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Sample records for activity immunoblot analysis

  1. An Analysis of Critical Factors for Quantitative Immunoblotting

    PubMed Central

    Janes, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Immunoblotting (also known as Western blotting) combined with digital image analysis can be a reliable method for analyzing the abundance of proteins and protein modifications, but not every immunoblot-analysis combination produces an accurate result. Here, I illustrate how sample preparation, protocol implementation, detection scheme, and normalization approach profoundly affect the quantitative performance of immunoblotting. This study implemented diagnostic experiments that assess an immunoblot-analysis workflow for accuracy and precision. The results showed that ignoring such diagnostics can lead to pseudoquantitative immunoblot data that dramatically overestimate or underestimate true differences in protein abundance. PMID:25852189

  2. Detection of Connexins in Liver Cells Using Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis and Immunoblot Analysis.

    PubMed

    Willebrords, Joost; Maes, Michaël; Yanguas, Sara Crespo; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Since connexin expression is partly regulated at the protein level, immunoblot analysis represents a frequently addressed technique in the connexin research field. The present chapter describes the setup of an immunoblot procedure, including protein extraction and quantification from biological samples, gel electrophoresis, protein transfer, and immunoblotting, which is optimized for analysis of connexins in liver tissue. In essence, proteins are separated on a polyacrylamide gel using sodium dodecyl sulfate followed by transfer of proteins on a nitrocellulose membrane. The latter allows specific detection of connexins with antibodies combined with revelation through enhanced chemiluminescence. PMID:27207285

  3. Detection of connexins in liver cells using sodiumdodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analysis

    PubMed Central

    Willebrords, Joost; Maes, Michaël; Yanguas, Sara Crespo; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Summary Since connexin expression is partly regulated at the protein level, immunoblot analysis represents a frequently addressed technique in the connexin research field. The present chapter describes the set-up of an immunoblot procedure, including protein extraction and quantification from biological samples, gel electrophoresis, protein transfer and immunoblotting, which is optimized for analysis of connexins in liver tissue. In essence, proteins are separated on a polyacrylamide gel using sodiumdodecylsulfate followed by transfer of proteins on a nitrocellulose membrane. The latter allows specific detection of connexins with antibodies combined with revelation through enhanced chemiluminescence. PMID:27207285

  4. An immunoblotting analysis of cross-reactivity between melon, and plantago and grass pollens.

    PubMed

    García Ortiz, J C; Ventas, P; Cosmes, P; López-Asunsolo, A

    1996-01-01

    It is known that most patients with type I allergy to pollens also suffer intolerance to fruits. Recently, an epidemiological and CAP-inhibition study has shown a new clustering of allergy between melon and Plantago and grass pollens. The aim of the present study was to confirm these results by immunoblotting analysis and inhibition of immunoblotting. Sera from 3 patients with confirmed allergy to melon, and Dactylis glomerata and Plantago lanceolata pollens were used for the in vitro studies. SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting analysis with a pool of sera revealed that several distinct protein bands were shared by the three extracts at 14, 31, and a spectrum between 40 and 70 kDa, approximately. Immunoblotting inhibition experiments, performed with extracts of melon, Plantago and Dactylis, showed that all allergens of melon blotting were almost completely inhibited by grass and Plantago pollen extracts. Inversely, the melon extract was capable of inhibiting IgE-binding to various allergens of Dactylis at high mol mass and partially to the band at 14 kDa. Moreover, the melon almost totally inhibited the IgE-binding capacity to the proteins of Plantago extract. Taken together, the results support the presence of structurally similar allergens in melon, Plantago and grass pollens, and that all allergenic epitopes of the melon are present in these pollens. PMID:9015782

  5. Identification of subunits of gonococcal RNA polymerase by immunoblot analysis: evidence for multiple sigma factors.

    PubMed Central

    Klimpel, K W; Lesley, S A; Clark, V L

    1989-01-01

    Heparin-agarose and single-stranded DNA-cellulose chromatography were used to purify RNA polymerase 25-fold from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and the activity of the polymerase was characterized in altered assay systems. The core subunits (beta, beta', and alpha) were tentatively identified as major proteins copurifying with polymerase activity. The identification of the core subunits was confirmed by Western (immunoblot) analysis with polyclonal antisera to Escherichia coli core RNA polymerase. Gonococcal sigma factor heterogeneity was examined by Western blot analysis with polyclonal antiserum to the major E. coli sigma factor, sigma 70, to the E. coli heat shock sigma factor, sigma 32, and with a monoclonal antiserum to Salmonella typhimurium NtrA (sigma 54). Purified RNA polymerase and whole-cell extracts from type 1, type 4, heat-shocked, and anaerobically grown gonococci were examined. Four putative gonococcal sigma factors were detected in purified RNA polymerase preparations and in whole-cell extracts from all cell types. Two of these bands appeared as a doublet, which had an estimated Mr of 80,000. A single lower-Mr band, estimated to be 40,000, was also present. All three of these bands reacted with antisera to E. coli sigma 70 and to E. coli sigma 32. A fourth gonococcal protein reacted solely with a highly specific monoclonal antibody to sigma 54 and had an Mr of 90,000. We conclude that N. gonorrhoeae may contain multiple sigma factors, which it may use to regulate gene expression. Images PMID:2472377

  6. Quality control of murine monoclonal antibodies using isoelectric focusing affinity immunoblot analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Robert G.; Rodkey, L. Scott; Reimer, Charles B.

    1987-01-01

    The quality control of murine hybridoma secretory products has been performed using two approaches for isoelectric focusing affinity immunoblot analysis: (1) a method in which antigen-coated nitrocellulose is placed on top of an acrylamide gel containing isoelectrically focused ascites to bind the antigen specific monoclonal antibody; and (2) a method in which focused ascite proteins were passively blotted onto nitrocellulose and specific monoclonal antibodies were detected with enzyme-conjugated antigen. Analysis by both methods of batches of ascites containing antihuman IgG antibodies that were produced by six hybridomas permitted effective monitoring of immunoreactive antibodies for pI microheterogeneity.

  7. Affinity immunoblotting - High resolution isoelectric focusing analysis of antibody clonotype distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knisley, Keith A.; Rodkey, L. Scott

    1986-01-01

    A sensitive and specific method is proposed for the analysis of specific antibody clonotype changes occurring during an immune response and for comparing multiple sera for antibody clonotype similarities. Polyclonal serum antibodies separated by isoelectric focusing (IEF) were analyzed by an affinity immunoblotting method using antigen-coated nitrocellulose membranes. Antibodies present on the surface of the acrylamide gels following IEF bind the antigen on the nitrocellulose when the coated nitrocellulose is laid over the gels. The technique has been used to analyze Ig clonotypes specific for five protein antigens and two carbohydrate antigens. Optimal antigen concentrations for coating the nitrocellulose membranes were found to range from 10-100 microgram/ml.

  8. Detection of Yersinia enterocolitica in milk powders by cross-priming amplification combined with immunoblotting analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongwei; Feng, Shaolong; Zhao, Yulong; Wang, Shuo; Lu, Xiaonan

    2015-12-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica (Y. enterocolitica) is frequently isolated from a wide variety of foods and can cause human yersiniosis. Biochemical and culture-based assays are common detection methods, but require a long incubation time and easily misidentify Y. enterocolitica as other non-pathogenic Yersinia species. Alternatively, cross-priming amplification (CPA) under isothermal conditions combined with immunoblotting analysis enables a more sensitive detection in a relatively short time period. A set of specific displacement primers, cross primers and testing primers was designed on the basis of six specific sequences in Y. enterocolitica 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer. Under isothermal condition, amplification and hybridization were conducted simultaneously at 63°C for 60 min. The specificity of CPA was tested for 96 different bacterial strains and 165 commercial milk powder samples. Two red lines were developed on BioHelix Express strip for all of the Y. enterocolitica strains, and one red line was shown for non-Y. enterocolitica strains. The limit of detection of CPA was 10(0)fg for genomic DNA (1000 times more sensitive than PCR assay), 10(1) CFU/ml for pure bacterial culture, and 10(0) CFU per 100 g milk powder with pre-enrichment at 37°C for 24 h. CPA combined with immunoblotting analysis can achieve highly specific and sensitive detection of Y. enterocolitica in milk powder in 90 min after pre-enrichment. PMID:26253307

  9. Western Immunoblot Analysis of the Antigens of Haemobartonella felis with Sera from Experimentally Infected Cats

    PubMed Central

    Alleman, A. Rick; Pate, Melanie G.; Harvey, John W.; Gaskin, Jack M.; Barbet, Anthony F.

    1999-01-01

    Cats were experimentally infected with a Florida isolate of Haemobartonella felis in order to collect organisms and evaluate the immune response to H. felis. Cryopreserved organisms were thawed and injected intravenously into nonsplenectomized and splenectomized cats. Splenectomized animals were given 10 mg of methylprednisolone per ml at the time of inoculation. Blood films were evaluated daily for 1 week prior to infection and for up to 60 days postinfection (p.i.). Blood for H. felis purification was repeatedly collected from splenectomized animals at periods of peak parasitemias. Organisms were purified from infected blood by differential centrifugation, separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and transferred to nitrocellulose membranes for immunoblot analysis. Serum was collected from nonsplenectomized animals prior to and for up to 60 days p.i. and was used on immunoblots to identify antigens. The combination of splenectomy and corticosteroid treatment resulted in marked, cyclic parasitemias without concurrent severe anemia, providing an opportunity to harvest organisms in a manner that was not lethal to the animals. Several antigens (150, 52, 47, 45, and 14 kDa) were identified. An antigen with a molecular mass of approximately 14 kDa appeared to be one of the most immunodominant and was consistently recognized by immune sera collected at various times during the course of infection. These data suggest that one or more of these antigens might be useful for the serologic diagnosis of H. felis infections in cats. PMID:10203508

  10. Comparison of Mycoplasma arthritidis strains by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting, and DNA restriction analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, L R; Voelker, L L; Ehle, L J; Hirsch, S; Dutenhofer, C; Olson, K; Beck, B

    1995-01-01

    Twenty Mycoplasma arthritidis strains or isolates were compared by a combination of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by an antiserum adsorption technique, Western immunoblotting, and restriction analysis of chromosomal DNA. Antigenic markers that defined strains related to strains 158p10p9, PG6, and H606 were identified. In addition, restriction analysis allowed all 20 strains to be divided into six groups. Results of restriction analysis corresponded generally with antigenic similarities, although the former did not allow grouping with as fine a precision as the latter. However, intrastrain antigenic variability, which is common among many Mycoplasma species, including M. arthritidis, introduced a complicating factor into our attempts at antigenic analysis. While serologic and antigenic analyses remain useful, we recommend that they be used with caution and in combination with other techniques for identifying and characterizing new isolates and newly acquired strains. Combinations of these techniques have proven to be useful in our laboratory for quality control and for uncovering interesting relationships among strains subjected to animal passage and their less virulent antecedents and among strains originally classified as the same but obtained from different sources and maintained, sometimes for decades, in different laboratories. PMID:7494014

  11. Immunoblot analysis of the humoral immune response to Pythium insidiosum in horses with pythiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, L; Nicholson, V; Prescott, J F

    1992-01-01

    Reactions to Pythium insidiosum by sera from horses with active pythiosis were investigated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting. Five strains of P. insidiosum were grown in nutrient broth and then sonicated. After centrifugation, supernatant antigens were separated by SDS-PAGE. An exoantigen of Conidiobolus coronatus was also tested. Bands with molecular weights between 97,000 and 14,000 were identified by Coomassie blue and silver staining. After being transferred to nitrocellulose, the antigens were reacted against sera from six horses with pythiosis, sera from four horses cured a year earlier by vaccination, and sera from five healthy horses. The sera from horses with pythiosis recognized at least 20 antigens in all strains. Three antigens with molecular weights of 32,000, 30,000, and 28,000 appeared to be immunodominant and specific. Sera from horses cured by immunotherapy showed only five very weak bands, three of them the 32,000-molecular-weight (32K), 30K, and 28K antigens. No bands were observed with sera from healthy horses or sera from horses with a variety of other infections. Sera from horses with pythiosis cross-reacted with the 44K antigen of C. coronatus. The immunodominant antigens described here may be useful for diagnostic purposes and in immunotherapy for this oomycotic infection in horses. Images PMID:1452669

  12. Isoelectric focusing-affinity immunoblot analysis of mouse monoclonal antibodies to the four human IgG subclasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Robert G.; Roebber, Marianne; Rodkey, L. Scott; Reimer, Charles B.

    1987-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF)/affinity immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used for parallel analysis of murine monoclonal antihuman IgG-subclass antisera (MoAbs). Coomassie Blue-stained protein bands in the pH region 5.5-8.0 were shown to be murine IgG by direct blotting onto nitrocellulose followed by detection with conjugated antimouse IgG. Use of IgG myeloma antigen-coated nitrocellulose in the IEF-affinity immunoblot allowed detection of the charge microheterogeneity of MoAbs. The MoAb group contained one to five major dense bands flanked by up to four minor fainter bands, all with pIs ranging from 6.1 to 7.8. Semiquantitative estimates of binding specificity in the IEF-affinity blot compared well with cross-reactivity data obtained from a quantitative ELISA.

  13. Analysis of tuberculous meningitis cases by an immunoblotting assay based on a mycobacterial antigen complex.

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Y L; Van Antwerpen, M P; Shi, G Q; Chen, Q X; Sindic, C J; Cocito, C

    1994-01-01

    Tuberculous meningitis cases were analyzed by an immunoblotting test based on Mycobacterium bovis BCG antigen complex A60. Anti-A60 immunoglobulin G (IgG) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowed early diagnosis, and concentrations decreased after recovery. In primary meningitis forms, anti-A60 IgGs were intrathecally synthesized and specific oligoclonal IgGs were present in CSF. In meningeal complications of pulmonary tuberculosis, there were matching titers of anti-A60 IgG in blood and CSF (mirror pattern). Correlation between CSF-restricted patterns and CSF pleocytosis was shown. Images PMID:7496976

  14. Human placental DNA polymerase delta: identification of a 170-kilodalton polypeptide by activity staining and immunoblotting

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.Y.W.T.; Toomey, N.L.

    1987-02-24

    DNA polymerase delta was isolated from human placenta and identified as such on the basis of its association with a 3'- to 5'-exonuclease activity. The association of the polymerase and exonuclease activities was maintained throughout purification and attempted separations by physical or electrophoretic methods. Moreover, ratios of the two activities remained constant during the purification steps, and both activities were inhibited by aphidicolin, oxidized glutathione, and n-ethylmaleimide. The purified enzyme had an estimated molecular weight of 172,000, on the basis of a Stokes radius of 53.6 A and a sedimentation coefficient of 7.8 S. On sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis, polymerase delta preparations contained a band of ca. 170 kilodaltons (kDa) as well as several smaller polypeptides. The 170-kDa polypeptide was identified as the largest polypeptides component in the preparation possessing DNA polymerase activity by an activity staining procedure following gel electrophoresis in the presence of SDS. Western blotting of DNA polymerase delta with polyclonal antisera also revealed a single 170-kDa immunoreactive polypeptide. Monoclonal antibodies to KB cell polymerase ..cap alpha.. inhibited placental polymerase ..cap alpha.. but did not inhibit DNA polymerase delta, while the murine polyclonal antisera to polymerase delta inhibited delta but not ..cap alpha... These findings establish the existence of DNA polymerase delta in a human tissue and support the view that both its polymerase and its exonuclease activities may be associated with a single protein.

  15. Potential Use of Biomphalaria alexandrina Snail Antigens for Serodiagnosis of Schistosomiasis Mansoni by Immunoblot Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Basyoni, Maha MA; EL-Wahab, Azza Abd

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible use of Biomphalaria alexandrina snail antigens in diagnosis of schistosomiasis mansoni using enzyme linked immunolectrotransfere blot (EITB). Methods S. mansoni adult worm crude antigens (AWA), feet and visceral humps of B. alexandrina and Bulinus truncatus were used. Hyperimmune mice sera (HIS) versus each antigen were prepared for diagnosis of S. mansoni using western blot (WB). Results Snail foot antigens were more specific in antibodies detection than visceral hump antigens. Three of five polypeptides of B. alexandrina foot antigen identified by S. mansoni HIS showed specific positive reactivity. These polypeptides were at MW of 31/32 and 43 kDa. While, only one of the six polypeptides of B. alexandrina hepatopancrease antigen identified by S. mansoni HIS, at a MW of 43 kDa was specific. Similarly, 2 polypeptides at MW of 44 and 55 kDa were specific in detection of anti- S. haematobium antibodies. However, the antigenically active polypeptide of B. truncatus hepatopancrease antigen had no specific reactivity towards anti-S. haematobium antibodies. Conclusion B. alexandrina foot antigens were the most specific of the tested snail antigens in diagnosis of schistosomiasis mansoni. PMID:23682262

  16. An enzyme immunoassay and immunoblot analysis for curculin, a new type of taste-modifying protein: cross-reactivity of curculin and miraculin to both antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nakajo, S; Akabane, T; Nakaya, K; Nakamura, Y; Kurihara, Y

    1992-02-01

    We have developed an enzyme immunoassay method for curculin, a new type of taste-modifying protein. This method can accurately quantify 0.05-20 ng of curculin, a sensitivity about 3000-times that of the psychometric method. The content of curculin in the fruit of Curculigo latifolia increased gradually until 3 weeks after artificial pollination and dramatically at 4 weeks, to finally reach 1.3 mg per fruit. Immunoblot analysis indicated that antiserum to curculin was faintly reactive with miraculin, but not with thaumatin or monellin. PMID:1737052

  17. Reactivity of dog sera to whole-cell or recombinant antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi by ELISA and immunoblot analysis.

    PubMed

    Magnarelli, L A; Levy, S A; Ijdo, J W; Wu, C; Padula, S J; Fikrig, E

    2001-10-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) with separate preparations of 10 purified recombinant antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto were used to test sera from 36 dogs not vaccinated with whole cells of this agent and from five dogs vaccinated with whole-cell B. burgdorferi bacteria. All dogs lived in tick-infested areas of Connecticut and south-eastern New York state, USA. The non-vaccinated dogs had limb or joint disorder, lameness and fever during the period 1984-1991 and had antibodies to B. burgdorferi, as determined by a polyvalent ELISA with whole-cell antigen. In re-analyses of sera for total immunoglobulins in ELISAs with recombinant antigens, reactions were most frequently recorded when outer-surface protein (Osp) F, protein (p)35, p37, p39 and p-41G (a flagellin component) were tested separately. Western immunoblots of a subset of 16 sera, positive by ELISA with whole-cell antigen and representing a range of antibody titres (640-40960), verified immune responses to these or other lysed whole-cell antigens. Sera from vaccinated dogs contained antibodies to OspA, OspB, p22, p37 and p41-G. Therefore, serological reactions to OspF, p35 and p39 were the most important indicators of natural exposure to B. burgdorferi. Serum reactivities to these recombinant antigens in ELISAs can be used to help identify possible natural infections of canine borreliosis in dogs not vaccinated with whole-cell B. burgdorferi and to provide information on the geographic distribution of this bacterium. PMID:11599738

  18. Comparative analysis of excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis and Trichinella britovi muscle larvae by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Trichinellosis is a zoonotic disease in humans caused by Trichinella spp. The present study was undertaken to discover excretory-secretory (E-S) proteins from T. spiralis and T. britovi muscle larvae (ML) that hold promise for species-specific diagnostics. To that end, the purified E-S proteins were analyzed by fluorescent two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) coupled with protein identification by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). To search for immunoreactive proteins that are specifically recognized by host antibodies the E-S proteins were subjected to two-dimensional (2-DE) immunoblotting with antisera derived from pigs experimentally infected with T. spiralis or T. britovi. Results According to 2-D DIGE analysis, a total of twenty-two proteins including potentially immunogenic proteins and proteins produced only by one of the two Trichinella species were subjected to LC-MS/MS for protein identification. From these proteins seventeen could be identified, of which many were identified in multiple spots, suggesting that they have undergone post-translational modification, possibly involving glycosylation and/or proteolysis. These proteins included 5'-nucleotidase, serine-type protease/proteinase, and p43 glycoprotein (gp43) as well as 49 kDa E-S protein (p49). Our findings also suggest that some of the commonly identified proteins were post-translationally modified to different extents, which in certain cases seemed to result in species-specific modification. Both commonly and specifically recognized immunoreactive proteins were identified by 2-DE immunoblotting; shared antigens were identified as gp43 and different protease variants, whereas those specific to T. britovi included multiple isoforms of the 5'-nucleotidase. Conclusions Both 2-D DIGE and 2-DE immunoblotting approaches indicate that T. spiralis and T. britovi produce somewhat distinctive antigen profiles, which contain E-S antigens with potential

  19. Densitometric analysis of Western blot (immunoblot) assays for human immunodeficiency virus antibodies and correlation with clinical status.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, G; Amiraian, K; Frey, H; Stevens, R W; Berns, D S

    1987-01-01

    Western blot assays for antibodies directed against components of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were examined with a densitometer and integrator. Antibody responses to seven HIV proteins were determined from the areas under the peaks of bands on blots from 430 seropositive individuals. Antibody responses corresponded qualitatively and quantitatively with clinical status. The Western blot assays examined were done on single specimens from individuals in one of four clinical states: asymptomatic with no risk factor identified, asymptomatic with risk factor(s) identified, AIDS-related complex, and AIDS. The ratios of gp41 antibody to p24 antibody and of gp41 antibody to total HIV antibodies increased, and the number of total HIV antibodies decreased progressively in these populations. Parameters were assigned to characterize the typical response found in AIDS: gp41 antibody/p24 antibody ratio, greater than or equal to 2.0; gp41 antibody/total HIV antibodies ratio, greater than or equal to 0.30; and number of total HIV antibodies, less than or equal to 25.0 signal units. Parameter match increased with progression of clinical status. These parameters were applied in a brief follow-up study of 34 HIV-infected asymptomatic individuals who developed AIDS-related complex or AIDS. Initial specimens showed a stronger correlation than our population data base had predicted, suggesting that the parameters have prognostic value. Densitometric analysis of antibody responses on Western blot assays of single or serial specimens should prove useful to physicians in staging and monitoring HIV-infected individuals and in predicting which individuals will progress to AIDS. Images PMID:2444624

  20. Western immunoblot analysis of Haemobartonella muris and comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences of H. muris, H. felis, and Eperythrozoon suis.

    PubMed Central

    Rikihisa, Y; Kawahara, M; Wen, B; Kociba, G; Fuerst, P; Kawamori, F; Suto, C; Shibata, S; Futohashi, M

    1997-01-01

    Infectious agents were isolated from the spleens of three wild mice (Apodemus argenteus) by intraperitoneal inoculation of the spleen homogenate into laboratory mice. The laboratory mice developed clinical signs and splenomegaly, and three isolates were maintained by passage in mice. Tetracyclines were effective in preventing infection of mice with these agents, but streptomycin and penicillin were ineffective. The agents did not grow in bacterial growth media or chicken embryos. In smears of blood from infected mice stained by the Giemsa or the indirect immunofluorescence method, numerous organisms were found on the surfaces of erythrocytes. Electron microscopy revealed cell wall-less pleomorphic cocci of 350 to 700 nm in diameter. On the basis of these results, the isolates were identified as Haemobartonella muris. There was no antigenic cross-reactivity with Rickettsia or Ehrlichia spp. or other related organisms. Western immunoblot analysis of three strains of H. muris with mouse antisera to H. muris revealed identical major antigens of 118, 65, 53, 45, and 40 kDa. By heteroduplex analysis of the three PCR-amplified segments of the 16S rRNA genes, the three strains of H. muris were found to be identical. The 16S rRNA genes of one of the H. muris strains, four strains of H. felis, and two strains of Eperythrozoon suis were sequenced and compared. The sequences of two strains of H. felis from cats in California were identical, as were the sequences of a strain from a cat in Ohio and a strain from a cat in Florida, but the similarity of sequences between the California and the Ohio-Florida strains was only 85%. The sequence of an H. muris strain was unique and was more closely related to that of the Ohio-Florida strain of H. felis (89%) than to that of the California strain of H. felis (84%). The sequence of E. suis from a pig in Illinois was identical to that from another pig from Taiwan. The similarity of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of E. suis with those of three

  1. Spatial and temporal variations in cuticle proteins as revealed by monoclonal antibodies. Immunoblotting analysis and ultrastructural immunolocalization in a beetle, Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, A; Millot, C; Curie, G; Delachambre, J

    1990-01-01

    A library of monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against adult cuticle of Tenebrio was used to visualize the secretion of cuticular antigens during metamorphosis. Immunoblots of water- and urea-soluble proteins, and high resolution immunogold labelling has shown that, except in one clone, the Mabs recognize antigens in the three developmental stages. However, the MW of larval and pupal antigens are different from the adult ones, though sharing common epitopes. Blots of cuticle proteins (CPs) bound to different lectins shown few water-soluble glycosylated proteins weakly or not recognized by the Mabs, suggesting that the majority of the Mabs do not recognize glycosylated epitopes. The immunolocalization of the different antigens suggests a molecular basis for both developmental and regional variations in cuticular architecture and to the modifications due to sclerotization, which differ between pre- and postecdysial cuticles of the three developmental stages. PMID:18620297

  2. Strategies of statistical image analysis of 2D immunoblots: the case of IgG response in experimental Taenia crassiceps cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Esquivel-Velázquez, Marcela; Ostoa-Jacobo, Pedro; Larralde, Carlos

    2009-12-31

    A procedure is described to measure the diversity and enrich the meaning and usefulness of the information contained in 2D immunoblot images of the reaction between a complex mixture of parasite antigens and the complex set of antibodies usually present in the sera of infected individual hosts. The procedure and results are illustrated by the experimental infection of 30 mice (three strains, both sexes, 5 mice in each strain x sex combination) with Taenia crassiceps cysticerci, thirty days after the challenge. The exercise revealed a significant positive correlation of parasite loads with the hosts' IgG response, in association with their genetic background and less clearly with their sex, all in the midst of a remarkable diversity of both response variables among individual mice. After superimposing a 10 x 10 grid upon the 2D immunoblots some 10% of the positive grid-cells (those who had at least one spot) were positively correlated, suggesting shared epitopes between different antigen spots and/or similar factors controlling different antibody-producing cell clones. Also, a significant correlation was found between many of the positive grid-cells with high values of [Sigma]parasites, but none with low. Thus, the procedure provided many clues for the selection of antigen spots useful to improve immunodiagnosis of cysticercosis and weakened the inclusion of any as vaccine candidate(s). However, some 16 antigen spots were shared almost exclusively by the resistant strains and could relate to protection. The procedure here illustrated may be used in other infections to assess and identify the relevance of antibodies in diagnosis and prevention, as well as provides a measurement of the expected diversity in the hosts' antibody response to the pathogen and of the possible relations between the individual responses towards different antigens contained in the mixture. PMID:19800348

  3. Immunoblot technique to visualise serum pepsinogen A isozymogen patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Zwiers, A; Toonstra, C; Pals, G; Donker, A J; Meuwissen, S G; ten Kate, R W

    1990-01-01

    Pepsinogen A (PGA) isozymogen patterns in urine and gastric mucosa can be visualised in non-denatured polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis by showing proteolytic activity after the conversion of pepsinogen into pepsin by acid. This method is not suitable for visualising PGA patterns in serum due to low PGA concentrations. To obtain a more sensitive visualisation method an immunoblotting technique was developed. PGA isozymogen patterns from urine and sonified gastric mucosa specimens obtained by immunoblotting were identical with those obtained by activity staining. The immunostaining method was at least 50 times more sensitive. PGA isozymogen patterns could be visualised in serum. Preliminary results suggest that the PGA patterns in serum and gastric mucosa are identical. As an association has been found between the genetically determined PGA isozymogen patterns in gastric mucosa and gastric malignancies in man, immunoblotting of PGA isozymogens in serum may provide a screening tool for subjects at risk of malignant gastric disease. Images PMID:2229438

  4. Analysis of mammalian scrapie protein by novel monoclonal antibodies recognizing distinct prion protein glycoforms: an immunoblot and immunohistochemical study at the light and electron microscopic levels.

    PubMed

    Matucci, Andrea; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Gelati, Matteo; Farinazzo, Alessia; Fiorini, Michele; Ferrari, Sergio; Andrighetto, Giancarlo; Cestari, Tiziana; Caramelli, Maria; Negro, Alessandro; Morbin, Michela; Chiesa, Roberto; Monaco, Salvatore; Tridente, Giuseppe

    2005-03-15

    The availability of specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing the aberrant form (PrP(Sc)) of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) in different mammalian species is important for molecular diagnostics, PrP(Sc) typing and future immunotherapy. We obtained a panel of anti-PrP monoclonal antibodies in PrP(0/0) knock-out mice immunized with recombinant human PrP(23-231). Two mAbs, recognizing PrP epitopes in the alpha-helix 1 (mAb SA65) and alpha-helix 2 (mAb SA21) regions, immunoreacted with PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) and its proteolytic product, PrP27-30, from human, murine, bovine, caprine and ovine brains by Western blot. Remarkably, mAb SA21 recognized unglycosylated and monoglycosylated PrP with the second site occupied by glycan moieties, but not monoglycosylated PrP with the first consensus site occupied or highly glycosylated species. Immunoblots with mAb SA21 disclosed that PrP glycosylated at the second site accounted for the slower migrating form of the customary monoglycosylated PrP doublet. mAb SA65 immunolabelled all PrP glycoforms by Western blot and was highly efficient in detecting tissue PrP by immunohistochemistry in light microscopy and in immunoelectron microscopy. These novel anti-PrP mAbs provide tools to investigate the subcellular site of PrP deposition in mammalian prion diseases and may also contribute to assess the role of different PrP glycoforms in human and animal prion diseases. PMID:15763182

  5. Monoclonal antibodies against muscle actin isoforms: epitope identification and analysis of isoform expression by immunoblot and immunostaining in normal and regenerating skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chaponnier, Christine; Gabbiani, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Higher vertebrates (mammals and birds) express six different highly conserved actin isoforms that can be classified in three subgroups: 1) sarcomeric actins, α-skeletal (α-SKA) and α-cardiac (α-CAA), 2) smooth muscle actins (SMAs), α-SMA and γ-SMA, and 3) cytoplasmic actins (CYAs), β-CYA and γ-CYA. The variations among isoactins, in each subgroup, are due to 3-4 amino acid differences located in their acetylated N-decapeptide sequence. The first monoclonal antibody (mAb) against an actin isoform (α-SMA) was produced and characterized in our laboratory in 1986 (Skalli  et al., 1986) . We have further obtained mAbs against the 5 other isoforms. In this report, we focus on the mAbs anti-α-SKA and anti-α-CAA obtained after immunization of mice with the respective acetylated N-terminal decapeptides using the Repetitive Immunizations at Multiple Sites Strategy (RIMMS). In addition to the identification of their epitope by immunoblotting, we describe the expression of the 2 sarcomeric actins in mature skeletal muscle and during muscle repair after micro-lesions. In particular, we analyze the expression of α-CAA, α-SKA and α-SMA by co-immunostaining in a time course frame during the muscle repair process. Our results indicate that a restricted myocyte population expresses α-CAA and suggest a high capacity of self-regeneration in muscle cells. These antibodies may represent a helpful tool for the follow-up of muscle regeneration and pathological changes. PMID:27335638

  6. Immunoblot assay for detection of autoantibodies in autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Capín, N G; Rodriguez, M R; Lavalle, C M; Ortiz-Ortiz, L

    1992-01-01

    When detecting antinuclear antibodies (ANA) a similar indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) pattern may be produced by antibodies which correspond to different antigenic specificity or to diverse autoimmune disorders. To circumvent this problem, we used an immunoblotting against total antigen from HEp-2 cells (TA-HEp-2-C) which proved to be more specific and sensitive than IIF, since it detected up to 40 antigenic bands and an immunoblot pattern characteristic of each individual and unrelated to the fluorescence patterns of ANA. The analysis of immunoblot patterns is of great diagnostic value, since in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) the antigenic zone is found between 21 and 48 kDa, whereas in other rheumatic diseases with or without positive ANA antibodies by IIF it is found between 14 and 21 kDa. Bands which appear after 50 kDa may or may not have pathological significance since they are present in most normal individuals. The use of reference sera allowed the identification in the extract of previously described antigens relevant to these diseases. Some patients showed bands which have yet to be reported and may be clinically significant on their own or in association with other autoantibodies. The long-term follow-up of these immunoblot patterns may prove to be of prognostic importance. PMID:1403353

  7. Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in Seibert fractions by immunoblotting.

    PubMed Central

    Coates, S R; Hansen, D; Schecter, G; Slutkin, G; Hopewell, P; Affronti, L; Echenberg, D F

    1986-01-01

    Seibert fractions prepared from Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrates were evaluated by immunoblotting with a serum pool from patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Antibody activity was observed primarily with antigens in the polysaccharide II and A protein fractions; these fractions were further evaluated by immunoblotting with sera from individual patients with tuberculosis, from individuals without tuberculosis and positive for the purified protein derivative antigen skin test, and from individuals negative for the purified protein derivative antigen skin test. The antigens identified in the protein A fraction, a 32,000-molecular-weight antigen and a heterogeneous high-molecular-weight antigen, reacted with antibody found in sera from all patients with tuberculosis and with antibody from over 25% of the control individuals. A 10,000-molecular-weight antigen, a 30,000- to 44,000-molecular-weight antigen, and a heterogeneous high-molecular-weight antigen were observed in the polysaccharide II fraction; these antigens reacted with serum antibody from 70% or more of the patients with tuberculosis and with antibody from 20 to 70% of the control individuals. One of the antigens, with a molecular weight ranging from 17,000 to 28,000 in the polysaccharide II fraction, reacted with antibody in 64% of the sera from patients with tuberculosis but with only 1 of 15 control normal sera. This antigen may elicit an antibody response specifically associated with tuberculosis. Images PMID:3088029

  8. False Positive Lyme Disease IgM Immunoblots in Children.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M; Lipsett, Susan C; Nigrovic, Lise E

    2016-07-01

    In our cross-sectional sample of 7289 serologic tests for Lyme disease, we identified 167 instances of a positive IgM immunoblot but a negative IgG immunoblot test result. Considering that only 71% (95% CI 64%-78%) of patients had Lyme disease, a positive IgM immunoblot alone should be interpreted with caution to avoid over-diagnosis of Lyme disease. PMID:27157898

  9. Activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alfassi, Z.B. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains 16 chapters on the application of activation analysis in the fields of life sciences, biological materials, coal and its effluents, environmental samples, archaeology, material science, and forensics. Each chapter is processed separately for the data base.

  10. Neospora caninum immunoblotting improves serodiagnosis of bovine neosporosis.

    PubMed

    Staubli, Daniela; Nunez, Sandra; Sager, Heinz; Schares, Gereon; Gottstein, Bruno

    2006-11-01

    Neospora caninum ranges among the major causes of infectious abortion in cattle worldwide. The present study was designed to improve the serodiagnostic tools by complementing a conventional ELISA with a highly sensitive and species-specific N. caninum immunoblot. To evaluate this test combination, sera from several groups of cows were tested. The first group, consisting of experimentally infected calves, showed that immunoblot antibody reactivities were detectable 1 to 3 days earlier than those found in ELISA. The first immunodominant bands that appeared were a 29-kDa (NcSAG1) and a 36-kDa (NcSRS2) antigen. Other groups, based upon naturally infected cattle, were used to compare the diagnostic sensitivity of ELISA and immunoblotting. Overall, N. caninum immunoblotting exhibited a higher sensitivity (98%) than ELISA (87%). Conversely, immunoblotting also confirm in two other cases, true transient negativation in some animals. In general, banding patterns and band staining intensity correlated to the semiquantitative ELISA findings. On the other hand, the banding pattern could not be used to discriminate between sera from animals with a recent abortion and those of cows with latent N. caninum infection. We also addressed putative cross-reactions due to infection with Toxoplasma gondii. Sera from animals with a serologically proven T. gondii infection were either clearly negative by Neospora immunoblotting or they yielded a specific immunoblot antibody profile indicating a double infection with N. caninum. Sera from animals with positive findings in both Toxoplasma and Neospora ELISA thus provided dichotomic results in the immunoblot by allowing to confirm or to rule out the specificity of the antibody reaction in Neospora ELISA. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that N. caninum immunoblotting is a very sensitive and specific complementary tool to improve the serology for N. caninum infections in cattle. PMID:16718512

  11. Cryptosporidium parvum in calves: kinetics and immunoblot analysis of specific serum and local antibody responses (immunoglobulin A [IgA], IgG, and IgM) after natural and experimental infections.

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, J E; Villacorta, I; Vanopdenbosch, E; Vandergheynst, D; Naciri, M; Ares-Mazás, E; Yvoré, P

    1992-01-01

    Fecal and serum anti-Cryptosporidium parvum immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgM, and IgG were monitored by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after experimental and natural infection of calves with C. parvum. Although all experimentally infected calves showed high levels of colostral antibodies in the feces, they acquired C. parvum infection. Three of five animals died. Calves which acquired natural infection showed only diarrhea. Levels of colostral coproantibodies dropped quickly. Experimental infection was followed by a rise in local anti-C. parvum IgM levels from day 5 postinfection (p.i.). IgM peaked at day 14 p.i. and then disappeared quickly. Anti-C. parvum IgA levels rose between days 7 and 14 p.i. and decreased slowly. Rising levels of coproantibodies coincided with falling oocyst output. Fecal anti-C. parvum IgG levels rose slightly during oocyst output, and IgG disappeared 3 weeks p.i. Similar kinetics were established in naturally infected calves. Although fecal anti-C. parvum IgA levels declined slowly, reinfections were established 5, 7, and 14 weeks after the primary contact. Serum anti-C. parvum IgG levels rose during maximal oocyst excretion, whereas serum anti-C. parvum IgA levels peaked later than did local IgA levels. Challenge reinfection of naturally infected calves at day 112 was not followed by clinical signs or oocyst output or by a secondary antibody response. Sequential Western immunoblotting with fecal extracts revealed up to 32 different parasite antigens. Convalescent-phase sera recognized up to 23 antigens. Fecal IgA reacted intensely with antigens with relative molecular weights (M(r)) of approximately 11,000 and 15,000. These antigens were not recognized by convalescent-phase serum IgG. Both local IgA and serum IgG also showed strong reactions with 23,000- and 44,000-M(r) antigens and with several antigens of between 66,200 and 200,000 M(r). Most bands remained detectable for at least 16 weeks p.i. Images PMID:1587597

  12. Combining Microinjection and Immunoblotting to Analyze MAP Kinase Phosphorylation in Single Starfish Oocytes and Eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, David J.; Hua, Wei

    The starfish oocyte has proven useful for studies involving microinjection because it is relatively large (190 μm) and optically clear. These oocytes are easily obtained from the ovary arrested at prophase of meiosis I, making them useful as a model system for the study of cell cycle-related events. In this chapter, a method for combining microinjection with immunoblotting of single cells is described. Individual starfish oocytes are injected, removed from the microinjection chamber, and analyzed by immunoblotting for the dual-phosphorylated form of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). This method will allow for experiments testing the regulation of MAPK in single cells and for the manipulation of these cells by a quantitative microinjection technique.

  13. Immunoblot Profile as Predictor of Toxoplasmic Encephalitis in Patients Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Leport, Catherine; Franck, Jacqueline; Chene, Genevieve; Derouin, Francis; Ecobichon, Jean-Luc; Pueyo, Sophie; Miro, Jose M.; Luft, Benjamin J.; Morlat, Philippe; Dumon, Henri

    2001-01-01

    In order to define more accurately human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients at risk of developing toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE), we assessed the prognostic significance of the anti-Toxoplasma gondii immunoglobulin G (IgG) immunoblot profile, in addition to AIDS stage, a CD4+ cell count <50/mm3, and an antibody titer ≥150 IU/ml, in patients with CD4 cell counts <200/mm3 and seropositive for T. gondii. Baseline serum samples from 152 patients included in the placebo arm of the ANRS 005-ACTG 154 trial (pyrimethamine versus placebo) were used. The IgG immunoblot profile was determined using a Toxoplasma lysate and read using the Kodak Digital Science 1D image analysis software. Mean follow-up was 15.1 months, and the 1-year incidence of TE was 15.9%. The cumulative probability of TE varied according to the type and number of anti-T. gondii IgG bands and reached 65% at 12 months for patients with IgG bands of 25 and 22 kDa. In a Cox model adjusted for age, gender, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) clinical stage, and CD4 and CD8 cell counts, the incidence of TE was higher when the IgG 22-kDa band (hazard ratio [HR] = 5.4; P < 0.001), the IgG 25-kDa band (HR = 4.7; P < 0.001), or the IgG 69-kDa band (HR = 3.4; P < 0.001) was present and was higher for patients at CDC stage C (HR = 4.9; P < 0.001). T. gondii antibody titer and CD4 cell count were not predictive of TE. Thus, detection of IgG bands of 25, 22, and/or 69 kDa may be helpful for deciding when primary prophylaxis for TE should be started or discontinued, especially in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. PMID:11329461

  14. Measuring the redox state of cellular peroxiredoxins by immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Cox, Andrew G; Winterbourn, Christine C; Hampton, Mark B

    2010-01-01

    The peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are a family of thiol peroxidases that scavenge hydroperoxides and peroxynitrite. The abundance and reactivity of these proteins makes them primary targets for cellular H(2)O(2). The catalytic cycle of typical 2-Cys Prxs involves formation of an intermolecular disulfide bond between peroxidatic and resolving cysteines on opposing subunits. Rapid alterations in the ratio of reduced monomer and oxidized dimer have been detected in the cytoplasm and mitochondria of cultured cells exposed to various exogenous and endogenous sources of oxidative stress. Here we describe immunoblot methods to monitor the interconversion of individual 2-Cys Prxs in cultured cells. We also outline an adaptation of this method to measure the extent to which individual 2-Cys Prxs become hyper oxidized in treated cells. Together, these methods enable the redox status of cellular Prxs to be assessed and quantified in a rapid and robust manner. PMID:20609904

  15. Development of immunoblotting techniques for DNA radical detection

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Fiona A.; Mason, Ronald P.; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Radical damage to DNA has been implicated in cell death, cellular dysfunction and cancer. A recently developed method for detecting DNA radicals uses the nitrone spin trap DMPO (5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide) to trap radicals. The trapped radicals then decay into stable nitrone adducts detectable with anti-DMPO antibodies and quantifiable by ELISA or dot blot assays. However, the sequences of DNA that are damaged are likely to be as important as the total level of damage. Therefore, we have developed immunoblotting methods for detection of DNA nitrone adducts on electrophoretically separated DNA, comparable to Western blotting for proteins. These new techniques not only allow the assessment of relative radical adduct levels, but can reveal specific DNA fragments, and ultimately nucleotides, as radical targets. Moreover, we have determined that denaturation of samples into single-stranded DNA enhances the detection of DNA-DMPO adducts in our new blotting methods and also ELISA assays. PMID:23142572

  16. Soybean flour asthma: detection of allergens by immunoblotting

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, R.K.; Schroeckenstein, D.; Meier-Davis, S.; Balmes, J.; Rempel, D.

    1988-08-01

    A 43-year-old woman developed asthma 6 years after beginning work in a food-processing plant in which soybean flour was used as a protein extender. Symptoms of sneezing, coughing, and wheezing would begin within minutes of exposure to soybean flour and resolve 2 hours after exposure ceased. Skin tests were positive to a soy extract prepared from the flour. Airway hyperreactivity was confirmed by a positive bronchial challenge to methacholine. Bronchial challenge with soybean flour produced an immediate increase in specific airway resistance from 5.0 to 22.7 L. cm of H2O/L/sec. There was no response to challenge with lactose. The patient's allergic response to soy-flour extract was further characterized by several immunologic methods. IgE binding to soy-flour protein by direct RAST was 5.98 times that of a normal control serum. The soy-flour extract was separated by dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Twenty-four protein bands were detected in the crude soy-flour extract. After immunoblotting and subsequent autoradiography, nine proteins with molecular weights ranging from 54,500 to 14,875 were found. Cross-reactivity studies with other legumes demonstrated apparent immunologic identity between a component in green pea extract and a soybean protein with a molecular weight of 17,000. The clinical significance of this cross-reactivity is not known. We conclude that in this case of occupational asthma to soybean flour, multiple allergens were involved. Immunoblotting may be useful in identifying the allergens involved in occupational asthma.

  17. Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Lactobacillus zeae isolates identified by sequence signature and immunoblot phenotype.

    PubMed

    Dobson, C Melissa; Chaban, Bonnie; Deneer, Harry; Ziola, Barry

    2004-07-01

    Species taxonomy within the Lactobacillus casei group of bacteria has been unsettled. With the goal of helping clarify the taxonomy of these bacteria, we investigated the first 3 variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene, the 16S-23S rRNA interspacer region, and one third of the chaperonin 60 gene for Lactobacillus isolates originally designated as L. casei, L. paracasei, L. rhamnosus, and L. zeae. For each genetic region, a phylogenetic tree was created and signature sequence analysis was done. As well, phenotypic analysis of the various strains was performed by immunoblotting. Both sequence signature analysis and immunoblotting gave immediate identification of L. casei, L. rhamnosus, and L. zeae isolates. These results corroborate and extend previous findings concerning these lactobacilli; therefore, we strongly endorse recent proposals for revised nomenclature. Specifically, isolate ATCC 393 is appropriately rejected as the L. casei type strain because of grouping with isolates identified as L. zeae. As well, because all other L. casei isolates, including the proposed neotype isolate ATCC 334, grouped together with isolates designated L. paracasei, we support the use of the single species L. casei and rejection of the name L. paracasei. PMID:15381972

  18. Optimising methods for the preservation, capture and identification of ubiquitin chains and ubiquitylated proteins by immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Emmerich, Christoph H; Cohen, Philip

    2015-10-01

    Immunoblotting is a powerful technique for the semi-quantitative analysis of ubiquitylation events, and remains the most commonly used method to study this process due to its high specificity, speed, sensitivity and relatively low cost. However, the ubiquitylation of proteins is complex and, when the analysis is performed in an inappropriate manner, it can lead to the misinterpretation of results and to erroneous conclusions being reached. Here we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the methods currently in use to analyse ubiquitin chains and protein ubiquitylation, and describe the procedures that we have found to be most useful for optimising the quality and reliability of the data that we have generated. We also highlight commonly encountered problems and the pitfalls inherent in some of these methods. Finally, we introduce a set of recommendations to help researchers obtain high quality data, especially those new to the field of ubiquitin signalling. The specific topics addressed in this article include sample preparation, the separation, detection and identification of particular ubiquitin chains by immunoblotting, and the analysis of ubiquitin chain topology through the combined use of ubiquitin-binding proteins and ubiquitin linkage-specific deubiquitylases. PMID:26325464

  19. Optimising methods for the preservation, capture and identification of ubiquitin chains and ubiquitylated proteins by immunoblotting

    PubMed Central

    Emmerich, Christoph H.; Cohen, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Immunoblotting is a powerful technique for the semi-quantitative analysis of ubiquitylation events, and remains the most commonly used method to study this process due to its high specificity, speed, sensitivity and relatively low cost. However, the ubiquitylation of proteins is complex and, when the analysis is performed in an inappropriate manner, it can lead to the misinterpretation of results and to erroneous conclusions being reached. Here we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the methods currently in use to analyse ubiquitin chains and protein ubiquitylation, and describe the procedures that we have found to be most useful for optimising the quality and reliability of the data that we have generated. We also highlight commonly encountered problems and the pitfalls inherent in some of these methods. Finally, we introduce a set of recommendations to help researchers obtain high quality data, especially those new to the field of ubiquitin signalling. The specific topics addressed in this article include sample preparation, the separation, detection and identification of particular ubiquitin chains by immunoblotting, and the analysis of ubiquitin chain topology through the combined use of ubiquitin-binding proteins and ubiquitin linkage-specific deubiquitylases. PMID:26325464

  20. Quantitation of protein kinase C by immunoblot-expression in different cell lines and response to phorbol esters

    SciTech Connect

    Stabel, S.; Rodriguez-Pena, A.; Young, S.; Rozengurt, E.; Parker, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Antisera have been raised against human protein kinase C and also against a synthetic peptide based on the sequence of the bovine brain enzyme (LLNQEEGEYYNVPIPE). These antibodies react with protein kinase C from a number of species (human, murine, rat, rabbit, bovine), indicating substantial conservation of epitopes. These antisera have been used to quantitate directly protein kinase C by immunoblot analysis. The authors show here that there is a strict correlation between the levels of immunoreactive polypeptide and extractable calcium- and phospholipid-dependent kinase activity for various cell lines. Treatment of murine, rat, and human cells with phorbol dibutyrate was found to deplete levels of immunoreactive protein kinase C severely. A detailed study of the time course of this depletion in Swiss 3T3 cells shows that it follows precisely the loss of extractable activity. On exposure to 400 nM phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate protein kinase C was essentially undetectable by 40 hours; the half-life of this down-regulation was 6.7 hours. This data thus demonstrate that the loss of immunoreactive protein kinase C and of extractable calcium- and phospholipid-dependent kinase activity precisely parallels the phorbol ester induced down-regulation of binding and responsiveness in Swiss 3T3 cells.

  1. An immunoblot for detection of Taenia saginata cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Abuseir, Sameh; Nagel-Kohl, Uschi; Wolken, Sonja; Strube, Christina

    2013-05-01

    Control measures to prevent human infections with the food-borne zoonotic helminth Taenia saginata are currently based on meat inspection, which shows rather low diagnostic sensitivity. To develop an immunoblot for detection of T. saginata-infected cattle, crude proteins of T. saginata cysts were extracted and separated with SDS-PAGE. The cyst antigens showed ten protein bands ranging from 260 to 14 kDa. T. saginata cyst proteins 260, 150, 130, 67, 60, 55, 50, and 23 kDa were immunoreactive with known positive sera of T. saginata-infected cattle but cross-reacted with sera from Echinocccus granulosus-infected ruminants. By contrast, 14- and 18-kDa cyst proteins reacted specifically with T. saginata-positive sera and thus might be potential candidates for the development of a T. saginata-specific immunoassay. Proteins of E. granulosus cysts and Taenia hydatigena cysts were also extracted and separated with SDS-PAGE. E. granulosus cysts revealed 11 protein bands ranging from 260 to 23 kDa. E. granulosus protein 60 kDa was immunoreactive with E. granulosus-positive sera only. The cyst of T. hydatigena showed 11 protein bands ranging from 290 to 14 kDa. The protein band 35 kDa showed cross-reaction with positive sera from both T. saginata- and E. granulosus-infected animals. A protein of 67 kDa was present in all three tested cestode species and was the major antigenic protein detected by sera of T. saginata- and E. granulosus-infected animals. Therefore, this protein represents a potential vaccine candidate against both cysticercosis and cystic echinococcosis in cattle. PMID:23483261

  2. An improved recombinant IgG immunoblot for serodiagnosis of Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Wilske, B; Habermann, C; Fingerle, V; Hillenbrand, B; Jauris-Heipke, S; Lehnert, G; Pradel, I; Rössler, D; Schulte-Spechtel, U

    1999-12-01

    We have previously described the use of the following recombinant antigens for serodiagnostic immunoblots: p83/100, p39, OspC and p41 (flagellin) internal fragment [Wilske et al. (1993) Med Microbiol Immunol 182:255-270; Rossler et al. (1997) J Clin Microbiol 35:2752-2758]. In our currently used immunoblot p83/100 is derived from strain PKo (Borrelia afzelii), p39 (BmpA) and OspC from strains PKa2 (B. hurgdorferi sensu stricto), PKo and PBi (B. garinii), respectively; the p41 (flagellin) internal fragments were cloned from strains PKo and PBi. In this study we describe the use of two additional recombinantly expressed highly immunogenic proteins Osp 7 (derived from PKo) and p58 (derived from PBi). A clinically well-defined panel of sera from 147 Lyme borreliosis patients and 139 controls previously tested by a standardized whole cell lysate immunoblot [Hauser et al. (1997) J Clin Microbiol 35:1433-1444] was investigated in the recombinant immunoblot without (old recombinant immunoblot) and with Ospl7 and p58 (new recombinant immunoblot) for IgG antibodies. The sensitivity of the recombinant IgG immunoblot for diagnosis of stage II and stage III could be significantly improved by addition of Osp17 and p58 without loss of specificity. With the exception of sera from patients with erythema migrans the diagnostic sensitivity is comparable to the whole cell lysate IgG immunoblot. The main advantage of the recombinant immunoblot is the easy identification of diagnostic bands, whereas the identification of bands in the whole cell lysate immunoblot is difficult. The recombinant immunoblot is especially suitable where large series of sera need to be investigated. PMID:10776844

  3. Enhanced specificity of immunoblotting using radiolabeled antigen overlay: studies of blood coagulation factor XII and prekallikrein in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Laemmle, B.; Berrettini, M.; Griffin, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Immunoblotting of blood coagulation Factor XII and plasma prekallikrein in whole plasma was performed using radiolabeled antigen for detection. After sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of plasma and transfer to nitrocellulose sheets, the blots were first reacted with polyclonal goat anti-Factor XII or anti-prekallikrein antisera and then with /sup 125/I-Factor XII or /sup 125/I-prekallikrein, respectively. A major advantage of using radiolabeled antigen rather than radiolabeled secondary antibody was enhanced specificity of immunodetection of these antigens in plasma. This procedure was sensitive to approx.0.3 ng of either Factor XII or prekallikrein antigen and was useful for detection of Factor XII cleavage fragments in contact activated plasma. Radiolabeled antigen overlay may improve the specificity of immunoblotting of trace antigens in any complex mixtures.

  4. Quantitative demonstration of intrathecal synthesis of high affinity immunoglobulin G in herpes simplex encephalitis using affinity-mediated immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Miles D; Thompson, Edward J; Candler, Paul M; Dale, Russell C; Church, Andrew J; Giovannoni, Gavin

    2007-04-01

    Three paired serial samples of CSF and serum (from days 8, 13 and 22) were taken from a patient referred to the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery with what was duly confirmed as having herpes simplex encephalitis using PCR. The samples were investigated using affinity-mediated immunoblotting followed by incubation with sodium thiocyanate. Digitisation of the blots enabled further analysis. We showed that the clones of antigen-specific IgG, which were produced intrathecally, were of higher relative affinity than polyclonal antigen-specific IgG. PMID:17303253

  5. Detection of antimicrobial (poly)peptides with acid urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by Western immunoblot.

    PubMed

    Porter, Edith; Valore, Erika V; Anouseyan, Rabin; Salzman, Nita H

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial (poly)peptides (AMPs) are ancient key effector molecules of innate host defense and have been identified in mammals, insects, plants, and even fungi (Nakatsuji and Gallo, J Invest Dermatol, 132: 887-895, 2012). They exhibit a cationic net charge at physiological pH and are rich in hydrophobic amino acids (Dufourc et al., Curr Protein Pept Sci, 13: 620-631, 2012). Their mode of action has been best investigated in bacteria. When assuming secondary structure the cationic and hydrophobic amino acids are sequestered creating a bipartitioned molecule in which the cationic amino acids mediate initial electrostatic interaction with the negatively charged bacterial surface and the hydrophobic amino acids mediate embedding into the bacterial membranes followed by a multitude of effects interfering with bacterial viability (Nicolas, FEBS J, 276: 6483-6496, 2009; Padovan et al., Curr Protein Pept Sci, 11: 210-219, 2010). However, immunomodulatory, antitumor, and other effects have been added to the ever increasing list of AMP functions (Pushpanathan et al., Int J Pept, 2013: 675391, 2013). Several classes of AMPs have been distinguished based on structure, namely anti-parallel beta-sheet, alpha-helical, circular, as well as disulfide bridge connectivity (Bond and Khalid, Protein Pept Lett, 17: 1313-1327, 2010). Many of the AMPs undergo posttranslational modification including further proteolysis. Biochemical analysis at the protein level is of great interest for a wide range of scientists and important when studying host-pathogen interaction, for example Salmonella invasion of the small intestine. Acid-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (AU-PAGE) followed by Western immunoblotting is an important tool for the identification and quantification of cationic AMPs. The protocol for these procedures outlined here describes, in detail, the necessary steps; including pouring the AU-gels, preparing the test samples, performing the electrophoretic separation and

  6. Anti-histone antibodies (ELISA and immunoblot) in canine lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Brinet, A; Fournel, C; Faure, J R; Venet, C; Monier, J C

    1988-01-01

    In the canine systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), anti-double stranded DNA (ds-DNA) antibodies (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or indirect immunofluorescence on Crithidia luciliae) are rare whereas anti-histone antibodies are often found: 61.7% with ELISA and 74% with immunoblot. In canine SLE the pattern of anti-histone antibodies on immunoblot is different from anti-histone antibodies in human SLE. Indeed, histone fractions which are most often recognized by the canine antibodies are by order of frequency H3, H4 and H2A, whereas in man this order is H1, H2B then H3. In the diagnostic criteria of canine SLE, we suggest replacing the anti-ds-DNA antibodies by the anti-histone antibodies detected by immunoblot. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3265365

  7. Neutron activation analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, M.C.; Rhodes, J.R.

    1973-12-25

    A neutron activation analysis system for monitoring a generally fluid media, such as slurries, solutions, and fluidized powders, including two separate conduit loops for circulating fluid samples within the range of radiation sources and detectors is described. Associated with the first loop is a neutron source that emits s high flux of slow and thermal neutrons. The second loop employs a fast neutron source, the flux from which is substantially free of thermal neutrons. Adjacent to both loops are gamma counters for spectrographic determination of the fluid constituents. Other gsmma sources and detectors are arranged across a portion of each loop for deterMining the fluid density. (Official Gazette)

  8. Utility of Immunoblotting for Early Diagnosis of Toxoplasmosis Seroconversion in Pregnant Women▿

    PubMed Central

    Jost, C.; Touafek, F.; Fekkar, A.; Courtin, R.; Ribeiro, M.; Mazier, D.; Paris, L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital transmission of Toxoplasma gondii occurs mainly when a mother acquires the infection for the first time during pregnancy. It was recently shown that although early treatment of the primary infection during pregnancy has little or no impact on the fetomaternal transmission rate, it does reduce the incidence of sequelae in infected infants. Seroconversion is defined by the appearance of IgG. Commercial reagents continue to vary considerably in detecting low concentrations of antibodies, as during early seroconversion. We compared two routinely used immunoassays (IA) (Platelia and Elecsys Toxo IgG) and an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IIF) with a qualitative test based on immunoblot analysis (Toxo II IgG) (IB) to assess their abilities to diagnose seroconversion at its earliest stages. This prospective study was carried out between January and November 2010. It included 39 pregnant women with monthly follow-up who seroconverted during pregnancy. On first sera that were IgM positive but IgG negative (or equivocal) as detected by IA, IB diagnosed seroconversion twice as often as IIF (26/39 [66.7%] versus 13/39 [33.3%]; P < 0.001; χ2 test). Serum samples were retaken 2 to 5 weeks later for the other 13 cases (IgG negative by IB on first serum). Seroconversion was demonstrated as follows: IB for 5 cases where IA remained negative or equivocal, IB and IIF for 5 cases where IA remained negative or equivocal, IA for 2 cases, and no method for 1 case (a third sample was necessary). In summary, IB permitted toxoplasmosis seroconversion diagnosis before other means in 92.3% of cases (36/39) and thus earlier therapeutic intervention. PMID:21880851

  9. Identification of Giardia lamblia-specific antigens in infected human and gerbil feces by western immunoblotting.

    PubMed Central

    Stibbs, H H; Samadpour, M; Ongerth, J E

    1990-01-01

    Western immunoblot analysis of aqueous extracts of feces obtained from five giardiasis patients and from experimentally infected gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) with rabbit antiserum to Giardia lamblia cysts has revealed antigens of three molecular weight groups. A stepladderlike, evenly-spaced set of strongly reactive antigens (darkest at a molecular weight [m.w.] of 55,000 to 70,000) appeared in the gerbil feces from day 4 (first experiment) or day 2 (second experiment) and lasted to about day 7 but disappeared completely by day 8 and did not reappear later. These antigenic bands were seen in gerbils infected with two isolates of G. lamblia. These bands were not revealed when antiserum to trophozoites was used as the probe, nor were they evident in specimens from the patients or in a preparation of sonicated cysts. A second group of antigens, represented by two to three low-m.w. bands of approximately 15,000 to 20,000, was evident in both the blots of gerbil feces after approximately day 8 and the specimens from the giardiasis patients. The third group of antigens revealed by blotting experiments was a high-m.w. band (approximately 110,000) which appeared on a number of days (beginning of day 8 of gerbil infection), but this band was not seen in the human specimens. A clear band corresponding to the previously reported GSA-65 antigen was not seen in either the gerbil or the human samples. Some low- and high-m.w. bands were also detected by antitrophozoite serum in the gerbil samples, but these were weak and unimpressive compared with those visualized using anticyst serum. A monoclonal antibody-based antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that Giardia spp.-specific stool antigen rose suddenly at day 3 of gerbil infection, at the time when fecal cyst numbers began to rise rapidly. Images PMID:2229361

  10. Comparison of arbitrarily primed PCR with restriction endonuclease and immunoblot analyses for typing Clostridium difficile isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Y J; Houston, S T; Gumerlock, P H; Mulligan, M E; Gerding, D N; Johnson, S; Fekety, F R; Silva, J

    1995-01-01

    Arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR) was used to genotype 26 clinical isolates of Clostridium difficile previously analyzed by immunoblotting (IB) and 20 isolates typed by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) with HindIII. Two levels of differentiation were achieved with the AP-PCR approach by use of two different arbitrary primers. With the 19-mer arbitrary primer T-7 (first level of differentiation), a good correlation was found between IB and AP-PCR typing. Twenty isolates grouped into six IB types were separated into seven major AP-PCR types. These seven AP-PCR groups were further discriminated into 12 subtypes after genotyping with the arbitrary primer PG-05 (second level of differentiation). The remaining six isolates, all of different IB types, showed a unique and distinct DNA banding pattern with both of the arbitrary primers, T-7 and PG-05. Twenty isolates representing 20 REA types from 15 REA groups were resolved into 13 AP-PCR DNA profiles with the arbitrary primer T-7. A good correlation was found at this level of differentiation between the major REA groups, Y and M, and AP-PCR typing. While AP-PCR with this primer failed to differentiate isolates in REA groups J, G, R, and B, AP-PCR with PG-05 resolved these four isolates into four distinct AP-PCR types. In addition, one of three M strains and one of four Y strains displayed a slightly different DNA banding pattern by AP-PCR (with PG-05) from that of the other strains in the group. We conclude that AP-PCR is a rapid and sensitive method which not only complements other typing schemes but also may be a substitute and prove to be especially suited for immediate epidemiological tracking of nosocomial infections due to C. difficile. PMID:8586695

  11. Interactive analysis program activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. P.; Frisch, H. P.; Jones, G. K.; Walker, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    The development of an analysis software system capable of performing interdisciplinary preliminary design analyses of large space structure configurations is discussed. Disciplines such as thermal, structures, and controls are to be integrated into a highly user oriented analysis capability. The key feature of the integrated analysis capability, a rapid and efficient system that will minimize solution turnaround time, is discussed.

  12. [An immunoblotting as a method for the diagnosis of typhoid fever].

    PubMed

    Dera-Tomaszewska, Bozena; Głośnicka, Renata

    2007-01-01

    The patients' sera had been referred to the National Salmonella Centre for routine Widal serology. Sera were predominately from patients suspected of having been infected with Salmonella Typhi, but also included one serum from patient with typhoid fever who was culture positive for Salmonella Typhi. The immunoblotting procedure using Salmonella Typhi somatic (O=9,12 LPS) and flagellar (H=d) antigens was used for preliminary testing of selected patients sera previously evaluated by Widal agglutination assay as containing different levels of antibodies against O and/or H antigens of Salmonella Typhi. Following Chart et al., immunoblotting reactions were graded between 0 and 3, with 0 indicating an absence of antibody binding, and 3 where antibody binding was readily observed. Sera giving reaction of 2 or 3 were considered to be antibody positive for this study. Positive immunoblotting reaction to O=9,12 LPS antigen was obtained only with the serum of patient with typhoid fever. Presence of specific anti-LPS antibodies was also observed in two other patients' sera diluted 1:50, and in case of one of them also in dilution 1:200, but intensity of antigen-antibody reaction was under positive result criterion. The most other sera positive to O=9,12 antigen in law dilutions (1:50, 1:100) by Widal assay, showed the traces of non-specific reaction by immunoblotting. Presence of positive antigen-antibody reaction was indicated for five sera in dilution 1:50 when tested with the >55 kDa H=d flagellar protein subunit, including the serum of patient with typhoid fever. Only in this serum the high level of specific antibodies was detected also in dilution 1:200, what was not observed in case of the other four, which appeared negative. All the other sera were shown not to contain antibodies to flagella antigen. Although the presented results are preliminary and additional study of more sera of people infected with Salmonella Typhi is needed, it can be concluded after Chart et al

  13. [Optimization of ELISA and immunoblot methods for the detection of IgG antibodies against old world hantaviruses in wild rodents].

    PubMed

    Polat, Ceylan; Karataş, Ahmet; Sözen, Mustafa; Matur, Ferhat; Abacıoğlu, Hakan; Öktem, Mehmet Ali

    2016-04-01

    /50 and 1/100 serum dilutions and 1/5.000 and 1/10.000 conjugate dilutions were tested. The horseradish peroxidase conjugated goat anti-mouse IgG for ELISA and the alkaline phosphatase conjugated goat anti-mouse IgG for immunoblot were used. We followed the manufacturer's recommendations for the incubation parameters, substrate and the number of washes. 1/50 serum dilution and 1/10.000 conjugate dilution for ELISA and 1/100 serum dilution and 1/5.000 conjugate dilution for immunoblot were determined as optimal concentrations. By using the optimized ELISA, 26.2% (22/84) of rodents were found positive for hantavirus antibodies according the determined cut-off value (OD(450/620): 0.325). By using immunoblot as a confirmatory test, 20 out of 22 ELISA positive samples could be studied because of the insufficient amount of sera and 17 of them was found positive in terms of DOBV antibodies. Of these rodents 11 were Apodemus flavicollis, three were Apodemus agrarius, two were Microtus guentheri and one was Apodemus sylvaticus. When the results of ELISA were compared to immunoblot results, the optimized ELISA's sensitivity and specificity were found as 100% and 95%, respectively. In this study, a method that can be used in the screening of rodent sera was constituted which uses commercial antigens that can be provided easily, gives fast and reliable results. Similar serological methods optimized for different types of rodents are of great importance for the realization of active follow-up and monitoring of the studies in the field. PMID:27175497

  14. Use of immunoblotting to detect antibodies to Mycoplasma crocodyli infection in the sera of crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus).

    PubMed

    Dawo, Fufa; Mohan, Krishna

    2008-02-01

    An immunoblotting protocol for the detection of antibodies to Mycoplasma crocodyli was developed using sonicated antigen of the reference strain 266/93. Immunoblotting detected nine reacting antigens, of which the 33 and 40kDa antigens were immunodominant. There was no difference in reactivity of the antigens against sera obtained from vaccinated and infected crocodiles. Both antigens are candidates for other serological and molecular studies. This is the first report to develop and apply an immunoblotting test for detection of antibody to M. crocodyli infection in crocodiles. PMID:17360201

  15. Differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar in cyst-passers by immunoblot.

    PubMed

    Lee, M; Hong, S T

    1996-12-01

    Differentiation of invasive strains of Entamoeba histolytica according to their pathogenicity has been a topic of long debate, but now the pathogenic species only is regarded as E. histolytica while the non pathogenic species is E. dispar. The present study applied immunoblot to differentiate infections of the two species among microscopically-detected cyst-passers in Korea. The crude extract of E. histolytica separated in 5.20% gradient gels, revealed many fractions of 94, 81, 71, 50, 44, 38.5, 37.5, 29, 19, and 18 kDa when the cysteine proteinase inhibitor, E64, was supplemented. The scrum IgG antibody of 3 proven E, histolytica cases reacted with the antigenic fractions of 117, 110, 99, 68, 66, 60, 54, 52, 46, and 45 kDa. Sera of PCR confirmed 3 cases of E. dispar reacted only to the 117 kDa fraction of the E. histolytica crude extract which was regarded as non-specific. To the antigen of monoxenic E. dispar, sera of E. dispar and E. histolytica cases showed the same immunoblot reactions. The serum IgA antibody reacted with several antigenic fractions of both E. histolytica and E. dispar, but IgM and IgE antibodies showed no reaction to either antigen. Sera of 24 symptomless amebic cyst passers were screened with the E. histolytica antigen; two were found to be infected by E. histolytica and 22 were by E. dispar. The present findings suggest that in Korea most of asymptomatic cyst passers of E. histolytica are carriers of E. dispar. Immunoblot using E. histolytica antigen is a good technique for the differentiation of E. histolytica and E. dispar infections. PMID:9017910

  16. Evaluation of the Western immunoblot as a detection method for Brucella abortus exposure in elk.

    PubMed

    Schumaker, Brant A; Mazet, Jonna A K; Gonzales, Ben J; Elzer, Philip H; Hietala, Sharon K; Ziccardi, Michael H

    2010-01-01

    Brucella abortus has been an important wildlife disease issue for most of the last century, especially because wildlife species are considered to be important disease reservoirs for cattle. Diagnostic uncertainty, caused in part by cross-reactions of antibodies to environmental pathogens such as Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 on standard Brucella serology, has exacerbated the challenges of managing the disease and has highlighted the need for test validation in wildlife species. The western immunoblot was evaluated for use in detecting B. abortus exposure in elk (Cervus elaphus) and for ruling out exposure to cross-reacting bacteria. Samples collected from 2003 to 2006, including 54 female and immature elk from four different elk herds, were tested using standard Brucella serologic methods (card, rapid automated presumptive [RAP], and rivanol tests), as well as the western immunoblot. Samples (n=28) from animals known to be naturally infected with B. abortus biovar 1 served as positive controls. For presumed negative samples, sera (n=26) were collected from two elk herds in which negative serologic tests, and the absence of clinical signs of disease such as abortions, supported Brucella-negative classification. In addition to these study samples, serologic data from 12 tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) were provided from the California Department of Fish and Game in order to illustrate a field application of the western blot. The western immunoblot had the highest sensitivity (1.0; % 0.899-1.0) and specificity (1.0; 0.891-1.0) among all tests used in the study. The Kappa statistic for agreement between the western blot and the card, rivanol, and RAP tests were 0.701, 0.808, and 0.921, respectively, showing good to excellent agreement with the standard diagnostic tests currently in use. Although the western immunoblot is more expensive and time intensive than other tests, in this limited study, it was shown to be reliable for establishing and confirming B. abortus

  17. A high temperature transfer procedure for detection of G protein gamma subunits by immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Robishaw, J D; Balcueva, E A

    1993-02-01

    The production of antibodies against synthetic peptides derived from amino acid sequences common or unique to a particular protein(s) is an important tool in the identification of structurally related members of an ever-increasing number of protein families. The successful use of anti-peptide antibodies requires that the protein(s) of interest be properly transferred and fully denatured prior to detection by Western-type immunoblotting. In this paper, we demonstrate that conventional transfer procedures are not successful in presenting the G protein gamma subunits in a suitable state for immunodetection. We describe a high temperature (70 degrees C) transfer procedure that results in a more than 20-fold enhancement in the sensitivity of immunodetection of the various G protein gamma subunits. The effect of high temperature transfer could not be duplicated by including 0.2% SDS in the buffer during transfer to nitrocellulose, or by baking or autoclaving the nitrocellulose after transfer. Thus, high temperature transfer is a powerful procedure for enhancing immunoblot detection of protein(s) that may be resistant to denaturation and/or subject to renaturation during the transfer and/or binding to nitrocellulose. PMID:7680843

  18. Immunoblot assays using recombinant antigens for the detection of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antibodies.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, S; Frey, J; Huang, B; Djordjevic, S; Kwang, J

    2000-07-01

    The 36kDa L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and a 29kDa partial fragment of an ABC transporter ATP-binding protein analogue/multidrug resistance protein homologue (PR2) of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae were tested for their potential as diagnostic antigens. Recombinant LDH was genetically engineered to contain six histidine residues at its C-terminal end, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to a high degree using Ni(2+)-chelate affinity chromatography. A partial 262 amino acid segment representing the C-terminal end of the PR2 protein was cloned as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein, expressed in E. coli and purified by urea extraction. Purified recombinant LDH-6xHis and PR2-GST were then reacted with pig sera in immunoblot assays. Our immunoblots showed that both proteins detected anti-M. hyopneumoniae antibodies in field and experimentally infected pig sera but not in any of the SPF control sera. The two proteins were specific for M. hyopneumoniae as they did not react with sera of pigs infected with the closely related Mycoplasma flocculare and Mycoplasma hyorhinis which are frequently isolated in pigs but are not of particular concern. PMID:10865156

  19. Diagnostic performance of a commercial immunoblot assay for myositis antibody testing.

    PubMed

    Bundell, Chris; Rojana-Udomsart, Arada; Mastaglia, Frank; Hollingsworth, Peter; McLean-Tooke, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to establish a population based reference range for a commercial immunoblot assay detecting myositis specific autoantibodies (MSAs) and myositis associated autoantibodies (MAAs), and to assess the diagnostic performance of this reference range against the manufacturer's recommended ranges in a myositis patient cohort. A total of 124 patients from a myositis cohort and 197 healthy controls were serologically assessed using a commercial immunoblot containing eleven autoantigens (Jo-1, EJ, OJ, PL7, PL12, Mi-2, SRP, Ku, PMScl75, PMScl100 and Ro52) according to the manufacturer's instructions. Use of the manufacturer's reference ranges resulted in detection of MSAs in 19.4% of myositis patients and 9.1% of controls; MAAs were detected in 41.1% of myositis patients and 14.2% of controls. Reference values derived from the healthy control population resulted in significant differences in cut-off values for some autoantibodies, particularly Ro52 and PMScl75. Use of local reference ranges reduced detection of MSAs to 16.9% of myositis patients and 3% of healthy controls, with MAAs 23.4% of patients and 2% of healthy controls. Application of population based reference ranges resulted in significant differences in detection of MSAs and MAAs compared to the manufacturer's recommended ranges. Cut-off levels should be assessed to ensure suitability for the population tested. PMID:27114370

  20. Activation analysis using Cornell TRIGA

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Tim Z.

    1994-07-01

    A major use of the Cornell TRIGA is for activation analysis. Over the years many varieties of samples have been analyzed from a number of fields of interest ranging from geology, archaeology and textiles. More recently the analysis has been extended to high technology materials for applications in optical and semiconductor devices. Trace analysis in high purity materials like Si wafers has been the focus in many instances, while in others analysis of major/minor components were the goals. These analysis has been done using the delayed mode. Results from recent measurements in semiconductors and other materials will be presented. In addition the near future capability of using prompt gamma activation analysis using the Cornell cold neutron beam will be discussed. (author)

  1. Standardizing Activation Analysis: New Software for Photon Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Z. J.; Wells, D.; Green, J.; Segebade, C.

    2011-06-01

    Photon Activation Analysis (PAA) of environmental, archaeological and industrial samples requires extensive data analysis that is susceptible to error. For the purpose of saving time, manpower and minimizing error, a computer program was designed, built and implemented using SQL, Access 2007 and asp.net technology to automate this process. Based on the peak information of the spectrum and assisted by its PAA library, the program automatically identifies elements in the samples and calculates their concentrations and respective uncertainties. The software also could be operated in browser/server mode, which gives the possibility to use it anywhere the internet is accessible. By switching the nuclide library and the related formula behind, the new software can be easily expanded to neutron activation analysis (NAA), charged particle activation analysis (CPAA) or proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Implementation of this would standardize the analysis of nuclear activation data. Results from this software were compared to standard PAA analysis with excellent agreement. With minimum input from the user, the software has proven to be fast, user-friendly and reliable.

  2. Exploring Early and Late Toxoplasma gondii Strain RH Infection by Two-Dimensional Immunoblots of Chicken Immunoglobulin G and M Profiles

    PubMed Central

    El-Ashram, Saeed; Sun, Ximeng; Yin, Qing; Liu, Xianyong; Suo, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular apicomplexan parasite infecting warm-blooded vertebrate hosts, with only early infection stage being contained with drugs. But diagnosis differencing early and late infection was not available. In the present investigation, 2-dimensional immunobloting was used to explore early and late infections in chickens. The protein expression of T. gondii was determined by image analysis of the tachyzoites proteome separated by standard-one and conventional two-dimentional gel polyacrylamide electrophoresis (2D- PAGE). Pooled gels were prepared from tachyzoites of T. gondii. A representative gel spanning a pH range of 3-10 of the tachyzoite proteome consisted of 1306 distinct polypeptide spots. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with 2-DE immunoblotting was used to resolve and compare immunoglobulins (Igs) M & G patterns against Toxoplasma gondii strain RH (mouse virulent strain). Total tachyzoite proteins of T. gondii were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and analyzed by Western blotting for their reactivity with the 7 and 56 days post-infection (dpi) SPF chicken antisera. Different antigenic determinant patterns were detected during analysis with M and G immunoglobulins. Of the total number of polypeptide spots analyzed (1306 differentially expressed protein spots), 6.97% were identified as having shared antigenic polypeptide spots on immunoblot profiles with IgG and IgM antibodies regardless the time after infection. Furthermore, some of the immunoreactive polypeptide spots seemed to be related to the stage of infection. Interestingly, we found natural antibodies to toxoplasmic antigens, in addition to the highly conserved antigenic determinants that reacted with non-specific secondary antibody; goat anti-chicken IgG antibodies conjugated with horseradish peroxidase. In conclusion, unique reactive polypeptide spots are promising candidates for designation of molecular markers to discriminate early and late

  3. Detection on immunoblot of new proteins from the microsomal fraction recognized by anti-liver-kidney microsome antibodies type 1.

    PubMed

    Ballot, E; Desbos, A; Auger, C; Monier, J C

    1996-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that sera from patients with autoimmune hepatitis type 1 contain antibodies which react with proteins other than the endoplasmic reticulum integral membrane protein of apparent Mr 50,000, now known to be a cytochrome P450 of the IID subfamily. Sera from 141 patients found by immunofluorescence to be positive for anti-liver-kidney microsome antibodies type 1, and sera from 50 blood donors used as controls, were analyzed by immunoblotting experiments on rat liver microsomes, microsomal subfractions, and also microsomes subjected to various treatments, as described in the text. These fractions were characterized morphologically by electronic microscopy and biochemically by different enzymatic activities. Five bands were found to be stained more often by the patients' sera than by the controls' and with a statistically significant difference in frequency. These antigenic proteins were located at apparent Mr 62,000, 58,000, 50,000, 40,000, and 35,000. The 50,000 protein was of course more often stained than the others. Antibodies against these antigens belonged essentially to the IgG1 subclass. For some of them, subcellular localization and membrane topography are discussed. Interestingly, the 58,000 protein is not an integral membrane protein. PMID:8811045

  4. Neutron Activation Analysis: Techniques and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, Ryan

    2011-04-27

    The role of neutron activation analysis in low-energy low-background experimentsis discussed in terms of comparible methods. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis is introduce. The procedure of instrumental neutron activation analysis is detailed especially with respect to the measurement of trace amounts of natural radioactivity. The determination of reactor neutron spectrum parameters required for neutron activation analysis is also presented.

  5. The Borrelia burgdorferi 37-Kilodalton Immunoblot Band (P37) Used in Serodiagnosis of Early Lyme Disease Is the flaA Gene Product

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Robert D.; Murphree, Rendi L.; James, Angela M.; Sullivan, Sarah A.; Johnson, Barbara J. B.

    1999-01-01

    The 37-kDa protein (P37) of Borrelia burgdorferi is an antigen that elicits an early immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody response in Lyme disease patients. The P37 gene was cloned from a B. burgdorferi genomic library by screening with antibody from a Lyme disease patient who had developed a prominent humoral response to the P37 antigen. DNA sequence analysis of this clone revealed the identity of P37 to be FlaA, an outer sheath protein of the periplasmic flagella. Recombinant P37 expression was accomplished in Escherichia coli by using a gene construct with the leader peptide deleted and fused to a 38-kDa E. coli protein. The recombinant antigen was reactive in IgM immunoblots using serum samples from patients clinically diagnosed with early Lyme disease that had been scored positive for B. burgdorferi anti-P37 reactivity. Lyme disease patient samples serologically negative for the B. burgdorferi P37 protein did not react with the recombinant. Recombinant P37 may be a useful component of a set of defined antigens for the serodiagnosis of early Lyme disease. This protein can be utilized as a marker in diagnostic immunoblots, aiding in the standardization of the present generation of IgM serologic tests. PMID:9986810

  6. Immunoblot observation of antigenic protein fractions in Paragonimus westermani reacting with human patients sera.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hwan; Kong, Yoon; Kim, Suk Il; Kang, Shin Yong; Cho, Seung Yull

    1988-12-01

    In order to observe the antigenic fractions in saline extract of adult Paragonimus westermani, proteins in the crude extract were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) in reducing conditions. The separated protein fractions were transferred to nitrocellulose paper on which 20 sera from human paragonimiasis were reacted and immunoblotted. Out of 15 stained protein bands in SDS-PAGE, 7 reacted with the sera. Of 14 reacted bands, 30 kilodalton(kDa) band was the most frequently reacted (95%) and was a strong antigen. Protein bands of 23 and 46 kDa were also strong antigens. Bands of over 150 kDa, 120 kDa, 92 kDa, 86 kDa, 74 kDa, 62 kDa, 51 kDa, 32 kDa, 28 kDa, 16.5 kDa and 15.5 kDa were also reactive but their frequencies of the reaction were variable. PMID:12811037

  7. Studying G protein-coupled receptors: immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, phosphorylation, surface labeling, and cross-linking protocols.

    PubMed

    Pal, Kasturi; Badgandi, Hemant; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are signaling organelles that have been shown to coordinate cellular responses to extracellular cues during physiological processes ranging from organ patterning to cell cycle regulation. A variety of receptors, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), downstream effectors (adenylyl cyclases), and second messengers, such as calcium, accumulate in the ciliary compartment. Isolation of GPCRs is essential for studying posttranslational modifications, intracellular trafficking, and protein-protein interactions that are important in downstream signaling. However, the presence of multiple hydrophobic transmembrane domains, and the inherent conformational flexibility of GPCRs make their extraction from membranes and solubilization particularly challenging. Here, we describe detailed methods for immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation of GPCRs from whole cell extracts. These methods are applicable for studying other multipass transmembrane proteins (such as adenylyl cyclases). We also describe methods for determining GPCR phosphorylation, surface labeling by biotinylation, and cross-linking to detect transient interactions with other proteins. These methods are amenable for studying both ciliary and nonciliary GPCRs in the context of cellular signaling pathways. PMID:25837398

  8. Immunoblot Method To Detect Streptococcus pneumoniae and Identify Multiple Serotypes from Nasopharyngeal Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Bronsdon, Melinda A.; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Facklam, Richard R.; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Schwartz, Benjamin; Carlone, George M.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional culture techniques are limited in the ability to detect multiple Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes in nasopharyngeal (NP) secretions. We developed an immunoblot (IB) method with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to detect S. pneumoniae and to identify serotypes. NP specimens stored in skim milk-tryptone-glucose-glycerol medium were assessed by the IB method and the reference culture method (RM). In the RM, four optochin-sensitive alpha-hemolytic colonies resembling pneumococci were typed by the Quellung reaction. In the IB method, a nitrocellulose membrane blot of surface growth was reacted with a pneumococcal surface adhesion (PsaA) MAb and visualized. Of 47 NP specimens, 32 (68%) were found to be positive and 13 (28%) were found to be negative for pneumococci by both methods; each method alone yielded one positive result. The sensitivity and specificity of the IB method for the detection of pneumococci were 97 and 93%, respectively. To identify serotypes, blots were tested with serotype-specific MAbs (4, 6A, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F, and 23F). To detect the remaining serotypes, positive serotype-specific replicate blots were compared visually to an original anti-PsaA-positive blot; four unidentified colonies were subcultured and serotyped by the Quellung reaction. Fifty-eight S. pneumoniae-positive NP specimens containing 69 pneumococcal strains (23 serotypes) were tested; 68 (98.6%) of the strains were detected by the IB method, and 66 (95.6%) were detected by the RM. For 11 specimens found to contain two serotypes, both methods detected both serotypes in 7 (63.6%), the IB method alone detected the two serotypes in 3 (27.3%), and the RM alone detected both serotypes in 1 (9%). The IB method identified multiple clones and minor populations of pneumococci in NP secretions. This method is useful for detecting specific serotypes and carriage of multiple serotypes in epidemiologic surveillance and carriage studies. PMID:15071010

  9. Mechanistic and Signaling Analysis of Muc4-ErbB2 Signaling Module: New Insights into the Mechanism of Ligand-Independent ErbB2 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kozloski, Goldi A.; Carothers Carraway, Coralie A.; Carraway, Kermit L.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The membrane mucin Muc4 is aberrantly expressed in numerous epithelial carcinomas and is currently used as a cancer diagnostic and prognostic tool. Muc4 can also potentiate signal transduction by modulating differential ErbB2 phosphorylation in the absence and in the presence of the ErbB3 soluble ligand heregulin (HRG-β1). These features of Muc4 suggest that Muc4 is not merely a cancer marker, but an oncogenic factor with a unique binding/activation relationship with the receptor ErbB2. In the present study, we examined the signaling mechanisms that are associated with the Muc4-ErbB2 module by analyzing ErbB2 differential signaling in response to Muc4 expression. Our study was carried out in the A375 human melanoma and BT-474 breast cancer cell lines as our model systems. Quantitative and comparative signaling modulations were evaluated by immunoblot using phospho-specific antibodies, and densitometry analysis. Signaling complex components were identified by chemical cross-linking, fractionation by gel filtration, immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. Activated downstream signaling pathways were analyzed by an antibody microarray screen and immunoblot analyses. Our results indicate that Muc4 modulates ErbB2 signaling potential significantly by stabilizing and directly interacting with the ErbB2-ErbB3 heterodimer. Further analyses indicate that Muc4 promotes ErbB2 autocatalysis, but it has no effect on ErbB3 phosphorylation, although the chemical cross linking data indicated that the signaling module is composed of Muc4, ErbB2 and ErbB3. Our microarray analysis indicates that Muc4 expression promotes cell migration by increasing the phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and also through an increase in the levels of β-catenin. PMID:20432461

  10. Western Immunoblotting with Five Treponema pallidum Recombinant Antigens for Serologic Diagnosis of Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Sambri, Vittorio; Marangoni, Antonella; Eyer, Christina; Reichhuber, Christine; Soutschek, Erwin; Negosanti, Massimo; D'Antuono, Antonietta; Cevenini, Roberto

    2001-01-01

    Five immunodominant Treponema pallidum recombinant polypeptides (rTpN47, rTmpA, rTpN37, rTpN17, and rTpN15) were blotted onto strips, and 450 sera (200 from blood donors, 200 from syphilis patients, and 50 potentially cross-reactive) were tested to evaluate the diagnostic performance of recombinant Western blotting (recWB) in comparison with in-house whole-cell lysate antigen-based immunoblotting (wclWB) and T. pallidum hemagglutination (MHA-TP) for the laboratory diagnosis of syphilis. None of the serum specimens from blood donors or from potential cross-reactors gave a positive result when evaluated by recWB, wclWB, or MHA-TP. The evaluation of the immunoglobulin G immune response by recWB in sera from patients with different stages of syphilis showed that rTmpA was the most frequently identified antigen (95%), whereas only 41% of the specimens were reactive to rTpN37. The remaining recombinant polypeptides were recognized as follows: rTpN47, 92.5%; rTpN17, 89.5%; and rTpN15, 67.5%. The agreement between recWB and MHA-TP was 95.0% (100% with sera from patients with latent and late disease), and the concordance between wclWB and MHA-TP was 92.0%. The overall concordance between recWB and wclWB was 97.5% (100% with sera from patients with secondary and late syphilis and 94.6 and 98.6% with sera from patients with primary and latent syphilis, respectively). The overall sensitivity of recWB was 98.8% and the specificity was 97.1% with MHA-TP as the reference method. These values for sensitivity and specificity were slightly superior to those calculated for wclWB (sensitivity, 97.1%, and specificity, 96.1%). With wclWB as the standard test, the sensitivity and specificity of recWB were 98.9 and 99.3%, respectively. These findings suggest that the five recombinant polypeptides used in this study could be used as substitutes for the whole-cell lysate T. pallidum antigens and that this newly developed recWB test is a good, easy-to-use confirmatory method for the

  11. Antigenic differences between Coxiella burnetii cells revealed by postembedding immunoelectron microscopy and immunoblotting.

    PubMed Central

    McCaul, T F; Banerjee-Bhatnagar, N; Williams, J C

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antigenic structures of the morphologically distinct cells of the Coxiella burnetii developmental cycle. Postembedding immunoelectron microscopy with polyclonal antibodies produced in rabbits to (i) phase I cells, (ii) a chloroform-methanol residue fraction of cells, (iii) the cell walls (CW) of large and small cells and small dense cells (SDC), and (iv) the peptidoglycan-protein complexes of small cells and SDC labelled the continuum of morphologically distinct cells. But these antibodies did not distinguish between the antigenic structures of the various cells. Monoclonal antibodies to the phase I lipopolysaccharide labelled the CW of a majority of the smaller cells, but there was diminished reactivity to the larger cells. Although monoclonal antibodies to a 29.5-kDa outer membrane protein labelled the CW of the large mother cells, the large cells, and the small cells, a minority of the SDC with compact CW were not labelled. The endogenous spore within the mother cell was not labelled by the polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies to cellular components. A selected population of SDC was prepared by osmotic lysis of large cells, differential centrifugation, Renografin step-gradient fractionation, and breakage of the small cells in a French press at 20,000 lb/in2. The pressure-resistant SDC collected as fraction CL did not contain the 29.5-kDa protein, as evidenced by the lack of (i) Coomassie brilliant blue staining of protein in the 29.5-kDa region of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and (ii) reactivity of the 29.5-kDa protein antigenic epitopes in immunoblotting with monoclonal antibodies to the protein. In contrast, CW of the pressure-sensitive small cells contained the 29.5-kDa protein. Therefore, the observed ultrastructural differences between large and small cells and SDC reflect differences in sensitivity to breakage by pressure treatment and in cell-associated antigens. Although the process of

  12. Total body nitrogen analysis. [neutron activation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    Studies of two potential in vivo neutron activation methods for determining total and partial body nitrogen in animals and humans are described. A method using the CO-11 in the expired air as a measure of nitrogen content was found to be adequate for small animals such as rats, but inadequate for human measurements due to a slow excretion rate. Studies on the method of measuring the induced N-13 in the body show that with further development, this method should be adequate for measuring muscle mass changes occurring in animals or humans during space flight.

  13. Analysis of active renin heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Katz, S A; Malvin, R L; Lee, J; Kim, S H; Murray, R D; Opsahl, J A; Abraham, P A

    1991-09-01

    Active renin is a heterogeneous enzyme that can be separated into multiple forms with high-resolution isoelectric focusing. The isoelectric heterogeneity may result from differences in glycosylation between the different forms. In order to determine the relationship between active renin heterogeneity and differences in composition or attachment of oligosaccharides, two separate experiments were performed: (i) Tunicamycin, which interferes with normal glycosylation processing, increased the proportion of relatively basic renin forms secreted into the incubation media by rat renal cortical slices. (ii) Endoglycosidase F, which enzymatically removes carbohydrate from some classes of glycoprotein, similarly increased the proportion of relatively basic forms when incubated with active human recombinant renin. In addition, further studies with inhibitors of human renin activity revealed that the heterogeneous renin forms were similarly inhibited by two separate renin inhibitors. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that renin isoelectric heterogeneity is due in part to differences in carbohydrate moiety attachment and that the heterogeneity of renin does not influence access of direct renin inhibitors to the active site of renin. PMID:1908097

  14. Conference on Instrumental Activation Analysis: IAA 89

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vobecky, M.; Obrusnik, I.

    1989-05-01

    The proceedings contain 40 abstracts of papers all of which have been incorporated in INIS. The papers were centred on the applications of radioanalytical methods, especially on neutron activation analysis, x ray fluorescence analysis, PIXE analysis and tracer techniques in biology, medicine and metallurgy, measuring instruments including microcomputers, and data processing methods.

  15. Comparative sensitivity of 125I-protein A and enzyme-conjugated antibodies for detection of immunoblotted proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, J M; Stokes, C E; Fernie, B

    1987-01-01

    Immunoblotting is a powerful technique for the detection of small amounts of immunologically interesting proteins in unpurified preparations. Iodinated protein A (PA) has been widely used as a second antibody for detection of proteins; however, it does not bind equally well to immunoglobulins from different species nor does it bind to all subclasses of immunoglobulin G (IgG). We compared the sensitivity of [125I]PA with those of both horseradish peroxidase-conjugated second antibodies (HRP) and glucose oxidase-anti-glucose oxidase (GAG) soluble complexes for visualizing bovine serum albumin, human IgG, or human C3 which was either dot blotted or electroblotted to nitrocellulose. [125I]PA was uniformly 10- to 100-fold less sensitive than either HRP or GAG. GAG was more sensitive than HRP except for C3 (electroblotting) and bovine serum albumin and IgG (dot blotting), in which they were equivalent. In general, dot blotting was 10- to 1,000-fold more sensitive than electroblotting. Although relative sensitivities varied depending on the proteins analyzed and the antisera used, GAG appeared to be superior to [125I]PA and HRP for detection of immunoblotted proteins. Images PMID:3540001

  16. NONDESTRUCTIVE MULTIELEMENT INSTRUMENTAL NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A nondestructive instrumental neutron activation analysis procedure permitted accurate and sensitive measurement of most elements with atomic numbers between 11 and 92. The sensitivity of the procedure was dependent on each element's intrinsic characteristics and the sample matri...

  17. The origin and evolution of activity analysis.

    PubMed

    Creighton, C

    1992-01-01

    Practitioners of occupational therapy in the early 1900s selected therapeutic activities with an intuitive understanding of their characteristics and operations. The term activity analysis and the methodology for breaking down and examining tasks scientifically, however, were borrowed from industry during World War I. Methods originally used in time and motion study of jobs were applied to vocational retraining and therapeutic crafts; later, they were applied to a broader range of activities. The most systematic early use of activity analysis was in occupational therapy for physical dysfunction, particularly in military hospitals. Development of the concept was gradual until the 1970s, when the delineation of theoretical frames of reference for practice led to important changes. Today, activity analysis is viewed as a multifaceted process that involves both generic and specific components. PMID:1558138

  18. Use of immunoblotting to identify antigenic differences between the yeast and mycelial phases of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Burnie, J P; Matthews, R C; Fox, A; Tabaqchali, S

    1985-01-01

    Western blotting was applied to the analysis of Candida albicans in the yeast and mycelial phases in an attempt to recognise mycelial specific antigens which might be of serodiagnostic value. The antisera were prepared in rabbits by immunising them with pressates of C albicans type A NCTC 3153 in the yeast phase or the mycelial phase. These were blotted against C albicans in the yeast and mycelial phases and the yeast phase of C parapsilosis, C krusei, C tropicalis, and Torulopsis glabrata. Cross reactivity was greatest against C parapsilosis. One yeast specific mannoprotein was identified with a molecular weight of 49 000. No mycelial specific antigens could be identified. Images PMID:3891792

  19. Use of immunoblot technique for detection of human IgE and IgG antibodies to individual silk proteins.

    PubMed

    Dewair, M; Baur, X; Ziegler, K

    1985-10-01

    Allergenic proteins were extracted from one silk batch that was imported to be used as filling material for bed mattresses and rugs. IgE and IgG antibodies to the extracted silk proteins were measured by RAST in sera of nine silk-sensitive persons as well as in sera of healthy control donors. Silk proteins were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis into 12 polypeptides of molecular weights between 14 and 70 kilodaltons. By means of the immunoblot technique, IgE and IgG antibodies to the individual silk polypeptides could be detected. Sera of silk-sensitive persons contained high titers of IgE and low titers of IgG antibodies to the separated silk polypeptides. Sera of control donors contained low IgG antibody titers to a limited number of these polypeptides. PMID:4056241

  20. Western blot (immunoblot) assay of small, round-structured virus associated with an acute gastroenteritis outbreak in Tokyo.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Y; Ando, T; Utagawa, E; Sekine, S; Okada, S; Yabuuchi, K; Miki, T; Ohashi, M

    1989-01-01

    Small, round-structured virus (SRSV) was detected in a stool specimen of a patient during an acute gastroenteritis outbreak in Tokyo and was tentatively named SRSV-9. SRSV-9 was purified by sucrose velocity gradient centrifugation after CsCl density gradient centrifugation. The buoyant density of SRSV-9 appeared to be 1.36 g/ml in CsCl. A Western blot (immunoblot) assay using the biotin-avidin system revealed that SRSV-9 was antigenically related to the Hawaii agent but distinct from the Norwalk agent and contained a single major structural protein with a molecular size of 63.0 +/- 0.6 kilodaltons. The prevalence of SRSV-9 infection in Tokyo was surveyed by the Western blot antibody assay by using a crude virus preparation as the antigen. Seroconversion was observed in 56.5% of the patients involved in the outbreaks from which SRSV was detected by electron microscopy. Images PMID:2504773

  1. Neutron Activation Analysis of Water - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, John D.

    1971-01-01

    Recent developments in this field are emphasized. After a brief review of basic principles, topics discussed include sources of neutrons, pre-irradiation physical and chemical treatment of samples, neutron capture and gamma-ray analysis, and selected applications. Applications of neutron activation analysis of water have increased rapidly within the last few years and may be expected to increase in the future.

  2. Biochemical classification of tauopathies by immunoblot, protein sequence and mass spectrometric analyses of sarkosyl-insoluble and trypsin-resistant tau.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi-Watanabe, Sayuri; Arai, Tetsuaki; Kametani, Fuyuki; Nonaka, Takashi; Masuda-Suzukake, Masami; Tarutani, Airi; Murayama, Shigeo; Saito, Yuko; Arima, Kunimasa; Yoshida, Mari; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Robinson, Andrew; Mann, David M A; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Masato

    2016-02-01

    Intracellular filamentous tau pathology is the defining feature of tauopathies, which form a subset of neurodegenerative diseases. We have analyzed pathological tau in Alzheimer's disease, and in frontotemporal lobar degeneration associated with tauopathy to include cases with Pick bodies, corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, and ones due to intronic mutations in MAPT. We found that the C-terminal band pattern of the pathological tau species is distinct for each disease. Immunoblot analysis of trypsin-resistant tau indicated that the different band patterns of the 7-18 kDa fragments in these diseases likely reflect different conformations of tau molecular species. Protein sequence and mass spectrometric analyses revealed the carboxyl-terminal region (residues 243-406) of tau comprises the protease-resistant core units of the tau aggregates, and the sequence lengths and precise regions involved are different among the diseases. These unique assembled tau cores may be used to classify and diagnose disease strains. Based on these results, we propose a new clinicopathological classification of tauopathies based on the biochemical properties of tau. PMID:26538150

  3. Consensus brain-derived protein, extraction protocol for the study of human and murine brain proteome using both 2D-DIGE and mini 2DE immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco-Jose; Jumeau, Fanny; Derisbourg, Maxime; Burnouf, Sylvie; Tran, Hélène; Eddarkaoui, Sabiha; Obriot, Hélène; Dutoit-Lefevre, Virginie; Deramecourt, Vincent; Mitchell, Valérie; Lefranc, Didier; Hamdane, Malika; Blum, David; Buée, Luc; Buée-Scherrer, Valérie; Sergeant, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) is a powerful tool to uncover proteome modifications potentially related to different physiological or pathological conditions. Basically, this technique is based on the separation of proteins according to their isoelectric point in a first step, and secondly according to their molecular weights by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In this report an optimized sample preparation protocol for little amount of human post-mortem and mouse brain tissue is described. This method enables to perform both two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mini 2DE immunoblotting. The combination of these approaches allows one to not only find new proteins and/or protein modifications in their expression thanks to its compatibility with mass spectrometry detection, but also a new insight into markers validation. Thus, mini-2DE coupled to western blotting permits to identify and validate post-translational modifications, proteins catabolism and provides a qualitative comparison among different conditions and/or treatments. Herein, we provide a method to study components of protein aggregates found in AD and Lewy body dementia such as the amyloid-beta peptide and the alpha-synuclein. Our method can thus be adapted for the analysis of the proteome and insoluble proteins extract from human brain tissue and mice models too. In parallel, it may provide useful information for the study of molecular and cellular pathways involved in neurodegenerative diseases as well as potential novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:24747743

  4. Neutron activation analysis in the life sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frontasyeva, M. V.

    2011-03-01

    Development of methods for instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and their applications in the life sciences are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on epithermal activation with reactor neutrons (ENAA), and the advantages of this technique in analysis of environmental objects are shown. The results of applied INAA studies in the field of the life sciences carried out at the world's leading nuclear centers are reported. Experience in employing a radioanalytical complex at the IBR-2 reactor (Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna) for such studies is summarized.

  5. Simultaneous analysis of biologically active aminoalkanephosphonic acids.

    PubMed

    Kudzin, Zbigniew H; Gralak, Dorota K; Andrijewski, Grzegorz; Drabowicz, Józef; Luczak, Jerzy

    2003-05-23

    A new approach for simultaneous analysis of biologically active aminoalkanephosphonic acids, namely glyphosate, phosphonoglycine, phosphonosarcosine, phosphonoalanine, phosphono-beta-alanine, phosphonohomoalanine, phosphono-gamma-homoalanine and glufosinate, is presented. This includes a preliminary 31p NMR analysis of these amino acids, their further derivatization to volatile phosphonates (phosphinates) by means of trifluoroacetic acid-trifluoroacetic anhydride-trimethyl orthoacetate reagent and subsequent analysis of derivatization products using MS and/or GC-MS (chemical ionization and/or electron impact ionization). PMID:12862383

  6. Transforming Teacher Education, An Activity Theory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNicholl, Jane; Blake, Allan

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the work of teacher education in England and Scotland. It seeks to locate this work within conflicting sociocultural views of professional practice and academic work. Drawing on an activity theory framework that integrates the analysis of these seemingly contradictory discourses with a study of teacher educators' practical…

  7. Anti-H1 histone antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus: epitope localization after immunoblotting of chymotrypsin-digested H1.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, O; Tchouatcha-Tchouassom, J C; Roux, B; Monier, J C

    1986-01-01

    Using micro enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (micro-ELISA) anti-H1 antibodies are most frequently seen in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (61.4% of patients). Positive anti-H1 ELISA reactions are rare in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (5.8% of cases), melanomas (16.7%), leukaemias (13.6%) and other cancers (5.6%). In SLE, the immunoglobulins (Ig) which constitute anti-H1 antibodies are, by order of importance, IgM, IgG and IgA. By means of immunoblotting using H1 solutions digested by alpha-1-chymotrypsin fixed on collagen membranes, we have shown that all the SLE sera containing anti-H1 antibodies recognize the sequential epitopes that are found on the carboxy terminal tail and, for 28% of anti-H1 sera, also the epitopes present on the aminoterminal half. The technique used did not make it possible to determine with certainty whether anti-H1 autoantibodies are also directed against the conformational epitopes of the globular part of the molecule. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2423279

  8. SDS-PAGE/immunoblot detection of Abeta multimers in human cortical tissue homogenates using antigen-epitope retrieval.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Rebecca F; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Ghiso, Jorge A; Walker, Lary C

    2010-01-01

    The anomalous folding and polymerization of the beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide is thought to initiate the neurodegenerative cascade in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis(1). Abeta is predominantly a 40- or 42-amino acid peptide that is prone to self-aggregation into beta-sheet-rich amyloid fibrils that are found in the cores of cerebral senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease. Increasing evidence suggests that low molecular weight, soluble Abeta multimers are more toxic than fibrillar Abeta amyloid(2). The identification and quantification of low- and high-molecular weight multimeric Abeta species in brain tissue is an essential objective in Alzheimer's disease research, and the methods employed also can be applied to the identification and characterization of toxic multimers in other proteopathies(3). Naturally occurring Abeta multimers can be detected by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by immunoblotting with Abeta-specific antibodies. However, the separation and detection of multimeric Abeta requires the use of highly concentrated cortical homogenates and antigen retrieval in small pore-size nitrocellulose membranes. Here we describe a technique for the preparation of clarified human cortical homogenates, separation of proteins by SDS-PAGE, and antigen-epitope retrieval/Western blotting with antibody 6E10 to the N-terminal region of the Abeta peptide. Using this protocol, we consistently detect Abeta monomers, dimers, trimers, tetramers, and higher molecular weight multimers in cortical tissue from humans with Alzheimer's pathology. PMID:20418805

  9. Activity Analysis and Cost Analysis in Medical Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler, John E.; Slighton, Robert L.

    There is no unique answer to the question of what an ongoing program costs in medical schools. The estimates of program costs generated by classical methods of cost accounting are unsatisfactory because such accounting cannot deal with the joint production or joint cost problem. Activity analysis models aim at calculating the impact of alternative…

  10. Neutron activation analysis of Etruscan pottery

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.; Silverman, A.; Ouellet, C.G.; Clark, D.D.; Hossain, T.Z

    1992-07-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) has been widely used in archaeology for compositional analysis of pottery samples taken from sites of archaeological importance. Elemental profiles can determine the place of manufacture. At Cornell, samples from an Etruscan site near Siena, Italy, are being studied. The goal of this study is to compile a trace element concentration profile for a large number of samples. These profiles will be matched with an existing data bank in an attempt to understand the place of origin for these samples. The 500 kW TRIGA reactor at the Ward Laboratory is used to collect NAA data for these samples. Experiments were done to set a procedure for the neutron activation analysis with respect to sample preparation, selection of irradiation container, definition of activation and counting parameters and data reduction. Currently, we are able to analyze some 27 elements in samples of mass 500 mg with a single irradiation of 4 hours and two sequences of counting. Our sensitivity for many of the trace elements is better than 1 ppm by weight under the conditions chosen. In this talk, details of our procedure, including quality assurance as measured by NIST standard reference materials, will be discussed. In addition, preliminary results from data treatment using cluster analysis will be presented. (author)

  11. Radiation inactivation analysis of assimilatory NADH:nitrate reductase. Apparent functional sizes of partial activities associated with intact and proteolytically modified enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Solomonson, L.P.; McCreery, M.J.; Kay, C.J.; Barber, M.J.

    1987-06-25

    Recently we demonstrated that target sizes for the partial activities of nitrate reductase were considerably smaller than the 100-kDa subunit which corresponded to the target size of the full (physiologic) activity NADH:nitrate reductase. These results suggested that the partial activities resided on functionally independent domains and that radiation inactivation may be due to localized rather than extensive damage to protein structure. The present study extends these observations and addresses several associated questions. Monophasic plots were observed over a wide range of radiation doses, suggesting a single activity component in each case. No apparent differences were observed over a 10-fold range of concentration for each substrate, suggesting that the observed slopes were not due to marked changes in Km values. Apparent target sizes estimated for partial activities associated with native enzyme and with limited proteolysis products of native enzyme suggested that the functional size obtained by radiation inactivation analysis is independent of the size of the polypeptide chain. The presence of free radical scavengers during irradiation reduced the apparent target size of both the physiologic and partial activities by an amount ranging from 24 to 43%, suggesting that a free radical mechanism is at least partially responsible for the inactivation. Immunoblot analysis of nitrate reductase irradiated in the presence of free radical scavengers revealed formation of distinct bands at 90, 75, and 40 kDa with increasing doses of irradiation rather than complete destruction of the polypeptide chain.

  12. House-dust mite allergy: mapping of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus allergens for dogs by two-dimensional immunoblotting

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Andreia Grilo; Pereira, Luísa Maria Dotti Silva; Goicoa, Ana; Semião-Santos, Saul José; Bento, Ofélia Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Specific immunotherapy has shown to be very useful for allergy control in dogs, with a common success rate ranging from 65% to 70%. However, this efficacy could probably be improved and the identification of individual allergomes, with the choice of more adequate molecular allergen pools for specific immunotherapy, being the strategy. Aim To map Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p) allergens for mite-sensitized atopic dogs, for better understanding how individual allergograms may influence the response to house-dust mite immunotherapy. Material and methods To identify the Der p mite allergome for dogs, 20 individuals allergic to dust-mites and sensitized to Der p, were selected. The extract from Der p was submitted to isoelectric focusing (IEF), one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Separated proteins were blotted onto polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes and immunoblottings were performed with patient sera. Allergen-bound specific IgE was detected. Results Eleven allergens were identified from isoelectric focusing (IEF), as well as from 1-D SDS PAGE. From 2-D SDS-PAGE, 24 spots were identified. Conclusions Several similarities were found between dog and human allergograms and no absolute correlation between sensitization and allergy was observed either. As in humans, different individual allergograms do not seem to implicate different clinical patterns, but may influence the response to specific immunotherapy. The molecular epidemiology approach in veterinary allergy management, by the characterization of individual patients’ allergoms and by choosing the best molecular allergen pool for each patient could also improve the efficacy of allergy immunotherapy. PMID:26015775

  13. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  14. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  15. Neutron activation analysis in archaeological chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Harbottle, G.

    1987-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis has proven to be a convenient way of performing the chemical analysis of archaeologically-excavated artifacts and materials. It is fast and does not require tedious laboratory operations. It is multielement, sensitive, and can be made nondestructive. Neutron activation analysis in its instrumental form, i.e., involving no chemical separation, is ideally suited to automation and conveniently takes the first step in data flow patterns that are appropriate for many taxonomic and statistical operations. The future will doubtless see improvements in the practice of NAA in general, but in connection with archaeological science the greatest change will be the filling, interchange and widespread use of data banks based on compilations of analytical data. Since provenience-oriented data banks deal with materials (obsidian, ceramics, metals, semiprecious stones, building materials and sculptural media) that participated in trade networks, the analytical data is certain to be of interest to a rather broad group of archaeologists. It is to meet the needs of the whole archaeological community that archaeological chemistry must now turn.

  16. Analysis of DOE international environmental management activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ragaini, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Strategic Plan (April 1994) states that DOE`s long-term vision includes world leadership in environmental restoration and waste management activities. The activities of the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) can play a key role in DOE`s goals of maintaining U.S. global competitiveness and ensuring the continuation of a world class science and technology community. DOE`s interest in attaining these goals stems partly from its participation in organizations like the Trade Policy Coordinating Committee (TPCC), with its National Environmental Export Promotion Strategy, which seeks to strengthen U.S. competitiveness and the building of public-private partnerships as part of U.S. industrial policy. The International Interactions Field Office task will build a communication network which will facilitate the efficient and effective communication between DOE Headquarters, Field Offices, and contractors. Under this network, Headquarters will provide the Field Offices with information on the Administration`s policies and activities (such as the DOE Strategic Plan), interagency activities, as well as relevant information from other field offices. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will, in turn, provide Headquarters with information on various international activities which, when appropriate, will be included in reports to groups like the TPCC and the EM Focus Areas. This task provides for the collection, review, and analysis of information on the more significant international environmental restoration and waste management initiatives and activities which have been used or are being considered at LLNL. Information gathering will focus on efforts and accomplishments in meeting the challenges of providing timely and cost effective cleanup of its environmentally damaged sites and facilities, especially through international technical exchanges and/or the implementation of foreign-development technologies.

  17. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Reveals Molecular Adaptations in the Hippocampal Synaptic Active Zone of Chronic Mild Stress-Unsusceptible Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Liu, Zhao; Yu, Jia; Han, Xin; Fan, Songhua; Shao, Weihua; Chen, Jianjun; Qiao, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Background: While stressful events are recognized as an important cause of major depressive disorder, some individuals exposed to life stressors maintain normal psychological functioning. The molecular mechanism(s) underlying this phenomenon remain unclear. Abnormal transmission and plasticity of hippocampal synapses have been implied to play a key role in the pathoetiology of major depressive disorder. Methods: A chronic mild stress protocol was applied to separate susceptible and unsusceptible rat subpopulations. Proteomic analysis using an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was performed to identify differential proteins in enriched hippocampal synaptic junction preparations. Results: A total of 4318 proteins were quantified, and 89 membrane proteins were present in differential amounts. Of these, SynaptomeDB identified 81 (91%) having a synapse-specific localization. The unbiased profiles identified several candidate proteins within the synaptic junction that may be associated with stress vulnerability or insusceptibility. Subsequent functional categorization revealed that protein systems particularly involved in membrane trafficking at the synaptic active zone exhibited a positive strain as potential molecular adaptations in the unsusceptible rats. Moreover, through STRING and immunoblotting analysis, membrane-associated GTP-bound Rab3a and Munc18-1 appear to coregulate syntaxin-1/SNAP25/VAMP2 assembly at the hippocampal presynaptic active zone of unsusceptible rats, facilitating SNARE-mediated membrane fusion and neurotransmitter release, and may be part of a stress-protection mechanism in actively maintaining an emotional homeostasis. Conclusions: The present results support the concept that there is a range of potential protein adaptations in the hippocampal synaptic active zone of unsusceptible rats, revealing new investigative targets that may contribute to a better understanding of stress

  18. Immunoblot for the detection of Ascaris suum-specific antibodies in patients with visceral larva migrans (VLM) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Renate; Obwaller, Andreas; Auer, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Visceral larva migrans (VLM) syndrome caused by Toxocara canis larvae was first described in the 1950s. The role of other nematode larvae, i.e. the pig roundworm Ascaris suum as a causative agent of visceral larva migrans-associated symptoms like general malaise, cough, liver dysfunction, hypereosinophilia with hepatomegaly and/or pneumonia, was discussed controversially during the last decades. Recent serological screening studies for specific A. suum antibodies carried out in the Netherlands and Sweden yielded remarkable high seroprevalences, while a number of case reports from Japan report pulmonal, hepatic and cerebral symptoms caused by A. suum larvae after ingestion of infected raw meat (liver) or contaminated vegetables. We present here a sensitive and specific larval excretory-secretory (E/S) antigen-based immunoblot (As-IB) for the serodiagnosis of A. suum-infected patients suffering from symptoms associated to the VLM syndrome. In total, 34 sera from patients with hypereosinophilia and other clinical symptoms associated to the VLM syndrome tested negative for Toxocara sp. antibodies but positive in our newly established As-IB, 30 sera from healthy volunteers, 53 sera from patients with clinically and serologically confirmed toxocarosis and other helminthoses as well as 3 sera from patients with intestinal ascariosis due to Ascaris lumbricoides were included in the study. When evaluated with 30 sera from healthy volunteers and 53 sera from patients suffering from different helminthoses, the calculated specificity of our new As-IB is 95%. Problems hampering the establishment of simple serological screening tests for specific A. suum antibodies, like extensive antigenic similarities between the nematodes Ascaris and Toxocara or the absence of suitable experimental animals, are discussed. We assume that specific serological testing for antibodies of A. suum is very important for the treatment of individual patients on one hand and seroepidemiological

  19. Scalable histopathological image analysis via active learning.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Shaoting; Liu, Wei; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2014-01-01

    Training an effective and scalable system for medical image analysis usually requires a large amount of labeled data, which incurs a tremendous annotation burden for pathologists. Recent progress in active learning can alleviate this issue, leading to a great reduction on the labeling cost without sacrificing the predicting accuracy too much. However, most existing active learning methods disregard the "structured information" that may exist in medical images (e.g., data from individual patients), and make a simplifying assumption that unlabeled data is independently and identically distributed. Both may not be suitable for real-world medical images. In this paper, we propose a novel batch-mode active learning method which explores and leverages such structured information in annotations of medical images to enforce diversity among the selected data, therefore maximizing the information gain. We formulate the active learning problem as an adaptive submodular function maximization problem subject to a partition matroid constraint, and further present an efficient greedy algorithm to achieve a good solution with a theoretically proven bound. We demonstrate the efficacy of our algorithm on thousands of histopathological images of breast microscopic tissues. PMID:25320821

  20. Electrodermal activity analysis during affective haptic elicitation.

    PubMed

    Greco, Alberto; Valenza, Gaetano; Nardelli, Mimma; Bianchi, Matteo; Lanata, Antonio; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigates how the autonomic nervous system dynamics, quantified through the analysis of the electrodermal activity (EDA), is modulated according to affective haptic stimuli. Specifically, a haptic display able to convey caress-like stimuli is presented to 32 healthy subjects (16 female). Each stimulus is changed according to six combinations of three velocities and two forces levels of two motors stretching a strip of fabric. Subjects were also asked to score each stimulus in terms of arousal (high/low activation) and valence (pleasant/unpleasant), in agreement with the circumplex model of affect. EDA was processed using a deconvolutive method, separating tonic and phasic components. A statistical analysis was performed in order to identify significant differences in EDA features among force and velocity levels, as well as in their valence and arousal scores. Results show that the simulated caress induced by the haptic display significantly affects the EDA. In detail, the phasic component seems to be inversely related to the valence score. This finding is new and promising, since it can be used, e.g., as an additional cue for haptics design. PMID:26737605

  1. Use of viral lysate antigen combined with recombinant protein in Western immunoblot assay as confirmatory test for serodiagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ming; Chen, Hsiao Ying; Tan, Phuay Heng; Shen, Shuo; Goh, Phuay-Yee; Tan, Yee-Joo; Pang, Peow Hoon; Lu, Yang; Fong, Priscilla Yiquan; Chin, Daria

    2004-11-01

    A Western immunoblot assay for confirmatory serodiagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was developed utilizing viral lysate antigens combined with a recombinant nucleocapsid protein, GST-N (glutathione S-transferase-nucleocapsid) of the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). The viral lysate antigens were separated by electrophoresis and transblotted onto nitrocellulose membranes. The resultant membrane was subsequently added with the GST-N recombinant protein at a specific location. The positions of bands corresponding to some of the structural proteins immobilized on the membrane were then located and verified with mouse or rabbit antisera specific to the respective proteins. The Western immunoblot assay was able to detect antibodies to SARS-CoV in all 40 serum specimens from SARS patients and differentiate the SARS-positive samples from those of the healthy donor or non-SARS patient controls (150 samples) when set criteria were followed. In addition, when the immunoblot was used to test samples considered falsely positive by an in-house-developed SARS-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, band patterns different from those with samples from SARS patients were obtained. PMID:15539520

  2. Avidity of immunoglobulin G antibody response to the different antigenic fractions of soluble Schistosoma mansoni adult worm antigen preparation (SWAP) using avidity immunoblotting assay.

    PubMed

    Tawfeek, Gihan M; Hameed, Dina M Abdel; el-Hoseiny, Laila M

    2004-08-01

    The detection of IgG antibodies against the different SWAP antigenic fractions plus the determination of their avidity in avidity immunoblotting assay using 6 M urea wash, presents a novel alternative for the characterization of optimal antigenic markers for acute and chronic phases of Schistosoma mansoni infection and for vaccine development. Human serum samples from 25 acute schistosomiasis patients, 20 chronic cases and 15 normal healthy controls were analysed by IgG avidity enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and IgG avidity immunoblotting assay. Using avidity ELISA, a pronounced overlap of avidity index values was observed between acute and chronic infections with a range of uncertainty (0.86-1) which was encountered in both groups. Using avidity immunoblotting assay, antigenic bands at >116, 84, 48, 40 & 34 KDa were exclusive for the acute phase. From these bands, 34 KDa was recognized mostly by low-avidity antibodies and showed a high sensitivity (96%) and specificity (100%) making it an optimal marker for the acute phase. 40 KDa band was recognized mostly by high-avidity antibodies even during acute infection. Bands of 80, 70, 42, 36, 30 & 26 KDa were exclusive for the chronic phase. Only 70 KDa band was recognized by high-avidity antibodies yet, with low sensitivity (35%), that limits its use as an optimal marker for the chronic infection. Meanwhile, 70 and 40 KDa bands, recognized by high-avidity antibodies, are considered as potential vaccine antigen candidates. PMID:15287177

  3. Active polarimeter optical system laser hazard analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2005-07-01

    A laser hazard analysis was performed for the SNL Active Polarimeter Optical System based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers and the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The Active Polarimeter Optical System (APOS) uses a pulsed, near-infrared, chromium doped lithium strontium aluminum fluoride (Cr:LiSAF) crystal laser in conjunction with a holographic diffuser and lens to illuminate a scene of interest. The APOS is intended for outdoor operations. The system is mounted on a height adjustable platform (6 feet to 40 feet) and sits atop a tripod that points the beam downward. The beam can be pointed from nadir to as much as 60 degrees off of nadir producing an illuminating spot geometry that can vary from circular (at nadir) to elliptical in shape (off of nadir). The JP Innovations crystal Cr:LiSAF laser parameters are presented in section II. The illuminating laser spot size is variable and can be adjusted by adjusting the separation distance between the lens and the holographic diffuser. The system is adjusted while platform is at the lowest level. The laser spot is adjusted for a particular spot size at a particular distance (elevation) from the laser by adjusting the separation distance (d{sub diffuser}) to predetermined values. The downward pointing angle is also adjusted before the platform is raised to the selected operation elevation.

  4. Neutron activation analysis of some building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salagean, M. N.; Pantelica, A. I.; Georgescu, I. I.; Muntean, M. I.

    1999-01-01

    Concentrations of As, Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Mo, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, U. Yb, W and Zn in seven Romanian building materials were determined by the Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) method using the VVR-S Reactor of NIPNE- Bucharest. Raw matarials used in cement obtaining ≈ 75% of limestone and ≈ 25% of clay, cement samples from three different factories, furnace slag, phosphogypsum, and a type of brick have been analyzed. The brick was compacted from furnace slay, fly coal ash, phosphogypsum, lime and cement. The U, Th and K concentrations determined in the brick are in agreement with the natural radioactivity measurements of226Ra,232Th and40K. These specific activities were found about twice and 1.5 higher than the accepted levels in the case of226Ra and232Th, as well as40K, respectively. By consequence, the investigated brick is considered a radioactive waste. The rather high content of Co, Cr, K, Th, and Zh in the brick is especially due to the slag and fly ash, the main componets. The presence of U, Th and K in slag is mainly correlated with the limestone and dolomite as fluxes in matallurgy.

  5. Applications of activation analysis to geochemical, meteoritic and lunar studies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Showalter, D. L.; Schmitt, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The application of activation analysis techniques to the analysis of cosmological materials, i.e., terrestrial, tektitic, meteoritic, and lunar matter, is reviewed. Elemental determinations can be made by instrumental fast-neutron and thermal-neutron activation analysis, photonuclear and charged-particle activation analysis, and by radiochemical neutron activation analysis. Partition-coefficient methods, autoradiography studies, gamma-gamma coincidence counting, and age determination by neutron activation are discussed. Attention is given to K-Ar and I-Xe dating of meteorites.

  6. Concordance of four commercial enzyme immunoassay and three immunoblot formats for the detection of Lyme borreliosis antibodies in human serum: the two-tier approach remains.

    PubMed

    Dickeson, David J; Chen, Sharon C-A; Sintchenko, Vitali G

    2016-04-01

    Serological tests show considerable variation in their ability to correctly diagnose Lyme borreliosis (LB). This study compared four commercially available screening enzyme immunoassays (EIA) for the detection of LB IgG using either whole cell lysate (WCL) antigens, purified proteins or recombinant antigens with the second-tier whole cell sonicate (WCS) western immunoblots or recombinant antigen line blots. A consensus between three EIA results from 222 patient sera was designated as a point of comparison for each method which gave 66 positive and 156 negative results. The positive predictive values (PPV) of WCL EIA were 40% for the MarDx Diagnostics Borrelia burgdorferi EIA 'combined' IgG and IgM (Trinity Biotech) and 55% for the EUROIMMUN plus VlsE IgG. These were significantly lower PPVs than that produced by the recombinant antigen-based EIA NovaLisa Borrelia burgdorferi IgG-ELISA (NovaTec Immunodiagnostica) and the EUROIMMUN Anti-Borrelia Select ELISA IgG (90% and 100%, respectively; p = 0.02). The WCS western immunoblot using B. burgdorferi and B. afzelii separately showed a high PPV of 91% but its positive agreement with consensus EIA result was only 65%. Another WCL western immunoblot with purified extracts of Osp C and VlsE, the Trinity Biotech EU Lyme + VlsE IgG Western Blot had a PPV of 92% while the recombinant line blot from EUROIMMUN, the Anti-Borrelia (IgG) EUROLINE-RN-AT, demonstrated a significantly reduced PPV of 70% with some non-specific reactions in sera containing antibodies to Leptospira species, Helicobacter pylori and Treponema pallidum. The use of recombinant antigens in EIA for LB IgG screening significantly improves the predictive values of serological results above those of WCL antigen EIA. Second tier WCS western immunoblots offer high PPVs, especially with added specific purified proteins, more so than in one recombinant line blot. PMID:27020501

  7. An active matter analysis of intracellular Active Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Kejia; Bae, Sung Chul; Granick, Steve

    2012-02-01

    Tens of thousands of fluorescence-based trajectories at nm resolution have been analyzed, regarding active transport along microtubules in living cells. The following picture emerges. Directed motion to pre-determined locations is certainly an attractive idea, but cannot be pre-programmed as to do so would sacrifice adaptability. The polarity of microtubules is inadequate to identify these directions in cells, and no other mechanism is currently known. We conclude that molecular motors carry cargo through disordered intracellular microtubule networks in a statistical way, with loud cellular ``noise'' both in directionality and speed. Programmed random walks describe how local 1D active transport traverses crowded cellular space efficiently, rapidly, minimizing the energy waste that would result from redundant activity. The mechanism of statistical regulation is not yet understood, however.

  8. Comparative evaluation of purified Taenia solium glycoproteins and crude metacestode extracts by immunoblotting for the serodiagnosis of human T. solium cysticercosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Canul, R; Allan, J C; Fletes, C; Sutisna, I P; Kapti, I N; Craig, P S

    1997-01-01

    A lentil-lectin purified glycoprotein (LL-Gp) and a crude saline extract of Taenia solium metacestodes were compared for the immunodiagnosis of human cysticercosis by immunoblotting. The LL-Gp preparation was 95% sensitive for antibodies against a range of seven antigens with molecular masses of 50 to 13 kDa, whereas the sensitivity of the crude saline extract for the detection of antibodies against two major polypeptide molecules (26 and 8 kDa) was 91%. Specificity was 100% with both sets of diagnostic antigens. Affinity-purified antibodies against the 26-kDa molecule from the crude saline extract recognized the 24-kDa diagnostic region in the LL-Gp-purified extract and vice versa, suggesting that the antigens had common epitopes recognized by cysticercotic sera. In addition, in a preliminary community study of 115 randomly selected people from Bali (Indonesia), seroprevalence by immunoblot assay varied from 7.8% (with the crude saline antigen extract) to 9.6% (with the LL-Gp-purified extract). The results of this study demonstrate that both antigenic preparations are applicable for the immunodiagnosis of T. solium cysticercosis. The crude T. solium metacestode antigen extract was as specific as the purified LL-Gp T. solium metacestode extract and simpler to produce but slightly less sensitive. PMID:9302208

  9. Complementarity between microarray and immunoblot for the comparative evaluation of IgE repertoire of French and Italian cypress pollen allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Shahali, Y; Nicaise, P; Brázdová, A; Charpin, D; Scala, E; Mari, A; Sutra, J P; Chollet-Martin, S; Sénéchal, H; Poncet, P

    2014-01-01

    Cypress pollen represents the primary cause of respiratory allergies in Mediterranean areas. Patients allergic to Cupressus sempervirens pollen (Cups) (CPA) can be discriminated on the basis of the immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding to a basic 14 kDa protein (BP14) or to high-molecular-weight (HMW) glycoproteins only. Specific IgE repertoires of two differentially exposed CPA cohorts, French and Italian, were investigated using an IgE microarray system (some known major allergens from several allergenic sources) and individual IgE immunoblotting (IB) of whole Cups pollen extract separated by SDS-PAGE (all allergens from one allergenic source: cypress pollen). The prevalence of sensitization to BP14 was higher in French (37 %) than in Italian patients (17 %) and major differences were observed in IgE reactivities to lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). Thirty percent of the Italian CPA (4 % in the French group) had specific IgE against the Parietaria pollen LTP, independently of IB subgroups. Regarding peach LTP sensitization, all Pru p 3+ Italian CPA (10 %) were in the HMW+ subgroup, while Pru p 3+ French CPA (20 %) were all included in the BP14+ subgroup. BP14 sensitization is likely a marker of Cups exposure and is, in French CPA, significantly correlated to Pru p 3 sensitization. The IgE immunoblot and microarray are complementary tools that highlight differences in the subtle sensitization profile between groups of patients in comparative studies. PMID:25152053

  10. Intruder Activity Analysis under Unreliable Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tae-Sic Yoo; Humberto E. Garcia

    2007-09-01

    This paper addresses the problem of counting intruder activities within a monitored domain by a sensor network. The deployed sensors are unreliable. We characterize imperfect sensors with misdetection and false-alarm probabilities. We model intruder activities with Markov Chains. A set of Hidden Markov Models (HMM) models the imperfect sensors and intruder activities to be monitored. A novel sequential change detection/isolation algorithm is developed to detect and isolate a change from an HMM representing no intruder activity to another HMM representing some intruder activities. Procedures for estimating the entry time and the trace of intruder activities are developed. A domain monitoring example is given to illustrate the presented concepts and computational procedures.

  11. Limitation of dietary copper and zinc decreases superoxide dismutase activity in the onion fly, Delia antiqua.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, T; Ooe, S; Ishikawa, Y

    1997-06-01

    Larvae of the onion fly, Delia antiqua, have lower superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity when they are fed a defined synthetic diet that contains no copper or zinc. SOD activity was rapidly recovered when these larvae were fed onion bulbs. Addition of copper and zinc to the synthetic diet also led to the recovery of SOD activity. Results of an immunoblotting analysis using anti-D. antiqua CuZnSOD mouse monoclonal antibody suggest that this alteration of SOD activity is dependent on the amount of CuZnSOD. PMID:9172377

  12. Neutron activation analysis of wheat samples.

    PubMed

    Galinha, C; Anawar, H M; Freitas, M C; Pacheco, A M G; Almeida-Silva, M; Coutinho, J; Maçãs, B; Almeida, A S

    2011-11-01

    The deficiency of essential micronutrients and excess of toxic metals in cereals, an important food items for human nutrition, can cause public health risk. Therefore, before their consumption and adoption of soil supplementation, concentrations of essential micronutrients and metals in cereals should be monitored. This study collected soil and two varieties of wheat samples-Triticum aestivum L. (Jordão/bread wheat), and Triticum durum L. (Marialva/durum wheat) from Elvas area, Portugal and analyzed concentrations of As, Cr, Co, Fe, K, Na, Rb and Zn using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) to focus on the risk of adverse public health issues. The low variability and moderate concentrations of metals in soils indicated a lower significant effect of environmental input on metal concentrations in agricultural soils. The Cr and Fe concentrations in soils that ranged from 93-117 and 26,400-31,300mg/kg, respectively, were relatively high, but Zn concentration was very low (below detection limit <22mg/kg) indicating that soils should be supplemented with Zn during cultivation. The concentrations of metals in roots and straw of both varieties of wheat decreased in the order of K>Fe>Na>Zn>Cr>Rb>As>Co. Concentrations of As, Co and Cr in root, straw and spike of both varieties were higher than the permissible limits with exception of a few samples. The concentrations of Zn in root, straw and spike were relatively low (4-30mg/kg) indicating the deficiency of an essential micronutrient Zn in wheat cultivated in Portugal. The elemental transfer from soil to plant decreases with increasing growth of the plant. The concentrations of various metals in different parts of wheat followed the order: Root>Straw>Spike. A few root, straw and spike samples showed enrichment of metals, but the majority of the samples showed no enrichment. Potassium is enriched in all samples of root, straw and spike for both varieties of wheat. Relatively to the seed used for cultivation, Jord

  13. High-Throughput Analysis of Enzyme Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Lu

    2007-12-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) techniques have been applied to many research fields nowadays. Robot microarray printing technique and automation microtiter handling technique allows HTS performing in both heterogeneous and homogeneous formats, with minimal sample required for each assay element. In this dissertation, new HTS techniques for enzyme activity analysis were developed. First, patterns of immobilized enzyme on nylon screen were detected by multiplexed capillary system. The imaging resolution is limited by the outer diameter of the capillaries. In order to get finer images, capillaries with smaller outer diameters can be used to form the imaging probe. Application of capillary electrophoresis allows separation of the product from the substrate in the reaction mixture, so that the product doesn't have to have different optical properties with the substrate. UV absorption detection allows almost universal detection for organic molecules. Thus, no modifications of either the substrate or the product molecules are necessary. This technique has the potential to be used in screening of local distribution variations of specific bio-molecules in a tissue or in screening of multiple immobilized catalysts. Another high-throughput screening technique is developed by directly monitoring the light intensity of the immobilized-catalyst surface using a scientific charge-coupled device (CCD). Briefly, the surface of enzyme microarray is focused onto a scientific CCD using an objective lens. By carefully choosing the detection wavelength, generation of product on an enzyme spot can be seen by the CCD. Analyzing the light intensity change over time on an enzyme spot can give information of reaction rate. The same microarray can be used for many times. Thus, high-throughput kinetic studies of hundreds of catalytic reactions are made possible. At last, we studied the fluorescence emission spectra of ADP and obtained the detection limits for ADP under three different

  14. Karyotype Analysis Activity: A Constructivist Learning Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Noveera T.

    2015-01-01

    This classroom activity is based on a constructivist learning design and engages students in physically constructing a karyotype of three mock patients. Students then diagnose the chromosomal aneuploidy based on the karyotype, list the symptoms associated with the disorder, and discuss the implications of the diagnosis. This activity is targeted…

  15. Glycoproteins, antigens, and regulation of complement activation on the surface of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma lewisi: implications for immune evasion

    SciTech Connect

    Sturtevant, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    The surface antigens and glycoproteins of the rat parasitic protozoan, Trypanosoma lewisi were characterized. Radioiodination with /sup 125/I identified 10 out of more 40 polypeptides separated on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. All of these components were identified as glycoproteins by peroxidase-conjugated Conconavalin A (HR-Con A) lectin affinoblotting. This analysis detected that quantitative but not qualitative changes occurred during infection. Localization of most of the reactive determinants was indicated by immunoblotting extracts of radioiodinated T. lewisi. Changes in the antigenicity as related to survival in the host are discussed. The presence of IgG and IgM on the surface of T. lewisi isolated from intact and ..gamma..-irradiated rats (irr.) and that determinants bind Ig from uninfected rat sera (NRS) was indicated by flow cytometric analysis. Immunoblotting identified the major NRS IgG binding component as the 74 kd surface glycoprotein. Complement component C3 deposition during infection was indicated by flow cytometric analysis and immunoblotting. Incubation of intact T. lewisi with normal human sera indicated that C3, C5, and factor B deposition was Mg/sup 2 +/ dependent, Ca/sup 2 +/ independent and deposited C3 was rapidly processed to hemolytically inactive fragments. Radioiodination of intact and protease T. lewisi after cultivation identified three components which correlate with resistance to lysis. This suggests that surface moieties on intact T. lewisi modulate host complement activity by restricting C3/C5 convertase activity.

  16. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2003-01-01

    TD64, the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group, is one of several groups with high-fidelity fluids design and analysis expertise in the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). TD64 assists personnel working on other programs. The group participates in projects in the following areas: turbomachinery activities, nozzle activities, combustion devices, and the Columbia accident investigation.

  17. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph report presents an overview of activities and accomplishments of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group. Expertise in this group focuses on high-fidelity fluids design and analysis with application to space shuttle propulsion and next generation launch technologies. Topics covered include: computational fluid dynamics research and goals, turbomachinery research and activities, nozzle research and activities, combustion devices, engine systems, MDA development and CFD process improvements.

  18. Acceleration of reverse analysis method using hyperbolic activation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pwasong, Augustine; Sathasivam, Saratha

    2015-10-01

    Hyperbolic activation function is examined for its ability to accelerate the performance of doing data mining by using a technique named as Reverse Analysis method. In this paper, we describe how Hopfield network perform better with hyperbolic activation function and able to induce logical rules from large database by using reverse analysis method: given the values of the connections of a network, we can hope to know what logical rules are entrenched in the database. We limit our analysis to Horn clauses.

  19. Method for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2006-06-06

    A non-destructive testing method comprises providing a specimen having at least one positron emitter therein; determining a threshold energy for activating the positron emitter; and determining whether a half-life of the positron emitter is less than a selected half-life. If the half-life of the positron emitter is greater than or equal to the selected half-life, then activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater than the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons in the specimen. If the half-life of the positron emitter is less then the selected half-life, then alternately activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater then the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by positron annihilation within the specimen.

  20. Faculty Activity Analysis in the Universidad Tecnica Del Estado Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karadima, Oscar

    An analysis of academic activities of college faculty at the eight campuses of Chile's Universidad Tecnica del Estado was conducted. Activities were grouped into seven categories: direct teaching, indirect teaching, research, community services, faculty development, academic administration, and other activities. Following the narrative…

  1. Childhood Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita: Confirmation of Diagnosis by Skin Deficient in Type VII Collagen, Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay, and Immunoblotting

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Nupur; Rao, Raghavendra; Balachandran, C; Pai, Sathish; Bhogal, Balbir S; Schmidt, Enno; Zillikens, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an acquired subepidermal bullous disorder characterized by autoantibodies against Type VII collagen. It usually affects adults; childhood EBA is rare. We describe a 10-year-old girl presenting with recurrent tense blisters predominantly on legs, dorsa of hands and feet accompanied by oral erosions since the age of 5 years. Direct immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy showed linear deposition of IgG and C3 along the basement membrane zone (BMZ); indirect IF microscopy on salt-split skin revealed staining of IgG to the dermal side of the split. The patient's serum did not show BMZ staining in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa skin deficient for Type VII collagen, thus confirming autoantibody reactivity against Type VII collagen. Circulating antibodies against the immunodominant noncollagenous 1 domain of Type VII collagen were detected by ELISA and immunoblotting studies. The patient was treated with oral corticosteroids and dapsone with good improvement. PMID:27293257

  2. Sensitive detection of metallothioneins-1, -2 and -3 in tissue homogenates by immunoblotting: a method for enhanced membrane transfer and retention.

    PubMed

    Mizzen, C A; Cartel, N J; Yu, W H; Fraser, P E; McLachlan, D R

    1996-05-14

    Standard immunoblotting procedures were unable to detect metallothioneins-1 and 2 (MT-1, MT-2) and metallothionein-3 (MT-3)/growth inhibitory factor (GIF) in unfractionated brain homogenates. We have developed a novel process which involves the inclusion of 2 mM CaCl2 in electrophoretic transfer buffers and glutaraldehyde fixation following transfer to either nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes. Using commercial MT antibodies and a specific MT-3 polyclonal antibody raised in our laboratory, we have been able to detect all three MTs on both membrane types with a detection limit of approx. 10 ng for MT-1 and MT-2. Nitrocellulose membrane pore size had no noticeable effect on detection sensitivity. These modifications enable more sensitive MT detection than previously described blotting methods. In addition, this technique eliminates the need for indirect monitoring approaches and simplifies quantification since sample fractionation or enrichment are not required. PMID:8796480

  3. Childhood Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita: Confirmation of Diagnosis by Skin Deficient in Type VII Collagen, Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay, and Immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Nupur; Rao, Raghavendra; Balachandran, C; Pai, Sathish; Bhogal, Balbir S; Schmidt, Enno; Zillikens, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an acquired subepidermal bullous disorder characterized by autoantibodies against Type VII collagen. It usually affects adults; childhood EBA is rare. We describe a 10-year-old girl presenting with recurrent tense blisters predominantly on legs, dorsa of hands and feet accompanied by oral erosions since the age of 5 years. Direct immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy showed linear deposition of IgG and C3 along the basement membrane zone (BMZ); indirect IF microscopy on salt-split skin revealed staining of IgG to the dermal side of the split. The patient's serum did not show BMZ staining in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa skin deficient for Type VII collagen, thus confirming autoantibody reactivity against Type VII collagen. Circulating antibodies against the immunodominant noncollagenous 1 domain of Type VII collagen were detected by ELISA and immunoblotting studies. The patient was treated with oral corticosteroids and dapsone with good improvement. PMID:27293257

  4. Microscopic Analysis of Activated Sludge. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on the use of a compound microscope to analyze microscope communities, present in wastewater treatment processes, for operational control. Course topics include: sampling techniques, sample handling, laboratory analysis, identification of organisms, data interpretation, and use of the compound microscope.…

  5. A Method and On-Line Tool for Maximum Likelihood Calibration of Immunoblots and Other Measurements That Are Quantified in Batches.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Steven S; Rutherford, Suzannah

    2016-01-01

    Experimental measurements require calibration to transform measured signals into physically meaningful values. The conventional approach has two steps: the experimenter deduces a conversion function using measurements on standards and then calibrates (or normalizes) measurements on unknown samples with this function. The deduction of the conversion function from only the standard measurements causes the results to be quite sensitive to experimental noise. It also implies that any data collected without reliable standards must be discarded. Here we show that a "1-step calibration method" reduces these problems for the common situation in which samples are measured in batches, where a batch could be an immunoblot (Western blot), an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), a sequence of spectra, or a microarray, provided that some sample measurements are replicated across multiple batches. The 1-step method computes all calibration results iteratively from all measurements. It returns the most probable values for the sample compositions under the assumptions of a statistical model, making them the maximum likelihood predictors. It is less sensitive to measurement error on standards and enables use of some batches that do not include standards. In direct comparison of both real and simulated immunoblot data, the 1-step method consistently exhibited smaller errors than the conventional "2-step" method. These results suggest that the 1-step method is likely to be most useful for cases where experimenters want to analyze existing data that are missing some standard measurements and where experimenters want to extract the best results possible from their data. Open source software for both methods is available for download or on-line use. PMID:26908370

  6. A Method and On-Line Tool for Maximum Likelihood Calibration of Immunoblots and Other Measurements That Are Quantified in Batches

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Steven S.; Rutherford, Suzannah

    2016-01-01

    Experimental measurements require calibration to transform measured signals into physically meaningful values. The conventional approach has two steps: the experimenter deduces a conversion function using measurements on standards and then calibrates (or normalizes) measurements on unknown samples with this function. The deduction of the conversion function from only the standard measurements causes the results to be quite sensitive to experimental noise. It also implies that any data collected without reliable standards must be discarded. Here we show that a “1-step calibration method” reduces these problems for the common situation in which samples are measured in batches, where a batch could be an immunoblot (Western blot), an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), a sequence of spectra, or a microarray, provided that some sample measurements are replicated across multiple batches. The 1-step method computes all calibration results iteratively from all measurements. It returns the most probable values for the sample compositions under the assumptions of a statistical model, making them the maximum likelihood predictors. It is less sensitive to measurement error on standards and enables use of some batches that do not include standards. In direct comparison of both real and simulated immunoblot data, the 1-step method consistently exhibited smaller errors than the conventional “2-step” method. These results suggest that the 1-step method is likely to be most useful for cases where experimenters want to analyze existing data that are missing some standard measurements and where experimenters want to extract the best results possible from their data. Open source software for both methods is available for download or on-line use. PMID:26908370

  7. Rapid and specific detection of Sin Nombre virus antibodies in patients with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome by a strip immunoblot assay suitable for field diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hjelle, B; Jenison, S; Torrez-Martinez, N; Herring, B; Quan, S; Polito, A; Pichuantes, S; Yamada, T; Morris, C; Elgh, F; Lee, H W; Artsob, H; Dinello, R

    1997-01-01

    To develop a rapid antibody test for Sin Nombre hantavirus (SNV) infection for diagnosis of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in field settings where advanced instrumentation is not available, a strip immunoblot assay bearing four immobilized antigens for SNV and a recombinant nucleocapsid protein antigen of Seoul hantavirus (SEOV) was prepared. The SNV antigens included a full-length recombinant-expressed nucleocapsid (N) protein (rN), a recombinant-expressed G1 protein (residues 35 to 117), and synthetic peptides derived from N (residues 17 to 59) and G1 (residues 55 to 88). On the basis of the observed reactivities of hantavirus-infected patient and control sera, we determined that a positive assay requires reactivity with SNV or SEOV rN antigen and at least one other antigen. Isolated reactivity to either viral rN antigen is indeterminate, and any pattern of reactivity that does not include reactivity to an rN antigen is considered indeterminate but is unlikely to represent hantavirus infection. Fifty-eight of 59 samples from patients with acute SNV-associated HPS were positive according to these criteria, and one was initially indeterminate. Four of four samples from patients with HPS due to other hantaviruses were positive, as were most samples from patients with SEOV and Puumala virus infections. Of 192 control serum samples, 2 (1%) were positive and 2 were indeterminate. Acute SNV infection was distinguishable from remote SNV infection or infection with hantaviruses other than SNV by the presence of G1 peptide antigen reactivities in the former. The strip immunoblot assay shows promise for the detection of SNV antibodies early in the course of HPS. PMID:9041397

  8. Active vision in satellite scene analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naillon, Martine

    1994-01-01

    In earth observation or planetary exploration it is necessary to have more and, more autonomous systems, able to adapt to unpredictable situations. This imposes the use, in artificial systems, of new concepts in cognition, based on the fact that perception should not be separated from recognition and decision making levels. This means that low level signal processing (perception level) should interact with symbolic and high level processing (decision level). This paper is going to describe the new concept of active vision, implemented in Distributed Artificial Intelligence by Dassault Aviation following a 'structuralist' principle. An application to spatial image interpretation is given, oriented toward flexible robotics.

  9. Protein extraction from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Denecke, M

    2006-01-01

    Two methods for the separation of protein originating from activated sludge were compared. In one method, the total protein was isolated out of the activated sludge (crude extract). These samples included all dissolved proteins originating from the bacterial cells and biofilm made up of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Every time polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was done, the protein bands from samples of crude extract were covered by polymeric substances including carbohydrates, uronic acids or humic compounds. Using the immunoblot technique it was possible to demonstrate the presence of the heat shock protein HSP70 in crude extracts of activated sludge. The comparison of protein fingerprints required that clear and distinct bands appear on the PAGE analysis. To this end, a procedure to separates bacterial cells from the EPS was developed. Bacterial cells were separated by incubation with EDTA and subsequent filtration. The isolated cells were directly incubated in a sample buffer. PMID:16898150

  10. Passive versus active mitigation cost analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Parazin, R.J.; Galbraith, J.D.

    1995-04-01

    The scope of this task is to assess the impact of mitigation alternatives for Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103 on the Project W-236A Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. This assessment and other related tasks are part of an Action Plan Path Forward prepared by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Life Extension and Transition Program. Task 3.7 of the Action Plan for Project W-236A MWTF analyzed the comparative cost/risk of two hydrogen gas mitigation alternatives (active versus passive) to recommend the most appropriate course of action to resolve the hydrogen gas safety issue. The qualitative success of active mitigation has been demonstrated through Tank 241-SY-101 testing. Passive mitigation has not been demonstrated but will be validated by laboratory test work performed under Task 3.1 of the Action Plan. It is assumed for this assessment that the uncertainties associated with the performance of either alternative is comparable. Determining alternative specific performance measures beyond those noted are not in the scope of this effort.

  11. Activation analysis of the compact ignition tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Selcow, E.C.

    1986-01-01

    The US fusion program has completed the conceptual design of a compact tokamak device that achieves ignition. The high neutron wall loadings associated with this compact deuterium-tritium-burning device indicate that radiation-related issues may be significant considerations in the overall system design. Sufficient shielding will be requied for the radiation protection of both reactor components and occupational personnel. A close-in igloo shield has been designed around the periphery of the tokamak structure to permit personnel access into the test cell after shutdown and limit the total activation of the test cell components. This paper describes the conceptual design of the igloo shield system and discusses the major neutronic concerns related to the design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak.

  12. Neutron-activation analysis applied to copper ores and artifacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linder, N. F.

    1970-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis is used for quantitative identification of trace metals in copper. Establishing a unique fingerprint of impurities in Michigan copper would enable identification of artifacts made from this copper.

  13. Phosphorus Determination by Derivative Activation Analysis: A Multifaceted Radiochemical Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleppinger, E. W.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Although determination of phosphorus is important in biology, physiology, and environmental science, traditional gravimetric and colorimetric methods are cumbersome and lack the requisite sensitivity. Therefore, a derivative activation analysis method is suggested. Background information, procedures, and results are provided. (JN)

  14. Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) for Elemental Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Robin P. Gardner

    2006-04-11

    This research project was to improve the prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) measurement approach for bulk analysis, oil well logging, and small sample thermal enutron bean applications.

  15. Analysis of body calcium (regional changes in body calcium by in vivo neutron activation analysis)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suki, W.; Johnson, P. C.; Leblanc, A.; Evans, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of space flight on urine and fecal calcium loss was documented during the three long-term Skylab flights. Neutron activation analysis was used to determine regional calcium loss. Various designs for regional analysis were investigated.

  16. Activated Corrosion Product Analysis. Analytical Approach.

    SciTech Connect

    Golubov, Stanislav I; Busby, Jeremy T; Stoller, Roger E

    2010-01-01

    The presence of activated corrosion products (ACPs) in a water cooling system is a key factor in the licensing of ITER and affects nuclear classification, which governs design and operation. The objective of this study is to develop a method to accurately estimate radionuclide concentrations during ITER operation in support of nuclear classification. A brief overview of the PACTITER numerical code, which is currently used for ACP estimation, is presented. An alternative analytical approach for calculation of ACPs, which can also be used for validation of existing numerical codes, including PACTITER, has been proposed. A continuity equation describing the kinetics of accumulation of radioactive isotopes in a water cooling system in the form of a closed ring has been formulated, taking into account the following processes: production of radioactive elements and their decay, filtration, and ACP accumulation in filter system. Additional work is needed to more accurately assess the ACP inventory in the cooling water system, including more accurate simulation of the Tokamak cooling water system (TCWS) operating cycle and consideration of material corrosion, release, and deposition rates.

  17. Gaia Payload Module Testing and Analysis Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soula, Laurent

    2012-07-01

    The Gaia objective is to produce a very accurate catalogue of 1 billion of sky objects in our galaxy and beyond. ASTRIUM’s extensive experience on silicon carbide (SiC) instruments has helped developing the latest-generation payload module. It integrates the most sensitive and stable telescopes ever made, mounted on a SiC torus structure supported by three bipods. This payload module has been tested in June 2011 by ASTRIUM at INTESPACE facilities in Toulouse. To conduct the sine qualification tests and support the data analyses in real-time, advanced tools have been used. Most of them have been developed in a previous ESA R&D project [1] “DYNamics: AssessMent and Improvement of TEst Data (DYNAMITED)” and implemented in a DynaWorks® environment. Mass Operator calculation, to evaluate the payload module interface loads from measured accelerations, or automatic correlation through a criterion based on FRF from tests or predictions, are part of these tools. Testing such a structure also revealed some piloting difficulties due to a quite low and varying damping of the structure and a strong coupling with the shaker. To take into account such phenomena in the correlation work, enhanced simulations have also been performed considering multi-points phased excitations. These analyses demonstrate the payload module qualification status and allow derivate a more representative model to be used in further coupled system activities.

  18. Analysis of Smad Phosphatase Activity In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tao; Qin, Lan; Lin, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 at the C-terminal SXS motif by BMP type I receptors is one of the most critical events in BMP signaling. Conversely, protein phosphatases that dephosphorylate phospho-Smad1/5/8 can consequently prevent or terminate BMP signaling. PPM1H is an undercharacterized phosphatase in the PPM family. We recently demonstrated that PPM1H can dephosphorylate Smad1 in the cytoplasm and block BMP signaling responses in cellular assays. Here we describe in vitro method showing that PPM1H is a bona fide phosphatase for Smad1/5/8. PPM1H is produced as GST fusion protein in E. coli, and purified against glutathione sepharose beads. Bacterially purified recombinant PPM1H possesses phosphatase activity toward artificial substrate para-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP). Recombinant PPM1H also dephosphorylates immuno-purified phosphorylated Smad1 in test tubes. These direct in vitro phosphatase assays provide convincing evidence demonstrating the role of PPM1H as a specific phosphatase for P-Smad1. PMID:26520120

  19. Analysis of supercooling activities of surfactants.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Chikako; Terauchi, Ryuji; Tochigi, Hiroshi; Takaoka, Hisao; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2014-08-01

    Supercooling-promoting activities (SCAs) of 25 kinds of surfactants including non-ionic, anionic, cationic and amphoteric types were examined in solutions (buffered Milli-Q water, BMQW) containing the ice nucleation bacterium (INB) Erwinia ananas, silver iodide (AgI) or BMQW alone, which unintentionally contained unidentified ice nucleators, by a droplet freezing assay. Most of the surfactants exhibited SCA in solutions containing AgI but not in solutions containing the INB E. ananas or BMQW alone. SCAs of many surfactants in solutions containing AgI were very high compared with those of previously reported supercooling-promoting substances. Cationic surfactants, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (C16TAC), at concentrations of 0.01% (w/v) exhibited SCA of 11.8 °C, which is the highest SCA so far reported. These surfactants also showed high SCAs at very low concentrations in solutions containing AgI. C16TAB exhibited SCA of 5.7 °C at a concentration of 0.0005% (w/v). PMID:24792543

  20. Detector analysis for shallow water active sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Thomas J.; Phillips, Michael E.

    2002-11-01

    SPAWAR Systems Center-San Diego, in concert with the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has designed and built a proof-of-concept broadband biomimetic sonar. This proof-of-concept sonar emulates a dolphin biosonar system; emitted broadband signals approximate the frequency and time domain characteristics of signals produced by echolocating dolphins, the receive system is spatially modeled after the binaural geometry of the dolphin, and signal processing algorithms incorporate sequential integration of aspect varying returns. As with any sonar, object detection in shallow water while maintaining an acceptable false alarm rate is an important problem. A comprehensive parametric analysis of detection algorithms is presented, focusing primarily on two detector strategies: a matched filter and a spectral detector. The spectral detector compares the ratio of in-band to out-of-band power, and thus functions something like a phase-incoherent matched filter. This computationally efficient detector is shown to perform well with high proportional bandwidth signals. The detector (either matched filter or spectral) is coupled with an alpha-beta tracker which maintains a running noise estimate and calculates signal excess above the estimated noise level which is compared to a fixed threshold.

  1. Understanding Tensions: Activity Systems Analysis of Cross-Continental Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, LanHui Zhang; Yamagata-Lynch, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Using the lens of Vygotsky's sociocultural theory, activity theory, and Engeström's activity systems analysis, this qualitative study explores students' experiences in the context of a sixteen-week transpacific collaboration between seven students at Northern Illinois University (NIU) and seven students from Shandong Normal…

  2. Overview af MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities. The topics include: 1) Status of programs at MSFC; 2) Fluid Mechanics at MSFC; 3) Relevant Fluid Dynamics Activities at MSFC; and 4) Shuttle Return to Flight.

  3. Spatiotemporal Data Mining, Analysis, and Visualization of Human Activity Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xun

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the research challenge of developing efficient new methods for discovering useful patterns and knowledge in large volumes of electronically collected spatiotemporal activity data. I propose to analyze three types of such spatiotemporal activity data in a methodological framework that integrates spatial analysis, data…

  4. Applying an Activity System to Online Collaborative Group Work Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Hyungshin; Kang, Myunghee

    2010-01-01

    This study determines whether an activity system provides a systematic framework to analyse collaborative group work. Using an activity system as a unit of analysis, the research examined learner behaviours, conflicting factors and facilitating factors while students engaged in collaborative work via asynchronous computer-mediated communication.…

  5. Project-Based Language Learning: An Activity Theory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbes, Marina; Carson, Lorna

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of project-based language learning (PBLL) in a university language programme. Learner reflections of project work were analysed through Activity Theory, where tool-mediated activity is understood as the central unit of analysis for human interaction. Data were categorised according to the components of human…

  6. Insulin receptor/IGF-I receptor hybrids are widely distributed in mammalian tissues: quantification of individual receptor species by selective immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Bailyes, E M; Navé, B T; Soos, M A; Orr, S R; Hayward, A C; Siddle, K

    1997-10-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) receptor (IGFR) are both widely expressed in mammalian tissues, and are known to be capable of heteromeric assembly as insulin/IGF hybrid receptors, in addition to the classically described receptors. By selective immunoadsorption of radioligand/receptor complexes and by immunoblotting we have determined the fraction of insulin receptors and IGF receptors occurring as hybrids in different tissues. Microsomal membranes were isolated from tissue homogenates and solubilized with Triton X-100. Solubilized receptors were incubated with 125I-IGF-I, and radioligand/receptor complexes bound by IR-specific and IGFR-specific monoclonal antibodies were quantified. The fraction of IGF-I binding sites behaving as hybrids (anti-IR-bound/anti-IGFR-bound) was approx. 40% in liver and spleen, 70% in placenta, and 85-90% in skeletal muscle and heart, similar results being obtained in rabbit and human tissues. There was no correlation between the proportion of hybrids and the ratio of 125I-insulin/125I-IGF-I binding in different tissues. The fraction of 125I-insulin bound to hybrids was too low for accurate quantification, because of the relatively low affinity of hybrids for insulin. The fraction of insulin receptors present in hybrids was therefore determined by immunoblotting. Receptors in solubilized human placental microsomal membranes were precipitated with IR-specific or IGFR-specific monoclonal antibodies, and after SDS/PAGE, blots were prepared and probed with IR-specific and IGFR-specific antisera. It was found that 15% of IR and 80% of IGFR were present in hybrids. Consistent with these figures, the overall level of IR was estimated, by blotting with the respective antibodies at concentrations shown to give equal signals with equal amounts of receptor, to be 4-fold greater than IGFR. Overall it was concluded that a significant fraction of both IR and IGFR occurs as hybrids in most mammalian tissues

  7. Neutron activation analysis for antimetabolites. [in food samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Determination of metal ion contaminants in food samples is studied. A weighed quantity of each sample was digested in a concentrated mixture of nitric, hydrochloric and perchloric acids to affect complete solution of the food products. The samples were diluted with water and the pH adjusted according to the specific analysis performed. The samples were analyzed by neutron activation analysis, polarography, and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The solid food samples were also analyzed by neutron activation analysis for increased sensitivity and lower levels of detectability. The results are presented in tabular form.

  8. Comparison between dot-immunoblotting assay and clinical sign determination method for quantifying avian infectious bronchitis virus vaccine by titration in embryonated eggs.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Seong-su; Kwon, Jung-Hoon; Noh, Jin-Yong; Hong, Woo-tack; Gwon, Gyeong-Bin; Jeong, Jei-Hyun; Jeong, Sol; Youn, Ha-Na; Heo, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon

    2016-04-01

    A sensitive and specific method for measuring the vaccine titer of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is important to commercial manufacturers for improving vaccine quality. Typically, IBV is titrated in embryonated chicken eggs, and the infectivity of the virus dilutions is determined by assessing clinical signs in the embryos as evidence of viral propagation. In this study, we used a dot-immunoblotting assay (DIA) to measure the titers of IBV vaccines that originated from different pathogenic strains or attenuation methods in embryonated eggs, and we compared this assay to the currently used method, clinical sign evaluation. To compare the two methods, we used real-time reverse transcription-PCR, which had the lowest limit of detection for propagated IBV. As a clinical sign of infection, dwarfism of the embryo was quantified using the embryo: egg (EE) index. The DIA showed 9.41% higher sensitivity and 15.5% higher specificity than the clinical sign determination method. The DIA was particularly useful for measuring the titer of IBV vaccine that did not cause apparent stunting but propagated in embryonated chicken eggs such as a heat-adapted vaccine strain. The results of this study indicate that the DIA is a rapid, sensitive, reliable method for determining IBV vaccine titer in embryonated eggs at a relatively low cost. PMID:26802454

  9. Detection of anti-U3-RNP/fibrillarin IgG antibodies by line immunoblot assay has comparable clinical significance to immunoprecipitation testing in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lisa K; Jaskowski, Troy D; Mayes, Maureen D; Tebo, Anne E

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance and clinical relevance of a commercially available line immunoblot assay (LIA) for detecting anti-U3-RNP/fibrillarin (anti-U3-RNP), against immunoprecipitation (gold standard). This study involved a multi-ethnic cohort of 1000 American systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients and 50 healthy controls. Antinuclear antibodies and centromere antibodies were detected by indirect immunofluorescent antibody test, anti-topo I by immunodiffusion and anti-RNAP III by ELISA. The presence of anti-U3-RNP in select serum samples was detected by immunoprecipitation (IP) and LIA. By IP, U3-RNP antibody was detected in 75 (7.5 %) patients with SSc. Overall agreement between LIA and IP was very good (κ = 0.966). Analytic sensitivity and specificity of the U3-RNP LIA was 100 and 94.7 %, respectively. Clinical features associated with positivity for the anti-U3-RNP antibody include diffuse cutaneous SSc and increased prevalence of renal crisis, consistent with previous studies that used IP. Testing for U3-RNP antibodies is only performed by a small number of laboratories due to the complexity of both performance and interpretation of the IP. LIA is faster and less complex than IP. Excellent agreement between IP and LIA demonstrates that LIA is an acceptable and attractive alternative to IP for anti-U3-RNP detection. PMID:26467972

  10. Immunoblot detection of class-specific humoral immune response to outer membrane proteins isolated from Salmonella typhi in humans with typhoid fever.

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, V; Isibasi, A; García-Ortigoza, E; Kumate, J

    1989-01-01

    The studies reported here were undertaken to assess the ability of the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of Salmonella typhi to induce a humoral immune response in humans with typhoid fever. OMPs were isolated with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 and were found to be contaminated with approximately 4% lipopolysaccharide. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis patterns showed protein bands with molecular size ranges from 17 to 70 kilodaltons; the major groups of proteins were those that correspond to the porins and OmpA of gram-negative bacteria. Rabbit antiserum to OMPs or to S. typhi recognized OMPs after absorption with lipopolysaccharide. Sera from patients with typhoid fever contained immunoglobulin M antibodies which reacted with a protein of 28 kilodaltons and immunoglobulin G antibodies which reacted mainly with the porins, as determined by immunoblotting. These results indicate that the porins are the major immunogenic OMPs from S. typhi and that the immune response induced in the infection could be related to the protective status. Images PMID:2768450

  11. INDUSTRIAL/MILITARY ACTIVITY-INITIATED ACCIDENT SCREENING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Kalinich

    1999-09-27

    Impacts due to nearby installations and operations were determined in the Preliminary MGDS Hazards Analysis (CRWMS M&O 1996) to be potentially applicable to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. This determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of the potential activities ongoing on or off the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It is intended that the Industrial/Military Activity-Initiated Accident Screening Analysis provided herein will meet the requirements of the ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987) in establishing whether this external event can be screened from further consideration or must be included as a design basis event (DBE) in the development of accident scenarios for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). This analysis only considers issues related to preclosure radiological safety. Issues important to waste isolation as related to impact from nearby installations will be covered in the MGR performance assessment.

  12. Physical basis for prompt-neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The technique called prompt ..gamma..-ray neutron activation analysis has been applied to rapid materials analysis. The radiation following the neutron radiation capture is prompt in the sense that the nuclear decay time is on the order of 10/sup -15/ second, and thus the technique is not strictly activation, but should be called radiation neutron capture spectroscopy or neutron capture ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy. This paper reviews the following: sources and detectors, theory of radiative capture, nonstatistical capture, giant dipole resonance, fast neutron capture, and thermal neutron capture ..gamma..-ray spectra. 14 figures.

  13. Inference of Splicing Regulatory Activities by Sequence Neighborhood Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Michael B; Shomron, Noam; Yeo, Gene W; Schneider, Aniket; Xiao, Xinshu; Burge, Christopher B

    2006-01-01

    Sequence-specific recognition of nucleic-acid motifs is critical to many cellular processes. We have developed a new and general method called Neighborhood Inference (NI) that predicts sequences with activity in regulating a biochemical process based on the local density of known sites in sequence space. Applied to the problem of RNA splicing regulation, NI was used to predict hundreds of new exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) and silencer (ESS) hexanucleotides from known human ESEs and ESSs. These predictions were supported by cross-validation analysis, by analysis of published splicing regulatory activity data, by sequence-conservation analysis, and by measurement of the splicing regulatory activity of 24 novel predicted ESEs, ESSs, and neutral sequences using an in vivo splicing reporter assay. These results demonstrate the ability of NI to accurately predict splicing regulatory activity and show that the scope of exonic splicing regulatory elements is substantially larger than previously anticipated. Analysis of orthologous exons in four mammals showed that the NI score of ESEs, a measure of function, is much more highly conserved above background than ESE primary sequence. This observation indicates a high degree of selection for ESE activity in mammalian exons, with surprisingly frequent interchangeability between ESE sequences. PMID:17121466

  14. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Wang, Tee-See; Griffin, Lisa; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a presentation graphic which reviews the activities of the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center (i.e., Code TD64). The work of this group focused on supporting the space transportation programs. The work of the group is in Computational Fluid Dynamic tool development. This development is driven by hardware design needs. The major applications for the design and analysis tools are: turbines, pumps, propulsion-to-airframe integration, and combustion devices.

  15. Active Desiccant-Based Preconditioning Market Analysis and Product Development

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.

    2001-01-11

    The Phase 1 report (ORNL/Sub/94-SVO44/1), completed earlier in this program, involved a comprehensive field survey and market analysis comparing various specialized outdoor air handling units. This initial investigation included conventional cooling and reheat, conventional cooling with sensible recovery, total energy recovery systems (passive desiccant technology) and various active desiccant systems. The report concluded that several markets do promise a significant sales opportunity for a Climate Changer-based active desiccant system offering. (Climate Changer is a registered trademark of Trane Company.) This initial market analysis defined the wants and needs of the end customers (design engineers and building owners), which, along with subsequent information included in this report, have been used to guide the determination of the most promising active desiccant system configurations. This Phase 2 report begins with a summary of a more thorough investigation of those specific markets identified as most promising for active desiccant systems. Table 1 estimates the annual sales potential for a cost-effective product line of active desiccant systems, such as that built from Climate Changer modules. The Product Development Strategy section describes the active desiccant system configurations chosen to best fit the needs of the marketplace while minimizing system options. Key design objectives based on market research are listed in this report for these active desiccant systems. Corresponding performance goals for the dehumidification wheel required to meet the overall system design objectives are also defined. The Performance Modeling section describes the strategy used by SEMCO to design the dehumidification wheels integrated into the prototype systems currently being tested as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Desiccant Technology Program. Actual performance data from wheel testing was used to revise the system performance and energy analysis

  16. Taking into account photofission effects in gamma-activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dayvdov, M.G.; Kishel'gof, V.V.; Naumov, A.P.; Trukhov, A.V.

    1986-11-01

    The authors proposed a method for calculating the effect of photofission of U and Th, which is based on the well-known laws of physics of photofission and methods for calculating the activity of fission products. The authors compared the results of numerical calculations of the gamma spectra of photofission products with the measurements performed with a Ge (Li) detector with the spectra from activated model samples of U and Th. The method developed enables calculating the coefficients of interference and is also applicable to the solution of the problems of optimization of gamma activation analysis taking into account U and Th fission.

  17. Preliminary Work Domain Analysis for Human Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Kerry; Miller, Matthew; Feigh, Karen

    2015-01-01

    A work domain analysis (WDA) of human extravehicular activity (EVA) is presented in this study. A formative methodology such as Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA) offers a new perspective to the knowledge gained from the past 50 years of living and working in space for the development of future EVA support systems. EVA is a vital component of human spaceflight and provides a case study example of applying a work domain analysis (WDA) to a complex sociotechnical system. The WDA presented here illustrates how the physical characteristics of the environment, hardware, and life support systems of the domain guide the potential avenues and functional needs of future EVA decision support system development.

  18. Optimizing human activity patterns using global sensitivity analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hickmann, Kyle S.; Mniszewski, Susan M.; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Hyman, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Implementing realistic activity patterns for a population is crucial for modeling, for example, disease spread, supply and demand, and disaster response. Using the dynamic activity simulation engine, DASim, we generate schedules for a population that capture regular (e.g., working, eating, and sleeping) and irregular activities (e.g., shopping or going to the doctor). We use the sample entropy (SampEn) statistic to quantify a schedule’s regularity for a population. We show how to tune an activity’s regularity by adjusting SampEn, thereby making it possible to realistically design activities when creating a schedule. The tuning process sets up a computationally intractable high-dimensional optimization problem. To reduce the computational demand, we use Bayesian Gaussian process regression to compute global sensitivity indices and identify the parameters that have the greatest effect on the variance of SampEn. We use the harmony search (HS) global optimization algorithm to locate global optima. Our results show that HS combined with global sensitivity analysis can efficiently tune the SampEn statistic with few search iterations. We demonstrate how global sensitivity analysis can guide statistical emulation and global optimization algorithms to efficiently tune activities and generate realistic activity patterns. Though our tuning methods are applied to dynamic activity schedule generation, they are general and represent a significant step in the direction of automated tuning and optimization of high-dimensional computer simulations. PMID:25580080

  19. Optimizing human activity patterns using global sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, Geoffrey; Hickmann, Kyle S.; Mniszewski, Susan M.; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Hyman, James M.

    2013-12-10

    Implementing realistic activity patterns for a population is crucial for modeling, for example, disease spread, supply and demand, and disaster response. Using the dynamic activity simulation engine, DASim, we generate schedules for a population that capture regular (e.g., working, eating, and sleeping) and irregular activities (e.g., shopping or going to the doctor). We use the sample entropy (SampEn) statistic to quantify a schedule’s regularity for a population. We show how to tune an activity’s regularity by adjusting SampEn, thereby making it possible to realistically design activities when creating a schedule. The tuning process sets up a computationally intractable high-dimensional optimization problem. To reduce the computational demand, we use Bayesian Gaussian process regression to compute global sensitivity indices and identify the parameters that have the greatest effect on the variance of SampEn. Here we use the harmony search (HS) global optimization algorithm to locate global optima. Our results show that HS combined with global sensitivity analysis can efficiently tune the SampEn statistic with few search iterations. We demonstrate how global sensitivity analysis can guide statistical emulation and global optimization algorithms to efficiently tune activities and generate realistic activity patterns. Finally, though our tuning methods are applied to dynamic activity schedule generation, they are general and represent a significant step in the direction of automated tuning and optimization of high-dimensional computer simulations.

  20. Optimizing human activity patterns using global sensitivity analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fairchild, Geoffrey; Hickmann, Kyle S.; Mniszewski, Susan M.; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Hyman, James M.

    2013-12-10

    Implementing realistic activity patterns for a population is crucial for modeling, for example, disease spread, supply and demand, and disaster response. Using the dynamic activity simulation engine, DASim, we generate schedules for a population that capture regular (e.g., working, eating, and sleeping) and irregular activities (e.g., shopping or going to the doctor). We use the sample entropy (SampEn) statistic to quantify a schedule’s regularity for a population. We show how to tune an activity’s regularity by adjusting SampEn, thereby making it possible to realistically design activities when creating a schedule. The tuning process sets up a computationally intractable high-dimensional optimizationmore » problem. To reduce the computational demand, we use Bayesian Gaussian process regression to compute global sensitivity indices and identify the parameters that have the greatest effect on the variance of SampEn. Here we use the harmony search (HS) global optimization algorithm to locate global optima. Our results show that HS combined with global sensitivity analysis can efficiently tune the SampEn statistic with few search iterations. We demonstrate how global sensitivity analysis can guide statistical emulation and global optimization algorithms to efficiently tune activities and generate realistic activity patterns. Finally, though our tuning methods are applied to dynamic activity schedule generation, they are general and represent a significant step in the direction of automated tuning and optimization of high-dimensional computer simulations.« less

  1. Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) and short-lived neutron activation analysis (NAA) applied to the characterization of legacy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B; English, G.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Perry, D.L.; Reijonen, J.P.; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Garabedian, G.F.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay, Zs.

    2008-02-13

    Without quality historical records that provide the composition of legacy materials, the elemental and/or chemical characterization of such materials requires a manual analytical strategy that may expose the analyst to unknown toxicological hazards. In addition, much of the existing legacy inventory also incorporates radioactivity, and, although radiological composition may be determined by various nuclear-analytical methods, most importantly, gamma-spectroscopy, current methods of chemical characterization still require direct sample manipulation, thereby presenting special problems with broad implications for both the analyst and the environment. Alternately, prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) provides a'single-shot' in-situ, non-destructive method that provides a complete assay of all major entrained elemental constituents.1-3. Additionally, neutron activation analysis (NAA) using short-lived activation products complements PGAA and is especially useful when NAA activation surpasses the PGAA in elemental sensitivity.

  2. Statistical Analysis of Acoustic Wave Parameters Near Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. Cristina; Bogart, Richard S.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to quantify the influence of magnetic fields on acoustic mode parameters and flows in and around active regions, we analyze the differences in the parameters in magnetically quiet regions nearby an active region (which we call “nearby regions”), compared with those of quiet regions at the same disk locations for which there are no neighboring active regions. We also compare the mode parameters in active regions with those in comparably located quiet regions. Our analysis is based on ring-diagram analysis of all active regions observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) during almost five years. We find that the frequency at which the mode amplitude changes from attenuation to amplification in the quiet nearby regions is around 4.2 mHz, in contrast to the active regions, for which it is about 5.1 mHz. This amplitude enhacement (the “acoustic halo effect”) is as large as that observed in the active regions, and has a very weak dependence on the wave propagation direction. The mode energy difference in nearby regions also changes from a deficit to an excess at around 4.2 mHz, but averages to zero over all modes. The frequency difference in nearby regions increases with increasing frequency until a point at which the frequency shifts turn over sharply, as in active regions. However, this turnover occurs around 4.9 mHz, which is significantly below the acoustic cutoff frequency. Inverting the horizontal flow parameters in the direction of the neigboring active regions, we find flows that are consistent with a model of the thermal energy flow being blocked directly below the active region.

  3. Making Sense of Total VET Activity: An Initial Market Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2016

    2016-01-01

    Following the successful first national publication of total vocational education and training (VET) activity and presentation of various informative data products, NCVER has continued to undertake further analysis of the submitted data. This paper is the first in a suite of the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) authored…

  4. Pupil Inquiry Behavior Analysis and Change Activity. Interim Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manion, Raymond C.

    This interim report discusses progress toward three major goals of the Pupil Inquiry Behavior Analysis and Change Activity: increased pupil inquiry, changed teacher behavior to facilitate pupil inquiry, and the development of a 32-week course of instruction to provide for these behavioral changes. Data currently available deals with the emotional…

  5. Cowplex usage of the gold gamma - activation analysis information

    SciTech Connect

    Degtyarev, S.I.

    1993-12-31

    A simultaneous gold assay method, evaluation of gold`s grain number and weight, and lithologic type, of ore bearing rock, is described. The basis of this method is gamma activation analysis which permits the assay of 500 grams of gold samples crushed up to 3 mm.

  6. The Analysis and Reconciliation of Students' Rebuttals in Argumentation Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yu-Ren; Hung, Jeng-Fung

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the guidance provided by science teachers to resolve conflicts during socioscientific issue-based argumentation activities. A graphical representation (GR) was developed as a tool to code and analyze the dialogue interaction process. Through the GR and qualitative analysis, we identified three types of dialogue…

  7. Neutron activation analysis of certified samples by the absolute method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadem, F.; Belouadah, N.; Idiri, Z.

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear reactions analysis technique is mainly based on the relative method or the use of activation cross sections. In order to validate nuclear data for the calculated cross section evaluated from systematic studies, we used the neutron activation analysis technique (NAA) to determine the various constituent concentrations of certified samples for animal blood, milk and hay. In this analysis, the absolute method is used. The neutron activation technique involves irradiating the sample and subsequently performing a measurement of the activity of the sample. The fundamental equation of the activation connects several physical parameters including the cross section that is essential for the quantitative determination of the different elements composing the sample without resorting to the use of standard sample. Called the absolute method, it allows a measurement as accurate as the relative method. The results obtained by the absolute method showed that the values are as precise as the relative method requiring the use of standard sample for each element to be quantified.

  8. neutron activation analysis using thermochromatography. II. thermochromatographic separation of elements in the analysis of geological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sattarov, G.; Davydov, A.V.; Khamatov, S.; Kist, A.A.

    1986-07-01

    The use of gas thermochromatography (GTC) in the radioactivation analysis of difficulty soluble samples with a strongly activating substrate is discussed. The effect of sample coarseness and ore type on the rate of extraction of gold and accompanying elements was studied. The limits of detection of 22 elements were compared using neutron activation analysis with GTC and INAA. The analytical parameters of the procedure were estimated.

  9. Activity anorexia: An interplay between basic and applied behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, W. David; Epling, W. Frank; Dews, Peter B.; Estes, William K.; Morse, William H.; Van Orman, Willard; Herrnstein, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between basic research with nonhumans and applied behavior analysis is illustrated by our work on activity anorexia. When rats are fed one meal a day and allowed to run on an activity wheel, they run excessively, stop eating, and die of starvation. Convergent evidence, from several different research areas, indicates that the behavior of these animals and humans who self-starve is functionally similar. A biobehavioral theory of activity anorexia is presented that details the cultural contingencies, behavioral processes, and physiology of anorexia. Diagnostic criteria and a three-stage treatment program for activity-based anorexia are outlined. The animal model permits basic research on anorexia that for practical and ethical reasons cannot be conducted with humans. Thus, basic research can have applied importance. PMID:22478169

  10. neutron activation analysis using thermochromatography. III. analysis of samples of biological origin

    SciTech Connect

    Sattarov, G.; Davydov, A.V.; Khamatov, S.; Kist, A.A.

    1986-07-01

    The use of gas thermochromatography (GTC) in the radioactivation analysis of biological materials is discussed. A group separation of a number of highly volatile elements from sodium and bromine radionuclides has been achieved. The limit of detection of the elements by INAA and neutron activation analysis was estimated using GTC. The advantages of the procedure and the analytical parameters are discussed.

  11. Application of activation techniques to biological analysis. [813 references

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, H.J.M.

    1981-12-01

    Applications of activation analysis in the biological sciences are reviewed for the period of 1970 to 1979. The stages and characteristics of activation analysis are described, and its advantages and disadvantages enumerated. Most applications involve activation by thermal neutrons followed by either radiochemical or instrumental determination. Relatively little use has been made of activation by fast neutrons, photons, or charged particles. In vivo analyses are included, but those based on prompt gamma or x-ray emission are not. Major applications include studies of reference materials, and the elemental analysis of plants, marine biota, animal and human tissues, diets, and excreta. Relatively little use of it has been made in biochemistry, microbiology, and entomology, but it has become important in toxicology and environmental science. The elements most often determined are Ag, As, Au, Br, Ca, Cd, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hg, I, K, Mn, Mo, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, and Zn, while few or no determinations of B, Be, Bi, Ga, Gd, Ge, H, In, Ir, Li, Nd, Os, Pd, Pr, Pt, Re, Rh, Ru, Te, Tl, or Y have been made in biological materials.

  12. Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis of optogenetic modulation of neural activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Gu, L.; Ghosh, N.; Mohanty, S. K.

    2013-02-01

    Here, we introduce a computational procedure to examine whether optogenetically activated neuronal firing recordings could be characterized as multifractal series. Optogenetics is emerging as a valuable experimental tool and a promising approach for studying a variety of neurological disorders in animal models. The spiking patterns from cortical region of the brain of optogenetically-stimulated transgenic mice were analyzed using a sophisticated fluctuation analysis method known as multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA). We observed that the optogenetically-stimulated neural firings are consistent with a multifractal process. Further, we used MFDFA to monitor the effect of chemically induced pain (formalin injection) and optogenetic treatment used to relieve the pain. In this case, dramatic changes in parameters characterizing a multifractal series were observed. Both the generalized Hurst exponent and width of singularity spectrum effectively differentiates the neural activities during control and pain induction phases. The quantitative nature of the analysis equips us with better measures to quantify pain. Further, it provided a measure for effectiveness of the optogenetic stimulation in inhibiting pain. MFDFA-analysis of spiking data from other deep regions of the brain also turned out to be multifractal in nature, with subtle differences in the parameters during pain-induction by formalin injection and inhibition by optogenetic stimulation. Characterization of neuronal firing patterns using MFDFA will lead to better understanding of neuronal response to optogenetic activation and overall circuitry involved in the process.

  13. Multi-scale statistical analysis of coronal solar activity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gamborino, Diana; del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Martinell, Julio J.

    2016-07-08

    Multi-filter images from the solar corona are used to obtain temperature maps that are analyzed using techniques based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) in order to extract dynamical and structural information at various scales. Exploring active regions before and after a solar flare and comparing them with quiet regions, we show that the multi-scale behavior presents distinct statistical properties for each case that can be used to characterize the level of activity in a region. Information about the nature of heat transport is also to be extracted from the analysis.

  14. Analysis of alternatives for immobilized low activity waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Burbank, D.A.

    1997-10-28

    This report presents a study of alternative disposal system architectures and implementation strategies to provide onsite near-surface disposal capacity to receive the immobilized low-activity waste produced by the private vendors. The analysis shows that a flexible unit strategy that provides a suite of design solutions tailored to the characteristics of the immobilized low-activity waste will provide a disposal system that best meets the program goals of reducing the environmental, health, and safety impacts; meeting the schedule milestones; and minimizing the life-cycle cost of the program.

  15. Multi-scale statistical analysis of coronal solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamborino, Diana; del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Martinell, Julio J.

    2016-07-01

    Multi-filter images from the solar corona are used to obtain temperature maps that are analyzed using techniques based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) in order to extract dynamical and structural information at various scales. Exploring active regions before and after a solar flare and comparing them with quiet regions, we show that the multi-scale behavior presents distinct statistical properties for each case that can be used to characterize the level of activity in a region. Information about the nature of heat transport is also to be extracted from the analysis.

  16. Analysis of exposure due to work on activated components

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1987-09-01

    In this brief note the author summarized analysis of the exposure incurred in various maintenance jobs involving activated accelerator and beam line components at Fermilab. A tabulation was made of parameters associated with each job. Included are rather terse descriptions of the various tasks. The author presented various plots of the quantities in the table. All exposure rates are mR/hr while all exposures accumulated are mR. The exposure rates were generally measured at the Fermilab standard one foot distance from the activated component. Accumulated exposures are taken from the self-reading pocket dosimeter records maintained by the radiation control technicians.

  17. Prompt gamma activation analysis: An old technique made new

    SciTech Connect

    English, Jerry; Firestone, Richard; Perry, Dale; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Garabedian, Glenn; Bandong, Bryan; Molnar, Gabor; Revay, Zsolt

    2002-12-01

    The long list of contributors to the prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) project is important because it highlights the broad cast of active PGAA researchers from various facilities and backgrounds. PGAA is basically a simple process in principle that was traditionally difficult in application. It is an old technique that has for years been tied to and associated exclusively with nuclear reactor facilities, which has limited its acceptance as a general, analytical tool for identifying and quantifying elements or, more precisely, isotopes, whether radioactive or nonradioactive. Field use was not a viable option.

  18. Task Analysis of Shuttle Entry and Landing Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Albert W.; Vanderark, Stephen T.

    1993-01-01

    The Task Analysis of Shuttle Entry and Landing (E/L) Activities documents all tasks required to land the Orbiter following an STS mission. In addition to analysis of tasks performed, task conditions are described, including estimated time for completion, altitude, relative velocity, normal and lateral acceleration, location of controls operated or monitored, and level of g's experienced. This analysis precedes further investigations into potential effects of zero g on piloting capabilities for landing the Orbiter following long-duration missions. This includes, but is not limited to, researching the effects of extended duration missions on piloting capabilities. Four primary constraints of the analysis must be clarified: (1) the analysis depicts E/L in a static manner--the actual process is dynamic; (2) the task analysis was limited to a paper analysis, since it was not feasible to conduct research in the actual setting (i.e., observing or filming duration an actual E/L); (3) the tasks included are those required for E/L during nominal, daylight conditions; and (4) certain E/L tasks will vary according to the flying style of each commander.

  19. Teaching chemistry with neutron activation analysis at Dalhousie University

    SciTech Connect

    Holzbecher, J.; Chatt, A. )

    1991-11-01

    The Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 Reactor (DUSR) has been operating since July 1976 and has proven to be an invaluable tool in many teaching programs. These reactors are inherently safe and are designed to serve teaching and research needs of the universities, research centers, hospitals, etc. Since the DUSR has been, from its inception, associated with the Trace Analysis Research Centre, which is the Analytical Chemistry Division of the Department of Chemistry, the main thrust of its use continues to be in the field of nuclear analytical chemistry. Both teaching and research programs involve trace element analysis by neutron activation.

  20. 2D immunoblots show differential response of mouse IgG and IgM antibodies to antigens of mammary carcinoma 4 T1 cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunosuppression in breast cancer has been reported in women and in the highly metastatic mouse mammary tumor model 4 T1. The immunosuppressive environment complicates the use of the humoral response against the tumor as an immunodiagnostic tool. IgM has not been used in immunodiagnostic in part because its antitumor responses, both innate and adaptive, have not been studied in function of time in breast cancer. We show a new approach to analyzing the mouse humoral immune response, and compare the evolution with time of IgG and IgM responses against the antigens of 4 T1 cells. Methods The study is based on 2-dimensional immunoblotting detection of antigens from 4 T1 cells by the IgG and IgM antibodies in the serum of female mice injected with 4 T1 cells. Results There was a high variability in the intra-and inter-mouse response. Variability in the IgM response was manifested as a pattern of spots that could become a multibinomial variable of 0 and 1, which could represent a signature of the immune response. Different numbers of spots was found in the IgG and IgM responses from week 1 to 5. On average, the IgM had more but the IgG response decrease with the time. The natural IgM at t = 0 responds stronger than w1; the adaptive response of both IgM and IgG were elicited where, with the former being stronger better than the latter. Antigens that are recognized by some female mice in the first week are also recognized by other female mice at time 0. Contamination of the natural IgM makes difficult use the adaptive IgM as a tool for immunodiagnostic. Conclusions IgM and IgG response varied with the time and individuals. Spot variation in 2D pattern for the natural IgM could be expressed as a binomial signature, which opens up the way to correlate a particular pattern with resistance or susceptibility. This uncovers a battery of IgMs for each individual to confront cancer or infections. The possibility to differentiate between adaptive IgM antibodies

  1. Nondestructive neutron activation analysis of volcanic samples: Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Zoller, W.H.; Finnegan, D.L.; Crowe, B.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of volcanic emissions have been collected between and during eruptions of both Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes during the last three years. Airborne particles have been collected on Teflon filters and acidic gases on base-impregnated cellulose filters. Chemically neutral gas-phase species are collected on charcoal-coated cellulose filters. The primary analytical technique used is nondestructive neutron activation analysis, which has been used to determine the quantities of up to 35 elements on the different filters. The use of neutron activation analysis makes it possible to analyze for a wide range of elements in the different matrices used for the collection and to learn about the distribution between particles and gas phases for each of the elements.

  2. Diagnostic Application of Absolute Neutron Activation Analysis in Hematology

    SciTech Connect

    Zamboni, C.B.; Oliveira, L.C.; Dalaqua, L. Jr.

    2004-10-03

    The Absolute Neutron Activation Analysis (ANAA) technique was used to determine element concentrations of Cl and Na in blood of healthy group (male and female blood donators), select from Blood Banks at Sao Paulo city, to provide information which can help in diagnosis of patients. This study permitted to perform a discussion about the advantages and limitations of using this nuclear methodology in hematological examinations.

  3. Analyses of Oxyanion Materials by Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B; Perry, D.L.; English, G.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Leung, K.-N.; Garabedian, G.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay, Zs.

    2008-03-24

    Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) has been used to analyze metal ion oxyanion materials that have multiple applications, including medicine, materials, catalysts, and electronics. The significance for the need for accurate, highly sensitive analyses for the materials is discussed in the context of quality control of end products containing the parent element in each material. Applications of the analytical data for input to models and theoretical calculations related to the electronic and other properties of the materials are discussed.

  4. Adult Active Transport in the Netherlands: An Analysis of Its Contribution to Physical Activity Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Elliot; Böcker, Lars; Helbich, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Modern, urban lifestyles have engineered physical activity out of everyday life and this presents a major threat to human health. The Netherlands is a world leader in active travel, particularly cycling, but little research has sought to quantify the cumulative amount of physical activity through everyday walking and cycling. Methods Using data collected as part of the Dutch National Travel Survey (2010 – 2012), this paper determines the degree to which Dutch walking and cycling contributes to meeting minimum level of physical activity of 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic activity throughout the week. The sample includes 74,465 individuals who recorded at least some travel on the day surveyed. As physical activity benefits are cumulative, all walking and cycling trips are analysed, including those to and from public transport. These trips are then converted into an established measure of physical activity intensity, known as metabolic equivalents of tasks. Multivariate Tobit regression models were performed on a range of socio-demographic, transport resources, urban form and meteorological characteristics. Results The results reveal that Dutch men and women participate in 24 and 28 minutes of daily physical activity through walking and cycling, which is 41% and 55% more than the minimum recommended level. It should be noted however that some 57% of the entire sample failed to record any walking or cycling, and an investigation of this particular group serves as an important topic of future research. Active transport was positively related with age, income, bicycle ownership, urban density and air temperature. Car ownership had a strong negative relationship with physically active travel. Conclusion The results of this analysis demonstrate the significance of active transport to counter the emerging issue of sedentary lifestyle disease. The Dutch experience provides other countries with a highly relevant case study in the creation of

  5. Effects of seasonal adiposity on ovarian activity of Vespertilionid bat, Scotophilus heathi: Proteomics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajit; Powell, Michael D.; Sridaran, Rajagopala; Krishna, Amitabh

    2014-01-01

    In present study comparative proteomics was utilized to identify ovarian protein profiles and correlate the expression of these proteins with adiposity induced changes in ovarian activity leading to suppression of ovulation (delayed ovulation) in the bat, S. heathi. To achieve this, two-dimension gel electrophoresis combined with protein identification by tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) was applied. Protein profiles were obtained from intact ovaries of bats collected during recrudescence (basal body weight) and delayed ovulation (increased body weight) phases of reproductive cycle. Out of 42 differentially expressed protein spots, 15 protein spots were identified by LC–MS/MS. A majority of the 15 protein spots identified belonged to a group of enzymes within the glycolytic and citrate cycles. Greater concentrations of these enzymes were found during the period of delayed ovulation, which may be responsible for an increase in the production of ATP within the ovary. The increased metabolic activity and energy production observed within the ovary during winter dormancy may be required for increased steroidogenic activity during this period. The protein 14-3-3 identified by LC–MS/MS was verified by immunoblotting, which confirmed its increased expression during the period of delayed ovulation and may be associated with development of insulin resistance. Treatment with adipokines (adiponectin, resistin) is responsible for increased expression of 14-3-3 protein in the ovary of S. heathi. Adiposity-associated rise in adipokines are thus responsible for increased expression of 14-3-3 protein in the ovary of S. heathi, which may be responsible for prolonged survival of antral follicles and suppression of ovulation. The 14-3-3 protein may represent a new marker for adiposity associated ovarian anovulation (disorders). PMID:25305638

  6. Significant improvement of the recombinant Borrelia-specific immunoglobulin G immunoblot test by addition of VlsE and a DbpA homologue derived from Borrelia garinii for diagnosis of early neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Spechtel, Ulrike; Lehnert, Gisela; Liegl, Gaby; Fingerle, Volker; Heimerl, Christiane; Johnson, Barbara J B; Wilske, Bettina

    2003-03-01

    We investigated whether the recombinant Borrelia Western blot test previously described (B. Wilske, C. Habermann, V. Fingerle, B. Hillenbrand, S. Jauris-Heipke, G. Lehnert, I. Pradel, D. Rössler, and U. Schulte-Spechtel, Med. Microbiol. Immunol. 188:139-144, 1999) can be improved by the addition of VlsE and additional DbpA and OspC homologues. By using a panel of sera from 36 neuroborreliosis patients and 67 control patients, the diagnostic sensitivity of the recombinant immunoblot test was significantly increased (86.1% versus 52.7%) without loss of specificity and was higher (86.1% versus 63.8%) than that of the conventional whole-cell lysate immunoblot test (U. Hauser, G. Lehnert, R. Lobentanzer, and B. Wilske, J. Clin. Microbiol. 35:1433-1444, 1997). Improvement was mainly due to the presence of VlsE and DbpA. PMID:12624072

  7. Genetic analysis of lipolytic activities in Thermus thermophilus HB27.

    PubMed

    Leis, Benedikt; Angelov, Angel; Li, Haijuan; Liebl, Wolfgang

    2014-12-10

    The extremely thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB27 displays lipolytic activity for the hydrolysis of triglycerides. In this study we performed a mutational in vivo analysis of esterases and lipases that confer growth on tributyrin. We interrupted 10 ORFs suspected to encode lipolytic enzymes. Two chromosomal loci were identified that resulted in reduced hydrolysis capabilities against tributyrin and various para-nitrophenyl acyl esters. By implementation of a convenient new one-step method which abstains from the use of selectable markers, a mutant strain with multiple scar-less deletions was constructed by sequentially deleting ORFs TT_C1787, TT_C0340, TT_C0341 and TT_C0904. The quadruple deletion mutant of T. thermophilus exhibited significantly lower lipolytic activity (approximately 25% residual activity compared to wild type strain) over a broad range of fatty acyl esters and had lost the ability to grow on agar plates containing tributyrin as the sole carbon source. Furthermore, we were able to determine the impact of each gene disruption on the lipolytic activity profile in this model organism and show that the esterase activity in T. thermophilus HB27 is due to a concerted action of several hydrolases having different substrate preferences and activities. The esterase-less T. thermophilus multi-deletion mutant from this study can be used as a screening and expression host for esterase genes from thermophiles or metagenomes. PMID:25102235

  8. Transition path theory analysis of c-Src kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yilin; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S; Roux, Benoît

    2016-08-16

    Nonreceptor tyrosine kinases of the Src family are large multidomain allosteric proteins that are crucial to cellular signaling pathways. In a previous study, we generated a Markov state model (MSM) to simulate the activation of c-Src catalytic domain, used as a prototypical tyrosine kinase. The long-time kinetics of transition predicted by the MSM was in agreement with experimental observations. In the present study, we apply the framework of transition path theory (TPT) to the previously constructed MSM to characterize the main features of the activation pathway. The analysis indicates that the activating transition, in which the activation loop first opens up followed by an inward rotation of the αC-helix, takes place via a dense set of intermediate microstates distributed within a fairly broad "transition tube" in a multidimensional conformational subspace connecting the two end-point conformations. Multiple microstates with negligible equilibrium probabilities carry a large transition flux associated with the activating transition, which explains why extensive conformational sampling is necessary to accurately determine the kinetics of activation. Our results suggest that the combination of MSM with TPT provides an effective framework to represent conformational transitions in complex biomolecular systems. PMID:27482115

  9. Functional domain analysis of the Saccharomyces MAL-activator.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Gibson, A W; Kim, J H; Wojciechowicz, L A; Zhang, B; Michels, C A

    1999-08-01

    MAL63 of the MAL6 locus and its homologues at the other MAL loci encode transcription activators required for the maltose-inducible expression of the MAL structural genes. We carried out a deletion analysis of LexA-MAL63 gene fusions to localize the functional domains of the Mal63 MAL-activator protein. Our results indicate that the sequence-specific DNA-binding domain of Mal63p is contained in residues 1-100; that residues 60-283 constitute a functional core region including the transactivation domain; that residues 251-299 are required to inhibit the activation function of Mal63p; and that the rest of the C-terminal region of the protein contains a maltose-responsive domain that acts to relieve the inhibitory effect on the activation function. Abundant overproduction of Mal63p does not overcome the negative regulation of MAL gene expression in the absence of maltose, suggesting that a titratable MAL-specific repressor similar to Gal80p is not involved in the negative regulation of the MAL-activator. A model for maltose-inducible autoregulation of the MAL-activator is presented. PMID:10447589

  10. HPTLC Analysis, Antioxidant and Antigout Activity of Indian Plants.

    PubMed

    Nile, Shivraj Hariram; Park, Se Won

    2014-01-01

    The HPTLC analysis, antioxidant, and antigout activity of Asparagus racemosus, Withania somnifera, Vitex negundo, Plumbago zeylanica, Butea monosperma and Tephrosia purpurea extracts were investigated. The chemical fingerprinting were carried out by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC), antioxidant activity by ABTS, DPPH, FRAP radical scavenging assays, and antiogout activity by cow milk xanthine oxidase. The HPTLC fingerprint qualitatively revealed predominant amount of flavonoids. The TEAC values ranged from 45.80 to 140 µM trolox/100 g dry weight for ABTS, from 85 to 430 µM trolox/ 100 g dw DPPH, and 185 to 560 µM trolox/100 g dw for FRAP respectively. Plants used in this study was found to inhibit the toxicity, as seen from the decreased LPO and increased GSH, SOD and CAT levels. The total phenolic and flavonoid content ranged from 10.21 to 28.17 and 5.80 to 10.1 mg of gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/100 gdw respectively. The plant extracts demonstrated significant xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity at 100 g/mL and revealed an inhibition greater than 50 % and IC50 values below the standard. This effect was almost similar to the activity of allopurinol (Standard drug) against xanthine oxidase (90.2 ± 0.4 %). These plant root extract will be subjected for further extensive studies to isolate and identify their active constituents which are useful for against inflammation and gout. PMID:25237348

  11. Nonlinear analysis of epileptic activity in rabbit neocortex.

    PubMed

    Sarnthein, J; Abarbanel, H D; Pockberger, H

    1998-01-01

    We report on the nonlinear analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings in the rabbit visual cortex. Epileptic seizures were induced by local penicillin application and triggered by visual stimulation. The analysis procedures for nonlinear signals have been developed over the past few years and applied primarily to physical systems. This is an early application to biological systems and the first to EEG data. We find that during epileptic activity, both global and local embedding dimensions are reduced with respect to nonepileptic activity. Interestingly, these values are very low (dE approximately equal to 3) and do not change between preictal and tonic stages of epileptic activity, also the Lyapunov dimension remains constant. However, between these two stages the manifestations of the local dynamics change quite drastically, as can be seen, e.g., from the shape of the attractors. Furthermore, the largest Lyapunov exponent is reduced by a factor of about two in the second stage and characterizes the difference in dynamics. Thus, the occurrence of clinical symptoms associated with the tonic seizure activity seems to be mainly related to the local dynamics of the nonlinear system. These results thus seem to give a strong indication that the dynamics remains much the same in these stages of behavior, and changes are due to alterations in model parameters and consequent bifurcations of the observed orbits. PMID:9485585

  12. Multidisciplinary analysis of actively controlled large flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Paul A.; Young, John W.; Sutter, Thomas R.

    1986-01-01

    The control of Flexible Structures (COFS) program has supported the development of an analysis capability at the Langley Research Center called the Integrated Multidisciplinary Analysis Tool (IMAT) which provides an efficient data storage and transfer capability among commercial computer codes to aid in the dynamic analysis of actively controlled structures. IMAT is a system of computer programs which transfers Computer-Aided-Design (CAD) configurations, structural finite element models, material property and stress information, structural and rigid-body dynamic model information, and linear system matrices for control law formulation among various commercial applications programs through a common database. Although general in its formulation, IMAT was developed specifically to aid in the evaluation of the structures. A description of the IMAT system and results of an application of the system are given.

  13. A Novel Analysis of Acoustic Oscillations in Chromospheric Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsue, Teresa; Hill, Frank; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2015-04-01

    A helioseismic analysis of the chromosphere is employed in H-alpha to study how solar flares around active regions affect the behavior of acoustic oscillations. Our analysis deals with flares directly over sunspots, where the region is highly magnetized. In our current study of analyzing these oscillations in the chromosphere we study the temporal evolution of the oscillatory behavior from data taken from the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) H-alpha detectors. We investigate the wave behavior across different frequency bands (1 < ν < 8.33 mHz). In order to analyze the frequency bands of the oscillations, our analysis utilizes time series data to create Fourier power spectra of individual pixels spatially resolved and temporally evolved around the flare region; thereby creating a movie of each frequency band. This study entails three active regions, directly over sunspots, in which flaring activity is taking place from two solar flares, which occurred on June 13th and July 12th, 2012. We found that the intensity of the flare has an effect on the oscillations within different frequency bands. A suppression of power was observed in dark anomalous structures across the total frequency bands and in other regions there was an observed boost in power due to flaring activity. We find that, in the heart of all three regions, the low-frequency power (˜1-2 mHz) is substantially enhanced immediately prior to and after the flare, and that power at all frequencies up to 8 mHz is depleted at flare maximum. This depletion is both frequency and time dependent, which probably reflects the changing depths visible during the flare in the bandpass of the filter. These variations are not observed outside the flaring region. The depletion may indicate that acoustic energy is being converted into thermal energy at flare maximum, while the low-frequency enhancement may arise from an instability in the chromosphere and provide an early warning of the flare onset.

  14. Analysis of Charge Carrier Transport in Organic Photovoltaic Active Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2015-03-01

    We present a systematic analysis of charge carrier transport in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices based on phenomenological, deterministic charge carrier transport models. The models describe free electron and hole transport, trapping, and detrapping, as well as geminate charge-pair dissociation and geminate and bimolecular recombination, self-consistently with Poisson's equation for the electric field in the active layer. We predict photocurrent evolution in devices with active layers of P3HT, P3HT/PMMA, and P3HT/PS, as well as P3HT/PCBM blends, and photocurrent-voltage (I-V) relations in these devices at steady state. Charge generation propensity, zero-field charge mobilities, and trapping, detrapping, and recombination rate coefficients are determined by fitting the modeling predictions to experimental measurements. We have analyzed effects of the active layer morphology for layers consisting of both pristine drop-cast films and of nanoparticle (NP) assemblies, as well as effects on device performance of insulating NP doping in conducting polymers and of specially designed interlayers placed between an electrode and the active layer. The model predictions provide valuable input toward synthesis of active layers with prescribed morphology that optimize OPV device performance.

  15. Neutron Activation Analysis for the Demonstration of Amphibolite Rock-Weathering Activity of a Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rades-Rohkohl, E.; Hirsch, P.; Fränzle, O.

    1979-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis was employed in a survey of weathering abilities of rock surface microorganisms. A yeast isolated from an amphibolite of a megalithic grave was found actively to concentrate, in media and in or on cells, iron and other elements when grown in the presence of ground rock. This was demonstrated by comparing a spectrum of neutron-activated amphibolite powder (particle size, 50 to 100 μm) with the spectra of neutron-activated, lyophilized yeast cells which had grown with or without amphibolite powder added to different media. The most active yeast (IFAM 1171) did not only solubilize Fe from the rock powder, but significant amounts of Co, Eu, Yb, Ca, Ba, Sc, Lu, Cr, Th, and U were also mobilized. The latter two elements occurred as natural radioactive isotopes in this amphibolite. When the yeast cells were grown with neutron-activated amphibolite, the cells contained the same elements. Furthermore, the growth medium contained Fe, Co, and Eu which had been solubilized from the amphibolite. This indicates the presence, in this yeast strain, of active rockweathering abilities as well as of uptake mechanisms for solubilized rock components. PMID:16345472

  16. Meta-Analysis of Workplace Physical Activity Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Vicki S.; Hafdahl, Adam R.; Cooper, Pamela S.; Brown, Lori M.; Lusk, Sally L.

    2009-01-01

    Context Most adults do not achieve adequate physical activity. Despite the potential benefits of worksite health promotion, no previous comprehensive meta-analysis has summarized health and physical activity behavior outcomes from these programs. This comprehensive meta-analysis integrated the extant wide range of worksite physical activity intervention research. Evidence acquisition Extensive searching located published and unpublished intervention studies reported from 1969 through 2007. Results were coded from primary studies. Random-effects meta-analytic procedures, including moderator analyses, were completed in 2008. Evidence synthesis Effects on most variables were substantially heterogeneous because diverse studies were included. Standardized mean difference (d) effect sizes were synthesized across approximately 38,231 subjects. Significantly positive effects were observed for physical activity behavior (0.21), fitness (0.57), lipids (0.13), anthropometric measures (0.08), work attendance (0.19), and job stress (0.33). The significant effect size for diabetes risk (0.98) is more tentative given small sample sizes. Significant heterogeneity documents intervention effects varied across studies. The mean effect size for fitness corresponds to a difference between treatment minus control subjects' means on V02max of 3.5 mL/kg/min; for lipids, −0.2 on total cholesterol:HDL; and for diabetes risk, −12.6 mg/dL on fasting glucose. Conclusions These findings document that some workplace physical activity interventions can improve both health and important worksite outcomes. Effects were variable for most outcomes, reflecting the diversity of primary studies. Future primary research should compare interventions to confirm causal relationships and further explore heterogeneity. PMID:19765506

  17. Empirical comparison of neutron activation sample analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillenwalters, Elizabeth

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates a research reactor used mainly for neutron activation of samples, which are then shipped to industrial customers. Accurate nuclide identification and activity determination are crucial to remain in compliance with Code of Federal Regulations guidelines. This facility utilized a Canberra high purity germanium detector (HPGe) coupled with Canberra Genie(TM) 2000 (G2K) software for gamma spectroscopy. This study analyzed the current method of nuclide identification and activity determination of neutron activated materials utilized by the USGS reactor staff and made recommendations to improve the method. Additionally, analysis of attenuators, effect of detector dead time on nuclide identification, and validity of activity determination assumptions were investigated. The current method of activity determination utilized the G2K software to obtain ratio of activity per nuclide identified. This determination was performed without the use of geometrically appropriate efficiency calibration curves. The ratio of activity per nuclide was used in conjunction with an overall exposure rate in mR/h obtained via a Fluke Biomedical hand-held ion chamber. The overall exposure rate was divided into individual nuclide amounts based on the G2K nuclide ratios. A gamma energy of 1 MeV and a gamma yield of 100% was assumed for all samples. Utilizing the gamma assumption and nuclide ratios, a calculation was performed to determine total sample activity in muCi (microCuries). An alternative method was proposed, which would eliminate the use of exposure rate and rely solely on the G2K software capabilities. The G2K software was energy and efficiency calibrated with efficiency curves developed for multiple geometries. The USGS reactor staff were trained to load appropriate calibration data into the G2K software prior to sample analysis. Comparison of the current method and proposed method demonstrated that the activity value calculated with the 1 Me

  18. Solar activity forecast: Spectral analysis and neurofuzzy prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholipour, Ali; Lucas, Caro; Araabi, Babak N.; Shafiee, Masoud

    2005-04-01

    Active research in the last two decades indicates that the physical precursor and solar dynamo techniques are preferred as practical tools for long-term prediction of solar activity. But why should we omit more than 23 cycles of solar activity history, and just use empirical methods or simple autoregressive methods on the basis of observations for the latest eight cycles? In this article, a method based on spectral analysis and neurofuzzy modeling is proposed that is capable of issuing very accurate long-term prediction of sunspot number time series. A locally linear neurofuzzy model is optimized for each of the principal components obtained from singular spectrum analysis, and the multi-step predicted values are recombined to make the sunspot number time series. The proposed method is used for solar cycles 22 and 23 and the results are remarkably good in comparison to the predictions made by solar dynamo and precursor methods. An early prediction of the maximum smoothed international sunspot number for cycle 24 is 145 in 2011 2012.

  19. Mineral exploration and soil analysis using in situ neutron activation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Hoyte, A.F.

    1966-01-01

    A feasibility study has been made to operate by remote control an unshielded portable positive-ion accelerator type neutron source to induce activities in the ground or rock by "in situ" neutron irradiation. Selective activation techniques make it possible to detect some thirty or more elements by irradiating the ground for periods of a few minutes with either 3-MeV or 14-MeV neutrons. The depth of penetration of neutrons, the effect of water content of the soil on neutron moderation, gamma ray attenuation in the soil and other problems are considered. The analysis shows that, when exploring for most elements of economic interest, the reaction 2H(d,n)3He yielding ??? 3-MeV neutrons is most practical to produce a relatively uniform flux of neutrons of less than 1 keV to a depth of 19???-20???. Irradiation with high energy neutrons (??? 14 MeV) can also be used and may be better suited for certain problems. However, due to higher background and lower sensitivity for the heavy minerals, it is not a recommended neutron source for general exploration use. Preliminary experiments have been made which indicate that neutron activation in situ is feasible for a mineral exploration or qualititative soil analysis. ?? 1976.

  20. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of sectioned hair strands for arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Guinn, V.P.

    1996-12-31

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) is a valuable and proven method for the quantitative analysis of sectioned human head hair specimens for arsenic - and, if arsenic is found to be present at high concentrations, the approximate times when it was ingested. Reactor-flux thermal-neutron activation of the hair samples produces 26.3-h {sup 76}As, which is then detected by germanium gamma-ray spectrometry, measuring the 559.1-keV gamma-ray peak of {sup 76}As. Even normal levels of arsenic in hair, in the range of <1 ppm up to a few parts per million of arsenic can be measured - and the far higher levels associated with large internal doses of arsenic, levels approaching or exceeding 100 ppm arsenic, are readily and accurately measurable. However, all phases of forensic investigations of possible chronic (or in some cases, acute) arsenic poisoning are important, i.e., not just the analysis phase. All of these phases are discussed in this paper, based on the author`s experience and the experience of others, in criminal cases. Cases of chronic arsenic poisoning often reveal a series of two to four doses, perhaps a few months apart, with increasing doses.

  1. Usability engineering: domain analysis activities for augmented-reality systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbard, Joseph; Swan, J. E., II; Hix, Deborah; Lanzagorta, Marco O.; Livingston, Mark; Brown, Dennis B.; Julier, Simon J.

    2002-05-01

    This paper discusses our usability engineering process for the Battlefield Augmented Reality System (BARS). Usability engineering is a structured, iterative, stepwise development process. Like the related disciplines of software and systems engineering, usability engineering is a combination of management principals and techniques, formal and semi- formal evaluation techniques, and computerized tools. BARS is an outdoor augmented reality system that displays heads- up battlefield intelligence information to a dismounted warrior. The paper discusses our general usability engineering process. We originally developed the process in the context of virtual reality applications, but in this work we are adapting the procedures to an augmented reality system. The focus of this paper is our work on domain analysis, the first activity of the usability engineering process. We describe our plans for and our progress to date on our domain analysis for BARS. We give results in terms of a specific urban battlefield use case we have designed.

  2. Analysis of antifreeze protein activity using colorimetric gold nanosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xu; Choi, Ho-seok; Park, Ji-In; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-07-01

    High activity and long stability of antifreeze proteins (AFPs), also known as ice-binding proteins (IBPs), are necessary for exerting their physiological functions in biotechnology and cryomedicine. Here we report a simple analysis of antifreeze protein activity and stability based on self-assembly of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) via freezing and thawing cycles. While the mercaptosuccinic acid-capped AuNP (MSA-AuNP) was easily self-assembled after a freezing/thawing cycle, due to the mechanical attack of ice crystal on the MSA-AuNP surface, the presence of AFP impeded the self-assembly of MSA-AuNP via the interaction of AFP with ice crystals via freezing and thawing cycles, which led to a strong color in the MSA-AuNP solution. As a result, the aggregation parameter (E520/E650) of MSA-AuNP showed the rapid detection of both activity and stability of AFPs. We suggest that our newly developed method is very suitable for measuring antifreeze activity and stability in a simple and rapid manner with reliable quantification.

  3. Modeling of Neutron Spectra Based on Activation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovancevic, N.; Fridman, M.; Daraban, L.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Hult, M.; Lutter, G.; Marissens, G.; Stroh, H.

    Safe and economical use of nuclear energy and particularly the development of GEN-IV reactors impose a better understanding of prompt neutron emission in fission, as well as of the fission process as such. Therefore, accurate measurements of the prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) are very important. In this work, we are testing the possibility to determine the PFNS by an activation method called DONA (DOsimetry and Spectroscopy using Neuron Activation) recently developed at IRMM (Wieslander et al., 2010, Lövestam et al., 2009). This type of modeling of the neutron spectra, based on the activation analysis, can provide new information about an old problem which still exists today, i.e. the discrepancy between measured integral and differential data (Capote et al., 2012). The problem is that the calculated average cross section for a certain neutron reaction, by using the differential experimental PFNS, in many cases cannot reproduce satisfactorily the integral measured cross section values. The modeling of the neutron spectra by the DONA technique was tested with the standard neutron spectrum of the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. We analyzed the sensitivity of the unfolding procedure to the initial neutron energy spectrum, the influence of the neutron scattering, the possibility of using different activation reactions and we also made an estimation of the lowest measurable neutron fluence rate.

  4. CMS dashboard for monitoring of the user analysis activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavakis, Edward; Andreeva, Julia; Maier, Gerhild; Khan, Akram

    2012-12-01

    The CMS Virtual Organisation (VO) uses various fully distributed job submission methods and execution backends. The CMS jobs are processed on several middleware platforms such as the gLite, the ARC and the OSG. Up to 200,000 CMS jobs are submitted daily to the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) infrastructure and this number is steadily growing. These mentioned factors increase the complexity of the monitoring of the user analysis activities within the CMS VO. Reliable monitoring is an aspect of particular importance; it is a vital factor for the overall improvement of the quality of the CMS VO infrastructure.

  5. Activation analysis of admixtures in certain semiconductive materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artyukhin, P. I.; Gilbert, E. P.; Pronin, V. A.

    1978-01-01

    The use of extractions and chromatographic operations to separate macrobases, and to divide elements into groups convenient for gamma-spectrometric analysis is discussed. Methods are described for the activation detection of some impurities in silicon, arsenic, thallium, and trichloromethylsilane, on the basis of the extraction properties of bis(2-chlorethyl ether) and dimethylbenzylalkylammonium chloride. A schematic diagram of the extraction separation of elements-admixture is presented showing the aqueous and organic phases. The content percentage of the various elements are given in tables.

  6. Modeling place field activity with hierarchical slow feature analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schönfeld, Fabian; Wiskott, Laurenz

    2015-01-01

    What are the computational laws of hippocampal activity? In this paper we argue for the slowness principle as a fundamental processing paradigm behind hippocampal place cell firing. We present six different studies from the experimental literature, performed with real-life rats, that we replicated in computer simulations. Each of the chosen studies allows rodents to develop stable place fields and then examines a distinct property of the established spatial encoding: adaptation to cue relocation and removal; directional dependent firing in the linear track and open field; and morphing and scaling the environment itself. Simulations are based on a hierarchical Slow Feature Analysis (SFA) network topped by a principal component analysis (ICA) output layer. The slowness principle is shown to account for the main findings of the presented experimental studies. The SFA network generates its responses using raw visual input only, which adds to its biological plausibility but requires experiments performed in light conditions. Future iterations of the model will thus have to incorporate additional information, such as path integration and grid cell activity, in order to be able to also replicate studies that take place during darkness. PMID:26052279

  7. Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cheryl B.; Conger, Bruce C.; Miranda, Bruno M.; Bue, Grant C.; Rouen, Michael N.

    2007-01-01

    An effort was initiated by NASA/JSC in 2001 to develop an Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT) for the sizing of Extravehicular Activity System (EVAS) architecture and studies. Its intent was to support space suit development efforts and to aid in conceptual designs for future human exploration missions. Its basis was the Life Support Options Performance Program (LSOPP), a spacesuit and portable life support system (PLSS) sizing program developed for NASA/JSC circa 1990. EVAS_SAT estimates the mass, power, and volume characteristics for user-defined EVAS architectures, including Suit Systems, Airlock Systems, Tools and Translation Aids, and Vehicle Support equipment. The tool has undergone annual changes and has been updated as new data have become available. Certain sizing algorithms have been developed based on industry standards, while others are based on the LSOPP sizing routines. The sizing algorithms used by EVAS_SAT are preliminary. Because EVAS_SAT was designed for use by members of the EVA community, subsystem familiarity on the part of the intended user group and in the analysis of results is assumed. The current EVAS_SAT is operated within Microsoft Excel 2003 using a Visual Basic interface system.

  8. Behavioural Activation for Depression; An Update of Meta-Analysis of Effectiveness and Sub Group Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ekers, David; Webster, Lisa; Van Straten, Annemieke; Cuijpers, Pim; Richards, David; Gilbody, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression is a common, disabling condition for which psychological treatments are recommended. Behavioural activation has attracted increased interest in recent years. It has been over 5 years since our meta-analyses summarised the evidence supporting and this systematic review updates those findings and examines moderators of treatment effect. Method Randomised trials of behavioural activation for depression versus controls or anti-depressant medication were identified using electronic database searches, previous reviews and reference lists. Data on symptom level and study level moderators were extracted and analysed using meta-analysis, sub-group analysis and meta-regression respectively. Results Twenty six randomised controlled trials including 1524 subjects were included in this meta-analysis. A random effects meta-analysis of symptom level post treatment showed behavioural activation to be superior to controls (SMD −0.74 CI −0.91 to −0.56, k = 25, N = 1088) and medication (SMD −0.42 CI −0.83 to-0.00, k = 4, N = 283). Study quality was low in the majority of studies and follow- up time periods short. There was no indication of publication bias and subgroup analysis showed limited association between moderators and effect size. Conclusions The results in this meta-analysis support and strengthen the evidence base indicating Behavioural Activation is an effective treatment for depression. Further high quality research with longer term follow-up is needed to strengthen the evidence base. PMID:24936656

  9. Characterization of indoor cooking aerosol using neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.; Landsberger, S.; Larson, S. )

    1993-01-01

    Suspended particles in air are potentially harmful to human health, depending on their sizes and chemical composition. Residential indoor particles mainly come from (a) outdoor sources that are transported indoors, (b) indoor dust that is resuspended, and (c) indoor combustion sources, which include cigarette smoking, cooking, and heating. Jedrychowski stated that chronic phlegm in elderly women was strongly related to the cooking exposure. Kamens et al. indicated that cooking could generate small particles (<0.1 [mu]m), and cooking one meal could contribute [approximately]5 to 18% of total daytime particle volume exposure. Although cooking is a basic human activity, there are not many data available on the properties of particles generated by this activity. Some cooking methods, such as stir-frying and frying, which are the most favored for Chinese and other Far East people, generate a large quantity of aerosols. This research included the following efforts: 1. investigating particle number concentrations, distributions, and their variations with four different cooking methods and ventilation conditions; 2. measuring the chemical composition of cooking aerosol samples by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

  10. Probabilistic analysis of activation volumes generated during deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Butson, Christopher R; Cooper, Scott E; Henderson, Jaimie M; Wolgamuth, Barbara; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2011-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) and shows great promise for the treatment of several other disorders. However, while the clinical analysis of DBS has received great attention, a relative paucity of quantitative techniques exists to define the optimal surgical target and most effective stimulation protocol for a given disorder. In this study we describe a methodology that represents an evolutionary addition to the concept of a probabilistic brain atlas, which we call a probabilistic stimulation atlas (PSA). We outline steps to combine quantitative clinical outcome measures with advanced computational models of DBS to identify regions where stimulation-induced activation could provide the best therapeutic improvement on a per-symptom basis. While this methodology is relevant to any form of DBS, we present example results from subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS for PD. We constructed patient-specific computer models of the volume of tissue activated (VTA) for 163 different stimulation parameter settings which were tested in six patients. We then assigned clinical outcome scores to each VTA and compiled all of the VTAs into a PSA to identify stimulation-induced activation targets that maximized therapeutic response with minimal side effects. The results suggest that selection of both electrode placement and clinical stimulation parameter settings could be tailored to the patient's primary symptoms using patient-specific models and PSAs. PMID:20974269

  11. The role of neutron activation analysis in nutritional biomonitoring programs

    SciTech Connect

    Iyengar, V.

    1988-01-01

    Nutritional biomonitoring is a multidisciplinary task and an integral part of a more general bioenvironmental surveillance. In its comprehensive form, it is a combination of biological, environmental, and nutrient monitoring activities. Nutrient monitoring evaluates the input of essential nutrients required to maintain vital bodily functions; this includes vigilance over extreme fluctuations of nutrient intake in relation to the recommended dietary allowances and estimated safe and adequate daily dietary intakes and adherence to the goals of provisional tolerance limits. Environmental monitoring assesses the external human exposure via ambient pathways, namely, air, water, soil, food, etc. Biological monitoring quantifies a toxic agent and its metabolites in representative biologic specimens of an exposed organ to identify health effects. In practice, coordinating all three components of a nutritional biomonitoring program is complex, expensive, and tedious. Experience gained from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys demonstrates the problems involved. By far the most critical challenge faced here is the question of analytical quality control, particularly when trace element determinations are involved. Yet, measures to ensure reliability of analytical data are mandatory, and there are no short-cuts to this requirement. The purpose of this presentation is to elucidate the potential of neutron activation analysis (NAA) in nutritional biomonitoring activities.

  12. Knowledge discovery in group activities through sequential observation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Vinayak; Shirkhodaie, Amir

    2014-06-01

    Understanding of Group Activities (GA) has significant applications in civilian and military domains. The process of understanding GA is typically involved with spatiotemporal analysis of multi-modality sensor data. Video imagery is one popular sensing modality that offers rich data, however, data associated with imagery source may become fragmented and discontinued due to a number of reasons (e.g., data transmission, or observation obstructions and occlusions). However, making sense out of video imagery is a real challenge. It requires a proper inference working model capable of analyzing video imagery frame by frame, extract and inference spatiotemporal information pertaining to observations while developing an incremental perception of the GA as they emerge overtime. In this paper, we propose an ontology based GA recognition where three inference Hidden Markov Models (HMM's) are used for predicting group activities taking place in outdoor environments and different task operational taxonomy. The three competing models include: a concatenated HMM, a cascaded HMM, and a context-based HMM. The proposed ontology based GA-HMM was subjected to set of semantically annotated visual observations from outdoor group activity experiments. Experimental results from GA-HMM are presented with technical discussions on design of each model and their potential implication to Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS).

  13. TEAK: topology enrichment analysis framework for detecting activated biological subpathways.

    PubMed

    Judeh, Thair; Johnson, Cole; Kumar, Anuj; Zhu, Dongxiao

    2013-02-01

    To mine gene expression data sets effectively, analysis frameworks need to incorporate methods that identify intergenic relationships within enriched biologically relevant subpathways. For this purpose, we developed the Topology Enrichment Analysis frameworK (TEAK). TEAK employs a novel in-house algorithm and a tailor-made Clique Percolation Method to extract linear and nonlinear KEGG subpathways, respectively. TEAK scores subpathways using the Bayesian Information Criterion for context specific data and the Kullback-Leibler divergence for case-control data. In this article, we utilized TEAK with experimental studies to analyze microarray data sets profiling stress responses in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using a public microarray data set, we identified via TEAK linear sphingolipid metabolic subpathways activated during the yeast response to nitrogen stress, and phenotypic analyses of the corresponding deletion strains indicated previously unreported fitness defects for the dpl1Δ and lag1Δ mutants under conditions of nitrogen limitation. In addition, we studied the yeast filamentous response to nitrogen stress by profiling changes in transcript levels upon deletion of two key filamentous growth transcription factors, FLO8 and MSS11. Via TEAK we identified a nonlinear glycerophospholipid metabolism subpathway involving the SLC1 gene, which we found via mutational analysis to be required for yeast filamentous growth. PMID:23268448

  14. Helioseismology of pre-emerging active regions. III. Statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.; Braun, D. C.; Birch, A. C.

    2014-05-01

    The subsurface properties of active regions (ARs) prior to their appearance at the solar surface may shed light on the process of AR formation. Helioseismic holography has been applied to samples taken from two populations of regions on the Sun (pre-emergence and without emergence), each sample having over 100 members, that were selected to minimize systematic bias, as described in Paper I. Paper II showed that there are statistically significant signatures in the average helioseismic properties that precede the formation of an AR. This paper describes a more detailed analysis of the samples of pre-emergence regions and regions without emergence based on discriminant analysis. The property that is best able to distinguish the populations is found to be the surface magnetic field, even a day before the emergence time. However, after accounting for the correlations between the surface field and the quantities derived from helioseismology, there is still evidence of a helioseismic precursor to AR emergence that is present for at least a day prior to emergence, although the analysis presented cannot definitively determine the subsurface properties prior to emergence due to the small sample sizes.

  15. Dictionary learning and sparse recovery for electrodermal activity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, Malia; Dallal, Ahmed; Eldeeb, Safaa; Akcakaya, Murat; Kleckner, Ian; Gerard, Christophe; Quigley, Karen S.; Goodwin, Matthew S.

    2016-05-01

    Measures of electrodermal activity (EDA) have advanced research in a wide variety of areas including psychophysiology; however, the majority of this research is typically undertaken in laboratory settings. To extend the ecological validity of laboratory assessments, researchers are taking advantage of advances in wireless biosensors to gather EDA data in ambulatory settings, such as in school classrooms. While measuring EDA in naturalistic contexts may enhance ecological validity, it also introduces analytical challenges that current techniques cannot address. One limitation is the limited efficiency and automation of analysis techniques. Many groups either analyze their data by hand, reviewing each individual record, or use computationally inefficient software that limits timely analysis of large data sets. To address this limitation, we developed a method to accurately and automatically identify SCRs using curve fitting methods. Curve fitting has been shown to improve the accuracy of SCR amplitude and location estimations, but have not yet been used to reduce computational complexity. In this paper, sparse recovery and dictionary learning methods are combined to improve computational efficiency of analysis and decrease run time, while maintaining a high degree of accuracy in detecting SCRs. Here, a dictionary is first created using curve fitting methods for a standard SCR shape. Then, orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) is used to detect SCRs within a dataset using the dictionary to complete sparse recovery. Evaluation of our method, including a comparison to for speed and accuracy with existing software, showed an accuracy of 80% and a reduced run time.

  16. Physical activity and sedentary activity patterns among children and adolescents: a latent class analysis approach

    PubMed Central

    Heitzler, Carrie; Lytle, Leslie; Erickson, Darin; Sirard, John; Barr-Anderson, Daheia; Story, Marry

    2010-01-01

    Background While much is known about the overall levels of physical activity and sedentary activity among youth, few studies have attempted to define clusters of such behaviors. The purpose of this study was to identify and describe unique classes of youth based on their participation in a variety of physical activity and sedentary behaviors. Methods Latent class analysis was used to characterize segments of youth based on patterns of self-reported and accelerometer-measured participation in 12 behaviors. Children and adolescents (N=720) from 6th–11th grade were included in the analysis. Differences in class membership were examined using multinomial logistic regression. Results Three distinct classes emerged for boys and girls. Among boys, the three classes were characterized as: (1) “Active” (42.1%), (2) “Sedentary” (24.9%), and (3) “Low Media/Moderate Activity” (33.0%). For girls, classes were: (1) “Active” (18.7%), (2) “Sedentary” (47.6%), and (3) “Low Media/Functional Activity” (33.7%). Significant differences were found between the classes for a number of demographic indicators including the proportion in each class who were classified as overweight or obese. Conclusions The behavioral profiles of the classes identified in this study can be used to suggest possible audience segments for intervention and to tailor strategies appropriately. PMID:21597117

  17. Unconjugated Bilirubin exerts Pro-Apoptotic Effect on Platelets via p38-MAPK activation

    PubMed Central

    NaveenKumar, Somanathapura K.; Thushara, Ram M.; Sundaram, Mahalingam S.; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Paul, Manoj; Thirunavukkarasu, Chinnasamy; Basappa; Nagaraju, Ganesh; Raghavan, Sathees C.; Girish, Kesturu S.; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is one of the most frequently observed secondary complications in many pathological conditions including liver diseases, where hyperbilirubinemia is very common. The present study sought to find the cause of thrombocytopenia in unconjugated hyperbilirubinemic conditions. Unconjugated bilirubin (UCB), an end-product of heme catabolism, is known to have pro-oxidative and cytotoxic effects at high serum concentration. We investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the pro-apoptotic effect of UCB on human platelets in vitro, and followed it up with studies in phenylhydrazine-induced hyperbilirubinemic rat model and hyperbilirubinemic human subjects. UCB is indeed found to significantly induce platelet apoptotic events including elevated endogenous reactive oxygen species generation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, increased intracellular calcium levels, cardiolipin peroxidation and phosphatidylserine externalization (p < 0.001) as evident by FACS analysis. The immunoblots show the elevated levels of cytosolic cytochrome c and caspase activation in UCB-treated platelets. Further, UCB is found to induce mitochondrial ROS generation leading to p38 activation, followed by downstream activation of p53, ultimately resulting in altered expression of Bcl-2 and Bax proteins as evident from immunoblotting. All these parameters conclude that elevated unconjugated bilirubin causes thrombocytopenia by stimulating platelet apoptosis via mitochondrial ROS-induced p38 and p53 activation. PMID:26459859

  18. Flow cytometric analysis of crayfish haemocytes activated by lipopolysaccharides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardenas, W.; Dankert, J.R.; Jenkins, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria are strong stimulators of white river crayfish, Procambarus zonangulus, haemocytes in vitro. Following haemocyte treatment with LPS and with LPS from rough mutant R5 (LPS Rc) from Salmonella minnesota, flow cytometric analysis revealed a conspicuous and reproducible decrease in cell size as compared to control haemocytes. These LPS molecules also caused a reduction in haemocyte viability as assessed by flow cytometry with the fluorescent dyes calcein-AM and ethidium homodimer. The onset of cell size reduction was gradual and occurred prior to cell death. Haemocytes treated with LPS from S. minnesota without the Lipid A moiety (detoxified LPS) decreased in size without a reduction of viability. The action of LPS on crayfish haemocytes appeared to be related to the activation of the prophenoloxidase system because phenoloxidase (PO)-specific activity in the supernatants from control and detoxified LPS-treated cells was significantly lower than that from LPS and LPS-Rc treated cells (P < 0.05). Furthermore, addition of trypsin inhibitor to the LPS treatments caused noticeable delays in cell size and viability changes. These patterns of cellular activation by LPS formulations indicated that crayfish haemocytes react differently to the polysaccharide and lipid A moieties of LPS, where lipid A is cytotoxic and the polysaccharide portion is stimulatory. These effects concur with the general pattern of mammalian cell activation by LPS, thereby indicting commone innate immune recognition mechanisms to bacterial antigens between cells from mammals and invertebrates. These definitive molecular approaches used to verify and identify mechanisms of invertbrate haemocyte responses to LPS could be applied with other glycoconjugates, soluble mediators, or xenobiotic compounds.

  19. Kinetic analysis of the interaction between plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed Central

    Masson, C; Angles-Cano, E

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics of inhibition of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) by the fast-acting plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) was investigated in homogeneous (plasma) and heterogeneous (solid-phase fibrin) systems by using radioisotopic and spectrophotometric analysis. It is demonstrated that fibrin-bound t-PA is protected from inhibition by PAI-1, whereas t-PA in soluble phase is rapidly inhibited (K1 = 10(7) M-1.s-1) even in the presence of 2 microM-plasminogen. The inhibitor interferes with the binding of t-PA to fibrin in a competitive manner. As a consequence the Kd of t-PA for fibrin (1.2 +/- 0.4 nM) increases and the maximal velocity of plasminogen activation by fibrin-bound t-PA is not modified. From the plot of the apparent Kd versus the concentration of PAI-1 a Ki value of 1.3 +/- 0.3 nM was calculated. The quasi-similar values for the dissociation constants between fibrin and t-PA (Kd) and between PAI-1 and t-PA (Ki), as well as the competitive type of inhibition observed, indicate that the fibrinolytic activity of human plasma may be the result of an equilibrium distribution of t-PA between both the amount of fibrin generated and the concentration of circulating inhibitor. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3146972

  20. Improvement of Lyme borreliosis serodiagnosis by a newly developed recombinant immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM line immunoblot assay and addition of VlsE and DbpA homologues.

    PubMed

    Goettner, Gereon; Schulte-Spechtel, Ulrike; Hillermann, Ruth; Liegl, Gabi; Wilske, Bettina; Fingerle, Volker

    2005-08-01

    We developed and evaluated a recombinant Borrelia line immunoblot assay based on 18 homologues of seven different antigens, i.e., p100, p58, p41i, BmpA, VlsE, OspC, and DbpA. Each recombinant antigen can be detected separately and is distinct even from homologues with identical molecular weights. This blot was compared to the recently described recombinant Borrelia Western immunoblot assay (U. Schulte-Spechtel, G. Lehnert, G. Liegl, V. Fingerle, C. Heimerl, B. J. Johnson, and B. Wilske, J. Clin. Microbiol. 41:1299-1303, 2003). To verify sensitivity and specificity, both blots were evaluated for reactivity with Borrelia-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibodies with 85 sera from patients with different manifestations of Lyme borreliosis and 110 controls. According to European interpretation criteria for Borrelia Western blots, which define a serum as positive when it recognizes at least two bands, sensitivity increased significantly from 70.6% (Western blot) to 84.7% (line blot) for IgG (P = 0.042) and from 40.0% (Western blot) to 73.8% (line blot) for IgM (P < 0.005). The increased sensitivity for IgG detection is due to the new line blot technique, whereas the improvement in detection of IgM is mainly achieved through incorporation of the additional antigens. Notably, the recombinant VlsE of Borrelia garinii strain PBi displayed the highest sensitivity of all antigens tested for IgG detection and is also one of the most useful antigens for IgM. Due to its excellent sensitivity and specificity combined with ease of evaluation, this line immunoblot assay offers a useful improvement in serodiagnosis of Lyme borreliosis. PMID:16081885

  1. Multi-element analysis of emeralds and associated rocks by k(o) neutron activation analysis

    PubMed

    Acharya; Mondal; Burte; Nair; Reddy; Reddy; Reddy; Manohar

    2000-12-01

    Multi-element analysis was carried out in natural emeralds, their associated rocks and one sample of beryl obtained from Rajasthan, India. The concentrations of 21 elements were assayed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis using the k0 method (k0 INAA method) and high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The data reveal the segregation of some elements from associated (trapped and host) rocks to the mineral beryl forming the gemstones. A reference rock standard of the US Geological Survey (USGS BCR-1) was also analysed as a control of the method. PMID:11077961

  2. Structural analysis and immunostimulatory activity of glycopeptides from Paecilomyces sinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen-Yuan; Meng, Meng; Sun, Huiqing; Li, Yang; Yu, Na; Zhang, Yong-Min

    2016-03-01

    The parasitic fungus, Paecilomyces sinensis, is used to produce Cordyceps materials as a succedaneum of natural Cordyceps sinensis (C. sinensis) in China. In this work, a glycopeptide (CPS-II) was isolated and purified from Paecilomyces sinensis. The result of HPLC indicated that CPS-II was a glycopeptide. The estimated average molecular weight of CPS-II was 2 × 10(6) Da. FTIR, methylation, periodate oxidation, Smith degradation, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and CD were used for its structural analysis. The glycopeptide CPS-II was mainly composed of (1 → 3), (1 → 4) connected glucose and galactose as the backbone, there are (1 → 2,3,6) connected glucose, (1 → 3,6) connected mannose, and (1 → 6) connected galactose. Cell proliferation assay and morphological observations indicated that in a certain range of concentrations and time, CPS-II can significantly improve the proliferation activity of RAW264.7 cells. PMID:26912165

  3. Neutron activation analysis; A sensitive test for trace elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, T.Z. . Ward Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses neutron activation analysis (NAA), an extremely sensitive technique for determining the elemental constituents of an unknown specimen. Currently, there are some twenty-five moderate-power TRIGA reactors scattered across the United States (fourteen of them at universities), and one of their principal uses is for NAA. NAA is procedurally simple. A small amount of the material to be tested (typically between one and one hundred milligrams) is irradiated for a period that varies from a few minutes to several hours in a neutron flux of around 10{sup 12} neutrons per square centimeter per second. A tiny fraction of the nuclei present (about 10{sup {minus}8}) is transmuted by nuclear reactions into radioactive forms. Subsequently, the nuclei decay, and the energy and intensity of the gamma rays that they emit can be measured in a gamma-ray spectrometer.

  4. The analysis and reconciliation of students' rebuttals in argumentation activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Ren; Hung, Jeng-Fung

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the guidance provided by science teachers to resolve conflicts during socioscientific issue-based argumentation activities. A graphical representation (GR) was developed as a tool to code and analyze the dialogue interaction process. Through the GR and qualitative analysis, we identified three types of dialogue reconciling strategies. The first one consists of teacher management, in which the teacher temporarily maintains the right to speak when students get mired in an emotional rebuttal situation. The second strategy involves the use of qualifiers to identify the strengths and weaknesses of an opposing argument. The third strategy consists of providing students with guidance to keep both parties (i.e. the students taking, respectively, the affirmative and negative positions) on the same discussion topic and can be used to assist teachers with forming broad questions that prompt students to conduct deeper discussions. These reconciling strategies were beneficial in that they helped students to argue in a more reflective way.

  5. Testing the quasi-absolute method in photon activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Z. J.; Wells, D.; Starovoitova, V.; Segebade, C.

    2013-04-19

    In photon activation analysis (PAA), relative methods are widely used because of their accuracy and precision. Absolute methods, which are conducted without any assistance from calibration materials, are seldom applied for the difficulty in obtaining photon flux in measurements. This research is an attempt to perform a new absolute approach in PAA - quasi-absolute method - by retrieving photon flux in the sample through Monte Carlo simulation. With simulated photon flux and database of experimental cross sections, it is possible to calculate the concentration of target elements in the sample directly. The QA/QC procedures to solidify the research are discussed in detail. Our results show that the accuracy of the method for certain elements is close to a useful level in practice. Furthermore, the future results from the quasi-absolute method can also serve as a validation technique for experimental data on cross sections. The quasi-absolute method looks promising.

  6. Active cooling for downhole instrumentation: Preliminary analysis and system selection

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1988-03-01

    A feasibility study and a series of preliminary designs and analyses were done to identify candidate processes or cycles for use in active cooling systems for downhole electronic instruments. A matrix of energy types and their possible combinations was developed and the energy conversion process for each pari was identified. The feasibility study revealed conventional as well as unconventional processes and possible refrigerants and identified parameters needing further clarifications. A conceptual design or series od oesigns for each system was formulated and a preliminary analysis of each design was completed. The resulting coefficient of performance for each system was compared with the Carnot COP and all systems were ranked by decreasing COP. The system showing the best combination of COP, exchangeability to other operating conditions, failure mode, and system serviceability is chosen for use as a downhole refrigerator. 85 refs., 48 figs., 33 tabs.

  7. Structure-activity analysis and antiprion mechanism of isoprenoid compounds.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Taichi; Nishizawa, Keiko; Sakasegawa, Yuji; Teruya, Kenta; Doh-ura, Katsumi

    2015-12-01

    The prion strain-specific mechanism by which normal prion protein is converted to abnormal prion protein remains largely unknown. This study found that insect juvenile hormone III reduced abnormal prion protein levels only in cells infected with the RML prion. We conducted a structure-activity analysis using juvenile hormone III biosynthetic intermediates in the isoprenoid pathway. Both farnesol and geranylgeraniol, the most potent inhibitors of abnormal prion protein formation, behaved in an RML prion-dependent fashion. Neither of them modified cellular and cell surface prion protein levels. Events downstream of this pathway include cholesterol biosynthesis and protein prenylation. However, neither of these isoprenoid compounds modified lipid raft microdomains and cellular cholesterol levels and neither affected the representative prenylated protein expression levels of prenylation pathways. Therefore, these isoprenoid compounds are a new class of prion strain-dependent antiprion compounds. They are useful for exploring strain-specific prion biology. PMID:26402376

  8. Neutron activation analysis of sea-, lake-, and evaporated salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauser, G.; Sterba, J. H.; Poljanc, K.; Bichler, M.; Buchtela, K.

    2006-01-01

    Salt is essential for human nutrition. Recently, it has become popular in Europe to rather use exotic sea salt or lake salt instead of purified evaporated salt, because of an alleged higher content of trace elements. In this study the content of trace elements and their bioavailability of 19 samples of different types of salt and 1 sample of brine purification sludge were investigated using instrumental neutron activation analysis. In general, sea-, lake-, and evaporated salt are quite pure. Trace elements determined in salt were Al, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Rb, Sc, Sr, and Zn; some of them only in individual cases. It was found that, in general, the content of trace elements in sea- or lake salt was higher than in purified salt. Nevertheless, the use of sea- or lake salt does not contribute significantly to the human needs of essential trace elements, because their concentration in salt is too low or their compounds are not bioavailable.

  9. Inflammasome Activation by Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Bouwman, Lieneke I.; de Zoete, Marcel R.; Bleumink-Pluym, Nancy M.C.; Flavell, Richard A.; van Putten, Jos P.M

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterial foodborne disease worldwide. The mechanisms that lead to bacterial invasion of eukaryotic cells and massive intestinal inflammation are still unknown. Here we report that C. jejuni infection of mouse macrophages induces up-regulation of pro-IL-1β transcript and secretion of IL-1β without eliciting cell death. Immunoblotting indicated cleavage of caspase-1 and IL-1β in infected cells. In bone-marrow-derived macrophages from different knock-out mice, IL-1β secretion was found to require NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1/11, but not NLRC4. In contrast to NLRP3 activation by ATP, C. jejuni activation did not require priming of these macrophages. C. jejuni also activated the NLRP3 inflammasome in human macrophages as indicated by the presence of ASC foci and FLICA-positive cells. Analysis of a vast array of C. jejunimutants with defects in capsule formation, LOS biosynthesis, chemotaxis, flagella synthesis and flagellin (-like) secretion, T6SS needle protein or cytolethal distending toxin revealed a direct correlation between the number of intracellular bacteria and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. The C. jejuni invasion related activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome without cytotoxicity and even in non-primed cells extends the known repertoire of bacterial inflammasome activation and likely contributes to C. jejuni-induced intestinal inflammation. PMID:25267974

  10. Detailed analysis of the promoter activity of an attenuated lentivirus.

    PubMed

    Blatti-Cardinaux, Laure; Sanjosé, Leticia; Zahno, Marie-Luise; Zanoni, Reto; Reina, Ramses; Bertoni, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    In spite of an eradication campaign that eliminated clinical cases of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus-induced arthritis in the Swiss goat population, seroconversions are still observed. In the affected flocks, viruses belonging mainly to the small ruminant lentivirus A4 subtype are regularly isolated. These viruses are considered attenuated, except in the mammary gland, where high viral loads and histopathological lesions have been observed. We previously characterized and sequenced such field isolates, detecting several potentially attenuating mutations in their LTR. Here we present a detailed analysis of the promoter activity of these genetic elements, which was comparable to those of virulent isolates. An AP-1 binding site was shown to be crucial for promoter activity in reporter gene assays and also in the context of a replicating molecular clone. Other sites, such as AML(vis) and a conserved E-box, appeared to be less crucial. Analysis of a unique AP-4 site showed a clear discrepancy between results obtained with reporter gene assays and those with mutated viruses. Within the limits of this in vitro study, we did not find evidence pointing to the LTR as the genetic correlate of attenuation for these viruses. Finally, the limited replication of SRLV A4 in mammary cell culture could not explain the suggested mammary tropism. In contrast, and in view of the abundance of macrophages in the mammary gland, it is the striking replication capacity of SRLV A4 in these cells, unaffected by all LTR mutations tested, which may explain the apparent mammary tropism of these viruses. PMID:27114068

  11. Improved mesh based photon sampling techniques for neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Relson, E.; Wilson, P. P. H.; Biondo, E. D.

    2013-07-01

    The design of fusion power systems requires analysis of neutron activation of large, complex volumes, and the resulting particles emitted from these volumes. Structured mesh-based discretization of these problems allows for improved modeling in these activation analysis problems. Finer discretization of these problems results in large computational costs, which drives the investigation of more efficient methods. Within an ad hoc subroutine of the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, we implement sampling of voxels and photon energies for volumetric sources using the alias method. The alias method enables efficient sampling of a discrete probability distribution, and operates in 0(1) time, whereas the simpler direct discrete method requires 0(log(n)) time. By using the alias method, voxel sampling becomes a viable alternative to sampling space with the 0(1) approach of uniformly sampling the problem volume. Additionally, with voxel sampling it is straightforward to introduce biasing of volumetric sources, and we implement this biasing of voxels as an additional variance reduction technique that can be applied. We verify our implementation and compare the alias method, with and without biasing, to direct discrete sampling of voxels, and to uniform sampling. We study the behavior of source biasing in a second set of tests and find trends between improvements and source shape, material, and material density. Overall, however, the magnitude of improvements from source biasing appears to be limited. Future work will benefit from the implementation of efficient voxel sampling - particularly with conformal unstructured meshes where the uniform sampling approach cannot be applied. (authors)

  12. Nuclear export of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein Rev is mediated by its activation domain and is blocked by transdominant negative mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Szilvay, A M; Brokstad, K A; Kopperud, R; Haukenes, G; Kalland, K H

    1995-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein Rev moves repeatedly between the cytoplasm, a perinuclear zone, the nucleoli, and nucleoplasmic speckles. In this study, we demonstrated by both indirect immunofluorescence and Western immunoblot analysis that nuclear exit of Rev transdominant negative mutants was defective compared with that of wild-type Rev. The basic and activation domains of Rev signal import and export, respectively, of Rev across the nuclear membrane. In cotransfection experiments, mutants containing mutations of Rev inhibited the nuclear egress of wild-type Rev, thus revealing a novel transdominant negative phenotype. PMID:7745679

  13. Underground Corrosion of Activated Metals, 6-Year Exposure Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    M. K. Adler Flitton; T. S. Yoder

    2006-03-01

    The subsurface radioactive disposal site located at the Idaho National Laboratory contains neutronactivated metals from non-fuel nuclear-reactor-core components. A long-term underground corrosion test is being conducted to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements in the surrounding arid vadose zone environment. The test uses nonradioactive metal coupons representing the prominent neutron-activated materials buried at the disposal location, namely, Type 304L stainless steel (UNS S30403), Type 316L stainless steel (S31603), nickel-chromium alloy (UNS NO7718), beryllium, aluminum 6061-T6 (A96061), and a zirconium alloy (UNS R60804). In addition, carbon steel (the material presently used in the cask disposal liners and other disposal containers) and a duplex stainless steel (UNS S32550) are also included in the test. This paper briefly describes the ongoing test and presents the results of corrosion analysis from coupons exposed underground for 1, 3, and 6 years.

  14. Transcriptomic analysis of mononuclear phagocyte differentiation and activation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A; Freeman, Tom C

    2014-11-01

    Monocytes and macrophages differentiate from progenitor cells under the influence of colony-stimulating factors. Genome-scale data have enabled the identification of the sets of genes that are associated with specific functions and the mechanisms by which thousands of genes are regulated in response to pathogen challenge. In large datasets, it is possible to identify large sets of genes that are coregulated with the transcription factors that regulate them. They include macrophage-specific genes, interferon-responsive genes, early inflammatory genes, and those associated with endocytosis. Such analyses can also extract macrophage-associated signatures from large cancer tissue datasets. However, cluster analysis provides no support for a signature that distinguishes macrophages from antigen-presenting dendritic cells, nor the classification of macrophage activation states as classical versus alternative, or M1 versus M2. Although there has been a focus on a small subset of lineage-enriched transcription factors, such as PU.1, more than half of the transcription factors in the genome can be expressed in macrophage lineage cells under some state of activation, and they interact in a complex network. The network architecture is conserved across species, but many of the target genes evolve rapidly and differ between mouse and human. The data and publication deluge related to macrophage biology require the development of new analytical tools and ways of presenting information in an accessible form. PMID:25319328

  15. Analysis of lightning field changes during active Florida thunderstorms

    SciTech Connect

    Koshak, W.J.; Krider, E.P. )

    1989-01-20

    A computer algorithm has been developed to derive accurate values of lightning-caused changes in cloud electric fields under active storm conditions. This algorithm has been applied to data obtained from a network of ground-based electric field mills at the NASA Kennedy Space Center and the U.S. Air Force Cape Canaveral Air Force Station during portions of two storms. The resulting field changes have been analyzed using a least squares optimization procedure and point-charge (Q) and point-dipole (P) models. The results indicate that the values and time variations of the Q-model parameters under active storm conditions are similar to those reported previously for small storms when the computations are done with the same analysis criteria and comparable biases. The parameters of P solutions seem to vary with time within the storm interval and from storm to storm. The P vectors at low altitudes all tend to point upward, and those at high altitudes almost always point downward. When a P solution is located in the altitude range corresponding to Q altitudes, the direction of P tends to be horizontal. Since Q solutions typically describe cloud-to-ground lightning and P solutions describe cloud discharges (Maier and Krider, 1986), the altitude dependence of the P vectors is consistent with the classic thunder-cloud charge model that has an excess negative charge at altitudes corresponding to the Q altitudes.

  16. Mercury mass measurement in fluorescent lamps via neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viererbl, L.; Vinš, M.; Lahodová, Z.; Fuksa, A.; Kučera, J.; Koleška, M.; Voljanskij, A.

    2015-11-01

    Mercury is an essential component of fluorescent lamps. Not all fluorescent lamps are recycled, resulting in contamination of the environment with toxic mercury, making measurement of the mercury mass used in fluorescent lamps important. Mercury mass measurement of lamps via instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) was tested under various conditions in the LVR-15 research reactor. Fluorescent lamps were irradiated in different positions in vertical irradiation channels and a horizontal channel in neutron fields with total fluence rates from 3×108 cm-2 s-1 to 1014 cm-2 s-1. The 202Hg(n,γ)203Hg nuclear reaction was used for mercury mass evaluation. Activities of 203Hg and others induced radionuclides were measured via gamma spectrometry with an HPGe detector at various times after irradiation. Standards containing an Hg2Cl2 compound were used to determine mercury mass. Problems arise from the presence of elements with a large effective cross section in luminescent material (europium, antimony and gadolinium) and glass (boron). The paper describes optimization of the NAA procedure in the LVR-15 research reactor with particular attention to influence of neutron self-absorption in fluorescent lamps.

  17. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1992 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W.

    1993-03-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIACs staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. As analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

  18. Ultrastructural and biochemical analysis of fibrinogen receptors on activated thrombocytes

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    The present studies have been concerned with the role of fibrinogen and its receptor, GP IIb/IIIa, during the activation and early aggregation of pigeon thrombocytes. Thrombocytes were surface labeled with {sup 125}I then separated on SDS-PAGE. Analysis by gel autoradiography revealed major bands at MW 145 kd and 98 kd, which corresponded to human GPIIb and GPIIIa. Immunologic similarity of the pigeon and human receptor components was established by dot blot analysis using polyclonal antibodies directed against human GPIIb and GPIIIa. Pigeon fibrinogen, isolated by plasma precipitation with PEG-1000 and purified over Sepharose 4B, was used to study receptor-ligand interaction. Separation of pigeon fibrinogen on SDS-PAGE resulted in three peptides having apparent MW of 62kd, 55kd, and 47kd which are comparable to human fibrinogen. Further similarity of human and pigeon fibrinogen was verified by immonodiffusion against an antibody specific for the human protein. The role of fibrinogen and its receptor in thrombocyte function was established by turbidimetric aggregation using thrombin as an agonist under conditions requiring Ca++ and fibrinogen.

  19. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1991 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W.

    1992-06-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specially publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC`s staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, factsheets, specially publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

  20. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1991 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W.

    1992-06-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specially publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC's staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC's staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC's response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, factsheets, specially publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC's information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

  1. Coincidence Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. gandner; C.W. Mayo; W.A. Metwally; W. Zhang; W. Guo; A. Shehata

    2002-11-10

    The normal prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis for either bulk or small beam samples inherently has a small signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio due primarily to the neutron source being present while the sample signal is being obtained. Coincidence counting offers the possibility of greatly reducing or eliminating the noise generated by the neutron source. The present report presents our results to date on implementing the coincidence counting PGNAA approach. We conclude that coincidence PGNAA yields: (1) a larger signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, (2) more information (and therefore better accuracy) from essentially the same experiment when sophisticated coincidence electronics are used that can yield singles and coincidences simultaneously, and (3) a reduced (one or two orders of magnitude) signal from essentially the same experiment. In future work we will concentrate on: (1) modifying the existing CEARPGS Monte Carlo code to incorporate coincidence counting, (2) obtaining coincidence schemes for 18 or 20 of the common elements in coal and cement, and (3) optimizing the design of a PGNAA coincidence system for the bulk analysis of coal.

  2. Neutron Activation Analysis PRognosis and Optimization Code System.

    2004-08-20

    Version 00 NAAPRO predicts the results and main characteristics (detection limits, determination limits, measurement limits and relative precision of the analysis) of neutron activation analysis (instrumental and radiochemical). Gamma-ray dose rates for different points of time after sample irradiation and input count rate of the spectrometry system are also predicted. The code uses standard Windows user interface and extensive graphical tools for the visualization of the spectrometer characteristics (efficiency, response and background) and simulated spectrum.more » Optimization part is not included in the current version of the code. This release is designated NAAPRO, Version 01.beta. The MCNP code was used for generating detector responses. PREPRO-2000 and FCONV programs were used at the preparation of the program nuclear databases. A special program was developed for viewing, editing and updating of the program databases (not included into the present program package). The MCNP, PREPRO-2000 and FCONV software packages are not included in the NAAPRO package.« less

  3. Structural Analysis of Active North Bozgush Fault Zone (NW Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, R.; Isik, V.; Caglayan, A.

    2013-12-01

    NW Iran is one of the seismically active regions between Zagros Thrust Belt at the south and Caucasus at the north. Not only large magnitude historical earthquakes (Ms>7), but also 1987 Bozgush, 1997 Ardebil (Mw 6.1) and 2012 Ahar-Varzagan (Mw 6.4) earthquakes reveal that the region is seismically active. The North Bozgush Fault Zone (NBFZ) in this region has tens of kilometers in length and hundreds of meters in width. The zone has produced some large and destructive earthquakes (1593 M:6.1 and 1883 M:6.2). The NBFZ affects the Cenozoic units and along this zone Eocene units thrusted over Miocene and/or Plio-Quaternary sedimentary units. Together with morphologic features (stream offsets and alluvial fan movements) affecting the young unites reveal that the zone is active. The zone is mainly characterized by strike-slip faults with reverse component and reverse faults. Reverse faults striking N55°-85°E and dip of 40°-50° to the SW while strike-slip faults show right lateral slip with N60°-85°W and N60°-80°E directions. Our structural data analysis in NBFZ indicates that the axis direction of σ2 principal stress is vertical and the stress ratio (R) is 0.12. These results suggest that the tectonic regime along the North Bozgush Fault Zone is transpressive. Obtained other principal stresses (σ1, σ3) results are compatible with stress directions and GPS velocity suggested for NW Iran.

  4. Synchronization analysis of the uterine magnetic activity during contractions

    PubMed Central

    Ramon, Ceon; Preissl, Hubert; Murphy, Pam; Wilson, James D; Lowery, Curtis; Eswaran, Hari

    2005-01-01

    Background Our objective was to quantify and compare the extent of synchronization of the spatial-temporal myometrial activity over the human uterus before and during a contraction using transabdominal magnetomyographic (MMG) recordings. Synchronization can be an important indicator for the quantification of uterine contractions. Methods The spatialtermporal myometrial activity recordings were performed using a 151-channel noninvasive magnetic sensor system called SARA. This device covers the entire pregnant abdomen and records the magnetic field corresponding to the electrical activity generated in the uterine myometrium. The data was collected at 250 samples/sec and was resampled with 25 samples/sec and then filtered in the band of 0.1–0.2 Hz to study the primary magnetic activity of the uterus related to contractions. The synchronization between a channel pair was computed. It was inferred from a statistical tendency to maintain a nearly constant phase difference over a given period of time even though the analytic phase of each channel may change markedly during that time frame. The analytic phase was computed after taking Hilbert transform of the magnetic field data. The process was applied on the pairs of magnetic field traces (240 sec length) with a stepping window of 20 sec duration which is long enough to cover two cycle of the lowest frequency of interest (0.1 Hz). The analysis was repeated by stepping the window at 10 sec intervals. The spatial patterns of the synchronization indices covering the anterior transabdominal area were computed. For this, regional coil-pairs were used. For a given coil, the coil pairs were constructed with the surrounding six coils. The synchronization indices were computed for each coil pair, averaged over the 21 coil-pairs and then assigned as the synchronization index to that particular coil. This procedure was tested on six pregnant subjects at the gestational age between 29 and 40 weeks admitted to the hospital for

  5. The Masticatory Contractile Load Induced Expression and Activation of Akt1/PKBα in Muscle Fibers at the Myotendinous Junction within Muscle-Tendon-Bone Unit

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Yüksel; Klinz, Franz J.; Moghbeli, Mehrnoush; Addicks, Klaus; Raab, Wolfgang H. -M.; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    The cell specific detection of enzyme activation in response to the physiological contractile load within muscle-tendon-bone unit is essential for understanding of the mechanical forces transmission from muscle cells via tendon to the bone. The hypothesis that the physiological mechanical loading regulates activation of Akt1/PKBα at Thr308 and at Ser473 in muscle fibers within muscle-tendon-bone unit was tested using quantitative immunohistochemistry, confocal double fluorescence analysis, and immunoblot analysis. In comparison to the staining intensities in peripheral regions of the muscle fibers, Akt1/PKBα was detected with a higher staining intensity in muscle fibers at the myotendinous junction (MTJ) areas. In muscle fibers at the MTJ areas, Akt1/PKBα is dually phosphorylated at Thr308 and Ser473. The immunohistochemical results were confirmed by immunoblot analysis. We conclude that contractile load generated by masticatory muscles induces local domain-dependent expression of Akt1/PKBα as well as activation by dually phosphorylation at Thr308 and Ser473 in muscle fibers at the MTJ areas within muscle-tendon-bone unit. PMID:20454577

  6. AGFATL- ACTIVE GEAR FLEXIBLE AIRCRAFT TAKEOFF AND LANDING ANALYSIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Active Gear, Flexible Aircraft Takeoff and Landing Analysis program, AGFATL, was developed to provide a complete simulation of the aircraft takeoff and landing dynamics problem. AGFATL can represent an airplane either as a rigid body with six degrees of freedom or as a flexible body with multiple degrees of freedom. The airframe flexibility is represented by the superposition of up to twenty free vibration modes on the rigid-body motions. The analysis includes maneuver logic and autopilots programmed to control the aircraft during glide slope, flare, landing, and takeoff. The program is modular so that performance of the aircraft in flight and during landing and ground maneuvers can be studied separately or in combination. A program restart capability is included in AGFATL. Effects simulated in the AGFATL program include: (1) flexible aircraft control and performance during glide slope, flare, landing roll, and takeoff roll under conditions of changing winds, engine failures, brake failures, control system failures, strut failures, restrictions due to runway length, and control variable limits and time lags; (2) landing gear loads and dynamics for up to five gears; (3) single and multiple engines (maximum of four) including selective engine reversing and failure; (4) drag chute and spoiler effects; (5) wheel braking (including skid-control) and selective brake failure; (6) aerodynamic ground effects; (7) aircraft carrier operations; (8) inclined runways and runway perturbations; (9) flexible or rigid airframes; 10) rudder and nose gear steering; and 11) actively controlled landing gear shock struts. Input to the AGFATL program includes data which describe runway roughness; vehicle geometry, flexibility and aerodynamic characteristics; landing gear(s); propulsion; and initial conditions such as attitude, attitude change rates, and velocities. AGFATL performs a time integration of the equations of motion and outputs comprehensive information on the airframe

  7. Predictive Analysis of Landslide Activity Using Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markuzon, N.; Regan, J.; Slesnick, C.

    2012-12-01

    Landslides are historically one of the most damaging geohazard phenomena in terms of death tolls and socio-economic losses. Therefore, understanding the underlying causes of landslides and how environmental phenomena affect their frequency and severity is of critical importance. Of specific importance for mitigating future damage is increasing our understanding of how climate change will affect landslide severity, occurrence rates, and damage. We are developing data driven models aimed at predicting landslide activity. The models learn multi-dimensional weather and geophysical patterns associated with historical landslides and estimate location-dependent probabilities for landslides under current or future weather and geophysical conditions. Our approach uses machine learning algorithms capable of determining non-linear associations between dependent variables and landslide occurrence without requiring detailed knowledge of geomorphology. Our primary goal in year one of the project is to evaluate the predictive capabilities of data mining models in application to landslide activity, and to analyze if the approach will discover previously unknown variables and/or relationships important to landslide occurrence, frequency or severity. The models include remote sensing and ground-based data, including weather, landcover, slope, elevation and drainage information as well as urbanization data. The historical landslide dataset we used to build our preliminary models was compiled from City of Seattle landslide files, United States Geological Survey reports, newspaper articles, and a verified subset of the Seattle Landslide Database that consists of all reported landslides within Seattle, WA, between 1948 and 1999. Most of the landslides analyzed to-date are shallow. Using statistical analysis and unsupervised clustering methods we have thus far identified subsets of weather conditions that lead to a significantly higher landslide probability, and have developed

  8. Assessment of nose protector for sport activities: finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Coto, Neide Pena; Meira, Josete Barbosa Cruz; Brito e Dias, Reinaldo; Driemeier, Larissa; de Oliveira Roveri, Guilherme; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito

    2012-04-01

    There has been a significant increase in the number of facial fractures stemming from sport activities in recent years, with the nasal bone one of the most affected structures. Researchers recommend the use of a nose protector, but there is no standardization regarding the material employed. Clinical experience has demonstrated that a combination of a flexible and rigid layer of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) offers both comfort and safety to practitioners of sports. The aim of the present study was the investigation into the stresses generated by the impact of a rigid body on the nasal bone on models with and without an EVA protector. For such, finite element analysis was employed. A craniofacial model was constructed from images obtained through computed tomography. The nose protector was modeled with two layers of EVA (1 mm of rigid EVA over 2 mm of flexible EVA), following the geometry of the soft tissue. Finite element analysis was performed using the LS Dyna program. The bone and rigid EVA were represented as elastic linear material, whereas the soft tissues and flexible EVA were represented as hyperelastic material. The impact from a rigid sphere on the frontal region of the face was simulated with a constant velocity of 20 m s(-1) for 9.1 μs. The model without the protector served as the control. The distribution of maximal stress of the facial bones was recorded. The maximal stress on the nasal bone surpassed the breaking limit of 0.13-0.34 MPa on the model without a protector, while remaining below this limit on the model with the protector. Thus, the nose protector made from both flexible and rigid EVA proved effective at protecting the nasal bones under high-impact conditions. PMID:21790992

  9. Analysis of Solar Magnetic Activity with the Wavelet Coherence Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, V. M.; Perez-Peraza, J. A.; Mendoza, B. E.; Valdes-Galicia, J. F.; Sosa, O.; Alvarez-Madrigal, M.

    2007-05-01

    The origin, behavior and evolution of the solar magnetic field is one of the main challenges of observational and theoretical solar physics. Up to now the Dynamo theory gives us the best approach to the problem. However, it is not yet able to predict many features of the solar activity, which seems not to be strictly a periodical phenomenon. Among the indicators of solar magnetic variability there is the 11-years cycle of sunspots, as well as the solar magnetic cycle of 22 years (the Hale cycle). In order to provide more elements to the Dynamo theory that could help it in the predicting task, we analyze here the plausible existence of other periodicities associated with the solar magnetic field. In this preliminary work we use historical data (sunspots and aurora borealis), proxies (Be10 and C14) and modern instrumental data (Coronal Holes, Cosmic Rays, sunspots, flare indexes and solar radio flux at 10.7 cm). To find relationships between different time-frequency series we have employed the t Wavelet Coherence technique: this technique indicates if two time-series of solar activity have the same periodicities in a given time interval. If so, it determines whether such relation is a linear one or not. Such a powerful tool indicates that, if some periodicity at a given frequency has a confidence level below 95%, it appears very lessened or does not appear in the Wavelet Spectral Analysis, such periodicity does not exist . Our results show that the so called Glaisberg cycle of 80-90 years and the periodicity of 205 years (the Suess cycle) do not exist . It can be speculated that such fictitious periodicities hav been the result of using the Fourier transform with series with are not of stationary nature, as it is the case of the Be10 and C14 series. In contrast we confirm the presence of periodicities of 1.3, 1.7, 3.5, 5.5, 7, 60, 120 and 240 years. The concept of a Glaisberg cycle falls between those of 60 and 120 years. We conclude that the periodicity of 120 years

  10. Metatranscriptomic Analysis of Groundwater Reveals an Active Anammox Bacterial Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, T. N. M.; Karaoz, U.; Thomas, B. C.; Banfield, J. F.; Brodie, E.; Williams, K. H.; Beller, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater is a major natural resource, yet little is known about the contribution of microbial anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) activity to subsurface nitrogen cycling. During anammox, energy is generated as ammonium is oxidized under anaerobic conditions to dinitrogen gas, using nitrite as the final electron acceptor. This process is a global sink for fixed nitrogen. Only a narrow range of monophyletic bacteria within the Planctomycetes carries out anammox, and the full extent of their metabolism, and subsequent impact on nitrogen cycling and microbial community structure, is still unknown. Here, we employ a metatranscriptomic analysis on enriched mRNA to identify the abundance and activity of a population of anammox bacteria within an aquifer at Rifle, CO. Planktonic biomass was collected over a two-month period after injection of up to 1.5 mM nitrate. Illumina-generated sequences were mapped to a phylogenetically binned Rifle metagenome database. We identified transcripts for genes with high protein sequence identities (81-98%) to those of anammox strain KSU-1 and to two of the five anammox bacteria genera, Brocadia and Kuenenia, suggesting an active, if not diverse, anammox population. Many of the most abundant anammox transcripts mapped to a single scaffold, indicative of a single dominant anammox species. Transcripts of the genes necessary for the anammox pathway were present, including an ammonium transporter (amtB), nitrite/formate transporter, nitrite reductase (nirK), and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzoB). The form of nitrite reductase encoded by anammox is species-dependent, and we only identified nirK, with no evidence of anammox nirS. In addition to the anammox pathway we saw evidence of the anammox bacterial dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium pathway (narH, putative nrfA, and nrfB), which provides an alternate means of generating substrates for anammox from nitrate, rather than relying on an external pool. Transcripts for hydroxylamine

  11. Multidimensional analysis and probabilistic model of volcanic and seismic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V.

    2009-04-01

    .I. Gushchenko, 1979) and seismological (database of USGS/NEIC Significant Worldwide Earthquakes, 2150 B.C.- 1994 A.D.) information which displays dynamics of endogenic relief-forming processes over a period of 1900 to 1994. In the course of the analysis, a substitution of calendar variable by a corresponding astronomical one has been performed and the epoch superposition method was applied. In essence, the method consists in that the massifs of information on volcanic eruptions (over a period of 1900 to 1977) and seismic events (1900-1994) are differentiated with respect to value of astronomical parameters which correspond to the calendar dates of the known eruptions and earthquakes, regardless of the calendar year. The obtained spectra of volcanic eruptions and violent earthquake distribution in the fields of the Earth orbital movement parameters were used as a basis for calculation of frequency spectra and diurnal probability of volcanic and seismic activity. The objective of the proposed investigations is a probabilistic model development of the volcanic and seismic events, as well as GIS designing for monitoring and forecast of volcanic and seismic activities. In accordance with the stated objective, three probability parameters have been found in the course of preliminary studies; they form the basis for GIS-monitoring and forecast development. 1. A multidimensional analysis of volcanic eruption and earthquakes (of magnitude 7) have been performed in terms of the Earth orbital movement. Probability characteristics of volcanism and seismicity have been defined for the Earth as a whole. Time intervals have been identified with a diurnal probability twice as great as the mean value. Diurnal probability of volcanic and seismic events has been calculated up to 2020. 2. A regularity is found in duration of dormant (repose) periods has been established. A relationship has been found between the distribution of the repose period probability density and duration of the period. 3

  12. Neutron activation analysis: A primary method of measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Robert R.; Bode, Peter; De Nadai Fernandes, Elisabete A.

    2011-03-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA), based on the comparator method, has the potential to fulfill the requirements of a primary ratio method as defined in 1998 by the Comité Consultatif pour la Quantité de Matière — Métrologie en Chimie (CCQM, Consultative Committee on Amount of Substance — Metrology in Chemistry). This thesis is evidenced in this paper in three chapters by: demonstration that the method is fully physically and chemically understood; that a measurement equation can be written down in which the values of all parameters have dimensions in SI units and thus having the potential for metrological traceability to these units; that all contributions to uncertainty of measurement can be quantitatively evaluated, underpinning the metrological traceability; and that the performance of NAA in CCQM key-comparisons of trace elements in complex matrices between 2000 and 2007 is similar to the performance of Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS), which had been formerly designated by the CCQM as a primary ratio method.

  13. RADSAT Benchmarks for Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Kimberly A.; Gesh, Christopher J.

    2011-07-01

    The accurate and efficient simulation of coupled neutron-photon problems is necessary for several important radiation detection applications. Examples include the detection of nuclear threats concealed in cargo containers and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for nondestructive determination of elemental composition of unknown samples. High-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers are used in these applications to measure the spectrum of the emitted photon flux, which consists of both continuum and characteristic gamma rays with discrete energies. Monte Carlo transport is the most commonly used simulation tool for this type of problem, but computational times can be prohibitively long. This work explores the use of multi-group deterministic methods for the simulation of coupled neutron-photon problems. The main purpose of this work is to benchmark several problems modeled with RADSAT and MCNP to experimental data. Additionally, the cross section libraries for RADSAT are updated to include ENDF/B-VII cross sections. Preliminary findings show promising results when compared to MCNP and experimental data, but also areas where additional inquiry and testing are needed. The potential benefits and shortcomings of the multi-group-based approach are discussed in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency.

  14. Analysis of low levels of rare earths by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wandless, G.A.; Morgan, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure for the radiochemical neutron-activation analysis for the rare earth elements (REE) involves the separation of the REE as a group by rapid ion-exchange methods and determination of yields by reactivation or by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry. The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) standard rocks, BCR-1 and AGV-1, were analyzed to determine the precision and accuracy of the method. We found that the precision was ??5-10% on the basis of replicate analysis and that, in general the accuracy was within ??5% of accepted values for most REE. Data for USGS standard rocks BIR-1 (Icelandic basalt) and DNC-1 (North Carolina diabase) are also presented. ?? 1985 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  15. Identification of a 115kDa MAP-kinase activated by freezing and anoxic stresses in the marine periwinkle, Littorina littorea.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Justin A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2006-06-15

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade regulates changes in gene transcription by transmitting extracellular stimuli from the plasma membrane to the cell nucleus and has an important role to play in organismal responses to environmental stresses. The activities of MAPKs were investigated in the marine gastropod mollusk, Littorina littorea, a species that tolerates both extracellular freezing and long term oxygen deprivation. In-gel kinase assays revealed the presence of two MAPKs in foot muscle and hepatopancreas, a 42 and a 115kDa protein. Immunoblot analysis showed that both were MAPK proteins and that one was the periwinkle homologue of p42(ERK2). Size exclusion chromatography confirmed the 115kDa size of the novel snail MAPK and its role as the dominant MAPK activity in foot muscle. In-gel kinase assays, immunoblotting with phospho-specific ERK antibody, as well as kinase activity profiles from hydroxyapatite chromatography demonstrated that p115 MAPK kinase activity was increased in foot muscle in response to in vivo freezing or anoxia exposures. The results suggest a role for this novel kinase in environmental stress response. PMID:16620767

  16. In vivo acylation of proteolipid protein and DM-20 in myelin and myelin subfractions of developing rat brain: immunoblot identification of acylated PLP and DM-20

    SciTech Connect

    Garwood, M.M.; Gilbert, W.R.; Agrawal, H.C.

    1983-05-01

    The acylation of proteolipid protein (PLP) was examined in myelin and myelin subfractions from rat brain during the active period of myelination. Proteolipid protein and DM-20 in myelin and myelin subfractions were readily acylated in developing rat brain 22 hours after intracerebral injection of (/sup 3/H)palmitic acid. No differences in the relative specific activity of PLP in myelin from 9-, 15-, and 30-day-old rat brains was observed; however, the relative specific activity of PLP in the heavy myelin subfraction tended to be higher than that in the light myelin subfraction. The acylation of PLP was confirmed by fluorography of immuno-stained cellulose nitrate sheets, clearly establishing that the acylated protein is in fact the oligodendroglial cell- and myelin-specific protein, PLP. Since PLP is acylated in the 9-day-old animal, when little compact myelin is present, it is possible that the acylation of PLP is a prerequisite for the incorporation of this protein into the myelin membrane.

  17. Epithermal Neutron Activation Analysis of the Asian Herbal Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Baljinnyam, N.; Frontasyeva, M. V.; Ostrovnaya, T. M.; Pavlov, S. S.; Jugder, B.; Norov, N.

    2011-06-28

    Asian medicinal herbs Chrysanthemum (Spiraea aquilegifolia Pall.) and Red Sandalwood (Pterocarpus Santalinus) are widely used in folk and Ayurvedic medicine for healing and preventing some diseases. The modern medical science has proved that the Chrysanthemum (Spiraea aquilegifolia Pall.) possesses the following functions: reducing blood press, dispelling cancer cell, coronary artery's expanding and bacteriostating and Red Sandalwood (Pterocarpus Santalinus) is recommended against headache, toothache, skin diseases, vomiting and sometimes it is taken for treatment of diabetes. Species of Chrysanthemums were collected in the north-eastern and central Mongolia, and the Red Sandalwood powder was imported from India. Samples of Chrysanthemums (branches, flowers and leaves)(0.5 g) and red sandalwood powder (0.5 g) were subjected to the multi-element instrumental neutron activation analysis using epithermal neutrons (ENAA) at the IBR-2 reactor, Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (FLNP) JINR, Dubna. A total of 41 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Mo, Cd, Cs, Ba, La, Hf, Ta, W, Sb, Au, Hg, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Yb, Th, U, Lu) were determined. For the first time such a large group of elements was determined in the herbal plants used in Mongolia. The quality control of the analytical results was provided by using certified reference material Bowen Cabbage. The results obtained are compared to the ''Reference plant? data (B. Markert, 1992) and interpreted in terms of excess of such elements as Se, Cr, Ca, Fe, Ni, Mo, and rare earth elements.

  18. Epithermal Neutron Activation Analysis of the Asian Herbal Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baljinnyam, N.; Jugder, B.; Norov, N.; Frontasyeva, M. V.; Ostrovnaya, T. M.; Pavlov, S. S.

    2011-06-01

    Asian medicinal herbs Chrysanthemum (Spiraea aquilegifolia Pall.) and Red Sandalwood (Pterocarpus Santalinus) are widely used in folk and Ayurvedic medicine for healing and preventing some diseases. The modern medical science has proved that the Chrysanthemum (Spiraea aquilegifolia Pall.) possesses the following functions: reducing blood press, dispelling cancer cell, coronary artery's expanding and bacteriostating and Red Sandalwood (Pterocarpus Santalinus) is recommended against headache, toothache, skin diseases, vomiting and sometimes it is taken for treatment of diabetes. Species of Chrysanthemums were collected in the north-eastern and central Mongolia, and the Red Sandalwood powder was imported from India. Samples of Chrysanthemums (branches, flowers and leaves) (0.5 g) and red sandalwood powder (0.5 g) were subjected to the multi-element instrumental neutron activation analysis using epithermal neutrons (ENAA) at the IBR-2 reactor, Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (FLNP) JINR, Dubna. A total of 41 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Mo, Cd, Cs, Ba, La, Hf, Ta, W, Sb, Au, Hg, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Yb, Th, U, Lu) were determined. For the first time such a large group of elements was determined in the herbal plants used in Mongolia. The quality control of the analytical results was provided by using certified reference material Bowen Cabbage. The results obtained are compared to the "Reference plant» data (B. Markert, 1992) and interpreted in terms of excess of such elements as Se, Cr, Ca, Fe, Ni, Mo, and rare earth elements.

  19. The affect of industrial activities on zinc in alluvial Egyptian soil determined using neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Sabour, M F; Abdel-Basset, N

    2002-07-01

    Thirty-two surface (0-20 cm) soil samples were collected from different locations in Egypt representing non-polluted, moderately and highly polluted soils. The aim of this study was to evaluate total Zn content in alluvial soils of Nile Delta in Egypt by using the delayed neutron activation analysis technique (DNAA), in the irradiation facilities of the first Egyptian research reactor (ET-RR-1). The gamma-ray spectra were recorded with a hyper pure germanium detection system. The well resolved gamma-ray peak at 1116.0 keV was efficiently used for 65Zn content determination. Zn content in non-polluted soil samples ranged between 74.1 and 103.8 ppm with an average of 98.5 +/- 5.1 ppm. Zn content in moderately polluted soils ranged between 136.0 and 232.5 ppm with an average of 180.1 +/- 32.6 ppm. The highest Zn levels ranging from 240.0 and 733.0 ppm with an average of 410.3 +/- 54.4 ppm, were observed in soil samples collected from, either highly polluted agricultural soils exposed to prolonged irrigation with industrial wastewater or surface soil samples from industrial sites. PMID:12211982

  20. Development of DNA Damage Response Signaling Biomarkers using Automated, Quantitative Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaishvilli-Feinberg, Nana; Cohen, Stephanie M.; Midkiff, Bentley; Zhou, Yingchun; Olorvida, Mark; Ibrahim, Joseph G.; Omolo, Bernard; Shields, Janiel M.; Thomas, Nancy E.; Groben, Pamela A.; Kaufmann, William K.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) coordinates DNA repair with cell cycle checkpoints to ameliorate or mitigate the pathological effects of DNA damage. Automated quantitative analysis (AQUA) and Tissue Studio are commercial technologies that use digitized immunofluorescence microscopy images to quantify antigen expression in defined tissue compartments. Because DDR is commonly activated in cancer and may reflect genetic instability within the lesion, a method to quantify DDR in cancer offers potential diagnostic and/or prognostic value. In this study, both AQUA and Tissue Studio algorithms were used to quantify the DDR in radiation-damaged skin fibroblasts, melanoma cell lines, moles, and primary and metastatic melanomas. Digital image analysis results for three markers of DDR (γH2AX, P-ATM, P-Chk2) correlated with immunoblot data for irradiated fibroblasts, whereas only γH2AX and P-Chk2 correlated with immunoblot data in melanoma cell lines. Melanoma cell lines displayed substantial variation in γH2AX and P-Chk2 expression, and P-Chk2 expression was significantly correlated with radioresistance. Moles, primary melanomas, and melanoma metastases in brain, lung and liver displayed substantial variation in γH2AX expression, similar to that observed in melanoma cell lines. Automated digital analysis of immunofluorescent images stained for DDR biomarkers may be useful for predicting tumor response to radiation and chemotherapy. PMID:24309508

  1. Development of DNA damage response signaling biomarkers using automated, quantitative image analysis.

    PubMed

    Nikolaishvilli-Feinberg, Nana; Cohen, Stephanie M; Midkiff, Bentley; Zhou, Yingchun; Olorvida, Mark; Ibrahim, Joseph G; Omolo, Bernard; Shields, Janiel M; Thomas, Nancy E; Groben, Pamela A; Kaufmann, William K; Miller, C Ryan

    2014-03-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) coordinates DNA repair with cell cycle checkpoints to ameliorate or mitigate the pathological effects of DNA damage. Automated quantitative analysis (AQUA) and Tissue Studio are commercial technologies that use digitized immunofluorescence microscopy images to quantify antigen expression in defined tissue compartments. Because DDR is commonly activated in cancer and may reflect genetic instability within the lesion, a method to quantify DDR in cancer offers potential diagnostic and/or prognostic value. In this study, both AQUA and Tissue Studio algorithms were used to quantify the DDR in radiation-damaged skin fibroblasts, melanoma cell lines, moles, and primary and metastatic melanomas. Digital image analysis results for three markers of DDR (γH2AX, P-ATM, P-Chk2) correlated with immunoblot data for irradiated fibroblasts, whereas only γH2AX and P-Chk2 correlated with immunoblot data in melanoma cell lines. Melanoma cell lines displayed substantial variation in γH2AX and P-Chk2 expression, and P-Chk2 expression was significantly correlated with radioresistance. Moles, primary melanomas, and melanoma metastases in brain, lung and liver displayed substantial variation in γH2AX expression, similar to that observed in melanoma cell lines. Automated digital analysis of immunofluorescent images stained for DDR biomarkers may be useful for predicting tumor response to radiation and chemotherapy. PMID:24309508

  2. An ecosystem analysis of the activated sludge microbial community.

    PubMed

    Yiannakopoulou, Trissevyene V

    2010-01-01

    This study was undertaken (i) to investigate the interactions of the activated sludge microbial community in a chemostat with the "environment", such as the substrate composition and variations, (ii) to investigate how these interactions affect the quality of the treated effluent and (iii) to determine the limits or applicability conditions to the indicators and to the prediction potential of the treated effluent quality. This work presents (a) the experimental results obtained from a reactor fed municipal wastewater (Data Set2-DS2) concerning the reactor's operating conditions and the microbial community of the sludge (b) comparisons between DS2 and an older Data Set (DS1) obtained when the reactor was fed synthetic substrate, all other experimental conditions being identical, and (c) simulation results and sensitivity analyses of two model runs (R1 and R2, corresponding to DS1 and DS2). The first trophic level (P(1)) of the DS2 microbial community consisted of bacteria, the second trophic level (P(2)) of bacteria-eating protozoa, rotifers and nematodes and the third trophic level (P(3)) of carnivorous protozoa and arthropods. Rotifers were an important constituent of the DS2 microbial community. The DS1 and DS1 communities differed in total size, trophic level sizes and species composition. Correlations between the major microbial groups of DS2 community and either loading rates or effluent quality attributes were generally low, but the correlation of bacteria with SVI and ammonia in the effluent was better. Also, the ratio of rotifers to protozoa in P(2) was correlated to BOD in the effluent. The results of this work indicate that predictions of the treated effluent quality based only on protozoa may not be safe. Sensitivity analysis of R2 run indicate that, when variation in Y and K(d) biokinetic coefficients of the sludge are combined with fluctuations in composition and quality of municipal wastewater entering the reactor, then sufficient significant

  3. Analysis of murine HOXA-2 activity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Percival-Smith, A; Bondy, J A

    1999-01-01

    The murine HOXA-2 protein shares amino acid sequence similarity with Drosophila Proboscipedia (PB). In this paper, we test whether HOXA-2 and PB are functionally equivalent in Drosophila. In Drosophila, PB inhibits SCR activity required for larval T1 beard formation and adult tarsus formation and is required for maxillary palp and proboscis formation. HOXA-2 expressed from a heat-shock promoter weakly suppressed SCR activity required for T1 beard formation. But interestingly neither PB nor HOXA-2 expressed from a heat-shock promoter suppressed murine HOXA-5 activity, the murine SCR homologue, from inducing ectopic T1 beards in T2 and T3, indicating that HOXA-5 does not interact with PB. HOXA-2 activity expressed from the Tubulin alpha 1 promoter modified the pb null phenotype resulting in a proboscis-to-arista transformation, indicating that HOXA-2 was able to suppress SCR activity required for tarsus formation. However, HOXA-2 expressed from a Tubulin alpha 1 promoter was unable to direct maxillary palp determination when either ectopically expressed in the antenna or in the maxillary palp primordia of a pb null mutant. HOXA-2 was also unable to rescue pseudotrachea formation in a pb null mutant. These results indicate that the only activity that PB and HOXA-2 weakly share is the inhibition of SCR activity, and that murine HOXA-5 and Drosophila SCR do not share inhibition by PB activity. PMID:10322642

  4. Teacher Mentoring: An Analysis of Roles, Activities, and Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Terry M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Mentors' notes and comments were analyzed to determine their perceptions of roles, activities, and conditions influencing their work with beginning teachers. Mentors had many helping strategies that developed and shaped complex roles. A conceptual framework of eight categories of mentoring activities addressing five domains of beginning teachers'…

  5. PDAs as Lifelong Learning Tools: An Activity Theory Based Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waycott, Jenny; Jones, Ann; Scanlon, Eileen

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the use of an activity theory (AT) framework to analyze the ways that distance part time learners and mobile workers adapted and appropriated mobile devices for their activities and in turn how their use of these new tools changed the ways that they carried out their learning or their work. It is argued that there are two key…

  6. Laminar analysis of slow wave activity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Csercsa, Richárd; Dombovári, Balázs; Fabó, Dániel; Wittner, Lucia; Erőss, Loránd; Entz, László; Sólyom, András; Rásonyi, György; Szűcs, Anna; Kelemen, Anna; Jakus, Rita; Juhos, Vera; Grand, László; Magony, Andor; Halász, Péter; Freund, Tamás F.; Maglóczky, Zsófia; Cash, Sydney S.; Papp, László; Karmos, György; Halgren, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Brain electrical activity is largely composed of oscillations at characteristic frequencies. These rhythms are hierarchically organized and are thought to perform important pathological and physiological functions. The slow wave is a fundamental cortical rhythm that emerges in deep non-rapid eye movement sleep. In animals, the slow wave modulates delta, theta, spindle, alpha, beta, gamma and ripple oscillations, thus orchestrating brain electrical rhythms in sleep. While slow wave activity can enhance epileptic manifestations, it is also thought to underlie essential restorative processes and facilitate the consolidation of declarative memories. Animal studies show that slow wave activity is composed of rhythmically recurring phases of widespread, increased cortical cellular and synaptic activity, referred to as active- or up-state, followed by cellular and synaptic inactivation, referred to as silent- or down-state. However, its neural mechanisms in humans are poorly understood, since the traditional intracellular techniques used in animals are inappropriate for investigating the cellular and synaptic/transmembrane events in humans. To elucidate the intracortical neuronal mechanisms of slow wave activity in humans, novel, laminar multichannel microelectrodes were chronically implanted into the cortex of patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy undergoing cortical mapping for seizure focus localization. Intracortical laminar local field potential gradient, multiple-unit and single-unit activities were recorded during slow wave sleep, related to simultaneous electrocorticography, and analysed with current source density and spectral methods. We found that slow wave activity in humans reflects a rhythmic oscillation between widespread cortical activation and silence. Cortical activation was demonstrated as increased wideband (0.3–200 Hz) spectral power including virtually all bands of cortical oscillations, increased multiple- and single-unit activity and

  7. Laminar analysis of slow wave activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Csercsa, Richárd; Dombovári, Balázs; Fabó, Dániel; Wittner, Lucia; Eross, Loránd; Entz, László; Sólyom, András; Rásonyi, György; Szucs, Anna; Kelemen, Anna; Jakus, Rita; Juhos, Vera; Grand, László; Magony, Andor; Halász, Péter; Freund, Tamás F; Maglóczky, Zsófia; Cash, Sydney S; Papp, László; Karmos, György; Halgren, Eric; Ulbert, István

    2010-09-01

    Brain electrical activity is largely composed of oscillations at characteristic frequencies. These rhythms are hierarchically organized and are thought to perform important pathological and physiological functions. The slow wave is a fundamental cortical rhythm that emerges in deep non-rapid eye movement sleep. In animals, the slow wave modulates delta, theta, spindle, alpha, beta, gamma and ripple oscillations, thus orchestrating brain electrical rhythms in sleep. While slow wave activity can enhance epileptic manifestations, it is also thought to underlie essential restorative processes and facilitate the consolidation of declarative memories. Animal studies show that slow wave activity is composed of rhythmically recurring phases of widespread, increased cortical cellular and synaptic activity, referred to as active- or up-state, followed by cellular and synaptic inactivation, referred to as silent- or down-state. However, its neural mechanisms in humans are poorly understood, since the traditional intracellular techniques used in animals are inappropriate for investigating the cellular and synaptic/transmembrane events in humans. To elucidate the intracortical neuronal mechanisms of slow wave activity in humans, novel, laminar multichannel microelectrodes were chronically implanted into the cortex of patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy undergoing cortical mapping for seizure focus localization. Intracortical laminar local field potential gradient, multiple-unit and single-unit activities were recorded during slow wave sleep, related to simultaneous electrocorticography, and analysed with current source density and spectral methods. We found that slow wave activity in humans reflects a rhythmic oscillation between widespread cortical activation and silence. Cortical activation was demonstrated as increased wideband (0.3-200 Hz) spectral power including virtually all bands of cortical oscillations, increased multiple- and single-unit activity and powerful

  8. Comparing Active Pediatric Obesity Treatments Using Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilles, Allyson; Cassano, Michael; Shepherd, Elizabeth J.; Higgins, Diana; Hecker, Jeffrey E.; Nangle, Douglas W.

    2008-01-01

    The current meta-analysis reviews research on the treatment of pediatric obesity focusing on studies that have been published since 1994. Eleven studies (22 comparisons, 115 effect sizes, N = 447) were included in the present meta-analysis. Results indicated that comprehensive behavioral interventions may be improved in at least two ways:…

  9. Evolution & Phylogenetic Analysis: Classroom Activities for Investigating Molecular & Morphological Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Wilfred A.

    2010-01-01

    In a flexible multisession laboratory, students investigate concepts of phylogenetic analysis at both the molecular and the morphological level. Students finish by conducting their own analysis on a collection of skeletons representing the major phyla of vertebrates, a collection of primate skulls, or a collection of hominid skulls.

  10. Teaching an Engaged Analysis Class through Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Erin Terwilleger

    2012-01-01

    Real Analysis is a required class for most undergraduate mathematics majors, but it is also one of the most difficult classes they will take. In this article, the author compares two approaches to teaching in the two analysis classes she has taught. The first one was taught in a traditional lecture-homework-exam format, while the second was taught…

  11. Analysis of scapular kinematics during active and passive arm elevation

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Yoshihiro; Gotoh, Masafumi; Takei, Kazuto; Madokoro, Kazuya; Imura, Takeshi; Murata, Shin; Morihara, Toru; Shiba, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Early postoperative passive motion exercise after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair remains controversial. To better understand this issue, this study was aimed at evaluating scapular kinematics and muscle activities during passive arm elevation in healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] The dominant shoulders of 27 healthy subjects were examined. Electromagnetic sensors attached to the scapula, thorax, and humerus were used to determine three-dimensional scapular kinematics during active arm elevation with or without external loads and passive arm elevation. Simultaneously, the activities of seven shoulder muscles were recorded with surface and intramuscular fine-wire electrodes. [Results] Compared with active arm elevation, passive elevation between 30° and 100° significantly decreased the scapular upward rotation and increased the glenohumeral elevation angle. However, no significant differences in scapular posterior tilt and external rotation were observed between active and passive arm elevation, and scapular plane kinematics were not affected by muscle activity. [Conclusion] Unlike active motion with or without an external load, passive arm elevation significantly decreased the scapular upward rotation and significantly increased the mid-range glenohumeral elevation. These data, which suggest that passive arm elevation should be avoided during the early postoperative period, may expand the understanding of rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. PMID:27390438

  12. Analysis of scapular kinematics during active and passive arm elevation.

    PubMed

    Kai, Yoshihiro; Gotoh, Masafumi; Takei, Kazuto; Madokoro, Kazuya; Imura, Takeshi; Murata, Shin; Morihara, Toru; Shiba, Naoto

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] Early postoperative passive motion exercise after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair remains controversial. To better understand this issue, this study was aimed at evaluating scapular kinematics and muscle activities during passive arm elevation in healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] The dominant shoulders of 27 healthy subjects were examined. Electromagnetic sensors attached to the scapula, thorax, and humerus were used to determine three-dimensional scapular kinematics during active arm elevation with or without external loads and passive arm elevation. Simultaneously, the activities of seven shoulder muscles were recorded with surface and intramuscular fine-wire electrodes. [Results] Compared with active arm elevation, passive elevation between 30° and 100° significantly decreased the scapular upward rotation and increased the glenohumeral elevation angle. However, no significant differences in scapular posterior tilt and external rotation were observed between active and passive arm elevation, and scapular plane kinematics were not affected by muscle activity. [Conclusion] Unlike active motion with or without an external load, passive arm elevation significantly decreased the scapular upward rotation and significantly increased the mid-range glenohumeral elevation. These data, which suggest that passive arm elevation should be avoided during the early postoperative period, may expand the understanding of rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. PMID:27390438

  13. Analysis of solid-rocket effluents for aluminum, silicon, and other trace elements by neutron activation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furr, A. K.

    1974-01-01

    The sensitivity and reliability of neutron activation analysis in detecting trace elements in solid rocket effluents are discussed. Special attention was given to Al and Si contaminants. The construction and performance of a thermal column irradiation unit was reported.

  14. ANALYSIS OF ARACHIDONIC ACID METABOLITE AND PLATELET ACTIVATING FACTOR PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolites of arachidonic acid ("eicosanoids") and platelet activating factor are important bioactive lipids that may be involved in the pathobiological alterations in animals induced by pollutant exposure. nalysis of these substances in biological tissue and fluids is important...

  15. ANALYSIS OF DISCRIMINATING FACTORS IN HUMAN ACTIVITIES THAT AFFECT EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurately modeling exposure to particulate matter (PM) and other pollutants ultimately involves the utilization of human location-activity databases to assist in understanding the potential variability of microenvironmental exposures. This paper critically considers and stati...

  16. Elemental analysis of granite by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF).

    PubMed

    El-Taher, A

    2012-01-01

    The instrumental neutron activation analysis technique (INAA) was used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of granite samples collected from four locations in the Aswan area in South Egypt. The samples were prepared together with their standards and simultaneously irradiated in a neutron flux of 7×10(11)n/cm(2)s in the TRIGA Mainz research reactor. Gamma-ray spectra from an hyper-pure germanium detector were analyzed. The present study provides the basic data of elemental concentrations of granite rocks. The following elements have been determined Na, Mg, K, Fe, Mn, Sc, Cr, Ti, Co, Zn, Ga, Rb, Zr, Nb, Sn, Ba, Cs, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Yb, Lu, Hf, Ta, Th and U. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) was used for comparison and to detect elements, which can be detected only by XRF such as F, S, Cl, Co, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se and V. The data presented here are our contribution to understanding the elemental composition of the granite rocks. Because there are no existing databases for the elemental analysis of granite, our results are a start to establishing a database for the Egyptian granite. It is hoped that the data presented here will be useful to those dealing with geochemistry, granite chemistry and related fields. PMID:21992845

  17. Teaching Tip: Using Activity Diagrams to Model Systems Analysis Techniques: Teaching What We Preach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lending, Diane; May, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Activity diagrams are used in Systems Analysis and Design classes as a visual tool to model the business processes of "as-is" and "to-be" systems. This paper presents the idea of using these same activity diagrams in the classroom to model the actual processes (practices and techniques) of Systems Analysis and Design. This tip…

  18. Activation and characterization of the reovirus transcriptase: genetic analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Drayna, D; Fields, B N

    1982-01-01

    We studied the ability of chymotrypsin to activate the transcriptases of the three serotypes of reovirus. When we used conditions that reproducibly caused the activation of type 3 transcriptase by chymotrypsin alone, type 2 transcriptase was sometimes activated, and type 1 transcriptase was never activated. Using intertypic recombinants containing various combinations of genome segments from reovirus types 3 and 1, we showed that the M2 segment determined this difference. Biochemical experiments indicated that the digestion of reovirus type 1 by chromotrypsin was blocked at an intermediate stage in uncoating. We found conditions which reproducibly activated the transcriptases of all three serotypes. This allowed us to compare the biochemical properties of the three transcriptases. Although the monovalent cation preferences, divalent cation preferences and optima, and temperature optima of type 1, 2, and 3 transcriptases were indistinguishable, the pH activity curves were reproducibly different. The largest difference was between type 2 and 3 transcriptases; the pH optimum of type 2 transcriptase was lower than the pH optimum of type 3 transcriptase. Using intertypic recombinants containing various combinations of genome segments from reovirus types 2 and 3, we demonstrated that the L1 segment specified this difference. Images PMID:7086953

  19. Patterns of Activity Revealed by a Time Lag Analysis of a Model Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Stephen; Viall, Nicholeen

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the global activity patterns predicted from a model active region heated by distributions of nanoflares that have a range of average frequencies. The activity patterns are manifested in time lag maps of narrow-band instrument channel pairs. We combine an extrapolated magnetic skeleton with hydrodynamic and forward modeling codes to create a model active region, and apply the time lag method to synthetic observations. Our aim is to recover some typical properties and patterns of activity observed in active regions. Our key findings are: 1. Cooling dominates the time lag signature and the time lags between the channel pairs are generally consistent with observed values. 2. Shorter coronal loops in the core cool more quickly than longer loops at the periphery. 3. All channel pairs show zero time lag when the line-of-sight passes through coronal loop foot-points. 4. There is strong evidence that plasma must be re-energized on a time scale comparable to the cooling timescale to reproduce the observed coronal activity, but it is likely that a relatively broad spectrum of heating frequencies operates across active regions. 5. Due to their highly dynamic nature, we find nanoflare trains produce zero time lags along entire flux tubes in our model active region that are seen between the same channel pairs in observed active regions.

  20. Analysis of essential oils from Voacanga africana seeds at different hydrodistillation extraction stages: chemical composition, antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiong; Yang, Dongliang; Liu, Jiajia; Ren, Na

    2015-01-01

    In this study, essential oils from Voacanga africana seeds at different extraction stages were investigated. In the chemical composition analysis, 27 compounds representing 86.69-95.03% of the total essential oils were identified and quantified. The main constituents in essential oils were terpenoids, alcohols and fatty acids accounting for 15.03-24.36%, 21.57-34.43% and 33.06-57.37%, respectively. Moreover, the analysis also revealed that essential oils from different extraction stages possessed different chemical compositions. In the antioxidant evaluation, all analysed oils showed similar antioxidant behaviours, and the concentrations of essential oils providing 50% inhibition of DPPH-scavenging activity (IC50) were about 25 mg/mL. In the antimicrobial experiments, essential oils from different extraction stages exhibited different antimicrobial activities. The antimicrobial activity of oils was affected by extraction stages. By controlling extraction stages, it is promising to obtain essential oils with desired antimicrobial activities. PMID:25686854

  1. A Social Network Analysis Approach to Detecting Suspicious Online Financial Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lei; Barbier, Geoffrey; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Jianping

    Social network analysis techniques can be applied to help detect financial crimes. We discuss the relationship between detecting financial crimes and the social web, and use select case studies to illustrate the potential for applying social network analysis techniques. With the increasing use of online financing services and online financial activities, it becomes more challenging to find suspicious activities among massive numbers of normal and legal activities.

  2. Comparison of Impurities in Charcoal Sorbents Found by Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Doll, Charles G.; Finn, Erin C.; Cantaloub, Michael G.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Kephart, Jeremy; Kephart, Rosara F.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Neutron activation of gas samples in a reactor often requires a medium to retain sufficient amounts of the gas for analysis. Charcoal is commonly used to adsorb gas and hold it for activation; however, the amount of activated sodium in the charcoal after irradiation swamps most signals of interest. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) was performed on several commonly available charcoal samples in an effort to determine the activation background. The results for several elements, including the dominant sodium element, are reported. It was found that ECN charcoal had the lowest elemental background, containing sodium at 2.65 ± 0.05 ppm, as well as trace levels of copper and tungsten.

  3. ANALYSIS OF HUMAN ACTIVITY DATA FOR USE IN MODELING ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activity data are a critical part of exposure models being developed by the US EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). An analysis of human activity data within NERL's Consolidated Human Activity Database (CHAD) was performed in two areas relevant to exposure ...

  4. Flipping the Audience Script: An Activity That Integrates Research and Audience Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Chris; Hannah, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a flipped classroom activity that requires students to integrate research and audience analysis. The activity uses Twitter as a data source. In the activity, students identify a sample, collect customer tweets, and analyze the language of the tweets in an effort to construct knowledge about an audience's values, needs, and…

  5. 30 CFR 280.30 - What activities will not require environmental analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Obligations Under This Part Environmental Issues § 280.30 What activities will not require environmental analysis? We anticipate that activities of the type listed below... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What activities will not require...

  6. Analysis of Selection Activities to Supplement Approval Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loup, Jean L.; Snoke, Helen Lloyd

    1991-01-01

    Describes two surveys of libraries by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) that were conducted to compare approval plans and to determine alternative acquisitions methods for materials in philosophy and political science. Time spent by selectors is examined, collection evaluation activities are described, and implications for resource…

  7. Microscopic Analysis of Plankton, Periphyton, and Activated Sludge. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This manual is intended for professional personnel in the fields of water pollution control, limnology, water supply and waste treatment. Primary emphasis is given to practice in the identification and enumeration of microscopic organisms which may be encountered in water and activated sludge. Methods for the chemical and instrumental evaluation…

  8. Carbon analysis in CdTe by nuclear activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibani, H.; Stoquert, J. P.; Hage-Ali, M.; Koebel, J. M.; Abdesselam, M.; Siffert, P.

    1991-06-01

    We describe the capabilities of the nuclear reaction 12C(d, n) 13Nlimit→β +13C the measurement of absolute concentrations of C in CdTe by the charged particle activation (CPA) method. This technique is used to determine the segregation coefficient of C introduced as an impurity in CdTe.

  9. Antibacterial activities and phytochemical analysis of Cassia fistula (Linn.) leaf

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Sujogya K.; Padhi, L. P.; Mohanty, G.

    2011-01-01

    Cassia fistula Linn. which belongs to family Leguminosae is a medium-sized tree and its different parts are used in ayurvedic medicine as well as home remedies for common ailments. Sequential extraction was carried out using solvents viz. petroleum ether, chloroform, ethanol, methanol and water from leaf of the plant were investigated for preliminary phytochemical and antibacterial property. Results of the study showed that all the extracts had good inhibitory activity against Gram-positive test organism. Although all five extracts showed promising antibacterial activity against test bacterial species, yet maximum activity was observed in ethanol extract. The minimum inhibitory concentration ranged in between 94 to 1 500 μg/ml. Evaluation of phytochemicals such as alkaloids, flavonoids, carbohydrates, glycosides, protein and amino acids, saponins, and triterpenoids revealed the presence of most of constituents in polar extracts (ethanol, methanol, and aqueous) compared with nonpolar extracts (petroleum ether and chloroform). Furthermore, the ethanol extract was subjected to TLC bioautography and time-kill study against Staphylococcus epidermidis. All the findings exhibit that the leaf extracts have broad-spectrum activity and suggest its possible use in treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:22171295

  10. Proteomic analysis of macrophage activated with salmonella lipopolysaccharide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophages play pivotal role in immunity. They are activated by many pathogen derived molecules such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) which trigger the production of various proteins and peptides that drive and resolve inflammation. There are numerous studies on the effect of LPS at the genome level bu...

  11. Dynamic-Loads Analysis of Flexible Aircraft With Active Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, B. I.; Durling, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    Integrated system of stand-along computer programs, DYLOFLEX, analyzes dynamic loads on flexible aircraft with active controls. DYLOFLEX capabilities include calculating dynamic loads due to continuous atmospheric turbulence, discrete gusts, and discrete control inputs. Each of the eight individual DYLOFLEX programs may be used alone or in conjunction with other DYLOFLEX programs.

  12. Long Term Activity Analysis in Surveillance Video Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ming-yu

    2010-01-01

    Surveillance video recording is becoming ubiquitous in daily life for public areas such as supermarkets, banks, and airports. The rate at which surveillance video is being generated has accelerated demand for machine understanding to enable better content-based search capabilities. Analyzing human activity is one of the key tasks to understand and…

  13. Activation energy measurements in rheological analysis of cheese

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activation energy of flow (Ea) was calculated from temperature sweeps of cheeses with contrasting characteristics to determine its usefulness in predicting rheological behavior upon heating. Cheddar, Colby, whole milk Mozzarella, low moisture part skim Mozzarella, Parmesan, soft goat, and Queso Fre...

  14. SILAC-Based Mass Spectrometry Analysis Reveals That Epibrassinolide Induces Apoptosis via Activating Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Epibrassinolide (EBR) is a polyhydroxylated sterol derivative and biologically active compound of the brassinosteroids. In addition to well-described roles in plant growth, EBR induces apoptosis in the LNCaP prostate cancer cells expressing functional androgen receptor (AR). Therefore, it is suggested that EBR might have an inhibitory potential on androgen receptor signaling pathway. However, the mechanism by which EBR exerts its effects on LNCaP is poorly understood. To address this gap in knowledge, we used an unbiased global proteomics approach, i.e., stable-isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). In total, 964 unique proteins were identified, 160 of which were differentially expressed after 12 h of EBR treatment. The quantification of the differentially expressed proteins revealed that the expression of the unfolded protein response (UPR) chaperone protein, calreticulin (CALR), was dramatically downregulated. The decrease in CALR expression was also validated by immunoblotting. Because our data revealed the involvement of the UPR in response to EBR exposure, we evaluated the expression of the other UPR proteins. We demonstrated that EBR treatment downregulated calnexin and upregulated BiP and IRE1α expression levels and induced CHOP translocation from the cytoplasm to nucleus. The translocation of CHOP was associated with caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation after a 12 h EBR treatment. Co-treatment of EBR with rapamycin, an upstream mTOR pathway inhibitor, prevented EBR-induced cell viability loss and PARP cleavage in LNCaP prostate cancer cells, suggesting that EBR could induce ER stress in these cells. In addition, we observed similar results in DU145 cells with nonfunctional androgen receptor. When proteasomal degradation of proteins was blocked by MG132 co-treatment, EBR treatment further induced PARP cleavage relative to drug treatment alone. EBR also induced Ca2+ sequestration, which confirmed the alteration of the ER pathway due to drug

  15. SILAC-Based Mass Spectrometry Analysis Reveals That Epibrassinolide Induces Apoptosis via Activating Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Obakan, Pinar; Barrero, Carlos; Coker-Gurkan, Ajda; Arisan, Elif Damla; Merali, Salim; Palavan-Unsal, Narcin

    2015-01-01

    Epibrassinolide (EBR) is a polyhydroxylated sterol derivative and biologically active compound of the brassinosteroids. In addition to well-described roles in plant growth, EBR induces apoptosis in the LNCaP prostate cancer cells expressing functional androgen receptor (AR). Therefore, it is suggested that EBR might have an inhibitory potential on androgen receptor signaling pathway. However, the mechanism by which EBR exerts its effects on LNCaP is poorly understood. To address this gap in knowledge, we used an unbiased global proteomics approach, i.e., stable-isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). In total, 964 unique proteins were identified, 160 of which were differentially expressed after 12 h of EBR treatment. The quantification of the differentially expressed proteins revealed that the expression of the unfolded protein response (UPR) chaperone protein, calreticulin (CALR), was dramatically downregulated. The decrease in CALR expression was also validated by immunoblotting. Because our data revealed the involvement of the UPR in response to EBR exposure, we evaluated the expression of the other UPR proteins. We demonstrated that EBR treatment downregulated calnexin and upregulated BiP and IRE1α expression levels and induced CHOP translocation from the cytoplasm to nucleus. The translocation of CHOP was associated with caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation after a 12 h EBR treatment. Co-treatment of EBR with rapamycin, an upstream mTOR pathway inhibitor, prevented EBR-induced cell viability loss and PARP cleavage in LNCaP prostate cancer cells, suggesting that EBR could induce ER stress in these cells. In addition, we observed similar results in DU145 cells with nonfunctional androgen receptor. When proteasomal degradation of proteins was blocked by MG132 co-treatment, EBR treatment further induced PARP cleavage relative to drug treatment alone. EBR also induced Ca2+ sequestration, which confirmed the alteration of the ER pathway due to drug

  16. Active RF seeker analysis for land combat seekers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, R. F.; Garlough, R. H.

    1981-04-01

    This report discusses some analysis techniques which apply to all-weather/day-night missile guidance systems against tank type targets using an RF seeker. Those techniques are examined that may be applied to obtain the proper s/c ratio and terminal accuracy, including squint, polarization and frequency discrimination.

  17. Optimization of HEP Analysis Activities Using a Tier2 Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arezzini, S.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Ciampa, A.; Coscetti, S.; Mazzoni, E.; Sarkar, S.; Taneja, S.

    2012-12-01

    While the model for a Tier2 is well understood and implemented within the HEP Community, a refined design for Analysis specific sites has not been agreed upon as clearly. We aim to describe the solutions adopted at the INFN Pisa, the biggest Tier2 in the Italian HEP Community. A Standard Tier2 infrastructure is optimized for Grid CPU and Storage access, while a more interactive oriented use of the resources is beneficial to the final data analysis step. In this step, POSIX file storage access is easier for the average physicist, and has to be provided in a real or emulated way. Modern analysis techniques use advanced statistical tools (like RooFit and RooStat), which can make use of multi core systems. The infrastructure has to provide or create on demand computing nodes with many cores available, above the existing and less elastic Tier2 flat CPU infrastructure. At last, the users do not want to have to deal with data placement policies at the various sites, and hence a transparent WAN file access, again with a POSIX layer, must be provided, making use of the soon-to-be-installed 10 Gbit/s regional lines. Even if standalone systems with such features are possible and exist, the implementation of an Analysis site as a virtual layer over an existing Tier2 requires novel solutions; the ones used in Pisa are described here.

  18. Phytochemical Analysis and Biological Activities of Cola nitida Bark

    PubMed Central

    Dah-Nouvlessounon, Durand; Adoukonou-Sagbadja, Hubert; Diarrassouba, Nafan; Sina, Haziz; Adjanohoun, Adolphe; Inoussa, Mariam; Akakpo, Donald; Gbenou, Joachim D.; Kotchoni, Simeon O.; Dicko, Mamoudou H.; Baba-Moussa, Lamine

    2015-01-01

    Kola nut is chewed in many West African cultures and is used ceremonially. The aim of this study is to investigate some biological effects of Cola nitida's bark after phytochemical screening. The bark was collected, dried, and then powdered for the phytochemical screening and extractions. Ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts of C. nitida were used in this study. The antibacterial activity was tested on ten reference strains and 28 meat isolated Staphylococcus strains by disc diffusion method. The antifungal activity of three fungal strains was determined on the Potato-Dextrose Agar medium mixed with the appropriate extract. The antioxidant activity was determined by DPPH and ABTS methods. Our data revealed the presence of various potent phytochemicals. For the reference and meat isolated strains, the inhibitory diameter zone was from 17.5 ± 0.7 mm (C. albicans) to 9.5 ± 0.7 mm (P. vulgaris). The MIC ranged from 0.312 mg/mL to 5.000 mg/mL and the MBC from 0.625 mg/mL to >20 mg/mL. The highest antifungal activity was observed with F. verticillioides and the lowest one with P. citrinum. The two extracts have an excellent reducing free radical activity. The killing effect of A. salina larvae was perceptible at 1.04 mg/mL. The purified extracts of Cola nitida's bark can be used to hold meat products and also like phytomedicine. PMID:25767723

  19. Activation analysis of the PULSAR-II fusion power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Khater, H.Y.

    1995-12-31

    The PULSAR-II pulsed tokamak power plant design utilizes a blanket made of the vanadium alloy, V-5Cr-5Ti, and cooled with liquid lithium. The shield is made of a mixture of the low activation austenitic steel (Tenelon) and vanadium. The blanket is assumed to be replaced every 5.6 full power years (FPY) and the shield is assumed to stay in place for 30 FPY. The activity induced in the blanket at the end of its lifetime is higher than the activity induced in the shield after 30 FPY. At shutdown, the blanket and shield activities are 2678 MCi and 1747 MCi, respectively. One year after shutdown the shield activity drops to 18 MCi compared to 84 MCi for the blanket. The total decay heat generated in the blanket at the end of its lifetime is 34.7 MW and drops to 17.6 MW within an hour. At shutdown, 25.3 MW of decay heat are generated in the shield, dropping to only 0.1 MW within the first year. One week after shutdown, the values of the integrated decay heat are 1770 GJ for the blanket and 469 GJ for the shield. The radwaste classification of the reactor structure is evaluated according to both the NRC 10CFR61 and Fetter waste disposal concentration limits. After 5.6 years of irradiation, the blanket will only qualify for Class C low level waste. After 30 years of operation, the shield will also qualify for disposal as Class C waste. Only remote maintenance will be allowed inside the containment building.

  20. Impurities analysis of polycrystalline silicon substrates: Neutronic Activation Analysis (NAA) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounis, A.; Lenouar, K.; Gritly, Y.; Abbad, B.; Azzaz, M.; Taïbi, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we have determined the concentration of some impurities such as carbon, iron, copper, titanium, nickel of the flat product (polycrystalline silicon). These impurities generate a yield decrease in the photovoltaic components. The material (polycrystalline silicon) used in this work is manufactured by the Unit of Silicon Technology Development (UDTS Algiers, Algeria). The 80 kg ingot has been cutted into 16 briquettes in order to have plates (flat product) of 100 mm×100 mm dimensions. Each briquette is divided into three parts top (T), middle (M) and bottom (B). For this purpose, the following instrumental analysis techniques have been employed: neutronic analysis (neutronic activation analysis) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Masses of 80 mg are sampled and form of discs 18 mm in diameter, then exposed to a flux of neutron of 2.1012neutron cm-2 s-1 during 15 min. The energetic profile of incidental flux is constituted of fast neutrons (ΦR = 3.1012n.cm-2 s-1; E = 2 Mev), thermal neutrons (ΦTH = 1013n.cm-2 s-1; E = 0.025 ev) and epithermal neutrons (Φepi = 7.1011 n cm-2 s-1; E>4.9 ev), irradiation time 15 mn, after 20 mn of decrement, acquisitions of 300 s are carried out. The results are expressed by disintegration per second which does not exceed the 9000 Bq, 500 Bq and 2600 Bq, respectively for copper, titanium and nickel. It is observed that the impurities concentrations in the medium are higher. The impurities in the bottom of the ingots originate from the crucible. The impurities in the top originate from impurities dissolved in the liquid silicon, which have segregated to the top layer of the ingot and after solidification diffuse. Silicon corresponds to a mixture of three isotopes 28Si, 29Si and 30Si. These elements clearly appear on the mass spectrum (SIMS). The presence of iron and the one of nickel has been noticed.

  1. The pharmacological activity of fish venoms.

    PubMed

    Church, Jarrod E; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2002-08-01

    Venomous creatures have been the source of much recent research in the effort to find novel physiological tools and pharmaceuticals. However, due to the technical difficulties with obtaining and storing venom extracts, the venoms of marine animals, particularly fish, remain a largely untapped source of novel compounds. The most potent effects of piscine venoms are on the cardiovascular system. All piscine venoms produce profound cardiovascular changes, both in vitro and in vivo, including the release of nitric oxide from endothelial cells, smooth muscle contraction, and differing effects on atria. Although there is a complex balance between different components of the venom response, similarities exist between the responses to the venoms of all species of fish. In addition to their cardiovascular effects, piscine venoms possess neuromuscular activity. Once again, the activities of most piscine venoms are very similar, usually consisting of a depolarising action on both nerve and muscle cells. Most piscine venoms have potent cytolytic activity, and it seems likely that this activity is the mechanism behind many of their cardiovascular and neuromuscular effects. Piscine venoms all seem to share similar activity, probably as a result of evolving for a common purpose, and cross-reactivity with stonefish antivenom, both functionally in experimental models and in Western immunoblotting analysis, suggesting that piscine venoms may also possess structural similarities in addition to their functional similarities. PMID:12165309

  2. Features for voice activity detection: a comparative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Simon; Herbig, Tobias; Buck, Markus; Schmidt, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    In many speech signal processing applications, voice activity detection (VAD) plays an essential role for separating an audio stream into time intervals that contain speech activity and time intervals where speech is absent. Many features that reflect the presence of speech were introduced in literature. However, to our knowledge, no extensive comparison has been provided yet. In this article, we therefore present a structured overview of several established VAD features that target at different properties of speech. We categorize the features with respect to properties that are exploited, such as power, harmonicity, or modulation, and evaluate the performance of some dedicated features. The importance of temporal context is discussed in relation to latency restrictions imposed by different applications. Our analyses allow for selecting promising VAD features and finding a reasonable trade-off between performance and complexity.

  3. HPLC analysis and cytotoxic activity of Vernonia cinerea.

    PubMed

    Khay, Mom; Toeng, Phirom; Mahiou-Leddet, Valérie; Mabrouki, Fathi; Sothea, Kim; Ollivier, Evelyne; Elias, Riad; Bun, Sok-Siya

    2012-10-01

    The extracts of five Cambodian medicinal plants (Aganosma marginata, Dracaena cambodiana, Harrisonia perforata, Hymenodictyon excelsum and Vernonia cinerea) were evaluated in vitro for their cytotoxic activity against HT29 colon adenocarcinoma cells and HepG2 hepatoma cells, using the MTT assay. Among these five plants, Vernonia cinerea displayed potent cytotoxicity. One main sesquiterpene lactone, 8alpha-tigloyloxy-hirsutinolide-13-O-acetate was isolated from the whole plant of V. cinerea. This compound was active against both cancer cell lines (IC50 = 3.50 microM for HT29 and IC50 = 4.27 microM for HepG2). To quantify this compound in the plant, an analytical high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed and validated. PMID:23156983

  4. Active magnetic radiation shielding system analysis and key technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, S. A.; Blattnig, S. R.; Singleterry, R. C.; Westover, S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Many active magnetic shielding designs have been proposed in order to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on long duration, deep space missions. While these designs are promising, they pose significant engineering challenges. This work presents a survey of the major systems required for such unconfined magnetic field design, allowing the identification of key technologies for future development. Basic mass calculations are developed for each system and are used to determine the resulting galactic cosmic radiation exposure for a generic solenoid design, using a range of magnetic field strength and thickness values, allowing some of the basic characteristics of such a design to be observed. This study focuses on a solenoid shaped, active magnetic shield design; however, many of the principles discussed are applicable regardless of the exact design configuration, particularly the key technologies cited.

  5. Active magnetic radiation shielding system analysis and key technologies.

    PubMed

    Washburn, S A; Blattnig, S R; Singleterry, R C; Westover, S C

    2015-01-01

    Many active magnetic shielding designs have been proposed in order to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on long duration, deep space missions. While these designs are promising, they pose significant engineering challenges. This work presents a survey of the major systems required for such unconfined magnetic field design, allowing the identification of key technologies for future development. Basic mass calculations are developed for each system and are used to determine the resulting galactic cosmic radiation exposure for a generic solenoid design, using a range of magnetic field strength and thickness values, allowing some of the basic characteristics of such a design to be observed. This study focuses on a solenoid shaped, active magnetic shield design; however, many of the principles discussed are applicable regardless of the exact design configuration, particularly the key technologies cited. PMID:26177618

  6. Active Control Analysis for Aeroelastic Instabilities in Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2002-01-01

    Turbomachines onboard aircraft operate in a highly complex and harsh environment. The unsteady flowfield inherent to turbomachines leads to several problems associated with safety, stability, performance and noise. In-flight surge or flutter incidents could be catastrophic and impact the safety and reliability of the aircraft. High-Cycle-Fatigue (HCF), on the other hand, can significantly impact safety, readiness and maintenance costs. To avoid or minimize these problems generally a more conservative design method must be initiated which results in thicker blades and a loss of performance. Actively controlled turbomachines have the potential to reduce or even eliminate the instabilities by impacting the unsteady aerodynamic characteristics. By modifying the unsteady aerodynamics, active control may significantly improve the safety and performance especially at off-design conditions, reduce noise, and increase the range of operation of the turbomachine. Active control can also help improve reliability for mission critical applications such as the Mars Flyer. In recent years, HCF has become one of the major issues concerning the cost of operation for current turbomachines. HCF alone accounts for roughly 30% of maintenance cost for the United States Air-Force. Other instabilities (flutter, surge, rotating-stall, etc.) are generally identified during the design and testing phase. Usually a redesign overcomes these problems, often reducing performance and range of operation, and resulting in an increase in the development cost and time. Despite a redesign, the engines do not have the capabilities or means to cope with in-flight unforeseen vibration, stall, flutter or surge related instabilities. This could require the entire fleet worldwide to be stood down for expensive modifications. These problems can be largely overcome by incorporating active control within the turbomachine and its design. Active control can help in maintaining the integrity of the system in

  7. Cell trapping in activated micropores for functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Talasaz, AmirAli H; Powell, Ashley A; Stahl, Patrik; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Jeffrey, Stefanie S; Mindrinos, Michael; Davis, Ronald W

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a novel device which provides the opportunity to perform high-throughput biochemical assays on different individual cells. In particular, the proposed device is suited to screen the rare cells in biological samples for early stage cancer diagnosis and explore their biochemical functionality. In the process, single cells are precisely positioned and captured in activated micropores. To show the performance of the proposed device, cultured yeast cells and human epithelial circulating tumor cells are successfully captured. PMID:17945673

  8. Determination of indium in standard rocks by neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Johansen, O; Steinnes, E

    1966-08-01

    A rapid neutron activation method for the determination of indium in rocks, based on 54 min (116m)In, is described. The method has been applied to a series of geochemical standards including granite G-1 and diabase W-1. The precision is better than +/- 5% for samples containing more than 5 x 10(-10)g indium. Good agreement with previously published values for G-1 and W-1 has been obtained. PMID:18959988

  9. Using instrumental neutron activation analysis for geochemical analyses of terrestrial impact structures: current analytical procedures at the university of vienna geochemistry activation analysis laboratory.

    PubMed

    Mader, Dieter; Koeberl, Christian

    2009-12-01

    The Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis Gamma Spectroscopy Laboratory at the Department of Lithospheric Research, University of Vienna, has been upgraded in the year 2006. This paper describes the sample preparation, new instrumentation and data evaluation for hundreds of rock samples of two terrestrial impact structures. The measurement and data evaluation are done by using Genie 2000 and a custom-made batch software for the used analysis sequences. PMID:19481467

  10. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Active cooling system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross section and structural arrangement on the performance of actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles are investigated. An active cooling system which maintains the aircraft's entire surface area at temperatures below 394 K at Mach 6 is developed along with a hydrogen fuel tankage thermal protection system. Thermodynamic characteristics of the actively cooled thermal protection systems established are summarized. Design heat loads and coolant flowrate requirements are defined for each major structural section and for the total system. Cooling system weights are summarized at the major component level. Conclusions and recommendations are included.

  11. Metaproteomic analysis reveals microbial metabolic activities in the deep ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da-Zhi; Xie, Zhang-Xian; Zhang, Shu-Feng; Wang, Ming-Hua; Zhang, Hao; Kong, Ling-Fen; Lin, Lin

    2016-04-01

    The deep sea is the largest habitat on earth and holds many and varied microbial life forms. However, little is known about their metabolic activities in the deep ocean. Here, we characterized protein profiles of particulate (>0.22 μm) and dissolved (between 10 kDa and 0.22 μm) fractions collected from the deep South China Sea using a shotgun proteomic approach. SAR324, Alteromonadales and SAR11 were the most abundant groups, while Prasinophyte contributed most to eukaryotes and cyanophage to viruses. The dominant heterotrophic activity was evidenced by the abundant transporters (33%). Proteins participating in nitrification, methanogenesis, methyltrophy and CO2 fixation were detected. Notably, the predominance of unique cellular proteins in dissolved fraction suggested the presence of membrane structures. Moreover, the detection of translation proteins related to phytoplankton indicated that other process rather than sinking particles might be the downward export of living cells. Our study implied that novel extracellular activities and the interaction of deep water with its overlying water could be crucial to the microbial world of deep sea.

  12. Fault analysis and detection in large active optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Charles D.; Furber, Mark E.; Jordan, David C.; Blaszak, David D.

    1995-05-01

    Active optical systems are complex systems that may be expected to operate in hostile environments such as space. The ability of such a system either to tolerate failures of components or to reconfigure to accommodate failed components could significantly increase the useful lifetime of the system. Active optical systems often contain hundreds of actuators and sensor channels but have an inherent redundancy, i.e., more actuators or sensor channels than the minimum needed to achieve the required performance. A failure detection and isolation system can be used to find and accommodate failures. One type of failure is the failure of an actuator. The effect of actuator failure on the ability of a deformable mirror to correct aberrations is analyzed using a finite-element model of the deformable mirror, and a general analytical procedure for determining the effect of actuator failures on system performance is given. The application of model-based failure detection, isolation and identification algorithms to active optical systems is outlined.

  13. Analysis of the crystal structure of an active MCM hexamer

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Justin M; Arachea, Buenafe T; Epling, Leslie B; Enemark, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    In a previous Research article (Froelich et al., 2014), we suggested an MCM helicase activation mechanism, but were limited in discussing the ATPase domain because it was absent from the crystal structure. Here we present the crystal structure of a nearly full-length MCM hexamer that is helicase-active and thus has all features essential for unwinding DNA. The structure is a chimera of Sulfolobus solfataricus N-terminal domain and Pyrococcus furiosus ATPase domain. We discuss three major findings: 1) a novel conformation for the A-subdomain that could play a role in MCM regulation; 2) interaction of a universally conserved glutamine in the N-terminal Allosteric Communication Loop with the AAA+ domain helix-2-insert (h2i); and 3) a recessed binding pocket for the MCM ssDNA-binding motif influenced by the h2i. We suggest that during helicase activation, the h2i clamps down on the leading strand to facilitate strand retention and regulate ATP hydrolysis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03433.001 PMID:25262915

  14. Analysis of a Constellation Lab Cooperative Learning Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, A. J.

    2001-12-01

    A cooperative learning activity was designed for use in the undergraduate laboratory course Introduction to Astronomical Observation. This group exercise enhances the student's learning of constellations and will hopefully increase retention of the material throughout the semester. It also serves as an "ice-breaker" during the first week of lab, promoting student involvement and vested interest in the course. To gain some insight into the student mind, a survey was conducted to evaluate the usefulness and overall opinion of this method. The students who completed the survey had previously been enrolled in a pre-requisite astronomy course that also required a constellation lab. In this previous course they "learned" the constellations from an instructor and a flashlight beam, studied them on their own, and then promptly took a quiz. Both methods are analyzed from an instructional designer's point of view and suggestions for future activities are presented. The preliminary results and accompanying activity will be discussed in poster and hand-out medium.

  15. In silico antitubercular activity analysis of benzofuran and naphthofuran derivatives.

    PubMed

    Karunakar, Prashantha; Girija, Chamarahalli Ramakrishnaiyer; Krishnamurthy, Venkatappa; Krishna, Venkatarangaiah; Shivakumar, Kunigal Venugopal

    2014-01-01

    For the human health, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is the deadliest enemy since decades due to its multidrug resistant strains. During latent stage of tuberculosis infection, MTB consumes nitrate as the alternate mechanism of respiration in the absence of oxygen, thus increasing its survival and virulence. NarL is a nitrate/nitrite response transcriptional regulatory protein of two-component signal transduction system which regulates nitrate reductase and formate dehydrogenase for MTB adaptation to anaerobic condition. Phosphorylation by sensor kinase (NarX) is the primary mechanism behind the activation of NarL although many response regulators get activated by small molecule phospho-donors in the absence of sensor kinase. Using in silico approach, the molecular docking of benzofuran and naphthofuran derivatives and dynamic study of benzofuran derivative were performed. It was observed that compound Ethyl 5-bromo-3-ethoxycarbonylamino-1-benzofuran-2-carboxylate could be stabilized at the active site for over 10 ns of simulation. Here we suggest that derivatives of benzofuran moiety can lead to developing novel antituberculosis drugs. PMID:25302118

  16. Adults' Physical Activity Patterns across Life Domains: Cluster Analysis with Replication

    PubMed Central

    Rovniak, Liza S.; Sallis, James F.; Saelens, Brian E.; Frank, Lawrence D.; Marshall, Simon J.; Norman, Gregory J.; Conway, Terry L.; Cain, Kelli L.; Hovell, Melbourne F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Identifying adults' physical activity patterns across multiple life domains could inform the design of interventions and policies. Design Cluster analysis was conducted with adults in two US regions (Baltimore-Washington DC, n = 702; Seattle-King County, n = 987) to identify different physical activity patterns based on adults' reported physical activity across four life domains: leisure, occupation, transport, and home. Objectively measured physical activity, and psychosocial and built (physical) environment characteristics of activity patterns were examined. Main Outcome Measures Accelerometer-measured activity, reported domain-specific activity, psychosocial characteristics, built environment, body mass index (BMI). Results Three clusters replicated (kappa = .90-.93) across both regions: Low Activity, Active Leisure, and Active Job. The Low Activity and Active Leisure adults were demographically similar, but Active Leisure adults had the highest psychosocial and built environment support for activity, highest accelerometer-measured activity, and lowest BMI. Compared to the other clusters, the Active Job cluster had lower socioeconomic status and intermediate accelerometer-measured activity. Conclusion Adults can be clustered into groups based on their patterns of accumulating physical activity across life domains. Differences in psychosocial and built environment support between the identified clusters suggest that tailored interventions for different subgroups may be beneficial. PMID:20836604

  17. HITCAN for actively cooled hot-composite thermostructural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.; Lackney, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    A computer code, high temperature composite analyzer (HITCAN), was developed to analyze/design hot metal matrix composite structures. HITCAN is a general purpose code for predicting the global structural and local stress-strain response of multilayered (arbitrarily oriented) metal matrix structures both at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) and the structural level, including the fabrication process effects. The thermomechanical properties of the constituents are considered to be nonlinearly dependent on several parameters, including temperature, stress, and stress rate. The computational procedure employs an incremental iterative nonlinear approach utilizing a multifactor-interaction material behavior model, i.e., the material properties are expressed in terms of a product of several factors that affect the properties. HITCAN structural analysis capabilities (static, load stepping - a multistep static analysis with material properties updated at each step, modal, and buckling) for cooled hot structures are demonstrated through a specific example problem.

  18. HITCAN for actively cooled hot-composite thermostructural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.; Lackney, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    A computer code, high temperature composite analyzer (HITCAN), was developed to analyze/design hot metal matrix composite structures. HITCAN is a general purpose code for predicting the global structural and local stress-strain response of multilayered (arbitrarily oriented) metal matrix structures both at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) and the structural level, including the fabrication process effects. The thermomechanical properties of the constituents are considered to be nonlinearly dependent on several parameters, including temperature, stress, and stress rate. The computational procedure employs an incremental iterative nonlinear approach utilizing a multifactor-interaction material behavior model, i.e., the material properties are expressed in terms of a product of several factors that affect the properties. HITCAN structural analysis capabilities (static, load stepping - a multistep static analysis with material properties updated at each step, modal, and buckling) for cooled hot structures are demonstrated through a specific example problem.

  19. Synthetic Training Data Generation for Activity Monitoring and Behavior Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monekosso, Dorothy; Remagnino, Paolo

    This paper describes a data generator that produces synthetic data to simulate observations from an array of environment monitoring sensors. The overall goal of our work is to monitor the well-being of one occupant in a home. Sensors are embedded in a smart home to unobtrusively record environmental parameters. Based on the sensor observations, behavior analysis and modeling are performed. However behavior analysis and modeling require large data sets to be collected over long periods of time to achieve the level of accuracy expected. A data generator - was developed based on initial data i.e. data collected over periods lasting weeks to facilitate concurrent data collection and development of algorithms. The data generator is based on statistical inference techniques. Variation is introduced into the data using perturbation models.

  20. Vulnerability-attention analysis for space-related activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Donnie; Hays, Dan; Lee, Sung Yong; Wolfsberger, John

    1988-01-01

    Techniques for representing and analyzing trouble spots in structures and processes are discussed. Identification of vulnerable areas usually depends more on particular and often detailed knowledge than on algorithmic or mathematical procedures. In some cases, machine inference can facilitate the identification. The analysis scheme proposed first establishes the geometry of the process, then marks areas that are conditionally vulnerable. This provides a basis for advice on the kinds of human attention or machine sensing and control that can make the risks tolerable.

  1. Mathematical analysis techniques for modeling the space network activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Lisa M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to explore and identify mathematical analysis techniques, and in particular, the use of linear programming. This topic was then applied to the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) in order to understand the space network better. Finally, a small scale version of the system was modeled, variables were identified, data was gathered, and comparisons were made between actual and theoretical data.

  2. Thermal Analysis of ISS Service Module Active TCS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altov, Vladimir V.; Zaletaev, Sergey V.; Belyavskiy, Evgeniy P.

    2000-01-01

    ISS Service Module mission must begin in July 2000. The verification of design thermal requirements is mostly due to thermal analysis. The thermal analysis is enough difficult problem because of large number of ISS configurations that had to be investigated and various orbital environments. Besides the ISS structure has articulating parts such as solar arrays and radiators. The presence of articulating parts greatly increases computation times and requires accurate approach to organization of calculations. The varying geometry needs us to calculate the view factors several times during the orbit, while in static geometry case we need do it only once. In this paper we consider the thermal mathematical model of SM that includes the TCS and construction thermal models and discuss the results of calculations for ISS configurations 1R and 9Al. The analysis is based on solving the nodal heat balance equations for ISS structure by Kutta-Merson method and analytical solutions of heat transfer equations for TCS units. The computations were performed using thermal software TERM [1,2] that will be briefly described.

  3. Development of nuclear analysis capabilities for DOE waste management activities

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; DeHart, M.D.; Broadhead, B.L.; Hopper, C.M.; Petrie, L.M.

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate prototypic analysis capabilities that can be used by the nuclear safety analysis practitioners to: (1) demonstrate a more thorough understanding of the underlying physics phenomena that can lead to improved reliability and defensibility of safety evaluations; and (2) optimize operations related to the handling, storage, transportation, and disposal of fissile material and DOE spent fuel. To address these problems, the project will investigate the implementation of sensitivity and uncertainty methods within existing Monte Carlo codes used for criticality safety analyses, as well as within a new deterministic code that allows specification of arbitrary grids to accurately model the geometry details required in a criticality safety analysis. This capability can facilitate improved estimations of the required subcritical margin and potentially enable the use of a broader range of experiments in the validation process. The new arbitrary-grid radiation transport code will also enable detailed geometric modeling valuable for improved accuracy in application to a myriad of other problems related to waste characterization. Application to these problems will also be explored.

  4. Complement Regulatory Activity of Normal Human Intraocular Fluid Is Mediated by MCP, DAF, and CD59

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Jeong-Hyeon; Kaplan, Henry J.; Suk, Hye-Jung; Bora, Puran S.; Bora, Nalini S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To identify the molecules in normal human intraocular fluid (aqueous humor and vitreous) that inhibit the functional activity of the complement system. Methods Aqueous humor and vitreous were obtained from patients with noninflammatory ocular disease at the time of surgery. Samples were incubated with normal human serum (NHS), and the mixture assayed for inhibition of the classical and alternative complement pathways using standard CH50 and AH50 hemolytic assays, respectively. Both aqueous humor and vitreous were fractionated by microconcentrators and size exclusion column chromatography. The inhibitory molecules were identified by immunoblotting as well as by studying the effect of depletion of membrane cofactor protein (MCP), decay-accelerating factor (DAF), and CD59 on inhibitory activity. Results Both aqueous humor and vitreous inhibited the activity of the classical pathway (CH50). Microcentrifugation revealed the major inhibitory activity resided in the fraction with an Mr ≥ 3 kDa. Chromatography on an S-100-HR column demonstrated that the most potent inhibition was associated with the high-molecular-weight fractions (≥ 19.5 kDa). In contrast to unfractionated aqueous and vitreous, fractions with an Mr ≥ 3 kDa also had an inhibitory effect on the alternative pathway activity (AH50). The complement regulatory activity in normal human intraocular fluid was partially blocked by monoclonal antibodies against MCP, DAF, and CD59. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the presence of these three molecules in normal intraocular fluid. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that normal human intraocular fluid (aqueous humor and vitreous) contains complement inhibitory factors. Furthermore, the high-molecular-weight factors appear to be the soluble forms of MCP, DAF, and CD59. PMID:11095615

  5. Engineering analysis activities in support of susquehanna unit 1 startup testing and cycle 1 operations

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.D.; Kukielka, C.A.; Olson, L.M.; Refling, J.G.; Roscioli, A.J.; Somma, S.A.

    1985-07-01

    The engineering analysis group is responsible for all nuclear plant systems analysis and reactor analysis activities, excluding fuel management analysis, at Pennsylvania Power and Light Company. These activities include making pretest and posttest predictions of startup tests; analyzing unplanned or unexpected transient events; providing technical training to plant personnel; assisting in the development of emergency drill scenarios; providing engineering evaluations to support design and technical specification changes, and evaluating, assessing, and resolving a number of license conditions. Many of these activities have required the direct use of RETRAN models. Two RETRAN analyses that were completed to support plant operations - a pretest analysis of the turbine trip startup test, and a posttest analysis of the loss of startup transformer event - are investigated. For each case, RETRAN results are compared with available plant data and comparisons are drawn on the acceptability of the performance of the plant systems.

  6. Evaluation of radioisotope tracer and activation analysis techniques for contamination monitoring in space environment simulation chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smathers, J. B.; Kuykendall, W. E., Jr.; Wright, R. E., Jr.; Marshall, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Radioisotope measurement techniques and neutron activation analysis are evaluated for use in identifying and locating contamination sources in space environment simulation chambers. The alpha range method allows the determination of total contaminant concentration in vapor state and condensate state. A Cf-252 neutron activation analysis system for detecting oils and greases tagged with stable elements is described. While neutron activation analysis of tagged contaminants offers specificity, an on-site system is extremely costly to implement and provides only marginal detection sensitivity under even the most favorable conditions.

  7. Seismic Activity in the Gulf of Mexico: a Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, S. I.; Canet, C.; Iglesias, A.; Valdes-Gonzales, C. M.

    2013-05-01

    The southwestern corner of Gulf of Mexico (around the northern Isthmus of Tehuantepec) is exposed to an intense deep (> 100 km) seismic activity caused by the subduction of the Cocos plate. Aside from this, the gulf has been considered as a zone of low or no-seismicity. However, a sparse shallow seismic activity is observed across the Gulf of Mexico; some of these earthquakes have been strongly felt (e.g. 23/05/2007 and 10/09/2006), and the Jaltipan, 1959 earthquake caused fatalities and severe destruction in central and southern Veracruz. In this work we analyze 5 relevant earthquakes that occurred since 2001. At the central Gulf of Mexico focal mechanisms show inverse faults oriented approximately NW-SE with dip near 45 degrees, suggesting a link to sediment loading and/or to salt tectonics. On the other hand, in the southwestern corner of the gulf we analyzed some clear examples of strike-slip faults and activity probably related to the Veracruz Fault. One anomalous earthquake, recorded in 2007 in the western margin of the gulf, shows a strike-slip mechanism indicating a transform regime probably related with the East Mexican Fault. The recent improvement of the Mexican Seismological broadband network have allowed to record small earthquakes distributed in and around the Gulf of Mexico. Although the intermediate and large earthquakes in the region are infrequent, the historic evidence indicates that the magnitudes could reach Mw~6.4. This fact could be taken in consideration to reassess the seismic hazard for oil and industrial infrastructure in the region.

  8. Neutron activation analysis of an Egyptian monazite ore sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissa, E. A.; Rofail, N. B.; Ashmawy, L. S.; Hassan, A. M.

    1999-01-01

    The absolute sensitivity of a gamma-ray line following thermal or epithermal neutron activation is expressed as a product of four terms, namely, the intrinsic, irradiation, decay and measurement factors. The total absolute sensitivity is the sum of the absolute sensitivities due to thermal and epithermal activation. A. FORTRAN computer program was prepared on the TANDY 3000 NL PCA to calculate the total absolute sensitivity of the intensive gamma-ray lines from the thermal and epithermal neutron activation of all the naturally occurring nuclides. Another program was prepared for the determination of the total absolute sensitivity for gammarays emitted by radioactive daughters such as233Pa from233Th and239Np from239U. Long time irradiation periods (about 48 hours) for specimens of the monazite ore sample were carried out at the (ET-RR-1) reactor core periphery. The monazite ore sample was separated from the associating minerals in the sand of Abou-Khashaba of Rashied (Rosetta) area on the Mediterranean (North of Egypt). The separated monazite ore sample was provided by the Nuclear Material Authority of Egypt. The cadmium difference method was applied to thin gold foils for absolute thermal and epithermal neutron flux determination. The gamma-ray spectra were measured using a spectrometer with a HPGe coaxial detector. The evaluated absolute sensitivity tables were helpful in identifying the radioisotopes contributing to the gamma- ray spectra and in evaluating the elemental concentration of the monazite constitutents. Most of the rare earth elements were observed and their concentrations are reported. La, Ce, Nd, Sd and Th were found as major elements, U, Tb, Hf and Eu as minor elements.

  9. Neutron Activation Analysis and Product Isotope Inventory Code System.

    1990-10-31

    Version 00 NAC was designed to predict the neutron-induced gamma-ray radioactivity for a wide variety of composite materials. The NAC output includes the input data, a list of all reactions for each constituent element, and the end-of-irradiation disintegration rates for each reaction. NAC also compiles a product isotope inventory containing the isotope name, the disintegration rate, the gamma-ray source strength, and the absorbed dose rate at 1 meter from an unshielded point source. The inducedmore » activity is calculated as a function of irradiation and decay times; the effect of cyclic irradiation can also be calculated.« less

  10. Active neutron multiplicity analysis and Monte Carlo calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krick, M. S.; Ensslin, N.; Langner, D. G.; Miller, M. C.; Siebelist, R.; Stewart, J. E.; Ceo, R. N.; May, P. K.; Collins, L. L., Jr.

    Active neutron multiplicity measurements of high-enrichment uranium metal and oxide samples have been made at Los Alamos and Y-12. The data from the measurements of standards at Los Alamos were analyzed to obtain values for neutron multiplication and source-sample coupling. These results are compared to equivalent results obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. An approximate relationship between coupling and multiplication is derived and used to correct doubles rates for multiplication and coupling. The utility of singles counting for uranium samples is also examined.

  11. Tensor analysis methods for activity characterization in spatiotemporal data

    SciTech Connect

    Haass, Michael Joseph; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Ochoa, Edward M.

    2014-03-01

    Tensor (multiway array) factorization and decomposition offers unique advantages for activity characterization in spatio-temporal datasets because these methods are compatible with sparse matrices and maintain multiway structure that is otherwise lost in collapsing for regular matrix factorization. This report describes our research as part of the PANTHER LDRD Grand Challenge to develop a foundational basis of mathematical techniques and visualizations that enable unsophisticated users (e.g. users who are not steeped in the mathematical details of matrix algebra and mulitway computations) to discover hidden patterns in large spatiotemporal data sets.

  12. Global Analysis of Protein Activities Using Proteome Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Heng; Bilgin, Metin; Bangham, Rhonda; Hall, David; Casamayor, Antonio; Bertone, Paul; Lan, Ning; Jansen, Ronald; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Houfek, Thomas; Mitchell, Tom; Miller, Perry; Dean, Ralph A.; Gerstein, Mark; Snyder, Michael

    2001-09-01

    To facilitate studies of the yeast proteome, we cloned 5800 open reading frames and overexpressed and purified their corresponding proteins. The proteins were printed onto slides at high spatial density to form a yeast proteome microarray and screened for their ability to interact with proteins and phospholipids. We identified many new calmodulin- and phospholipid-interacting proteins; a common potential binding motif was identified for many of the calmodulin-binding proteins. Thus, microarrays of an entire eukaryotic proteome can be prepared and screened for diverse biochemical activities. The microarrays can also be used to screen protein-drug interactions and to detect posttranslational modifications.

  13. Circadian Patterns of Wikipedia Editorial Activity: A Demographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yasseri, Taha; Sumi, Robert; Kertész, János

    2012-01-01

    Wikipedia (WP) as a collaborative, dynamical system of humans is an appropriate subject of social studies. Each single action of the members of this society, i.e., editors, is well recorded and accessible. Using the cumulative data of 34 Wikipedias in different languages, we try to characterize and find the universalities and differences in temporal activity patterns of editors. Based on this data, we estimate the geographical distribution of editors for each WP in the globe. Furthermore we also clarify the differences among different groups of WPs, which originate in the variance of cultural and social features of the communities of editors. PMID:22272279

  14. Recent Activities of Tsukuba Correlator/Analysis Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokado, K.; Kurihara, S.; Kawabata, R.; Nozawa, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI) has been a member of IVS and taken charge of a Network Station and an IVS Correlator since 1998. In addition, GSI became an IVS Operational Analysis Center in January 2010.The Tsukuba Correlator takes charge of correlation work for approximately 100 IVS-INT02 (INT2) sessions and 10 Japanese domestic sessions every year. In 2011, the number of INT2 sessions dramatically increased, because INT2 sessions were observed twice a day during the weekend from April 2011 to January 2012 due to the change in position of the Tsukuba 32-m antenna by the 2011 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku. The role of the Tsukuba VLBI Analysis Center is to produce ultra-rapid dUT1 measurements, sessions with the goal of obtaining a dUT1 solution within 30 minutes after the end of the observation session. The data processing system at the Tsukuba Correlator and Analysis Center was dramatically improved to achieve rapid data processing. It enabled us to shorten the data processing time to one-sixth and to process the IVS VLBI data in near real-time. In 2011, we processed the ultra-rapid dUT1 measurements with the Onsala or Wettzell stations from INT2 sessions or IVS 24-hour sessions, such as R1, RD or T2 sessions. The most successful sessions for ultra-rapid dUT1 measurement was the CONT11 sessions which were a campaign of 15 days of continuous VLBI sessions. During these sessions, we succeeded in estimating continuous dUT1 solutions in near real-time for 15 days.

  15. Altered sensorimotor activation patterns in idiopathic dystonia—an activation likelihood estimation meta‐analysis of functional brain imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Damian M.; Haagensen, Brian N.; Lorentzen, Anne K.; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Siebner, Hartwig R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dystonia is characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements or postures. Functional neuroimaging studies have yielded abnormal task‐related sensorimotor activation in dystonia, but the results appear to be rather variable across studies. Further, study size was usually small including different types of dystonia. Here we performed an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta‐analysis of functional neuroimaging studies in patients with primary dystonia to test for convergence of dystonia‐related alterations in task‐related activity across studies. Activation likelihood estimates were based on previously reported regional maxima of task‐related increases or decreases in dystonia patients compared to healthy controls. The meta‐analyses encompassed data from 179 patients with dystonia reported in 18 functional neuroimaging studies using a range of sensorimotor tasks. Patients with dystonia showed bilateral increases in task‐related activation in the parietal operculum and ventral postcentral gyrus as well as right middle temporal gyrus. Decreases in task‐related activation converged in left supplementary motor area and left postcentral gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus and dorsal midbrain. Apart from the midbrain cluster, all between‐group differences in task‐related activity were retrieved in a sub‐analysis including only the 14 studies on patients with focal dystonia. For focal dystonia, an additional cluster of increased sensorimotor activation emerged in the caudal cingulate motor zone. The results show that dystonia is consistently associated with abnormal somatosensory processing in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex along with abnormal sensorimotor activation of mesial premotor and right lateral temporal cortex. Hum Brain Mapp 37:547–557, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26549606

  16. Altered sensorimotor activation patterns in idiopathic dystonia-an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of functional brain imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Løkkegaard, Annemette; Herz, Damian M; Haagensen, Brian N; Lorentzen, Anne K; Eickhoff, Simon B; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2016-02-01

    Dystonia is characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements or postures. Functional neuroimaging studies have yielded abnormal task-related sensorimotor activation in dystonia, but the results appear to be rather variable across studies. Further, study size was usually small including different types of dystonia. Here we performed an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies in patients with primary dystonia to test for convergence of dystonia-related alterations in task-related activity across studies. Activation likelihood estimates were based on previously reported regional maxima of task-related increases or decreases in dystonia patients compared to healthy controls. The meta-analyses encompassed data from 179 patients with dystonia reported in 18 functional neuroimaging studies using a range of sensorimotor tasks. Patients with dystonia showed bilateral increases in task-related activation in the parietal operculum and ventral postcentral gyrus as well as right middle temporal gyrus. Decreases in task-related activation converged in left supplementary motor area and left postcentral gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus and dorsal midbrain. Apart from the midbrain cluster, all between-group differences in task-related activity were retrieved in a sub-analysis including only the 14 studies on patients with focal dystonia. For focal dystonia, an additional cluster of increased sensorimotor activation emerged in the caudal cingulate motor zone. The results show that dystonia is consistently associated with abnormal somatosensory processing in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex along with abnormal sensorimotor activation of mesial premotor and right lateral temporal cortex. Hum Brain Mapp 37:547-557, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26549606

  17. Structural interpretation of activity cliffs revealed by systematic analysis of structure-activity relationships in analog series.

    PubMed

    Sisay, Mihiret T; Peltason, Lisa; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2009-10-01

    Discontinuity in structure-activity relationships (SARs) is caused by so-called activity cliffs and represents one of the major caveats in SAR modeling and lead optimization. At activity cliffs, small structural modifications of compounds lead to substantial differences in potency that are essentially unpredictable using quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) methods. In order to better understand SAR discontinuity at the molecular level of detail, we have analyzed different compound series in combinatorial analog graphs and determined substitution patterns that introduce activity cliffs of varying magnitude. So identified SAR determinants were then analyzed on the basis of complex crystal structures to enable a structural interpretation of SAR discontinuity and underlying activity cliffs. In some instances, SAR discontinuity detected within analog series could be well rationalized on the basis of structural data, whereas in others a structural explanation was not possible. This reflects the intrinsic complexity of small molecule SARs and suggests that the analysis of short-range receptor-ligand interactions seen in X-ray structures is insufficient to comprehensively account for SAR discontinuity. However, in other cases, SAR information extracted from ligands was incomplete but could be deduced taking X-ray data into account. Thus, taken together, these findings illustrate the complementarity of ligand-based SAR analysis and structural information. PMID:19761254

  18. Trace element analysis of coal by neutron activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The irradiation, counting, and data reduction scheme is described for an analysis capability of 1000 samples per year. Up to 56 elements are reported on each sample. The precision and accuracy of the method are shown for 25 elements designated as hazardous by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The interference corrections for selenium and ytterbium on mercury and ytterbium on selenium are described. The effect of bromine and antimony on the determination of arsenic is also mentioned. The use of factorial design techniques to evaluate interferences in the determination of mercury, selenium, and arsenic is shown. Some typical trace element results for coal, fly ash, and bottom ash are given.

  19. Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) - Active and passive methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, C.B.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Ivanov, J.

    2007-01-01

    The conventional seismic approaches for near-surface investigation have usually been either high-resolution reflection or refraction surveys that deal with a depth range of a few tens to hundreds meters. Seismic signals from these surveys consist of wavelets with frequencies higher than 50 Hz. The multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method deals with surface waves in the lower frequencies (e.g., 1-30 Hz) and uses a much shallower depth range of investigation (e.g., a few to a few tens of meters). ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  20. Trace element analysis of coal by neutron activation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The irradiation, counting, and data reduction scheme is described for an analysis capability of 1000 samples per year. Up to 56 elements are reported on each sample. The precision and accuracy of the method are shown for 25 elements designated as hazardous by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The interference corrections for selenium and ytterbium on mercury and ytterbium on selenium are described. The effect of bromine and antimony on the determination of arsenic is also mentioned. The use of factorial design techniques to evaluate interferences in the determination of mercury, selenium, and arsenic is shown. Some typical trace element results for coal, fly ash, and bottom ash are given.

  1. Statistical analysis on activation and photo-bleaching of step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence of melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zetong; Lai, Zhenhua; Zhang, Xi; Yin, Jihao; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2015-03-01

    Melanin is regarded as the most enigmatic pigments/biopolymers found in most organisms. We have shown previously that melanin goes through a step-wise multi-photon absorption process after the fluorescence has been activated with high laser intensity. No melanin step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) can be obtained without the activation process. The step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence has been observed to require less laser power than what would be expected from a non-linear optical process. In this paper, we examined the power dependence of the activation process of melanin SMPAF at 830nm and 920nm wavelengths. We have conducted research using varying the laser power to activate the melanin in a point-scanning mode for multi-photon microscopy. We recorded the fluorescence signals and position. A sequence of experiments indicates the relationship of activation to power, energy and time so that we can optimize the power level. Also we explored regional analysis of melanin to study the spatial relationship in SMPAF and define three types of regions which exhibit differences in the activation process.

  2. Jerk analysis of active body-weight-transfer.

    PubMed

    Baldinotti, Ivan; Timmann, Dagmar; Kolb, Florian P; Kutz, Dieter F

    2010-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that whole-body vibration improves posture and gait control in stroke patients. Patients with degenerative cerebellar disease suffer from ataxic gait also which is characterised by the variation of gait pattern. Our interest is to test whole-body vibration as a method for rehabilitation treatment in cerebellar patients and to assess the success of the treatment using dynamic tests. The aim of this study was to introduce a method for quantifying movement dynamics during an active voluntary sidestep that results in a body-weight-transfer. Subjects had to perform a step from a feet-apart-position to a feet-together-position and back again. The algorithms presented in this study allow automatic identification of the timing of the dynamic phases by analysing the centre of pressure trajectory. For this study the time flow of averaged speed, acceleration, and jerk was calculated for the active movement only. This study demonstrates that jerk provides a sensitive measure for the improvement in gait in rehabilitation and during training. PMID:20940098

  3. Pyrolysis of activated sludge: energy analysis and its technical feasibility.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Manu; Tardio, James; Venkata Mohan, S

    2015-02-01

    A comprehensive study on the potential of pyrolysis of activated sludge to generate substances that can be used to produce energy was evaluated for its technical and environmental viability. The products of the process viz., pyrolysis gas, pyrolysis oil and char can readily be used by the major energy consumers viz., electricity and transportation. Based on the results obtained it is estimated that a 1 ton capacity process for pyrolysis of activated sludge can serve the electrical needs of a maximum of 239, 95 and 47 Indian houses per day, considering lower middle class, middle class and upper middle class, respectively. In addition the process would also produce the daily methane (CNG) requirement of 128 public transport buses. The process was determined to be technically feasible at low and medium temperatures for both, pyrolysis gas and electrical energy. The gas generated could be utilized as fuel directly while the oil generated would require pretreatment before its potential application. The process is potentially sustainable when commercialized and can self-sustain in continuous mode of operation in biorefinery context. PMID:25451771

  4. A quantitative analysis of contractility in active cytoskeletal protein networks.

    PubMed

    Bendix, Poul M; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Cuvelier, Damien; Dogic, Zvonimir; Koeleman, Bernard N; Brieher, William M; Field, Christine M; Mahadevan, L; Weitz, David A

    2008-04-15

    Cells actively produce contractile forces for a variety of processes including cytokinesis and motility. Contractility is known to rely on myosin II motors which convert chemical energy from ATP hydrolysis into forces on actin filaments. However, the basic physical principles of cell contractility remain poorly understood. We reconstitute contractility in a simplified model system of purified F-actin, muscle myosin II motors, and alpha-actinin cross-linkers. We show that contractility occurs above a threshold motor concentration and within a window of cross-linker concentrations. We also quantify the pore size of the bundled networks and find contractility to occur at a critical distance between the bundles. We propose a simple mechanism of contraction based on myosin filaments pulling neighboring bundles together into an aggregated structure. Observations of this reconstituted system in both bulk and low-dimensional geometries show that the contracting gels pull on and deform their surface with a contractile force of approximately 1 microN, or approximately 100 pN per F-actin bundle. Cytoplasmic extracts contracting in identical environments show a similar behavior and dependence on myosin as the reconstituted system. Our results suggest that cellular contractility can be sensitively regulated by tuning the (local) activity of molecular motors and the cross-linker density and binding affinity. PMID:18192374

  5. Corporate cost of occupational accidents: an activity-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Rikhardsson, Pall M; Impgaard, Martin

    2004-03-01

    The systematic accident cost analysis (SACA) project was carried out during 2001 by The Aarhus School of Business and PricewaterhouseCoopers Denmark with financial support from The Danish National Working Environment Authority. Its focused on developing and testing a method for evaluating occupational costs of companies for use by occupational health and safety professionals. The method was tested in nine Danish companies within three different industry sectors and the costs of 27 selected occupational accidents in these companies were calculated. One of the main conclusions is that the SACA method could be used in all of the companies without revisions. The evaluation of accident cost showed that 2/3 of the costs of occupational accidents are visible in the Danish corporate accounting systems reviewed while 1/3 is hidden from management view. The highest cost of occupational accidents for a company with 3.600 employees was estimated to approximately US$ 682.000. The paper includes an introduction regarding accident cost analysis in companies, a presentation of the SACA project methodology and the SACA method itself, a short overview of some of the results of the SACA project and a conclusion. Further information about the project is available at http://www.asb.dk/saca. PMID:14642872

  6. Microscopic resolution imaging and proteomics correlation at histogeographically identical location: point by point correlation between ex vivo tissue imaging with high field MRI and multiplex tissue immunoblotting for proteomics profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Kant M.; Chung, Joon-Yong; Ylaya, Kris; Dodd, Stephen; Fukunaga, Masaki; Hewitt, Stephen M.

    2010-03-01

    Histopathologic correlation is an essential component for validation of the radiological findings. There has been significant advancement in medical imaging technologies, including molecular imaging, such that, it is essential to establish the system beyond histopathologic correlation, to protein profiling that can be correlated with imaging at anatomically identical manner for accurate examination. Recently, a novel technology for proteomic profiling has been established, called "multiplex tissue immunoblotting (MTIB)" which can offer studying multiple protein expression from a single histology slide. Therefore, we attempted to establish the system to obtain an identical plane between high resolution imaging and histopathology at microscopic level so that proteomic profiling can be readily performed using MTIB. A variety of tissues were obtained from autopsy materials and initially scanned with high field MRI (14T) ex vivo along with the marker for tissue orientation. The histology slides were prepared from post-scanned tissue under the marker-guidance in order to obtain an identical plane with high resolution imaging. Subsequently, MTIB was carried out to study expression of proteins of interest and point by point correlation with high resolution imaging was performed at histogeographically identical manner.

  7. Clinical applications of in vivo neutron-activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress.

  8. Collection, analysis, and archival of LDEF activation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.; Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.

    1993-01-01

    The study of the induced radioactivity of samples intentionally placed aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and samples obtained from the LDEF structure is reviewed. The eight laboratories involved in the gamma-ray counting are listed and the scientists and the associated counting facilities are described. Presently, most of the gamma-ray counting has been completed and the spectra are being analyzed and corrected for efficiency and self absorption. The acquired spectra are being collected at Eastern Kentucky University for future reference. The results of these analyses are being compiled and reviewed for possible inconsistencies as well as for comparison with model calculations. These model calculations are being revised to include the changes in trapped-proton flux caused by the onset of the period of maximum solar activity and the rapidly decreasing spacecraft orbit. Tentative plans are given for the storage of the approximately 1000 gamma-ray spectra acquired in this study and the related experimental data.

  9. In-vivo neutron activation analysis: principles and clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress. It seems likely that by the end of this century there will have been significant progress with this research tool, and exciting insights obtained into the nature and dynamics of human body composition.

  10. Advances in preparation, analysis and biological activities of single chitooligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Li, Kecheng; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Li, Pengcheng

    2016-03-30

    Chitooligosaccharides (COS), as a source of potential bioactive material, has been reported to possess diverse bioactivities. These bioactivities of COS are often tested using relatively poorly characterized oligomer mixtures during past few decades, resulting in difficult identification of COS molecules responsible for biological effects. Therefore, a new interest has recently been emerged on highly purified COS of defined size. Several technological approaches have been used to produce single COS and new improvements were introduced to their characterization in order to understand the unrevealed structure-function relationship. Here we provide an overview of techniques that were used to prepare and analyze reasonably well-defined COS fractions. Based on the latest reports, several applications of single COS for plants and animals, are also presented, including antitumor, immunostimulatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial, elicitors of plant defence and neural activity. PMID:26794961

  11. Comparative Analysis of the Antioxidant Activity of Cassia fistula Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Irshad, Md.; Zafaryab, Md.; Singh, Man; Rizvi, M. Moshahid A.

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidant potential of various extracts of Cassia fistula was determined by the DPPH, FRAP, Fe3+ reducing power, and hydrogen peroxide scavenging assay. Methanolic extracts of Cassia fistula showed the highest amount of phenolic and flavonoid content and reducing capacity, whereas hexane extracts exhibited the lowest level of reducing capacity. The order of antioxidant activity in Cassia fistula extracts displayed from higher to lower level as methanolic extracts of pulp, methanolic extracts of seed, hexane extracts of pulp, and hexane extracts of seed. The antioxidant potential of Cassia fistula extracts significantly correlated (P < 0.02) with the phenolic content of the methanolic extracts. Ascorbic acid taken as control showed highest antioxidant power in the present study. PMID:25374682

  12. Technology Combination Analysis Tool (TCAT) for Active Debris Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamot, B.; Richard, M.; Salmon, T.; Pisseloup, A.; Cougnet, C.; Axthelm, R.; Saunder, C.; Dupont, C.; Lequette, L.

    2013-08-01

    This paper present the work of the Swiss Space Center EPFL within the CNES-funded OTV-2 study. In order to find the most performant Active Debris Removal (ADR) mission architectures and technologies, a tool was developed in order to design and compare ADR spacecraft, and to plan ADR campaigns to remove large debris. Two types of architectures are considered to be efficient: the Chaser (single-debris spacecraft), the Mothership/ Kits (multiple-debris spacecraft). Both are able to perform controlled re-entry. The tool includes modules to optimise the launch dates and the order of capture, to design missions and spacecraft, and to select launch vehicles. The propulsion, power and structure subsystems are sized by the tool thanks to high-level parametric models whilst the other ones are defined by their mass and power consumption. Final results are still under investigation by the consortium but two concrete examples of the tool's outputs are presented in the paper.

  13. An analysis of the history of dust activity on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, L. J.; Zurek, R. W.

    1993-02-01

    A comprehensive list of dust storm activity on Mars has been compiled from various published lists and additional data. For uniformity and clarity, each event is classified using a new system that includes a well-defined nomenclature. Maps showing the reported locations of events have been compiled. Detailed commentaries describe the events and/or circumstances of their observation. The seasonal distribution of Martian dust events is diagrammed and discussed together with a seasonal and annual (Mars years) timeline that includes the frequency of photographic coverage. Regional dust storms tend to occur most frequently, and all planet-encircling dust storms have been observed during the southern spring and summer seasons, although there is significant interannual variability.

  14. Online Nonparametric Bayesian Activity Mining and Analysis From Surveillance Video.

    PubMed

    Bastani, Vahid; Marcenaro, Lucio; Regazzoni, Carlo S

    2016-05-01

    A method for online incremental mining of activity patterns from the surveillance video stream is presented in this paper. The framework consists of a learning block in which Dirichlet process mixture model is employed for the incremental clustering of trajectories. Stochastic trajectory pattern models are formed using the Gaussian process regression of the corresponding flow functions. Moreover, a sequential Monte Carlo method based on Rao-Blackwellized particle filter is proposed for tracking and online classification as well as the detection of abnormality during the observation of an object. Experimental results on real surveillance video data are provided to show the performance of the proposed algorithm in different tasks of trajectory clustering, classification, and abnormality detection. PMID:26978823

  15. Analysis of supercooling activity of tannin-related polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Chikako; Wang, Donghui; Endoh, Keita; Fukushi, Yukiharu; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2013-08-01

    Based on the discovery of novel supercooling-promoting hydrolyzable gallotannins from deep supercooling xylem parenchyma cells (XPCs) in Katsura tree (see Wang et al. (2012) [38]), supercooling capability of a wide variety of tannin-related polyphenols (TRPs) was examined in order to find more effective supercooling-promoting substances for their applications. The TRPs examined were single compounds including six kinds of hydrolyzable tannins, 11 kinds of catechin derivatives, two kinds of structural analogs of catechin and six kinds of phenolcarboxylic acid derivatives, 11 kinds of polyphenol mixtures and five kinds of crude plant tannin extracts. The effects of these TRPs on freezing were examined by droplet freezing assays using various solutions containing different kinds of identified ice nucleators such as the ice nucleation bacterium (INB) Erwinia ananas, the INB Xanthomonas campestris, silver iodide and phloroglucinol as well as a solution containing only unintentionally included unidentified airborne ice nucleators. Among the 41 kinds of TRPs examined, all of the hydrolyzable tannins, catechin derivatives, polyphenol mixtures and crude plant tannin extracts as well as a few structural analogs of catechin and phenolcarboxylic acid derivatives exhibited supercooling-promoting activity (SCA) with significant differences (p>0.05) from at least one of the solutions containing different kinds of ice nucleators. It should be noted that there were no TRPs exhibiting ice nucleation-enhancing activity (INA) in all solutions containing identified ice nucleators, whereas there were many TRPs exhibiting INA with significant differences in solutions containing unidentified ice nucleators alone. An emulsion freezing assay confirmed that these TRPs did not essentially affect homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures. It is thought that not only SCA but also INA in the TRPs are produced by interactions with heterogeneous ice nucleators, not by direct interaction with water

  16. Muscle networks: Connectivity analysis of EMG activity during postural control.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Tjeerd W; Danna-Dos-Santos, Alessander; Xie, Hong-Bo; Roerdink, Melvyn; Stins, John F; Breakspear, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that reduce the many degrees of freedom in the musculoskeletal system remains an outstanding challenge. Muscle synergies reduce the dimensionality and hence simplify the control problem. How this is achieved is not yet known. Here we use network theory to assess the coordination between multiple muscles and to elucidate the neural implementation of muscle synergies. We performed connectivity analysis of surface EMG from ten leg muscles to extract the muscle networks while human participants were standing upright in four different conditions. We observed widespread connectivity between muscles at multiple distinct frequency bands. The network topology differed significantly between frequencies and between conditions. These findings demonstrate how muscle networks can be used to investigate the neural circuitry of motor coordination. The presence of disparate muscle networks across frequencies suggests that the neuromuscular system is organized into a multiplex network allowing for parallel and hierarchical control structures. PMID:26634293

  17. Explorative data analysis for changes in neural activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythe, Duncan A. J.; Meinecke, Frank C.; von Bünau, Paul; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2013-04-01

    Neural recordings are non-stationary time series, i.e. their properties typically change over time. Identifying specific changes, e.g., those induced by a learning task, can shed light on the underlying neural processes. However, such changes of interest are often masked by strong unrelated changes, which can be of physiological origin or due to measurement artifacts. We propose a novel algorithm for disentangling such different causes of non-stationarity and in this manner enable better neurophysiological interpretation for a wider set of experimental paradigms. A key ingredient is the repeated application of Stationary Subspace Analysis (SSA) using different temporal scales. The usefulness of our explorative approach is demonstrated in simulations, theory and EEG experiments with 80 brain-computer interfacing subjects.

  18. Muscle networks: Connectivity analysis of EMG activity during postural control

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Tjeerd W.; Danna-Dos-Santos, Alessander; Xie, Hong-Bo; Roerdink, Melvyn; Stins, John F.; Breakspear, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that reduce the many degrees of freedom in the musculoskeletal system remains an outstanding challenge. Muscle synergies reduce the dimensionality and hence simplify the control problem. How this is achieved is not yet known. Here we use network theory to assess the coordination between multiple muscles and to elucidate the neural implementation of muscle synergies. We performed connectivity analysis of surface EMG from ten leg muscles to extract the muscle networks while human participants were standing upright in four different conditions. We observed widespread connectivity between muscles at multiple distinct frequency bands. The network topology differed significantly between frequencies and between conditions. These findings demonstrate how muscle networks can be used to investigate the neural circuitry of motor coordination. The presence of disparate muscle networks across frequencies suggests that the neuromuscular system is organized into a multiplex network allowing for parallel and hierarchical control structures. PMID:26634293

  19. Application of thermal analysis techniques in activated carbon production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnals, G.L.; DeBarr, J.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.; Brady, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal analysis techniques have been used at the ISGS as an aid in the development and characterization of carbon adsorbents. Promising adsorbents from fly ash, tires, and Illinois coals have been produced for various applications. Process conditions determined in the preparation of gram quantities of carbons were used as guides in the preparation of larger samples. TG techniques developed to characterize the carbon adsorbents included the measurement of the kinetics of SO2 adsorption, the performance of rapid proximate analyses, and the determination of equilibrium methane adsorption capacities. Thermal regeneration of carbons was assessed by TG to predict the life cycle of carbon adsorbents in different applications. TPD was used to determine the nature of surface functional groups and their effect on a carbon's adsorption properties.

  20. Trace elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis for pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Methods and technology were developed to analyze 1000 samples/yr of coal and other pollution-related samples. The complete trace element analysis of 20-24 samples/wk averaged 3-3.5 man-hours/sample. The computerized data reduction scheme could identify and report data on as many as 56 elements. In addition to coal, samples of fly ash, bottom ash, crude oil, fuel oil, residual oil, gasoline, jet fuel, kerosene, filtered air particulates, ore, stack scrubber water, clam tissue, crab shells, river sediment and water, and corn were analyzed. Precision of the method was plus or minus 25% based on all elements reported in coal and other sample matrices. Overall accuracy was estimated at 50%.

  1. Muscle networks: Connectivity analysis of EMG activity during postural control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonstra, Tjeerd W.; Danna-Dos-Santos, Alessander; Xie, Hong-Bo; Roerdink, Melvyn; Stins, John F.; Breakspear, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that reduce the many degrees of freedom in the musculoskeletal system remains an outstanding challenge. Muscle synergies reduce the dimensionality and hence simplify the control problem. How this is achieved is not yet known. Here we use network theory to assess the coordination between multiple muscles and to elucidate the neural implementation of muscle synergies. We performed connectivity analysis of surface EMG from ten leg muscles to extract the muscle networks while human participants were standing upright in four different conditions. We observed widespread connectivity between muscles at multiple distinct frequency bands. The network topology differed significantly between frequencies and between conditions. These findings demonstrate how muscle networks can be used to investigate the neural circuitry of motor coordination. The presence of disparate muscle networks across frequencies suggests that the neuromuscular system is organized into a multiplex network allowing for parallel and hierarchical control structures.

  2. Active-site titration analysis of surface influence on immobilized Candida antarctica Lipase B activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Matrix morphology and surface polarity effects were investigated for Candida antarctica lipase B immobilization. Measurements of the amount of lipase immobilized (bicinchoninic acid method) and the catalyst’s tributyrin hydrolysis activity, coupled with a determination of the lipase’s functional fr...

  3. Analysis and Management of Large-Scale Activities Based on Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shaofan; Ji, Jingwei; Lu, Ligang; Wang, Zhiyi

    Based on the concepts of system safety engineering, life-cycle and interface that comes from American system safety standard MIL-STD-882E, and apply them to the process of risk analysis and management of large-scale activities. Identify the involved personnel, departments, funds and other contents throughout the life cycle of large-scale activities. Recognize and classify the ultimate risk sources of people, objects and environment of large-scale activities from the perspective of interface. Put forward the accident cause analysis model according to the previous large-scale activities' accidents and combine with the analysis of the risk source interface. Analyze the risks of each interface and summary various types of risks the large-scale activities faced. Come up with the risk management consciousness, policies and regulations, risk control and supervision departments improvement ideas.

  4. Paris Observatory Analysis Center (OPAR): Report on Activities, January - December 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Sebastien; Barache, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    We report on activities of the Paris Observatory VLBI Analysis Center (OPAR) for calendar year 2012 concerning the development of operational tasks, the development of our Web site, and various other activities: monitoring of the Earth's free core nutation, measuring of the post-seismic displacements of some stations, and the analysis of the recent IVS R&D sessions, including observations of quasars close to the Sun.

  5. Trajectory Hunting: Analysis of UARS Measurements Showing Rapid Chlorine Activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M. Y.; Santee, M. L.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Mergenthaler, J. M.; Kumer, J. B.; Tabazadeh, A.

    1998-01-01

    Trajectory hunting (i.e., a technique to find air parcels sampled at least twice over the course of a few days) is applied to analyze Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measurements in conjunction with the AER photochemical box model. In this study, we investigate rapid chlorine activation in the Arctic lower stratosphere on 29 Dec. 1992 associated with a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) event. Six air parcels that have been sampled twice were followed along 5-day trajectories at the 465 K (approx. 46 mb) and 585 K (approxi. 22 mb) levels. A detailed sensitivity study with the AER photochemical box model along these trajectories leads to the following conclusions for the episode considered: 1) model results are in better agreement with UARS measurements at these levels if the U.K. Meteorological Office (UKMO) temperature is decreased by at least 1-2 K; 2) the NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) PSC formation scheme produces results in better agreement with observations than the STS (supercooled ternary solution) scheme; 3) the model can explain the UARS measurements at 585 K, but under-estimates the ClO abundance at 465 K, suggesting some inconsistency between the UARS measurements at this level.

  6. Trajectory Hunting: Analysis of UARS Measurements showing Rapid Chlorine Activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M.Y.; Santee, M. L.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Ko, M. K. W.; Mergenthaler, J. M.; Kumer, J. B.; Tabazadeh, A.

    1998-01-01

    Trajectory hunting (i.e., a technique to find air parcels sampled at least twice over the course of a few days) is applied to analyze Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measurements in conjunction with the AER photochemical box model. In this study, we investigate rapid chlorine activation in the Arctic lower stratosphere on 29 Dec 1992 associated with a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) event. Six air parcels that have been sampled twice were followed along 5-day trajectories at the 465 K (approximately 46 mb) and 585 K (approximately 22 mb) levels. A detailed sensitivity study with the AER. photochemical box model along these trajectories leads to the following conclusions for the episode considered: (1) model results are in better agreement with UARS measurements at these levels if the UKMO temperature is decreased by at least 1-2 K; (2) the NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) PSC formation scheme produces results in better agreement with observations than the STS (supercooled ternary solution) scheme; (3) the model can explain the UARS measurements at 585 K, but under-estimates the ClO abundance at 465 K, suggesting some inconsistency between the UARS measurements at this level.

  7. Learning Multiscale Active Facial Patches for Expression Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Lin; Liu, Qingshan; Yang, Peng; Huang, Junzhou; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we present a new idea to analyze facial expression by exploring some common and specific information among different expressions. Inspired by the observation that only a few facial parts are active in expression disclosure (e.g., around mouth, eye), we try to discover the common and specific patches which are important to discriminate all the expressions and only a particular expression, respectively. A two-stage multitask sparse learning (MTSL) framework is proposed to efficiently locate those discriminative patches. In the first stage MTSL, expression recognition tasks are combined to located common patches. Each of the tasks aims to find dominant patches for each expression. Secondly, two related tasks, facial expression recognition and face verification tasks, are coupled to learn specific facial patches for individual expression. The two-stage patch learning is performed on patches sampled by multiscale strategy. Extensive experiments validate the existence and significance of common and specific patches. Utilizing these learned patches, we achieve superior performances on expression recognition compared to the state-of-the-arts. PMID:25291808

  8. Neutron activation analysis of airborne thorium liberated during welding operations

    SciTech Connect

    Glasgow, D.C.; Robinson, L.; Janjovic, J.T.

    1996-02-01

    Typically, reactive metals such as aluminum are welded using a thoriated tungsten welding electrode which is attached to a source of argon gas such that the local atmosphere around the weld is inert. The metal is heated by the arc formed between the electrode and the grounded component to be welded. During this process, some of the electrode is vaporized in the arc and is potentially liberated to the surrounding air. This situation may result in a hazardous airborne thorium level. Because the electrode is consumed during welding, the electrode tip must be repeatedly dressed by grinding the tip to a fine point so that the optimal welding conditions are maintained. These grinding activities may also release thorium to the air. Data generated in the 1950s suggested that these electrodes posed no significant health hazard and seemed to justify their exemption from licensing requirements for source material. Since that time, other studies have been performed and present conflicting results as to the level of risk. Values both above and below the health protection limit in use in the United States, have been reported in the literature recently. This study is being undertaken to provide additional data which may be useful in evaluating both the chemical toxicity risk and radiological dose assessment criteria associated with thoriated tungsten welding operations.

  9. Analysis of signal degradation in an integrated active crossbar switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probst, David K.; Sodergren, Clifford C.; Krainak, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    One of the most desirable features for a modern systems architecture is reconfigurability. It facilitates the sharing of various processing and memory resources among many different subsystems, thereby reducing the need for each subsystem to duplicate these resources. Reducing duplication also reduces size, weight, power consumption, and cost; all important considerations, especially in modern military systems. Sensor data requires very-wide- bandwidth, point-to-point connections, which are easily provided by fiber optics with good noise immunity, but the switching of such wide-bandwidth signals is problematic because electrical switches have both limited bandwidth and limited switching times. A wide- bandwidth, reconfigurable optical switch is required that overcomes coupling and splitting losses experienced by the optical signal passing through the switch so that sufficient signal- fidelity is maintained. In this paper, we investigate an integrated, active (i.e. amplifying) photonic crossbar switch to determine the signal degradation incurred for intensity modulation and direct detection using an NRZ data format and an ideal, matched-filter receiver. Various device configurations are analyzed in order to determine which produces the smallest degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio.

  10. ISO Guest Observer Data Analysis and LWS Instrument Team Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard

    2001-01-01

    The following is an interim annual report. Dr. Smith is currently on an extended TDY to the Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (IFSI) at the Consilio Nazionale delle Richerche (CNR) in Rome, Italy, where he has been working on a related NASA grant in support of analysis of Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) data on star formation in Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies and our galaxy. Work emphasizes development of metal mesh grids for use in spacecraft, and the design and fabrication of test elements by the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington D.C. Work has progressed well, but slowly, on that program due to the departure of a key engineer. NASA has been advised of the delay, and granted a no-cost extension, whereby SAO has authorized a delay in the final report from NRL. Nevertheless NRL has continued to make progress. Two papers have been submitted to refereed journals related to this program, and a new design for mesh operating in the 20-40 micron region has been developed. Meetings continue through the summer on these items. A new technical scientist has been made a job offer and hopefully will be on board NRL shortly, although most of the present grant work is already completed. A more complete report, with copies of the submitted papers, designs, and other measures of progress, will be submitted to NASA in September when Dr. Smith returns from his current TDY.

  11. Phosphoinositide and Inositol Phosphate Analysis in Lymphocyte Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Karsten; Huang, Yina Hsing; Lin, Hongying; Sandberg, Mark; Mayr, Georg W.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphocyte antigen receptor engagement profoundly changes the cellular content of phosphoinositide lipids and soluble inositol phosphates. Among these, the phosphoinositides phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) play key signaling roles by acting as pleckstrin homology (PH) domain ligands that recruit signaling proteins to the plasma membrane. Moreover, PIP2 acts as a precursor for the second messenger molecules diacylglycerol and soluble inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), essential mediators of PKC, Ras/Erk, and Ca2+ signaling in lymphocytes. IP3 phosphorylation by IP3 3-kinases generates inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (IP4), an essential soluble regulator of PH domain binding to PIP3 in developing T cells. Besides PIP2, PIP3, IP3, and IP4, lymphocytes produce multiple other phosphoinositides and soluble inositol phosphates that could have important physiological functions. To aid their analysis, detailed protocols that allow one to simultaneously measure the levels of multiple different phosphoinositide or inositol phosphate isomers in lymphocytes are provided here. They are based on thin layer, conventional and high-performance liquid chromatographic separation methods followed by radiolabeling or non-radioactive metal-dye detection. Finally, less broadly applicable nonchromatographic methods for detection of specific phosphoinositide or inositol phosphate isomers are discussed. Support protocols describe how to obtain pure unstimulated CD4+CD8+ thymocyte populations for analyses of inositol phosphate turnover during positive and negative selection, key steps in T cell development. PMID:19918943

  12. Bird Activity Analysis Using Avian Radar Information in Naval Air Station airport, WA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Herricks, E.

    2010-12-01

    The number of bird strikes on aircraft has increased sharply over recent years and airport bird hazard management has gained increasing attention in wildlife management and control. Evaluation of bird activity near airport is very critical to analyze the hazard of bird strikes. Traditional methods for bird activity analysis using visual counting provide a direct approach to bird hazard assessment. However this approach is limited to daylight and good visual conditions. Radar has been proven to be a useful and effective tool for bird detection and movement analysis. Radar eliminates observation bias and supports consistent data collection for bird activity analysis and hazard management. In this study bird activity data from the Naval Air Station Whidbey Island was collected by Accipiter Avian Radar System. Radar data was pre-processed by filtering out non-bird noises, including traffic vehicle, aircraft, insects, wind, rainfall, ocean waves and so on. Filtered data is then statistically analyzed using MATLAB programs. The results indicated bird movement dynamics in target areas near the airport, which includes (1) the daily activity varied at dawn and dusk; (2) bird activity varied by target area due to the habitat difference; and (3) both temporal and spatial movement patterns varied by bird species. This bird activity analysis supports bird hazard evaluation and related analysis and modeling to provide very useful information in airport bird hazard management planning.

  13. Ribavirin and alpha interferon enhance death receptor-mediated apoptosis and caspase activation in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Stephan F; Schuler, Markus; Berg, Christoph P; Lauber, Kirsten; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Schmahl, Friedrich Wilhelm; Wesselborg, Sebastian

    2003-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the clinical effects of alpha interferon (IFN) and ribavirin are not understood. Elimination of infected cells occurs in part by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) expressing CD95 ligand and thereby attacking target cells which are positive for the death receptor CD95. Since many viruses have evolved mechanisms to inhibit apoptosis, the opposite, namely, promotion of apoptosis, could be a strategy to strengthen the host antiviral response. In the present study, we have asked whether the antiviral substances IFN and ribavirin could support CD95-mediated apoptosis by interfering with the activation of caspases, a family of proteases known for their essential role in apoptosis. HepG2 cells, stimulated with the agonistic anti-CD95 antibody, served as a minimal model to mimic the CD95 stimulation occurring during a CTL attack of target cells in vivo. Apoptosis was quantitated by flow cytometric detection of hypodiploid nuclei. Caspase activity was measured by cytofluorometry, immunocytochemistry, and immunoblot analysis. IFN and ribavirin sensitized HepG2 cells for CD95-mediated apoptosis. This effect was correlated with an increase in CD95-mediated caspase activation and enhanced cleavage of the caspase substrate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Furthermore, the positive effect on CD95-mediated caspase activation by IFN and ribavirin was confirmed by immunocytochemistry for activated caspase-3 and by immunoblot detection of activated caspase-3, caspase-7, and caspase-8. Our data demonstrate that the antiviral substances IFN and ribavirin are able to sensitize for CD95-mediated apoptosis. IFN and ribavirin also enhance CD95-mediated caspase activation, which might in part be responsible for the apoptosis-promoting effect of these antiviral compounds. PMID:12760867

  14. 1,25D3 enhances antitumor activity of gemcitabine and cisplatin in human bladder cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingyu; Yu, Wei-Dong; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2010-01-01

    Background 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) potentiates the cytotoxic effects of several common chemotherapeutic agents. The combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC) is a current standard chemotherapy regimen for bladder cancer. We investigated whether 1,25D3 could enhance the antitumor activity of GC in bladder cancer model systems. Methods Human bladder cancer T24 and UMUC3 cells were pretreated with 1,25D3 followed by GC. Apoptosis were assessed by annexin V staining. Caspase activation was examined by immunoblot analysis and substrate-based caspase activity assay. The cytotoxic effects were examined using MTT and in vitro clonogenic assay. p73 protein levels were assessed by immunoblot analysis. Knockdown of p73 was achieved by siRNA. The in vivo antitumor activity was assessed by in vivo excision clonogenic assay and tumor regrowth delay in the T24 xenograft model. Results 1,25D3 pretreatment enhanced GC-induced apoptosis and the activities of caspases- 8, 9 and 3 in T24 and UMUC3 cells. 1,25D3 synergistically reduced GC-suppressed surviving fraction in T24 cells. 1,25D3, gemcitabine, or cisplatin induced p73 accumulation, which was enhanced by GC or 1,25D3 and GC. p73 expression was lower in human primary bladder tumor tissue compared with adjacent normal tissue. Knockdown of p73 increased clonogenic capacity of T24 cells treated with 1,25D3, GC or 1,25D3 and GC. 1,25D3 and GC combination enhanced tumor regression compared with 1,25D3 or GC alone. Conclusions 1,25D3 potentiates GC-mediated growth inhibition in human bladder cancer models in vitro and in vivo, which involves p73 induction and apoptosis. PMID:20564622

  15. The persistence of equatorial spread F - an analysis on seasonal, solar activity and geomagnetic activity aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, V.; Devasia, C. V.; Ravindran, Sudha; Sridharan, R.

    2009-02-01

    The persistence (duration) of Equatorial Spread F (ESF), which has significant impact on communication systems, is addressed. Its behavior during different seasons and geomagnetic activity levels under the solar maximum (2001) and minimum (2006) conditions, is reported using the data from the magnetic equatorial location of Trivandrum (8.5° N; 77° E; dip 0.5° N) in India. The study reveals that the persistence of the irregularities can be estimated to a reasonable extent by knowing the post sunset F region vertical drift velocity (Vz) and the magnetic activity index Kp. Any sort of advance information on the possible persistence of the ionospheric irregularities responsible for ESF is important for understanding the scintillation morphology, and the results which form the first step in this direction are presented and discussed.

  16. Quantitative analysis of wrist electrodermal activity during sleep.

    PubMed

    Sano, Akane; Picard, Rosalind W; Stickgold, Robert

    2014-12-01

    We present the first quantitative characterization of electrodermal activity (EDA) patterns on the wrists of healthy adults during sleep using dry electrodes. We compare the new results on the wrist to the prior findings on palmar or finger EDA by characterizing data measured from 80 nights of sleep consisting of 9 nights of wrist and palm EDA from 9 healthy adults sleeping at home, 56 nights of wrist and palm EDA from one healthy adult sleeping at home, and 15 nights of wrist EDA from 15 healthy adults in a sleep laboratory, with the latter compared to concurrent polysomnography. While high frequency patterns of EDA called "storms" were identified by eye in the 1960s, we systematically compare thresholds for automatically detecting EDA peaks and establish criteria for EDA storms. We found that more than 80% of the EDA peaks occurred in non-REM sleep, specifically during slow-wave sleep (SWS) and non-REM stage 2 sleep (NREM2). Also, EDA amplitude is higher in SWS than in other sleep stages. Longer EDA storms were more likely to occur in the first two quarters of sleep and during SWS and NREM2. We also found from the home studies (65 nights) that EDA levels were higher and the skin conductance peaks were larger and more frequent when measured on the wrist than when measured on the palm. These EDA high frequency peaks and high amplitude were sometimes associated with higher skin temperature, but more work is needed looking at neurological and other EDA elicitors in order to elucidate their complete behavior. PMID:25286449

  17. Reconstruction of human brain spontaneous activity based on frequency-pattern analysis of magnetoencephalography data

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, Rodolfo R.; Ustinin, Mikhail N.; Rykunov, Stanislav D.; Boyko, Anna I.; Sychev, Vyacheslav V.; Walton, Kerry D.; Rabello, Guilherme M.; Garcia, John

    2015-01-01

    A new method for the analysis and localization of brain activity has been developed, based on multichannel magnetic field recordings, over minutes, superimposed on the MRI of the individual. Here, a high resolution Fourier Transform is obtained over the entire recording period, leading to a detailed multi-frequency spectrum. Further analysis implements a total decomposition of the frequency components into functionally invariant entities, each having an invariant field pattern localizable in recording space. The method, addressed as functional tomography, makes it possible to find the distribution of magnetic field sources in space. Here, the method is applied to the analysis of simulated data, to oscillating signals activating a physical current dipoles phantom, and to recordings of spontaneous brain activity in 10 healthy adults. In the analysis of simulated data, 61 dipoles are localized with 0.7 mm precision. Concerning the physical phantom the method is able to localize three simultaneously activated current dipoles with 1 mm precision. Spatial resolution 3 mm was attained when localizing spontaneous alpha rhythm activity in 10 healthy adults, where the alpha peak was specified for each subject individually. Co-registration of the functional tomograms with each subject's head MRI localized alpha range activity to the occipital and/or posterior parietal brain region. This is the first application of this new functional tomography to human brain activity. The method successfully provides an overall view of brain electrical activity, a detailed spectral description and, combined with MRI, the localization of sources in anatomical brain space. PMID:26528119

  18. Effectiveness of Physical Activity Interventions for Preschoolers: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Elliott S.; Tucker, Patricia; Burke, Shauna M.; Carron, Albert V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the meta-analysis was to examine the effectiveness of physical activity interventions on physical activity participation among preschoolers. A secondary purpose was to investigate the influence of several possible moderator variables (e.g., intervention length, location, leadership, type) on moderate-to-vigorous physical…

  19. QSAR analysis of antitumor activities of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiphene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastija, Vesna; Bajić, Miroslav; Stolić, Ivana; Krstulović, Luka; Jukić, Marijana; Glavaš-Obrovac, Ljubica

    2015-12-01

    QSAR analysis was performed for the antitumor activity of 27 derivatives of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene against six carcinoma cell lines. The best models were obtained with surface area (SAG) in combination with lipohilicity (log P) as descriptors. Results have shown that molecules with smaller solvent accessible surface area and higher lipophilicy should have higher biological activity against carcinoma cell.

  20. Cultural-Historical Activity Theory and Domain Analysis: Metatheoretical Implications for Information Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cultural-historical activity theory is an important theory in modern psychology. In recent years, it has drawn more attention from related disciplines including information science. Argument: This paper argues that activity theory and domain analysis which uses the theory as one of its bases could bring about some important…

  1. Newspaper Content Analysis in Evaluation of a Community-Based Participatory Project to Increase Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granner, Michelle L.; Sharpe, Patricia A.; Burroughs, Ericka L.; Fields, Regina; Hallenbeck, Joyce

    2010-01-01

    This study conducted a newspaper content analysis as part of an evaluation of a community-based participatory research project focused on increasing physical activity through policy and environmental changes, which included activities related to media advocacy and media-based community education. Daily papers (May 2003 to December 2005) from both…

  2. 30 CFR 280.30 - What activities will not require environmental analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Obligations Under This Part Environmental Issues § 280.30 What activities will not require environmental... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities will not require environmental... environmental impact and will normally be categorically excluded from additional environmental analysis....

  3. 30 CFR 580.30 - What activities will not require environmental analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Obligations Under This Part Environmental Issues § 580.30 What activities will not require environmental... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What activities will not require environmental... environmental impact and will normally be categorically excluded from additional environmental analysis....

  4. 30 CFR 580.30 - What activities will not require environmental analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Obligations Under This Part Environmental Issues § 580.30 What activities will not require environmental... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What activities will not require environmental... environmental impact and will normally be categorically excluded from additional environmental analysis....

  5. 30 CFR 580.30 - What activities will not require environmental analysis?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Obligations Under This Part Environmental Issues § 580.30 What activities will not require environmental... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What activities will not require environmental... environmental impact and will normally be categorically excluded from additional environmental analysis....

  6. Seeing, Believing, and Learning to Be Skeptical: Supporting Language Learning through Advertising Analysis Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Renee; He, Haixia; Robbgrieco, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This study documents how a high school ESL teacher working with new immigrants ages 14-20 supported the development of their critical thinking and English language skills by using advertising analysis activities. The article examines the use of key critical questions for analyzing media messages and documents instructional activities designed to…

  7. Comparing Effects of Different Writing Activities on Reading Comprehension: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Michael; Simpson, Amy; Graham, Steve

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this review were to determine: (1) if different writing activities were more effective than others in improving students' reading comprehension, and (2) if obtained differences among writing activities was related to how reading comprehension was measured? Meta-analysis was used to examine these questions across studies involving…

  8. 77 FR 45717 - Proposed Information Collection (Food Service and Nutritional Care Analysis) Activity; Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Food Service and Nutritional Care Analysis) Activity; Comment.... Title: Food Service and Nutritional Care Analysis, VA Form 10-5387. OMB Control Number: 2900-0227. Type... and advanced food delivery systems. All meals served are an integral ] part of a patient's therapy....

  9. 77 FR 64385 - Proposed Information Collection (Loan Analysis) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Loan Analysis) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Loan Analysis, VA Form 26-6393. OMB... complete and submit the form ] to provide evidence that their decision to submit a prior approval...

  10. OBJECTIVE ANALYSIS OF SPERM MOTILITY IN THE LAKE STURGEON, ACIPENSER FULVESCENS: ACTIVATION AND INHIBITION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An objective analysis of the duration of motility of sperm from the lake sturgeon, Acipenser fulvescens, has been performed using computer-assisted sperm motion analysis at 200 frames/s. Motility was measured in both 1993 and 1994. The percentage of activated motile sperm and the...

  11. Cytotoxic, pro-apoptotic, pro-oxidant, and non-genotoxic activities of a novel copper(II) complex against human cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Frías González, Susana E; Angeles Anguiano, Enrique; Mendoza Herrera, Alberto; Escutia Calzada, Daniel; Ordaz Pichardo, Cynthia

    2013-12-01

    Cisplatin remains one of the most effective current chemotherapeutic agents; however, metal complexes synthesis has increased in order to produce new anti-neoplastic drugs with DNA binding and apoptotic activities in tumor cells and less toxicity for patients. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxic activity of a novel copper(II) complex (LQM402) against cervical cancer cell lines and found that LQM402 exhibited selective cytotoxicity against HeLa and Ca Ski cells. FITC-annexin assay and DNA fragmentation indicated that apoptosis could be involved in HeLa cell death. Caspase 3/7 and cytochrome c analysis by immunoblotting suggest the intrinsic pathway. LQM402 is a lipid peroxidation inductor according to TBARS production. Additionally, the Ames and micronucleus tests demonstrated non-genotoxic activity for this compound in Salmonella typhimurium and CD1 mice, respectively. Therefore, LQM402 may be a promising and safe anti-cervical cancer compound. PMID:24012731

  12. Analysis of active compounds and antioxidant activity assessment of six popular Chinese Juhua teas.

    PubMed

    Du, Hui; Li, Shan-Shan; Wu, Qian; Ji, Kui-Xian; Wu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Wang, Liang-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Chrysanthemum is an important traditional Chinese medicine and is drunk daily as a herbal tea. Chlorogenic acids and flavonoids are generally considered as the bioactive compounds. In this work, six kinds of Juhua Tea were analyzed and their active compounds and antioxidant activities were compared. In total, 32 phenolic compounds were profiled and identified using HPLC-DAD/ESI-MSn, composed of chlorogenic acids (10), flavones (8), chalcones (8), flavanones (4) and flavonols (2). Chalcones were the main flavonoids in Kunlun Xueju (Coreopsis tinctoria) extract, while flavones and chlorogenic acids were dominant in the five Chrysanthemum teas. Total chlorogenic acids content (TCA) was highest in Tai Ju (Chrysanthemum morifolium cv. 'Tai Ju') (8.59 ± 0.87 mg/g DW), and total flavonoids content (TF) was highest in Kunlun Xueju (87.2 ± 7.0 mg/g DW), which were both lowest in Ganye Ju (Chrysanthemum eticuspe) (TCA 0.86 ± 0.26 mg/g DW, TF 1.43 ± 0.41 mg/g DW). Huangin Ju (Anthemis tinctoria) possessed the most flavones (19.7 ± 0.6 mg/g DW). Antioxidant capacity of each drink, assessed by Folin-Ciocalteu, DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assays, consistently showed that Kunlun Xueju extract possessed stronger antioxidant activity than the other five, suggesting that the flavonoids content accounted for the free radical scavenging. The present work provides a method for the characterization and quality control of Juhua Tea. Moreover, it is a guideline for consuming choice, due to the different biological functions resulting from chalcones, chlorogenic acids, and flavones. PMID:25924537

  13. An analysis of Mars mission activities and the derivation of Extravehicular Activity System design requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Peter J.

    1992-07-01

    This paper describes a design process used to develop an extravehicular system suitable for accomplishing a set of specific missions in a Mars environment. The paper first identifies specific candidate geological and operational missions that require direct extravehicular activity action. The tools and procedures necessary to accomplish these missions are identified. The missions are analyzed in order to produce a set of functional and design requirements for the extravehicular system. A preliminary design of an extravehicular system specifically tailored to accomplish the identified missions is presented.

  14. Microbiological Analysis of an Active Pilot-Scale Mobile Bioreactor Treating Organic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L.

    1997-11-26

    Samples were obtained for microbiological analysis from a granular activated carbon fluidized bed bioreactor (GAC-FBR). This GAC-FBR was in operation at a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) Site in Augusta Georgia for in situ groundwater bioremediation of organics. The samples included contaminated site groundwater, GAC-FBR effluent, and biofilm coated granular activated carbon at 5, 9, and 13 feet within the GAC-FBR column. The objective of this analysis was to correlate contaminant removal with microbiological activity within the GAC-FBR.

  15. Multidimensional analysis and probabilistic model of volcanic and seismic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V.

    2009-04-01

    A search for space and time regularities in volcanic and seismic events for the purpose of forecast method development seems to be of current concern, both scientifically and practically. The seismic and volcanic processes take place in the Earth's field of gravity which in turn is closely related to gravitational fields of the Moon, the Sun, and the planets of the Solar System. It is mostly gravity and tidal forces that exercise control over the Earth's configuration and relief. Dynamic gravitational interaction between the Earth and other celestial bodies makes itself evident in tidal phenomena and other effects in the geospheres (including the Earth's crust). Dynamics of the tidal and attractive forces is responsible for periodical changes in gravity force, both in value and direction [Darwin, 1965], in the rate of rotation and orbital speed; that implies related changes in the endogenic activity of the Earth. The Earth's rotation in the alternating gravitational field accounts to a considerable extent for regular pattern of crustal deformations and dislocations; it is among principal factors that control the Earth's form and structure, distribution of oceans and continents and, probably, continental drift [Peive, 1969; Khain, 1973; Kosygin, 1983]. The energy of gravitational interaction is transmitted through the tidal energy to planetary spheres and feeds various processes there, including volcanic and seismic ones. To determine degree, character and special features of tidal force contribution to the volcanic and seismic processes is of primary importance for understanding of genetic and dynamic aspects of volcanism and seismicity. Both volcanic and seismic processes are involved in evolution of celestial bodies; they are operative on the planets of the Earth group and many satellites [Essays…, 1981; Lukashov, 1996]. From this standpoint, studies of those processes are essential with a view to development of scenarios of the Earth's evolution as a celestial

  16. The technical analysis of the stock exchange and physics: Japanese candlesticks for solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dineva, C.; Atanasov, V.

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we use the Japanese candlesticks, a method popular in the technical analysis of the Stock/Forex markets and apply it to a variable in physics-the solar activity. This method is invented and used exclusively for economic analysis and its application to a physical problem produced unexpected results. We found that the Japanese candlesticks are convenient tool in the analysis of the variables in the physics of the Sun. Based on our observations, we differentiated a new cycle in the solar activity.

  17. COHN analysis: Body composition measurements based on the associated particle imaging and prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The measurement of the body's carbon (C), oxygen (O), hydrogen (H), and nitrogen (N) content can be used to calculate the relative amounts of fat, protein, and water. A system based on prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), coupled with the associated particle imaging (API) technique, is...

  18. Health-care district management information system plan: Review of operations analysis activities during calendar year 1975 and plan for continued research and analysis activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, G. J.; Stevenson, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    Operations research activities developed to identify the information required to manage both the efficiency and effectiveness of the Veterans Administration (VA) health services as these services relate to individual patient care are reported. The clinical concerns and management functions that determine this information requirement are discussed conceptually. Investigations of existing VA data for useful management information are recorded, and a diagnostic index is provided. The age-specific characteristics of diseases and lengths of stay are explored, and recommendations for future analysis activities are articulated. The effect of the introduction of new technology to health care is also discussed.

  19. Analysis of surface EMG baseline for detection of hidden muscle activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Ping

    2014-02-01

    Objective. This study explored the feasibility of detecting hidden muscle activity in surface electromyogram (EMG) baseline. Approach. Power spectral density (PSD) analysis and multi-scale entropy (MSE) analysis were used. Both analyses were applied to computer simulations of surface EMG baseline with the presence (representing activity data) or absence (representing reference data) of hidden muscle activity, as well as surface electrode array EMG baseline recordings of healthy control and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) subjects. Main results. Although the simulated reference data and the activity data yielded no distinguishable difference in the time domain, they demonstrated a significant difference in the frequency and signal complexity domains with the PSD and MSE analyses. For a comparison using pooled data, such a difference was also observed when the PSD and MSE analyses were applied to surface electrode array EMG baseline recordings of healthy control and ALS subjects, which demonstrated no distinguishable difference in the time domain. Compared with the PSD analysis, the MSE analysis appeared to be more sensitive for detecting the difference in surface EMG baselines between the two groups. Significance. The findings implied the presence of a hidden muscle activity in surface EMG baseline recordings from the ALS subjects. To promote the presented analysis as a useful diagnostic or investigatory tool, future studies are necessary to assess the pathophysiological nature or origins of the hidden muscle activity, as well as the baseline difference at the individual subject level.

  20. Fast serial analysis of active cholesterol at the plasma membrane in single cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chunxiu; Zhou, Junyu; Wu, Zeng-Qiang; Fang, Danjun; Jiang, Dechen

    2014-01-01

    Previously, our group has utilized the luminol electrochemiluminescence to analyze the active cholesterol at the plasma membrane in single cells by the exposure of one cell to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) through a pinhole. In this paper, fast analysis of active cholesterol at the plasma membrane in single cells was achieved by a multimicroelectrode array without the pinhole. Single cells were directly located on the microelectrodes using cell-sized microwell traps. A cycle of voltage was applied on the microelectrodes sequentially to induce a peak of luminescence from each microelectrode for the serial measurement of active membrane cholesterol. A minimal time of 1.60 s was determined for the analysis of one cell. The simulation and the experimental data exhibited a semisteady-state distribution of hydrogen peroxide on the microelectrode after the reaction of cholesterol oxidase with the membrane cholesterol, which supported the relative accuracy of the serial analysis. An eight-microelectrode array was demonstrated to analyze eight single cells in 22 s serially, including the channel switching time. The results from 64 single cells either activated by low ion strength buffer or the inhibition of intracellular acyl-coA/cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) revealed that most of the cells analyzed had the similar active membrane cholesterol, while few cells had more active cholesterol resulting in the cellular heterogeneity. The fast single-cell analysis platform developed will be potentially useful for the analysis of more molecules in single cells using proper oxidases. PMID:24328095

  1. WWER Expert System for Fuel Failure Analysis Using Data on Primary Coolant Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Likhanskii, V.V.; Evdokimov, I.A.; Sorokin, A.A.; Khromov, A.G.; Kanukova, V.D.; Apollonova, O.V.; Ugryumov, A.V.

    2007-07-01

    The computer expert system for fuel failure analysis of WWER during operation is presented. The diagnostics is based on the measurement of specific activity of reference nuclides in reactor primary coolant and application of a computer code for the data interpretation. The data analysis includes an evaluation of tramp uranium mass in reactor core, detection of failures by iodine and caesium spikes, evaluation of burnup of defective fuel. Evaluation of defective fuel burnup was carried out by applying the relation of caesium nuclides activity in spikes and relations of activities of gaseous fission products for steady state operational conditions. The method of burnup evaluation of defective fuel by use of fission gas activity is presented in detail. The neural-network analysis is performed for determination of failed fuel rod number and defect size. Results of the expert system application are illustrated for several fuel campaigns on operating WWER NPPs. (authors)

  2. Guidance for Safety Analysis of Other Than Nuclear Facilities/Activities at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Douglas Sidney; Perry, Scott William

    2002-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) provided guidance per DOE-ID Orders 420.C, "Safety Basis Review and Approval Process," and 420.D, "Requirements and Guidance for Safety Analysis," for conducting safety analysis for facilities and activities that do not meet either the nuclear facility criteria or the criteria for not requiring additional safety analysis (NRASA). These facilities and activities are thus designated as "other than nuclear" (OTN), and hazard analyses are performed using a graded approach. This graded approach is done in accordance with DOE-ID Order 420.D. DOE-ID guidance is used to format these OTN facilities and activities into 3-chapter documents, rather than the 17-chapter format specified in DOE-STD-3009-94, "Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports."

  3. Detection on immunoblot of new proteins from the soluble fraction of the cell recognized either by anti-liver-kidney microsome antibodies type 1 or by anti-liver cytosol antibodies type 1--relationship with hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ballot, E; Desbos, A; Monier, J C

    1996-09-01

    Antibodies directed against liver cytosol protein, called anti-liver cytosol type 1 (LC1 Ab), have been described by both immunofluorescence (IF) and immunodiffusion techniques in sera from patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). They have never been found in association with antibodies directed against the hepatitis C virus (HCV), unlike the anti-liver-kidney microsome antibodies type 1 (LKM1 Ab), the serological marker of AIH type 2. This suggests that there are two subgroups of AIH type 2, i.e., HCV-related and non-HCV-related. In this study, immunoblotting experiments were performed using proteins from the soluble phase of the rat liver cell; 141 sera which tested positive for LKM1 Ab by IF, 24 identified as having LC1 Ab by IF, and 50 from blood donors as controls were analyzed. Three bands were stained by LC1 Ab sera more often than by the control sera, and with a statistically significant frequency. These 3 proteins were located at apparent Mr 50,000, 55,000, and 60,000. The LKM1 Ab-positive sera as defined by IF stained six bands with a statistically significant frequency compared to the controls. Their apparent Mr were 35,000, 39,000, 47,000, 50,000, 55,000, and 60,000. LKM1 Ab-positive sera which were anti-HCV negative recognized a 60,000 protein belonging to the soluble phase of the cell, with a statistically significant frequency compared to LKM1 Ab-positive sera which were anti-HCV positive. This 60,000 protein was also recognized by LC1 Ab-positive sera, which were almost always anti-HCV negative. The presence of antibodies against a 60,000 protein from the soluble phase of the cell is discussed in terms of the anti-HCV serological markers found in the sera from patients with AIH. PMID:8811044

  4. Activation of caspases in intestinal villus epithelial cells of normal and nematode infected rats

    PubMed Central

    Hyoh, Y; Ishizaka, S; Horii, T; Fujiwara, A; Tegoshi, T; Yamada, M; Arizono, N

    2002-01-01

    Background: Small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) show apoptosis in physiological turnover of cells and in certain inflammatory diseases. Aims: To investigate the role of caspases in the progression of IEC apoptosis in vivo. Methods: IEC were separated along the villus-crypt axis from the jejunum of normal and Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infected rats at 4°C. Caspases were examined by a fluorometric assay method, histochemistry, and immunoblotting. Results: Villus cell rich IEC from normal rats exhibited a high level of caspase-3-like activity whereas activities of caspase-1, -8, and -9 were negligible. Immunoblotting analysis of villus cell rich IEC revealed partial cleavage of procaspase-3 into a 17 kDa molecule as well as cleavage of a caspase-3 substrate, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), whereas in crypt cell rich IEC, caspase-3 cleavage was less significant. Caspase-3 activity was also observed histochemically in villus epithelium on frozen sections of the normal small intestine. IEC prepared at 4°C did not reveal nuclear degradation whereas subsequent incubation in a suspension at 37°C induced intense nuclear degradation within one hour in accordance with increases in active caspase-3. This apoptosis was partially suppressed by the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk. Nematode infected animals showed villus atrophy together with significant increases in levels of caspase-3 in IEC but not of caspase-1, -8, or -9. Conclusion: Caspase-3 may have an important role in the physiological replacement of IEC as well as in progression of IEC apoptosis induced by nematode infection. PMID:11772970

  5. Outer Membrane Vesicles Mediate Transport of Biologically Active Vibrio cholerae Cytolysin (VCC) from V. cholerae Strains

    PubMed Central

    Elluri, Sridhar; Enow, Constance; Vdovikova, Svitlana; Rompikuntal, Pramod K.; Dongre, Mitesh; Carlsson, Sven; Pal, Amit; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2014-01-01

    Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released from Gram-negative bacteria can serve as vehicles for the translocation of virulence factors. Vibrio cholerae produce OMVs but their putative role in translocation of effectors involved in pathogenesis has not been well elucidated. The V. cholerae cytolysin (VCC), is a pore-forming toxin that lyses target eukaryotic cells by forming transmembrane oligomeric β-barrel channels. It is considered a potent toxin that contributes to V. cholerae pathogenesis. The mechanisms involved in the secretion and delivery of the VCC have not been extensively studied. Methodology/Principal Findings OMVs from V. cholerae strains were isolated and purified using a differential centrifugation procedure and Optiprep centrifugation. The ultrastructure and the contents of OMVs were examined under the electron microscope and by immunoblot analyses respectively. We demonstrated that VCC from V. cholerae strain V:5/04 was secreted in association with OMVs and the release of VCC via OMVs is a common feature among V. cholerae strains. The biological activity of OMV-associated VCC was investigated using contact hemolytic assay and epithelial cell cytotoxicity test. It showed toxic activity on both red blood cells and epithelial cells. Our results indicate that the OMVs architecture might play a role in stability of VCC and thereby can enhance its biological activities in comparison with the free secreted VCC. Furthermore, we tested the role of OMV-associated VCC in host cell autophagy signalling using confocal microscopy and immunoblot analysis. We observed that OMV-associated VCC triggered an autophagy response in the target cell and our findings demonstrated for the first time that autophagy may operate as a cellular defence mechanism against an OMV-associated bacterial virulence factor. Conclusion/Significance Biological assays of OMVs from the V. cholerae strain V:5/04 demonstrated that OMV-associated VCC is indeed biologically active and

  6. Activation Analysis of the Final Optics Assemblies at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dauffy, L S; Khater, H Y; Sitaraman, S; Brereton, S J

    2008-10-14

    Commissioning shots have commenced at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Within a year, the 192 laser beam facility will be operational and the experimental phase will begin. At each shot, the emitted neutrons will interact in the facility's surroundings, activating them, especially inside the target bay where the neutron flux is the highest. We are calculating the dose from those activated structures and objects in order to plan and minimize worker exposures during maintenance and normal NIF operation. This study presents the results of the activation analysis of the optics of the Final Optics Assemblies (FOA), which are a key contributor to worker exposure. Indeed, there are 48 FOAs weighting three tons each, and routine change-out and maintenance of optics and optics modules is expected. The neutron field has been characterized using the three-dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNP with subsequent activation analysis performed using the activation code, ALARA.

  7. The relevance of particle flux monitors in accelerator-based activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Segebade, Chr.; Maimaitimin, M.; Sun Zaijing

    2013-04-19

    One of the most critical parameters in activation analysis is the flux density of the activating radiation, its spatial distribution in particular. The validity of the basic equation for calculating the activity induced to the exposed item depends upon the fulfilment of several conditions, the most relevant of them being equal doses of incident activating radiation received by the unknown sample, the calibration material and the reference material, respectively. This requirement is most problematic if accelerator-produced radiation is used for activation. Whilst nuclear research reactors usually are equipped with exposure positions that provide fairly homogenous activation fields for thermal neutron activation analysis accelerator-generated particle beams (neutrons, photons, charged particles) usually exhibit axial and, in particular, sharp radial flux gradients. Different experimental procedures have been developed to fulfil the condition mentioned above. In this paper, three variants of the application of flux monitors in photon activation analysis are discussed (external monitor, additive and inherent internal monitor). Experiments have indicated that the latter technique yields highest quality of the analytical results.

  8. The relevance of particle flux monitors in accelerator-based activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segebade, Chr.; Maimaitimin, M.; Zaijing, Sun

    2013-04-01

    One of the most critical parameters in activation analysis is the flux density of the activating radiation, its spatial distribution in particular. The validity of the basic equation for calculating the activity induced to the exposed item depends upon the fulfilment of several conditions, the most relevant of them being equal doses of incident activating radiation received by the unknown sample, the calibration material and the reference material, respectively. This requirement is most problematic if accelerator-produced radiation is used for activation. Whilst nuclear research reactors usually are equipped with exposure positions that provide fairly homogenous activation fields for thermal neutron activation analysis accelerator-generated particle beams (neutrons, photons, charged particles) usually exhibit axial and, in particular, sharp radial flux gradients. Different experimental procedures have been developed to fulfil the condition mentioned above. In this paper, three variants of the application of flux monitors in photon activation analysis are discussed (external monitor, additive and inherent internal monitor). Experiments have indicated that the latter technique yields highest quality of the analytical results.

  9. Analysis of primer independent phosphorylase activity in potato plants: high levels of activity in sink organs and sucrose-dependent activity in cultured stem explants.

    PubMed

    Moreno, S; Tandecarz, J S

    1996-07-01

    One isoform of potato (Solanum tuberosum L., cv. Spunta), type L phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1), exhibiting primer independent activity appears to be tuber-specific. However, this activity can also be modulated by exogenous sucrose in storage as well as in non-storage organs. Primer independent phosphorylase (PIPh) activity in microtubers and shoots of in vitro plantlets was found to be much higher than in tubers and shoots of soil-grown plants. Detached leaves of soil-grown plants showed an increase in PIPh activity as well when incubated in sucrose-containing Murashige-Skoog (MS) medium. This increase was always accompanied by a rise in starch content. The presence of metabolizable carbohydrates in the growth or incubation medium are likely to be responsible for the observed rise in PIPh activity. In vitro microtubers and micropropagated plantlet organs (shoots and roots) exhibited a correlation between measurable PIPh activity and presence of enzyme protein, as judged by Western blot analysis using anti-potato tuber type L phosphorylase antibody. Therefore, in addition, to be developmentally regulated (tuber-specific accumulation), PIPh activity associated with the tuber type L isoform might be under a form of metabolic regulation. PMID:8832093

  10. Structure-Activity Analysis of Gram-positive Bacterium-producing Lasso Peptides with Anti-mycobacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Inokoshi, Junji; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Miyake, Midori; Shimizu, Yuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Lariatin A, an 18-residue lasso peptide encoded by the five-gene cluster larABCDE, displays potent and selective anti-mycobacterial activity. The structural feature is an N-terminal macrolactam ring, through which the C-terminal passed to form the rigid lariat-protoknot structure. In the present study, we established a convergent expression system by the strategy in which larA mutant gene-carrying plasmids were transformed into larA-deficient Rhodococcus jostii, and generated 36 lariatin variants of the precursor protein LarA to investigate the biosynthesis and the structure-activity relationships. The mutational analysis revealed that four amino acid residues (Gly1, Arg7, Glu8, and Trp9) in lariatin A are essential for the maturation and production in the biosynthetic machinery. Furthermore, the study on structure-activity relationships demonstrated that Tyr6, Gly11, and Asn14 are responsible for the anti-mycobacterial activity, and the residues at positions 15, 16 and 18 in lariatin A are critical for enhancing the activity. This study will not only provide a useful platform for genetically engineering Gram-positive bacterium-producing lasso peptides, but also an important foundation to rationally design more promising drug candidates for combatting tuberculosis. PMID:27457620

  11. Structure-Activity Analysis of Gram-positive Bacterium-producing Lasso Peptides with Anti-mycobacterial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inokoshi, Junji; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Miyake, Midori; Shimizu, Yuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Lariatin A, an 18-residue lasso peptide encoded by the five-gene cluster larABCDE, displays potent and selective anti-mycobacterial activity. The structural feature is an N-terminal macrolactam ring, through which the C-terminal passed to form the rigid lariat-protoknot structure. In the present study, we established a convergent expression system by the strategy in which larA mutant gene-carrying plasmids were transformed into larA-deficient Rhodococcus jostii, and generated 36 lariatin variants of the precursor protein LarA to investigate the biosynthesis and the structure-activity relationships. The mutational analysis revealed that four amino acid residues (Gly1, Arg7, Glu8, and Trp9) in lariatin A are essential for the maturation and production in the biosynthetic machinery. Furthermore, the study on structure-activity relationships demonstrated that Tyr6, Gly11, and Asn14 are responsible for the anti-mycobacterial activity, and the residues at positions 15, 16 and 18 in lariatin A are critical for enhancing the activity. This study will not only provide a useful platform for genetically engineering Gram-positive bacterium-producing lasso peptides, but also an important foundation to rationally design more promising drug candidates for combatting tuberculosis.

  12. Determination of aluminium, silicon and magnesium in geological matrices by delayed neutron activation analysis based on k0 instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Baidoo, I K; Dampare, S B; Opata, N S; Nyarko, B J B; Akaho, E H K; Quagraine, R E

    2013-12-01

    In this work, concentrations of silicon, aluminium and magnesium in geological matrices were determined by Neutron Activation Analysis based on k0-IAEA software. The optimum activation and delay times were found to be 5 min and 15-20 min respectively for the determination of Si via (29)Si (n,p) (29)Al reaction. The adopted irradiation scheme did not work for the determination of magnesium. Each sample was irradiated under a thermal neutron flux density of 5.0 × 10(11) ncm(-2)s(-1). Cadmium covered activation indicated that a permanent epithermal irradiation site for research reactors would be very useful for routine determination of silicon in environmental samples. PMID:23999324

  13. Determination of carrier yields for neutron activation analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.G.; Wandless, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    A new method is described for determining carrier yield in the radiochemical neutron activation analysis of rare-earth elements in silicate rocks by group separation. The method involves the determination of the rare-earth elements present in the carrier by means of energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis, eliminating the need to re-irradiate samples in a nuclear reactor after the gamma ray analysis is complete. Results from the analysis of USGS standards AGV-1 and BCR-1 compare favorably with those obtained using the conventional method. ?? 1984 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  14. [Activity and cost analysis in surgical pathology. Experience of a French university laboratory using the activity-based costing method].

    PubMed

    Bellocq, J P; Biron, N; Kessler, S; Penaud, M; Faujour, V; Ospel, J; Supper, E; Barthel, A; Roussel, J F; Méchine-Neuville, A; Marcellin, L; Lang-Avérous, G; Chenard, M P

    2001-06-01

    Good self-knowledge enables us to have a well- reasoned adaptation to our environment. Starting from this precept based on simple common sense, activity and cost analysis, when applied to medical departments in a university hospital setting, represents a necessary phase in their scientific progression and in the continuation of their university vocation. This is all the more true given the present climate of economic and organizational restructuring of medical facilities. This paper relates the experience of a French surgical pathology department which was assessed for cost effectiveness using the Activity-Based Costing (ABC) method in 1999. This method, which originated in the business world and of which the general concepts are presented here, has given us a keener understanding of the diverse processes involved, their costs and how these costs are arrived at. Moreover, this method has identified the proportion of costs imputable to diagnostic work and of those linked to work specific to a university hospital, in particular teaching and research and development. The results can then be used for a clearer analysis of the figures required by prescribers and health care funding agencies, and, within the department, to enhance perception of work carried out by the entire staff in order to initiate a new type of management centered on activity (Activity-Based Management). Adaptable to any medical department, whatever its organizational structure, independent of the significance of any given code letter and regardless of the rating method used to grade activities, the ABC method also allows for comparisons between structures of a similar nature. The thoughts it inspires on economic performance must take into account the rules of good medical practice, the imperatives of quality assurance, the need for "breathing space" which are indispensable to research and a humanist conception of working relations. PMID:11468559

  15. A unified framework for activity recognition-based behavior analysis and action prediction in smart homes.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Iram; Fahim, Muhammad; Lee, Young-Koo; Lee, Sungyoung

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, activity recognition in smart homes is an active research area due to its applicability in many applications, such as assistive living and healthcare. Besides activity recognition, the information collected from smart homes has great potential for other application domains like lifestyle analysis, security and surveillance, and interaction monitoring. Therefore, discovery of users common behaviors and prediction of future actions from past behaviors become an important step towards allowing an environment to provide personalized service. In this paper, we develop a unified framework for activity recognition-based behavior analysis and action prediction. For this purpose, first we propose kernel fusion method for accurate activity recognition and then identify the significant sequential behaviors of inhabitants from recognized activities of their daily routines. Moreover, behaviors patterns are further utilized to predict the future actions from past activities. To evaluate the proposed framework, we performed experiments on two real datasets. The results show a remarkable improvement of 13.82% in the accuracy on average of recognized activities along with the extraction of significant behavioral patterns and precise activity predictions with 6.76% increase in F-measure. All this collectively help in understanding the users" actions to gain knowledge about their habits and preferences. PMID:23435057

  16. A Unified Framework for Activity Recognition-Based Behavior Analysis and Action Prediction in Smart Homes

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Iram; Fahim, Muhammad; Lee, Young-Koo; Lee, Sungyoung

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, activity recognition in smart homes is an active research area due to its applicability in many applications, such as assistive living and healthcare. Besides activity recognition, the information collected from smart homes has great potential for other application domains like lifestyle analysis, security and surveillance, and interaction monitoring. Therefore, discovery of users common behaviors and prediction of future actions from past behaviors become an important step towards allowing an environment to provide personalized service. In this paper, we develop a unified framework for activity recognition-based behavior analysis and action prediction. For this purpose, first we propose kernel fusion method for accurate activity recognition and then identify the significant sequential behaviors of inhabitants from recognized activities of their daily routines. Moreover, behaviors patterns are further utilized to predict the future actions from past activities. To evaluate the proposed framework, we performed experiments on two real datasets. The results show a remarkable improvement of 13.82% in the accuracy on average of recognized activities along with the extraction of significant behavioral patterns and precise activity predictions with 6.76% increase in F-measure. All this collectively help in understanding the users” actions to gain knowledge about their habits and preferences. PMID:23435057

  17. Structure-activity Relationship Analysis of N-Benzoylpyrazoles for Elastase Inhibitory Activity: A Simplified Approach Using Atom Pair Descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Quinn, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we utilized high throughput screening of a chemical diversity library to identify potent inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase and found that many of these compounds had N-benzoylpyrazole core structures. We also found individual ring substituents had significant impact on elastase inhibitory activity and compound stability. In the present study, we utilized computational structure–activity relationship (SAR) analysis of a series of 53 N-benzoylpyrazole derivatives to further optimize these lead molecules. We present an improved approach to SAR methodology based on atom pair descriptors in combination with 2-dimentional (2D) molecular descriptors. This approach utilizes the rich representation of chemical structure and leads to SAR analysis that is both accurate and intuitively easy to understand. A sequence of ANOVA, linear discriminant, and binary classification tree analyses of the molecular descriptors led to the derivation of SAR rule-based algorithms. These rules revealed that the main factors influencing elastase inhibitory activity of N-benzoylpyrazole molecules were the presence of methyl groups in the pyrazole moiety and ortho-substituents in the benzoyl radical. Furthermore, our data showed that physicochemical characteristics (energy of frontier molecular orbitals, molar refraction, lipophilicity) were not necessary for achieving good SAR, as comparable quality of SAR classification was obtained with atom pairs and 2D descriptors only. This simplified SAR approach may be useful to qualitative SAR recognition problems in a variety of data sets. PMID:18234502

  18. Structure-activity relationship analysis of N-benzoylpyrazoles for elastase inhibitory activity: a simplified approach using atom pair descriptors.

    PubMed

    Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Schepetkin, Igor A; Quinn, Mark T

    2008-03-15

    Previously, we utilized high throughput screening of a chemical diversity library to identify potent inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase and found that many of these compounds had N-benzoylpyrazole core structures. We also found individual ring substituents had significant impact on elastase inhibitory activity and compound stability. In the present study, we utilized computational structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of a series of 53 N-benzoylpyrazole derivatives to further optimize these lead molecules. We present an improved approach to SAR methodology based on atom pair descriptors in combination with 2-dimensional (2D) molecular descriptors. This approach utilizes the rich representation of chemical structure and leads to SAR analysis that is both accurate and intuitively easy to understand. A sequence of ANOVA, linear discriminant, and binary classification tree analyses of the molecular descriptors led to the derivation of SAR rule-based algorithms. These rules revealed that the main factors influencing elastase inhibitory activity of N-benzoylpyrazole molecules were the presence of methyl groups in the pyrazole moiety and ortho-substituents in the benzoyl radical. Furthermore, our data showed that physicochemical characteristics (energy of frontier molecular orbitals, molar refraction, lipophilicity) were not necessary for achieving good SAR, as comparable quality of SAR classification was obtained with atom pairs and 2D descriptors only. This simplified SAR approach may be useful to qualitative SAR recognition problems in a variety of data sets. PMID:18234502

  19. Physical activity and risk of pancreatic cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Gundula; Jochem, Carmen; Schmid, Daniela; Keimling, Marlen; Ricci, Cristian; Leitzmann, Michael F

    2015-04-01

    Physical activity may prevent pancreatic cancer by regulating body weight and decreasing insulin resistance, DNA damage, and chronic inflammation. Previous meta-analyses found inconsistent evidence for a protective effect of physical activity on pancreatic cancer but those studies did not investigate whether the association between physical activity and pancreatic cancer varies by smoking status, body mass index (BMI), or level of consistency of physical activity over time. To address these issues, we conducted an updated meta-analysis following the PRISMA guidelines among 30 distinct studies with a total of 10,501 pancreatic cancer cases. Random effects meta-analysis of cohort studies revealed a weak, statistically significant reduction in pancreatic cancer risk for high versus low levels of physical activity (relative risk (RR) 0.93, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.88-0.98). By comparison, case-control studies yielded a stronger, statistically significant risk reduction (RR 0.78, 95 % CI 0.66-0.94; p-difference by study design = 0.07). When focusing on cohort studies, physical activity summary risk estimates appeared to be more pronounced for consistent physical activity over time (RR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.76-0.97) than for recent past physical activity (RR 0.95, 95 % CI 0.90-1.01) or distant past physical activity (RR 0.95, 95 % CI 0.79-1.15, p-difference by timing in life of physical activity = 0.36). Physical activity summary risk estimates did not differ by smoking status or BMI. In conclusion, physical activity is not strongly associated with pancreatic cancer risk, and the relation is not modified by smoking status or BMI level. While overall findings were weak, we did find some suggestion of potential pancreatic cancer risk reduction with consistent physical activity over time. PMID:25773752

  20. Real-time fMRI-based activation analysis and stimulus control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moench, Tobias; Hollmann, Maurice; Bernarding, Johannes

    2007-03-01

    The real-time analysis of brain activation using functional MRI data offers a wide range of new experiments such as investigating self-regulation or learning strategies. However, besides special data acquisition and real-time data analysing techniques such examination requires dynamic and adaptive stimulus paradigms and self-optimising MRI-sequences. This paper presents an approach that enables the unified handling of parameters influencing the different software systems involved in the acquisition and analysing process. By developing a custom-made Experiment Description Language (EDL) this concept is used for a fast and flexible software environment which treats aspects like extraction and analysis of activation as well as the modification of the stimulus presentation. We describe how extracted real-time activation is subsequently evaluated by comparing activation patterns to previous acquired templates representing activated regions of interest for different predefined conditions. According to those results the stimulus presentation is adapted. The results showed that the developed system in combination with EDL is able to reliably detect and evaluate activation patterns in real-time. With a processing time for data analysis of about one second the approach is only limited by the natural time course of the hemodynamic response function of the brain activation.

  1. Brain activations during pain: a neuroimaging meta-analysis of patients with pain and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Karin B; Regenbogen, Christina; Ohse, Margarete C; Frasnelli, Johannes; Freiherr, Jessica; Lundström, Johan N

    2016-06-01

    In response to recent publications from pain neuroimaging experiments, there has been a debate about the existence of a primary pain region in the brain. Yet, there are few meta-analyses providing assessments of the minimum cerebral denominators of pain. Here, we used a statistical meta-analysis method, called activation likelihood estimation, to define (1) core brain regions activated by pain per se, irrelevant of pain modality, paradigm, or participants and (2) activation likelihood estimation commonalities and differences between patients with chronic pain and healthy individuals. A subtraction analysis of 138 independent data sets revealed that the minimum denominator for activation across pain modalities and paradigms included the right insula, secondary sensory cortex, and right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Common activations for healthy subjects and patients with pain alike included the thalamus, ACC, insula, and cerebellum. A comparative analysis revealed that healthy individuals were more likely to activate the cingulum, thalamus, and insula. Our results point toward the central role of the insular cortex and ACC in pain processing, irrelevant of modality, body part, or clinical experience; thus, furthering the importance of ACC and insular activation as key regions for the human experience of pain. PMID:26871535

  2. Sample Heat, Activity, Reactivity, and Dose Analysis for Safety Analysis of Irradiations in a Research Reactor.

    1987-12-01

    SHARDA is a program for assessing sample heating rates, activities produced and reactivity load caused while irradiating a small sample in a well thermalized research reactor like CIRUS. It estimates the sample cooling or lead shielding requirements to limit the gamma-ray dose rates due to the irradiated sample within permissible levels.

  3. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency. PMID:26168032

  4. Frequency domain stability analysis of nonlinear active disturbance rejection control system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Qi, Xiaohui; Xia, Yuanqing; Pu, Fan; Chang, Kai

    2015-05-01

    This paper applies three methods (i.e., root locus analysis, describing function method and extended circle criterion) to approach the frequency domain stability analysis of the fast tool servo system using nonlinear active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) algorithm. Root locus qualitative analysis shows that limit cycle is generated because the gain of the nonlinear function used in ADRC varies with its input. The parameters in the nonlinear function are adjustable to suppress limit cycle. In the process of root locus analysis, the nonlinear function is transformed based on the concept of equivalent gain. Then, frequency domain description of the nonlinear function via describing function is presented and limit cycle quantitative analysis including estimating prediction error is presented, which virtually and theoretically demonstrates that the describing function method cannot guarantee enough precision in this case. Furthermore, absolute stability analysis based on extended circle criterion is investigated as a complement. PMID:25532936

  5. Neutron Activation Analysis of Soil Samples from Different Parts of Edirne in Turkey*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaim, N.; Dogan, C.; Camtakan, Z.

    2016-05-01

    The concentrations of constituent elements were determined in soil samples collected from different parts of the Maritza Basin, Edirne, Turkey. Neutron activation analysis, an extremely accurate technique, and the comparator method (using a standard) were applied for the first time in this region. After preparing the soil samples for neutron activation analysis, they were activated with thermal neutrons in a nuclear reactor, TRIGA-MARK II, at Istanbul Technical University. The activated samples were analyzed using a high-efficiency high-purity germanium detector, and gamma spectrometry was employed to determine the elemental concentration in the samples. Eight elements (chromium, manganese, cobalt, zinc, arsenic, molybdenum, cadmium, and barium) were qualitatively and quantitatively identified in 36 samples. The concentrations of some elements in the soil samples were high compared with values reported in the literature.

  6. Mapping of Brain Activity by Automated Volume Analysis of Immediate Early Genes.

    PubMed

    Renier, Nicolas; Adams, Eliza L; Kirst, Christoph; Wu, Zhuhao; Azevedo, Ricardo; Kohl, Johannes; Autry, Anita E; Kadiri, Lolahon; Umadevi Venkataraju, Kannan; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Victoria X; Tang, Cheuk Y; Olsen, Olav; Dulac, Catherine; Osten, Pavel; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2016-06-16

    Understanding how neural information is processed in physiological and pathological states would benefit from precise detection, localization, and quantification of the activity of all neurons across the entire brain, which has not, to date, been achieved in the mammalian brain. We introduce a pipeline for high-speed acquisition of brain activity at cellular resolution through profiling immediate early gene expression using immunostaining and light-sheet fluorescence imaging, followed by automated mapping and analysis of activity by an open-source software program we term ClearMap. We validate the pipeline first by analysis of brain regions activated in response to haloperidol. Next, we report new cortical regions downstream of whisker-evoked sensory processing during active exploration. Last, we combine activity mapping with axon tracing to uncover new brain regions differentially activated during parenting behavior. This pipeline is widely applicable to different experimental paradigms, including animal species for which transgenic activity reporters are not readily available. PMID:27238021

  7. Design and Analysis of Hammerhead Ribozyme Activity Against an Artificial Gene Target

    PubMed Central

    Carter, James; Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Balaraman, Velmurugan; Fraser, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro cleavage assays are routinely conducted to properly assess the catalytic activity of hammerhead ribozymes (HHR) against target RNA molecules like the dengue virus RNA genomes. These experiments are performed for initial assessment of HHR catalysis in a cell-free system and have been simplified by the substitution of agarose gel electrophoresis for SDS-PAGE. Substituting mobility assays enables the analysis of ribozymes in a more rapid fashion without radioisotopes. Here we describe the in vitro transcription of an HHR and corresponding target from T7-promoted plasmids into RNA molecules leading to the analysis of HHR activity against the RNA target by in vitro cleavage assays. PMID:24318886

  8. Determination of elements in National Bureau of Standards' geological Standard Reference Materials by neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.C.; Glascock, M.D.; Carni, J.J.; Vogt, J.R.; Spalding, T.G.

    1982-08-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) have been used to determine elemental concentrations in two recently issued National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Standard Reference Materials (SRM's). The results obtained are in good agreement with the certified and information values reported by NBS for those elements in each material for which comparisons are available. Average concentrations of 35 elements in SRM 278 obsidian rock and 32 elements in SRM 688 basalt rock are reported for comparison with results that may be obtained by other laboratories.

  9. Activity analysis: contributions to the innovation of projects for aircrafts cabins.

    PubMed

    Rossi, N T; Greghi, F M; Menegon, L N; Souza, G B J

    2012-01-01

    This article presents results obtained from some ergonomics intervention in the project for the conception of aircraft's cabins. The study's aim is to analyze the contribution of the method adopted in the passengers' activities analysis in reference situations, real-use situations in aircraft's cabins, applied to analyze typical activities performed by people in their own environment. Within this perspective, the study shows two analyses which highlight the use of electronic device. The first analysis has been registered through a shooting filming in a real commercial flight. In the second one, the use is developed within the domestic environment. The same method has been applied in both contexts and it is based on activity analysis. Starting with the filming activity, postures and actions analysis, self-confrontation interviews, action course reconstruction and elaboration of postures envelopes. The results point out that the developed method might be applied to different contexts, evincing different ways of space occupation to meet human personal needs while performing an activity, which can help us with the anticipation of the users' needs, as well as indicate some innovation possibilities. PMID:22317538

  10. Quantitative end qualitative analysis of the electrical activity of rectus abdominis muscle portions.

    PubMed

    Negrão Filho, R de Faria; Bérzin, F; Souza, G da Cunha

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the electrical behavior pattern of the Rectus abdominis muscle by qualitative and quantitative analysis of the electromyographic signal obtained from its superior, medium and inferior portions during dynamic and static activities. Ten voluntaries (aged X = 17.8 years, SD = 1.6) athletic males were studied without history of muscle skeletal disfunction. For the quantitative analysis the RMS (Root Mean Square) values obtained in the electromyographic signal during the isometric exercises were normalized and expressed in maximum voluntary isometric contraction percentages. For the qualitative analysis of the dynamic activity the electromyographic signal was processed by full-wave rectification, linear envelope and normalization (amplitude and time), so that the resulting curve of the processed signal was submitted to descriptive graphic analysis. The results of the quantitative study show that there is not a statistically significant difference among the portions of the muscle. Qualitative analysis demonstrated two aspects: the presence of a common activation electric pattern in the portions of Rectus abdominis muscle and the absence of significant difference in the inclination angles in the electrical activity curve during the isotonic exercises. PMID:12964259

  11. Neutron-activation analysis by standard addition and solvent extraction Determination of traces of antimony.

    PubMed

    Alian, A; Shabana, R; Sanad, W; Allam, B; Khalifa, K

    1968-02-01

    The application of neutron activation analysis by standard addition and solvent extraction to the determination of traces of antimony in aluminium and rocks is reported. Three simple extraction procedures, using isopropyl ether, hexone, and tributyl phosphate, are described for the selective separation of radioantimony from interfering radionuclides. Antimony concentration is measured by counting the activities of the (122)Sb and (124)Sb photopeaks at 0.564 and 0.603 MeV. PMID:18960289

  12. Rational Development of Novel Activity Probes for the Analysis of Human Cytochromes P450.

    PubMed

    Sellars, Jonathan D; Skipsey, Mark; Sadr-Ul-Shaheed; Gravell, Sebastian; Abumansour, Hamza; Kashtl, Ghasaq; Irfan, Jawaria; Khot, Mohamed; Pors, Klaus; Patterson, Laurence H; Sutton, Chris W

    2016-06-01

    The identification and quantification of functional cytochromes P450 (CYPs) in biological samples is proving important for robust analyses of drug efficacy and metabolic disposition. In this study, a novel CYP activity-based probe was rationally designed and synthesised, demonstrating selective binding of CYP isoforms. The dependence of probe binding upon the presence of NADPH permits the selective detection of functionally active CYP. This allows the detection and analysis of these enzymes using biochemical and proteomic methodologies and approaches. PMID:27154431

  13. IAEA Activities in the Area of Safety Analysis and Accident Management

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; El-Shanawany, M.

    2006-07-01

    Safety analysis is a means of demonstrating how critical safety functions, the integrity of barriers against the release of radioactive materials, and various other safety requirements are fulfilled for a broad range of operating conditions and initiating events. Accordingly, performing safety analysis for a nuclear power plant is one of the most important safety principles. Thermal-hydraulic computer codes are extensively used worldwide for safety analysis by utilities, regulatory authorities, power plant designers and vendors, nuclear fuel companies, research organizations, and technical support organizations. Safety analysis methodology and computer codes have seen a significant development over the last two decades. This fact is also reflected in the work of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) that aims at increasing the quality and international harmonization of the approaches used in safety analysis. The paper provides an overview of activities and of examples of results obtained recently or planned in the near future in the IAEA's Division of Nuclear Installation Safety in the field of safety analysis for both design basis accidents and beyond design basis accidents as well as accident management. In this paper, specific technical guidance on the safety assessments in the IAEA Safety Standards such as safety analysis methodologies, probabilistic safety assessment, and development of accident management programmes are described. Future trends and related activities in safety analysis and accident management are also introduced. (authors)

  14. Neutron activation analysis for reference determination of the implantation dose of cobalt ions

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, R.P.H.; Bubert, H.; Palmetshofer, L.

    1992-05-15

    The authors prepared depth profilling reference materials by cobalt ion implantation at an ion energy of 300 keV into n-type silicon. The implanted Co dose was then determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) giving an analytical dynamic range of almost 5 decades and uncertainty of 1.5%. This form of analysis allows sources of error (beam spreading, misalignment) to be corrected. 70 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. Qualitative Elemental Analyses of a Meteorite Sample Found in Turkey by Photo-activation Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertugay, C.; Boztosun, I.; Ozmen, S. F.; Dapo, H.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a meteorite sample provided from TÜBITAK National Observatory found in Turkey has been investigated by using a clinical linear accelerator that has endpoint energy of 18 MeV, and a high purity Germanium detector for qualitative elemental analysis within photo-activation analysis method. 21 nuclei ranging from 24Na to 149Nd have been identified in the meteorite sample.

  16. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of soil and sediment samples from Siwa Oasis, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, Wael M.; Ali, Khaled; El-Samman, Hussein M.; Frontasyeva, Marina V.; Gundorina, Svetlana F.; Duliu, Octavian G.

    2015-07-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to study geochemical peculiarities of the Siwa Oasis in the Western Egyptian Desert. A total of 34 elements were determined in soil and sediment samples (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Sb, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Tb, Dy, Tm, Yb, Hf, Ta, Th, and U). For data interpretation Cluster analysis was applied. Comparison with the available literature data was carried out.

  17. Elemental analysis of Anethum gravedlens, Sismbrium Irio Linn and Veronia Anthelmintica seeds by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Fatima, I; Waheed, S; Zaidi, J H

    2013-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis has been used to characterize As, Ba, Br, Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hg, K, Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Se and Zn, and Sc in seeds of Anethum graveolens (Dill), Sisymbrium irio Linn. (Wild Mustard) and Vernonia anthelmintica (Iron Weed). Dill seed was found to contain high K while Wild Mustard has high Fe, Mn and Na levels. Iron Weed has highest Cl, Co, Cr and Zn content with least concentration of Fe. PMID:23103327

  18. Luminol electrochemiluminescence for the analysis of active cholesterol at the plasma membrane in single mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guangzhong; Zhou, Junyu; Tian, Chunxiu; Jiang, Dechen; Fang, Danjun; Chen, Hongyuan

    2013-04-16

    A luminol electrochemiluminescence assay was reported to analyze active cholesterol at the plasma membrane in single mammalian cells. The cellular membrane cholesterol was activated by the exposure of the cells to low ionic strength buffer or the inhibition of intracellular acyl-coA/cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT). The active membrane cholesterol was reacted with cholesterol oxidase in the solution to generate a peak concentration of hydrogen peroxide on the electrode surface, which induced a measurable luminol electrochemiluminescence. Further treatment of the active cells with mevastatin decreased the active membrane cholesterol resulting in a drop in luminance. No change in the intracellular calcium was observed in the presence of luminol and voltage, which indicated that our analysis process might not interrupt the intracellular cholesterol trafficking. Single cell analysis was performed by placing a pinhole below the electrode so that only one cell was exposed to the photomultiplier tube (PMT). Twelve single cells were analyzed individually, and a large deviation on luminance ratio observed exhibited the cell heterogeneity on the active membrane cholesterol. The smaller deviation on ACAT/HMGCoA inhibited cells than ACAT inhibited cells suggested different inhibition efficiency for sandoz 58035 and mevastatin. The new information obtained from single cell analysis might provide a new insight on the study of intracellular cholesterol trafficking. PMID:23527944

  19. Low-volume multiplexed proteolytic activity assay and inhibitor analysis through a pico-injector array.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ee Xien; Miller, Miles A; Jing, Tengyang; Lauffenburger, Doug A; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2015-02-21

    Secreted active proteases, from families of enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinases), participate in diverse pathological processes. To simultaneously measure multiple specific protease activities, a series of parallel enzyme reactions combined with a series of inhibitor analyses for proteolytic activity matrix analysis (PrAMA) are essential but limited due to the sample quantity requirements and the complexity of performing multiple reactions. To address these issues, we developed a pico-injector array to generate 72 different reactions in picoliter-volume droplets by controlling the sequence of combinational injections, which allowed simultaneous recording of a wide range of multiple enzyme reactions and measurement of inhibitor effects using small sample volumes (~10 μL). Multiple MMP activities were simultaneously determined by 9 different substrates and 2 inhibitors using injections from a pico-injector array. Due to the advantages of inhibitor analysis, the MMP/ADAM activities of MDA-MB-231, a breast cancer cell line, were characterized with high MMP-2, MMP-3 and ADAM-10 activity. This platform could be customized for a wide range of applications that also require multiple reactions with inhibitor analysis to enhance the sensitivity by encapsulating different chemical sensors. PMID:25553996

  20. Trace-element analysis of 1000 environmental samples per year using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    The technology and methods developed at the Plum Brook Reactor to analyze 1000 samples per year and report data on as many as 56 elements are described. The manpower for the complete analysis of 20 to 24 samples per week required only 3 to 3.5 hours per sample. The solutions to problems encountered in sample preparation, irradiation, and counting are discussed. The automation of data reduction is described. Typical data on various sample matrices are presented.

  1. Use of surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization protein chip system to analyze streptococcal exotoxin B activity secreted by Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Boyle, M D; Romer, T G; Meeker, A K; Sledjeski, D D

    2001-08-01

    Ciphergen surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization (SELDI) protein chip technology was used to analyze the secretion and autoactivation of the Streptococcus pyogenes cysteine protease SpeB. This method allowed rapid identification of both the zymogen form of the protein Mr approximately 41,000 and the fully active enzyme Mr approximately 28,500. SpeB production in culture supernatants was demonstrated to be growth-phase regulated and SpeB positive and negative variants of a blood passaged S. pyogenes isolate could readily be distinguished. In kinetic studies of the autoactivation of the zymogen form of SpeB, the sequential generation of four intermediates was detected before the accumulation of the fully active enzyme. The methods described enabled enhanced speed, use of lower sample volumes and concentrations, and a more complete molecular characterization of SpeB than allowed by existing methods of analysis using SDS-PAGE and Western immunoblotting. PMID:11412919

  2. A systematic analysis of recombination activity and genotype-phenotype correlation in human recombination-activating gene 1 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu Nee; Frugoni, Francesco; Dobbs, Kerry; Walter, Jolan E.; Giliani, Silvia; Gennery, Andrew R.; Al-Herz, Waleed; Haddad, Elie; LeDeist, Francoise; Bleesing, Jack H.; Henderson, Lauren A.; Pai, Sung-Yun; Nelson, Robert P.; El-Ghoneimy, Dalia H.; El-Feky, Reem A.; Reda, Shereen M.; Hossny, Elham; Soler-Palacin, Pere; Fuleihan, Ramsay L.; Patel, Niraj C.; Massaad, Michel J.; Geha, Raif S.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Palma, Paolo; Cancrini, Caterina; Chen, Karin; Vihinen, Mauno; Alt, Frederick W.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The recombination-activating gene (RAG) 1/2 proteins play a critical role in the development of T and B cells by initiating the VDJ recombination process that leads to generation of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor repertoire. Pathogenic mutations in the RAG1/2 genes result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from T−B− severe combined immune deficiency to delayed-onset disease with granuloma formation, autoimmunity, or both. It is not clear what contributes to such heterogeneity of phenotypes. Objective We sought to investigate the molecular basis for phenotypic diversity presented in patients with various RAG1 mutations. Methods We have developed a flow cytometry–based assay that allows analysis of RAG recombination activity based on green fluorescent protein expression and have assessed the induction of the Ighc locus rearrangements in mouse Rag1−/− pro-B cells reconstituted with wild-type or mutant human RAG1 (hRAG1) using deep sequencing technology. Results Here we demonstrate correlation between defective recombination activity of hRAG1 mutant proteins and severity of the clinical and immunologic phenotype and provide insights on the molecular mechanisms accounting for such phenotypic diversity. Conclusions Using a sensitive assay to measure the RAG1 activity level of 79 mutations in a physiologic setting, we demonstrate correlation between recombination activity of RAG1 mutants and the severity of clinical presentation and show that RAG1 mutants can induce specific abnormalities of the VDJ recombination process. PMID:24290284

  3. Off-road motorbike performance analysis using a rear semi-active suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozoya-Santos, Jorge de J.; Cervantes-Muñoz, Damián.; Ramírez Mendoza, Ricardo

    2015-04-01

    The topic of this paper is the analysis of a control system for a semi active rear suspension in an off-road 2-wheel vehicle. Several control methods are studied, as well as the recently proposed Frequency Estimation Based (FEB) algorithm. The test motorcycle dynamics, as well as the passive, semi active, and the algorithm controlled shock absorber models are loaded into BikeSim, a professional two-wheeled vehicle simulation software, and tested in several road conditions. The results show a detailed comparison of the theoretical performance of the different control approaches in a novel environment for semi active dampers.

  4. Analysis and synthesis of distributed-lumped-active networks by digital computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The use of digital computational techniques in the analysis and synthesis of DLA (distributed lumped active) networks is considered. This class of networks consists of three distinct types of elements, namely, distributed elements (modeled by partial differential equations), lumped elements (modeled by algebraic relations and ordinary differential equations), and active elements (modeled by algebraic relations). Such a characterization is applicable to a broad class of circuits, especially including those usually referred to as linear integrated circuits, since the fabrication techniques for such circuits readily produce elements which may be modeled as distributed, as well as the more conventional lumped and active ones.

  5. Active and passive imaging of clothes in the NIR and SWIR regions for reflectivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Grönwall, Christina; Steinvall, Ove; Göhler, Benjamin; Hamoir, Dominique

    2016-07-10

    We perform statistical analysis of data from active and passive imaging sensors in the near infrared (NIR) and short wavelength infrared (SWIR) wavelength bands. The data were obtained from measurements performed on clothing in a field campaign and in the laboratory. We show that reflectivity data from active imaging can be fitted to Gaussian functions, although earlier theory proposes gamma-gamma functions. We analyze the reflectivity data collected during the field campaign and compare that data with data obtained in the laboratory. We focus on the added value of active imaging when combined with passive imaging to distinguish different clothes for friend/foe identification. PMID:27409302

  6. Autonomic activity assessed by heart rate spectral analysis varies with fat distribution in obese women.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y Y; Lovejoy, J C; Sparti, A; Bray, G A; Keys, L K; Partington, C

    1996-01-01

    Obesity in humans has been associated with altered autonomic nervous system activity. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between autonomic function and body fat distribution in 16 obese, postmenopausal women using power spectrum analysis of heart rate variability. Using this technique, a low frequency peak (0.04-0.12 Hz) reflecting mixed sympathetic and parasympathetic activity, and a high frequency peak (0.22-0.28 Hz) reflecting parasympathetic activity, were identified from 5-minute consecutive heart rate data (both supine and standing). Autonomic activity in upper body (UBO) vs. lower body obesity (LBO)(by waist-to-hip ratio) and subcutaneous vs. visceral obesity (by CT scan) was evaluated. Power spectrum data were log transformed to normalize the data. The results showed that standing, low-frequency power (reflecting sympathetic activity) and supine, high-frequency power (reflecting parasympathetic activity) were significantly greater in UBO than in LBO, and in visceral compared to subcutaneous obesity. Women with combined UBO and visceral obesity had significantly higher cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic activity than any other subgroup. We conclude that cardiac autonomic function as assessed by heart rate spectral analysis varies in women depending on their regional body fat distribution. PMID:8787938

  7. Microfluidic mixing for sperm activation and motility analysis of pearl Danio zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Park, Daniel S; Egnatchik, Robert A; Bordelon, Hali; Tiersch, Terrence R; Monroe, W Todd

    2012-07-15

    Sperm viability in aquatic species is increasingly being evaluated by motility analysis via computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) following activation of sperm with manual dilution and mixing by hand. User variation can limit the speed and control over the activation process, preventing consistent motility analysis. This is further complicated by the short interval (i.e., less than 15 s) of burst motility in these species. The objectives of this study were to develop a staggered herringbone microfluidic mixer to: 1) activate small volumes of Danio pearl zebrafish (Danio albolineatus) sperm by rapid mixing with diluent, and 2) position sperm in a viewing chamber for motility evaluation using a standard CASA system. A herringbone micromixer was fabricated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to yield high quality smooth surfaces. Based on fluorescence microscopy, mixing efficiency exceeding 90% was achieved within 5 s for a range of flow rates (from 50 to 250 μL/h), with a correlation of mixing distances and mixing efficiency. For example, at the nominal flow rate of 100 μL/h, there was a significant difference in mixing efficiency between 3.5 mm (75±4%; mean±SD) and 7 mm (92±2%; P=0.002). The PDMS micromixer, integrated with standard volumetric slides, demonstrated activation of fresh zebrafish sperm with reduced user variation, greater control, and without morphologic damage to sperm. Analysis of zebrafish sperm viability by CASA revealed a statistically higher motility rate for activation by micromixing (56±4%) than manual activation (45±7%; n=5, P=0.011). This micromixer represented a first step in streamlining methods for consistent, rapid assessment of sperm quality for zebrafish and other aquatic species. The capability to rapidly activate sperm and consistently measure motility with CASA using the PDMS micromixer described herein will improve studies of germplasm physiology and cryopreservation. PMID:22494680

  8. Microfluidic mixing for sperm activation and motility analysis of pearl Danio zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Park, Daniel S.; Egnatchik, Robert A.; Bordelon, Hali; Tiersch, Terrence R.; Monroe, W. Todd

    2013-01-01

    Sperm viability in aquatic species is increasingly being evaluated by motility analysis via computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) following activation of sperm with manual dilution and mixing by hand. User variation can limit the speed and control over the activation process, preventing consistent motility analysis. This is further complicated by the short interval (i.e., less than 15 s) of burst motility in these species. The objectives of this study were to develop a staggered herringbone microfluidic mixer to: 1) activate small volumes of Danio pearl zebrafish (Danio albolineatus) sperm by rapid mixing with diluent, and 2) position sperm in a viewing chamber for motility evaluation using a standard CASA system. A herringbone micromixer was fabricated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to yield high quality smooth surfaces. Based on fluorescence microscopy, mixing efficiency exceeding 90% was achieved within 5 s for a range of flow rates (from 50 to 250 μL/h), with a correlation of mixing distances and mixing efficiency. For example, at the nominal flow rate of 100 μL/h, there was a significant difference in mixing efficiency between 3.5 mm (75 ± 4%; mean ± SD) and 7 mm (92 ± 2%; P = 0.002). The PDMS micromixer, integrated with standard volumetric slides, demonstrated activation of fresh zebrafish sperm with reduced user variation, greater control, and without morphologic damage to sperm. Analysis of zebrafish sperm viability by CASA revealed a statistically higher motility rate for activation by micromixing (56 ± 4%) than manual activation (45 ± 7%; n = 5, P = 0.011). This micromixer represented a first step in streamlining methods for consistent, rapid assessment of sperm quality for zebrafish and other aquatic species. The capability to rapidly activate sperm and consistently measure motility with CASA using the PDMS micromixer described herein will improve studies of germplasm physiology and cryopreservation. PMID:22494680

  9. Analysis, review, and documentation of the activation data from LDEF material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    Samples removed from Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF-1) are being studied at various laboratories to determine the specific activity(pCi/kg) produced in orbit by exposure to protons and neutrons in near-Earth orbit. These activities are being corrected for efficiency, self-attenuation, and background. The activities and associated gamma-ray spectra are being collected, analyzed, documented and reviewed by faculty and graduate students at Eastern Kentucky University. The currently available activation results have been tabulated and reviewed in this report. Approximately 500 spectra have been accumulated for future archival and analysis. The effect of the changing satellite orbit on the activation is reported herein and was calculated using more recent estimates of the flux of Van Allen belt protons.

  10. Analysis of DNA structure and sequence requirements for Pseudomonas aeruginosa MutL endonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Correa, Elisa M E; De Tullio, Luisina; Vélez, Pablo S; Martina, Mariana A; Argaraña, Carlos E; Barra, José L

    2013-12-01

    The hallmark of the mismatch repair system in bacterial and eukaryotic organisms devoid of MutH is the presence of a MutL homologue with endonuclease activity. The aim of this study was to analyse whether different DNA structures affect Pseudomonas aeruginosa MutL (PaMutL) endonuclease activity and to determine if a specific nucleotide sequence is required for this activity. Our results showed that PaMutL was able to nick covalently closed circular plasmids but not linear DNA at high ionic strengths, while the activity on linear DNA was only found below 60 mM salt. In addition, single strand DNA, ss/ds DNA boundaries and negatively supercoiling degree were not required for PaMutL nicking activity. Finally, the analysis of the incision sites revealed that PaMutL, as well as Bacillus thuringiensis MutL homologue, did not show DNA sequence specificity. PMID:23969026

  11. An exploratory analysis of the relationship between psychiatric nurses' perceptions of workload and unit activity.

    PubMed

    Gerolamo, Angela M

    2009-06-01

    Although research exists relative to psychiatric nurses' perceptions of their work conditions, the relationship between nurses' perceptions of their workloads and the activities in which they engage has been unexplored. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between unit activity and nurses' perceptions of their workloads. The design is a secondary analysis using two data sources: (a) reports from 36 psychiatric nurses consisting of perceptions of their work conditions (n = 383) and (b) the hospital census and activity and acuity 24-hour shift reports (n = 384). Nurses' perceptions of workloads were related to unit activity; the greater the number of heavy and medium-to-heavy workloads, the higher the unit activity. This evidence contributes to the growing body of research demonstrating that nurses accurately provide information related to the hospital environment. PMID:19446779

  12. Short half-life activation analysis in biomedical and scientific research

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    There are a number of elements that upon neutron irradiation produce very short-lived activation products, which are potentially useful for neutron activation analysis (NAA). In some cases these nuclides may be the only available activation product (e.g., for fluorine, oxygen, and lead). In other cases, the nuclides are activation products that provide improved sensitivity, accuracy, or ease of determination (e.g., for selenium, silver, and rhodium). The existing pneumatic tubes in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) nuclear reactor have relatively long transfer times (3 to 15 s) and have no accurate timing capability. These deficiencies make them relatively useless for the measurement of very short half-life activation products.

  13. Interfacing interactive data analysis tools with the grid: The PPDG CS-11 activity

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Douglas L.; Perl, Joseph

    2002-10-09

    For today's physicists, who work in large geographically distributed collaborations, the data grid promises significantly greater capabilities for analysis of experimental data and production of physics results than is possible with today's ''remote access'' technologies. The goal of letting scientists at their home institutions interact with and analyze data as if they were physically present at the major laboratory that houses their detector and computer center has yet to be accomplished. The Particle Physics DataGrid project (www.ppdg.net) has recently embarked on an effort to ''Interface and Integrate Interactive Data Analysis Tools with the grid and identify Common Components and Services.'' The initial activities are to collect known and identify new requirements for grid services and analysis tools from a range of current and future experiments (ALICE, ATLAS, BaBar, D0, CMS, JLab, STAR, others welcome), to determine if existing plans for tools and services meet these requirements. Follow-on activities will foster the interaction between grid service developers, analysis tool developers, experiment analysis frame work developers and end user physicists, and will identify and carry out specific development/integration work so that interactive analysis tools utilizing grid services actually provide the capabilities that users need. This talk will summarize what we know of requirements for analysis tools and grid services, as well as describe the identified areas where more development work is needed.

  14. INTERFACING INTERACTIVE DATA ANALYSIS TOOLS WITH THE GRID: THE PPDG CS-11 ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Joseph

    2003-07-10

    For today's physicists, who work in large geographically distributed collaborations, the data grid promises significantly greater capabilities for analysis of experimental data and production of physics results than is possible with today's ''remote access'' technologies. The goal of letting scientists at their home institutions interact with and analyze data as if they were physically present at the major laboratory that houses their detector and computer center has yet to be accomplished. The Particle Physics Data Grid project (www.ppdg.net) has recently embarked on an effort to ''Interface and Integrate Interactive Data Analysis Tools with the grid and identify Common Components and Services''. The initial activities are to collect known and identify new requirements for grid services and analysis tools from a range of current and future experiments to determine if existing plans for tools and services meet these requirements. Follow-on activities will foster the interaction between grid service developers, analysis tool developers, experiment analysis framework developers and end user physicists, and will identify and carry out specific development/integration work so that interactive analysis tools utilizing grid services actually provide the capabilities that users need. This talk will summarize what we know of requirements for analysis tools and grid services, as well as describe the identified areas where more development work is needed.

  15. [Quantitative Analysis of Immuno-fluorescence of Nuclear Factor-κB Activation].

    PubMed

    Xiu, Min; He, Feng; Lou, Yuanlei; Xu, Lu; Xiong Jieqi; Wang, Ping; Liu, Sisun; Guo, Fei

    2015-06-01

    Immuno-fluorescence technique can qualitatively determine certain nuclear translocation, of which NF-κB/ p65 implicates the activation of NF-κB signal pathways. Immuno-fluorescence analysis software with independent property rights is able to quantitatively analyze dynamic location of NF-κB/p65 by computing relative fluorescence units in nuclei and cytoplasm. We verified the quantitative analysis by Western Blot. When we applied the software to analysis of nuclear translocation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced (0. 5 h, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h) primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) , we found that nuclear translocation peak showed up at 2h as with calculated Western blot verification results, indicating that the inventive immuno-fluorescence analysis software can be applied to the quantitative analysis of immuno-fluorescence. PMID:26485997

  16. A Two-State Analysis of ERP Activity Measures and fMRI Activations Relevant to the Detection of Deception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, Michael; Vendemia, Jennifer; Green, Eric; Buzan, Robert; Meek, Scott; Phillips, Michelle

    2007-03-01

    A novel analysis approach for high-density event related scalp potential data (ERP) gathered druing various scenarios is presented. We construct energy-density functional clusters using the empirical voltage and power values and extract extrema of these cognitive activity mesaures to assess the temporal dynamics in areas of physiological significance for the detection of deception. These studies indicate that for questions relating to autobiographical knowledge neocortical interaction times are greater for deceptive responses. This finding is reproduced when workload requirements are increased and suggests that a ``neocortical circuit'' involving activity in short-term memory, visual processing, and executive control regions of the cortex is present. Individual and group analyses are given and continuing experiments involving questions where misinformation is used illustrate that early, up-front control may also be present during deceptive repsonses. A comparison of dipole source models with fMRI data collected in our lab confirms that BOLD activation in the ROIs is consistent with our model of deception.

  17. The association between physical activity and gastroesophageal cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Gundula; Jochem, Carmen; Keimling, Marlen; Ricci, Cristian; Schmid, Daniela; Leitzmann, Michael Fred

    2014-03-01

    Physical activity may decrease gastroesophageal cancer risk through a reduction of oxidative stress and decreased chronic inflammation, yet few epidemiologic studies have been able to report a clear inverse association between physical activity and gastroesophageal cancer. Because no meta-analysis has investigated the relation of physical activity to gastroesophageal cancer, we conducted a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis according to the PRISMA guidelines based on 24 studies with a total of 15,745 cases. When we compared high versus low physical activity levels and summarized associations according to anatomic site and tumor histology, risk reductions were evident for esophageal adenocarcinoma [relative risk (RR) = 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.66-0.94], gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.69-0.99) and gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma (RR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.62-0.84). The risk reduction for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (RR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.41-2.16) became statistically significant (RR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.46-0.96) after excluding an influential study. The test for heterogeneity by gastroesophageal cancer subtype was statistically non-significant (p-difference = 0.71). The RR of total gastroesophageal cancer for high versus low physical activity was 0.82 (95% CI = 0.74-0.90). A dose-response analysis of frequency of physical activity and total gastroesophageal cancer risk revealed that the greatest risk reduction was achieved among those engaging in moderate to vigorous physical activity five times per week (RR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.58-0.79). Our results provide support for an inverse relation of physical activity, in particular exercise frequency, to gastroesophageal cancer risk. PMID:24705782

  18. Variability in Measurement of Swimming Forces: A Meta-Analysis of Passive and Active Drag

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havriluk, Rod

    2007-01-01

    An analysis was conducted to identify sources of true and error variance in measuring swimming drag force to draw valid conclusions about performance factor effects. Passive drag studies were grouped according to methodological differences: tow line in pool, tow line in flume, and carriage in tow tank. Active drag studies were grouped according to…

  19. Critical Access Hospitals and Retail Activity: An Empirical Analysis in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Lara; Whitacre, Brian E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper takes an empirical approach to determining the effect that a critical access hospital (CAH) has on local retail activity. Previous research on the relationship between hospitals and economic development has primarily focused on single-case, multiplier-oriented analysis. However, as the efficacy of federal and state-level rural…

  20. The Activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, U.; Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Cabellos, O.; Kodeli, I.; Koning, A.; Konobeyev, A. Yu.; Leeb, H.; Rochman, D.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Sauvan, P.; Sublet, J.-C.; Trkov, A.; Dupont, E.; Leichtle, D.; Izquierdo, J.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion. The Consortium combines available European expertise to provide services for the generation, maintenance, and validation of nuclear data evaluations and data files relevant for ITER, IFMIF and DEMO, as well as codes and software tools required for related nuclear calculations.

  1. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Project Spectrum Activities. A Second-Order "g" Factor or Multiple Intelligences?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castejon, Juan L.; Perez, Antonio M.; Gilar, Raquel

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares different theoretical models of the structure of intelligence, based on the analysis of data obtained in a series of measured abilities corresponding to the Spectrum assessment activities (Gardner, Feldman & Krechevsky, 1998) in a sample of 393 children enrolled in kindergarten and first grade. The data were analyzed using…

  2. Software safety analysis activities during software development phases of the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Hui-Yin; Sherif, Joseph S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the MLS software safety analysis activities and documents the SSA results. The scope of this software safety effort is consistent with the MLS system safety definition and is concentrated on the software faults and hazards that may have impact on the personnel safety and the environment safety.

  3. A Functional Analysis of Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Tracy A.; Normand, Matthew P.; Morley, Allison J.; Miller, Bryon G.

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate physical activity increases the risks related to a number of health problems in children, most notably obesity and the corresponding range of associated health problems. The purpose of the current study was to conduct a functional analysis to investigate the effects of several consequent variables on moderate-to-vigorous physical…

  4. An Emergent Language Program Framework: Actively Involving Learners in Needs Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, William; Storer, Graeme

    1992-01-01

    Relates the experience of the staff of an aquaculture outreach program in Northeast Thailand in implementing an English for special purposes program. By actively involving learners in both the needs analysis and program design, teachers were able to adapt the program content to the requirements of the students. (15 references) (JL)

  5. Decreasing Sports Activity with Increasing Age? Findings from a 20-Year Longitudinal and Cohort Sequence Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breuer, Christoph; Wicker, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    According to cross-sectional studies in sport science literature, decreasing sports activity with increasing age is generally assumed. In this paper, the validity of this assumption is checked by applying more effective methods of analysis, such as longitudinal and cohort sequence analyses. With the help of 20 years' worth of data records from the…

  6. In vitro cell based assay for activity analysis of staphylococcal enterotoxin A in food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) are a leading cause of food poisoning. They function both as toxins that cause gastroenteritis after ingestion and as superantigens that non-specifically activate large numbers of T cells. Monkey or kitten bioassays were historically developed for analysis of SE act...

  7. Linking New Learning with Previous Experiences: An Activity in Teaching Dimensional Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Stan M.; Werner, Jana Rae

    Throughout America's secondary science classrooms, students struggle to master fundamental science principles, especially when math-related applications are involved. For example, in chemistry students struggle to solve quantitative problems. This paper presents an activity that leads to a useful understanding of dimensional analysis; i.e., unit…

  8. The Activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, U.; Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Cabellos, O.; Kodeli, I.; Koning, A.; Konobeyev, A.Yu.; Leeb, H.; Rochman, D.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Sauvan, P.; Sublet, J.-C.; Dupont, E.; Leichtle, D.; Izquierdo, J.

    2014-06-15

    This paper presents an overview of the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion. The Consortium combines available European expertise to provide services for the generation, maintenance, and validation of nuclear data evaluations and data files relevant for ITER, IFMIF and DEMO, as well as codes and software tools required for related nuclear calculations.

  9. Magnetoencephalographic Analysis of Cortical Activity in Adults with and without Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virji-Babul, N.; Cheung, T.; Weeks, D.; Herdman, A. T.; Cheyne, D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: This preliminary study served as a pilot for an ongoing analysis of spectral power in adults with Down syndrome (DS) using a 151 channel whole head magnetoencephalography (MEG). The present study is the first step for examining and comparing cortical responses during spontaneous and task related activity in DS. Method: Cortical…

  10. Web-Based Tools for Modelling and Analysis of Multivariate Data: California Ozone Pollution Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Christou, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a hands-on web-based activity motivated by the relation between human health and ozone pollution in California. This case study is based on multivariate data collected monthly at 20 locations in California between 1980 and 2006. Several strategies and tools for data interrogation and exploratory data analysis, model fitting…

  11. Neuroimaging of reading intervention: a systematic review and activation likelihood estimate meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Barquero, Laura A; Davis, Nicole; Cutting, Laurie E

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of studies examine instructional training and brain activity. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature regarding neuroimaging of reading intervention, with a particular focus on reading difficulties (RD). To locate relevant studies, searches of peer-reviewed literature were conducted using electronic databases to search for studies from the imaging modalities of fMRI and MEG (including MSI) that explored reading intervention. Of the 96 identified studies, 22 met the inclusion criteria for descriptive analysis. A subset of these (8 fMRI experiments with post-intervention data) was subjected to activation likelihood estimate (ALE) meta-analysis to investigate differences in functional activation following reading intervention. Findings from the literature review suggest differences in functional activation of numerous brain regions associated with reading intervention, including bilateral inferior frontal, superior temporal, middle temporal, middle frontal, superior frontal, and postcentral gyri, as well as bilateral occipital cortex, inferior parietal lobules, thalami, and insulae. Findings from the meta-analysis indicate change in functional activation following reading intervention in the left thalamus, right insula/inferior frontal, left inferior frontal, right posterior cingulate, and left middle occipital gyri. Though these findings should be interpreted with caution due to the small number of studies and the disparate methodologies used, this paper is an effort to synthesize across studies and to guide future exploration of neuroimaging and reading intervention. PMID:24427278

  12. Altered resting-state functional activity in posttraumatic stress disorder: A quantitative meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Junran; Zhan, Wang; Li, Lei; Wu, Min; Huang, Hua; Zhu, Hongyan; Kemp, Graham J.; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-01-01

    Many functional neuroimaging studies have reported differential patterns of spontaneous brain activity in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but the findings are inconsistent and have not so far been quantitatively reviewed. The present study set out to determine consistent, specific regional brain activity alterations in PTSD, using the Effect Size Signed Differential Mapping technique to conduct a quantitative meta-analysis of resting-state functional neuroimaging studies of PTSD that used either a non-trauma (NTC) or a trauma-exposed (TEC) comparison control group. Fifteen functional neuroimaging studies were included, comparing 286 PTSDs, 203 TECs and 155 NTCs. Compared with NTC, PTSD patients showed hyperactivity in the right anterior insula and bilateral cerebellum, and hypoactivity in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); compared with TEC, PTSD showed hyperactivity in the ventral mPFC. The pooled meta-analysis showed hypoactivity in the posterior insula, superior temporal, and Heschl’s gyrus in PTSD. Additionally, subgroup meta-analysis (non-medicated subjects vs. NTC) identified abnormal activation in the prefrontal-limbic system. In meta-regression analyses, mean illness duration was positively associated with activity in the right cerebellum (PTSD vs. NTC), and illness severity was negatively associated with activity in the right lingual gyrus (PTSD vs. TEC). PMID:27251865

  13. Bayesian Inference for Neural Electromagnetic Source Localization: Analysis of MEG Visual Evoked Activity

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.S.; Schmidt, D.M.; Wood, C.C.

    1999-02-01

    We have developed a Bayesian approach to the analysis of neural electromagnetic (MEG/EEG) data that can incorporate or fuse information from other imaging modalities and addresses the ill-posed inverse problem by sarnpliig the many different solutions which could have produced the given data. From these samples one can draw probabilistic inferences about regions of activation. Our source model assumes a variable number of variable size cortical regions of stimulus-correlated activity. An active region consists of locations on the cortical surf ace, within a sphere centered on some location in cortex. The number and radi of active regions can vary to defined maximum values. The goal of the analysis is to determine the posterior probability distribution for the set of parameters that govern the number, location, and extent of active regions. Markov Chain Monte Carlo is used to generate a large sample of sets of parameters distributed according to the posterior distribution. This sample is representative of the many different source distributions that could account for given data, and allows identification of probable (i.e. consistent) features across solutions. Examples of the use of this analysis technique with both simulated and empirical MEG data are presented.

  14. Altered resting-state functional activity in posttraumatic stress disorder: A quantitative meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Junran; Zhan, Wang; Li, Lei; Wu, Min; Huang, Hua; Zhu, Hongyan; Kemp, Graham J; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-01-01

    Many functional neuroimaging studies have reported differential patterns of spontaneous brain activity in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but the findings are inconsistent and have not so far been quantitatively reviewed. The present study set out to determine consistent, specific regional brain activity alterations in PTSD, using the Effect Size Signed Differential Mapping technique to conduct a quantitative meta-analysis of resting-state functional neuroimaging studies of PTSD that used either a non-trauma (NTC) or a trauma-exposed (TEC) comparison control group. Fifteen functional neuroimaging studies were included, comparing 286 PTSDs, 203 TECs and 155 NTCs. Compared with NTC, PTSD patients showed hyperactivity in the right anterior insula and bilateral cerebellum, and hypoactivity in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); compared with TEC, PTSD showed hyperactivity in the ventral mPFC. The pooled meta-analysis showed hypoactivity in the posterior insula, superior temporal, and Heschl's gyrus in PTSD. Additionally, subgroup meta-analysis (non-medicated subjects vs. NTC) identified abnormal activation in the prefrontal-limbic system. In meta-regression analyses, mean illness duration was positively associated with activity in the right cerebellum (PTSD vs. NTC), and illness severity was negatively associated with activity in the right lingual gyrus (PTSD vs. TEC). PMID:27251865

  15. Neuroimaging of Reading Intervention: A Systematic Review and Activation Likelihood Estimate Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Barquero, Laura A.; Davis, Nicole; Cutting, Laurie E.

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of studies examine instructional training and brain activity. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature regarding neuroimaging of reading intervention, with a particular focus on reading difficulties (RD). To locate relevant studies, searches of peer-reviewed literature were conducted using electronic databases to search for studies from the imaging modalities of fMRI and MEG (including MSI) that explored reading intervention. Of the 96 identified studies, 22 met the inclusion criteria for descriptive analysis. A subset of these (8 fMRI experiments with post-intervention data) was subjected to activation likelihood estimate (ALE) meta-analysis to investigate differences in functional activation following reading intervention. Findings from the literature review suggest differences in functional activation of numerous brain regions associated with reading intervention, including bilateral inferior frontal, superior temporal, middle temporal, middle frontal, superior frontal, and postcentral gyri, as well as bilateral occipital cortex, inferior parietal lobules, thalami, and insulae. Findings from the meta-analysis indicate change in functional activation following reading intervention in the left thalamus, right insula/inferior frontal, left inferior frontal, right posterior cingulate, and left middle occipital gyri. Though these findings should be interpreted with caution due to the small number of studies and the disparate methodologies used, this paper is an effort to synthesize across studies and to guide future exploration of neuroimaging and reading intervention. PMID:24427278

  16. Advances in the analysis of non-allowed pharmacologically active substances in cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Manuela; Marchei, Emilia; Pacifici, Roberta; Rotolo, Maria Concetta; Pichini, Simona

    2011-06-25

    The state-of-the art analysis of non-allowed pharmacologically active substances in cosmetic products is here presented and a new methodology developed for this type of analysis is proposed. Cosmetic products released on the market should not cause damage to human health when applied under normal conditions of use. With respect to this condition, the definition of "cosmetic product" is reported according to the international and region specific regulatory requirements for the manufacturing and marketing and that of non-allowed substances with particular reference to pharmacologically active substances, with therapeutic indication. The existing methodologies for the analysis of non-allowed products in cosmetic preparations generally include some sort of sample treatment and/or extraction before the analytical step, which always include a separation by liquid chromatography (LC) at ambient temperature followed by detection with ultraviolet spectrophotometric detection or mass spectrometry. A systematic high throughput analysis of non-allowed pharmacologically active substances is finally proposed together with the results of such an analysis performed in the "Drug abuse and doping" Unit of the National Institute of Health in Rome. PMID:21353431

  17. Antioxidant activity of diphenylpropionamide derivatives: synthesis, biological evaluation and computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Urbani, Paolo; Ramunno, Anna; Filosa, Rosanna; Pinto, Aldo; Popolo, Ada; Bianchino, Erminia; Piotto, Stefano; Saturnino, Carmela; De Prisco, Rocco; Nicolaus, Barbara; Tommonaro, Giuseppina

    2008-01-01

    We report the synthesis, antioxidant and antiproliferative activity and a QSAR analysis of synthetic diphenylpropionamide derivatives. Synthesis of these compounds was achieved by direct condensation of 2,2- and 3,3-diphenylpropionic acid and appropriate amines using 1-propylphoshonic acid cyclic anhydride (PPAA) as catalyst. Compound structures were elucidated by NMR analysis and their melting points were measured. The in vitro antioxidant activity of these compounds was tested by evaluating the amount of scavenged ABTS radical and estimating ROS and NO production in LPS stimulated J774.A1 macrophages. All compounds were tested for their effect on viability of cells and results demonstrated that they are not toxic towards the cell lines used. The cytotoxic activity of all compounds was evaluated by a Brine Shrimp Test. PMID:18463576

  18. Bioelectrical impedance analysis as a laboratory activity: At the interface of physics and the body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylott, Elliot; Kutschera, Ellynne; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    We present a novel laboratory activity on RC circuits aimed at introductory physics students in life-science majors. The activity teaches principles of RC circuits by connecting ac-circuit concepts to bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) using a custom-designed educational BIA device. The activity shows how a BIA device works and how current, voltage, and impedance measurements relate to bioelectrical characteristics of the human body. From this, useful observations can be made including body water, fat-free mass, and body fat percentage. The laboratory is engaging to pre-health and life-science students, as well as engineering students who are given the opportunity to observe electrical components and construction of a commonly used biomedical device. Electrical concepts investigated include alternating current, electrical potential, resistance, capacitance, impedance, frequency, phase shift, device design, and the use of such topics in biomedical analysis.

  19. Aeroelastic Analysis of the NASA/ARMY/MIT Active Twist Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Mirick, Paul H.; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Shin, Sangloon

    1999-01-01

    Aeroelastic modeling procedures used in the design of a piezoelectric controllable twist helicopter rotor wind tunnel model are described. Two aeroelastic analysis methods developed for active twist rotor studies, and used in the design of the model blade, are described in this paper. The first procedure uses a simple flap-torsion dynamic representation of the active twist blade, and is intended for rapid and efficient control law and design optimization studies. The second technique employs a commercially available comprehensive rotor analysis package, and is used for more detailed analytical studies. Analytical predictions of hovering flight twist actuation frequency responses are presented for both techniques. Forward flight fixed system nP vibration suppression capabilities of the model active twist rotor system are also presented. Frequency responses predicted using both analytical procedures agree qualitatively for all design cases considered, with best correlation for cases where uniform blade properties are assumed.

  20. Pore size distribution analysis of activated carbons prepared from coconut shell using methane adsorption data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadpour, A.; Okhovat, A.; Darabi Mahboub, M. J.

    2013-06-01

    The application of Stoeckli theory to determine pore size distribution (PSD) of activated carbons using high pressure methane adsorption data is explored. Coconut shell was used as a raw material for the preparation of 16 different activated carbon samples. Four samples with higher methane adsorption were selected and nitrogen adsorption on these adsorbents was also investigated. Some differences are found between the PSD obtained from the analysis of nitrogen adsorption isotherms and their PSD resulting from the same analysis using methane adsorption data. It is suggested that these differences may arise from the specific interactions between nitrogen molecules and activated carbon surfaces; therefore caution is required in the interpretation of PSD obtained from the nitrogen isotherm data.

  1. Device and software used to carry out Cyclic Neutron Activation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-García, M. P.; Rey-Ronco, M. A.; Alonso-Sánchez, T.

    2014-11-01

    This paper discusses the device and software used to carry out Cyclic Neutron Activation Analysis (CNAA). The aim of this investigation is defining through this device the fluorite content present on different samples from fluorspar concentration plant through the DGNAA (Delayed Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis) method. This device is made of americium-beryllium neutron source, NaI (2"×2") and BGO (2"×2") gamma rays detectors, multichannel and an automatic mechanism which moves the samples from activation and reading position. This mechanism is controlled by a software which allows moving the samples precisely and in a safe way (~ms), which it is very useful when the radioactive isotopes have to be detected with a half time less than 8s.

  2. Assessment of the site of ventricular activation by Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool studies

    SciTech Connect

    Links, J.M.; Raichlen, J.S.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Reid, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The authors studied the use of first-harmonic Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool images to assess the site of ventricular activation in a group of 12 patients undergoing electrophysiologic pacing studies. They acquired gated blood-pool studies during pacing at up to four sites at each of two different rates. A total of 50 studies were made. At a pacing rate of 100 beats/min, when the pacing electrode was the right-ventricular outflow tract, 7/8; at the anterolateral left-ventricular wall, 4/4. When the Fourier activation site was at the right-ventricular apex, 9/9 times the pacing electrode was there; at the right-ventricular outflow tract, 7/10; in the left ventricle, 4/4. Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool studies can help identify the site of ventricular activation but is not sufficiently accurate to fully replace endocardial mapping.

  3. Principal component analysis of Birkeland currents determined by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Principal component analysis is performed on Birkeland or field-aligned current (FAC) measurements from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment. Principal component analysis (PCA) identifies the patterns in the FACs that respond coherently to different aspects of geomagnetic activity. The regions 1 and 2 current system is shown to be the most reproducible feature of the currents, followed by cusp currents associated with magnetic tension forces on newly reconnected field lines. The cusp currents are strongly modulated by season, indicating that their strength is regulated by the ionospheric conductance at the foot of the field lines. PCA does not identify a pattern that is clearly characteristic of a substorm current wedge. Rather, a superposed epoch analysis of the currents associated with substorms demonstrates that there is not a single mode of response, but a complicated and subtle mixture of different patterns.

  4. Development and performance test of the analysis software for the CRIB active target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pilsoo; Lee, Chun Sik; Moon, Jun Young; Chae, Kyung Yuk; Cha, Soo Mi; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Nakao, Taro; Kahl, David M.; Kubono, Shigeru; Cherubini, Silvio; Hayakawa, Seiya; Signorini, Cosimo

    2015-02-01

    Software for genuinely event-by-event analysis and event reconstruction of data obtained by using an active target has been developed in the graphical user interface under the CERN ROOT framework. The primary motivation for developing the software was to provide physicists who perform experiments using an active target a more user-friendly environment for the purpose of investigating the performance of detection systems and obtaining ideas about physics from a large amount of experimental data. To test the performance of the software, we analyzed experimental data from a 16N radioactive ion beam experiment for α-decay measurements. As a result of the analysis, we observed the Bragg curve and measured the range of the 16N RI beam in the detector. Data were calibrated against the calculation after comparing the Bragg curve to the one obtained from an energy loss calculation in P-10 gas. We present a detailed description of the analysis software and its test results.

  5. Cognitive tasks in information analysis: Use of event dwell time to characterize component activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sanquist, Thomas F.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Slavich, Antoinette L.; Littlefield, Rik J.; Littlefield, Janis S.; Cowley, Paula J.

    2004-09-28

    Technology-based enhancement of information analysis requires a detailed understanding of the cognitive tasks involved in the process. The information search and report production tasks of the information analysis process were investigated through evaluation of time-stamped workstation data gathered with custom software. Model tasks simulated the search and production activities, and a sample of actual analyst data were also evaluated. Task event durations were calculated on the basis of millisecond-level time stamps, and distributions were plotted for analysis. The data indicate that task event time shows a cyclic pattern of variation, with shorter event durations (< 2 sec) reflecting information search and filtering, and longer event durations (> 10 sec) reflecting information evaluation. Application of cognitive principles to the interpretation of task event time data provides a basis for developing “cognitive signatures” of complex activities, and can facilitate the development of technology aids for information intensive tasks.

  6. Gaussian-Process Factor Analysis for Low-Dimensional Single-Trial Analysis of Neural Population Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Byron M.; Cunningham, John P.; Santhanam, Gopal; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.; Sahani, Maneesh

    2009-01-01

    We consider the problem of extracting smooth, low-dimensional neural trajectories that summarize the activity recorded simultaneously from many neurons on individual experimental trials. Beyond the benefit of visualizing the high-dimensional, noisy spiking activity in a compact form, such trajectories can offer insight into the dynamics of the neural circuitry underlying the recorded activity. Current methods for extracting neural trajectories involve a two-stage process: the spike trains are first smoothed over time, then a static dimensionality-reduction technique is applied. We first describe extensions of the two-stage methods that allow the degree of smoothing to be chosen in a principled way and that account for spiking variability, which may vary both across neurons and across time. We then present a novel method for extracting neural trajectories—Gaussian-process factor analysis (GPFA)—which unifies the smoothing and dimensionality-reduction operations in a common probabilistic framework. We applied these methods to the activity of 61 neurons recorded simultaneously in macaque premotor and motor cortices during reach planning and execution. By adopting a goodness-of-fit metric that measures how well the activity of each neuron can be predicted by all other recorded neurons, we found that the proposed extensions improved the predictive ability of the two-stage methods. The predictive ability was further improved by going to GPFA. From the extracted trajectories, we directly observed a convergence in neural state during motor planning, an effect that was shown indirectly by previous studies. We then show how such methods can be a powerful tool for relating the spiking activity across a neural population to the subject's behavior on a single-trial basis. Finally, to assess how well the proposed methods characterize neural population activity when the underlying time course is known, we performed simulations that revealed that GPFA performed tens of percent

  7. Global analysis of active longitudes of solar X-ray flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Mursula, K.; Usoskin, I.; Wang, H.

    2011-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that various manifestations of solar activity are non-axisymmetric and mainly occur in two preferred longitude ranges, so called active longitudes. We have earlier analyzed the longitudinal occurrence of solar X-ray flares observed by GOES satellites using a specially developed dynamic, differentially rotating coordinate system. In this frame, the longitude distribution shows two persistent preferred longitudes separated by about 180 degrees whose strength alternates in time according to the so called flip-flop phenomenon. Here we make the first global statistical analysis to find the best fitting values for parameters describing the differential rotation of active longitudes of X-ray flares. We find that the new analysis greatly improves the earlier values for the rotation parameters, making them consistent between the three different classes of X-ray flares. The improved parameters also yield a systematically higher level of non-axisymmetry for the longitudinal distribution, thus increasing the statistical significance of the existence of active longitudes. Accordingly, a significant amount of X-ray flares of different classes are produced by the same two active longitudes. We also find a significant difference between the rotation rates in the two solar hemispheres, with active longitudes rotating faster than the Carrington rate in the northern hemisphere and slower than the Carrington rate in the southern hemisphere.

  8. Determination of phosphate in natural waters by activation analysis of tungstophosphoric acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Herbert E.; Hahn, Richard B.

    1969-01-01

    Activation analysis may be used to determine quantitatively traces of phosphate in natural waters. Methods based on the reaction 31P(n,γ)32P are subject to interference by sulfur and chlorine which give rise to 32P through n,p and n,α reactions. If the ratio of phosphorus to sulfur or chlorine is small, as it is in most natural waters, accurate analyses by these methods are difficult to achieve. In the activation analysis method, molybdate and tungstate ions are added to samples containing phosphate ion to form tungstomolybdophosphoric acid. The complex is extracted with 2,6-dimethyl-4-heptanone. After activation of an aliquot of the organic phase for 1 hour at a flux of 1013 neutrons per cm2, per second, the gamma spectrum is essentially that of tungsten-187. The induced activity is proportional to the concentration of phosphate in the sample. A test of the method showed it to give accurate results at concentrations of 4 to at least 200 p.p.b. of phosphorus when an aliquot of 100 μl. was activated. By suitable reagent purification, counting for longer times, and activation of larger aliquots, the detection limit could be lowered several hundredfold.

  9. Frequency analysis of a semi-active suspension with magneto-rheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronic, Florin; Mihai, Ioan; Suciu, Cornel; Beniuga, Marius

    2015-02-01

    Suspension systems for motor vehicles are constantly evolving in order to ensure vehicle stability and traffic safety under all driving conditions. The present work aims to highlight the influence factors in the case of a quarter car model for semi-active suspensions. The functions that must be met by such suspension systems are first presented. Mathematical models for passive systems are first illustrated and then customized for the semi-active case. A simulation diagram was conceived for Matlab Simulink. The obtained simulation results allow conducting a frequency analysis of the passive and semi-active cases of the quarter car model. Various charts for Passive Suspension Transmissibility and for the Effect of Damping on Vertical Acceleration Response were obtained for both passive and semi-active situations. Analysis of obtained results allowed evaluating of the suspension systems behavior and their frequency dependence. Significant differences were found between the behaviors of passive and semi-active suspensions. It was found that semi-active suspensions ensure damping in accordance to the chosen control method, and are much more efficient than passive ones.

  10. Online Social Networks That Connect Users to Physical Activity Partners: A Review and Descriptive Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Passarella, Ralph Joseph; Appel, Lawrence J

    2014-01-01

    Background The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have identified a lack of encouragement, support, or companionship from family and friends as a major barrier to physical activity. To overcome this barrier, online social networks are now actively leveraging principles of companion social support in novel ways. Objective The aim was to evaluate the functionality, features, and usability of existing online social networks which seek to increase physical activity and fitness among users by connecting them to physical activity partners, not just online, but also face-to-face. Methods In September 2012, we used 3 major databases to identify the website addresses for relevant online social networks. We conducted a Google search using 8 unique keyword combinations: the common keyword “find” coupled with 1 of 4 prefix terms “health,” “fitness,” “workout,” or “physical” coupled with 1 of 2 stem terms “activity partners” or “activity buddies.” We also searched 2 prominent technology start-up news sites, TechCrunch and Y Combinator, using 2 unique keyword combinations: the common keyword “find” coupled with 1 of 2 stem terms “activity partners” and “activity buddies.” Sites were defined as online social health activity networks if they had the ability to (1) actively find physical activity partners or activities for the user, (2) offer dynamic, real-time tracking or sharing of social activities, and (3) provide virtual profiles to users. We excluded from our analysis sites that were not Web-based, publicly available, in English, or free. Results Of the 360 initial search results, we identified 13 websites that met our complete criteria of an online social health activity network. Features such as physical activity creation (13/13, 100%) and private messaging (12/13, 92%) appeared almost universally among these websites. However, integration with Web 2.0 technologies such as Facebook and Twitter (9/13, 69%) and the option of

  11. Antioxidant activity and analysis of proanthocyanidins from pine (Pinus densiflora) needles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong Soo; Jeon, Min Hee; Hwang, Hyun Jung; Park, Mi Ra; Lee, Sang-Hyeon; Kim, Sung Gu

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the antioxidant activity of pine needle extracts prepared with hot water, ethanol, hexane, hot water-hexane (HWH), and hot water-ethanol (HWE), using the DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical method. The hot water extract possessed superior antioxidant activity than the other extracts. We also compared the antioxidant activity of pine needle extracts through ROS inhibition activity in a cellular system using MC3T3 E-1 cells. The hot water extract exhibited the lowest ROS production. The pattern of HPLC analysis of each extract indicated that the hot water extract contained the highest proanthocyanidin level. The pine needle hot-water extract was then isolated and fractionated with Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography to determine the major contributor to its antioxidant activity. The No.7 and 12 fractions had high antioxidant activities, that is, the highest contents of proanthocyanidins and catechins, respectively. These results indicate that the antioxidant activity of procyanidins from the hot water extract of pine needles is positively related to not only polymeric proanthocyanidins but also to monomeric catechins. Moreover, the antioxidant activity of the pine needle hot water extract was similar to well-known antioxidants, such as vitamin C. This suggests that pine needle proanthocyanidins and catechins might be of interest for use as alternative antioxidants. PMID:21994521

  12. Structural Analysis and Anti-Complement Activity of Polysaccharides from Kjellmaniella crsaaifolia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenjing; Jin, Weihua; Sun, Delin; Zhao, Luyu; Wang, Jing; Duan, Delin; Zhang, Quanbin

    2015-01-01

    Two polysaccharides, named KCA and KCW, were extracted from Kjellmaniella crassifolia using dilute hydrochloric acid and water, respectively. Composition analysis showed that these polysaccharides predominantly consisted of fucose, with galactose, mannose and glucuronic acid as minor components. After degradation and partial desulfation, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was performed, which showed that the polysaccharides consisted of sulfated fucooligosaccharides, sulfated galactofucooligosaccharides and methyl glycosides of mono-sulfated/multi-sulfated fucooligosaccharides. The structures of the oligomeric fragments were further characterized by electrospray ionization collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-CID-MS2 and ESI-CID-MS3). Moreover, the activity of KCA and KCW against the hemolytic activity of both the classical and alternative complement pathways was determined. The activity of KCA was found to be similar to KCW, suggesting that the method of extraction did not influence the activity. In addition, the degraded polysaccharides (DKCA and DKCW) displayed lower activity levels than the crude polysaccharides (KCA and KCW), indicating that molecular weight had an effect on activity. Moreover, the desulfated fractions (ds-DKCA and ds-DKCW) showed less or no activity, which confirmed that sulfate was important for activity. In conclusion, polysaccharides from K. crassifolia may be good candidates for the treatment of diseases involving the complement pathway. PMID:25786064

  13. Meta-analysis of internet-delivered interventions to increase physical activity levels

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Many internet-delivered physical activity behaviour change programs have been developed and evaluated. However, further evidence is required to ascertain the overall effectiveness of such interventions. The objective of the present review was to evaluate the effectiveness of internet-delivered interventions to increase physical activity, whilst also examining the effect of intervention moderators. A systematic search strategy identified relevant studies published in the English-language from Pubmed, Proquest, Scopus, PsychINFO, CINHAL, and Sport Discuss (January 1990 – June 2011). Eligible studies were required to include an internet-delivered intervention, target an adult population, measure and target physical activity as an outcome variable, and include a comparison group that did not receive internet-delivered materials. Studies were coded independently by two investigators. Overall effect sizes were combined based on the fixed effect model. Homogeneity and subsequent exploratory moderator analysis was undertaken. A total of 34 articles were identified for inclusion. The overall mean effect of internet-delivered interventions on physical activity was d = 0.14 (p = 0.00). Fixed-effect analysis revealed significant heterogeneity across studies (Q = 73.75; p = 0.00). Moderating variables such as larger sample size, screening for baseline physical activity levels and the inclusion of educational components significantly increased intervention effectiveness. Results of the meta-analysis support the delivery of internet-delivered interventions in producing positive changes in physical activity, however effect sizes were small. The ability of internet-delivered interventions to produce meaningful change in long-term physical activity remains unclear. PMID:22546283

  14. Complexity analysis of brain activity in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A multiscale entropy analysis.

    PubMed

    Chenxi, Li; Chen, Yanni; Li, Youjun; Wang, Jue; Liu, Tian

    2016-06-01

    The multiscale entropy (MSE) is a novel method for quantifying the intrinsic dynamical complexity of physiological systems over several scales. To evaluate this method as a promising way to explore the neural mechanisms in ADHD, we calculated the MSE in EEG activity during the designed task. EEG data were collected from 13 outpatient boys with a confirmed diagnosis of ADHD and 13 age- and gender-matched normal control children during their doing multi-source interference task (MSIT). We estimated the MSE by calculating the sample entropy values of delta, theta, alpha and beta frequency bands over twenty time scales using coarse-grained procedure. The results showed increased complexity of EEG data in delta and theta frequency bands and decreased complexity in alpha frequency bands in ADHD children. The findings of this study revealed aberrant neural connectivity of kids with ADHD during interference task. The results showed that MSE method may be a new index to identify and understand the neural mechanism of ADHD. PMID:26995277

  15. Dendritic Cell Activation by Glucan Isolated from Umbilicaria Esculenta

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Sook; Kim, Jee Youn; Lee, Hong Kyung; Kim, Moo Sung; Lee, Sang Rin; Kang, Jong Soon; Kim, Hwan Mook; Lee, Kyung-Ae; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2010-01-01

    Background Lichen-derived glucans have been known to stimulate the functions of immune cells. However, immunostimulatory activity of glucan obtained from edible lichen, Umbilicaria esculenta, has not been reported. Thus we evaluated the phenotype and functional maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) following treatment of extracted glucan (PUE). Methods The phenotypic and functional maturation of PUE-treated DCs was assessed by flow cytometric analysis and cytokine production, respectively. PUE-treated DCs was also used for mixed leukocyte reaction to evaluate T cell-priming capacity. Finally we detected the activation of MAPK and NF-κB by immunoblot. Results Phenotypic maturation of DCs was shown by the elevated expressions of CD40, CD80, CD86, and MHC class I/II molecules. Functional activation of DCs was proved by increased cytokine production of IL-12, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-α/β, decreased endocytosis, and enhanced proliferation of allogenic T cells. Polymyxin B, specific inhibitor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), did not affect PUE activity, which suggested that PUE was free of LPS contamination. As a mechanism of action, PUE increased phosphorylation of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPKs, and enhanced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p50/p65 in DCs. Conclusion These results indicate that PUE induced DC maturation via MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:21286379

  16. Comprehensive measurement of respiratory activity in permeabilized cells using extracellular flux analysis

    PubMed Central

    Salabei, Joshua K.; Gibb, Andrew A.; Hill, Bradford G.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular flux (XF) analysis has become a mainstream method to measure bioenergetic function in cells and tissues. While this technique is commonly used to measure energetics in intact cells, we outline here a detailed XF protocol for measuring respiration in permeabilized cells. Cells are permeabilized using saponin, digitonin, or recombinant perfringolysin O (XF PMP reagent) and provided with specific substrates to measure complex I- or II-mediated respiratory activity, Complex III+IV respiratory activity, or Complex IV activity. Medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines or glutamine may also be provided for measuring fatty acid oxidation or glutamine oxidation, respectively. This protocol allows for such measurements using a minimal number of cells compared with other protocols, without the need for mitochondrial isolation. The results are highly reproducible, and mitochondria remain well coupled. Collectively, this protocol provides comprehensive and detailed information regarding mitochondrial activity and efficiency, and, following preparative steps, takes approximately 6 hours to complete. PMID:24457333

  17. Validation of an Active Gear, Flexible Aircraft Take-off and Landing analysis (AGFATL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an analytical investigation using a computer program for active gear, flexible aircraft take off and landing analysis (AGFATL) are compared with experimental data from shaker tests, drop tests, and simulated landing tests to validate the AGFATL computer program. Comparison of experimental and analytical responses for both passive and active gears indicates good agreement for shaker tests and drop tests. For the simulated landing tests, the passive and active gears were influenced by large strut binding friction forces. The inclusion of these undefined forces in the analytical simulations was difficult, and consequently only fair to good agreement was obtained. An assessment of the results from the investigation indicates that the AGFATL computer program is a valid tool for the study and initial design of series hydraulic active control landing gear systems.

  18. The determination of the antiperspirant activity of aluminium-chlorhydrate by digital image-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sauermann, G; Hoppe, U; Kligman, A M

    1992-02-01

    Synopsis The method of Minor to visualize by iodine-starch-reaction the activity of sweat glands was used in combination with image-analysis to quantify sweat-secretion. Aqueous aluminium chlorohydrate solutions (ACH) (1, 2, 4, 8, 16%) were applied twice daily for 6 days to defined areas of the lower volar forearms. After 3 and 6 days of treatment perspiration was induced by thermal stress. The dark blue spots on top of active glands which are formed by iodine-starch-complexes were counted and their projection area was measured by an image analysing system. Increasing concentrations of ACH lower the number of active sweat glands, while the size of the dark spots is not dependent on the concentration of the active ingredient. PMID:19272092

  19. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a statewide media campaign to promote adolescent physical activity.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Michael; Chandlee, Margaret; Abraham, Avron

    2008-10-01

    A cost-effectiveness analysis of a statewide social marketing campaign was performed using a statewide surveillance survey distributed to 6th through 12th graders, media production and placement costs, and 2000 census data. Exposure to all three advertisements had the highest impact on both intent and behavior with 65.6% of the respondents considering becoming more active and 58.3% reporting becoming more active. Average cost of the entire campaign was $4.01 per person to see an ad, $7.35 per person to consider being more active, and $8.87 per person to actually become more active, with billboards yielding the most positive cost-effectiveness. Findings highlight market research as an essential part of social marketing campaigns and the importance of using multiple marketing modalities to enhance cost-effectiveness and impact. PMID:18367641

  20. Significance probability mapping: an aid in the topographic analysis of brain electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Duffy, F H; Bartels, P H; Burchfiel, J L

    1981-05-01

    We illustrate the application of significance probability mapping (SPM) to the analysis of topographic maps of spectral analyzed EEG and visual evoked potential (VEP) activity from patients with brain tumors, boys with dyslexia, and control subjects. When the VEP topographic plots of tumor patients were displayed as number of standard deviations from a reference mean, more subjects were correctly identified than by inspection of the underlying raw data. When topographic plots of EEG alpha activity obtained while listening to speech or music were compared by t statistic to plots of resting alpha activity, regions of cortex presumably activated by speech or music were delineated. DIfferent regions were defined in dyslexic boys and controls. We propose that SPM will prove valuable in the regional localization of normal and abnormal functions in other clinical situations. PMID:6165544