Science.gov

Sample records for activity ground deformation

  1. Using the Global Positioning System to monitor dynamic ground deformation networks on potentially active landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Jane L.

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) has many advantages over conventional surveying for landslide disaster prevention and mitigation. Once an initial baseline network of ground markers has been positioned, the re-occupation of survey stations determines ground deformation. This verifies both the boundary of the landslide block and ground surface changes. These changes may take the form of either slow to moderate creep, or massive structural failure. Creep may occur as a precursor to slope failure, either within (i) fresh slopes that do not show any evidence of past collapse, (ii) the existing active landslides and (iii) areas adjacent to existing collapses. Networks are measured using rapid static GPS. The method, which enables many survey stations to be measured in a short time, provides a quick means for determining the three-dimensional map of the ground surface (of the landslide). A study in Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, established an initial baseline network within the Barranco de Tirajana, a basin on Gran Canaria that contains evidence of both ancient and recent landslides. Reoccupation of the network using rapid static GPS revealed a field accuracy of approximately 10 mm; the data indicated that the most recent landslide is currently stable.

  2. Preliminary results of ESA Category-1 Project 5834 "Application of DInSAR technique to areas of active ground deformations"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, B.; D'Auria, L.

    2009-04-01

    We have established a processing chain of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data for identification and parametrisation of deformation sources in areas of active ground deformation (e.g. seismogenic areas, volcanic districts). SAR data from European Space Agency (ESA) satellites ERS-2 and ENVISAT are used. SAR and InSAR data processing LEVEL 0 SAR data are focussed to Single Look Complex (SLC) through ROI_PAC (Copyright 2002-2008, Caltech/Jet Propulsion Laboratory). We perform an advanced data processing using Doris (Kampes and Usai, 1999) a single program that can do most common steps of the interferometric radar processing starting from SLC data to generation of interferometric products and geocoding. Unwrapping of interferometric phase is performed using the public domain software snaphu (Chen and Zebker, 2001). Modeling of deformation sources We propose a novel inversion approach base on non-linear inversion. The forward modeling is provided by the semi-analytic deformation model for point sources and finite faults. The parameters of the fault (center position, width, height, rake and seismic moment) are inverted using a combination of non-linear optimization algorithms (as Monte-Carlo, Nelder&Mead Simplex and Simulated Annealing). The misfit function defined for the optimization is based on the L2 norm of the error weighted by the coherence of the considered spatial point. Test datasets To test our modeling procedure we chose three different study areas, refer to mainly strike-slip seismogenic sources with different orientation to respect satellite Line Of Sight (LOS): December 26 2003 Iranian earthquake (Bam e.), data from both ascending and descending passes of ENVISAT ASAR narrow swath IS2 (RAW and SLCs); August 17 1999 Turkey earthquake (Izmit e.), data from both ascending and descending passes of ERS-2 AMI SAR (SLCs); June 17-21 2000 Iceland earthquakes, data from both ascending and descending passes of ERS-2 AMI SAR (SLCs). Tests carried over real

  3. Regional ground deformation and its controlling measures in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhifang; Zhu, Haisheng; Huang, Yong

    2006-12-01

    With the development of construction of China Cities, there exist a lot of environmental geological problems involved in the geofracture, land subsidence, collapse, landslide, devolution, mudrock flow, floating sand, piping and soft ground deformation. Of big cities whose population is over one million in China, about 30 cities appears the land subsidence region. Other cities locate in the regions of collapse yellow earth or expand soil of strong swell-shrink charasteristic, soft ground and karst. In the paper, the cause and hazard of regionality ground deformation is summed up. The causes of regional land deformation caused by the natural geological effect and activities of human being are analyzed. According to the length of deformation course and endanger of society, economy and life, land deformation involves three types, that is, the delay, rapid and break land deformation. And the concrete countermeasure and method are provided.

  4. Thermomechanics of shallow magma chamber pressurization: Implications for the assessment of ground deformation data at active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, P. M.; de Silva, S. L.; Grosfils, E. B.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we utilize thermomechanical models to investigate how magma chambers overpressurize as the result of either magmatic recharge or volatile exsolution. By implementing an adaptive reservoir boundary condition we are able to track how overpressure dissipates as the magma chamber expands to accommodate internal volume changes. We find that the size of the reservoir greatly impacts the resultant magma chamber overpressure. In particular, overpressure estimates for small to moderate-sized reservoirs (1-10 km3) are up to 70% lower than previous analytical predictions. We apply our models to Santorini volcano in Greece where recent seismic activity and ground deformation observations suggested the potential for eruption. The incorporation of an adaptive boundary condition reproduces Mogi flux estimates and suggests that the magma reservoir present at Santorini may be quite large. Furthermore, model results suggest that if the magma chamber is >100 km3, overpressures generated due to the high magma flux may not exceed the strength of the host rock, thus requiring an additional triggering mechanism for eruption. Although the adaptive boundary condition approach does not calculate the internal evolution of the magma reservoir, it represents a fundamental step forward from elastic Mogi models and fixed boundary solutions on which future investigations of the evolution of the magma can be built.

  5. Ground deformation from ground-based SAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarchi, Dario; Casagli, Nicola; Fortuny-Guasch, Joaquim; Guerri, Letizia; Antonello, Giuseppe; Leva, Davide

    An in-depth analysis of the last two images acquired by the ground-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar system installed on Stromboli before the 5 April 2003 explosion allowed us to detect the precursory signals of the explosion related to ground deformation. In particular, it was possible to estimate the exact time of the explosion through the time domain analysis of raw data from the radar acquisition. This was interrupted by a blackout that occurred a few seconds after the event. The explosion onset time corresponds to a clear change in the intensity of the backscattered energy, related to the dense volcanic plume emission from the Crater. In addiction, the use of a particular interferometric processing technique for the last two acquisitions, consisting of the selection of synthetic sub-apertures from the main ones and creating with these a sequence of interferograms with a higher temporal resolution, detected precursory deformations starting 2 min before the explosion. These observations indicate the occurrence of an elastic deformation of a centimeter amplitude that affected the volcanic edifice progressively from the Crater down to the Sciara del Fuoco depression.

  6. Combining Satellite and Ground-Based Radar Interferometry Data to Measure Surface Deformation Associated with EGS Pumping Activities at Newberry Crater, OR Geothermal Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, P.; Cladouhos, T. T.; Schultz, A.; Rose, K.; Urquhart, S.

    2013-12-01

    TerraSAR-X (TSX) satellite data are combined with data collected using a ground-based real aperture radar interferometer (GAMMA Remote Sensing AG Portable Radar Interferometer-2, GPRI2) to remotely image surface deformation arising from enhanced geothermal system (EGS) pumping activity at the geothermal site located off the western flank of Newberry Crater, OR. Due to the heavily forested area impeding the utility of interferometric measurements at X-band (TSX) and Ku-band (GPRI2) wavelengths, 100 aluminum radar corner reflectors (CRs) were fabricated and installed in pairs approximately 5-8 meters above the ground in 50 large trees for optimal visibility and wind stability. One CR in each pair was aimed up at the ascending orbit track look direction for TSX, and the other was simultaneously aimed at the descending orbit track look direction for TSX and to Paulina Peak 6 km to the southwest for line-of-sight to the GPRI2 antenna position. The combination of 11-day repeat orbit acquisitions from a near vertical look direction from TSX with on-demand (up to daily) acquisitions from a near horizontal look direction from the GPRI2 instrument allows for full 3D displacement vector determination for each target imaged. Standard and point-target processing techniques are used to maximize the utility of the data collected and the transient nature of the pumping activities and resulting surface deformation signals demand this high level of spatial-temporal sampling. Preliminary data quality and deformation signal results will be presented and put in context with well-log data such as pressure, volume and flow rate, as well as data from microseismic array, MT, and gravity surveys.

  7. On the influence of a geothermal system on ground deformation during a volcanic eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarin, G. A.; Melnik, O. E.; Tsvetkova, Yu. D.; Afanasyev, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    The measurement of ground deformation during a volcanic eruption is one of the main tools for the monitoring of active volcanoes. The deformation is caused by processes that are occurring in the chamber-conduit system, as well as in the geothermal systems that are heated by ascending magma. The influence of the magma chamber and, to a lesser degree, of the conduit on deformation in host rocks is sufficiently well known theoretically, but no studies have been made to investigate the effects of a hydrothermal system on measurable ground deformation during a volcanic eruption. We made a comparative study of the ground deformation due to two deformation-initiating sources: a fissure conduit with a specified excess pressure and a hydrothermal system that was heated by magma flow. We show that the vertical deformation due to the activity of a geothermal system can exceed that due to magma flow by factors of several times. The spatial distributions of the deformation are also substantially different. The vertical displacement due to a geothermal system has its maximum above the fissure conduit, while when the pressure varies in the conduit it induces a local subsidence of the ground; the maximum ground uplift is at a distance of approximately twice the depth to the top of the conduit. The influence of the geothermal system should be incorporated in interpretations of data that come from the monitoring of active volcanoes.

  8. Ground Deformation Extraction Using Visible Images and LIDAR Data in Mining Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenmin; Wu, Lixin

    2016-06-01

    Recognition and extraction of mining ground deformation can help us understand the deformation process and space distribution, and estimate the deformation laws and trends. This study focuses on the application of ground deformation detection and extraction combining with high resolution visible stereo imagery, LiDAR observation point cloud data and historical data. The DEM in large mining area is generated using high-resolution satellite stereo images, and ground deformation is obtained through time series analysis combined with historical DEM data. Ground deformation caused by mining activities are detected and analyzed to explain the link between the regional ground deformation and local deformation. A district of covering 200 km2 around the West Open Pit Mine in Fushun of Liaoning province, a city located in the Northeast China is chosen as the test area for example. Regional and local ground deformation from 2010 to 2015 time series are detected and extracted with DEMs derived from ZY-3 images and LiDAR point DEMs in the case study. Results show that the mean regional deformation is 7.1 m of rising elevation with RMS 9.6 m. Deformation of rising elevation and deformation of declining elevation couple together in local area. The area of higher elevation variation is 16.3 km2 and the mean rising value is 35.8 m with RMS 15.7 m, while the deformation area of lower elevation variation is 6.8 km2 and the mean declining value is 17.6 m with RMS 9.3 m. Moreover, local large deformation and regional slow deformation couple together, the deformation in local mining activities has expanded to the surrounding area, a large ground fracture with declining elevation has been detected and extracted in the south of West Open Pit Mine, the mean declining elevation of which is 23.1 m and covering about 2.3 km2 till 2015. The results in this paper are preliminary currently; we are making efforts to improve more precision results with invariant ground control data for validation.

  9. Determination of visual figure and ground in dynamically deforming shapes.

    PubMed

    Barenholtz, Elan; Feldman, Jacob

    2006-10-01

    Figure/ground assignment - determining which part of the visual image is foreground and which background - is a critical step in early visual analysis, upon which much later processing depends. Previous research on the assignment of figure and ground to opposing sides of a contour has almost exclusively involved static geometric factors - such as convexity, symmetry, and size - in non-moving images. Here, we introduce a new class of cue to figural assignment based on the motion of dynamically deforming contours. Subjects viewing an animated, deforming shape tended to assign figure and ground so that articulating curvature extrema - i.e., "hinging" vertices - had negative (concave) contour curvature. This articulating-concavity bias is present when all known static cues to figure/ground are absent or neutral in each of the individual frames of the animation, and even seems to override a number of well-known static cues when they are in opposition to the motion cue. We propose that the phenomenon reflects the visual system's inbuilt expectations about the way shapes will deform - specifically, that deformations tend to involve rigid parts articulating at concavities.

  10. Pipeline response to permanent ground deformation: A benchmark case

    SciTech Connect

    O`Rourke, T.D.; O`Rourke, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    Permanent ground deformation on Balboa Blvd. and McLennon Ave. during the 1994 Northridge earthquake affected four gas transmission, one oil transmission, and two water trunk pipelines. Deformation occurred as sliding of a relatively coherent soil mass parallel to the longitudinal axes of the pipelines, rupturing three lines and leaving the other four undamaged. Relevant pipe, soil, and geometric conditions are reported in this paper. Analytical results from sliding block models of soil-pipeline interaction are compared with observed pipeline performance. The analytical results compare favorably with field performance, and thus provide a benchmark case history from which design and siting decisions can be made for pipelines under similar conditions of ground deformation.

  11. Nuclear ground-state masses and deformations: FRDM(2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Moller, P.; Sierk, A. J.; Ichikawa, T.; Sagawa, H.

    2016-03-25

    Here, we tabulate the atomic mass excesses and binding energies, ground-state shell-plus-pairing corrections, ground-state microscopic corrections, and nuclear ground-state deformations of 9318 nuclei ranging from 16O to A=339. The calculations are based on the finite-range droplet macroscopic and the folded-Yukawa single-particle microscopic nuclear-structure models, which are completely specified. Relative to our FRDM(1992) mass table in Möller et al. (1995), the results are obtained in the same model, but with considerably improved treatment of deformation and fewer of the approximations that were necessary earlier, due to limitations in computer power. The more accurate execution of the model and the more extensive and more accurate experimental mass data base now available allow us to determine one additional macroscopic-model parameter, the density-symmetry coefficient LL, which was not varied in the previous calculation, but set to zero. Because we now realize that the FRDM is inaccurate for some highly deformed shapes occurring in fission, because some effects are derived in terms of perturbations around a sphere, we only adjust its macroscopic parameters to ground-state masses.

  12. Nuclear ground-state masses and deformations: FRDM(2012)

    DOE PAGES

    Moller, P.; Sierk, A. J.; Ichikawa, T.; ...

    2016-03-25

    Here, we tabulate the atomic mass excesses and binding energies, ground-state shell-plus-pairing corrections, ground-state microscopic corrections, and nuclear ground-state deformations of 9318 nuclei ranging from 16O to A=339. The calculations are based on the finite-range droplet macroscopic and the folded-Yukawa single-particle microscopic nuclear-structure models, which are completely specified. Relative to our FRDM(1992) mass table in Möller et al. (1995), the results are obtained in the same model, but with considerably improved treatment of deformation and fewer of the approximations that were necessary earlier, due to limitations in computer power. The more accurate execution of the model and the more extensivemore » and more accurate experimental mass data base now available allow us to determine one additional macroscopic-model parameter, the density-symmetry coefficient LL, which was not varied in the previous calculation, but set to zero. Because we now realize that the FRDM is inaccurate for some highly deformed shapes occurring in fission, because some effects are derived in terms of perturbations around a sphere, we only adjust its macroscopic parameters to ground-state masses.« less

  13. Nuclear ground-state masses and deformations: FRDM(2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, P.; Sierk, A. J.; Ichikawa, T.; Sagawa, H.

    2016-05-01

    We tabulate the atomic mass excesses and binding energies, ground-state shell-plus-pairing corrections, ground-state microscopic corrections, and nuclear ground-state deformations of 9318 nuclei ranging from 16O to A = 339. The calculations are based on the finite-range droplet macroscopic and the folded-Yukawa single-particle microscopic nuclear-structure models, which are completely specified. Relative to our FRDM(1992) mass table in Möller et al. (1995), the results are obtained in the same model, but with considerably improved treatment of deformation and fewer of the approximations that were necessary earlier, due to limitations in computer power. The more accurate execution of the model and the more extensive and more accurate experimental mass data base now available allow us to determine one additional macroscopic-model parameter, the density-symmetry coefficient L, which was not varied in the previous calculation, but set to zero. Because we now realize that the FRDM is inaccurate for some highly deformed shapes occurring in fission, because some effects are derived in terms of perturbations around a sphere, we only adjust its macroscopic parameters to ground-state masses.

  14. Very shallow dyke intrusion and potential slope failure imaged by ground deformation: The 28 December 2014 eruption on Mount Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonforte, Alessandro; Guglielmino, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    On 28 December 2014, eruptive activity resumed at Mount Etna with fire fountain activity feeding two lava flows on the eastern and southwestern upper flanks of the volcano. Unlike all previous summit activity, this eruption produced clear deformation at the summit of the volcano. GPS displacements and Sentinel-1A ascending interferograms were calculated in order to image the ground deformation pattern accompanying the eruption. The displacements observed by GPS depict a local ground deformation pattern, affecting only the upper part of the volcano. Despite snow cover on the summit, differential interferometry synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR) data allowed obtaining more detail on the ground deformation pattern on the upper eastern side of the volcano. Three-dimensional GPS displacements inversion located a very shallow NE-SW intrusion just beneath the New Southeast Crater. However, this model cannot justify all the deformation observed by DInSAR thus revealing a gravitational failure of the lava flow field.

  15. Evidence of active ground deformation on the mid-ocean ridge: Axial seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge, April-June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, C.G. )

    1990-08-10

    Since September 1987 a precision bottom pressure recorder (BPR) has been deployed within the summit caldera of Axial seamount. The instrument is capable of measuring pressure of 1 mbar resolution and recording these measurements at 64 samples per hour for up to 15 months. Any significant change in the pressure record should indicate a change of depth associated with vertical ground movement, commonly indicative of active inflation or deflation of underlying magma bodies. Results from the first 9 months of the BPR deployment revealed a significant change in pressure, which is interpreted to represent a 15-cm subsidence of the caldera floor during two 2- to 3-week periods in April-June 1988. Also during these periods, an anomalous decline in temperature at the site was recorded that is correlated with an apparent increase in current velocity at the Axial Seamount Hydrothermal Emissions Study (ASHES) vent field, suggesting vigorous advection of cold water into the caldera. Concurrent oceanographic data from Geosat and from current meter arrays do not indicate any large-scale oceanographic phenomena capable of generating these simultaneous events. One mechanism to explain simultaneous ground subsidence and temperature decline at the caldera center and increased bottom current at the caldera margin is the generation of a buoyant parcel of heated water in response to the intrusion or the eruption of magma associated with volcanic deflation. Similar volcanic events also may have generated large midwater plumes that have been described previously along the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge.

  16. Ground Surface Deformation Around Tehran due to Groundwater Recharge: InSAR Monitoring.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourmelen, N.; Peyret, M.; Chery, J.; Ritz, J.

    2002-12-01

    Tehran is located on an active tectonic and seismic zone. The surface deformation monitoring provides a powerful tool for getting a better understanding of faults kinematics and mechanisms. Used in conjunction with GPS networks, InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) provides dense and precise deformation measurements which are essential for mapping complex heterogeneous deformation fields. Moreover, urban and arid areas preserve interferometric phase coherence. The archived acquisitions of ERS that span 9 months between September 1998 and June 1999 reveal wide areas of surface uplift (by as much as 9 cm). This vertical deformation (gradual in time) has probably no tectonic meaning but is rather the ground response to ground water recharge. These zones are all located dowstream of large alluvial fans like the one of Karaj. The variation of effective stress caused by intersticial water draining could explain such surface deformation. It can also be noticed that some faults act as boundary for these deformation zones and fluid motion. The understanding of this deformation is relevant for groundwater monitoring and urban developement management. It is also necessary for discriminating it from tectonic deformation that also occurs on this zone. Due to the lack of attitude control of satellite ERS-2 since February 2001, the last images acquired could not be combined with the former acquisitions. Nevertheless, we expect to be able to enrich our set of images in order to map tectonic deformation on a longer period and to monitor in a more continuous way the deformation due to groundwater evolution. This would allow to quantify the permanent and reversible part of this signal.

  17. Ground Surface Deformation around Tehran due to Groundwater Recharge: InSAR Monitoring.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourmelen, N.; Peyret, M.; Fritz, J. F.; Cherry, J.

    2003-04-01

    Tehran is located on an active tectonic and seismic zone. The surface deformation monitoring provides a powerful tool for getting a better understanding of faults kinematics and mechanisms. Used in conjunction with GPS networks, InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) provides dense and precise deformation measurements which are essential for mapping complex heterogeneous deformation fields. Moreover, urban and arid areas preserve interferometric phase coherence. The archived acquisitions of ERS that span 9 months between September 1998 and June 1999 reveal wide areas of surface uplift (by as much as 9 cm). This vertical deformation (gradual in time) has probably no tectonic meaning but is rather the ground response to ground water recharge. These zones are all located dowstream of large alluvial fans like the one of Karaj. The variation of effective stress caused by intersticial water draining could explain such surface deformation. It can also be noticed that some faults act as boundary for these deformation zones and fluid motion. The understanding of this deformation is relevant for groundwater monitoring and urban developement management. It is also necessary for discriminating it from tectonic deformation that also occurs on this zone. Due to the lack of attitude control of satellite ERS-2 since February 2001, the last images acquired could not be combined with the former acquisitions. Nevertheless, we expect to be able to enrich our set of images in order to map tectonic deformation on a longer period and to monitor in a more continuous way the deformation due to groundwater evolution. This would allow to quantify the permanent and reversible part of this signal.

  18. Monitoring Surface Deformation using Polarimetric Ground Based Interferometric Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legarsky, J. J.; Gomez, F.; Rosenblad, B.; Loehr, E.; Cherukumilli, S.; Deng, H.; Held, B.; Jenkins, W.

    2012-12-01

    Surface deformation monitoring using ground based interferometric radar (GBIR) measurements may be desirable for a number of applications in the earth sciences. The University of Missouri (MU) research team has ongoing efforts to use the MU GBIR for monitoring surface deformation at a number of sites. Measurements have been collected at sites requiring access by various transportation means such as using off-road vehicle, hiking, and helicopter. Once on site, initial setup takes about 10 minutes. After setup, an image may be acquired by azimuth scan about every 20 seconds. The highly portable system lends itself to rapid deployment in remote environments and repeat survey sites. The MU GBIR's high portability and fast imaging capabilities allow rapid surveying and long-term surveying potential of surface deformation. Imagery may be formed in near real time for initial quick looks. After data collection, imagery data may be further enhanced by radiometric calibration, polarimetric calibration, and time-series analysis. Imaging may be acquired at the electromagnetic spectral bands of C-band and Ku-band. Prior demonstration of millimeter and better sensitivity to deformation over the course of a day of data collects has been performed using the MU GBIR. In addition, the MU GBIR can be removed and re-positioned at the same point with geodetic-grade precision for repeat surveys. Study results and additional development progress will be presented. This project is sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation.

  19. Ground Deformation Mapping of Houston-Galveston, Texas Using InSAR Time-Series Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    QU, F.; Lu, Z.; Bawden, G. W.; Kim, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Houston-Galveston region in Texas has been subsiding due to the combined effects of groundwater withdrawal, hydrocarbon extraction, soil compaction, and active faulting. This human- and partially nature-induced ground deformation has gradually threatened the stability of urban infrastructure and caused the loss of wetland habitat along the Gulf of Mexico. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) exploiting multiple SAR images has the capability of obtaining ground motions in high spatial resolution over large coverage. In this study, ERS-1/2 (1993-2000), ENVISAT (2004-2010), and ALOS (2007-2011) datasets are used to unravel the characteristics of ground deformation from 1993 to 2011 over the Houston-Galveston area. The persistent scatterer InSAR (PSInSAR) time-series analysis technique is employed to estimate the spatial and temporal variations of ground motions during 20 years. The ERS-1/2 PSInSAR products have measured subsidence (up to 5 cm/yr) in the northwest Houston area as well as a slight uplift (1 cm/yr) in the southeast region from 1993 to 2000. The subsidence rate (up to 2 cm/yr) between 2004 and 2011 has been obtained from ENVISAT and ALOS data. Our results indicate that the pattern of ground deformation was nearly concentric around the location of intense groundwater withdrawal and the subsiding area has been shrinking and migrating toward the northeast after 2000. In addition, an approximately 2 cm of differential subsidence across faults are observed. Presence of faults can induce localized surface displacements, aggravate localized subsidence, discontinue the integrity of ground water flow, and limit the horizontal spread of subsidence funnels. Finally, our long-term measurement of ground deformation has also been validated by GPS observations in study area.

  20. Precursory acoustic signals and ground deformation in volcanic explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D. C.; Kim, K.; Anderson, J.; Lees, J. M.; Taddeucci, J.; Graettinger, A. H.; Sonder, I.; Valentine, G.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate precursory acoustic signals that appear prior to volcanic explosions in real and experimental settings. Acoustic records of a series of experimental blasts designed to mimic maar explosions show precursory energy 0.02 to 0.05 seconds before the high amplitude overpressure arrival. These blasts consisted of 1 to 1/3 lb charges detonated in unconsolidated granular material at depths between 0.5 and 1 m, and were performed during the Buffalo Man Made Maars experiment in Springville, New York, USA. The preliminary acoustic arrival is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower in amplitude compared to the main blast wave. The waveforms vary from blast to blast, perhaps reflecting the different explosive yields and burial depths of each shot. Similar arrivals are present in some infrasound records at Santiaguito volcano, Guatemala, where they precede the main blast signal by about 2 seconds and are about 1 order of magnitude weaker. Precursory infrasound has also been described at Sakurajima volcano, Japan (Yokoo et al, 2013; Bull. Volc. Soc. Japan, 58, 163-181) and Suwanosejima volcano, Japan (Yokoo and Iguchi, 2010; JVGR, 196, 287-294), where it is attributed to rapid deformation of the vent region. Vent deformation has not been directly observed at these volcanoes because of the difficulty of visually observing the crater floor. However, particle image velocimetry of video records at Santiaguito has revealed rapid and widespread ground motion just prior to eruptions (Johnson et al, 2008; Nature, 456, 377-381) and may be the cause of much of the infrasound recorded at that volcano (Johnson and Lees, 2010; GRL, 37, L22305). High speed video records of the blasts during the Man Made Maars experiment also show rapid deformation of the ground immediately before the explosion plume breaches the surface. We examine the connection between source yield, burial depths, ground deformation, and the production of initial acoustic phases for each simulated maar explosion. We

  1. Monitoring on Xi'an ground fissures deformation with TerraSAR-X data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, C.; Zhang, Q.; Zhu, W.; Lu, Zhiming

    2012-01-01

    Owing to the fine resolution of TerraSAR-X data provided since 2007, this paper applied 6 TerraSAR data (strip mode) during 3rd Dec. 2009 to 23rd Mar. 2010 to detect and monitor the active fissures over Xi'an region. Three themes have been designed for high precision detection and monitoring of Xi'an-Chang'an fissures, as small baseline subsets (SBAS) to test the atmospheric effects of differential interferograms pair stepwise, 2-pass differential interferogram with very short baseline perpendicular to generate the whole deformation map with 44 days interval, and finally, corner reflector (CR) technique was used to closely monitor the relative deformation time series between two CRs settled crossing two ground fissures. Results showed that TerraSAR data are a good choice for small-scale ground fissures detection and monitoring, while special considerations should be taken for their great temporal and baseline decorrelation. Secondly, ground fissures in Xi'an were mostly detected at the joint section of stable and deformable regions. Lastly, CR-InSAR had potential ability to monitor relative deformation crossing fissures with millimeter precision.

  2. Observations of coupled seismicity and ground deformation at El Hierro Island (2011-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    New insights into the magma storage and evolution at oceanic island volcanoes are now being achieved using remotely sensed space geodetic techniques, namely satellite radar interferometry. Differential radar interferometry is a technique tracking, at high spatial resolution, changes in the travel-time (distance) from the satellites to the ground surface, having wide applications in Earth sciences. Volcanic activity usually is accompanied by surface ground deformation. In many instances, modelling of surface deformation has the great advantage to estimate the magma volume change, a particularly interesting parameter prior to eruptions. Jointly interpreted with petrology, degassing and seismicity, it helps to understand the crustal magmatic systems as a whole. Current (and near-future) radar satellite missions will reduce the revisit time over global sub-aerial volcanoes to a sub-weekly basis, which will increase the potential for its operational use. Time series and filtering processing techniques of such streaming data would allow to track subsurface magma migration with high precision, and frequently update over vast areas (volcanic arcs, large caldera systems, etc.). As an example for the future potential monitoring scenario, we analyze multiple satellite radar data over El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain) to measure and model surface ground deformation. El Hierro has been active for more than 3 years (2011 to 2014). Initial phases of the unrest culminated in a submarine eruption (late 2011 - early 2012). However, after the submarine eruption ended, its magmatic system still active and affected by pseudo-regular energetic seismic swarms, accompanied by surface deformation without resumed eruptions. Such example is a great opportunity to understand the crustal magmatic systems in low magma supply-rate oceanic island volcanoes. This new approach to measure surface deformation processes is yielding an ever richer level of information from volcanology to

  3. Ground Deformation of Krakatau Volcano, Indonesia, Detected by InSAR: June 2007 to February 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustan, A.; Kimata, F.; Pamitro, Y. E.; Abidin, H. Z.

    2009-12-01

    The catastrophic eruption on 27th August 1883 of Krakatau, a volcano island in Sunda Strait, destroyed two thirds of the island and collapsing its caldera. However, after reposed for 43 years, Krakatau produced a newly born active volcano named Anak Krakatau in 1929. This study aims to detect the ground deformation of Anak Krakatau Volcano using InSAR technique utilizing PALSAR data ranging from June 2007 to February 2009. In this period, the volcanic activity increased, including the eruption stage that started at the end of October 2007 and ended on August 2008. The eruption was characterized by Strombolian activity; 500 m ash column height; pyroclastic flows and lava flows. Differential InSAR was applied by removing topographic artifacts utilizing the enhanced SRTM data. A linear dependent atmospheric phase was utilized to reduce the atmospheric phase. To obtain ground deformation pattern, range change along line of sight was mapped into vertical component in grid format and filtered by median filter algorithm. Uplift of 20 cm and subsidence of 10 cm were detected in the northeast and southwest part of the cone respectively for one year and seven months until February 2009. The ground deformation pattern can be explained by a dipping rectangular tensile dislocation buried in an elastic half-space. Observed surface deformation from InSAR was used to fit the source model and it was found that the source was located in shallow region, just approximately 400 m below sea level with maximum opening tensile of 90 cm. There was inflation pattern before the eruption, whereas after the eruption started, subsidence occurred on the southwestern flank of the summit. On the other hand, the northeastern flank continued to uplift. In this observation period, it was found that Anak Krakatau uplifted 12 cm/year in average. The volume source before and after the eruption was increased approximately 2.9 x 104 m3.

  4. Coupling of Activity at Neighbouring Volcanoes in Iceland: Ground Deformation and Activity at the Bárðarbunga-Tungnafellsjökull and Eyjafjallajökull-Katla Volcano Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, M.; Heimisson, E. R.; Sigmundsson, F.; Hooper, A. J.; Ofeigsson, B.; Vogfjord, K. S.; Arnadottir, T.; Dumont, S.; Drouin, V.; Bagnardi, M.; Spaans, K.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Friðriksdóttir, H. M.; Jonsdottir, K.; Guðmundsson, G.; Hensch, M.; Hjaltadottir, S.; Hjartardottir, A. R.; Einarsson, P.; Gudmundsson, M. T.; Hognadottir, T.; Lafemina, P.; Geirsson, H.; Sturkell, E.; Magnússon, E.

    2015-12-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques are used to generate a time series of high-resolution deformation measurements, in the vicinity of two pairs of closely spaced volcanoes in Iceland: Bárðarbunga and Tungnafellsjökull, as well as Eyjafjallajökull and Katla. Following the declaration of Icelandic Volcanoes as a Permanent Geohazard Supersite in 2013, a considerable amount of SAR data was made available for both past and future satellite acquisitions, including new X-band images and historic C-band images. InSAR time series have been formed using these data and compared to other geodetic and microseismic measurements to determine the most likely processes responsible for recently observed deformation and/or seismicity. A comprehensive network of seismometers and continuous GPS stations are already deployed at these volcanoes and a series of campaign GPS measurements have been undertaken since 2010. We present an overview of the temporal variation in InSAR observations and these complementary field based measurements at Bárðarbunga and Tungnafellsjökull from 2014-2015 (covering the recent eruption at Holuhraun and contemporaneous slow collapse of the Bárðarbunga caldera), and Eyjafjallajökull and Katla volcanoes from 2010 onwards, after the 2010 explosive eruption of Eyjafjallajökull. We undertake a joint InSAR-GPS inversion using a Markov-chain Monte Carlo approach. The best-fit source geometries responsible for both the inflation of a 50 km long dyke and simultaneous deflation of the Bárðarbunga central volcano during the 2014-2015 unrest and eruption are found. Using these we calculate the stress changes associated with the Bárðarbunga deformation events and compare our results to the location of earthquake swarms in the vicinity of neighbouring Tungnafellsjökull, where seismic activity increased significantly following the onset of unrest at Bárðarbunga in August 2014. We also determine the optimal source parameters for

  5. Somma-Vesuvius ground deformation over the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marturano, Aldo; Aiello, Giuseppe; Barra, Diana

    2013-04-01

    Vertical ground movements at Somma-Vesuvius during the last glacial cycle have been inferred from micropalaeontological and petrochemical analyses of rock samples from boreholes drilled at the archaeological sites of Herculaneum and Pompeii as well as on the apron of the volcano and the adjacent Sebeto and Sarno Valleys. Opposing movements occurred during the periods preceding and following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The uplift began 20 ka ago with marine deposits rising several tens of metres up to 25 m a.s.l., recovering previous subsidence which occurred during the Late glacial period, suggesting a strict connection between volcano-tectonic and glacial cycles. Here we present the analysis of deposits predating the LGM, which confirms subsidence of the Campanian Plain where Mt. Somma-Vesuvius is located, shows variable surface loading effects and highlights the volcano-tectonic stages experienced by the volcano. The self-balancing mechanism of the volcanic system, evolving towards an explosive, subaerial activity 60 ka ago, is testified to by a large ground oscillation in phase with sea level change during the last glacial cycle.

  6. PSP SAR interferometry monitoring of ground and structure deformations in the archeological site of Pompeii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Mario; Francioni, Elena; Paglia, Luca; Minati, Federico; Margottini, Claudio; Spizzichino, Daniele; Trigila, Alessandro; Iadanza, Carla; De Nigris, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The "Major Project Pompeii" (MPP) is a great collective commitment of different institututions and people to set about solving the serious problem of conservation of the largest archeological sites in the world. The ancient city of Pompeii with its 66 hectares, 44 of which are excaveted, is divided into 9 regiones (district), subdivided in 118 insulae (blocks) and almost 1500 domus (houses), and is Unesco site since 1996. The Italian Ministry for Heritage and Cultural Activities and Tourism (MiBACT) and Finmeccanica Group have sealed an agreement whereby the Finmeccanica Group will donate innovative technologies and services for monitoring and protecting the archaeological site of Pompeii. Moreover, the Italian Institute for Environment Protection and Research (ISPRA) - Geological Survey of Italy, was also involved to support the ground based analysis and interpretation of the measurements provided by the industrial team, in order to promote an interdisciplinary approach. In this work, we will focus on ground deformation measurements obtained by satellite SAR interferometry and on their interpretation. The satellite monitoring service is based on the processing of COSMO-SkyMed Himage data by the e-Geos proprietary Persistent Scatterer Pair (PSP) SAR interferometry technology. The PSP technique is a proven SAR interferometry method characterized by the fact of exploiting in the processing only the relative properties between close points (pairs) in order to overcome atmospheric artifacts (which are one of the main problems of SAR interferometry). Validations analyses showed that this technique applied to COSMO-SkyMed Himage data is able to retrieve very dense (except of course on vegetated or cultivated areas) millimetric deformation measurements with sub-metric localization. By means of the COSMO-SkyMed PSP SAR interferometry processing, a historical analysis of the ground and structure deformations occurred over the entire archaeological site of Pompeii in the

  7. Ground deformation model for Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) from TEGETEIDE GNSS stations observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, A.; Carmona, J.; Fernández-Ros, A.; Pérez-Peña, A.; Ortiz, R.; Berrocoso, M.

    2009-04-01

    TEGETEIDE GNSS network is composed of seven benchmarks distributed over Tenerife Island, two of them are permanent stations. The whole network has been observed periodically from 2005 at least twice a year. Processed data using Bernese 5.0 software indicates different vector displacement pattern, as in magnitude as in direction, which expected from the African plate movement, suggesting the activity of other geodynamic process in the Island. The TEGETEIDE ground deformation model suggest the action not only the tectonics, but also the volcanic activity in an island where during 2004 a reawakening of the Teide volcano was detected. In this sense, the use of precise space-geodetic techniques to study the present-day dynamics of Tenerife is essential for a better knowledge and forecasting of the volcanic evolution during periods of crises, in an island of one million inhabitants and 5 million tourists a year.

  8. Mapping ground surface deformation using temporarily coherent point SAR interferometry: Application to Los Angeles Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, L.; Lu, Zhiming; Ding, X.; Jung, H.-S.; Feng, G.; Lee, C.-W.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-temporal interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is an effective tool to detect long-term seismotectonic motions by reducing the atmospheric artifacts, thereby providing more precise deformation signal. The commonly used approaches such as persistent scatterer InSAR (PSInSAR) and small baseline subset (SBAS) algorithms need to resolve the phase ambiguities in interferogram stacks either by searching a predefined solution space or by sparse phase unwrapping methods; however the efficiency and the success of phase unwrapping cannot be guaranteed. We present here an alternative approach - temporarily coherent point (TCP) InSAR (TCPInSAR) - to estimate the long term deformation rate without the need of phase unwrapping. The proposed approach has a series of innovations including TCP identification, TCP network and TCP least squares estimator. We apply the proposed method to the Los Angeles Basin in southern California where structurally active faults are believed capable of generating damaging earthquakes. The analysis is based on 55 interferograms from 32 ERS-1/2 images acquired during Oct. 1995 and Dec. 2000. To evaluate the performance of TCPInSAR on a small set of observations, a test with half of interferometric pairs is also performed. The retrieved TCPInSAR measurements have been validated by a comparison with GPS observations from Southern California Integrated GPS Network. Our result presents a similar deformation pattern as shown in past InSAR studies but with a smaller average standard deviation (4.6. mm) compared with GPS observations, indicating that TCPInSAR is a promising alternative for efficiently mapping ground deformation even from a relatively smaller set of interferograms. ?? 2011.

  9. Implementing ground surface deformation tools to characterize field-scale properties of a fractured aquifer during a short hydraulic test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuite, Jonathan; Longuevergne, Laurent; Bour, Olivier; Boudin, Frédérick; Durand, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    In naturally fractured reservoirs, fluid flow is governed by the structural and hydromechanical properties of fracture networks or conductive fault zones. In order to ensure a sustained exploitation of resources or to assess the safety of underground storage, it is necessary to evaluate these properties. As they generally form highly heterogeneous and anisotropic reservoirs, fractured media may be well characterized by means of several complementary experimental methods or sounding techniques. In this framework, the observation of ground deformation has been proved useful to gain insight of a fractured reservoir's geometry and hydraulic properties. Commonly, large conductive structures like faults can be studied from surface deformation from satellite methods at monthly time scales, whereas meter scale fractures have to be examined under short-term in situ experiments using high accuracy intruments like tiltmeters or extensometers installed in boreholes or at the ground's surface. To the best of our knowledge, the feasability of a field scale (~ 100 m) characterization of a fractured reservoir with geodetic tools in a short term experiment has not yet been addressed. In the present study, we implement two complementary ground surface geodetic tools, namely tiltmetry and optical leveling, to monitor the deformation induced by a hydraulic recovery test at the Ploemeur hydrological observatory (France). Employing a simple purely elastic modeling approach, we show that the joint use of time constraining data (tilt) and spatially constraining data (vertical displacement) makes it possible to evaluate the geometry (dip, root depth and lateral extent) and the storativity of a hydraulically active fault zone, in good agreement with previous studies. Hence we demonstrate that the adequate use of two complementary ground surface deformation methods offer a rich insight of large conductive structure's properties using a single short term hydraulic load. Ground surface

  10. Integrated monitoring system for ground deformation hazard assessment in Telese Terme (Benevento province, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessitore, S.; Castiello, G.; Fedi, M.; Florio, G.; Fuschini, V.; Ramondini, M.; Calcaterra, D.

    2012-04-01

    TeleseTerme plain is characterized by a very articulated stratigraphy (levels of travertine, fluvial-marshy and pyroclastic deposits), that allows the occurrence of underground water circulation with overlapping aquifers. These aquifers are locally in pressure and, because of chemical characteristics and physical properties of the water, they may activate processes of accelerated travertine's corrosion; the consequence is the formation of cavity along the ground water's preferential flow paths, and the activation of subsidence and sinkholes phenomena. In particular test area includes two zones, where in 2002 and 2006 occurred two sinkholes events, classified as "piping sinkholes". The hazard evaluation was carried out trhought an integrated monitoring system, based on "traditional" techniques conduced "in situ", as geological-geomorphological and geophysical (microgravity) surveys, integrated by the most innovative techniques of Remote sensing interferometry(Advanced DInSAR Interferometry Techniques). The last allow to evaluate the ground deformation, characterized by a predominantvertical component (typical deformation of sinkholes and subsidence phenomena), and are well suited to operate a continuous and long monitoring ofvery extended areas. Through an initial analysis of the Permanent Scatterers available in the Telese municipality, we found the envelopes of the areal that contain PS with negative and positive mean velocities; these velocities showed the presence of a possible phenomenon of subsidence detected by ERS and ENVISAT satellites. Through interferometric processing of ENVISAT images, the soil deformations of 2002-2010 year sare evaluated and compared with the data obtainedby survey took "in situ" during the same period. The knowledge of the deformation's evolution of the area made it possible to organize a more focused future monitoring through traditional techniques of relief (with the help of geophysical methodologies). Since the zone affected by

  11. Modeling ground deformation associated with the destructive earthquakes occurring on Mt. Etna's southeastern flank in 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannavò, Flavio; Gambino, Salvatore; Puglisi, Biagio; Velardita, Rosanna

    2016-11-01

    The Timpe Fault System is the source of very shallow but destructive earthquakes that affect several towns and villages on the eastern flank of Mt. Etna (Italy). In 1984, several seismic events, and specifically on 19 and 25 October, caused one fatality, 12 injuries and produced serious damage in the Zafferana and Acireale territories. This seismicity was mainly related to the activity of the Fiandaca Fault, one of the structures belonging to the Timpe Fault System. We inverted ground deformation data collected by a geodimeter trilateration network set up in 1977 at a low altitude along the eastern side of the volcano in order to define the Timpe Fault System faulting mechanisms linked to the seismicity in 1984. We have found that in the period May 1980-October 1984, the Fiandaca Fault was affected by a strike-slip and normal dip-slip of about 20.4 and 12.7 cm respectively. This result is kinematically consistent with field observations of the coseismic ground ruptures along the fault but it is notably large compared to displacements estimated by seismicity, then suggesting that most of the slip over the fault plane was aseismic. The results once again confirm how seismicity and its relation with ground ruptures and creep displacement represent a very high hazard to the several towns and villages situated along the Timpe Fault System.

  12. Deformation Monitoring of AN Active Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapchuk, A.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of low frequency earthquakes, slow slip events and other deformation phenomena, new for geophysics, change our understanding of how the energy accumulated in the Earth's crust do release. The new geophysical data make one revise the underlying mechanism of geomechanical processes taking place in fault zones. Conditions for generating different slip modes are still unclear. The most vital question is whether a certain slip mode is intrinsic for a fault or may be controlled by external factors. This work presents the results of two and a half year deformation monitoring of a discontinuity in the zone of the Main Sayanskiy Fault. Main Sayanskiy Fault is right-lateral strike-slip fault. Observations were performed in the tunnel of Talaya seismic station (TLY), Irkutsk region, Russia. Measurements were carried out 70 m away from the entrance of the tunnel, the thickness of overlying rock was about 30 m. Inductive sensors of displacement were mounted at the both sides of a discontinuity, which recorded three components of relative fault side displacement with the accuracy of 0.2 mcm. Temperature variation inside the tunnel didn't exceed 0.5oC during the all period of observations. Important information about deformation properties of an active fault was obtained. A pronounced seasonality of deformation characteristics of discontinuity is observed in the investigated segment of rock. A great number of slow slip events with durations from several hours to several weeks were registered. Besides that alterations of fault deformation characteristics before the megathrust earthquake M9.0 Tohoku Oki 11 March 2011 and reaction to the event itself were detected. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (grant no. 14-17-00719).

  13. Removal of systematic seasonal atmospheric signal from interferometric synthetic aperture radar ground deformation time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, Sergey V.; Trishchenko, Alexander P.; Tiampo, Kristy; González, Pablo J.; Zhang, Yu; Fernández, José

    2014-09-01

    Applying the Multidimensional Small Baseline Subset interferometric synthetic aperture radar algorithm to about 1500 Envisat and RADARSAT-2 interferograms spanning 2003-2013, we computed time series of ground deformation over Naples Bay Area in Italy. Two active volcanoes, Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei, are located in this area in close proximity to the densely populated city of Naples. For the first time, and with remarkable clarity, we observed decade-long elevation-dependent seasonal oscillations of the vertical displacement component with a peak-to-peak amplitude of up to 3.0 cm, substantially larger than the long-term deformation rate (<0.6 cm/yr). Analysis, utilizing surface weather and radiosonde data, linked observed oscillations with seasonal fluctuations of water vapor, air pressure, and temperature in the lower troposphere. The modeled correction is in a good agreement with observed results. The mean, absolute, and RMS differences are 0.014 cm, 0.073 cm, and 0.087 cm, respectively. Atmospherically corrected time series confirmed continuing subsidence at Vesuvius previously observed by geodetic techniques.

  14. Viscoelastic deformation near active plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Model deformations near the active plate boundaries of Western North America using space-based geodetic measurements as constraints are discussed. The first six months of this project were spent gaining familarity with space-based measurements, accessing the Crustal Dynamics Data Information Computer, and building time independent deformation models. The initial goal was to see how well the simplest elastic models can reproduce very long base interferometry (VLBI) baseline data. From the Crustal Dynamics Data Information Service, a total of 18 VLBI baselines are available which have been surveyed on four or more occasions. These data were fed into weighted and unweighted inversions to obtain baseline closure rates. Four of the better quality lines are illustrated. The deformation model assumes that the observed baseline rates result from a combination of rigid plate tectonic motions plus a component resulting from elastic strain build up due to a failure of the plate boundary to slip at the full plate tectonic rate. The elastic deformation resulting from the locked plate boundary is meant to portray interseismic strain accumulation. During and shortly after a large interplate earthquake, these strains are largely released, and points near the fault which were previously retarded suddenly catch up to the positions predicted by rigid plate models. Researchers judge the quality of fit by the sum squares of weighted residuals, termed total variance. The observed baseline closures have a total variance of 99 (cm/y)squared. When the RM2 velocities are assumed to model the data, the total variance increases to 154 (cm/y)squared.

  15. Geophysical Monitoring of Ground Surface Deformation Associated with a Confined Aquifer Storage and Recovery Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneville, Alain; Heggy, Essam; Strickland, Christopher; Normand, Jonathan; Dermond, Jeffrey; Fang, Yilin; Sullivan, Charlotte

    2015-08-01

    One important issue in the storage of large volumes of fluids, mainly water and CO2, in the deep subsurface is to determine the resulting field-scale-induced displacements and consequences of overpressures on the mechanical integrity of the storage reservoir and surroundings. A quantifiable estimation of displacement can be made by combining the robust, cost-effective, and repeatable geophysical techniques of micro-gravimetry, differential global positioning system (DGPS), and differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR). These techniques were field tested and evaluated for the first time on an active large-volume aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project in Pendleton, Oregon, USA, where three ASR wells are injecting up to 1.9 million m3 year-1 into basalt aquifers to a depth of about 150 m. Injection and recovery of water at the wells are accompanied by significant gravity anomalies and vertical deformation of the ground surface localized to the immediate surroundings of the injection wells as evidenced by DGPS and gravity measurements collected in 2011. At a larger scale, and between 2011 and 2013, DInSAR monitoring of the Pendleton area shows sub- centimetric deformation in the western part of the city and close to the injection locations associated with ASR cycle. Deformations are found to be temporally out phased with the injection and recovery events due to complex groundwater flow. A numerical simulation of the effect of the water injection gives results in good agreement with the observations and confirms the validity of the approach, which could be deployed in similar geological contexts to look at the mechanical effects of water and gas injections.

  16. Active Beam Shaping System and Method Using Sequential Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A. (Inventor); Pueyo, Laurent A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active optical beam shaping system includes a first deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept an entrance beam of light and to provide a first reflected beam of light, a second deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept the first reflected beam of light from the first deformable mirror and to provide a second reflected beam of light, and a signal processing and control system configured to communicate with the first and second deformable mirrors. The first deformable mirror, the second deformable mirror and the signal processing and control system together provide a large amplitude light modulation range to provide an actively shaped optical beam.

  17. Evolution of Deformation Studies on Active Hawaiian Volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Decker, Robert; Okamura, Arnold; Miklius, Asta; Poland, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Everything responds to pressure, even rocks. Deformation studies involve measuring and interpreting the changes in elevations and horizontal positions of the land surface or sea floor. These studies are variously referred to as geodetic changes or ground-surface deformations and are sometimes indexed under the general heading of geodesy. Deformation studies have been particularly useful on active volcanoes and in active tectonic areas. A great amount of time and energy has been spent on measuring geodetic changes on Kilauea and Mauna Loa Volcanoes in Hawai`i. These changes include the build-up of the surface by the piling up and ponding of lava flows, the changes in the surface caused by erosion, and the uplift, subsidence, and horizontal displacements of the surface caused by internal processes acting beneath the surface. It is these latter changes that are the principal concern of this review. A complete and objective review of deformation studies on active Hawaiian volcanoes would take many volumes. Instead, we attempt to follow the evolution of the most significant observations and interpretations in a roughly chronological way. It is correct to say that this is a subjective review. We have spent years measuring and recording deformation changes on these great volcanoes and more years trying to understand what makes these changes occur. We attempt to make this a balanced as well as a subjective review; the references are also selective rather than exhaustive. Geodetic changes caused by internal geologic processes vary in magnitude from the nearly infinitesimal - one micron or less, to the very large - hundreds of meters. Their apparent causes also are varied and include changes in material properties and composition, atmospheric pressure, tidal stress, thermal stress, subsurface-fluid pressure (including magma pressure, magma intrusion, or magma removal), gravity, and tectonic stress. Deformation is measured in units of strain or displacement. For example, tilt

  18. A persistent scatterer method for retrieving accurate InSAR ground deformation map over vegetation-decorrelated areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Zebker, H. A.; Knight, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    InSAR is commonly used to measure surface deformation between different radar passes at cm-scale accuracy and m-scale resolution. However, InSAR measurements are often decorrelated due to vegetation growth, which greatly limits high quality InSAR data coverage. Here we present an algorithm for retrieving InSAR deformation measurements over areas with significant vegetation decorrelation through the use of adaptive interpolation between persistent scatterer (PS) pixels, those points at which surface scattering properties do not change much over time and thus decorrelation artifacts are minimal. The interpolation filter restores phase continuity in space and greatly reduces errors in phase unwrapping. We apply this algorithm to process L-band ALOS interferograms acquired over the San Luis Valley, Colorado and the Tulare Basin, California. In both areas, groundwater extraction for irrigation results in land deformation that can be detected using InSAR. We show that the PS-based algorithm reduces the artifacts from vegetation decorrelation while preserving the deformation signature. The spatial sampling resolution achieved over agricultural fields is on the order of hundreds of meters, usually sufficient for groundwater studies. The improved InSAR data allow us further to reconstruct the SBAS ground deformation time series and transform the measured deformation to head levels using the skeletal storage coefficient and time delay constant inferred from a joint InSAR-well data analysis. The resulting InSAR-head and well-head measurements in the San Luis valley show good agreement with primary confined aquifer pumping activities. This case study demonstrates that high quality InSAR deformation data can be obtained over vegetation-decorrrelated region if processed correctly.

  19. Deformation of subglacial till near ice-sheet grounding zones: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowal, K. N.; Worster, G.

    2015-12-01

    Large-scale ice-sheet dynamics pivot on the deformation and transport of subglacial sediment through changes in the basal sliding velocities of glaciers. Such unconsolidated, water-saturated glacigenic sediment, or till, is found to accumulate into sedimentary wedges, or till-deltas, in grounding zones separating floating ice shelves from grounded ice streams. In addition to affecting glacial slip, such sedimentation may serve to stabilise ice sheets against grounding-line retreat in response to rising sea levels. We present a fluid-mechanical explanation of the formation of these wedges in terms of the jump in hydrostatic loading and unloading of till across the grounding zone, and we compare our findings with geophysical data of sedimentary wedge formation at the modern-day grounding zone of Whillans Ice Stream, West Antarctica. We develop a theoretical model of wedge formation in which we treat both ice and till as viscous fluids spreading under gravity into an inviscid ocean and find that a similar wedge of underlying fluid accumulates around the grounding line in our series of fluid-mechanical laboratory experiments. The experiments were performed in a confined channel geometry. We extend our theory to unconfined geometries in which till deformation is resisted dominantly by vertical shear stresses and the flow of the overlying ice is resisted dominantly either by vertical shear stresses between the ice and till or by extensional stresses characteristic of floating ice shelves and shelfy streams. The former is relevant to less-lubricated, grounded ice sheets whereas the latter is relevant to well-lubricated ice streams, sliding over soft, deformable till of low viscosity and appreciable thickness. We formulate a local condition relating wedge slopes in each of the three scenarios and find a reasonable agreement with geophysical data.

  20. Signature of magmatic processes in ground deformation signals from Phlegraean Fields (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagagli, Matteo; Montagna, Chiara Paola; Longo, Antonella; Papale, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Ground deformation signals such as dilatometric and tiltmetric ones, are nowadays well studied from the vulcanological community all over the world. These signals can be used to retrieve information on volcanoes state and to study the magma dynamics in their plumbing system. We compared synthetic signals in the Very Long Period (VLP, 10-2 - 10-1 Hz) and Ultra Long Period (ULP, 10-4 - 10-2 Hz) bands obtained from the simulation of magma mixing in shallow reservoirs ([3],[4]) with real data obtained from the dilatometers and tiltmeters network situated in the Phlegraean Fields near Naples (Italy), in order to define and constrain the relationships between them. Analyses of data from the October 2006 seismic swarm in the area show that the frequency spectrum of the synthetics is remarkably similar to the transient present in the real signals. In depth studies with accurated techniques for spectral analysis (i.e wavelet transform) and application of this method to other time windows have identified in the bandwidth around 10-4Hz (between 1h30m and 2h45m) peaks that are fairly stable and independent from the processing carried out on the full-band signal. These peaks could be the signature of ongoing convection at depth. It is well known that re-injection of juvenile magmas can reactivate the eruption dynamics ([1],[2]), thus being able to define mixing markers and detect them in the ground deformation signals is a relevant topic in order to understand the dynamics of active and quiescent vulcanoes and to eventually improve early-warning methods for impending eruptions. [1] Arienzo, I. et al. (2010). "The feeding system of Agnano-Monte Spina eruption (Campi Flegrei, Italy): dragging the past into present activity and future scenarios". In: Chemical Geology 270.1, pp. 135-147. [2] Bachmann, Olivier and George Bergantz (2008). "The magma reservoirs that feed supereruptions". In: Elements 4.1, pp. 17-21. [3] Longo, Antonella et al. (2012). "Magma convection and mixing

  1. Coupled reservoir-geomechanical analysis of CO2 injection and ground deformations at In Salah, Algeria

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.; Vasco, D.W.; Myer, L.

    2009-11-01

    In Salah Gas Project in Algeria has been injecting 0.5-1 million tonnes CO{sub 2} per year over the past five years into a water-filled strata at a depth of about 1,800 to 1,900 m. Unlike most CO{sub 2} storage sites, the permeability of the storage formation is relatively low and comparatively thin with a thickness of about 20 m. To ensure adequate CO{sub 2} flow-rates across the low-permeability sand-face, the In Salah Gas Project decided to use long-reach (about 1 to 1.5 km) horizontal injection wells. In an ongoing research project we use field data and coupled reservoir-geomechanical numerical modeling to assess the effectiveness of this approach and to investigate monitoring techniques to evaluate the performance of a CO{sub 2}-injection operation in relatively low permeability formations. Among the field data used are ground surface deformations evaluated from recently acquired satellite-based inferrometry (InSAR). The InSAR data shows a surface uplift on the order of 5 mm per year above active CO{sub 2} injection wells and the uplift pattern extends several km from the injection wells. In this paper we use the observed surface uplift to constrain our coupled reservoir-geomechanical model and conduct sensitivity studies to investigate potential causes and mechanisms of the observed uplift. The results of our analysis indicates that most of the observed uplift magnitude can be explained by pressure-induced, poro-elastic expansion of the 20 m thick injection zone, but there could also be a significant contribution from pressure-induced deformations within a 100 m thick zone of shaly sands immediately above the injection zone.

  2. GDM: a ForM@Ter service for ground deformation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostanciaux, Emilie; Diament, Michel; Jamet, Olivier; Mandea, Mioara

    2015-04-01

    ForM@Ter is a French solid Earth thematic data pole project. It was launched in 2012 by the French national space agency (CNES) and the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS), with the active participation of the National institute for geographical and forestry information (IGN). Currently, it relies on the contributions of scientists from more than 20 French Earth science laboratories. Its perimeter, designed with the scientific community, focus on the determination of the shape and movements of the Earth surface (ForM@Ter: Formes et Mouvements de la Terre) with the objective to federate a wide variety of scientific areas (earthquake cycle, tectonics, morphogenesis, volcanism, erosion dynamics, mantle rheology, geodesy) and to offer many interfaces with other thematics, such as glaciology or snow evolution. The project aims at providing a national cooperative platform to facilitate data access, provide processing tools and value-added products with support for non-expert users. However its challenge in the evolving context of the current and forthcoming national and international e-infrastructures, is to design a non-redundant service based on interoperations with existing services, and to cope with highly complex data flows due to the granularity of the data and its associated knowledge. For this purpose, the services offer by the pole will be built based on the needs expressed by the scientific community. This is the case of Ground Deformation Monitoring (GDM) service which we will present here. This service will be based on a CNES computing infrastructure hosting Sentinels products, and will offer catalogue access, HPC facilities and thematic computation services on inSAR and optical imagery. Computation services will give scientists access to DTM, displacement map times series, quality indicators and modelling tools. GDM is aimed at serving a wide panel of scientific fields, such as earthquake cycle studies, tectonics, volcanism, erosion dynamics, or

  3. Geophysical Monitoring of Ground Surface Deformation Associated with a Confined Aquifer Storage and Recovery Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Bonneville, Alain; Heggy, Essam; Strickland, Christopher E.; Normand, Jonathan; Dermond, Jeffrey A.; Fang, Yilin; Sullivan, E. C.

    2015-08-11

    A main issue in the storage of large volumes of fluids, mainly water and CO2, in the deep subsurface is to determine their field-scale-induced displacements and consequences on the mechanical behavior of the storage reservoir and surroundings. A quantifiable estimation of displacement can be made by combining the robust, cost-effective, and repeatable geophysical techniques of micro-gravimetry, differential global positioning system (DGPS), and differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR). These techniques were field tested and evaluated in an active large-volume aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project in Pendleton, Oregon, USA, where three ASR wells are injecting up to 1.9 million m3/yr-1 into basalt aquifers to a depth of about 150 m. Injection and recovery of water at the wells was accompanied by significant gravity anomalies and vertical deformation of the ground surface localized to the immediate surroundings of the injection wells as evidenced by DGPS and gravity measurements collected in 2011. At a larger scale, and between 2011 and 2013, DInSAR monitoring of the Pendleton area suggests the occurrence of sub-centimetric deformation in the western part of the city and close to the injection locations associated with the ASR cycle. A numerical simulation of the effect of the water injection gives results in good agreement with the observations and confirms the validity of the approach, which could be deployed in similar geological contexts to look at the mechanical effects of water and gas injections. The gravity signal reflects deep phenomena and gives additional insight into the repartition of fluids in the subsurface.

  4. Joint inversion of ground deformation and gravity changes using free geometry bodies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Jose; Camacho, Antonio G.; Carbone, Daniele; Bonforte, Alessandro; Guglielmino, Francesco; Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    Persistent inflation and long-period gravity fluctuations occurred at Mt Etna (Italy) during the time interval bounded by the 1991-93 and 2001 main flank eruptions. Several studies suggest that, since 1993 and before the 2001 eruption, a large amount of magma was stored at depth. Up to date, an integrated inversion of the available ground deformation and gravity data has not been attempted, in spite of the possibility of bringing new insight into the processes that led to the 2001 eruption. We use nearly annual microgravity , GPS and interferometric SAR data acquired on Mt. Etna during the 1995-2000 period . We apply a recent published methodology able to carry out a simultaneous inversion of the whole data to obtain a 3D modelling of the causative extended sources of pressure and density changes. The method is characterized by setting up the anomalous body as aggregations of small cells in a step-by-step growth process. The ambiguity problem is solved by adding a simple regularization condition. The non-linearity problem is solved by explorative schemes. In the present communication, the inverse method has been modified to take into account the existence of possible regional deformations and local noise. Actually the inverse approach permits an exhaustive inversion and modeling, allowing a good separation of the regional, local and noise components. Preliminary results indicate constancy in time of the position of pressure and mass sources, in spite of the different phases of activity displayed by the volcano during the period of interest. A fundamental result of this study is that pressure and mass sources are widely separated in space.

  5. Geophysical Monitoring of Ground Surface Deformation Associated with a Confined Aquifer Storage and Recovery Operation

    DOE PAGES

    Bonneville, Alain; Heggy, Essam; Strickland, Christopher E.; ...

    2015-08-11

    A main issue in the storage of large volumes of fluids, mainly water and CO2, in the deep subsurface is to determine their field-scale-induced displacements and consequences on the mechanical behavior of the storage reservoir and surroundings. A quantifiable estimation of displacement can be made by combining the robust, cost-effective, and repeatable geophysical techniques of micro-gravimetry, differential global positioning system (DGPS), and differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR). These techniques were field tested and evaluated in an active large-volume aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project in Pendleton, Oregon, USA, where three ASR wells are injecting up to 1.9 million m3/yr-1more » into basalt aquifers to a depth of about 150 m. Injection and recovery of water at the wells was accompanied by significant gravity anomalies and vertical deformation of the ground surface localized to the immediate surroundings of the injection wells as evidenced by DGPS and gravity measurements collected in 2011. At a larger scale, and between 2011 and 2013, DInSAR monitoring of the Pendleton area suggests the occurrence of sub-centimetric deformation in the western part of the city and close to the injection locations associated with the ASR cycle. A numerical simulation of the effect of the water injection gives results in good agreement with the observations and confirms the validity of the approach, which could be deployed in similar geological contexts to look at the mechanical effects of water and gas injections. The gravity signal reflects deep phenomena and gives additional insight into the repartition of fluids in the subsurface.« less

  6. The mechanics of ground deformation precursory to dome-building extrusions at Mount St. Helens 1981-1982.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, W.W.; Archuleta, R.J.; Swanson, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Detailed monitoring at Mount St. Helens since 1980 has enabled prediction of the intermittent eruptive activity (mostly dome growth) with unprecedented success. During 1981 and 1982, accelerating deformation of the crater floor around the vent (including radial cracks, thrust faults, and ground tilt) was the earliest indicator of impending activity. The magnitude of the shear stress required to match observed dipslacements (1-7 MPa) is inversely proportional to the conduit diameter (estimated to be 25-100 m). The most probable source of this shear stress is the flow of viscous magma up to the conduit and into the lava dome. A model is proposed in which the accelerating deformation, beginning as much as 4 weeks before extrusions, is caused by the increasing velocity of ascending magma in the conduit. This model is examined by using deformation data of the dome before four extrusions in 1981 and 1982 to estimate the volumetric flow rate through the conduit. This flow rate and an estimate of the effective viscosity of the magma enable calculation of an ascent velocity and an applied shear stress that, again, depend on the conduit diameter. The results of these calculations are consistent with the finite element experiments and show that the proposed model is feasible. Precursory deformation like that measured at Mount St. Helens should be observable at similar volcanoes elsewhere because it is caused by the fundamental process of magma ascent.-from Authors

  7. Implications of ground-deformation measurements across earth fissures in subsidence areas in the southwestern USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Ground deformation was monitored at earth fissures in areas of land subsidence induced by groundwater extraction in the southwestern United States. The ground deformation is consistent with the mechanism that fissures are caused by horizontal strains generated by bending of overburden in response to localized differential compaction. Subsidence profiles indicated that localized differential subsidence occurred across the fissures and that maximum convex-upward curvature was at the fissure. The overall shape of the profile stayed similar with time, and maximum curvature remained stationary at the fissure. Horizontal displacements were largest near the fissure, and generally were small to negligible away from the fissure. Maximum tensile horizontal strains were at the fissure and coincided with maximum curvature in the subsidence profiles. Horizontal tensile strain continued to accumulate at fissures after they formed with rates of opening ranging from 30 to 120 microstrain/year at fissures in Arizona.

  8. Ground deformation associated with volcanic tremor at Izu-Oshima volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Oikawa, Jun; Ida, Yoshiaki; Yamaoka, Koshun; Watanabe, Hidefumi ); Sato, Kaoru ); Fukuyama, Eiichi

    1991-03-01

    Izu-Oshima volcano had summit and fissure eruptions in November, 1986 after 12 years of dormancy, and three small eruptions followed these events within one year. Episodic and continuous volcanic tremors were observed for the period containing these eruptions. It is a remarkable discovery that the episodic volcanic tremor was accompanied by a small but sharp ground deformation, the polarity of which was variable. The distribution of tilt vectors reveals that the source of ground deformation was always located beneath the northwestern flank of the volcano, where a magma reservoir was predicted by other studies. On the other hand, the seismologically detected tremor source was determined to be at a shallow depth below the central pit crater, a few kilometers away from the predicted magma reservoir. It is thus inferred that the tremor source near the crater generated pressure increases or decreases that were simultaneously transmitted through the vent to the magma reservoir and lead to its expansion or contraction.

  9. Deformation Behaviors of Geosynthetic Reinforced Soil Walls on Shallow Weak Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, You-Seong; Won, Myoung-Soo

    In this study, the fifteen-month behavior of two geosynthetic reinforced soil walls, which was constructed on the shallow weak ground, was measured and analyzed. The walls were backfilled with clayey soil obtained from the construction site nearby, and the safety factors obtained from general limit equilibrium analysis were less than 1.3 in both wall. To compare with the measured data from the real GRS walls and unreinforced soil mass, a series of finite element method (FEM) analyses on two field GRS walls and unreinforced soil mass were conducted. The FEM analysis results showed that failure plane of unreinforced soil mass was consistent with the Rankine active state, but failure plane did not occur in GRS walls. In addition, maximum horizontal displacements and shear strains in GRS walls were 50% smaller than those found in unreinforced soil mass. Modeling results such as the maximum horizontal displacements, horizontal pressure, and geosynthetic tensile strengths in GRS wall have a god agreement with the measured data. Based on this study, it could be concluded that geosynthetic reinforcement are effective to reduce the displacement of the wall face and/or the deformation of the backfill soil even if the mobilized tensile stress after construction is very small.

  10. MetaSensing's FastGBSAR: ground based radar for deformation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rödelsperger, Sabine; Meta, Adriano

    2014-10-01

    The continuous monitoring of ground deformation and structural movement has become an important task in engineering. MetaSensing introduces a novel sensor system, the Fast Ground Based Synthetic Aperture Radar (FastGBSAR), based on innovative technologies that have already been successfully applied to airborne SAR applications. The FastGBSAR allows the remote sensing of deformations of a slope or infrastructure from up to a distance of 4 km. The FastGBSAR can be setup in two different configurations: in Real Aperture Radar (RAR) mode it is capable of accurately measuring displacements along a linear range profile, ideal for monitoring vibrations of structures like bridges and towers (displacement accuracy up to 0.01 mm). Modal parameters can be determined within half an hour. Alternatively, in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) configuration it produces two-dimensional displacement images with an acquisition time of less than 5 seconds, ideal for monitoring areal structures like dams, landslides and open pit mines (displacement accuracy up to 0.1 mm). The MetaSensing FastGBSAR is the first ground based SAR instrument on the market able to produce two-dimensional deformation maps with this high acquisition rate. By that, deformation time series with a high temporal and spatial resolution can be generated, giving detailed information useful to determine the deformation mechanisms involved and eventually to predict an incoming failure. The system is fully portable and can be quickly installed on bedrock or a basement. The data acquisition and processing can be fully automated leading to a low effort in instrument operation and maintenance. Due to the short acquisition time of FastGBSAR, the coherence between two acquisitions is very high and the phase unwrapping is simplified enormously. This yields a high density of resolution cells with good quality and high reliability of the acquired deformations. The deformation maps can directly be used as input into an Early

  11. Liquefaction, ground oscillation, and soil deformation at the Wildlife Array, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, T.L.; Youd, T.L.

    2007-01-01

    Excess pore-water pressure and liquefaction at the Wildlife Liquefaction Array in 1987 were caused by deformation associated with both high-frequency strong ground motion and 5.5-second-period Love waves. The Love waves produced large (???1.5%) cyclic shear strains well after the stronger high-frequency ground motion abated. These cyclic strains generated approximately from 13 to 35% of the excess pore-water pressure in the liquefied layer and caused excess pore-water pressures ultimately to reach effective overburden stress. The deformation associated with the Love waves explains the "postearthquake" increase of pore-water pressure that was recorded at the array. This explanation suggests that conventional methods for predicting liquefaction based on peak ground acceleration are incomplete and may need to consider cyclic strains associated with long-period surface waves. A post-earthquake survey of an inclinometer casing indicated permanent shear strain associated with lateral spreading primarily occurred in the upper part of the liquefied layer. Comparison of cone penetration test soundings conducted after the earthquake with pre-earthquake soundings suggests sleeve friction increased. Natural lateral variability of the liquefied layer obscured changes in tip resistance despite a ???1% reduction in volume. The large oscillatory motion associated with surface waves explains ground oscillation that has been reported at some liquefaction sites during earthquakes.

  12. Long-range ground deformation monitoring by InSAR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokugawa, S.; Nakamura, T.

    2015-11-01

    InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) analysis is an effective technique to map 3-dimensional surface deformation with high spatial resolution. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capability of InSAR analysis when applied to ground monitoring of an environmental disaster. We performed a time series InSAR analysis using ENVISAT/ASAR and ALOS/PALSAR data and commercial software to investigate subsidence around the Kanto District of Japan. We also investigated techniques for efficient early detection of landslides in Kyushu using time series analysis that incorporated synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. ENVISAT/ASAR data acquired from 2003-2010 and ALOS/PALSAR data acquired from 2006-2011 were used to detect poorly expressed geomorphological deformation by conducting time series analyses of periodically acquired SAR data. In addition, to remove noise caused by geographical feature stripes or phase retardation, we applied median filtering, histogram extraction processing, and clarification of the displacement with a Laplacian filter. The main functions of the InSAR time series analysis are the calculation of phase differences between two images and the inversion with smoothness constraint for the estimation of deformation along the line of sight. The results enabled us to establish criteria for the selection of suitable InSAR data pairs, and provided the final error estimation of the derived surface deformation. The results of the analysis in the Kanto District suggested that localized areas of uplift and subsidence have occurred at irregular intervals in this area. Furthermore, the method offers the possibility of early warning of environmental disasters such as landslide and abrupt subsidence. Our results confirm the effectiveness of InSAR analysis for the monitoring of ground deformation over wide areas via the detection of localized subsidence and landslides.

  13. Instabilities, motion and deformation of active fluid droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, Carl A.; Hawkins, Rhoda J.

    2016-12-01

    We consider two minimal models of active fluid droplets that exhibit complex dynamics including steady motion, deformation, rotation and oscillating motion. First we consider a droplet with a concentration of active contractile matter adsorbed to its boundary. We analytically predict activity driven instabilities in the concentration profile, and compare them to the dynamics we find from simulations. Secondly, we consider a droplet of active polar fluid of constant concentration. In this system we predict, motion and deformation of the droplets in certain activity ranges due to instabilities in the polarisation field. Both these systems show spontaneous transitions to motility and deformation which resemble dynamics of the cell cytoskeleton in animal cells.

  14. 4D imaging of the source of ground deformation at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy) during recent unrest episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, L.; Giudicepietro, F.; Martini, M.; Lanari, R.

    2011-12-01

    Campi Flegrei caldera, has been affected in recent decades by three episodes of significant ground uplift. After the last crisis (1982-84), which was accompanied by strong seismicity, the ground has shown a general descending trend, occasionally interrupted by minor uplift episodes, together with low-magnitude volcano-tectonic and long-period seismicity. We assume that the source of minor ground deformations consists in a diffuse volumetric source, related to both thermoelastic and poroelastic strain. This is a reasonable assumption considering that Campi Flegrei are known to host a geothermal reservoir. We have inverted a DInSAR dataset spanning the interval 1995-2008. Results show that the geometry of the source is much more complex than previously recognized and, most important, it shows significant temporal variations, within few months. The deformation source, of the analyzed uplift episodes, starts with a volumetric expansion centered at a depth of about 5 km. The position of this volume is close to the caldera rims. Later the expansion migrates upward, reaching the surface along preferred paths, leading to the Solfatara area, located almost at the center of the caldera. This area is well known for its powerful geothermal emissions. During the upward migration, seismic long-period sources are activated. Their location is consistent with the path identified by the inversion of the DInSAR dataset. We infer, that this dynamics is linked to the injection of hot fluid batches, along the caldera rims and their upward migration, following preferential high permeability paths. Furthermore we have identified an injection episode which has not been previously recognized. The deformation source remains at depth slowly waning in few years. We show how this conceptual framework fits well with the observed geodetic, seismic and geochemical data.

  15. Active Deformation of Etna Volcano Combing IFSAR and GPS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The surface deformation of an active volcano is an important indicator of its eruptive state and its hazard potential. Mount Etna volcano in Sicily is a very active volcano with well documented eruption episodes.

  16. Evaluating Topographic Effects on Ground Deformation: Insights from Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchin, Erika; Geyer, Adelina; Martí, Joan

    2015-07-01

    Ground deformation has been demonstrated to be one of the most common signals of volcanic unrest. Although volcanoes are commonly associated with significant topographic relief, most analytical models assume the Earth's surface as flat. However, it has been confirmed that this approximation can lead to important misinterpretations of the recorded surface deformation data. Here we perform a systematic and quantitative analysis of how topography may influence ground deformation signals generated by a spherical pressure source embedded in an elastic homogeneous media and how these variations correlate with the different topographic parameters characterizing the terrain form (e.g., slope, aspect, curvature). For this, we bring together the results presented in previous published papers and complement them with new axisymmetric and 3D finite element (FE) model results. First, we study, in a parametric way, the influence of a volcanic edifice centered above the pressure source axis. Second, we carry out new 3D FE models simulating the real topography of three different volcanic areas representative of topographic scenarios common in volcanic regions: Rabaul caldera (Papua New Guinea) and the volcanic islands of Tenerife and El Hierro (Canary Islands). The calculated differences are then correlated with a series of topographic parameters. The final aim is to investigate the artifacts that might arise from the use of half-space models at volcanic areas due to diverse topographic features (e.g., collapse caldera structures, prominent central edifices, large landslide scars).

  17. Deformation-induced changes in hydraulic head during ground-water withdrawal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsieh, Paul A.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water withdrawal from a confined or semiconfined aquifer causes three-dimensional deformation in the pumped aquifer and in adjacent layers (overlying and underlying aquifers and aquitards). In response to the deformation, hydraulic head in the adjacent layers could rise or fall almost immediately after the start of pumping. This deformation-induced effect suggest that an adjacent layer undergoes horizontal compression and vertical extension when pumping begins. Hydraulic head initially drops in a region near the well and close to the pumped aquifer, but rises outside this region. Magnitude of head change varies from a few centimeters to more than 10 centimeters. Factors that influence the development of deformation-induced effects includes matrix rigidity (shear modulus), the arrangement of aquifer and aquitards, their thicknesses, and proximity to land surface. Induced rise in hydraulic head is prominent in an aquitard that extends from land surface to a shallow pumped aquifer. Induced drop in hydraulic head is likely observed close to the well in an aquifer that is separated from the pumped aquifer by a relatively thin aquitard. Induced effects might last for hours in an aquifer, but could persist for many days in an aquitard. Induced effects are eventually dissipated by fluid flow from regions of higher head to regions of lower head, and by propagation of drawdown from the pumped aquifer into adjacent layers.

  18. Ground deformation across the Corinth rift from 22 years of GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briole, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    shows a co-seismic displacement in January 2010. The extension rate at all stations except Efpalio is steady over the ten years period. The velocities determined at approximately a hundred network points (1st order and 2nd order observed twice or more) show no temporal variation during the sampled period except the co-seismic of the large 1995 Aigion earthquake. The southern side of the rift behaves as a rigid body with less than 1mm/yr internal deformation except around the Psathopirgos fault. Most of the extension, more than 12 mm/yr at the longitude of Trizonia, occurs offshore in the centre of the rift. The northern side of the rift is less rigid, with 3 mm/yr accommodated between Trizonia and Lidoriki. The points located along the northern shore between Nafpaktos and Itea show a westward (or clockwise) component with respect to the overall velocity field. No significant deformation is observed in the area located between Nafpaktos and the eastern termination of the Trichonis lake and the block located between Etoliko, Thermo, Lidoriki and Nafpaktos has less than 1mm/yr internal deformation. At the western termination of the Psathopirgos fault both GPS and SAR interferometry show the existence of localized deformation in the first few kilometres inland that becomes progressively dominated by right lateral strike slip corresponding probably to the northern termination of the crustal discontinuity activated more to the southwest during the M=6.4 June 8, 2008 Andravida earthquake. No vertical motion is detected at campaign points except at the Drepano lighthouse northwest of the Psathopirgos fault. Further steps forward in the knowledge of the deformation of this exceptional area during the next few decades require among others the deployment of a few ten of permanent GPS stations across the main actives structures on both sides of the rift and at its western termination around Patras, a complete analysis of the available and future InSAR data and fusion with the GPS

  19. How second generation SAR systems are impacting the analysis of ground deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansosti, E.; Berardino, P.; Bonano, M.; Calò, F.; Castaldo, R.; Casu, F.; Manunta, M.; Manzo, M.; Pepe, A.; Pepe, S.; Solaro, G.; Tizzani, P.; Zeni, G.; Lanari, R.

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, a second generation of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite sensor has been designed and, partially, put into operation, leading to an important breakthrough in Earth Science studies. The common characteristics of such new systems are, indeed, a reduced revisit time (as short as a few days) and, in most cases, an improved spatial resolution (as small as a few meters), providing scientists with unprecedented data for the mapping and monitoring of natural and human-induced hazards. This paper provides an overview on the new observational capability offered by the second generation of SAR sensors, especially in the field of ground deformation analysis for mitigating the risk associated with natural and human-induced hazards. In particular, we exploit the high resolution X-band data acquired by the COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) constellation to show how deformation phenomena characterized by limited spatial extent and extremely fast dynamics can be detected and investigated in details. Whenever possible, we compare the achieved results with those obtained by using data collected by the first generation ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT systems. A comparison with one ALOS satellite dataset is also included. Most of the results, based on the application of Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) techniques, highlight how this technology is not anymore just a sophisticated tool for remotely studying surface deformation phenomena, but it is becoming an operational system for near-real time deformation monitoring. Moreover, we also show how the improved spatial resolution extends the possibility to exploit SAR image amplitude, instead of phase, for direct comparison with optical data and for imaging large deformation episodes, typically associated with strong seismic events, for which DInSAR may fail.

  20. Magnificent Ground Water Connection. [Sample Activities].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    Water conservation and usage is an important concept in science. This document, geared specifically to New England, provides many activities for protecting and discussing ground water situations. Sample activities for grades K-6 include: (1) All the Water in the World; (2) The Case of the Disappearing Water; (3) Deep Subjects--Wells and Ground…

  1. Modes of active deformation in Eastern Hispaniola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Senz, J.; Pérez-Estaún, A.

    2012-04-01

    Eastern Hispaniola and the Puerto Rico Island are the emerged part of a doubly vergent thrust wedge formed by oblique arc-continent collision with subduction and underthrusting of the North America Plate in the Puerto Rico trench and underthrusting of the Caribbean crust in The Muertos trough (Dolan et al. 1998, Mann et al., 2002, ten Brink et al. 2010). In the relatively small area of Eastern Hispaniola several types of active crustal deformation have been recognized: 1) At the prowedge of the orogene, the rear of the accretionary prism is cut by the strike-slip Septentrional Fault, bounding a sliver plate (Mann et al, 2002). Recent detailed mapping and aeromagnetic surveys in the onshore part of the prism (Samaná Peninsula and Septentrional Cordillera, Sysmin Team) revealed that the internal structure of the sliver is made of parallel bands of sigmoidal, left-lateral, NW-SE thrust splays, bounded by steep strike-slip faults. We interpreted these structures as transpressional strike-slip duplex. It is worth to note the similarity between the strike and dip of the thrust splays and the 303, 62, 74 focal mechanism calculated by Russo and Villaseñor (1995) for the thrust event of the August 4, 1946 Hispaniola earthquake. 2) The uplifted core of the orogen extends between the accretionary prism and the beginning of the Muertos retrowedge. Half of this area is occupied by the Oriental Cordillera, a recent uplift of cretaceous island-arc rocks arching the Late Neogene reef. The rest of the territory is the Caribbean Coastal Plain modelled on the Late Neogene reef. The Oriental Cordillera is made of two en echelon left-stepping uplifts: the domal-shaped Haitises and the rhombohedral-shaped Seibo (García-Senz et al, 2007); the latter share structural similarities and scaling relations with the 90° neutral stepover model of McClay and Bonora (2001). Therefore we interpret it as a restraining stepover developed over a blind splay of the Septentrional Fault, and the main

  2. Measuring ground deformations with 1-Hz GPS data: the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake (preliminary report)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwan, Meilano; Kimata, Fumiaki; Hirahara, Kazuro; Sagiya, Takeshi; Yamagiwa, Atsushi

    2004-03-01

    We analyzed 1-Hz GPS data observed at 14 stations of the GPS Earth Observation Network (GEONET) of the Geographical Survey Institute, Japan, associated with the 2003 M JMA 8.1 Tokachi-oki earthquake, which occurred at the Kurile Trench. The GPS stations are located 70-240 km away from the epicenter. GPS data clearly captured rapid co-seismic ground displacements. At a GPS station 70 km away from the epicenter, coseismic displacements started 15 seconds after the origin time, and after 40 seconds at the stations 240 km away. Observed displacement amplitude exceeded 20 cm at GPS sites 240 km away from the epicenter. Displacement amplitudes attenuate with time and distance from the epicenter, oscillating with periods of 40-60 seconds. We compared the 1-Hz GPS data and displacement seismogram integrated from strong ground motion data, which showed fairly good agreements. In spite of careful screening of 1-Hz GPS data during 30 minutes preceding the main shock, no significant preseismic deformation over 1 cm in the horizontal components was recorded. 30 second sampling GPS data at 14 sites during 20 hours preceding the main shock did not show any significant pre-seismic deformation, either. These results indicate that pre-seismic strain change, if any, was smaller than 0.5-1.0×10-7 before the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake.

  3. Evaluating topographic effects on ground deformation: Insights from finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchin, Erika; Geyer, Adelina; Marti, Joan

    2015-04-01

    Ground deformation has been demonstrated to be one of the most common signals of volcanic unrest. Although volcanoes are commonly associated with significant topographic relief, most analytical models assumed the Earth's surface as flat. In the last years, it has been confirmed that this approximation can lead to important misinterpretations of the recorded surface deformation data. Here we perform a systematic and quantitative analysis of how topography may influence ground deformation signals and how these variations correlate with the different topographic parameters characterizing the terrain form (e.g. slope, aspect, curvature, etc.). For this, we bring together the results exposed in previous published papers and complement them with new axisymmetric and 3D Finite Elements (FE) models results. First, we study, in a parametric way, the influence of a volcanic edifice centered above the pressure source axis. Second, we carry out new 3D FE models simulating the real topography of three different volcanic areas representative of topographic scenarios common in volcanic regions: Rabaul caldera (Papua New Guinea) and the volcanic islands of Tenerife and El Hierro (Canary Islands). The calculated differences are then correlated with a series of topographic parameters. The final aim is to investigate the artifacts that might arise from the use of half-space models at volcanic areas considering their diverse topographic features (e.g. collapse caldera structures, prominent central edifices, large landslide scars, etc.). Final conclusions may be also useful for the design of an optimal geodetic monitoring network. This research was partially funded by the European Commission (FP7 Theme: ENV.2011.1.3.3-1; Grant 282759: "VUELCO")and RYC-2012-11024.

  4. Geomorphic response to tectonically-induced ground deformation in the Wabash Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fraser, G.S.; Thompson, T.A.; Olyphant, G.A.; Furer, L.; Bennett, S.W.

    1997-01-01

    Numerous low- to moderate-intensity earthquakes have been recorded in a zone of diffuse modern seismicity in southwest Indiana, southeast Illinois, and northernmost Kentucky. Structural elements within the zone include the Wabash Valley Fault System, the LaSalle Anticlinal Belt in western Illinois, and the Rough Creek-Shawneetown Fault System in northern Kentucky. The presence of seismically-induced liquefaction features in the near-surface alluvial sediments in the region indicates that strong ground motion has occurred in the recent geological past, but because the glacial and alluvial sediments in the Wabash Valley appear to be otherwise undisturbed, post-Paleozoic ground deformation resulting from movement on these structural elements has not yet been documented. Morphometric analysis of the land surface, detailed mapping of geomorphic elements in the valley, reconnaissance drilling of the Holocene and Pleistocene alluvium, and structural analysis of the bedrock underlying the valley were used to determine whether the geomorphology of the valley and the patterns of alluviation of the Wabash River were affected by surface deformation associated with the seismic zone during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. Among the observed features in the valley that can be attributed to deformation are: (1) tilting of the modern land surface to the west, (2) preferred channel migration toward the west side of the valley, with concomitant impact on patterns of soil development and sedimentation rate, (3) a convex longitudinal profile of the Wabash River where it crosses the LaSalle Anticlinal Belt, and (4) increased incision of the river into its floodplain downstream from the anticlinal belt.

  5. Terrestrial and Airborne LIDAR: Comparison of Coincident Datasets for Measuring Ground Deformation and Topographic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayen, R. E.; Stewart, J. P.; Lembo, A. J.; Hu, J.; Davis, C. A.; Hogue, T.; Collins, B. D.; Minasian, D.; Louis-Kayen, N. M.; O'Rourke, T. D.

    2009-05-01

    We present the results from a controlled study on the use of pulse-based terrestrial lidar and phase-based airborne lidar to detect topographic change and ground deformation in areas of earthquake- and storm- induced landslides. Terrestrial and airborne lidar scans were performed at three sites in Los Angeles County and their accuracy was gauged using coincident total station survey measurements as the control. The study was supported by the Multidisciplinary Center for Earthquake Engineering Research (MCEER), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP). Horizontal accuracy was evaluated through the measurement of Northing and Easting residuals, standardized to WGS84. Assessment of accuracy was made on lengths and heights of well-defined objects in the lidar scans, such as LADWP buildings and water tanks. The bias and dispersion of lidar height measurements, standardized to NGVD88, were assessed at the Mulholland Tank adjacent to Hollywood Reservoir, the Owens Aqueduct Penstock at Power Plant 2 (PP2) in San Francisquito Canyon, and a flat un-vegetated site near the Los Angeles Reservoir before and after carefully measured trenching. At the vegetated slopes near PP2 and the Hollywood Reservoir site, airborne lidar showed minimal elevation bias and a standard deviation of approximately 50 cm, whereas terrestrial lidar demonstrated large bias and dispersion (on order of meters) due to the inability of ground-based lidar to penetrate heavy vegetation. Both systems were able to assess heights and lengths on unobstructed man made structures at the sub-decimeter scale. At the trench site, airborne lidar showed decimeter scale bias of -23.6 cm for flat ground to -8.7 cm for trenched ground, and dispersion of 5.6 for flat ground to 20 cm for trenched ground. Terrestrial lidar was nearly unbiased (~0 cm for flat or trenched ground) and with very low dispersion of 4.1 and 6.5 cm for flat and trenched ground, respectively

  6. Fiber-Reinforced Rocks Akin to Roman Concrete Help Explain Ground Deformation at Campi Flegrei Caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanorio, Tiziana; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn

    2016-04-01

    The caldera of Campi Flegrei is one of the active hydrothermal systems of the Mediterranean region experiencing notable unrest episodes in a densely populated area. During the last crisis of 1982-1984, nearly 40,000 people were evacuated for almost two years from the main town of Pozzuoli, the Roman Puteoli, due to the large uplifts (~2 m over two years) and the persistent seismic activity. The evacuation severely hampered the economy and the social make-up of the community, which included the relocation of schools and commercial shops as well as the harbor being rendered useless for docking. Despite the large uplifts, the release of strain appears delayed. Seismicity begins and reaches a magnitude of 4.0 only upon relatively large uplifts (~ 70-80 cm) contrary to what is generally observed for calderas exhibiting much lower deformation levels. Over and above the specific mechanism causing the unrest and the lack of identification of a shallow magmatic reservoir (< 4 km) by seismic data, there is a core question of how the subsurface rocks of Campi Flegrei withstand a large strain and have high strength. We performed a series of direct measurements on deep well cores by combining high-resolution microstructural and mineralogical analyses with the elastic and mechanical properties of well cores from the deep wells drilled in the area right before the unrest of 1982-1984 - San Vito (SV1 and SV2) and Mofete (MF1, MF2, MF5). The rock physics analysis of the well cores provides evidence for the existence of two horizons, above and below the seismogenic area, underlying a natural, coupled process. The basement is a calc-silicate rock housing hydrothermal decarbonation reactions, which provide lime-rich fluids. The caprock above the seismogenic area has a pozzolanic composition and a fibril-rich matrix made of intertwining filaments of ettringite and tobemorite, resulting from lime-pozzolanic reactions. These findings provide evidence for a natural process reflecting that

  7. Joint Inversions of Gas Emissions and Ground Deformation During and Following Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, M.; McCormick, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are associated with complex, time-dependent gas emissions and ground deformation. Observations of such signals are a primary gauge of eruption mechanisms, progress and cessation and as such, are critical for hazard assessment. It is often the case that gas emissions and deformation continue for months to years after the end of an eruption. Interpretation of such signals are critical for making decisions about whether an eruption may be considered over or not, yet very little is understood about the processes behind them and how they are coupled. However, the link between the deformation measured and the gases emitted during and after eruptions is fundamental. It has long been recognised that the presence of exsolved fluids enhances magma compressibility, leading to smaller-than-expected syn-eruptive volume changes observed at the surface (by InSAR or by GPS networks). The fluid phase present in the magma prior to eruption contains an assemblage of volatile species, most of which we are able to measure at the surface. Our improved understanding of volatile saturation in silicate melts and the availability of thermodynamic models to predict the partitioning of sulfur between fluid and melt means that coupled interpretations of gas emissions and deformation are now possible, given independent estimates of erupted volumes and other intrinsic parameters such as pressure, temperature and oxygen fugacity. We illustrate, using a well constrained example of a prolonged, multi-episode eruption, the utility in developing coupled models to describe volume changes and outgassing processes with a view to enhancing our ability to interpret these critical monitoring data streams.

  8. InSAR analysis of ground deformation over the Istanbul Area in the framework of the FP7 MARsite Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Stefano; Bonano, Manuela; Nobile, Adriano; Merryman Boncori, John Peter; Manzo, Mariarosaria; Solaro, Giuseppe; Moro, Marco; Saroli, Michele

    2015-04-01

    , showing a mainly linear deformation trend with a velocity of about 1 cm/yr. We started a detailed investigation of the causes of the detected local deformation. We used a stereo pair of very high resolution (0.6 m) satellite images (Pleiades satellite) to carry out a photogeological interpretation which allowed us to identify and characterize various gravitational phenomena in the Avcilar peninsula. The identified gravitational elements are represented by flows, complex landslides, translations and paleolandslides. They have been classified in certain, inferred and quiescent. We identified linear elements associated with landslides, as escarpments and paleo-escarpments over a trench associated to a deep-seated gravitational slope deformation. Terraces, paleo-terraces, counterslope terraces, solifluctions and unmapped landslides were also identified. The comparison of the identified morphological features with the present ground deformation rates allowed to identify and characterise the active gravitational movements.

  9. Numerical models for ground deformation and gravity changes during volcanic unrest: simulating the hydrothermal system dynamics of a restless caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coco, A.; Gottsmann, J.; Whitaker, F.; Rust, A.; Currenti, G.; Jasim, A.; Bunney, S.

    2016-04-01

    Ground deformation and gravity changes in restless calderas during periods of unrest can signal an impending eruption and thus must be correctly interpreted for hazard evaluation. It is critical to differentiate variation of geophysical observables related to volume and pressure changes induced by magma migration from shallow hydrothermal activity associated with hot fluids of magmatic origin rising from depth. In this paper we present a numerical model to evaluate the thermo-poroelastic response of the hydrothermal system in a caldera setting by simulating pore pressure and thermal expansion associated with deep injection of hot fluids (water and carbon dioxide). Hydrothermal fluid circulation is simulated using TOUGH2, a multicomponent multiphase simulator of fluid flows in porous media. Changes in pore pressure and temperature are then evaluated and fed into a thermo-poroelastic model (one-way coupling), which is based on a finite-difference numerical method designed for axi-symmetric problems in unbounded domains.

    Informed by constraints available for the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy), a series of simulations assess the influence of fluid injection rates and mechanical properties on the hydrothermal system, uplift and gravity. Heterogeneities in hydrological and mechanical properties associated with the presence of ring faults are a key determinant of the fluid flow pattern and consequently the geophysical observables. Peaks (in absolute value) of uplift and gravity change profiles computed at the ground surface are located close to injection points (namely at the centre of the model and fault areas). Temporal evolution of the ground deformation indicates that the contribution of thermal effects to the total uplift is almost negligible with respect to the pore pressure contribution during the first years of the unrest, but increases in time and becomes dominant after a long period of the simulation. After a transient increase over the first years of

  10. Application of terrestrial laser scanning for detection of ground surface deformation in small mud volcano (Murono, Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Yuichi S.; Kusumoto, Shigekazu; Matta, Nobuhisa

    2016-07-01

    We perform terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to detect changes in surface morphology of a mud volcano in Murono, north-central Japan. The study site underwent significant deformation by a strong earthquake in 2011, and the surface deformation has continued in the following years. The point cloud datasets were obtained by TLS at three different times in 2011, 2013 and 2014. Those point clouds were aligned by cloud-based registration, which minimizes the closest point distance of point clouds of unchanged ground features, and the TLS-based point cloud data appear to be suitable for detecting centimeter-order deformations in the central domain of the mud volcano, as well as for measurements of topographic features including cracks of paved ground surface. The spatial patterns and accumulative amount of the vertical deformation during 2011-2014 captured by TLS correspond well with those previously reported based on point-based leveling surveys, supporting the validity of TLS survey.

  11. Anthropogenic and natural ground deformation in the Hengill geothermal area, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juncu, D.; Árnadóttir, Th.; Hooper, A.; Gunnarsson, G.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate crustal deformation due to the extraction of water and steam from a high-enthalpy geothermal reservoir; a common occurrence, yet not well understood. The cause of this deformation can be a change in pressure or in temperature in the reservoir, both of which can be caused by extraction or injection of geothermal fluids. Our study area, the Hengill mountains in SW Iceland, is an active volcanic center and a plate triple junction that hosts two power plants producing geothermal energy. This combination of natural and anthropogenic processes causes a complex displacement field at the surface. We analyze geodetic data—Global Navigation Satellite System and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar—to obtain the surface velocity field, which we then simulate using an inverse modeling approach. We focus on the deformation around the geothermal power plants but need to model the regional tectonic and volcanic deformation as well, because the signals are overlapping. We find that plate motion and a deep contracting body can explain the broad scale signal in the area. Local deformation near the two power plants, Hellisheidi and Nesjavellir, can be explained by extraction of geothermal fluids. We estimate reservoirs extending from 0.6 to 3.0 km depth at Hellisheidi, and 1.0 to 3.0 km depth at Nesjavellir for observed pressure decrease rates of 0.25 MPa/yr and 0.1 MPa/yr, respectively. We find that the main cause for the subsidence in the geothermal area is the observed pressure drawdown.

  12. Measurement of Surface Deformation using a Ground-based Real Aperture Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, C. L.; Wiesmann, A.; Strozzi, T.; Wegmueller, U.

    2007-12-01

    Differential interferometry has proven as a technique to be very useful for the measurement of surface deformation relating to geophysical processes such as earthquakes, landslides, volcanoes, glaciers. Up until recently these measurements have been performed from data derived from space borne sensors such as ERS, Envisat, and Radarsat. These space borne sensors have the advantage of obtaining large area acquisitions but are limited in a number of ways. Most serious is the lack of dense temporal sampling due to long repeat times. Also due to the fixed orbit track, the number of views of the scene is limited. Ground based interferometry (GBI) has demonstrated the capability to continuously map the motion of landslides, glaciers, at mm scale. The advantages of ground-based observation include on-demand availability, the potential of continuous observations, and flexibility in selection of the observation geometry with very small baselines, high spatial resolution, and the potential to suppress atmospheric phase variations by averaging by acquisition of multiple images. GBI implementations up to this time have utilized a small antenna traveling along a linear rail. We have developed a new Terrestrial Radar Interferometer (TRI) operating at 17.2 GHz and utilizing a azimuthal rotating interferometric array of real-aperture antennas Because the two SLC images are created simultaneously, we can create an elevation model of the entire scene, even for scatterers that are incoherent. The scope of this paper is to describe the system and performance for generating height and deformation maps. We show some our first results mapping motion of the Rhône Glacier in Switzerland and the Tessina landslide near the city of Belluno in Northern Italy.

  13. Monocytic Cells Become Less Compressible but More Deformable upon Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ravetto, Agnese; Wyss, Hans M.; Anderson, Patrick D.; den Toonder, Jaap M. J.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Monocytes play a significant role in the development of atherosclerosis. During the process of inflammation, circulating monocytes become activated in the blood stream. The consequent interactions of the activated monocytes with the blood flow and endothelial cells result in reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins, in particular of the microfilament structure, and concomitant changes in cell shape and mechanical behavior. Here we investigate the full elastic behavior of activated monocytes in relation to their cytoskeletal structure to obtain a better understanding of cell behavior during the progression of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Methods and Results The recently developed Capillary Micromechanics technique, based on exposing a cell to a pressure difference in a tapered glass microcapillary, was used to measure the deformation of activated and non-activated monocytic cells. Monitoring the elastic response of individual cells up to large deformations allowed us to obtain both the compressive and the shear modulus of a cell from a single experiment. Activation by inflammatory chemokines affected the cytoskeletal organization and increased the elastic compressive modulus of monocytes with 73–340%, while their resistance to shape deformation decreased, as indicated by a 25–88% drop in the cell’s shear modulus. This decrease in deformability is particularly pronounced at high strains, such as those that occur during diapedesis through the vascular wall. Conclusion Overall, monocytic cells become less compressible but more deformable upon activation. This change in mechanical response under different modes of deformation could be important in understanding the interplay between the mechanics and function of these cells. In addition, our data are of direct relevance for computational modeling and analysis of the distinct monocytic behavior in the circulation and the extravascular space. Lastly, an understanding of the changes of monocyte

  14. Sequential data assimilation strategies for utilizing ground deformation data to assess rapidly evolving magma reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, P. M.; Pettijohn, J. C.; Zhan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Classic inversion and joint inversion schemes for analyzing ground deformation data are limited in their ability to provide model forecasts and track the temporal dynamics of a volcano experiencing unrest. Sequential data assimilation techniques, such as the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF; Evensen, 1994), estimate the instantaneous state of a dynamic system in a time-forward fashion by updating the model of a system whenever observations become available. The EnKF method uses a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach to estimate the covariance matrix in the Kalman filter and also tracks model parameters concurrently at a fraction of the computational cost of the Kalman filter (Kalman, 1960) and Extended Kalman Filter (Schmidt, 1966). In this investigation, we build upon Gregg and Pettijohn (2015) to test the performance of the EnKF for assimilating multiple, disparate ground deformation datasets (InSAR, GPS, leveling, and EDM) to provide model forecasts of a volcano exhibiting rapid variations in surface deformation. Specifically, the EnKF is applied to a hypothetical volcano experiencing both inflation and deflation to determine how quickly the EnKF is able to respond to changes in the magma chamber source given a particular set of surface observations. Of interest is how the EnKF responds to limitations imposed by the spatial and temporal resolution of the observations as well as data uncertainties. A series of synthetic tests is run to compare EnKF functionality with individual and multiple dataset assimilation. As the EnKF is model-independent, we test the performance of the EnKF with both time-forward viscoelastic finite element models as well as classic elastic analytical models. References: Evensen, G. (1994), Sequential data assimilation with a nonlinear quasi-geostrophic model using Monte Carlo methods to forecast error statistics, JGR, doi:10.1029/94jc00572. Gregg, P. M., and Pettijohn, J. C. (2015), A multi-data stream assimilation framework for the assessment

  15. Phantom-based ground-truth generation for cerebral vessel segmentation and pulsatile deformation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schetelig, Daniel; Säring, Dennis; Illies, Till; Sedlacik, Jan; Kording, Fabian; Werner, René

    2016-03-01

    Hemodynamic and mechanical factors of the vascular system are assumed to play a major role in understanding, e.g., initiation, growth and rupture of cerebral aneurysms. Among those factors, cardiac cycle-related pulsatile motion and deformation of cerebral vessels currently attract much interest. However, imaging of those effects requires high spatial and temporal resolution and remains challenging { and similarly does the analysis of the acquired images: Flow velocity changes and contrast media inflow cause vessel intensity variations in related temporally resolved computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography data over the cardiac cycle and impede application of intensity threshold-based segmentation and subsequent motion analysis. In this work, a flow phantom for generation of ground-truth images for evaluation of appropriate segmentation and motion analysis algorithms is developed. The acquired ground-truth data is used to illustrate the interplay between intensity fluctuations and (erroneous) motion quantification by standard threshold-based segmentation, and an adaptive threshold-based segmentation approach is proposed that alleviates respective issues. The results of the phantom study are further demonstrated to be transferable to patient data.

  16. Multitemporal InSAR analysis at Betic-Rif arc: transient and steady state ground deformation style varieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, J.; Gonzalez, P.

    2010-12-01

    We present results of the analysis of multitemporal Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) at the Betics-Rif arc. We exploited a collected database with more than 400 SAR images from ERS and ENVISAT satellites from 6 descending tracks in South Spain and one ascending and one descending track in Northern Morocco (Alhucemas/Al-hoceima area). We compute time series of displacements, taking care on the occurrence of significant shallow earthquakes (clear temporal discontinuities) at the phase-screen atmospheric filter step. Ground deformation velocity maps indicate a large variety in ground deformation styles from clear anthropogenic to step-wise and steady-state tectonic motions. Here, we present preliminary results of significant deformation occurring at several places along the internal zone of the arc, which guarantee discussion and foster later investigations.

  17. Thermally activated deformation of irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhmert, J.; Müller, G.

    2002-03-01

    Temperature and strain rate change tensile tests were performed on two VVER 1000-type reactor pressure vessel welds with different contents of nickel in unirradiated and irradiated conditions in order to determine the activation parameters of the contribution of the thermally activated deformation. There are no differences of the activation parameters in the unirradiated and the irradiated conditions as well as for the two different materials. This shows that irradiation hardening preferentially results from a friction hardening mechanism by long-range obstacles.

  18. Temporal Variations of Yellowstone Ground Deformation, 2004-2011, from Geodetic Observations and Magmatic Source Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W.; Smith, R. B.; Farrell, J.; Puskas, C.

    2011-12-01

    In mid-2004, GPS and InSAR measurements of Yellowstone revealed the initiation of accelerated uplift of the Yellowstone caldera, with maximum rates of ~7 cm/yr near the Sour Creek resurgent dome in the northeastern caldera. From mid-2006 to 2010, the ground uplift rates declined in two distinct phases: in 2006-2009 from 7 to 5 cm/yr in the northeast caldera and from 4 to 2 cm/yr in the southwest, and in 2009-2010 to 2 cm/yr and 0.5 cm/yr at the same areas. Elastic dislocation modeling of the GPS and InSAR data suggest that magmatic intrusions at 7- 10 km beneath the caldera have been responsible for the uplift, and that a decreasing rate of magmatic replenishment from beneath the northeast caldera and an increase of seismic moment release can plausibly account for reduced rates of caldera uplift. Furthermore, geodetic measurements, including three campaign-mode GPS surveys from 2008 to 2010, revealed that the caldera-wide vertical motion reverted to subsidence in 2010, with an average rate of 2-3 cm/yr (see the attached figure). The initiation of the reversal in vertical deformation was coincident with the occurrence of a large earthquake swarm (a total moment of ~3×1022 dyne-cm) that occurred in January 2010 at the northwestern caldera boundary. With new geodetic measurements in 2011, we expect to present key information for decadal-scale observations and modeling of the Yellowstone caldera deformation that provide insight on temporal variations in the context of Yellowstone magma reservoir replacement and transport.

  19. Comparison of Ground Deformation Measurements and Atmospheric Artifacts Using Insar Cosmo-Skymed and GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbini, S.; Prati, C.; Errico, M.; Novali, F.; Santi, E.

    2012-12-01

    Integrating and exploiting the synergetic combination of the InSAR and GPS techniques allows overcoming the limitations inherent in the use of each technique alone. GPS-based estimates of tropospheric delays may contribute in obtaining better corrections of the wet tropospheric path delay in InSAR signals. This will enhance the coherence and will allow the application of InSAR in a wider range of applications. The test area chosen for the comparison between InSAR and GPS data is in northeastern Italy, in particular, in the city of Bologna (urbanized area) and in the surroundings of Medicina (agricultural area). In these sites, two permanent GPS stations (EUREF EPN sites) of the University of Bologna are operational since mid 1999 (BOLG) and 1996 (MSEL) respectively. The InSAR data used are the COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) images made available by the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The Permanent Scatterers (PS) technique was applied to a number of repeated CSK strip map SAR images acquired over a 40x40 square km area encompassing the two towns mentioned above. The results of this work demonstrate, on the one hand, the CSK capabilities to operate in a repeated interferometric survey mode for measuring ground deformation with millimeter accuracy in different environments. On the other, the comparison of the differential height between the two stations derived with the GPS and the InSAR data, using both acquisition geometries, is satisfactory. Elevation, ground deformation and atmospheric artifacts were estimated in correspondence of the identified PS and compared with the GPS measurements carried out at the same acquisition time by the permanent stations at Bologna and Medicina. The comparison of the differential height between the two stations shows the sensitivity of the GPS height solution to the length of the observation interval. The vertical dispersion achieved by GPS is higher than that achieved by PS InSAR, as expected; however, a similar linear trend appears in the

  20. Multidimensional Time Series Analysis Of Ground Deformation From Multiple InSAR Data Sets Applied To Virunga Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Oreye, N.; Samsonov, S. V.; Benoît, S.

    2012-12-01

    A novel, Multidimensional Small Baseline Subset (MSBAS), methodology is presented for integration of multiple InSAR data sets for computation of two or three dimensional time series of deformation (Samsonov and d'Oreye, Resubmitted). The approach allows combination of all possible air-borne and space-borne SAR data acquired with different acquisition parameters, temporal and spatial sampling and resolution, wave-band and polarization. The proposed method has four main advantages: 1) it achieves combined temporal coverage over an extended period of time when data from many different sensors with different temporal coverages are available; 2) temporal resolution of produced time series increases since it includes the combined sampling from all data sets, which helps to observe signal in more details and also to improve the quality of post-processing (i.e. filtering); 3) two or three components of ground deformation vector are computed, which helps in interpretation of observed ground deformation and further modeling and inversion; 4) various sources of noise (i.e. tropospheric, ionospheric, topographic, orbital, thermal, etc.) are averaged out during the processing improving a signal-to-noise ratio. We apply this technique to SAR data acquired by ERS-1/2, ENVISAT, Radarsat-2 and ALOS starting from March of 2003 until July 2010 over Virunga Volcanic Province (DR Congo) in order to produce time series of ground deformation. The horizontal and vertical time series of ground displacement clearly identify lava compaction areas, long-term deformation of Mt. Nyamulagira and deformations associated to 2004, 2006 and 2010 Nyamulagira eruptions. The method also reveals first unambiguous pre-eruptive deformations in the Virunga Volcanic Province. In particular, pre-eruptive signals are detected about 15 days prior the onset of Nyamulagira 2010 eruption by three successive satellite images acquired by three different sensors in different geometries while the seismic precursors

  1. New constraints on the active tectonic deformation of the Aegean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nyst, M.; Thatcher, W.

    2004-01-01

    Site velocities from six separate Global Positioning System (GPS) networks comprising 374 stations have been referred to a single common Eurasia-fixed reference frame to map the velocity distribution over the entire Aegean. We use the GPS velocity field to identify deforming regions, rigid elements, and potential microplate boundaries, and build upon previous work by others to initially specify rigid elements in central Greece, the South Aegean, Anatolia, and the Sea of Marmara. We apply an iterative approach, tentatively defining microplate boundaries, determining best fit rigid rotations, examining misfit patterns, and revising the boundaries to achieve a better match between model and data. Short-term seismic cycle effects are minor contaminants of the data that we remove when necessary to isolate the long-term kinematics. We find that present day Aegean deformation is due to the relative motions of four microplates and straining in several isolated zones internal to them. The RMS misfit of model to data is about 2-sigma, very good when compared to the typical match between coseismic fault models and GPS data. The simplicity of the microplate description of the deformation and its good fit to the GPS data are surprising and were not anticipated by previous work, which had suggested either many rigid elements or broad deforming zones that comprise much of the Aegean region. The isolated deforming zones are also unexpected and cannot be explained by the kinematics of the microplate motions. Strain rates within internally deforming zones are extensional and range from 30 to 50 nanostrain/year (nstrain/year, 10-9/year), 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than rates observed across the major microplate boundaries. Lower strain rates may exist elsewhere withi the microplates but are only resolved in Anatolia, where extension of 13 ?? 4 nstrain/ year is required by the data. Our results suggest that despite the detailed complexity of active continental deformation

  2. 3D time dependent thermo-fluid dynamic model of ground deformation at Campi Flegrei caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaldo, R.; Tizzani, P.; Manconi, A.; Manzo, M.; Pepe, S.; Pepe, A.; Lanari, R.

    2012-04-01

    In active volcanic areas deformation signals are generally characterized by non-linear spatial and temporal variations [Tizzani P. et al., 2007]. This behaviour has been revealed in the last two decades by the so-called advanced DInSAR processing algorithms, developed to analyze surface deformation phenomena [Berardino P. et al., 2002; Ferretti C. et al., 2001]. Notwithstanding, most of the inverse modelling attempts to characterize the evolution of the volcanic sources are based on the assumption that the Earth's crust behaves as a homogeneous linear elastic material. However, the behaviour of the upper lithosphere in thermally anomalous regions (as active volcanoes are) might be well described as a non-Newtonian fluid, where some of the material proprieties of the rocks (i.e., apparent viscosities) can change over time [Pinkerton H. et al., 1995]. In this context, we considered the thermal proprieties and mechanical heterogeneities of the upper crust in order to develop a new 3D time dependent thermo-fluid dynamic model of Campi Flegrei (CF) caldera, Southern Italy. More specifically, according to Tizzani P. et al. (2010), we integrated in a FEM environment geophysical information (gravimetric, seismic, and borehole data) available for the considered area and performed two FEM optimization procedures to constrain the 3D distribution of unknown physical parameters (temperature and viscosity distributions) that might help explaining the data observed at surface (geothermal wells and DInSAR measurements). First, we searched for the heat production, the volume source distribution and surface emissivity parameters providing the best-fit of the geothermal profiles data measured at six boreholes [Agip ESGE, 1986], by solving the Fourier heat equation over time (about 40 kys). The 3D thermal field resulting from this optimization was used to calculate the 3D brittle-ductile transition. This analysis revealed the presence of a ductile region, located beneath the centre of

  3. 400My of Deformation Along Tibet Active Strike Slip Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaud, N. O.

    2003-12-01

    While it is widely accepted that strike slip faults in Tibet accommodate a significant part of the tertiary convergence between India and Asia, the true Cenozoic magnitude of the offset is still largely debated. Direct dating of Cenozoic piercing points is the most powerful tool to assess the total offset, but their use is not always possible. Therefore one gets to use older markers although this leads to significant results ONLY at the supreme condition that pre-Cenozoic movement of those markers be accurately known. The Kunlun and Altyn Tagh faults for example form a prominent example of Tibetan presently active fault, but they also constitute geological frontiers between blocks of different geological histories accreted at various times since early Paleozoic. One may thus question how much of the visible offset is indeed Cenozoic. Although deformation facies agree with recent kinematics, multi-geochronological approach indicates a series of events from 280-230 Ma to 120+/-10 Ma. The former may be linked either with suturing of the Qiantang and Kunlun blocks farther to the south, or collision further to the north or east in the Qilian Shan and Bei Shan ranges, while the latter range appears to be growing in importance with ongoing work but is still largely unexplained. Oblique subductions of collision to the north of the Qilian Shan are adequate candidates. Argon loss suggests that deformation was associated to a 250-300° C thermal pulse that lasted 5 to 20 Ma after the onset of movement (Arnaud et al., 2003). Unroofing on all faults occurred much later, around 25 Ma ago when sudden cooling suggests a component of normal faulting (Mock et al., 1999). Strong inheritage was also found along the Ghoza active fault, in central western Tibet. Of course the fact that some of the deformation is much older than the Cretaceous and shares compatible deformation criteria with the present-day deformation leads to false appreciation of the pure Cenozoic offset, potentially

  4. Ground deformation at Merapi Volcano, Java, Indonesia: distance changes, June 1988-October 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, K.D.; Voight, B.; ,; ,; ,; Casadevall, T.J.

    2000-01-01

    Edifice deformations are reported here for the period 1988–1995 at Merapi volcano, one of the most active and dangerous volcanoes in Indonesia. The study period includes a major resumption in lava effusion in January 1992 and a major dome collapse in November 1994. The data comprise electronic distance measurements (EDM) on a summit trilateration network, slope distance changes measured to the upper flanks, and other data collected from 1988 to 1995. A major consequence of this study is the documentation of a significant 4-year period of deformation precursory to the 1992 eruption. Cross-crater strain rates accelerated from less than 3×10−6/day between 1988 and 1990 to more than 11×10−6/day just prior to the January 1992 activity, representing a general, asymmetric extension of the summit during high-level conduit pressurization. After the vent opened and effusion of lava resumed, strain occurred at a much-reduced rate of less than 2×10−6/day. EDM measurements between lower flank benchmarks and the upper edifice indicate displacements as great as 1 m per year over the four years before the 1992 eruption. The Gendol breach, a pronounced depression formed by the juxtaposition of old lava coulées on the southeast flank, functioned as a major displacement discontinuity. Since 1993, movements have generally not exceeded the 95% confidence limits of the summit network. Exceptions to this include 12 cm outward movement for the northwest crater rim in 1992–1993, probably from loading by newly erupted dome lava, and movements as much as 7 cm on the south flank between November 1994 and September 1995. No short-term precursors were noted before the November 1994 lava dome collapse, but long-term adjustments of crater geometry accompanied lava dome growth in 1994. Short-term 2-cm deflation of the edifice occurred following the November 1994 dome collapse.

  5. Sill emplacement and corresponding ground deformation processes at the Alu-Dalafilla volcanic centre in the Danakil Depression, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Craig; Bastow, Ian; Hetherington, Rachel; van Wyk de Vries, Ben; Jackson, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    evaporitic host rock sequence. Important consequences of the shift to sill-dominated magmatism in the Danakil Depression include: (i) roof uplift induced by sill intrusion may not directly relate to the emplaced magma volume if intrusion promotes ductile deformation of the host evaporitic sequence (Schofield et al. 2014), implying that InSAR studies of ground deformation, crucial to volcanic hazard assessment, may under-estimate intruded magma volumes; and (ii) sill volumes are not incorporated into total melt volume estimates, which are used to constrain lithospheric processes active during continental break-up.

  6. Quantitative models for magma degassing and ground deformation (bradyseism) at Campi Flegrei, Italy: Implications for future eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodnar, R.J.; Cannatelli, C.; de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.; Belkin, H.E.; Milia, A.

    2007-01-01

    Campi Flegrei (Phlegrean Fields) is an active volcanic center near Naples, Italy. Numerous eruptions have occurred here during the Quaternary, and repeated episodes of slow vertical ground movement (bradyseism) have been documented since Roman times. Here, we present a quantitative model that relates deformation episodes to magma degassing and fracturing at the brittle-ductile transition in a magmatic-hydrothermal enviromnent. The model is consistent with field and laboratory observations and predicts that uplift between 1982 and 1984 was associated with crystallization of ???0.83 km3 of H2O-saturated magma at 6 km depth. During crystallization, ???6.2 ?? 1010 kg of H2O and 7.5 ?? 108 kg of CO2, exsolved from the magma and generated ???7 ?? 1015 J of mechanical (P??V) energy to drive the observed uplift. For comparison, ???1017 J of thermal energy was released during the 18 May 1980 lateral blast at Mount St. Helens. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  7. Ground deformation monitoring using small baseline DInSAR technique: A case study in Taiyuan City from 2003 to 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, H.-A.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Chen, X.-Y.; Lu, T.; Du, J.; Sun, Z.-H.; Sun, G.-T.

    2011-01-01

    DInSAR technique based on time series of SAR images has been very popular to monitor ground stow deformation in recent years such as permanent scatterers (PS) method small baseline subsets (SBAS) method and coherent targets (CT) method. By taking advantage of PS method and CT method in this paper small baseline DTnSAR technique is used to investigate the ground deformation of Taiyuan City Shanxi Province from 2003 to 2009 by using 23 ENVISAT ASAR images. The experiment results demonstrate that: (1) during this period four significant subsidence centers have been developed in Taiyuan namely Xiayuan Wujiabu Xiaodian Sunjiazhai. The largest subsidence center is Sunjiazhai with an average subsidence rate of -77. 28 mm/a; (2) The subsidence of the old center Wanbolin has sHowed down. And the subsidence in the northern region has stopped and some areas even rebounded. (3) The change of subsidence centers indicates that the control measures of "closing wells and reducing exploitation" taken by the Taiyuan government has achieved initial effects. (4) The experiment results have been validated with leveling data and the acouracy is 2. 90 mm which shows that the small baseline DInSAR technique can be used to monitor urban ground deformation.

  8. A Stable Geodetic Reference Frame within the COCONET Footprint to Enable High-Accuracy Ground Deformation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Wang, G.; Yu, J.

    2014-12-01

    COCONET(Continuously Operating Caribbean GPS Observational Network) is a multidisciplinary research infrastructure focused on improving the ability to understand, predict, and prepare for multiple natural hazards in the Caribbean, Central America, and Northern Andes. GPS data alone cannot provide accurate ground deformation information over time and space. A precise regional reference frame is needed in interpolating GPS observations to address regional and local ground deformations. Failure to use a precise reference frame would cause unintended negative consequences. The mainly purpose of this study is to establish a stable geodetic reference frame within the COCONet footprint (abbreviated as "COCONet-RF") and to provide positional time series and velocities (relative to COCONet-RF) of all permanent GPS stations within the COCONet footprint to the public. The GIPSY software package was used to calculate position within IGS08. The local reference frame was realized by a 14-parameter Helmert transformation technique. It will be periodically updated in order to synchronize with the update of the IGS reference frame. This stable COCONer-RF would provide a higher accuracy geodetic infrastructure for delineating the magnitude and spatial and temporal variations of ground deformations associated with landslides, faulting, subsidence, and volcanoes. Researchers who are not familiar with GPS data processing and reference transformation will be able to directly integrate COCONET products into their specific research.

  9. Temporal evolution of continental lithospheric strength in actively deforming regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.; Pollitz, F.F.

    2008-01-01

    It has been agreed for nearly a century that a strong, load-bearing outer layer of earth is required to support mountain ranges, transmit stresses to deform active regions and store elastic strain to generate earthquakes. However the dept and extent of this strong layer remain controversial. Here we use a variety of observations to infer the distribution of lithospheric strength in the active western United States from seismic to steady-state time scales. We use evidence from post-seismic transient and earthquake cycle deformation reservoir loading glacio-isostatic adjustment, and lithosphere isostatic adjustment to large surface and subsurface loads. The nearly perfectly elastic behavior of Earth's crust and mantle at the time scale of seismic wave propagation evolves to that of a strong, elastic crust and weak, ductile upper mantle lithosphere at both earthquake cycle (EC, ???10?? to 103 yr) and glacio-isostatic adjustment (GIA, ???103 to 104 yr) time scales. Topography and gravity field correlations indicate that lithosphere isostatic adjustment (LIA) on ???106-107 yr time scales occurs with most lithospheric stress supported by an upper crust overlying a much weaker ductile subtrate. These comparisons suggest that the upper mantle lithosphere is weaker than the crust at all time scales longer than seismic. In contrast, the lower crust has a chameleon-like behavior, strong at EC and GIA time scales and weak for LIA and steady-state deformation processes. The lower crust might even take on a third identity in regions of rapid crustal extension or continental collision, where anomalously high temperatures may lead to large-scale ductile flow in a lower crustal layer that is locally weaker than the upper mantle. Modeling of lithospheric processes in active regions thus cannot use a one-size-fits-all prescription of rheological layering (relation between applied stress and deformation as a function of depth) but must be tailored to the time scale and tectonic

  10. Active deformable sheets: prototype implementation, modeling, and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Robert J.; Johnson, Norbert; Doumanidis, Charalabos C.

    2000-06-01

    Active deformable sheets are integrated smart planar sheet structures performing off-plane deformations under computer actuation and control, to take up a desired dynamic morphology specified in CAD software or obtained by 3-D scanning of a solid surface. The sheet prototypes are implemented in the laboratory by elastic neoprene foil layers with embedded asymmetric grids of SMA wires (Nitinol), which upon electrical contraction bend the sheet to the necessary local curvature distribution. An analytical model of such prototypes, consisting of an electrical, a thermal, a material and a mechanical module, as well as a more complex finite element thermomechanical simulation of the sheet structure have been developed and validated experimentally. Besides open-loop control of the sheet curvatures by modulation of the SMA wire actuation current, a closed-loop control system has been implemented, using feedback of the wire electrical resistance measurements in real time, correlating to the material transformation state. The active deformable sheets are intended for applications such as reconfigurable airfoils and aerospace structures, variable focal length optics and electromagnetic reflectors, flexible and rapid tooling and microrobotics.

  11. A persistent scatterer interpolation for retrieving accurate ground deformation over InSAR-decorrelated agricultural fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingyi; Zebker, Howard A.; Knight, Rosemary

    2015-11-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is a radar remote sensing technique for measuring surface deformation to millimeter-level accuracy at meter-scale resolution. Obtaining accurate deformation measurements in agricultural regions is difficult because the signal is often decorrelated due to vegetation growth. We present here a new algorithm for retrieving InSAR deformation measurements over areas with severe vegetation decorrelation using adaptive phase interpolation between persistent scatterer (PS) pixels, those points at which surface scattering properties do not change much over time and thus decorrelation artifacts are minimal. We apply this algorithm to L-band ALOS interferograms acquired over the San Luis Valley, Colorado, and the Tulare Basin, California. In both areas, the pumping of groundwater for irrigation results in deformation of the land that can be detected using InSAR. We show that the PS-based algorithm can significantly reduce the artifacts due to vegetation decorrelation while preserving the deformation signature.

  12. Real Time Tracking of Magmatic Intrusions by means of Ground Deformation Modeling during Volcanic Crises

    PubMed Central

    Cannavò, Flavio; Camacho, Antonio G.; González, Pablo J.; Mattia, Mario; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Fernández, José

    2015-01-01

    Volcano observatories provide near real-time information and, ultimately, forecasts about volcano activity. For this reason, multiple physical and chemical parameters are continuously monitored. Here, we present a new method to efficiently estimate the location and evolution of magmatic sources based on a stream of real-time surface deformation data, such as High-Rate GPS, and a free-geometry magmatic source model. The tool allows tracking inflation and deflation sources in time, providing estimates of where a volcano might erupt, which is important in understanding an on-going crisis. We show a successful simulated application to the pre-eruptive period of May 2008, at Mount Etna (Italy). The proposed methodology is able to track the fast dynamics of the magma migration by inverting the real-time data within seconds. This general method is suitable for integration in any volcano observatory. The method provides first order unsupervised and realistic estimates of the locations of magmatic sources and of potential eruption sites, information that is especially important for civil protection purposes. PMID:26055494

  13. Real Time Tracking of Magmatic Intrusions by means of Ground Deformation Modeling during Volcanic Crises.

    PubMed

    Cannavò, Flavio; Camacho, Antonio G; González, Pablo J; Mattia, Mario; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Fernández, José

    2015-06-09

    Volcano observatories provide near real-time information and, ultimately, forecasts about volcano activity. For this reason, multiple physical and chemical parameters are continuously monitored. Here, we present a new method to efficiently estimate the location and evolution of magmatic sources based on a stream of real-time surface deformation data, such as High-Rate GPS, and a free-geometry magmatic source model. The tool allows tracking inflation and deflation sources in time, providing estimates of where a volcano might erupt, which is important in understanding an on-going crisis. We show a successful simulated application to the pre-eruptive period of May 2008, at Mount Etna (Italy). The proposed methodology is able to track the fast dynamics of the magma migration by inverting the real-time data within seconds. This general method is suitable for integration in any volcano observatory. The method provides first order unsupervised and realistic estimates of the locations of magmatic sources and of potential eruption sites, information that is especially important for civil protection purposes.

  14. Real Time Tracking of Magmatic Intrusions by means of Ground Deformation Modeling during Volcanic Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannavò, Flavio; Camacho, Antonio G.; González, Pablo J.; Mattia, Mario; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Fernández, José

    2015-06-01

    Volcano observatories provide near real-time information and, ultimately, forecasts about volcano activity. For this reason, multiple physical and chemical parameters are continuously monitored. Here, we present a new method to efficiently estimate the location and evolution of magmatic sources based on a stream of real-time surface deformation data, such as High-Rate GPS, and a free-geometry magmatic source model. The tool allows tracking inflation and deflation sources in time, providing estimates of where a volcano might erupt, which is important in understanding an on-going crisis. We show a successful simulated application to the pre-eruptive period of May 2008, at Mount Etna (Italy). The proposed methodology is able to track the fast dynamics of the magma migration by inverting the real-time data within seconds. This general method is suitable for integration in any volcano observatory. The method provides first order unsupervised and realistic estimates of the locations of magmatic sources and of potential eruption sites, information that is especially important for civil protection purposes.

  15. Crustal deformation and volcanic earthquakes associated with the recent volcanic activity of Iwojima Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, H.; Fujita, E.; Tanada, T.

    2013-12-01

    Iwojima is an active volcanic island located within a 10 km wide submarine caldera about 1250 km to the south of Tokyo, Japan. The seismometer and GPS network of National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) in Iwojima has observed a repeating island wide uplift more than 1 m associated with large number of volcanic earthquakes every several years. During 2006-2012, we observed more than 20000 volcanic earthquakes and an uplift of about 3 m, and precursory volcanic earthquakes and rapid crustal deformation just before the small submarine eruption near the northern coast of Iwojima in April 2012. In a restless volcano such as Iwojima, it is important issue to distinguish whether rapid crustal deformation and intense earthquake activity lead to an eruption or not. According to a long period geodetic observation by Ukawa et al. (2006), the crustal deformation of Iwojima can be classify into 2 phases. The first is an island wide large uplift centering on Motoyama area (the eastern part of the island, the center of the caldera), and the second is contraction and subsidence at local area centering on Motoyama and uplift around that area. They are interpreted by superposition of crustal deformations by a shallow contraction source and a deep seated inflation source beneath Motoyama. The earthquake activity of Iwojima highly correlates with the island wide large uplift, suggesting the earthquakes are almost controlled by a magma accumulation into a deep seated magma chamber. In contrast to the activity, the precursory activity of the eruption in 2012 is deviated from the correlation. The rapid crustal deformation just before and after the eruption in 2012 can be interpreted by rapid inflation and deflation of a shallow sill source about 1km deep, respectively, suggesting that it was caused by a shallow hydrothermal activity. The result shows that we can probably distinguish an abnormal activity related with a volcanic eruption when we observe

  16. A Blind Test Experiment in Volcano Geodesy: a Benchmark for Inverse Methods of Ground Deformation and Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, Luca; Fernandez, Jose; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Rivalta, Eleonora; Camacho, Antonio; Nikkhoo, Mehdi; Walter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The inversion of ground deformation and gravity data is affected by an intrinsic ambiguity because of the mathematical formulation of the inverse problem. Current methods for the inversion of geodetic data rely on both parametric (i.e. assuming a source geometry) and non-parametric approaches. The former are able to catch the fundamental features of the ground deformation source but, if the assumptions are wrong or oversimplified, they could provide misleading results. On the other hand, the latter class of methods, even if not relying on stringent assumptions, could suffer from artifacts, especially when dealing with poor datasets. In the framework of the EC-FP7 MED-SUV project we aim at comparing different inverse approaches to verify how they cope with basic goals of Volcano Geodesy: determining the source depth, the source shape (size and geometry), the nature of the source (magmatic/hydrothermal) and hinting the complexity of the source. Other aspects that are important in volcano monitoring are: volume/mass transfer toward shallow depths, propagation of dikes/sills, forecasting the opening of eruptive vents. On the basis of similar experiments already done in the fields of seismic tomography and geophysical imaging, we have devised a bind test experiment. Our group was divided into one model design team and several inversion teams. The model design team devised two physical models representing volcanic events at two distinct volcanoes (one stratovolcano and one caldera). They provided the inversion teams with: the topographic reliefs, the calculated deformation field (on a set of simulated GPS stations and as InSAR interferograms) and the gravity change (on a set of simulated campaign stations). The nature of the volcanic events remained unknown to the inversion teams until after the submission of the inversion results. Here we present the preliminary results of this comparison in order to determine which features of the ground deformation and gravity source

  17. A Blind Test Experiment in Volcano Geodesy: a Benchmark for Inverse Methods of Ground Deformation and Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, L.; Fernandez, J.; Puglisi, G.; Rivalta, E.; Camacho, A. G.; Nikkhoo, M.; Walter, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    The inversion of ground deformation and gravity data is affected by an intrinsic ambiguity because of the mathematical formulation of the inverse problem. Current methods for the inversion of geodetic data rely on both parametric (i.e. assuming a source geometry) and non-parametric approaches. The former are able to catch the fundamental features of the ground deformation source but, if the assumptions are wrong or oversimplified, they could provide misleading results. On the other hand, the latter class of methods, even if not relying on stringent assumptions, could suffer from artifacts, especially when dealing with poor datasets. In the framework of the EC-FP7 MED-SUV project we aim at comparing different inverse approaches to verify how they cope with basic goals of Volcano Geodesy: determining the source depth, the source shape (size and geometry), the nature of the source (magmatic/hydrothermal) and hinting the complexity of the source. Other aspects that are important in volcano monitoring are: volume/mass transfer toward shallow depths, propagation of dikes/sills, forecasting the opening of eruptive vents. On the basis of similar experiments already done in the fields of seismic tomography and geophysical imaging, we have devised a bind test experiment. Our group was divided into one model design team and several inversion teams. The model design team devised two physical models representing volcanic events at two distinct volcanoes (one stratovolcano and one caldera). They provided the inversion teams with: the topographic reliefs, the calculated deformation field (on a set of simulated GPS stations and as InSAR interferograms) and the gravity change (on a set of simulated campaign stations). The nature of the volcanic events remained unknown to the inversion teams until after the submission of the inversion results. Here we present the preliminary results of this comparison in order to determine which features of the ground deformation and gravity source

  18. Ground deformation monitoring using RADARSAT-2 DInSAR-MSBAS at the Aquistore CO2 storage site in Saskatchewan (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnogorska, M.; Samsonov, S.; White, D.

    2014-11-01

    The research objectives of the Aquistore CO2 storage project are to design, adapt, and test non-seismic monitoring methods for measurement, and verification of CO2 storage, and to integrate data to determine subsurface fluid distributions, pressure changes and associated surface deformation. Aquistore site is located near Estevan in Southern Saskatchewan on the South flank of the Souris River and west of the Boundary Dam Power Station and the historical part of Estevan coal mine in southeastern Saskatchewan, Canada. Several monitoring techniques were employed in the study area including advanced satellite Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) technique, GPS, tiltmeters and piezometers. The targeted CO2 injection zones are within the Winnipeg and Deadwood formations located at > 3000 m depth. An array of monitoring techniques was employed in the study area including advanced satellite Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) with established corner reflectors, GPS, tiltmeters and piezometers stations. We used airborne LIDAR data for topographic phase estimation, and DInSAR product geocoding. Ground deformation maps have been calculated using Multidimensional Small Baseline Subset (MSBAS) methodology from 134 RADARSAT-2 images, from five different beams, acquired during 20120612-20140706. We computed and interpreted nine time series for selected places. MSBAS results indicate slow ground deformation up to 1 cm/year not related to CO2 injection but caused by various natural and anthropogenic causes.

  19. Recent ground deformation of Taiyuan basin (China) investigated with C-, L-, and X-bands SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wu; Zhang, Qin; Ding, Xiaoli; Zhao, Chaoying; Yang, Chengsheng; Qu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    C-, L- and X-bands Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images acquired from November 2006 to June 2011 were processed with Small BAseline Subset DInSAR (SBAS-DInSAR) technique to investigate spatial and temporal variations in deformation over Taiyuan basin, China. The annual deformation rate, created by integrating C-, L- and X-bands interferograms, revealed severe subsidence regions in the basin, where the average subsidence exceeded 10 cm/y and the maximum subsidence reached to 24 cm/y. Meanwhile, it was found that shapes of these subsidence areas were characterized as either subsiding bowls or elongated subsiding belts, implying an intimate connection among groundwater exploration, ground subsidence and faults. Additionally, significant differences in displacement were identified near the faults. This phenomenon could be explained that faults acted as barriers to groundwater flow, impeding the horizontal propagation of fluid-pressure changes and therefore creating groundwater level difference across them. Furthermore, the time series of deformation maps presented inconspicuous nonlinear periodic variations, which might be caused by the seasonal groundwater level fluctuations. In view of the poor water resource and presented features of subsidence over the study area, we deduced that excessive pumping of groundwater was the dominant process driving land subsidence. Our results could provide scientific evidence on a sound management of ground water pumping to mitigate potential damages on infrastructures and environments.

  20. Active Printed Materials for Complex Self-Evolving Deformations

    PubMed Central

    Raviv, Dan; Zhao, Wei; McKnelly, Carrie; Papadopoulou, Athina; Kadambi, Achuta; Shi, Boxin; Hirsch, Shai; Dikovsky, Daniel; Zyracki, Michael; Olguin, Carlos; Raskar, Ramesh; Tibbits, Skylar

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated models are designed and printed as static objects. Here, we introduce a novel approach for simulating and fabricating self-evolving structures that transform into a predetermined shape, changing property and function after fabrication. The new locally coordinated bending primitives combine into a single system, allowing for a global deformation which can stretch, fold and bend given environmental stimulus. PMID:25522053

  1. Active printed materials for complex self-evolving deformations.

    PubMed

    Raviv, Dan; Zhao, Wei; McKnelly, Carrie; Papadopoulou, Athina; Kadambi, Achuta; Shi, Boxin; Hirsch, Shai; Dikovsky, Daniel; Zyracki, Michael; Olguin, Carlos; Raskar, Ramesh; Tibbits, Skylar

    2014-12-18

    We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated models are designed and printed as static objects. Here, we introduce a novel approach for simulating and fabricating self-evolving structures that transform into a predetermined shape, changing property and function after fabrication. The new locally coordinated bending primitives combine into a single system, allowing for a global deformation which can stretch, fold and bend given environmental stimulus.

  2. Deformed Shape Calculation of a Full-Scale Wing Using Fiber Optic Strain Data from a Ground Loads Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutte, Christine V.; Ko, William L.; Stephens, Craig A.; Bakalyar, John A.; Richards, W. Lance

    2011-01-01

    A ground loads test of a full-scale wing (175-ft span) was conducted using a fiber optic strain-sensing system to obtain distributed surface strain data. These data were input into previously developed deformed shape equations to calculate the wing s bending and twist deformation. A photogrammetry system measured actual shape deformation. The wing deflections reached 100 percent of the positive design limit load (equivalent to 3 g) and 97 percent of the negative design limit load (equivalent to -1 g). The calculated wing bending results were in excellent agreement with the actual bending; tip deflections were within +/- 2.7 in. (out of 155-in. max deflection) for 91 percent of the load steps. Experimental testing revealed valuable opportunities for improving the deformed shape equations robustness to real world (not perfect) strain data, which previous analytical testing did not detect. These improvements, which include filtering methods developed in this work, minimize errors due to numerical anomalies discovered in the remaining 9 percent of the load steps. As a result, all load steps attained +/- 2.7 in. accuracy. Wing twist results were very sensitive to errors in bending and require further development. A sensitivity analysis and recommendations for fiber implementation practices, along with, effective filtering methods are included

  3. Discontinuous fluidization transition in dense suspensions of actively deforming particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjhung, Elsen; Berthier, Ludovic

    Collective dynamics of self-propelled particles at high density have been shown to display a glass-like transition with a critical slowing down of 2 to 4 orders of magnitude. In this talk, we propose a new mechanism of injecting energy or activity via volume fluctuations. We show that the behaviour of actively deforming particles is strikingly different from that of self-propelled particles. In particular, we find a discontinuous non-equilibrium phase transition from a flowing state to an arrested state. Our minimal model might also explain the collective dynamics in epithelial tissues. In particular, without needing self-propulsion or cell-cell adhesion, volume fluctuations of individual cells alone might be sufficient to give rise to an active fluidization and collective dynamics in densely packed tissues.

  4. Grounds for Movement: Green School Grounds as Sites for Promoting Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyment, J. E.; Bell, A. C.

    2008-01-01

    An environmental factor of particular importance to children's physical activity levels appears to be the presence of parks and open space. Thus, in promoting children's health, school grounds merit consideration as a potential setting for intervention. This paper explores how "green" school grounds, which contain a greater diversity of…

  5. The 2011 volcanic crisis at El Hierro (Canary Islands): monitoring ground deformation through tiltmeter and gravimetric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoso, J.; Montesinos, F. G.; Benavent, M.; Vélez, E. J.

    2012-04-01

    and shallow earthquakes happened, producing in some cases large tilt variations of tens of µrad. By other side, in 2003 we established a control gravity network that was measured again in 2004 and 2008. After the beginning of the eruption on October 2011, we have carried out gravity measurements in various points of the network as well as other new points to attain more accurate control of the possible variations of gravity or/and altitude. Gravity data are still under study although some results about observed gravity changes could reflect the ground deformations pattern according to tiltmeter records and GPS measurements, or a change in the subsurface mass distribution as consequence of the new emplacement the magmatic material in the area with volcanic and seismic activity.

  6. Measuring structure deformations of a composite glider by optical means with on-ground and in-flight testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakunowicz, Jerzy; Święch, Łukasz; Meyer, Ralf

    2016-12-01

    In aeronautical research experimental data sets of high quality are essential to verify and improve simulation algorithms. For this reason the experimental techniques need to be constantly refined. The shape, movement or deformation of structural aircraft elements can be measured implicitly in multiple ways; however, only optical, correlation-based techniques are able to deliver direct high-order and spatial results. In this paper two different optical metrologies are used for on-ground preparation and the actual execution of in-flight wing deformation measurements on a PW-6U glider. Firstly, the commercial PONTOS system is used for static tests on the ground and for wind tunnel investigations to successfully certify an experimental sensor pod mounted on top of the test bed fuselage. Secondly, a modification of the glider is necessary to implement the optical method named image pattern correlation technique (IPCT), which has been developed by the German Aerospace Center DLR. This scientific technology uses a stereoscopic camera set-up placed inside the experimental pod and a stochastic dot matrix applied to the area of interest on the glider wing to measure the deformation of the upper wing surface in-flight. The flight test installation, including the preparation, is described and results are presented briefly. Focussing on the compensation for typical error sources, the paper concludes with a recommended procedure to enhance the data processing for better results. Within the presented project IPCT has been developed and optimized for a new type of test bed. Adapted to the special requirements of the glider, the IPCT measurements were able to deliver a valuable wing deformation data base which now can be used to improve corresponding numerical models and simulations.

  7. Correcting Thermal Deformations in an Active Composite Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Samuel C.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Wilkie, William K.

    2011-01-01

    Large, high-precision composite reflectors for future space missions are costly to manufacture, and heavy. An active composite reflector capable of adjusting shape in situ to maintain required tolerances can be lighter and cheaper to manufacture. An active composite reflector testbed was developed that uses an array of piezoelectric composite actuators embedded in the back face sheet of a 0.8-m reflector panel. Each individually addressable actuator can be commanded from 500 to +1,500 V, and the flatness of the panel can be controlled to tolerances of 100 nm. Measuring the surface flatness at this resolution required the use of a speckle holography interferometer system in the Precision Environmental Test Enclosure (PETE) at JPL. The existing testbed combines the PETE for test environment stability, the speckle holography system for measuring out-of-plane deformations, the active panel including an array of individually addressable actuators, a FLIR thermal camera to measure thermal profiles across the reflector, and a heat source. Use of an array of flat piezoelectric actuators to correct thermal deformations is a promising new application for these actuators, as is the use of this actuator technology for surface flatness and wavefront control. An isogrid of these actuators is moving one step closer to a fully active face sheet, with the significant advantage of ease in manufacturing. No extensive rib structure or other actuation backing structure is required, as these actuators can be applied directly to an easy-to-manufacture flat surface. Any mission with a surface flatness requirement for a panel or reflector structure could adopt this actuator array concept to create lighter structures and enable improved performance on orbit. The thermal environment on orbit tends to include variations in temperature during shadowing or changes in angle. Because of this, a purely passive system is not an effective way to maintain flatness at the scale of microns over several

  8. Role of the interface between distributed fibre optic strain sensor and soil in ground deformation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng-Cheng; Zhu, Hong-Hu; Shi, Bin

    2016-11-01

    Recently the distributed fibre optic strain sensing (DFOSS) technique has been applied to monitor deformations of various earth structures. However, the reliability of soil deformation measurements remains unclear. Here we present an integrated DFOSS- and photogrammetry-based test study on the deformation behaviour of a soil foundation model to highlight the role of strain sensing fibre–soil interface in DFOSS-based geotechnical monitoring. Then we investigate how the fibre–soil interfacial behaviour is influenced by environmental changes, and how the strain distribution along the fibre evolves during progressive interface failure. We observe that the fibre–soil interfacial bond is tightened and the measurement range of the fibre is extended under high densities or low water contents of soil. The plastic zone gradually occupies the whole fibre length when the soil deformation accumulates. Consequently, we derive a theoretical model to simulate the fibre–soil interfacial behaviour throughout the progressive failure process, which accords well with the experimental results. On this basis, we further propose that the reliability of measured strain can be determined by estimating the stress state of the fibre–soil interface. These findings may have important implications for interpreting and evaluating fibre optic strain measurements, and implementing reliable DFOSS-based geotechnical instrumentation.

  9. A model of earthquake triggering probabilities and application to dynamic deformations constrained by ground motion observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Felzer, K.

    2008-01-01

    We have used observations from Felzer and Brodsky (2006) of the variation of linear aftershock densities (i.e., aftershocks per unit length) with the magnitude of and distance from the main shock fault to derive constraints on how the probability of a main shock triggering a single aftershock at a point, P(r, D), varies as a function of distance, r, and main shock rupture dimension, D. We find that P(r, D) becomes independent of D as the triggering fault is approached. When r ??? D P(r, D) scales as Dm where m-2 and decays with distance approximately as r-n with n = 2, with a possible change to r-(n-1) at r > h, where h is the closest distance between the fault and the boundaries of the seismogenic zone. These constraints may be used to test hypotheses about the types of deformations and mechanisms that trigger aftershocks. We illustrate this using dynamic deformations (i.e., radiated seismic waves) and a posited proportionality with P(r, D). Deformation characteristics examined include peak displacements, peak accelerations and velocities (proportional to strain rates and strains, respectively), and two measures that account for cumulative deformations. Our model indicates that either peak strains alone or strain rates averaged over the duration of rupture may be responsible for aftershock triggering.

  10. Role of the interface between distributed fibre optic strain sensor and soil in ground deformation measurement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng-Cheng; Zhu, Hong-Hu; Shi, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Recently the distributed fibre optic strain sensing (DFOSS) technique has been applied to monitor deformations of various earth structures. However, the reliability of soil deformation measurements remains unclear. Here we present an integrated DFOSS- and photogrammetry-based test study on the deformation behaviour of a soil foundation model to highlight the role of strain sensing fibre–soil interface in DFOSS-based geotechnical monitoring. Then we investigate how the fibre–soil interfacial behaviour is influenced by environmental changes, and how the strain distribution along the fibre evolves during progressive interface failure. We observe that the fibre–soil interfacial bond is tightened and the measurement range of the fibre is extended under high densities or low water contents of soil. The plastic zone gradually occupies the whole fibre length when the soil deformation accumulates. Consequently, we derive a theoretical model to simulate the fibre–soil interfacial behaviour throughout the progressive failure process, which accords well with the experimental results. On this basis, we further propose that the reliability of measured strain can be determined by estimating the stress state of the fibre–soil interface. These findings may have important implications for interpreting and evaluating fibre optic strain measurements, and implementing reliable DFOSS-based geotechnical instrumentation. PMID:27827385

  11. Fernandina Volcano (Galápagos) ground deformation modeling via multi-orbits DInSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Novellis, Vincenzo; Pepe, Susi; Castaldo, Raffaele; De Luca, Claudio; Casu, Francesco; Tizzani, Pietro; Sansosti, Eugenio

    2015-04-01

    We study the temporal and spatial ground deformation at Fernandina Volcano (Galápagos) between 2004 and 2013, by using two different DInSAR data set, acquired by ENVISAT C-Band satellite and COSMO-SkyMed X-Band constellation, respectively; we use both ascending and descending orbits for each system. To this purpose, we use the SBAS-DInSAR approach and combine ascending and descending time series to produce vertical and E-W components of the mean deformation velocity and associated deformation time series. More specifically, the long-term components analysis, carried out by using the ENVISAT sensor, revealed a broad uplift phenomenon of about 4 cm on the SE slope of the volcano; similarly, a large subsidence with maximum vertical displacement of about 2 cm on NE flank, is found. For what concern the horizontal components, the performed analysis showed a westward displacement of the southeast flank of the island. The most relevant aspect, which arises from the analysis of the DInSAR vertical eformation time series, is a strong, high rate subsidence phenomenon, that followed the 2009 eruptive event. This tendency is localized in the region around the caldera rim where the circumferential structures border the summit caldera. The multi-orbits X-Band data processing showed a new uplift phenomenon: between March 2012 and July 2013 the vertical component is characterized by a radially symmetric deformation pattern with a maximum uplift of about 20 cm strongly concentrated inside the caldera rim. This symmetry is also observed in the E-W horizontal mean velocity map, showing a maximum displacement of about 12 cm towards East for the SE flank, and 12 cm towards West for the NW flank of the volcano. In particular, the deformation time series show a rather linear uplift trend from March to September 2012, interrupted by a low deformation rate interval lasting until January 2013. After this stage, the deformation shows again a linear behaviour with an increased uplift rate

  12. Chronology of the seismic and ground deformation precursors of the 2014 Fogo Volcano - Cape Verde Islands - eruption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, S. J.; Faria, B. V. E.

    2015-12-01

    The most recent eruption of Fogo Volcano, Cape Verde Islands started on the 23 November 2014 at 10h15 (CVT), after 19 years of quiescence. Several months before the begging of the eruption, the seismic activity started to deviate from the baseline, with the appearance of a class of events that was not recorded before then. This activity was characterized by a significant number of instrumentally detected, very low magnitude seismic events, sometimes more than 100 per day. In September those events became more energetic and analysis indicated that they could be of volcano-tectonic (VT) origin. The first VT event to be located was on 4 October with a 2.5 local magnitude: it was located slightly to the south of the middle of the island at between 15.5 and 16 km depth. This was deeper than normal for background VT events and coincided with the depth of last magma equilibration in the 1995 eruption. It was therefore interpreted as a possible precursor of an eruption: thus the alert level was raised to level 2, and the civil protection authorities were informed. On the following weeks the rate of VT events slightly increased and the focal depths became shallower. Very sporadic harmonic volcano tremor episodes and very few and weak long-period events were also recorded. From about the 15 to 21 November, the VT activity rate oscillated, and hypocentres tended to gather in the vicinity of an inferred dike emplacement and at shallower depth - 6 to 5 km b.s.l. On the first hours of the 22 November seismic rate increased from 3 to 6 events per hour and the events became more energetic. After 19h30 (CVT), when the magma reached the ductile-brittle transition zone (5 to 4 km b.s.l), the seismic rate increased again to more than one event per minute; earthquake magnitudes increased as well. At about 03h00 (CVT) the tilt records shown a prominent ground deformation. Continuous volcanic tremor started only one to half an hour before the start of the eruption.

  13. Perceiving Object Shape from Specular Highlight Deformation, Boundary Contour Deformation, and Active Haptic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Jacob R.; Thomason, Kelsey E.; Ronning, Cecilia; Behari, Kriti; Kleinman, Kayla; Calloway, Autum B.; Lamirande, Davora

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that motion facilitates the visual perception of solid object shape, particularly when surface texture or other identifiable features (e.g., corners) are present. Conventional models of structure-from-motion require the presence of texture or identifiable object features in order to recover 3-D structure. Is the facilitation in 3-D shape perception similar in magnitude when surface texture is absent? On any given trial in the current experiments, participants were presented with a single randomly-selected solid object (bell pepper or randomly-shaped “glaven”) for 12 seconds and were required to indicate which of 12 (for bell peppers) or 8 (for glavens) simultaneously visible objects possessed the same shape. The initial single object’s shape was defined either by boundary contours alone (i.e., presented as a silhouette), specular highlights alone, specular highlights combined with boundary contours, or texture. In addition, there was a haptic condition: in this condition, the participants haptically explored with both hands (but could not see) the initial single object for 12 seconds; they then performed the same shape-matching task used in the visual conditions. For both the visual and haptic conditions, motion (rotation in depth or active object manipulation) was present in half of the trials and was not present for the remaining trials. The effect of motion was quantitatively similar for all of the visual and haptic conditions–e.g., the participants’ performance in Experiment 1 was 93.5 percent higher in the motion or active haptic manipulation conditions (when compared to the static conditions). The current results demonstrate that deforming specular highlights or boundary contours facilitate 3-D shape perception as much as the motion of objects that possess texture. The current results also indicate that the improvement with motion that occurs for haptics is similar in magnitude to that which occurs for vision. PMID:26863531

  14. Ground Deformation Monitoring in Qingdao Coastal Areas by Time-Series Terrasar-X Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, A. Y.; Qiao, X.; Li, D.

    2016-06-01

    As a new generation of high resolution and short revisit period of radar satellite, TerraSAR-X is not only able to meet the requirements of monitoring large scale surface subsidence, but also make it possible to monitor the small deformation of the short period. This articles takes the coastal areas of the west coast of Qingdao as the research object. With Small baselines subsets interferometry synthetic aperture radar (SBASI), this paper obtained the period the average annual rate of change from the time series analysis of TerraSAR-X data from April 2015 to October 2014.In order to enrich the historical deformation data of the study area, it analyse the time series of ALOS images from December 2010 to October 2008 with the same method. Finally,it analyse and demonstrate the experimental results.

  15. Horizontal ground deformation patterns and magma storage during the Puu Oo eruption of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii: episodes 22-42

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffmann, J.P.; Ulrich, G.E.; Garcia, M.O.

    1990-01-01

    Horizontal ground deformation measurements were made repeatedly with an electronic distance meter near the Puu Oo eruption site approximately perpendicular to Kilauea's east rift zone (ERZ) before and after eruptive episodes 22-42. Line lengths gradually extended during repose periods and rapidly contracted about the same amount following eruptions. The repeated extension and contraction of the measured lines are best explained by the elastic response of the country rock to the addition and subsequent eruption of magma from a local reservoir. The deformation patterns are modeled to constrain the geometry and location of the local reservoir near Puu Oo. The observed deformation is consistent with deformation patterns that would be produced by the expansion of a shallow, steeply dipping dike just uprift of Puu Oo striking parallel to the trend of the ERZ. The modeled dike is centered about 800 m uprift of Puu Oo. Its top is at a depth of 0.4 km, its bottom at about 2.9 km, and the length is about 1.6 km; the dike strikes N65?? E and dips at about 87??SE. The model indicates that the dike expanded by 11 cm during repose periods, for an average volumetric expansion of nearly 500 000 m3. The volume of magma added to the dike during repose periods was variable but correlates positively with the volume of erupted lava of the subsequent eruption and represents about 8% of the new lava extruded. Dike geometry and expansion values are used to estimate the pressure increase near the eruption site due to the accumulation of magma during repose periods. On average, vent pressures increased by about 0.38 MPa during the repose periods, one-third of the pressure increase at the summit. The model indicates that the dikelike body below Puu Oo grew in volume from 3 million cubic meters (Mm3) to about 10-12 Mm3 during the series of eruptions. The width of this body was probably about 2.5-3.0 m. No net long-term deformation was detected along the measured deformation lines. ?? 1990

  16. Grounds for movement: green school grounds as sites for promoting physical activity.

    PubMed

    Dyment, J E; Bell, A C

    2008-12-01

    An environmental factor of particular importance to children's physical activity levels appears to be the presence of parks and open space. Thus, in promoting children's health, school grounds merit consideration as a potential setting for intervention. This paper explores how 'green' school grounds, which contain a greater diversity of landscaping and design features, affect the quantity and quality of physical activity among elementary school children. Teachers, parents and administrators associated with 59 schools across Canada completed questionnaires (n = 105). Analysis reveals that through greening, school grounds diversify the play repertoire, creating opportunities for boys and girls of all ages, interests and abilities to be more physically active. Complementing the rule-bound, competitive games supported by asphalt and turf playing fields, green school grounds invite children to jump, climb, dig, lift, rake, build, role play and generally get moving in ways that nurture all aspects of their health and development. Of particular significance is the potential to encourage moderate and light levels of physical activity by increasing the range of enjoyable, non-competitive, open-ended forms of play at school. Seen in this light, green school grounds stand to be an important intervention to be included in school health promotion initiatives.

  17. Mismatch Between Interseismic Ground Deformation and Paleoseismic/Paleogeodetic Observations, Humboldt Bay, Northern California, Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, J. R.; Williams, T. B.; Leroy, T. H.; Anderson, J. K.; Weldon, R. J.; Gilkerson, W.

    2011-12-01

    Observations made by Plafker in Chile (1960) and Alaska (1964) show that vertical deformation during earthquakes is generally opposite in sense of motion compared to interseismic deformation. This elastic rebound theory drives estimates of potential coseismic deformation on the Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ). Similar to other coastal marshes along the CSZ, paleoseismic investigations around Humboldt Bay reveal evidence of coseismic subsidence for the past 4 ka. Tide gage data obtained from NOAA tide gages, as well as 'campaign' style tide gages, are used to infer interseismic ground deformation. Tide gage data from Crescent City and Humboldt Bay are compared to each other and also compared to estimates of eustatic sea-level rise to estimate rates of land-level change. Earthscope and USGS GPS permanent site data are also used to evaluate vertical interseismic deformation in this region. These rates of land-level change are then compared to paleoseismic proxies for vertical land-level change. Cores collected for master's theses research at Humboldt State University were used to compile an earthquake history for the Humboldt Bay region. Some cores in Mad River and Hookton sloughs were used to evaluate magnitudes of coseismic subsidence by comparing diatom and foraminiferid assemblages associated with lithologic contacts (paleogeodesy). Minimum estimates of paleosubsidence for earthquakes range from 0.3 to 2.6 meters. Subtracting eustatic sea-level rise (~2.3 mm/yr, 1977-2010) from Crescent City (CC) and North Spit (NS) relative sea-level rates reveals that CC is uplifting at ~3mm/yr and NS is subsiding at ~2.5 mm/yr. GPS vertical deformation reveals similar rates of ~3 mm/yr of uplift and ~2 mm/yr of subsidence in these two locations. GPS based subsidence rates show a gradient of subsidence between Trinidad (in the north) to Cape Mendocino (in the south). The spatial region of ongoing subsidence reveals the depth of locking of the CSZ fault (differently from previous

  18. InSAR Observation of Ground Surface Deformations Associated to Aquifer Storage and Recovery: A Case study for Future CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, J.; Heggy, E.; Bonneville, A.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage in subsurface has been suggested as a potential method to reduce the steep increase of exogenic CO2 in the atmosphere resulting from man-made industrial activities. Our site of Pendleton, OR is used as an analog to understand reservoirs' dynamic response for future CO2 sequestration. The CO2 sequestration simulation is carried out by injecting drainage water in the permeable basalt confined aquifer during winter and recovering it in summer. However, an extensive monitoring is necessary to measure the potential dilatation and subsidence of the ground during the injection and recovery. Two Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques; Differential inSAR associated with the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) Time Series approach and Permanent Scatterer inSAR (PSinSAR), are performed herein to assess the potential ground deformation associated to these injections and recoveries. The two inSAR techniques are applied on three different radar frequencies; ALOS PALSAR L-Band, Radarsat-2 C-Band and TerraSAR-X X-Band, which allow us to select the most adequate inSAR technique and Radar frequency for monitoring urban and semi-vegetated areas. The potential for sub-wavelength deformations in such type of terrains due to fluid recovery and injections, is explored through this study. Our discontinuous four-years of Line Of Sight (LOS) displacement observations, in areas with low decorrelation near the injection points, suggest that surface deformation associated with water injection and recovery follows an uplift and subsidence cycle with an amplitude of ~4 mm. While observed displacements are geographically correlated to injections and recoveries, they are temporally out-phased with these events due to the subsurface hydraulic conductivity. The sub-centimetric LOS displacements observed with Radar inSAR techniques in Pendleton after water injection in this basaltic confined aquifer suggest that the potential for CO2 sequestration is

  19. Can we infer the magma overpressure threshold before an eruption? Insights from ground deformation time series and numerical modeling of reservoir failure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, F.; Gregg, P. M.; Amelug, F.

    2015-12-01

    Overpressure within a magma chamber is a key parameter to understanding the onset of an eruption. Recent investigations indicate that surface inflation at a volcanic edifice does not always precede eruption (Chaussard and Amelung, 2012; Biggs et al., 2014), suggesting that the overpressure threshold may differ between volcanoes. To understand the failure conditions of a magma reservoir, mechanical models were developed to quantify the range of overpressure affordable in a reservoir for a given situation. Even if the choice of the failure criterion is still debated, most investigators agree that the overpressure required to fail the magma reservoir is at first order a function of the crustal stress field and the shape of the magma reservoir. Radar interferometry (InSAR) provides a large dataset of ground deformation worldwide, but many of these InSAR studies continue to use point or dislocation sources (Mogi, Okada) to explain deformation on volcanoes. Even if these simple solutions often fit the data and estimate the depth and the volume change of the source of deformation, key parameters such as the magma overpressure or the mechanical properties of the rocks cannot be derived. We use mechanical numerical models of reservoir failure combined with ground deformation data. It has been observed that volume change before an eruption can easily range one or two order of magnitude from 1-100x106 m3. The first goal of this study is to understand which parameter(s) control the critical volume changes just before the failure of the reservoir. First, a parametric study is performed to quantify the effect of the geometry of the reservoir (radius, depth), the local stress (compressive/extensive) and even the crust rheology (elastic/viscoelastic). We then compare modeling results with several active volcanoes where long time series of volume change are available: Okmok and Westdahl in Alaska, Sinabung and Agung in Indonesia and Galapagos. For each case, the maximum

  20. Geometric Aspects of Ground Augmentation of Satellite Networks for the Needs of Deformation Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protaziuk, Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    Satellite measurements become competitive in many tasks of engineering surveys, however, in many requiring applications possibilities to apply such solutions are still limited. The possibility to widely apply satellite technologies for displacements measurements is related with new challenges; the most important of them relate to increasing requirements concerning the accuracy, reliability and continuity of results of position determination. One of the solutions is a ground augmentation of satellite network, which intention is to improve precision of positioning, ensure comparable accuracy of coordinates and reduce precision fluctuations over time. The need for augmentation of GNSS is particularly significant in situations: where the visibility of satellites is poor because of terrain obstacles, when the determined position is not precise enough or a satellites constellation does not allow for reliable positioning. Ground based source/sources of satellite signal placed at a ground, called pseudosatellites, or pseudolites were intensively investigated during the last two decades and finally were developed into groundbased, time-synchronized transceivers, that can transmit and receive a proprietary positioning signal. The paper presents geometric aspects of the ground based augmentation of the satellite networks using various quality measures of positioning geometry, which depends on access to the constellation of satellites and the conditions of the observation environment. The issue of minimizing these measures is the key problem that allows to obtain the position with high accuracy. For this purpose, the use of an error ellipsoid is proposed and compared with an error ellipse. The paper also describes the results of preliminary accuracy analysis obtained at test area and a comparison of various measures of the quality of positioning geometry.

  1. Stress Changes and Deformation Monitoring of Longwall Coal Pillars Located in Weak Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bin; Zhang, Zhenyu; Kuang, Tiejun; Liu, Jinrong

    2016-08-01

    Coal pillar stability is strongly influenced by the site-specific geological and geotechnical conditions. Many geological structures such as faults, joints, or rock intrusions can be detrimental to mining operations. In order to evaluate the performance of coal pillars under weak roof degraded by igneous rock intrusion, stress and deformation monitoring was conducted in the affected tailgate areas of Nos. 8208 and 8210 longwalls in Tashan coal mine, Shanxi Province, China. The measurements in the 8208 longwall tailgate showed that the mining-induced stresses in 38-m-wide coal chain pillars under the overburden depth of 300-500 m started to increase at about 100 m ahead of the 8208 longwall working face and reached its peak level at approximately 50 m ahead of the longwall face. The peak stress of 9.16 MPa occurred at the depth of 8-9 m into the pillar from the tailgate side wall. In comparison, disturbance of the headgate block pillar area was negligible, indicating the difference of abutment pressure distribution between the tailgate and headgate sites where the adjacent unmined longwall block carried most of the overburden load. However, when the longwall face passed the headgate monitoring site by 360-379 m, the pillar stress increased to a peak value of 21.4 MPa at the pillar depth of 13 m from the gob side mainly due to stress redistribution in the chain pillar. In contrast to the headgate, at the tailgate side, the adjacent goaf was the dominant triggering factor for high stress concentrations in the chain pillar. Convergence measurements in the tailgate during longwall mining further indicated the evolution characteristics of coal pillar deformation, clearly showing that the gateroad deformation is mainly induced by the longwall extraction it serves. When predicting the future pillar loads from the monitored data, two stress peaks appeared across the 38-m-wide tailgate coal pillar, which are separated by the lower stress area within the pillar center. This

  2. Volcano seismicity and ground deformation unveil the gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics of a volcanic eruption.

    PubMed

    Ripepe, Maurizio; Donne, Dario Delle; Genco, Riccardo; Maggio, Giuseppe; Pistolesi, Marco; Marchetti, Emanuele; Lacanna, Giorgio; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Poggi, Pasquale

    2015-05-18

    Effusive eruptions are explained as the mechanism by which volcanoes restore the equilibrium perturbed by magma rising in a chamber deep in the crust. Seismic, ground deformation and topographic measurements are compared with effusion rate during the 2007 Stromboli eruption, drawing an eruptive scenario that shifts our attention from the interior of the crust to the surface. The eruption is modelled as a gravity-driven drainage of magma stored in the volcanic edifice with a minor contribution of magma supplied at a steady rate from a deep reservoir. Here we show that the discharge rate can be predicted by the contraction of the volcano edifice and that the very-long-period seismicity migrates downwards, tracking the residual volume of magma in the shallow reservoir. Gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics explain the initially high discharge rates observed during eruptive crises and greatly influence our ability to predict the evolution of effusive eruptions.

  3. Volcano seismicity and ground deformation unveil the gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics of a volcanic eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripepe, Maurizio; Donne, Dario Delle; Genco, Riccardo; Maggio, Giuseppe; Pistolesi, Marco; Marchetti, Emanuele; Lacanna, Giorgio; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Poggi, Pasquale

    2015-05-01

    Effusive eruptions are explained as the mechanism by which volcanoes restore the equilibrium perturbed by magma rising in a chamber deep in the crust. Seismic, ground deformation and topographic measurements are compared with effusion rate during the 2007 Stromboli eruption, drawing an eruptive scenario that shifts our attention from the interior of the crust to the surface. The eruption is modelled as a gravity-driven drainage of magma stored in the volcanic edifice with a minor contribution of magma supplied at a steady rate from a deep reservoir. Here we show that the discharge rate can be predicted by the contraction of the volcano edifice and that the very-long-period seismicity migrates downwards, tracking the residual volume of magma in the shallow reservoir. Gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics explain the initially high discharge rates observed during eruptive crises and greatly influence our ability to predict the evolution of effusive eruptions.

  4. Sensing surface mechanical deformation using active probes driven by motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nitta, Takahiro; Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Sada, Kazuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Studying mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials has been challenging due to the difficulty in separating surface deformation from the bulk elasticity of the materials. Here, we introduce a new approach for studying the surface mechanical deformation of a soft material by utilizing a large number of self-propelled microprobes driven by motor proteins on the surface of the material. Information about the surface mechanical deformation of the soft material is obtained through changes in mobility of the microprobes wandering across the surface of the soft material. The active microprobes respond to mechanical deformation of the surface and readily change their velocity and direction depending on the extent and mode of surface deformation. This highly parallel and reliable method of sensing mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials is expected to find applications that explore surface mechanics of soft materials and consequently would greatly benefit the surface science. PMID:27694937

  5. Railway deformation detected by DInSAR over active sinkholes in the Ebro Valley evaporite karst, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galve, J. P.; Castañeda, C.; Gutiérrez, F.

    2015-11-01

    Subsidence was measured for the first time on railway tracks in the central sector of Ebro Valley (NE Spain) using Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) techniques. This area is affected by evaporite karst and the analysed railway corridors traverse active sinkholes that produce deformations in these infrastructures. One of the railway tracks affected by slight settlements is the Madrid-Barcelona high-speed line, a form of transport infrastructure highly vulnerable to ground deformation processes. Our analysis based on DInSAR measurements and geomorphological surveys indicates that this line shows dissolution-induced subsidence and compaction of anthropogenic deposits (infills and embankments). Significant sinkhole-related subsidence was also measured by DInSAR techniques on the Castejón-Zaragoza conventional railway line. This study demonstrates that DInSAR velocity maps, coupled with detailed geomorphological surveys, may help in the identification of the railway track sections that are affected by active subsidence.

  6. July 1973 ground survey of active Central American volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoiber, R. E. (Principal Investigator); Rose, W. I., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Ground survey has shown that thermal anomalies of various sizes associated with volcanic activity at several Central American volcanoes should be detectable from Skylab. Anomalously hot areas of especially large size (greater than 500 m in diameter) are now found at Santiaguito and Pacaya volcanoes in Guatemala and San Cristobal in Nicaragua. Smaller anomalous areas are to be found at least seven other volcanoes. This report is completed after ground survey of eleven volcanoes and ground-based radiation thermometry mapping at these same points.

  7. Ground deformation cycles participating with sub-Plinian, Vulcanian eruptions, and a magma effusive stage at Kirishima volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeo, M.; Maehara, Y.; Ohminato, T.; Ichihara, M.; Oikawa, J.

    2012-12-01

    Volcanoes display several kinds of explosive eruptions, such as Plinian, sub-Plinian, Vulcanian, and Strombolian eruptions. The ground deformation data participating in explosive eruptions yield a fruitful knowledge about the dynamics of explosive eruptions. In this paper, we present tilt motions, near a summit crater during the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake, Kirishima volcanoes, participated with the different kinds of volcanic activities, and make clear the characteristics of tilt motions and time sequences. The beginning period of volcanic activity at Shimoe-dake volcano in 2001 is divided into three different stages: the sub-Plinian stage (26-27 January 2011), the magma effusive stage (28-31 January 2011), and the Vulcanian stage (1-7 February 2011). During these three distinct stages, different kinds of tilt motions were observed participating with these activities. The sub-Plinian and the Vulcanian eruptions were preceded by inflations directed to the summit. A time sequence of the tilt ratio between NS component at KISH and that at SMN represents a gradual increment approaching the first sub-Plinian eruption on 26 January 2011: from 0.3 at 14:30 to 0.4 at 14:40. Employing a cylindrical pressure source in a conduit and taking into account the topography of Shinmoe-dake volcano in a calculation of tilts [Maeda et al., 2011], it became clear that the gradual increment of tilt ratio from 0.3 to 0.4 corresponds to the deepening of the source depth from 810 m to 710 m above sea level. The inflation-deflation cycles with the typical period of one hour were also recorded during the magma effusive stage; these cycles synchronized with volcanic tremors or long-period events in the last term of this stage. Almost all Vulcanian eruptions are preceded by step-like inflations. The tilt motions represented various time sequences after the inflations halted: no distinct tilt change until the Vulcanian eruption, gradual deflation preceding the Vulcanian eruption, and

  8. Direct experimental evidence for a multiparticle-hole ground state configuration of deformed 33Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Ushasi; Rahaman, A.; Aumann, T.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Boretzky, K.; Caesar, C.; Carlson, B. V.; Catford, W. N.; Chakraborty, S.; Chartier, M.; Cortina-Gil, D.; de Angelis, G.; Diaz Fernandez, P.; Emling, H.; Ershova, O.; Fraile, L. M.; Geissel, H.; Gonzalez-Diaz, D.; Jonson, B.; Johansson, H.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Langer, C.; Le Bleis, T.; Leifels, Y.; Marganiec, J.; Münzenberg, G.; Najafi, M. A.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Panin, V.; Paschalis, S.; Plag, R.; Reifarth, R.; Ricciardi, V.; Rossi, D.; Scheit, H.; Scheidenberger, C.; Simon, H.; Taylor, J. T.; Togano, Y.; Typel, S.; Volkov, V.; Wagner, A.; Wamers, F.; Weick, H.; Weigand, M.; Winfield, J. S.; Yakorev, D.; Zoric, M.

    2016-09-01

    The first direct experimental evidence of a multiparticle-hole ground state configuration of the neutron-rich 33Mg isotope has been obtained via intermediate energy (400 A MeV) Coulomb dissociation measurement. The major part ˜(70 ±13 )% of the cross section is observed to populate the excited states of 32Mg after the Coulomb breakup of 33Mg. The shapes of the differential Coulomb dissociation cross sections in coincidence with different core excited states favor that the valence neutron occupies both the s1 /2 and p3 /2 orbitals. These experimental findings suggest a significant reduction and merging of s d -p f shell gaps at N ˜20 and 28. The ground state configuration of 33Mg is predominantly a combination of 32Mg(3.0 ,3.5 MeV ;2-,1-) ⨂νs1/2 , 32Mg(2.5 MeV ;2+) ⨂νp3/2 , and 32Mg(0 ;0+) ⨂νp3/2 . The experimentally obtained quantitative spectroscopic information for the valence neutron occupation of the s and p orbitals, coupled with different core states, is in agreement with Monte Carlo shell model (MCSM) calculation using 3 MeV as the shell gap at N =20 .

  9. An activated energy approach for accelerated testing of the deformation of UHMWPE in artificial joints.

    PubMed

    Galetz, Mathias Christian; Glatzel, Uwe

    2010-05-01

    The deformation behavior of ultrahigh molecular polyethylene (UHMWPE) is studied in the temperature range of 23-80 degrees C. Samples are examined in quasi-static compression, tensile and creep tests to determine the accelerated deformation of UHMWPE at elevated temperatures. The deformation mechanisms under compression load can be described by one strain rate and temperature dependent Eyring process. The activation energy and volume of that process do not change between 23 degrees C and 50 degrees C. This suggests that the deformation mechanism under compression remains stable within this temperature range. Tribological tests are conducted to transfer this activated energy approach to the deformation behavior under loading typical for artificial knee joints. While this approach does not cover the wear mechanisms close to the surface, testing at higher temperatures is shown to have a significant potential to reduce the testing time for lifetime predictions in terms of the macroscopic creep and deformation behavior of artificial joints.

  10. Insar and Finite Element Analysis of Ground Deformation at Lake Urmia Causeway (luc), Northwest Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshiri, R.; Motagh, M.; Baes, M.; Sharifi, M. A.

    2013-09-01

    Precise long-term deformation monitoring of causeways and bridges is of vital task for maintenance and management work related to transportation safety. In this study, we analyse the settlement of Lake Urmia Causeway (LUC), northwest Iran, using observations from InSAR and Finite Element Model (FEM) simulation. For InSAR processing, we analyse 58 SAR images of ENVISAT, ALOS and TerraSAR-X (TSX) using the SBAS technique to assess the settlement of embankments in the years 2003-2013. The InSAR results show deflation on both embankments with a peak velocity of > 5 cm/year in the satellite Line Of Sight (LOS) direction. The InSAR observations are then used to construct a settlement compaction model for the cross section at the distance of 4 km from the most western edge of the causeway, using a 2D Finite Element Model. Our FEM results suggest that settlement of the embankments will continue in the future due to consolidation phenomenon.

  11. Mechanics of dielectric elastomer-activated deformable transmission grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Zhou, Jinxiong; Sun, Wenjie; Wu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Ling

    2014-09-01

    Laminating a thin layer of elastomeric grating on the surface of a prestretched dielectric elastomer (DE) membrane forms a basic design of electrically tunable transmission grating. We analyze the inhomogeneous deformation of a circular multiple-region configuration. Variation of the geometric and material parameters, as well as of the critical condition determined by loss of tension instability, is probed to aid the design of a DE-based deformable grating. The predicted changes in the grating period agree substantially with the experimental results reported by Aschwanden et al (Aschwanden et al 2007 IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 19 1090).

  12. Multi-temporal interferometric monitoring of ground deformations in Haiti with COSMO/SkyMed HIMAGE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutricato, R.; Wasowski, J.; Chiaradia, M.; Piard, B. E.; Généa, S.

    2013-12-01

    The catastrophic Mw=7.0 shallow earthquake of 12 January 2010 that struck Haiti have led to numerous studies focused on the geodynamics of the region. In particular, the co-seismic fault mechanism of the 2010 Haiti earthquake as well as post-seismic deformations have been investigated through SAR interferometry (InSAR) techniques, thanks to the availability of satellite SAR sensors operating in different radar bands (ENVISAT ASAR, ALOS PALSAR, TerraSAR-X, COSMO/SkyMed). Moreover, advanced multitemporal SAR interferometry (MTI) based on COSMO/SkyMED (CSK) data is well suited for the detection and monitoring of post-seismic ground or structural instabilities. Indeed, with its short revisit time (up to 4 days) CSK allows building interferometric stacks much faster than previous satellite missions, like ERS/ENVISAT. Here we report the first outcomes of the MTI investigation based on high resolution (3 m) CSK data, conducted in the framework of a scientific collaboration between the Centre National de l'Information Géo-Spatiale (CNIGS) of Haiti and the Department of Physics (DIF) of the University of Bari, Italy. We rely on a stack of 89 CSK data (image mode: HIMAGE; polarization: HH; look side: right; pass direction: ascending; beam: H4-0A) acquired by the Italian Space Agency (ASI) over the Port-au-Prince (PaP) metropolitan and surrounding areas that were severely hit by the 2010 earthquake. CSK acquisitions span the period June 2011 ÷ February 2013, which is sufficient for detecting and monitoring significant ground instabilities. The MTI results were obtained through the application of the SPINUA processing chain, a Persistent Scatterers Interferometry (PSI)-like technique. In particular, we detected significant subsidence phenomena affecting river deltas and coastal areas of the PaP and Carrefour region. The maximum rate of subsidence movements exceed few cm/yr and this implies increasing flooding (or tsunami) hazard. Furthermore, maximum subsidence rates were

  13. Modeling crustal deformation near active faults and volcanic centers: a catalog of deformation models and modeling approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, Maurizio; ,; Peter, F.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-01-01

    This manual provides the physical and mathematical concepts for selected models used to interpret deformation measurements near active faults and volcanic centers. The emphasis is on analytical models of deformation that can be compared with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), leveling surveys, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal, and horizontal penny-shaped geometries in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. Vertical dikes and faults are described following the mathematical notation for rectangular dislocations in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. All the analytical expressions were verified against numerical models developed by use of COMSOL Multyphics, a Finite Element Analysis software (http://www.comsol.com). In this way, typographical errors present were identified and corrected. Matlab scripts are also provided to facilitate the application of these models.

  14. Sequential activation of multiple grounding pads reduces skin heating.

    PubMed

    Schutt, D J; Haemmerich, D

    2006-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) tumor ablation has become an accepted treatment modality for tumors not amenable to surgery. The need for larger ablation zones has required increase in RF generator power, with current generation devices delivering 200-250 W. Skin burns due to ground pad heating have become a common complication and are now a limiting factor for further increase in ablation zone and generator power. We performed ex vivo experiments with three ground pads (5 x 5 cm) placed on a tissue phantom. We applied 100 W of power for 12 min between the pads, and an RF electrode while we measured leading edge temperature below each pad, and temperature profile on the pads using temperature-sensitive LCD-paper. We compared conventional operation (i.e. simultaneous connection of all three pads) to sequential activation of the pads where each pad is only active for approximately 0.5 s. The timing during sequential activation was adjusted to keep leading edge temperature equal between the pads. Temperature rise below the leading edge for proximal, middle and distal ground pad was 10.7 +/- 1.04, 1.0 +/- 0.15 and 0.3 +/- 0.07 degrees C for conventional operation, and 4.8 +/- 0.16, 4.4 +/- 0.20 and 4.5 +/- 0.35 degrees C for sequentially activated operation. The maximum leading edge temperature rise was more than twice as high for conventional compared to switched operation (p<0.001). Sequential activation of multiple ground pads resulted in reduced maximum leading edge temperature, and allows control of each pad such that leading edge temperature of all pads is the same. This may reduce the incidence of ground pad burns by allowing each pad to reach same temperatures independent of location, and may allow higher power RF generators due to reduced skin heating.

  15. Integrating Multiple Space Ground Sensors to Track Volcanic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Davies, Ashley; Doubleday, Joshua; Tran, Daniel; Jones, Samuel; Kjartansson, Einar; Thorsteinsson, Hrobjartur; Vogfjord, Kristin; Guomundsson, Magnus; Thordarson, Thor; Mandl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Volcanic activity can occur with little or no warning. Increasing numbers of space borne assets can enable coordinated measurements of volcanic events to enhance both scientific study and hazard response. We describe the use of space and ground measurements to target further measurements as part of a worldwide volcano monitoring system. We utilize a number of alert systems including the MODVOLC, GOESVOLC, US Air Force Weather Advisory, and Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) alert systems. Additionally we use in-situ data from ground instrumentation at a number of volcanic sites, including Iceland.

  16. QPNM calculation for the ground state magnetic moments of odd-mass deformed nuclei: 157-167Er isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakut, H.; Guliyev, E.; Guner, M.; Tabar, E.; Zenginerler, Z.

    2012-08-01

    A new microscopic method has been developed in the framework of the Quasiparticle-Phonon Nuclear Model (QPNM) in order to investigate spin polarization effects on the magnetic properties such as magnetic moment, intrinsic magnetic moment and effective gs factor of the ground state of odd-mass 157-167Er isotopes. The calculations were performed using both Tamm-Dancoff Approximation (TDA) and Quasiparticle Random-Phase Approximation (QRPA). Reasonably good agreement has been obtained between the QRPA results and the relevant experimental data. Furthermore the variation of the intrinsic magnetic moment gK values with the mass number A exhibits similar behavior for both theoretical and experimental results. From the compression of the calculated intrinsic magnetic moment values with the experimental data the spin-spin interaction parameter has been found as χ=(30/A) MeV for odd-mass 157-167Er isotopes. Our results clarify the possibility of using this new method to describe the magnetic properties of odd-mass deformed nuclei.

  17. Thermo-mechanical evolution of the magmatic plumbing system of Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat, and resultant ground deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottsmann, Joachim; Odbert, Henry

    2014-05-01

    We exploit cyclic ground deformation timeseries from Soufrière Hills volcano expressed by ground uplift during reservoir priming and subsidence during extrusion. This study focuses on the period of eruptive repose between July 2003 and August 2005 marked by ground uplift prior to renewed dome growth thereafter. Using finite - element analysis we simulate the stress and pressure evolution in the magmatic plumbing system using a time-dependent, non-linear pressure-time history and inelastic thermo-mechanical properties of the upper crust. We compare two models of the plumbing system assembly: 1) two stacked spheroidal reservoirs and 2) a single prolate reservoir. In addition, two different crustal rheology models are tested for each of the plumbing models, with one order of magnitude difference in near-surface (<1 km) rock stiffness. Assuming reasonable values for the tensile strength of encasing rocks as proxies for reservoir excess pressure (1 to 10 MPa), we use the deformation timeseries as a reservoir barometer. We compare the amplitude of pre-eruptive pressurisation capable of explaining the observed ground displacements from the four best-fit time-dependent model designs with pressure changes deduced for purely elastic mechanical conditions. We find that assuming an elastic rheology for the upper crust beneath Montserrat requires unrealistically low rock rigidities with values on the order of 100 MPa - similar to rubber or beeswax - to fit both near and far-field deformation data. Although one might invoke such low rigidities in the immediate (heated) vicinity of an active magmatic plumbing system, they are unreasonable to assume over a large subsurface volume. Our results show that the thermal perturbation of the geotherm by the presence of a hot plumbing system is significant and fundamentally alters the portioning of subsurface stresses and strains. We further find that the thermal perturbation caused by best-fitting dual source and single source models are

  18. InSAR study on the 2011 eruption at Nyamulagira volcano, D.R.C: lava flow emplacement and post-eruption ground deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, F.; Kervyn, F.; Smets, B.; d'Oreye, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nyamulagira volcano, located in the Virunga Volcanic Province (Democratic Republic of Congo), is a very active shield volcano. During the 21th century, Nyamulagira erupted six times producing large lava flows mainly originated from the flanks of the volcano. We focus on the last eruption, which started on November 6, 2011 at a distance of c.a. 12 km NE from the summit crater, and ended in late April 2012. For the study we use 11 pairs of bi-static SAR data acquired by the Tandem-X mission between June 2011-December 2012. Pre- and post-eruption Digital Elevation Models are built from bi-static interferometry. The difference between the two surfaces provides a map of the topographic changes associated to the eruptive event. The 2011 lava flow covers an area of 20 km2 with a mean thickness of about 15 meters, which gives a total erupted volume of 300.10 m6. Such a volume suggests that the 2011 eruption is a large event in comparison with past eruptions (2004, 2006 and 2010). The average thickness is about 5 times larger than what is commonly estimated for previous eruptions. One year after lava emplacement, decorrelation still affects the zones of lava flows where the thickness is the largest. From Tandem-X differential SAR interferometry (dInSAR), syn- and post- ground deformation associated to the 2011 eruption is detected. (1) First we observe subsidence at the edge of the flow as a response of substrate due to lava loading. Point load solutions as well as more complex numerical models (FEM) for an elastic medium were initially tested. But the persistence of the subsidence signal over months suggests a viscous response of the substrate and more realistic rheology were investigated in a second time. In addition of substrate deformation, the lava flow deforms itself due to thermal contraction or mechanical compaction, as currently observed in other volcanic fields (Okmok, Etna, Kilauea). However, at that time, this type of deformation has not been observed for the

  19. Ground-based multi-view photogrammetry for the monitoring of landslide deformation and erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, André; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Allemand, Pascal; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Marc; Skupinski, Grzegorz; Delacourt, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Recent advances in multi-view photogrammetry have resulted in a new class of algorithms and software tools for more automated surface reconstruction. These new techniques have a great potential to provide topographic information for geoscience applications at significantly lower costs than classical topographic and laser scanning surveys. Based on several open-source libraries for multi-view stereo-photogrammetry and Structure-from-Motion, we investigate the accuracy that can be obtained from different processing pipelines for the 3D surface reconstruc- tion of landslides and the detection of changes over time. Two different algorithms for point-cloud comparison are tested and the accuracy of the resulting models is assessed against terrestrial and airborne LiDAR point clouds. Change detection over a period of more than two years allows a detailed assessment of the seasonal dynamics of the landslide; the possibility to estimate sediment volumes, as well as the quantification of the 3D displacement at most active parts of the landslide. Compared to LiDAR point clouds, the root-mean squared error of the photogrammetric point clouds did generally not exceed 0.2 m for the reconstruction of the entire landslide and 0.06 m for the reconstruction of the main scarp. We show that at the slope scale terrestrial multi-view photogrammetry is sufficiently accurate to detect surface changes in the range of decimeters. Thus, the technique currently remains less precise than terrestrial laser scanning or differential satellite positioning systems but provides spatially distributed information at significant lower costs and is, therefore, valuable for many practical landslide investigations. Algorithm parameters and the image acquisition protocols are found to have important impacts on the quality of the results and are discussed in detail. Our findings suggest that a relative precision of 1:500 and better is possible. The results of the change detection show a strong seasonality

  20. Ground-based multi-view photogrammetry for the monitoring of landslide deformation and erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, A.; Malet, J.-P.; Allemand, P.; Pierrot-Deseilligny, M.; Skupinski, G.

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances in multi-view photogrammetry have resulted in a new class of algorithms and software tools for more automated surface reconstruction. These new techniques have a great potential to provide topographic information for geoscience applications at significantly lower costs than classical topographic and laser scanning surveys. Based on open-source libraries for multi-view stereo-photogrammetry and Structure-from-Motion, this study investigates the accuracy that can be obtained from several processing pipelines for the 3D surface reconstruction of landslides and the detection of changes over time. Two different algorithms for point-cloud comparison are tested and the accuracy of the resulting models is assessed against terrestrial and airborne LiDAR point clouds. Change detection over a period of more than two years allows a detailed assessment of the seasonal dynamics of the landslide; the possibility to estimate sediment volumes and 3D displacement are illustrated for the most active parts of the landslide. Algorithm parameters and the image acquisition protocols are found to have important impacts on the quality of the results and are discussed in detail.

  1. Observations and models of ground deformation from the PLUTONS Project: Lazufre and Uturuncu, Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S. T.; Pritchard, M. E.; Elliott, J.; Del Potro, R.; Delgado, F.

    2014-12-01

    The Central Andes Volcanic Zone (CVZ, 14°-28°S) is one of three distinct arc segments the Nazca-South America subduction system. In comparison to the Northern and Southern segments, the CVZ contains approximately 40% of volcanoes active during the Holocene, but less than 20% of documented eruptions. It is therefore surprising that synoptic geodetic observations since 1992 have so far revealed half of the 20 known uplifting volcanoes in the Andes are in the CVZ. Furthermore, an especially high concentration of Miocene ignimbrite deposits (> 10,000 km^3) suggests that in the past large volumes of eruptible magma traversed the crust in this region. We utilize geodetic modeling to address the following questions: What are physically plausible depths, geometries, volumes, and transport mechanisms of intrusions? What are the conditions for plutonism versus volcanism in the CVZ? Our modeling efforts are focused on two of the spatially largest (>2,000 km^2) volcanic uplift events observed globally (Lazufre and Uturuncu). We present a synthesis of InSAR, continuous GPS, and campaign GPS (collected from a small network of sites around Lazurfre in Nov. 2011 and March 2014). New InSAR processing of Envisat ScanSAR (09/2003 - 11/2009), ALOS (02/2007 - 02/2011), and TSX (04/2008 - 07/2014) confirm continued Lazufre uplift rates of approximately 3 cm/yr. Neither TSX data (06/2012 - 07/2014), nor two continuous GPS sites on and around Uturuncu show evidence of continued 1 cm/yr vertical motion since the sites were installed in April 2010. Analytic elastic models of uplift suggest intrusions accumulate in reservoirs in the mid-to-upper crust at both volcanic centers. However, peripheral subsidence at Uturuncu and observations of an extensive low velocity zone motivate the exploration of alternative realistic models that consider the influence of a feeder reservoir in the lower crust and heterogeneous crustal structure. The dual-reservoir model provides a first-order estimate of

  2. Deformation of partially pumped active mirrors for high average-power diode-pumped solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Albach, Daniel; LeTouzé, Geoffroy; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe

    2011-04-25

    We discuss the deformation of a partially pumped active mirror amplifier as a free standing disk, as implemented in several laser systems. We rely on the Lucia laser project to experimentally evaluate the analytical and numerical deformation models.

  3. Cloud-to-ground lightning activity in mesoscale convective complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.; Macgorman, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of the evolution of cloud-to-ground lightning discharges attending convective storms in mesoscale convective systems was conducted in the framework of the mesoscale convective complexes (MCCs) life cycle. The lightning discharge data were acquired by a commercially available lightning detection and location system. Peak rates averaged 42/min for the MCCs analyzed; these rates are comparable to the highest observed rates within other mesoscale storm systems and are greater than 20 times the rates previously observed in isolated thunderstorms. Lightning damage occurs with half of the MCCs and is most frequent between the development and the mature phases of the MCC life cycle. The most active period is also characterized by the greatest average number of discrete strokes and largest fraction of multiple-stroke discharges. The total cloud-to-ground lightning activity and maximum flashing rate do not appear to be directly related to either the size of the cloud shield or total duration of the MCC.

  4. Preliminary atlas of active shallow tectonic deformation in the Puget Lowland, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, Elizabeth A.; Haugerud, Ralph A.; Sherrod, Brian L.; Weaver, Craig S.; Pratt, Thomas L.; Blakely, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    This atlas presents an up-to-date map compilation of the geological and geophysical observations that underpin interpretations of active, surface-deforming faults in the Puget Lowland, Washington. Shallow lowland faults are mapped where observations of deformation from paleoseismic, seismic-reflection, and potential-field investigations converge. Together, results from these studies strengthen the identification and characterization of regional faults and show that as many as a dozen shallow faults have been active during the Holocene. The suite of maps presented in our atlas identifies sites that have evidence of deformation attributed to these shallow faults. For example, the paleoseismic-investigations map shows where coseismic surface rupture and deformation produced geomorphic scarps and deformed shorelines. Other maps compile results of seismic-reflection and potential-field studies that demonstrate evidence of deformation along suspected fault structures in the subsurface. Summary maps show the fault traces derived from, and draped over, the datasets presented in the preceding maps. Overall, the atlas provides map users with a visual overview of the observations and interpretations that support the existence of active, shallow faults beneath the densely populated Puget Lowland.

  5. PMCA activity and membrane tubulin affect deformability of erythrocytes from normal and hypertensive human subjects.

    PubMed

    Monesterolo, Noelia E; Nigra, Ayelen D; Campetelli, Alexis N; Santander, Verónica S; Rivelli, Juan F; Arce, Carlos A; Casale, Cesar H

    2015-11-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated formation of a complex between acetylated tubulin and brain plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA), and the effect of the lipid environment on structure of this complex and on PMCA activity. Deformability of erythrocytes from hypertensive human subjects was reduced by an increase in membrane tubulin content. In the present study, we examined the regulation of PMCA activity by tubulin in normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes, and the effect of exogenously added diacylglycerol (DAG) and phosphatidic acid (PA) on erythrocyte deformability. Some of the key findings were that: (i) PMCA was associated with tubulin in normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes, (ii) PMCA enzyme activity was directly correlated with erythrocyte deformability, and (iii) when tubulin was present in the erythrocyte membrane, treatment with DAG or PA led to increased deformability and associated PMCA activity. Taken together, our findings indicate that PMCA activity is involved in deformability of both normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes. This rheological property of erythrocytes is affected by acetylated tubulin and its lipid environment because both regulate PMCA activity.

  6. a case of casing deformation and fault slip for the active fault drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, H.; Song, L.; Yuan, S.; Yang, W.

    2010-12-01

    Active fault is normally defined as a fault with displacement or seismic activity during the geologically recent period (in the last 10,000 years, USGS). Here, we refer the active fault to the fault that is under the post-seismic stress modification or recovery. Micro-seismic, fault slip would happen during the recovery of the active faults. It is possible that the drilling through this active fault, such as the Wenchuan Fault Scientific Drilling(WFSD), will be accompanied with some possible wellbore instability and casing deformation, which is noteworthy for the fault scientific drilling. This presentation gives a field case of the Wenchuan earthquake. The great Wenchuan earthquake happened on May 12, 2008. An oilfield is 400km apart from the epicenter and 260km from the main fault. Many wells were drilled or are under drilling. Some are drilled through the active fault and a few tectonic active phenomenons were observed. For instance, a drill pipe was cut off in the well which was just drilled through the fault. We concluded that this is due to the fault slip,if not, so thick wall pipe cannot be cut off. At the same time, a mass of well casings of the oilfield deformed during the great Wenchuan Earthquake. The analysis of the casing deformation characteristic, formation structure, seismicity, tectonic stress variation suggest that the casing deformation is closely related to the Wenchuan Earthquake. It is the tectonic stress variation that induces seismic activities, fault slip, salt/gypsum creep speedup, and deformation inconsistent between stratums. Additional earthquake dynamic loads were exerted on the casing and caused its deformation. Active fault scientific drilling has become an important tool to understand earthquake mechanism and physics. The casing deformation and wellbore instability is not only a consequence of the earthquake but also an indicator of stress modification and fault activity. It is noteworthy that tectonic stress variation and fault

  7. The role of mechanical heterogeneities in evaporite sequence during deformation initiated by basement fault activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamuszek, Marta; Dabrowski, Marcin; Burliga, Stanisław

    2016-04-01

    Kłodawa Salt Structure (KSS) situated in the centre of the Polish Zechstein Basin started to rise above a basement fault in the Early Triassic. Geological studies of the KSS revealed significant differences in the deformation patterns between the PZ1-PZ2 (intensely deformed) and PZ3-PZ4 (less deformed) cycle evaporites. These two older and two younger cycle evaporite complexes are separated by the thick Main Anhydrite (A3) bed. We use numerical simulations to assess the impact of a thick anhydrite bed on intrasalt deformation. In our models, the overburden consists of clastic sediments. A normal fault located in the rigid basement beneath the salt is activated due to model extension. At the same time, the sedimentation process takes place. The evaporites consist of a salt bed intercalated with a thick anhydrite layer of varying position and geometry. To understand the role of anhydrite layer, we run comparative simulations, in which no anhydrite layer is present. In the study, we use our own numerical codes implemented in MATLAB combined with the MILAMIN and MUTILS numerical packages. Our investigations revealed a significant influence of the anhydrite on deformation style in the evaporate series. The supra-anhydrite domain is characterized by weaker deformation and lower rates of salt flow in comparison to the sub-anhydrite domain. The highest contrast in the rate of salt flow between the two domains is observed in the case of the anhydrite layer situated close to the bottom of the salt complex. The thick anhydrite layer additionally diminishes the deformation rate in the supra-anhydrite domain and can lead to detachment of the basement deformation from its overlay. Our numerical simulations showed that the presence of the A3 Main Anhydrite bed could be the dominant factor responsible for the decoupling of deformation in the KSS salt complex.

  8. Closure Plan for Active Low Level Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    2000-11-16

    This plan has been prepared in response to direction from the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of the plan is to define approaches that will be implemented to ensure protection of the public and the environment when active Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBGs) at the Hanford Site are closed. Performance assessments for active burial grounds in the 200 East and West 200 Areas provide current estimates of potential environmental contamination and doses to the ''maximum exposed individual'' from burial ground operation and closure and compare dose estimates to performance objective dose limits for the facilities. This is an Operational Closure Plan. The intent of the guidance in DOE Order 435.1 is that this plan will be a living document, like the facility performance assessments, and will be revised periodically through the operational life of the LLBGs to reflect updated information on waste inventory. management practices, facility transition planning, schedule dates, assessments of post-closure performance, and environmental consequences. Out year dates identified in this plan are tentative. A Final Closure Plan will be prepared in the future when the timing and extent of closure-related activities for LLBGs can be established with greater certainty. After current operations at the LLBGs are concluded, this plan proposes transitioning of these facilities to the Environmental Restoration Program. This action will enable the Environmental Restoration Program to design and implement consistent and coordinated final remedial actions for active and inactive LLBGs. Active and inactive burial grounds in the 200 West and 200 East Areas are commingled. This plan describes approaches that will be implemented during Interim Closure, Final Closure, and Institutional Control Periods to prepare LLBGs for surface barriers, and the construction of barriers, as well as the scope of inspection, monitoring and maintenance practices that will be performed during and after closure

  9. The secret life of ground squirrels: accelerometry reveals sex-dependent plasticity in above-ground activity.

    PubMed

    Williams, Cory T; Wilsterman, Kathryn; Zhang, Victor; Moore, Jeanette; Barnes, Brian M; Buck, C Loren

    2016-09-01

    The sexes differ in how and when they allocate energy towards reproduction, but how this influences phenotypic plasticity in daily activity patterns is unclear. Here, we use collar-mounted light loggers and triaxial accelerometers to examine factors that affect time spent above ground and overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA), an index of activity-specific energy expenditure, across the active season of free-living, semi-fossorial arctic ground squirrels (Urocitellus parryii). We found high day-to-day variability in time spent above ground and ODBA with most of the variance explained by environmental conditions known to affect thermal exchange. In both years, females spent more time below ground compared with males during parturition and early lactation; however, this difference was fourfold larger in the second year, possibly, because females were in better body condition. Daily ODBA positively correlated with time spent above ground in both sexes, but females were more active per unit time above ground. Consequently, daily ODBA did not differ between the sexes when females were early in lactation, even though females were above ground three to six fewer hours each day. Further, on top of having the additional burden of milk production, ODBA data indicate females also had fragmented rest patterns and were more active during late lactation. Our results indicate that sex differences in reproductive requirements can have a substantial influence on activity patterns, but the size of this effect may be dependent on capital resources accrued during gestation.

  10. The secret life of ground squirrels: accelerometry reveals sex-dependent plasticity in above-ground activity

    PubMed Central

    Wilsterman, Kathryn; Zhang, Victor; Moore, Jeanette; Barnes, Brian M.; Buck, C. Loren

    2016-01-01

    The sexes differ in how and when they allocate energy towards reproduction, but how this influences phenotypic plasticity in daily activity patterns is unclear. Here, we use collar-mounted light loggers and triaxial accelerometers to examine factors that affect time spent above ground and overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA), an index of activity-specific energy expenditure, across the active season of free-living, semi-fossorial arctic ground squirrels (Urocitellus parryii). We found high day-to-day variability in time spent above ground and ODBA with most of the variance explained by environmental conditions known to affect thermal exchange. In both years, females spent more time below ground compared with males during parturition and early lactation; however, this difference was fourfold larger in the second year, possibly, because females were in better body condition. Daily ODBA positively correlated with time spent above ground in both sexes, but females were more active per unit time above ground. Consequently, daily ODBA did not differ between the sexes when females were early in lactation, even though females were above ground three to six fewer hours each day. Further, on top of having the additional burden of milk production, ODBA data indicate females also had fragmented rest patterns and were more active during late lactation. Our results indicate that sex differences in reproductive requirements can have a substantial influence on activity patterns, but the size of this effect may be dependent on capital resources accrued during gestation. PMID:27703706

  11. Detection and Analysis of Deep Seated Gravitational Slope Deformation and Relations with the Active Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, M.; Saroli, M.; Lancia, M.; Albano, M.; Lo Sardo, L.; Stramondo, S.

    2015-12-01

    Modern geomorphological investigations focused on the definition of major factors conditioning the landscape evolution. The interaction of some of these factors as the litho-structural setting, the local relief, the tectonic activity, the climatic conditions and the seismicity plays a key-role in determining large scale slope instability phenomena which display the general morphological features of deep seated gravitational deformations (DSGD). The present work aims to detect the large scale gravitational deformation and relations with the active tectonics affecting the Abruzzo Region and to provide a description of the morphologic features of the deformations by means of aerial photograph interpretation, geological/geomorphological field surveys and DInSAR data. The investigated areas are morphologically characterized by significant elevation changes due to the presence of high mountain peaks, separated from surrounding depressed areas by steep escarpments, frequently represented by active faults. Consequently, relief energy favours the development of gravity-driven deformations. These deformations seem to be superimposed on and influenced by the inherited structural and tectonic pattern, related to the sin- and post-thrusting evolution. The morphological evidences of these phenomena, are represented by landslides, sackungen or rock-flows, lateral spreads and block slides. DInSAR analysis measured deformation of the large scale gravitative phenomena previously identified through aerial-photo analysis. DSGD may evolve in rapid, catastrophic mass movements and this paroxistic evolution of the deformations may be triggered by high magnitude seismic events. These assumptions point out the great importance of mapping in detail large scale slope instability phenomena in relation to the active faults, in a perspective of land-use planning such as the Abruzzo Region characterized by a high magnitude historical seismicity.

  12. 2D and 3D Ground Penetrating Radar monitoring of a reinforced concrete asphalt plate affected by mechanical deformation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavusi, M.; Dumoulin, J.; Loperte, A.; Rizzo, E.; Soldovieri, F.

    2012-04-01

    The main facility of Hydrogeosite Laboratory of the Italian National Research Council (Marsico Nuovo, CNR) is a 3m x 7m x 10m reinforced concrete pool filled by siliceous sand designed for hydrologic experiments. One of its peculiarities is the possibility to vary the water table depth by using a proper hydraulic system [1]. In the framework of the FP7 ISTIMES project (Integrated System for Transport Infrastructure surveillance and Monitoring by Electromagnetic Sensing), a 3m x 3m layered structure has been purposely built and placed in the pool of the Hydrogeosite Laboratory with the aim to carry out a long term monitoring, by using jointly several electromagnetic sensing technologies, during two different phases simulating the rising of the water table and a mechanical solicitation. Several layers composed the structure from the top to the bottom, such as: 5 cm of asphalt; 5-10 cm of reinforced concrete; 20-25 cm of conglomerate, 55 cm of sand. Moreover, in the sand layer, three (metallic and plastic) pipes of different size were buried to simulate utilities. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) surveys were performed by using a the GSSI SIR 3000 system equipped with 400 MHz and 1500 MHz central frequency antennas. Surveys carried out by means of 400 MHz antenna allowed to detect and localize the three pipes (one in plastic and two in metal) and to investigate the effects of the sand water content on their radar signature. Surveys carried out by using 1500 MHz antenna were focused to characterize the shallower layers of the structure. The Hydrogeosite experiment consisted in following stages: • Arising of a water table by infiltration from the bottom; • Water gravity infiltration condescendingly; • Infiltration by peristaltic pump in the very shallow layers of the structure; • Water table drawdown; • Mechanical structure deformation; • Asphalt plate restoration after mechanical solicitation. After each stage a series of GPR surveys was performed. Moreover

  13. Ground deformation associated with the precursory unrest and early phases of the January 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cervelli, P.F.; Fournier, T.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Power, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    On January 11, 2006 Augustine Volcano erupted after nearly 20 years of quiescence. Global Positioning System (GPS) instrumentation at Augustine, consisting of six continuously recording, telemetered receivers, measured clear precursory deformation consistent with a source of inflation or pressurization beneath the volcano's summit at a depth of around sea level. Deformation began in early summer 2005, and was preceded by a subtle, but distinct, increase in seismicity, which began in May 2005. After remaining more or less constant, deformation rates accelerated on at least three stations beginning in late November 2005. After this date, GPS data suggest the upward propagation of a small dike into the edifice, which, based on the style of deformation and high levels of gas emission, appears to have ascended to shallow levels by mid-December 2005, about four weeks before the eruption began.

  14. Ground Deformation Monitoring in Cultural Heritage Areas by TimeSeries SAR Interferometry: the Case of Ancient Olympia Site (Western Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parcharidis, Is.; Foumelis, M.; Pavlopoulos, K.; Kourkouli, P.

    2010-03-01

    Ancient Olympia is a unique archaeological site located in Ilia Prefecture (Western Greece), the broader area, characterized by various types of natural hazards, which could act as potential source of ground deformation. The archeological site was built on the flood plains of the Alpheios and Kladeos rivers. The hills around the site are made of Late Pliocene loose sediments of sands, silts, clays and conglomerates, where along their lower slopes numerous small landslides occur. The present study concerns the application of time series interferometric analysis, in order to detect ground deformation in the broader area Ancient Olympia and specifically its archeological site. Deformation monitoring was focused on buildings of special interest like the Temple of Zeus, the Prytaneion, the Leonideum and the Academy of Olympic Games. The observed subsidence for the majority of point targets in the vicinity of Olympia show rates between 1.0-1.5 mm/yr. Special efforts was given on the identification in the field of the detected point targets inside the archaeological site, taking into consideration the location and the geometry of the ruins.

  15. Crustal deformation at very long baseline interferometry sites due to seasonal air-mass and ground water variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolz, A.; Larden, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    The seasonal deformation normal to the Earth's surface was calculated at stations involved or interested in very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) geodesy and at hypothetical sites in Australia and Brazil using global atmospheric pressure data, values for groundwater storage, and load Love numbers deduced from current Earth models. It was found that the annual range of deformation approached the centimeter level measuring potential of the VLBI technqiue at Greenbank, Haystack, and the Brazil site.

  16. Cyclic mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast proliferation and autocrine growth factor activity.

    PubMed

    Bishop, J E; Mitchell, J J; Absher, P M; Baldor, L; Geller, H A; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Hamblin, M J; Vacek, P; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    Cellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia and increased extracellular matrix deposition are features of tissue hypertrophy resulting from increased work load. It is known, for example, that mechanical forces play a critical role in lung development, cardiovascular remodeling following pressure overload, and skeletal muscle growth. The mechanisms involved in these processes, however, remain unclear. Here we examined the effect of mechanical deformation on fibroblast function in vitro. IMR-90 human fetal lung fibroblasts grown on collagen-coated silastic membranes were subjected to cyclical mechanical deformation (10% increase in culture surface area; 1 Hz) for up to 5 days. Cell number was increased by 39% after 2 days of deformation (1.43 +/- .01 x 10(5) cells/membrane compared with control, 1.03 +/- 0.02 x 10(5) cells; mean +/- SEM; P < 0.02) increasing to 163% above control by 4 days (2.16 +/- 0.16 x 10(5) cells compared with 0.82 +/- 0.03 x 10(5) cells; P < 0.001). The medium from mechanically deformed cells was mitogenic for IMR-90 cells, with maximal activity in the medium from cells mechanically deformed for 2 days (stimulating cell replication by 35% compared with media control; P < 0.002). These data suggest that mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast replication and that this effect is mediated by the release of autocrine growth factors.

  17. Dynamic deformation measurement and analysis of active stressed lap using optical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qican; Su, Xianyu; Liu, Yuankun; Xiang, Liqun

    2007-12-01

    The active stressed lap is the heart of polishing process. A novel non-contact optical method of dynamic deformation measurement and analysis of an active stressed lap is put forward. This method, based on structured illumination, is able to record full-field information of the bending and rotating stressed lap dynamically and continuously, while its profile is changed under computer control, and restore the whole process of lap deformation varied with time at different position and rotating angle. It has been verified by experiments that this proposed method will be helpful to the opticians to ensure the stressed lap as expected.

  18. Ground surface deformation patterns, magma supply, and magma storage at Okmok volcano, Alaska, from InSAR analysis: 1. Intereruption deformation, 1997–2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Dzurisin, Daniel; Biggs, Juliet; Wicks, Charles; McNutt, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Starting soon after the 1997 eruption at Okmok volcano and continuing until the start of the 2008 eruption, magma accumulated in a storage zone centered ~3.5 km beneath the caldera floor at a rate that varied with time. A Mogi-type point pressure source or finite sphere with a radius of 1 km provides an adequate fit to the deformation field portrayed in time-sequential interferometric synthetic aperture radar images. From the end of the 1997 eruption through summer 2004, magma storage increased by 3.2–4.5 × 107 m3, which corresponds to 75–85% of the magma volume erupted in 1997. Thereafter, the average magma supply rate decreased such that by 10 July 2008, 2 days before the start of the 2008 eruption, magma storage had increased by 3.7–5.2 × 107 m3 or 85–100% of the 1997 eruption volume. We propose that the supply rate decreased in response to the diminishing pressure gradient between the shallow storage zone and a deeper magma source region. Eventually the effects of continuing magma supply and vesiculation of stored magma caused a critical pressure threshold to be exceeded, triggering the 2008 eruption. A similar pattern of initially rapid inflation followed by oscillatory but generally slowing inflation was observed prior to the 1997 eruption. In both cases, withdrawal of magma during the eruptions depressurized the shallow storage zone, causing significant volcano-wide subsidence and initiating a new intereruption deformation cycle.

  19. Observing active deformation of volcanoes in North America: Geodetic data from the Plate Boundary Observatory and associated networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskas, C. M.; Phillips, D. A.; Mattioli, G. S.; Meertens, C. M.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Enders, M.; Feaux, K.; Mencin, D.; Baker, S.; Lisowski, M.; Smith, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), operated by UNAVCO, records deformation of the geologically diverse North America western plate boundary, with subnetworks of instruments concentrated at selected active and potentially active volcanoes. These sensors record deformation and earthquakes and allow monitoring agencies and researchers to analyze changes in ground motion and seismicity. The intraplate volcanoes at Yellowstone and Long Valley are characterized by uplift/subsidence cycles, high seismicity, and hydrothermal activity but there have been no historic eruptions at either volcano. PBO maintains dense GPS networks of 20-25 stations at each of these volcanoes, with an additional 5 boreholes at Yellowstone containing tensor strainmeters, short-period seismometers, and borehole tiltmeters. Subduction zone volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc have had multiple historic eruptions, and PBO maintains equipment at Augustine (8 GPS), Akutan (8 GPS, 4 tiltmeters), and Unimak Island (14 GPS, 8 tiltmeters). The Unimak stations are at the active Westdahl and Shishaldin edifices and the nearby, inactive Isanotski volcano. In the Cascade Arc, PBO maintains networks at Mount St. Helens (15 GPS, 4 borehole strainmeters and seismometers, 8 borehole tiltmeters), Shasta (7 GPS, 1 borehole strainmeter and seismometer), and Lassen Peak (8 GPS). Data from many of these stations in the Pacific Northwest and California are also provided as realtime streams of raw and processed data. Real-time GPS data, along with high-rate GPS data, will be an important new resource for detecting and studying future rapid volcanic deformation events and earthquakes. UNAVCO works closely with the USGS Volcano Hazards Program, archiving data from USGS GPS stations in Alaska, Cascadia, and Long Valley. The PBO and USGS networks combined provide more comprehensive coverage than PBO alone, particularly of the Cascade Arc, where the USGS maintains a multiple instruments near each volcano. Ground

  20. Railway deformation detected by DInSAR over active sinkholes in the Ebro Valley evaporite karst, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galve, J. P.; Castañeda, C.; Gutiérrez, F.

    2015-06-01

    Previously not measured subsidence on railway tracks was detected using DInSAR displacement maps produced for the central sector of Ebro Valley (NE Spain). This area is affected by evaporite karst and the analyzed railway corridors traverse active sinkholes that produce deformations in these infrastructures. One of the railway tracks affected by slight settlements corresponds to the Madrid-Barcelona high-speed line, a transport infrastructure highly vulnerable to ground deformation processes. Our analysis based on DInSAR measurements and geomorphological surveys indicate that this line show dissolution-induced subsidence and compaction of anthropogenic deposits (infills and embankments). By using DInSAR techniques, it was also measured the significant subsidence related to the activity of sinkholes in the Castejón-Zaragoza conventional railway line. Thus, this study demonstrate that DInSAR velocity maps coupled with detailed geomorphological surveys may help in the identification of the sectors of railway tracks that may compromise the safety of travellers.

  1. Cold Season Ground Validation Activities in support of GPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudak, D. R.; Petersen, W. A.

    2012-12-01

    A fundamental component of the next-generation global precipitation data products that will be addressed by the GPM mission is the hydrologic cycle at higher latitudes. In this respect, falling snow represents a primary contribution to regional atmospheric and terrestrial water budgets. The current study provides provide information on the precipitation microphysics and processes associated with cold season precipitation and precipitating cloud systems across multiple scales. It also addresses the ability of in-situ ground-based sensors as well as multi-frequency active and passive microwave sensors to detect and estimate falling snow, and more generally to contribute to our knowledge and understanding of the complete global water cycle. The work supports the incorporation of appropriate physics into GPM snowfall retrieval algorithms and the development of improved ground validation techniques for GPM product evaluation. Important information for developing GPM falling snow retrieval algorithms will be provided by a field campaign that took place in the winter of 2011/12 in the Great Lakes area of North America, termed the GPM Cold Season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx). GCPEx represented a collaboration among the NASA, Environment Canada (EC), the Canadian Space Agency and several US, Canadian and European universities. The data collection strategy for GCPEx was coordinated, stacked high-altitude and in-situ cloud aircraft missions sampling within a broader network of ground-based volumetric observations and measurements. The NASA DSC-8 research aircraft provided a platform for the downward-viewing dual-frequency radar and multi-frequency radiometer observations. The University of North Dakota Citation and the Canadian NRC Convair-580 aircraft provided in-situ profiles of cloud and precipitation microphysics using a suite of optical array probes and bulk measurement instrumentation. Ground sampling was focused about a densely-instrumented central location that is

  2. Some contributions to the high strain rate deformation of solids and the thermally activated deformation of wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, W. George

    2009-08-01

    The behaviour of metals as a function of rate of loading, strain rate, and temperature is discussed in terms of previous work by the author. Strain rates range from 10-3 s-1, obtained in a standard tensile testing machine, to 102 s-1 obtained in a hydraulic piston driven machine and up to 104 s-1, very high strain rates with a Kolsky split Hopkinson bar using shear type loading. At rates less 103 s-1 the strength is a function of strain rate and temperature, is thermally activated and governed by the stress-assisted thermal activation of dislocations across short-range barriers in the crystal. At very high strain rates however the behaviour is controlled by interaction of dislocations with either phonons or electrons, giving a strength proportional to strain rate. The compressive strength of small clear samples of wood, Pinus radiata and Kahikatea, determined over the strain rate range 10-3 s-1 to 103 s-1 as a function of strain rate, temperature and moisture content shows the behaviour to again be thermally activated with the strength a function of stain rate, temperature and moisture content. A rate theory of deformation is developed where the yield behaviour of wood is assumed to result from the stress-assisted thermally activated motion of elementary fibrils over short-range barriers. The moisture is assumed to affect the bond energy between elementary fibrils and the barrier energy is taken to be a linear decreasing function of increasing moisture content and the moisture to act like a plasticiser in separating the elementary fibrils. The theory more than adequately explains the observed behaviour.

  3. Activity of platelet hemostasis in children with spinal deformities.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, I N; Lapshina, E V; Zavalishina, S Yu

    2010-10-01

    An increase of adhesion and aggregation functions of platelets in vivo and in vitro was detected in 5-6-year-old children with scoliosis. These disorders were caused by hyperproduction of von Willebrand's factor in the vascular wall and intensification of thromboxane production in blood platelets. Activation of thromboxane formation is the main cause of platelet hyperactivity in children with scoliosis. Correction of platelet hemostasis may include pathogenetically substantiated complex of therapeutic exercises, swimming, and massage.

  4. A deformable lung tumor tracking method in fluoroscopic video using active shape models: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qianyi; Hamilton, Russell J; Schowengerdt, Robert A; Jiang, Steve B

    2007-09-07

    A dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) can be used to track a moving target during radiotherapy. One of the major benefits for DMLC tumor tracking is that, in addition to the compensation for tumor translational motion, DMLC can also change the aperture shape to conform to a deforming tumor projection in the beam's eye view. This paper presents a method that can track a deforming lung tumor in fluoroscopic video using active shape models (ASM) (Cootes et al 1995 Comput. Vis. Image Underst. 61 38-59). The method was evaluated by comparing tracking results against tumor projection contours manually edited by an expert observer. The evaluation shows the feasibility of using this method for precise tracking of lung tumors with deformation, which is important for DMLC-based real-time tumor tracking.

  5. Active range of motion outcomes after reconstruction of burned wrist and hand deformities.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Ahmed M; Mahboub, Tarek A; Ibrahim Fouad, Amr; Azari, Kodi; Khalil, Haitham H; McCarthy, James E

    2016-06-01

    This works aim is to evaluate the efficacy of skin grafts and flaps in reconstruction of post-burn hand and wrist deformities. A prospective study of 57 burn contractures of the wrist and dorsum of the hand was performed. Flaps were used only if there was a non-vascularized structure after contracture release, otherwise a skin graft was used. Active range of motion (ROM) was used to assess hand function. The extension deformity cohort uniformly underwent skin graft following contracture release with a mean improvement of 71 degrees (p<0.0001). The flexion deformity cohort was treated with either skin grafts (8 patients) or flaps (9 patients) with a mean improvement of 44 degrees (p<0.0001). Skin grafts suffice for dorsal hand contractures to restore functional wrist ROM. For flexion contractures, flaps were more likely for contractures >6 months. Early release of burn contracture is advisable to avoid deep structure contracture.

  6. Dense seismic networks as a tool to characterize active faulting in regions of slow deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custódio, Susana; Arroucau, Pierre; Carrilho, Fernando; Cesca, Simone; Dias, Nuno; Matos, Catarina; Vales, Dina

    2016-04-01

    The theory of plate tectonics states that the relative motion between lithospheric plates is accommodated at plate boundaries, where earthquakes occur on long faults. However, earthquakes with a wide range of magnitudes also occur both off plate boundaries, in intra-plate settings, and along discontinuous, diffuse plate boundaries. These settings are characterized by low rates of lithospheric deformation. A fundamental limitation in the study of slowly deforming regions is the lack of high-quality observations. In these regions, earthquake catalogs have traditionally displayed diffuse seismicity patterns. The location, geometry and activity rate of faults - all basic parameters for understanding fault dynamics - are usually poorly known. The dense seismic networks deployed in the last years around the world have opened new windows in observational seismology. Although high-magnitude earthquakes are rare in regions of slow deformation, low-magnitude earthquakes are well observable on the time-scale of these deployments. In this presentation, we will show how data from dense seismic deployments can be used to characterize faulting in regions of slow deformation. In particular, we will present the case study of western Iberia, a region undergoing low-rate deformation and which has generated some of the largest earthquakes in Europe, both intraplate (mainland) and interplate (offshore). The methods that we employ include automated earthquake detection methods to lower the completeness magnitude of catalogs, earthquake relocations, focal mechanisms patterns, waveform similarity and clustering analysis.

  7. Deformation of the Calabrian Arc subduction complex and its relation to STEP activity at depth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonia, Alina; Wortel, Rinus; Nijholt, Nicolai; Govers, Rob; Torelli, Luigi

    2015-04-01

    Propagating tear faults at the edge of subducted slabs ("Subduction transform edge propagator", STEP) are an intrinsic part of lithospheric plate dynamics. The surface expression of a STEP is generally not known yet, and is expected to vary significantly from one region to the other. We choose the Sicily -Calabria-Ionian Sea region, of which the lithosphere-upper mantle structure has the characteristics of a STEP zone, as a study area. The area has a very prominent accretionary wedge, the formation and subsequent deformation of which presumably were affected by the STEP activity at depth. In this contribution, we use seismic data on the near surface structure and deformation in combination with numerical model results to investigate the relation between deep STEP activity and near surface expression. Prominent features in the surface tectonics are the Malta escarpment (with predominantly normal faulting), the newly identified Ionian Fault and Alfeo-Etna fault system, and a distinct longitudinal division of the wedge into a western and an eastern lobe (Polonia et al., Tectonics, 2011). The two lobes are characterized by different structural style, deformation rates and basal detachment depths. Numerical model results indicate that the regional lithospheric structure, such as the orientation of the eastern passive (albeit subsequently activated) margin of Sicily relative to the Calabrian subduction zone, has a profound effect on possible fault activity along the Malta escarpment. Fault activity along the above primary fault structures may have varied in time, implying the possibility of intermittent activity. Interpreting seismicity in the context of a possible STEP, and the accompanying deformation zone at or near the surface, is not (yet) straightforward. Although direct evidence for recognizing all aspects of STEP activity is - as usual - lacking, a comparison with two well-known STEP regions, the northern part of the Tonga subduction zone and southern part of the

  8. Active crustal deformation in the Jalisco block, Mexico: evidence for a great historical earthquake in the 16th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Gerardo; García-Acosta, Virginia; Gaulon, Roland

    1994-06-01

    On December 27th, 1568, a large earthquake occurred to the southwest of Guadalajara, Mexico, near the northeastern corner of the Jalisco block, in an area where no great earthquakes have been reported before. It caused heavy damage in the region where the Colima and Tepic-Zacoalco grabens intersect. Many churches, houses and convents in the neighboring towns collapsed and severe deformation of the ground was observed in the area. Landslides apparently dammed the Ameca River for several days and the opening of large cracks was reported in the lowlands. The flow of natural springs and the level of Lake Zacoalco changed dramatically after the earthquake. All of these reports strongly suggest that a local fault was the source of this large and destructive earthquake. Based on the intensity data inferred from the historical reports, the 1568 event is perhaps the largest earthquake to date in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Compared to other well documented, large earthquakes that occurred in the volcanic belt in 1875, 1912 and 1920, the magnitude appears to be greater than 7.0 ( MW). The Jalisco block is presumed to be rifting away from the North American plate. The Colima and Tepic-Zacoalco grabens, which bound the Jalisco block to the east and north, respectively, are apparently the boundaries where rifting is taking place in a complex and highly faulted environment. Based on the data available, it is impossible to identify the specific fault ruptured during the earthquake unequivocally. However, the occurrence of this large event in 1568 confirms that active deformation is still taking place in the Jalisco block. The apparently long recurrence times of these large events suggest that tectonic deformation is slow.

  9. Chemopreventive activity of sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) from yacon against TPA-induced Raji cells deformation.

    PubMed

    Siriwan, D; Miyawaki, C; Miyamoto, T; Naruse, T; Okazaki, K; Tamura, H

    2011-05-15

    Yacon is a medicinal plant used as a traditional medicine by the natives in South America. In Japan, it becomes popular as a health food. Sesquiterpene Lactones (SLs) from yacon leaves were investigated and the active SLs such as enhydrin, uvedalin and sonchifolin, bearing alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone and epoxides as the active functional groups, were identified by 1H-6000 MHz-NMR. Chemopreventive and cytotoxic activities were determined using different primary screening methods. In this study, all tested SLs strongly inhibited TPA-induced deformed of Raji cells. The IC50 values of yacon SLs from anti-deforming assay were 0.04-0.4 microM. Interestingly, yacon SLs showed more potential of chemo preventive activity than both curcumin and parthenolide. However, the cytotoxicity on Raji cells was observed at high concentration of yacon SLs. The degree of anti-deformation was ranked in order: enhydrin >uvedalin >sonchifolin >parthenolide >curcumin. As according to structure-activity relationship, the high activities of enhydrin, uvedalin and sonchifolin may be due to the 2-methyl-2-butenoate and its epoxide moiety.

  10. NASA SPoRT GOES-R Proving Ground Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Fuell, Kevin K.; Jedloec, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program is a partner with the GOES-R Proving Ground (PG) helping prepare forecasters understand the unique products to come from the GOES-R instrument suite. SPoRT is working collaboratively with other members of the GOES-R PG team and Algorithm Working Group (AWG) scientists to develop and disseminate a suite of proxy products that address specific forecast problems for the WFOs, Regional and National Support Centers, and other NOAA users. These products draw on SPoRT s expertise with the transition and evaluation of products into operations from the MODIS instrument and the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA). The MODIS instrument serves as an excellent proxy for the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) that will be aboard GOES-R. SPoRT has transitioned and evaluated several multi-channel MODIS products. The true and false color products are being used in natural hazard detection by several SPoRT partners to provide better observation of land features, such as fires, smoke plumes, and snow cover. Additionally, many of SPoRT s partners are coastal offices and already benefit from the MODIS sea surface temperature composite. This, along with other surface feature observations will be developed into ABI proxy products for diagnostic use in the forecast process as well as assimilation into forecast models. In addition to the MODIS instrument, the NALMA has proven very valuable to WFOs with access to these total lightning data. These data provide situational awareness and enhanced warning decision making to improve lead times for severe thunderstorm and tornado warnings. One effort by SPoRT scientists includes a lightning threat product to create short-term model forecasts of lightning activity. Additionally, SPoRT is working with the AWG to create GLM proxy data from several of the ground based total lightning networks, such as the NALMA. The evaluation will focus on the vastly improved spatial

  11. Thrust faulting and 3D ground deformation of the 3 July 2015 Mw 6.4 Pishan, China earthquake from Sentinel-1A radar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianbao; Shen, Zheng-Kang; Li, Tao; Chen, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Boosted by the launch of Sentinel-1A radar satellite from the European Space Agency (ESA), we now have the opportunity of fast, full and multiple coverage of the land based deformation field of earthquakes. Here we use the data to investigate a strong earthquake struck Pishan, western China on July 3, 2015. The earthquake fault is blind and no ground break features are found on-site, thus Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data give full play to its technical advantage for the recovery of coseismic deformation field. By using the Sentinel-1A radar data in the Interferometric Wide Swath mode, we obtain 3 tracks of InSAR data over the struck region, and resolve the 3D ground deformation generated by the earthquake. Then the Line-of-Sight (LOS) InSAR data are inverted for the slip-distribution of the seismogenic fault. The final model shows that the earthquake is completely blind with pure-thrust motion. The maximum slip is 0.48 m at a depth of 7 km, consistent with the depth estimate from seismic reflection data. In particular, the inverted model is also compatible with a south-dipping fault ramp among a group of fault interfaces detected by the seismic reflection profile over the region. The seismic moment obtained equals to a Mw 6.4 earthquake. The Pishan earthquake ruptured the frontal part of the thrust ramps under the Slik anticline, and unloaded the coulomb stress of them. However, it may have loaded stress to the back-thrust above the thrust ramps by 1-4 bar, and promoted it for future failure. Moreover, the stress loading on the west side of the earthquake fault is much larger than that on the east side, indicating a higher risk for failure to the west of the Zepu fault.

  12. Grounding Abstractness: Abstract Concepts and the Activation of the Mouth.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Anna M; Zarcone, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    One key issue for theories of cognition is how abstract concepts, such as freedom, are represented. According to the WAT (Words As social Tools) proposal, abstract concepts activate both sensorimotor and linguistic/social information, and their acquisition modality involves the linguistic experience more than the acquisition of concrete concepts. We report an experiment in which participants were presented with abstract and concrete definitions followed by concrete and abstract target-words. When the definition and the word matched, participants were required to press a key, either with the hand or with the mouth. Response times and accuracy were recorded. As predicted, we found that abstract definitions and abstract words yielded slower responses and more errors compared to concrete definitions and concrete words. More crucially, there was an interaction between the target-words and the effector used to respond (hand, mouth). While responses with the mouth were overall slower, the advantage of the hand over the mouth responses was more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts. The results are in keeping with grounded and embodied theories of cognition and support the WAT proposal, according to which abstract concepts evoke linguistic-social information, hence activate the mouth. The mechanisms underlying the mouth activation with abstract concepts (re-enactment of acquisition experience, or re-explanation of the word meaning, possibly through inner talk) are discussed. To our knowledge this is the first behavioral study demonstrating with real words that the advantage of the hand over the mouth is more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts, likely because of the activation of linguistic information with abstract concepts.

  13. Grounding Abstractness: Abstract Concepts and the Activation of the Mouth

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Anna M.; Zarcone, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    One key issue for theories of cognition is how abstract concepts, such as freedom, are represented. According to the WAT (Words As social Tools) proposal, abstract concepts activate both sensorimotor and linguistic/social information, and their acquisition modality involves the linguistic experience more than the acquisition of concrete concepts. We report an experiment in which participants were presented with abstract and concrete definitions followed by concrete and abstract target-words. When the definition and the word matched, participants were required to press a key, either with the hand or with the mouth. Response times and accuracy were recorded. As predicted, we found that abstract definitions and abstract words yielded slower responses and more errors compared to concrete definitions and concrete words. More crucially, there was an interaction between the target-words and the effector used to respond (hand, mouth). While responses with the mouth were overall slower, the advantage of the hand over the mouth responses was more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts. The results are in keeping with grounded and embodied theories of cognition and support the WAT proposal, according to which abstract concepts evoke linguistic-social information, hence activate the mouth. The mechanisms underlying the mouth activation with abstract concepts (re-enactment of acquisition experience, or re-explanation of the word meaning, possibly through inner talk) are discussed. To our knowledge this is the first behavioral study demonstrating with real words that the advantage of the hand over the mouth is more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts, likely because of the activation of linguistic information with abstract concepts. PMID:27777563

  14. Observations of Seafloor Deformation and Methane Venting within an Active Fault Zone Offshore Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K.; Lundsten, E. M.; Paull, C. K.; Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H. J.; Brewer, P. G.; Vrijenhoek, R.; Lundsten, L.

    2013-12-01

    Detailed mapping surveys of the floor and flanks of the Santa Monica Basin, San Pedro Basin, and San Diego Trough were conducted during the past seven years using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) built and operated by MBARI specifically for seafloor mapping. The AUV collected data provide up to 1 m resolution multibeam bathymetric grids with a vertical precision of 0.15 m. Along with high-resolution multibeam, the AUV also collects chirp seismic reflection profiles. Structures within the uppermost 10-20 m of the seafloor, which in the surveys presented here is composed of recent sediment drape, can typically be resolved in the sub-bottom reflectors. Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives allowed for ground-truth observations and sampling within the surveyed areas. The objectives of these dives included finding evidence of recent seafloor deformation and locating areas where chemosynthetic biological communities are supported by fluid venting. Distinctive seafloor features within an active fault zone are revealed in unprecedented detail in the AUV generated maps and seismic reflection profiles. Evidence for recent fault displacements include linear scarps which can be as small as 20 cm high but traceable for several km, right lateral offsets within submarine channels and topographic ridges, and abrupt discontinuities in sub-bottom reflectors, which in places appear to displace seafloor sediments. Several topographic highs that occur within the fault zone appear to be anticlines related to step-overs in these faults. These topographic highs are, in places, topped with circular mounds that are up to 15 m high and have ~30° sloping sides. The crests of the topographic highs and the mounds both have distinctive rough morphologies produced by broken pavements of irregular blocks of methane-derived authigenic carbonates, and by topographic depressions, commonly more than 2 m deep. These areas of distinctive rough topography are commonly associated with living

  15. Active deformation near the Nicoya Peninsula, northwestern Costa Rica, between 1996 and 2010: Interseismic megathrust coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lujia; Newman, Andrew V.; Protti, Marino; GonzáLez, VíCtor; Jiang, Yan; Dixon, Timothy H.

    2012-06-01

    We use campaign and continuous GPS measurements at 49 sites between 1996 and 2010 to describe the long-term active deformation in and near the Nicoya Peninsula, northwestern Costa Rica. The observed deformation reveals partial partitioning of the Cocos-Caribbean oblique convergence into trench-parallel forearc sliver motion and less oblique thrusting on the subduction interface. The northern Costa Rican forearc translates northwestward as a whole ridge block at 11 ± 1 mm/yr relative to the stable Caribbean. The transition from the forearc to the stable Caribbean occurs in a narrow deforming zone of ˜16 km wide. Subduction thrust earthquakes take 2/3 of the trench-parallel component of the plate convergence; however, surface deformation caused by interseismic megathrust coupling is primarily trench-normal. Two fully coupled patches, one located offshore Nicoya centered at ˜15 km depth and the other located inland centered at ˜24 km depth, are identified in Nicoya with the potential to generate an Mw 7.8 1950-type earthquake. Another fully coupled patch SE of Nicoya coincides with the rupture region of the 1990 Nicoya Gulf earthquake. Interface microearthquakes, non-volcanic tremor, low-frequency earthquakes, and transient slow-slip events generally occur in the intermediately to weakly coupled regions.

  16. New results on ground deformation in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin (southern Poland) obtained during the DORIS Project (EU-FP 7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graniczny, Marek; Colombo, Davide; Kowalski, Zbigniew; Przyłucka, Maria; Zdanowski, Albin

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents application of satellite interferometric methods (persistent scatterer interferometric synthetic aperture radar (PSInSAR™) and differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR)) for observation of ground deformation in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin (USCB) in Southern Poland. The presented results were obtained during the DORIS project (EC FP 7, Grant Agreement n. 242212, www.doris-project.eu). Several InSAR datasets for this area were analysed. Most of them were processed by Tele-Rilevamento Europa - T.R.E. s.r.l. Italy. Datasets came from different SAR satellites (ERS 1 and 2, Envisat, ALOS- PALSAR and TerraSAR-X) and cover three different SAR bands (L, C and X). They were processed using both InSAR techniques: DInSAR, where deformations are presented as interferometric fringes on the raster image, and PSInSAR, where motion is indentified on irregular set of persistent scatterer (PS) points. Archival data from the C-band European Space Agency satellites ERS and ENVISAT provided information about ground movement since 1992 until 2010 in two separate datasets (1992-2000 and 2003-2010). Two coal mines were selected as examples of ground motion within inactive mining areas: Sosnowiec and Saturn, where mining ceased in 1995 and 1997, respectively. Despite well pumping after closure of the mines, groundwater rose several dozen meters, returning to its natural horizon. Small surface uplift clearly indicated on satellite interferometric data is related to high permeability of the hydrogeological subregion and insufficient water withdrawal from abandoned mines. The older 1992-2000 PSInSAR dataset indicates values of ground motion ranging from -40.0 to 0.0 mm. The newer 2003-2010 dataset shows values ranging from -2.0 to +7.0 mm. This means that during this period of time subsidence was less and uplift greater in comparison to the older dataset. This is even more evident in the time series of randomly selected PS points from both coal

  17. Monitoring Hippocampus Electrical Activity In Vitro on an Elastically Deformable Microelectrode Array

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhe; Graudejus, Oliver; Tsay, Candice; Lacour, Stéphanie P.; Wagner, Sigurd

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Interfacing electronics and recording electrophysiological activity in mechanically active biological tissues is challenging. This challenge extends to recording neural function of brain tissue in the setting of traumatic brain injury (TBI), which is caused by rapid (within hundreds of milliseconds) and large (greater than 5% strain) brain deformation. Interfacing electrodes must be biocompatible on multiple levels and should deform with the tissue to prevent additional mechanical damage. We describe an elastically stretchable microelectrode array (SMEA) that is capable of undergoing large, biaxial, 2-D stretch while remaining functional. The new SMEA consists of elastically stretchable thin metal films on a silicone membrane. It can stimulate and detect electrical activity from cultured brain tissue (hippocampal slices), before, during, and after large biaxial deformation. We have incorporated the SMEA into a well-characterized in vitro TBI research platform, which reproduces the biomechanics of TBI by stretching the SMEA and the adherent brain slice culture. Mechanical injury parameters, such as strain and strain rate, can be precisely controlled to generate specific levels of damage. The SMEA allowed for quantification of neuronal function both before and after injury, without breaking culture sterility or repositioning the electrodes for the injury event, thus enabling serial and long-term measurements. We report tests of the SMEA and an initial application to study the effect of mechanical stimuli on neuron function, which could be employed as a high-content, drug-screening platform for TBI. PMID:19594385

  18. EFFECT OF GROUND-WATER REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES ON INDIGENOUS MICROFLORA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), working with the Interagency DNAPL Consortium, completed an independent evaluation of microbial responses to ground-water remediation technology demonstrations at Launch Pad 34 at Cape Canaveral Air Station in Brevard Count...

  19. Active Thermal Control Experiments for LISA Ground Verification Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Sei; DeBra, Daniel B.

    2006-11-01

    The primary mission goal of LISA is detecting gravitational waves. LISA uses laser metrology to measure the distance between proof masses in three identical spacecrafts. The total acceleration disturbance to each proof mass is required to be below 3 × 10-15 m/s2√Hz . Optical path length variations on each optical bench must be kept below 40 pm/√Hz over 1 Hz to 0.1 mHz. Thermal variations due to, for example, solar radiation or temperature gradients across the proof mass housing will distort the spacecraft causing changes in the mass attraction and sensor location. We have developed a thermal control system developed for the LISA gravitational reference sensor (GRS) ground verification testing which provides thermal stability better than 1 mK/√Hz to f < 1 mHz and which by extension is suitable for in-flight thermal control for the LISA spacecraft to compensate solar irradiation. Thermally stable environment is very demanded for LISA performance verification. In a lab environment specifications can be met with considerable amount of insulation and thermal mass. For spacecraft, the very limited thermal mass calls for an active control system which can meet disturbance rejection and stability requirements simultaneously in the presence of long time delay. A simple proportional plus integral control law presently provides approximately 1 mK/√Hz of thermal stability for over 80 hours. Continuing development of a model predictive feed-forward algorithm will extend performance to below 1 mK/√Hz at f < 1 mHz and lower.

  20. Projection Moire Interferometry for Rotorcraft Applications: Deformation Measurements of Active Twist Rotor Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Soto, Hector L.; South, Bruce W.

    2002-01-01

    Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) has been used during wind tunnel tests to obtain azimuthally dependent blade bending and twist measurements for a 4-bladed Active Twist Rotor (ATR) system in simulated forward flight. The ATR concept offers a means to reduce rotor vibratory loads and noise by using piezoelectric active fiber composite actuators embedded in the blade structure to twist each blade as they rotate throughout the rotor azimuth. The twist imparted on the blades for blade control causes significant changes in blade loading, resulting in complex blade deformation consisting of coupled bending and twist. Measurement of this blade deformation is critical in understanding the overall behavior of the ATR system and the physical mechanisms causing the reduction in rotor loads and noise. PMI is a non-contacting, video-based optical measurement technique capable of obtaining spatially continuous structural deformation measurements over the entire object surface within the PMI system field-of-view. When applied to rotorcraft testing, PMI can be used to measure the azimuth-dependent blade bending and twist along the full span of the rotor blade. This paper presents the PMI technique as applied to rotorcraft testing, and provides results obtained during the ATR tests demonstrating the PMI system performance. PMI measurements acquired at select blade actuation conditions generating minimum and maximum rotor loads are provided to explore the interrelationship between rotor loads, blade bending, and twist.

  1. Active faults in the deformation zone off Noto Peninsula, Japan, revealed by high- resolution seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Okamura, Y.; Murakami, F.; Kimura, H.; Ikehara, K.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, a lot of earthquakes occur in Japan. The deformation zone which many faults and folds have concentrated exists on the Japan Sea side of Japan. The 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake (MJMA 6.9) and 2007 Chuetsu-oki Earthquake (MJMA 6.8) were caused by activity of parts of faults in this deformation zone. The Noto Hanto Earthquake occurred on 25 March, 2007 under the northwestern coast of Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. This earthquake is located in Quaternary deformation zone that is continued from northern margin of Noto Peninsula to southeast direction (Okamura, 2007a). National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) carried out high-resolution seismic survey using Boomer and 12 channels short streamer cable in the northern part off Noto Peninsula, in order to clarify distribution and activities of active faults in the deformation zone. A twelve channels short streamer cable with 2.5 meter channel spacing developed by AIST and private corporation is designed to get high resolution seismic profiles in shallow sea area. The multi-channel system is possible to equip on a small fishing boat, because the data acquisition system is based on PC and the length of the cable is short and easy to handle. Moreover, because the channel spacing is short, this cable is very effective for a high- resolution seismic profiling survey in the shallow sea, and seismic data obtained by multi-channel cable can be improved by velocity analysis and CDP stack. In the northern part off Noto Peninsula, seismic profiles depicting geologic structure up to 100 meters deep under sea floor were obtained. The most remarkable reflection surface recognized in the seismic profiles is erosion surface at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In the western part, sediments about 30 meters (40 msec) thick cover the erosional surface that is distributed under the shelf shallower than 100m in depth and the sediments thin toward offshore and east. Flexures like deformation in

  2. The unrest of the San Miguel volcano (El Salvador, Central America): installation of the monitoring network and observed volcano-tectonic ground deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonforte, Alessandro; Hernandez, Douglas Antonio; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Handal, Louis; Polío, Cecilia; Rapisarda, Salvatore; Scarlato, Piergiorgio

    2016-08-01

    On 29 December 2013, the Chaparrastique volcano in El Salvador, close to the town of San Miguel, erupted suddenly with explosive force, forming a column more than 9 km high and projecting ballistic projectiles as far as 3 km away. Pyroclastic density currents flowed to the north-northwest side of the volcano, while tephras were dispersed northwest and north-northeast. This sudden eruption prompted the local Ministry of Environment to request cooperation with Italian scientists in order to improve the monitoring of the volcano during this unrest. A joint force, made up of an Italian team from the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia and a local team from the Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales, was organized to enhance the volcanological, geophysical and geochemical monitoring system to study the evolution of the phenomenon during the crisis. The joint team quickly installed a multiparametric mobile network comprising seismic, geodetic and geochemical sensors (designed to cover all the volcano flanks from the lowest to the highest possible altitudes) and a thermal camera. To simplify the logistics for a rapid installation and for security reasons, some sensors were colocated into multiparametric stations. Here, we describe the prompt design and installation of the geodetic monitoring network, the processing and results. The installation of a new ground deformation network can be considered an important result by itself, while the detection of some crucial deforming areas is very significant information, useful for dealing with future threats and for further studies on this poorly monitored volcano.

  3. The surface geometry of inherited joint and fracture trace patterns resulting from active and passive deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podwysocki, M. H.; Gold, D. P.

    1974-01-01

    Hypothetical models are considered for detecting subsurface structure from the fracture or joint pattern, which may be influenced by the structure and propagated to the surface. Various patterns of an initially orthogonal fracture grid are modeled according to active and passive deformation mechanisms. In the active periclinal structure with a vertical axis, fracture frequency increased both over the dome and basin, and remained constant with decreasing depth to the structure. For passive periclinal features such as a reef or sand body, fracture frequency is determined by the arc of curvature and showed a reduction over the reefmound and increased over the basin.

  4. Active control of shocks and sonic boom ground signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagiz, Bedri

    The manipulation of a flow field to obtain a desired change is a much heightened subject. Active flow control has been the subject of the major research areas in fluid mechanics for the past two decades. It offers new solutions for mitigation of shock strength, sonic boom alleviation, drag minimization, reducing blade-vortex interaction noise in helicopters, stall control and the performance maximization of existing designs to meet the increasing requirements of the aircraft industries. Despite the wide variety of the potential applications of active flow control, the majority of studies have been performed at subsonic speeds. The active flow control cases were investigated in transonic speed in this study. Although the active flow control provides significant improvements, the sensibility of aerodynamic performance to design parameters makes it a nontrivial and expensive problem, so the designer has to optimize a number of different parameters. For the purpose of gaining understanding of the active flow control concepts, an automated optimization cycle process was generated. Also, the optimization cycle reduces cost and turnaround time. The mass flow coefficient, location, width and angle were chosen as design parameters to maximize the aerodynamic performance of an aircraft. As the main contribution of this study, a detailed parametric study and optimization process were presented. The second step is to appraise the practicability of weakening the shock wave and thereby reducing the wave drag in transonic flight regime using flow control devices such as two dimensional contour bump, individual jet actuator, and also the hybrid control which includes both control devices together, thereby gaining the desired improvements in aerodynamic performance of the air-vehicle. After this study, to improve the aerodynamic performance, the flow control and shape parameters are optimized separately, combined, and in a serial combination. The remarkable part of all these

  5. Removal of daytime thermal deformations in the GBT active surface via out-of-focus holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, T. R.; Mello, M.; Nikolic, B.; Mason, B.; Schwab, F.; Ghigo, F.; Dicker, S.

    2009-01-01

    The 100-m diameter Green Bank Telescope (GBT) was built with an active surface of 2209 actuators in order to achieve and maintain an accurate paraboloidal shape. While much of the large-scale gravitational deformation of the surface can be described by a finite element model, a significant uncompensated gravitational deformation exists. In recent years, the elevation-dependence of this residual deformation has been successfully measured during benign nighttime conditions using the out-of-focus (OOF) holography technique (Nikolic et al, 2007, A&A 465, 685). Parametrized by a set of Zernike polynomials, the OOF model correction was implemented into the active surface and has been applied during all high-frequency observations since Fall 2006, yielding a consistent gain curve that is flat with elevation. However, large-scale thermal deformation of the surface has remained a problem for daytime high-frequency observations. OOF holography maps taken throughout a clear winter day indicate that surface deformations become significant whenever the Sun is above 10 degrees elevation, but that they change slowly while tracking a single source. In this paper, we describe a further improvement to the GBT active surface that allows an observer to measure and compensate for the thermal surface deformation using the OOF technique. In order to support high-frequency observers, "AutoOOF" is a new GBT Astrid procedure that acquires a quick set of in-focus and out-of-focus on-the-fly continuum maps on a quasar using the currently active receiver. Upon completion of the maps, the data analysis software is launched automatically which produces and displays the surface map along with a set of Zernike coefficients. These coefficients are then sent to the active surface manager which combines them with the existing gravitational Zernike terms and FEM in order to compute the total active surface correction. The end-to-end functionality has been tested on the sky at Q-Band and Ka-band during

  6. Removal of daytime thermal deformations in the GBT active surface via out-of-focus holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, T. R.; Mello, M.; Nikolic, B.; Mason, B. S.; Schwab, F. R.; Ghigo, F. D.; Dicker, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    The 100-m diameter Green Bank Telescope (GBT) was built with an active surface of 2209 actuators in order to achieve and maintain an accurate paraboloidal shape. While much of the large-scale gravitational deformation of the surface can be described by a finite element model, a significant uncompensated gravitational deformation exists. In recent years, the elevation-dependence of this residual deformation has been successfully measured during benign nighttime conditions using the out-of-focus (OOF) holography technique (Nikolic et al, 2007, A&A 465, 685). Parametrized by a set of Zernike polynomials, the OOF model correction was implemented into the active surface and has been applied during all high frequency observations since Fall 2006, yielding a consistent gain curve that is constant with elevation. However, large-scale thermal deformation of the surface has remained a problem for daytime high-frequency observations. OOF holography maps taken throughout a clear winter day indicate that surface deformations become significant whenever the Sun is above 10 degrees elevation, but that they change slowly while tracking a single source. In this paper, we describe a further improvement to the GBT active surface that allows an observer to measure and compensate for the thermal surface deformation using the OOF technique. In order to support high-frequency observers, "AutoOOF" is a new GBT Astrid procedure that acquires a quick set of in-focus and out-of-focus on-the-fly continuum maps on a quasar using the currently active receiver. Upon completion of the maps, the data analysis software is launched automatically which produces and displays the surface map along with a set of Zernike coefficients. These coefficients are then sent to the active surface manager which combines them with the existing gravitational Zernike terms and FEM in order to compute the total active surface correction. The end-to-end functionality has been tested on the sky at Q-Band and Ka

  7. The Isospin Admixture of The Ground State and The Properties of The Isobar Analog Resonances In Deformed Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Aygor, H. Ali; Maras, Ismail; Cakmak, Necla; Selam, Cevad

    2008-11-11

    Within quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA), Pyatov-Salamov method for the self-consistent determination of the isovector effective interaction strength parameter, restoring a broken isotopic symmetry for the nuclear part of the Hamiltonian, is used. The isospin admixtures in the ground state of the parent nucleus, and the isospin structure of the isobar analog resonance (IAR) state are investigated by including the pairing correlations between nucleons for {sup 72-80}Kr isotopes. Our results are compared with the spherical case and with other theoretical results.

  8. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) activities related to sources of ground-water contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Black-Coleman, W.

    1987-02-01

    The report contains a listing of EPA programs and activities, as of October 1986, that address 33 sources of potential ground-water contamination. The information on each activity is presented in a matrix format that is organized by type of contamination source. The following information is presented for each program and activity listed: title, lead office, contact person, type of activity (study, regulation, guidance, strategy, etc.) status, and a summary of the activity. The 33 sources of ground-water contamination are discussed in the 1984 EPA Office of Technology report: Protecting the Nations Ground Water from Contamination.

  9. Assessment of Tungsten Content on Tertiary Creep Deformation Behavior of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, Kinkar

    2015-10-01

    Tertiary creep deformation behavior of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels having different tungsten contents has been assessed. Creep tests were carried out at 823 K (550 °C) over a stress range of 180 to 260 MPa on three heats of the RAFM steel (9Cr-W-0.06Ta-0.22V) with tungsten content of 1, 1.4, and 2.0 wt pct. With creep exposure, the steels exhibited minimum in creep rate followed by progressive increase in creep rate until fracture. The minimum creep rate decreased, rupture life increased, and the onset of tertiary stage of creep deformation delayed with the increase in tungsten content. The tertiary creep behavior has been assessed based on the relationship, , considering minimum creep rate () instead of steady-state creep rate. The increase in tungsten content was found to decrease the rate of acceleration of tertiary parameter ` p.' The relationships between (1) tertiary parameter `p' with minimum creep rate and time spent in tertiary creep deformation and (2) the final creep rate with minimum creep rate revealed that the same first-order reaction rate theory prevailed in the minimum creep rate as well as throughout the tertiary creep deformation behavior of the steel. A master tertiary creep curve of the steels has been developed. Scanning electron microscopic investigation revealed enhanced coarsening resistance of carbides in the steel on creep exposure with increase in tungsten content. The decrease in tertiary parameter ` p' with tungsten content with the consequent decrease in minimum creep rate and increase in rupture life has been attributed to the enhanced microstructural stability of the steel.

  10. Low resistivity and permeability in actively deforming shear zones on the San Andreas Fault at SAFOD

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, Carolyn A.; Lockner, David A.; Hickman, Stephen H.

    2015-01-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) scientific drillhole near Parkfield, California crosses the San Andreas Fault at a depth of 2.7 km. Downhole measurements and analysis of core retrieved from Phase 3 drilling reveal two narrow, actively deforming zones of smectite-clay gouge within a roughly 200 m-wide fault damage zone of sandstones, siltstones and mudstones. Here we report electrical resistivity and permeability measurements on core samples from all of these structural units at effective confining pressures up to 120 MPa. Electrical resistivity (~10 ohm-m) and permeability (10-21 to 10-22 m2) in the actively deforming zones were one to two orders of magnitude lower than the surrounding damage zone material, consistent with broader-scale observations from the downhole resistivity and seismic velocity logs. The higher porosity of the clay gouge, 2 to 8 times greater than that in the damage zone rocks, along with surface conduction were the principal factors contributing to the observed low resistivities. The high percentage of fine-grained clay in the deforming zones also greatly reduced permeability to values low enough to create a barrier to fluid flow across the fault. Together, resistivity and permeability data can be used to assess the hydrogeologic characteristics of the fault, key to understanding fault structure and strength. The low resistivities and strength measurements of the SAFOD core are consistent with observations of low resistivity clays that are often found in the principal slip zones of other active faults making resistivity logs a valuable tool for identifying these zones.

  11. Active deformation in the northern Sierra de Valle Fértil, Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Gustavo; Alvarado, Patricia; Fosdick, Julie C.; Perucca, Laura; Saez, Mauro; Venerdini, Agostina

    2015-12-01

    The Western Sierras Pampeanas region in the San Juan Province is characterized by thick-skinned deformation with approximately N-S trending ranges of average heights of 2500 m and a high frequency occurrence of seismic activity. Its location to the east of the mainly thin-skinned tectonics of the Argentine Precordillera fold-and-thrust belt suggests that at 30°S, deformation is concentrated in a narrow zone involving these two morphostructural units. In this paper, we present new apatite (U-Th)/He results (AHe) across the northern part of the Sierra de Valle Fértil (around 30°S) and analyze them in a framework of thermochronologic available datasets. We found Pliocene AHe results for Carboniferous and Triassic strata in the northern Sierra de Valle Fértil consistent with the hypothesis of recent cooling and inferred erosional denudation concentrated along the northern end of this mountain range. Our analysis shows that this northern region may have evolved under different conditions than the central part of the Sierra de Valle Fértil. Previous studies have observed AHe ages consistent with Permian through Cretaceous cooling, indicating the middle part of the Sierra de Valle Fértil remained near surface before the Pampean slab subduction flattening process. Those studies also obtained ˜5 My cooling ages in the southern part of the Sierra de Valle Fértil, which are similar to our results in the northern end of the range. Taken together, these results suggest a pattern of young deformation in the northern and southern low elevation ends of the Sierra de Valle Fértil consistent with regions of high seismic activity, and Quaternary active faulting along the western-bounding thrust fault of the Sierra de Valle Fértil.

  12. Analysis of Mining Terrain Deformation Characteristics with Deformation Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blachowski, Jan; Milczarek, Wojciech; Grzempowski, Piotr

    2014-05-01

    Mapping and prediction of mining related deformations of the earth surface is an important measure for minimising threat to surface infrastructure, human population, the environment and safety of the mining operation itself arising from underground extraction of useful minerals. The number of methods and techniques used for monitoring and analysis of mining terrain deformations is wide and increasing with the development of geographical information technologies. These include for example: terrestrial geodetic measurements, global positioning systems, remote sensing, spatial interpolation, finite element method modelling, GIS based modelling, geological modelling, empirical modelling using the Knothe theory, artificial neural networks, fuzzy logic calculations and other. The aim of this paper is to introduce the concept of an integrated Deformation Information System (DIS) developed in geographic information systems environment for analysis and modelling of various spatial data related to mining activity and demonstrate its applications for mapping and visualising, as well as identifying possible mining terrain deformation areas with various spatial modelling methods. The DIS concept is based on connected modules that include: the spatial database - the core of the system, the spatial data collection module formed by: terrestrial, satellite and remote sensing measurements of the ground changes, the spatial data mining module for data discovery and extraction, the geological modelling module, the spatial data modeling module with data processing algorithms for spatio-temporal analysis and mapping of mining deformations and their characteristics (e.g. deformation parameters: tilt, curvature and horizontal strain), the multivariate spatial data classification module and the visualization module allowing two-dimensional interactive and static mapping and three-dimensional visualizations of mining ground characteristics. The Systems's functionality has been presented on

  13. Interpretation of deformed ionograms induced by vertical ground motion of seismic Rayleigh waves and infrasound in the thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Takashi; Yusupov, Kamil; Akchurin, Adel

    2016-02-01

    The vertical ground motion of seismic surface waves launches acoustic waves into the atmosphere and induces ionospheric disturbances. Disturbances due to Rayleigh waves near the short-period Airy phase appear as wavy fluctuations in the virtual height of an ionogram and have a multiple-cusp signature (MCS) when the fluctuation amplitude is increased. An extremely developed MCS was observed at Kazan, Russia, after the 2010 M 8.8 Chile earthquake. The ionogram exhibited steep satellite traces for which the virtual heights increased rapidly with frequency starting near the top of cusps and continuing for 0.1-0.2 MHz. This complicated ionogram was analyzed by applying a ray tracing technique to the radio wave propagation in the ionosphere that was perturbed by acoustic waves. Acoustic wavefronts were inclined by the effects of finite Rayleigh wave velocity and sound speed in the thermosphere. The satellite echo traces were reproduced by oblique returns from the inclined wavefronts, in addition to the nearly vertical returns that are responsible for the main trace.

  14. The unrest of S. Miguel volcano (El Salvador, CA): installation of the monitoring network and observed volcano-tectonic ground deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonforte, A.; Hernandez, D.; Gutiérrez, E.; Handal, L.; Polío, C.; Rapisarda, S.; Scarlato, P.

    2015-10-01

    On 29 December 2013, the Chaparrastique volcano in El Salvador, close to the town of S. Miguel, erupted suddenly with explosive force, forming a more than 9 km high column and projecting ballistic projectiles as far as 3 km away. Pyroclastic Density Currents flowed to the north-northwest side of the volcano, while tephras were dispersed northwest and north-northeast. This sudden eruption prompted the local Ministry of Environment to request cooperation with Italian scientists in order to improve the monitoring of the volcano during this unrest. A joint force made up of an Italian team from the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia and a local team from the Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales was organized to enhance the volcanological, geophysical and geochemical monitoring system to study the evolution of the phenomenon during the crisis. The joint team quickly installed a multi-parametric mobile network comprising seismic, geodetic and geochemical sensors, designed to cover all the volcano flanks from the lowest to the highest possible altitudes, and a thermal camera. To simplify the logistics for a rapid installation and for security reasons, some sensors were co-located into multi-parametric stations. Here, we describe the prompt design and installation of the geodetic monitoring network, the processing and results. The installation of a new ground deformation network can be considered an important result by itself, while the detection of some crucial deforming areas is very significant information, useful for dealing with future threats and for further studies on this poorly monitored volcano.

  15. Inelastic deformation demands of regular steel frames subjected to pulse-like near-fault ground shakings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siahpolo, Navid; Gerami, Mohsen; Vahdani, Reza

    2016-09-01

    Evaluating the capability of elastic Load Patterns (LPs) including seismic codes and modified LPs such as Method of Modal Combination (MMC) and Upper Bound Pushover Analysis (UBPA) in estimating inelastic demands of non deteriorating steel moment frames is the main objective of this study. The Static Nonlinear Procedure (NSP) is implemented and the results of NSP are compared with Nonlinear Time History Analysis (NTHA). The focus is on the effects of near-fault pulselike ground motions. The primary demands of interest are the maximum floor displacement, the maximum story drift angle over the height, the maximum global ductility, the maximum inter-story ductility and the capacity curves. Five types of LPs are selected and the inelastic demands are calculated under four levels of inter-story target ductility ( μ t) using OpenSees software. The results show that the increase in μ t coincides with the migration of the peak demands over the height from the top to the bottom stories. Therefore, all LPs estimate the story lateral displacement accurately at the lower stories. The results are almost independent of the number of stories. While, the inter-story drift angle (IDR) obtained from MMC method has the most appropriate accuracy among the other LPs. Although, the accuracy of this method decreases with increasing μ t so that with increasing number of stories, IDR is smaller or greater than the values resulted from NTHA depending on the position of captured results. In addition, increasing μ t decreases the accuracy of all LPs in determination of critical story position. In this case, the MMC method has the best coincidence with distribution of inter-story ductility over the height.

  16. 10Be surface exposure dating reveals strong active deformation in the central Andean backarc interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Morabito, Ezequiel; Terrizzano, Carla; Zech, Roland; Willett, Sean; Yamin, Marcela; Haghipour, Negar; Wuethrich, Lorenz; Christl, Marcus; María Cortes, José; Ramos, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the deformation associated with active thrust wedges is essential to evaluate seismic hazard. How is active faulting distributed throughout the wedge, and how much deformation is taken up by individual structures? We address these questions for our study region, the central Andean backarc of Argentina. We combined a structural and geomorphological approach with surface exposure dating (10Be) of alluvial fans and strath terraces in two key localities at ~32° S: the Cerro Salinas, located in the active orogenic front of the Precordillera, and the Barreal block in the interior of the Andean mountain range. We analysed 22 surface samples and 6 depth profiles. At the thrust front, the oldest terrace (T1) yields an age of 100-130 ka, the intermediate terrace (T2) between 40-95 ka, and the youngest terrace (T3) an age of ~20 ka. In the Andean interior, T1´ dates to 117-146 ka, T2´ to ~70 ka, and T3´ to ~20 ka, all calculations assuming negligible erosion and using the scaling scheme for spallation based on Lal 1991, Stone 2000. Vertical slip rates of fault offsets are 0.3-0.5 mm/yr and of 0.6-1.2 mm/yr at the thrust front and in the Andean interior, respectively. Our results highlight: i) fault activity related to the growth of the Andean orogenic wedge is not only limited to a narrow thrust front zone. Internal structures have been active during the last 150 ka, ii) deformation rates in the Andean interior are comparable or even higher that those estimated and reported along the emerging thrust front, iii) distribution of active faulting seems to account for unsteady state conditions, and iv) seismic hazards may be more relevant in the internal parts of the Andean orogen than assumed so far. References Lal, D., 1991: Cosmic ray labeling of erosion surfaces: In situ nuclide production rates and erosion models. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 104: 424-439. Stone, J.O., 2000: Air pressure and cosmogenic isotope production. Journal of Geophysical

  17. Investigation of the Deformation Activation Volume of an Ultrafinegrained Ti50Ni50 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunderov, D. V.; Churakova, A. A.; Lukianov, A. V.; Prokofiev, E. A.; Prokoshkin, S. D.; Kreizberg, A. Yu.; Raab, G. I.; Sabirov, I. N.

    2015-10-01

    The mechanical properties, strain rate sensitivity (m) and deformation activation volume (ΔV) are investigated at the experimental temperatures from 20 to 400°C in a Ti50Ni50 alloy in a coarse-grained (CG) state with the austenite grain size D = 200 μm and in an ultrafine-grained (UFG) state with D = 700 μm following an ECAP treatment. It is observed that this treatment improves the yield strength of the alloy compared to its CG-state. The strain rate sensitivity, m, is found to be by a factor of 1.5-2 higher than that of CG-specimens; it increases with the temperature in both states of the material. As the temperature of the material in tension increases up to Т = 150-250°C, parameter ΔV increases to its maximum and with a further growth of the experimental temperature to 400°C, parameter ΔV decreases. The deformation activation volume of the alloy in the UFG-state is by a factor of 2-4 larger than that in the CG-state for the same experimental temperatures.

  18. Active salt deformation and rapid, transient incision along the Colorado River near Moab, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochems, Andrew P.; Pederson, Joel L.

    2015-04-01

    In certain settings, erosion is driven by and balanced with tectonic uplift, but the evolution of many landscapes is dominated by other factors such as geologic substrate, drainage history, and transient incision. The Colorado Plateau is an example where these controls are debated and where salt deformation is hypothesized to be locally active and driven by differential unloading, although this is unconfirmed and unquantified in most places. We use luminescence-dated Colorado River terraces upstream of Moab, Utah, to quantify rates of salt-driven subsidence and uplift at the local scale. Active deformation in the study area is also supported by patterns of concavity along tributary drainages crossing salt structures. Subsidence in Professor Valley at a time-averaged rate of ~500 m/Myr (meters/million years) is superimposed upon rapid bedrock incision rates that increase from ~600 to ~900 m/Myr upstream through the study area. Such high rates are unexpected given the absence of sources of regional tectonic uplift here. Instead, the incision rate pattern across the greater area is consistent with a transient signal, perhaps still from ancient drainage integration through Grand Canyon far downstream, and then amplified by unloading at both the broad regional scale and at the local canyon scale.

  19. Active Deformation in the Overriding Plate Associated with Temporal Changes of the Philippine Sea Plate Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, T.; Sato, H.; Van Horne, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present detailed geologic evidence linking changes over time in Philippine Sea plate (PHS) motion and intracontinental deformation in central and southwest (SW) Japan during the Pliocene and after. In the early Pliocene, subduction of the PHS plate under SW Japan restarted in a northerly direction after period of deceleration or cessation. Later, motion changed to a more westerly direction. Corresponding geological changes found in the overriding plate include unconformities in the forearc basins, changes in slip sense on faults, depocenter migration, re-organization of drainage systems and volcanism. Quaternary intraplate deformation is prominent north of the Median Tectonic Line (MTL) inactive segment, above a shallow flat slab. In contrast, less Quaternary tectonic activity is found north of the MTL active segment which lies over a steadily-slipping portion of the subducting slab that behaves as a less-deformed rigid block. Depocenters and active thrusting have migrated north/northwestward over the past 5 My above the shallow flat slab segment of the PHS. We reconstructed the Plio-Pleistocene migration history using Neogene stratigraphy and shallow seismic reflection profiles. We see shallow PHS slab contact with the lower continental crust in our deep seismic reflection profiles, which may explain its enhanced downward drag of the overriding plate and synchronous strong compression in the crust. We find evidence of more westerly PHS plate subduction since the middle Pleistocene in (1) unconformities in the Kumano forearc basin deposits in SW Japan, (2) drastic stream captures in Shikoku, and (3) concordant changes in fault slip sense from thrust to dextral slip along the MTL. Oblique subduction could have induced stronger horizontal stress in the overriding plate above the shallow flat slab which could account for the increasing geologic slip rate observed on active structures. During four repetitions of megathrust earthquake sequences since the 17th century

  20. Kinetic Monte Carlo study of activated states and correlated shear-transformation-zone activity during the deformation of an amorphous metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homer, Eric R.; Rodney, David; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2010-02-01

    Shear transformation zone (STZ) dynamics simulations, which are based on the kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm, are used to model the mechanical response of amorphous metals and provide insight into the collective aspects of the microscopic events underlying deformation. The present analysis details the activated states of STZs in such a model, as well as the statistics of their activation and how these are affected by imposed conditions of stress and temperature. The analysis sheds light on the spatial and temporal correlations between the individual STZ activations that lead to different macroscopic modes of deformation. Three basic STZ correlation behaviors are observed: uncorrelated activity, nearest-neighbor correlation, and self-reactivating STZs. These three behaviors correspond well with the macroscopic deformation modes of homogeneous flow, inhomogeneous deformation, and elastic behavior, respectively. The effect of pre-existing stresses in the simulation cell is also studied and found to have a homogenizing effect on STZ correlations, suppressing the tendency for localization.

  1. Active Ground Optical Remote Sensing for Improved Monitoring of Seedling Stress in Nurseries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Active ground optical remote sensing (AGORS) devices mounted on overhead irrigation booms could help to improve seedling quality by autonomously monitoring seedling stress. In contrast to traditionally used passive optical sensors, AGORS devices operate independently of ambient light conditions and ...

  2. On the energy conservation during the active deformation in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Zhong, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we examined the energy conservation for the current schemes of applying active deformation in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Specifically, two methods are examined. One is scaling the dimension of the simulation box and the atom positions via an affine transformation, suitable for the periodic system. The other is moving the rigid walls that interact with the atoms in the system, suitable for the non-periodic system. Based on the calculation of the external work and the internal energy change, we present that the atom velocities also need to be updated in the first deformation method; otherwise the energy conservation cannot be satisfied. The classic updating scheme is examined, in which any atom crossing the periodic boundary experiences a velocity delta that is equal to the velocity difference between the opposite boundaries. In addition, a new scheme which scales the velocities of all the atoms according to the strain increment is proposed, which is more efficient and realistic than the classic scheme. It is also demonstrated that the Virial stress instead of its interaction part is the correct stress definition that corresponds to Cauchy stress in the continuum mechanics.

  3. GPS-derived ground deformation (2005-2014) within the Gulf of Mexico region referred to a stable Gulf of Mexico reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiangbo; Wang, Guoquan

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates current ground deformation derived from the GPS geodesy infrastructure in the Gulf of Mexico region. The positions and velocity vectors of 161 continuous GPS (CGPS) stations are presented with respect to a newly established local reference frame, the Stable Gulf of Mexico Reference Frame (SGOMRF). Thirteen long-term (> 5 years) CGPS are used to realize the local reference frame. The root mean square (RMS) of the velocities of the 13 SGOMRF reference stations achieves 0.2 mm yr-1 in the horizontal and 0.3 mm yr-1 in the vertical directions. GPS observations presented in this study indicate significant land subsidence in the coastal area of southeastern Louisiana, the greater Houston metropolitan area, and two cities in Mexico (Aguascalientes and Mexico City). The most rapid subsidence is recorded at the Mexico City International airport, which is up to 26.6 cm yr-1 (2008-2014). Significant spatial variation of subsidence rates is observed in both Mexico City and the Houston area. The overall subsidence rate in the Houston area is decreasing. The subsidence rate in southeastern Louisiana is relatively smaller (4.0-6.0 mm yr-1) but tends to be steady over time. This poses a potential threat to the safety of coastal infrastructure in the long-term.

  4. Gross-beta activity in ground water: natural sources and artifacts of sampling and laboratory analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, Alan H.

    1995-01-01

    Gross-beta activity has been used as an indicator of beta-emitting isotopes in water since at least the early 1950s. Originally designed for detection of radioactive releases from nuclear facilities and weapons tests, analysis of gross-beta activity is widely used in studies of naturally occurring radioactivity in ground water. Analyses of about 800 samples from 5 ground-water regions of the United States provide a basis for evaluating the utility of this measurement. The data suggest that measured gross-beta activities are due to (1) long-lived radionuclides in ground water, and (2) ingrowth of beta-emitting radionuclides during holding times between collection of samples and laboratory measurements.Although40K and228Ra appear to be the primary sources of beta activity in ground water, the sum of40K plus228Ra appears to be less than the measured gross-beta activity in most ground-water samples. The difference between the contribution from these radionuclides and gross-beta activity is most pronounced in ground water with gross-beta activities > 10 pCi/L, where these 2 radionuclides account for less than one-half the measured ross-beta activity. One exception is groundwater from the Coastal Plain of New Jersey, where40K plus228Ra generally contribute most of the gross-beta activity. In contrast,40K and228Ra generally contribute most of beta activity in ground water with gross-beta activities < 1 pCi/L.The gross-beta technique does not measure all beta activity in ground water. Although3H contributes beta activity to some ground water, it is driven from the sample before counting and therefore is not detected by gross-beta measurements. Beta-emitting radionuclides with half-lives shorter than a few days can decay to low values between sampling and counting. Although little is known about concentrations of most short-lived beta-emitting radionuclides in environmental ground water (water unaffected by direct releases from nuclear facilities and weapons tests), their

  5. Studies Of A Local Ground Deformation Episode Measured By Gps, During The 2001 Eruption, In The Upper Southern Flank Of Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, G.; Bonforte, A.; Guglielmino, F.; Palano, M.; Galvani, A.; Pesci, A.

    positions of each kinematic station, for different days, have been compared in order to estimate its displacement. The most significantly result of the data processing refers to a deformation episode occurred on a very short period during the first days of the eruption, between July 20th and 27th, even if a more ac- curate analysis shows that most of the this deformation episode seems to be occurred mainly during the last two days of this one week period, between July 25th to 27th. Offsets are relative to benchmarks crossing the tensile fracture field opened during the 1989 Mt. Etna eruption. Here the ground deformation pattern shows a divergent motion of GPS stations from the fracture area. Data inversions for the July 20th to 27th comparison have been performed using an Okada model. Results converged to a shallow deformation source with the same orientation of the 1989 fracture, showing dextral strike slip behaviour of the fault, with a minor normal dip and tensile compo- nents.

  6. Neural networks to simulate regional ground water levels affected by human activities.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shaoyuan; Kang, Shaozhong; Huo, Zailin; Chen, Shaojun; Mao, Xiaomin

    2008-01-01

    In arid regions, human activities like agriculture and industry often require large ground water extractions. Under these circumstances, appropriate ground water management policies are essential for preventing aquifer overdraft, and thereby protecting critical ecologic and economic objectives. Identification of such policies requires accurate simulation capability of the ground water system in response to hydrological, meteorological, and human factors. In this research, artificial neural networks (ANNs) were developed and applied to investigate the effects of these factors on ground water levels in the Minqin oasis, located in the lower reach of Shiyang River Basin, in Northwest China. Using data spanning 1980 through 1997, two ANNs were developed to model and simulate dynamic ground water levels for the two subregions of Xinhe and Xiqu. The ANN models achieved high predictive accuracy, validating to 0.37 m or less mean absolute error. Sensitivity analyses were conducted with the models demonstrating that agricultural ground water extraction for irrigation is the predominant factor responsible for declining ground water levels exacerbated by a reduction in regional surface water inflows. ANN simulations indicate that it is necessary to reduce the size of the irrigation area to mitigate ground water level declines in the oasis. Unlike previous research, this study demonstrates that ANN modeling can capture important temporally and spatially distributed human factors like agricultural practices and water extraction patterns on a regional basin (or subbasin) scale, providing both high-accuracy prediction capability and enhanced understanding of the critical factors influencing regional ground water conditions.

  7. Regulation of glucokinase activity in liver of hibernating ground squirrel Spermophilus undulatus.

    PubMed

    Khu, L Ya; Storey, K B; Rubtsov, A M; Goncharova, N Yu

    2014-07-01

    The kinetic properties of glucokinase (GLK) from the liver of active and hibernating ground squirrels Spermophilus undulatus have been studied. Entrance of ground squirrels into hibernation from their active state is accompanied by a sharp decrease in blood glucose (Glc) level (from 14 to 2.9 mM) and with a significant (7-fold) decrease of GLK activity in the liver cytoplasm. Preparations of native GLK practically devoid of other molecular forms of hexokinase were obtained from the liver of active and hibernating ground squirrels. The dependence of GLK activity upon Glc concentration for the enzyme from active ground squirrel liver showed a pronounced sigmoid character (Hill coefficient, h=1.70 and S0.5=6.23 mM; the experiments were conducted at 25°C in the presence of enzyme stabilizers, K+ and DTT). The same dependence of enzyme activity on Glc concentration was found for GLK from rat liver. However, on decreasing the temperature to 2°C (simulation of hibernation conditions), this dependency became almost hyperbolic (h=1.16) and GLK affinity for substrate was reduced (S0.5=23 mM). These parameters for hibernating ground squirrels (body temperature 5°C) at 25°C were found to be practically equal to the corresponding values obtained for GLK from the liver of active animals (h=1.60, S0.5=9.0 mM, respectively); at 2°C sigmoid character was less expressed and affinity for Glc was drastically decreased (h=1.20, S0.5=45 mM). The calculations of GLK activity in the liver of hibernating ground squirrels based on enzyme kinetic characteristics and seasonal changes in blood Glc concentrations have shown that GLK activity in the liver of hibernating ground squirrels is decreased about 5500-fold.

  8. Constraints and conundrums resulting from ground-deformation measurements made during the 2004-2005 dome-building eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington: Chapter 14 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Lisowski, Michael; Poland, Michael P.; Sherrod, David R.; LaHusen, Richard G.; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Lack of precursory inflation suggests that the volcano was poised to erupt magma already stored in a crustal reservoir when JRO1 was installed in 1997. Trilateration and campaign GPS data indicate surface dilatation, presumably caused by reservoir expansion between 1982 and 1991, but no measurable deformation between 1991 and 2003. We conclude that all three of the traditionally reliable eruption precursors (seismicity, ground deformation, and volcanic gas emission) failed to provide warning that an eruption was imminent until a few days before a visible welt appeared at the surface--a situation reminiscent of the 1980 north-flank bulge at Mount St. Helens.

  9. Residual triose phosphate isomerase activity and color measurements to determine adequate cooking of ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Sair, A I; Booren, A M; Berry, B W; Smith, D M

    1999-02-01

    The objectives were to (i) compare the use of triose phosphate isomerase (TPI) activity and internal color scores for determination of cooking adequacy of beef patties and (ii) determine the effect of frozen storage and fat content on residual TPI activity in ground beef. Ground beef patties (24.4% fat) were cooked to five temperatures ranging from 60.0 to 82.2 degrees C. TPI activity decreased as beef patty cooking temperature was increased from 60.0 to 71.1 degrees C; however, no difference (P > 0.05) in activity (6.3 U/kg meat) was observed in patties cooked to 71.1 degrees C and above. Degree of doneness color scores, a* values and b* values, of ground beef patties decreased as internal temperature was increased from 60.0 to 71.1 degrees C; however, temperature had no effect on L* values. TPI activity in raw ground beef after five freeze-thaw cycles did not differ from the control. Three freeze-thaw cycles of raw ground beef resulted in a 57.2% decrease in TPI activity after cooking. TPI activity of cooked beef increased during 2 months of frozen storage, but TPI activity in ground beef stored for 3 months or longer did not differ from the unfrozen control. While past research has shown color to be a poor indicator of adequate thermal processing, our results suggest that undercooked ground beef patties could be distinguished from those that had been adequately cooked following U.S. Department of Agriculture guidelines using residual TPI activity as a marker.

  10. Quaternary grabens in southernmost Illinois: deformation near an active intraplate seismic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, W. John; Denny, F. Brett; Follmer, Leon R.; Masters, John M.

    1999-05-01

    Narrow grabens displace Quaternary sediments near the northern edge of the Mississippi Embayment in extreme southern Illinois, east-central United States. Grabens are part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC), which has been recurrently active throughout Phanerozoic time. The FAFC strikes directly toward the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), scene of some of the largest intra-plate earthquakes in history. The NMSZ and FAFC share origin in a failed Cambrian rift (Reelfoot Rift). Every major fault zone of the FAFC in Illinois exhibits Quaternary displacement. The structures appear to be strike-slip pull-apart grabens, but the magnitude and direction of horizontal slip and their relationship to the current stress field are unknown. Upper Tertiary strata are vertically displaced more than 100 m, Illinoian and older Pleistocene strata 10 to 30 m, and Wisconsinan deposits 1 m or less. No Holocene deformation has been observed. Average vertical slip rates are estimated at 0.01 to 0.03 mm/year, and recurrence intervals for earthquakes of magnitude 6 to 7 are on the order of 10,000s of years for any given fault. Previous authors remarked that the small amount of surface deformation in the New Madrid area implies that the NMSZ is a young feature. Our findings show that tectonic activity has shifted around throughout the Quaternary in the central Mississippi Valley. In addition to the NMSZ and southern Illinois, the Wabash Valley (Illinois-Indiana), Benton Hills (Missouri), Crowley's Ridge (Arkansas-Missouri), and possibly other sites have experienced Quaternary tectonism. The NMSZ may be only the latest manifestation of seismicity in an intensely fractured intra-plate region.

  11. Quaternary grabens in southernmost Illinois: Deformation near an active intraplate seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, W.J.; Denny, F.B.; Follmer, L.R.; Masters, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Narrow grabens displace Quaternary sediments near the northern edge of the Mississippi Embayment in extreme southern Illinois, east-central United States. Grabens are part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC), which has been recurrently active throughout Phanerozoic time. The FAFC strikes directly toward the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), scene of some of the largest intra-plate earthquakes in history. The NMSZ and FAFC share origin in a failed Cambrian rift (Reelfoot Rift). Every major fault zone of the FAFC in Illinois exhibits Quaternary displacement. The structures appear to be strike-slip pull-apart grabens, but the magnitude and direction of horizontal slip and their relationship to the current stress field are unknown. Upper Tertiary strata are vertically displaced more than 100 m, Illinoian and older Pleistocene strata 10 to 30 m, and Wisconsinan deposits 1 m or less. No Holocene deformation has been observed. Average vertical slip rates are estimated at 0.01 to 0.03 mm/year, and recurrence intervals for earthquakes of magnitude 6 to 7 are on the order of 10,000s of years for any given fault. Previous authors remarked that the small amount of surface deformation in the New Madrid area implies that the NMSZ is a young feature. Our findings show that tectonic activity has shifted around throughout the Quaternary in the central Mississippi Valley. In addition to the NMSZ and southern Illinois, the Wabash Valley (Illinois-Indiana), Benton Hills (Missouri), Crowley's Ridge (Arkansas-Missouri), and possibly other sites have experienced Quaternary tectonism. The NMSZ may be only the latest manifestation of seismicity in an intensely fractured intra-plate region.

  12. Influence of thermally activated processes on the deformation behavior during low temperature ECAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, S.; Scholze, M.; F-X Wagner, M.

    2016-03-01

    High strength aluminum alloys are generally hard to deform. Therefore, the application of conventional severe plastic deformation methods to generate ultrafine-grained microstructures and to further increase strength is considerably limited. In this study, we consider low temperature deformation in a custom-built, cooled equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) tool (internal angle 90°) as an alternative approach to severely plastically deform a 7075 aluminum alloy. To document the maximum improvement of mechanical properties, these alloys are initially deformed from a solid solution heat-treated condition. We characterize the mechanical behavior and the microstructure of the coarse grained initial material at different low temperatures, and we analyze how a tendency for the PLC effect and the strain-hardening rate affect the formability during subsequent severe plastic deformation at low temperatures. We then discuss how the deformation temperature and velocity influence the occurrence of PLC effects and the homogeneity of the deformed ECAP billets. Besides the mechanical properties and these microstructural changes, we discuss technologically relevant processing parameters (such as pressing forces) and practical limitations, as well as changes in fracture behavior of the low temperature deformed materials as a function of deformation temperature.

  13. Subscale Validation of the Subsurface Active Filtration of Exhaust (SAFE) Approach to the NTP Ground Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, William M.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Bulman, Mel; Joyner, Russell; Martin, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) has been recognized as an enabling technology for missions to Mars and beyond. However, one of the key challenges of developing a nuclear thermal rocket is conducting verification and development tests on the ground. A number of ground test options are presented, with the Sub-surface Active Filtration of Exhaust (SAFE) method identified as a preferred path forward for the NTP program. The SAFE concept utilizes the natural soil characteristics present at the Nevada National Security Site to provide a natural filter for nuclear rocket exhaust during ground testing. A validation method of the SAFE concept is presented, utilizing a non-nuclear sub-scale hydrogen/oxygen rocket seeded with detectible radioisotopes. Additionally, some alternative ground test concepts, based upon the SAFE concept, are presented. Finally, an overview of the ongoing discussions of developing a ground test campaign are presented.

  14. [Seasonal peculiarities of the ground squirrel (Spermophilus undulatus) and Wistar rats circadian activity].

    PubMed

    Semenova, T P; Spiridonova, L A; Zakharova, N M

    2014-09-01

    The seasonal peculiarities of the circadian activity of hibernator, Yakutian long tail ground squirrels (S. undulatus) (n = 35) and non hibernator, Wistar rats (n = 35), were studied. The locomotor activity was registered in each subject individually during 5-17 days by means of "Animex" in the different periods of annual cycle. It was shown that ground squirrels were animals with daily type of activity. On the contrary, the Wistar rats demonstrated nocturne type of locomotors activity. The active period in rats was longer than in ground squirrels. It included not only at night, but morning time in spring, and daytime--in summer. The circadian differences between hibernators and non-hibernators were kept during all annual cycle at night time, but in daytime--only in spring and summer time.

  15. Land-subsidence and ground-water storage monitoring in the Tucson Active Management Area, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pool, Don R.; Winster, Daniel; Cole, K.C.

    2000-01-01

    The Tucson Active Management Area (TAMA) comprises two basins--Tucson Basin and Avra Valley. The TAMA has been directed by Arizona ground-water law to attain an annual balance between groundwater withdrawals and recharge by the year 2025. This balance is defined by the statute as "safe yield." Current ground-water withdrawals exceed recharge, resulting in conditions of ground-water overdraft, which causes removal of water from ground-water storage and subsidence of the land surface. Depletion of storage and associated land subsidence will not be halted until all discharge from the system, both natural and human induced, is balanced by recharge. The amount of the ground-water overdraft has been difficult to estimate until recently because it could not be directly measured. Overdraft has been estimated using indirect water-budget methods that rely on uncertain estimates of recharge. As a result, the status of the ground-water budget could not be known with great certainty. Gravity methods offer a means to directly measure ground-water overdraft through measurement of changes in the gravitational field of the Earth that are caused by changes in the amount of water stored in the subsurface. Changes in vertical position also affect the measured gravity value and thus subsidence also must be monitored. The combination of periodic observations of gravity and vertical positions provide direct measures of changes in stored ground water and land subsidence.

  16. Deformation Time Series Monitoring Of Nisyros Volcano (Greece) During Unrest And Rest Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derdelakos, K.; Parcharidis, I.; Benekos, G.; Papageorgiou, E.

    2013-12-01

    Nisyros Volcano (SW Greece) shows an unrest phase during 1996-97 accompanied by intensive seismic activity in the broader area at the beginning of 1996 and lasted through the end of 1997 and returned to the background level at the beginning of 1998. SAR interferometry has already shown its ability in mapping ground deformation, like co-seismic deformation, as well as long-term movements as is the ground deformation in volcanoes, landslides and subsidence. Ground deformation monitoring is one of the main parameters that should be considered to assess volcanic hazard. In the current study the multi-reference synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometric technique was applied in order to study the evolution of ground deformation during the unrest period 1996-1997 and the post period of 2003-2010. Two different data sets of common acquisition geometry of radar scenes covering the mention periods were used.

  17. Calculation of the Slip System Activity in Deformed Zinc Single Crystals Using Digital 3-D Image Correlation Data

    SciTech Connect

    Florando, J; Rhee, M; Arsenlis, A; LeBlanc, M; Lassila, D

    2006-02-21

    A 3-D image correlation system, which measures the full-field displacements in 3 dimensions, has been used to experimentally determine the full deformation gradient matrix for two zinc single crystals. Based on the image correlation data, the slip system activity for the two crystals has been calculated. The results of the calculation show that for one crystal, only the primary slip system is active, which is consistent with traditional theory. The other crystal however, shows appreciable deformation on slip systems other than the primary. An analysis has been conducted which confirms the experimental observation that these other slip system deform in such a manner that the net result is slip which is approximately one third the magnitude and directly orthogonal to the primary system.

  18. Analysis of ground reaction force and electromyographic activity of the gastrocnemius muscle during double support.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Andreia S P; Santos, Rubim; Oliveira, Francisco P M; Carvalho, Paulo; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2012-05-01

    Mechanisms associated with energy expenditure during gait have been extensively researched and studied. According to the double-inverted pendulum model energy expenditure is higher during double support, as lower limbs need to work to redirect the centre of mass velocity. This study looks into how the ground reaction force of one limb affects the muscle activity required by the medial gastrocnemius of the contralateral limb during step-to-step transition. Thirty-five subjects were monitored as to the medial gastrocnemius electromyographic activity of one limb and the ground reaction force of the contralateral limb during double support. After determination of the Pearson correlation coefficient (r), a moderate correlation was observed between the medial gastrocnemius electromyographic activity of the dominant leg and the vertical (Fz) and anteroposterior (Fy) components of ground reaction force of the non-dominant leg (r = 0.797, p < 0.000 1; r = -0.807, p < 0.000 1). A weak and moderate correlation was observed between the medial gastrocnemius electromyographic activity of the non-dominant leg and the Fz and Fy of the dominant leg, respectively (r = 0.442, p = 0.018; r = -0.684 p < 0.000 1). The results obtained suggest that during double support, ground reaction force is associated with the electromyographic activity of the contralateral medial gastrocnemius and that there is an increased dependence between the ground reaction force of the non-dominant leg and the electromyographic activity of the dominant medial gastrocnemius.

  19. Cloud-to-ground lightning activity in Colombia and the influence of topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranguren, D.; López, J.; Inampués, J.; Torres, H.; Betz, H.

    2017-02-01

    Lightning activity on the Colombian mountains, where the altitude varies from 0 to more than 5000 MSL, is studied based on VLF/LF lightning detection data and using a 2012-2013 dataset. The influence of altitude is observed by evaluating cloud-to-ground lightning incidence at different altitude intervals. The relationship between ground flash density and altitude gradient vectors is studied. Results show a clear dependence of the flash density on elevation.

  20. National water-information clearinghouse activities; ground-water perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haupt, C.A.; Jensen, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) has functioned for many years as an informal clearinghouse for water resources information, enabling users to access groundwater information effectively. Water resources clearinghouse activities of the USGS are conducted through several separate computerized water information programs that are involved in the collection, storage, retrieval, and distribution of different types of water information. The following USGS programs perform water information clearinghouse functions and provide the framework for a formalized National Water-Information Clearinghouse: (1) The National Water Data Exchange--a nationwide confederation of more than 300 Federal, State, local, government, academic, and private water-oriented organizations that work together to improve access to water data; (2) the Water Resources Scientific Information Center--acquires, abstracts, and indexes the major water-resources-related literature of the world, and provides this information to the water resources community; (3) the Information Transfer Program--develops innovative approaches to transfer information and technology developed within the USGS to audiences in the public and private sectors; (4) the Hydrologic Information Unit--provides responses to a variety of requests, both technical and lay-oriented, for water resources information , and helps efforts to conduct water resources research; (5) the Water Data Storage and Retrieval System--maintains accessible computerized files of hydrologic data collected nationwide, by the USGS and other governmental agencies, from stream gaging stations, groundwater observation wells, and surface- and groundwater quality sampling sites; (6) the Office of Water Data Coordination--coordinate the water data acquisition activities of all agencies of the Federal Government, and is responsible for the planning, design, and inter-agency coordination of a national water data and information network; and (7) the Water Resources Research

  1. Microearthquake activity, lithospheric structure, and deformation modes at an amagmatic ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Florian; Schlindwein, Vera

    2016-07-01

    While nascent oceanic lithosphere at slow to fast spreading mid-ocean ridges (MOR) is relatively well studied, much less is known about the lithospheric structure and properties at ultraslow MORs. Here we present microearthquake data from a 1 year ocean bottom seismometer deployment at the amagmatic, oblique supersegment of the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. A refraction seismic experiment was performed to constrain upper lithosphere P-velocities and results were used to construct a 1D velocity model for earthquake location. Earthquake foci were located individually and subsequently relocated relative to each other to sharpen the image of seismically active structures. Frequent earthquake activity extends to 31 km beneath the seafloor, indicating an exceptionally thick brittle lithosphere and an undulating brittle-ductile transition that implies significant variations in the along-axis thermal structure of the lithosphere. We observe a strong relation between petrology, microseismicity distribution, and topography along the ridge axis: Peridotite-dominated areas associate with deepest hypocenters, vast volumes of lithosphere that deforms aseismically as a consequence of alteration, and the deepest axial rift valley. Areas of basalt exposure correspond to shallower hypocenters, shallower and more rugged axial seafloor. Focal mechanisms deviate from pure extension and are spatially variable. Earthquakes form an undulating band of background seismicity and do not delineate discrete detachment faults as common on slow spreading ridges. Instead, the seismicity band sharply terminates to the south, immediately beneath the rift boundary. Considering the deep alteration, large steep boundary faults might be present but are entirely aseismic.

  2. Promoting physical activity: fertile ground for rehabilitation psychology.

    PubMed

    Uswatte, Gitendra

    2013-02-01

    Comments on the article by Schmacher et al. (see record 2013-06066-009). Readers of Rehabilitation Psychology might be surprised, or maybe even alarmed, to find an article on promoting physical activity in able-bodied people between the covers of their latest issue. This commentary contends that this area of research and practice might be one into which rehabilitation psychologists want to venture. Schumacher and coworkers describe a field test (N = 216) of a token system for reinforcing stair taking. The setting was an eight-story office building housing a single company in a midsized city in the southeastern United States. Schumacher et al. report an increase from 39 stair transactions per day by all study participants in the 6 months before implementation of the intervention to 301 transactions in the 6 months after the implementation of the intervention, which represents a 600% increase. The cost of the intervention was only $17 per person. Although replication of these results in a study with additional sources of control would increase confidence in the validity of the findings, the size of the gains in stair taking, the number of participants in the study, the length of the baseline and implementation periods, and the objective measurement of outcome warrant attention.

  3. Sequential activation of ground pads reduces skin heating during radiofrequency tumor ablation: in vivo porcine results.

    PubMed

    Schutt, David J; Swindle, M Michael; Helke, Kristi L; Bastarrika, Gorka; Schwarz, Florian; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2010-03-01

    Skin burns below ground pads during monopolar RF ablation are increasingly prevalent, thereby hindering the development of higher power RF generators capable of creating larger tumor ablation zones in combination with multiple or new applicators. Our goal was to evaluate reduction in skin temperatures via additional ground pads in an in vivo porcine model. Three ground pads placed on the animal's abdomen were activated either simultaneously or sequentially, where activation timing was adjusted to equilibrate skin temperature below each pad. Thirteen RF ablations (n = 4 simultaneous at 300 W, n = 5 sequential at 300 W, and n = 4 sequential at 375 W) were performed for 12 min via two internally cooled cluster electrodes placed in the gluteus maximus of domestic swine. Temperature rise at each pad and burn degree as determined via histology were compared. Ablation zone size was determined via T2-weighted MRI. Maximum temperature rise was significantly higher with simultaneous activation than with either of the sequential activation group (21.4 degrees C versus 8.1 degrees C or 9.6 degrees C, p < 0.01). Ablation zone diameters during simultaneous (300 W) and sequential activations (300 and 375 W) were and 6.9 +/- 0.3, 5.6 +/- 0.3, and 7.5 +/- 0.6 cm, respectively. Sequential activation of multiple ground pads results in significantly lower skin temperatures and less severe burns, as measured by histological examination.

  4. Active oil-water interfaces: buckling and deformation of oil drops by bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Gabriel; Stocker, Roman

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria are unicellular organisms that seek nutrients and energy for growth, division, and self-propulsion. Bacteria are also natural colloidal particles that attach and self-assemble at liquid-liquid interfaces. Here, we present experimental results on active oil-water interfaces that spontaneously form when bacteria accumulate or grow on the interface. Using phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy, we simultaneously observed the dynamics of adsorbed Alcanivorax bacteria and the oil-water interface within microfluidic devices. We find that, by growing and dividing, adsorbed bacteria form a jammed monolayer of cells that encapsulates the entire oil drop. As bacteria continue to grow at the interface, the drop buckles and the interface undergoes strong deformations. The bacteria act to stabilize non-equilibrium shapes of the oil-phase such wrinkling and tubulation. In addition to presenting a natural example of a living interface, these findings shape our understanding of microbial degradation of oil and may have important repercussions on engineering interventions for oil bioremediation.

  5. Tectonic history and thrust-fold deformation style of seismically active structures near Coalinga

    SciTech Connect

    Namson, J.S. ); Davis, T.L.; Lagoe, M.B.

    1990-01-01

    The stratigraphy of the Coalinga region can be divided into tectostratigraphic facies whose boundaries delineate two major tectonic events - one in the mid-Cenozoic (38-17 Ma) and one in the late Cenozoic (less than 3 Ma). The succession of these tectostratigraphic facies, and an integration of geology, subsurface well data, a seismic-reflection profile, and earthquake seismicity on a retrodeformable cross section, yield a model for the tectonic evolution of the Coalinga region. This model suggests that the structural style of both deformational events is characteristic of fold and thrust belts. The model also indicates that the causative fault of the May 2 earthquake is a ramped thrust. The results of this study, in combination with regional geologic relations, suggest that the Coalinga region is part of an active fold and thrust belt which borders the west and south sides of the San Joaquin Valley. The potential for future earthquakes due to movement of other blind thrust faults within this belt should be evaluated.

  6. Earthquake relocations, crustal rheology, and active deformation in the central-eastern Alps (N Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viganò, Alfio; Scafidi, Davide; Ranalli, Giorgio; Martin, Silvana; Della Vedova, Bruno; Spallarossa, Daniele

    2015-10-01

    A revised seismic catalogue (1994-2007) for the central-eastern Alps (N Italy) is presented. 396 earthquake relocations, for local magnitudes in the 1.2-5.3 range, are performed using a 3D crustal velocity structure and probabilistic locations. The location procedure is validated by computing a set of 41 quarry shot solutions and all the results, both about shots and seismic events, are compared with those obtained using the routine location procedure. Results are shown for five contiguous seismotectonic domains, as supported by geological and geophysical evidence (e.g., fault systems, crustal tomography, focal mechanisms types). Earthquake hypocentres are mostly located in the upper crust (0-15 km of depth), in good agreement with thermo-rheological models about the brittle-ductile transitions (8-9 km of depth) and total crustal strengths (1.0-2.0 TN m- 1). Epicentres are clustered and/or aligned along present-day active geological structures. The proposed seismotectonic model shows dominant compression along the Giudicarie and Belluno-Bassano-Montello thrusts, with strain partitioning along the dominant right-lateral strike-slip faults of the Schio-Vicenza domain. The present-day deformation of the Southern Alps and the internal Alpine chain is compatible with Adria indentation and the related crustal stress distribution.

  7. Crustal deformation induced by volcanic activity measured by InSAR time series analysis (Volcan de Colima-Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunori, Carlo Alberto; Norini, Gianluca; Stramondo, Salvatore; Capra, Lucia; Zucca, Francesco; Groppelli, Gianluca; Bignami, Christian; Chini, Marco; Manea, Marina; Manea, Vlad

    2010-05-01

    The Volcán de Colima (CV) is currently the most active Mexican volcano. After the 1913 plinian activity the volcano presented several eruptive phases that lasted few years, but since 1991 its activity became more persistent with vulcanian eruptions, lava and dome extrusions. During the last 15 years the volcano suffered several eruptive episodes as in 1991, 1994, 1998-1999, 2001-2003, 2004 and 2005 with the emplacement of pyroclastic flows. During rain seasons lahars are frequent affecting several infrastructures such as bridges and electric towers. This work is focused on the detection of surface deformation with centimetre or sub-centimeter accuracy of the Volcán de Colima and surrounding areas. We try to assess the amount and the spatial extension of surface movements of the CV and to get insights into the causes of the surface deformation by using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), a powerful tool ensuring measurements at high-accuracy over large areas. The image dataset acquired by ESA ENVISAT ASAR (C band) sensor, has been processed using Advanced interferometric techniques (A-InSAR) to overcome the really challenging sources of decorrelation related to the setting context, mainly vegetation and atmosphere, in order to give us the opportunity to detect also very low rates of deformations. The main objectives of the interferometric analysis is the measurement of deformations in the CV in relation with active tectonics and gravity induced spreading, the identification of magma migration below the surface in the last decade, the detection of the incipient movements of volcanic landslides and large scale volcano instability, and the kinematics of the Colima rift. We present preliminary results of the A-InSAR processing, in the framework of the interdisciplinary Colima Deformation project (ColDef).

  8. Microtopographic and depth controls on active layer chemistry in Arctic polygonal ground

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Brent D.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Graham, David E.; Gu, Baohua; Hubbard, Susan S.; Liang, Liyuan; Wu, Yuxin; Heikoop, J. M.; Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Wilson, Cathy; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-03-24

    Polygonal ground is a signature characteristic of Arctic lowlands, and carbon release from permafrost thaw can alter feedbacks to Arctic ecosystems and climate. This study describes the first comprehensive spatial examination of active layer biogeochemistry that extends across high- and low-centered, ice wedge polygons, their features, and with depth. Water chemistry measurements of 54 analytes were made on surface and active layer pore waters collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA. Significant differences were observed between high- and low-centered polygons suggesting that polygon types may be useful for landscape-scale geochemical classification. However, differences were found for polygon features (centers and troughs) for analytes that were not significant for polygon type, suggesting that finer-scale features affect biogeochemistry differently from polygon types. Depth variations were also significant, demonstrating important multidimensional aspects of polygonal ground biogeochemistry. These results have major implications for understanding how polygonal ground ecosystems function, and how they may respond to future change.

  9. Microtopographic and depth controls on active layer chemistry in Arctic polygonal ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, B. D.; Throckmorton, H. M.; Graham, D. E.; Gu, B.; Hubbard, S. S.; Liang, L.; Wu, Y.; Heikoop, J. M.; Herndon, E. M.; Phelps, T. J.; Wilson, C. J.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2015-03-01

    Polygonal ground is a signature characteristic of Arctic lowlands, and carbon release from permafrost thaw can alter feedbacks to Arctic ecosystems and climate. This study describes the first comprehensive spatial examination of active layer biogeochemistry that extends across high- and low-centered, ice wedge polygons, their features, and with depth. Water chemistry measurements of 54 analytes were made on surface and active layer pore waters collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA. Significant differences were observed between high- and low-centered polygons suggesting that polygon types may be useful for landscape-scale geochemical classification. However, differences were found for polygon features (centers and troughs) for analytes that were not significant for polygon type, suggesting that finer-scale features affect biogeochemistry differently from polygon types. Depth variations were also significant, demonstrating important multidimensional aspects of polygonal ground biogeochemistry. These results have major implications for understanding how polygonal ground ecosystems function, and how they may respond to future change.

  10. Ground reaction forces, kinematics, and muscle activations during the windmill softball pitch.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gretchen D; Plummer, Hillary

    2011-07-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine quantitatively ground reaction forces, kinematics, and muscle activations during the windmill softball pitch, and to determine relationships between knee valgus and muscle activations, ball velocity and muscle activation as well as ball velocity and ground reaction forces. It was hypothesized that there would be an inverse relationship between degree of knee valgus and muscle activation, a direct relationship between ground reaction forces and ball velocity, and non-stride leg muscle activations and ball velocity. Ten female windmill softball pitchers (age 17.6 ± 3.47 years, stature 1.67 ± 0.07 m, weight 67.4 ± 12.2 kg) participated. Dependent variables were ball velocity, surface electromyographic (sEMG), kinematic, and kinetic data while the participant was the independent variable. Stride foot contact reported peak vertical forces of 179% body weight. There were positive relationships between ball velocity and ground reaction force (r = 0.758, n = 10, P = 0.029) as well as ball velocity and non-stride leg gluteus maximus (r = 0.851, n = 10, P = 0.007) and medius (r = 0.760, n = 10, P = 0.029) muscle activity, while there was no notable relationship between knee valgus and muscle activation. As the windmill softball pitcher increased ball velocity, her vertical ground reaction forces also increased. Proper conditioning of the lumbopelvic-hip complex, including the gluteals, is essential for injury prevention. From the data presented, it is evident that bilateral strength and conditioning of the gluteal muscle group is salient in the windmill softball pitch as an attempt to decrease incidence of injury.

  11. What do we know about winter active ground beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae) in Central and Northern Europe?

    PubMed Central

    Jaskuła, Radomir; Soszyńska-Maj, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This paper summarizes the current knowledge on winter active Carabidae in Central and Northern Europe. In total 73 winter active species are listed, based on literature and own observations. Ground beetles are among the three most numerous Coleoptera families active during the autumn to spring period. The winter community of Carabidae is composed both of larvae (mainly autumn breeding species) and adults, as well as of epigeic species and those inhabiting tree trunks. Supranivean fauna is characterized by lower species diversity than the subnivean fauna. The activity of ground beetles decreases in late autumn, is lowest during mid-winter and increases in early spring. Carabidae are noted as an important food source in the diet of insectivorous mammals. They are also predators, hunting small winter active invertebrates. PMID:21738431

  12. Activated carbon derived from waste coffee grounds for stable methane storage.

    PubMed

    Kemp, K Christian; Baek, Seung Bin; Lee, Wang-Geun; Meyyappan, M; Kim, Kwang S

    2015-09-25

    An activated carbon material derived from waste coffee grounds is shown to be an effective and stable medium for methane storage. The sample activated at 900 °C displays a surface area of 1040.3 m(2) g(-1) and a micropore volume of 0.574 cm(3) g(-1) and exhibits a stable CH4 adsorption capacity of ∼4.2 mmol g(-1) at 3.0 MPa and a temperature range of 298 ± 10 K. The same material exhibits an impressive hydrogen storage capacity of 1.75 wt% as well at 77 K and 100 kPa. Here, we also propose a mechanism for the formation of activated carbon from spent coffee grounds. At low temperatures, the material has two distinct types with low and high surface areas; however, activation at elevated temperatures drives off the low surface area carbon, leaving behind the porous high surface area activated carbon.

  13. Changing patterns of seismicity and ground deformation at the end of the Mount St. Helens 2004-2008 dome-building eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisowski, M.; Moran, S. C.; Dzurisin, D.; Anderson, K. R.

    2012-12-01

    The onset and character of the 2004-2008 dome-building eruption at Mount St. Helens has been reported in detail through 2006-2007; our purpose here is to describe activity near the end of the eruption in early 2008. Overall, seismicity, deformation, and extrusion rates progressively declined throughout the eruption. As measured from SEP, the continuously-running seismic station closest to the vent, the number of detected earthquakes declined from ~1000/day during January-October 2006 to hundreds per day by September 2007 and to near zero by late October 2007. Starting in December 2007 the seismicity rate increased slightly , culminating in a short-lived episode of about 500 events on January 12-13, most of which accompanied several tremor-like signals and a spasmodic burst of LPs. At this time, distinctive sawtooth-shaped tilt events that had accompanied dome growth ceased; these had been recorded throughout the earlier part of the eruption at three locations on the 1980s lava dome adjacent to the 2004-2008 vent. Seismicity rapidly declined back to rates of 10-20 per day for the next two weeks. The "last gasp" from the seismic perspective was on January 27-28, when a spasmodic burst of ~50 VT earthquakes occurred over the space of 3 hours early on January 27. This burst followed by a brief return of drumbeat-style earthquakes that had characterized much of the 2004-2008 eruption, with hybrid-style earthquakes occurring every 35-40 minutes through the end of January 28. By the end of January, seismicity had declined to 1-2 earthquakes per day, consistent with pre-2004-eruption background levels. In conjunction with the decline in seismicity rate, depths of locatable earthquakes increased from the 0-1 km depth range seen during the eruption to 2-3 km by the end of January 2008, a depth range typical of pre-2004-eruption seismicity. Remote-camera photography confirmed the cessation of dome growth and also the subsequent subsidence of the 2004-2008 dome as a result of

  14. Structural deformation and sedimentation in an active Caldera, Rabaul, Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, H. Gary; Tiffin, D.L.; McKee, C.O.

    1986-01-01

    Recent seismic and tectonic activity in Rabaul Caldera, Papua New Guinea, suggests that magma is accumulating at a shallow depth beneath this partially submerged structure and that a new volcano may be developing. Changes in onshore elevation since 1971 (as much as 2 m on south Matupit Island) indicate that rapid and large-scale uplifts have occurred on the seafloor near the center of the caldera. The frequency of seismic events within the caldera has also increased during this period. Earthquake locations define an elliptical ring surrounding the center of this uplift within the caldera. A marine geophysical survey in 1982 by the U.S. Geological Survey's R/V "S.P. Lee" in Rabaul Caldera shows the development of a bulge in the seafloor near the center of the caldera. High-resolution seismic reflection profiles show that this bulge consists of two domal uplifts bounded and separated by two major north-south-trending fault zones. Deformed sediments overlie these zones; a prominent slump flanks the area of the bulge. Five major acoustic units were identified in the seismic reflection profiles: an acoustic basement and four sedimentary units consisting of irregularly layered, cross-layered, contorted, and well-layered sequences. The acoustic basement is probably composed of crystalline volcanic rocks, and the layered acoustic units are probably sediments, primarily ash deposited in different environments. The cross-layered, irregularly layered, and contorted units appear to have been deposited in a dynamic environment subjected to strong currents, seismicity, and/or mass wasting, while the well-layered units were deposited in a low-energy environment. Locally, well-layered sequences interfinger with the other sedimentary units, indicating a transitional environment that alternated between high-energy and low-energy depositional processes. A submarine channel cuts most of the acoustic units and appears to be the conduit for sediment transport out of the caldera; it

  15. A High-Performance Deformable Mirror with Integrated Driver ASIC for Space Based Active Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Chris

    Direct imaging of exoplanets is key to fully understanding these systems through spectroscopy and astrometry. The primary impediment to direct imaging of exoplanets is the extremely high brightness ratio between the planet and its parent star. Direct imaging requires a technique for contrast suppression, which include coronagraphs, and nulling interferometers. Deformable mirrors (DMs) are essential to both of these techniques. With space missions in mind, Microscale is developing a novel DM with direct integration of DM and its electronic control functions in a single small envelope. The Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) is key to the shrinking of the electronic control functions to a size compatible with direct integration with the DM. Through a NASA SBIR project, Microscale, with JPL oversight, has successfully demonstrated a unique deformable mirror (DM) driver ASIC prototype based on an ultra-low power switch architecture. Microscale calls this the Switch-Mode ASIC, or SM-ASIC, and has characterized it for a key set of performance parameters, and has tested its operation with a variety of actuator loads, such as piezo stack and unimorph, and over a wide temperature range. These tests show the SM-ASIC's capability of supporting active optics in correcting aberrations of a telescope in space. Microscale has also developed DMs to go with the SM-ASIC driver. The latest DM version produced uses small piezo stack elements in an 8x8 array, bonded to a novel silicon facesheet structure fabricated monolithically into a polished mirror on one side and mechanical linkage posts that connect to the piezoelectric stack actuators on the other. In this Supporting Technology proposal we propose to further develop the ASIC-DM and have assembled a very capable team to do so. It will be led by JPL, which has considerable expertise with DMs used in Adaptive Optics systems, with high-contrast imaging systems for exoplanet missions, and with designing DM driver

  16. Sequential activation of a segmented ground pad reduces skin heating during radiofrequency tumor ablation: optimization via computational models.

    PubMed

    Schutt, David J; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2008-07-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation has become an accepted treatment modality for unresectable tumors. The need for larger ablation zones has resulted in increased RF generator power. Skin burns due to ground pad heating are increasingly limiting further increases in generator power, and thus, ablation zone size. We investigated a method for reducing ground pad heating in which a commercial ground pad is segmented into multiple ground electrodes, with sequential activation of ground electrode subsets. We created finite-element method computer models of a commercial ground pad (14 x 23 cm) and compared normal operation of a standard pad to sequential activation of a segmented pad (two to five separate ground electrode segments). A constant current of 1 A was applied for 12 min in all simulations. Time periods during sequential activation simulations were adjusted to keep the leading edge temperatures at each ground electrode equal. The maximum temperature using standard activation of the commercial pad was 41.7 degrees C. For sequential activation of a segmented pad, the maximum temperature ranged from 39.3 degrees C (five segments) to 40.9 degrees C (two segments). Sequential activation of a segmented ground pad resulted in lower tissue temperatures. This method may reduce the incidence of ground pad burns and enable the use of higher power generators during RF tumor ablation.

  17. Sequential Activation of a Segmented Ground Pad Reduces Skin Heating During Radiofrequency Tumor Ablation: Optimization via Computational Models

    PubMed Central

    Schutt, David J.; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation has become an accepted treatment modality for unresectable tumors. The need for larger ablation zones has resulted in increased RF generator power. Skin burns due to ground pad heating are increasingly limiting further increases in generator power, and thus, ablation zone size. We investigated a method for reducing ground pad heating in which a commercial ground pad is segmented into multiple ground electrodes, with sequential activation of ground electrode subsets. We created finite-element method computer models of a commercial ground pad (14 × 23 cm) and compared normal operation of a standard pad to sequential activation of a segmented pad (two to five separate ground electrode segments). A constant current of 1 A was applied for 12 min in all simulations. Time periods during sequential activation simulations were adjusted to keep the leading edge temperatures at each ground electrode equal. The maximum temperature using standard activation of the commercial pad was 41.7 °C. For sequential activation of a segmented pad, the maximum temperature ranged from 39.3 °C (five segments) to 40.9 °C (two segments). Sequential activation of a segmented ground pad resulted in lower tissue temperatures. This method may reduce the incidence of ground pad burns and enable the use of higher power generators during RF tumor ablation. PMID:18595807

  18. Automatic corpus callosum segmentation using a deformable active Fourier contour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachet, Clement; Yvernault, Benjamin; Bhatt, Kshamta; Smith, Rachel G.; Gerig, Guido; Cody Hazlett, Heather; Styner, Martin

    2012-03-01

    The corpus callosum (CC) is a structure of interest in many neuroimaging studies of neuro-developmental pathology such as autism. It plays an integral role in relaying sensory, motor and cognitive information from homologous regions in both hemispheres. We have developed a framework that allows automatic segmentation of the corpus callosum and its lobar subdivisions. Our approach employs constrained elastic deformation of flexible Fourier contour model, and is an extension of Szekely's 2D Fourier descriptor based Active Shape Model. The shape and appearance model, derived from a large mixed population of 150+ subjects, is described with complex Fourier descriptors in a principal component shape space. Using MNI space aligned T1w MRI data, the CC segmentation is initialized on the mid-sagittal plane using the tissue segmentation. A multi-step optimization strategy, with two constrained steps and a final unconstrained step, is then applied. If needed, interactive segmentation can be performed via contour repulsion points. Lobar connectivity based parcellation of the corpus callosum can finally be computed via the use of a probabilistic CC subdivision model. Our analysis framework has been integrated in an open-source, end-to-end application called CCSeg both with a command line and Qt-based graphical user interface (available on NITRC). A study has been performed to quantify the reliability of the semi-automatic segmentation on a small pediatric dataset. Using 5 subjects randomly segmented 3 times by two experts, the intra-class correlation coefficient showed a superb reliability (0.99). CCSeg is currently applied to a large longitudinal pediatric study of brain development in autism.

  19. Measuring active deformation of the Yakima fold and thrust belt using GPS and InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalzle, G. M.; Baker, M. S.; McCaffrey, R.; King, R. W.; Osmanoglu, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Yakima fold-thrust belt (YFTB; also known as Yakima Fold Belt), forming the distinct geomorphology of northernmost Oregon and south-central Washington, is one of the few actively deforming fold and thrust belts in the conterminous United States. Although controversial, currently available data suggest that the YFTB is "thick-skinned", i.e., its faults penetrate the seismogenic layer, allowing for large (~M7) earthquakes. The YFTB is bisected by the Olympic-Wallowa Lineament (OWL) that runs from eastern Washington into the highly populated Puget Sound. Together, the YFTB and OWL make up the boundary between the clockwise rotating Oregon block and eastern Washington, which is largely moving with the North American plate. Paleomagnetic data suggest that Oregon has been rotating at its present (GPS-derived) rate for more than 15 million years with the predicted consequence of a long history of shortening across the YFTB. GPS data obtained over the past ~20 years indicate a NE-directed shortening strain rate of about 9 x 10^-9 /yr, but how this strain is partitioned across the YFTB is unclear due to the sparse locations of GPS sites. We use Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data to examine the degree to which strain rates are localized or distributed within this continental thrust belt, shedding light on the controversy regarding the behavior of the continental lithosphere under contraction. These data are compared to local seismicity, gravity surveys, recent high-resolution aeromagnetic work and paleoseismic studies.

  20. MAGNETIC LIQUID DEFORMABLE MIRRORS FOR ASTRONOMICAL APPLICATIONS: ACTIVE CORRECTION OF OPTICAL ABERRATIONS FROM LOWER-GRADE OPTICS AND SUPPORT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Borra, E. F.

    2012-08-01

    Deformable mirrors are increasingly used in astronomy. However, they still are limited in stroke for active correction of high-amplitude optical aberrations. Magnetic liquid deformable mirrors (MLDMs) are a new technology that has the advantages of high-amplitude deformations and low costs. In this paper, we demonstrate extremely high strokes and interactuator strokes achievable by MLDMs which can be used in astronomical instrumentation. In particular, we consider the use of such a mirror to suggest an interesting application for the next generation of large telescopes. We present a prototype 91 actuator deformable mirror made of a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid). This mirror uses a technique that linearizes the response of such mirrors by superimposing a large and uniform magnetic field on the magnetic field produced by an array of small coils. We discuss experimental results that illustrate the performance of MLDMs. A most interesting application of MLDMs comes from the fact they could be used to correct the aberrations of large and lower optical quality primary mirrors held by simple support systems. We estimate basic parameters of the needed MLDMs, obtaining reasonable values.

  1. Active Fault Geometry and Crustal Deformation Along the San Andreas Fault System Through San Gorgonio Pass, California: The View in 3D From Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, C.; Hauksson, E.; Plesch, A.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the 3D geometry and deformation style of the San Andreas fault (SAF) is critical to accurate dynamic rupture and ground motion prediction models. We use 3D alignments of hypocenter and focal mechanism nodal planes within a relocated earthquake catalog (1981-2011) [Hauksson et al., 2012] to develop improved 3D fault models for active strands of the SAF and adjacent secondary structures. Through San Gorgonio Pass (SGP), earthquakes define a mechanically layered crust with predominantly high-angle strike-slip faults in the upper ~10 km, while at greater depth, intersecting sets of strike-slip, oblique slip and low-angle thrust faults define a wedge-shaped volume deformation of the lower crust. In some places, this interface between upper and lower crustal deformation may be an active detachment fault, and may have controlled the down-dip extent of recent fault rupture. Alignments of hypocenters and nodal planes define multiple principal slip surfaces through SGP, including a through-going steeply-dipping predominantly strike-slip Banning fault strand at depth that upward truncates a more moderately dipping (40°-50°) blind, oblique North Palm Springs fault. The North Palm Springs fault may be the active down-dip extension of the San Gorgonio Pass thrust offset at depth by the principal, through-going Banning strand. In the northern Coachella Valley, seismicity indicates that the Garnet Hill and Banning fault strands are most likely sub-parallel and steeply dipping (~70°NE) to depths of 8-10 km, where they intersect and merge with a stack of moderately dipping to low-angle oblique thrust faults. Gravity and water well data confirm that these faults are sub-parallel and near vertical in the upper 2-3 km. Although the dense wedge of deep seismicity below SGP and largely south of the SAF contains multiple secondary fault sets of different orientations, the predominant fault set appears to be a series of en echelon NW-striking oblique strike-slip faults

  2. Ground-water activation from the upcoming operation of MI40 beam absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; Read, A.L.

    1996-09-01

    During the course of normal operation, a particle accelerator can produce radionuclides in the adjacent soil and in the beam line elements through the interactions of accelerated particles and/or secondary particles produced in the beam absorbers, targets, and sometimes elsewhere through routine beam losses. The production and concentration of these radionuclides depends on the beam parameters such as energy, intensity, particle type, and target configuration. The radionuclides produced in the soil can potentially migrate to the ground water. Soil activation and migration to the ground water depends on the details of the local hydrogeology. Generally, very few places such as the beam stops, target stations, injection and extraction sectors can have high enough radiation fields to produce radionuclides in the soil outside the enclosures. During the design, construction, or an upgrade in the intensity of existing beams, measures are taken to minimize the production of activated soil. The only leachable radionuclides known to be produced in the Fermilab soil are {sup 3}H, {sup 7}Be , {sup 22}Na, {sup 45}Ca and {sup 54}Mn and it has been determined that only {sup 3}H, and {sup 22}Na, because of their longer half lives and greater leachabilities, may significantly impact ground water resources.In the past, Fermilab has developed and used the Single Resident Well Model (SRWM) to estimate the ground water activation. Recently, the Concentration Model (CM), a more realistic method which depends on the site hydrogeology has been developed to decide the shielding requirements of the high radiation sites, and to calculate the ground water activation and its subsequent migration to the aquifer. In this report, the concentration of radionuclide released to the surface waters and the aquifer around the MI40 beam absorber are calculated. Subsequently, the ultimate limit on the primary proton beam intensity to be aborted on the Main Injector beam absorber is determined.

  3. Influence of constriction, wall tension, smooth muscle activation and cellular deformation on rat resistance artery vasodilator reactivity.

    PubMed

    Colton, Ilsley; Mandalà, Maurizio; Morton, Jude; Davidge, Sandra T; Osol, George

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how vasoconstriction (tone), wall tension, smooth muscle activation, and vascular wall deformation influence resistance artery vasodilator reactivity. Resistance arteries, from two different regional circulations (splanchnic, uterine) and from pregnant and non-pregnant rats, were cannulated and pressurized, or mounted on a wire myograph under isometric conditions prior to being exposed to both endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) vasodilator agonists. A consistent pattern of reduced vasodilator sensitivity was noted as a function of extent of preconstriction for both agonists noted in pressurized arteries. A similar pattern regarding activation was noted in wire-mounted arteries in response to SNP but not ACh. Wall tension proved to be a major determinant of vascular smooth muscle vasodilator reactivity and its normalization reversed this pattern, as more constricted vessels were more sensitive to ACh relaxation without any change in SNP sensitivity, suggesting that endothelial deformation secondary to vasoconstriction augments its vasodilator output. To our knowledge, this is the first study to dissect out the complex interplay between biophysical forces impinging on VSM (pressure, wall tension), the ambient level of tone (vasoconstriction, smooth muscle cell activation), and consequences of cellular (particularly endothelial) deformation secondary to constriction in determining resistance artery vasodilatory reactivity.

  4. Active deformation of the northern front of the Eastern Great Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niviere, Bertrand; Gagala, Lukasz; Callot, Jean-Paul; Regard, Vincent; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude

    2016-04-01

    The Arabia-Eurasia collision involved a mosaic of island arcs and microcontinents. Their accretion to the complex paleogeographic margin of Neotethys was marked by numerous collisional events. The Greater Caucasus constitute the northernmost tectonic element of this tectonic collage, developed as a back arc extensional zone now inverted, which relationships to the onset of Arabia-Eurasia continental collision and/or to the reorganization of the Arabia-Eurasia plate boundary at ˜5 Ma remain controversial. Structurally, the Greater Caucasus are a former continental back arc rift, now the locus of ongoing continental shortening. Modern geodetic observations suggest that in the west, the strain north of the Armenian Plateau is accommodated almost exclusively along the margins of the Greater Caucasus. This differs from regions further east where strain accommodation is distributed across both the Lesser and Greater Caucasus, and within the Greater Caucasus range, with a unique southward vergence. We question here the amount and mechanisms by which the Eastern Greater Caucasus accommodate part of the Arabia-Eurasia convergence. Morphostructural analysis of the folded late Pleistocene marine terrace along the northern slope of the Eastern Greater Caucasus evidences an on going tectonic activity in the area where GPS measurements record no motion. Most of the recent foreland deformation is accommodated by south-vergent folds and thrust, i. e. opposite to the vergence of the Caucasus frontal northern thrust. A progressive unconformity in the folded beds shows that it was already active during the late Pliocene. Cosmogenic dating of the terrace and kinematic restoration of the remnant terrace, linked to the subsurface geology allows for the estimation of a shortening rate ranging from a few mm/yr to 1 cm/yr over the last 5 Myr along the greater Caucasus northern front. Thus more than one third of the shortening between the Kura block / Lesser Caucasus domain and the Stable

  5. Regolith Activation on the Lunar Surface and Its Ground Test Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the surfaces of lunar regolith particles can occur through interactions with solar electromagnetic radiation, solar and galactic particle radiation and micrometeoroid bombardment. An attempt has been made to quantify the relative importance of each of those effects. The effects of these activated surfaces may be to enhance the adhesion and toxicity of the particles. Also key to the importance of activation is the lifetimes of activated states in various environments which is controlled by their passivation rate as well as their activation rate. Although techniques exist to characterize the extent of activation of particles in biological system, it is important to be able to quantify the activation state on the lunar surface, in ground-test vacuum systems, and in habitat atmospheres as well.

  6. SPoRT's Participation in the GOES-R Proving Ground Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlovec, G.; Fuell, K.; Smith, M. R.; Stano, G. T.; Molthan, A.

    2011-12-01

    The next generation geostationary satellite, GOES-R, will carry two new instruments with unique atmospheric and surface observing capabilities, the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), to study short-term weather processes. The ABI will bring enhanced multispectral observing capabilities with frequent refresh rates for regional and full disk coverage to geostationary orbit to address many existing and new forecast challenges. The GLM will, for the first time, provide the continuous monitoring of total lightning flashes over a hemispherical region from space. NOAA established the GOES-R Proving Ground activity several years ago to demonstrate the new capabilities of these instruments and to prepare forecasters for their day one use. Proving Ground partners work closely with algorithm developers and the end user community to develop and transition proxy data sets representing GOES-R observing capabilities. This close collaboration helps to maximize refine algorithms leading to the delivery of a product that effectively address a forecast challenge. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program has been a participant in the NOAA GOES-R Proving Ground activity by developing and disseminating selected GOES-R proxy products to collaborating WFOs and National Centers. Established in 2002 to demonstrate the weather and forecasting application of real-time EOS measurements, the SPoRT program has grown to be an end-to-end research to operations activity focused on the use of advanced NASA modeling and data assimilation approaches, nowcasting techniques, and unique high-resolution multispectral data from EOS satellites to improve short-term weather forecasts on a regional and local scale. Participation in the Proving Ground activities extends SPoRT's activities and taps its experience and expertise in diagnostic weather analysis, short-term weather forecasting, and the transition of research and experimental

  7. SPoRT's Participation in the GOES-R Proving Ground Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary; Fuell, Kevin; Smith, Matthew; Stano, Geoffrey; Molthan, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The next generation geostationary satellite, GOES-R, will carry two new instruments with unique atmospheric and surface observing capabilities, the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), to study short-term weather processes. The ABI will bring enhanced multispectral observing capabilities with frequent refresh rates for regional and full disk coverage to geostationary orbit to address many existing and new forecast challenges. The GLM will, for the first time, provide the continuous monitoring of total lightning flashes over a hemispherical region from space. NOAA established the GOES-R Proving Ground activity several years ago to demonstrate the new capabilities of these instruments and to prepare forecasters for their day one use. Proving Ground partners work closely with algorithm developers and the end user community to develop and transition proxy data sets representing GOES-R observing capabilities. This close collaboration helps to maximize refine algorithms leading to the delivery of a product that effectively address a forecast challenge. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) program has been a participant in the NOAA GOES-R Proving Ground activity by developing and disseminating selected GOES-R proxy products to collaborating WFOs and National Centers. Established in 2002 to demonstrate the weather and forecasting application of real-time EOS measurements, the SPoRT program has grown to be an end-to-end research to operations activity focused on the use of advanced NASA modeling and data assimilation approaches, nowcasting techniques, and unique high-resolution multispectral data from EOS satellites to improve short-term weather forecasts on a regional and local scale. Participation in the Proving Ground activities extends SPoRT s activities and taps its experience and expertise in diagnostic weather analysis, short-term weather forecasting, and the transition of research and experimental

  8. Long-term High-Quality Deformation Observations near Active Faults in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnew, D. C.; Wyatt, F. K.

    2014-12-01

    For monitoring and for improved understanding of the seismic cycle we have collected continuous deformation data close to the two most active faults in Southern California over the past few decades. Pinyon Flat Observatory (PFO) is 14 km from the Anza section of the San Jacinto fault (slip rate 10-15 mm/yr), which has not produced a large earthquake in the past 200 years; Salton City (SCS) is within 15 km of the blind section of the fault further SE. Two locations (Cholame, or CHL, and Durmid Hill, or DHL) are within three km of the San Andreas fault (SAF): CHL, at the N end of the segment that ruptured in 1857, and DHL at the S end of the segment that ruptured about 1700. All these observatories use laser strainmeters (LSM's), 400 to 700 m long, and located on the surface with endpoints anchored 25 m deep. These instruments provide unique long-term high-quality measurements of strain; in geological settings from slightly weathered granite to lake-bed clay sediments, the LSM data record secular strain accumulation consistent with continuous GPS, while covering the temporal range from seismic waves to secular changes. At periods less than a few months, the LSM noise level is far below that from fault-scale GPS networks.The LSM sites near the SAF show strain-rate fluctuations over periods of months and longer of up to 20 percent of the long-term rate, and have also observed aseismic strain events lasting hours to days. At CHL these short-term signals have been observed on borehole strainmeters nearby, and there and at DHL they appear to be a few km deep. Aseismic signals observed at PFO seem to be nearer to the seismogenic zone. In most cases further interpretation has been hampered by not having similar measurements at other locations, but the existing LSM data have been used to rule out possible aseismic strains from nearby earthquake swarms (DHL) and deep tremor (CHL).The LSM data and other measurements at the observatories, confirm how important patience and

  9. Characterising Seismicity at Alutu, an Actively Deforming Volcano in the Main Ethiopian Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilks, M.; Nowacki, A.; Kendall, J. M.; Wookey, J. M.; Biggs, J.; Bastow, I. D.; Ayele, A.; Bedada, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) provides a unique example of the tectonic and volcanic processes occuring during the transition from continental rifting to oceanic spreading. Situated 100 km south of Addis Ababa along the eastern rift margin, Alutu is a silicic stratovolcano that geodetic measurements (InSAR and GPS) have shown is actively deforming. Though the volcano has received relatively little scientific attention it is also a site of economic significance as a geothermal power plant resides within the caldera. As part of ARGOS (Alutu Research Geophysical ObservationS), a multi-disciplinary project aiming to investigate the magmatic and hydrothermal processes occuring at Alutu, a seismic network of 12 broadband seismometers was deployed in January 2012. Other components of ARGOS include InSAR, GPS, geologic mapping and magnetotellurics. From the seismic dataset, P- and S-wave arrivals across the array were manually picked and used to locate events using a non-linear earthquake location algorithm (NonLinLoc) and a predefined 1D velocity model. Perturbations were later applied to this velocity model to investigate the sensitivity of the locations and evaluate the true uncertainties of the solutions. Over 1000 events were successfully located during 2012, where picks were possible at 4 or more stations. Seismicity clusters at both shallow depths (z<2 km) beneath the caldera and at deeper depths of 5-15 km. There is a significant increase in seismicity during the rainy months, suggesting the shallow events may be related to the hydrothermal system. We interpret the deeper events as being magmatic in origin. Events are also located along the eastern border faults that bound the outer edges of the MER and highlights that seismicity arises concurrently via tectonic processes. An adapted version of Richter's original local magnitude scale (ML) to account for attenuation within the MER (Keir et al., 2006) was then used to compute magnitudes for the best located events

  10. Active deformations of the Jura arc inferred by GPS and seismotectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, Mickael; Sue, Christian; Walpersdorf, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The Jura Mountain is the most recent expression of the alpine orogeny. At the northern end of the western Alps, its recent deformation is still a matter of debates. GPS data available in the Jura bear witness of disagreement between studies, as interpretations vary from uplifted belt to arc-parallel extension (Walpersdorf, et al., 2006) and very slow horizontal movements. Moreover, the traditionally accepted model of an active collisional activity of the Jura, in the dynamic continuity of the Alps, rises up the matter of its geodynamic origin. Indeed, the European Alps are in a post-collisional regime characterized by isostatic-related extension and uplift driven by interaction between buoyancy forces and erosional dynamics (e.g. Sue et al. 2007; Champagnac, et al., 2007; Vernant, et al., 2013.). We present a reappraisal of published focal mechanisms combined with a new GPS solution over the entire arc and surrounding areas. Although the Jura presents a low seismic activity, 53 focal mechanisms over the Jura have been inverted in order to infer the current stress field. Anyhow, we tested several combinations of f.m. inversions, by structural zones, in order to test the regional stress stability. It appears that the current stress field is very stable all over the arc, and following our different sub-datasets. Indeed, the stress field shows a stable near horizontal NW-SE-oriented s1, associated to a NE-SW-oriented s3. Therefore, the structural arc of the Jura seems to have very low or no impact in terms of current stress. Complementarily, we present preliminary velocity and strain fields from a GPS network composed of 25 permanent stations implemented between 1998 and 2014 all around the Jura arc. Indeed, we also integrated the recent GPS-JURA station (OSU THETA Besançon), but they are still too young to accurately constrain the strain of the belt. Preliminary results exhibit very slow velocities across the arc in term of baselines evolution, with infra

  11. Innovative use of activated carbon for the removal of heavy metals from ground water sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T. III

    1996-12-31

    This report discusses the evaluation of the ENVIRO-CLEAN PROCESS, a technology developed by Lewis Environmental Services, Inc. for the recovery of metals such as chromium, mercury, copper, cadmium, lead, and zinc from surface and groundwater streams. This new heavy metal removal process (patent-pending) utilizes granular activated carbon with a proprietary conditioning pretreatment to enhance heavy metal adsorption combined with electrolytic metal recovery to produce a saleable metallic product. The process generates no sludge or hazardous waste and the effluent meets EPA limits. A 50 gpm system was installed for recovering hexavalent chromium from a ground water stream at a site located in Fresno, California. The effluent from the activated carbon system was reinjected into the ground water table with the hexavalent chromium concentration < 10 ppb. The system simultaneously removed trichloroethylene (TCE) to concentrations levels < 05 ppb. The activated carbon is regenerated off-site and the chromium electrolytically recovered. The full scale system has treated over 5 million gallons of ground water since installation. 5 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. InSAR analysis of surface deformation over permafrost to estimate active layer thickness based on one-dimensional heat transfer model of soils

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiwei; Zhao, Rong; Hu, Jun; Wen, Lianxing; Feng, Guangcai; Zhang, Zeyu; Wang, Qijie

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method to estimate active layer thickness (ALT) over permafrost based on InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) observation and the heat transfer model of soils. The time lags between the periodic feature of InSAR-observed surface deformation over permafrost and the meteorologically recorded temperatures are assumed to be the time intervals that the temperature maximum to diffuse from the ground surface downward to the bottom of the active layer. By exploiting the time lags and the one-dimensional heat transfer model of soils, we estimate the ALTs. Using the frozen soil region in southern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) as examples, we provided a conceptual demonstration of the estimation of the InSAR pixel-wise ALTs. In the case study, the ALTs are ranging from 1.02 to 3.14 m and with an average of 1.95 m. The results are compatible with those sparse ALT observations/estimations by traditional methods, while with extraordinary high spatial resolution at pixel level (~40 meter). The presented method is simple, and can potentially be used for deriving high-resolution ALTs in other remote areas similar to QTP, where only sparse observations are available now. PMID:26480892

  13. Beam quality active control of a slab MOPA solid state laser with combined deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Rujian; Xu, Honglai; Li, Guohui; Wu, Jing; Du, Yinglei; Zhang, Kai

    2017-01-01

    A novel phase aberration correcting method based on combined deformable mirrors (DMs) in a slab MOPA (master oscillator and power amplifier) solid state laser system is proposed and validated experimentally. The adaptive optics(AO) system with combined deformable mirrors composed of a one-dimension (1D) DM with 11 actuators and a two-dimension (2D) DM with 67 valid actuators, has been designed to correct the phase aberrations, which doesn't need the high voltage drivers and has an excellent correcting efficiency of the high order phase aberrations. The experimental results show that the wave front of the slab laser beam is compensated well and the residual wave front is less than 0.08 λ rms. The beam quality of the slab laser in the far field is improved to1.67x DL.

  14. Active debris removal GNC challenges over design and required ground validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmenarejo, Pablo; Avilés, Marcos; di Sotto, Emanuele

    2015-06-01

    Because of the exponential growth of space debris, the access to space in the medium-term future is considered as being seriously compromised, particularly within LEO polar Sun-synchronous orbits and within geostationary orbits. The active debris removal (ADR) application poses new and challenging requirements on: first, the new required Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) technologies and, second, how to validate these new technologies before being applied in real missions. There is no doubt about the strong safety and collision risk aspects affecting the real operational ADR missions. But it shall be considered that even ADR demonstration missions will be affected by significant risk of collision during the demonstration, and that the ADR GNC systems/technologies to be used shall be well mature before using/demonstrating them in space. Specific and dedicated on-ground validation approaches, techniques and facilities are mandatory. The different ADR techniques can be roughly catalogued in three main groups (rigid capture, non-rigid capture and contactless). All of them have a strong impact on the GNC system of the active vehicle during the capture/proximity phase and, particularly, during the active vehicle/debris combo control phase after capture and during the de-orbiting phase. The main operational phases on an ADR scenario are: (1) ground controlled phase (ADR vehicle and debris are far), (2) fine orbit synchronization phase (ADR vehicle to reach debris ±V-bar), (3) short range phase (along track distance reduction till 10-100 s of metres), (4) terminal approach/capture phase and (5) de-orbiting. While phases 1-3 are somehow conventional and already addressed in detail during past/on-going studies related to rendezvous and/or formation flying, phases 4-5 are very specific and not mature in terms of GNC needed technologies and HW equipment. GMV is currently performing different internal activities and ESA studies/developments related to ADR mission, GNC and

  15. Earthquake Cycle Deformation and GPS: A Quantitative Computer-Based Activity for Undergraduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, S. T.

    2012-12-01

    Earthquake cycle deformation and geodetic measurements of tectonic strain are well represented in recent peer-reviewed literature; however, because of the quantitative nature of these topics, students are often given only a conceptual description of these processes and techniques at the undergraduate level. Here, I present a computer-based assignment appropriate for Sophomore-level undergraduate students in either a structural geology, tectonics, or geophysics course. The assignment introduces students to the classic analytical earthquake cycle equations for a vertical strike-slip fault. While the equations alone are relatively non-intuitive for understanding earthquake cycle deformation, modern computer applications (e.g Maple, Excel, Matlab, Mathematica, etc…) can be used to easily produce graphs of the equations that are much more meaningful for understanding tectonics. The advantage of having students create their own plots is that once the plots have been created, students can tweak model parameters (locking depth and slip rate) to see how the resultant deformation would change. Thus, the students can effectively create their own earthquake cycle deformation tool that can be tweaked to fit real or hypothetical data. The assignment ends by having students determine the interseismic slip rate and locking depth on the San Andreas fault given actual Plate Boundary Observatory Data that is provided to them. The overarching goals of the assignment are to encourage students to make their own tools and graphics for learning new concepts and to encourage the next generation of geologists to pursue quantitative tectonic studies in their academic and/or professional futures.

  16. Feedback between erosion and active deformation: geomorphic constraints from the frontal Jura fold-and-thrust belt (eastern France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madritsch, Herfried; Fabbri, Olivier; Hagedorn, Eva-Marie; Preusser, Frank; Schmid, Stefan M.; Ziegler, Peter A.

    2010-10-01

    A regional tectono-geomorphic analysis indicates a Pliocene to recent rock uplift of the outermost segment of the Jura fold-and-thrust belt, which spatially coincides with the intra-continental Rhine-Bresse Transfer Zone. Elevated remnants of the partly eroded Middle Pliocene Sundgau-Forêt de Chaux Gravels identified by heavy mineral analyses allow for a paleo-topographic reconstruction that yields minimum regional Latest Pliocene to recent rock uplift rates of 0.05 ± 0.02 mm/year. This uplift also affected the Pleistocene evolution of the Ognon and Doubs drainage basins and is interpreted as being tectonically controlled. While the Ognon River was deflected from the uplifted region the Doubs deeply incised into it. Focused incision of the Doubs possibly sustained ongoing deformation along anticlines which were initiated during the Neogene evolution of the thin-skinned Jura fold-and-thrust belt. At present, this erosion-related active deformation is taking place synchronously with thick-skinned tectonics, controlling the inversion of the Rhine-Bresse Transfer Zone. This suggests local decoupling between seismogenic basement faulting and erosion-related deformation of the Mesozoic cover sequences.

  17. dMODELS: A MATLAB software package for modeling crustal deformation near active faults and volcanic centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Cervelli, Peter F.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a MATLAB software package for the most common models used to interpret deformation measurements near faults and active volcanic centers. The emphasis is on analytical models of deformation that can be compared with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS), InSAR, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal and sill-like magma chambers in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. Dikes and faults are described following the mathematical notation for rectangular dislocations in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. All the expressions have been checked for typographical errors that might have been present in the original literature, extended to include deformation and strain within the Earth's crust (as opposed to only the Earth's surface) and verified against finite element models. A set of GPS measurements from the 2006 eruption at Augustine Volcano (Alaska) is used to test the software package. The results show that the best fit source to the GPS data is a spherical intrusion (ΔV=5×10 km3), about 880 m beneath the volcano's summit.

  18. Factors Involved in Iranian Women Heads of Household's Health Promotion Activities: A Grounded Theory Study.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Forough; Seyedfatemi, Naima; Rezaei, Mahboubeh

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to explore and describe the factors involved in Iranian women heads of household's health promotion activities. Grounded theory was used as the method. Sixteen women heads of household were recruited. Data were generated by semi structured interviews. Our findings indicated that remainder of resources (money, time and energy) alongside perceived severity of health risk were two main factors whereas women's personal and socio-economic characteristics were two contextual factors involved in these women's health promotion activities. To help these women improve their health status, we recommended that the government, non-governmental organizations and health care professionals provide them with required resources and increase their knowledge by holding training sessions.

  19. Monitoring Ground Deformation Using Persistent Scatters Interferometry (PSI) and Small Baselines (SBAS) Techniques Integrated in the ESA RSS Service: The Case Study of Valencia, Rome and South Sardinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Manuel J.; Cuccu, Roberto; Rivolta, Giancarlo

    2015-05-01

    This work is focused on the infrastructure monitoring of areas which had experienced significant urbanization and therefore, also an increase of the exploitation of natural resources. Persistent Scatters Interferometry (PS-InSAR) and Small Baselines (SBAS) approaches are applied to three study areas for which large datasets of SAR images are available in ascending and descending modes to finally deploy deformation maps of different buildings and infrastructures. Valencia, Rome and South Sardinia areas have been selected for this study, having experienced an increase of the exploitation of natural resources in parallel with their urban expansion. Moreover, Rome is a very special case, where Cultural Heritage permeating the city and its surroundings would suggest the necessity of a tool for monitoring the stability of the different sites. This work wants to analyse the potential deformation that had occurred in these areas during the period 1992 to 2010, by applying Persistent Scatters Interferometry to ESA ERS SAR and Envisat ASAR data.

  20. Deep soil compaction as a method of ground improvement and to stabilization of wastes and slopes with danger of liquefaction, determining the modulus of deformation and shear strength parameters of loose rock.

    PubMed

    Lersow, M

    2001-01-01

    For the stabilization of dumps with the construction of hidden dams and for building ground improvement, for instance for traffic lines over dumps, nearly all applied compaction methods have the aim to reduce the pore volume in the loose rock. With these methods, a homogenization of the compacted loose rock will be obtained too. The compaction methods of weight compaction by falling weight, compaction by vibration and compaction by blasting have been introduced, and their applications and efficiencies have been shown. For the estimation of the effective depth of the compaction and for a safe planning of the bearing layer, respectively, the necessary material parameters have to be determined for each deep compaction method. Proposals for the determination of these parameters have been made within this paper. In connection with the stabilization of flow-slide-prone dump slopes, as well as for the improvement of dump areas for the use as building ground, it is necessary to assess the deformation behavior and the bearing capacity. To assess the resulting building ground improvement, deformation indexes (assessment of the flow-prone layer) and strength indexes (assessment of the bearing capacity) have to be determined with soil mechanical tests. Förster and Lersow, [Patentschrift DE 197 17 988. Verfahren, auf der Grundlage last- und/oder weggesteuerter Plattendruckversuche auf der Bohrlochsohle, zur Ermittlung des Spannungs-Verformungs-Verhaltens und/oder von Deformationsmoduln und/oder von Festigkeitseigenschaften in verschiedenen Tiefen insbesondere von Lockergesteinen und von Deponiekörpern in situ; Förster W, Lersow M. Plattendruckversuch auf der Bohrlochsohle, Ermittlung des Spannungs-Verformungs-Verhaltens von Lockergestein und Deponiematerial Braunkohle--Surface Mining, 1998;50(4): 369-77; Lersow M. Verfahren zur Ermittlung von Scherfestigkeitsparametern von Lockergestein und Deponiematerial aus Plattendruckversuchen auf der Bohrlochsohle. Braunkohle

  1. Character and origins of ground rupturing and ground deformation during the 28 June 1992 Landers, California earthquake (as well as the 1989 Loma Prieta and 1994 Northridge earthquakes). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.M.

    1996-09-17

    The overall objective of the research has been to understand the form and significance of surface rupture produced by earthquakes. Specific objectives are to describe fracturing and other manifestations of broad belts of ground rupture during the Landers earthquake and to mechanically analyze the structures that form along the belts. The author has learned much about ground rupture during earthquakes, even though he has studied only three earthquakes to date: Loma Prieta, Landers and Northridge.

  2. Microtopographic and depth controls on active layer chemistry in Arctic polygonal ground

    DOE PAGES

    Newman, Brent D.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Graham, David E.; ...

    2015-03-24

    Polygonal ground is a signature characteristic of Arctic lowlands, and carbon release from permafrost thaw can alter feedbacks to Arctic ecosystems and climate. This study describes the first comprehensive spatial examination of active layer biogeochemistry that extends across high- and low-centered, ice wedge polygons, their features, and with depth. Water chemistry measurements of 54 analytes were made on surface and active layer pore waters collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA. Significant differences were observed between high- and low-centered polygons suggesting that polygon types may be useful for landscape-scale geochemical classification. However, differences were found for polygon features (centers and troughs) formore » analytes that were not significant for polygon type, suggesting that finer-scale features affect biogeochemistry differently from polygon types. Depth variations were also significant, demonstrating important multidimensional aspects of polygonal ground biogeochemistry. These results have major implications for understanding how polygonal ground ecosystems function, and how they may respond to future change.« less

  3. Ground subsidence and associated ground fracturing in urban areas: InSAR monitoring of active tectonic structures (Ciudad Guzman, Colima Graben - Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bignami, C.; Brunori, C.; Zucca, F.; Groppelli, G.; Norini, G.; Hernandez, N. D.; Stramondo, S.

    2013-12-01

    This study focuses on the observation of a creeping phenomenon that produces subsidence of the Zapotlan basin and ground fracturing in correspondence of the Ciudad Guzmàn (Jalisco - Mexico). The September 21, 2012, the Ciudad Guzmàn has been struck by a phenomenon of ground fracturing of about 1.5 km of length. This event caused the deformation of the roads and the damage of 30 houses, of which eight have been declared uninhabitable. The alignment of fractures is coincident with the escarpments produced in September 19, 1985, in the Ciudad Guzman urban area, when a strong earthquake, magnitude 8.1, struck the Mexican area, causing the deaths of at least 10,000 people and serious damage in Mexico City. In Ciudad Guzmán, about 60% of the buildings were destroyed, with about 50 loss of life. The city is located in the Zapotlan basin (northern Colima graben), a wide tectonic depression where the depth of the infilling sediments is about 1 km. This subsidence cannot be measured outside the urbanized area, but it can be considered as a deformation mechanism of the central part of the basin. In order to detect and mapping the spatio-temporal features of the processes that led to this event, we applied InSAR multi-temporal techniques to analyze a dataset of ENVISAT satellite SAR images, acquired in a time span between 2003-2010. InSAR techniques detect a subsidence of the north-western part of Ciudad Guzmàn of about 15 mm/yr in the time interval 2003-2010. The displacement occurred in September 21, 2012, was detected using two RadarSAT2 acquisitions (2012-03-22 and 2013-03-17). The explanation of surface movements based on interferometric results, ground data and geological field observations, allowed confirming surface effect due to the overexploitation of the aquifers and highlights a subsidence due to anthropogenic causes coupled to buried tectonic structures.

  4. Spent coffee grounds-based activated carbon preparation for sequestering of malachite green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jun-Wei; Lam, Keat-Ying; Bashir, Mohammed J. K.; Yeong, Yin-Fong; Lam, Man-Kee; Ho, Yeek-Chia

    2016-11-01

    The key of reported work was to optimize the fabricating factors of spent coffee grounds-based activated carbon (SCG-bAC) used to sequester Malachite Green (MG) form aqueous solution via adsorption process. The fabricating factors of impregnation ratio with ortho-phosphoric acid, activation temperature and activation time were simultaneously optimized by central composite design (CCD) of response surface methodology (RSM) targeting on maximum removal of MG. At the optimum condition, 96.3% of MG was successfully removed by SCG-bAC at the impregnation ratio with ortho-phosphoric acid of 0.50, activation temperature of 554°C and activation time of 31.4 min. Statistical model that could predict the MG removal percentage was also derived and had been statistically confirmed to be significant. Subsequently, the MG adsorption equilibrium data was found well-fitted to Langmuir isotherm model, indicating the predominance of monolayer adsorption of MG on SCG-bAC surface. To conclude, the findings from the this study unveil the potential of spent coffee grounds as an alternative precursor in fabricating low-cost AC for the treatment of wastewater loaded with MG pollutant.

  5. Variations in stable- isotope ratios of ground waters in seismically active regions of California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Chi-Yu, King

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of D and 18O concentrations of ground waters in seismically active regions are potentially useful in earthquake prediction and in elucidating mechanisms operative during earthquakes. Principles of this method are discussed and some preliminary data regarding a magnitude 5.7 earthquake at the Oroville Dam in 1975 and a series of events near San Juan Bautista in 1980 are presented to support the utility of such measurements. After earthquakes, the D content of nearby ground waters increased by several permil while the 18O content remained constant. This increase implies that H2O may have either decomposed or reacted to form molecular H2 at depth. It is emphasized that many areas must be investigated for these effects in order to find a sufficient number of 'sensitive' water wells and springs to permit a truly effective program of earthquake research. -Authors

  6. Suspension of mitotic activity in dentate gyrus of the hibernating ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Popov, Victor I; Kraev, Igor V; Ignat'ev, Dmitri A; Stewart, Michael G

    2011-01-01

    Neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian hippocampus, a region of the brain important for learning and memory. Hibernation in Siberian ground squirrels provides a natural model to study mitosis as the rapid fall in body temperature in 24 h (from 35-36°C to +4-6°C) permits accumulation of mitotic cells at different stages of the cell cycle. Histological methods used to study adult neurogenesis are limited largely to fixed tissue, and the mitotic state elucidated depends on the specific phase of mitosis at the time of day. However, using an immunohistochemical study of doublecortin (DCX) and BrdU-labelled neurons, we demonstrate that the dentate gyrus of the ground squirrel hippocampus contains a population of immature cells which appear to possess mitotic activity. Our data suggest that doublecortin-labelled immature cells exist in a mitotic state and may represent a renewable pool for generation of new neurons within the dentate gyrus.

  7. Active crustal deformation of the El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ) using GPS data: Implications in seismic hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staller, Alejandra; Benito, Belen; Jesús Martínez-Díaz, José; Hernández, Douglas; Hernández-Rey, Román; Alonso-Henar, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    El Salvador, Central America, is part of the Chortis block in the northwestern boundary of the Caribbean plate. This block is interacting with a diffuse triple junction point with the Cocos and North American plates. Among the structures that cut the Miocene to Pleistocene volcanic deposits stands out the El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ): It is oriented in N90º-100ºE direction, and it is composed of several structural segments that deform Quaternary deposits with right-lateral and oblique slip motions. The ESFZ is seismically active and capable of producing earthquakes such as the February 13, 2001 with Mw 6.6 (Martínez-Díaz et al., 2004), that seriously affected the population, leaving many casualties. This structure plays an important role in the tectonics of the Chortis block, since its motion is directly related to the drift of the Caribbean plate to the east and not with the partitioning of the deformation of the Cocos subduction (here not coupled) (Álvarez-Gómez et al., 2008). Together with the volcanic arc of El Salvador, this zone constitutes a weakness area that allows the motion of forearc block toward the NW. The geometry and the degree of activity of the ESFZ are not studied enough. However their knowledge is essential to understand the seismic hazard associated to this important seismogenic structure. For this reason, since 2007 a GPS dense network was established along the ESFZ (ZFESNet) in order to obtain GPS velocity measurements which are later used to explain the nature of strain accumulation on major faults along the ESFZ. The current work aims at understanding active crustal deformation of the ESFZ through kinematic model. The results provide significant information to be included in a new estimation of seismic hazard taking into account the major structures in ESFZ.

  8. Increased Na+/Ca2+ exchanger activity promotes resistance to excitotoxicity in cortical neurons of the ground squirrel (a Hibernator).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan-Juan; Gao, Shan; Jing, Jun-Zhan; Zhu, Ming-Yue; Zhou, Chen; Chai, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Ground squirrel, a hibernating mammalian species, is more resistant to ischemic brain stress than rat. Gaining insight into the adaptive mechanisms of ground squirrels may help us design treatment strategies to reduce brain damage in patients suffering ischemic stroke. To understand the anti-stress mechanisms in ground squirrel neurons, we studied glutamate toxicity in primary cultured neurons of the Daurian ground squirrel (Spermophilus dauricus). At the neuronal level, for the first time, we found that ground squirrel was more resistant to glutamate excitotoxicity than rat. Mechanistically, ground squirrel neurons displayed a similar calcium influx to the rat neurons in response to glutamate or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) perfusion. However, the rate of calcium removal in ground squirrel neurons was markedly faster than in rat neurons. This allows ground squirrel neurons to maintain lower level of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) upon glutamate insult. Moreover, we found that Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) activity was higher in ground squirrel neurons than in rat neurons. We also proved that overexpression of ground squirrel NCX2, rather than NCX1 or NCX3, in rat neurons promoted neuron survival against glutamate toxicity. Taken together, our results indicate that ground squirrel neurons are better at maintaining calcium homeostasis than rat neurons and this is likely achieved through the activity of ground squirrel NCX2. Our findings not only reveal an adaptive mechanism of mammalian hibernators at the cellular level, but also suggest that NCX2 of ground squirrel may have therapeutic value for suppressing brain ischemic damage.

  9. Safe Physical Activity Environments--To What Extent Are Local Government Authorities Auditing the Safety of Grassed Sporting Grounds?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otago, Leonie; Swan, Peter; Donaldson, Alex; Payne, Warren; Finch, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) participation is influenced by the safety of the settings in which it is undertaken. This study describes the grounds assessment practices of Local Government Authorities (LGAs) in Victoria, Australia to ensure the safety of grassed sporting grounds. It also makes recommendations for improving these practices to maximise the…

  10. Direct effects of tillage on the activity density of ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) weed seed predators.

    PubMed

    Shearin, A F; Reberg-Horton, S C; Gallandt, E R

    2007-10-01

    Ground beetles are well known as beneficial organisms in agroecosystems, contributing to the predation of a wide range of animal pests and weed seeds. Tillage has generally been shown to have a negative effect on ground beetles, but it is not known whether this is because of direct mortality or the result of indirect losses resulting from dispersal caused by habitat deterioration. In 2005, field experiments measured direct, tillage-induced mortality, of four carabid weed seed predators, Harpalus rufipes DeGeer, Agonum muelleri Herbst, Anisodactylus merula Germar, and Amara cupreolata Putzeys, and one arthropod predator, Pterostichus melanarius Illiger, common to agroecosystems in the northeastern United States. Three tillage treatments (moldboard plow, chisel plow, and rotary tillage) were compared with undisturbed controls at two sites (Stillwater and Presque Isle) and at two dates (July and August) in Maine. Carabid activity density after disturbance was measured using fenced pitfall traps installed immediately after tillage to remove any effects of dispersal. Rotary tillage and moldboard plowing reduced weed seed predator activity density 52 and 54%, respectively. Carabid activity density after chisel plowing was similar to the undisturbed control. This trend was true for each of the weed seed predator species studied. However, activity density of the arthropod predator P. melanarius was reduced by all tillage types, indicating a greater sensitivity to tillage than the four weed seed predator species. These results confirm the need to consider both direct and indirect effects of management in studies of invertebrate seed predators.

  11. Opposing activity changes in AMP deaminase and AMP-activated protein kinase in the hibernating ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Lanaspa, Miguel A; Epperson, L Elaine; Li, Nanxing; Cicerchi, Christina; Garcia, Gabriela E; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A; Trostel, Jessica; Jain, Swati; Mant, Colin T; Rivard, Christopher J; Ishimoto, Takuji; Shimada, Michiko; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Jani, Alkesh; Stenvinkel, Peter; Martin, Sandra L; Johnson, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Hibernating animals develop fatty liver when active in summertime and undergo a switch to a fat oxidation state in the winter. We hypothesized that this switch might be determined by AMP and the dominance of opposing effects: metabolism through AMP deaminase (AMPD2) (summer) and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (winter). Liver samples were obtained from 13-lined ground squirrels at different times during the year, including summer and multiples stages of winter hibernation, and fat synthesis and β-fatty acid oxidation were evaluated. Changes in fat metabolism were correlated with changes in AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid (downstream product of AMPD2), as well as changes in AMPK and intrahepatic β-hydroxybutyrate (a marker of fat oxidation). Hepatic fat accumulation occurred during the summer with relatively increased enzymes associated with fat synthesis (FAS, ACL and ACC) and decreased enoyl CoA hydratase (ECH1) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A), rate limiting enzymes of fat oxidation. In summer, AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid levels were high and hepatic AMPK activity was low. In contrast, the active phosphorylated form of AMPK and β-hydroxybutyrate both increased during winter hibernation. Therefore, changes in AMPD2 and AMPK activity were paralleled with changes in fat synthesis and fat oxidation rates during the summer-winter cycle. These data illuminate the opposing forces of metabolism of AMP by AMPD2 and its availability to activate AMPK as a switch that governs fat metabolism in the liver of hibernating ground squirrel.

  12. Ground-state kinetics of bistable redox-active donor-acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules.

    PubMed

    Fahrenbach, Albert C; Bruns, Carson J; Li, Hao; Trabolsi, Ali; Coskun, Ali; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2014-02-18

    The ability to design and confer control over the kinetics of theprocesses involved in the mechanisms of artificial molecular machines is at the heart of the challenge to create ones that can carry out useful work on their environment, just as Nature is wont to do. As one of the more promising forerunners of prototypical artificial molecular machines, chemists have developed bistable redox-active donor-acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs) over the past couple of decades. These bistable MIMs generally come in the form of [2]rotaxanes, molecular compounds that constitute a ring mechanically interlocked around a dumbbell-shaped component, or [2]catenanes, which are composed of two mechanically interlocked rings. As a result of their interlocked nature, bistable MIMs possess the inherent propensity to express controllable intramolecular, large-amplitude, and reversible motions in response to redox stimuli. In this Account, we rationalize the kinetic behavior in the ground state for a large assortment of these types of bistable MIMs, including both rotaxanes and catenanes. These structures have proven useful in a variety of applications ranging from drug delivery to molecular electronic devices. These bistable donor-acceptor MIMs can switch between two different isomeric states. The favored isomer, known as the ground-state co-conformation (GSCC) is in equilibrium with the less favored metastable state co-conformation (MSCC). The forward (kf) and backward (kb) rate constants associated with this ground-state equilibrium are intimately connected to each other through the ground-state distribution constant, KGS. Knowing the rate constants that govern the kinetics and bring about the equilibration between the MSCC and GSCC, allows researchers to understand the operation of these bistable MIMs in a device setting and apply them toward the construction of artificial molecular machines. The three biggest influences on the ground-state rate constants arise from

  13. Removal of micropollutants with coarse-ground activated carbon for enhanced separation with hydrocyclone classifiers.

    PubMed

    Otto, N; Platz, S; Fink, T; Wutscherk, M; Menzel, U

    2016-01-01

    One key technology to eliminate organic micropollutants (OMP) from wastewater effluent is adsorption using powdered activated carbon (PAC). To avoid a discharge of highly loaded PAC particles into natural water bodies a separation stage has to be implemented. Commonly large settling tanks and flocculation filters with the application of coagulants and flocculation aids are used. In this study, a multi-hydrocyclone classifier with a downstream cloth filter has been investigated on a pilot plant as a space-saving alternative with no need for a dosing of chemical additives. To improve the separation, a coarser ground PAC type was compared to a standard PAC type with regard to elimination results of OMP as well as separation performance. With a PAC dosing rate of 20 mg/l an average of 64.7 wt% of the standard PAC and 79.5 wt% of the coarse-ground PAC could be separated in the hydrocyclone classifier. A total average separation efficiency of 93-97 wt% could be reached with a combination of both hydrocyclone classifier and cloth filter. Nonetheless, the OMP elimination of the coarse-ground PAC was not sufficient enough to compete with the standard PAC. Further research and development is necessary to find applicable coarse-grained PAC types with adequate OMP elimination capabilities.

  14. Measurement of energetic radiation caused by thunderstorm activities by a sounding balloon and ground observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, T.

    2015-12-01

    Energetic radiation caused by thunderstorm activity is observed at various places, such as the ground, high mountain areas, and artificial satellites. In order to investigate the radiation source and its energy distribution, we measured energetic radiation by a sounding balloon, and the ground observation. On the measurement inside/above the thundercloud, we conducted a sounding observation using a radiosonde mounted two GM tubes (for gamma-rays, and for beta/gamma-rays), in addition to meteorological instruments. The balloon passed through a region of strong echoes in a thundercloud shown by radar image, at which time an increase in counting rate of the GM tube about 2 orders of magnitude occurred at the altitude from 5 km to 7.5 km. Furthermore, the counting rate of two GM tubes indicated the tendency different depending on movement of a balloon. This result suggests that the ratio for the gamma-rays (energetic photons) of the beta-rays (energetic electrons) varies according to the place in the thundercloud. Furthermore, we carried out a ground observation of the energetic gamma rays during winter thunderstorm at a coastal area facing the Sea of Japan. Two types of the energetic radiation have been observed at this time. We report the outline of these measurements and analysis in the session of the AGU meeting.

  15. The three-dimensional pattern of crustal deformation associated with active normal fault systems observed using continuous GPS geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, R. A.; Hreinsdottir, S.

    2009-12-01

    Geological examples of shallow dipping normal faults with large displacements are exposed at numerous locations throughout the world and it is widely recognized that extensional deformation at brittle crustal levels is most efficiently accomplished by slip across such structures. It has previously been shown that lower dip angles reduce the regional stresses required to drive large horizontal displacements. Nevertheless, the traditional theory of fault mechanics—based on Anderson’s classification of stress regimes, the Coulomb failure criterion, and Byerlee’s friction law—precludes such faults from slipping at low angle. Observational support for this traditional theory includes the absence of large unequivocally low-angle normal fault earthquakes in the global catalog; all well-determined normal fault earthquakes appear to have occurred on moderate to steeply dipping planes. However, precise measurements of 3D crustal motions based on continuous GPS in central Italy and Utah reveal deformation patterns across active normal fault systems that are inconsistent with active slip across steeply dipping planes. Instead, the combination of observed horizontal and vertical surface motions are consistent with slip across low angle surfaces independently imaged in the subsurface by seismic reflection and other geophysical data. For the Alto Tiberina fault in central Italy, active aseismic creep occurs at shallow crustal levels, most likely within the brittle-frictional regime at which Andersonian-Byerlee fault mechanics should be applicable. The actively creeping portion of the fault inferred using GPS geodesy correlates well with the observed pattern of micro-seismicity, which concentrates along the inferred subsurface fault plane. GPS measurements across the greater Wasatch fault zone in the vicinity of Salt Lake City, Utah, reveal crustal motions consistent with aseismic displacement across a shallow dipping fault or sub-horizontal shear zone at mid

  16. Estimation of active faulting in a slow deformation area: Culoz fault as a case study (Jura-Western Alps junction).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Taille, Camille; Jouanne, Francois; Crouzet, Christian; Jomard, Hervé; Beck, Christian; de Rycker, Koen; van Daele, Maarten; Lebourg, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The north-western Alps foreland is considered as still experiencing distal effects of Alpine collision, resulting in both horizontal and vertical relative displacements. Based on seismological and geodetic surveys, detailed patterns of active faulting (including subsurface décollements, blind ramps and deeper crustal thrusts have been proposed (Thouvenot et al., 1998), underlining the importance of NW-SE left-lateral strike-slip offsets as along the Vuache and Culoz faults (cf. the 1996 Epagny event: M=5.4; Thouvenot et al., 1998 and the 1822 Culoz event I=VII-VIII; Vogt, 1979). In parallel to this tectonic evolution, the last glaciation-deglaciation cycles contributed to develop large and over-deepened lacustrine basins, such as Lake Le Bourget (Perrier, 1980). The fine grain, post LGM (ie post 18 ky), sedimentary infill gives a good opportunity to evidence late quaternary tectonic deformations. This study focuses on the Culoz fault, extending from the Jura to the West, to the Chautagne swamp and through the Lake Le Bourget to the East. Historical earthquakes are known nearby this fault as ie the 1822 Culoz event. The precise location and geometry of the main fault is illustrated but its Eastern termination still needs to be determined. High resolution seismic sections and side-scan sonar images performed in the 90's (Chapron et al., 1996) showed that the Col du Chat and Culoz faults have locally deformed the quaternary sedimentary infill of the lake. These studies, mainly devoted to paleo-climate analysis were not able to determine neither the geometry of the fault, or to quantify the observed deformations. A new campaign devoted to highlight the fault geometry and associated deformation, has been performed in October 2013. Very tight profiles were performed during this high resolution seismic survey using seistec boomer and sparker sources. In several places the rupture reaches the most recent seismic reflectors underlying that these faults were active during

  17. Quantification of Cyclic Ground Reaction Force Histories During Daily Activity in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, G. A.; Whalen, R. T.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical models and experimental studies of bone remodeling suggest that bone density and structure are influenced by local cyclic skeletal tissue stress and strain histories. Estimation of long-term loading histories in humans is usually achieved by assessment of physical activity level by questionnaires, logbooks, and pedometers, since the majority of lower limb cyclic loading occurs during walking and running. These methods provide some indication of the mechanical loading history, but fail to consider the true magnitude of the lower limb skeletal forces generated by various daily activities. These techniques cannot account for individual gait characteristics, gait speed, and unpredictable high loading events that may influence bone mass significantly. We have developed portable instrumentation to measure and record the vertical component of the ground reaction force (GRFz) during normal daily activity. This equipment allows long-term quantitative monitoring of musculoskeletal loads, which in conjunction with bone mineral density assessments, promises to elucidate the relationship between skeletal stresses and bone remodeling.

  18. Ground-based observations of time variability in multiple active volcanoes on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, Julie A.; Spencer, John R.

    2010-10-01

    Since before the beginning of the Galileo spacecraft's Jupiter orbital tour, we have observed Io from the ground using NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). We obtained images of Io in reflected sunlight and in-eclipse at 2.3, 3.5, and 4.8 μm. In addition, we have measured the 3.5 μm brightness of an eclipsed Io as it is occulted by Jupiter. These lightcurves enable us to measure the brightness and one-dimensional location of active volcanoes on the surface. During the Galileo era, two volcanoes were observed to be regularly active: Loki and either Kanehekili and/or Janus. At least 12 other active volcanoes were observed for shorter periods of time, including one distinguishable in images that include reflected sunlight. These data can be used to compare volcano types and test volcano eruption models, such as the lava lake model for Loki.

  19. Method and Apparatus for Monitoring of Daily Activity in Terms of Ground Reaction Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Robert T. (Inventor); Breit, Gregory A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A device to record and analyze habitual daily activity in terms of the history of gait-related musculoskeletal loading is disclosed. The device consists of a pressure-sensing insole placed into the shoe or embedded in a shoe sole, which detects contact of the foot with the ground. The sensor is coupled to a portable battery-powered digital data logger clipped to the shoe or worn around the ankle or waist. During the course of normal daily activity, the system maintains a record of time-of-occurrence of all non-spurious foot-down and lift-off events. Off line, these data are filtered and converted to a history of foot-ground contact times, from which measures of cumulative musculoskeletal loading, average walking- and running-specific gait speed, total time spent walking and running, total number of walking steps and running steps, and total gait-related energy expenditure are estimated from empirical regressions of various gait parameters to the contact time reciprocal. Data are available as cumulative values or as daily averages by menu selection. The data provided by this device are useful for assessment of musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health and risk factors associated with habitual patterns of daily activity.

  20. Auditory Power-Law Activation Avalanches Exhibit a Fundamental Computational Ground State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, Ruedi; Gomez, Florian

    2016-07-01

    The cochlea provides a biological information-processing paradigm that we are only beginning to understand in its full complexity. Our work reveals an interacting network of strongly nonlinear dynamical nodes, on which even a simple sound input triggers subnetworks of activated elements that follow power-law size statistics ("avalanches"). From dynamical systems theory, power-law size distributions relate to a fundamental ground state of biological information processing. Learning destroys these power laws. These results strongly modify the models of mammalian sound processing and provide a novel methodological perspective for understanding how the brain processes information.

  1. CHANG'E-3 Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer: ground verification test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dongya; Peng, Wenxi; Cui, XingZhu; Wang, Huanyu

    The Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is one of the payloads of Chang’E-3 rover Yutu, with which the major elemental composition of lunar soils and rocks can be measured on site. In order to assess the instrument performance and the accuracy of determination, ground verification test was carried out with two blind samples(basaltic rock, powder). Details of the experiments and data analysis method are discussed. The results show that the accuracy of quantitative analysis for major elements(Mg,Al,Si,K,Ca,Ti,Fe) is better than 15%.

  2. Auditory Power-Law Activation Avalanches Exhibit a Fundamental Computational Ground State.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Ruedi; Gomez, Florian

    2016-07-15

    The cochlea provides a biological information-processing paradigm that we are only beginning to understand in its full complexity. Our work reveals an interacting network of strongly nonlinear dynamical nodes, on which even a simple sound input triggers subnetworks of activated elements that follow power-law size statistics ("avalanches"). From dynamical systems theory, power-law size distributions relate to a fundamental ground state of biological information processing. Learning destroys these power laws. These results strongly modify the models of mammalian sound processing and provide a novel methodological perspective for understanding how the brain processes information.

  3. Source mechanism analysis of strong mining induced seismic event and its influence on ground deformation observed by InSAR technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzinski, Lukasz; Mirek, Katarzyna; Mirek, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    On April 17th, 2015 a strong shallow seismic event M4.0 struck a mining panel in the Wujek-Slask coal mine, southern Poland. The event was widely felt, followed with rockburst and caused a strong damages inside mining corridors. Unfortunately two miners are trapped by tunnels collapse. Full Moment Tensor (MT) estimated with regional broad-band signals shows that the event was characterized with very high isotropic (implosive) part. Mining inspections verified the occurrence of a rockfall and floor uplift. Very shallow foci depth (less than 1000m) and collapse - like MT solution suggest that event could be responsible for surface deformation in the vicinity of epicenter. To verified this issue we used the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar technique (InSAR). The InSAR relies on measuring phase differences between two SAR images (radarograms). The measured differences may be computed into a single interferometric image. i.e. an interferogram. Interferogram computed from two radarograms of the same terrain taken at different time allows detecting changes in elevation of the terrain. Two SAR scenes acquired by Sentinel-1 satellite (European Space Agency) were processed to obtain the interferogram covered study area (12.04.2015 and 24.04.2015). 12 days interval differential interferogram shows distinctive concentric feature which indicate subsidence trough. Subsidence pattern shows 1 cycle of deformation corresponding with about 2.5 cm subsidence. The InSAR solution support the reliability of very strong implosive MT part.

  4. Ground surface deformation patterns, magma supply, and magma storage at Okmok volcano, Alaska, from InSAR analysis: 2. Coeruptive deflation, July-August 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Dzurisin, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A hydrovolcanic eruption near Cone D on the floor of Okmok caldera, Alaska, began on 12 July 2008 and continued until late August 2008. The eruption was preceded by inflation of a magma reservoir located beneath the center of the caldera and ~3 km below sea level (bsl), which began immediately after Okmok's previous eruption in 1997. In this paper we use data from several radar satellites and advanced interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques to produce a suite of 2008 coeruption deformation maps. Most of the surface deformation that occurred during the eruption is explained by deflation of a Mogi-type source located beneath the center of the caldera and 2–3 km bsl, i.e., essentially the same source that inflated prior to the eruption. During the eruption the reservoir deflated at a rate that decreased exponentially with time with a 1/e time constant of ~13 days. We envision a sponge-like network of interconnected fractures and melt bodies that in aggregate constitute a complex magma storage zone beneath Okmok caldera. The rate at which the reservoir deflates during an eruption may be controlled by the diminishing pressure difference between the reservoir and surface. A similar mechanism might explain the tendency for reservoir inflation to slow as an eruption approaches until the pressure difference between a deep magma production zone and the reservoir is great enough to drive an intrusion or eruption along the caldera ring-fracture system.

  5. New GPS constraints on active deformation along the Africa-Iberia plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulali, A.; Ouazar, D.; Tahayt, A.; King, R. W.; Vernant, P.; Reilinger, R. E.; McClusky, S.; Mourabit, T.; Davila, J. M.; Amraoui, N.

    2011-08-01

    We use velocities from 65 continuous stations and 31 survey-mode GPS sites as well as kinematic modeling to investigate present day deformation along the Africa-Iberia plate boundary zone in the western Mediterranean region. The GPS velocity field shows southwestward motion of the central part of the Rif Mountains in northern Morocco with respect to Africa varying between 3.5 and 4.0 mm/yr, consistent with prior published results. Stations in the southwestern part of the Betic Mountains of southern Spain move west-southwest with respect to Eurasia (˜ 2-3 mm/yr). The western component of Betics motion is consistent with partial transfer of Nubia-Eurasia plate motion into the southern Betics. The southward component of Betics motion with respect to Iberia is kinematically consistent with south to southwest motion of the Rif Mountains with respect to Africa. We use block modeling, constrained by mapped surface faults and seismicity to estimate the geometry and rates of strain accumulation on plate boundary structures. Our preferred plate boundary geometry includes one block between Iberia and Africa including the SW Betics, Alboran Sea, and central Rif. This geometry provides a good fit to the observed motions, suggesting a wide transpressive boundary in the westernmost Mediterranean, with deformation mainly accommodated by the Gloria-Azores fault system to the West and the Rif-Tell lineament to the East. Block boundaries encompass aspects of earlier interpretations suggesting three main deformation styles: (i) extension along the NE-SW trending Trans-Alboran shear zone, (ii) dextral strike-slip in the Betics corresponding to a well defined E-W seismic lineament, and (iii) right lateral strike-slip motion extending West to the Azores and right-lateral motion with compression extending East along the Algerian Tell. We interpret differential motion in the Rif-Alboran-Betic system to be driven both by surface processes related the Africa-Eurasia oblique convergence and

  6. Soft sediment deformation structures in the Lixian lacustrine sediments, eastern Tibetan Plateau and implications for postglacial seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hanchao; Zhong, Ning; Li, Yanhao; Xu, Hongyan; Yang, Huili; Peng, Xiaoping

    2016-10-01

    The eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau is characterized by frequent earthquakes, which are closely associated with tectonic activity. To assess tectonic activity during the Late Pleistocene, we studied a well-exposed, 23-m-thick lacustrine sequence on the eastern margin of the plateau and found a variety of soft-sediment deformation (SSD) structures. Distributed in 24 stratigraphic levels, they comprise clastic dykes, ball-and-pillow structures, flame structures, clastic gravels, micro-faults, and slump folds. Most of the SSD structures indicate deformation mechanisms related to liquefaction and/or fluidization processes, most probably triggered by paleoseismic events. Given at least 4 historical earthquakes of M > 7 in the study area, most SSD structures in the Lixian lacustrine sequence indicate seismic events with M > 6 while simple flame structures point to some lower-magnitude earthquakes. OSL dating indicates that the sequence accumulated between 15.8 and 6.0 ka, giving a mean recurrence interval of 480 years for the 24 events, and demonstrating that lacustrine sediments in eastern Tibet have the potential to record a continuous seismic history on the centennial scale.

  7. Structure modulated electrostatic deformable mirror for focus and geometry control.

    PubMed

    Nam, Saekwang; Park, Suntak; Yun, Sungryul; Park, Bongje; Park, Seung Koo; Kyung, Ki-Uk

    2016-01-11

    We suggest a way to electrostatically control deformed geometry of an electrostatic deformable mirror (EDM) based on geometric modulation of a basement. The EDM is composed of a metal coated elastomeric membrane (active mirror) and a polymeric basement with electrode (ground). When an electrical voltage is applied across the components, the active mirror deforms toward the stationary basement responding to electrostatic attraction force in an air gap. Since the differentiated gap distance can induce change in electrostatic force distribution between the active mirror and the basement, the EDMs are capable of controlling deformed geometry of the active mirror with different basement structures (concave, flat, and protrusive). The modulation of the deformed geometry leads to significant change in the range of the focal length of the EDMs. Even under dynamic operations, the EDM shows fairly consistent and large deformation enough to change focal length in a wide frequency range (1~175 Hz). The geometric modulation of the active mirror with dynamic focus tunability can allow the EDM to be an active mirror lens for optical zoom devices as well as an optical component controlling field of view.

  8. Active deformation in Zagros-Makran transition zone inferred from GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, R.; Chery, J.; Tatar, M.; Vernant, Ph.; Abbassi, M.; Masson, F.; Nilforoushan, F.; Doerflinger, E.; Regard, V.; Bellier, O.

    2006-04-01

    The Bandar Abbas-Strait of Hormuz zone is considered as a transition between the Zagros collision and the Makran oceanic subduction. We used GPS network measurements collected in 2000 and 2002 to better understand the distribution of the deformation between the collision zone and the Makran subduction. Analysing the GPS velocities, we show that transfer of the deformation is mainly accommodated along the NNW-SSE-trending reverse right-lateral Zendan-Minab-Palami (ZMP) fault system. The rate is estimated to 10 +/- 3 mm yr-1 near the faults. Assuming that the ZMP fault system transfers the motion between the Makran-Lut Block and the Arabian plate, we estimate to 15 mm yr-1 and 6 mm yr-1, respectively, the dextral strike-slip and shortening components of the long-term transpressive displacement. Our geodetic measurements suggest also a 10-15 km locking depth for the ZMP fault system. The radial velocity pattern and the orientation of compressive strain axes around the straight of Hormuz is probably the consequence of the subducting Musandam promontory. The N-S Jiroft-Sabzevaran (JS) fault system prolongates southwards the dextral shear motion of the Nayband-Gowk (NG) fault system at an apparent rate of 3.1 +/- 2.5 mm yr-1. The change from strong to weak coupling for underthrusting the Arabian plate beneath the Zagros (strong) and the Makran (weak) may explain the dextral motion along the ZMP, JS/NG and Neh-Zahedan fault systems which transfer the convergence from a broad zone in the western Iran (Zagros, Tabriz fault system, Alborz, Caucasus and Caspian sea surroundings) to Makran subduction.

  9. Active Dehydration, Delamination and Deformation of Transitional Continental Crust in an Arc-Continent Collision, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, T. B.; Rau, R. J.; Chen, K. H.; Huang, H. H.; Wang, Y. J.; Ouimet, W. B.

    2014-12-01

    A new study of the 3-D velocity structure of Taiwan, using a new tomographic model (Vp and Vs; Huang et al., 2014), suggests that subducted continental crust is delaminated from the subducting mantle of the Eurasia plate and progressively deformed by the subducting Philippine Sea plate. In southern Taiwan, vertical sections show an east-dipping, asymmetric lobe of low velocity that projects down dip to a band of seismicity interpreted as the Wadati-Benioff zone of the subducting Eurasian plate. Seismic tremors in the mid-crust also suggest dehydration (Chuang et al., 2014), consistent with prograde metamorphism of crustal materials. In central Taiwan, however, the seismicity of the W-B zone progressively disappears and the low velocity lobe shallows and broadens. The velocity structure of the lower and middle crust (represented by the 7.5 and 6.5 km/sec isovelocity surfaces, respectively) also appear distinctly out-of-phase, with the lower crust forming a broad, smooth synformal structure that contrasts with the higher amplitude undulations of the middle crust. These mid-crust structures appear as smaller irregular lobes separated by patches of higher velocity. In northern Taiwan, the velocity structure of the lower and middle crust again appear "in phase" and form a symmetrical crustal root centered beneath the Central Range. Seismicity patterns and 3-D analysis of the velocity structure also show the western edge of the PSP subducting beneath the eastern Central Range. We interpret these south-to-north changes to reflect the partial subduction (southern Taiwan), delamination (central Taiwan) and deformation (northern Taiwan) of continental-like crust. Support for these interpretation comes from: 1) unusually high rates of surface uplift (up to 15 mm/yr; Ching et al., 2011); 2) Vp and Vs attenuation studies that suggest anomalously high temperatures; 3) evidence for NE-SW extension; and 4) anomalous areas of low topographic relief.

  10. GOES-R Proving Ground Activities at the NASA Short-Term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    SPoRT is actively involved in GOES-R Proving Ground activities in a number of ways: (1) Applying the paradigm of product development, user training, and interaction to foster interaction with end users at NOAA forecast offices national centers. (2) Providing unique capabilities in collaboration with other GOES-R Proving Ground partners (a) Hybrid GOES-MODIS imagery (b) Pseudo-GLM via regional lightning mapping arrays (c) Developing new RGB imagery from EUMETSAT guidelines

  11. Temperature adaptation of active sodium-potassium transport and of passive permeability in erythrocytes of ground squirrels.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimzey, S. L.; Willis, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    Unidirectional active and passive fluxes of K-42 and Na-24 were measured in red blood cells of ground squirrels (hibernators) and guinea pigs (nonhibernators). As the temperature was lowered, ?active' (ouabain-sensitive) K influx and Na efflux were more considerably diminished in guinea pig cells than in those of ground squirrels. The fraction of total K influx which is ouabain-sensitive in red blood cells of ground squirrels was virtually constant at all temperatures, whereas it decreased abruptly in guinea pig cells as temperature was lowered.

  12. Patterned ground as an indicator of periglacial activity in and around Lomonosov Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Alex; Balme, Matt; Patel, Manish; Hagermann, Axel

    2014-05-01

    A survey of the northern plains of Mars has been conducted to catalogue the distribution of possible periglacial landforms across several large study areas in Acidalia, Utopia and Arcadia Planitiae.. Several hundred HiRISE and CTX images have been surveyed, looking for features indicative of a periglacial environment; patterned ground, solifluction features and scalloped depressions. Non-sorted patterned ground is fairly common across the Northern Plains of Mars where nets of fracture polygons are common at mid to high latitudes. These features are most likely the result of contraction cracking due to temperature changes. The occurrence of fracture polygons is in keeping with the cold, dry environment of Mars. Analogous features on Earth are found in some of the coldest and driest regions of the planet. However other types of patterned ground, such as sorted circles and stripes, tend to occur in warmer and wetter environments as sorted patterned ground is the result of the repeated freezing and thawing of the permafrost active layer. These features require the action of liquid water during the warmer months of the year and are characteristic of a periglacial environment. Such features would not be expected to be as common on Mars, where the surface temperature is only warm enough for water to exist in a liquid state for short periods of time in isolated areas which receive high levels of insolation. Prior studies (e.g. Gallagher et al., 2011, Icarus.) have observed features which appear to be morphologically similar to sorted patterned ground. It is possible that unusual sites where boulders appear organised into stripes and networks could be analogous to these terrestrial periglacial features. Determining where such features occur on Mars could have important implications for understanding the martian environment. Lomonosov Crater, located at 64.9 degrees N, 9.3 degrees W in the northern reaches of Acidalia Planitia, is a 150 km diameter crater surrounded by the

  13. Creep Deformation and Rupture Behavior of Single- and Dual-Pass 316LN Stainless-Steel-Activated TIG Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayanand, V. D.; Vasudevan, M.; Ganesan, V.; Parameswaran, P.; Laha, K.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    Creep deformation and rupture behavior of single-pass and dual-pass 316LN stainless steel (SS) weld joints fabricated by an autogenous activated tungsten inert gas welding process have been assessed by performing metallography, hardness, and conventional and impression creep tests. The fusion zone of the single-pass joint consisted of columnar zones adjacent to base metals with a central equiaxed zone, which have been modified extensively by the thermal cycle of the second pass in the dual-pass joint. The equiaxed zone in the single-pass joint, as well as in the second pass of the dual-pass joint, displayed the lowest hardness in the joints. In the dual-pass joint, the equiaxed zone of the first pass had hardness comparable to the columnar zone. The hardness variations in the joints influenced the creep deformation. The equiaxed and columnar zone in the first pass of the dual-pass joint was more creep resistant than that of the second pass. Both joints possessed lower creep rupture life than the base metal. However, the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint was about twofolds more than that of the single-pass joint. Creep failure in the single-pass joint occurred in the central equiaxed fusion zone, whereas creep cavitation that originated in the second pass was blocked at the weld pass interface. The additional interface and strength variation between two passes in the dual-pass joint provides more restraint to creep deformation and crack propagation in the fusion zone, resulting in an increase in the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint. Furthermore, the differences in content, morphology, and distribution of delta ferrite in the fusion zone of the joints favors more creep cavitation resistance in the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint with the enhancement of creep rupture life.

  14. Inter-seasonal surface deformations of an active rock glacier imaged with radar and lidar remote sensing; Turtmann valley, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, Andrew; Buchli, Thomas; Strozzi, Tazio; Springman, Sarah

    2013-04-01

    Inter-seasonal changes in surface deformation were imaged using a portable radar interferometer and terrestrial laser scanner during a series of three campaigns that took place in autumn 2011, summer 2012 and autumn 2012 on a rock glacier located in the Turtmann valley, Switzerland. Satellite radar interferometry (ERS 1 & 2, CosmoSkymed) indicate that accelerated downslope movement of the rock glacier commenced during the 1990s. Due to signal decorrelation associated with the satellite repeat pass time interval, continuous ground-based radar interferometry measurements were undertaken. Results show that the rock glacier accelerated significantly in Summer (Vmax = 6.0cm/25hrs), probably in response to the condition of the subsurface hydrology (e.g. post-peak spring snow melt and/or infiltration of rainfall). In autumn, the displacement velocity was reduced (Vmax = 2.0cm/25hrs). A one year surface difference of the glacier topography, derived from terrestrial laser scanning, provided insight into the rock glacier kinematics. Ongoing research is aimed at integrating surface displacement results with an extensive borehole monitoring system consisting of inclinometers and temperature sensors.

  15. Active Deformation in the Zagros-Makran Transition Zone Inferred From GPS, Tectonic and Seismological Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, R.; Shabanian, E.; Regard, V.; Yaminifard, F.; Vernant, P.; Nilforoushan, F.; Abbassi, M.; Chery, J.; Tatar, M.; Doerflinger, E.; Peyret, M.; Daignières, M.; Bellier, O.; Hatzfeld, D.; Mokhtari, M.

    2002-12-01

    The present-day N-S convergence between the Arabian and the Eurasian plates is accommodated in Southern Iran along the Zagros fold and thrust belt (with a shortening of ~8 mm/yr)and by the subduction of the Oman oceanic lithosphere beneath the Makran (with a rate of 18mm/yr). The Bandar Abbas-Strait of Hormuz zone is considered as a transition between the Zagros continental collision and the Makran oceanic subduction. In this area, the strain is mainly accommodated along the NNW-SSE trending reverse right lateral Minab-Zendan-Palami faults and along the N-S trending faults of Sarduiyeh, Jiroft and Sabzevaran. We used GPS network measurements (carried out in 2000 and 2002) to better understand how the deformation is distributed between between the Zagros continental collision and the Makran oceanic subduction. The analysis of the velocities (together with the measurements of the global network of Iran) leads to the following conclusions : - The rate of shortening in the Eastern Zagros is < 8mm/yr. It is < 5 mm/yr between the coast and the Main Zagros Thrust. - The horizontal residual velocities of the coastal sites in Zagros relative to Musandan are < 3mm/yr, evidencing for a small deformation in the Persian Gulf. - Across the Minab-Zendan-Palami faults system GPS measurements are consistent with a N-S trending reverse right lateral motion at rate of ~ 10 mm/yr. - West of the Lut block at the latitude of Khanuj, the N-S trending Sarduiyeh-Jiroft-Sabzevaran fault system is characterized by a 2 mm/yr right strike slip motion. Local seismicity is located at an unusual depth down to 35 km. Little is associated with the Minab-Zendan-Palami faults strike slip faults. They rather suggest that they are associated with a complex transition between the Zagros collision and the Makran subduction. Times delays also suggest a large heterogeneity in the crust across the fault system. These measurements support the model that the convergence from the collision to the subduction is

  16. New insights into the active deformation of accretionary prisms: examples from the Western Makran, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penney, Camilla; Copley, Alex; Oveisi, Benham

    2016-04-01

    The Makran subduction zone, along the southern coasts of Iran and Pakistan, hosts one of the largest exposed accretionary wedges in the world. The western Makran has been characterised by a lack of shallow and thrust seismicity in both the instrumental and historical periods. The Mw 6.1 2013 Minab earthquake thus provides a rare opportunity to study the deformation of the accretionary wedge in the transition region between continent-continent collision, in the Zagros, and oceanic subduction, in the Makran. We study the source parameters and slip distribution of this earthquake using seismology, geodesy and field observations. We observe left-lateral strike-slip motion on a fault striking ENE-WSW; approximately perpendicular to the faults of the Minab-Zendan-Palami fault zone, the main structure previously thought to accommodate the right-lateral shear between the Zagros and the Makran. The fault that ruptured in 2013 is one of a series of approximately E-W striking left-lateral faults visible in the geology and geomorphology. These accommodate a velocity field equivalent to right-lateral shear on N-S striking planes by clockwise rotations about vertical axes. The longitudinal range of shear in the western Makran is likely to be controlled by the distance over which the underthrusting Arabian lithosphere deepens in the transition from continent-continent collision to oceanic subduction. The lack of observed megathrust seismicity in the western Makran has led to assertions that the convergence in this region may be aseismic, in contrast to the eastern Makran, which experienced an Mw8.1 earthquake in 1945. The right-lateral Sistan Suture Zone, which runs ~N-S along the Iran-Afghanistan border to the north of the Makran, appears to separate these regimes. However, right-lateral faulting is not observed south of ~27°N, within the wedge. The Minab earthquake and the 2013 Balochistan earthquake show that the Makran accretionary wedge is dominated by strike-slip faulting

  17. Characterization of Activity at Loki from Galileo and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, R. R.; Lopes, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    While Loki is the most active volcanic center on Io, major questions remain concerning the nature of that activity. Rathbun et al. showed that the activity was semi-periodic, and suggested it was due to a resurfacing wave which swept across a lava lake as the crust cooled and become unstable. However in 2001 new observations showed that an intermediate level, less periodic mode of activity had apparently begun. Galileo-NIMS observations of Loki clearly show that the highest temperatures are found near the edge of the patera, consistent with disruption of a lava lake at the margins. NIMS observations also show gradients in temperature across the patera which, when modeled in terms of lava cooling models, are generally consistent with ages expected for the resurfacing wave but may also be consistent with spreading flows. We present a further analysis of NIMS data from I24 and I32 which help define the nature of the temperature variations present in Loki patera, along with Galileo-SSI images from the G1-I32 flybys which show albedo changes apparently correlated with the "periodic" activity measured from ground-based observations.

  18. Long-term ground deformation patterns of Bucharest using multi-temporal InSAR and multivariate dynamic analyses: a possible transpressional system?

    PubMed

    Armaş, Iuliana; Mendes, Diana A; Popa, Răzvan-Gabriel; Gheorghe, Mihaela; Popovici, Diana

    2017-03-02

    The aim of this exploratory research is to capture spatial evolution patterns in the Bucharest metropolitan area using sets of single polarised synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite data and multi-temporal radar interferometry. Three sets of SAR data acquired during the years 1992-2010 from ERS-1/-2 and ENVISAT, and 2011-2014 from TerraSAR-X satellites were used in conjunction with the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) and persistent scatterers (PS) high-resolution multi-temporal interferometry (InSAR) techniques to provide maps of line-of-sight displacements. The satellite-based remote sensing results were combined with results derived from classical methodologies (i.e., diachronic cartography) and field research to study possible trends in developments over former clay pits, landfill excavation sites, and industrial parks. The ground displacement trend patterns were analysed using several linear and nonlinear models, and techniques. Trends based on the estimated ground displacement are characterised by long-term memory, indicated by low noise Hurst exponents, which in the long-term form interesting attractors. We hypothesize these attractors to be tectonic stress fields generated by transpressional movements.

  19. Long-term ground deformation patterns of Bucharest using multi-temporal InSAR and multivariate dynamic analyses: a possible transpressional system?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armaş, Iuliana; Mendes, Diana A.; Popa, Răzvan-Gabriel; Gheorghe, Mihaela; Popovici, Diana

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this exploratory research is to capture spatial evolution patterns in the Bucharest metropolitan area using sets of single polarised synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite data and multi-temporal radar interferometry. Three sets of SAR data acquired during the years 1992–2010 from ERS-1/-2 and ENVISAT, and 2011–2014 from TerraSAR-X satellites were used in conjunction with the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) and persistent scatterers (PS) high-resolution multi-temporal interferometry (InSAR) techniques to provide maps of line-of-sight displacements. The satellite-based remote sensing results were combined with results derived from classical methodologies (i.e., diachronic cartography) and field research to study possible trends in developments over former clay pits, landfill excavation sites, and industrial parks. The ground displacement trend patterns were analysed using several linear and nonlinear models, and techniques. Trends based on the estimated ground displacement are characterised by long-term memory, indicated by low noise Hurst exponents, which in the long-term form interesting attractors. We hypothesize these attractors to be tectonic stress fields generated by transpressional movements.

  20. Long-term ground deformation patterns of Bucharest using multi-temporal InSAR and multivariate dynamic analyses: a possible transpressional system?

    PubMed Central

    Armaş, Iuliana; Mendes, Diana A.; Popa, Răzvan-Gabriel; Gheorghe, Mihaela; Popovici, Diana

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this exploratory research is to capture spatial evolution patterns in the Bucharest metropolitan area using sets of single polarised synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite data and multi-temporal radar interferometry. Three sets of SAR data acquired during the years 1992–2010 from ERS-1/-2 and ENVISAT, and 2011–2014 from TerraSAR-X satellites were used in conjunction with the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) and persistent scatterers (PS) high-resolution multi-temporal interferometry (InSAR) techniques to provide maps of line-of-sight displacements. The satellite-based remote sensing results were combined with results derived from classical methodologies (i.e., diachronic cartography) and field research to study possible trends in developments over former clay pits, landfill excavation sites, and industrial parks. The ground displacement trend patterns were analysed using several linear and nonlinear models, and techniques. Trends based on the estimated ground displacement are characterised by long-term memory, indicated by low noise Hurst exponents, which in the long-term form interesting attractors. We hypothesize these attractors to be tectonic stress fields generated by transpressional movements. PMID:28252103

  1. PS-InSAR measurements at the most active volcanoes in Iceland: role of the GEO supersite initiative in deformation monitoring at Bárðarbunga, Askja, Hekla, Katla and Eyjafjallajökull volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Michelle; Dumont, Stéphanie; Drouin, Vincent; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Spaans, Karsten; Hooper, Andrew; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Árnadóttir, Þóra; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Michalczewska, Karolina; Hjaltadóttir, Sigurlaug; María Friðriksdóttir, Hildur; Rut Hjartardóttir, Ásta; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Vogfjörd, Kristín; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Hensch, Martin; Guðmundsson, Gunnar; Geirsson, Halldór; Sturkell, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of a time series of ground deformation measurements at active volcanoes can provide an improved understanding of sub-volcanic and sub-aerial processes; including those related to magmatic, hydrothermal and structural development. Interpreting a long time series may also help determine background behavior, and identify any deviations from this, including the migration of new melt. We use Persistent Scatterer Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PS-InSAR) techniques to generate a time series of high-resolution deformation measurements, in the vicinity of the most active volcanoes in Iceland: Bárðarbunga, Askja, Hekla, Katla and Eyjafjallajökull and compare these to other geodetic measurements. A comprehensive network of continuous GPS stations is already deployed at these volcanoes and a series of campaign GPS measurements are routinely undertaken each summer. InSAR observations are complementary to these field based measurements and their high spatial resolution assists in resolving the geometry of the deformation field hence gaining improved constraints on the inferred source. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites has recently declared Iceland a Permanent Geohazard Supersite, based on its propensity for relatively frequent eruptions and their potentially hazardous, long ranging effects. The recent Supersite award ensures a considerable amount of SAR data is made available for both past and future satellite acquisitions, including new X-band images (acquired by TerraSAR-X and Cosmo-SkyMed satellites), and historic C-band images from ERS and ENVISAT. We present a series of long-term deformation measurements for Hekla, Katla, Eyjafjallajökull and Askja volcanoes, derived using PS-InSAR techniques, and include recent interferograms spanning the 2014 unrest and eruption within the Bárðarbunga volcanic system. InSAR and tilt measurements at Hekla indicate renewed melt supply to a sub-volcanic reservoir after the last eruption in 2000. Recent

  2. Characteristics of cloud-to-ground lightning activity in hailstorms over Yunnan province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiran; Wu, Jian; Liu, Xuetao; Zhang, Tengfei; Xie, Yinjian; Xu, Yinjie; Zhao, Deming

    2015-12-01

    The characteristics of cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning for nine hailstorms in Yunnan province of China are analyzed statistically. It is determined that the hailstorms were found to present dominant negative CG lightning flashes at any given stage. One specific hailstorm occurring on July 16, 2006, is analyzed in detail by using the data from a CG lightning location network and Doppler radar. This severe hailstorm, which exhibited strong vertical development with cloud tops reaching 15.9 km, produced hailstones as large as 15 mm and had a lifespan of 3 h and 12 min. The total CG lightning within the hailstorm showed high levels of activity with flash rates of up to 79 fl/5 min. The analysis of the storm cell's lifecycle shows similar trends between the CG lightning flash rates and radar-derived parameters. Cloud-to-ground flashes tended to initiate within the cloud region with reflectivity of more than 30 dBZ at the -10 °C isotherm height. A distinct increase in CG flash rate is shown during the rapid development stages of hailstorms. The CG lightning jump pattern appears to be an effective tool for short-term forecasting of possible occurrences of severe weather.

  3. Acid phosphatase activity and color changes in consumer-style griddle-cooked ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Lyon, B G; Davis, C E; Windham, W R; Lyon, C E

    2001-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration have issued temperature requirements to help consumers cook beef patty products that are free of pathogens. Verification of end-point temperature (EPT) is needed in cooked meat products due to concerns over outbreaks of Escherichia coli O157:H7. Acid phosphatase (ACP) activity was studied as a potential method for determination of EPT in ground beef patties cooked nonfrozen, patties frozen 7 days and thawed at room temperature 4 h in a refrigerator or by microwave, and patties made from ground beef frozen in store packages, then thawed in a refrigerator overnight. Pressed-out meat juices were analyzed from patties (n = 314) cooked to 57.2 degrees C (135 degrees F). 65.6 degrees C (150 degrees F), 71.1 degrees C (160 degrees F), and 79.4 degrees C (175 degrees F) target EPTs. Expressed meat juice and internal meat patty color decreased in redness as EPT increased. Freezing whole packs with slow refrigerator or room temperature thawing caused significantly greater loss of redness in expressed cooked meat juice than did other handling methods. Log10 ACP had a significant linear (R2 = 0.99) response to EPT. Results show that the 3- to 5-min ACP test could be used to verify EPT in griddle-cooked hamburger patties.

  4. Ground-state thermodynamics of bistable redox-active donor-acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules.

    PubMed

    Fahrenbach, Albert C; Bruns, Carson J; Cao, Dennis; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2012-09-18

    Fashioned through billions of years of evolution, biological molecular machines, such as ATP synthase, myosin, and kinesin, use the intricate relative motions of their components to drive some of life's most essential processes. Having control over the motions in molecules is imperative for life to function, and many chemists have designed, synthesized, and investigated artificial molecular systems that also express controllable motions within molecules. Using bistable mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs), based on donor-acceptor recognition motifs, we have sought to imitate the sophisticated nanoscale machines present in living systems. In this Account, we analyze the thermodynamic characteristics of a series of redox-switchable [2]rotaxanes and [2]catenanes. Control and understanding of the relative intramolecular movements of components in MIMs have been vital in the development of a variety of applications of these compounds ranging from molecular electronic devices to drug delivery systems. These bistable donor-acceptor MIMs undergo redox-activated switching between two isomeric states. Under ambient conditions, the dominant translational isomer, the ground-state coconformation (GSCC), is in equilibrium with the less favored translational isomer, the metastable-state coconformation (MSCC). By manipulating the redox state of the recognition site associated with the GSCC, we can stimulate the relative movements of the components in these bistable MIMs. The thermodynamic parameters of model host-guest complexes provide a good starting point to rationalize the ratio of GSCC to MSCC at equilibrium. The bistable [2]rotaxanes show a strong correlation between the relative free energies of model complexes and the ground-state distribution constants (K(GS)). This relationship does not always hold for bistable [2]catenanes, most likely because of the additional steric and electronic constraints present when the two rings are mechanically interlocked with each other

  5. Active vibration control of functionally graded beams with piezoelectric layers based on higher order shear deformation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendine, K.; Boukhoulda, F. B.; Nouari, M.; Satla, Z.

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports on a study of active vibration control of functionally graded beams with upper and lower surface-bonded piezoelectric layers. The model is based on higher-order shear deformation theory and implemented using the finite element method (FEM). The proprieties of the functionally graded beam (FGB) are graded along the thickness direction. The piezoelectric actuator provides a damping effect on the FGB by means of a velocity feedback control algorithm. A Matlab program has been developed for the FGB model and compared with ANSYS APDL. Using Newmark's method numerical solutions are obtained for the dynamic equations of FGB with piezoelectric layers. Numerical results show the effects of the constituent volume fraction and the influence the feedback control gain on the frequency and dynamic response of FGBs.

  6. Influence of a moderate physical activity intervention on red cell deformability in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Basit; Ferrari, Nina; Montiel, Georgina; Bloch, Wilhelm; Raabe-Oetker, Anke; Skrobala, Nina; Brixius, Klara

    2013-07-01

    The present study investigates whether a moderate physical activity intervention may alter red cell deformability (RCD) of patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Subjects (n = 10; age: 62 ± 4; body-mass index (BMI): 25.8 ± 7.5) performed a training regimen for 10 weeks. In the beginning of the study and after the training period, COPD patients underwent a WHO cycle ergometry test. Venous blood samples were taken before (T0), immediately after (T1) and 30 min after (T2) the intervention. RCD was measured with the laser-assisted optical rotational cell analyzer (LORCA). Significant improvements of the RCD were detected. The semi-maximal shear stress increased significantly. Acute exhaustion had no effect on RCD. Thus, the training period of 10 weeks influenced RCD.

  7. Microbial diversity and activity through a permafrost/ground ice core profile from the Canadian high Arctic.

    PubMed

    Steven, Blaire; Pollard, Wayne H; Greer, Charles W; Whyte, Lyle G

    2008-12-01

    Culture-dependent and culture-independent methods were used in an investigation of the microbial diversity in a permafrost/massive ground ice core from the Canadian high Arctic. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis as well as Bacteria and Archaea 16S rRNA gene clone libraries showed differences in the composition of the microbial communities in the distinct core horizons. Microbial diversity was similar in the active layer (surface) soil, permafrost table and permafrost horizons while the ground ice microbial community showed low diversity. Bacteria and Archaea sequences related to the Actinobacteria (54%) and Crenarchaeota (100%) respectively were predominant in the active layer while the majority of sequences in the permafrost were related to the Proteobacteria (57%) and Euryarchaeota (76%). The most abundant phyla in the ground ice clone libraries were the Firmicutes (59%) and Crenarchaeota (82%). Isolates from the permafrost were both less abundant and diverse than in the active layer soil, while no culturable cells were recovered from the ground ice. Mineralization of [1-(14)C] acetic acid and [2-(14)C] glucose was used to detect microbial activity in the different horizons in the core. Mineralization was detected at near ambient permafrost temperatures (-15 degrees C), indicating that permafrost may harbour an active microbial population, while the low microbial diversity, abundance and activity in ground ice suggests a less hospitable microbial habitat.

  8. High red blood cell nitric oxide synthase activation is not associated with improved vascular function and red blood cell deformability in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Grau, Marijke; Mozar, Anaïs; Charlot, Keyne; Lamarre, Yann; Weyel, Linda; Suhr, Frank; Collins, Bianca; Jumet, Stéphane; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Romana, Marc; Lemonne, Nathalie; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Antoine-Jonville, Sophie; Bloch, Wilhelm; Connes, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Human red blood cells (RBC) express an active and functional endothelial-like nitric oxide (NO) synthase (RBC-NOS). We report studies on RBC-NOS activity in sickle cell anaemia (SCA), a genetic disease characterized by decreased RBC deformability and vascular dysfunction. Total RBC-NOS content was not significantly different in SCA patients compared to healthy controls; however, using phosphorylated RBC-NOS-Ser(1177) as a marker, RBC-NOS activation was higher in SCA patients as a consequence of the greater activation of Akt (phosphorylated Akt-Ser(473) ). The higher RBC-NOS activation in SCA led to higher levels of S-nitrosylated α- and β-spectrins, and greater RBC nitrite and nitrotyrosine levels compared to healthy controls. Plasma nitrite content was not different between the two groups. Laser Doppler flowmetric experiments demonstrated blunted microcirculatory NO-dependent response under hyperthermia in SCA patients. RBC deformability, measured by ektacytometry, was reduced in SCA in contrast to healthy individuals, and pre-shearing RBC in vitro did not improve deformability despite an increase of RBC-NOS activation. RBC-NOS activation is high in freshly drawn blood from SCA patients, resulting in high amounts of NO produced by RBC. However, this does not result in improved RBC deformability and vascular function: higher RBC-NO is not sufficient to counterbalance the enhanced oxidative stress in SCA.

  9. Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru

    2012-09-04

    This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

  10. Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

  11. Active Ground Optical Remote Sensing for Improved Monitoring of Seedling Stress in Nurseries

    PubMed Central

    Eitel, Jan U. H.; Keefe, Robert F.; Long, Dan S.; Davis, Anthony S.; Vierling, Lee A.

    2010-01-01

    Active ground optical remote sensing (AGORS) devices mounted on overhead irrigation booms could help to improve seedling quality by autonomously monitoring seedling stress. In contrast to traditionally used passive optical sensors, AGORS devices operate independently of ambient light conditions and do not require spectral reference readings. Besides measuring red (590–670 nm) and near-infrared (>760 nm) reflectance AGORS devices have recently become available that also measure red-edge (730 nm) reflectance. We tested the hypothesis that the additional availability of red-edge reflectance information would improve AGORS of plant stress induced chlorophyll breakdown in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). Our results showed that the availability of red-edge reflectance information improved AGORS estimates of stress induced variation in chlorophyll concentration (r2 > 0.73, RMSE < 1.69) when compared to those without (r2 = 0.57, RMSE = 2.11). PMID:22319275

  12. Active suspension design for a Large Space Structure ground test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Thomas J. H.; Schlegel, Clemens

    1993-01-01

    The expected future high performance requirements for Large Space Structures (LSS) enforce technology innovations such as active vibration damping techniques e.g., by means of structure sensors and actuators. The implementation of new technologies like that requires an interactive and integrated structural and control design with an increased effort in hardware validation by ground testing. During the technology development phase generic system tests will be most important covering verification and validation aspects up to the preparation and definition of relevant space experiments. For many applications using advanced designs it is deemed necessary to improve existing testing technology by further reducing disturbances and gravity coupling effects while maintaining high performance reliability. A key issue in this context is the improvement of suspension techniques. The ideal ground test facility satisfying these requirements completely will never be found. The highest degree of reliability will always be obtained by passive suspension methods taking into account severe performance limitations such as non-zero rigid body modes, restriction of degrees of freedom of motion and frequency response limitations. Passive compensation mechanisms, e.g., zero-spring-rate mechanisms, either require large moving masses or they are limited with respect to low-frequency performance by friction, stiction or other non-linear effects. With active suspensions these limitations can be removed to a large extent thereby increasing the range of applications. Despite an additional complexity which is associated with a potential risk in reliability their development is considered promising due to the amazing improvement of real-time control technology which is still continuing.

  13. Ground-based acoustic parametric generator impact on the atmosphere and ionosphere in an active experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapoport, Yuriy G.; Cheremnykh, Oleg K.; Koshovy, Volodymyr V.; Melnik, Mykola O.; Ivantyshyn, Oleh L.; Nogach, Roman T.; Selivanov, Yuriy A.; Grimalsky, Vladimir V.; Mezentsev, Valentyn P.; Karataeva, Larysa M.; Ivchenko, Vasyl. M.; Milinevsky, Gennadi P.; Fedun, Viktor N.; Tkachenko, Eugen N.

    2017-01-01

    We develop theoretical basics of active experiments with two beams of acoustic waves, radiated by a ground-based sound generator. These beams are transformed into atmospheric acoustic gravity waves (AGWs), which have parameters that enable them to penetrate to the altitudes of the ionospheric E and F regions where they influence the electron concentration of the ionosphere. Acoustic waves are generated by the ground-based parametric sound generator (PSG) at the two close frequencies. The main idea of the experiment is to design the output parameters of the PSG to build a cascade scheme of nonlinear wave frequency downshift transformations to provide the necessary conditions for their vertical propagation and to enable penetration to ionospheric altitudes. The PSG generates sound waves (SWs) with frequencies f1 = 600 and f2 = 625 Hz and large amplitudes (100-420 m s-1). Each of these waves is modulated with the frequency of 0.016 Hz. The novelty of the proposed analytical-numerical model is due to simultaneous accounting for nonlinearity, diffraction, losses, and dispersion and inclusion of the two-stage transformation (1) of the initial acoustic waves to the acoustic wave with the difference frequency Δf = f2 - f1 in the altitude ranges 0-0.1 km, in the strongly nonlinear regime, and (2) of the acoustic wave with the difference frequency to atmospheric acoustic gravity waves with the modulational frequency in the altitude ranges 0.1-20 km, which then reach the altitudes of the ionospheric E and F regions, in a practically linear regime. AGWs, nonlinearly transformed from the sound waves, launched by the two-frequency ground-based sound generator can increase the transparency of the ionosphere for the electromagnetic waves in HF (MHz) and VLF (kHz) ranges. The developed theoretical model can be used for interpreting an active experiment that includes the PSG impact on the atmosphere-ionosphere system, measurements of electromagnetic and acoustic fields, study of

  14. Communication and general concern criterion prior to activation of the rapid response team: a grounded theory.

    PubMed

    Martland, Jarrad; Chamberlain, Diane; Hutton, Alison; Smigielski, Michael

    2015-11-30

    Objective Patients commonly show signs and symptoms of deterioration for hours or days before cardiorespiratory arrest. Rapid response teams (RRT) were created to improve recognition and response to patient deterioration in these situations. Activation criteria include vital signs or 'general concern' by a clinician or family member. The general concern criterion for RRT activation accounts for nearly one-third of all RRT activity, and although it is well established that communication deficits between staff can contribute to poorer outcomes for patients, there is little evidence pertaining to communication and its effects on the general concern RRT activation. Thus, the aim of the present study was to develop a substantive grounded theory related to the communication process between clinicians that preceded the activation of an RRT when general concern criterion was used.Methods Qualitative grounded theory involved collection of three types of data details namely personal notes from participants in focus groups with white board notes from discussions and audio recordings of the focus groups sessions. Focus groups were conducted with participants exploring issues associated with clinician communication and how it related to the activation of an RRT using the general concern criterion.Results The three main phases of coding (i.e. open, axial and selective coding) analysis identified 322 separate open codes. The strongest theme contributed to a theory of ineffective communication and decreased psychological safety, namely that 'In the absence of effective communication there is a subsequent increase in anxiety, fear or concern that can be directly attributed to the activation of an RRT using the 'general concern' criterion'. The RRT filled cultural and process deficiencies in the compliance with an escalation protocol. Issues such as 'not for resuscitation documentation' and 'inability to establish communication with and between medical or nursing personnel' rated

  15. Similar electromyographic activities of lower limbs between squatting on a reebok core board and ground.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongming; Cao, Chunmei; Chen, Xiaoping

    2013-05-01

    Reebok Core Boards (RCB) used as a platform in training provide an unstable environment for resistance training. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of unstable surface on muscle electromyographic (EMG) activities during a deep squat task. Thirteen male subjects participated in the study. Electromyographic activities of soleus (SO), vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), gluteus maximus (GMa), gluteus medius (GMe), and upper lumbar erector spinae (ULES) muscles were collected when subjects were performing a deep squat task on a RCB and ground with different weight loads (body weight, 30%RM (repetition maximum) and 60%RM). No significant difference was observed for all muscle EMG between unstable and stable surface during all weight load conditions (p > 0.05). Muscle EMG significantly increased when the weight load increased (p < 0.05). Similar muscle activities were observed when subjects performed a deep squat task on a stable and unstable surface. Simply applying unstable surface might not provide extra stimulation to the superficial muscles during squatting in resistance-trained students.

  16. Prediction of ground reaction forces and moments during various activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Fluit, R; Andersen, M S; Kolk, S; Verdonschot, N; Koopman, H F J M

    2014-07-18

    Inverse dynamics based simulations on musculoskeletal models is a commonly used method for the analysis of human movement. Due to inaccuracies in the kinematic and force plate data, and a mismatch between the model and the subject, the equations of motion are violated when solving the inverse dynamics problem. As a result, dynamic inconsistency will exist and lead to residual forces and moments. In this study, we present and evaluate a computational method to perform inverse dynamics-based simulations without force plates, which both improves the dynamic consistency as well as removes the model׳s dependency on measured external forces. Using the equations of motion and a scaled musculoskeletal model, the ground reaction forces and moments (GRF&Ms) are derived from three-dimensional full-body motion. The method entails a dynamic contact model and optimization techniques to solve the indeterminacy problem during a double contact phase and, in contrast to previously proposed techniques, does not require training or empirical data. The method was applied to nine healthy subjects performing several Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and evaluated with simultaneously measured force plate data. Except for the transverse ground reaction moment, no significant differences (P>0.05) were found between the mean predicted and measured GRF&Ms for almost all ADLs. The mean residual forces and moments, however, were significantly reduced (P>0.05) in almost all ADLs using our method compared to conventional inverse dynamic simulations. Hence, the proposed method may be used instead of raw force plate data in human movement analysis using inverse dynamics.

  17. Tragaldabas: a muon ground-based detector for the study of the solar activity; first observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Blanco, Juan

    2016-04-01

    A new RPC-based cosmic ray detector, TRAGALDABAS (acronym of "TRAsGo for the AnaLysis of the nuclear matter Decay, the Atmosphere, the earth's B-field And the Solar activity") has been installed at the Univ. of Santiago de Compostela, Spain (N:42°52'34",W:8°33'37"). The detector, in its present layout, consists of three 1.8 m2 planes of three 1mm-gap glass RPCs. Each plane is readout with 120 pads with grounded guard electrodes between them to minimize the crosstalk noise. The main performances of the detectors are: an arrival time resolution of about ~300 ps, a tracking angular resolution below 3°, a detection efficiency close to 1, and a solid angle acceptance of ~5 srad. TRAGALDABAS will be able to monitor the cosmic ray low energy component strongly modulated by solar activity by mean the observation of secondary muons from the interaction between cosmic rays and atmospheric molecules. Its cadence and its angular resolution will allow to study in detail, small variations in cosmic ray anisotropy. These variations can be a key parameter to understand the effect of solar disturbances on the propagation of cosmic ray in the inner heliosphere and, maybe, provide a new tool for space weather analysis. In this work first TRAGALDABAS observations of solar events are shown

  18. Figure-ground separation during active electrolocation in the weakly electric fish, Gnathonemus petersii.

    PubMed

    Fechler, Katharina; von der Emde, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The weakly electric fish Gnathonemus petersii uses active electrolocation to detect and discriminate between objects in its environment. Objects are recognised by analysing the electric images, which they project onto the fish's skin. In this study, we determined whether different types of large backgrounds interfere with the fishes' ability to discriminate between objects. Fish were trained in a food-rewarded two-alternative forced-choice procedure to discriminate between two objects. In subsequent tests, structured and non-structured as well as stationary and moving backgrounds were positioned behind the objects and discrimination performance between objects was measured at different object distances. To define the electrosensory stimuli during the tests, the electric images of the objects and backgrounds used were measured. Without a background G. petersii was able to discriminate between objects up to distances of about 3-4 cm. Even though the electric images of background and object superimposed in a complex way, the addition of stationary structured or plain backgrounds had only minor effects on the range of object discrimination. However, two types of moving backgrounds improved electrolocation by extending the range of object discrimination up to a distance of almost 5 cm. This suggests that movements in the environment plays an important role for object identification and improves figure-ground separation during active electrolocation.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of the pygidial gland secretion of three ground beetle species (Insecta: Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    PubMed

    Nenadić, Marija; Soković, Marina; Glamočlija, Jasmina; Ćirić, Ana; Perić-Mataruga, Vesna; Ilijin, Larisa; Tešević, Vele; Vujisić, Ljubodrag; Todosijević, Marina; Vesović, Nikola; Ćurčić, Srećko

    2016-04-01

    The antimicrobial properties of the pygidial gland secretions released by the adults of the three ground beetle species, Carabus ullrichii, C. coriaceus, and Abax parallelepipedus, have been tested. Microdilution method was applied for detection of minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), and minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFCs). Additionally, morpho-histology of the pygidial glands is investigated. We have tested 16 laboratory and clinical strains of human pathogens--eight bacterial both gram-positive and gram-negative species and eight fungal species. The pygidial secretion samples of C. ullrichii have showed the strongest antimicrobial effect against all strains of treated bacteria and fungi. Staphylococcus aureus, Lysteria monocytogenes, and Salmonella typhimurium proved to be the most sensitive bacterial strains. Penicillium funiculosum proved to be the most sensitive micromycete, while P. ochrochloron and P. verrucosum var. cyclopium the most resistant micromycetes. The pygidial secretion of C. coriaceus has showed antibacterial potential solely against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and antifungal activity against Aspergillus fumigatus, A. versicolor, A. ochraceus, and P. ochrochloron. Antibacterial properties of pygidial gland secretion of A. parallelepipedus were achieved against P. aeruginosa, while antifungal activity was detected against five of the eight tested micromycetes (A. fumigatus, A. versicolor, A. ochraceus, Trichoderma viride, and P. verrucosum var. cyclopium). Commercial antibiotics Streptomycin and Ampicillin and mycotics Ketoconazole and Bifonazole, applied as the positive controls, showed higher antibacterial/antifungal properties for all bacterial and fungal strains. The results of this observation might have a significant impact on the environmental aspects and possible medical purpose in the future.

  20. Optimization of activator solution and heat treatment of ground lignite type fly ash geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, Z.; Szabó, R.; Rácz, Á.; Lakatos, J.; Debreczeni, Á.; Mucsi, G.

    2017-02-01

    Geopolymers are inorganic polymers which can be produced by the reaction between silico aluminate oxides and alkali silicates in alkaline medium. Materialscontaining silica and alumina compounds are suitable for geopolymer production. These can beprimary materials or industrial wastes, i. e. fly ash, metallurgical slag and red mud. In this paper, the results of the systematic experimental series are presented which were carried out in order to optimize the geopolymer preparation process. Fly ash was ground for different residence time (0, 5, 10, 30, 60 min) in order to investigate the optimal specific surface area. NaOH activator solution concentration also varied (6, 8, 10, 12, 14 M). Furthermore, sodium silicate was added to NaOH as a network builder solution. In this last serie different heat curing temperatures (30, 60, 90°C) were also applied. After seven days of ageing the physical properties of the geopolymer(compressive strength and specimen density)were measured. Chemical leaching tests on the rawmaterial and the geopolymers were carried out to determine the elements which can be mobilized by different leaching solutions. It was found that the above mentioned parameters (fly ash fineness, molar concentration and composition of activator solution, heat curing) has great effect on the physical and chemical properties of geopolymer specimens. Optimal conditions were as follows: specific surface area of the fly ash above 2000 cm2/g, 10 M NaOH, 30°C heat curing temperature which resulted in 21 MPa compressive strength geopolymer.

  1. Antimicrobial activity of the pygidial gland secretion of three ground beetle species (Insecta: Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenadić, Marija; Soković, Marina; Glamočlija, Jasmina; Ćirić, Ana; Perić-Mataruga, Vesna; Ilijin, Larisa; Tešević, Vele; Vujisić, Ljubodrag; Todosijević, Marina; Vesović, Nikola; Ćurčić, Srećko

    2016-04-01

    The antimicrobial properties of the pygidial gland secretions released by the adults of the three ground beetle species, Carabus ullrichii, C. coriaceus, and Abax parallelepipedus, have been tested. Microdilution method was applied for detection of minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), and minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFCs). Additionally, morpho-histology of the pygidial glands is investigated. We have tested 16 laboratory and clinical strains of human pathogens—eight bacterial both gram-positive and gram-negative species and eight fungal species. The pygidial secretion samples of C. ullrichii have showed the strongest antimicrobial effect against all strains of treated bacteria and fungi. Staphylococcus aureus, Lysteria monocytogenes, and Salmonella typhimurium proved to be the most sensitive bacterial strains. Penicillium funiculosum proved to be the most sensitive micromycete, while P. ochrochloron and P. verrucosum var . cyclopium the most resistant micromycetes. The pygidial secretion of C. coriaceus has showed antibacterial potential solely against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and antifungal activity against Aspergillus fumigatus, A. versicolor, A. ochraceus, and P. ochrochloron. Antibacterial properties of pygidial gland secretion of A. parallelepipedus were achieved against P. aeruginosa, while antifungal activity was detected against five of the eight tested micromycetes (A. fumigatus, A. versicolor, A. ochraceus, Trichoderma viride, and P. verrucosum var . cyclopium). Commercial antibiotics Streptomycin and Ampicillin and mycotics Ketoconazole and Bifonazole, applied as the positive controls, showed higher antibacterial/antifungal properties for all bacterial and fungal strains. The results of this observation might have a significant impact on the environmental aspects and possible medical purpose in the future.

  2. Evidence of a shallow persistent magmatic reservoir from joint inversion of gravity and ground deformation data: The 25-26 October 2013 Etna lava fountaining event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Filippo; Currenti, Gilda; Palano, Mimmo; Pepe, Antonio; Pepe, Susi

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the volcanic processes leading to the 25-26 October 2013 lava fountain at Mount Etna, we jointly investigated gravity, GPS, and DInSAR measurements covering the late-June to early-November time interval. We used finite element modeling to infer a shallow magmatic reservoir which (i) inflated since July 2013, (ii) fed the volcanic activity at the summit craters during 25-26 October, and (iii) deflated due to magma drainage related to this volcanic activity. We suggested that this reservoir belongs to a shallow volume, which is located beneath the summit area and is replenished by magma rising from deep reservoirs and fed the short-term volcanic activity, representing a persistent shallow magmatic plumbing system of Etna. In addition, the model results show that there is a large discrepancy between the erupted and shallow reservoir deflation volumes, which could be reasonably attributable to a highly compressible volatile-rich magma.

  3. 2D and 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography imaging of earthquake related ground deformations at the Ancient Roman Forum and Isis Temple of Baelo Claudia (Cádiz, South Spain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Pablo G.

    2010-05-01

    The ancient roman city of Baelo Claudia has been subject of several papers on earthquake environmental effects (EEE) and well as earthquake archaeological effects (EAE). During the field training course on archaeoseismology and palaeoseismology conducted in September 2009 (INQUA-IGCP567 Workshop) held at Baelo Claudia, four Electric Resistivity Tomography (ERT) profiles were carried out, by the teams of the Salamanca University (Spain), RWTH Aachen University (Germany) and the Geological Survey of Spain (IGME). ERT surveys were developed in the eastern side of the ancient roman Forum across the unexcavated sector of the archaeological site heading on the 1st Century AD Isis Temple. Each ERT profile was constituted by a 48 multielectrode array with spacing of 2 m resulting in a total length of investigation of around 384 m. ERT lines were separated 10 m each other resulting in a total research area of 3840 m2 to a mean investigation depth of 16 m. The selected survey configurations were Pole-Dipole and Wenner in order to get detailed information about lateral resistivity contrasts, but with a reasonable depth of investigation. The resulting 2D resistivity pseudosections clearly display deformations of the buried roman pavements which propagated in depth within the pre-roman clayey substratum of the Bolonia Bay area.. 3D modelling of the 2D pseudosections indicates that the observed deformations are related to near-surface landsliding, being possible to calculate the minimum volume of mobilized material. ERT 3D imaging allow to refine previous GPR surveys conducted at this same area and to get a subsurface picture of ground deformations caused by repeated earthquakes during the 1st and 3rd Centuries AD. Preliminary calculated volume for the mobilized materials affecting the foundations of the Isis Temple and Forum clearly points to a minimum ESI-07 VIII Intensity validating previous research in the zone. This study has been supported by the Spanish Research Projects

  4. Quality-assurance plan for ground-water activities, U.S. Geological Survey, Washington Water Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drost, B. W.

    2005-01-01

    This quality-assurance plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey's Washington Water Science Center, for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of ground-water data. This plan serves as a guide to all Washington Water Science Center personnel involved in ground-water activities, and changes as the needs and requirements of the Washington Water Science Center and Discipline change. Regular updates to this plan represent an integral part of the quality-assurance process.

  5. Dynamic performance of microelectromechanical systems deformable mirrors for use in an active/adaptive two-photon microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer-Zhang, Christian Chunzi; Foster, Warren B.; Downey, Ryan D.; Arrasmith, Christopher L.; Dickensheets, David L.

    2016-12-01

    Active optics such as deformable mirrors can be used to control both focal depth and aberrations during scanning laser microscopy. If the focal depth can be changed dynamically during scanning, then imaging of oblique surfaces becomes possible. If aberrations can be corrected dynamically during scanning, an image can be optimized throughout the field of view. Here, we characterize the speed and dynamic precision of a Boston Micromachines Corporation Multi-DM 140 element aberration correction mirror and a Revibro Optics 4-zone focus control mirror to assess suitability for use in an active and adaptive two-photon microscope. Tests for the multi-DM include both step response and sinusoidal frequency sweeps of specific Zernike modes (defocus, spherical aberration, coma, astigmatism, and trefoil). We find wavefront error settling times for mode amplitude steps as large as 400 nm to be less than 52 μs, with 3 dB frequencies ranging from 6.5 to 10 kHz. The Revibro Optics mirror was tested for step response only, with wavefront error settling time less than 80 μs for defocus steps up to 3000 nm, and less than 45 μs for spherical aberration steps up to 600 nm. These response speeds are sufficient for intrascan correction at scan rates typical of two-photon microscopy.

  6. InSAR imaging of volcanic deformation over cloud-prone areas - Aleutian islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong

    2007-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) is capable of measuring ground-surface deformation with centimeter-tosubcentimeter precision and spatial resolution of tens-of meters over a relatively large region. With its global coverage and all-weather imaging capability, INSAR is an important technique for measuring ground-surface deformation of volcanoes over cloud-prone and rainy regions such as the Aleutian Islands, where only less than 5 percent of optical imagery is usable due to inclement weather conditions. The spatial distribution of surface deformation data, derived from INSAR images, enables the construction of detailed mechanical models to enhance the study of magmatic processes. This paper reviews the basics of INSAR for volcanic deformation mapping and the INSAR studies of ten Aleutian volcanoes associated with both eruptive and noneruptive activity. These studies demonstrate that all-weather INSAR imaging can improve our understanding of how the Aleutian volcanoes work and enhance our capability to predict future eruptions and associated hazards.

  7. Estrogen and androgen receptor activities of hydraulic fracturing chemicals and surface and ground water in a drilling-dense region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Davis, J. Wade; Hormann, Anette M.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid rise in natural gas extraction using hydraulic fracturing increases the potential for contamination of surface and ground water from chemicals used throughout the process. Hundreds of products containing more than 750 chemicals and components are potentially used throughout the extraction process, including more than 100 known or suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals. We hypothesized thataselected subset of chemicalsusedin natural gas drilling operationsandalso surface and ground water samples collected in a drilling-dense region of Garfield County, Colorado, would exhibit estrogen and androgen receptor activities. Water samples were collected, solid-phase extracted, and measured for estrogen and androgen receptor activities using reporter gene assays in human cell lines. Of the 39 unique water samples, 89%, 41%, 12%, and 46% exhibited estrogenic, antiestrogenic, androgenic, and antiandrogenic activities, respectively. Testing of a subset of natural gas drilling chemicals revealed novel antiestrogenic, novel antiandrogenic, and limited estrogenic activities. The Colorado River, the drainage basin for this region, exhibited moderate levels of estrogenic, antiestrogenic, and antiandrogenic activities, suggesting that higher localized activity at sites with known natural gas–related spills surrounding the river might be contributing to the multiple receptor activities observed in this water source. The majority of water samples collected from sites in a drilling-dense region of Colorado exhibited more estrogenic, antiestrogenic, or antiandrogenic activities than reference sites with limited nearby drilling operations. Our data suggest that natural gas drilling operationsmayresult in elevated endocrine-disrupting chemical activity in surface and ground water.

  8. Estrogen and androgen receptor activities of hydraulic fracturing chemicals and surface and ground water in a drilling-dense region.

    PubMed

    Kassotis, Christopher D; Tillitt, Donald E; Davis, J Wade; Hormann, Annette M; Nagel, Susan C

    2014-03-01

    The rapid rise in natural gas extraction using hydraulic fracturing increases the potential for contamination of surface and ground water from chemicals used throughout the process. Hundreds of products containing more than 750 chemicals and components are potentially used throughout the extraction process, including more than 100 known or suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals. We hypothesized that a selected subset of chemicals used in natural gas drilling operations and also surface and ground water samples collected in a drilling-dense region of Garfield County, Colorado, would exhibit estrogen and androgen receptor activities. Water samples were collected, solid-phase extracted, and measured for estrogen and androgen receptor activities using reporter gene assays in human cell lines. Of the 39 unique water samples, 89%, 41%, 12%, and 46% exhibited estrogenic, antiestrogenic, androgenic, and antiandrogenic activities, respectively. Testing of a subset of natural gas drilling chemicals revealed novel antiestrogenic, novel antiandrogenic, and limited estrogenic activities. The Colorado River, the drainage basin for this region, exhibited moderate levels of estrogenic, antiestrogenic, and antiandrogenic activities, suggesting that higher localized activity at sites with known natural gas-related spills surrounding the river might be contributing to the multiple receptor activities observed in this water source. The majority of water samples collected from sites in a drilling-dense region of Colorado exhibited more estrogenic, antiestrogenic, or antiandrogenic activities than reference sites with limited nearby drilling operations. Our data suggest that natural gas drilling operations may result in elevated endocrine-disrupting chemical activity in surface and ground water.

  9. Coastal Marine Terraces Define Late Quaternary Fault Activity and Deformation Within Northern East Bay Hills, San Francisco Bay Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelson, K. I.

    2004-12-01

    Detailed mapping of uplifted marine platforms bordering the Carquinez Strait between Benicia and Pinole, California, provides data on the pattern and rate of late Quaternary deformation across the northern East Bay Hills. Field mapping, interpretation of early 20th-century topographic data, analysis of aerial photography, and compilation of onshore borehole data show the presence of remnants of three platforms, with back-edge elevations of about 4 m, 12 m, and 18 m. Based on U-series dates (Helley et al., 1993) and comparison of platform elevations to published sea-level curves, the 12-m-high and 18-m-high platforms correlate with substage 5e (ca. 120 ka) and stage 9 (ca. 330 ka) sea-level high stands, respectively. West of the Southhampton fault, longitudinal profiles of platform back-edges suggest that the East Bay Hills between Pinole and Vallejo have undergone block uplift at a rate of 0.05 +/- 0.01 m/ka without substantial tilting or warping. With uncertainty of <3 m, the 120 ka and 330 ka platforms are at the same elevations across the NW-striking Franklin fault. This west-vergent reverse fault previously was interpreted to have had late Pleistocene activity and to accommodate crustal shortening in the East Bay Hills. Our data indicate an absence of vertical displacement across the Franklin fault within at least the past 120ka and perhaps 330ka. In contrast, the stage 5e and 9 have up-on-the-east vertical displacement and gentle westward tilting across the N-striking Southhampton fault, with a late Pleistocene vertical slip rate of >0.02 m/ka. The northerly strike and prominent geomorphic expression of this potentially active fault differs from the Franklin fault. Our mapping of the Southhampton fault suggests that it accommodates dextral shear in the East Bay Hills, and is one of several left-stepping, en echelon N-striking faults (collectively, the "Contra Costa shear zone", CCSZ) in the East Bay Hills. Faults within this zone coincide with geomorphic

  10. Slip-rate Estimation of Active Fault by Luminescence Dating on Deformed River Terraces at Tsaotun, Central Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Chen, W.; Lee, C.

    2003-12-01

    This study carried out luminescence ages of the deformed terraces located at Tsaotun in central Taiwan. These terraces are considered as a result of crustal deformation caused by recent activity of the Chelungpu fault, 1999 surface rupture. Since this active fault runs through urban area, it is urgently needed to figure out its neotectonic behavior, including slip-rate and recurrence interval. Based on new ages, we also discuss the terrace correlation and its related structures. The study terraces are all strath terraces with only a few meters of veneered fluvial deposits on top. Due to the strong stream-power, nearly all the outcrops are dominated by fluvial cobbles, which is worst condition to preserve the syndepositional carbonaceous materials. Alternatively, optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating uses sandy quartz as the material and even has longer dating upper limit (up to several hundreds of years). Fortunately, sandy layer are found intercalated within the fluvial cobbles in studying terraces. We adopted the Single-Aliquot Regenerative (SAR) dose protocol on large aliquots of 90-150μ m quartz, which were cleaned using HCL, H2O2 and HF in the usual way. In case of incomplete bleaching during quick deposition, the OSL/TL ratio was adopted to approach the true De. Dosimetry is derived by ICP-MS and XRF analyses. For ascertainment of the initial bleaching of fluvial sediment, the modern samples collected in river bed of Wuhsi were also measured. Based on the results of modern samples, we believe that the residuals are inevitable in younger sediments, especially along the upper stream. On the contrary, the samples older than 10 kyr are little influenced due to the larger age error than the younger ones. The OSL age of the terrace samples in the hanging wall is dated ca. 13 kyr, which has been corrected for poorly-bleaching problem. Comparing to the ages collected down hole in the footwalls, we found out vertical displacements of ca. 67 and 37 m, has been

  11. A review about the mechanisms associated with active deformation, regional uplift and subsidence in southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folguera, Andrés; Gianni, Guido; Sagripanti, Lucía; Rojas Vera, Emilio; Novara, Iván; Colavitto, Bruno; Alvarez, Orlando; Orts, Darío; Tobal, Jonathan; Giménez, Mario; Introcaso, Antonio; Ruiz, Francisco; Martínez, Patricia; Ramos, Victor A.

    2015-12-01

    A broad range of processes acted simultaneously during the Quaternary producing relief in the Andes and adjacent foreland, from the Chilean coast, where the Pacific Ocean floor is being subducted beneath South American, to the Brazilian and the Argentinean Atlantic platform area. This picture shows to be complex and responds to a variety of processes. The Geoid exemplifies this spectrum of uplift mechanisms, since it reflects an important change at 35°S along the Andes and the foreland that could be indicating the presence of dynamic forces modeling the topography with varying intensity through the subduction margin. On the other hand, mountains uplifted in the Atlantic margin, along a vast sector of the Brazilian Atlantic coast and inland regions seem to be created at the area where the passive margin has been hyper-extended and consequently mechanically debilitated and the forearc region shifts eastwardly at a similar rate than the westward advancing continent. Therefore the forearc at the Arica latitudes can be considered as relatively stationary and dynamically sustained by a perpendicular-to-the-margin asthenospheric flow that inhibits trench roll back, determining a highly active orogenic setting at the eastern Andes in the Subandean region. To the south, the Pampean flat subduction zone creates particular conditions for deformation and rapid propagation of the orogenic front producing a high-amplitude orogen. In the southern Central and Patagonian Andes, mountain (orogenic) building processes are attenuated, becoming dominant other mechanisms of exhumation such as the i) impact of mantle plumes originated in the 660 km mantle transition, ii) the ice-masse retreat from the Andes after the Pleistocene producing an isostatic rebound, iii) the dynamic topography associated with the opening of an asthenospheric window during the subduction of the Chile ridge and slab tearing processes, iv) the subduction of oceanic swells linked to transform zones and v) the

  12. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis.

  13. Ground level photosynthetically active radiation dynamics in stands of Acacia mearnsii De Wild.

    PubMed

    Péllico Netto, Sylvio; Sanquetta, Carlos R; Caron, Braulio O; Behling, Alexandre; Simon, Augusto A; Corte, Ana Paula D; Bamberg, Rogério

    2015-09-01

    The objective is to study the dynamics of photosynthetic radiation reaching the soil surface in stands of Acacia mearnsii De Wild and its influence on height growth in stands. This fact gives rise to the formulation of the following hypothesis for this study: "The reduction of the incidence of light inside the stand of black wattle will cause the inflection point in its height growth when this reaches 4 to 5 m in height, i.e. when the stand is between 2 and 3 years of age". The study was conducted in stands in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, where diameters at breast height, total height and photosynthetically active radiation available at ground level were measured. The frequency tended to be more intense when the age of the stands increases. It was evident that a reduction of light incidence inside the forest occurred, caused by canopy closure. Consequently, closed canopy propitiated the competition of plants. This has affected the conditions for growth in diameter and height of this species, reason why it becomes possible to conceive the occurrence of an inflection point in the growth of these two variables, confirming the formulated hypothesis.

  14. An Evaluation of Activated Bismuth Isotopes in Environmental Samples From the Former Western Pacific Proving Grounds

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W.L.; Brunk, J.A.; Jokela, T.A.

    2000-03-21

    {sup 207}Bi (t{sub 1/2}=32.2 y) was generated by activation of weapons material during a few ''clean'' nuclear tests at the U.S. Western Pacific Proving Grounds of Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. The radionuclides first appeared in the Enewetak environment during 1958 and in the environment of Bikini during 1956. Crater sediments from Bikini with high levels of {sup 207}Bi were analyzed by gamma spectrometry in an attempt to determine the relative concentrations of {sup 208}Bi (t{sup 1/2} = 3.68 x 10{sup 5} y). The bismuth isotopes were probably generated during the ''clean'', 9.3 Mt Poplar test held on 7/12/58. The atom ratio of {sup 208}Bi to {sup 207}Bi (R value) ranges from {approx}12 to over 200 in sections of core sediments from the largest nuclear crater at Bikini atoll. The presence of bismuth in the device is suggested to account for R values in excess of 10.

  15. Statistical-dynamical modeling of the cloud-to-ground lightning activity in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, J. F.; Fragoso, M.; Mendes, S.; Corte-Real, J.; Santos, J. A.

    2013-10-01

    The present study employs a dataset of cloud-to-ground discharges over Portugal, collected by the Portuguese lightning detection network in the period of 2003-2009, to identify dynamically coherent lightning regimes in Portugal and to implement a statistical-dynamical modeling of the daily discharges over the country. For this purpose, the high-resolution MERRA reanalysis is used. Three lightning regimes are then identified for Portugal: WREG, WREM and SREG. WREG is a typical cold-core cut-off low. WREM is connected to strong frontal systems driven by remote low pressure systems at higher latitudes over the North Atlantic. SREG is a combination of an inverted trough and a mid-tropospheric cold-core nearby Portugal. The statistical-dynamical modeling is based on logistic regressions (statistical component) developed for each regime separately (dynamical component). It is shown that the strength of the lightning activity (either strong or weak) for each regime is consistently modeled by a set of suitable dynamical predictors (65-70% of efficiency). The difference of the equivalent potential temperature in the 700-500 hPa layer is the best predictor for the three regimes, while the best 4-layer lifted index is still important for all regimes, but with much weaker significance. Six other predictors are more suitable for a specific regime. For the purpose of validating the modeling approach, a regional-scale climate model simulation is carried out under a very intense lightning episode.

  16. Preliminary Evidence of Active Deformation in Morocco from Repeat GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilinger, R.; McClusky, S.; Ben Sari, D.; Mourabit, T.; Gomez, F.; Barazangi, M.

    2001-12-01

    We initiated GPS observations in Morocco during 1999 with the installation (May) and observation (October) of a 23-station network distributed throughout most of the country and extending from the Anti Atlas in central Morocco to the Rif Mountains along the Mediterranean coast. With UNAVCO assistance, we installed continuously recording, on-line GPS stations in Rabat (298, relocated 500), Tetouan (500), and Ifrane (701). We completed the first repeat observations of the network during February 2001. The resulting velocity estimates have uncertainties of about 3 mmyr E-W, and 2 mm/yr N-S (1 sigma, scaled). For the most part, the velocity determinations are within the uncertainties at the 95% confidence level. However, the preliminary velocities suggest N-S shortening between stations in the Rif Mountains and those in the Middle Atlas Mountains and the Anti Atlas. Furthermore, we see no clear evidence of significant northwestward motion of this part of the African plate (i.e., northwest Africa) relative to Eurasia, as is predicted by global plate models (Nuvel-1; 4.5 mmyr ~ NW). We are planning a repeat occupation of the survey network in October 2001. With three surveys over a two-year period, we should have substantially better constraints on present-day kinematics. We will present the results of this survey and discuss their implications for models of Africa plate motion and the active dynamics of Morocco and the Alboran Sea region.

  17. Bend, stretch, and touch: Locating a finger on an actively deformed transparent sensor array

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Mirza Saquib; Dobashi, Yuta; Preston, Claire; Wyss, Justin K. M.; Mirabbasi, Shahriar; Madden, John David Wyndham

    2017-01-01

    The development of bendable, stretchable, and transparent touch sensors is an emerging technological goal in a variety of fields, including electronic skin, wearables, and flexible handheld devices. Although transparent tactile sensors based on metal mesh, carbon nanotubes, and silver nanowires demonstrate operation in bent configurations, we present a technology that extends the operation modes to the sensing of finger proximity including light touch during active bending and even stretching. This is accomplished using stretchable and ionically conductive hydrogel electrodes, which project electric field above the sensor to couple with and sense a finger. The polyacrylamide electrodes are embedded in silicone. These two widely available, low-cost, transparent materials are combined in a three-step manufacturing technique that is amenable to large-area fabrication. The approach is demonstrated using a proof-of-concept 4 × 4 cross-grid sensor array with a 5-mm pitch. The approach of a finger hovering a few centimeters above the array is readily detectable. Light touch produces a localized decrease in capacitance of 15%. The movement of a finger can be followed across the array, and the location of multiple fingers can be detected. Touch is detectable during bending and stretch, an important feature of any wearable device. The capacitive sensor design can be made more or less sensitive to bending by shifting it relative to the neutral axis. Ultimately, the approach is adaptable to the detection of proximity, touch, pressure, and even the conformation of the sensor surface. PMID:28345045

  18. Effect of yeast biomass with high content of carotenoids on erythrocyte deformability, NO production and Na,K-ATPase activity in healthy and LPS treated rats.

    PubMed

    Radosinska, J; Mezesova, L; Okruhlicova, L; Frimmel, K; Breierova, E; Bartekova, M; Vrbjar, N

    2016-11-25

    Measurements of red blood cell (RBC) deformability together with estimation of NO-synthase activity and Na,K-ATPase activity were used for characterization of RBC functionality in rats subjected to single dose of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharides (LPS) at a dose of 1 mg/kg. We hypothesized that LPS might initiate a malfunction of RBC. We also investigated the potential effect of carotenoids (10 mg/kg/day) produced in red yeast biomass of Rhodotorula glutinis on RBC in LPS-challenged rats. LPS significantly reduced the deformability of RBC (by 14%) together with decrease of NO-synthase activity by 20%. Daily supplementation of carotenoids for 10 days attenuated the LPS-induced injury, as observed by 22% increase of RBC deformability and 23% increase of NO-synthase activity. The activity of Na,K-ATPase was also improved probably due to increased number of active enzyme molecules as indicated by 66% enhancement of Vmax value, hence maintaining the activity of erythrocyte Na,K-ATPase to the level even higher as compared with healthy control animals. It may be concluded that administration of yeast biomass with high content of carotenoids resulted in advanced function of erythrocytes as concerns their ability to squeeze through narrow capillaries of the circulation, better intrinsic production of NO and improvement of intracellular homeostasis of sodium.

  19. Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) point cloud ground filtering for area of an active landslide (Doren, Western Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodić, Nenad; Cvijetinović, Željko; Milenković, Milutin; Dorninger, Peter; Mitrović, Momir

    2014-05-01

    Ground filtering of point cloud is the primary step required for Digital Terrain Model (DTM) generation. The procedure is especially interesting for forested areas, since LiDAR systems can measure terrain elevation under vegetation cover with a high level of penetration. This work analyzes the potential of ALS data ground filtering for area of an active landslide. The results of ALS filtering, for example, may improve geomorphological and motion-detection studies. ALS data was collected during flight campaign 2011 under leaf-off conditions for Doren region, Vorarlberg, Western Austria. In this area, non-ground objects are mostly low vegetation such as shrubs, small trees etc. The vegetation is more dense in lower part of the landslide where erosion is smaller. Vegetation points can be removed based on the hypothesis that these are significantly higher than their neighboring points. However, in case of steep terrain, ground points may have the same heights as vegetation points, and thus, local slope should be considered. Also, if terrain roughness increases, the classification may become even more complex. Software system OPALS (Orientation and Processing of Airborne Laser Scanning data, Vienna University of Technology) was used for processing the ALS data. Labeling ground points has been made using physical and geometrical attributes (parameters) of ALS points. Also additional attributes were calculated in order to improve extraction. Since bare ground surface is usually smooth and continuous unlike vegetation, standard deviation of local elevations was used as roughness measure to differentiate these surfaces. EchoRatio (ER) was adopted as a measure of surface penetrability, while number of echoes and differentiation between echoes (EchoNumber) were also deployed in filtering. Since the ground points are measurements from bare-earth that are usually the lowest surface features in a local area, normalized height was defined as a rank of neighboring points

  20. Application oft triple collocation in ground-based validation of soil moisture active/passive (SMAP) level 2 data products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The validation of the soil moisture retrievals from the recently-launched NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) satellite is important prior to their full public release. Uncertainty in attempts to characterize footprint-scale surface-layer soil moisture using point-scale ground observations has ...

  1. Addendum to the performance assessment analysis for low-level waste disposal in the 200 west area active burial grounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, M.I., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-20

    An addendum was completed to the performance assessment (PA) analysis for the active 200 West Area low-level solid waste burial grounds. The addendum includes supplemental information developed during the review of the PA analysis, an ALARA analysis, a comparison of PA results with the Hanford Groundwater Protection Strategy, and a justification for the assumption of 500 year deterrence to the inadvertent intruder.

  2. Views of Growing Methane Emissions near Oil and Natural Gas Activity: Satellite, Aircraft, and Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollonige, D. E.; Thompson, A. M.; Diskin, G. S.; Hannigan, J. W.; Nussbaumer, E.

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the discrepancies between current top-down and bottom-up estimates, additional methane (CH4) measurements are necessary for regions surrounding growing oil and natural gas (ONG) development. We have evaluated satellite measurements of CH4 in US regions with ONG operations for their application as "top-down" constraints (part of the NASA Air Quality Applied Sciences Team (AQAST) project). For validation of the satellite instruments' sensitivities to emitted gases, we focus on regions where the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) campaign deployed ground and aircraft measurements in Maryland (2011), California and Texas (2013), and Colorado (2014). The largest CH4 signals were observed in the Greater Green River and Powder River Basins using Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) Representative Tropospheric Volume Mixing Ratio (RTVMR) measurements. A long-term comparison between a ground remote-sensing Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) at Boulder and TES for 2010-2013 shows good correlation and differences ranging 2.5-5% for their yearly distribution of total column CH4. To determine any correlation between lower/mid-tropospheric CH4 (where a thermal IR sensor, such as TES, is most sensitive) and near-surface/boundary CH4 (where sources emit), we analyze the variability of DISCOVER-AQ aircraft profiles using principal component analysis and assess the correlation between near-surface (0-2 km) and mid-tropospheric (>2 km) CH4 concentrations. Using these relationships, we estimate near-surface CH4 using mid-tropospheric satellite measurements based on the partial column amounts within vertical layers with a linear regression. From this analysis, we will demonstrate whether the uncertainties of satellite-estimated near-surface CH4 are comparable to observed variability near ONG activity. These results will assist validation of satellite instrument

  3. Enhancement of cloud-to-ground lightning activity over Taipei, Taiwan in relation to urbanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, S. K.; Liou, Y. A.

    2014-10-01

    Collecting the cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flash data from Tai-Power Company of Taiwan, a long term study has been performed to investigate the enhancement of lightning activity in and around Taipei City, the largest metropolitan city of Taiwan, in relation to urbanization, for the period of 2005-2010. Results reveal that negative flash density is enhanced by approximately 64% while the positive flash density is enhanced by 48%, over and downwind of the city compared with other neighboring areas. On the other hand a decrease of nearly 24% in the percentage of positive flashes occurs over and downwind of Taipei compared to upwind values. We have also investigated the effect of urbanization on peak current of both polarities but no significant effect is noticed. Possible influence of urban particulate matter on the enhancement of CG lightning activity has been analyzed utilizing the annual averages of PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm) and SO2 (sulfur dioxide) concentrations data. Interesting results are found, indicating the higher concentrations of PM10 and SO2 contributes to the CG lightning enhancement. Both the concentrations exhibit a positive linear correlation with the percent change in CG flashes from the upwind to the urban area and from the upwind to the downwind area. However, the correlation coefficient for PM10 concentrations is comparatively much lower than SO2 concentrations. Positive correlations of 0.55 and 0.68 are found for the PM10 and SO2 concentrations, respectively, when compared separately with the percent change in CG flashes from the upwind to the downwind area, indicating the influence of aerosols on urban CG lightning enhancement. Hourly variation of lightning flashes show that the urban effects on CG lightning is prominent in the afternoon and early evening hours. The results obtained from the present analysis corroborate the results reported in the literature by other researchers.

  4. Different deformation patterns using GPS in the volcanic process of El Hierro (Canary Island) 2011-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Cañada, Laura; José García-Arias, María; Pereda de Pablo, Jorge; Lamolda, Héctor; López, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    Ground deformation is one of the most important parameter in volcano monitoring. The detected deformations in volcanic areas can be precursors of a volcanic activity and contribute with useful information to study the evolution of an unrest, eruption or any volcanic process. GPS is the most common technique used to measure volcano deformations. It can be used to detect slow displacement rates or much larger and faster deformations associated with any volcanic process. In volcanoes the deformation is expected to be a mixed of nature; during periods of quiescence it will be slow or not present, while increased activity slow displacement rates can be detected or much larger and faster deformations can be measure due to magma intrusion, for example in the hours to days prior a eruption beginning. In response to the anomalous seismicity detected at El Hierro in July 2011, the Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN) improved its volcano monitoring network in the island with continuous GPS that had been used to measure the ground deformation associated with the precursory unrest since summer 2011, submarine eruption (October 2011-March 2012) and the following unrest periods (2012-2013). The continuous GPS time series, together with other techniques, had been used to evaluate the activity and to detect changes in the process. We investigate changes in the direction and module of the deformation obtained by GPS and they show different patterns in every unrest period, very close to the seismicity locations and migrations.

  5. Remote ischemia preconditioning increases red blood cell deformability through red blood cell-nitric oxide synthase activation.

    PubMed

    Grau, Marijke; Kollikowski, Alexander; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2016-09-12

    Remote ischemia preconditioning (rIPC), short cycles of ischemia (I) and reperfusion (R) of a region remote from the heart, protects against myocardial I/R injury. This effect is triggered by endothelial derived nitric oxide (NO) production. Red blood cells (RBC) are also capable of NO production and it is hypothesized that the beneficial effect of rIPC in terms of cardioprotection is strengthened by increased RBC dependent NO production and improved RBC function after rIPC maneuver. For this purpose, twenty male participants were subjected to four cycles of no-flow ischemia with subsequent reactive hyperemia within the forearm. Blood sampling and measurement of blood pressures and heart rate were carried out pre intervention, after each cycle and 15 min post intervention at both the non-treated and treated arm. These are the first results that show improved RBC deformability in the treated arm after rIPC cycles 1- 4 caused by significantly increased RBC-NO synthase activation. This in turn was associated to increased NO production in both arms after rIPC cycles 3 + 4. Also, systolic and diastolic blood pressures were decreased after rIPC. The findings lead to the conclusion that the cardioprotective effects associated with rIPC include improvement of the RBC-NOS/NO signaling in RBC.

  6. Active tectonic deformation along rejuvenated faults in tropical Borneo: Inferences obtained from tectono-geomorphic evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Manoj Joseph; Menier, David; Siddiqui, Numair; Kumar, Shashi Gaurav; Authemayou, Christine

    2016-08-01

    active folding of the Rajang Group fold-thrust belt to present and these events reactivated old major faults and minor related dislocations. From geomorphic analysis associated with sedimentary record, we posit that the terrain could have undergone high uplift rates since 5 Ma or multi-phased uplift with periodic intermittent pulses of high and low uplift rates.

  7. Investigation of remnant versus active deformation in the lithosphere beneath south Africa from shear-wave splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    emuh, M.; Nyblade, A.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    South Africa is comprised of several continental blocks formed during previous collisional events, which date back 2-3 Ga. The three main blocks known as the Pietersburg, Kimberley, and Witwatersrand blocks are delineated by ancient subduction boundaries such as the Colesberg lineament. We consider whether these continental blocks retain remnant deformation at lithospheric depths from ancient collisional events or are governed by stresses due to current plate motion and mantle flow. We use shear-wave splitting methods to study seismic anisotropy from teleseismic phases. Splitting measurements are obtained by minimizing the smallest eigenvalue, maximizing the ratio of the smallest and largest eigenvalues, and rotation correlation, using the graphical user interface Splitlab. We only consider results that show consistency between multiple methods. The seismic data was collected from a new deployment of AfricaArray stations in south Africa and consists of 28 earthquake events. Earthquakes used in this study have a good azimuthal distribution with the poorest coverage only in the NW and S directions. Stations located within the Witwatersrand block display consistent results with a NE fast direction and an average delay time of 1.01 +/- 0.4 s. One station west of the Colesberg lineament in the Kimberley block yields a NW-SE fast direction for all measurements and is nearly perpendicular to results from stations east of this boundary. Stations south of Kaapvaal craton show dependence on the back azimuth of earthquake arrivals. Paths which travel through the Namaqua-Natal fold belt all produce N-S fast directions with average delay times of 0.9 s. Raypaths that travel through the southern Saldania fold belt produce NW-SE fast directions. We suggest that seismic anisotropy in this region represents active deformation in the Witwatersrand block dictated by current tectonic stresses and absolute plate motion. Remnant fabric from ancient tectonic collisional events may still

  8. Active Deformation in the Greater Himalayan Zone in Western Nepal from Inversion of New (U-Th)/He Cooling Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. E.; Burbank, D.

    2015-12-01

    Much of the central Himalaya features an abrupt rise in mean elevation from ~1.5 km in the Lesser Himalaya to ~4-5 km Greater Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau. This physiographic transition is known as PT2, and is often interpreted as the surface expression of transport over a ramp in the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT). In western Nepal, however, the same rise in elevation occurs over two distinct topographic steps (PT2-N and PT2-S). In previous work, Harvey et al. (2015) argue that this anomalous topography is the result of recent southward-migration of mid-crustal deformation along the MHT. Due to the seismogenic potential of the MHT it is important to constrain its geometry in the western Nepal seismic gap, which has not had a large earthquake in over 600 years. To test the above hypothesis, we perform [U-Th]/He dating on 39 apatite and 47 zircon samples collected along seven relief transects throughout western Nepal. We constrain exhumation histories by inverting these new cooling ages with the 3-D thermo-kinematic model Pecube. Five transects collected from the Greater Himalaya north of PT2-N are best fit by relatively rapid exhumation rates (~1-2 km/Myr) since ~4 Ma. The other two, collected from farther south near PT2-S, require rapid (~1-2 km/Myr) exhumation until around 8-11 Ma, followed by much slower (~0.1-0.2 km/Myr) exhumation until at least the late Pliocene. Assuming that exhumation rates reflect uplift rates, the rapid Plio-Pleistocene exhumation in the Greater Himalaya north of PT2-N suggest that this physiographic transition is similar to that at the foot of the Greater Himalaya in central Nepal. It follows that active deformation is occurring along a NW-trend as much as 100 km farther north than would be expected if simply projecting PT2 across western Nepal. This finding is consistent with transport over a more northerly MHT ramp or perhaps oblique slip along the recently identified, surface-breaking WNFZ. Although the geomorphology and microseismicity

  9. Ground deformation effects from the M6 earthquakes (2014-2015) on Cephalonia-Ithaca Islands (Western Greece) deduced by GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwed, Małgorzata; Pińskwar, Iwona; Kundzewicz, Zbigniew W.; Graczyk, Dariusz; Mezghani, Abdelkader

    2017-03-01

    The implications of the earthquakes that took place in the central Ionian Islands in 2014 (Cephalonia, M w6.1, M w5.9) and 2015 (Lefkas, M w6.4) are described based on repeat measurements of the local GPS networks in Cephalonia and Ithaca, and the available continuous GPS stations in the broader area. The Lefkas earthquake occurred on a branch of the Cephalonia Transform Fault, affecting Cephalonia with SE displacements gradually decreasing from north ( 100 mm) to south ( 10 mm). This earthquake revealed a near N-S dislocation boundary separating Paliki Peninsula in western Cephalonia from the rest of the island, as well as another NW-SE trending fault that separates kinematically the northern and southern parts of Paliki. Strain field calculations during the interseismic period (2014-2015) indicate compression between Ithaca and Cephalonia, while extension appears during the following co-seismic period (2015-2016) including the 2015 Lefkas earthquake. Additional tectonically active zones with differential kinematic characteristics were also identified locally.

  10. An Overview of JAXA's Ground-Observation Activities for HAYABUSA Reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Kazuhisa; Yamamoto, Masa-Yuki; Abe, Shinsuke; Ishihara, Yoshiaki; Iiyama, Ohmi; Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Furumoto, Muneyoshi; Takayanagi, Hiroki; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Yanagisawa, Toshifumi; Kurosaki, Hirohisa; Shoemaker, Michael; Ueda, Masayoshi; Shiba, Yasuo; Suzuki, Masaharu

    2011-10-01

    On 2010 June 13, the HAYABUSA asteroid explorer returned to Earth and underwent a super-orbital atmospheric reentry. In order to recover the sample return capsule and to take ground-based measurements, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency organized a ground-observation team and performed optical tracking of the capsule, spectroscopy of the fireball, and measurements of infrasounds and shock waves generated by the fireball. In this article, an overview of the ground-based observation is presented, and an outline of the preliminary results derived from observations is reported.

  11. Quaternary strike-slip crustal deformation around an active fault based on paleomagnetic analysis: a case study of the Enako fault in central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Haruo; Itoh, Yasuto; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2004-10-01

    To evaluate cumulative strike-slip deformation around an active fault, we carried out tectonic geomorphic investigations of the active right-lateral strike-slip Enako fault in central Japan and paleomagnetic investigations of the Kamitakara pyroclastic flow deposit (KPFD; 0.6 Ma welded tuff) distributed around the fault. Tectonic geomorphic study revealed that the strike-slip displacement on the fault is ca. 150 m during the past 600 ka. We carried out measurements of paleomagnetic directions and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) within the pyroclastic flow deposit. Stable primary magnetic directions at each sampling site are well clustered and the AMS fabric is very oblate. We then applied tilt correction of paleomagnetic directions at 15 sites using tilting data obtained by the AMS property and orientations of eutaxitic structures. Within a distance of about 500 m from the fault trace, differential clockwise rotations were detected; the rotation angle is larger for zones closer to the fault. Because of this relation and absence of block boundary faults, a continuous deformation model explains the crustal deformation in the study area. The calculated minimum value of strike-slip displacement associated with this deformation detected within the shear zone is 210 m. The sum of this and offset on the Enako fault is 360 m and the slip rate is estimated at 0.6 mm/year.

  12. Dynamic performance of MEMS deformable mirrors for use in an active/adaptive two-photon microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Christian C.; Foster, Warren B.; Downey, Ryan D.; Arrasmith, Christopher L.; Dickensheets, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Active optics can facilitate two-photon microscopic imaging deep in tissue. We are investigating fast focus control mirrors used in concert with an aberration correction mirror to control the axial position of focus and system aberrations dynamically during scanning. With an adaptive training step, sample-induced aberrations may be compensated as well. If sufficiently fast and precise, active optics may be able to compensate under-corrected imaging optics as well as sample aberrations to maintain diffraction-limited performance throughout the field of view. Toward this end we have measured a Boston Micromachines Corporation Multi-DM 140 element deformable mirror, and a Revibro Optics electrostatic 4-zone focus control mirror to characterize dynamic performance. Tests for the Multi-DM included both step response and sinusoidal frequency sweeps of specific Zernike modes. For the step response we measured 10%-90% rise times for the target Zernike amplitude, and wavefront rms error settling times. Frequency sweeps identified the 3dB bandwidth of the mirror when attempting to follow a sinusoidal amplitude trajectory for a specific Zernike mode. For five tested Zernike modes (defocus, spherical aberration, coma, astigmatism and trefoil) we find error settling times for mode amplitudes up to 400nm to be less than 52 us, and 3 dB frequencies range from 6.5 kHz to 10 kHz. The Revibro Optics mirror was tested for step response only, with error settling time of 80 μs for a large 3 um defocus step, and settling time of only 18 μs for a 400nm spherical aberration step. These response speeds are sufficient for intra-scan correction at scan rates typical of two-photon microscopy.

  13. Faults Activities And Crustal Deformation Along The Arc-Continent Collision Boundary, Eastern Taiwan - Observed From Persistent Scatterer SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Jiun-Yee; Chang, Chung-Pai; Hooper, Andrew; Chang, Yo-Ho; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Chang, Tsui-Yu

    2010-05-01

    Located in the southeastern periphery of the Eurasian plate, eastern Taiwan marks the collional boundary between the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea plate. These two plates converge at about 8 cm/yr near Taiwan and nearly half of the shortening is consumed in eastern Taiwan. There have been many studies in this area about the dynamics of the plate convergence, however, most of the geodetic studies focused on small area (strainmeter), with very few data points (GPS), or only gather data along a specific profile (leveling). We applied the Persistent Scatterer SAR Interferometry in the Longitudinal Valley of eastern Taiwan to observe temporally-variable processes using both ERS and Envisat data. At the same time, leveling and GPS data were measured for the auxiliary tool to verify the deformation rate in this area. Our result indicated that although the area is under active collision, faults do not move in the same fashion along the boundary. In the very northern part of the collided arc, small subsidence has been detected, while in the north-central part very few activity is observed. In the central and southern part of the collisional boundary, patches of faults are moving as rapidly as 15 mm/yr along radar line-of-sight. In addition. between late 2004 and middle 2005 there had been an earthquake swarm consists of shallow earthquakes, which coincided with PSI observation of a large vertical displacement. The comparison between our leveling data and PS results indicated PSI is a reliable tool even in the highly vegetated area in eastern Taiwan.

  14. Transcriptional responses, metabolic activity and mouthpart deformities in natural populations of Chironomus riparius larvae exposed to environmental pollutants.

    PubMed

    Planelló, Rosario; Servia, María J; Gómez-Sande, Pablo; Herrero, Óscar; Cobo, Fernando; Morcillo, Gloria

    2015-04-01

    Biomarkers are an important tool in laboratory assays that link exposure or effect of specific toxicants to key molecular and cellular events, but they have not been widely used in invertebrate populations exposed to complex mixtures of environmental contaminants in their natural habitats. The present study focused on a battery of biomarkers and their comparative analysis in natural populations of the benthic larvae of Chironomus riparius (Diptera), sampled in three differentially polluted rivers (the Con, Sar, and Louro in Galicia, Spain). In our study, some parameters were identified, such as hsp70 gene activity, GST enzymatic activity, total glycogen content and mouthpart deformities, which showed significant differences among populations from the three rivers that differed in the levels and types of sedimentary contaminants analyzed (metals, organic-chlorine pesticides, alkylphenols, pharmaceutical, and personal care products). In contrast to these sensitive biomarkers, other parameters showed no significant differences (hsc70 gene, EcR gene, P450 gene, RNA:DNA ratio, total protein content), and were stable even when comparing field and nonexposed laboratory populations. The hsp70 gene seems to be particularly sensitive to conditions of pollutant exposure, while its constitutive counterpart hsc70 showed invariable expression, suggesting that the hsc70/hsp70 ratio may be a potential indicator of polluted environments. Although further studies are required to understand the correlation between molecular responses and the ecological effects of pollutants on natural populations, the results provide new data about the biological responses to multiple-stressor environments. This field study adds new molecular endpoints, including gene expression, as suitable tools that, complementing other ecotoxicological parameters, may help to improve the methodologies of freshwater monitoring under the increasing burden of xenobiotics.

  15. The effect of ground tilt on the lower extremity muscle activity of stroke patients performing squat exercises.

    PubMed

    Ki, Kyog-Il; Choi, Jong-Duk; Cho, Hyuk-Shin

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of ground tilt on the lower extremity muscle activity of stroke patients performing squat exercises. [Subjects] Fifteen hemiparetic patients volunteered to participate in this study. [Methods] The subjects performed squat exercises at three different ground tilt angles: 15° plantar flexion, a neutral position, and 15° dorsiflexion. A surface electromyogram (sEMG) was used to record the electromyographic activities of the leg extensor muscle in the vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), gastrocnemius lateralis (GL), and gastrocnemius medialis (GM). The sEMG activity was analyzed using a one-way repeated measures ANOVA and a post hoc Bonferroni correction. [Results] The results of this study are summarized as follows. Significant differences were noted for the VL and the GL when the angle of the ankle joint was between the 15° plantar flexion and neutral positions during squat exercises involving the VL and when the angle of the ankle joint was between the neutral position and 15° dorsiflexion during squat exercises involving the VM. [Conclusion] In this study, sEMG showed that the VL and GL changed significantly during squat exercises according to the ground tilt angle of hemiparetic patients. Therefore, squat exercises with different ground tilt angles can be used to improve VL and GL strength.

  16. Cloud-to-ground lightning activity over Greece: Spatio-temporal analysis and impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsangouras, I. T.; Nastos, P. T.; Kapsomenakis, J.

    2016-03-01

    Cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning activity recorded by the Hellenic National Meteorological Service (HNMS) Precision Lightning Network (PLN) is analysed over the wider area of Greece. In addition, the spatial and temporal relationships between TRMM 3B42 (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) datasets and lightning are presented. The analyses concern the period from January 14, 2008 to December 31, 2012. The Laboratory of Climatology and Atmospheric Environment, University of Athens, has established a detailed dataset of lightning impacts over Greece from 1895 to 2013, based on digitized archive editions of newspapers. The mean seasonal variability of CG lightning activity revealed autumn as the most dominant season with 303 LD, while the mean monthly variability of CG indicated October as the most lightning active month and May as the month with a mean of 27 LD. The mean annual spatial distribution of CG lightning per km2, depicted the maximum frequency over Pindus mountain range (> 7 CG/km2). During the autumn season, the northern Ionian Sea experienced a mean frequency of more than 5 CG/km2, compared to the southern Ionian Sea and NW Peloponnesus, where values of more than 7 CG/km2 are depicted. During the summer season, the maximum frequency appeared along Pindus mountain range, around Attica, Thessaly and central Macedonia highlands. The spatial distribution of seasonal correlations between the number of CG flashes/day and gridded (TRMM 3B42) daily rainfall totals for the period 2008-2012 over Greece, indicated that correlations were mainly positive all over the under study area, within all seasons, and especially during summer and autumn. Regarding the lightning impacts in Greece, based on the 1895-2013 study period, more than 343 fatalities and at least 224 injured people have been recorded. The spatial analysis of lightning impacts, showed that the majority of events has been recorded over Greek mainland and only few scattered events have been reported over

  17. Levelling Profiles and a GPS Network to Monitor the Active Folding and Faulting Deformation in the Campo de Dalias (Betic Cordillera, Southeastern Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Lechado, Carlos; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Gil, Antonio José; Borque, María Jesús; de Lacy, María Clara; Pedrera, Antonio; López-Garrido, Angel Carlos; Alfaro, Pedro; García-Tortosa, Francisco; Ramos, Maria Isabel; Rodríguez-Caderot, Gracia; Rodríguez-Fernández, José; Ruiz-Constán, Ana; de Galdeano-Equiza, Carlos Sanz

    2010-01-01

    The Campo de Dalias is an area with relevant seismicity associated to the active tectonic deformations of the southern boundary of the Betic Cordillera. A non-permanent GPS network was installed to monitor, for the first time, the fault- and fold-related activity. In addition, two high precision levelling profiles were measured twice over a one-year period across the Balanegra Fault, one of the most active faults recognized in the area. The absence of significant movement of the main fault surface suggests seismogenic behaviour. The possible recurrence interval may be between 100 and 300 y. The repetitive GPS and high precision levelling monitoring of the fault surface during a long time period may help us to determine future fault behaviour with regard to the existence (or not) of a creep component, the accumulation of elastic deformation before faulting, and implications of the fold-fault relationship. PMID:22319309

  18. [Influence of ADP-ribose, AMP and adenosine on bioelectric activity of hibernating ground squirrel atrium and papillary muscle].

    PubMed

    Kuz'min, V S; Abramochkin, D V; Sukhova, G S; Rozenshtraukh, L V

    2008-01-01

    The aim of work was to investigate effects of adenosine, AMP and ADP-ribose (1x10(-5)) on bioelectric activity of atrium and papillary muscle of nonhibernating (rat) and hibernating (Yakutian ground squirrel) animals. Action potential (AP) was registered with use of standard microelectrode technique. AP duration (APD) at level of 90% repolarisation in rat atrium in control experiments was 30+/-5 ms, APD at level of 50% repolarisation was 12+/-2 ms. APD at level of 90% repolarisation in rat papillary muscle was 56+/-7 ms, at level of 50% repolarisation was 18+/-2 ms. APD at level of 90% repolarisation in ground squirrel atrium was 77+/-6, APD at level of 50% repolarisation was 38+/-6 ms. APD at level of 90% repolarisation in ground squirrel papillary muscle was 105+/-9 ms, APD at level of 50% repolarisation was 42+/-8 ms. Purine nucleotides and nucleoside, that were tested in work, except ADP-ribose, act as inhibitory factors and decrease APD both in rat and hibernating ground squirrel heart. ADP-ribose decreases APD in papillary muscle of hibernator but did not in its atrium. In ground squirrel atrium AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 50% repolarisation by 10+/-3% and 18+/-3% respectively. AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 90% repolarisation by 9+/-2% and 11+/-2% respectively. In ground squirrel papillary muscle ADP-ribose, AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 50% repolarisation by 26+/-8%, 23+/-8% and 26+/-7%. ADP-ribose, AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 90% repolarisation by 12+/-3%, 10+/-3%, 13+/-3%. Thus, decrease of APD in ground squirrel papillary muscle at level of 90% repolarisation during nucleotides and adenosine action was 2-2.5 fold less, than the rat.

  19. [Oxidative modification of proteins and antioxidative blood activity of ground squirrels during induced awakening from winter sleep].

    PubMed

    Astaeva, M D; Klichkhanov, N K

    2009-01-01

    The intensity of oxidative modification of plasma proteins and activity of the antioxidative system of the blood of the ground squirrels during awakening from winter sleep is studied. During waking of animals, processes of oxidative modification of proteins in the blood plasma intensify. While the body temperature rises, the antioxidative activity of hydrophylic components of the blood plasma grows essentially, and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase too. Activity of erythrocyte catalase at all stages of waking is definitely higher than in the control. The received results evidence that the high activity of various links of antioxidative blood protection provides stability to oxidative stress during waking of animals from deep sleep.

  20. Ground penetrating radar and active seismic investigation of stratigraphically verified pyroclastic deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gase, A.; Bradford, J. H.; Brand, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    We conducted ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and active seismic surveys in July and August, 2015 parallel to outcrops of the pyroclastic density current deposits of the May 18th, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH), Washington. The primary objective of this study is to compare geophysical properties that influence electromagnetic and elastic wave velocities with stratigraphic parameters in the un-saturated zone. The deposits of interest are composed of pumice, volcanic ash, and lava blocks comprising a wide range of intrinsic porosities and grain sizes from sand to boulders. Single-offset GPR surveys for reflection data were performed with a Sensors and Software pulseEKKO Pro 100 GPR using 50 MHz, 100 MHz, and 200 MHz antennae. GPR data processing includes time-zero correction, dewow filter, migration, elevation correction. Multi-offset acquisition with 100 MHz antennae and offsets ranging from 1 m to 16 m are used for reflection tomography to create 2 D electromagnetic wave velocity models. Seismic surveys are performed with 72 geophones spaced at two meters using a sledge hammer source with shot points at each receiver point. We couple p- wave refraction tomography with Rayleigh wave inversion to compute Vp/Vs ratios. The two geophysical datasets are then compared with stratigraphic information to illustrate the influence of lithological parameters (e.g. stratification, grain-size distribution, porosity, and sorting) on geophysical properties of unsaturated pyroclastic deposits. Future work will include joint petrophysical inversion of the multiple datasets to estimate porosity and water content in the unsaturated zone.

  1. Ozone treatment of coal- and coffee grounds-based active carbons: Water vapor adsorption and surface fractal micropores

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunoda, Ryoichi; Ozawa, Takayoshi; Ando, Junichi

    1998-09-15

    Characteristics of the adsorption iostherms of water vapor on active carbons from coal and coffee grounds and those ozonized ones from the surface fractal dimension analysis are discussed. The upswing of the adsorption isotherms in the low relative pressure of coffee grounds-based active carbon, of which isotherms were not scarcely affected on ozonization, was attributed to the adsorption of water molecules on the metallic oxides playing the role of oxygen-surface complexes, which formed the corrugated surfaces on the basal planes of micropore walls with the surface fractal dimension D{sub s} > 2. On the other hand, coal-based active carbon with D{sub s} < 2, which indicated the flat surfaces of micropore walls, showed little effect on the upswing even on ozonization, even though the adsorption amounts of water vapor were increased in the low relative pressure.

  2. The impact of military activities on the concentration of mercury in soils of military training grounds and marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Gębka, Karolina; Bełdowski, Jacek; Bełdowska, Magdalena

    2016-11-01

    Military activities have been conducted on land and at sea. Both during conflicts and in peace time, some regions served as a military training ground which included firing positions and bunkers. Mercury fulminate has been used in ammunition primers and detonators. Certain amount of ammunition was dumped into the Baltic Sea after the Second World War. Because of corroded containers, mercury can be released into the marine environment. The soil and sediment samples were taken from military training grounds, southern Baltic in 2014 and 2015. The concentration of mercury was determined by AMA-254 analyzer. Hg concentration was higher in the places of military activities, as compared to other areas. Ten times increased concentration of Hg was determined in soil sample collected in area of active gun range compared to the reference station. The significant higher concentration of mercury was detected in stations where chemical warfare agents were found.

  3. Coseismic Faulting and Folding in an Active Thrust Sheet over Multiple Rupture Cycles Resolved by Integrating Surface and Subsurface Records of Earthquake Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockmeyer, J. M.; Shaw, J. H.; Brown, N.; Rhodes, E. J.; Wang, M.; Lavin, L. C.; Guan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Many recent thrust fault earthquakes have involved coseismic surface faulting and folding, revealing the complex nature of surface deformation in active thrust sheets. In this study, we characterize deformation along the active Southern Junggar Thrust (SJT) in the Junggar basin, NW China - which sourced the 1906 M8 Manas earthquake - to gain insight into how fault slip at depth is partitioned between faulting and folding strains at Earth's surface by integrating deformed terrace records, subsurface geophysical data, and luminescence geochronology. Using a 1-m digital elevation model and field surveys, we have mapped the precise geometries of fluvial terraces across the entire Tugulu anticline, which lies in the hanging wall of the SJT. These profiles reveal progressive uplift of several terraces along prominent fault scarps where the SJT is surface-emergent. Similarly aged terraces are folded in the backlimb of the Tugulu fold, providing a sequential record of surface folding. These folded terraces are progressively rotated such that the oldest terraces are dipping much steeper than younger terraces within the same fold limb. Using 2- and 3-D seismic reflection data, we integrate subsurface deformation constraints with records of surface strain. Structural interpretations of these seismic data define the geometry of the SJT and reveal that folding is localized across synclinal bends along the SJT. We evaluate a range of distinct fault-related fold models (e.g. fault-bend folding, shear fault-bend folding) to assess which structural style best describes the geometries of the subsurface and surface fold patterns. By doing so, we have the opportunity to directly relate surface fault slip measures from terrace folding and uplift to total fault slip at depth. This integration of surface and subsurface deformation - combined with constraints on terrace ages from post-IR IRSL geochronology - allows us to characterize how fault slip and seismic moment are partitioned

  4. Gravity changes and deformation at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii, associated with summit eruptive activity, 2009-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagnardi, Marco; Poland, Michael P.; Carbone, Daniele; Baker, Scott; Battaglia, Maurizio; Amelung, Falk

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of microgravity and surface displacement data collected at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii (USA), between December 2009 and November 2012 suggests a net mass accumulation at ~1.5 km depth beneath the northeast margin of Halema‘uma‘u Crater, within Kīlauea Caldera. Although residual gravity increases and decreases are accompanied by periods of uplift and subsidence of the surface, respectively, the volume change inferred from the modeling of interferometric synthetic aperture radar deformation data can account for only a small portion (as low as 8%) of the mass addition responsible for the gravity increase. We propose that since the opening of a new eruptive vent at the summit of Kīlauea in 2008, magma rising to the surface of the lava lake outgasses, becomes denser, and sinks to deeper levels, replacing less dense gas-rich magma stored in the Halema‘uma‘u magma reservoir. In fact, a relatively small density increase (<200 kg m−3) of a portion of the reservoir can produce the positive residual gravity change measured during the period with the largest mass increase, between March 2011 and November 2012. Other mechanisms may also play a role in the gravity increase without producing significant uplift of the surface, including compressibility of magma, formation of olivine cumulates, and filling of void space by magma. The rate of gravity increase, higher than during previous decades, varies through time and seems to be directly correlated with the volcanic activity occurring at both the summit and the east rift zone of the volcano.

  5. Determination of the activation enthalpy for migration of dislocations in plastically deformed 8006 Al-alloy by positron annihilation lifetime technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, Mohammed; Abdel-Rahman, M.; Badawi, Emad A.; Abdel-Rahman, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    The activation enthalpy for migration of dislocations of plastically deformed 8006 Al-alloy was investigated by positron annihilation lifetime technique. Plastic deformation using a hydraulic press produces mainly dislocations and may produce point defects. The type of defect was studied by isochronal annealing which determines the temperature range of recovery of each type. Only one type of defect (dislocations) was observed for the investigated sample and was found to be recovered within the range 455-700 K. Isothermal annealing by slow cooling was performed through this range and used in determination of the activation enthalpy of migration of dislocations which was found to be 0.26 ± 0.01 eV.

  6. Synchronous Tests of Laser Active ARTEMIS Satellite at Different Ground Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyryev, Yevgen; Sybiryakova, Yevgeniya; Shulga, Alexander; Kuzkov, Volodymyr; Kuzkov, Sergii; Lopachenko, Vladimir; Kozhukhov, Alexander; Rikhal'sky, Vladimir; Caramia, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    In July 2001, the geostationary satellite ARTEMIS with laser communication terminal OPALE on board was launched. Successful laser communication sessions were performed between ARTEMIS and low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellite SPOT-4. Regular laser communication experiments between the Optical Ground Station (OGS) of ESA and ARTEMIS were also performed. The laser communication sessions were successfully established between LEO satellite KIRARI and ARTEMIS. A laser communication link between LEO satellites with the data rate of 5.625 Gbps (5100 km distance) was established by the TESAT Spacecom in 2008. First laser communication experiments between the LADEE spacecraft at the lunar orbit and Earth OGS with a rate of 622 Mbps were realized in October 2013. The amount of information sent from telecommunication satellites located at the geostationary orbit is constantly increasing. There is a certain demand in high speed laser link data transmission between ground stations and satellites. For some LEO satellites, the direct transmission of information to a ground station is required. To reduce the influence of atmosphere, some of ground stations located in different climatic regions are needed. The Main Astronomical Observatory of Ukraine (MAO) have developed a compact laser communication system named LACES (Laser Atmospheric and Communicational Experiments with Satellites) using the Cassegrain focus of its 0.7 m telescope. The laser link between the LACES terminal of MAO and the OPALE terminal of ARTEMIS was established. During the pointing, OPALE terminal performs the beacon laser scanning of the territory where a MAO ground station is located. Several experimental observations of OPALE beacon laser scanning by ground stations located in different regions of Ukraine took place in 2012-2013 years. During the sessions, laser beacon peaks from OPALE were detected by the stations in Kyiv, Mykolaiv (500 km from Kyiv), Yevpatoriya (800 km from Kyiv), Odesa, and other stations

  7. Comparison of ground and satellite based measurements of the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation intercepted by tall-grass prairie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demetriades-Shah, T. H.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Flitcroft, I.; Su, H.

    1991-01-01

    The fraction, of photosynthetically active radiation intercepted by vegetation, F(sub ipar) is an important parameter for modeling the interactions between the land-surface and atmosphere and for estimating vegetation biomass productivity. This study was; therefore, an integral part of FIFE. The specific purpose of this experiment was to find out how well definitive measurements of F(sub ipar) on the ground relate to near-ground and satellite based spectral reflectance measurements. Concurrent measurements of F(sub ipar) and ground, helicopter, and satellite based reflectance measurements were taken at thirteen tall-grass prairie sites within the FIFE experimental area. The sites were subjected to various combinations of burning and grazing managements. The ground and helicopter based reflectance measurements were taken on the same day or few days from the time of the overpass of LANDSAT and SPOT satellites. Ground-based reflectance measurements and sun photometer readings taken at the times of the satellite overpasses were used to correct for atmospheric attenuation. Hand-held radiometer spectral indices were strongly correlated with helicopter and satellite based values (r=0.94 for helicopter, 0.93 for LANDSAT Thematic Mapper, and 0.86 for SPOT). However, the ground, helicopter, and satellite based normalized difference spectral vegetation indices showed low sensitivity to changes in F(sub ipar). Reflectance measurements were only moderately well correlated with measurements of F(sub ipar) (r=0.82 for hand-held radiometer, 0.84 for helicopter measurements, and 0.75 for the LANDSAT Thematic Mapper and SPOT). Improved spectral indices which can compensate for site differences are needed in order to monitor F(sub ipar) more reliably.

  8. Comparison of ground and satellite based measurements of the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation intercepted by tall-grass prairie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demetriades-Shah, T. H.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Flitcroft, I. D.; Su, H.

    1992-01-01

    The fraction of photosynthetically active radiation intercepted by vegetation, F(sub ipar) is an important parameter for modeling the interactions between the land-surface and atmosphere and for estimating vegetation biomass productivity. This study was, therefore, an integral part of FIFE. The specific purpose of this experiment was to find out how well definitive measurements of F(sub ipar) on the ground relate to near-ground and satellite based spectral reflectance measurements. Concurrent measurements of F(sub ipar) and ground, helicopter, and satellite based reflectance measurements were taken at thirteen tall-grass prairie sites within the FIFE experimental area. The sites were subjected to various combinations of burning and grazing managements. The ground and helicopter based reflectance measurements were taken on the same day or few days from the time of the overpass of LANDSAT and SPOT satellites. Ground-based reflectance measurements and sun photometer readings taken at the times of the satellite overpasses were used to correct for atmospheric attenuation. Hand-held radiometer spectral indices were strongly correlated with helicopter and satellite based values (r = 0.94 for helicopter, 0.93 for LANDSAT Thematic Mapper, and 0.86 for SPOT). However, the ground, helicopter, and satellite based normalized difference spectral vegetation indices showed low sensitivity to changes in F(sub ipar). Reflectance measurements were only moderately well correlated with measurements of F(sub ipar) (r = 0.82 for hand-held radiometer, 0.84 for helicopter measurements, and 0.75 for the LANDSAT Thematic Mapper and SPOT). Improved spectral indices which can compensate for site differences are needed in order to monitor F(sub ipar) more reliably.

  9. Effects of Hypothermia and Self-Warming on Activity of Ca(2+)-Dependent Neutral Proteases in Tissues of Ground Squirrels and Rats.

    PubMed

    Nurmagomedova, P M; Emirbekov, E Z; Abasova, M M

    2016-04-01

    Effects of hypothermia and subsequent self-warming on activity of Ca(2+)-dependent neutral proteases were studied in tissues of ground squirrels and rats. Moderate hypothermia did not significantly change activity of Ca(2+)-dependent neutral proteases in the analyzed tissues of ground squirrels, but reduced protease activity in rat heart. Severe hypothermia reduced enzyme activity in the analyzed tissues of rats and ground squirrels. Differences in activity of Ca(2+)-dependent neutral proteases after long-term hypothermia and subsequent self-warming were found only in the heart.

  10. Constraints on Alpine hydrothermal activity and deformation from U-Th-Pb dating of cleft monazite and xenotime (Western Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand'Homme, Alexis; Janots, Emilie; Bosse, Valerie; Seydoux-Guillaume, Anne-Magali; De Ascencao, Roger

    2016-04-01

    movements along major strike slip faults. On the other hand, monazite dating in the Argentera (20.6 ± 0.3 Ma) confirms for the regional diachronism observed from South to the North of the ECM in the Western Alps. First ages were here obtained for the hydrothermal activity of the internal massifs of the Western Alps. As expected from other (thermo)chronometers, hydrothermal activity in the Internal Alpine domains (Briançonnais) is older than in the ECM. In the Briançonnais zone, monazite age at 32.1 ± 0.2 Ma coincides with the exhumation along the penninic front. In the second cleft, monazite age at 23.3 ± 0.2 Ma is more complex to attribute to a specific deformation stage.

  11. Ground tests with prototype of CeBr3 active gamma ray spectrometer proposed for future venus surface missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Golovin, D. V.; Jun, I.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Vostrukhin, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    The results of a series of ground tests with a prototype of an active gamma-ray spectrometer based on a new generation of scintillation crystal (CeBr3) are presented together with a consideration to its applicability to future Venus landing missions. We evaluated the instrument's capability to distinguish the subsurface elemental composition of primary rock forming elements such as O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K and Fe. Our study uses heritage from previous ground and field tests and applies to the analysis of gamma lines from activation reaction products generated by a pulsed neutron generator. We have estimated that the expected accuracies achieved in this approach could be as high as 1-10% for the particular chemical element being studied.

  12. Contribution of space platforms to a ground and airborne remote-sensing programme over active Italian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassinis, R.; Lechi, G. M.; Tonelli, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS-1 imagery of the volcanic areas of southern Italy was used primarily for the evaluation of space platform capabilties in the domains of regional geology, soil and rock-type classification and, more generally, to study the environment of active volcanoes. The test sites were selected and equipped primarily to monitor thermal emission, but ground truth data was also collected in other domains (reflectance of rocks, soils and vegetation). The test areas were overflown with a two channel thermal scanner, while a thermo camera was used on the ground to monitor the hot spots. The primary goal of this survey was to plot the changes in thermal emission with time in the framework of a research program for the surveillance of active volcanoes. However, another task was an evaluation of emissivity changes by comparing the outputs of the two thermal channels. These results were compared with the reflectance changes observed on multispectral ERTS-1 imagery.

  13. East-west type precursor activity prior to the auroral onset: Ground-based and THEMIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovchanskaya, I. V.; Kornilov, I. A.; Kornilova, T. A.

    2015-02-01

    Using ground-based optical observations, we study an auroral breakup event, focusing on the wave-like signatures of the east-west (E-W) type auroral activities which appear before breakup. By conjunction with the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) P2 and P5 measurements, it is shown that the underlying wave mode can be identified as the ballooning mode. Considering the similarity of the wave-like characteristics derived from ground-based auroral and THEMIS spacecraft observations, we argue that the E-W activities under study may be related to ballooning waves propagating in the plasma sheet. The implications for mechanisms of substorm triggering are discussed.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of soy edible films incorporated with thyme and oregano essential oils on fresh ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Emiroğlu, Zehra Karagöz; Yemiş, Gökçe Polat; Coşkun, Betül Kodal; Candoğan, Kezban

    2010-10-01

    Antibacterial activity of soy protein edible films (SPEF) incorporated with 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5% oregano (OR) or thyme (TH) essential oils was evaluated against Escherichia coli, E. coli O157:H7, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Lactobacillus plantarum by the inhibition zone test. Effects of SPEF containing 5% OR and TH or a mixture of OR+TH (ORT) were also tested on fresh ground beef during refrigerated storage (at 4 degrees C). OR and TH incorporated SPEF exhibited similar antibacterial activity against all bacteria in inhibition zone test. While E. coli, E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus were significantly inhibited by antimicrobial films, L. plantarum and P. aeruginosa appeared to be the more resistant bacteria. SPEF with OR, ORT, and TH did not have significant effects on total viable counts, lactic acid bacteria and Staphylococcus spp. when applied on ground beef patties whereas reductions (p<0.05) in coliform and Pseudomonas spp. counts were observed.

  15. Blanket Biological Review for General Maintenance Activities within Active Burial Grounds, 200 E and 200 W Areas, ECR No. 99-200-042

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Charles A.

    1999-04-30

    No plant and animal species protected under the Endangered Species Act, candidates for such protection, or species listed by the Washington state government were observed in the vicinity of the proposed sites. Piper's daisy is a Washington State Sensitive plant species, and as such is a Level III resource under the Hanford Site Biological Resources Management Plan. Compensatory mitigation is appropriate for this species when adverse impacts cannot be avoided. The stalked pod and crouching milkvetchs are relatively common throughout 200 West area, therefore even if the few individuals within the active burial grounds are disturbed, it is not likely that the overall local population will be adversely affected. The Watch List is the lowest level of listing for plant species of concern in the State of Washington. No adverse impacts to species or habitats of concern are expected to occur from routine maintenance within the active portions of the 218-W-4C, 218-W-4B, 218-W-3, 218-W-3A, a nd 218-W-5 burial grounds, as well as the portion of 218-E-12B currently used for storage of retired submarine reactor cores. The remaining portions of the 218-E-12B burial ground, the entire 218-E-10 burial ground, and the 218-W-6 burial ground currently have extensive vegetative cover and it is highly likely that migratory birds, such as meadow larks, horned larks, and curlews will nest in these areas. Therefore, it is recommended that if removal of the existing vegetation is required for burial ground operations, such removal only occur during the August through March time period (i.e. when the birds are not actively nesting). If vegetation removal is required prior to August 1999 or after 1 April 2000, please contact the ECAP staff for an additional analysis to ensure compliance with the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

  16. 76 FR 48859 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Facility Ground...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ...-Water Monitoring Requirements AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In... facilities at 40 CFR Parts 264 and 265, as specified. The ground-water monitoring requirements for regulated... requirements. This ICR is scheduled to expire on January 31, 2011. Before submitting the ICR to OMB for...

  17. 77 FR 51827 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Ground...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office...; Ground Control Plans for Surface Coal Mines and Surface Work Areas of Underground Coal Mines ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (DOL) is submitting the Mine Safety and Health...

  18. Ground survey of active Central American volcanoes in November - December 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoiber, R. E. (Principal Investigator); Rose, W. I., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Thermal anomalies at two volcanoes, Santiaguito and Izalco, have grown in size in the past six months, based on repeated ground survey. Thermal anomalies at Pacaya volcano have became less intense in the same period. Large (500 m diameter) thermal anomalies exist at 3 volcanoes presently, and smaller scale anomalies are found at nine other volcanoes.

  19. Experimental Deformation of Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, J. L.; Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. F. G.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetite is an important iron ore mineral and the most prominent Fe-oxide phase in the Earth's crust. The systematic occurrence of magnetite in zones of intense deformation in oceanic core complexes suggests that it may play a role in strain localization in some silicate rocks. We performed a series of high-temperature deformation experiments on synthetic magnetite aggregates and natural single crystals to characterize the rheological behavior of magnetite. As starting material, we used fine-grained magnetite powder that was hot isostatically pressed at 1100°C for several hours, resulting in polycrystalline material with a mean grain size of around 40 μm and containing 3-5% porosity. Samples were deformed to 15-20% axial strain under constant load (approximating constant stress) conditions in a Paterson-type gas apparatus for triaxial deformation at temperatures between 900 and 1100°C and 300 MPa confining pressure. The aggregates exhibit typical power-law creep behavior. At high stresses, samples deformed by dislocation creep exhibit stress exponents close to 3, revealing a transition to near-Newtonian creep with stress exponents around 1.3 at lower stresses. Natural magnetite single crystals deformed at 1 atm pressure and temperatures between 950°C and 1150 °C also exhibit stress exponents close to 3, but with lower flow stresses and a lower apparent activation energy than the aggregates. Such behavior may result from the different oxygen fugacity buffers used. Crystallographic-preferred orientations in all polycrystalline samples are very weak and corroborate numerical models of CPO development, suggesting that texture development in magnetite may be inherently slow compared with lower symmetry phases. Comparison of our results with experimental deformation data for various silicate minerals suggests that magnetite should be weaker than most silicates during ductile creep in dry igneous rocks.

  20. Effects of Season and Host Physiological State on the Diversity, Density, and Activity of the Arctic Ground Squirrel Cecal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Timothy J.; Duddleston, Khrystyne N.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the seasonal changes of the cecal microbiota of captive arctic ground squirrels (Urocitellus parryii) by measuring microbial diversity and composition, total bacterial density and viability, and short-chain fatty acid concentrations at four sample periods (summer, torpor, interbout arousal, and posthibernation). Abundance of Firmicutes was lower, whereas abundances of Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Proteobacteria were higher during torpor and interbout arousal than in summer. Bacterial densities and percentages of live bacteria were significantly higher in summer than during torpor and interbout arousal. Likewise, total short-chain fatty acid concentrations were significantly greater during summer than during torpor and interbout arousal. Concentrations of individual short-chain fatty acids varied across sample periods, with butyrate concentrations higher and acetate concentrations lower during summer than at all other sample periods. Characteristics of the gut community posthibernation were more similar to those during torpor and interbout arousal than to those during summer. However, higher abundances of the genera Bacteroides and Akkermansia occurred during posthibernation than during interbout arousal and torpor. Collectively, our results clearly demonstrate that seasonal changes in physiology associated with hibernation and activity affect the gut microbial community in the arctic ground squirrel. Importantly, similarities between the gut microbiota of arctic ground squirrels and thirteen-lined ground squirrels suggest the potential for a core microbiota during hibernation. PMID:25002417

  1. Effects of season and host physiological state on the diversity, density, and activity of the arctic ground squirrel cecal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Timothy J; Duddleston, Khrystyne N; Buck, C Loren

    2014-09-01

    We examined the seasonal changes of the cecal microbiota of captive arctic ground squirrels (Urocitellus parryii) by measuring microbial diversity and composition, total bacterial density and viability, and short-chain fatty acid concentrations at four sample periods (summer, torpor, interbout arousal, and posthibernation). Abundance of Firmicutes was lower, whereas abundances of Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Proteobacteria were higher during torpor and interbout arousal than in summer. Bacterial densities and percentages of live bacteria were significantly higher in summer than during torpor and interbout arousal. Likewise, total short-chain fatty acid concentrations were significantly greater during summer than during torpor and interbout arousal. Concentrations of individual short-chain fatty acids varied across sample periods, with butyrate concentrations higher and acetate concentrations lower during summer than at all other sample periods. Characteristics of the gut community posthibernation were more similar to those during torpor and interbout arousal than to those during summer. However, higher abundances of the genera Bacteroides and Akkermansia occurred during posthibernation than during interbout arousal and torpor. Collectively, our results clearly demonstrate that seasonal changes in physiology associated with hibernation and activity affect the gut microbial community in the arctic ground squirrel. Importantly, similarities between the gut microbiota of arctic ground squirrels and thirteen-lined ground squirrels suggest the potential for a core microbiota during hibernation.

  2. Paleoseismologic and geomorphic constraints to the deformation style and activity of the Cittanova Fault (southern Calabria, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peronace, Edoardo; Della Seta, Marta; Fredi, Paola; Galli, Paolo; Giaccio, Biagio; Messina, Paolo; Troiani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The western side of Southern Calabria is the epicentral region of the strongest earthquakes of Italy. These are mainly generated by extensional faults which are still poorly investigated and/or parameterized. In this study, we explore the potential of the combined analysis of geomorphic markers, stream network morphometry and paleosimological investigations, aimed at identifying and time-constraining the surface effects of the Calabrian seismogenic faults. In this perspective, we presents results from i) plano-altimetric analysis of geomorphic markers related to active tectonics (such as marine and fluvial terraces), ii) paleoseismological investigations, and iii) time-dependent river basin and long-profile metrics of the Cittanova Fault (CF). The CF, responsible for the catastrophic Mw 7.0 earthquake of 5 February 1783, is a N220° striking, 30 km-long normal fault that downthrows the crystalline-metamorphic basement of the Aspromonte massif (~1000 m asl) below the Gioia Tauro Plain, to elevations of ~500-800 m bsl. Radiocarbon dating allowed us to ascribe the depostion of a major terraced alluvial fan (Cittanova-Taurianova terrace, TAC) to the early Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and to date the avulsion of the depositional top surface of TAC to 28 ka. As we have found remnants of the TAC also in the CF footwall offset by 12-17 m, we estimate a vertical slip rate of 0.6 ± 0.1 mm/yr for the past 28 ka. Paleoseismological data across the fault scarp evidenced at least three surface ruptures associated to ~Mw 7.0 paleoearthquakes prior to the 1783 event. The recurrence time (~3.2 kyr) is rather longer than other Apennine normal faults (0.3-2.4 kyr), whereas it is consistent with the low slip rate of CF for the late Upper Pleistocene (0.6 mm/yr). On a longer time scale, the spatial configuration of river basin morphometry evidenced the morphodynamic rensponse to the higher slip in the central sector of CF. Furthermore, long-profile metrics, and in particular the spatial

  3. Ground-squirrel mounds and related patterned ground along the San Andreas Fault in Central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    Extensive areas of mound topography and related patterned ground, apparently derived from the mounds of the California Ground Squirrel (Spermophilus beecheyi beecheyi), are in central California.  The relation of patterned ground to the San Andreas fault west of Bakersfield may provide insight into the timing of deformation along the fault as well as the history of ground squirrels.  Mound topography appears to have evolved through several stages from scattered mounds currently being constructed on newly deposited alluvial surfaces, to saturation of areas by mounds, followed by coalescence, elongation and lineation of the mounds.  Elongation, coalescence and modification of the mounds has been primarily by wind, but to a lesser extent by drainage and solifluction.  A time frame including ages of 4,000, 10,500, 29,000, and 73,000 years BP is derived by relating the patterns to slip on the San Andreas fault.  Further relating of the patterns to faulting, tilting, and warping may illuminate details of the rates and history of deformation.  Similarly, relating the patterns to the history of ground squirrel activity may help answer such problems as rates of dispersal and limits on population density.

  4. Numerical investigation on active isolation of ground shock by soft porous layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. G.; Sun, W.; Anand, S.

    2009-04-01

    The mitigation and reduction of blast-induced ground shock in near field is an interesting topic worth considering for the protection of buried structures. Soft porous materials are usually used to form an isolation layer around the buried structures. However, the interaction of soft porous layer and surrounding geomedia as well as buried structures is not well understood. In this paper, the effects of soft porous layer barriers on the reduction of buried blast-induced ground shock are numerically studied. Based on the prototype dimensions of a centrifuge test, a numerical model is set up with two steel boxes symmetrically buried at two sides of the charge. One box is directly located in soil mass without protection (unprotected) and the other is located behind a soft porous layer barrier (protected). The soft porous layer barriers studied here include an open trench, an inundated water trench, three in-filled geofoam walls with different densities, and a concrete wall. The numerical responses of the two boxes are evaluated when subjected to the protection of different soft porous layer barriers. These numerical simulations show that both open trench and geofoam barriers can effectively reduce blast-induced stress waves. However, inundated water trench and concrete wall have almost no effect on the reduction of ground shock. Therefore, a geofoam barrier is more practicable in soil mass.

  5. Imaging active faulting in a region of distributed deformation from the joint clustering of focal mechanisms and hypocentres: Application to the Azores-western Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custódio, Susana; Lima, Vânia; Vales, Dina; Cesca, Simone; Carrilho, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The matching between linear trends of hypocentres and fault planes indicated by focal mechanisms (FMs) is frequently used to infer the location and geometry of active faults. This practice works well in regions of fast lithospheric deformation, where earthquake patterns are clear and major structures accommodate the bulk of deformation, but typically fails in regions of slow and distributed deformation. We present a new joint FM and hypocentre cluster algorithm that is able to detect systematically the consistency between hypocentre lineations and FMs, even in regions of distributed deformation. We apply the method to the Azores-western Mediterranean region, with particular emphasis on western Iberia. The analysis relies on a compilation of hypocentres and FMs taken from regional and global earthquake catalogues, academic theses and technical reports, complemented by new FMs for western Iberia. The joint clustering algorithm images both well-known and new seismo-tectonic features. The Azores triple junction is characterised by FMs with vertical pressure (P) axes, in good agreement with the divergent setting, and the Iberian domain is characterised by NW-SE oriented P axes, indicating a response of the lithosphere to the ongoing oblique convergence between Nubia and Eurasia. Several earthquakes remain unclustered in the western Mediterranean domain, which may indicate a response to local stresses. The major regions of consistent faulting that we identify are the mid-Atlantic ridge, the Terceira rift, the Trans-Alboran shear zone and the north coast of Algeria. In addition, other smaller earthquake clusters present a good match between epicentre lineations and FM fault planes. These clusters may signal single active faults or wide zones of distributed but consistent faulting. Mainland Portugal is dominated by strike-slip earthquakes with fault planes coincident with the predominant NNE-SSW and WNW-ESE oriented earthquake lineations. Clusters offshore SW Iberia are

  6. BLANKET BIOLOGICAL REVIEW FOR GENERAL MAINTENANCE ACTIVITIES WITHIN ACTIVE BURIAL GROUNDS, 200 E and 200 W Areas, ECR No.2001-200-048

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.

    2002-05-08

    No plant and animal species protected under the ESA, candidates for such protection, or species listed by the Washington state government were observed in the vicinity of the proposed sites. Piper's daisy may still occur in some of the burial grounds. This is a Washington State Sensitive plant species, and as such is a Level III resource under the Hanford Site Biological Resources Management Plan. Compensatory mitigation is appropriate for this species when adverse impacts cannot be avoided. The Ecological Compliance Assessment Project (ECAP) staff should consulted prior to the initiation of major work activities within areas where this species has been identified (218-E-12, 218-E-10). The stalked-pod and crouching milkvetch are relatively common throughout 200 West area, therefore even if the few individuals within the active burial grounds are disturbed, it is not likely that the overall local population will be adversely affected. The Watch List is the lowest level of listing for plant species of concern in the State of Washington. No adverse impacts to species or habitats of concern are expected to occur from routine maintenance within the active portions of the 218-W-4C, 218-W-4B, 218-W-3, 218-W-3A, and 218-W-5 burial grounds, as well as the portion of 218-E-12B currently used for storage of retired submarine reactor cores. The remaining portions of the 218-E-12B burial ground, the entire 218-E-10 burial ground, and the 218-W-6 burial ground currently have extensive vegetative cover and it is highly likely that migratory birds, such as meadow larks, horned larks, and curlews will nest in these areas. Therefore, it is recommended that if removal of the existing vegetation is required for burial ground operations, such removal only occur during the August through March time period (i.e. when the birds are not actively nesting). This blanket review does not apply to the portions of 218-W-4C, and 218-W-6 previously described.

  7. BLANKET BIOLOGICAL REVIEW FOR GENERAL MAINTENANCE ACTIVITIES WITHIN ACTIVE BURIAL GROUNDS, 200 E and 200 W Areas, ECR No. 2002-200-034

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.

    2003-06-26

    No plant and animal species protected under the ESA, candidates for such protection, or species listed by the Washington state government were observed in the vicinity of the proposed sites. Piper's daisy may still occur in some of the burial grounds. This is a Washington State Sensitive plant species, and as such is a Level III resource under the Hanford Site Biological Resources Management Plan. Compensatory mitigation is appropriate for this species when adverse impacts cannot be avoided. The Ecological Compliance Assessment Project (ECAP) staff should consulted prior to the initiation of major work activities within areas where this species has been identified (218-E-12, 218-E-10). The stalked-pod and crouching milkvetch are relatively common throughout 200 West area, therefore even if the few individuals within the active burial grounds are disturbed, it is not likely that the overall local population will be adversely affected. The Watch List is the lowest level of listing for pl ant species of concern in the State of Washington. No adverse impacts to species or habitats of concern are expected to occur from routine maintenance within the active portions of the 218-W-4C, 218-W-4B, 218-W-3, 218-W-3A, and 218-W-5 burial grounds, as well as the portion of 218-E-12B currently used for storage of retired submarine reactor cores. The remaining portions of the 218-E-12B burial ground, the entire 218-E-10 burial ground, and the 218-W-6 burial ground currently have extensive vegetative cover and it is highly likely that migratory birds, such as meadow larks, horned larks, and curlews will nest in these areas. Therefore, it is recommended that if removal of the existing vegetation is required for burial ground operations, such removal only occur during the August through March time period (i.e. when the birds are not actively nesting). This blanket review does not apply to the portions of 218-W-4C, and 218-W-6 previously described.

  8. BLANKET BIOLOGICAL REVIEW FOR GENERAL MAINTENANCE ACTIVITIES WITHIN ACTIVE BURIAL GROUNDS, 200 E and 200 W Areas, ECR #2000-200-013

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.

    2002-04-04

    No plant and animal species protected under the ESA, candidates for such protection, or species listed by the Washington state government were observed in the vicinity of the proposed sites. Piper's daisy may still occur in some of the burial grounds. This is a Washington State Sensitive plant species, and as such is a Level III resource under the Hanford Site Biological Resources Management Plan. Compensatory mitigation is appropriate for this species when adverse impacts cannot be avoided. The Ecological Compliance Assessment Project (ECAP) staff should consulted prior to the initiation of major work activities within areas where this species has been identified (218-E-12, 218-E-10). The stalked-pod and crouching milkvetch are relatively common throughout 200 West area, therefore even if the few individuals within the active burial grounds are disturbed, it is not likely that the overall local population will be adversely affected. The Watch List is the lowest level of listing for plant species of concern in the State of Washington. No adverse impacts to species or habitats of concern are expected to occur from routine maintenance within the active portions of the 218-W-4C, 218-W-4B, 218-W-3, 218-W-3A, and 218-W-5 burial grounds, as well as the portion of 218-E-12B currently used for storage of retired submarine reactor cores. The remaining portions of the 218-E-12B burial ground, the entire 218-E-10 burial ground, and the 218-W-6 burial ground currently have extensive vegetative cover and it is highly likely that migratory birds, such as meadow larks, horned larks, and curlews will nest in these areas. Therefore, it is recommended that if removal of the existing vegetation is required for burial ground operations, such removal only occur during the August through March time period (i.e. when the birds are not actively nesting). This blanket review does not apply to the portions of 218-W-4C, and 218-W-6 previously described.

  9. Synergistic activity between lauric arginate and carvacrol in reducing Salmonella in ground turkey.

    PubMed

    Oladunjoye, Ademola; Soni, Kamlesh A; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna; Schilling, M Wes; Silva, Juan L; Mikel, Benjy; Bailey, R Hartford; Mahmoud, Barakat S M; Sharma, Chander Shekhar

    2013-05-01

    In the present study, low concentrations of carvacrol (0.025 to 0.2%) and lauric arginate (LAE; 25 to 200 ppm) were tested at 4, 22, and 45°C in a broth model, and higher concentrations of carvacrol (0.1 to 5%) and LAE (200 to 5,000 ppm) were tested individually and in combination at 4°C in 3 different ground turkey samples (with 15, 7, and 1% fat content) for their effectiveness against a 3-strain mixture of Salmonella. A low concentration of 25 ppm of LAE or 0.025% carvacrol had no effect on Salmonella in a broth model, but their mixture showed a synergistic action by reducing 6 log cfu/mL Salmonella counts to a nondetectable level within 30 min of exposure. The US Food and Drug Administration-recommended 200 ppm of LAE was not sufficient for Salmonella reductions in ground turkey when applied internally. High concentrations of 2,000 to 5,000 ppm of LAE or 1 to 2% carvacrol were needed to reduce Salmonella counts by 2 to 5 log cfu/g in ground turkey by internal application. No specific relationship existed between fat content and LAE or carvacrol concentrations for Salmonella reductions. For example, 2,000 ppm of LAE could reduce Salmonella counts by 4 log cfu/g in 1% fat-containing turkey samples but very similar ~1.5 log cfu/g reductions in both 7 and 15% fat-containing ground turkey samples. For the total microbial load, about 2,000 ppm of LAE or 2% of carvacrol treatments were needed to achieve 2 to 3 log (P ≤ 0.05) cfu/g reductions in different turkey samples. A mixture of 1% carvacrol and 2,000 ppm of LAE exhibited a synergistic action in ground turkey containing 7% fat by reducing the Salmonella counts by 4 log cfu/g, which was not found with individual antimicrobial treatments.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of plant compounds against Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and the influence of heat and storage on the antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cynthia H; Ravishankar, Sadhana; Marchello, John; Friedman, Mendel

    2013-07-01

    Salmonella enterica is a predominant foodborne pathogen that causes diarrheal illness worldwide. A potential method of inhibiting pathogenic bacterial growth in meat is through the introduction of plant-derived antimicrobials. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of heat (70°C for 5 min) and subsequent cold storage (4°C up to 7 days) on the effectiveness of oregano and cinnamon essential oils and powdered olive and apple extracts against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 in ground pork and to evaluate the activity of the most effective antimicrobials (cinnamon oil and olive extract) at higher concentrations in heated ground pork. The surviving Salmonella populations in two groups (heated and unheated) of antimicrobial-treated pork were compared. Higher concentrations of the most effective compounds were then tested (cinnamon oil at 0.5 to 1.0% and olive extract at 3, 4, and 5%) against Salmonella Typhimurium in heated ground pork. Samples were stored at 4°C and taken on days 0, 3, 5, and 7 for enumeration of survivors. The heating process did not affect the activity of antimicrobials. Significant 1.3- and 3-log reductions were observed with 1.0% cinnamon oil and 5% olive extract, respectively, on day 7. The minimum concentration required to achieve . 1-log reduction in Salmonella population was 0.8% cinnamon oil or 4% olive extract. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of these antimicrobials against multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium in ground pork and their stability during heating and cold storage. The most active formulations have the potential to enhance the microbial safety of ground pork.

  11. Comparison of ground and satellite based measurements of the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation intercepted by tall-grass prairie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demetriades-Shah, T. H.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Flitcroft, I.; Su, H.

    1990-01-01

    The fraction, of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by vegetation, F sub ipar, is an important requirement for estimating vegetation biomass productivity and related quantities. This was an integral part of a large international effort; the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE). The main objective of FIFE was to study the effects of vegetation on the land atmosphere interactions and to determine if these interactions can be assessed from satellite spectral measurements. The specific purpose of this experiment was to find out how well measurements of F sub ipar relate to ground, helicopter, and satellite based spectral reflectance measurements. Concurrent measurements of F sub ipar and ground, helicopter, and satellite based measurements were taken at 13 tall grass prairie sites in Kansas. The sites were subjected to various combinations of burning and grazing managements.

  12. A two-dimensional deformable phantom for quantitatively verifying deformation algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Neil; Chuang, Cynthia; Pouliot, Jean

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: The incorporation of deformable image registration into the treatment planning process is rapidly advancing. For this reason, the methods used to verify the underlying deformation algorithms must evolve equally fast. This manuscript proposes a two-dimensional deformable phantom, which can objectively verify the accuracy of deformation algorithms, as the next step for improving these techniques. Methods: The phantom represents a single plane of the anatomy for a head and neck patient. Inflation of a balloon catheter inside the phantom simulates tumor growth. CT and camera images of the phantom are acquired before and after its deformation. Nonradiopaque markers reside on the surface of the deformable anatomy and are visible through an acrylic plate, which enables an optical camera to measure their positions; thus, establishing the ground-truth deformation. This measured deformation is directly compared to the predictions of deformation algorithms, using several similarity metrics. The ratio of the number of points with more than a 3 mm deformation error over the number that are deformed by more than 3 mm is used for an error metric to evaluate algorithm accuracy. Results: An optical method of characterizing deformation has been successfully demonstrated. For the tests of this method, the balloon catheter deforms 32 out of the 54 surface markers by more than 3 mm. Different deformation errors result from the different similarity metrics. The most accurate deformation predictions had an error of 75%. Conclusions: The results presented here demonstrate the utility of the phantom for objectively verifying deformation algorithms and determining which is the most accurate. They also indicate that the phantom would benefit from more electron density heterogeneity. The reduction of the deformable anatomy to a two-dimensional system allows for the use of nonradiopaque markers, which do not influence deformation algorithms. This is the fundamental advantage of this

  13. Blanket Biological Review for General Maintenance Activities Within Active Burial Grounds, 200 East and 200 West Areas, ECR No.2003-200-035

    SciTech Connect

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.

    2003-08-25

    No plant and animal species protected under the ESA, candidates for such protection, or species listed by the Washington state government were observed in the vicinity of the proposed sites. Piper's daisy may still occur in some of the burial grounds (218-E-12, 218-E-10). This is a Washington State Sensitive plant species, and as such is a Level III resource under the Hanford Site Biological Resources Management Plan. Compensatory mitigation is appropriate for this species when adverse impacts cannot be avoided. The stalked-pod and crouching milkvetch, Watch List species, are relatively common throughout 200 West area, therefore even if the few individuals within the active burial grounds are disturbed, it is not likely that the overall local population will be adversely affected. The Watch List is the lowest level of listing for plant species of concern in the State of Washington. No adverse impacts to species or habitats of concern are expected to occur from routine maintenance within the active portions of the 218-W-4C, 218-W-4B, 218-W-3, 218-W-3A, and 218-W-5 burial grounds, as well as the portion of 218-E-12B currently used for storage of retired submarine reactor cores. The remaining portions of the 218-E-12B burial ground and the entire 218-E-10 burial ground currently have extensive vegetative cover and it is highly likely that migratory birds, such as meadowlarks, horned larks, and curlews may nest in these areas. Therefore, it is recommended that if removal of the existing vegetation is required for burial ground operations, such removal only occur during the August through March time period (i.e. when the birds are not actively nesting). If vegetation removal is required prior to August 2003 or after 1 April 2004, please contact the ECAP staff for an additional analysis to ensure compliance with the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Workers should be advised to watch for nesting birds within the burial grounds, if any are encountered, please contact the ECAP

  14. Hypergravity Facilities in the ESA Ground-Based Facility Program - Current Research Activities and Future Tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frett, Timo; Petrat, Guido; W. A. van Loon, Jack J.; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Anken, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Research on Artificial Gravity (AG) created by linear acceleration or centrifugation has a long history and could significantly contribute to realize long-term human spaceflight in the future. Employing centrifuges plays a prominent role in human physiology and gravitational biology. This article gives a short review about the background of Artificial Gravity with respect to hypergravity (including partial gravity) and provides information about actual ESA ground-based facilities for research on a variety of biosystems such as cells, plants, animals or, particularly, humans.

  15. The sequence of moderate-size earthquakes at the junction of the Ligurian basin and the Corsica margin (western Mediterranean): The initiation of an active deformation zone revealed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larroque, Christophe; Delouis, Bertrand; Sage, Françoise; Régnier, Marc; Béthoux, Nicole; Courboulex, Françoise; Deschamps, Anne

    2016-04-01

    A new seismically active zone is found in the southern part of the Ligurian basin, 80-km west of Corsica (western Mediterranean). The activity began in February 2011 with a foreshock (ML 4) and a mainshock (ML 5.3) 5 days later, followed by numerous aftershocks. We first analyze the fore- and mainshock in detail. We compare the results obtained using classical methods (linear location in a 1D medium and focal mechanisms from P and S polarities) and new approaches (non-linear location in a 3D medium and waveform modeling for determining the seismic moment and the focal mechanism). Both methods provided similar results for location, depth (in the range of 6-13 km) and focal mechanisms, which reveal reverse faulting with nodal planes oriented N-S and NE-SW. We then locate 27 of the aftershocks in the 3D model and find a 10-km-long NE-SW alignment with a depth between 7 and 16 km. In 2012 and 2013, three other moderate-size events (ML 3.8, 4 and 4.5) occurred and confirm that this zone is still active. The epicentral area is located in the oceanic domain of the Ligurian Basin. From analysis of the bathymetry and high-resolution multi-channel seismic profiles, no morphologic anomaly at surface and no inherited fault in the shallow ~ 4 km depth were imaged, which suggest that no significant deformation occurred in the area since 5 Ma. Thus, the structure(s) activated during the 2011-2013 sequence remain unknown. In light of these results, we point out a notable difference on both sides of the Ligurian Basin: the northern margin, close to the alpine chain, suffered strong earthquakes and large cumulated deformation since 5 Ma, while the southern margin, close to the Corsica-Sardinia continental block, is poorly deformed since 5 Ma.

  16. Active shortening along the northern edge of the western Transverse Ranges recorded by deformed fluvial terraces along Santa Cruz Creek in the eastern Santa Ynez Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, E.

    2011-12-01

    Vertical-axis rotation of the western Transverse Ranges in southern California was accompanied by folding and reverse faulting at the northern edge of the rotated domain during late Miocene to Pliocene time. Deformed Pleistocene strata in the Santa Ynez Valley suggest that this rotational folding and faulting is still occurring. Fluvial terraces are present along several major drainages that cross the faults and folds and provide an opportunity to evaluate the timing and magnitude of Late Quaternary deformation at the northern edge of the rotated western Transverse Ranges. Three flights of well-preserved fluvial strath terraces are exposed along a 9.3 km stretch of the Santa Cruz Creek drainage in the eastern Santa Ynez Valley. Fluvial deposits that make up the terrace treads have been lifted 18.5 m (T-1) to 110m (T-3) above the active channel and are unpaired across the drainage. The terrace surfaces are underlain by a thin 0.6m-6m veneer of fluvial deposits resting on an erosional surface cut into the underlying Pleistocene Paso Robles Formation. GPS profiles (accurate to .1m) of the terrace surfaces and the Santa Cruz Creek stream profile show evidence of Late Quaternary deformation. The T1 surface (lowest terrace surface) is offset vertically 3.5m across the Los Alamos/Baseline fault, the T2 surface is offset 7m vertically across this feature, and the T2 and T3 terraces terminate abruptly at the Little Pine Fault indicating Quaternary displacement across these structures. Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating is being used to date the terraces in order to calculate rates of uplift and deformation.

  17. Inflation-predictable behavior and co-eruption deformation at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooner, Scott L.; Chadwick, William W.

    2016-12-01

    Deformation of the ground surface at active volcanoes provides information about magma movements at depth. Improved seafloor deformation measurements between 2011 and 2015 documented a fourfold increase in magma supply and confirmed that Axial Seamount’s eruptive behavior is inflation-predictable, probably triggered by a critical level of magmatic pressure. A 2015 eruption was successfully forecast on the basis of this deformation pattern and marked the first time that deflation and tilt were captured in real time by a new seafloor cabled observatory, revealing the timing, location, and volume of eruption-related magma movements. Improved modeling of the deformation suggests a steeply dipping prolate-spheroid pressure source beneath the eastern caldera that is consistent with the location of the zone of highest melt within the subcaldera magma reservoir determined from multichannel seismic results.

  18. Ground-based and spacecraft observations of lightning activity on Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenko, V.; Mylostna, C.; Konovalenko, A.; Zarka, P.; Fischer, G.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Litvinenko, G.; Rucker, H.; Sidorchuk, M.; Ryabov, B.; Vavriv, D.; Ryabov, V.; Cecconi, B.; Coffre, A.; Denis, L.; Fabrice, C.; Pallier, L.; Schneider, J.; Kozhyn, R.; Vinogradov, V.; Mukha, D.; Weber, R.; Shevchenko, V.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2012-02-01

    In late 2007, Saturn electrostatic discharges (SED) were simultaneously observed at the radio telescope UTR-2 and with the Cassini spacecraft. Observations at UTR-2 were performed with a multichannel receiver in the frequency range 12-33 MHz, and those performed on Cassini-with a swept frequency receiver that is part of the RPWS (Radio and Plasma Wave Science) instrument in the frequency band 1.8-16 MHz. We got a very good coincidence between data of UTR-2 and Cassini. It is shown for the first time that ground-based radio astronomy lets us detect Saturn's lightning with a high degree of reliability despite terrestrial interferences. This is the necessary basis for further detailed study of the temporal and spectral characteristics of the SEDs with ground based radio telescopes. Based on six observation sessions, several parameters of SEDs were determined, in particularly a correlation of 0.77±0.15 between the average intensity of storms and the e-folding time.

  19. COSMO-SkyMed sensor constellation and GPS data to study the source responsible of ground deformation beneath the urban area of Naples (Southern Italy) in 2012-2013.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, Susi

    2016-04-01

    To understand uplift phenomenon occurred during the April 2012 - January 2013 time interval at Campi Flegrei caldera, we exploited the displacement time series obtained by processing 90 SAR images acquired from the COSMO-SkyMed sensor constellation along ascending orbits via the well-known DInSAR algorithm referred to as SBAS algorithm, and the measurements provided by 14 continuous GPS stations deployed within the caldera and belonging to the permanent INGV-OV monitoring network. In particular, the caldera has shown a rapid uplift of about 6 cm with a peak rate of about 3 cm/month in December 2012. This event led the Italian Civil Protection to raise the alert level of the volcano from green to yellow. Using a novel geodetic inversion technique we imaged the kinematics of the intrusion of a magmatic sill beneath the town of Pozzuoli at a depth of about 3100 m. The retrieved kinematics was then used as input to infer the dynamics of the sill intrusion using a recently developed numerical model. The best fit obtained by non-linear inverse approach that consider a time-varying deformation field is a penny-shaped source located at a depth of 3100 m. To study the detail of the intrusion process we have applied a geodetic imaging technique to determine the spatial and temporal kinematics of the ground deformation source in the selected period. The retrieved temporal pattern of the source geometry reflects that of a growing sill that, at the end of the considered period, has a roughly elliptical geometry with an extension of about 6 km in the EW direction and about 4 km in the NS one. The maximum aperture of the sill is of about 30 cm at its center. To understand the dynamics of this phenomenon we used a numerical model of the emplacement of a magmatic sill, to fit the retrieved geometry. The parameters to be determined are: the average magma viscosity, the amount of magma already present in the sill before the 2012-2013 episode and the magma injection rate. Results show

  20. Inhibitory activity of Syzygium aromaticum and Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf. essential oils against Listeria monocytogenes inoculated in bovine ground meat

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Thales Leandro Coutinho; das Graças Cardoso, Maria; de Araújo Soares, Rodrigo; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf; Tebaldi, Victor Maximiliano Reis

    2013-01-01

    This research evaluated the antimicrobial effect of the clove (Syzygium aromaticum) and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf.) essential oils (EOs) against Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 growth added to bovine ground meat stored under refrigeration (5 ± 2 °C) for three days. The EOs, extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), were tested in vitro using an agar well diffusion methodology for determination of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). The MIC concentrations for both essential oils on culture tested of L. monocytogenes were 1.56%. The EOs concentrations applied in contaminated ground beef were 1.56, 3.125 and 6.25% (w/v) based on MIC levels and possible activity reductions by food constituents. The bacteria populations were significantly reduced (p ≤ 0.05) after one day of storage in ground meat samples treated with clove and lemongrass EOs at concentrations of 1.56%. There were no significant counts of L. monocytogenes in samples at the other concentrations of the two oils applied after the second day of storage. The sensory acceptability evaluation of the bovine ground meat samples treated with EOs showed that the addition at concentrations higher than 1.56% promote undesirable alterations of taste, odor and characteristic color. The application of EOs at low concentrations in food products can be used in combination with other preservation methods, such as refrigeration, to control pathogens and spoilage bacteria during shelf-life; which goes according to current market trends, where consumers are requesting natural products. PMID:24294222

  1. Inhibitory activity of Syzygium aromaticum and Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf. essential oils against Listeria monocytogenes inoculated in bovine ground meat.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Thales Leandro Coutinho; das Graças Cardoso, Maria; de Araújo Soares, Rodrigo; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf; Tebaldi, Victor Maximiliano Reis

    2013-01-01

    This research evaluated the antimicrobial effect of the clove (Syzygium aromaticum) and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf.) essential oils (EOs) against Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 growth added to bovine ground meat stored under refrigeration (5 ± 2 °C) for three days. The EOs, extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), were tested in vitro using an agar well diffusion methodology for determination of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). The MIC concentrations for both essential oils on culture tested of L. monocytogenes were 1.56%. The EOs concentrations applied in contaminated ground beef were 1.56, 3.125 and 6.25% (w/v) based on MIC levels and possible activity reductions by food constituents. The bacteria populations were significantly reduced (p ≤ 0.05) after one day of storage in ground meat samples treated with clove and lemongrass EOs at concentrations of 1.56%. There were no significant counts of L. monocytogenes in samples at the other concentrations of the two oils applied after the second day of storage. The sensory acceptability evaluation of the bovine ground meat samples treated with EOs showed that the addition at concentrations higher than 1.56% promote undesirable alterations of taste, odor and characteristic color. The application of EOs at low concentrations in food products can be used in combination with other preservation methods, such as refrigeration, to control pathogens and spoilage bacteria during shelf-life; which goes according to current market trends, where consumers are requesting natural products.

  2. In vitro and in vivo thermal activation of steroid-receptor complexes from rats and ground squirrels (Spermophilus citellus).

    PubMed

    Zivadinović, D; Andjus, R K

    1995-02-01

    Using 3H-labelled triamcinolone acetonide (3HTA, synthetic steroid hormone), it was shown that the in vitro time course kinetics of thermal activation of 3HTA-receptor complexes exhibited the same temperature dependence in liver cytosols prepared from hibernating ground squirrels (Spermophilus citellus) as in cytosols from the rat. When 3HTA was injected in vivo to animals hibernating with a body temperature of 3 degrees C, the activation and nuclear uptake of the in vivo formed steroid-receptor complexes proceeded at a slow rate, comparable to the one predicted by in vitro studies. In the hibernator, the results are not indicative of adaptive modifications at the level of thermal activation, but prove that steroid action does proceed at a temperature incompatible with hypothermic survival in the nonhibernator.

  3. Reading Salt Activates Gustatory Brain Regions: fMRI Evidence for Semantic Grounding in a Novel Sensory Modality

    PubMed Central

    González, Julio; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Bustamante, Juan Carlos; Costumero, Víctor; Parcet, María Antonia; Ávila, César

    2012-01-01

    Because many words are typically used in the context of their referent objects and actions, distributed cortical circuits for these words may bind information about their form with perceptual and motor aspects of their meaning. Previous work has demonstrated such semantic grounding for sensorimotor, visual, auditory, and olfactory knowledge linked to words, which is manifest in activation of the corresponding areas of the cortex. Here, we explore the brain basis of gustatory semantic links of words whose meaning is primarily related to taste. In a blocked functional magnetic resonance imaging design, Spanish taste words and control words matched for a range of factors (including valence, arousal, imageability, frequency of use, number of letters and syllables) were presented to 59 right-handed participants in a passive reading task. Whereas all the words activated the left inferior frontal (BA44/45) and the posterior middle and superior temporal gyri (BA21/22), taste-related words produced a significantly stronger activation in these same areas and also in the anterior insula, frontal operculum, lateral orbitofrontal gyrus, and thalamus among others. As these areas comprise primary and secondary gustatory cortices, we conclude that the meaning of taste words is grounded in distributed cortical circuits reaching into areas that process taste sensations. PMID:22123940

  4. Developing Long-Term Physical Activity Participation: A Grounded Theory Study with African American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Amy E.; Buckworth, Janet; Katz, Mira L.; Willis, Sharla K.; Odoms-Young, Angela; Heaney, Catherine A.

    2009-01-01

    Regular physical activity is linked to a reduced risk of obesity and chronic disease. African American women bear a disproportionate burden from these conditions and many do not get the recommended amount of physical activity. Long-term success of interventions to initiate and maintain a physically active lifestyle among African American women has…

  5. Enhancement of sub-daily positioning solutions for surface deformation surveillance at El Hierro volcano (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prates, G.; García, A.; Fernández-Ros, A.; Marrero, J. M.; Ortiz, R.; Berrocoso, M.

    2013-06-01

    El Hierro Island in the Canary Archipelago recently experienced a submerged eruption a few kilometers off its southern shore, detected 2011 October 10 on the island's south-rift alignment. The seismic activity suddenly increased around mid 2011 July, and ground deformation was then detected on the only geodetic benchmark that is continuously observed by global navigation satellite systems techniques and provides public data access. Based on that information, several other global navigation satellite system signal receivers were deployed on the island to provide continuous observation. For data collected by these receivers, a processing strategy was applied to achieve millimeter-level half-hourly positioning solutions. Position updates every 24 h are satisfactory to determine tectonic-plates' velocities. Updates near 1 s or less are required to characterize seismic waves. In between, minute-level updates are well suited for monitoring active volcano's inflation or deflation, providing an optimal time resolution of the local ground deformation. In half-hourly positioning solutions, the heterogeneous satellites' distribution in their orbital planes gives different constraints during satellite-constellation revolution, which can bias the solutions. Also, several geophysical influences can bias the solutions, including those related to gravitational movements. These influences have mostly semi-diurnal periodicities and may be considered Gaussian colored noise on the position's time series. Daily solutions that average out these influences can be applied in active volcanoes, but they can impose some limitations because they average the daily deformation, and the update waiting time is not suitable when near real-time surveillance is mandatory. These semi-diurnal biases do need to be removed or minimized to achieve millimeter-level sub-daily positioning solutions, however, and to do so, a discrete Kalman filter was applied to enhance the half-hourly positioning solutions

  6. Movement and fate of chlorinated solvents in ground water; research activities at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fusillo, T.V.; Ehlke, T.A.; Martin, Mary

    1987-01-01

    The USGS, through its Toxic Waste--Ground-Water Contamination Program, is undertaking an interdisciplinary research study of contaminants. The purpose of the study is to gain a better understanding of the chemical, physical, and biological processes that affect the movement and fate of these contaminants in groundwater. The study is being conducted at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, where metal plating and metal etching wastes have contaminated part of the glacial stratified drift aquifers. Major areas of research at the site are described, including: (1) distribution and movement of chlorinated solvents in groundwater, (2) behavior of chlorinated solvents in the unsaturated zone, (3) geochemistry of the contaminated groundwater, and (4) microbial transformations of chlorinated solvents. (Author 's abstract)

  7. Application of the Deformation Information System for automated analysis and mapping of mining terrain deformations - case study from SW Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blachowski, Jan; Grzempowski, Piotr; Milczarek, Wojciech; Nowacka, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring, mapping and modelling of mining induced terrain deformations are important tasks for quantifying and minimising threats that arise from underground extraction of useful minerals and affect surface infrastructure, human safety, the environment and security of the mining operation itself. The number of methods and techniques used for monitoring and analysis of mining terrain deformations is wide and expanding with the progress in geographical information technologies. These include for example: terrestrial geodetic measurements, Global Navigation Satellite Systems, remote sensing, GIS based modelling and spatial statistics, finite element method modelling, geological modelling, empirical modelling using e.g. the Knothe theory, artificial neural networks, fuzzy logic calculations and other. The presentation shows the results of numerical modelling and mapping of mining terrain deformations for two cases of underground mining sites in SW Poland, hard coal one (abandoned) and copper ore (active) using the functionalities of the Deformation Information System (DIS) (Blachowski et al, 2014 @ http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2014/EGU2014-7949.pdf). The functionalities of the spatial data modelling module of DIS have been presented and its applications in modelling, mapping and visualising mining terrain deformations based on processing of measurement data (geodetic and GNSS) for these two cases have been characterised and compared. These include, self-developed and implemented in DIS, automation procedures for calculating mining terrain subsidence with different interpolation techniques, calculation of other mining deformation parameters (i.e. tilt, horizontal displacement, horizontal strain and curvature), as well as mapping mining terrain categories based on classification of the values of these parameters as used in Poland. Acknowledgments. This work has been financed from the National Science Centre Project "Development of a numerical method of

  8. In-situ monitoring of deformation of clayey and volcanic sequences in the lacustrine plain of Iztapalapa, Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreon-Freyre, D.; Cerca, M.; Barrientos, B.; Gutierrez, R.; Blancas, D.

    2012-12-01

    Major cities of Central Mexico with lowering of land elevation problems are located in inter-volcanic and fault bounded basins within the central Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB). The most representative and studied case of ground deformation is Mexico City, where the Iztapalapa Municipality presents the highest population density. This area is located over the geological contact between the "Sierra de Santa Catarina" volcanic range and a lacustrine plain. Filling of lacustrine basins includes silty and clayey sediments as well as pyroclastic deposits (coarse and fine grained) and volcanic rocks layers. We used Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and MASW prospection to evaluate contrasts in the physical properties of fine grained soils and identify geometry of the deformational features and implemented a mechanical system for in situ monitoring in fractured sites. Deformational features in this basin reflect an interplay between the geological history (depositional conditions), load history, seismic activity, and faulting. Plastic mechanical behaviour predominates in these clayey sediments and differential deformation locally triggers brittle fracturing and/or subsidence of the surface. In this work we present the results of monitoring and characterization of ground deformation and fracturing in different sequences, our results show a dynamic interplay between the mechanisms of ground fracturing and the stress history of sedimentary sequences. Relating the mechanical behaviour of the studied sequences with variations of physical and geological properties should be taken into account to estimate land level lowering and risk of fracturing for urban development planning.

  9. Bunionette deformity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Bruce E; Nicholson, Christopher W

    2007-05-01

    The bunionette, or tailor's bunion, is a lateral prominence of the fifth metatarsal head. Most commonly, bunionettes are the result of a widened 4-5 intermetatarsal angle with associated varus of the metatarsophalangeal joint. When symptomatic, these deformities often respond to nonsurgical treatment methods, such as wider shoes and padding techniques. When these methods are unsuccessful, surgical treatment is based on preoperative radiographs and associated lesions, such as hyperkeratoses. In rare situations, a simple lateral eminence resection is appropriate; however, the risk of recurrence or overresection is high with this technique. Patients with a lateral bow to the fifth metatarsal are treated with a distal chevron-type osteotomy. A widened 4-5 intermetatarsal angle often requires a diaphyseal osteotomy for correction.

  10. Constraining fault activity by investigating tectonically-deformed Quaternary palaeoshorelines using a synchronous correlation method: the Capo D'Orlando Fault as a case study (NE Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschis, Marco; Roberts, Gerald P.; Robertson, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Long-term curstal extension rates, accommodated by active normal faults, can be constrained by investigating Late Quaternary vertical movements. Sequences of marine terraces tectonically deformed by active faults mark the interaction between tectonic activity, sea-level changes and active faulting throughout the Quaternary (e.g. Armijo et al., 1996, Giunta et al, 2011, Roberts et al., 2013). Crustal deformation can be calculated over multiple seismic cycles by mapping Quaternary tectonically-deformed palaeoshorelines, both in the hangingwall and footwall of active normal faults (Roberts et al., 2013). Here we use a synchronous correlation method between palaeoshorelines elevations and the ages of sea-level highstands (see Roberts et al., 2013 for further details) which takes advantage of the facts that (i) sea-level highstands are not evenly-spaced in time, yet must correlate with palaeoshorelines that are commonly not evenly-spaced in elevation, and (ii) that older terraces may be destroyed and/or overprinted by younger highstands, so that the next higher or lower paleoshoreline does not necessarily correlate with the next older or younger sea-level highstand. We investigated a flight of Late Quaternary marine terraces deformed by normal faulting as a result of the Capo D'Orlando Fault in NE Sicily (e.g. Giunta et al., 2011). This fault lies within the Calabrian Arc which has experienced damaging seismic events such as the 1908 Messina Straits earthquake ~ Mw 7. Our mapping and previous mapping (Giunta et al. (2011) demonstrate that the elevations of marine terraces inner edges change along the strike the NE - SW oriented normal fault. This confirms active deformation on the Capo D'Orlando Fault, strongly suggesting that it should be added into the Database of Individual Seismogenic Sources (DISS, Basili et al., 2008). Giunta et al. (2011) suggested that uplift rates and hence faults lip-rates vary through time for this examples. We update the ages assigned to

  11. Study of Droplet Activation in Thin Clouds Using Ground-based Raman Lidar and Ancillary Remote Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosoldi, Marco; Madonna, Fabio; Gumà Claramunt, Pilar; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2015-04-01

    Studies on global climate change show that the effects of aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) on the Earth's radiation balance and climate, also known as indirect aerosol effects, are the most uncertain among all the effects involving the atmospheric constituents and processes (Stocker et al., IPCC, 2013). Droplet activation is the most important and challenging process in the understanding of ACI. It represents the direct microphysical link between aerosols and clouds and it is probably the largest source of uncertainty in estimating indirect aerosol effects. An accurate estimation of aerosol-clouds microphysical and optical properties in proximity and within the cloud boundaries represents a good frame for the study of droplet activation. This can be obtained by using ground-based profiling remote sensing techniques. In this work, a methodology for the experimental investigation of droplet activation, based on ground-based multi-wavelength Raman lidar and Doppler radar technique, is presented. The study is focused on the observation of thin liquid water clouds, which are low or midlevel super-cooled clouds characterized by a liquid water path (LWP) lower than about 100 gm-2(Turner et al., 2007). These clouds are often optically thin, which means that ground-based Raman lidar allows the detection of the cloud top and of the cloud structure above. Broken clouds are primarily inspected to take advantage of their discontinuous structure using ground based remote sensing. Observations are performed simultaneously with multi-wavelength Raman lidars, a cloud Doppler radar and a microwave radiometer at CIAO (CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory: www.ciao.imaa.cnr.it), in Potenza, Southern Italy (40.60N, 15.72E, 760 m a.s.l.). A statistical study of the variability of optical properties and humidity in the transition from cloudy regions to cloud-free regions surrounding the clouds leads to the identification of threshold values for the optical properties, enabling the

  12. Role of coupled cataclasis-pressure solution deformation in microearthquake activity along the creeping segment of the SAF: Inferences from studies of the SAFOD core samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadizadeh, J.; Gratier, J.; Renard, F.; Mittempregher, S.; di Toro, G.

    2009-12-01

    Rocks encountered in the SAFOD drill hole represent deformation in the southern-most extent of the creeping segment of the SAF north of the Parkfield. At the site and toward the northwest the SAF is characterized by aseismic creep as well as strain release through repeating microearthquakes M<3. The activity is shown to be mostly distributed as clusters aligned in the slip direction, and occurring at depths of between 3 to 5 kilometers. It has been suggested that the events are due to frequent moment release from high strength asperities constituting only about 1% or less of the total fault surface area within an otherwise weak fault gouge. We studied samples selected from the SAFOD phase 3 cores (3142m -3296m MD) using high resolution scanning electron microscopy, cathodoluminescence imaging, X-ray fluorescence mapping, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The observed microstructural deformation that is apparently relevant to the seismological data includes clear evidence of cyclic deformation events, cataclastic flow, and pressure solution creep with attendant vein sealing and fracture healing fabrics. Friction testing of drill cuttings and modeling by others suggest that the overall creep behavior in shale-siltstone gouge may be due to low bulk friction coefficient of 0.2-0.4 for the fault rock. Furthermore, the low resistivity zone extending to about 5km beneath the SAFOD-Middle Mountain area is believed to consist of a pod of fluid-filled fractured and porous rocks. Our microstructural data indicate that the foliated shale-siltstone cataclasites are, in a highly heterogeneous way, more porous and permeable than the host rock and therefore provide for structurally controlled enhanced fluid-rock interactions. This is consistent with the observed pressure solution deformation and the microstructural indications of transiently high fluid pressures. We hypothesize that while the friction laws defining stable sliding are prevalent in bulk deformation of the

  13. Integrated Active Fire Retrievals and Biomass Burning Emissions Using Complementary Near-Coincident Ground, Airborne and Spaceborne Sensor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Wilfrid; Ellicott, Evan; Ichoku, Charles; Ellison, Luke; Dickinson, Matthew B.; Ottmar, Roger D.; Clements, Craig; Hall, Dianne; Ambrosia, Vincent; Kremens, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Ground, airborne and spaceborne data were collected for a 450 ha prescribed fire implemented on 18 October 2011 at the Henry W. Coe State Park in California. The integration of various data elements allowed near coincident active fire retrievals to be estimated. The Autonomous Modular Sensor-Wildfire (AMS) airborne multispectral imaging system was used as a bridge between ground and spaceborne data sets providing high quality reference information to support satellite fire retrieval error analyses and fire emissions estimates. We found excellent agreement between peak fire radiant heat flux data (less than 1% error) derived from near-coincident ground radiometers and AMS. Both MODIS and GOES imager active fire products were negatively influenced by the presence of thick smoke, which was misclassified as cloud by their algorithms, leading to the omission of fire pixels beneath the smoke, and resulting in the underestimation of their retrieved fire radiative power (FRP) values for the burn plot, compared to the reference airborne data. Agreement between airborne and spaceborne FRP data improved significantly after correction for omission errors and atmospheric attenuation, resulting in as low as 5 difference between AquaMODIS and AMS. Use of in situ fuel and fire energy estimates in combination with a collection of AMS, MODIS, and GOES FRP retrievals provided a fuel consumption factor of 0.261 kg per MJ, total energy release of 14.5 x 10(exp 6) MJ, and total fuel consumption of 3.8 x 10(exp 6) kg. Fire emissions were calculated using two separate techniques, resulting in as low as 15 difference for various species

  14. Structure and deformation of the Southern Taiwan accretionary prism: The active submarine Fangliao Fault Zone offshore west Hengchun Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffontaines, Benoit; Liu, Char-Shine; Hsu, Ho-Han

    2016-12-01

    What is the structural geometry of the southern Taiwan transition zone from the Manila subduction offshore to the Taiwan onshore collision, specifically in the western flank of the Hengchun peninsula that corresponds to the summit of the Manila subduction accretionary prism? This paper aims to decipher the onshore/offshore structures and tectonic deformation that occur west of the Hengchun Ridge through both detailed topographic analyses and interpretation of numerous old and new seismic profiles. From a geomorphic point of view, both Fangliao and Hongchai submarine canyons have different structural and landslide implications. The Fangliao Canyon is guided by a N-S elongated mud diapir (the Fangliao Ridge), intruding an inferred N010°E trending, left lateral strike-slip fault zone. Conversely, the arcuate and concave shape of the Hongchai Canyon appear to follow the crown and the northern boundary of a newly recognized Hongchai submarine landslide situated on the steep western flank of the onshore asymmetric Hengchun Anticline. Our results highlight that both Fangliao and Hengchun Faults are linear, near-vertical left-lateral strike-slip faults. They converge onshore to the Chaochou Fault. This study demonstrates that neotectonics combine with morphostructural analysis of the submarine canyon drainages lead to a better comprehension of the present deformation in the northern part of the Manila accretionary prism.

  15. Improving the mechanical properties of Zr-based bulk metallic glass by controlling the activation energy for β-relaxation through plastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Nozomu; Todaka, Yoshikazu Umemoto, Minoru; Yokoyama, Yoshihiko

    2014-09-29

    The mechanism of plastic deformation in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is widely believed to be based on a shear transformation zone (STZ). This model assumes that a shear-induced atomic rearrangement occurs at local clusters that are a few to hundreds of atoms in size. It was recently postulated that the potential energy barrier for STZ activation, W{sub STZ}, calculated using the cooperative shear model, is equivalent to the activation energy for β-relaxation, E{sub β}. This result suggested that the fundamental process for STZ activation is the mechanically activated β-relaxation. Since the E{sub β} value and the glass transition temperature T{sub g} of BMGs have a linear relation, that is, because E{sub β} ≈ 26RT{sub g}, the composition of the BMG determines the ease with which the STZ can be activated. Enthalpy relaxation experiments revealed that the BMG Zr{sub 50}Cu{sub 40}Al{sub 10} when deformed by high-pressure torsion (HPT) has a lower E{sub β} of 101 kJ/mol. The HPT-processed samples accordingly exhibited tensile plastic elongation (0.34%) and marked decreases in their yield strength (330 MPa). These results suggest that mechanically induced structural defects (i.e., the free volume and the anti-free volume) effectively act to reduce W{sub STZ} and increase the number of STZs activated during tensile testing to accommodate the plastic strain without requiring a change in the composition of the BMG. Thus, this study shows quantitatively that mechanically induced structural defects can overcome the compositional limitations of E{sub β} (or W{sub STZ}) and result in improvements in the mechanical properties of the BMG.

  16. Factors Involved in Iranian Women Heads of Household’s Health Promotion Activities: A Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Forough; Seyedfatemi, Naima; Rezaei, Mahboubeh

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to explore and describe the factors involved in Iranian women heads of household’s health promotion activities. Grounded theory was used as the method. Sixteen women heads of household were recruited. Data were generated by semi structured interviews. Our findings indicated that remainder of resources (money, time and energy) alongside perceived severity of health risk were two main factors whereas women’s personal and socio-economic characteristics were two contextual factors involved in these women's health promotion activities. To help these women improve their health status, we recommended that the government, non-governmental organizations and health care professionals provide them with required resources and increase their knowledge by holding training sessions. PMID:24039645

  17. Active layer and permafrost thermal regime in a patterned ground soil in Maritime Antarctica, and relationship with climate variability models.

    PubMed

    Chaves, D A; Lyra, G B; Francelino, M R; Silva, Ldb; Thomazini, A; Schaefer, Cegr

    2017-04-15

    Permafrost and active layer studies are important to understand and predict regional climate changes. The objectives of this work were: i) to characterize the soil thermal regime (active layer thickness and permafrost formation) and its interannual variability and ii) to evaluate the influence of different climate variability modes to the observed soil thermal regime in a patterned ground soil in Maritime Antarctica. The study was carried out at Keller Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica. Six soil temperatures probes were installed at different depths (10, 30 and 80cm) in the polygon center (Tc) and border (Tb) of a patterned ground soil. We applied cross-correlation analysis and standardized series were related to the Antarctic Oscillation Index (AAO). The estimated active layer thickness was approximately 0.75cm in the polygon border and 0.64cm in the center, indicating the presence of permafrost (within 80cm). Results indicate that summer and winter temperatures are becoming colder and warmer, respectively. Considering similar active layer thickness, the polygon border presented greater thawing days, resulting in greater vulnerability to warming, cooling faster than the center, due to its lower volumetric heat capacity (Cs). Cross-correlation analysis indicated statistically significant delay of 1day (at 10cm depth) in the polygon center, and 5days (at 80cm depth) for the thermal response between atmosphere and soil. Air temperature showed a delay of 5months with the climate variability models. The influence of southern winds from high latitudes, in the south facing slopes, favored freeze in the upper soil layers, and also contributed to keep permafrost closer to the surface. The observed cooling trend is linked to the regional climate variability modes influenced by atmospheric circulation, although longer monitoring period is required to reach a more precise scenario.

  18. Validation of an accelerated 'demons' algorithm for deformable image registration in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, He; Dong, Lei; O'Daniel, Jennifer; Mohan, Radhe; Garden, Adam S.; Kian Ang, K.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Bonnen, Mark; Chang, Joe Y.; Cheung, Rex

    2005-06-01

    A greyscale-based fully automatic deformable image registration algorithm, originally known as the 'demons' algorithm, was implemented for CT image-guided radiotherapy. We accelerated the algorithm by introducing an 'active force' along with an adaptive force strength adjustment during the iterative process. These improvements led to a 40% speed improvement over the original algorithm and a high tolerance of large organ deformations. We used three methods to evaluate the accuracy of the algorithm. First, we created a set of mathematical transformations for a series of patient's CT images. This provides a 'ground truth' solution for quantitatively validating the deformable image registration algorithm. Second, we used a physically deformable pelvic phantom, which can measure deformed objects under different conditions. The results of these two tests allowed us to quantify the accuracy of the deformable registration. Validation results showed that more than 96% of the voxels were within 2 mm of their intended shifts for a prostate and a head-and-neck patient case. The mean errors and standard deviations were 0.5 mm ± 1.5 mm and 0.2 mm ± 0.6 mm, respectively. Using the deformable pelvis phantom, the result showed a tracking accuracy of better than 1.5 mm for 23 seeds implanted in a phantom prostate that was deformed by inflation of a rectal balloon. Third, physician-drawn contours outlining the tumour volumes and certain anatomical structures in the original CT images were deformed along with the CT images acquired during subsequent treatments or during a different respiratory phase for a lung cancer case. Visual inspection of the positions and shapes of these deformed contours agreed well with human judgment. Together, these results suggest that the accelerated demons algorithm has significant potential for delineating and tracking doses in targets and critical structures during CT-guided radiotherapy.

  19. Validation of an accelerated 'demons' algorithm for deformable image registration in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, He; Dong, Lei; O'Daniel, Jennifer; Mohan, Radhe; Garden, Adam S; Ang, K Kian; Kuban, Deborah A; Bonnen, Mark; Chang, Joe Y; Cheung, Rex

    2005-06-21

    A greyscale-based fully automatic deformable image registration algorithm, originally known as the 'demons' algorithm, was implemented for CT image-guided radiotherapy. We accelerated the algorithm by introducing an 'active force' along with an adaptive force strength adjustment during the iterative process. These improvements led to a 40% speed improvement over the original algorithm and a high tolerance of large organ deformations. We used three methods to evaluate the accuracy of the algorithm. First, we created a set of mathematical transformations for a series of patient's CT images. This provides a 'ground truth' solution for quantitatively validating the deformable image registration algorithm. Second, we used a physically deformable pelvic phantom, which can measure deformed objects under different conditions. The results of these two tests allowed us to quantify the accuracy of the deformable registration. Validation results showed that more than 96% of the voxels were within 2 mm of their intended shifts for a prostate and a head-and-neck patient case. The mean errors and standard deviations were 0.5 mm+/-1.5 mm and 0.2 mm+/-0.6 mm, respectively. Using the deformable pelvis phantom, the result showed a tracking accuracy of better than 1.5 mm for 23 seeds implanted in a phantom prostate that was deformed by inflation of a rectal balloon. Third, physician-drawn contours outlining the tumour volumes and certain anatomical structures in the original CT images were deformed along with the CT images acquired during subsequent treatments or during a different respiratory phase for a lung cancer case. Visual inspection of the positions and shapes of these deformed contours agreed well with human judgment. Together, these results suggest that the accelerated demons algorithm has significant potential for delineating and tracking doses in targets and critical structures during CT-guided radiotherapy.

  20. Surface deformation in Houston, Texas using GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelkemeir, Richard; Khan, Shuhab D.; Burke, Kevin

    2010-07-01

    Surface deformation in the Houston area has been quantified by using a variety of methods including LIDAR, InSAR, extensometers, drilling (to approximately 100 m), and Ground Penetrating Radar. In this paper we report on GPS data acquired during the period between 1995 and 2005 that found evidence of ongoing subsidence (up to - 56 mm/year) in northwestern Houston and of possible horizontal surface movement towards the Gulf of Mexico (up to 6 mm/year). We describe the methods of data-processing used in the study and speculate on the possibility that the active elevation of salt domes, mainly at the south and east of the city, may indirectly influence other surface movements including fault movements and subsidence over areas > 1 km 2. Making use of our observations and analysis could help in natural hazard mitigation in the Houston area and possibly also indicate approaches to surface subsidence study that might be used in other urban areas.

  1. Spatiotemporal analysis of soil moisture in using active and passive remotely sensed data and ground observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Fang, B.; Lakshmi, V.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: Soil moisture plays a vital role in ecosystem, biological processes, climate, weather and agriculture. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) improves data by combining the advantages and avoiding the limitation of passive microwave remote sensing (low resolution), and active microwave (challenge of soil moisture retrieval). This study will advance the knowledge of the application of soil moisture by using the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) data as well as data collected at Walnut Gulch Arizona in August 2015 during SMAPVEX15. Specifically, we will analyze the 5m radar data from Unmanned Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) to study spatial variability within the PALS radiometer pixel. SMAPVEX12/15 and SMAP data will also be analyzed to evaluate disaggregation algorithms. The analytical findings will provide valuable information for policy-makers to initiate and adjust protocols and regulations for protecting land resources and improving environmental conditions. Keywords: soil moisture, Remote Sensing (RS), spatial statistic

  2. JPSS Proving Ground Activities with NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, L. A.; Smith, M. R.; Fuell, K.; Stano, G. T.; LeRoy, A.; Berndt, E.

    2015-12-01

    Instruments aboard the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) series of satellites will provide imagery and other data sets relevant to operational weather forecasts. To prepare current and future weather forecasters in application of these data sets, Proving Ground activities have been established that demonstrate future JPSS capabilities through use of similar sensors aboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites, and the S-NPP mission. As part of these efforts, NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center in Huntsville, Alabama partners with near real-time providers of S-NPP products (e.g., NASA, UW/CIMSS, UAF/GINA, etc.) to demonstrate future capabilities of JPSS. This includes training materials and product distribution of multi-spectral false color composites of the visible, near-infrared, and infrared bands of MODIS and VIIRS. These are designed to highlight phenomena of interest to help forecasters digest the multispectral data provided by the VIIRS sensor. In addition, forecasters have been trained on the use of the VIIRS day-night band, which provides imagery of moonlit clouds, surface, and lights emitted by human activities. Hyperspectral information from the S-NPP/CrIS instrument provides thermodynamic profiles that aid in the detection of extremely cold air aloft, helping to map specific aviation hazards at high latitudes. Hyperspectral data also support the estimation of ozone concentration, which can highlight the presence of much drier stratospheric air, and map its interaction with mid-latitude or tropical cyclones to improve predictions of their strengthening or decay. Proving Ground activities are reviewed, including training materials and methods that have been provided to forecasters, and forecaster feedback on these products that has been acquired through formal, detailed assessment of their applicability to a given forecast threat or task. Future opportunities for collaborations around the delivery of training are proposed

  3. Improvements on GPS Location Cluster Analysis for the Prediction of Large Carnivore Feeding Activities: Ground-Truth Detection Probability and Inclusion of Activity Sensor Measures

    PubMed Central

    Blecha, Kevin A.; Alldredge, Mat W.

    2015-01-01

    Animal space use studies using GPS collar technology are increasingly incorporating behavior based analysis of spatio-temporal data in order to expand inferences of resource use. GPS location cluster analysis is one such technique applied to large carnivores to identify the timing and location of feeding events. For logistical and financial reasons, researchers often implement predictive models for identifying these events. We present two separate improvements for predictive models that future practitioners can implement. Thus far, feeding prediction models have incorporated a small range of covariates, usually limited to spatio-temporal characteristics of the GPS data. Using GPS collared cougar (Puma concolor) we include activity sensor data as an additional covariate to increase prediction performance of feeding presence/absence. Integral to the predictive modeling of feeding events is a ground-truthing component, in which GPS location clusters are visited by human observers to confirm the presence or absence of feeding remains. Failing to account for sources of ground-truthing false-absences can bias the number of predicted feeding events to be low. Thus we account for some ground-truthing error sources directly in the model with covariates and when applying model predictions. Accounting for these errors resulted in a 10% increase in the number of clusters predicted to be feeding events. Using a double-observer design, we show that the ground-truthing false-absence rate is relatively low (4%) using a search delay of 2–60 days. Overall, we provide two separate improvements to the GPS cluster analysis techniques that can be expanded upon and implemented in future studies interested in identifying feeding behaviors of large carnivores. PMID:26398546

  4. Improvements on GPS Location Cluster Analysis for the Prediction of Large Carnivore Feeding Activities: Ground-Truth Detection Probability and Inclusion of Activity Sensor Measures.

    PubMed

    Blecha, Kevin A; Alldredge, Mat W

    2015-01-01

    Animal space use studies using GPS collar technology are increasingly incorporating behavior based analysis of spatio-temporal data in order to expand inferences of resource use. GPS location cluster analysis is one such technique applied to large carnivores to identify the timing and location of feeding events. For logistical and financial reasons, researchers often implement predictive models for identifying these events. We present two separate improvements for predictive models that future practitioners can implement. Thus far, feeding prediction models have incorporated a small range of covariates, usually limited to spatio-temporal characteristics of the GPS data. Using GPS collared cougar (Puma concolor) we include activity sensor data as an additional covariate to increase prediction performance of feeding presence/absence. Integral to the predictive modeling of feeding events is a ground-truthing component, in which GPS location clusters are visited by human observers to confirm the presence or absence of feeding remains. Failing to account for sources of ground-truthing false-absences can bias the number of predicted feeding events to be low. Thus we account for some ground-truthing error sources directly in the model with covariates and when applying model predictions. Accounting for these errors resulted in a 10% increase in the number of clusters predicted to be feeding events. Using a double-observer design, we show that the ground-truthing false-absence rate is relatively low (4%) using a search delay of 2-60 days. Overall, we provide two separate improvements to the GPS cluster analysis techniques that can be expanded upon and implemented in future studies interested in identifying feeding behaviors of large carnivores.

  5. Effects of forest-management activities on runoff components and ground-water recharge to Quabbin Reservoir, central Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bent, G.C.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of forest-management activities (timber cutting and herbicide application) on runoff components (total streamflow, direct runoff, and base flow) and on ground-water recharge per unit area were evaluated for two separate paired drainage basins of Quabbin Reservoir in central Massachusetts. The Cadwell Creek study area, studied from 1962-1973, included an experimental basin (Upper Cadwell Creek) and a control basin (Lower Cadwell Creek). In the experimental basin, herbicide was applied to mixed oaks, northern hardwoods, and understory vegetation in different riparian zones during the summers of 1967 and 1968, and some pine plantations were thinned or clear-cut during the winter of 1967-1968. These forest-management activities decreased the total basal area by about 34%. The decrease in total basal area resulted in an increase in total streamflow, direct runoff (total streamflow minus base flow), and ground-water recharge for six dormant seasons (October-April) and six growing seasons (May-September) during 1968-1973. Base flow increased for three dormant seasons and two growing seasons during 1968-1970 and the dormant seasons of 1971 and 1973. Base flow accounted for 34% and direct runoff accounted for 66% of the 94 mm (15%) increase in total streamflow during water years 1968-1973. Sixty-one percent of this increase in total streamflow occurred in the dormant seasons. The Dickey Brook study area, studied from 1985-1989, included an experimental basin (Dickey Brook) and a control basin (Dickey Brook Tributary). Some pine plantations were thinned or clear-cut in the headwaters of the experimental basin from October 1986 to March 1987 and October to December 1988. These forest-management activities decreased the total basal area by 24% during 1986-1987 and an additional 8% during 1988. The decrease in total basal area resulted in an increase in total streamflow, base flow, and ground-water recharge for only one dormant season and one growing season in 1987

  6. Physical Activity and Fitness Knowledge Learning in Physical Education: Seeking a Common Ground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Senlin; Chen, Ang; Sun, Haichun; Zhu, Xihe

    2013-01-01

    Motivation to learn is a disposition developed through exposure to learning opportunities. Guided by the expectancy-value theory of Eccles and Wigfield (1995), this study examined the extent to which expectancy belief and task value influenced elementary school students' physical activity and knowledge learning in physical education (PE).…

  7. Quality assurance project plan for ground water monitoring activities managed by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPP) applies specifically to the field activities and laboratory analysis performed for all RCRA groundwater projects conducted by Hanford Technical Services. This QAPP is generic in approach and shall be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of individual groundwater monitoring plans.

  8. Estimation of ground water residence times in the Critical zone: insight from U activity ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabaux, Francois; Ackerer, Julien; Lucas, Yann; viville, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The use of radioactive disequilibria as tracers and chronometers of weathering processes and related mass transfers has been recognized since the 60'. The development, over the last two decades, of analytical methods for measuring very precisely U-series nuclides (especially, 234U, 230Th and 226Ra) in environmental samples has opened up new scientific applications in Earth Surface Sciences. Here, we propose to present the potential of U activity ratios in surface waters as chronometer of water transfers at a watershed scale. This will be illustrated from studies performed at different scales, with the analysis of U activity ratios in surface waters from small watersheds (Strengbach and Ringelbach watersheds in the Vosges Mountain, France) but also from watersheds of much more regional extension (e.g., the Upper Rhine basin or the Ganges basin). These various studies show that variations of U activity ratios in surface waters are mainly associated with 234U-238U fractionations occurring during the water transfer within the bedrock, which intensity depends on two main parameters: the petro-physical characteristics of the aquifer, principally the geometry of water-rock interfaces and the duration of the water-rock interactions. This readily explains why different U activity ratios (UAR) can be observed in the different aquifers of a continental hydrosystem and hence why UAR can be used to trace the source of river waters. For a hydrological system developed on a substratum marked by fairly homogeneous petro-physical characteristics, the main parameter controlling the UAR in waters draining such a system would be the duration of the water-rock interactions. Variations of UAR in stream or spring waters of such a system can therefore be modeled using simple reactive transport model, which allows the estimation of both the dissolution rate of the bedrock and the residence time of the waters within the aquifer.

  9. Vertical-axis rotations and deformation along the active strike-slip El Tigre Fault (Precordillera of San Juan, Argentina) assessed through palaeomagnetism and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazzito, Sabrina Y.; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Cortés, José M.; Terrizzano, Carla M.

    2017-03-01

    Palaeomagnetic data from poorly consolidated to non-consolidated late Cenozoic sediments along the central segment of the active El Tigre Fault (Central-Western Precordillera of the San Juan Province, Argentina) demonstrate broad cumulative deformation up to 450 m from the fault trace and reveal clockwise and anticlockwise vertical-axis rotations of variable magnitude. This deformation has affected in different amounts Miocene to late Pleistocene samples and indicates a complex kinematic pattern. Several inherited linear structures in the shear zone that are oblique to the El Tigre Fault may have acted as block boundary faults. Displacement along these faults may have resulted in a complex pattern of rotations. The maximum magnitude of rotation is a function of the age of the sediments sampled, with largest values corresponding to middle Miocene-lower Pliocene deposits and minimum values obtained from late Pleistocene deposits. The kinematic study is complemented by low-field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data to show that the local strain regime suggests a N-S stretching direction, subparallel to the strike of the main fault.

  10. Vertical-axis rotations and deformation along the active strike-slip El Tigre Fault (Precordillera of San Juan, Argentina) assessed through palaeomagnetism and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazzito, Sabrina Y.; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Cortés, José M.; Terrizzano, Carla M.

    2016-05-01

    Palaeomagnetic data from poorly consolidated to non-consolidated late Cenozoic sediments along the central segment of the active El Tigre Fault (Central-Western Precordillera of the San Juan Province, Argentina) demonstrate broad cumulative deformation up to ~450 m from the fault trace and reveal clockwise and anticlockwise vertical-axis rotations of variable magnitude. This deformation has affected in different amounts Miocene to late Pleistocene samples and indicates a complex kinematic pattern. Several inherited linear structures in the shear zone that are oblique to the El Tigre Fault may have acted as block boundary faults. Displacement along these faults may have resulted in a complex pattern of rotations. The maximum magnitude of rotation is a function of the age of the sediments sampled, with largest values corresponding to middle Miocene-lower Pliocene deposits and minimum values obtained from late Pleistocene deposits. The kinematic study is complemented by low-field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data to show that the local strain regime suggests a N-S stretching direction, subparallel to the strike of the main fault.

  11. Inventory of anthropogenic surface deformation measured by InSAR in the western U.S./Mexico and possible impacts on GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semple, A.; Pritchard, M. E.; Taylor, H.

    2014-12-01

    The western US and Mexico are deforming at several spatial scales that can be measured by ground and satellite observations like GPS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). Many GPS stations have been installed throughout this area to monitor ground deformation caused by large scale tectonic processes; however, several studies have noted that the data recorded at a GPS station can be contaminated by local, non-tectonic ground deformation. In this study, we use InSAR to examine deformation from various sources in the western US and Mexico. We chose this method due to the spatially large study area and the availability and temporal coverage of SAR imagery. We use SAR images acquired by the satellites Envisat, ERS-1 and ERS-2 over a time period from 1992-2010 to create several time series. Data from the ALOS satellite between 2006-2011 are also used in some areas. We use these time series analysis along with previously published results to observe and catalogue various sources of surface deformation in the western US and Mexico - from groundwater pumping, geothermal activity, mining, hydrocarbon production, and other sources. We then use these results to identify GPS stations that have potentially been contaminated by non-tectonic deformation signals. We document more than 150 distinct regions of non-tectonic and likely anthropogenic deformation. We have located 82 GPS stations within 20km of the center of at least one of the non-tectonic deformation signals we have identified. It is likely that the data from these 82 GPS stations have been contaminated by local anthropogenic deformation. Some examples of previously unpublished non-tectonic deformation we have seen in this study include but are not limited to, subsidence due to groundwater extraction in Jesus Garcia, Mexico, both uplift and subsidence due to natural gas extraction at Jonah Field in Sublette County, WY, and uplift due to a water recharge project in Tonopah, AZ.

  12. Estimating 3D variation in active-layer thickness beneath arctic streams using ground-penetrating radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brosten, T.R.; Bradford, J.H.; McNamara, J.P.; Gooseff, M.N.; Zarnetske, J.P.; Bowden, W.B.; Johnston, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    We acquired three-dimensional (3D) ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data across three stream sites on the North Slope, AK, in August 2005, to investigate the dependence of thaw depth on channel morphology. Data were migrated with mean velocities derived from multi-offset GPR profiles collected across a stream section within each of the 3D survey areas. GPR data interpretations from the alluvial-lined stream site illustrate greater thaw depths beneath riffle and gravel bar features relative to neighboring pool features. The peat-lined stream sites indicate the opposite; greater thaw depths beneath pools and shallower thaw beneath the connecting runs. Results provide detailed 3D geometry of active-layer thaw depths that can support hydrological studies seeking to quantify transport and biogeochemical processes that occur within the hyporheic zone.

  13. [The effects of antioxidants on the reflex from an eye-ground and electric activity of retina during intravitreal haemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Guliyeva, U

    2008-10-01

    The object of investigation was to study the reflex from an eye-ground, the character of the disorder of electric activity of retina during the experimental vitreous haemorrhage and the possibility of correction of these alterations by the antioxidants. The research was conducted on 5 month 300 chinchilla rabbits of male sex, weight 2.8-3.2 kg. The phenosan kali, superoxidedismutase (SOD), catalasa, "Hemaza", ditikarbomat natrium (DTKN), mannitol, tocopherol acetate, deferooxamin were used. The rabbits treated with the antioxidants complex and "Hemasa" showed the best dynamic of the restoration of the ophthalmological conditions. It was found that, vitreous haemorrhage considerably damaged the formation of ERG. Separate application of antioxidants: phenosan kali, SOD and mannitol restore the amplitude of ERG retina during intravitreal haemorrhage, not influencing the temporal parameters. The applica