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Sample records for activity knee motion

  1. Complementary limb motion estimation for the control of active knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Vallery, Heike; Burgkart, Rainer; Hartmann, Cornelia; Mitternacht, Jürgen; Riener, Robert; Buss, Martin

    2011-02-01

    To restore walking after transfemoral amputation, various actuated exoprostheses have been developed, which control the knee torque actively or via variable damping. In both cases, an important issue is to find the appropriate control that enables user-dominated gait. Recently, we suggested a generic method to deduce intended motion of impaired or amputated limbs from residual human body motion. Based on interjoint coordination in physiological gait, statistical regression is used to estimate missing motion. In a pilot study, this complementary limb motion estimation (CLME) strategy is applied to control an active knee exoprosthesis. A motor-driven prosthetic knee with one degree of freedom has been realized, and one above-knee amputee has used it with CLME. Performed tasks are walking on a treadmill and alternating stair ascent and descent. The subject was able to walk on the treadmill at varying speeds, but needed assistance with the stairs, especially to descend. The promising results with CLME are compared with the subject's performance with her own prosthesis, the C-Leg from Otto Bock.

  2. Complementary limb motion estimation for the control of active knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Vallery, Heike; Burgkart, Rainer; Hartmann, Cornelia; Mitternacht, Jürgen; Riener, Robert; Buss, Martin

    2011-02-01

    To restore walking after transfemoral amputation, various actuated exoprostheses have been developed, which control the knee torque actively or via variable damping. In both cases, an important issue is to find the appropriate control that enables user-dominated gait. Recently, we suggested a generic method to deduce intended motion of impaired or amputated limbs from residual human body motion. Based on interjoint coordination in physiological gait, statistical regression is used to estimate missing motion. In a pilot study, this complementary limb motion estimation (CLME) strategy is applied to control an active knee exoprosthesis. A motor-driven prosthetic knee with one degree of freedom has been realized, and one above-knee amputee has used it with CLME. Performed tasks are walking on a treadmill and alternating stair ascent and descent. The subject was able to walk on the treadmill at varying speeds, but needed assistance with the stairs, especially to descend. The promising results with CLME are compared with the subject's performance with her own prosthesis, the C-Leg from Otto Bock. PMID:21303189

  3. Older Adults without Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis: Knee Alignment and Knee Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Fahlman, Lissa; Sangeorzan, Emmeline; Chheda, Nimisha; Lambright, Daphne

    2014-01-01

    This study describes knee alignment and active knee range of motion (ROM) in a community-based group of 78-year old adults (n = 143) who did not have radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis in either knee (KL < 2). Although knee malalignment is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, most women and men had either valgus or varus alignments. Notably, no men were valgus in both knees. Women with both knees valgus had significantly greater body mass index (P > 0.001) than women with varus or straight knees. Men and women with valgus or varus knee alignments had generally lower ROM than individuals with both knees straight. In summary, this study highlights the complex relationships among knee alignment, ROM, body mass index, and gender in elderly adults without radiographic knee osteoarthritis. PMID:24453501

  4. Older Adults without Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis: Knee Alignment and Knee Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    Fahlman, Lissa; Sangeorzan, Emmeline; Chheda, Nimisha; Lambright, Daphne

    2014-01-12

    This study describes knee alignment and active knee range of motion (ROM) in a community-based group of 78-year old adults (n = 143) who did not have radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis in either knee (KL < 2). Although knee malalignment is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, most women and men had either valgus or varus alignments. Notably, no men were valgus in both knees. Women with both knees valgus had significantly greater body mass index (P > 0.001) than women with varus or straight knees. Men and women with valgus or varus knee alignments had generally lower ROM than individuals with both knees straight. In summary, this study highlights the complex relationships among knee alignment, ROM, body mass index, and gender in elderly adults without radiographic knee osteoarthritis.

  5. HIP MUSCLE ACTIVATION AND KNEE FRONTAL PLANE MOTION DURING WEIGHT BEARING THERAPEUTIC EXERCISES

    PubMed Central

    Lubahn, Amanda J.; Tyson, Tiffany L.; Merkitch, Kenneth W.; Reutemann, Paul; Chestnut, John Mark

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Hip abduction strengthening exercises may be critical in the prevention and rehabilitation of both overuse and traumatic injuries where knee frontal plane alignment is considered to be important. The purpose of the current investigation was to examine the muscular activation of the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius during the double-leg squat (DLS), single-leg squat (SLS), or front step-up (FSU), and the same exercises when an added load was used to pull the knee medially. Methods: Eighteen healthy females (ages 18-26) performed six exercises: DLS, DLS with load, FSU, FSU with load, SLS, and SLS with load. Integrated and peak surface electromyography of gluteus maximus and gluteus medius of the dominant leg were recorded and normalized. Motion analysis was used to measure knee abduction angle during each exercise. Results: SLS had the highest integrated and peak activation for both muscles, regardless of load. Adding load, only increased DLS integrated gluteus maximus activation (p=0.019). Load did not increase integrated gluteus medius or peak gluteus maximus activation. Adding load decreased SLS peak gluteus medius activation (p=0.003). Adding load increased peak knee abduction angle during DLS (p=0.013), FSU (p=0.000), and SLS (p=0.011). Conclusions: Overall, the SLS was most effective exercise for activating the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius. Applied knee load does not appear to increase muscle activation during SLS and FSU. DLS with an applied load may be more beneficial in activating the gluteus maximus. Overall, the use of applied loads appears to promote poorer musculoskeletal alignment in terms of peak knee valgus angle. Level of Evidence: 3 PMID:21713231

  6. Active knee range of motion assessment in elite track and field athletes: normative values

    PubMed Central

    Malliaropoulos, Nikos; Kakoura, Lena; Tsitas, Kostas; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Siozos, Alexandros; Malliaras, Peter; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background flexibility is an important physical characteristic in athletes in terms of performance and injury prevention. Active Range Of Motion (AROM) was assessed in elite Greek track and field athletes. Methods prospective cohort study was carried out. In the period 2000–2010, the AROM was measured bilaterally with the Active Knee Extension (AKE) test during an in-season period with a goniometer in 127 athletes. Results male runners and jumpers had a higher mean AROM than throwers, but this result was not statistically significant. Female jumpers had a higher mean AROM than both runners and throwers, but the difference was also not statistically significant. Conclusion in athletes, mean posterior thigh muscle flexibility is likely to be between 72.3° and 73.9°. Posterior thigh muscle flexibility is associated with performance, the higher the AROM, the better performance is achieved athletes have generally high AROM, and this may be a result of their increased muscle flexibility. The normative values of posterior thigh flexibility may assist in better monitoring rehabilitation of the posterior thigh muscle injuries and be useful in pre-season screening of athletes’ flexibility. PMID:26605196

  7. Active knee joint flexibility and sports activity.

    PubMed

    Hahn, T; Foldspang, A; Vestergaard, E; Ingemann-Hansen, T

    1999-04-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate active knee flexion and active knee extension in athletes and to investigate the potential association of each to different types of sports activity. Active knee extension and active knee flexion was measured in 339 athletes. Active knee extension was significantly higher in women than in men and significantly positively associated with weekly hours of swimming and weekly hours of competitive gymnastics. Active knee flexion was significantly positively associated with participation in basketball, and significantly negatively associated with age and weekly hours of soccer, European team handball and swimming. The results point to sport-specific adaptation of active knee flexion and active knee extension.

  8. Effects of balance training by knee joint motions on muscle activity in adult men with functional ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seung-min; Kim, Won-bok; Yun, Chang-kyo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of balance training by applying knee joint movements on muscle activity in male adults with functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] 28 adults with functional ankle instability, divided randomly into an experimental group, which performed balance training by applying knee joint movements for 20 minutes and ankle joint exercises for 10 minutes, and a control group, which performed ankle joint exercise for 30 minutes. Exercises were completed three times a week for 8 weeks. Electromyographic values of the tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, peroneus brevis, and the lateral gastrocnemius muscles were obtained to compare and analyze muscle activity before and after the experiments in each group. [Results] The experimental group had significant increases in muscle activity in the tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, and lateral gastrocnemius muscles, while muscle activity in the peroneus brevis increased without significance. The control group had significant increases in muscle activity in the tibialis anterior and peroneus longus, while muscle activity in the peroneus brevis and lateral gastrocnemius muscles increased without significance. [Conclusion] In conclusion, balance training by applying knee joint movements can be recommended as a treatment method for patients with functional ankle instability. PMID:27313386

  9. [Effectiveness of continuous passive motion after total knee replacement].

    PubMed

    Trzeciak, Tomasz; Richter, Magdalena; Ruszkowski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Continuous passive motion (CPM) is frequently used method in the early post-operative rehabilitation in patients after knee surgery. Aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CPM after primary total knee arthroplasty. Efficacy was assesed in terms of clinical score and functional recovery. 93 patients (101 knee joints) undergoing total knee replacement were assigned into two groups. The experimental group received continuous passive motion and active exercises. A control group received conventional physical therapy only. CPM was initiated in the first day after surgery, for 120 minutes, starting with 0-40 degrees range of motion, increased as tolerated (mean 10 degrees per day) and maintained during the hospital stay. Outcome measures were those included in Knee Society Score (KSS). Functional recovery was evaluated using WOMAC. All subjects were evaluated once before the surgery and on 10th day postoperatively. Mean clinical score (KSS) at the day 10 was 70 +/- 15 points in the experimental group and 74 +/- 12 in a control group. There were no statistical difference between the two groups for any outcome measures. CPM group mean range of motion was 83 degrees +/- 14 degrees and a group without CPM 77 degrees +/- 21 degrees. KSS functional score was 66 +/- 9 points in the experimental group compared to 62 +/- 7 points in a control group. Subjective estimation of pain level, joint stiffness and function showed no statistical difference between the two groups regarding total and subscale scores. Mean total score was 24 +/- 19 points in the CPM group and 22 +/- 17 in a group without CPM. These findings show that CPM had no significant advantage in terms of improving clinical measurements. However, there was beneficial effect on subjective assessment of pain level, joint stiffness and functional ability.

  10. Does knee motion contribute to feet-in-place balance recovery?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kuangyou B

    2016-06-14

    Although knee motions have been observed at loss of balance, the ankle and hip strategies have remained the focus of past research. The present study aimed to investigate whether knee motions contribute to feet-in-place balance recovery. This was achieved by experimentally monitoring knee motions during recovery from forward falling, and by simulating balance recovery movements with and without knee joint as the main focus of the study. Twelve participants initially held a straight body configuration and were released from different forward leaning positions. Considerable knee motions were observed especially at greater leaning angles. Simulations were performed using 3-segment (feet, shanks+thighs, and head+arms+trunk) and 4-segment (with separate shanks and thighs segments) planar models. Movements were driven by joint torque generators depending on joint angle, angular velocity, and activation level. Optimal joint motions moved the mass center projection to be within the base of support without excessive joint motion. The 3-segment model (without knee motions) generated greater backward linear momentum and had better balance performance, which confirmed the advantage of having only ankle/hip strategies. Knee motions were accompanied with less body angular momentum and a lower body posture, which could be beneficial for posture control and reducing falling impact, respectively. PMID:27155745

  11. Kinematic motion of the anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee during functionally high and low demanding tasks.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kentaro; Hasegawa, Takayuki; Kiriyama, Yoshimori; Matsumoto, Hideo; Otani, Toshiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Nagura, Takeo

    2014-07-18

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether mechanical adaptations were present in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knees during high-demand activities. Twenty-two subjects with unilateral ACL deficiency (11 males and 11 females, 19.6 months after injury) performed five different activities at a comfortable speed (level walking, ascending and descending steps, jogging, jogging to a 90-degree side cutting toward the opposite direction of the tested side). Three-dimensional knee kinematics for the ACL-deficient knees and uninjured contralateral knees were evaluated using the Point Cluster Technique. There was no significant difference in knee flexion angle, but an offset toward the knee in less valgus and more external tibial rotation was observed in the ACL-deficient knee. The tendency was more obvious in high demand motions, and a significant difference was clearly observed in the side cutting motions. These motion patterns, with the knee in less valgus and more external tibial rotation, are proposed to be an adaptive movement to avoid pivot shift dynamically, and reveal evidence in support of a dynamic adaptive motion occurring in ACL-deficient knees.

  12. Tractive forces during rolling motion of the knee: implications for wear in total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, M A; Andriacchi, T P

    1997-02-01

    Wear at the polyethylene tibial plateau in total knee arthroplasty (TKR) is one of the primary concerns with these devices. The artificial bearing of a TKR has to sustain large forces while allowing the mobility for normal motion, typically, rolling, gliding and rotation. The tractive forces during the rolling motion at the knee joint were analyzed to determine which factors cause these forces to increase in TKR. The implications of these tractive forces to polyethylene wear were considered. Traction forces were calculated using a model of the knee to evaluate the effect of variations in the coefficient of friction, gait characteristics, antagonistic muscle contraction and patellofemoral mechanics. The model was limited to the sagittal plane motion of the femur on the tibia. The input for the model was the shape of the articulating surface, coefficient of friction, contact path, muscle anatomy and gait kinetics common to patients with a total knee replacement. The generation of tractive forces on the tibial polyethylene plateau was highly dependent on the static and dynamic coefficient of friction between the femur and the tibia. A peak tractive force of approximately 0.4 body weight was calculated with a peak normal force of 3.3 body weight. Tractive rolling occurred during most of stance phase when the static coefficient was 0.2. Alterations in gait patterns had a substantial effect on the generation of tractive forces at the knee joint. When an abnormal gait pattern (often seen following TKR) was input to the model the posteriorly directed tractive force on the tibial surface was reduced. It was also found that variations in muscle contractions associated with antagonistic muscle activity as well as the angle of pull of the patellar tendon affected the magnitude of tractive forces. The results of the study suggest that there are feasible conditions following total knee replacement which can lead to tractive forces during rolling motion at the tibiofemoral

  13. Effect of Perturbing a Simulated Motion on Knee and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Herfat, Safa T.; Boguszewski, Daniel V.; Nesbitt, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    Current surgical treatments for common knee injuries do not restore the normal biomechanics. Among other factors, the abnormal biomechanics increases the susceptibility to the early onset of osteoarthritis. In pursuit of improving long term outcome, investigators must understand normal knee kinematics and corresponding joint and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) kinetics during the activities of daily living. Our long term research goal is to measure in vivo joint motions for the ovine stifle model and later simulate these motions with a 6 degree of freedom (DOF) robot to measure the corresponding 3D kinetics of the knee and ACL-only joint. Unfortunately, the motion measurement and motion simulation technologies used for our project have associated errors. The objective of this study was to determine how motion measurement and motion recreation error affect knee and ACL-only joint kinetics by perturbing a simulated in vivo motion in each DOF and measuring the corresponding intact knee and ACL-only joint forces and moments. The normal starting position for the motion was perturbed in each degree of freedom by four levels (−0.50, −0.25, 0.25, and 0.50 mm or degrees). Only translational perturbations significantly affected the intact knee and ACL-only joint kinetics. The compression-distraction perturbation had the largest effect on intact knee forces and the anterior-posterior perturbation had the largest effect on the ACL forces. Small translational perturbations can significantly alter intact knee and ACL-only joint forces. Thus, translational motion measurement errors must be reduced to provide a more accurate representation of the intact knee and ACL kinetics. To account for the remaining motion measurement and recreation errors, an envelope of forces and moments should be reported. These force and moment ranges will provide valuable functional tissue engineering parameters (FTEPs) that can be used to design more effective ACL treatments. PMID:23083204

  14. Improvements in knee biomechanics during walking are associated with increased physical activity after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Arnold, John B; Mackintosh, Shylie; Olds, Timothy S; Jones, Sara; Thewlis, Dominic

    2015-12-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in people with knee osteoarthritis increases knee-specific and general physical function, but it has not been established if there is a relationship between changes in these elements of functional ability. This study investigated changes and relationships between knee biomechanics during walking, physical activity, and use of time after TKA. Fifteen people awaiting TKA underwent 3D gait analysis before and six months after surgery. Physical activity and use of time were determined in free-living conditions from a high resolution 24-h activity recall. After surgery, participants displayed significant improvements in sagittal plane knee biomechanics and improved their physical activity profiles, standing for 105 more minutes (p=0.001) and performing 64 min more inside chores on average per day (p=0.008). Changes in sagittal plane knee range of motion (ROM) and peak knee flexion positively correlated with changes in total daily energy expenditure, time spent undertaking moderate to vigorous physical activity, inside chores and passive transport (r=0.52-0.66, p=0.005-0.047). Restoration of knee function occurs in parallel and is associated with improvements in physical activity and use of time after TKA. Increased functional knee ROM is required to support improvements in total and context specific physical activity.

  15. Deconditioned Knee: The Effectiveness of a Rehabilitation Program that Restores Normal Knee Motion to Improve Symptoms and Function

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Angela; Gray, Tinker

    2007-01-01

    Background Knee pain can cause a deconditioned knee. Deconditioned is defined as causing one to lose physical fitness. Therefore, a deconditioned knee is defined as a painful syndrome caused by anatomical or functional abnormalities that result in a knee flexion contracture (functional loss of knee extension), decreased strength, and decreased function. To date, no published studies exist examining treatment for a deconditioned knee. Objective To determine the effectiveness of a rehabilitation program focused on increasing range of motion for patients with a deconditioned knee. Methods Fifty patients (mean age 53.2 years) enrolled in the study. Objective evaluation included radiographs, knee range of motion, and isokinetic strength testing. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective questionnaire was used to measure symptoms and function. Patients were given a rehabilitation program to increase knee extension (including hyperextension) and flexion equal to the normal knee, after which patients were instructed in leg strengthening exercises. Results Knee extension significantly improved from a mean deficit of 10° to 3° and knee flexion significantly improved from a mean deficit of 19° to 9°. The IKDC survey scores significantly improved from a mean of 34.5 points to 70.5 points 1 year after beginning treatment. The IKDC subjective pain frequency and severity scores were significantly improved. Conclusions A rehabilitation program that improves knee range of motion can relieve pain and improve function for patients with a deconditioned knee. PMID:21522205

  16. [Recovery from total knee arthroplasty through continuous passive motion].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Mayo, B; Rodríguez-Mansilla, J; González Sánchez, B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to know the effects of continuous passive mobilization in patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty. A search strategy was developed to retrieve all clinical trials, written in English and/or Spanish, published in the electronic search databases PubMed, Cochrane Library Plus, Dialnet, CSIC and PEDro. The inclusion criteria were: clinical trials published from January 2000 until November 2014 in English or Spanish. Out of 537 clinical trials that were potentially relevant, a total of 12 were included in this review. The evaluation of 1,153 patients shows that there is no significant difference in improving the range of the joint, pain, balance, motion, healing and hospital stay using continuous passive mobilization against the regular physiotherapy treatment for total knee arthroplasty. The application of continuous passive mobilization in the long-term does not provide any benefit in terms of the breadth of the range of the joint, pain and improvement of standing and motion in comparison with conventional postoperative physiotherapy treatment in total knee arthroplasty. In the short term an improvement is obtained in the range of joint motion in knee flexion.

  17. [Recovery from total knee arthroplasty through continuous passive motion].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Mayo, B; Rodríguez-Mansilla, J; González Sánchez, B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to know the effects of continuous passive mobilization in patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty. A search strategy was developed to retrieve all clinical trials, written in English and/or Spanish, published in the electronic search databases PubMed, Cochrane Library Plus, Dialnet, CSIC and PEDro. The inclusion criteria were: clinical trials published from January 2000 until November 2014 in English or Spanish. Out of 537 clinical trials that were potentially relevant, a total of 12 were included in this review. The evaluation of 1,153 patients shows that there is no significant difference in improving the range of the joint, pain, balance, motion, healing and hospital stay using continuous passive mobilization against the regular physiotherapy treatment for total knee arthroplasty. The application of continuous passive mobilization in the long-term does not provide any benefit in terms of the breadth of the range of the joint, pain and improvement of standing and motion in comparison with conventional postoperative physiotherapy treatment in total knee arthroplasty. In the short term an improvement is obtained in the range of joint motion in knee flexion. PMID:26486536

  18. Predicting Functional Performance and Range of Motion Outcomes After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bade, Michael J.; Kittelson, John M.; Kohrt, Wendy M.; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of functional performance and range of motion measures on outcomes after total knee arthroplasty. Design This is a secondary analysis of two pooled prospective randomized controlled trials. Sixty-four subjects (32 men and 32 women) with end-stage knee osteoarthritis scheduled to undergo primary total knee arthroplasty were enrolled. Active knee flexion and extension range of motion, Timed Up and Go (TUG) test time, and 6-min walk test distance were assessed. Results Preoperative measures of knee flexion and extension were predictive of long-term flexion (β = 0.44, P < 0.001) and extension (β = 0.46, P < 0.001). Acute measures of knee flexion and extension were not predictive of long-term flexion (β= 0.09, P = 0.26) or extension (β = 0.04, P = 0.76). Preoperative TUG performance was predictive of long-term 6-min walk performance (β = −21, P < 0.001). Acute TUG performance was predictive of long-term functional performance on the 6-min walk test, after adjusting for the effects of sex and age (P = 0.02); however, once adjusted for preoperative TUG performance, acute TUG was no longer related to long-term 6-min walk performance (P = 0.65). Conclusions Acute postoperative measures of knee range of motion are of limited prognostic value, although preoperative measures have some prognostic value. However, acute measures of functional performance are of useful prognostic value, especially when preoperative functional performance data are unavailable. PMID:24508937

  19. Dynamic activity dependence of in vivo normal knee kinematics.

    PubMed

    Moro-oka, Taka-aki; Hamai, Satoshi; Miura, Hiromasa; Shimoto, Takeshi; Higaki, Hidehiko; Fregly, Benjamin J; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Banks, Scott A

    2008-04-01

    Dynamic knee kinematics were analyzed for normal knees in three activities, including two different types of maximum knee flexion. Continuous X-ray images of kneel, squat, and stair climb motions were taken using a large flat panel detector. CT-derived bone models were used for model registration-based 3D kinematic measurement. Three-dimensional joint kinematics and contact locations were determined using three methods: bone-fixed coordinate systems, interrogation of CT-based bone model surfaces, and interrogation of MR-based articular cartilage model surfaces. The femur exhibited gradual external rotation throughout the flexion range. Tibiofemoral contact exhibited external rotation, with contact locations translating posterior while maintaining 15 degrees to 20 degrees external rotation from 20 degrees to 80 degrees of flexion. From 80 degrees to maximum flexion, contact locations showed a medial pivot pattern. Kinematics based on bone-fixed coordinate systems differed from kinematics based on interrogation of CT and MR surfaces. Knee kinematics varied significantly by activity, especially in deep flexion. No posterior subluxation occurred for either femoral condyle in maximum knee flexion. Normal knees accommodate a range of motions during various activities while maintaining geometric joint congruency.

  20. Knee Extension Range of Motion at 4 Weeks Is Related to Knee Extension Loss at 12 Weeks After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Sarah; Garrison, J. Craig; Bothwell, James; Conway, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is commonly torn, and surgical reconstruction is often required to allow a patient to return to their prior level of activity. Avoiding range of motion (ROM) loss is a common goal, but little research has been done to identify when ROM loss becomes detrimental to a patient’s future function. Purpose: To determine whether there is a relationship between early knee side-to-side extension difference after ACL reconstruction and knee side-to-side extension difference at 12 weeks. The hypothesis was that early (within the first 8 weeks) knee side-to-side extension difference will be predictive of knee side-to-side extension difference seen at 12 weeks. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Knee side-to-side extension difference measures were taken on 74 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction rehabilitation at the initial visit and 4, 8, and 12 weeks postoperatively. Visual analog scores (VAS) and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores were also recorded at these time frames. Results: There was a strong relationship between knee extension ROM at 4 and 12 weeks (r = 0.639, P < .001) and 8 and 12 weeks (r = 0.742, P < .001). When the variables of knee extension ROM at initial visit and 4 and 8 weeks were entered into a regression analysis, the predictor variable explained 61% (R2 = 0.611) of variance for knee extension ROM at 12 weeks, with 4 weeks (R2 = 0.259) explaining the majority of this variance. Conclusion: This study found that a patient’s knee extension at 4 weeks was strongly correlated with knee extension at 12 weeks. Clinical Relevance: This information may be useful for clinicians treating athletic patients who are anxious for return to sport by providing them an initial goal to work toward in hopes of ensuring successful rehabilitation of their knee. PMID:26675061

  1. Characterising knee motion and laxity in a testing machine for application to total knee evaluation.

    PubMed

    Walker, Peter S; Arno, Sally; Borukhoy, Ilya; Bell, Christopher P

    2015-10-15

    The goal of this study was to determine knee motions in specimens under combined input forces over a full range of flexion, so that the various flexion angles and loading combinations encountered in functional conditions would be contained. The purpose was that the data would act as a benchmark for the evaluation of TKR designs using the same testing methodology. We measured the neutral path of motion and laxity about the neutral path. The femur was flexed in a continuous movement, rather than at discrete flexion angles, using optical tracking. The motion of the femoral circular axis relative to the tibia was determined, as well as the contact patches on the tibial surfaces. The neutral path of motion was independent of compressive load, and consisted of a relatively constant medial contact and steady posterior displacement laterally, in agreement with previous studies. The anterior-posterior laxities of the lateral and medial condyles were similar whether AP forces or torques were applied. The lateral laxity was predominantly anterior with respect to the neutral path, while on the medial side, the laxity was less than lateral and predominantly posterior of the neutral path. Contact on the anterior surface of the medial tibial plateau only occurred in some cases in 5° hyperextension and at 0° flex when an anterior femoral shear or an external femoral torque were applied. The method can be regarded as a development of the ASTM constraint standard, with the addition of the benchmark, for the evaluation of total knee designs. PMID:26315916

  2. Knee Flexion and Daily Activities in Patients following Total Knee Replacement: A Comparison with ISO Standard 14243

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Markus A.; Nechtow, William; Schwenke, Thorsten; Moisio, Kirsten C.

    2015-01-01

    Walking is only one of many daily activities performed by patients following total knee replacement (TKR). The purpose of this study was to examine the hypotheses (a) that subject activity characteristics are correlated with knee flexion range of motion (ROM) and (b) that there is a significant difference between the subject's flexion/extension excursion throughout the day and the ISO specified input for knee wear testing. In order to characterize activity, the number of walking and stair stepping cycles, the time spent with dynamic and stationary activities, the number of activity sequences, and the knee flexion/extension excursion of 32 TKR subjects were collected during daily activity. Flexion/extension profiles were compared with the ISO 14243 simulator input profile using a level crossing classification algorithm. Subjects took an average of 3102 (range: 343–5857) walking cycles including 65 (range: 0–319) stair stepping cycles. Active and passive ROMs were positively correlated with stair walking time, stair step counts, and stair walking sequences. Simulated knee motion according to ISO showed significantly fewer level crossings at the flexion angles 20–40° and beyond 50° than those measured with the monitor. This suggests that implant wear testing protocols should contain more cycles and a variety of activities requiring higher knee flexion angles with incorporated resting/transition periods to account for the many activity sequences. PMID:26347875

  3. Relationship of spasticity to knee angular velocity and motion during gait in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Damiano, Diane L; Laws, Edward; Carmines, Dave V; Abel, Mark F

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of spasticity in the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles on gait parameters including temporal spatial measures, knee position, excursion and angular velocity in 25 children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP) as compared to 17 age-matched peers. While subjects were instructed to relax, an isokinetic device alternately flexed and extended the left knee at one of the three constant velocities 30 degrees/s, 60 degrees/s and 120 degrees/s, while surface electromyography (EMG) electrodes over the biceps femoris and the rectus femoris recorded muscle activity. Patients then participated in 3D gait analysis at a self-selected speed. Results showed that, those with CP who exhibited heightened stretch responses (spasticity) in both muscles, had significantly slower knee angular velocities during the swing phase of gait as compared to those with and without CP who did not exhibit stretch responses at the joint and the tested speeds. The measured amount (torque) of the resistance to passive flexion or extension was not related to gait parameters in subjects with CP; however, the rate of change in resistance torque per unit angle change (stiffness) at the fastest test speed of 120 degrees/s showed weak to moderate relationships with knee angular velocity and motion during gait. For the subset of seven patients with CP who subsequently underwent a selective dorsal rhizotomy, knee angular extension and flexion velocity increased post-operatively, suggesting some degree of causality between spasticity and movement speed.

  4. Loss of neuromuscular control related to motion in the acutely ACL-injured knee: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Bonsfills, N; Gómez-Barrena, E; Raygoza, J J; Núñez, A

    2008-10-01

    Ligamentomuscular and muscular stretch reflexes are known to contribute to knee joint stability. After anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, a more intense and adjusted muscular response is required to maintain joint stability, but this neuromuscular control of the knee has not been clearly proved. The aim of the study is to record electromyography (EMG) signal and muscular fibre length variations in quadriceps and hamstrings of the knee with and without ACL, and to analyze and integrate the ligament strain and the muscular reaction to forced anterior tibial translation (ATT). In 17 knees from 12 cats, EMG electrodes and ultrasonomicrometry crystals were inserted into four main periarticular muscles, with strain gauges on periarticular ligament insertions. Their output signal was compared before and after ACL surgical section in series of ATT (at 90 degrees and 30 degrees knee flexion), and also during knee flexion and extension. Linear regression analysis was performed between the EMG signal and muscular fibre length variations, and between the EMG signal and the strain on ligament insertions, in the search of this reflex neuromuscular response. In the ACL deficient knees, the studied muscles showed a poor adjustment to motion of EMG firing, inversely to controls. The muscle stretch reflexes showed poorer correlation with post-peak EMG activity than the ligaments. ATT control depended mainly on hamstrings activity in control knees, whereas in unstable knees, quadriceps activity was associated with more tibial translation. Acute ACL-deficient knees showed poor neuromuscular control with weak ligamentomuscular reflexes and no muscular stretch reflexes, suggesting the ineffectiveness of acute muscular reaction to provide early mechanical knee stabilization after injury.

  5. Occupational activities and osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Keith T

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) is rising and the search for interventions to mitigate risk is intensifying. This review considers the contribution of occupational activities to disease occurrence and the lessons for prevention. Sources Systematic search in Embase and Medline covering the period 1996 to November 2011. Areas of agreement Reasonably good evidence exists that physical work activities (especially kneeling, squatting, lifting, and climbing) can cause and/or aggravate knee OA. These exposures should be reduced where possible. Obese workers with such exposures are at additional risk of knee OA and should therefore particularly be encouraged to lose weight. Areas of uncertainty/research need Workplace interventions and policies to prevent knee OA have seldom been evaluated. Moreover, their implementation can be problematic. However, the need for research to optimise the design of work in relation to knee OA is pressing, given population trends towards extended working life. PMID:22544778

  6. Behavioral effect of knee joint motion on body's center of mass during human quiet standing.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Akio; Sasagawa, Shun; Oba, Naoko; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2015-01-01

    The balance control mechanism during upright standing has often been investigated using single- or double-link inverted pendulum models, involving the ankle joint only or both the ankle and hip joints, respectively. Several studies, however, have reported that knee joint motion during quiet standing cannot be ignored. This study aimed to investigate the degree to which knee joint motion contributes to the center of mass (COM) kinematics during quiet standing. Eight healthy adults were asked to stand quietly for 30s on a force platform. Angular displacements and accelerations of the ankle, knee, and hip joints were calculated from kinematic data obtained by a motion capture system. We found that the amplitude of the angular acceleration was smallest in the ankle joint and largest in the hip joint (ankle < knee < hip). These angular accelerations were then substituted into three biomechanical models with or without the knee joint to estimate COM acceleration in the anterior-posterior direction. Although the "without-knee" models greatly overestimated the COM acceleration, the COM acceleration estimated by the "with-knee" model was similar to the actual acceleration obtained from force platform measurement. These results indicate substantial effects of knee joint motion on the COM kinematics during quiet standing. We suggest that investigations based on the multi-joint model, including the knee joint, are required to reveal the physiologically plausible balance control mechanism implemented by the central nervous system. PMID:25248799

  7. Behavioral effect of knee joint motion on body's center of mass during human quiet standing.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Akio; Sasagawa, Shun; Oba, Naoko; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2015-01-01

    The balance control mechanism during upright standing has often been investigated using single- or double-link inverted pendulum models, involving the ankle joint only or both the ankle and hip joints, respectively. Several studies, however, have reported that knee joint motion during quiet standing cannot be ignored. This study aimed to investigate the degree to which knee joint motion contributes to the center of mass (COM) kinematics during quiet standing. Eight healthy adults were asked to stand quietly for 30s on a force platform. Angular displacements and accelerations of the ankle, knee, and hip joints were calculated from kinematic data obtained by a motion capture system. We found that the amplitude of the angular acceleration was smallest in the ankle joint and largest in the hip joint (ankle < knee < hip). These angular accelerations were then substituted into three biomechanical models with or without the knee joint to estimate COM acceleration in the anterior-posterior direction. Although the "without-knee" models greatly overestimated the COM acceleration, the COM acceleration estimated by the "with-knee" model was similar to the actual acceleration obtained from force platform measurement. These results indicate substantial effects of knee joint motion on the COM kinematics during quiet standing. We suggest that investigations based on the multi-joint model, including the knee joint, are required to reveal the physiologically plausible balance control mechanism implemented by the central nervous system.

  8. Dynamic Frequency Analyses of Lower Extremity Muscles during Sit-To-Stand Motion for the Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kentaro; Yagi, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    Objective Muscle activities during the sit-to-stand motion (STS) are characterized by coordinated movements between hip extensors and knee extensors. However, previous reports regarding the STS and lower extremity muscle activities have focused on some quantitative assessment, but little qualitative research. This study aimed to examine the muscle activities of the lower extremity both quantitatively and qualitatively. Methods Study participants included 13 patients with knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) and 11 age-matched asymptomatic controls. The task was STS from a chair with a height-adjustable seat. EMG activities were acquired using surface electromyogram. The root mean square signals normalized as a percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction values (RMS%MVC) and the mean power frequency (MPF) were calculated. Results During STS, knee OA patients had increased RMS%MVC of the vastus medialis and raised MPF of the rectus femoris before buttocks-off. Conclusion These findings suggest that STS of knee OA patients not only increased relative muscle activity of the vastus medialis, but also enlisted the rectus femoris in knee extension to improve muscle contraction force by activating more type II fibers to accomplish buttocks-off. PMID:26807578

  9. Quantifying the Consistency of Wearable Knee Acoustical Emission Measurements During Complex Motions.

    PubMed

    Toreyin, Hakan; Jeong, Hyeon Ki; Hersek, Sinan; Teague, Caitlin N; Inan, Omer T

    2016-09-01

    Knee-joint sounds could potentially be used to noninvasively probe the physical and/or physiological changes in the knee associated with rehabilitation following acute injury. In this paper, a system and methods for investigating the consistency of knee-joint sounds during complex motions in silent and loud background settings are presented. The wearable hardware component of the system consists of a microelectromechanical systems microphone and inertial rate sensors interfaced with a field programmable gate array-based real-time processor to capture knee-joint sound and angle information during three types of motion: flexion-extension (FE), sit-to-stand (SS), and walking (W) tasks. The data were post-processed to extract high-frequency and short-duration joint sounds (clicks) with particular waveform signatures. Such clicks were extracted in the presence of three different sources of interference: background, stepping, and rubbing noise. A histogram-vector Vn(→) was generated from the clicks in a motion-cycle n, where the bin range was 10°. The Euclidean distance between a vector and the arithmetic mean Vav(→) of all vectors in a recording normalized by the Vav(→) is used as a consistency metric dn. Measurements from eight healthy subjects performing FE, SS, and W show that the mean (of mean) consistency metric for all subjects during SS (μ [ μ (dn)] = 0.72 in silent, 0.85 in loud) is smaller compared with the FE (μ [ μ (dn)] = 1.02 in silent, 0.95 in loud) and W ( μ [ μ (dn)] = 0.94 in silent, 0.97 in loud) exercises, thereby implying more consistent click-generation during SS compared with the FE and W. Knee-joint sounds from one subject performing FE during five consecutive work-days (μ [ μ (dn) = 0.72) and five different times of a day (μ [ μ (dn) = 0.73) suggests high consistency of the clicks on different days and throughout a day. This work represents the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that joint sound consistency has been

  10. Auricular Acupressure for Managing Postoperative Pain and Knee Motion in Patients with Total Knee Replacement: A Randomized Sham Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ling-hua; Hsu, Chung-Hua; Jong, Gwo-Ping; Ho, Shungtai; Tsay, Shiow-luan; Lin, Kuan-Chia

    2012-01-01

    Background. Postoperative pain management remains a significant challenge for all healthcare providers. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine the adjuvant effects of auricular acupressure on relieving postoperative pain and improving the passive range of motion in patients with total knee replacement (TKR). Method. Sixty-two patients who had undergone a TKR were randomly assigned to the acupressure group and the sham control group. The intervention was delivered three times a day for 3 days. A visual analog scale (VAS) and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire were used to assess pain intensity. Pain medication consumption was recorded, and the knee motion was measured using a goniometer. Results. The patients experienced a moderately severe level of pain postoperatively (VAS 58.66 ± 20.35) while being on the routine PCA. No differences were found in pain scores between the groups at all points. However, analgesic drug usage in the acupressure group patients was significantly lower than in the sham control group (P < 0.05), controlling for BMI, age, and pain score. On the 3rd day after surgery, the passive knee motion in the acupressure group patients was significantly better than in the sham control group patients (P < 0.05), controlling for BMI. Conclusion. The application of auricular acupressure at specific therapeutic points significantly reduces the opioid analgesia requirement and improves the knee motion in patients with TKR. PMID:22844334

  11. Pathological Knee Joint Motion Analysis By High Speed Cinephotography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Jurg U.

    1985-02-01

    The use of cinephotography for evaluation of disturbed knee joint function was compared in three groups of patients. While a sampling rate of 50 images per second was adequate for patients with neuromuscular disorders, a higher frequency of around 300 i.p.s. is necessary in osteoarthritis and ligamentous knee joint injuries, but the task of digitizing is prohibitive unless automated.

  12. The effects of kinesiology taping therapy on degenerative knee arthritis patients’ pain, function, and joint range of motion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwansub; Yi, Chae-Woo; Lee, Sangyong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of kinesiology taping therapy on degenerative knee arthritis patients’ pain, function, and joint range of motion. [Subjects] To conduct the experiment in the present study, 30 patients with degenerative knee arthritis were divided into a control group (the conservative treatment group) of 15 patients, who received conservative physical therapy, and an experimental group (the kinesiology taping group) of 15 patients, who received kinesiology taping therapy. [Methods] All patients received treatment three times per week for four weeks. The kinesiology taping group had elastic tapes applied to the hamstring muscles, anterior tibialis, quadriceps femoris, and gastrocnemius. The range of motion was measured using joint goniometers, pain was measured using visual analog scales, and functional evaluation was conducted using the Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. [Results] In intragroup comparisons of the kinesiology taping group and the conservative treatment group, the visual analog scale and Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores significantly decreased, and the range of motion increased more than significantly. In intergroup comparisons, the kinesiology taping group showed significantly lower visual analog scale and Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores and significantly larger ranges of motion than the conservative treatment group. [Conclusion] Kinesiology taping therapy is considered to be an effective nonsurgical intervention method for pain relief, daily living activities, and range of motion of degenerative knee arthritis patients. PMID:26957729

  13. The effects of kinesiology taping therapy on degenerative knee arthritis patients' pain, function, and joint range of motion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwansub; Yi, Chae-Woo; Lee, Sangyong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of kinesiology taping therapy on degenerative knee arthritis patients' pain, function, and joint range of motion. [Subjects] To conduct the experiment in the present study, 30 patients with degenerative knee arthritis were divided into a control group (the conservative treatment group) of 15 patients, who received conservative physical therapy, and an experimental group (the kinesiology taping group) of 15 patients, who received kinesiology taping therapy. [Methods] All patients received treatment three times per week for four weeks. The kinesiology taping group had elastic tapes applied to the hamstring muscles, anterior tibialis, quadriceps femoris, and gastrocnemius. The range of motion was measured using joint goniometers, pain was measured using visual analog scales, and functional evaluation was conducted using the Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. [Results] In intragroup comparisons of the kinesiology taping group and the conservative treatment group, the visual analog scale and Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores significantly decreased, and the range of motion increased more than significantly. In intergroup comparisons, the kinesiology taping group showed significantly lower visual analog scale and Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores and significantly larger ranges of motion than the conservative treatment group. [Conclusion] Kinesiology taping therapy is considered to be an effective nonsurgical intervention method for pain relief, daily living activities, and range of motion of degenerative knee arthritis patients.

  14. Videoradiographic analysis of the range of motion in unilateral experimental knee joint arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The translational and predictive value of animal models highly depends on the validity of respective readout parameters. In arthritis research, there has been a shift from sole threshold testing for pain-related behavior, as well as from swelling and histology assessment for inflammation, toward an analysis of joint function as indicated, for instance, by an increasing number of studies on gait abnormalities. Clinically, the range of motion (ROM) of the affected joint plays a major role in diagnosis and the assessment of treatment benefits. This parameter, however, is only insufficiently detected by currently used analytic systems in animals. Methods Here we used high-resolution videoradiographic analysis to assess ROM in experimental knee joint arthritis in rats. This parameter is described during the 21-day course of antigen-induced arthritis in rats. Furthermore, the therapeutic effects of antinociceptive (morphine) and anti-inflammatory (dexamethasone) treatment on ROM are documented. To obtain additional information on the implications of ROM in animal models, correlations were performed to measure pain-related behavior and inflammation. Results The study animals showed a significant reduction in ROM of the inflamed knee joint in the acute phase of arthritis. This was accompanied by an increase in knee joint movement on the contralateral side, indicating a compensational mechanism. Both morphine and dexamethasone treatment increased and thus normalized ROM. Changes in ROM were further stage-dependently correlated with weight bearing and joint swelling, that is, with both pain-related behavior and signs of inflammation. Conclusions The dynamic ROM observed in freely moving rats in our model of knee joint arthritis might serve as a parameter for global disease activity and might thus represent a promising readout parameter for preclinical assessment regarding the overall efficacy not only of antiarthritic but also of antinociceptive compounds. PMID

  15. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PATELLAR HEIGHT AND RANGE OF MOTION AFTER TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    Júnior, Lúcio Honório de Carvalho; Soares, Luiz Fernando Machado; Gonçalves, Matheus Braga Jacques; Pereira, Marcelo Lobo; Lessa, Rodrigo Rosa; Costa, Lincoln Paiva

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether, after total knee arthroplasty, there is any correlation between patellar height and range of motion (ROM) achieved by patients six months after the operation. Methods: Forty-five patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty were assessed at least 12 months after the operation (total of 54 knees). The maximum and minimum ROM of all the knees was recorded under fluoroscopy, along with patellar height according to the Blackburne and Peel ratio. Two possible correlations were evaluated: patellar height and ROM; and patellar height and ROM variation from before to after the operation. Results: A correlation was found between patellar height and postoperative ROM (p = 0.04). There was no correlation between patellar height and ROM variation (p = 0.182). Conclusion: After total knee arthroplasty, the lower the patella is, the worse the ROM is. PMID:27027029

  16. Motion analysis of knee joint using dynamic volume images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haneishi, Hideaki; Kohno, Takahiro; Suzuki, Masahiko; Moriya, Hideshige; Mori, Sin-ichiro; Endo, Masahiro

    2006-03-01

    Acquisition and analysis of three-dimensional movement of knee joint is desired in orthopedic surgery. We have developed two methods to obtain dynamic volume images of knee joint. One is a 2D/3D registration method combining a bi-plane dynamic X-ray fluoroscopy and a static three-dimensional CT, the other is a method using so-called 4D-CT that uses a cone-beam and a wide 2D detector. In this paper, we present two analyses of knee joint movement obtained by these methods: (1) transition of the nearest points between femur and tibia (2) principal component analysis (PCA) of six parameters representing the three dimensional movement of knee. As a preprocessing for the analysis, at first the femur and tibia regions are extracted from volume data at each time frame and then the registration of the tibia between different frames by an affine transformation consisting of rotation and translation are performed. The same transformation is applied femur as well. Using those image data, the movement of femur relative to tibia can be analyzed. Six movement parameters of femur consisting of three translation parameters and three rotation parameters are obtained from those images. In the analysis (1), axis of each bone is first found and then the flexion angle of the knee joint is calculated. For each flexion angle, the minimum distance between femur and tibia and the location giving the minimum distance are found in both lateral condyle and medial condyle. As a result, it was observed that the movement of lateral condyle is larger than medial condyle. In the analysis (2), it was found that the movement of the knee can be represented by the first three principal components with precision of 99.58% and those three components seem to strongly relate to three major movements of femur in the knee bend known in orthopedic surgery.

  17. In-vivo three-dimensional knee kinematics during daily activities in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Stanley E; Jones, Stephen C; Lewis, Daniel D; Banks, Scott A; Conrad, Bryan P; Tremolada, Giovanni; Abbasi, Abdullah Z; Coggeshall, Jason D; Pozzi, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    The canine knee is morphologically similar to the human knee and thus dogs have been used in experimental models to study human knee pathology. To date, there is limited data of normal canine 3D knee kinematics during daily activities. The objective of this study was to characterize 3D in-vivo femorotibial kinematics in normal dogs during commonly performed daily activities. Using single-plane fluoroscopy, six normal dogs were imaged performing walk, trot, sit, and stair ascent activities. CT-generated bone models were used for kinematic measurement using a 3D-to-2D model registration technique. Increasing knee flexion angle was typically associated with increasing tibial internal rotation, abduction and anterior translation during all four activities. The precise relationship between flexion angle and these movements varied both within and between activities. Significant differences in axial rotation and coronal angulation were found at the same flexion angle during different phases of the walk and trot. This was also found with anterior tibial translation during the trot only. Normal canine knees accommodate motion in all planes; precise kinematics within this envelope of motion are activity dependent. This data establishes the characteristics of normal 3D femorotibial joint kinematics in dogs that can be used as a comparison for future studies. PMID:25982776

  18. Patients' reasons for electing to undergo total knee arthroplasty impact post-operative pain severity and range of motion.

    PubMed

    Cremeans-Smith, Julie K; Boarts, Jessica M; Greene, Kenneth; Delahanty, Douglas L

    2009-06-01

    The present study examines the reasons cited by 103 patients for their electing to undergo total knee arthroplastic surgery and the relationship between these reasons and their post-operative pain and range of motion. Results suggest that individuals who describe different reasons for undergoing surgery vary in their post-operative recovery. Specifically, patients who cite pain as the reason they are undergoing surgery report greater levels of pain during the early post-operative period. In contrast, patients who describe goals of regaining mobility or a specific activity as their reason for undergoing surgery achieve a greater range of motion during early post-operative physical therapy. Individuals who express avoidance goals for undergoing total knee arthroplasty report more severe post-operative pain at 1 and 3 months following surgery compared to patients who express approach goals. Interventions targeted towards patients reporting pre-operative pain or avoidance goals may decrease subsequent post-operative pain and increase mobility.

  19. Motion analysis of Chinese normal knees during gait based on a novel portable system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yao, Zilong; Wang, Shaobai; Huang, Wenhan; Ma, Limin; Huang, Huayang; Xia, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Normative tibiofemoral data of Chinese or Asian subjects during gait is rarely reported. This study is aimed at investigating the six-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) knee kinematics of adult Chinese during gait, based on a novel portable system. Twenty-eight healthy Chinese subjects (56 knees) were studied during their treadmill gaits. A set of optical marker clusters were attached to the thighs and shanks of each subject, who was tracked by an optical joint kinematics measurement system. Knee landmarks were initially digitized with respect to the marker cluster sets to determine the local coordinate systems for calculation of 6DOF knee joint kinematics. The range of motion (ROM) in 6DOF and 5 kinematic parameters were calculated and compared between bilateral knees and genders. We discovered that knee rotations, as well as motion in proximodistal and mediolateral translations, showed similar patterns in flexion and extension. However, the anteroposterior translations did not show a clear pattern. The results of ROM in 6DOF obtained in this study are comparable with those reported in existing literature. No statistical difference was found between left and right knees either in the ROMs or in the 5 kinematic parameters. However, the ROM in the mediolateral direction during gait was found to be higher in men than women (P=0.014). In addition, the femurs of female subjects rotated more internally than the femurs of male during the stance phase (P=0.011). We concluded that normal Chinese knees exhibited distinct gait patterns, except for anteroposterior motion. Women and men exhibit different axial rotations and mediolateral translation patterns during their treadmill gait.

  20. The relationships between active extensibility, and passive and active stiffness of the knee flexors.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, J Troy; Padua, Darin A; Riemann, Bryan L; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2004-12-01

    Insufficient active knee flexor stiffness may predispose the anterior cruciate ligament to injury. Insufficient passive stiffness may result in insufficient active stiffness. Similarly, higher levels of musculotendinous extensibility may inhibit active and passive muscle stiffness, potentially contributing to an increased risk of injury. The literature is both limited and inconsistent concerning relationships between extensibility, passive stiffness, and active stiffness. Extensibility was measured as the maximal active knee extension angle from a supine position with the hip flexed to 90 degrees . Passive stiffness was calculated as the slope of the moment-angle curve resulting from passive knee extension. Active stiffness was assessed via acceleration associated with damped oscillatory motion about the knee. Stepwise multiple regression indicated that passive stiffness accounted for 25% of active muscle stiffness variance. The linear combination of extensibility and passive stiffness explained only 2% more variance compared to passive stiffness alone. Musculotendinous extensibility was moderately related to passive muscle stiffness, and weakly related to active muscle stiffness. The moderate relationship observed between active and passive stiffness emphasizes the dependence of active muscle stiffness on cross-bridge formation, and the relatively smaller contribution from parallel elastic tissues. Additionally, heightened extensibility does not appear to be a predisposing factor for reduced muscle stiffness. PMID:15491843

  1. Range of Motion of the Ankle According to Pushing Force, Gender and Knee Position

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kang Hee; Lee, Hyunkeun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the difference of range of motion (ROM) of ankle according to pushing force, gender and knee position. Methods One hundred and twenty-eight healthy adults (55 men, 73 women) between the ages of 20 and 51, were included in the study. One examiner measured the passive range of motion (PROM) of ankle by Dualer IQ Inclinometers and Commander Muscle Testing. ROM of ankle dorsiflexion (DF) and plantarflexion (PF) according to change of pushing force and knee position were measured at prone position. Results There was significant correlation between ROM and pushing force, the more pushing force leads the more ROM at ankle DF and ankle PF. Knee flexion of 90° position showed low PF angle and high ankle DF angle, as compared to the at neutral position of knee joint. ROM of ankle DF for female was greater than for male, with no significant difference. ROM of ankle PF for female was greater than male regardless of the pushing force. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the relationship between pushing force and ROM of ankle joint. There was significant correlation between ROM of ankle and pushing force. ROM of ankle PF for female estimated greater than male regardless of the pushing force and the number of measurement. The ROM of the ankle is measured differently according to the knee joint position. Pushing force, gender and knee joint position are required to be considered when measuring the ROM of ankle joint. PMID:27152277

  2. Remobilization does not restore immobilization-induced adhesion of capsule and restricted joint motion in rat knee joints.

    PubMed

    Ando, Akira; Suda, Hideaki; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Onoda, Yoshito; Chimoto, Eiichi; Itoi, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Joint immobilization, which is used in orthopaedic treatments and observed in bedridden people, usually causes restricted joint motion. Decreased joint motion diminishes activities of daily living and increases burden of nursing-care. The purpose of this study was to clarify the reversibility of immobilization-induced capsular changes and restricted joint motion in rat knee joints. The unilateral knee joints of adult male rats were immobilized with an internal fixator for 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks as a model of immobilization after surgery or disuse of the joint. After the fixation devices were removed, the rats were allowed to move freely for 16 weeks. Sham-operated rats were used as controls. Sagittal sections at medial midcondylar regions were made and assessed with histological, histomorphometric, and immunohistochemical methods. Joint motion was measured using a custom-made device under x-ray control after removal of the periarticular muscles. In the 1/16-week and 2/16-week immobilization-remobilization (Im-Rm) groups, cord-like structures connecting the superior and inferior portions of the posterior capsule (partial adhesion) were observed without restricted joint motion. In the 4/16-, 8/16-, and 16/16-week Im-Rm groups, global adhesion of the posterior capsule and restricted joint motion were observed. The restricted joint motion was not completely restored after incision of the posterior capsule. These data indicate that immobilization alone causes irreversible capsular changes and arthrogenic restricted joint motion. Besides the joint capsule, other arthrogenic factors such as ligaments might influence the restricted joint motion. Prolonged immobilization over 4 weeks should be avoided to prevent irreversible joint contracture.

  3. [Measurement of the knee range of motion: standard goniometer or smartphone?].

    PubMed

    Rwakabayiza, Sylvia; Pereira, Luis Carlos; Lécureux, Estelle; Jolles-Haeberli, Brigitte

    2013-12-18

    Universal standard goniometer is an essential tool to measure articulations' range of motion (ROM). In this time of technological advances and increasing use of smartphones, new measurement's tools appear as specific smartphone applications. This article compares the iOS application "Knee Goniometer" with universal standard goniometer to assess knee ROM. To our knowledge, this is the first study that uses a goniometer application in a clinical context. The purpose of this study is to determine if this application could be used in clinical practice. PMID:24693586

  4. [Measurement of the knee range of motion: standard goniometer or smartphone?].

    PubMed

    Rwakabayiza, Sylvia; Pereira, Luis Carlos; Lécureux, Estelle; Jolles-Haeberli, Brigitte

    2013-12-18

    Universal standard goniometer is an essential tool to measure articulations' range of motion (ROM). In this time of technological advances and increasing use of smartphones, new measurement's tools appear as specific smartphone applications. This article compares the iOS application "Knee Goniometer" with universal standard goniometer to assess knee ROM. To our knowledge, this is the first study that uses a goniometer application in a clinical context. The purpose of this study is to determine if this application could be used in clinical practice.

  5. The use of Continuous Passive Motion (CPM) in the rehabilitation of patients after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Synder, Marek; Kozłowski, Piotr; Drobniewski, Marek; Grzegorzewski, Andrzej; Głowacka, Anna

    2004-06-30

    Background. Total knee alloplasty (TKA) is standard treatment for advanced gonarthrosis. Proper rehabilitation of the operated joint and the patient is essential in order to achieve a satisfactory functional outcome. The aim of our study was to compare rehabilitation methods used for patients recovering from TKA in the Orthopedic Clinic of the Medical University in Łódź, Poland. Material and methods. We studied 186 patients operated for advanced gonarthrosis, ranging in age from 29 to 80 (average 65.8), who had received 197 endoprotheses. From 1986 to 1989 the rehabilitation program included isometric exercises of the muscles in the operated joint, general fitness exercises in bed, and passive exercises of the knee conducted by a physiotherapist. The average stay during this period was 19.7 +/- 2.5 days. In 1989, continuous passive motion (CPM) using an electric rail was introduced to the rehabilitation program. Results. Thanks to the earlier additional flexibility of the operated joint, active exercises and weight bearing on the operated limb could be accelerated. The patients left the Clinic 2 weeks after surgery (13.6 +/- 2.5 days). The change in the rehabilitation program produced a statistically significant increase in the average range of flexion in the operated joint (p = 0.000001) in a significantly shorter time (p = 0.0000). Conclusion. Introducing CPM to the rehabilitation of TKA patients accelerates their progress and reduces hospitalization time, which improves the patients' emotional comfort and enables a faster return to an active life in society. PMID:17675995

  6. [Sport activity after hip and knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Keren, Amit; Berkovich, Yaron; Berkovitch, Yaron; Soudry, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Joint arthroplasty is one of the commonest surgical procedures in orthopedic surgery. In recent years there was an increase in the number of procedures, patient satisfaction and implant survival. Originally, these operations were designed for old patients in order to relieve pain and to enable ambulation. Over the past few years, these operations have become common in younger patients which desire to return to activity, including sports activities. The importance of physical activity is a well known fact. In recent years it became clear that with the proper physical activity the outcomes of the operations are better. There are several types of arthroplasty. Many factors influence the outcome of the operation apart from the post-surgery physical activity. These factors include patient factors, surgical technique and type of arthroplasty. This review summarizes the recommendations for sports activities after hip and knee arthroplasties. These activities are evaluated according to surgeons' recommendations, stress applied on the implant and long term outcomes. The recommended sports activities after joint arthroplasties are walking, swimming and cycling. Soccer, basketball and jogging are not advised. Tennis, downhill skiing and horse riding are recommended with previous experience. There are many more sports activities that patients can participate in, and it is important that the patient discuss the different options prior to the operation. Since these operations are so common, many non-orthopedic physicians encounter these patients in their practice. They should be acquainted with the recommendations for sports activities and encourage them. PMID:24416822

  7. [Sport activity after hip and knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Keren, Amit; Berkovich, Yaron; Berkovitch, Yaron; Soudry, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Joint arthroplasty is one of the commonest surgical procedures in orthopedic surgery. In recent years there was an increase in the number of procedures, patient satisfaction and implant survival. Originally, these operations were designed for old patients in order to relieve pain and to enable ambulation. Over the past few years, these operations have become common in younger patients which desire to return to activity, including sports activities. The importance of physical activity is a well known fact. In recent years it became clear that with the proper physical activity the outcomes of the operations are better. There are several types of arthroplasty. Many factors influence the outcome of the operation apart from the post-surgery physical activity. These factors include patient factors, surgical technique and type of arthroplasty. This review summarizes the recommendations for sports activities after hip and knee arthroplasties. These activities are evaluated according to surgeons' recommendations, stress applied on the implant and long term outcomes. The recommended sports activities after joint arthroplasties are walking, swimming and cycling. Soccer, basketball and jogging are not advised. Tennis, downhill skiing and horse riding are recommended with previous experience. There are many more sports activities that patients can participate in, and it is important that the patient discuss the different options prior to the operation. Since these operations are so common, many non-orthopedic physicians encounter these patients in their practice. They should be acquainted with the recommendations for sports activities and encourage them.

  8. Clinical evaluation of 292 Genesis II posterior stabilized high-flexion total knee arthroplasty: range of motion and predictors.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Mathijs C H W; Janssen, Rob P A

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of the study was to evaluate the range of motion and complications after Genesis II total knee arthroplasty with high-flexion tibia insert (TKA-HF). Furthermore, difference in knee flexion between high flexion and standard inserts was compared. The hypothesis was that knee flexion is better after high-flexion TKA. A total of 292 TKA-HF were retrospectively reviewed. Mean follow-up was 24.3 months. The range of motion was compared between TKA-HF (high-flexion group) and a comparable cohort of 86 Genesis II TKA with a standard tibia insert (control group). Surgeries were performed by one experienced knee orthopedic surgeon. Knee flexion in the high-flexion group increased from 114.8° preoperatively to 118.0° postoperatively (P < 0.01). Knee extension in the high-flexion group increased from -4.5° preoperatively to -0.4° after surgery (P < 0.01). Mean knee flexion was 5.52° (± 1.46°) better in the high-flexion group compared with the control group (P < 0.01). Preoperative range of motion, body mass index, diabetes mellitus and patellofemoral pain significantly influenced range of motion. Few complications occurred after TKA-HF. The Genesis II TKA-HF showed good short-term results with limited complications. Knee flexion after Genesis II TKA-HF was better compared with a standard tibia insert.

  9. In vivo kinematics of medial unicompartmental osteoarthritic knees during activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Fiacchi, Francesco; Zambianchi, Francesco; Digennaro, Vitantonio; Ricchiuto, Ippazio; Mugnai, Raffaele; Catani, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Few studies exist describing unicompartmental osteoarthritic knee kinematics. Moreover, the role of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the determination of knee kinematics has not been fully described. The objective of the current study was to analyze the in vivo kinematics of knees with medial osteoarthritis (OA) and intact ACL during closed and open chained motion. Eight patients scheduled for UKA diagnosed with primary medial OA underwent knee CT-scans and video-fluoroscopy. Fluoroscopic analysis included stair climbing, chair rising and leg extension. Three-dimensional bone positions were obtained from each image by iterative procedures using a CAD-model-based shape-matching technique. Patterns of axial rotation and anterior-posterior (AP) motion of the medial and lateral femoral condyle were obtained with specific software. The femur reported an overall external rotation relative to the tibia from extension to flexion in all tasks. Average AP translation of the medial femoral condyle were smaller in open-chained tasks than in weight-bearing conditions. Average AP motion of the lateral femoral condyle reported an overall posterior translation with knee flexion. The absent natural "screw-home" mechanism and the lack of medial condyle posterior translation was explained by bone-cartilage defects and meniscal degeneration. Relevant findings were the kinematic pattern differences between weight-bearing and open chained activities, suggesting that in biphasic muscle contraction and unloaded conditions, the function of the cruciate ligaments was not physiological. The kinematics of knees with medial OA and intact ACL differed from healthy knees. PMID:25382361

  10. In vivo kinematics of medial unicompartmental osteoarthritic knees during activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Fiacchi, Francesco; Zambianchi, Francesco; Digennaro, Vitantonio; Ricchiuto, Ippazio; Mugnai, Raffaele; Catani, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Few studies exist describing unicompartmental osteoarthritic knee kinematics. Moreover, the role of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the determination of knee kinematics has not been fully described. The objective of the current study was to analyze the in vivo kinematics of knees with medial osteoarthritis (OA) and intact ACL during closed and open chained motion. Eight patients scheduled for UKA diagnosed with primary medial OA underwent knee CT-scans and video-fluoroscopy. Fluoroscopic analysis included stair climbing, chair rising and leg extension. Three-dimensional bone positions were obtained from each image by iterative procedures using a CAD-model-based shape-matching technique. Patterns of axial rotation and anterior-posterior (AP) motion of the medial and lateral femoral condyle were obtained with specific software. The femur reported an overall external rotation relative to the tibia from extension to flexion in all tasks. Average AP translation of the medial femoral condyle were smaller in open-chained tasks than in weight-bearing conditions. Average AP motion of the lateral femoral condyle reported an overall posterior translation with knee flexion. The absent natural "screw-home" mechanism and the lack of medial condyle posterior translation was explained by bone-cartilage defects and meniscal degeneration. Relevant findings were the kinematic pattern differences between weight-bearing and open chained activities, suggesting that in biphasic muscle contraction and unloaded conditions, the function of the cruciate ligaments was not physiological. The kinematics of knees with medial OA and intact ACL differed from healthy knees.

  11. A parallel framework for the FE-based simulation of knee joint motion.

    PubMed

    Wawro, Martin; Fathi-Torbaghan, Madjid

    2004-08-01

    We present an object-oriented framework for the finite-element (FE)-based simulation of the human knee joint motion. The FE model of the knee joint is acquired from the patients in vivo by using magnetic resonance imaging. The MRI images are converted into a three-dimensional model and finally an all-hexahedral mesh for the FE analysis is generated. The simulation environment uses nonlinear finite-element analysis (FEA) and is capable of handling contact of the model to handle the complex rolling/sliding motion of the knee joint. The software strictly follows object-oriented concepts of software engineering in order to guarantee maximum extensibility and maintainability. The final goal of this work-in-progress is the creation of a computer-based biomechanical model of the knee joint which can be used in a variety of applications, ranging from prosthesis design and treatment planning (e.g., optimal reconstruction of ruptured ligaments) over surgical simulation to impact computations in crashworthiness simulations.

  12. Altered Knee and Ankle Kinematics During Squatting in Those With Limited Weight-Bearing–Lunge Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Karli E.; Begalle, Rebecca L.; Frank, Barnett S.; Zinder, Steven M.; Padua, Darin A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Ankle-dorsiflexion (DF) range of motion (ROM) may influence movement variables that are known to affect anterior cruciate ligament loading, such as knee valgus and knee flexion. To our knowledge, researchers have not studied individuals with limited or normal ankle DF-ROM to investigate the relationship between those factors and the lower extremity movement patterns associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Objective: To determine, using 2 different measurement techniques, whether knee- and ankle-joint kinematics differ between participants with limited and normal ankle DF-ROM. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Forty physically active adults (20 with limited ankle DF-ROM, 20 with normal ankle DF-ROM). Main Outcome Measure(s): Ankle DF-ROM was assessed using 2 techniques: (1) nonweight-bearing ankle DF-ROM with the knee straight, and (2) weight-bearing lunge (WBL). Knee flexion, knee valgus-varus, knee internal-external rotation, and ankle DF displacements were assessed during the overhead-squat, single-legged squat, and jump-landing tasks. Separate 1-way analyses of variance were performed to determine whether differences in knee- and ankle-joint kinematics existed between the normal and limited groups for each assessment. Results: We observed no differences between the normal and limited groups when classifying groups based on nonweight-bearing passive-ankle DF-ROM. However, individuals with greater ankle DF-ROM during the WBL displayed greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement and peak knee flexion during the overhead-squat and single-legged squat tasks. In addition, those individuals also demonstrated greater knee-varus displacement during the single-legged squat. Conclusions: Greater ankle DF-ROM assessed during the WBL was associated with greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement during both squatting tasks as well as greater knee-varus displacement during

  13. Designing for scale: development of the ReMotion Knee for global emerging markets.

    PubMed

    Hamner, Samuel R; Narayan, Vinesh G; Donaldson, Krista M

    2013-09-01

    Amputees living in developing countries have a profound need for affordable and reliable lower limb prosthetic devices. The World Health Organization estimates there are approximately 30 million amputees living in low-income countries, with up to 95% lacking access to prosthetic devices. Effective prosthetics can significantly affect the lives of these amputees by increasing opportunity for employment and providing improvements to long-term health and well-being. However, current solutions are inadequate: state-of-the-art solutions from the US and Europe are cost-prohibitive, while low-cost devices have been challenged by poor quality and/or unreliable performance, and have yet to achieve large scale impact. The introduction of new devices is hampered by the lack of a cohesive prosthetics industry in low-income areas; the current network of low-cost prosthetic clinics is informal and loosely organized with significant disparities in geography, patient volume and demographics, device procurement, clinical and logistical infrastructure, and funding. At D-Rev (Design Revolution) we are creating the ReMotion Knee, which is an affordable polycentric prosthetic knee joint that performs on par with devices in more industrialized regions, like the US and Europe. As of September 2012, over 4200 amputees have been fitted with the initial version of the ReMotion Knee through a partnership with the JaipurFoot Organization, with an 79% compliance rate after 2 years. We are currently scaling production of the ReMotion Knee using centralized manufacturing and distribution to serve the existing clinics in low-income countries and increase the availability of devices for amputees without access to appropriate care. At D-Rev, we develop products that target these customers through economically-sustainable models and provide a measurable impact in the lives of the world's amputees.

  14. Roller-Massager Application to the Quadriceps and Knee-Joint Range of Motion and Neuromuscular Efficiency During a Lunge

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury-Squires, David J.; Noftall, Jennifer C.; Sullivan, Kathleen M.; Behm, David G.; Power, Kevin E.; Button, Duane C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Roller massagers are used as a recovery and rehabilitative tool to initiate muscle relaxation and improve range of motion (ROM) and muscular performance. However, research demonstrating such effects is lacking. Objective: To determine the effects of applying a roller massager for 20 and 60 seconds on knee-joint ROM and dynamic muscular performance. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten recreationally active men (age = 26.6 ± 5.2 years, height = 175.3 ± 4.3 cm, mass = 84.4 ± 8.8 kg). Intervention(s): Participants performed 3 randomized experimental conditions separated by 24 to 48 hours. In condition 1 (5 repetitions of 20 seconds) and condition 2 (5 repetitions of 60 seconds), they applied a roller massager to the quadriceps muscles. Condition 3 served as a control condition in which participants sat quietly. Main Outcome Measure(s): Visual analog pain scale, electromyography (EMG) of the vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps femoris during roller massage and lunge, and knee-joint ROM. Results: We found no differences in pain between the 20-second and 60-second roller-massager conditions. During 60 seconds of roller massage, pain was 13.5% (5.7 ± 0.70) and 20.6% (6.2 ± 0.70) greater at 40 seconds and 60 seconds, respectively, than at 20 seconds (P < .05). During roller massage, VL and biceps femoris root mean square (RMS) EMG was 8% and 7%, respectively, of RMS EMG recorded during maximal voluntary isometric contraction. Knee-joint ROM was 10% and 16% greater in the 20-second and 60-second roller-massager conditions, respectively, than the control condition (P < .05). Finally, average lunge VL RMS EMG decreased as roller-massage time increased (P < .05). Conclusions: Roller massage was painful and induced muscle activity, but it increased knee-joint ROM and neuromuscular efficiency during a lunge. PMID:25415414

  15. [Age, activity and strength of knee ligaments].

    PubMed

    Kasperczyk, W J; Rosocha, S; Bosch, U; Oestern, H J; Tscherne, H

    1991-07-01

    The cruciate ligaments of older persons are thought to have diminished biomechanical properties. On the other hand, joint immobilization also leads to similar functional losses in ligaments. It can be difficult to differentiate between these factors in older and immobile persons. The anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments of six younger (average age 30 years) and six older (average age 64.7 years) donors with similar levels of activity were subjected to biomechanical testing. Each sample had to meet the following conditions: appropriate age, no chronic vascular and cardiopulmonary disease found on autopsy, no signs of osteoarthrosis and no knee injuries. The material properties of maximum stress (e.g. ACL: young/old 24/21N/mm2), elastic modulus (e.g. ACL: young/old 144/129 MPa), and strain (e.g. ACL: young/old 25/28%), did not differ significantly (p less than 0.05). This indicates that older persons who are active do not necessarily show functional losses in the cruciate ligaments. Other data found in the literature can be ascribed to immobilization influences. In this data many of the older test persons had chronic vascular insufficiency, cardiopulmonary disease or malignancies.

  16. Displacement of the medial meniscus within the passive motion characteristics of the human knee joint: an RSA study in human cadaver knees.

    PubMed

    Tienen, T G; Buma, P; Scholten, J G F; van Kampen, A; Veth, R P H; Verdonschot, N

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this study was to validate an in vitro human cadaver knee-joint model for the evaluation of the meniscal movement during knee-joint flexion. The question was whether our model showed comparable meniscal displacements to those found in earlier meniscal movement studies in vivo. Furthermore, we determined the influence of tibial torque on the meniscal displacement during knee-joint flexion. Three tantalum beads were inserted in the medial meniscus of six human-cadaver joints. The knee joints were placed and loaded in a loading apparatus, and the movements of the beads were determined by means of RSA during knee-joint flexion and extension with and without internal tibial (IT) and external tibial (ET) torque. During flexion without tibial torque, all menisci moved in posterior and lateral direction. The anterior horn showed significantly greater excursions than the posterior horn in both posterior and lateral direction. Internal tibial torque caused an anterior displacement of the pathway on the tibial plateau. External tibial torque caused a posterior displacement of the pathway. External tibial torque restricted the meniscal displacement during the first 30 degrees of knee-joint flexion. The displacements of the meniscus in this experiment were similar to the displacements described in the in vivo MRI studies. Furthermore, the application of tibial torque confirmed the relative immobility of the posterior horn of the meniscus. During external tibial torque, the posterior displacement of the pathway on the tibial plateau during the first 30 degrees of flexion might be restricted by the attached knee-joint capsule or the femoral condyle. This model revealed representative meniscal displacements during simple knee-joint flexion and also during the outer limits of passive knee-joint motion.

  17. Knee loading reduces MMP13 activity in the mouse cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Moderate loads with knee loading enhance bone formation, but its effects on the maintenance of the knee are not well understood. In this study, we examined the effects of knee loading on the activity of matrix metalloproteinase13 (MMP13) and evaluated the role of p38 MAPK and Rac1 GTPase in the regulation of MMP13. Methods Knee loading (0.5–3 N for 5 min) was applied to the right knee of surgically-induced osteoarthritis (OA) mice as well as normal (non-OA) mice, and MMP13 activity in the femoral cartilage was examined. The sham-loaded knee was used as a non-loading control. We also employed primary non-OA and OA human chondrocytes as well as C28/I2 chondrocyte cells, and examined MMP13 activity and molecular signaling in response to shear at 2–20 dyn/cm2. Results Daily knee loading at 1 N for 2 weeks suppressed cartilage destruction in the knee of OA mice. Induction of OA elevated MMP13 activity and knee loading at 1 N suppressed this elevation. MMP13 activity was also increased in primary OA chondrocytes, and this increase was attenuated by applying shear at 10 dyn/cm2. Load-driven reduction in MMP13 was associated with a decrease in the phosphorylation level of p38 MAPK (p-p38) and NFκB (p-NFκB). Molecular imaging using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique showed that Rac1 activity was reduced by shear at 10 dyn/cm2 and elevated by it at 20 dyn/cm2. Silencing Rac1 GTPase significantly reduced MMP13 expression and p-p38 but not p-NFκB. Transfection of a constitutively active Rac1 GTPase mutant increased MMP13 activity, while a dominant negative mutant decreased it. Conclusions Knee loading reduces MMP13 activity at least in part through Rac1-mediated p38 MAPK signaling. This study suggests the possibility of knee loading as a therapy not only for strengthening bone but also preventing tissue degradation of the femoral cartilage. PMID:24180431

  18. [The association between sports activity and knee osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Zeller, Lior; Sukenik, Shaul

    2008-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common non-inflammatory joint disease. The hip and knee, the main weight-bearing joints, are most commonly affected. Previous trauma to the joints is strongly associated with OA. Participation in various sports activities, including fitness room activities, intensive running and cycling, is on the rise. These activities offer potential health benefits and have been advocated for the primary and secondary prevention of many diseases, including diabetes and coronary artery disease. However, it has been hypothesized that physical activity might increase cartilage degeneration and thus accelerate knee OA. In this article we review the literature with the purpose of evaluating the purported association between sports activity and knee OA. Previous research did not show a significant association between intense physical activity and knee OA in the general population. A strong association was found in cases of former joint injury and in acquired and congenital joint defects. Moderate physical activity is recommended for people already suffering from OA with the goal of increasing muscle-strength, reducing pain and preserving the range of movement in the affected joints. People who wish to participate in sports activities should be evaluated by their family physician. This evaluation should include assessment of risk factors for knee OA, particularly in patients with previous joint injury. PMID:18686813

  19. Greater Hip Extension but Not Hip Abduction Explosive Strength Is Associated With Lesser Hip Adduction and Knee Valgus Motion During a Single-Leg Jump-Cut

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Baker; Johnson, Samuel T.; Chang, Eunwook; Pollard, Christine D.; Norcross, Marc F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationships between hip abductor and extensor strength and frontal plane hip and knee motions that are associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury risk are equivocal. However, previous research on these relationships has evaluated relatively low-level movement tasks and peak torque rather than a time-critical strength measure such as the rate of torque development (RTD). Hypothesis: Females with greater hip abduction and extension RTD would exhibit lesser frontal plane hip and knee motion during a single-leg jump-cutting task. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Forty recreationally active females performed maximal isometric contractions and single-leg jump-cuts. From recorded torque data, hip extension and abduction RTD was calculated from torque onset to 200 ms after onset. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to quantify frontal plane hip and knee kinematics during the movement task. For each RTD measure, jump-cut biomechanics were compared between participants in the highest (high) and lowest (low) RTD tertiles. Results: No differences in frontal plane hip and knee kinematics were identified between high and low hip abduction RTD groups. However, those in the high hip extension RTD group exhibited lower hip adduction (high, 3.8° ± 3.0°; low, 6.5° ± 3.0°; P = .019) and knee valgus (high, –2.5° ± 2.3°; low, –4.4° ± 3.2°; P = .046) displacements during the jump-cut. Conclusion: In movements such as cutting that are performed with the hip in a relatively abducted and flexed position, the ability of the gluteus medius to control hip adduction may be compromised. However, the gluteus maximus, functioning as a hip abductor, may take on a pivotal role in controlling hip adduction and knee valgus motion during these types of tasks. Clinical Relevance: Training with a specific emphasis on increasing explosive strength of the hip extensors may be a means through which to improve frontal plane hip and knee

  20. Correlation between hip function and knee kinematics evaluated by three-dimensional motion analysis during lateral and medial side-hopping

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Hiromitsu; Takiguchi, Kohei; Shibata, Yohei; Okubo, Satoshi; Yoshiya, Shinichi; Kuroda, Ryosuke

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Kinematic and kinetic characteristics of the limb during side-hopping and hip/knee interaction during this motion have not been clarified. The purposes of this study were to examine the biomechanical parameters of the knee during side hop and analyze its relationship with clinical measurements of hip function. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven male college rugby players were included. A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to assess motion characteristics of the knee during side hop. In addition, hip range of motion and muscle strength were evaluated. Subsequently, the relationship between knee motion and the clinical parameters of the hip was analyzed. [Results] In the lateral touchdown phase, the knee was positioned in an abducted and externally rotated position, and increasing abduction moment was applied to the knee. An analysis of the interaction between knee motion and hip function showed that range of motion for hip internal rotation was significantly correlated with external rotation angle and external rotation/abduction moments of the knee during the lateral touchdown phase. [Conclusion] Range of motion for hip internal rotation should be taken into consideration for identifying the biomechanical characteristics in the side hop test results. PMID:27799670

  1. The effect of tibio-femoral traction mobilization on passive knee flexion motion impairment and pain: a case series.

    PubMed

    Maher, Sara; Creighton, Doug; Kondratek, Melodie; Krauss, John; Qu, Xianggui

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this case series was to explore the effects of tibio-femoral (TF) manual traction on pain and passive range of motion (PROM) in individuals with unilateral motion impairment and pain in knee flexion. Thirteen participants volunteered for the study. All participants received 6 minutes of TF traction mobilization applied at end-range passive knee flexion. PROM measurements were taken before the intervention and after 2, 4, and 6 minutes of TF joint traction. Pain was measured using a visual analog scale with the TF joint at rest, at end-range passive knee flexion, during the application of joint traction, and immediately post-treatment. There were significant differences in PROM after 2 and 4 minutes of traction, with no significance noted after 4 minutes. A significant change in knee flexion of 25.9°, which exceeded the MDC(95,) was found when comparing PROM measurements pre- to final intervention. While pain did not change significantly over time, pain levels did change significantly during each treatment session. Pain significantly increased when the participant's knee was passively flexed to end range; it was reduced, although not significantly, during traction mobilization; and it significantly decreased following traction. This case series supports TF joint traction as a means of stretching shortened articular and periarticular tissues without increasing reported levels of pain during or after treatment. In addition, this is the first study documenting the temporal aspects of treatment effectiveness in motion restoration.

  2. Spontaneous Knee Ankylosis through Heterotopic Ossification after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boulezaz, Samuel; Gibon, Emmanuel; Loriaut, Philippe; Casabianca, Laurent; Rousseau, Romain; Dallaudiere, Benjamin; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a case of total ankylosis of the knee after a cruciate-sacrificing cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA). An 82-year-old female patient previously underwent primary TKA for osteoarthritis twenty years ago in our institution. She had recovered uneventfully and returned to her regular activities. There was no history of postsurgical trauma; however, she progressively lost knee range of motion. Radiographs revealed severe bridging heterotopic ossification. PMID:27119034

  3. Dynamic splinting for knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Finger, Eric; Willis, F Buck

    2008-01-01

    Total Knee Arthroplasty operations are increasing in frequency, and knee flexion contracture is a common pathology, both pre-existing and post-operative. A 61-year-old male presented with knee flexion contracture following a total knee arthroplasty. Physical therapy alone did not fully reduce the contracture and dynamic splinting was then prescribed for daily low-load, prolonged-duration stretch. After 28 physical therapy sessions, the active range of motion improved from -20 degrees to -12 degrees (stiff knee still lacking full extension), and after eight additional weeks with nightly wear of dynamic splint, the patient regained full knee extension, (active extension improved from -12 degrees to 0 degrees ).

  4. Effects of exercise and physical activity on knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Esser, Stephan; Bailey, Allison

    2011-12-01

    Exercise is one of the most discussed and controversial nonpharmacologic management strategies for osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Health care providers and patients share varied and often pseudoscientific beliefs regarding the effects of exercise on knee OA formulated on outdated notions of the etiology, pathophysiology, and progression of the condition. Based on the contemporary literature, regular light to moderate physical activity has both preventive and therapeutic benefits for individuals with knee OA. Exercise regimens with strong evidence of benefit include those that focus on aerobic/cardiovascular conditioning and lower extremity strength training. Health care providers should confidently incorporate exercise recommendations into clinical management and offer patients evidence-based and individually tailored exercise prescriptions to help manage the painful and often disabling symptoms of this condition.

  5. Effects of Group-Based Exercise on Range of Motion, Muscle Strength, Functional Ability, and Pain During the Acute Phase After Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, Yoshinori; Kamitani, Tsukasa; Wada, Osamu; Mizuno, Kiyonori; Yamada, Minoru

    2016-09-01

    Study Design Prospective observational study including a historical control group. Background The extent to which group-based exercise (G-EXE) improves knee range of motion (ROM), quadriceps strength, and gait ability is similar to that of individualized exercise (I-EXE) at 6 weeks and 8 months after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, the benefits of G-EXE for patients during the acute recovery phase after TKA remain unclear. Objective To determine the effects of G-EXE during the acute recovery phase after TKA on knee ROM, quadriceps strength, functional ability, and knee pain. Methods Two hundred thirty-one patients participated in G-EXE in addition to regular ambulation and activities-of-daily-living exercises twice daily during the hospital stay. Outcomes were compared to those of a retrospectively identified, historical control group (I-EXE group [n = 206]) that included patients who performed exercises identical to those performed by the G-EXE group. The outcomes included knee ROM, quadriceps strength, pain intensity, and timed up-and-go test score at 1 month before surgery and at discharge. Analyses were adjusted for age, body mass index, sex, length of hospital stay, and preoperative values. Results Changes in ROM of knee flexion and extension (P<.001) and quadriceps strength (P<.001) were significantly better in the G-EXE group than those in the I-EXE group at discharge. The pain intensity improved more in the G-EXE group than in the I-EXE group at discharge (P<.001). However, the changes in the timed up-and-go scores were not significantly different. Conclusion Patients performing G-EXE in addition to regular ambulation and activities-of-daily-living exercises demonstrated greater changes in knee ROM, quadriceps strength, and knee pain than those performing I-EXE in addition to regular ambulation and activities-of-daily-living exercises. The nonrandomized, asynchronous design decreases certainty of these findings. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 2b

  6. Definition and evaluation of testing scenarios for knee wear simulation under conditions of highly demanding daily activities.

    PubMed

    Schwiesau, Jens; Schilling, Carolin; Kaddick, Christian; Utzschneider, Sandra; Jansson, Volkmar; Fritz, Bernhard; Blömer, Wilhelm; Grupp, Thomas M

    2013-05-01

    The objective of our study was the definition of testing scenarios for knee wear simulation under various highly demanding daily activities of patients after total knee arthroplasty. This was mainly based on a review of published data on knee kinematics and kinetics followed by the evaluation of the accuracy and precision of a new experimental setup. We combined tibio-femoral load and kinematic data reported in the literature to develop deep squatting loading profiles for simulator input. A servo-hydraulic knee wear simulator was customised with a capability of a maximum flexion of 120°, a tibio-femoral load of 5000N, an anterior-posterior (AP) shear force of ±1000N and an internal-external (IE) rotational torque of ±50Nm to simulate highly demanding patient activities. During the evaluation of the newly configurated simulator the ability of the test machine to apply the required load and torque profiles and the flexion kinematics in a precise manner was examined by nominal-actual profile comparisons monitored periodically during subsequent knee wear simulation. For the flexion kinematics under displacement control a delayed actuator response of approximately 0.05s was inevitable due to the inertia of masses in movement of the coupled knee wear stations 1-3 during all applied activities. The axial load and IE torque is applied in an effective manner without substantial deviations between nominal and actual load and torque profiles. During the first third of the motion cycle a marked deviation between nominal and actual AP shear load profiles has to be noticed but without any expected measurable effect on the latter wear simulation due to the fact that the load values are well within the peak magnitude of the nominal load amplitude. In conclusion the described testing method will be an important tool to have more realistic knee wear simulations based on load conditions of the knee joint during activities of daily living. PMID:22922096

  7. Accuracy of a Custom Physical Activity and Knee Angle Measurement Sensor System for Patients with Neuromuscular Disorders and Gait Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Feldhege, Frank; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Lindner, Tobias; Hein, Albert; Markschies, Andreas; Zettl, Uwe Klaus; Bader, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Long-term assessment of ambulatory behavior and joint motion are valuable tools for the evaluation of therapy effectiveness in patients with neuromuscular disorders and gait abnormalities. Even though there are several tools available to quantify ambulatory behavior in a home environment, reliable measurement of joint motion is still limited to laboratory tests. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a novel inertial sensor system for ambulatory behavior and joint motion measurement in the everyday environment. An algorithm for behavior classification, step detection, and knee angle calculation was developed. The validation protocol consisted of simulated daily activities in a laboratory environment. The tests were performed with ten healthy subjects and eleven patients with multiple sclerosis. Activity classification showed comparable performance to commercially available activPAL sensors. Step detection with our sensor system was more accurate. The calculated flexion-extension angle of the knee joint showed a root mean square error of less than 5° compared with results obtained using an electro-mechanical goniometer. This new system combines ambulatory behavior assessment and knee angle measurement for long-term measurement periods in a home environment. The wearable sensor system demonstrated high validity for behavior classification and knee joint angle measurement in a laboratory setting. PMID:25954954

  8. Accuracy of a custom physical activity and knee angle measurement sensor system for patients with neuromuscular disorders and gait abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Feldhege, Frank; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Lindner, Tobias; Hein, Albert; Markschies, Andreas; Zettl, Uwe Klaus; Bader, Rainer

    2015-05-06

    Long-term assessment of ambulatory behavior and joint motion are valuable tools for the evaluation of therapy effectiveness in patients with neuromuscular disorders and gait abnormalities. Even though there are several tools available to quantify ambulatory behavior in a home environment, reliable measurement of joint motion is still limited to laboratory tests. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a novel inertial sensor system for ambulatory behavior and joint motion measurement in the everyday environment. An algorithm for behavior classification, step detection, and knee angle calculation was developed. The validation protocol consisted of simulated daily activities in a laboratory environment. The tests were performed with ten healthy subjects and eleven patients with multiple sclerosis. Activity classification showed comparable performance to commercially available activPAL sensors. Step detection with our sensor system was more accurate. The calculated flexion-extension angle of the knee joint showed a root mean square error of less than 5° compared with results obtained using an electro-mechanical goniometer. This new system combines ambulatory behavior assessment and knee angle measurement for long-term measurement periods in a home environment. The wearable sensor system demonstrated high validity for behavior classification and knee joint angle measurement in a laboratory setting.

  9. Does the GMFCS level influence the improvement in knee range of motion after rectus femoris transfer in cerebral palsy?

    PubMed

    Blumetti, Francesco C; Morais Filho, Mauro C; Kawamura, Cátia M; Cardoso, Michelle O; Neves, Daniella L; Fujino, Marcelo H; Lopes, José Augusto F

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) on the outcomes of rectus femoris transfer (RFT) for patients with cerebral palsy and stiff knee gait. We performed a retrospective review of patients seen at our gait laboratory from 1996 to 2013. Inclusion criteria were (i) spastic diplegic cerebral palsy, (ii) GMFCS levels I-III, (iii) reduced peak knee flexion in swing (PKFSw<55°), and (iv) patients who underwent orthopedic surgery with preoperative and postoperative gait analysis. Patients were divided into two groups according to whether they received a concurrent RFT or not at the time of surgery: non-RFT group (185 knees) and RFT group (123 knees). The primary outcome was the overall knee range of motion (KROM) derived from gait kinematics. The secondary outcomes were the PKFSw and the time of peak knee flexion in swing (tPKFSw). We observed a statistically significant improvement in KROM only for patients in the RFT group (P<0.001). However, PKFSw and tPKFSw improved in both groups after surgery (P<0.001 for all analyses). In the RFT group, the improvement in KROM was observed only for patients classified as GMFCS levels I and II. In the non-RFT group, no improvement in KROM was observed in any GMFCS level. In this study, patients at GMFCS levels I and II were more likely to benefit from the RFT procedure.

  10. Model-Based Estimation of Active Knee Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Serge; Hardegger, Michael; Vallery, Heike; List, Renate; Foresti, Mauro; Riener, Robert; Perreault, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Knee joint impedance varies substantially during physiological gait. Quantifying this modulation is critical for the design of transfemoral prostheses that aim to mimic physiological limb behavior. Conventional methods for quantifying joint impedance typically involve perturbing the joint in a controlled manner, and describing impedance as the dynamic relationship between applied perturbations and corresponding joint torques. These experimental techniques, however, are difficult to apply during locomotion without impeding natural movements. In this paper, we propose a method to estimate the elastic component of knee joint impedance that depends on muscle activation, often referred to as active knee stiffness. The method estimates stiffness using a musculoskeletal model of the leg and a model for activation-dependent short-range muscle stiffness. Muscle forces are estimated from measurements including limb kinematics, kinetics and muscle electromyograms. For isometric validation, we compare model estimates to measurements involving joint perturbations; measured stiffness is 17% lower than model estimates for extension, and 42% lower for flexion torques. We show that sensitivity of stiffness estimates to common approaches for estimating muscle force is small in isometric conditions. We also make initial estimates of how knee stiffness is modulated during gait, illustrating how this approach may be used to obtain parameters relevant to the design of transfemoral prostheses. PMID:22275672

  11. Comparison of strain-gage and fiber-optic goniometry for measuring knee kinematics during activities of daily living and exercise.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Abeer A; Baba, Jennifer; Beyea, James; Landry, John; Sexton, Andrew; McGibbon, Chris A

    2012-08-01

    There is increasing interest in wearable sensor technology as a tool for rehabilitation applications in community or home environments. Recent studies have focused on evaluating inertial based sensing (accelerometers, gyroscopes, etc.) that provide only indirect measures of joint motion. Measurement of joint kinematics using flexible goniometry is more direct, and still popular in laboratory environments, but has received little attention as a potential tool for wearable systems. The aim of this study was to compare two goniometric devices: a traditional strain-gauge flexible goniometer, and a fiberoptic flexible goniometer, for measuring dynamic knee flexion/extension angles during activity of daily living: chair rise, and gait; and exercise: deep knee bends, against joint angles computed from a "gold standard" Vicon motion tracking system. Six young adults were recruited to perform the above activities in the lab while wearing a goniometer on each knee, and reflective markers for motion tracking. Kinematic data were collected simultaneously from the goniometers (one on each leg) and the motion tracking system (both legs). The results indicate that both goniometers were within 2-5 degrees of the Vicon angles for gait and chair rise. For some deep knee bend trials, disagreement with Vicon angles exceeded ten degrees for both devices. We conclude that both goniometers can record ADL knee movement faithfully and accurately, but should be carefully considered when high (>120 deg) knee flexion angles are required.

  12. Comparison of strain-gage and fiber-optic goniometry for measuring knee kinematics during activities of daily living and exercise.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Abeer A; Baba, Jennifer; Beyea, James; Landry, John; Sexton, Andrew; McGibbon, Chris A

    2012-08-01

    There is increasing interest in wearable sensor technology as a tool for rehabilitation applications in community or home environments. Recent studies have focused on evaluating inertial based sensing (accelerometers, gyroscopes, etc.) that provide only indirect measures of joint motion. Measurement of joint kinematics using flexible goniometry is more direct, and still popular in laboratory environments, but has received little attention as a potential tool for wearable systems. The aim of this study was to compare two goniometric devices: a traditional strain-gauge flexible goniometer, and a fiberoptic flexible goniometer, for measuring dynamic knee flexion/extension angles during activity of daily living: chair rise, and gait; and exercise: deep knee bends, against joint angles computed from a "gold standard" Vicon motion tracking system. Six young adults were recruited to perform the above activities in the lab while wearing a goniometer on each knee, and reflective markers for motion tracking. Kinematic data were collected simultaneously from the goniometers (one on each leg) and the motion tracking system (both legs). The results indicate that both goniometers were within 2-5 degrees of the Vicon angles for gait and chair rise. For some deep knee bend trials, disagreement with Vicon angles exceeded ten degrees for both devices. We conclude that both goniometers can record ADL knee movement faithfully and accurately, but should be carefully considered when high (>120 deg) knee flexion angles are required. PMID:22938362

  13. Knee extensor muscle oxygen consumption in relation to muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Kooistra, R D; Blaauboer, M E; Born, J R; de Ruiter, C J; de Haan, A

    2006-12-01

    Recently, fatigability and muscle oxygen consumption (mVO(2)) during sustained isometric contractions were found to be less at shorter (30 degrees knee angle; 0 degrees = full extension) compared to longer knee extensor muscle lengths (90 degrees ) and, at low torques, less in the rectus femoris (RF) muscle than in the vastus lateralis and medialis. In the present study we hypothesized that these findings could be accounted for by a knee angle- and a muscle-dependent activation respectively. On two experimental days rectified surface EMG (rsEMG) was obtained as a measure of muscle activation in nine healthy young males. In addition, on day 1 maximal torque capacity (MTC) was carefully determined using superimposed nerve stimulation on brief high intensity contractions (> 70%MVC) at 30, 60 and 90 degrees knee angles. On day 2, subjects performed longer lasting isometric contractions (10-70%MTC) while mVO(2) was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). At 30 degrees , maximal mVO(2) was reached significantly later (11.0 s +/- 6.5 s) and was 57.9 +/- 8.3% less (average +/- SD, across intensities and muscles) than mVO(2) at 60 and 90 degrees (p < 0.05). However, rsEMG was on average only 18.0 +/- 11.8% (p = 0.062) less at the start of the contraction at 30 degrees . At 10%MTC at all knee angles, maximal mVO(2) of the RF occurred significantly later (28.8 +/- 36.0 s) and showed a significantly smaller increase in rsEMG compared to both vasti. In conclusion, it is unlikely that the tendency for less intense muscle activation could fully account for the approximately 60% lower oxygen consumption at 30 degrees , but the later increase in RFmVO(2) seemed to be caused by a less strong activation of the RF.

  14. Uncertainty of knee joint muscle activity during knee joint torque exertion: the significance of controlling adjacent joint torque.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Daichi; Nakazawa, Kimitaka; Akai, Masami

    2005-09-01

    In the single-joint torque exertion task, which has been widely used to control muscle activity, only the relevant joint torque is specified. However, the neglect of the neighboring joint could make the procedure unreliable, considering our previous result that even monoarticular muscle activity level is indefinite without specifying the adjacent joint torque. Here we examined the amount of hip joint torque generated with knee joint torque and its influence on the activity of the knee joint muscles. Twelve healthy subjects were requested to exert various levels of isometric knee joint torque. The knee and hip joint torques were obtained by using a custom-made device. Because no information about hip joint torque was provided to the subjects, the hip joint torque measured here was a secondary one associated with the task. The amount of hip joint torque varied among subjects, indicating that they adopted various strategies to achieve the task. In some subjects, there was a considerable internal variability in the hip joint torque. Such variability was not negligible, because the knee joint muscle activity level with respect to the knee joint torque, as quantified by surface electromyography (EMG), changed significantly when the subjects were requested to change the strategy. This change occurred in a very systematic manner: in the case of the knee extension, as the hip flexion torque was larger, the activity of mono- and biarticular knee extensors decreased and increased, respectively. These results indicate that the conventional single knee joint torque exertion has the drawback that the intersubject and/or intertrial variability is inevitable in the relative contribution among mono- and biarticular muscles because of the uncertainty of the hip joint torque. We discuss that the viewpoint that both joint torques need to be considered will bring insights into various controversial problems such as the shape of the EMG-force relationship, neural factors that help

  15. Effect of a high intensity quadriceps fatigue protocol on knee joint mechanics and muscle activation during gait in young adults.

    PubMed

    Murdock, Gillian Hatfield; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of impaired quadriceps function on knee joint biomechanics and neuromuscular function during gait. Surface electromyograms, three-dimensional motion and ground reaction forces were collected during gait before and after 20 healthy adults completed a high intensity quadriceps fatigue protocol. Pattern recognition techniques were utilized to examine changes in amplitude and temporal characteristics of all gait variables. The fatigue protocol resulted in decreased knee extensor torque generation and quadriceps median power frequencies for 18 of 20 participants (p < 0.05). The gait data from these 18 participants was analyzed. The knee external rotation angle increased (p < 0.05), the net external flexion and external rotation moments decreased (p < 0.05), and the net external adduction moment increased (p < 0.05). Post-fatigue changes in periarticular muscle activation patterns were consistent with the biomechanical changes, but were not significantly altered. Even for this low demand task of walking the knee motion and loading characteristics were altered following a high intensity fatigue protocol in a manner that may place the knee joint at greater risk for joint pathology and injury.

  16. Gastrocnemius and soleus are selectively activated when adding knee extensor activity to plantar flexion.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahito; Chino, Kentaro; Fukashiro, Senshi

    2014-08-01

    The gastrocnemius is a biarticular muscle that acts not only as a plantar flexor, but also as a knee flexor, meaning that it is an antagonist during knee extension. In contrast, the soleus is a monoarticular plantar flexor. Based on this anatomical difference, these muscles' activities should be selectively activated during simultaneous plantar flexion and knee extension, which occur during many activities of daily living. This study examined the selective activation of gastrocnemius and soleus activities when voluntary isometric activation of knee extensors was added to voluntary isometric plantar flexion. Ten male volunteers performed isometric plantar flexion at 10%, 20%, and 30% of maximum effort. During each plantar flexion task, isometric knee extension was added at 0%, 50%, and 100% of maximum effort. When knee extension was added, the average rectified value of the electromyographic activity of the medial gastrocnemius was significantly depressed (P=.002), whereas that of the soleus was significantly increased (P<.001) regardless of the plantar flexion level. These results suggest that plantar flexion with concurrent knee extensor activity leads to selective activation of the soleus and depression of the synergistic activity of the gastrocnemius.

  17. 78 FR 38098 - Proposed Information Collection (Knee and Lower Leg Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Knee and Lower Leg Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... disability benefits related to a claimant's diagnosis of knee and lower leg conditions. DATES: Written... nancy.kessinger@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW (Knee and Lower Leg...

  18. Reciprocating motion of active deformable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarama, M.; Ohta, T.

    2016-05-01

    Reciprocating motion of an active deformable particle in a homogeneous medium is studied theoretically. For generality, we employ a simple model derived from symmetry considerations for the center-of-mass velocity and elliptical and triangular deformations in two dimensions. We carry out, for the first time, a systematic investigation of the reciprocating motion of a self-propelled particle. It is clarified that spontaneous breaking of the front-rear asymmetry is essential for the reciprocating motion. Moreover, two routes are found for the formation of the reciprocating motion. One is a bifurcation from a motionless stationary state. The other is destabilisation of an oscillatory rectilinear motion.

  19. Multiple LREK active contours for knee meniscus ultrasound image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Amir; Ng, Siew-Cheok; Goh, Siew-Li; George, John; Supriyanto, Eko; Lai, Khin W

    2015-10-01

    Quantification of knee meniscus degeneration and displacement in an ultrasound image requires simultaneous segmentation of femoral condyle, meniscus, and tibial plateau in order to determine the area and the position of the meniscus. In this paper, we present an active contour for image segmentation that uses scalable local regional information on expandable kernel (LREK). It includes using a strategy to adapt the size of a local window in order to avoid being confined locally in a homogeneous region during the segmentation process. We also provide a multiple active contours framework called multiple LREK (MLREK) to deal with multiple object segmentation without merging and overlapping between the neighboring contours in the shared boundaries of separate regions. We compare its performance to other existing active contour models and show an improvement offered by our model. We then investigate the choice of various parameters in the proposed framework in response to the segmentation outcome. Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance measures over a set of real knee meniscus ultrasound images indicate a potential application of MLREK for assessment of knee meniscus degeneration and displacement. PMID:25910057

  20. Perioperative Rehabilitation Using a Knee Extension Device and Arthroscopic Debridement in the Treatment of Arthrofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Biggs-Kinzer, Angie; Murphy, Brian; Shelbourne, K. Donald; Urch, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Background: Arthrofibrosis is a postoperative complication of intra-articular knee surgery that can be difficult to treat. Evidence suggests that maximizing knee range of motion may improve outcomes in patients with arthrofibrosis who undergo arthroscopic debridement. Hypothesis: Patients who achieve greater knee range of motion will have better subjective scores. Study Design: Retrospective case series analysis. Methods: A review of records was performed for 33 patients with arthrofibrosis who underwent knee arthroscopy and scar resection coupled with perioperative rehabilitation to maximize knee range of motion. Patient demographics and preoperative and postoperative range of motion measurements were extracted from the records. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Form was administered to assess pain, activity, and knee function. Patients performed a preoperative and postoperative rehabilitation program utilizing a knee extension device to maximize knee extension. Results: According to the IKDC range of motion criteria, 27 of 33 patients achieved normal knee extension, and 14 of 33 achieved normal knee flexion at a mean of 8.6 months after surgery. Patients with normal knee motion had a mean IKDC Subjective Knee Form score of 72.6 ± 13.6, which was significantly higher than patients who did not achieve normal motion (P = .04). Overall, mean IKDC Subjective Knee Form scores improved from 45.3 ± 16.7 preoperatively to 67.1 ± 18.0 postoperatively (P < .01) at a mean of 14.7 months after surgery. Conclusions: Perioperative rehabilitation that emphasizes restoration of normal knee range of motion appears to improve outcomes in patients with arthrofibrosis who undergo arthroscopic scar resection. In support of our hypothesis, patients who achieved greater knee range of motion had better subjective knee scores. PMID:23015970

  1. Hi-flexion and gender-specific designs fail to provide significant increases in range of motion during cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Kyoo; Park, Sang Jin; Yoon, Taek Rim; Park, Kyung Soon; Seo, Hyoung Yeon; Seon, Jong Keun

    2012-06-01

    The effects of different femoral component designs on intraoperative range of motion were examined in 40 female patients during primary cruciate-retaining (CR) total knee arthroplasty. After complete bone resection and soft tissue balancing, standard CR, high-flexion, and gender-specific knee trials were sequentially inserted, and maximal flexion and extension under gravity were measured using a navigation system. Average maximal flexions were 134.3° for standard CR knees, 136.2° for high-flexion knees, and 136.4° for gender-specific knees. No significant intergroup differences in intraoperative maximal flexion and extension were found (P > .05). High-flexion and gender-specific femoral designs were found to show subtle increases in intraoperative range of motion as compared with the standard design but no significant differences.

  2. Provocative mechanical tests of the peripheral nervous system affect the joint torque-angle during passive knee motion.

    PubMed

    Andrade, R J; Freitas, S R; Vaz, J R; Bruno, P M; Pezarat-Correia, P

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the influence of the head, upper trunk, and foot position on the passive knee extension (PKE) torque-angle response. PKE tests were performed in 10 healthy subjects using an isokinetic dynamometer at 2°/s. Subjects lay in the supine position with their hips flexed to 90°. The knee angle, passive torque, surface electromyography (EMG) of the semitendinosus and quadriceps vastus medialis, and stretch discomfort were recorded in six body positions during PKE. The different maximal active positions of the cervical spine (neutral; flexion; extension), thoracic spine (neutral; flexion), and ankle (neutral; dorsiflexion) were passively combined for the tests. Visual analog scale scores and EMG were unaffected by body segment positioning. An effect of the ankle joint was verified on the peak torque and knee maximum angle when the ankle was in the dorsiflexion position (P < 0.05). Upper trunk positioning had an effect on the knee submaximal torque (P < 0.05), observed as an increase in the knee passive submaximal torque when the cervical and thoracic spines were flexed (P < 0.05). In conclusion, other apparently mechanical unrelated body segments influence torque-angle response since different positions of head, upper trunk, and foot induce dissimilar knee mechanical responses during passive extension.

  3. Knee pain during activities of daily living and its relationship with physical activity in patients with early and severe knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fukutani, Naoto; Iijima, Hirotaka; Aoyama, Tomoki; Yamamoto, Yuko; Hiraoka, Masakazu; Miyanobu, Kazuyuki; Jinnouchi, Masashi; Kaneda, Eishi; Tsuboyama, Tadao; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether knee pain during various activities of daily living (ADLs) is associated with physical activity in patients with early and severe knee osteoarthritis (OA). We hypothesized that the painful ADLs associated with decreased physical activity differ according to disease severity. This cross-sectional study enrolled 270 patients with medial knee OA, assigned to either the early (Kellgren Lawrence [K/L] grade 1-2) or the severe group (K/L grade 3-4). Physical activity was assessed using a pedometer. Knee pain during six ADLs (waking up in the morning, walking on a flat surface, ascending stairs, etc.) was evaluated using a questionnaire. We performed multiple regression and quantile regression analysis to investigate whether knee pain during each ADL was associated with physical activity. In the early group, the more knee pain they experienced while ascending stairs, the lower their physical activity was (75th regression coefficient = -1033.70, P = 0.018). In the severe group, the more knee pain they experienced while walking on a flat surface or bending to the floor or standing up, the lower their physical activity was (unstandardized coefficients = -1850.87, P = 0.026; unstandardized coefficients = -2640.35, P = 0.010). Knee pain while ascending stairs and while walking on a flat surface or bending to the floor or standing up was a probable limiting factor for physical activity in early and severe knee OA, respectively. These findings suggested that a reduction in task-specific knee pain according to disease severity could improve physical activity levels. PMID:27041381

  4. Knee pain during activities of daily living and its relationship with physical activity in patients with early and severe knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fukutani, Naoto; Iijima, Hirotaka; Aoyama, Tomoki; Yamamoto, Yuko; Hiraoka, Masakazu; Miyanobu, Kazuyuki; Jinnouchi, Masashi; Kaneda, Eishi; Tsuboyama, Tadao; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether knee pain during various activities of daily living (ADLs) is associated with physical activity in patients with early and severe knee osteoarthritis (OA). We hypothesized that the painful ADLs associated with decreased physical activity differ according to disease severity. This cross-sectional study enrolled 270 patients with medial knee OA, assigned to either the early (Kellgren Lawrence [K/L] grade 1-2) or the severe group (K/L grade 3-4). Physical activity was assessed using a pedometer. Knee pain during six ADLs (waking up in the morning, walking on a flat surface, ascending stairs, etc.) was evaluated using a questionnaire. We performed multiple regression and quantile regression analysis to investigate whether knee pain during each ADL was associated with physical activity. In the early group, the more knee pain they experienced while ascending stairs, the lower their physical activity was (75th regression coefficient = -1033.70, P = 0.018). In the severe group, the more knee pain they experienced while walking on a flat surface or bending to the floor or standing up, the lower their physical activity was (unstandardized coefficients = -1850.87, P = 0.026; unstandardized coefficients = -2640.35, P = 0.010). Knee pain while ascending stairs and while walking on a flat surface or bending to the floor or standing up was a probable limiting factor for physical activity in early and severe knee OA, respectively. These findings suggested that a reduction in task-specific knee pain according to disease severity could improve physical activity levels.

  5. Peak muscle activation, joint kinematics, and kinetics during elliptical and stepping movement pattern on a Precor Adaptive Motion Trainer.

    PubMed

    Rogatzki, Matthew J; Kernozek, Thomas W; Willson, John D; Greany, John F; Hong, Di-An; Porcari, John R

    2012-06-01

    Kinematic, kinetic, and electromyography data were collected from the biceps femoris, rectus femoris (RF), gluteus maximus, and erector spinae (ES) during a step and elliptical exercise at a standardized workload with no hand use. Findings depicted 95% greater ankle plantar flexion (p = .01), 29% more knee extension (p = .003), 101% higher peak knee flexor moments (p < .001) 54% greater hip extensor moments (p < .001), 268% greater anterior joint reaction force (p = .009), 37% more RF activation (p < .001), and 200 % more ES activation (p <. 001) for the elliptical motion. Sixteen percent more hip flexion (p < .001), 42% higher knee extensor moments (p < .001), and 54% greater hip flexor moments (p = .041) occurred during the step motion. Biomechanical differences between motions should be considered when planning an exercise regimen. PMID:22808700

  6. Active Flexion in Weight Bearing Better Correlates with Functional Outcomes of Total Knee Arthroplasty than Passive Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Dong; Jain, Nimash; Kang, Yeon Gwi; Kim, Tae Yune

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Correlations between maximum flexion and functional outcomes in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients are reportedly weak. We investigated whether there are differences between passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing and other types of maximum flexion and whether the type of maximum flexion correlates with functional outcomes. Materials and Methods A total of 210 patients (359 knees) underwent preoperative evaluation and postoperative follow-up evaluations (6, 12, and 24 months) for the assessment of clinical outcomes including maximum knee flexion. Maximum flexion was measured under five conditions: passive nonweight bearing, passive weight bearing, active nonweight bearing, and active weight bearing with or without arm support. Data were analyzed for relationships between passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing by Pearson correlation analyses, and a variance comparison between measurement techniques via paired t test. Results We observed substantial differences between passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing and the other four maximum flexion types. At all time points, passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing correlated poorly with active maximum flexion in weight bearing with or without arm support. Active maximum flexion in weight bearing better correlated with functional outcomes than the other maximum flexion types. Conclusions Our study suggests active maximum flexion in weight bearing should be reported together with passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing in research on the knee motion arc after TKA. PMID:27274468

  7. Effect of Planning on Trunk Motion and Knee Moments During a Side Step Cut Task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houck, Jeff; Gorniak, Stacey; Nicholson, Kristen

    2004-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that alterations in knee biomechanics associated with unanticipated cutting tasks place athletes at higher risk of knee injuries. Besier et al observed alterations in knee moments during unanticipated cutting tasks that were consistent with in-vitro ACL injury mechanisms. During similar tasks, Patla et al observed lateral trunk lean and decreased foot placement, suggesting that full body center of mass control is perturbed during such tasks. The purpose of this study was to compare the trunk and knee frontal plane moments and evaluate a relationship between the two during unanticipated cutting tasks. The results of this study suggest that there is a relationship between the trunk and knee frontal plane moments during the first 200-400ms of the stance phase of gait.

  8. The Hip and Knee Book: developing an active management booklet for hip and knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Nefyn H; Amoakwa, Elvis; Burton, Kim; Hendry, Maggie; Lewis, Ruth; Jones, Jeremy; Bennett, Paul; Neal, Richard D; Andrew, Glynne; Wilkinson, Clare

    2010-01-01

    Background The pain and disability of hip and knee osteoarthritis can be improved by exercise, but the best method of encouraging this is not known. Aim To develop an evidence-based booklet for patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis, offering information and advice on maintaining activity. Design of study Systematic review of reviews and guidelines, then focus groups. Setting Four general practices in North East Wales. Method Evidence-based messages were developed from a systematic review, synthesised into patient-centred messages, and then incorporated into a narrative. A draft booklet was examined by three focus groups to improve the phrasing of its messages and discuss its usefulness. The final draft was examined in a fourth focus group. Results Six evidence-based guidelines and 54 systematic reviews were identified. The focus groups found the draft booklet to be informative and easy to read. They reported a lack of clarity about the cause of osteoarthritis and were surprised that the pain could improve. The value of exercise and weight loss beliefs was accepted and reinforced, but there was a perceived contradiction about heavy physical work being causative, while moderate exercise was beneficial. There was a fear of dependency on analgesia and misinterpretation of the message on hyaluranon injections. The information on joint replacement empowered patients to discuss referral with their GP. The text was revised to accommodate these issues. Conclusion The booklet was readable, credible, and useful to end-users. A randomised controlled trial is planned, to test whether the booklet influences beliefs about osteoarthritis and exercise. PMID:20132695

  9. A prosthetic knee using magnetorhelogical fluid damper for above-knee amputees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinhyuk; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-04-01

    A prosthetic knee for above-knee (AK) amputees is categorized into two types; namely a passive and an active type. The passive prosthetic knee is generally made by elastic materials such as carbon fiber reinforced composite material, titanium and etc. The passive prosthetic knee easy to walk. But, it has disadvantages such that a knee joint motion is not similar to ordinary people. On the other hand, the active prosthetic knee can control the knee joint angle effectively because of mechanical actuator and microprocessor. The actuator should generate large damping force to support the weight of human body. But, generating the large torque using small actuator is difficult. To solve this problem, a semi-active type prosthetic knee has been researched. This paper proposes a semi-active prosthetic knee using a flow mode magneto-rheological (MR) damper for AK amputees. The proposed semi-active type prosthetic knee consists of the flow mode MR damper, hinge and prosthetic knee body. In order to support weight of human body, the required energy of MR damper is smaller than actuator of active prosthetic leg. And it can control the knee joint angle by inducing the magnetic field during the stance phase.

  10. A new protocol from real joint motion data for wear simulation in total knee arthroplasty: stair climbing.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Santina; Belvedere, Claudio; Jaber, Sami Abdel; Affatato, Saverio; D'Angeli, Valentina; Leardini, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    In its normal lifespan, a knee prosthesis must bear highly demanding loading conditions, going beyond the sole activity of level walking required by ISO standard 14243. We have developed a protocol for in vitro wear simulation of stair climbing on a displacement controlled knee simulator. The flexion/extension angle, intra/extra rotation angle, and antero/posterior translation were obtained in patients by three-dimensional video-fluoroscopy. Axial load data were collected by gait analysis. Kinematics and load data revealed a good consistence across patients, in spite of the different prosthesis size. The protocol was then implemented and tested on a displacement controlled knee wear simulator, showing an accurate reproduction of stair climbing waveforms with a relative error lower than 5%.

  11. Sports activities 5 years after total knee or hip arthroplasty: the Ulm Osteoarthritis Study

    PubMed Central

    Huch, K; Muller, K; Sturmer, T; Brenner, H; Puhl, W; Gunther, K

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyse sports activities of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) over lifetime, preoperatively, and 5 years after arthroplasty. Methods: In a longitudinal four centre study, 809 consecutive patients with advanced OA of the hip (420) or the knee (389) joint under the age of 76 years who required total joint replacement were recruited. A completed questionnaire about sports activities at 5 year follow up was received from 636 (79%) of the 809 patients. Results: Although most patients with hip (97%) and knee (94%) OA had performed sports activities during their life, only 36% (hip patients) and 42% (knee patients) had maintained sports activities at the time of surgery. Five years postoperatively, the proportion of patients performing sports activities increased to 52% among patients with hip OA, but further declined to 34% among those with knee OA. Accordingly, the proportion of patients with hip OA performing sports activities for more than 2 hours a week increased from 8 to 14%, whereas this proportion decreased from 12 to 5% among patients with knee OA. Pain in the replaced joint was reported by 9% of patients with hip and by >16% with knee OA. Conclusion: Differences in pain 5 years after joint replacement may explain some of the difference of sports activities between patients with hip and knee OA. Reasons for reduction of sports activities may include the increasing age of the patients, their worries about an "artificial joint", and the advice of their surgeon to be cautious. PMID:15843453

  12. Effects of ankle joint mobilization with movement and weight-bearing exercise on knee strength, ankle range of motion, and gait velocity in patients with stroke: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    An, Chang-Man; Won, Jong-Im

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ankle joint mobilization with movement on knee strength, ankle range of motion, and gait velocity, compared with weight-bearing exercise in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects with chronic stroke were divided into three groups: MWM (n = 12), WBE (n = 8), and control (n = 10). All groups attended physical therapy sessions 3 times a week for 5 weeks. Subjects in the MWM group performed mobilization with movement exercises, whilst participants in the WBE group performed weight-bearing exercises. Knee peak torque, ankle range of motion, and spatiotemporal gait parameters were evaluated before and after the interventions. [Results] Knee extensor peak torque increased significantly in both MWM and WBE groups. However, only the MWM group showed significant improvement in passive and active ankle range of motion and gait velocity, among the three groups. [Conclusion] Ankle joint mobilization with movement intervention is more effective than simple weight-bearing intervention in improving gait speed in stroke patients with limited ankle motion.

  13. Effects of Low-Impact Dance on Blood Biochemistry, Bone Mineral Density, the Joint Range of Motion of Lower Extremities, Knee Extension Torque, and Fall in Females.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui Ying; Tu, Jui Hung; Hsu, Chin Hsing; Tsao, Te Hung

    2016-01-01

    The effect of low-impact dance on blood metabolites, the joint range of motion (ROM) of the lower extremities, knee extension torque, bone mass density (BMD), the number of falls, and the confidence to perform daily activities (Modified Falls Efficacy Scale [MFES]) was examined in older sedentary women (age: 59 ± 4 years) before and after a 16-week intervention. Results showed that the average score for the MFES, some parameters of blood chemistry, and joint ROM were significantly improved after low-impact intervention. In addition to improvements in blood lipids and body fat percentages, the increases shown in the parameters regarding the lower extremities may contribute to confidence in performing common daily activities in older women, although the number of falls did not significantly differ between the two groups during the 16-week period.

  14. The mechanics of activated semitendinosus are not representative of the pathological knee joint condition of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Ateş, Filiz; Temelli, Yener; Yucesoy, Can A

    2016-06-01

    Characteristic cerebral palsy effects in the knee include a restricted joint range of motion and forcefully kept joint in a flexed position. To show whether the mechanics of activated spastic semitendinosus muscle are contributing to these effects, we tested the hypothesis that the muscle's joint range of force exertion is narrow and force production capacity in flexed positions is high. The isometric semitendinosus forces of children with cerebral palsy (n=7, mean (SD)=7years (8months), GMFCS levels III-IV, 12 limbs tested) were measured intra-operatively as a function of knee angle, from flexion (120°) to full extension (0°). Peak force measured in the most flexed position was considered as the benchmark. However, peak force (mean (SD)=112.4N (54.3N)) was measured either at intermediate or even full knee extension (three limbs) indicating no narrow joint range of force exertion. Lack of high force production capacity in flexed knee positions (e.g., at 120° negligible or below 22% of the peak force) was shown except for one limb. Therefore, our hypothesis was rejected for a vast majority of the limbs. These findings and those reported for spastic gracilis agree, indicating that the patients' pathological joint condition must rely on a more complex mechanism than the mechanics of individual spastic muscles. PMID:27128957

  15. Functionality and Safety of an Ultra-Congruent Rotating Platform Knee Prosthesis at 5.6 Years: More than 5- Year Follow-Up of the e.motion® UC-TKA

    PubMed Central

    Chavoix, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mobile bearing TKA prostheses were designed to minimize polyethylene wear by increasing implant conformity and reducing stresses between the articulating prosthesis components. It is the purpose of this study to assess the mid-term functionality and clinical outcome associated with a highly congruent mobile platform design, the e.motion® UC total knee prosthesis. Material and Methods: Functional and clinical outcomes were assessed after an average of 5.6 years (5.1 – 6.0 years) after total knee arthroplasty in 28 patients (24 women), aged 77.8±7.5 years. The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was assessed. Secondary outcomes included the Knee Society Score (KSS), radiological evaluation of radiolucent lines and recording of adverse events. Results: The average KOOS subscore for the activities of daily life was 77.8 points after 5.6 years. Both the clinical and functional KSS improved at 2.4 and 5.6 years. Two patients showed radiolucent lines at 5.6 years. Adverse events over 5.6 years included 3 subluxations, 1 tilting and 1 misalignment of the patella. None of the prostheses were revised. Conclusion: This pilot study shows promising outcomes for the e.motion® UC prosthesis. In the small sample, the implant performed comparably to the LCS prosthesis (the gold standard). There were no loosenings or revisions observed at 5.6 years. PMID:23730378

  16. Robust 2D/3D registration for fast-flexion motion of the knee joint using hybrid optimization.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Takashi; Suzuki, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Naomoto, Shinji; Sukegawa, Tomoyuki; Nawata, Atsushi; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we proposed a 2D/3D registration method that uses Powell's algorithm to obtain 3D motion of a knee joint by 3D computed-tomography and bi-plane fluoroscopic images. The 2D/3D registration is performed consecutively and automatically for each frame of the fluoroscopic images. This method starts from the optimum parameters of the previous frame for each frame except for the first one, and it searches for the next set of optimum parameters using Powell's algorithm. However, if the flexion motion of the knee joint is fast, it is likely that Powell's algorithm will provide a mismatch because the initial parameters are far from the correct ones. In this study, we applied a hybrid optimization algorithm (HPS) combining Powell's algorithm with the Nelder-Mead simplex (NM-simplex) algorithm to overcome this problem. The performance of the HPS was compared with the separate performances of Powell's algorithm and the NM-simplex algorithm, the Quasi-Newton algorithm and hybrid optimization algorithm with the Quasi-Newton and NM-simplex algorithms with five patient data sets in terms of the root-mean-square error (RMSE), target registration error (TRE), success rate, and processing time. The RMSE, TRE, and the success rate of the HPS were better than those of the other optimization algorithms, and the processing time was similar to that of Powell's algorithm alone.

  17. Knee functions and a return to sports activity in competitive athletes following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Y; Shirai, Y; Narita, T; Mori, A; Kobayashi, K

    2000-06-01

    We investigated knee functions and a return to sports in 50 competitive athlete patients treated with arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using double-looped STG augmented by woven polyester at a 1-year follow-up. There were 25 males and 25 females with a mean age of 24.3 years (range: 19-39 years). The majority of preinjury sports were basketball, volleyball and soccer. Athletic rehabilitation including agility training and sports-specific training was started at 12 weeks. Fourty patients (80%) was rated as normal or nearly normal on the assessment of International Knee Documentation Commitee postoperatively. Fourty-eight patients (96%) obtained full range of motion, and the mean quadriceps muscle strength of the injured side was 91.3%of that of the uninjured side. As for a return to sports, 46 patients (92%) were able to do fully competitive sports at a mean of 8.1 postoperative months. These results suggest that arthroscopic reconstruction using augmented double-looped STG allows early athletic rehabilitation, and lead satisfactory outcome as well as a reliable and early return to preinjury level of sport activity for the majority of the competitive athlete patients.

  18. Effect of knee angle on quadriceps strength and activation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Theuerkauf, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Quadriceps strength and activation deficits after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury or surgery are typically evaluated at joint positions that are biomechanically advantageous to the quadriceps muscle. However, the effect of knee joint position and the associated changes in muscle length on strength and activation is currently unknown in this population. Here, we examined the effect of knee angle on quadriceps strength, activation, and electrically evoked torque in individuals with ACL reconstruction. Furthermore, we evaluated whether knee angle mediated the relationship between quadriceps weakness and functional performance after ACL reconstruction. Knee strength and activation were tested bilaterally at 90° and 45° of knee flexion in 11 subjects with ACL reconstruction using an interpolated triplet technique. The magnitude of electrically evoked torque at rest was used to quantify peripheral muscle contractile property changes, and the single-leg hop for distance test was used to evaluate functional performance. The results indicated that although quadriceps strength deficits were similar between knee angles, voluntary activation deficits were significantly higher in the reconstructed leg at 45° of knee flexion. On the contrary, the side-to-side evoked torque at rest ratio [i.e., (reconstructed/nonreconstructed) × 100] was significantly lower at 90° than at 45° of knee flexion. The association between quadriceps strength and functional performance was stronger at 45° of knee flexion. The results provide novel evidence that quadriceps activation is selectively affected at 45° of knee flexion and emphasize the importance of assessing quadriceps strength and activation at this position when feasible because it better captures activation deficits. PMID:25997949

  19. Effect of knee angle on quadriceps strength and activation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Chandramouli; Theuerkauf, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Quadriceps strength and activation deficits after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury or surgery are typically evaluated at joint positions that are biomechanically advantageous to the quadriceps muscle. However, the effect of knee joint position and the associated changes in muscle length on strength and activation is currently unknown in this population. Here, we examined the effect of knee angle on quadriceps strength, activation, and electrically evoked torque in individuals with ACL reconstruction. Furthermore, we evaluated whether knee angle mediated the relationship between quadriceps weakness and functional performance after ACL reconstruction. Knee strength and activation were tested bilaterally at 90° and 45° of knee flexion in 11 subjects with ACL reconstruction using an interpolated triplet technique. The magnitude of electrically evoked torque at rest was used to quantify peripheral muscle contractile property changes, and the single-leg hop for distance test was used to evaluate functional performance. The results indicated that although quadriceps strength deficits were similar between knee angles, voluntary activation deficits were significantly higher in the reconstructed leg at 45° of knee flexion. On the contrary, the side-to-side evoked torque at rest ratio [i.e., (reconstructed/nonreconstructed) × 100] was significantly lower at 90° than at 45° of knee flexion. The association between quadriceps strength and functional performance was stronger at 45° of knee flexion. The results provide novel evidence that quadriceps activation is selectively affected at 45° of knee flexion and emphasize the importance of assessing quadriceps strength and activation at this position when feasible because it better captures activation deficits.

  20. Influence of restricted vision and knee joint range of motion on gait properties during level walking and stair ascent and descent.

    PubMed

    Demura, Tomohiro; Demura, Shin-ich

    2011-01-01

    Because elderly individuals experience marked declines in various physical functions (e.g., vision, joint function) simultaneously, it is difficult to clarify the individual effects of these functional declines on walking. However, by imposing vision and joint function restrictions on young men, the effects of these functional declines on walking can be clarified. The authors aimed to determine the effect of restricted vision and range of motion (ROM) of the knee joint on gait properties while walking and ascending or descending stairs. Fifteen healthy young adults performed level walking and stair ascent and descent during control, vision restriction, and knee joint ROM restriction conditions. During level walking, walking speed and step width decreased, and double support time increased significantly with vision and knee joint ROM restrictions. Stance time, step width, and walking angle increased only with knee joint ROM restriction. Stance time, swing time, and double support time were significantly longer in level walking, stair descent, and stair ascent, in that order. The effects of vision and knee joint ROM restrictions were significantly larger than the control conditions. In conclusion, vision and knee joint ROM restrictions affect gait during level walking and stair ascent and descent. This effect is marked in stair ascent with knee joint ROM restriction.

  1. A magnetorheological fluid-based controllable active knee brace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadkhanlou, Farzad; Zite, Jamaal L.; Washington, Gregory N.

    2007-04-01

    High customization costs and reduction of natural mobility put current rehabilitative knee braces at a disadvantage. A resolution to this problem is to integrate a Magnetorheological (MR) fluid-based joint into the system. A MR joint will allow patients to apply and control a resistive torque to knee flexion and extension. The resistance torque can also be continuously adjusted as a function of extension angle and patient strength (or as a function of time), which is currently impossible with state of the art rehabilitative knee braces. A novel MR fluid-based controllable knee brace is designed and prototyped in this research. The device exhibits large resistive torque in the on-state and low resistance in the offstate. The controllable variable stiffness, compactness, and portability of the system make it a proper alternative to current rehabilitative knee braces.

  2. Multipurpose active/passive motion compensation system

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.A.; Clements, R.E.; Davenport, M.R.

    1984-05-01

    A microprocessor-controlled active/passive motion compensation system has been developed for deploying a variety of geotechnical in-situ testing devices with mobile drilling rigs from low-cost service vessels. The light-weight rotary heave compensator incorporates a hydraulic motor as the compensator actuator and a servo-controlled closed loop pump to reduce the air storage and power requirements. Unique features of the system are the use of inertial sensors to measure three components of boat motion, the ability to run the system in active/passive or passive modes, and the ability to automatically lower the drillstring at a constant velocity while maintaining motion compensation. Quantitative measurements made during sea trials offshore California yielded motion compensation accuracy approaching 98 percent which is much better than the compensation achieved with passive systems. Results are presented from offshore in-situ testing with a cone penetrometer, a vane shear device, and a suspension PS logger. The system can also be used for other offshore applications.

  3. Posterior cruciate supplementing total knee replacement using conforming inserts and cruciate recession. Effect on range of motion and radiolucent lines.

    PubMed

    Scott, R D; Thornhill, T S

    1994-12-01

    This study was performed to determine if a sagittally curved conforming tibial insert can be used with a retained, but balanced, posterior cruciate ligament without deleterious effects on range of motion (ROM) and tibial radiolucencies, as compared with a flatter insert that is less conforming and does not require cruciate balancing. The authors reviewed 50 consecutive primary knees implanted with flatter posterior lipped inserts and 50 consecutive primary knees with curved inserts and posterior cruciate ligament balancing. The average ROM for both groups was the same postoperatively as preoperatively: 111 degrees for the posterior lipped inserts and 113 degrees for the curved inserts. The incidence of tibial radiolucent lines was 8% for both groups. The authors conclude that sagittally curved, more conforming tibial inserts with retained, but balanced, posterior cruciate ligaments, do not adversely effect ROM and tibial radiolucencies. Their use forms an attractive compromise between the schools of cruciate preservation and cruciate substitution, maximizing their advantages while minimizing their disadvantages. Functional ROM can be achieved while bone stock is preserved, the joint line is restored, and wear characteristics are improved.

  4. A magnetorheological fluid based orthopedic active knee brace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zite, Jamaal L.; Ahmadkhanlou, Farzad; Neelakantan, Vijay A.; Washington, Gregory N.

    2006-03-01

    The disadvantage of current knee braces ranges from high cost for customization to a loss in physical mobility and limited rehabilitative value. One approach to solving this problem is to use a Magnetorheological (MR) device to make the knee brace have a controllable resistance. Our design solution is to replace the manufacturer's joint with an rotary MR fluid based shear damper. The device is designed based on a maximum yield stress, a corresponding magnetic field, a torque and the MR fluid viscosity. The analytical and experimental results show the advantages and the feasibility of using the proposed MR based controllable knee braces.

  5. Interaction between pre-landing activities and stiffness regulation of the knee joint musculoskeletal system in the drop jump: implications to performance.

    PubMed

    Horita, T; Komi, P V; Nicol, C; Kyröläinen, H

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the interaction between the pre-landing activities and the stiffness regulation of the knee joint musculoskeletal system and the takeoff speed during a drop jump (DJ). Nine healthy male subjects performed a DJ test from the height of 50 cm. The surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of the vastus lateralis (VL) muscle was recorded to evaluate both the pre-landing and post-landing muscle activation levels. Simultaneous recording of the jumping motion and ground reaction force was performed by a high-speed video camera (100 frames x s(-1)), and a force platform was employed to allow joint moment analysis. Joint stiffness was calculated by a linear regression of the knee joint moment/angle relationship. Elasticity of the knee extensor muscle during DJ was estimated by means of a four-element muscle model consisting of a parallel elastic component, a series elastic component (SEC), a viscous damper, and a contractile element. DJ performance correlated positively with the positive peak power of the knee joint (P < 0.01) and with the moment of the knee joint at the end of stretch (P < 0.01). However, there was no significant relationship between DJ performance and the positive peak power of the ankle joint. The knee joint moment at the end of stretch correlated with the SEC stiffness during the transmission phase from the end of the initial impact to the onset of the concentric action (P < 0.01) and with the maximum rate of isometric force development of the knee extensors (P < 0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed that the SEC stiffness during the transmission phase of the knee joint can be explained by a combination of the pre-activity of the VL muscle and the knee joint angular velocity at touchdown (F = 5.76, P < 0.05). These results seem to emphasize the functional significance of the pre-programmed activity for controlling the subsequent stiffness regulation and then contributing to the performance in DJ

  6. Effects of soft tissue artifacts on differentiating kinematic differences between natural and replaced knee joints during functional activity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Chung; Lu, Tung-Wu; Lu, Hsuan-Lun; Kuo, Mei-Ying; Hsu, Horng-Chaung

    2016-05-01

    Functional performance of total knee replacement (TKR) is often assessed using skin marker-based stereophotogrammetry, which can be affected by soft tissue artifacts (STA). The current study aimed to compare the STA and their effects on the kinematics of the knee between twelve patients with TKR and twelve healthy controls during sit-to-stand, and to assess the effects of STA on the statistical between-group comparisons. Each subject performed the sit-to-stand task while motions of the skin markers and the knees were measured by a motion capture system integrated with a three-dimensional fluoroscopy technique. The bone motions measured by the three-dimensional fluoroscopy were taken as the gold standard, with respect to which the STA of the markers were obtained. The STA were found to affect the calculated segmental poses and knee kinematics between the groups differently. The STA resulted in artefactual posterior displacements of the knee joint center, with magnitudes significantly greater in TKR than controls (p<0.01). The STA-induced knee external rotations in TKR were smaller than those in controls with mean differences of 2.3-3.0°. These between-group differences in the STA effects on knee kinematics in turn concealed the true between-group differences in the anterior-posterior translation and internal/external rotation of knee while leading to false significant between-group differences in the abduction/adduction and proximal-distal translation.

  7. Console video games, postural activity, and motion sickness during passive restraint.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hui; Pan, Wu-Wen; Chen, Fu-Chen; Stoffregen, Thomas A

    2013-08-01

    We examined the influence of passive restraint on postural activity and motion sickness in individuals who actively controlled a potentially nauseogenic visual motion stimulus (a driving video game). Twenty-four adults (20.09 ± 1.56 years; 167.80 ± 7.94 cm; 59.02 ± 9.18 kg) were recruited as participants. Using elastic bands, standing participants were passively restrained at the head, shoulders, hips, and knees. During restraint, participants played (i.e., controlled) a driving video game (a motorcycle race), for 50 min. During game play, we recorded the movement of the head and torso, using a magnetic tracking system. Following game play, participants answered a forced choice, yes/no question about whether they were motion sick, and were assigned to sick and well groups on this basis. In addition, before and after game play, participants completed the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire, which provided numerical ratings of the severity of individual symptoms. Five of 24 participants (20.83 %) reported motion sickness. Participants moved despite being passively restrained. Both the magnitude and the temporal dynamics of movement differed between the sick and well groups. The results show that passive restraint of the body can reduce motion sickness when the nauseogenic visual stimulus is under participants' active control and confirm that motion sickness is preceded by distinct patterns of postural activity even during passive restraint.

  8. Physiological alterations of maximal voluntary quadriceps activation by changes of knee joint angle.

    PubMed

    Becker, R; Awiszus, F

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of different angles of the knee joint on voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle, estimating the ability of a subject to activate a muscle maximally by means of voluntary contraction. Isometric torque measurement was performed on 6 healthy subjects in 5 degrees intervals between 30 degrees and 90 degrees of knee joint flexion. Superimposed twitches at maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and at a level of 60% and 40% of the MVC were applied and the voluntary activation estimated. At between 30 degrees and 75 degrees of knee flexion, the maximal extension torque increased at an average rate of 2.67 +/- 0.6 Nm/degree, followed by a decline with further flexion. However, throughout the joint-angle range tested, voluntary activation increased on average by 0.37%/degree with a maximum at 90 degrees of flexion. Due to the influence of joint position it is not possible to generalize results obtained at the knee joint angle of 90 degrees of flexion, which is usually used for the quadriceps twitch-interpolation technique. Consequently, it is useful to investigate voluntary activation deficits in knee joint disorders at a range of knee joint angles that includes, in particular, the more extended joint angles used frequently during daily activity.

  9. Dynamic splinting for knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Finger, Eric; Willis, F Buck

    2008-01-01

    Total Knee Arthroplasty operations are increasing in frequency, and knee flexion contracture is a common pathology, both pre-existing and post-operative. A 61-year-old male presented with knee flexion contracture following a total knee arthroplasty. Physical therapy alone did not fully reduce the contracture and dynamic splinting was then prescribed for daily low-load, prolonged-duration stretch. After 28 physical therapy sessions, the active range of motion improved from -20° to -12° (stiff knee still lacking full extension), and after eight additional weeks with nightly wear of dynamic splint, the patient regained full knee extension, (active extension improved from -12° to 0°). PMID:19113998

  10. Testosterone reduces knee passive range of motion and expression of relaxin receptor isoforms via 5α-dihydrotestosterone and androgen receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Dehghan, Firouzeh; Muniandy, Sekaran; Yusof, Ashril; Salleh, Naguib

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian steroids such as estrogen and progesterone have been reported to influence knee laxity. The effect of testosterone, however, remains unknown. This study investigated the effect of testosterone on the knee range of motion (ROM) and the molecular mechanisms that might involve changes in the expression of relaxin receptor isoforms, Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 in the patella tendon and lateral collateral ligament of the female rat knee. Ovariectomized adult female Wistar rats received three days treatment with peanut oil (control), testosterone (125 and 250 μg/kg) and testosterone (125 and 250 μg/kg) plus flutamide, an androgen receptor blocker or finasteride, a 5α-reductase inhibitor. Duplicate groups received similar treatment however in the presence of relaxin (25 ng/kg). A day after the last drug injection, knee passive ROM was measured by using a digital miniature goniometer. Both tendon and ligament were harvested and then analysed for protein and mRNA expression for Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 respectively. Knee passive ROM, Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 expression were significantly reduced following treatment with testosterone. Flutamide or finasteride administration antagonized the testosterone effect. Concomitant administration of testosterone and relaxin did not result in a significant change in knee ROM as compared to testosterone only treatment; however this was significantly increased following flutamide or finasteride addition. Testosterone effect on knee passive ROM is likely mediated via dihydro-testosterone (DHT), and involves downregulation of Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 expression, which may provide the mechanism underlying testosterone-induced decrease in female knee laxity. PMID:24642882

  11. Role of flexors in knee stability.

    PubMed

    Chen, C Y; Jiang, C C; Jan, M H; Lai, J S

    1995-05-01

    The muscle strength of knee extensors is commonly used as an indicator of a patient's functional recovery following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The knee flexors are dynamic stabilizers that prevent tibial anterior displacement and may reinforce the function of the ACL. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of knee flexor performance assessed by isokinetic dynamometer and clinical evaluations including KT-1000 stability tests, shuttle run tests, thigh and calf circumference and range of motion of the knee joint. Ten patients who received ACL reconstruction over a 3- to 5-year period were included in this study, as were 15 normal controls who were tested for comparison. There was no significant difference in the time taken for the shuttle run test between normal controls and patients who underwent ACL, but there was a positive correlation between the shuttle run test and laxity of the knee joint. The knee laxity of ACL patients was significantly greater than that of the normal controls under passive anterior force. However, no significant difference was seen in the stability test under active contraction of the knee extensors. In addition, a positive correlation was seen between the KT-1000 knee ligament arthrometry test results and both torque acceleration energy and the average power of the flexors. These results suggest that physical therapy for patients following ACL reconstruction should emphasize the explosiveness of knee flexors to help strengthen the dynamic stability of the knee joint and motor performance.

  12. Biotribology of a mobile bearing posterior stabilised knee design--effect of motion restraint on wear, tibio-femoral kinematics and particles.

    PubMed

    Grupp, Thomas M; Schroeder, Christian; Kyun Kim, Tae; Miehlke, Rolf K; Fritz, Bernhard; Jansson, Volkmar; Utzschneider, Sandra

    2014-07-18

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the impact of a biphaseal anterior-posterior (AP) and internal-external (IE) motion restraint system on the wear behaviour, tibio-femoral kinematics and particle release of a mobile bearing posterior stabilised knee design in comparison to the widely used linear restraint. in vitro wear simulation was performed using a posterior stabilised total knee replacement with a mobile rotating platform gliding surface design to compare the standard ISO 14243-1:2002 (E) protocol with a linear AP and IE motion restraint and the new ISO 14243-1:2009 (E) protocol with a biphaseal AP and IE motion restraint. For the mobile gliding surfaces, an increase in wear rate by more than a magnitude was measured applying the biphaseal protocol (8.5±1.6 mg/million cycles) in a direct comparison to the linear protocol (0.33±0.07 mg/million cycles), with statistically significant difference. The amplitudes of AP displacement were 3.22±0.47 mm for the biphaseal test, compared to 1.97±0.22 mm in the linear test and the amplitudes of the IE rotation angle had mean values of 7.32°±0.91° under the biphaseal setup, compared to 1.97°±0.14° under linear motion restraint test conditions. From our observations, we conclude that the changes in AP translation and IE rotation motion restraints from ISO linear to ISO biphaseal test conditions highly impact the knee joint kinematics and wear behaviour of a mobile bearing posterior stabilised knee design. PMID:24837220

  13. Snapping knee caused by symptomatic fabella in a native knee.

    PubMed

    Hire, Justin M; Oliver, David L; Hubbard, Ryan C; Fontaine, Michelle L; Bojescul, John A

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of a 31-year-old man with a 5-year history of snapping knee syndrome secondary to a single, large symptomatic fabella of the knee. On physical examination, the patient was able to reproduce an audible and palpable snapping with active range of motion. His condition was refractory to physical therapy. He had undergone a prior iliotibial band release at an outside facility. After excision of the fabella, measuring 15 × 8 × 9 mm, the patient's snapping and pain with activity were resolved.

  14. Effect of gait retraining for reducing ambulatory knee load on trunk biomechanics and trunk muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Nüesch, Corina; Laffer, Dominik; Netzer, Cordula; Pagenstert, Geert; Mündermann, Annegret

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that walking with increased medio-lateral trunk sway is associated with lower external knee adduction moment and lower extremity muscle activation, and higher external ipsilateral trunk moment and trunk muscle activity than walking with normal trunk sway in healthy participants. Fifteen participants performed walking trials with normal and increased medio-lateral trunk sway. Maximum trunk sway, first maximum knee adduction moment, lateral trunk bending moment, and bilateral vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, gluteus medius, rectus abdominis, external oblique and erector spinae muscle activity were computed. Walking with increased trunk sway was associated with lower maximum knee adduction moment (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.50-0.62Nm/kg vs. 0.62-0.76Nm/kg; P<.001) and ipsilateral gluteus medius (-17%; P=.014) and erector spinae muscle activity (-24%; P=.004) and greater maximum lateral trunk bending moment (+34%; P<.001) and contralateral external oblique muscle activity (+60%; P=.009). In all participants, maximum knee adduction moment was negatively correlated and maximum trunk moment was positively correlated with maximum trunk sway. The results of this study suggest that walking with increased trunk sway not only reduces the external knee adduction moment but also alters and possibly increases the load on the trunk. Hence, load-altering biomechanical interventions should always be evaluated not only regarding their effects on the index joint but on other load-bearing joints such as the spine. PMID:27264398

  15. Design and control of a prosthetic leg for above-knee amputees operated in semi-active and active modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinhyuk; Yoon, Gun-Ha; Kang, Je-Won; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a new prosthesis operated in two different modes; the semi-active and active modes. The semi-active mode is achieved from a flow mode magneto-rheological (MR) damper, while the active mode is obtained from an electronically commutated (EC) motor. The knee joint part of the above knee prosthesis is equipped with the MR damper and EC motor. The MR damper generates reaction force by controlling the field-dependent yield stress of the MR fluid, while the EC motor actively controls the knee joint angle during gait cycle. In this work, the MR damper is designed as a two-end type flow mode mechanism without air chamber for compact size. On other hand, in order to predict desired knee joint angle to be controlled by EC motor, a polynomial prediction function using a statistical method is used. A nonlinear proportional-derivative controller integrated with the computed torque method is then designed and applied to both MR damper and EC motor to control the knee joint angle. It is demonstrated that the desired knee joint angle is well achieved in different walking velocities on the ground ground.

  16. EMG activity and voluntary activation during knee-extensor concentric torque generation.

    PubMed

    Babault, Nicolas; Pousson, Michel; Michaut, Anne; Ballay, Yves; Hoecke, Jacques Van

    2002-04-01

    This study was designed to re-examine and compare the neural drive of the knee extensors during isokinetic concentric muscular actions by means of the twitch interpolation technique (activation level, AL) and surface electromyographic (EMG) recordings (root mean square, RMS). Torque, AL and RMS amplitudes of three knee extensors and one knee flexor were measured in nine subjects during maximal and sub-maximal voluntary contractions, performed under concentric (60 degrees.s(-1) and 120 degrees.s(-1); Con60 and Con120, respectively) and isometric (Iso) conditions. Mean (SD) maximal voluntary torque was significantly lower ( P<0.01) during concentric contractions [Con60: 208.6 (26.8) Nm and Con120: 184.7 (26.4) Nm] compared with isometric contractions [327.4 (52.0) Nm]. A significantly lower AL ( P<0.05) was recorded during Con60 [80.9 (8.8)%] compared with Iso [87.9 (5.1)%] and Con120 [88.2 (6.6)%] maximal contractions. Simultaneously, a lower knee extensor average RMS amplitudes (av.RMS) was measured during Con60 maximal contractions compared with Iso and Con120 maximal contractions. The antagonist biceps femoris RMS values were not different between maximal Iso, Con60 and Con120 contractions. During sub-maximal voluntary contractions, the RMS/torque relationships were similar whatever the muscle considered (vastus lateralis, vastus medialis or rectus femoris) and the AL/av.RMS relationships did not reveal any noticeable differences between each contractile condition. The results of the present study indicate that av.RMS and AL describe similarly the neural drive during maximal and sub-maximal efforts and indicate that during maximal voluntary efforts, neural drive is dependent upon concentric angular velocity (up to 120 degrees.s(-1)). Thus, our results suggest that when applying different contractile conditions, the torque output is regulated via complex interactions between intrinsic muscular properties and the neural drive.

  17. Perceived causality influences brain activity evoked by biological motion.

    PubMed

    Morris, James P; Pelphrey, Kevin A; McCarthy, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated brain activity in an observer who watched the hand and arm motions of an individual when that individual was, or was not, the cause of the motion. Subjects viewed a realistic animated 3D character who sat at a table containing four pistons. On Intended Motion trials, the character raised his hand and arm upwards. On Unintended Motion trials, the piston under one of the character's hands pushed the hand and arm upward with the same motion. Finally, during Non-Biological Motion control trials, a piston pushed a coffee mug upward in the same smooth motion. Hand and arm motions, regardless of intention, evoked significantly more activity than control trials in a bilateral region that extended ventrally from the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) region and which was more spatially extensive in the right hemisphere. The left pSTS near the temporal-parietal junction, robustly differentiated between the Intended Motion and Unintended Motion conditions. Here, strong activity was observed for Intended Motion trials, while Unintended Motion trials evoked similar activity as the coffee mug trials. Our results demonstrate a strong hemispheric bias in the role of the pSTS in the perception of causality of biological motion. PMID:18633843

  18. Changes in the activity of trunk and hip extensor muscles during bridge exercises with variations in unilateral knee joint angle

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juseung; Park, Minchul

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared abdominal and hip extensor muscle activity during a bridge exercise with various knee joint angles. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-two healthy male subjects performed a bridge exercise in which the knee joint angle was altered. While subjects performed the bridge exercise, external oblique, internal oblique, gluteus maximus, and semitendinosus muscle activity was measured using electromyography. [Results] The bilateral external and internal oblique muscle activity was significantly higher at 0° knee flexion compared to 120°, 90°, and 60°. The bilateral gluteus maximus muscle activity was significantly different at 0° of knee flexion compared to 120°, 90°, and 60°. The ipsilateral semitendinosus muscle activity was significantly increased at 90° and 60° of knee flexion compared to 120°, and significantly decreased at 0° knee flexion compared with 120°, 90°, and 60°. The contralateral semitendinosus muscle activity was significantly higher at 60° of knee flexion than at 120°, and significantly higher at 0° of knee flexion than at 120°, 90°, and 60°. [Conclusion] Bridge exercises performed with knee flexion less than 90° may be used to train the ipsilateral semitendinosus. Furthermore, bridge exercise performed with one leg may be used to train abdominal and hip extensor muscles. PMID:27799688

  19. Single- vs. double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a new aspect of knee assessment during activities involving dynamic knee rotation.

    PubMed

    Czamara, Andrzej; Królikowska, Aleksandra; Szuba, Łukasz; Widuchowski, Wojciech; Kentel, Maciej

    2015-02-01

    Few studies have compared single-bundle (SB) and double-bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in the knee joint during activities involving change-of-direction maneuvers and knee rotation. This study examined whether the type of ACLR contributes to postphysiotherapy outcomes, with an emphasis on knee function assessment during activities involving dynamic knee rotation. Fifteen male patients after SB ACLR and 15 male patients after DB ACLR took part in the same physiotherapy program. Twenty-four weeks after ACLR, both groups underwent anterior laxity measurement, pivot shift tests, range of movement and joint circumference measurements, subjective assessment of pain and stability levels in the knee joint, peak torque measurement of the muscles rotating the tibia toward the femur, and a run test with maximal speed and change-of-direction maneuvers. Comparative analysis did not show any differences between the results of anterior tibial translation, pivot shift test, range of movement and joint circumference, and subjective assessment of pain and knee joint stability levels. No differences were noted between the groups in peak torque values obtained from the muscles responsible for internal and external tibial rotation or results of the run test. The data obtained from this study can be used by research teams to monitor and compare the effectiveness of various study protocols involving surgical and physiotherapy treatment. The data are especially useful when combined with the clinical assessment of patients who would like to return to sport.

  20. Single- vs. double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a new aspect of knee assessment during activities involving dynamic knee rotation.

    PubMed

    Czamara, Andrzej; Królikowska, Aleksandra; Szuba, Łukasz; Widuchowski, Wojciech; Kentel, Maciej

    2015-02-01

    Few studies have compared single-bundle (SB) and double-bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in the knee joint during activities involving change-of-direction maneuvers and knee rotation. This study examined whether the type of ACLR contributes to postphysiotherapy outcomes, with an emphasis on knee function assessment during activities involving dynamic knee rotation. Fifteen male patients after SB ACLR and 15 male patients after DB ACLR took part in the same physiotherapy program. Twenty-four weeks after ACLR, both groups underwent anterior laxity measurement, pivot shift tests, range of movement and joint circumference measurements, subjective assessment of pain and stability levels in the knee joint, peak torque measurement of the muscles rotating the tibia toward the femur, and a run test with maximal speed and change-of-direction maneuvers. Comparative analysis did not show any differences between the results of anterior tibial translation, pivot shift test, range of movement and joint circumference, and subjective assessment of pain and knee joint stability levels. No differences were noted between the groups in peak torque values obtained from the muscles responsible for internal and external tibial rotation or results of the run test. The data obtained from this study can be used by research teams to monitor and compare the effectiveness of various study protocols involving surgical and physiotherapy treatment. The data are especially useful when combined with the clinical assessment of patients who would like to return to sport. PMID:25148470

  1. Active motion assisted by correlated stochastic torques.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christian; Radtke, Paul K; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz; Hänggi, Peter

    2011-07-01

    The stochastic dynamics of an active particle undergoing a constant speed and additionally driven by an overall fluctuating torque is investigated. The random torque forces are expressed by a stochastic differential equation for the angular dynamics of the particle determining the orientation of motion. In addition to a constant torque, the particle is supplemented by random torques, which are modeled as an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process with given correlation time τ(c). These nonvanishing correlations cause a persistence of the particles' trajectories and a change of the effective spatial diffusion coefficient. We discuss the mean square displacement as a function of the correlation time and the noise intensity and detect a nonmonotonic dependence of the effective diffusion coefficient with respect to both correlation time and noise strength. A maximal diffusion behavior is obtained if the correlated angular noise straightens the curved trajectories, interrupted by small pirouettes, whereby the correlated noise amplifies a straightening of the curved trajectories caused by the constant torque.

  2. Spontaneous motion in hierarchically assembled active matter

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Tim; Chen, Daniel T. N.; DeCamp, Stephen J.; Heymann, Michael; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2012-01-01

    With exquisite precision and reproducibility, cells orchestrate the cooperative action of thousands of nanometer-sized molecular motors to carry out mechanical tasks at much larger length scales, such as cell motility, division and replication1. Besides their biological importance, such inherently non-equilibrium processes are an inspiration for developing biomimetic active materials from microscopic components that consume energy to generate continuous motion2–4. Being actively driven, these materials are not constrained by the laws of equilibrium statistical mechanics and can thus exhibit highly sought-after properties such as autonomous motility, internally generated flows and self-organized beating5–7. Starting from extensile microtubule bundles, we hierarchically assemble active analogs of conventional polymer gels, liquid crystals and emulsions. At high enough concentration, microtubules form a percolating active network characterized by internally driven chaotic flows, hydrodynamic instabilities, enhanced transport and fluid mixing. When confined to emulsion droplets, 3D networks spontaneously adsorb onto the droplet surfaces to produce highly active 2D nematic liquid crystals whose streaming flows are controlled by internally generated fractures and self-healing, as well as unbinding and annihilation of oppositely charged disclination defects. The resulting active emulsions exhibit unexpected properties, such as autonomous motility, which are not observed in their passive analogues. Taken together, these observations exemplify how assemblages of animate microscopic objects exhibit collective biomimetic properties that are starkly different from those found in materials assembled from inanimate building blocks, challenging us to develop a theoretical framework that would allow for a systematic engineering of their far-from-equilibrium material properties. PMID:23135402

  3. Using Kinesthetic Activities to Teach Ptolemaic and Copernican Retrograde Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Ted

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method for teaching planetary retrograde motion, and the Ptolemaic and Copernican accounts of retrograde motion, by means of a series kinesthetic learning activities (KLAs). In the KLAs described, the students literally walk through the motions of the planets in both systems. A retrospective statistical analysis shows that…

  4. Reduced biceps femoris myoelectrical activity influences eccentric knee flexor weakness after repeat sprint running.

    PubMed

    Timmins, R G; Opar, D A; Williams, M D; Schache, A G; Dear, N M; Shield, A J

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether declines in knee flexor strength following overground repeat sprints were related to changes in hamstrings myoelectrical activity. Seventeen recreationally active men completed maximal isokinetic concentric and eccentric knee flexor strength assessments at 180°/s before and after repeat sprint running. Myoelectrical activity of the biceps femoris (BF) and medial hamstrings (MHs) was measured during all isokinetic contractions. Repeated measures mixed model [fixed factors = time (pre- and post-repeat sprint) and leg (dominant and nondominant), random factor = participants] design was fitted with the restricted maximal likelihood method. Repeat sprint running resulted in significant declines in eccentric, and concentric, knee flexor strength (eccentric = 26 ± 4 Nm, 15% P < 0.001; concentric 11 ± 2 Nm, 10% P < 0.001). Eccentric BF myoelectrical activity was significantly reduced (10%; P = 0.035). Concentric BF and all MH myoelectrical activity were not altered. The declines in maximal eccentric torque were associated with the change in eccentric BF myoelectrical activity (P = 0.013). Following repeat sprint running, there were preferential declines in the myoelectrical activity of the BF, which explained declines in eccentric knee flexor strength.

  5. Brain activity accompanying perception of implied motion in abstract paintings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chai-Youn; Blake, Randolph

    2007-01-01

    Early 20th century artists including Duchamp and Balla tried to portray moving objects on a static canvas by superimposing objects in successive portrayals of an action. We investigated whether implied motion in those paintings is associated with activation of motion-sensitive area MT+. In Experiment 1, we found that observers rated these kinds of paintings higher in portraying motion than they did other abstract paintings in which motion is not intended. We also found that observers who had previously experienced abstract paintings with implied motion tended to give higher motion ratings to that class of paintings. In Experiment 2, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure brain activity of observers while viewing abstract paintings receiving the highest and the lowest motion rating scores in Experiment 1. We found MT+, but not primary visual cortex (V1), showed greater BOLD responses to abstract paintings with implied motion than to abstract paintings with little motion impression, but only in observers with prior experience viewing those kinds of paintings. These results imply that the neural machinery ordinarily engaged during perception of real visual motion is activated when people view paintings explicitly designed to convey a sense of visual motion. Experience, however, is necessary to achieve this sense of motion.

  6. Biomechanical analysis of knee and trunk in badminton players with and without knee pain during backhand diagonal lunges.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Hua, Shiang-Hua; Huang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Hsing-Hsan; Liao, Jen-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of core neuromuscular control to the dynamic stability of badminton players with and without knee pain during backhand lunges has not been investigated. Accordingly, this study compared the kinematics of the lower extremity, the trunk movement, the muscle activation and the balance performance of knee-injured and knee-uninjured badminton players when performing backhand stroke diagonal lunges. Seventeen participants with chronic knee pain (injured group) and 17 healthy participants (control group) randomly performed two diagonal backhand lunges in the forward and backward directions, respectively. This study showed that the injured group had lower frontal and horizontal motions of the knee joint, a smaller hip-shoulder separation angle and a reduced trunk tilt angle. In addition, the injured group exhibited a greater left paraspinal muscle activity, while the control group demonstrated a greater activation of the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis and medial gastrocnemius muscle groups. Finally, the injured group showed a smaller distance between centre of mass (COM) and centre of pressure, and a lower peak COM velocity when performing the backhand backward lunge tasks. In conclusion, the injured group used reduced knee and trunk motions to complete the backhand lunge tasks. Furthermore, the paraspinal muscles contributed to the lunge performance of the individuals with knee pain, whereas the knee extensors and ankle plantar flexor played a greater role for those without knee pain.

  7. Biomechanical analysis of knee and trunk in badminton players with and without knee pain during backhand diagonal lunges.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Hua, Shiang-Hua; Huang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Hsing-Hsan; Liao, Jen-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of core neuromuscular control to the dynamic stability of badminton players with and without knee pain during backhand lunges has not been investigated. Accordingly, this study compared the kinematics of the lower extremity, the trunk movement, the muscle activation and the balance performance of knee-injured and knee-uninjured badminton players when performing backhand stroke diagonal lunges. Seventeen participants with chronic knee pain (injured group) and 17 healthy participants (control group) randomly performed two diagonal backhand lunges in the forward and backward directions, respectively. This study showed that the injured group had lower frontal and horizontal motions of the knee joint, a smaller hip-shoulder separation angle and a reduced trunk tilt angle. In addition, the injured group exhibited a greater left paraspinal muscle activity, while the control group demonstrated a greater activation of the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis and medial gastrocnemius muscle groups. Finally, the injured group showed a smaller distance between centre of mass (COM) and centre of pressure, and a lower peak COM velocity when performing the backhand backward lunge tasks. In conclusion, the injured group used reduced knee and trunk motions to complete the backhand lunge tasks. Furthermore, the paraspinal muscles contributed to the lunge performance of the individuals with knee pain, whereas the knee extensors and ankle plantar flexor played a greater role for those without knee pain. PMID:25574707

  8. Muscle activity response to external moment during single-leg drop landing in young basketball players: the importance of biceps femoris in reducing internal rotation of knee during landing.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Meguru; Sato, Haruhiko; Takahira, Naonobu

    2012-01-01

    Internal tibial rotation with the knee close to full extension combined with valgus collapse during drop landing generally results in non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between internal rotation of the knee and muscle activity from internal and external rotator muscles, and between the internal rotation of knee and externally applied loads on the knee during landing in collegiate basketball players. Our hypothesis was that the activity of biceps femoris muscle would be an important factor reducing internal knee rotation during landing. The subjects were 10 collegiate basketball students: 5 females and 5 males. The subjects performed a single-leg drop landing from a 25-cm height. Femoral and tibial kinematics were measured using a 3D optoelectronic tracking system during the drop landings, and then the knee angular motions were determined. Ground reaction forces and muscle activation patterns (lateral hamstring and medial hamstring) were simultaneously measured and computed. Results indicated that lower peak internal tibial rotation angle at the time of landing was associated with greater lateral hamstring activity (r = -0.623, p < 0.001). When gender was considered, the statistically significant correlation remained only in females. There was no association between the peak internal tibial rotation angle and the knee internal rotation moment. Control of muscle activity in the lateral to medial hamstring would be an important factor in generating sufficient force to inhibit excessive internal rotation during landing. Strengthening the biceps femoris might mitigate the higher incidence of non-contact ACL injury in female athletes. Key pointsLower activity of the external rotator muscle of the knee, which inhibits internal rotation of the knee, may be the reason why females tend to show a large internal rotation of the knee during drop landing.Externally applied internal rotation moment of

  9. Walking to meet physical activity guidelines in knee osteoarthritis: Is 10,000 steps enough?

    PubMed Central

    White, Daniel K.; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Felson, David T.; Gross, K. Doug; Niu, Jingbo; Nevitt, Michael; Lewis, Cora E.; Torner, James; Neogi, Tuhina

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study if step goals (e.g. walking 10,000 steps/day) approximate meeting 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans among adults with or at high risk of knee OA. Design Cross-sectional observational cohort Setting Community Participants People with or at high risk of knee OA Interventions None Main Outcome Measures Objective physical activity data were collected over 7 consecutive days from people with or at high risk of knee (OA) participating in the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study. Using activity monitor data, we determined the proportion that 1) walked ≥10,000 steps/day, 2) met the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines, and 3) achieved both recommendations. Results Of 1788 subjects studied (age 67 ± 8 yrs, BMI 31 ± 6 kg/m2, 60% women), 16.7% of men and 12.6% of women walked ≥10,000 steps/day, while 6% of men and 5% of women met the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Of those walking ≥10,000 steps/day, 16.7% and 26.7% of men and women also met the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines. Conclusions Among this sample of older adults with or at high risk of knee OA, walking ≥10,000 steps/day did not translate into meeting public health guidelines. These findings highlight the disparity between number of steps/day believed to be needed and recommended time-intensity guidelines to achieve positive health benefits. PMID:23228625

  10. Mechanical correction of dynamometer moment for the effects of segment motion during isometric knee-extension tests.

    PubMed

    Tsaopoulos, Dimitrios E; Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Richards, Paula J; Maganaris, Constantinos N

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of dynamometer and joint axis misalignment on measured isometric knee-extension moments using inverse dynamics based on the actual joint kinematic information derived from the real-time X-ray video and to compare the errors when the moments were calculated using measurements from external anatomical surface markers or obtained from the isokinetic dynamometer. Six healthy males participated in this study. They performed isometric contractions at 90° and 20° of knee flexion, gradually increasing to maximum effort. For the calculation of the actual knee-joint moment and the joint moment relative to the knee-joint center, determined using the external marker, two free body diagrams were used of the Cybex arm and the lower leg segment system. In the first free body diagram, the mean center of the circular profiles of the femoral epicondyles was used as the knee-joint center, whereas in the second diagram, the joint center was assumed to coincide with the external marker. Then, the calculated knee-joint moments were compared with those measured by the dynamometer. The results indicate that 1) the actual knee-joint moment was different from the dynamometer recorded moment (difference ranged between 1.9% and 4.3%) and the moment calculated using the skin marker (difference ranged between 2.5% and 3%), and 2) during isometric knee extension, the internal knee angle changed significantly from rest to the maximum contraction state by about 19°. Therefore, these differences cannot be neglected if the moment-knee-joint angle relationship or the muscle mechanical properties, such as length-tension relationship, need to be determined. PMID:21474701

  11. Loading of the knee joint during activities of daily living measured in vivo in five subjects.

    PubMed

    Kutzner, I; Heinlein, B; Graichen, F; Bender, A; Rohlmann, A; Halder, A; Beier, A; Bergmann, G

    2010-08-10

    Detailed knowledge about loading of the knee joint is essential for preclinical testing of implants, validation of musculoskeletal models and biomechanical understanding of the knee joint. The contact forces and moments acting on the tibial component were therefore measured in 5 subjects in vivo by an instrumented knee implant during various activities of daily living. Average peak resultant forces, in percent of body weight, were highest during stair descending (346% BW), followed by stair ascending (316% BW), level walking (261% BW), one legged stance (259% BW), knee bending (253% BW), standing up (246% BW), sitting down (225% BW) and two legged stance (107% BW). Peak shear forces were about 10-20 times smaller than the axial force. Resultant forces acted almost vertically on the tibial plateau even during high flexion. Highest moments acted in the frontal plane with a typical peak to peak range -2.91% BWm (adduction moment) to 1.61% BWm (abduction moment) throughout all activities. Peak flexion/extension moments ranged between -0.44% BWm (extension moment) and 3.16% BWm (flexion moment). Peak external/internal torques lay between -1.1% BWm (internal torque) and 0.53% BWm (external torque). The knee joint is highly loaded during daily life. In general, resultant contact forces during dynamic activities were lower than the ones predicted by many mathematical models, but lay in a similar range as measured in vivo by others. Some of the observed load components were much higher than those currently applied when testing knee implants.

  12. Role of gastrocnemius activation in knee joint biomechanics: gastrocnemius acts as an ACL antagonist.

    PubMed

    Adouni, M; Shirazi-Adl, A; Marouane, H

    2016-01-01

    Gastrocnemius is a premier muscle crossing the knee, but its role in knee biomechanics and on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) remains less clear when compared to hamstrings and quadriceps. The effect of changes in gastrocnemius force at late stance when it peaks on the knee joint response and ACL force was initially investigated using a lower extremity musculoskeletal model driven by gait kinematics-kinetics. The tibiofemoral joint under isolated isometric contraction of gastrocnemius was subsequently analyzed at different force levels and flexion angles (0°-90°). Changes in gastrocnemius force at late stance markedly influenced hamstrings forces. Gastrocnemius acted as ACL antagonist by substantially increasing its force. Simulations under isolated contraction of gastrocnemius confirmed this role at all flexion angles, in particular, at extreme knee flexion angles (0° and 90°). Constraint on varus/valgus rotations substantially decreased this effect. Although hamstrings and gastrocnemius are both knee joint flexors, they play opposite roles in respectively protecting or loading ACL. Although the quadriceps is also recognized as antagonist of ACL, at larger joint flexion and in contrast to quadriceps, activity in gastrocnemius substantially increased ACL forces (anteromedial bundle). The fact that gastrocnemius is an antagonist of ACL should help in effective prevention and management of ACL injuries.

  13. Early active extension after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction does not result in increased laxity of the knee.

    PubMed

    Isberg, Jonas; Faxén, Eva; Brandsson, Sveinbjörn; Eriksson, Bengt I; Kärrholm, Johan; Karlsson, Jon

    2006-11-01

    If permission of full active and passive extension immediately after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction will increase the post-operative laxity of the knee has been a subject of discussion. We investigated whether a post-operative rehabilitation protocol including active and passive extension without any restrictions in extension immediately after an ACL reconstruction would increase the post-operative anterior-posterior knee laxity (A-P laxity). Our hypothesis was that full active and passive extension immediately after an ACL reconstruction would have no effect on the A-P laxity and clinical results up to 2 years after the operation. Twenty-two consecutive patients (14 men, 8 women, median age 21 years, range 17-41) were included. All the patients had a unilateral ACL rupture and no other ligament injuries or any other history of previous knee injuries. The surgical procedure was identical in all patients and one experienced surgeon operated on all the patients, using the bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft. The post-operative rehabilitation programme was identical in both groups, except for extension training during the first 4 weeks post-operatively. The patients were randomly allocated to post-operative rehabilitation programmes either allowing (Group A, n=11) or not allowing [Group B (30 to -10 degrees ), n=11] full active and passive extension immediately after the operation. They were evaluated pre-operatively and at 6 months and 2 years after the reconstruction. To evaluate the A-P knee laxity, radiostereometric analysis (RSA) and KT-1000 arthrometer (KT-1000) measurements were used, range of motion, Lysholm score, Tegner activity level, the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) evaluation system and one-leg-hop test quotient were used. Pre-operatively, the RSA measurements revealed side-to-side differences in Group A of 8.6 mm (2.3-15.4), median (range) and in Group B of 7.2 mm (2.2-17.4) (n.s.). The corresponding KT-1000

  14. Knee Instability and Basic and Advanced Function Decline in Persons with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Leena; Chmiel, Joan S.; Almagor, Orit; Moisio, Kirsten; Chang, Alison H.; Belisle, Laura; Zhang, Yunhui; Hayes, Karen W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Manifestations of instability in knee OA include low overall knee confidence, low confidence that the knees will not buckle, buckling, and excessive motion during gait. Confidence and buckling may particularly influence activity choices, contributing to events leading to disability. Buckling is more likely to affect advanced than basic functional tasks. In this prospective, longitudinal study, we tested the hypotheses: overall knee confidence, buckling confidence, buckling, and frontal plane motion during gait are associated with advanced 2-year function outcome in persons with knee OA. Methods Persons with knee OA were queried about overall knee confidence (higher worse), buckling confidence, and knee buckling, and underwent quantitative gait analysis to quantify varus-valgus excursion and angular velocity. Physical function was assessed using the LLFDI Basic and Advanced Lower Extremity Domain scores. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between baseline instability measures and baseline-to-2-year function outcome, adjusting for potential confounders. Results 212 persons (mean age 64.6 years, 76.9% women) comprised the sample. Buckling was significantly associated with poor advanced (adjusted OR 2.08, 95% CI: 1.03–4.20) but not basic function outcome. Overall knee confidence was significantly associated with advanced outcome (adjusted OR 1.65, 95% CI: 1.01–2.70), while associations between buckling confidence and both outcomes approached significance. Neither varus-valgus excursion nor angular velocity during gait was associated with either outcome. Conclusion Knee buckling and confidence were each associated with poor 2-year advanced function outcome. Current treatment does not address these modifiable factors; interventions to address them may improve outcome in knee OA. PMID:25732594

  15. Prospective Randomized Trial of the Efficacy of Continuous Passive Motion Post Total Knee Arthroplasty: Experience of the Hospital for Special Surgery.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rupali N; White, Peter B; Murray-Weir, Mary; Alexiades, Michael M; Sculco, Thomas P; Ranawat, Amar S

    2015-12-01

    Conflicting evidence has created substantial controversy regarding the use of continuous passive motion (CPM) in the in-patient setting post total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A total of 109 patients were randomly assigned to two groups, CPM or no CPM, applied after TKA. All patients received the same physical therapy protocol (3 sessions per day), with the only exception being the CPM. Both groups had a knee flexion of 115° at 6 weeks and 120° at 3 months, with no significant differences (P=0.69 and P=0.41, respectively). Length of stay was significantly less for the group who did not receive CPM. The use of CPM had no clinically relevant benefits with respect to AROM, clinical outcomes or discharge disposition and was associated with a cost of $235.50 per TKA.

  16. Orientation of tendons in vivo with active and passive knee muscles.

    PubMed

    Aalbersberg, Sietske; Kingma, Idsart; Ronsky, Janet L; Frayne, Richard; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2005-09-01

    Tendon orientations in knee models are often taken from cadaver studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of muscle activation on tendon orientation in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images of the knee were made during relaxation and isometric knee extensions and flexions with 0 degrees , 15 degrees and 30 degrees of knee joint flexion. For six tendons, the orientation angles in sagittal and frontal plane were calculated. In the sagittal plane, muscle activation pulled the patellar tendon to a more vertical orientation and the semitendinosus and sartorius tendons to a more posterior orientation. In the frontal plane, the semitendinosus had a less lateral orientation, the biceps femoris a more medial orientation and the patellar tendon less medial orientation in loaded compared to unloaded conditions. The knee joint angle also influenced the tendon orientations. In the sagittal plane, the patellar tendon had a more anterior orientation near full extension and the biceps femoris had an anterior orientation with 0 degrees and 15 degrees flexions and neutral with 30 degrees flexions. Within 0 degrees to 30 degrees of flexion, the biceps femoris cannot produce a posterior shear force and the anterior angle of the patellar tendon is always larger than the hamstring tendons. Therefore, co-contraction of the hamstring and quadriceps is unlikely to reduce anterior shear forces in knee angles up to 30 degrees . Finally, inter-individual variation in tendon angles was large. This suggests that the amount of shear force produced and the potential to counteract shear forces by co-contraction is subject-specific. PMID:16023464

  17. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament injury after more than 20 years: I. Physical activity level and knee function.

    PubMed

    Tengman, E; Brax Olofsson, L; Nilsson, K G; Tegner, Y; Lundgren, L; Häger, C K

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about physical activity level and knee function including jump capacity and fear of movement/reinjury more than 20 years after injury of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Seventy persons with unilateral ACL injury participated (23 ± 2 years post-injury): 33 treated with physiotherapy in combination with surgical reconstruction (ACLR ), and 37 treated with physiotherapy alone (ACLPT ). These were compared with 33 age- and gender-matched controls. Assessment included knee-specific and general physical activity level [Tegner activity scale, International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)], knee function [Lysholm score, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)], jump capacity (one-leg hop, vertical jump, side hops), and fear of movement/reinjury [Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK)]. Outcomes were related to degree of osteoarthritis (OA). ACL-injured had lower Lysholm, KOOS, and Tegner scores than controls (P < 0.001), while IPAQ score was similar. ACL-injured demonstrated inferior jump capacity in injured compared with noninjured leg (6-25%, P < 0.001-P = 0.010 in the different jumps), while noninjured leg had equal jump capacity as controls. ACL groups scored 33 ± 7 and 32 ± 7 of 68 on TSK. Lower scores on Lysholm and KOOS symptom were seen for persons with moderate-to-high OA than for no-or-low OA, while there were no differences for physical activity and jump capacity. Regardless of treatment, there are still negative knee-related effects of ACL injury more than 20 years later.

  19. The effects of lower extremity muscle activation and passive range of motion on single leg squat performance.

    PubMed

    Mauntel, Timothy C; Begalle, Rebecca L; Cram, Tyler R; Frank, Barnett S; Hirth, Christopher J; Blackburn, Troy; Padua, Darin A

    2013-07-01

    Knee valgus is a potential risk factor for lower extremity (LE) injuries. Clinical movement screenings and passive range of motion (PROM) measurements may help identify neuromuscular patterns, which contribute to knee valgus. The purpose of this study was to compare LE muscle activation and PROM between subjects who display visual medial knee displacement (MKD) during a single leg squat (SLS) and those who do not. We hypothesized that muscular activation and PROM would differ between the groups. Forty physically active adults (20 controls, 20 MKDs) participated in this study. Subjects completed 10 LE PROM assessments and performed 5 SLS trials while electromyography (EMG) data were collected from 8 LE muscles. Three separate multivariate analysis of variance were used to identify group differences in EMG data, muscle coactivation, and PROM. Results during the SLS indicated hip coactivation ratios revealed smaller gluteus medius to hip adductor (GMed:Hip Add) (p = 0.028) and gluteus maximus to hip adductor (GMax:Hip Add) coactivation ratios (p = 0.007) compared with the control group. Also, the MKD group displayed significantly less passive ankle dorsiflexion with the knee extended (p = 0.047) and flexed (p = 0.034), and greater talar glide motion (p = 0.012). The findings of this study indicate that MKD during a SLS seems to be influenced by decreased coactivation of the gluteal to the hip adductor muscles and restricted dorsiflexion. Therefore, conditioning, rehabilitation, and injury prevention programs should focus on decreasing hip adductor activity, increasing hip abductor and external rotator activity, and increasing ankle dorsiflexion in hopes to decrease the incidence of these injuries. PMID:23096063

  20. Using Kinesthetic Activities to Teach Ptolemaic and Copernican Retrograde Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Ted

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes a method for teaching planetary retrograde motion, and the Ptolemaic and Copernican accounts of retrograde motion, by means of a series kinesthetic learning activities (KLAs). In the KLAs described, the students literally walk through the motions of the planets in both systems. A retrospective statistical analysis shows that students who participated in these activities performed better on examination questions pertaining to retrograde motion than students who did not. Potential explanations for this result, including the breaking of classroom routine, the effect of body movement on conceptual memory, and egocentric spatial proprioception, are considered.

  1. People can understand descriptions of motion without activating visual motion brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Dravida, Swethasri; Saxe, Rebecca; Bedny, Marina

    2013-01-01

    What is the relationship between our perceptual and linguistic neural representations of the same event? We approached this question by asking whether visual perception of motion and understanding linguistic depictions of motion rely on the same neural architecture. The same group of participants took part in two language tasks and one visual task. In task 1, participants made semantic similarity judgments with high motion (e.g., “to bounce”) and low motion (e.g., “to look”) words. In task 2, participants made plausibility judgments for passages describing movement (“A centaur hurled a spear … ”) or cognitive events (“A gentleman loved cheese …”). Task 3 was a visual motion localizer in which participants viewed animations of point-light walkers, randomly moving dots, and stationary dots changing in luminance. Based on the visual motion localizer we identified classic visual motion areas of the temporal (MT/MST and STS) and parietal cortex (inferior and superior parietal lobules). We find that these visual cortical areas are largely distinct from neural responses to linguistic depictions of motion. Motion words did not activate any part of the visual motion system. Motion passages produced a small response in the right superior parietal lobule, but none of the temporal motion regions. These results suggest that (1) as compared to words, rich language stimuli such as passages are more likely to evoke mental imagery and more likely to affect perceptual circuits and (2) effects of language on the visual system are more likely in secondary perceptual areas as compared to early sensory areas. We conclude that language and visual perception constitute distinct but interacting systems. PMID:24009592

  2. [What are the recommendations for sport activity following total hip or total knee arthroplasty?].

    PubMed

    Tsur, Azmon; Volpin, Gershon

    2013-11-01

    Total hip and knee arthroplasty are surgical procedures usually performed in older adults aged 65-70 years and more, who suffer from arthritic joint degeneration, in order to relieve pain and improve functioning. In the past decade there have been more and more documentations of younger people, 50-60 years old and even less, who expect to participate in physical activity following these procedures. The trend today is to recommend activities which exert mild pressure on the implants such as swimming, cycling, golf, bowling, walking and cycling. It is not recommended to participate in sports activities that place greater pressure on the implants such as soccer, football, volleyball, handball, basketball, hockey and jogging. Such high-stress activities may cause early loosening of implants, as described in the article by Keren et al. in this issue: "Sport activity after hip and knee arthroplasty". PMID:24416821

  3. [What are the recommendations for sport activity following total hip or total knee arthroplasty?].

    PubMed

    Tsur, Azmon; Volpin, Gershon

    2013-11-01

    Total hip and knee arthroplasty are surgical procedures usually performed in older adults aged 65-70 years and more, who suffer from arthritic joint degeneration, in order to relieve pain and improve functioning. In the past decade there have been more and more documentations of younger people, 50-60 years old and even less, who expect to participate in physical activity following these procedures. The trend today is to recommend activities which exert mild pressure on the implants such as swimming, cycling, golf, bowling, walking and cycling. It is not recommended to participate in sports activities that place greater pressure on the implants such as soccer, football, volleyball, handball, basketball, hockey and jogging. Such high-stress activities may cause early loosening of implants, as described in the article by Keren et al. in this issue: "Sport activity after hip and knee arthroplasty".

  4. Dynamic Contact Mechanics on the Tibial Plateau of the Human Knee During Activities of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Susannah; Chen, Tony; Hutchinson, Ian D.; Choi, Dan; Voigt, Clifford; Warren, Russell F.; Maher, Suzanne A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant advances in scaffold design, manufacture, and development, it remains unclear what forces these scaffolds must withstand when implanted into the heavily loaded environment of the knee joint. The objective of this study was to fully quantify the dynamic contact mechanics across the tibial plateau of the human knee joint during gait and stair climbing. Our model consisted of a modified Stanmore knee simulator (to apply multi-directional dynamic forces), a two-camera motion capture system (to record joint kinematics), an electronic sensor (to record contact stresses on the tibial plateau), and a suite of post-processing algorithms. During gait, peak contact stresses on the medial plateau occurred in areas of cartilage-cartilage contact; while during stair climb, peak contact stresses were located in the posterior aspect of the plateau, under the meniscus. On the lateral plateau, during gait and in early stair-climb, peak contact stresses occurred under the meniscus, while in late stair-climb, peak contact stresses were experienced in the zone of cartilage-cartilage contact. At 45% of the gait cycle, and 20% and 48% of the stair-climb cycle, peak stresses were simultaneously experienced on both the medial and lateral compartment, suggesting that these phases of loading warrant particular consideration in any simulation intended to evaluate scaffold performance. Our study suggests that in order to design a scaffold capable of restoring ‘normal’ contact mechanics to the injured knees, the mechanics of the intended site of implantation should be taken into account in any pre-clinical testing regime. PMID:24296275

  5. Knee Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, Robert C.; Richter, Dustin L.; Wascher, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traumatic knee dislocation is becoming more prevalent because of improved recognition and increased exposure to high-energy trauma, but long-term results are lacking. Purpose: To present 2 cases with minimum 20-year follow-up and a review of the literature to illustrate some of the fundamental principles in the management of the dislocated knee. Study Design: Review and case reports. Methods: Two patients with knee dislocations who underwent multiligamentous knee reconstruction were reviewed, with a minimum 20-year follow-up. These patients were brought back for a clinical evaluation using both subjective and objective measures. Subjective measures include the following scales: Lysholm, Tegner activity, visual analog scale (VAS), Short Form–36 (SF-36), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and a psychosocial questionnaire. Objective measures included ligamentous examination, radiographic evaluation (including Telos stress radiographs), and physical therapy assessment of function and stability. Results: The mean follow-up was 22 years. One patient had a vascular injury requiring repair prior to ligament reconstruction. The average assessment scores were as follows: SF-36 physical health, 52; SF-36 mental health, 59; Lysholm, 92; IKDC, 86.5; VAS involved, 10.5 mm; and VAS uninvolved, 2.5 mm. Both patients had excellent stability and were functioning at high levels of activity for their age (eg, hiking, skydiving). Both patients had radiographic signs of arthritis, which lowered 1 subject’s IKDC score to “C.” Conclusion: Knee dislocations have rare long-term excellent results, and most intermediate-term studies show fair to good functional results. By following fundamental principles in the management of a dislocated knee, patients can be given the opportunity to function at high levels. Hopefully, continued advances in the evaluation and treatment of knee dislocations will improve the long-term outcomes for these patients in the

  6. Uses of motion imagery in activity-based intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lash, Thomas D.

    2013-05-01

    Activity-Based Intelligence (ABI) was defined by the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence as "a discipline of intelligence where the analysis and subsequent collection is focused on activity and transactions associated with an entity, population, or area of interest." ABI is inherently multi-INT, and motion imagery is a rich data source for ABI analysis. Motion imagery provides a unique temporal aspect which is critical for activity detection and classification. Additionally, motion imagery tends to have high spatial oversampling useful for determining activities and patterns above the noise threshold.

  7. Acute effects of instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization vs. foam rolling on knee and hip range of motion in soccer players.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Goran

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the acute effects of foam rolling (FR) and a new form of instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM), Fascial Abrasion Technique ™ (FAT) on hip and knee range of motion in soccer players. Twenty male soccer players randomly allocated into FR and FAT group (n = 10 each). Passive knee flexion and straight leg raise tests were measured before, immediately after and 24 h after intervention (FR or FAT). The FR group applied a 2-min quadriceps and hamstrings rolling, while FAT group received a 2-min application of FAT to the quadriceps and hamstrings muscles. Both groups significantly improved knee and hip ROM (p < 0.05), with higher gains observed in FAT group (10-19% vs. 5-9%). At 24 h post-treatment, only FAT group preserved most of the gains in ROM (7-13%; p < 0.05). These results support the use of the newly developed IASMT, Fascial Abrasion Technique ™ and FR for increasing lower extremity ROM of athletes. PMID:26592226

  8. Influence of Hip Joint Position on Muscle Activity during Prone Hip Extension with Knee Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Suehiro, Tadanobu; Mizutani, Masatoshi; Okamoto, Mitsuhisa; Ishida, Hiroshi; Kobara, Kenichi; Fujita, Daisuke; Osaka, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hisashi; Watanabe, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the selective activation of the gluteus maximus during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise, with the hip joint in different positions. [Subjects] The subjects were 21 healthy, male volunteers. [Methods] Activities of the right gluteus maximus, right hamstrings, bilateral lumbar erector spinae, and bilateral lumbar multifidus were measured using surface electromyography during a prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise. Measurements were made with the hip joint in each of 3 positions: (1) a neutral hip joint position, (2) an abduction hip joint position, and (3) an abduction with external rotation hip joint position. [Results] Gluteus maximus activity was significantly higher when the hip was in the abduction with external rotation hip joint position than when it was in the neutral hip joint and abduction hip joint positions. Gluteus maximus activity was also significantly higher in the abduction hip joint position than in the neutral hip joint position. Hamstring activity was significantly lower when the hip was in the abduction with external rotation hip joint position than when it was in the neutral hip joint and abduction hip joint positions. [Conclusion] Abduction and external rotation of the hip during prone hip extension with knee flexion exercise selectively activates the gluteus maximus. PMID:25540492

  9. Knee and Hip Joint Kinematics Predict Quadriceps and Hamstrings Neuromuscular Activation Patterns in Drop Jump Landings

    PubMed Central

    Malfait, Bart; Dingenen, Bart; Smeets, Annemie; Staes, Filip; Pataky, Todd; Robinson, Mark A.; Vanrenterghem, Jos; Verschueren, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to assess if variation in sagittal plane landing kinematics is associated with variation in neuromuscular activation patterns of the quadriceps-hamstrings muscle groups during drop vertical jumps (DVJ). Methods Fifty female athletes performed three DVJ. The relationship between peak knee and hip flexion angles and the amplitude of four EMG vectors was investigated with trajectory-level canonical correlation analyses over the entire time period of the landing phase. EMG vectors consisted of the {vastus medialis(VM),vastus lateralis(VL)}, {vastus medialis(VM),hamstring medialis(HM)}, {hamstring medialis(HM),hamstring lateralis(HL)} and the {vastus lateralis(VL),hamstring lateralis(HL)}. To estimate the contribution of each individual muscle, linear regressions were also conducted using one-dimensional statistical parametric mapping. Results The peak knee flexion angle was significantly positively associated with the amplitudes of the {VM,HM} and {HM,HL} during the preparatory and initial contact phase and with the {VL,HL} vector during the peak loading phase (p<0.05). Small peak knee flexion angles were significantly associated with higher HM amplitudes during the preparatory and initial contact phase (p<0.001). The amplitudes of the {VM,VL} and {VL,HL} were significantly positively associated with the peak hip flexion angle during the peak loading phase (p<0.05). Small peak hip flexion angles were significantly associated with higher VL amplitudes during the peak loading phase (p = 0.001). Higher external knee abduction and flexion moments were found in participants landing with less flexed knee and hip joints (p<0.001). Conclusion This study demonstrated clear associations between neuromuscular activation patterns and landing kinematics in the sagittal plane during specific parts of the landing. These findings have indicated that an erect landing pattern, characterized by less hip and knee flexion, was significantly associated with an

  10. Gait patterns during different walking conditions in older adults with and without knee osteoarthritis--results from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    PubMed

    Ko, Seung-uk; Ling, Shari M; Schreiber, Catherine; Nesbitt, Mark; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2011-02-01

    Biomechanical analysis of lower extremity activities while walking at different speeds and in challenging conditions may help to identify specific gait patterns associated with knee osteoarthritis (knee-OA). We hypothesized that individuals with asymptomatic knee-OA have lower ankle activity, while individuals with symptomatic knee-OA have similar or higher ankle activity compared to individuals without knee-OA, and that such differences are enhanced during challenging gait tasks. We tested this hypothesis by examining gait characteristics in multiple gait tasks using data from 153 Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) participants (112 without knee-OA, 41 with knee-OA; 53-87 years, 52% women). All participants who could walk unassisted were evaluated in the BLSA gait lab while walking at self-selected speed (usual-walking), at maximum speed (fast-walking) and again at self-selected speed after 30-min of walking activities (usual-walking-after-30 min). Knee range of motion was lower for knee-OA participants in the fast-walking and usual-walking-after-30 min tasks (p<0.030). Ankle range of motion for symptomatic knee-OA was greater compared to asymptomatic knee-OA for all walking tasks (p<0.050). Symptomatic knee-OA had greater generative MWE of the ankle compared to asymptomatic knee-OA (p=0.034), while keeping similar absorptive MWE of the knee when compared to no-OA controls (p=0.151). Symptomatic knee-OA individuals seem to adapt an ankle kinematic gait pattern aimed at avoiding knee pain, by enhancing forward propulsion so to minimize knee joint load. Whether these conditions represent subsequent steps in the causal pathway from knee-OA to changes in gait is still not clear.

  11. Image-based compensation for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm cone-beam CT scanning of knees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unberath, Mathias; Choi, Jang-Hwan; Berger, Martin; Maier, Andreas; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    We previously introduced four fiducial marker-based strategies to compensate for involuntary knee-joint motion during weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of the lower body. 2D methods showed significant reduction of motion- related artifacts, but 3D methods worked best. However, previous methods led to increased examination times and patient discomfort caused by the marker attachment process. Moreover, sub-optimal marker placement may lead to decreased marker detectability and therefore unstable motion estimates. In order to reduce overall patient discomfort, we developed a new image-based 2D projection shifting method. A C-arm cone-beam CT system was used to acquire projection images of five healthy volunteers at various flexion angles. Projection matrices for the horizontal scanning trajectory were calibrated using the Siemens standard PDS-2 phantom. The initial reconstruction was forward projected using maximum-intensity projections (MIP), yielding an estimate of a static scan. This estimate was then used to obtain the 2D projection shifts via registration. For the scan with the most motion, the proposed method reproduced the marker-based results with a mean error of 2.90 mm +/- 1.43 mm (compared to a mean error of 4.10 mm +/- 3.03 mm in the uncorrected case). Bone contour surrounding modeling clay layer was improved. The proposed method is a first step towards automatic image-based, marker-free motion-compensation.

  12. Effects of Therapeutic Exercise and Hydrotherapy on Pain Severity and Knee Range of Motion in Patients with Hemophilia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mazloum, Vahid; Rahnama, Nader; Khayambashi, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain and limited range of motion (ROM) are the crucial subsequent results of joint hemorrhages in individuals with bleeding disorders and hemophilia. Exercise interventions are particularly recommended in treatment of such patients. The purpose of this study was to detect the influences of conventional exercise therapy and hydrotherapy on the knee joint complications in patients with hemophilia. Methods: A total of 40 patients engaging hemophilia A were randomized into one of three groups: Therapeutic exercise (N = 13), hydrotherapy (N = 14) or control (N = 13). While the first two groups followed their specific programs for 4 weeks, routine life-style was maintained by subjects in the control group in this period. To evaluate the pain level and knee ROM the visual analog scale and standard goniometer were utilized, respectively. The outcome was measured at baseline and after completing the prescribed protocols. Data analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance and Scheffe statistical tests (P < 0.05). Results: Both experimental groups experienced more significant decreasing in pain level (P < 0.001) and knee flexion and extension ROM (P < 0.001) in comparison to the control group. Although the pain was significantly (P < 0.01) more alleviated in participants treated through hydrotherapy in comparison to exercise therapy, the difference in ROM improvement was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Using hydrotherapy in addition to usual rehabilitation training can result in beneficial effect in terms of pain and knee joint ROM. However, it appears that hydrotherapy is more effective in reducing pain. PMID:24554996

  13. Knee Muscular Control During Jump Landing in Multidirections

    PubMed Central

    Sinsurin, Komsak; Vachalathiti, Roongtiwa; Jalayondeja, Wattana; Limroongreungrat, Weerawat

    2016-01-01

    Background Jump landing is a complex movement in sports. While competing and practicing, athletes frequently perform multi-planar jump landing. Anticipatory muscle activity could influence the amount of knee flexion and prepare the knee for dynamic weight bearing such as landing tasks. Objectives The aim of the present study was to examine knee muscle function and knee flexion excursion as athletes naturally performed multi-direction jump landing. Materials and Methods Eighteen male athletes performed the jump-landing test in four directions: forward (0°), 30° diagonal, 60° diagonal, and lateral (90°). Muscles tested were vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris (RF), semitendinosus (ST), and biceps femoris (BF). A ViconTM 612 workstation collected the kinematic data. An electromyography was synchronized with the ViconTM Motion system to quantify dynamic muscle function. Repeated measure ANOVA was used to analyze the data. Results Jump-landing direction significantly influenced (P < 0.05) muscle activities of VL, RF, and ST and knee flexion excursion. Jumpers landed with a trend of decreasing knee flexion excursion and ST muscle activity 100 ms before foot contact progressively from forward to lateral directions of jump landing. Conclusions A higher risk of knee injury might occur during lateral jump landing than forward and diagonal directions. Athletes should have more practice in jump landing in lateral direction to avoid injury. Landing technique with high knee flexion in multi-directions should be taught to jumpers for knee injury prevention. PMID:27625758

  14. Knee Muscular Control During Jump Landing in Multidirections

    PubMed Central

    Sinsurin, Komsak; Vachalathiti, Roongtiwa; Jalayondeja, Wattana; Limroongreungrat, Weerawat

    2016-01-01

    Background Jump landing is a complex movement in sports. While competing and practicing, athletes frequently perform multi-planar jump landing. Anticipatory muscle activity could influence the amount of knee flexion and prepare the knee for dynamic weight bearing such as landing tasks. Objectives The aim of the present study was to examine knee muscle function and knee flexion excursion as athletes naturally performed multi-direction jump landing. Materials and Methods Eighteen male athletes performed the jump-landing test in four directions: forward (0°), 30° diagonal, 60° diagonal, and lateral (90°). Muscles tested were vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris (RF), semitendinosus (ST), and biceps femoris (BF). A ViconTM 612 workstation collected the kinematic data. An electromyography was synchronized with the ViconTM Motion system to quantify dynamic muscle function. Repeated measure ANOVA was used to analyze the data. Results Jump-landing direction significantly influenced (P < 0.05) muscle activities of VL, RF, and ST and knee flexion excursion. Jumpers landed with a trend of decreasing knee flexion excursion and ST muscle activity 100 ms before foot contact progressively from forward to lateral directions of jump landing. Conclusions A higher risk of knee injury might occur during lateral jump landing than forward and diagonal directions. Athletes should have more practice in jump landing in lateral direction to avoid injury. Landing technique with high knee flexion in multi-directions should be taught to jumpers for knee injury prevention.

  15. Technology Efficacy in Active Prosthetic Knees for Transfemoral Amputees: A Quantitative Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Amr M.; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have presented technological ensembles of active knee systems for transfemoral prosthesis. Other studies have examined the amputees' gait performance while wearing a specific active prosthesis. This paper combined both insights, that is, a technical examination of the components used, with an evaluation of how these improved the gait of respective users. This study aims to offer a quantitative understanding of the potential enhancement derived from strategic integration of core elements in developing an effective device. The study systematically discussed the current technology in active transfemoral prosthesis with respect to its functional walking performance amongst above-knee amputee users, to evaluate the system's efficacy in producing close-to-normal user performance. The performances of its actuator, sensory system, and control technique that are incorporated in each reported system were evaluated separately and numerical comparisons were conducted based on the percentage of amputees' gait deviation from normal gait profile points. The results identified particular components that contributed closest to normal gait parameters. However, the conclusion is limitedly extendable due to the small number of studies. Thus, more clinical validation of the active prosthetic knee technology is needed to better understand the extent of contribution of each component to the most functional development. PMID:25110727

  16. Assessment of Knee Cartilage Stress Distribution and Deformation Using Motion Capture System and Wearable Sensors for Force Ratio Detection.

    PubMed

    Mijailovic, N; Vulovic, R; Milankovic, I; Radakovic, R; Filipovic, N; Peulic, A

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the knee cartilage deformation ratio as well as the knee cartilage stress distribution is of particular importance in clinical studies due to the fact that these represent some of the basic indicators of cartilage state and that they also provide information about joint cartilage wear so medical doctors can predict when it is necessary to perform surgery on a patient. In this research, we apply various kinds of sensors such as a system of infrared cameras and reflective markers, three-axis accelerometer, and force plate. The fluorescent marker and accelerometers are placed on the patient's hip, knee, and ankle, respectively. During a normal walk we are recording the space position of markers, acceleration, and ground reaction force by force plate. Measured data are included in the biomechanical model of the knee joint. Geometry for this model is defined from CT images. This model includes the impact of ground reaction forces, contact force between femur and tibia, patient body weight, ligaments, and muscle forces. The boundary conditions are created for the finite element method in order to noninvasively determine the cartilage stress distribution. PMID:26417382

  17. Physical activity and osteoarthritis of the knee: can MRI scans shed more light on this issue?

    PubMed

    Jones, Graeme; Schultz, Martin G; Dore, Dawn

    2011-09-01

    Physical activity has many health benefits; however, there has been concern that exercise may increase the risk of the development or progression of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. There is little doubt that injury increases the risk of OA, but the role of physical activity independent to injury is uncertain. Recently, magnetic resonance imaging has allowed an in-depth assessment of joints and relevant structural changes-this review covers the recent imaging data relevant to this area. In children and young adults, physical activity appears beneficial for knee cartilage, possibly even in structurally abnormal knees. In addition, there is consistent evidence showing aerobic and strengthening exercise improves OA symptoms later in life. However, there is limited evidence associating exercise with structural changes in later life and this lacks consistency, suggesting little or no effect. In the meantime, it appears safe to prescribe exercise in later life without major concern for structural deterioration, although caution is appropriate in those with bone marrow lesions until more information becomes available.

  18. Patterns of knee osteoarthritis in Arabian and American knees.

    PubMed

    Hodge, W Andrew; Harman, Melinda K; Banks, Scott A

    2009-04-01

    This study illustrates differences in the cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritic knees in patients with more frequent hyperflexion activities of daily living compared with Western patients. Proximal tibial articular cartilage wear and cruciate ligament condition were assessed in Saudi Arabian and North American patients with varus osteoarthritis undergoing total knee arthroplasty. In anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) intact knees, there were significant differences in wear location, with a clearly more anterior pattern in Saudi Arabian knees. Complete ACL deficiency occurred in 25% of North American knees but only 14% of Saudi Arabian knees. These ACL-deficient knees showed the most severe cartilage wear in both groups and posterior medial wear patterns. Biomechanical descriptions of knee flexion and axial rotation during kneeling or squatting are consistent with the more pronounced anteromedial and posterolateral cartilage wear patterns observed on the Saudi Arabian knees. These observations provide insight into altered knee mechanics in 2 culturally different populations with different demands on knee flexion.

  19. Impact of decline-board squat exercises and knee joint angles on the muscle activity of the lower limbs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daehee; Lee, Sangyong; Park, Jungseo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aims to investigate how squat exercises on a decline board and how the knee joint angles affect the muscle activity of the lower limbs. [Subjects] The subjects were 26 normal adults. [Methods] A Tumble Forms wedge device was used as the decline board, and the knee joint angles were measured with a goniometer. To examine the muscle activity of the biceps femoris, rectus femoris, gastrocnemius lateralis, and tibialis anterior of the lower limbs, a comparison analysis with electromyography was conducted. [Results] The muscle activity of the biceps femoris, rectus femoris, gastrocnemius lateralis, and tibialis anterior increased with increased knee joint angles, both for squat exercises on the decline board and on a flat floor. When the knee joint angle was 45°, 60°, and 90°, the muscle activity of the rectus femoris was significantly higher and that of the tibialis anterior was significantly lower during squat exercises on the decline board than on the flat floor. When the knee joint angle was 90°, the muscle activity of the gastrocnemius lateralis was significantly lower. [Conclusion] Squat exercises on a decline board are an effective intervention to increase the muscle activity of the rectus femoris with increased knee joint angles. PMID:26357447

  20. A conceptual framework for a sports knee injury performance profile (SKIPP) and return to activity criteria (RTAC).

    PubMed

    Logerstedt, David; Arundale, Amelia; Lynch, Andrew; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to the knee, including intra-articular fractures, ligamentous ruptures, and meniscal and articular cartilage lesions, are commonplace within sports. Despite advancements in surgical techniques and enhanced rehabilitation, athletes returning to cutting, pivoting, and jumping sports after a knee injury are at greater risk of sustaining a second injury. The clinical utility of objective criteria presents a decision-making challenge to ensure athletes are fully rehabilitated and safe to return to sport. A system centered on specific indicators that can be used to develop a comprehensive profile to monitor rehabilitation progression and to establish return to activity criteria is recommended to clear athletes to begin a progressive and systematic approach to activities and sports. Integration of a sports knee injury performance profile with return to activity criteria can guide clinicians in facilitating an athlete's safe return to sport, prevention of subsequent injury, and life-long knee joint health.

  1. A conceptual framework for a sports knee injury performance profile (SKIPP) and return to activity criteria (RTAC)

    PubMed Central

    Logerstedt, David; Arundale, Amelia; Lynch, Andrew; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to the knee, including intra-articular fractures, ligamentous ruptures, and meniscal and articular cartilage lesions, are commonplace within sports. Despite advancements in surgical techniques and enhanced rehabilitation, athletes returning to cutting, pivoting, and jumping sports after a knee injury are at greater risk of sustaining a second injury. The clinical utility of objective criteria presents a decision-making challenge to ensure athletes are fully rehabilitated and safe to return to sport. A system centered on specific indicators that can be used to develop a comprehensive profile to monitor rehabilitation progression and to establish return to activity criteria is recommended to clear athletes to begin a progressive and systematic approach to activities and sports. Integration of a sports knee injury performance profile with return to activity criteria can guide clinicians in facilitating an athlete's safe return to sport, prevention of subsequent injury, and life-long knee joint health. PMID:26537805

  2. Knee Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to ... Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not ...

  3. Voluntary activation of human knee extensors measured using transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Goodall, S; Romer, L M; Ross, E Z

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the applicability and reliability of a transcranial magnetic stimulation twitch interpolation technique for measuring voluntary activation of a lower limb muscle group. Cortical voluntary activation of the knee extensors was determined in nine healthy men on two separate visits by measuring superimposed twitch torques evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation during isometric knee extensions of varying intensity. Superimposed twitch amplitude decreased linearly with increasing voluntary torque between 50 and 100% of mean maximal torque, allowing estimation of resting twitch amplitude and subsequent calculation of voluntary activation. There were no systematic differences for maximal voluntary activation within day (mean +/- s.d. 90.9 +/- 6.2 versus 90.7 +/- 5.9%; P = 0.98) or between days (90.8 +/- 6.0 versus 91.2 +/- 5.7%; P = 0.92). Systematic bias and random error components of the 95% limits of agreement were 0.23 and 9.3% within day versus 0.38 and 7.5% between days. Voluntary activation was also determined immediately after a 2 min maximal voluntary isometric contraction; in four of these subjects, voluntary activation was determined 30 min after the sustained contraction. Immediately after the sustained isometric contraction, maximal voluntary activation was reduced from 91.2 +/- 5.7 to 74.2 +/- 12.0% (P < 0.001), indicating supraspinal fatigue. After 30 min, voluntary activation had recovered to 85.4 +/- 8.8% (P = 0.39 versus baseline). These results demonstrate that transcranial magnetic stimulation enables reliable measurement of maximal voluntary activation and assessment of supraspinal fatigue of the knee extensors.

  4. Abdominal muscle activation changes if the purpose is to control pelvis motion or thorax motion.

    PubMed

    Vera-Garcia, Francisco J; Moreside, Janice M; McGill, Stuart M

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare trunk muscular recruitment and lumbar spine kinematics when motion was constrained to either the thorax or the pelvis. Nine healthy women performed four upright standing planar movements (rotations, anterior-posterior translations, medial-lateral translations, and horizontal circles) while constraining pelvis motion and moving the thorax or moving the pelvis while minimizing thorax motion, and four isometric trunk exercises (conventional curl-up, reverse curl-up, cross curl-up, and reverse cross curl-up). Surface EMG (upper and lower rectus abdominis, lateral and medial aspects of external oblique, internal oblique, and latissimus dorsi) and 3D lumbar displacements were recorded. Pelvis movements produced higher EMG amplitudes of the oblique abdominals than thorax motions in most trials, and larger lumbar displacements in the medial-lateral translations and horizontal circles. Conversely, thorax movements produced larger rotational lumbar displacement than pelvis motions during rotations and higher EMG amplitudes for latissimus dorsi during rotations and anterior-posterior translations and for lower rectus abdominis during the crossed curl-ups. Thus, different neuromuscular compartments appear when the objective changes from pelvis to thorax motion. This would suggest that both movement patterns should be considered when planning spine stabilization programs, to optimize exercises for the movement and muscle activations desired.

  5. The benefits and barriers to physical activity and lifestyle interventions for osteoarthritis affecting the adult knee

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis prevalence is increasing, placing greater demands on healthcare and future socioeconomic costing models. Exercise and non-pharmacological methods should be employed to manage this common and disabling disease. Expectations at all stages of disease are increasing with a desire to remain active and independent. Three key areas have been reviewed; the evidence for physical activity, lifestyle changes and motivational techniques concerning knee osteoarthritis and the barriers to instituting such changes. Promotion of activity in primary care is discussed and evidence for compliance has been reviewed. This article reviews a subject that is integral to all professionals involved with osteoarthritis care. PMID:22462601

  6. Wavelet-based motion artifact removal for electrodermal activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weixuan; Jaques, Natasha; Taylor, Sara; Sano, Akane; Fedor, Szymon; Picard, Rosalind W

    2015-01-01

    Electrodermal activity (EDA) recording is a powerful, widely used tool for monitoring psychological or physiological arousal. However, analysis of EDA is hampered by its sensitivity to motion artifacts. We propose a method for removing motion artifacts from EDA, measured as skin conductance (SC), using a stationary wavelet transform (SWT). We modeled the wavelet coefficients as a Gaussian mixture distribution corresponding to the underlying skin conductance level (SCL) and skin conductance responses (SCRs). The goodness-of-fit of the model was validated on ambulatory SC data. We evaluated the proposed method in comparison with three previous approaches. Our method achieved a greater reduction of artifacts while retaining motion-artifact-free data.

  7. Fiducial marker-based correction for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of knees. II. Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Maier, Andreas; Keil, Andreas; McWalter, Emily J.; Gold, Garry E.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Pal, Saikat; Beaupré, Gary S.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A C-arm CT system has been shown to be capable of scanning a single cadaver leg under loaded conditions by virtue of its highly flexible acquisition trajectories. In Part I of this study, using the 4D XCAT-based numerical simulation, the authors predicted that the involuntary motion in the lower body of subjects in weight-bearing positions would seriously degrade image quality and the authors suggested three motion compensation methods by which the reconstructions could be corrected to provide diagnostic image quality. Here, the authors demonstrate that a flat-panel angiography system is appropriate for scanning both legs of subjectsin vivo under weight-bearing conditions and further evaluate the three motion-correction algorithms using in vivo data. Methods: The geometry of a C-arm CT system for a horizontal scan trajectory was calibrated using the PDS-2 phantom. The authors acquired images of two healthy volunteers while lying supine on a table, standing, and squatting at several knee flexion angles. In order to identify the involuntary motion of the lower body, nine 1-mm-diameter tantalum fiducial markers were attached around the knee. The static mean marker position in 3D, a reference for motion compensation, was estimated by back-projecting detected markers in multiple projections using calibrated projection matrices and identifying the intersection points in 3D of the back-projected rays. Motion was corrected using three different methods (described in detail previously): (1) 2D projection shifting, (2) 2D deformable projection warping, and (3) 3D rigid body warping. For quantitative image quality analysis, SSIM indices for the three methods were compared using the supine data as a ground truth. Results: A 2D Euclidean distance-based metric of subjects’ motion ranged from 0.85 mm (±0.49 mm) to 3.82 mm (±2.91 mm) (corresponding to 2.76 to 12.41 pixels) resulting in severe motion artifacts in 3D reconstructions. Shifting in 2D, 2D warping, and 3D

  8. Reciprocal activation of gastrocnemius and soleus motor units is associated with fascicle length change during knee flexion

    PubMed Central

    Lauber, Benedikt; Lichtwark, Glen A.; Cresswell, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract While medial gastrocnemius (MG) and soleus (SOL) are considered synergists, they are anatomically exclusive in that SOL crosses only the ankle, while MG crosses both the knee and ankle. Due to the force‐length properties of both active and passive structures, activation of SOL and MG must be constantly regulated to provide the required joint torques for any planned movement. As such, the aim of this study was to investigate the neural regulation of MG and SOL when independently changing their length by changing only the knee joint angle, thus exclusively altering the length of MG fibers. MG and SOL motor units (MU) were recorded intramuscularly along with ultrasound imaging of MG and SOL fascicle lengths, while moving the knee through 60° of rotation and maintaining a low level of voluntary plantar flexor torque. The results showed a reciprocal activation of MG and SOL as the knee was moved into flexion and extension. A clear reduction in MG MU firing rates occurred as the knee was flexed (MG fascicles shortening), with de‐recruitment of most MG MU occurring at close to full knee flexion. A concomitant increase in SOL MU activity was observed while no change in the length of its fascicles was found. The opposite effects were found when the knee was moved into extension. A strong correlation (ICC = 0.78) was found between the fascicle length at which MG MUs were de‐recruited and subsequently re‐recruited. This was stronger than the relationship of de‐recruitment and re‐recruitment with knee angle (ICC = 0.52), indicating that in this instance, muscle fascicle length rather than joint angle is more influential in regulating MG recruitment. Such a reciprocal arrangement like the one presented here for SOL and MG is essential for human voluntary movements such as walking or cycling. PMID:24920126

  9. Video summarization using descriptors of motion activity: a motion activity based approach to key-frame extraction from video shots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divakaran, Ajay; Radhakrishnan, Regunathan; Peker, Kadir A.

    2001-10-01

    We describe a video summarization technique that uses motion descriptors computed in the compressed domain. It can either speed up conventional color-based video summarization techniques, or rapidly generate a key-frame based summary by itself. The basic hypothesis of the work is that the intensity of motion activity of a video segment is a direct indication of its `summarizability,' which we experimentally verify using the MPEG-7 motion activity descriptor and the fidelity measure proposed in H. S. Chang, S. Sull, and S. U. Lee, `Efficient video indexing scheme for content-based retrieval,' IEEE Trans. Circuits Syst. Video Technol. 9(8), (1999). Note that the compressed domain extraction of motion activity intensity is much simpler than the color-based calculations. We are thus able to quickly identify easy to summarize segments of a video sequence since they have a low intensity of motion activity. We are able to easily summarize these segments by simply choosing their first frames. We can then apply conventional color-based summarization techniques to the remaining segments. We thus speed up color-based summarization by reducing the number of segments processed. Our results also motivate a simple and novel key-frame extraction technique that relies on a motion activity based nonuniform sampling of the frames. Our results indicate that it can either be used by itself or to speed up color-based techniques as explained earlier.

  10. Controlling Knee Swing Initiation and Ankle Plantarflexion With an Active Prosthesis on Level and Inclined Surfaces at Variable Walking Speeds

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Ann M.; Young, Aaron J.; Hargrove, Levi J.

    2014-01-01

    Improving lower-limb prostheses is important to enhance the mobility of amputees. The purpose of this paper is to introduce an impedance-based control strategy (consisting of four novel algorithms) for an active knee and ankle prosthesis and test its generalizability across multiple walking speeds, walking surfaces, and users. The four algorithms increased ankle stiffness throughout stance, decreased knee stiffness during terminal stance, as well as provided powered ankle plantarflexion and knee swing initiation through modifications of equilibrium positions of the ankle and knee, respectively. Seven amputees (knee disarticulation and transfemoral levels) walked at slow, comfortable, and hurried speeds on level and inclined (10°) surfaces. The prosthesis was tuned at their comfortable level ground walking speed. We further quantified trends in prosthetic knee and ankle kinematics, and kinetics across conditions. Subjects modulated their walking speed by ±25% (average) from their comfortable speeds. As speed increased, increasing ankle angles and velocities as well as stance phase ankle power and plantarflexion torque were observed. At slow and comfortable speeds, plantarflexion torque was increased on the incline. At slow and comfortable speeds, stance phase positive knee power was increased and knee torque more flexor on the incline. As speed increased, knee torque became less flexor on the incline. These algorithms were shown to generalize well across speed, produce gait mechanics that compare favorably with non-amputee data, and display evidence of scalable device function. They have the potential to reduce the challenge of clinically configuring such devices and increase their viability during daily use. PMID:27170878

  11. Wear testing of moderate activities of daily living using in vivo measured knee joint loading.

    PubMed

    Reinders, Jörn; Sonntag, Robert; Vot, Leo; Gibney, Christian; Nowack, Moritz; Kretzer, Jan Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Resumption of daily living activities is a basic expectation for patients provided with total knee replacements. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the impact of different activities on the wear performance. In this study the wear performance under application of different daily activities has been analyzed. In vivo load data for walking, walking downstairs/upstairs, sitting down/standing up, and cycling (50 W & 120 W) has been standardized for wear testing. Wear testing of each activity was carried out on a knee wear simulator. Additionally, ISO walking was tested for reasons of comparison. Wear was assessed gravimetrically and wear particles were analyzed. In vivo walking produced the highest overall wear rates, which were determined to be three times higher than ISO walking. Moderate wear rates were determined for walking upstairs and downstairs. Low wear rates were determined for standing up/sitting down and cycling at power levels of 50 W and 120 W. The largest wear particles were observed for cycling. Walking based on in vivo data has been shown to be the most wear-relevant activity. Highly demanding activities (stair climbing) produced considerably less wear. Taking into account the expected number of loads, low-impact activities like cycling may have a greater impact on articular wear than highly demanding activities.

  12. Wear Testing of Moderate Activities of Daily Living Using In Vivo Measured Knee Joint Loading

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Jörn; Sonntag, Robert; Vot, Leo; Gibney, Christian; Nowack, Moritz; Kretzer, Jan Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Resumption of daily living activities is a basic expectation for patients provided with total knee replacements. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the impact of different activities on the wear performance. In this study the wear performance under application of different daily activities has been analyzed. In vivo load data for walking, walking downstairs/upstairs, sitting down/standing up, and cycling (50 W & 120 W) has been standardized for wear testing. Wear testing of each activity was carried out on a knee wear simulator. Additionally, ISO walking was tested for reasons of comparison. Wear was assessed gravimetrically and wear particles were analyzed. In vivo walking produced the highest overall wear rates, which were determined to be three times higher than ISO walking. Moderate wear rates were determined for walking upstairs and downstairs. Low wear rates were determined for standing up/sitting down and cycling at power levels of 50 W and 120 W. The largest wear particles were observed for cycling. Walking based on in vivo data has been shown to be the most wear-relevant activity. Highly demanding activities (stair climbing) produced considerably less wear. Taking into account the expected number of loads, low-impact activities like cycling may have a greater impact on articular wear than highly demanding activities. PMID:25811996

  13. Cortical voluntary activation of the human knee extensors can be reliably estimated using transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Simranjit K; Bentley, David J; Carroll, Timothy J

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) method of quantifying the degree to which the motor cortex drives the muscles during voluntary efforts can be reliably applied to the human knee extensors. Although the technique for estimating "cortical" voluntary activation (VA) is valid and reliable for elbow flexors and wrist extensors, evidence that it can be applied to muscles of the lower limb is necessary if twitch interpolation with TMS is to be widely used in research or clinical practice. Eight subjects completed two identical test sessions involving brief isometric knee extensions at forces ranging from rest to maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Electromyographic (EMG) responses to TMS of the motor cortex and electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve were recorded from the rectus femoris (RF) and biceps femoris (BF) muscles, and knee extension twitch forces evoked by stimulation were measured. The amplitude of TMS-evoked twitch forces decreased linearly between 25% and 100% MVC (r(2) > 0.9), and produced reliable estimations of resting twitch and VA (ICC(2,1) > 0.85). The reliability and size of cortical measures of VA were comparable to those derived from motor nerve stimulation when the resting twitches were estimated on the basis of as few as three TMS trials. Thus, TMS measures of VA may provide a reliable and valid tool in studies investigating central fatigue due to exercise and neurological deficits in neural drive in the lower limbs. PMID:19034956

  14. Cooling Does Not Affect Knee Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Ozmun, John C.; Thieme, Heather A.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Knight, Kenneth L.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of cooling on proprioception of the knee has not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the movement reproduction (timing and accuracy) aspect of proprioception. Subjects were tested under two conditions: a 20-minute application of ice and control. Proprioceptive accuracy and timing were measured by passively moving the knee, then comparing the subject's active reproduction of the passive movement. Subjects were blindfolded, then tested in three sectors of the knee's range of motion: 90° to 60°, 60° to 30°, and 30° to full extension. Ice application had no apparent effect on the subject's ability to perform accurate movement reproductions in the sectors tested. However, accuracy of the subject's final angle reproduction varied between the sectors as did the total time of the movement. One possible explanation for the difference between sectors is that different receptors are active at different points in the knee's range of motion. We conclude that cooling the knee joint for 20 minutes does not have an adverse effect on proprioception. PMID:16558379

  15. Position-Specific Hip and Knee Kinematics in NCAA Football Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Deneweth, Jessica M.; Pomeroy, Shannon M.; Russell, Jason R.; McLean, Scott G.; Zernicke, Ronald F.; Bedi, Asheesh; Goulet, Grant C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Femoroacetabular impingement is a debilitating hip condition commonly affecting athletes playing American football. The condition is associated with reduced hip range of motion; however, little is known about the range-of-motion demands of football athletes. This knowledge is critical to effective management of this condition. Purpose: To (1) develop a normative database of game-like hip and knee kinematics used by football athletes and (2) analyze kinematic data by playing position. The hypothesis was that kinematics would be similar between running backs and defensive backs and between wide receivers and quarterbacks, and that linemen would perform the activities with the most erect lower limb posture. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Forty National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) football athletes, representing 5 playing positions (quarterback, defensive back, running back, wide receiver, offensive lineman), executed game-like maneuvers while lower body kinematics were recorded via optical motion capture. Passive hip range of motion at 90° of hip flexion was assessed using a goniometer. Passive range of motion, athlete physical dimensions, hip function, and hip and knee rotations were submitted to 1-way analysis of variance to test for differences between playing positions. Correlations between maximal hip and knee kinematics and maximal hip kinematics and passive range of motion were also computed. Results: Hip and knee kinematics were similar across positions. Significant differences arose with linemen, who used lower maximal knee flexion (mean ± SD, 45.04° ± 7.27°) compared with running backs (61.20° ± 6.07°; P < .001) and wide receivers (54.67° ± 6.97°; P = .048) during the cut. No significant differences were found among positions for hip passive range of motion (overall means: 102° ± 15° [flexion]; 25° ± 9° [internal rotation]; 25° ± 8° [external rotation]). Several maximal hip measures were found

  16. [Jumper's knee].

    PubMed

    Hagner, W; Sosnowski, S; Kaziński, W; Frankowski, S

    1993-01-01

    A series of 30 athletes aged about 16 years on an average, exposed to activities putting a strain on the patellar tendon during training has been examined. They were involved in competitive sports for 3 years on an average. In 27 per cent of them jumpers knee symptoms have been found.

  17. Active motion, communicative aggregations, and the spatial closure of Umwelt.

    PubMed

    Kull, K

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of a simple model of movable organisms that are supplied by semiotic force of attraction or repulsion, several general features of spatial behavior are demonstrated: (1) the stochastic spatial distribution of actively moving organisms is unstable; (2) simple or complex aggregations of organisms appear as a result of active motion; and (3) the ability for active motion ties the organisms with place. These results show that models that apply an internalist approach can considerably simplify the theory of spatial behavior of organic systems. Explanations based on the effects of Darwinian fitness may not be necessary for understanding the origin of biological aggregations.

  18. In vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for the screening of boron-10 distribution in a rabbit knee: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.; Clackdoyle, R.; Shortkroff, S.; Yanch, J.

    2008-05-01

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) is under development as a potential treatment modality for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is characterized by the inflammation of the synovium (the membrane lining articular joints), which leads to pain and a restricted range of motion. BNCS is a two-part procedure involving the injection of a boronated compound directly into the diseased joint followed by irradiation with a low-energy neutron beam. The neutron capture reactions taking place in the synovium deliver a local, high-linear energy transfer (LET) dose aimed at destroying the inflamed synovial membrane. For successful treatment via BNCS, a boron-labeled compound exhibiting both high synovial uptake and long retention time is necessary. Currently, the in vivo uptake behavior of potentially useful boronated compounds is evaluated in the knee joints of rabbits in which arthritis has been induced. This strategy involves the sacrifice and dissection of a large number of animals. An in vivo 10B screening approach is therefore under investigation with the goal of significantly reducing the number of animals needed for compound evaluation via dissection studies. The 'in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis' (IVPGNAA) approach uses a narrow neutron beam to irradiate the knee from several angular positions following the intra-articular injection of a boronated compound whose uptake characteristics are unknown. A high-purity germanium detector collects the 478 keV gamma photons produced by the 10B capture reactions. The 10B distribution in the knee is then reconstructed by solving a system of simultaneous equations using a weighted least squares algorithm. To study the practical feasibility of IVPGNAA, simulation data were generated with the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code. The boron-containing region of a rabbit knee was partitioned into 8 compartments, and the 10B prompt gamma signals were tallied from 16 angular positions. Results demonstrate that for this

  19. The dynamic effect of muscle activation on knee stiffness.

    PubMed

    Ludvig, Daniel; Perreault, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Adapting limb mechanics in a task and environment dependent manner is one component of human motor control. Joint mechanics have been extensively studied under static postural conditions, but less so under time-varying movement conditions. The limited studies that have investigated joint mechanics during movement, have found a drop in joint stiffness during movement, however the source of this decrease in stiffness remains unknown. Here in this paper we investigate whether time-varying muscle activation, which occurs during volitional movement, can lead to the drop in stiffness seen during movement. We found that under time-varying isometric conditions stiffness dropped when subjects transitioned from extension to flexion and vice-versa, a phenomenon that could not be explained by simply superimposing extension and flexion contractions. These findings suggest that dynamics of muscle activation may be responsible for the complex pattern of stiffness changes seen during simple movements. Furthermore, these results imply that EMG-based estimates of stiffness, which work well for steady-state postural conditions, will need to be augmented to account for the highly non-linear relationship between muscle activation and stiffness before they can also be used to estimate stiffness during dynamic contractions.

  20. Effect of ACL graft material on anterior knee force during simulated in vivo ovine motion applied to the porcine knee: An in vitro examination of force during 2000 cycles.

    PubMed

    Boguszewski, Daniel V; Wagner, Christopher T; Butler, David L; Shearn, Jason T

    2015-12-01

    This study determined how anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction affected the magnitude and temporal patterns of anterior knee force and internal knee moment during 2000 cycles of simulated gait. Porcine knees were tested using a six degree-of-freedom robot, examining three porcine allograft materials compared with the native ACL. Reconstructions were performed using: (1) bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft (BPTB), (2) reconstructive porcine tissue matrix (RTM), or (3) an RTM-polymer hybrid construct (Hybrid). Forces and moments were measured over the entire gait cycle and contrasted at heel strike, mid stance, toe off, and peak flexion. The Hybrid construct performed the best, as magnitude and temporal changes in both anterior knee force and internal knee moment were not different from the native ACL knee. Conversely, the RTM knees showed greater loss in anterior knee force during 2000 cycles than the native ACL knee at heel strike and toe off, with an average force loss of 46%. BPTB knees performed the least favorably, with significant loss in anterior knee force at all key points and an average force loss of 61%. This is clinically relevant, as increases in post-operative knee laxity are believed to play a role in graft failure and early onset osteoarthritis. PMID:26134453

  1. Muscle activation and knee biomechanics during squatting and lunging after lower extremity fatigue in healthy young women.

    PubMed

    Longpré, Heather S; Acker, Stacey M; Maly, Monica R

    2015-02-01

    Muscle activations and knee joint loads were compared during squatting and lunging before and after lower extremity neuromuscular fatigue. Electromyographic activations of the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis and biceps femoris, and the external knee adduction and flexion moments were collected on 25 healthy women (mean age 23.5 years, BMI of 23.7 kg/m(2)) during squatting and lunging. Participants were fatigued through sets of 50 isotonic knee extensions and flexions, with resistance set at 50% of the peak torque achieved during a maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Fatigue was defined as a decrease in peak isometric knee extension or flexion torque ≥25% from baseline. Co-activation indices were calculated between rectus femoris and biceps femoris; and between vastus lateralis and biceps femoris. Fatigue decreased peak isometric extension and flexion torques (p<0.05), mean vastus lateralis activation during squatting and lunging (p<0.05), and knee adduction and flexion moments during lunging (p<0.05). Quadriceps activations were greater during lunging than squatting (p<0.05). Thus, fatigue altered the recruitment strategy of the quadriceps during squatting and lunging. Lunging challenges quadriceps activation more than squatting in healthy, young women.

  2. Jumper's knee.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, A; Ippolito, E; Mariani, P; Puddu, G

    1983-01-01

    Jumper's knee (patellar or quadriceps tendon tendonitis) is found in a high number of athletes, especially in volleyball and basketball players. Conservative treatment (rest, stretching, physical therapy and antiinflammatory drugs) is usually successful. The athletes often recover completely and resume their sports activity. The purpose of this study is to present the histologic findings and our surgical repair of 18 knees of patients who underwent surgery after failure of conservative treatment. Histologic findings confirm that the so-called "jumper's knee" is a pathology localized at the bone-tendon junction. In all cases the following abnormalities were found: pseudocystic cavities at the borderline between mineralized fibrocartilage and bone, disappearance of the "blue line," increased thickness of the insertional fibrocartilage with myxomatous and hyaline metaplasia, mineralization, and ossification of the fibrocartilage far from the "blue line." Abnormalities of the patellar tendon were observed only in one patient who received local injection of corticosteroids. Eleven of the 18 surgically treated knees obtained a satisfactory result with complete resumption of sports activity.

  3. A comparison of lower-body flexibility, strength, and knee stability between karate athletes and active controls.

    PubMed

    Probst, Manuel M; Fletcher, Richard; Seelig, Dayna S

    2007-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the lower-body flexibility, strength, and knee stability of karate athletes against that of non-karate controls and to determine whether regular karate training results in adaptations that may result in an increased risk for knee injury. Flexibility measurements included knee flexion and extension, hip flexion and extension, hip internal and external rotation, and foot inversion and eversion. Nine karate athletes (4 women and 5 men, age = 24.3 +/- 6.7 years) and 15 active, non-karate controls (7 women and 8 men, age = 22.1 +/- 3.2 years) participated. No subjects reported recent knee surgery or chronic or acute knee pain. Concentric quadriceps and hamstrings strength and endurance were measured using a Biodex II isokinetic dynamometer at 60 degrees .s(-1) and 180 degrees .s(-1). Eccentric strength was measured at 150 degrees .s(-1) and 250 ft-lb (339 N.m). Knee stability was measured via varus and valgus stress and anterior drawer testing. Karate athletes demonstrated a significantly greater right hip flexion (p knees between the karate and control groups. The results indicate that this group of karate athletes may have demonstrated sport-specific adaptations in certain flexibility and strength measurements, but they showed no increased risk for knee injury.

  4. The effect of mechanical massage on early outcome after total knee arthroplasty: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Mi; Kim, Sang-Rim; Lee, Yong Ki; Kim, Bo Ryun; Han, Eun Young

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mechanical massage via Endermologie(®) after total knee arthroplasty in reducing edema and pain and improving knee range of motion, in the early postoperative period. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen patients with knee edema following total knee arthroplasty were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n=8) or the control group (n=10). The intervention group received mechanical massage therapy using Endermologie(®) and the control group received conventional physical therapy for 20 minutes a day, 5 times a week from the seventh day postsurgery. Clinical assessments included active knee flexion and extension range of motion, knee pain using a numeric rating scale, the operated limb circumference, the soft tissue cross-sectional area using ultrasonography, the extracelluar fluid volume, and single frequency bioimpedance analysis at 5 kHz using bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy. [Results] Both groups showed significant reduction in edema and pain, and improvement in active knee flexion at the end of treatment. There were no significant inter-group differences before or after treatment. [Conclusion] Mechanical massage could be an alternative way of managing knee edema after total knee arthroplasty in early postoperative recovery.

  5. The effect of mechanical massage on early outcome after total knee arthroplasty: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Mi; Kim, Sang-Rim; Lee, Yong Ki; Kim, Bo Ryun; Han, Eun Young

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mechanical massage via Endermologie® after total knee arthroplasty in reducing edema and pain and improving knee range of motion, in the early postoperative period. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen patients with knee edema following total knee arthroplasty were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n=8) or the control group (n=10). The intervention group received mechanical massage therapy using Endermologie® and the control group received conventional physical therapy for 20 minutes a day, 5 times a week from the seventh day postsurgery. Clinical assessments included active knee flexion and extension range of motion, knee pain using a numeric rating scale, the operated limb circumference, the soft tissue cross-sectional area using ultrasonography, the extracelluar fluid volume, and single frequency bioimpedance analysis at 5 kHz using bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy. [Results] Both groups showed significant reduction in edema and pain, and improvement in active knee flexion at the end of treatment. There were no significant inter-group differences before or after treatment. [Conclusion] Mechanical massage could be an alternative way of managing knee edema after total knee arthroplasty in early postoperative recovery. PMID:26696709

  6. Human-robot interaction: kinematics and muscle activity inside a powered compliant knee exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Knaepen, Kristel; Beyl, Pieter; Duerinck, Saartje; Hagman, Friso; Lefeber, Dirk; Meeusen, Romain

    2014-11-01

    Until today it is not entirely clear how humans interact with automated gait rehabilitation devices and how we can, based on that interaction, maximize the effectiveness of these exoskeletons. The goal of this study was to gain knowledge on the human-robot interaction, in terms of kinematics and muscle activity, between a healthy human motor system and a powered knee exoskeleton (i.e., KNEXO). Therefore, temporal and spatial gait parameters, human joint kinematics, exoskeleton kinetics and muscle activity during four different walking trials in 10 healthy male subjects were studied. Healthy subjects can walk with KNEXO in patient-in-charge mode with some slight constraints in kinematics and muscle activity primarily due to inertia of the device. Yet, during robot-in-charge walking the muscular constraints are reversed by adding positive power to the leg swing, compensating in part this inertia. Next to that, KNEXO accurately records and replays the right knee kinematics meaning that subject-specific trajectories can be implemented as a target trajectory during assisted walking. No significant differences in the human response to the interaction with KNEXO in low and high compliant assistance could be pointed out. This is in contradiction with our hypothesis that muscle activity would decrease with increasing assistance. It seems that the differences between the parameter settings of low and high compliant control might not be sufficient to observe clear effects in healthy subjects. Moreover, we should take into account that KNEXO is a unilateral, 1 degree-of-freedom device. PMID:24846650

  7. Human-robot interaction: kinematics and muscle activity inside a powered compliant knee exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Knaepen, Kristel; Beyl, Pieter; Duerinck, Saartje; Hagman, Friso; Lefeber, Dirk; Meeusen, Romain

    2014-11-01

    Until today it is not entirely clear how humans interact with automated gait rehabilitation devices and how we can, based on that interaction, maximize the effectiveness of these exoskeletons. The goal of this study was to gain knowledge on the human-robot interaction, in terms of kinematics and muscle activity, between a healthy human motor system and a powered knee exoskeleton (i.e., KNEXO). Therefore, temporal and spatial gait parameters, human joint kinematics, exoskeleton kinetics and muscle activity during four different walking trials in 10 healthy male subjects were studied. Healthy subjects can walk with KNEXO in patient-in-charge mode with some slight constraints in kinematics and muscle activity primarily due to inertia of the device. Yet, during robot-in-charge walking the muscular constraints are reversed by adding positive power to the leg swing, compensating in part this inertia. Next to that, KNEXO accurately records and replays the right knee kinematics meaning that subject-specific trajectories can be implemented as a target trajectory during assisted walking. No significant differences in the human response to the interaction with KNEXO in low and high compliant assistance could be pointed out. This is in contradiction with our hypothesis that muscle activity would decrease with increasing assistance. It seems that the differences between the parameter settings of low and high compliant control might not be sufficient to observe clear effects in healthy subjects. Moreover, we should take into account that KNEXO is a unilateral, 1 degree-of-freedom device.

  8. Development of a mathematical model for predicting electrically elicited quadriceps femoris muscle forces during isovelocity knee joint motion

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Ramu; Wexler, Anthony S; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A

    2008-01-01

    Background Direct electrical activation of skeletal muscles of patients with upper motor neuron lesions can restore functional movements, such as standing or walking. Because responses to electrical stimulation are highly nonlinear and time varying, accurate control of muscles to produce functional movements is very difficult. Accurate and predictive mathematical models can facilitate the design of stimulation patterns and control strategies that will produce the desired force and motion. In the present study, we build upon our previous isometric model to capture the effects of constant angular velocity on the forces produced during electrically elicited concentric contractions of healthy human quadriceps femoris muscle. Modelling the isovelocity condition is important because it will enable us to understand how our model behaves under the relatively simple condition of constant velocity and will enable us to better understand the interactions of muscle length, limb velocity, and stimulation pattern on the force produced by the muscle. Methods An additional term was introduced into our previous isometric model to predict the force responses during constant velocity limb motion. Ten healthy subjects were recruited for the study. Using a KinCom dynamometer, isometric and isovelocity force data were collected from the human quadriceps femoris muscle in response to a wide range of stimulation frequencies and patterns. % error, linear regression trend lines, and paired t-tests were used to test how well the model predicted the experimental forces. In addition, sensitivity analysis was performed using Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test to obtain a measure of the sensitivity of our model's output to changes in model parameters. Results Percentage RMS errors between modelled and experimental forces determined for each subject at each stimulation pattern and velocity showed that the errors were in general less than 20%. The coefficients of determination between the measured

  9. The effect of co-stabilizer muscle activation on knee joint position sense: a single group pre-post test

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Yeongyo; Lee, Ho Jun; Choi, Myongryol; Chung, Sangmi; Park, Junhyung; Yu, Jaeho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of co-stabilizer muscle activation on knee joint position sense. [Subjects and Methods] This study was a pre-post, single-blinded randomly controlled trial (angle sequence randomly selected) design. Seven healthy adults with no orthopaedic or neurological problems participated in this study. Knee joint position sense was measured by a target matching test at target angles of 30°, 45° and 80° of knee flexion a using digital inclinometer under two conditions: erect sitting, which is known to highly activate co-stabilizer muscle and slump sitting, which is known to little activate the co-stabilizer muscle. [Results] A significant difference in joint position matching error at the knee flexion angle of 45° was founded between two conditions erect sitting: (3.83 ± 1.47) and slump sitting: (1.00 ± 0.63). There were no significant differences in joint position matching error at the other target angles. [Conclusion] Knee joint position sense at 45° is likely to be affected by activation of co-stabilizer muscle, and this value is suitable for facilitation of joint position sense with skilled movement. PMID:27512279

  10. Quantitative, Comparative Assessment of Gait Between Single-Radius and Multi-Radius Total Knee Arthroplasty Designs.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Bethany; Jacofsky, Marc C; Jacofsky, David J

    2015-06-01

    Gait of single-radius (SR, n=16) and multi-radius (MR, n=16) posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasties was compared, along with controls (n=16), pre-op and 1 year post-op. Computer navigation and standard order sets controlled confounding variables. Post-operatively, SR knees did not differ from controls while MR knees continued to differ in important knee kinetic and kinematic properties. MR knees remained more extended (P=0.019) and had decreased power absorption (P=0.0001) during weight acceptance compared to the SR knees. Both surgical groups had similar KSS for Knee Scores (P=0.22) and Function Scores (P=0.58). The significant biomechanical differences are likely influenced by patella-femoral moment arm geometry and changing ligament laxity throughout the active range of motion.

  11. An acute bout of self-myofascial release increases range of motion without a subsequent decrease in muscle activation or force.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Graham Z; Penney, Michael D H; Mullaley, Michelle E; Cuconato, Amanda L; Drake, Corey D J; Behm, David G; Button, Duane C

    2013-03-01

    Foam rolling is thought to improve muscular function, performance, overuse, and joint range of motion (ROM); however, there is no empirical evidence demonstrating this. Thus, the objective of the study was to determine the effect of self-myofascial release (SMR) via foam roller application on knee extensor force and activation and knee joint ROM. Eleven healthy male (height 178.9 ± 3.5 cm, mass 86.3 ± 7.4 kg, age 22.3 ± 3.8 years) subjects who were physically active participated. Subjects' quadriceps maximum voluntary contraction force, evoked force and activation, and knee joint ROM were measured before, 2 minutes, and 10 minutes after 2 conditions: (a) 2, 1-minute trials of SMR of the quadriceps via a foam roller and (b) no SMR (Control). A 2-way analysis of variance (condition × time) with repeated measures was performed on all dependent variables recorded in the precondition and postcondition tests. There were no significant differences between conditions for any of the neuromuscular dependent variables. However, after foam rolling, subjects' ROM significantly (p < 0.001) increased by 10° and 8° at 2 and 10 minutes, respectively. There was a significant (p < 0.01) negative correlation between subjects' force and ROM before foam rolling, which no longer existed after foam rolling. In conclusion, an acute bout of SMR of the quadriceps was an effective treatment to acutely enhance knee joint ROM without a concomitant deficit in muscle performance.

  12. An acute bout of self-myofascial release increases range of motion without a subsequent decrease in muscle activation or force.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Graham Z; Penney, Michael D H; Mullaley, Michelle E; Cuconato, Amanda L; Drake, Corey D J; Behm, David G; Button, Duane C

    2013-03-01

    Foam rolling is thought to improve muscular function, performance, overuse, and joint range of motion (ROM); however, there is no empirical evidence demonstrating this. Thus, the objective of the study was to determine the effect of self-myofascial release (SMR) via foam roller application on knee extensor force and activation and knee joint ROM. Eleven healthy male (height 178.9 ± 3.5 cm, mass 86.3 ± 7.4 kg, age 22.3 ± 3.8 years) subjects who were physically active participated. Subjects' quadriceps maximum voluntary contraction force, evoked force and activation, and knee joint ROM were measured before, 2 minutes, and 10 minutes after 2 conditions: (a) 2, 1-minute trials of SMR of the quadriceps via a foam roller and (b) no SMR (Control). A 2-way analysis of variance (condition × time) with repeated measures was performed on all dependent variables recorded in the precondition and postcondition tests. There were no significant differences between conditions for any of the neuromuscular dependent variables. However, after foam rolling, subjects' ROM significantly (p < 0.001) increased by 10° and 8° at 2 and 10 minutes, respectively. There was a significant (p < 0.01) negative correlation between subjects' force and ROM before foam rolling, which no longer existed after foam rolling. In conclusion, an acute bout of SMR of the quadriceps was an effective treatment to acutely enhance knee joint ROM without a concomitant deficit in muscle performance. PMID:22580977

  13. Sports activity following total knee arthroplasty in patients older than 60 years.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Hermann O; Reinhold, Maik; Bernstein, Anke; Suedkamp, Norbert P; Stoehr, Amelie

    2015-01-01

    In a retrospective study with a population over 65 years, sports activity was conducted 6 years after cruciate retaining (CR) total condylar knee arthroplasty (TKA) with rotating platform (RP). Eighty-one Patients (71.8±5.4years) were examined at follow-up 6.4±0.9 years postoperative. Sport was practiced 5.3 hours every week in mean. Patients were active in sports 3.5times per week. Twenty-five percent performed high impact sports, 47% medium impact sports and 52% low impact sports at follow-up. In KOOS sports 60±28 was reached, in WOMAC 12.1±15.1. It can be concluded that in this population 50% of patients were active in medium and low impact sport 6 years after surgery. However, a quarter of patients were also active in high impact sports.

  14. The Effects of Knee Joint and Hip Abduction Angles on the Activation of Cervical and Abdominal Muscles during Bridging Exercises.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Kyoung; Park, Du-Jin

    2013-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of the flexion angle of the knee joint and the abduction angle of the hip joint on the activation of the cervical region and abdominal muscles. [Subjects] A total of 42 subjects were enrolled 9 males and 33 females. [Methods] The bridging exercise in this study was one form of exercise with a knee joint flexion angle of 90°. Based on this, a bridging exercise was conducted at the postures of abduction of the lower extremities at 0, 5, 10, and 15°. [Result] The changes in the knee joint angle and the hip abduction angle exhibited statistically significant effects on the cervical erector spinae, adductor magnus, and gluteus medius muscles. The abduction angles did not result in statistically significant effects on the upper trapezium, erector spinae, external oblique, and rectus abdominis muscles. However, in relation to the knee joint angles, during the bridging exercise, statistically significant results were exhibited. [Conclusion] When patients with both cervical and back pain do a bridging exercise, widening the knee joint angle would reduce cervical and shoulder muscle activity through minimal levels of abduction, permitting trunk muscle strengthening with reduced cervical muscle activity. This method would be helpful for strengthening trunk muscles in a selective manner. PMID:24259870

  15. The contribution of activated peripheral kappa opioid receptors (kORs) in the inflamed knee joint to anti-nociception.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sun Wook; Park, Eui Ho; Suh, Hye Rim; Ko, Duk Hwan; Kim, Yang In; Han, Hee Chul

    2016-10-01

    The systemic administration of opioids can be used for their strong analgesic effect. However, extensive activation of opioid receptors (ORs) beyond the targeted tissue can cause dysphoria, pruritus, and constipation. Therefore, selective activation of peripheral ORs present in the afferent fibers of the targeted tissue can be considered a superior strategy in opioid analgesia to avoid potential adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of peripheral kappa opioid receptors (kORs) in arthritic pain for the possible use of peripheral ORs as a target in anti-nociceptive therapy. We administered U50488 or nor-BNI/DIPPA, a selective agonist or antagonist of kOR, respectively into arthritic rat knee joints induced using 1% carrageenan. After the injection of U50488 or U50488 with nor-BNI or DIPPA into the inflamed knee joint, we evaluated nociceptive behavior as indicated by reduced weight-bearing on the ipsilateral limbs of the rat and recorded the activity of mechanosensitive afferents (MSA). In the inflamed knee joint, the intra-articular application of 1μM, 10nM, or 0.1nM U50488 resulted in a significant reduction in nociceptive behavior. In addition, 1μM and 10nM U50488 decreased MSA activity. However, in a non-inflamed knee joint, 1μM U50488 had no effect on MSA activity. Additionally, intra-articular pretreatment with 20μM nor-BNI or 10μM DIPPA significantly blocked the inhibitory effects of 1μM U50488 on nociceptive behavior and MSA activity in the inflamed knee joint. These results implicate that peripheral kORs can contribute to anti-nociceptive processing in an inflamed knee joint. PMID:27378583

  16. Capitalizing on the Teachable Moment: Osteoarthritis Physical Activity and Exercise Net for Improving Physical Activity in Early Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lineker, Sydney; Cibere, Jolanda; Crooks, Valorie A; Jones, Catherine A; Kopec, Jacek A; Lear, Scott A; Pencharz, James; Rhodes, Ryan E; Esdaile, John M

    2013-01-01

    Background Practice guidelines emphasize the use of exercise and weight reduction as the first line of management for knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, less than half of the people with mild OA participate in moderate intensity physical activity. Given that physical activities have been shown to reduce pain, improve quality of life, and have the potential to reduce the progression of joint damage, many people with OA are missing the benefits of this inexpensive intervention. Objective The objectives of this study are (1) to develop a behavioral theory-informed Internet intervention called Osteoarthritis Physical Activity & Exercise Net (OPEN) for people with previously undiagnosed knee OA, and (2) to assess the efficacy of the OPEN website for improving physical activity participation through a proof-of-concept study. Methods OPEN was developed based on the theory of planned behavior. Efficacy of this online intervention is being assessed by an ongoing proof-of-concept, single-blind randomized controlled trial in British Columbia, Canada. We are currently recruiting participants and plan to recruit a total of 252 sedentary people with previously undiagnosed knee OA using a set of validated criteria. Half of the participants will be randomized to use OPEN and receive an OA education pamphlet. The other half only will receive the pamphlet. Participants will complete an online questionnaire at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months about their participation in physical activities, health-related quality of life, and motivational outcomes. In addition, we will perform an aerobic fitness test in a sub-sample of participants (n=20 per study arm). In the primary analysis, we will use logistic regression to compare the proportion of participants reporting being physically active at or above the recommended level in the 2 groups, adjusting for baseline measurement, age, and sex. Results This study evaluates a theory-informed behavioral intervention at a time when people affected

  17. Agonist-antagonist active knee prosthesis: a preliminary study in level-ground walking.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Villalpando, Ernesto C; Herr, Hugh

    2009-01-01

    We present a powered knee prosthesis with two series-elastic actuators positioned in parallel in an agonist-antagonist arrangement. To motivate the knee's design, we developed a prosthetic knee model that comprises a variable damper and two series-elastic clutch units that span the knee joint. Using human gait data to constrain the model's joint to move biologically, we varied model parameters using an optimization scheme that minimized the sum over time of the squared difference between the model's joint torque and biological knee values. We then used these optimized values to specify the mechanical and control design of the prosthesis for level-ground walking. We hypothesized that a variable-impedance control design could produce humanlike knee mechanics during steady-state level-ground walking. As a preliminary evaluation of this hypothesis, we compared the prosthetic knee mechanics of an amputee walking at a self-selected gait speed with those of a weight- and height-matched nonamputee. We found qualitative agreement between prosthetic and human knee mechanics. Because the knee's motors never perform positive work on the knee joint throughout the level-ground gait cycle, the knee's electrical power requirement is modest in walking (8 W), decreasing the size of the onboard battery required to power the prosthesis.

  18. Wear, delamination, and fatigue resistance of melt-annealed highly crosslinked UHMWPE cruciate-retaining knee inserts under activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Popoola, Oludele O; Yao, Jian Q; Johnson, Todd S; Blanchard, Cheryl R

    2010-09-01

    The wear, delamination, and fatigue resistance of artificially aged gamma irradiation-sterilized conventional polyethylene (CPE) and gas-plasma-sterilized melt-annealed highly crosslinked polyethylene tibial inserts (HXPE) were compared. Six CPE and 12 HXPE (six irradiated at 58 kGy and six at 72 kGy) left knee inserts were wear tested for 5.5 million cycles (Mc) under loads and motions that mimic activities of daily living, such as walking, chair rise, stair ascent, and deep squatting. Another six HXPE (72 kGy) and six CPE inserts were also tested under conditions that could produce severe delamination for 8 Mc. Ten other knees (five 72 kGy HXPE and five CPE) were subjected to posterior edge loading fatigue testing for 5 Mc. The HXPE inserts had an average wear rate reduction of about 80% relative to their CPE counterparts during all activities. All of the CPE inserts delaminated and fractured during high cycle deep squat (152 degrees flexion) motions, while all the HXPE remained intact. None of the HXPE inserts delaminated after 8 Mc, while all of the CPE inserts developed delamination damage within 1.5-5.8 Mc of delamination testing. All CPE inserts developed subsurface cracks and delamination within 2.8 Mc during posterior edge loading fatigue studies, while none of the HXPE inserts showed cracking or delamination after 5 Mc. These results show that aged HXPE has higher wear and fatigue resistance than aged CPE, and offers potential long-term advantages for young active patients with sustained activities of daily living.

  19. Strength Training to Contraction Failure Increases Voluntary Activation of the Quadriceps Muscle Shortly After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Elin Karin; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Andersen, Lars Louis; Bandholm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The objective of this study was to investigate voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle during one set of knee extensions performed until contraction failure in patients shortly after total knee arthroplasty. Design This was a cross-sectional study of 24 patients with total knee arthroplasty. One set of knee extensions was performed until contraction failure, using a predetermined 10 repetition maximum loading. In the operated leg, electromyographic (EMG) activity of the lateral and medial vastus, semitendinosus, and biceps femoris muscles was recorded during the set. Muscle activity (%EMGmax) and median power frequency of the EMG power spectrum were calculated for each repetition decile (10%–100% contraction failure). Results Muscle activity increased significantly over contractions from a mean of 90.0 and 93.6 %EMGmax (lateral vastus and medial vastus, respectively) at 10% contraction failure to 99.3 and 105.5 %EMGmax at 100% contraction failure (P = 0.009 and 0.004). Median power frequency decreased significantly over contractions from a mean of 66.8 and 64.2 Hz (lateral vastus and medial vastus, respectively) at 10% contraction failure to 59.9 and 60.1 Hz at 100% contraction failure (P = 0.0006 and 0.0187). Conclusion In patients shortly after total knee arthroplasty, 10 repetition maximum–loaded knee extensions performed in one set until contraction failure increases voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle during the set. Clinical Trials Gov-identifier: NCT01713140 to the abstract to increase trial transparency. PMID:26339729

  20. Contribution of complex stapes motion to cochlea activation.

    PubMed

    Eiber, Albrecht; Huber, Alexander M; Lauxmann, Michael; Chatzimichalis, Michail; Sequeira, Damien; Sim, Jae Hoon

    2012-02-01

    Classic theories of hearing have considered only a translational component (piston-like component) of the stapes motion as being the effective stimulus for cochlear activation and thus the sensation of hearing. Our previous study (Huber et al., 2008) qualitatively showed that rotational components around the long and short axes of the footplate (rocking-like components) lead to cochlear activation as well. In this study, the contribution of the piston-like and rocking-like components of the stapes motion to cochlea activation was quantitatively investigated with measurements in live guinea pigs and a related mathematical description. The isolated stapes in anesthetized guinea pigs was stimulated by a three-axis piezoelectric actuator, and 3-D motions of the stapes and compound action potential (CAP) of the cochlea were measured simultaneously. The measured values were used to fit a hypothesis of the CAP as a linear combination of the logarithms of the piston-like and rocking-like components. Both the piston-like and rocking-like components activate cochlear responses when they exceed certain thresholds. These thresholds as well as the relation between CAP and intensity of the motion component were different for piston-like and rocking-like components. The threshold was found to be higher and the sensitivity lower for the rocking-like component than the corresponding values for the piston-like component. The influence of the rocking-like component was secondary in cases of piston-dominant motions of the stapes although it may become significant for low amplitudes of the piston-like component.

  1. Individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis show neuromuscular adaptation when perturbed during walking despite functional and structural impairments.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Swanik, Charles Buz; Reisman, Darcy S; Rudolph, Katherine S

    2014-01-01

    Neuromuscular control relies on sensory feedback that influences responses to changing external demands, and the normal response is for movement and muscle activation patterns to adapt to repeated perturbations. People with knee osteoarthritis (OA) are known to have pain, quadriceps weakness, and neuromotor deficits that could affect adaption to external perturbations. The aim of this study was to analyze neuromotor adaptation during walking in people with knee OA (n = 38) and controls (n = 23). Disability, quadriceps strength, joint space width, malalignment, and proprioception were assessed. Kinematic and EMG data were collected during undisturbed walking and during perturbations that caused lateral translation of the foot at initial contact. Knee excursions and EMG magnitudes were analyzed. Subjects with OA walked with less knee motion and higher muscle activation and had greater pain, limitations in function, quadriceps weakness, and malalignment, but no difference was observed in proprioception. Both groups showed increased EMG and decreased knee motion in response to the first perturbation, followed by progressively decreased EMG activity and increased knee motion during midstance over the first five perturbations, but no group differences were observed. Over 30 trials, EMG levels returned to those of normal walking. The results illustrate that people with knee OA respond similarly to healthy individuals when exposed to challenging perturbations during functional weight-bearing activities despite structural, functional, and neuromotor impairments. Mechanisms underlying the adaptive response in people with knee OA need further study. PMID:24072409

  2. Acute Orthotic Intervention Does Not Affect Muscular Response Times and Activation Patterns at the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Holly M.; Shultz, Sandra J.; Arnold, Brent L.; Gansneder, Bruce M.; Perrin, David H.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the short-term effect of a semirigid foot orthotic device on response times and activation patterns of knee musculature in individuals with hyperpronation after a lower extremity perturbation in a single-leg, weight-bearing stance. Design and Setting: We used a lower extremity perturbation device designed to produce a forward and either internal or external rotation of the trunk and femur on the weight-bearing tibia to evoke a reflex response. Subjects were tested both with and without orthotic devices. Subjects: Seventeen (13 male, 4 female) volunteers (age, 20.6 ± 1.8 years; height, 181.0 ± 8.1 cm; weight, 87.4 ± 19.5 kg; navicular drop, 12.1 ± 1.8 mm) with a navicular drop greater than 10 mm volunteered for this study. Measurements: Long latency reflex times were recorded via surface electromyography for the medial and lateral hamstrings, gastrocnemius, and quadriceps muscles. Results: A dependent-sample t test revealed a significant decrease in navicular drop with orthotic intervention (P < .0001). With that confirmed, separate repeated-measures analyses of variance with 2 within factors (orthotic condition and muscle) revealed no significant difference in muscle response time between orthotic and nonorthotic conditions for either internal or external rotation perturbation. Although we found a main effect for muscle for both internal (P < .0001) and external (P < .0001) rotation, indicating a preferred muscle activation order, this activation order did not differ between orthotic and nonorthotic conditions (internal rotation P = .674, external rotation P = .829). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that a short-term application of a semirigid orthotic device does not alter muscle response times or activation patterns of the muscles that stabilize the knee. Further research is needed to determine whether changes in activation patterns may occur over time since mechanical adaptations occur with long-term wear. PMID:12937425

  3. Knee Bracing: What Works?

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Knee Bracing: What Works? Knee Bracing: What Works? What are knee braces? Knee braces are supports ... have arthritis in their knees. Do knee braces work? Maybe. Companies that make knee braces claim that ...

  4. Quadriceps Strength Asymmetry Following ACL Reconstruction Alters Knee Joint Biomechanics and Functional Performance at Time of Return to Activity

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri-Smith, RM; Lepley, LK

    2016-01-01

    Background Quadriceps strength deficits are observed clinically following anterior cruciate injury and reconstruction and are often not overcome despite rehabilitation. Given that quadriceps strength may be important for achieving symmetrical joint biomechanics and promoting long-term joint health, determining the magnitude of strength deficits that lead to altered mechanics is critical. Purpose To determine if the magnitude of quadriceps strength asymmetry alters knee and hip biomechanical symmetry, as well as functional performance and self-reported function. Study Design Cross-Sectional study. Methods Seventy-three patients were tested at the time they were cleared for return to activity following ACL reconstruction. Quadriceps strength and activation, scores on the International Knee Documentation Committee form, the hop for distance test, and sagittal plane lower extremity biomechanics were recorded while patients completed a single-legged hop. Results Patients with high and moderate quadriceps strength symmetry had larger central activation ratios as well as greater limb symmetry indices on the hop for distance compared to patients with low quadriceps strength symmetry (P<0.05). Similarly, knee flexion angle and external moment symmetry was higher in the patients with high and moderate quadriceps symmetry compared to those with low symmetry (P<0.05). Quadriceps strength was found to be associated with sagittal plane knee angle and moment symmetry (P<0.05). Conclusion Patients with low quadriceps strength displayed greater movement asymmetries at the knee in the sagittal plane. Quadriceps strength was related to movement asymmetries and functional performance. Rehabilitation following ACL reconstruction needs to focus on maximizing quadriceps strength, which likely will lead to more symmetrical knee biomechanics. PMID:25883169

  5. Internal motions prime cIAP1 for rapid activation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Aaron H; Schoeffler, Allyn J; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M; Blankenship, John W; Zobel, Kerry; Giannetti, Anthony M; Dueber, Erin C; Fairbrother, Wayne J

    2014-12-01

    Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 1 (cIAP1) is a ubiquitin ligase with critical roles in the control of programmed cell death and NF-κB signaling. Under normal conditions, the protein exists as an autoinhibited monomer, but proapoptotic signals lead to its dimerization, activation and proteasomal degradation. This view of cIAP1 as a binary switch has been informed by static structural studies that cannot access the protein's dynamics. Here, we use NMR spectroscopy to study micro- and millisecond motions of specific domain interfaces in human cIAP1 and use time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering to observe the global conformational changes necessary for activation. Although motions within each interface of the 'closed' monomer are insufficient to activate cIAP1, they enable associations with catalytic partners and activation factors. We propose that these internal motions facilitate rapid peptide-induced opening and dimerization of cIAP1, which undergoes a dramatic spring-loaded structural transition. PMID:25383668

  6. Active motion induced break-up of colloidal gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szakasits, Megan; Solomon, Michael

    2015-03-01

    We found that fractal gel networks of polystyrene colloids can be broken up by active motion of Janus colloids that have been incorporated into them. Janus particles were synthesized by electron beam deposition of platinum onto one micron carboxylate modified polystyrene particles. Through addition of the divalent salt magnesium chloride, an initially stable suspension of Janus and polystyrene colloids, present in equal proportion, underwent aggregation to yield a fractal gel. The Janus colloids were activated by addition of 30% v/v hydrogen peroxide through a porous hydrogel membrane. Changes in structure and dynamics were visualized by two channel confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). By means of image analysis, we calculated the mean squared displacement (MSD) and radial distribution function (RDF) for gel samples before and after addition of hydrogen peroxide. The MSD confirmed the Janus particles we synthesized undergo active motion. The RDF and cluster size distribution of gel samples before and after addition of peroxide demonstrate how active motion broke apart the gel network into smaller clusters.

  7. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  8. Hybrid magnetic mechanism for active locomotion based on inchworm motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Hashi, Shuichiro; Ishiyama, Kazushi

    2013-02-01

    Magnetic robots have been studied in the past. Insect-type micro-robots are used in various biomedical applications; researchers have developed inchworm micro-robots for endoscopic use. A biological inchworm has a looping locomotion gait. However, most inchworm micro-robots depend on a general bending, or bellows, motion. In this paper, we introduce a new robotic mechanism using magnetic force and torque control in a rotating magnetic field for a looping gait. The proposed robot is controlled by the magnetic torque, attractive force, and body mechanisms (two stoppers, flexible body, and different frictional legs). The magnetic torque generates a general bending motion. In addition, the attractive force and body mechanisms produce the robot’s looping motion within a rotating magnetic field and without the use of an algorithm for field control. We verified the device’s performance and analyzed the motion through simulations and various experiments. The robot mechanism can be applied to active locomotion for various medical robots, such as wireless endoscopes.

  9. Motion Sensor Reactivity in Physically Active Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, Timothy K.; Dinger, Mary K.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether young adults changed their physical activity (PA) behavior when wearing motion sensors. PA patterns of 119 young adults (M age = 20.82 years, SD = 1.50, M body mass index = 23.93 kg/m[superscript 2] , SD = 4.05) were assessed during 2 consecutive weeks. In Week 1, participants wore an accelerometer.…

  10. Thermally activated depinning motion of contact lines in pseudopartial wetting.

    PubMed

    Du, Lingguo; Bodiguel, Hugues; Colin, Annie

    2014-07-01

    We investigate pressure-driven motion of liquid-liquid menisci in circular tubes, for systems in pseudopartial wetting conditions. The originality of this type of wetting lies in the coexistence of a macroscopic contact angle with a wetting liquid film covering the solid surface. Focusing on small capillary numbers, we report observations of an apparent contact angle hysteresis at first sight similar to the standard partial wetting case. However, this apparent hysteresis exhibits original features. We observe very long transient regimes before steady state, up to several hundreds of seconds. Furthermore, in steady state, the velocities are nonzero, meaning that the contact line is not strongly pinned to the surface defects, but are very small. The velocity of the contact line tends to vanish near the equilibrium contact angle. These observations are consistent with the thermally activated depinning theory that has been proposed to describe partial wetting systems on disordered substrates and suggest that a single physical mechanism controls both the hysteresis (or the pinning) and the motion of the contact line. The proposed analysis leads to the conclusion that the depinning activated energy is lower with pseudopartial wetting systems than with partial wetting ones, allowing the direct observation of the thermally activated motion of the contact line. PMID:25122310

  11. Motion Sensor Use for Physical Activity Data: Methodological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Margaret; Grey, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity continues to be a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and only one half of adults in the United States meet physical activity (PA) goals. PA data are often collected for surveillance or for measuring change after an intervention. One of the challenges in PA research is quantifying exactly how much and what type of PA is taking place—especially because self-report instruments have inconsistent validity. Objective The purpose is to review the elements to consider when collecting PA data via motion sensors, including the difference between PA and exercise; type of data to collect; choosing the device; length of time to monitor PA; instructions to the participants; and interpretation of the data. Methods The current literature on motion sensor research was reviewed and synthesized to summarize relevant considerations when using a motion sensor to collect PA data. Results Exercise is a division of PA that is structured, planned, and repetitive. Pedometer data includes steps taken, and calculated distance and energy expenditure. Accelerometer data includes activity counts and intensity. The device chosen depends on desired data, cost, validity, and ease of use. Reactivity to the device may influence the duration of data collection. Instructions to participants may vary depending on purpose of the study. Experts suggest pedometer data be reported as steps—since that is the direct output—and distance traveled and energy expenditure are estimated values. Accelerometer count data may be analyzed to provide information on time spent in moderate or vigorous activity. Discussion Thoughtful decision making about PA data collection using motion sensor devices is needed to advance nursing science. PMID:26126065

  12. In vivo healthy knee kinematics during dynamic full flexion.

    PubMed

    Hamai, Satoshi; Moro-oka, Taka-aki; Dunbar, Nicholas J; Miura, Hiromasa; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Banks, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Healthy knee kinematics during dynamic full flexion were evaluated using 3D-to-2D model registration techniques. Continuous knee motions were recorded during full flexion in a lunge from 85° to 150°. Medial and lateral tibiofemoral contacts and femoral internal-external and varus-valgus rotations were analyzed as a function of knee flexion angle. The medial tibiofemoral contact translated anteroposteriorly, but remained on the center of the medial compartment. On the other hand, the lateral tibiofemoral contact translated posteriorly to the edge of the tibial surface at 150° flexion. The femur exhibited external and valgus rotation relative to the tibia over the entire activity and reached 30° external and 5° valgus rotations at 150° flexion. Kinematics' data during dynamic full flexion may provide important insight as to the designing of high-flexion total knee prostheses.

  13. Reduced Maximal Force during Acute Anterior Knee Pain Is Associated with Deficits in Voluntary Muscle Activation

    PubMed Central

    Salomoni, Sauro; Tucker, Kylie; Hug, François; McPhee, Megan; Hodges, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Although maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force is reduced during pain, studies using interpolated twitch show no consistent reduction of voluntary muscle drive. The present study aimed to test if the reduction in MVC force during acute experimental pain could be explained by increased activation of antagonist muscles, weak voluntary activation at baseline, or changes in force direction. Twenty-two healthy volunteers performed maximal voluntary isometric knee extensions before, during, and after the effects of hypertonic (pain) and isotonic (control) saline injections into the infrapatellar fat pad. The MVC force, voluntary activation, electromyographic (EMG) activity of agonist, antagonist, and auxiliary (hip) muscles, and pain cognition and anxiety scores were recorded. MVC force was 9.3% lower during pain than baseline (p < 0.001), but there was no systematic change in voluntary activation. Reduced MVC force during pain was variable between participants (SD: 14%), and was correlated with reduced voluntary activation (r = 0.90), baseline voluntary activation (r = − 0.62), and reduced EMG amplitude of agonist and antagonist muscles (all r > 0.52), but not with changes in force direction, pain or anxiety scores. Hence, reduced MVC force during acute pain was mainly explained by deficits in maximal voluntary drive. PMID:27559737

  14. Knee cartilage segmentation using active shape models and local binary patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Germán.; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris

    2014-05-01

    Segmentation of knee cartilage has been useful for opportune diagnosis and treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). This paper presents a semiautomatic segmentation technique based on Active Shape Models (ASM) combined with Local Binary Patterns (LBP) and its approaches to describe the surrounding texture of femoral cartilage. The proposed technique is tested on a 16-image database of different patients and it is validated through Leave- One-Out method. We compare different segmentation techniques: ASM-LBP, ASM-medianLBP, and ASM proposed by Cootes. The ASM-LBP approaches are tested with different ratios to decide which of them describes the cartilage texture better. The results show that ASM-medianLBP has better performance than ASM-LBP and ASM. Furthermore, we add a routine which improves the robustness versus two principal problems: oversegmentation and initialization.

  15. Acute effects of blood flow restriction on muscle activity and endurance during fatiguing dynamic knee extensions at low load.

    PubMed

    Wernbom, Mathias; Järrebring, Rickard; Andreasson, Mikael A; Augustsson, Jesper

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activity and endurance during fatiguing low-intensity dynamic knee extension exercise with and without blood flow restriction. Eleven healthy subjects with strength training experience performed 3 sets of unilateral knee extensions with no relaxation between repetitions to concentric torque failure at 30% of the 1 repetition maximum. One leg was randomized to exercise with cuff occlusion and the other leg to exercise without occlusion. The muscle activity in the quadriceps was recorded with electromyography (EMG). Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and acute pain were collected immediately, and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) was rated before and at 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. The results demonstrated high EMG levels in both experimental conditions, but there were no significant differences regarding maximal muscle activity, except for a higher EMG in the eccentric phase in set 3 for the nonoccluded condition (p = 0.005). Significantly more repetitions were performed with the nonoccluded leg in every set (p < 0.05). The RPE and acute pain ratings were similar, but DOMS was higher in the nonoccluded leg (p < 0.05). We conclude that blood flow restriction during low-intensity dynamic knee extension decreases the endurance but does not increase the maximum muscle activity compared with training without restriction when both regimes are performed to failure. The high levels of muscle activity suggest that performing low-load dynamic knee extensions in a no-relaxation manner may be a useful method in knee rehabilitation settings when large forces are contraindicated. However, similarly to fatiguing blood flow restricted exercise, this method is associated with ischemic muscle pain, and thus its applications may be limited to highly motivated individuals.

  16. Autonomous Motion Learning for Intra-Vehicular Activity Space Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yutaka; Yairi, Takehisa; Machida, Kazuo

    Space robots will be needed in the future space missions. So far, many types of space robots have been developed, but in particular, Intra-Vehicular Activity (IVA) space robots that support human activities should be developed to reduce human-risks in space. In this paper, we study the motion learning method of an IVA space robot with the multi-link mechanism. The advantage point is that this space robot moves using reaction force of the multi-link mechanism and contact forces from the wall as space walking of an astronaut, not to use a propulsion. The control approach is determined based on a reinforcement learning with the actor-critic algorithm. We demonstrate to clear effectiveness of this approach using a 5-link space robot model by simulation. First, we simulate that a space robot learn the motion control including contact phase in two dimensional case. Next, we simulate that a space robot learn the motion control changing base attitude in three dimensional case.

  17. Partial knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... You will need to understand what surgery and recovery will be like. Partial knee arthroplasty may be a good choice if you have arthritis in only one side or part of the knee and: You are older, thin, and not very active. You do not ...

  18. Motion of Euglena gracilis: Active fluctuations and velocity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanczuk, P.; Romensky, M.; Scholz, D.; Lobaskin, V.; Schimansky-Geier, L.

    2015-07-01

    We study the velocity distribution of unicellular swimming algae Euglena gracilis using optical microscopy and active Brownian particle theory. To characterize a peculiar feature of the experimentally observed distribution at small velocities we use the concept of active fluctuations, which was recently proposed for the description of stochastically self-propelled particles [Romanczuk, P. and Schimansky-Geier, L., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 230601 (2011)]. In this concept, the fluctuating forces arise due to internal random performance of the propulsive motor. The fluctuating forces are directed in parallel to the heading direction, in which the propulsion acts. In the theory, we introduce the active motion via the depot model [Schweitzer, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80(23), 5044 (1998)]. We demonstrate that the theoretical predictions based on the depot model with active fluctuations are consistent with the experimentally observed velocity distributions. In addition to the model with additive active noise, we obtain theoretical results for a constant propulsion with multiplicative noise.

  19. Muscle Activation Differs between Three Different Knee Joint-Angle Positions during a Maximal Isometric Back Squat Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Jarbas da Silva, Josinaldo; Jon Schoenfeld, Brad; Nardi, Priscyla Silva Monteiro; Pecoraro, Silvio Luis; D'Andréa Greve, Julia Maria; Hartigan, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare muscle activation of the lower limb muscles when performing a maximal isometric back squat exercise over three different positions. Fifteen young, healthy, resistance-trained men performed an isometric back squat at three knee joint angles (20°, 90°, and 140°) in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion. Surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activation of the vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), semitendinosus (ST), and gluteus maximus (GM). In general, muscle activity was the highest at 90° for the three quadriceps muscles, yet differences in muscle activation between knee angles were muscle specific. Activity of the GM was significantly greater at 20° and 90° compared to 140°. The BF and ST displayed similar activation at all joint angles. In conclusion, knee position alters muscles activation of the quadriceps and gluteus maximus muscles. An isometric back squat at 90° generates the highest overall muscle activation, yet an isometric back squat at 140° generates the lowest overall muscle activation of the VL and GM only. PMID:27504484

  20. A COMPARISON OF TWO TAPING TECHNIQUES (KINESIO AND MCCONNELL) AND THEIR EFFECT ON ANTERIOR KNEE PAIN DURING FUNCTIONAL ACTIVITIES

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Jenie; Dmochowska, Katarzyna; Scariah, Shiju; Varughese, Jincy

    2013-01-01

    Background: Anterior knee pain is a clinical syndrome characterized by pain experienced perceived over the anterior aspect of the knee that can be aggravated by functional activities such as stair climbing and squatting. Two taping techniques commonly used for anterior knee pain in the clinic include the McConnell Taping Technique (MT) and the Kinesio Taping® Method (KT®). Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of KT® and the MT versus no tape in subjects with anterior knee pain during a squat lift and stair climbing. Design: Pretest‐ posttest design. Participants: A total of 20 subjects (15 female, 5 male) with unilateral anterior knee pain were recruited. The mean age of the subjects was 24 (+/–3) years, with a mean weight of 160 (+/–28) pounds. Methods: Each participant was tested during two functional activities; a squat lift with a weighted box (10% of his/her body weight, plus the weight [8.5 pounds] of the box) and stair climbing under three conditions: 1) no tape, 2) MT and 3) KT®. Pain levels were assessed (verbally) using the 0‐10 Numeric Pain Intensity Scale. Results: The median (interquartile range [IQR]) pain during squat lift was 2 (2.75) for no tape, 1 (1) for KT®, and 0.5 (2) for McConnell, with no significant differences between the groups. During the stair activity the median (IQR) pain was 1.5 (2.75) for no tape, 1 (1.75) for KT®, and 1 (1.75) for MT with a significant difference (p=0.024) between the groups. Further analysis determined that the only a significant difference was (p=0.034) between the no tape and the KT® conditions. Conclusion: The results of this study found that both the KT® and the MT may be effective in reducing pain during stair climbing activities. Level of Evidence: Level 2, Prospective Cohort study PMID:23593548

  1. Photothermally activated motion and ignition using aluminum nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Abboud, Jacques E.; Chong Xinyuan; Zhang Mingjun; Zhang Zhili; Jiang Naibo; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2013-01-14

    The aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs) are demonstrated to serve as active photothermal media, to enhance and control local photothermal energy deposition via the photothermal effect activated by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and amplified by Al NPs oxidation. The activation source is a 2-AA-battery-powered xenon flash lamp. The extent of the photothermally activated movement of Al NPs can be {approx}6 mm. Ignition delay can be {approx}0.1 ms. Both scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements of motion-only and after-ignition products confirm significant Al oxidation occurs through sintering and bursting after the flash exposure. Simulations suggest local heat generation is enhanced by LSPR. The positive-feedback effects from the local heat generation amplified by Al oxidation produce a large increase in local temperature and pressure, which enhances movement and accelerates ignition.

  2. Motion transition of active filaments: rotation without hydrodynamic interactions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2014-02-21

    We investigate the dynamics of an active semiflexible filament in a bead–rod model involving dynamically the hydrodynamic interaction (HI), active force, filament flexibility and viscous drag. We find that the filament can show three distinct types of motion, namely, translation, snaking and rotation, with the variation of the rigidity or active force. The transition from translation to snaking is continuous and mainly due to transverse instability, while the snaking–rotation transition is first-order like and shown to result from a type of symmetry breaking associated with the shape kinematics. Of particular interest, we find that HI is not necessary for the rotation or snaking motion, but can enlarge remarkably the parameter regions in which they can occur. Combining with local collisions, we show that, for the parameter region where HI is essential for the maintenance of rotation curvature of a single filament, HI is also essential for the emergence of collective vortexes. Thus, our findings provide new insights into the subtle role of HI in the formation of collective structures in active systems PMID:24983114

  3. Fusion of smartphone motion sensors for physical activity recognition.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2014-06-10

    For physical activity recognition, smartphone sensors, such as an accelerometer and a gyroscope, are being utilized in many research studies. So far, particularly, the accelerometer has been extensively studied. In a few recent studies, a combination of a gyroscope, a magnetometer (in a supporting role) and an accelerometer (in a lead role) has been used with the aim to improve the recognition performance. How and when are various motion sensors, which are available on a smartphone, best used for better recognition performance, either individually or in combination? This is yet to be explored. In order to investigate this question, in this paper, we explore how these various motion sensors behave in different situations in the activity recognition process. For this purpose, we designed a data collection experiment where ten participants performed seven different activities carrying smart phones at different positions. Based on the analysis of this data set, we show that these sensors, except the magnetometer, are each capable of taking the lead roles individually, depending on the type of activity being recognized, the body position, the used data features and the classification method employed (personalized or generalized). We also show that their combination only improves the overall recognition performance when their individual performances are not very high, so that there is room for performance improvement. We have made our data set and our data collection application publicly available, thereby making our experiments reproducible.

  4. Assessing the Relative Contributions of Active Ankle and Knee Assistance to the Walking Mechanics of Transfemoral Amputees Using a Powered Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Ann M.; Hargrove, Levi J.

    2016-01-01

    Powered knee-ankle prostheses are capable of providing net-positive mechanical energy to amputees. Yet, there are limitless ways to deliver this energy throughout the gait cycle. It remains largely unknown how different combinations of active knee and ankle assistance affect the walking mechanics of transfemoral amputees. This study assessed the relative contributions of stance phase knee swing initiation, increasing ankle stiffness and powered plantarflexion as three unilateral transfemoral amputees walked overground at their self-selected walking speed. Five combinations of knee and ankle conditions were evaluated regarding the kinematics and kinetics of the amputated and intact legs using repeated measures analyses of variance. We found eliminating active knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion was linked to increased compensations of the ipsilateral hip joint during the subsequent swing phase. The elimination of knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion also led to reduced braking ground reaction forces of the amputated and intact legs, and influenced both sagittal and frontal plane loading of the intact knee joint. Gradually increasing prosthetic ankle stiffness influenced the shape of the prosthetic ankle plantarflexion moment, more closely mirroring the intact ankle moment. Increasing ankle stiffness also corresponded to increased prosthetic ankle power generation (despite a similar maximum stiffness value across conditions) and increased braking ground reaction forces of the amputated leg. These findings further our understanding of how to deliver assistance with powered knee-ankle prostheses and the compensations that occur when specific aspects of assistance are added/removed. PMID:26807889

  5. Assessing the Relative Contributions of Active Ankle and Knee Assistance to the Walking Mechanics of Transfemoral Amputees Using a Powered Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Ingraham, Kimberly A; Fey, Nicholas P; Simon, Ann M; Hargrove, Levi J

    2016-01-01

    Powered knee-ankle prostheses are capable of providing net-positive mechanical energy to amputees. Yet, there are limitless ways to deliver this energy throughout the gait cycle. It remains largely unknown how different combinations of active knee and ankle assistance affect the walking mechanics of transfemoral amputees. This study assessed the relative contributions of stance phase knee swing initiation, increasing ankle stiffness and powered plantarflexion as three unilateral transfemoral amputees walked overground at their self-selected walking speed. Five combinations of knee and ankle conditions were evaluated regarding the kinematics and kinetics of the amputated and intact legs using repeated measures analyses of variance. We found eliminating active knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion was linked to increased compensations of the ipsilateral hip joint during the subsequent swing phase. The elimination of knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion also led to reduced braking ground reaction forces of the amputated and intact legs, and influenced both sagittal and frontal plane loading of the intact knee joint. Gradually increasing prosthetic ankle stiffness influenced the shape of the prosthetic ankle plantarflexion moment, more closely mirroring the intact ankle moment. Increasing ankle stiffness also corresponded to increased prosthetic ankle power generation (despite a similar maximum stiffness value across conditions) and increased braking ground reaction forces of the amputated leg. These findings further our understanding of how to deliver assistance with powered knee-ankle prostheses and the compensations that occur when specific aspects of assistance are added/removed.

  6. Comparison of Recovery Strategies on Maximal Force-Generating Capacity and Electromyographic Activity Level of the Knee Extensor Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Zarrouk, Nidhal; Rebai, Haithem; Yahia, Abdelmoneem; Souissi, Nizar; Hug, François; Dogui, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Context: With regard to intermittent training exercise, the effects of the mode of recovery on subsequent performance are equivocal. Objective: To compare the effects of 3 types of recovery intervention on peak torque (PT) and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the knee extensor muscles after fatiguing isokinetic intermittent concentric exercise. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Eight elite judo players (age = 18.4 ± 1.4 years, height = 180 ± 3 cm, mass = 77.0 ± 4.2 kg). Interventions : Participants completed 3 randomized sessions within 7 days. Each session consisted of 5 sets of 10 concentric knee extensions at 80% PT at 120°/s, with 3 minutes of recovery between sets. Recovery interventions were passive, active, and electromyostimulation. The PT and maximal EMG activity were recorded simultaneously while participants performed isokinetic dynamometer trials before and 3 minutes after the resistance exercise. Main Outcome Measure(s): The PT and maximal EMG activity from the knee extensors were quantified at isokinetic velocities of 60°/s, 120°/s, and 180°/s, with 5 repetitions at each velocity. Results: The reduction in PT observed after electromyo-stimulation was less than that seen after passive (P < .001) or active recovery (P < .001). The reduction in PT was less after passive recovery than after active recovery (P < .001). The maximal EMG activity level observed after electromyostimulation was higher than that seen after active recovery (P < .05). Conclusions: Electromyostimulation was an effective recovery tool in decreasing neuromuscular fatigue after high-intensity, intermittent isokinetic concentric exercise for the knee extensor muscles. Also, active recovery induced the greatest amount of neuromuscular fatigue. PMID:21944070

  7. [Exercise therapy in hip or knee osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Dekker, Joost; Peter, Wilfred; van der Leeden, Marike; Lems, Willem F

    2011-01-01

    "Exercise is medicine": exercise therapy reduces pain and activity limitations in osteoarthritis of the knee and is likely to have the same effects in osteoarthritis of the hip. Further research into exercise therapy is needed, since disease-modifying drugs are not available, pain medication can cause side effects, and surgical interventions are preferably applied in an advanced stage of disease. Classical exercise therapy is aimed at improving muscle strength, aerobic capacity, range of joint motion, and training of walking and activities of daily living. New modalities of targeted exercise therapy are currently being developed, aimed at the correction of low levels of activity and to correct instability of the knee. Weight loss, preferably combined with exercise therapy, reduces pain and activity limitations in osteoarthritis patients who are overweight. Modalities of exercise therapy adapted to comorbid conditions are currently being developed.

  8. Validity of physical activity measures in individuals after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Gustavo J.; Wert, David M.; Brower, Kelly S.; Piva, Sara R.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the concurrent criterion-related validity of two activity monitors in comparison to the criterion method of indirect calorimetry in older adults after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). DESIGN Validation study. SETTING Subjects completed 9 increasingly demanding daily activities in a research laboratory; each activity was performed for 7 minutes, for a total of 80-minutes while the activity monitors and criterion method were used concurrently. PARTICIPANTS Twenty-one subjects, 67% female, mean age 68±7 years old, and BMI 29±4. INTERVENTIONS not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Energy expenditure (EE) in kcal/min measured by accelerometer-based and multisensor-based monitors, and the criterion method. Validity was assessed by paired t-test, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), and Bland-Altman plots comparing the measurements from the activity monitors to the criterion method. RESULTS Measurements from the accelerometer-based monitor were significantly lower than those of the criterion method across all walking and non-walking activities. The underestimations ranged from 40% to 100%. The accelerometer-based monitor demonstrated small to moderate agreement compared to the criterion method (ICCs from 0 to 0.38). Measurements from the multisensor-based monitor were significantly lower than the criterion method during several non-walking activities; yet, the differences were minor (2% to 19%). Measurements from the multisensor-based monitor during walking activities were not different compared to the criterion method. The multisensor-based monitor demonstrated moderate to excellent agreement with the criterion method (ICCs from 0.48 to 0.81). CONCLUSION The multisensor-based monitor showed better criterion-related validity than the accelerometer-based monitor, and should be considered as a tool to measure physical activity in individuals after TKA. PMID:25450127

  9. Association of physical activity measured by accelerometer, knee joint abnormalities and cartilage T2-measurements obtained from 3T MRI: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, M.; Lin, W.; Nardo, L.; Joseph, G. B.; Dunlop, D. D.; Heilmeier, U.; Nevitt, M. C.; Alizai, H.; McCulloch, C. E.; Lynch, J. A.; Link, T. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the cross-sectional association between physical activity measured with an accelerometer, structural knee abnormalities and cartilage T2-values assessed with 3T MRI. Methods We included 274 subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative cohort without definite radiographic osteoarthritis (KL 0 and 1) and at most mild pain, stiffness and functional limitation in the study knee (WOMAC 0–1), which had not limited their activity due to knee pain. Physical activity was measured over seven days with an ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer. Subjects were categorized by quartile of physical activity based on the average daily minutes of moderate/vigorous activity (mv-PA). MR images of the right knee (at 48-months visit) were assessed for structural abnormalities using a modified WORMS score and for T2-relaxation times derived from segmented cartilage of 4 femorotibial regions and the patella. WORMS-grades and T2-measurements were compared between activity quartiles using a linear regression model. Covariates included age, sex, BMI, knee injury, family history of knee replacement, knee symptoms, hip and ankle pain and daily wear time of the accelerometer. Results Higher mv-PA was associated with increased severity (p=0.0087) and number of lesions of the medial meniscus (p=0.0089) and severity of bone marrow edema lesions (p=0.0053). No association between cartilage lesions and mv-PA was found. T2-values of cartilage (loss, damage, abnormalities) tended to be greater in the higher quartiles of mv-PA, but the differences were non-significant. Conclusion In knees without radiographic osteoarthritis in subjects with no or mild knee pain, higher physical activity levels were associated with increases in meniscal and BMEP lesions. PMID:25777255

  10. Knee flexor strength and bicep femoris electromyographical activity is lower in previously strained hamstrings.

    PubMed

    Opar, David A; Williams, Morgan D; Timmins, Ryan G; Dear, Nuala M; Shield, Anthony J

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if athletes with a history of hamstring strain injury display lower levels of surface EMG (sEMG) activity and median power frequency in the previously injured hamstring muscle during maximal voluntary contractions. Recreational athletes were recruited, 13 with a history of unilateral hamstring strain injury and 15 without prior injury. All athletes undertook isokinetic dynamometry testing of the knee flexors and sEMG assessment of the biceps femoris long head (BF) and medial hamstrings (MHs) during concentric and eccentric contractions at ±180 and ±60°s(-1). The knee flexors on the previously injured limb were weaker at all contraction speeds compared to the uninjured limb (+180°s(-1)p=0.0036; +60°s(-1)p=0.0013; -60°s(-1)p=0.0007; -180°s(-1)p=0.0007) whilst sEMG activity was only lower in the BF during eccentric contractions (-60°s(-1)p=0.0025; -180°s(-1)p=0.0003). There were no between limb differences in MH sEMG activity or median power frequency from either BF or MH in the injured group. The uninjured group showed no between limb differences in any of the tested variables. Secondary analysis comparing the between limb difference in the injured and the uninjured groups, confirmed that previously injured hamstrings were mostly weaker (+180°s(-1)p=0.2208; +60°s(-1)p=0.0379; -60°(-1)p=0.0312; -180°s(-1)p=0.0110) and that deficits in sEMG were confined to the BF during eccentric contractions (-60°s(-1)p=0.0542; -180°s(-1)p=0.0473). Previously injured hamstrings were weaker and BF sEMG activity was lower than the contralateral uninjured hamstring. This has implications for hamstring strain injury prevention and rehabilitation which should consider altered neural function following hamstring strain injury.

  11. Crew activity and motion effects on the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochon, Brian V.; Scheer, Steven A.

    1987-01-01

    Among the significant sources of internal disturbances that must be considered in the design of space station vibration control systems are the loads induced on the structure from various crew activities. Flight experiment T013, flown on the second manned mission of Skylab, measured force and moment time histories for a range of preplanned crew motions and activities. This experiment has proved itself invaluable as a source of on-orbit crew induced loads that has allowed a space station forcing function data base to be built. This will enable forced response such as acceleration and deflections, attributable to crew activity, to be calculated. The flight experiment, resultant database and structural model pre-processor, analysis examples and areas of combined research shall be described.

  12. Biological activity and migration of wear particles in the knee joint: an in vivo comparison of six different polyethylene materials.

    PubMed

    Utzschneider, S; Lorber, V; Dedic, M; Paulus, A C; Schröder, C; Gottschalk, O; Schmitt-Sody, M; Jansson, V

    2014-06-01

    Wear of polyethylene causes loosening of joint prostheses because of the particle mediated activity of the host tissue. It was hypothesized that conventional and crosslinked polyethylene particles lead to similar biological effects around the knee joint in vivo as well as to a similar particle distribution in the surrounding tissues. To verify these hypotheses, particle suspensions of six different polyethylene materials were injected into knee joints of Balb/C mice and intravital microscopic, histological and immunohistochemical evaluations were done after 1 week. Whereas the biological effects on the synovial layer and the subchondral bone of femur and tibia were similar for all the polyethylenes, two crosslinked materials showed an elevated cytokine expression in the articular cartilage. Furthermore, the distribution of particles around the joint was dependent on the injected polyethylene material. Those crosslinked particles, which remained mainly in the joint space, showed an increased expression of TNF-alpha in articular cartilage. The data of this study support the use of crosslinked polyethylene in total knee arthroplasty. In contrast, the presence of certain crosslinked wear particles in the joint space can lead to an elevated inflammatory reaction in the remaining cartilage, which challenges the potential use of those crosslinked polyethylenes for unicondylar knee prostheses.

  13. Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sprains A sprain means you've stretched or torn a ligament. Common knee sprains usually involve damage ... A strain means you've partly or completely torn a muscle or tendon. With knee strains, you ...

  14. The effect of total knee arthroplasty on knee joint kinematics and kinetics during gait.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Gillian L; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L; Astephen Wilson, Janie L; Dunbar, Michael J

    2011-02-01

    This study determined how total knee arthroplasty (TKA) altered knee motion and loading during gait. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic gait patterns of 42 patients with severe knee osteoarthritis were collected 1 week prior and 1-year post-TKA. Principal component analysis extracted major patterns of variability in the gait waveforms. Overall and midstance knee adduction moment magnitude decreased. Overall knee flexion angle magnitude increased due to an increase during swing. Increases in the early stance knee flexion moment and late stance knee extension moment were found, indicating improved impact attenuation and function. A decrease in the early stance knee external rotation moment indicated alteration in the typical rotation mechanism. Most changes moved toward an asymptomatic pattern and would be considered improvements in motion, function, and loading.

  15. Active Motion Control of Tetrahymena pyriformis by Galvanotaxis and Geotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Byun, Doyoung; Kim, Min Jun

    2013-11-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in the swimming behavior of microorganisms and biologically inspired micro-robots. These microorganisms naturally accompanied by complex motions. Therefore it is important to understand the flow characteristics as well as control mechanisms. One of eukaryotic cells, the protozoa are a diverse group of unicellular organisms, many of which are motile cilia. Motile cilia are cover on the surface of cell in large numbers and beat in oriented waves. Sequential beating motions of a single cilium form metachronal strokes, producing a propagation wave, and therefore the body is achieved propulsion force. So preliminary studies are achieved to understand the flow induced by swimming microorganisms. Based on hydrodynamic results, the follow study of a few micro-scale protozoa cell, such as the Tetrahymena pyriformis, has provided active or passive control into several external stimuli. In typical control methods, the galvanotaxis and geotaxis were adopted active and passive control, respectively. The validation of galvanotaxis is used DC and AC voltage. In terms of geotaxis, corrugated microstructures were used to control in the microchannel. This research was supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MEST, 2011-0016461), National Science Foundation (NSF) CMMI Control Systems Program (#1000255) and Army Research Office (W911NF-11-1-0490).

  16. Thigh-calf contact: does it affect the loading of the knee in the high-flexion range?

    PubMed

    Zelle, J; Barink, M; De Waal Malefijt, M; Verdonschot, N

    2009-03-26

    Recently, high-flexion knee implants have been developed to provide for a large range of motion (ROM>120 degrees ) after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Since knee forces typically increase with larger flexion angles, it is commonly assumed that high-flexion knee implants are subjected to larger loads than conventional knee implants. However, most high-flexion studies do not consider thigh-calf contact which occurs during high-flexion activities such as squatting and kneeling. In this study, we hypothesized that thigh-calf contact reduces the knee forces during deep knee flexion as the tibio-femoral load shifts from occurring inside the knee towards the thigh-calf contact interface. Hence, the effect of thigh-calf contact on the knee loading was evaluated using a free body diagram and a finite element model and both the knee forces and polyethylene stresses were analyzed. Thigh-calf contact force characteristics from an earlier study were included and a squatting movement was simulated. In general, we found thigh-calf contact considerably reduced both the knee forces and polyethylene stresses during deep knee flexion. At maximal flexion (155 degrees ), the compressive knee force decreased from 4.89 to 2.90 times the bodyweight (BW) in case thigh-calf contact was included and the polyethylene contact stress at the tibial post decreased from 49.3 to 28.1MPa. Additionally, there was a clear correlation between a subject's thigh and calf circumference and the force reduction at maximal flexion due to thigh-calf contact (R=0.89). The findings presented in this study can be used to optimize the mechanical behavior of high-flexion total knee arthroplasty designs. PMID:19200996

  17. Coupling of active motion and advection shapes intracellular cargo transport.

    PubMed

    Khuc Trong, Philipp; Guck, Jochen; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2012-07-13

    Intracellular cargo transport can arise from passive diffusion, active motor-driven transport along cytoskeletal filament networks, and passive advection by fluid flows entrained by such cargo-motor motion. Active and advective transport are thus intrinsically coupled as related, yet different representations of the same underlying network structure. A reaction-advection-diffusion system is used here to show that this coupling affects the transport and localization of a passive tracer in a confined geometry. For sufficiently low diffusion, cargo localization to a target zone is optimized either by low reaction kinetics and decoupling of bound and unbound states, or by a mostly disordered cytoskeletal network with only weak directional bias. These generic results may help to rationalize subtle features of cytoskeletal networks, for example as observed for microtubules in fly oocytes.

  18. Documenting Western Burrowing Owl Reproduction and Activity Patterns Using Motion-Activated Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Derek B.; Greger, Paul D.

    2014-08-01

    We used motion-activated cameras to monitor the reproduction and patterns of activity of the Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) above ground at 45 burrows in south-central Nevada during the breeding seasons of 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2005. The 37 broods, encompassing 180 young, raised over the four years represented an average of 4.9 young per successful breeding pair. Young and adult owls were detected at the burrow entrance at all times of the day and night, but adults were detected more frequently during afternoon/early evening than were young. Motion-activated cameras require less effort to implement than other techniques. Limitations include photographing only a small percentage of owl activity at the burrow; not detecting the actual number of eggs, young, or number fledged; and not being able to track individual owls over time. Further work is also necessary to compare the accuracy of productivity estimates generated from motion-activated cameras with other techniques.

  19. The influences of impact interface, muscle activity, and knee angle on impact forces and tibial and femoral accelerations occurring after external impacts.

    PubMed

    Potthast, Wolfgang; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Lundberg, Arne; Arndt, Anton

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify relative contributions of impact interface, muscle activity, and knee angle to the magnitudes of tibial and femoral accelerations occurring after external impacts. Impacts were initiated with a pneumatically driven impacter under the heels of four volunteers. Impact forces were quantified with a force sensor. Segmental accelerations were measured with bone mounted accelerometers. Experimental interventions were hard and soft shock interfaces, different knee angles (0 degrees, 20 degrees, 40 degrees knee flexion), and muscular preactivation (0%, 30%, 60% of maximal voluntary contraction) of gastrocnemii, hamstrings, and quadriceps. Greater knee flexion led to lower impact forces and higher tibial accelerations. Increased muscular activation led to higher forces and lower tibial accelerations. The softer of the two shock interfaces under study reduced both parameters. The effects on accelerations and forces through the activation and knee angle changes were greater than the effect of interface variations. The hardness of the two shock interfaces explained less than 10% of the variance of accelerations and impact forces, whereas knee angle changes explained 25-29%, and preactivation changes explained 35-48% of the variances. It can be concluded that muscle force and knee joint angle have greater effects in comparison with interface hardness on the severity of shocks on the lower leg.

  20. Prosthetic knee design by simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K; Hollister, A

    1999-07-30

    Although 150,000 total knee replacement surgeries are performed annually in North America, current designs of knee prostheses have mechanical problems that include a limited range of motion, abnormal gait patterns, patellofemoral joint dysfunction, implant loosening or subsidence, and excessive wear. These problems fall into three categories: failure to reproduce normal joint kinematics, which results in altered limb function; bone-implant interface failure; and material failure. Modern computer technology can be used to design, prototype, and test new total knee implants. The design team uses the full range of CAD-CAM to design and produce implant prototypes for mechanical and clinical testing. Closer approximation of natural knee kinematics and kinetics is essential for improved patient function and diminished implant loads. Current knee replacement designs are based on 19th Century theories that the knee moves about a variable axis of rotation. Recent research has shown, however, that knee motion occurs about two fixed, offset axes of rotation. These aces are not perpendicular to the long axes of the bones or to each other, and the axes do not intersect. Bearing surfaces of mechanisms that move about axes of rotation are surfaces of revolution of those axes which advanced CAD technology can produce. Solids with surfaces of revolution for the two axes of rotation for the knee have been made using an HP9000 workstation and Structural Ideas Master Series CAD software at ArthroMotion. The implant's CAD model should closely replicate movements of the normal knee. The knee model will have a range of flexion-extension (FE) from -5 to 120 degrees. Movements include varus, valgus, internal and external rotation, as well as flexion and extension. The patellofemoral joint is aligned perpendicular to the FE axis and replicates the natural joint more closely than those of existing prostheses. The bearing surfaces will be more congruent than current designs and should

  1. Quantifying thigh muscle co-activation during isometric knee extension contractions: within- and between-session reliability.

    PubMed

    Katsavelis, Dimitrios; Threlkeld, A Joseph

    2014-08-01

    Muscle co-activation around the knee is important during ambulation and balance. The wide range of methodological approaches for the quantification of co-activation index (CI) makes comparisons across studies and populations difficult. The present study determined within- and between-session reliability of different methodological approaches for the quantification of the CI of the knee extensor and flexor muscles during maximum voluntary isometric contractions (MVICs). Eight healthy volunteers participated in two repeated testing sessions. A series of knee extension MVICs of the dominant leg with concomitant torque and electromyographic (EMG) recordings were captured. CI was calculated utilizing different analytical approaches. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) showed that within-session measures displayed higher reliability (ICC>0.861) and lower variability (Coefficient of variation; CV<21.8%) than between-session measures (ICC<0.645; CV>24.2%). A selection of a 500ms or larger window of RMS EMG activity around the PT delivered more reliable and less variable results than other approaches. Our findings suggest that the CI can provide a reliable measure for comparisons among conditions and is best utilized for within-session experimental designs.

  2. Within- and between-session reliability of the maximal voluntary knee extension torque and activation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jihong; Hopkins, J Ty

    2013-01-01

    A ratio between the torque generated by maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) and exogenous electrical stimulus, central activation ratio (CAR), has been widely used to assess quadriceps function. To date, no data exist regarding between-session reliability of this measurement. Thirteen neurologically sound volunteers underwent three testing sessions (three trials per session) with 48 hours between-session. Subjects performed MVICs of the quadriceps with the knee locked at 90° flexion and the hip at 85°. Once the MVIC reached a plateau, an electrical stimulation from superimposed burst technique (SIB: 125 V with peak output current 450 mA) was manually delivered and transmitted directly to the quadriceps via stimulating electrodes. CAR was calculated by using the following equation: CAR = MVIC torque/MVIC + SIB torque. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated within- (ICC((2,1))) and between-session (ICC((2,k))) for MVIC torques and CAR values. Our data show that quadriceps MVIC and CAR are very reliable both within- (ICC((2,1)) = 0.99 for MVIC; 0.94 for CAR) and between-measurement sessions (ICC((2,k)) = 0.92 for MVIC; 0.86 for CAR) in healthy young adults. For clinical research, more data of the patients with pathological conditions are required to ensure reproducibility of calculation of CAR.

  3. The use of the greater trochanter marker in the thigh segment model: implications for hip and knee frontal and transverse plane motion

    PubMed Central

    Graci, Valentina; Salsich, Gretchen

    2015-01-01

    Background The greater trochanter marker is commonly used in 3-dimensional models; however, its influence on hip and knee kinematics during gait is unclear. Understanding the influence of the greater trochanter marker is important when quantifying frontal and transverse plane hip and knee kinematics, parameters which are particularly relevant to investigate in individuals with conditions such as patellofemoral pain, knee osteoarthritis, ACL injury and hip pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of including the greater trochanter in the construction of the thigh segment on hip and knee kinematics during gait. Methods Three-dimensional kinematics were collected in 19 healthy subjects during walking using a surface marker system. Hip and knee angles were compared across two thigh segment definitions (with and without greater trochanter) at two time points during stance: peak knee flexion (PKF) and minimum knee flexion (MinKF). Results Hip and knee angles differed in magnitude and direction in the transverse plane at both time points. In the thigh model with the greater trochanter the hip was more externally rotated than in the thigh model without the greater trochanter, (PKF −9.34°±5.21° vs 1.40°±5.22°, MinKF −5.68°±4.24° vs 5.01°±4.86°, p<0.001). In the thigh model with the greater trochanter, the knee angle was more internally rotated compared to the knee angle calculated using the thigh definition without the greater trochanter (PKF 14.67°±6.78° vs 4.33°±4.18°, MinKF 10.54°±6.71° vs −0.01°±2.69°, p<.001). Small but significant differences were detected in the sagittal and frontal plane angles at both time points (p<.001). Conclusion Hip and knee kinematics differed across different segment definitions including or excluding the greater trochanter marker, especially in the transverse plane. Therefore when considering whether to include the greater trochanter in the thigh segment model when using a surface markers to

  4. Unwinding motion of a twisted active region filament

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Kong, D. F.; Liu, J. H.; Xu, C. L.

    2014-12-10

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.

  5. Alterations in lower limb multimuscle activation patterns during stair climbing in female total knee arthroplasty patients

    PubMed Central

    von Tscharner, V.; Hutchison, C.; Ronsky, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients commonly experience neuromuscular adaptations that may affect stair climbing competence. This study identified multimuscle pattern (MMP) changes in postoperative female TKA patients during stair climbing with a support vector machine (SVM). It was hypothesized that TKA patients adopt temporal and spectral muscle activation characteristics indicative of muscle atrophy and cocontraction strategies. Nineteen female subjects [10 unilateral sex-specific TKAs, 62.2 ± 8.6 yr, body mass index (BMI) 28.2 ± 5.4 kg/m2; 9 healthy control subjects, 61.4 ± 7.4 yr, BMI 25.6 ± 2.4 kg/m2] were recruited. Surface electromyograms (EMGs) were obtained for seven lower limb muscles of the affected limb of TKA subjects and a randomly assigned limb for control subjects during stair climbing. Stance phase (±30%) EMG data were wavelet transformed and normalized to total power. Data across all muscles were combined to form MMPs and analyzed with a SVM. Statistical analysis was performed with binomial tests, independent group t-tests, or independent group Mann-Whitney U-tests in SPSS (P < 0.05). SVM results indicated significantly altered muscle activation patterns in the TKA group for biceps femoris (recognition rate 84.2%), semitendinosus (recognition rate 73.7%), gastrocnemius (recognition rate 68.4%), and tibialis anterior (recognition rate 68.4%). Further analysis identified no significant differences in spectral activation characteristics between groups. Temporal adaptations, indicative of cocontraction strategies, were, however, evident in TKA MMPs. This approach may provide a valuable tool for clinical neuromuscular function assessment and rehabilitation monitoring. PMID:26354313

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF CORE MUSCULATURE ENGAGEMENT ON HIP AND KNEE KINEMATICS IN WOMEN DURING A SINGLE LEG SQUAT

    PubMed Central

    Shirey, Matthew; Hurlbutt, Matthew; Johansen, Nicole; King, Gregory W.; Wilkinson, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Excessive frontal plane motion and valgus torques have been linked to knee injuries, particularly in women. Studies have investigated the role of lower extremity musculature, yet few have studied the activation of trunk or “core” musculature on hip and knee kinematics. Therefore, this study evaluated the influence of intentional core engagement on hip and knee kinematics during a single leg squat. Methods: Participants (n = 14) performed a single leg squat from a 6 inch step under 2 conditions: core intentionally engaged (CORE) and no intentional core engagement (NOCORE). Participants were also evaluated for core activation ability using Sahrmann's model, and the resulting scores were used to divide participants into low (LOWCORE) and high scoring (HIGHCORE) groups. All trials were captured using 3-D motion analysis, and data were normalized for height and time. Paired t-tests and repeated measures, mixed model MANOVAs were used to assess condition and group differences. Results: The CORE condition, compared to NOCORE, was characterized by smaller right [t(13) = 3.03, p = .01] and left [t(13) = 3.04, p = .01] hip frontal plane displacement and larger knee flexion range of motion [t(13) = 3.08, p = .009]. Subsequent MANOVAs and follow-up analyses revealed that: (1) the CORE condition demonstrated smaller right and left hip medial-lateral displacement in the LOWCORE group (p = .001), but not in the HIGHCORE group; (2) the CORE condition showed larger overall knee flexion range of motion across LOWCORE and HIGHCORE groups (p = .021); and (3) the HIGHCORE group exhibited less knee varus range of motion across CORE and NOCORE conditions (p = .028). Conclusions: Intentional core activation influenced hip and knee kinematics during single leg squats, with greater positive effect noted in the LOWCORE group. These findings may have implications for preventing and rehabilitating knee injuries among women. Level of Evidence: 2B, Cohort laboratory study

  7. Heat generated by knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, James W

    2006-01-01

    Temperature sensors were placed in 50 knees in 25 patients who had one or both joints replaced. Temperature recordings were made before walking, after walking, and after cycling. The heat generated in healthy, arthritic, and replaced knees was measured. The knee replacements were done using eight different prostheses. A rotating hinge knee prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 7 degrees C in 20 minutes and 9 degrees C in 40 minutes. An unconstrained ceramic femoral prosthesis articulating with a polyethylene tibial prosthesis generated a temperature increase of 4 degrees C compared with a healthy resting knee. The other designs using a cobalt-chrome alloy and high-density polyethylene had temperature increases of 5 degrees-7 degrees C with exercise. Frictional heat generated in a prosthetic knee is not immediately dissipated and may result in wear, creep, and other degenerative processes in the high-density polyethylene. Extended periods of elevated temperature in joints may inhibit cell growth and perhaps contribute to adverse performance via bone resorption or component loosening. Prosthetic knees generate more heat with activity than healthy or arthritic knees. More-constrained knee prostheses generate more heat than less-constrained prostheses. A knee with a ceramic femoral component generates less heat than a knee with the same design using a cobalt-chromium alloy. PMID:16394760

  8. Effects of Patellar Taping on Brain Activity During Knee Joint Proprioception Tests Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    McKie, Shane; Richardson, Paul; Oldham, Jacqueline A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Patellar taping is a common treatment modality for physical therapists managing patellofemoral pain. However, the mechanisms of action remain unclear, with much debate as to whether its efficacy is due to a change in patellar alignment or an alteration in sensory input. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the sensory input hypothesis using functional magnetic resonance imaging when taping was applied to the knee joint during a proprioception task. Design This was an observational study with patellar taping intervention. Methods Eight male volunteers who were healthy and right-leg dominant participated in a motor block design study. Each participant performed 2 right knee extension repetitive movement tasks: one simple and one proprioceptive. These tasks were performed with and without patellar taping and were auditorally paced for 400 seconds at 72 beats/min (1.2 Hz). Results The proprioception task without patellar taping caused a positive blood oxygenation level–dependant (BOLD) response bilaterally in the medial supplementary motor area, the cingulate motor area, the basal ganglion, and the thalamus and medial primary sensory motor cortex. For the proprioception task with patellar taping, there was a decreased BOLD response in these regions. In the lateral primary sensory cortex, there was a negative BOLD response with less activity for the proprioception task with taping. Limitations This study may have been limited by the small sample size, a possible learning effect due to a nonrandom order of tasks, and use of a single-joint knee extension task. Conclusions This study demonstrated that patellar taping modulates brain activity in several areas of the brain during a proprioception knee movement task. PMID:22282771

  9. Effect of two different kinesio taping techniques on knee kinematics and kinetics in young females

    PubMed Central

    Guner, Senem; Alsancak, Serap; Koz, Mitat

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The application of kinesio taping may improve strength and performance, inhibit and facilitate motor activity, and increase range of motion. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of kinesio taping facilitation and inhibition applications on spatiotemporal knee kinematics and kinetics during walking activity in healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] A three-dimensional quantitative gait evaluation was performed without tape and with, facilitation and inhibition kinesio taping application on the knee. Sixteen healthy female college students (age, 19.7 ± 0.4 years; height, 1.64 ± 3.4 cm; body mass, 51.5 ± 4.8 kg) participated in the study. [Results] Spatiotemporal parameters (cadence, walking speed, stride length) were significantly different among the trials. Knee joint sagittal plane range of motion was not different with either kinesio taping application. Knee external flexion moment during the early stance phase decreased significantly with facilitation kinesio taping and increased with the inhibition kinesio taping. Knee external extension moment during the mid-stance phase increased with facilitation kinesio taping. Knee power parameters, eccentric activity in the rectus femoris during the pre-swing phase was significantly increased with inhibition kinesio taping application, while eccentric activity of the hamstrings during the terminal swing of gait was decreased. [Conclusion] These findings showed that facilitation kinesio taping application affected the terminal stance phase and that inhibition kinesio taping influenced the terminal swing phase compared with the no tape condition. PMID:26644651

  10. Effect of two different kinesio taping techniques on knee kinematics and kinetics in young females.

    PubMed

    Guner, Senem; Alsancak, Serap; Koz, Mitat

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The application of kinesio taping may improve strength and performance, inhibit and facilitate motor activity, and increase range of motion. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of kinesio taping facilitation and inhibition applications on spatiotemporal knee kinematics and kinetics during walking activity in healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] A three-dimensional quantitative gait evaluation was performed without tape and with, facilitation and inhibition kinesio taping application on the knee. Sixteen healthy female college students (age, 19.7 ± 0.4 years; height, 1.64 ± 3.4 cm; body mass, 51.5 ± 4.8 kg) participated in the study. [Results] Spatiotemporal parameters (cadence, walking speed, stride length) were significantly different among the trials. Knee joint sagittal plane range of motion was not different with either kinesio taping application. Knee external flexion moment during the early stance phase decreased significantly with facilitation kinesio taping and increased with the inhibition kinesio taping. Knee external extension moment during the mid-stance phase increased with facilitation kinesio taping. Knee power parameters, eccentric activity in the rectus femoris during the pre-swing phase was significantly increased with inhibition kinesio taping application, while eccentric activity of the hamstrings during the terminal swing of gait was decreased. [Conclusion] These findings showed that facilitation kinesio taping application affected the terminal stance phase and that inhibition kinesio taping influenced the terminal swing phase compared with the no tape condition. PMID:26644651

  11. Effect of two different kinesio taping techniques on knee kinematics and kinetics in young females.

    PubMed

    Guner, Senem; Alsancak, Serap; Koz, Mitat

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The application of kinesio taping may improve strength and performance, inhibit and facilitate motor activity, and increase range of motion. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of kinesio taping facilitation and inhibition applications on spatiotemporal knee kinematics and kinetics during walking activity in healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] A three-dimensional quantitative gait evaluation was performed without tape and with, facilitation and inhibition kinesio taping application on the knee. Sixteen healthy female college students (age, 19.7 ± 0.4 years; height, 1.64 ± 3.4 cm; body mass, 51.5 ± 4.8 kg) participated in the study. [Results] Spatiotemporal parameters (cadence, walking speed, stride length) were significantly different among the trials. Knee joint sagittal plane range of motion was not different with either kinesio taping application. Knee external flexion moment during the early stance phase decreased significantly with facilitation kinesio taping and increased with the inhibition kinesio taping. Knee external extension moment during the mid-stance phase increased with facilitation kinesio taping. Knee power parameters, eccentric activity in the rectus femoris during the pre-swing phase was significantly increased with inhibition kinesio taping application, while eccentric activity of the hamstrings during the terminal swing of gait was decreased. [Conclusion] These findings showed that facilitation kinesio taping application affected the terminal stance phase and that inhibition kinesio taping influenced the terminal swing phase compared with the no tape condition.

  12. Activity Increase Despite Arthritis (AÏDA): design of a Phase II randomised controlled trial evaluating an active management booklet for hip and knee osteoarthritis [ISRCTN24554946

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Nefyn H; Amoakwa, Elvis; Burton, Kim; Hendry, Maggie; Belcher, John; Lewis, Ruth; Hood, Kerenza; Jones, Jeremy; Bennett, Paul; Edwards, Rhiannon T; Neal, Richard D; Andrew, Glynne; Wilkinson, Clare

    2009-01-01

    Background Hip and knee osteoarthritis is a common cause of pain and disability, which can be improved by exercise interventions. However, regular exercise is uncommon in this group because the low physical activity level in the general population is probably reduced even further by pain related fear of movement. The best method of encouraging increased activity in this patient group is not known. A booklet has been developed for patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis. It focuses on changing disadvantageous beliefs and encouraging increased physical activity. Methods/Design This paper describes the design of a Phase II randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test the effectiveness of this new booklet for patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis in influencing illness and treatment beliefs, and to assess the feasibility of conducting a larger definitive RCT in terms of health status and exercise behaviour. A computerised search of four general medical practice patients' record databases will identify patients older than 50 years of age who have consulted with hip or knee pain in the previous twelve months. A random sample of 120 will be invited to participate in the RCT comparing the new booklet with a control booklet, and we expect 100 to return final questionnaires. This trial will assess the feasibility of recruitment and randomisation, the suitability of the control intervention and outcome measurement tools, and will provide an estimate of effect size. Outcomes will include beliefs about hip and knee pain, beliefs about exercise, fear avoidance, level of physical activity, health status and health service costs. They will be measured at baseline, one month and three months. Discussion We discuss the merits of testing effectiveness in a phase II trial, in terms of intermediate outcome measures, whilst testing the processes for a larger definitive trial. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of testing the psychometric properties of the primary outcome

  13. Motion verb sentences activate left posterior middle temporal cortex despite static context.

    PubMed

    Wallentin, Mikkel; Lund, Torben Ellegaard; Ostergaard, Svend; Ostergaard, Leif; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2005-04-25

    The left posterior middle temporal region, anterior to V5/MT, has been shown to be responsive both to images with implied motion, to simulated motion, and to motion verbs. In this study, we investigated whether sentence context alters the response of the left posterior middle temporal region. 'Fictive motion' sentences are sentences in which an inanimate subject noun, semantically incapable of self movement, is coupled with a motion verb, yielding an apparent semantic contradiction (e.g. 'The path comes into the garden.'). However, this context yields no less activation in the left posterior middle temporal region than sentences in which the motion can be applied to the subject noun. We speculate that the left posterior middle temporal region activity in fictive motion sentences reflects the fact that the hearer applies motion to the depicted scenario by scanning it egocentrically.

  14. Viewing the motion of human body parts activates different regions of premotor, temporal, and parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Kylie J; Thompson, James C; Syngeniotis, Ari; Abbott, David F; Puce, Aina

    2004-05-01

    Activation of premotor and temporoparietal cortex occurs when we observe others movements, particularly relating to objects. Viewing the motion of different body parts without the context of an object has not been systematically evaluated. During a 3T fMRI study, 12 healthy subjects viewed human face, hand, and leg motion, which was not directed at or did not involve an object. Activation was identified relative to static images of the same human face, hand, and leg in both individual subject and group average data. Four clear activation foci emerged: (1) right MT/V5 activated to all forms of viewed motion; (2) right STS activated to face and leg motion; (3) ventral premotor cortex activated to face, hand, and leg motion in the right hemisphere and to leg motion in the left hemisphere; and (4) anterior intraparietal cortex (aIP) was active bilaterally to viewing hand motion and in the right hemisphere leg motion. In addition, in the group data, a somatotopic activation pattern for viewing face, hand, and leg motion occurred in right ventral premotor cortex. Activation patterns in STS and aIP were more complex--typically activation foci to viewing two types of human motion showed some overlap. Activation in individual subjects was similar; however, activation to hand motion also occurred in the STS with a variable location across subjects--explaining the lack of a clear activation focus in the group data. The data indicate that there are selective responses to viewing motion of different body parts in the human brain that are independent of object or tool use.

  15. An electromyographic analysis of the knee during functional activities. II. The anterior cruciate ligament-deficient and -reconstructed profiles.

    PubMed

    Ciccotti, M G; Kerlan, R K; Perry, J; Pink, M

    1994-01-01

    This study compared the electromyographic activity of normal (N = 22), rehabilitated anterior cruciate ligament-deficient (N = 8), and -reconstructed knees (N = 10) while subjects performed activities. Each subject had evaluation of 8 muscles during 7 functional activities. Sixty-seven percent of the differences in the quadriceps muscle reflected increased activity in the vastus lateralis muscle of the rehabilitated group; 75% of the differences in the hamstrings muscles noted increased biceps femoris muscle activity in the rehabilitated group; 56% of the differences in the lower leg musculature showed increased tibialis anterior muscle activity in the rehabilitated group. Eighty-six percent of the statistically different intervals involved rehabilitated subjects demonstrating increased activity over reconstructed or normal subjects or both. The presence of a quadriceps-hamstrings muscles coordinated response was identified consistently in all 3 groups in each activity. This study supports surgical reconstruction for the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee. It also demonstrates the importance of the vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and tibialis anterior musculature in the rehabilitation of the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient patient. The presence of a quadriceps-hamstrings muscles coordinated response indicates that mechanoreceptors mediating this reflex arc exist in structures other than the cruciate ligament.

  16. Immediate effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on knee joint moments in women with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Masashi; Takagi, Yui; Goto, Yusuke; Otsuka, Naoki; Koyama, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Masashi; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Footwear modification can beneficially alter knee loading in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This study evaluated the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes on reductions in external knee moments in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used to examine the effect of Masai Barefoot Technology versus control shoes on the knee adduction and flexion moments in 17 women (mean age, 63.6 years) with radiographically confirmed knee osteoarthritis. The lateral and anterior trunk lean values, knee flexion and adduction angles, and ground reaction force were also evaluated. The influence of the original walking pattern on the changes in knee moments with Masai Barefoot Technology shoes was evaluated. The knee flexion moment in early stance was significantly reduced while walking with the Masai Barefoot Technology shoes (0.25±0.14Nm/kgm) as compared with walking with control shoes (0.30±0.19 Nm/kgm); whereas the knee adduction moment showed no changes. Masai Barefoot Technology shoes did not increase compensatory lateral and anterior trunk lean. The degree of knee flexion moment in the original walking pattern with control shoes was correlated directly with its reduction when wearing Masai Barefoot Technology shoes by multiple linear regression analysis (adjusted R2=0.44, P<0.01). Masai Barefoot Technology shoes reduced the knee flexion moment during walking without increasing the compensatory trunk lean and may therefore reduce external knee loading in women with knee osteoarthritis.

  17. Does motion-related brain functional connectivity reflect both artifacts and genuine neural activity?

    PubMed

    Pujol, Jesus; Macià, Dídac; Blanco-Hinojo, Laura; Martínez-Vilavella, Gerard; Sunyer, Jordi; de la Torre, Rafael; Caixàs, Assumpta; Martín-Santos, Rocío; Deus, Joan; Harrison, Ben J

    2014-11-01

    Imaging research on functional connectivity is uniquely contributing to characterize the functional organization of the human brain. Functional connectivity measurements, however, may be significantly influenced by head motion that occurs during image acquisition. The identification of how motion influences such measurements is therefore highly relevant to the interpretation of a study's results. We have mapped the effect of head motion on functional connectivity in six different populations representing a wide range of potential influences of motion on functional connectivity. Group-level voxel-wise maps of the correlation between a summary head motion measurement and functional connectivity degree were estimated in 80 young adults, 71 children, 53 older adults, 20 patients with Down syndrome, 24 with Prader-Willi syndrome and 20 with Williams syndrome. In highly compliant young adults, motion correlated with functional connectivity measurements showing a system-specific anatomy involving the sensorimotor cortex, visual areas and default mode network. Further characterization was strongly indicative of these changes expressing genuine neural activity related to motion, as opposed to pure motion artifact. In the populations with larger head motion, results were more indicative of widespread artifacts, but showing notably distinct spatial distribution patterns. Group-level regression of motion effects was efficient in removing both generalized changes and changes putatively related to neural activity. Overall, this study endorses a relatively simple approach for mapping distinct effects of head motion on functional connectivity. Importantly, our findings support the intriguing hypothesis that a component of motion-related changes may reflect system-specific neural activity.

  18. Activity-based exploitation of Full Motion Video (FMV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant, Shashi

    2012-06-01

    Video has been a game-changer in how US forces are able to find, track and defeat its adversaries. With millions of minutes of video being generated from an increasing number of sensor platforms, the DOD has stated that the rapid increase in video is overwhelming their analysts. The manpower required to view and garner useable information from the flood of video is unaffordable, especially in light of current fiscal restraints. "Search" within full-motion video has traditionally relied on human tagging of content, and video metadata, to provision filtering and locate segments of interest, in the context of analyst query. Our approach utilizes a novel machine-vision based approach to index FMV, using object recognition & tracking, events and activities detection. This approach enables FMV exploitation in real-time, as well as a forensic look-back within archives. This approach can help get the most information out of video sensor collection, help focus the attention of overburdened analysts form connections in activity over time and conserve national fiscal resources in exploiting FMV.

  19. Knee closure in total knee replacement: a randomized prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Masri, B A; Laskin, R S; Windsor, R E; Haas, S B

    1996-10-01

    A randomized prospective study of 75 total knee replacements in 64 patients who were randomized to capsular closure with the knee in full extension or in flexion was done. Thirty-one knees received a posterior cruciate ligament retaining prosthesis and 44 knees received a posterior stabilized prosthesis. Preoperatively, there was no significant difference between the groups, and patients were stratified by surgeon and type of prosthesis. Postoperatively, all patients were evaluated by a physical therapist who did not know the type of prosthesis the patient received. In addition to the range of motion obtained at discharge; the number of days required to achieve unassisted transfer; the number of days required to achieve assisted and unassisted use of a walker, cane, and stairs; and the number of days to discharge from the hospital were recorded. All patients were also evaluated at 2 to 3 months postoperatively, and the Knee Society clinical rating system scores were compared. There was no statistically significant difference in any of the early rehabilitation parameters or in the 2- to 3-month followup data. Moreover, there was no statistically significant difference in the rate of complications. With stratification according to the type of prosthesis used or the surgeon performing the operation, there was still no statistically significant difference in any of the studied parameters. It was therefore concluded that the degree of knee flexion at the time of capsular closure in total knee replacement has no effect on early rehabilitation after total knee replacement.

  20. Comparison of knee gait kinematics of workers exposed to knee straining posture to those of non-knee straining workers.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathaly; Hagemeister, Nicola; Poitras, Stéphane; de Guise, Jacques A

    2013-06-01

    Workers exposed to knee straining postures, such as kneeling and squatting, may present modifications in knee gait kinematics that can make them vulnerable to osteoarthritis. In this study, knee kinematics of workers exposed to occupational knee straining postures (KS workers) were compared to those of non-knee straining (non-KS) workers. Eighteen KS workers and 20 non-KS workers participated in the study. Three-dimensional gait kinematic data were recorded at the knee using an electromagnetic motion tracking system. The following parameters were extracted from flexion/extension, adduction/abduction and internal/external rotation angle data and used for group comparisons: knee angle at initial foot contact, peak angles, minimal angles and angle range during the entire gait cycle. Group comparisons were performed with Student t-tests. In the sagittal plane, KS workers had a greater knee flexion angle at initial foot contact, a lower peak knee flexion angle during the swing phase and a lower angle range than non-KS workers (p<0.05). In the frontal plane, all parameters indicated that KS workers had their knees more adducted than non-KS workers. External/internal rotation range was greater for KS workers. This study provides new knowledge on work related to KS postures and knee kinematics. The results support the concept that KS workers might exhibit knee kinematics that are different from those of non-KS workers.

  1. Investigation the efficacy of intra-articular prolotherapy with erythropoietin and dextrose and intra-articular pulsed radiofrequency on pain level reduction and range of motion improvement in primary osteoarthritis of knee

    PubMed Central

    Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Imani, Farnad; Faiz, Seyed Hamid Reza; Entezary, Saeed Reza; Nasiri, Ali Akbar; Ziaeefard, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis is one of the most common diseases and the knee is the most commonly affected joint. Intra-articular prolotherapy is being utilized in acute and chronic pain management setting. This study was designed to compare the efficacy of three methods of intra-articular knee joint therapies with erythropoietin, dextrose, and pulsed radiofrequency. Materials and Methods: After approval by the Ethics Committee and explaining the therapeutic method to volunteers, 70 patients who were suffering from primary knee osteoarthrosis went through one of the treatment methods (erythropoietin, dextrose, and pulsed radiofrequency). The study was double-blind randomized clinical trial performed from December 2012 to July 2013. Patients’ pain level was assessed through the visual analog pain scale (VAS), and range of motion (ROM) was measured by goniometric method. Furthermore, patients’ satisfaction was assessed before and after different treatment methods in weeks 2, 4, and 12. For analysis, Chi-square, one-way ANOVA, and repeated measured ANOVA were utilized. Results: The demographic results among the three groups did not indicate any statistical difference. The mean VAS in erythropoietin group in the 2nd, 4th, and 12th weeks was 3.15 ± 1.08, 3.15 ± 1.08, and 3.5 ± 1.23, respectively (P ≤ 0.005). Knee joint ROM in the erythropoietin group in the 2nd, 4th, and 12th weeks was 124 ± 1.50, 124 ± 1.4, and 123 ± 1.53 respectively (P ≤ 0.005). Satisfaction score in the 12th week in erythropoietin group was extremely satisfied 15%, satisfied 55%, and moderately satisfied 30%, (P = 0.005). No specific side-effects were observed. Conclusion: Intra-articular prolotherapy with erythropoietin was more effective in terms of pain level reduction and ROM improvement compared with dextrose and pulsed radiofrequency. PMID:25422652

  2. Knee-Extension Training with a Single-Joint Hybrid Assistive Limb during the Early Postoperative Period after Total Knee Arthroplasty in a Patient with Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sugaya, Hisashi; Kubota, Shigeki; Onishi, Mio; Kanamori, Akihiro; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The knee range of motion is an important outcome of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). According to previous studies, the knee range of motion temporarily decreases for approximately 1 month after TKA due to postoperative pain and quadriceps dysfunction following surgical invasion into the knee extensor mechanism. We describe our experience with a knee-extension training program based on a single-joint hybrid assistive limb (HAL-SJ, Cyberdyne Inc., Tsukuba, Japan) during the acute recovery phase after TKA. HAL-SJ is a wearable robot suit that facilitates the voluntary control of knee joint motion. A 76-year-old man underwent HAL-SJ-based knee-extension training, which enabled him to perform knee function training during the acute phase after TKA without causing increased pain. Thus, he regained the ability to fully extend his knee postoperatively. HAL-SJ-based knee-extension training can be used as a novel post-TKA rehabilitation modality. PMID:27774330

  3. Segmentation of knee cartilage by using a hierarchical active shape model based on multi-resolution transforms in magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Madeleine; Escalante-Ramirez, Boris

    2013-11-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by the morphological degeneration of cartilage. Efficient segmentation of cartilage is important for cartilage damage diagnosis and to support therapeutic responses. We present a method for knee cartilage segmentation in magnetic resonance images (MRI). Our method incorporates the Hermite Transform to obtain a hierarchical decomposition of contours which describe knee cartilage shapes. Then, we compute a statistical model of the contour of interest from a set of training images. Thereby, our Hierarchical Active Shape Model (HASM) captures a large range of shape variability even from a small group of training samples, improving segmentation accuracy. The method was trained with a training set of 16- MRI of knee and tested with leave-one-out method.

  4. Modulation of the Relationship Between External Knee Adduction Moments and Medial Joint Contact Forces Across Subjects and Activities

    PubMed Central

    Trepczynski, Adam; Kutzner, Ines; Bergmann, Georg; Taylor, William R; Heller, Markus O

    2014-01-01

    Objective The external knee adduction moment (EAM) is often considered a surrogate measure of the distribution of loads across the tibiofemoral joint during walking. This study was undertaken to quantify the relationship between the EAM and directly measured medial tibiofemoral contact forces (Fmed) in a sample of subjects across a spectrum of activities. Methods The EAM for 9 patients who underwent total knee replacement was calculated using inverse dynamics analysis, while telemetric implants provided Fmed for multiple repetitions of 10 activities, including walking, stair negotiation, sit-to-stand activities, and squatting. The effects of the factors “subject” and “activity” on the relationships between Fmed and EAM were quantified using mixed-effects regression analyses in terms of the root mean square error (RMSE) and the slope of the regression. Results Across subjects and activities a good correlation between peak EAM and Fmed values was observed, with an overall R2 value of 0.88. However, the slope of the linear regressions varied between subjects by up to a factor of 2. At peak EAM and Fmed, the RMSE of the regression across all subjects was 35% body weight (%BW), while the maximum error was 127 %BW. Conclusion The relationship between EAM and Fmed is generally good but varies considerably across subjects and activities. These findings emphasize the limitation of relying solely on the EAM to infer medial joint loading when excessive directed cocontraction of muscles exists and call for further investigations into the soft tissue–related mechanisms that modulate the internal forces at the knee. PMID:24470261

  5. New Generation Lockable Knee Brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A knee brace that uses Space Shuttle propulsion technology has moved a step closer to being available to help knee injury and stroke patients and may possibly benefit patients with birth defects, spinal cord injuries, and post-polio conditions. After years of hard work, inventors at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have turned over the final design and prototype to industry partners at Horton's Orthotic Lab in Little Rock, Arkansas for further clinical testing. The device, called the Selectively Lockable Knee Brace, may mean faster, less painful rehabilitation for patients by allowing the knee to move when weight is not on the heel. Devices currently on the market lock the knee in a rigid, straight-leg position, or allow continuous free motion. Pictured here is a knee brace prototype being tested and fitted at Horton's Orthotic Lab. The knee brace is just one example of how space technology is being used to improve the lives of people on Earth. NASA's MSFC inventors Michael Shadoan and Neill Myers are space propulsion engineers who use the same mechanisms and materials to build systems for rockets that they used to design and develop the knee brace.

  6. Active dipole clusters: From helical motion to fission.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Andreas; Popowa, Katarina; Löwen, Hartmut

    2015-07-01

    The structure of a finite particle cluster is typically determined by total energy minimization. Here we consider the case where a cluster of soft-sphere dipoles becomes active, i.e., when the individual particles exhibit an additional self-propulsion along their dipole moments. We numerically solve the overdamped equations of motion for soft-sphere dipoles in a solvent. Starting from an initial metastable dipolar cluster, the self-propulsion generates a complex cluster dynamics. The final cluster state has in general a structure widely different to the initial one, the details depend on the model parameters and on the protocol of how the self-propulsion is turned on. The center of mass of the cluster moves on a helical path, the details of which are governed by the initial cluster magnetization. An instantaneous switch to a high self-propulsion leads to fission of the cluster. However, fission does not occur if the self-propulsion is increased slowly to high strengths. Our predictions can be verified through experiments with self-phoretic colloidal Janus particles and for macroscopic self-propelled dipoles in a highly viscous solvent.

  7. Implied motion because of instability in Hokusai Manga activates the human motion-sensitive extrastriate visual cortex: an fMRI study of the impact of visual art.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Naoyuki; Matsuyoshi, Daisuke; Ikeda, Takashi; Osaka, Mariko

    2010-03-10

    The recent development of cognitive neuroscience has invited inference about the neurosensory events underlying the experience of visual arts involving implied motion. We report functional magnetic resonance imaging study demonstrating activation of the human extrastriate motion-sensitive cortex by static images showing implied motion because of instability. We used static line-drawing cartoons of humans by Hokusai Katsushika (called 'Hokusai Manga'), an outstanding Japanese cartoonist as well as famous Ukiyoe artist. We found 'Hokusai Manga' with implied motion by depicting human bodies that are engaged in challenging tonic posture significantly activated the motion-sensitive visual cortex including MT+ in the human extrastriate cortex, while an illustration that does not imply motion, for either humans or objects, did not activate these areas under the same tasks. We conclude that motion-sensitive extrastriate cortex would be a critical region for perception of implied motion in instability.

  8. Unsteady aerodynamic modeling for arbitrary motions. [for active control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Results indicating that unsteady aerodynamic loads derived under the assumption of simple harmonic motions executed by airfoil or wing can be extended to arbitrary motions are summarized. The generalized Theodorsen (1953) function referable to loads due to simple harmonic oscillations of a wing section in incompressible flow, the Laplace inversion integral for unsteady aerodynamic loads, calculations of root loci of aeroelastic loads, and analysis of generalized compressible transient airloads are discussed.

  9. Focusing on Increasing Velocity during Heavy Resistance Knee Flexion Exercise Boosts Hamstring Muscle Activity in Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Markus D.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Muscle strength is markedly reduced in stroke patients, which has negative implications for functional capacity and work ability. Different types of feedback during strength training exercises may alter neuromuscular activity and functional gains. Objective. To compare levels of muscle activity during conditions of blindfolding and intended high contraction speed with a normal condition of high-intensity knee flexions. Methods. Eighteen patients performed unilateral machine knee flexions with a 10-repetition maximum load. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded from the quadrics and hamstring muscles and normalized to maximal EMG (nEMG) of the nonparetic limb. Results. For the paretic leg, the speed condition showed higher values of muscle activity compared with the normal and blindfolded conditions for both biceps femoris and semitendinosus. Likewise, the speed condition showed higher co-contraction values compared with the normal and blindfolded conditions for the vastus lateralis. No differences were observed between exercise conditions for the nonparetic leg. Conclusion. Chronic stroke patients are capable of performing heavy resistance training with intended high speed of contraction. Focusing on speed during the concentric phase elicited higher levels of muscle activity of the hamstrings compared to normal and blindfolded conditions, which may have implications for regaining fast muscle strength in stroke survivors. PMID:27525118

  10. Sports Activity after Low-contact-stress Total Knee Arthroplasty - A long term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Vielgut, Ines; Leitner, Lukas; Kastner, Norbert; Radl, Roman; Leithner, Andreas; Sadoghi, Patrick

    2016-04-19

    The purpose of this study was to provide comprehensive long-term data about sports activity levels in patients following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and to determine the impact of pre-operative function, pain and specific performed sports on the results. 236 patients who have undergone TKA for severe osteoarthritis of the knee were asked to provide specific information regarding exercised types of sports before surgery and after at least 10 years following TKA. Pre- and postoperative function and pain were evaluated by the use of Tegner-, WOMAC- and VAS Score. After a mean of 14.9 years, a significant improvement regarding pain and function was observed. Pre-operative Tegner- and WOMAC scores revealed significant positive correlations with the post-operative Tegner-Score. Accordingly, a high percentage of patients (70.9%) stayed actively involved in sports. Nevertheless, the number of performing patients has decreased according to the sports impact. 71.3% continued practising low-impact-, 43.7% intermediate-impact sports whereas only 16.4% kept performing high impact sports. We conclude that TKA is highly effective in long-time pain reduction as well as improvement of function. Additionally, we found considerable sports activities preserved in the investigated series. However, sports activities in particular, seem to decrease according to the impact of sports.

  11. Sports Activity after Low-contact-stress Total Knee Arthroplasty – A long term follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Vielgut, Ines; Leitner, Lukas; Kastner, Norbert; Radl, Roman; Leithner, Andreas; Sadoghi, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide comprehensive long-term data about sports activity levels in patients following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and to determine the impact of pre-operative function, pain and specific performed sports on the results. 236 patients who have undergone TKA for severe osteoarthritis of the knee were asked to provide specific information regarding exercised types of sports before surgery and after at least 10 years following TKA. Pre- and postoperative function and pain were evaluated by the use of Tegner-, WOMAC- and VAS Score. After a mean of 14.9 years, a significant improvement regarding pain and function was observed. Pre-operative Tegner- and WOMAC scores revealed significant positive correlations with the post-operative Tegner-Score. Accordingly, a high percentage of patients (70.9%) stayed actively involved in sports. Nevertheless, the number of performing patients has decreased according to the sports impact. 71.3% continued practising low-impact-, 43.7% intermediate-impact sports whereas only 16.4% kept performing high impact sports. We conclude that TKA is highly effective in long-time pain reduction as well as improvement of function. Additionally, we found considerable sports activities preserved in the investigated series. However, sports activities in particular, seem to decrease according to the impact of sports. PMID:27090945

  12. Focusing on Increasing Velocity during Heavy Resistance Knee Flexion Exercise Boosts Hamstring Muscle Activity in Chronic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Vinstrup, Jonas; Calatayud, Joaquin; Jakobsen, Markus D; Sundstrup, Emil; Andersen, Lars L

    2016-01-01

    Background. Muscle strength is markedly reduced in stroke patients, which has negative implications for functional capacity and work ability. Different types of feedback during strength training exercises may alter neuromuscular activity and functional gains. Objective. To compare levels of muscle activity during conditions of blindfolding and intended high contraction speed with a normal condition of high-intensity knee flexions. Methods. Eighteen patients performed unilateral machine knee flexions with a 10-repetition maximum load. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded from the quadrics and hamstring muscles and normalized to maximal EMG (nEMG) of the nonparetic limb. Results. For the paretic leg, the speed condition showed higher values of muscle activity compared with the normal and blindfolded conditions for both biceps femoris and semitendinosus. Likewise, the speed condition showed higher co-contraction values compared with the normal and blindfolded conditions for the vastus lateralis. No differences were observed between exercise conditions for the nonparetic leg. Conclusion. Chronic stroke patients are capable of performing heavy resistance training with intended high speed of contraction. Focusing on speed during the concentric phase elicited higher levels of muscle activity of the hamstrings compared to normal and blindfolded conditions, which may have implications for regaining fast muscle strength in stroke survivors. PMID:27525118

  13. Will 'Unloading' Shoes Help Your Arthritic Knees?

    MedlinePlus

    ... anti-inflammatory medications may also help, as might physical therapy designed to improve flexibility and motion range. In severe cases, patients undergo invasive knee surgery ranging from joint-lining removal to partial or total knee replacement. Clinicians also often recommend using a ...

  14. Support of Joint Function, Range of Motion, and Physical Activity Levels by Consumption of a Water-Soluble Egg Membrane Hydrolyzate

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Gitte S.; Lenninger, Miki R.; Beaman, Joni L.; Taylor, Robert; Benson, Kathleen F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the effects of consumption of hydrolyzed water-soluble egg membrane (WSEM) on joint function in an otherwise healthy population experiencing chronic pain. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study included two 4-week periods of placebo and WSEM consumption, separated by a 4-week washout period. Twenty-five study participants were randomized to either the “placebo-first” or “WSEM first” sequence in the crossover trial, and 22 participants completed the study requirements. Range of motion (ROM) was assessed using digital inclinometry for joints associated with vertical weight bearing from neck to knees and for shoulders. Pain at rest and when physically active was scored for the same anatomical areas using visual analog scales (VAS). Physical functioning was tracked using questionnaires with VAS. Consumption of WSEM was associated with improved ROM for neck, spine, hips, and knees, with ROM for the neck and right knee being significantly improved during WSEM consumption compared to placebo (P < .05). ROM improvement for the dominant shoulder was highly significant during WSEM consumption (P < .01). Physical activity levels were significantly higher after WSEM than after placebo consumption (P < .05). Many aspects of physical functioning as part of daily living improved. Subgroup analysis showed rapid improvement of lower back pain after 5 days of WSEM consumption compared to placebo consumption (P < .05) in subjects who participated in the study during the winter season. Daily consumption of 450 mg WSEM was associated with improved joint function, comfort during daily activities, and increased physical activity. PMID:26355952

  15. Relationship of Knee Shear Force and Extensor Moment on Knee Translations in Females Performing Drop Landings: A Biplane Fluoroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Torry, Michael R.; Myers, Casey; Shelburne, Kevin B.; Peterson, Daniel; Giphart, J. Erik; Pennington, W. Wesley; Krong, Jacob P.; Woo, Savio L-Y.; Steadman, J. Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background Research has linked knee extensor moment and knee shear force to the non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury during the landing motion. However, how these biomechanical performance factors relate to knee translations in vivo it is not known as knee translations cannot be obtained with traditional motion capture techniques. The purpose of this study was to combine traditional motion capture with high-speed, biplane fluoroscopy imaging to determine relationships between knee extensor moment and knee shear force profiles with anterior and lateral tibial translations occurring during drop landing in females athletes. Methods 15 females performed drop landings from a height of 40 cm while being recorded using a high speed, biplane fluoroscopy system and simultaneously being recorded using surface marker motion capture techniques to estimate knee joint angle, reaction force and moment profiles. Findings No significant statistical relationships were observed between peak anterior or posterior knee shear force and peak anterior and lateral tibial translations; or, between peak knee extensor moment and peak anterior and lateral tibial translations. Although differences were noted in peak shear force (P = 0.02) and peak knee extensor moment (P < 0.001) after stratification into low and high shear force and moment cohorts, no differences were noted in anterior and lateral tibial translations (all P ≥ 0.18). Interpretation Females exhibiting high knee extensor moment and knee shear force during drop landings do not yield correspondingly high anterior and lateral tibial translations. PMID:21820780

  16. Brain Activation for Knee Movement Measured Days Before Second Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: Neuroimaging in Musculoskeletal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Grooms, Dustin R.; Page, Stephen J.; Onate, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury has multifactorial causes encompassing mechanical, hormonal, exposure, and anatomical factors. Alterations in the central nervous system also play a role, but their influence after injury, recovery, and recurrent injury remain unknown. Modern neuroimaging techniques can be used to elucidate the underlying functional and structural alterations of the brain that predicate the neuromuscular control adaptations associated with ACL injury. This knowledge will further our understanding of the neural adaptations after ACL injury and rehabilitation and in relation to injury risk. In this paper, we describe the measurement of brain activation during knee extension-flexion after ACL injury and reconstruction and 26 days before a contralateral ACL injury. Methods Brain functional magnetic resonance imaging data for an ACL-injured participant and a matched control participant were collected and contrasted. Results Relative to the matched control participant, the ACL-injured participant exhibited increased activation of motor-planning, sensory-processing, and visual-motor control areas. A similar activation pattern was present for the contralateral knee that sustained a subsequent injury. Conclusions Bilateral neuroplasticity after ACL injury may contribute to the risk of second injury, or aspects of neurophysiology may be predisposing factors to primary injury. Clinical Implications Sensory-visual-motor function and motor-learning adaptations may provide targets for rehabilitation. PMID:26509775

  17. Total knee arthroplasty in valgus knees using minimally invasive medial-subvastus approach

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilen Amulak; Jain, Nimesh Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Background: An ideal approach for valgus knees must provide adequate exposure with minimal complications due to approach per se. Median parapatellar approach is most commonly used approach in TKA including valgus knees. A medial subvastus approach is seldom used for valgus knees and has definite advantages of maintaining extensor mechanism integrity and minimal effect on patellar tracking. The present study was conducted to evaluate outcomes of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and efficacy of subvastus approach in valgus knees in terms of early functional recovery, limb alignment and complications. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 112 knees with valgus deformity between January 2006 and December 2011. All patients were assessed postoperatively for pain using Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and quadriceps recovery in form of time to active straight leg raising (SLR) and staircase competency and clinical outcomes using American Knee Society (AKS) score and radiographic evaluation with average followup of 40 months (range 24–84 months). Results: The mean VAS on postoperative day (POD) 1 and POD2 at rest was 2.73 and 2.39, respectively and after mobilization was 3.28 and 3.08, respectively (P < 0.001). The quadriceps recovery was very early and 92 (86.7%) patients were able to do active SLR by POD1 with mean time of 21.98 h while reciprocal gait and staircase competency was possible at 43.05 h. The AKS and function score showed significant improvement from preoperative mean score of 39 and 36 to 91 and 79 (P < 0.001), respectively, and the mean range of motion increased from 102° preoperatively to 119° at recent followup (P < 0.001). The mean tibiofemoral valgus was corrected from preoperative 16° (range 10°–35°) to 5° (range 3°–9°) valgus (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Mini-subvastus quadriceps approach provides adequate exposure and excellent early recovery for TKA in valgus knees, without increase in incidence of complications. PMID:26955174

  18. Design and Control of an Active Electrical Knee and Ankle Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sup, Frank; Varol, Huseyin Atakan; Mitchell, Jason; Withrow, Thomas; Goldfarb, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the design and control of an electrically powered knee and ankle prosthesis. The prosthesis design incorporates two motor-driven ball screw units to drive the knee and ankle joints. A spring in parallel with the ankle motor unit is employed to decrease the power consumption and increase the torque output for a given motor size. The device’s sensor package includes a custom load cell to measure the sagittal socket interface moment above the knee joint, a custom sensorized foot to measure the ground reaction force at the heel and ball of the foot, and commercial potentiometers and load cells to measure joint positions and torques. A finite-state based impedance control approach, previously developed by the authors, is used and experimental results on level treadmill walking are presented that demonstrate the potential of the device to restore normal gait. The experimental power consumption of the device projects a walking distance of 5.0 km at a speed of 2.8 km/hr with a lithium polymer battery pack. PMID:20648239

  19. Measurement of perioperative flexion-extension mechanics of the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Giori, N J; Giori, K L; Woolson, S T; Goodman, S B; Lannin, J V; Schurman, D J

    2001-10-01

    Perioperative knee mechanics currently are evaluated Perioperative knee mechanics currently are evaluated by measuring range of motion. This is an incomplete measurement, however, because the torque applied to achieve the motion is not measured. We hypothesized that a custom goniometer and force transducer could measure the torque required to passively flex a knee through its full range of motion. This measurement was done in the operating room immediately before and after surgery in 20 knees having total knee arthroplasty and 9 having surgery on another limb. Surgery changed the mechanics of 8 knees, whereas unoperated knees remained unchanged. This measurement technique is safe, easy, and repeatable. It improves on the current standard of perioperative knee measurement and can be applied to investigate the effects of surgery and rehabilitation on ultimate knee motion.

  20. Knee joint forces: prediction, measurement, and significance

    PubMed Central

    D’Lima, Darryl D.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Colwell, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    Knee forces are highly significant in osteoarthritis and in the survival and function of knee arthroplasty. A large number of studies have attempted to estimate forces around the knee during various activities. Several approaches have been used to relate knee kinematics and external forces to internal joint contact forces, the most popular being inverse dynamics, forward dynamics, and static body analyses. Knee forces have also been measured in vivo after knee arthroplasty, which serves as valuable validation of computational predictions. This review summarizes the results of published studies that measured knee forces for various activities. The efficacy of various methods to alter knee force distribution, such as gait modification, orthotics, walking aids, and custom treadmills are analyzed. Current gaps in our knowledge are identified and directions for future research in this area are outlined. PMID:22468461

  1. Application of computational lower extremity model to investigate different muscle activities and joint force patterns in knee osteoarthritis patients during walking.

    PubMed

    Nha, Kyung Wook; Dorj, Ariunzaya; Feng, Jun; Shin, Jun Ho; Kim, Jong In; Kwon, Jae Ho; Kim, Kyungsoo; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    Many experimental and computational studies have reported that osteoarthritis in the knee joint affects knee biomechanics, including joint kinematics, joint contact forces, and muscle activities, due to functional restriction and disability. In this study, differences in muscle activities and joint force patterns between knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients and normal subjects during walking were investigated using the inverse dynamic analysis with a lower extremity musculoskeletal model. Extensor/flexor muscle activations and torque ratios and the joint contact forces were compared between the OA and normal groups. The OA patients had higher extensor muscle forces and lateral component of the knee joint force than normal subjects as well as force and torque ratios of extensor and flexor muscles, while the other parameters had little differences. The results explained that OA patients increased the level of antagonistic cocontraction and the adduction moment on the knee joint. The presented findings and technologies provide insight into biomechanical changes in OA patients and can also be used to evaluate the postoperative functional outcomes of the OA treatments.

  2. Kettlebell swing, snatch, and bottoms-up carry: back and hip muscle activation, motion, and low back loads.

    PubMed

    McGill, Stuart M; Marshall, Leigh W

    2012-01-01

    The intent of this study was to quantify spine loading during different kettlebell swings and carries. No previously published studies of tissue loads during kettlebell exercises could be found. Given the popularity of kettlebells, this study was designed to provide an insight into the resulting joint loads. Seven male subjects participated in this investigation. In addition, a single case study of the kettlebell swing was performed on an accomplished kettlebell master. Electromyography, ground reaction forces (GRFs), and 3D kinematic data were recorded during exercises using a 16-kg kettlebell. These variables were input into an anatomically detailed biomechanical model that used normalized muscle activation; GRF; and spine, hip, and knee motion to calculate spine compression and shear loads. It was found that kettlebell swings create a hip-hinge squat pattern characterized by rapid muscle activation-relaxation cycles of substantial magnitudes (∼50% of a maximal voluntary contraction [MVC] for the low back extensors and 80% MVC for the gluteal muscles with a 16-kg kettlebell) resulting in about 3,200 N of low back compression. Abdominal muscular pulses together with the muscle bracing associated with carries create kettlebell-specific training opportunities. Some unique loading patterns discovered during the kettlebell swing included the posterior shear of the L4 vertebra on L5, which is opposite in polarity to a traditional lift. Thus, quantitative analysis provides an insight into why many individuals credit kettlebell swings with restoring and enhancing back health and function, although a few find that they irritate tissues.

  3. Postural activity and motion sickness during video game play in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hui; Pan, Wu-Wen; Tseng, Li-Ya; Stoffregen, Thomas A

    2012-03-01

    Research has confirmed that console video games give rise to motion sickness in many adults. During exposure to console video games, there are differences in postural activity (movement of the head and torso) between participants who later experience motion sickness and those who do not, confirming a prediction of the postural instability theory of motion sickness. Previous research has not addressed relations between video games, movement and motion sickness in children. We evaluated the nauseogenic properties of a commercially available console video game in both adults and 10-year-old children. Individuals played the game for up to 50 min and were instructed to discontinue immediately if they experienced any symptoms of motion sickness, however mild. During game play, we monitored movement of the head and torso. Motion sickness was reported by 67% of adults and by 56% of children; these rates did not differ. As a group, children moved more than adults. Across age groups, the positional variability of the head and torso increased over time during game play. In addition, we found differences in movement between participants who later reported motion sickness and those who did not. Some of these differences were general across age groups but we also found significant differences between the movement of adults and children who later reported motion sickness. The results confirm that console video games can induce motion sickness in children and demonstrate that changes in postural activity precede the onset of subjective symptoms of motion sickness in children.

  4. Effective temperature and spontaneous collective motion of active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenshen; Wolynes, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Spontaneous directed motion, a hallmark of cell biology, is unusual in classical statistical physics. Here we study, using both numerical and analytical methods, organized motion in models of the cytoskeleton in which constituents are driven by energy-consuming motors. Although systems driven by small-step motors are described by an effective temperature and are thus quiescent, at higher order in step size, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, flowing and oscillating behavior emerges. Motors that respond with a negative susceptibility to imposed forces lead to an apparent negative temperature system in which beautiful structures form resembling the asters seen in cell division.

  5. New Generation Lockable Knee Brace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A knee brace that uses Space Shuttle propulsion technology has moved a step closer to being available to help knee injury and stroke patients and may possibly benefit patients with birth defects, spinal cord injuries, and post-polio conditions. After years of hard work, inventors at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have turned over the final design and prototype to industry partners at Horton's Orthotic Lab in Little Rock, Arkansas for further clinical testing. The device, called the Selectively Lockable Knee Brace, may mean faster, less painful rehabilitation for patients by allowing the knee to move when weight is not on the heel. Devices currently on the market lock the knee in a rigid, straight-leg position, or allow continuous free motion. The knee brace is just one example of how space technology is being used to improve the lives of people on Earth. NASA's MSFC inventors Michael Shadoan and Neill Myers are space propulsion engineers who use the same mechanisms and materials to build systems for rockets that they used to design and develop the knee brace.

  6. Preclinical evaluation method for total knees designed to restore normal knee mechanics.

    PubMed

    Walker, Peter S; Heller, Yonah; Cleary, David J; Yildirim, Gokce

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to develop a simple, rapid, and low-cost method for evaluating proposed new total knee arthroplasty (TKA) models and then to evaluate 3 different TKA models with different kinematic characteristics. A "desktop" knee testing rig was used to apply forces and moments over a full flexion range, representing a spectrum of positions and activities; and the positions of the femur on the tibia were measured. The average neutral path of motion (for compressive force only) and the laxities about the neutral path (for superimposed shear and torque) were determined from 8 knee specimens to be used as a benchmark for the TKA evaluations. A typical posterior-stabilized TKA did not display the normal external femoral rotation with flexion and also showed abnormal anterior sliding on the medial side. A medial-pivot type of guided-motion design showed medial stability comparable to anatomical but still did not produce external femoral rotation and posterior lateral displacement with flexion. The addition of a central cam-post produced the rotation and displacement but only after 75° of flexion. It was concluded that the test method satisfied the objective and could be used as a design tool for evaluating new and existing designs, as well as for formulating a TKA with anatomical characteristics.

  7. Rehabilitation of the knee following sports injury.

    PubMed

    De Carlo, Mark; Armstrong, Brain

    2010-01-01

    Rehabilitation of a knee injury is done in a criterion-based progression that is based on individual progress from one phase to another and not on a prespecified period of time. If the rehabilitation deviates from this approach, the body will react with adverse affects such as inflammation, pain, and further injury. Delay in the entire rehabilitation program will delay the athlete in meeting goals and returning to play. Phase I focuses on restoration of range of motion, pain modulation, inflammatory control, modification of activities, and gait training. Phase II is characterized by gaining full range of motion, demonstration of normal gait pattern, basic to advanced strengthening and flexibility, appropriate cardiovascular conditioning, and proprioception retraining. Phase III allows functional return to prior activity level. This phase includes a sport/occupational-specific functional progression. Utilizing a trained rehabilitation specialist will allow the athlete/individual an effective and efficient return to prior level of function.

  8. [Postoperative knee joint mobilization in catheter peridural anesthesia following arthrolyses of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Ulrich, C; Burri, C; Wörsdörfer, O

    1985-04-01

    The results of arthrolysis of a stiff knee are often poor due to post-operative pain preventing early active mobilization that is so essential. Adequate analgesia may be ensured by the use of continuous anaesthesia via an epidural catheter, and in combination with continuous passive motion such analgesia is able to maintain, and often improve, the range of movement obtained at surgery. 22 patients treated in this way showed an improvement in the range of movement of between 39 and 120 degrees. Patients with post-traumatic knee stiffness achieved an average improvement in the range of movement of 93%, while those with stiffness following infection only improved by 55% on the average. The pre-operative loss of movement does not appear to determine the end result: the aetiology of the stiffness is more important.

  9. Total Knee Arthroplasty Designed to Accommodate the Presence or Absence of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Harman, Melinda K.; Bonin, Stephanie J.; Leslie, Chris J.; Banks, Scott A.; Hodge, W. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for selecting the same total knee arthroplasty prosthesis whether the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is retained or resected is rarely documented. This study reports prospective midterm clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes of a fixed-bearing design implanted using two different surgical techniques. The PCL was completely retained in 116 knees and completely resected in 43 knees. For the entire cohort, clinical knee (96 ± 7) and function (92 ± 13) scores and radiographic outcomes were good to excellent for 84% of patients after 5–10 years in vivo. Range of motion averaged 124° ± 9°, with 126 knees exhibiting ≥120° flexion. Small differences in average knee flexion and function scores were noted, with the PCL-resected group exhibiting an average of 5° more flexion but an average function score that was 7 points lower compared to the PCL-retained group. Fluoroscopic analysis of 33 knees revealed stable tibiofemoral translations. This study demonstrates that a TKA articular design with progressive congruency in the lateral compartment can provide for femoral condyle rollback in maximal flexion activities and achieve good clinical and functional performance in patients with PCL-retained and PCL-resected TKA. This TKA design proved suitable for use with either surgical technique, providing surgeons with the choice of maintaining or sacrificing the PCL. PMID:25374697

  10. State of the art review of knee-ankle-foot orthoses.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng; Hefzy, Mohamed Samir; Elahinia, Mohammad

    2015-02-01

    Knee-ankle-foot orthoses (KAFOs) are used to assist in ambulation. The purpose of this paper is to review existing KAFO designs which can be grouped into passive KAFOs, stance control (SC) KAFOs, and dynamic KAFOs. The conventional passive KAFOs do not provide any active control for knee motions. SCKAFOs lock the knee joint during the stance phase and allow free rotations during the swing phase. Some SCKAFOs switch between the stance and swing phases using body posture, while others use some kind of a control system to perform this switch. Finally, dynamic KAFOs control the knee joint during both stance and swing phases. Four dynamic systems are identified in the literature that use pneumatics, linear springs, hydraulics, and torsional rods made of superelastic alloys to control the knee joint during the gait cycle. However, only the two systems that use linear springs and torsional rods can reproduce the normal knee stiffness pattern which has two distinct characteristics: a soft stiffness during the swing phase and a hard stiffness during the stance phase. This review indicates that there is a need to conduct research regarding new KAFO designs that duplicate normal knee function during the whole gait cycle.

  11. Runner's Knee

    MedlinePlus

    ... Over the summer he bought a pair of running shoes and took up jogging. He started with ... bending the knee — when walking, kneeling, squatting, or running, for example. Walking or running downhill or even ...

  12. The effects of Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions of taekwondo on muscle activation of paraspinal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jongmyeng; Lee, Jaeseok; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jeonghun; Han, Dongwook; Byun, Sunghak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions on muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy male students who listened to an explanation of the study methods and the purpose of the experiment, and agreed to participate in the study. [Methods] Muscle activation measurements of the paraspinal muscles at C3, T7, and L3 were taken while standing still and while performing Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi movements. The Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions were performed 3 times, and its mean value was used for analysis. [Results] The right and left muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions in C3 and T7 were significantly higher than those induced by just standing. Muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseo Jireugi motions in C3, T7, and L3 were significantly higher than those induced by Juchumseogi alone. The right and left muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseo Jireugi motion in C3, T7, and L3 were significantly higher than those induced by standing and Juchumseogi alone. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions of Taekwondo could increase muscle activation of paraspinal muscles, and Juchumseo Jireugi motions were more effective for enhancing muscle activation of paraspinal muscles. PMID:26504295

  13. The effects of Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions of taekwondo on muscle activation of paraspinal muscles.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jongmyeng; Lee, Jaeseok; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jeonghun; Han, Dongwook; Byun, Sunghak

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions on muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy male students who listened to an explanation of the study methods and the purpose of the experiment, and agreed to participate in the study. [Methods] Muscle activation measurements of the paraspinal muscles at C3, T7, and L3 were taken while standing still and while performing Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi movements. The Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions were performed 3 times, and its mean value was used for analysis. [Results] The right and left muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions in C3 and T7 were significantly higher than those induced by just standing. Muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseo Jireugi motions in C3, T7, and L3 were significantly higher than those induced by Juchumseogi alone. The right and left muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseo Jireugi motion in C3, T7, and L3 were significantly higher than those induced by standing and Juchumseogi alone. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions of Taekwondo could increase muscle activation of paraspinal muscles, and Juchumseo Jireugi motions were more effective for enhancing muscle activation of paraspinal muscles.

  14. Femoral quadriceps neuromuscular electrical stimulation after total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Volpato, Helena Bruna Bettoni; Szego, Paulo; Lenza, Mario; Milan, Silvia Lefone; Talerman, Claudia; Ferretti, Mario

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients submitted to total knee arthroplasty. This was a systematic review with no language or publication status restriction. Our search was made in Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase and LILACS. Randomized or quasi-randomized clinical trials evaluating neuromuscular electrical stimulation after total knee arthroplasty were included. Four studies with moderate risk of bias and low statistical power were included, totalizing 376 participants. There was no statistically significant difference in knee function, pain and range of motion during 12 month follow-up. This review concluded that neuromuscular electrical stimulation was less effective than traditional rehabilitation in function, muscular strength and range of motion. However, this technique was useful for quadriceps activation during the first days after surgery. PMID:26537511

  15. Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion and Landing Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Chun-Man; Blackburn, J. Troy; Norcross, Marc F.; McGrath, Melanie; Padua, Darin A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: A smaller amount of ankle-dorsiflexion displacement during landing is associated with less knee-flexion displacement and greater ground reaction forces, and greater ground reaction forces are associated with greater knee-valgus displacement. Additionally, restricted dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) is associated with greater knee-valgus displacement during landing and squatting tasks. Because large ground reaction forces and valgus displacement and limited knee-flexion displacement during landing are anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk factors, dorsiflexion ROM restrictions may be associated with a greater risk of ACL injury. However, it is unclear whether clinical measures of dorsiflexion ROM are associated with landing biomechanics. Objective: To evaluate relationships between dorsiflexion ROM and landing biomechanics. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-five healthy, physically active volunteers. Intervention(s): Passive dorsiflexion ROM was assessed under extended-knee and flexed-knee conditions. Landing biomechanics were assessed via an optical motion-capture system interfaced with a force plate. Main Outcome Measure(s): Dorsiflexion ROM was measured in degrees using goniometry. Knee-flexion and knee-valgus displacements and vertical and posterior ground reaction forces were calculated during the landing task. Simple correlations were used to evaluate relationships between dorsiflexion ROM and each biomechanical variable. Results: Significant correlations were noted between extended-knee dorsiflexion ROM and knee-flexion displacement (r  =  0.464, P  =  .029) and vertical (r  =  −0.411, P  =  .014) and posterior (r  =  −0.412, P  =  .014) ground reaction forces. All correlations for flexed-knee dorsiflexion ROM and knee-valgus displacement were nonsignificant. Conclusions: Greater dorsiflexion ROM was associated with greater knee

  16. Knee Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your knee joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the knee joint move. When any of these structures is hurt or diseased, you have knee problems. Knee problems can cause pain and difficulty ...

  17. Analysis of neck muscle activity and comparison of head movement and body movement during rotational motion.

    PubMed

    Sirikantharajah, Shahini; Valter McConville, Kristiina M; Zolfaghari, Nika

    2015-08-01

    The neck is a very delicate part of the body that is highly prone to whiplash injuries, during jerk. A lot of the research relating to whiplash injuries performed to date has been tested in environments with linear motions and have mostly applied their work to car collisions. Whiplash injuries can also affect disabled individuals during falls, bed transfers, and while travelling in wheelchairs. The primary objective of this paper was to focus on neck and body behaviour during rotational motion, rather than linear motion which has been often associated with car collisions. This paper takes the current motion signal processing technique a step further by computing the differential between head and body motion. Neck electromyogram (EMG) and angular velocity data of the head and body were acquired simultaneously from 20 subjects, as they were rotated 45 degrees in the forward pitch plane, with and without visual input, in a motion simulator. The centre of rotation (COR) on the simulator was located behind the subject Results showed that neck muscle behaviour was affected by the forward rotations, as well as visual input. Anterior neck muscles were most active during forward rotations and trials including VR. Maximum effective muscle power and activity of 10.54% and 55.72 (mV/mV)·s were reached respectively. Furthermore, during forward rotations the motion profiles started off with dominance in body motion, followed by dominance in head motion.

  18. Analysis of neck muscle activity and comparison of head movement and body movement during rotational motion.

    PubMed

    Sirikantharajah, Shahini; Valter McConville, Kristiina M; Zolfaghari, Nika

    2015-08-01

    The neck is a very delicate part of the body that is highly prone to whiplash injuries, during jerk. A lot of the research relating to whiplash injuries performed to date has been tested in environments with linear motions and have mostly applied their work to car collisions. Whiplash injuries can also affect disabled individuals during falls, bed transfers, and while travelling in wheelchairs. The primary objective of this paper was to focus on neck and body behaviour during rotational motion, rather than linear motion which has been often associated with car collisions. This paper takes the current motion signal processing technique a step further by computing the differential between head and body motion. Neck electromyogram (EMG) and angular velocity data of the head and body were acquired simultaneously from 20 subjects, as they were rotated 45 degrees in the forward pitch plane, with and without visual input, in a motion simulator. The centre of rotation (COR) on the simulator was located behind the subject Results showed that neck muscle behaviour was affected by the forward rotations, as well as visual input. Anterior neck muscles were most active during forward rotations and trials including VR. Maximum effective muscle power and activity of 10.54% and 55.72 (mV/mV)·s were reached respectively. Furthermore, during forward rotations the motion profiles started off with dominance in body motion, followed by dominance in head motion. PMID:26737049

  19. Effects of attention and perceptual uncertainty on cerebellar activity during visual motion perception.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Oliver; Mattingley, Jason B

    2014-02-01

    Recent clinical and neuroimaging studies have revealed that the human cerebellum plays a role in visual motion perception, but the nature of its contribution to this function is not understood. Some reports suggest that the cerebellum might facilitate motion perception by aiding attentive tracking of visual objects. Others have identified a particular role for the cerebellum in discriminating motion signals in perceptually uncertain conditions. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to determine the degree to which cerebellar involvement in visual motion perception can be explained by a role in sustained attentive tracking of moving stimuli in contrast to a role in visual motion discrimination. While holding the visual displays constant, we manipulated attention by having participants attend covertly to a field of random-dot motion or a colored spot at fixation. Perceptual uncertainty was manipulated by varying the percentage of signal dots contained within the random-dot arrays. We found that attention to motion under high perceptual uncertainty was associated with strong activity in left cerebellar lobules VI and VII. By contrast, attending to motion under low perceptual uncertainty did not cause differential activation in the cerebellum. We found no evidence to support the suggestion that the cerebellum is involved in simple attentive tracking of salient moving objects. Instead, our results indicate that specific subregions of the cerebellum are involved in facilitating the detection and discrimination of task-relevant moving objects under conditions of high perceptual uncertainty. We conclude that the cerebellum aids motion perception under conditions of high perceptual demand.

  20. High knee valgus in female subjects does not yield higher knee translations during drop landings: a biplane fluoroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Torry, Michael R; Shelburne, Kevin B; Myers, Casey; Giphart, J Erik; Pennington, W Wesley; Krong, Jacob P; Peterson, Daniel S; Steadman, J Richard; Woo, Savio L-Y

    2013-02-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of peak knee valgus angle and peak knee abductor moment on the anterior, medial, and lateral tibial translations (ATT, MTT, LTT) in the "at risk" female knee during drop landing. Fifteen female subjects performed drop landings from 40 cm. Three-dimension knee motion was simultaneously recorded using a high speed, biplane fluoroscopy system, and a video-based motion analysis system. Valgus knee angles and knee abduction moments were stratified into low, intermediate, and high groups and peak ATT, MTT, and LTT were compared between these groups with ANOVA (α = 0.05). Significant differences were observed between stratified groups in peak knee valgus angle (p < 0.0001) and peak knee abduction moment (p < 0.0001). However, no corresponding differences in peak ATT, LTT, and MTT between groups exhibiting low to high-peak knee valgus angles (ATT: p = 0.80; LTT: p = 0.25; MTT: p = 0.72); or, in peak ATT (p = 0.61), LTT (p = 0.26) and MTT (p = 0.96) translations when stratified according to low to high knee abduction moments, were found. We conclude that the healthy female knee is tightly regulated with regard to translations even when motion analysis derived knee valgus angles and abduction moments are high.

  1. High Knee Valgus in Female Subjects Does Not Yield Higher Knee Translations During Drop Landings: A Biplane Fluoroscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Torry, Michael R.; Shelburne, Kevin B.; Myers, Casey; Giphart, J. Erik; Pennington, W. Wesley; Krong, Jacob P.; Peterson, Daniel S.; Steadman, J. Richard; Woo, Savio L-Y.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of peak knee valgus angle and peak knee abductor moment on the anterior, medial, and lateral tibial translations (ATT, MTT, LTT) in the ‘at risk’ female knee during drop landing. Fifteen female subjects performed drop landings from 40 cm. 3D knee motion was simultaneously recorded using a high speed, biplane fluoroscopy system and a video-based motion analysis system. Valgus knee angles and knee abduction moments were stratified into low, intermediate and high groups and peak ATT, MTT and LTT were compared between these groups with ANOVA (α = .05). Significant differences were observed between stratified groups in peak knee valgus angle (p < .0001) and peak knee abduction moment (p < .0001). However, no corresponding differences in peak ATT, LTT and MTT between groups exhibiting low to high peak knee valgus angles (ATT: p = .80; LTT: p = .25; MTT: p = .72); or, in peak ATT (p = .61), LTT (p = .26) and MTT (p = .96) translations when stratified according to low to high knee abduction moments, were found. We conclude that the healthy female knee is tightly regulated with regard to translations even when motion analysis derived knee valgus angles and abduction moments are high. PMID:22968826

  2. Tuning active Brownian motion with shot-noise energy pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiasconaro, Alessandro; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Ebeling, Werner

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of this work is to explore the possibility of modeling the biological energy support mediated by absorption of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) as an energetic shot noise. We develop a general model with discrete input of energy pulses and study shot-noise-driven ratchets. We consider these ratchets as prototypes of Brownian motors driven by energy-rich ATP molecules. Our model is a stochastic machine able to acquire energy from the environment and convert it into kinetic energy of motion. We present characteristic features and demonstrate the possibility of tuning these motors by adapting the mean frequency of the discrete energy inputs, which are described as a special shot noise. In particular, the effect of stochastically driven directionality and uphill flux in systems acquiring energy from the shot noise is analyzed. As a possible application we consider the motion of kinesin on a microtubule under a constant load force.

  3. Localized, Non-Harmonic Active Flap Motions for Low Frequency In-Plane Rotor Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; LeMasurier, Philip; Lorber, Peter; Andrews, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A first-of-its-kind demonstration of the use of localized, non-harmonic active flap motions, for suppressing low frequency, in-plane rotor noise, is reported in this paper. Operational feasibility is verified via testing of the full-scale AATD/Sikorsky/UTRC active flap demonstration rotor in the NFAC's 40- by 80-Foot anechoic wind tunnel. Effectiveness of using localized, non-harmonic active flap motions are compared to conventional four-per-rev harmonic flap motions, and also active flap motions derived from closed-loop acoustics implementations. All three approaches resulted in approximately the same noise reductions over an in-plane three-by-three microphone array installed forward and near in-plane of the rotor in the nearfield. It is also reported that using an active flap in this localized, non-harmonic manner, resulted in no more that 2% rotor performance penalty, but had the tendency to incur higher hub vibration levels.

  4. Altered Tibiofemoral Joint Contact Mechanics and Kinematics in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis and Episodic Complaints of Joint Instability

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Voycheck, Carrie A.; Klatt, Brian A.; Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Tashman, Scott; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate knee joint contact mechanics and kinematics during the loading response phase of downhill gait in knee osteoarthritis patients with self-reported instability. Methods Forty-three subjects, 11 with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis and self-reported instability (unstable), 7 with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis but no reports of instability (stable), and 25 without knee osteoarthritis or instability (control) underwent Dynamic Stereo X-ray analysis during a downhill gait task on a treadmill. Findings The medial compartment contact point excursions were longer in the unstable group compared to the stable (p=0.046) and the control groups (p=0.016). The peak medial compartment contact point velocity was also greater for the unstable group compared to the stable (p=0.047) and control groups (p=0.022). Additionally, the unstable group demonstrated a coupled movement pattern of knee extension and external rotation after heel contact which was different than the coupled motion of knee flexion and internal rotation demonstrated by stable and control groups. Interpretation Our findings suggest that knee joint contact mechanics and kinematics are altered during the loading response phase of downhill gait in knee osteoarthritis patients with self-reported instability. The observed longer medial compartment contact point excursions and higher velocities represent objective signs of mechanical instability that may place the arthritic knee joint at increased risk for disease progression. Further research is indicated to explore the clinical relevance of altered contact mechanics and kinematics during other common daily activities and to assess the efficacy of rehabilitation programs to improve altered joint biomechanics in knee osteoarthritis patients with self-reported instability. PMID:24856791

  5. Knee joint laxity and neuromuscular characteristics of male and female soccer and basketball players.

    PubMed

    Rozzi, S L; Lephart, S M; Gear, W S; Fu, F H

    1999-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injuries are occurring at a higher rate in female athletes compared with their male counterparts. Research in the area of anterior cruciate ligament injury has increasingly focused on the role of joint proprioception and muscle activity in promoting knee joint stability. We measured knee joint laxity, joint kinesthesia, lower extremity balance, the amount of time required to generate peak torque of the knee flexor and extensor musculature, and electromyographically assessed muscle activity in 34 healthy, collegiate-level athletes (average age, 19.6 +/- 1.5 years) who played soccer or basketball or both. Independent t-tests were used to determine significant sex differences. Results revealed that women inherently possess significantly greater knee joint laxity values, demonstrate a significantly longer time to detect the knee joint motion moving into extension, possess significantly superior single-legged balance ability, and produce significantly greater electromyographic peak amplitude and area of the lateral hamstring muscle subsequent to landing a jump. The excessive joint laxity of women appears to contribute to diminished joint proprioception, rendering the knee less sensitive to potentially damaging forces and possibly at risk for injury. Unable to rely on ligamentous structures, healthy female athletes appear to have adopted compensatory mechanisms of increased hamstring activity to achieve functional joint stabilization.

  6. Knee joint laxity and neuromuscular characteristics of male and female soccer and basketball players.

    PubMed

    Rozzi, S L; Lephart, S M; Gear, W S; Fu, F H

    1999-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injuries are occurring at a higher rate in female athletes compared with their male counterparts. Research in the area of anterior cruciate ligament injury has increasingly focused on the role of joint proprioception and muscle activity in promoting knee joint stability. We measured knee joint laxity, joint kinesthesia, lower extremity balance, the amount of time required to generate peak torque of the knee flexor and extensor musculature, and electromyographically assessed muscle activity in 34 healthy, collegiate-level athletes (average age, 19.6 +/- 1.5 years) who played soccer or basketball or both. Independent t-tests were used to determine significant sex differences. Results revealed that women inherently possess significantly greater knee joint laxity values, demonstrate a significantly longer time to detect the knee joint motion moving into extension, possess significantly superior single-legged balance ability, and produce significantly greater electromyographic peak amplitude and area of the lateral hamstring muscle subsequent to landing a jump. The excessive joint laxity of women appears to contribute to diminished joint proprioception, rendering the knee less sensitive to potentially damaging forces and possibly at risk for injury. Unable to rely on ligamentous structures, healthy female athletes appear to have adopted compensatory mechanisms of increased hamstring activity to achieve functional joint stabilization. PMID:10352766

  7. Arthroscopy of the knee without pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Schlepckow, P; Weber, M; Hempel, K

    1994-01-01

    From 1983 to 1990, 82 knee arthroscopies (8.2%) carried out in our patients found nothing pathological. Sixty-four percent of these patients were active in sports, but trauma was noted in 32% of the cases only. Football and other ball games, skiing, and track and field athletics were the main causes. Twenty-six percent of the patients had undergone previous surgery in the affected knee. At a mean of 4.6 years postoperatively, clinical and radiological re-assessment was conducted so as to compare our pre- and intraoperative findings with the further course of events. We found that 48.2% of the patients were symptom-free after the diagnostic arthroscopy, 37.5% had persistent discomfort and 14.3% had a recurrence of discomfort after 6 months to 2 years. The objective measurement score (Zarins Rowe score), at 47.5 out of 50 points, was better than the subjective score, at 40 out of 50 points. Our diagnoses had to be changed retrospectively: meniscal lesions were diagnosed too frequently, while chondropathia patellae and instability were often missed. Additionally, complaints could be related to abnormal axis, limited range of motion of the hip or knee, leg length inequality and hypermobility. Being unable to verify a presumed intra-articular lesion arthroscopically is frustrating for both doctor and patient. Our data suggest that meniscal signs should be looked at more critically and emphasise the need for a complete evaluation of the whole locomotor system.

  8. Physical Activity Recognition Based on Motion in Images Acquired by a Wearable Camera.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Lu; Jia, Wenyan; Fernstrom, John D; Sclabassi, Robert J; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sun, Mingui

    2011-06-01

    A new technique to extract and evaluate physical activity patterns from image sequences captured by a wearable camera is presented in this paper. Unlike standard activity recognition schemes, the video data captured by our device do not include the wearer him/herself. The physical activity of the wearer, such as walking or exercising, is analyzed indirectly through the camera motion extracted from the acquired video frames. Two key tasks, pixel correspondence identification and motion feature extraction, are studied to recognize activity patterns. We utilize a multiscale approach to identify pixel correspondences. When compared with the existing methods such as the Good Features detector and the Speed-up Robust Feature (SURF) detector, our technique is more accurate and computationally efficient. Once the pixel correspondences are determined which define representative motion vectors, we build a set of activity pattern features based on motion statistics in each frame. Finally, the physical activity of the person wearing a camera is determined according to the global motion distribution in the video. Our algorithms are tested using different machine learning techniques such as the K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN), Naive Bayesian and Support Vector Machine (SVM). The results show that many types of physical activities can be recognized from field acquired real-world video. Our results also indicate that, with a design of specific motion features in the input vectors, different classifiers can be used successfully with similar performances.

  9. Physical Activity Recognition Based on Motion in Images Acquired by a Wearable Camera

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Lu; Jia, Wenyan; Fernstrom, John D.; Sclabassi, Robert J.; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sun, Mingui

    2011-01-01

    A new technique to extract and evaluate physical activity patterns from image sequences captured by a wearable camera is presented in this paper. Unlike standard activity recognition schemes, the video data captured by our device do not include the wearer him/herself. The physical activity of the wearer, such as walking or exercising, is analyzed indirectly through the camera motion extracted from the acquired video frames. Two key tasks, pixel correspondence identification and motion feature extraction, are studied to recognize activity patterns. We utilize a multiscale approach to identify pixel correspondences. When compared with the existing methods such as the Good Features detector and the Speed-up Robust Feature (SURF) detector, our technique is more accurate and computationally efficient. Once the pixel correspondences are determined which define representative motion vectors, we build a set of activity pattern features based on motion statistics in each frame. Finally, the physical activity of the person wearing a camera is determined according to the global motion distribution in the video. Our algorithms are tested using different machine learning techniques such as the K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN), Naive Bayesian and Support Vector Machine (SVM). The results show that many types of physical activities can be recognized from field acquired real-world video. Our results also indicate that, with a design of specific motion features in the input vectors, different classifiers can be used successfully with similar performances. PMID:21779142

  10. Is the Modified Tardieu Scale in Semi-Standing Position Better Associated with Knee Extension and Hamstring Activity in Terminal Swing than the Supine Tardieu?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faber, Irene R.; Nienhuis, Bart; Rijs, Nique P. A. M.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Duysens, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the modified Tardieu scale (MTS) in a semi-standing position, used for the assessment of hamstrings spasticity, was better associated with knee extension and hamstrings activity in terminal swing than the MTS in a supine position in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Seven children diagnosed with…

  11. Motion sickness susceptibility in parabolic flight and velocity storage activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dizio, Paul; Lackner, James R.

    1991-01-01

    In parabolic flight experiments, postrotary nystagmus is as found to be differentially suppressed in free fall (G) and in a high gravitoinertial force (1.8 G) background relative to 1 G. In addition, the influence of postrotary head movements on nystagmus suppression was found to be contingent on G-dependency of the velocity storage and dumping mechanisms. Here, susceptibility to motion sickness during head movements in 0 G and 1.8 G was rank-correlated with the following: (1) the decay time constant of the slow phase velocity of postrotary nystagmus under 1 G, no head movement, baseline conditions, (2) the extent of time constant reduction elicited in 0 G and 1.8 G; (3) the extent of time constant reduction elicited by head tilts in 1 G; and (4) changes in the extent of time constants reduction in 0 G and 1.8 G over repeated tests. Susceptibility was significantly correlated with the extent to which a head movement reduced the time constant in 1 G, was weakly correlated with the baseline time constant, but was not correlated with the extent of reduction in 0 G or 1.8 G. This pattern suggests a link between mechanisms evoking symptoms of space motion sickness and the mechanisms of velocity storage and dumping. Experimental means of evaluating this link are described.

  12. Ankle motion influences the external knee adduction moment and may predict who will respond to lateral wedge insoles?: an ancillary analysis from the SILK trial

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, G.J.; Parkes, M.J.; Forsythe, L.; Felson, D.T.; Jones, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Lateral wedge insoles are a potential simple treatment for medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients by reducing the external knee adduction moment (EKAM). However in some patients, an increase in their EKAM is seen. Understanding the role of the ankle joint complex in the response to lateral wedge insoles is critical in understanding and potentially identifying why some patients respond differently to lateral wedge insoles. Method Participants with medial tibiofemoral OA underwent gait analysis whilst walking in a control shoe and a lateral wedge insole. We evaluated if dynamic ankle joint complex coronal plane biomechanical measures could explain and identify those participants that increased (biomechanical non-responder) or decreased (biomechanical responder) EKAM under lateral wedge conditions compared to the control shoe. Results Of the 70 participants studied (43 male), 33% increased their EKAM and 67% decreased their EKAM. Overall, lateral wedge insoles shifted the centre of foot pressure laterally, increased eversion of the ankle/subtalar joint complex (STJ) and the eversion moment compared to the control condition. Ankle angle at peak EKAM and peak eversion ankle/STJ complex angle in the control condition predicted if individuals were likely to decrease EKAM under lateral wedge conditions. Conclusions Coronal plane ankle/STJ complex biomechanical measures play a key role in reducing EKAM when wearing lateral wedge insoles. These findings may assist in the identification of those individuals that could benefit more from wearing lateral wedge insoles. PMID:25749010

  13. Early recovery after fast-track Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose After total knee arthroplasty with conventional surgical approach, more than half of the quadriceps extension strength is lost in the first postoperative month. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) operated with minimally invasive surgery (MIS) results in less operative trauma. We investigated changes in leg-extension power (LEP) in the first month after MIS Oxford UKA and its relation to pain, knee motion, functional performance, and knee function. Patients and methods In 35 consecutive Oxford UKA patients, LEP was measured 1 week before and 1 month after surgery together with knee motion, knee swelling, the 30-second chair-stand test, and Oxford knee score. Assessment of knee pain at rest and walking was done using a visual analog scale. Results 30 patients were discharged on the day after surgery, and 5 on the second day after surgery. LEP and functional performance reached the preoperative level after 1 month. Only slight postoperative knee swelling was observed with rapid restoration of knee flexion and function. A high level of pain during the first postoperative night and day fell considerably thereafter. None of the patients needed physiotherapy supervision in the first month after discharge. Interpretation Fast-track MIS Oxford UKA with discharge on the day after surgery is safe and leads to early recovery of knee motion and strength even when no physiotherapy is used. PMID:22313368

  14. The effect of anterior cruciate ligament rupture on the timing and amplitude of gastrocnemius muscle activation: a study of alterations in EMG measures and their relationship to knee joint stability.

    PubMed

    Klyne, David M; Keays, Susan L; Bullock-Saxton, Joanne E; Newcombe, Peter A

    2012-06-01

    Changes in hamstring and quadriceps activity are well known in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency (ACLD) to potentially compensate for knee joint instability. However, few studies have explored gastrocnemius activity or its relationship to knee stability. The purpose of this study was therefore to examine the activation characteristics of medial gastrocnemius (MG) in ACLD subjects and relate any changes to knee joint laxity. Two subject cohorts were assessed: those with unilateral ACLD (n=15) and uninjured control subjects (n=11). Surface EMG of the left and right MG were recorded during a controlled single leg hop on each limb. Onset and offset of MG activation relative to take-off, during flight and landing were calculated as well as muscle activity (RMS). Passive antero-posterior knee laxity was measured with a KT1000 arthrometer during a maximal manual displacement test. Medial gastrocnemius activity on the injured side of ACLD participants demonstrated significantly prolonged activation in preparation to hop, minimal muscle inactivity prior to take-off, and increased duration of overall muscle activity when compared to the uninjured side and control subjects (p<0.05). Significant positive correlations were found between passive knee joint laxity and prolonged activation prior to knee bend. RMS of the muscle signal was not significantly different between limbs. Overall, MG on the ACLD side demonstrated longer activation, with minimal rest during the hop test, which may be an attempt to maintain knee stability. Furthermore, the strong relationship between knee laxity and prolonged muscle activation suggests that individuals with a loss of knee stability are more reliant on active control of the gastrocnemius muscle.

  15. The Cruciate Ligaments in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parcells, Bertrand W; Tria, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    The early knee replacements were hinge designs that ignored the ligaments of the knee and resurfaced the joint, allowing freedom of motion in a single plane. Advances in implant fixation paved the way for modern designs, including the posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that sacrifices both cruciate ligaments while substituting for the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and the cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA designs that sacrifice the anterior cruciate ligament but retain the PCL. The early bicruciate retaining (BCR) TKA designs suffered from loosening and early failures. Townley and Cartier designed BCR knees that had better clinical results but the surgical techniques were challenging.Kinematic studies suggest that normal motion relies on preservation of both cruciate ligaments. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty retains all knee ligaments and closely matches normal motion, while PS and CR TKA deviate further from normal. The 15% to 20% dissatisfaction rate with current TKA has renewed interest in the BCR design. Replication of normal knee kinematics and proprioception may address some of the dissatisfaction.

  16. Tracking of EEG activity using motion estimation to understand brain wiring.

    PubMed

    Nisar, Humaira; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Ullah, Rafi; Shim, Seong-O; Bawakid, Abdullah; Khan, Muhammad Burhan; Subhani, Ahmad Rauf

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental step in brain research deals with recording electroencephalogram (EEG) signals and then investigating the recorded signals quantitatively. Topographic EEG (visual spatial representation of EEG signal) is commonly referred to as brain topomaps or brain EEG maps. In this chapter, full search full search block motion estimation algorithm has been employed to track the brain activity in brain topomaps to understand the mechanism of brain wiring. The behavior of EEG topomaps is examined throughout a particular brain activation with respect to time. Motion vectors are used to track the brain activation over the scalp during the activation period. Using motion estimation it is possible to track the path from the starting point of activation to the final point of activation. Thus it is possible to track the path of a signal across various lobes.

  17. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  18. Self-reported previous knee injury and low knee function increase knee injury risk in adolescent female football.

    PubMed

    Clausen, M B; Tang, L; Zebis, M K; Krustrup, P; Hölmich, P; Wedderkopp, N; Andersen, L L; Christensen, K B; Møller, M; Thorborg, K

    2016-08-01

    Knee injuries are common in adolescent female football. Self-reported previous knee injury and low Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) are proposed to predict future knee injuries, but evidence regarding this in adolescent female football is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate self-reported previous knee injury and low KOOS subscale score as risk factors for future knee injuries in adolescent female football. A sample of 326 adolescent female football players, aged 15-18, without knee injury at baseline, were included. Data on self-reported previous knee injury and KOOS questionnaires were collected at baseline. Time-loss knee injuries and football exposures were reported weekly by answers to standardized text-message questions, followed by injury telephone interviews. A priori, self-reported previous knee injury and low KOOS subscale scores (< 80 points) were chosen as independent variables in the risk factor analyses. The study showed that self-reported previous knee injury significantly increased the risk of time-loss knee injury [relative risk (RR): 3.65, 95% confidence (CI) 1.73-7.68; P < 0.001]. Risk of time-loss knee injury was also significantly increased in players with low KOOS subscale scores (< 80 points) in Activities of Daily Living (RR: 5.0), Sport/Recreational (RR: 2.2) and Quality of Life (RR: 3.0) (P < 0.05). In conclusion, self-reported previous knee injury and low scores in three KOOS subscales significantly increase the risk of future time-loss knee injury in adolescent female football. PMID:26179111

  19. Unicondylar knee arthroplasty: a cementless perspective

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Michael E.; Englund, Roy E.; Leighton, Ross K.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To compare the results of cementless unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) with those already reported in a similar study on cemented UKA. Design A case-series cross-sectional study. Setting The Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax. Patients Fifty-one patients who underwent a total of 57 UKAs between May 1989 and May 1997. Inclusion criteria were osteoarthritis involving the predominantly the medial compartment of the knee, relative sparing of the other compartments, less than 15° of varus, minimal knee instability, and attendance at the postoperative clinical visit. Intervention Cementless UKA. Main outcome measures Clinical parameters that included pain, range of motion and the Knee Society Clinical Knee Score. Roentgenographic parameters that included α, β, γ and σ angles and the presence of periprosthetic radiolucency or loose beads. Results Age, weight, gender and follow-up interval did not significantly affect the clinical results in terms of pain, range of motion or knee score. Knees with more than 1 mm of radiolucency had significantly lower knee scores than those with no radiolucency. Knees that radiologically had loose beads also had significantly lower knee scores. The clinical outcomes of cementless UKA were comparable to those already reported on cemented UKA. Cementless femurs had less radiolucency than the cemented femurs, whereas cementless tibias had more radiolucency than their cemented counterparts. Conclusions Cementless UKA seems to be as efficacious as cemented UKA. However, there is some concern about the amount of radiolucency in the cementless tibial components. A randomized clinical trial comparing both cementless and cemented tibial components with a cementless femur (hybrid knee) is needed to further assess this controversial issue in UKA. PMID:11129829

  20. Electromyographic analysis of the knee during jump landing in male and female athletes.

    PubMed

    Urabe, Yukio; Kobayashi, Risa; Sumida, Sachiko; Tanaka, Kosuke; Yoshida, Nami; Nishiwaki, Gaston Ariel; Tsutsumi, Eriko; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2005-04-01

    Many noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in female athletes occur at foot strike during jump landing when the knee is extended. This study was undertaken to determine the activation level of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles electromyographically. Fifteen healthy volunteers (eight women and seven men), all of whom were collegiate basketball players, participated in the study. The maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of the vastus medialis (VM) at a knee flexion angle of 15-45 degrees was significantly higher in women than in men. There was no significant difference in overall mean hamstring activity in men and women over the same knee flexion range. However, when the knee flexion angle was 15 degrees , 20 degrees , and 25 degrees , hamstring activity was significantly lower in female athletes. These results suggest that female athletes have a higher risk of ACL injury during jump landing due to increased anterior tibial translation force with quadriceps muscle activity. Female athletes require greater hamstring activation, and it is suggested that exercising this muscle will increase its activity when the knee is extended, thus preventing ACL injury during actual sport motions.

  1. Four weeks of mobility after 8 weeks of immobility fails to restore normal motion: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Trudel, Guy; Zhou, Jian; Uhthoff, Hans K; Laneuville, Odette

    2008-05-01

    Prolonged immobilization reduces passive range of motion of joints creating joint contractures. Whether and to what extent these iatrogenic contractures can be reduced is unknown. We raised three questions using an animal model: What degree of contracture remains at the end of a defined remobilization period? Do contractures in sham-operated and immobilized joints differ? What is the contribution of the posterior knee capsule in limiting knee extension? We immobilized one knee of 11 adult male rats in flexion to induce a joint contracture; 10 control animals underwent a sham operation. After 8 weeks, the internal fixation device was removed, and the animals were allowed to resume unrestricted activity for 4 weeks at the end of which the knee range of motion was measured with standardized torques. The mean flexion contracture was higher in the immobilized group (51.9 degrees +/- 2.8 degrees ) than in the sham-operated group (18.9 degrees +/- 2.1 degrees ). Eighty-eight percent of the contractures remained in the immobilized group after dividing skin and muscle, suggesting an important contribution of the posterior knee capsule in limiting knee mobility. Based on our preliminary study the range of motion of rat knees immobilized for 8 weeks remained substantially reduced after a 4-week period of unassisted remobilization.

  2. Validation of a new method for finding the rotational axes of the knee using both marker-based roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis and 3D video-based motion analysis for kinematic measurements.

    PubMed

    Roland, Michelle; Hull, M L; Howell, S M

    2011-05-01

    In a previous paper, we reported the virtual axis finder, which is a new method for finding the rotational axes of the knee. The virtual axis finder was validated through simulations that were subject to limitations. Hence, the objective of the present study was to perform a mechanical validation with two measurement modalities: 3D video-based motion analysis and marker-based roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA). A two rotational axis mechanism was developed, which simulated internal-external (or longitudinal) and flexion-extension (FE) rotations. The actual axes of rotation were known with respect to motion analysis and RSA markers within ± 0.0006 deg and ± 0.036 mm and ± 0.0001 deg and ± 0.016 mm, respectively. The orientation and position root mean squared errors for identifying the longitudinal rotation (LR) and FE axes with video-based motion analysis (0.26 deg, 0.28 m, 0.36 deg, and 0.25 mm, respectively) were smaller than with RSA (1.04 deg, 0.84 mm, 0.82 deg, and 0.32 mm, respectively). The random error or precision in the orientation and position was significantly better (p=0.01 and p=0.02, respectively) in identifying the LR axis with video-based motion analysis (0.23 deg and 0.24 mm) than with RSA (0.95 deg and 0.76 mm). There was no significant difference in the bias errors between measurement modalities. In comparing the mechanical validations to virtual validations, the virtual validations produced comparable errors to those of the mechanical validation. The only significant difference between the errors of the mechanical and virtual validations was the precision in the position of the LR axis while simulating video-based motion analysis (0.24 mm and 0.78 mm, p=0.019). These results indicate that video-based motion analysis with the equipment used in this study is the superior measurement modality for use with the virtual axis finder but both measurement modalities produce satisfactory results. The lack of significant differences between

  3. sEMG during Whole-Body Vibration Contains Motion Artifacts and Reflex Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lienhard, Karin; Cabasson, Aline; Meste, Olivier; Colson, Serge S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the excessive spikes observed in the surface electromyography (sEMG) spectrum recorded during whole-body vibration (WBV) exercises contain motion artifacts and/or reflex activity. The occurrence of motion artifacts was tested by electrical recordings of the patella. The involvement of reflex activity was investigated by analyzing the magnitude of the isolated spikes during changes in voluntary background muscle activity. Eighteen physically active volunteers performed static squats while the sEMG was measured of five lower limb muscles during vertical WBV using no load and an additional load of 33 kg. In order to record motion artifacts during WBV, a pair of electrodes was positioned on the patella with several layers of tape between skin and electrodes. Spectral analysis of the patella signal revealed recordings of motion artifacts as high peaks at the vibration frequency (fundamental) and marginal peaks at the multiple harmonics were observed. For the sEMG recordings, the root mean square of the spikes increased with increasing additional loads (p < 0.05), and was significantly correlated to the sEMG signal without the spikes of the respective muscle (r range: 0.54 - 0.92, p < 0.05). This finding indicates that reflex activity might be contained in the isolated spikes, as identical behavior has been found for stretch reflex responses evoked during direct vibration. In conclusion, the spikes visible in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activity. Key points The spikes observed in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activity The motion artifacts are more pronounced in the first spike than the following spikes in the sEMG spectrum Reflex activity during WBV exercises is enhanced with an additional load of approximately 50% of the body mass PMID:25729290

  4. Electromyographic activity of knee stabilizer muscles during six different balance board stimuli after anterior cruciate ligament surgery.

    PubMed

    Pereira, H M; Nowotny, A H; Santos, A B A N; Cardoso, J R

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the electrical activity of the knee stabilizers, in patients with ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) reconstructed and uninjured individuals during different balance board stimuli. Eleven post-surgery individuals and eleven uninjured controls participated in the study. The muscular activity of the vastus medialis obliquus, vastus lateralis, semitendinosus, biceps femoris and gastrocnemius medial were analyzed by surface electromyography during the execution of six different balance board activities. All electromyographic data were reported as percentage of RMS mean values obtained in maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) for each muscle. When comparing the individuals with ACL reconstructed and uninjured controls, minor electromyographic activity was observed (MVIC %) for all the muscles in the surgery group (P < 0.05), however, when comparing each exercise between the groups, a statistically significant difference for vastus lateralis was demonstrated in the floor exercise (P = 0.02) and for gastrocnemius on the round board (P = 0.04). Individuals ACL reconstructed presented a decrease in muscular activity during different balance board stimuli, which suggests that compensatory alterations after ACL may still exist even after a surgery to repair an ACL rupture.

  5. Design and development of an unconstrained dynamic knee simulator.

    PubMed

    McLean, C A; Ahmed, A M

    1993-05-01

    A dynamic knee simulator has been developed to allow in-vitro investigation of the mechanical response of the joint corresponding to dynamic functional activities, e.g., walking. In the simulator, the controlled inputs are the time-histories of three parameters of a given dynamic activity: the flexion angle, and the flexion/extension moment and tibial axial force components of the foot-to-floor reaction. A combination of stepping motors and electro-hydraulic actuators is used to apply to a knee specimen, simultaneously and independently, the specified load and/or displacement inputs while allowing unconstrained relative motion between the joint members. Satisfactory performance of the simulator has been established for walking gait conditions based on measurements on three fresh-frozen specimens.

  6. Effects of attention and perceptual uncertainty on cerebellar activity during visual motion perception.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Oliver; Mattingley, Jason B

    2014-02-01

    Recent clinical and neuroimaging studies have revealed that the human cerebellum plays a role in visual motion perception, but the nature of its contribution to this function is not understood. Some reports suggest that the cerebellum might facilitate motion perception by aiding attentive tracking of visual objects. Others have identified a particular role for the cerebellum in discriminating motion signals in perceptually uncertain conditions. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to determine the degree to which cerebellar involvement in visual motion perception can be explained by a role in sustained attentive tracking of moving stimuli in contrast to a role in visual motion discrimination. While holding the visual displays constant, we manipulated attention by having participants attend covertly to a field of random-dot motion or a colored spot at fixation. Perceptual uncertainty was manipulated by varying the percentage of signal dots contained within the random-dot arrays. We found that attention to motion under high perceptual uncertainty was associated with strong activity in left cerebellar lobules VI and VII. By contrast, attending to motion under low perceptual uncertainty did not cause differential activation in the cerebellum. We found no evidence to support the suggestion that the cerebellum is involved in simple attentive tracking of salient moving objects. Instead, our results indicate that specific subregions of the cerebellum are involved in facilitating the detection and discrimination of task-relevant moving objects under conditions of high perceptual uncertainty. We conclude that the cerebellum aids motion perception under conditions of high perceptual demand. PMID:23982589

  7. The visual perception of natural motion: abnormal task-related neural activity in DYT1 dystonia.

    PubMed

    Sako, Wataru; Fujita, Koji; Vo, An; Rucker, Janet C; Rizzo, John-Ross; Niethammer, Martin; Carbon, Maren; Bressman, Susan B; Uluğ, Aziz M; Eidelberg, David

    2015-12-01

    Although primary dystonia is defined by its characteristic motor manifestations, non-motor signs and symptoms have increasingly been recognized in this disorder. Recent neuroimaging studies have related the motor features of primary dystonia to connectivity changes in cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways. It is not known, however, whether the non-motor manifestations of the disorder are associated with similar circuit abnormalities. To explore this possibility, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study primary dystonia and healthy volunteer subjects while they performed a motion perception task in which elliptical target trajectories were visually tracked on a computer screen. Prior functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of healthy subjects performing this task have revealed selective activation of motor regions during the perception of 'natural' versus 'unnatural' motion (defined respectively as trajectories with kinematic properties that either comply with or violate the two-thirds power law of motion). Several regions with significant connectivity changes in primary dystonia were situated in proximity to normal motion perception pathways, suggesting that abnormalities of these circuits may also be present in this disorder. To determine whether activation responses to natural versus unnatural motion in primary dystonia differ from normal, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study 10 DYT1 dystonia and 10 healthy control subjects at rest and during the perception of 'natural' and 'unnatural' motion. Both groups exhibited significant activation changes across perceptual conditions in the cerebellum, pons, and subthalamic nucleus. The two groups differed, however, in their responses to 'natural' versus 'unnatural' motion in these regions. In healthy subjects, regional activation was greater during the perception of natural (versus unnatural) motion (P < 0.05). By contrast, in DYT1 dystonia subjects, activation was relatively greater

  8. The influence of yaw motion on the perception of active vs passive visual curvilinear displacement.

    PubMed

    Savona, Florian; Stratulat, Anca Melania; Roussarie, Vincent; Bourdin, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Self-motion perception, which partly determines the realism of dynamic driving simulators, is based on multisensory integration. However, it remains unclear how the brain integrates these cues to create adequate motion perception, especially for curvilinear displacements. In the present study, the effect of visual, inertial and visuo-inertial cues (concordant or discordant bimodal cues) on self-motion perception was analyzed. Subjects were asked to evaluate (externally produced) or produce (self-controlled) curvilinear displacements as accurately as possible. The results show systematic overestimation of displacement, with better performance for active subjects than for passive ones. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that participants used unimodal or bimodal cues differently in performing their activity. When passive, subjects systematically integrated visual and inertial cues even when discordant, but with weightings that depended on the dynamics. On the contrary, active subjects were able to reject the inertial cue when the discordance became too high, producing self-motion perception on the basis of more reliable information. Thereby, multisensory integration seems to follow a non-linear integration model of, i.e., the cues' weight changes with the cue reliability and/or the intensity of the stimuli, as reported by previous studies. These results represent a basis for the adaptation of motion cueing algorithms are developed for dynamic driving simulators, by taking into account the dynamics of simulated motion in line with the status of the participants (driver or passenger).

  9. Intra-articular pressures and joint mechanics: should we pay attention to effusion in knee osteoarthritis?

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Derek James

    2014-09-01

    What factors play a role to ensure a knee joint does what it should given the demands of moving through the physical environment? This paper aims to probe the hypothesis that intra-articular joint pressures, once a topic of interest, have been left aside in contemporary frameworks in which we now view knee joint function. The focus on ligamentous deficiencies and the chondrocentric view of osteoarthritis, while important, have left little attention to the consideration of other factors that can impair joint function across the lifespan. Dynamic knee stability is required during every step we take. While there is much known about the role that passive structures and muscular activation play in maintaining a healthy knee joint, this framework does not account for the role that intra-articular joint pressures may have in providing joint stability during motion and how these factors interact. Joint injuries invariably result in some form of intra-articular fluid accumulation. Ultimately, it may be how the knee mechanically responds to this fluid, of which pressure plays a significant role that provides the mechanisms for continued function. Do joint pressures provide an important foundation for maintaining knee function? This hypothesis is unique and argues that we are missing an important piece of the puzzle when attempting to understand implications that joint injury and disease have for joint function.

  10. The Effects of a Lateral Wedge Insole on Knee and Ankle Joints During Slope Walking.

    PubMed

    Uto, Yuki; Maeda, Tetsuo; Kiyama, Ryoji; Kawada, Masayuki; Tokunaga, Ken; Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Fukudome, Kiyohiro; Ohshige, Tadasu; Yoshimoto, Yoichi; Yone, Kazunori

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a lateral wedge insole reduces the external knee adduction moment during slope walking. Twenty young, healthy subjects participated in this study. Subjects walked up and down a slope using 2 different insoles: a control flat insole and a 7° lateral wedge insole. A three-dimensional motion analysis system and force plate were used to examine the knee adduction moment, the ankle valgus moment, and the moment arm of the ground reaction force to the knee joint center in the frontal plane. The lateral wedge insole significantly decreased the moment arm of the ground reaction force, resulting in a reduction of the knee adduction moment during slope walking, similar to level walking. The reduction ratio of knee adduction moment by the lateral wedge insole during the early stance of up-slope walking was larger than that of level walking. Conversely, the lateral wedge insole increased the ankle valgus moment during slope walking, especially during the early stance phase of up-slope walking. Clinicians should examine the utilization of a lateral wedge insole for knee osteoarthritis patients who perform inclined walking during daily activity, in consideration of the load on the ankle joint. PMID:26252560

  11. Effects of eating on vection-induced motion sickness, cardiac vagal tone, and gastric myoelectric activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uijtdehaage, S. H.; Stern, R. M.; Koch, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of food ingestion on motion sickness severity and its physiological mechanisms. Forty-six fasted subjects were assigned either to a meal group or to a no-meal group. Electrogastrographic (EGG) indices (normal 3 cpm activity and abnormal 4-9 cpm tachyarrhythmia) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) were measured before and after a meal and during a subsequent exposure to a rotating drum in which illusory self-motion was induced. The results indicated that food intake enhanced cardiac parasympathetic tone (RSA) and increased gastric 3 cpm activity. Postprandial effects on motion sickness severity remain equivocal due to group differences in RSA baseline levels. During drum rotation, dysrhythmic activity of the stomach (tachyarrhythmia) and vagal withdrawal were observed. Furthermore, high levels of vagal tone prior to drum rotation predicted a low incidence of motion sickness symptoms, and were associated positively with gastric 3 cpm activity and negatively with tachyarrhythmia. These data suggest that enhanced levels of parasympathetic activity can alleviate motion sickness symptoms by suppressing, in part, its dysrhythmic gastric underpinnings.

  12. The effect of prosthetic ankle energy storage and return properties on muscle activity in below-knee amputee walking.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Jessica D; Klute, Glenn K; Neptune, Richard R

    2011-02-01

    In an effort to improve amputee gait, energy storage and return (ESAR) prosthetic feet have been developed to provide enhanced function by storing and returning mechanical energy through elastic structures. However, the effect of ESAR feet on muscle activity in amputee walking is not well understood. Previous studies have analyzed commercial prosthetic feet with a wide range of material properties and geometries, making it difficult to associate specific ESAR properties with changes in muscle activity. In contrast, prosthetic ankles offer a systematic way to manipulate ESAR properties while keeping the prosthetic heel and keel geometry intact. In the present study, ESAR ankles were added to a Seattle Lightfoot2 to carefully control the energy storage and return by altering the ankle stiffness and orientation in order to identify its effect on lower extremity muscle activity during below-knee amputee walking. A total of five foot conditions were analyzed: solid ankle (SA), stiff forward-facing ankle (FA), compliant FA, stiff reverse-facing ankle (RA) and compliant RA. The ESAR ankles decreased the activity of muscles that contribute to body forward propulsion and increased the activity of muscles that provide body support. The compliant ankles generally caused a greater change in muscle activity than the stiff ankles, but without a corresponding increase in energy return. Ankle orientation also had an effect, with RA generally causing a lower change in muscle activity than FA. These results highlight the influence of ESAR stiffness on muscle activity and the importance of prescribing appropriate prosthetic foot stiffness to improve rehabilitation outcomes.

  13. Embodied Semiotic Activities and Their Role in the Construction of Mathematical Meaning of Motion Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botzer, Galit; Yerushalmy, Michal

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the relation between bodily actions, artifact-mediated activities, and semiotic processes that students experience while producing and interpreting graphs of two-dimensional motion in the plane. We designed a technology-based setting that enabled students to engage in embodied semiotic activities and experience two modes of…

  14. Your Students Can Be Rocket Scientists! A Galaxy of Great Activities about Astronauts, Gravity, and Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1994-01-01

    Presents activities for a springtime Space Day that can teach students about astronauts, gravity, and motion. Activities include creating a paper bag spacecraft to study liftoff and having students simulate gravity's effects by walking in various manners and recording pulse rates. A list of resources is included. (SM)

  15. Morphometrical investigations on the reproductive activity of the ovaries in rats subjected to immobilization and to motion activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konstantinov, N.; Cheresharov, L.; Toshkova, S.

    1982-01-01

    Wistar-strain white female rats were divided into three groups, with the first group subjected to motion loading, the second used as control, and the third group was immobilized. A considerable reduction in numbers of corpora lutea was observed in the immobilized group, together with smaller numbers of embryos, high percent of embryo mortality, fetal growth retardation, and endometrium disorders. The control group showed no deviation from normal conditions, and there was slight improvement in reproductive activity of animals under motion loading.

  16. Treatment of knee arthrofibrosis and quadriceps insufficiency after patellar tendon repair: a case report including use of the graston technique.

    PubMed

    Black, Douglass W

    2010-06-23

    Arthrofibrosis of the knee is a surgical complication that can limit range of motion, inhibit muscle activity, and decrease patient function. Optimal conservative treatment has not been well established in the literature, leaving a clinician with limited evidence for treatment planning. Described here is part of the rehabilitative course of care for a patient with arthrofibrotic limitations after a mid-substance patellar tendon repair with augmentation. Marked limitations in knee flexion range of motion and quadriceps activity were addressed using the Graston Technique to deal with soft-tissue adhesions; traditional physical therapy care was also provided. Clear improvement in range of motion and quadriceps activity and function was noted over the course of 5 treatments during 1 month. Treatment process and clinical reasoning are offered to promote understanding and to facilitate future inquiry.

  17. Treatment of Knee Arthrofibrosis and Quadriceps Insufficiency after Patellar Tendon Repair: A Case Report Including Use of the Graston Technique

    PubMed Central

    Black, Douglass W.

    2010-01-01

    Arthrofibrosis of the knee is a surgical complication that can limit range of motion, inhibit muscle activity, and decrease patient function. Optimal conservative treatment has not been well established in the literature, leaving a clinician with limited evidence for treatment planning. Described here is part of the rehabilitative course of care for a patient with arthrofibrotic limitations after a mid-substance patellar tendon repair with augmentation. Marked limitations in knee flexion range of motion and quadriceps activity were addressed using the Graston Technique to deal with soft-tissue adhesions; traditional physical therapy care was also provided. Clear improvement in range of motion and quadriceps activity and function was noted over the course of 5 treatments during 1 month. Treatment process and clinical reasoning are offered to promote understanding and to facilitate future inquiry. PMID:21589706

  18. Multimodal integration of self-motion cues in the vestibular system: active versus passive translations.

    PubMed

    Carriot, Jerome; Brooks, Jessica X; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2013-12-11

    The ability to keep track of where we are going as we navigate through our environment requires knowledge of our ongoing location and orientation. In response to passively applied motion, the otolith organs of the vestibular system encode changes in the velocity and direction of linear self-motion (i.e., heading). When self-motion is voluntarily generated, proprioceptive and motor efference copy information is also available to contribute to the brain's internal representation of current heading direction and speed. However to date, how the brain integrates these extra-vestibular cues with otolith signals during active linear self-motion remains unknown. Here, to address this question, we compared the responses of macaque vestibular neurons during active and passive translations. Single-unit recordings were made from a subgroup of neurons at the first central stage of sensory processing in the vestibular pathways involved in postural control and the computation of self-motion perception. Neurons responded far less robustly to otolith stimulation during self-generated than passive head translations. Yet, the mechanism underlying the marked cancellation of otolith signals did not affect other characteristics of neuronal responses (i.e., baseline firing rate, tuning ratio, orientation of maximal sensitivity vector). Transiently applied perturbations during active motion further established that an otolith cancellation signal was only gated in conditions where proprioceptive sensory feedback matched the motor-based expectation. Together our results have important implications for understanding the brain's ability to ensure accurate postural and motor control, as well as perceptual stability, during active self-motion.

  19. Spontaneous Motion in Hierarchically Assembled Active Cellular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    With exquisite precision and reproducibility, cells orchestrate the cooperative action of thousands of nanometer-sized molecular motors to carry out mechanical tasks at much larger length scales, such as cell motility, division and replication. Besides their biological importance, such inherently far-from-equilibrium processes are an inspiration for the development of soft materials with highly sought after biomimetic properties such as autonomous motility and self-healing. I will describe our exploration of such a class of biologically inspired soft active materials. Starting from extensile bundles comprised of microtubules and kinesin, we hierarchically assemble active analogs of polymeric gels, liquid crystals and emulsions. At high enough concentration, microtubule bundles form an active gel network capable of generating internally driven chaotic flows that enhance transport and fluid mixing. When confined to emulsion droplets, these 3D networks buckle onto the water-oil interface forming a dense thin film of bundles exhibiting cascades of collective buckling, fracture, and self-healing driven by internally generated stresses from the kinesin clusters. When compressed against surfaces, this active nematic cortex exerts traction stresses that propel the locomotion of the droplet. Taken together, these observations exemplify how assemblies of animate microscopic objects exhibit collective biomimetic properties that are fundamentally distinct from those found in materials assembled from inanimate building blocks. These assemblies, in turn, enable the generation of a new class of materials that exhibit macroscale flow phenomena emerging from nanoscale components.

  20. Gait Using Pneumatic Brace for End-Stage Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; Starr, Roland; Chughtai, Morad; Mont, Michael A; Harwin, Steven F; Bhave, Anil

    2016-04-01

    More than 20 million individuals in the United States are affected by knee osteoarthritis (OA), which can lead to altered biomechanics and excessive joint loading. The use of an unloader pneumatic brace with extension assist has been proposed as a nonoperative treatment modality that may improve gait mechanics and correct knee malalignment. We assessed the following parameters in patients who have knee OA treated with and without a brace: (1) changes in temporospatial parameters in gait; (2) knee range of motion, knee extension at heel strike, and foot placement; (3) knee joint moments and impulse; and (4) changes in dynamic stiffness and rate of change of knee flexion during midstance to terminal stance. This 2:1 prospective, randomized, single-blinded trial evaluated 36 patients (24 brace and 12 matching). OA knee patients were randomized to receive either a pneumatic unloader brace or a standard nonoperative treatment regimen as the matching cohort for a 3-month period. They underwent evaluation of gait parameters using a three-dimensional gait analysis system at their initial appointment and at 3 months follow-up. All the testing, pre- and postbracing were performed without wearing the brace to examine for retained effects. Treatment with the brace led to significant improvements versus standard treatment in various gait parameters. Patients in the brace group had improvements in walking speed, knee extension at heel strike, total range of motion, knee joint forces, and rate of knee flexion from midstance to terminal stance when compared with the matching cohort. Knee OA patients who used a pneumatic unloader brace for 3 months for at least 3 hours per day had significant improvements various gait parameters when compared with a standard nonoperative therapy cohort. Braced patients demonstrated gait-modifying affects when not wearing the brace. These results are encouraging and suggest that this device represents a promising treatment modality for knee OA that

  1. Knee microfracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... knee: a 2-year randomised study. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc . 2010 Apr;18(4):519-27. Hurst JM, Steadman JR, O'Brien L, Rodkey WG, Briggs KK. Rehabilitation following microfracture for chondral injury in the knee. ...

  2. HIGH TIBIAL OSTEOTOMY VERSUS UNICOMPARTMENTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY FOR MEDIAL COMPARTMENT ARTHROSIS OF THE KNEE: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    PubMed Central

    Dettoni, Federico; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Castoldi, Filippo; Bruzzone, Matteo; Blonna, Davide; Rossi, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    This review examined the literature regarding high tibial osteotomy (HTO) and imicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA), focusing on indications, survivorship and functional outcomes of the two procedures, as well as revision to total knee arthroplasty (TKA) after failed HTO or UKA. HTO and UKA share the same indications in selected cases of medial unicompartmental knee arthrosis. These indications include patients who are: 1) 55 to 65 years old; 2) moderately active; 3) non-obese; 4) have mild varus malalignment; 5) no joint instability; 6) good range of motion; and 7) moderate unicompartmental arthrosis. Few studies are available in the literature comparing the outcomes of HTO and UKA. Those few studies show slightly better results for UKA in terms of survivorship and functional outcome. Nevertheless, the differences are not remarkable, the study methods are not homogeneous and most of the papers report on closing wedge HTOs. For these reasons, no definitive conclusions can be drawn. TKA represents the revision option for both treatments and yields satisfactory functional outcomes and survivorship. Whether revision HTO and UKA-to-TKA perform any worse than primary TKA is still controversial. With the correct indications, both treatments produce durable and predictable outcomes in the treatment of medial unicompartmental arthrosis of the knee. There is no evidence of superior results of one treatment over the other. PMID:21045985

  3. Soft tissue artifact compensation in knee kinematics by multi-body optimization: Performance of subject-specific knee joint models.

    PubMed

    Clément, Julien; Dumas, Raphaël; Hagemeister, Nicola; de Guise, Jaques A

    2015-11-01

    Soft tissue artifact (STA) distort marker-based knee kinematics measures and make them difficult to use in clinical practice. None of the current methods designed to compensate for STA is suitable, but multi-body optimization (MBO) has demonstrated encouraging results and can be improved. The goal of this study was to develop and validate the performance of knee joint models, with anatomical and subject-specific kinematic constraints, used in MBO to reduce STA errors. Twenty subjects were recruited: 10 healthy and 10 osteoarthritis (OA) subjects. Subject-specific knee joint models were evaluated by comparing dynamic knee kinematics recorded by a motion capture system (KneeKG™) and optimized with MBO to quasi-static knee kinematics measured by a low-dose, upright, biplanar radiographic imaging system (EOS(®)). Errors due to STA ranged from 1.6° to 22.4° for knee rotations and from 0.8 mm to 14.9 mm for knee displacements in healthy and OA subjects. Subject-specific knee joint models were most effective in compensating for STA in terms of abduction-adduction, inter-external rotation and antero-posterior displacement. Root mean square errors with subject-specific knee joint models ranged from 2.2±1.2° to 6.0±3.9° for knee rotations and from 2.4±1.1 mm to 4.3±2.4 mm for knee displacements in healthy and OA subjects, respectively. Our study shows that MBO can be improved with subject-specific knee joint models, and that the quality of the motion capture calibration is critical. Future investigations should focus on more refined knee joint models to reproduce specific OA knee geometry and physiology.

  4. Clinical evaluation of a mobile sensor-based gait analysis method for outcome measurement after knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Calliess, Tilman; Bocklage, Raphael; Karkosch, Roman; Marschollek, Michael; Windhagen, Henning; Schulze, Mareike

    2014-08-28

    Clinical scores and motion-capturing gait analysis are today's gold standard for outcome measurement after knee arthroplasty, although they are criticized for bias and their ability to reflect patients' actual quality of life has been questioned. In this context, mobile gait analysis systems have been introduced to overcome some of these limitations. This study used a previously developed mobile gait analysis system comprising three inertial sensor units to evaluate daily activities and sports. The sensors were taped to the lumbosacral junction and the thigh and shank of the affected limb. The annotated raw data was evaluated using our validated proprietary software. Six patients undergoing knee arthroplasty were examined the day before and 12 months after surgery. All patients reported a satisfactory outcome, although four patients still had limitations in their desired activities. In this context, feasible running speed demonstrated a good correlation with reported impairments in sports-related activities. Notably, knee flexion angle while descending stairs and the ability to stop abruptly when running exhibited good correlation with the clinical stability and proprioception of the knee. Moreover, fatigue effects were displayed in some patients. The introduced system appears to be suitable for outcome measurement after knee arthroplasty and has the potential to overcome some of the limitations of stationary gait labs while gathering additional meaningful parameters regarding the force limits of the knee.

  5. Clinical Evaluation of a Mobile Sensor-Based Gait Analysis Method for Outcome Measurement after Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Calliess, Tilman; Bocklage, Raphael; Karkosch, Roman; Marschollek, Michael; Windhagen, Henning; Schulze, Mareike

    2014-01-01

    Clinical scores and motion-capturing gait analysis are today's gold standard for outcome measurement after knee arthroplasty, although they are criticized for bias and their ability to reflect patients' actual quality of life has been questioned. In this context, mobile gait analysis systems have been introduced to overcome some of these limitations. This study used a previously developed mobile gait analysis system comprising three inertial sensor units to evaluate daily activities and sports. The sensors were taped to the lumbosacral junction and the thigh and shank of the affected limb. The annotated raw data was evaluated using our validated proprietary software. Six patients undergoing knee arthroplasty were examined the day before and 12 months after surgery. All patients reported a satisfactory outcome, although four patients still had limitations in their desired activities. In this context, feasible running speed demonstrated a good correlation with reported impairments in sports-related activities. Notably, knee flexion angle while descending stairs and the ability to stop abruptly when running exhibited good correlation with the clinical stability and proprioception of the knee. Moreover, fatigue effects were displayed in some patients. The introduced system appears to be suitable for outcome measurement after knee arthroplasty and has the potential to overcome some of the limitations of stationary gait labs while gathering additional meaningful parameters regarding the force limits of the knee. PMID:25171119

  6. The Waist Width of Skis Influences the Kinematics of the Knee Joint in Alpine Skiing

    PubMed Central

    Zorko, Martin; Nemec, Bojan; Babič, Jan; Lešnik, Blaz; Supej, Matej

    2015-01-01

    Recently alpine skis with a wider waist width, which medially shifts the contact between the ski edge and the snow while turning, have appeared on the market. The aim of this study was to determine the knee joint kinematics during turning while using skis of different waist widths (65mm, 88mm, 110mm). Six highly skilled skiers performed ten turns on a predefined course (similar to a giant slalom course). The relation of femur and tibia in the sagital, frontal and coronal planes was captured by using an inertial motion capture suit, and Global Navigation Satellite System was used to determine the skiers’ trajectories. With respect of the outer ski the knee joint flexion, internal rotation and abduction significantly decreased with the increase of the ski waist width for the greatest part of the ski turn. The greatest abduction with the narrow ski and the greatest external rotation (lowest internal rotation) with the wide ski are probably the reflection of two different strategies of coping the biomechanical requirements in the ski turn. These changes in knee kinematics were most probably due to an active adaptation of the skier to the changed biomechanical conditions using wider skis. The results indicated that using skis with large waist widths on hard, frozen surfaces could bring the knee joint unfavorably closer to the end of the range of motion in transversal and frontal planes as well as potentially increasing the risk of degenerative knee injuries. Key points The change in the skis’ waist width caused a change in the knee joint movement strategies, which had a tendency to adapt the skier to different biomechanical conditions. The use of wider skis or, in particular, skis with a large waist width, on a hard or frozen surface, could unfavourably bring the knee joint closer to the end of range of motion in transversal and frontal planes as well as may potentially increase the risk of degenerative knee injuries. The overall results of the abduction and

  7. The Waist Width of Skis Influences the Kinematics of the Knee Joint in Alpine Skiing.

    PubMed

    Zorko, Martin; Nemec, Bojan; Babič, Jan; Lešnik, Blaz; Supej, Matej

    2015-09-01

    Recently alpine skis with a wider waist width, which medially shifts the contact between the ski edge and the snow while turning, have appeared on the market. The aim of this study was to determine the knee joint kinematics during turning while using skis of different waist widths (65mm, 88mm, 110mm). Six highly skilled skiers performed ten turns on a predefined course (similar to a giant slalom course). The relation of femur and tibia in the sagital, frontal and coronal planes was captured by using an inertial motion capture suit, and Global Navigation Satellite System was used to determine the skiers' trajectories. With respect of the outer ski the knee joint flexion, internal rotation and abduction significantly decreased with the increase of the ski waist width for the greatest part of the ski turn. The greatest abduction with the narrow ski and the greatest external rotation (lowest internal rotation) with the wide ski are probably the reflection of two different strategies of coping the biomechanical requirements in the ski turn. These changes in knee kinematics were most probably due to an active adaptation of the skier to the changed biomechanical conditions using wider skis. The results indicated that using skis with large waist widths on hard, frozen surfaces could bring the knee joint unfavorably closer to the end of the range of motion in transversal and frontal planes as well as potentially increasing the risk of degenerative knee injuries. Key pointsThe change in the skis' waist width caused a change in the knee joint movement strategies, which had a tendency to adapt the skier to different biomechanical conditions.The use of wider skis or, in particular, skis with a large waist width, on a hard or frozen surface, could unfavourably bring the knee joint closer to the end of range of motion in transversal and frontal planes as well as may potentially increase the risk of degenerative knee injuries.The overall results of the abduction and internal

  8. Activation of the Human MT Complex by Motion in Depth Induced by a Moving Cast Shadow

    PubMed Central

    Katsuyama, Narumi; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A moving cast shadow is a powerful monocular depth cue for motion perception in depth. For example, when a cast shadow moves away from or toward an object in a two-dimensional plane, the object appears to move toward or away from the observer in depth, respectively, whereas the size and position of the object are constant. Although the cortical mechanisms underlying motion perception in depth by cast shadow are unknown, the human MT complex (hMT+) is likely involved in the process, as it is sensitive to motion in depth represented by binocular depth cues. In the present study, we examined this possibility by using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. First, we identified the cortical regions sensitive to the motion of a square in depth represented via binocular disparity. Consistent with previous studies, we observed significant activation in the bilateral hMT+, and defined functional regions of interest (ROIs) there. We then investigated the activity of the ROIs during observation of the following stimuli: 1) a central square that appeared to move back and forth via a moving cast shadow (mCS); 2) a segmented and scrambled cast shadow presented beside the square (sCS); and 3) no cast shadow (nCS). Participants perceived motion of the square in depth in the mCS condition only. The activity of the hMT+ was significantly higher in the mCS compared with the sCS and nCS conditions. Moreover, the hMT+ was activated equally in both hemispheres in the mCS condition, despite presentation of the cast shadow in the bottom-right quadrant of the stimulus. Perception of the square moving in depth across visual hemifields may be reflected in the bilateral activation of the hMT+. We concluded that the hMT+ is involved in motion perception in depth induced by moving cast shadow and by binocular disparity. PMID:27597999

  9. Activation of the Human MT Complex by Motion in Depth Induced by a Moving Cast Shadow.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Narumi; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A moving cast shadow is a powerful monocular depth cue for motion perception in depth. For example, when a cast shadow moves away from or toward an object in a two-dimensional plane, the object appears to move toward or away from the observer in depth, respectively, whereas the size and position of the object are constant. Although the cortical mechanisms underlying motion perception in depth by cast shadow are unknown, the human MT complex (hMT+) is likely involved in the process, as it is sensitive to motion in depth represented by binocular depth cues. In the present study, we examined this possibility by using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. First, we identified the cortical regions sensitive to the motion of a square in depth represented via binocular disparity. Consistent with previous studies, we observed significant activation in the bilateral hMT+, and defined functional regions of interest (ROIs) there. We then investigated the activity of the ROIs during observation of the following stimuli: 1) a central square that appeared to move back and forth via a moving cast shadow (mCS); 2) a segmented and scrambled cast shadow presented beside the square (sCS); and 3) no cast shadow (nCS). Participants perceived motion of the square in depth in the mCS condition only. The activity of the hMT+ was significantly higher in the mCS compared with the sCS and nCS conditions. Moreover, the hMT+ was activated equally in both hemispheres in the mCS condition, despite presentation of the cast shadow in the bottom-right quadrant of the stimulus. Perception of the square moving in depth across visual hemifields may be reflected in the bilateral activation of the hMT+. We concluded that the hMT+ is involved in motion perception in depth induced by moving cast shadow and by binocular disparity. PMID:27597999

  10. Activation of the Human MT Complex by Motion in Depth Induced by a Moving Cast Shadow.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Narumi; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A moving cast shadow is a powerful monocular depth cue for motion perception in depth. For example, when a cast shadow moves away from or toward an object in a two-dimensional plane, the object appears to move toward or away from the observer in depth, respectively, whereas the size and position of the object are constant. Although the cortical mechanisms underlying motion perception in depth by cast shadow are unknown, the human MT complex (hMT+) is likely involved in the process, as it is sensitive to motion in depth represented by binocular depth cues. In the present study, we examined this possibility by using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. First, we identified the cortical regions sensitive to the motion of a square in depth represented via binocular disparity. Consistent with previous studies, we observed significant activation in the bilateral hMT+, and defined functional regions of interest (ROIs) there. We then investigated the activity of the ROIs during observation of the following stimuli: 1) a central square that appeared to move back and forth via a moving cast shadow (mCS); 2) a segmented and scrambled cast shadow presented beside the square (sCS); and 3) no cast shadow (nCS). Participants perceived motion of the square in depth in the mCS condition only. The activity of the hMT+ was significantly higher in the mCS compared with the sCS and nCS conditions. Moreover, the hMT+ was activated equally in both hemispheres in the mCS condition, despite presentation of the cast shadow in the bottom-right quadrant of the stimulus. Perception of the square moving in depth across visual hemifields may be reflected in the bilateral activation of the hMT+. We concluded that the hMT+ is involved in motion perception in depth induced by moving cast shadow and by binocular disparity.

  11. Basic biomechanic principles of knee instability.

    PubMed

    Zlotnicki, Jason P; Naendrup, Jan-Hendrik; Ferrer, Gerald A; Debski, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    Motion at the knee joint is a complex mechanical phenomenon. Stability is provided by a combination of static and dynamic structures that work in concert to prevent excessive movement or instability that is inherent in various knee injuries. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a main stabilizer of the knee, providing both translational and rotatory constraint. Despite the high volume of research directed at native ACL function, pathogenesis and surgical reconstruction of this structure, a gold standard for objective quantification of injury and subsequent repair, has not been demonstrated. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that novel anatomic structures may play a significant role in knee stability. The use of biomechanical principles and testing techniques provides essential objective/quantitative information on the function of bone, ligaments, joint capsule, and other contributing soft tissues in response to various loading conditions. This review discusses the principles of biomechanics in relation to knee stability, with a focus on the objective quantification of knee stability, the individual contributions of specific knee structures to stability, and the most recent technological advances in the biomechanical evaluation of the knee joint. PMID:27007474

  12. MAGNETIC HELICITY TRANSPORTED BY FLUX EMERGENCE AND SHUFFLING MOTIONS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 10930

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Kitai, R.; Takizawa, K. E-mail: zhangyin@bao.ac.cn

    2012-06-01

    We present a new methodology which can determine magnetic helicity transport by the passage of helical magnetic field lines from the sub-photosphere and the shuffling motions of footpoints of preexisting coronal field lines separately. It is well known that only the velocity component, which is perpendicular to the magnetic field ({upsilon}{sub B}), has contributed to the helicity accumulation. Here, we demonstrate that {upsilon}{sub B} can be deduced from a horizontal motion and vector magnetograms under a simple relation of {upsilon}{sub t} = {mu}{sub t} + ({upsilon}{sub n}/B{sub n} ) B{sub t}, as suggested by Demoulin and Berger. Then after dividing {upsilon}{sub B} into two components, as one is tangential and the other is normal to the solar surface, we can determine both terms of helicity transport. Active region (AR) NOAA 10930 is analyzed as an example during its solar disk center passage by using data obtained by the Spectropolarimeter and the Narrowband Filter Imager of Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. We find that in our calculation the helicity injection by flux emergence and shuffling motions have the same sign. During the period we studied, the main contribution of helicity accumulation comes from the flux emergence effect, while the dynamic transient evolution comes from the shuffling motions effect. Our observational results further indicate that for this AR the apparent rotational motion in the following sunspot is the real shuffling motions on the solar surface.

  13. Modelling and analysis on biomechanical dynamic characteristics of knee flexion movement under squatting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianping; Tao, Kun; Li, Huanyi; Wang, Chengtao

    2014-01-01

    The model of three-dimensional (3D) geometric knee was built, which included femoral-tibial, patellofemoral articulations and the bone and soft tissues. Dynamic finite element (FE) model of knee was developed to simulate both the kinematics and the internal stresses during knee flexion. The biomechanical experimental system of knee was built to simulate knee squatting using cadaver knees. The flexion motion and dynamic contact characteristics of knee were analyzed, and verified by comparing with the data from in vitro experiment. The results showed that the established dynamic FE models of knee are capable of predicting kinematics and the contact stresses during flexion, and could be an efficient tool for the analysis of total knee replacement (TKR) and knee prosthesis design.

  14. Modelling and Analysis on Biomechanical Dynamic Characteristics of Knee Flexion Movement under Squatting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianping; Tao, Kun; Li, Huanyi; Wang, Chengtao

    2014-01-01

    The model of three-dimensional (3D) geometric knee was built, which included femoral-tibial, patellofemoral articulations and the bone and soft tissues. Dynamic finite element (FE) model of knee was developed to simulate both the kinematics and the internal stresses during knee flexion. The biomechanical experimental system of knee was built to simulate knee squatting using cadaver knees. The flexion motion and dynamic contact characteristics of knee were analyzed, and verified by comparing with the data from in vitro experiment. The results showed that the established dynamic FE models of knee are capable of predicting kinematics and the contact stresses during flexion, and could be an efficient tool for the analysis of total knee replacement (TKR) and knee prosthesis design. PMID:25013852

  15. A case-control study to investigate the relation between low and moderate levels of physical activity and osteoarthritis of the knee using data collected as part of the Allied Dunbar National Fitness Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, A; Muir, K; Mockett, S; Fentem, P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Physical activity is being recommended as an intervention for seemingly almost universal improvements to health. A potential concern with this recommendation for increased exercise is that some believe increased levels of activity may lead to increased incidence of osteoarthritis of the knee (knee OA), as a result of accelerated "wear and tear" of the major joints.
OBJECTIVE—To investigate the hypothesis that the occurrence of knee OA may be related to the duration of participation in some forms of sport and active recreation.
METHODS—The relation between habitual exercise, reported by a cross section of people surveyed in England, and self reported knee OA was investigated. Data were derived from the Allied Dunbar National Fitness Survey (1990-91). A matched retrospective case-control design was used and a new exposure classification system which categorised different grades of activities for different time periods for each subject's lifetime participation in regular physical activities was developed. Additional data on knee injuries sustained and bodily composition were also included in a multivariate analysis.
RESULTS—From 4316 people originally interviewed, 216 eligible cases (66 men, 150 women) were identified (mean age 57.1). Each case was matched to four controls. When habitual sport/exercise participation were examined during a subject's life, only exposure to regular long walks and being physically active between the ages of 20 and 24 suggested any association with developing knee OA later in life. The only strong association found was a greatly increased risk of knee OA having previously sustained a knee injury (p<0.01, odds ratio 8.0 (95% confidence interval 2.0 to 32.0)).
CONCLUSIONS—There was little evidence to suggest that increased levels of regular physical activity throughout life lead to an increased risk of knee OA later in life. Previous knee injury was associated with an increased risk of knee OA

  16. Spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in collective active motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breier, Rebekka E.; Selinger, Robin L. B.; Ciccotti, Giovanni; Herminghaus, Stephan; Mazza, Marco G.

    2016-02-01

    Chiral symmetry breaking is ubiquitous in biological systems, from DNA to bacterial suspensions. A key unresolved problem is how chiral structures may spontaneously emerge from achiral interactions. We study a simple model of active swimmers in three dimensions that effectively incorporates hydrodynamic interactions. We perform large-scale molecular dynamics simulations (up to 106 particles) and find long-lived metastable collective states that exhibit chiral organization although the interactions are achiral. We elucidate under which conditions these chiral states will emerge and grow to large scales. To explore the complex phase space available to the system, we perform nonequilibrium quenches on a one-dimensional Lebwohl-Lasher model with periodic boundary conditions to study the likelihood of formation of chiral structures.

  17. [Knee endoprosthesis: sports orthopedics possibilities and limitations].

    PubMed

    Kuster, M S; Grob, K; Gächter, A

    2000-08-01

    Many patients would like to resume some sport activities after total knee replacement; however, most recommendations are based on subjective opinion rather than scientific evidence. The following paper presents a literature review of sports after total knee replacement and includes recommendations which are based on biomechanical laws. Most total knee designs show increased conformity near full extension. Beyond a certain knee flexion angle, the conformity ratio decreases due to a reduced femoral radius. Therefore, these designs accept higher loads near full extension than in flexion. In order to recommend suitable physical activities after total knee replacement, both the load and the knee flexion angle of the peak load must be considered. It has been shown that power walking and cycling produce the lowest polyethylene inlay stress of a total knee replacement and seem to be the least demanding endurance activities. Jogging and downhill walking show high inlay stress levels and should be avoided. Hence, for mountain hiking, patients are advised to avoid descents or at least use skipoles and walk slowly downhill to reduce the load on the knee joint. It must also be mentioned that any activity represents additional wear, which may affect the long-term results of total knee replacements. Further clinical studies are necessary to validate the biomechanical investigations. PMID:11013918

  18. Can We Quantify Functional Improvement Following Total Knee Arthroplasty in the Clinical Setting?

    PubMed

    Parks, Nancy L; Whitney, Catherine E; Engh, Gerard A

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if improvements in knee function after arthroplasty could be practicably measured in the clinical setting using available, validated technology. The tools we assessed included a timed test of common activities, a platform posturography analysis, and a portable gait laboratory device to quantify body segment motion. We measured the function of 25 total knee arthroplasty patients before surgery and at 1, 4, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Assessment of sit-to-stand, walking, stair climbing, lunging, Knee Society Scores, and Oxford Survey Scores were collected at each interval. Patients showed significant improvement in step length, gait speed, symmetry of weight distribution, symmetry of lunging, and speed of stair climbing. Changes in function with long-term follow-up can be precisely measured, making this technology promising for clinical or research applications.

  19. Effective one step-iterative fiducial marker-based compensation for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm cone-beam CT scanning of knees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Maier, Andreas; Berger, Martin; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-03-01

    We previously introduced three different fiducial marker-based correction methods (2D projection shifting, 2D projection warping, and 3D image warping) for patients' involuntary motion in the lower body during weight-bearing Carm CT scanning. The 3D warping method performed better than 2D methods since it could more accurately take into account the lower body motion in 3D. However, as the 3D warping method applies different rotational and translational movement to the reconstructed image for each projection frame, distance-related weightings were slightly twisted and thus result in overlaying background noise over the entire image. In order to suppress background noise and artifacts (e.g. metallic marker-caused streaks), the 3D warping method has been improved by incorporating bilateral filtering and a Landwebertype iteration in one step. A series of projection images of five healthy volunteers standing at various flexion angles were acquired using a C-arm cone-beam CT system with a flat panel. A horizontal scanning trajectory of the C-arm was calibrated to generate projection matrices. Using the projection matrices, the static reference marker coordinates in 3D were estimated and used for the improved 3D warping method. The improved 3D warping method effectively reduced background noise down below the noise level of 2D methods and also eliminated metal-generated streaks. Thus, improved visibility of soft tissue structures (e.g. fat and muscle) was achieved while maintaining sharp edges at bone-tissue interfaces. Any high resolution weight-bearing cone-beam CT system can apply this method for motion compensation.

  20. Sports, Physical Activity and Patient-Reported Outcomes After Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty in Young Patients.

    PubMed

    Walker, Tilman; Streit, Julia; Gotterbarm, Tobias; Bruckner, Thomas; Merle, Christian; Streit, Marcus R

    2015-11-01

    One hundred-and-one patients age 60 or younger following medial mobile bearing UKA were reviewed retrospectively with a minimum follow-up of 2 years using the Schulthess activity score, Tegner, UCLA and SF-36 score to assess their level of physical activity and quality of life. Patients showed a rapid recovery and resumption of their activities with a return-to-activity rate of 93%. Most common activities were low impact, whereas high-impact activities showed a significant decrease. Precaution was found to be the main reason for a decrease in the level of activity. The results of this study demonstrate that patients age 60 or younger following medial UKA were able to return to regular physical activities with almost two-thirds of the patients reaching a high activity level (UCLA≥7).

  1. Design and evaluation of an orthotic knee-extension assist.

    PubMed

    Spring, Alexander N; Kofman, Jonathan; Lemaire, Edward D

    2012-09-01

    Individuals with quadriceps muscle weakness often have difficulty generating the knee-extension moments required to complete common mobility tasks. A new device that provides knee-extension moments through a range of knee angles was designed to help individuals perform stand-to-sit and sit-to-stand tasks. The novel knee-extension assist (KEA) was designed as a modular component to be incorporated into existing knee-ankle-foot orthoses or used in a knee orthosis. During stand-to-sit, a set of springs is loaded as the knee flexes under bodyweight and the KEA thus provides a knee-extension moment that aids in achieving a smoothly controlled knee flexion. The springs can be locked in place at the end of knee flexion to prevent unwanted knee extension while the user is seated. The entire knee extension assist can be disengaged to allow free joint motion anytime the affected leg is unloaded. During sit-to-stand, the KEA assists knee extension by returning the energy stored in the springs as an extension moment. In mechanical testing of a prototype of the new KEA, a mean maximum extension moment of 42.9 ± 0.46 Nm was provided by the device during flexion and 28.4 ± 0.28 Nm during extension. A biomechanical evaluation with two able-bodied individuals demonstrated the effectiveness of the KEA in successfully assisting stand-to-sit and sit-to-stand tasks. During stand-to-sit, the KEA provided 82% and 75% of the total (muscle and KEA) knee-extension moment required by the braced leg for the task for the two subjects, respectively; and during sit-to-stand, the KEA provided 56% and 50% of the total knee-extension moment for the two subjects, respectively. This KEA performance exceeded 50% knee-extension moment assistance for a 70 kg person.

  2. Analysis of in vitro and in vivo function of total knee replacements using dynamic contact models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dong

    Despite the high incidence of osteoarthritis in human knee joint, its causes remain unknown. Total knee replacement (TKR) has been shown clinically to be effective in restoring the knee function. However, wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene has limited the longevity of TKRs. To address these important issues, it is necessary to investigate the in vitro and in vivo function of total knee replacements using dynamic contact models. A multibody dynamic model of an AMTI knee simulator was developed. Incorporating a wear prediction model into the contact model based on elastic foundation theory enables the contact surface to take into account creep and wear during the dynamic simulation. Comparisons of the predicted damage depth, area, and volume lost with worn retrievals from a physical machine were made to validate the model. In vivo tibial force distributions during dynamic and high flexion activities were investigated using the dynamic contact model. In vivo medial and lateral contact forces experienced by a well-aligned instrumented knee implant, as well as upper and lower bounds on contact pressures for a variety of activities were studied. For all activities, the predicted medial and lateral contact forces were insensitive to the selected material model. For this patient, the load split during the mid-stance phase of gait and during stair is more equal than anticipated. The external knee adduction torque has been proposed as a surrogate measure for medial compartment load during gait. However, a direct link between these two quantities has not been demonstrated using in vivo measurement of medial compartment load. In vivo data collected from a subject with an instrumented knee implant were analyzed to evaluate this link. The subject performed five different overground gait motions (normal, fast, slow, wide, and toe out) while instrumented implant, video motion, and ground reaction data were simultaneously collected. The high correlation coefficient

  3. Image-based synchronization of force and bead motion in active electromagnetic microrheometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang-Young; Saleh, Omar A.

    2014-12-01

    In the past, electromagnetic tweezers have been used to make active microrheometers. An active microrheometer measures the dynamic mechanical properties of a material from the motion of embedded particles under external force, e.g. a sinusoidal magnetic force generated by a sinusoidal current on a coil. The oscillating amplitude and the phase lag of the motion are then used to estimate the material’s dynamic mechanical properties. The phase lag, in particular, requires precise synchronization of the particle motion with the external force. In previous works, synchronization difficulties have arisen from measuring two parameters with two instruments, one of them being a camera. We solved the synchronization issue by measuring two parameters with a single instrument, the camera alone. From captured images, particles can be tracked in three dimensions through an image-analysis algorithm while the current on the coil can be measured from the brightness of the image; this enables simultaneous synchronization of the phases of the driving current on the electromagnet coil and the motion of the magnetic probe particle. We calibrate the phase delay between the magnetic force and the particle’s motion in glycerol and confirm the calibration with a Hall probe. The technique is further tested by measuring the shear modulus of a polyacrylamide gel, and comparing the results to those obtained using a conventional rheometer.

  4. Active linear head motion improves dynamic visual acuity in pursuing a high-speed moving object.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tatsuhisa; Yamashita, Masayuki; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Hisa, Yasuo; Wada, Yoshiro

    2009-04-01

    We usually move both our eyes and our head when pursuing a high-speed moving object. However, the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), evoked by head motion, seems to disturb smooth pursuit eye movement because the VOR stabilizes the gaze against head motion. To determine whether head motion is advantageous for pursuing a high-speed moving object, we examined dynamic visual acuity (DVA) for a high-speed (80 degrees /s) rightward moving object with and without active linear rightward head motion (HM) at a maximum of 50 cm/s in nine healthy subjects. Furthermore, we analyzed eye and head movements to investigate the contribution of linear VOR (LVOR) and smooth eye movement under these conditions. In most subjects, active linear head motion improved DVA for a high-speed moving object. Subjects with higher DVA scores under HM had robust rightward gaze (eye + head) velocities (>60 cm/s), i.e., rightward smooth eye movements (>10 degrees /s). With the head stationary (HS), faster smooth eye movements (>40 degrees /s) were generated when the subjects pursued a high-speed moving object. They also showed anticipatory smooth eye movements under conditions HM and HS. However, the level of suppression of their LVOR abilities was equal to that of the others. These results suggest that the ability to generate anticipatory smooth pursuit eye movements for following a high-speed moving object against the LVOR is a determining factor for improvement of DVA under HM.

  5. Prospective active marker motion correction improves statistical power in BOLD fMRI.

    PubMed

    Muraskin, Jordan; Ooi, Melvyn B; Goldman, Robin I; Krueger, Sascha; Thomas, William J; Sajda, Paul; Brown, Truman R

    2013-03-01

    Group level statistical maps of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals acquired using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have become a basic measurement for much of systems, cognitive and social neuroscience. A challenge in making inferences from these statistical maps is the noise and potential confounds that arise from the head motion that occurs within and between acquisition volumes. This motion results in the scan plane being misaligned during acquisition, ultimately leading to reduced statistical power when maps are constructed at the group level. In most cases, an attempt is made to correct for this motion through the use of retrospective analysis methods. In this paper, we use a prospective active marker motion correction (PRAMMO) system that uses radio frequency markers for real-time tracking of motion, enabling on-line slice plane correction. We show that the statistical power of the activation maps is substantially increased using PRAMMO compared to conventional retrospective correction. Analysis of our results indicates that the PRAMMO acquisition reduces the variance without decreasing the signal component of the BOLD (beta). Using PRAMMO could thus improve the overall statistical power of fMRI based BOLD measurements, leading to stronger inferences of the nature of processing in the human brain.

  6. Evidence of left-lateral active motion at the North America-Caribbean plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, S. D.; Ellouz, N.; Corbeau, J.; Rolandone, F.; Mercier De Lepinay, B. F.; Meyer, B.; Momplaisir, R.; Granja, J. L.; Battani, A.; Burov, E. B.; Clouard, V.; Deschamps, R.; Gorini, C.; Hamon, Y.; LE Pourhiet, L.; Loget, N.; Lucazeau, F.; Pillot, D.; Poort, J.; Tankoo, K.; Cuevas, J. L.; Alcaide, J.; Poix, C. J.; Mitton, S.; Rodriguez, Y.; Schmitz, J.; Munoz Martin, A.

    2014-12-01

    The North America-Caribbean plate boundary is one of the least-known among large plate boundaries. Although it was identified early on as an example of a strike-slip fault in the north of Hispaniola, its structure and rate of motion remains poorly constrained. We present the first direct evidence for active sinistral strike-slip motion along this fault, based on swath seafloor mapping of the northern Haiti area. There is evidence for ~16.5 km of apparent strike-slip motion along the mapped segment of the Septentrional fault zone off Cap Haitien town which is terminated to the east onland Dominican republic and in the west to southern Cuban margin. By evaluating these new constraints within the context of geodetic models of global plate motions, we estimate an activity of the fault since 2 Ma with an angular velocity for the Caribbean plate relative to the North America predicted 6-12 mmyr-1 sinistral motion along the Septentrional fault zone. This transform fault was initiated around 20 million years ago in its western segment and since 2 Ma in its eastern segment in response to a regional reorganization of plate velocities and directions, which induced a change in configuration of plate boundaries.

  7. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2016-03-24

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2-30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available.

  8. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2016-01-01

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2-30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available. PMID:27023543

  9. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2–30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available. PMID:27023543

  10. Retrospective comparison of functional and radiological outcome, between two contemporary high flexion knee designs

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Vikash; Chatterjee, Daipayan; Hazra, Sutanu; Chatterjee, Anirban; Garg, Parag; Debnath, Kaustav; Mandal, Soham; Sarkar, Sudipto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patient satisfaction after total knee replacement (TKR) depends on the amount of pain relief and the functional activities achieved. An important criterion of good functional outcome is the amount of flexion achieved and whether the patient can manage high flexion activities. In order to increase the amount of safe flexion, various implant designs have been developed. This study aims to compare the outcome after TKR using two contemporary high flexion knee designs: Sigma CR150 High Flex Knee prosthesis (Depuy, Warsaw, Indiana) and NexGen High Flex Knee prosthesis (Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana). Material: A retrospective study was conducted with 100 cases of each design and their functional and radiological outcome was assessed after two years of follow-up. Results: The two groups had comparable results in terms of subjective satisfaction, range of motion achieved and radiological outcome. Depuy group fared better than Zimmer in terms of functional outcome (modified Oxford knee score). Conclusion: Depuy group was found to have fared better than Zimmer in terms of functional outcome. However, it is very difficult to rate one design above the other based on our small sample size and short duration of follow-up. PMID:27748254

  11. Biomechanical Analysis of the Effects of Bilateral Hinged Knee Bracing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hangil; Ha, Dokyeong; Kang, Yeoun-Seung; Park, Hyung-Soon

    2016-01-01

    This research analyzed the effect of bilateral hinged knee braces on a healthy knee from a biomechanical frame in vivo. This was accomplished by fitting a knee brace with two customized wireless force/torque (F/T) sensors that could readily record force and torque during live motion, while the kinetics at the knee were computed using the inverse dynamics of the motion capture and force plate data. Four tasks to test the brace’s effects were drop vertical jumping, pivoting, stop vertical jumping, and cutting. The results showed that the hinges in the knee brace can absorb up to 18% of the force and 2.7% of the torque at the knee during various athletic motions. Thus, the hinges demonstrated minimal effect in reducing the mechanical load on the knee. There were limitations concerning the consistency of the motions performed by the subjects during the trials and the influence of the other portions of the brace to evaluate the overall effectiveness of the brace as a whole. Future works may incorporate a fatigue protocol and injured subjects to better determine the effects of the brace. There is still a need for more research on the biomechanical influence of knee braces to develop safer and more effective products. PMID:27379233

  12. How crouch gait can dynamically induce stiff-knee gait.

    PubMed

    van der Krogt, Marjolein M; Bregman, Daan J J; Wisse, Martijn; Doorenbosch, Caroline A M; Harlaar, Jaap; Collins, Steven H

    2010-04-01

    Children with cerebral palsy frequently experience foot dragging and tripping during walking due to a lack of adequate knee flexion in swing (stiff-knee gait). Stiff-knee gait is often accompanied by an overly flexed knee during stance (crouch gait). Studies on stiff-knee gait have mostly focused on excessive knee muscle activity during (pre)swing, but the passive dynamics of the limbs may also have an important effect. To examine the effects of a crouched posture on swing knee flexion, we developed a forward-dynamic model of human walking with a passive swing knee, capable of stable cyclic walking for a range of stance knee crouch angles. As crouch angle during stance was increased, the knee naturally flexed much less during swing, resulting in a 'stiff-knee' gait pattern and reduced foot clearance. Reduced swing knee flexion was primarily due to altered gravitational moments around the joints during initial swing. We also considered the effects of increased push-off strength and swing hip flexion torque, which both increased swing knee flexion, but the effect of crouch angle was dominant. These findings demonstrate that decreased knee flexion during swing can occur purely as the dynamical result of crouch, rather than from altered muscle function or pathoneurological control alone.

  13. Structure, Sex, and Strength and Knee and Hip Kinematics During Landing

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Jennifer S; Fazio, Melisa A.; Mattacola, Carl G.; Uhl, Timothy L.; Jacobs, Cale A.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Researchers have observed that medial knee collapse is a mechanism of knee injury. Lower extremity alignment, sex, and strength have been cited as contributing to landing mechanics. Objective: To determine the relationship among measurements of asymmetry of unilateral hip rotation (AUHR); mobility of the foot, which we described as relative arch deformity (RAD); hip abduction–external rotation strength; sex; and me-dial collapse of the knee during a single-leg jump landing. We hypothesized that AUHR and RAD would be positively correlated with movements often associated with medial collapse of the knee, including hip adduction and internal rotation excursions and knee abduction and rotation excursions. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty women and 15 men (age = 21 ± 2 years, height = 171.7 ± 9.5 cm, mass = 68.4 ± 9.5 kg) who had no history of surgery or recent injury and who participated in regular physical activity volunteered. Interventions : Participants performed 3 double-leg forward jumps with a single-leg landing. Three-dimensional kinematic data were sampled at 100 Hz using an electromagnetic tracking system. We evaluated AUHR and RAD on the preferred leg and evaluated isometric peak hip abductor–external rotation torque. We assessed AUHR by calculating the difference between internal and external hip rotation in the prone position (AUHR = internal rotation – external rotation). We evaluated RAD using the Arch Height Index Measurement System. Correlations and linear regression analyses were used to assess relationships among AUHR, RAD, sex, peak hip abduction–external rotation torque, and kinematic variables for 3-dimensional motion of the hip and knee. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent variables were joint angles at contact and joint excursions between contact and peak knee flexion. Results: We found that AUHR was correlated with hip adduction excursion (R = 0

  14. Predicting the effects of muscle activation on knee, thigh, and hip injuries in frontal crashes using a finite-element model with muscle forces from subject testing and musculoskeletal modeling.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Rupp, Jonathan D; Reed, Matthew P; Hughes, Richard E; Schneider, Lawrence W

    2009-11-01

    In a previous study, the authors reported on the development of a finite-element model of the midsize male pelvis and lower extremities with lower-extremity musculature that was validated using PMHS knee-impact response data. Knee-impact simulations with this model were performed using forces from four muscles in the lower extremities associated with two-foot bracing reported in the literature to provide preliminary estimates of the effects of lower-extremity muscle activation on knee-thigh-hip injury potential in frontal impacts. The current study addresses a major limitation of these preliminary simulations by using the AnyBody three-dimensional musculoskeletal model to estimate muscle forces produced in 35 muscles in each lower extremity during emergency one-foot braking. To check the predictions of the AnyBody Model, activation levels of twelve major muscles in the hip and lower extremities were measured using surface EMG electrodes on 12 midsize-male subjects performing simulated maximum and 50% of maximum braking in a laboratory seating buck. Comparisons between test results and the predictions of the AnyBody Model when it was used to simulate these same braking tests suggest that the AnyBody model appropriately predicts agonistic muscle activations but under predicts antagonistic muscle activations. Simulations of knee-to-knee-bolster impacts were performed by impacting the knees of the lower-extremity finite element model with and without the muscle forces predicted by the validated AnyBody Model. Results of these simulations confirm previous findings that muscle tension increases knee-impact force by increasing the effective mass of the KTH complex due to tighter coupling of muscle mass to bone. They also indicate that muscle activation preferentially couples mass distal to the hip, thereby accentuating the decrease in femur force from the knee to the hip. However, the reduction in force transmitted from the knee to the hip is offset by the increased force

  15. Pathological tremor and voluntary motion modeling and online estimation for active compensation.

    PubMed

    Bo, Antônio Padilha Lanari; Poignet, Philippe; Geny, Christian

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents an algorithm to perform online tremor characterization from motion sensors measurements, while filtering the voluntary motion performed by the patient. In order to estimate simultaneously both nonstationary signals in a stochastic filtering framework, pathological tremor was represented by a time-varying harmonic model and voluntary motion was modeled as an auto-regressive moving-average (ARMA) model. Since it is a nonlinear problem, an extended Kalman filter (EKF) was used. The developed solution was evaluated with simulated signals and experimental data from patients with different pathologies. Also, the results were comprehensively compared with alternative techniques proposed in the literature, evidencing the better performance of the proposed method. The algorithm presented in this paper may be an important tool in the design of active tremor compensation systems.

  16. Active faults, stress field and plate motion along the Indo-Eurasian plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Takashi; Otsuki, Kenshiro; Khan, S. H.

    1990-09-01

    The active faults of the Himalayas and neighboring areas are direct indicators of Recent and sub-Recent crustal movements due to continental collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates. The direction of the maximum horizontal shortening or horizontal compressive stress axes deduced from the strike and type of active faulting reveals a characteristic regional stress field along the colliding boundary. The trajectories of the stress axes along the transcurrent faults and the Eastern Himalayan Front, are approximately N-S, parallel to the relative motion of the two plates. However, along the southern margin of the Eurasian plate, they are NE-SW in the Western Himalayan Front and NW-SE to E-W in the Kirthar-Sulaiman Front, which is not consistent with the direction of relative plate motion. A simple model is proposed in order to explain the regional stress pattern. In this model, the tectonic sliver between the transcurrent faults and the plate margin, is dragged northward by the oblique convergence of the Indian plate. Thus, the direction of relative motion between the tectonic sliver and the Indian plate changes regionally, causing local compressive stress fields. Judging from the long-term slip rates along the active faults, the relative motion between the Indian and Eurasian plates absorbed in the colliding zone is about one fourth of its total amount; the rest may be consumed along the extensive strike-slip faults in Tibet and China.

  17. Population activity in the human dorsal pathway predicts the accuracy of visual motion detection.

    PubMed

    Donner, Tobias H; Siegel, Markus; Oostenveld, Robert; Fries, Pascal; Bauer, Markus; Engel, Andreas K

    2007-07-01

    A person's ability to detect a weak visual target stimulus varies from one viewing to the next. We tested whether the trial-to-trial fluctuations of neural population activity in the human brain are related to the fluctuations of behavioral performance in a "yes-no" visual motion-detection task. We recorded neural population activity with whole head magnetoencephalography (MEG) while subjects searched for a weak coherent motion signal embedded in spatiotemporal noise. We found that, during motion viewing, MEG activity in the 12- to 24-Hz ("beta") frequency range is higher, on average, before correct behavioral choices than before errors and that it predicts correct choices on a trial-by-trial basis. This performance-predictive activity is not evident in the prestimulus baseline and builds up slowly after stimulus onset. Source reconstruction revealed that the performance-predictive activity is expressed in the posterior parietal and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and, less strongly, in the visual motion-sensitive area MT+. The 12- to 24-Hz activity in these key stages of the human dorsal visual pathway is correlated with behavioral choice in both target-present and target-absent conditions. Importantly, in the absence of the target, 12- to 24-Hz activity tends to be higher before "no" choices ("correct rejects") than before "yes" choices ("false alarms"). It thus predicts the accuracy, and not the content, of subjects' upcoming perceptual reports. We conclude that beta band activity in the human dorsal visual pathway indexes, and potentially controls, the efficiency of neural computations underlying simple perceptual decisions.

  18. Active contour-based visual tracking by integrating colors, shapes, and motions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weiming; Zhou, Xue; Li, Wei; Luo, Wenhan; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Maybank, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present a framework for active contour-based visual tracking using level sets. The main components of our framework include contour-based tracking initialization, color-based contour evolution, adaptive shape-based contour evolution for non-periodic motions, dynamic shape-based contour evolution for periodic motions, and the handling of abrupt motions. For the initialization of contour-based tracking, we develop an optical flow-based algorithm for automatically initializing contours at the first frame. For the color-based contour evolution, Markov random field theory is used to measure correlations between values of neighboring pixels for posterior probability estimation. For adaptive shape-based contour evolution, the global shape information and the local color information are combined to hierarchically evolve the contour, and a flexible shape updating model is constructed. For the dynamic shape-based contour evolution, a shape mode transition matrix is learnt to characterize the temporal correlations of object shapes. For the handling of abrupt motions, particle swarm optimization is adopted to capture the global motion which is applied to the contour in the current frame to produce an initial contour in the next frame.

  19. Active contour-based visual tracking by integrating colors, shapes, and motions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weiming; Zhou, Xue; Li, Wei; Luo, Wenhan; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Maybank, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present a framework for active contour-based visual tracking using level sets. The main components of our framework include contour-based tracking initialization, color-based contour evolution, adaptive shape-based contour evolution for non-periodic motions, dynamic shape-based contour evolution for periodic motions, and the handling of abrupt motions. For the initialization of contour-based tracking, we develop an optical flow-based algorithm for automatically initializing contours at the first frame. For the color-based contour evolution, Markov random field theory is used to measure correlations between values of neighboring pixels for posterior probability estimation. For adaptive shape-based contour evolution, the global shape information and the local color information are combined to hierarchically evolve the contour, and a flexible shape updating model is constructed. For the dynamic shape-based contour evolution, a shape mode transition matrix is learnt to characterize the temporal correlations of object shapes. For the handling of abrupt motions, particle swarm optimization is adopted to capture the global motion which is applied to the contour in the current frame to produce an initial contour in the next frame. PMID:23288333

  20. On the relationship between photospheric footpoint motions and coronal heating in solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Asgari-Targhi, M.; Berger, M. A.

    2014-05-20

    Coronal heating theories can be classified as either direct current (DC) or alternating current (AC) mechanisms, depending on whether the coronal magnetic field responds quasi-statically or dynamically to the photospheric footpoint motions. In this paper we investigate whether photospheric footpoint motions with velocities of 1-2 km s{sup –1} can heat the corona in active regions, and whether the corona responds quasi-statically or dynamically to such motions (DC versus AC heating). We construct three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic models for the Alfvén waves and quasi-static perturbations generated within a coronal loop. We find that in models where the effects of the lower atmosphere are neglected, the corona responds quasi-statically to the footpoint motions (DC heating), but the energy flux into the corona is too low compared to observational requirements. In more realistic models that include the lower atmosphere, the corona responds more dynamically to the footpoint motions (AC heating) and the predicted heating rates due to Alfvén wave turbulence are sufficient to explain the observed hot loops. The higher heating rates are due to the amplification of Alfvén waves in the lower atmosphere. We conclude that magnetic braiding is a highly dynamic process.

  1. Functional assessments of the knee joint biomechanics by using pendulum test in adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Casabona, Antonino; Valle, Maria Stella; Pisasale, Mariangela; Pantò, Maria Rosita; Cioni, Matteo

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we assessed kinematics and viscoelastic features of knee joint in adults with Down syndrome (DS) by means of the Wartenberg pendulum test. This test allows the measuring of the kinematics of the knee joint during passive pendular motion of leg under the influence of gravity. In addition, by a combination of kinematic and anthropometric data, pendulum test provides estimates of joint viscoelastic properties by computing damping and stiffness coefficients. To monitor the occurrences of muscle activation, the surface electromyogram (EMG) of muscle rectus femoris was recorded. The experimental protocol was performed in a group of 10 adults with DS compared with 10 control adults without DS. Joint motion amplitude, velocity, and acceleration of the leg during the first knee flexion significantly decreased in persons with DS with respect to those without DS. This behavior was associated with the activation of rectus femoris in subjects with DS that resulted in increasing of joint resistance shortly after the onset of the first leg flexion. The EMG bursts mostly occurred between 50 and 150 ms from the leg flexion onset. During the remaining cycles of pendular motion, persons with DS exhibited passive leg oscillations with low tonic EMG activity and reduced damping coefficient compared with control subjects. These results suggest that adults with DS might perform preprogrammed contractions to increase joint resistance and compensate for inherent joint instability occurring for quick and unpredictable perturbations. The reduction of damping coefficients observed during passive oscillations could be a predictor of muscle hypotonia.

  2. MR-based motion correction for PET imaging using wired active MR microcoils in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chuan; Brady, Thomas J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong; Ackerman, Jerome L.; Petibon, Yoann

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Artifacts caused by head motion present a major challenge in brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The authors investigated the feasibility of using wired active MR microcoils to track head motion and incorporate the measured rigid motion fields into iterative PET reconstruction. Methods: Several wired active MR microcoils and a dedicated MR coil-tracking sequence were developed. The microcoils were attached to the outer surface of an anthropomorphic{sup 18}F-filled Hoffman phantom to mimic a brain PET scan. Complex rotation/translation motion of the phantom was induced by a balloon, which was connected to a ventilator. PET list-mode and MR tracking data were acquired simultaneously on a PET-MR scanner. The acquired dynamic PET data were reconstructed iteratively with and without motion correction. Additionally, static phantom data were acquired and used as the gold standard. Results: Motion artifacts in PET images were effectively removed by wired active MR microcoil based motion correction. Motion correction yielded an activity concentration bias ranging from −0.6% to 3.4% as compared to a bias ranging from −25.0% to 16.6% if no motion correction was applied. The contrast recovery values were improved by 37%–156% with motion correction as compared to no motion correction. The image correlation (mean ± standard deviation) between the motion corrected (uncorrected) images of 20 independent noise realizations and static reference was R{sup 2} = 0.978 ± 0.007 (0.588 ± 0.010, respectively). Conclusions: Wired active MR microcoil based motion correction significantly improves brain PET quantitative accuracy and image contrast.

  3. Relationship of anterior knee laxity to knee translations during drop landings: a bi-plane fluoroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Myers, C.; Pennington, W. W.; Shelburne, K. B.; Krong, J. P.; Giphart, J. E.; Steadman, J. R.; Woo, Savio L-Y

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Passive anterior knee laxity has been linked to non-contact ACL injury risk. High deceleration movements have been implicated in the non-contact ACL injury mechanism, and evidence suggests that greater anterior tibial translations (ATT) may occur in healthy knees that are lax compared to a tight knee. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between anterior knee laxity scores and ATT during drop landings using biplane fluoroscopy. Methods Sixteen healthy adults (10 women; 6 men) performed stiff drop landings (40 cm) while being filmed using a high-speed, biplane fluoroscopy system. Initial, peak and excursions for rotations and translations were calculated and regression analysis used to determine the 6DoF kinematic relationships with KT1000 scores with peak ATT occurring during the landing. Results KT1000 values were (+) correlated with peak ATT values for group (r = 0.89; P < 0.0001) and both genders (males, r = 0.97; P = 0.0003; females, r = 0.93; P = < 0.0001). Regression analysis yielded a significant linear fit for the group (r2 = 0.80; YATT-group = −0.516 + 1.2 × XKT1000-group) and for each gender (females: r2 = 0.86; YATT-females = 0.074 + 1.2 × XKT1000-females and males: r2 = 0.94; YATT-males = −0.79 + 1.2 × XKT1000-males). Conclusion A strong relationship was observed between passive anterior knee laxity measured via KT1000 and peak ATT experienced during dynamic activity in otherwise healthy persons performing a stiff drop-landing motion. PMID:21153545

  4. Rotating platform knees did not improve patellar tracking: a prospective, randomized study of 240 primary total knee arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Pagnano, Mark W; Trousdale, Robert T; Stuart, Michael J; Hanssen, Arlen D; Jacofsky, David J

    2004-11-01

    Renewed interest in mobile-bearing total knee replacement designs has been generated by the concept of self alignment and the suggestion that those designs can accommodate small mismatches in the rotational position of the tibial and femoral components. Self alignment might improve patellar tracking, decrease the prevalence of lateral retinacular release and postoperative patellar tilt or subluxation, improve knee flexion, and improve patellofemoral function during daily activities such as stair climbing. This prospective randomized study of 240 patients used a single posterior-stabilized femoral component and included three groups of 80 patients: an all-polyethylene group, a modular metal-backed group, and a rotating platform tibia group. The prevalence of lateral retinacular release was 3.8% in each group. The prevalence of patellar tilt was 5% (all-polyethylene group), 7% (modular metal-backed group), and 11% (rotating platform group). Preoperative motion was not significantly different and both the 3-month flexion (112 degrees , 110 degrees , and 108 degrees ) and 1-year flexion (116 degrees , 117 degrees , and 115 degrees ) were not significantly different among the all-polyethylene, modular metal-backed, and rotating platform groups, respectively. Preoperative stair climbing scores were not significantly different and both the 3-month (38, 41, and 35 points) and 1-year (44, 46, and 42 points) scores were not significantly different. In this prospective randomized study, the rotating platform knee design did not decrease the prevalence of lateral retinacular release or patellar tilt or subluxation and did not increase knee flexion or improve stair climbing ability at 3 months or at 1 year postoperatively when compared with a posterior-stabilized, fixed-bearing knee.

  5. Activity-Modifying Behaviour Mediates the Relationship between Pain Severity and Activity Limitations among Adults with Emergent Knee Pain.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Clayon B; Maly, Monica R; Clark, Jessica M; Speechley, Mark; Petrella, Robert J; Chesworth, Bert M

    2013-01-01

    Objectif : Déterminer si un comportement modifiant les activités peut influer sur la relation entre la sévérité d'une douleur au genou et chacune des fonctions physiques et la qualité de vie associée au genou. Méthode : Au total, 105 participants avec douleur au genou interne et aucun diagnostic d'arthrose du genou (âge moyen de 52,2 ans; écart type de 6,7 ans) ont rempli deux questionnaires d'auto-évaluation. Le questionnaire pour déterminer les symptômes au genou (Questionnaire to Identify Knee Symptoms, QuIKS) visait à évaluer les comportements qui modifient les activités; le pointage obtenu au questionnaire sur les blessures au genou et l'arthrose (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, KOOS) permettait d'évaluer la sévérité de la douleur, la fonction physique et la qualité de vie associée au genou. Une analyse de médiation simple a été réalisée à l'aide d'un modèle de régression linéaire. Résultats : Le coefficient de régression non normalisé (±erreur type) du comportement modifiant l'activité a révélé une réduction partielle de l'effet de la sévérité de la douleur sur la fonction physique (0,31±0,09, p<0,001) et sur la qualité de vie associée au genou (0,24±0,07, p<0,001). Après la mise en place d'un comportement modifiant l'activité, la variation de la fonction physique causée par la douleur est passée de 45 % à 15 %, et la variation dans la qualité de vie associée au genou provoquée par la douleur est passée de 64 % à 25 %. Conclusion : Un comportement qui modifie l'activité réduit partiellement la relation entre la sévérité de la douleur et la fonction physique et entre la sévérité de la douleur et la qualité de vie associée au genou. On a donc recours à une modification de l'activité chez les personnes aux prises avec une douleur émergente au genou, et cette modification pourrait contrer les effets de la douleur au genou sur la fonction physique et sur la qualité de

  6. Isokinetic and isometric muscle function of the knee extensors and flexors during simulated soccer activity: effect of exercise and dehydration.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ajmol; Williams, Clyde

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of dehydration during soccer-type intermittent exercise on isokinetic and isometric muscle function. Eight soccer players performed two 90-min high-intensity intermittent shuttle-running trials without (NF) or with (FL) fluid ingestion (5 ml · kg(-1) before and 2 ml · kg(-1) every 15 min). Isokinetic and isometric strength and muscular power of knee flexors and knee extensors were measured pre-exercise, at half-time and post-exercise using isokinetic dynamometry. Sprint performance was monitored throughout the simulated-soccer exercise. Isokinetic knee strength was reduced at faster (3.13 rad · s(-1); P = 0.009) but not slower (1.05 rad · s(-1); P = 0.063) contraction speeds with exercise; however, there was no difference between FL and NF. Peak isometric strength of the knee extensors (P = 0.002) but not the knee flexors (P = 0.065) was significantly reduced with exercise with no difference between FL and NF. Average muscular power was reduced over time at both 1.05 rad · s(-1) (P = 0.01) and 3.14 rad · s(-1) (P = 0.033) but was not different between FL and NF. Mean 15-m sprint time increased with duration of exercise (P = 0.005) but was not different between FL and NF. In summary, fluid ingestion during 90 min of soccer-type exercise was unable to offset the reduction in isokinetic and isometric strength and muscular power of the knee extensors and flexors.

  7. Active vibration isolation of macro-micro motion stage disturbances using a floating stator platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lufan; Long, Zhili; Cai, Jiandong; Liu, Yang; Fang, Jiwen; Wang, Michael Yu

    2015-10-01

    Macro-micro motion stage is mainly applied in microelectronics manufacturing to realize a high-acceleration, high-speed and nano-positioning motion. The high acceleration and nano-positioning accuracy would be influenced by the vibration of the motion stage. In the paper, a concept of floating stage is introduced in the macro-micro motion for isolating vibration disturbances. The design model of the floating stage is established and its theoretical analyses including natural frequency, transient and frequency response analyses are investigated, in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the floating stator platform as a vibration isolator for the macro-micro motion stage. Moreover, an optimal design of the floating stator is conducted and then verified by experiments. In order to characterize and quantify the performance of isolation obtained from the traditional fixed stator and the floating stator, the acceleration responses at different accelerations, speeds and displacements are measured in x, y and z directions. The theoretical and experimental analyses in time and frequency domains indicate that the floating stator platform is effective to actively isolate the vibration in the macro-micro motion stage. In macro-micro motion stage, high acceleration motion is provided by VCM. Vibration is induced from VCM, that is, VCM is a source system, the vibration response or force is felt by a receiver system. Generally, VCM is fixed on the base, which means that the base is the receiver system which absorbs or transfers the vibration. However, the vibration cannot completely disappear and the base vibration is inevitable. In the paper, a floated stator platform as isolation system is developed to decrease or isolate vibration between VCM and base. The floated stator platform consists of damper, stopper, floated lock, spring, limiter, sub base, etc. Unlike the traditional stator of VCM fixed on the base, the floated stator can be moved on the linear guide under vibration

  8. Influence of patellofemoral bracing on pain, knee extensor torque, and gait function in females with patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Powers, Christopher M; Doubleday, Kathryn L; Escudero, Carina

    2008-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the effects of a patellofemoral brace on pain response, knee extensor torque production, and gait function in females with patellofemoral pain (PFP). Sixteen females between the ages of 14 and 46 with diagnosis of PFP participated. Knee extensor torque was measured by using a LIDO isokinetic dynamometer. Pain levels were documented by using the Visual Analog Pain Scale. Stride characteristics during the conditions of free walk, fast walk, ascend stairs, descend stairs, ascend ramp, and descend ramp were obtained with a stride analyzer unit. EMG activity of the vasti musculature was recorded by using indwelling, bipolar, wire electrodes. Knee joint motion was assessed by using a VICON motion analysis system. All testing was performed with and without the Bauerfeind Genutrain P3 patellofemoral brace. There were no significant differences in torque production, pain levels, and stride characteristics between braced and non-braced trials. In addition, there were no significant differences in mean vasti EMG between braced and non-braced trials. When averaged across all conditions, a small but statistically significant increase in knee flexion was found during the braced trials. Although the current study did not find significant improvements in the clinical measures evaluated, 8 of the 16 subjects did experience a decrease in knee pain. This finding suggests that certain patients with PFP may respond favorably to bracing, and criteria must be established to determine which patients would best benefit from such an intervention.

  9. Knee stability before and after total and unicondylar knee replacement: in vivo kinematic evaluation utilizing navigation.

    PubMed

    Casino, Daniela; Martelli, Sandra; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Lopomo, Nicola; Iacono, Francesco; Bignozzi, Simone; Visani, Andrea; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2009-02-01

    Surgical navigation systems are currently used to guide the surgeon in the correct alignment of the implant. The aim of this study was to expand the use of navigation systems by proposing a surgical protocol for intraoperative kinematics evaluations during knee arthroplasty. The protocol was evaluated on 20 patients, half undergoing unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) and half undergoing posterior-substituting, rotating-platform total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The protocol includes a simple acquisition procedure and an original elaboration methodology. Kinematic tests were performed before and after surgery and included varus/valgus stress at 0 and 30 degrees and passive range of motion. Both UKA and TKA improved varus/valgus stability in extension and preserved the total magnitude of screw-home motion during flexion. Moreover, compared to preoperative conditions, values assumed by tibial axial rotation during flexion in TKA knees were more similar to the rotating patterns of UKA knees. The analysis of the anteroposterior displacement of the knee compartments confirmed that the two prostheses did not produce medial pivoting, but achieved a postoperative normal behavior. These results demonstrated that proposed intraoperative kinematics evaluations by a navigation system provided new information on the functional outcome of the reconstruction useful to restore knee kinematics during surgery.

  10. An improved OpenSim gait model with multiple degrees of freedom knee joint and knee ligaments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hang; Bloswick, Donald; Merryweather, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Musculoskeletal models are widely used to investigate joint kinematics and predict muscle force during gait. However, the knee is usually simplified as a one degree of freedom joint and knee ligaments are neglected. The aim of this study was to develop an OpenSim gait model with enhanced knee structures. The knee joint in this study included three rotations and three translations. The three knee rotations and mediolateral translation were independent, with proximodistal and anteroposterior translations occurring as a function of knee flexion/extension. Ten elastic elements described the geometrical and mechanical properties of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL), and the medial and lateral collateral ligaments (MCL and LCL). The three independent knee rotations were evaluated using OpenSim to observe ligament function. The results showed that the anterior and posterior bundles of ACL and PCL (aACL, pACL and aPCL, pPCL) intersected during knee flexion. The aACL and pACL mainly provided force during knee flexion and adduction, respectively. The aPCL was slack throughout the range of three knee rotations; however, the pPCL was utilised for knee abduction and internal rotation. The LCL was employed for knee adduction and rotation, but was slack beyond 20° of knee flexion. The MCL bundles were mainly used during knee adduction and external rotation. All these results suggest that the functions of knee ligaments in this model approximated the behaviour of the physical knee and the enhanced knee structures can improve the ability to investigate knee joint biomechanics during various gait activities.

  11. Biocatalyst activity in nonaqueous environments correlates with centisecond-range protein motions.

    PubMed

    Eppler, Ross K; Hudson, Elton P; Chase, Shannon D; Dordick, Jonathan S; Reimer, Jeffrey A; Clark, Douglas S

    2008-10-14

    Recent studies exploring the relationship between enzymatic catalysis and protein dynamics in the aqueous phase have yielded evidence that dynamics and enzyme activity are strongly correlated. Given that protein dynamics are significantly attenuated in organic solvents and that proteins exhibit a wide range of motions depending on the specific solvent environment, the nonaqueous milieu provides a unique opportunity to examine the role of protein dynamics in enzyme activity. Variable-temperature kinetic measurements, X-band electron spin resonance spectroscopy, (1)H NMR relaxation, and (19)F NMR spectroscopy experiments were performed on subtilisin Carlsberg colyophilized with several inorganic salts and suspended in organic solvents. The results indicate that salt activation induces a greater degree of transition-state flexibility, reflected by a more positive DeltaDeltaS(dagger), for the more active biocatalyst preparations in organic solvents. In contrast, DeltaDeltaH(dagger) was negligible regardless of salt type or salt content. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy and (1)H NMR relaxation measurements, including spin-lattice relaxation, spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame, and longitudinal magnetization exchange, revealed that the enzyme's turnover number (k(cat)) was strongly correlated with protein motions in the centisecond time regime, weakly correlated with protein motions in the millisecond regime, and uncorrelated with protein motions on the piconanosecond timescale. In addition, (19)F chemical shift measurements and hyperfine tensor measurements of biocatalyst formulations inhibited with 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl fluoride and 4-ethoxyfluorophosphinyl-oxy-TEMPO, respectively, suggest that enzyme activation was only weakly affected by changes in active-site polarity. PMID:18840689

  12. Examining the Magnetic Field Strength and the Horizontal and Vertical Motions in an Emerging Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Yu-Che

    2016-03-01

    Earlier observational studies have used the time evolution of emerging magnetic flux regions at the photosphere to infer their subsurface structures, assuming that the flux structure does not change significantly over the near-surface layer. In this study, we test the validity of this assumption by comparing the horizontal and vertical motions of an emerging active region. The two motions would be correlated if the emerging structure is rigid. The selected active region (AR) NOAA 11645 is not embedded in detectable preexisting magnetic field. The observed horizontal motion is quantified by the separation of the two AR polarities and the width of the region. The vertical motion is derived from the magnetic buoyancy theory. Our results show that the separation of the polarities is fastest at the beginning with a velocity of {≈ }4 Mm hr^{-1} and decreases to ≤ 1 Mm hr^{-1} after the main growing phase of flux emergence. The derived thick flux-tube buoyant velocity is between 1 and 3 Mm hr^{-1}, while the thin flux-tube approximation results in an unreasonably high buoyant velocity, consistent with the expectation that the approximation is inappropriate at the surface layer. The observed horizontal motion is not found to directly correlate with either the magnetic field strength or the derived buoyant velocities. However, the percentage of the horizontally oriented fields and the temporal derivatives of the field strength and the buoyant velocity show some positive correlations with the separation velocity. The results of this study imply that the assumption that the emerging active region is the cross section of a rising flux tube whose structure can be considered rigid as it rises through the near-surface layer should be taken with caution.

  13. Functional calibration procedure for 3D knee joint angle description using inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Favre, J; Aissaoui, R; Jolles, B M; de Guise, J A; Aminian, K

    2009-10-16

    Measurement of three-dimensional (3D) knee joint angle outside a laboratory is of benefit in clinical examination and therapeutic treatment comparison. Although several motion capture devices exist, there is a need for an ambulatory system that could be used in routine practice. Up-to-date, inertial measurement units (IMUs) have proven to be suitable for unconstrained measurement of knee joint differential orientation. Nevertheless, this differential orientation should be converted into three reliable and clinically interpretable angles. Thus, the aim of this study was to propose a new calibration procedure adapted for the joint coordinate system (JCS), which required only IMUs data. The repeatability of the calibration procedure, as well as the errors in the measurement of 3D knee angle during gait in comparison to a reference system were assessed on eight healthy subjects. The new procedure relying on active and passive movements reported a high repeatability of the mean values (offset<1 degrees) and angular patterns (SD<0.3 degrees and CMC>0.9). In comparison to the reference system, this functional procedure showed high precision (SD<2 degrees and CC>0.75) and moderate accuracy (between 4.0 degrees and 8.1 degrees) for the three knee angle. The combination of the inertial-based system with the functional calibration procedure proposed here resulted in a promising tool for the measurement of 3D knee joint angle. Moreover, this method could be adapted to measure other complex joint, such as ankle or elbow.

  14. Relationship between improvements in physical measures and patient satisfaction in rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nazzal, Mahmoud I; Bashaireh, Khaldoon H; Alomari, Mahmoud A; Nazzal, Mohammad S; Maayah, Mikhled F; Mesmar, Mohammad

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine patient satisfaction with rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Fifty-six patients, aged 45-77 years, were enrolled in a post-TKA comprehensive therapy program focusing on knee strengthening and functional activities. The program lasted 3 months and was conducted for 1 h, twice a day, 5 days per week. Pain scores, number of steps climbed (STp), and maximum walked distance (MWD) were determined before the operation and 3 months after cessation of the rehabilitation program. In addition, knee-flexion range of motion (ROM) was measured before the surgery and immediately, 2 weeks and 3 months after the surgery. Pain decreased whereas MWD and STp increased at 3 months postoperation. In addition, the magnitude of improvement in STp correlated positively with the magnitude of change in MWD and pain. There was a significant increase in knee-flexion ROM at 2 weeks and 3 months postoperation compared with preoperation. The patient age also correlated positively with the magnitude of improvement in knee-flexion ROM after 2 weeks and 3 months of therapy. Improvements in MWD and STp were greater and pain was less, among the satisfied patients compared with unsatisfied ones. The results of this study further confirm the importance of therapy for osteoarthritis patients after TKA. In addition, as older patients are less conditioned, they seem to be more inclined to improvement in functionality with rehabilitation. Satisfied patients seem to achieve larger improvements in functional capacity and pain measures.

  15. A comparison between dynamic implicit and explicit finite element simulations of the native knee joint.

    PubMed

    Naghibi Beidokhti, Hamid; Janssen, Dennis; Khoshgoftar, Mehdi; Sprengers, Andre; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Van den Boogaard, Ton; Verdonschot, Nico

    2016-10-01

    The finite element (FE) method has been widely used to investigate knee biomechanics. Time integration algorithms for dynamic problems in finite element analysis can be classified as either implicit or explicit. Although previously both static/dynamic implicit and dynamic explicit method have been used, a comparative study on the outcomes of both methods is of high interest for the knee modeling community. The aim of this study is to compare static, dynamic implicit and dynamic explicit solutions in analyses of the knee joint to assess the prediction of dynamic effects, potential convergence problems, the accuracy and stability of the calculations, the difference in computational time, and the influence of mass-scaling in the explicit formulation. The heel-strike phase of fast, normal and slow gait was simulated for two different body masses in a model of the native knee. Our results indicate that ignoring the dynamic effect can alter joint motion. Explicit analyses are suitable to simulate dynamic loading of the knee joint in high-speed simulations, as this method offers a substantial reduction of the computational time with a similar prediction of cartilage stresses and meniscus strains. Although mass-scaling can provide even more gain in computational time, it is not recommended for high-speed activities, in which inertial forces play a significant role. PMID:27349493

  16. Cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R; Ribeiro, F; Oliveira, J

    2010-03-01

    The effects of cryotherapy on joint position sense are not clearly established; however it is paramount to understand its impact on peripheral feedback to ascertain the safety of using ice therapy before resuming exercise on sports or rehabilitation settings. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cryotherapy, when applied over the quadriceps and over the knee joint, on knee position sense. This within-subjects repeated-measures study encompassed fifteen subjects. Knee position sense was measured by open kinetic chain technique and active positioning at baseline and after cryotherapy application. Knee angles were determined by computer analysis of the videotape images. Twenty-minute ice bag application was applied randomly, in two sessions 48 h apart, over the quadriceps and the knee joint. The main effect for cryotherapy application was significant (F (1.14)=7.7, p=0.015) indicating an increase in both absolute and relative angular errors after the application. There was no significant main effect for the location of cryotherapy application, indicating no differences between the application over the quadriceps and the knee joint. In conclusion, cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense in normal knees. This deleterious effect is similar when cryotherapy is applied over the quadriceps or the knee joint.

  17. Cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R; Ribeiro, F; Oliveira, J

    2010-03-01

    The effects of cryotherapy on joint position sense are not clearly established; however it is paramount to understand its impact on peripheral feedback to ascertain the safety of using ice therapy before resuming exercise on sports or rehabilitation settings. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cryotherapy, when applied over the quadriceps and over the knee joint, on knee position sense. This within-subjects repeated-measures study encompassed fifteen subjects. Knee position sense was measured by open kinetic chain technique and active positioning at baseline and after cryotherapy application. Knee angles were determined by computer analysis of the videotape images. Twenty-minute ice bag application was applied randomly, in two sessions 48 h apart, over the quadriceps and the knee joint. The main effect for cryotherapy application was significant (F (1.14)=7.7, p=0.015) indicating an increase in both absolute and relative angular errors after the application. There was no significant main effect for the location of cryotherapy application, indicating no differences between the application over the quadriceps and the knee joint. In conclusion, cryotherapy impairs knee joint position sense in normal knees. This deleterious effect is similar when cryotherapy is applied over the quadriceps or the knee joint. PMID:20221997

  18. Altered Loading in the Injured Knee after ACL Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Gardinier, Emily S.; Manal, Kurt; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Articular loading is an important factor in the joint degenerative process for individuals with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Evaluation of loading for a population that exhibits neuromuscular compensation for injury requires an approach which can incorporate individual muscle activation strategies in its estimation of muscle forces. The purpose of this study was to evaluate knee joint contact forces for patients with ACL deficiency using an EMG-driven modeling approach to estimate muscle forces. Thirty (30) athletes with acute, unilateral ACL rupture underwent gait analysis after resolving range of motion, effusion, pain and obvious gait impairments. Electromyography was recorded bilaterally from 14 lower extremity muscles and input to a musculoskeletal model for estimation of muscle forces and joint contact forces. Gait mechanics were consistent with previous reports for individuals with ACL-deficiency. Our major finding was that joint loading was altered in the injured limb after acute ACL injury; patients walked with decreased contact force on their injured knee compared to their uninjured knee. Both medial and lateral compartment forces were reduced without a significant change in the distribution of tibiofemoral load between compartments. This is the first study to estimate medial and lateral compartment contact forces in patients with acute ACL rupture using an approach which is sensitive to individual muscle activation patterns. Further work is needed to determine whether this early decreased loading of the injured limb is involved in the development of osteoarthritis in these patients. PMID:23097309

  19. Total knee arthroplasty using subvastus approach in stiff knee: A retrospective analysis of 110 cases

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nilen A; Patil, Hitendra Gulabrao; Vaishnav, Vinod O; Savale, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subvastus approach used in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is known to produce an earlier recovery but is not commonly utilized for TKA when the preoperative range of motion (ROM) of the knee is limited. Subvastus approach is known for its ability to give earlier recovery due to less postoperative pain and early mobilization (due to rapid quadriceps recovery). Subvastus approach is considered as a relative contraindication for TKA in knees with limited ROM due to difficulty in exposure which can increase risk of complications such as patellar tendon avulsion or medial collateral injury. Short stature and obesity are also relative contraindications. Tarabichi successfully used subvastus approach in knees with limited preoperative ROM. However, there are no large series in literature with the experience of the subvatus approach in knees with limited preoperative ROM. We are presenting our experience of the subvastus approach for TKA in knees with limited ROM. Materials and Methods: We conducted retrospective analysis of patients with limited preoperative ROM (flexion ≤90°) of the knee who underwent TKA using subvastus approach and presenting the 2 years results. There were a total 84 patients (110 knees) with mean age 64 (range 49–79 years) years. The mean preoperative flexion was 72° (range 40°–90°) with a total ROM of 64° (range 36°–90°). Results: Postoperatively knee flexion improved by mean 38° (P < 0.05) which was significant as assed by Student's t- test. The mean knee society score improved from 36 (range 20–60) to 80 (range 70–90) postoperatively (P < 0.05). There was one case of partial avulsion of patellar tendon from the tibial tubercle. Conclusions: We concluded that satisfactory results of TKA can be obtained in knees with limited preoperative ROM using subvastus approach maintaining the advantages of early mobilization. PMID:27053806

  20. The influence of joint line position on knee stability after condylar knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Martin, J W; Whiteside, L A

    1990-10-01

    Using a special knee-testing device, ten knees obtained at autopsy were subjected to varus-valgus, anterior-posterior, and flexion-rotation analysis in the intact state and after total knee arthroplasty. The ten knees showed no significant change in stability after knee replacement when the joint line was maintained in its natural position. When the femoral component was repositioned 5 mm proximally and 5 mm anteriorly, a significant increase in laxity occurred during midflexion. When the joint line was shifted 5 mm distal and 5 mm posterior to its anatomic location, significant tightening occurred in midrange of motion. Coupled rotation of the tibia with knee flexion was decreased after surgery in all knees with no specific relationship to joint line position. Coupled rotation with varus-valgus testing, however, remained within the normal range through the first 30 degrees of flexion only when the joint line was restored to its normal anatomic position. Stability in condylar knee arthroplasty is in part dependent on position of the joint line. Surgical techniques that rely on restoring the flexion and extension gap without regard to joint line position may result in alteration of varus-valgus or anterior-posterior displacement in midrange flexion. PMID:2208849

  1. Coupling of postural activity with motion of a ship at sea.

    PubMed

    Varlet, Manuel; Bardy, Benoît G; Chen, Fu-Chen; Alcantara, Cristina; Stoffregen, Thomas A

    2015-05-01

    On land, body sway during stance becomes coupled with imposed oscillations of the illuminated environment or of the support surface. This coupling appears to have the function of stabilizing the body relative to the illuminated or inertial environment. In previous research, the stimulus has been limited to motion in a single axis. Little is known about our ability to couple postural activity with complex, multi-axis oscillations. On a ship at sea, we evaluated postural activity using measures of body movement, as such, and we separately evaluated a direct measure of coupling between body movement and ship motion. Participants were tested while facing fore-aft and athwartship. We compared postural activity between participants who had been seasick at the beginning of the voyage and those who had not. Coupling of postural activity with ship motion differed between body axes as a function of body orientation relative to the ship. In addition, coupling differed between participants who had been seasick at the beginning of the voyage and those who had not. We discuss the results in terms of implications for general theories of postural control, and for prediction of susceptibility to seasickness in individuals.

  2. Meridional motions of sunspots from 1947.9 to 1985.0. II - Latitude motions dependent on SPOT type and phase of the activity cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustig, G.; Hanslmeier, A.

    1987-01-01

    The dependence of the meridional motions of sunspots on sunspot-type and phase in the solar activity cycle for the time interval 1947.9-1985.0 is examined; this was done also with the sunspot data from the solar-observatory Kanzelhoehe. For the total time interval, investigations for each cycle were carried out only for the elder or long lasting G, H, and J sunspot groups and distinctions between similar sunspot types AB, C, D, EF, GHJ (Zuerich-classification). The meridional motions about the different activity maxima were also examined. In all investigations in the period from 1947.9 to 1985.0 a tendency to a southdrift can be observed on both hemispheres of the sun, but the mean meridional motions are between the error-bars not very significantly different from zero.

  3. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  4. Isokinetic torque levels in hemophiliac knee musculature.

    PubMed

    Strickler, E M; Greene, W B

    1984-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to 1) measure peak torques generated by knee extensors and flexors in hemophilia patients; 2) describe flexor to extensor; 3) record the point in the arc of motion where peak torque was achieved; 4) correlate results with age, degree of hemophilic arthropathy, and presence of flexion contracture; and 5) compare results with reports on healthy subjects. Forty-seven patients (94 knees) with severe hemophilia were tested with a Cybex II isokinetic dynamometer at a speed of 30 degrees per second. Height, weight, thigh girths, and passive knee range of motion were recorded. Standing roentgenograms of the knee were evaluated to assess degree of arthropathy. Subjects were divided into groups by age and degree of arthropathy. Descriptive statistics were generated for all groups. Average peak extensor and flexor torque was similar for adolescents and adults. Increasing degree of arthropathy was associated with significant decreases in both extensor and flexor torque, an increase in flexor to extensor ratios and increasing knee flexion contractures. Across all groups, flexor to extensor ratios were abnormally high, particularly in patients with type IV arthropathy. The point in arc of motion where peak torques occurred did not differ significantly across groups and compared favorably with measures reported in the literature. For all ages, mean peak extensor and flexor torques were less than values reported in the literature for healthy subjects. Results of this study demonstrate the profound decrease in torque produced by knee musculature in hemophilia patients, particularly those with more severe arthropathy and knee flexion deformity.

  5. Stiffness after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Jorge; Gomez, Miguel M; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-04-01

    Stiffness after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) adversely affects outcome and impacts patient function. Various risk factors for stiffness after TKA have been identified, including reduced preoperative knee range of motion, history of prior knee surgery, etiology of arthritis, incorrect positioning or oversizing of components, and incorrect gap balancing. Mechanical and associated causes, such as infection, arthrofibrosis, complex regional pain syndrome, and heterotopic ossification, secondary gain issues have also been identified. Management of stiffness following TKA can be challenging. The condition needs to be assessed and treated in a staged manner. A nonsurgical approach is the first step. Manipulation under anesthesia may be considered within the first 3 months after the index TKA, if physical therapy fails to improve the range of motion. Beyond this point, consideration should be given to surgical intervention such as lysis of adhesions, either arthroscopically or by open arthrotomy. If the cause of stiffness is deemed to be surgical error, such as component malpositioning, revision arthroplasty is indicated. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the various aspects of management of stiffness after TKA.

  6. A kinematic comparison of alterations to knee and ankle angles from resting measures to active pedaling during a graded exercise protocol.

    PubMed

    Peveler, Willard W; Shew, Brandy; Johnson, Samantha; Palmer, Thomas G

    2012-11-01

    Saddle height is one of the most researched areas of bike fit. The current accepted method for adjusting saddle height involves the use of a goniometer to adjust saddle height so that a knee angle between 25° and 35° is obtained. This measurement is taken while the cyclist maintains a static position with the pedal at the 6-o'-clock position. However, the act of pedaling is dynamic, and angles may alter during movement. The purpose of this study was to examine the alterations to knee and ankle angle occurring from static measures to active pedaling across intensities experienced by cyclists during a graded exercise protocol. Thirty-four recreational to highly trained cyclists were evaluated using 2D analysis of stationary position and 3 active levels (level 1, respiratory exchange ratio of 1.00, and max). Dependent measures were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance (p = 0.05). When examining the results, it is evident that significant alterations to pedal stroke occur from stationary measures to active pedaling and as intensity increases toward maximal. Plantar flexion increased when moving from stationary measures to active pedaling, which resulted in an increase in knee angle. Although still greater than stationary measures, less plantar flexion occurred at higher intensities when compared with lower intensity cycling. Less plantar flexion at higher intensities is most likely a result of application of a larger downward torque occurring because of greater power requirements at higher intensities. There appeared to be greater variability in angle when examining novice cyclists in relation to more experienced cyclists. Although stationary measures are where a bike fit session will begin, observation during the pedal cycle may be needed to fine-tune the riders' fit.

  7. Are External Knee Load and EMG Measures Accurate Indicators of Internal Knee Contact Forces during Gait?

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Andrew J.; D'Lima, Darryl D.; Besier, Thor F.; Lloyd, David G.; Colwell, Clifford W.; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical loading is believed to be a critical factor in the development and treatment of knee osteoarthritis. However, the contact forces to which the knee articular surfaces are subjected during daily activities cannot be measured clinically. Thus, the ability to predict internal knee contact forces accurately using external measures (i.e., external knee loads and muscle EMG signals) would be clinically valuable. This study quantifies how well external knee load and EMG measures predict internal knee contact forces during gait. A single subject with a force-measuring tibial prosthesis and post-operative valgus alignment performed four gait patterns (normal, medial thrust, walking pole, and trunk sway) to induce a wide range of external and internal knee joint loads. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess how much of the variability in internal contact forces was accounted for by variability in the external measures. Though the different gait patterns successfully induced significant changes in the external and internal quantities, changes in external measures were generally weak indicators of changes in total, medial, and lateral contact force. Our results suggest that when total contact force may be changing, caution should be exercised when inferring changes in knee contact forces based on observed changes in external knee load and EMG measures. Advances in musculoskeletal modeling methods may be needed for accurate estimation of in vivo knee contact forces. PMID:23280647

  8. A Novel Methodology for the Simulation of Athletic Tasks on Cadaveric Knee Joints with Respect to In Vivo Kinematics.

    PubMed

    Bates, Nathaniel A; Nesbitt, Rebecca J; Shearn, Jason T; Myer, Gregory D; Hewett, Timothy E

    2015-10-01

    Six degree of freedom (6-DOF) robotic manipulators have simulated clinical tests and gait on cadaveric knees to examine knee biomechanics. However, these activities do not necessarily emulate the kinematics and kinetics that lead to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. The purpose of this study was to determine the techniques needed to derive reproducible, in vitro simulations from in vivo skin-marker kinematics recorded during simulated athletic tasks. Input of raw, in vivo, skin-marker-derived motion capture kinematics consistently resulted in specimen failure. The protocol described in this study developed an in-depth methodology to adapt in vivo kinematic recordings into 6-DOF knee motion simulations for drop vertical jumps and sidestep cutting. Our simulation method repeatably produced kinetics consistent with vertical ground reaction patterns while preserving specimen integrity. Athletic task simulation represents an advancement that allows investigators to examine ACL-intact and graft biomechanics during motions that generate greater kinetics, and the athletic tasks are more representative of documented cases of ligament rupture. Establishment of baseline functional mechanics within the knee joint during athletic tasks will serve to advance the prevention, repair and rehabilitation of ACL injuries.

  9. Radiotherapy for intraarticular venous malformations of the knee.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takeshi; Okimoto, Tomoaki; Ito, Katsuyoshi; Tanabe, Masahiro; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2014-11-01

    Intraarticular venous malformation (IAVM) of the knee is a rare vascular disease that manifests with pain, swelling, and hemarthrosis. A young man with left knee pain and swelling was admitted to our institution for the treatment of the IAVM of the left knee which was diagnosed by a local orthopedic doctor via arthroscopy. A total dose of 40 Gy of radiotherapy was delivered with a daily dose of 2.0 Gy using 6 MV X-ray beams and a linear accelerator through anteroposterior portals. Fifteen months after radiotherapy, follow-up examination using radiologic imaging showed distinct shrinkage of the venous malformations. Swelling and pain of the left knee had decreased, and range of motion of the left knee was maintained. This report describes a case involving a 38-year-old man with IAVM of the left knee in whom favorable outcomes were obtained in response to radiotherapy. PMID:25017778

  10. Is Lifelong Knee Joint Force from Work, Home, and Sport Related to Knee Osteoarthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Ratzlaff, Charles R.; Koehoorn, Mieke; Cibere, Jolanda; Kopec, Jacek A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the association of cumulative lifetime knee joint force on the risk of self-reported medically-diagnosed knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. Exposure data on lifetime physical activity type (occupational, household, sport/recreation) and dose (frequency, intensity, duration) were collected from 4,269 Canadian men and women as part of the Physical Activity and Joint Heath cohort study. Subjects were ranked in terms of the “cumulative peak force index”, a measure of lifetime mechanical knee force. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to obtain adjusted effects for mean lifetime knee force on the risk of knee OA. Results. High levels of total lifetime, occupational and household-related force were associated with an increased in risk of OA, with odds ratio's ranging from approximately 1.3 to 2. Joint injury, high BMI and older age were related to risk of knee OA, consistent with previous studies. Conclusions. A newly developed measure of lifetime mechanical knee force from physical activity was employed to estimate the risk of self-reported, medically-diagnosed knee OA. While there are limitations, this paper suggests that high levels of total lifetime force (all domains combined), and occupational force in men and household force in women were risk factors for knee OA. PMID:22848225

  11. Conical Euler simulation and active suppression of delta wing rocking motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Elizabeth M.; Batina, John T.

    1990-01-01

    A conical Euler code was developed to study unsteady vortex-dominated flows about rolling highly-swept delta wings, undergoing either forced or free-to-roll motions including active roll suppression. The flow solver of the code involves a multistage Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme which uses a finite volume spatial discretization of the Euler equations on an unstructured grid of triangles. The code allows for the additional analysis of the free-to-roll case, by including the rigid-body equation of motion for its simultaneous time integration with the governing flow equations. Results are presented for a 75 deg swept sharp leading edge delta wing at a freestream Mach number of 1.2 and at alpha equal to 10 and 30 deg angle of attack. A forced harmonic analysis indicates that the rolling moment coefficient provides: (1) a positive damping at the lower angle of attack equal to 10 deg, which is verified in a free-to-roll calculation; (2) a negative damping at the higher angle of attack equal to 30 deg at the small roll amplitudes. A free-to-roll calculation for the latter case produces an initially divergent response, but as the amplitude of motion grows with time, the response transitions to a wing-rock type of limit cycle oscillation. The wing rocking motion may be actively suppressed, however, through the use of a rate-feedback control law and antisymmetrically deflected leading edge flaps. The descriptions of the conical Euler flow solver and the free-to-roll analysis are presented. Results are also presented which give insight into the flow physics associated with unsteady vortical flows about forced and free-to-roll delta wings, including the active roll suppression of this wing-rock phenomenon.

  12. Does joint line elevation after revision knee arthroplasty affect tibio-femoral kinematics, contact pressure or collateral ligament lengths? An in vitro analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczewski, Jacek B.; Chevalier, Yan; Okon, Tomasz; Innocenti, Bernardo; Bellemans, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Correct restoration of the joint line is generally considered as crucial when performing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). During revision knee arthroplasty however, elevation of the joint line occurs frequently. The general belief is that this negatively affects the clinical outcome, but the reasons are still not well understood. Material and methods In this cadaveric in vitro study the biomechanical consequences of joint line elevation were investigated using a previously validated cadaver model simulating active deep knee squats and passive flexion-extension cycles. Knee specimens were sequentially tested after total knee arthroplasty with joint line restoration and after 4 mm joint line elevation. Results The tibia rotated internally with increasing knee flexion during both passive and squatting motion (range: 17° and 7° respectively). Joint line elevation of 4 mm did not make a statistically significant difference. During passive motion, the tibia tended to become slightly more adducted with increasing knee flexion (range: 2°), while it went into slighlty less adduction during squatting (range: –2°). Neither of both trends was influenced by joint line elevation. Also anteroposterior translation of the femoral condyle centres was not affected by joint line elevation, although there was a tendency for a small posterior shift (of about 3 mm) during squatting after joint line elevation. In terms of kinetics, ligaments lengths and length changes, tibiofemoral contact pressures and quadriceps forces all showed the same patterns before and joint line elevation. No statistically significant changes could be detected. Conclusions Our study suggests that joint line elevation by 4 mm in revision total knee arthroplasty does not cause significant kinematic and kinetic differences during passive flexion/extension movement and squatting in the tibio-femoral joint, nor does it affect the elongation patterns of collateral ligaments. Therefore, clinical

  13. Active control of heave motion for TLP-type offshore platform under random waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, Ronaldo C.; Alves, Rosane M.

    1999-05-01

    In deep waters scenarios Tension Leg Platforms (TLP), under severe sea/wind conditions, may experience large response amplitudes of the hull motion. Large heave amplitudes caused by random dynamic loads appear as one of the most deleterious effects to the structural safety and integrity of the most critical components: mooring system and the handing risers. In a preliminary design reduction of these amplitudes is in general tentatively sought by compromised measures and concurrent design criteria like: high flutuability and deck payload vs. tendons and risers submerged weight; deck hydrodynamic vs. length variation of pretension tendons, etc. This paper shows that active control system may be installed inside the hull to attenuate dynamic amplitudes in heave motion. Optimal control theory are applicated for the idealization of mechanism to reduce the dynamic response amplitude, improving the safety conditions and increasing service life of tendons and risers, insuring the system functioning at all. The uncontrolled and controlled dynamic behaviors of a TLP prototype are investigated by using simplified mathematical models. The numerical results lead to the conclusion that active systems have good performance and efficiency in reducing and controlling the heave motion amplitudes and consequently the stress variations in tendons and risers of a TLP.

  14. Microprocessor prosthetic knees.

    PubMed

    Berry, Dale

    2006-02-01

    This article traces the development of microprocessor prosthetic knees from early research in the 1970s to the present. Read about how microprocessor knees work, functional options, patient selection, and the future of this prosthetic.

  15. Arm position influences the activation patterns of trunk muscles during trunk range-of-motion movements.

    PubMed

    Siu, Aaron; Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Drake, Janessa Dm

    2016-10-01

    To understand the activation patterns of the trunk musculature, it is also important to consider the implications of adjacent structures such as the upper limbs, and the muscles that act to move the arms. This study investigated the effects of arm positions on the activation patterns and co-activation of the trunk musculature and muscles that move the arm during trunk range-of-motion movements (maximum trunk axial twist, flexion, and lateral bend). Fifteen males and fifteen females, asymptomatic for low back pain, performed maximum trunk range-of-motion movements, with three arm positions for axial twist (loose, crossed, abducted) and two positions for flexion and lateral bend (loose, crossed). Electromyographical data were collected for eight muscles bilaterally, and activation signals were cross-correlated between trunk muscles and the muscles that move the arms (upper trapezius, latissimus dorsi). Results revealed consistently greater muscle co-activation (higher cross-correlation coefficients) between the trunk muscles and upper trapezius for the abducted arm position during maximum trunk axial twist, while results for the latissimus dorsi-trunk pairings were more dependent on the specific trunk muscles (either abdominal or back) and latissimus dorsi muscle (either right or left side), as well as the range-of-motion movement. The findings of this study contribute to the understanding of interactions between the upper limbs and trunk, and highlight the influence of arm positions on the trunk musculature. In addition, the comparison of the present results to those of individuals with back or shoulder conditions may ultimately aid in elucidating underlying mechanisms or contributing factors to those conditions.

  16. Robotic-assisted knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Elmallah, Randa K; Jauregui, Julio J; Pierce, Todd P; Mont, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Robotics in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has undergone vast improvements. Although some of the systems have fallen out of favor due to safety concerns, there has been recent increased interest for semi-active haptic robotic systems that provide intraoperative tactile feedback to the surgeon. The potential advantages include improvements in radiographic outcomes, reducing the incidence of mechanical axis malalignment of the lower extremity and better tissue balance. Proponents of robotic technology believe that these improvements may lead to superior functional outcomes and implant survivorship. We aim to discuss robotic technology development, outcomes of unicompartmental and total knee arthroplasty and the future outlook. Short-term follow-up studies on robotic-assisted knee arthroplasty suggest that, although some alignment objectives may have been achieved, more studies regarding functional outcomes are needed. Furthermore, studies evaluating the projected cost-benefit analyses of this new technology are needed before widespread adoption. Nevertheless, the short-term results warrant further evaluation. PMID:26365088

  17. Knee arthroscopy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... retinacular release - discharge; Synovectomy - discharge; Patellar debridement - discharge; Meniscus repair - discharge; Lateral release - discharge; Collateral ligament repair - discharge; Knee surgery - ...

  18. Post-traumatic knee stiffness: surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Pujol, N; Boisrenoult, P; Beaufils, P

    2015-02-01

    Post-traumatic knee stiffness and loss of range of motion is a common complication of injuries to the knee area. The causes of post-traumatic knee stiffness can be divided into flexion contractures, extension contractures, and combined contractures. Post-traumatic stiffness can be due to the presence of dense intra-articular adhesions and/or fibrotic transformation of peri-articular structures. Various open and arthroscopic surgical treatments are possible. A precise diagnosis and understanding of the pathology is mandatory prior to any surgical treatment. Failure is imminent if all pathologies are not addressed correctly. From a general point of view, a flexion contracture is due to posterior adhesions and/or anterior impingement. On the other hand, extension contractures are due to anterior adhesions and/or posterior impingement. This overview will describe the different modern surgical techniques for treating post-traumatic knee stiffness. Any bony impingements must be treated before soft tissue release is performed. Intra-articular stiff knees with a loss of flexion can be treated by an anterior arthroscopic arthrolysis. Extra-articular pathology causing a flexion contracture can be treated by open or endoscopic quadriceps release. Extension contractures can be treated by arthroscopic or open posterior arthrolysis. Postoperative care (analgesia, rehabilitation) is essential to maintaining the range of motion obtained intra-operatively.

  19. Current Surgical Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rönn, Karolin; Reischl, Nikolaus; Gautier, Emanuel; Jacobi, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Osteoathritis (OA) of the knee is common, and the chances of suffering from OA increase with age. Its treatment should be initially nonoperative—and requires both pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment modalities. If conservative therapy fails, surgery should be considered. Surgical treatments for knee OA include arthroscopy, cartilage repair, osteotomy, and knee arthroplasty. Determining which of these procedures is most appropriate depends on several factors, including the location, stage of OA, comorbidities on the one side and patients suffering on the other side. Arthroscopic lavage and débridement is often carried out, but does not alter disease progression. If OA is limited to one compartment, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty or unloading osteotomy can be considered. They are recommended in young and active patients in regard to the risks and limited durability of total knee replacement. Total arthroplasty of the knee is a common and safe method in the elderly patients with advanced knee OA. This paper summarizes current surgical treatment strategies for knee OA, with a focus on the latest developments, indications and level of evidence. PMID:22046517

  20. Predicting muscle activation patterns from motion and anatomy: modelling the skull of Sphenodon (Diapsida: Rhynchocephalia)

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Neil; Jones, Marc E. H.; Evans, Susan E.; Shi, JunFen; O'Higgins, Paul; Fagan, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between skull shape and the forces generated during feeding is currently under widespread scrutiny and increasingly involves the use of computer simulations such as finite element analysis. The computer models used to represent skulls are often based on computed tomography data and thus are structurally accurate; however, correctly representing muscular loading during food reduction remains a major problem. Here, we present a novel approach for predicting the forces and activation patterns of muscles and muscle groups based on their known anatomical orientation (line of action). The work was carried out for the lizard-like reptile Sphenodon (Rhynchocephalia) using a sophisticated computer-based model and multi-body dynamics analysis. The model suggests that specific muscle groups control specific motions, and that during certain times in the bite cycle some muscles are highly active whereas others are inactive. The predictions of muscle activity closely correspond to data previously recorded from live Sphenodon using electromyography. Apparent exceptions can be explained by variations in food resistance, food size, food position and lower jaw motions. This approach shows considerable promise in advancing detailed functional models of food acquisition and reduction, and for use in other musculoskeletal systems where no experimental determination of muscle activity is possible, such as in rare, endangered or extinct species. PMID:19474084

  1. Modeling meiotic chromosome pairing: nuclear envelope attachment, telomere-led active random motion, and anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Wallace F.; Fung, Jennifer C.

    2016-04-01

    The recognition and pairing of homologous chromosomes during meiosis is a complex physical and molecular process involving a combination of polymer dynamics and molecular recognition events. Two highly conserved features of meiotic chromosome behavior are the attachment of telomeres to the nuclear envelope and the active random motion of telomeres driven by their interaction with cytoskeletal motor proteins. Both of these features have been proposed to facilitate the process of homolog pairing, but exactly what role these features play in meiosis remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the roles of active motion and nuclear envelope tethering using a Brownian dynamics simulation in which meiotic chromosomes are represented by a Rouse polymer model subjected to tethering and active forces at the telomeres. We find that tethering telomeres to the nuclear envelope slows down pairing relative to the rates achieved by unattached chromosomes, but that randomly directed active forces applied to the telomeres speed up pairing dramatically in a manner that depends on the statistical properties of the telomere force fluctuations. The increased rate of initial pairing cannot be explained by stretching out of the chromosome conformation but instead seems to correlate with anomalous diffusion of sub-telomeric regions.

  2. Voluntary motion support control of Robot Suit HAL triggered by bioelectrical signal for hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Hiroaki; Taal, Stefan; Niniss, Hafid; Hayashi, Tomohiro; Kamibayashi, Kiyotaka; Eguchi, Kiyoshi; Sankai, Yoshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Our goal is to enhance the quality of life of patients with hemiplegia by means of an active motion support system that assists the impaired motion such as to make it as close as possible to the motion of an able bodied person. We have developed the Robot Suit HAL (Hybrid Assistive Limb) to actively support and enhance the human motor functions. The purpose of the research presented in this paper is to propose the required control method to support voluntarily motion using a trigger based on patient's bioelectrical signal. Clinical trials were conducted in order to investigate the effectiveness of the proposed control method. The first stage of the trials, described in this paper, involved the participation of one hemiplegic patient who is not able to bend his right knee. As a result, the motion support provided by the HAL moved the paralyzed knee joint according to his intention and improved the range of the subject's knee flexion. The first evaluation of the control method with one subject showed promising results for future trials to explore the effectiveness for a wide range of types of hemiplegia. PMID:21095652

  3. Active breathing control (ABC): Determination and reduction of breathing-induced organ motion in the chest

    SciTech Connect

    Gagel, Bernd . E-mail: BGagel@UKAachen.de; Demirel, Cengiz M.P.; Kientopf, Aline; Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc; Stanzel, Sven; Breuer, Christian; Asadpour, Branka; Jansen, Thomas; Holy, Richard; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Eble, Michael J.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Extensive radiotherapy volumes for tumors of the chest are partly caused by interfractional organ motion. We evaluated the feasibility of respiratory observation tools using the active breathing control (ABC) system and the effect on breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with unresectable tumors of the chest were selected for evaluation of the ABC system. Computed tomography scans were performed at various respiratory phases starting at the same couch position without patient movement. Threshold levels were set at minimum and maximum volume during normal breathing cycles and at a volume defined as shallow breathing, reflecting the subjective maximal tolerable reduction of breath volume. To evaluate the extent of organ movement, 13 landmarks were considering using commercial software for image coregistration. In 4 patients, second examinations were performed during therapy. Results: Investigating the differences in a normal breathing cycle versus shallow breathing, a statistically significant reduction of respiratory motion in the upper, middle, and lower regions of the chest could be detected, representing potential movement reduction achieved through reduced breath volume. Evaluating interfraction reproducibility, the mean displacement ranged between 0.24 mm (chest wall/tracheal bifurcation) to 3.5 mm (diaphragm) for expiration and shallow breathing and 0.24 mm (chest wall) to 5.25 mm (diaphragm) for normal inspiration. Conclusions: By modifying regularity of the respiratory cycle through reduction of breath volume, a significant and reproducible reduction of chest and diaphragm motion is possible, enabling reduction of treatment planning margins.

  4. Increased sensitivity to physical activity among individuals with knee osteoarthritis: relation to pain outcomes, psychological factors, and responses to quantitative sensory testing.

    PubMed

    Wideman, Timothy H; Finan, Patrick H; Edwards, Robert R; Quartana, Phillip J; Buenaver, Luis F; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Smith, Michael T

    2014-04-01

    Recent findings suggest that certain individuals with musculoskeletal pain conditions have increased sensitivity to physical activity (SPA) and respond to activities of stable intensity with increasingly severe pain. This study aimed to determine the degree to which individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA) show heightened SPA in response to a standardized walking task and whether SPA cross-sectionally predicts psychological factors, responses to quantitative sensory testing (QST), and different OA-related outcomes. One hundred seven adults with chronic knee OA completed self-report measures of pain, function, and psychological factors, underwent QST, and performed a 6-min walk test. Participants rated their discomfort levels throughout the walking task; an index of SPA was created by subtracting first ratings from peak ratings. Repeated-measure analysis of variance revealed that levels of discomfort significantly increased throughout the walking task. A series of hierarchical regression analyses determined that after controlling for significant covariates, psychological factors, and measures of mechanical pain sensitivity, individual variance in SPA predicted self-report pain and function and performance on the walking task. Analyses also revealed that both pain catastrophizing and the temporal summation of mechanical pain were significant predictors of SPA and that SPA mediated the relationship between catastrophizing and self-reported pain and physical function. The discussion addresses the potential processes contributing to SPA and the role it may play in predicting responses to different interventions for musculoskeletal pain conditions.

  5. Biomechanical Analysis of Stair Descent in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Igawa, Tatsuya; Katsuhira, Junji

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were to investigate the lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics of patients with the knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) during stair descent and clarify the biomechanical factors related to their difficulty in stair descent. [Subjects and Methods] Eight healthy elderly persons and four knee OA patients participated in this study. A 3-D motion analysis system and force plates were employed to measure lower extremity joint angles, ranges of motion, joint moments, joint powers, and ratios of contribution for the joint powers while descending stairs. [Results] Knee joint flexion angle, extension moment, and negative power during the early stance phase in the knee OA group were smaller than those in the healthy subjects group. However, no significant changes in these parameters in the ankle joint were observed between the two subject groups. [Conclusion] Knee OA patients could not use the knee joint to absorb impact during the early stance phase of stair descent. Hence, they might compensate for the roles played by the intact knee joint by mainly using ipsilateral ankle kinematics and kinetics. PMID:24926119

  6. Biomechanical analysis of stair descent in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Igawa, Tatsuya; Katsuhira, Junji

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were to investigate the lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics of patients with the knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) during stair descent and clarify the biomechanical factors related to their difficulty in stair descent. [Subjects and Methods] Eight healthy elderly persons and four knee OA patients participated in this study. A 3-D motion analysis system and force plates were employed to measure lower extremity joint angles, ranges of motion, joint moments, joint powers, and ratios of contribution for the joint powers while descending stairs. [Results] Knee joint flexion angle, extension moment, and negative power during the early stance phase in the knee OA group were smaller than those in the healthy subjects group. However, no significant changes in these parameters in the ankle joint were observed between the two subject groups. [Conclusion] Knee OA patients could not use the knee joint to absorb impact during the early stance phase of stair descent. Hence, they might compensate for the roles played by the intact knee joint by mainly using ipsilateral ankle kinematics and kinetics.

  7. Processing 3D form and 3D motion: respective contributions of attention-based and stimulus-driven activity.

    PubMed

    Paradis, A-L; Droulez, J; Cornilleau-Pérès, V; Poline, J-B

    2008-12-01

    This study aims at segregating the neural substrate for the 3D-form and 3D-motion attributes in structure-from-motion perception, and at disentangling the stimulus-driven and endogenous-attention-driven processing of these attributes. Attention and stimulus were manipulated independently: participants had to detect the transitions of one attribute--form, 3D motion or colour--while the visual stimulus underwent successive transitions of all attributes. We compared the BOLD activity related to form and 3D motion in three conditions: stimulus-driven processing (unattended transitions), endogenous attentional selection (task) or both stimulus-driven processing and attentional selection (attended transitions). In all conditions, the form versus 3D-motion contrasts revealed a clear dorsal/ventral segregation. However, while the form-related activity is consistent with previously described shape-selective areas, the activity related to 3D motion does not encompass the usual "visual motion" areas, but rather corresponds to a high-level motion system, including IPL and STS areas. Second, we found a dissociation between the neural processing of unattended attributes and that involved in endogenous attentional selection. Areas selective for 3D-motion and form showed either increased activity at transitions of these respective attributes or decreased activity when subjects' attention was directed to a competing attribute. We propose that both facilitatory and suppressive mechanisms of attribute selection are involved depending on the conditions driving this selection. Therefore, attentional selection is not limited to an increased activity in areas processing stimulus properties, and may unveil different functional localization from stimulus modulation.

  8. Development of Kinematic Graphs of Median Nerve during Active Finger Motion: Implications of Smartphone Use

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Certain hand activities cause deformation and displacement of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel due to the gliding motion of tendons surrounding it. As smartphone usage escalates, this raises the public’s concern whether hand activities while using smartphones can lead to median nerve problems. Objective The aims of this study were to 1) develop kinematic graphs and 2) investigate the associated deformation and rotational information of median nerve in the carpal tunnel during hand activities. Methods Dominant wrists of 30 young adults were examined with ultrasonography by placing a transducer transversely on their wrist crease. Ultrasound video clips were recorded when the subject performing 1) thumb opposition with the wrist in neutral position, 2) thumb opposition with the wrist in ulnar deviation and 3) pinch grip with the wrist in neutral position. Six still images that were separated by 0.2-second intervals were then captured from the ultrasound video for the determination of 1) cross-sectional area (CSA), 2) flattening ratio (FR), 3) rotational displacement (RD) and 4) translational displacement (TD) of median nerve in the carpal tunnel, and these collected information of deformation, rotational and displacement of median nerve were compared between 1) two successive time points during a single hand activity and 2) different hand motions at the same time point. Finally, kinematic graphs were constructed to demonstrate the mobility of median nerve during different hand activities. Results Performing different hand activities during this study led to a gradual reduction in CSA of the median nerve, with thumb opposition together with the wrist in ulnar deviation causing the greatest extent of deformation of the median nerve. Thumb opposition with the wrist in ulnar deviation also led to the largest extent of TD when compared to the other two hand activities of this study. Kinematic graphs showed that the motion pathways of median nerve during

  9. Respiratory Motion of The Heart and Positional Reproducibility Under Active Breathing Control

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Moran, Jean M.; Kessler, Marc L.; Marsh, Robin B. C; Balter, James M.; Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To reduce cardiotoxicity from breast radiotherapy (RT), innovative techniques are under investigation. Information about cardiac motion with respiration and positional reproducibility under active breathing control (ABC) is necessary to evaluate these techniques. Methods and Materials: Patients requiring loco-regional RT for breast cancer were scanned by computed tomography using an ABC device at various breath-hold states, before and during treatment. Ten patients were studied. For each patient, 12 datasets were analyzed. Mutual information-based regional rigid alignment was used to determine the magnitude and reproducibility of cardiac motion as a function of breathing state. For each scan session, motion was quantified by evaluating the displacement of a point along the left anterior descending artery (LAD) with respect to its position at end expiration. Long-term positional reproducibility was also assessed. Results: Displacement of the LAD was greatest in the inferior direction, moderate in the anterior direction, and lowest in the left-right direction. At shallow breathing states, the average displacement of LAD position was up to 6 mm in the inferior direction. The maximum displacement in any patient was 2.8 cm in the inferior direction, between expiration and deep-inspiration breath hold. At end expiration, the long-term reproducibility (SD) of the LAD position was 3 mm in the A-P, 6 mm in the S-I, and 4 mm in the L-R directions. At deep-inspiration breath hold, long-term reproducibility was 3 mm in the A-P, 7 mm in the S-I, and 3 mm in the L-R directions. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the extent of LAD displacement that occurs with shallow breathing and with deep-inspiration breath hold. This information may guide optimization studies considering the effects of respiratory motion and reproducibility of cardiac position on cardiac dose, both with and without ABC.

  10. Multibody dynamic simulation of knee contact mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bei, Yanhong; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2006-01-01

    Multibody dynamic musculoskeletal models capable of predicting muscle forces and joint contact pressures simultaneously would be valuable for studying clinical issues related to knee joint degeneration and restoration. Current three-dimensional multi-body knee models are either quasi-static with deformable contact or dynamic with rigid contact. This study proposes a computationally efficient methodology for combining multibody dynamic simulation methods with a deformable contact knee model. The methodology requires preparation of the articular surface geometry, development of efficient methods to calculate distances between contact surfaces, implementation of an efficient contact solver that accounts for the unique characteristics of human joints, and specification of an application programming interface for integration with any multibody dynamic simulation environment. The current implementation accommodates natural or artificial tibiofemoral joint models, small or large strain contact models, and linear or nonlinear material models. Applications are presented for static analysis (via dynamic simulation) of a natural knee model created from MRI and CT data and dynamic simulation of an artificial knee model produced from manufacturer’s CAD data. Small and large strain natural knee static analyses required 1 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact conditions except for peak pressure, which was higher for the large strain model. Linear and nonlinear artificial knee dynamic simulations required 10 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact force and torque but different contact pressures, which were lower for the nonlinear model due to increased contact area. This methodology provides an important step toward the realization of dynamic musculoskeletal models that can predict in vivo knee joint motion and loading simultaneously. PMID:15564115

  11. Decreased frontal plane hip joint moments in runners with excessive varus excursion at the knee.

    PubMed

    Williams, Dorsey Shelton; Isom, Wesley

    2012-05-01

    Knee varus position and motion have been correlated with increased medial knee loading during gait. The purpose of this study is to determine whether runners with excessive varus excursion (EVE) at the knee demonstrate frontal plane knee and hip kinetics that are different from those of runners with normal varus excursion (NVE). Twelve runners with EVE were compared with 12 NVE subjects using three-dimensional kinematics and kinetics. Frontal plane angles and moments were compared at the knee and hip. Runners with EVE had significantly greater abductor moment of the knee (p = .004) and lower peak abductor moment of the hip (p = .047). Runners with EVE demonstrate knee and hip mechanics thought to be associated with increased medial tibiofemoral loading. Further understanding of how changing hip abductor moments may affect changes in knee abductor moments during running may potentially lead to interventions that augment long-term risk of injury.

  12. Relationships between Paraspinal Muscle Activity and Lumbar Inter-Vertebral Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    du Rose, Alister; Breen, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Control of the lumbar spine requires contributions from both the active and passive sub-systems. Identifying interactions between these systems may provide insight into the mechanisms of low back pain. However, as a first step it is important to investigate what is normal. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between the lumbar inter-vertebral range of motion and paraspinal muscle activity during weight-bearing flexion in healthy controls using quantitative fluoroscopy (QF) and surface electromyography (sEMG). Contemporaneous lumbar sEMG and QF motion sequences were recorded during controlled active flexion of 60° using electrodes placed over Longissimus thoracis pars thoracis (TES), Longissimus thoracis pars lumborum (LES), and Multifidus (LMU). Normalised root mean square (RMS) sEMG amplitude data were averaged over five epochs, and the change in amplitude between epochs was calculated. The sEMG ratios of LMU/LES LMU/TES and LES/TES were also determined. QF was used to measure the maximum inter-vertebral range of motion from L2-S1, and correlation coefficients were calculated between sEMG amplitude variables and these measurements. Intra- and inter-session sEMG amplitude repeatability was also assessed for all three paraspinal muscles. The sEMG amplitude measurements were highly repeatable, and sEMG amplitude changes correlated significantly with L4-5 and L5-S1 IV-RoMmax (r = -0.47 to 0.59). The sEMG amplitude ratio of LES/TES also correlated with L4-L5 IV-RoMmax (r = -0.53). The relationships found may be important when considering rehabilitation for low back pain. PMID:27417592

  13. Relationships between Paraspinal Muscle Activity and Lumbar Inter-Vertebral Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    du Rose, Alister; Breen, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Control of the lumbar spine requires contributions from both the active and passive sub-systems. Identifying interactions between these systems may provide insight into the mechanisms of low back pain. However, as a first step it is important to investigate what is normal. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between the lumbar inter-vertebral range of motion and paraspinal muscle activity during weight-bearing flexion in healthy controls using quantitative fluoroscopy (QF) and surface electromyography (sEMG). Contemporaneous lumbar sEMG and QF motion sequences were recorded during controlled active flexion of 60° using electrodes placed over Longissimus thoracis pars thoracis (TES), Longissimus thoracis pars lumborum (LES), and Multifidus (LMU). Normalised root mean square (RMS) sEMG amplitude data were averaged over five epochs, and the change in amplitude between epochs was calculated. The sEMG ratios of LMU/LES LMU/TES and LES/TES were also determined. QF was used to measure the maximum inter-vertebral range of motion from L2-S1, and correlation coefficients were calculated between sEMG amplitude variables and these measurements. Intra- and inter-session sEMG amplitude repeatability was also assessed for all three paraspinal muscles. The sEMG amplitude measurements were highly repeatable, and sEMG amplitude changes correlated significantly with L4-5 and L5-S1 IV-RoMmax (r = −0.47 to 0.59). The sEMG amplitude ratio of LES/TES also correlated with L4-L5 IV-RoMmax (r = −0.53). The relationships found may be important when considering rehabilitation for low back pain. PMID:27417592

  14. Evaluating knee replacement mechanics during ADL with PID-controlled dynamic finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Clare K; Baldwin, Mark A; Clary, Chadd W; Maletsky, Lorin P; Rullkoetter, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Validated computational knee simulations are valuable tools for design phase development of knee replacement devices. Recently, a dynamic finite element (FE) model of the Kansas knee simulator was kinematically validated during gait and deep flexion cycles. In order to operate the computational simulator in the same manner as the experiment, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller was interfaced with the FE model to control the quadriceps actuator excursion and produce a target flexion profile regardless of implant geometry or alignment conditions. The controller was also expanded to operate multiple actuators simultaneously in order to produce in vivo loading conditions at the joint during dynamic activities. Subsequently, the fidelity of the computational model was improved through additional muscle representation and inclusion of relative hip-ankle anterior-posterior (A-P) motion. The PID-controlled model was able to successfully recreate in vivo loading conditions (flexion angle, compressive joint load, medial-lateral load distribution or varus-valgus torque, internal-external torque, A-P force) for deep knee bend, chair rise, stance-phase gait and step-down activities.

  15. Extract the Relational Information of Static Features and Motion Features for Human Activities Recognition in Videos

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Both static features and motion features have shown promising performance in human activities recognition task. However, the information included in these features is insufficient for complex human activities. In this paper, we propose extracting relational information of static features and motion features for human activities recognition. The videos are represented by a classical Bag-of-Word (BoW) model which is useful in many works. To get a compact and discriminative codebook with small dimension, we employ the divisive algorithm based on KL-divergence to reconstruct the codebook. After that, to further capture strong relational information, we construct a bipartite graph to model the relationship between words of different feature set. Then we use a k-way partition to create a new codebook in which similar words are getting together. With this new codebook, videos can be represented by a new BoW vector with strong relational information. Moreover, we propose a method to compute new clusters from the divisive algorithm's projective function. We test our work on the several datasets and obtain very promising results. PMID:27656199

  16. Extract the Relational Information of Static Features and Motion Features for Human Activities Recognition in Videos

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Both static features and motion features have shown promising performance in human activities recognition task. However, the information included in these features is insufficient for complex human activities. In this paper, we propose extracting relational information of static features and motion features for human activities recognition. The videos are represented by a classical Bag-of-Word (BoW) model which is useful in many works. To get a compact and discriminative codebook with small dimension, we employ the divisive algorithm based on KL-divergence to reconstruct the codebook. After that, to further capture strong relational information, we construct a bipartite graph to model the relationship between words of different feature set. Then we use a k-way partition to create a new codebook in which similar words are getting together. With this new codebook, videos can be represented by a new BoW vector with strong relational information. Moreover, we propose a method to compute new clusters from the divisive algorithm's projective function. We test our work on the several datasets and obtain very promising results.

  17. Lower body positive-pressure exercise after knee surgery.

    PubMed

    Eastlack, Robert K; Hargens, Alan R; Groppo, Eli R; Steinbach, Gregory C; White, Klane K; Pedowitz, Robert A

    2005-02-01

    Lower body positive pressure allows unloading of the lower extremities during exercise in a pressurized treadmill chamber. This study assessed the preliminary feasibility of lower body positive pressure exercise as a rehabilitation technique by examining its effects on gait mechanics and pain, postoperatively. Fifteen patients who had arthroscopic meniscectomy or anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction participated in this study. Patients exercised for 5 minutes at 2.0 mph under three body weight conditions (normal body weight, 60% body weight, and 20% body weight) in random order. Bilateral ground reaction force, electromyographs, and dynamic knee range of motion were collected, and pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Ground reaction forces for surgically treated and contralateral extremities were reduced 42% and 79% from normal body weight conditions when ambulating at 60% and 20% body weight, respectively. After meniscectomy, ambulatory knee range of motion decreased only at 20% body weight (37 degrees), compared with normal body weight conditions (49 degrees). Peak electromyographic activity of the biceps was maintained at all body weight conditions, whereas that of the vastus medialis was reduced at 20% body weight. Pain relief was significant with lower body positive pressure ambulation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. This study showed that lower body positive pressure exercise is effective at reducing ground reaction forces, while safely facilitating gait postoperatively.

  18. Mobile Sensor Application for Kinematic Detection of the Knees

    PubMed Central

    Suputtitada, Areerat; Khovidhungij, Watcharapong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To correctly measure the knee joint angle, this study utilized a Qualisys motion capture system and also used it as the reference to assess the validity of the study's Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) system that consisted of four IMU sensors and the Knee Angle Recorder software. The validity was evaluated by the root mean square (RMS) of different angles and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values between the Qualisys system and the IMU system. Methods Four functional knee movement tests for ten healthy participants were investigated, which were the knee flexion test, the hip and knee flexion test, the forward step test and the leg abduction test, and the walking test. Results The outcomes of the knee flexion test, the hip and knee flexion test, the forward step test, and the walking test showed that the RMS of different angles were less than 6°. The ICC values were in the range of 0.84 to 0.99. However, the leg abduction test showed a poor correlation in the measurement of the knee abduction-adduction movement. Conclusion The IMU system used in this study is a new good method to measure the knee flexion-extension movement. PMID:26361597

  19. MIS unicondylar knee arthroplasty: surgical approach and early results.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Mark W; Tria, Alfred J

    2004-11-01

    Unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee has seen a resurgence of interest in the United States. The principles of unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee are different from those for total knee arthroplasty, allowing replacement of only the affected joint compartment with less bone loss. Minimally invasive surgery allows for less soft tissue dissection with the potential for less morbidity. The key question is: will the changes associated with the minimally invasive surgery procedure improve the clinical results of the standard unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee or will the changes make the procedure too difficult and lead to an increasing failure rate? This study reviews the surgical technique and presents the 2 to 4 year results of the minimally invasive unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee 47 knees in 41 patients. The average range of motion increased from 121 degrees -132 degrees . The Knee Society pain score improved from 45-80 and the function score improved from 47-78. Only one knee has been revised. With proper patient selection, minimally invasive unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee allows for results that are at least equal to those of the standard open procedure at 2 to 4 years after the surgery.

  20. Kinetic and kinematic changes with the use of valgus knee brace and lateral wedge insoles in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fantini Pagani, Cynthia H; Hinrichs, Maren; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2012-07-01

    The effect of a valgus knee brace and a lateral wedged insole on knee and ankle kinematics and kinetics was evaluated in ten patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA). The knee orthosis was tested in two valgus adjustments (4° and 8°), and the laterally wedged insole was fabricated with an inclination of 4°. A motion capture system and force platforms were used for data collection and joint moments were calculated using inverse dynamics. The valgus moment applied by the orthosis was also measured using a strain gauge implemented in the orthosis' rotational axis. For the second peak knee adduction moment, decreases of 18%, 21%, and 7% were observed between baseline and test conditions for the orthosis in 4° valgus, in 8° valgus, and insole, respectively. Similar decreases were observed for knee lever arm in the frontal plane. Knee adduction angular impulse decreased 14%, 18%, and 7% from baseline to conditions for the orthosis in 4° valgus, in 8° valgus, and insole, respectively. Knee angle in the frontal plane reached a more valgus position during gait using the valgus knee brace. The valgus moment applied by the orthosis with 8° valgus adjustment was 30% higher than with 4° valgus adjustment. The valgus knee orthosis was more effective than the laterally wedged insole in reducing knee adduction moment in patients with medial knee OA.

  1. Asymmetric varus and valgus stability of the anatomic cadaver knee and the load sharing between collateral ligaments and bearing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaonan; Malik, Aamer; Bartel, Donald L; Wickiewicz, Thomas L; Wright, Timothy

    2014-08-01

    Knee joint stability is important in maintaining normal joint motion during activities of daily living. Joint instability not only disrupts normal motion but also plays a crucial role in the initiation and progression of osteoarthritis. Our goal was to examine knee joint coronal plane stability under varus or valgus loading and to understand the relative contributions of the mechanisms that act to stabilize the knee in response to varus-valgus moments, namely, load distribution between the medial and lateral condyles and the ligaments. A robot testing system was used to determine joint stability in human cadaveric knees as described by the moment versus angular rotation behavior under varus and valgus loads at extension and at 30 deg and 90 deg of flexion. The anatomic knee joint was more stable in response to valgus than varus moments, and stability decreased with flexion angle. The primary mechanism for providing varus-valgus stability was the redistribution of the contact force on the articular surfaces from both condyles to a single condyle. Stretching of the collateral ligaments provided a secondary stabilizing mechanism after the lift-off of a condyle occurred. Compressive loads applied across the knee joint, such as would occur with the application of muscle forces, enhanced the ability of the articular surface to provide varus-valgus moment, and thus, helped stabilize the joint in the coronal plane. Coupled internal/external rotations and anteroposterior and medial-lateral translations were variable and in the case of the rotations were often as large as the varus-valgus rotations created by the applied moment.

  2. Semi-active control of the rocking motion of monolithic art objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceravolo, Rosario; Pecorelli, Marica Leonarda; Zanotti Fragonara, Luca

    2016-07-01

    The seismic behaviour of many art objects and obelisks can be analysed in the context of the seismic response of rigid blocks. Starting from the pioneering works by Housner, a large number of analytical studies of the rigid block dynamics were proposed. In fact, despite its apparent simplicity, the motion of a rigid block involves a number of complex dynamic phenomena such as impacts, sliding, uplift and geometric nonlinearities. While most of the current strategies to avoid toppling consist in preventing rocking motion, in this paper a novel semi-active on-off control strategy for protecting monolithic art objects was investigated. The control procedure under study follows a feedback-feedforward scheme that is realised by switching the stiffness of the anchorages located at the two lower corner of the block between two values. Overturning spectra have been calculated in order to clarify the benefits of applying a semi-active control instead of a passive control strategy. In accordance with similar studies, the numerical investigation took into account the dynamic response of blocks with different slenderness and size subject to one-sine pulse excitation.

  3. Reliability of the universal goniometer for assessing active cervical range of motion in asymptomatic healthy persons

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Muhammad Nazim; Bandpei, Mohammad A. Mohseni; Ali, Mudassar; Khan, Ghazanfar Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine within-rater and between-rater reliability of the universal goniometer (UG) for measuring active cervical range of motion (ACROM) in asymptomatic healthy subjects. Methods: Nineteen healthy subjects were tested in an identical seated position. Two raters used UG to measure active cervical movements of flexion, extension, right side flexion, left side flexion, right rotation and left rotation. Each motion was measured twice by each of the two raters and was re-measured all over again after one week. Data analysis was performed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: The results demonstrated excellent within-session (ICC2,1 = 0.83 to 0.98) and between-session (ICC2,2 = 0.79 to 0.97) intra-rater reliability and excellent inter-rater reliability (ICC2,2 = 0.79 to 0.92). Conclusion: Considering above results it is concluded that UG is a reliable tool for assessing ACROM in a clinical setting for healthy subjects. PMID:27182261

  4. A prospective study on knee proprioception after meniscal allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thijs, Y; Witvrouw, E; Evens, B; Coorevits, P; Almqvist, F; Verdonk, R

    2007-06-01

    The meniscus plays an important role in the proprioceptive ability of the knee joint. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the short-term influence of a meniscus replacement on the proprioception of the knee. Fourteen patients who had undergone a fresh meniscal allograft transplantation between May 2001 and June 2003 were tested pre-operatively and 6 months post-operatively. Disability regarding pain, stiffness and functionality of the affected knee during daily activities was measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis (WOMAC) scale. The knee joint position sense was assessed using the Biodex System 3 isokinetic dynamometer. The results of the WOMAC scale showed no significant differences concerning pain, stiffness or knee function between the pre- and post-operative condition of the knee. Assessment of the knee joint position sense at a reference point of 70 degrees of knee flexion revealed a significant improvement of the proprioception of the operated knee at 6 months after surgery compared with the pre-operative condition. The results of this study suggest that although no significant improvement of pain and functionality of the operated knee occurred at this short-term follow-up period, a meniscal allograft transplantation seems to have a significant positive effect on the joint position sense of the previously meniscectomised knee.

  5. Muscle metabolism and activation heterogeneity by combined 31P chemical shift and T2 imaging, and pulmonary O2 uptake during incremental knee-extensor exercise

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Daniel T.; Howe, Franklyn A.; Whipp, Brian J.; Ward, Susan A.; McIntyre, Dominick J.; Ladroue, Christophe; Griffiths, John R.; Kemp, Graham J.

    2013-01-01

    The integration of skeletal muscle substrate depletion, metabolite accumulation, and fatigue during large muscle-mass exercise is not well understood. Measurement of intramuscular energy store degradation and metabolite accumulation is confounded by muscle heterogeneity. Therefore, to characterize regional metabolic distribution in the locomotor muscles, we combined 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, chemical shift imaging, and T2-weighted imaging with pulmonary oxygen uptake during bilateral knee-extension exercise to intolerance. Six men completed incremental tests for the following: 1) unlocalized 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy; and 2) spatial determination of 31P metabolism and activation. The relationship of pulmonary oxygen uptake to whole quadriceps phosphocreatine concentration ([PCr]) was inversely linear, and three of four knee-extensor muscles showed activation as assessed by change in T2. The largest changes in [PCr], [inorganic phosphate] ([Pi]) and pH occurred in rectus femoris, but no voxel (72 cm3) showed complete PCr depletion at exercise cessation. The most metabolically active voxel reached 11 ± 9 mM [PCr] (resting, 29 ± 1 mM), 23 ± 11 mM [Pi] (resting, 7 ± 1 mM), and a pH of 6.64 ± 0.29 (resting, 7.08 ± 0.03). However, the distribution of 31P metabolites and pH varied widely between voxels, and the intervoxel coefficient of variation increased between rest (∼10%) and exercise intolerance (∼30–60%). Therefore, the limit of tolerance was attained with wide heterogeneity in substrate depletion and fatigue-related metabolite accumulation, with extreme metabolic perturbation isolated to only a small volume of active muscle (<5%). Regional intramuscular disturbances are thus likely an important requisite for exercise intolerance. How these signals integrate to limit muscle power production, while regional “recruitable muscle” energy stores are presumably still available, remains uncertain. PMID:23813534

  6. The flexion-extension axis of the knee and its relationship to the rotational orientation of the tibial plateau.

    PubMed

    Lawrie, Charles M; Noble, Philip C; Ismaily, Sabir K; Stal, Drew; Incavo, Steve J

    2011-09-01

    We measured the optimal rotational alignment of the tibial component with respect to anatomic landmarks. Kinematic data were collected from functional maneuvers simulated in 20 cadaveric knees mounted in a joint simulator. The axis of knee motion was calculated for squatting and lunging activities over the interval of 30° to 90° of knee flexion. We then examined the accuracy and variability of 5 different anatomic axes in predicting the direction of knee motion. No one landmark guaranteed correct alignment of the tibial component and most predictors were highly variable (range, 6°-21°). The most accurate indicators were the medial third of the tibial tubercle (average error: squatting: 3.5° external rotation; lunging: 9.5°), and the medial-lateral axis of the resected tibial surface (6.7° and 1.1° internal rotation). The correct alignment of the tibial component can be best achieved by splitting the difference between these landmarks to eliminate placement of the component in excessive external and excessive internal rotation.

  7. Fixed flexion deformity and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Su, E P

    2012-11-01

    Fixed flexion deformities are common in osteoarthritic knees that are indicated for total knee arthroplasty. The lack of full extension at the knee results in a greater force of quadriceps contracture and energy expenditure. It also results in slower walking velocity and abnormal gait mechanics, overloading the contralateral limb. Residual flexion contractures after TKA have been associated with poorer functional scores and outcomes. Although some flexion contractures may resolve with time after surgery, a substantial percentage will become permanent. Therefore, it is essential to correct fixed flexion deformities at the time of TKA, and be vigilant in the post-operative course to maintain the correction. Surgical techniques to address pre-operative flexion contractures include: adequate bone resection, ligament releases, removal of posterior osteophytes, and posterior capsular releases. Post-operatively, extension can be maintained with focused physiotherapy, a specially modified continuous passive motion machine, a contralateral heel lift, and splinting.

  8. Active and passive Brownian motion of charged particles in two-dimensional plasma models

    SciTech Connect

    Dunkel, Joern; Ebeling, Werner; Trigger, Sergey A.

    2004-10-01

    The dynamics of charged Coulomb grains in a plasma is numerically and analytically investigated. Analogous to recent experiments, it is assumed that the grains are trapped in an external parabolic field. Our simulations are based on a Langevin model, where the grain-plasma interaction is realized by a velocity-dependent friction coefficient and a velocity-independent diffusion coefficient. In addition to the ordinary case of positive (passive) friction between grains and plasma, we also discuss the effects of negat