six running trials were completed after a standard warm-up. Average AM intensity (g) and pVGRF (N) during stance were determined. Repeated measures mixed effects regression models to estimate pVGRF from Biotrainer activity monitor acceleration in youth (girls 10–12, boys 12–14 years) while walking and running were developed. Log transformed pVGRF had a statistically significant relationship with activity monitor acceleration, centered mass, sex (girl), type of locomotion (run), and locomotion type-acceleration interaction controlling for subject as a random effect. A generalized regression model without subject specific random effects was also developed. The average absolute differences between the actual and predicted pVGRF were 5.2% (1.6% standard deviation) and 9% (4.2% standard deviation) using the mixed and generalized models, respectively. The results of this study support the use of estimating pVGRF from hip acceleration using a mixed model regression equation. PMID:23133564

  14. Antimicrobial activity of the pygidial gland secretion of three ground beetle species (Insecta: Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenadić, Marija; Soković, Marina; Glamočlija, Jasmina; Ćirić, Ana; Perić-Mataruga, Vesna; Ilijin, Larisa; Tešević, Vele; Vujisić, Ljubodrag; Todosijević, Marina; Vesović, Nikola; Ćurčić, Srećko

    2016-04-01

    The antimicrobial properties of the pygidial gland secretions released by the adults of the three ground beetle species, Carabus ullrichii, C. coriaceus, and Abax parallelepipedus, have been tested. Microdilution method was applied for detection of minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), and minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFCs). Additionally, morpho-histology of the pygidial glands is investigated. We have tested 16 laboratory and clinical strains of human pathogens—eight bacterial both gram-positive and gram-negative species and eight fungal species. The pygidial secretion samples of C. ullrichii have showed the strongest antimicrobial effect against all strains of treated bacteria and fungi. Staphylococcus aureus, Lysteria monocytogenes, and Salmonella typhimurium proved to be the most sensitive bacterial strains. Penicillium funiculosum proved to be the most sensitive micromycete, while P. ochrochloron and P. verrucosum var . cyclopium the most resistant micromycetes. The pygidial secretion of C. coriaceus has showed antibacterial potential solely against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and antifungal activity against Aspergillus fumigatus, A. versicolor, A. ochraceus, and P. ochrochloron. Antibacterial properties of pygidial gland secretion of A. parallelepipedus were achieved against P. aeruginosa, while antifungal activity was detected against five of the eight tested micromycetes (A. fumigatus, A. versicolor, A. ochraceus, Trichoderma viride, and P. verrucosum var . cyclopium). Commercial antibiotics Streptomycin and Ampicillin and mycotics Ketoconazole and Bifonazole, applied as the positive controls, showed higher antibacterial/antifungal properties for all bacterial and fungal strains. The results of this observation might have a significant impact on the environmental aspects and possible medical purpose in the future.

  15. Tragaldabas: a muon ground-based detector for the study of the solar activity; first observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Blanco, Juan

    2016-04-01

    A new RPC-based cosmic ray detector, TRAGALDABAS (acronym of "TRAsGo for the AnaLysis of the nuclear matter Decay, the Atmosphere, the earth's B-field And the Solar activity") has been installed at the Univ. of Santiago de Compostela, Spain (N:42°52'34",W:8°33'37"). The detector, in its present layout, consists of three 1.8 m2 planes of three 1mm-gap glass RPCs. Each plane is readout with 120 pads with grounded guard electrodes between them to minimize the crosstalk noise. The main performances of the detectors are: an arrival time resolution of about ~300 ps, a tracking angular resolution below 3°, a detection efficiency close to 1, and a solid angle acceptance of ~5 srad. TRAGALDABAS will be able to monitor the cosmic ray low energy component strongly modulated by solar activity by mean the observation of secondary muons from the interaction between cosmic rays and atmospheric molecules. Its cadence and its angular resolution will allow to study in detail, small variations in cosmic ray anisotropy. These variations can be a key parameter to understand the effect of solar disturbances on the propagation of cosmic ray in the inner heliosphere and, maybe, provide a new tool for space weather analysis. In this work first TRAGALDABAS observations of solar events are shown

  16. Antimicrobial activity of the pygidial gland secretion of three ground beetle species (Insecta: Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    PubMed

    Nenadić, Marija; Soković, Marina; Glamočlija, Jasmina; Ćirić, Ana; Perić-Mataruga, Vesna; Ilijin, Larisa; Tešević, Vele; Vujisić, Ljubodrag; Todosijević, Marina; Vesović, Nikola; Ćurčić, Srećko

    2016-04-01

    The antimicrobial properties of the pygidial gland secretions released by the adults of the three ground beetle species, Carabus ullrichii, C. coriaceus, and Abax parallelepipedus, have been tested. Microdilution method was applied for detection of minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), and minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFCs). Additionally, morpho-histology of the pygidial glands is investigated. We have tested 16 laboratory and clinical strains of human pathogens--eight bacterial both gram-positive and gram-negative species and eight fungal species. The pygidial secretion samples of C. ullrichii have showed the strongest antimicrobial effect against all strains of treated bacteria and fungi. Staphylococcus aureus, Lysteria monocytogenes, and Salmonella typhimurium proved to be the most sensitive bacterial strains. Penicillium funiculosum proved to be the most sensitive micromycete, while P. ochrochloron and P. verrucosum var. cyclopium the most resistant micromycetes. The pygidial secretion of C. coriaceus has showed antibacterial potential solely against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and antifungal activity against Aspergillus fumigatus, A. versicolor, A. ochraceus, and P. ochrochloron. Antibacterial properties of pygidial gland secretion of A. parallelepipedus were achieved against P. aeruginosa, while antifungal activity was detected against five of the eight tested micromycetes (A. fumigatus, A. versicolor, A. ochraceus, Trichoderma viride, and P. verrucosum var. cyclopium). Commercial antibiotics Streptomycin and Ampicillin and mycotics Ketoconazole and Bifonazole, applied as the positive controls, showed higher antibacterial/antifungal properties for all bacterial and fungal strains. The results of this observation might have a significant impact on the environmental aspects and possible medical purpose in the future.

  17. Environmental assessment of ground-water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This report assesses the environmental impacts of the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Spook, Wyoming on ground water. DOE previously characterized the site and monitoring data were collected during the surface remediation. The ground water compliance strategy is to perform no further remediation at the site since the ground water in the aquifer is neither a current nor potential source of drinking water. Under the no-action alternative, certain regulatory requirements would not be met.

  18. Quality-assurance plan for ground-water activities, U.S. Geological Survey, Washington Water Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drost, B. W.

    2005-01-01

    This quality-assurance plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey's Washington Water Science Center, for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of ground-water data. This plan serves as a guide to all Washington Water Science Center personnel involved in ground-water activities, and changes as the needs and requirements of the Washington Water Science Center and Discipline change. Regular updates to this plan represent an integral part of the quality-assurance process.

  19. The paleoclimatic significance of deformation structures in Neoproterozoic successions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, Emmanuelle

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the different types of soft sediment deformation structures that can form in glacial and non-glacial settings and explores the potential use of these structures in resolving long standing debates in paleoenvironmental reconstructions of Neoproterozoic glacigenic successions. Soft sediment deformation structures are created when compressional, gravitational or shear stress is applied to unlithified sediments during or shortly after deposition. In subglacial or ice marginal glacial settings, shear and compressional stress imparted by ice moving on top of a deformable substrate or advancing ice buldozing unlithified ice marginal sediments can result in a wide range of folding, faulting and shear structures. In glaciofluvial or stagnant ice marginal setting, gravitational collapse and remobilization of sediments associated with the melting of buried ice can result in normal faulting and broad folding. In glaciolacustrine or glaciomarine settings, compressional, shear and gravitational types of deformation structures can occur as a result of grounding ice or icebergs, rapid sedimentation and reworking downslope associated with high sedimentation rates. In non glacial settings, similar deformation structures can form as a result of slope instability and reworking of sediments downslope, rapid sedimentation, seismic shaking, wave induced shearing or loading. In this context, two case studies are presented to demonstrate the type of paleoenvironmental information that an analysis of deformation structures can provide. In the first case study, analysis of deformation in the Port Askaig Formation (Scotland) reveals a distinctive stratigraphic distribution of deformation structures. The types of deformation observed together with their recurrence over several 100s of meters and their basinal context are used to infer a seismic origin for the deformation, which in turn suggests a significant tectonic control on sedimentation atop a record of ice margin

  20. Neotectonic deformation models for probabilistic seismic hazard: a study in the External Dinarides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastelic, Vanja; Carafa, Michele M. C.; Visini, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    In Europe, common input data types for seismic hazard evaluation include earthquake catalogues, seismic zonation models and ground motion models, all with well-constrained epistemic uncertainties. In contrast, neotectonic deformation models and their related uncertainties are rarely considered in earthquake forecasting and seismic hazard studies. In this study, for the first time in Europe, we developed a seismic hazard model based exclusively on active fault and geodynamic deformation models. We applied it to the External Dinarides, a slow-deforming fold-and-thrust belt in the Central Mediterranean. The two deformation models furnish consistent long-term earthquake rates above the Mw 4.7 threshold on a latitude/longitude grid with 0.2° spacing. Results suggest that the use of deformation models is a valid alternative to empirical-statistical approaches in earthquake forecasting in slow-deforming regions of Europe. Furthermore, we show that the variability of different deformation models has a comparable effect on the peak ground motion acceleration uncertainty as do the ground motion prediction equations.

  1. Evidence of a shallow persistent magmatic reservoir from joint inversion of gravity and ground deformation data: The 25-26 October 2013 Etna lava fountaining event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Filippo; Currenti, Gilda; Palano, Mimmo; Pepe, Antonio; Pepe, Susi

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the volcanic processes leading to the 25-26 October 2013 lava fountain at Mount Etna, we jointly investigated gravity, GPS, and DInSAR measurements covering the late-June to early-November time interval. We used finite element modeling to infer a shallow magmatic reservoir which (i) inflated since July 2013, (ii) fed the volcanic activity at the summit craters during 25-26 October, and (iii) deflated due to magma drainage related to this volcanic activity. We suggested that this reservoir belongs to a shallow volume, which is located beneath the summit area and is replenished by magma rising from deep reservoirs and fed the short-term volcanic activity, representing a persistent shallow magmatic plumbing system of Etna. In addition, the model results show that there is a large discrepancy between the erupted and shallow reservoir deflation volumes, which could be reasonably attributable to a highly compressible volatile-rich magma.

  2. 2D and 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography imaging of earthquake related ground deformations at the Ancient Roman Forum and Isis Temple of Baelo Claudia (Cádiz, South Spain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Pablo G.

    2010-05-01

    The ancient roman city of Baelo Claudia has been subject of several papers on earthquake environmental effects (EEE) and well as earthquake archaeological effects (EAE). During the field training course on archaeoseismology and palaeoseismology conducted in September 2009 (INQUA-IGCP567 Workshop) held at Baelo Claudia, four Electric Resistivity Tomography (ERT) profiles were carried out, by the teams of the Salamanca University (Spain), RWTH Aachen University (Germany) and the Geological Survey of Spain (IGME). ERT surveys were developed in the eastern side of the ancient roman Forum across the unexcavated sector of the archaeological site heading on the 1st Century AD Isis Temple. Each ERT profile was constituted by a 48 multielectrode array with spacing of 2 m resulting in a total length of investigation of around 384 m. ERT lines were separated 10 m each other resulting in a total research area of 3840 m2 to a mean investigation depth of 16 m. The selected survey configurations were Pole-Dipole and Wenner in order to get detailed information about lateral resistivity contrasts, but with a reasonable depth of investigation. The resulting 2D resistivity pseudosections clearly display deformations of the buried roman pavements which propagated in depth within the pre-roman clayey substratum of the Bolonia Bay area.. 3D modelling of the 2D pseudosections indicates that the observed deformations are related to near-surface landsliding, being possible to calculate the minimum volume of mobilized material. ERT 3D imaging allow to refine previous GPR surveys conducted at this same area and to get a subsurface picture of ground deformations caused by repeated earthquakes during the 1st and 3rd Centuries AD. Preliminary calculated volume for the mobilized materials affecting the foundations of the Isis Temple and Forum clearly points to a minimum ESI-07 VIII Intensity validating previous research in the zone. This study has been supported by the Spanish Research Projects

  3. Estrogen and androgen receptor activities of hydraulic fracturing chemicals and surface and ground water in a drilling-dense region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Davis, J. Wade; Hormann, Anette M.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid rise in natural gas extraction using hydraulic fracturing increases the potential for contamination of surface and ground water from chemicals used throughout the process. Hundreds of products containing more than 750 chemicals and components are potentially used throughout the extraction process, including more than 100 known or suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals. We hypothesized thataselected subset of chemicalsusedin natural gas drilling operationsandalso surface and ground water samples collected in a drilling-dense region of Garfield County, Colorado, would exhibit estrogen and androgen receptor activities. Water samples were collected, solid-phase extracted, and measured for estrogen and androgen receptor activities using reporter gene assays in human cell lines. Of the 39 unique water samples, 89%, 41%, 12%, and 46% exhibited estrogenic, antiestrogenic, androgenic, and antiandrogenic activities, respectively. Testing of a subset of natural gas drilling chemicals revealed novel antiestrogenic, novel antiandrogenic, and limited estrogenic activities. The Colorado River, the drainage basin for this region, exhibited moderate levels of estrogenic, antiestrogenic, and antiandrogenic activities, suggesting that higher localized activity at sites with known natural gas–related spills surrounding the river might be contributing to the multiple receptor activities observed in this water source. The majority of water samples collected from sites in a drilling-dense region of Colorado exhibited more estrogenic, antiestrogenic, or antiandrogenic activities than reference sites with limited nearby drilling operations. Our data suggest that natural gas drilling operationsmayresult in elevated endocrine-disrupting chemical activity in surface and ground water.

  4. Estrogen and androgen receptor activities of hydraulic fracturing chemicals and surface and ground water in a drilling-dense region.

    PubMed

    Kassotis, Christopher D; Tillitt, Donald E; Davis, J Wade; Hormann, Annette M; Nagel, Susan C

    2014-03-01

    The rapid rise in natural gas extraction using hydraulic fracturing increases the potential for contamination of surface and ground water from chemicals used throughout the process. Hundreds of products containing more than 750 chemicals and components are potentially used throughout the extraction process, including more than 100 known or suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals. We hypothesized that a selected subset of chemicals used in natural gas drilling operations and also surface and ground water samples collected in a drilling-dense region of Garfield County, Colorado, would exhibit estrogen and androgen receptor activities. Water samples were collected, solid-phase extracted, and measured for estrogen and androgen receptor activities using reporter gene assays in human cell lines. Of the 39 unique water samples, 89%, 41%, 12%, and 46% exhibited estrogenic, antiestrogenic, androgenic, and antiandrogenic activities, respectively. Testing of a subset of natural gas drilling chemicals revealed novel antiestrogenic, novel antiandrogenic, and limited estrogenic activities. The Colorado River, the drainage basin for this region, exhibited moderate levels of estrogenic, antiestrogenic, and antiandrogenic activities, suggesting that higher localized activity at sites with known natural gas-related spills surrounding the river might be contributing to the multiple receptor activities observed in this water source. The majority of water samples collected from sites in a drilling-dense region of Colorado exhibited more estrogenic, antiestrogenic, or antiandrogenic activities than reference sites with limited nearby drilling operations. Our data suggest that natural gas drilling operations may result in elevated endocrine-disrupting chemical activity in surface and ground water.

  5. 77 FR 51827 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Ground...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ...; Ground Control Plans for Surface Coal Mines and Surface Work Areas of Underground Coal Mines ACTION... (MSHA) sponsored information collection request (ICR) titled, ``Ground Control Plans for Surface Coal Mines and Surface Work Areas of Underground Coal Mines,'' to the Office of Management and Budget...

  6. Slip-rate Estimation of Active Fault by Luminescence Dating on Deformed River Terraces at Tsaotun, Central Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Chen, W.; Lee, C.

    2003-12-01

    This study carried out luminescence ages of the deformed terraces located at Tsaotun in central Taiwan. These terraces are considered as a result of crustal deformation caused by recent activity of the Chelungpu fault, 1999 surface rupture. Since this active fault runs through urban area, it is urgently needed to figure out its neotectonic behavior, including slip-rate and recurrence interval. Based on new ages, we also discuss the terrace correlation and its related structures. The study terraces are all strath terraces with only a few meters of veneered fluvial deposits on top. Due to the strong stream-power, nearly all the outcrops are dominated by fluvial cobbles, which is worst condition to preserve the syndepositional carbonaceous materials. Alternatively, optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating uses sandy quartz as the material and even has longer dating upper limit (up to several hundreds of years). Fortunately, sandy layer are found intercalated within the fluvial cobbles in studying terraces. We adopted the Single-Aliquot Regenerative (SAR) dose protocol on large aliquots of 90-150μ m quartz, which were cleaned using HCL, H2O2 and HF in the usual way. In case of incomplete bleaching during quick deposition, the OSL/TL ratio was adopted to approach the true De. Dosimetry is derived by ICP-MS and XRF analyses. For ascertainment of the initial bleaching of fluvial sediment, the modern samples collected in river bed of Wuhsi were also measured. Based on the results of modern samples, we believe that the residuals are inevitable in younger sediments, especially along the upper stream. On the contrary, the samples older than 10 kyr are little influenced due to the larger age error than the younger ones. The OSL age of the terrace samples in the hanging wall is dated ca. 13 kyr, which has been corrected for poorly-bleaching problem. Comparing to the ages collected down hole in the footwalls, we found out vertical displacements of ca. 67 and 37 m, has been

  7. A review about the mechanisms associated with active deformation, regional uplift and subsidence in southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folguera, Andrés; Gianni, Guido; Sagripanti, Lucía; Rojas Vera, Emilio; Novara, Iván; Colavitto, Bruno; Alvarez, Orlando; Orts, Darío; Tobal, Jonathan; Giménez, Mario; Introcaso, Antonio; Ruiz, Francisco; Martínez, Patricia; Ramos, Victor A.

    2015-12-01

    A broad range of processes acted simultaneously during the Quaternary producing relief in the Andes and adjacent foreland, from the Chilean coast, where the Pacific Ocean floor is being subducted beneath South American, to the Brazilian and the Argentinean Atlantic platform area. This picture shows to be complex and responds to a variety of processes. The Geoid exemplifies this spectrum of uplift mechanisms, since it reflects an important change at 35°S along the Andes and the foreland that could be indicating the presence of dynamic forces modeling the topography with varying intensity through the subduction margin. On the other hand, mountains uplifted in the Atlantic margin, along a vast sector of the Brazilian Atlantic coast and inland regions seem to be created at the area where the passive margin has been hyper-extended and consequently mechanically debilitated and the forearc region shifts eastwardly at a similar rate than the westward advancing continent. Therefore the forearc at the Arica latitudes can be considered as relatively stationary and dynamically sustained by a perpendicular-to-the-margin asthenospheric flow that inhibits trench roll back, determining a highly active orogenic setting at the eastern Andes in the Subandean region. To the south, the Pampean flat subduction zone creates particular conditions for deformation and rapid propagation of the orogenic front producing a high-amplitude orogen. In the southern Central and Patagonian Andes, mountain (orogenic) building processes are attenuated, becoming dominant other mechanisms of exhumation such as the i) impact of mantle plumes originated in the 660 km mantle transition, ii) the ice-masse retreat from the Andes after the Pleistocene producing an isostatic rebound, iii) the dynamic topography associated with the opening of an asthenospheric window during the subduction of the Chile ridge and slab tearing processes, iv) the subduction of oceanic swells linked to transform zones and v) the

  8. InSAR imaging of volcanic deformation over cloud-prone areas - Aleutian islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong

    2007-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) is capable of measuring ground-surface deformation with centimeter-tosubcentimeter precision and spatial resolution of tens-of meters over a relatively large region. With its global coverage and all-weather imaging capability, INSAR is an important technique for measuring ground-surface deformation of volcanoes over cloud-prone and rainy regions such as the Aleutian Islands, where only less than 5 percent of optical imagery is usable due to inclement weather conditions. The spatial distribution of surface deformation data, derived from INSAR images, enables the construction of detailed mechanical models to enhance the study of magmatic processes. This paper reviews the basics of INSAR for volcanic deformation mapping and the INSAR studies of ten Aleutian volcanoes associated with both eruptive and noneruptive activity. These studies demonstrate that all-weather INSAR imaging can improve our understanding of how the Aleutian volcanoes work and enhance our capability to predict future eruptions and associated hazards.

  9. An Evaluation of Activated Bismuth Isotopes in Environmental Samples From the Former Western Pacific Proving Grounds

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W.L.; Brunk, J.A.; Jokela, T.A.

    2000-03-21

    {sup 207}Bi (t{sub 1/2}=32.2 y) was generated by activation of weapons material during a few ''clean'' nuclear tests at the U.S. Western Pacific Proving Grounds of Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. The radionuclides first appeared in the Enewetak environment during 1958 and in the environment of Bikini during 1956. Crater sediments from Bikini with high levels of {sup 207}Bi were analyzed by gamma spectrometry in an attempt to determine the relative concentrations of {sup 208}Bi (t{sup 1/2} = 3.68 x 10{sup 5} y). The bismuth isotopes were probably generated during the ''clean'', 9.3 Mt Poplar test held on 7/12/58. The atom ratio of {sup 208}Bi to {sup 207}Bi (R value) ranges from {approx}12 to over 200 in sections of core sediments from the largest nuclear crater at Bikini atoll. The presence of bismuth in the device is suggested to account for R values in excess of 10.

  10. Ground level photosynthetically active radiation dynamics in stands of Acacia mearnsii De Wild.

    PubMed

    Péllico Netto, Sylvio; Sanquetta, Carlos R; Caron, Braulio O; Behling, Alexandre; Simon, Augusto A; Corte, Ana Paula D; Bamberg, Rogério

    2015-09-01

    The objective is to study the dynamics of photosynthetic radiation reaching the soil surface in stands of Acacia mearnsii De Wild and its influence on height growth in stands. This fact gives rise to the formulation of the following hypothesis for this study: "The reduction of the incidence of light inside the stand of black wattle will cause the inflection point in its height growth when this reaches 4 to 5 m in height, i.e. when the stand is between 2 and 3 years of age". The study was conducted in stands in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, where diameters at breast height, total height and photosynthetically active radiation available at ground level were measured. The frequency tended to be more intense when the age of the stands increases. It was evident that a reduction of light incidence inside the forest occurred, caused by canopy closure. Consequently, closed canopy propitiated the competition of plants. This has affected the conditions for growth in diameter and height of this species, reason why it becomes possible to conceive the occurrence of an inflection point in the growth of these two variables, confirming the formulated hypothesis.

  11. Ground level photosynthetically active radiation dynamics in stands of Acacia mearnsii De Wild.

    PubMed

    Péllico Netto, Sylvio; Sanquetta, Carlos R; Caron, Braulio O; Behling, Alexandre; Simon, Augusto A; Corte, Ana Paula D; Bamberg, Rogério

    2015-09-01

    The objective is to study the dynamics of photosynthetic radiation reaching the soil surface in stands of Acacia mearnsii De Wild and its influence on height growth in stands. This fact gives rise to the formulation of the following hypothesis for this study: "The reduction of the incidence of light inside the stand of black wattle will cause the inflection point in its height growth when this reaches 4 to 5 m in height, i.e. when the stand is between 2 and 3 years of age". The study was conducted in stands in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, where diameters at breast height, total height and photosynthetically active radiation available at ground level were measured. The frequency tended to be more intense when the age of the stands increases. It was evident that a reduction of light incidence inside the forest occurred, caused by canopy closure. Consequently, closed canopy propitiated the competition of plants. This has affected the conditions for growth in diameter and height of this species, reason why it becomes possible to conceive the occurrence of an inflection point in the growth of these two variables, confirming the formulated hypothesis. PMID:26375018

  12. Above- and below-ground methane fluxes and methanotrophic activity in a landfill-cover soil

    SciTech Connect

    Schroth, M.H.; Eugster, W.; Gomez, K.E.; Gonzalez-Gil, G.; Niklaus, P.A.; Oester, P.

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We quantify above- and below-ground CH{sub 4} fluxes in a landfill-cover soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We link methanotrophic activity to estimates of CH{sub 4} loading from the waste body. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methane loading and emissions are highly variable in space and time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eddy covariance measurements yield largest estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Potential methanotrophic activity is high at a location with substantial CH{sub 4} loading. - Abstract: Landfills are a major anthropogenic source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH{sub 4}). However, much of the CH{sub 4} produced during the anaerobic degradation of organic waste is consumed by methanotrophic microorganisms during passage through the landfill-cover soil. On a section of a closed landfill near Liestal, Switzerland, we performed experiments to compare CH{sub 4} fluxes obtained by different methods at or above the cover-soil surface with below-ground fluxes, and to link methanotrophic activity to estimates of CH{sub 4} ingress (loading) from the waste body at selected locations. Fluxes of CH{sub 4} into or out of the cover soil were quantified by eddy-covariance and static flux-chamber measurements. In addition, CH{sub 4} concentrations at the soil surface were monitored using a field-portable FID detector. Near-surface CH{sub 4} fluxes and CH{sub 4} loading were estimated from soil-gas concentration profiles in conjunction with radon measurements, and gas push-pull tests (GPPTs) were performed to quantify rates of microbial CH{sub 4} oxidation. Eddy-covariance measurements yielded by far the largest and probably most representative estimates of overall CH{sub 4} emissions from the test section (daily mean up to {approx}91,500 {mu}mol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}), whereas flux-chamber measurements and CH{sub 4} concentration profiles indicated that at the majority of locations the cover soil was a

  13. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis. PMID:3786010

  14. Antimicrobial activity of the pygidial gland secretion of three ground beetle species (Insecta: Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    PubMed

    Nenadić, Marija; Soković, Marina; Glamočlija, Jasmina; Ćirić, Ana; Perić-Mataruga, Vesna; Ilijin, Larisa; Tešević, Vele; Vujisić, Ljubodrag; Todosijević, Marina; Vesović, Nikola; Ćurčić, Srećko

    2016-04-01

    The antimicrobial properties of the pygidial gland secretions released by the adults of the three ground beetle species, Carabus ullrichii, C. coriaceus, and Abax parallelepipedus, have been tested. Microdilution method was applied for detection of minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), and minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFCs). Additionally, morpho-histology of the pygidial glands is investigated. We have tested 16 laboratory and clinical strains of human pathogens--eight bacterial both gram-positive and gram-negative species and eight fungal species. The pygidial secretion samples of C. ullrichii have showed the strongest antimicrobial effect against all strains of treated bacteria and fungi. Staphylococcus aureus, Lysteria monocytogenes, and Salmonella typhimurium proved to be the most sensitive bacterial strains. Penicillium funiculosum proved to be the most sensitive micromycete, while P. ochrochloron and P. verrucosum var. cyclopium the most resistant micromycetes. The pygidial secretion of C. coriaceus has showed antibacterial potential solely against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and antifungal activity against Aspergillus fumigatus, A. versicolor, A. ochraceus, and P. ochrochloron. Antibacterial properties of pygidial gland secretion of A. parallelepipedus were achieved against P. aeruginosa, while antifungal activity was detected against five of the eight tested micromycetes (A. fumigatus, A. versicolor, A. ochraceus, Trichoderma viride, and P. verrucosum var. cyclopium). Commercial antibiotics Streptomycin and Ampicillin and mycotics Ketoconazole and Bifonazole, applied as the positive controls, showed higher antibacterial/antifungal properties for all bacterial and fungal strains. The results of this observation might have a significant impact on the environmental aspects and possible medical purpose in the future. PMID:27000261

  15. Analysis of slip activity and heterogeneous deformation in tension and tension-creep of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn (wt %) using in-situ SEM experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Boehlert, C. J.; Bieler, T. R.; Crimp, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    The deformation behavior of a Ti-5Al-2.5Sn (wt %) near-α alloy was investigated during in-situ deformation inside a scanning electron microscope. Tensile experiments were performed at 296 K and 728 K (≈0.4 T m), while tensile-creep experiments were performed at 728 K and 763 K. Active deformation systems were identified using electron backscattered diffraction-based slip trace analysis. Both basal and prismatic slip systems were active during the tensile experiments. Basal slip was observed for grains clustered around high Schmid factor orientations, while prismatic slip exhibited less dependence on the crystallographic orientation. The tension-creep experiments revealed less slip but more development of grain boundary ledges than in the higher strain rate tensile experiments. Some of the grain boundary ledges evolved into grain boundary cracks, and grain boundaries oriented nearly perpendicular to the tensile axis formed ledges earlier in the deformation process. Grain boundaries with high misorientations also tended to form ledges earlier than those with lower misorientations. Most of the grain boundary cracks formed in association with grains displaying hard orientations, where the c-axis was nearly perpendicular to the tensile direction. For the tension-creep experiments, pronounced basal slip was observed in the lower-stress creep regime and the activity of prismatic slip increased with increasing creep stress and temperature.

  16. Views of Growing Methane Emissions near Oil and Natural Gas Activity: Satellite, Aircraft, and Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollonige, D. E.; Thompson, A. M.; Diskin, G. S.; Hannigan, J. W.; Nussbaumer, E.

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the discrepancies between current top-down and bottom-up estimates, additional methane (CH4) measurements are necessary for regions surrounding growing oil and natural gas (ONG) development. We have evaluated satellite measurements of CH4 in US regions with ONG operations for their application as "top-down" constraints (part of the NASA Air Quality Applied Sciences Team (AQAST) project). For validation of the satellite instruments' sensitivities to emitted gases, we focus on regions where the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) campaign deployed ground and aircraft measurements in Maryland (2011), California and Texas (2013), and Colorado (2014). The largest CH4 signals were observed in the Greater Green River and Powder River Basins using Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) Representative Tropospheric Volume Mixing Ratio (RTVMR) measurements. A long-term comparison between a ground remote-sensing Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) at Boulder and TES for 2010-2013 shows good correlation and differences ranging 2.5-5% for their yearly distribution of total column CH4. To determine any correlation between lower/mid-tropospheric CH4 (where a thermal IR sensor, such as TES, is most sensitive) and near-surface/boundary CH4 (where sources emit), we analyze the variability of DISCOVER-AQ aircraft profiles using principal component analysis and assess the correlation between near-surface (0-2 km) and mid-tropospheric (>2 km) CH4 concentrations. Using these relationships, we estimate near-surface CH4 using mid-tropospheric satellite measurements based on the partial column amounts within vertical layers with a linear regression. From this analysis, we will demonstrate whether the uncertainties of satellite-estimated near-surface CH4 are comparable to observed variability near ONG activity. These results will assist validation of satellite instrument

  17. Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) point cloud ground filtering for area of an active landslide (Doren, Western Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodić, Nenad; Cvijetinović, Željko; Milenković, Milutin; Dorninger, Peter; Mitrović, Momir

    2014-05-01

    Ground filtering of point cloud is the primary step required for Digital Terrain Model (DTM) generation. The procedure is especially interesting for forested areas, since LiDAR systems can measure terrain elevation under vegetation cover with a high level of penetration. This work analyzes the potential of ALS data ground filtering for area of an active landslide. The results of ALS filtering, for example, may improve geomorphological and motion-detection studies. ALS data was collected during flight campaign 2011 under leaf-off conditions for Doren region, Vorarlberg, Western Austria. In this area, non-ground objects are mostly low vegetation such as shrubs, small trees etc. The vegetation is more dense in lower part of the landslide where erosion is smaller. Vegetation points can be removed based on the hypothesis that these are significantly higher than their neighboring points. However, in case of steep terrain, ground points may have the same heights as vegetation points, and thus, local slope should be considered. Also, if terrain roughness increases, the classification may become even more complex. Software system OPALS (Orientation and Processing of Airborne Laser Scanning data, Vienna University of Technology) was used for processing the ALS data. Labeling ground points has been made using physical and geometrical attributes (parameters) of ALS points. Also additional attributes were calculated in order to improve extraction. Since bare ground surface is usually smooth and continuous unlike vegetation, standard deviation of local elevations was used as roughness measure to differentiate these surfaces. EchoRatio (ER) was adopted as a measure of surface penetrability, while number of echoes and differentiation between echoes (EchoNumber) were also deployed in filtering. Since the ground points are measurements from bare-earth that are usually the lowest surface features in a local area, normalized height was defined as a rank of neighboring points

  18. Quaternary hinterland evolution of the active Banda Arc: Surface uplift and neotectonic deformation recorded by coral terraces at Kisar, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Jonathan; Harris, Ron; Chiang, Hong-Wei; Cox, Nicole; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Nelson, Stephen T.; Prasetyadi, Carolus; Rianto, Arif

    2013-09-01

    Coral terrace surveys and U-series ages of coral yield a surface uplift rate of ∼0.5 m/ka for Kisar Island, which is an emergent island in the hinterland of the active Banda arc-continent collision. Based on this rate, Kisar first emerged from the ocean as recently as ∼450 ka. These uplifted terraces are gently warped in a pattern of east-west striking folds. These folds are strike parallel to more developed thrust-related folds of similar wavelength imaged by a seismic reflection profile just offshore. This deformation shows that the emergence of Kisar is influenced by forearc closure along the south-dipping Kisar Thrust. However, the pinnacle shape of Kisar and the protrusion of its metamorphic rocks through the forearc basin sediments also suggest a component of extrusion along shear zones or active doming. Coral encrusts the island coast in many locations over 100 m above sea level. Terrace morphology and coral ages are best explained by recognizing major surfaces as mostly growth terraces and minor terraces as mostly erosional into older terraces. All reliable and referable coral U-series ages determined by MC-ICP-MS correlate with marine isotope stage (MIS) 5e (118-128 ka). The only unaltered coral samples are found below 6 m elevation; however an unaltered Tridacna (giant clam) shell in growth position at 95 m elevation yields a U-series age of 195 ± 31 ka, which corresponds to MIS 7. This age agrees with the best-fit uplift model for the island. Loose deposits of unaltered coral fragments found at elevations between 8 and 20 m yield U-series ages of <100 years and may represent paleotsunami deposits from previously undocumented tectonic activity in the region.

  19. Application oft triple collocation in ground-based validation of soil moisture active/passive (SMAP) level 2 data products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The validation of the soil moisture retrievals from the recently-launched NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) satellite is important prior to their full public release. Uncertainty in attempts to characterize footprint-scale surface-layer soil moisture using point-scale ground observations has ...

  20. Ground penetrating radar survey of the ice-filled active crater of Mount Baker, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, M.; Clark, D. H.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.

    2010-12-01

    Sherman Crater, the center of volcanic activity at Mount Baker, in northwest Washington, provides an excellent site to study glacier dynamics in an active crater because of its history of sudden, significant increases in geothermal activity, its confined geometry, the potential hazards it poses to downstream reservoirs, and the paucity of recent research related to these hazards. We present results from a ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey of the crater conducted in the summers of 2009 and 2010, including characterization of the subglacial crater morphology, estimates for the crater glacier’s volume, maximum depth, annual mass balance and surface velocity and for the crater’s geothermal flux density. We used a GSSI SIR-3000 GPR system and a low frequency (80 MHz) antenna in common-offset (reflection) collection mode to image subglacial conditions along several west-east and south-north transects within the crater. We processed the GPR data with GSSI’s RADAN 6.0 and paired the surface elevations of each transect to the ice-surface topography using GPS locations and spot altimeter readings. GPR profiles reveal several sets of distinct basal and englacial reflectors. Along west-east (longitudinal) transects, the crater’s bedrock topography largely follows the glacier’s surface (high to the west, descending to the east), but the ice thins dramatically along the margin nearest the crater rim’s eastern breach. The prominent basal reflectors in the GPR transects are consistent with an ice/hydrothermally altered rock interface, but short more well-defined segments suggest the presence of bedrock (towards the center of the crater) and water (near the eastern breach) at the base of the ice. GPR data combined with surface ice melting measurements yield a first-order estimate for the area-averaged accumulation rate of 4.8 +/- 0.1 m yr-1 and ablation rate of 2.4 +/- 0.3 m yr-1 water equivalent from surface melting. The resulting calculated geothermal flux for

  1. Remote ischemia preconditioning increases red blood cell deformability through red blood cell-nitric oxide synthase activation.

    PubMed

    Grau, Marijke; Kollikowski, Alexander; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2016-09-12

    Remote ischemia preconditioning (rIPC), short cycles of ischemia (I) and reperfusion (R) of a region remote from the heart, protects against myocardial I/R injury. This effect is triggered by endothelial derived nitric oxide (NO) production. Red blood cells (RBC) are also capable of NO production and it is hypothesized that the beneficial effect of rIPC in terms of cardioprotection is strengthened by increased RBC dependent NO production and improved RBC function after rIPC maneuver. For this purpose, twenty male participants were subjected to four cycles of no-flow ischemia with subsequent reactive hyperemia within the forearm. Blood sampling and measurement of blood pressures and heart rate were carried out pre intervention, after each cycle and 15 min post intervention at both the non-treated and treated arm. These are the first results that show improved RBC deformability in the treated arm after rIPC cycles 1- 4 caused by significantly increased RBC-NO synthase activation. This in turn was associated to increased NO production in both arms after rIPC cycles 3 + 4. Also, systolic and diastolic blood pressures were decreased after rIPC. The findings lead to the conclusion that the cardioprotective effects associated with rIPC include improvement of the RBC-NOS/NO signaling in RBC.

  2. Active tectonic deformation along rejuvenated faults in tropical Borneo: Inferences obtained from tectono-geomorphic evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Manoj Joseph; Menier, David; Siddiqui, Numair; Kumar, Shashi Gaurav; Authemayou, Christine

    2016-08-01

    active folding of the Rajang Group fold-thrust belt to present and these events reactivated old major faults and minor related dislocations. From geomorphic analysis associated with sedimentary record, we posit that the terrain could have undergone high uplift rates since 5 Ma or multi-phased uplift with periodic intermittent pulses of high and low uplift rates.

  3. An Overview of JAXA's Ground-Observation Activities for HAYABUSA Reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Kazuhisa; Yamamoto, Masa-Yuki; Abe, Shinsuke; Ishihara, Yoshiaki; Iiyama, Ohmi; Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Furumoto, Muneyoshi; Takayanagi, Hiroki; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Yanagisawa, Toshifumi; Kurosaki, Hirohisa; Shoemaker, Michael; Ueda, Masayoshi; Shiba, Yasuo; Suzuki, Masaharu

    2011-10-01

    On 2010 June 13, the HAYABUSA asteroid explorer returned to Earth and underwent a super-orbital atmospheric reentry. In order to recover the sample return capsule and to take ground-based measurements, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency organized a ground-observation team and performed optical tracking of the capsule, spectroscopy of the fireball, and measurements of infrasounds and shock waves generated by the fireball. In this article, an overview of the ground-based observation is presented, and an outline of the preliminary results derived from observations is reported.

  4. Investigation of remnant versus active deformation in the lithosphere beneath south Africa from shear-wave splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    emuh, M.; Nyblade, A.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    South Africa is comprised of several continental blocks formed during previous collisional events, which date back 2-3 Ga. The three main blocks known as the Pietersburg, Kimberley, and Witwatersrand blocks are delineated by ancient subduction boundaries such as the Colesberg lineament. We consider whether these continental blocks retain remnant deformation at lithospheric depths from ancient collisional events or are governed by stresses due to current plate motion and mantle flow. We use shear-wave splitting methods to study seismic anisotropy from teleseismic phases. Splitting measurements are obtained by minimizing the smallest eigenvalue, maximizing the ratio of the smallest and largest eigenvalues, and rotation correlation, using the graphical user interface Splitlab. We only consider results that show consistency between multiple methods. The seismic data was collected from a new deployment of AfricaArray stations in south Africa and consists of 28 earthquake events. Earthquakes used in this study have a good azimuthal distribution with the poorest coverage only in the NW and S directions. Stations located within the Witwatersrand block display consistent results with a NE fast direction and an average delay time of 1.01 +/- 0.4 s. One station west of the Colesberg lineament in the Kimberley block yields a NW-SE fast direction for all measurements and is nearly perpendicular to results from stations east of this boundary. Stations south of Kaapvaal craton show dependence on the back azimuth of earthquake arrivals. Paths which travel through the Namaqua-Natal fold belt all produce N-S fast directions with average delay times of 0.9 s. Raypaths that travel through the southern Saldania fold belt produce NW-SE fast directions. We suggest that seismic anisotropy in this region represents active deformation in the Witwatersrand block dictated by current tectonic stresses and absolute plate motion. Remnant fabric from ancient tectonic collisional events may still

  5. Active Deformation in the Greater Himalayan Zone in Western Nepal from Inversion of New (U-Th)/He Cooling Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. E.; Burbank, D.

    2015-12-01

    Much of the central Himalaya features an abrupt rise in mean elevation from ~1.5 km in the Lesser Himalaya to ~4-5 km Greater Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau. This physiographic transition is known as PT2, and is often interpreted as the surface expression of transport over a ramp in the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT). In western Nepal, however, the same rise in elevation occurs over two distinct topographic steps (PT2-N and PT2-S). In previous work, Harvey et al. (2015) argue that this anomalous topography is the result of recent southward-migration of mid-crustal deformation along the MHT. Due to the seismogenic potential of the MHT it is important to constrain its geometry in the western Nepal seismic gap, which has not had a large earthquake in over 600 years. To test the above hypothesis, we perform [U-Th]/He dating on 39 apatite and 47 zircon samples collected along seven relief transects throughout western Nepal. We constrain exhumation histories by inverting these new cooling ages with the 3-D thermo-kinematic model Pecube. Five transects collected from the Greater Himalaya north of PT2-N are best fit by relatively rapid exhumation rates (~1-2 km/Myr) since ~4 Ma. The other two, collected from farther south near PT2-S, require rapid (~1-2 km/Myr) exhumation until around 8-11 Ma, followed by much slower (~0.1-0.2 km/Myr) exhumation until at least the late Pliocene. Assuming that exhumation rates reflect uplift rates, the rapid Plio-Pleistocene exhumation in the Greater Himalaya north of PT2-N suggest that this physiographic transition is similar to that at the foot of the Greater Himalaya in central Nepal. It follows that active deformation is occurring along a NW-trend as much as 100 km farther north than would be expected if simply projecting PT2 across western Nepal. This finding is consistent with transport over a more northerly MHT ramp or perhaps oblique slip along the recently identified, surface-breaking WNFZ. Although the geomorphology and microseismicity

  6. On the use of the activation energy concept to investigate analyte and network deformations in entangled polymer solution capillary electrophoresis of synthetic polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Cottet, H; Gareil, P

    2001-01-01

    The activation energy associated with the electrophoretic migration of an analyte under given electrolyte conditions can be accessed through the determination of the analyte electrophoretic mobility at various temperatures. In the case of the electrophoretic separation of polyelectrolytes in the presence of an entangled polymer network, activation energy can be regarded as the energy needed by the analyte to overcome the obstacles created by the separating network. Any deformation undergone by the analyte or the network is expected to induce a decrease in the activation energy. In this work, the electrophoretic mobilities of poly(styrenesulfonates) (PSSs) of various molecular weights (Mr 16 x 10(3) to 990 x 10(3)) were determined in entangled polyethylene oxide (PEO) solutions as a function of temperature (in the 17-60 degrees C range) and the PSS activation energies were calculated. The influences of the PSS molecular weight, blob sizes zetab of the separating network (related to the PEO concentration), ionic strength of the electrolyte and electric field strength (75-600 V/cm) were investigated. The results were interpreted in terms of analyte and network deformations and were confronted with those previously obtained for DNA migration in polymer solutions and chemical gels. For a radius of gyration Rgactivation energy increases with the PSS molecular mass, while the reverse is true for Rg>zetab, suggesting PSS and network deformations in the latter case. Increasing ionic strength resulted in an increase in the PSS activation energy, because of the decrease of their radii of gyration, which makes them less deformable. Finally, the activation energies of all the PSSs are a decreasing function of field strength and at high field strength tend to reach a constant value close to that for a small molecule.

  7. Transcriptional responses, metabolic activity and mouthpart deformities in natural populations of Chironomus riparius larvae exposed to environmental pollutants.

    PubMed

    Planelló, Rosario; Servia, María J; Gómez-Sande, Pablo; Herrero, Óscar; Cobo, Fernando; Morcillo, Gloria

    2015-04-01

    Biomarkers are an important tool in laboratory assays that link exposure or effect of specific toxicants to key molecular and cellular events, but they have not been widely used in invertebrate populations exposed to complex mixtures of environmental contaminants in their natural habitats. The present study focused on a battery of biomarkers and their comparative analysis in natural populations of the benthic larvae of Chironomus riparius (Diptera), sampled in three differentially polluted rivers (the Con, Sar, and Louro in Galicia, Spain). In our study, some parameters were identified, such as hsp70 gene activity, GST enzymatic activity, total glycogen content and mouthpart deformities, which showed significant differences among populations from the three rivers that differed in the levels and types of sedimentary contaminants analyzed (metals, organic-chlorine pesticides, alkylphenols, pharmaceutical, and personal care products). In contrast to these sensitive biomarkers, other parameters showed no significant differences (hsc70 gene, EcR gene, P450 gene, RNA:DNA ratio, total protein content), and were stable even when comparing field and nonexposed laboratory populations. The hsp70 gene seems to be particularly sensitive to conditions of pollutant exposure, while its constitutive counterpart hsc70 showed invariable expression, suggesting that the hsc70/hsp70 ratio may be a potential indicator of polluted environments. Although further studies are required to understand the correlation between molecular responses and the ecological effects of pollutants on natural populations, the results provide new data about the biological responses to multiple-stressor environments. This field study adds new molecular endpoints, including gene expression, as suitable tools that, complementing other ecotoxicological parameters, may help to improve the methodologies of freshwater monitoring under the increasing burden of xenobiotics. PMID:23893657

  8. Transcriptional responses, metabolic activity and mouthpart deformities in natural populations of Chironomus riparius larvae exposed to environmental pollutants.

    PubMed

    Planelló, Rosario; Servia, María J; Gómez-Sande, Pablo; Herrero, Óscar; Cobo, Fernando; Morcillo, Gloria

    2015-04-01

    Biomarkers are an important tool in laboratory assays that link exposure or effect of specific toxicants to key molecular and cellular events, but they have not been widely used in invertebrate populations exposed to complex mixtures of environmental contaminants in their natural habitats. The present study focused on a battery of biomarkers and their comparative analysis in natural populations of the benthic larvae of Chironomus riparius (Diptera), sampled in three differentially polluted rivers (the Con, Sar, and Louro in Galicia, Spain). In our study, some parameters were identified, such as hsp70 gene activity, GST enzymatic activity, total glycogen content and mouthpart deformities, which showed significant differences among populations from the three rivers that differed in the levels and types of sedimentary contaminants analyzed (metals, organic-chlorine pesticides, alkylphenols, pharmaceutical, and personal care products). In contrast to these sensitive biomarkers, other parameters showed no significant differences (hsc70 gene, EcR gene, P450 gene, RNA:DNA ratio, total protein content), and were stable even when comparing field and nonexposed laboratory populations. The hsp70 gene seems to be particularly sensitive to conditions of pollutant exposure, while its constitutive counterpart hsc70 showed invariable expression, suggesting that the hsc70/hsp70 ratio may be a potential indicator of polluted environments. Although further studies are required to understand the correlation between molecular responses and the ecological effects of pollutants on natural populations, the results provide new data about the biological responses to multiple-stressor environments. This field study adds new molecular endpoints, including gene expression, as suitable tools that, complementing other ecotoxicological parameters, may help to improve the methodologies of freshwater monitoring under the increasing burden of xenobiotics.

  9. Dynamic performance of MEMS deformable mirrors for use in an active/adaptive two-photon microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Christian C.; Foster, Warren B.; Downey, Ryan D.; Arrasmith, Christopher L.; Dickensheets, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Active optics can facilitate two-photon microscopic imaging deep in tissue. We are investigating fast focus control mirrors used in concert with an aberration correction mirror to control the axial position of focus and system aberrations dynamically during scanning. With an adaptive training step, sample-induced aberrations may be compensated as well. If sufficiently fast and precise, active optics may be able to compensate under-corrected imaging optics as well as sample aberrations to maintain diffraction-limited performance throughout the field of view. Toward this end we have measured a Boston Micromachines Corporation Multi-DM 140 element deformable mirror, and a Revibro Optics electrostatic 4-zone focus control mirror to characterize dynamic performance. Tests for the Multi-DM included both step response and sinusoidal frequency sweeps of specific Zernike modes. For the step response we measured 10%-90% rise times for the target Zernike amplitude, and wavefront rms error settling times. Frequency sweeps identified the 3dB bandwidth of the mirror when attempting to follow a sinusoidal amplitude trajectory for a specific Zernike mode. For five tested Zernike modes (defocus, spherical aberration, coma, astigmatism and trefoil) we find error settling times for mode amplitudes up to 400nm to be less than 52 us, and 3 dB frequencies range from 6.5 kHz to 10 kHz. The Revibro Optics mirror was tested for step response only, with error settling time of 80 μs for a large 3 um defocus step, and settling time of only 18 μs for a 400nm spherical aberration step. These response speeds are sufficient for intra-scan correction at scan rates typical of two-photon microscopy.

  10. Faults Activities And Crustal Deformation Along The Arc-Continent Collision Boundary, Eastern Taiwan - Observed From Persistent Scatterer SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Jiun-Yee; Chang, Chung-Pai; Hooper, Andrew; Chang, Yo-Ho; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Chang, Tsui-Yu

    2010-05-01

    Located in the southeastern periphery of the Eurasian plate, eastern Taiwan marks the collional boundary between the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea plate. These two plates converge at about 8 cm/yr near Taiwan and nearly half of the shortening is consumed in eastern Taiwan. There have been many studies in this area about the dynamics of the plate convergence, however, most of the geodetic studies focused on small area (strainmeter), with very few data points (GPS), or only gather data along a specific profile (leveling). We applied the Persistent Scatterer SAR Interferometry in the Longitudinal Valley of eastern Taiwan to observe temporally-variable processes using both ERS and Envisat data. At the same time, leveling and GPS data were measured for the auxiliary tool to verify the deformation rate in this area. Our result indicated that although the area is under active collision, faults do not move in the same fashion along the boundary. In the very northern part of the collided arc, small subsidence has been detected, while in the north-central part very few activity is observed. In the central and southern part of the collisional boundary, patches of faults are moving as rapidly as 15 mm/yr along radar line-of-sight. In addition. between late 2004 and middle 2005 there had been an earthquake swarm consists of shallow earthquakes, which coincided with PSI observation of a large vertical displacement. The comparison between our leveling data and PS results indicated PSI is a reliable tool even in the highly vegetated area in eastern Taiwan.

  11. [Influence of ADP-ribose, AMP and adenosine on bioelectric activity of hibernating ground squirrel atrium and papillary muscle].

    PubMed

    Kuz'min, V S; Abramochkin, D V; Sukhova, G S; Rozenshtraukh, L V

    2008-01-01

    The aim of work was to investigate effects of adenosine, AMP and ADP-ribose (1x10(-5)) on bioelectric activity of atrium and papillary muscle of nonhibernating (rat) and hibernating (Yakutian ground squirrel) animals. Action potential (AP) was registered with use of standard microelectrode technique. AP duration (APD) at level of 90% repolarisation in rat atrium in control experiments was 30+/-5 ms, APD at level of 50% repolarisation was 12+/-2 ms. APD at level of 90% repolarisation in rat papillary muscle was 56+/-7 ms, at level of 50% repolarisation was 18+/-2 ms. APD at level of 90% repolarisation in ground squirrel atrium was 77+/-6, APD at level of 50% repolarisation was 38+/-6 ms. APD at level of 90% repolarisation in ground squirrel papillary muscle was 105+/-9 ms, APD at level of 50% repolarisation was 42+/-8 ms. Purine nucleotides and nucleoside, that were tested in work, except ADP-ribose, act as inhibitory factors and decrease APD both in rat and hibernating ground squirrel heart. ADP-ribose decreases APD in papillary muscle of hibernator but did not in its atrium. In ground squirrel atrium AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 50% repolarisation by 10+/-3% and 18+/-3% respectively. AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 90% repolarisation by 9+/-2% and 11+/-2% respectively. In ground squirrel papillary muscle ADP-ribose, AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 50% repolarisation by 26+/-8%, 23+/-8% and 26+/-7%. ADP-ribose, AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 90% repolarisation by 12+/-3%, 10+/-3%, 13+/-3%. Thus, decrease of APD in ground squirrel papillary muscle at level of 90% repolarisation during nucleotides and adenosine action was 2-2.5 fold less, than the rat.

  12. Geohydrology and ground-water quality at the Pueblo Depot Activity Landfill near Pueblo, Colorado. Water Resources Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, K.R.; Ortiz, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    The report describes the geohydrologic system and chemical characteristics of ground water at the Pueblo Depot Activity landfill, as required for the issuance of a certificate of designation for the landfill, and describes the potential effects of the landfill on ground-water quality. Ground-water samples were collected during December 1988 and mid-January 1989 from eight wells, a seep, and an offsite stock tank. These sites and the four piezometers were sampled during February 1989. Water levels were measured in the monitor wells and piezometers to determine depth from land surface to the water table, the water-table altitude, and saturated thickness of the shallow unconfined aquifer at the landfill. Hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer are based on lithologic descriptions and results of aquifer tests in nearby wells with similar lithologic characteristics.

  13. Ground penetrating radar and active seismic investigation of stratigraphically verified pyroclastic deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gase, A.; Bradford, J. H.; Brand, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    We conducted ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and active seismic surveys in July and August, 2015 parallel to outcrops of the pyroclastic density current deposits of the May 18th, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH), Washington. The primary objective of this study is to compare geophysical properties that influence electromagnetic and elastic wave velocities with stratigraphic parameters in the un-saturated zone. The deposits of interest are composed of pumice, volcanic ash, and lava blocks comprising a wide range of intrinsic porosities and grain sizes from sand to boulders. Single-offset GPR surveys for reflection data were performed with a Sensors and Software pulseEKKO Pro 100 GPR using 50 MHz, 100 MHz, and 200 MHz antennae. GPR data processing includes time-zero correction, dewow filter, migration, elevation correction. Multi-offset acquisition with 100 MHz antennae and offsets ranging from 1 m to 16 m are used for reflection tomography to create 2 D electromagnetic wave velocity models. Seismic surveys are performed with 72 geophones spaced at two meters using a sledge hammer source with shot points at each receiver point. We couple p- wave refraction tomography with Rayleigh wave inversion to compute Vp/Vs ratios. The two geophysical datasets are then compared with stratigraphic information to illustrate the influence of lithological parameters (e.g. stratification, grain-size distribution, porosity, and sorting) on geophysical properties of unsaturated pyroclastic deposits. Future work will include joint petrophysical inversion of the multiple datasets to estimate porosity and water content in the unsaturated zone.

  14. Levelling profiles and a GPS network to monitor the active folding and faulting deformation in the Campo de Dalias (Betic Cordillera, southeastern Spain).

    PubMed

    Marín-Lechado, Carlos; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Gil, Antonio José; Borque, María Jesús; de Lacy, María Clara; Pedrera, Antonio; López-Garrido, Angel Carlos; Alfaro, Pedro; García-Tortosa, Francisco; Ramos, Maria Isabel; Rodríguez-Caderot, Gracia; Rodríguez-Fernández, José; Ruiz-Constán, Ana; de Galdeano-Equiza, Carlos Sanz

    2010-01-01

    The Campo de Dalias is an area with relevant seismicity associated to the active tectonic deformations of the southern boundary of the Betic Cordillera. A non-permanent GPS network was installed to monitor, for the first time, the fault- and fold-related activity. In addition, two high precision levelling profiles were measured twice over a one-year period across the Balanegra Fault, one of the most active faults recognized in the area. The absence of significant movement of the main fault surface suggests seismogenic behaviour. The possible recurrence interval may be between 100 and 300 y. The repetitive GPS and high precision levelling monitoring of the fault surface during a long time period may help us to determine future fault behaviour with regard to the existence (or not) of a creep component, the accumulation of elastic deformation before faulting, and implications of the fold-fault relationship. PMID:22319309

  15. Levelling Profiles and a GPS Network to Monitor the Active Folding and Faulting Deformation in the Campo de Dalias (Betic Cordillera, Southeastern Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Lechado, Carlos; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Gil, Antonio José; Borque, María Jesús; de Lacy, María Clara; Pedrera, Antonio; López-Garrido, Angel Carlos; Alfaro, Pedro; García-Tortosa, Francisco; Ramos, Maria Isabel; Rodríguez-Caderot, Gracia; Rodríguez-Fernández, José; Ruiz-Constán, Ana; de Galdeano-Equiza, Carlos Sanz

    2010-01-01

    The Campo de Dalias is an area with relevant seismicity associated to the active tectonic deformations of the southern boundary of the Betic Cordillera. A non-permanent GPS network was installed to monitor, for the first time, the fault- and fold-related activity. In addition, two high precision levelling profiles were measured twice over a one-year period across the Balanegra Fault, one of the most active faults recognized in the area. The absence of significant movement of the main fault surface suggests seismogenic behaviour. The possible recurrence interval may be between 100 and 300 y. The repetitive GPS and high precision levelling monitoring of the fault surface during a long time period may help us to determine future fault behaviour with regard to the existence (or not) of a creep component, the accumulation of elastic deformation before faulting, and implications of the fold-fault relationship. PMID:22319309

  16. Ozone treatment of coal- and coffee grounds-based active carbons: Water vapor adsorption and surface fractal micropores

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunoda, Ryoichi; Ozawa, Takayoshi; Ando, Junichi

    1998-09-15

    Characteristics of the adsorption iostherms of water vapor on active carbons from coal and coffee grounds and those ozonized ones from the surface fractal dimension analysis are discussed. The upswing of the adsorption isotherms in the low relative pressure of coffee grounds-based active carbon, of which isotherms were not scarcely affected on ozonization, was attributed to the adsorption of water molecules on the metallic oxides playing the role of oxygen-surface complexes, which formed the corrugated surfaces on the basal planes of micropore walls with the surface fractal dimension D{sub s} > 2. On the other hand, coal-based active carbon with D{sub s} < 2, which indicated the flat surfaces of micropore walls, showed little effect on the upswing even on ozonization, even though the adsorption amounts of water vapor were increased in the low relative pressure.

  17. Late Quaternary Deformation along the North Wuitaishan Fault of the Shanxi Graben System: Active Intracontinental Rifting in North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corley, J.; Cochran, W. J.; Hinrichs, N.; Ding, R.; Zhang, S.; Gomez, F.

    2012-12-01

    The Shanxi rift system in north China is an intracontinental rift zone which has been active since the late Tertiary. and has produced many destructive earthquakes in recorded history. This area is of particular interest for earthquake research because of the high seismicity levels in an intraplate setting. The Shanxi rift system is composed of NNE-oriented en-echelon half-graben basins controlled by normal faults. This study focuses on the north Wutaishan fault, which bounds the Wutai Mountains and the Xingding basin, located in the northern part of the Shanxi rift system. Quaternary tectonism is investigated using remotely-sensed imagery for mapping of large tectonically-influenced landforms, field investigations for ground truth, and structural analyses. Initial neotectonic mapping utilized stereoscopic Corona satellite imagery to differentiate between fluvial and agricultural terraces; Cartosat-based DEMs were used to correct altitude measurements of terrace heights and to analyze streams and other landforms for morphometric analysis. Fluvial terraces are used to reconstruct paleo-stream profiles of the Yangyan River and nearby tributaries to determine mountain uplift rates inferred from fluvial incision, basin extension rates, and possible warping of the footwall basin block. Field work provided ground truth for fluvial terrace altitude, type of terrace, and thicknesses of alluvial and loess deposits. Another aspect of the study involves development of structural cross-section to relate fault slip to regional tectonic strain. Fault kinematic analysis of micro-fault features found in bedrock were used to assess the Quaternary stress field. Results of this study have implications in the understanding of earthquake recurrence intervals and basin evolution in the Shanxi rift system and more generally, can improve the understanding of spatial and temporal variations of seismic events in intraplate settings.

  18. Coseismic Faulting and Folding in an Active Thrust Sheet over Multiple Rupture Cycles Resolved by Integrating Surface and Subsurface Records of Earthquake Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockmeyer, J. M.; Shaw, J. H.; Brown, N.; Rhodes, E. J.; Wang, M.; Lavin, L. C.; Guan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Many recent thrust fault earthquakes have involved coseismic surface faulting and folding, revealing the complex nature of surface deformation in active thrust sheets. In this study, we characterize deformation along the active Southern Junggar Thrust (SJT) in the Junggar basin, NW China - which sourced the 1906 M8 Manas earthquake - to gain insight into how fault slip at depth is partitioned between faulting and folding strains at Earth's surface by integrating deformed terrace records, subsurface geophysical data, and luminescence geochronology. Using a 1-m digital elevation model and field surveys, we have mapped the precise geometries of fluvial terraces across the entire Tugulu anticline, which lies in the hanging wall of the SJT. These profiles reveal progressive uplift of several terraces along prominent fault scarps where the SJT is surface-emergent. Similarly aged terraces are folded in the backlimb of the Tugulu fold, providing a sequential record of surface folding. These folded terraces are progressively rotated such that the oldest terraces are dipping much steeper than younger terraces within the same fold limb. Using 2- and 3-D seismic reflection data, we integrate subsurface deformation constraints with records of surface strain. Structural interpretations of these seismic data define the geometry of the SJT and reveal that folding is localized across synclinal bends along the SJT. We evaluate a range of distinct fault-related fold models (e.g. fault-bend folding, shear fault-bend folding) to assess which structural style best describes the geometries of the subsurface and surface fold patterns. By doing so, we have the opportunity to directly relate surface fault slip measures from terrace folding and uplift to total fault slip at depth. This integration of surface and subsurface deformation - combined with constraints on terrace ages from post-IR IRSL geochronology - allows us to characterize how fault slip and seismic moment are partitioned

  19. Gravity changes and deformation at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii, associated with summit eruptive activity, 2009-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagnardi, Marco; Poland, Michael P.; Carbone, Daniele; Baker, Scott; Battaglia, Maurizio; Amelung, Falk

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of microgravity and surface displacement data collected at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii (USA), between December 2009 and November 2012 suggests a net mass accumulation at ~1.5 km depth beneath the northeast margin of Halema‘uma‘u Crater, within Kīlauea Caldera. Although residual gravity increases and decreases are accompanied by periods of uplift and subsidence of the surface, respectively, the volume change inferred from the modeling of interferometric synthetic aperture radar deformation data can account for only a small portion (as low as 8%) of the mass addition responsible for the gravity increase. We propose that since the opening of a new eruptive vent at the summit of Kīlauea in 2008, magma rising to the surface of the lava lake outgasses, becomes denser, and sinks to deeper levels, replacing less dense gas-rich magma stored in the Halema‘uma‘u magma reservoir. In fact, a relatively small density increase (<200 kg m−3) of a portion of the reservoir can produce the positive residual gravity change measured during the period with the largest mass increase, between March 2011 and November 2012. Other mechanisms may also play a role in the gravity increase without producing significant uplift of the surface, including compressibility of magma, formation of olivine cumulates, and filling of void space by magma. The rate of gravity increase, higher than during previous decades, varies through time and seems to be directly correlated with the volcanic activity occurring at both the summit and the east rift zone of the volcano.

  20. Left-lateral active deformation along the Mosha-North Tehran fault system (Iran): Morphotectonics and paleoseismological investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solaymani Azad, Shahryar; Ritz, Jean-François; Abbassi, Mohammad Reza

    2011-01-01

    The Mosha and North Tehran faults correspond to the nearest seismic sources for the northern part of the Tehran megacity. The present-day structural relationships and the kinematics of these two faults, especially at their junction in Lavasanat region, is still a matter of debate. In this paper, we present the results of a morphotectonic analysis (aerial photos and field investigations) within the central part of the Mosha and eastern part of the North Tehran faults between the Mosha valley and Tehran City. Our investigations show that, generally, the traces of activity do not follow the older traces corresponding to previous long-term dip-slip thrusting movements. The recent faulting mainly occurs on new traces trending E-W to ENE-WSW affecting Quaternary features (streams, ridges, risers, and young glacial markers) and cutting straight through the topography. Often defining en-echelon patterns (right- and left-stepping), these new traces correspond to steep faults with either north- or south-dipping directions, along which clear evidences for left-lateral strike-slip motion are found. At their junction zone, the two sinistral faults display a left-stepping en-echelon pattern defining a positive flower structure system clearly visible near Ira village. Further west, the left-lateral strike-slip motion is transferred along the ENE-WSW trending Niavaran fault and other faults. The cumulative offsets associated with this left-lateral deformation is small compared with the topography associated with the previous Late Tertiary thrusting motion, showing that it corresponds to a recent change of kinematics.

  1. Improved aircraft dynamic response and fatigue life during ground operations using an active control landing gear system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.; Carden, H. D.; Edson, R.

    1978-01-01

    A three-degree-of-freedom aircraft landing analysis incorporating a series-hydraulic active control main landing gear has been developed and verified using preliminary experimental data from drop tests of a modified main landing gear from a 2722 kg (6000 lbm) class of airplane. The verified analysis was also employed to predict the landing dynamics of a supersonic research airplane with an active control main landing gear system. The results of this investigation have shown that this type of active gear is feasible and indicate a potential for improving airplane dynamic response and reducing structural fatigue damage during ground operations by approximately 90% relative to that incurred with the passive gear.

  2. Determination of the activation enthalpy for migration of dislocations in plastically deformed 8006 Al-alloy by positron annihilation lifetime technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, Mohammed; Abdel-Rahman, M.; Badawi, Emad A.; Abdel-Rahman, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    The activation enthalpy for migration of dislocations of plastically deformed 8006 Al-alloy was investigated by positron annihilation lifetime technique. Plastic deformation using a hydraulic press produces mainly dislocations and may produce point defects. The type of defect was studied by isochronal annealing which determines the temperature range of recovery of each type. Only one type of defect (dislocations) was observed for the investigated sample and was found to be recovered within the range 455-700 K. Isothermal annealing by slow cooling was performed through this range and used in determination of the activation enthalpy of migration of dislocations which was found to be 0.26 ± 0.01 eV.

  3. Comparison of ground and satellite based measurements of the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation intercepted by tall-grass prairie

    SciTech Connect

    Demetriades-shah, T.H.; Kanemasu, E.T.; Flitcroft, I.D.; Su, H. Kansas State Univ., Manhattan )

    1992-11-01

    The fraction of photosynthetically active radiation intercepted by vegetation, F(sub ipar) is an important parameter for modeling the interactions between the land-surface and atmosphere and for estimating vegetation biomass productivity. This study was, therefore, an integral part of FIFE. The specific purpose of this experiment was to find out how well definitive measurements of F(sub ipar) on the ground relate to near-ground and satellite based spectral reflectance measurements. Concurrent measurements of F(sub ipar) and ground, helicopter, and satellite based reflectance measurements were taken at thirteen tall-grass prairie sites within the FIFE experimental area. The sites were subjected to various combinations of burning and grazing managements. The ground and helicopter based reflectance measurements were taken on the same day or few days from the time of the overpass of LANDSAT and SPOT satellites. Ground-based reflectance measurements and sun photometer readings taken at the times of the satellite overpasses were used to correct for atmospheric attenuation. Hand-held radiometer spectral indices were strongly correlated with helicopter and satellite based values (r = 0.94 for helicopter, 0.93 for LANDSAT Thematic Mapper, and 0.86 for SPOT). However, the ground, helicopter, and satellite based normalized difference spectral vegetation indices showed low sensitivity to changes in F(sub ipar). Reflectance measurements were only moderately well correlated with measurements of F(sub ipar) (r = 0.82 for hand-held radiometer, 0.84 for helicopter measurements, and 0.75 for the LANDSAT Thematic Mapper and SPOT). Improved spectral indices which can compensate for site differences are needed in order to monitor F(sub ipar) more reliably. 12 refs.

  4. Comparison of ground and satellite based measurements of the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation intercepted by tall-grass prairie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demetriades-Shah, T. H.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Flitcroft, I. D.; Su, H.

    1992-01-01

    The fraction of photosynthetically active radiation intercepted by vegetation, F(sub ipar) is an important parameter for modeling the interactions between the land-surface and atmosphere and for estimating vegetation biomass productivity. This study was, therefore, an integral part of FIFE. The specific purpose of this experiment was to find out how well definitive measurements of F(sub ipar) on the ground relate to near-ground and satellite based spectral reflectance measurements. Concurrent measurements of F(sub ipar) and ground, helicopter, and satellite based reflectance measurements were taken at thirteen tall-grass prairie sites within the FIFE experimental area. The sites were subjected to various combinations of burning and grazing managements. The ground and helicopter based reflectance measurements were taken on the same day or few days from the time of the overpass of LANDSAT and SPOT satellites. Ground-based reflectance measurements and sun photometer readings taken at the times of the satellite overpasses were used to correct for atmospheric attenuation. Hand-held radiometer spectral indices were strongly correlated with helicopter and satellite based values (r = 0.94 for helicopter, 0.93 for LANDSAT Thematic Mapper, and 0.86 for SPOT). However, the ground, helicopter, and satellite based normalized difference spectral vegetation indices showed low sensitivity to changes in F(sub ipar). Reflectance measurements were only moderately well correlated with measurements of F(sub ipar) (r = 0.82 for hand-held radiometer, 0.84 for helicopter measurements, and 0.75 for the LANDSAT Thematic Mapper and SPOT). Improved spectral indices which can compensate for site differences are needed in order to monitor F(sub ipar) more reliably.

  5. Comparison of ground and satellite based measurements of the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation intercepted by tall-grass prairie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demetriades-Shah, T. H.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Flitcroft, I.; Su, H.

    1991-01-01

    The fraction, of photosynthetically active radiation intercepted by vegetation, F(sub ipar) is an important parameter for modeling the interactions between the land-surface and atmosphere and for estimating vegetation biomass productivity. This study was; therefore, an integral part of FIFE. The specific purpose of this experiment was to find out how well definitive measurements of F(sub ipar) on the ground relate to near-ground and satellite based spectral reflectance measurements. Concurrent measurements of F(sub ipar) and ground, helicopter, and satellite based reflectance measurements were taken at thirteen tall-grass prairie sites within the FIFE experimental area. The sites were subjected to various combinations of burning and grazing managements. The ground and helicopter based reflectance measurements were taken on the same day or few days from the time of the overpass of LANDSAT and SPOT satellites. Ground-based reflectance measurements and sun photometer readings taken at the times of the satellite overpasses were used to correct for atmospheric attenuation. Hand-held radiometer spectral indices were strongly correlated with helicopter and satellite based values (r=0.94 for helicopter, 0.93 for LANDSAT Thematic Mapper, and 0.86 for SPOT). However, the ground, helicopter, and satellite based normalized difference spectral vegetation indices showed low sensitivity to changes in F(sub ipar). Reflectance measurements were only moderately well correlated with measurements of F(sub ipar) (r=0.82 for hand-held radiometer, 0.84 for helicopter measurements, and 0.75 for the LANDSAT Thematic Mapper and SPOT). Improved spectral indices which can compensate for site differences are needed in order to monitor F(sub ipar) more reliably.

  6. Antimicrobial activity of soy edible films incorporated with thyme and oregano essential oils on fresh ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Emiroğlu, Zehra Karagöz; Yemiş, Gökçe Polat; Coşkun, Betül Kodal; Candoğan, Kezban

    2010-10-01

    Antibacterial activity of soy protein edible films (SPEF) incorporated with 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5% oregano (OR) or thyme (TH) essential oils was evaluated against Escherichia coli, E. coli O157:H7, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Lactobacillus plantarum by the inhibition zone test. Effects of SPEF containing 5% OR and TH or a mixture of OR+TH (ORT) were also tested on fresh ground beef during refrigerated storage (at 4 degrees C). OR and TH incorporated SPEF exhibited similar antibacterial activity against all bacteria in inhibition zone test. While E. coli, E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus were significantly inhibited by antimicrobial films, L. plantarum and P. aeruginosa appeared to be the more resistant bacteria. SPEF with OR, ORT, and TH did not have significant effects on total viable counts, lactic acid bacteria and Staphylococcus spp. when applied on ground beef patties whereas reductions (p<0.05) in coliform and Pseudomonas spp. counts were observed.

  7. Ground survey of active Central American volcanoes in November - December 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoiber, R. E. (Principal Investigator); Rose, W. I., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Thermal anomalies at two volcanoes, Santiaguito and Izalco, have grown in size in the past six months, based on repeated ground survey. Thermal anomalies at Pacaya volcano have became less intense in the same period. Large (500 m diameter) thermal anomalies exist at 3 volcanoes presently, and smaller scale anomalies are found at nine other volcanoes.

  8. Ground state destabilization from a positioned general base in the ketosteroid isomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Ruben, Eliza A; Schwans, Jason P; Sonnett, Matthew; Natarajan, Aditya; Gonzalez, Ana; Tsai, Yingssu; Herschlag, Daniel

    2013-02-12

    We compared the binding affinities of ground state analogues for bacterial ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) with a wild-type anionic Asp general base and with uncharged Asn and Ala in the general base position to provide a measure of potential ground state destabilization that could arise from the close juxtaposition of the anionic Asp and hydrophobic steroid in the reaction's Michaelis complex. The analogue binding affinity increased ~1 order of magnitude for the Asp38Asn mutation and ~2 orders of magnitude for the Asp38Ala mutation, relative to the affinity with Asp38, for KSI from two sources. The increased level of binding suggests that the abutment of a charged general base and a hydrophobic steroid is modestly destabilizing, relative to a standard state in water, and that this destabilization is relieved in the transition state and intermediate in which the charge on the general base has been neutralized because of proton abstraction. Stronger binding also arose from mutation of Pro39, the residue adjacent to the Asp general base, consistent with an ability of the Asp general base to now reorient to avoid the destabilizing interaction. Consistent with this model, the Pro mutants reduced or eliminated the increased level of binding upon replacement of Asp38 with Asn or Ala. These results, supported by additional structural observations, suggest that ground state destabilization from the negatively charged Asp38 general base provides a modest contribution to KSI catalysis. They also provide a clear illustration of the well-recognized concept that enzymes evolve for catalytic function and not, in general, to maximize ground state binding. This ground state destabilization mechanism may be common to the many enzymes with anionic side chains that deprotonate carbon acids.

  9. Evolution of fault activity reflecting the crustal deformation: Insights from crustal stress and fault orientations in the northeast-southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, A.; Otsubo, M.

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated fault activity in northeast- southwest Japan based on the regional stress and the fault orientation field for both active faults and inactive faults (here, an inactive fault is a fault which activity has not been identified in Quaternary). The regional stress field was calculated using the stress inversion method [Hardebeck and Michael, 2006] applied to earthquake focal mechanisms in the northeast-southwest Japan. The locations and orientations (i.e., strike and dip, assuming a planar fault geometry) of active faults in the study area were obtained from the Active Fault Database of Japan and inactive faults from a database compiled by Kosaka et al. [2011]. We employed slip tendency analysis [Morris et al., 1996] to evaluate the likelihood of fault slip. The values of the slip tendency is generally higher along active faults than along inactive faults. The difference between the slip tendencies of active and inactive faults reflects the difference in their activities. Furthermore the high slip tendency observed for some inactive faults suggests their high activity. These high slip tendencies imply that they have potential to be active. We propose the temporal evolution from inactive to active faulting during long-term crustal deformation to explain the potential for fault activity along inactive faults. When a region undergoes the transition from inactive to active faulting, potential active faults are observed as inactive faults with a high Part of this findig have been submitted to Tectonics (AGU Journal) (2015-07-27). We will presentate some new findings.slip tendency. The average slip tendency of inactive faults gradually increases from northeast to southwest Japan, because a relatively large number of inactive faults in southwest Japan have a high slip tendency. The representative deformation zones in Japan shows a relationship with the observed spatial variations in the evolution from inactive to active faulting. This study was supported by MEXT

  10. Effects of season and host physiological state on the diversity, density, and activity of the arctic ground squirrel cecal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Timothy J; Duddleston, Khrystyne N; Buck, C Loren

    2014-09-01

    We examined the seasonal changes of the cecal microbiota of captive arctic ground squirrels (Urocitellus parryii) by measuring microbial diversity and composition, total bacterial density and viability, and short-chain fatty acid concentrations at four sample periods (summer, torpor, interbout arousal, and posthibernation). Abundance of Firmicutes was lower, whereas abundances of Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Proteobacteria were higher during torpor and interbout arousal than in summer. Bacterial densities and percentages of live bacteria were significantly higher in summer than during torpor and interbout arousal. Likewise, total short-chain fatty acid concentrations were significantly greater during summer than during torpor and interbout arousal. Concentrations of individual short-chain fatty acids varied across sample periods, with butyrate concentrations higher and acetate concentrations lower during summer than at all other sample periods. Characteristics of the gut community posthibernation were more similar to those during torpor and interbout arousal than to those during summer. However, higher abundances of the genera Bacteroides and Akkermansia occurred during posthibernation than during interbout arousal and torpor. Collectively, our results clearly demonstrate that seasonal changes in physiology associated with hibernation and activity affect the gut microbial community in the arctic ground squirrel. Importantly, similarities between the gut microbiota of arctic ground squirrels and thirteen-lined ground squirrels suggest the potential for a core microbiota during hibernation.

  11. Paleoseismologic and geomorphic constraints to the deformation style and activity of the Cittanova Fault (southern Calabria, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peronace, Edoardo; Della Seta, Marta; Fredi, Paola; Galli, Paolo; Giaccio, Biagio; Messina, Paolo; Troiani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The western side of Southern Calabria is the epicentral region of the strongest earthquakes of Italy. These are mainly generated by extensional faults which are still poorly investigated and/or parameterized. In this study, we explore the potential of the combined analysis of geomorphic markers, stream network morphometry and paleosimological investigations, aimed at identifying and time-constraining the surface effects of the Calabrian seismogenic faults. In this perspective, we presents results from i) plano-altimetric analysis of geomorphic markers related to active tectonics (such as marine and fluvial terraces), ii) paleoseismological investigations, and iii) time-dependent river basin and long-profile metrics of the Cittanova Fault (CF). The CF, responsible for the catastrophic Mw 7.0 earthquake of 5 February 1783, is a N220° striking, 30 km-long normal fault that downthrows the crystalline-metamorphic basement of the Aspromonte massif (~1000 m asl) below the Gioia Tauro Plain, to elevations of ~500-800 m bsl. Radiocarbon dating allowed us to ascribe the depostion of a major terraced alluvial fan (Cittanova-Taurianova terrace, TAC) to the early Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and to date the avulsion of the depositional top surface of TAC to 28 ka. As we have found remnants of the TAC also in the CF footwall offset by 12-17 m, we estimate a vertical slip rate of 0.6 ± 0.1 mm/yr for the past 28 ka. Paleoseismological data across the fault scarp evidenced at least three surface ruptures associated to ~Mw 7.0 paleoearthquakes prior to the 1783 event. The recurrence time (~3.2 kyr) is rather longer than other Apennine normal faults (0.3-2.4 kyr), whereas it is consistent with the low slip rate of CF for the late Upper Pleistocene (0.6 mm/yr). On a longer time scale, the spatial configuration of river basin morphometry evidenced the morphodynamic rensponse to the higher slip in the central sector of CF. Furthermore, long-profile metrics, and in particular the spatial

  12. Numerical investigation on active isolation of ground shock by soft porous layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. G.; Sun, W.; Anand, S.

    2009-04-01

    The mitigation and reduction of blast-induced ground shock in near field is an interesting topic worth considering for the protection of buried structures. Soft porous materials are usually used to form an isolation layer around the buried structures. However, the interaction of soft porous layer and surrounding geomedia as well as buried structures is not well understood. In this paper, the effects of soft porous layer barriers on the reduction of buried blast-induced ground shock are numerically studied. Based on the prototype dimensions of a centrifuge test, a numerical model is set up with two steel boxes symmetrically buried at two sides of the charge. One box is directly located in soil mass without protection (unprotected) and the other is located behind a soft porous layer barrier (protected). The soft porous layer barriers studied here include an open trench, an inundated water trench, three in-filled geofoam walls with different densities, and a concrete wall. The numerical responses of the two boxes are evaluated when subjected to the protection of different soft porous layer barriers. These numerical simulations show that both open trench and geofoam barriers can effectively reduce blast-induced stress waves. However, inundated water trench and concrete wall have almost no effect on the reduction of ground shock. Therefore, a geofoam barrier is more practicable in soil mass.

  13. Agonist-antagonist active knee prosthesis: a preliminary study in level-ground walking.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Villalpando, Ernesto C; Herr, Hugh

    2009-01-01

    We present a powered knee prosthesis with two series-elastic actuators positioned in parallel in an agonist-antagonist arrangement. To motivate the knee's design, we developed a prosthetic knee model that comprises a variable damper and two series-elastic clutch units that span the knee joint. Using human gait data to constrain the model's joint to move biologically, we varied model parameters using an optimization scheme that minimized the sum over time of the squared difference between the model's joint torque and biological knee values. We then used these optimized values to specify the mechanical and control design of the prosthesis for level-ground walking. We hypothesized that a variable-impedance control design could produce humanlike knee mechanics during steady-state level-ground walking. As a preliminary evaluation of this hypothesis, we compared the prosthetic knee mechanics of an amputee walking at a self-selected gait speed with those of a weight- and height-matched nonamputee. We found qualitative agreement between prosthetic and human knee mechanics. Because the knee's motors never perform positive work on the knee joint throughout the level-ground gait cycle, the knee's electrical power requirement is modest in walking (8 W), decreasing the size of the onboard battery required to power the prosthesis.

  14. Holocene soft-sediment deformation of the Santa Fe-Sopetrán Basin, northern Colombian Andes: Evidence for pre-Hispanic seismic activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, F.; Martínez, J. I.; Vélez, M. I.

    2011-04-01

    The detailed study of four deformed intervals from the Holocene fluvio-lacustrine deposits of the Santa Fe-Sopetrán Basin in northern Colombia shows 17 types of soft-sediment deformation (SSD) structures. Evidence indicates that seismic activity was responsible for the SSD structures, a conclusion reached after considering the environmental conditions at the time of sediment deposition and shortly after, and the detailed analysis of the driving force systems. Other triggers (i.e. overloading and rapid sedimentation), however, are not discarded. Intervals showing SSD structures occurred at centennial frequencies and apparently resulted from Mw 6-7 earthquakes. The Holocene age of these major shaking events should be seriously considered when evaluating the seismic hazard and risk for the middle Cauca Valley and the nearby city of Medellín with 3 million inhabitants.

  15. BLANKET BIOLOGICAL REVIEW FOR GENERAL MAINTENANCE ACTIVITIES WITHIN ACTIVE BURIAL GROUNDS, 200 E and 200 W Areas, ECR No. 2002-200-034

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.

    2003-06-26

    No plant and animal species protected under the ESA, candidates for such protection, or species listed by the Washington state government were observed in the vicinity of the proposed sites. Piper's daisy may still occur in some of the burial grounds. This is a Washington State Sensitive plant species, and as such is a Level III resource under the Hanford Site Biological Resources Management Plan. Compensatory mitigation is appropriate for this species when adverse impacts cannot be avoided. The Ecological Compliance Assessment Project (ECAP) staff should consulted prior to the initiation of major work activities within areas where this species has been identified (218-E-12, 218-E-10). The stalked-pod and crouching milkvetch are relatively common throughout 200 West area, therefore even if the few individuals within the active burial grounds are disturbed, it is not likely that the overall local population will be adversely affected. The Watch List is the lowest level of listing for pl ant species of concern in the State of Washington. No adverse impacts to species or habitats of concern are expected to occur from routine maintenance within the active portions of the 218-W-4C, 218-W-4B, 218-W-3, 218-W-3A, and 218-W-5 burial grounds, as well as the portion of 218-E-12B currently used for storage of retired submarine reactor cores. The remaining portions of the 218-E-12B burial ground, the entire 218-E-10 burial ground, and the 218-W-6 burial ground currently have extensive vegetative cover and it is highly likely that migratory birds, such as meadow larks, horned larks, and curlews will nest in these areas. Therefore, it is recommended that if removal of the existing vegetation is required for burial ground operations, such removal only occur during the August through March time period (i.e. when the birds are not actively nesting). This blanket review does not apply to the portions of 218-W-4C, and 218-W-6 previously described.

  16. Imaging active faulting in a region of distributed deformation from the joint clustering of focal mechanisms and hypocentres: Application to the Azores-western Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custódio, Susana; Lima, Vânia; Vales, Dina; Cesca, Simone; Carrilho, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The matching between linear trends of hypocentres and fault planes indicated by focal mechanisms (FMs) is frequently used to infer the location and geometry of active faults. This practice works well in regions of fast lithospheric deformation, where earthquake patterns are clear and major structures accommodate the bulk of deformation, but typically fails in regions of slow and distributed deformation. We present a new joint FM and hypocentre cluster algorithm that is able to detect systematically the consistency between hypocentre lineations and FMs, even in regions of distributed deformation. We apply the method to the Azores-western Mediterranean region, with particular emphasis on western Iberia. The analysis relies on a compilation of hypocentres and FMs taken from regional and global earthquake catalogues, academic theses and technical reports, complemented by new FMs for western Iberia. The joint clustering algorithm images both well-known and new seismo-tectonic features. The Azores triple junction is characterised by FMs with vertical pressure (P) axes, in good agreement with the divergent setting, and the Iberian domain is characterised by NW-SE oriented P axes, indicating a response of the lithosphere to the ongoing oblique convergence between Nubia and Eurasia. Several earthquakes remain unclustered in the western Mediterranean domain, which may indicate a response to local stresses. The major regions of consistent faulting that we identify are the mid-Atlantic ridge, the Terceira rift, the Trans-Alboran shear zone and the north coast of Algeria. In addition, other smaller earthquake clusters present a good match between epicentre lineations and FM fault planes. These clusters may signal single active faults or wide zones of distributed but consistent faulting. Mainland Portugal is dominated by strike-slip earthquakes with fault planes coincident with the predominant NNE-SSW and WNW-ESE oriented earthquake lineations. Clusters offshore SW Iberia are

  17. Antimicrobial activity of plant compounds against Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and the influence of heat and storage on the antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cynthia H; Ravishankar, Sadhana; Marchello, John; Friedman, Mendel

    2013-07-01

    Salmonella enterica is a predominant foodborne pathogen that causes diarrheal illness worldwide. A potential method of inhibiting pathogenic bacterial growth in meat is through the introduction of plant-derived antimicrobials. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of heat (70°C for 5 min) and subsequent cold storage (4°C up to 7 days) on the effectiveness of oregano and cinnamon essential oils and powdered olive and apple extracts against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and to evaluate the activity of the most effective antimicrobials (cinnamon oil and olive extract) at higher concentrations in heated ground pork. The surviving Salmonella populations in two groups (heated and unheated) of antimicrobial-treated pork were compared. Higher concentrations of the most effective compounds were then tested (cinnamon oil at 0.5 to 1.0% and olive extract at 3, 4, and 5%) against Salmonella Typhimurium in heated ground pork. Samples were stored at 4°C and taken on days 0, 3, 5, and 7 for enumeration of survivors. The heating process did not affect the activity of antimicrobials. Significant 1.3- and 3-log reductions were observed with 1.0% cinnamon oil and 5% olive extract, respectively, on day 7. The minimum concentration required to achieve . 1-log reduction in Salmonella population was 0.8% cinnamon oil or 4% olive extract. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of these antimicrobials against multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium in ground pork and their stability during heating and cold storage. The most active formulations have the potential to enhance the microbial safety of ground pork. PMID:23834804

  18. Antimicrobial activity of plant compounds against Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and the influence of heat and storage on the antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cynthia H; Ravishankar, Sadhana; Marchello, John; Friedman, Mendel

    2013-07-01

    Salmonella enterica is a predominant foodborne pathogen that causes diarrheal illness worldwide. A potential method of inhibiting pathogenic bacterial growth in meat is through the introduction of plant-derived antimicrobials. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of heat (70°C for 5 min) and subsequent cold storage (4°C up to 7 days) on the effectiveness of oregano and cinnamon essential oils and powdered olive and apple extracts against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and to evaluate the activity of the most effective antimicrobials (cinnamon oil and olive extract) at higher concentrations in heated ground pork. The surviving Salmonella populations in two groups (heated and unheated) of antimicrobial-treated pork were compared. Higher concentrations of the most effective compounds were then tested (cinnamon oil at 0.5 to 1.0% and olive extract at 3, 4, and 5%) against Salmonella Typhimurium in heated ground pork. Samples were stored at 4°C and taken on days 0, 3, 5, and 7 for enumeration of survivors. The heating process did not affect the activity of antimicrobials. Significant 1.3- and 3-log reductions were observed with 1.0% cinnamon oil and 5% olive extract, respectively, on day 7. The minimum concentration required to achieve . 1-log reduction in Salmonella population was 0.8% cinnamon oil or 4% olive extract. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of these antimicrobials against multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium in ground pork and their stability during heating and cold storage. The most active formulations have the potential to enhance the microbial safety of ground pork.

  19. Comparison of ground and satellite based measurements of the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation intercepted by tall-grass prairie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demetriades-Shah, T. H.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Flitcroft, I.; Su, H.

    1990-01-01

    The fraction, of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by vegetation, F sub ipar, is an important requirement for estimating vegetation biomass productivity and related quantities. This was an integral part of a large international effort; the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE). The main objective of FIFE was to study the effects of vegetation on the land atmosphere interactions and to determine if these interactions can be assessed from satellite spectral measurements. The specific purpose of this experiment was to find out how well measurements of F sub ipar relate to ground, helicopter, and satellite based spectral reflectance measurements. Concurrent measurements of F sub ipar and ground, helicopter, and satellite based measurements were taken at 13 tall grass prairie sites in Kansas. The sites were subjected to various combinations of burning and grazing managements.

  20. Anti-lymphoproliferative activity of alpha-2-macroglobulin in the plasma of hibernating 13-lined ground squirrels and woodchucks.

    PubMed

    Sieckmann, Donna G; Jaffe, Howard; Golech, Susanne; Cai, DeCheng; Hallenbeck, John M; McCarron, Richard M

    2014-09-15

    Plasma from hibernating (HIB) woodchucks (Marmota monax) or 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) suppressed (3)H-thymidine uptake in mouse spleen cell cultures stimulated with Concanavalin A (ConA); plasma from non-hibernating animals were only slightly inhibitory. Maximum inhibition occurred when HIB plasma was added to the cultures prior to ConA. After HPLC size exclusion chromatography of the HIB ground squirrel plasma, a single fraction (fraction-14) demonstrated inhibitory activity. Assay of fraction-14 from 8 HIB squirrels showed inhibition ranging from 13 to 95%; inhibition was correlated to the time the squirrels were exposed to cold prior to hibernation. Western blot analysis showed the factor to be a large molecular weight protein (>300 kDa), and mass spectrometry identified sequences that were 100% homologous with alpha-2-macroglobulin from humans and other species. These findings indicate a hibernation-related protein that may be responsible for immune system down regulation.

  1. Ground-squirrel mounds and related patterned ground along the San Andreas Fault in Central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    Extensive areas of mound topography and related patterned ground, apparently derived from the mounds of the California Ground Squirrel (Spermophilus beecheyi beecheyi), are in central California.  The relation of patterned ground to the San Andreas fault west of Bakersfield may provide insight into the timing of deformation along the fault as well as the history of ground squirrels.  Mound topography appears to have evolved through several stages from scattered mounds currently being constructed on newly deposited alluvial surfaces, to saturation of areas by mounds, followed by coalescence, elongation and lineation of the mounds.  Elongation, coalescence and modification of the mounds has been primarily by wind, but to a lesser extent by drainage and solifluction.  A time frame including ages of 4,000, 10,500, 29,000, and 73,000 years BP is derived by relating the patterns to slip on the San Andreas fault.  Further relating of the patterns to faulting, tilting, and warping may illuminate details of the rates and history of deformation.  Similarly, relating the patterns to the history of ground squirrel activity may help answer such problems as rates of dispersal and limits on population density.

  2. Natural vanadium-containing Jeju ground water stimulates glucose uptake through the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in L6 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seung-Lark; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of natural vanadium-containing Jeju ground water on glucose uptake in L6 myotubes and adipogensesis in 3T3 L1 cells. The Jeju ground water samples containing vanadium components were designated as S1 (8.0 ± 0.9 μg/l), S2 (24.0 ± 2.0 μg/l), and S3 (26.0 ± 2.0 μg/l), respectively. To investigate the effects of the Jeju ground water on glucose uptake in L6 myotubes, L6 cells were differentiated in media containing deionized distilled water (DDW group) and the water samples (S1, S2, and S3 groups). After daily changes in cultured media containing the Jeju ground water samples for 1 week, all samples had increased glucose uptake compared to the DDW group and the order of glucose uptake increased in parallel with vanadium content (S3 > S2 > S1). In addition, S3 significantly stimulated the phosphorylation of the Thr-172 residue of the AMP-activated protein kinase-α subunit and the Ser-79 subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase compared to the DDW group. The effect of glucose uptake by S3 was reversed by pretreatment with Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. Interestingly, vanadium pentoxide also increased glucose uptake and activated AMPK activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, as compared to the DDW treated group, S3 treatment inhibited adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells by down regulation of expressions of adipogenic transcription factors. Taken together, these findings suggest that S3 displays beneficial effects in the treatment of diabetes, at least in part through the activation of AMPK activity.

  3. Plate description of active deformation in the Africa (AF)-Arabia (AR)-Eurasia (EU) zone of plate interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernant, P.; McClusky, S.; Reilinger, R.

    2006-12-01

    We present the results of 17 years of GPS monitoring in this zone of plate interaction and show that to the resolution of our observations (i.e., ~1-2 mm/yr; ~ ±10 % of relative plate motions), deformation is consistent with plate-block models with relative motion between adjacent plates/blocks accommodated by elastic strain accumulation. Relative plate motions are consistent with geologically recent (~ 3 Ma) plate motions where geologic estimates of relative plate motion have been determined (AR- Nubia: Red Sea; AR-Somalia: Gulf of Aden; AF-EU; AR-EU). Furthermore, fault slip rates derived from the GPS block motions are mostly equal to geologic slip rates determined for long enough time intervals to average out earthquake cycle effects. We conclude that a plate description (i.e., relative Euler vectors) is appropriate to describe the kinematics of continental deformation during the past few Myr in this zone of plate interaction.

  4. Volcano Deformation and Modeling on Active Volcanoes in the Philippines from ALOS InSAR Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales Rivera, Anieri M.; Amelung, Falk; Eco, Rodrigo

    2015-05-01

    Bulusan, Kanlaon, and Mayon volcanoes have erupted over the last decade, and Taal caldera showed signs of volcanic unrest within the same time range. Eruptions at these volcanoes are a threat to human life and infrastructure, having over 1,000,000 people living within 10 km from just these 4 volcanic centers. For this reason, volcano monitoring in the Philippines is of extreme importance. We use the ALOS-1 satellite from the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) to make an InSAR time series analysis over Bulusan, Kanlaon, Mayon, and Taal volcanoes for the 2007-2011 period. Time-dependent deformation was detected at all of the volcanoes. Deformation related to changes in pressurization of the volcanic systems was found on Taal caldera and Bulusan volcanoes, with best fitting Mogi sources located at half-space depths of 3.07 km and 0.5 km respectively.

  5. Effect of realistic grounds and atmospheric conditions on single-channel active control of outdoor sound propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Ann; Hodgson, Murray

    2005-03-01

    Engine run-up tests are a part of routine aircraft maintenance at the Vancouver International Airport. A source of noise complaints is the Dash-8 aircraft, which emits low-frequency, tonal noise. Active noise control is a potentially cost-effective alternative to passive noise-control methods, which are ineffective at controlling low-frequency noise. Since the run-up tests are performed outdoors, the effects of outdoor conditions on the performance of an active control system must be considered. In this paper, the results of a preliminary investigation of the effects of realistic meteorological conditions and ground impedance on the performance of a single-channel active-control system are presented. Computer simulations of single-channel active control of a monopole source were performed using the Green's-function parabolic-equation method. Different realistic atmospheric conditions, and reflective or soft ground, were used in the simulations. The results show that atmospheric refraction causes fluctuations in the noise attenuation achieved by a single-channel control system, and has the overall effect of decreasing its performance, making the system ineffective in some cases. .

  6. Relationship of fatigued run and rapid stop to ground reaction forces, lower extremity kinematics, and muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Nyland, J A; Shapiro, R; Stine, R L; Horn, T S; Ireland, M L

    1994-09-01

    Fatigue may be related to lower extremity injury. The effect of lower extremity fatigue on ground reaction force production, lower extremity kinematics, and muscle activation during the landing phase of a run and rapid stop was investigated. Subjects were 19 female, Division 1 collegiate basketball and volleyball players (mean age = 20.8 +/- 1.8 years, mean weight = 71.7 +/- 6.9 kg, mean height = 174 +/- 5 cm). Dominant leg ground reaction and muscle activation data were sampled at 2,000 Hz. Lower extremity kinematic data were sampled at 200 Hz, and three-dimensional analysis was performed. Knee extensor/flexor muscle activation tended to be delayed during fatigue (p < or = .08). Maximum knee flexion tended to occur earlier during fatigue (p < or = .09). Step-wise multiple regression suggested that the knee may be the primary site of force attenuation following fatigue. During fatigue, biodynamical compensations in the mechanical properties of the knee extensor musculature, as evidenced by differences in knee kinematics and muscle activation times, may occur to enhance knee stability.

  7. Active crustal deformation across the Basin and Range province, western United States, measured with the Global Positioning System, 1992-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, W.; Thatcher, W.

    2003-04-01

    The Basin and Range province of the western United States is a region of active tectonic extension and dextral shear, accommodating roughly 25% of the motion between non-deforming North America (NA) and the Pacific Plate (PA). The orientation of dextral shear is consistent with that of NA/PA relative plate motion, suggesting that this high elevation interior province is an important part of the plate boundary system. We present an analysis of Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected from 1992 to 2002. An 800 km long network of campaign-style geodetic benchmarks extends from east of the Wasatch fault zone (WFZ) in central Utah to west of the Genoa fault zone and Lake Tahoe in the northern Sierra Nevada mountains. From the new data collected in September 2002 and from data collected in 1992, 1996, and 1998, velocities have been estimated at 92 GPS sites, nearly double the number previously presented by Thatcher et al. [1999]. This new data reduces the uncertainty in site velocities and increases the spatial detail compared to earlier results, and now allows resolution of distinct domains in the tensor strain rate field. To process the data we use the GIPSY/OASIS and Quasi-Observation Combination Analysis (Dong et al. [1998]) software packages and incorporate data from continuously recording GPS stations in California and Nevada. The results show that most of the approximately 12 mm/yr of Sierra Nevada block motion is accommodated by right lateral shear and extensional deformation concentrated in the westernmost 200 km of Nevada, in the vicinity of the Walker Lane (WL). A lesser amount of velocity variation (roughly 3 mm/yr) is localized at the easternmost edge of the network, in the vicinity of the Wasatch Fault Zone (WFZ). Estimates of tensor strain rates show transitions in the style of deformation. Near the WFZ only uniaxial, roughly east-west extension can be resolved. Between longitude -112 and -117.5 no deformation is resolvable. Near longitude -118, in

  8. Developing Long-Term Physical Activity Participation: A Grounded Theory Study with African American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Amy E.; Buckworth, Janet; Katz, Mira L.; Willis, Sharla K.; Odoms-Young, Angela; Heaney, Catherine A.

    2009-01-01

    Regular physical activity is linked to a reduced risk of obesity and chronic disease. African American women bear a disproportionate burden from these conditions and many do not get the recommended amount of physical activity. Long-term success of interventions to initiate and maintain a physically active lifestyle among African American women has…

  9. Inhibitory activity of Syzygium aromaticum and Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf. essential oils against Listeria monocytogenes inoculated in bovine ground meat.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Thales Leandro Coutinho; das Graças Cardoso, Maria; de Araújo Soares, Rodrigo; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf; Tebaldi, Victor Maximiliano Reis

    2013-01-01

    This research evaluated the antimicrobial effect of the clove (Syzygium aromaticum) and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf.) essential oils (EOs) against Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 growth added to bovine ground meat stored under refrigeration (5 ± 2 °C) for three days. The EOs, extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), were tested in vitro using an agar well diffusion methodology for determination of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). The MIC concentrations for both essential oils on culture tested of L. monocytogenes were 1.56%. The EOs concentrations applied in contaminated ground beef were 1.56, 3.125 and 6.25% (w/v) based on MIC levels and possible activity reductions by food constituents. The bacteria populations were significantly reduced (p ≤ 0.05) after one day of storage in ground meat samples treated with clove and lemongrass EOs at concentrations of 1.56%. There were no significant counts of L. monocytogenes in samples at the other concentrations of the two oils applied after the second day of storage. The sensory acceptability evaluation of the bovine ground meat samples treated with EOs showed that the addition at concentrations higher than 1.56% promote undesirable alterations of taste, odor and characteristic color. The application of EOs at low concentrations in food products can be used in combination with other preservation methods, such as refrigeration, to control pathogens and spoilage bacteria during shelf-life; which goes according to current market trends, where consumers are requesting natural products.

  10. Transcriptional Activation of p53 during Cold Induced Torpor in the 13-Lined Ground Squirrel Ictidomys tridecemlineatus

    PubMed Central

    Hefler, Joshua; Wu, Cheng-Wei; Storey, Kenneth B.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor p53 is located at the centre of multiple pathways relating the cellular response to stress. Commonly known as a tumor suppressor, it is responsible for initiating diverse actions to protect the integrity of the genome, ranging from cell cycle arrest to apoptosis. This study investigated the regulation of p53 protein in hibernating 13-lined ground squirrel Ictidomys tridecemlineatus during multiple stages of the torpor-arousal cycle. Transcript and protein levels of p53 were both elevated in the skeletal muscle during early and late torpor stages of the hibernation cycle. Nuclear localization of p53 was also increased during late torpor, and this is associated with an increase in its DNA binding activity and expression of p53 transcriptional targets p21CIP, gadd45α, and 14-3-3σ. The increase in p53 transcriptional activity appears to be independent of its phosphorylation at Ser-15, Ser-46, and Ser-392, consistent with an absence of checkpoint kinase activation during torpor. Sequence analysis revealed unique amino acid substitutions in the ground squirrel p53 protein, which may contribute to an increase in protein stability compared to nonhibernators. Overall, the study results provided evidences for a potential role of p53 in the protection of the skeletal muscle during torpor. PMID:26843984

  11. Transcriptional Activation of p53 during Cold Induced Torpor in the 13-Lined Ground Squirrel Ictidomys tridecemlineatus.

    PubMed

    Hefler, Joshua; Wu, Cheng-Wei; Storey, Kenneth B

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor p53 is located at the centre of multiple pathways relating the cellular response to stress. Commonly known as a tumor suppressor, it is responsible for initiating diverse actions to protect the integrity of the genome, ranging from cell cycle arrest to apoptosis. This study investigated the regulation of p53 protein in hibernating 13-lined ground squirrel Ictidomys tridecemlineatus during multiple stages of the torpor-arousal cycle. Transcript and protein levels of p53 were both elevated in the skeletal muscle during early and late torpor stages of the hibernation cycle. Nuclear localization of p53 was also increased during late torpor, and this is associated with an increase in its DNA binding activity and expression of p53 transcriptional targets p21CIP, gadd45α, and 14-3-3σ. The increase in p53 transcriptional activity appears to be independent of its phosphorylation at Ser-15, Ser-46, and Ser-392, consistent with an absence of checkpoint kinase activation during torpor. Sequence analysis revealed unique amino acid substitutions in the ground squirrel p53 protein, which may contribute to an increase in protein stability compared to nonhibernators. Overall, the study results provided evidences for a potential role of p53 in the protection of the skeletal muscle during torpor.

  12. Supercritical fluid extraction from spent coffee grounds and coffee husks: antioxidant activity and effect of operational variables on extract composition.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Kátia S; Gonçalvez, Ricardo T; Maraschin, Marcelo; Ribeiro-do-Valle, Rosa Maria; Martínez, Julian; Ferreira, Sandra R S

    2012-01-15

    The present study describes the chemical composition and the antioxidant activity of spent coffee grounds and coffee husks extracts, obtained by supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with CO(2) and with CO(2) and co-solvent. In order to evaluate the high pressure method in terms of process yield, extract composition and antioxidant activity, low pressure methods, such as ultrasound (UE) and soxhlet (SOX) with different organic solvents, were also applied to obtain the extracts. The conditions for the SFE were: temperatures of 313.15K, 323.15K and 333.15K and pressures from 100 bar to 300 bar. The SFE kinetics and the mathematical modeling of the overall extraction curves (OEC) were also investigated. The extracts obtained by LPE (low pressure extraction) with ethanol showed the best results for the global extraction yield (X(0)) when compared to SFE results. The best extraction yield was 15±2% for spent coffee grounds with ethanol and 3.1±04% for coffee husks. The antioxidant potential was evaluated by DPPH method, ABTS method and Folin-Ciocalteau method. The best antioxidant activity was showed by coffee husk extracts obtained by LPE. The quantification and the identification of the extracts were accomplished using HPLC analysis. The main compounds identified were caffeine and chlorogenic acid for the supercritical extracts from coffee husks.

  13. COSMO-SkyMed sensor constellation and GPS data to study the source responsible of ground deformation beneath the urban area of Naples (Southern Italy) in 2012-2013.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, Susi

    2016-04-01

    To understand uplift phenomenon occurred during the April 2012 - January 2013 time interval at Campi Flegrei caldera, we exploited the displacement time series obtained by processing 90 SAR images acquired from the COSMO-SkyMed sensor constellation along ascending orbits via the well-known DInSAR algorithm referred to as SBAS algorithm, and the measurements provided by 14 continuous GPS stations deployed within the caldera and belonging to the permanent INGV-OV monitoring network. In particular, the caldera has shown a rapid uplift of about 6 cm with a peak rate of about 3 cm/month in December 2012. This event led the Italian Civil Protection to raise the alert level of the volcano from green to yellow. Using a novel geodetic inversion technique we imaged the kinematics of the intrusion of a magmatic sill beneath the town of Pozzuoli at a depth of about 3100 m. The retrieved kinematics was then used as input to infer the dynamics of the sill intrusion using a recently developed numerical model. The best fit obtained by non-linear inverse approach that consider a time-varying deformation field is a penny-shaped source located at a depth of 3100 m. To study the detail of the intrusion process we have applied a geodetic imaging technique to determine the spatial and temporal kinematics of the ground deformation source in the selected period. The retrieved temporal pattern of the source geometry reflects that of a growing sill that, at the end of the considered period, has a roughly elliptical geometry with an extension of about 6 km in the EW direction and about 4 km in the NS one. The maximum aperture of the sill is of about 30 cm at its center. To understand the dynamics of this phenomenon we used a numerical model of the emplacement of a magmatic sill, to fit the retrieved geometry. The parameters to be determined are: the average magma viscosity, the amount of magma already present in the sill before the 2012-2013 episode and the magma injection rate. Results show

  14. Experimental evidence for shallow, slow-moving landslides activated by a decrease in ground temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibasaki, Tatsuya; Matsuura, Sumio; Okamoto, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    In order to understand the trigger mechanism of slow-moving landslides occurring in the early cold season from late autumn to winter, we investigated the effect of temperature on the shear strength of slip surface soils. Displacement-controlled and shear stress-controlled box shear experiments were performed on undisturbed slip zone soils under residual strength conditions. Test results conducted at temperatures from 9 to 25°C showed remarkable shear strength reductions with decreasing temperature. Creep-like slow shear displacements were induced by a decrease in temperature. These temperature-dependent shear behaviors are attributed to the rheological properties of hydrous smectite that dominantly compose the soil material along the failure surface. Our experimental results imply that ground temperature conditions influence slope instability, especially for shallow landslides occurring in smectite-bearing rock areas.

  15. Movement and fate of chlorinated solvents in ground water; research activities at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fusillo, T.V.; Ehlke, T.A.; Martin, Mary

    1987-01-01

    The USGS, through its Toxic Waste--Ground-Water Contamination Program, is undertaking an interdisciplinary research study of contaminants. The purpose of the study is to gain a better understanding of the chemical, physical, and biological processes that affect the movement and fate of these contaminants in groundwater. The study is being conducted at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, where metal plating and metal etching wastes have contaminated part of the glacial stratified drift aquifers. Major areas of research at the site are described, including: (1) distribution and movement of chlorinated solvents in groundwater, (2) behavior of chlorinated solvents in the unsaturated zone, (3) geochemistry of the contaminated groundwater, and (4) microbial transformations of chlorinated solvents. (Author 's abstract)

  16. Study of Droplet Activation in Thin Clouds Using Ground-based Raman Lidar and Ancillary Remote Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosoldi, Marco; Madonna, Fabio; Gumà Claramunt, Pilar; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2015-04-01

    Studies on global climate change show that the effects of aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) on the Earth's radiation balance and climate, also known as indirect aerosol effects, are the most uncertain among all the effects involving the atmospheric constituents and processes (Stocker et al., IPCC, 2013). Droplet activation is the most important and challenging process in the understanding of ACI. It represents the direct microphysical link between aerosols and clouds and it is probably the largest source of uncertainty in estimating indirect aerosol effects. An accurate estimation of aerosol-clouds microphysical and optical properties in proximity and within the cloud boundaries represents a good frame for the study of droplet activation. This can be obtained by using ground-based profiling remote sensing techniques. In this work, a methodology for the experimental investigation of droplet activation, based on ground-based multi-wavelength Raman lidar and Doppler radar technique, is presented. The study is focused on the observation of thin liquid water clouds, which are low or midlevel super-cooled clouds characterized by a liquid water path (LWP) lower than about 100 gm-2(Turner et al., 2007). These clouds are often optically thin, which means that ground-based Raman lidar allows the detection of the cloud top and of the cloud structure above. Broken clouds are primarily inspected to take advantage of their discontinuous structure using ground based remote sensing. Observations are performed simultaneously with multi-wavelength Raman lidars, a cloud Doppler radar and a microwave radiometer at CIAO (CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory: www.ciao.imaa.cnr.it), in Potenza, Southern Italy (40.60N, 15.72E, 760 m a.s.l.). A statistical study of the variability of optical properties and humidity in the transition from cloudy regions to cloud-free regions surrounding the clouds leads to the identification of threshold values for the optical properties, enabling the

  17. Integrated Active Fire Retrievals and Biomass Burning Emissions Using Complementary Near-Coincident Ground, Airborne and Spaceborne Sensor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Wilfrid; Ellicott, Evan; Ichoku, Charles; Ellison, Luke; Dickinson, Matthew B.; Ottmar, Roger D.; Clements, Craig; Hall, Dianne; Ambrosia, Vincent; Kremens, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Ground, airborne and spaceborne data were collected for a 450 ha prescribed fire implemented on 18 October 2011 at the Henry W. Coe State Park in California. The integration of various data elements allowed near coincident active fire retrievals to be estimated. The Autonomous Modular Sensor-Wildfire (AMS) airborne multispectral imaging system was used as a bridge between ground and spaceborne data sets providing high quality reference information to support satellite fire retrieval error analyses and fire emissions estimates. We found excellent agreement between peak fire radiant heat flux data (less than 1% error) derived from near-coincident ground radiometers and AMS. Both MODIS and GOES imager active fire products were negatively influenced by the presence of thick smoke, which was misclassified as cloud by their algorithms, leading to the omission of fire pixels beneath the smoke, and resulting in the underestimation of their retrieved fire radiative power (FRP) values for the burn plot, compared to the reference airborne data. Agreement between airborne and spaceborne FRP data improved significantly after correction for omission errors and atmospheric attenuation, resulting in as low as 5 difference between AquaMODIS and AMS. Use of in situ fuel and fire energy estimates in combination with a collection of AMS, MODIS, and GOES FRP retrievals provided a fuel consumption factor of 0.261 kg per MJ, total energy release of 14.5 x 10(exp 6) MJ, and total fuel consumption of 3.8 x 10(exp 6) kg. Fire emissions were calculated using two separate techniques, resulting in as low as 15 difference for various species

  18. Constraining fault activity by investigating tectonically-deformed Quaternary palaeoshorelines using a synchronous correlation method: the Capo D'Orlando Fault as a case study (NE Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschis, Marco; Roberts, Gerald P.; Robertson, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Long-term curstal extension rates, accommodated by active normal faults, can be constrained by investigating Late Quaternary vertical movements. Sequences of marine terraces tectonically deformed by active faults mark the interaction between tectonic activity, sea-level changes and active faulting throughout the Quaternary (e.g. Armijo et al., 1996, Giunta et al, 2011, Roberts et al., 2013). Crustal deformation can be calculated over multiple seismic cycles by mapping Quaternary tectonically-deformed palaeoshorelines, both in the hangingwall and footwall of active normal faults (Roberts et al., 2013). Here we use a synchronous correlation method between palaeoshorelines elevations and the ages of sea-level highstands (see Roberts et al., 2013 for further details) which takes advantage of the facts that (i) sea-level highstands are not evenly-spaced in time, yet must correlate with palaeoshorelines that are commonly not evenly-spaced in elevation, and (ii) that older terraces may be destroyed and/or overprinted by younger highstands, so that the next higher or lower paleoshoreline does not necessarily correlate with the next older or younger sea-level highstand. We investigated a flight of Late Quaternary marine terraces deformed by normal faulting as a result of the Capo D'Orlando Fault in NE Sicily (e.g. Giunta et al., 2011). This fault lies within the Calabrian Arc which has experienced damaging seismic events such as the 1908 Messina Straits earthquake ~ Mw 7. Our mapping and previous mapping (Giunta et al. (2011) demonstrate that the elevations of marine terraces inner edges change along the strike the NE - SW oriented normal fault. This confirms active deformation on the Capo D'Orlando Fault, strongly suggesting that it should be added into the Database of Individual Seismogenic Sources (DISS, Basili et al., 2008). Giunta et al. (2011) suggested that uplift rates and hence faults lip-rates vary through time for this examples. We update the ages assigned to

  19. Application of the Deformation Information System for automated analysis and mapping of mining terrain deformations - case study from SW Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blachowski, Jan; Grzempowski, Piotr; Milczarek, Wojciech; Nowacka, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring, mapping and modelling of mining induced terrain deformations are important tasks for quantifying and minimising threats that arise from underground extraction of useful minerals and affect surface infrastructure, human safety, the environment and security of the mining operation itself. The number of methods and techniques used for monitoring and analysis of mining terrain deformations is wide and expanding with the progress in geographical information technologies. These include for example: terrestrial geodetic measurements, Global Navigation Satellite Systems, remote sensing, GIS based modelling and spatial statistics, finite element method modelling, geological modelling, empirical modelling using e.g. the Knothe theory, artificial neural networks, fuzzy logic calculations and other. The presentation shows the results of numerical modelling and mapping of mining terrain deformations for two cases of underground mining sites in SW Poland, hard coal one (abandoned) and copper ore (active) using the functionalities of the Deformation Information System (DIS) (Blachowski et al, 2014 @ http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2014/EGU2014-7949.pdf). The functionalities of the spatial data modelling module of DIS have been presented and its applications in modelling, mapping and visualising mining terrain deformations based on processing of measurement data (geodetic and GNSS) for these two cases have been characterised and compared. These include, self-developed and implemented in DIS, automation procedures for calculating mining terrain subsidence with different interpolation techniques, calculation of other mining deformation parameters (i.e. tilt, horizontal displacement, horizontal strain and curvature), as well as mapping mining terrain categories based on classification of the values of these parameters as used in Poland. Acknowledgments. This work has been financed from the National Science Centre Project "Development of a numerical method of

  20. Study of Droplet Activation in Thin Clouds Using Ground-Based Raman Lidar and Ancillary Remote Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosoldi, Marco; Madonna, Fabio; Gumà Claramunt, Pilar; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-06-01

    A methodology for the study of cloud droplet activation based on the measurements performed with ground-based multi-wavelength Raman lidars and ancillary remote sensors collected at CNR-IMAA observatory, Potenza, South Italy, is presented. The study is focused on the observation of thin warm clouds. Thin clouds are often also optically thin: this allows the cloud top detection and the full profiling of cloud layers using ground-based Raman lidar. Moreover, broken clouds are inspected to take advantage of their discontinuous structure in order to study the variability of optical properties and water vapor content in the transition from cloudy regions to cloudless regions close to the cloud boundaries. A statistical study of this variability leads to identify threshold values for the optical properties, enabling the discrimination between clouds and cloudless regions. These values can be used to evaluate and improve parameterizations of droplet activation within numerical models. A statistical study of the co-located Doppler radar moments allows to retrieve droplet size and vertical velocities close to the cloud base. First evidences of a correlation between droplet vertical velocities measured at the cloud base and the aerosol effective radius observed in the cloud-free regions of the broken clouds are found.

  1. SO2 on Venus: IUE, HST and ground-based measurements, and the active volcanism connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Na, C. Y.; Barker, E. S.; Stern, S. A.; Esposito, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Magellan images have shown that the volcanic features are widespread over the surface of Venus. The question of whether there is active volcanism is important for understanding both the atmospheric and the geological processes on Venus. The thick cloud cover of Venus precludes any direct observation of active volcanoes even if they exist. The only means of monitoring the active volcanism on Venus at present seems to be remote sensing from Earth. Continuous monitoring of SO2 is important to establish the long term trend of SO2 abundance and to understand the physical mechanism responsible for the change.

  2. Improving the mechanical properties of Zr-based bulk metallic glass by controlling the activation energy for β-relaxation through plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Nozomu; Todaka, Yoshikazu Umemoto, Minoru; Yokoyama, Yoshihiko

    2014-09-29

    The mechanism of plastic deformation in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is widely believed to be based on a shear transformation zone (STZ). This model assumes that a shear-induced atomic rearrangement occurs at local clusters that are a few to hundreds of atoms in size. It was recently postulated that the potential energy barrier for STZ activation, W{sub STZ}, calculated using the cooperative shear model, is equivalent to the activation energy for β-relaxation, E{sub β}. This result suggested that the fundamental process for STZ activation is the mechanically activated β-relaxation. Since the E{sub β} value and the glass transition temperature T{sub g} of BMGs have a linear relation, that is, because E{sub β} ≈ 26RT{sub g}, the composition of the BMG determines the ease with which the STZ can be activated. Enthalpy relaxation experiments revealed that the BMG Zr{sub 50}Cu{sub 40}Al{sub 10} when deformed by high-pressure torsion (HPT) has a lower E{sub β} of 101 kJ/mol. The HPT-processed samples accordingly exhibited tensile plastic elongation (0.34%) and marked decreases in their yield strength (330 MPa). These results suggest that mechanically induced structural defects (i.e., the free volume and the anti-free volume) effectively act to reduce W{sub STZ} and increase the number of STZs activated during tensile testing to accommodate the plastic strain without requiring a change in the composition of the BMG. Thus, this study shows quantitatively that mechanically induced structural defects can overcome the compositional limitations of E{sub β} (or W{sub STZ}) and result in improvements in the mechanical properties of the BMG.

  3. Infrared sensor modeling for discrimination of ground-based human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flug, Eric; Deaver, Dawne

    2008-04-01

    In an initial effort to better understand how motion in human activities influences sensor performance, Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) developed a perception experiment that tests an observer's ability to identify an activity in static and dynamic scenes. Current sensor models such as NVTherm were calibrated using static imagery of military vehicles but, given the current battlefield environment, the focus has shifted more towards discriminating human activities. In these activities, motion plays an important role but this role is not well quantified by the model. This study looks at twelve hostile and non-hostile activities that may be performed on an urban roadside such as digging a hole, raking, surveillance with binoculars, and holding several weapons. The forced choice experiment presents the activities in both static and dynamic scenes so that the effect of adding motion can be evaluated. The results are analyzed and attempts are made at relating observer performance to various static and dynamic metrics and ultimately developing a calibration for the sensor model.

  4. Spatiotemporal analysis of soil moisture in using active and passive remotely sensed data and ground observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Fang, B.; Lakshmi, V.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: Soil moisture plays a vital role in ecosystem, biological processes, climate, weather and agriculture. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) improves data by combining the advantages and avoiding the limitation of passive microwave remote sensing (low resolution), and active microwave (challenge of soil moisture retrieval). This study will advance the knowledge of the application of soil moisture by using the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) data as well as data collected at Walnut Gulch Arizona in August 2015 during SMAPVEX15. Specifically, we will analyze the 5m radar data from Unmanned Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) to study spatial variability within the PALS radiometer pixel. SMAPVEX12/15 and SMAP data will also be analyzed to evaluate disaggregation algorithms. The analytical findings will provide valuable information for policy-makers to initiate and adjust protocols and regulations for protecting land resources and improving environmental conditions. Keywords: soil moisture, Remote Sensing (RS), spatial statistic

  5. Deglaciation, ground temperature and volcanic activity in Popocatépetl (México).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, N.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.; Mendoza-Margáin, C. E.; Vázquez-Selem, L.

    2012-04-01

    From 2001 to 2011 we monitored the soil temperature at different depths down to 1 m and the air temperature from 4100 to 5000 m asl over the Northern slope of the active volcano Popocatépetl (19°02´N, 98°62´W; 5.424 m asl). During this time period the volcano has been active, especially until the end of 2003, presenting periods of short activity thereafter. This eruptive activity has triggered the melting of the glacier situated on the Northern slope, frequently generating lahars. Finally, the glacier has been reduced to isolated ice islets. In this work we have analysed air and soil temperature data in order to differentiate the influence of solar and geothermal energies on the soil energy balance. We also compared these data to the soil temperature data from the nearby Iztaccíhuatl volcano, located just 15 km away and inactive since the late Pleistocene. The disappearance of the glacier has left large areas exposed on the Northern slope. Snow remains very few days per year and does not isolate the slope from periglacial processes. The results indicate a certain influence of geothermal activity on the soil related to periglacial processes and to the distribution of permafrost. As an example, the models elaborated to study the distribution of permafrost on Popocatépetl from soil temperature data indicate the existence of discontinuous permafrost above 5100/5200m asl, 200 m higher than on Iztaccíhuatl. However, the disappearance of glaciers on these altitudes could be favouring the formation of permafrost, also promoted by the relative eruptive calm of the last few years. In any case, the influence of geothermal activity on the superficial soil temperature of the volcano is vague as we have not detected specific warming events directly related to the most intensive eruptive periods. Research funded by CGL2009-7343 project, Government of Spain.

  6. JPSS Proving Ground Activities with NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, L. A.; Smith, M. R.; Fuell, K.; Stano, G. T.; LeRoy, A.; Berndt, E.

    2015-12-01

    Instruments aboard the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) series of satellites will provide imagery and other data sets relevant to operational weather forecasts. To prepare current and future weather forecasters in application of these data sets, Proving Ground activities have been established that demonstrate future JPSS capabilities through use of similar sensors aboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites, and the S-NPP mission. As part of these efforts, NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center in Huntsville, Alabama partners with near real-time providers of S-NPP products (e.g., NASA, UW/CIMSS, UAF/