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Sample records for activity kinetic studies

  1. Adsorption studies of molasse's wastewaters on activated carbon: modelling with a new fractal kinetic equation and evaluation of kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Figaro, S; Avril, J P; Brouers, F; Ouensanga, A; Gaspard, S

    2009-01-30

    Adsorption kinetic of molasses wastewaters after anaerobic digestion (MSWD) and melanoidin respectively on activated carbon was studied at different pH. The kinetic parameters could be determined using classical kinetic equations and a recently published fractal kinetic equation. A linear form of this equation can also be used to fit adsorption data. Even with lower correlation coefficients the fractal kinetic equation gives lower normalized standard deviation values than the pseudo-second order model generally used to fit adsorption kinetic data, indicating that the fractal kinetic model is much more accurate for describing the kinetic adsorption data than the pseudo-second order kinetic model.

  2. Antioxidant activity and kinetics studies of eugenol and 6-bromoeugenol.

    PubMed

    Mahboub, Radia; Memmou, Faiza

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we report the antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity of 6-bromoeugenol and eugenol. EC50, the concentration providing 50% inhibition, is calculated and the antioxidant activity index (AAI) is evaluated. The antioxidant activity was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging method. EC50 values of 6-bromoeugenol, ascorbic acid and eugenol were 34.270 μg/mL, 54.888 μg/mL and 130.485 μg/mL, respectively. 6-Bromoeugenol showed higher AAI value (1.122) followed by ascorbic acid (0.700), then by eugenol (0.295). We also investigate the kinetics of DPPH radical scavenging activity of our products to determine the useful parameter TEC50 to evaluate their antiradical efficiency (ARE). Our results have shown high ARE. This study has provided the following ARE ( × 10(-3)) order for the tested antioxidants: ascorbic acid (70.119)>6-bromoeugenol (34.842) > eugenol (21.313). Finally, we classify ascorbic acid and eugenol as fast kinetics reaction (TEC50 8.82 and 11.38 min, respectively) and 6-bromoeugenol as medium kinetics reaction (TEC50 39.24 min).

  3. Adsorption of chromium onto activated alumina: kinetics and thermodynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Marzouk, Ikhlass; Dammak, Lassaad; Hamrouni, Béchir

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the removal of chromium (VI) by adsorption on activated alumina was investigated and the results were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Redushkevich, and Temkin adsorption models at various temperatures. The constants of each model were evaluated depending on temperature. Thermodynamic parameters for the adsorption system were determined at 10, 25 and 40 degrees C. (deltaH degrees = -21.18 kJ x mol(-1); deltaG degrees = -8.75 to -7.43 kJ x mol(-1) and deltaS degrees = -0.043 kJ x K(-1) x mol(-1)). The obtained values showed that chromium (VI) adsorption is a spontaneous and exothermic process. The kinetic process was evaluated by first-order, second-order and Elovich kinetic models.

  4. Study of kinetics of degradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid by acclimated activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhua; Shi, Shuian; Chen, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Activated sludge contains complex microorganisms, which are highly effective biodegrading agents. In this study, the kinetics of biodegradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid (CHCA) by an acclimated aerobic activated sludge were investigated. The results showed that after 180 days of acclimation, the activated sludge could steadily degrade >90% of the CHCA in 120 h. The degradation of CHCA by the acclimated activated sludge could be modeled using a first-order kinetics equation. The equations for the degradation kinetics for different initial CHCA concentrations were also obtained. The kinetics constant, kd, decreased with an increase in the CHCA concentration, indicating that, at high concentrations, CHCA had an inhibiting effect on the microorganisms in the activated sludge. The effects of pH on the degradation kinetics of CHCA were also investigated. The results showed that a pH of 10 afforded the highest degradation rate, indicating that basic conditions significantly promoted the degradation of CHCA. Moreover, it was found that the degradation efficiency for CHCA increased with an increase in temperature and concentration of dissolved oxygen under the experimental conditions.

  5. Kinetic studies of elemental mercury adsorption in activated carbon fixed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Skodras, G; Diamantopoulou, Ir; Pantoleontos, G; Sakellaropoulos, G P

    2008-10-01

    Activated carbons are suitable materials for Hg(0) adsorption in fixed bed operation or in injection process. The fixed bed tests provide good indication of activated carbons effectiveness and service lives, which depend on the rates of Hg(0) adsorption. In order to correlate fixed bed properties and operation conditions, with their adsorptive capacity and saturation time, Hg(0) adsorption tests were realized in a bench-scale unit, consisted of F400 activated carbon fixed bed reactor. Hg(0) adsorption tests were conducted at 50 degrees C, under 0.1 and 0.35 ng/cm(3) Hg(0) initial concentrations and with carbon particle sizes ranging between 75-106 and 150-250 microm. Based on the experimental breakthrough data, kinetic studies were performed to investigate the mechanism of adsorption and the rate controlling steps. Kinetic models evaluated include the Fick's intraparticle diffusion equation, the pseudo-first order model, the pseudo-second order model and Elovich kinetic equation. The obtained experimental results revealed that the increase in particle size resulted in significant decrease of breakthrough time and mercury adsorptive capacity, due to the enhanced internal diffusion limitations and smaller external mass transfer coefficients. Additionally, higher initial mercury concentrations resulted in increased breakthrough time and mercury uptake. From the kinetic studies results it was observed that all the examined models describes efficiently Hg(0) breakthrough curves, from breakpoint up to equilibrium time. The most accurate prediction of the experimental data was achieved by second order model, indicating that the chemisorption rate seems to be the controlling step in the procedure. However, the successful attempt to describe mercury uptake with Fick's diffusion model and the first order kinetic model, reveals that the adsorption mechanism studied was complex and followed both surface adsorption and particle diffusion.

  6. Kinetics studies of d-glucose hydrogenation over activated charcoal supported platinum catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Muthanna J.

    2012-02-01

    The kinetics of the catalytic hydrogenation of d-glucose to produce d-sorbitol was studied in a three-phase laboratory scale reactor. The hydrogenation reactions were performed on activated charcoal supported platinum catalyst in the temperature range 25-65°C and in a constant pressure of 1 atm. The kinetic data were modeled by zero, first and second-order reaction equations. In the operating regimes studied, the results show that the hydrogenation reaction was of a first order with respect to d-glucose concentration. Also the activation energy of the reaction was determined, and found to be 12.33 kJ mole-1. A set of experiment was carried out to test the deactivation of the catalyst, and the results show that the deactivation is slow with the ability of using the catalyst for several times with a small decrease in product yield.

  7. Kinetics and thermodynamics studies of silver ions adsorption onto coconut shell activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Silva-Medeiros, Flávia V; Consolin-Filho, Nelson; Xavier de Lima, Mateus; Bazzo, Fernando Previato; Barros, Maria Angélica S D; Bergamasco, Rosângela; Tavares, Célia R G

    2016-12-01

    The presence of silver in the natural water environment has been of great concern because of its toxicity, especially when it is in the free ion form (Ag(+)). This paper aims to study the adsorption kinetics of silver ions from an aqueous solution onto coconut shell activated carbon using batch methods. Batch kinetic data were fitted to the first-order model and the pseudo-second-order model, and this last equation fits correctly the experimental data. Equilibrium experiments were carried out at 30°C, 40°C, and 50°C. The adsorption isotherms were reasonably fit using Langmuir model, and the adsorption process was slightly influenced by changes in temperature. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH°, ΔG°, and ΔS°) were determined. The adsorption process seems to be non-favorable, exothermic, and have an increase in the orderness.

  8. Understanding long-time vacancy aggregation in iron: A kinetic activation-relaxation technique study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brommer, Peter; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2014-10-01

    Vacancy diffusion and clustering processes in body-centered-cubic (bcc) Fe are studied using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities. For monovacancies and divacancies, k-ART recovers previously published results while clustering in a 50-vacancy simulation box agrees with experimental estimates. Applying k-ART to the study of clustering pathways for systems containing from one to six vacancies, we find a rich set of diffusion mechanisms. In particular, we show that the path followed to reach a hexavacancy cluster influences greatly the associated mean-square displacement. Aggregation in a 50-vacancy box also shows a notable dispersion in relaxation time associated with effective barriers varying from 0.84 to 1.1 eV depending on the exact pathway selected. We isolate the effects of long-range elastic interactions between defects by comparing to simulations where those effects are deliberately suppressed. This allows us to demonstrate that in bcc Fe, suppressing long-range interactions mainly influences kinetics in the first 0.3 ms, slowing down quick energy release cascades seen more frequently in full simulations, whereas long-term behavior and final state are not significantly affected.

  9. Kinetic study of solid waste pyrolysis using distributed activation energy model.

    PubMed

    Bhavanam, Anjireddy; Sastry, R C

    2015-02-01

    The pyrolysis characteristics of municipal solid waste, agricultural residues such as ground nut shell, cotton husk and their blends are investigated using non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) with in a temperature range of 30-900 °C at different heating rates of 10 °C, 30 °C and 50 °C/min in inert atmosphere. From the thermograms obtained from TGA, it is observed that the maximum rate of degradation occurred in the second stage of the pyrolysis process for all the solid wastes. The distributed activation energy model (DAEM) is used to study the pyrolysis kinetics of the solid wastes. The kinetic parameters E (activation energy), k0 (frequency factor) are calculated from this model. It is found that the range of activation energies for agricultural residues are lower than the municipal solid waste. The activation energies for the municipal solid waste pyrolysis process drastically decreased with addition of agricultural residues. The proposed DAEM is successfully validated with TGA experimental data.

  10. Adsorption of methylene blue onto bamboo-based activated carbon: kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Hameed, B H; Din, A T M; Ahmad, A L

    2007-03-22

    Bamboo, an abundant and inexpensive natural resource in Malaysia was used to prepare activated carbon by physiochemical activation with potassium hydroxide (KOH) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) as the activating agents at 850 degrees C for 2h. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of methylene blue dye on such carbon were then examined at 30 degrees C. Adsorption isotherm of the methylene blue (MB) on the activated carbon was determined and correlated with common isotherm equations. The equilibrium data for methylene blue adsorption well fitted to the Langmuir equation, with maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 454.2mg/g. Two simplified kinetic models including pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equation were selected to follow the adsorption processes. The adsorption of methylene blue could be best described by the pseudo-second-order equation. The kinetic parameters of this best-fit model were calculated and discussed.

  11. Isotherm and kinetics study for acrylic acid removal using powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Prasad, B; Mishra, I M

    2010-04-15

    The potential of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for the adsorption of acrylic acid (AA) from aqueous solution was studied at the initial concentration (C(0)) in the range of 50-500 mg/l over the temperature range of 303-348 K. The equilibrium adsorption studies were carried out to evaluate the effect of adsorbent dosage and contact time, change in pH by adding adsorbents and the initial concentration. Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson (R-P) equilibrium isotherm models were tested to represent the data. Error functions were used to test their validity to fit of the adsorption data with the isotherm and kinetic models. The Freundlich isotherm equation is found to best represent the equilibrium separation data in the temperature range of 303-348 K. The maximum adsorption capacity of AA onto PAC was obtained as q(m)=36.23 mg/g with an optimum PAC dosage w=20 g/l at 303 K for C(0)=100 mg/l. The pseudo-second-order kinetics is found to represent the experimental AA-PAC data. The negative value of DeltaG(ad)(o) (-16.60 to -18.18 kJ/mol K) indicate the feasibility and spontaneity of the adsorption process.

  12. Kinetics and Mechanism of Ultrasonic Activation of Persulfate: An in Situ EPR Spin Trapping Study.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zongsu; Villamena, Frederick A; Weavers, Linda K

    2017-03-21

    Ultrasound (US) was shown to activate persulfate (PS) providing an alternative activation method to base or heat as an in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) method. The kinetics and mechanism of ultrasonic activation of PS were examined in aqueous solution using an in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping technique and radical trapping with probe compounds. Using the spin trap, 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO), hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) and sulfate radical anion (SO4(•-)) were measured from ultrasonic activation of persulfate (US-PS). The yield of (•)OH was up to 1 order of magnitude greater than that of SO4(•-). The comparatively high (•)OH yield was attributed to the hydrolysis of SO4(•-) in the warm interfacial region of cavitation bubbles formed from US. Using steady-state approximations, the dissociation rate of PS in cavitating bubble systems was determined to be 3 orders of magnitude greater than control experiments without sonication at ambient temperature. From calculations of the interfacial volume surrounding cavitation bubbles and using the Arrhenius equation, an effective mean temperature of 340 K at the bubble-water interface was estimated. Comparative studies using the probe compounds tert-butyl alcohol and nitrobenzene verified the bubble-water interface as the location for PS activation by high temperature with (•)OH contributing a minor role in activating PS to SO4(•-). The mechanisms unveiled in this study provide a basis for optimizing US-PS as an ISCO technology.

  13. Peroxydisulfate activation by [RuII(tpy)(pic)(H2O)]+. Kinetic, mechanistic and anti-microbial activity studies.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Debabrata; Banerjee, Priyabrata; Bose, Jagadeesh C K; Mukhopadhyay, Sudit

    2012-03-07

    The oxidation of [Ru(II)(tpy)(pic)H(2)O](+) (tpy = 2,2',6',2''-terpyridine; pic(-) = picolinate) by peroxidisulfate (S(2)O(8)(2-)) as precursor oxidant has been investigated kinetically by UV-VIS, IR and EPR spectroscopy. The overall oxidation of Ru(II)- to Ru(IV)-species takes place in a consecutive manner involving oxidation of [Ru(II)(tpy)(pic)H(2)O](+) to [Ru(III)(tpy)(pic)(OH)](+), and its further oxidation of to the ultimate product [Ru(IV)(tpy)(pic)(O)](+) complex. The time course of the reaction was followed as a function of [S(2)O(8)(2-)], ionic strength (I) and temperature. Kinetic data and activation parameters are interpreted in terms of an outer-sphere electron transfer mechanism. Anti-microbial activity of Ru(II)(tpy)(pic)H(2)O](+) complex by inhibiting the growth of Escherichia coli DH5α in presence of peroxydisulfate has been explored, and the results of the biological studies have been discussed in terms of the [Ru(IV)(tpy)(pic)(O)](+) mediated cleavage of chromosomal DNA of the bacteria.

  14. Adsorption kinetic and equilibrium study for removal of mercuric chloride by CuCl2-impregnated activated carbon sorbent.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Liu, Zhouyang; Lee, Joo-Youp

    2013-05-15

    The intrinsic adsorption kinetics of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) was studied for raw, 4% and 10% CuCl2-impregnated activated carbon (CuCl2-AC) sorbents in a fixed-bed system. An HgCl2 adsorption kinetic model was developed for the AC sorbents by taking into account the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium, and internal and external mass transfer. The adsorption kinetic constants determined from the comparisons between the simulation and experimental results were 0.2, 0.3, and 0.5m(3)/(gs) for DARCO-HG, 4%(wt), and 10%(wt) CuCl2-AC sorbents, respectively, at 140 °C. CuCl2 loading was found to slightly increase the adsorption kinetic constant or at least not to decrease it. The HgCl2 equilibrium adsorption data based on the Langmuir isotherm show that high CuCl2 loading can result in high binding energy of the HgCl2 adsorption onto the carbon surface. The adsorption equilibrium constant was found to increase by ~10 times when CuCl2 loading varied from 0 to 10%(wt), which led to a decrease in the desorption kinetic constant (k2) by ~10 times and subsequently the desorption rate by ~50 times. Intraparticle pore diffusion considered in the model showed good accuracy, allowing for the determination of intrinsic HgCl2 adsorption kinetics.

  15. Different antibacterial activity of novel theophylline-based ionic liquids - Growth kinetic and cytotoxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Andrzej; Ławniczak, Łukasz; Cłapa, Tomasz; Narożna, Dorota; Selwet, Marek; Pęziak, Daria; Markiewicz, Bartosz; Chrzanowski, Łukasz

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate novel theophylline-based ionic liquids and their cytotoxic effects towards model Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli, respectively). Growth kinetics, respiratory rates and dehydrogenase activities were studied in the presence of ionic liquids at concentrations ranging from 10 to 1000mg/L. Additionally, the influence of ionic liquids on bacterial cells associated with specific interactions based on the structure of cell wall was evaluated. This effect was assessed by viability tests and scanning electron microscope observations. The obtained results confirmed that ionic liquids exhibit different levels of toxicity in relation to Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Those effects are associated with the chemical structure of the cationic species of the ionic liquids and their critical micelle concentration value. It was established that the presence of an alkyl or allyl group increased the toxicity, whereas the presence of an aryl group in the cation decreased the toxic effect of ILs. Results presented in this study also revealed unexpected effects of self-aggregation of E. coli cells. Overall, it was established that the studied ILs exhibited higher toxicity towards Gram-positive bacteria due to different interactions between the ILs and the cell membranes. These findings may be of importance for the design of ILs with targeted antimicrobial properties.

  16. Adsorption of cellulase Aspergillus niger on a commercial activated carbon: kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Fatima Boukraa-Oulad; Kaddour, Samia; Sadoun, Tahar

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption kinetics of cellulase Aspergillus niger on a commercial activated carbon has been performed using a batch-adsorption technique. The effect of various experimental parameters such as initial enzyme concentration, contact time and temperature were investigated. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models were used to describe the kinetic data which shows that the adsorption of the enzyme followed the pseudo-second-order rate expression and the rate constants were evaluated. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms, and the isotherm constants were determined. It was found that Langmuir model was more suitable for our data. The activation energy of adsorption was also evaluated for the adsorption of enzyme onto activated carbon. It was found 11.37 kJ mol(-1). Thermodynamic parameters Delta G(0), Delta H(0) and DeltaS(0) were calculated, indicating that this process can be spontaneous and endothermic. The adsorption enthalpy and entropy were found 11.12 kJ mol(-1) and 0.084 kJ mol(-1)K(-1), respectively. At 30 degrees C and at pH 4.8, 1g activated carbon adsorbed about 1565 mg of cellulase, with a retention of 70% of the native enzyme activity up to five cycles of repeated batch enzyme reactions.

  17. Active food packaging based on molecularly imprinted polymers: study of the release kinetics of ferulic acid.

    PubMed

    Otero-Pazos, Pablo; Rodríguez-Bernaldo de Quirós, Ana; Sendón, Raquel; Benito-Peña, Elena; González-Vallejo, Victoria; Moreno-Bondi, M Cruz; Angulo, Immaculada; Paseiro-Losada, Perfecto

    2014-11-19

    A novel active packaging based on molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was developed for the controlled release of ferulic acid. The release kinetics of ferulic acid from the active system to food simulants (10, 20, and 50% ethanol (v/v), 3% acetic acid (w/v), and vegetable oil), substitutes (95% ethanol (v/v) and isooctane), and real food samples at different temperatures were studied. The key parameters of the diffusion process were calculated by using a mathematical modeling based on Fick's second law. The ferulic acid release was affected by the temperature as well as the percentage of ethanol of the simulant. The fastest release occurred in 95% ethanol (v/v) at 20 °C. The diffusion coefficients (D) obtained ranged between 1.8 × 10(-11) and 4.2 × 10(-9) cm(2)/s. A very good correlation between experimental and estimated data was obtained, and consequently the model could be used to predict the release of ferulic acid into food simulants and real food samples.

  18. Kinetics and equilibrium adsorption study of p-nitrophenol onto activated carbon derived from walnut peel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Fang; Bai, Song

    2015-01-01

    An original activated carbon prepared from walnut peel, which was activated by zinc chloride, was modified with ammonium hydroxide or sodium hydroxide in order to contrast the adsorption property of the three different activated carbons. The experiment used a static adsorption test for p-nitrophenol. The effects of parameters such as initial concentration, contact time and pH value on amount adsorbed and removal are discussed in depth. The thermodynamic data of adsorption were analyzed by Freundlich and Langmuir models. The kinetic data of adsorption were measured by the pseudo-first-order kinetics and the pseudo-second-order kinetics models. The results indicated that the alkalized carbon samples derived from walnut peel had a better performance than the original activated carbon treated with zinc chloride. It was found that adsorption equilibrium time was 6 h. The maximum removal rate of activated carbon treated with zinc chloride for p-nitrophenol was 87.3% at pH 3,whereas the maximum removal rate of the two modified activated carbon materials was found to be 90.8% (alkalized with ammonium hydroxide) and 92.0% (alkalized with sodium hydroxide) at the same pH. The adsorption data of the zinc chloride activated carbon were fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model. The two alkalized activated carbon samples were fitted well to the Freundlich model. The pseudo-second-order dynamics equation provided better explanation of the adsorption dynamics data of the three activated carbons than the pseudo-first-order dynamics equation.

  19. Gating Kinetics of the Cyclic-GMP-Activated Channel of Retinal Rods: Flash Photolysis and Voltage-Jump Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpen, Jeffrey W.; Zimmerman, Anita L.; Stryer, Lubert; Baylor, Denis A.

    1988-02-01

    The gating kinetics of the cGMP-activated cation channel of salamander retinal rods have been studied in excised membrane patches. Relaxations in patch current were observed after two kinds of perturbation: (i) fast jumps of cGMP concentration, generated by laser flash photolysis of a cGMP ester (``caged'' cGMP), and (ii) membrane voltage jumps, which perturb activation of the channel by cGMP. In both methods the speed of activation increased with the final cGMP concentration. The results are explained by a simple kinetic model in which activation involves three sequential cGMP binding steps with bimolecular rate constants close to the diffusion-controlled limit; fully liganded channels undergo rapid open-closed transitions. Voltage perturbs activation by changing the rate constant for channel closing, which increases with hyperpolarization. Intramolecular transitions of the fully liganded channel limit the kinetics of activation at high cGMP concentrations (>50 μ M), whereas at physiological cGMP concentrations (<5 μ M), the kinetics of activation are limited by the third cGMP binding step. The channel appears to be optimized for rapid responses to changes in cytoplasmic cGMP concentration.

  20. Adsorption of leather dye onto activated carbon prepared from bottle gourd: equilibrium, kinetic and mechanism studies.

    PubMed

    Foletto, Edson Luiz; Weber, Caroline Trevisan; Paz, Diego Silva; Mazutti, Marcio Antonio; Meili, Lucas; Bassaco, Mariana Moro; Collazzo, Gabriela Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Activated carbon prepared from bottle gourd has been used as adsorbent for removal of leather dye (Direct Black 38) from aqueous solution. The activated carbon obtained showed a mesoporous texture, with surface area of 556.16 m(2) g(-1), and a surface free of organic functional groups. The initial dye concentration, contact time and pH significantly influenced the adsorption capacity. In the acid region (pH 2.5) the adsorption of dye was more favorable. The adsorption equilibrium was attained after 60 min. Equilibrium data were analyzed by the Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich and Temkin isotherm models. The equilibrium data were best described by the Langmuir isotherm, with maximum adsorption capacity of 94.9 mg g(-1). Adsorption kinetic data were fitted using the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion models. The adsorption kinetic was best described by the second-order kinetic equation. The adsorption process was controlled by both external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion. Activated carbon prepared from bottle gourd was shown to be a promising material for adsorption of Direct Black 38 from aqueous solution.

  1. Degradation of diclofenac by UV-activated persulfate process: Kinetic studies, degradation pathways and toxicity assessments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xian; Shao, Yisheng; Gao, Naiyun; Chen, Juxiang; Zhang, Yansen; Xiang, Huiming; Guo, Youluo

    2017-03-21

    Diclofenac (DCF) is the frequently detected non-steroidal pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. In this study, the degradation of DCF was evaluated by UV-254nm activated persulfate (UV/PS). The degradation of DCF followed the pseudo first-order kinetics pattern. The degradation rate constant (kobs) was accelerated by UV/PS compared to UV alone and PS alone. Increasing the initial PS dosage or solution pH significantly enhanced the degradation efficiency. Presence of various natural water constituents had different effects on DCF degradation, with an enhancement or inhibition in the presence of inorganic anions (HCO3(-) or Cl(-)) and a significant inhibition in the presence of NOM. In addition, preliminary degradation mechanisms and major products were elucidated using LC-MS/MS. Hydroxylation, decarbonylation, ring-opening and cyclation reaction involving the attack of SO4(•)(-) or other substances, were the main degradation mechanism. TOC analyzer and Microtox bioassay were employed to evaluate the mineralization and cytotoxicity of solutions treated by UV/PS at different times, respectively. Limited elimination of TOC (32%) was observed during the mineralization of DCF. More toxic degradation products and their related intermediate species were formed, and the UV/PS process was suitable for removing the toxicity. Of note, longer degradation time may be considered for the final toxicity removal.

  2. Kinetic studies of the liquid-phase adsorption of a reactive dye onto activated lignite

    SciTech Connect

    Petrolekas, P.D.; Maggenakis, G.

    2007-02-14

    The kinetics of batch adsorption of a commercial reactive dye onto activated lignite has been investigated at temperatures of 26, 40, and 55{sup o}C, using aqueous solutions with initial dye concentrations in the range of 15-60 mg/L. An empirical single parameter relationship of the adsorbent loading versus the square root of contact time was proposed, which was determined to provide a very good description of the batch adsorption transients up to equilibrium. The data were also examined by means of the Elovich equation. The effect of the temperature and the initial dye concentration on the adsorption kinetics was analyzed, and the results were discussed by considering that intraparticle diffusion is the dominant mechanism.

  3. Application of the distributed activation energy model to the kinetic study of pyrolysis of the fresh water algae Chlorococcum humicola.

    PubMed

    Kirtania, Kawnish; Bhattacharya, Sankar

    2012-03-01

    Apart from capturing carbon dioxide, fresh water algae can be used to produce biofuel. To assess the energy potential of Chlorococcum humicola, the alga's pyrolytic behavior was studied at heating rates of 5-20K/min in a thermobalance. To model the weight loss characteristics, an algorithm was developed based on the distributed activation energy model and applied to experimental data to extract the kinetics of the decomposition process. When the kinetic parameters estimated by this method were applied to another set of experimental data which were not used to estimate the parameters, the model was capable of predicting the pyrolysis behavior, in the new set of data with a R(2) value of 0.999479. The slow weight loss, that took place at the end of the pyrolysis process, was also accounted for by the proposed algorithm which is capable of predicting the pyrolysis kinetics of C. humicola at different heating rates.

  4. Adsorption of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution by native and activated bentonite: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Kul, Ali Riza; Koyuncu, Hülya

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of Pb(II) ions on native (NB) and acid activated (AAB) bentonites were examined. The specific surface areas, pore size and pore-size distributions of the samples were fully characterized. The adsorption efficiency of Pb(II) onto the NB and AAB was increased with increasing temperature. The kinetics of adsorption of Pb(II) ions was discussed using three kinetic models, the pseudo-first-order, the pseudo-second-order and the intra-particle diffusion model. The experimental data fitted very well the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The initial sorption rate and the activation energy were also calculated. The activation energy of the sorption was calculated as 16.51 and 13.66 kJ mol(-1) for NB and AAB, respectively. Experimental results were also analysed by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Redushkevich (D-R) isotherm equations at different temperatures. R(L) separation factor for Langmuir and the n value for Freundlich isotherm show that Pb(II) ions are favorably adsorbed by NB and AAB. Thermodynamic quantities such as Gibbs free energy (DeltaG), the enthalpy (DeltaH) and the entropy change of sorption (DeltaS) were determined as about -5.06, 10.29 and 0.017 kJ mol(-1) K(-1), respectively for AAB. It was shown that the sorption processes were an endothermic reactions, controlled by physical mechanisms and spontaneously.

  5. Polymeric brushes as functional templates for immobilizing ribonuclease A: study of binding kinetics and activity.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Sean P; Liu, Xiaosong; Mandel, Ian C; Himpsel, Franz J; Gopalan, Padma

    2008-02-05

    The ability to immobilize proteins with high binding capacities on surfaces while maintaining their activity is critical for protein microarrays and other biotechnological applications. We employed poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) brushes as templates to immobilize ribonuclease A (RNase A), which is commonly used to remove RNA from plasmid DNA preparations. The brushes are grown by surface-anchored atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiators. RNase A was immobilized by both covalent esterification and a high binding capacity metal-ion complexation method to PAA brushes. The polymer brushes immobilized 30 times more enzyme compared to self-assembled monolayers. As the thickness of the brush increases, the surface density of the RNase A increases monotonically. The immobilization was investigated by ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). The activity of the immobilized RNase A was determined using UV absorbance. As much as 11.0 microg/cm(2) of RNase A was bound to PAA brushes by metal-ion complexation compared to 5.8 microg/cm(2) by covalent immobilization which is 30 and 16 times the estimated mass bound in a monolayer. The calculated diffusion coefficient D was 0.63 x 10(-14) cm(2)/s for metal-ion complexation and 0.71 x 10(-14) cm(2)/s for covalent immobilization. Similar values of D indicate that the binding kinetics is similar, but the thermodynamic equilibrium coverage varies with the binding chemistry. Immobilization kinetics and thermodynamics were characterized by ellipsometry for both methods. A maximum relative activity of 0.70-0.80 was reached between five and nine monolayers of the immobilized enzyme. However, the relative activity for covalent immobilization was greater than that of metal-ion complexation. Covalent esterification resulted in similar temperature dependence as free enzyme, whereas metal-ion complexation showed no

  6. Kinetic studies on the adsorption of methylene blue onto vegetal fiber activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherifi, Hakima; Fatiha, Bentahar; Salah, Hanini

    2013-10-01

    The vegetable sponge of cylindrical loofa (CL), a natural product which grows in the north of Algeria, was used to prepare activated carbons. Two activated carbons, AC1 and AC2, by two physiochemical activation methods to be used for methylene blue removal from wastewater. The surface structure of AC1, AC2 and CL were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Adsorption isotherm of methylene blue onto the prepared activated carbons was determined by batch tests. The effects of various parameters such as contact time, initial concentration, pH, temperature, adsorbent dose and granulometry were investigated, at agitation rate 150 rpm. The results showed that the equilibrium uptake increased with increasing initial MB concentration. The maximum % removal of MB obtained was 99% at 50 °C for AC1 and 82% at 30 °C for AC2. The increase in initial pH in the ranges of 2-10 increases the yields removal of MB on AC2. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models were applied to test the experimental data. The latter provided the best correlation of the experimental data compared to the pseudo-first-order model.

  7. [Adsorption kinetic and thermodynamic studies of lead onto activated carbons from cotton stalk].

    PubMed

    Li, Kun-quan; Zheng, Zheng; Jiang, Jian-chun; Zhang, Ji-biao

    2010-05-01

    Low-cost high surface area microporous carbons were prepared from cotton stalk and cotton stalk fiber by H3PO4 activation. The adsorption of lead ions on the carbons was investigated by conducting a series of batch adsorption experiments. The influence of solution pH value, contact time and temperature was investigated. The adsorption kinetics, thermodynamic behavior and mechanism were also discussed. The surface area and pore structure of the activated carbons were analyzed by BET equation, BJH method and H-K method according to the data from nitrogen adsorption at 77K. Boehm titration, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), the point of zero charge (pH(PZC)) measurement and elemental analysis were used to characterize the surface properties. The results show that the carbons from cotton stalk and cotton stalk fiber have high surface area of 1570 and 1731 m2 x g(-1), and high content of oxygen-containing functional groups of 1.43 and 0.83 mmol x g(-1). The adsorption experiments show that the carbons have high adsorption capacity for lead, and the maximum adsorption equilibrium amount was found to be 120 mg x g(-1). The adsorption amount increased with contact time, and almost 80% of the adsorption occurred in the first 5 min. The pseudo-second-order model describes the adsorption kinetics most effectively. The Freundlich isotherm was found to the best explanation for experimental data. The negative change in free energy (delta G0) and positive change in enthalpy (delta H0) indicate that the adsorption is a spontaneous and endothermic process, and the adsorption of lead ions onto the carbons might be involved in an ion-exchange mechanism.

  8. An enzyme kinetics study of the pH dependence of chloride activation of oxygen evolution in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Baranov, Sergei; Haddy, Alice

    2017-03-01

    Oxygen evolution by photosystem II (PSII) involves activation by Cl(-) ion, which is regulated by extrinsic subunits PsbQ and PsbP. In this study, the kinetics of chloride activation of oxygen evolution was studied in preparations of PSII depleted of the PsbQ and PsbP subunits (NaCl-washed and Na2SO4/pH 7.5-treated) over a pH range from 5.3 to 8.0. At low pH, activation by chloride was followed by inhibition at chloride concentrations >100 mM, whereas at high pH activation continued as the chloride concentration increased above 100 mM. Both activation and inhibition were more pronounced at lower pH, indicating that Cl(-) binding depended on protonation events in each case. The simplest kinetic model that could account for the complete data set included binding of Cl(-) at two sites, one for activation and one for inhibition, and four protonation steps. The intrinsic (pH-independent) dissociation constant for Cl(-) activation, K S, was found to be 0.9 ± 0.2 mM for both preparations, and three of the four pK as were determined, with the fourth falling below the pH range studied. The intrinsic inhibition constant, K I, was found to be 64 ± 2 and 103 ± 7 mM for the NaCl-washed and Na2SO4/pH7.5-treated preparations, respectively, and is considered in terms of the conditions likely to be present in the thylakoid lumen. This enzyme kinetics analysis provides a more complete characterization of chloride and pH dependence of O2 evolution activity than has been previously presented.

  9. Kinetic study of an enzymic cycling system coupled to an enzymic step: determination of alkaline phosphatase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Valero, E; Varón, R; García-Carmona, F

    1995-01-01

    A kinetic study is made of a system consisting of a specific enzymic cycling assay coupled to an enzymic reaction. A kinetic analysis of this system is presented, and the accumulation of chromophore involved in the cycle is seen to be parabolic, i.e. the rate of the reaction increases continuously with constant acceleration. The system is illustrated by the measurement of alkaline phosphatase activity using beta-NADP+ as substrate. The enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase and diaphorase are used to cycle beta-NAD+ in the presence of ethanol and p-Iodonitrotetrazolium Violet. During each turn of the cycle, one molecule of the tetrazolium salt is reduced to an intensely coloured formazan. A simple procedure for evaluating the kinetic parameters involved in the system and for optimizing this cycling assay is described. The method is applicable to the measurement of any enzyme, and its amplification capacity as well as the simplicity of determining kinetic parameters enable it to be employed in enzyme immunoassays to increase the magnitude of the measured response. PMID:7619054

  10. Polarized electric field effects on the regulation of succinate dehydrogenase activity in amphibian muscle and liver: kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Subrahamanyam, K; Reddy, G R; Babu, G R; Chetty, C S

    1989-04-01

    Electropolarity treatment (0.8 V/DC/Cm) was given to the gastrocnemius muscle of Bufo melanostictus every day for 5 min. for 5 days, and kinetic study of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) in muscle and liver was conducted with different effectors - sodium malonate, ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA), calcium chloride (CACl2) and sodium citrate. Of the four modulators tested, the malonate and EDTA inhibited while sodium citrate and CACl2 activated the enzyme. The significance of the modulation in SDH activity to different extents was discussed.

  11. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

    PubMed

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  12. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  13. Hydrolytic activity of vanadate toward serine-containing peptides studied by kinetic experiments and DFT theory.

    PubMed

    Ho, Phuong Hien; Mihaylov, Tzvetan; Pierloot, Kristine; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2012-08-20

    Hydrolysis of dipeptides glycylserine (Gly-Ser), leucylserine (Leu-Ser), histidylserine (His-Ser), glycylalanine (Gly-Ala), and serylglycine (Ser-Gly) was examined in vanadate solutions by means of (1)H, (13)C, and (51)V NMR spectroscopy. In the presence of a mixture of oxovanadates, the hydrolysis of the peptide bond in Gly-Ser proceeds under the physiological pH and temperature (37 °C, pD 7.4) with a rate constant of 8.9 × 10(-8) s(-1). NMR and EPR spectra did not show evidence for the formation of paramagnetic species, excluding the possibility of V(V) reduction to V(IV) and indicating that the cleavage of the peptide bond is purely hydrolytic. The pD dependence of k(obs) exhibits a bell-shaped profile, with the fastest hydrolysis observed at pD 7.4. Combined (1)H, (13)C, and (51)V NMR experiments revealed formation of three complexes between Gly-Ser and vanadate, of which only one complex, designated Complex 2, formed via coordination of amide oxygen and amino nitrogen to vanadate, is proposed to be hydrolytically active. Kinetic experiments at pD 7.4 performed by using a fixed amount of Gly-Ser and increasing amounts of Na(3)VO(4) allowed calculation of the formation constant for the Gly-Ser/VO(4)(3-) complex (K(f) = 16.1 M(-1)). The structure of the hydrolytically active Complex 2 is suggested also on the basis of DFT calculations. The energy difference between Complex 2 and the major complex detected in the reaction mixture, Complex 1, is calculated to be 7.1 kcal/mol in favor of the latter. The analysis of the molecular properties of Gly-Ser and their change upon different modes of coordination to the vanadate pointed out that only in Complex 2 the amide carbon is suitable for attack by the hydroxyl group in the Ser side chain, which acts as an effective nucleophile. The origin of the hydrolytic activity of vanadate is most likely a combination of the polarization of amide oxygen in Gly-Ser due to the binding to vanadate, followed by the intramolecular

  14. Adsorption of methylene blue onto activated carbon produced from tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells: kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun-Jie; Qin, Ye-Bo; Zhou, Tao; Cao, Dong-Dong; Xu, Ping; Hochstetter, Danielle; Wang, Yue-Fei

    2013-07-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells, the main byproduct of the manufacture of tea seed oil, were used as precursors for the preparation of tea activated carbon (TAC) in the present study. A high yield (44.1%) of TAC was obtained from tea seed shells via a one-step chemical method using ZnCl2 as an agent. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and the total pore volumes of the obtained TAC were found to be 1530.67 mg(2)/g and 0.7826 cm(3)/g, respectively. The equilibrium adsorption results were complied with Langmuir isotherm model and its maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was 324.7 mg/g for methylene blue. Adsorption kinetics studies indicated that the pseudo-second-order model yielded the best fit for the kinetic data. An intraparticle diffusion model suggested that the intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. Thermodynamics studies revealed the spontaneous and exothermic nature of the sorption process. These results indicate that tea seed shells could be utilized as a renewable resource to develop activated carbon which is a potential adsorbent for methylene blue.

  15. Adsorption of methylene blue onto activated carbon produced from tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells: kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics studies*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun-jie; Qin, Ye-bo; Zhou, Tao; Cao, Dong-dong; Xu, Ping; Hochstetter, Danielle; Wang, Yue-fei

    2013-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) seed shells, the main byproduct of the manufacture of tea seed oil, were used as precursors for the preparation of tea activated carbon (TAC) in the present study. A high yield (44.1%) of TAC was obtained from tea seed shells via a one-step chemical method using ZnCl2 as an agent. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and the total pore volumes of the obtained TAC were found to be 1 530.67 mg2/g and 0.782 6 cm3/g, respectively. The equilibrium adsorption results were complied with Langmuir isotherm model and its maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was 324.7 mg/g for methylene blue. Adsorption kinetics studies indicated that the pseudo-second-order model yielded the best fit for the kinetic data. An intraparticle diffusion model suggested that the intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. Thermodynamics studies revealed the spontaneous and exothermic nature of the sorption process. These results indicate that tea seed shells could be utilized as a renewable resource to develop activated carbon which is a potential adsorbent for methylene blue. PMID:23825151

  16. A kinetic study of the effects of phosphate and organic phosphates on the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from Crassula argentea.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C R; Rustin, P; Wedding, R T

    1989-05-15

    The effects of phosphate and several phosphate-containing compounds on the activity of purified phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the crassulacean acid metabolism plant, Crassula argentea, were investigated. When assayed at subsaturating phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) concentrations, low concentrations of most of the compounds tested were found to stimulate PEPC activity. This activation, variable in extent, was found in all cases to be competitive with glucose 6-phosphate (Glc-6-P) stimulation, suggesting that these effectors bind to the Glc-6-P site. At higher concentrations, depending upon the effector molecule studied, deactivation, inhibition, or no response was observed. More detailed studies were performed with Glc-6-P, AMP, phosphoglycolate, and phosphate. AMP had previously been shown to be a specific ligand for the Glc-6-P site. The main effect of Glc-6-P and AMP on the kinetic parameters was to decrease the apparent Km and increase Vmax/Km. AMP also caused a decrease in the Vmax of the reaction. In contrast, phosphoglycolate acted essentially as a competitive inhibitor increasing the apparent Km for PEP and decreasing Vmax/Km. Inorganic phosphate had a biphasic effect on the kinetic parameters, resulting in a transient decrease in Km followed by an increase of the apparent Km for PEP with increasing concentration of phosphate. The Vmax also was decreased with increasing phosphate concentrations. Further, the enzyme appeared to respond to the complex of phosphate with magnesium. In the presence of a saturating concentration of AMP, no activation but rather inhibition was observed with increasing phosphate concentration. This is consistent with the binding of phosphate to two separate sites--the Glc-6-P activation site and an inhibitory site, a phenomenon that may be occurring with other phosphate containing compounds. High concentrations of phosphate with magnesium were found to protect enzyme activity when PEPC, previously shown to contain an

  17. Pb(II) adsorption by a novel activated carbon - alginate composite material. A kinetic and equilibrium study.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Salvatore; Gianguzza, Antonio; Milea, Demetrio; Muratore, Nicola; Pettignano, Alberto

    2016-11-01

    The adsorption capacity of an activated carbon - calcium alginate composite material (ACAA-Ca) has been tested with the aim of developing a new and more efficient adsorbent material to remove Pb(II) ion from aqueous solution. The study was carried out at pH=5, in NaCl medium and in the ionic strength range 0.1-0.75molL(-1). Differential Pulse Anodic Stripping Voltammetry (DP-ASV) technique was used to check the amount of Pb(II) ion removed during kinetic and equilibrium experiments. Different kinetic (pseudo first order, pseudo second order and Vermuelen) and equilibrium (Langmuir and Freundlich) models were used to fit experimental data, and were statistically compared. Calcium alginate (AA-Ca) improves the adsorption capacity (qm) of active carbon (AC) in the ACAA-Ca adsorbent material (e.g., qm=15.7 and 10.5mgg(-1) at I=0.25molL(-1), for ACAA-Ca and AC, respectively). SEM-EDX and thermogravimetric (TGA) measurements were carried out in order to characterize the composite material. The results of the speciation study on the Pb(II) solution and of the characterization of the ACAA-Ca and of the pristine AA-Ca and AC were evaluated in order to explain the specific contribution of AC and AA-Ca to the adsorption of the metal ion.

  18. Application of zeolite-activated carbon macrocomposite for the adsorption of Acid Orange 7: isotherm, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chi Kim; Bay, Hui Han; Neoh, Chin Hong; Aris, Azmi; Abdul Majid, Zaiton; Ibrahim, Zaharah

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the adsorption behavior of azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) from aqueous solution onto macrocomposite (MC) was investigated under various experimental conditions. The adsorbent, MC, which consists of a mixture of zeolite and activated carbon, was found to be effective in removing AO7. The MC were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray, point of zero charge, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis. A series of experiments were performed via batch adsorption technique to examine the effect of the process variables, namely, contact time, initial dye concentration, and solution pH. The dye equilibrium adsorption was investigated, and the equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich, and Tempkin isotherm models. The Langmuir isotherm model fits the equilibrium data better than the Freundlich isotherm model. For the kinetic study, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion model were used to fit the experimental data. The adsorption kinetic was found to be well described by the pseudo-second-order model. Thermodynamic analysis indicated that the adsorption process is a spontaneous and endothermic process. The SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectral and high performance liquid chromatography analysis were carried out before and after the adsorption process. For the phytotoxicity test, treated AO7 was found to be less toxic. Thus, the study indicated that MC has good potential use as an adsorbent for the removal of azo dye from aqueous solution.

  19. Adsorption of methylene blue dye onto activated carbons based on agricultural by-products: equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Z; Simitzis, J

    2013-01-01

    Mixtures of novolac resin and olive stone biomass (20/80 and 40/60 w/w) were cured, pyrolyzed up to 1,000 °C and activated with CO2 under a continuous flow operation (named N20B-cCa and N40B-cCa respectively). Commercial activated charcoal was similarly re-activated with CO2 and used for comparison reasons (AC-a). The characterization of these materials was performed by Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis and their specific surface area was determined according to DIN 66132. The materials were tested for their adsorption abilities at different temperatures (298, 333 K) and initial dye concentrations (0.01-0.35 g/L) using 1 L of methylene blue (MB) solution in 10 g of activated carbon. MB adsorption kinetic was also studied. The FTIR spectra of all activated carbons show absorption peaks which correspond to -OH, -CH, -C-O-C- groups and to aromatic ring. The presence of the absorption peak at about 1,400 cm(-1) for N20B-cCa, N40B-cCa indicates more acidic groups on them compared to the commercial AC-a. The specific surface area of N20B-cCa, N40B-cCa and AC-a has values equal to 352, 342 and 760 m(2)/g respectively. From the applied kinetic models, pseudo-second-order equation could best describe MB adsorption. Consequently, such adsorbents can be used as filters to adsorb dyes from wastewaters.

  20. A kinetic study of pig liver pyruvate kinase activated by fructose diphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Neil; Ainsworth, Stanley

    1974-01-01

    The paper reports a study of the reaction between phosphoenolpyruvate, ADP and Mg2+ catalysed by pig liver pyruvate kinase when activated by fructose diphosphate and K+. The experimental results are consistent with two non-sequential mechanisms in which the substrates and products of the reaction are phosphoenolpyruvate, ADP, Mg2+, pyruvate and MgATP. Pyruvate release occurs before ADP binding. Two Mg2+ ions are involved, though the two Mg2+-binding sites cannot be occupied simultaneously. An isomerized enzyme complex forms before release of MgATP. Values were determined for the Michaelis constants of the reaction. Apparent MgATP inhibition constants are also given. PMID:4850216

  1. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of adsorption of phosphate onto ZnCl2 activated coir pith carbon.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, C; Sangeetha, D

    2004-12-15

    Phosphate removal from aqueous solution was investigated using ZnCl(2)-activated carbon developed from coir pith, an agricultural solid waste. Studies were conducted to delineate the effect of contact time, adsorbent dose, phosphate concentration, pH, and temperature. The adsorption equilibrium data followed both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Langmuir adsorption capacity was found to be 5.1 mg/g. Adsorption followed second-order kinetics. The removal was maximum in the pH range 3-10. pH effect and desorption studies showed that adsorption occurred by both ion exchange and chemisorption mechanisms. Adsorption was found to be spontaneous and endothermic. Effect of foreign ions on adsorption shows that perchlorate, sulfate, and selenite decreased the percent removal of phosphate.

  2. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of 2-nitroaniline onto activated carbon prepared from cotton stalk fibre.

    PubMed

    Li, Kunquan; Zheng, Zheng; Huang, Xingfa; Zhao, Guohua; Feng, Jingwei; Zhang, Jibiao

    2009-07-15

    Activated carbon prepared from cotton stalk fibre has been utilized as an adsorbent for the removal of 2-nitroaniline from aqueous solutions. The influence of adsorbent mass, contact time and temperature on the adsorption was investigated by conducting a series of batch adsorption experiments. The equilibrium data at different temperatures were fitted with the Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin, Redlich-Peterson and Langmuir-Freundlich models. The Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm was found to best describe the experimental data. The adsorption amount increased with increasing temperature. The maximum adsorption capacity of 2-nitroaniline was found to be 383 mg/g for initial 2-nitroaniline concentration of 200mg/L at 45 degrees C. The kinetic rates were modeled by using the Lagergren-first-order, pseudo-second-order and Elovich models. The pseudo-second-order model was found to explain the adsorption kinetics most effectively. It was also found that the pore diffusion played an important role in the adsorption, and intraparticle diffusion was the rate-limiting step at the first 30 min for the temperatures of 25, 35 and 45 degrees C. FTIR and (13)C NMR study revealed that the amino and isocyanate groups present on the surface of the adsorbent were involved in chemical interaction with 2-nitroaniline. The negative change in free energy (Delta G degrees) and positive change in enthalpy (Delta H degrees) indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  3. A comparative study of the antioxidant scavenging activity of green tea, black tea and coffee extracts: a kinetic approach.

    PubMed

    Anissi, Jaouad; El Hassouni, Mohammed; Ouardaoui, Abdelkrim; Sendide, Khalid

    2014-05-01

    The antioxidant activities of three beverages, coffee, black tea and green tea, along with their major components, were investigated in terms of their reaction with the stable radical 2,2'-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). We used a kinetic approach in parallel with quantification methods based on a fixed end-point to determine the scavenging efficiency of compounds abundant in these beverages during their reaction with DPPH using a stopped-flow spectrophotometer-based method. Ascorbic acid, (+)-catechin, (-)-epigallocatechin, tannic acid, and caffeic acid were selected as model antioxidants to study in coffee, black tea and green tea. We applied a second-order model to demonstrate similarities in the kinetics behavior of beverages and related compounds. Our findings showed the slopes k2(')((mol/L)(-1)s(-1)) and k2max(')((mol/L)(1)s(-1)) exhibited similar and correlated values; we suggest the variation in k2(') as a function of time is more informative about antioxidant properties than reaction with DPPH alone. We also used IC100 to test the reliability of the relative stoichiometry using a new comparative parameter "n", which was calculated as: n=c0DPPHIC100 (mol/L(mol/L)(-1), (mol/L)mlmg(-1) or molg(-1)).

  4. Unchanged peripheral sympathetic activity following withdrawal of chronic metoprolol treatment. A study of noradrenaline concentrations and kinetics in plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, G; Daleskog, M; Hjemdahl, P; Rehnqvist, N

    1984-01-01

    Noradrenaline plasma kinetics were assessed in 17 male patients, who had been treated with metoprolol 100-200 mg daily (n = 8) or placebo for 3 years after an acute myocardial infarction, before and 1 week after gradual withdrawal (during 1 week) of the study treatment. Endogenous noradrenaline concentrations in plasma were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Noradrenaline spillover rate, plasma clearance and the t1/2 for the rapid removal from plasma were determined by radio-tracer methodology. During treatment the plasma noradrenaline concentrations and noradrenaline plasma kinetic variables were similar in the two groups. Venous plasma noradrenaline concentrations were more closely correlated to the spillover rates of noradrenaline to plasma than to the clearance of noradrenaline from plasma, but the spillover rates were correlated to the clearance rates. Following the withdrawal of metoprolol noradrenaline clearance from plasma increased slightly (by 18 +/- 5%, P less than 0.05), but the plasma concentrations and spillover rates of noradrenaline were unchanged. In the placebo group withdrawal did not result in any significant changes. Our results indicate that a generalised increase in sympathetic nerve activity is not the cause of so-called rebound phenomena following withdrawal of chronic beta-adrenoceptor blockade. PMID:6487497

  5. Iron Impregnated Activated Carbon as an Efficient Adsorbent for the Removal of Methylene Blue: Regeneration and Kinetics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Irfan; Adnan, Rohana; Wan Ngah, Wan Saime; Mohamed, Norita

    2015-01-01

    In this study, iron impregnated activated carbon (FeAC) was synthesized following an oxidation and iron impregnation of activated carbon (AC). Both the AC and FeAC were characterized by pHZPC and FTIR spectroscopy. The removal of Methylene Blue (MB) by AC and FeAC was examined under various experimental conditions. The FeAC showed up to 95% (higher than AC) MB removal in the pH range of 7–10. Although the reaction kinetics was pseudo–second order, the overall rate was controlled by a number of processes such as film diffusion, pore diffusion and intraparticle diffusion. The activation energy values for the MB uptake by AC and FeAC (21.79 and 14.82 kJ/mol, respectively) revealed a physisorption process. In the regeneration study, FeAC has shown consistently ≥ 90% MB removal even up to 10 repeated cycles. The reusable characteristic of the spent FeAC improved the practical use of activated carbon and can be a breakthrough for continuous flow system applications where it can work effectively without any significant reduction in its performance. PMID:25849291

  6. Equilibrium and kinetics study on the adsorption of perfluorooctanoic acid from aqueous solution onto powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yan; Zhang, Chaojie; Li, Fei; Bo, Xiaowen; Liu, Guangfu; Zhou, Qi

    2009-09-30

    Powdered activated carbon (PAC) was applied to remove perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) from the aqueous PFOA solution in this study. Contact time, adsorbent dose and temperature were analyzed as the effect factors in the adsorption reaction. The contact time of maximum PFOA uptake was around 1h while the sorption removal efficiency increased with the PAC concentrations. And the process of adsorption increased from 303 K to 313 K and then decreased from 313 K to 323 K. Among four applied models, the experimental isotherm data were discovered to follow Langmuir isotherm model more closely. Thermodynamically, adsorption was endothermic because enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs constants were 198.5 kJ/mol, 0.709 kJ/mol/K and negative, respectively, which also indicated that the adsorption process was spontaneous and feasible. From kinetic analysis, the adsorption was suggested to be pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption of PFOA on the PAC was mainly controlled by particle diffusion.

  7. Liquefaction chemistry and kinetics: Hydrogen utilization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenberger, K.S.; Warzinski, R.P.; Cugini, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this project are to investigate the chemistry and kinetics that occur in the initial stages of coal liquefaction and to determine the effects of hydrogen pressure, catalyst activity, and solvent type on the quantity and quality of the products produced. The project comprises three tasks: (1) preconversion chemistry and kinetics, (2) hydrogen utilization studies, and (3) assessment of kinetic models for liquefaction. The hydrogen utilization studies work will be the main topic of this report. However, the other tasks are briefly described.

  8. Study on carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde polymeric films: mechanical properties, release kinetics and antibacterial and antibiofilm activities.

    PubMed

    Nostro, A; Scaffaro, R; D'Arrigo, M; Botta, L; Filocamo, A; Marino, A; Bisignano, G

    2012-11-01

    Polyethylene-co-vinylacetate (EVA) films with different concentrations (3.5 wt% and 7 wt%) of essential oil constituents, carvacrol or cinnamaldehyde, were prepared and characterized by mechanical, antibacterial and antibiofilm properties. The incorporation of the compounds into copolymer films affected their elastic modulus, tensile stress and elongation at break. Carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde act as plasticizers which reduce the intermolecular forces of polymer chains, thus improving the flexibility and extensibility of the film. The analysis of the surface characteristics demonstrated that essential oil constituents lowered the contact angle values without causing any remarkable variation of the surface roughness. The films allowed progressive diffusion of the bioactive molecules and the kinetic of release was correlated with the damaging effect on bacterial growth. The kill curves proved that the film with essential oil constituents (7 wt%) had a significant bactericidal effect (reduction of 4 and 2 log CFU) against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and a bacteriostatic effect against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Listeria monocytogenes (reduction of about 1 log CFU). With regard to biofilm formation the biomass formed on polymeric films surface was significantly reduced if compared with the pure copolymer control. The results were confirmed by fluorescence microscopy images by Live/dead staining. The reduction in the surface tension coupled to an inherent bactericidal property of carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde could in turn affect the initial attachment phase of bacteria and compromise the normal biofilm development.

  9. Kinetic Monte Carlo study of activated states and correlated shear-transformation-zone activity during the deformation of an amorphous metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homer, Eric R.; Rodney, David; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2010-02-01

    Shear transformation zone (STZ) dynamics simulations, which are based on the kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm, are used to model the mechanical response of amorphous metals and provide insight into the collective aspects of the microscopic events underlying deformation. The present analysis details the activated states of STZs in such a model, as well as the statistics of their activation and how these are affected by imposed conditions of stress and temperature. The analysis sheds light on the spatial and temporal correlations between the individual STZ activations that lead to different macroscopic modes of deformation. Three basic STZ correlation behaviors are observed: uncorrelated activity, nearest-neighbor correlation, and self-reactivating STZs. These three behaviors correspond well with the macroscopic deformation modes of homogeneous flow, inhomogeneous deformation, and elastic behavior, respectively. The effect of pre-existing stresses in the simulation cell is also studied and found to have a homogenizing effect on STZ correlations, suppressing the tendency for localization.

  10. Structure-activity relationship studies of resveratrol and its analogues by the reaction kinetics of low density lipoprotein peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jin-Chun; Fang, Jian-Guo; Chen, Wei-Feng; Zhou, Bo; Yang, Li; Liu, Zhong-Li

    2006-06-01

    Resveratrol (3,5,4'-trans-trihydroxystibene) is a natural phytoalexin present in grapes and red wine, which possesses a variety of biological activities including antioxidative activity. To find more active antioxidants, with resveratrol as the lead compound, we synthesized resveratrol analogues, i.e., 3,4,3',4'-tetrahydroxy-trans-stilbene (3,4,3',4'-THS), 3,4,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene (3,4,4'-THS), 2,4,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene (2,4,4'-THS), 3,3'-dimethoxy-4,4'-dihydroxy-trans-stilbene (3,3'-DM-4,4'-DHS), 3,4-dihydroxy-trans-stilbene (3,4-DHS), 4,4'-dihydroxy-trans-stilbene (4,4'-DHS), 3,5-dihydroxy-trans-stilbene (3,5-DHS) and 2,4-dihydroxy-trans-stilbene (2,4-DHS). Antioxidative effects of resveratrol and its analogues against free-radical-induced peroxidation of human low density lipoprotein (LDL) were studied. The peroxidation was initiated either by a water-soluble initiator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane hydrochloride) (AAPH), or by cupric ion (Cu(2+)). The reaction kinetics were monitored either by the uptake of oxygen and the depletion of alpha-tocopherol (TOH) presented in the native LDL, or by the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Kinetic analysis of the antioxidation process demonstrates that these trans-stilbene derivatives are effective antioxidants against both AAPH- and Cu(2+)-induced LDL peroxidation with the activity sequence of 3,4,3',4'-THS approximately 3,3'-DM-4,4'-DHS>3,4-DHS approximately 3,4,4'-THS>2,4,4'-THS>resveratrol approximately 3,5-DHS>4,4'-DHS approximately 2,4-HS, and 3,4,3',4'-THS approximately 3,4-DHS approximately 3,4,4'-THS>3,3'-DM-4,4'-DHS>4,4'-DHS>resveratrol approximately 2,4-HS>2,4,4'-THS approximately 3,5-DHS, respectively. Molecules bearing ortho-dihydroxyl or 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyl groups possess significantly higher antioxidant activity than those bearing no such functionalities.

  11. Structural features, kinetics and SAR study of radical scavenging and antioxidant activities of phenolic and anilinic compounds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phenolic compounds are widely distributed in plant kingdom and constitute one of the most important classes of natural and synthetic antioxidants. In the present study fifty one natural and synthetic structurally variant phenolic, enolic and anilinic compounds were examined as antioxidants and radical scavengers against DPPH, hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals. The structural diversity of the used phenolic compounds includes monophenols with substituents frequently present in natural phenols e.g. alkyl, alkoxy, ester and carboxyl groups, besides many other electron donating and withdrawing groups, in addition to polyphenols with 1–3 hydroxyl groups and aminophenols. Some common groups e.g. alkyl, carboxyl, amino and second OH groups were incorporated in ortho, meta and para positions. Results SAR study indicates that the most important structural feature of phenolic compounds required to possess good antiradical and antioxidant activities is the presence of a second hydroxyl or an amino group in o- or p-position because of their strong electron donating effect in these positions and the formation of a stable quinone-like products upon two hydrogen-atom transfer process; otherwise, the presence of a number of alkoxy (in o or p-position) and /or alkyl groups (in o, m or p-position) should be present to stabilize the resulted phenoxyl radical and reach good activity. Anilines showed also similar structural feature requirements as phenols to achieve good activities, except o-diamines which gave low activity because of the high energy of the resulted 1,2-dimine product upon the 2H-transfer process. Enols with ene-1,2-diol structure undergo the same process and give good activity. Good correlations were obtained between DPPH inhibition and inhibition of both OH and peroxyl radicals. In addition, good correlations were obtained between DPPH inhibition and antioxidant activities in sunflower oil and liver homogenate systems. Conclusions In conclusion, the

  12. An investigation into the crystallization tendency/kinetics of amorphous active pharmaceutical ingredients: A case study with dipyridamole and cinnarizine.

    PubMed

    Baghel, Shrawan; Cathcart, Helen; Redington, Wynette; O'Reilly, Niall J

    2016-07-01

    Amorphous drug formulations have great potential to enhance solubility and thus bioavailability of BCS class II drugs. However, the higher free energy and molecular mobility of the amorphous form drive them towards the crystalline state which makes them unstable. Accurate determination of the crystallization tendency/kinetics is the key to the successful design and development of such systems. In this study, dipyridamole (DPM) and cinnarizine (CNZ) have been selected as model compounds. Thermodynamic fragility (mT) was measured from the heat capacity change at the glass transition temperature (Tg) whereas dynamic fragility (mD) was evaluated using methods based on extrapolation of configurational entropy to zero [Formula: see text] , and heating rate dependence of Tg [Formula: see text] . The mean relaxation time of amorphous drugs was calculated from the Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) equation. Furthermore, the correlation between fragility and glass forming ability (GFA) of the model drugs has been established and the relevance of these parameters to crystallization of amorphous drugs is also assessed. Moreover, the crystallization kinetics of model drugs under isothermal conditions has been studied using Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach to determine the Avrami constant 'n' which provides an insight into the mechanism of crystallization. To further probe into the crystallization mechanism, the non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of model systems were also analysed by statistically fitting the crystallization data to 15 different kinetic models and the relevance of model-free kinetic approach has been established. The crystallization mechanism for DPM and CNZ at each extent of transformation has been predicted. The calculated fragility, glass forming ability (GFA) and crystallization kinetics are found to be in good correlation with the stability prediction of amorphous solid dispersions. Thus, this research work involves a multidisciplinary approach to

  13. Kinetic Study of the Active Site Structure of β-Amylase from Bacillus cereus var. mycoides.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Y; Shirakawa, M; Takasaki, Y

    1996-01-01

    The subsite affinities of the active site of β-amylase from Bacillus cereus var. mycoides were evaluated based on Hiromi's theory, using (14)C-radiolabeled maltooligosaccharides as substrate. It was estimated that the active site consisted of six subsites, and all subsite affinities could be evaluated. The active site had a common subsite arrangement with those of β -amylases from soybean and wheat bran. The intrinsic breakdown rate constant of α-1,4 glucosidic linkage (kint) was five to seven times as large as those of the other enzymes.From the pH dependence of log[k0/Km], pK values of two functional ionizable groups were pK1 =4.0 and pK2 = 8.4. The pK values were 0.5-0.6 units for pK1 and 0.2-0.3 units for pK2 larger than those of the other enzymes. For the affinity-labeling of this enzyme by 2, 3 epoxypropyl α-D-glucopyranoside (α-EPG), the binding affinity of α-EPG was 1-1.6kcal/mol larger than those of the other β-amylases.

  14. Silica coating and photocatalytic activities of ZnO nanoparticles: effect of operational parameters and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Ismail, L F M; Emara, M M; El-Moselhy, M M; Maziad, N A; Hussein, O K

    2014-10-15

    Silica-coating ZnO nanoparticles were prepared using the hydrothermal method. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX). It was found that ultrafine core/shell structured silica-coating ZnO nanoparticles were successfully obtained. TEM analysis revealed a continuous and uniform silica coating layer of about 8nm in thickness on the surface of ZnO nanoparticles. The photocatalytic performance of silica-coating ZnO core/shell nanoparticles in methylene blue aqueous solution was investigated. The effects of some operational parameters such as pH value, nanocatalyst loading and initial MB concentration on the degradation efficiency were discussed. Kinetic parameters were experimentally determined and a pseudo-first-order kinetic was observed. Thus, the main advantage of the coating is the stability of the photocatalysts and the better performance in acidic or alkaline solutions. Compared to ZnO the maximum apparent rate constant is obtained at pH 8.5 (pH 11.5 in case of bare ZnO). Moreover, the Langmuir adsorption model was applied to describe the equilibrium isotherm at different MB concentration. The applicability of the Langmuir isotherm suggests monolayer coverage of the MB onto surface of silica-coating ZnO nanoparticles. The kinetics of the adsorption with respect to the initial dye concentration, were also investigated. The pseudo-first-order and second-order kinetic models were used and the rate constants were evaluated. The kinetic studies revealed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model better represented the adsorption kinetics, suggesting that the adsorption process may be chemisorption.

  15. Adsorption behavior of activated carbon derived from pyrolusite-modified sewage sludge: equilibrium modeling, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Jiang, Wenju; Jiang, Li; Ji, Xiujuan

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbon was developed from sewage sludge using pyrolusite as an additive. It was demonstrated that the removal efficiency of two synthetic dyes (Tracid orange GS and Direct fast turquoise blue GL) by the produced adsorbent was up to 97.6%. The activated carbon with pyrolusite addition had 38.2% higher surface area, 43.8% larger micropore and 54.4% larger mesopore production than ordinary sludge-based activated carbons. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were also investigated based on dyes adsorption tests. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption, and the results fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm. The kinetic data have been analyzed using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion equation. The experimental data fitted very well with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Activation energies for the adsorption processes ranged between 8.7 and 19.1 kJ mol 1. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard free energy (deltaG0), standard enthalpy (deltaH0) and standard entropy (deltaS0) were evaluated. The adsorption of these two dyes on the activated carbon was found to be a spontaneous and endothermic process in nature.

  16. Activation of Prodrug Treosulfan at pH 7.4 and 37°C Accompanied by Hydrolysis of Its Active Epoxides: Kinetic Studies with Clinical Relevance.

    PubMed

    Romański, Michał; Urbaniak, Bartosz; Kokot, Zenon; Główka, Franciszek K

    2015-12-01

    Treosulfan (TREO), originally registered for treatment of ovarian cancer, is currently being investigated for conditioning prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. TREO is a prodrug, which undergoes a pH- and temperature-dependent two-step conversion to active monoepoxide [S,S-EBDM, (2S,3S)-1,2-epoxybutane-3,4-diol-4-methanesulfonate] and diepoxide [S,S-DEB, (2S,3S)-1,2:3,4-diepoxybutane]. In this paper, the kinetics of the nonenzymatic transformation of TREO at pH 7.4 and 37°C were studied for the first time including the effects of the TREO concentration, buffer concentration, ionic strength, and the presence of NaCl. Transformation of TREO was well described by a kinetic model, which included first-order reactions for TREO activation, that is, TREO → S,S-EBDM → S,S-DEB, and pseudo-first-order reactions for the hydrolytic decomposition of S,S-EBDM and S,S-DEB. In contrast to the two-step activation of TREO, the hydrolysis of epoxides was influenced by electrolytes. In phosphate-buffered saline, decomposition of S,S-EBDM and S,S-DEB (mean half-lives 25.7 and 15.4 h) proceeded much slower than their formation (mean half-lives 1.5 and 3.5 h). In conclusion, the kinetics of the nonenzymatic transformation of TREO in the presence of plasma electrolytes cannot contribute to the very low levels of S,S-EBDM and S,S-DEB observed in patient plasma. The results also indicate that elimination of TREO proceeds primarily via conversion to S,S-EBDM.

  17. Activated carbon derived from carbon residue from biomass gasification and its application for dye adsorption: Kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Maneerung, Thawatchai; Liew, Johan; Dai, Yanjun; Kawi, Sibudjing; Chong, Clive; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    In this work, activated carbon (AC) as an effective and low-cost adsorbent was successfully prepared from carbon residue (or char, one of the by-products from woody biomass gasification) via physical activation. The surface area of char was significantly increased from 172.24 to 776.46m(2)/g after steam activation at 900°C. The obtained activated carbons were then employed for the adsorption of dye (Rhodamine B) and it was found that activated carbon obtained from steam activation exhibited the highest adsorption capability, which is mainly attributed to the higher surface area and the abundance of hydroxyl (-OH) and carboxyl (-COOH) groups on the activated carbon surface. Moreover, it was also found that the adsorption capability significantly increased under the basic condition, which can be attributed to the increased electrostatic interaction between the deprotonated (negatively charged) activated carbon and dye molecules. Furthermore, the equilibrium data were fitted into different adsorption isotherms and found to fit well with Langmuir model (indicating that dye molecules form monolayer coverage on activated carbon) with a maximum monolayer adsorption capability of 189.83mg/g, whereas the adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics.

  18. Kinetics and equilibrium adsorption study of lead(II) onto activated carbon prepared from coconut shell.

    PubMed

    Sekar, M; Sakthi, V; Rengaraj, S

    2004-11-15

    Removal of lead from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto coconut-shell carbon was investigated. Batch adsorption experiments were performed to find out the effective lead removal at different metal ion concentrations. Adsorption of Pb2+ ion was strongly affected by pH. The coconut-shell carbon (CSC) exhibited the highest lead adsorption capacity at pH 4.5. Isotherms for the adsorption of lead on CSC were developed and the equilibrium data fitted well to the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Tempkin isotherm models. At pH 4.5, the maximum lead adsorption capacity of CSC estimated with the Langmuir model was 26.50 mg g(-1) adsorbent. Energy of activation (Ea) and thermodynamic parameters such as DeltaG, DeltaH, and DeltaS were evaluated by applying the Arrhenius and van't Hoff equations. The thermodynamics of Pb(II) on CSC indicates the spontaneous and endothermic nature of adsorption. Quantitative desorption of Pb(II) from CSC was found to be 75% which facilitates the sorption of metal by ion exchange.

  19. The interplay between tissue plasminogen activator domains and fibrin structures in the regulation of fibrinolysis: kinetic and microscopic studies

    PubMed Central

    Thelwell, Craig; Williams, Stella C.; Silva, Marta M. C. G.; Szabó, László; Kolev, Krasimir

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) depends on fibrin binding and fibrin structure. tPA structure/function relationships were investigated in fibrin formed by high or low thrombin concentrations to produce a fine mesh and small pores, or thick fibers and coarse structure, respectively. Kinetics studies were performed to investigate plasminogen activation and fibrinolysis in the 2 types of fibrin, using wild-type tPA (F-G-K1-K2-P, F and K2 binding), K1K1-tPA (F-G-K1-K1-P, F binding), and delF-tPA (G-K1-K2-P, K2 binding). There was a trend of enzyme potency of tPA > K1K1-tPA > delF-tPA, highlighting the importance of the finger domain in regulating activity, but the differences were less apparent in fine fibrin. Fine fibrin was a better surface for plasminogen activation but more resistant to lysis. Scanning electron and confocal microscopy using orange fluorescent fibrin with green fluorescent protein-labeled tPA variants showed that tPA was strongly associated with agglomerates in coarse but not in fine fibrin. In later lytic stages, delF-tPA-green fluorescent protein diffused more rapidly through fibrin in contrast to full-length tPA, highlighting the importance of finger domain-agglomerate interactions. Thus, the regulation of fibrinolysis depends on the starting nature of fibrin fibers and complex dynamic interaction between tPA and fibrin structures that vary over time. PMID:20966169

  20. The interplay between tissue plasminogen activator domains and fibrin structures in the regulation of fibrinolysis: kinetic and microscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Longstaff, Colin; Thelwell, Craig; Williams, Stella C; Silva, Marta M C G; Szabó, László; Kolev, Krasimir

    2011-01-13

    Regulation of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) depends on fibrin binding and fibrin structure. tPA structure/function relationships were investigated in fibrin formed by high or low thrombin concentrations to produce a fine mesh and small pores, or thick fibers and coarse structure, respectively. Kinetics studies were performed to investigate plasminogen activation and fibrinolysis in the 2 types of fibrin, using wild-type tPA (F-G-K1-K2-P, F and K2 binding), K1K1-tPA (F-G-K1-K1-P, F binding), and delF-tPA (G-K1-K2-P, K2 binding). There was a trend of enzyme potency of tPA > K1K1-tPA > delF-tPA, highlighting the importance of the finger domain in regulating activity, but the differences were less apparent in fine fibrin. Fine fibrin was a better surface for plasminogen activation but more resistant to lysis. Scanning electron and confocal microscopy using orange fluorescent fibrin with green fluorescent protein-labeled tPA variants showed that tPA was strongly associated with agglomerates in coarse but not in fine fibrin. In later lytic stages, delF-tPA-green fluorescent protein diffused more rapidly through fibrin in contrast to full-length tPA, highlighting the importance of finger domain-agglomerate interactions. Thus, the regulation of fibrinolysis depends on the starting nature of fibrin fibers and complex dynamic interaction between tPA and fibrin structures that vary over time.

  1. Kinetic and Spectroscopic Studies of Bicupin Oxalate Oxidase and Putative Active Site Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Moomaw, Ellen W.; Hoffer, Eric; Moussatche, Patricia; Salerno, John C.; Grant, Morgan; Immelman, Bridget; Uberto, Richard; Ozarowski, Andrew; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Ceriporiopsis subvermispora oxalate oxidase (CsOxOx) is the first bicupin enzyme identified that catalyzes manganese-dependent oxidation of oxalate. In previous work, we have shown that the dominant contribution to catalysis comes from the monoprotonated form of oxalate binding to a form of the enzyme in which an active site carboxylic acid residue must be unprotonated. CsOxOx shares greatest sequence homology with bicupin microbial oxalate decarboxylases (OxDC) and the 241-244DASN region of the N-terminal Mn binding domain of CsOxOx is analogous to the lid region of OxDC that has been shown to determine reaction specificity. We have prepared a series of CsOxOx mutants to probe this region and to identify the carboxylate residue implicated in catalysis. The pH profile of the D241A CsOxOx mutant suggests that the protonation state of aspartic acid 241 is mechanistically significant and that catalysis takes place at the N-terminal Mn binding site. The observation that the D241S CsOxOx mutation eliminates Mn binding to both the N- and C- terminal Mn binding sites suggests that both sites must be intact for Mn incorporation into either site. The introduction of a proton donor into the N-terminal Mn binding site (CsOxOx A242E mutant) does not affect reaction specificity. Mutation of conserved arginine residues further support that catalysis takes place at the N-terminal Mn binding site and that both sites must be intact for Mn incorporation into either site. PMID:23469254

  2. Kinetic studies of adsorption of thiocyanate onto ZnCl2 activated carbon from coir pith, an agricultural solid waste.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, C; Sangeetha, D

    2005-09-01

    The adsorption of thiocyanate onto ZnCl2 activated carbon developed from coir pith was investigated to assess the possible use of this adsorbent. The influence of various parameters such as agitation time, thiocyanate concentration, adsorbent dose, pH and temperature has been studied. Adsorption followed second-order rate kinetics. Two theoretical adsorption isotherms, namely, Langmuir and Freundlich were used to describe the experimental results. The Langmuir adsorption capacity (Q0) was found to be 16.2 mg g(-1) of the adsorbent. The per cent adsorption was maximum in the pH range 3.0-7.0. pH effect and desorption studies showed that ion exchange and chemisorption mechanism are involved in the adsorption process. Thermodynamic parameters such as DeltaG0, DeltaH0 and DeltaS0 for the adsorption were evaluated. The negative values of DeltaH0 confirm the exothermic nature of adsorption. Effects of foreign ions on the adsorption of thiocyanate have been investigated. Removal of thiocyanate from ground water was also tested.

  3. Adsorption of ammonium ion by coconut shell-activated carbon from aqueous solution: kinetic, isotherm, and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Boopathy, Ramasamy; Karthikeyan, Sekar; Mandal, Asit Baran; Sekaran, Ganesan

    2013-01-01

    Ammonium ions are one of the most encountered nitrogen species in polluted water bodies. High level of ammonium ion in aqueous solution imparts unpleasant taste and odor problems, which can interfere with the life of aquatics and human population when discharged. Many chemical methods are developed and being used for removal of ammonium ion from aqueous solution. Among various techniques, adsorption was found to be the most feasible and environmentally friendly with the use of natural-activated adsorbents. Hence, in this study, coconut shell-activated carbon (CSAC) was prepared and used for the removal of ammonium ion by adsorption techniques. Ammonium chloride (analytical grade) was purchased from Merck Chemicals for adsorption studies. The CSAC was used to adsorb ammonium ions under stirring at 100 rpm, using orbital shaker in batch experiments. The concentration of ammonium ion was estimated by ammonia distillate, using a Buchi distillation unit. The influence of process parameters such as pH, temperature, and contact time was studied for adsorption of ammonium ion, and kinetic, isotherm models were validated to understand the mechanism of adsorption of ammonium ion by CSAC. Thermodynamic properties such as ∆G, ∆H, and ∆S were determined for the ammonium adsorption, using van't Hoff equation. Further, the adsorption of ammonium ion was confirmed through instrumental analyses such as SEM, XRD, and FTIR. The optimum conditions for the effective adsorption of ammonium ion onto CSAC were found to be pH 9.0, temperature 283 K, and contact time 120 min. The experimental data was best followed by pseudosecond order equation, and the adsorption isotherm model obeyed the Freundlich isotherm. This explains the ammonium ion adsorption onto CSAC which was a multilayer adsorption with intraparticle diffusion. Negative enthalpy confirmed that this adsorption process was exothermic. The instrumental analyses confirmed the adsorption of ammonium ion onto CSAC.

  4. Kinetic study on biomass gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Bingyan, X.; Chuangzhi, W.; Zhengfen, L.; Guang, Z.X. )

    1992-09-01

    An experimental apparatus, with the features of fast heating rate and continuous record of reaction parameters, was developed to study kinetics of fast pyrolysis. The temperature effects, at a range of 400 C to 900 C, on pyrolysis rate, products profile, gas quality and quantity, and so on, were studied and the results are listed and analyzed. The effect of secondary reaction of gas phase at 700 C was tested and the regression result is expressed in an experimental formula. Based on the experimental results, the three-stage-reaction mechanism module is suggested. The kinetic expression to calculate gas formation rate is concluded as: d{alpha}/dt = A exp({minus}E/RT)(1 {minus} {alpha}){sup n}. The kinetic parameters of A, E, and n at different temperatures are given in the paper.

  5. Kinetic study on the tyrosinase and melanin formation inhibitory activities of carthamus yellow isolated from Carthamus tinctorius L.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Shyan; Lee, Shu-Mei; Lin, Chih-Chien; Liu, Chia-Yi; Wu, Meng-Chen; Shi, Wun-Ling

    2013-03-01

    Carthamus yellow (CY) is the major component of the yellow pigments of Carthamus tinctorius L. CY has been extensively used as a natural color additive for food and cosmetics. Here, our results demonstrate that carthamus yellow reduced the activity of mushroom tyrosinase in a dose-dependent manner with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) value of approximately 1.01 ± 0.03 mg/mL. A kinetic study of carthamus yellow on tyrosinase exhibited a mode of competitive inhibition with a Ki of 0.607 mg/mL. Moreover, cell viability analysis indicated that carthamus yellow used at concentrations of 1.0-4.0 mg/mL had no cytotoxicity in B16F10 melanoma cells. Melanin content analysis showed that melanin production in B16F10 melanoma cells treated with 4 mg/mL carthamus yellow can decrease to 82.3 ± 0.4% of the levels of melanin production of untreated cells. Thus, carthamus yellow has the potential to become a useful skin-whitening agent in the future.

  6. Kinetic model of excess activated sludge thermohydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Imbierowicz, Mirosław; Chacuk, Andrzej

    2012-11-01

    Thermal hydrolysis of excess activated sludge suspensions was carried at temperatures ranging from 423 K to 523 K and under pressure 0.2-4.0 MPa. Changes of total organic carbon (TOC) concentration in a solid and liquid phase were measured during these studies. At the temperature 423 K, after 2 h of the process, TOC concentration in the reaction mixture decreased by 15-18% of the initial value. At 473 K total organic carbon removal from activated sludge suspension increased to 30%. It was also found that the solubilisation of particulate organic matter strongly depended on the process temperature. At 423 K the transfer of TOC from solid particles into liquid phase after 1 h of the process reached 25% of the initial value, however, at the temperature of 523 K the conversion degree of 'solid' TOC attained 50% just after 15 min of the process. In the article a lumped kinetic model of the process of activated sludge thermohydrolysis has been proposed. It was assumed that during heating of the activated sludge suspension to a temperature in the range of 423-523 K two parallel reactions occurred. One, connected with thermal destruction of activated sludge particles, caused solubilisation of organic carbon and an increase of dissolved organic carbon concentration in the liquid phase (hydrolysate). The parallel reaction led to a new kind of unsolvable solid phase, which was further decomposed into gaseous products (CO(2)). The collected experimental data were used to identify unknown parameters of the model, i.e. activation energies and pre-exponential factors of elementary reactions. The mathematical model of activated sludge thermohydrolysis appropriately describes the kinetics of reactions occurring in the studied system.

  7. Exploring the active site of tripeptidyl-peptidase II through studies of pH dependence of reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Sandra; Lindås, Ann-Christin; Hamnevik, Emil; Widersten, Mikael; Tomkinson, Birgitta

    2012-04-01

    Tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPP II) is a subtilisin-like serine protease which forms a large enzyme complex (>4MDa). It is considered a potential drug target due to its involvement in specific physiological processes. However, information is scarce concerning the kinetic characteristics of TPP II and its active site features, which are important for design of efficient inhibitors. To amend this, we probed the active site by determining the pH dependence of TPP II catalysis. Access to pure enzyme is a prerequisite for kinetic investigations and herein we introduce the first efficient purification system for heterologously expressed mammalian TPP II. The pH dependence of kinetic parameters for hydrolysis of two different chromogenic substrates, Ala-Ala-Phe-pNA and Ala-Ala-Ala-pNA, was determined for murine, human and Drosophila melanogaster TPP II as well as mutant variants thereof. The investigation demonstrated that TPP II, in contrast to subtilisin, has a bell-shaped pH dependence of k(cat)(app)/K(M) probably due to deprotonation of the N-terminal amino group of the substrate at higher pH. Since both the K(M) and k(cat)(app) are lower for cleavage of AAA-pNA than for AAF-pNA we propose that the former can bind non-productively to the active site of the enzyme, a phenomenon previously observed with some substrates for subtilisin. Two mutant variants, H267A and D387G, showed bell-shaped pH-dependence of k(cat)(app), possibly due to an impaired protonation of the leaving group. This work reveals previously unknown differences between TPP II orthologues and subtilisin as well as features that might be conserved within the entire family of subtilisin-like serine peptidases.

  8. Nanoporous activated carbon fluidized bed catalytic oxidations of aqueous o, p and m-cresols: kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, S; Sekaran, G; Gupta, V K

    2013-07-01

    Nanoporous activated carbon prepared from rice husk through precarbonisation at 400 °C and phosphoric acid activation at 800 °C was used as fluidized bed in Fenton oxidation of the o, p and m-cresols in aqueous solution. The efficiencies of homogeneous Fenton oxidation, fluidized Fenton oxidation and aerobic biological oxidation systems for the removal of o, p and m-cresols in aqueous solution have been compared. The kinetic constants and the thermodynamic parameters for the homogeneous Fenton, heterogeneous Fenton and aerobic biological oxidations of o, p and m-cresols in synthetic wastewater were determined. The degradation of cresols in synthetic wastewater was confirmed using FT-IR, (1)H-NMR and UV-visible spectroscopy.

  9. Kinetic study of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} formation from mechanochemically activated Zn-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Botta, P.M.; Aglietti, E.F.; Porto Lopez, J.M.

    2006-04-13

    The kinetics of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} formation starting from mechanochemically activated Zn-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders are studied. Mixtures of metallic Zn and hematite were activated under air atmosphere in a high energy mill and thermally treated at temperatures between 500 and 650 deg. C during several holding times. During the activation, morphological and compositional changes were observed, but ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} formation was not detected. The ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} content in heated samples was determined using quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis. The resulting conversion-time curves were fitted using different kinetic models of solid-state reaction, calculating the kinetic parameters of the studied reaction. The comparison with the conventional synthesis method revealed that the mechanochemical treatment provoked a change of the rate-controlling step and a significant decrease of the activation energy, which was more evident for the more activated mixtures.

  10. Uptake and toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in terrestrial springtails--studying bioconcentration kinetics and linking toxicity to chemical activity.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stine Nørgaard; Smith, Kilian Eric Christopher; Holmstrup, Martin; Mayer, Philipp

    2013-02-01

    Passive dosing applies a polymer loaded with test compound(s) to establish and maintain constant exposure in laboratory experiments. Passive dosing with the silicone poly(dimethylsiloxane) was used to control exposure of the terrestrial springtail Folsomia candida to six polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in bioconcentration and toxicity experiments. Folsomia candida could move freely on the PAH-loaded silicone, resulting in exposure via air and direct contact. The bioconcentration kinetics indicated efficient uptake of naphthalene, anthracene, and pyrene through air and (near) equilibrium partitioning of these PAHs to lipids and possibly the waxy layer of the springtail cuticle. Toxicities of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene were related to chemical activity, which quantifies the energetic level and drives spontaneous processes including diffusive biouptake. Chemical activity-response relationships yielded effective lethal chemical activities (La50s) well within the expected range for baseline toxicity (0.01-0.1). Effective lethal body burdens for naphthalene and pyrene exceeded the expected range of 2 to 8 mmol kg(-1) fresh weight, which again indicated the waxy layer to be a sorbing phase. Finally, chemical activities were converted into equilibrium partitioning concentrations in lipids yielding effective lethal concentrations for naphthalene and phenanthrene in good correspondence with the lethal membrane burden for baseline toxicity (40-160 mmol kg(-1) lipid). Passive dosing was a practical approach for tightly controlling PAH exposure, which in turn provided new experimental possibilities and findings.

  11. Equilibrium isotherm and kinetic studies for the simultaneous removal of phenol and cyanide by use of S. odorifera (MTCC 5700) immobilized on coconut shell activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Neetu; Balomajumder, Chandrajit

    2016-09-01

    In this study, simultaneous removal of phenol and cyanide by a microorganism S. odorifera (MTCC 5700) immobilized onto coconut shell activated carbon surface (CSAC) was studied in batch reactor from mono and binary component aqueous solution. Activated carbon was derived from coconut shell by chemical activation method. Ferric chloride (Fecl3), used as surface modification agents was applied to biomass. Optimum biosorption conditions were obtained as a function of biosorbent dosage, pH, temperature, contact time and initial phenol and cyanide concentration. To define the equilibrium isotherms, experimental data were analyzed by five mono component isotherm and six binary component isotherm models. The higher uptake capacity of phenol and cyanide onto CSAC biosorbent surface was 450.02 and 2.58 mg/g, respectively. Nonlinear regression analysis was used for determining the best fit model on the basis of error functions and also for calculating the parameters involved in kinetic and isotherm models. The kinetic study results revealed that Fractal-like mixed first second order model and Brouser-Weron-Sototlongo models for phenol and cyanide were capable to offer accurate explanation of biosorption kinetic. According to the experimental data results, CSAC with immobilization of bacterium S. odorifera (MTCC 5700) seems to be an alternative and effective biosorbent for the elimination of phenol and cyanide from binary component aqueous solution.

  12. Kinetic studies on the pyrolysis of pinewood.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Garima; Kumar, Jitendra; Bhaskar, Thallada

    2015-04-01

    The kinetic study for pyrolysis of pine wood has been studied by a thermogravimetric analyzer in an inert atmosphere. Non isothermal model free kinetic methods were used to evaluate kinetics at six different heating rates of 5-40°C/min. Three zones can be detected from the iso-conversional plot of pine with average activation energy values of 134.32 kJ/mol, 146.89 kJ/mol and 155.76 kJ/mol in the conversion range of 1-22%, 24-84% and 85-90%, respectively. The activation energy values were used to determine the reaction mechanism using master plots and compensation parameters. The results show that the pyrolysis process of pine wood can be described by two dimensional diffusion reaction mechanism in a wide range of conversion up to 0.7, followed by close to one and half order reaction mechanism. The kinetic results were validated by making isothermal predictions from non-isothermal data.

  13. Kinetics and Quantitative Structure—Activity Relationship Study on the Degradation Reaction from Perfluorooctanoic Acid to Trifluoroacetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Chen; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Zhang, Xue; Niu, Junfeng

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of the degradation kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been carried out to calculate rate constants of the main elementary reactions using the multichannel Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory and canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling correction over a temperature range of 200~500 K. The Arrhenius equations of rate constants of elementary reactions are fitted. The decarboxylation is role step in the degradation mechanism of PFOA. For the perfluorinated carboxylic acids from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid, the quantitative structure–activity relationship of the decarboxylation was analyzed with the genetic function approximation method and the structure–activity model was constructed. The main parameters governing rate constants of the decarboxylation reaction from the eight-carbon chain to the two-carbon chain were obtained. As the structure–activity model shows, the bond length and energy of C1–C2 (RC1–C2 and EC1–C2) are positively correlated to rate constants, while the volume (V), the energy difference between EHOMO and ELUMO (ΔE), and the net atomic charges on atom C2 (QC2) are negatively correlated. PMID:25196516

  14. Unique nucleation activity of inorganic fullerene-like WS2 nanoparticles in polyphenylene sulfide nanocomposites: isokinetic and isoconversional study of dynamic crystallization kinetics.

    PubMed

    Naffakh, Mohammed; Marco, Carlos; Gómez, Marián A; Jiménez, Ignacio

    2009-05-21

    The dynamic crystallization kinetics of polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) nanocomposites with inorganic fullerene WS2 nanopartices (IF-WS2) content varying from 0.05 to 8 wt % has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The analysis of the crystallization at different cooling rates demonstrates that the completely isokinetic description of the crystallization process is not possible. However, the isoconversional methods in combination with the JMAEK equation provide a better understanding of the kinetics of the dynamic crystallization process. The addition of IF-WS2 influences the crystallization kinetics of PPS but in ways unexpected for polymer nanocomposites. A drastic change from retardation to promotion of crystallization is observed with increasing nanoparticle content. In the same way, the results of the nucleation activity and the effective energy barrier confirmed the unique dependence of the crystallization behavior of PPS on composition. In addition, the morphological data obtained from the polarized optical microscopy (POM) and time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction is consistent with results of the crystallization kinetics of PPS/IF-WS2 nanocomposites.

  15. The adsorption of basic dye (Astrazon Blue FGRL) from aqueous solutions onto sepiolite, fly ash and apricot shell activated carbon: kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Karagozoglu, B; Tasdemir, M; Demirbas, E; Kobya, M

    2007-08-17

    In this study, sepiolite, fly ash and apricot stone activated carbon (ASAC) were used as adsorbents for the investigation of the adsorption kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamic parameters of the basic dye (Astrazon Blue FGRL) from aqueous solutions at various concentrations (100-300 mg/L), adsorbent doses (3-12 g/L) and temperatures (303-323 K). The result showed that the adsorption capacity of the dye increased with increasing initial dye concentration, adsorbent dose and temperature. Three kinetic models, the pseudo-first-order, second-order, intraparticle diffusion, were used to predict the adsorption rate constants. The kinetics of adsorption of the basic dye followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. Equations were developed using the pseudo-second-order model which predicts the amount of the basic dye adsorbed at any contact time, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dose within the given range accurately. The adsorption equilibrium data obeyed Langmuir isotherm. The adsorption capacities (Q0) calculated from the Langmuir isotherm were 181.5 mg/g for ASAC, 155.5 mg/g for sepiolite and 128.2 mg/g for fly ash at 303 K. Thermodynamical parameters were also evaluated for the dye-adsorbent systems and revealed that the adsorption process was endothermic in nature.

  16. A critical study of the Miura-Maki integral method for the estimation of the kinetic parameters of the distributed activation energy model.

    PubMed

    Cai, Junmeng; Li, Tao; Liu, Ronghou

    2011-02-01

    Using some theoretically simulated data constructed from known sets of the activation energy distribution f(E) (assumed to follow the Gaussian distribution [Formula in text] where E is the activation energy, E(0) is the mean value of the activation energy distribution, and σ is the standard deviation of the activation energy distribution) and the frequency factor k(0), a critical study of the use of the Miura-Maki integral method for the estimation of the kinetic parameters of the distributed activation energy model has been performed from three cases. For all cases, the use of the Miura-Maki integral method leads to important errors in the estimation of k(0). There are some differences between the assumed and calculated activation energy distributions and the differences decrease with increasing the assumed k(0) values (for Case 1), with increasing the assumed σ values (for Case 2), and with decreasing the b values (for Case 3).

  17. Antimycobacterial activity evaluation, time-kill kinetic and 3D-QSAR study of C-(3-aminomethyl-cyclohexyl)-methylamine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Raj, K Kranthi; Bailey, MaiAnn; Alling, Torey; Parish, Tanya; Rawat, Diwan S

    2013-03-01

    A series of C-(3-aminomethyl-cyclohexyl)-methylamine derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their antitubercular activity. Some of the compounds exhibited potent activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. One of the compound having t-butyl at para position of the benzene ring showed excellent activity even better than the standard drug ethambutol with MIC value 1.1 ± 0.2 μM. The time-kill kinetics study of two most active compounds showed rapid killing of the M. tuberculosis within 4 days. Additionally atom-based quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model was developed that gave a statistically satisfying result (R(2))=0.92, Q(2)=0.75, Pearson-R=0.96 and effectively predicts the anti-tuberculosis activity of training and test set compounds.

  18. Adsorption of Pb(II) on mesoporous activated carbons fabricated from water hyacinth using H3PO4 activation: Adsorption capacity, kinetic and isotherm studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yang; Li, Shunxing; Chen, Jianhua; Zhang, Xueliang; Chen, Yiping

    2014-02-01

    Activated carbons with high mesoporosity and abundant oxygen-containing functional groups were prepared from water hyacinth using H3PO4 activation (WHAC) to eliminate Pb(II) in water. Characterizations of the WHAC were performed using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The BET analysis showed that WHAC possesses a high mesoporosity (93.9%) with a BET surface area of 423.6 m2/g. The presence of oxygen-containing functional groups including hydroxyl, carbonyl, carboxyl and phosphate groups renders the WHAC a favorable adsorbent for Pb(II) with the maximum monolayer capacity (qm) 118.8 mg/g. The adsorption behavior follows pseudo-first order kinetic and Langmuir isotherm. The desorption study demonstrated that the WHAC could be readily regenerated using 0.1 M HCl (pH = 1.0). The desorbed WHAC could be reused at least six times without significant adsorption capacity reduction. The adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic with ΔG (-0.27, -1.13, -3.02, -3.62, -5.54, and -9.31 kJ/mol) and ΔH (38.72 kJ/mol). Under the optimized conditions, a small amount of the adsorbent (1.0 g/L) could remove as much as 90.1% of Pb(II) (50 mg/L) in 20 min at pH 6.0 and temperature of 298 K. Therefore, the WHAC has a great potential to be an economical and efficient adsorbent in the treatment of lead-contaminated water.

  19. Structural, kinetic, and theoretical studies on models of the zinc-containing phosphodiesterase active center: medium-dependent reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Selmeczi, Katalin; Michel, Carine; Milet, Anne; Gautier-Luneau, Isabelle; Philouze, Christian; Pierre, Jean-Louis; Schnieders, David; Rompel, Annette; Belle, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Dinuclear zinc(II) complexes [Zn(2)(bpmp)(mu-OH)](ClO(4))(2) (1) and [Zn(2)(bpmp)(H(2)O)(2)](ClO(4))(3) (2) (H-BPMP=2,6-bis[bis(2-pyridylmethyl)aminomethyl]-4-methylphenol) have been synthesized, structurally characterized, and pH-driven changes in metal coordination observed. The transesterification reaction of 2-hydroxypropyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNP) in the presence of the two complexes was studied both in a water/DMSO (70:30) mixture and in DMSO. Complex 2 was not reactive whereas for 1 considerable rate enhancement of the spontaneous hydrolysis reaction was observed. A detailed mechanistic investigation by kinetic studies, spectroscopic measurements ((1)H, (31)P NMR spectroscopy), and ESI-MS analysis in conjunction with ab initio calculations was performed on 1. Based on these results, two medium-dependent mechanisms are presented and an unusual bridging phosphate intermediate is proposed for the process in DMSO.

  20. ZnS:Cu nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon as novel adsorbent for kinetic, thermodynamic and isotherm studies of Reactive Orange 12 and Direct yellow 12 adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Ansari, Amin; Sahraei, Reza

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this work is the study of adsorption of Reactive Orange 12 (RO-12) and Direct yellow 12 (DY 12) by zinc sulfide:copper (ZnS-Cu-NP-AC) nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon. This new material with high efficiency in a routine manner was synthesized in our laboratory and its surface properties viz surface area, pore volume and functional groups was characterized with different techniques such FT-IR, SEM, and BET analysis. Generally, in batch adsorption procedure variables including amount of adsorbent, initial dyes concentration, contact time, temperature on dyes removal percentage has great effect on removal percentage that their influence was optimized. The kinetic of proposed adsorption processes efficiently followed, pseudo-second-order, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models. The equilibrium data the removal strongly follow Langmuir monolayer adsorption with high adsorption capacity in short time. This novel adsorbent by small amount (0.08 g) really is applicable for removal of high amount of both dyes (RO 12 and DY 12) in short time (<20 min). Based on the calculated thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (ΔS), activation energy (Ea), sticking probability (S*) and Gibb's free energy changes (ΔG), it is noticeable that the sorption of both dyes onto ZnS:Cu-AC was spontaneous and endothermic process. At optimum values all variables the effect of contact time on adsorption was investigated and the dependency of adsorption data to different kinetic model such as pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and intra-particle diffusion was assessed and it was found that the removal processes follow pseudo second order kinetics and interparticle diffusion mechanism.

  1. Kinetic, equilibrium isotherm and thermodynamic studies of Cr(VI) adsorption onto low-cost adsorbent developed from peanut shell activated with phosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    ALOthman, Zeid A; Naushad, Mu; Ali, Rahmat

    2013-05-01

    A particular agricultural waste, peanut shell, has been used as precursor for activated carbon production by chemical activation with H₃PO₄. Unoxidized activated carbon was prepared in nitrogen atmosphere which was then heated in air at a desired temperature to get oxidized activated carbon. The prepared carbons were characterized for surface area, surface morphology, and pore volume and utilized for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. Batch mode experiments were conducted to study the effects of pH, contact time, particle size, adsorbent dose, initial concentration of adsorbate, and temperature on the adsorption of Cr(VI). Cr(VI) adsorption was significantly dependent on solution pH, and the optimum adsorption was observed at pH 2. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models were used to analyze the kinetic data obtained at different initial Cr(VI) concentrations. The adsorption kinetic data were described very well by the pseudo-second-order model. Equilibrium isotherm data were analyzed by the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin models. The results showed that the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model fitted the data better in the temperature range studied. The adsorption capacity which was found to increase with temperature showed the endothermic nature of Cr(VI) adsorption. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibb's Free energy change (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°), and standard entropy change (ΔS°) were evaluated.

  2. Comparative evaluation of adsorption kinetics of diclofenac and isoproturon by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Torrellas, Silvia A; Rodriguez, Araceli R; Escudero, Gabriel O; Martín, José María G; Rodriguez, Juan G

    2015-01-01

    Adsorption mechanism of diclofenac and isoproturon onto activated carbon has been proposed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Adsorption capacity and optimum adsorption isotherms were predicted by nonlinear regression method. Different kinetic equations, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intraparticle diffusion model and Bangham kinetic model, were applied to study the adsorption kinetics of emerging contaminants on activated carbon in two aqueous matrices.

  3. Kinetic study and mechanism of Niclosamide degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaazaa, Hala E.; Abdelrahman, Maha M.; Ali, Nouruddin W.; Magdy, Maimana A.; Abdelkawy, M.

    2014-11-01

    A spectrophotometric kinetic study of Niclosamide alkaline degradation as a function of drug concentration, alkaline concentration and temperature has been established utilizing double divisor-ratio spectra spectrophotometric method. The developed method allowed determination of Niclosamide in presence of its alkaline degradation products; namely; 2-chloro-4-nitro aniline (DEG I) and 5-chloro salicylic acid (DEG II) with characterization of its degradation mechanism. It was found that degradation kinetic of Niclosamide followed pseudo-first order under the established experimental conditions with a degradation rate constant (k) of 0.0829 mol/h and half life (t1/2) of 8.35 h. The overall degradation rate constant as a function of the temperature under the given conditions obeyed Arrhenius equation where the activation energy was calculated to be 3.41 kcal/mol.

  4. Kinetic study and mechanism of Niclosamide degradation.

    PubMed

    Zaazaa, Hala E; Abdelrahman, Maha M; Ali, Nouruddin W; Magdy, Maimana A; Abdelkawy, M

    2014-11-11

    A spectrophotometric kinetic study of Niclosamide alkaline degradation as a function of drug concentration, alkaline concentration and temperature has been established utilizing double divisor-ratio spectra spectrophotometric method. The developed method allowed determination of Niclosamide in presence of its alkaline degradation products; namely; 2-chloro-4-nitro aniline (DEG I) and 5-chloro salicylic acid (DEG II) with characterization of its degradation mechanism. It was found that degradation kinetic of Niclosamide followed pseudo-first order under the established experimental conditions with a degradation rate constant (k) of 0.0829 mol/h and half life (t1/2) of 8.35 h. The overall degradation rate constant as a function of the temperature under the given conditions obeyed Arrhenius equation where the activation energy was calculated to be 3.41 kcal/mol.

  5. Kinetic modeling of active plasma resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberrath, Jens

    2016-09-01

    The term ``active plasma resonance spectroscopy'' (APRS) refers to a plasma diagnostic method which employs the natural ability of plasmas to resonate close to the plasma frequency. Essential for this method is an appropriate model to determine the relation between the resonance parameters and demanded plasma parameters. Measurements with these probes in plasmas of a few Pa typically show a broadening of the spectrum that cannot be predicted by a fluid model. Thus, a kinetic model is necessary. A general kinetic model of APRS probes, which can be described in electorstatic approximation, valid for all pressures has been presented. This model is used to analyze the dynamic behavior of such probes by means of functional analytic methods. One of the main results is, that the system response function Y (ω) is given in terms of the matrix elements of the resolvent of the dynamic operator evaluated for values on the imaginary axis. The spectrum of this operator is continuous which implies a new phenomenon related to anomalous or non-collisional dissipation. Based on the scalar product, which is motivated by the kinetic free energy, the non-collisional damping can be interpreted: In a periodic state, the probe constantly emits plasma waves which propagate to ``infinity''. The free energy simply leaves the ``observation range'' of the probe which is recorded as damping. The kinetic damping, which depends on the mean kinetic energy of the electrons, is responsible for the broadening of a resonance peak in the measured spectrum of APRS probes. The ultimate goal is to determine explicit formulas for the relation between the broadening of the resonance peak and the ``equivalent electron temperature'', especially in the case of the spherical Impedance Probe and the Multipole Resonance Probe. Gratitude is expressed to the internal funding of Leuphana University, the BMBF via PluTO+, the DFG via Collaborative Research Center TR 87, and the Ruhr University Research School.

  6. Biologically active thiosemicarbazone Fe chelators and their reactions with ferrioxamine B and ferric EDTA; a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Paul V; Martínez, Manuel; Rodríguez, Carlos; Vazquez, Marta

    2012-02-21

    The Fe(III) abstraction from Fe(III)/DFO and Fe(III)/EDTA complex systems by thiosemicarbazone ligands derived from 2-acetylpyridine has been studied from a kinetico-mechanistic perspective at relevant pH conditions and at varying temperatures and buffer solutions. The reactions have been found to be extremely dependent on the dominant E/Z isomeric form of the TSC ligands present in the reaction medium. Consequently the isomerisation processes occurring on the free ligands have also been monitored under equivalent conditions. The isomerisation process is found to be acid dependent, despite the absence of protonation under the conditions used, and presumably proceeds via an azo-type tautomer of the ligand. In all cases the existence of outer-sphere interaction processes has been established, both promoting the reactions and producing dead-end complexes. The better oriented forms of the ligands (EZ thiolate) have been found to react faster with the [Fe(HDFO)](+) complex, although for mono-N(4) substituted thiosemicarbazones the process is retarded by the formation of a dead-end outer-sphere complex. A comparison with the abstraction of Fe(III) from [Fe(EDTA)(H(2)O)](-) has also been conducted with significant differences in the kinetic features that implicate keystone outer-sphere interactions which dominate reactivity, even with isomeric forms that are not the best suited for direct complexation.

  7. Kinetics and molecular docking studies of the inhibitions of angiotensin converting enzyme and renin activities by hemp seed (Cannabis sativa L.) peptides.

    PubMed

    Girgih, Abraham T; He, Rong; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2014-05-07

    Four novel peptide sequences (WVYY, WYT, SVYT, and IPAGV) identified from an enzymatic digest of hemp seed proteins were used for enzyme inhibition kinetics and molecular docking studies. Results showed that WVYY (IC50 = 0.027 mM) was a more potent (p < 0.05) ACE-inhibitory peptide than WYT (IC50 = 0.574 mM). However, WYT (IC50 = 0.054 mM) and SVYT (IC50 = 0.063 mM) had similar renin-inhibitory activity, which was significantly better than that of IPAGV (IC50 = 0.093 mM). Kinetics studies showed that WVYY had a lower inhibition constant (Ki) of 0.06 mM and hence greater affinity for ACE when compared to the 1.83 mM obtained for WYT. SVYT had lowest Ki value of 0.89 mM against renin, when compared to the values obtained for WYT and IPAGV. Molecular docking results showed that the higher inhibitory activities of WVYY and SVYT were due to the greater degree of noncovalent bond-based interactions with the enzyme protein, especially formation of higher numbers of hydrogen bonds with active site residues.

  8. Active biopolymers confer fast reorganization kinetics.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Douglas; Wingreen, Ned S

    2011-11-18

    Many cytoskeletal biopolymers are "active," consuming energy in large quantities. In this Letter, we identify a fundamental difference between active polymers and passive, equilibrium polymers: for equal mean lengths, active polymers can reorganize faster than equilibrium polymers. We show that equilibrium polymers are intrinsically limited to linear scaling between mean lifetime (or mean first-passage time, or MFPT) and mean length, MFPT∼, by analogy to 1D Potts models. By contrast, we present a simple active-polymer model that improves upon this scaling, such that MFPT∼(1/2). Since, to be biologically useful, structural biopolymers must typically be many monomers long yet respond dynamically to the needs of the cell, the difference in reorganization kinetics may help to justify the active polymers' greater energy cost.

  9. CURRENT AND KINETIC HELICITY OF LONG-LIVED ACTIVITY COMPLEXES

    SciTech Connect

    Komm, Rudolf; Gosain, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    We study long-lived activity complexes and their current helicity at the solar surface and their kinetic helicity below the surface. The current helicity has been determined from synoptic vector magnetograms from the NSO/SOLIS facility, and the kinetic helicity of subsurface flows has been determined with ring-diagram analysis applied to full-disk Dopplergrams from NSO/GONG and SDO/HMI. Current and kinetic helicity of activity complexes follow the hemispheric helicity rule with mainly positive values (78%; 78%, respectively, with a 95% confidence level of 31%) in the southern hemisphere and negative ones (80%; 93%, respectively, with a 95% confidence level of 22% and 14%, respectively) in the northern hemisphere. The locations with the dominant sign of kinetic helicity derived from Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) and SDO/HMI data are more organized than those of the secondary sign even if they are not part of an activity complex, while locations with the secondary sign are more fragmented. This is the case for both hemispheres even for the northern one where it is not as obvious visually due to the large amount of magnetic activity present as compared to the southern hemisphere. The current helicity shows a similar behavior. The dominant sign of current helicity is the same as that of kinetic helicity for the majority of the activity complexes (83% with a 95% confidence level of 15%). During the 24 Carrington rotations analyzed here, there is at least one longitude in each hemisphere where activity complexes occur repeatedly throughout the epoch. These ''active'' longitudes are identifiable as locations of strong current and kinetic helicity of the same sign.

  10. Adsorptive removal of phthalate ester (Di-ethyl phthalate) from aqueous phase by activated carbon: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Venkata Mohan, S; Shailaja, S; Rama Krishna, M; Sarma, P N

    2007-07-19

    Adsorptive studies were carried out on Di-ethyl phthalate (DEP) removal from aqueous phase onto activated carbon. Batch sorption studies were performed and the results revealed that activated carbon demonstrated ability to adsorb DEP. Influence of varying experimental conditions such as DEP concentration, pH of aqueous solution, and dosage of adsorbent were investigated on the adsorption process. Sorption interaction of DEP onto activated carbon obeyed the pseudo second order rate equation. Experimental data showed good fit with both the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. DEP sorption was found to be dependent on the aqueous phase pH and the uptake was observed to be greater at acidic pH.

  11. A Kinetic Model of Active Extensile Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Daniel; Chakraborty, Bulbul; Baskaran, Aparna

    Recent experiments in active filament networks reveal interesting rheological properties (Dan Chen: APS March Meeting 2015 D49.00001). This system consumes ATP to produce an extensile motion in bundles of microtubules. This extension then leads to self generated stresses and spontaneous flows. We propose a minimal model where the activity is modeled by self-extending bundles that are part of a cross linked network. This network can reorganize itself through buckling of extending filaments and merging events that alter the topology of the network. We numerically simulate this minimal kinetic model and examine the emergent rheological properties and determine how stresses are generated by the extensile activity. We will present results that focus on the effects of confinement and network connectivity of the bundles on stress fluctuations and response of an active gel.

  12. Kinetic approach for evaluation of total antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Karyakina, Elena E; Vokhmyanina, Darya V; Sizova, Natalya V; Sabitov, Aytugan N; Borisova, Anastasiya V; Sazontova, Tatyana G; Arkhipenko, Yury V; Tkachuk, Vsevolod A; Zolotov, Yury A; Karyakin, Arkady A

    2009-12-15

    We propose a novel approach for assessment of total antioxidant activity by monitoring kinetics of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) scavenging after its injection into liquid sample under study. H(2)O(2) is known to be the strongest oxidant, really presented in human body in contrast to the majority of the model oxidative systems used for evaluation of antioxidant activity. In addition, kinetic approach, being more informative than the commonly used determination of the final product, obviously provides better discrimination of potential antioxidants. Prussian Blue based sensor due to its high sensitivity and operational stability allowed to monitor kinetics of hydrogen peroxide consumption in turbid and colored samples. The pseudo-first order kinetic constants of hydrogen peroxide scavenging in the presence of different food additives correlated with total antioxidant activity of these samples evaluated via standard procedure based on lipid peroxidation. However, in contrast to the standard method, the proposed kinetic approach is expressed and does not require fresh biological tissues.

  13. Sialidase, receptor-binding and fusion-promotion activities of Newcastle disease virus haemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoprotein: a mutational and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Laura; Muñoz-Barroso, Isabel; Marcos, Fernando; Shnyrov, Valery L; Villar, Enrique

    2004-07-01

    Mutations were generated in residues at the putative catalytic site of the haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of Newcastle disease virus Clone 30 strain (Arg498, Glu258, Tyr262, Tyr317 and Ser418) and their effects on its three associated activities were studied. Expression of the mutant proteins at the surface of HeLa cells was similar to that of the wild-type. Sialidase, receptor-binding and fusion-promotion activities were affected to different degrees for all mutants studied. Mutant Arg498Lys lost most of its sialidase activity, although it retained most of the receptor-binding activity, suggesting that, for the former activity, besides the presence of a basic residue, the proximity to the substrate molecule is also important, as Lys is shorter than Arg. Proximity also seems to be important in substrate recognition, since Tyr262Phe retained most of its sialidase activity while Tyr262Ser lost most of it. Also, Ser418Ala displayed most of the wild-type sialidase activity. However, a kinetic and thermodynamic study of the sialidase activity of the Tyr262Ser and Ser418Ala mutants was performed and revealed that the hydroxyl group of these residues also plays an important role in catalysis, since such activity was much less effective than that of the wild-type and these mutations modified their activation energy for sialidase catalysis. The discrepancy of the modifications in sialidase and receptor-binding activities in the mutants analysed does not account for the topological coincidence of the two sites. These results also suggest that the globular head of HN protein may play a role in fusion-promotion activity.

  14. Fluidization and Active Thinning by Molecular Kinetics in Active Gels.

    PubMed

    Oriola, David; Alert, Ricard; Casademunt, Jaume

    2017-02-24

    We derive the constitutive equations of an active polar gel from a model for the dynamics of elastic molecules that link polar elements. Molecular binding kinetics induces the fluidization of the material, giving rise to Maxwell viscoelasticity and, provided that detailed balance is broken, to the generation of active stresses. We give explicit expressions for the transport coefficients of active gels in terms of molecular properties, including nonlinear contributions on the departure from equilibrium. In particular, when activity favors linker unbinding, we predict a decrease of viscosity with activity-active thinning-of kinetic origin, which could explain some experimental results on the cell cortex. By bridging the molecular and hydrodynamic scales, our results could help understand the interplay between molecular perturbations and the mechanics of cells and tissues.

  15. A study on the morphology and catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles by the kinetic Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiang; Chen, Zhao-Xu

    2016-05-01

    We studied the thermal-stability of supported Au nanoparticles on the substrates of different binding strength to gold by Monte Carlo simulations. It has been revealed that the stable Au morphology is determined by the temperature and the binding strength. When heated on the strongly-binding substrates, the Au nanoparticles would wet the substrate completely and form monolayer. The stable Au layered structure of few layers can be formed by the incomplete wetting of clusters on the intermediate-binding substrates. The simulation results are in good agreement with pertinent experimental and theoretical results. Based on the simulation results and experimental observations, we find the strong linkage between the top edge sites and the activity TOF of low-temperature CO oxidation. We conclude that the top edges sites of Au layered structures are possible reactive sites. This study may provide new perspective for controlling morphology and understanding catalytic activity of supported metallic clusters.

  16. Application of activated carbon derived from 'waste' bamboo culms for the adsorption of azo disperse dye: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lianggui

    2012-07-15

    The utilization of activated carbon derived from 'waste' bamboo culms (BAC) for the removal of Disperse Red 167 (DR167), an azo disperse dye, was investigated. Studies of the properties of the adsorbent, the effect of contact time, the initial pH of the solution, the initial concentration of the dye solution and temperature indicated that a low initial pH or concentration of dye solution favors the adsorption process; temperature exerts a greater effect on the removal of azo disperse red 167 dye from aqueous solution. Kinetic and isotherm data were fitted to five non-linear kinetic and nine non-linear isotherm equations. In addition, the fits were evaluated in terms of the non-linear coefficient, Chi-square test, Marquardt's percent standard deviation error function and small-sample-corrected Akaike Information Criterion (AICc) methodology. The results showed that the AICc analysis was the best statistical tool for analyzing the data, the intra-particle diffusion and the pseudo-first-order models played important roles in the controlling rate step, and the Temkin equation best described the BAC isotherm data. Furthermore, the thermodynamic analysis indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous, endothermic, entropy-increasing and physical process. Two types of commercial activated carbon, Filtrasorb 400 and Filtrasorb (F400 and F300), were used as contrast adsorbents. The contrast experiments revealed that BAC exhibits similar properties to F400 and F300. The utilization of bamboo wastes as carbon precursors is feasible.

  17. Hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous solution by algal bloom residue derived activated carbon: equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Tang, Yi; Cai, Dongqing; Liu, Xianan; Wang, Xiangqin; Huang, Qing; Yu, Zengliang

    2010-09-15

    A novel approach to prepare activated carbon from blue-green algal bloom residue has been tried for first time and its adsorption capability to remove hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) from aqueous solution has been examined. For this algal bloom residue derived activated carbon, the physical characters regarding adsorption capability were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Batch studies showed that initial pH, absorbent dosage, and initial concentration of Cr(VI) were important parameters for Cr(VI) absorption. It was found that initial pH of 1.0 was most favorable for Cr(VI) removal. The adsorption process followed the pseudo-second-order equation and Freundlich isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) was 155.52 mg g(-1) in an acidic medium, which is comparable to best result from activated carbons derived from biomass. Therefore, this work put forward a nearly perfect solution which on one hand gets rid of environment-unfriendly algae residue while on the other hand produces high-quality activated carbon that is in return advantageous to environment protection.

  18. Fluidization and Active Thinning by Molecular Kinetics in Active Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriola, David; Alert, Ricard; Casademunt, Jaume

    2017-02-01

    We derive the constitutive equations of an active polar gel from a model for the dynamics of elastic molecules that link polar elements. Molecular binding kinetics induces the fluidization of the material, giving rise to Maxwell viscoelasticity and, provided that detailed balance is broken, to the generation of active stresses. We give explicit expressions for the transport coefficients of active gels in terms of molecular properties, including nonlinear contributions on the departure from equilibrium. In particular, when activity favors linker unbinding, we predict a decrease of viscosity with activity—active thinning—of kinetic origin, which could explain some experimental results on the cell cortex. By bridging the molecular and hydrodynamic scales, our results could help understand the interplay between molecular perturbations and the mechanics of cells and tissues.

  19. The use of real-time PCR to study Penicillium chrysogenum growth kinetics on solid food at different water activities.

    PubMed

    Arquiza, J M R Apollo; Hunter, Jean

    2014-09-18

    Fungal growth on solid foods can make them unfit for human consumption, but certain specialty foods require fungi to produce their characteristic properties. In either case, a reliable way of measuring biomass is needed to study how various factors (e.g. water activity) affect fungal growth rates on these substrates. Biochemical markers such as chitin, glucosamine or ergosterol have been used to estimate fungal growth, but they cannot distinguish between individual species in mixed culture. In this study, a real-time polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR) protocol specific for a target fungal species was used to quantify its DNA while growing on solid food. The measured amount of DNA was then related to the biomass present using an experimentally determined DNA-to-biomass ratio. The highly sensitive rt-PCR biomass assay was found to have a wide range, able to quantify the target DNA within a six orders-of-magnitude difference. The method was used to monitor germination and growth of Penicillium chrysogenum spores on a model porous food (cooked wheat flour) at 25°C and different water activities of 0.973, 0.936, and 0.843. No growth was observed at 0.843, but lag, exponential and stationary phases were identified in the growth curves for the higher water activities. The calculated specific growth rates (μ) during the exponential phase were almost identical, at 0.075/h and 0.076/h for aw=0.973 and 0.936, respectively. The specificity of the method was demonstrated by measuring the biomass of P. chrysogenum while growing together with Aspergillus niger on solid media at aw=0.973.

  20. Kinetic studies of ICF implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Kagan, Grigory; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. -H.; ...

    2016-05-26

    Here, kinetic effects on inertial confinement fusion have been investigated. In particular, inter-ion-species diffusion and suprathermal ion distribution have been analyzed. The former drives separation of the fuel constituents in the hot reacting core and governs mix at the shell/fuel interface. The latter underlie measurements obtained with nuclear diagnostics, including the fusion yield and inferred ion burn temperatures. Basic mechanisms behind and practical consequences from these effects are discussed.

  1. Kinetic and Structural Studies of Aldehyde Oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas Reveal a Dithiolene-Based Chemistry for Enzyme Activation and Inhibition by H2O2

    PubMed Central

    Brondino, Carlos D.; Moura, José J. G.; Romão, Maria J.; González, Pablo J.; Santos-Silva, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Mononuclear Mo-containing enzymes of the xanthine oxidase (XO) family catalyze the oxidative hydroxylation of aldehydes and heterocyclic compounds. The molybdenum active site shows a distorted square-pyramidal geometry in which two ligands, a hydroxyl/water molecule (the catalytic labile site) and a sulfido ligand, have been shown to be essential for catalysis. The XO family member aldehyde oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas (DgAOR) is an exception as presents in its catalytically competent form an equatorial oxo ligand instead of the sulfido ligand. Despite this structural difference, inactive samples of DgAOR can be activated upon incubation with dithionite plus sulfide, a procedure similar to that used for activation of desulfo-XO. The fact that DgAOR does not need a sulfido ligand for catalysis indicates that the process leading to the activation of inactive DgAOR samples is different to that of desulfo-XO. We now report a combined kinetic and X-ray crystallographic study to unveil the enzyme modification responsible for the inactivation and the chemistry that occurs at the Mo site when DgAOR is activated. In contrast to XO, which is activated by resulfuration of the Mo site, DgAOR activation/inactivation is governed by the oxidation state of the dithiolene moiety of the pyranopterin cofactor, which demonstrates the non-innocent behavior of the pyranopterin in enzyme activity. We also showed that DgAOR incubation with dithionite plus sulfide in the presence of dioxygen produces hydrogen peroxide not associated with the enzyme activation. The peroxide molecule coordinates to molybdenum in a η2 fashion inhibiting the enzyme activity. PMID:24391748

  2. Adsorption of Trametes versicolor laccase to soil iron and aluminum minerals: enzyme activity, kinetics and stability studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Jiang, Ying; Jiao, Jiaguo; Liu, Manqiang; Hu, Feng; Griffiths, Bryan S; Li, Huixin

    2014-02-01

    Laccases play an important role in the degradation of soil phenol or phenol-like substance and can be potentially used in soil remediation through immobilization. Iron and aluminum minerals can adsorb extracellular enzymes in soil environment. In the present study, we investigated the adsorptive interaction of laccase, from the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor, with soil iron and aluminum minerals and characterized the properties of the enzyme after adsorption to minerals. Results showed that both soil iron and aluminum minerals adsorbed great amount of laccase, independent of the mineral specific surface areas. Adsorbed laccases retained 26-64% of the activity of the free enzyme. Compared to the free laccase, all adsorbed laccases showed higher Km values and lower Vmax values, indicating a reduced enzyme-substrate affinity and a lower rate of substrate conversion in reactions catalyzed by the adsorbed laccase. Adsorbed laccases exhibited increased catalytic activities compared to the free laccase at low pH, implying the suitable application of iron and aluminum mineral-adsorbed T. versicolor laccase in soil bioremediation, especially in acid soils. In terms of the thermal profiles, adsorbed laccases showed decreased thermal stability and higher temperature sensitivity relative to the free laccase. Moreover, adsorption improved the resistance of laccase to proteolysis and extended the lifespan of laccase. Our results implied that adsorbed T. versicolor laccase on soil iron and aluminum minerals had promising potential in soil remediation.

  3. DNA damage, cell kinetics and ODC activities studied in CBA mice exposed to electromagnetic fields generated by transmission lines.

    PubMed

    Svedenstål, B M; Johanson, K J; Mattsson, M O; Paulsson, L E

    1999-01-01

    CBA mice were exposed outdoors to 50 Hz electromagnetic fields (EMF), with a flux density of about 8 microT rms (root mean square), generated by a 220 kV transmission line. Assays were performed in order to investigate, the possible genotoxic effects after 11, 20 and 32 days of exposure, as well as the effects on body weight, leukocytes, erythrocytes, and the level of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity in spleen and testis. DNA migration was studied on brain cells by single cell electrophoresis (comet assay). After 32 days of exposure a highly significant change of the tail/head ratio of the comets was observed (p < 0.001), showing DNA-damage. Further, a decreased number of mononuclear leukocytes (0.02 < p < 0.05) was observed in mice EMF-exposed for 20 days. In summary, our data indicate that transmission lines of this type may induce genotoxic effects in mice, seen as changes in the DNA migration. These results might have an important implication for health effects.

  4. Synthesis and properties of Fe3O4-activated carbon magnetic nanoparticles for removal of aniline from aqueous solution: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, powder activated carbon (PAC) and magnetic nanoparticles of iron (III) oxide were used for synthesis of Fe3O4-activated carbon magnetic nanoparticles (AC-Fe3O4 MNPs) as an adsorbent for the removal of aniline. The characteristics of adsorbent were evaluated by SEM, TEM, XRD and BET. Also, the impact of different parameters such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, aniline initials concentration and solution temperature were studied. The experimental data investigated by Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms and two models kinetically of pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order. The results indicated that the adsorption followed Langmuir and pseudo second-order models with correlation r2 > 0.98 and r2 > 0.99, respectively. The equilibrium time was obtained after 5 h. According to Langmuir model, the maximum adsorption capacity was 90.91 mg/g at pH = 6, and 20°C. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that adsorption of aniline on magnetic activated carbon was exothermic and spontaneous. This synthesized AC-Fe3O4 MNPs due to have advantages such as easy and rapid separation from solution could be applied as an adsorbent effective for removal of pollutants such as aniline from water and wastewater. PMID:23414171

  5. Synthesis and properties of Fe3O4-activated carbon magnetic nanoparticles for removal of aniline from aqueous solution: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Kakavandi, Babak; Jonidi, Ahmad; Rezaei, Roshanak; Nasseri, Simin; Ameri, Ahmad; Esrafily, Ali

    2013-01-01

    In this study, powder activated carbon (PAC) and magnetic nanoparticles of iron (III) oxide were used for synthesis of Fe3O4-activated carbon magnetic nanoparticles (AC-Fe3O4 MNPs) as an adsorbent for the removal of aniline. The characteristics of adsorbent were evaluated by SEM, TEM, XRD and BET. Also, the impact of different parameters such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, aniline initials concentration and solution temperature were studied. The experimental data investigated by Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms and two models kinetically of pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order. The results indicated that the adsorption followed Langmuir and pseudo second-order models with correlation r(2) > 0.98 and r(2) > 0.99, respectively. The equilibrium time was obtained after 5 h. According to Langmuir model, the maximum adsorption capacity was 90.91 mg/g at pH = 6, and 20°C. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that adsorption of aniline on magnetic activated carbon was exothermic and spontaneous. This synthesized AC-Fe3O4 MNPs due to have advantages such as easy and rapid separation from solution could be applied as an adsorbent effective for removal of pollutants such as aniline from water and wastewater.

  6. An arsenate reductase homologue possessing phosphatase activity from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam): kinetic studies and characterization.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ya-Hui; Lin, Chao-Yi; Pai, Shou-Hsiung; Huang, Jenq-Kuen; Lin, Chi-Tsai

    2011-04-13

    A cDNA encoding a putative arsenate reductase homologue (IbArsR) was cloned from sweet potato (Ib). The deduced protein showed a high level of sequence homology (16-66%) with ArsRs from other organisms. A 3-D homology structure was created based on AtArsR (PDB code 1T3K ) from Arabidopsis thaliana. The putative active site of protein tyrosine phosphatase (HC(X)(5)R) is conserved in all reported ArsRs. IbArsR was overexpressed and purified. The monomeric nature of the enzyme was confirmed by 15% SDS-PAGE and molecular mass determination of the native enzyme via ESI Q-TOF. The IbArsR lacks arsenate reductase activity but possesses phosphatase activity. The Michaelis constant (K(M)) value for p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) was 11.11 mM. The phosphatase activity was inhibited by 0.5 mM sodium arsenate [As(V)]. The protein's half-life of deactivation at 25 °C was 6.1 min, and its inactivation rate constant K(d) was 1.1 × 10(-1) min(-1). The enzyme was active in a broad pH range from 4.0 to 11.0 with optimum activity at pH 10.0. Phosphatase would remove phosphate group from nucleic acid or dephosphorylation of other enzymes as regulation signaling.

  7. Tea catechins inhibit hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET kinase) activity in human colon cancer cells: kinetic and molecular docking studies

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Christine A.; Bisson, William H.; Dashwood, Roderick H.

    2009-01-01

    Most cancer deaths result from spread of the primary tumor to distant sites (metastasis). MET is an important protein for metastasis in multiple tumor types. Here we report on the ability of tea catechins to suppress MET activation in human colon cancer cells, and propose a mechanism by which they might compete for the kinase domain of the MET protein. PMID:19839593

  8. Equilibrium and kinetic studies on the removal of Acid Red 114 from aqueous solutions using activated carbons prepared from seed shells.

    PubMed

    Thinakaran, N; Panneerselvam, P; Baskaralingam, P; Elango, D; Sivanesan, S

    2008-10-01

    The use of low-cost and ecofriendly adsorbents has been investigated as an ideal alternative to the current expensive methods of removing dyes from wastewater. This paper deals with the removal of Acid Red 114 (AR 114) from aqueous solutions using activated carbons prepared from agricultural waste materials such as gingelly (sesame) (Sp), cotton (Cp) and pongam (Pp) seed shells. Optimum conditions for AR 114 removal were found to be pH 3, adsorbent dosage=3g/L of solution and equilibrium time=4h. Higher removal percentages were observed at lower concentrations of AR 114. The adsorption isotherm data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich equation, and the adsorption capacity of the studied adsorbents was in the order Sp>Cp>Pp. Kinetic studies showed that the adsorption followed both pseudo-second-order and Elovich equation. The thermodynamics parameters such as DeltaG degrees, DeltaH degrees, DeltaS degrees were also evaluated. The activated carbons prepared were characterized by FT-IR, SEM and BET analysis.

  9. Oxidation kinetics of ferrous sulfate over active carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Roennholm, M.R.; Waernaa, J.; Salmi, T.; Turunen, I.; Luoma, M.

    1999-07-01

    Catalyzed oxidation kinetics of dissolved Fe{sup 2+} ions to Fe{sup 3+} over active carbon in concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-FeSO{sub 4} solutions was studied with isothermal and isobaric experiments carried out in a laboratory-scale pressurized autoclave. The experiments were performed at temperatures between 60 and 130 C, and the pressure of oxygen (O{sub 2}) was varied between 4 and 10 bar. The kinetic results revealed that the oxidation rate was enhanced by increasing the temperature and pressure and that the catalytic and noncatalytic oxidations proceed as parallel processes. A rate equation was obtained for the catalytic oxidation process, based on the assumption that the oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} with adsorbed oxygen is rate determining. The total oxidation rate was simulated by including a previously determined rate equation for the noncatalytic oxidation into the global model, from which the kinetic parameters of the catalytic oxidation rate were determined. A comparison of the model fit with the experimental data revealed that the proposed rate equation is applicable for the prediction of the Fe{sup 2+} oxidation kinetics in acidic ferrous sulfate solutions.

  10. Kinetic behaviour of zymogen activation processes in the presence of an inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Varón, R; Manjabacas, M C; García-Moreno, M; Valero, E; Garcia-Canovas, F

    1993-01-01

    A global kinetic analysis of a general zymogen activation model, where not only the activating but also the activated enzyme suffer an irreversible inhibition is presented. A reaction in which the enzyme acts upon a substrate is coupled to monitor the process. In addition, we determined the corresponding kinetic equations for a number of particular cases of the general model studied. Finally, a kinetic data analysis and a procedure to discriminate among the different mechanisms considered, which are based on the kinetic equations obtained, are suggested. PMID:8452535

  11. Spectrophotometric evaluation of surface morphology dependent catalytic activity of biosynthesized silver and gold nanoparticles using UV-vis spectra: A comparative kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankamwar, Balaprasad; Kamble, Vaishali; Sur, Ujjal Kumar; Santra, Chittaranjan

    2016-03-01

    The development of eco-friendly and cost-effective synthetic protocol for the preparation of nanomaterials, especially metal nanoparticles is an emerging area of research in nanotechnology. These metal nanoparticles, especially silver can play a crucial role in various catalytic reactions. The biosynthesized silver nanoparticles described here was very stable up to 6 months and can be further exploited as an effective catalyst in the chemical reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol. The silver nanoparticles were utilized as an efficient surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) active substrate using Rhodamine 6G as Raman probe molecule. We have also carried out systematic comparative studies on the catalytic efficiency of both silver and gold nanoparticles using UV-vis spectra to monitor the above reaction spectrophotometrically. We find that the reaction follows pseudo-first order kinetics and the catalytic activity can be explained by a simple model based on Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism for heterogeneous catalysis. We also find that silver nanoparticles are more efficient as a catalyst compare to gold nanoparticles in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol, which can be explained by the morphology of the nanoparticles as determined by transmission electron microscopy.

  12. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, J.L. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  13. Structural, kinetic, and thermodynamic study of the reversible thermal C-H activation/reductive elimination of alkanes at iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, J.M.; Stryker, J.M.; Bergman, R.G.

    1986-04-02

    The hydrido alkyl iridium complex Cp*(PMe/sub 3/)Ir(Cy)(H) (1, Cp* = eta/sup 5/-C/sub 5/; Cy = cyclohexyl) has been isolated by air-free chromatography at -80/sup 0/C, and its molecular structure has been determined by X-ray diffraction. Thermolysis of 1 in benzene cleanly produces cyclohexane and Cp*(PMe/sub 3/)Ir(Ph)(H) (2). The rate of reaction is first-order in 1, zero-order in benzene, and inhibited by cyclohexane; its activation parameters are ..delta..H/sup + +/ = 35.6 +/- 0.5 kcal/mol and ..delta..S/sup + +/ = +10 +/- 2 eu. An inverse isotope effect, kappa/sub h/kappa/sub d/ = 0.7 +/- 0.1, is calculated from rates of cyclohexane and cyclohexane-d/sub 12/ reductive elimination at 130/sup 0/C, and deuterium scrambling between the hydride and ..cap alpha..-cyclohexyl positions is observed to occur competitively with reductive elimination. A mechanism is proposed in which cyclohexane loss from 1 is reversible and produces (Cp*(PMe/sub 3/)Ir), which oxidatively adds to a C-H bond in a benzene solvent molecule to form 2. Evidence is also presented for the possible intermediacy of a cyclohexane/(Cp*(PMe/sub 3/)Ir) sigma-complex, which is formed before free (Cp*(PMe/sub 3/)Ir) is released. Equilibrium constants for the equilibration of several pairs of alkanes and their corresponding iridium(III) hydrido alkyl complexes have been determined and imply the following trend in solution phase iridium-carbon bond dissociation enthalpies: phenyl >> n-pentyl > 2,3-dimethylbutyl > cyclopentyl approx. cyclohexyl > neopentyl.

  14. 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance and kinetic studies of the active site structure of chloroplast CF1 ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Devlin, C C; Grisham, C M

    1990-07-03

    The interaction of nucleotides and nucleotide analogues and their metal complexes with Mn2+ bound to both the latent and dithiothreitol-activated CF1 ATP synthase has been examined by means of steady-state kinetics, water proton relaxation rate (PRR) measurements, and 1H and 31P nuclear relaxation measurements. Titration of both the latent and activated Mn(2+)-CF1 complexes with ATP, ADP, Pi, Co(NH3)4ATP, Co(NH3)4ADP, and Co(NH3)4AMPPCP leads to increases in the water relaxation enhancement, consistent with enhanced metal binding and a high ternary complex enhancement. Steady-state kinetic studies are consistent with competitive inhibition of CF1 by Co(NH3)4AMPPCP with respect to CaATP. The data are consistent with a Ki for Co(NH3)4AMPPCP of 650 microM, in good agreement with a previous Ki of 724 microM for Cr(H2O)4ATP [Frasch, W., & Selman, B. (1982) Biochemistry 21, 3636-3643], and a best fit KD of 209 microM from the water PRR measurements. 1H and 31P nuclear relaxation measurements in solutions of CF1 and Co(NH3)4AMPPCP were used to determine the conformation of the bound substrate analogue and the arrangement with respect to this structure of high- and low-affinity sites for Mn2+. The bound nucleotide analogue adopts a bent conformation, with the low-affinity Mn2+ site situated between the adenine and triphosphate moieties and the high-affinity metal site located on the far side of the triphosphate chain. The low-affinity metal forms a distorted inner-sphere complex with the beta-P and gamma-P of the substrate. The distances from Mn2+ to the triphosphate chain are too large for first coordination sphere complexes but are appropriate for second-sphere complexes involving, for example, intervening hydrogen-bonded water molecules or residues from the protein.

  15. sup 1 H and sup 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance and kinetic studies of the active site structure of chloroplast CF sub 1 ATP synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, C.C.; Grisham, C.M. )

    1990-07-03

    The interaction of nucleotides and nucleotide analogues and their complexes with Mn{sup 2+} bound to both the latent and dithiothreitol-activated CF{sub 1} ATP synthase has been examined by means of steady-state kinetics, water proton relaxation rate (PRR) measurements, and {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear relaxation measurements. Titration of both the latent and activated Mn{sup 2+}-CF{sub 1} complexes with ATP, ADP, P{sub i}, Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}ATP, Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}ADP, and Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}AMPPCP leads to increases in the water relaxation enhancement, consistent with enhanced metal binding and a high ternary complex enhancement. Steady-state kinetic studies are consistent with competitive inhibition of CF{sub 1} by Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}AMPPCP with respect to CaATP. {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear relaxation measurements in solutions of CF{sub 1} and Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}AMPPCP were used to determine the conformation of the bound substrate analogue and the arrangement with respect to this structure of high- and low-affinity sites for Mn{sup 2+}. The bound nucleotide analogue adopts a bent conformation, with the low-affinity sites for Mn{sup 2+}. The bound nucleotide analogue adopts a bent conformation, with the low-affinity Mn{sup 2+} site situated between the adenine and triphosphate moieties and the high-affinity metal site located on the far side of the triphosphate chain. The low-affinity metal forms a distorted inner-sphere complex with the {beta}-P and {gamma}-P of the substrate. The distances from Mn{sup 2+} to the triphosphate chain are too large for first coordination sphere complexes but are appropriate for second-sphere complexes involving, for example, intervening hydrogen-bonded water molecules or residues from the protein.

  16. Flash kinetics in liquefied noble gases: Studies of alkane activation and ligand dynamics at rhodium carbonyl centers, and a search for xenon-carbene adducts

    SciTech Connect

    Yeston, Jake Simon

    2001-01-01

    A general introduction is given to place the subsequent chapters in context for the nonspecialist. Results are presented from a low temperature infrared (IR) flash kinetic study of C-H bond activation via photoinduced reaction of Cp*Rh(CO)2 (1) with linear and cyclic alkanes in liquid krypton and liquid xenon solution. No reaction was observed with methane; for all other hydrocarbons studied, the rate law supports fragmentation of the overall reaction into an alkane binding step followed by an oxidative addition step. For the binding step, larger alkanes within each series (linear and cyclic) interact more strongly than smaller alkanes with the Rh center. The second step, oxidative addition of the C-H bond across Rh, exhibits very little variance in the series of linear alkanes, while in the cyclic series the rate decreases with increasing alkane size. Results are presented from an IR flash kinetic study of the photoinduced chemistry of Tp*Rh(CO)2 (5; Tp* = hydridotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borato) in liquid xenon solution at –50 °C. IR spectra of the solution taken 2 μs after 308 nm photolysis exhibit two transient bands at 1972-1980 cm-1 and 1992-2000 cm-1, respectively. These bands were assigned to (η3-Tp*)Rh(CO)•Xe and (η2-Tp*)Rh(CO)•Xe solvates on the basis of companion studies using Bp*Rh(CO)2 (9; Bp* = dihydridobis(3,5-dimethyl pyrazolyl)borato). Preliminary kinetic data for reaction of 5 with cyclohexane in xenon solution indicate that both transient bands still appear and that their rates of decay correlate with formation of the product Tp*Rh(CO)(C6H11)(H). The preparation and reactivity of the new complex Bp*Rh(CO)(pyridine) (11) are described. The complex reacts with CH3I to yield the novel Rh carbene hydride complex HB(Me2pz)2Rh(H)(I)(C5H5N)(C(O)Me) (12), resulting from formal addition of CH

  17. Kinetics studies on the inhibition mechanism of pancreatic α-amylase by glycoconjugated 1H-1,2,3-triazoles: a new class of inhibitors with hypoglycemiant activity.

    PubMed

    Senger, Mario Roberto; Gomes, Lucas da Costa Andrade; Ferreira, Sabrina Baptista; Kaiser, Carlos Roland; Ferreira, Vitor Francisco; Silva, Floriano Paes

    2012-07-23

    Glycoconjugated 1H-1,2,3-triazoles (GCTs) comprise a new class of glycosidase inhibitors that are under investigation as promising therapeutic agents for a variety of diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, few kinetics studies have been performed to clarify the mode of inhibition of GCTs with their target glycosidases. Our group has previously shown that some methyl-β-D-ribofuranosyl-1H-1,2,3-triazoles that inhibit baker's yeast maltase were also able to reduce post-prandial glucose levels in normal rats. We hypothesized that this hypoglycemiant activity was attributable to inhibition of mammalian α-glucosidases involved in sugar metabolism, such as pancreatic α-amylase. Hence, the aim of this work was to test a series of 26 GCTs on porcine pancreatic α-amylase (PPA) and to characterize their inhibition mechanisms. Six GCTs, all ribofuranosyl-derived GCTs, significantly inhibited PPA, with IC(50) values in the middle to high micromolar range. Our results also demonstrated that ribofuranosyl-derived GCTs are reversible, noncompetitive inhibitors when using 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl-α-D-maltotrioside as a substrate. E/ES affinity ratios (α) ranged from 0.3 to 1.1, with the majority of ribofuranosyl-derived GCTs preferentially forming stable ternary ESI complexes. Competition assays with acarbose showed that ribofuranosyl-derived GCTs bind to PPA in a mutually exclusive fashion. The data presented here show that pancreatic α-amylase is one of the possible molecular targets in the pharmacological activity of ribofuranosyl-derived GCTs. Our results also provide important mechanistic insight that can be of major help to develop this new class of synthetic small molecules into more potent compounds with anti-diabetic activity through rational drug design.

  18. Sorption of water alkalinity and hardness from high-strength wastewater on bifunctional activated carbon: process optimization, kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Amosa, Mutiu K

    2016-08-01

    Sorption optimization and mechanism of hardness and alkalinity on bifunctional empty fruit bunch-based powdered activation carbon (PAC) were studied. The PAC possessed both high surface area and ion-exchange properties, and it was utilized in the treatment of biotreated palm oil mill effluent. Batch adsorption experiments designed with Design Expert(®) were conducted in correlating the singular and interactive effects of the three adsorption parameters: PAC dosage, agitation speed and contact time. The sorption trends of the two contaminants were sequentially assessed through a full factorial design with three factor interaction models and a central composite design with polynomial models of quadratic order. Analysis of variance revealed the significant factors on each design response with very high R(2) values indicating good agreement between model and experimental values. The optimum operating conditions of the two contaminants differed due to their different regions of operating interests, thus necessitating the utility of desirability factor to get consolidated optimum operation conditions. The equilibrium data for alkalinity and hardness sorption were better represented by the Langmuir isotherm, while the pseudo-second-order kinetic model described the adsorption rates and behavior better. It was concluded that chemisorption contributed majorly to the adsorption process.

  19. Kinetic Study on Pyrolysis of Oil Palm Frond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soon, V. S. Y.; Chin, B. L. F.; Lim, A. C. R.

    2016-03-01

    The pyrolysis of oil palm frond is studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. The present study investigates the thermal degradation behaviour and determination of the kinetic parameters such as the activation energy (EA ) and pre-exponential factor (A) values of oil palm frond under pyrolysis condition. The kinetic data is produced based on first order rate of reaction. In this study, the experiments are conducted at different heating rates of 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 K/min in the temperature range of 323-1173 K under non-isothermal condition. Argon gas is used as an inert gas to remove any entrapment of gases in the TGA equipment.

  20. Interactions of xanthines with activated carbon. I. Kinetics of the adsorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarrete Casas, R.; García Rodriguez, A.; Rey Bueno, F.; Espínola Lara, A.; Valenzuela Calahorro, C.; Navarrete Guijosa, A.

    2006-06-01

    Because of their pharmaceutical and industrial applications, we have studied the adsorption of xanthine derivates (caffeine and theophylline) by activated carbon. To this end, we examined kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic aspects of the process. This paper reports the kinetics results. The experimental results indicate that the process was first order in C and the overall process was assumed to involve a single, reversible adsorption-desorption process obeying a kinetic law postulated by us.

  1. Kinetic smog-chamber studies on halogen activation from a simulated salt pan, using dry and wet NaCl/NaBr surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleicher, Sergej; Balzer, Natalja; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Buxmann, Joelle; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Field experiments and laboratory studies have shown that atomic Br and Cl are released from sea-salt aerosol and saline soils. This halogen release is based on the uptake of gaseous HOX by aqueous, acidified salt surfaces. Br and Cl play an important role in atmospheric ozone depletion and the destruction of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) and HUmic LIke Substances (HULIS) may take part in these reaction cycles by halogenation and production of volatile organic halogen compounds. Aerosol smog-chamber facilities (coolable to -25°C) enable us to simulate the halogen release mechanism under arctic tropospheric conditions. Mechanistic and kinetic studies are carried out to investigate the influence of SOA and HULIS on halogen cycles and to determine halogenated gaseous and solid organic products. The present laboratory measurements study halogen activation from salt surfaces, which are similar to typical salt pan environments. In these experiments we placed different artificial salt mixtures with NaCl/NaBr ratios up to 300:1 on a Teflon pan located in a Teflon chamber with a volume of 3.5 m3. Under clean air conditions we inject ozone and a mixture of non-methane hydrocarbons with well-known reactivities against OH and Cl and irradiated the chamber with a solar simulator. Beside the usual observing instruments like an ozone monitor and a gas chromatograph we used Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) in a White cell with a light path up to 320 m to observe various gas-phase species including BrO radicals. A dry air / dry salt pan environment showed no ozone depletion and no halogen activation. At relative humidity above 50%, a rapid ozone depletion (4.7 h half-life) was observed, which is much faster than for pure NaCl under the same conditions (77 h). Furthermore, the mixed salt was acidified with H2SO4 to a pH value of 4.3, no difference in ozone depletion and halogen activation was observed at this point. The DOAS

  2. Removal of mixture of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles (NPs) from water using activated carbon in batch kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Piplai, Tropita; Kumar, Arun; Alappat, Babu J

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the effects of pH (5, 6, 7, 8, 9) and activated carbon (AC) concentration (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, 100 g/L) on the removal of a colloidal solution of nanoparticles (NPs) (ZnO + CuO) using AC in batch kinetic studies. Results revealed that adsorption capacities of AC for Zn and Cu (individually) were 0.9 ± 0.028 mg/g (91.3% removal) and 0.95 ± 0.036 mg/g (95.6% removal) in deionized water and 0.6 ± 0.038 mg/g (78% removal) and 0.75 ± 0.078 mg/g (83% removal) in wastewater at pH 8 (Zn) and pH 6 (Cu) respectively. In a colloidal solution mixture of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) and copper oxide nanoparticles (CuONPs), adsorption capacity of AC for Zn in deionized water was 0.71 ± 0.051 mg/g (74.7% removal) and in wastewater was 0.576 ± 0.019 mg/g (69% removal) and for Cu in deionized water was 0.82 ± 0.017 mg/g (81.2% removal) and in wastewater was 0.6 ± 0.032 mg/g (71.5% removal). Overall, this study provided a detailed analysis of the removal capacity of AC and indicated that AC can be used as an efficient adsorbent filter for removing engineered NPs like ZnONPs and CuONPs (single and mixture) from water. As there is a need for removing NPs from wastewater, removal of NPs using an AC-based adsorptive-filter might become a promising method.

  3. Adsorption isotherms, kinetics, thermodynamics and desorption studies of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol on oil palm empty fruit bunch-based activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Tan, I A W; Ahmad, A L; Hameed, B H

    2009-05-30

    The adsorption characteristics of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) on activated carbon prepared from oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB) were evaluated. The effects of TCP initial concentration, agitation time, solution pH and temperature on TCP adsorption were investigated. TCP adsorption uptake was found to increase with increase in initial concentration, agitation time and solution temperature whereas adsorption of TCP was more favourable at acidic pH. The adsorption equilibrium data were best represented by the Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson isotherms. The adsorption kinetics was found to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The mechanism of the adsorption process was determined from the intraparticle diffusion model. Boyd plot revealed that the adsorption of TCP on the activated carbon was mainly governed by particle diffusion. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ), standard entropy (DeltaS degrees ), standard free energy (DeltaG degrees ) and activation energy were determined. The regeneration efficiency of the spent activated carbon was high, with TCP desorption of 99.6%.

  4. Isotherm and kinetics study of malachite green adsorption onto copper nanowires loaded on activated carbon: artificial neural network modeling and genetic algorithm optimization.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Shojaeipour, E; Ghaedi, A M; Sahraei, Reza

    2015-05-05

    In this study, copper nanowires loaded on activated carbon (Cu-NWs-AC) was used as novel efficient adsorbent for the removal of malachite green (MG) from aqueous solution. This new material was synthesized through simple protocol and its surface properties such as surface area, pore volume and functional groups were characterized with different techniques such XRD, BET and FESEM analysis. The relation between removal percentages with variables such as solution pH, adsorbent dosage (0.005, 0.01, 0.015, 0.02 and 0.1g), contact time (1-40min) and initial MG concentration (5, 10, 20, 70 and 100mg/L) was investigated and optimized. A three-layer artificial neural network (ANN) model was utilized to predict the malachite green dye removal (%) by Cu-NWs-AC following conduction of 248 experiments. When the training of the ANN was performed, the parameters of ANN model were as follows: linear transfer function (purelin) at output layer, Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA), and a tangent sigmoid transfer function (tansig) at the hidden layer with 11 neurons. The minimum mean squared error (MSE) of 0.0017 and coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.9658 were found for prediction and modeling of dye removal using testing data set. A good agreement between experimental data and predicted data using the ANN model was obtained. Fitting the experimental data on previously optimized condition confirm the suitability of Langmuir isotherm models for their explanation with maximum adsorption capacity of 434.8mg/g at 25°C. Kinetic studies at various adsorbent mass and initial MG concentration show that the MG maximum removal percentage was achieved within 20min. The adsorption of MG follows the pseudo-second-order with a combination of intraparticle diffusion model.

  5. Isotherm and kinetics study of malachite green adsorption onto copper nanowires loaded on activated carbon: Artificial neural network modeling and genetic algorithm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaedi, M.; Shojaeipour, E.; Ghaedi, A. M.; Sahraei, Reza

    2015-05-01

    In this study, copper nanowires loaded on activated carbon (Cu-NWs-AC) was used as novel efficient adsorbent for the removal of malachite green (MG) from aqueous solution. This new material was synthesized through simple protocol and its surface properties such as surface area, pore volume and functional groups were characterized with different techniques such XRD, BET and FESEM analysis. The relation between removal percentages with variables such as solution pH, adsorbent dosage (0.005, 0.01, 0.015, 0.02 and 0.1 g), contact time (1-40 min) and initial MG concentration (5, 10, 20, 70 and 100 mg/L) was investigated and optimized. A three-layer artificial neural network (ANN) model was utilized to predict the malachite green dye removal (%) by Cu-NWs-AC following conduction of 248 experiments. When the training of the ANN was performed, the parameters of ANN model were as follows: linear transfer function (purelin) at output layer, Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA), and a tangent sigmoid transfer function (tansig) at the hidden layer with 11 neurons. The minimum mean squared error (MSE) of 0.0017 and coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.9658 were found for prediction and modeling of dye removal using testing data set. A good agreement between experimental data and predicted data using the ANN model was obtained. Fitting the experimental data on previously optimized condition confirm the suitability of Langmuir isotherm models for their explanation with maximum adsorption capacity of 434.8 mg/g at 25 °C. Kinetic studies at various adsorbent mass and initial MG concentration show that the MG maximum removal percentage was achieved within 20 min. The adsorption of MG follows the pseudo-second-order with a combination of intraparticle diffusion model.

  6. Investigation kinetics mechanisms of adsorption malachite green onto activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Onal, Y; Akmil-Başar, C; Sarici-Ozdemir, C

    2007-07-19

    Lignite was used to prepare activated carbon (T3K618) by chemical activation with KOH. Pore properties of the activated carbon such as BET surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and pore diameter were characterized by t-plot based on N2 adsorption isotherm. BET surface area of activated carbon is determined as 1000 m2/g. Adsorption capacity of malachite green (MG) onto T3K618 activated carbon was investigated in a batch system by considering the effects of various parameters like initial concentration (100, 150 and 200 mg/L) and temperature (25, 40 and 50 degrees C). The adsorption process was relatively fast and equilibrium was reached after about 20 min for 100, 150 mg/L at all adsorption temperature. Equilibrium time for 200 mg/L was determined as 20 min and 40 min at 298, 313 and 323 K, respectively. Simple mass and kinetic models were applied to the experimental data to examine the mechanisms of adsorption and potential rate controlling steps such as external mass transfer, intraparticle diffusion. Pseudo second-order model was found to explain the kinetics of MG adsorption most effectively. It was found that both mass transfer and pore diffusion are important in determining the adsorption rates. The intraparticle diffusion rate constant, external mass transfer coefficient, film and pore diffusion coefficient at various temperatures were evaluated. The activation energy (Ea) was determined as 48.56, 63.16, 67.93 kJ/mol for 100, 150, 200 mg/L, respectively. The Langmiur and Freundlich isotherm were used to describe the adsorption equilibrium studies at different temperatures. Langmiur isotherm shows better fit than Freundlich isotherm in the temperature range studied. The thermodynamic parameters, such as DeltaG degrees, DeltaS and DeltaH degrees were calculated. The thermodynamics of dyes-T3K618 system indicates endothermic process.

  7. Thermodynamics, Kinetics, and Activation energy Studies of the sorption of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) to a Mn3O4 nanomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, Yvette; Remes, Abril; Reyna, Alejandra; Martinez, Denise; Villarreal, Jahaziel; Ramos, Hilda; Trevino, Samantha; Tamez, C.; Martinez, A.; Eubanks, T.; Parsons, J. G.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a manganese oxide, Mn3O4 was used to remove chromium(III) and chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions. The Mn3O4 nanomaterial was synthesized through a precipitation method, and was characterized using XRD, which confirmed the material had a crystal structure similar to hausmannite. In addition, using Scherrer’s equation it was determined that the nanomaterial had an average grain size of 19.5 ± 1.10 nm. A study of the effects of pH on the binding of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) showed that the optimum binding pH was 4 and 3 respectively. Batch isotherm studies were performed to determine the binding capacity of chromium(III), which was determined to be 18.7 mg/g, 41.7 mg/g, and 54.4 mg/g respectively for 4°C, 21°C, and 45°C. Chromium(VI) on the other hand had lower binding capacities of 2.5 mg/g, 4.3 mg/g, and 5.8 mg/g for 4°C, 21°C, 45°C, respectively. Thermodynamic studies performed indicated the sorption process was for the most part controlled by physisorption. The ΔG for the sorption of chromium(III) and Chromium(VI) ranged from −0.9 to −13 kJ/mol, indicating a spontaneous reaction was occurring. The enthalpy indicated a endothermic reaction was occurring during the binding and show ΔH values of 70.6 and 19.1 kJ.mol for chromium(III) and Chromium(VI), respectively. In addition, ΔS for the reaction had positive values of 267 and 73 J/mol for chromium(III) and chromium(VI) which indicate a spontaneous reaction. In addition, the sorption process was found to follow pseudo second order kinetic and the activation energy studies indicated the binding process occurred through chemisorption. PMID:25097453

  8. Kinetics of small particle activation in supersaturated vapors

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw, R.; Wang, J.

    2010-08-29

    We examine the nucleated (with barrier) activation of perfectly wetting (zero contact angle) particles ranging from bulk size down to one nanometer. Thermodynamic properties of the particles, coated with liquid layers of varying thickness and surrounded by vapor, are analyzed. Nano-size particles are predicted to activate at relative humidity below the Kelvin curve on crossing a nucleation barrier, located at a critical liquid layer thickness such that the total particle size (core + liquid layer) equals the Kelvin radius (Fig. 1). This barrier vanishes precisely as the critical layer thickness approaches the thin layer limit and the Kelvin radius equals the radius of the particle itself. These considerations are similar to those included in Fletcher's theory (Fletcher, 1958) however the present analysis differs in several important respects. Firstly, where Fletcher used the classical prefactor-exponent form for the nucleation rate, requiring separate estimation of the kinetic prefactor, we solve a diffusion-drift equation that is equivalent to including the full Becker-Doering (BD) multi-state kinetics of condensation/evaporation along the growth coordinate. We also determine the mean first passage time (MFPT) for barrier crossing (Wedekind et al., 2007), which is shown to provide a generalization of BD nucleation kinetics especially useful for barrier heights that are considerably lower than those typically encountered in homogeneous vapor-liquid nucleation, and make explicit comparisons between the MFPT and BD kinetic models. Barrier heights for heterogeneous nucleation are computed by a thermo-dynamic area construction introduced recently to model deliquescence and efflorescence of small particles (McGraw and Lewis, 2009). In addition to providing a graphical representation of the activation process that offers new insights, the area construction provides a molecular approach that avoids explicit use of the interfacial tension. Typical barrier profiles for

  9. Kinetic study of N-type calcium current modulation by delta-opioid receptor activation in the mammalian cell line NG108-15.

    PubMed Central

    Toselli, M; Tosetti, P; Taglietti, V

    1999-01-01

    The voltage-dependent inhibition of N-type Ca2+ channel current by the delta-opioid agonist [D-pen2, D-pen5]-enkephalin (DPDPE) was investigated in the mammalian cell line NG108-15 with 10 microM nifedipine to block L-type channels, with whole-cell voltage clamp methods. In in vitro differentiated NG108-15 cells DPDPE reversibly decreased omega-conotoxin GVIA-sensitive Ba2+ currents in a concentration-dependent way. Inhibition was maximal with 1 microM DPDPE (66% at 0 mV) and was characterized by a slowing of Ba2+ current activation at low test potentials. Both inhibition and kinetic slowing were attenuated at more positive potentials and could be relieved up to 90% by strong conditioning depolarizations. The kinetics of removal of inhibition (de-inhibition) and of its retrieval (re-inhibition) were also voltage dependent. Both de-inhibition and re-inhibition were single exponentials and, in the voltage range from -20 to +10 mV, had significantly different time constants at a given membrane potential, the time course of re-inhibition being faster than that of de-inhibition. The kinetics of de-inhibition at -20 mV and of reinhibition at -40 mV were also concentration dependent, both processes becoming slower at lower agonist concentrations. The rate of de-inhibition at +80/+120 mV was similar to that of Ca2+ channel activation at the same potentials measured during application of DPDPE (approximately 7 ms), both processes being much slower than channel activation in controls (<1 ms). Moreover, the amplitude but not the time course of tail currents changed as the depolarization to +80/+120 mV was made longer. The state-dependent properties of DPDPE Ca2+ channel inhibition could be simulated by a model that assumes that inhibition by DPDPE results from voltage- and concentration-dependent binding of an inhibitory molecule to the N-type channel. PMID:10233071

  10. Detailed spectroscopic, thermodynamic, and kinetic studies on the protolytic equilibria of Fe(III)cydta and the activation of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Brausam, Ariane; Maigut, Joachim; Meier, Roland; Szilágyi, Petra A; Buschmann, Hans-Jürgen; Massa, Werner; Homonnay, Zoltán; van Eldik, Rudi

    2009-08-17

    .1 cm(3) mol(-1). A detailed kinetic study of the effect of the buffer, temperature, and pressure on the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with [Fe(III)(cydta)(H(2)O)](-) was performed using stopped-flow techniques. The reaction was found to consist of two steps and resulted in the formation of a purple Fe(III) side-on-bound peroxo complex [Fe(III)(cydta)(eta(2)-O(2))](3-). The peroxo complex and its degradation products were characterized using Mossbauer spectroscopy. Formation of the purple peroxo complex is only observable above a pH of 9.5. Both reaction steps are affected by specific and general acid catalysis. Two different buffer systems were used to clarify the role of general acid catalysis in these reactions. Mechanistic descriptions and a comparison between the edta and cydta systems are presented. The first reaction step reveals an element of reversibility, which is evident over the whole studied pH range. The positive volume of activation for the forward reaction and the positive entropy of activation for the backward reaction suggest a dissociative interchange mechanism for the reversible end-on binding of hydrogen peroxide to [Fe(III)(cydta)(H(2)O)](-). Deprotonation of the end-on-bound hydroperoxo complex leads to the formation of a seven-coordinate side-on-bound peroxo complex [Fe(III)(cydta)(eta(2)-O(2))](3-), where one carboxylate arm is detached. [Fe(III)(cydta)(eta(2)-O(2))](3-) can be reached by two different pathways, of which one is catalyzed by a base and the other by deprotonated hydrogen peroxide. For both pathways, a small negative volume and entropy of activation was observed, suggesting an associative interchange mechanism for the ring-closure step to the side-on-bound peroxo complex. For the second reaction step, no element of reversibility was found.

  11. Studies of combustion kinetics and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Gutman, D.

    1993-12-01

    The objective of the current research is to gain new quantitative knowledge of the kinetics and mechanisms of polyatomic free radicals which are important in hydrocarbon combustion processes. The special facility designed and built for these (which includes a heatable tubular reactor coupled to a photoionization mass spectrometer) is continually being improved. Where possible, these experimental studies are coupled with theoretical ones, sometimes conducted in collaboration with others, to obtain an improved understanding of the factors determining reactivity. The decomposition of acetyl radicals, isopropyl radicals, and n-propyl radicals have been studied as well as the oxidation of methylpropargyl radicals.

  12. [Kinetic study on pyrolysis of psoralen].

    PubMed

    Fan, Haiyan; Liao, Kun; Hu, Wei; Su, Jiakun; Tian, Yaowei; Qi, Fei; Cai, Jibao

    2012-01-01

    In this study, products of psoralen pyrolysis were detected using a solid pyrolysis apparatus and synchrotron radiation vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrum (SVUV-PIMS). The pyrolytic kinetics of psoralen was also studied by calculating its initial pyrolytic route in quantum chemistry. According to the findings with SVUV-PIMS, three pyrolytic products were observed, CO, C9H6O and C10H6O2. Theoretically, three fragment pathways were calculated for psoralen, in which the major primary decomposition route was de-CO, and the major secondary decomposition reaction was de-CO reaction of de-CO products.

  13. Kinetics study on conventional and microwave pyrolysis of moso bamboo.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qing; Xiong, Yuanquan

    2014-11-01

    A comparative study on the pyrolysis kinetics of moso bamboo has been conducted in a conventional thermogravimetric analyzer and a microwave thermogravimetric analyzer respectively. The effect of heating rate on the pyrolysis process was also discussed. The results showed that both the maximum and average reaction rates increased with the heating rate increasing. The values of activation energy increased from 58.30 to 84.22 kJ/mol with the heating rate decreasing from 135 to 60 °C/min during conventional pyrolysis. The value of activation energy was 24.5 kJ/mol for microwave pyrolysis, much lower than that for conventional pyrolysis at a similar heating rate of 160 °C/min. The pyrolysis of moso bamboo exhibited a kinetic compensation effect. The low activation energy obtained under microwave irradiation suggests that microwaves heating would be a promising method for biomass pyrolysis.

  14. Comparative studies on removal of Erythrosine using ZnS and AgOH nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon as adsorbents: Kinetic and isotherm studies of adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaedi, M.; Rozkhoosh, Z.; Asfaram, A.; Mirtamizdoust, B.; Mahmoudi, Z.; Bazrafshan, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    Erythrosine adsorption (Er) onto ZnS and AgOH nanoparticle-loaded activated carbon (ZnS-NP-AC and AgOH-NP-AC) was studied and results were compared. Subsequent preparation were fully analyzed by different approach such as BET to obtain knowledge about surface area, pore volume, while FT-IR analysis give comprehensive information about functional group the dependency of removal percentage to adsorbent mass, initial Er concentration and contact time were investigated and optimum conditions for pH, adsorbent dosage, Er concentration and contact time was set as be 3.2, 0.016 g, 20 mg/L and 16 min and 3.2, 0.015 g, 19 mg/L and 2 min for ZnS-NP-AC and AgOH-NP-AC, respectively. The equilibrium data correspond to adsorption strongly follow Langmuir model by ZnS-NP-AC and Freundlich model for AgOH-NP-AC. High adsorption capacity for of 55.86-57.80 mg g-1 and 67.11-89.69 mg g-1 for ZnS-NP-AC and AgOH-NP-AC, respectively. The result of present study confirm the applicability of small amount of these adsorbent (<0.02 g) for efficient removal of Er (>95%) in short reasonable time (20 min).

  15. Comparative studies on removal of Erythrosine using ZnS and AgOH nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon as adsorbents: Kinetic and isotherm studies of adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Rozkhoosh, Z; Asfaram, A; Mirtamizdoust, B; Mahmoudi, Z; Bazrafshan, A A

    2015-03-05

    Erythrosine adsorption (Er) onto ZnS and AgOH nanoparticle-loaded activated carbon (ZnS-NP-AC and AgOH-NP-AC) was studied and results were compared. Subsequent preparation were fully analyzed by different approach such as BET to obtain knowledge about surface area, pore volume, while FT-IR analysis give comprehensive information about functional group the dependency of removal percentage to adsorbent mass, initial Er concentration and contact time were investigated and optimum conditions for pH, adsorbent dosage, Er concentration and contact time was set as be 3.2, 0.016g, 20mg/L and 16min and 3.2, 0.015g, 19mg/L and 2min for ZnS-NP-AC and AgOH-NP-AC, respectively. The equilibrium data correspond to adsorption strongly follow Langmuir model by ZnS-NP-AC and Freundlich model for AgOH-NP-AC. High adsorption capacity for of 55.86-57.80mgg(-1) and 67.11-89.69mgg(-1) for ZnS-NP-AC and AgOH-NP-AC, respectively. The result of present study confirm the applicability of small amount of these adsorbent (<0.02g) for efficient removal of Er (>95%) in short reasonable time (20min).

  16. Modeling high adsorption capacity and kinetics of organic macromolecules on super-powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Ando, Naoya; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Kurotobi, Ryuji; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-02-01

    The capacity to adsorb natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonates (PSSs) on small particle-size activated carbon (super-powdered activated carbon, SPAC) is higher than that on larger particle-size activated carbon (powdered-activated carbon, PAC). Increased adsorption capacity is likely attributable to the larger external surface area because the NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle; they preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle. In this study, we propose a new isotherm equation, the Shell Adsorption Model (SAM), to explain the higher adsorption capacity on smaller adsorbent particles and to describe quantitatively adsorption isotherms of activated carbons of different particle sizes: PAC and SPAC. The SAM was verified with the experimental data of PSS adsorption kinetics as well as equilibrium. SAM successfully characterized PSS adsorption isotherm data for SPACs and PAC simultaneously with the same model parameters. When SAM was incorporated into an adsorption kinetic model, kinetic decay curves for PSSs adsorbing onto activated carbons of different particle sizes could be simultaneously described with a single kinetics parameter value. On the other hand, when SAM was not incorporated into such an adsorption kinetic model and instead isotherms were described by the Freundlich model, the kinetic decay curves were not well described. The success of the SAM further supports the adsorption mechanism of PSSs preferentially adsorbing near the outer surface of activated carbon particles.

  17. Evaluation of proton activity in microemulsions by a kinetic probe.

    PubMed

    Peñacoba, Indalecio A; García, Begoña; Navarro, Ana M; Hoyuelos, F Javier; Leal, José M

    2010-12-15

    The decomposition reaction of the purple dye murexide in acidic media is used as a probe indicator for protons in nonionic microemulsions. The reaction kinetics primarily rely on the proton concentration and permit assessment of the proton activity in the nonionic microemulsions of water/cyclohexane/Igepal and water/heptane/Igepal. The experiments performed in the two microemulsions covered a wide range of water-to-oil mass fraction for the two systems. The kinetic runs were monitored under pseudo-first order conditions by the stopped-flow technique. The equilibrium constants for the formation of purpuric acid and the kinetic constants for the ensuing decomposition reaction fulfill a trend consistent with the micro compartmentalized nature of the multicomponent medium, and support the use of murexide as an indicator of the proton activity in microemulsions.

  18. Using a molecular model and kinetic experiments in the presence of divalent cations to study the active site and catalysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Beassoni, Paola R; Otero, Lisandro H; Lisa, Angela T; Domenech, Carlos E

    2008-12-01

    Phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PchP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a product of the PA5292 gene, catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphocholine to choline and inorganic phosphate (Pi). Phosphocholine is produced after hemolytic phospholipase C (PlcH) acts upon phosphatidylcholine or sphingomyelin. Therefore, PlcH and PchP are involved in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa. PchP belongs to the HAD superfamily as it contains three conserved sequences motifs. In mature PchP, the motifs I, II, and III are (31)DMDNT(35), (166)S, and (261)GDTPDSD(267), respectively. Kinetic characterization of wild-type and mutated proteins, obtained by site-directed mutagenesis, in addition to a molecular model of PchP helped us to understand the contribution of key residues in the conserved motifs I, II and III that are involved in the catalysis of p-nitrophenylphosphate processing after the addition of Mg(2+), Zn(2+) or Cu(2+) (these are activators of PchP activity). Our results are explained by invoking the concept of chemical hardness and softness introduced by Pearson in 1963 and its extension that "hard acids prefer to coordinate to hard bases and soft acids to soft bases" [Parr and Pearson, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 105, 7512-7516 (1983)].

  19. Kinetic discrimination in T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, J D; Beeson, C; Lyons, D S; Davis, M M; McConnell, H M

    1996-01-01

    We propose a quantitative model for T-cell activation in which the rate of dissociation of ligand from T-cell receptors determines the agonist and antagonist properties of the ligand. The ligands are molecular complexes between antigenic peptides and proteins of the major histocompatibility complex on the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells. Binding of ligand to receptor triggers a series of biochemical reactions in the T cell. If the ligand dissociates after these reactions are complete, the T cell receives a positive activation signal. However, dissociation of ligand after completion of the first reaction but prior to generation of the final products results in partial T-cell activation, which acts to suppress a positive response. Such a negative signal is brought about by T-cell ligands containing the variants of antigenic peptides referred to as T-cell receptor antagonists. Results of recent experiments with altered peptide ligands compare favorably with T-cell responses predicted by this model. PMID:8643643

  20. Can We Confidently Study VO2 Kinetics in Young People?

    PubMed Central

    Fawkner, Samantha G.; Armstrong, Neil

    2007-01-01

    The study of VO2 kinetics offers the potential to non-invasively examine the cardiorespiratory and metabolic response to dynamic exercise and limitations to every day physical activity. Its non-invasive nature makes it hugely attractive for use with young people, both healthy and those with disease, and yet the literature, whilst growing with respect to adults, remains confined to a cluster of studies with these special populations. It is most likely that this is partly due to the methodological difficulties involved in studying VO2 kinetics in young people which are not present, or present to a lesser degree, with adults. This article reviews these methodological issues, and explains the main procedures that might be used to overcome them. Key pointsThe VO2 kinetic response to exercise represents the combined efficiency of the cardiovascular, pulmonary and metabolic systems, and an accurate assessment of the response potentially provides a great deal of useful information via non-invasive methodology.An accurate assessment of the VO2 kinetic response is however inherently difficult with children and especially those with reduced exercise tolerance, due primarily to the apparent breath-by-breath noise which masks the true underlying physiological response, and the small amplitudes of the response signal.Despite this, it is possible to assess and quantify the VO2 kinetic response with children if appropriate steps are taken to apply carefully selected methodologies and report response variables with confidence intervals. In this way, both the researcher and the reader can be confident that the data reported is meaningful. PMID:24149413

  1. Combined pressure and cosolvent effects on enzyme activity - a high-pressure stopped-flow kinetic study on α-chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Luong, Trung Quan; Winter, Roland

    2015-09-21

    We investigated the combined effects of cosolvents and pressure on the hydrolysis of a model peptide catalysed by α-chymotrypsin. The enzymatic activity was measured in the pressure range from 0.1 to 200 MPa using a high-pressure stopped-flow systems with 10 ms time resolution. A kosmotropic (trimethalymine-N-oxide, TMAO) and chaotropic (urea) cosolvent and mixtures thereof were used as cosolvents. High pressure enhances the hydrolysis rate as a consequence of a negative activation volume, ΔV(#), which, depending on the cosolvent system, amounts to -2 to -4 mL mol(-1). A more negative activation volume can be explained by a smaller compression of the ES complex relative to the transition state. Kinetic constants, such as kcat and the Michaelis constant KM, were determined for all solution conditions as a function of pressure. With increasing pressure, kcat increases by about 35% and its pressure dependence by a factor of 1.9 upon addition of 2 M urea, whereas 1 M TMAO has no significant effect on kcat and its pressure dependence. Similarly, KM increases upon addition of urea 6-fold. Addition of TMAO compensates the urea-effect on kcat and KM to some extent. The maximum rate of the enzymatic reaction increases with increasing pressure in all solutions except in the TMAO : urea 1 : 2 mixture, where, remarkably, pressure is found to have no effect on the rate of the enzymatic reaction anymore. Our data clearly show that compatible solutes can easily override deleterious effects of harsh environmental conditions, such as high hydrostatic pressures in the 100 MPa range, which is the maximum pressure encountered in the deep biosphere on Earth.

  2. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of the interaction between activating and inhibitory Ly49 natural killer receptors and MHC class I molecules.

    PubMed

    Romasanta, Pablo N; Curto, Lucrecia M; Sarratea, María B; Noli Truant, Sofía; Antonoglou, María B; Fernández Lynch, María J; Delfino, José M; Mariuzza, Roy A; Fernández, Marisa M; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that eliminate virally infected or malignantly transformed cells. NK cell function is regulated by diverse surface receptors that are both activating and inhibitory. Among them, the homodimeric Ly49 receptors control NK cell cytotoxicity by sensing major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC-I) on target cells. Although crystal structures have been reported for Ly49/MHC-I complexes, the underlying binding mechanism has not been elucidated. Accordingly, we carried out thermodynamic and kinetic experiments on the interaction of four NK Ly49 receptors (Ly49G, Ly49H, Ly49I and Ly49P) with two MHC-I ligands (H-2D(d) and H-2D(k)). These Ly49s embrace the structural and functional diversity of the highly polymorphic Ly49 family. Combining surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence anisotropy and far-UV circular dichroism (CD), we determined that the best model to describe both inhibitory and activating Ly49/MHC-I interactions is one in which the two MHC-I binding sites of the Ly49 homodimer present similar binding constants for the two sites (∼10(6) M(-1)) with a slightly positive co-operativity in some cases, and without far-UV CD observable conformational changes. Furthermore, Ly49/MHC-I interactions are diffusion-controlled and enthalpy-driven. These features stand in marked contrast with the activation-controlled and entropy-driven interaction of Ly49s with the viral immunoevasin m157, which is characterized by strong positive co-operativity and conformational selection. These differences are explained by the distinct structures of Ly49/MHC-I and Ly49/m157 complexes. Moreover, they reflect the opposing roles of NK cells to rapidly scan for virally infected cells and of viruses to escape detection using immunoevasins such as m157.

  3. Kinetic studies of corn stover saccharification using sulphuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, N.; Macdonald, D.G.; Bakhshi, N.N.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of crystalline cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysis in corn stover were studied with a nonisothermal technique. Reactions were arrested at temperatures between 160 and 240/sup 0/C and product sugars were analyzed using a Bio-Rad HPX-85 liquid chromatographic column. A simple first-order series reaction model was used for both cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysis rections. Kinetic parameters were obtained for three different sulphuric acid concentrations (0.49, 0.92, and 1.47 wt %). Activation energies remained constant over this acid concentration range but the preexponential factors showed an increase with acid concentration. Relationships were obtained between the preexponential factors and acid concentrations. Cellulose hydrolysis and glucose degradation reactions were observed to be of higher order with respect to acid concentration in comparison with the previous studies with other raw materials.

  4. Kinetic studies of corn stover saccharification using sulphuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, N.; Macdonald, D.G.; Bakhshi, N.N.

    1984-04-01

    The kinetics of crystalline cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysis in corn stover were studied with a nonisothermal technique. Reactions were arrested at temperatures between 160 and 240 degrees C and product sugars were analyzed using a Bio-Rad HPX-85 liquid chromatographic column. A simple first-order series reaction model was used for both cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysis reactions. Kinetic parameters were obtained for three different sulphuric acid concentrations (0.49, 0.92, and 1.47 weight %). Activation energies remained constant over this acid concentration range but the preexponential factors showed an increase with acid concentration. Relationships were obtained between the preexponential factors and acid concentrations. Cellulose hydrolysis and glucose degradation reactions were observed to be of higher order with respect to acid concentration in comparison with the previous studies with other raw materials. (Refs. 22).

  5. Factors affecting the activation and inhibition of intracellular enzymes for degradation of 1,2 diamino benzene: kinetics and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    P, Saranya; G, Sekaran

    2015-11-01

    Citrobacter freundii, the bacterium isolated from marine sediments was capable of degrading 1,2 diamino benzene (DAB), an endocrine disruptor. The mixed intracellular enzymes from C. freundii were extracted and purified. The mixed intracellular enzymes were used for the degradation of DAB and degree of degradation was evaluated in terms of pyruvic acid, the end product, formed. The variables such as effect of pH, temperature and metal ions on the degradation of DAB using mixed intracellular enzymes (MICE) were investigated. The maximum amount of pyruvic acid formed was found to be 569 ± 5 µg with 96% degradation efficiency at pH 7; temperature 25 °C; zinc nitrate 0.1 mM; and copper sulphate ions 0.15 mM. The stability of MICE at different temperatures and the interaction of MICE with metal ions were confirmed using FT-IR spectroscopy. The formation of pyruvic acid from degradation of DAB followed pseudo-second-order rate kinetics and it was a spontaneous, exothermic process. The activation energy of degradation of DAB by MICE was found to be 82.55 kJ/mol.

  6. Active colloids in the context of chemical kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshanin, G.; Popescu, M. N.; Dietrich, S.

    2017-03-01

    We study a mesoscopic model of a chemically active colloidal particle which on certain parts of its surface promotes chemical reactions in the surrounding solution. For reasons of simplicity and conceptual clarity, we focus on the case in which only electrically neutral species are present in the solution and on chemical reactions which are described by first order kinetics. Within a self-consistent approach we explicitly determine the steady state product and reactant number density fields around the colloid as functionals of the interaction potentials of the various molecular species in solution with the colloid. By using a reciprocal theorem, this allows us to compute and to interpret—in a transparent way in terms of the classical Smoluchowski theory of chemical kinetics—the external force needed to keep such a catalytically active colloid at rest (stall force) or, equivalently, the corresponding velocity of the colloid if it is free to move. We use the particular case of triangular-well interaction potentials as a benchmark example for applying the general theoretical framework developed here. For this latter case, we derive explicit expressions for the dependences of the quantities of interest on the diffusion coefficients of the chemical species, the reaction rate constant, the coverage by catalyst, the size of the colloid, as well as on the parameters of the interaction potentials. These expressions provide a detailed picture of the phenomenology associated with catalytically-active colloids and self-diffusiophoresis.

  7. Application of granular activated carbon/MnFe₂O₄ composite immobilized on C. glutamicum MTCC 2745 to remove As(III) and As(V): Kinetic, mechanistic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Podder, M S; Majumder, C B

    2016-01-15

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate the efficiency of Corynebacterium glutamicum MTCC 2745 immobilized on granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 (GAC/MnFe2O4) composite to treat high concentration of arsenic bearing wastewater. Non-linear regression analysis was done for determining the best-fit kinetic model on the basis of three correlation coefficients and three error functions and also for predicting the parameters involved in kinetic models. The results showed that Fractal-like mixed 1,2 order model for As(III) and Brouser-Weron-Sototlongo as well as Fractal-like pseudo second order models for As(V) were proficient to provide realistic description of biosorption/bioaccumulation kinetic. Applicability of mechanistic models in the current study exhibited that the rate governing step in biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was film diffusion rather than intraparticle diffusion. The evaluated thermodynamic parameters ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0) revealed that biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic under studied conditions.

  8. Application of granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 composite immobilized on C. glutamicum MTCC 2745 to remove As(III) and As(V): Kinetic, mechanistic and thermodynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podder, M. S.; Majumder, C. B.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate the efficiency of Corynebacterium glutamicum MTCC 2745 immobilized on granular activated carbon/MnFe2O4 (GAC/MnFe2O4) composite to treat high concentration of arsenic bearing wastewater. Non-linear regression analysis was done for determining the best-fit kinetic model on the basis of three correlation coefficients and three error functions and also for predicting the parameters involved in kinetic models. The results showed that Fractal-like mixed 1,2 order model for As(III) and Brouser-Weron-Sototlongo as well as Fractal-like pseudo second order models for As(V) were proficient to provide realistic description of biosorption/bioaccumulation kinetic. Applicability of mechanistic models in the current study exhibited that the rate governing step in biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was film diffusion rather than intraparticle diffusion. The evaluated thermodynamic parameters ΔG0, ΔH0 and ΔS0 revealed that biosorption/bioaccumulation of both As(III) and As(V) was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic under studied conditions.

  9. Cloud condensation nuclei activity and droplet activation kinetics of wet processed regional dust samples and minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Sokolik, I. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-08-01

    This study reports laboratory measurements of particle size distributions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, and droplet activation kinetics of wet generated aerosols from clays, calcite, quartz, and desert soil samples from Northern Africa, East Asia/China, and Northern America. The dependence of critical supersaturation, sc, on particle dry diameter, Ddry, is used to characterize particle-water interactions and assess the ability of Frenkel-Halsey-Hill adsorption activation theory (FHH-AT) and Köhler theory (KT) to describe the CCN activity of the considered samples. Wet generated regional dust samples produce unimodal size distributions with particle sizes as small as 40 nm, CCN activation consistent with KT, and exhibit hygroscopicity similar to inorganic salts. Wet generated clays and minerals produce a bimodal size distribution; the CCN activity of the smaller mode is consistent with KT, while the larger mode is less hydrophilic, follows activation by FHH-AT, and displays almost identical CCN activity to dry generated dust. Ion Chromatography (IC) analysis performed on regional dust samples indicates a soluble fraction that cannot explain the CCN activity of dry or wet generated dust. A mass balance and hygroscopicity closure suggests that the small amount of ions (from low solubility compounds like calcite) present in the dry dust dissolve in the aqueous suspension during the wet generation process and give rise to the observed small hygroscopic mode. Overall these results identify an artifact that may question the atmospheric relevance of dust CCN activity studies using the wet generation method. Based on the method of threshold droplet growth analysis, wet generated mineral aerosols display similar activation kinetics compared to ammonium sulfate calibration aerosol. Finally, a unified CCN activity framework that accounts for concurrent effects of solute and adsorption is developed to describe the CCN activity of aged or hygroscopic dusts.

  10. Kinetics Studies in a Washing Bottle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teggins, John; Mahaffy, Chris

    1997-05-01

    The kinetics of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide using iodide ion in aqueous solution is studied in sealed completely-filled washing bottles. Oxygen gas produced by the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide forces liquid out of a bottom feeding washing bottle. After an initiation period of a few minutes at room temperature, the rate at which the liquid is expelled from the spout of the of the washing bottle stabilizes. A comparison of the rates for different reaction concentrations results in a rate law that is approximately first-order with respect to both hydrogen peroxide and iodide concentrations. Because the need for a gas buret to measure oxygen volumes is not necessary, the experiment can be conveniently performed by a student seated in a wheelchair.

  11. Comparison of nickel oxide and palladium nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon for efficient removal of methylene blue: kinetic and isotherm studies of removal process.

    PubMed

    Arabzadeh, S; Ghaedi, M; Ansari, A; Taghizadeh, F; Rajabi, M

    2015-02-01

    Palladium nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) and nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiO-NPs) were synthesized and loaded on activated carbon (AC). This novel material successfully used for the removal of methylene blue (MB) dye from aqueous medium. Full characterization of both material using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Brunauer-Emmet-Teller analyses for Pd-NP show their high surface area (>1340 m(2)/g) and low pore size (<20 Å) and average particle size lower than 45 Å and for NiO-NP show their high surface area (>1316.1554 m(2)/g) and low pore size (<20 Å) and average particle size lower than 46 Å in addition to high reactive atom and presence of various functional groups. These unique properties make them possible for efficient removal of MB. In batch experimental set-up, optimum conditions for maximum removal of MB by both adsorbents were attained following searching effect of variables such as central composite design. The Langmuir isotherm was found to be highly recommended for fitting the experimental equilibrium data. The kinetic of adsorption of MB on both adsorbents strongly can be fitted by a combination of pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion pathway. The experimental result achieved in this article shows the superiority of Pd-NP-AC for MB removal than NiO-NP-AC, so the maximum adsorption capacities of Pd-NP-AC and NiO-NP-AC were 555.5 mg/g and 588.2 mg/g, respectively.

  12. [Kinetics of in vitro bactericidal activity of the antiseptic biseptine combining 3 active principles].

    PubMed

    Reverdy, M E; Rougier, M; Fleurette, J

    1996-09-01

    Biseptine, is an association of chlorhexidine digluconate, benzalkonium chloride and benzylic alcohol. Little is known, in literature, on this antiseptic, used for cutaneous antisepsis. We studied killing kinetic of Biseptine, at different concentrations, on 4 AFNOR bacterial strains. Killing curves were studied at antiseptic concentration of 90 to 0.1% in 10 ml of distilled water. Bacterial counts were determined after neutralization in liquid medium. Synergy of chlorhexidine and benzalkonium chloride in Biseptine, allowed to obtain similar bactericidal activity than Hibitane champ with chlorhexidine concentrations 2 fold less. At 90, 50, 25, 10 and 5% concentrations, bactericidal activity (5 log10 reduction of the initial bacterial count) was effective in one minute. After 5 to 15 minutes, activity persisted at 1 and 0.5% concentrations. The 0.1% solution was inefficacious. This report disclosed an important security margin in antiseptic activity.

  13. A model for the interfacial kinetics of phospholipase D activity on long-chain lipids.

    PubMed

    Majd, Sheereen; Yusko, Erik C; Yang, Jerry; Sept, David; Mayer, Michael

    2013-07-02

    The membrane-active enzyme phospholipase D (PLD) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond in phospholipids and plays a critical role in cell signaling. This catalytic reaction proceeds on lipid-water interfaces and is an example of heterogeneous catalysis in biology. Recently we showed that planar lipid bilayers, a previously unexplored model membrane for these kinetic studies, can be used for monitoring interfacial catalytic reactions under well-defined experimental conditions with chemical and electrical access to both sides of the lipid membrane. Employing an assay that relies on the conductance of the pore-forming peptide gramicidin A to monitor PLD activity, the work presented here reveals the kinetics of hydrolysis of long-chain phosphatidylcholine lipids in situ. We have developed an extension of a basic kinetic model for interfacial catalysis that includes product activation and substrate depletion. This model describes the kinetic behavior very well and reveals two kinetic parameters, the specificity constant and the interfacial quality constant. This approach results in a simple and general model to account for product accumulation in interfacial enzyme kinetics.

  14. Platelet-activating factor-induced increases in glucose kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Dobrescu, C.; Hargrove, D.M.; Bagby, G.J.; Spitzer, J.J. )

    1988-02-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a postulated mediator of many of the early hemodynamic effects of endotoxin. The aim of the present study was to determine whether in vivo administration of PAF could produce alterations in whole-body glucose metabolism that would mimic those seen during endotoxemia. Glucose kinetics were assessed in chronically catheterized conscious rats by the constant infusion of (6-{sup 3}H)- and (U-{sup 14}C)glucose before and for 4 h after either a bolus injection or a constant infusion of PAF. The bolus injection of PAF elevated the rate of glucose appearance (R{sub a}; 44%) for 1.5 h. The lower PAF infusion rate decreased blood pressure 11% to 104 mmHg, whereas the higher infusion rate decreased pressure 34% to 77 mmHg. Both PAF infusion rates produced elevations in plasma glucose and glucose R{sub a} throughout the 4-h infusion period in a dose-related manner. The PAF infusions also induced dose-related increases in plasma glucagon and catecholamine levels throughout the infusion period. Because the constant infusion of PAF did stimulate many of the hemodynamic and metabolic alterations produced by endotoxin, this study provides additional support for the potential importance of PAF as a mediator of the early hemodynamic and metabolic sequela of endotoxin shock. Furthermore, the PAF-induced changes in glucose metabolism appear to be mediated by the resultant elevation in plasma catecholamines.

  15. Effect of temperature on Candida antartica lipase B activity in the kinetic resolution of acebutolol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajin, Mariani; Kamaruddin, A. H.

    2016-06-01

    Thermodynamic studies of free Candida antartica lipase B in kinetic resolution of acebutolol have been carried out to characterize the temperature effects towards enzyme stability and activity. A decreased in reaction rate was observed in temperature above 40oC. Thermodynamic studies on lipase deactivation exhibited a first-order kinetic pattern. The activation and deactivation energies were 39.63 kJ/mol and 54.90 kJ/mol, respectively. The enthalpy and entropy of the lipase deactivation were found to be 52.12 kJ/mol and -0.18 kJ/mol, respectively.

  16. Kinetic parameter estimation model for anaerobic co-digestion of waste activated sludge and microalgae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunyoung; Cumberbatch, Jewel; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Qiong

    2017-03-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion has a potential to improve biogas production, but limited kinetic information is available for co-digestion. This study introduced regression-based models to estimate the kinetic parameters for the co-digestion of microalgae and Waste Activated Sludge (WAS). The models were developed using the ratios of co-substrates and the kinetic parameters for the single substrate as indicators. The models were applied to the modified first-order kinetics and Monod model to determine the rate of hydrolysis and methanogenesis for the co-digestion. The results showed that the model using a hyperbola function was better for the estimation of the first-order kinetic coefficients, while the model using inverse tangent function closely estimated the Monod kinetic parameters. The models can be used for estimating kinetic parameters for not only microalgae-WAS co-digestion but also other substrates' co-digestion such as microalgae-swine manure and WAS-aquatic plants.

  17. Kinetics and mechanism studies of p-nitroaniline adsorption on activated carbon fibers prepared from cotton stalk by NH4H2PO4 activation and subsequent gasification with steam.

    PubMed

    Li, Kunquan; Li, Ye; Zheng, Zheng

    2010-06-15

    Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were prepared for the removal of p-nitroaniline (PNA) from cotton stalk by chemical activation with NH(4)H(2)PO(4) and subsequent physical activation with steam. Surface properties of the prepared ACFs were performed using nitrogen adsorption, FTIR spectroscopy and SEM. The influence of contact time, solution temperature and surface property on PNA adsorption onto the prepared ACFs was investigated by conducting a series of batch adsorption experiments. The kinetic rates at different temperatures were modeled by using the Lagergren-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Morris's intraparticle diffusion and Boyd's film-diffusion models, respectively. It was found that the maximum adsorption of PNA on the ACFs was more than 510 mg/L, and over 60% adsorption occurred in first 25 min. The effect of temperature on the adsorption was related to the contacting time and the micropore structure of the adsorbents. And the increase of micropore surface area favored the adsorption process. Kinetic rates fitted the pseudo-second-order model very well. The pore diffusion played an important role in the entire adsorption period, and intraparticle diffusion was the rate-limiting step in the beginning 20 min. The Freundlich model provided a better data fitting as compared with the Langmuir model. The surface micrograph of the ACF after adsorption showed a distinct roughness with oval patterns. The results revealed that the adsorption was in part with multimolecular layers of coverage.

  18. Kinetics of nucleotide entry into RNA polymerase active site provides mechanism for efficiency and fidelity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Sexton, Rachel E; Feig, Michael

    2017-04-01

    During transcription, RNA polymerase II elongates RNA by adding nucleotide triphosphates (NTPs) complementary to a DNA template. Structural studies have suggested that NTPs enter and exit the active site via the narrow secondary pore but details have remained unclear. A kinetic model is presented that integrates molecular dynamics simulations with experimental data. Previous simulations of trigger loop dynamics and the dynamics of matched and mismatched NTPs in and near the active site were combined with new simulations describing NTP exit from the active site via the secondary pore. Markov state analysis was applied to identify major states and estimate kinetic rates for transitions between those states. The kinetic model predicts elongation and misincorporation rates in close agreement with experiment and provides mechanistic hypotheses for how NTP entry and exit via the secondary pore is feasible and a key feature for achieving high elongation and low misincorporation rates during RNA elongation.

  19. Continuum Theory of Phase Separation Kinetics for Active Brownian Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenhammar, Joakim; Tiribocchi, Adriano; Allen, Rosalind J.; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E.

    2013-10-01

    Active Brownian particles (ABPs), when subject to purely repulsive interactions, are known to undergo activity-induced phase separation broadly resembling an equilibrium (attraction-induced) gas-liquid coexistence. Here we present an accurate continuum theory for the dynamics of phase-separating ABPs, derived by direct coarse graining, capturing leading-order density gradient terms alongside an effective bulk free energy. Such gradient terms do not obey detailed balance; yet we find coarsening dynamics closely resembling that of equilibrium phase separation. Our continuum theory is numerically compared to large-scale direct simulations of ABPs and accurately accounts for domain growth kinetics, domain topologies, and coexistence densities.

  20. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of methylated liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C S

    1978-01-01

    Reductive methylation of lysine residues activates liver alcohol dehydrogenase in the oxidation of primary alcohols, but decreases the activity of the enzyme towards secondary alcohols. The modification also desensitizes the dehydrogenase to substrate inhibition at high alcohol concentrations. Steady-state kinetic studies of methylated liver alcohol dehydrogenase over a wide range of alcohol concentrations suggest that alcohol oxidation proceeds via a random addition of coenzyme and substrate with a pathway for the formation of the productive enzyme-NADH-alcohol complex. To facilitate the analyses of the effects of methylation on liver alcohol dehydrogenase and factors affecting them, new operational kinetic parameters to describe the results at high substrate concentration were introduced. The changes in the dehydrogenase activity on alkylation were found to be associated with changes in the maximum velocities that are affected by the hydrophobicity of alkyl groups introduced at lysine residues. The desensitization of alkylated liver alcohol dehydrogenase to substrate inhibition is identified with a decrease in inhibitory Michaelis constants for alcohols and this is favoured by the steric effects of substituents at the lysine residues. PMID:697732

  1. Rethinking growth and decay kinetics in activated sludge - towards a new adaptive kinetics approach.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Michael; Jimenez, Jose; Pruden, Amy; Miller, Jennifer H; Metch, Jacob; Takács, Imre

    2017-02-01

    Growth kinetics in activated sludge modelling (ASM) are typically assumed to be the result of intrinsic growth and decay properties and thus process parameters are deemed to be constant. The activity change in a microbial population is expressed in terms of variance of the active biomass fraction and not actual shifts in bacterial cellular activities. This approach is limited, in that it does not recognise the reality that active biomass is highly physiologically adaptive. Here, a strong correlation between maximum specific growth rate (μmax) and decay rate (be) of ordinary heterotrophic organisms was revealed in both low solids retention times (SRT) and high SRT activated sludge systems. This relationship is indicative of physiological adaptation either for growth (high μmax and be) or survival optimization (low μmax and be). Further, the nitrifier decay process was investigated using molecular techniques to measure decay rates of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and nitrite oxidizing bacteria over a range of temperatures. This approach revealed decay rates 10-12% lower than values previously accepted and used in ASM. These findings highlight potential benefits of incorporating physiological adaptation of heterotrophic and nitrifying populations in future ASM.

  2. Kinetic studies of stress-corrosion cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noronha, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    Use of time-to-failure curves for stress-corrosion cracking processes may lead to incorrect estimates of structural life, if material is strongly dependent upon prestress levels. Technique characterizes kinetics of crackgrowth rates and intermediate arrest times by load-level changes.

  3. Triacylglycerol kinetics in endotoxic rats with suppressed lipoprotein lipase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, G.J.; Corll, C.B.; Martinez, R.R.

    1987-07-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia observed in animals after bacterial endotoxin administration and some forms of sepsis can result from increased hepatic triacylglycerol (TG) output or decreased TG clearance by extrahepatic tissues. To differentiate between these two possibilities, TG and free fatty acid (FFA) kinetics were determined in control and endotoxin-injected rats 18 h after treatment. Plasma TG and FFA kinetics were assessed by a constant intravenous infusion with (9,10-/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled very low-density lipoprotein and (1-/sup 14/C)palmitate bound to albumin, respectively. In addition, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was determined in heart, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue as well as in postheparin plasma of functionally hepatectomized, adrenalectomized, and gonadectomized rats. Plasma FFA acid concentrations were slightly increased in endotoxin-treated rats but their turnover did not differ from control. Endotoxin-treated rats had a threefold increase in plasma TG concentrations and decreased heart, skeletal muscle, and post-heparin plasma LPL activity. Plasma TG turnover was decreased, indicating that hypertriglyceridemia was not due to an increased TG output by the liver. Instead, the endotoxin-induced increase in plasma TG concentration was consequence of the 80% reduction in TG metabolic clearance rate. Thus, suppression of LPL activity in endotoxic animals impairs TG clearance resulting in hypertriglyceridemia. Furthermore, endotoxin administration reduced the delivery of TG-FFA to extrahepatic tissues because hepatic synthesis and secretion of TG from plasma FFA was decreased and LPL activity was suppressed.

  4. Spectroscopic, thermodynamic, kinetic studies and oxidase/antioxidant biomimetic catalytic activities of tris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate Cu(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Shaban Y; Ramadan, Abd El-Motaleb M; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Mohamed, Mahmoud A; van Eldik, Rudi

    2015-08-21

    A series of copper(ii) complexes, viz. [Tp(MeMe)Cu(Cl)(H2O)] (), [Tp(MeMe)Cu(OAc)(H2O)] (), [Tp(MeMe)Cu(NO3)] () and [Tp(MeMe)Cu(ClO4)] () containing tris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate (KTp(MeMe)), have been synthesized and fully characterized. The substitution reaction of with thiourea was studied under pseudo-first-order conditions as a function of concentration, temperature and pressure in methanol and acetonitrile as solvents. Two reaction steps that both depended on the nucleophile concentration were observed for both solvents. Substitution of coordinated methanol is about 40 times faster than the substitution of chloride. In acetonitrile, the rate constant for the displacement of coordinated acetonitrile was more than 20 times faster than the substitution of chloride. The reported activation parameters indicate that both reaction steps follow a dissociative mechanism in both solvents. On going from methanol to acetonitrile, the rate constant for the displacement of the solvent becomes more than 200 times faster due to the more labile acetonitrile, but the substitution mechanism remained to have a dissociative character. The antioxidant activities of were evaluated for superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-s-transferase (GST0 and glutathione reduced (GSH-Rd) activity. and were found to show (p < 0.05) the highest antioxidant activity in comparison to and , which can be ascribed to the geometric configuration as well as the nature of the co-ligand. showed catechol oxidase activity with turnover numbers of 20 min(-1) and a coordination affinity for 3,5-DTBC of K1, = 31 mM(-1). K1 is rather large and seems to be typical for faster biomimetic models, and also for the enzyme itself (25 mM(-1)). The reaction rate depended linearly on the complex concentration, indicating a first-order dependence on the catalyst concentration.

  5. Kinetics of adsorption of dyes from aqueous solution using activated carbon prepared from waste apricot.

    PubMed

    Onal, Yunus

    2006-10-11

    Adsorbent (WA11Zn5) has been prepared from waste apricot by chemical activation with ZnCl(2). Pore properties of the activated carbon such as BET surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and pore diameter were characterized by N(2) adsorption and DFT plus software. Adsorption of three dyes, namely, Methylene Blue (MB), Malachite Green (MG), Crystal Violet (CV), onto activated carbon in aqueous solution was studied in a batch system with respect to contact time, temperature. The kinetics of adsorption of MB, MG and CV have been discussed using six kinetic models, i.e., the pseudo-first-order model, the pseudo-second-order model, the Elovich equation, the intraparticle diffusion model, the Bangham equation, the modified Freundlich equation. Kinetic parameters and correlation coefficients were determined. It was shown that the second-order kinetic equation could describe the adsorption kinetics for three dyes. The dyes uptake process was found to be controlled by external mass transfer at earlier stages (before 5 min) and by intraparticle diffusion at later stages (after 5 min). Thermodynamic parameters, such as DeltaG, DeltaH and DeltaS, have been calculated by using the thermodynamic equilibrium coefficient obtained at different temperatures and concentrations. The thermodynamics of dyes-WA11Zn5 system indicates endothermic process.

  6. Antioxidant potential of curcumin-related compounds studied by chemiluminescence kinetics, chain-breaking efficiencies, scavenging activity (ORAC) and DFT calculations

    PubMed Central

    Slavova-Kazakova, Adriana K; Angelova, Silvia E; Veprintsev, Timur L; Denev, Petko; Fabbri, Davide; Dettori, Maria Antonietta; Kratchanova, Maria; Naumov, Vladimir V; Trofimov, Aleksei V; Vasil’ev, Rostislav F

    2015-01-01

    Summary This study compares the ability to scavenge different peroxyl radicals and to act as chain-breaking antioxidants of monomers related to curcumin (1): dehydrozingerone (2), zingerone (3), (2Z,5E)-ethyl 2-hydroxy-6-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxohexa-2,5-dienoate (4), ferulic acid (5) and their corresponding C 2-symmetric dimers 6–9. Four models were applied: model 1 – chemiluminescence (CL) of a hydrocarbon substrate used for determination of the rate constants (k A) of the reactions of the antioxidants with peroxyl radicals; model 2 – lipid autoxidation (lipidAO) used for assessing the chain-breaking antioxidant efficiency and reactivity; model 3 – oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), which yields the activity against peroxyl radicals generated by an azoinitiator; model 4 – density functional theory (DFT) calculations at UB3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level, applied to explain the structure–activity relationship. Dimers showed 2–2.5-fold higher values of k A than their monomers. Model 2 gives information about the effects of the side chains and revealed much higher antioxidant activity for monomers and dimers with α,β-unsaturated side chains. Curcumin and 6 in fact are dimers of the same monomer 2. We conclude that the type of linkage between the two “halves” by which the molecule is made up does not exert influence on the antioxidant efficiency and reactivity of these two dimers. The dimers and the monomers demonstrated higher activity than Trolox (10) in aqueous medium (model 3). A comparison of the studied compounds with DL-α-tocopherol (11), Trolox and curcumin is made. All dimers are characterized through lower bond dissociation enthalpies (BDEs) than their monomers (model 4), which qualitatively supports the experimental results. PMID:26425195

  7. Large-scale epitaxial growth kinetics of graphene: A kinetic Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2015-08-28

    Epitaxial growth via chemical vapor deposition is considered to be the most promising way towards synthesizing large area graphene with high quality. However, it remains a big theoretical challenge to reveal growth kinetics with atomically energetic and large-scale spatial information included. Here, we propose a minimal kinetic Monte Carlo model to address such an issue on an active catalyst surface with graphene/substrate lattice mismatch, which facilitates us to perform large scale simulations of the growth kinetics over two dimensional surface with growth fronts of complex shapes. A geometry-determined large-scale growth mechanism is revealed, where the rate-dominating event is found to be C{sub 1}-attachment for concave growth-front segments and C{sub 5}-attachment for others. This growth mechanism leads to an interesting time-resolved growth behavior which is well consistent with that observed in a recent scanning tunneling microscopy experiment.

  8. Kinetic analysis of a general model of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens involving a reversible inhibitor. I. Kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, A; Sotos-Lomas, A; Arribas, E; Masia-Perez, J; Garcia-Molina, F; García-Moreno, M; Varon, R

    2007-04-01

    Starting from a simple general reaction mechanism of activation of aspartic proteinases zymogens involving a uni- and a bimolecular simultaneous activation route and a reversible inhibition step, the time course equation of the zymogen, inhibitor and activated enzyme concentrations have been derived. Likewise, expressions for the time required for any reaction progress and the corresponding mean activation rates as well as the half-life of the global zymogen activation have been derived. An experimental design and kinetic data analysis is suggested to estimate the kinetic parameters involved in the reaction mechanism proposed.

  9. Plasma Assisted Combustion: Flame Regimes and Kinetic Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-05

    effect dominant Kinetic effect 1. Plasma Activated Low Temperature Combustion and cool flames for liquid hydrocarbon fuels >1100 K High temperature...better understood) 800-1100 K Intermediate 500-800 K Low Plasma has more kinetic enhancement effect in lower temperature combustion However...species Absorption Dispersion ν ν HO2 energy levels Zeeman splitting New diagnostics: HO2/OH using mid-IR Faraday Rotational Spectroscopy

  10. Insights into Coupled Folding and Binding Mechanisms from Kinetic Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Michael D.; Dahal, Liza; Wicky, Basile I. M.; Clarke, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are characterized by a lack of persistent structure. Since their identification more than a decade ago, many questions regarding their functional relevance and interaction mechanisms remain unanswered. Although most experiments have taken equilibrium and structural perspectives, fewer studies have investigated the kinetics of their interactions. Here we review and highlight the type of information that can be gained from kinetic studies. In particular, we show how kinetic studies of coupled folding and binding reactions, an important class of signaling event, are needed to determine mechanisms. PMID:26851275

  11. Diffusion of point defects in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique method

    DOE PAGES

    Trochet, Mickaël; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean -François; ...

    2015-06-16

    We study point-defect diffusion in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities based on the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau), coupled to the standard Stillinger-Weber potential. We focus more particularly on the evolution of crystalline cells with one to four vacancies and one to four interstitials in order to provide a detailed picture of both the atomistic diffusion mechanisms and overall kinetics. We show formation energies, activation barriers for the ground state of all eight systems, and migration barriers for those systems that diffuse. Additionally, we characterize diffusion pathsmore » and special configurations such as dumbbell complex, di-interstitial (IV-pair+2I) superdiffuser, tetrahedral vacancy complex, and more. In conclusion, this study points to an unsuspected dynamical richness even for this apparently simple system that can only be uncovered by exhaustive and systematic approaches such as the kinetic activation-relaxation technique.« less

  12. Diffusion of point defects in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique method

    SciTech Connect

    Trochet, Mickaël; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean -François; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-06-16

    We study point-defect diffusion in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities based on the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau), coupled to the standard Stillinger-Weber potential. We focus more particularly on the evolution of crystalline cells with one to four vacancies and one to four interstitials in order to provide a detailed picture of both the atomistic diffusion mechanisms and overall kinetics. We show formation energies, activation barriers for the ground state of all eight systems, and migration barriers for those systems that diffuse. Additionally, we characterize diffusion paths and special configurations such as dumbbell complex, di-interstitial (IV-pair+2I) superdiffuser, tetrahedral vacancy complex, and more. In conclusion, this study points to an unsuspected dynamical richness even for this apparently simple system that can only be uncovered by exhaustive and systematic approaches such as the kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

  13. Diffusion of point defects in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trochet, Mickaël; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean-François; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-06-01

    We study point-defect diffusion in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities based on the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau), coupled to the standard Stillinger-Weber potential. We focus more particularly on the evolution of crystalline cells with one to four vacancies and one to four interstitials in order to provide a detailed picture of both the atomistic diffusion mechanisms and overall kinetics. We show formation energies, activation barriers for the ground state of all eight systems, and migration barriers for those systems that diffuse. Additionally, we characterize diffusion paths and special configurations such as dumbbell complex, di-interstitial (IV-pair+2I) superdiffuser, tetrahedral vacancy complex, and more. This study points to an unsuspected dynamical richness even for this apparently simple system that can only be uncovered by exhaustive and systematic approaches such as the kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

  14. Kinetic studies on the cupric ion oxidation of sheep hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Brittain, T; Ivanetich, K M

    1980-11-01

    The oxidation of sheep hemoglobin, in both the oxygenated and deoxygenated forms, by cuprous ions have been studied by spectrophotometric and stopped-flow techniques. Mixing of both the oxy and deoxy forms with excess Cu2+ leads to the rapid oxidation of the iron atoms of all four of the hem groups of the tetrameric protein, followed by the slow formation of hemichromes (low spin FeIII forms of hemoglobin). Stopped-flow studies show that the oxidations follow simple monophasic kinetics with second-order rate constants of 65 and 310 M-1 sec-1 for the oxy and deoxy forms, respectively. Variable temperature studies yield Arrhenius activation energies of 43 for the oxy form and 113 kJ mole-1 for the deoxy form. For each form of the protein the activation energy is very similar to the activation enthalpy. While the deoxy form is characterized by an activation energy and enthalpy that is more than twice the corresponding value in the oxy form. The activation entropies show highly significant differences being -128 e.u. and 136 e.u. at 25 degrees C for the oxy and deoxy forms, respectively.

  15. Reactivity of organic micropollutants with ozone: A kinetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Brambilla, A.; Bolzacchini, E.; Meinardi, S.

    1995-12-01

    Studies about the chemical reactivity of compounds widely used in the environment are needed. The chemical reactivity of triazines (simazine, atrazine, terbutylazine) and phenylureas (linuron and diuron) was studied. The kinetics of the oxidation of the triazines and phenylureas with ozone at pH 3 and the kinetics of the saturation of the solution with ozone were evaluated. These data may be useful for the prediction of the persistency of these compuonds in the environment and for the treatment of wastewaters contaminated with these compounds. The solution was presaturated with ozone before the addition of the substrate, and the reaction constants for the pseudo first order kinetics -d[substrate]/dt = k{sub app} [substrate] at 298{degree}K were obtained, assuming a steady state concentration of ozone of 1.91 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1} for the phenylureas and of 3.03 10{sup -4} and L{sup -1} for the triazines. The data obtained were: atrazine k = 6.86 (L mol{sup -1}s{sup -1}); simazine: 9.26; t-butylazine 7.26; linuron 11.00; diuron 43.90. The activation parameters for the reaction of simazine were {Delta}H{sup =} = 9.35 kcal mol{sup -1} and {Delta}S{sup =} = -22.3 cal mol{sup -1} {degree}K{sup -1} and for the reaction of diuron were {Delta}H{sup =} = 16.83 Kcal mol{sup -1}, {Delta}S{sup =} = 5.696 cal mol{sup -1} {degree}K{sup -1}.

  16. A kinetic study of lipase-catalyzed reversible kinetic resolution involving verification at miniplant-scale.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, W R; Gendrot, G; Freund, A; Reuss, M

    2006-12-05

    Lipase-catalyzed kinetic resolution of racemates is a popular method for synthesis of chiral synthons. Most of these resolutions are reversible equilibrium limited reactions. For the first time, an extensive kinetic model is proposed for kinetic resolution reactions, which takes into account the full reversibility of the reaction, substrate inhibition by an acyl donor and an acyl acceptor as well as alternative substrate inhibition by each enantiomer. For this purpose, the reversible enantioselective transesterification of (R/S)-1-methoxy-2-propanol with ethyl acetate catalyzed by Candida antarctica lipase B (CAL-B) is investigated. The detailed model presented here is valid for a wide range of substrate and product concentrations. Following model discrimination and the application of Haldane equations to reduce the degree of freedom in parameter estimation, the 11 free parameters are successfully identified. All parameters are fitted to the complete data set simultaneously. Six types of independent initial rate studies provide a solid data basis for the model. The effect of changes in substrate and product concentration on reaction kinetics is discussed. The developed model is used for simulations to study the behavior of reaction kinetics in a fixed bed reactor. The typical plot of enantiomeric excess versus conversion of substrate and product is evaluated at various initial substrate mixtures. The model is validated by comparison with experimental results obtained with a fixed bed reactor, which is part of a fully automated state-of-the-art miniplant.

  17. Thermogravimetric kinetic study of agricultural residue biomass pyrolysis based on combined kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xun; Hu, Mian; Hu, Wanyong; Chen, Zhihua; Liu, Shiming; Hu, Zhiquan; Xiao, Bo

    2016-11-01

    Pyrolytic kinetic of an agricultural residue (AR) feedstock, a mixture of plants (cotton, wheat, rich, corn) stems, was investigated based on combined kinetics. The most suitable mechanism for AR one-step pyrolysis was f(α)=(1-α)(1.1816)α(-1.8428) with kinetic parameters of: apparent activation energy 221.7kJ/mol, pre-exponential factor 4.17E16s(-1). Pyrolysis of AR feedstock could not be described by one-step reaction attributes to heterogeneous features of pyrolysis processes. Combined kinetics three-parallel-reaction (CK-TPR) model fitted the pyrolysis experimental data very well. Reaction mechanisms for pseudo hemicelluloses, cellulose, lignin in CK-TPR model was f(α)=(1-α)(1.6244)α(-0.3371)[-ln(1-α)](-0.0515), f(α)=(1-α)(1.0597)α(-0.6909)[-ln(1-α)](0.9026) and f(α)=(1-α)(2.9577)α(-4.7719), respectively. Apparent activation energy of three pseudo components followed the order of Elignin(197.3kJ/mol)>Ecellulose(176.3kJ/mol)>Ehemicelluloses (151.1kJ/mol). Mechanism of hemicelluloses pyrolysis could be further expressed as f(α)=(1-α)(1.4). The pyrolytic mechanism of cellulose met the Nucleation well. However, mechanism of lignin pyrolysis was complex, which possibly was the combined effects of Nucleation, Diffusion, Geometrical contraction, and Power law.

  18. Kinetic and spectrophotometric studies on the renaturation of deoxyribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Thrower, K J; Peacocke, A R

    1968-10-01

    The kinetics of the renaturation of Escherichia coli DNA in 0.4-1.0m-sodium chloride at temperatures from 60 degrees to 90 degrees have been studied. The extent of renaturation was a maximum at 65 degrees to 75 degrees and increased with ionic strength, and the rate constant increased with both ionic strength and temperature. The energy and entropy of activation of renaturation were calculated to be 6-7kcal.mole(-1) and -40cal.deg.(-1)mole(-1) respectively. It has been shown that renaturation is a second-order process for 5hr. under most conditions. The results are consistent with a reaction in which the rate-controlling step is the diffusion together of two separated complementary DNA strands and the formation of a nucleus of base pairs between them. The kinetics of the renaturation of T7-phage DNA and Bordetella pertussis DNA have also been studied, and their rates of renaturation related quantitatively to the relative heterogeneity of the DNA samples. By analysis of the spectra of DNA at different stages during renaturation it was shown that initially the renatured DNA was rich in guanine-cytosine base pairs and non-random in base sequence, but that, as equilibrium was approached, the renatured DNA gradually resembled native DNA more closely. The rate constant for the renaturation of guanine-cytosine base pairs was slightly higher than for adenine-thymine base pairs.

  19. Kinetic Study of Denatonium Sorption to Smectite Clay Minerals

    PubMed Central

    Crosson, Garry S.; Sandmann, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The denatonium cation, as a benzoate salt, is the most bitter cation known to modern society and is frequently added to consumer products to reduce accidental and intentional consumption by humans and animals. Denatonium can enter the environment by accidental discharges, potentially rendering water supplies undrinkable. Interactions of denatonium with soil components (i.e., smectite minerals) ultimately control the environmental fate of denatonium, but the current literature is devoid of studies that evaluate denatonium sorption to smectite minerals. This study investigated the mechanism and kinetics of denatonium sorption to smectite clay minerals as a function of smectite type, temperature, pH and ionic strength. Uptake by synthetic mica montmorillonite (Syn-1), Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-2), and Texas montmorillonite (STx-1b) at 305K was rapid, with equilibrium being reached within 2 min for all clays. Complete removal of denatonium was observed for STx-1b at pH 6.9, while partial removal was observed for Syn-1 and SWy-2. Kinetic behavior of SWy-2 and Syn-1 is consistent with a pseudo–second-order model at 305K. An activation energy of +25.9 kJ/mol was obtained for sorption to Syn-1 and was independent of temperature between 286K and 338K. Activation-free energy (ΔG*), activation enthalpy (ΔH*), and activation entropy (ΔS*) for Syn-1 were found to be +62.91 kJ/mol, +23.36 kJ/mol, and −0.130 kJ/(K·mol), respectively. Sorption capacities at pH 3.6, 6.9, and 8.2 were constant at 1.3×10−2 g denatonium/g clay; however, the kinetic rate constant increased by 56%, going from acidic to basic solution conditions. Distribution coefficients were negatively correlated with ionic strength, suggesting cation exchange. Collectively, results suggested that smectite minerals can serve as efficient sinks for denatonium cations. This is much-needed information for agencies developing regulations regarding denatonium usage and for water treatment

  20. Kinetic Study of Denatonium Sorption to Smectite Clay Minerals.

    PubMed

    Crosson, Garry S; Sandmann, Emily

    2013-06-01

    The denatonium cation, as a benzoate salt, is the most bitter cation known to modern society and is frequently added to consumer products to reduce accidental and intentional consumption by humans and animals. Denatonium can enter the environment by accidental discharges, potentially rendering water supplies undrinkable. Interactions of denatonium with soil components (i.e., smectite minerals) ultimately control the environmental fate of denatonium, but the current literature is devoid of studies that evaluate denatonium sorption to smectite minerals. This study investigated the mechanism and kinetics of denatonium sorption to smectite clay minerals as a function of smectite type, temperature, pH and ionic strength. Uptake by synthetic mica montmorillonite (Syn-1), Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-2), and Texas montmorillonite (STx-1b) at 305K was rapid, with equilibrium being reached within 2 min for all clays. Complete removal of denatonium was observed for STx-1b at pH 6.9, while partial removal was observed for Syn-1 and SWy-2. Kinetic behavior of SWy-2 and Syn-1 is consistent with a pseudo-second-order model at 305K. An activation energy of +25.9 kJ/mol was obtained for sorption to Syn-1 and was independent of temperature between 286K and 338K. Activation-free energy (ΔG*), activation enthalpy (ΔH*), and activation entropy (ΔS*) for Syn-1 were found to be +62.91 kJ/mol, +23.36 kJ/mol, and -0.130 kJ/(K·mol), respectively. Sorption capacities at pH 3.6, 6.9, and 8.2 were constant at 1.3×10(-2) g denatonium/g clay; however, the kinetic rate constant increased by 56%, going from acidic to basic solution conditions. Distribution coefficients were negatively correlated with ionic strength, suggesting cation exchange. Collectively, results suggested that smectite minerals can serve as efficient sinks for denatonium cations. This is much-needed information for agencies developing regulations regarding denatonium usage and for water treatment professionals who may

  1. Model-based analysis of coupled equilibrium-kinetic processes: indirect kinetic studies of thermodynamic parameters using the dynamic data.

    PubMed

    Emami, Fereshteh; Maeder, Marcel; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2015-05-07

    Thermodynamic studies of equilibrium chemical reactions linked with kinetic procedures are mostly impossible by traditional approaches. In this work, the new concept of generalized kinetic study of thermodynamic parameters is introduced for dynamic data. The examples of equilibria intertwined with kinetic chemical mechanisms include molecular charge transfer complex formation reactions, pH-dependent degradation of chemical compounds and tautomerization kinetics in micellar solutions. Model-based global analysis with the possibility of calculating and embedding the equilibrium and kinetic parameters into the fitting algorithm has allowed the complete analysis of the complex reaction mechanisms. After the fitting process, the optimal equilibrium and kinetic parameters together with an estimate of their standard deviations have been obtained. This work opens up a promising new avenue for obtaining equilibrium constants through the kinetic data analysis for the kinetic reactions that involve equilibrium processes.

  2. Kinetic study of hydrolysis of coconut fiber into glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhaimin, Sudiono, Sri

    2017-03-01

    Kinetic study of hydrolysis of coconut fiber into glucose has been done. The aim of this research was to study of the effect of time and temperature to the glucose as the result of the conversion of coconut fiber. The various temperature of the hydrolysis process were 30 °C, 48 °C, 72 °C and 95 °C and the various time of the hydrolysis process were 0, 15, 30, 60, 120, 180, 240, 300 minutes. A quantitative analysis was done by measured the concentration of the glucose as the result of the conversion of coconut fiber. The result showed that the rate constant from the various temperature were 3.10-4 minute-1; 8.10-4 minutees-1; 84.10-4 minute-1, and 205.10-4 minute-1, and the energy activation was 7,69. 103 kJ/mol.

  3. Planning a Kinetic and Mechanistic Study with Cerium (IV)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Samir B.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Presents a kinetic study that utilizes a method for varying the concentrations of the possible Ce(IV) species and computing the concentration distribution of the sulfato and hydroxo species of Ce(IV). (MLH)

  4. Kinetic analysis of a general model of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens.

    PubMed

    Varón, R; García-Moreno, M; Valera-Ruipérez, D; García-Molina, F; García-Cánovas, F; Ladrón-de Guevara, R G; Masiá-Pérez, J; Havsteen, B H

    2006-10-07

    Starting from a simple general reaction mechanism of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens involving an uni- and a bimolecular simultaneous route, the time course equation of the concentration of the zymogen and of the activated enzyme have been derived. From these equations, an analysis quantifying the relative contribution to the global process of the two routes has been carried out for the first time. This analysis suggests a way to predict the time course of the relative contribution as well as the effect of the initial zymogen and activating enzyme concentrations, on the relative weight. An experimental design and kinetic data analysis is suggested to estimate the kinetic parameters involved in the reaction mechanism proposed. Finally, we apply some of our results to experimental data obtained by other authors in experimental studies of the activation of some aspartic proteinase zymogens.

  5. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of sulforaphane adsorption on macroporous resin.

    PubMed

    Yuanfeng, Wu; Lei, Zhang; Jianwei, Mao; Shiwang, Liu; Jun, Huang; Yuru, You; Lehe, Mei

    2016-08-15

    The adsorption equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic of sulforaphane (SF) adsorption onto macroporous resin in aqueous phase were studied. The SP850 resin was screened as the appropriate resin for SF purification. From the equilibrium studies, the Redlich-Peterson model was found to be the best for description of the adsorption behavior of SF onto SP850 resin, followed by the Freundlich model and the Langmuir model. Batch equilibrium experiments demonstrated that, in the examined temperature range, the equilibrium adsorption capacity of SP850 resin decreased with increasing adsorption temperature. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of SF was a physical, exothermic, and spontaneous process. The adsorption kinetics revealed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model was suitable to characterize the kinetics of adsorption of SF onto SP850. Finally, the intra-particle diffusion model demonstrated that SF diffused quickly into macropores, and that diffusion slowed down in the meso- and micropores.

  6. Kinetic studies of ICF target dynamics with ePLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, R. J.

    2016-10-01

    The ePLAS code was recently used1 to show that a modeling change from artificial to real viscosity can result in a decrease of the predicted performance of ICF targets. This code typically follows either fluid or PIC electrons with fluid ions in self-consistent E - and B - fields computed by the Implicit Moment Method2. For the present study the ions have instead been run as PIC particles undergoing Krook-like self-collisions. The ePLAS collision model continually redistributes the ion particle properties toward a local Maxwellian, while conserving the mean density, momentum and energy. Whereas the use of real viscosity captures large Knudsen Number effects as the active target dimensions shrink below the ion mean-free-path, the new kinetic modeling can manifest additional effects such as collisional shock precursors3 from the escape and streaming of the fastest particle ions. In 2D cylindrical geometry we will explore how such kinetic shock extensions might affect shell and core compression dynamics in ICF target implosions.

  7. Sintering kinetic studies in nonstoichiometric strontium titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, Luis; Senos, Ana M.R. Vilarinho, Paula M.

    2009-02-04

    The effect of nonstoichiometry on the densification of SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics with Sr/Ti ratios from 0.997 to 1.02 was systematically addressed. The kinetics of densification was studied by dilatometric analysis. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used for crystallographic and microstructure characterization. Ti excess enhanced matter transport during sintering whereas Sr excess decreased it. The shrinkage rate and average grain size increased with the decrease of Sr/Ti ratio. Close values of the activation energy for the initial densification and the near constant onset temperature for densification suggest that identical transport mechanisms control the densification of all the compositions. Small excesses of TiO{sub 2} and SrO were mostly incorporated into the perovskite lattice inducing alterations in the defect chemistry of the material and the mass transport during sintering is controlled by Sr vacancies. Very small stoichiometric variations have a strong influence on the sintering kinetics and resulting microstructure of ST ceramics.

  8. Ultrasonic enhancement of the simultaneous removal of quaternary toxic organic dyes by CuO nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon: Central composite design, kinetic and isotherm study.

    PubMed

    Dashamiri, Somayeh; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Dashtian, Kheibar; Rahimi, Mahmood Reza; Goudarzi, Alireza; Jannesar, Ramin

    2016-07-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (CuO-NPs-AC) were prepared and fully analyzed and characterized with FE-SEM, XRD and FT-IR. Subsequently, this novel material was used for simultaneous ultrasound-assisted adsorption of brilliant green (BG), auramine O (AO), methylene blue (MB) and eosin yellow (EY) dyes. Problems regard to dyes spectra overlap in quaternary solution of this dyes were omitted by derivative spectrophotometric method. The best pH in quaternary system was studied by using one at a time method to achieved maximum dyes removal percentage. Subsequently, sonication time, adsorbent dosage and initial dyes concentrations influence on dyes removal was optimized by central composite design (CCD) combined with desirability function approach (DFA). Desirability score of 0.978 show optimum conditions set at sonication time (4.2 min), adsorbent mass (0.029 g), initial dyes concentration (4.5 mg L(-1)). Under this optimum condition the removal percentage for MB, AO, EY and BG dyes 97.58, 94.66, 96.22 and 94.93, respectively. The adsorption rate well fitted by pseudo second-order while adsorption capacity according to the Langmuir model as best equilibrium isotherm model for BG, MB, AO and EY was 20.48, 21.26, 22.34 and 21.29 mg g(-1), respectively.

  9. Staphylococcal nuclease active-site amino acids: pH dependence of tyrosines and arginines by sup 13 C NMR and correlation with kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Grissom, C.G.; Markley, J.L. )

    1989-03-07

    The pH and temperature dependence of the kinetic parameters of staphylococcal nuclease have been examined with three p-nitrophenyl phosphate containing DNA analogues that vary as to 3'-substituent. With wild-type (Foggi variant) nuclease (nuclease wt) and the substrates thymidine 3'-phosphate 5'-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) (PNPdTp), thymidine 3'-methylphosphonate 5'-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) (PNPdTp Me), and thymidine 5'-(p-nitrophenyl phosphate) (PNPdT), k{sub cat} remains nearly constant at 13 min{sup {minus}1}. However, k{sub cat}/k{sub m} with nuclease wt varies considerably. The data suggests that the inflection k{sub cat}/K{sub m} with pK{sub a} at 9.67 arises from ionization of tyrosine-85, which hydrogen bonds to the divalent 3'-phosphomonester of substrates with this substituent. The enthalpy of ionization of both deprotonation steps in the k{sub cat}/K{sub m} versus pH profile is 5 kcal/mol. {sup 13}C NMR has been used to determine the pK{sub a} values of the arginine and tyrosine residues. The results do not rule out arginine as a candidate for the acidic catalyst that protonates the 5'-ribose alkoxide prior to product release. The phenolic hydroxyl carbon of tyrosine-85 has been assigned by comparing the {sup 13}C NMR spectrum of nuclease wt and nuclease Y85F. This correlation between pK{sub a} values along with the absence of other candidates indicates that the ionization of tyrosine-85 is the pK{sub a} seen in the k{sub cat}/K{sub m} vs pH profile for substrates with a divalent 3'-phosphomonester. This conclusion is consistent with the proposed role of tyrosine-85 as a hydrogen-bond donor to the 3'-phosphomonoester of substrates poised for exonucleolytic hydrolysis.

  10. Kinetic study of brilliant green adsorption from aqueous solution onto white rice husk ash.

    PubMed

    Tavlieva, Mariana P; Genieva, Svetlana D; Georgieva, Velyana G; Vlaev, Lyubomir T

    2013-11-01

    The present research was focused on the study of adsorption kinetics of brilliant green (BG) onto white rice husk ash from aqueous solutions. The research was performed in the temperature interval 290-320 K in 10° steps and in the concentration range of 3-100 mg L(-1). Batch studies were conducted in order to determine the optimal adsorbent dose, and the time required to reach the adsorption equilibrium at each temperature. The effect of the initial concentration of brilliant green was studied (pH not adjusted), as well as the effect of temperature. The maximum adsorption capacity of the WRHA for BG at 320 K was determined to be 85.56 mg g(-1). The adsorption kinetic data were analyzed employing several kinetic models: pseudo-first-order equation, pseudo-second-order equation, Elovichequation, Banghman's equation, Diffusion-chemisorption model, and Boyd kinetic expression. It was established that the adsorption process obeyed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Based on the rate constants obtained by this kinetic model using Arrhenius and Eyring equations, the activation parameters were determined, namely the activation energy (50.04 kJ mol(-1)), the change of entropy (-318.31 J mol(-1) K(-1)), enthalpy (-47.50 kJ mol(-1)), and Gibbs free energy (range 44.81-54.36 kJ mol(-1)) for the formation of activated complex from the reagents.

  11. Physiological adaptation of growth kinetics in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, M; Takács, I; Tränckner, J

    2015-11-15

    Physiological adaptation as it occurs in bacterial cells at variable environmental conditions influences characteristic properties of growth kinetics significantly. However, physiological adaptation to growth related parameters in activated sludge modelling is not yet recognised. Consequently these parameters are regarded to be constant. To investigate physiological adaptation in activated sludge the endogenous respiration in an aerobic degradation batch experiment and simultaneous to that the maximum possible respiration in an aerobic growth batch experiment was measured. The activated sludge samples were taken from full scale wastewater treatment plants with different sludge retention times (SRTs). It could be shown that the low SRT sludge adapts by growth optimisation (high maximum growth rate and high decay rate) to its particular environment where a high SRT sludge adapts by survival optimization (low maximum growth rate and low decay rate). Thereby, both the maximum specific growth rate and the decay rate vary in the same pattern and are strongly correlated to each other. To describe the physiological state of mixed cultures like activated sludge quantitatively a physiological state factor (PSF) is proposed as the ratio of the maximum specific growth rate and the decay rate. The PSF can be expressed as an exponential function with respect to the SRT.

  12. [Kinetic analysis of additive effect on desulfurization activity].

    PubMed

    Han, Kui-hua; Zhao, Jian-li; Lu, Chun-mei; Wang, Yong-zheng; Zhao, Gai-ju; Cheng, Shi-qing

    2006-02-01

    The additive effects of A12O3, Fe2O3 and MnCO3 on CaO sulfation kinetics were investigated by thermogravimetic analysis method and modified grain model. The activation energy (Ea) and the pre-exponential factor (k0) of surface reaction, the activation energy (Ep) and the pre-exponential factor (D0) of product layer diffusion reaction were calculated according to the model. Additions of MnCO3 can enhance the initial reaction rate, product layer diffusion and the final CaO conversion of sorbents, the effect mechanism of which is similar to that of Fe2O3. The method based isokinetic temperature Ts and activation energy can not estimate the contribution of additive to the sulfation reactivity, the rate constant of the surface reaction (k), and the effective diffusivity of reactant in the product layer (Ds) under certain experimental conditions can reflect the effect of additives on the activation. Unstoichiometric metal oxide may catalyze the surface reaction and promote the diffusivity of reactant in the product layer by the crystal defect and distinct diffusion of cation and anion. According to the mechanism and effect of additive on the sulfation, the effective temperature and the stoichiometric relation of reaction, it is possible to improve the utilization of sorbent by compounding more additives to the calcium-based sorbent.

  13. Study on kinetic model of microwave thermocatalytic treatment of biomass tar model compound.

    PubMed

    Anis, Samsudin; Zainal, Z A

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic model parameters for toluene conversion under microwave thermocatalytic treatment were evaluated. The kinetic rate constants were determined using integral method based on experimental data and coupled with Arrhenius equation for obtaining the activation energies and pre-exponential factors. The model provides a good agreement with the experimental data. The kinetic model was also validated with standard error of 3% on average. The extrapolation of the model showed a reasonable trend to predict toluene conversion and product yield both in thermal and catalytic treatments. Under microwave irradiation, activation energy of toluene conversion was lower in the range of 3-27 kJ mol(-1) compared to those of conventional heating reported in the literatures. The overall reaction rate was six times higher compared to conventional heating. As a whole, the kinetic model works better for tar model removal in the absence of gas reforming within a level of reliability demonstrated in this study.

  14. Cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma according to various activation protocols

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Y. H.; Kim, W.; Park, K. U.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to evaluate the cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) according to different activation protocols. Methods Two manual preparation procedures (single-spin (SS) at 900 g for five minutes; double-spin (DS) at 900 g for five minutes and then 1500 g for 15 minutes) were performed for each of 14 healthy subjects. Both preparations were tested for platelet activation by one of three activation protocols: no activation, activation with calcium (Ca) only, or calcium with a low dose (50 IU per 1 ml PRP) of thrombin. Each preparation was divided into four aliquots and incubated for one hour, 24 hours, 72 hours, and seven days. The cytokine-release kinetics were evaluated by assessing PDGF, TGF, VEGF, FGF, IL-1, and MMP-9 concentrations with bead-based sandwich immunoassay. Results The concentration of cytokine released from PRP varied over time and was influenced by various activation protocols. Ca-only activation had a significant effect on the DS PRPs (where the VEGF, FGF, and IL-1 concentrations were sustained) while Ca/thrombin activation had effects on both SS and DS PRPs (where the PDGF and VEGF concentrations were sustained and the TGF and FGF concentrations were short). The IL-1 content showed a significant increase with Ca-only or Ca/thrombin activation while these activations did not increase the MMP-9 concentration. Conclusion The SS and DS methods differed in their effect on cytokine release, and this effect varied among the cytokines analysed. In addition, low dose of thrombin/calcium activation increased the overall cytokine release of the PRP preparations over seven days, relative to that with a calcium-only supplement or non-activation. Cite this article: Professor J. H. Oh. Cytokine-release kinetics of platelet-rich plasma according to various activation protocols. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:37–45. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.52.2000540 PMID:26862077

  15. Modeling and Classification of Kinetic Patterns of Dynamic Metabolic Biomarkers in Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Breit, Marc; Netzer, Michael; Weinberger, Klaus M; Baumgartner, Christian

    2015-08-01

    The objectives of this work were the classification of dynamic metabolic biomarker candidates and the modeling and characterization of kinetic regulatory mechanisms in human metabolism with response to external perturbations by physical activity. Longitudinal metabolic concentration data of 47 individuals from 4 different groups were examined, obtained from a cycle ergometry cohort study. In total, 110 metabolites (within the classes of acylcarnitines, amino acids, and sugars) were measured through a targeted metabolomics approach, combining tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) with the concept of stable isotope dilution (SID) for metabolite quantitation. Biomarker candidates were selected by combined analysis of maximum fold changes (MFCs) in concentrations and P-values resulting from statistical hypothesis testing. Characteristic kinetic signatures were identified through a mathematical modeling approach utilizing polynomial fitting. Modeled kinetic signatures were analyzed for groups with similar behavior by applying hierarchical cluster analysis. Kinetic shape templates were characterized, defining different forms of basic kinetic response patterns, such as sustained, early, late, and other forms, that can be used for metabolite classification. Acetylcarnitine (C2), showing a late response pattern and having the highest values in MFC and statistical significance, was classified as late marker and ranked as strong predictor (MFC = 1.97, P < 0.001). In the class of amino acids, highest values were shown for alanine (MFC = 1.42, P < 0.001), classified as late marker and strong predictor. Glucose yields a delayed response pattern, similar to a hockey stick function, being classified as delayed marker and ranked as moderate predictor (MFC = 1.32, P < 0.001). These findings coincide with existing knowledge on central metabolic pathways affected in exercise physiology, such as β-oxidation of fatty acids, glycolysis, and glycogenolysis. The presented modeling approach

  16. Modeling and Classification of Kinetic Patterns of Dynamic Metabolic Biomarkers in Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Breit, Marc; Netzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this work were the classification of dynamic metabolic biomarker candidates and the modeling and characterization of kinetic regulatory mechanisms in human metabolism with response to external perturbations by physical activity. Longitudinal metabolic concentration data of 47 individuals from 4 different groups were examined, obtained from a cycle ergometry cohort study. In total, 110 metabolites (within the classes of acylcarnitines, amino acids, and sugars) were measured through a targeted metabolomics approach, combining tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) with the concept of stable isotope dilution (SID) for metabolite quantitation. Biomarker candidates were selected by combined analysis of maximum fold changes (MFCs) in concentrations and P-values resulting from statistical hypothesis testing. Characteristic kinetic signatures were identified through a mathematical modeling approach utilizing polynomial fitting. Modeled kinetic signatures were analyzed for groups with similar behavior by applying hierarchical cluster analysis. Kinetic shape templates were characterized, defining different forms of basic kinetic response patterns, such as sustained, early, late, and other forms, that can be used for metabolite classification. Acetylcarnitine (C2), showing a late response pattern and having the highest values in MFC and statistical significance, was classified as late marker and ranked as strong predictor (MFC = 1.97, P < 0.001). In the class of amino acids, highest values were shown for alanine (MFC = 1.42, P < 0.001), classified as late marker and strong predictor. Glucose yields a delayed response pattern, similar to a hockey stick function, being classified as delayed marker and ranked as moderate predictor (MFC = 1.32, P < 0.001). These findings coincide with existing knowledge on central metabolic pathways affected in exercise physiology, such as β-oxidation of fatty acids, glycolysis, and glycogenolysis. The presented modeling approach

  17. Kinetic Uptake Studies of Powdered Materials in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Mohamed H.; Wilson, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    Challenges exist for the study of time dependent sorption processes for heterogeneous systems, especially in the case of dispersed nanomaterials in solvents or solutions because they are not well suited to conventional batch kinetic experiments. In this study, a comparison of batch versus a one-pot setup in two variable configurations was evaluated for the study of uptake kinetics in heterogeneous (solid/solution) systems: (i) conventional batch method; (ii) one-pot system with dispersed adsorbent in solution with a semi-permeable barrier (filter paper or dialysis tubing) for in situ sampling; and (iii) one-pot system with an adsorbent confined in a semi-permeable barrier (dialysis tubing or filter paper barrier) with ex situ sampling. The sorbent systems evaluated herein include several cyclodextrin-based polyurethane materials with two types of phenolic dyes: p-nitrophenol and phenolphthalein. The one-pot kinetics method with in situ (Method ii) or ex situ (Method iii) sampling described herein offers significant advantages for the study of heterogeneous sorption kinetics of highly dispersed sorbent materials with particles sizes across a range of dimensions from the micron to nanometer scale. The method described herein will contribute positively to the development of advanced studies for heterogeneous sorption processes where an assessment of the relative uptake properties is required at different experimental conditions. The results of this study will be advantageous for the study of nanomaterials with significant benefits over batch kinetic studies for a wide range of heterogeneous sorption processes.

  18. First principle kinetic studies of zeolite-catalyzed methylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Van der Mynsbrugge, Jeroen; Vandichel, Matthias; Hemelsoet, Karen; Lesthaeghe, David; Ghysels, An; Marin, Guy B; Waroquier, Michel

    2011-02-02

    Methylations of ethene, propene, and butene by methanol over the acidic microporous H-ZSM-5 catalyst are studied by means of state of the art computational techniques, to derive Arrhenius plots and rate constants from first principles that can directly be compared with the experimental data. For these key elementary reactions in the methanol to hydrocarbons (MTH) process, direct kinetic data became available only recently [J. Catal.2005, 224, 115-123; J. Catal.2005, 234, 385-400]. At 350 °C, apparent activation energies of 103, 69, and 45 kJ/mol and rate constants of 2.6 × 10(-4), 4.5 × 10(-3), and 1.3 × 10(-2) mol/(g h mbar) for ethene, propene, and butene were derived, giving following relative ratios for methylation k(ethene)/k(propene)/k(butene) = 1:17:50. In this work, rate constants including pre-exponential factors are calculated which give very good agreement with the experimental data: apparent activation energies of 94, 62, and 37 kJ/mol for ethene, propene, and butene are found, and relative ratios of methylation k(ethene)/k(propene)/k(butene) = 1:23:763. The entropies of gas phase alkenes are underestimated in the harmonic oscillator approximation due to the occurrence of internal rotations. These low vibrational modes were substituted by manually constructed partition functions. Overall, the absolute reaction rates can be calculated with near chemical accuracy, and qualitative trends are very well reproduced. In addition, the proposed scheme is computationally very efficient and constitutes significant progress in kinetic modeling of reactions in heterogeneous catalysis.

  19. Kinetics of Alkaline Activation of Slag and Fly ash-Slag Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chithiraputhiran, Sundara Raman

    Alkali-activated aluminosilicates, commonly known as "geopolymers", are being increasingly studied as a potential replacement for Portland cement. These binders use an alkaline activator, typically alkali silicates, alkali hydroxides or a combination of both along with a silica-and-alumina rich material, such as fly ash or slag, to form a final product with properties comparable to or better than those of ordinary Portland cement. The kinetics of alkali activation is highly dependent on the chemical composition of the binder material and the activator concentration. The influence of binder composition (slag, fly ash or both), different levels of alkalinity, expressed using the ratios of Na2O-to-binders (n) and activator SiO2-to-Na2O ratios (Ms), on the early age behavior in sodium silicate solution (waterglass) activated fly ash-slag blended systems is discussed in this thesis. Optimal binder composition and the n values are selected based on the setting times. Higher activator alkalinity (n value) is required when the amount of slag in the fly ash-slag blended mixtures is reduced. Isothermal calorimetry is performed to evaluate the early age hydration process and to understand the reaction kinetics of the alkali activated systems. The differences in the calorimetric signatures between waterglass activated slag and fly ash-slag blends facilitate an understanding of the impact of the binder composition on the reaction rates. Kinetic modeling is used to quantify the differences in reaction kinetics using the Exponential as well as the Knudsen method. The influence of temperature on the reaction kinetics of activated slag and fly ash-slag blends based on the hydration parameters are discussed. Very high compressive strengths can be obtained both at early ages as well as later ages (more than 70 MPa) with waterglass activated slag mortars. Compressive strength decreases with the increase in the fly ash content. A qualitative evidence of leaching is presented through

  20. Kinetic Studies of the Solvolysis of Two Organic Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, J. A.; Pasto, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment which utilizes the solvolysis of organic halides to demonstrate first and second order reaction kinetics. The experiment also investigates the effect of a change of solvent polarity on reaction rate, common-ion and noncommon-ion salt effects, and the activation parameters of a…

  1. Kinetic studies on the tensile state of water in trees.

    PubMed

    Tributsch, Helmut; Cermak, Jan; Nadezhdina, Nadezhda

    2005-09-22

    The solar-powered generation and turnover of tensile, cohesive water in trees is described as a kinetic phenomenon of irreversible thermodynamics. A molecular kinetic model for tensile water formation and turnover is presented, which is found to be mathematically equivalent with an autocatalytic reaction (Brusselator). It is also shown to be consistent with the van der Waals equation for real liquid-gas systems, which empirically considers intermolecular forces. It can therefore be used to explain both the irreversible thermodynamics and the kinetics of the tensile liquid state of water. A nonlinear bistable evaporation behavior of tensile water is predicted, which has not yet been experimentally characterized in trees. Conventional sap flow techniques in combination with infrared imaging of heat flow around a local heat source were used to study the dynamics and energetics of water transport of trees during the eclipse of August 11, 1999. The evaporative "pulling force" in a tree was demonstrated with infrared techniques and shown to respond within seconds. While the ambient temperature during the eclipse did not drop by more than 2 degrees C, evaporative water transport was reduced by a factor of up to 2-3. The expected hysteresis (with an up to 50% decrease in energy-conversion-related entropy production) was measured, reflecting a bistable mode of conversion of solar energy into tensile water flow. This nonlinear (autocatalytic) phenomenon, together with tensile molecular order, damped the oscillating behavior of xylem tensile water, and its occasional all-or-none rupture (cavitation) can thus be explained by the nonlinear nature of intermolecular forces active in the water conduit/parenchyma environment. This characterizes the physical chemistry and energetics of tensile water in trees as an active-solar-energy-driven self-organizing process. Water is handled in the form of microcanonical ensembles and transformed into a stretched, metastable icelike state

  2. Single-molecule kinetics under force: probing protein folding and enzymatic activity with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wesley

    2010-03-01

    Weak non-covalent bonds between and within single molecules govern many aspects of biological structure and function (e.g. DNA base-paring, receptor-ligand binding, protein folding, etc.) In living systems, these interactions are often subject to mechanical forces, which can greatly alter their kinetics and activity. My group develops and applies novel single-molecule manipulation techniques to explore and quantify these force-dependent kinetics. Using optical tweezers, we have quantified the force-dependent unfolding and refolding kinetics of different proteins, including the cytoskeletal protein spectrin in collaboration with E. Evans's group [1], and the A2 domain of the von Willebrand factor blood clotting protein in collaboration with T. Springer's group [2]. Furthermore, we have studied the kinetics of the ADAMTS13 enzyme acting on a single A2 domain, and have shown that physiolgical forces in the circulation can act as a cofactor for enzymatic cleavage, regulating hemostatic activity [2]. References: 1. E. Evans, K. Halvorsen, K. Kinoshita, and W.P. Wong, Handbook of Single Molecule Biophysics, P. Hinterdorfer, ed., Springer (2009). 2. X. Zhang, K. Halvorsen, C.-Z. Zhang, W.P. Wong, and T.A. Springer, Science 324 (5932), 1330-1334 (2009).

  3. Kinetic Evidence of an Apparent Negative Activation Enthalpy in an Organocatalytic Process

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiao; Lee, Richmond; Chen, Tao; Luo, Jie; Lu, Yixin; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2013-01-01

    A combined kinetic and computational study on our tryptophan-based bifunctional thiourea catalyzed asymmetric Mannich reactions reveals an apparent negative activation enthalpy. The formation of the pre-transition state complex has been unambiguously confirmed and these observations provide an experimental support for the formation of multiple hydrogen bonding network between the substrates and the catalyst. Such interactions allow the creation of a binding cavity, a key factor to install high enantioselectivity. PMID:23990028

  4. Towards a quantitative kinetic theory of polar active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihle, T.

    2014-06-01

    A recent kinetic approach for Vicsek-like models of active particles is reviewed. The theory is based on an exact Chapman- Kolmogorov equation in phase space. It can handle discrete time dynamics and "exotic" multi-particle interactions. A nonlocal mean-field theory for the one-particle distribution function is obtained by assuming molecular chaos. The Boltzmann approach of Bertin, et al., Phys. Rev. E 74, 022101 (2006) and J. Phys. A 42, 445001 (2009), is critically assessed and compared to the current approach. In Boltzmann theory, a collision starts when two particles enter each others action spheres and is finished when their distance exceeds the interaction radius. The average duration of such a collision, τ0, is measured for the Vicsek model with continuous time-evolution. If the noise is chosen to be close to the flocking threshold, the average time between collisions is found to be roughly equal to τ0 at low densities. Thus, the continuous-time Vicsek-model near the flocking threshold cannot be accurately described by a Boltzmann equation, even at very small density because collisions take so long that typically other particles join in, rendering Boltzmann's binary collision assumption invalid. Hydrodynamic equations for the phase space approach are derived by means of a Chapman-Enskog expansion. The equations are compared to the Toner-Tu theory of polar active matter. New terms, absent in the Toner-Tu theory, are highlighted. Convergence problems of Chapman-Enskog and similar gradient expansions are discussed.

  5. Impacts of amount of impregnated iron in granular activated carbon on arsenate adsorption capacities and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qigang; Lin, Wei; Ying, Wei-Chi

    2012-06-01

    Iron-impregnated granular activated carbons (Fe-GAC) can remove arsenic effectively from water. In this study, Fe-GACs with iron content of 1.64 to 28.90% were synthesized using a new multi-step procedure for the investigation of effects of iron amount on arsenic adsorption capacities and kinetics. Langmuir model satisfactorily fit arsenic adsorption on Fe-GACs. The maximum arsenic adsorption capacity (q(m)) increased significantly with iron impregnation and reached 1,867 to 1,912 microg/g with iron content of 9.96 to 13.59%. Further increase of iron content (> 13.59%) caused gradual decrease of q(m). It was found that the amount of impregnated iron showed little impact on the affinity for arsenate. Kinetic study showed that the amount of impregnated iron affected the arsenic intraparticle diffusion rate greatly. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model fit arsenic adsorption kinetics on Fe-GACs better than the pseudo-first-order model. The arsenic adsorption rate increased with increasing of iron content from 1.64% to 13.59%, and then decreased with more impregnated iron (13.59 to 28.90%).

  6. Artificial neural network (ANN) method for modeling of sunset yellow dye adsorption using zinc oxide nanorods loaded on activated carbon: Kinetic and isotherm study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghsoudi, M.; Ghaedi, M.; Zinali, A.; Ghaedi, A. M.; Habibi, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    In this research, ZnO nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon (ZnO-NPs-AC) was synthesized simply by a low cost and nontoxic procedure. The characterization and identification have been completed by different techniques such as SEM and XRD analysis. A three layer artificial neural network (ANN) model is applicable for accurate prediction of dye removal percentage from aqueous solution by ZnO-NRs-AC following conduction of 270 experimental data. The network was trained using the obtained experimental data at optimum pH with different ZnO-NRs-AC amount (0.005-0.015 g) and 5-40 mg/L of sunset yellow dye over contact time of 0.5-30 min. The ANN model was applied for prediction of the removal percentage of present systems with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA), a linear transfer function (purelin) at output layer and a tangent sigmoid transfer function (tansig) in the hidden layer with 6 neurons. The minimum mean squared error (MSE) of 0.0008 and coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.998 were found for prediction and modeling of SY removal. The influence of parameters including adsorbent amount, initial dye concentration, pH and contact time on sunset yellow (SY) removal percentage were investigated and optimal experimental conditions were ascertained. Optimal conditions were set as follows: pH, 2.0; 10 min contact time; an adsorbent dose of 0.015 g. Equilibrium data fitted truly with the Langmuir model with maximum adsorption capacity of 142.85 mg/g for 0.005 g adsorbent. The adsorption of sunset yellow followed the pseudo-second-order rate equation.

  7. Artificial neural network (ANN) method for modeling of sunset yellow dye adsorption using zinc oxide nanorods loaded on activated carbon: Kinetic and isotherm study.

    PubMed

    Maghsoudi, M; Ghaedi, M; Zinali, A; Ghaedi, A M; Habibi, M H

    2015-01-05

    In this research, ZnO nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon (ZnO-NPs-AC) was synthesized simply by a low cost and nontoxic procedure. The characterization and identification have been completed by different techniques such as SEM and XRD analysis. A three layer artificial neural network (ANN) model is applicable for accurate prediction of dye removal percentage from aqueous solution by ZnO-NRs-AC following conduction of 270 experimental data. The network was trained using the obtained experimental data at optimum pH with different ZnO-NRs-AC amount (0.005-0.015 g) and 5-40 mg/L of sunset yellow dye over contact time of 0.5-30 min. The ANN model was applied for prediction of the removal percentage of present systems with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA), a linear transfer function (purelin) at output layer and a tangent sigmoid transfer function (tansig) in the hidden layer with 6 neurons. The minimum mean squared error (MSE) of 0.0008 and coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.998 were found for prediction and modeling of SY removal. The influence of parameters including adsorbent amount, initial dye concentration, pH and contact time on sunset yellow (SY) removal percentage were investigated and optimal experimental conditions were ascertained. Optimal conditions were set as follows: pH, 2.0; 10 min contact time; an adsorbent dose of 0.015 g. Equilibrium data fitted truly with the Langmuir model with maximum adsorption capacity of 142.85 mg/g for 0.005 g adsorbent. The adsorption of sunset yellow followed the pseudo-second-order rate equation.

  8. Effect of the porous structure of activated carbon on the adsorption kinetics of gold(I) cyanide complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimova, P. I.; Grebennikov, S. F.; Gur'yanov, V. V.; Fedyukevich, V. A.; Vorob'ev-Desyatovskii, N. V.

    2014-06-01

    The effect the porous structure of activated carbons obtained from furfural and coconut shells has on the kinetics of [Au(CN)2]- ion adsorption is studied. Effective diffusion coefficients for [Au(CN)2]- anions in transport and adsorbing pores and mass transfer coefficients in a transport system of the pores and in microporous zones are calculated using the statistical moments of the kinetic curve.

  9. Thermogravimetric analysis and kinetic study of formation of lithium titanate by solid state route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonak, Sagar; Jain, Uttam; Sahu, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Sanjay; Krishnamurthy, Nagaiyar

    2015-02-01

    The kinetics of formation of lithium titanate from the solid state reaction of lithium carbonate and titanium oxide was studied using non-isothermal thermogravimetric technique. Thermogravimetric data for the reaction of lithium carbonate and titanium oxide was obtained at various heating rates. The methods such as Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose were used to estimate the kinetic parameters from the obtained thermogravimetric data. The average activation energy for the formation of lithium titanate by solid state route was found to be 243 kJ/mol K. The reaction mechanism was determined by the method given by Malek. It was found that the three dimensional diffusion model best describes the reaction kinetics. A kinetic equation describing the reaction is proposed and reaction mechanism is discussed.

  10. Kinetic study on Michael-type reactions of β-nitrostyrenes with cyclic secondary amines in acetonitrile: transition-state structures and reaction mechanism deduced from negative enthalpy of activation and analyses of LFERs.

    PubMed

    Um, Ik-Hwan; Kang, Ji-Sun; Park, Jong-Yoon

    2013-06-07

    A kinetic study is reported for the Michael-type reactions of X-substituted β-nitrostyrenes (1a-j) with a series of cyclic secondary amines in MeCN. The plots of pseudo-first-order rate constant k(obsd) vs [amine] curve upward, indicating that the reactions proceed through catalyzed and uncatalyzed routes. The dissection of k(obsd) into Kk2 and Kk3 (i.e., the rate constants for the uncatalyzed and catalyzed routes, respectively) revealed that Kk3 is much larger than Kk2, implying that the reactions proceed mainly through the catalyzed route when [amine] > 0.01 M. Strikingly, the reactivity of β-nitrostyrene (1g) toward piperidine decreases as the reaction temperature increases. Consequently, a negative enthalpy of activation is obtained, indicating that the reaction proceeds through a relatively stable intermediate. The Brønsted-type plots for the reactions of 1g are linear with β(nuc) = 0.51 and 0.61, and the Hammett plots for the reactions of 1a-j are also linear with ρX = 0.84 and 2.10 for the uncatalyzed and catalyzed routes, respectively. The reactions are concluded to proceed through six-membered cyclic transition states for both the catalyzed and uncatalyzed routes. The effects of the substituent X on reactivity and factors influencing β(nuc) and ρX obtained in this study are discussed.

  11. Thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors of trinitrotoluene adsorption on powdered activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.W.; Hwang, K.J.; Shim, W.G.; Moon, I.S.

    2006-07-01

    Regulations on the removal of trinitrotoluene (TNT) from wastewater have become increasingly more stringent, demanding faster, less expensive, and more efficient treatment. This study focuses on the adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of TNT on powered activated carbons (PAC). Three types of PACs (i.e., wood based, coal based, and coconut-shell based) were studied as functions of temperature and pH. Thermodynamic properties including Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy, were evaluated by applying the Van't Hoff equation. In addition, the adsorption energy distribution functions which describe heterogeneous characteristics of porous solid sorbents were calculated by using the generalized nonlinear regularization method. Adsorption kinetic studies were carried out in batch adsorber under important conditions such as PAC types, temperature, pH, and concentration. We found that fast and efficient removal of TNT dissolved in water can be successfully achieved by PAC adsorption.

  12. Diffusion barriers in the kinetics of water vapor adsorption/desorption on activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, A.W.; Foley, N.J.; Thomas, K.M.; Norman, P.R.; Francis, D.C.

    1998-07-07

    The adsorption of water vapor on a highly microporous coconut-shell-derived carbon and a mesoporous wood-derived carbon was studied. These carbons were chosen as they had markedly different porous structures. The adsorption and desorption characteristics of water vapor on the activated carbons were investigated over the relative pressure range p/p{degree} = 0--0.9 for temperatures in the range 285--313 K in a static water vapor system. The adsorption isotherms were analyzed using the Dubinin-Serpinski equation, and this provided an assessment of the polarity of the carbons. The kinetics of water vapor adsorption and desorption were studied with different amounts of preadsorbed water for set changes in pressure relative to the saturated vapor pressure (p/p{degree}). The adsorption kinetics for each relative pressure step were compared and used to calculate the activation energies for the vapor pressure increments. The kinetic results are discussed in relation to their relative position on the equilibrium isotherm and the adsorption mechanism of water vapor on activated carbons.

  13. Degradation of reactive blue 19 by needle-plate non-thermal plasma in different gas atmospheres: Kinetics and responsible active species study assisted by CFD calculations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Liu, Yanan; Li, Rui; Xue, Gang; Ognier, Stéphanie

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the degradation of a model organic compound, reactive blue (RB-19), in aqueous solution using a needle-plate non-thermal plasma (NTP) reactor, which was operated using three gas atmospheres (Ar, air, O2) at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The relative discharge and degradation parameters, including the peak to peak applied voltage, power, ozone generation, pH, decolorization rates, energy density and the total organic carbon (TOC) reduction were analyzed to determine the various dye removal efficiencies. The decolorization rate for Ar, air and O2 were 59.9%, 49.6% and 89.8% respectively at the energy density of 100 kJ/L. The best TOC reduction was displayed by Ar with about 8.8% decrease, and 0% with O2 and air atmospheres. This phenomenon could be explained by the formation of OH• and O3 in the Ar and O2 atmospheres, which are responsible for increased mineralization and efficient decolorization. A one-dimension model was developed using software COMSOL to simulate the RB-19-ozone reaction and verify the experiments by comparing the simulated and experimental results. It was determined that ozone plays the most important role in the dye removal process, and the ozone contribution rate ranged from 0.67 to 0.82.

  14. Kinetics of hydrophobic organic contaminant extraction from sediment by granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Rakowska, M I; Kupryianchyk, D; Smit, M P J; Koelmans, A A; Grotenhuis, J T C; Rijnaarts, H H M

    2014-03-15

    Ex situ solid phase extraction with granular activated carbon (GAC) is a promising technique to remediate contaminated sediments. The methods' efficiency depends on the rate by which contaminants are transferred from the sediment to the surface of GAC. Here, we derive kinetic parameters for extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from sediment by GAC, using a first-order multi-compartment kinetic model. The parameters were obtained by modeling sediment-GAC exchange kinetic data following a tiered model calibration approach. First, parameters for PAH desorption from sediment were calibrated using data from systems with 50% (by weight) GAC acting as an infinite sink. Second, the estimated parameters were used as fixed input to obtain GAC uptake kinetic parameters in sediment slurries with 4% GAC, representing the ex situ remediation scenario. PAH uptake rate constants (kGAC) by GAC ranged from 0.44 to 0.0005 d(-1), whereas GAC sorption coefficients (KGAC) ranged from 10(5.57) to 10(8.57) L kg(-1). These values are the first provided for GAC in the presence of sediment and show that ex situ extraction with GAC is sufficiently fast and effective to reduce the risks of the most available PAHs among those studied, such as fluorene, phenanthrene and anthracene.

  15. A kinetic study on the isomerization of hop alpha-acids.

    PubMed

    Jaskula, Barbara; Kafarski, Pawel; Aerts, Guido; De Cooman, Luc

    2008-08-13

    In this article, a detailed study on hop alpha-acid isomerization kinetics is presented. Because of the complex wort matrix and interfering interactions occurring during real wort boiling (i.e., trub formation and alpha-acids/iso-alpha-acids complexation), this investigation on alpha-acid isomerization kinetics was performed in aqueous buffer solution as a function of time (0-90 min) and heating temperature (80-100 degrees C). Rate constants and activation energies for the formation of individual iso-alpha-acids were determined. It was found that iso-alpha-acid formation follows first-order kinetics and Arrhenius behavior. Differences in activation energies for the formation of trans- and cis-isomers were noticed, the activation energy for the formation of trans-iso-alpha-acids being approximately 9 kJmol (-1) lower.

  16. A kinetics modeling study on the inhibition of glucose on cellulosome of Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengcheng; Wang, Buyun; Xiao, Qunfang; Wu, Shan

    2015-08-01

    A simplified kinetics model was built to study the inhibition of glucose on cellulosome of Clostridium thermocellum. Suitable reaction conditions were adopted to evaluate the model. The model was evaluated at different temperatures and further with various activated carbon additions as adsorbent for glucose. Investigation results revealed that the model could describe the hydrolysis kinetics of cellulose by cellulosome quite well. Glucose was found to be an inhibitor for cellulosome based on the kinetics analysis. Inhibition increased with the increase in temperature. Activated carbon as adsorbent could lower the inhibition. Parameters in the model were further discussed based on the experiment. The model might also be used to describe the strong inhibition of cellobiose on cellulosome. Saccharification of cellulose by both cellulosome and C. thermocellum could be enhanced efficiently by activated carbon addition.

  17. Combining an Optical Resonance Biosensor with Enzyme Activity Kinetics to Understand Protein Adsorption and Denaturation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kerry A.; Finch, Craig A.; Anderson, Phillip; Vollmer, Frank; Hickman, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding protein adsorption and resultant conformation changes on modified and unmodified silicon dioxide surfaces is a subject of keen interest in biosensors, microfluidic systems and for medical diagnostics. However, it has been proven difficult to investigate the kinetics of the adsorption process on these surfaces as well as understand the topic of the denaturation of proteins and its effect on enzyme activity. A highly sensitive optical whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator was used to study a catalytic enzyme’s adsorption processes on different silane modified glass substrates (plain glass control, DETA, 13F, and SiPEG). The WGM sensor was able to obtain high resolution kinetic data of glucose oxidase (GO) adsorption with sensitivity of adsorption better than that possible with SPR. The kinetic data, in combination with a functional assay of the enzyme activity, was used to test hypotheses on adsorption mechanisms. By fitting numerical models to the WGM sensograms for protein adsorption, and by confirming numerical predictions of enzyme activity in a separate assay, we were able to identify mechanisms for GO adsorption on different alkylsilanes and infer information about the adsorption of protein on nanostructured surfaces. PMID:25453976

  18. Label-free solution-based kinetic study of aptamer-small molecule interactions by kinetic capillary electrophoresis with UV detection revealing how kinetics control equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jiayin; Krylova, Svetlana M; Reinstein, Oren; Johnson, Philip E; Krylov, Sergey N

    2011-11-15

    Here we demonstrate a label-free solution-based approach for studying the kinetics of biopolymer-small molecule interactions. The approach utilizes kinetic capillary electrophoresis (KCE) separation and UV light absorption detection of the unlabeled small molecule. In this proof-of-concept work, we applied KCE-UV to study kinetics of interaction between a small molecule and a DNA aptamer. From the kinetic analysis of a series of aptamers, we found that dissociation rather than binding controls the stability of the complex. Because of its label-free features and generic nature, KCE-UV promises to become a practical tool for challenging kinetic studies of biopolymer-small molecule interactions.

  19. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR KINETIC STUDIES OF BIOLOGICAL INTERACTIONS: A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiwei; Bi, Cong; Li, Zhao; Podariu, Maria; Hage, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information concerning the mechanism and behavior of these processes in living systems. This review discusses several analytical methods that can be used to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. These techniques include common or traditional methods such as stopped-flow analysis and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, as well as alternative methods based on affinity chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The general principles and theory behind these approaches are examined, and it is shown how each technique can be utilized to provide information on the kinetics of biological interactions. Examples of applications are also given for each method. In addition, a discussion is provided on the relative advantages or potential limitations of each technique regarding its use in kinetic studies. PMID:25700721

  20. Chemical kinetic studies on dry sorbents. Final report. [Sodium bicarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W.T.; Keener, T.C.

    1982-02-15

    The scope of this research investigation has included a review of potential additives suitable for dry flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) and a bench scale laboratory study to determine the chemical kinetics for the reaction of five different sorbents with sulfur dioxide. The sorbents chosen included sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO/sub 3/), soda ash (Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/), trona, lime (CaO) and hydrated lime (Ca(OH)/sub 2/). This study has shown that: (1) The reaction rate increases with temperature for soda ash and calcium oxide. The reaction temperature has an inverse effect on sodium bicarbonate and trona due, primarily, to the simultaneous thermal activation reaction. The calcium hydroxide-SO/sub 2/ reaction increased up to 550/sup 0/F, and then decreased, due to uneven gas flow distribution. (2) The reaction rates for soda ash, calcium oxide and calcium hydroxide were increased by decreasing their particle size. This effect was not confirmed for sodium bicarbonate and trona where reaction temperature was the most important reaction parameter. (3) Reaction with soda ash was found to be limited by the presence of an impervious ash layer which prevented interparticle gaseous diffusion. Calcium oxide and calcium hydroxide were found to be limited by a slow chemical reaction rate. Results on the rate-limiting steps for sodium bicarbonate and trona were inconclusive because of the simultaneous thermal activation reaction. (4) The effect of thermal activation was to increase the reaction rate for sodium bicarbonate and trona at lower temperatures. This effect was less pronounced at higher temperatures. (5) Results obtained for nitric oxide show limited adsorption for the five sorbents tested as compared to the finding for sulfur dioxide.

  1. Kinetic arrest, dynamical transitions, and activated relaxation in dense fluids of attractive nonspherical colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2011-06-01

    The coupled translation-rotation activated dynamics in dense suspensions of attractive homogeneous and Janus uniaxial dicolloids are studied using microscopic statistical mechanical theory. Multiple kinetic arrest transitions and reentrant phenomena are predicted that are associated with fluid, gel, repulsive glass, attractive glass, plastic glass, and novel glass-gel states. The activated relaxation rate is a nonuniversal nonmonotonic function of attraction strength at high volume fractions due to the consequences of a change of the transient localization mechanism from caging to physical bonding.

  2. Raman scattering study of glass crystallization kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkanski, M.; Haro, E.; Espinosa, G. P.; Phillips, J. C.

    1984-08-01

    Laser induced glass-crystalline transition is studied by light scattering. Three significant effects are observed depending on the incident laser energy density: (i) Spectral band narrowing indicating cluster enlargement constitutes a precursor effect, (ii) an intensity increase effect indicates a rapid rise of the density of clusters attaining microcrystalline size and (iii) a dynamical reversal effect indicative of glass-crystalline instability. Cluster volume and crystallization appear as separate but related threshold phenomena.

  3. Kinetic Study of the Heck Reaction: An Interdisciplinary Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gozzi, Christel; Bouzidi, Naoual

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to study and calculate the kinetic constant of a Heck reaction: the arylation of but-3-en-2-ol by iodobenzene catalyzed by palladium acetate in presence of triethylamine in DMF. The reaction leads to a mixture of two ketones. Students use GC analysis to quantify reagents and products of reaction. They control the…

  4. Hardening kinetics investigation of alkali-activated binder by small amplitude oscillatory rheometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, D.; Kullová, L.; Čekalová, M.; Kovářík, T.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the rheological behavior of geopolymeric inorganic binder was determined. This binder was synthesized by alkaline activation of mixture, comprising calcined claystone powder and milled blast furnace slag. As an alkaline activator of hardening process, the potassium silicate solution was used. For the investigation of hardening kinetics, the strain controlled small amplitude oscillatory rheometry was used with strain of 0.01%. The reproducibility and versatility of this method is demonstrated for determination of hardening process evolution. The changes of loss tangent shape were studied in this experiment and applied for determination of gelation time. All experiments were conducted at isothermal conditions in temperature range 27-70°C and parallel plate geometry. The results indicate that reaction kinetics is directly depending on temperature. The hardening kinetics was mathematically described and these calculations were compared with self-contained experiment conducted at 2°C. This experiment is described in details and the results of gelation time measurements confirmed calculated data.

  5. Adsorption kinetics of a basic dye from aqueous solutions onto apricot stone activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Demirbas, E; Kobya, M; Sulak, M T

    2008-09-01

    The preparation of activated carbon from apricot stone with H(2)SO(4) activation and its ability to remove a basic dye, astrazon yellow 7 GL, from aqueous solutions were reported in this study. The adsorbent was characterized by FTIR, BET and SEM, respectively. The effects of various experimental parameters, such as initial dye concentration, pH, adsorbent dosage and temperature were investigated in a batch-adsorption technique. The optimum conditions for removal of the basic dye were found to be pH 10, 6g/l of adsorbent dosage and equilibrium time of 35 min, respectively. A comparison of three kinetic models, the pseudo first-order, second-order and diffusion controlled kinetic models, on the basic dye-adsorbent system showed that the removal rate was heavily dependent on diffusion controlled kinetic models. The adsorption isotherm data were fitted well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The adsorption capacity was calculated as 221.23 mg/g at 50 degrees C. Thermodynamics parameters were also evaluated. The values of enthalpy and entropy were 49.87 kJ/mol and 31.93 J/mol K, respectively, indicating that this process was spontaneous and endothermic. The experimental studies were indicated that ASC had the potential to act as an alternative adsorbent to remove the basic dye from aqueous solutions.

  6. Catechol oxidase activity of a series of new dinuclear copper(II) complexes with 3,5-DTBC and TCC as substrates: syntheses, X-ray crystal structures, spectroscopic characterization of the adducts and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Banu, Kazi Sabnam; Chattopadhyay, Tanmay; Banerjee, Arpita; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Suresh, Eringathodi; Nethaji, Munirathinam; Zangrando, Ennio; Das, Debasis

    2008-08-18

    very efficiently. The substrate TCC forms an adduct with 2- 5 without performing further oxidation to TCQ due to the high reduction potential of TCC (in comparison with 3,5-DTBC). But most interestingly, 1 is observed to be effective even in TCC oxidation, a process never reported earlier. Kinetic experiments have been performed to determine initial rate of reactions (3,5-DTBC as substrate, in methanol medium) and the activity sequence is 1 > 5 > 2 = 4 > 3. A treatment on the basis of Michaelis-Menten model has been applied for kinetic study, suggesting that all five complexes exhibit very high turnover number, especially 1, which exhibits turnover number or K cat of 3.24 x 10 (4) (h (-1)), which is approximately 3.5 times higher than the most efficient catalyst reported to date for catecholase activity in methanol medium.

  7. Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei activity and droplet activation kinetics of wet processed regional dust samples and minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Sokolik, I. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-04-01

    This study reports laboratory measurements of particle size distributions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, and droplet activation kinetics of wet generated aerosols from clays, calcite, quartz, and desert soil samples from Northern Africa, East Asia/China, and Northern America. The dependence of critical supersaturation, sc, on particle dry diameter, Ddry, is used to characterize particle-water interactions and assess the ability of Frenkel-Halsey-Hill adsorption activation theory (FHH-AT) and Köhler theory (KT) to describe the CCN activity of the considered samples. Regional dust samples produce unimodal size distributions with particle sizes as small as 40 nm, CCN activation consistent with KT, and exhibit hygroscopicity similar to inorganic salts. Clays and minerals produce a bimodal size distribution; the CCN activity of the smaller mode is consistent with KT, while the larger mode is less hydrophilic, follows activation by FHH-AT, and displays almost identical CCN activity to dry generated dust. Ion Chromatography (IC) analysis performed on regional dust samples indicates a soluble fraction that cannot explain the CCN activity of dry or wet generated dust. A mass balance and hygroscopicity closure suggests that the small amount of ions (of low solubility compounds like calcite) present in the dry dust dissolve in the aqueous suspension during the wet generation process and give rise to the observed small hygroscopic mode. Overall these results identify an artifact that may question the atmospheric relevance of dust CCN activity studies using the wet generation method. Based on a threshold droplet growth analysis, wet generated mineral aerosols display similar activation kinetics compared to ammonium sulfate calibration aerosol. Finally, a unified CCN activity framework that accounts for concurrent effects of solute and adsorption is developed to describe the CCN activity of aged or hygroscopic dusts.

  8. Study of kinetics of crystallization of Ge7Se75Sb18 chalcogenide glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanwar, Naveen; Saraswat, Vibhav K.

    2014-04-01

    Present paper is an attempt to study kinetics of crystallization of Ge7Se75Sb18 chalcogenide glass by Differential Scanning Calorimetery (DSC) under non-isothermal condition. The sample was prepared by melt quenched technique and amorphous nature has been confirmed by XRD. Activation energy of crystallization has been evaluated using Kissinger, Augis-Bennett and Ozawa models.

  9. Kinetics of dodecanoic acid adsorption from caustic solution by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Phillip; Wu, Sophie Hua

    2003-10-15

    This study examines the influences of adsorbent porosity and surface chemistry and of carbon dosage on dodecanoic acid adsorption kinetics from aqueous and 2 M NaOH solutions as batch adsorption processes. Both adsorbents are steam-activated carbons prepared from either coconut or coal precursors. Prior to use the adsorbents were washed in deionized water or 2 M NaOH. Mass transfer coefficients and effective overall diffusion coefficients indicate a minor contribution from adsorbent porosity. In contrast, high surface oxygen content impedes transport to and into the adsorbent structure. Carbon dosage shows a proportional increase in transport coefficients with increasing mass; these coefficients are constant when normalized per unit mass. Neither water nor NaOH treatment of the adsorbents has a significant influence on dodecanoic acid adsorption kinetics. Molecular and Knudsen diffusion coefficients are defined to demonstrate that the overall effective diffusion coefficient values and the diffusion process are controlled by surface diffusion.

  10. Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei activity and droplet activation kinetics of fresh unprocessed regional dust samples and minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Sokolik, I. N.; Nenes, A.

    2010-12-01

    This study reports laboratory measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity and droplet activation kinetics of aerosols dry-generated from clays, calcite, quartz, and desert soil samples from Northern Africa, East Asia/China, and Northern America. Based on the observed dependence of critical supersaturation, sc, with particle dry diameter, Ddry, we find that FHH adsorption activation theory is a far more suitable framework for describing fresh dust CCN activity than Köhler theory. One set of FHH parameters (AFFH ~ 2.25 ± 0.75, BFFH ~ 1.20 ± 0.10) can adequately reproduce the measured CCN activity for all species considered, and also explains the large range of hygroscopicities reported in the literature. Based on threshold droplet growth analysis, mineral dust aerosols were found to display retarded activation kinetics compared to ammonium sulfate. Comprehensive simulations of mineral dust activation and growth in the CCN instrument suggest that this retardation is equivalent to a reduction of the water vapor uptake coefficient (relative to that for calibration ammonium sulfate aerosol) by 30-80%. These results suggest that dust particles do not require deliquescent material to act as CCN in the atmosphere.

  11. Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei activity and droplet activation kinetics of fresh unprocessed regional dust samples and minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Sokolik, I. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-04-01

    This study reports laboratory measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity and droplet activation kinetics of aerosols dry generated from clays, calcite, quartz, and desert soil samples from Northern Africa, East Asia/China, and Northern America. Based on the observed dependence of critical supersaturation, sc, with particle dry diameter, Ddry, we found that FHH (Frenkel, Halsey and Hill) adsorption activation theory is a far more suitable framework for describing fresh dust CCN activity than Köhler theory. One set of FHH parameters (AFHH ∼ 2.25 ± 0.75, BFHH ∼ 1.20 ± 0.10) can adequately reproduce the measured CCN activity for all species considered, and also explains the large range of hygroscopicities reported in the literature. Based on a threshold droplet growth analysis, mineral dust aerosols were found to display retarded activation kinetics compared to ammonium sulfate. Comprehensive simulations of mineral dust activation and growth in the CCN instrument suggest that this retardation is equivalent to a reduction of the water vapor uptake coefficient (relative to that for calibration ammonium sulfate aerosol) by 30-80%. These results suggest that dust particles do not require deliquescent material to act as CCN in the atmosphere.

  12. Effect of sorption on flocculation kinetics: Experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Subramaniam, K.; Yiacoumi, S.; Tsouris, C.

    1997-11-01

    Sorption of copper and cadmium ions from aqueous solutions by ferric oxide particles was studied using batch equilibrium and kinetic experiments. The sorption process was found to be pH dependent, with the uptake increasing at high pH values. An increase in equilibrium pH was observed when the initial pH was in the acidic range and a decrease from initial values was observed in the basic range, in the case of both copper and cadmium sorption. The former phenomenon is due to competition between metal and proton binding and the latter is due to precipitation mechanisms at high initial pH values. A large increase in the zeta potential of the particles from baseline values was observed during equilibrium sorption. This increase occurs as a result of surface charge neutralization due to metal ion uptake. Particle destabilization appears to occur as a result of metal ion sorption. Kinetic experiments indicate that the uptake of copper by ferric oxide particles is a slow process. pH histories were similar to those obtained in the sorption equilibrium experiments. Changes in the size distribution of the ferric oxide particles due to aggregate formation during uptake of ions is observed in the kinetic studies. These findings indicate a potential role of metal ion uptake in particle flocculation kinetics through alteration of the surface electrostatic potential.

  13. Kinetic studies of microfabricated biosensors using local adsorption strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Menglun; Huang, Jingze; Cui, Weiwei; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Daihua; Duan, Xuexin

    2015-12-15

    Micro/nano scale biosensors integrated with the local adsorption mask have been demonstrated to have a better limit of detection (LOD) and less sample consumptions. However, the molecular diffusions and binding kinetics in such confined droplet have been less studied which limited further development and application of the local adsorption method and imposed restrictions on discovery of new signal amplification strategies. In this work, we studied the kinetic issues via experimental investigations and theoretical analysis on microfabricated biosensors. Mass sensitive film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) sensors with hydrophobic Teflon film covering the non-sensing area as the mask were introduced. The fabricated masking sensors were characterized with physical adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and specific binding of antibody and antigen. Over an order of magnitude improvement on LOD was experimentally monitored. An analytical model was introduced to discuss the target molecule diffusion and binding kinetics in droplet environment, especially the crucial effects of incubation time, which has been less covered in previous local adsorption related literatures. An incubation time accumulated signal amplification effect was theoretically predicted, experimentally monitored and carefully explained. In addition, device optimization was explored based on the analytical model to fully utilize the merits of local adsorption. The discussions on the kinetic issues are believed to have wide implications for other types of micro/nano fabricated biosensors with potentially improved LOD.

  14. Kinetic study of non-isothermal decomposition of a composite diasporic-boehmitic bauxite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samouhos, M.; Angelopoulos, P.; Pilatos, G.; Taxiarchou, M.; Papageorgiou, S.

    2016-04-01

    In the current study, the kinetic of the thermal decomposition of a composite diasporic-boehmitic bauxite is investigated under non-isothermal heating conditions by means of thermogravimetric analysis. The calculation of activation energy (Ea) has been performed by various methods and the attained values range from 185000 to 190000 J.mol-1 for conversion rate of 0.5. The first-order kinetic model can adequately be used to describe thermal decomposition of bauxite composite, while the pre-exponential factor value was found to be 2.088*1011 min-1. The calculated activation energy value together with pre-exponential factor and the solid state kinetic model factors enable the simulation of the thermal decomposition under various heating conditions by the implementation of an ordinary differential equation. The calculated values are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental ones.

  15. Kinetic and thermodynamic study of the liquid-phase etherification of isoamylenes with methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Piccoli, R.L. ); Lovisi, H.R. )

    1995-02-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of liquid-phase etherification of isoamylenes with methanol on ion exchange catalyst (Amberlyst 15) were studied. Thermodynamic properties and rate data were obtained in a batch reactor operating under 1,013 kPa and 323--353 K. The kinetic equation was modeled following the Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson formalism according to a proposed surface mechanism where the rate-controlling step is the surface reaction. According to the experimental results, methanol adsorbs very strongly on the active sites, covering them completely, and thus the reaction follows an apparent first-order behavior. The isoamylenes, according to the proposed mechanism, adsorb simultaneously on the same single active center already occupied by methanol, migrating through the liquid layer formed by the alcohol around the catalyst to react in the acidic site. From the proposed mechanism a model was suggested and the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were obtained using nonlinear estimation methods.

  16. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of allicin as an antioxidant.

    PubMed

    Okada, Youji; Tanaka, Kaoru; Sato, Eisuke; Okajima, Haruo

    2006-11-21

    We have undertaken a detailed study of the antioxidant activity of allicin, one of the main thiosulfinates in garlic, in order to obtain quantitative information on it as a chain-breaking antioxidant. The antioxidant actions of allicin against the oxidation of cumene and methyl linoleate (ML) in chlorobenzene were studied in detail using HPLC. The hydroperoxides formed during the course of the inhibited oxidation of ML were analyzed as their corresponding alcohols by HPLC, and it is apparent that an allylic hydrogen atom of the allicin is responsible for the antioxidant activity. Furthermore, it is clear that the radical-scavenging reactions of allicin proceed via a one-step hydrogen atom transfer based on the results of the reaction with 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) in the presence of Mg2+ and calculation of the ionization potential value. In addition, we determined the stoichiometric factor (n), the number of peroxyl radicals trapped by one antioxidant molecule, of allicin by measuring the reactivity toward DPPH in chlorobenzene, and the value of n for allicin was about 1.0. Therefore, we measured the rate constants, k(inh), for the reaction of allicin with peroxyl radicals during the induction period of the cumene and the ML oxidation. As a result, we found that allicin reacts with peroxyl radicals derived from cumene and ML with the rate constants k(inh) = 2.6 x 10(3) M(-1)s(-1) and 1.6 x 10(5) M(-1)s(-1) in chlorobenzene, respectively. Our results demonstrate for the first time reliable quantitative kinetic data and the antioxidative mechanism of allicin as an antioxidant.

  17. A study of the Sabatier-methanation reaction kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verostko, C. E.; Forsythe, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    The kinetics of the Sabatier methanation reaction, the reduction of carbon dioxide with hydrogen to methane and water, was investigated for 58 percent nickel on kieselguhr catalyst and 20 percent ruthenium on alumina catalyst. Differential rate data from an experimental program were correlated with a power function rate equation both for forward and reverse reactions. The kinetic parameters of activation energy, frequency rate constant and reaction order were determined for the rate equation. The values of these parameters were obtained from an Arrhenius plot of the experimental differential rate data. Also the carbon monoxide side reaction effect was measured and included in the correlation of parameters. The reaction was found to fit the rate equation experimentally within the temperature range 421 K, where the reaction effectively begins, the 800 K where the reaction rate drops and departs from the rate equation form.

  18. COMSOL-based Nuclear Reactor Kinetics Studies at the HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David; Freels, James D; Maldonado, G Ivan; Primm, Trent

    2011-01-01

    The computational ability to accurately predict the dynamic behavior of a nuclear reactor core in response to reactivity-induced perturbations is an important subject in reactor physics. Space-time and point kinetics methodologies were developed for the purpose of studying the transient-induced behavior of the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) compact core. The space-time simulations employed the three-energy-group neutron diffusion equations, and transients initiated by control cylinder and hydraulic tube rabbit ejections were studied. The work presented here is the first step towards creating a comprehensive multiphysics methodology for studying the dynamic behavior of the HFIR core during reactivity perturbations. The results of these studies show that point kinetics is adequate for small perturbations in which the power distribution is assumed to be time-independent, but space-time methods must be utilized to determine localized effects.

  19. Rupture kinetics of liquid bridges during a pulling process: a kinetic density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Men, Yumei; Zhang, Xianren; Wang, Wenchuan

    2011-03-28

    Capillary bridge is a common phenomenon in nature and can significantly contribute to the adhesion of biological and artificial micro- and nanoscale objects. Especially, it plays a crucial role in the operation of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and influences in the measured force. In the present work, we study the rupture kinetics and transition pathways of liquid bridges connecting an AFM tip and a flat substrate during a process of pulling the tip off. Depending on thermodynamic conditions and the tip velocity, two regimes corresponding to different transition pathways are identified. In the single-bridge regime, the initial equilibrium bridge persists as a single one during the pulling process until the liquid bridge breaks. While, in the multibridge regime the stretched liquid bridge transforms into an intermediate state with a collection of slender liquid bridges, which then break gradually during the pulling process. Moreover, the critical rupture distance at which the bridges break changes with the tip velocity and thermodynamic conditions, and its maximum value occurs near the boundary between the single-bridge regime and the multibridge regime, where the longest range capillary force is produced. In this work, the effects of tip velocity, tip size, tip-fluid interaction, and humidity on rupture kinetics and transition pathways are also systematically studied.

  20. Covalent binding of aniline to humic substances. 1. Kinetic studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weber, E.J.; Spidle, D.L.; Thorn, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    The reaction kinetics for the covalent binding of aniline with reconstituted IHSS humic and fulvic acids, unfractionated DOM isolated from Suwannee River water, and whole samples of Suwannee River water have been investigated. The reaction kinetics in each of these systems can be adequately described by a simple second-order rate expression. The effect of varying the initial concentration of aniline on reaction kinetics suggested that approximately 10% of the covalent binding sites associated with Suwannee River fulvic acid are highly reactive sites that are quickly saturated. Based on the kinetic parameters determined for the binding of aniline with the Suwannee River fulvic and humic acid isolates, it was estimated that 50% of the aniline concentration decrease in a Suwannee River water sample could be attributed to reaction with the fulvic and humic acid components of the whole water sample. Studies with Suwannee River fulvic acid demonstrated that the rate of binding decreased with decreasing pH, which parallels the decrease in the effective concentration of the neutral form, or reactive nucleophilic species of aniline. The covalent binding of aniline with Suwannee River fulvic acid was inhibited by prior treatment of the fulvic acid with hydrogen sulfide, sodium borohydride, or hydroxylamine. These observations are consistent with a reaction pathway involving nucleophilic addition of aniline to carbonyl moieties present in the fulvic acid.

  1. Computational Kinetic Study for the Unimolecular Decomposition Pathways of Cyclohexanone.

    PubMed

    Zaras, Aristotelis M; Dagaut, Philippe; Serinyel, Zeynep

    2015-07-16

    There has been evidence lately that several endophytic fungi can convert lignocellulosic biomass into ketones among other oxygenated compounds. Such compounds could prove useful as biofuels for internal combustion engines. Therefore, their combustion properties are of high interest. Cyclohexanone was identified as an interesting second-generation biofuel ( Boot , M. ; et al. Cyclic Oxygenates: A New Class of Second-Generation Biofuels for Diesel Engines? Energy Fuels 2009 , 23 , 1808 - 1817 ; Klein-Douwel , R. J. H. ; et al. Soot and Chemiluminescence in Diesel Combustion of Bio-Derived, Oxygenated and Reference Fuels . Proc. Combust. Inst. 2009 , 32 , 2817 - 2825 ). However, until recently ( Serinyel , Z. ; et al. Kinetics of Oxidation of Cyclohexanone in a Jet- Stirred Reactor: Experimental and Modeling . Proc. Combust. Inst. 2014 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.proci.2014.06.150 ), no previous studies on the kinetics of oxidation of that fuel could be found in the literature. In this work, we present the first theoretical kinetic study of the unimolecular decomposition pathways of cyclohexanone, a cyclic ketone that could demonstrate important fuel potential. Using the quantum composite G3B3 method, we identified six different decomposition pathways for cyclohexanone and computed the corresponding rate constants. The rate constants were calculated using the G3B3 method coupled with Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory in the temperature range of 800-2000 K. Our calculations show that the kinetically more favorable channel for thermal decomposition is pathway 2 that produces 1,3-butadien-2-ol, which in turn can isomerize easily to methyl vinyl ketone through a small barrier. The results presented here can be used in a future kinetic combustion mechanism.

  2. Kinetics of the Factor XIa catalyzed activation of human blood coagulation Factor IX

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, P.N.; Bradford, H.; Sinha, D.; Piperno, J.R.; Tuszynski, G.P.

    1984-05-01

    The kinetics of activation of human Factor IX by human Factor XIa was studied by measuring the release of a trichloroacetic acid-soluble tritium-labeled activation peptide from Factor IX. Initial rates of trichloroacetic acid-soluble /sup 3/H-release were linear over 10-30 min of incubation of Factor IX (88 nM) with CaCl/sub 2/ (5 mM) and with pure (greater than 98%) Factor XIa (0.06-1.3 nM), which was prepared by incubating human Factor XI with bovine Factor XIIa. Release of /sup 3/H preceded the appearance of Factor IXa activity, and the percentage of /sup 3/H released remained constant when the mole fraction of /sup 3/H-labeled and unlabeled Factor IX was varied and the total Factor IX concentration remained constant. A linear correlation (r greater than 0.98, P less than 0.001) was observed between initial rates of /sup 3/H-release and the concentration of Factor XIa, measured by chromogenic assay and by radioimmunoassay and added at a Factor IX:Factor XIa molar ratio of 70-5,600. Kinetic parameters, determined by Lineweaver-Burk analysis, include K/sub m/ (0.49 microM) of about five- to sixfold higher than the plasma Factor IX concentration, which could therefore regulate the reaction. The catalytic constant (k/sub cat/) (7.7/s) is approximately 20-50 times higher than that reported by Zur and Nemerson for Factor IX activation by Factor VIIa plus tissue factor. Therefore, depending on the relative amounts of Factor XIa and Factor VIIa generated in vivo and other factors which may influence reaction rates, these kinetic parameters provide part of the information required for assessing the relative contributions of the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways to Factor IX activation, and suggest that the Factor XIa catalyzed reaction is physiologically significant.

  3. Kinetics and conformational stability studies of recombinant leucine aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Moreno, Ana V; Villaseñor, Francisco; Medina-Rivero, Emilio; Pérez, Néstor O; Flores-Ortiz, Luis F; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Luna-Bárcenas, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    Leucine aminopeptidase from Vibrio proteolyticus is a broad specificity N-terminal aminopeptidase that is widely used in pharmaceutical processes where the removal of N-terminal residues in recombinant proteins is required. We previously reported the expression of a heterologous construction of the mature protein fused to a 6-histidine tag that presents a reasonable refolding rate for its use at industrial level. Here, we investigate this recombinant leucine aminopeptidase (rLAP) to explain the gain of activity observed when incubated at 37 °C after its production. Unfolding transitions of rLAP as a function of urea concentration were monitored by circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence (FL) spectroscopy exhibiting single transitions by both techniques. Free energy change for unfolding measured by CD and FL spectroscopy are 2.8 ± 0.4 and 3.7 ± 0.4 kcal mol(-1), respectively. Thermal stability conformation of rLAP is 2.6 ± 0.1 and 6.1 kcal mol(-1) for CD and Nano-Differential Scanning Calorimetry (Nano-DSC), respectively. Enzyme activity was assessed with L-leucine-p-nitroanilide (L-pNA) as substrate. The catalytic efficiency was 3.87 ± 0.10 min(-1) μM(-1) at 37 °C and pH 8.0. Kinetic and conformation studies show differences between the enzyme native and rLAP; however rLAP is selective and specific to remove N-terminal groups from amino acids.

  4. Kinetic study of the complexation of gallic acid with Fe(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Li-li; Li, Ying-hua; Lu, Xiu-yang

    2009-10-01

    Kinetic study on the complexation of gallic acid with ferrous sulfate was performed using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. Under the experimental conditions, the stoichiometric composition of the formed complex is 1:1. The complexation reaction was found to be a second-order one. The influences of temperature, ionic strength and solvents on the complexation reaction were investigated. According to the Arrhenius equation, the apparent activation energy of the complexation reaction was evaluated to be 71.64 kJ × mol -1. A three-step reaction mechanism was proposed, which can well explain the kinetic results obtained.

  5. Surface heterogeneity effects of activated carbons on the kinetics of paracetamol removal from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, B.; Cabrita, I.; Mestre, A. S.; Parra, J. B.; Pires, J.; Carvalho, A. P.; Ania, C. O.

    2010-06-01

    The removal of a compound with therapeutic activity (paracetamol) from aqueous solutions using chemically modified activated carbons has been investigated. The chemical nature of the activated carbon material was modified by wet oxidation, so as to study the effect of the carbon surface chemistry and composition on the removal of paracetamol. The surface heterogeneity of the carbon created upon oxidation was found to be a determinant in the adsorption capability of the modified adsorbents, as well as in the rate of paracetamol removal. The experimental kinetic data were fitted to the pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models. The parameters obtained were linked to the textural and chemical features of the activated carbons. After oxidation the wettability of the carbon is enhanced, which favors the transfer of paracetamol molecules to the carbon pores (smaller boundary layer thickness). At the same time the overall adsorption rate and removal efficiency are reduced in the oxidized carbon due to the competitive effect of water molecules.

  6. Copper and cobalt complexes of octadentate azamacrocycles: spectrophotometric titration, stopped-flow kinetics and crystallographic study.

    PubMed

    Ozay, Hava; Baran, Yakup; Ishii, Youichi

    2011-12-01

    Details of complex formation kinetics are reported for tetrakis(2-hydroxyethyl) substituted cyclen (L(1)) and cyclam (L(2)) with Cu(II) and Co(II). Stopped-flow kinetics and spectroscopic titration methods were employed for the activation parameters and stability constants, respectively. X-ray studies revealed that the pendant 2-hydroxyethyl groups are not equivalent: two are folded over the macrocycle and maintained by intramolecular hydrogen bonds while the others are extended and pointed away from the macrocyclic cavity. Complex formation kinetics and spectroscopic titration were performed in aqueous acidic buffer solutions. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters revealed that the ring size of the macrocycles plays an extremely important role for each metal ion studied. Stopped-flow kinetic measurements explained the mechanism of the complex formation process of both Cu(II) and Co(II) which proceed in outer-sphere interactions with ligands. There are two steps in the complex formation of the system studied. The initial step is a second order reaction between the metal ion and macrocycle with a second order rate constant.

  7. Kinetic study of alkaline protease 894 for the hydrolysis of the pearl oyster Pinctada martensii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Chen, Hua; Cai, Bingna; Liu, Qingqin; Sun, Huili

    2013-05-01

    A new enzyme (alkaline protease 894) obtained from the marine extremophile Flavobacterium yellowsea (YS-80-122) has exhibited strong substrate-binding and catalytic activity, even at low temperature, but the characteristics of the hydrolysis with this enzyme are still unclear. The pearl oyster Pinctada martensii was used in this study as the raw material to illustrate the kinetic properties of protease 894. After investigating the intrinsic relationship between the degree of hydrolysis and several factors, including initial reaction pH, temperature, substrate concentration, enzyme concentration, and hydrolysis time, the kinetics model was established. This study showed that the optimal conditions for the enzymatic hydrolysis were an initial reaction pH of 5.0, temperature of 30°C, substrate concentration of 10% (w/v), enzyme concentration of 2 500 U/g, and hydrolysis time of 160 min. The kinetic characteristics of the protease for the hydrolysis of P. martensii were obtained. The inactivation constant was found to be 15.16/min, and the average relative error between the derived kinetics model and the actual measurement was only 3.04%, which indicated a high degree of fitness. Therefore, this study provides a basis for the investigation of the concrete kinetic characteristics of the new protease, which has potential applications in the food industry.

  8. Kinetic study of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Permsukarome, P.; Chang, C.; Fogler, H.S.

    1997-09-01

    The kinetics of dissolution of pentane-insoluble solid asphaltene precipitates by amphiphile/alkane solutions were investigated using a differential reactor flow system. Two amphiphiles, dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid and nonylphenol, and five alkane solvents, ranging from hexane to hexadecane, were used. Results showed that the rate of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane fluids could be approximated with a first-order kinetics with respect to the undissolved asphaltene mass in solution. The specific dissolution rate constant, k, varied with the concentration of amphiphiles, the type of alkane solvents, the temperature, and the fluid flow rate. The rate of asphaltene dissolution displayed a Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics with respect to the concentration of amphiphiles. Increasing the temperature of amphiphile/alkane fluids also enhanced the rate of asphaltene dissolution. The apparent activation energy for asphaltene dissolution was approximated to be 4--7 kcal/mol. The rate of asphaltene dissolution was also greater in amphiphile solutions containing lighter alkanes, such as hexane, with lower viscosities. These trends suggest that both surface reaction and mass transfer processes are important to the rate of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane fluids.

  9. Bioregeneration of activated carbon and activated rice husk loaded with phenolic compounds: Kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Ng, S L; Seng, C E; Lim, P E

    2010-01-01

    A kinetic model consisting of first-order desorption and biodegradation processes was developed to describe the bioregeneration of phenol- and p-nitrophenol-loaded powdered activated carbon (PAC) and pyrolyzed rice husk (PRH), respectively. Different dosages of PAC and PRH were loaded with phenol or p-nitrophenol by contacting with the respective phenolic compound at various concentrations. The kinetic model was used to fit the phenol or p-nitrophenol concentration data in the bulk solution during the bioregeneration process to determine the rate constants of desorption, k(d), and biodegradation, k. The results showed that the kinetic model fitted relatively well (R(2)>0.9) to the experimental data for the phenol- and p-nitrophenol-loaded PAC as well as p-nitrophenol-loaded PRH. Comparison of the values of k(d) and k shows that k is much greater than k(d). This indicates clearly that the desorption process is the rate-determining step in bioregeneration and k(d) can be used to characterize the rate of bioregeneration. The trend of the variation of the k(d) values with the dosages of PAC or PRH used suggests that higher rate of bioregeneration can be achieved under non-excess adsorbent dosage condition.

  10. Cross-bridge kinetics in rat myocardium: effect of sarcomere length and calcium activation.

    PubMed

    Wannenburg, T; Heijne, G H; Geerdink, J H; Van Den Dool, H W; Janssen, P M; De Tombe, P P

    2000-08-01

    We tested the hypotheses that Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) and sarcomere length (SL) modulate force development via graded effects on cross-bridge kinetics in chemically permeabilized rat cardiac trabeculae. Using sinusoidal length perturbations, we derived the transfer functions of stiffness over a range of [Ca(2+)] at a constant SL of 2.1 micrometer (n = 8) and at SL of 2.0, 2.1, and 2.2 micrometer (n = 4). We found that changes in SL affected only the magnitude of stiffness, whereas [Ca(2+)] affected the magnitude and phase-frequency relations. The data were fit to complex functions of two exponential processes. The characteristic frequencies (b and c) of these processes are indexes of cross-bridge kinetics, with b relating to cross-bridge attachment to and c to detachment from certain non-force-generating states. Both were significantly affected by [Ca(2+)], with an increase in b and c of 140 and 44%, respectively, over the range of [Ca(2+)] studied (P < 0.01). In contrast, SL had no effect on the characteristic frequencies (P > 0.6). We conclude that Ca(2+) activation modulates force development in rat myocardium, at least in part, via a graded effect on cross-bridge kinetics, whereas SL effects are mediated mainly by recruitment of cross bridges.

  11. Controlling enzymatic activity and kinetics in swollen mesophases by physical nano-confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenjie; Vallooran, Jijo J.; Zabara, Alexandru; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2014-05-01

    into a highly confined environment. We show that the enzymatic activity of a model enzyme, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), can be accurately controlled by relaxing its confinement within the cubic phases' water channels, when the aqueous channel diameters are systematically swollen with varying amount of hydration-enhancing sugar ester. The in-meso activity and kinetics of HRP are then systematically investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy, as a function of the size of the aqueous mesophase channels. The enzymatic activity of HRP increases with the swelling of the water channels. In swollen mesophases with water channel diameter larger than the HRP size, the enzymatic activity is more than double that measured in standard mesophases, approaching again the enzymatic activity of free HRP in bulk water. We also show that the physically-entrapped enzymes in the mesophases exhibit a restricted-diffusion-induced initial lag period and report the first observation of in-meso enzymatic kinetics significantly deviating from the normal Michaelis-Menten behaviour observed in free solutions, with deviations vanishing when enzyme confinement is released by swelling the mesophase. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Visual appearance of the standard mesophase before and after HRP enzymatic reaction (Fig. S1); SAXS results of four Pn3m phases with increasing amount of SE 0%, 10%, 15% and 20% just below maximum hydration (Fig. S2); calibration curve for determining the partition coefficient of ABTS in lipids (Fig. S3); progress curves of the HRP catalytic reaction in pure water (Fig. S4) and reactions at varying ABTS concentrations for the in-meso enzymatic kinetics studies (Fig. S5); SAXS characterization of the influence of the added H2O2 (Fig. S6) and HRP (Fig. S7) on the hosted mesophases; initial rate as function of H2O2 concentration in 3 varying environments (Fig. S8). See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01394h

  12. A study of switchgrass pyrolysis: Product variability and reaction kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovee, Jonathan Matthew

    Samples of the same cultivar of cave-in-rock switchgrass were harvested from plots in Frankenmuth, Roger City, Cass County, and Grand Valley, Michigan. It was determined that variation exists, between locations, among the pyrolytic compounds which can lead to variability in bio-oil and increased processing costs at bio-refineries to make hydrocarbon fuels. Washed and extractives-free switchgrass samples, which contain a lower alkali and alkaline earth metals content than untreated samples, were shown to produce lower amounts of acids, esters, furans, ketones, phenolics, and saccharides and also larger amounts of aldehydes upon pyrolysis. Although the minerals catalyzed pyrolytic reactions, there was no evidence indicating their effect on reducing the production of anhydrosugars, specifically levoglucosan. To further link minerals present in the biomass to a catalytic pathway, mathematic models were employed to determine the kinetic parameters of the switchgrass. While the calculated activation energies of switchgrass, using the FWO and KAS methods, were 227.7 and 217.8 kJ/mol, correspondingly, it was concluded that the activation energies for the switchgrass hemicellulose and cellulose peaks were 115.5 and 158.2 kJ/mol, respectively, using a modified model-fitting method. The minerals that effect the production of small molecules and levoglucosan also have an observable catalytic effect on switchgrass reaction rate, which may be quantifiable through the use of reaction kinetics so as to determine activation energy.

  13. Kinetic Studies of Biological Interactions By Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Schiel, John E.; Hage, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The rates at which biological interactions occur can provide important information on the mechanism and behavior of such processes in living systems. This review will discuss how affinity chromatography can be used as a tool to examine the kinetics of biological interactions. This approach, referred to here as biointeraction chromatography, uses a column with an immobilized binding agent to examine the association or dissociation of this agent with other compounds. The use of HPLC-based affinity columns in kinetic studies has received particular attention in recent years. Advantages of using HPLC with affinity chromatography for this purpose include the ability to reuse the same ligand within a column for a large number of experiments, and the good precision and accuracy of this approach. A number of techniques are available for kinetic studies through the use of affinity columns and biointeraction chromatography. These approaches include plate height measurements, peak profiling, peak fitting, split-peak measurements, and peak decay analysis. The general principles for each of these methods are discussed in this review and some recent applications of these techniques are presented. The advantages and potential limitations of each approach are also considered. PMID:19391173

  14. Kinetic study of aluminum adsorption by aluminosilicate clay minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, W.J.; Cronan, C.S.; Patterson, H.H.

    1988-01-01

    The adsorption kinetics of Al/sup 3 +/ by montmorillonite, kaolinite, and vermiculite were investigated as a function of the initial Al concentration, the surface area of the clay, and H/sup +/ concentration, at 25/sup 0/, 18/sup 0/, and 10/sup 0/C. In order to minimize complicated side reactions the pH range was kept between 3.0 and 4.1. Results showed that the adsorption rate was first order with respect to both the initial Al concentration and the clay surface area. Changes in pH within this narrow range had virtually no effect on adsorption rate. This zero order reaction dependence suggested that the H/sup +/, compared to Al, has a weak affinity for the surface. The rates of adsorption decreased in the order of montmorillonite > kaolinite > vermiculite when compared on the basis of equal surface areas, but changed to kaolinite > montmorillonite > vermiculite when the clays were compared on an equal exchange capacity basis. The calculated apparent activation energies were < 32 kJ mol/sup -1/, indicating that over the temperature range of the study the adsorption process is only marginally temperature sensitive. The mechanism is governed by a simple electrostatic cation exchange involving outer sphere complexes between adsorbed Al and the clay surface. Vermiculite, may have a second reaction step governed by both electrostatic attraction and internal ion diffusion. Equilibrium constants for the formation of an adsorbed Al clay complex were also estimated and are 10/sup 5.34/, 10/sup 5.18/, and 10/sup 4.94/ for kaolinite, montmorillonite, and vermiculite, respectively, suggesting that these clays could play a significant role in controlling soil solutions Al concentrations.

  15. Kinetic Activation-Relaxation Technique and Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo: Comparison of on-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo algorithms

    DOE PAGES

    Beland, Laurent Karim; Osetskiy, Yury N.; Stoller, Roger E.; ...

    2015-02-07

    Here, we present a comparison of the Kinetic Activation–Relaxation Technique (k-ART) and the Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC), two off-lattice, on-the-fly Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) techniques that were recently used to solve several materials science problems. We show that if the initial displacements are localized the dimer method and the Activation–Relaxation Technique nouveau provide similar performance. We also show that k-ART and SEAKMC, although based on different approximations, are in agreement with each other, as demonstrated by the examples of 50 vacancies in a 1950-atom Fe box and of interstitial loops in 16,000-atom boxes. Generally speaking, k-ART’s treatment ofmore » geometry and flickers is more flexible, e.g. it can handle amorphous systems, and rigorous than SEAKMC’s, while the later’s concept of active volumes permits a significant speedup of simulations for the systems under consideration and therefore allows investigations of processes requiring large systems that are not accessible if not localizing calculations.« less

  16. Kinetic Activation-Relaxation Technique and Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo: Comparison of on-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Beland, Laurent Karim; Osetskiy, Yury N.; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-02-07

    Here, we present a comparison of the Kinetic Activation–Relaxation Technique (k-ART) and the Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC), two off-lattice, on-the-fly Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) techniques that were recently used to solve several materials science problems. We show that if the initial displacements are localized the dimer method and the Activation–Relaxation Technique nouveau provide similar performance. We also show that k-ART and SEAKMC, although based on different approximations, are in agreement with each other, as demonstrated by the examples of 50 vacancies in a 1950-atom Fe box and of interstitial loops in 16,000-atom boxes. Generally speaking, k-ART’s treatment of geometry and flickers is more flexible, e.g. it can handle amorphous systems, and rigorous than SEAKMC’s, while the later’s concept of active volumes permits a significant speedup of simulations for the systems under consideration and therefore allows investigations of processes requiring large systems that are not accessible if not localizing calculations.

  17. Activity-dependent modulation of inhibitory synaptic kinetics in the cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Nerlich, Jana; Keine, Christian; Rübsamen, Rudolf; Burger, R. Michael; Milenkovic, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Spherical bushy cells (SBCs) in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus respond to acoustic stimulation with discharges that precisely encode the phase of low-frequency sound. The accuracy of spiking is crucial for sound localization and speech perception. Compared to the auditory nerve input, temporal precision of SBC spiking is improved through the engagement of acoustically evoked inhibition. Recently, the inhibition was shown to be less precise than previously understood. It shifts from predominantly glycinergic to synergistic GABA/glycine transmission in an activity-dependent manner. Concurrently, the inhibition attains a tonic character through temporal summation. The present study provides a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms underlying this slow inhibitory input. We performed whole-cell voltage clamp recordings on SBCs from juvenile Mongolian gerbils and recorded evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) at physiological rates. The data reveal activity-dependent IPSC kinetics, i.e., the decay is slowed with increased input rates or recruitment. Lowering the release probability yielded faster decay kinetics of the single- and short train-IPSCs at 100 Hz, suggesting that transmitter quantity plays an important role in controlling the decay. Slow transmitter clearance from the synaptic cleft caused prolonged receptor binding and, in the case of glycine, spillover to nearby synapses. The GABAergic component prolonged the decay by contributing to the asynchronous vesicle release depending on the input rate. Hence, the different factors controlling the amount of transmitters in the synapse jointly slow the inhibition during physiologically relevant activity. Taken together, the slow time course is predominantly determined by the receptor kinetics and transmitter clearance during short stimuli, whereas long duration or high frequency stimulation additionally engage asynchronous release to prolong IPSCs. PMID:25565972

  18. 4-Hydroxy cinnamic acid as mushroom preservation: Anti-tyrosinase activity kinetics and application.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong-Hua; Chen, Qing-Xi; Cui, Yi; Gao, Huan-Juan; Xu, Lian; Yu, Xin-Yuan; Wang, Ying; Yan, Chong-Ling; Wang, Qin

    2016-05-01

    Tyrosinase is a key enzyme in post-harvest browning of fruit and vegetable. To control and inhibit its activity is the most effective method for delaying the browning and extend the shelf life. In this paper, the inhibitory kinetics of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid on mushroom tyrosinase was investigated using the kinetics method of substrate reaction. The results showed that the inhibition of tyrosinase by 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid was a slow, reversible reaction with fractional remaining activity. The microscopic rate constants were determined for the reaction on 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid with tyrosinase. Furthermore, the molecular docking was used to simulate 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid dock with tyrosinase. The results showed that 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid interacted with the enzyme active site mainly through the hydroxy competed with the substrate hydroxy group. The cytotoxicity study of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid indicated that it had no effects on the proliferation of normal liver cells. Moreover, the results of effects of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid on the preservation of mushroom showed that it could delay the mushroom browning. These results provide a comprehensive underlying the inhibitory mechanisms of 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid and its delaying post-harvest browning, that is beneficial for the application of this compound.

  19. Exploring Secondary Students' Understanding of Chemical Kinetics through Inquiry-Based Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chairam, Sanoe; Klahan, Nutsuda; Coll, Richard K.

    2015-01-01

    This research is trying to evaluate the feedback of Thai secondary school students to inquiry-based teaching and learning methods, exemplified by the study of chemical kinetics. This work used the multiple-choice questions, scientifically practical diagram and questionnaire to assess students' understanding of chemical kinetics. The findings…

  20. Kinetic study of the cetyltrimethylammonium/DNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Grueso, E; Roldan, E; Sanchez, F

    2009-06-18

    A kinetic study of the interaction of the surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium (CTA(+)) with DNA was carried out in water and in salt (NaCl) solutions. The results can be explained in terms of a reaction mechanism involving two consecutive reversible steps. The first step corresponds to the union/separation of the surfactant with/from the DNA. The second step corresponds to a conformational change of the surfactant/DNA complex. The equilibrium constant, calculated from the forward and reverse rate constants of these steps, agrees with the results of a previous thermodynamic study.

  1. Wanderlust kinetics and variable Ca(2+)-sensitivity of Drosophila, a large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channel, expressed in oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Silberberg, S D; Lagrutta, A; Adelman, J P; Magleby, K L

    1996-01-01

    Cloned large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels (BK or maxi-K+ channels) from Drosophila (dSlo) were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and studied in excised membrane patches with the patch-clamp technique. Both a natural variant and a mutant that eliminated a putative cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site exhibited large, slow fluctuations in open probability with time. These fluctuations, termed "wanderlust kinetics," occurred with a time course of tens of seconds to minutes and had kinetic properties inconsistent with simple gating models. Wanderlust kinetics was still observed in the presence of 5 mM caffeine or 50 nM thapsigargin, or when the Ca2+ buffering capacity of the solution was increased by the addition of 5 mM HEDTA, suggesting that the wanderlust kinetics did not arise from Ca2+ release from caffeine and thapsigargin sensitive internal stores in the excised patch. The slow changes in kinetics associated with wanderlust kinetics could be generated with a discrete-state Markov model with transitions among three or more kinetic modes with different levels of open probability. To average out the wanderlust kinetics, large amounts of data were analyzed and demonstrated up to a threefold difference in the [Ca2+]i required for an open probability of 0.5 among channels expressed from the same injected mRNA. These findings indicate that cloned dSlo channels in excised patches from Xenopus oocytes can exhibit large variability in gating properties, both within a single channel and among channels. PMID:8744301

  2. DSC and curing kinetics study of epoxy grouting diluted with furfural -acetone slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, H.; Sun, D. W.; Li, B.; Liu, Y. T.; Ran, Q. P.; Liu, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The use of furfural-acetone slurry as active diluents of Bisphenol-A epoxy resin (DGEBA) groutings has been studied by dynamic and non-isothermal DSC for the first time. Curing kinetics study was investigated by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetries at different heating rates. Activation enery (Ea) was calculated based on Kissinger and Ozawa Methods, and the results showed that Ea increased from 58.87 to 71.13KJ/mol after the diluents were added. The furfural-acetone epoxy matrix could cure completely at the theoretical curing temperature of 365.8K and the curing time of 139mins, which were determined by the kinetic model parameters.

  3. A kinetic study of rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ainsworth, Stanley; Macfarlane, Neil

    1973-01-01

    The paper reports a study of the kinetics of the reaction between phosphoenolpyruvate, ADP and Mg2+ catalysed by rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase. The experimental results indicate that the reaction mechanism is equilibrium random-order in type, that the substrates and products are phosphoenolpyruvate, ADP, Mg2+, pyruvate and MgATP, and that dead-end complexes, between pyruvate, ADP and Mg2+, form randomly and exist in equilibrium with themselves and other substrate complexes. Values were determined for the Michaelis, dissociation and inhibition constants of the reaction and are compared with values ascertained by previous workers. PMID:4737316

  4. Coke forming reaction kinetic study on petroleum based feeds

    SciTech Connect

    Shigley, J.K.; Fu, Ta-Wei

    1988-08-01

    The carbonization of hydrocarbons is a very complex process. The pyrolysis reactions are predominantly free radical in nature and can be summarized as a polymerization process. The phase transitions from a 199% isotropic phase to an anisotropic mesophase during the carbonization of many feeds is an important and much studied phenomena. This phenomena is capitalized on in industry to produce needle or graphite coke. The kinetics of pitch polymerization and coke formation have historically been studied by measuring the solubility of the heat treated material in various solvents. The concentration of free radicals in the carbonized samples have also been used to investigate the mechanistic and kinetic aspects of the process. A very extensive study was conducted by Greinke using GPC techniques to measure the changes in narrow molecular weight ranges and the overall molecular weight distribution of a pitch during carbonization. This study focuses on the use of product volatile matter as the measure of extent of carbonization of two different feedstocks. It is ideally suited for use in commercial coking operations as a control or quality parameter of green coke.

  5. Simultaneous Kinetic Analysis of Ribulose 1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Activities 1

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Samuel S.; Young, Joseph D.

    1980-01-01

    An assay was developed for simultaneous kinetic analysis of the activities of the bifunctional plant enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase [EC 4.1.1.39]. [1-14C,5-3H]Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) was used as the labeled substrate. Tritium enrichment of the doubly labeled 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA) product, common to both enzyme activities, may be used to calculate Vc/Vo ratios from the expression A/(B-A) where A and B represent the 3H/14C isotope ratios of doubly labeled RuBP and 3-PGA, and Vc and Vo represent the activities of carboxylase and oxygenase, respectively. Doubly labeled substrate was synthesized from [2-14C]glucose and [6-3H]glucose using the enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway coupled with phosphoribulokinase. The kinetic properties of a commercial preparation of fully activated spinach carboxylase were studied under approximated physiological conditions of 20% O2 (252 micromolar), 295 μl/l CO2 (10 micromolar), 25 C, and pH 8.19. The Vc/Vo ratio was, within experimental error, constant at 30 seconds and 1 minute. This double label assay method may be used to calculate Vc/Vo ratios for the Laing-Ogren-Hageman equation, Vc/Vo = (VcKo/VoKc) ([CO2]/[O2]) where Vc and Vo represent Vmax, and Kc and Ko represent Michaelis constants for the carboxylase and oxygenase activities, respectively. PMID:16661214

  6. Adsorption of dyes using peat: equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, L; Fernández, K; Contreras, E; Palma, C

    2004-09-01

    In recent years, adsorption has been accepted as one of the most appropriate processes for decolorization of wastewaters. This paper presents experimental results on application of peat for removal of structurally diverse dyes (azo, oxazine, triphenylmethane, thiazine and others) with emphasis on relevant factors such as the adsorbate-adsorbent chemical properties and chemical interaction as well as adsorption conditions. The equilibrium experimental results were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms to obtain the characteristic parameters of each model. According to the evaluation using the Langmuir equation, the maximum sorption capacity of basic dyes at 22 degrees C was 667 (mg g(-1)) for Basic Blue 24, 526 (mg g(-1)) for Basic Green 4 and 714 (mg g(-1)) for Basic Violet 4. On the other hand for Acid Black 1 it was only 25 (mg g(-1)). Batch kinetics studies were undertaken and the data evaluated in compliance with chemical sorption mechanisms. For all of the systems studied the pseudo-second order model provided the best correlation of the kinetic experimental data. A film-pore double resistance diffusion model for mass transfer has also been used in this study to determine the effective diffusivity, Deff, for the adsorption of basic dyes in to peat.

  7. A Simple and Fast Kinetic Assay for the Determination of Fructan Exohydrolase Activity in Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.).

    PubMed

    Gasperl, Anna; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that fructans are the main constituent of water-soluble carbohydrates in forage grasses and cereal crops of temperate climates, little knowledge is available on the regulation of the enzymes involved in fructan metabolism. The analysis of enzyme activities involved in this process has been hampered by the low affinity of the fructan enzymes for sucrose and fructans used as fructosyl donor. Further, the analysis of fructan composition and enzyme activities is restricted to specialized labs with access to suited HPLC equipment and appropriate fructan standards. The degradation of fructan polymers with high degree of polymerization (DP) by fructan exohydrolases (FEHs) to fructosyloligomers is important to liberate energy in the form of fructan, but also under conditions where the generation of low DP polymers is required. Based on published protocols employing enzyme coupled endpoint reactions in single cuvettes, we developed a simple and fast kinetic 1-FEH assay. This assay can be performed in multi-well plate format using plate readers to determine the activity of 1-FEH against 1-kestotriose, resulting in a significant time reduction. Kinetic assays allow an optimal and more precise determination of enzyme activities compared to endpoint assays, and enable to check the quality of any reaction with respect to linearity of the assay. The enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay was validated in a case study showing the expected increase in 1-FEH activity during cold treatment. This assay is cost effective and could be performed by any lab with access to a plate reader suited for kinetic measurements and readings at 340 nm, and is highly suited to assess temporal changes and relative differences in 1-FEH activities. Thus, this enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay is of high importance both to the field of basic fructan research and plant breeding.

  8. A Simple and Fast Kinetic Assay for the Determination of Fructan Exohydrolase Activity in Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.)

    PubMed Central

    Gasperl, Anna; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud’homme, Marie-Pascale; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that fructans are the main constituent of water-soluble carbohydrates in forage grasses and cereal crops of temperate climates, little knowledge is available on the regulation of the enzymes involved in fructan metabolism. The analysis of enzyme activities involved in this process has been hampered by the low affinity of the fructan enzymes for sucrose and fructans used as fructosyl donor. Further, the analysis of fructan composition and enzyme activities is restricted to specialized labs with access to suited HPLC equipment and appropriate fructan standards. The degradation of fructan polymers with high degree of polymerization (DP) by fructan exohydrolases (FEHs) to fructosyloligomers is important to liberate energy in the form of fructan, but also under conditions where the generation of low DP polymers is required. Based on published protocols employing enzyme coupled endpoint reactions in single cuvettes, we developed a simple and fast kinetic 1-FEH assay. This assay can be performed in multi-well plate format using plate readers to determine the activity of 1-FEH against 1-kestotriose, resulting in a significant time reduction. Kinetic assays allow an optimal and more precise determination of enzyme activities compared to endpoint assays, and enable to check the quality of any reaction with respect to linearity of the assay. The enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay was validated in a case study showing the expected increase in 1-FEH activity during cold treatment. This assay is cost effective and could be performed by any lab with access to a plate reader suited for kinetic measurements and readings at 340 nm, and is highly suited to assess temporal changes and relative differences in 1-FEH activities. Thus, this enzyme coupled kinetic 1-FEH assay is of high importance both to the field of basic fructan research and plant breeding. PMID:26734049

  9. Kinetics study on biomass pyrolysis for fuel gas production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guan-Yi; Fang, Meng-Xiang; Andries, J; Luo, Zhong-Yang; Spliethoff, H; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic knowledge is of great importance in achieving good control of the pyrolysis and gasification process and optimising system design. An overall kinetic pyrolysis scheme is therefore addressed here. The kinetic modelling incorporates the following basic steps: the degradation of the virgin biomass materials into primary products (tar, gas and semi-char), the decomposition of primary tar into secondary products and the continuous interaction between primary gas and char. The last step is disregarded completely by models in the literature. Analysis and comparison of predicted results from different kinetic schemes and experimental data on our fixed bed pyrolyser yielded very positive evidence to support our kinetic scheme.

  10. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of boron activation in implanted Si under laser thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisicaro, Giuseppe; Pelaz, Lourdes; Aboy, Maria; Lopez, Pedro; Italia, Markus; Huet, Karim; Cristiano, Filadelfo; Essa, Zahi; Yang, Qui; Bedel-Pereira, Elena; Quillec, Maurice; La Magna, Antonino

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the correlation between dopant activation and damage evolution in boron-implanted silicon under excimer laser irradiation. The dopant activation efficiency in the solid phase was measured under a wide range of irradiation conditions and simulated using coupled phase-field and kinetic Monte Carlo models. With the inclusion of dopant atoms, the presented code extends the capabilities of a previous version, allowing its definitive validation by means of detailed comparisons with experimental data. The stochastic method predicts the post-implant kinetics of the defect-dopant system in the far-from-equilibrium conditions caused by laser irradiation. The simulations explain the dopant activation dynamics and demonstrate that the competitive dopant-defect kinetics during the first laser annealing treatment dominates the activation phenomenon, stabilizing the system against additional laser irradiation steps.

  11. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies of uranium biosorption by calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jing; Fan, Fangli; Wu, Xiaolei; Tian, Wei; Zhao, Liang; Yin, Xiaojie; Fan, Fuyou; Li, Zhan; Tian, Longlong; Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Guo, Junsheng

    2013-12-01

    Calcium alginate beads are potential biosorbent for radionuclides removal as they contain carboxyl groups. However, until now limited information is available concerning the uptake behavior of uranium by this polymer gel, especially when sorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics are concerned. In present work, batch experiments were carried out to study the equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of uranium sorption by calcium alginate beads. The effects of initial solution pH, sorbent amount, initial uranium concentration and temperature on uranium sorption were also investigated. The determined optimal conditions were: initial solution pH of 3.0, added sorbent amount of 40 mg, and uranium sorption capacity increased with increasing initial uranium concentration and temperature. Equilibrium data obtained under different temperatures were fitted better with Langmuir model than Freundlich model, uranium sorption was dominated by a monolayer way. The kinetic data can be well depicted by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The activation energy derived from Arrhenius equation was 30.0 kJ/mol and the sorption process had a chemical nature. Thermodynamic constants such as ΔH(0), ΔS(0) and ΔG(0) were also evaluated, results of thermodynamic study showed that the sorption process was endothermic and spontaneous.

  12. Kinetic study on urea uptake with chitosan based sorbent materials.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chen; Wilson, Lee D

    2016-01-01

    A one-pot kinetic uptake study of urea in aqueous solution with various chitosan sorbent materials such as pristine chitosan, cross-linked chitosan with glutaraldehyde from low (C-1) to higher (C-2) glutaraldehyde content, and a Cu(II) complex of a glutaraldehyde cross-linked chitosan material (C-3) is reported herein. The kinetic uptake profiles were analyzed by the pseudo-first order (PFO) and pseudo-second-order (PSO) models, respectively. The uptake rate constant of urea and the sorption capacity (qe) of high molecular weight (HMW) chitosan, C-1, C-2, and C-3 were best described by the PFO model. The uptake rate constant of urea with the various sorbents is listed in ascending order: HMW chitosanstudies. These results further illustrate the rational design of chitosan-based materials for the controlled uptake of urea in aquatic environments.

  13. Adsorptive removal of acrylonitrile by commercial grade activated carbon: kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Prasad, B; Mishra, I M

    2008-04-01

    The potential of activated carbons--powdered (PAC) and granular (GAC), for the adsorption of acrylonitrile (AN) at different initial AN concentrations (50studied over the temperature range of 303-333 K. The effect of adsorbent dosage, initial AN concentration, contact time, and the change in pH with addition of adsorbents on adsorption was studied. The Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin, and Redlich-Peterson (R-P) isotherm equations were used to test their fit with the experimental data, and the model parameters were determined for different temperatures. The Langmuir and R-P models were found to be the best to describe the equilibrium isotherm data of AN adsorption on PAC and GAC, respectively. Error analysis also confirmed the efficacy of the R-P isotherm to best fit the experimental data. The pseudo-second order kinetic model best represents the kinetics of the adsorption of AN onto PAC and GAC. Maximum adsorption capacity of PAC and GAC at optimum conditions of AN removal (adsorbent dose approximately 20 g/l of solution, and equilibrium time approximately 5 h) was found to be 51.72 and 46.63 mg/g, respectively.

  14. Antibacterial Activity and Kinetics of Litsea cubeba Oil on Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Ru; Shi, Qing-Shan; Liang, Qing; Xie, Xiao-Bao; Huang, Xiao-Mo; Chen, Yi-Ben

    2014-01-01

    Litsea cubeba oil is extracted from the fresh fruits of Litsea cubeba by distillation. In this study, its chemical constituents, antibacterial activity, kinetics and effects against Escherichia coli were studied. Its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were both 0.125% (v/v) by toxic food method. Moreover, the antibacterial kinetic curves indicated 0.0625% (v/v) of litsea cubeba oil was able to prolong the growth lag phase of E. coli cells to approximate 12 hours while 0.125% (v/v) of litsea cubeba oil was able to kill the cells completely. Furthermore, transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation showed most E. coli cells treated with 0.125% (v/v) of litsea cubeba oil were killed or destroyed severely within 2 hours. The litsea cubeba oil might penetrate and destroy the outer and inner membrane of E. coli cells. Thus many holes and gaps were observed on the damaged cells, which led to their death eventually. The antibacterial effects of litsea cubeba oil mainly attributed to the presence of aldehydes, which accounted for approximately 70% in its whole components analyzed by GC/MS. Based on the antimicrobial properties, litsea cubeba oil would have a broad application in the antimicrobial industry. PMID:25372706

  15. Degradation of oxcarbazepine by UV-activated persulfate oxidation: kinetics, mechanisms, and pathways.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lingjun; Zhou, Shiqing; Shi, Zhou; Deng, Lin; Li, Guangchao; Yi, Qihang; Gao, Naiyun

    2016-02-01

    The degradation kinetics and mechanism of the antiepileptic drug oxcarbazepine (OXC) by UV-activated persulfate oxidation were investigated in this study. Results showed that UV/persulfate (UV/PS) process appeared to be more effective in degrading OXC than UV or PS alone. The OXC degradation exhibited a pseudo-first order kinetics pattern and the degradation rate constants (k obs) were affected by initial OXC concentration, PS dosage, initial pH, and humic acid concentration to different degrees. It was found that low initial OXC concentration, high persulfate dosage, and initial pH enhanced the OXC degradation. Additionally, the presence of humic acid in the solution could greatly inhibit the degradation of OXC. Moreover, hydroxyl radical (OH•) and sulfate radical (SO4 (-)••) were identified to be responsible for OXC degradation and SO4 (-)• made the predominant contribution in this study. Finally, major intermediate products were identified and a preliminary degradation pathway was proposed. Results demonstrated that UV/PS system is a potential technology to control the water pollution caused by emerging contaminants such as OXC.

  16. Kinetics of adsorption with granular, powdered, and fibrous activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Shmidt, J.L.; Pimenov, A.V.; Lieberman, A.I.; Cheh, H.Y.

    1997-08-01

    The properties of three different types of activated carbon, fibrous, powdered, and granular, were investigated theoretically and experimentally. The adsorption rate of the activated carbon fiber was found to be two orders of magnitude higher than that of the granular activated carbon, and one order of magnitude higher than that of the powdered activated carbon. Diffusion coefficients of methylene blue in the fibrous, powdered, and granular activated carbons were determined experimentally. A new method for estimating the meso- and macropore surface areas in these carbons was proposed.

  17. Kinetics of thermal activation of an ultraviolet cone pigment.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Victoria; Sekharan, Sivakumar; Liu, Jian; Guo, Ying; Batista, Victor S; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2015-01-14

    Visual pigments can be thermally activated via isomerization of the retinyl chromophore and hydrolysis of the Schiff base (SB) through which the retinyl chromophore is bound to the opsin protein. Here, we present the first combined experimental and theoretical study of the thermal activation of a Siberian hamster ultraviolet (SHUV) pigment. We measured the rates of thermal isomerization and hydrolysis in the SHUV pigment and bovine rhodopsin. We found that these rates were significantly faster in the UV pigment than in rhodopsin due to the difference in the structural and electrostatic effects surrounding the unprotonated Schiff base (USB) retinyl chromophore in the UV pigment. Theoretical (DFT-QM/MM) calculations of the cis-trans thermal isomerization revealed a barrier of ∼23 kcal/mol for the USB retinyl chromophore in SHUV compared to ∼40 kcal/mol for protonated Schiff base (PSB) chromophore in rhodopsin. The lower barrier for thermal isomerization in the SHUV pigment is attributed to the (i) lessening of the steric restraints near the β-ionone ring and SB ends of the chromophore, (ii) displacement of the transmembrane helix 6 (TM6) away from the binding pocket toward TM5 due to absence of the salt bridge between the USB and the protonated E113 residue, and (iii) change in orientation of the hydrogen-bonding networks (HBNs) in the extracellular loop 2 (EII). The results in comparing thermal stability of UV cone pigment and rhodopsin provide insight into molecular evolution of vertebrate visual pigments in achieving low discrete dark noise and high photosensitivity in rod pigments for dim-light vision.

  18. Accelerated hydrolysis of substituted cellulose for potential biofuel production: kinetic study and modeling.

    PubMed

    Mu, Bingnan; Xu, Helan; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-11-01

    In this work, kinetics of substitution accelerated cellulose hydrolysis with multiple reaction stages was investigated to lay foundation for mechanism study and molecular design of substituting compounds. High-efficiency hydrolysis of cellulose is critical for cellulose-based bioethanol production. It is known that, substitution could substantially decrease activation energy and increase reaction rate of acidic hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds in cellulose. However, reaction kinetics and mechanism of the accelerated hydrolysis were not fully revealed. In this research, it was proved that substitution therefore accelerated hydrolysis only occurred in amorphous regions of cellulose fibers, and was a process with multiple reaction stages. With molar ratio of substitution less than 1%, the overall hydrolysis rate could be increased for around 10 times. We also quantified the relationship between the hydrolysis rate of individual reaction stage and its major influences, including molar ratio of substitution, activation energy of acidic hydrolysis, pH and temperature.

  19. Adsorption of methylene blue onto jute fiber carbon: kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumaar, S; Varadarajan, P R; Porkodi, K; Subbhuraam, C V

    2005-04-01

    Jute fiber obtained from the stem of a plant was used to prepare activated carbon using phosphoric acid. Feasibility of employing this jute fiber activated carbon (JFC) for the removal of Methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution was investigated. The adsorption of MB on JFC has found to dependent on contact time, MB concentration and pH. Experimental result follows Langmuir isotherm model and the capacity was found to be 225.64 mg/g. The optimum pH for the MB removal was found to be 5-10. The kinetic data obtained at different concentrations have been analyzed using a pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order equation, intraparticle diffusion and Elovich equation. Among the kinetic models studied, the intraparticle diffusion was the best applicable model to describe the adsorption of MB onto JFC.

  20. Comparative Studies of the Pyrolytic and Kinetic Characteristics of Maize Straw and the Seaweed Ulva pertusa

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Naihao; Li, Demao; Chen, Limei; Zhang, Xiaowen; Xu, Dong

    2010-01-01

    Seaweed has attracted considerable attention as a potential biofuel feedstock. The pyrolytic and kinetic characteristics of maize straw and the seaweed Ulva pertusa were studied and compared using heating rates of 10, 30 and 50°C min−1 under an inert atmosphere. The activation energy, and pre-exponential factors were calculated by the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO), Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) and Popescu methods. The kinetic mechanism was deduced by the Popescu method. The results indicate that there are three stages to the pyrolysis; dehydration, primary devolatilization and residual decomposition. There were significant differences in average activation energy, thermal stability, final residuals and reaction rates between the two materials. The primary devolatilization stage of U. pertusa can be described by the Avramic-Erofeev equation (n = 3), whereas that of maize straw can be described by the Mampel Power Law (n = 2). The average activation energy of maize straw and U. pertusa were 153.0 and 148.7 KJ mol−1, respectively. The pyrolysis process of U.pertusa would be easier than maize straw. And co-firing of the two biomass may be require less external heat input and improve process stability. There were minor kinetic compensation effects between the pre-exponential factors and the activation energy. PMID:20844751

  1. Immobilization of enzymes using non-ionic colloidal liquid aphrons (CLAs): Activity kinetics, conformation, and energetics.

    PubMed

    Ward, Keeran; Xi, Jingshu; Stuckey, David C

    2016-05-01

    This study seeks to examine the ability of non-ionic/non-polar Colloidial Liquid Aphrons (CLAs) to preserve enzyme functionality upon immobilization and release. CLAs consisting of micron-sized oil droplets surrounded by a thin aqueous layer stabilized by a mixture of surfactants, were formulated by direct addition (pre-manufacture addition) using 1% Tween 80/mineral oil and 1% Tween 20 and the enzymes lipase, aprotinin and α-chymotrypsin. The results of activity assays for both lipase and α-chymotrypsin showed that kinetic activity increased upon immobilization by factors of 7 and 5.5, respectively, while aprotinin retained approximately 85% of its native activity. The conformation of the enzymes released through desorption showed no significant alterations compared to their native state. Changes in pH and temperature showed that optimum conditions did not change after immobilization, while analysis of activation energy for the immobilized enzyme showed an increase in activity at higher temperatures. Furthermore, the effect of bound water within the aphron structure allowed for some degree of enzyme hydration, and this hydration was needed for an active conformation with results showing a decrease in ΔH* for the immobilized system compared to its native counterpart.

  2. Blueberry polyphenol oxidase: Characterization and the kinetics of thermal and high pressure activation and inactivation.

    PubMed

    Terefe, Netsanet Shiferaw; Delon, Antoine; Buckow, Roman; Versteeg, Cornelis

    2015-12-01

    Partially purified blueberry polyphenol oxidase (PPO) in Mcllvaine buffer (pH=3.6, typical pH of blueberry juice) was subjected to processing at isothermal-isobaric conditions at temperatures from 30 to 80 °C and pressure from 0.1 to 700 MPa. High pressure processing at 30-50 °C at all pressures studied caused irreversible PPO activity increase with a maximum of 6.1 fold increase at 500 MPa and 30 °C. Treatments at mild pressure-mild temperature conditions (0.1-400 MPa, 60 °C) also caused up to 3 fold PPO activity increase. Initial activity increase followed by a decrease occurred at relatively high pressure-mild temperature (400-600 MPa, 60 °C) and mild pressure-high temperature (0.1-400 MPa, 70-80 °C) combinations. At temperatures higher than 76 °C, monotonic decrease in PPO activity occurred at 0.1 MPa and pressures higher than 500 MPa. The activation/inactivation kinetics of the enzyme was successfully modelled assuming consecutive reactions in series with activation followed by inactivation.

  3. Catalytic oxidation ofS(IV) on activated carbon in aqueous suspension: kinetics and mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Brodzinsky, R.

    1981-02-01

    Activated carbon and combustion produced soot particles have been studied for their catalytic effect on the oxidation of aqueous sulfur(IV) species. Detailed kinetic studies of the reaction were performed on three different activated carbons and on a soot collected in a highway tunnel. Combustion produced soots were tested for their catalytic behavior and found to be similar to the activated carbons. The reaction rate was found to be linearly dependent on the concentration of carbon particles in the solution. The rate was found to follow a Langmuir adsorption isotherm for its dependence on oxygen and the product of two adsorption isotherms for S(IV). The reaction is independent of the pH of the solution when the pH is below 7.6. The reaction does not occur when the pH is above 7.6. The three aqueous S(IV) species are catalyzed in their oxidation by the carbon particles in a similar manner. Activation energies for the reactions on the different carbons are all about 8.5 kcal/mole. A possible four-step reaction mechanism is proposed. It consists of the adsorption of a dissolved oxygen molecule onto the carbon surface, followed by the adsorption of two S(IV) molecules or ions. These are oxidized on the surface to sulfate, which desorbs from the surface, regenerating the catalytically active site.

  4. Studying dissolution with a model integrating solid-liquid interface kinetics and diffusion kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jeff Y

    2012-12-18

    A dissolution model that integrates the solid-liquid interface kinetics and the mass transport kinetics is introduced. Such a model reduces to the Noyes-Whitney equation under special conditions, but offers expanded range of applicability and flexibility fitting dissolution profiles when interfacial kinetics and interfacial concentration deviate from the assumptions implied in the Noyes-Whitney equation. General solutions to the integrated dissolution model derived for noninteractive solutes as well as for solutes participating in ionization equilibrium are discussed. Parameters defining the integrated dissolution model are explained conceptually along with practical ways for their determinations. Conditions under which the model exhibits supersaturation features are elaborated. Simulated dissolution profiles using the integrated dissolution model for published experimental data exhibiting supersaturation features are illustrated.

  5. Lipase-catalyzed ethanolysis of borage oil: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carlos F; Hill, Charles G; Otero, Cristina

    2004-01-01

    Ethanolysis of borage oil catalyzed by two commercial lipases (from Pseudomonas cepacia and Candida antarctica) was studied using two different methodologies. Multiresponse models derived from a generalized Michaelis-Menten mechanism were utilized to describe the rates of formation of ethyl esters of the primary fatty acids present in the precursor oil. The relative rate constants determined for each of the fatty acid residues indicated that both lipases discriminate against release of gamma-linolenic acid residues under the reaction conditions studied. However, both lipases also released some of the residues located at the sn-2 position, indicating that for the experimental conditions studied, both lipases are nonspecific. Moreover, inactivation of Novozym 435 was rapid. Because the half-life of this enzyme (ca. 2.2 h) is comparable to the half-life of the reaction, the intrinsic reaction rate and enzyme deactivation must both be considered in modeling the kinetics.

  6. Orszag Tang vortex - Kinetic study of a turbulent plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, T. N.; Servidio, S.; Shay, M. A.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Cassak, P. A.

    2010-03-25

    Kinetic evolution of the Orszag-Tang vortex is studied using collisionless hybrid simulations based on particle in cell ions and fluid electrons. In magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) this configuration leads rapidly to broadband turbulence. An earlier study estimated the dissipation in the system. A comparison of MHD and hybrid simulations showed similar behavior at large scales but substantial differences at small scales. The hybrid magnetic energy spectrum shows a break at the scale where Hall term in the Ohm's law becomes important. The protons heat perpendicularly and most of the energy is dissipated through magnetic interactions. Here, the space time structure of the system is studied using frequency-wavenumber (k-omega) decomposition. No clear resonances appear, ruling out the cyclotron resonances as a likely candidate for the perpendicular heating. The only distinguishable wave modes present, which constitute a small percentage of total energy, are magnetosonic modes.

  7. Kinetic Batch Soil Adsorption Studies of 2, 4-dinitroanisole (DNAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, J.; Mark, N. W.; Taylor, S.; Brusseau, M. L.; Dontsova, K.

    2014-12-01

    Currently the explosive 2, 4, 6- trinitrotoluene (TNT) is used as a main ingredient in munitions; however the compound has failed to meet sensitivity requirements. The replacement compound being tested is 2, 4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). DNAN is less sensitive to shock, high temperatures, and has good detonation characteristics. However, DNAN is more soluble than TNT, which can influence transport and fate behavior and thus bioavailability and exposure potential. DNAN has been shown to have some human and environmental toxicity. The objective of this study was to investigate the environmental fate of DNAN in soil, with a specific focus on sorption processes. Batch experiments were conducted using 11 soils collected from military installations located across the United States. The soils were characterized for pH, specific surface area, electrical conductivity, cation exchange capacity, and organic carbon content. Adsorption kinetic data determined at room temperature were fitted using the first order kinetic equation. Adsorption isotherms were fitted with linear and Freundlich isotherm equations. The magnitudes of the linear adsorption coefficients ranged from 0.6 to 6 cm3/g. Results indicated that the adsorption of DNAN is strongly dependent on the amount of organic carbon present in the soil.

  8. Kinetic study of sulphuric acid hydrolysis of protein feathers.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamad Bouhamed, Sana; Kechaou, Nabil

    2017-02-28

    Poultry feather keratin is the most important by-product from the poultry industry due to its abundance. Different methods have been still applied to process this by-product such as enzymatic hydrolysis which is expensive and inapplicable at the industrial level. This paper presents a study of acid hydrolysis of poultry feathers using different types of acids, sulphuric acid concentration, different temperatures and solid to liquid ratio to obtain a liquid product rich in peptides. The feathers analysis revealed a crude protein content of 88.83%. A maximum peptides production of 676 mg/g was reached using sulphuric acid, 1 molar acid concentration and 50 g/l solid to liquid ratio at a temperature of 90 °C after 300 min. A reaction scheme for protein aggregation and decomposition to polypeptides and amino acids was proposed and a kinetic model for peptides production was developed. The proposed kinetic model proved to be well adapted to the experimental data with R (2) = 0.99.

  9. Activity Level-Dependent Synapse-Specific AMPA Receptor Trafficking Regulates Transmission Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, J. Julius

    2009-01-01

    Central glutamatergic synapses may express AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptors (AMPA-Rs) with distinct gating properties and exhibit different transmission dynamics, which are important for computing various synaptic inputs received at different populations of synapses. However, how glutamatergic synapses acquire AMPA-Rs with distinct kinetics to influence synaptic integration remains poorly understood. Here I report synapse-specific trafficking of distinct AMPA-Rs in rat cortical layer 4 stellate and layer 5 pyramidal neurons. The analysis indicates that in single layer 4 stellate neurons thalamocortical synapses generate faster synaptic responses than intracortical synapses. Moreover, GluR1-containing AMPA-Rs traffic selectively into intracortical synapses, and this process requires sensory experience-dependent activity and slows down transmission kinetics. GluR4-containing AMPA-Rs traffic more heavily into thalamocortical synapses than intracortical synapses, and this process requires spontaneous synaptic activity and speeds up transmission kinetics. GluR2-containing AMPA-Rs traffic equally into both thalamocortical and intracortical synapses, and this process requires no synaptic activity and resets transmission kinetics. Notably, synaptic trafficking of distinct AMPA-Rs differentially regulates synaptic integration. Thus, synapse-specific AMPA-R trafficking coarsely sets and synaptic activity finely tunes transmission kinetics and integration properties at different synapses in central neurons. PMID:19439609

  10. A study on degradation kinetics of ascorbic acid in amla (Phyllanthus emblica L.) during cooking.

    PubMed

    Nisha, P; Singhal, Rekha S; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2004-08-01

    The kinetics of ascorbic acid degradation in amla (Phyllanthus emblica L.) as well as in pure ascorbic acid solutions at initial concentrations present in amla over a temperature range of 50-120 degrees C (steady-state temperature) has been studied. The ascorbic acid degradation followed first-order reaction kinetics where the rate constant increased with an increase in temperature. The temperature dependence of degradation was adequately modeled by the Arrhenius equation. The activation energies were found to be 4.09 kcal/mole for amla and 4.49 kcal/mole for pure vitamin solution. The degradation kinetics of ascorbic acid was also evaluated in normal open pan cooking, pressure-cooking and a newly developed and patented fuel-efficient EcoCooker (unsteady state heating process). A mathematical model was developed using the steady-state kinetic parameters obtained to predict the losses of ascorbic acid from the time-temperature data of the unsteady state heating processing method. The results obtained indicate the ascorbic acid degradation is of a similar order of magnitude in all the methods of cooking.

  11. Kinetic Study of the Combustion of Phosphorus Containing Species

    SciTech Connect

    Glaude, P.A.; Curran, H.J.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1999-10-22

    The combustion of organophosphorus compounds is of great interest for the incineration of chemical warfare agent and their use in flame inhibition as halon replacement. The thermochemical data of these species and the reactions involved at high temperature are not well known, despite some recent experimental studies. With BAC-MP4 ab initio estimations as a basis and semi-empirical estimations for many new compounds, the thermochemistry of organophosphorus compounds is studied. New group additivity values are proposed for enthalpies of formation at 298K, entropies and heat capacities of species involving pentavalent phosphorus bonded to carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, fluorine, nitrogen and sulfur atoms. The kinetic of unimolecular elimination is investigated by modeling pyrolysis experiments of DEMP, TEP and DIMP. A new combustion mechanism is described and applied to the modeling of DMMP reaction in a H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} flame.

  12. Alkaline assisted thermal oil recovery: Kinetic and displacement studies

    SciTech Connect

    Saneie, S.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1993-06-01

    This report deals with two major issues of chemical assisted flooding - the interaction of caustic, one of the proposed additives to steam flood, with the reservoir rock, and the displacement of oil by a chemical flood at elevated temperatures. A mathematical model simulating the kinetics of silica dissolution and hydroxyl ion consumption in a typical alkaline flooding environment is first developed. The model is based on the premise that dissolution occurs via hydrolysis of active sites through the formation of an intermediate complex, which is in equilibrium with the silicic acid in solution. Both static (batch) and dynamic (core flood) processes are simulated to examine the sensitivity of caustic consumption and silica dissolution to process parameters, and to determine rates of propagation of pH values. The model presented provides a quantitative description of the quartz-alkali interaction in terms of pH, salinity, ion exchange properties, temperature and contact time, which are of significant importance in the design of soluble silicate flooding processes. The modeling of an adiabatic hot waterflood assisted by the simultaneous injection of a chemical additive is next presented. The model is also applicable to the hot alkaline flooding under conditions of negligible adsorption of the generated anionic surfactant and of hydroxide adsorption being Langmuirian. The theory of generalized simple waves (coherence ) is used to develop solutions for the temperature, concentration, and oil saturation profiles, as well as the oil recovery curves. It is shown that, for Langmuir adsorption kinetics, the chemical resides in the heated region of the reservoir if its injection concentration is below a critical value, and in the unheated region if its concentration exceeds this critical value. Results for a chemical slug injection in a tertiary recovery process indicate recovery performance is maximized when chemical resides in the heated region of the reservior.

  13. Structural and Kinetic Analyses of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Active Site Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Crichlow, G.; Lubetsky, J; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Lolis, E

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a secreted protein expressed in numerous cell types that counters the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids and has been implicated in sepsis, cancer, and certain autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the structure of MIF contains a catalytic site resembling the tautomerase/isomerase sites of microbial enzymes. While bona fide physiological substrates remain unknown, model substrates have been identified. Selected compounds that bind in the tautomerase active site also inhibit biological functions of MIF. It had previously been shown that the acetaminophen metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), covalently binds to the active site of MIF. In this study, kinetic data indicate that NAPQI inhibits MIF both covalently and noncovalently. The structure of MIF cocrystallized with NAPQI reveals that the NAPQI has undergone a chemical alteration forming an acetaminophen dimer (bi-APAP) and binds noncovalently to MIF at the mouth of the active site. We also find that the commonly used protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), forms a covalent complex with MIF and inhibits the tautomerase activity. Crystallographic analysis reveals the formation of a stable, novel covalent bond for PMSF between the catalytic nitrogen of the N-terminal proline and the sulfur of PMSF with complete, well-defined electron density in all three active sites of the MIF homotrimer. Conclusions are drawn from the structures of these two MIF-inhibitor complexes regarding the design of novel compounds that may provide more potent reversible and irreversible inhibition of MIF.

  14. Neutron activation analysis via nuclear decay kinetics using gamma-ray spectroscopy at SFU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo, Thomas; Chester, Aaron; Starosta, Krzysztof; Williams, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool used in a variety of fields including nuclear and analytical chemistry, environmental science, and health risk management. At SFU, the Germanium detector for Elemental Analysis and Radiation Studies (GEARS), a low-background shielded high-purity germanium gamma-ray detector, has been used recently in all of the above fields. The current project aims to expand upon the number of applications for which GEARS can be used while enhancing its current functionality. A recent addition to the SFU Nuclear Science laboratory is the Thermo Scientific P 385 neutron generator. This device provides a nominal yield of 3 ×108 neutrons/s providing the capacity for neutron activation analysis, opening a major avenue of research at SFU which was previously unavailable. The isotopes created via neutron activation have a wide range of half-lives. To measure and study isotopes with half-lives above a second, a new analogue data acquisition system has been installed on GEARS allowing accurate measurements of decay kinetics. This new functionality enables identification and quantification of the products of neutron activation. Results from the neutron activation analysis of pure metals will be presented.

  15. Binding kinetics of triclosan (Irgasan) to alloplastic vascular grafts: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Richter, T; Schardey, H M; Löhlein, F; Fleischer, C T; Walli, A K; Boos, K S; Schildberg, F W

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the binding kinetics of triclosan (Irgasan) to alloplastic vascular grafts and to examine its antimicrobial activity against various microbial pathogens in vitro. Vascular grafts made by Intergard (Intervascular), Fluoropassiv (Vascutek), and Gore-tex (Gore) were examined. Grafts were incubated in 10 g/L triclosan (Irgasan), dried, sterilized, and incubated in RPMI medium. One-centimeter segments of the grafts were resected under sterile conditions at intervals of minutes, then hours, followed by days and up to 4 weeks. Samples were stored frozen at -20 degrees C for the measurement of triclosan bound to the vascular graft by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The binding kinetics under perfusion conditions were determined for Intergard grafts, which were perfused with 50 mL of nutrient medium for 24 hr. Samples were taken at various time intervals for the measurement of triclosan. The antimicrobial activity of triclosan against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans as well as Enterococcus faecium was determined. Triclosan effectively binds to vascular graft without the use of intermediate binding substances. It stayed on the graft for the duration of 4 weeks. Under both static and perfusion conditions, the binding kinetics are similar. Triclosan binds most effectively to Intergard grafts, less so to Fluoropassiv grafts, and not at all to Gore-tex material. Antimicrobial activity of triclosan is very effective against S. aureus and E. faecium but not against P. aeruginosa.

  16. Kinetics and activation thermodynamics of methane monooxygenase compound Q formation and reaction with substrates.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, B J; Lipscomb, J D

    2000-11-07

    The transient kinetics of formation and decay of the reaction cycle intermediates of the Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b methane monooxygenase (MMO) catalytic cycle are studied as a function of temperature and substrate type and deuteration. Kinetic evidence is presented for the existence of three intermediates termed compounds O, P, and P forming after the addition of O(2) to diferrous MMO hydroxylase (H(r)) and before the formation of the reactive intermediate compound Q. The Arrhenius plots for these reactions are linear and independent of substrate concentration and type, showing that substrate does not participate directly in the oxygen activation phase of the catalytic cycle. Analysis of the transient kinetic data revealed only small changes relative to the weak optical spectrum of H(r) for any of these intermediates. In contrast, large changes in the 430 nm spectral region are associated with the formation of Q. The decay reaction of Q exhibits an apparent first-order concentration dependence for all substrates tested, and the observed rate constant depends on the substrate type. The kinetics of the decay reaction of Q yield a nonlinear Arrhenius plot when methane is the substrate, and the rates in both segments of the plot increase linearly with methane concentration. Together these observations suggest that at least two reactions with a methane concentration dependence, and perhaps two methane molecules, are involved in the decay process. When CD(4) is used as the substrate, a large isotope effect and a linear Arrhenius plot are observed. Analogous plots for all other MMO substrates tested (e.g., ethane) are linear, and no isotope effect for deuterated analogues is observed. This demonstrates that a step other than C-H bond breaking is rate limiting for alternative MMO substrates. A two step Q decay mechanism is proposed that provides an explanation for the lack of an isotope effect for alternative MMO substrates and the fact that rate of oxidation of

  17. [Study on Chemical Kinetic Effect of Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma].

    PubMed

    Zrang, Peng; Hong, Yan-ji; Shen, Shuang-yan; Ding, Xiao-yu; Ma, Di

    2015-03-01

    To reveal the mechanism of plasma (assisted the ignition process of methane/air further, schematic of dielectric barrier discharge plasma system with atmospheric air was designed and set up, the emission spectrum of dielectric barrier discharge plasma with atmospheric air was measured, and the active particles produced by the interaction of dielectric barrier discharge plasma with atmospheric air were analyzed with the spectrum technology, the ignition model and calculation methods of sensitivity analysis and reaction path analysis were given, effects of NO and O3 on the ignition delay time were simulated, and the chemical kinetics mechanism of NO and O3 assisted ignition was revealed via sensitivity analysis and reaction path analysis. The results show that main excited particles of N2 and O3 are generated via effect of plasma on the atmospheric air, which are converted into active particles of NO(ξ) and O3 in the end, the life of which are longer than any other active particles, effects of plasma on the ignition is simplified as effects of NO(ξ) and O3 on the ignition; NO and O3 could reduce the ignition delay time significantly, but the amplitude decrease with increase of the initial temperature, this is because the rate of ignition is decided by the oxidation rate of CH3, the oxidized pathway of CH3 is R155 and R156 for auto-ignition and their rates are slower when temperature is low, so the ignition delay time of methane/air is longer; NO could reduce the ignition delay time significantly because of the oxidized pathway of CH3 is changed to R327 CH3O2 + NO = CH3O + NO2, R328 CH3 + NO2 = CH3O + NO for NO(ξ) (assisted ignition process from R155 and R156 for auto-ignition; and the chemical kinetic effect is the dominating factor of O3 on the ignition and which change the reaction path.

  18. Kinetic Defects Induced by Melittin in Model Lipid Membranes: A Solution Atomic Force Microscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jianjun; Khadka, Nawal K

    2016-05-26

    Quantitative characterization of membrane defects (pores) is important for elucidating the molecular basis of many membrane-active peptides. We study kinetic defects induced by melittin in vesicular and planar lipid bilayers. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements indicate that melittin induces time-dependent calcein leakage. Solution atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to visualize melittin-induced membrane defects. After initial equilibration, the most probable defect radius is ∼3.8 nm in 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC) bilayers. Unexpectedly, defects become larger with longer incubation, accompanied by substantial shape transformation. The initial defect radius is ∼4.7 nm in 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers. Addition of 30 mol % cholesterol to DOPC bilayers suppresses defect kinetics, although the inhibitory impact is negated by longer incubation. Overall, the kinetic rate of defect development follows DLPC > DOPC > DOPC/cholesterol. Kinetic defects are also observed when anionic lipids are present. Based on the observation that defects can occupy as large as 40% of the bilayer surface, we propose a kinetic defect growth model. We also study the effect of melittin on the phase behavior of DOPC/egg-sphingomyelin/cholesterol bilayers. We find that melittin initially suppresses or eliminates liquid-ordered (Lo) domains; Lo domains gradually emerge and become the dominant species with longer incubation; and defects in phase-coexisting bilayers have a most probable radius of ∼5 nm and are exclusively localized in the liquid-disordered (Ld) phase. Our experimental data highlight that melittin-induced membrane defects are not static; conversely, spontaneous defect growth is intrinsically associated with membrane permeabilization exerted by melittin.

  19. Kinetic studies on the aggregation of Aspergillus niger conidia.

    PubMed

    Grimm, L H; Kelly, S; Hengstler, J; Göbel, A; Krull, R; Hempel, D C

    2004-07-20

    Morphology has a crucial effect on productivity and the supply of substrate for cultures of filamentous fungi. However, cultivation parameters leading to the desired morphology are often chosen empirically as the mechanisms governing the processes involved are usually unknown. For coagulating microorganisms like Aspergillus niger the morphological development is considered to start with the aggregation of conidia right after inoculation. To elucidate the mechanism of this process, kinetic studies were carried out using an in-line particle size analyzer. Based on the data obtained from these experiments a model for conidial aggregation is proposed in this article. It consists of two separate aggregation steps. The first one takes place immediately after inoculation, but only leads to a small decrease of total particle concentration. Most suspended conidia aggregate after a second aggregation step triggered by germination and hyphal growth. Aggregation velocity of this second phase is linearly dependent on the particle growth rate.

  20. Theoretical studies on kinetics of singlet oxygen in nonthermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Mikhail P.; Ionin, Andrei A.; Kotkov, Andrei A.; Kochetov, Igor V.; Napartovich, Anatolii P.; Podmarkov, Yurii P.; Seleznev, Leonid V.; Sinitsyn, Dmitrii V.; Vagin, Nikolai P.; Yuryshev, Nikolay N.

    2004-09-01

    An idea to replace singlet delta oxygen (SDO) generator working with wet chemistry by electric discharge generator has got much attention last years. Different kinds of discharge were examined for this purpose, but without a great success. The existing theoretical models are not validated by well-characterized experimental data. To describe complicated kinetics in gas discharge with oxygen one needs to know in detail processes involving numerous electronic excited oxygen molecules and atoms. To gain new knowledge about these processes experimental studies were made on electric discharge properties in gas mixture flow with independent control of inlet SDO concentration. The theoretical model extended to include minor additives like oxygen atoms, water molecules, ozone was developed. Comparison with careful experimental measurements of electric characteristics along with gas composition allows us to verify the model and make theoretical predictions more reliable. Results of numerical simulations using this model for an electron-beam sustained discharge are reported and compared with the experimental data.

  1. Kinetic study on CO2 photoreduction by Re complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Y.; Tsuda, M.; Maruo, Y. Y.; Nakamura, J.

    2012-08-01

    The photoreduction of CO2 using Re(btp)(CO)3Cl (btp: bathophenanthroline) was investigated in a CO2-saturated DMF-triethanolamine solution. CO formation was observed during irradiation with 365-nm light. Meanwhile, UV-vis spectral changes suggested that Re(btp)(CO)3Cl was degraded and its amount decreased during irradiation. The degradation of Re(btp)(CO)3Cl could cause CO formation, and the observed CO amount was the sum of CO produced by CO2 reduction and Re(btp)(CO)3Cl degradation. Thus, in the present paper, we discuss how the net amount of CO produced by CO2 reduction could be determined via a kinetic study during UV irradiation which considers the CO production originating from the Re(btp)(CO)3Cl degradation process.

  2. An Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Methyl Decanoate Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Thomson, M J; Pitz, W J; Lu, T

    2010-02-19

    Biodiesel is typically a mixture of long chain fatty acid methyl esters for use in compression ignition engines. Improving biofuel engine performance requires understanding its fundamental combustion properties and the pathways of combustion. This research study presents new combustion data for methyl decanoate in an opposed-flow diffusion flame. An improved detailed chemical kinetic model for methyl decanoate combustion is developed, which serves as the basis for deriving a skeletal mechanism via the direct relation graph method. The novel skeletal mechanism consists of 648 species and 2998 reactions. This mechanism well predicts the methyl decanoate opposed-flow diffusion flame data. The results from the flame simulations indicate that methyl decanoate is consumed via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radicals, which lead to the production of alkenes. The ester moiety in methyl decanoate leads to the formation of low molecular weight oxygenated compounds such as carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and ketene.

  3. Adiabatic molecular-dynamics-simulation-method studies of kinetic friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Sokoloff, J. B.

    2005-06-01

    An adiabatic molecular-dynamics method is developed and used to study the Muser-Robbins model for dry friction (i.e., nonzero kinetic friction in the slow sliding speed limit). In this model, dry friction between two crystalline surfaces rotated with respect to each other is due to mobile molecules (i.e., dirt particles) adsorbed at the interface. Our adiabatic method allows us to quickly locate interface potential-well minima, which become unstable during sliding of the surfaces. Since dissipation due to friction in the slow sliding speed limit results from mobile molecules dropping out of such unstable wells, our method provides a way to calculate dry friction, which agrees extremely well with results found by conventional molecular dynamics for the same system, but our method is more than a factor of 10 faster.

  4. Femtomole Mixer for Microsecond Kinetic Studies of Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Hertzog, David E.; Michalet, Xavier; Jäger, Marcus; Kong, Xiangxu; Santiago, Juan G.; Weiss, Shimon; Bakajin, Olgica

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a microfluidic mixer for studying protein folding and other reactions with a mixing time of 8 μs and sample consumption of femtomoles. This device enables us to access conformational changes under conditions far from equilibrium and at previously inaccessible time scales. In this paper, we discuss the design and optimization of the mixer using modeling of convective diffusion phenomena and a characterization of the mixer performance using microparticle image velocimetry, dye quenching, and Förster resonance energy-transfer (FRET) measurements of single-stranded DNA. We also demonstrate the feasibility of measuring fast protein folding kinetics using FRET with acyl-CoA binding protein. PMID:15595857

  5. Study of the diffusion of points defects in crystalline silicon using the kinetic ART method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trochet, Mickael; Brommer, Peter; Beland, Laurent-Karim; Joly, Jean-Francois; Mousseau, Normand

    2013-03-01

    Because of the long-time scale involved, the activated diffusion of point defects is often studied in standard molecular dynamics at high temperatures only, making it more difficult to characterize complex diffusion mechanisms. Here, we turn to the study of point defect diffusion in crystalline silicon using kinetic ART (kART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building based on the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau). By generating catalogs of diffusion mechanisms and fully incorporating elastic and off-lattice effects, kART is a unique tool for characterizing this problem. More precisely, using kART with the standard Stillinger-Weber potential we consider the evolution of crystalline cells with 1 to 4 vacancies and 1 to 4 interstitials at various temperatures and to provide a detailed picture of both the atomistic diffusion mechanisms and overall kinetics in addition to identifying special configurations such as a 2-interstitial super-diffuser.

  6. Kinetic studies of cellulose enzymatic hydrolysis from pretreated corn cob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevanie, Jeannie; Kartawiria, Irvan; Abimanyu, Haznan

    2017-01-01

    Successful utilization of corn cob biomass as raw material in bioethanol production is depending on the hydrolysis process where high level of β-cellulose is converted into glucose. Enzymatic hydrolysis is the common process for this purpose. This study is focusing on the evaluation of hydrolysis of pre-treated corn cob using Novozymes Cellic ® C-Tec2 and H-Tec2 enzymes to obtain the optimum reaction condition and its general reaction kinetics. The corn cob used was pretreated using 10% of NaOH solution. Hydrolysis reactions were conducted in 250 ml Erlenmeyer flask for 72 hour using mixture of C-Tec2 and H-Tec2 enzymes at the fixed ratio of 5:1 and glucose concentration were measured using HPLC. Reaction temperature of 40°C and quantity of 0.5 ml enzyme solution per gram substrate gives the highest reaction rate (0.0123 gram of glucose/gram sample.h) with the glucose yield being 0.089 g glucose/ g substrate. Total conversion of cellulose observed was 11.91 %. Corn cob hydrolysis using C-Tec2 and H-Tec2 enzymes also result in xylose (0.0202 g/g substrate), which can also contribute to bioethanol productivity in further fermentation process. The reaction is following zero order kinetics for the first 8 hours and reaches maximum yield within 10 hours; significantly shorter compared to previous studies of cellulosic material hydrolysis that may take up to 72 hour to complete. Prolonging the hydrolysis of pre-treated corn cob more than 24 hour gives no significant increase in glucose conversion and yield. Hydrolysis temperature range of 40°C to 60°C is in accordance with the manufacturer recommendation for the purpose; however the decrease of reaction rate is observable at temperature 50°C or higher.

  7. Heterogeneous and homogeneous catalytic ozonation of benzothiazole promoted by activated carbon: kinetic approach.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Héctor; Zaror, Claudio A

    2006-11-01

    Ozone oxidation combined with activated carbon adsorption (O(3)/AC) has recently started to be developed as a single process for water and wastewater treatment. While a number of aspects of aqueous ozone decomposition are well understood, the importance and relationship between aqueous ozone decomposition and organic contaminant degradation in the presence of activated carbon is still not clear. This study focuses on determining the contribution of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions to organic contaminants removal in O(3)/AC system. Benzothiazole (BT) was selected as a target organic pollutant due to its environmental concern. A reactor system based on a differential circular flow reactor composed by a 19 cm(3) activated carbon fixed bed column and 1 dm(3) storage tank was used. Ozone was produced from pure and dry oxygen using an Ozocav ozone generator rated at 5 g O(3)h(-1). Experimental results show that BT removal rate was proportional to activated carbon dosage. Activated carbon surface contribution to BT oxidation reactions with ozone, increased with pH in absence of radical scavengers. The radical reaction contribution within the pH range 2-11 accounted for 67-83% for BT removal in O(3)/AC simultaneous treatment. Results suggest that at pH higher than the pH of the point of zero charge of the activated carbon dissociated acid groups such as carboxylic acid anhydrides and carboxylic acids present on activated carbon surface could be responsible for the observed increase in the ozone decomposition reaction rate. A simplified mechanism and a kinetic scheme representing the contribution of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions on BT ozonation in the presence of activated carbon is proposed.

  8. Ab initio quantum chemical and kinetic modeling study of the pyrolysis kinetics of pyrrole

    SciTech Connect

    Martoprawiro, M.; Bacskay, G.B.; Mackie, J.C.

    1999-05-20

    The five-membered heterocyclic pyrrole moiety is an important structure in coals and derived tars, and the thermal decomposition reactions of pyrrole are important for production of precursors of the oxides of nitrogen, NO{sub x}, in the combustion of coals. The kinetics of pyrolysis of pyrrole have been investigated theoretically by ab initio quantum chemical techniques and by detailed chemical kinetic modeling of previously reported experimental results. The overall kinetics can be successfully modeled by a 117 step kinetic model that gives good agreement with temperature profiles of major products and also provides an acceptable fit for minor products. The thermochemistry and rate parameters of a number of key reactions have been obtained by ab initio calculations carried out at CASSCF, CASPT2, and G2(MP2) levels of theory. Several reaction pathways were investigated. The major product, HCN, arises principally from a hydrogen migration in pyrrole to form a cyclic carbene with the NH bond intact. Ring scission of this carbene leads to an allenic imine precursor of HCN and propyne. This is the decomposition pathway of lowest energy. Pyrolysis is preceded by the facile tautomerization of pyrrole to 2H-pyrrolenine. The latter can undergo CN fission to form an open chain biradical species, which is the precursor of the butenenitrile isomeric products, cis- and trans-crotononitrile and allyl cyanide. The biradical can also undergo facile H-fission to form cyanoallyl radical, which is an important precursor of acetylene, acetonitrile, and acrylonitrile, H{sub 2} also arises principally from H-fission of the biradical.

  9. Reduction of Carbon Dioxide by a Molybdenum-Containing Formate Dehydrogenase: A Kinetic and Mechanistic Study.

    PubMed

    Maia, Luisa B; Fonseca, Luis; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G

    2016-07-20

    Carbon dioxide accumulation is a major concern for the ecosystems, but its abundance and low cost make it an interesting source for the production of chemical feedstocks and fuels. However, the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the carbon dioxide molecule makes its activation a challenging task. Studying the chemistry used by nature to functionalize carbon dioxide should be helpful for the development of new efficient (bio)catalysts for atmospheric carbon dioxide utilization. In this work, the ability of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans formate dehydrogenase (Dd FDH) to reduce carbon dioxide was kinetically and mechanistically characterized. The Dd FDH is suggested to be purified in an inactive form that has to be activated through a reduction-dependent mechanism. A kinetic model of a hysteretic enzyme is proposed to interpret and predict the progress curves of the Dd FDH-catalyzed reactions (initial lag phase and subsequent faster phase). Once activated, Dd FDH is able to efficiently catalyze, not only the formate oxidation (kcat of 543 s(-1), Km of 57.1 μM), but also the carbon dioxide reduction (kcat of 46.6 s(-1), Km of 15.7 μM), in an overall reaction that is thermodynamically and kinetically reversible. Noteworthy, both Dd FDH-catalyzed formate oxidation and carbon dioxide reduction are completely inactivated by cyanide. Current FDH reaction mechanistic proposals are discussed and a different mechanism is here suggested: formate oxidation and carbon dioxide reduction are proposed to proceed through hydride transfer and the sulfo group of the oxidized and reduced molybdenum center, Mo(6+)═S and Mo(4+)-SH, are suggested to be the direct hydride acceptor and donor, respectively.

  10. Thermodynamic and kinetic study of phenol degradation by a non-catalytic wet air oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Sébastien; Boutin, Olivier; Ferrasse, Jean-Henry; Malleret, Laure; Faucherand, Rémy; Viand, Alain

    2011-08-01

    This work is dedicated to an accurate evaluation of thermodynamic and kinetics aspects of phenol degradation using wet air oxidation process. Phenol is a well known polluting molecule and therefore it is important having data of its behaviour during this process. A view cell is used for the experimental study, with an internal volume of 150 mL, able to reach pressures up to 30 MPa and temperatures up to 350°C. Concerning the thermodynamic phase equilibria, experimental and modelling results are obtained for different binary systems (water/nitrogen, water/air) and ternary system (water/nitrogen/phenol). The best model is the Predictive Soave Redlich Kwong one. This information is necessary to predict the composition of the gas phase during the process. It is also important for an implementation in a process simulation. The second part is dedicated to kinetics evaluation of the degradation of phenol. Different compounds have been detected using GC coupled with a MS. A kinetic scheme is deduced, taking into account the evolution of phenol, hydroquinones, catechol, resorcinol and acetic acid. The kinetic parameters are calculated for this scheme. These data are important to evaluate the evolution of the concentration of the different polluting molecules during the process. A simplified kinetic scheme, which can be easily implemented in a process simulation, is also determined for the direct degradation of phenol into H(2)O and CO(2). The Arrhenius law data obtained for the phenol disappearance are the following: k=1.8×10(6)±3.9×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) (pre-exponential factor) and E(a)=77±8 kJ mol(-1) (activation energy).

  11. Succinate Overproduction: A Case Study of Computational Strain Design Using a Comprehensive Escherichia coli Kinetic Model.

    PubMed

    Khodayari, Ali; Chowdhury, Anupam; Maranas, Costas D

    2014-01-01

    Computational strain-design prediction accuracy has been the focus for many recent efforts through the selective integration of kinetic information into metabolic models. In general, kinetic model prediction quality is determined by the range and scope of genetic and/or environmental perturbations used during parameterization. In this effort, we apply the k-OptForce procedure on a kinetic model of E. coli core metabolism constructed using the Ensemble Modeling (EM) method and parameterized using multiple mutant strains data under aerobic respiration with glucose as the carbon source. Minimal interventions are identified that improve succinate yield under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions to test the fidelity of model predictions under both genetic and environmental perturbations. Under aerobic condition, k-OptForce identifies interventions that match existing experimental strategies while pointing at a number of unexplored flux re-directions such as routing glyoxylate flux through the glycerate metabolism to improve succinate yield. Many of the identified interventions rely on the kinetic descriptions that would not be discoverable by a purely stoichiometric description. In contrast, under fermentative (anaerobic) condition, k-OptForce fails to identify key interventions including up-regulation of anaplerotic reactions and elimination of competitive fermentative products. This is due to the fact that the pathways activated under anaerobic condition were not properly parameterized as only aerobic flux data were used in the model construction. This study shed light on the importance of condition-specific model parameterization and provides insight on how to augment kinetic models so as to correctly respond to multiple environmental perturbations.

  12. A kinetic study of struvite precipitation recycling technology with NaOH/Mg(OH)2 addition.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rongtai; Ren, Hongqiang; Wang, Yanru; Ding, Lili; Geng, Jingji; Xu, Ke; Zhang, Yan

    2013-09-01

    Struvite precipitation recycling technology is received wide attention in removal ammonium and phosphate out of wastewater. While past study focused on process efficiency, and less on kinetics. The kinetic study is essential for the design and optimization in the application of struvite precipitation recycling technology. The kinetics of struvite with NaOH/Mg(OH)2 addition were studied by thermogravimetry analysis with three rates (5, 10, 20 °C/min), using Friedman method and Ozawa-Flynn-Wall method, respectively. Degradation process of struvite with NaOH/Mg(OH)2 addition was three steps. The stripping of ammonia from struvite was mainly occurred at the first step. In the first step, the activation energy was about 70 kJ/mol, which has gradually declined as the reaction progress. By model fitting studies, the proper mechanism function for struvite decomposition process with NaOH/Mg(OH)2 addition was revealed. The mechanism function was f(α)=α(α)-(1-α)(n), a Prout-Tompkins nth order (Bna) model.

  13. Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Decomposition Studied via in Situ Low Temperature X-ray Powder Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Susan M; Rawn, Claudia J; Keffer, David J.; Mull, Derek L; Payzant, E Andrew; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrates are known to have a slowed decomposition rate at ambient pressure and temperatures below the melting point of ice termed self-preservation or anomalous preservation. As hydrate exothermically decomposes, gas is released and water of the clathrate cages transforms into ice. Two regions of slowed decomposition for methane hydrate, 180 200 K and 230 260 K, were observed, and the kinetics were studied by in situ low temperature x-ray powder diffraction. The kinetic constants for ice formation from methane hydrate were determined by the Avrami model within each region and activation energies, Ea, were determined by the Arrhenius plot. Ea determined from the data for 180 200 K was 42 kJ/mol and for 230 260 K was 22 kJ/mol. The higher Ea in the colder temperature range was attributed to a difference in the microstructure of ice between the two regions.

  14. Oxidation of psychotropic drugs by Chloramine-T in acid medium: a kinetic study using spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldanha, R. J. D.; Ananda, S.; Venkatesha, B. M.; Made Gowda, N. M.

    2002-03-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of psychotropic drugs, chlorpromazine hydrochloride (CPH) and fluphenazine dihydrochloride (FPH), by Chloramine-T (CAT) in pH 1.6 buffer medium has been studied spectrophotometrically at λmax=570 and 530 nm, respectively, at 30°C. The reaction rate shows a fractional-order dependence on [CAT] and first-order dependence on each [substrate]. The reaction rate also shows an inverse fractional-order in [H +]. Additions of halide ions and the reduction product of CAT, p-toluenesulfonamide, and variation of ionic strength and dielectric constant of the medium do not have any significant effect on the reaction rate. The activation parameters for the reaction were evaluated. The proposed general mechanism and the derived rate law are consistent with the observed kinetics.

  15. Kinetics of Detergent-Induced Activation and Inhibition of a Minimal Lipase.

    PubMed

    Kübler, Daniel; Bergmann, Anna; Weger, Lukas; Ingenbosch, Kim N; Hoffmann-Jacobsen, Kerstin

    2017-02-16

    Detergents are commonly applied in lipase assays to solubilize sparingly soluble model substrates. However, detergents affect lipases as well as substrates in multiple ways. The effect of detergents on lipase activity is commonly attributed to conformational changes in the lid region. This study deals with the effect of the nonionic detergent, poly(ethylene glycol) dodecyl ether, on a lipase that does not contain a lid sequence, lipase A from Bacillus subtilis (BSLA). We show that BSLA activity depends strongly on the detergent concentration and the dependency profile changes with pH. The interaction of BSLA with detergent monomers and micelles is studied using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, time-resolved anisotropy decay, and temperature-induced unfolding. Detergent-dependent hydrolysis kinetics of two different substrates at two pH values are fitted with a microkinetic model. This analysis shows that the mechanism of interfacial lipase catalysis is strongly affected by the detergent. It reveals an activation mechanism by monomeric detergent that does not result from structural changes of the lipase. Instead, we propose that interfacial diffusion of the lipase is enhanced by detergent binding.

  16. Concept of variable activation energy and its validity in nonisothermal kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guanglei; Wang, Qi; Zheng, Hongxia; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Song; Liu, Zhongsuo

    2011-06-09

    The concept of variable activation energy in solid-state kinetics under nonisothermal conditions has been suffering from doubt and controversy. Rate equations of nonisothermal kinetics of solid decomposition, which involve the factors of thermodynamics conditions, pressure of gaseous product, structure parameters of solid, and/or extent of conversion, are derived from the models of the interface reaction, the diffusion of gaseous product, and the nuclei growth of the solid product, respectively. The definition of the validity function in the rate equations represents the influence of the factors on the reaction rate. A function of variable activation energy depending on the validity function is also developed. The changing trend and degree of activation energy are extrapolated from the function of variable activation energy and based on the data of nonisothermal thermal decomposition of calcium carbonate. It is shown that the concept of variable activation energy is meaningfully applicable to solid-state reactions under nonisothermal conditions.

  17. Equilibrium and kinetic modeling of contaminant immobilization by activated carbon amended to sediments in the field.

    PubMed

    Rakowska, Magdalena I; Kupryianchyk, Darya; Koelmans, Albert A; Grotenhuis, Tim; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2014-12-15

    Addition of activated carbons (AC) to polluted sediments and soils is an attractive remediation technique aiming at reducing pore water concentrations of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). In this study, we present (pseudo-)equilibrium as well as kinetic parameters for sorption of a series of PAHs and PCBs to powdered and granular activated carbons (AC) after three different sediment treatments: sediment mixed with powdered AC (PAC), sediment mixed with granular AC (GAC), and addition of GAC followed by 2 d mixing and subsequent removal ('sediment stripping'). Remediation efficiency was assessed by quantifying fluxes of PAHs towards SPME passive samplers inserted in the sediment top layer, which showed that the efficiency decreased in the order of PAC > GAC stripping > GAC addition. Sorption was very strong to PAC, with Log KAC (L/kg) values up to 10.5. Log KAC values for GAC ranged from 6.3-7.1 and 4.8-6.2 for PAHs and PCBs, respectively. Log KAC values for GAC in the stripped sediment were 7.4-8.6 and 5.8-7.7 for PAH and PCB. Apparent first order adsorption rate constants for GAC (kGAC) in the stripping scenario were calculated with a first-order kinetic model and ranged from 1.6 × 10(-2) (PHE) to 1.7 × 10(-5) d(-1) (InP). Sorption affinity parameters did not change within 9 months post treatment, confirming the longer term effectiveness of AC in field applications for PAC and GAC.

  18. CCN Activity, Hygroscopicity, and Droplet Activation Kinetics of Secondary Organic Aerosol Resulting from the 2010 Gulf Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.; Lathem, T. L.; Cerully, K.; Bahreini, R.; Brock, C. A.; Langridge, J. M.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Nenes, A.; Calnex Science Team

    2010-12-01

    We present an analysis of the hygroscopicity and droplet activation kinetics of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) sampled onboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration WP-3D aircraft downwind of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill site on June 8th and 10th, 2010. This set of measurements provides a unique case study for assessing in-situ the impact of fresh, hydrocarbonlike aerosols, which are expected to be formed via gas-to-particle conversion of the semi-volatile vapors released from oil evaporation. Similar hydrocarbon-rich aerosols constitute an important local emissions source in urban areas, but often coexist as an external/partially-internal mixture with more-oxidized, aged organic and sulfate aerosol. The DWH site provides the means to study the hygroscopic properties of these less-oxidized organic aerosols above a cleaner environmental background typical of marine environments in order to better discern their contribution to CCN activity and droplet growth. Measurements were performed with a Droplet Measurement Technologies Streamwise, Thermal-Gradient CCN counter, operating both as a counter (s=0.3%) and as a spectrometer (s=0.2-0.6%) using the newly-developed Scanning Flow CCN Analysis (SFCA) technique [1]. The instrument measures both the number concentration of particles able to nucleate droplets and also their resulting droplet sizes. The measured size information combined with a comprehensive computational fluid dynamics instrument model enables us to determine the rate of water uptake onto the particles and parameterize it in terms of an effective mass transfer coefficient [2], a key parameter needed to predict the number of activated droplets in ambient clouds. Non-refractory aerosol chemical composition was measured with an Aerodyne compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer. It was observed that the aerosols sampled downwind of the site on both days were composed predominantly of organics with a low degree of oxidation and low

  19. Branched pore kinetic model analysis of geosmin adsorption on super-powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Ando, Naoya; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2009-07-01

    Super-powdered activated carbon (S-PAC) is activated carbon of much finer particle size than powdered activated carbon (PAC). Geosmin is a naturally occurring taste and odor compound that impairs aesthetic quality in drinking water. Experiments on geosmin adsorption on S-PAC and PAC were conducted, and the results using adsorption kinetic models were analyzed. PAC pulverization, which produced the S-PAC, did not change geosmin adsorption capacity, and geosmin adsorption capacities did not differ between S-PAC and PAC. Geosmin adsorption kinetics, however, were much higher on S-PAC than on PAC. A solution to the branched pore kinetic model (BPKM) was developed, and experimental adsorption kinetic data were analyzed by BPKM and by a homogeneous surface diffusion model (HSDM). The HSDM describing the adsorption behavior of geosmin required different surface diffusivity values for S-PAC and PAC, which indicated a decrease in surface diffusivity apparently associated with activated carbon particle size. The BPKM, consisting of macropore diffusion followed by mass transfer from macropore to micropore, successfully described the batch adsorption kinetics on S-PAC and PAC with the same set of model parameter values, including surface diffusivity. The BPKM simulation clearly showed geosmin removal was improved as activated carbon particle size decreased. The simulation also implied that the rate-determining step in overall mass transfer shifted from intraparticle radial diffusion in macropores to local mass transfer from macropore to micropore. Sensitivity analysis showed that adsorptive removal of geosmin improved with decrease in activated carbon particle size down to 1microm, but further particle size reduction produced little improvement.

  20. Reductive activation of mitomycin C by thiols: kinetics, mechanism, and biological implications.

    PubMed

    Paz, Manuel M

    2009-10-01

    The clinically used antitumor antibiotic mitomycin C requires a reductive activation to be converted to a bis-electrophile that forms several covalent adducts with DNA, including an interstrand cross-link which is considered to be the lesion responsible for the cytotoxic effects of the drug. Enzymes such as cytochrome P450 reductase and DT-diaphorase have traditionally been implicated in the bioreduction of mitomycin C, but recent reports indicate that enzymes containing a dithiol active site are also involved in the metabolism of mitomycin C. The reductive activation can also be effected in vitro with chemical reductants, but until now, mitomycin C was considered to be inert to thiols. We report here that mitomycin C can, in fact, be reductively activated by thiols. We show that the reaction is autocatalytic and that the end product is a relatively stable aziridinomitosene that can be trapped by adding several nucleophiles after the activation reaction. Kinetic studies show that the reaction is highly sensitive to pH and does not proceed or proceeds very slowly at neutral pH, an observation that explains the unsuccessful results on previous attempts to activate mitomycin C with thiols. The optimum pH for the reactions is around the pK(a) values of the thiols used in the activation. A mechanism for the reaction is hypothesized, involving the initial formation of a thiolate-mitomycin adduct, that then evolves to give the hydroquinone of mitomycin C and disulfide. The results presented here provide a chemical mechanism to explain how some biological dithiols containing an unusually acidic thiol group (deprotonated at physiological pH) participate in the modulation of mitomycin C cytotoxicity.

  1. Employing Magnetic Levitation to Monitor Reaction Kinetics and Measure Activation Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benz, Lauren; Cesafsky, Karen E.; Le, Tran; Park, Aileen; Malicky, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive undergraduate-level kinetics experiment that uses magnetic levitation to monitor the progress and determine the activation energy of a condensation reaction on a polymeric solid support. The method employs a cuvette filled with a paramagnetic solution positioned between two strong magnets. The…

  2. Kinetic effect of Pd additions on the hydrogen uptake of chemically activated, ultramicroporous carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C

    2010-01-01

    The effect of mixing chemically-activated ultramicroporous carbon (UMC) with Pd nanopowder is investigated. Results show that Pd addition doubles the rate of hydrogen uptake, but does not enhance the hydrogen capacity or improve desorption kinetics. The effect of Pd on the rate of hydrogen adsorption supports the occurrence of the hydrogen spillover mechanism in the Pd - UMC system.

  3. Synthesis, kinetic mechanism and docking studies of vanillin derivatives as inhibitors of mushroom tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Zaman; Rafiq, Muhammad; Seo, Sung-Yum; Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Zaidi, Najam-us-Sahar Sadaf

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to discover the extent of contribution to antityrosinase activity by adding hydroxy substituted benzoic acid, cinnamic acid and piperazine residues to vanillin. The study showed the transformation of vanillin into esters as shown in (4a-4d), (6a-6b), and (8a-8b). In addition, the relationship between structures of these esters and their mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activity was explored. The kinetics of inhibition on mushroom tyrosinase by these esters was also investigated. It was found that hydroxyl substituted benzoic acid derivatives were weak inhibitors; however hydroxy or chloro substituted cinnamic acid and piperazine substituted derivatives were able to induce significant tyrosinase inhibition. The mushroom tyrosinase (PDBID 2ZWE) was docked with synthesized vanillin derivatives and their calculated binding energies were compared with experimental IC50 values which provided positive correlation. The most potent derivative 2-(4-formyl-2-methoxyphenoxy)-2-oxoethyl (2E)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)prop-2-enoate (6a) possesses hydroxy substituted cinnamic acid scaffold having IC50 value 16.13 μM with binding energy of -7.2 kcal/mol. The tyrosinase inhibitory activity of (6a) is comparable with standard kojic acid. Kinetic analysis indicated that compound 6a was mixed-type tyrosinase inhibitor with inhibition constant values Ki (13 μM) and Ki' (53 μM) and formed reversible enzyme inhibitor complex. The active vanillin analog (6a) was devoid of toxic effects as shown in cytotoxic studies.

  4. Kinetics study of carbon raiser on the reduction of nickel laterite from Pomalaa, Southeast Sulawesi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrus, H. T. B. M.; Rhamdani, A. R.; Putera, A. D. P.; Warmada, I. W.; Yuliansyad, A. T.; Perdana, I.

    2016-11-01

    As one of the top ten on nickel laterite ore resources in the world, Indonesia must have been initiating the nickel processing in total amount of about 1.5 million tonnes. In regard to the low nickel laterite processing, one of the possible product is nickel pig iron (NPI) needed for the stainless steel industries. In this study carbon raiser that is waste from oil industries was used to replace metalurgical coke. The kinetic of nickel laterite reduction using carbon raiser was studied and compared with anthrasite coal. In this work, the author conducted the reduction of nickel laterite ores by both carbon raiser and anthrasite coal as reductant, in air and CO2 atmosphere, within the temperature ranged from 800°C and 1000°C. Two models were applied, sphere particle geometry model and Ginstling-Brounhstein diffusion model, to study the kinetic parameters. The results indicated that type of reductants and reduction atmosphere greatly influence the kinetic parameters. The obtained values of activation energy were varied between 17.44-18.12 kcal/mol.

  5. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study of the biosorption of uranium onto Cystoseria indica algae.

    PubMed

    Khani, M H; Keshtkar, A R; Ghannadi, M; Pahlavanzadeh, H

    2008-02-11

    Biosorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of binding of uranium ions to Cystoseria indica were studied in a batch system with respect to temperature and initial metal ion concentration. Algae biomass exhibited the highest uranium uptake capacity at 15 degrees C at an initial uranium ion concentration of 500 mg l(-1) and an initial pH of 4. Biosorption capacity increased from 198 to 233 mg g(-1) with an decrease in temperature from 45 to 15 degrees C at this initial uranium concentration. The Langmuir isotherm model were applied to experimental equilibrium data of uranium biosorption depending on temperature. Equilibrium data fitted very well to the Langmuir model C. indica algae in the studied concentration range of Uranium ions at all the temperatures studied. The saturation type kinetic model was applied to experimental data at different temperatures changing from 15 to 45 degrees C to describe the batch biosorption kinetics assuming that the external mass transfer limitations in the system can be neglected and biosorption is chemical sorption controlled. The activation energy of biosorption (E(A)) was determined as -6.15 using the Arrhenius equation. Using the thermodynamic equilibrium coefficients obtained at different temperatures, the thermodynamic constants of biosorption (DeltaG degrees , DeltaH degrees and DeltaS degrees ) were also evaluated.

  6. New approaches to the kinetic study of alcoholic fermentation by chromatographic techniques.

    PubMed

    Lainioti, Georgia Ch; Karaiskakis, George

    2013-09-01

    The kinetics of the fermentation process has gained increasing interest, not only in the scientific community, but in the industrial world as well. Information concerning the improvement of batch fermentation performance may potentially be valuable for the designing of scale-up processes. Intensive studies have been conducted with the use of various chromatographic techniques, such as conventional gas chromatography, reversed-flow gas chromatography (RFGC), high-performance liquid chromatography, field-flow fractionation and others. In the present study, specific focus is placed on the employment of RFGC, a method that can successfully be applied for the determination of physicochemical quantities, such as reaction rate constants and activation energies, at each phase of the alcoholic fermentation. In contrast to conventional chromatographic techniques, RFGC can lead to substantial information referring to the evaluation of fermentation kinetics at any time of the process. Moreover, gravitational field-flow fractionation, a sub-technique of field-flow fractionation, presents the ability to monitor the proliferation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells through their elution profiles that can be related to the different cell growth stages. The combination of the two techniques can provide important information for kinetic study and the distinction of the growth phases of yeast cell proliferation during alcoholic fermentations conducted under different environmental conditions.

  7. Denitrification kinetics in anoxic/aerobic activated sludge systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, G.M.

    1998-12-11

    Nitrogen removal needs at municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have increased due to greater concerns about eutrophication and increased interest in reuse of treated municipal effluents. Biological processes are the most cost-effective method for nitrogen removal. Biological nitrogen removal is accomplished in two distinctly different processes by the conversion of nitrogen in the wastewater from organic nitrogen and ammonia to nitrate, followed by reduction of the nitrate to nitrogen gas. Nitrate production occurs in an aerobic activated sludge treatment zone during a process called nitrification. The nitrate is then converted through a series of intermediate steps to nitrogen gas in an anoxic zone (an anaerobic condition with nitrate present) during a process called denitrification, effectively removing the nitrogen from the wastewater. Many different WWTP designs have been developed to incorporate these two conditions for nitrogen removal.

  8. Effect of heating rate and kinetic model selection on activation energy of nonisothermal crystallization of amorphous felodipine.

    PubMed

    Chattoraj, Sayantan; Bhugra, Chandan; Li, Zheng Jane; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2014-12-01

    The nonisothermal crystallization kinetics of amorphous materials is routinely analyzed by statistically fitting the crystallization data to kinetic models. In this work, we systematically evaluate how the model-dependent crystallization kinetics is impacted by variations in the heating rate and the selection of the kinetic model, two key factors that can lead to significant differences in the crystallization activation energy (Ea ) of an amorphous material. Using amorphous felodipine, we show that the Ea decreases with increase in the heating rate, irrespective of the kinetic model evaluated in this work. The model that best describes the crystallization phenomenon cannot be identified readily through the statistical fitting approach because several kinetic models yield comparable R(2) . Here, we propose an alternate paired model-fitting model-free (PMFMF) approach for identifying the most suitable kinetic model, where Ea obtained from model-dependent kinetics is compared with those obtained from model-free kinetics. The most suitable kinetic model is identified as the one that yields Ea values comparable with the model-free kinetics. Through this PMFMF approach, nucleation and growth is identified as the main mechanism that controls the crystallization kinetics of felodipine. Using this PMFMF approach, we further demonstrate that crystallization mechanism from amorphous phase varies with heating rate.

  9. Penicillin V acylase from Pectobacterium atrosepticum exhibits high specific activity and unique kinetics.

    PubMed

    Avinash, V S; Ramasamy, Sureshkumar; Suresh, C G; Pundle, Archana

    2015-08-01

    Penicillin V acylases (PVAs, E.C.3.5.11) belong to the Ntn hydrolase super family of enzymes that catalyze the deacylation of the side chain from phenoxymethyl penicillin (penicillin V). Penicillin acylases find use in the pharmaceutical industry for the production of semi-synthetic antibiotics. PVAs employ the N-terminal cysteine residue as catalytic nucleophile and are structurally and evolutionarily related to bile salt hydrolases (BSHs). Here, we report the cloning and characterization of a PVA enzyme from the Gram-negative plant pathogen, Pectobacterium atrosepticum (PaPVA). The enzyme was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli attaining a very high yield (250 mg/l) and a comparatively high specific activity (430 IU/mg). The enzyme showed marginally better pH and thermo-stability over PVAs characterized from Gram-positive bacteria. The enzyme also showed enhanced activity in presence of organic solvents and detergents. The enzyme kinetics turned out to be significantly different from that of previously reported PVAs, displaying positive cooperativity and substrate inhibition. The presence of bile salts had a modulating effect on PaPVA activity. Sequence analysis and characterization reveal the distinctive nature of these enzymes and underscore the need to study PVAs from Gram-negative bacteria.

  10. Kinetic modeling and docking study of immobilized lipase catalyzed synthesis of furfuryl acetate.

    PubMed

    Mathpati, Ashwini C; Badgujar, Kirtikumar C; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M

    2016-03-01

    The present work deals with the kinetic modeling and docking study for the furfuryl acetate synthesis using immobilized Burkholderia cepacia (BCL) lipase. Initially various lipases were immobilized on hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) and poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) base hybrid polymer matrix. After screening of various immobilized biocatalysts, HPMC:PVA:BCL was found to be a robust biocatalyst. Various reaction conditions were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) based on a four-factor-three-level Box-Behnken design. The optimal conditions were obtained at molar ratio of 1:2 of furfuryl alcohol to acyl donor, temperature 50°C with catalyst loading of 30mg in 3mL of non-aqueous media toluene. Under these conditions 99.98% yield was obtained in 3h. The Arrhenius plot showed that the activation energy for furfuryl acetate synthesis was 10.68kcal/mol. The kinetics of reaction was studied close to optimized conditions which obey order bi-bi model. Molecular docking study was carried out to understand the active site of BCL which is responsible for the reaction. It was observed that the reaction proceeds via acylation of the active serine of BCL and demonstrating strong hydrogen bond between the substrate and histidine site. The catalyst recyclability study was carried up to five cycles.

  11. Two-step kinetic study on the adsorption and desorption of reactive dyes at cationic polymer/bentonite.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Yue, Qin-Yan; Su, Yuan; Gao, Bao-Yu; Li, Jing

    2009-06-15

    The adsorption kinetics of two reactive dyes, namely, Reactive Blue K-GL and Reactive Yellow K-4G onto the new cationic polymer/bentonite, i.e., polyepicholorohydrin-dimethylamine/bentonite (EPI-DMA/bentonite), were studied under different conditions. The result indicated that the adsorption processes were found to follow the two-step kinetic rate equation with two different adsorption rate constants (k(1) and k(2)) and also to follow the intraparticle diffusion model with two different diffusion rate constants (k(int,1) and k(int,2)). The corresponding values of energies of activation of adsorption, enthalpies of activation and entropies of activation for both the two adsorption kinetic steps have been calculated, suggesting that the adsorption processes were endothermic and physical. The desorption kinetics of two dyes from EPI-DMA/bentonite were studied in NaOH solution with different concentrations, which were also found to obey the two-step kinetic rate equation with two different desorption rate constants (k(d,1) and k(d,2)).

  12. Thermogravimetric analysis and kinetic study of bamboo waste treated by Echinodontium taxodii using a modified three-parallel-reactions model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongbo; Liu, Fang; Ke, Ming; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the effect of pretreatment with Echinodontium taxodii on thermal decomposition characteristics and kinetics of bamboo wastes was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. The results showed fungal pretreatment can enhance the thermal degradation of bamboo. The negative effect of extractives in bamboo on the thermal decomposition can be decreased by the pretreatment. A modified three-parallel-reactions model based on isolated lignin was firstly proposed to study pyrolysis kinetics of bamboo lignocellulose. Kinetic analysis showed that with increasing pretreatment time fungal delignification was enhanced to transform the lignin component with high activation energy into that with low activation energy and raise the cellulose content in bamboo, making the thermal decomposition easier. These results demonstrated fungal pretreatment provided a potential way to improve thermal conversion efficiency of bamboo.

  13. An improved pyrite pretreatment protocol for kinetic and isotopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoyan, Natella; Kamyshny, Alexey; Halevy, Itay

    2014-05-01

    An improved pyrite pretreatment protocol for kinetic and isotopic studies Natella Mirzoyan1, Alexey Kamyshny Jr.2, Itay Halevy1 1Earth and Planetary Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel 2Geological and Environmental Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105, Israel Pyrite is one of the most abundant and widespread of the sulfide minerals with a central role in biogeochemical cycles of iron and sulfur. Due to its diverse roles in the natural and anthropogenic sulfur cycle, pyrite has been extensively studied in various experimental investigations of the kinetics of its dissolution and oxidation, the isotopic fractionations associated with these reactions, and the microbiological processes involved. Pretreatment of pyrite for removal of oxidation impurities to prevent experimental artifacts and inaccuracies is often practiced. While numerous pyrite-cleaning methods have been used in experiments, a common pyrite pretreatment method, often used to investigate pyrite chemistry by the isotopic fractionations associated with it, includes several rinses by HCl, acetone and deionized water. Elemental sulfur (S0) is a common product of incomplete pyrite oxidation. Removal of S0 is desirable to avoid experimental biases associated with its participation in pyrite transformations, but is more complicated than the removal of sulfate. Although rinsing with an organic solvent is in part aimed at removing S0, to the best of our knowledge, the extraction efficiency of S0 in existing protocols has not been assessed. We have developed and tested a new protocol for elemental sulfur removal from the surface of pyrite by ultrasonication with warm acetone. Our data demonstrate the presence of large fractions of S0 on untreated pyrite particle surfaces, of which only approximately 60% was removed by the commonly used pretreatment method. The new protocol described here was found to be more efficient at S0 removal than the commonly used method

  14. Stabilized leachates: ozone-activated carbon treatment and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Rivas, F Javier; Beltrán, Fernando; Gimeno, Olga; Acedo, Benito; Carvalho, Fátima

    2003-12-01

    Ozone has been used as a pre-oxidation step for the treatment of stabilized leachates. Given the refractory nature of this type of effluents, the conversion of some wastewater quality parameters has been moderate after 1 h of ozonation (i.e. 30% chemical oxygen demand (COD) depletion). Ozone uptake was calculated in the interval 1.3-1.5 g of ozone per gram of COD degraded. An optimum dose of ozone has been experienced in terms of biodegradability of the processed effluent (60 min of treatment, 1 x 10(-3) mol L(-1) ozone inlet feeding concentration and 50 L h(-1) gas flow-rate). pH and other typical hydroxyl radical generator systems exerted no influence on the efficiency of the process, suggesting the negligible role played by the indirect route of oxidation (generation of hydroxyl radicals). The ozonated effluent was thereafter treated in a second adsorption stage by using a commercial activated carbon. Removal levels up to 90% of COD in approximately 120 h were experienced for adsorbent dosages of 30 g L(-1). Both steps, the single ozonation and the adsorption stage have been modelled by using different pseudoempirical models.

  15. Novel three-stage kinetic model for aqueous benzene adsorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Woo; Choi, Nag-Choul; Lee, Soon-Jae; Kim, Dong-Ju

    2007-10-15

    We propose a novel kinetic model for adsorption of aqueous benzene onto both granular activated carbon (GAC) and powdered activated carbon (PAC). The model is based on mass conservation of benzene coupled with three-stage adsorption: (1) the first portion for an instantaneous stage or external surface adsorption, (2) the second portion for a gradual stage with rate-limiting intraparticle diffusion, and (3) the third portion for a constant stage in which the aqueous phase no longer interacts with activated carbon. An analytical solution of the kinetic model was validated with the kinetic data obtained from aqueous benzene adsorption onto GAC and PAC in batch experiments with two different solution concentrations (C(0)=300 mg L(-1), 600 mg L(-1)). Experimental results revealed that benzene adsorption for the two concentrations followed three distinct stages for PAC but two stages for GAC. The analytical solution could successfully describe the kinetic adsorption of aqueous benzene in the batch reaction system, showing a fast instantaneous adsorption followed by a slow rate-limiting adsorption and a final long constant adsorption. Use of the two-stage model gave incorrect values of adsorption coefficients in the analytical solution due to inability to describe the third stage.

  16. A Validity Study of the Kinetic School Drawing Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prout, H. Thompson; Celmer, David S.

    1984-01-01

    Examined the relationship between Kinetic School Drawing responses and academic achievement in 100 normal fifth-grade students. Significant correlations were found for a number of measures, generally supporting the validity of the technique. (JAC)

  17. Kinetic Study to Predict Sigma Phase Formation in Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Daniella Caluscio; Magnabosco, Rodrigo

    2016-04-01

    This work presents an improved kinetic study of sigma phase formation during isothermal aging between 973 K and 1223 K (700 °C and 950 °C), based on Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (K-J-M-A) model, established from volume fraction of sigma phase determined in backscattered electron images over polished surfaces of aged samples. The kinetic study shows a change in the main mechanism of sigma formation between 973 K and 1173 K (700 °C and 900 °C), from a nucleation-governed stage to a diffusion-controlled growth-coarsening stage, confirmed by a double inclination in K-J-M-A plots and microstructural observations. A single inclination in K-J-M-A plots was observed for the 1223 K (950 °C) aging temperature, showing that kinetic behavior in this temperature is only related to diffusion-controlled growth of sigma phase. The estimated activation energies for the nucleation of sigma phase are close to the molybdenum diffusion in ferrite, probably the controlling mechanism of sigma phase nucleation. The proposed time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram shows a "double c curve" configuration, probably associated to the presence of chi-phase formed between 973 K and 1073 K (700 °C and 800 °C), which acts as heterogeneous nuclei for sigma phase formation in low aging temperatures.

  18. Thermal behavior and kinetic study for catalytic co-pyrolysis of biomass with plastics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuesong; Lei, Hanwu; Zhu, Lei; Zhu, Xiaolu; Qian, Moriko; Yadavalli, Gayatri; Wu, Joan; Chen, Shulin

    2016-11-01

    The present study aims to investigate the thermal decomposition behaviors and kinetics of biomass (cellulose/Douglas fir sawdust) and plastics (LDPE) in a non-catalytic and catalytic co-pyrolysis over ZSM-5 catalyst by using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). It was found that there was a positive synergistic interaction between biomass and plastics according to the difference of weight loss (ΔW), which could decrease the formation of solid residue at the end of the experiment. The first order reaction model well fitted for both non-catalytic and catalytic co-pyrolysis of biomass with plastics. The activation energy (E) of Cellulose-LDPE-Catalyst and DF-LDPE-Catalyst are only 89.51 and 54.51kJ/mol, respectively. The kinetics analysis showed that adding catalyst doesn't change the decomposition mechanism. As a result, the kinetic study on catalytic co-pyrolysis of biomass with plastics was suggested that the catalytic co-pyrolysis is a promising technique that can significantly reduce the energy input.

  19. Effect of electric current frequency on the activation kinetics of raw charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, A.O.; Ivakhnyuk, G.K.; Fedorov, N.F.

    1993-12-10

    The effect of electric current frequency on the kinetics of raw charcoal activation with water vapor has been investigated. It was established that under the effect of alternating current the rate constant increases under otherwise equal conditions. A dependence of the reaction rate on the current frequency was found. It was discovered that under the effect of alternating current the activation energy of interaction with water vapor diminishes.

  20. Benchmark Study of Density Cumulant Functional Theory: Thermochemistry and Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Copan, Andreas V; Sokolov, Alexander Yu; Schaefer, Henry F

    2014-06-10

    We present an extensive benchmark study of density cumulant functional theory (DCFT) for thermochemistry and kinetics of closed- and open-shell molecules. The performance of DCFT methods (DC-06, DC-12, ODC-06, and ODC-12) is compared to that of coupled-electron pair methods (CEPA0 and OCEPA0) and coupled-cluster theory (CCSD and CCSD(T)) for the description of noncovalent interactions (A24 database), barrier heights of hydrogen-transfer reactions (HTBH38), radical stabilization energies (RSE30), adiabatic ionization energies (AIE), and covalent bond stretching in diatomic molecules. Our results indicate that out of four DCFT methods the ODC-12 method is the most reliable and accurate DCFT formulation to date. Compared to CCSD, ODC-12 shows superior results for all benchmark tests employed in our study. With respect to coupled-pair theories, ODC-12 outperforms CEPA0 and shows similar accuracy to the orbital-optimized CEPA0 variant (OCEPA0) for systems at equilibrium geometries. For covalent bond stretching, ODC-12 is found to be more reliable than OCEPA0. For the RSE30 and AIE data sets, ODC-12 shows competitive performance with CCSD(T). In addition to benchmark results, we report new reference values for the RSE30 data set computed using coupled cluster theory with up to perturbative quadruple excitations.

  1. Constant composition kinetics study of carbonated apatite dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ruikang; Henneman, Zachary J.; Nancollas, George H.

    2003-03-01

    The carbonated apatites (CAP) may be more suitable models for biominerals such as bone and dental hard tissues than is pure hydroxyapatite (HAP) since they have similar chemical compositions. Although they contain only a relatively small amount of carbonate, the solubility and dissolution properties are different. The solubility product of the CAP particles used in this dissolution study, 2.88×10 -112 mol 18 l -18, was significantly greater than that of HAP, 5.52×10 -118 mol 18 l -18. The kinetics of dissolution of CAP has been studied using the constant composition (CC) method. At low undersaturations, the dissolution reaction appeared to be controlled mainly by surface diffusion with an effective reaction order of 1.9±0.1 with respect to the relative undersaturation. These results together with those obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) suggest a dissolution model. Based on the surface diffusion theory of Burton, Cabrera and Frank (BCF). The interfacial tension between CAP and the aqueous phase calculated from this dissolution model, 9.0 m J m -2, was consistent with its relatively low solubility. An abnormal but interesting dissolution behavior is that the CAP dissolution rate was relatively insensitive to changes in calcium and phosphate concentrations at higher undersaturations, suggesting the importance of the carbonate component under these conditions.

  2. Ripening kinetics of bubbles: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Inaoka, Hajime; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2016-09-01

    The ripening kinetics of bubbles is studied by performing molecular dynamics simulations. From the time evolution of a system, the growth rates of individual bubbles are determined. At low temperatures, the system exhibits a t1/2 law and the growth rate is well described by classical Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner (LSW) theory for the reaction-limited case. This is direct evidence that the bubble coarsening at low temperatures is reaction-limited. At high temperatures, although the system exhibits a t1/3 law, which suggests that it is diffusion-limited, the accuracy of the growth rate is insufficient to determine whether the form is consistent with the prediction of LSW theory for the diffusion-limited case. The gas volume fraction dependence of the coarsening behavior is also studied. Although the behavior of the system at low temperatures has little sensitivity to the gas volume fraction up to 10%, at high temperatures it deviates from the prediction of LSW theory for the diffusion-limited case as the gas volume fraction increases. These results show that the mean-field-like treatment is valid for a reaction-limited system even with a finite volume fraction, while it becomes inappropriate for a diffusion-limited system since classical LSW theory for the diffusion-limited case is valid at the dilute limit.

  3. Structural and Kinetic Studies of Formate Dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qi; Gakhar, Lokesh; Wickersham, Kyle; Francis, Kevin; Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Major, Dan T; Cheatum, Christopher M; Kohen, Amnon

    2016-05-17

    The structure of formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii (CbFDH) is of both academic and practical interests. First, this enzyme represents a unique model system for studies on the role of protein dynamics in catalysis, but so far these studies have been limited by the availability of structural information. Second, CbFDH and its mutants can be used in various industrial applications (e.g., CO2 fixation or nicotinamide recycling systems), and the lack of structural information has been a limiting factor in commercial development. Here, we report the crystallization and structural determination of both holo- and apo-CbFDH. The free-energy barrier for the catalyzed reaction was computed and indicates that this structure indeed represents a catalytically competent form of the enzyme. Complementing kinetic examinations demonstrate that the recombinant CbFDH has a well-organized reactive state. Finally, a fortuitous observation has been made: the apoenzyme crystal was obtained under cocrystallization conditions with a saturating concentration of both the cofactor (NAD(+)) and inhibitor (azide), which has a nanomolar dissociation constant. It was found that the fraction of the apoenzyme present in the solution is less than 1.7 × 10(-7) (i.e., the solution is 99.9999% holoenzyme). This is an extreme case where the crystal structure represents an insignificant fraction of the enzyme in solution, and a mechanism rationalizing this phenomenon is presented.

  4. Phenol oxidation by mushroom waste extracts: a kinetic and thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Pigatto, Gisele; Lodi, Alessandra; Aliakbarian, Bahar; Converti, Attilio; da Silva, Regildo Marcio Gonçalves; Palma, Mauri Sérgio Alves

    2013-09-01

    Tyrosinase activity of mushroom extracts was checked for their ability to degrade phenol. Phenol oxidation kinetics was investigated varying temperature from 10 to 60 °C and the initial values of pH, enzyme activity and phenol concentration in the ranges 4.5-8.5, 1.43-9.54 U/mL and 50-600 mg/L, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters of phenol oxidation and tyrosinase reversible inactivation were estimated. Tyrosinase thermostability was also investigated through residual activity tests after extracts exposition at 20-50 °C, whose results allowed exploring the thermodynamics of enzyme irreversible thermoinactivation. This study is the first attempt to separate the effects of reversible unfolding and irreversible denaturation of tyrosinase on its activity. Extracts were finally tested on a real oil mill wastewater.

  5. Educational activities of CAREER: Crystallization Kinetics in Volcanology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Professional development of teachers is recognized as critical for improving student learning outcomes. The major outreach initiative of my CAREER award was to develop a teacher professional development program for middle school (grades 6-8) teachers that would improve teacher's mastery of geoscience and basic science skills and practices and expose them to an authentic research environment. The explicit objectives of the Research Experience for Teachers in Volcano-Petrology (RET/V-P) were for teachers to (1) master technical skills for safe and productive laboratory work, (2) deepen understanding of science content, (3) develop scientific "habits of the mind" as outlined in the National Science Standards, and (4) hone science communication skills. Six teachers, one undergraduate, and two graduate students participated in the teacher professional development program during the summers of the CAREER award period. A subsequent EAR award now supports the program, and summer 2011 saw the participation of five additional teachers. The teachers span a wide range of educational backgrounds, prior exposure to geoscience, and teaching assignments at public and private schools. Each year, the program was modified using formative and summative evaluation tools to better serve the scheduling needs and content preferences. In general, the program has evolved from an emphasis on research exposure to an emphasis on imparting basic geoscience concepts. A myriad of approaches including field trips to local outcrops, lecture tutorials and lecture-based active engagement exercises (such as iclicker delivery of Geoscience Concept Inventory questions), with a taste of laboratory work (crystal growth experiments, optics primer), has emerged as the most successful means of achieving objectives 1-4, above. The first summer I advertised the RET/V-P, no teachers applied. (This challenge was overcome in subsequent years by targeting the solicitation using teacher list serves, the Hawaii

  6. Systems Biology of Coagulation Initiation: Kinetics of Thrombin Generation in Resting and Activated Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Manash S.; Denney, William S.; Jing, Huiyan; Diamond, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    Blood function defines bleeding and clotting risks and dictates approaches for clinical intervention. Independent of adding exogenous tissue factor (TF), human blood treated in vitro with corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI, to block Factor XIIa) will generate thrombin after an initiation time (Ti) of 1 to 2 hours (depending on donor), while activation of platelets with the GPVI-activator convulxin reduces Ti to ∼20 minutes. Since current kinetic models fail to generate thrombin in the absence of added TF, we implemented a Platelet-Plasma ODE model accounting for: the Hockin-Mann protease reaction network, thrombin-dependent display of platelet phosphatidylserine, VIIa function on activated platelets, XIIa and XIa generation and function, competitive thrombin substrates (fluorogenic detector and fibrinogen), and thrombin consumption during fibrin polymerization. The kinetic model consisting of 76 ordinary differential equations (76 species, 57 reactions, 105 kinetic parameters) predicted the clotting of resting and convulxin-activated human blood as well as predicted Ti of human blood under 50 different initial conditions that titrated increasing levels of TF, Xa, Va, XIa, IXa, and VIIa. Experiments with combined anti-XI and anti-XII antibodies prevented thrombin production, demonstrating that a leak of XIIa past saturating amounts of CTI (and not “blood-borne TF” alone) was responsible for in vitro initiation without added TF. Clotting was not blocked by antibodies used individually against TF, VII/VIIa, P-selectin, GPIb, protein disulfide isomerase, cathepsin G, nor blocked by the ribosome inhibitor puromycin, the Clk1 kinase inhibitor Tg003, or inhibited VIIa (VIIai). This is the first model to predict the observed behavior of CTI-treated human blood, either resting or stimulated with platelet activators. CTI-treated human blood will clot in vitro due to the combined activity of XIIa and XIa, a process enhanced by platelet activators and which proceeds in the

  7. Ciprofloxacin adsorption on graphene and granular activated carbon: kinetics, isotherms, and effects of solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuan; Tsang, Daniel C W; Chen, Feng; Li, Shiyu; Yang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin (CIP) is a commonly used antibiotic and widely detected in wastewaters and farmlands nowadays. This study evaluated the efficacy of next-generation adsorbent (graphene) and conventional adsorbent (granular activated carbon, GAC) for CIP removal. Batch experiments and characterization tests were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium isotherms, thermodynamic properties, and the influences of solution chemistry (pH, ionic strength, natural organic matter (NOM), and water sources). Compared to GAC, graphene showed significantly faster adsorption and reached equilibrium within 3 min, confirming the rapid access of CIP into the macroporous network of high surface area of graphene as revealed by the Brunner-Emmet-Teller measurements analysis. The kinetics was better described by a pseudo-second-order model, suggesting the importance of the initial CIP concentration related to surface site availability of graphene. The adsorption isotherm on graphene followed Langmuir model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 323 mg/g, which was higher than other reported carbonaceous adsorbents. The CIP adsorption was thermodynamically favourable on graphene and primarily occurred through π - π interaction, according to the FTIR spectroscopy. While the adsorption capacity of graphene decreased with increasing solution pH due to the speciation change of CIP, the adverse effects of ionic strength (0.01-0.5 mol L(-1)), presence of NOM (5 mg L⁻¹), and different water sources (river water or drinking water) were less significant on graphene than GAC. These results indicated that graphene can serve as an alternative adsorbent for CIP removal in commonly encountered field conditions, if proper separation and recovery is available in place.

  8. Sorption kinetics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons removal using granular activated carbon: intraparticle diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, C; Gamisans, X; de las Heras, X; Farrán, A; Cortina, J L

    2008-09-15

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) was evaluated as a suitable sorbent for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) removal from aqueous solutions. For this purpose, kinetic measurements on the extraction of a family of six PAHs were taken. A morphology study was performed by means of a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of GAC samples. Analyses of the batch rate data for each PAH were carried out using two kinetic models: the homogenous particle diffusion model (HPDM) and the shell progressive model (SPM). The process was controlled by diffusion rate the solutes (PAHs) that penetrated the reacted layer at PAH concentrations in the range of 0.2-10 mg L(-1). The effective particle diffusion coefficients (D(eff)) derived from the two models were determined from the batch rate data. The Weber and Morris intraparticle diffusion model made a double contribution to the surface and pore diffusivities in the sorption process. The D(eff) values derived from both the HPMD and SPM equations varied from 1.1 x 10(-13) to 6.0 x 10(-14) m(2) s(-1). The simplest model, the pore diffusion model, was applied first for data analysis. The model of the next level of complexity, the surface diffusion model, was applied in order to gain a deeper understanding of the diffusion process. This model is able to explain the data, and the apparent surface diffusivities are in the same order of magnitude as the values for the sorption of functionalized aromatic hydrocarbons (phenols and sulphonates) that are described in the literature.

  9. Integrated Analysis of Contractile Kinetics, Force Generation, and Electrical Activity in Single Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kijlstra, Jan David; Hu, Dongjian; Mittal, Nikhil; Kausel, Eduardo; van der Meer, Peter; Garakani, Arman; Domian, Ibrahim J

    2015-12-08

    The quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte function is essential for stem cell-based approaches for the in vitro study of human cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. We present a method to comprehensively assess the function of single human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs) through simultaneous quantitative analysis of contraction kinetics, force generation, and electrical activity. We demonstrate that statistical analysis of movies of contracting hPSC-CMs can be used to quantify changes in cellular morphology over time and compute contractile kinetics. Using a biomechanical model that incorporates substrate stiffness, we calculate cardiomyocyte force generation at single-cell resolution and validate this approach with conventional traction force microscopy. The addition of fluorescent calcium indicators or membrane potential dyes allows the simultaneous analysis of contractility and calcium handling or action potential morphology. Accordingly, our approach has the potential for broad application in the study of cardiac disease, drug discovery, and cardiotoxicity screening.

  10. Integrated Analysis of Contractile Kinetics, Force Generation, and Electrical Activity in Single Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kijlstra, Jan David; Hu, Dongjian; Mittal, Nikhil; Kausel, Eduardo; van der Meer, Peter; Garakani, Arman; Domian, Ibrahim J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte function is essential for stem cell-based approaches for the in vitro study of human cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. We present a method to comprehensively assess the function of single human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs) through simultaneous quantitative analysis of contraction kinetics, force generation, and electrical activity. We demonstrate that statistical analysis of movies of contracting hPSC-CMs can be used to quantify changes in cellular morphology over time and compute contractile kinetics. Using a biomechanical model that incorporates substrate stiffness, we calculate cardiomyocyte force generation at single-cell resolution and validate this approach with conventional traction force microscopy. The addition of fluorescent calcium indicators or membrane potential dyes allows the simultaneous analysis of contractility and calcium handling or action potential morphology. Accordingly, our approach has the potential for broad application in the study of cardiac disease, drug discovery, and cardiotoxicity screening. PMID:26626178

  11. Comparisons of kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide adsorption in aqueous solution with graphene oxide, zeolite and activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shenteng; Lu, Chungsying; Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO), sodium Y-type zeolite (NaY) and granular activated carbon (GAC) are selected as adsorbents to study their kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) adsorption from water. The adsorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order rate law while the adsorption thermodynamics shows an exothermic reaction with GO and GAC but displays an endothermic reaction with NaY. The adsorbed TMAH can be readily desorbed from the surface of GO and NaY by 0.05 M NaCl solution. A comparative study on the cyclic TMAH adsorption with GO, NaY and GAC is also conducted and the results reveal that GO exhibits the greatest TMAH adsorption capacity as well as superior reversibility of TMAH adsorption over 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption process. These features indicate that GO is a promising and efficient adsorbent for TMAH removal in wastewater treatment.

  12. Detailed kinetic modeling study of n-pentanol oxidation

    DOE PAGES

    Heufer, K. Alexander; Sarathy, S. Mani; Curran, Henry J.; ...

    2012-09-28

    To help overcome the world’s dependence upon fossil fuels, suitable biofuels are promising alternatives that can be used in the transportation sector. Recent research on internal combustion engines shows that short alcoholic fuels (e.g., ethanol or n-butanol) have reduced pollutant emissions and increased knock resistance compared to fossil fuels. Although higher molecular weight alcohols (e.g., n-pentanol and n-hexanol) exhibit higher reactivity that lowers their knock resistance, they are suitable for diesel engines or advanced engine concepts, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), where higher reactivity at lower temperatures is necessary for engine operation. The present study presents a detailedmore » kinetic model for n-pentanol based on modeling rules previously presented for n-butanol. This approach was initially validated using quantum chemistry calculations to verify the most stable n-pentanol conformation and to obtain C–H and C–C bond dissociation energies. In addition, the proposed model has been validated against ignition delay time data, speciation data from a jet-stirred reactor, and laminar flame velocity measurements. Overall, the model shows good agreement with the experiments and permits a detailed discussion of the differences between alcohols and alkanes.« less

  13. Laminar-flow fluid mixer for fast fluorescence kinetics studies.

    PubMed Central

    Pabit, Suzette A; Hagen, Stephen J

    2002-01-01

    The ability to mix aqueous liquids on microsecond time scales, while consuming minimal amounts of sample and maintaining UV-visible optical access to the mixing region, is highly desirable for a range of biophysical studies of fast protein and nucleic acid interactions and folding. We have constructed a laminar coaxial jet mixer that allows the measurement of UV-excited fluorescence from nanoliter and microliter quantities of material, mixed at microsecond rates. The mixer injects a narrow cylindrical stream (radius a < 1 microm) of fluorescent sample into a larger flow of diluting buffer that moves through a capillary (100 microm i.d.) at a speed approximately 20 cm/s, under laminar flow conditions (Re approximately equal to 14). Construction from a fused silica capillary allows the laser excitation (at 266 nm) and detection (at 350 nm) of tryptophan fluorescence at reasonably low working concentrations, without interference from background fluorescence. Using this mixer we have measured sub-millisecond fluorescence quenching kinetics while consuming fluorescent sample at rates no greater than 6 nl/s. Consumption of the diluting buffer is also very modest (approximately 1-3 microl/s) in comparison with other rapid mixer designs. PMID:12414719

  14. A diaphragmless shock tube for high temperature kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tranter, Robert S.; Giri, Binod R.

    2008-09-15

    A novel, diaphragmless shock tube (DFST) has been developed for use in high temperature chemical kinetic studies. The design of the apparatus is presented along with performance data that demonstrate the range and reproducibility of reaction conditions that can be generated. The ability to obtain data in the fall off region, confined to much narrower pressure ranges than can be obtained with a conventional shock tube is shown, and results from laser schlieren densitometry experiments on the unimolecular dissociation of phenyl iodide (P{sub 2}=57{+-}9 and 122{+-}7 torr, T{sub 2}=1250-1804 K) are presented. These are compared with results similar to those that would be obtained from a classical shock tube and the implications for extrapolation by theoretical methods are discussed. Finally, the use of the DFST with an online mass spectrometer to create reproducible experiments that can be signal averaged to improve signal/noise and the quality of mass peaks is demonstrated; something that is not possible with a conventional shock tube where each experiment has to be considered unique.

  15. Photodegradation of the acaricide abamectin: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Escalada, Juan Pablo; Gianotti, José; Pajares, Adriana; Massad, Walter A; Amat-Guerri, Francisco; García, Norman A

    2008-08-27

    The acaricide abamectin is a mixture of two colorless homologues in a molar ratio of at least 4:1 with the same structure of macrocyclic lactone. The kinetics of its degradation under direct (254 nm) and dye-sensitized (>400 nm) photoirradiation in methanol solution has been studied by UV-vis spectrophotometry, potentiometric detection of dissolved oxygen, stationary fluorescence, laser flash photolysis, and time-resolved detection of singlet molecular oxygen (O2((1)Delta(g))) phosphorescence. The results indicate that the degradation is very efficient under direct irradiation with UV light (254 nm), with a quantum yield of 0.23. On the contrary, under visible-light irradiation, using the natural pigment riboflavin or the synthetic dye rose bengal as sensitizers, the degradation is very inefficient and proceeds through a O2((1)Delta(g))-mediated mechanism, with a bimolecular rate constant for the overall O2((1)Delta(g)) quenching (the sum of physical and chemical quenching) of 5.5 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). This value is similar to those reported for the rate constants of the reactions of O2((1)Delta(g)) with isolated double bonds or conjugated dienes and points to similar processes in the case of abamectin.

  16. Kinetic studies on enzymatic acetylation of chloramphenicol in Streptococcus faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Y; Nitahara, Y; Miyamura, S

    1979-01-01

    The kinetics of chloramphenicol (CP) acetylation by CP acetyltransferase from Streptococcus faecalis was studied. CP was shown to be acetylated enzymatically to its 3-O-acetyl derivative (3-AcCP) in the presence of acetyl coenzyme A, after which 3-AcCP was converted nonenzymatically to its 1-O-acetyl isomer, 1-O-acetyl CP (1-AcCP). At equilibrium, the 1-AcCP and 3-AcCP were present in a 1:4 ratio. Subsequently the diacetylated product, 1,3-O-O-diacetyl CP [1,3-(Ac)2CP], was enzymatically produced from 1-AcCP by the same enzyme. Theoretical calculation of rate constants (k1, k2, k3) for each successive reaction is as follows: (Formula: see text). This calculation gave k1 = 0.4 min-1, k2 = 0.002 min-1, and k3 = 0.016 min-1. Experimental results agreed closely with these calculated values. Images PMID:119483

  17. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Mass transfer/kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Basu, R.; Johnson, E.R.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    Mass transfer and kinetic studies were carried out for the Rhodospirillum rubrum and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum bacterial systems. R. rubrum is a photosynthetic anaerobic bacterium which catalyzes the biological water gas shift reaction: CO + H{sub 2}0 {yields} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. C. thiosulfatophilum is also a H{sub 2}S and COS to elemental sulfur. The growth of R. rubrum may be satisfactorily carried out at 25{degree} and 30{degree}C, while CO uptake and thus the conversion of CO best occurs at temperatures of either 30{degree}, 32{degree} or 34{degree}C. The rate of conversion of COs and H{sub 2}O to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S may be modeled by a first order rate expression. The rate constant at 30{degree}C was found to be 0.243 h{sup {minus}1}. The growth of C. thiosulfatophilum may be modeled in terms of incoming light intensity using a Monod equation: {mu} = {sub 351} + I{sub o}/{sup 0.152}I{sub o}. Comparisons of the growth of R. rubrum and C. thiosulfatophilum shows that the specific growth rate of C. thiosulfatophilum is much higher at a given light intensity.

  18. A study of transglucosylation kinetic in an enzymatic synthesis of benzyl alcohol glucoside by α-glucosidase from S. cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlović, M.; Dimitrijević, A.; Trbojević, J.; Milosavić, N.; Gavrović-Jankulović, M.; Bezbradica, D.; Veličković, D.

    2013-12-01

    α-1,4-Glucosidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an enzyme which is widely used in synthesis of different drugs. Glucosidase inhibitors are studied as potential drugs for prevention of HIV and diabetes. For understanding of these processes it is very important to have insights in the transglucosylation activity of this enzyme. In this paper the kinetics of transglucosylation reaction catalyzed by this enzyme in the synthesis of benzyl alcohol glucoside was studied and all relevant kinetic constants for this system are found. It was shown one additional property of transglycosylation reactions catalyzed by glycosidases—inhibition by both, glucose acceptor and glucose donor, and mechanisms for these inhibitions were proposed.

  19. Impact of Assay conditions on activity estimate and kinetics comparison of Aspergillus niger PhyA and Escherichia coli AppA2 phytases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was to compare three phytase activity assays and kinetics of Aspergillus niger PhyA and Escherichia coli AppA2 phytases expressed in Pichia pastoris at the observed stomach pH of 3.5. In Experiment 1, equivalent phytase activities in the crude preparations of PhyA and AppA2 were tested ...

  20. Equilibrium and kinetics study on hexavalent chromium adsorption onto diethylene triamine grafted glycidyl methacrylate based copolymers.

    PubMed

    Maksin, Danijela D; Nastasović, Aleksandra B; Milutinović-Nikolić, Aleksandra D; Suručić, Ljiljana T; Sandić, Zvjezdana P; Hercigonja, Radmila V; Onjia, Antonije E

    2012-03-30

    Two porous and one non-porous crosslinked poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) [abbreviated PGME] were prepared by suspension copolymerization and functionalized with diethylene triamine [abbreviated PGME-deta]. Samples were characterized by elemental analysis, mercury porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption by PGME-deta were investigated in batch static experiments, in the temperature range 25-70°C. Sorption was rapid, with the uptake capacity higher than 80% after 30 min. Sorption behavior and rate-controlling mechanisms were analyzed using five kinetic models (pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich, intraparticle diffusion and Bangham model). Kinetic studies showed that Cr(VI) adsorption adhered to the pseudo-second-order model, with definite influence of pore diffusion. Equilibrium data was tested with Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin adsorption isotherm models. Langmuir model was the most suitable indicating homogeneous distribution of active sites on PGME-deta and monolayer sorption. The maximum adsorption capacity from the Langmuir model, Q(max), at pH 1.8 and 25°C was 143 mg g(-1) for PGME2-deta (sample with the highest amino group concentration) while at 70°C Q(max) reached the high value of 198 mg g(-1). Thermodynamic parameters revealed spontaneous and endothermic nature of Cr(VI) adsorption onto PGME-deta.

  1. Kinetic study on the isothermal and nonisothermal crystallization of monoglyceride organogels.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zong; Yang, Lijun; Geng, Wenxin; Yao, Yubo; Wang, Xingguo; Liu, Yuanfa

    2014-01-01

    The isothermal and nonisothermal crystallization kinetics of monoglyceride (MAG) organogels were studied by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), respectively. The Avrami equation was used to describe the isothermal crystallization kinetics and experimental data fitted the equation fairly well. Results showed that the crystal growth of MAG organogels was a rod-like growth of instantaneous nuclei at higher degrees of supercooling and a plate-like form with high nucleation rate at lower degrees of supercooling. The exothermic peak in nonisothermal DSC curves for the MAG organogels became wider and shifted to lower temperature when the cooling rate increased, and nonisothermal crystallization was analyzed by Mo equation. Results indicated that at the same crystallization time, to get a higher degree of relative crystallinity, a higher cooling rate was necessary. The activation energy of nonisothermal crystallization was calculated as 739.59 kJ/mol according to the Kissinger method. Therefore, as the results of the isothermal and nonisothermal crystallization kinetics for the MAG organogels obtained, the crystallization rate, crystal nucleation, and growth during the crystallization process could be preliminarily monitored through temperature and cooling rate regulation, which laid the foundation for the real industrial manufacture and application of the MAG organogels.

  2. Study the oxidation kinetics of uranium using XRD and Rietveld method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanzhi; Guan, Weijun; Wang, Qinguo; Wang, Xiaolin; Lai, Xinchun; Shuai, Maobing

    2010-03-01

    The surface oxidation of uranium metal has been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rietveld method in the range of 50~300°C in air. The oxidation processes are analyzed by XRD to determine the extent of surface oxidation and the oxide structure. The dynamics expression for the formation of UO2 was derived. At the beginning, the dynamic expression was nonlinear, but switched to linear subsequently for uranium in air and humid oxygen. That is, the growth kinetics of UO2 can be divided into two stages: nonlinear portion and linear portion. Using the kinetic data of linear portion, the activation energy of reaction between uranium and air was calculated about 46.0 kJ/mol. However the content of oxide as a function of time was linear in humid helium ambience. Contrast the dynamics results, it prove that the absence of oxygen would accelerate the corrosion rate of uranium in the humid gas. We can find that the XRD and Rietveld method are a useful convenient method to estimate the kinetics and thermodynamics of solid-gas reaction.

  3. Kinetics of enzymatic high-solid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass studied by calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Søren N; Lumby, Erik; McFarland, Kc; Borch, Kim; Westh, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of high-solid biomass (>10% w/w dry mass) has become increasingly important as a key step in the production of second-generation bioethanol. To this end, development of quantitative real-time assays is desirable both for empirical optimization and for detailed kinetic analysis. In the current work, we have investigated the application of isothermal calorimetry to study the kinetics of enzymatic hydrolysis of two substrates (pretreated corn stover and Avicel) at high-solid contents (up to 29% w/w). It was found that the calorimetric heat flow provided a true measure of the hydrolysis rate with a detection limit of about 500 pmol glucose s(-1). Hence, calorimetry is shown to be a highly sensitive real-time method, applicable for high solids, and independent on the complexity of the substrate. Dose-response experiments with a typical cellulase cocktail enabled a multidimensional analysis of the interrelationships of enzyme load and the rate, time, and extent of the reaction. The results suggest that the hydrolysis rate of pretreated corn stover is limited initially by available attack points on the substrate surface (<10% conversion) but becomes proportional to enzyme dosage (excess of attack points) at later stages (>10% conversion). This kinetic profile is interpreted as an increase in polymer end concentration (substrate for CBH) as the hydrolysis progresses, probably due to EG activity in the enzyme cocktail. Finally, irreversible enzyme inactivation did not appear to be the source of reduced hydrolysis rate over time.

  4. Study on the thermal decomposition kinetics of nano-sized calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Li, Dai-Xi; Shi, Hong-Yun; Jie, Deng; Xu, Yuan-Zhi

    2003-01-01

    This study of the thermal decomposition kinetics of various average diameter nano-particles of calcium carbonate by means of TG-DTA ( thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis) showed that the thermal decomposition kinetic mechanisms of the same crystal type of calcium carbonate samples do not vary with decreasing of their average diameters; their pseudo-active energy (a); and that the top-temperature of decomposition T(p) decreases gently in the scope of micron-sized diameter, but decreases sharply when the average diameter decreases from micron region to nanometer region. The extraordinary properties of nano-particles were explored by comparing the varying regularity of the mechanisms and kinetic parameters of the solid-phase reactions as well as their structural characterization with the variation of average diameters of particles. These show that the aggregation, surface effect as well as internal aberrance and stress of the nano-particles are the main reason causing both E(a) and T(p) to decline sharply with the decrease of the average diameter of nano-particles.

  5. Pulsed IR heating studies of single-molecule DNA duplex dissociation kinetics and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Holmstrom, Erik D; Dupuis, Nicholas F; Nesbitt, David J

    2014-01-07

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful technique that makes it possible to observe the conformational dynamics associated with biomolecular processes. The addition of precise temperature control to these experiments can yield valuable thermodynamic information about equilibrium and kinetic rate constants. To accomplish this, we have developed a microscopy technique based on infrared laser overtone/combination band absorption to heat small (≈10(-11) liter) volumes of water. Detailed experimental characterization of this technique reveals three major advantages over conventional stage heating methods: 1), a larger range of steady-state temperatures (20-100°C); 2), substantially superior spatial (≤20 μm) control; and 3), substantially superior temporal (≈1 ms) control. The flexibility and breadth of this spatial and temporally resolved laser-heating approach is demonstrated in single-molecule fluorescence assays designed to probe the dissociation of a 21 bp DNA duplex. These studies are used to support a kinetic model based on nucleic acid end fraying that describes dissociation for both short (<10 bp) and long (>10 bp) DNA duplexes. These measurements have been extended to explore temperature-dependent kinetics for the 21 bp construct, which permit determination of single-molecule activation enthalpies and entropies for DNA duplex dissociation.

  6. Kinetic analysis of a general model of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens involving a reversible inhibitor. II. Contribution of the uni- and bimolecular activation routes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, A; Sotos-Lomas, A; Arribas, E; Escribano, J; Masia-Perez, J; Muñoz-Muñoz, J L; Varon, R

    2007-04-01

    From the kinetic study carried out in part I of this series (preceding article) an analysis quantifying the relative contribution to the global process of the uni- and bimolecular routes has been carried out. This analysis suggests a way to predict the time course of the relative contribution as well as the effect on this relative weight of the initial zymogen, inhibitor and activating enzyme concentrations.

  7. Preparation of steam activated carbon from rubberwood sawdust (Hevea brasiliensis) and its adsorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Prakash Kumar, B G; Shivakamy, K; Miranda, Lima Rose; Velan, M

    2006-08-25

    Activated carbon was produced from a biowaste product, rubberwood sawdust (RWSD) using steam in a high temperature fluidized bed reactor. Experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of various process parameters such as activation time, activation temperature, particle size and fluidising velocity on the quality of the activated carbon. The activated carbon was characterized based on its iodine number, methylene blue number, Brauner Emmet Teller (BET) surface area and surface area obtained using the ethylene glycol mono ethyl ether (EGME) retention method. The best quality activated carbon was obtained at an activation time and temperature of 1h and 750 degrees C for an average particle size of 0.46 mm. The adsorption kinetics shows that pseudo-second-order rate fitted the adsorption kinetics better than pseudo-first-order rate equation. The adsorption capacity of carbon produced from RWSD was found to be 1250 mg g(-1) for the Bismark Brown dye. The rate constant and diffusion coefficient for intraparticle transport were determined for steam activated carbon. The characteristic of the prepared activated carbon was found comparable to the commercial activated carbon.

  8. Effect of acoustically assisted treatments on vitamins, antioxidant activity, organic acids and drying kinetics of pineapple.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Óscar; Gomes, Wesley; Rodrigues, Sueli; Fernandes, Fabiano A N

    2017-03-01

    The effects of the application of an acoustically assisted treatment on the vitamins (C, B1, B2, B3, and B5), the antioxidant activity (DPPH, FRAP), the polyphenol and flavonoid contents, the organic acid contents (citric and malic) and drying kinetics of pineapple (Ananas comosus var. Perola) have been studied. Treatments were carried out using two different soaking media: distilled water and pineapple juice at 30°C during 10, 20 and 30min without and with acoustic assistance (23.2W/L). After treatment, samples were dried at 60°C and 0.5m/s during 8h. The quality parameters were determined in untreated, treated, and treated-dried samples. The acoustic assistance promoted an increment of vitamins B1, B2, B3 and B5, total flavonoid and malic acid contents, and a reduction of vitamin C, total polyphenol content, antioxidant activity and citric acid content in treated samples. However, in all treated-dried samples the final content of those quality parameters was higher than the observed in the untreated dried sample.

  9. Molecular and Kinetic Characterization of Planktonic Nitrospira spp. Selectively Enriched from Activated Sludge.

    PubMed

    Park, Mee-Rye; Park, Hongkeun; Chandran, Kartik

    2017-03-07

    Nitrospira spp. are chemolithoautotrophic nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), which are ubiquitous in natural and engineered environments. However, there exist few independent biokinetic studies on Nitrospira spp., likely because their isolation and selective enrichment from environmental consortia such as activated sludge can be challenging. Herein, planktonic Nitrospira spp. cultures closely related to Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii (Nitrospira lineage I) were successfully enriched from activated sludge in a sequencing batch reactor by maintaining sustained limiting extant nitrite and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Morphologically, the enrichment consisted largely of planktonic cells with an average characteristic diameter of 1.3 ± 0.6 μm. On the basis of respirometric assays, estimated maximum specific growth rate (μmax), nitrite half saturation coefficient (KS), oxygen half saturation coefficient (KO), and biomass yield coefficient (Y) of the enriched cultures were 0.69 ± 0.10 d(-1), 0.52 ± 0.14 mg-N/L, 0.33 ± 0.14 mg-O2/L, and 0.14 ± 0.02 mg-COD/mg-N, respectively. These parameters collectively reflect not just higher affinities of this enrichment for nitrite and oxygen, respectively, but also a higher biomass yield and energy transfer efficiency relative to Nitrobacter spp. Used in combination, these kinetic and thermodynamic parameters can help toward the development and application of energy-efficient biological nutrient removal processes through effective Nitrospira out-selection.

  10. A two-dimensional adsorption kinetic model for thermal hysteresis activity in antifreeze proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q. Z.; Yeh, Y.; Liu, J. J.; Feeney, R. E.; Krishnan, V. V.

    2006-05-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) and antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs), collectively abbreviated as AF(G)Ps, are synthesized by various organisms to enable their cells to survive in subzero environments. Although the AF(G)Ps are markedly diverse in structure, they all function by adsorbing to the surface of embryonic ice crystals to inhibit their growth. This adsorption results in a freezing temperature depression without an appreciable change in the melting temperature. The difference between the melting and freezing temperatures, termed thermal hysteresis (TH), is used to detect and quantify the antifreeze activity. Insights from crystallographic structures of a number of AFPs have led to a good understanding of the ice-protein interaction features. Computational studies have focused either on verifying a specific model of AFP-ice interaction or on understanding the protein-induced changes in the ice crystal morphology. In order to explain the origin of TH, we propose a novel two-dimensional adsorption kinetic model between AFPs and ice crystal surfaces. The validity of the model has been demonstrated by reproducing the TH curve on two different β-helical AFPs upon increasing the protein concentration. In particular, this model is able to accommodate the change in the TH behavior observed experimentally when the size of the AFPs is increased systematically. Our results suggest that in addition to the specificity of the AFPs for the ice, the coverage of the AFPs on the ice surface is an equally necessary condition for their TH activity.

  11. Elution kinetics, antimicrobial activity, and mechanical properties of 11 different antibiotic loaded acrylic bone cement.

    PubMed

    Gálvez-López, Ruben; Peña-Monje, Alejandro; Antelo-Lorenzo, Ramón; Guardia-Olmedo, Juan; Moliz, Juan; Hernández-Quero, José; Parra-Ruiz, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic-loaded acrylic bone cements (ALABC) spacers are routinely used in the treatment of prosthetic joint infections. The objectives of our study were to evaluate different ALABC for elution kinetics, thermal stability, and mechanical properties. A 10 or 20% mixture (w/w) beads of medium viscosity bone cement (DePuy, Inc) and vancomycin (VAN), gentamycin (GM), daptomycin (DAP), moxifloxacin (MOX), rifampicin (RIF), cefotaxime (CTX), cefepime (FEP), amoxicillin clavulanate (AmC), ampicillin (AMP), meropenem (MER), and ertapenem (ERT) were formed and placed into wells filled with phosphate-buffered saline. Antibiotic concentrations were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. Antimicrobial activity was tested against Micrococcus luteus ATCC 9341 or Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. AmC, AMP, and FEP concentration rapidly decreased after day 2, being almost undetectable at day 4. Sustained and high elution rates were observed with VAN, GM, MOX, and RIF for the 30-day duration of the experiment. DAP, MER, ERT, and CTX elution rates constantly decreased from day 4. All antibiotics tested retained antimicrobial activity proving thermal stability. Mechanical properties of ALABC were maintained except when RIF was used.

  12. Pattern, growth, and aging in aggregation kinetics of a Vicsek-like active matter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subir K.

    2017-01-01

    Via molecular dynamics simulations, we study kinetics in a Vicsek-like phase-separating active matter model. Quantitative results, for isotropic bicontinuous pattern, are presented on the structure, growth, and aging. These are obtained via the two-point equal-time density-density correlation function, the average domain length, and the two-time density autocorrelation function. Both the correlation functions exhibit basic scaling properties, implying self-similarity in the pattern dynamics, for which the average domain size exhibits a power-law growth in time. The equal-time correlation has a short distance behavior that provides reasonable agreement between the corresponding structure factor tail and the Porod law. The autocorrelation decay is a power-law in the average domain size. Apart from these basic similarities, the overall quantitative behavior of the above-mentioned observables is found to be vastly different from those of the corresponding passive limit of the model which also undergoes phase separation. The functional forms of these have been quantified. An exceptionally rapid growth in the active system occurs due to fast coherent motion of the particles, mean-squared-displacements of which exhibit multiple scaling regimes, including a long time ballistic one.

  13. Multiphase Processing of Isoprene Oxidation Products - Kinetic and Product Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, D.; Schoene, L.; Schindelka, J.; Herrmann, H.

    2010-12-01

    Isoprene represents a significant fraction of NMHC in the troposphere with recently estimated emission rates of 500-750 TgC yr-1 (1). Due to its enormous source strength, the fate of isoprene and its degradation products is important in atmospheric processes. Possible ascendancies of such oxidation processes are the regional ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Some aspects of SOA formation from isoprene and its degradation products have already been studied by chamber studies (2,3). Aqueous phase oxidation processes which may occur after phase transfer of ‘early’ oxidation products are often neglected. But these processes provide a potentially important source for organic particle mass constituents such as carboxylic acids. The majority of existing aqueous phase modelling studies focus only on ‘later’ products such as methylglyoxal and oxalic acid. Yet, a recent field study reports much higher aqueous phase concentrations of some ‘earlier’ isoprene oxidation products including methacrolein (MACR) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) than expected (4). This indicates a possibly underestimated importance of multiphase chemical processes in the course of the isoprene oxidation as a source for the production of organic particle mass together with known ‘heterogeneous processes’ such as the direct condensation of low-volatility products from gas phase processes onto existing particle surfaces. In order to implement the isoprene multiphase chemistry in atmospheric models detailed kinetic and mechanistic studies are needed. Hence, the temperature dependence of MACR, MVK, methacrylic acid and acrylic acid exposed to NO3, SO4- and OH radicals in the aqueous phase was investigated. The measurements were performed using a laser-photolysis laser long path absorption technique. The analysis confirmed in all cases the much higher reactivity of the OH radical in comparison to SO4- and NO3 radicals. The temperature dependence is most distinct for NO3

  14. The Study of a Simple Redox Reaction as an Experimental Approach to Chemical Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elias, Horst; Zipp, Arden P.

    1988-01-01

    Recommends using iodide ions and peroxodisulfate ions for studying rate laws instead of the standard iodine clock for kinetic study. Presents the methodology and a discussion of the kinetics involved for a laboratory experiment for a high school or introductory college course. (ML)

  15. Case study 3. Application of basic enzyme kinetics to metabolism studies: real-life examples.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongmei; McCabe, Michelle; Podila, Lalitha; Tracy, Timothy S; Tweedie, Donald J

    2014-01-01

    An appreciation of the principles of enzyme kinetics can be applied in a number of drug metabolism applications. The concept for this chapter arose from a simple discussion on selecting appropriate time points to most efficiently assess metabolite profiles in a human Phase 1a clinical study (Subheading 4). By considering enzyme kinetics, a logical approach to the issue was derived. The dialog was an important learning opportunity for the participants in the discussion, and we have endeavored to capture this experience with other questions related to determination of K m and V max parameters, a consideration of the value of hepatocytes versus liver microsomes and enzyme inhibition parameters.

  16. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yunyan; Ma, Qisheng; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Dai, Jinxing; Katz, Barry; Zhang, Shuichang; Tang, Yongchun

    2011-05-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2 cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using δD values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the δ 13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that δD values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that δD values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane.

  17. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Kinetic and structural evaluation of selected active site mutants of the Aspergillus fumigatus KDNase (sialidase).

    PubMed

    Yeung, Juliana H F; Telford, Judith C; Shidmoossavee, Fahimeh S; Bennet, Andrew J; Taylor, Garry L; Moore, Margo M

    2013-12-23

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an airborne fungal pathogen. We previously cloned and characterized an exo-sialidase from A. fumigatus and showed that it preferred 2-keto-3-deoxynononic acid (KDN) as a substrate to N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac). The purpose of this study was to investigate the structure-function relationships of critical catalytic site residues. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to create three mutant recombinant enzymes: the catalytic nucleophile (Y358H), the general acid/base catalyst (D84A), and an enlargement of the binding pocket to attempt to accommodate the N-acetyl group of Neu5Ac (R171L). Crystal structures for all enzymes were determined. The D84A mutation had an effect in decreasing the activity of AfKDNase that was stronger than that of the same mutation in the structurally similar sialidase from the bacterium Micromonospora viridifaciens. These data suggest that the catalytic acid is more important in the reaction of AfKDNase and that catalysis is less dependent on nucleophilic or electrostatic stabilization of the developing positive charge at the transition state for hydrolysis. Removal of the catalytic nucleophile (Y358H) significantly lowered the activity of the enzyme, but this mutant remained a retaining glycosidase as demonstrated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis. This is a novel finding that has not been shown with other sialidases. Kinetic activity measured at pH 5.2 revealed that R171L had higher activity on a Neu5Ac-based substrate than wild-type KDNase; hence, leucine in place of arginine in the binding pocket improved catalysis toward Neu5Ac substrates. Hence, whether a sialidase is primarily a KDNase or a neuraminidase is due in part to the presence of an amino acid that creates a steric clash with the N-acetyl group.

  19. Kinetic Model for Surface-Active Enzymes Based on the Langmuir Adsorption Isotherm: Phospholipase C (Bacillus cereus) Activity toward Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylcholine/Detergent Micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Ramon A.; El-Sayed, Maha Y.; Roberts, Mary F.

    1982-08-01

    A simple kinetic model for the enzymatic activity of surface-active proteins against mixed micelles has been developed. This model uses the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, the classic equation for the binding of gas molecules to metal surfaces, to characterize enzyme adsorption to micelles. The number of available enzyme binding sites is equated with the number of substrate and inhibitor molecules attached to micelles; enzyme molecules are attracted to the micelle due to the affinity of the enzyme active site for the molecules in the micelle. Phospholipase C (Bacillus cereus) kinetics in a wide variety of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine/detergent micelles are readily explained by this model and the assumption of competitive binding of the detergent at the enzyme active site. Binding of phospholipase C to pure detergent micelles is demonstrated by gel filtration chromatography. The experimentally determined enzyme-detergent micelle binding constants are used directly in the rate equation. The Langmuir adsorption model predicts a variety of the characteristics observed for phospholipase kinetics, such as differential inhibition by various charged, uncharged, and zwitterionic detergents and surface-dilution inhibition. The essential idea of this model, that proteins can be attracted and bound to bilayers or micelles by possessing a binding site for the molecules composing the surface, may have wider application in the study of water-soluble (extrinsic) protein-membrane interactions.

  20. Intrinsic Kinetics of Dimethyl Ether Synthesis from Plasma Activation of CO2 Hydrogenation over Cu-Fe-Ce/HZSM-5.

    PubMed

    Su, Tongming; Zhou, Xinhui; Qin, Zuzeng; Ji, Hongbing

    2017-02-02

    CO2 is activated in a plasma reactor followed by hydrogenation over a Cu-Fe-Ce/HZSM-5 catalyst, and the intrinsic kinetics of the plasma catalytic process are studied. Compared with CO2 hydrogenation using Cu-Fe-Ce/HZSM-5 alone, the CO2 conversion and the dimethyl ether selectivity for the plasma catalytic process are increased by 16.3 %, and 10.1 %, respectively, indicating that the CO2 was activated by the plasma to promote hydrogenation. A study of the intrinsic kinetics shows that the activation energies of methanol formation, the reverse water-gas shift reaction, and methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether are 149.34, 75.47, and 73.18 kJ mol(-1) , respectively, which are lower than if Cu-Fe-Ce/HZSM-5 is used without plasma, indicating that the activation of CO2 in the plasma reduces the activation energy of the hydrogenation reaction and improves the yield of dimethyl ether.

  1. Kinetic and Isotherm Modelling of the Adsorption of
Phenolic Compounds from Olive Mill Wastewater onto Activated Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Casazza, Alessandro A.; Perego, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Summary The adsorption of phenolic compounds from olive oil wastewater by commercial activated carbon was studied as a function of adsorbent quantity and temperature. The sorption kinetics and the equilibrium isotherms were evaluated. Under optimum conditions (8 g of activated carbon per 100 mL), the maximum sorption capacity of activated carbon expressed as mg of caffeic acid equivalent per g of activated carbon was 35.8 at 10 °C, 35.4 at 25 °C and 36.1 at 40 °C. The pseudo-second-order model was considered as the most suitable for kinetic results, and Langmuir isotherm was chosen to better describe the sorption system. The results confirmed the efficiency of activated carbon to remove almost all phenolic compound fractions from olive mill effluent. The preliminary results obtained will be used in future studies. The carbohydrate fraction of this upgraded residue could be employed to produce bioethanol, and adsorbed phenolic compounds can be recovered and used in different industries. PMID:27904350

  2. The kinetic activation-relaxation technique: an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm with on-the-fly event search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Nomand

    2012-02-01

    While kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm has been proposed almost 40 years ago, its application in materials science has been mostly limited to lattice-based motion due to the difficulties associated with identifying new events and building usable catalogs when atoms moved into off-lattice position. Here, I present the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (kinetic ART) is an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm with on-the-fly event search [1]. It combines ART nouveau [2], a very efficient unbiased open-ended activated method for finding transition states, with a topological classification [3] that allows a discrete cataloguing of local environments in complex systems, including disordered materials. In kinetic ART, local topologies are first identified for all atoms in a system. ART nouveau event searches are then launched for new topologies, building an extensive catalog of barriers and events. Next, all low energy events are fully reconstructed and relaxed, allowing to take complete account of elastic effects in the system's kinetics. Using standard kinetic Monte Carlo, the clock is brought forward and an event is then selected and applied before a new search for topologies is launched. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, I will discuss three recent applications to ion-bombarded silicon, defect diffusion in Fe and structural relaxation in amorphous silicon.[4pt] This work was done in collaboration with Laurent Karim B'eland, Peter Brommer, Fedwa El-Mellouhi, Jean-Francois Joly and Laurent Lewis.[4pt] [1] F. El-Mellouhi, N. Mousseau and L.J. Lewis, Phys. Rev. B. 78, 153202 (2008); L.K. B'eland et al., Phys. Rev. E 84, 046704 (2011).[2] G.T. Barkema and N. Mousseau, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 4358 (1996); E. Machado-Charry et al., J. Chem Phys. 135, 034102, (2011).[3] B.D. McKay, Congressus Numerantium 30, 45 (1981).

  3. Effects of oligomerization phenomenon on dissolved organic matter removal kinetics on novel activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang; Deeter, Valerie; Lalley, Jacob; Medellin, Oscar; Kupferle, Margaret J; Sorial, George A

    2014-08-15

    The overall objective of this research was to determine the effects of oxidative coupling (oligomerization) phenomenon on the adsorption kinetics of dissolved natural organic matter (DOM) on novel tailored activated carbons. A comparison of adsorption kinetics data collected in the presence and absence of phenolic compounds under both oxic (presence of molecular oxygen) and anoxic (absence of molecular oxygen) conditions showed that the adsorption rate of DOM was strongly affected by the oligomerization phenomenon. The diffusion rate of DOM is in inverse proportion to the critical oxidation potential of the phenolic compound. In addition, the roles of carbon physicochemical characteristics and DOM molecular weight distribution were also investigated. Tailored activated carbon impregnated with manganese oxide was found to play an important role in promoting complexation reactions between DOM and phenolic compounds. Meanwhile, Fulvic acid molecules (component of DOM) with molecular weight below 2000 Da appeared to have more potential to get influenced from oligomerization effects.

  4. Kinetic and isotherm studies of adsorption and biosorption processes in the removal of phenolic compounds from aqueous solutions: comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The phenolic compounds are known by their carcinogenicity and high toxicity as well as creating unpleasant taste and odor in water resources. The present study develops a cost-effective technology for the treatment of water contaminated with phenolic compounds, including Phenol (Ph), 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), and 4-chlorophenol (4-CP). So, two sorbents, rice bran ash (RBA) and biomass of brown algae, Cystoseiraindica, were used and results were compared with the commercially granular activated carbon (GAC). The phenolic compounds were determined using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) under batch equilibrium conditions. The effects of contact time, pH, initial adsorbate concentration, and adsorbent dosages on the removal efficiency were studied. The adsorption data were simulated by isotherm and kinetic models. Results indicated that RBA and GAC had the lowest efficiency for the removal of 2-CP, while the order of removal efficiency for C. indica biomass was as follows: 2-CP > 4-CP > phenol. The efficiency of GAC was higher than those of other adsorbents for all of the phenolic compounds. Furthermore, the adsorption capacity of RBA was found to be higher than that of C. indica biomass. The optimal initial pH for the removal of phenol, 2-CP and 4-CP was determined to be 5, 7, and 7 for RBA, GAC, and algal biomass, respectively. Kinetic studies suggested that the pseudo-second order best fitted the kinetic data. PMID:24355013

  5. A kinetic study of methanol oxidation in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Anitescu, G.; Zhang, Z.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1999-06-01

    The oxidation rate of methanol in supercritical water at 253 bar and temperatures between 673 and 773 K is investigated using an isothermal, isobaric plug-flow tubular reactor and GC/FID and GC/TCD chromatographic methods. Experiments are conducted at a nominal methanol feed concentration of 0.88 mol % (1.53 wt %) using H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as an initial oxidant. In some experiments, the O{sub 2}/MeOH molar ratios are varied from 1.5 to 3.0 and show that the rate of methanol oxidation is independent of the oxygen initial feed concentration. Overall first-order rate constants calculated from the data lead to Arrhenius parameters of A = 10{sup 11.8} s{sup {minus}1} and E{sub a} = 178 kJ/mol (42.5 kcal/mol). The identified reaction products are mainly CO and CO{sub 2}. The temporal variation of the CO yield exhibits a maximum at temperatures of 723 and 748 K, whereas the CO{sub 2} yield increases monotonically over the experimental range of residence time (3--50 s). The experimental data are consistent with a set of consecutive first-order reactions CH{sub 3}OH {yields} CO {yields} CO{sub 2}. The global rate-controlling step in the complete oxidation of methanol is the conversion of CO to CO{sub 2}. The first-order rate constants calculated for CO oxidation to CO{sub 2} lead to A = 10{sup 10.8} s{sup {minus}1} and E{sub a} = 172 kJ/mol (41.0 kcal/mol). Kinetics of this system may be useful to study supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) dissolved in methanol.

  6. Aqueous chlorination of carbamazepine: kinetic study and transformation product identification.

    PubMed

    Soufan, M; Deborde, M; Delmont, A; Legube, B

    2013-09-15

    Carbamazepine reactivity and fate during chlorination was investigated in this study. From a kinetic standpoint, a third-order reaction (first-order relative to the CBZ concentration and second-order relative to the free chlorine concentration) was observed at neutral and slightly acidic pH, whereas a second-order reaction (first order relative to the CBZ concentration and first order relative to the free chlorine concentration) was noted under alkaline conditions. In order to gain insight into the observed pH-dependence of the reaction order, elementary reactions (i.e. reactions of Cl2, Cl2O, HOCl with CBZ and of ClO(-) with CBZ or of HOCl with the ionized form of CBZ) were highlighted and second order rate constants of each of them were calculated. Close correlations between the experimental and modeled values were obtained under these conditions. Cl2 and Cl2O were the main chlorination agents at neutral and acidic pH. These results indicate that, for a 1 mg/L free chlorine concentration and 1-10 mg/L chloride concentration at pH 7, halflives about 52-69 days can be expected. A low reactivity of chlorine with CBZ could thus occur under the chlorination steps used during water treatment. From a mechanistic viewpoint, several transformation products were observed during carbamazepine chlorination. As previously described for the chlorination of polynuclear aromatic or unsaturated compounds, we proposed monohydroxylated, epoxide, diols or chlorinated alcohol derivatives of CBZ for the chemical structures of these degradation products. Most of these compounds seem to accumulate in solution in the presence of excess chlorine.

  7. QM/MM calculations of kinetic isotope effects in the chorismate mutase active site.

    PubMed

    Martí, Sergio; Moliner, Vincent; Tuñón, Iñaki; Williams, Ian H

    2003-02-07

    Kinetic isotope effects have been computed for the Claisen rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate in aqueous solution and in the active site of chorismate mutase from B. subtilus. These included primary 13C and 18O and secondary 3H effects for substitutions at the bond-making and bond-breaking positions. The initial structures of the putative stationary points on the potential energy surface, required for the calculations of isotope effects using the CAMVIB/CAMISO programs, have been selected from hybrid QM/MM molecular dynamical simulations using the DYNAMO program. Refinement of the reactant complex and transition-state structures has been carried out by means of AM1/CHARMM24/TIP3P calculations using the GRACE program, with full gradient relaxation of the position of > 5200 atoms for the enzymic simulations, and with a box containing 711 water molecules for the corresponding reaction in aqueous solution. Comparison of these results, and of gas phase calculations, with experimental data has shown that the chemical rearrangement is largely rate-determining for the enzyme mechanism. Inclusion of the chorismate conformational pre-equilibrium step in the modelled kinetic scheme leads to better agreement between recent experimental data and theoretical predictions. These results provide new information on an important enzymatic transformation, and the key factors responsible for the kinetics of its molecular mechanism are clarified. Treatment of the enzyme and/or solvent environment by means of a large and flexible model is absolutely essential for prediction of kinetic isotope effects.

  8. Penicillin Hydrolysis: A Kinetic Study of a Multistep, Multiproduct Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarrick, Thomas A.; McLafferty, Fred W.

    1984-01-01

    Background, procedures used, and typical results are provided for an experiment in which students carry out the necessary measurements on the acid-catalysis of penicillin in two hours. By applying kinetic theory to the data obtained, the reaction pathways for the hydrolysis of potassium benzyl penicillin are elucidated. (JN)

  9. A Case Study in Chemical Kinetics: The OH + CO Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weston, Ralph E., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews some important properties of the bimolecular reaction between the hydroxyl radical and carbon monoxide. Investigates the kinetics of the reaction, the temperature and pressure dependence of the rate constant, the state-to-state dynamics of the reaction, and the reverse reaction. (MVL)

  10. An Undergraduate Laboratory Exercise for Studying Kinetics of Batch Crystallization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louhi­-Kultanen, Marjatta; Han, Bing; Nurkka, Annikka; Hatakka, Henry

    2015-01-01

    The present work describes an undergraduate laboratory exercise for improving understanding of fundamental phenomena in cooling crystallization. The exercise of nucleation and crystal growth kinetics supports learning of theories and models presented in lectures and calculation exercises. The teaching methodology incorporates precepts the…

  11. Kinetics of the esterification of active pharmaceutical ingredients containing carboxylic acid functionality in polyethylene glycol: formulation implications.

    PubMed

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie V; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Moesgaard, Birthe; Østergaard, Jesper

    2014-08-01

    Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are attractive as excipients in the manufacture of drug products because they are water soluble and poorly immunogenic. They are used in various pharmaceutical preparations. However, because of their terminal hydroxyl groups, PEGs can participate in esterification reactions. In this study, kinetics of two active pharmaceutical ingredients, cetirizine and indomethacin possessing carboxylic acid functionality, has been studied in PEG 400 and PEG 1000 at 50 °C, 60 °C, 70 °C, and 80 °C. HPLC-UV was applied for the determination of concentrations in the kinetic studies, whereas HPLC-MS was used to identify reaction products. The esterification reactions were observed to be reversible. A second-order reversible kinetic model was applied and rate constants were determined. The rate constants demonstrated that cetirizine was esterified about 240 times faster than indomethacin at 80 °C. The shelf-life for cetirizine in a PEG 400 formulation at 25 °C expressed as t(95%) was predicted to be only 30 h. Further, rate constants for esterification of cetirizine in PEG 1000 in relation to PEG 400 decreased by a factor of 10, probably related to increased viscosity. However, it is important to be aware of this drug-excipient interaction, as it can reduce the shelf-life of a low-average molecular weight PEG formulation considerably.

  12. Relaxation Kinetic Study of Eudragit® NM30D Film Based on Complex Modulus Formalism.

    PubMed

    Penumetcha, Sai Sumana; Byrn, Stephen R; Morris, Kenneth R

    2015-10-01

    This study is aimed at resolving and characterizing the primary (α) and secondary relaxations (β) in Eudragit® NM30D film based on apparent activation energies derived from complex modulus formalism using dielectric analysis (DEA). The glass transition (T g) of the film was determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The α relaxation corresponding to T g and the β relaxations occurring below T g were probed using DEA. The occurrence of α and β relaxations in Eudragit® NM30D film was elucidated using the complex modulus of the dielectric response employing loss modulus and permittivity data. Activation energies of these relaxations and the fundamental frequency so determined support the assignment of the relaxation pattern in the Eudragit® NM30D film. DEA methodology of the complex modulus formalism is a useful tool for differentiating the α and β relaxation kinetics in Eudragits® not easily studied using traditional thermal methods such as DSC. The kinetics associated with α and β relaxations so determined will provide formulation design support for solid orals that incorporate Eudragit® polymers. As mobility changes can affect stability and diffusion, the dipolar α and β relaxations revealed through DEA analysis may enable a better correlation to functionality of Eudragit® based pharmaceutical dosage forms.

  13. Kinetic study of phase transformation of n-octane using hydrothermal diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuanjiang; Zheng, Haifei; Wang, Duojun

    2016-02-01

    A kinetic study of phase transformation of n-octane has been performed using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell. The results show that pressure has a negative effect on the solid-liquid reaction rate. The increase of pressure can accelerate the liquid-solid transformation rate. Upon the liquid-solid transformation, the light transmittance showed a decreased trend with time in the early stage, which was caused by the formation of a large quantity of crystal nuclei. In the later stage, the light transmittance almost remained the same, thus indicating a growth stage of crystal nuclei. The activation volume yields a value of 2.16×10-5 and -1.35×10-5 m3/mol for the solid-liquid and liquid-solid transformations. Based on the obtained activation energy, the solid-liquid transformation is dominated by the interfacial reaction and diffusion, and the liquid-solid transformation is controlled by diffusion. This technique is an effective and powerful tool for the transformation kinetics study of n-octane.

  14. Kinetics studies with fruit bromelain (Ananas comosus) in the presence of cysteine and divalent ions.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Tajwinder; Kaur, Amandeep; Grewal, Ravneet K

    2015-09-01

    The kinetics of cysteine and divalent ion modulation viz. Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Hg(2+) of fruit bromelain (EC 3.4.22.33) have been investigated in the present study. Kinetic studies revealed that at pH 4.5, cysteine induced V-type activation of bromelain catalyzed gelatin hydrolysis. At pH 3.5, Ca(2+) inhibited the enzyme noncompetitively, whereas, both K-and V-type activations of bromelain were observed in the presence of 0.5 mM Ca(2+) at pH 4.5 and 7.5. Bromelain was inhibited competitively at 0.6 mM Cu(2+) ions at pH 3.5, which changed to an uncompetitive inhibition at pH 4.5 and 7.5. An un-competitive inhibition of bromelain catalyzed gelatin hydrolysis was observed in the presence of 0.6 mM Hg(2+) at pH 3.5 and 4.5. These findings suggest that divalent ions modulation of fruit bromelain is pH dependent.

  15. Palladium nanoparticles anchored on graphene nanosheets: Methanol, ethanol oxidation reactions and their kinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaraju, D.H.; Devaraj, S.; Balaya, P.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Palladium nanoparticles decorated graphene is synthesized in a single step. • Electro-catalytic activity of Gra/Pd toward alcohol oxidation is evaluated. • 1:1 Gra/Pd exhibits good electro-catalytic activity and efficient electron transfer. - Abstract: Palladium nanoparticles decorated graphene (Gra/Pd nanocomposite) was synthesized by simultaneous chemical reduction of graphene oxide and palladium salt in a single step. The negatively charged graphene oxide (GO) facilitates uniform distribution of Pd{sup 2+} ions onto its surface. The subsequent reduction by hydrazine hydrate provides well dispersed Pd nanoparticles decorated graphene. Different amount of Pd nanoparticles on graphene was synthesized by changing the volume to weight ratio of GO to PdCl{sub 2}. X-ray diffraction studies showed FCC lattice of Pd with predominant (1 1 1) plane. SEM and TEM studies revealed that thin graphene nanosheets are decorated by Pd nanoparticles. Raman spectroscopic studies revealed the presence of graphene nanosheets. The electro-catalytic activity of Gra/Pd nanocomposites toward methanol and ethanol oxidation in alkaline medium was evaluated by cyclic voltammetric studies. 1:1 Gra/Pd nanocomposite exhibited good electro-catalytic activity and efficient electron transfer. The kinetics of electron transfer was studied using chronoamperometry. Improved electro-catalytic activity of 1:1 Gra/Pd nanocomposite toward alcohol oxidation makes it as a potential anode for the alcohol fuel cells.

  16. The Biginelli reaction with an imidazolium-tagged recyclable iron catalyst: kinetics, mechanism, and antitumoral activity.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Luciana M; Guido, Bruna C; Nobrega, Catharine C; Corrêa, José R; Silva, Rafael G; de Oliveira, Heibbe C B; Gomes, Alexandre F; Gozzo, Fábio C; Neto, Brenno A D

    2013-03-25

    The present work describes the synthesis, characterization, and application of a new ion-tagged iron catalyst. The catalyst was employed in the Biginelli reaction with impressive performance. High yields have been achieved when the reaction was carried out in imidazolium-based ionic liquids (BMI⋅PF6, BMI⋅NTf2, and BMI⋅BF4), thus showing that the ionic-liquid effects play a role in the reaction. Moreover, the ion-tagged catalyst could be recovered and reused up to eight times without any noticeable loss in activity. Mechanistic studies performed by using high-resolution electrospray-ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass (HR-EI-QTOF) spectrometry and kinetic experiments indicate only one reaction pathway and rule out the other two possibilities under the development conditions. The theoretical calculations are in accordance with the proposed mechanism of action of the iron catalyst. Finally, the 37 dihydropyrimidinone derivatives, products of the Biginelli reaction, had their cytotoxicity evaluated in assays against MCF-7 cancer cell linages with encouraging results of some derivatives, which were virtually non-toxic against healthy cell linages (fibroblasts).

  17. In situ hydrogen consumption kinetics as an indicator of subsurface microbial activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, S.H.; Smith, R.L.; Suflita, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    There are few methods available for broadly assessing microbial community metabolism directly within a groundwater environment. In this study, hydrogen consumption rates were estimated from in situ injection/withdrawal tests conducted in two geochemically varying, contaminated aquifers as an approach towards developing such a method. The hydrogen consumption first-order rates varied from 0.002 nM h-1 for an uncontaminated, aerobic site to 2.5 nM h-1 for a contaminated site where sulfate reduction was a predominant process. The method could accommodate the over three orders of magnitude range in rates that existed between subsurface sites. In a denitrifying zone, the hydrogen consumption rate (0.02 nM h-1) was immediately abolished in the presence of air or an antibiotic mixture, suggesting that such measurements may also be sensitive to the effects of environmental perturbations on field microbial activities. Comparable laboratory determinations with sediment slurries exhibited hydrogen consumption kinetics that differed substantially from the field estimates. Because anaerobic degradation of organic matter relies on the rapid consumption of hydrogen and subsequent maintenance at low levels, such in situ measures of hydrogen turnover can serve as a key indicator of the functioning of microbial food webs and may be more reliable than laboratory determinations. ?? 2007 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  18. Detailed characterization of lithium diffusion mechanisms in crystalline silicon using the kinetic Activation-Relaxation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trochet, Mickaël; Restrepo Gutierrez, Oscar Antonio; Mousseau, Normand

    Silicon displays a potential for high-capacity anode material for lithium-ion batteries as it can absorb large quantities of this metal. Yet, very little is understood about the evolution of diffusion mechanisms and migration barriers as the concentration of lithium increases. Until now, for example, simulations studies were limited by the time scale over which diffusion takes place. Here, we use the kinetic activation relaxation technique (kART), an unbiased off-lattice Monte Carlo method with on-the fly catalog building, coupled with the ReaxFF forcefield to follow diffusion of Li in c - Si over timescale of seconds and more at room temperature, obtaining detailed information about the whole set of possible diffusion mechanisms as the local environment evolves. We first present a detailed characterization of Li diffusion in the presence of 1 to 3 impurities and then show the evolution of systems with a higher concentration of solute as Li aggregate. These results provide a first detailed picture of the onset of Li aggregating into this high-capacity material, as it modifies the structure through local rearrangements and long-range elastic deformations, crucial information for the development of the next generation of high-capacity anode. ∖pard ∖pard.

  19. Antifungal activity, kinetics and molecular mechanism of action of garlic oil against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Ru; Shi, Qing-Shan; Dai, Huan-Qin; Liang, Qing; Xie, Xiao-Bao; Huang, Xiao-Mo; Zhao, Guang-Ze; Zhang, Li-Xin

    2016-01-01

    The antifungal activity, kinetics, and molecular mechanism of action of garlic oil against Candida albicans were investigated in this study using multiple methods. Using the poisoned food technique, we determined that the minimum inhibitory concentration of garlic oil was 0.35 μg/mL. Observation by transmission electron microscopy indicated that garlic oil could penetrate the cellular membrane of C. albicans as well as the membranes of organelles such as the mitochondria, resulting in organelle destruction and ultimately cell death. RNA sequencing analysis showed that garlic oil induced differential expression of critical genes including those involved in oxidation-reduction processes, pathogenesis, and cellular response to drugs and starvation. Moreover, the differentially expressed genes were mainly clustered in 19 KEGG pathways, representing vital cellular processes such as oxidative phosphorylation, the spliceosome, the cell cycle, and protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, four upregulated proteins selected after two-dimensional fluorescence difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) analysis were identified with high probability by mass spectrometry as putative cytoplasmic adenylate kinase, pyruvate decarboxylase, hexokinase, and heat shock proteins. This is suggestive of a C. albicans stress responses to garlic oil treatment. On the other hand, a large number of proteins were downregulated, leading to significant disruption of the normal metabolism and physical functions of C. albicans. PMID:26948845

  20. Crystallization kinetics of orthorhombic paracetamol from supercooled melts studied by non-isothermal DSC.

    PubMed

    Nikolakakis, Ioannis; Kachrimanis, Kyriakos

    2017-02-01

    A simple and highly reproducible procedure was established for the study of orthorhombic paracetamol crystallization kinetics, comprising melting, quench-cooling of the melt and scanning the formed glass by DSC at different heating rates. Results were analyzed on the basis of the mean as well as local values of the Avrami exponent, n, the energy of activation, as well as the Šesták-Berggren two-parameter autocatalytic kinetic model. The mean value of the Avrami kinetic exponent, n, ranged between 3 and 5, indicating deviation from the nucleation and growth mechanism underlying the Johnson-Mehl, Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model. To verify the extent of the deviation, local values of the Avrami exponent as a function of the volume fraction transformed were calculated. Inspection of the local exponent values indicates that the crystallization mechanism changes over time, possibly reflecting the uncertainty of crystallization onset, instability of nucleation due to an autocatalytic effect of the crystalline phase, and growth anisotropy due to impingement of spherulites in the last stages of crystallization. The apparent energy of activation, Ea, has a rather low mean value, close to 81 kJ/mol, which is in agreement with the observed instability of glassy-state paracetamol. Isoconversional methods revealed that Ea tends to decrease with the volume fraction transformed, possibly because of the different energy demands of nucleation and growth. The exponents of the Šesták-Berggren two-parameter model showed that the crystallized fraction influences the process, confirming the complexity of the crystallization mechanism.

  1. A Variable Active Site Residue Influences the Kinetics of Response Regulator Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Immormino, Robert M; Silversmith, Ruth E; Bourret, Robert B

    2016-10-04

    Two-component regulatory systems, minimally composed of a sensor kinase and a response regulator protein, are common mediators of signal transduction in microorganisms. All response regulators contain a receiver domain with conserved active site residues that catalyze the signal activating and deactivating phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions. We explored the impact of variable active site position T+1 (one residue C-terminal to the conserved Thr/Ser) on reaction kinetics and signaling fidelity, using wild type and mutant Escherichia coli CheY, CheB, and NarL to represent the three major sequence classes observed across response regulators: Ala/Gly, Ser/Thr, and Val/Ile/Met, respectively, at T+1. Biochemical and structural data together suggested that different amino acids at T+1 impacted reaction kinetics by altering access to the active site while not perturbing overall protein structure. A given amino acid at position T+1 had similar effects on autodephosphorylation in each protein background tested, likely by modulating access of the attacking water molecule to the active site. Similarly, rate constants for CheY autophosphorylation with three different small molecule phosphodonors were consistent with the steric constraints on access to the phosphorylation site arising from combination of specific phosphodonors with particular amino acids at T+1. Because other variable active site residues also influence response regulator phosphorylation biochemistry, we began to explore how context (here, the amino acid at T+2) affected the influence of position T+1 on CheY autocatalytic reactions. Finally, position T+1 affected the fidelity and kinetics of phosphotransfer between sensor kinases and response regulators but was not a primary determinant of their interaction.

  2. Delithiation kinetics study of carbon coated and carbon free LiFePO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepage, D.; Sobh, F.; Kuss, C.; Liang, G.; Schougaard, S. B.

    2014-06-01

    A chemical oxidation method was employed to measure the kinetics of lithium release from LiFePO4 during oxidation. Similar to potential step measurements, the chemical method simplifies quantification compared to the common electrochemical techniques (PITT, GITT etc.). It was found that the overall release of lithium fits one dimensional diffusion kinetics, however, it is also shown that the mechanism must be more complex as the derived activation energy led to an unusually low attack rate of ∼108 Hz. A comparison of carbon coated/carbon free LiFePO4 samples indicated that the carbon coating has only a marginal effect on the delithiation kinetics.

  3. Controlling enzymatic activity and kinetics in swollen mesophases by physical nano-confinement.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjie; Vallooran, Jijo J; Zabara, Alexandru; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2014-06-21

    Bicontinuous lipid cubic mesophases are widely investigated as hosting matrices for functional enzymes to build biosensors and bio-devices due to their unique structural characteristics. However, the enzymatic activity within standard mesophases (in-meso) is severely hindered by the relatively small diameter of the mesophase aqueous channels, which provide only limited space for enzymes, and restrict them into a highly confined environment. We show that the enzymatic activity of a model enzyme, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), can be accurately controlled by relaxing its confinement within the cubic phases' water channels, when the aqueous channel diameters are systematically swollen with varying amount of hydration-enhancing sugar ester. The in-meso activity and kinetics of HRP are then systematically investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy, as a function of the size of the aqueous mesophase channels. The enzymatic activity of HRP increases with the swelling of the water channels. In swollen mesophases with water channel diameter larger than the HRP size, the enzymatic activity is more than double that measured in standard mesophases, approaching again the enzymatic activity of free HRP in bulk water. We also show that the physically-entrapped enzymes in the mesophases exhibit a restricted-diffusion-induced initial lag period and report the first observation of in-meso enzymatic kinetics significantly deviating from the normal Michaelis-Menten behaviour observed in free solutions, with deviations vanishing when enzyme confinement is released by swelling the mesophase.

  4. Gold cementation on copper in thiosulfate solution: Kinetic, electrochemical, and morphological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaeheon

    2003-08-01

    Cyanidation has been used for more than a century for precious metal recovery and it is still in use today. Cyanide is a very toxic chemical and if not used appropriately will cause environmental problems. There is considerable attention devoted to the development of non-cyanide lixiviants for the process of gold and silver ores. Thiosulfate solution is one of the proposed alternatives to cyanide and gold cementation by copper has been suggested as a promising method for gold recovery from leaching solution. Copper powder and rotating disc electrode were used for the kinetic study. The rate of gold cementation on copper disc is proportional to the initial gold concentration and disc rotating speed. The cementation reaction exhibited two distinct kinetic regions, an initial slow rate followed by an enhanced rate. The activation energy of the reaction was 5.9 kJ/mol at low copper concentration and the reaction is mass transport controlled. With 30 ppm initial copper concentration, there was noticeable decrease in the reaction rate in high temperature range. EDS, XRD, and XPS analysis revealed that the deposits are a Au-Cu alloy instead of pure gold. The alloy composition ranged from Au 3Cu to AuCu3 depending on the initial Cu/Au mole ratio in solution and applied potential. Electrochemical studies were performed using rotating disc electrode and electrochemical quartz crystal nanobalance. Evans' diagrams were constructed under various experimental conditions. Corrosion current increased with increasing gold concentration, disc rotating speed, as well as thiosulfate concentration. These results confirmed those obtained in the kinetic study. Corrosion potential measurements indicated that passivation onset time was changed by gold concentration, copper concentration and disc rotating speed. Gold(I)-thiosulfate reduction was found to occur at approximately -250 mV vs. SHE using EQCN. Copper adions on the gold surface contributed to the underpotential deposition of

  5. A Kinetic Degradation Study of Curcumin in Its Free Form and Loaded in Polymeric Micelles.

    PubMed

    Naksuriya, Ornchuma; van Steenbergen, Mies J; Torano, Javier S; Okonogi, Siriporn; Hennink, Wim E

    2016-05-01

    Curcumin, a phenolic compound, possesses many pharmacological activities and is under clinical evaluation to treat different diseases. However, conflicting data about its stability have been reported. In this study, the kinetic degradation of curcumin from a natural curcuminoid mixture under various conditions (pH, temperature, and dielectric constant of the medium) was investigated. Moreover, the degradation of pure curcumin at some selected conditions was also determined. To fully solubilize curcumin and to prevent precipitation of curcumin that occurs when low concentrations of co-solvent are present, a 50:50 (v/v) aqueous buffer/methanol mixture was used as standard medium to study its degradation kinetics. The results showed that degradation of curcumin both as pure compound and present in the curcuminoid mixture followed first order kinetic reaction. It was further shown that an increasing pH, temperature, and dielectric constant of the medium resulted in an increase in the degradation rate. Curcumin showed rapid degradation due to autoxidation in aqueous buffer pH = 8.0 with a rate constant of 280 × 10(-3) h(-1), corresponding with a half-life (t1/2) of 2.5 h. Dioxygenated bicyclopentadione was identified as the final degradation product. Importantly, curcumin loaded as curcuminoid mixture in ω-methoxy poly (ethylene glycol)-b-(N-(2-benzoyloxypropyl) methacrylamide) (mPEG-HPMA-Bz) polymeric micelles and in Triton X-100 micelles was about 300-500 times more stable than in aqueous buffer. Therefore, loading of curcumin into polymeric micelles is a promising approach to stabilize this compound and develop formulations suitable for further pharmaceutical and clinical studies.

  6. A dehydroxylation kinetics study of brucite Mg(OH)2 at elevated pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuanjiang; Wang, Duojun; Zheng, Haifei; Liu, Tao

    2016-11-01

    We performed an in situ dehydroxylation kinetics study of brucite under water-saturated conditions in the pressure and temperature ranges of 593-633 K and 668-1655 MPa using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell. The kinetic analysis of the isothermal-isobaric data using an Avrami-type model involving nucleation and growth processes yields values for the dehydroxylation rate and reaction order compatible with a reaction mechanism limited by the monodimensional diffusion of water molecules from structural OH groups. Our results show a negative pressure dependence on the reaction rate k and a positive temperature dependence on the k. The dehydroxylation of brucite yields an activation volume ∆V value of 5.03 cm3/mol. Following the Arrhenius relationship, the apparent activation energy E a of the process is calculated to be 146 kJ/mol within the experimental P-T ranges. It is determined that the fluid production rates varying from 4.4 × 10-7 to 10.7 × 10-7 {m}_{fluid}3 {m}_{rock}^{ - 3} {s}^{ - 1} are a few orders of magnitude greater than the strain rate of the mantle serpentinites, which may be fast enough to result in the brittle fracture of rocks. Moreover, the rate of fluid production will be enhanced when brucite occurs in the non-/low H2O environments of the subduction zone.

  7. A kinetic study of pyrolysis and combustion of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris using thermo-gravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ankit; Chakraborty, Saikat

    2013-01-01

    This work uses thermo-gravimetric, differential thermo-gravimetric and differential thermal analyses to evaluate the kinetics of pyrolysis (in inert/N(2) atmosphere) and (oxidative) combustion of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris by heating from 50 to 800 °C at heating rates of 5-40 °C/min. This study shows that combustion produces higher biomass conversion than pyrolysis, and that three stages of decomposition occur in both cases, of which, the second one--consisting of two temperature zones--is the main stage of devolatization. Proteins and carbohydrates are decomposed in the first of the two zones at activation energies of 51 and 45 kJ/mol for pyrolysis and combustion, respectively, while lipids are decomposed in its second zone at higher activation energies of 64 and 63 kJ/mol, respectively. The kinetic expressions of the reaction rates in the two zones for pyrolysis and combustion have been obtained and it has been shown that increased heating rates result in faster and higher conversion.

  8. Catalytic pyrolysis of tobacco rob: kinetic study and fuel gas produced.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Li, Tan; Jin, Shiping; Lin, Yixin; Yang, Haiping

    2011-12-01

    The pyrolysis kinetics of tobacco rob (TR) was investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) under inert atmosphere, adding chemicals (dolomite and NiO) as catalysts by catalytic-mixing method. The TGA results showed that mass loss and mass loss rates were affected by catalysts. The conversion rates increased while the activation energy decreased. Moreover, the thermal decomposition behaviors of TR were studied in the fixed-bed reactor using dolomite and NiO/γ-Al2O3 as catalysts by catalyst-bed method. A series of experiments had been performed to explore the effects of catalysts, and reaction temperature on the composition and yield of fuel gas. The experiments demonstrated that the catalysts had a high activity of cracking tar and hydrocarbons, as well as yielding a high fuel gas production. For both methods, dolomite and NiO revealed better catalytic performance as a view of enhancing conversion rates and increasing product gas yield.

  9. Active matter beyond mean-field: ring-kinetic theory for self-propelled particles.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yen-Liang; Ihle, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Recently, Hanke et al. [Phys. Rev. E 88, 052309 (2013)] showed that mean-field kinetic theory fails to describe collective motion in soft active colloids and that correlations must not be neglected. Correlation effects are also expected to be essential in systems of biofilaments driven by molecular motors and in swarms of midges. To obtain correlations in an active matter system from first principles, we derive a ring-kinetic theory for Vicsek-style models of self-propelled agents from the exact N-particle evolution equation in phase space. The theory goes beyond mean-field and does not rely on Boltzmann's approximation of molecular chaos. It can handle precollisional correlations and cluster formation, which are both important to understand the phase transition to collective motion. We propose a diagrammatic technique to perform a small-density expansion of the collision operator and derive the first two equations of the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy. An algorithm is presented that numerically solves the evolution equation for the two-particle correlations on a lattice. Agent-based simulations are performed and informative quantities such as orientational and density correlation functions are compared with those obtained by ring-kinetic theory. Excellent quantitative agreement between simulations and theory is found at not-too-small noises and mean free paths. This shows that there are parameter ranges in Vicsek-like models where the correlated closure of the BBGKY hierarchy gives correct and nontrivial results. We calculate the dependence of the orientational correlations on distance in the disordered phase and find that it seems to be consistent with a power law with an exponent around -1.8, followed by an exponential decay. General limitations of the kinetic theory and its numerical solution are discussed.

  10. Active matter beyond mean-field: Ring-kinetic theory for self-propelled particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yen-Liang; Ihle, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Recently, Hanke et al. [Phys. Rev. E 88, 052309 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.88.052309] showed that mean-field kinetic theory fails to describe collective motion in soft active colloids and that correlations must not be neglected. Correlation effects are also expected to be essential in systems of biofilaments driven by molecular motors and in swarms of midges. To obtain correlations in an active matter system from first principles, we derive a ring-kinetic theory for Vicsek-style models of self-propelled agents from the exact N -particle evolution equation in phase space. The theory goes beyond mean-field and does not rely on Boltzmann's approximation of molecular chaos. It can handle precollisional correlations and cluster formation, which are both important to understand the phase transition to collective motion. We propose a diagrammatic technique to perform a small-density expansion of the collision operator and derive the first two equations of the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy. An algorithm is presented that numerically solves the evolution equation for the two-particle correlations on a lattice. Agent-based simulations are performed and informative quantities such as orientational and density correlation functions are compared with those obtained by ring-kinetic theory. Excellent quantitative agreement between simulations and theory is found at not-too-small noises and mean free paths. This shows that there are parameter ranges in Vicsek-like models where the correlated closure of the BBGKY hierarchy gives correct and nontrivial results. We calculate the dependence of the orientational correlations on distance in the disordered phase and find that it seems to be consistent with a power law with an exponent around -1.8 , followed by an exponential decay. General limitations of the kinetic theory and its numerical solution are discussed.

  11. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of thermally activated magnetization reversal in dual-layer Exchange Coupled Composite recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumer, M. L.; Almudallal, A. M.; Mercer, J. I.; Whitehead, J. P.; Fal, T. J.

    The kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method developed for thermally activated magnetic reversal processes in single-layer recording media has been extended to study dual-layer Exchange Coupled Composition (ECC) media used in current and next generations of disc drives. The attempt frequency is derived from the Langer formalism with the saddle point determined using a variant of Bellman Ford algorithm. Complication (such as stagnation) arising from coupled grains having metastable states are addressed. MH-hysteresis loops are calculated over a wide range of anisotropy ratios, sweep rates and inter-layer coupling parameter. Results are compared with standard micromagnetics at fast sweep rates and experimental results at slow sweep rates.

  12. Aerobic composting of waste activated sludge: Kinetic analysis for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Y.; Kawase, Y. . E-mail: bckawase@mail.eng.toyo.ac.jp

    2006-07-01

    In order to examine the optimal design and operating parameters, kinetics for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption in composting of waste activated sludge were quantitatively examined. A series of experiments was conducted to discuss the optimal operating parameters for aerobic composting of waste activated sludge obtained from Kawagoe City Wastewater Treatment Plant (Saitama, Japan) using 4 and 20 L laboratory scale bioreactors. Aeration rate, compositions of compost mixture and height of compost pile were investigated as main design and operating parameters. The optimal aerobic composting of waste activated sludge was found at the aeration rate of 2.0 L/min/kg (initial composting mixture dry weight). A compost pile up to 0.5 m could be operated effectively. A simple model for composting of waste activated sludge in a composting reactor was developed by assuming that a solid phase of compost mixture is well mixed and the kinetics for microbiological reaction is represented by a Monod-type equation. The model predictions could fit the experimental data for decomposition of waste activated sludge with an average deviation of 2.14%. Oxygen consumption during composting was also examined using a simplified model in which the oxygen consumption was represented by a Monod-type equation and the axial distribution of oxygen concentration in the composting pile was described by a plug-flow model. The predictions could satisfactorily simulate the experiment results for the average maximum oxygen consumption rate during aerobic composting with an average deviation of 7.4%.

  13. Long-time atomistic evolution of grain boundary in nickel using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Sami; Trochet, Mickaël; Restrepo, Oscar; Mousseau, Normand

    The microscopic mechanisms associated with the evolution of metallic materials are still a matter of debate as both experimental and numerical approaches fail to provide a detailed atomic picture of their time evolution. Here, we use the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an unbiased off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building to overcome these limitations and follow the atomistic evolution of a 10.000-atom grain boundary Ni system over macroscopic time scales. We first characterize the kinetic properties of four different empirical potentials, the embedded atom method (EAM), the first and second modified embedded atom method (MEAM1NN and MEAM2NN respectively) and the Reax force field (ReaxFF) potentials. Comparing the energetics, the elastic effects and the diffusion mechanisms for systems with one to three vacancies and one to three self-interstitials in nickel simulated over second time scale, we conclude that ReaxFF and EAM potentials are closest to experimental values. We then proceed to study the long-time evolution of a grain boundary with the Reax forcefield and to offer a detailed description of its energy landscape, including the exact description of short and long-range effects on self-diffusion along the interface

  14. Adsorption behavior of direct red 80 and congo red onto activated carbon/surfactant: process optimization, kinetics and equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhengjun; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Xiao; Jiang, Xiaohui; Li, Tian

    2015-02-25

    Adsorptions of congo red and direct red 80 onto activated carbon/surfactant from aqueous solution were optimized. The Box-Behnken design (BBD) has been employed to analyze the effects of concentration of surfactant, temperature, pH, and initial concentration of the dye in the adsorption capacity. Their corresponding experimental data could be evaluated excellently by second order polynomial regression models and the two models were also examined based on the analysis of variance and t test statistics, respectively. The optimum conditions were obtained as follows: Cs=34.10 μM, T=50°C, pH=3.5, and CCR=160 mg/L for the congo red system, and Cs=34.10 μM, T=50°C, pH=6.1, and CDR80=110 mg/L for the direct red 80 system. And in these conditions, the measured experimental maximum adsorption capacities for the congo red and direct red 80 removals were 769.48 mg/g and 519.90 mg/g, which were consistent with their corresponding predicted values, with small relative errors of -2.81% and -0.67%, respectively. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetics for the two dye adsorptions onto AC/DDAC were also investigated. The experimental data were fitted by four isotherm models, and Langmuir model presented the best fit. The kinetic studies indicated that the kinetic data followed the pseudo-second-order model.

  15. Kinetic studies of nitrate removal from aqueous solution using granular chitosan-Fe(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qili; Chen, Nan; Feng, Chuanping; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Weiwu; Lv, Long

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a granular chitosan-Fe(III) complex was prepared as a feasible adsorbent for the removal of nitrate from an aqueous solution. There was no significant change in terms of nitrate removal efficiency over a wide pH range of 3-11. Nitrate adsorption on the chitosan-Fe(III) complex followed the Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm model. In order to more accurately reflect adsorption and desorption behaviors at the solid/solution interface, kinetic model I and kinetic model II were proposed to simulate the interfacial process in a batch system. Nitrate adsorption on the chitosan-Fe(III) complex followed the pseudo-first-order kinetic model and kinetic model I. The proposed half-time could provide useful information for optimizing process design. Adsorption and desorption rate constants obtained from kinetic model I and kinetic model II were beneficial to understanding the interfacial process and the extent of adsorption reaction. Kinetic model I and kinetic model II implied that nitrate uptake exponentially approaches a limiting value.

  16. Electrochemical degradation, kinetics & performance studies of solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debanjan

    Linear and Non-linear electrochemical characterization techniques and equivalent circuit modelling were carried out on miniature and sub-commercial Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) stacks as an in-situ diagnostic approach to evaluate and analyze their performance under the presence of simulated alternative fuel conditions. The main focus of the study was to track the change in cell behavior and response live, as the cell was generating power. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was the most important linear AC technique used for the study. The distinct effects of inorganic components usually present in hydrocarbon fuel reformates on SOFC behavior have been determined, allowing identification of possible "fingerprint" impedance behavior corresponding to specific fuel conditions and reaction mechanisms. Critical electrochemical processes and degradation mechanisms which might affect cell performance were identified and quantified. Sulfur and siloxane cause the most prominent degradation and the associated electrochemical cell parameters such as Gerisher and Warburg elements are applied respectively for better understanding of the degradation processes. Electrochemical Frequency Modulation (EFM) was applied for kinetic studies in SOFCs for the very first time for estimating the exchange current density and transfer coefficients. EFM is a non-linear in-situ electrochemical technique conceptually different from EIS and is used extensively in corrosion work, but rarely used on fuel cells till now. EFM is based on exploring information obtained from non-linear higher harmonic contributions from potential perturbations of electrochemical systems, otherwise not obtained by EIS. The baseline fuel used was 3 % humidified hydrogen with a 5-cell SOFC sub-commercial planar stack to perform the analysis. Traditional methods such as EIS and Tafel analysis were carried out at similar operating conditions to verify and correlate with the EFM data and ensure the validity of the

  17. [Calmodulin can induce and control damping oscillations in the plasma membrane Ca2+ -ATPase activity: a kinetic model].

    PubMed

    Gol'dshtein, B N; Aksirov, A M; Zakrzhevskaia, D T

    2007-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase is the calcium pump that extrudes calcium ions from cells using ATP hydrolisis for the maintenance of low Ca2+ concentrations in the cell. Calmodulin stimulates Ca2+-ATPase by binding to the autoinhibitory enzyme domain, which allows the access of cytoplasmic ATP and Ca2+ to the active and transport cites. Our kinetic model predicts damped oscillations in the enzyme activity and interprets the known nonmonotonous kinetic behavior of the enzyme in the presence of calmodulin. For the parameters close to the experimental ones, the kinetic model explains the changes in frequency and damping factor of the oscillatory enzyme activity, as dependent on calmodulin concentration. The calculated pre-steady-state curves fit well the known experimental data. The kinetic analysis allows us to assign Ca2+-ATPase to the hysteretic enzymes exhibiting activity oscillations in open systems.

  18. A Novel Approach to Experimental Studies of Mineral Dissolution Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhu; William E. Seyfried

    2005-01-01

    Currently, DOE is conducting pilot CO{sub 2} injection tests to evaluate the concept of geological sequestration. One strategy that potentially enhances CO{sub 2} solubility and reduces the risk of CO{sub 2} leak back to the surface is dissolution of indigenous minerals in the geological formation and precipitation of secondary carbonate phases, which increases the brine pH and immobilizes CO{sub 2}. Clearly, the rates at which these dissolution and precipitation reactions occur directly determine the efficiency of this strategy. However, one of the fundamental problems in modern geochemistry is the persistent two to five orders of magnitude discrepancy between laboratory-measured and field derived feldspar dissolution rates. To date, there is no real guidance as to how to predict silicate reaction rates for use in quantitative models. Current models for assessment of geological carbon sequestration have generally opted to use laboratory rates, in spite of the dearth of such data for compositionally complex systems, and the persistent disconnect between lab and field applications. Therefore, a firm scientific basis for predicting silicate reaction kinetics in CO{sub 2} injected geological formations is urgently needed to assure the reliability of the geochemical models used for the assessments of carbon sequestration strategies. The funded experimental and theoretical study attempts to resolve this outstanding scientific issue by novel experimental design and theoretical interpretation to measure silicate dissolution rates and iron carbonate precipitation rates at conditions pertinent to geological carbon sequestration. In the first year of the project, we have successfully developed a sample preparation method and completed three batch feldspar dissolution experiments at 200 C and 300 bars. The changes of solution chemistry as dissolution experiments progressed were monitored with on-line sampling of the aqueous phase at the constant temperature and pressure

  19. Comparison of nickel doped Zinc Sulfide and/or palladium nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon as efficient adsorbents for kinetic and equilibrium study of removal of Congo Red dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, K.; Ghaedi, M.; Ansari, A.

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the efficiency of nickel doped Zinc Sulfide nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon (Ni-ZnS-NP-AC) and palladium nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (Pd-NP-AC) for the removal of Congo Red (CR) from aqueous solution was investigated. These materials were fully identified and characterized in term of structure, surface area and pore volume with different techniques such XRD, FE-SEM and TEM analysis. The dependency of CR removal percentage to variables such as pH, contact time, amount of adsorbents, CR concentration was examined and optimum values were set as: 0.03 g Ni-ZnS-NP-AC and 0.04 g of Pd-NP-AC at pH of 3 and 2 after mixing for 22 and 26 min for Ni-ZnS-NP-AC and Pd-NP-AC, respectively. Subsequently, it was revealed that isotherm data efficiency can be correlated Langmuir with maximum monolayer adsorption capacities of 286 and 126.6 mg g-1 at room temperature for Ni-ZnS-NP-AC and Pd-NP-AC, respectively. Investigation of correlation between time and rate of adsorption reveal that the CR adsorption onto both adsorbents followed pseudo second order and interparticle diffusion simultaneously.

  20. Optimization and Kinetic Studies on Biodiesel Production from Kusum (Schleichera triguga) Oil Using Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Sarve, Antaram; Varma, Mahesh N; Sonawane, Shriram S

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the low-cost non-edible kusum (Schleichera triguga) oil with a substantial amount of free fatty acid (FFA) was utilized for biodiesel synthesis. In pretreatment step, FFA was reduced by the acid catalyzed esterification method. Then, response surface method (RSM) in conjunction with centre composite design (CCD) containing 30 experimental runs were statistically employed for process optimization and kinetic study for the base catalyzed transesterification process. A statistical model predicted highest fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yield of 97.37% at the optimal values of process parameters as follows: sodium methoxide concentration 0.9 wt% of oil, Methanol to oil molar ratio 9:1, temperature 58.9 ℃ and reaction time 58.5 min. Using these optimal parameters under experimental conditions in three independent replicates an actual FAME content of 98.14% was obtained which was in reasonable agreement with predicted one. The developed kinetic model suggested a 1.8(th) order reaction with activation energy of 31.42 kcal mol(-1) and frequency factor of 5.53×10(19) L mol(-1)min(-1). Furthermore, Important fuel properties of kusum oil biodiesel (KOB) was compared with ASTM 6751 and DIN EN 14214. The viscosity was found to be 5.34 Cst at 40 °C and the flash point was 152°C.

  1. A quantitative multiplexed mass spectrometry assay for studying the kinetic of residue-specific histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yin-Ming; Henry, Ryan A; Andrews, Andrew J

    2014-12-01

    Histone acetylation is involved in gene regulation and, most importantly, aberrant regulation of histone acetylation is correlated with major human diseases. Although many lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) have been characterized as being capable of acetylating multiple lysine residues on histones, how different factors such as enzyme complexes or external stimuli (e.g. KAT activators or inhibitors) alter KAT specificity remains elusive. In order to comprehensively understand how the homeostasis of histone acetylation is maintained, a method that can quantitate acetylation levels of individual lysines on histones is needed. Here we demonstrate that our mass spectrometry (MS)-based method accomplishes this goal. In addition, the high throughput, high sensitivity, and high dynamic range of this method allows for effectively and accurately studying steady-state kinetics. Based on the kinetic parameters from in vitro enzymatic assays, we can determine the specificity and selectivity of a KAT and use this information to understand what factors influence histone acetylation. These approaches can be used to study the enzymatic mechanisms of histone acetylation as well as be adapted to other histone modifications. Understanding the post-translational modification of individual residues within the histones will provide a better picture of chromatin regulation in the cell.

  2. Combustion synthesis of advanced materials: Studies of the influence of gravity and reaction kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelekh, Aleksey Yevgeuyevich

    Combustion synthesis is an attractive technique to synthesize a wide variety of advanced materials that include powders and near-net shape products of ceramics, intermetallics, composites and functionally gradient materials. It is also considered to be a valuable method for space applications, because of low energy requirements and simple equipment. However, it is necessary to understand how microgravity influences the combustion mechanism and properties of the synthesized materials. In this work, combustion synthesis experiments were conducted both in normal and in low-gravity conditions, using a unique setup designed and developed for this purpose. Microgravity experiments were done in NASA Lewis Research Center using Drop Tower which provided 2.2 s of 10-5 g level, as well as on-board DC-9 aircraft (20 s of 10-2 g). It was clearly demonstrated that gravity plays an important role during combustion synthesis. It significantly influences both the combustion and structure formation processes. It was also shown that microgravity conditions allow the synthesis of materials with improved micro- and macrostructures. The study of chemical reaction kinetics in combustion synthesis systems is of critical importance. The measurement of kinetic parameters (especially activation energy) and a comparison with known elementary processes provides an insight into the controlling step of the mechanism. In this work, a computer-assisted electrothermography method was developed to determine the intrinsic kinetics of reactions under conditions similar to those realized during combustion synthesis of materials. This technique was applied to investigate the kinetics and other features associated with the reaction of titanium with nitrogen at 1 atm pressure. It was shown that at temperatures below the melting point of titanium, the reaction follows parabolic rate law. The obtained activation energy value is in good agreement with literature data. At higher temperatures, however, the

  3. Quantum dot based enzyme activity sensors present deviations from Michaelis-Menten kinetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Sebastián. A.; Brown, Carl W.; Malanoski, Anthony P.; Oh, Eunkeu; Susumu, Kimihiro; Medintz, Igor L.

    2016-03-01

    Nanosensors employing quantum dots (QDs) and enzyme substrates with fluorescent moieties offer tremendous promise for disease surveillance/diagnostics and as high-throughput co-factor assays. Advantages of QDs over other nanoscaffolds include their small size and inherent photochemical properties such as size tunable fluorescence, ease in attaching functional moieties, and resistance to photobleaching. These properties make QDs excellent Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) donors; well-suited for rapid, optical measurement applications. We report enzyme sensors designed with a single FRET donor, the QD donor acting as a scaffold to multiple substrates or acceptors. The QD-sensor follows the concrete activity of the enzyme, as compared to the most common methodologies that quantify the enzyme amount or its mRNA precursor. As the sensor reports on the enzyme activity in real-time we can actively follow the kinetics of the enzyme. Though classic Michaelis-Menten (MM) parameters can be obtained to describe the activity. In the course of these experiments deviations, both decreasing and increasing the kinetics, from the common MM model were observed upon close examinations. From these observations additional experiments were undertaken to understand the varying mechanisms. Different enzymes can present different deviations depending on the chosen target, e.g. trypsin appears to present a positive hopping mechanism while collagenase demonstrates a QD caused reversible inhibition.

  4. Anaerobic waste-activated sludge digestion - A bioconversion mechanism and kinetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Tatsuo; Kudo, Kenzo; Nasu, Yoshikazu )

    1993-05-01

    The anaerobic bioconversion of raw and mechanically lysed waste-activated sludge was kinetically investigated. The hydrolysis of the biopolymers, such as protein, which leaked out from the biological sludge with ultrasonic lysis, was a first-order reaction in anaerobic digestion and the rate constant was much higher than the decay rate constant of the raw waste activated sludge. An anaerobic digestion model that is capable of evaluating the effect of the mechanical sludge lysis on digestive performance was developed. The present model includes four major biological processes - the release of intracellular matter with sludge lysis; hydrolysis of biopolymers to volatile acids; the degradation of various volatile acids to acetate; and the conversion of acetate and hydrogen to methane. Each process was assumed to follow first-order kinetics. The model approximately simulated the overall process performance of the anaerobic digestion of waste-activated sludge. The model suggested that when the lysed waste-activated sludge was fed, the overall digestive performance remarkably increased in the two-phase system consisting of an acid forming process and a methanogenic process, which ensured the symbiotic growth of acetogenic and methanogenic bacteria.

  5. A Simulation Game for the Study of Enzyme Kinetics and Inhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chayoth, Reuben; Cohen, Annette

    1996-01-01

    Presents a simulation game that facilitates understanding of the concepts of enzyme kinetics and inhibition. The first part of the game deals with the relationship between enzyme activity and substrate concentration while the second part deals with characterization of competitive and noncompetitive inhibition of enzyme activity. (JRH)

  6. Advances in Studies of Electrode Kinetics and Mass Transport in AMTEC Cells (abstract)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; Kisor, A.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    Previous work reported from JPL has included characterization of electrode kinetics and alkali atom transport from electrodes including Mo, W, WRh(sub x), WPt(sub x)(Mn), in sodium AMTEC cells and vapor exposure cells, and Mo in potassium vapor exposure cells. These studies were generally performed in cells with small area electrodes (about 1 to 5 cm(sup 2)), and device geometry had little effect on transport. Alkali diffusion coefficients through these electrodes have been characterized, and approximate surface diffusion coefficients derived in cases of activated transport. A basic model of electrode kinetic at the alkali metal vapor/porous metal electrode/alkali beta'-alumina solid electrolyte three phase boundary has been proposed which accounts for electrochemical reaction rates with a collision frequency near the three phase boundary and tunneling from the porous electrode partially covered with adsorbed alkali metal atoms. The small electrode effect in AMTEC cells has been discussed in several papers, but quantitative investigations have described only the overall effect and the important contribution of electrolyte resistance. The quantitative characterization of transport losses in cells with large area electrodes has been limited to simulations of large area electrode effects, or characterization of transport losses from large area electrodes with significant longitudinal temperature gradients. This paper describes new investigations of electrochemical kinetics and transport, particularily with WPt(sub 3.5) electrodes, including the influence of electrode size on the mass transport loss in the AMTEC cell. These electrodes possess excellent sodium transport properties making verification of device limitations on transport much more readily attained.

  7. Kinetic study of microwave-assisted alkaline hydrolysis of Jatropha curcas oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusuf, Nur'aini Raman; Kamil, Ruzaimah Nik Mohamad; Yusup, Suzana

    2016-11-01

    The kinetics of hydrolysis of Jatropha curcas oil under microwave irradation in the presence of alkaline solution was studied. The temperature of 50°C, 65°C and 80°C were studied in the range of optimum condition of 1.75 M catalyst, solvent/oil ratio of (1: 68) and 15 minutes reaction time. The rate constants of oil hydrolysis are corresponding to triglyceride disappearance concentration. The rates of reaction for fatty acids production was determined by pseudo first order. The activation energy (Ea) achieved at 30.61 kJ/mol is lower using conventional method. This conclude that the rate of reaction via microwave heating is less temperature sensitive therefore reaction can be obtained at lower temperature.

  8. A Novel Approach to Experimental Studies of Mineral Dissolution Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhu

    2006-08-31

    Currently, DOE is conducting pilot CO{sub 2} injection tests to evaluate the concept of geological sequestration. One strategy that potentially enhances CO{sub 2} solubility and reduces the risk of CO{sub 2} leak back to the surface is dissolution of indigenous minerals in the geological formation and precipitation of secondary carbonate phases, which increases the brine pH and immobilizes CO{sub 2}. Clearly, the rates at which these dissolution and precipitation reactions occur directly determine the efficiency of this strategy. However, one of the fundamental problems in modern geochemistry is the persistent two to five orders of magnitude discrepancy between laboratory measured and field derived feldspar dissolution rates. To date, there is no real guidance as to how to predict silicate reaction rates for use in quantitative models. Current models for assessment of geological carbon sequestration have generally opted to use laboratory rates, in spite of the dearth of such data for compositionally complex systems, and the persistent disconnect between laboratory and field applications. Therefore, a firm scientific basis for predicting silicate reaction kinetics in CO2 injected geological formations is urgently needed to assure the reliability of the geochemical models used for the assessments of carbon sequestration strategies. The funded experimental and theoretical study attempts to resolve this outstanding scientific issue by novel experimental design and theoretical interpretation to measure silicate dissolution rates and iron carbonate precipitation rates at conditions pertinent to geological carbon sequestration. In the second year of the project, we completed CO{sub 2}-Navajo sandstone interaction batch and flow-through experiments and a Navajo sandstone dissolution experiment without the presence of CO{sub 2} at 200 C and 250-300 bars, and initiated dawsonite dissolution and solubility experiments. We also performed additional 5-day experiments at the

  9. Thermal degradation studies and kinetic modeling of cardoon (Cynara cardunculus) pyrolysis using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

    PubMed

    Damartzis, Th; Vamvuka, D; Sfakiotakis, S; Zabaniotou, A

    2011-05-01

    A key element in the design of sustainable pyrolysis processes is the thermal degradation kinetics of biomass. In this work, pyrolysis tests for cardoon (Cynara carduculus) stems and leaves were performed in a non-isothermal thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) in order to determine the thermal degradation behavior of both stems and leaves. The kinetic parameters of the process were evaluated using three different kinetic models, the independent parallel reaction model, KAS and OFW iso-conversional model. Good agreement with the experimental TGA data was observed for all models, the best being with the independent parallel reaction model. A variance in the activation energy with conversion was observed when the KAS and OFW models were employed, which reveals that the pyrolysis of cardoon progresses through more complex and multi-step kinetics.

  10. A study of the kinetics of isothermal nicotine desorption from silicon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnadjevic, Borivoj; Lazarevic, Natasa; Jovanovic, Jelena

    2010-12-01

    The isothermal kinetics of nicotine desorption from silicon dioxide (SiO 2) was investigated. The isothermal thermogravimetric curves of nicotine at temperatures of 115 °C, 130 °C and 152 °C were recorded. The kinetic parameters ( Ea, ln A) of desorption of nicotine were calculated using various methods (stationary point, model constants and differential isoconversion method). By applying the "model-fitting" method, it was found that the kinetic model of nicotine desorption from silicon dioxide was a phase boundary controlled reaction (contracting volume). The values of the kinetic parameters, Ea,α and ln Aα, complexly change with changing degree of desorption and a compensation effect exists. A new mechanism of activation for the desorption of the absorbed molecules of nicotine was suggested in agreement with model of selective energy transfer.

  11. Study of the kinetics of catalytic decomposition of hydrazine vapors on palladium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khomenko, A. A.; Apelbaum, L. O.

    1987-01-01

    The decomposition rates of N2H4 on a palladium surface are studied. Experiments were conducted in a circulating unit at atmosphere pressure. The experimental method is described. The laws found for the reaction kinetics are explained by equations.

  12. A kinetic study of hydrolysis of polyester elastomer in magnetic tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Watanabe, H.

    1994-01-01

    A useful method for kinetic study of the hydrolysis of polyester elastomer is established which uses the number-average molecular weight. The reasonableness of this method is confirmed and the effect of magnetic particles on hydrolysis is considered.

  13. A Study in Enzyme Kinetics Using an Ion-Specific Electrode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turchi, Sandra; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment on enzyme kinetics using the D-amino acid oxidase system and an ammonia electrode. Preparation of an ammonia standard curve, a sample preparation, and inhibition studies are discussed. (YP)

  14. Stable isotope studies of nicotine kinetics and bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Benowitz, N.L.; Jacob, P. 3d.; Denaro, C.; Jenkins, R. )

    1991-03-01

    The stable isotope-labeled compound 3',3'-dideuteronicotine was used to investigate the disposition kinetics of nicotine in smokers, the systemic absorption of nicotine from cigarette smoke, and the bioavailability of nicotine ingested as oral capsules. Blood levels of labeled nicotine could be measured for 9 hours after a 30-minute intravenous infusion. Analysis of disposition kinetics in 10 healthy men revealed a multiexponential decline after the end of an infusion, with an elimination half-life averaging 203 minutes. This half-life was longer than that previously reported, indicating the presence of a shallow elimination phase. Plasma clearance averaged 14.6 ml/min/kg. The average intake of nicotine per cigarette was 2.29 mg. A cigarette smoke-monitoring system that directly measured particulate matter in smoke was evaluated in these subjects. Total particulate matter, number of puffs on the cigarette, total puff volume, and time of puffing correlated with the intake of nicotine from smoking. The oral bioavailability of nicotine averaged 44%. This bioavailability is higher than expected based on the systemic clearance of nicotine and suggests that there may be significant extrahepatic metabolism of nicotine.

  15. Predictive Framework and Experimental Tests of the Kinetic Isotope Effect at Redox-Active Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavner, A.; John, S.; Black, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Electrochemical reactions provide a compelling framework to study kinetic isotope effects because redox-related processes are important for a wide variety of geological and environmental processes. In the laboratory, electrochemical reaction rates can be electronically controlled and measured in the laboratory using a potentiostat. This enables variation of redox reactions rates independent of changes in chemistry and, and the resulting isotope compositions of reactants and products can be separated and analyzed. In the past years, a series of experimental studies have demonstrated a large, light, and tunable kinetic isotope effect during electrodeposition of metal Fe, Zn, Li, Cu, and Mo from a variety of solutions (e.g. Black et al., 2009, 2010, 2011). A theoretical framework based on Marcus kinetic theory predicts a voltage-dependent kinetic isotope effect (Kavner et al., 2005, 2008), however while this framework was able to predict the tunable nature of the effect, it was not able to simultaneously predict absolute reaction rates and relative isotope rates. Here we present a more complete development of a statistical mechanical framework for simple interfacial redox reactions, which includes isotopic behavior. The framework is able to predict a kinetic isotope effect as a function of temperature and reaction rate, starting with three input parameters: a single reorganization energy which describes the overall kinetics of the electron transfer reaction, and the equilibrium reduced partition function ratios for heavy and light isotopes in the product and reactant phases. We show the framework, elucidate some of the predictions, and show direct comparisons against isotope fractionation data obtained during laboratory and natural environment redox processes. A. Kavner, A. Shahar, F. Bonet, J. Simon and E. Young (2005) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 69(12), 2971-2979. A. Kavner, S. G. John, S. Sass, and E. A. Boyle (2008), Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, vol 72, pp. 1731

  16. Effects of PEF and heat pasteurization on PME activity in orange juice with regard to a new inactivation kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Agcam, E; Akyıldız, A; Evrendilek, G Akdemir

    2014-12-15

    The inactivation kinetics of pectin methyl esterase (PME) during the shelf life (4°C-180 days) of freshly squeezed orange juice samples processed by both pulsed electric fields (PEF) and heat pasteurization (HP) was evaluated in the study. The PME inactivation level after the PEF (25.26 kV/cm-1206.2 μs) and HP (90°C-20s) treatments were 93.8% and 95.2%, respectively. The PME activity of PEF-processed samples decreased or did not change, while that of HP samples increased during storage (p<0.01). A kinetic model was developed expressing PME inactivation as a function of the PEF treatment conditions, and this enabled the estimation of the reaction rate constant (587.8-2375.4s(-1)), and the time required for a 90% reduction (De, 3917.7-969.5s). Quantification of the increase in PEF energy to ensure a ten-fold reduction in De (ze, 63.7 J), activation electric fields (-921.2 kV cm(-1)mol(-1)), and electrical activation energy (12.9 kJ mol(-1)) was also carried out. Consequently, PEF processing was very effective for the inactivation of PME and for providing stability of orange juice during storage.

  17. mRNA Noise Reveals that Activators Induce a Biphasic Response in the Promoter Kinetics of Highly Regulated Genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Katie; To, Tsz-Leung; Maheshri, Narendra

    2012-02-01

    A dominant source of fluctuations in gene expression is thought to be the process of transcription. The statistics of these fluctuations arise from the kinetics of transcription. Multiple studies suggest the bulk of fluctuations can be understood by a simple process where genes are inactive for exponentially distributed times punctuated by geometric bursts of mRNA. Yet it's largely unknown how cis and trans factors affect the two lumped kinetic parameters, burst size and burst frequency, that describe this process. Importantly, how these parameters are regulated in a single gene can qualitatively affect the dynamical behavior of the network it is embedded within. Here, we ask whether transcriptional activators increase gene expression by increasing the burst size or burst frequency. We do so by deducing these parameters from steady-state mRNA distributions measured in individual yeast cells using single molecule mRNA FISH. We find that for both a synthetic and natural promoter, activators appear to first increase burst size, then burst frequency. We suggest this biphasic response may be common to all highly regulated genes and was previously unappreciated because of measurement techniques. Furthermore, its origins appear to relate to cis events at the promoter, and may arise from combinations of basal and activator-dependent bursts. Our measurements shed new light on transcriptional mechanisms and should assist in building synthetic promoters with tunable statistics.

  18. Kinetic Modeling of the Arabidopsis Cryptochrome Photocycle: FADHo Accumulation Correlates with Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Procopio, Maria; Link, Justin; Engle, Dorothy; Witczak, Jacques; Ritz, Thorsten; Ahmad, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoprotein photoreceptors with multiple signaling roles during plant de-etiolation and development. Arabidopsis cryptochromes (cry1 and cry2) absorb light through an oxidized flavin (FADox) cofactor which undergoes reduction to both FADH° and FADH− redox states. Since the FADH° redox state has been linked to biological activity, it is important to estimate its concentration formed upon illumination in vivo. Here we model the photocycle of isolated cry1 and cry2 proteins with a three-state kinetic model. Our model fits the experimental data for flavin photoconversion in vitro for both cry1 and cry2, providing calculated quantum yields which are significantly lower in cry1 than for cry2. The model was applied to the cryptochrome photocycle in vivo using biological activity in plants as a readout for FADH° concentration. The fit to the in vivo data provided quantum yields for cry1 and cry2 flavin reduction similar to those obtained in vitro, with decreased cry1 quantum yield as compared to cry2. These results validate our assumption that FADH° concentration correlates with biological activity. This is the first reported attempt at kinetic modeling of the cryptochrome photocycle in relation to macroscopic signaling events in vivo, and thereby provides a theoretical framework to the components of the photocycle that are necessary for cryptochrome response to environmental signals. PMID:27446119

  19. Kinetic and theoretical study of the reaction of Cl atoms with a series of linear thiols

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, Andres; Albaladejo, Jose

    2008-11-21

    The reactions of Cl with a series of linear thiols: 1-propanethiol (k{sub 1}), 1-butanethiol (k{sub 2}), and 1-pentanethiol (k{sub 3}) were investigated as a function of temperature (in the range of 268-379 K) and pressure (in the range of 50-200 Torr) by laser photolysis-resonance fluorescence. Only 1-propanethiol has previously been studied, but at 1 Torr of total pressure. The derived Arrhenius expressions obtained using our kinetic data were as follows: k{sub 1}=(3.97{+-}0.44)x10{sup -11} exp[(410{+-}36)/T], k{sub 2}=(1.01{+-}0.16)x10{sup -10} exp[(146{+-}23)/T], and k{sub 3}=(1.28{+-}0.10)x10{sup -10} exp[(129{+-}25)/T] (in units of cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}). Moreover, a theoretical insight into mechanisms of these reactions has also been pursued through ab initio Moeller-Plesset second-order perturbation treatment calculations with 6-311G** basis set. Optimized geometries have been obtained for transition states and molecular complexes appearing along the different reaction pathways. Furthermore, molecular energies have been calculated at QCISD(T) level in order to get an estimation of the activation energies. Finally, the nature of the molecular complexes and transitions states is analyzed by using kinetic-potential and natural bond orbital total energy decomposition schemes.

  20. Efficient removal of cadmium using magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotube nanoadsorbents: equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashai Gatabi, Maliheh; Milani Moghaddam, Hossain; Ghorbani, Mohsen

    2016-07-01

    Adsorptive potential of maghemite decorated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for the removal of cadmium ions from aqueous solution was investigated. The magnetic nanoadsorbent was synthesized using a versatile and cost effective chemical route. Structural, magnetic and surface charge properties of the adsorbent were characterized using FTIR, XRD, TEM, VSM analysis and pHPZC determination. Batch adsorption experiments were performed under varied system parameters such as pH, contact time, initial cadmium concentration and temperature. Highest cadmium adsorption was obtained at pH 8.0 and contact time of 30 min. Adsorption behavior was kinetically studied using pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order, and Weber-Morris intra particle diffusion models among which data were mostly correlated to pseudo second-order model. Adsorbate-adsorbent interactions as a function of temperature was assessed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) and Temkin isotherm models from which Freundlich model had the highest consistency with the data. The adsorption capacity increased with increasing temperature and maximum Langmuir's adsorption capacity was found to be 78.81 mg g-1 at 298 K. Thermodynamic parameters and activation energy value suggest that the process of cadmium removal was spontaneous and physical in nature, which lead to fast kinetics and high regeneration capability of the nanoadsorbent. Results of this work are of great significance for environmental applications of magnetic MWCNTs as promising adsorbent for heavy metals removal from aqueous solutions.

  1. Steady state kinetic studies of purified yeast plasma membrane proton-translocating ATPase.

    PubMed

    Koland, J G; Hammes, G G

    1986-05-05

    The plasma membrane H+-ATPase from bakers' yeast was purified and reconstituted with phosphatidylserine. The steady state kinetics of ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the H+-ATPase were studied over a wide range of Mg2+ and ATP concentrations. Whereas MgATP was the substrate hydrolyzed, excess concentrations of either Mg2+ or ATP were inhibitory. The dependence of the steady state initial velocity of ATP hydrolysis on the concentration of MgATP at a fixed concentration of Mg2+ was sigmoidal rather than hyperbolic. This precluded mechanisms involving only activation and inhibition by Mg2+ and competitive inhibition by ATP. Two alternative interpretations of these results are: 1) the enzyme possesses multiple catalytic sites which interact cooperatively; or 2) the enzyme can exist in multiple conformational states which catalyze MgATP hydrolysis by parallel pathways. The rate laws for both mechanisms are identical so that the two mechanisms cannot be distinguished on the basis of the kinetic data. The data are well fit by the rate law for these mechanisms with the inclusion of competitive inhibition by Mg2+ and ATP and an independent inhibition site for Mg2+.

  2. Kinetic Reaction Mechanism of Sinapic Acid Scavenging NO2 and OH Radicals: A Theoretical Study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Wang, AiHua; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Hui; Li, ZeSheng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics underlying reactions between the naturally-occurring antioxidant sinapic acid (SA) and the very damaging ·NO2 and ·OH were investigated through the density functional theory (DFT). Two most possible reaction mechanisms were studied: hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and radical adduct formation (RAF). Different reaction channels of neutral and anionic sinapic acid (SA-) scavenging radicals in both atmosphere and water medium were traced independently, and the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were calculated. We find the most active site of SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 and ·OH is the –OH group in benzene ring by HAT mechanism, while the RAF mechanism for SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 seems thermodynamically unfavorable. In water phase, at 298 K, the total rate constants of SA eliminating ·NO2 and ·OH are 1.30×108 and 9.20×109 M-1 S-1 respectively, indicating that sinapic acid is an efficient scavenger for both ·NO2 and ·OH. PMID:27622460

  3. Thermochemical conversion pathways of Kappaphycus alvarezii granules through study of kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Das, Prasanta; Mondal, Dibyendu; Maiti, Subarna

    2017-03-10

    Kappaphycus alvarezii seaweed belongs to the class of red alga (Rhodophyta). The granules obtained after recovery of "sap" (liquid plant stimulant) from freshly harvested alga is a promising biomass feedstock for energy application. Herein we report the kinetic behaviour of the granules using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) at different heating rates in N2 atmosphere and thermogravimetric-mass spectrometry (TG-MS) analysis. Sawdust as lignocellulosic biomass is considered for comparative study. Four different kinetic models (i) multilinear regression technique, (ii) Friedman method, (iii) Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO) method and (iv) Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) method are used to evaluate the apparent activation energy (Ea), the pre-exponential factor (Aα) and the overall reaction order (n). Maximum SO2 peak at 300°C and 950°C (from TG-MS), indicates that slow pyrolysis at 500°C, with a packed bed lime scrubber at the outlet during temperature rise, is the best suited thermochemical pathway for energy harnessing.

  4. Thermoluminescence of kunzite: A study of kinetic processes and dosimetry characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogundare, F. O.; Alatishe, M. A.; Chithambo, M. L.; Costin, G.

    2016-04-01

    Since the use of natural minerals for dating and dose reconstruction using luminescence techniques is well-established and always of interest, we present thermoluminescence characteristics of kunzite, a gem variety of spodumene. The chemical composition of the sample was determined using an Electron Probe MicroAnalyzer to be (Li0.996Na0.009Mn0.006)∑ = 1.016(Al0.981Cr0.003Fe2+0.001)∑ = 0.995[(Si1.993Al0.008)∑ = 2.000O6]. Thermoluminescence glow curves measured at 0.5 K/s after laboratory irradiation consist of three prominent peaks at 338 K (labelled as peak I), 454 K (peak II) and 681 K (peak III). The dose response of these three peaks is linear in the range 20-308 Gy studied. The position of each of the peaks is independent of dose, an archetypical feature of first order behaviour. However, detailed kinetic analyses showed that in fact, the peaks are not subject to first order kinetics. Each of the three peaks is affected by thermal quenching with an associated activation energy of thermal quenching estimated to be 0.70, 1.35 and 0.54 eV for peaks I, II and III respectively. In terms of dosimetry use, only peak III was found to be reliable for possible use in luminescence dating and dose reconstruction.

  5. Riboflavin-sensitized photooxidation of Ceftriaxone and Cefotaxime. Kinetic study and effect on Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Reynoso, Eugenia; Spesia, Mariana B; García, Norman A; Biasutti, María A; Criado, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Trace amounts of the widely used β-lactam antibiotics (Atbs) in waste water may cause adverse effects on the ecosystems and contribute to the proliferation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. On these grounds, kinetic and mechanistic aspects of photosensitized degradation of Ceftriaxone (Cft) and Cefotaxime (Ctx), have been studied in pure water by stationary and time-resolved techniques. Additionally, possible implications of these photoprocesses on the antimicrobial activity of the Atbs have also been investigated. Photoirradiation of aqueous solutions of Cft and Ctx produces the degradation of both Atbs in the presence of Riboflavin (vitamin B2), a well known pigment dissolved in natural aquatic systems. The process occurs through Type I and Type II mechanisms, with effective prevalence of the former. The participation of O2(-), OH and O2((1)Δg) is supported by experiments of oxygen consumption carried out in the presence of specific scavengers for such reactive oxygen species. Microbiological assays exhibit a parallelism between the rate of Cft and Ctx photodegradation and the loss of their bactericidal capacity on Staphylococcus aureus strains. Results contribute to both understanding kinetic and mechanism aspects of the degradation and predicting on natural decay of Atbs waste water-contaminants.

  6. Clinical study of quantitative diagnosis of early cervical cancer based on the classification of acetowhitening kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yim, So-Fan; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2010-03-01

    A quantitative colposcopic imaging system for the diagnosis of early cervical cancer is evaluated in a clinical study. This imaging technology based on 3-D active stereo vision and motion tracking extracts diagnostic information from the kinetics of acetowhitening process measured from the cervix of human subjects in vivo. Acetowhitening kinetics measured from 137 cervical sites of 57 subjects are analyzed and classified using multivariate statistical algorithms. Cross-validation methods are used to evaluate the performance of the diagnostic algorithms. The results show that an algorithm for screening precancer produced 95% sensitivity (SE) and 96% specificity (SP) for discriminating normal and human papillomavirus (HPV)-infected tissues from cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) lesions. For a diagnostic algorithm, 91% SE and 90% SP are achieved for discriminating normal tissue, HPV infected tissue, and low-grade CIN lesions from high-grade CIN lesions. The results demonstrate that the quantitative colposcopic imaging system could provide objective screening and diagnostic information for early detection of cervical cancer.

  7. Extracellular mercury sequestration by exopolymeric substances produced by Yarrowia spp.: Thermodynamics, equilibria, and kinetics studies.

    PubMed

    Oyetibo, Ganiyu Oladunjoye; Miyauchi, Keisuke; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Satoru; Endo, Ginro

    2016-12-01

    Exopolymeric substances (EPS) produced by highly mercury-resistant strains of the yeast Yarrowia spp. (Idd1 and Idd2) were isolated and studied for their mercury binding potential. Excellent yield (approximately 0.3 g EPS per gram biomass) of soluble EPS in medium with 3% glucose was observed in the Yarrowia cultures 7 day post-inoculation. A gram dry weight of the EPS consists mainly of carbohydrates (0.4 g), protein (0.3-0.4 g), uronic acid (0.02 g), and nucleic acids (0.002 g). Mercury interactions with the biopolymer were measured as uptake kinetics from a simulated aquatic system and modelled with thermodynamics and calculated mass action equilibria. The EPS forms a complex with Hg(2+) in water with small activation energy (≤2 kJ mol(-1)), achieving about 30 mg Hg(2+) adsorption per gram dry weight of EPS. The adsorption models confirmed complexation of Hg(2+) by the EPS via heterogeneous multilayer adsorption that obey second-order kinetics at constant rate of 4.0 and 8.1 mg g(-1) min(-1). The EPS used chemisorption as rate-limiting step that controls the uptake of Hg(2+) from aquatic systems during micro-precipitation as bio-removal strategy. The EPS are promising biotechnological tools to design bioreactors for treatment of mercury-rich industrial wastewater.

  8. Effects of penconazole on two yeast strains: growth kinetics and molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Jawich, Dalal; Lteif, Roger; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie; Strehaiano, Pierre

    2006-05-01

    The aim of this study consisted to evaluate the impact of a pesticide (penconazole) on the growth kinetics and genotoxicity on two yeast strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Metschnikowia pulcherrima). When the penconazole was added at different phases of the growth of M. pulcherrima, no effect was noticed on the kinetics of yeast growth but DNA adducts were observed when penconazole was added in the exponential phase. Increasing doses (1-15 maximum residue limit) of the pesticide added at the beginning of the fermentation did not induce DNA adducts while kinetics were affected.

  9. Study of Aspect Ratio Effects on Kinetic MHD Instabilities in NSTX and DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    E.D. Fredrickson; W.W. Heidbrink; C.Z. Cheng; N.N. Gorelenkov; E. Belova; A.W. Hyatt; G.J. Kramer; J. Manickam; J. Menard; R. Nazikian; T.L. Rhodes; E. Ruskov

    2004-10-21

    We report general observations of kinetic instabilities on the low aspect-ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and describe explicit aspect ratio scaling studies of kinetic instabilities using both the NSTX and the DIII-D tokamak. The NSTX and the DIII-D tokamak are nearly ideal for such experiments, having a factor of two difference in major radius but otherwise similar parameters. We also introduce new theoretical work on the physics of kinetic ballooning modes (KBM), toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE), and compressional Alfven eigenmodes (CAE) with applications to NSTX.

  10. Autoignition chemistry of the hexane isomers: An experimental and kinetic modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, H.J.; Gaffuri, P.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.; Leppard, W.R.

    1995-06-01

    Autoignition of the five distinct isomers of hexane is studied experimentally under motored engine conditions and computationally using a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism. Computed and experimental results are compared and used to help understand the chemical factors leading to engine knock in spark-ignited engines and the molecular structure factors contributing to octane rating for hydrocarbon fuels. The kinetic model reproduces observed variations in critical compression ratio with fuel structure, and it also provides intermediate and final product species concentrations in very dose agreement with observed results. In addition, the computed results provide insights into the kinetic origins of fuel octane sensitive.

  11. Comparative Kinetic Study and Microwaves Non-Thermal Effects on the Formation of Poly(amic acid) 4,4′-(Hexafluoroisopropylidene)diphthalic Anhydride (6FDA) and 4,4′-(Hexafluoroisopropylidene)bis(p-phenyleneoxy)dianiline (BAPHF). Reaction Activated by Microwave, Ultrasound and Conventional Heating

    PubMed Central

    Tellez, Hugo Mendoza; Alquisira, Joaquín Palacios; Alonso, Carlos Rius; Cortés, José Guadalupe López; Toledano, Cecilio Alvarez

    2011-01-01

    Green chemistry is the design of chemical processes that reduce or eliminate negative environmental impacts. The use and production of chemicals involve the reduction of waste products, non-toxic components, and improved efficiency. Green chemistry applies innovative scientific solutions in the use of new reagents, catalysts and non-classical modes of activation such as ultrasounds or microwaves. Kinetic behavior and non-thermal effect of poly(amic acid) synthesized from (6FDA) dianhydride and (BAPHF) diamine in a low microwave absorbing p-dioxane solvent at low temperature of 30, 50, 70 °C were studied, under conventional heating (CH), microwave (MW) and ultrasound irradiation (US). Results show that the polycondensation rate decreases (MW > US > CH) and that the increased rates observed with US and MW are due to decreased activation energies of the Arrhenius equation. Rate constant for a chemical process activated by conventional heating declines proportionally as the induction time increases, however, this behavior is not observed under microwave and ultrasound activation. We can say that in addition to the thermal microwave effect, a non-thermal microwave effect is present in the system. PMID:22072913

  12. Comparative kinetic study and microwaves non-thermal effects on the formation of poly(amic acid) 4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)diphthalic anhydride (6FDA) and 4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene)bis(p-phenyleneoxy)dianiline (BAPHF). Reaction activated by microwave, ultrasound and conventional heating.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Hugo Mendoza; Alquisira, Joaquín Palacios; Alonso, Carlos Rius; Cortés, José Guadalupe López; Toledano, Cecilio Alvarez

    2011-01-01

    Green chemistry is the design of chemical processes that reduce or eliminate negative environmental impacts. The use and production of chemicals involve the reduction of waste products, non-toxic components, and improved efficiency. Green chemistry applies innovative scientific solutions in the use of new reagents, catalysts and non-classical modes of activation such as ultrasounds or microwaves. Kinetic behavior and non-thermal effect of poly(amic acid) synthesized from (6FDA) dianhydride and (BAPHF) diamine in a low microwave absorbing p-dioxane solvent at low temperature of 30, 50, 70 °C were studied, under conventional heating (CH), microwave (MW) and ultrasound irradiation (US). Results show that the polycondensation rate decreases (MW > US > CH) and that the increased rates observed with US and MW are due to decreased activation energies of the Arrhenius equation. Rate constant for a chemical process activated by conventional heating declines proportionally as the induction time increases, however, this behavior is not observed under microwave and ultrasound activation. We can say that in addition to the thermal microwave effect, a non-thermal microwave effect is present in the system.

  13. Dry (CO2) reforming of methane over Pt catalysts studied by DFT and kinetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Juntian; Du, Xuesen; Ran, Jingyu; Wang, Ruirui

    2016-07-01

    Dry reforming of methane (DRM) is a well-studied reaction that is of both scientific and industrial importance. In order to design catalysts that minimize the deactivation and improve the selectivity and activity for a high H2/CO yield, it is necessary to understand the elementary reaction steps involved in activation and conversion of CO2 and CH4. In our present work, a microkinetic model based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations is applied to explore the reaction mechanism for methane dry reforming on Pt catalysts. The adsorption energies of the reactants, intermediates and products, and the activation barriers for the elementary reactions involved in the DRM process are calculated over the Pt(1 1 1) surface. In the process of CH4 direct dissociation, the kinetic results show that CH dissociative adsorption on Pt(1 1 1) surface is the rate-determining step. CH appears to be the most abundant species on the Pt(1 1 1) surface, suggesting that carbon deposition is not easy to form in CH4 dehydrogenation on Pt(1 1 1) surface. In the process of CO2 activation, three possible reaction pathways are considered to contribute to the CO2 decomposition: (I) CO2* + * → CO* + O*; (II) CO2* + H* → COOH* + * → CO* + OH*; (III) CO2* + H* → mono-HCOO* + * → bi-HCOO* + * [CO2* + H* → bi-HCOO* + *] → CHO* + O*. Path I requires process to overcome the activation barrier of 1.809 eV and the forward reaction is calculated to be strongly endothermic by 1.430 eV. In addition, the kinetic results also indicate this process is not easy to proceed on Pt(1 1 1) surface. While the CO2 activation by H adsorbed over the catalyst surface to form COOH intermediate (Path II) is much easier to be carried out with the lower activation barrier of 0.746 eV. The Csbnd O bond scission is the rate-determining step along this pathway and the process needs to overcome the activation barrier of 1.522 eV. Path III reveals the CO2 activation through H adsorbed over the catalyst

  14. Wanderlust kinetics and variable Ca(2+)-sensitivity of dSlo [correction of Drosophila], a large conductance CA(2+)-activated K+ channel, expressed in oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Silberberg, S D; Lagrutta, A; Adelman, J P; Magleby, K L

    1996-01-01

    Cloned large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK or maxi-K+ channels) from Drosophila (dSlo) were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and studied in excised membrane patches with the patch-clamp technique. Both a natural variant and a mutant that eliminated a putative cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site exhibited large, slow fluctuations in open probability with time. These fluctuations, termed "wanderlust kinetics," occurred with a time course of tens of seconds to minutes and had kinetic properties inconsistent with simple gating models. Wanderlust kinetics was still observed in the presence of 5mM caffeine or 50 nM thapsigargin, or when the Ca2+ buffering capacity of the solution was increased by the addition of 5 mM HEDTA, suggesting that the wanderlust kinetics did not arise from Ca2+ release from caffeine and thapsigargin sensitive internal stores in the excised patch. The slow changes in kinetics associated with wanderlust kinetics could be generated with a discrete-state Markov model with transitions among three or more kinetic modes with different levels of open probability. To average out the wanderlust kinetics, large amounts of data were analyzed and demonstrated up to a threefold difference in the [Ca2+]i required for an open probability of 0.5 among channels expressed from the same injected mRNA. These findings indicate that cloned dSlo channels in excised patches from Xenopus oocytes can exhibit large variability in gating properties, both within a single channel and among channels. PMID:9643949

  15. The Role of Target Binding Kinetics in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Heitman, Laura H; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2015-11-01

    Traditionally structure-activity/affinity relationships (SAR) have dominated research in medicinal chemistry. However, structure-kinetics relationships (SKR) can be very informative too. In this viewpoint we explore the molecular determinants of binding kinetics and discuss challenges for future binding kinetics studies. A scheme for future kinetics-directed drug design and discovery is also proposed.

  16. Characterization study of the sporulation kinetics of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Liu, B L; Tzeng, Y M

    2000-04-05

    A wild-type and an rDNA strain of Bacillus thuringiensis were cultured in a net-draft-tube modified 20-L airlift bioreactor. A comparison of the sporulation patterns suggests that the early sporulation strain has a lower final spore count. Results from off-gas analysis suggests that the CO(2) profile could be an alternative indication to spore counts for the examination of fermentation performance or even the mortality in bioassay of the cultivation product. The difference in mortality tests exhibited by the microorganism was attributed to different patterns of sporulation as well as different levels of gene control inside the cell itself. The sporulation kinetics of B. thuringiensis was simulated by a simple modified Hill equation, where the initial glucose concentration could affect the timing of the onset of sporulation. The equation matches well with the experimental sporulation data for B. thuringiensis in both wild-type and rDNA strains.

  17. A kinetic study of hypoxanthine oxidation by milk xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Escribano, J; Garcia-Canovas, F; Garcia-Carmona, F

    1988-01-01

    The course of the reaction sequence hypoxanthine----xanthine----uric acid catalysed by xanthine:oxygen oxidoreductase from milk was investigated on the basis of u.v. spectra taken during the course of hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidations. It was found that xanthine accumulated in the reaction mixture when hypoxanthine was used as a substrate. The time course of the concentrations of hypoxanthine, xanthine intermediate and uric acid product was simulated numerically. The mathematical model takes into account the competition of substrate, intermediate and product and the accumulation of the intermediate at the enzyme. This type of analysis permits the kinetic parameters of the enzyme for hypoxanthine and xanthine to be obtained. PMID:3196295

  18. Integration of thermocouple microelectrode in the scanning electrochemical microscope at variable temperatures: simultaneous temperature and electrochemical imaging and its kinetic studies

    PubMed Central

    Pan, He; Zhang, Hailing; Lai, Junhui; Gu, Xiaoxin; Sun, Jianjun; Tang, Jing; Jin, Tao

    2017-01-01

    We describe herein a method for the simultaneous measurement of temperature and electrochemical signal with a new type of thermocouple microelectrode. The thermocouple microelectrode can be used not only as a thermometer but also as a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) tip in the reaction between tip-generated bromine and a heated Cu sample. The influence of temperature on the SECM imaging process and the related kinetic parameters have been studied, such as kinetic constant and activation energy. PMID:28338002

  19. Integration of thermocouple microelectrode in the scanning electrochemical microscope at variable temperatures: simultaneous temperature and electrochemical imaging and its kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, He; Zhang, Hailing; Lai, Junhui; Gu, Xiaoxin; Sun, Jianjun; Tang, Jing; Jin, Tao

    2017-03-01

    We describe herein a method for the simultaneous measurement of temperature and electrochemical signal with a new type of thermocouple microelectrode. The thermocouple microelectrode can be used not only as a thermometer but also as a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) tip in the reaction between tip-generated bromine and a heated Cu sample. The influence of temperature on the SECM imaging process and the related kinetic parameters have been studied, such as kinetic constant and activation energy.

  20. Engineering GCaMP affinity and kinetics for improved tracking of neuronal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaonan Richard

    Fluorescent calcium indicator proteins (FCIPs) are powerful tools for monitoring neural activity. However, they still have significant performance limitations compared with synthetic indicators based on the small-molecule chelator BAPTA. Because of high cooperativity originating from a calmodulin-based recombinant calcium sensor, a given GECI is only sensitive to a small part of a neuron's likely calcium concentration range, which can span a range of 0.1-10 microM. GECIs also have up to 100-fold slower reponse kinetics than BAPTA-based indicators. Overcoming limitations in range and kinetics is a key step toward monitoring spike times and firing rates in cell-type-specific brain circuits. We are engaged in structure-based design to vary the affinity and accelerate the response kinetics of a widely used GECI, GCaMP3. We have designed more than 50 novel variants by targeted mutation of GCaMP3's calmodulin (CaM) domain and its intraprobe peptide partner, RS20. In our cuvet characterizations of purified protein, we have attained a nearly 40-fold (0.16-6 microM) range of KD without impairing per-molecule brightness. In stopped-flow biochemical measurements, off-responses to sharp decreases in calcium are more than 10 times faster than any other published GECI. Most of the gap in off-response speed between G-CaMP3 and BAPTA-based indicators could be closed without perturbing KD. In Drosophila antennal nerve axons, sensory stimulation-evoked fluorescence responses were significantly enhanced in speed and amplitude in two novel GECIs. With our biophysical measurements, we discovered that the N-lobe of the bilobular CaM domain is required for the high-fluorescence state and the C-lobe contributes to high affinity Ca2+ binding. To account for our observations, we propose a molecular dynamics model of GCaMP3 with two kinetic pathways leading to a high-fluorescence state. First, small amounts of Ca 2+ activate a slow "C-like" pathway through sequential binding to the C

  1. Kinetic modeling of the adsorption of basic dyes onto steam-activated bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    El Qada, E.N.; Allen, S.J.; Walker, G.M.

    2007-07-15

    The principal aim of this work is to investigate the mechanism of basic dye (methylene blue (MB) and basic red (BR)) adsorption onto activated carbons produced from steam-activated bituminous coal. The rate of adsorption onto various activated carbons, produced in small laboratory-scale and pilot-industrial-scale processes, was investigated under a variety of conditions. The kinetic data from these investigations were correlated to a number of adsorption models in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of the adsorption processes. The adsorption mechanism was found to follow pseudo-second-order and intraparticle-diffusion models, with external mass transfer predominating in the first 5 min of the experiment. Filtrasorb 400 (Chemviron Carbon) exhibited the highest adsorption rate for the removal of basic dyes followed by activated carbons produced by our research group: PAC1 (activated carbon produced from Venezuelan bituminous coal in small laboratory scale using physical activation technique) and PAC2 (activated carbon produced by the steam activation of New Zealand bituminous coal on a pilot-industrial scale).

  2. Kinetic study of antibiotic ciprofloxacin ozonation by MWCNT/MnO2 using Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Hamed Moradmand

    2016-02-01

    Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation was used to investigate kinetics of antibiotic ciprofloxacin degradation by direct and heterogeneous catalytic (MnO2 and carbon nano-tube loaded with MnO2) ozonation. The reaction kinetic mechanisms of each system have been obtained. The rate constant values for the each step of the reaction mechanisms were attained as adjustable parameters by kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. The carbon nano-tube loaded with MnO2 plays important role as catalyst in the ciprofloxacin ozonation by increasing reactivity of ozone and ciprofloxacin drug on the surface of carbon nano-tube. Optimized amount of ozone and catalysts were obtained via studying the effect of inlet ozone concentration and initial amount of catalyst on the rate of ciprofloxacin degradation using Monte Carlo simulation. The simulation results of this study have reasonably agreement with the present experimental data for the ozonation of ciprofloxacin drug.

  3. Surface kinetic roughening caused by dental erosion: An atomic force microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quartarone, Eliana; Mustarelli, Piercarlo; Poggio, Claudio; Lombardini, Marco

    2008-05-01

    Surface kinetic roughening takes place both in case of growth and erosion processes. Teeth surfaces are eroded by contact with acid drinks, such as those used to supplement mineral salts during sporting activities. Calcium-phosphate based (CPP-ACP) pastes are known to reduce the erosion process, and to favour the enamel remineralization. In this study we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the surface roughening during dental erosion, and the mechanisms at the basis of the protection role exerted by a commercial CPP-ACP paste. We found a statistically significant difference (p<0.01) in the roughness of surfaces exposed and not exposed to the acid solutions. The treatment with the CPP-ACP paste determined a statistically significant reduction of the roughness values. By interpreting the AFM results in terms of fractal scaling concepts and continuum stochastic equations, we showed that the protection mechanism of the paste depends on the chemical properties of the acid solution.

  4. Thermal oxidation of single-crystal silicon carbide - Kinetic, electrical, and chemical studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petit, J. B.; Neudeck, P. G.; Matus, L. G.; Powell, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents kinetic data from oxidation studies of the polar faces for 3C and 6H SiC in wet and dry oxidizing ambients. Values for the linear and parabolic rate constants were obtained, as well as preliminary results for the activation energies of the rate constants. Examples are presented describing how thermal oxidation can be used to map polytypes and characterize defects in epitaxial layers grown on low tilt angle 6H SiC substrates. Interface widths were measured using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) with Ar ion beam depth profiling and variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) with effective medium approximation (EMA) models. Preliminary electrical measurements of MOS capacitors are also presented.

  5. [Studying kinetics of oxime-induced reactivation of malathion-inhibited cholinesterase].

    PubMed

    Iudin, M A; Lantukhov, D V; Vengerovich, N G

    2013-01-01

    The kinetics of oxime-induced reactivation of malathion-inhibited cholinesterase has been experimentally studied in vitro. It is shown that oximes do not restore the activity of inhibited butyrylcholinesterase. Acetylcholinesterase reactivation peak (5-mins long) was found to take place upon introduction of dipyroxime (32.5%), pralidoxime (18%), carboxyme (16%) at a concentration of 2.5 x 10(-4) mol/l or toxogonine (26%) at a concentration of 5 x 10(-4) mol/l. Toxogonine demonstrated the maximum affinity to phosphorylated enzyme, while dipyroxime is characterized by a high reactivity with respect to oxime. Significant reactivating ability of these preparations (kR -2300 mol(-1) min(-1) makes them promising solution for the treatment of malathion intoxication.

  6. Atmospheric chemistry: Laboratory studies of kinetics of important reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. J.

    Experiments to measure the rate constants for some reactions of the atmospherically important nitrate radical (NO3) are described using the discharge-flow technique. The nitrate radical was monitored by optical absorption at lambda = 662 nm. The reactions of NO3 with some stable organic and inorganic substrates are reported. The temperature dependences of some of the rate constants were also determined (298 less than T less than 523 K). In most cases, computer simulation was used to extract the rate constant for the primary process because the time-dependent behavior of (NO3) was affected by secondary reactions of NO3 with products of the primary interaction. The Arrhenius parameter for the reactions of NO3 with CH3CH3, CH2CH2, CH3OH, CHCl3, and HCl were determined. The activation energies for the reactions studied between NO3 and some alkynes are presented along with the corresponding pre-exponential factors. Some reactions were studied at room temperature (298 plus or minus 2 K) only and the rate constants found (in units of cubic cm/molecule sec) are: buta-1,3-diene (1.8 x 10 (exp -13), isobutene (2.8 x 10 (exp -13), HBr (1.3 x 10 (exp -15) and hex-2-yne (3.0 x 10 (exp -14). Non-Arrhenius behavior was found in the reactions of NO3 with n-butane, isobutane and propene. The empirical variation of these rate constants with temperature is presented. The curvature of the Arrhenius plots is discussed in terms of (1) a temperature-dependent pre-exponential factor, and (2) the possibility that two competing channels, possessing differing activation energies, exist for each reaction. The atmospheric implications of these reactions are discussed with reference to the nighttime production of nitric acid and the importance of the these reactions as loss processes for NO3.

  7. Phosphotyrosine-mediated LAT assembly on membranes drives kinetic bifurcation in recruitment dynamics of the Ras activator SOS

    PubMed Central

    Huang, William Y. C.; Yan, Qingrong; Lin, Wan-Chen; Chung, Jean K.; Hansen, Scott D.; Christensen, Sune M.; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Kuriyan, John; Groves, Jay T.

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of cell surface receptors with downstream signaling molecules is a commonly occurring theme in multiple signaling systems. However, little is known about how these assemblies modulate reaction kinetics and the ultimate propagation of signals. Here, we reconstitute phosphotyrosine-mediated assembly of extended linker for the activation of T cells (LAT):growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2):Son of Sevenless (SOS) networks, derived from the T-cell receptor signaling system, on supported membranes. Single-molecule dwell time distributions reveal two, well-differentiated kinetic species for both Grb2 and SOS on the LAT assemblies. The majority fraction of membrane-recruited Grb2 and SOS both exhibit fast kinetics and single exponential dwell time distributions, with average dwell times of hundreds of milliseconds. The minor fraction exhibits much slower kinetics, extending the dwell times to tens of seconds. Considering this result in the context of the multistep process by which the Ras GEF (guanine nucleotide exchange factor) activity of SOS is activated indicates that kinetic stabilization from the LAT assembly may be important. This kinetic proofreading effect would additionally serve as a stochastic noise filter by reducing the relative probability of spontaneous SOS activation in the absence of receptor triggering. The generality of receptor-mediated assembly suggests that such effects may play a role in multiple receptor proximal signaling processes. PMID:27370798

  8. Kinetic Mechanisms of Mutation-dependent Harvey Ras Activation and Their Relevance for Development of Costello Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wey, Michael; Lee, Jungwoon; Jeong, Soon Seog; Kim, Jungho; Heo, Jongyun

    2013-01-01

    Costello syndrome is linked to activating mutations of a residue in the p-loop or the NKCD/SAK motifs of Harvey Ras (HRas). More than 10 HRas mutants that induce Costello syndrome have been identified; G12S HRas is the most prevalent of these. However, certain HRas p-loop mutations also are linked to cancer formation that are exemplified with G12V HRas. Despite these relations, specific links between types of HRas mutations and diseases evade definition because some Costello syndrome HRas p-loop mutations, such as G12S HRas, also often cause cancer. This study established novel kinetic parameter-based equations that estimate the value of the cellular fractions of the GTP-bound active form of HRas mutant proteins. Such calculations differentiate between two basic kinetic mechanisms that populate the GTP-bound form of Ras in cells. (i) The increase in GTP-bound Ras by the HRas mutation-mediated perturbation of the intrinsic kinetic characteristics of Ras. This generates a broad spectrum of the population of the GTP-bound form of HRas that typically causes Costello syndrome. The upper end of this spectrum of HRas mutants, as exemplified by G12S HRas, can also cause cancer. (ii) The increase in GTP-bound Ras because the HRas mutations perturb the p120GAP action on Ras. This causes production of a significantly high population of the only GTP-bound form of HRas linked merely to cancer formation. The HRas mutant G12V belongs to this category. PMID:24224811

  9. Myosin heavy chain isoform composition and stretch activation kinetics in single fibres of Xenopus laevis iliofibularis muscle

    PubMed Central

    Andruchova, Olena; Stephenson, Gabriela M M; Andruchov, Oleg; Stephenson, D George; Galler, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is composed of specialized fibre types that enable it to fulfil complex and variable functional needs. Muscle fibres of Xenopus laevis, a frog formerly classified as a toad, were the first to be typed based on a combination of physiological, morphological, histochemical and biochemical characteristics. Currently the most widely accepted criterion for muscle fibre typing is the myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition because it is assumed that variations of this protein are the most important contributors to functional diversity. Yet this criterion has not been used for classification of Xenopus fibres due to the lack of an effective protocol for MHC isoform analysis. In the present study we aimed to resolve and visualize electrophoretically the MHC isoforms expressed in the iliofibularis muscle of Xenopus laevis, to define their functional identity and to classify the fibres based on their MHC isoform composition. Using a SDS-PAGE protocol that proved successful with mammalian muscle MHC isoforms, we were able to detect five MHC isoforms in Xenopus iliofibularis muscle. The kinetics of stretch-induced force transients (stretch activation) produced by a fibre was strongly correlated with its MHC isoform content indicating that the five MHC isoforms confer different kinetics characteristics. Hybrid fibre types containing two MHC isoforms exhibited stretch activation kinetics parameters that were intermediate between those of the corresponding pure fibre types. These results clearly show that the MHC isoforms expressed in Xenopus muscle are functionally different thereby validating the idea that MHC isoform composition is the most reliable criterion for vertebrate skeletal muscle fibre type classification. Thus, our results lay the foundation for the unequivocal classification of the muscle fibres in the Xenopus iliofibularis muscle and for gaining further insights into skeletal muscle fibre diversity. PMID:16644798

  10. Myosin heavy chain isoform composition and stretch activation kinetics in single fibres of Xenopus laevis iliofibularis muscle.

    PubMed

    Andruchova, Olena; Stephenson, Gabriela M M; Andruchov, Oleg; Stephenson, D George; Galler, Stefan

    2006-07-01

    Skeletal muscle is composed of specialized fibre types that enable it to fulfil complex and variable functional needs. Muscle fibres of Xenopus laevis, a frog formerly classified as a toad, were the first to be typed based on a combination of physiological, morphological, histochemical and biochemical characteristics. Currently the most widely accepted criterion for muscle fibre typing is the myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition because it is assumed that variations of this protein are the most important contributors to functional diversity. Yet this criterion has not been used for classification of Xenopus fibres due to the lack of an effective protocol for MHC isoform analysis. In the present study we aimed to resolve and visualize electrophoretically the MHC isoforms expressed in the iliofibularis muscle of Xenopus laevis, to define their functional identity and to classify the fibres based on their MHC isoform composition. Using a SDS-PAGE protocol that proved successful with mammalian muscle MHC isoforms, we were able to detect five MHC isoforms in Xenopus iliofibularis muscle. The kinetics of stretch-induced force transients (stretch activation) produced by a fibre was strongly correlated with its MHC isoform content indicating that the five MHC isoforms confer different kinetics characteristics. Hybrid fibre types containing two MHC isoforms exhibited stretch activation kinetics parameters that were intermediate between those of the corresponding pure fibre types. These results clearly show that the MHC isoforms expressed in Xenopus muscle are functionally different thereby validating the idea that MHC isoform composition is the most reliable criterion for vertebrate skeletal muscle fibre type classification. Thus, our results lay the foundation for the unequivocal classification of the muscle fibres in the Xenopus iliofibularis muscle and for gaining further insights into skeletal muscle fibre diversity.

  11. Kinetics Studies of Radical-Radical Reactions: The NO2 + N2H3 System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    investigating the kinetics of this elementary reaction . 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES...Viewgraph 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) September 2013- October 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Kinetics Studies of Radical-Radical Reactions (I): The NO2...characteristics in relevant operating environments. Here we report theoretical results obtained on the prototypical radical- radical reaction : NO2 + N2H3

  12. Chlorine dioxide oxidation of Escherichia coli in water - A study of the disinfection kinetics and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ofori, Isaac; Maddila, Suresh; Lin, Johnson; Jonnalagadda, Sreekantha B

    2017-03-16

    This study investigated the kinetics and mechanism of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) inactivation of a Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (ATCC 35218) in oxidant demand free (ODF) water in detail as a function of disinfectant concentration (0.5-5.0 mg/L), water pH (6.5-8.5), temperature variations (4-37°C) and bacterial density (10(5)-10(7) cfu/mL). The effects of ClO2 on bacterial cell morphology, outer membrane permeability, cytoplasmic membrane disruption and intracellular enzymatic activity were also studied to elucidate the mechanism of action on the cells. Increasing temperature and disinfectant concentration were proportional to the rate of cell killing, but efficacy was found to be significantly subdued at 0.5 mg/L and less dependent on the bacterial density. The bactericidal efficiency was higher at alkaline pH of 8 or above as compared to neutral and slightly acidic pH of 7 and 6.5 respectively. The disinfection kinetic curves followed a biphasic pattern of rapid inactivation within the initial 2 min which were followed by a tailing even in the presence of residual biocide. The curves were adequately described by the Cavg Hom model. Transmission Electron Microscopy images of the bacteria cells exposed to lethal concentrations of ClO2 indicated very little observable morphological damage to the outer membranes of the cells. ClO2 however was found to increase the permeability of the outer and cytoplasmic membranes leading to the leakage of membrane components such as 260 nm absorbing materials and inhibiting the activity of the intracellular enzyme β-D-galactosidase. It is suggested that the disruption of the cytoplasmic membrane and subsequent efflux of intracellular components result in the inactivation of the Gram-negative bacteria.

  13. Measurement and modelling of adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetics and breakthrough curve of toluene at very low concentrations on to activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Réguer, Anne; Sochard, Sabine; Hort, Cécile; Platel, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Indoor air pollution, characterized by many pollutants at very low concentrations, is nowadays known as a worrying problem for human health. Among physical treatments, adsorption is a widely used process, since porous materials offer high capacity for volatile organic chemicals. However, there are few studies in the literature that deal with adsorption as an indoor air pollution treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the adsorption of toluene on to activated carbon at characteristic indoor air concentrations. Firstly, global kinetic parameters were determined by fitting Thomas's model to experimental data obtained with batch experiments. Then, these kinetic parameters led to the determination of Henry's coefficient, which was checked with experimental data of the adsorption isotherm. Secondly, we simulated a breakthrough curve made at an inlet concentration 10 times higher than the indoor air level. Even if the kinetic parameters in this experiment are different from those in batch experiments, it can be emphasized that the Henry coefficient stays the same.

  14. Photocatalytic activity enhancement of anatase-graphene nanocomposite for methylene removal: Degradation and kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Mostafa; Salem, Shiva

    2016-10-01

    In the present research, the TiO2-graphene nanocomposite was synthesized by an eco-friendly method. The blackberry juice was introduced to graphene oxide (GO) as a reducing agent to produce the graphene nano-sheets. The nanocomposite of anatase-graphene was developed as a photocatalyst for the degradation of methylene blue, owing to the larger specific surface area and synergistic effect of reduced graphene oxide (RGO). The UV spectroscopy measurements showed that the prepared nanocomposite exhibited an excellent photocatalytic activity toward the methylene blue degradation. The rate of electron transfer of redox sheets is much higher than that observed on GO, indicating the applicability of proposed method for the production of anatase-RGO nanocomposite for treatment of water contaminated by cationic dye. The prepared materials were characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A facile and rapid route was applied for the uniform deposition of anatase nanoparticles on the sheets. The resulting nanocomposite contained nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 10 nm. A mechanism for the photocatalytic activity of nanocomposite was suggested and the degradation reaction obeyed the second-order kinetics. It was concluded that the degradation kinetics is changed due to the reduction of GO in the presence of blackberry juice.

  15. Photocatalytic activity enhancement of anatase-graphene nanocomposite for methylene removal: Degradation and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Mostafa; Salem, Shiva

    2016-10-05

    In the present research, the TiO2-graphene nanocomposite was synthesized by an eco-friendly method. The blackberry juice was introduced to graphene oxide (GO) as a reducing agent to produce the graphene nano-sheets. The nanocomposite of anatase-graphene was developed as a photocatalyst for the degradation of methylene blue, owing to the larger specific surface area and synergistic effect of reduced graphene oxide (RGO). The UV spectroscopy measurements showed that the prepared nanocomposite exhibited an excellent photocatalytic activity toward the methylene blue degradation. The rate of electron transfer of redox sheets is much higher than that observed on GO, indicating the applicability of proposed method for the production of anatase-RGO nanocomposite for treatment of water contaminated by cationic dye. The prepared materials were characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A facile and rapid route was applied for the uniform deposition of anatase nanoparticles on the sheets. The resulting nanocomposite contained nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 10nm. A mechanism for the photocatalytic activity of nanocomposite was suggested and the degradation reaction obeyed the second-order kinetics. It was concluded that the degradation kinetics is changed due to the reduction of GO in the presence of blackberry juice.

  16. Controllable activation of nanoscale dynamics in a disordered protein alters binding kinetics

    DOE PAGES

    Callaway, David J. E.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas; ...

    2017-03-08

    The phosphorylation of specific residues in a flexible disordered activation loop yields precise control of signal transduction. One paradigm is the phosphorylation of S339/S340 in the intrinsically disordered tail of the multi-domain scaffolding protein NHERF1, which affects the intracellular localization and trafficking of NHERF1 assembled signaling complexes. Using neutron spin echo spectroscopy (NSE), we show salt-concentration-dependent excitation of nanoscale motion at the tip of the C-terminal tail in the phosphomimic S339D/S340D mutant. The “tip of the whip” that is unleashed is near the S339/S340 phosphorylation site and flanks the hydrophobic Ezrin-binding motif. The kinetic association rate constant of the bindingmore » of the S339D/S340D mutant to the FERM