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Sample records for activity hermiston oregon

  1. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.O.; Miller, R.L.; Patton, T.G.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Tolbert, V.R.; Feldman, D.L.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Morrissey, J.; Rickert, L.W.; Staub, W.P.; West, D.C.

    1993-02-01

    The Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) near Hermiston, Oregon, is one of eight US Army installations in the continental United States where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored, and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at UMDA consists of 11.6%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts), using a method based on five measures of risk for potential human health and ecosystem/environmental effects; the effectiveness and adequacy of emergency preparedness capabilities also played a key role in the FPEIS selection methodology. In some instances, the FPEIS included generic data and assumptions that were developed to allow a consistent comparison of potential impacts among programmatic alternatives and did not include detailed conditions at each of the eight installations. The purpose of this Phase 1 report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at UMDA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those included in the FPEIS. Specifically, this Phase 1 report is intended to either confirm or reject the validity of on-site disposal for the UMDA stockpile. Using the same computation methods as in the FPEIS, new population data were used to compute potential fatalities from hypothetical disposal accidents. Results indicate that onsite disposal is clearly preferable to either continued storage at UMDA or transportation of the UMDA stockpile to another depot for disposal.

  2. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon. Final Phase 1 environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.O.; Miller, R.L.; Patton, T.G.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Tolbert, V.R.; Feldman, D.L.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Morrissey, J.; Rickert, L.W.; Staub, W.P.; West, D.C.

    1993-02-01

    The Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) near Hermiston, Oregon, is one of eight US Army installations in the continental United States where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored, and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at UMDA consists of 11.6%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts), using a method based on five measures of risk for potential human health and ecosystem/environmental effects; the effectiveness and adequacy of emergency preparedness capabilities also played a key role in the FPEIS selection methodology. In some instances, the FPEIS included generic data and assumptions that were developed to allow a consistent comparison of potential impacts among programmatic alternatives and did not include detailed conditions at each of the eight installations. The purpose of this Phase 1 report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at UMDA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those included in the FPEIS. Specifically, this Phase 1 report is intended to either confirm or reject the validity of on-site disposal for the UMDA stockpile. Using the same computation methods as in the FPEIS, new population data were used to compute potential fatalities from hypothetical disposal accidents. Results indicate that onsite disposal is clearly preferable to either continued storage at UMDA or transportation of the UMDA stockpile to another depot for disposal.

  3. Energy conservation study on Lamb-Weston potato processing plant, Hermiston, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-03-21

    This report presents the findings of an energy study done at the Lamb-Weston potato processing plant in Hermiston, Oregon. The study includes all electrical energy using systems at the plant but does not address specifc modificiations to process equipment. The Hermiston plant receives raw potatoes and produces a mixture of pre-fried and frozen potato products, including french fries, breakfast products, and a dinner product. The plant contains all necessary equipment and processes to produce a finished product but does not have on-site, long-term cold storage. The Hermiston plant purchases electricity from the Umatilla Rural Electrical Association (REA) on two main services: a 12.7 KV, three phase service for the electric boiler, and a three phase, 480 volt service that provides electricity for all other functions in the main plant (the wheelturning load).

  4. Risk assessment for the Explosive Washout Lagoons (Site 4), Umatilla Depot Activity Hermiston, Oregon. Final report, Mar 91-Mar 92

    SciTech Connect

    Leinbach, A.; Enright, A.M.; Eaton, W.; Lemont, S.

    1992-03-01

    This document is the Risk Assessment (RA) for the Explosive Washout Lagoons (Site 4) at Umatilla Army Depot Activity (UMDA). The purpose of this RA is to address the potential future health risks posed by explosives-contaminated soil and groundwater associated with Site 4 in the absence of remediation, and to identify safe residual explosives concentrations (remedial action criteria) in soil if remediation is determined to be a requirement. This RA is not intended to address the remediation of contaminated groundwater; contaminated groundwater is addressed only to the extent that contaminants in Site 4 soil are affecting groundwater quality. The potential remediation of contaminated groundwater will be addressed in the installation-wide Baseline RA for UMDA. Based on the available data, explosives contamination appears to be widespread in soil near the lagoons and in groundwater at distances of over 650 yards from the lagoons. Three future land use scenarios-residential, light industrial, and military-and four potential future exposure pathways-soil ingestion, dust inhalation, dermal contact with soil, and groundwater ingestion-were evaluated in the RA to estimate potential future carcinogenic hazards. The results of RA indicate that remediation may be a requirement for soil at Site 4; therefore, remedial action criteria for soil were developed.

  5. Resource Contingency Program - Oregon : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hermiston Power Project.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-09-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility, industrial, and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. In 1990, to cover the outer range of potential load growth with new resources, BPA embarked upon the Resource Contingency Program (RCP). Instead of buying or building generating plants now, BPA has purchased options to acquire power later, if and when it is needed. The decision to acquire any of these option energy projects to fulfill statutory supply obligations will be influenced by Federal system load growth, the outcome of BPA`s Business Plan, required operational changes in Columbia-Snake River Hydroelectric facilities, and the loss of major generating resources. In September 1993, three option development agreements were signed with three proposed natural gas-fired, combined cycle combustion turbine CT projects near Chehalis and Satsop, Washington, and near Hermiston, Oregon. Together these three projects could supply BPA with 1,090 average megawatts (aMW) of power. Under these agreements, sponsors are obtaining permits and conducting project design work, and BPA is completing this EIS process. In September 1993, BPA published a Notice of Intent to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) on these three proposed gas-fired combustion turbine projects and held public scoping meetings in October 1993 at each site. In February 1994, BPA released an Implementation Plan on the proposed scope of the EIS. A draft EIS on the three proposed projects was published in February 1995. The impacts of the Chehalis and Satsop projects located in Washington State will be covered in one EIS document, while the impacts of the Hermiston project located in Oregon are covered in this final EIS document. It is BPA`s intent to continue to base the analysis of impacts on the assumption that all three projects may be constructed at some point in the future.

  6. Risk Assessment for the Explosive Washout Lagoons (Site 4), Umatilla Depot Activity Hermiston, Oregon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    eti, 1985; Soares and Lock, 1980) revealed no additional data. Studies by Lee Ltji. (1978) and Ellis It jd. (1979) demonstrated depressed ...an acclimated microbiota . The leaching and transport of explosives as suspended particulates may lead to contamination of groundwater and nearby

  7. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 10): Umatilla Army Depot (lagoons), soils operable Unit 2, Hermiston, OR. (First remedial action), September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-25

    The Umatilla Army Depot lagoons site is located in the center of the 19,700-acre U.S. Army Depot Activity, Umatilla (UMDA), 5 miles west of Hermiston, in Morrow and Umatilla Counties, Oregon. From the 1950's through 1965, UMDA operated an onsite explosives washout plant, which processed munitions to remove and recover explosives using a pressurized hot water system. An estimated 85,000,000 gallons of effluent were discharged to the lagoons during plant operations. The ROD provides a final remedy for the soil present at the lagoons. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil are inorganics and explosives, including DNB, 2, 4-DNT, HMX, NB, TNB, TNT, and RDX.

  8. Explosives Washout Lagoons Soils Operable Unit Supplemental Investigation Technical and Environmental Management Support of Installation Restoration Technology Development Program Umatilla Depot Activity Hermiston, Oregon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-15

    moisture. 10020B 1L.S EA 4-2 Pesticide and PCB analyses of water samples utilized gas chromatography (GC) coup- led with an electron capture detector...Elements 5-11 5.2.4 Major Elements 5-13 5.2.5 TCL Volatiles and Sernivolatiles 5-14 5.2.6 Organochlorine Pesticides 5-14 5.2.7 PCBs 5-14 5.2.8...Enginecring, Inc. "OF degrees Fahrenheit FS Feasibility Study FSP Field Sampling Plan g gram,% GC Gas chromatography GCOMS Gas chromatography /mass

  9. Learning Activities for Social Studies in Oregon Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Herman A.; Davis, Rose Marie

    This guide suggests social studies learning activities for developing specific concepts in grades K-12. A related document, SO 013 465, lists the concepts and generalizations upon which a comprehensive K-12 social studies program should be built. Although written for teachers and curriculum specialists involved in curriculum development in Oregon,…

  10. Explosives Washout Lagoons Soils Operable Unit supplemental investigation technical and environmental management support of installation-restoration technology development program, Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon. Final report, May 91-May 92

    SciTech Connect

    Raymondi, R.

    1992-04-15

    As part of an ongoing Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study at the Umatilla Army Depot, the soils of the Explosives Washout Lagoons at that installation were assigned as an operable unit for a possible expedited remedial action. Additional sampling was conducted to determine the explosives concentrations at depth beneath the lagoons, and to verify the absence of other contaminants. Explosives contamination was found from the ground surface to the groundwater at 47 feet. Concentrations were much higher in the top 3 feet than in the soil beneath that. Other organic contamination was not present; some metals were elevated slightly above background. The results of the study are being used in a feasibility study of remedial action alternatives.

  11. Explosive washout lagoons soils operable unit supplemental investigation technical and environmental management support of installation restoration technology development program, Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston. Oregon. Phase 2. Final Draft report, May 1991-May 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Raymondi, R.

    1992-04-15

    As part of an ongoing Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study at the Umatilla Army Depot, the soils of the Explosives Washout Lagoons at that installation were assigned as an operable unit for a possible expedited remedial action. Additional sampling was conducted to determine the explosives concentrations at depth beneath the lagoons, and to verify the absence of other contaminants. Explosives contamination was found from the ground surface to the groundwater at 47 feet. Concentrations were much higher in the top 3 feet than in the soil beneath that. Other organic contamination was not present; some metals were elevated slightly above background. The results of the study are being used in a feasibility study of remedial action alternatives.

  12. ADA Compliance and the Accessibility of Physical Activity Facilities in Western Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinal, Bradley J.; Spaziani, Marc D.

    2003-01-01

    Investigated how compliant physical activity facilities in western Oregon were with regard to the Americans with Disabilities Act's mandate regarding accessibility of public facilities for all people. Data from direct observations and physical measurements at 50 physical activity facilities indicated that no facility was 100-percent compliant. The…

  13. Volatile budget for an unusual Central Oregon Cascades cinder cone and implications for future activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, L. K.; Wallace, P. J.; Cashman, K. V.

    2011-12-01

    Sand Mountain is one of many hundred mafic vents in the Central Oregon Cascades, and is the largest in a chain consisting of twenty-three mafic cones 30km NNW of the Three Sisters Volcanoes. Sand Mountain represents the maximum probable tephra hazard for mafic activity in Central Oregon because of its unusually large tephra deposit (≥0.9km3), most likely due to interaction with groundwater. To date, no focused analyses have been performed on the volatiles of Sand Mountain. Here we analyze melt inclusions, tephra and lava flows to constrain the volatile budget associated with Sand Mountain with specific focus on the potential impact of future activity on human and livestock populations in Central Oregon. Preliminary analyses of sulfur, chlorine and fluorine in glass show original dissolved volatile contents of 2014 ppm S, 954 ppm Cl and 646 ppm F; these measured abundances translate to a total species budget of 5.54 Mt SO2, 1.35 Mt HCl, and 0.94 Mt HF for the erupted magma (estimated at 0.5 km3 DRE). Comparison of volatile abundances in melt inclusions and matrix glass shows that during eruption, the Sand Mountain magma released 99% of its sulfur, 44% of its chlorine and 35% of its fluorine, equivalent to 5.48 Mt SO2, 0.59 Mt HCl and 0.33 Mt HF. The 1783-1784 AD Laki eruption in Iceland, which had a devastating impact on both proximal and distal populations, showed similar percentages of volatile release, although the total volatile budget was much higher because of the large volume of erupted magma. However, an interesting difference between the Sand Mountain eruption and the Laki eruption is the mechanism of degassing: at Laki, about half of the gas loss occurred during lava flow emplacement; in contrast, at Sand Mountain, the volatile release appears to have been focused in the explosive phase of the eruption, suggesting efficient transfer of gas species with the eruptive plume, which traveled east toward central Oregon. We will test this interpretation by

  14. Oregon Model Center--Learning Disabilities: Final Report on Products and Activities, 1973-1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calkin, Abigail B.

    Presented are evaluations of eight 1973-75 objectives of the Oregon Model Center for children with learning disabilities. The center was developed to facilitate expansion of the Educational Evaluation Center, a diagnostic-prescriptive center at Oregon College of Education. Among objectives evaluated are: studying the process of the Education…

  15. Earthquake history of Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    von Hake, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    Although situated between two States (California and Washington) that have has many violent earthquakes, Oregon is noticeably less active seismically. the greatest damage experienced resulted from a major shock near Olympia, Wash., in 1949. During the short history record available (since 1841), 34 earthquakes of intensity V, Modified Mercalli Scale, or greater have centered within Oregon or near its borders. Only 13 of the earthquakes had an intensity above V, and many of the shocks were local. However, a 1936 earthquake in the eastern Oregon-Washington region caused extensive damage and was felt over an area of 272,000 square kilometers. 

  16. Bat activity in thinned, unthinned, and old-growth forests in western Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Humes, Marcia L.; Hayes, J.P.; Collopy, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    Many aspects of the influences of forest management activities on bats (Chiroptera) in the Pacific Northwest are poorly known. We compared thinned and unthinned forest stands of the same age and old-growth forest stands to determine potential differences in structure and amount of use by bats. We hypothesized that activity levels of bats would differ in stands differing in structure as a result of management history and that activity of bats would be similar in stands of similar structure. We used automated ultrasonic detectors (Anabat II) to record calls of bats in 50-100-year-old thinned and unthinned stands, and in old-growth (a?Y200 yr old) stands in the Oregon Coast Range during the summers of 1994 and 1995. Our median index of bat activity was higher in old-growth than in unthinned stands and higher in thinned than in unthinned stands. We were not able to detect a significant difference between the index of median bat activity for old-growth and thinned stands. More than 90% of identifiable passes were identified as calls from Myotis species. The 3 stand types we examined differed in certain structural characteristics such as density and size of trees, and amount of overstory and understory cover. We concluded that the structural changes caused by thinning may benefit bats by creating habitat structure in young stands that bats are able to use more effectively.

  17. Environmental influences on children's physical activity and eating habits in a rural Oregon County.

    PubMed

    Findholt, Nancy E; Michael, Yvonne L; Jerofke, Linda J; Brogoitti, Victoria W

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE. To identify environmental barriers and facilitators of children's physical activity and healthy eating in a rural county. DESIGN. Community-based participatory research using mixed methods, primarily qualitative. SETTING. A rural Oregon county. SUBJECTS. Ninety-five adults, 6 high school students, and 41 fifth-grade students. MEASURES. In-depth interviews, focus groups, Photovoice, and structured observations using the Physical Activity Resource Assessment, System for Observing Play and Leisure Activity, Community Food Security Assessment Toolkit, and School Food and Beverage Marketing Assessment Tool. ANALYSIS. Qualitative data were coded by investigators; observational data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The findings were triangulated to produce a composite of environmental barriers and assets. RESULTS. Limited recreational resources, street-related hazards, fear of strangers, inadequate physical education, and denial of recess hindered physical activity, whereas popularity of youth sports and proximity to natural areas promoted physical activity. Limited availability and high cost of healthy food, busy lifestyles, convenience stores near schools, few healthy meal choices at school, children's being permitted to bring snacks to school, candy used as incentives, and teachers' modeling unhealthy eating habits hindered healthy eating, whereas the agricultural setting and popularity of gardening promoted healthy eating. CONCLUSIONS. This study provides data on a neglected area of research, namely environmental determinants of rural childhood obesity, and points to the need for multifaceted and multilevel environmental change interventions.

  18. Using Macroscopic Charcoal to Reconstruct the Holocene Fire Activity of the Willamette Valley, Oregon and Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, M. K.; Whitlock, C.; Bartlein, P. J.; Pearl, C. A.

    2006-12-01

    High-resolution macroscopic charcoal analysis of two lacustrine records has revealed the Holocene fire activity of the Willamette Valley, located between the Coast and Cascade ranges of southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. The Willamette Valley experienced major environmental and cultural changes during the Holocene, however, its long-term fire history is poorly known. Of particular interest are shifts in fire activity that occurred in response to (1) millennial- and centennial-scale climate and vegetation changes (e.g., the Early Holocene warm period, the Little Ice Age) and (2) major shifts in human activity and population size (e.g., Native American population decline, Euro-American settlement). Macroscopic charcoal analysis of contiguous core samples was used to reconstruct fire activity at each site. Charcoal source (i.e., herbaceous or woody) was also determined based on particle morphology. Charcoal influx was decomposed into a peak component (which indicates fire episodes) and a background component (which indicates changes in burnable biomass). Charcoal records from Battle Ground Lake and Beaver Lake reveal major shifts in fire activity that are consistent with known changes in regional climate on orbital time scales. The Battle Ground Lake charcoal data, for example, show a general increase in fire frequency from the beginning of the Holocene to a maximum of ~18 fire episodes/1000 years at 6500 cal yr BP, associated with the early Holocene insolation maximum and its influence on summer drought, followed by a decrease to ~5 fire episodes/1000 years at present. Similar trends are indicated by the Beaver Lake charcoal data. Both records also indicate shifts in fire activity that suggest the possibility of anthropogenic burning, but at different times at each site. Additional records are being analyzed to examine the spatial and temporal patterns of fire activity across the Willamette Valley as a whole.

  19. Vegetation Response to Holocene Variations in Climate and Fire Activity in Southwestern Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A.; Briles, C.; Whitlock, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Past ecosystem responses to fire and climate change have been well studied in many parts of the Pacific Northwest, but forest history of the southern Cascades is poorly understood. Pollen and charcoal records from Hobart Lake (42.099°N, 122.482°W, 1458m) in southwestern Oregon were analyzed to reconstruct past changes in vegetation and fire activity. The watershed today supports mixed conifer forest of Abies, Pseudotsuga, Cupressaceae, and Pinus. From 8000 to 3500 cal yr BP, the forest had more xerophytic species, such as Pinus and Cupressaceae, and higher frequency of fires than at present, suggesting a climate that was warmer and drier than current conditions. The last 3500 cal years was characterized by increasing mesophytic taxa, such as Abies and Pseudotsuga, and decreasing fire activity; these trends are consistent with the establishment of cooler wetter conditions in the late Holocene. Changes in the abundance of Abies and Pseudotsuga pollen were compared at multiple sites to better understand their history in relation to long-term variations in climate and local disturbance. The pollen record suggests that Abies (i.e., Abies concolor, A. magnifica, A. amabilis or A. grandis) was abundant during the late-glacial period in a widespread subalpine forest that was present at all elevations. The genus declined in abundance during the early Holocene when it was best represented at higher elevations. Abies species gradually became more widespread and abundant during the mid- and late Holocene consistent with cooler conditions and expansion of closed mesic forest. Pseudotsuga was most abundant at low-elevation sites in the Coast and Cascade ranges during the early Holocene and then most abundant in more southern, mid-elevation sites in the Klamath and southern Cascade ranges in the late Holocene. Thus, the regional conifer history was strongly governed by variations in the summer insolation as they relate to changes in summer effective moisture.

  20. Habitat use and terrestrial activity by red tree voles (Arborimus longicaudus) in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corn, Paul Stephen; Bury, R. Bruce

    1986-01-01

    Several species of vertebrates may find optimal habitat for breeding, nesting, or foraging in old-growth (>200 years old) confierous forests in the Pacific Northwest. Old-growth forests are economically valuable, however, and most unprotected stands will be cut within 40 years (Franklin et al., 1981). Meslow et al. (1981) and Raphael (1984) identified a critical need to document habitat use and establish the relationship of wildlife species in these forests. In 1983, we operated arrays of pitfall traps for six months to investigate habitat use by terrestrial herpetofauna and small mammals in four age classes of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forest in and near the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Linn and Lane counties, Oregon. Red tree voles, Arborimus longicaudus, were among the mammals captured. This species is considered to find optimum habitat in old-growth forests (Franklin et al., 1981; Meslow et al., 1981), but quantitative data on the local occurrence of the species are lacking. Here we report on habitat use by A. longicaudus and document terrestrial activity for this presumably arboreal species. A pitfall array was located in each of 18 stands dominated by Douglas-fir. Each array consisted of two sets of three 5-m aluminum drift fences each with pitfall traps (No. 10 tin cans; 6.4 l in volume) at the ends of the fences (see Bury and Raphael, 1983). The 18 stands represented four successional stages based on estimated age: 3 pre-canopy (clear cuts 5-9 years old), 3 young (30-69 years), 4 mature (76-150 years), and 8 old-growth (195-450 years). Additionally, old-growth stands were ranked on a general moisture gradient (wet, mesic, or dry) based on aspect, topographic position, and presence of indicator plant species. Pitfall traps were operated continuously for 180 days from late May to late November, 1983.

  1. Eighth year projects and activities of the Environmental Remote Sensing Applications Laboratory (ERSAL). [Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, A. J.; Isaacson, D. L.; Schrumpf, B. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Projects completed for the NASA Office of University Affairs include the application of remote sensing data in support of rehabilitation of wild fire damaged areas and the use of LANDSAT 3 return beam vidicon in forestry mapping applications. Continuing projects for that office include monitoring western Oregon timber clearcut; detecting and monitoring wheat disease; land use monitoring for tax assessment in Umatilla, Lake, and Morrow Counties; and the use of Oregon Air National Guard thermal infrared scanning data. Projects funded through other agencies include the remote sensing inventory of elk in the Blue Mountains; the estimation of burned agricultural acreage in the Willamette Valley; a resource inventory of Deschutes County; and hosting a LANDSAT digital workshop.

  2. Laboratory-based educational and outreach activities in the framework of a CAREER award at the University of Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindeman, I. N.

    2011-12-01

    The Stable Isotope Laboratory at the University of Oregon has been used as a learning and outreach center in the framework of the 09 award entitled "Stable isotope insights into large-volume volcanic eruptions". The PI and other members of the group have actively recruitted undergraduate students, summer session and catalytic outreach undergraduates, and hosted international students, visitors, and collaborators from Russia, Iceland, France, the UK, Australia, and Switzerland. We also integrated closely with the Oregon-wide summer program that brings community college students to the University of Oregon for 2.5 months summer research residence (UCORE). In total we gave supervised five undergraduate students and three UCORE students. Additionally, we recruited undergraduates from U of Chicago, Colorado and Pomona Colleges to spend summers in the lab and in the field. In conjunction with the NSF funded PIRE program, two female graduate and one female undergraduate students participated in fieldwork in Kamchatka, and three Kamchatka undergraduates, and one Moscow graduate student visited the University Oregon. Students performed their own projects or Senior Theses and reported their results locally and at AGU conferences. We developed a management structure in which graduate students, a postdoc, and lab technician co-supervised students and visitors and this exposed them into the supervisory roles, contributed to the project progress, and liberated PI from micromanagement duties. The talk will present our experience with this management concept of a lab-based-learning initiative, which defines roles for each member of the lab. Our outreach activities included public lectures at community colleges by PI and a graduate student, and the topical Penrose conference co-organized by the PI, which attracted many students and visitors who collected their data in the lab. PI has introduced a voluntary fieldtrip as a part of his Volcanoes and Earthquake large enrollment class

  3. Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Family Child Care Homes in Oregon: Baseline Findings from the Healthy Home Child Care Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunter, Katherine B.; Rice, Kelly R.; Trost, Stewart G.

    2012-01-01

    Baseline findings from the Healthy Home Child Care Project include data from Family Child Care Providers (FCCPs) in Oregon (n=53) who completed assessments of nutrition and physical activity policies and practices and BMI data for children in the care of FCCPs (n=205). Results show that a significant percentage of FCCPs failed to meet child care…

  4. Workforce: Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This fact sheet states that in 2006, a good education is no longer just a way for an individual to get ahead. It is also the best way a state can get ahead -- and therefore a real economic priority. A state must ensure that all of its citizens have access to a college education. In Oregon, a state recovering from the 2000-03 recession, the demand…

  5. Stratigraphic development and hydrothermal activity in the central western Cascade Range, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, M.L.; Bull, M.K. ); Pollock, J.M. ); Thompson, G.D. )

    1990-11-10

    Two volcanic sequences bounded by erosional unconformities compose the stratigraphy of the North Santiam mining district, Western Cascade Range, Oregon. Diorite, grandodiorite, and leucocratic quartz porphyry dikes, stocks, and sills intrude the breccias, flows, and tuffs of a volcanic center in the older Sardine Formation. Tourmaline-bearing breccia pipes are associated with the porphyritic granodiorite intrusions. An erosional unconformity separates the Sardine Formation from the overlying Elk Lake formation. The alteration patterns in the two formations are consistent with the development of hydrothermal systems during the eruption of each formation. However, the development of the two hydrothermal systems is separated by a period of erosion of the older volcanic pile. Early formation of mineralization that resembles porphyry copper deposits occurred within the Sardine Formation, and later, after eruption of the Elk Lake formation, epithermal veins and alteration developed along faults, fractures, and the margins of dikes in the Sardine Formation.

  6. Predation by Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) on Western toads (Bufo boreas) in Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearl, Christopher A.; Hayes, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    Toads of the genus Bufo co-occur with true frogs (family Ranidae) throughout their North American ranges. Yet, Bufo are rarely reported as prey for ranid frogs, perhaps due to dermal toxins that afford them protection from some predators. We report field observations from four different localities demonstrating that Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) readily consume juvenile western toads (Bufo boreas) at breeding sites in Oregon. Unpalatability thought to deter predators of selected taxa and feeding mode may not protect juvenile stages of western toads from adult Oregon spotted frogs. Activity of juvenile western toads can elicit ambush behavior by Oregon spotted frog adults. Our review of published literature suggests that regular consumption of toadlets sets Oregon spotted frogs apart from most North American ranid frogs. Importance of the trophic context of juvenile western toads as a seasonally important resource to Oregon spotted frogs needs critical investigation.

  7. Older American Indians’ Perspectives on Health, Arthritis, and Physical Activity: Implications for Adapting Evidence-Based Interventions, Oregon, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Schure, Marc B.; Goins, R. Turner

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite the high prevalence of arthritis and physical disability among older American Indians, few evidence-based interventions that improve arthritis self-management via physical activity have been adapted for use in this population. The purpose of this study was to identify beliefs about health, arthritis, and physical activity among older American Indians living in a rural area in Oregon to help select and adapt an arthritis self-management program. Methods In partnership with a tribal health program, we conducted surveys, a focus group, and individual interviews with older American Indians with arthritis. Our sample comprised 6 focus group participants and 18 interviewees. The 24 participants were aged 48 to 82 years, of whom 67% were women. Forms B and C of the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) instrument, modified for arthritis, measured MHLC. Results The concepts of health, arthritis, and physical activity overlapped in that health was a holistic concept informed by cultural teachings that included living a healthy lifestyle, socializing, and being functionally independent. Arthritis inhibited health and healthy behaviors. Participants identified barriers such as unreliable transportation and recruiting challenges that would make existing interventions challenging to implement in this setting. The Doctor subscale had the highest MHLC (mean = 4.4 [standard deviation (SD), 1.0]), followed by the Internal subscale (3.9 [SD, 1.4]) and the Other People subscale (2.8 [SD, 1.1]). Conclusions Existing evidence-based programs for arthritis should be adapted to address implementation factors, such as access to transportation, and incorporate cultural values that emphasize holistic wellness and social interconnectedness. Culturally sensitive programs that build on indigenous values and practices to promote active coping strategies for older American Indians with arthritis are needed. PMID:27337558

  8. Community Pride: An Oregon 4-H Activity Relating to Beautification and Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Univ., Corvallis. Cooperative Extension Service.

    The Community Pride program is a 4-H activity in conservation and beautification. Instructions for selecting and carrying out a Community Pride activity are presented: planning, organizing, and doing the project. Suggestions for possible activities are offered, and instructions for reporting the activity to the county extension office are given.…

  9. Historic and recent patterns in dissolved oxygen within the Yaquina Estuary (Oregon, USA): Importance of anthropogenic activities and oceanic conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spatial and temporal patterns of dissolved oxygen (DO) in Yaquina Estuary, Oregon (USA) are examined using historic and recent data. There was a significant increasing trend in DO in the upstream portion of the estuary during the years 1960–1985. Historically, minimum dry season ...

  10. Comparing effects of active and passive restoration on the Middle Fork John Day River, NE Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, P. F.; Goslin, M.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2000, cattle grazing has been eliminated on over 14 km of the upper Middle Fork John Day. Starting in 2008, active restoration (log structures with dug pools, woody vegetation planting, and modifications to increase channel-floodplain hydrologic connectivity) was implemented on nearly 6 km within the cattle exclosure length. Implementation of active and passive restoration strategies in the same and adjacent reaches allows comparison of these two approaches. We have been monitoring these reaches since 2008. Unexpectedly in response to grazing exclosure, a native sedge, Carex nudata (torrent sedge), has exploded in population. C. nudata grows in the active channel, anchoring itself tightly to the gravel-cobble river bed with a dense root network. As a result, C. nudata has changed erosion and sedimentation patterns including bank erosion, channel bed scour, and island formation. We present data on fish cover increases due to C. nudata and log structures, and on channel complexity before and after restoration. Both active and passive restorations are increasing channel complexity and juvenile fish cover, although in different ways. Fish cover provided by active and passive restoration are similar in area but different in depth and position, with C. nudata fish cover generally shallower and partly mid-channel. Residual pool depth is larger in log structure pools than in C. nudata scour pools, but C. nudata pools are more numerous in some reaches. By producing frequent, small scour features and small islands, it can be argued that C. nudata is increasing hydraulic complexity more than the large, meander-bend pools at log structures, but this is hard to quantify. C. nudata has also stabilized active bars, perhaps changing the bedload sediment budget. Positive habitat benefits of active restoration appear to be greater in the short term, but over the long term (20 years or more) effects of C. nudata may be comparable or greater.

  11. Hermiston Reversionary Lands Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Walden, Greg [R-OR-2

    2013-10-29

    06/02/2014 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. Lyme disease in Oregon.

    PubMed

    Doggett, J Stone; Kohlhepp, Sue; Gresbrink, Robert; Metz, Paul; Gleaves, Curt; Gilbert, David

    2008-06-01

    The incidence of Lyme disease in Oregon is calculated from cases reported to the Oregon State Health Division. We reviewed the exposure history of reported cases of Lyme disease and performed field surveys for infected Ixodes pacificus ticks. The incidence of Lyme disease correlated with the distribution of infected I. pacificus ticks.

  13. Oregon: Biscuit Wildfire

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... during a record-breaking heat wave, the Biscuit Fire became Oregon's largest wildfire of the past century. Between mid July and early ... Fire was the most expensive fire fighting effort in Oregon's history, with more than 6,000 personnel assisting the battle to suppress the ...

  14. Oregon Trail Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Park Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The road to the U.S. West, known as the Oregon Trail, had its first real traffic in 1843 when a group of about 1000 people left Independence, Missouri and traveled west. This teacher's guide contains short descriptions of the main landmarks and stopping points that were significant along the northwest portion of the Oregon Trail. The guide is…

  15. Instructional Innovation in Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Educational Coordinating Council, Salem.

    In 1969 the 55th Legislative Assembly established the Oregon Program of Grants for the Improvement of Undergraduate Instruction. The Legislature directed that the program be administered by the Oregon Educational Coordinating Council and provided for an Advisory Committee to guide the Council. All public higher education institutions were eligible…

  16. Parent Management Training-Oregon Model (PMTO™) in Mexico City: Integrating Cultural Adaptation Activities in an Implementation Model.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Ana A; Domenech Rodríguez, Melanie M; Amador, Nancy G; Forgatch, Marion S; Parra-Cardona, J Rubén

    2014-03-01

    This article describes the process of cultural adaptation at the start of the implementation of the Parent Management Training intervention-Oregon model (PMTO) in Mexico City. The implementation process was guided by the model, and the cultural adaptation of PMTO was theoretically guided by the cultural adaptation process (CAP) model. During the process of the adaptation, we uncovered the potential for the CAP to be embedded in the implementation process, taking into account broader training and economic challenges and opportunities. We discuss how cultural adaptation and implementation processes are inextricably linked and iterative and how maintaining a collaborative relationship with the treatment developer has guided our work and has helped expand our research efforts, and how building human capital to implement PMTO in Mexico supported the implementation efforts of PMTO in other places in the United States.

  17. Parent Management Training-Oregon Model (PMTO™) in Mexico City: Integrating Cultural Adaptation Activities in an Implementation Model

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Ana A.; Domenech Rodríguez, Melanie M.; Amador, Nancy G.; Forgatch, Marion S.; Parra-Cardona, J. Rubén

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the process of cultural adaptation at the start of the implementation of the Parent Management Training intervention-Oregon model (PMTO) in Mexico City. The implementation process was guided by the model, and the cultural adaptation of PMTO was theoretically guided by the cultural adaptation process (CAP) model. During the process of the adaptation, we uncovered the potential for the CAP to be embedded in the implementation process, taking into account broader training and economic challenges and opportunities. We discuss how cultural adaptation and implementation processes are inextricably linked and iterative and how maintaining a collaborative relationship with the treatment developer has guided our work and has helped expand our research efforts, and how building human capital to implement PMTO in Mexico supported the implementation efforts of PMTO in other places in the United States. PMID:26052184

  18. South Oregon Coast Reinforcement.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1998-05-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to build a transmission line to reinforce electrical service to the southern coast of Oregon. This FYI outlines the proposal, tells how one can learn more, and how one can share ideas and opinions. The project will reinforce Oregon`s south coast area and provide the necessary transmission for Nucor Corporation to build a new steel mill in the Coos Bay/North Bend area. The proposed plant, which would use mostly recycled scrap metal, would produce rolled steel products. The plant would require a large amount of electrical power to run the furnace used in its steel-making process. In addition to the potential steel mill, electrical loads in the south Oregon coast area are expected to continue to grow.

  19. Fires Scorch Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In southwest Oregon, the Biscuit Fire continues to grow. This Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image from August 14, 2002, shows the burn scar associated with the enormous blaze. The visualization uses ASTER's 30-meter-resolution, short-wave infrared bands to minimize smoke contamination and enhance the burn scar, which appears purple amid green vegetation. Actively burning areas of the fire appear very light purple. More than 6,000 fire personnel are assigned to the Biscuit Fire, which was 390, 276 acres as of Friday morning, August 15, and only 26 percent contained. Among the resources threatened are thousands of homes, three nationally designated wild and scenic rivers, and habitat for several categories of plants and animals at risk of extinction. Firefighters currently have no estimate as to when the fire might be contained. Credit: This image was acquired on an expedited basis as part of NASA Wildfire Response Team activities. Image courtesy Mike Abrams, Simon Hook, and the ASTER team at EROS Data Center DAAC.

  20. Advocating for active living on the rural-urban fringe: a case study of planning in the Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Adler, Sy; Dobson, Noelle; Fox, Karen Perl; Weigand, Lynn

    2008-06-01

    This case study is about the politics of incorporating active-living elements into a concept plan for a new community of about 68,000 people on the edge of the Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area. Development on the rural-urban fringe is ongoing in metropolitan areas around the United States. In this article, we evaluate the product of the concept-planning process from the standpoint of the extent to which environmental elements conducive to active living were included. We also analyze four issues in which challenges to the incorporation of active-living features surfaced: choices related to transportation facilities, the design and location of retail stores, the location of schools and parks, and the location of a new town center. Overall, the Damascus/Boring Concept Plan positions the area well to promote active living. Analyses of the challenges that emerged yielded lessons for advocates regarding ways to deal with conflicts between facilitating active living and local economic development and related tax-base concerns and between active-living elements and school-district planning autonomy as well as the need for advocates to have the capacity to present alternatives to the usual financial and design approaches taken by private- and public-sector investors.

  1. Evaluation of Malolactic Bacteria Isolated from Oregon Wines †

    PubMed Central

    Henick-Kling, T.; Sandine, W. E.; Heatherbell, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Oregon is a cool wine-producing region where grapes characteristically contain high concentrations of organic acids. To reduce the natural acidity and increase the microbiological stability and flavor complexity of the wine, malolactic fermentation is encouraged. In this study, strains of Leuconostoc oenos indigenous to Oregon wines were evaluated for their suitability to conduct malolactic fermentation in Oregon wines. Tests determined the malolactic activity of the Oregon isolates in comparison with commercial strains ML-34, PSU-1, MLT-kli, and ens 44-40 under various temperature and pH conditions. Sensitivities to sulfur dioxide, ethanol, and fumaric acid also were determined. Two Oregon strains, Er-1a and Ey-2d, were selected for commercial winemaking tests because they had greater malolactic activity under conditions of low pH (3.0) and low temperature (15 and 8°C), respectively. PMID:16347992

  2. Collective Bargaining--Oregon Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Eldon G.

    The implications of the mandatory collective bargaining law in Oregon, House Bill 2263, are described in a case history of Lane Community College. In addition, problems that have emerged as a result of collective bargaining in Oregon are listed. (DB)

  3. Rural Oregon Community Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Young-Lorion, Julia; Davis, Melinda M.; Kirks, Nancy; Hsu, Anna; Slater, Jana Kay; Rollins, Nancy; Aromaa, Susan; McGinnis, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The Community Health Improvement Partnership (CHIP) model has supported community health development in more than 100 communities nationally. In 2011, four rural Oregon CHIPs collaborated with investigators from the Oregon Rural Practice-based Research Network (ORPRN), a component of the Oregon Clinical and Translational Research Institute (OCTRI), to obtain training on research methods, develop and implement pilot research studies on childhood obesity, and explore matches with academic partners. This article summarizes the experiences of the Lincoln County CHIP, established in 2003, as it transitioned from CHIP to Community Health Improvement and Research Partnership (CHIRP). Our story and lessons learned may inform rural community-based health coalitions and academicians who are engaged in or considering Community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnerships. Utilizing existing infrastructure and relationships in community and academic settings provides an ideal starting point for rural, bidirectional research partnerships. PMID:24056513

  4. Optimization Review, Black Butte Mine Superfund Site, Lane County, Oregon

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The BBM Superfund Site (the site) is located in Lane County, Oregon, approximately 35 miles southeast of Eugene and approximately 10 miles upstream from the Cottage Grove Reservoir (CGR). Mercury mining and processing operations were active at the site...

  5. Peaceful Cooperation Is the Aim of Oregon School Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Jayne

    1983-01-01

    Describes the peace-oriented instructional materials and classroom activities developed by Pat Feller for use in her sixth-grade class. Discusses the adoption of these techniques in another Oregon Catholic school. (LAL)

  6. Umpqua River Entrance, Oregon.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    In a letter from the Portland District dated 28 March 1975, subject: ’Tidal Hydraulics Committee Services - Umpqua River Entrance, Oregon,’ the...Committee on Tidal Hydraulics was requested to assist in the evaluation of navigation problems at the entrance to the Umpqua River. As a result, the 80th

  7. Oregon's first wind park

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The bringing on-line of the 1.25 MW wind park at Whiskey Run, Oregon, is reported. The park features twenty-five 50 KW wind turbine generators and is expected to produce about three million kilowatt-hours per year for the Pacific Power and Light system.

  8. The Oregon Walkabout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parnell, Dale

    1974-01-01

    Too often American schools aim to satisfy the self-actualizing and higher-level needs in Maslow's hierarchy, while ignoring survival and security needs. The new State curriculum seeks to correct that deficit. To graduate, an Oregon student in the Class of 1978 will be expected to demonstrate the competencies to function effectively on the job, as…

  9. Oregon Social Sciences Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    The study of the social sciences includes: history, civics, geography, and economics to prepare students for responsible citizenship. The Oregon state standards for social sciences sets out common curriculum goals, content standards, information for Benchmark 1 (grade three), Benchmark 2 (grade five), Benchmark 3 (grade eight), and Certificate of…

  10. Oregon hydrologic landscape regions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Individuals who spend time working with streams intuitively come to understand that stream hydrologic and ecological characteristics are related to the attributes of the watersheds in which they occur. This is easy to see in Oregon with its large climatic and geologic variations ...

  11. THREE SISTERS WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacLeod, Norman S.; Causey, J. Douglas

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Three Sisters Wilderness, Oregon indicated little promise for the occcurrence of metallic mineral resources. Block pumice suitable for commercial uses occurs at an undeveloped claim at Rock Mesa in the wilderness, but numerous other sources occur outside the wilderness closer to markets. A broad area centered around South Sister volcano is among the most favorable targets for geothermal resources in the Oregon Cascade Range, based on the very young age and large volume of silicic volcanic rocks that occur in this area. Deep exploration holes could be drilled in areas outside the wilderness south of South Sister to provide data on the subsurface thermal and hydrologic regimes in the southern part of the area most likely to contain geothermal resources.

  12. On the Oregon trail.

    PubMed

    Kitzhaber, J; Kemmy, A M

    1995-10-01

    On the eve of the 21st century, governments around the world are struggling to resolve the dual problems of health care cost and access. My own experience in addressing these issues as they manifest themselves in the US, and particularly in the state of Oregon, convinces me that successful health care reform, anywhere in the world, must sooner or later grapple with two questions: what are we buying with our health care dollars, and how do these expenditures relate to health?

  13. Hispanics in Oregon's Workforce, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Brenda; Wood, Mary

    This report describes the Latino workforce in Oregon, outlining employment, income, education, and unemployment data. A brief history of Hispanics in the state notes that most of Oregon's Hispanics are of Mexican origin and that the state's Hispanic population grew 66 percent between 1990 and 1997. The history of migrant agricultural labor in…

  14. Diurnal activity of Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) and beef cattle (Bos taurus) grazing a northeastern Oregon summer range

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) and beef cattle (Bos taurus) exist in a complex social environment that is marked by diurnal activities such as periods of foraging, ruminating, resting, and sheltering. Elk unlike cattle, must be continually alert to potential predators. We hypothesize that elk...

  15. KALMIOPSIS WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, Norman J; Miller, Michael S.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic, geochemical, geophysical field and laboratory, and mine and prospect studies conducted in the Kalmiopsis Wilderness, Oregon indicate that areas within and immediately adjacent to the wilderness have substantiated mineral-resource potential. The types of mineral resources which occur in these areas include massive sulfide deposits containing copper, zinc, lead, silver and gold; podiform chromite deposits; laterite deposits containing nickel, cobalt, and chromium; lode gold deposits; and placer gold deposits. Past production from existing mines is estimated to have been at least 7000 troy oz of gold, 4000 long tons of chromite, and few tens of tons of copper ore.

  16. MOUNT WASHINGTON WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Edward M.; Causey, J. Douglas

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey, Mount Washington Wilderness, Oregon has little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or fossil fuel resources. Abundant cinder resources occur in the wilderness, but other large volume cinder deposits are available outside the wilderness and closer to markets. Analysis of the geothermal potential of the High Cascades province cannot be made without data on the subsurface thermal and hydrologic regimes which can only be provided by deep drill holes. Several deep holes could be drilled in areas outside the wildernesses of the High Cascades, from which extrapolations of the geothermal potential of the wildernesses could be made.

  17. STRAWBERRY MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thayer, T.P.; Stotelmeyer, Ronald B.

    1984-01-01

    The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness extends 18 mi along the crest of the Strawberry Range and comprises about 53 sq mi in the Malheur National Forest, Grant County, Oregon. Systematic geologic mapping, geochemical sampling and detailed sampling of prospect workings was done. A demonstrated copper resource in small quartz veins averaging at most 0. 33 percent copper with traces of silver occurs in shear zones in gabbro. Two small areas with substantiated potential for chrome occur near the northern edge of the wilderness. There is little promise for the occurrence of additional mineral or energy resources in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.

  18. On the Road to Cultural Bias: A Critique of "The Oregon Trail" CD-ROM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Bill

    1997-01-01

    Presents a critical review of "The Oregon Trail" CD-ROMs. Argues that "The Oregon Trail" is sexist, racist, culturally insensitive, and contemptuous of the earth, imparting bad values and wrong history. Suggests questions teachers can ask before choosing to use these materials, and offers classroom activities to develop students' critical computer…

  19. Petroleum potential of Oregon and Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Billo, S.M. )

    1990-06-01

    The states of Oregon and Washington border the Pacific Ocean within an area of diverse topography, climate, and vegetation with altitudes ranging from sea level to more than 8,000 ft. The Mesozoic and Paleozoic rocks are quasi-eugeosynclinal but badly indurated and/or metamorphosed, implying that almost all the pre-Tertiary rocks were unfavorable for oil and gas except some 700 mi{sup 2} of outcropping Mesozoic rocks exposed through windows in the overlying volcanics along the SW extension of the Blue and the Klamath mountains, accordingly. A profound angular and erosional unconformity separates the Tertiary sediments and volcanics from the older rocks. During Late Mesozoic and Tertiary time, uplift accompanied by erosion caused the removal of large areas of metamorphosed sediments and the development of pre-Miocene surface of large relief. Crustal movements of Late Miocene age produced NW-SE folds in Washington, and NS folds in the Coast range of Oregon. Some of the exploration methods (excluding wildcat drilling) were inconvenient. Seismic and gravity methods are impeded, the first by glacial till, basalt flows, sills, and dikes, and the second by laccoliths. Although the region is not the best place for hustling, drilling activity for development of potential oil and gas ushered 78% success rate in Oregon, and Shell and Exxon earned significant bonus bids in Washington.

  20. Status of Oregon's Bull Trout.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, David V.; Hanson, Mary L.; Hooton, Robert M.

    1997-10-01

    Limited historical references indicate that bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in Oregon were once widely spread throughout at least 12 basins in the Klamath River and Columbia River systems. No bull trout have been observed in Oregon's coastal systems. A total of 69 bull trout populations in 12 basins are currently identified in Oregon. A comparison of the 1991 bull trout status (Ratliff and Howell 1992) to the revised 1996 status found that 7 populations were newly discovered and 1 population showed a positive or upgraded status while 22 populations showed a negative or downgraded status. The general downgrading of 32% of Oregon's bull trout populations appears largely due to increased survey efforts and increased survey accuracy rather than reduced numbers or distribution. However, three populations in the upper Klamath Basin, two in the Walla Walla Basin, and one in the Willamette Basin showed decreases in estimated population abundance or distribution.

  1. OLALLIE ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Neumann, Terry R.

    1984-01-01

    The Olallie Roadless Area, Oregon, is devoid of mines and mineral prospects, and a mineral-resource evaluation of the area did not identify any mineral-resource potential. There is no evidence that fossil fuels are present in the roadless area. Nearby areas in Clackamas, Marion, Jefferson, and Wasco Counties are characterized by higher-than-normal heat flow and by numerous thermal springs, some of which have been partly developed. this may indicate that the region has some, as yet undefined, potential for the development of geothermal energy. Lack of thermal springs or other evidence of localized geothermal anomalies within the roadless area may be the result of masking by young, nonconductive rock units and by the flooding out and dilution of rising thermal waters by cool meteoric water.

  2. A bill to amend the Reclamation Wastewater and Groundwater Study and Facilities Act to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to participate in the City of Hermiston, Oregon, water recycling and reuse project, and for other purposes.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Wyden, Ron [D-OR

    2011-05-19

    06/23/2011 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power. Hearings held. With printed Hearing: S.Hrg. 112-129. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. A bill to amend the Reclamation Wastewater and Groundwater Study and Facilities Act to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to participate in the city of Hermiston, Oregon, water recycling and reuse project, and for other purposes.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Wyden, Ron [D-OR

    2009-08-04

    04/27/2010 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power. Hearings held. With printed Hearing: S.Hrg. 111-619. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. Libraries in Oregon: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/oregon.html Libraries in Oregon To use the sharing features on ... Albany Samaritan Albany General Hospital Stanley K. Davis Library 1046 6th Ave. SW Albany, OR 97321 541- ...

  5. Teenage Suicide in Oregon 1983-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Human Resources, Portland.

    During the 3-year period from 1983 through 1985, 80 Oregon teenagers intentionally took their own lives, making suicide second only to accidents as the leading cause of death among Oregon teenagers. Data on suicides committed by individuals between the ages of 10 and 19 were retrieved from death certificates on file with the Oregon Health Division…

  6. The Oregon Geothermal Planning Conference

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-02

    Oregon's geothermal resources represent a large portion of the nation's total geothermal potential. The State's resources are substantial in size, widespread in location, and presently in various stages of discovery and utilization. The exploration for, and development of, geothermal is presently dependent upon a mixture of engineering, economic, environmental, and legal factors. In response to the State's significant geothermal energy potential, and the emerging impediments and incentives for its development, the State of Oregon has begun a planning program intended to accelerate the environmentally prudent utilization of geothermal, while conserving the resource's long-term productivity. The program, which is based upon preliminary work performed by the Oregon Institute of Technology's Geo-Heat Center, will be managed by the Oregon Department of Energy, with the assistance of the Departments of Economic Development, Geology and Mineral Industries, and Water Resources. Funding support for the program is being provided by the US Department of Energy. The first six-month phase of the program, beginning in July 1980, will include the following five primary tasks: (1) coordination of state and local agency projects and information, in order to keep geothermal personnel abreast of the rapidly expanding resource literature, resource discoveries, technological advances, and each agency's projects. (2) Analysis of resource commercialization impediments and recommendations of incentives for accelerating resource utilization. (3) Compilation and dissemination of Oregon geothermal information, in order to create public and potential user awareness, and to publicize technical assistance programs and financial incentives. (4) Resource planning assistance for local governments in order to create local expertise and action; including a statewide workshop for local officials, and the formulation of two specific community resource development plans. (5) Formulation and

  7. Effect of deep vs. shallow tillage on onion stunting and onion bulb yield, 2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field experiment was conducted at a site inoculated with R. solani AG 8 at the Oregon State University Hermiston Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Hermiston, OR to determine the effect of plowing (deep tillage) vs. rototilling (shallow tillage) on onion stunting caused by R. solani AG ...

  8. 16. Photocopy of original USRS photograph (from original print in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of original USRS photograph (from original print in the Umatilla Project History 1918, on file at National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, Colorado) Photographer unknown, ca. 1918. Office of U.S. Reclamation Service - Hermiston, Umatilla Project, Oregon - Former Umatilla Project Headquarters Buildings, Office, Hermiston, Umatilla County, OR

  9. Rethinking Recycling: An Oregon Waste Reduction Curriculum. Teacher Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Environmental Quality, Portland.

    In 1993, the Oregon State Department of Education, in conjunction with the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), developed four "Classroom Activity Packets" with waste reduction and recycling lessons for each of the following groups: Grades K-2; Grades 3-5; Grades 6-8; and Grades 9-12. This teacher resource guide is the final…

  10. The Oregon Vo-Tech Math Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn-Benton Community Coll., Albany, OR.

    Covering the time period of January 1974 to June 1975, the report describes the activities of an ongoing project to provide verbal problem sets for occupational math courses offered in Oregon community colleges and secondary schools. The problems were selected to provide the math skills necessary for job entry and performance in several…

  11. Lee v. State of Oregon.

    PubMed

    1995-08-03

    The U.S. District Court for the District of Oregon found unconstitutional the Oregon Death with Dignity Act, which allows a terminally ill patient to obtain a doctor's prescription for a fatal drug dosage in order to commit suicide. The court held that the state law, which classified competent terminally ill patients as a group and established procedures for them to opt for assisted suicide, was not rationally related to any legitimate state interest for purposes of the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Ammendment. The law did not ensure rational and voluntary decision making by the terminally ill.

  12. Indians In Oregon Today. Oregon Middle School - High School Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepper, Floy

    2004-01-01

    The main purpose of this publication is to provide current, accurate information to teachers and students about the Indian tribes living in the state of Oregon. Too often information about Indian tribes is stereotypic, inaccurate, and outdated. A number of Indian tribes have worked on the development of this document, using the "Oregon…

  13. An update of Quaternary faults of central and eastern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weldon, Ray J.; Fletcher, D.K.; Weldon, E.M.; Scharer, K.M.; McCrory, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    This is the online version of a CD-ROM publication. We have updated the eastern portion of our previous active fault map of Oregon (Pezzopane, Nakata, and Weldon, 1992) as a contribution to the larger USGS effort to produce digital maps of active faults in the Pacific Northwest region. The 1992 fault map has seen wide distribution and has been reproduced in essentially all subsequent compilations of active faults of Oregon. The new map provides a substantial update of known active or suspected active faults east of the Cascades. Improvements in the new map include (1) many newly recognized active faults, (2) a linked ArcInfo map and reference database, (3) more precise locations for previously recognized faults on shaded relief quadrangles generated from USGS 30-m digital elevations models (DEM), (4) more uniform coverage resulting in more consistent grouping of the ages of active faults, and (5) a new category of 'possibly' active faults that share characteristics with known active faults, but have not been studied adequately to assess their activity. The distribution of active faults has not changed substantially from the original Pezzopane, Nakata and Weldon map. Most faults occur in the south-central Basin and Range tectonic province that is located in the backarc portion of the Cascadia subduction margin. These faults occur in zones consisting of numerous short faults with similar rates, ages, and styles of movement. Many active faults strongly correlate with the most active volcanic centers of Oregon, including Newberry Craters and Crater Lake.

  14. Designing Student Spaces for Community Colleges: How Four Schools in Oregon Did It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delansky, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    Describes how Oregon's Linn-Benton Community College, Lane Community College, Chemeketa Community College, and Portland Community College Cascade recently created areas specifically for their student activities programs. (EV)

  15. Lee v. State of Oregon.

    PubMed

    Devlin, M M

    1996-01-01

    HELD: Oregon's Death with Dignity Act, Measure 16, which legalizes physician-assisted suicide for certain terminally ill persons, violates the equal protection clause of the fourteenth amendment to the United States Constitution. Measure 16 fails to withstand even the lowest level of judicial scrutiny because the disparate treatment afforded the class of terminally ill persons does not further any legitimate state interest.

  16. Record Conversion at Oregon State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Deane

    1985-01-01

    Describes the conversion of card catalog records at William Jasper Kerr Library, Oregon State University, to an online system. Discussion covers the use of OCLC and student assistants, procedures and specifications, and problems associated with massive retrospective conversion needs and uncertain budget allocations. Eight sources are recommended.…

  17. Oregon Schools Begin Inspection, Cleanup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, James F.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the need for environmental health inspections in schools. Reports on the results of a survey of Clackamas County (Oregon) school kitchens, in relation to a high incidence of hepatitis A. Describes the variety of violations found and urges that schools no longer be exempt from state health division regulations. (TW)

  18. MAP OF ECOREGIONS OF OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ecoregions of Oregon have been identified, mapped, and described and provide a geographic structure for environmental resources research, assessment, monitoring, and management. This project is part of a larger effort by the U.S. EPA to create a national, hierarchical ecoregi...

  19. Oregon Agriculture I Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Univ., Corvallis. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    This curriculum package was developed to be used as a guide for high school vocational agriculture teachers in Oregon preparing a curriculum to meet local community/regional needs. A second goal of this curriculum is to eliminate sex-bias or sex-role stereotyping in vocational agriculture classes. The curriculum contains 20 units. Topics covered…

  20. Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Oregon Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity International, Washington, DC.

    Designed for middle school through high school students, this unit contains eight lesson plans that focus on Oregon state law. The state lessons correspond to lessons in the volume, "Antidote: Civic Responsibility. Drug Avoidance Lessons for Middle School & High School Students." Developed to be presented by educators, law student,…

  1. Nitrogen fixation associated with grasses in Oregon.

    PubMed

    Nelson, A D; Barber, L E; Tjepkema, J; Russell, S A; Powelson, R; Evans, H J

    1976-04-01

    Nitrogen fixation associated with both natural grasslands and grain crops of Oregon was studied using the acetylene-reduction assay. A number of the grasses collected has some acetylene-reducing activity. Agrostis tenuis Sibth. had substantially greater activity than any of the other species, with a mean rate estimated at 37 g N2 fixed per hectare per day. Assuming 100 days of activity, about 3 kg of N2 would be fixed per hectare per year. This quantity of nitrogen may be important in the maintenance of this species under natural conditions. Nitrogen-fixing microorganisms were isolated from the root surfaces of some of the grasses. Cultures of Bacillus macerans, Bacillus polymyxa, and Enterobacter cloacoa were isolated from wheat roots as were two cultures which have not been assigned a specific taxonomic classification. Strains of N2-fixing Bacillus species and Gram-negative aerobic bacteria were isolated from Festuca and Agrostis.

  2. Landslide inventory for the Little North Santiam River Basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sobieszczyk, Steven

    2010-01-01

    This geodatabase is an inventory of existing landslides in the Little North Santiam River Basin, Oregon (2009). Each landslide feature shown has been classified according to a number of specific characteristics identified at the time recorded in the GIS database. The classification scheme was developed by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (Burns and Madin, 2009). Several significant landslide characteristics recorded in the database are portrayed with symbology on this map. The specific characteristics shown for each landslide are the activity of landsliding, landslide features, deep or shallow failure, type of landslide movement, and confidence of landslide interpretation. These landslide characteristics are determined primarily on the basis of geomorphic features, or landforms, observed for each landslide. This work was completed as part of the Master's thesis "Turbidity Monitoring and LiDAR Imagery Indicate Landslides are Primary Source of Suspended-Sediment Load in the Little North Santiam River Basin, Oregon, Winter 2009-2010" by Steven Sobieszczyk, Portland State University and U.S. Geological Survey. Data layers in this geodatabase include: landslide deposit boundaries (Deposits); field-verfied location imagery (Photos); head scarp or scarp flanks (Scarp_Flanks); and secondary scarp features (Scarps).The geodatabase template was developed by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (Burns and Madin, 2009).

  3. Early chiropractic education in Oregon

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Joseph C

    2002-01-01

    Chiropractic education in the northwestern United States has its origins in the Marsh School & Cure in 1904. Most of the early schools were located in Portland, Oregon, including the D.D. Palmer College of Chiropractic (1908-1910), and several of these had merged by 1912 or 1913 to form the Pacific Chiropractic College, forerunner of today's Western States College. The latter was organized as a non-profit institution during the Great Depression, and struggled not only to survive but to create a higher standard. The early broad-scope of chiropractic training in the state probably encouraged the liberal scope of practice enjoyed in Oregon to this day. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16Figure 18Figure 19Figure 20Figure 21Figure 22Figure 24

  4. Tsunami Preparedness in Oregon (video)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filmed and edited by: Loeffler, Kurt; Gesell, Justine

    2010-01-01

    Tsunamis are a constant threat to the coasts of our world. Although tsunamis are infrequent along the West coast of the United States, it is possible and necessary to prepare for potential tsunami hazards to minimize loss of life and property. Community awareness programs are important, as they strive to create an informed society by providing education and training. This video about tsunami preparedness in Oregon distinguishes between a local tsunami and a distant event and focus on the specific needs of this region. It offers guidelines for correct tsunami response and community preparedness from local emergency managers, first-responders, and leading experts on tsunami hazards and warnings, who have been working on ways of making the tsunami affected regions safer for the people and communities on a long-term basis. This video was produced by the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI).

  5. Lee v. State of Oregon.

    PubMed

    1994-12-27

    The U.S. District Court, District of Oregon, granted the plaintiffs' motion for a preliminary injunction to Measure 16, a ballot measure passed by Oregon voters that authorizes physician-assisted suicide for the terminally ill. The plaintiffs were physicians, terminally ill patients, and residential care facilities, and they sued the state, challenging the constitutionality of Measure 16. The court held that (1) the plaintiffs had standing; (2) serious questions were presented as to whether the measure violated the plaintiffs' freedom of association, freedom of religion, due process, and equal protection rights; and (3) the balance of hardships favored the plaintiffs. The public interest in protecting vulnerable citizens from irreparable harm of death was held to be greater than the hardship to terminally ill patients who want physician-assisted suicide to be immediately available.

  6. 77 FR 23791 - Oregon Disaster #OR-00042

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Marion. Contiguous Counties: Oregon: Clackamas, Jefferson, Linn, Polk, Wasco, Yamhill. The Interest Rates are: Percent For Physical Damage: Homeowners...

  7. Mantle Helium and Carbon Isotopes in Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters Area, Central Oregon: Evidence for Renewed Volcanic Activity or a Long Term Steady State System?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Soest, M. C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Evans, William C.; Mariner, R.H.

    2002-01-01

    Here we present the helium and carbon isotope results from the initial study of a fluid chemistry-monitoring program started in the summer of 2001 near the South Sister volcano in central Oregon. The Separation Creek area which is several miles due west of the volcano is the locus of strong crustal uplift currently occurring at a rate of 4-5 cm/yr (Wicks, et. al., 2001).Helium [RC/RA = 7.44 and 8.61 RA (RC/R A = (3He/4He)sample-. air corrected/(3He/4He)air))] and carbon (??13C = -11.59 to -9.03??? vs PDB) isotope data and CO2/3He (5 and 9 ?? 109) show that bubbling cold springs in the Separation Creek area near South Sister volcano carry a strong mantle signal, indicating the presence of fresh basaltic magma in the volcanic plumbing system. There is no evidence though, to directly relate this signal to the crustal uplift that is currently taking place in the area, which started in 1998. The geothermal system in the area is apparently much longer lived and shows no significant changes in chemistry compared to data from the early 1990s. Hot springs in the area, which are relatively far removed from the volcanic edifice, do not carry a strong mantle signal in helium isotope ratios (2.79 to 5.08 RA), unlike the cold springs, and also do not show any significant changes in helium isotope ratios compared to literature data for the same springs of over two decades ago. The cold springs of the Separation Creek area form a very diffuse but significant low temperature geothermal system, that should, due to its close vicinity to the center of up uplift, be more sensitive to changes in the deeper volcanic plumbing system than the far removed hot springs and therefore require much more study and consideration when dealing with volcano monitoring in the Cascade range or possibly with geothermal exploration in general.

  8. Oregon State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The Oregon State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Oregon. The profile is a result of a survey of NRC licensees in Oregon. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Oregon.

  9. Pattern formation in superdiffusion Oregonator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Fan; Yan, Jia; Liu, Fu-Cheng; He, Ya-Feng

    2016-10-01

    Pattern formations in an Oregonator model with superdiffusion are studied in two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulations. Stability analyses are performed by applying Fourier and Laplace transforms to the space fractional reaction-diffusion systems. Antispiral, stable turing patterns, and travelling patterns are observed by changing the diffusion index of the activator. Analyses of Floquet multipliers show that the limit cycle solution loses stability at the wave number of the primitive vector of the travelling hexagonal pattern. We also observed a transition between antispiral and spiral by changing the diffusion index of the inhibitor. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11205044 and 11405042), the Research Foundation of Education Bureau of Hebei Province, China (Grant Nos. Y2012009 and ZD2015025), the Program for Young Principal Investigators of Hebei Province, China, and the Midwest Universities Comprehensive Strength Promotion Project.

  10. Newberry Volcano—Central Oregon's Sleeping Giant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Stovall, Wendy K.; Ramsey, David W.; Ewert, John W.; Jensen, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Hidden in plain sight, Oregon's massive Newberry Volcano is the largest volcano in the Cascades volcanic arc and covers an area the size of Rhode Island. Unlike familiar cone-shaped Cascades volcanoes, Newberry was built into the shape of a broad shield by repeated eruptions over 400,000 years. About 75,000 years ago a major explosion and collapse event created a large volcanic depression (caldera) at its summit. Newberry last erupted about 1,300 years ago, and present-day hot springs and geologically young lava flows indicate that it could reawaken at any time. Because of its proximity to nearby communities, frequency and size of past eruptions, and geologic youthfulness, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are working to better understand volcanic activity at Newberry and closely monitor the volcano for signs of unrest.

  11. 40 CFR 81.425 - Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oregon. 81.425 Section 81.425 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.425 Oregon. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal...

  12. Oregon School Bond Manual. Seventh Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    To help school districts comply with Oregon's school bond laws, this manual provides guidelines for school district attorneys and personnel in the issuance and sale of school district bonds. The manual deals with the three primary types of Oregon school district borrowings: (1) general obligation bonds; (2) tax and revenue anticipation notes; and…

  13. The Oregon Career and Technical Education Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Steven; Richards, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    Oregon educators, policymakers, and business people are working together to increase the number and quality of Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs in secondary and postsecondary institutions. CTE is an integral component of Oregon's education and workforce development system and prepares students for careers in areas ranging from the…

  14. On the Oregon Trail. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    In this lesson, students work with primary documents and latter-day photographs to recapture the experience of traveling on the Oregon Trail. The learning objectives of the lesson are: (1) to learn about the pioneer experience on the Oregon Trail; (2) to evaluate a historical re-enactment in light of documentary evidence; and (3) to synthesize…

  15. 21 CFR 808.87 - Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.87 Oregon. (a) The following Oregon medical device requriements...

  16. 21 CFR 808.87 - Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.87 Oregon. (a) The following Oregon medical device requriements...

  17. Oregon Migrant Health Project, 1970 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Health, Portland.

    The 1970 annual report on the Oregon Migrant Health Project discusses health services for migrant agricultural workers and their families (approximately 30,000 individuals) who worked and lived temporarily in various Oregon counties. As noted, some 9,000 of the 30,000 migrants were estimated to be in need of some type of medical service. Thus, the…

  18. Steller Cove. Oregon Zoo Teacher Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Kristin

    The goal of this teacher guide is to promote education by providing resources and information to aid classroom teachers in using the Oregon Zoo as an educational setting. The unit also emphasizes the integration of science, mathematics, reading, writing, speaking, and problem solving. It is designed for grades 3-5 and is based on the Oregon State…

  19. Endangered Plants in Oregon and Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Rhoda M.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a partial list of the 132 Oregon and Washington plants which have been proposed for federal protection under the Endangered Species Act. Suggestions for student/citizen involvement in preserving these species and a description of a videotape about rare/endangered species of the Willamette Valley (Oregon) are included. (DH)

  20. Oregon University System Fact Book 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon University System, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This compendium of narrative and statistical information is an overview of the Oregon University System (OUS) and is the last Fact Book published under the auspices of the Oregon University System. The introduction includes a mission statement, a listing of OUS campuses and centers, a roster of the members of the State Board of Higher Education,…

  1. Dissolved Oxygen Data for Coos Estuary (Oregon)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this product is the transmittal of dissolved oxygen data collected in the Coos Estuary, Oregon to Ms. Molly O'Neill (University of Oregon), for use in her studies on the factors influencing spatial and temporal patterns in dissolved oxygen in this estuary. These d...

  2. 78 FR 8016 - Establishment of the Elkton Oregon Viticultural Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau 27 CFR Part 9 RIN 1513-AB88 Establishment of the Elkton Oregon...-acre ``Elkton Oregon'' viticultural area in Douglas County, Oregon. The viticultural area lies totally within the Umpqua Valley viticultural area and the multi-county Southern Oregon viticultural area....

  3. Oregon's Toxic Household Products Law.

    PubMed

    Neumann, C M; Giffin, S; Hall, R; Henderson, M; Buhler, D R

    2000-01-01

    In 1991, Oregon became the first state in the U.S. to require the addition of an aversive agent to ethylene glycol-containing antifreeze and methanol-containing windshield wiper fluid. This new law, entitled "Toxic Household Products (THP) Act," was designed to reduce pediatric and animal poisonings from accidental ingestion of these two potentially lethal consumer automotive products. While not the stated intention of the law, addition of aversive agents to consumer automotive products could also reduce adult poisonings associated with intentional (suicides or alcoholics ingesting methanol-containing windshield wiper fluid) or accidental exposures. This law went into effect April 30, 1995, following settlement of a lawsuit brought by the Chemical Manufacturing Specialties Association (CSMA), a trade group representing the five largest manufacturers of ethylene glycol-based antifreeze in the U.S. This paper discusses the major policy issues that arose following the passage of Oregon's THP Act. Major provisions of the law are provided along with a discussion of CSMA's opposition to the Act's implementation. A description of the eventual settlement that was reached with CSMA as well as the major components of Oregon Health Division's (OHD) enforcement program are also highlighted. Data are presented for 1987 through 1998 on the number of exposures and severity of effects for pediatric cases (children < 6 years old) following exposure to both of these potentially lethal automotive products. However, because of the low incidence of exposures each year, these data are insufficient to draw any conclusions on the impact of the THP Act.

  4. Landslide assessment of Newell Creek Canyon, Oregon City, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Growney, L.; Burris, L.; Garletts, D.; Walsh, K. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    A study has been conducted in Newell Creek Canyon near Oregon City, Oregon, T3S, T2S, R2E. A landslide inventory has located 53 landslides in the 2.8 km[sup 2] area. The landslides range in area from approximately 15,000m[sup 2] to 10m[sup 2]. Past slides cover an approximate 7% of the canyon area. Landslide processes include: slump, slump-translational, slump-earthflow and earthflow. Hard, impermeable clay-rich layers in the Troutdale Formation form the failure planes for most of the slides. Slopes composed of Troutdale material may seem to be stable, but when cuts and fills are produced, slope failure is common because of the perched water tables and impermeable failure planes. Good examples of cut and fill failures are present on Highway 213 which passes through Newell Creek Canyon. Almost every cut and fill has failed since the road construction began. The latest failure is in the fill located at mile-post 2.1. From data gathered, a slope stability risk map was generated. Stability risk ratings are divided into three groups: high, moderate and low. High risk of slope instability is designated to all landslides mapped in the slide inventory. Moderate risk is designated to slopes in the Troutdale Formation greater than 8[degree]. Low risk is designated to slopes in the Troutdale Formation less than 8[degree].

  5. Copper corrosion in coastal Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S. Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is studying the atmospheric corrosion performance of copper and other metals along the Oregon coast. Only the copper results will be presented in this paper. Atmospheric corrosion measurements of copper samples were made at seven bridges, eight coastal communities, and three inland reference sites to quantify and understand the effect of high chloride environments on the corrosion performance of copper. The materials were atmospherically exposed for 1, 2, and 3 years to examine the effects of sheltering, orientation, distance from the ocean, and coastal microclimates on the rate of corrosion and the composition of the corrosion film.

  6. U.S. Geological Survey ground-water studies in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolke, E.L.

    1988-01-01

    The use of groundwater in Oregon is expected to increase owing to continued population growth and to surface water supplies that are inadequate to meet present or future demand. The major groundwater issues in Oregon are: conjunctive use of surface and groundwater; contamination from hazardous wastes, leakage from underground gasoline and diesel tanks, naturally occurring brackish water, and high concentrations of dissolved iron; groundwater availability; and Indian water rights. Before 1987, the Oregon Water Resources Department, in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), maintained a network of about 400 observation wells in Oregon to monitor fluctuations in groundwater levels. Water levels currently are measured cooperatively only in active project areas. The USGS has conducted more than 120 hydrologic investigations in Oregon. During fiscal year 1987, the USGS entered into cooperative agreements with 23 local, State, and Federal agencies to conduct hydrologic investigations in Oregon; six investigations included quantitative studies of groundwater. Examples of these groundwater studies are: groundwater hydrology of the Portland basin; groundwater hydrology in the Umatilla Plateau; and iron geochemistry of a sand dune aquifer near Coos Bay. (Lantz-PTT)

  7. 78 FR 38703 - LNG Development Company (d/b/a Oregon LNG); Oregon Pipeline Company, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission LNG Development Company (d/b/a Oregon LNG); Oregon Pipeline Company, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on June 7, 2013, LNG Development Company, LLC (d/ b/a Oregon LNG) (Oregon LNG), 8100 NE Parkway Drive, Suite 165, Vancouver, WA 98662, filed in Docket No. CP9-6-001...

  8. Iowa and Eugene, Oregon, orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2003-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, the commitment of orthopaedic surgeons to basic and clinical research and evaluation of treatment outcomes has made possible remarkable improvements in the care of people with injuries and diseases of the limbs and spine. A group of Oregon orthopaedic surgeons has had an important role in these advances, especially in the orthopaedic specialties of sports medicine and hip reconstruction. Since Don Slocum (Iowa Orthopaedic Resident, 1934-1937), started practice in Eugene, Oregon, in 1939, three orthopaedic surgeons, Denny Collis, Craig Mohler and Paul Watson, who received their orthopaedic residency education at the University of Iowa, and three orthopaedic surgeons, Stan James, Tom Wuest and Dan Fitzpatrick, who received their undergraduate, medical school and orthopaedic residency education at the University of Iowa, have joined the group Dr. Slocum founded. These individuals, and their partners, established and have maintained a successful growing practice that serves the people of the Willamette valley, but in addition, they have made important contributions to the advancement of orthopaedics.

  9. DOES ANTHROPOGENIC ACTIVITIES OR NATURE DOMINATE THE SHAPING OF THE LANDSCAPE IN THE OREGON PILOT STUDY AREA FOR 1990-1999?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climatic variation and human activities are major factors resulting in land degradation in arid and semiarid lands. In the Mediterranean region and over history, climatic drying was coincidental with developing agricultural technology and the rapid increase of the population and ...

  10. Oregon Salt Marshes: How Blue are They?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two important ecosystem services of wetlands are carbon sequestration and filtration of nutrients and particulates. We quantified the carbon and nitrogen accumulation rates in salt marshes at 135 plots distributed across eight estuaries located in Oregon, USA. Net carbon and ...

  11. Oregon State University Governmental Impact Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Univ., Corvallis.

    Interactions between the government and Oregon State University were assessed with attention to the following areas: employment and personnel administration (regulations regarding equal opportunity, affirmative action, and nondiscrimination); students and student life (regulations regarding admissions, financial aid, records management, special…

  12. John Kitzhaber and the Oregon Health Plan.

    PubMed

    Lunch, W M

    2000-01-01

    The Oregon Health Plan could not have developed into its current form without strong leadership. Criticism, which has shifted from the political left to the right, has been a constant companion, making integration of mental health services more precarious.

  13. Cascade Mountain Range in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Along its Oregon segment, the Cascade Range is almost entirely volcanic in origin. The volcanoes and their eroded remnants are the visible magmatic expression of the Cascadia subduction zone, where the offshore Juan de Fuca tectonic plate is subducted beneath North America. Subduction occurs as two lithospheric plates collide, and an underthrusted oceanic plate is commonly dragged into the mantle by the pull of gravity, carrying ocean-bottom rock and sediment down to where heat and pressure expel water. As this water rises, it lowers the melting temperature in the overlying hot mantle rocks, thereby promoting melting. The molten rock supplies the volcanic arcs with heat and magma. Cascade Range volcanoes are part of the Ring of Fire, a popular term for the numerous volcanic arcs that encircle the Pacific Ocean.

  14. Lee v. State of Oregon.

    PubMed

    1997-02-27

    The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ordered the dismissal of a challenge to Oregon's Death with Dignity Act because competent, terminally ill patients, physicians, and nursing homes all lacked standing. None were entitled to a judicial decision because all failed to assert an "injury in fact" resulting from violations against the Equal Protection or Due Process clauses, the Americans with Disabilities Act, or the Rehabilitation Act. The patient's claim of depression to the degree of being unable to make an informed decision about ending her life was too speculative. Nor would the conjectural nature of the claim have changed if it were asserted by either the doctors or the residential care facilities.

  15. DOES ANTHROPOGENIC ACTIVITIES OR NATURE DOMINATE THE SHAPING OF THE LANDSCDAPE IN THE OREGON PILOT STUDY AREA FOR 1990-1999?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climatic variation and human activities are major factors resulting in land degradation in arid and semi-arid lands. In the Mediterranean region and over history, climatic drying was coincidental with developing agricultural technology and the rapid increase of the population and...

  16. Copper sensitivity of Oregon coastal phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, G.F.

    1983-01-01

    The copper sensitivity of natural populations of Oregon coastal phytoplankton was studied using both additions of ionic copper and Cu-TRIS free ion activity buffers in coastal seawater. Phytoplankton growth rate, taxonomic composition and copper content were examined in treatment additions. The growth rate results suggested that the deficiency of another trace metal increased the apparent toxicity of copper to phytoplankton, especially in TRIS-free ion activity buffered seawater. Laboratory experiments with isolated coastal phytoplankton species indicated that manganese deficiency exacerbated copper toxicity, and that manganese deficiency was induced in TRIS buffered seawater by a TRIS-catalyzed oxidation of Mn. When manganese additions to natural populations were employed inconjunction with ionic copper additions and TRIS-free ion regulated seawater, they showed that ambient manganese concentrations were low enough to shift the onset of copper toxicity to lower copper concentrations. The results suggest that while acute toxicity to phytoplankton by ambient concentrations of copper is unlikely, the interactions of copper and other metals, especially manganese, may influence natural coastal phytoplankton populations in more subtle ways, such as taxonomic composition.

  17. Developing the OORCC: A Multifaceted Astronomical Research and Outreach Facility at the University of Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Teiler J.; Bullis, Jeremy; Gustafsson, Annika; Fisher, Robert Scott

    2015-01-01

    The University of Oregon (UO) owns and operates Pine Mountain Observatory (PMO), located in central Oregon on the summit of Pine Mountain at an elevation of 1980 meters. PMO consists of four telescopes ranging in size from 0.35 - 0.8 meters. The Oregon Observatory Remote Control Center (OORCC) is a remote-observing center within the Department of Physics on the UO campus (~140 miles from the observatory) that has a direct connection to PMO through a dedicated fiber-optic cable. With this facility, we will enable UO undergraduate student researchers, UO faculty, and the non-scientific community to fully control and operate a newly installed robotic telescope on the summit of Pine Mountain from Eugene, or any other authorized site in Oregon. In addition to providing undergraduates with instrumentation and engineering experience, we will implement research by photometrically monitoring bright and variable astronomical sources including main belt comets, Herbig Ae/Be stars, and active galactic nuclei in extragalactic systems. The primary objective with the OORCC is to manage a multifaceted astronomy and astrophysics research facility, extending as a state-wide resource for K-12 STEM activities and public outreach programs. With the OORCC, we intend to bring unique and enriching astronomy exposure to many different groups of people throughout the state of Oregon.

  18. Superfund explanation of significant difference for the Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): Umatilla Army Depot (Lagoons), Hermiston, OR, September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This document presents an Explanation of Significant Difference (ESD) from the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) Explosives Washout Lagoons Soils Operable Unit issued September 25, 1992 (PB93-964610). This ESD documents the significant differences to the selected remedy outlined in the ROD. In summary, the significant difference from the selected remedy in the ROD is the utilization of the treated soil as the organic component in the re-vegetation of several designated sites on the installation rather than backfilling the former Explosive Washout Lagoons with the compost.

  19. A Plan for Course and Credit Transfer between Oregon Community Colleges and Oregon University System Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Univ. System, Eugene. Office of Academic Affairs.

    This document presents a plan for course and credit transfer between Oregon community colleges and Oregon University System (OUS) institutions. It outlines the current and proposed policies, practices, and procedures for providing effective course and credit transfer in the state. The document also provides a summary of intersector communication…

  20. Organizing for Digitization at Oregon State University: A Case Study and Comparison with ARL Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boock, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a case study of how Oregon State University Libraries (OSUL) organized to accomplish digitization activities. Digitization activities are broken down into six major categories: management, copyright, digital imaging, metadata, hardware/software/web design, and selection. The OSUL departments responsible for tasks within each…

  1. Occupational health and safety status of indigenous and Latino farmworkers in Oregon.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, S A; Goff, N M; Shadbeh, N; Samples, J; Ventura, S; Sanchez, V; Rao, P; Davis, S

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to pesticides poses great risk to agricultural workers and their families. Of the approximately 174,000 agricultural workers in Oregon, studies estimate that up to 40% of the workers in Oregon are indigenous and may be particularly vulnerable to the health risks of working in pesticide treated areas. Surveys conducted with Oregon farmworkers suggest that Latino and indigenous farmworkers differ demographically and may have diverse occupational and health needs. All Latino workers reported Spanish as their native language, while indigenous workers spoke several different native languages. Latino workers were employed mostly in orchards (28%) and nurseries (24%), while indigenous workers were mostly pickers (40%). Indigenous farmworkers reported less frequent suitable occupational safety training, and potentially less knowledge of the health consequences of pesticides. Addressing the barriers to obtaining pesticide health and safety information is of primary importance, given the changing demographics of farmworkers in Oregon. This article concludes with a discussion of these findings and the programmatic activities that have been implemented in Oregon to improve farmworkers' understanding of hazards and rights associated with agricultural work.

  2. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE NATIONAL REGISTERLISTED OREGON STATE FORESTER'S OFFICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE NATIONAL REGISTER-LISTED OREGON STATE FORESTER'S OFFICE BUILDING AND STONEMASONRY WALL AND FLAGSTONE SIDEWALK ALONG STATE STREET, VIEW LOOKING SOUTH FROM STATE STREET. - Oregon State Forester's Office Complex, 2600 State Street, Salem, Marion, OR

  3. 36. MYRTLE CREEK BRIDGE, OREGON STATE HIGHWAY 199, AT END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. MYRTLE CREEK BRIDGE, OREGON STATE HIGHWAY 199, AT END OF STOUT GROVE ROAD. JOSEPHINE COUNTY, OREGON LOOKING WNW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  4. 71. MYRTLE CREED BRIDGE, OREGON STATE HIGHWAY 199, AT END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. MYRTLE CREED BRIDGE, OREGON STATE HIGHWAY 199, AT END OF STOUT GROVE ROAD. JOSEPHINE COUNTY, OREGON. LOOKING WNW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  5. 1. General view of Oregon Electric Railway, view looking north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. General view of Oregon Electric Railway, view looking north at Hedges Creek trestle. - Oregon Electric Railroad, Hedges Creek Trestle, Garden Home to Wilsonville Segment, Milepost 38.7, Garden Home, Washington County, OR

  6. GENERAL PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE "KEEP OREGON GREEN" ASSOCIATION BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE "KEEP OREGON GREEN" ASSOCIATION BUILDING (K.O.G. BUILDING), VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST ACROSS STATE STREET. - Oregon State Forester's Office Complex, 2600 State Street, Salem, Marion, OR

  7. Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Crumb rubber modified asphalt concrete in Oregon. Summary report. Report for 1985-94

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, E.; Peters, W.

    1995-07-01

    Over the last nine years, the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) has constructed 13 projects using crumb rubber modifiers (CRM) in asphalt concrete pavements using both the wet and dry process. State and federal legislation may require the use of recycled rubber in asphalt concrete, therefore, the Oregon Department of Transportation is interested in determining the most cost -effective crumb rubber modified asphalt concrete. The report includes a literature review on the use of crumb rubber modifiers in asphalt concrete pavement; a review on non-ODOT CRM paving projects constructed by Oregon counties and cities; and the Washington Department of Transportation. In additon, the report summarizes the data collected on all CRM hot mix asphalt concrete pavement projects constructed by ODOT. The ODOT information includes background constitution, cost, and performance data for each of the test and control sections. Finally, the future activities of the project are reviewed.

  9. Trichinella surveillance in black bears (Ursus americanus) from Oregon, USA.

    PubMed

    Mortenson, J A; Kent, M L; Fowler, D R; Chomel, B B; Immell, D A

    2014-01-01

    We used serology and muscle digestion to test black bears (Ursus americanus) from western Oregon, USA, for Trichinella. Results indicate black bears in Oregon are not part of a sylvatic cycle for Trichinella, and risk of human exposure to Trichinella larvae from eating black bear meat from Oregon appears low.

  10. Oregon geology - parent of the soil, foundation for the vine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, Ray

    2006-01-01

    This presentation describes USGS geologic mapping in western Oregon, geologic map products, a thumbnail sketch of geologic history, a discussion of new mapping in progress in northwest Oregon, a tour of northwest Oregon geologic units, their relation to new American Viticultural Areas, and online sources of information.

  11. Lowering the Age of Identification: Oregon's Design and Preliminary Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Jean Attridge; Moore, William

    1993-01-01

    This newsletter article describes early identification of children who have hearing impairments in Oregon. Oregon was selected to demonstrate a model system for early identification that had been developed in Utah. A new birth certificate was designed, which enabled the Oregon Health Division to screen for risk factors for hearing loss. A…

  12. UMTRA water sampling and analysis plan, Lakeview, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-29

    The purpose of this document is to provide background, guidance, and justification for water sampling activities for the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) processing and disposal sites. This water sampling and analysis plan will form the basis for groundwater sampling and analysis work orders (WSAWO) to be implemented during 1993. Monitoring at the former Lakeview processing site is for characterization purposes and in preparation for the risk assessment, scheduled for the fall of 1993. Compliance monitoring was conducted at the disposal site. Details of the sampling plan are discussed in Section 5.0.

  13. Gonzales versus Oregon:the Oregon Death with Dignity Act Meets the Controlled Substances Act.

    PubMed

    Rich, Ben A

    2007-01-01

    The decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in the case of Gonzales v. Oregon represents the most recent battle in a long war of attrition waged by the opponents of the practice of physician-assisted suicide in general and the Oregon Death with Dignity Act in particular. The history of the Oregon law and the many challenges to it provide pertinent background to understanding important elements of the majority and dissenting opinions in this case and suggest where this seemingly intractable societal debate may be headed.

  14. 77 FR 62442 - Safety Zone; Oregon City Bridge Grand Opening Fireworks Display; Willamette River, Oregon City, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Oregon City Bridge Grand Opening Fireworks Display; Willamette River, Oregon City, OR AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a safety zone on the Willamette River between the Oregon City...

  15. Creating Open Textbooks: A Unique Partnership between Oregon State University Libraries and Press and Open Oregon State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwell, Faye A.; Fisher, Dianna M.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents Oregon State University's experience launching an innovative Open Textbook initiative in spring 2014. The partners, Open Oregon State and the Oregon State University Libraries and Press, aimed to reduce the cost of course materials for students while ensuring the content created was peer-reviewed and employed multimedia…

  16. Chapter 6. Impacts of Climate Change on Oregon's Coasts and Estuaries in "Oregon Climate Change Assessment Report"

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2007 the Oregon legislature created a new Oregon Climate Change Research Institute (OCCRI), which is based at Oregon State University (OSU). As part of its charter, OCCRI is mandated to produce a biennial report for the state legislature synthesizing climate change impacts a...

  17. Renewing Oregon's Economy: Growing Jobs and Industries through Innovation. A Report from the Oregon Council for Knowledge and Economic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    The Oregon Council for Knowledge and Economic Development (OCKED), a collaborative effort among Oregon's higher education institutions, economic development department, and the private sector, is charged with developing strategies to enhance Oregon's economic competitiveness in a knowledge-based, global economy. This report describes the council's…

  18. 76 FR 37059 - Siuslaw National Forest; Oregon; Oregon Dunes NRA Management Area 10 (C) Route and Area Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... Forest Service Siuslaw National Forest; Oregon; Oregon Dunes NRA Management Area 10 (C) Route and Area...) routes within Management Area (MA) 10 (C) of the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area (ODNRA) beyond the... 10 (C) to MA 10 (B), in order to meet the management objectives of MA 10 (B); and (3) designate...

  19. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bedrossian, Karen L.

    1984-08-01

    The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

  20. Oregon School-Based Health Centers, 1992-1994 Services Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nystrom, Robert J.

    This report describes the activities of Oregon's 25 high school-based health centers between 1992 and 1994. Information is provided on funding sources, services offered (including general medical services and reproductive health, mental health, health promotion services, and hours of operation), staffing (including levels of staffing and…

  1. Learning about Oregon: Symbols, Legends and Facts. A Source Book for Elementary Teachers. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covey, Marvin L.; Covey, Marjorie A.

    This compendium of information and ideas is intended as a resource for teachers introducing the study of Oregon history to elementary school children. Brief discussions of 42 topics are followed by suggestions for classroom activities using this information. The topics include the various state symbols, Indian legends, the origin of the state…

  2. Some important elk-forest habitat relationships for Western Oregon and Washington. [Cervus canadensis

    SciTech Connect

    Witmer, G.; Wisdom, M.

    1986-01-01

    The report identifies some basic Roosevelt elk - habitat relationships so that the needs of elk could be better integrated with forestry practices and other human activities occurring in the forestlands of western Oregon and Washington. The relationships discussed are: space and water, large areas, cover areas, and interspersion component, and the roading/disturbance component. (ACR)

  3. Deep long-period earthquakes beneath Washington and Oregon volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, M.L.; Malone, S.D.; Moran, S.C.; Thelen, W.A.; Vidale, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Deep long-period (DLP) earthquakes are an enigmatic type of seismicity occurring near or beneath volcanoes. They are commonly associated with the presence of magma, and found in some cases to correlate with eruptive activity. To more thoroughly understand and characterize DLP occurrence near volcanoes in Washington and Oregon, we systematically searched the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) triggered earthquake catalog for DLPs occurring between 1980 (when PNSN began collecting digital data) and October 2009. Through our analysis we identified 60 DLPs beneath six Cascade volcanic centers. No DLPs were associated with volcanic activity, including the 1980-1986 and 2004-2008 eruptions at Mount St. Helens. More than half of the events occurred near Mount Baker, where the background flux of magmatic gases is greatest among Washington and Oregon volcanoes. The six volcanoes with DLPs (counts in parentheses) are Mount Baker (31), Glacier Peak (9), Mount Rainier (9), Mount St. Helens (9), Three Sisters (1), and Crater Lake (1). No DLPs were identified beneath Mount Adams, Mount Hood, Mount Jefferson, or Newberry Volcano, although (except at Hood) that may be due in part to poorer network coverage. In cases where the DLPs do not occur directly beneath the volcanic edifice, the locations coincide with large structural faults that extend into the deep crust. Our observations suggest the occurrence of DLPs in these areas could represent fluid and/or magma transport along pre-existing tectonic structures in the middle crust. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Deep long-period earthquakes beneath Washington and Oregon volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, M. L.; Malone, S. D.; Moran, S. C.; Thelen, W. A.; Vidale, J. E.

    2011-03-01

    Deep long-period (DLP) earthquakes are an enigmatic type of seismicity occurring near or beneath volcanoes. They are commonly associated with the presence of magma, and found in some cases to correlate with eruptive activity. To more thoroughly understand and characterize DLP occurrence near volcanoes in Washington and Oregon, we systematically searched the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) triggered earthquake catalog for DLPs occurring between 1980 (when PNSN began collecting digital data) and October 2009. Through our analysis we identified 60 DLPs beneath six Cascade volcanic centers. No DLPs were associated with volcanic activity, including the 1980-1986 and 2004-2008 eruptions at Mount St. Helens. More than half of the events occurred near Mount Baker, where the background flux of magmatic gases is greatest among Washington and Oregon volcanoes. The six volcanoes with DLPs (counts in parentheses) are Mount Baker (31), Glacier Peak (9), Mount Rainier (9), Mount St. Helens (9), Three Sisters (1), and Crater Lake (1). No DLPs were identified beneath Mount Adams, Mount Hood, Mount Jefferson, or Newberry Volcano, although (except at Hood) that may be due in part to poorer network coverage. In cases where the DLPs do not occur directly beneath the volcanic edifice, the locations coincide with large structural faults that extend into the deep crust. Our observations suggest the occurrence of DLPs in these areas could represent fluid and/or magma transport along pre-existing tectonic structures in the middle crust.

  5. New Approaches to Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Demonstrated in Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, G. R.; Rizzo, A.; Madin, I.; Lyles Smith, R.; Stimely, L.

    2012-12-01

    methods were: (1) door-to-door (person-to-person) education, (2) evacuation drills, (3) outreach to K-12 schools, (4) media events, and (5) workshops targeted to key audiences (lodging facilities, teachers, and local officials). Community organizers were hired to apply these five methods to clusters of small communities, measuring performance by before and after polling. Organizers were encouraged to approach the top priority, person-to-person education, by developing Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT) or CERT-like organizations in each community, thereby leaving behind a functioning volunteer-based group that will continue the outreach program and build long term resiliency. One of the most effective person-to-person educational tools was the Map Your Neighborhood program that brings people together so they can sketch the basic layout of their neighborhoods to depict key earthquake and tsunami hazards and mitigation solutions. The various person-to-person volunteer efforts and supporting outreach activities are knitting communities together and creating a permanent culture of tsunami and earthquake preparedness. All major Oregon coastal population centers will have been covered by this intensive outreach program by ~2014.

  6. Interview: Public Alternative Schools in Eugene, Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edcentric, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Information from interviews with a parent coordinator at Eastside Elementary School, a teacher at Silver Lea Corridor School, and a student at Action High and the Planning Course is presented to show history, relationship and function with parents, teachers, students, and administrators in the Eugene, Oregon, public alternative school system. (JT)

  7. Directory and Statistics of Oregon Libraries, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheppke, Jim, Comp.; Vogt, Valerie, Comp.

    This report provides information for 1988-89 on libraries in Oregon. The first section, which presents information on 214 public libraries, includes a directory arranged by city of headquarters library; a map showing governance of public libraries; analysis of statistics including long-term trends, short-term trends, comparisons by county, and top…

  8. Oregon Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse: Third Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Library, Salem. Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse.

    The Oregon Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse received reports of formal challenges to 25 books and 1 recording during the time period between July 1, 1989, and June 30, 1990. It is noted that 17 of the challenged items were held by public libraries and 9 by school library media centers, with 21 items designated as children's and young adult…

  9. Oregon Students Help Prepare Impact Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Tom

    1973-01-01

    Describes a field-biology research project conducted at Coos Bay, Oregon by high school students attending the summer sessions at Terramar Field Science Facility during the summer of 1972. Discusses the value of this type of environmental survey for both the students and the community. (JR)

  10. Growing Oregon's Innovation Economy through Postsecondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon University System, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This document sets forth the principles and practices of the Academic Excellence and Economic Development (AEED) Working Group of the Oregon State Board of Higher Education. The goal of AEED is to identify and gain support for 2-5 development opportunity areas that meet five criteria: (1) Show a measurable return on investment over 20 years (with…

  11. Teaching Biochemistry Online at Oregon State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahern, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    A strategy for growing online biochemistry courses is presented based on successes in ecampus at Oregon State University. Four free drawing cards were key to the effort--YouTube videos, iTunes U online free course content, an Open Educational Resource textbook--Biochemistry Free and Easy, and a fun set of educational songs known as the Metabolic…

  12. 76 FR 11835 - Oregon Disaster #OR-00036

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... State of Oregon (FEMA-1956- DR), dated 02/17/2011. Incident: Severe Winter Storm, Flooding, Mudslides, Landslides, and Debris Flows. Incident Period: 01/13/2011 through 01/21/2011. Effective Date: 02/17/2011...: 11/17/2011. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business...

  13. Oregon University System Fact Book 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayfield, Vern; North, Tom; Kieran, Bob

    2007-01-01

    This compendium of narrative and statistical information is an overview of the Oregon University System (OUS) and is produced every two years. The introduction includes a mission and vision statement, a listing of OUS campuses and centers, a history of the institutions, OUS degree partnership programs, and distance education degree programs, OUS…

  14. Oregon University System Fact Book, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayfield, Vern; Kieran, Bob

    2004-01-01

    This compendium of narrative and statistical information is an overview of the Oregon University System (OUS). The introduction includes a mission statement, a listing of OUS campuses and centers, the top accomplishments of each campus in 2003-2004, a history of the institutions, and a roster of the members of the State Board of Higher Education.…

  15. History of the Oregon Small Schools Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Education, Salem.

    Development of the Oregon Small Schools Program is traced against the background of other small-school projects, such as the Western States Small Schools Project and the Texas Small Schools Project. Information is given on the various procedures involved in the organization's development and on problems (e.g., high turnover of teachers and high…

  16. History of successful ballot initiatives--Oregon.

    PubMed

    Weller, J

    1998-12-15

    In this report, the author traces the background of Ballot Measure 44, which raised taxes on cigarette and other tobacco products in Oregon. He highlights the effect of a positive coalescing of different forces (nonprofit health groups and medical groups) despite initial differences in program strategy.

  17. Oregon Criteria of Excellence in Reading Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    The Oregon criteria of excellence for quality community reading programs include criteria for the following: (1) staffing, preparation, and inservice training for personnel; (2) organization and management; (3) maintenance and dissemination of materials and information; (4) diagnosis and prescription; (5) the developmental reading program; (6)…

  18. 77 FR 14853 - Oregon Disaster #OR-00041

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oregon Disaster OR-00041 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This.../03/2012. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street...

  19. Recharging Professionally: The Oregon Seaside Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dosch, Peg; Paxton, Cindy

    1981-01-01

    Two conferences, Seaside I and Seaside II, were held to develop a professional support system to assist in improving the health education profession in Oregon. Due to the success of the first two conferences, two more were held in which conceptual models in nutrition, fitness, sexuality, and weight control were presented. (JN)

  20. 40 CFR 81.338 - Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oregon. 81.338 Section 81.338 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Urban Growth Boundary Medford Area Jackson County (part) 9/23/02 Attainment Medford Urban...

  1. Marketing Cluster Brief. [Vocational Education in Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamps, Margaret McDonnall

    This guide sets forth minimum approval criteria for marketing/distributive education programs in Oregon. The information in the guide is intended for use by district-level curriculum planners, teachers, regional coordinators, or state education department staff involved with new program development or revisions of existing programs. The guide…

  2. Volcano hazards at Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Mastin, Larry G.; Scott, William E.; Schilling, Steven P.

    1997-01-01

    Newberry volcano is a broad shield volcano located in central Oregon. It has been built by thousands of eruptions, beginning about 600,000 years ago. At least 25 vents on the flanks and summit have been active during several eruptive episodes of the past 10,000 years. The most recent eruption 1,300 years ago produced the Big Obsidian Flow. Thus, the volcano's long history and recent activity indicate that Newberry will erupt in the future. The most-visited part of the volcano is Newberry Crater, a volcanic depression or caldera at the summit of the volcano. Seven campgrounds, two resorts, six summer homes, and two major lakes (East and Paulina Lakes) are nestled in the caldera. The caldera has been the focus of Newberry's volcanic activity for at least the past 10,000 years. Other eruptions during this time have occurred along a rift zone on the volcano's northwest flank and, to a lesser extent, the south flank. Many striking volcanic features lie in Newberry National Volcanic Monument, which is managed by the U.S. Forest Service. The monument includes the caldera and extends along the northwest rift zone to the Deschutes River. About 30 percent of the area within the monument is covered by volcanic products erupted during the past 10,000 years from Newberry volcano. Newberry volcano is presently quiet. Local earthquake activity (seismicity) has been trifling throughout historic time. Subterranean heat is still present, as indicated by hot springs in the caldera and high temperatures encountered during exploratory drilling for geothermal energy. This report describes the kinds of hazardous geologic events that might occur in the future at Newberry volcano. A hazard-zonation map is included to show the areas that will most likely be affected by renewed eruptions. In terms of our own lifetimes, volcanic events at Newberry are not of day-to-day concern because they occur so infrequently; however, the consequences of some types of eruptions can be severe. When Newberry

  3. Institutional Nitrogen Footprint: A Case Study at Oregon State ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Many institutions of higher education are measuring and consciously managing their impact on the environment, using metrics of energy use, recycling, alternative transportation or local foods. While the carbon footprint is a more widely known metric of sustainability, the nitrogen footprint is also an important measure of human environmental impact that comes from food, energy, transportation and waste demands of a university. Oregon State University is a large, western land-grant university that has supported a Sustainability Office for more than 10 years, and joined the institutional Nitrogen Footprint Network in 2015. This poster presentation will demonstrate the Nitrogen Footprint Tool calculations for a large land-grant institution using existing data. Goals to reduce nitrogen will be explored in relation to existing efforts within the university that aim to reduce their carbon footprint, support alternative transportation, reduce waste and increase local foods. EPA's Sustainable and Healthy Communities Research Program has been working with the University of Virginia to grow the Nitrogen Footprint Tool (NFT) network from one institution to over 16 institutions since 2014. This poster will present the nitrogen footprint results from Oregon State University. The university has been actively involved in sustainability efforts for many years, and this presentation will share how much of the data that OSU collects for their existing sustainability metrics

  4. Occurrence and concentration of caffeine in Oregon coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez del Rey, Zoe; Granek, Elise F; Sylvester, Steve

    2012-07-01

    Caffeine, a biologically active drug, is recognized as a contaminant of freshwater and marine systems. We quantified caffeine concentrations in Oregon's coastal ocean to determine whether levels correlated with proximity to caffeine pollution sources. Caffeine was analyzed at 14 coastal locations, stratified between populated areas with sources of caffeine pollution and sparsely populated areas with no major caffeine pollution sources. Caffeine concentrations were measured in major water bodies discharging near sampling locations. Caffeine in seawater ranged from below the reporting limit (8.5 ng/L) to 44.7 ng/L. Caffeine occurrence and concentrations in seawater did not correspond with pollution threats from population density and point and non-point sources, but did correspond with storm event occurrence. Caffeine concentrations in rivers and estuaries draining to the coast ranged from below the reporting limit to 152.2 ng/L. This study establishes the occurrence of caffeine in Oregon's coastal waters, yet relative importance of sources, seasonal variability, and processes affecting caffeine transport into the coastal ocean require further research.

  5. Distribution, foraging behavior, and capture results of the spotted bat (Euderma maculatum) in central Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodhouse, T.J.; McCaffrey, M.F.; Wright, R.G.

    2005-01-01

    The spotted bat (Euderma maculatum) has been virtually unknown in Oregon despite the existence of potential habitat in many areas of the state. In 2002 and 2003 we searched for spotted bats along the John Day, Deschutes, and Crooked Rivers and at a remote dry canyon southeast of the city of Bend in central Oregon. The species was documented through the use of mist-nets, a bat detector, and recognition of audible spotted bat calls. Spotted bats were found at 11 locations in 6 Oregon counties. Nightly activity patterns of spotted bats were unpredictable. Spotted bats were found in 78% of search areas but on only 48% of survey nights. We observed spotted bats foraging above fields and low upland slopes adjacent to rivers and creeks and along the rims of cliffs. Estimated flying heights of spotted bats ranged from 3 m to 50 m aboveground. The species was difficult to capture and was captured only after considerable experimentation with methods and materials. Three spotted bats were captured toward the end of the project in 2003 and accounted for only 0.5% of all bats captured during the study. Although we attached radio transmitters to 2 spotted bats, we found no roost locations. We believe additional spotted bat surveys in Oregon are warranted, especially in higher-elevation habitats, but recommend that to increase their effectiveness, surveys accommodate the unique foraging behavior of the species.

  6. Landslide deposit boundaries for the Little North Santiam River Basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sobieszczyk, Steven

    2010-01-01

    This layer is an inventory of existing landslides deposits in the Little North Santiam River Basin, Oregon (2009). Each landslide deposit shown on this map has been classified according to a number of specific characteristics identified at the time recorded in the GIS database. The classification scheme was developed by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (Burns and Madin, 2009). Several significant landslide characteristics recorded in the database are portrayed with symbology on this map. The specific characteristics shown for each landslide are the activity of landsliding, landslide features, deep or shallow failure, type of landslide movement, and confidence of landslide interpretation. These landslide characteristics are determined primarily on the basis of geomorphic features, or landforms, observed for each landslide. This work was completed as part of the Master's thesis "Turbidity Monitoring and LiDAR Imagery Indicate Landslides are Primary Source of Suspended-Sediment Load in the Little North Santiam River Basin, Oregon, Winter 2009-2010" by Steven Sobieszczyk, Portland State University and U.S. Geological Survey.Data layers in this geodatabase include: landslide deposit boundaries (Deposits); field-verfied location imagery (Photos); head scarp or scarp flanks (Scarp_Flanks); and secondary scarp features (Scarps).The geodatabase template was developed by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (Burns and Madin, 2009).

  7. TEMPERATURE RELATIONS OF CENTRAL OREGON MARINE INTERTIDAL INVERTEBRATES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MARINE BIOLOGY, OREGON), (*INVERTEBRATES, ECOLOGY), SEA WATER, TIDES, SURFACE TEMPERATURE, DIURNAL VARIATIONS, TEMPERATURE, ECHINODERMATA , GASTROPODA, PELECYPODA, BARNACLES, SALINITY, REPRODUCTION(PHYSIOLOGY)

  8. Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

    1980-06-01

    The following subjects are covered: Oregons' geothermal potential, exploration methods and costs, drilling, utilization methods, economic factors of direct use projects, and legal and institutional setting. (MHR)

  9. WENAHA TUCANNON WILDERNESS, WASHINGTON AND OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Donald A.; Munts, Steven R.

    1984-01-01

    A geologic and mineral survey conducted in the Wenaha Tucannon Wilderness, southeast Washington and northeast Oregon, indicates little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Thin seams of low-grade coal possibly occur in the subsurface in the southeast corner of the wilderness. Additional study of the pre-Tertiary rocks north of the wilderness might reveal important features to aid in further evaluating the pre-Tertiary rocks in the northern tip of the wilderness.

  10. TRANSIENT SOUNDING INVESTIGATION OF NEWBERRY VOLCANO, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitterman, David V.; Neev, Deborah K.

    1985-01-01

    Transient electromagnetic soundings were used to map the geoelectrical structure of Newberry Volcano in central Oregon. An extensive conductor was found to underlie the volcano and to have resistivities from 20 OMEGA m to 72 OMEGA m. The depth to the conductor ranges from 410 m to 870 m. Inside the caldera, low basement resistivities are the result of hot fluids. The cause of the conductor outside the caldera is not known; however, we speculate that it is due to the water table.

  11. Oregon earthquakes increase local landslide risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2014-11-01

    Coastal Oregon is home to a number of slow, recurrent landslides. During bouts of heavy rain, water gets into the soil, reducing friction and causing the ground to slip. Often, these landslides creep along at a barely perceptible rate—less than a centimeter per day. Yet the landslides are a lurking threat, as past events that have damaged infrastructure and cut communities off for months at a time have demonstrated.

  12. Seaside, Oregon, Tsunami Vulnerability Assessment Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, P. K.; Dominey-Howes, D.; Varner, J.

    2006-12-01

    The results of a pilot study to assess the risk from tsunamis for the Seaside-Gearhart, Oregon region will be presented. To determine the risk from tsunamis, it is first necessary to establish the hazard or probability that a tsunami of a particular magnitude will occur within a certain period of time. Tsunami inundation maps that provide 100-year and 500-year probabilistic tsunami wave height contours for the Seaside-Gearhart, Oregon, region were developed as part of an interagency Tsunami Pilot Study(1). These maps provided the probability of the tsunami hazard. The next step in determining risk is to determine the vulnerability or degree of loss resulting from the occurrence of tsunamis due to exposure and fragility. The tsunami vulnerability assessment methodology used in this study was developed by M. Papathoma and others(2). This model incorporates multiple factors (e.g. parameters related to the natural and built environments and socio-demographics) that contribute to tsunami vulnerability. Data provided with FEMA's HAZUS loss estimation software and Clatsop County, Oregon, tax assessment data were used as input to the model. The results, presented within a geographic information system, reveal the percentage of buildings in need of reinforcement and the population density in different inundation depth zones. These results can be used for tsunami mitigation, local planning, and for determining post-tsunami disaster response by emergency services. (1)Tsunami Pilot Study Working Group, Seaside, Oregon Tsunami Pilot Study--Modernization of FEMA Flood Hazard Maps, Joint NOAA/USGS/FEMA Special Report, U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency, 2006, Final Draft. (2)Papathoma, M., D. Dominey-Howes, D.,Y. Zong, D. Smith, Assessing Tsunami Vulnerability, an example from Herakleio, Crete, Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, Vol. 3, 2003, p. 377-389.

  13. Corrosion prevention of Oregon's reinforced coastal bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Cryer. C.B; Gallardo, M. L.

    2004-06-01

    The Oregon Department of Transportation (Oregon DOT) maintains more than 120 coastal bridges; many are reinforced concrete structures over 15 m (50 ft) in length. Twelve of these bridges are historic structures. Oregon DOT is concerned about the ongoing deterioration of these bridges, rising maintenance and repair costs, and the need to protect Oregon’s large investment in coastal bridges. Over 80,000 m2 (850,000 ft2) of coastal bridge surface have been repaired and protected from further chloride-induced corrosion damage by using conductive coating anodes. Most of the anode area is thermal-sprayed (TS) Zn. Other anode materials include TS Ti, Zn-hydrogel, and conductive carbon paint. TS Zn anodes are estimated to have a service life exceeding 25 years but exhibit increasing anode polarization with age. Catalyzed TS Ti anodes develop no significant anode polarization and have exhibited stable long-term performance over 8 years of service. Galvanic Zn-hydrogel anodes produce a stable protection current with no evidence of aging effects over 6 years of service. The conductive carbon paint anode operates at a low anode current density and consumption rate with a low rate of acidification at the anode-concrete interface, which has contributed to a stable protection current over 17 years of service.

  14. Seepage investigations of the Clackamas River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Karl K.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of streamflow measurements and continuous records of streamflow provided insight into interaction of the groundwater system with the Clackamas River in northwestern Oregon. This report assesses gains and losses of the Clackamas River based on streamflow measurements made during previous hydrologic studies, decades of continuous streamflow data, and a detailed suite of streamflow measurements made in September 2006. Gains and losses were considered significant if, after accounting for tributary inflows and withdrawals, the difference in streamflow from a measurement site to the next site downstream exceeded the streamflow measurement uncertainty. Streamflow measurements made in 1987, 1992, and 1998 indicated minor gains and losses. Comparison of continuous records of late summer streamflow of the Clackamas River at Estacada to sites at Clackamas and Oregon City indicated gains in some years, and no losses. Analysis of streamflow measurements of the Clackamas River from Estacada to Oregon City during low-flow conditions in September 2006 enabled an estimation of gains and losses on a reach-by-reach scale; these gains and losses were attributable to the geomorphic setting. During late summer, most groundwater discharge occurs upstream of Estacada, and groundwater contributions to streamflow downstream of Estacada are minor.

  15. Geothermal research, Oregon Cascades: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.

    1988-10-27

    Previous USDOE-funded geothermal studies have produced an extensive temperature gradient and heat flow data base for the State of Oregon. One of the important features identified as a result of these studies is a rapid transition from heat flow values on the order of 40 mW/m/sup 2/ in the Willamette Valley and Western Cascades to values of greater than or equal to100 mW/m/sup 2/ in the High Cascades and the eastern portion of the Western Cascades. These data indicate that the Cascade Range in Oregon has potential as a major geothermal province and stimulated much of the later work completed by government agencies and private industry. Additional data generated as a result of this grant and published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-86-2 further define the location and magnitude of this transition zone. In addition, abundant data collected from the vicinity of Breitenbush and Austin Hot Springs have permitted the formulation of relatively detailed models of these hydrothermal systems. These models are published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-88-5. Task 1.2 of the Deliverables section of Amendment M001 is fulfilled by DOGAMI publication GMS-48, Geologic map of the McKenzie Bridge quadrangle, Lane County, Oregon. This map was printed in October, 1988, and is part of the final submission to USDOE. 8 refs.

  16. Eruptive history of South Sister, Oregon Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fierstein, J.; Hildreth, W.; Calvert, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    South Sister is southernmost and highest of the Three Sisters, three geologically dissimilar stratovolcanoes that together form a spectacular 20km reach along the Cascade crest in Oregon. North Sister is a monotonously mafic edifice as old as middle Pleistocene, Middle Sister a basalt-andesite-dacite cone built between 48 and 14ka, and South Sister is a basalt-free edifice that alternated rhyolitic and intermediate modes from 50ka to 2ka (largely contemporaneous with Middle Sister). Detailed mapping, 330 chemical analyses, and 42 radioisotopic ages show that the oldest exposed South Sister lavas were initially rhyolitic ~50ka. By ~37ka, rhyolitic lava flows and domes (72-74% SiO2) began alternating with radially emplaced dacite (63-68% SiO2) and andesite (59-63% SiO2) lava flows. Construction of a broad cone of silicic andesite-dacite (61-64% SiO2) culminated ~30ka in a dominantly explosive sequence that began with crater-forming andesitic eruptions that left fragmental deposits at least 200m thick. This was followed at ~27ka by growth of a steeply dipping summit cone of agglutinate-dominated andesite (56-60.5% SiO2) and formation of a summit crater ~800m wide. This crater was soon filled and overtopped by a thick dacite lava flow and then by >150m of dacitic pyroclastic ejecta. Small-volume dacite lavas (63-67% SiO2) locally cap the pyroclastic pile. A final sheet of mafic agglutinate (54-56% SiO2) - the most mafic product of South Sister - erupted from and drapes the small (300-m-wide) present-day summit crater, ending a summit-building sequence that lasted until ~22ka. A 20kyr-long-hiatus was broken by rhyolite eruptions that produced (1) the Rock Mesa coulee, tephra, and satellite domelets (73.5% SiO2) and (2) the Devils Chain of ~20 domes and short coulees (72.3-72.8% SiO2) from N-S vent alignments on South Sister's flanks. The compositional reversal from mafic summit agglutinate to recent rhyolites epitomizes the frequently changing compositional modes of the

  17. Plugs or flood-makers? the unstable landslide dams of eastern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safran, Elizabeth B.; O'connor, James; Ely, Lisa L.; House, Kyle; Grant, Gordon E.; Harrity, Kelsey; Croall, Kelsey; Jones, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Landslides into valley bottoms can affect longitudinal profiles of rivers, thereby influencing landscape evolution through base-level changes. Large landslides can hinder river incision by temporarily damming rivers, but catastrophic failure of landslide dams may generate large floods that could promote incision. Dam stability therefore strongly modulates the effects of landslide dams and might be expected to vary among geologic settings. Here, we investigate the morphometry, stability, and effects on adjacent channel profiles of 17 former and current landslide dams in eastern Oregon. Data on landslide dam dimensions, former impoundment size, and longitudinal profile form were obtained from digital elevation data constrained by field observations and aerial imagery; while evidence for catastrophic dam breaching was assessed in the field. The dry, primarily extensional terrain of low-gradient volcanic tablelands and basins contrasts with the tectonically active, mountainous landscapes more commonly associated with large landslides. All but one of the eastern Oregon landslide dams are ancient (likely of order 103 to 104 years old), and all but one has been breached. The portions of the Oregon landslide dams blocking channels are small relative to the area of their source landslide complexes (0.4–33.6 km2). The multipronged landslides in eastern Oregon produce marginally smaller volume dams but affect much larger channels and impound more water than do landslide dams in mountainous settings. As a result, at least 14 of the 17 (82%) large landslide dams in our study area appear to have failed cataclysmically, producing large downstream floods now marked by boulder outwash, compared to a 40–70% failure rate for landslide dams in steep mountain environments. Morphometric indices of landslide dam stability calibrated in other environments were applied to the Oregon dams. Threshold values of the Blockage and Dimensionless Blockage Indices calibrated to worldwide

  18. Potential effects of climate change on Oregon crops

    EPA Science Inventory

    This talk will discuss: 1) potential changes in the Pacific Northwest climate with global climate change, 2) how climate change can affect crops, 3) the diversity of Oregon agriculture, 4) examples of potential response of Oregon crops – especially dryland winter wheat, and 5) br...

  19. Oregon School Districts Respond to Increased Tax Limitations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Toole, Daniel; Stipak, Brian

    2000-01-01

    Passage of a 1990 tax limitation measure made Oregon one of few states since 1978 to mandate reductions in local property taxes. A survey of Oregon school superintendents revealed their fears about reduced local discretion and use of revenue management/forecasting tools and rational, goal-oriented cutback approaches. (Contains 36 footnotes.) (MLH)

  20. The Artist Residency Program in Eastern Oregon: Emphasizing the Rural.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Doug

    During a 1979-1980 pilot project, 13 nine-week residencies by professional artists were sponsored in 10 eastern Oregon school districts with Eastern Oregon State College serving as liaison, the Northwest Area Foundation of St. Paul (Minnesota) contributing $33,500, and participating school districts adding a total of $8,000 in funding. This low…

  1. 77 FR 54608 - Southeast Oregon Resource Advisory Council (RAC); Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... ecosystems of burned areas within the Southeast Oregon RAC jurisdictional boundary; updates on travel management planning in the Lakeview Resource Area, the Chiloquin Ranger District, and the Malheur National...; and a partial-day field tour to the Miller Homestead wildfire area near Frenchglen, Oregon....

  2. Oregon Online: Automated Document Management of an Infobase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Ernest

    1995-01-01

    Describes Oregon Online, the gopher developed for Oregon to provide efficient public access and distribution of government information to citizens via Internet as well as by dial-up access. System development and planning, including the use of ASCII (American Standard Code Information Interchange) format rather than HTML (hypertext mark-up…

  3. 75 FR 43897 - FM TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, GRANTS PASS, OREGON

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 FM TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, GRANTS PASS, OREGON AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: This document sets forth a proposal to amend the FM Table of... the allotment of FM Channel 257A as the second commercial allotment at Grants Pass, Oregon....

  4. 40 CFR 282.87 - Oregon State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the EPA, Regional Administrator on July 11, 2011, though not incorporated by reference, is referenced... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Oregon State-Administered Program. 282... program on September 16, 2011, and it became effective on that date. (b) Oregon has primary...

  5. Go West: Imagining the Oregon Trail. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

    In this lesson plan, students in grades 3-5 compare imagined travel experiences of their own with the actual experiences of 19th-century pioneers on the Oregon Trail. After the 4 lessons students will have: (1) learned about the pioneer experience on the Oregon Trail; (2) compared and contrasted modern-day travel experiences with those of the 19th…

  6. The New Oregon Trail: Accountability for Results. Special Report #7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Anne; Dunkle, Margaret

    This report was designed to help policy makers and concerned citizens understand the context, culture, and history that set the stage for Oregon's efforts to reform state government, including those areas of government that affect education. This text offers a "snapshot" of what Oregon is doing to improve results, such as setting…

  7. Oregon Statewide Writing Assessment, Grade 8: Results and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This report reviews and analyzes the results of the third statewide analytical writing assessment of Oregon eighth graders. Following an introduction, the report is in five chapters: (1) The Oregon Writing Assessment Interpretive Panel: Comments and Recommendations; (2) Strengths and Weaknesses in Student Writing--A Trait-by-Trait Analysis (giving…

  8. 75 FR 13252 - Oregon Coast Provincial Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Oregon Coast Provincial Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Oregon Coast Province Advisory Committee will meet at the Siuslaw National...

  9. Oregon Pre-Engineering Learning Outcomes Study: Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, David T.; Langan, Holly; Veach, Darya; Farkas, Virginia

    2007-01-01

    The Oregon Pre-engineering Learning Outcomes Project was conducted by the Educational Policy Improvement Center (EPIC) with grant funding from the Engineering and Technology Industry Council (ETIC). The study sought to improve student preparation and success in pre-engineering programs through the development of the Oregon Pre-engineering Learning…

  10. County Data for Community Action: 1996 Status of Oregon's Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Human Resources, Salem.

    This Children First for Oregon report, funded by a Kids Count grant from the Annie Casey Foundation, investigates state and countywide trends in the well-being of Oregon's children. The statistical report is based on 14 indicators of child well-being: (1) child abuse and neglect rates; (2) crimes against persons; (3) child death rate; (4) prenatal…

  11. Volcano hazards in the Three Sisters region, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, William E.; Iverson, R.M.; Schilling, S.P.; Fisher, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    Three Sisters is one of three potentially active volcanic centers that lie close to rapidly growing communities and resort areas in Central Oregon. Two types of volcanoes exist in the Three Sisters region and each poses distinct hazards to people and property. South Sister, Middle Sister, and Broken Top, major composite volcanoes clustered near the center of the region, have erupted repeatedly over tens of thousands of years and may erupt explosively in the future. In contrast, mafic volcanoes, which range from small cinder cones to large shield volcanoes like North Sister and Belknap Crater, are typically short-lived (weeks to centuries) and erupt less explosively than do composite volcanoes. Hundreds of mafic volcanoes scattered through the Three Sisters region are part of a much longer zone along the High Cascades of Oregon in which birth of new mafic volcanoes is possible. This report describes the types of hazardous events that can occur in the Three Sisters region and the accompanying volcano-hazard-zonation map outlines areas that could be at risk from such events. Hazardous events include landslides from the steep flanks of large volcanoes and floods, which need not be triggered by eruptions, as well as eruption-triggered events such as fallout of tephra (volcanic ash) and lava flows. A proximal hazard zone roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) in diameter surrounding the Three Sisters and Broken Top could be affected within minutes of the onset of an eruption or large landslide. Distal hazard zones that follow river valleys downstream from the Three Sisters and Broken Top could be inundated by lahars (rapid flows of water-laden rock and mud) generated either by melting of snow and ice during eruptions or by large landslides. Slow-moving lava flows could issue from new mafic volcanoes almost anywhere within the region. Fallout of tephra from eruption clouds can affect areas hundreds of kilometers (miles) downwind, so eruptions at volcanoes elsewhere in the

  12. Oregon`s forest products industry: 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, F.R.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents the findings of a survey of primary forest products industries in Oregon for 1994. The survey included the following sectors: lumber; veneer; pulp and board; shake and shingle; export; and post, pole, and piling. Tables, presented by sector and for the industry as a whole, include characteristics of the industry, nature and flow of logs consumed, and disposition of mill residues.

  13. Radical State Legislation and School Restructuring: Oregon Educator's Reactions to the Oregon Educational Act for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, David T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Findings of a 1992 survey that examined Oregon educators' perceptions of the Oregon Educational Act for the 21st Century, a law designed to bring about fundamental change and radical restructuring in public education, are presented in this journal article. Data were derived from questionnaires that were mailed to 2,140 teachers and 120…

  14. Statewide Report Card: An Annual Report to the Legislature on Oregon Public Schools, 2013-2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Oregon Statewide Report Card is an annual publication required by law (ORS 329.115), which reports on the state of public schools and their progress towards the goals of the Oregon Educational Act for the 21st Century. The purpose of the Oregon Report Card is to monitor trends among school districts and Oregon's progress toward achieving the…

  15. Statewide Report Card: An Annual Report to the Legislature on Oregon Public Schools, 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Oregon Statewide Report Card is an annual publication required by law (ORS 329.115), which reports on the state of public schools and their progress towards the goals of the Oregon Educational Act for the 21st Century. The purpose of the Oregon Report Card is to monitor trends among school districts and Oregon's progress toward achieving the…

  16. COMPONENTS OF SURFACE AND SUBSURFACE CONNECTIVITY IN A LARGE OREGON (USA) RIVER--WHAT CAN BE RESTORED?

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted research on the Willamette River in western Oregon (USA) to determine the ecological functions of off-channel habitats (OCH). OCHs have declined in our 70 km study reach of the active floodplain since European settlement. Surface and subsurface connectivity between...

  17. Career Exploration/Industrial Arts (Student Managed Learning). An Adopter's Guide Referenced in "Promising Practices in Oregon Education, 1975."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairbanks, Dwight W.

    The Career Exploration/Industrial Arts program guide is based on experiences at two Oregon junior high schools. The program is unique in two respects: the learning is student-managed and the facility is a general open shop in which students plan and develop projects in a variety of activity areas. Student management consists of a notebook kept by…

  18. Diets and foraging behavior of northern Spotted Owls in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forsman, E.D.; Anthony, R.G.; Meslow, E.C.; Zabel, C.J.

    2004-01-01

    We describe local, regional, and annual variation in diets of northern Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) in Oregon based on 24 497 prey collected at 1118 owl territories in 1970-2003. The sample included 91.5% mammals, 4.3% birds, 4.1% insects, and 0.1% other prey. The diet included ???131 species, including 49 mammals, 41 birds, 3 reptiles, 1 frog, 1 crayfish, 1 scorpion, 2 snails, and 33 species of insects. On average, 91.9 ?? 0.3% (SE) of prey in the diet were nocturnal animals, 3.3 ?? 0.2% were diurnal, and 4.8 ?? 0.2% were active both day and night. Of the prey captured, 50.5 ?? 0.8% were arboreal, 18.7 ?? 0.7% were scansorial, 4.8 ?? 0.2% were aerial, and 26.0 = 0.7% were terrestrial. Mean mass of prey was 116.6 ?? 6.5 g. Diets varied among owl territories, geographic regions, and years; but were generally dominated by four to six species of nocturnal mammals, including northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus), woodrats (Neotoma fuscipes and N. cinerea), red tree voles (Arborimus longicaudus), western red-backed voles (Clethrionomys californicus), deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), or gophers (Thomomys spp.). Estimates of dietary evenness were low, indicating diets dominated by a few species of mammals. Forest management practices that produce healthy populations of arboreal and scansorial mammals such as flying squirrels, woodrats, and red tree voles should benefit northern Spotted Owls in Oregon and Washington. ?? 2004 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  19. WINDIGO-THIELSEN ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Benham, John R.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey indicate that the Windigo-Thielsen Roadless Area, in Oregon has little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or fossil fuel resources. Abundant cinder deposits occur in the area, but numerous other large volume deposits are available in the region, closer to markets. The geothermal potential of the High Cascades province cannot be realistically evaluated without data on the subsurface thermal and hydrologic regime that can only be provided by deep drill holes. Several deep holes could be drilled outside the roadless areas of the High Cascades from which extrapolations of the geothermal potential of the province could be made.

  20. A Forest Vegetation Database for Western Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busing, Richard T.

    2004-01-01

    Data on forest vegetation in western Oregon were assembled for 2323 ecological survey plots. All data were from fixed-radius plots with the standardized design of the Current Vegetation Survey (CVS) initiated in the early 1990s. For each site, the database includes: 1) live tree density and basal area of common tree species, 2) total live tree density, basal area, estimated biomass, and estimated leaf area; 3) age of the oldest overstory tree examined, 4) geographic coordinates, 5) elevation, 6) interpolated climate variables, and 7) other site variables. The data are ideal for ecoregional analyses of existing vegetation.

  1. Poppy seed ingestion: the Oregon perspective.

    PubMed

    Meneely, K D

    1992-07-01

    Numerous articles have been published regarding the positive morphine and codeine urinalysis results from the ingestion of poppy seeds. Oregon's perspective towards ingestion of controlled substances focuses around driving under impaired conditions. To determine the influence of the residual opium on poppy seeds to impairment, seven volunteers each ingested 25 grams of poppy seeds baked into bundt cakes. Urine samples were screened by EMIT using 300 ng/ml cutoff levels. All of the urine specimens were found to be opiate positive shortly after consuming the cake; however, after administering a series of standardized drug recognition evaluation tests, no subjects were found to exhibit symptoms of opiate impairment.

  2. Ambulatory Research and Education Center Oregon Health Science University. Environmental Assesment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-21

    DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0921) evaluating the proposed construction and operation of the Ambulatory Research and Education Center (AREC), which would be located on the top seven floors of the existing NeuroSensory Research Center (NRC) on the campus of the Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) at Portland, Oregon. The proposed action would combine activities scattered across the campus into a central facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  3. Bed-material, channel stability, and regional gravel production dynamics in Oregon coastal rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. L.; O'Connor, J. E.; Wallick, R.; Anderson, S.; Keith, M. K.; Mangano, J. F.

    2010-12-01

    Along the Oregon coast, gravel-bed rivers of various basin sizes and network topologies carve their way to the Pacific Ocean through a suite of geologic formations and land-use activities. To date, we have initiated assessments of bed-material condition and channel stability for seven coastal Oregon rivers (from north to south: Nehalem, Tillamook, Umpqua, Coquille, Rogue, Hunter, and Chetco). These river channels are of interest, in part, due to historic and on-going removal of gravels for commercial aggregate. Gravel extraction alone or in conjunction with the effects of other land uses may initiate a variety of channel changes, leading to channel instability. For each river, we synthesize multiple lines of evidence (including field observations, particle measurements, GIS analyses, specific gage analyses, and previous studies) to determine if the river channels are in equilibrium, degrading, or aggrading and if bed-material transport is likely limited by transport capacity or sediment supply. Initial field observations include the presence of reaches with some channel instability (mainly aggradation and channel widening) in the Hunter, Rogue, and Coquille basins. Our preliminary specific gage analyses indicate changes in the stage-discharge relationships at several gages, including a long-term gage on Rogue River near Grants Pass, where the channel has either incised or widened, resulting in a lowering of stage over time and different discharges. Building on our preliminary findings and review of the literature, we postulate that gravel production in coastal Oregon rivers is a function of the surrounding geology, basin slope, annual precipitation rates, channel bed elevation patterns (e.g., the length of the channel bed at sea level), and network structure. Bed-material supply tends to be greatest for rivers draining the Klamath terrane. Preliminary statistical analyses also show that the product of basin slope and mean annual precipitation describes 57% of the

  4. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Point of Entry/Point of Use Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Oregon Institute of Technology at Klamath Falls, OR - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) at Klamath Falls, OR. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness...

  5. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Final Siting Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Montgomery

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  6. 78 FR 61389 - Sanyo Solar of Oregon, LLC, Wafer Slicing and Quality Control Operations, Including On-Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... Employment and Training Administration Sanyo Solar of Oregon, LLC, Wafer Slicing and Quality Control... to workers of Sanyo Solar of Oregon, LLC, Wafer Slicing and Quality Control Operations, Salem, Oregon... Salem, Oregon location of Sanyo Solar of Oregon, LLC, Wafer Slicing and Quality Control Operations....

  7. The Scotts Mills, Oregon earthquake on March 25, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, Ivan; Hemphill-Haley, Mark; Salah-Mars-Woodward-Clyde, Said

    1993-01-01

    At 5:34 a.m. on March 25, 1993, much of northwestern Oregon and southwestern Washington was shaken by one if the largest historic earthquakes ever observed in the region. The Richter magnitude 5.6 earthquake occurred near the small town of Scotts Mills, 48 km south of Portland, Oregon. The March 25 earthquake was felt over a large part of the Pacific Northwest extending from Seattle, Washington, in the north to the town of Roseburg in southern Oregon. Due in large part to the moderate size of the event and its location in a rural setting, only minor injuries occurred, principally from falling objects and broken glass.

  8. Water resources data for Oregon, water year 1985. Volume 1: Eastern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, C.W.; Moffatt, R.L.; Boucher, P.R.; Smith, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Water Resources Data for the 1985 water year for Oregon consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; and stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs. This report, in two volumes , contains discharge records for 259 gaging stations; stage only records for 10 gaging stations; stage and contents for 37 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 82 stations, and water quality for 3 precipitation stations. Also included are 5 crest-stage, partial-record stations. Additional water data were collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data collection program, and are published as miscellaneous measurements. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S . Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Oregon.

  9. Oregon`s forest products industry: 1992. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, F.R.

    1995-03-01

    The report presents the findings of a survey of primary forest products industries in Oregon for 1992. The survey included the following sectors; lumber; veneer and plywood; pulp and board; shake and shingle; export; and post, pole, and piling. Tables presented by sector and for the industry as a whole, include characteristics of the industry, nature and flow of logs consumed, and disposition of mill residues.

  10. Oregon Trail Mushrooms geothermal loan guaranty application, Malheur County, Oregon: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    The action assessed is the guaranty of a loan by the Geothermal Loan Guaranty Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to finance the construction and operation of a mushroom-growing facility that will use geothermal (hot) water for process and space heat. The project consists of two separate facilities: a growing facility located just outside of the eastern limit of the city of Vale, Oregon (Malheur County, Oregon) and a composting facility located about 6.4 km (4 miles) southwest of the city limits (also in Malheur County, Oregon). Five test wells have been drilled into the geothermal resource at the growing site. Either well No. 4 or well No. 5 will serve as a production well. All geothermal fluids will be reinjected into the geothermal aquifer, so either well No. 3 will be used for this purpose, wells Nos. 1 and 2 will be deepened, or a new well will be drilled on the site. A cold-water well will be drilled at the growing site, and another will be drilled at the composting site. The environmental effects of the proposed project are not expected to be significant.

  11. A Geographically Variable Water Quality Index Used in Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunnette, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the procedure developed in Oregon to formulate a valid water quality index which accounts for the specific conditions in the water body of interest. Parameters selected include oxygen depletion, BOD, eutrophication, dissolved substances, health hazards, and physical characteristics. (CS)

  12. CONTROLS ON WATER CHEMISTRY OF AN OREGON COAST RANGE STREAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous factors may control losses of dissolved nutrients from forested basins in the Oregon Coast Range. Potentially important factors include forest composition, stand age, forest management, grazing, agriculture, sewage inputs and bedrock types, as well as others perhaps not...

  13. INTERIOR GUEST BATH, LOOKING NORTHWEST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR GUEST BATH, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  14. INTERIOR INNKEEPER FAMILY ROOM, LOOKING NORTH. Oregon Inlet Coast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR INNKEEPER FAMILY ROOM, LOOKING NORTH. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  15. INTERIOR BUNK ROOM C, LOOKING NORTHWEST. Oregon Inlet Coast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR BUNK ROOM C, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  16. INTERIOR BUNK ROOM A, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. Oregon Inlet Coast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR BUNK ROOM A, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  17. INTERIOR GUEST BEDROOM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR GUEST BEDROOM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  18. INTERIOR GUEST BEDROOM, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR GUEST BEDROOM, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  19. INTERIOR TOWER ROOM, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR TOWER ROOM, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  20. INTERIOR LIBRARY HALL, LOOKING WEST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR LIBRARY HALL, LOOKING WEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  1. INTERIOR TOWER STAIRS FIRST LEVEL, LOOKING EAST. Oregon Inlet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR TOWER STAIRS FIRST LEVEL, LOOKING EAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  2. INTERIOR BUNK ROOM C, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. Oregon Inlet Coast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR BUNK ROOM C, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  3. INTERIOR TOWER ENTRANCE, LOOKING NORTH. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR TOWER ENTRANCE, LOOKING NORTH. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  4. INTERIOR HALL BY TOWER STAIRS, LOOKING SOUTH. Oregon Inlet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR HALL BY TOWER STAIRS, LOOKING SOUTH. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  5. INTERIOR LIBRARY, LOOKING NORTHWEST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR LIBRARY, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  6. INTERIOR TOWER STAIRS HALL, LOOKING NORTH INTO MESS. Oregon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR TOWER STAIRS HALL, LOOKING NORTH INTO MESS. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  7. INTERIOR INNKEEPER FAMILY ROOM, LOOKING WEST. Oregon Inlet Coast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR INNKEEPER FAMILY ROOM, LOOKING WEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  8. INTERIOR BUNK ROOM B, LOOKING WEST. Oregon Inlet Coast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR BUNK ROOM B, LOOKING WEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  9. INTERIOR TOWER ENTRANCE HALL, LOOKING NORTHWEST. Oregon Inlet Coast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR TOWER ENTRANCE HALL, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  10. INTERIOR LIBRARY, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR LIBRARY, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  11. LOOKOUT TOWER DETAILS, SHEET 5 OF 6. Oregon Inlet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOOKOUT TOWER DETAILS, SHEET 5 OF 6. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  12. STRUCTURAL FLOOR PLAN, SHEET 2 OF 6. Oregon Inlet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STRUCTURAL FLOOR PLAN, SHEET 2 OF 6. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  13. INTERIOR TOWER ROOM LOOKING NORTHEAST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR TOWER ROOM LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  14. ALTERNATIVE FUTURES FOR THE WILLAMETTE RIVER BASIN, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alternative futures analysis is an assessment approach designed to inform community decisions regarding land and water use. We conducted an alternative futures analysis in the Willamette River Basin in western Oregon. Based on detailed input from local stakeholders, three alter...

  15. DOWNSTREAM MIGRATION OF SALMONID SMOLTS IN OREGON RIVERS AND ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migratory fish passage is an important designated use for many Oregon estuaries. Acoustic transmitters were implanted in coho smolts in 2004 and 2006 to evaluate how estuarine habitat, and habitat loss, might affect population health. Acoustic receivers that identified individu...

  16. Oregon Cascades Play Fairway Analysis: Faults and Heat Flow maps

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This submission includes a fault map of the Oregon Cascades and backarc, a probability map of heat flow, and a fault density probability layer. More extensive metadata can be found within each zip file.

  17. Nekton-habitat associations in Yaquina Bay, Oregon - March 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a 3-year field study to determine the relative nekton usage of 4 intertidal habitats (eelgrass [Zostera marina], mud shrimp [Upogebia pugettensis], ghost shrimp [Neotrypaea californiensis], and unvegetated sand) in Yaquina Bay, Oregon. Nekton samples were collected u...

  18. Yaquina Bay, Oregon, Intertidal Sediment Temperature Database, 1998 - 2006.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detailed, long term sediment temperature records were obtained and compiled in a database to determine the influence of daily, monthly, seasonal and annual temperature variation on eelgrass distribution across the intertidal habitat in Yaquina Bay, Oregon. Both currently and hi...

  19. Comparison of Nutrient Drivers and Response Metrics in Oregon Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the goal of assessing sensitivity to nutrient enrichment, we present a cross-estuary comparison of nutrient sources, levels, and biological responses (phytoplankton and macroalgae) for thirteen Oregon estuaries. Nitrogen levels in the upstream portions of the estuaries are ...

  20. University of Oregon: GPS-based Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Vignola, F.; Andreas, A.

    2013-08-22

    A partnership with the University of Oregon and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) data to compliment existing resource assessment data collection by the university.

  1. "Choking game" awareness and participation among 8th graders--Oregon, 2008.

    PubMed

    2010-01-15

    The "choking game" is an activity in which persons strangulate themselves to achieve euphoria through brief hypoxia. It is differentiated from autoerotic asphyxiation. The activity can cause long-term disability and death among youths. In 2008, CDC reported 82 deaths attributed to the choking game and other strangulation activities during the period 1995-2007; most victims were adolescent males aged 11-16 years. To assess the awareness and prevalence of this behavior among 8th graders in Oregon, the Oregon Public Health Division added a question to the 2008 Oregon Healthy Teens survey concerning familiarity with and participation in this activity. This report describes the results of that survey, which indicated that 36.2% of 8th-grade respondents had heard of the choking game, 30.4% had heard of someone participating, and 5.7% had participated themselves. Youths in rural areas were significantly more likely (6.7%) to have participated than youths in urban areas (4.9%). Choking game participation was higher among 8th graders who reported mental health risk factors (4.0%), substance use (7.9%), or both (15.8%), compared with those who reported neither (1.7%). Public health surveillance of these strangulation activities among youths should be expanded to better quantify the risks and understand the motives and circumstances surrounding participation. Parents, educators, counselors, and others who work with youths should be aware of strangulation activities and their serious health effects; they should watch for signs of participation in strangulation activities, especially among youths with suspected substance use or mental health risk factors.

  2. Ospreys in Oregon and the Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, Charles J.; Kaiser, James L.; Grove, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    From early April through September each year, famous residents grace the small western town of Corvallis, Oregon. Two ospreys have become mascots of the town since the pair's arrival in 1994. Their nest, built on a 90-foot power pole near the twin bridges over the Willamette River, could be seen by many commuters on their way in and out of town. After the 2002 nesting season, the nest was moved a short distance downriver to a constructed nesting platform because sticks sometimes dropped from the huge nest onto power lines below and caused power outages. At the new location, the pair can once again raise a family of young, their general well being monitored by the 50,000 residents of the community.

  3. A field guide to Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenson, Robert A.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; McKay, Daniele

    2009-01-01

    Newberry Volcano is located in central Oregon at the intersection of the Cascade Range and the High Lava Plains. Its lavas range in age from ca. 0.5 Ma to late Holocene. Erupted products range in composition from basalt through rhyolite and cover ~3000 km2. The most recent caldera-forming eruption occurred ~80,000 years ago. This trip will highlight a revised understanding of the volcano's history based on new detailed geologic work. Stops will also focus on evidence for ice and flooding on the volcano, as well as new studies of Holocene mafic eruptions. Newberry is one of the most accessible U.S. volcanoes, and this trip will visit a range of lava types and compositions including tholeiitic and calc-alkaline basalt flows, cinder cones, and rhyolitic domes and tuffs. Stops will include early distal basalts as well as the youngest intracaldera obsidian flow.

  4. MOUNT HOOD WILDERNESS AND ADJACENT AREAS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keith, T.E.C.; Causey, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Mount Hood Wilderness, Oregon, was conducted. Geochemical data indicate two areas of substantiated mineral-resource potential containing weak epithermal mineralization: an area of the north side of Zigzag Mountain where vein-type lead-zinc-silver deposits occur and an area of the south side of Zigzag Mountain, where the upper part of a quartz diorite pluton has propylitic alteration associated with mineralization of copper, gold, silver, lead, and zinc in discontinuous veins. Geothermal-resource potential for low- to intermediate-temperature (less than 248 degree F) hot-water systems in the wilderness is probable in these areas. Part of the wilderness is classified as a Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), which is considered to have probable geothermal-resource potential, and two parts of the wilderness have been included in geothermal lease areas.

  5. Mount Hood Wilderness and adjacent areas, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, T.E.C.; Causey, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Mount Hood Wilderness, Oregon, was conducted in 1980. Geochemical data indicate two areas of substantiated mineral-resource potential containing weak epithermal mineralization: an area on the north side of Zigzag Mountain, where vein-type lead-zinc-silver deposits occur and an area on the south side of Zigzag Mountain, where the upper part of a quartz diorite pluton has propylitic alteration associated with mineralization of copper, gold, silver, lead, and zinc in discontinuous veins. Geothermal-resource potential for low- to intermediate-temperature (less than 248/sup 0/F) hot-water systems in the wilderness is probable in three areas. Part of the wilderness is classified as a Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), which is considered to have probable geothermal-resource potential, and two parts of the wilderness have been included in geothermal lease areas.

  6. Clean Energy Works Oregon Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Andria; Cyr, Shirley

    2013-12-31

    In April 2010, the City of Portland received a $20 million award from the U.S. Department of Energy, as part of the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant program. This award was appropriated under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), passed by President Obama in 2009. DOE’s program became known as the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The BBNP grant objectives directed the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability (BPS) as the primary grantee to expand the BPS-led pilot program, Clean Energy Works Portland, into Clean Energy Works Oregon (CEWO), with the mission to deliver thousands of home energy retrofits, create jobs, save energy and reduce carbon dioxide emissions.The Final Technical Report explores the successes and lessons learned from the first 3 years of program implementation.

  7. Estimating Flow-Duration and Low-Flow Frequency Statistics for Unregulated Streams in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risley, John; Stonewall, Adam J.; Haluska, Tana

    2008-01-01

    Flow statistical datasets, basin-characteristic datasets, and regression equations were developed to provide decision makers with surface-water information needed for activities such as water-quality regulation, water-rights adjudication, biological habitat assessment, infrastructure design, and water-supply planning and management. The flow statistics, which included annual and monthly period of record flow durations (5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, and 95th percent exceedances) and annual and monthly 7-day, 10-year (7Q10) and 7-day, 2-year (7Q2) low flows, were computed at 466 streamflow-gaging stations at sites with unregulated flow conditions throughout Oregon and adjacent areas of neighboring States. Regression equations, created from the flow statistics and basin characteristics of the stations, can be used to estimate flow statistics at ungaged stream sites in Oregon. The study area was divided into 10 regression modeling regions based on ecological, topographic, geologic, hydrologic, and climatic criteria. In total, 910 annual and monthly regression equations were created to predict the 7 flow statistics in the 10 regions. Equations to predict the five flow-duration exceedance percentages and the two low-flow frequency statistics were created with Ordinary Least Squares and Generalized Least Squares regression, respectively. The standard errors of estimate of the equations created to predict the 5th and 95th percent exceedances had medians of 42.4 and 64.4 percent, respectively. The standard errors of prediction of the equations created to predict the 7Q2 and 7Q10 low-flow statistics had medians of 51.7 and 61.2 percent, respectively. Standard errors for regression equations for sites in western Oregon were smaller than those in eastern Oregon partly because of a greater density of available streamflow-gaging stations in western Oregon than eastern Oregon. High-flow regression equations (such as the 5th and 10th percent exceedances) also generally were more accurate

  8. Oregon Wildlife Planning Coordination Project, October 1, 1998 to September 30, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Susan P.

    1999-10-05

    The intent of the Oregon Wildlife Planning Coordination project is to fund Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) staff to facilitate wildlife mitigation coordination and planning between Oregon wildlife managers. The primary goal of ODFW wildlife mitigation planning/coordination staff is to foster, facilitate, and manage a statewide cooperative wildlife mitigation planning and implementation effort between the Oregon wildlife managers (the Oregon Wildlife Coalition or OWC) to mitigate for wildlife losses in Oregon caused by the development and operation of the hydropower system.

  9. Floating Offshore Wind in Oregon: Potential for Jobs and Economic Impacts in Oregon Coastal Counties from Two Future Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, Tony; Keyser, David; Tegen, Suzanne

    2016-07-01

    This analysis examines the employment and potential economic impacts of large-scale deployment of offshore wind technology off the coast of Oregon. This analysis examines impacts within the seven Oregon coastal counties: Clatsop, Tillamook, Lincoln, Lane, Douglas, Coos, and Curry. The impacts highlighted here can be used in county, state, and regional planning discussions and can be scaled to get a general sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other deployment scenarios.

  10. Geology of Newberry National Volcanic Monument, Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Jensen, R. A.; Robinson, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic geology is the dominant theme at Newberry National Volcanic Monument in central Oregon. Established almost 25 years ago, the NNVM (like the Mt. St. Helens National Volcanic Monument) is managed by the U.S. Forest Service. The monument encompasses some 90 square miles in Deschutes National Forest of the 1200-sq-mi Newberry Volcano, including the 4x5 mi scenic central caldera and the volcano's youngest lava flow, the 1300-yr-old Big Obsidian Flow. The seismically-monitored Newberry Volcano is considered by the USGS to be a very high threat volcano, with the potential to impact adjacent populations in Bend, Sunriver, and LaPine and damage infrastructure including highways, railroads, and power lines. Unspectacular from a distance, the broad shield shape of Newberry Volcano hides the abundance and youthfulness of volcanic activity. Included in NNVM are 7-ka basalt to andesite lavas of the Northwest Rift Zone (NWRZ) that erupted from spatter and cinder cones over a N-S distance of 20 miles and temporarily blocked the flow of the adjacent Deschutes River. These well-exposed lavas are post-Mazama in age, having erupted after a blanket of ash and pumice was deposited on the volcano when Mt. Mazama erupted at 7.7 ka to form Crater Lake. Images from lidar data obtained in 2011 clearly display the post-Mazama lavas, which not only are unmantled by the tephra, but also lack the thick forest that has grown in the tephra further obscuring many of the youthful volcanic features across this massive rear-arc Cascades volcano. NNVM features interpretive trails at the Big Obsidian Flow in the caldera and at Lava Cast Forest and Lava Butte flow along the NWRZ. Also within the monument are two of the premier drivable viewpoints in Oregon, on Lava Butte and at the 7984-ft top of Paulina Peak on the rim of the caldera. On a clear day, views from Paulina Peak encompass much of the High Cascades, extending from Mt. Shasta in California to Mt. Adams in Washington.

  11. Flow-banded Rhyolite of the Northern Oregon Cascades: Graveyard and Gordon Buttes, Tygh Valley, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westby, E.; Streck, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most structurally complex areas along the northeastern margin of the Oregon Cascades is in Tygh Valley. Crustal shortening produced folds and extensional tectonics resulted in rifting during the Miocene/Pliocene. Rhyolite, exposed in channel cuts and river canyon, records this transition, summarized in new, more detailed research. Tygh Valley, Oregon, is a synclinal basin bordered by the Tygh Ridge anticline to the north, Mutton Mountains to the south, and the Cascade Range (with Mt. Hood) to the west. The stratigraphy of the basin consists of epi- and volcaniclastic deposits mostly derived from the Cascades Range, in addition to ash flow tuffs and surficial basalt lava flows. Rhyolite lava flows are found at two dome complexes in the Tygh Valley area, Graveyard Butte and Gordon Butte. At Graveyard Butte, the White River has cut a winding canyon 140 meters deep, exposing at its base, a 40-meter thick outcrop of flow-banded rhyolite (73 wt.% SiO2) that laterally extends along the canyon walls for about 1 km. Stratigraphically above the flow-banded rhyolites are locally-erupted Fe-rich andesites (lava flows, agglutinate and other pyroclastic rocks as well as clastic debris), a rhyolitic ash-flow tuff (74 wt.% SiO2) and the 2.7 My basalt lava flows of Juniper Flat. At Gordon Butte, compositionally similar rhyolite lavas are exposed in channel cuts but flows are less constrained on ridge tops due to heavy vegetation. Ongoing age dating experiments will likely reveal a late Miocene/Pliocene age for these rhyolite lava flows. The rhyolite lavas flows at both buttes are chemically nearly indistinguishable but contrast with the stratigraphically younger rhyolitic ash-flow tuff at Graveyard Butte. Rhyolite lavas are richer in Nb and Zr than the younger rhyolitic tuff (Nb 30-40 versus 13 ppm; Zr 490 versus 240 ppm) and share characteristics with much older (~30 Ma) rhyolites of the Western Cascades and John Day Formation of central and eastern Oregon as well as

  12. Reservoir-system model for the Willamette River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shearman, James O.

    1976-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Methanogenic Diversity in Marine Sediments at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, M. M.; Boone, D. R.

    2004-12-01

    Little is known about the mechanism of methanogenic degradation of acetate or the fate of hydrogen and formate in cold marine sediments, or the ability of methanogens to grow and produce methane there. We used cultivation and molecular techniques to examine the microbes that produce methane from these substrates in permanently cold, anoxic marine sediments at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon (44° 35'N, 125° 10'W, depth 800 m). Sediment samples (15 to 35 cm deep) were collected from areas of active methane ebullition or areas where methane hydrates occurred. The samples were anoxically diluted and inoculated into enrichment media with formate, acetate, or trimethylamine as catabolic substrate. After 2 years incubation at 4° C to 15° C, enrichment cultures grew and produced methane. DNA was extracted from the highest dilutions that grew. The sequence data suggested that each enrichment culture contained a single strain of methanogen, and many of these sequences were dissimilar to known sequences of methanogens. This level of similarity (89 to 91% similar) suggests that these methanogens belong to novel genera. A clone library of 16S rRNA genes was also created from DNA extracted from the sediment samples. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene libraries also revealed phylotypes that were only distantly related to cultivated organisms. The sequences of the clone library and of the enrichment cultures indicate a high degree of phylogenetic diversity among the Hydrate Ridge Archaea.

  14. Russ Donnelly's research at the University of Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemela, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Coming to the University of Oregon in 1966, Russ Donnelly built up a strong research activity having two threads within hydrodynamics: the flow of ordinary fluids and that of superfluids. Vortices-quantized and classical-were at the heart of his research. His 1991 book ``Quantized Vortices in Helium II,'' by now a standard reference for researchers and students, elucidated some of it. To produce vortices Russ brought from Chicago two enormous rotating tables, based on 1-m diameter industrial lathe chucks obtained from General Motors. They were also used for classical systems such as Taylor-Couette flow (to generate strong Coriolis forces) and thermal convection, where the properties of rotation-including early experimental investigations of the Kuppers-Lortz instability-were studied. Another common thread in his research was the modulation of control parameters leading to Stokes layer effects, both thermal and viscous. In the early `90s, Russ and his group turned their attention to cryogenic turbulence in normal and superfluid systems, creating what has now become a small industry and a well-established sub-field within low temperature physics.

  15. Volcano hazards in the Mount Hood region, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, W.E.; Pierson, T.C.; Schilling, S.P.; Costa, J.E.; Gardner, C.A.; Vallance, J.W.; Major, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Mount Hood is a potentially active volcano close to rapidly growing communities and recreation areas. The most likely widespread and hazardous consequence of a future eruption will be for lahars (rapidly moving mudflows) to sweep down the entire length of the Sandy (including the Zigzag) and White River valleys. Lahars can be generated by hot volcanic flows that melt snow and ice or by landslides from the steep upper flanks of the volcano. Structures close to river channels are at greatest risk of being destroyed. The degree of hazard decreases as height above a channel increases, but large lahars can affect areas more than 30 vertical meters (100 vertical feet) above river beds. The probability of eruption-generated lahars affecting the Sandy and White River valleys is 1-in-15 to l-in-30 during the next 30 years, whereas the probability of extensive areas in the Hood River Valley being affected by lahars is about ten times less. The accompanying volcano-hazard-zonation map outlines areas potentially at risk and shows that some areas may be too close for a reasonable chance of escape or survival during an eruption. Future eruptions of Mount Hood could seriously disrupt transportation (air, river, and highway), some municipal water supplies, and hydroelectric power generation and transmission in northwest Oregon and southwest Washington.

  16. Geologic evidence for a magma chamber beneath Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Macleod, N.S.; Sherrod, D.R.

    1988-09-10

    At Newberry Volcano, central Oregon, more than 0.5 m.y. of magmatic activity, including caldera collapse and renewed caldera-filling volcanism, has created a structural and thermal chimney that channels magma ascent. Holocene rhyolitic eruptions (1) have been confined mainly within the caldera in an area 5 km in diameter, (2) have been very similar in chemical composition, phenocryst mineralogy, and eruptive style, and (3) have occurred as recently as 1300 years ago, with repose periods of 2000--3000 years between eruptions. Holocene basaltic andesite eruptions are widespread on the flanks but are excluded from the area of rhyolitic volcanism. Basaltic andesite in fissures at the edge of the rhyolite area has silicic inclusions and shows mixed basalt-rhyolite magma relations. These geologic relations and the high geothermal gradient that characterizes the lower part of a drill hole in the caldera (U.S. Geological Survey Newberry 2) indicate that a rhyolitic magma chamber has existed beneath the caldera throughout the Holocene. Its longevity probably is a result of intermittent underplating by basaltic magma.

  17. 76 FR 7853 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Oregon Patient Safety Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Oregon Patient Safety Commission AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of delisting. SUMMARY: Oregon Patient Safety Commission: AHRQ has accepted...

  18. TOMORROW: EPA ADMINISTRATOR IN PORTLAND, OREGON, TO FOCUS ON AIR QUALITY AND CLEAN WATER

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - This Wednesday, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy will be in Portland, Oregon to award a Diesel Emissions Reduction Act (DERA) grant to the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and speak at the Craft Brewers Conference about t

  19. 77 FR 72245 - Pears Grown in Oregon and Washington; Committee Membership Reapportionment for Processed Pears

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 927 Pears Grown in Oregon and Washington; Committee Membership Reapportionment for Processed Pears AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA... Processed Pear Committee (Committee) established under the Oregon-Washington pear marketing order....

  20. Digital Data for Volcano Hazards at Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Doelger, S.; Sherrod, D.R.; Mastin, L.G.; Scott, W.E.

    2008-01-01

    Newberry volcano is a broad shield volcano located in central Oregon, the product of thousands of eruptions, beginning about 600,000 years ago. At least 25 vents on the flanks and summit have been active during the past 10,000 years. The most recent eruption 1,300 years ago produced the Big Obsidian Flow. Thus, the volcano's long history and recent activity indicate that Newberry will erupt in the future. Newberry Crater, a volcanic depression or caldera has been the focus of Newberry's volcanic activity for at least the past 10,000 years. Newberry National Volcanic Monument, which is managed by the U.S. Forest Service, includes the caldera and extends to the Deschutes River. Newberry volcano is quiet. Local earthquake activity (seismicity) has been trifling throughout historic time. Subterranean heat is still present, as indicated by hot springs in the caldera and high temperatures encountered during exploratory drilling for geothermal energy. The report USGS Open-File Report 97-513 (Sherrod and others, 1997) describes the kinds of hazardous geologic events that might occur in the future at Newberry volcano. A hazard-zonation map is included to show the areas that will most likely be affected by renewed eruptions. When Newberry volcano becomes restless, the eruptive scenarios described herein can inform planners, emergency response personnel, and citizens about the kinds and sizes of events to expect. The geographic information system (GIS) volcano hazard data layers used to produce the Newberry volcano hazard map in USGS Open-File Report 97-513 are included in this data set. Scientists at the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory created a GIS data layer to depict zones subject to the effects of an explosive pyroclastic eruption (tephra fallout, pyroclastic flows, and ballistics), lava flows, volcanic gasses, and lahars/floods in Paulina Creek. A separate GIS data layer depicts drill holes on the flanks of Newberry Volcano that were used to estimate the probability

  1. A new subspecies of Chamaea fasciata (Wrentit) from Oregon (Aves: Timaliinae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Browning, M. Ralph

    1992-01-01

    Geographic variation in plumage color of Chamaea fasciata (Wrentit) from northern California and southern Oregon is related to climate. A new subspecies, Chamaea fasciata margra, is described from a disjunct population of southern interior Oregon. Colonization of C. fasciata in interior Oregon was perhaps from birds crossing coniferous forests via isolated balds of Ceonothus. Recent increases of Wrentits in interior Oregon may be in response to habitat alterations (deforestation, fires) and concurrent global warming.

  2. Pygmy rabbit surveys on state lands in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagar, Joan; Lienkaemper, George

    2007-01-01

    The pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis) is classified by the federal government as a species of concern (i.e., under review by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for consideration as a candidate for listing as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act) because of its specialized habitat requirements and evidence of declining populations. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) lists pygmy rabbits as “sensitive-vulnerable,” meaning that protective measures are needed if sustainable populations are to be maintained over time (Oregon Natural Heritage Program, 2001). The Oregon Natural Heritage Program considers this species to be threatened with extirpation from Oregon. Pygmy rabbits also are a species of concern in all the other states where they occur (NatureServe, 2004). The Washington population, known as the Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit, was listed as endangered by the federal government in 2003. Historically, pygmy rabbits have been collected from Deschutes, Klamath, Crook, Lake, Grant, Harney, Baker, and Malheur Counties in Oregon. However, the geographic range of pygmy rabbit in Oregon may have decreased in historic times (Verts and Carraway, 1998), and boundaries of the current distribution are not known. Not all potentially suitable sites appear to be occupied, and populations are susceptible to rapid declines and local extirpation (Weiss and Verts, 1984). In order to protect and manage remaining populations on State of Oregon lands, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife needs to identify areas currently occupied by pygmy rabbits, as well as suitable habitats. The main objective of this survey was document to presence or absence of pygmy rabbits on state lands in Malheur, Harney, Lake, and Deschutes counties. Knowledge of the location and extent of pygmy rabbit populations can provide a foundation for the conservation and management of this species in Oregon. The pygmy rabbit is just one of a suite of species of concern

  3. Pygmy Rabbit Surveys on State Lands in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagar, Joan; Lienkaemper, George

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis) is classified by the federal government as a species of concern (i.e., under review by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for consideration as a candidate for listing as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act) because of its specialized habitat requirements and evidence of declining populations. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) lists pygmy rabbits as 'sensitive-vulnerable,' meaning that protective measures are needed if sustainable populations are to be maintained over time (Oregon Natural Heritage Program, 2001). The Oregon Natural Heritage Program considers this species to be threatened with extirpation from Oregon. Pygmy rabbits also are a species of concern in all the other states where they occur (NatureServe, 2004). The Washington population, known as the Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit, was listed as endangered by the federal government in 2003. Historically, pygmy rabbits have been collected from Deschutes, Klamath, Crook, Lake, Grant, Harney, Baker, and Malheur Counties in Oregon. However, the geographic range of pygmy rabbit in Oregon may have decreased in historic times (Verts and Carraway, 1998), and boundaries of the current distribution are not known. Not all potentially suitable sites appear to be occupied, and populations are susceptible to rapid declines and local extirpation (Weiss and Verts, 1984). In order to protect and manage remaining populations on State of Oregon lands, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife needs to identify areas currently occupied by pygmy rabbits, as well as suitable habitats. The main objective of this survey was document to presence or absence of pygmy rabbits on state lands in Malheur, Harney, Lake, and Deschutes counties. Knowledge of the location and extent of pygmy rabbit populations can provide a foundation for the conservation and management of this species in Oregon. The pygmy rabbit is just one of a suite of species of

  4. Geothermal Exploration of Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Waibel, Albert F.; Frone, Zachary S.; Blackwell, David D.

    2014-12-01

    Davenport Newberry (Davenport) has completed 8 years of exploration for geothermal energy on Newberry Volcano in central Oregon. Two deep exploration test wells were drilled by Davenport on the west flank of the volcano, one intersected a hydrothermal system; the other intersected isolated fractures with no hydrothermal interconnection. Both holes have bottom-hole temperatures near or above 315°C (600°F). Subsequent to deep test drilling an expanded exploration and evaluation program was initiated. These efforts have included reprocessing existing data, executing multiple geological, geophysical, geochemical programs, deep exploration test well drilling and shallow well drilling. The efforts over the last three years have been made possible through a DOE Innovative Exploration Technology (IET) Grant 109, designed to facilitate innovative geothermal exploration techniques. The combined results of the last 8 years have led to a better understanding of the history and complexity of Newberry Volcano and improved the design and interpretation of geophysical exploration techniques with regard to blind geothermal resources in volcanic terrain.

  5. Water balance for Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, Manuel

    1992-01-01

    A water balance for Crater Lake, Oregon, is calculated using measured lake levels and precipitation data measured at Park Headquarters and at a gage on the North Rim. Total water supply to the lake from precipitation and inflow from the crater walls is found to be 224 cm/y over the area of the lake. The ratio between water supply to the lake and precipitation at Park Headquarters is calculated as 1.325. Using leakage determined by Phillips (1968) and Redmond (1990), evaporation from the lake is approximately 85 cm/y. Calculations show that water balances with precipitation data only from Park Headquarters are unable to accurately define the water-level variation, whereas the addition of yearly precipitation data from the North Rim reduces the average absolute deviation between calculated and modeled water levels by one half. Daily precipitation and water-level data are modeled assuming that precipitation is stored on the rim as snow during fall and winter and released uniformly during the spring and early summer. Daily data do not accurately define the water balance, but they suggest that direct precipitation on the lake is about 10 % higher than that measured at Park Headquarters and that about 17 % of the water supply is from inflow from the rim.

  6. Gravity model studies of Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, M.E.; Griscom, A.

    1988-01-01

    Newberry Volcano, a large Quaternary volcano located about 60 km east of the axis of the High Cascades volcanoes in central Oregon, has a coincident positive residual gravity anomaly of about 12 mGals. Model calculations of the gravity anomaly field suggest that the volcano is underlain by an intrusive complex of mafic composition of about 20-km diameter and 2-km thickness, at depths above 4 km below sea level. However, uplifted basement in a northwest trending ridge may form part of the underlying excess mass, thus reducing the volume of the subvolcanic intrusive. A ring dike of mafic composition is inferred to intrude to near-surface levels along the caldera ring fractures, and low-density fill of the caldera floor probably has a thickness of 0.7-0.9 km. The gravity anomaly attributable to the volcano is reduced to the east across a north-northwest trending gravity anomaly gradient through Newberry caldera and suggests that normal, perhaps extensional, faulting has occurred subsequent to caldera formation and may have controlled the location of some late-stage basaltic and rhyolitic eruptions. Significant amounts of felsic intrusive material may exist above the mafic intrusive zone but cannot be resolved by the gravity data. -Authors

  7. Gravity model studies of Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Gettings, M.E.; Griscom, A.

    1988-09-10

    Newberry, Volcano, a large Quaternary volcano located about 60 km east of the axis of the High Cascades volcanoes in central Oregon, has a coincident positive residual gravity anomaly of about 12 mGals. Model calculations of the gravity anomaly field suggest that the volcano is underlain by an intrusive complex of mafic composition of about 20-km diameter and 2-km thickness, at depths above 4 km below sea level. However, uplifted basement in a northwest trending ridge may form part of the underlying excess mass, thus reducing the volume of the subvolcanic intrusive. A ring dike of mafic composition is inferred to intrude to near-surface levels along the caldera ring fractures, and low-density fill of the caldera floor probably has a thickness of 0.7--0.9 km. The gravity anomaly attributable to the volcano is reduced to the east across a north-northwest trending gravity anomaly gradient through Newberry caldera and suggests that normal, perhaps extensional, faulting has occurred subsequent to caldera formation and may have controlled the location of some late-stage basaltic and rhyolitic eruptions. Significant amounts of felsic intrusive material may exist above the mafic intrusive zone but cannot be resolved by the gravity data.

  8. Geologic Map of the Carlton Quadrangle, Yamhill County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheeler, Karen L.; Wells, Ray E.; Minervini, Joseph M.; Block, Jessica L.

    2009-01-01

    The Carlton, Oregon, 7.5-minute quadrangle is located in northwestern Oregon, about 35 miles (57 km) southwest of Portland. It encompasses the towns of Yamhill and Carlton in the northwestern Willamette Valley and extends into the eastern flank of the Oregon Coast Range. The Carlton quadrangle is one of several dozen quadrangles being mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) to provide a framework for earthquake- hazard assessments in the greater Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area. The focus of USGS mapping is on the structural setting of the northern Willamette Valley and its relation to the Coast Range uplift. Mapping was done in collaboration with soil scientists from the National Resource Conservation Service, and the distribution of geologic units is refined over earlier regional mapping (Schlicker and Deacon, 1967). Geologic mapping was done on 7.5-minute topographic base maps and digitized in ArcGIS to produce ArcGIS geodatabases and PDFs of the map and text. The geologic contacts are based on numerous observations and samples collected in 2002 and 2003, National Resource Conservation Service soils maps, and interpretations of 7.5-minute topography. The map was completed before new, high-resolution laser terrain mapping was flown for parts of the northern Willamette Valley in 2008.

  9. Oregon Low-Temperature-Resource Assessment Program. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.; Woller, N.M.

    1981-01-01

    Numerous low-temperature hydrothermal systems are available for exploitation throughout the Cascades and eastern Oregon. All of these areas have heat flow significantly higher than crustal averages and many thermal aquifers. In northeastern Oregon, low temperature geothermal resources are controlled by regional stratigraphic aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt Group at shallow depths and possibly by faults at greater depths. In southeastern Oregon most hydrothermal systems are of higher temperature than those of northeastern Oregon and are controlled by high-angle fault zones and layered volcanic aquifers. The Cascades have very high heat flow but few large population centers. Direct use potential in the Cascades is therefore limited, except possibly in the cities of Oakridge and Ashland, where load may be great enough to stimulate development. Absence of large population centers also inhibits initial low temperature geothermal development in eastern Oregon. It may be that uses for the abundant low temperature geothermal resources of the state will have to be found which do not require large nearby population centers. One promising use is generation of electricity from freon-based biphase electrical generators. These generators will be installed on wells at Vale and Lakeview in the summer of 1982 to evaluate their potential use on geothermal waters with temperatures as low as 80/sup 0/C (176/sup 0/F).

  10. Testing the Oregon delinquency model with 9-year follow-up of the Oregon Divorce Study.

    PubMed

    Forgatch, Marion S; Patterson, Gerald R; Degarmo, David S; Beldavs, Zintars G

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents experimental tests of the Oregon delinquency model applied within a randomized design of an at-risk sample of single mothers and their elementary school-aged sons. In the theoretical model, ineffective parenting practices and deviant peer association serve as the primary mechanisms for growth in adolescent delinquent behavior and early arrests. Multiple-method assessments of 238 mothers and sons include delinquency as measured by teacher reports and official arrest records, parenting skills measured by observations of parent-child interactions, and deviant peer association as reported by focal boys. Analyses of the 9-year follow-up data indicate that the Oregon model of parent management training significantly reduced teacher-reported delinquency and police arrests for focal boys. As hypothesized, the experiments demonstrated that improving parenting practices and reducing contacts with deviant peers served as mediating mechanisms for reducing rates of adolescent delinquency. As predicted, there was also a significant delay in the timing of police arrests for youth in the experimental as compared to the control group.

  11. 75 FR 41987 - Regulated Navigation Areas; Bars Along the Coasts of Oregon and Washington; Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... is making a change to the Regulated Navigation Area (RNA) covering the Umpqua River Bar in Oregon so... established Regulated Navigation Areas (RNA) covering each of the coastal bars in Oregon and Washington... Umpqua River Bar in Oregon indicating that the RNA covering that bar, as defined in 33 CFR...

  12. 33 CFR 165.1316 - Safety Zone; Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Oregon shoreline at 123°49′36″ West to 46°11′51″ North thence east to 123°48′53″ West thence south to the Oregon shoreline and finally westerly along the Oregon shoreline to the point of origin. (b)...

  13. Survey of Public Higher Education in Oregon. Bulletin, 1931, No. 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education, United States Department of the Interior, 1931

    1931-01-01

    On November 3, 1929, C. L. Starr, president of the Oregon State Board of Higher Education, requested that a survey be made of State institutions of higher learning, including normal schools. The five institutions involved were the University of Oregon, the Oregon State College, and the normal schools at Monmouth, Ashland, and La Grande. The…

  14. 76 FR 19355 - Oregon Winds Hydro, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Oregon Winds Hydro, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2011, Oregon Winds Hydro, LLC filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act (FPA), proposing to study the feasibility of the Oregon Winds Pumped...

  15. 78 FR 37124 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oregon: Heat Smart Program and Enforcement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oregon: Heat Smart Program and... Heat Smart program, rules for enforcement procedures and civil penalties, and contain minor revisions... revisions relate to Oregon's Heat Smart program in Oregon Administrative Rules (OAR) Chapter 340,...

  16. 75 FR 66124 - Notice of Public Meeting, National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center... Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center Advisory Board. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the Federal Land Policy and... Management (BLM) National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center (NHOTIC) Advisory Board will meet...

  17. Standards Guidelines. Safety in Oregon Schools. OAR 581-22-706.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This document contains guidelines that help Oregon schools meet the components of Oregon Administrative Rule 581-22-706, Emergency Plans and Safety Programs. The standard mandates that Oregon schools shall maintain a comprehensive safety program for all employees and students. School districts may alter the guidelines provided in this guidebook to…

  18. 77 FR 66830 - LNG Development Company, LLC and Oregon Pipeline Company; Northwest Pipeline GP; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission LNG Development Company, LLC and Oregon Pipeline Company; Northwest Pipeline GP; Notice of Extension of Comment Period for the Oregon LNG Export and Washington Expansion Projects This notice announces the extension of the public scoping process and comment period for the Oregon...

  19. 78 FR 20073 - Adequacy of Oregon's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 239 and 258 Adequacy of Oregon's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program AGENCY... modification to the State of Oregon's approved Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Program. On March 22, 2004, EPA... certain municipal solid waste landfills by approved states. On June 14, 2012, Oregon submitted...

  20. Geologic map of the Bend 30- x 60-minute quadrangle, central Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Taylor, Edward M.; Ferns, Mark L.; Scott, William E.; Conrey, Richard M.; Smith, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This map presents the stratigraphic and structural setting of volcanic and sedimentary strata deposited during the past 35 million years across 4,430 km2 in central Oregon. Snowfall in the Cascade Range (west part of map area) recharges important aquifers in the Deschutes basin (central part of map). The area includes the majestic peaks of the Three Sisters volcanoes, where continued eruptions of basalt and rhyolite in the past 3,000 years indicate an ongoing volcanic hazard. The Sisters fault zone, with several potentially active faults, traverses the map from southeast to northwest.

  1. Disturbance and forest health in Oregon and Washington. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Brookes, M.H.; Campbell, S.; Liegel, L.

    1996-10-01

    The scope and intensity of disturbance by such agents as fire, insects, diseases, air pollution, and weather in the Pacific Northwest forests suggest that forest health has declined in recent years in many areas. The most significant disturbances and causes of tree mortality or decline in Oregon and Washington are presented and illustrated. We discuss the interrelations of disturbance with forest management activities and the effect on native trees and suggest some solutions for reducing the severity of disturbance. One chapter reports on forest health monitoring pilot project.

  2. Relation of mercury, uranium, and lithium deposits to the McDermitt caldera complex, Nevada-Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, James J.; Glanzman, Richard K.

    1979-01-01

    The McDermitt caldera complex, located along the Nevada-Oregon border, is a Miocene collapse structure 45 km in diameter. Large-volume rhyolitic and peralkaline ash-flow tufts were erupted from 17.9-15.8 m.y. ago, leading to the formation of overlapping and nested calderas. Emplacement of rhyolitic ring domes, located primarily along the western margin of the calderas, represents the last phase of volcanic activity.

  3. Geomorphology of the Burnt River, eastern Oregon, USA: Topographic adjustments to tectonic and dynamic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morriss, Matthew Connor; Wegmann, Karl W.

    2017-02-01

    Eastern Oregon contains the deepest gorge in North America, where the Snake River cuts vertically down 2300 m. This deep gorge is known as Hells Canyon. A landscape containing such a topographic feature is likely undergoing relatively recent deformation. Study of the Burnt River, a tributary to the Snake River at the upstream end of Hells Canyon, yields data on active river incision in eastern Oregon, indicating that Quaternary faults are a first order control on regional landscape development. Through 1:24,000-scale geologic mapping, a 500,000-year record of fluvial incision along the Burnt River was constructed and is chronologically anchored by optically stimulated luminescence dating and tephrochronology analyses. A conceptual model of fluvial terrace formation was developed using these ages and likely applies to other non-glaciated catchments in eastern Oregon. Mapped terraces, inferred to have formed during glacial-interglacial cycles, provide constraints on rates of incision of the Burnt River. Incision through these terraces indicates that the Burnt River is down-cutting at 0.15 to 0.57 m kyr- 1. This incision appears to reflect a combination of local base-level adjustments tied to movement along the newly mapped Durkee fault and regional base-level control imposed by the downcutting of the Snake River. Deformation of terraces as young as 38.7 ± 5.1 ka indicates Quaternary activity along the Durkee fault, and when combined with topographic metrics (slope, relief, hypsometry, and stream-steepness), reveals a landscape in disequilibrium. Longer wavelength lithospheric dynamics (delamination and crustal foundering) that initiated in the Miocene may also be responsible for continued regional deformation of the Earth's surface.

  4. Understanding Community Wind Energy Development in Oregon: An Integrated Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yao

    This research intends to provide insights into community wind energy development in Oregon using an integrated analysis approach, which incorporates GIS Suitability Analysis, Socio-Political Analysis, and Empirical Case Studies. In the GIS analysis, we developed a model through a series of steps (including data acquisition, preprocessing, data management, manipulation and analysis, and output generation) to measure how suitable a location is for developing wind energy in Oregon. The socio-political analysis adopts the Socio-Political Evaluation of Energy Deployment (SPEED) framework and categorized policies and incentives that are applicable to community wind projects into three classes: strategic, tactical, and operational. The empirical case studies, focused on seven projects in Oregon, are analyzed using the actor-network theoretical framework, and their opportunities and barriers are explored as well.

  5. Physician-assisted suicide in Oregon: a medical perspective.

    PubMed

    Hendin, Herbert; Foley, Kathleen

    2008-06-01

    This Article examines the Oregon Death with Dignity Act from a medical perspective. Drawing on case studies and information provided by doctors, families, and other care givers, it finds that seemingly reasonable safeguards for the care and protection of terminally ill patients written into the Oregon law are being circumvented. The problem lies primarily with the Oregon Public Health Division ("OPHD"), which is charged with monitoring the law. OPHD does not collect the information it would need to effectively monitor the law and in its actions and publications acts as the defender of the law rather than as the protector of the welfare of terminally ill patients. We make explicit suggestions for what OPHD would need to do to change that.

  6. Parelaphostrongylus odocoilei in Columbian black-tailed deer from Oregon.

    PubMed

    Mortenson, Jack A; Abrams, Arthur; Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Dunams, Detiger; Hoberg, Eric P; Bildfell, Robert J; Green, Richard L

    2006-07-01

    Documenting the occurrence of Parelaphostrongylus odocoilei has historically relied on the morphological examination of adult worms collected from the skeletal muscle of definitive hosts, including deer. Recent advances in the knowledge of protostrongylid genetic sequences now permit larvae to be identified. Dorsal-spined larvae (DSLs) collected in 2003-2004 from the lung and feces of six Columbian black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) from Oregon were characterized genetically. The sequences from unknown DSLs were compared to those from morphologically validated adults and larvae of P. odocoilei at both the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of ribosomal DNA and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase II gene. We provide the first unequivocal identification of P. odocoilei in Columbian black-tailed deer from Oregon. The broader geographic distribution, prevalence, and pathology of P. odocoilei are not known in populations of Oregon deer.

  7. Magnitude and frequency of floods in western Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, David Dell; Hubbard, Larry L.; Hubbard, Lawrence E.

    1979-01-01

    A method for estimating the magnitude and frequency of floods is presented for unregulated streams in western Oregon. Equations relating flood magnitude to basin characteristics were developed for exceedance probabilities of 0.5 to 0.01 (2- to 100-year recurrence intervals). Separate equations are presented for four regions: Coast, Willamette, Rogue-Umpqua, and High Cascades. Also presented are values of flood discharges for selected exceedance probabilities and of basin characteristics for all gaging stations used in the analysis. Included are data for 230 stations in Oregon, 6 stations in southwestern Washington, and 3 stations in northwestern California. Drainage areas used in the analysis range from 0.21 to 7,280 square miles. Also included are maximum discharges for all western Oregon stations used in the analysis. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. Total dissolved gas and water temperature in the lower Columbia River, Oregon and Washington, 2002: Quality-assurance data and comparison to water-quality standards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, Dwight Q.; Johnston, Matthew W.; Bragg, Heather M.

    2002-12-10

    From mid-July to mid-September, water temperatures were usually above 20 degrees Celsius at each of the seven lower Columbia River sites in operation. According to the Oregon water-quality standard, when the temperature of the lower Columbia River exceeds 20 degrees Celsius, no measurable temperature increase resulting from anthropogenic activities is allowed.

  9. The Human Resources Certificate of Advanced Mastery Curriculum Framework and Statewide Articulation Projects. A Senate Bill 81 Project of the 1993 Oregon Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwestern Oregon Community Coll., Coos Bay.

    In 1993, the Oregon Legislature funded six curriculum development projects to design frameworks for integrating academic content with technical skills, work behaviors, sample teaching activities, and assessment strategies appropriate to the state's Certificates of Advanced Mastery (CAMs). This report describes results for the six projects as of…

  10. Finding the courage to lead: the Oregon experience.

    PubMed

    Potempa, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    A severe nursing shortage has the profession in crisis. The national picture is paralleled in Oregon. The Oregon Nursing Leadership Council (ONLC), through intense dialogue, developed a comprehensive statewide plan to resolve the shortage. From the perspective of group relations and leadership theories, this article describes the issues and events that contributed to the remarkable journey that culminated in this plan. Motivated by our concern for the public welfare and the survival of our profession, individual ONLC members surrendered their own narrow organizational goals to achieve a more effective collective outcome.

  11. Justice and the moral acceptability of rationing medical care: the Oregon experiment.

    PubMed

    Nelson, R M; Drought, T

    1992-02-01

    The Oregon Basic Health Services Act of 1989 seeks to establish universal access to basic medical care for all currently uninsured Oregon residents. To control the increasing cost of medical care, the Oregon plan will restrict funding according to a priority list of medical interventions. The basic level of medical care provided to residents with incomes below the federal poverty line will vary according to the funds made available by the Oregon legislature. A rationing plan such as Oregon's which potentially excludes medically necessary procedures from the basic level of health care may be just, for the right to publically-sponsored medical care is restricted by opposing rights of private property. However, the moral acceptability of the Oregon plan cannot be determined in the absence of knowing the level of resources to be provided. Finally, Oregon to date has failed to include the individuals being rationed in discussions as to how the scarce resources are to be distributed.

  12. Increasing Diversity in the Earth Sciences - Impact of the IDES Program in Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva, S. L.; Guerrero, E. F.; Duncan, R. A.; de Silva, L. L.; Eriksson, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-OEDG funded Increasing Diversity in the Earth Sciences (IDES) program hosted at Oregon State University targets undergraduate students from diverse backgrounds and diverse ethnicity to engage in research. Partnering with local community colleges, non-traditional students are the hallmark of this program. The IDES program has several components to support the students in the transition from community college to the four-year universities of Oregon State University and Portland State University. Over the four years, the program has adapted while adhering to its primary goals: (1) to increase the number of students from underrepresented groups who prepare for and pursue careers in Earth Science research and education, and (2) to strengthen the understanding of Earth Sciences and their relevance to society among broad and diverse segments of the population. Now in its final year under an extension, 53 participants have participated in the program. An ongoing external evaluation of the program reveals that the various stakeholders consider IDES very successful. Participant surveys and interviews document several impacts: expanded opportunities, making professional contacts, building self-confidence, enhanced ability to be employable, and personal acknowledgement. Research mentors and administrators from partner institutions see positive impacts on the students and on their organizations. Challenges include better communication between the IDES program, mentors, and students. IDES is poised to move forward with its current experiences and successes as a foundation for further funding. IDES-like activities can be funded from private sources and it is a good fit for funding from Research Experiences for Undergraduates at NSF. The new emphasis on education and research at community colleges is an exciting opportunity and Oregon State University has already used aspects of the IDES program in current grant proposals to obtain funds for more undergraduate research.

  13. The effects of carbon tax on the Oregon economy and state greenhouse gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, A. L.; Butenhoff, C. L.; Renfro, J.; Liu, J.

    2014-12-01

    Of the numerous mechanisms to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions on statewide, regional or national scales in the United States, a tax on carbon is perhaps one of the simplest. By taxing emissions directly, the costs of carbon emissions are incorporated into decision-making processes of market actors including consumers, energy suppliers and policy makers. A carbon tax also internalizes the social costs of climate impacts. In structuring carbon tax revenues to reduce corporate and personal income taxes, the negative incentives created by distortionary income taxes can be reduced or offset entirely. In 2008, the first carbon tax in North America across economic sectors was implemented in British Columbia through such a revenue-neutral program. In this work, we investigate the economic and environmental effects of a carbon tax in the state of Oregon with the goal of informing the state legislature, stakeholders and the public. The study investigates 70 different economic sectors in the Oregon economy and six geographical regions of the state. The economic model is built upon the Carbon Tax Analysis Model (C-TAM) to provide price changes in fuel with data from: the Energy Information Agency National Energy Modeling System (EIA-NEMS) Pacific Region Module which provides Oregon-specific energy forecasts; and fuel price increases imposed at different carbon fees based on fuel-specific carbon content and current and projected regional-specific electricity fuel mixes. CTAM output is incorporated into the Regional Economic Model (REMI) which is used to dynamically forecast economic impacts by region and industry sector including: economic output, employment, wages, fiscal effects and equity. Based on changes in economic output and fuel demand, we further project changes in greenhouse gas emissions resulting from economic activity and calculate revenue generated through a carbon fee. Here, we present results of this modeling effort under different scenarios of carbon fee and

  14. Preparing Oregon State University to Meet the Research Challenges of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R. Reese

    2008-10-08

    The OSU Radiation Center requested $100,000 under the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership University Readiness program to provide for graduate student support, reactor equipment upgrades, and irradiation support. A portion of the funds requested were used to support the graduate education of a graduate student for a period of one year. The remaining funds were utilized to enhance the irradiation facilities of the Oregon State TRIGA® Reactor as well as to offset the costs of irradiations for initial investigations where grant funding is not available. The focus of this effort was to create an environment that would enhance facilities and equipment at Oregon State University which emphasize GNEP related themes, specifically material science analytical capabilities for the next generation of nuclear reactors. These enhancements included development of a prompt gamma neutron activation analysis analytical capability, digital reactor data logging, electronic dosimetry for researchers, replacement of sample grapples, and irradiation/analytical services.

  15. Insect detection and nitrogen management for irrigated potatoes using remote sensing from small unmanned aircraft systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing with small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) has potential applications in agriculture because low flight altitudes allow image acquisition at very high spatial resolution. We set up experiments at the Oregon State University Hermiston Agricultural Research and Extension Center with d...

  16. Oxygen Isotope Character of the Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, T.; Strickland, A.; Valley, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Oxygen isotope analyses of zircons from lavas and tuffs from the Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field (LOVF) of east central Oregon unequivocally demonstrate the presence of mid-Miocene low-δ18O magmas (δ18Ozrc<4.7 ‰). Despite the growing data set of low-δ18O melts within, and proximal to, the Snake River Plain (SRP) Large Igneous Province, debate persists regarding both the mechanisms for low-δ18O magma petrogenesis, and their relative influence in the SRP. The LOVF is associated with widespread silicic volcanism roughly concurrent with the eruption of the Steens-Columbia River Basalt Group between ~17-15Ma. Silicic activity in the LOVF is limited to 16-15Ma, when an estimated 1100km3 of weakly peralkaline to metaluminous rhyolitic lavas and ignimbrites erupted from a series of fissures and calderas. Geographically, the LOVF overlaps the Oregon-Idaho Graben (OIG), and straddles the 87Sr/86Sr= 0.704 line which, together with the 0.706 line to the east, delineate the regional transition from the North American Precambrian continental crust to the east to younger Phanerozoic accreted terranes to the west. Here we report high accuracy ion microprobe analyses of δ18O in zircons using a 10-15μm spot, with average spot-to-spot precision ±0.28‰ (2SD), to investigate intra-grain and intra-unit δ18Ozrc trends for LOVF rhyolites. Due to its high closure temperature, chemical and physical resistance, and slow oxygen diffusion rates, zircon offers a robust record of magmatic oxygen isotope ratios during crystallization and provides constraints on the petrogenesis of Snake River Plain (SRP) low-δ18O melts. Individual zircons from LOVF rhyolites show no evidence of core-rim δ18O zoning, and populations exhibit ≤0.42‰ (2SD) intra-unit variability. Unit averages range from 2.2 to 4.3‰, with the lowest values in caldera-forming ignimbrites, but all units show evidence of crystallization from low-δ18O melts. Quartz and feldspar analyses by laser fluorination (precision

  17. Analysis of design attributes and crashes on the Oregon highway system.

    PubMed

    Strathman, James G; Dueker, Kenneth J; Zhang, Jihong; Williams, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    This paper estimates the relationship between crash activity and roadway design attributes on the Oregon state highway system. Crash models are estimated from roadway segments distinguished by functional classification and location. A number of design attributes were found to be related to crash activity in the various models, including number of lanes, curve characteristics, vertical grade, surface type, median type, turning lanes, shoulder width and lane width. In selected instances, crash reduction factors (CRFs) calculated from model results are compared with those presently used to evaluate projects in the Oregon Department of Transportation's Safety Improvement Program. The number of design attributes specified in the crash models is limited in comparison with the number of CRFs presently used to evaluate safety improvement projects. However, the attributes included in the crash models represent countermeasures associated with the more costly outlays that states make to improve safety. Thus, crash models of this type provide states with an opportunity to validate the CRFs that are most important economically.

  18. Impacts of multispecies parasitism on juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferguson, Jayde A.; Romer, Jeremy; Sifneos, Jean C.; Madsen, Lisa; Schreck, Carl B.; Glynn, Michael; Kent, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    We are studying the impacts of parasites on threatened stocks of Oregon coastal coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). In our previous studies, we have found high infections of digeneans and myxozoans in coho salmon parr from the lower main stem of West Fork Smith River (WFSR), Oregon. In contrast parr from tributaries of this river, and outmigrating smolts, harbor considerably less parasites. Thus, we have hypothesized that heavy parasite burdens in parr from this river are associated with poor overwintering survival. The objective of the current study was to ascertain the possible effects these parasites have on smolt fitness. We captured parr from the lower main stem and tributaries of WFSR and held them in the laboratory to evaluate performance endpoints of smolts with varying degrees of infection by three digeneans (Nanophyetus salmincola, Apophallus sp., and neascus) and one myxozoan (Myxobolus insidiosus). The parameters we assessed were weight, fork length, growth, swimming stamina, and gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity. We repeated our study on the subsequent year class and with hatchery reared coho salmon experimentally infected with N. salmincola. The most significant associations between parasites and these performance or fitness endpoints were observed in the heavily infected groups from both years. We found that all parasite species, except neascus, were negatively associated with fish fitness. This was corroborated for N. salmincola causing reduced growth with our experimental infection study. Parasites were most negatively associated with growth and size, and these parameters likely influenced the secondary findings with swimming stamina and ATPase activity levels.

  19. Transverse structural trends along the Oregon convergent margin: Implications for Cascadia earthquake potential and crustal rotations

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfinger, C.; Kulm, L.D.; Yeats, R.S. ); Applegate, B.; MacKay, M.E.; Moore, G.F. )

    1992-02-01

    A remarkable set of west-northwest-trending left-lateral strike-slip faults intersects the Cascadia subduction zone. Three of these faults have been mapped off northern and central Oregon by using seismic reflection, SeaMARC-1A sidescan sonar, and SeaBeam bathymetry. These faults are highly oblique to the north-south structural grain of the active accretionary wedge. One of them has 6 km of horizontal slip; the average slip rate is 7-10 mm/yr. The faults cut the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, and can be traced into the North American plate. Folds that deform late Pleistocene and Holocene sediments on the upper continental slope and shelf strike north-northwest to west-northwest. Some of the west-northwest-trending folds are associated with the throughgoing strike-slip faults, whereas other northwest-trending folds are approximately normal to the plate convergence direction. Many of these folds are mapped across the shelf, and several active shelf synclines project toward Oregon's coastal bays, where marsh subsidence events are inferred to be the result of great subduction-zone earthquakes. These subsidence events may actually record the growth of local synclines, possibly as secondary effects of slip on the megathrusts. The authors postulate that shortening of the forearc region by clockwise tectonic rotation, associated with movement of the left-lateral faults and folding of the upper plate, may accommodate a significant amount of plate convergence.

  20. Demography of Northern Spotted Owls in southwestern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zabel, Cynthia J.; Salmons, Susan E.; Forsman, Eric D.; Destefano, Stephen; Raphael, Martin G.; Gutierrez, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    Northern Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) are associated with lower elevation, commercially valuable, late-successional coniferous forests in the Pacific Northwest. Meta-analyses of demographic parameters indicate that Northern Spotted Owl populations are declining throughout their range (Anderson and Burnham 1992, Burnham et al. this volume). Recent research has attempted to determine whether management activities have affected the viability of Spotted Owl populations, and results have led to development of conservation plans for the species (Dawson et al. 1987, Thomas et al. 1990, Murphy and Noon 1992, USDI 1992, Thomas et al. 1993b).In the Recovery Plan for the Northern Spotted Owl (USDI 1992b) threats to the species were identified as small population sizes, declining populations, limited amounts of habitat, continued loss and fragmentation of habitat, geographically isolated populations, and predation and competition from other avian species. Weather and fire are natural processes that also may affect reproductive success of Spotted Owls. Weather may be a factor in the high annual variability in fecundity of Spotted Owls, as has been suggested for other predatory bird species (Newton, 1979, 1986). However, these factors have not been addressed in previous studies of Spotted Owls.Our objectives were to estimate survival, fecundity, and annual rates of population change (l) for resident, territorial female Spotted Owls at two study areas in the coastal mountains of southwestern Oregon. We tested if the amount of rainfall was correlated with reproduction of Spotted Owls. While surveying for Spotted Owls, we documented the increased presence of Barred Owls (Strix varia), a potential competitor of Spotted Owls.

  1. Condition assessment of tidal wetlands of Washington, Oregon and California

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA and State partners conducted an assessment of the condition of estuarine tidal wetlands of Washington, Oregon and California at 217 sites during the summer of 2002. Dominant habitat types varied, although unvegetated sand or mud flats were the dominant habitat types for all...

  2. Description of Globodera ellingtonae n. sp. (Nematoda: Heteroderidae) from Oregon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new species of cyst nematode, Globodera ellingtoni, is described from soil collected from a field with a cropping history including potatoes in Oregon. It is characterized in having second-stage juveniles (J2) with a body length of 450 um (365-515), stylet length of 20.9 um (19-22.5) with basal kn...

  3. Investigating Sand on the Coast of Oregon and Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komar, Paul D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes factors affecting sand composition and distribution along coastlines. Uses variations in sand types along the Oregon coast to illustrate the influences of sand grain density, wave action, and headlands on sand movements. Describes the seasonal movement of sand across beaches. (DLH)

  4. Educational Interpreting for Students Who Are Deaf: Oregon Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This document presents the Oregon state guidelines for provision of educational interpreting services for students who are deaf. An introduction defines an educational interpreter and considers how to determine the need for an educational interpreter and the student-interpreter relationship. The next section details the roles and responsibilities…

  5. Oregon State Institutional Library Services, Analysis and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, William H.

    This study was undertaken with funds from Title IV-A of the Library Services and Construction Act in order to improve library facilities and services in the eleven institutions Oregon maintains for the mentally ill, retarded, handicapped, and violaters of the law. Data were collected on questionnaires and by visits made to each institution. The…

  6. RIPARIAN AREAS OF AN AGRICULTURAL LANDSCAPE IN WESTERN OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Willamette Valley is a productive, diversified agricultural area in western Oregon. Pastureland and grass seed fields, mostly located on poorly drained soils, account for 60% of the agricultural land in the valley. The size and character of Willamette Valley streams and ass...

  7. ESTIMATING THE SIZE OF HISTORICAL COASTAL OREGON SALMON RUNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasing the abundance of salmon in Oregon's rivers and streams is a high priority public policy objective. Salmon runs have been reduced from pre-development conditions (typically defined as prior to the 1850s), but it is unclear by how much. Considerable public and private ...

  8. Ecological functions of riparian zones in Oregon hydrological landscapes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ecological functions of streams and associated riparian zones are strongly influenced by the hydrological attributes of watersheds and landscapes in which they occur. Oregon hydrologic landscape regions (HLRs) have been defined based on four types of GIS data: 1) climate, 2) ...

  9. Oregon Driver Education. Alcohol/Drugs and Driving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. Div. of Curriculum and School Improvement.

    This curriculum unit contains 10 modules, to be used in 10 driver education class sessions, on driving under the influence of alcohol and/or other drugs (DUI). The unit aims to combat the Oregon DUI problem, especially among 15- to 24-year-olds, with values clarification, awareness of risk factors and personal boundaries, refusal skills, social…

  10. On the Cusp: Corey Harper--University of Oregon, Eugene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    A recent library school graduate, Corey Harper was nominated by his colleagues at the University of Oregon (UO) because of the key role he played in implementing digital collections. Along with technical expertise, says Watson, he brought with him "[an ability to] balance idealism with expediency, the striving for perfection with the need to…

  11. SITE CHARACTERIZATION USING BIRD SPECIES COMPOSITION IN EASTERN OREGON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted riparian bird surveys at 25 randomly selected stream reaches in the John Day River Basin of eastern Oregon as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP). At each reach along a kilometer-length transect, ...

  12. Oregon Migrant Health Project; Annual Progress Report 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Health, Portland.

    In this 1969 annual report, 10 objectives of the Oregon Migrant Health Project--which served approximately 18,400 migrants during the project year--are listed. These objectives relate to providing for diagnostic and medical services, preventive medical services, and dental care, as well as promoting health awareness, education, and improved living…

  13. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Oregon. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater,…

  14. Distribution of cattle grazing in a northeastern Oregon riparian pasture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livestock grazing of a northeastern Oregon riparian pasture was monitored using high-frequency GPS tracking of cattle and high-resolution aerial photography. Tracking collars recorded positions, velocity, date, and time at 1-sec intervals. Areas where animals rested and moved were identified and re...

  15. Oregon Salt Marshes: How Blue are They? November 12, 2015

    EPA Science Inventory

    We quantified carbon and nitrogen accumulation rates in salt marshes at 135 plots distributed across eight estuaries in Oregon, USA. Net carbon and nitrogen accumulation rates were quantified by measuring the content of these constituents in sediment that accumulated in marsh ha...

  16. Suicidal Behavior: A Survey of Oregon High School Students, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, David

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death in the 10- to 19-year-old population in Oregon. The suicide rate has increased more than five-fold in the last three and one-half decades. This trend can be reversed by developing an understanding of the characteristics, behaviors, and events associated with suicide in at-risk youth. The Youth Risk…

  17. Implementing the Parent Management Training Oregon Model in The Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekkema, Nienke; Wiefferink, Carin; Mikolajczak, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    In cooperation with its American developers, the Parent Management Training Oregon (PMTO) model was introduced into the Dutch youth care system at the beginning of 2006. In general, implementing new interventions in practice is no simple matter. Several factors related to the socio-political context, the organizational context, the intervention…

  18. 75 FR 41093 - FM Table of Allotments, Maupin, Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 FM Table of Allotments, Maupin, Oregon AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. 0 As stated in the preamble, the Federal Communications Commission amends 47 CFR part 73 as follows: PART 73--RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES 0 1. The authority...

  19. Wyoming big sagebrush associations of eastern Oregon; vegetation attributes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report provides a synopsis of several vegetative characteristics for the Wyoming big sagebrush complex in eastern Oregon covering the High Desert , Snake River, and Owyhee Ecological Provinces in Harney, Lake, and Malheur Counties. The complex has been grouped into six associations defined by t...

  20. Managing Special Library Collections. A Bibliography and Oregon Union List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buser-Molatore, Marcia, Comp.

    Limited to books, this bibliography and union catalog list of the library holdings of 27 Oregon academic, public, government, and special libraries is a selection of resource materials intended to be representative of the concerns of librarians responsible for the management of special libraries and information centers. Organized by subject and…

  1. Remote sensing and the pelagic fisheries environment off Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearcy, W. G.

    1970-01-01

    Remote sensing oceanography at Oregon State University is part of a multidisciplinary research program: (1) to learn more about nearshore oceanographic processes and how they affect the production of marine life and the availability of albacore tuna; and (2) to provide fishermen with information in near real time that will be useful in scouting for albacore concentrations.

  2. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Oregon's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  3. Waste Not: An Oregon Solution to Joblessness and Overflowing Landfills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    The St. Vincent de Paul Society of Lane County (Oregon) provides a wide range of social services to stimulate community development, based on reuse, repair, and recycling. Job training and jobs are provided in the woodshop, appliance center, mattress factory, glass shop, and environmentally friendly housing construction projects, with priority…

  4. Aerial sampling of emissions from biomass pile burns in Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions from burning piles of post-harvest timber slash in Grande Ronde, Oregon were sampled using an instrument platform lofted into the plume using a tether-controlled aerostat or balloon. Emissions of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, particulate matter (PM2.5 µm), ...

  5. Oregon Pupil Transportation Manual. 1987 Revised Regulations and Responsibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This manual provides school bus drivers and school officials in Oregon with material relating to safe and efficient school transportation. The guide is not intended to take the place of motor vehicle laws or school laws, but is a reference for questions that arise in connection with the school bus driver's job. Chapter 1 enumerates laws governing…

  6. Mercury incident at Banks, Oregon home requires EPA emergency cleanup

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Seattle-April 17, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has completed an emergency cleanup of elemental mercury at a residential home in Banks, Oregon. EPA worked closely with state and local authorities to complete the cleanup and ensure that pu

  7. Energy-Efficient Schools: Three Case Studies from Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    This document presents case studies of three schools or districts in Oregon that have implemented steps to promote energy efficiency. Steps taken by the schools include daylighting, energy audits, special energy loans, new ventilation design, and sustainable building practices. The facilities described are Ash Creek Intermediate School in…

  8. Guide to the Geology of the Owyhee Region of Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittleman, Laurence R.

    In this bulletin a detailed description of a geologic region in Oregon is presented with numerous illustrations, both plates and schematic diagrams. Maps of the region as well as maps of various excursions are included in the booklet. A geologic-time unit table is presented covering the Cenozoic Era. Three excursions with included side-trips are…

  9. The Development of the Land Grant College in Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corley, Sherie P.

    The land grant colleges, funded by federal legislation in 1862, spawned public institutions in each state. The principal motivation for this funding was to create schools where practical education could be disseminated to the working classes. An example of the land grant school experience is revealed in the history of Oregon State University.…

  10. In Pursuit of Community Justice: Deschutes County, Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Dennis; Holcomb, Deevy

    2001-01-01

    One Oregon community applies a set of community justice principles and philosophies that have produced tangible and successful programs to build community, reduce risk, and repair harm. Describes some of the county's community justice history and programs, including revamped victim assistance programs, victim-offender mediation, and a community…

  11. Oregon Cascades Play Fairway Analysis: Raster Datasets and Models

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This submission includes maps of the spatial distribution of basaltic, and felsic rocks in the Oregon Cascades. It also includes a final Play Fairway Analysis (PFA) model, with the heat and permeability composite risk segments (CRS) supplied separately. Metadata for each raster dataset can be found within the zip files, in the TIF images

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF AGROSTIS SPP. HABITAT IN CENTRAL OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Creeping bentgrass, Agrostis stolonifera L., is a non-native grass commonly found at mesic sites in central Oregon. Interest in A. stolonifera plant communities and the factors that may control its distribution has increased since field trials of A. stolonifera ...

  13. Child and Family Resource Program (Salem, Oregon). Program Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Development Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Successful coordination of social service agencies, aimed at serving eligible families with children from the prenatal period to age 8, has been the focus of the Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP) in Salem, Oregon, one of 11 sites in this Head Start affiliated program. The Salem program also includes an infant-toddler program emphasizing…

  14. 77 FR 67832 - Southeast Oregon Resource Advisory Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... Burns, Oregon. Public comment periods will be scheduled each day of each meeting. Logistical details and...: Tara Martinak, Public Affairs Specialist, BLM Burns District Office, 28910 Highway 20 West, Hines..., conservation, and general interests. They provide advice to BLM and Forest Service resource managers...

  15. 77 FR 14041 - Southeast Oregon Resource Advisory Council; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... Specialist, Bureau of Land Management Burns District Office, 28910 Highway 20 West, Hines, Oregon 97738, (541... general interests. They provide advice to BLM and Forest Service resource managers regarding management... District of the Fremont-Winema National Forest, elect a new vice-Chair, and develop agenda items for...

  16. Aerial Sampling of Emissions from Biomass Pile Burns in Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract (already cleared). Emissions from burning piles of post-harvest timber slash in Grande Ronde, Oregon were sampled using an instrument platform lofted into the plume using a tether-controlled aerostat or balloon. Emissions of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, pa...

  17. Faculty Annual Merit Evaluation at Oregon Institute of Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, John G.

    This paper describes the approach taken at the Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) for the evaluation of its faculty in conjunction with the OIT administrator evaluation methods. A set of Annual Faculty Objectives (AFO) are established by both faculty and department chairmen. They review divisional and departmental goals and agree on specific…

  18. Oregon's "Artificial Depression": A Case Study in Cost-Cutting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    1991-01-01

    The history of and issues in Oregon's retrenchment in higher education (resulting from voter-imposed taxing restrictions) are chronicled. Changes made at Portland State University are used to illustrate the program review and termination process occurring statewide. The higher education community's response, faculty and staff morale, and…

  19. Profile of Teacher Education in Oregon: 1967-77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myton, David V.

    The first three years of a decade of teacher education programs in Oregon are compared to the last three years, revealing distinct differences between characteristics in the eras 1967-69 and 1975-77. The following characteristics were chosen for analysis: (1) legislative climate; (2) student enrollments; (3) cooperating public school personnel;…

  20. Needs Assessment of International Students at Eastern Oregon State College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eid, Mamoud Taha; Jordan-Domschot, Theresa

    The purpose of the research project was to assess the needs, satisfaction, and concerns of international students attending Eastern Oregon State College. The international student population consisted of students from Micronesia, Netherlands, Somalia, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Iran, Japan, Thailand, Zimbabwe, Belgium, Canada, Nigeria, China,…

  1. The Status of Children in Oregon. 1996 Report Card.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children First for Oregon, Portland.

    This Kids Count report card gives an overall account of statewide trends in the well-being of Oregon's children. The statistical report is based on 18 indicators of child well being: (1) childhood poverty; (2) health uninsured; (3) percentage of court-ordered child support paid; (4) affordable housing; (5) infant mortality rate; (6) low…

  2. 40 CFR 282.87 - Oregon State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Hazardous Materials II (Oil Storage Tanks: Sections 466.706-466.920 and Sections 466.990-466.995), insofar... Waste and Hazardous Materials II (Oil Storage Tanks): Sections 466.750; 466.783 through 466.787; 466.858... (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.87 Oregon...

  3. 40 CFR 282.87 - Oregon State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Hazardous Materials II (Oil Storage Tanks: Sections 466.706-466.920 and Sections 466.990-466.995), insofar... Waste and Hazardous Materials II (Oil Storage Tanks): Sections 466.750; 466.783 through 466.787; 466.858... (CONTINUED) APPROVED UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAMS Approved State Programs § 282.87 Oregon...

  4. Geologic map of the Washougal quadrangle, Clark County, Washington, and Multnomah County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evarts, Russell C.; O’Connor, Jim E.; Tolan, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    The Washougal 7.5’ quadrangle spans the boundary between the Portland Basin and the Columbia River Gorge, approximately 30 km east of Portland, Oregon. The map area contains the westernmost portion of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic area as well as the rapidly growing areas surrounding the Clark County, Washington, cities of Camas and Washougal. The Columbia River transects the map area, and two major tributaries, the Washougal River in Washington and the Sandy River in Oregon, also flow through the quadrangle. The Columbia, Washougal, and Sandy Rivers have all cut deep valleys through hilly uplands, exposing Oligocene volcanic bedrock in the north part of the map area and lava flows of the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group in the western Columbia River Gorge. Elsewhere in the map area, these older rocks are buried beneath weakly consolidated to well-consolidated Neogene and younger basin-fill sedimentary rocks and Quaternary volcanic and sedimentary deposits. The Portland Basin is part of the Coastal Lowland that separates the Cascade Range from the Oregon Coast Range. The basin has been interpreted as a pull-apart basin located in the releasing stepover between two en echelon, northwest-striking, right-lateral fault zones. These fault zones are thought to reflect regional transpression, transtension, and dextral shear within the forearc in response to oblique subduction of the Pacific plate along the Cascadia Subduction Zone. The southwestern margin of the Portland Basin is a well-defined topographic break along the base of the Tualatin Mountains, an asymmetric anticlinal ridge that is bounded on its northeast flank by the Portland Hills Fault Zone, which is probably an active structure. The nature of the corresponding northeastern margin of the basin is less clear, but a series of poorly defined and partially buried dextral extensional structures has been hypothesized from topography, microseismicity, potential-field anomalies, and reconnaissance

  5. Increasing Diversity in the Earth Sciences (IDES) - An Oregon Effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva, S. L.; Duncan, R. A.; Wright, D. J.; de Silva, L.; Guerrero, E. F.

    2011-12-01

    The IDES (Increasing Diversity in Earth Sciences) Program is the first partnership of its kind in the state of Oregon targeted at broadening participation in the Earth Science enterprise. Funded by the National Science Foundation Opportunities to Enhance Diversity in the Geosciences program (NSF-OEDG), this partnership involves community colleges, a research university with major strengths in Earth Science research and education and an institutionalized commitment to enhancing diversity, state and federal agencies, centers of informal education, and the Oregon Space Grant Consortium, IDES has two integrated goals: 1) to increase the number of students from under-represented groups who pursue careers in Earth Science research and education, and 2) to strengthen the understanding of Earth Sciences and their relevance to society among broad and diverse segments of the population. Built around the best practices of tiered mentoring, interactive student cohort, research and education internships, and financial support, this 4-year program recruits 10 to 12 students (mainly rising juniors) each year from science majors at Oregon State University and five Oregon community colleges. The program is reaching its goals by: a) training participants in the application of geospatial to Earth Science problems of personal relevance b) immersing participants in a two-year mentored research project that involves summer internships with academic units, state and federal agencies, and centers for informal education in Oregon. c) exposing, educating, and involving participants in the breadth of Earth Science careers through contact with Earth Science professionals through mentors, a professional internship, and a learning community that includes a speaker series. d) instilling an understanding of context and relevance of the Earth Science Enterprise to the participants, their families, their communities, and the general public. We report on the first two years of this program during

  6. Final Technical Report on DOE Awards DE-FG03 94ER61918, DE-FG06 94ER61918 to Oregon Health Sciences University, September 15, 1994 - September 29, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Krages, Kathryn Pyle

    1999-11-23

    This report describes the activities conducted with DOE funds at Oregon Health Sciences University between 9/15/94 and 9/29/99. The activities fall into four major categories: Information Technology, Information Services and Support, Medical Informatics and Outcomes Research, and collaboration with other institutions. The focus of these activities was to implement and maintain a regional healthcare information network.

  7. The Oregon Oceanbook. An Introduction to the Pacific Ocean off Oregon Including Its Physical Setting and Living Marine Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmenter, Tish; Bailey, Robert

    Developed to integrate fundamental oceanographic concepts with basic research, this book presents information about the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Oregon. Characterizations and descriptions of the marine environment from the coastline to approximately 200 miles offshore are provided for the interested public. Chapter topics include: (1) marine…

  8. The Oregon Conference Monograph 1995. Volume 7. [Proceedings of a Conference (Eugene, Oregon, February 2-4, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deffenbaugh, Abe, Ed.; And Others

    This monograph presents 23 papers presented at a 1995 Oregon conference which focused on students in trouble due to disabilities or context problems. Paper titles and authors are: "Identifying Students Who Have Learning Disabilities" (Barbara D. Bateman and David J. Chard); "ADHD: A Teachers' Guide" (Rosalyn A. Templeton);…

  9. Crest-stage gaging stations in Oregon: a compilation of peak data collected from October 1952 to September 1974

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friday, John

    1974-01-01

    A crest-stage gaging station provides an excellent means for determining peak water-surface elevations at a selected location on a stream channel. When related to streamflow, these data provide hydrologists with a knowledge of the flood experience of a drainage basin. If an adequate flood history is known, it is possible to estimate the probable magnitude and frequency of floods likely to occur in that basin, and this information is a valuable asset to anyone who must estimate design floods at proposed drainage structures. However, most design problems involve estimating peak flows on ungaged streams. This is difficult because the rate of storm runoff is not the same in all basins due to the influence of various basin characteristics which can either assist or retard the runoff. The crest-stage gaging program in Oregon is designed to provide a representative sampliing of peak flows at basins having a wide range in characteristics. Then, after sufficient data are collected, a statistical analysis can be made which will provide a means for estimating design floods at ungaged sites on the basis of known basin characteristics.This report is one of a series presenting a compilation of peak data collected at 232 crest-stage gaging stations in Oregon. The collection and publication of these data are made possible through mutual funding by State and Federal agencies. The Geological Survey, the Oregon State Highway Commission, the Federal Highway Administration, and the Bureau of Land Management are currently supporting 160 active crest-stage stations in Oregon.

  10. A tunnel runs through it: an inside view of the Tualatin Mountains, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Ken; Peterson, Gary L.; Beeson, Marvin H.; Wells, Ray E.; Fleck, Robert J.; Evarts, Russell C.; Duvall, Alison; Blakely, Richard J.; Burns, Scott

    2011-01-01

    The Tualatin Mountains form a northwest-striking ridge about 350 m high that separates Portland, Oregon, from the cities of the Tualatin Valley to the west. Known informally as the Portland Hills, the ridge is a late Cenozoic anticline, bounded by reverse faults that dip toward the anticlinal axis. The anticline is a broad, open fold consisting chiefly of Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group, with remnants of Miocene-Pliocene Troutdale Formation and Pleistocene basalt of the Boring Volcanic Field on the flanks of the anticline. Anticlinal structures similar to the Tualatin Mountains are characteristic of the northern Willamette Valley, where the structures accommodate margin-parallel shortening of the Cascadia fore arc. Global Positioning System (GPS) results indicate that the shortening is due to the northward motion of Oregon at several millimeters per year with respect to stable North America. Some of the uplifts may contain active faults, but the structures are poorly exposed and are overlain by thick Pleistocene loess and Missoula flood deposits. Between 1993 and 1998, construction of the 3-mile-long (4500-m-long) TriMet MAX Light Rail tunnel through the Tualatin Mountains provided an unusual opportunity to investigate the geological structure and history of the Tualatin Mountains. This report is a collaborative effort among the tunnel geologists and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to document the geologic story and quantify late Cenozoic and Quaternary deformation rates of the Tualatin Mountains.

  11. The post-Mazama northwest rift zone eruption at Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKay, Daniele; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Madin, Ian P.; Champion, Duane E.; O'Connor, Jim; Dorsey, Rebecca; Madin, Ian P.

    2009-01-01

    The northwest rift zone (NWRZ) eruption took place at Newberry Volcano ~7000 years ago after the volcano was mantled by tephra from the catastrophic eruption that destroyed Mount Mazama and produced the Crater Lake caldera. The NWRZ eruption produced multiple lava flows from a variety of vents including cinder cones, spatter vents, and fissures, possibly in more than one episode. Eruptive behaviors ranged from energetic Strombolian, which produced significant tephra plumes, to low-energy Hawaiian-style. This paper summarizes and in part reinterprets what is known about the eruption and presents information from new and ongoing studies. Total distance spanned by the eruption is 32 km north-south. The northernmost flow of the NWRZ blocked the Deschutes River upstream from the city of Bend, Oregon, and changed the course of the river. Renewed mafic activity in the region, particularly eruptions such as the NWRZ with tephra plumes and multiple lava flows from many vents, would have significant impacts for the residents of Bend and other central Oregon communities.

  12. Preliminary Assessment of Vertical Stability and Gravel Transport along the Umpqua River, Southwestern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, Jim E.; Wallick, J. Rose; Sobieszczyk, Steven; Cannon, Charles; Anderson, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    This report addresses physical channel issues related to instream gravel mining on the Umpqua River and its two primary tributaries, the North and South Umpqua Rivers. This analysis constitutes a 'Phase I' investigation, as designated by an interagency team cochaired by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, and the Oregon Department of State Lands to address instream gravel mining issues across Oregon. Phase I analyses rely primarily on existing datasets and cursory analysis to determine the vertical stability of a channel to ascertain whether a particular river channel is aggrading, degrading, or at equilibrium. Additionally, a Phase I analysis identifies other critical issues or questions pertinent to physical channel conditions that may be related to instream gravel mining activities. This analysis can support agency permitting decisions as well as possibly indicating the need for additional studies. This specific analysis focuses on the mainstem Umpqua River from the Pacific Ocean at River Mile (RM) 0 to the confluence of the North and South Umpqua Rivers (at RM 111.8), as well as the lower 29 mi of the North Umpqua River and the lower 80 mi of the South Umpqua River (fig. 1). It is within these reaches where mining of gravel bars for aggregate has been most prevalent.

  13. Coastal geologic hazards and land-use planning in northwestern Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Martin E.; Morgan, Michael

    1986-12-01

    Detailed mapping of geology-related development risks was completed for seven small, relatively remote communities along the northern Oregon coast in Clatsop and Tillamook counties. More than 45 previously unmapped, active landslides up to 20 km2 in area were mapped along one 15-km section of the 26 km of coastline studied Additional geologic constraints to land use in the study area include marine erosion, ocean and estuarine flooding, wind erosion of dune areas, soil erosion, and, in one community, soil piping Recommendations made on the basis of this mapping were incorporated into comprehensive land-use plans prepared by each community as required by the State of Oregon The principal changes in land-use regulations in the area obtained from this investigation are the rezoning of large tracts of undeveloped land to better reflect geologic limitations, the requiring of site-specific studies by licensed geotechnical experts for developments proposed in certain hazardous areas, the adoption of Chapter 70 of the Uniform Building Code by several communities, and the addition of numerous special regulations on site preparation methods This article shows that geologic data of sufficient detail can be effectively incorporated into local land-use plans when required by state law This is facillitated when state and federal agencies provide good regional geologic information and land-use planning guidelines.

  14. Hydrology of the Johnson Creek Basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Karl K.; Snyder, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    The Johnson Creek basin is an important resource in the Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area. Johnson Creek forms a wildlife and recreational corridor through densely populated areas of the cities of Milwaukie, Portland, and Gresham, and rural and agricultural areas of Multnomah and Clackamas Counties. The basin has changed as a result of agricultural and urban development, stream channelization, and construction of roads, drains, and other features characteristic of human occupation. Flooding of Johnson Creek is a concern for the public and for water management officials. The interaction of the groundwater and surface-water systems in the Johnson Creek basin also is important. The occurrence of flooding from high groundwater discharge and from a rising water table prompted this study. As the Portland metropolitan area continues to grow, human-induced effects on streams in the Johnson Creek basin will continue. This report provides information on the groundwater and surface-water systems over a range of hydrologic conditions, as well as the interaction these of systems, and will aid in management of water resources in the area. High and low flows of Crystal Springs Creek, a tributary to Johnson Creek, were explained by streamflow and groundwater levels collected for this study, and results from previous studies. High flows of Crystal Springs Creek began in summer 1996, and did not diminish until 2000. Low streamflow of Crystal Springs Creek occurred in 2005. Flow of Crystal Springs Creek related to water-level fluctuations in a nearby well, enabling prediction of streamflow based on groundwater level. Holgate Lake is an ephemeral lake in Southeast Portland that has inundated residential areas several times since the 1940s. The water-surface elevation of the lake closely tracked the elevation of the water table in a nearby well, indicating that the occurrence of the lake is an expression of the water table. Antecedent conditions of the groundwater level and autumn

  15. Hermiston Agricultural Research and Extension Center Land Conveyance Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Wyden, Ron [D-OR

    2013-08-01

    07/30/2014 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources Senate Subcommittee on Public Lands, Forests, and Mining. Hearings held. With printed Hearing: S.Hrg. 113-433. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. Identification of a new fault and associated lineament features in Oregon's Summer Lake Valley using high-resolution LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, L.; Madin, I.

    2012-12-01

    In 2012, the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted WSI to co-acquire airborne Light Detecting and Ranging (LiDAR) and Thermal Infrared Imagery (TIR) data within the region surrounding Summer Lake, Oregon. The objective of this project was to detect surficial expressions of geothermal activity and associated geologic features. An analysis of the LiDAR data revealed one newly identified fault and several accompanying lineaments that strike northwest, similar to the trend of the Ana River, Brothers, and Eugene-Denio Fault Zones in Central Oregon. The age of the Ana River Fault Zone and Summer Lake bed is known to be within the Holocene epoch. Apparent scarp height observed from the LiDAR is up to 8 meters. While detailed analysis is ongoing, the data illustrated the effectiveness of using high resolution remote sensing data for surficial analysis of geologic displacement. This presentation will focus on direct visual detection of features in the Summer Lake, Oregon landscape using LiDAR data.

  17. Post-Glacial Ant Generated Desert Pavements in Southeastern Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, K. C.

    2001-12-01

    Desert pavements typically require thousands to tens of thousands of years to reach a high level of development. In a pluvial lake valley in Southeastern Oregon I have observed harvester ants creating desert pavement-like features in less than two months. The summer lake basin is a fairly simple sedimentary system. In the eastern half of the basin, the basaltic bedrock is buried under tens of meters of alluvial deposits which lie beneath an approximately ten meter thick dune sheet. The dune sands are noticably different in grainsize and chemistry than the fine component of the alluvial deposits. The dunes began to form at the end of the last pluvial interval (Allison 1980) and continue to be active today. Roughly one fourth of the total area of the dune sheet is mantled with desert pavement, consisting of very coarse sand and fine pebbles (1-8 mm diameter). The dune sand is very fine grained with a considerable amount of silt and minimal clay. It forms thin (2-20 cm thick) well developed Av horizons beneath the desert pavement. Owyhee harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex owyheei) in the area use pebbles of the same size and petrology as the desert pavements to construct their hills. For the ants the closest source of these pebbles is often the alluvium, ten meters below the anthill, rather than in a desert pavement deposit at some distance away overland. An experiment conducted between June and August 1999 demonstrated that the ants rebuild their hills with newly excavated pebbles. When the colonies die off after 5-25 years, the pebbles are stranded at the surface. Processes such as those described by Haff and Werner (1996), where jackrabbits and birds were observed kicking desert pavement clasts aross the ground serve to redistribute the pebbles across the surface of the sand dunes. The sand dunes have been forming over an 8000 year period. Based on anthill-regrowth measurements, the lifespan of an individual colony of harvester ants leads to the excavation of only enough

  18. Long-term surveillance plan for the Collins Ranch disposal site, Lakeview, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Collins Ranch disposal site, Lakeview, Oregon, describes the surveillance activities for the disposal cell. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This final LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials. This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States and details how long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

  19. Long-term surveillance plan for the Collins Ranch Disposal Site, Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site describes the surveillance activities for the Lakeview (Collins Ranch) disposal cell, which will be referred to as the Collins Ranch disposal cell throughout this document. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This final LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials. This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States or an Indian tribe, and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

  20. Near-Surface Dynamics of a Separated Jet in the Coastal Transition Zone off Oregon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-08

    Near-surface dynamics of a separated jet in the Coastal Transition Zone off Oregon A. O. Koch, A. L. Kurapov, J. S. Allen College of Oceanic and...2009 Abstract Three-dimensional circulation in the coastal transition zone (CTZ) off Oregon is studied using a 3-km resolution model based on the...00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Near-surface dynamics of a separated jet in the Coastal Transition Zone off Oregon 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  1. Wave Modeling for Jetty Rehabilitation at the Mouth of the Columbia River, Washington/Oregon, USA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Washington/ Oregon , USA Zeki Demirbilek, Lihwa Lin, and Okey G. Nwogu March 2008 Co as ta l a nd H yd ra ul ic s La bo ra to ry Approved for...the Mouth of the Columbia River, Washington/ Oregon , USA Zeki Demirbilek and Lihwa Lin Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory U.S. Army Engineer...9440569. Strong winds along the Washington and Oregon coasts often dominate water level response in the shallow areas of the MCR estuary and in the

  2. Oregon's Senate Bill 560: practical policy lessons for nurse advocates.

    PubMed

    Gilson Sistrom, Maria

    2010-02-01

    In response to striking rates of childhood obesity in Oregon, advocates led by a nurse lobbyist proposed legislation in 2005 to regulate junk foods in public schools. Several theories propose to explain the policy-making process, yet Senate Bill 560 (SB 560) followed a twisted course through rule making, legislative and political processes that are not well articulated in policy theory. Three overlapping mechanisms were identified in content analysis of documents and interviews with participants in the SB 560 policy process. Strategically placed legislative "banana peels," proponents' amateur advocacy, and legislative outflanking by professional lobbyists more fully characterize this policy process and better account for the failure of SB 560. Subsequent passage of the Oregon Healthy School Foods bill in the more politically conducive 2007 legislature suggest that advocacy and incremental change frameworks are less predictive of successful passage than is the ability to take advantage of political opportunities to change public health policy.

  3. Marine nekton off Oregon and the 1997 98 El Nino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearcy, W. G.

    2002-09-01

    Several species of migratory, warm-water, oceanic fishes invaded Oregon waters during the summer of 1997. Also, the jumbo squid ( Dosidicus gigas), common in the eastern tropical Pacific, was reported for the first time in 1997 and was caught in large numbers. The occurrence of these oceanic nekton was associated with inshore advection of anomalously warm water. During 1998, after arrival of the main El Niño signal, some warm-water coastal fishes appeared off Oregon. However, unlike observations off California, fewer species of warm-water coastal fishes were noted during the 1997-98 El Niño than during the 1982-83 El Niño.

  4. Cost of Impressed Current Cathodic Protection for Coastal Oregon Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cryer, Curtis B.

    1998-07-01

    The State of Oregon is using arc-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems on reinforced concrete coastal bridges. The two lowest bids for four ICCP projects were averaged and converted to 1997 dollars. The total average cost for the ICCP projects was $51.63/ft2 ($555.51/m2) of protected concrete. The cathodic protection part of the ICCP projects average $14.08/ft2 ($151.47/m2), while zinc anode installation cost an average of $7.13/ft2 ($76.67/m2). Oregon's rugged and beautiful coastline is graced with a series of historical arched bridges designed by Conde B. McCullough. McCullough is the internationally recognized architect who designed many of the Oregon Coast Highway (U.S. 101) bridges in the 1920s and 1930s. Many are listed on the National Historic Register. After the expense ($45m) and public outcry associated with the replacement of the historic Alsea Bay Bridge in Waldport, Oregon, the Oregon Department of Transportation began using impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) to extend the service life of reinforced concrete bridges. Figure 1 visually illustrates the need for such remediation. It shows exposed rebar from underneath the Brush Creek Bridge, which is very representative of the conditions found underneath many coastal Oregon bridges. Four ICCP projects have been funded, put out for bid, and completed. The four projects, their bid closing dates, and their completion dates are the Cape Creek Bridge (1990- 1992), the Yaquina Bay Bridge south arches (1991-1995), the Depoe Bay Bridge (1993-1997), and the Yaquina Bay Bridge south approach (1995-1997). The Cape Creek, Yaquina Bay, and Depoe Bay Bridges are shown in Figs. 2-4. Other ICCP projects are underway on the Oregon coast. In the ICCP systems, arc-sprayed zinc coatings on the concrete surface are anodes that protect the steel rebar. Accelerated laboratory studies at the Albany Research Center have predicted zinc anode service lives of

  5. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-05-01

    Small Wind Electric Systems An Oregon Consumer's Guide provides consumers with enough information to help them determine if a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include: how to make your home more energy efficient, how to choose the right size turbine, the parts of a wind electric system, determining if there is enough wind resource on your site, choosing the best site for your turbine, connecting your system to the utility grid, and if it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the Oregon guide provides state specific information that includes and state wind resource map, state incentives, and state contacts for more information.

  6. Water Resources Data for Oregon, Water Year 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrett, T.A.; Hess, G.W.; House, J.G.; Ruppert, G.P.; Courts, M.L.

    2004-01-01

    The annual Oregon hydrologic data report is one of a series of annual reports that document hydrologic data gathered from the U.S. Geological Survey's surface- and ground-water data-collection networks in each State, Puerto Rico, and the Trust Territories. These records of streamflow, ground-water levels, and quality of water provide the hydrologic information needed by State, local and Federal agencies, and the private sector for developing and managing our Nation's land and water resources. This report includes records on both surface and ground water in Oregon and contains discharge records for 199 stream-gaging stations, 25 partial-record or miscellaneous streamflow stations, and 8 crest-stage partial-record streamflow stations; stage-only records for 6 gaging stations; stage and content records for 26 lakes and reservoirs; and water-quality records collected at 127 streamflow-gaging stations, 2 atmospheric deposition stations, and 11 ground-water sites.

  7. Integration of high-resolution seismic and aeromagnetic data for earthquake hazards evaluations: An example from the Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liberty, L.M.; Trehu, A.M.; Blakely, R.J.; Dougherty, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Aeromagnetic and high-resolution seismic reflection data were integrated to place constraints on the history of seismic activity and to determine the continuity of the possibly active, yet largely concealed Mount Angel fault in the Willamette Valley, Oregon. Recent seismic activity possibly related to the 20-km-long fault includes a swarm of small earthquakes near Woodburn in 1990 and the magnitude 5.6 Scotts Mills earthquake in 1993. Newly acquired aeromagnetic data show several large northwest-trending anomalies, including one associated with the Mount Angel fault. The magnetic signature indicates that the fault may actually extend 70 km across the Willamette Valley to join the Newberg and Gales Creek faults in the Oregon Coast Range. We collected 24-fold high-resolution seismic reflection data along two transects near Woodburn, Oregon, to image the offset of the Miocene-age Columbia River Basalts (CRB) and overlying sediments at and northwest of the known mapped extent of the Mount Angel fault. The seismic data show a 100-200-m offset in the CRB reflector at depths from 300 to 700 m. Folded or offset sediments appear above the CRB with decreasing amplitude to depths as shallow as were imaged (approximately 40 m). Modeling experiments based on the magnetic data indicate, however, that the anomaly associated with the Mount Angel fault is not caused solely by an offset of the CRB and overlying sediments. Underlying magnetic sources, which we presume to be volcanic rocks of the Siletz terrane, must have vertical offsets of at least 500 m to fit the observed data. We conclude that the Mount Angel fault appears to have been active since Eocene age and that the Gales Creek, Newberg, and Mount Angel faults should be considered a single potentially active fault system. This fault, as well as other parallel northwest-trending faults in the Willamette Valley, should be considered as risks for future potentially damaging earthquakes.

  8. Printing & Publishing from the Classroom to Careers. An Activity Guide for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulen, Robert

    This activity guide was developed in Oregon using the theme of the 150th anniversary of the Oregon Trail to help teachers conduct classroom activities that make use of the skills involved in printing and publishing. It was written by a classroom teacher and designed and published by the printing industry. The guide has the following six purposes:…

  9. Reconnaissance of chemical and biological quality in the Owyhee River from the Oregon State line to the Owyhee Reservoir, Oregon, 2001–02

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardy, Mark A.; Maret, Terry R.; George, David L.

    2004-01-01

    The Owyhee River drains an extremely rugged and sparsely populated landscape in northern Nevada, southwestern Idaho, and eastern Oregon. Most of the segment between the Oregon State line and Lake Owyhee is part of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System, and few water-quality data exist for evaluating environmental impacts. As a result, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management, assessed this river segment to characterize chemical and biological quality of the river, identify where designated beneficial uses are met and where changes in stream quality occur, and provide data needed to address activities related to environmental impact assessments and Total Maximum Daily Loads. Water-quality issues identified at one or more sites were water temperature, suspended sediment, dissolved oxygen, pH, nutrients, trace elements, fecal bacteria, benthic invertebrate communities, and periphyton communities. Generally, summer water temperatures routinely exceeded Oregon's maximum 7-day average criteria of 17.8 degrees Celsius. The presence of few coldwater taxa in benthic invertebrate communities supports this observation. Suspended-sediment concentrations during summer base flow were less than 10 milligrams per liter (mg/L). Dissolved solids concentrations ranged from 46 to 222 mg/L, were highest during base flow, and tended to increase in a downstream direction. Chemical compositions of water samples indicated that large proportions of upland-derived water extend to the lower reaches of the study area during spring runoff. Dissolved fluoride and arsenic concentrations were highest during base flow and may be a result of geothermal springs discharging to the river. No dissolved selenium was detected. Upstream from the Rome area, spring runoff concentrations of suspended sediment ranged from 0 to 52 mg/L, and all except at the Three Forks site were typically below 20 mg/L. Stream-bottom materials from the North Fork Owyhee River, an area

  10. Differential stream incision in the Oregon Coast Range

    SciTech Connect

    Personius, S.F. )

    1993-04-01

    Stream incision rates are used to determine rates and styles of late quaternary deformation of the Oregon Coast Range, in the forearc of the Cascadia subduction zone. Bedrock incision rates were obtained along westward-flowing streams, from the Umpqua river in a central western Oregon to the North Fork Nehalem River in northwestern Oregon. Incision measurements were restricted mostly to nontidal reaches that are more than 20--40 km inland from the coast, to exclude areas affected by eustatic changes in sea level. Most strath ages were determined indirectly by radiocarbon dating of detrital charcoal sampled from alluvium that overlies the straths. A few incision measurements were made on straths that underlie higher, less well preserved terrace remnants. The ages of some of these higher straths were determined by thermoluminescence (TL) dating. These ages are less constrained than those established with radiocarbon dating, but they appear to yield similar rates of incision. The difference in age between the overlying sediments and the age of strath abandonment is unknown, but several lines of evidence indicate that sediment mobilization and deposition most likely were concurrent with cutting of the strath. Numerous strath height measurements indicate that rates of incision are fairly uniform along many kilometers of individual Coast Range streams, regardless of the type of bedrock traversed. Such uniform incision rates do not support the landward tilting of the Coast Range as postulated by other studies. However, regional differences in incision apparent in northern Oregon may be explained by differential uplift caused by north-south compression in the overriding North American plate, or by changes in the geometry of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate.

  11. Wintering localities of Cooper's hawks nesting in northeastern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    The life span of the Cooper's Hawks banded between 1974 and 1979 is now believed completed. The band recoveries provide the first information on the migratory characteristics of the species in the Pacific Northwest. Cooper's Hawks nesting in northeastern Oregon winter in western Mexico. The second-year female shot near Zihuatanejo, Guerrero, Mexico on November, 12, 1977, is one of the southernmost records for the species.

  12. 14. 'TROOP A, OREGON CAVALRY IN CAMP AT PRESIDIO OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. 'TROOP A, OREGON CAVALRY IN CAMP AT PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA, 1915.' Anton C. Heidrick, photographer. This panoramic view looks west from the lower end of Soldier Field, before construction of walls and roads. Original warm toned silver gelatin print measures 94.9 cm by 19.7 cm, flush mounted on mat board. - Presidio of Monterey, Soldier Field, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  13. The passage and initial implementation of Oregon's Measure 44

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, L.; Glantz, S.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To prepare a history of the passage and early implementation of Ballot Measure 44, "An Act to Support the Oregon Health Plan", and tobacco control policymaking in Oregon. Measure 44 raised cigarette taxes in Oregon by US$0.30 per pack, and dedicated 10% of the revenues to tobacco control.
METHODS—Data were gathered from interviews with members of the Committee to Support the Oregon Health Plan, Measure 44's campaign committee, as well as with state and local officials, and tobacco control advocates. Additional information was obtained from public documents, internal memoranda, and news reports.
RESULTS—Although the tobacco industry outspent Measure 44's supporters 7 to 1, the initiative passed with 56% of the vote. Even before the election, tobacco control advocates were working to develop an implementation plan for the tobacco control programme. They mounted a successful lobbying campaign to see that the legislature did not divert tobacco control funds to other uses. They also stopped industry efforts to limit the scope of the programme. The one shortcoming of the tobacco control forces was not getting involved in planning the initiative early enough to influence the amount of money that was devoted to tobacco control. Although public health groups provided 37% of the money it cost to pass Measure 44, only 10% of revenues were devoted to tobacco control.
CONCLUSIONS—Proactive planning and aggressive implementation can secure passage of tobacco control initiatives and see that the associated implementing legislation follows good public health practice.


Keywords: advocacy; legislation; implementation; tobacco tax PMID:10599577

  14. 33 CFR 110.228 - Columbia River, Oregon and Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....08″ W; thence continuing west-southwesterly to latitude 46°11′46.27″ N, longitude 123°49′43.48″ W... Astoria, Oregon, at latitude 46°12′00.79″ N, longitude 123°49′55.40″ W; thence continuing easterly to latitude 46°12′02.00″ N, longitude 123°49′40.09″ W; thence continuing east-northeasterly to latitude...

  15. 33 CFR 110.228 - Columbia River, Oregon and Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....08″ W; thence continuing west-southwesterly to latitude 46°11′46.27″ N, longitude 123°49′43.48″ W... Astoria, Oregon, at latitude 46°12′00.79″ N, longitude 123°49′55.40″ W; thence continuing easterly to latitude 46°12′02.00″ N, longitude 123°49′40.09″ W; thence continuing east-northeasterly to latitude...

  16. 33 CFR 110.228 - Columbia River, Oregon and Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....08″ W; thence continuing west-southwesterly to latitude 46°11′46.27″ N, longitude 123°49′43.48″ W... Astoria, Oregon, at latitude 46°12′00.79″ N, longitude 123°49′55.40″ W; thence continuing easterly to latitude 46°12′02.00″ N, longitude 123°49′40.09″ W; thence continuing east-northeasterly to latitude...

  17. Tectonic control of Eocene arkosic sediment deposition, Oregon and Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Armentrout, J.M.; Ulrich, A.R.

    1983-03-01

    Chronostratigraphic and geographic studies of Eocene arkosic sandstones suggest deposition during a volcanically quiet interval resulting from the westward jump of the Farallon-Kula plate subduction zone in Oregon and Washington. The Eocene arkosic sandstones were deposited as part of a broad fluvial plain-coastal plain-shelf margin basin complex extending throughout Oregon and Washington between uplands of Mesozoic rocks. Feldspathic-quartzose sediments were transported from the east by river systems draining granitic terrains perhaps as far away as the Idaho Batholith. Chronostratigraphic correlations suggest that the arkosic sandstones were deposited along the margins of the depositional system during the early Eocene, prograded westward during the middle Eocene, and then regressed during the latest Eocene and Oligocene simultaneously with the influx of abundant pyroclastic debris. During the early Eocene, a northwest-southeast seamount chain was extruded on the Farallon and Kula plates west of an eastward-dipping subduction zone. Subduction of the oceanic plates moved the seamount chain obliquely toward the subduction zone. In middle Eocene time-49 to 40 m.y.b.p-the seamount chain reached the subduction zone creating instability in the subduction system and resulting in the westward jump of the underthrust boundary between the Farallon-Kula and North American plates. Coincident with and continuing after the subduction zone jump and seamount accretion, eastwardly derived arkosic sediments prograded across Oregon and Washington spilling into the new fore-arc basin and enveloping the seamounts.

  18. 78 FR 38011 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Notice of Intent To Prepare a Recovery Plan for Oregon Coast...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... Intent To Prepare a Recovery Plan for Oregon Coast Coho Salmon Evolutionarily Significant Unit AGENCY... Fisheries Service (NMFS) is announcing its intent to prepare a recovery plan for Oregon Coast coho...

  19. 76 FR 24479 - In the Matter of the Taylor Lumber and Treating Superfund Site, Sheridan, Oregon, Amendment to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... Agreement and Covenant Not To Sue, Pacific Wood Preserving of Oregon AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency.... Environmental Protection Agency (``EPA'') and Pacific Wood Preserving of Oregon (``PWPO''). In accordance with... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL...

  20. 78 FR 70571 - Notice of Availability of the Oregon Greater Sage-Grouse Draft Land Use Plan Amendments and Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ....DF0000.13XL1109AF.LXSISGST0000-HAG13-0282] Notice of Availability of the Oregon Greater Sage-Grouse Draft... of Land Management (BLM) has prepared Oregon Greater Sage-Grouse Draft Land Use Plan (LUP) Amendments...: You may submit comments related to the Oregon Greater Sage- Grouse Draft LUP Amendments/Draft EIS...

  1. Bull Trout Life History, Genetics, Habitat Needs, and Limiting Factors in Central and Northeast Oregon. Annual Report 1996.

    SciTech Connect

    Bellerud, Blane L.; Gunckel, Stephanie; Hemmingsen, Alan R.; Buchanan, David V.; Howell, Philip J.

    1997-10-01

    This study is part of a multi-year research project studying aspects of bull trout life history, ecology and genetics. This report covers the activities of the project in 1996. Results and analysis are presented in the following five areas: (1) analysis of the genetic structure of Oregon bull trout populations; (2) distribution and habitat use of bull trout and brook trout in streams containing both species; (3) bull trout spawning surveys; (4) summary and analysis of historical juvenile bull trout downstream migrant trap catches in the Grande Ronde basin; and (5) food habits and feeding behavior of bull trout alone and in sympatry with brook trout.

  2. Ecological health of river basins in forested regions of eastern Washington and Oregon. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wissmar, R.C.; Smith, J.E.; McIntosh, B.A.; Li, H.W.; Reeves, G.H.

    1994-02-01

    A retrospective examination of the history of the cumulative influences of past land water uses on the ecological health of select river basins in forest regions of eastern Washington and Oregon indicates the loss of fish and riparian habitat diversity and quality since the 19th century. The study focuses on impacts of timber harvest, fire management, live stock grazing, mining and irrigation management practices on stream and riparian ecosystems. An examination of past environmental management approaches for assessing stream, riparian, and watershed conditions in forest regions shows numerous advantages and shortcomings. Rcommendations for ecosystem management with emphasis on monitoring and restoration activities are provided.

  3. 78 FR 42945 - Public Water Supply Supervision Program; Program Revision for the State of Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ...; Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule; Ground Water Rule; and Lead and Copper Short-Term... AGENCY Public Water Supply Supervision Program; Program Revision for the State of Oregon AGENCY... that the State of Oregon has revised its approved State Public Water Supply Supervision Primacy...

  4. 78 FR 60220 - Safety Zone; Fireworks Display, Willamette River, Oregon City, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... City, OR AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a safety zone in Oregon City, OR. This safety zone is necessary to help ensure the safety of the... encompass all waters of the Willamette River south of the I-205 Bridge and north of the Oregon City...

  5. AIDS Education in Rural Oregon School Districts: Compliance with State Curriculum Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hales, Loyde W.; McGrew, Robin R.

    The Oregon State Department of Education mandates age-appropriate curricula for all grade levels on infectious diseases, including AIDS, ARC, HIV, and Hepatitis B. The objectives of this study were: (1) to determine the extent to which AIDS education was occurring in three remote rural Oregon school districts; (2) to examine the focus of the…

  6. INSTITUTE ON PLANNING HELD AT UNIVERSITY OF OREGON, PROCEEDINGS (EUGENE, AUGUST 23-27, 1965).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ENGEN, RICHARD B.

    CONDUCTED BY THE OREGON STATE LIBRARY WITH DR. PRESTON P. LE BRETON FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON SERVING AS THE CONSULTANT, THIS WEEK LONG INSTITUTE WAS HELD TO PREPARE LIBRARY ADMINISTRATORS FOR STATE-WIDE PLANNING FOR LIBRARY DEVELOPMENT IN OREGON. SPECIFIC GOALS OF INSTITUTE PARTICIPANTS WERE TO EXAMINE ACCEPTED MANAGEMENT AND…

  7. Spatial and temporal analysis of populations of the Sudden Oak Death pathogen in Oregon forests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sudden oak death caused by the oomycete Phytophthora ramorum was first discovered in California towards the end of the 20th century and subsequently emerged on tanoak forests in Oregon before its first detection in 2001 by aerial surveys. The Oregon Department of Forestry has since monitored the epi...

  8. The Politics of Marginality in Wallowa County, Oregon: Contesting the Production of Landscapes of Consumption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Jesse B.; Gosnell, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    The state of Oregon's (USA) land use planning framework has long been characterized by tensions between state and local authority, between traditionally-defined "urban" and "rural" concerns, and between the competing interests of various landowners. An examination of Wallowa County, Oregon's implementation of House Bill 3326, a…

  9. 77 FR 20047 - Filing of Plats of Survey: Oregon/Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ... Bureau of Land Management Filing of Plats of Survey: Oregon/Washington AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The plats of survey of the following described lands are scheduled to be..., Oregon 97204, upon required payment. A person or party who wishes to protest against a survey must file...

  10. 77 FR 68817 - Filing of Plats of Survey: Oregon/Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... Bureau of Land Management Filing of Plats of Survey: Oregon/Washington AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The plats of survey of the following described lands are scheduled to be... party who wishes to protest against this survey must file a written notice with the Oregon...

  11. 78 FR 19521 - Filing of Plats of Survey: Oregon/Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ... Bureau of Land Management Filing of Plats of Survey: Oregon/Washington AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The plats of survey of the following described lands are scheduled to be... survey must file a written notice with the Oregon State Director, Bureau of Land Management, stating...

  12. Investing in Educator Data Literacy Improves Student Achievement. Evidence of Impact: The Oregon Data Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Since 2007 the Oregon DATA Project has been investing resources to provide educators on-the-job training around effective data use to improve student achievement. New evidence shows that their efforts are paying off. A 2011 Oregon DATA Project report detailed the impact of their investment in the state's educators, finding the following: (1)…

  13. 75 FR 44975 - Notice of Intent To Solicit Nominations, Western Oregon Resource Advisory Committees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ..., Medford, Roseburg, and Salem District Resource Advisory Committees (RACs). The Committees will advise the... Committee: Jake Winn, 777 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg, Oregon 97470, (541) 440-4930; and Salem District Resource Advisory Committee: Richard Hatfield, 1717 Fabry Road SE, Salem, Oregon 97306, (503) 375-5657....

  14. 77 FR 51823 - Notice of Public Meetings, Western Oregon Resource Advisory Committees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... 12 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Roseburg District: Monday, September 17 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Salem... Winn, 777 NW Garden Valley Blvd., Roseburg, Oregon 97470, (541) 440-4930. Salem District Resource Advisory Committee: Richard Hatfield, 1717 Fabry Road SE., Salem, Oregon 97306, (503) 375-5657. FOR...

  15. 76 FR 26314 - Filing of Plats of Survey: Oregon/Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... Bureau of Land Management Filing of Plats of Survey: Oregon/Washington AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The plats of survey of the following described lands are scheduled to be..., Portland, Oregon 97204, upon required payment. A person or party who wishes to protest against a...

  16. Oregon Education Act for the 21st Century: Implications for the Profession and Administrator Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Joanne; And Others

    In 1991, the Oregon Legislature passed a landmark educational reform bill, the "Oregon Education Act for the 21st Century," providing for an extended school year, instructional accountability, establishment of state-funded, alternative learning centers, and a restructured high school program issuing certificates of mastery. High school…

  17. Transformational Leadership and the Leadership Performance of Oregon Secondary School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breaker, Jason Lee

    2009-01-01

    A study of 118 secondary school principals in Oregon was conducted to examine the relationship of transformational leadership to secondary school principals' leadership performance. This study measured the transformational leadership of secondary school principals in Oregon using the "Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (5X-Short)"…

  18. Linking Prevention Science and Social and Emotional Learning: The Oregon Resiliency Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrell, Kenneth W.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the contributions of the Oregon Resiliency Project, an effort to enhance positive social-emotional development of children and youth through social and emotional learning (SEL). The project was launched in 2001 as a collaborative effort between faculty and graduate student researchers at the University of Oregon. The primary…

  19. MODELING WILDLIFE RESPONSE TO LANDSCAPE CHANGE IN OREGON'S WILLAMETTE RIVER BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The PATCH simulation model was used to predict the response of 17 wildlife species to
    three plausible scenarios of habitat change in Oregon's Willamette River Basin. This 30
    thousand square-kilometer basin comprises about 12% of the state of Oregon, encompasses extensive f...

  20. Oregon Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse Annual Report. May 1987-June 30, 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Library, Salem. Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse.

    Established in May 1987 by the Oregon State Library to serve as a central clearinghouse for the collection of reports about challenges against library materials, the Oregon Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse received a total of 17 formal challenges against library materials during its first year of operation. Of these, 10 challenges were received…

  1. Oregon Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse. Second Annual Report, July 1, 1988-June 30, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Library, Salem. Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse.

    Challenges against library materials that were reported to the Oregon Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse by Oregon libraries during its second full year of operation totalled 34 books, 13 of which were owned by public libraries and 21 by school libraries. The first challenge against an art exhibit in a public library was also reported. In 25 of…

  2. 75 FR 21035 - Notice of Proposed Withdrawal Extension and Opportunity for Public Meeting; Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... approximately 1,050 acres of National Forest System lands from mining in order to protect the rare botanical...; Oregon AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Forest..., Oregon 97208- 2965. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David Krantz, Rogue River-Siskiyou National...

  3. 78 FR 56979 - Oregon Disaster #OR-00051 Declaration of Economic Injury

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oregon Disaster OR-00051 Declaration of Economic Injury AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) declaration for the State of Oregon, dated 09/06/2013. Incident: Multiple Fire Complexes. Incident Period: 07/26/2013...

  4. 78 FR 65745 - Oregon Disaster #OR-00051 Declaration of Economic Injury

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION Oregon Disaster OR-00051 Declaration of Economic Injury AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) declaration for the State of Oregon, dated 09/06/2013. Incident: Multiple Fire Complexes. Incident Period:...

  5. 77 FR 22217 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Oregon Slough, Hayden Island, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Oregon Slough, Hayden Island, OR... usage on this stretch of Oregon Slough includes vessels ranging from commercial sightseeing vessels...

  6. Stunted patches in onion bulb crops in Oregon and Washington: Etiology and yield loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Onion stunting caused by Rhizoctonia spp. is an important soilborne disease in the Columbia Basin of Oregon and Washington. From 2010 to 2013, 251 isolates of Rhizoctonia or Rhizoctonia-like spp. were obtained from soil and onion plant samples collected from Oregon and Washington. Sequence analysis ...

  7. 75 FR 76633 - Oregon; Correction of Federal Authorization of the State's Hazardous Waste Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-09

    ... authorization for changes the State of Oregon made to its federally authorized RCRA Hazardous Waste Management... Conditionally Exempt Small Quality Generators (CESQG) waste is subject to RCRA used oil management standards... later date. With this correction to Oregon's federally authorized RCRA Hazardous Waste...

  8. 75 FR 441 - Notice of Proposed Withdrawal Extension and Opportunity for Public Meeting; Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... funds at the National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center at Flagstaff Hill. Until April 5, 2010... significant historic and cultural resource values and the investment of Federal funds at the National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center at Flagstaff Hill. The withdrawal created by PLO Number 6865 will...

  9. New canker disease of Incense-cedar in Oregon caused by Phaeobotryon cupressi.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incense-cedar (Calocedrus decurrens) is a native tree occurring in Oregon and California. Since the early 2000’s, a new canker disease has been observed with increasing frequency on ornamental and windbreak trees planted in the Willamette Valley of Oregon. Symptoms appear as dead, flagging, small-di...

  10. 75 FR 14461 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... History/Oregon State Museum of Anthropology, Eugene, OR AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... State Museum of Anthropology, Eugene, OR. The human remains and associated funerary object were removed... Museum of Natural and Cultural History/Oregon State Museum of Anthropology professional staff...

  11. 76 FR 43716 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, Corvallis, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology... Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... affiliated with the human remains may contact ] the Oregon State University Department of...

  12. 76 FR 43714 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, Corvallis, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology... Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... affiliated with the human remains may contact the Oregon State University Department of...

  13. Area of old-growth forests in California, Oregon, and Washington. Forest Service research bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Bolsinger, C.L.; Waddell, K.L.

    1993-12-01

    An area of old-growth forests in California, Oregon, and Washington has declined significantly in the second half of the 20th century. The report summarizes available information on old-growth forest area by ownership in California, Oregon, and Washington. Old-growth definitions used by the various owners and agencies are provided.

  14. 75 FR 18107 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for Oregon Chub...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ...; Designation of Critical Habitat for Oregon Chub (Oregonichthys crameri); Correction AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... (Service), published a final rule to designate critical habitat for the Oregon chub (Oregonichthys crameri... INFORMATION: Background Our March 10, 2010, final rule (75 FR 11010) to designate critical habitat for...

  15. 75 FR 57976 - Designation of Service Area for Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs of Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Designation of Service Area for Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs of... Tribes of Warm Springs of Oregon, Warm Springs, Oregon (Warm Springs Tribe) for financial assistance and...: The Warm Springs Tribe submitted to BIA a request with supporting documentation to modify its...

  16. Rural Health Clinics and Diabetes-Related Primary Care for Medicaid Beneficiaries in Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkbride, Kelly; Wallace, Neal

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study assessed whether Rural Health Clinics (RHCs) were associated with higher rates of recommended primary care services for adult beneficiaries diagnosed with diabetes in Oregon's Medicaid program, the Oregon Health Plan (OHP). Methods: OHP claims data from 2002 to 2003 were used to assess quality of diabetic care for…

  17. More with Four: A Look at the Four Day Week in Oregon's Small Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinke, Joyce M.

    The 4-day school week offers solutions to the financial and instructional problems often faced by small rural schools. Two southern Oregon schools implemented the 4-day school week on a trial basis in 1982-83 and, along with five eastern Oregon districts, continue to use this schedule today. The primary purpose of the change to a 4-day week was…

  18. Suspension, Expulsion, and Achievement of English Learner Students in Six Oregon Districts. REL 2015-094

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the rates of exclusionary discipline (i.e., suspensions and expulsions) among English learners and non-English learners in six diverse Oregon districts that serve a third of the state's English learner students. Using 2011/12 databases from the Oregon Department of Education, the study found that differences in suspension and…

  19. 76 FR 46320 - Notice of Public Meeting, Southeast Oregon Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Mark Wilkening, 100 Oregon Street, Vale, Oregon 97918, (541) 473-6218 or e-mail mwilkeni... September 7, the meeting will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time (PDT). This will be a... a.m. to 4:30 p.m. PDT. Topics may include: Vale District Cultural Inventories; Federal...

  20. Indians in Oregon Today. A 4th Grade Social Studies Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepper, Floy

    Designed to provide current, accurate information to teachers and students about the American Indian people living in the state of Oregon, this publication focuses on 10 learning concepts: (1) Indian tribes in Oregon today; (2) Indian people's special relationship with the United States government; (3) the change and impact brought by newcomers to…

  1. 78 FR 16849 - Fall Creek Hydro, LLC, Oregon; Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Fall Creek Hydro, LLC, Oregon; Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental... construct the Fall Creek Dam Hydroelectric Project and has prepared a draft environmental assessment (EA). The proposed 10-megawatt project would be located on Fall Creek in Lane County, Oregon, near the...

  2. LIFE HISTORY MONITORING OF SALMONIDS IN THE WEST FORK SMITH RIVER, UMPQUA BASIN, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a life-cycle monitoring basin for the Oregon Salmon Plan, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has estimated adult returns, distribution and smolt outmigration of coho, chinook and winter steelhead in the West Fork Smith River since 1998. In 2001/2002, the Environmenta...

  3. Governor's Task Force on Juvenile Corrections Alternatives. Recommendations for Oregon's Juvenile Justice System. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Governor's Office, Salem.

    This document presents the final report and recommendations of a task force created to study the feasibility of further reducing juvenile training school populations in Oregon. The first section contains an executive summary which briefly reviews the history of Oregon's juvenile justice system and lists findings and recommendations of the task…

  4. Oregon Statewide Writing Assessment: Results, Analysis, and Sample Student Writings, 1993-1997. Grades 3 & 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Bonnie

    Noting that statewide writing assessment shows the achievements of Oregon students over the last decade, this booklet explains the results for the 1993-1997 assessments and provides papers illustrating the work that Oregon students in grades 3 and 5 produce on the state test. The booklet's chapters are: (1) The History of Writing Assessment in…

  5. 78 FR 24346 - Modification of VOR Federal Airway V-595, Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ..., Oregon AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action modifies VHF omnidirectional range (VOR) Federal airway V-595 in Oregon due to the scheduled...., Washington, DC 20591; telephone: (202) 267-8783. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: History On October 22, 2012,...

  6. 77 FR 50914 - Anchorage; Change to Cottonwood Island Anchorage, Columbia River, Oregon and Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ..., Columbia River, Oregon and Washington AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information On..., Oregon and Washington. (a) * * * (10) Cottonwood Island Anchorage. The waters of the Columbia...

  7. 60 FR 29708 - Travel Management Plan for Owyhee Reservoir, Owyhee Project, Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1995-06-05

    ... Travel Management Plan for Owyhee Reservoir, Owyhee Project, Oregon agency: Bureau of Reclamation... Travel Management Plan for Reclamation lands in the vicinity of Owyhee Reservoir, Oregon. The purpose of... date: The effective date of the travel management plan is June 5, 1995. addresses: Copies of the...

  8. Closing the Achievement Gap: Oregon's Plan for Success for All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Susan Castillo, Superintendent of Public Instruction in Oregon, named closing the achievement gap as a top instructional priority in Oregon. Superintendent Castillo notes three aspects to the achievement gap: (1) Performance gap: The discrepancies between the educational achievement and performance of students of diverse races, ethnicities, income…

  9. 78 FR 24036 - Pears Grown in Oregon and Washington; Committee Membership Reapportionment for Processed Pears

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 927 Pears Grown in Oregon and Washington; Committee Membership Reapportionment for Processed Pears AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY... Oregon-Washington pear marketing order. The marketing order regulates the handling of processed...

  10. Use of hydrologic landscape classification to diagnose streamflow predictability in Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    We implement a spatially lumped rainfall-runoff model to predict daily streamflow at 88 catchments within Oregon, USA and analyze its performance within the context of Oregon Hydrologic Landscapes (OHL) classification. OHL classification is used to characterize the physio-climat...

  11. 76 FR 21299 - Oregon: Tentative Approval of State Underground Storage Tank Program: Public Hearing Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 281 Oregon: Tentative Approval of State Underground Storage Tank Program: Public... relating to the State of Oregon's application for final approval of its Underground Storage Tank...

  12. 76 FR 57659 - Oregon: Final Approval of State Underground Storage Tank Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 281 Oregon: Final Approval of State Underground Storage Tank Program AGENCY... final approval of its underground storage tank program for petroleum and hazardous substances under... State of Oregon's underground storage tank program for petroleum and hazardous substances satisfies...

  13. 76 FR 27848 - Pears Grown in Oregon and Washington; Amendment To Allow Additional Exemptions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 927 Pears Grown in Oregon and Washington; Amendment To Allow... added an exemption to the marketing order for Oregon-Washington pears that provides for the sale of fresh pears directly to consumers without regard to regulation. For each customer, the interim...

  14. 33 CFR 100.1302 - Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. 100.1302 Section 100.1302 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... § 100.1302 Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. (a) Regulated area....

  15. 33 CFR 100.1302 - Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. 100.1302 Section 100.1302 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... § 100.1302 Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. (a) Regulated area....

  16. 33 CFR 100.1302 - Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. 100.1302 Section 100.1302 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... § 100.1302 Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. (a) Regulated area....

  17. 33 CFR 100.1302 - Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. 100.1302 Section 100.1302 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... § 100.1302 Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. (a) Regulated area....

  18. 33 CFR 100.1302 - Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. 100.1302 Section 100.1302 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... § 100.1302 Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. (a) Regulated area....

  19. Geologic Map of the Camas Quadrangle, Clark County, Washington, and Multnomah County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evarts, Russell C.; O'Connor, Jim E.

    2008-01-01

    The Camas 7.5' quadrangle is in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon approximately 20 km east of Portland. The map area, bisected by the Columbia River, lies on the eastern margin of the Portland Basin, which is part of the Puget-Willamette Lowland that separates the Cascade Range from the Oregon Coast Range. Since late Eocene time, the Cascade Range has been the locus of an episodically active volcanic arc associated with underthrusting of oceanic lithosphere beneath the North American continent along the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Bedrock consists largely of basalt and basaltic andesite flows that erupted during late Oligocene time from one or more vents located outside the map area. These rocks crop out only north of the Columbia River: at the base of Prune Hill in Camas, where they dip southward at about 5?; and east of Lacamas Creek, where they dip to the southeast at 15 to 30?. The volcanic bedrock is unconformably overlain by Neogene sediments that accumulated as the Portland Basin subsided. In the Camas quadrangle, most of these sediments consist of basaltic hyaloclastic debris generated in the volcanic arc to the east and carried into the Portland Basin by the ancestral Columbia River. The dominant structures in the map area are northwest-striking dextral strike-slip faults that offset the Paleogene basin floor as well as the lower part of the basin fill. The Oligocene rocks at Prune Hill and to the east were uplifted in late Pliocene to early Pleistocene time within a restraining bend along one of these dextral faults. In Pleistocene time, basaltic andesite flows issued from a volcano centered on the west side of Prune Hill; another flow entered the map area from the east. These flows are part of the Boring volcanic field, which comprises several dozen late Pliocene and younger monogenetic volcanoes scattered throughout the greater Portland region. In latest Pleistocene time, the Missoula floods of glacial-outburst origin inundated the Portland

  20. The Oregon health insurance experiment: when limited policy resources provide research opportunities.

    PubMed

    Allen, Heidi; Baicker, Katherine; Taubman, Sarah; Wright, Bill; Finkelstein, Amy

    2013-12-01

    In 2008 Oregon allocated access to its Medicaid expansion program, Oregon Health Plan Standard, by drawing names from a waiting list by lottery. The lottery was chosen by policy makers and stakeholders as the preferred way to allocate limited resources. At the same time, it also gave rise to the Oregon Health Insurance Experiment: an unprecedented opportunity to do a randomized evaluation - the gold standard in medical and scientific research - of the impact of expanding Medicaid. In this article we provide historical context for Oregon's decision to conduct a lottery, discuss the importance of randomized controlled designs for policy evaluation, and describe some of the practical challenges in successfully capitalizing on the research opportunity presented by the Oregon lottery through public-academic partnerships. Since policy makers will always face tough choices about how to distribute scarce resources, we urge thoughtful consideration of the opportunities to incorporate randomization that can substantially improve the evidence available to inform policy decisions without compromising policy goals.

  1. Debating Death: Religion, Politics, and the Oregon Death With Dignity Act

    PubMed Central

    Purvis, Taylor E.

    2012-01-01

    In 1994, Oregon passed the Oregon Death With Dignity Act, becoming the first state in the nation to allow physician-assisted suicide (PAS). This paper compares the public discussion that occurred in 1994 and during the Act’s implementation in 1997 and examines these debates in relation to health care reform under the Obama administration. I argue that the 1994 and 1997 Oregon PAS campaigns and the ensuing public debate represent the culmination of a growing lack of deference to medical authority, concerns with the doctor-patient relationship, and a desire for increased patient autonomy over decisions during death. The public debate over PAS in Oregon underscored the conflicts among competing religious, political, and personal interests. More visible and widespread than any other American debate on PAS, the conflict in Oregon marked the beginning of the now nationwide problem of determining if and when a terminally ill person can choose to die. PMID:22737056

  2. Debating death: religion, politics, and the Oregon Death With Dignity Act.

    PubMed

    Purvis, Taylor E

    2012-06-01

    In 1994, Oregon passed the Oregon Death With Dignity Act, becoming the first state in the nation to allow physician-assisted suicide (PAS). This paper compares the public discussion that occurred in 1994 and during the Act's implementation in 1997 and examines these debates in relation to health care reform under the Obama administration. I argue that the 1994 and 1997 Oregon PAS campaigns and the ensuing public debate represent the culmination of a growing lack of deference to medical authority, concerns with the doctor-patient relationship, and a desire for increased patient autonomy over decisions during death. The public debate over PAS in Oregon underscored the conflicts among competing religious, political, and personal interests. More visible and widespread than any other American debate on PAS, the conflict in Oregon marked the beginning of the now nationwide problem of determining if and when a terminally ill person can choose to die.

  3. Rethinking Recycling: An Oregon Waste Reduction Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Environmental Quality, Portland.

    This updated curriculum guide is designed to provide teachers of elementary school science with a set of activities on recycling and waste reduction. The curriculum has three sections: (1) Grades K-3 Lessons; (2) Grades 4-5 Lessons; and (3) Teacher's Resource Guide. It is designed to take students from an introduction to natural resources and…

  4. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2002-12-01

    The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration projects, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership

  5. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2001-03-01

    The John Day is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles--Oregon's third largest drainage basin--and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. Most all of the entire John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the Basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Using funding from the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation, and others, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) subcontracts the majority of its construction implementation activities with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/review, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2000, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and

  6. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2003-06-30

    The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day, who contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2002, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin

  7. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2004-02-27

    The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional

  8. Interrelationship of fluid venting and structural evolution: Alvin observations from the frontal accretionary prism, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.C.; Orange, D. ); Kulm, L.D. )

    1990-06-10

    Seismic reflection and Sea Beam bathymetric data plus submarine geological measurements define a ramp anticline at the deformatoin front of the central Oregon subduction zone. At its northern termination the ramp anticline is deeply incised by a large 500-m-deep submarine canyon and cut by a probable backthrust. To the south along the strike of the fold, a smaller submarine canyon shallowly erodes the anticline, and backthrusting is not apparent in the submersible observations. Two Alvin dives along a transect through the southern canyon show active fluid vents demarked by biological communities at the frontal thrust and at the breached crest of the anticline. Along a northern transect, encompassing the large submarine canyon, 10 Alvin dives indicated no venting on the formal thrust, limited venting in the canyon, but numerous biological communities along a scarp interpreted as the surface trace of the backthrust. These observations suggest a scenario of vent and structural-geomorphic development consisting of (1) frontal thrust faulting and associated venting, facilitated by high fluid pressure; (2) erosion of the oversteepened seaward flank of the ramp anticline assisted by seepage forces and leading to fluid flow out of stratigraphically controlled conduits in the limbs of the overthrust deposits; (3) locking of the frontal thrust due to dewatering or a local decrease in wedge taper associated with development of the large canyon, leading to failure along the backthrust; and (4) redirection of fluid flow by the backthrust. Thus, within {le}0.3 m.y., deformation of the relatively permeable sediments of the Oregon margin results in stratigraphically controlled flow being partially captured by faults.

  9. Using NPMR to forecast fire season severity for the state of Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintz, H. E.; Short, K.; Saltenberger, J. F.; Yost, A.; Mote, P.; Wood, A. W.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate that objective prediction of fire season severity in Oregon is possible and promising. The causes of fire season severity are various but seasonal climate plays a dominant role in the Pacific Northwest. Seasonal climate prediction has been gaining momentum in recent decades, and skillful forecasting occurs when perturbed boundary conditions alter weather regimes regionally. Regimes most conducive to fire season severity in Oregon are anomalously warm, dry seasons with pronounced dry lightning activity. Here, we used Non-Parametric Multiplicative Regression, a forecasting algorithm well suited to automatically accommodating complex interactions, to identify meaningful interactions and predict fire season severity as a function of sea surface temperature anomalies and atmospheric modes. We find the severity of a fire season can be forecast several months ahead of time in March with a cross-validated R-squared of 0.53. A cross-validated R-squared is more conservative than an R-squared as it is a measure of model fit to previously unseen data. The model we developed predicts fire season severity as the result of a complex interaction between specific modes the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, Pacific North American Pattern, and the Madden Julian Oscillation. Modes were derived using Variational Mode Decomposition (VMD). VMD is a new algorithm in signal processing that improves upon the limitations of Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) to decompose a signal into different modes of unknown but separate spectral bands. Prediction of fire season severity from atmosheric and boundary conditions can help budgetary planning and reduce the number of stand replacing fires and related economic losses.

  10. Sediment magnetic and paleomagnetic data from Buck Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbaum, J.G.; Reynolds, R.L.; Fitzmaurice, P.L.; Drexler, J.W.; Whitney, C.G.; Adam, D.P.

    1994-01-01

    Sediment magnetic and paleomagnetic studies were conducted on a core from Buck Lake, Klamath County, Oregon, that was collected as part of an investigation into the Quaternary climate history of the western United States. This report documents the methods used to obtain paleomagnetic directions, magnetic properties, and ancillary data, and presents these data in tabular form. Adam (1993) and Adam and others (1994) describe the site, the drilling methods, and lithology of the lacustrine sediments. Rosenbaum and others (1994) present preliminary interpretations of the sediment magnetic data and show that variations in magnetic properties closely reflect changes in climate as interpreted from the pollen record.

  11. Growth and diet of fish in Waldo Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Nicola L.; Liss, W.J.; Ziller, Jeffrey S.; Wade, M.; Gresswell, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    Waldo Lake, located in the Oregon Cascades, is considered to be one of the most dilute lakes in the world. Even with low nutrient concentrations and sparse populations of zooplankton, introduced fish in the lake are large in size and in good condition when compared to fish from other lakes. This apparent anomaly is due to the availability of benthic macroinvertebrates. Taxa found in the stomach contents offish captured in Waldo Lake consist primarily of Chironomidae larvae and pupae, Trichoptera larvae and pupae, amphipods, Ephemeroptera larvae, and Odonata larvae.

  12. SKY LAKES ROADLESS AREA AND MOUNTAIN LAKES WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, James G.; Benham, John R.

    1984-01-01

    Based on a mineral survey of the Sky Lakes Roadless Area and the Mountain Lakes Wilderness, Oregon, the areas have little or no promise for the occurrence of metallic-mineral resources or geothermal energy resources. Nonmetallic resources exist in the areas, but other areas outside the roadless area and wilderness also contain resources of volcanic cinders, scoria, ash, breccia, and sand and gravel which are easier to obtain and closer to markets. The roadless area and wilderness are not geologically favorable for metallic deposits, or for coal, oil, or gas resources.

  13. Use of dye tracers to collect hydrologic data in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, D.D.; Sanderson, R.B.

    1968-01-01

    Dye tracers have been used in Oregon in the Collection of hydrologic data on 2,350 miles of stream channels in the Long Tom, Umpqua, Willmette, and John Day River basins, and in the Carmen‐Smith power tunnel. These investigations demonstrated the usefulness, of dye tracers for determining: (1) estimates of traveltimes and travel rates of water, (2) discharge where standard methods of measuring are not applicable, and (3) dispersion characteristics of streams. Illustrations are used to present the results of time‐of‐travel studies in simple, concise, and readily interpreted form. 

  14. 33 CFR 110.228 - Columbia River, Oregon and Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Astoria, Oregon, at latitude 46°12′00.79″ N, longitude 123°49′55.40″ W; thence continuing easterly to latitude 46°12′02.00″ N, longitude 123°49′40.09″ W; thence continuing east-northeasterly to latitude 46°13′14.85″ N, longitude 123°46′27.89″ W; thence continuing south-southeasterly to latitude 46°13′00.56″...

  15. 33 CFR 110.228 - Columbia River, Oregon and Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Astoria, Oregon, at latitude 46°12′00.79″ N, longitude 123°49′55.40″ W; thence continuing easterly to latitude 46°12′02.00″ N, longitude 123°49′40.09″ W; thence continuing east-northeasterly to latitude 46°13′14.85″ N, longitude 123°46′27.89″ W; thence continuing south-southeasterly to latitude 46°13′00.56″...

  16. Natural resources inventory and monitoring in Oregon with ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonson, G. H.; Paine, D. P.; Poulton, C. E.; Lawrence, R. D.; Sherzog, J. H.; Murray, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Multidiscipline team interpretation of ERTS satellite and highflight imagery is providing resource and land use information needed for land use planning in Oregon. A coordinated inventory of geology, soil-landscapes, forest and range vegetation, and land use for Crook County, illustrates the value of this approach for broad area and state planning. Other applications include mapping fault zones, inventory of forest clearcut areas, location of forest insect damage, and monitoring irrigation development. Computer classification is being developed for use in conjunction with visual interpretation.

  17. Coastal circulation along Washington and Oregon. Volume 3. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Short, K.S.; Hachmeister, L.E.

    1988-10-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the existing state of knowledge with respect to coastal ocean circulation off the Pacific Northwest. The objectives of the study were to: (1) identify all available major data sets of physical oceanographic observations along the Washington and Oregon coast; (2) to determine and describe the accessibility of these data; and (3) to evaluate the adequacy of the data base for describing circulation assess on the continental shelf. A total of 73 data sets from experiments spanning the period 1915 to 1988 were identified.

  18. A Sediment Budget for the Deschutes River, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. E.; Grant, G. E.; Haluska, T. L.

    2001-12-01

    The Deschutes River drains 28,000 km2 of north-central Oregon before joining the Columbia River 160 km east of Portland. Relicensing of Portland General Electric's Pelton-Round Butte complex, a set of three hydroelectric dams 160-180 km upstream from the Columbia River confluence, has motivated assessment of the roles of these impoundments as well as those of upstream dams on the volume of sediment available to the lower river. To accomplish this, we applied a relatively simple procedure of determining spatially explicit sediment yield by combining GIS-calculated indices of relative sediment production with sediment-yield measurements derived from reservoir surveys. Estimates of relative unit-area sediment production (sediment production index, SPI) were calculated for each of 100 similar sized subbasins on the basis of the product of the subbasin drainage density and mean hillslope gradient. Digital stream data were acquired from 1:100,000 hydrography, and mean hillslope gradients were determined from 30-meter resolution digital elevation data. Such an approach is reasonable for basins such as the Deschutes, where hillslope sediment transport is dominated by diffusive processes such as biogenic activity, rainsplash, soil creep, and freeze-thaw action, and, consequently, sediment flux per unit stream length is proportional to hillslope gradient. Calculated SPI values were empirically related to regional sediment yield by regressing against surveyed volumes of sediment accumulated in basin reservoirs, including the Deschutes and Crooked River arms of Lake Billy Chinook, Ochoco Reservoir, and Prineville Reservoir (in total, capturing sediment from about 60 percent of the entire Deschutes River watershed). The resulting regression is Qs = 3.74(SPI)2.13 (r2 = 0.98; p = 0.015), where Qs is sediment yield, in tonnes per square kilometer per year, and SPI is in units of km-1. This result is only strictly applicable to transported bedload and suspended sand and silt that

  19. A Survey of Light Pollution in the Rogue Valley, Southwest Oregon, By St. Mary’s School, Medford, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensel, Holly; Arianna Ashby, Colin Cai, Thomas Cox, Genna Dorrell, Gabe FitzPatrick, Meaghan FitzPatrick, Jason Mars Liu, Mitchell Moczygemba, Kieran Rooney, Emry Timmons,; Ray You, students, (St. Mary's. School)

    2015-01-01

    Rural areas in Oregon, including the Rogue Valley, are renowned for beautiful dark skies. Electric light came to Medford, Oregon, the largest town in the Rogue Valley, in 1894. During the past 100 years the Rogue Valley grew from 2,500 individuals in 1895 to a population of 76,462 and a metropolitan area population of 208,545, in 2012. The increased population density resulted in increased light pollution. A light pollution chart using DMSP, Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, data was published in 2006, but did not show the spatial variation in detail. In the spring of 2014, the 9th grade physics students, astronomy students, and members of the Astronomy Club from St. Mary's School conducted the first detailed night sky survey. The purpose of the survey is to create a baseline of the variations in light pollution in the Rogue Valley.The project started with a talk by Steve Bosbach, former Texas IDA coordinator, on the topic of light pollution and how it affects our lives and the environment. Groups of students were given the tasks of measuring the night sky brightness in the Rogue Valley, doing a light audit in an area of their choice, and researching what light pollution is and its effects on the environment. From this they created a presentation for a final physics grade. The basis for this project, along with procedures can be found on the Globe at Night (www.globeatnight.org) website. The light audit and research portion were developed from the Dark Sky Rangers section (www.globeatnight.org/dsr/) of the website. In the fall of 2014, astronomy students and club members extended this study to the town of Ashland and the Sothern Oregon University campus, areas of the valley not surveyed in the Spring.This survey will increase awareness of light pollution in the Rogue Valley, as well as educate developers and city planners on the impact that light pollution has on the environment in Southern Oregon. It will help determine areas of concern and areas of dark

  20. A Survey of Light Pollution in the Rogue Valley, Southwest Oregon, by St. Mary's School, Medford, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensel, Holly; Dorrell, Genna; Feng, James; Hicks, Sean; Mars Liu, Jason; Liu, Steven; Moczygemba, Mitchell; Sheng, Jason; Sternenburg, Leah; Than, Emi; Timmons, Emry; Wen, Jerry; Yaeger, Bella; You, Ruiyang

    2016-01-01

    The Rogue Valley in Southwest Oregon was known for its beautiful dark skies, but due to population growth the dark skies are vanishing. A light pollution chart using Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) data was published in 2006, but did not show the spatial variation in detail. In the spring of 2014, the 9th grade physics students, astronomy students, and members of the Astronomy Club from St. Mary's School conducted the first detailed night sky survey. The purpose of the survey is to create a baseline of the variations in light pollution in the Rogue Valley.The project continued into 2015, incorporating suggestions made at the 2014 AAS Conference to improve the study by including more light meter data and community outreach. Students used light meters, Loss of the Night app, and the Dark Sky meter app. Students researched light pollution and its effects on the environment, measured night sky brightness in the Rogue Valley, and completed a light audit in an area of their choice. They created a presentation for a final physics grade. The basis for this project, along with procedures can be found on the GaN, Globe at Night, (www.globeatnight.org) website. The light audit and research portion were developed from the Dark Sky Rangers section of the website (www.globeatnight.org/dsr/).The 2014 survey and public outreach increased awareness of light pollution in the Rogue Valley and around the state of Oregon. Examples include a local senior project to change lighting at a baseball stadium and a 4-H club in Northeast Oregon starting a GaN survey in their area. GaN shows growth in the amount of data collected in Oregon from 8 data points in 2006 to 193 in 2014. The Rogue Valley magnitude data from the spring of 2015 indicates a drop from an average magnitude of 4 to an average magnitude of 2. This is due to hazy skies from smoke drifting into the valley from a Siberian wildfire. Data collection during the summer and fall was hampered due to smoke from local

  1. Total dissolved gas and water temperature in the lower Columbia River, Oregon and Washington, 2003: Quality-assurance data and comparison to water-quality standards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, Dwight Q.; Bragg, Heather M.; Johnston, Matthew W.

    2003-01-01

    The variances to the States of Oregon and Washington water-quality standards for total dissolved gas were exceeded at six of the seven monitoring sites. The sites at Camas and Bonneville forebay had the most days exceeding the variance of 115% saturation. The forebay exceedances may have been the result of the cumulative effects of supersaturated water moving downstream through the lower Columbia River. Apparently, the levels of total dissolved gas did not decrease rapidly enough downstream from the dams before reaching the next site. From mid-July to mid-September, water temperatures were usually above 20 degrees Celsius at each of the seven lower Columbia River sites. According to the Oregon water-quality standard, when the temperature of the lower Columbia River exceeds 20 degrees Celsius, no measurable temperature increase resulting from anthropogenic activities is allowed. Transient increases of about 1 degree Celsius were noted at the John Day forebay site, due to localized solar heating.

  2. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: FY 1999 Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Shawn W.

    2001-03-01

    The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1999, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional eleven (11

  3. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Conceptual Design Report, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Montgomery

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  4. Modeling vertebrate diversity in Oregon using satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cablk, Mary Elizabeth

    Vertebrate diversity was modeled for the state of Oregon using a parametric approach to regression tree analysis. This exploratory data analysis effectively modeled the non-linear relationships between vertebrate richness and phenology, terrain, and climate. Phenology was derived from time-series NOAA-AVHRR satellite imagery for the year 1992 using two methods: principal component analysis and derivation of EROS data center greenness metrics. These two measures of spatial and temporal vegetation condition incorporated the critical temporal element in this analysis. The first three principal components were shown to contain spatial and temporal information about the landscape and discriminated phenologically distinct regions in Oregon. Principal components 2 and 3, 6 greenness metrics, elevation, slope, aspect, annual precipitation, and annual seasonal temperature difference were investigated as correlates to amphibians, birds, all vertebrates, reptiles, and mammals. Variation explained for each regression tree by taxa were: amphibians (91%), birds (67%), all vertebrates (66%), reptiles (57%), and mammals (55%). Spatial statistics were used to quantify the pattern of each taxa and assess validity of resulting predictions from regression tree models. Regression tree analysis was relatively robust against spatial autocorrelation in the response data and graphical results indicated models were well fit to the data.

  5. Detecting long-term hydrological patterns at Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, D.L.; Silsbee, D.G.; Redmond, Kelly T.

    1999-01-01

    Tree-ring chronologies for mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana) were used to reconstruct the water level of Crater Lake, a high-elevation lake in the southern Cascade Range of Oregon. Reconstructions indicate that lake level since the late 1980s has been lower than at any point in the last 300 years except the early 1930s to mid 1940s. Lake level was consistently higher during the Little Ice Age than during the late 20th century; during the late 17th century, lake level was up to 9 m higher than recent (1980s and 1990s) low levels, which is consistent with paleoclimalic reconstructions of regional precipitation and atmospheric pressure. Furthermore, instrumental data available for the 20th century suggest that there are strong teleconnections among atmospheric circulation (e.g., Pacific Decadal Oscillation), tree growth, and hydrology in southern Oregon. Crater Lake is sensitive to interannual, interdecadal and intercentenary variation in precipitation and atmospheric circulation, and can be expected to track both short-term and longterm variation in regional climatic patterns that may occur in the future.

  6. Distribution of hypertension and renal disease in Oregon.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, W E; Knudsen, J C; Porter, G A

    1975-01-01

    Expecting to find agreement between the geographic distribution of hypertension and renal disease, we developed regional mortality rates for 1950-72 and prevalence rates for a Selective Service cohort born in 1939-41 and examined during 1957-69. For this purpose the State's counties were grouped into eight geographically homogeneous regions. The general decline in hypertension mortality was most pronounced in Portland, Oregon's major urban center. However, the decline halted during 1968-72 in the southern Cascade region which has become an area of relatively higher risk within the State. During these 23 years nephritis mortality fell, kidney infection mortality was stable, and both syndromes showed peak mortality in other, different regions of the State. The geographic pattern of hypertension prevalence among the draftee cohort resembled the 1963-67 hypertension mortality pattern, but more recent morbidity data are needed to confirm the southern Cascade region's recent change to a high-risk area. Of 529 draftees with diagnosed hypertension, only 35 percent of the cases were previously known, only 7 percent has had any previous treatment, and only 7 percent were associated with known renal conditions. Among 521 registrants with a history of renal disorders, the prevalence of hypertension was increased for all categories of renal disease but was significantly high only for those with a history of glomerulonephritis. To date in Oregon we have found no evidence that renal disorders are major determinants of hypertension morbidity or mortality. PMID:803695

  7. Temporal Epidemiology of Sudden Oak Death in Oregon.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Ebba K; Hansen, Everett M; Kanaskie, Alan

    2015-07-01

    An effort to eradicate Phytophthora ramorum, causal agent of sudden oak death, has been underway since its discovery in Oregon forests. Using an information-theoretical approach, we sought to model yearly variation in the size of newly infested areas and dispersal distance. Maximum dispersal distances were best modeled by spring and winter precipitation 2 years before detection, and infestation size the year prior. Infestation size was best modeled by infestation size and spring precipitation the year prior. In our interpretation, there is a 2-year delay between the introduction of inoculum and onset of mortality for a majority of sites. The year-long gap in between allows ample time for the production of inoculum contributing to the spread of P. ramorum. This is supported by epidemic development following changes in eradication protocols precipitated by an outbreak in 2011, attributable to a 2009 treatment delay and an uncharacteristically wet spring in 2010. Posteradication, we have observed an increase in the total area of new outbreaks and increased frequency in dispersal distances greater than 4 km. Although the eradication program has not eliminated P. ramorum from Oregon forests, it has likely moderated this epidemic, emphasizing the need for prompt treatment of future invasive forest pathogens.

  8. Osprey distribution, abundance, and status in western North America: II. The Oregon population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.; Collins, J.A.; Deibert, W.J.

    1978-01-01

    An estimated 308 ? 23 pairs of Ospreys nested in the survey area in Oregon in 1976. Major concentration centers include Crane Prairie Reservoir and the adjacent Deschutes National Forest, the coastal lakes and reservoirs between Florence and North Bend, the Rogue River, the Lane County reservoirs, and the Umpqua River. An estimated 47 percent of the Oregon population is nesting at reservoirs. Limited information is available concerning the long-term status of the Oregon population; however, the ability of the species to pioneer newly created reservoirs emphasizes that the population is utilizing new habitats.

  9. Structural Controls of Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Field, Malhuer County, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, J. H.; Faulds, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Detailed mapping (1:24,000) of the Neal Hot Springs area (90 km2) in eastern Oregon is part of a larger study of geothermal systems in the Basin and Range, which focuses on the structural controls of geothermal activity. The study area lies within the intersection of two regional grabens, the middle-late Miocene, N-striking, Oregon-Idaho graben and younger late Miocene to Holocene, NW-striking, western Snake River Plain graben. The geothermal field is marked by Neal Hot Springs, which effuse from opaline sinter mounds just north of Bully Creek. Wells producing geothermal fluids, with temperatures at 138°C, intersect a major, W-dipping, NNW-striking, high-angle normal fault at depths of 850-915 m. Displacement along this structure dies southward, with likely horse-tailing, which commonly produces high fracture density and a zone of high permeability conducive for channeling hydrothermal fluids. Mapping reveals that the geothermal resource lies within a local, left step-over. 'Hard-linkage' between strands of the left-stepping normal fault, revealed through a study of well chips and well logs, occurs through two concealed structures. Both are W-striking faults, with one that runs parallel to Cottonwood Creek and one 0.5 km N of the creek. Injection wells intersect these two transverse structures within the step-over. Stepping and displacement continue to the NW of the known geothermal field, along W-dipping, N-striking faults that cut lower to middle Miocene Hog Creek Formation, consisting of silicic and mafic volcanic rocks. These N-striking faults were likely initiated during initial Oregon-Idaho graben subsidence (15.3-15.1 Ma), with continued development through late Miocene. Bully Creek Formation deposits, middle to upper Miocene lacustrine and pyroclastic rocks, concomitantly filled the sub half-grabens, and they dip gently to moderately eastward. Younger, western Snake River Plain deposits, upper Miocene to Pliocene fluvial, lacustrine, and pyroclastic rocks

  10. An environmental streamflow assessment for the Santiam River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risley, John C.; Wallick, J. Rose; Mangano, Joseph F.; Jones, Krista L.

    2012-01-01

    The Santiam River is a tributary of the Willamette River in northwestern Oregon and drains an area of 1,810 square miles. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) operates four dams in the basin, which are used primarily for flood control, hydropower production, recreation, and water-quality improvement. The Detroit and Big Cliff Dams were constructed in 1953 on the North Santiam River. The Green Peter and Foster Dams were completed in 1967 on the South Santiam River. The impacts of the structures have included a decrease in the frequency and magnitude of floods and an increase in low flows. For three North Santiam River reaches, the median of annual 1-day maximum streamflows decreased 42–50 percent because of regulated streamflow conditions. Likewise, for three reaches in the South Santiam River basin, the median of annual 1-day maximum streamflows decreased 39–52 percent because of regulation. In contrast to their effect on high flows, the dams increased low flows. The median of annual 7-day minimum flows in six of the seven study reaches increased under regulated streamflow conditions between 60 and 334 percent. On a seasonal basis, median monthly streamflows decreased from February to May and increased from September to January in all the reaches. However, the magnitude of these impacts usually decreased farther downstream from dams because of cumulative inflow from unregulated tributaries and groundwater entering the North, South, and main-stem Santiam Rivers below the dams. A Wilcox rank-sum test of monthly precipitation data from Salem, Oregon, and Waterloo, Oregon, found no significant difference between the pre-and post-dam periods, which suggests that the construction and operation of the dams since the 1950s and 1960s are a primary cause of alterations to the Santiam River basin streamflow regime. In addition to the streamflow analysis, this report provides a geomorphic characterization of the Santiam River basin and the associated conceptual

  11. Mineral resources of the Fifteen Mile Creek, Oregon Canyon, Twelve Mile Creek, and Willow Creek Wilderness Study Areas, Malheur and Harney counties, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.A.; Rytuba, J.J.; Plouff, D.; Vercountere, T.L.; Turner, R.L.; Sawatzky, D.L. ); Leszcykowski, A.M.; Peters, T.J.; Schmauch, S.W.; Winters, R.A. )

    1988-01-01

    The four contiguous study areas are located in a volcanic terrane dominated by tuffs that were erupted from calderas of the McDermitt Caldera complex and the Whitehorse Caldera. None of these areas have identified resources, despite the proximity of mercury, uranium, and lithium mineralization to the south. The southern parts of the Fifteen Mile Creek and the Oregon Canyon Wilderness Study Areas have a low potential for mercury and uranium. The southern parts of the Fifteen Mile Creek, Oregon Canyon, and Willow Creek and the northwestern part of the Oregon Wilderness Study Areas have low potential for antimony, bismuth, mercury, silver,molybdenum, and zinc. In the Oregon Canyon Wilderness Study Area, the tuff of Oregon Canyon and the rim of the caldera of the McDermitt Caldera complex have a low potential for gold and silver in epithermal veins. The study areas have a low potential for zeolite minerals, oil and gas, and geothermal energy throughout, and restricted parts of the study areas have a low potential for pumice, rare-earth elements, zirconium, and decorative building stone.

  12. Anticipating Forest and Range Land Development in Central Oregon (USA) for Landscape Analysis, with an Example Application Involving Mule Deer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, Jeffrey D.; Moses, Alissa; Burcsu, Theresa

    2010-05-01

    Forest policymakers, public lands managers, and scientists in the Pacific Northwest (USA) seek ways to evaluate the landscape-level effects of policies and management through the multidisciplinary development and application of spatially explicit methods and models. The Interagency Mapping and Analysis Project (IMAP) is an ongoing effort to generate landscape-wide vegetation data and models to evaluate the integrated effects of disturbances and management activities on natural resource conditions in Oregon and Washington (USA). In this initial analysis, we characterized the spatial distribution of forest and range land development in a four-county pilot study region in central Oregon. The empirical model describes the spatial distribution of buildings and new building construction as a function of population growth, existing development, topography, land-use zoning, and other factors. We used the model to create geographic information system maps of likely future development based on human population projections to inform complementary landscape analyses underway involving vegetation, habitat, and wildfire interactions. In an example application, we use the model and resulting maps to show the potential impacts of future forest and range land development on mule deer ( Odocoileus hemionus) winter range. Results indicate significant development encroachment and habitat loss already in 2000 with development located along key migration routes and increasing through the projection period to 2040. The example application illustrates a simple way for policymakers and public lands managers to combine existing data and preliminary model outputs to begin to consider the potential effects of development on future landscape conditions.

  13. Anticipating forest and range land development in central Oregon (USA) for landscape analysis, with an example application involving mule deer.

    PubMed

    Kline, Jeffrey D; Moses, Alissa; Burcsu, Theresa

    2010-05-01

    Forest policymakers, public lands managers, and scientists in the Pacific Northwest (USA) seek ways to evaluate the landscape-level effects of policies and management through the multidisciplinary development and application of spatially explicit methods and models. The Interagency Mapping and Analysis Project (IMAP) is an ongoing effort to generate landscape-wide vegetation data and models to evaluate the integrated effects of disturbances and management activities on natural resource conditions in Oregon and Washington (USA). In this initial analysis, we characterized the spatial distribution of forest and range land development in a four-county pilot study region in central Oregon. The empirical model describes the spatial distribution of buildings and new building construction as a function of population growth, existing development, topography, land-use zoning, and other factors. We used the model to create geographic information system maps of likely future development based on human population projections to inform complementary landscape analyses underway involving vegetation, habitat, and wildfire interactions. In an example application, we use the model and resulting maps to show the potential impacts of future forest and range land development on mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) winter range. Results indicate significant development encroachment and habitat loss already in 2000 with development located along key migration routes and increasing through the projection period to 2040. The example application illustrates a simple way for policymakers and public lands managers to combine existing data and preliminary model outputs to begin to consider the potential effects of development on future landscape conditions.

  14. 76 FR 315 - Sisters Ranger District; Deschutes National Forest; Oregon; Popper Vegetation Management Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... comments-pacificnorthwest-deschutes-sisters@fs.fed.us . Please put ``Popper Vegetation Management Project... effects will take place. The Popper Vegetation Management Project decision and the reasons for the... Forest Service Sisters Ranger District; Deschutes National Forest; Oregon; Popper Vegetation...

  15. THERMAL HETEROGENEITY, STREAM CHANNEL MORPHOLOGY, AND SALMONID ABUNDANCE IN NORTHEASTERN OREGON STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heterogeneity in stream water temperatures created by local influx of cooler subsurface waters into geomorphically complex stream channels was associated with increased abundance of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) in northeastern Oregon. Th...

  16. PATTERNS OF NITRATE LOSSES FROM FORESTED BASINS IN THE OREGON COAST RANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous factors may control losses of dissolved nutrients from forested basins in the Oregon Coast Range. Potentially important factors include forest composition, stand age, forest management, grazing, agriculture, sewage inputs and bedrock types, as well as others perhaps not...

  17. CONTROLS ON STREAM CHEMISTRY IN AN OREGON COASTAL WATERSHED: THE SALMON RIVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous factors may control losses of dissolved nutrients from forested basins in the Oregon Coast Range. Potentially important factors include forest composition, stand age, forest management, grazing, agriculture, sewage inputs and bedrock types, as well as others perhaps not...

  18. INTERIOR INNKEEPER'S QUARTERS/HALL, LOOKING SOUTH. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR INNKEEPER'S QUARTERS/HALL, LOOKING SOUTH. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  19. INTERIOR LIBRARY HALL, LOOKING EAST INTO TV/GAME ROOM. Oregon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR LIBRARY HALL, LOOKING EAST INTO TV/GAME ROOM. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  20. INTERIOR INNKEEPER'S QUARTERS/HALL, LOOKING NORTH. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR INNKEEPER'S QUARTERS/HALL, LOOKING NORTH. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  1. INTERIOR TV/GAME, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR TV/GAME, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  2. INTERIOR TV/GAME ROOM, LOOKING NORTHEAST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR TV/GAME ROOM, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  3. The Oregon Public Health Policy Institute: Building Competencies for Public Health Practice.

    PubMed

    Luck, Jeff; Yoon, Jangho; Bernell, Stephanie; Tynan, Michael; Alvarado, Carla Sarai; Eversole, Tom; Mosbaek, Craig; Beathard, Candice

    2015-08-01

    The Oregon Public Health Policy Institute (PHPI) was designed to enhance public health policy competencies among state and local health department staff. The Oregon Health Authority funded the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University to develop the PHPI curriculum in 2012 and offer it to participants from 4 state public health programs and 5 local health departments in 2013. The curriculum interspersed short instructional sessions on policy development, implementation, and evaluation with longer hands-on team exercises in which participants applied these skills to policy topics their teams had selected. Panel discussions provided insights from legislators and senior Oregon health experts. Participants reported statistically significant increases in public health policy competencies and high satisfaction with PHPI overall.

  4. Compliance with environmental laws protects air, land, and water in communities across Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Seattle - April 1, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, completed over 25 environmental compliance and enforcement actions in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington from October 1, 2014 through December 31, 2014.

  5. 78 FR 64471 - Crescent Ranger District; Oregon; Withdrawal of Notice for Preparation of an Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Crescent Ranger District; Oregon; Withdrawal of Notice for Preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement for the Marsh Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of...

  6. Oregon: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, J.D.

    1983-05-01

    This sample file contains 346 records for Oregon. The records contain data on location, sample description, analysis type, collection condition, flow rates, and chemical and physical properties of the fluid. Stable and radioactive isotope data are occasionally available. (ACR)

  7. SUSPENDED AND BENTHIC SEDIMENT RELATIONSHIPS IN THE YAQUINA ESTUARY, OREGON: NUTRIENT PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of nutrient loading and subsequent nutrient processing are fundamental for determining biogeochemical processes in rivers and estuaries. In Oregon coastal watersheds, nutrient transport is strongly seasonal with up to 94% of the riverine dissolved nitrate and silic...

  8. 77 FR 476 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plan Southern Oregon/Northern California Coast Coho...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ... Plan Southern Oregon/ Northern California Coast Coho Salmon Evolutionarily Significant Unit AGENCY... Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU). NMFS is soliciting review and... Fisheries Service, 1655 Heindon Road, Arcata, CA 95521, Attn: Recovery Coordinator/SONCC Coho Salmon...

  9. 75 FR 51111 - Notice of Proposed Withdrawal Extension and Opportunity for Public Meeting; Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... approximately 1,400 acres of National Forest System land from mining in order to protect scientific and...; Oregon AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States...

  10. Estuarine intertidal sediment temperature variability in Zoster marina and Z. japonica habitats in Yaquina Bay, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physical characterization of intertidal estuarine plant habitats over time may reveal distribution-limiting thresholds. Temperature data from loggers embedded in sediment in transects crossing Zostera marina and Z. japonica habitats in lower Yaquina Bay, Oregon display signific...

  11. Shifting the paradigm in Oregon from teen pregnancy prevention to youth sexual health.

    PubMed

    Nystrom, Robert J; Duke, Jessica E A; Victor, Brad

    2013-01-01

    Oregon's work on teen pregnancy prevention during the previous 20 years has shifted from a risk-focused paradigm to a youth development model that places young people at the center of their sexual health and well-being. During 2005, the Oregon Governor's Office requested that an ad hoc committee of state agency and private partners develop recommendations for the next phase of teen pregnancy prevention. As a result of that collaborative effort, engagement of young people, and community input, the Oregon Youth Sexual Health Plan was released in 2009. The plan focuses on development of young people and embraces sexuality as a natural part of adolescent development. The plan's five goals and eight objectives guide the work of state agencies and partners addressing youth sexual health. Oregon's development of a statewide plan can serve as a framework for other states and entities to address all aspects of youth sexual health.

  12. The bathymetric distribution of intertidal eelgrass Zostera marina L. in three coastal estuaries of Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distributions of native eelgrass Zostera marina L. within the intertidal and shallow subtidal zones of three Oregon coastal estuaries (Tillamook, Yaquina, and Alsea) were determined by digital classification of aerial color infrared (CIR) orthophotographs. Stratified random surv...

  13. Spatial and temporal distributions of benthic green macroalgae in Yaquina bay, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal estuaries of Oregon, USA, typically support relatively large accumulations of benthic green macroalgae (BGM) during the summer/early fall growing season. This raises questions regarding possible (positive and negative) effects on eelgrass and benthic epifauna and infauna...

  14. Compliance with environmental laws protects air, land, and water in communities across Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Seattle - Feb. 5, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, completed 60 environmental compliance and enforcement actions in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington from July 1, 2014 through September 30, 2014. Violations of environme

  15. Carbon and Nitrogen Accumulation Rates in Salt Marshes in Oregon, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two important ecosystem services of wetlands are carbon sequestration and filtration of nutrients and particulates. We quantified the carbon and nitrogen accumulation rates in salt marshes at 135 plots distributed across eight estuaries located in Oregon, USA. Net carbon and ...

  16. 77 FR 46110 - Notice of Application for Proposed Withdrawal Extension and Opportunity for Public Meeting; Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    .... Barnes, BLM Oregon/ Washington State Office, 503-808-6155; or Dianne Torpin, USFS Pacific Northwest.... Barnes at the above address or phone number. For a period of 90 days from the date of publication of...

  17. Compliance with environmental laws protects air, land, and water in communities across Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Seattle - May 27, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, completed over 40 environmental compliance and enforcement actions in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington from January 1, 2015 through March 31, 2015. Violations of envir

  18. Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide policy in The Netherlands and Oregon: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kant

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a comparative analysis of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide policy in The Netherlands and the state of Oregon in the United States. The topics of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are discussed in the context of the historical setting of The Netherlands and the United States with special emphasis placed on public opinion, role of the courts and the legislative bodies, and opinions of physicians. Major similarities and differences in the laws of The Netherlands and Oregon are discussed. The article examines whether the passage of the law has led to a slide down the slippery slope in The Netherlands and Oregon as had been suggested by the opponents of the law. The article concludes that the empirical evidence does not support the contention of the opponents. However, the author argues that the potential for this happening is much greater in The Netherlands than in Oregon.

  19. Compliance with environmental laws protects air, land, and water in communities across Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Seattle - September 17, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, completed over 40 environmental compliance and enforcement actions in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington from April 1, 2015 through June 30, 2015.

  20. Distribution of macroalgae and sediment chlorophyll A along salinity and elevation gradients in Oregon tidal marshes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Algae contribute to trophic and biogeochemical processes in tidal wetlands. We investigated patterns of sediment pigment content and macroalgal abundance and diversity in marshes in four Oregon estuaries representing a variety of vegetation types, salinity regimes, and tidal ele...