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Sample records for activity lactate dehydrogenase

  1. Accelerated Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity Potentiates Osteoclastogenesis via NFATc1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Man; Kwon, So Hyun; Lee, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soo Young; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts seem to be metabolic active during their differentiation and bone-resorptive activation. However, the functional role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a tetrameric enzyme consisting of an A and/or B subunit that catalyzes interconversion of pyruvate to lactate, in RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is not known. In this study, RANKL treatment induced gradual gene expression and activation of the LDH A2B2 isotype during osteoclast differentiation as well as the LDH A1B3 and B4 isotypes during osteoclast maturation after pre-osteoclast formation. Glucose consumption and lactate production in growth media were accelerated during osteoclast differentiation, together with enhanced expression of H+-lactate co-transporter and increased extracellular acidification, demonstrating that glycolytic metabolism was stimulated during differentiation. Further, oxygen consumption via mitochondria was stimulated during osteoclast differentiation. On the contrary, depletion of LDH-A or LDH-B subunit suppressed both glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism, resulting in reduced mature osteoclast formation via decreased osteoclast precursor fusion and down-regulation of the osteoclastogenic critical transcription factor NFATc1 and its target genes. Collectively, our findings suggest that RANKL-induced LDH activation stimulates glycolytic and mitochondrial respiratory metabolism, facilitating mature osteoclast formation via osteoclast precursor fusion and NFATc1 signaling. PMID:27077737

  2. Evolution of D-lactate dehydrogenase activity from glycerol dehydrogenase and its utility for D-lactate production from lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-11-22

    Lactic acid, an attractive, renewable chemical for production of biobased plastics (polylactic acid, PLA), is currently commercially produced from food-based sources of sugar. Pure optical isomers of lactate needed for PLA are typically produced by microbial fermentation of sugars at temperatures below 40 °C. Bacillus coagulans produces L(+)-lactate as a primary fermentation product and grows optimally at 50 °C and pH 5, conditions that are optimal for activity of commercial fungal cellulases. This strain was engineered to produce D(-)-lactate by deleting the native ldh (L-lactate dehydrogenase) and alsS (acetolactate synthase) genes to impede anaerobic growth, followed by growth-based selection to isolate suppressor mutants that restored growth. One of these, strain QZ19, produced about 90 g L(-1) of optically pure D(-)-lactic acid from glucose in < 48 h. The new source of D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) activity was identified as a mutated form of glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH; D121N and F245S) that was produced at high levels as a result of a third mutation (insertion sequence). Although the native GlyDH had no detectable activity with pyruvate, the mutated GlyDH had a D-LDH specific activity of 0.8 μmoles min(-1) (mg protein)(-1). By using QZ19 for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to D-lactate (50 °C and pH 5.0), the cellulase usage could be reduced to 1/3 that required for equivalent fermentations by mesophilic lactic acid bacteria. Together, the native B. coagulans and the QZ19 derivative can be used to produce either L(+) or D(-) optical isomers of lactic acid (respectively) at high titers and yields from nonfood carbohydrates. PMID:22065761

  3. Not only osmoprotectant: betaine increased lactate dehydrogenase activity and L-lactate production in lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huibin; Wu, Zaiqiang; Xian, Mo; Liu, Hui; Cheng, Tao; Cao, Yujin

    2013-11-01

    Lactobacilli are commonly used for industrial production of polymer-grade L-lactic acid. The present study tested the Tween 80 alternative betaine in L-lactate production by several industrial lactobacilli. In flask fermentation of Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus buchneri, Lactobacillus lactis and Lactobacillus rhamnosus, the betaine addition (2g/l) had similar osmoprotectant effect with Tween 80 but had increased the lactate dehydrogenase activities and L-lactate production than Tween 80 control. In fed-batch fermentation of L. casei, betaine supplementation improved the L-lactic acid titer to 190 g/l, the yield to 95.5% (g L-lactic acid/g glucose), the productivity to 2.6g/lh, and the optical purity to 97.0%. The results demonstrated that supplementation of Tween 80 alternative - betaine in the fermentation medium is feasible for industrial l-lactic acid fermentation by lactobacilli, which will improve the lactate production but will not increase the process costs and modify any process conditions. PMID:24035452

  4. Relationship of lactate dehydrogenase activity to body measurements of Angus x Charolais cows and calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives were to examine 1) relationships between lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and body measurements of grazing beef cows, and 2) the association between maternal LDH activity in late gestation and subsequent calf birth weight (BRW), hip height (HH) at weaning, and adjusted weaning weight ...

  5. Relationship of lactate dehydrogenase activity with body measeurements of Angus x Charolais cows and calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Angus x Charolais cows (n = 87) and their Angus-sired, spring-born calves (n = 86) were utilized to examine relationships between lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and body measurements of beef cows; and the relationship between maternal LDH activity in late gestation and subsequent calf birth we...

  6. Multichannel Simultaneous Determination of Activities of Lactate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, L.

    2000-09-12

    It is very important to find the best conditions for some enzymes to do the best catalysis in current pharmaceutical industries. Based on the results above, we could say that this set-up could be widely used in finding the optimal condition for best enzyme activity of a certain enzyme. Instead of looking for the best condition for enzyme activity by doing many similar reactions repeatedly, we can complete this assignment with just one run if we could apply enough conditions.

  7. Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biologic...

  8. Novel biohybrids of layered double hydroxide and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme: Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djebbi, Mohamed Amine; Braiek, Mohamed; Hidouri, Slah; Namour, Philippe; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Ben Haj Amara, Abdesslem

    2016-02-01

    The present work introduces new biohybrid materials involving layered double hydroxides (LDH) and biomolecule such as enzyme to produce bioinorganic system. Lactate dehydrogenase (Lac Deh) has been chosen as a model enzyme, being immobilized onto MgAl and ZnAl LDH materials via direct ion-exchange (adsorption) and co-precipitation methods. The immobilization efficiency was largely dependent upon the immobilization methods. A comparative study shows that the co-precipitation method favors the immobilization of great and tunable amount of enzyme. The structural behavior, chemical bonding composition and morphology of the resulting biohybrids were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The free and immobilized enzyme activity and kinetic parameters were also reported using UV-Visible spectroscopy. However, the modified LDH materials showed a decrease in crystallinity as compared to the unmodified LDH. The change in activity of the immobilized lactate dehydrogenase was considered to be due, to the reduced accessibility of substrate molecules to the active sites of the enzyme and the partial conformational change of the Lac Deh molecules as a result of the immobilization way. Finally, it was proven that there is a correlation between structure/microstructure and enzyme activity dependent on the immobilization process.

  9. Prostate cancer cells metabolize d-lactate inside mitochondria via a D-lactate dehydrogenase which is more active and highly expressed than in normal cells.

    PubMed

    de Bari, Lidia; Moro, Loredana; Passarella, Salvatore

    2013-03-01

    Although D-lactate metabolism has been shown to occur in a variety of mitochondria, the metabolic fate of D-lactate in cancer cells has never been investigated, as it is believed to be exported to the extracellular phase. We show that mitochondria from both cancer (PC-3) and normal (PNT1A) prostate cells can metabolize D-lactate in an energy competent manner. This is due to the mitochondrial D-lactate dehydrogenase, a membrane flavoprotein, the activity and protein level of which are higher in PC-3 than in PNT1A cells, as detected by both kinetic and immunological analysis. D-Lactate can enter prostate mitochondria and cause the export of newly synthesized malate in a carrier-mediated manner, with the rate of malate efflux from mitochondria twofold higher in cancer. PMID:23333299

  10. The maximum activities of hexokinase, phosphorylase, phosphofructokinase, glycerol phosphate dehydrogenases, lactate dehydrogenase, octopine dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, nucleoside diphosphatekinase, glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase and arginine kinase in relation to carbohydrate utilization in muscles from marine invertebrates.

    PubMed Central

    Zammit, V A; Newsholme, E A

    1976-01-01

    Comparison of the activities of hexokinase, phosphorylase and phosphofructokinase in muscles from marine invertebrates indicates that they can be divided into three groups. First, the activities of the three enzymes are low in coelenterate muscles, catch muscles of molluscs and muscles of echinoderms; this indicates a low rate of carbohydrate (and energy) utilization by these muscles. Secondly, high activities of phosphorylase and phosphofructokinase relative to those of hexokinase are found in, for example, lobster abdominal and scallop snap muscles; this indicates that these muscles depend largely on anaerobic degradation of glycogen for energy production. Thirdly, high activities of hexokinase are found in the radular muscles of prosobranch molluscs and the fin muscles of squids; this indicates a high capacity for glucose utilization, which is consistent with the high activities of enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in these muscles [Alp, Newsholme & Zammit (1976) Biochem. J. 154, 689-700]. 2. The activities of lactate dehydrogenase, octopine dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, cytosolic and mitochondrial glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase were measured in order to provide a qualitative indication of the importance of different processes for oxidation of glycolytically formed NADH. The muscles are divided into four groups: those that have a high activity of lactate dehydrogenase relative to the activities of phosphofructokinase (e.g. crustacean muscles); those that have high activities of octopine dehydrogenase but low activities of lactate dehydrogenase (e.g. scallop snap muscle); those that have moderate activities of both lactate dehydrogenase and octopine dehydrogenase (radular muscles of prosobranchs), and those that have low activities of both lactate dehydrogenase and octopine dehydrogenase, but which possess activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (oyster adductor muscles). It is

  11. Muscular cholinesterase and lactate dehydrogenase activities in deep-sea fish from the NW Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Samuel; Solé, Montserrat

    2014-03-01

    Organisms inhabiting submarine canyons can be potentially exposed to higher inputs of anthropogenic chemicals than their counterparts from the adjacent areas. To find out to what extend this observation applies to a NW Mediterranean canyon (i.e. Blanes canyon) off the Catalan coast, four deep-sea fish species were collected from inside the canyon (BC) and the adjacent open slope (OS). The selected species were: Alepocephalus rostratus, Lepidion lepidion, Coelorinchus mediterraneus and Bathypterois mediterraneus. Prior to the choice of an adequate sentinel species, the natural variation of the selected parameters (biomarkers) in relation to factors such as size, sex, sampling depth and seasonality need to be characterised. In this study, the activities of cholinesterases (ChEs) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzymes were determined in the muscle of the four deep-sea fish. Of all ChEs, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was dominant and selected for further monitoring. Overall, AChE activity exhibited a significant relationship with fish size whereas LDH activity was mostly dependent on the sex and gonadal development status, although in a species-dependent manner. The seasonal variability of LDH activity was more marked than for AChE activity, and inside-outside canyon (BC-OS) differences were not consistent in all contrasted fish species, and in fact they were more dependent on biological traits. Thus, they did not suggest a differential stress condition between sites inside and outside the canyon. PMID:24296242

  12. Active-Loop Dynamics within the Michaelis Complex of Lactate Dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Nie, Beining; Lodewyks, Kara; Deng, Hua; Desamero, Ruel Z B; Callender, Robert

    2016-07-12

    Laser-induced temperature-jump relaxation spectroscopy was used to study the active site mobile-loop dynamics found in the binding of the NADH nucleotide cofactor and oxamate substrate mimic to lactate dehydrogenase in Bacillus stearothermophilus thermophilic bacteria (bsLDH). The kinetic data can be best described by a model in which NADH can bind only to the open-loop apoenzyme, oxamate can bind only to the bsLDH·NADH binary complex in the open-loop conformation, and oxamate binding is followed by closing of the active site loop preventing oxamate unbinding. The open and closed states of the loop are in dynamic equilibrium and interconvert on the submillisecond time scale. This interconversion strongly accelerates with an increase in temperature because of significant enthalpy barriers. Binding of NADH to bsLDH results in minor changes of the loop dynamics and does not shift the open-closed equilibrium, but binding of the oxamate substrate mimic shifts this equilibrium to the closed state. At high excess oxamate concentrations where all active sites are nearly saturated with the substrate mimic, all active site mobile loops are mainly closed. The observed active-loop dynamics for bsLDH is very similar to that previously observed for pig heart LDH. PMID:27319381

  13. Evaluation on the inhibition of pyrrol-2-yl ethanone derivatives to lactate dehydrogenase and anticancer activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Na-Na; Weng, Zhao-Yue; Chen, Qiu-Yun; Boison, Daniel; Xiao, Xin-Xin; Gao, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A) is a potentially important metabolic target for the inhibition of the highly activated glycolysis pathway in cancer cells. In order to develop bifunctional compounds as inhibitor of LDH-A and anticancer agents, two pyrrol-2-yl methanone (or ethanone) derivatives (PM1 and PM2) were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of LDH-A based on the enzyme assay and cell assay by spectroscopy analysis. Fluorescence and CD spectra results demonstrated that both the change of second structure of LDH-A and the affinity interaction for compounds to LDH-A gave great effect on the activity of LDH-A. In particular, low concentration of compounds (1 μμ-25 μμ) could change the level of pyruvate in cancer cells. Moreover, the in vitro assay results demonstrated that pyrrol-2-yl ethanone derivatives can inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells. Therefore, pyrrol-2-yl ethanone derivatives (PM2) can be both LDH-A inhibitor and anticancer agents.

  14. Evaluation on the inhibition of pyrrol-2-yl ethanone derivatives to lactate dehydrogenase and anticancer activities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Na-Na; Weng, Zhao-Yue; Chen, Qiu-Yun; Boison, Daniel; Xiao, Xin-Xin; Gao, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A) is a potentially important metabolic target for the inhibition of the highly activated glycolysis pathway in cancer cells. In order to develop bifunctional compounds as inhibitor of LDH-A and anticancer agents, two pyrrol-2-yl methanone (or ethanone) derivatives (PM1 and PM2) were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of LDH-A based on the enzyme assay and cell assay by spectroscopy analysis. Fluorescence and CD spectra results demonstrated that both the change of second structure of LDH-A and the affinity interaction for compounds to LDH-A gave great effect on the activity of LDH-A. In particular, low concentration of compounds (1μμ-25μμ) could change the level of pyruvate in cancer cells. Moreover, the in vitro assay results demonstrated that pyrrol-2-yl ethanone derivatives can inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells. Therefore, pyrrol-2-yl ethanone derivatives (PM2) can be both LDH-A inhibitor and anticancer agents. PMID:27104676

  15. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... dehydrogenase-B pieces (subunits) of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme. This enzyme is found throughout the body and is important ... cells. There are five different forms of this enzyme, each made up of four protein subunits. Various ...

  16. Estrogen-related receptor alpha modulates lactate dehydrogenase activity in thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Mirebeau-Prunier, Delphine; Le Pennec, Soazig; Jacques, Caroline; Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Gueguen, Naig; Boutet-Bouzamondo, Nathalie; Donnart, Audrey; Malthièry, Yves; Savagner, Frédérique

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic modifications of tumor cells are hallmarks of cancer. They exhibit an altered metabolism that allows them to sustain higher proliferation rates in hostile environment outside the cell. In thyroid tumors, the expression of the estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), a major factor of metabolic adaptation, is closely related to the oxidative metabolism and the proliferative status of the cells. To elucidate the role played by ERRα in the glycolytic adaptation of tumor cells, we focused on the regulation of lactate dehydrogenases A and B (LDHA, LDHB) and the LDHA/LDHB ratio. Our study included tissue samples from 10 classical and 10 oncocytic variants of follicular thyroid tumors and 10 normal thyroid tissues, as well as samples from three human thyroid tumor cell lines: FTC-133, XTC.UC1 and RO82W-1. We identified multiple cis-acting promoter elements for ERRα, in both the LDHA and LDHB genes. The interaction between ERRα and LDH promoters was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays and in vitro analysis for LDHB. Using knock-in and knock-out cellular models, we found an inverse correlation between ERRα expression and LDH activity. This suggests that thyroid tumor cells may reprogram their metabolic pathways through the up-regulation of ERRα by a process distinct from that proposed by the recently revisited Warburg hypothesis. PMID:23516535

  17. Catecholamine regulation of lactate dehydrogenase in rat brain cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; McGinnis, J.F.; de Vellis, J.

    1980-03-25

    The mechanism of catecholamine induction of the soluble cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) was studied in the rat glial tumor cell line, C6. Lactate dehydrogenase was partially purified from extracts of (/sup 3/H)leucine-labeled cells by affinity gel chromatography and quantitatively immunoprecipitated with anti-lactate dehydrogenase-5 IgG and with antilactate dehydrogenase-1 IgG. The immunoprecipitates were dissociated and electrophoresed on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. Using this methodology, the increased enzyme activity of lactate dehydrogenase in norepinephrine-treated C6 cells was observed to be concomitant with the increased synthesis of enzyme molecules. Despite the continued presence of norepinephrine, the specific increase in the rate of synthesis of lactate dehydrogenase was transient. It was first detected at 4 h, was maximum at 9 h, and returned to basal levels by 24 h. The half-life of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity was 36 h during the induction and 40 h during deinduction. The half-life for decay of /sup 3/H-labeled lactate dehydrogenase was 41 h. These observations suggest that the increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity in norepinephrine-treated cells does not involve any change in the rate of degradation. Norepinephrine increased the specific rate of synthesis of both lactate dehydrogenase-5 (a tetramer of four M subunits) and lactate dehydrogenase-1 (a tetramer of four H subunits), although to different extents. Since these subunits are coded for by two separate genes on separate chromosomes, it suggests that the regulatory mechanism involves at least two separate sites of action.

  18. Regulation of the Activity of Lactate Dehydrogenases from Four Lactic Acid Bacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Feldman-Salit, Anna; Hering, Silvio; Messiha, Hanan L.; Veith, Nadine; Cojocaru, Vlad; Sieg, Antje; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Wade, Rebecca C.; Fiedler, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Despite high similarity in sequence and catalytic properties, the l-lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs) in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) display differences in their regulation that may arise from their adaptation to different habitats. We combined experimental and computational approaches to investigate the effects of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), phosphate (Pi), and ionic strength (NaCl concentration) on six LDHs from four LABs studied at pH 6 and pH 7. We found that 1) the extent of activation by FBP (Kact) differs. Lactobacillus plantarum LDH is not regulated by FBP, but the other LDHs are activated with increasing sensitivity in the following order: Enterococcus faecalis LDH2 ≤ Lactococcus lactis LDH2 < E. faecalis LDH1 < L. lactis LDH1 ≤ Streptococcus pyogenes LDH. This trend reflects the electrostatic properties in the allosteric binding site of the LDH enzymes. 2) For L. plantarum, S. pyogenes, and E. faecalis, the effects of Pi are distinguishable from the effect of changing ionic strength by adding NaCl. 3) Addition of Pi inhibits E. faecalis LDH2, whereas in the absence of FBP, Pi is an activator of S. pyogenes LDH, E. faecalis LDH1, and L. lactis LDH1 and LDH2 at pH 6. These effects can be interpreted by considering the computed binding affinities of Pi to the catalytic and allosteric binding sites of the enzymes modeled in protonation states corresponding to pH 6 and pH 7. Overall, the results show a subtle interplay among the effects of Pi, FBP, and pH that results in different regulatory effects on the LDHs of different LABs. PMID:23720742

  19. Estimating the number of viable animal cells in multi-well cultures based on their lactate dehydrogenase activities.

    PubMed

    Haslam, G; Wyatt, D; Kitos, P A

    2000-01-01

    A method is described for estimating the numbers ofanimal cells in multi-well culture by simultaneouslymeasuring the lactate dehydrogenase activity of thetotal culture and the medium. The difference betweenthe two reflects the dehydrogenase content of thecells and correlates with cell number. This LDH/INTmethod was tested using several lines of normal andtransformed suspension and adherent cells. Thelactate dehydrogenase activities of duplicate cultureswere determined colourimetrically using reactioncocktails containing lactate, NAD(+), diaphorase,and p-iodonitrotetrazolium violet, with and withoutTriton X-100. The difference in absorbance at 490 nm(DeltaA(490) = A(490, test) - A(490, control)) was used to calculate the lactatedehydrogenase activity of the total culture (+ Triton)and the medium (- Triton). The cellular lactatedehydrogenase activity (difference between totaland medium dehydrogenaseactivities) was proportional to viable cell number. The effects on cell growth of four metabolicinhibitors, sodium azide, actinomycin D,cycloheximide, and taxol, were determined using theLDH/INT assay and direct cell counting. The inhibitorconcentrations that caused decreases in the LDHactivity and cell number by 50% were similar. TheLDH/INT assay is quick and sensitive, works equallywell for adherent and suspension cells, and providesinformation about LDH activities of both the mediumand cells. It is particularly useful for screeningpotential cell-growth inhibitors. PMID:19002967

  20. Lactate dehydrogenase activity of rat epididymis and spermatozoa: effect of constant light.

    PubMed

    Ponc, R H; Carriazo, C S; Vermouth, N T

    2001-01-01

    During its passage through the epididymis, the gamete undergoes a process of "maturation" leading to the acquisition of its fertilizing ability. The epididymis displays regional variations in the morphology and metabolic properties of its epithelium which are relevant for the progressive development of mature sperm characteristics. The epididymis has spontaneous peristaltic contractions and receives sympathetic innervation that is modulated by melatonin, a hormone synthesized and released by the pineal gland. Constant lighting disrupts melatonin synthesis and secretion. We have studied the effect of constant light on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27) and its isozyme C4 activities and protein content in whole epididymis, epididymal tissue and in spermatozoa from caput and cauda segments. Animals were exposed from birth to an illumination schedule of 14 h light:10 h dark (group L:D). At 60 days of age one group of animals was submitted to constant light over 50 days (group L:L). In order to test the fertilizing ability, the rats of each group were mated with soliciting estrous females. The percentage of pregnancies in females mated with males maintained in L:L was remarkably lower than those in females mated with males maintained in the L:D photoperiod (44% and 88% respectively). Constant light increased protein concentration and LDH activity in caput as well as in cauda of total epididymis. On the contrary, in epididymal tissue, the protein content decreased in both epididymal sections compared with controls. When enzymatic activity was expressed in Units per spermatozoa, constant light induced a significant reduction of total LDH and LDHC4 in caput and cauda spermatozoa while LDH activity of epididymal tissue was not affected. In spite of the decrease in LDH per sperm cell when rats were exposed to constant light, in total epididymis (epididymis tissue plus sperm cells content) and in spermatozoa, values of enzyme activities expressed per weight unit were

  1. Lactate dehydrogenase in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Stankovic Stojanovic, Katia; Lionnet, François

    2016-07-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity is elevated in many pathological states. Interest in LDH activity in sickle cell disease (SCD) has developed out of an increased comprehension of the pathophysiological process and the clinical course of the disease. Elevated LDH activity in SCD comes from various mechanisms, especially intravascular hemolysis, as well as ischemia-reperfusion damage and tissular necrosis. Intravascular hemolysis is associated with vasoconstriction, platelet activation, endothelial damage, and vascular complications. LDH has been used as a diagnostic and prognostic factor of acute and chronic complications. In this review we have evaluated the literature where LDH activity was examined during steady-state or acute conditions in SCD. PMID:27138446

  2. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum Lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Hernandez, Agustin; Speed, Haley; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-03-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes waterborne diseases worldwide. There is no effective therapy for C. parvum infection. The parasite depends mainly on glycolysis for energy production. Lactate dehydrogenase is a major regulator of glycolysis. This paper describes the biochemical characterization of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase and high resolution crystal structures of the apo-enzyme and four ternary complexes. The ternary complexes capture the enzyme bound to NAD/NADH or its 3-acetylpyridine analog in the cofactor binding pocket, while the substrate binding site is occupied by one of the following ligands: lactate, pyruvate or oxamate. The results reveal distinctive features of the parasitic enzyme. For example, C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase prefers the acetylpyridine analog of NADH as a cofactor. Moreover, it is slightly less sensitive to gossypol inhibition compared with mammalian lactate dehydrogenases and not inhibited by excess pyruvate. The active site loop and the antigenic loop in C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are considerably different from those in the human counterpart. Structural features and enzymatic properties of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are similar to enzymes from related parasites. Structural comparison with malate dehydrogenase supports a common ancestry for the two genes. PMID:25542170

  3. Detection of L-lactate in polyethylene glycol solutions confirms the identity of the active-site ligand in a proline dehydrogenase structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Tanner, John J

    2004-05-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is often used in protein crystallography as a low-ionic-strength precipitant for crystallization and as a cryoprotectant for low-temperature data collection. Prompted by the discovery of an apparent L-lactate molecule bound in the active site of the Escherichia coli PutA proline dehydrogenase domain crystal structure, the L-lactate concentration of several PEG solutions was measured. 50%(w/v) solutions of PEGs with molecular weight 3000, 4000 and 8000 contain millimolar levels of L-lactate. In contrast, L-lactate was not detected in solutions of PEG monomethyl ethers or PEG 3350. These results help to explain why L-lactate was present in the proline dehydrogenase domain crystal structure. This work also has implications for the crystallization of enzymes that bind L-lactate. PMID:15103160

  4. Assessment of lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase and aspartate aminotransferase activities in cow's milk as an indicator of subclinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Babaei, H; Mansouri-Najand, L; Molaei, M M; Kheradmand, A; Sharifan, M

    2007-05-01

    This study examined the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in the milk of lactating Holstein cows in association with subclinical mastitis (SCM). A total of 94 milk samples were collected from 58 lactating dairy cows representing stages of lactation from the second to the tenth week after calving. Those which were classified as positive by California mastitis test (CMT) were deemed to have subclinical mastitis. All the milk samples were skimmed by centrifugation at 10 000g at 0 degrees C and were used for enzyme activities estimations. The mean activities of LDH and ALP were higher in the milk from udders with SCM than in the milk from healthy udders (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in AST values. The maximum agreement rates between the CMT results and LDH and ALP values were seen at thresholds of > 180 IU/L and > 40 IU/L respectively (kappa values 0.65 and 0.79, respectively). However, the sensitivity of the tests for identifying SCM at these thresholds was higher for ALP (96.4%) than for LDH (68.5%). In this study, LDH and ALP tests were standardized for cow's milk and results showed that only the ALP test was reliable in the early diagnosis of subclinical mastitis. PMID:17268916

  5. Major Role of NAD-Dependent Lactate Dehydrogenases in Aerobic Lactate Utilization in Lactobacillus plantarum during Early Stationary Phase

    PubMed Central

    Goffin, Philippe; Lorquet, Frédérique; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Hols, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    NAD-independent lactate dehydrogenases are commonly thought to be responsible for lactate utilization during the stationary phase of aerobic growth in Lactobacillus plantarum. To substantiate this view, we constructed single and double knockout mutants for the corresponding genes, loxD and loxL. Lactate-to-acetate conversion was not impaired in these strains, while it was completely blocked in mutants deficient in NAD-dependent lactate dehydrogenase activities, encoded by the ldhD and ldhL genes. We conclude that NAD-dependent but not NAD-independent lactate dehydrogenases are involved in this process. PMID:15375150

  6. Age-related responses of right ventricle in swim-trained rats: changes in lactate and pyruvate contents and lactate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Anitha, V; Asha Devi, S

    1996-09-18

    Age related changes in carbohydrate substrates such as, glucose, glycogen, pyruvic acid and lactic acid and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and LDH isoenzyme profile were evaluated in the right ventricle (RV) of swim-trained rats of 6- (adult), 12- (middle-aged) and 18- (old) months-of-age. Moderate hypertrophy was seen in the heart and RV in response to training in all age groups with the 12 months exhibiting a significant increase. While resting levels of pyruvate and glucose in the RV showed small elevations in adult and middle-aged rats, lactic acid showed reductions in all ages. Glycogen supercompensation was seen in the RV of trained animals. These age-related alterations in RV were associated with decreases in blood lactic acid and glucose in the trained rats belonging to all ages. Total protein of the RV decreased with age and exercise increased the content. Total LDH and M4-LDH activities decreased with age. However, training increased their activities in all ages. These changes in the RV suggests that swimming activity produces adaptations (e.g. increased LDH and M4) in all age groups. Considering the degree of adaptations, it can be suggested that adult and middle-aged are suitable for initiating swim-training programs, but not in old age. PMID:8869911

  7. Ontogenetic changes in citrate synthase and lactate dehydrogenase activity in the jumping muscle of the American locust (Schistocerca americana).

    PubMed

    Kirkton, Scott D; Nyberg, Elizabeth T; Fox, Kristin M

    2011-10-01

    Intraspecific studies have repeatedly shown that muscle-specific oxidative enzyme activities scale negatively with body mass while muscle-specific glycolytic enzyme activities scale positively. However, most of these studies have not included juveniles. In this study, we examined how citrate synthase (CS, EC 2.3.3.1) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27) activity in the jumping muscle of Schistocerca americana grasshoppers varied with ontogeny across a 40-fold increase in body size. In contrast to the pattern observed when adult conspecifics are compared, we show that jumping muscle CS activity increased more than 2-fold from 2nd instars to adults, while jumping muscle LDH activity increased more than 5-fold. The increased LDH activity in older grasshoppers supports previous data that older grasshoppers have a reduced jumping endurance. The increased CS activity with age may help older grasshoppers efficiently produce aerobic ATP to bend cuticular springs for energy storage before a jump or alternatively recover from anaerobic metabolism after jumping. Metabolic changes in S. americana jumping muscle are similar to other developing taxa and highlight the importance of including juveniles within intraspecific studies. When compared to adults, juvenile locomotion may have increased selection pressure because of both greater energetic demands during growth and higher predation rates. PMID:21807111

  8. Isolation of human lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme X by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Kolk, A H; van Kuyk, L; Boettcher, B

    1978-01-01

    Human isoenzyme LDH-X (lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme X) was isolated from seminal fluid of frozen semen samples by affinity chromatography by using oxamate-Sepharose and AMP-Sepharose. In the presence of 1.6 mM-NAD+, isoenzyme LDH-X does not bind to AMP-Sepharose, whereas the other lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes do. This is the crucial point in the isolation of isoenzyme LDH-X from the other isoenzymes. The purified human isoenzyme LDH-X had a specific activity of 146 units/mg of protein. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:213050

  9. Protein Conformational Landscapes and Catalysis. Influence of Active Site Conformations in the Reaction Catalyzed by L-Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Świderek, Katarzyna; Tuñón, Iñaki; Martí, Sergio; Moliner, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade L-Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) has become an extremely useful marker in both clinical diagnosis and in monitoring the course of many human diseases. It has been assumed from the 80s that the full catalytic process of LDH starts with the binding of the cofactor and the substrate followed by the enclosure of the active site by a mobile loop of the protein before the reaction to take place. In this paper we show that the chemical step of the LDH catalyzed reaction can proceed within the open loop conformation, and the different reactivity of the different protein conformations would be in agreement with the broad range of rate constants measured in single molecule spectrometry studies. Starting from a recently solved X-ray diffraction structure that presented an open loop conformation in two of the four chains of the tetramer, QM/MM free energy surfaces have been obtained at different levels of theory. Depending on the level of theory used to describe the electronic structure, the free energy barrier for the transformation of pyruvate into lactate with the open conformation of the protein varies between 12.9 and 16.3 kcal/mol, after quantizing the vibrations and adding the contributions of recrossing and tunneling effects. These values are very close to the experimentally deduced one (14.2 kcal·mol−1) and ~2 kcal·mol−1 smaller than the ones obtained with the closed loop conformer. Calculation of primary KIEs and IR spectra in both protein conformations are also consistent with our hypothesis and in agreement with experimental data. Our calculations suggest that the closure of the active site is mainly required for the inverse process; the oxidation of lactate to pyruvate. According to this hypothesis H4 type LDH enzyme molecules, where it has been propose that lactate is transformed into pyruvate, should have a better ability to close the mobile loop than the M4 type LDH molecules. PMID:25705562

  10. The Arabidopsis KS-type dehydrin recovers lactate dehydrogenase activity inhibited by copper with the contribution of His residues.

    PubMed

    Hara, Masakazu; Monna, Shuhei; Murata, Takae; Nakano, Taiyo; Amano, Shono; Nachbar, Markus; Wätzig, Hermann

    2016-04-01

    Dehydrin, which is one of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, is involved in the ability of plants to tolerate the lack of water. Although many reports have indicated that dehydrins bind heavy metals, the physiological role of this metal binding has not been well understood. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis KS-type dehydrin (AtHIRD11) recovered the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity denatured by Cu(2+). The LDH activity was partially inhibited by 0.93 μM Cu(2+) but totally inactivated by 9.3 μM Cu(2+). AtHIRD11 recovered the activity of LDH treated with 9.3 μM Cu(2+) in a dose-dependent manner. The recovery activity of AtHIRD11 was significantly higher than those of serum albumin and lysozyme. The conversion of His residues to Ala in AtHIRD11 resulted in the loss of the Cu(2+) binding of the protein as well as the disappearance of the conformational change induced by Cu(2+) that is observed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The mutant protein showed lower recovery activity than the original AtHIRD11. These results indicate that AtHIRD11 can reactivate LDH inhibited by Cu(2+) via the His residues. This function may prevent physiological damage to plants due to heavy-metal stress. PMID:26940498

  11. Loss of NADH Oxidase Activity in Streptococcus mutans Leads to Rex-Mediated Overcompensation in NAD+ Regeneration by Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Baker, J. L.; Derr, A. M.; Faustoferri, R. C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies of the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans have determined that this Gram-positive facultative anaerobe mounts robust responses to both acid and oxidative stresses. The water-forming NADH oxidase (Nox; encoded by nox) is thought to be critical for the regeneration of NAD+, for use in glycolysis, and for the reduction of oxygen, thereby preventing the formation of damaging reactive oxygen species. In this study, the free NAD+/NADH ratio in a nox deletion strain (Δnox) was discovered to be remarkably higher than that in the parent strain, UA159, when the strains were grown in continuous culture. This unanticipated result was explained by significantly elevated lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh; encoded by ldh) activity and ldh transcription in the Δnox strain, which was mediated in part by the redox-sensing regulator Rex. cDNA microarray analysis of S. mutans cultures exposed to simultaneous acid stress (growth at a low pH) and oxidative stress (generated through the deletion of nox or the addition of exogenous oxygen) revealed a stress response synergistically heightened over that with either stress alone. In the Δnox strain, this elevated stress response included increased glucose phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) activity, which appeared to be due to elevated manL transcription, mediated in part, like elevated ldh transcription, by Rex. While the Δnox strain does possess a membrane composition different from that of the parent strain, it did not appear to have defects in either membrane permeability or ATPase activity. However, the altered transcriptome and metabolome of the Δnox strain were sufficient to impair its ability to compete with commensal peroxigenic oral streptococci during growth under aerobic conditions. IMPORTANCE Streptococcus mutans is an oral pathogen whose ability to outcompete commensal oral streptococci is strongly linked to the formation of dental caries. Previous work has demonstrated that the S

  12. Peafowl lactate dehydrogenase: problem of isoenzyme identification.

    PubMed

    Rose, R G; Wilson, A C

    1966-09-16

    Peafowl, like other vertebrates, contain multiple forms of lactate dehydrogenase. The electrophoretic properties of the peafowl isoenzymes are unusual in that the isoenzyme from heart tissue can be either more or less anodic than that of muscle, depending on the pH. This finding focuses attention on the problem of isoenzyme identification. It is suggested that isoenzymes be identified on the basis of properties that are chemically and biologically more significant than electrophoretic mobility. PMID:5917779

  13. Mutants of Escherichia coli deficient in the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Mat-Jan, F; Alam, K Y; Clark, D P

    1989-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli deficient in the fermentative NAD-linked lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) have been isolated. These mutants showed no growth defects under anaerobic conditions unless present together with a defect in pyruvate formate lyase (pfl). Double mutants (pfl ldh) were unable to grow anaerobically on glucose or other sugars even when supplemented with acetate, whereas pfl mutants can do so. The ldh mutation was found to map at 30.5 min on the E. coli chromosome. The ldh mutant FMJ39 showed no detectable lactate dehydrogenase activity and produced no lactic acid from glucose under anaerobic conditions as estimated by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. We also found that in wild-type strains the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase was conjointly induced by anaerobic conditions and an acidic pH. Despite previous findings that phosphate concentrations affect the proportion of lactic acid produced during fermentation, we were unable to find any intrinsic effect of phosphate on lactate dehydrogenase activity, apart from the buffering effect of this ion. PMID:2644194

  14. Effect of Follicular Fluid and Platelet-Activating Factor on Lactate Dehydrogenase C Expression in Human Asthenozoospermic Samples

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilpour, Tahereh; Zarei, Mohmmad-Reza; Bahmanpour, Soghra; Aliabadi, Elham; Hosseini, Ahmad; Jaberipour, Mansooreh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Application of follicular fluid (FF) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) in artificial insemination improves sperm motility. Lactate dehydrogenase C (LDH-C) is a key enzyme for sperm motility. In this study, the effects of FF and PAF on the sperm motility index and LDH-C expression were investigated. Moreover, LDH-C expression was compared between asthenozoospermic and normozoospermic samples. Methods: The expression of LDH-C was examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q-RT PCR) and western blotting after it was treated with optimized concentrations of FF and PAF in twenty asthenozoospermic samples. Also, LDH-C expression was evaluated in five normozoospermic samples. Results: Samples with 75% FF and 100 nM of PAF had an increase in their percentages of progressive and slowly motile sperms and a decrease in their percentages of non-progressive and non-motile sperms. Moreover, LDH-C mRNA transcripts were not changed following PAF and FF treatment, and LDH-C protein was detected in highly progressive motile specimens treated with FF in the asthenozoospermic samples. Furthermore, LDH-C expression was more detectable in the normal sperms. Conclusion: Our results indicated that PAF had more beneficial effects than FF on sperm motility in the asthenozoospermic samples (P=0.0001), although the LDH-C expressions of the sperms were not changed significantly in both groups. We found no association between LDH-C expression and sperm motility after FF and PAF actions. This finding, however, requires further investigation. The fact that LDH-C protein was detected in the normozoospermic, but not asthenozoospermic, samples could be cited as a reason for the infertility in these patients. PMID:24453390

  15. Elevated lactate dehydrogenase activity and increased cardiovascular mortality in the arsenic-endemic areas of southwestern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Ya-Tang; Chen, Chien-Jen; Li, Wan-Fen; Hsu, Ling-I; Tsai, Li-Yu; Huang, Yeou-Lih; Sun, Chien-Wen; Chen, Wei J.; Wang, Shu-Li

    2012-08-01

    Arsenic ingestion has been linked to increasing global prevalence of and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD); arsenic can be removed from drinking water to reduce related health effects. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is used for the evaluation of acute arsenic toxicity in vivo and in vitro, but it is not validated for the evaluation of long-term, chronic arsenic exposure. The present study examined the long-term effect of chronic arsenic exposure on CVD and serum LDH levels, after consideration of arsenic metabolism capacity. A total of 380 subjects from an arseniasis-endemic area and 303 from a non-endemic area of southwestern Taiwan were recruited in 2002. Various urinary arsenic species were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and hydride generation systems. Fasting serum was used for quantitative determination of the total LDH activity. A significant dose–response relationship was observed between arsenic exposure and LDH elevation, independent of urinary arsenic profiles (P < 0.001). Furthermore, abnormal LDH elevation was associated with CVD mortality after adjustment for Framingham risk scores for 10-year CVD and arsenic exposure (hazard ratio, 3.98; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–14.81). LDH was elevated in subjects with arsenic exposure in a dose-dependent manner. LDH is a marker of arsenic toxicity associated with CVD mortality. Results of this study have important implications for use in ascertaining long-term arsenic exposure risk of CVD. -- Highlights: ► We showed that arsenic exposure was correlated with LDH elevation. ► LDH elevation was related to arsenic methylation capacity. ► Abnormal LDH elevation can be a marker of susceptibility to CVD mortality.

  16. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase test system. 862.1440 Section 862.1440 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1440 Lactate dehydrogenase...

  17. NADP+-Preferring d-Lactate Dehydrogenase from Sporolactobacillus inulinus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lingfeng; Xu, Xiaoling; Wang, Limin; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxy acid dehydrogenases, including l- and d-lactate dehydrogenases (L-LDH and D-LDH), are responsible for the stereospecific conversion of 2-keto acids to 2-hydroxyacids and extensively used in a wide range of biotechnological applications. A common feature of LDHs is their high specificity for NAD+ as a cofactor. An LDH that could effectively use NADPH as a coenzyme could be an alternative enzymatic system for regeneration of the oxidized, phosphorylated cofactor. In this study, a d-lactate dehydrogenase from a Sporolactobacillus inulinus strain was found to use both NADH and NADPH with high efficiencies and with a preference for NADPH as its coenzyme, which is different from the coenzyme utilization of all previously reported LDHs. The biochemical properties of the D-LDH enzyme were determined by X-ray crystal structural characterization and in vivo and in vitro enzymatic activity analyses. The residue Asn174 was demonstrated to be critical for NADPH utilization. Characterization of the biochemical properties of this enzyme will contribute to understanding of the catalytic mechanism and provide referential information for shifting the coenzyme utilization specificity of 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases. PMID:26150461

  18. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system. 862.1445 Section 862.1445 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1445 Lactate...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system. 862.1445 Section 862.1445 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1445 Lactate...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system. 862.1445 Section 862.1445 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1445 Lactate...

  1. Stable Suppression of Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity during Anoxia in the Foot Muscle of Littorina littorea and the Potential Role of Acetylation as a Novel Posttranslational Regulatory Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Ali; Dawson, Neal J; Bell, Ryan A V; Storey, Kenneth B

    2013-01-01

    The intertidal marine snail, Littorina littorea, has evolved to withstand extended bouts of oxygen deprivation brought about by changing tides or other potentially harmful environmental conditions. Survival is dependent on a strong suppression of its metabolic rate and a drastic reorganization of its cellular biochemistry in order to maintain energy balance under fixed fuel reserves. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a crucial enzyme of anaerobic metabolism as it is typically responsible for the regeneration of NAD(+), which allows for the continued functioning of glycolysis in the absence of oxygen. This study compared the kinetic and structural characteristics of the D-lactate specific LDH (E.C. 1.1.1.28) from foot muscle of aerobic control versus 24 h anoxia-exposed L. littorea. Anoxic LDH displayed a near 50% decrease in V max (pyruvate-reducing direction) as compared to control LDH. These kinetic differences suggest that there may be a stable modification and regulation of LDH during anoxia, and indeed, subsequent dot-blot analyses identified anoxic LDH as being significantly less acetylated than the corresponding control enzyme. Therefore, acetylation may be the regulatory mechanism that is responsible for the suppression of LDH activity during anoxia, which could allow for the production of alternative glycolytic end products that in turn would increase the ATP yield under fixed fuel reserves. PMID:24233354

  2. Stable Suppression of Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity during Anoxia in the Foot Muscle of Littorina littorea and the Potential Role of Acetylation as a Novel Posttranslational Regulatory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Shahriari, Ali; Dawson, Neal J.; Bell, Ryan A. V.; Storey, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    The intertidal marine snail, Littorina littorea, has evolved to withstand extended bouts of oxygen deprivation brought about by changing tides or other potentially harmful environmental conditions. Survival is dependent on a strong suppression of its metabolic rate and a drastic reorganization of its cellular biochemistry in order to maintain energy balance under fixed fuel reserves. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a crucial enzyme of anaerobic metabolism as it is typically responsible for the regeneration of NAD+, which allows for the continued functioning of glycolysis in the absence of oxygen. This study compared the kinetic and structural characteristics of the D-lactate specific LDH (E.C. 1.1.1.28) from foot muscle of aerobic control versus 24 h anoxia-exposed L. littorea. Anoxic LDH displayed a near 50% decrease in Vmax (pyruvate-reducing direction) as compared to control LDH. These kinetic differences suggest that there may be a stable modification and regulation of LDH during anoxia, and indeed, subsequent dot-blot analyses identified anoxic LDH as being significantly less acetylated than the corresponding control enzyme. Therefore, acetylation may be the regulatory mechanism that is responsible for the suppression of LDH activity during anoxia, which could allow for the production of alternative glycolytic end products that in turn would increase the ATP yield under fixed fuel reserves. PMID:24233354

  3. Decreasing lactate level and increasing antibody production in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells (CHO) by reducing the expression of lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meixia; Crawford, Yongping; Ng, Domingos; Tung, Jack; Pynn, Abigail F J; Meier, Angela; Yuk, Inn H; Vijayasankaran, Natarajan; Leach, Kimberly; Joly, John; Snedecor, Bradley; Shen, Amy

    2011-04-20

    Large-scale fed-batch cell culture processes of CHO cells are the standard platform for the clinical and commercial production of monoclonal antibodies. Lactate is one of the major by-products of CHO fed-batch culture. In pH-controlled bioreactors, accumulation of high levels of lactate is accompanied by high osmolality due to the addition of base to control pH of the cell culture medium, potentially leading to lower cell growth and lower therapeutic protein production during manufacturing. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of the substrate, pyruvate, into lactate and many factors including pyruvate concentration modulate LDH activity. Alternately, pyruvate can be converted to acetyl-CoA by pyruvate dehydrogenases (PDHs), to be metabolized in the TCA cycle. PDH activity is inhibited when phosphorylated by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDHKs). In this study, we knocked down the gene expression of lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHa) and PDHKs to investigate the effect on lactate metabolism and protein production. We found that LDHa and PDHKs can be successfully downregulated simultaneously using a single targeting vector carrying small inhibitory RNAs (siRNA) for LDHa and PDHKs. Moreover, our fed-batch shake flask evaluation data using siRNA-mediated LDHa/PDHKs knockdown clones showed that downregulating LDHa and PDHKs in CHO cells expressing a therapeutic monoclonal antibody reduced lactate production, increased specific productivity and volumetric antibody production by approximately 90%, 75% and 68%, respectively, without appreciable impact on cell growth. Similar trends of lower lactate level and higher antibody productivity on average in siRNA clones were also observed from evaluations performed in bioreactors. PMID:21392546

  4. Circadian rhythm of lactate dehydrogenase in rat testis.

    PubMed

    Vermouth, N T; Ponce, R H; Carriazo, C S; Blanco, A

    1984-01-01

    Activity of total lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and of the isozyme X (LDH X or C4) have been determined at 2 hr intervals during 24 hr cycles in testis of adult rats maintained since birth in a photoperiod of 14 hr light: 10 hr dark. LDH X activity of epididymal sections (caput, corpus and cauda) from the same animals was also determined. Total LDH and LDH X activities in testis exhibited circadian rhythms with different timing. LDH X in the three portions of epididymis showed diurnal variations similar to those in testis. Rats subjected to constant light or constant dark presented marked modifications of LDH X profiles, indicating that the photoperiod plays a synchronizer role. While total soluble proteins did not show variations in testis of rats exposed to the photoperiod, a circadian rhythm was demonstrated in animals maintained in constant light or dark. PMID:6467917

  5. Yeast cell-based analysis of human lactate dehydrogenase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Lulu Ahmed; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Nakanishi, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    Human lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) has attracted attention as a potential target for cancer therapy and contraception. In this study, we reconstituted human lactic acid fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with the goal of constructing a yeast cell-based LDH assay system. pdc null mutant yeast (mutated in the endogenous pyruvate decarboxylase genes) are unable to perform alcoholic fermentation; when grown in the presence of an electron transport chain inhibitor, pdc null strains exhibit a growth defect. We found that introduction of the human gene encoding LDHA complemented the pdc growth defect; this complementation depended on LDHA catalytic activity. Similarly, introduction of the human LDHC complemented the pdc growth defect, even though LDHC did not generate lactate at the levels seen with LDHA. In contrast, the human LDHB did not complement the yeast pdc null mutant, although LDHB did generate lactate in yeast cells. Expression of LDHB as a red fluorescent protein (RFP) fusion yielded blebs in yeast, whereas LDHA-RFP and LDHC-RFP fusion proteins exhibited cytosolic distribution. Thus, LDHB exhibits several unique features when expressed in yeast cells. Because yeast cells are amenable to genetic analysis and cell-based high-throughput screening, our pdc/LDH strains are expected to be of use for versatile analyses of human LDH. PMID:26126931

  6. Separation of turkey lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes using isoelectric focusing technique.

    PubMed

    Heinová, Dagmar; Kostecká, Zuzana; Csank, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at pH 8.8 did not allow to separate lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzymes of turkey origin. Five electrophoretically distinguishable forms of the enzyme were detected in serum and tissues of turkey using IEF technique in a pH range of 3-9. Generally, three different groups were seen: (i) those having an anodic domination (heart, kidney, pancreas, and erythrocytes) with mainly LDH-1 fraction, (ii) those having a cathodic domination (breast muscle and serum) with prevalence of LDH-5, and (iii) those with a more uniform distribution (liver, spleen, lung, and brain). The specific enzyme activity was the highest in the breast muscle, followed by heart muscle, and brain. Low activities were detected in serum, kidney, and liver. PMID:26471476

  7. Human Lactate Dehydrogenase A Inhibitors: A Molecular Dynamics Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yun; Pinto, B. Mario

    2014-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) is an important enzyme in fermentative glycolysis, generating most energy for cancer cells that rely on anaerobic respiration even under normal oxygen concentrations. This renders LDHA a promising molecular target for the treatment of various cancers. Several efforts have been made recently to develop LDHA inhibitors with nanomolar inhibition and cellular activity, some of which have been studied in complex with the enzyme by X-ray crystallography. In this work, we present a molecular dynamics (MD) study of the binding interactions of selected ligands with human LDHA. Conventional MD simulations demonstrate different binding dynamics of inhibitors with similar binding affinities, whereas steered MD simulations yield discrimination of selected LDHA inhibitors with qualitative correlation between the in silico unbinding difficulty and the experimental binding strength. Further, our results have been used to clarify ambiguities in the binding modes of two well-known LDHA inhibitors. PMID:24466056

  8. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system. 862.1445 Section 862.1445 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system. 862.1445 Section 862.1445 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  10. Assessment of freshness and freeze-thawing of sea bream fillets (Sparus aurata) by a cytosolic enzyme: Lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Diop, Mamadou; Watier, Denis; Masson, Pierre-Yves; Diouf, Amadou; Amara, Rachid; Grard, Thierry; Lencel, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    The evaluation of freshness and freeze-thawing of fish fillets was carried out by assessment of autolysis of cells using a cytosolic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. Autolysis plays an important role in spoilage of fish and postmortem changes in fish tissue are due to the breakdown of the cellular structures and release of cytoplasmic contents. The outflow of a cytosolic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase, was studied in sea bream fillets and the Sparus aurata fibroblasts (SAF-1) cell-line during an 8day storage period at +4°C. A significant increase of lactate dehydrogenase release was observed, especially after 5days of storage. The ratio between the free and the total lactate dehydrogenase activity is a promising predictive marker to measure the quality of fresh fish fillets. The effect of freeze-thawing on cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase and lysosomal α-d-glucosidase activities was also tested. Despite the protecting effect of the tissue compared to the cell-line, a loss of lactate dehydrogenase activity, but not of α-d-glucosidase, was observed. In conclusion, lactate dehydrogenase may be used as a marker to both assess freshness of fish and distinguish between fresh and frozen-thawed fish fillets. PMID:27211667

  11. Evaluation of Milk Trace Elements, Lactate Dehydrogenase, Alkaline Phosphatase and Aspartate Aminotransferase Activity of Subclinical Mastitis as and Indicator of Subclinical Mastitis in Riverine Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Anirban; Gera, Sandeep; Sharma, Anshu

    2012-01-01

    Mastitis is a highly morbid disease that requires detection at the subclinical stage. Tropical countries like India mainly depend on milch buffaloes for milk. The present study was conducted to investigate whether the trace minerals viz. copper (Cu), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), cobalt (Co) and manganese (Mn) and enzyme activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in riverine buffalo milk can be used as an indicator of subclinical mastitis (SCM) with the aim of developing suitable diagnostic kit for SCM. Trace elements and enzyme activity in milk were estimated with Atomic absorption Spectrophotometer, GBC 932 plus and biochemical methods, respectively. Somatic cell count (SCC) was done microscopically. The cultural examination revealed Gram positive bacteria as the most prevalent etiological agent. A statistically significant (p<0.01) increase in SCC, Fe, Zn, Co and LDH occurred in SCM milk containing gram positive bacterial agents only. ALP was found to be elevated in milk infected by both gram positive and negative bacteria. The percent sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, predictive values and likelihood ratios were calculated taking bacterial culture examination and SCC≥2×105 cells/ml of milk as the benchmark. Only ALP and Zn, the former being superior, were found to be suitable for diagnosis of SCM irrespective of etiological agents. LDH, Co and Fe can be introduced in the screening programs where Gram positive bacteria are omnipresent. It is recommended that both ALP and Zn be measured together in milk to diagnose buffalo SCM, irrespective of etiology. PMID:25049573

  12. Lactate dehydrogenase from autotrophic and heterotrophic cells of the marine diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis Reimann & Lewin.

    PubMed

    Darley, W M; Smiley, R H

    1976-10-01

    Cultures of Cylindrotheca furisormis grown either autotrohpically or heterotrophically on lactate contained significant amounts of NAD-dependent L(+)-lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27). Polyacylamide gel electrophoresis of crude enzyme extracts revealed a single band which was indistinguishable between autotrohpic and heterotrohpic cells. The Km for lactate of partially purified preparations was lower under heterotrophic conditions. The specific activity in crude extracts was higher under autotrophic than heterotrophic conditions; it dropped precipitously when autotrophic cells were transferred to the dark, increasing again only in the presence of lactate. These and related observations suggest that this enzyme has at most only a minor role in the assimilation of lactate during heterotrophic growth on lactate. PMID:184899

  13. Effects of L-carnitine and Pentoxifylline on the Activity of Lactate Dehydrogenase C4 isozyme and Motility of Testicular Spermatozoa in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aliabadi, Elham; Karimi, Fatemeh; Rasti, Mozhgan; Akmali, Masoumeh; Esmaeilpour, Tahereh

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracted sperm from the testis have poor motility. Moreover, their motility changes during their journey through epidydimis. Meanwhile, they face high concentration of L-carnitin. In addition, lactate dehydrogenase C4 (LDH-C4) gene disorders has been shown to cause impaired sperm motility, leading to infertility in male mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate sperm motility and LDH-C4 enzyme activity upon L-carnitine (LC) and Pentoxifylline (PTX) administrations in mice. Methods We extracted testicular sperm of 48 mice and divided them into three equal parts. One part was incubated with Ham's F10 medium (control), the other parts were treated with Ham's F10 containing LC and PTX with a final concentration of 1.76 mM, for 30 min at room temperature. Sperm motility was assessed according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Sperm LDH-C4 enzyme activity was measured by spectrophotometery method. Statistical analyses were performed using ANOVA and Fisher's LSD test, and a p-value less than 0.05 was considered as a statistically significant difference. Results Sperm motility increased after 30 min of incubation in LC- and PTX-treated group (p<0.001). LC and PTX administrations showed a significant increase in the LDHC4 enzyme activity of sperm compared to that of the controls after 30 min (P=0.04 and 0.01, respectively). Conclusion The effects of LC and PTX on motility of sperm can be explained by an increase in LDH-C4 enzyme activity that may influence male fertility status. We suggest that LC as a non-toxic antioxidant is more suitable for use in assisted reproductive technique protocols than PTX. PMID:23926565

  14. Expression of Lactate Dehydrogenase in Aspergillus niger for L-Lactic Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Khyati K.; Punekar, Narayan S.

    2015-01-01

    Different engineered organisms have been used to produce L-lactate. Poor yields of lactate at low pH and expensive downstream processing remain as bottlenecks. Aspergillus niger is a prolific citrate producer and a remarkably acid tolerant fungus. Neither a functional lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from nor lactate production by A. niger is reported. Its genome was also investigated for the presence of a functional ldh. The endogenous A. niger citrate synthase promoter relevant to A. niger acidogenic metabolism was employed to drive constitutive expression of mouse lactate dehydrogenase (mldhA). An appraisal of different branches of the A. niger pyruvate node guided the choice of mldhA for heterologous expression. A high copy number transformant C12 strain, displaying highest LDH specific activity, was analyzed under different growth conditions. The C12 strain produced 7.7 g/l of extracellular L-lactate from 60 g/l of glucose, in non-neutralizing minimal media. Significantly, lactate and citrate accumulated under two different growth conditions. Already an established acidogenic platform, A. niger now promises to be a valuable host for lactate production. PMID:26683313

  15. Increasing the heme-dependent respiratory efficiency of Lactococcus lactis by inhibition of lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Arioli, Stefania; Zambelli, Daniele; Guglielmetti, Simone; De Noni, Ivano; Pedersen, Martin B; Pedersen, Per Dedenroth; Dal Bello, Fabio; Mora, Diego

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of heme-induced respiration in Lactococcus lactis has radically improved the industrial processes used for the biomass production of this species. Here, we show that inhibition of the lactate dehydrogenase activity of L. lactis during growth under respiration-permissive conditions can stimulate aerobic respiration, thereby increasing not only growth efficiency but also the robustness of this organism. PMID:23064338

  16. Reappraisal of the regulation of lactococcal L-lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    van Niel, Ed W J; Palmfeldt, Johan; Martin, Rani; Paese, Marco; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel

    2004-03-01

    Lactococcal lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs) are coregulated at the substrate level by at least two mechanisms: the fructose-1,6-biphosphate/phosphate ratio and the NADH/NAD ratio. Among the Lactococcus lactis species, there are strains that are predominantly regulated by the first mechanism (e.g., strain 65.1) or by the second mechanism (e.g., strain NCDO 2118). A more complete model of the kinetics of the regulation of lactococcal LDH is discussed. PMID:15006814

  17. Functional Replacement of the Escherichia coli d-(−)-Lactate Dehydrogenase Gene (ldhA) with the l-(+)-Lactate Dehydrogenase Gene (ldhL) from Pediococcus acidilactici†

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, K. T.; Ingram, L. O.

    2003-01-01

    The microbial production of l-(+)-lactic acid is rapidly expanding to allow increased production of polylactic acid (PLA), a renewable, biodegradable plastic. The physical properties of PLA can be tailored for specific applications by controlling the ratio of l-(+) and d-(−) isomers. For most uses of PLA, the l-(+) isomer is more abundant. As an approach to reduce costs associated with biocatalysis (complex nutrients, antibiotics, aeration, product purification, and waste disposal), a recombinant derivative of Escherichia coli W3110 was developed that contains five chromosomal deletions (focA-pflB frdBC adhE ackA ldhA). This strain was constructed from a d-(−)-lactic acid-producing strain, SZ63 (focA-pflB frdBC adhE ackA), by replacing part of the chromosomal ldhA coding region with Pediococcus acidilactici ldhL encoding an l-lactate dehydrogenase. Although the initial strain (SZ79) grew and fermented poorly, a mutant (SZ85) was readily isolated by selecting for improved growth. SZ85 exhibited a 30-fold increase in l-lactate dehydrogenase activity in comparison to SZ79, functionally replacing the native d-lactate dehydrogenase activity. Sequencing revealed mutations in the upstream, coding, and terminator regions of ldhL in SZ85, which are presumed to be responsible for increased l-lactate dehydrogenase activity. SZ85 produced l-lactic acid in M9 mineral salts medium containing glucose or xylose with a yield of 93 to 95%, a purity of 98% (based on total fermentation products), and an optical purity greater than 99%. Unlike other recombinant biocatalysts for l-lactic acid, SZ85 remained prototrophic and is devoid of plasmids and antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:12676706

  18. Expression of Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bzik, D J; Fox, B A; Gonyer, K

    1993-05-01

    A Plasmodium falciparum gene is described which encodes lactate dehydrogenase activity (P. falciparum LDH). The P. falciparum LDH gene contains no introns and is present in a single copy on chromosome 13. P. falciparum LDH was expressed in all asexual blood stages as a 1.6-kb mRNA. The predicted 316 amino acid protein coding region of P. falciparum LDH was inserted into the prokaryotic expression vector pKK223-3 and a 33-kDa protein having LDH activity was synthesized in Escherichia coli. P. falciparum LDH primary structure displays high amino acid similarity (50-57%) to vertebrate and bacterial LDH, but lacks the amino terminal extension observed in all vertebrate LDH. The majority of amino acid residues implicated in substrate and coenzyme binding and catalysis of other LDH are well conserved in P. falciparum LDH. However, several notable differences in amino acid composition were observed. P. falciparum LDH contained several distinctive single amino acid insertions and deletions compared to other LDH enzymes, and most remarkably, it contained a novel insertion of 5 amino acids within the conserved mobile loop region near arginine residue 109, a residue which is known to make contact with pyruvate in the ternary complex of other LDH. These results suggest that novel features of P. falciparum LDH primary structure may be correlated with previously characterized and distinctive kinetic, biochemical, immunochemical, and electrophoretic properties of P. falciparum LDH. PMID:8515777

  19. Membrane-bound, pyridine nucleotide-independent L-lactate dehydrogenase of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Markwell, J P; Lascelles, J

    1978-01-01

    Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides has a pyridine nucleotide-independent L-lactate dehydrogenase associated with the membrane fraction of cells grown either aerobically or phototrophically. The dehydrogenase is present in cells grown on a variety of carbon sources, but at levels less than 20% of that found in cells grown with DL-lactate. The dehydrogenase has been purified 45-fold from membranes of strain L-57, a non-photosynthetic mutant, by steps involving solubilization with lauryl dimethylamine oxide and three anion-exchange chromatography steps. The purified enzyme was specific for the L-isomer of lactate. The Km of the purified enzyme for L-lactate is 1.4 mM, whereas that of the membrane-associated enzyme is 0.5 mM. The enzyme activity was inhibited competitively by D-lactate and non-competitively by oxalate and oxamate. Quinacrine, a flavin analog, also inhibited the activity. The inducible enzyme may serve as a marker of membrane protein in studies of membrane development. PMID:304854

  20. Lactate dehydrogenase X, malate dehydrogenase and total protein in rat spermatozoa during epididymal transit.

    PubMed

    Vermouth, N T; Carriazo, C S; Ponce, R H; Blanco, A

    1986-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase isozyme X (LDH X), malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and total soluble protein have been determined in lysates of spermatozoa isolated from caput, corpus and cauda of rat epididymis. Transit of spermatozoa through epididymis is accompanied by a reduction of LDH X, MDH and total protein per cell in sexually rested animals. The profiles of reduction along epididymal segments are different for the three variables studied. Mating with receptive females during the 5 days prior to determinations increases significantly the levels of MDH in spermatozoa from all sections of epididymis and produces increase of total soluble protein in the cells contained in cauda. PMID:3956158

  1. Lactate dehydrogenase is not a mitochondrial enzyme in human and mouse vastus lateralis muscle

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Hans N; van Hall, Gerrit; Rasmussen, Ulla F

    2002-01-01

    The presence of lactate dehydrogenase in skeletal muscle mitochondria was investigated to clarify whether lactate is a possible substrate for mitochondrial respiration. Mitochondria were prepared from 100 mg samples of human and mouse vastus lateralis muscle. All fractions from the preparation procedure were assayed for marker enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The mitochondrial fraction contained no LDH activity (detection limit ∼0.05 % of the tissue activity) and the distribution of LDH activity among the fractions paralleled that of pyruvate kinase, i.e. LDH was fractionated as a cytoplasmic enzyme. Respiratory experiments with the mitochondrial fraction also indicated the absence of LDH. Lactate did not cause respiration, nor did it affect the respiration of pyruvate + malate. The major part of the native cytochrome c was retained in the isolated mitochondria, which, furthermore, showed high specific rates of state 3 respiration. This excluded artificial loss from the mitochondria of all activity of a possible LDH. It was concluded that skeletal muscle mitochondria are devoid of LDH and unable to metabolize lactate. PMID:12042361

  2. Mechanism of Thermal Adaptation in the Lactate Dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huo-Lei; Egawa, Tsuyoshi; Chang, Eric; Deng, Hua; Callender, Robert

    2015-12-10

    The mechanism of thermal adaptation of enzyme function at the molecular level is poorly understood but is thought to lie within the structure of the protein or its dynamics. Our previous work on pig heart lactate dehydrogenase (phLDH) has determined very high resolution structures of the active site, via isotope edited IR studies, and has characterized its dynamical nature, via laser-induced temperature jump (T-jump) relaxation spectroscopy on the Michaelis complex. These particular probes are quite powerful at getting at the interplay between structure and dynamics in adaptation. Hence, we extend these studies to the psychrophilic protein cgLDH (Champsocephalus gunnari; 0 °C) and the extreme thermophile tmLDH (Thermotoga maritima LDH; 80 °C) for comparison to the mesophile phLDH (38-39 °C). Instead of the native substrate pyruvate, we utilize oxamate as a nonreactive substrate mimic for experimental reasons. Using isotope edited IR spectroscopy, we find small differences in the substate composition that arise from the detailed bonding patterns of oxamate within the active site of the three proteins; however, we find these differences insufficient to explain the mechanism of thermal adaptation. On the other hand, T-jump studies of reduced β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) emission reveal that the most important parameter affecting thermal adaptation appears to be enzyme control of the specific kinetics and dynamics of protein motions that lie along the catalytic pathway. The relaxation rate of the motions scale as cgLDH > phLDH > tmLDH in a way that faithfully matches kcat of the three isozymes. PMID:26556099

  3. Characterization of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme in seminal plasma of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Singh, R P; Sastry, K V H; Pandey, N K; Shit, N; Agrawal, R; Singh, K B; Mohan, Jag; Saxena, V K; Moudgal, R P

    2011-02-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase enzyme present in quail seminal plasma has been characterized. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subsequently with LDH specific staining of seminal plasma revealed a single isozyme in quail semen. Studies on substrate inhibition, pH for optimum activity and inhibitor (urea) indicated the isozyme present in the quail semen has catalytic properties like LDH-1 viz. H-type. Furthermore, unlike other mammalian species, electrophoretic and kinetic investigations did not support the existence of semen specific LDH-X isozyme in quail semen. The effect of exogenous lactate and pyruvate on sperm metabolic activity was also studied. The addition of 1 mM lactate or pyruvate to quail semen increased sperm metabolic activity. Our results suggested that both pyruvate and lactate could be used by quail spermatozoa to maintain their basic functions. Since the H-type isozyme is important for conversion of lactate to pyruvate under anaerobic conditions it was postulated that exogenous lactate being converted into pyruvate via LDH present in semen may be used by sperm mitochondria to generate ATP. During conversion of lactate to pyruvate NADH is being generated that may be useful for maintaining sperm mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:21074838

  4. Peroxisomal lactate dehydrogenase is generated by translational readthrough in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Schueren, Fabian; Lingner, Thomas; George, Rosemol; Hofhuis, Julia; Dickel, Corinna; Gärtner, Jutta; Thoms, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Translational readthrough gives rise to low abundance proteins with C-terminal extensions beyond the stop codon. To identify functional translational readthrough, we estimated the readthrough propensity (RTP) of all stop codon contexts of the human genome by a new regression model in silico, identified a nucleotide consensus motif for high RTP by using this model, and analyzed all readthrough extensions in silico with a new predictor for peroxisomal targeting signal type 1 (PTS1). Lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB) showed the highest combined RTP and PTS1 probability. Experimentally we show that at least 1.6% of the total cellular LDHB is targeted to the peroxisome by a conserved hidden PTS1. The readthrough-extended lactate dehydrogenase subunit LDHBx can also co-import LDHA, the other LDH subunit, into peroxisomes. Peroxisomal LDH is conserved in mammals and likely contributes to redox equivalent regeneration in peroxisomes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03640.001 PMID:25247702

  5. The Archaeoglobus fulgidus d-Lactate Dehydrogenase Is a Zn2+ Flavoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Reed, David W.; Hartzell, Patricia L.

    1999-01-01

    Archaeoglobus fulgidus, a hyperthermophilic, archaeal sulfate reducer, is one of the few organisms that can utilize d-lactate as a sole source for both carbon and electrons. The A. fulgidus open reading frame, AF0394, which is predicted to encode a d-(−)-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld), was cloned, and its product was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion with the maltose binding protein (MBP). The 90-kDa MBP-Dld fusion protein was more efficiently expressed in E. coli when coexpressed with the E. coli dnaY gene, encoding the arginyl tRNA for the codons AGA and AGG. When cleaved from the fusion protein by treatment with factor Xa, the recombinant Dld (rDld) has an apparent molecular mass of 50 kDa, similar to that of the native A. fulgidus Dld enzyme. Both the purified MBP-Dld fusion protein and its rDld cleavage fragment have lactate dehydrogenase activities specific for d-lactate, are stable at 80°C, and retain activity after exposure to oxygen. The flavin cofactor FAD, which binds rDld apoprotein with a 1:1 stoichiometry, is essential for activity. PMID:10601217

  6. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production triggered by prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) regulates lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) expression/activity in TM4 Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Soledad P; Windschüttl, Stefanie; Matzkin, María E; Rey-Ares, Verónica; Terradas, Claudio; Ponzio, Roberto; Puigdomenech, Elisa; Levalle, Oscar; Calandra, Ricardo S; Mayerhofer, Artur; Frungieri, Mónica B

    2016-10-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate testicular function in health and disease. We previously described a prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) system in Sertoli cells. Now, we found that PGD2 increases ROS and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation in murine TM4 Sertoli cells, and also induces antioxidant enzymes expression suggesting that defense systems are triggered as an adaptive stress mechanism that guarantees cell survival. ROS and specially H2O2 may act as second messengers regulating signal transduction pathways and gene expression. We describe a stimulatory effect of PGD2 on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) expression via DP1/DP2 receptors, which is prevented by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine and the PI3K/Akt pathway inhibitor LY 294002. PGD2 also enhances Akt and CREB/ATF-1 phosphorylation. Our results provide evidence for a role of PGD2 in the regulation of the oxidant/antioxidant status in Sertoli cells and, more importantly, in the modulation of LDH expression which takes place through ROS generation and the Akt-CREB/ATF-1 pathway. PMID:27329155

  7. Lactate dehydrogenase (LD), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) isoenzymatic patterns in Iraqi children with visceral leishmaniasis before and after treatment with stibogluconate.

    PubMed

    Taher, Jasim Hameed; Al-Mulla Hummadi, Yassir Mustafa Kamal; Al-Bashir, Nada Muhammed Taha; Al-Araji, Ali Shaalan

    2016-06-01

    The mean levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase enzymes exhibited a significant elevation in visceral leishmaniasis (VL) patients compared to the control. There was no significant change in relation to the sex and age. ALP isoenzymes revealed three banding patterns which differ from the three zymodems which were obtained from control group. These differences may be due to isoenzymes activity of patients with VL before and after therapy. Lactate dehydrogenase (LD) isoenzymes revealed five banding patterns differ from the five normal zymodems. These differences mainly occurred due to LD isoenzymes activity in patients with VL before and after therapy. PMID:27413293

  8. Identification of lactate dehydrogenase as a mammalian pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Akagawa, Mitsugu; Minematsu, Kenji; Shibata, Takahiro; Kondo, Tatsuhiko; Ishii, Takeshi; Uchida, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a redox-active o-quinone, is an important nutrient involved in numerous physiological and biochemical processes in mammals. Despite such beneficial functions, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be established. In the present study, using PQQ-immobilized Sepharose beads as a probe, we examined the presence of protein(s) that are capable of binding PQQ in mouse NIH/3T3 fibroblasts and identified five cellular proteins, including l-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) A chain, as potential mammalian PQQ-binding proteins. In vitro studies using a purified rabbit muscle LDH show that PQQ inhibits the formation of lactate from pyruvate in the presence of NADH (forward reaction), whereas it enhances the conversion of lactate to pyruvate in the presence of NAD+ (reverse reaction). The molecular mechanism underlying PQQ-mediated regulation of LDH activity is attributed to the oxidation of NADH to NAD+ by PQQ. Indeed, the PQQ-bound LDH oxidizes NADH, generating NAD+, and significantly catalyzes the conversion of lactate to pyruvate. Furthermore, PQQ attenuates cellular lactate release and increases intracellular ATP levels in the NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. Our results suggest that PQQ, modulating LDH activity to facilitate pyruvate formation through its redox-cycling activity, may be involved in the enhanced energy production via mitochondrial TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:27230956

  9. Subcellular localization of branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase C4 in rat and mouse spermatozoa.

    PubMed Central

    Montamat, E E; Vermouth, N T; Blanco, A

    1988-01-01

    Spermatozoa isolated from rat and mouse epididymes show a relatively high branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase (leucine aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.6) activity. There is a significant reduction of leucine aminotransferase and of the isoenzyme C4 of lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) in the gametes during their epididymal transit. Studies of patterns of liberation of the leucine aminotransferase and of the lactate dehydrogenase C4 from intact spermatozoa, treated with increasing concentrations of digitonin, indicate that both enzymes have the same dual subcellular location, i.e. in the cytosol and in the mitochondria. PMID:3214422

  10. Subcellular localization of branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase C4 in rat and mouse spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Montamat, E E; Vermouth, N T; Blanco, A

    1988-11-01

    Spermatozoa isolated from rat and mouse epididymes show a relatively high branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase (leucine aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.6) activity. There is a significant reduction of leucine aminotransferase and of the isoenzyme C4 of lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) in the gametes during their epididymal transit. Studies of patterns of liberation of the leucine aminotransferase and of the lactate dehydrogenase C4 from intact spermatozoa, treated with increasing concentrations of digitonin, indicate that both enzymes have the same dual subcellular location, i.e. in the cytosol and in the mitochondria. PMID:3214422

  11. Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme patterns in blood cells from histiocytosis X children.

    PubMed

    Perlino, E; Marra, E; Maenza, S; de Terlizzi, M; Coppola, B C; Santostasi, T; Quagliariello, E

    1993-12-31

    To find a clinical assay for histiocytosis X (HX) diagnosis, measurements were made of both activity and isoenzyme distribution of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27) from the blood cells of 6 acute phase and 9 remission patients. A significant increase in the LDH activity measured in the monocytes and lymphocytes isolated from the blood of the acute phase patients was found. The increased activity was due to an enhancement of the normal pattern of LDH isoenzymes in these cells and not to a change in isoenzyme distribution. No increase was found in monocyte LDH isoenzymes from the patients in remission. PMID:8143371

  12. A detailed investigation of the properties of lactate dehydrogenase in which the 'Essential' cysteine-165 is modified by thioalkylation.

    PubMed Central

    Bloxham, D P; Sharma, R P; Wilton, D C

    1979-01-01

    The reaction of pig heart lactate dehydrogenase with methyl methanethiosulphonate resulted in the modification of one thiol group per protomer, and this was located at cysteine-165 in the enzyme sequence. On reduction, both the thiomethylation of cysteine-165 and any changes in kinetic properties of the enzyme were completely reversed. Cysteine-165 has been considered essential for catalytic activity; however, cysteine-165-thiomethylated dehydrogenase possessed full catalytic activity, although the affinity of the enzyme for carbonyl-or hydroxy-containing substrates was markedly decreased. The nicotinamide nucleotide-binding capacity was unaffected, as judged by the formation of fluorescent complexes with NADH. The enzyme-mediated activation of NAD+, as judged by sulphite addition, was unaffected in thiomethylated lactate dehydrogenase. However, the affinity of oxamate for the enzyme--NADH complex was decreased by 100-fold and it was calculated that this constituted a net increase of 10.4 kJ/mol in the activation energy for binding. Thiomethylated lactate dehydrogenase was able to form an abortive adduct between NAD+ and fluoropyruvate. However, the equilibrium constant for adduct formation between pyruvate and NAD+ was too low to demonstrate this complex at reasonable pyruvate concentrations. A conformational change in the protein structure on selective thiomethylation was revealed by the decreased thermostability of the modified enzyme. The alteration of lactate dehydrogenase catalytic properties on modification depended on the bulk of the reagent used, since thioethylation resulted in an increase in Km for pyruvate (13.5 +/- 3.5 mm) and an 85% decrease in maximum catalytic activity. The implications of all these findings for the catalytic mechanism of lactate dehydrogenase are discussed. PMID:36072

  13. Lactate dehydrogenase is the key enzyme for pneumococcal pyruvate metabolism and pneumococcal survival in blood.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Paula; Al-Bayati, Firas A Y; Andrew, Peter W; Neves, Ana Rute; Yesilkaya, Hasan

    2014-12-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a fermentative microorganism and causes serious diseases in humans, including otitis media, bacteremia, meningitis, and pneumonia. However, the mechanisms enabling pneumococcal survival in the host and causing disease in different tissues are incompletely understood. The available evidence indicates a strong link between the central metabolism and pneumococcal virulence. To further our knowledge on pneumococcal virulence, we investigated the role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which converts pyruvate to lactate and is an essential enzyme for redox balance, in the pneumococcal central metabolism and virulence using an isogenic ldh mutant. Loss of LDH led to a dramatic reduction of the growth rate, pinpointing the key role of this enzyme in fermentative metabolism. The pattern of end products was altered, and lactate production was totally blocked. The fermentation profile was confirmed by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of glucose metabolism in nongrowing cell suspensions of the ldh mutant. In this strain, a bottleneck in the fermentative steps is evident from the accumulation of pyruvate, revealing LDH as the most efficient enzyme in pyruvate conversion. An increase in ethanol production was also observed, indicating that in the absence of LDH the redox balance is maintained through alcohol dehydrogenase activity. We also found that the absence of LDH renders the pneumococci avirulent after intravenous infection and leads to a significant reduction in virulence in a model of pneumonia that develops after intranasal infection, likely due to a decrease in energy generation and virulence gene expression. PMID:25245810

  14. Lactate Dehydrogenase Is the Key Enzyme for Pneumococcal Pyruvate Metabolism and Pneumococcal Survival in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Paula; Al-Bayati, Firas A. Y.; Andrew, Peter W.; Neves, Ana Rute

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a fermentative microorganism and causes serious diseases in humans, including otitis media, bacteremia, meningitis, and pneumonia. However, the mechanisms enabling pneumococcal survival in the host and causing disease in different tissues are incompletely understood. The available evidence indicates a strong link between the central metabolism and pneumococcal virulence. To further our knowledge on pneumococcal virulence, we investigated the role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which converts pyruvate to lactate and is an essential enzyme for redox balance, in the pneumococcal central metabolism and virulence using an isogenic ldh mutant. Loss of LDH led to a dramatic reduction of the growth rate, pinpointing the key role of this enzyme in fermentative metabolism. The pattern of end products was altered, and lactate production was totally blocked. The fermentation profile was confirmed by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of glucose metabolism in nongrowing cell suspensions of the ldh mutant. In this strain, a bottleneck in the fermentative steps is evident from the accumulation of pyruvate, revealing LDH as the most efficient enzyme in pyruvate conversion. An increase in ethanol production was also observed, indicating that in the absence of LDH the redox balance is maintained through alcohol dehydrogenase activity. We also found that the absence of LDH renders the pneumococci avirulent after intravenous infection and leads to a significant reduction in virulence in a model of pneumonia that develops after intranasal infection, likely due to a decrease in energy generation and virulence gene expression. PMID:25245810

  15. Lactate Dehydrogenase in Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Something Old, Something New

    PubMed Central

    Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Memeo, Riccardo; Casadei Gardini, Andrea; Giampieri, Riccardo; Bittoni, Alessandro; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Del Prete, Michela; Cascinu, Stefano; Scartozzi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver tumour (80–90%) and represents more than 5.7% of all cancers. Although in recent years the therapeutic options for these patients have increased, clinical results are yet unsatisfactory and the prognosis remains dismal. Clinical or molecular criteria allowing a more accurate selection of patients are in fact largely lacking. Lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) is a glycolytic key enzyme in the conversion of pyruvate to lactate under anaerobic conditions. In preclinical models, upregulation of LDH has been suggested to ensure both an efficient anaerobic/glycolytic metabolism and a reduced dependence on oxygen under hypoxic conditions in tumour cells. Data from several analyses on different tumour types seem to suggest that LDH levels may be a significant prognostic factor. The role of LDH in HCC has been investigated by different authors in heterogeneous populations of patients. It has been tested as a potential biomarker in retrospective, small, and nonfocused studies in patients undergoing surgery, transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), and systemic therapy. In the major part of these studies, high LDH serum levels seem to predict a poorer outcome. We have reviewed literature in this setting trying to resume basis for future studies validating the role of LDH in this disease. PMID:27314036

  16. Nuclear lactate dehydrogenase modulates histone modification in human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Castonguay, Zachary; Auger, Christopher; Thomas, Sean C.; Chahma, M’hamed; Appanna, Vasu D.

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Nuclear LDH is up-regulated under oxidative stress. • SIRT1 is co-immunoprecipitated bound to nuclear LDH. • Nuclear LDH is involved in histone deacetylation and epigenetics. - Abstract: It is becoming increasingly apparent that the nucleus harbors metabolic enzymes that affect genetic transforming events. Here, we describe a nuclear isoform of lactate dehydrogenase (nLDH) and its ability to orchestrate histone deacetylation by controlling the availability of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}), a key ingredient of the sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) deacetylase system. There was an increase in the expression of nLDH concomitant with the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in the culture medium. Under oxidative stress, the NAD{sup +} generated by nLDH resulted in the enhanced deacetylation of histones compared to the control hepatocytes despite no discernable change in the levels of SIRT1. There appeared to be an intimate association between nLDH and SIRT1 as these two enzymes co-immunoprecipitated. The ability of nLDH to regulate epigenetic modifications by manipulating NAD{sup +} reveals an intricate link between metabolism and the processing of genetic information.

  17. SERUM VALUES OF ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE AND LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE IN OSTEOSARCOMA

    PubMed Central

    ZUMÁRRAGA, JUAN PABLO; BAPTISTA, ANDRÉ MATHIAS; ROSA, LUIS PABLO DE LA; CAIERO, MARCELO TADEU; CAMARGO, OLAVO PIRES DE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To study the relationship between the pre and post chemotherapy (CT) serum levels of alkaline phosphatase (AP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and the percentage of tumor necrosis (TN) found in specimens after the pre surgical CT in patients with osteosarcoma. Methods: Series of cases with retrospective evaluation of patients diagnosed with osteosarcoma. Participants were divided into two groups according to serum values of both enzymes. The values of AP and LDH were obtained before and after preoperative CT. The percentage of tumor necrosis (TN) of surgical specimens of each patient was also included. Results: One hundred and thirty seven medical records were included from 1990 to 2013. Both the AP as LDH decreased in the patients studied, being the higher in pre CT than post CT. The average LHD decrease was 795.12U/L and AP decrease was 437.40 U/L. The average TN was 34.10 %. There was no statistically significant correlation between the serums values and the percentage of tumoral necrosis. Conclusion: The serum levels values of AP and LDH are not good predictors for the chemotherapy-induced necrosis in patients with osteosarcoma. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:27217815

  18. Acetate Utilization in Lactococcus lactis Deficient in Lactate Dehydrogenase: a Rescue Pathway for Maintaining Redox Balance

    PubMed Central

    Hols, Pascal; Ramos, Ana; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Delcour, Jean; de Vos, Willem M.; Santos, Helena; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    1999-01-01

    Acetate was shown to improve glucose fermentation in Lactococcus lactis deficient in lactate dehydrogenase. 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance studies using [2-13C]glucose and [2-13C]acetate as substrates demonstrated that acetate was exclusively converted to ethanol. This novel pathway provides an alternative route for NAD+ regeneration in the absence of lactate dehydrogenase. PMID:10464231

  19. Identification of 3,6-disubstituted dihydropyrones as inhibitors of human lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Fauber, Benjamin P; Dragovich, Peter S; Chen, Jinhua; Corson, Laura B; Ding, Charles Z; Eigenbrot, Charles; Labadie, Sharada; Malek, Shiva; Peterson, David; Purkey, Hans E; Robarge, Kirk; Sideris, Steve; Ultsch, Mark; Wei, BinQing; Yen, Ivana; Yue, Qin; Zhou, Aihe

    2014-12-15

    A series of 3,6-disubstituted dihydropyrones were identified as inhibitors of human lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-A. Structure activity relationships were explored and a series of 6,6-spiro analogs led to improvements in LDHA potency (IC50 <350 nM). An X-ray crystal structure of an improved compound bound to human LDHA was obtained and it illustrated additional opportunities to enhance the potency of these compounds, resulting in the identification of 51 (IC50=30 nM). PMID:25467161

  20. [Nervous regulation of glycogen concentration and the lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme spectrum in the diaphragm of rats].

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, V F

    1981-01-01

    Content of glycogen, activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and its isoenzyme spectrum were studied in two cases of partial diaphragm denervation as well as in electro-stimulation of separate phrenic nerve branches. Dissimilar postdenervational alterations were observed in the content of glycogen and in the isozyme spectrum of LDH, which depended on the type of partial denervation. Stimulation of individual branches of the phrenic nerve showed that they separately affected the synthesis and consumption of glycogen. The data obtained suggest the nervous regulation of glycogensynthetic processes in muscle tissue. PMID:7467206

  1. Regulation of lactate dehydrogenase and change of fermentation products in streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, T; Carlsson, J

    1975-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans JC 2 produced mainly lactate as a fermentation product when grown in nitrogen-limited continuous culture in the presence of an excess of glucose and produced formate, acetate, and ethanol, but no lactate, under glucose-limited conditions. The levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in these cultures were of the same order of magnitude, and the activity of LDH was completely dependent on fructose-1,6-diphosphate (FDP). The intracellular level of FDP was high and the level of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) was low under the glucose-excess conditions. In the glucose-limited cultures, all glycolytic intermediates studied, except PEP, were low. S. mutans FIL, which had an FDP-independent LDH and similar levels of glycolytic intermediates as S. mutans JC2, produced mainly lactate under glucose-excess or under glucose-limited conditions. LDH of Streptococcus bovis ATCC 9809 was dependent on FDP for activity at a low concentration of pyruvate but had a significant activity without FDP at a high concentration of pyruvate. This strain also produced mainly lactate both under glucose-excess and glucose-limited conditions. The levels and characteristics of these LDHs were not changed by the culture conditions. These results indicate that changes in the intracellular level of FDP regulate LDH activity, which in turn influences the type of fermentation products produced by streptococci. PEP, adenosine 5'-monophosphate, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, and inorganic phosphate significantly inhibited LDH activity from S. mutans JC 2 and may also participate in the regulation of LDH activity in other streptococci. PMID:1176435

  2. Molecular and Kinetic Characterization of Babesia microti Gray Strain Lactate Dehydrogenase as a Potential Drug Target

    PubMed Central

    Vudriko, Patrick; Masatani, Tatsunori; Cao, Shinuo; Terkawi, Mohamad Alla; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Mousa, Ahmed A; Adjou Moumouni, Paul F; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Xuan, Xuenan

    2014-01-01

    Babesia microti is an emerging zoonotic protozoan organism that causes “malaria-like” symptoms that can be fatal in immunocompromised people. Owing to lack of specific therapeutic regiment against the disease, we cloned and characterized B. microti lactate dehydrogenase (BmLDH) as a potential molecular drug receptor. The in vitro kinetic properties of BmLDH enzyme was evaluated using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) as a co-factor and lactate as a substrate. Inhibitory assay was also done using gossypol as BmLDH inhibitor to determine the inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50). The result showed that the 0.99 kbp BmLDH gene codes for a barely soluble 36 kDa protein (332 amino acids) localized in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of the parasite. In vitro enzyme kinetic studies further revealed that BmLDH is an active enzyme with a high catalytic efficiency at optimal pH of 10.2. The Km values of NAD+ and lactate were 8.7 ± 0.57 mM and 99.9 ± 22.33 mM, respectively. The IC50 value for gossypol was 0.345 μM, while at 2.5 μM, gossypol caused 100% inhibition of BmLDH catalytic activity. These findings, therefore, provide initial evidence that BmLDH could be a potential drug target, although further in vivo studies are needed to validate the practical application of lactate dehydrogenase inhibitors against B. microti infection. PMID:25125971

  3. Diammonium phosphate stimulates transcription of L-lactate dehydrogenase leading to increased L-lactate production in the thermotolerant Bacillus coagulans strain.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lifan; Li, Yanfeng; Wang, Limin; Wang, Yanping; Yu, Bo

    2016-08-01

    Exploration of cost-effective fermentation substrates for efficient lactate production is an important economic objective. Although some organic nitrogen sources are also cheaper, inorganic nitrogen salts for lactate fermentation have additional advantages in facilitating downstream procedures and significantly improving the commercial competitiveness of lactate production. In this study, we first established an application of diammonium phosphate to replace yeast extract with a reduced 90 % nitrogen cost for a thermotolerant Bacillus coagulans strain. In vivo enzymatic and transcriptional analyses demonstrated that diammonium phosphate stimulates the gene expression of L-lactate dehydrogenase, thus providing higher specific enzyme activity in vivo and increasing L-lactic acid production. This new information provides a foundation for establishing a cost-effective process for polymer-grade L-lactic acid production in an industrial setting. PMID:26883345

  4. The effects of season and temperature on D-lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase and arginine kinase in the foot of Helix pomatia L.

    PubMed

    Wieser, W; Wright, E

    1979-04-01

    The effects of pH, season, environmental and experimental temperatures on the activities and kinetic parameters of D-lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase and arginine kinase from the foot of the pulmonate snail Helix pomatia were analyzed. Both in phosphate and Tris buffers D-lactate dehydrogenase was the enzyme with the most acid maximum, arginine kinase that with the most alkaline, whilst pyruvate kinase occupied an intermediate position. Pyruvate kinase activity, measured at 20 degrees C, was positively correlated with the environmental temperature at the moment of collecting the animal, whereas neither arginine kinase nor D-lactate dehydrogenase showed such a relationship. A seasonal study based on approximately 100 specimens established that arginine kinase activity remained the same throughout the year. Pyruvate kinase activity was slightly lower, and D-lactate dehydrogenase activity significantly higher, in winter than in summer animals. Snails subjected in spring to a short warm-up period before enzyme extraction showed extreme variability and some extraordinarily high values of pyruvate kinase activity, suggesting that either season or elevated temperature may have an immediate effect on the activity of this enzyme. Individual variability of all three enzymes ranges from 300 to 400%. The activities of pyruvate kinase and D-lactate dehydrogenase are strongly correlated in summer, forming a "constant-proportion-group", whereas in winter, with D-lactate dehydrogenase activity increasing and pyruvate kinase activity decreasing these two enzymes become "uncoupled". The Km value of pyruvate kinase is independent of experimental temperature between 10 and 25 degrees C, whereas that of D-lactate dehydrogenase and arginine kinase increases about three-fold within this range. Thus the temperature relationship of a single enzymic reaction cannot be used as an arguemnt for or against the occurrence of temperature compensation of whole animal metabolism. The

  5. Multiplex Fluorescent Immunoassay for Detection of Mice Infected with Lactate Dehydrogenase Elevating Virus

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Veronica; Myles, Matthew H

    2013-01-01

    Commercially available diagnostic tools for the detection of lactate dehydrogenase elevating virus (LDV) infection have been restricted to measurement of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity levels and detection of the viral genome by RT-PCR assays. Serologic diagnosis of LDV infection has not been widely adopted due to the belief that the formation of antigen–antibody complexes and B-cell polyclonal activation may confound interpretation of results. In the current study, we inoculated BALB/c, C57BL/6, and Swiss Webster mice with LDV to compare the diagnostic reliability of a commercially available multiplex fluorescent immunoassay for the detection of antiLDV antibodies with that of the LDH enzyme assay. The serologic assay was vastly more sensitive and specific than was the LDH enzyme assay. Moreover, the serologic assay detected antiviral antibodies throughout the 3-mo time course of this study. These results suggest that antigen–antibody complex formation and polyclonal B-cell activation had little effect on assay performance. PMID:23849407

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) multigene families.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Ju; Tsoi, Stephen C-M; Mannen, Hideyuka; Shoei-lung Li, Steven

    2002-05-01

    In this paper we analyzed 49 lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) sequences, mostly from vertebrates. The amino acid sequence differences were found to be larger for a human-killifish pair than a human-lamprey pair. This indicates that some protein sequence convergence may occur and reduce the sequence differences in distantly related species. We also examined transitions and transversions separately for several species pairs and found that the transitions tend to be saturated in the distantly related species pair, while transversions are increasing. We conclude that transversions maintain a conservative rate through the evolutionary time. Kimura's two-parameter model for multiple-hit correction on transversions only was used to derive a distance measure and then construct a neighbor-joining (NJ) tree. Three findings were revealed from the NJ tree: (i) the branching order of the tree is consistent with the common branch pattern of major vertebrates; (ii) Ldh-A and Ldh-B genes were duplicated near the origin of vertebrates; and (iii) Ldh-C and Ldh-A in mammals were produced by an independent gene duplication in early mammalian history. Furthermore, a relative rate test showed that mammalian Ldh-C evolved more rapidly than mammalian Ldh-A. Under a two-rate model, this duplication event was calibrated to be approximately 247 million years ago (mya), dating back to the Triassic period. Other gene duplication events were also discovered in Xenopus, the first duplication occurring approximately 60-70 mya in both Ldh-A and Ldh-B, followed by another recent gene duplication event, approximately 20 mya, in Ldh-B. PMID:11965434

  7. Myristica fragrans Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metabolism by Inhibiting Lactate Dehydrogenase A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Yeong; Choi, Hee-Jung; Park, Mi-Ju; Jung, Yeon-Seop; Lee, Syng-Ook; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Choi, Jung-Hye; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Most cancer cells predominantly produce ATP by maintaining a high rate of lactate fermentation, rather than by maintaining a comparatively low rate of tricarboxylic acid cycle, i.e., Warburg's effect. In the pathway, the pyruvate produced by glycolysis is converted to lactic acid by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Here, we demonstrated that water extracts from the seeds of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (MF) inhibit the in vitro enzymatic activity of LDH. MF effectively suppressed cell growth and the overall Warburg effect in HT29 human colon cancer cells. Although the expression of LDH-A was not changed by MF, both lactate production and LDH activity were decreased in MF-treated cells under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. In addition, intracellular ATP levels were also decreased by MF treatment, and the uptake of glucose was also reduced by MF treatment. Furthermore, the experiment on tumor growth in the in vivo mice model revealed that MF effectively reduced the growth of allotransplanted Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Taken together, these results suggest that MF effectively inhibits cancer growth and metabolism by inhibiting the activity of LDH, a major enzyme responsible for regulating cancer metabolism. These results implicate MF as a potential candidate for development into a novel drug against cancer through inhibition of LDH activity. PMID:27430914

  8. Catabolism of circulating enzymes: plasma clearance, endocytosis, and breakdown of lactate dehydrogenase-1 in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Smit, M J; Beekhuis, H; Duursma, A M; Bouma, J M; Gruber, M

    1988-12-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase-1 (EC 1.1.1.27), intravenously injected into rabbits, was cleared with first-order kinetics (half-life 27 min), until at least 80% of the injected activity had disappeared from plasma. Radioactivity from injected 125I-labeled enzyme disappeared at this same rate. Trichloroacetic-acid-soluble breakdown products started to appear in the circulation shortly after injection of the labeled enzyme. Body scans of the rabbits for 80 min after injection of 131I-labeled enzyme revealed rapid accumulation of label in the liver, peaking 10-20 min after injection. Subsequently, activity in the liver declined and radioactivity (probably labeled breakdown products of low molecular mass) steadily accumulated in the bladder. Tissue fractionation of liver, 19 min after injection of labeled enzyme, indicated that the radioactivity was present both in endosomes and in lysosomes, suggesting uptake by endocytosis, followed by breakdown in the lysosomes. Measurements of radioactivity in liver and plasma suggest that the liver is responsible for the breakdown of at least 75% of the injected enzyme. Radioautography of tissue sections of liver and spleen showed accumulated radioactivity in sinusoidal liver cells and red pulpa, respectively. These results are very similar to those for lactate dehydrogenase-5, creatine kinase MM, and several other enzymes that we have previously studied in rats. PMID:3197286

  9. Variability of intracellular lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes in single human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Q.; Yeung, E.S. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA )

    1994-04-01

    Trace amounts of enzymes within single human erythrocytes can be quantified by a combination of on-column reaction and capillary electrophoresis. A detection limit of 1.3 x 10[sup [minus]21] mol of LDH was achieved with laser-induced fluorescence by monitoring the product of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction between lactate and NAD[sup +]. Single erythrocyte analysis clearly isolates the major forms of LDH. The variation of total LDH activity in a population of cells from a single individual is large, but the relative activities of the isoenzymes LDH-1 and LDH-2 are fairly constant. This can be explained by the distribution of cell age in the population. A lower enzyme activity is indicative of senescence. The efficient separation of different LDH forms and the high detection sensitivity opens up the possibility of multiple-enzyme assays with a single mammalian cell. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Plasma Lactate Dehydrogenase Levels Predict Mortality in Acute Aortic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Fulvio; Ravetti, Anna; Nazerian, Peiman; Liedl, Giovanni; Veglio, Maria Grazia; Battista, Stefania; Vanni, Simone; Pivetta, Emanuele; Montrucchio, Giuseppe; Mengozzi, Giulio; Rinaldi, Mauro; Moiraghi, Corrado; Lupia, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In acute aortic syndromes (AAS), organ malperfusion represents a key event impacting both on diagnosis and outcome. Increased levels of plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a biomarker of malperfusion, have been reported in AAS, but the performance of LDH for the diagnosis of AAS and the relation of LDH with outcome in AAS have not been evaluated so far. This was a bi-centric prospective diagnostic accuracy study and a cohort outcome study. From 2008 to 2014, patients from 2 Emergency Departments suspected of having AAS underwent LDH assay at presentation. A final diagnosis was obtained by aortic imaging. Patients diagnosed with AAS were followed-up for in-hospital mortality. One thousand five hundred seventy-eight consecutive patients were clinically eligible, and 999 patients were included in the study. The final diagnosis was AAS in 201 (20.1%) patients. Median LDH was 424 U/L (interquartile range [IQR] 367–557) in patients with AAS and 383 U/L (IQR 331–460) in patients with alternative diagnoses (P < 0.001). Using a cutoff of 450 U/L, the sensitivity of LDH for AAS was 44% (95% confidence interval [CI] 37–51) and the specificity was 73% (95% CI 69–76). Overall in-hospital mortality for AAS was 23.8%. Mortality was 32.6% in patients with LDH ≥ 450 U/L and 16.8% in patients with LDH < 450 U/L (P = 0.006). Following stratification according to LDH quartiles, in-hospital mortality was 12% in the first (lowest) quartile, 18.4% in the second quartile, 23.5% in the third quartile, and 38% in the fourth (highest) quartile (P = 0.01). LDH ≥ 450 U/L was further identified as an independent predictor of death in AAS both in univariate and in stepwise logistic regression analyses (odds ratio 2.28, 95% CI 1.11–4.66; P = 0.025), in addition to well-established risk markers such as advanced age and hypotension. Subgroup analysis showed excess mortality in association with LDH ≥ 450 U/L in elderly, hemodynamically stable

  11. Identification of substituted 3-hydroxy-2-mercaptocyclohex-2-enones as potent inhibitors of human lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Dragovich, Peter S; Fauber, Benjamin P; Boggs, Jason; Chen, Jinhua; Corson, Laura B; Ding, Charles Z; Eigenbrot, Charles; Ge, HongXiu; Giannetti, Anthony M; Hunsaker, Thomas; Labadie, Sharada; Li, Chiho; Liu, Yichin; Liu, Yingchun; Ma, Shuguang; Malek, Shiva; Peterson, David; Pitts, Keith E; Purkey, Hans E; Robarge, Kirk; Salphati, Laurent; Sideris, Steve; Ultsch, Mark; VanderPorten, Erica; Wang, Jing; Wei, BinQing; Xu, Qing; Yen, Ivana; Yue, Qin; Zhang, Huihui; Zhang, Xuying; Zhou, Aihe

    2014-08-15

    A novel class of 3-hydroxy-2-mercaptocyclohex-2-enone-containing inhibitors of human lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was identified through a high-throughput screening approach. Biochemical and surface plasmon resonance experiments performed with a screening hit (LDHA IC50=1.7 μM) indicated that the compound specifically associated with human LDHA in a manner that required simultaneous binding of the NADH co-factor. Structural variation of this screening hit resulted in significant improvements in LDHA biochemical inhibition activity (best IC50=0.18 μM). Two crystal structures of optimized compounds bound to human LDHA were obtained and explained many of the observed structure-activity relationships. In addition, an optimized inhibitor exhibited good pharmacokinetic properties after oral administration to rats (F=45%). PMID:25037916

  12. [THE LEVEL OF LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE AS A MARKER OF RENAL DYSFUNCTION IN NEONATES WITH ASPHYXIA].

    PubMed

    Loboda, A M

    2015-01-01

    The article examines the possibility of determining the level of lactate dehydrogenase (LD) in biological fluids as a marker of renal dysfunction and energy supply in neonates with asphyxia. Investigation included 200 full-term newborns with disturbance kidney function: 100 infants who had severe asphyxia, and 100--with moderate asphyxia. LD activity was determined by kinetic spectrophotometric method. Determination of the activity of LD in the urine in the early neonatal period it is advisable to use as a non-invasive marker for the diagnosis of renal dysfunction in neonates with asphyxia. The content of LD in the blood serum can be used as one of the early markers of kidney damage in newborns with asphyxia. PMID:27491157

  13. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  17. A double mutant of highly purified Geobacillus stearothermophilus lactate dehydrogenase recognises l-mandelic acid as a substrate.

    PubMed

    Binay, Barış; Sessions, Richard B; Karagüler, Nevin Gül

    2013-05-10

    Lactate dehydrogenase from the thermophilic organism Geobacillus stearothermophilus (formerly Bacillus stearothermophilus) (bsLDH) has a crucial role in producing chirally pure hydroxyl compounds. α-Hydroxy acids are used in many industrial situations, ranging from pharmaceutical to cosmetic dermatology products. One drawback of this enzyme is its limited substrate specificity. For instance, l-lactate dehydrogenase exhibits no detectable activity towards the large side chain of 2-hydroxy acid l-mandelic acid, an α-hydroxy acid with anti-bacterial activity. Despite many attempts to engineer bsLDH to accept α-hydroxy acid substrates, there have been no attempts to introduce the industrially important l-mandelic acid to bsLDH. Herein, we describe attempts to change the reactivity of bsLDH towards l-mandelic acid. Using the Insight II molecular modelling programme (except 'program' in computers) and protein engineering techniques, we have successfully introduced substantial mandelate dehydrogenase activity to the enzyme. Energy minimisation modelling studies suggested that two mutations, T246G and I240A, would allow the enzyme to utilise l-mandelic acid as a substrate. Genes encoding for the wild-type and mutant enzymes were constructed, and the resulting bsLDH proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified using the TAGZyme system. Enzyme assays showed that insertion of this double mutation into highly purified bsLDH switched the substrate specificity from lactate to l-mandelic acid. PMID:23608509

  18. Evaluation of NAD(P)-Dependent Dehydrogenase Activities in Neutrophilic Granulocytes by the Bioluminescent Method.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, A A

    2015-09-01

    Bioluminescent method for measurements of the neutrophilic NAD(P)-dependent dehydrogenases (lactate dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase, NADP-dependent decarboxylating malate dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, and glucose- 6-phosphate dehydrogenase) is developed. The sensitivity of the method allows minimization of the volume of biological material for measurements to 104 neutrophils per analysis. The method is tried in patients with diffuse purulent peritonitis. Low levels of NADPH synthesis enzymes and high levels of enzymes determining the substrate flow by the Krebs cycle found in these patients can lead to attenuation of functional activity of cells. PMID:26468025

  19. Lactate dehydrogenase as a marker of Plasmodium infection in malaria vector Anopheles.

    PubMed

    Riandey, M F; Sannier, C; Peltre, G; Monteny, N; Cavaleyra, M

    1996-06-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh) electrophoresis showed the presence of Plasmodium yoelii yoelii in Anopheles stephensi and An. gambiae. The Ldh appeared as an additional band (pLdh) whose activity was more intense with 3-acetyl pyridine adenine dinucleotide as coenzyme than with beta nicotin-amide adenine dinucleotide. Several allelic forms occurred both in the vector and the host. The isoelectric point of Ldh, similar in the vector and host, differed from those of Ldh from mosquito and mouse. The presence of pLdh was detected from the 2nd to the 28th day of infection. The pLdh appeared to be proportional to the number of sporozoites present in infected salivary glands. However, pLdh was not found in salivary glands or midguts, but it was detected in the rest of the corresponding mosquito. The origin and use of pLdh as a marker of Plasmodium in its vector is discussed. PMID:8827592

  20. Targeting a Rate-Promoting Vibration with an Allosteric Mediator in Lactate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Dzierlenga, Michael W; Schwartz, Steven D

    2016-07-01

    We present a new type of allosteric modulation in which a molecule bound outside the active site modifies the chemistry of an enzymatic reaction through rapid protein dynamics. As a test case for this type of allostery, we chose an enzyme with a well-characterized rate-promoting vibration, lactate dehydrogenase; identified a suitable small molecule for binding; and used transition path sampling to obtain ensembles of reactive trajectories. We found that the small molecule significantly affected the reaction by changing the position of the transition state and, through applying committor distribution analysis, showed that it removed the protein component from the reaction coordinate. The ability of a small-molecule to disrupt enzymatic reactions through alteration of subpicosecond protein motion opens the door for new experimental studies on protein motion coupled to enzymatic reactions and possibly the design of drugs to target these enzymes. PMID:27327209

  1. Kinetic resolution of 2-hydroxybutanoate racemic mixtures by NAD-independent L-lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Zhang, Wen; Ma, Cuiqing; Liu, Peng; Xu, Ping

    2011-04-01

    Optically active D-2-hydroxybutanoate is an important building block intermediate for medicines and biodegradable poly(2-hydroxybutanoate). Kinetic resolution of racemic 2-hydroxybutanoate may be a green and desirable alternative for D-2-hydroxybutanoate production. In this work, D-2-hydroxybutanoate at a high concentration (0.197 M) and a high enantiomeric excess (99.1%) was produced by an NAD-independent L-lactate dehydrogenase (L-iLDH) containing biocatalyst. 2-Oxobutanoate, another important intermediate, was co-produced at a high concentration (0.193 M). Using a simple ion exchange process with the macroporous anion exchange resin D301, D-2-hydroxybutanoate was separated from the biotransformation system with a high recovery of 84.7%. PMID:21295977

  2. Theoretical site-directed mutagenesis: Asp168Ala mutant of lactate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Silvia; Tuñón, Iñaki; Moliner, Vicent; Williams, Ian H.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular simulations based on the use of hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods are able to provide detailed information about the complex enzymatic reactions and the consequences of specific mutations on the activity of the enzyme. In this work, the reduction of pyruvate to lactate catalysed by wild-type and Asp168Ala mutant lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) has been studied by means of simulations using a very flexible molecular model consisting of the full tetramer of the enzyme, together with the cofactor NADH, the substrate and solvent water molecules. Our results indicate that the Asp168Ala mutation provokes a shift in the pKa value of Glu199 that becomes unprotonated at neutral pH in the mutant enzyme. This change compensates the loss of the negative charge of Asp168, rendering a still active enzyme. Thus, our methodology gives a calculated barrier height for the Asp168Ala mutant 3 kcal mol−1 higher than that for wild-type LDH, which is in very good agreement with the experiment. The computed potential energy surfaces reveal the reaction pathways and transition structures for the wild-type and mutant enzymes. Hydride transfer is less advanced and the proton transfer is more advanced in the Asp168Ala mutant than in the wild type. This approach provides a very powerful tool for the analysis of the roles of key active-site residues. PMID:18682365

  3. Purification and properties of a monomeric lactate dehydrogenase from yak Hypoderma sinense larva.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengfei; Jin, Suyu; Huang, Lin; Liu, Haohao; Huang, Zhihong; Lin, Yaqiu; Zheng, Yucai

    2013-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to study the characteristics of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from Hypoderma sinense larva. H. sinense larvae were collected from yak (Bos grunniens) and identified by a PCR-RFLP method. Analysis of LDH activity showed that the total LDH activity in H. sinense larva was negatively correlated with the length of larva. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the extracts of H. sinense larvae revealed one band of LDH, which was then purified by affinity chromatography and gel filtration. This enzyme showed an approximately 36 kDa band on SDS-gel under both reducing and non-reducing conditions, in addition, size exclusion chromatography analysis showed that its molecular weight was smaller than bovine serum albumin (67 kDa), indicating that it contains only one subunit. Michaelis constants (Km) values assay revealed that LDH from H. sinense larva showed significantly lower Km for lactate than other animals. LDH of H. sinense larva was stable at 60 °C for 15 min, and also exhibited high catalytic efficiency in a wide range of pH. HgCl₂ at the concentration of 0.1mM significantly decreased the activity of LDH from H. sinense larva but not at the concentration of 0.01 mM. The results of the present study demonstrate that LDH from H. sinense larva is a thermal stable and pH insensitive enzyme suitable for catalyzing both forward and reverse reactions. PMID:23474203

  4. Surface modification of silicon dioxide, silicon nitride and titanium oxynitride for lactate dehydrogenase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Saengdee, Pawasuth; Chaisriratanakul, Woraphan; Bunjongpru, Win; Sripumkhai, Witsaroot; Srisuwan, Awirut; Jeamsaksiri, Wutthinan; Hruanun, Charndet; Poyai, Amporn; Promptmas, Chamras

    2015-05-15

    Three different types of surface, silicon dioxide (SiO2), silicon nitride (Si3N4), and titanium oxynitride (TiON) were modified for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) immobilization using (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) to obtain an amino layer on each surface. The APTES modified surfaces can directly react with LDH via physical attachment. LDH can be chemically immobilized on those surfaces after incorporation with glutaraldehyde (GA) to obtain aldehyde layers of APTES-GA modified surfaces. The wetting properties, chemical bonding composition, and morphology of the modified surface were determined by contact angle (CA) measurement, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. In this experiment, the immobilized protein content and LDH activity on each modified surface was used as an indicator of surface modification achievement. The results revealed that both the APTES and APTES-GA treatments successfully link the LDH molecule to those surfaces while retaining its activity. All types of tested surfaces modified with APTES-GA gave better LDH immobilizing efficiency than APTES, especially the SiO2 surface. In addition, the SiO2 surface offered the highest LDH immobilization among tested surfaces, with both APTES and APTES-GA modification. However, TiON and Si3N4 surfaces could be used as alternative candidate materials in the preparation of ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET) based biosensors, including lactate sensors using immobilized LDH on the ISFET surface. PMID:25108848

  5. Modification of Rhizopus lactate dehydrogenase for improved resistance to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizopus oryzae is frequently used for fermentative production of lactic acid. We determined that one of the key enzymes, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), involved in synthesis of lactic acid by R. oryzae was significantly inhibited by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) at physiological concentrations. Thi...

  6. Energy Landscape of the Michaelis Complex of Lactate Dehydrogenase: Relationship to Catalytic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) catalyzes the interconversion between pyruvate and lactate with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) as a cofactor. Using isotope-edited difference Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy on the “live” reaction mixture (LDH·NADH·pyruvate ⇌ LDH·NAD+·lactate) for the wild-type protein and a mutant with an impaired catalytic efficiency, a set of interconverting conformational substates within the pyruvate side of the Michaelis complex tied to chemical activity is revealed. The important structural features of these substates include (1) electronic orbital overlap between pyruvate’s C2=O bond and the nicotinamide ring of NADH, as shown from the observation of a delocalized vibrational mode involving motions from both moieties, and (2) a characteristic hydrogen bond distance between the pyruvate C2=O group and active site residues, as shown by the observation of at least four C2=O stretch bands indicating varying degrees of C2=O bond polarization. These structural features form a critical part of the expected reaction coordinate along the reaction path, and the ability to quantitatively determine them as well as the substate population ratios in the Michaelis complex provides a unique opportunity to probe the structure–activity relationship in LDH catalysis. The various substates have a strong variance in their propensity toward on enzyme chemistry. Our results suggest a physical mechanism for understanding the LDH-catalyzed chemistry in which the bulk of the rate enhancement can be viewed as arising from a stochastic search through an available phase space that, in the enzyme system, involves a restricted ensemble of more reactive conformational substates as compared to the same chemistry in solution. PMID:24576110

  7. Addressable self-immobilization of lactate dehydrogenase across multiple length scales.

    PubMed

    Cetinel, Sibel; Caliskan, H Burak; Yucesoy, Deniz T; Donatan, A Senem; Yuca, Esra; Urgen, Mustafa; Karaguler, Nevin G; Tamerler, Candan

    2013-02-01

    Successful nanobiotechnology implementation largely depends on control over the interfaces between inorganic materials and biological molecules. Controlling the orientations of biomolecules and their spatial arrangements on the surface may transform many technologies including sensors, to energy. Here, we demonstrate the self-organization of L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which exhibits enhanced enzymatic activity and stability on a variety of gold surfaces ranging from nanoparticles to electrodes, by incorporating a gold-binding peptide tag (AuBP2) as the fusion partner for Bacillus stearothermophilus LDH (bsLDH). Binding kinetics and enzymatic assays verified orientation control of the enzyme on the gold surface through the genetically incorporated peptide tag. Finally, redox catalysis efficiency of the immobilized enzyme was detected using cyclic voltammetry analysis in enzyme-based biosensors for lactate detection as well as in biofuel cell energy systems as the anodic counterpart. Our results demonstrate that the LDH enzyme can be self-immobilized onto different gold substrates using the short peptide tag under a biologically friendly environment. Depending on the desired inorganic surface, the proposed peptide-mediated path could be extended to any surface to achieve single-step oriented enzyme immobilization for a wide range of applications. PMID:23386458

  8. Complete knockout of the lactate dehydrogenase A gene is lethal in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1, 2, 3 down-regulated CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Yip, Shirley S M; Zhou, Meixia; Joly, John; Snedecor, Bradley; Shen, Amy; Crawford, Yongping

    2014-09-01

    Accumulation of high level of lactate can negatively impact cell growth during fed-batch culture process. In this study, we attempted to knockout the lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) gene in CHO cells in order to attenuate the lactate level. To prevent the potential deleterious effect of pyruvate accumulation, consequent to LDHA knockout, on cell culture, we chose a pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1, 2, and 3 (PDHK1, 2, and 3) knockdown cell line in which to knock out LDHA alleles. Around 3,000 clones were screened to obtain 152 mutants. Only heterozygous mutants were identified. An attempt to knockout the remaining wild-type allele from one such heterozygote yielded only two mutants after screening 567 clones. One had an extra valine. Another evidenced a duplication event, possessing at lease one wild-type and two different frameshifted alleles. Both mutants still retained LDH activity. Together, our data strongly suggest that a complete knockout of LDHA is lethal in CHO cells, despite simultaneous down-regulation of PDHK1, 2, and 3. PMID:24841241

  9. Inhibition of stress mediated cell death by human lactate dehydrogenase B in yeast.

    PubMed

    Sheibani, Sara; Jones, Natalie K; Eid, Rawan; Gharib, Nada; Arab, Nagla T T; Titorenko, Vladimir; Vali, Hojatollah; Young, Paul A; Greenwood, Michael T

    2015-08-01

    We report the identification of human L- lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB) as a novel Bax suppressor. Yeast heterologously expressing LDHB is also resistant to the lethal effects of copper indicating that it is a general suppressor of stress mediated cell death. To identify potential LDHB targets, LDHB was expressed in yeast mutants defective in apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. The absence of functional PCD regulators including MCA1, YBH3, cyclophilin (CPR3) and VMA3, as well as the absence of the pro-survival autophagic pathway (ATG1,7) did not interfere with the LDHB mediated protection against copper indicating that LDHB functions independently of known PCD regulators or by simply blocking or stimulating a common PCD promoting or inhibitory pathway. Measurements of lactate levels revealed that short-term copper stress (1.6 mM, 4 h), does not increase intracellular levels of lactate, instead a three-fold increase in extracellular lactate was observed. Thus, yeast cells resemble mammalian cells where different stresses are known to lead to increased lactate production leading to lactic acidosis. In agreement with this, we found that the addition of exogenous lactic acid to growth media was sufficient to induce cell death that could be inhibited by the expression of LDHB. Taken together our results suggest that lactate dehydrogenase is a general suppressor of PCD in yeast. PMID:26032856

  10. Metabolic Imaging: A link between Lactate Dehydrogenase A, Lactate and Tumor Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Sunitha B.; Vider, Jelena; Russell, James; Blasberg, Ronald; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We compared the metabolic profiles and the association between LDH-A expression and lactate production in two isogenic murine breast cancer cell lines and tumors (67NR and 4T1). These cell lines were derived from a single mammary tumor and have different growth and metabolic phenotypes. Experimental Design LDH-A expression, lactate concentration, glucose utilization and oxygen consumption were measured in cells, and the potential relationship between tumor lactate levels (measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI)) and tumor glucose utilization (measured by [18F] 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG-PET)) was assessed in orthotopic breast tumors derived from these cell lines. Results We show a substantial difference in LDH-A expression between 67NR and 4T1 cells under normoxia and hypoxia. We also show that small orthotopic 4T1 tumors generate tenfold more lactate than corresponding 67NR tumors. The high lactate levels in small primary 4T1 tumors are associated with intense pimonidazole staining (a hypoxia indicator). Less intense hypoxia staining was observed in the larger 67NR tumors, and is consistent with the gradual increase and plateau of lactate concentration in enlarging 67NR tumors. Conclusions Lactate-MRSI has a greater dynamic range than [18F]FDG-PET and may be a more sensitive measure with which to evaluate the aggressive and metastatic potential of primary breast tumors. PMID:21844011

  11. Enzymatic Kinetic Properties of the Lactate Dehydrogenase Isoenzyme C4 of the Plateau Pika (Ochotona curzoniae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Lian; Wei, Dengbang; Li, Xiao; Xu, Lina; Wei, Linna

    2016-01-01

    Testis-specific lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-C4) is one of the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isozymes that catalyze the terminal reaction of pyruvate to lactate in the glycolytic pathway. LDH-C4 in mammals was previously thought to be expressed only in spermatozoa and testis and not in other tissues. Plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) belongs to the genus Ochotona of the Ochotonidea family. It is a hypoxia-tolerant species living in remote mountain areas at altitudes of 3000–5000 m above sea level on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Surprisingly, Ldh-c is expressed not only in its testis and sperm, but also in somatic tissues of plateau pika. To shed light on the function of LDH-C4 in somatic cells, Ldh-a, Ldh-b, and Ldh-c of plateau pika were subcloned into bacterial expression vectors. The pure enzymes of Lactate Dehydrogenase A4 (LDH-A4), Lactate Dehydrogenase B4 (LDH-B4), and LDH-C4 were prepared by a series of expression and purification processes, and the three enzymes were identified by the method of sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The enzymatic kinetics properties of these enzymes were studied by Lineweaver-Burk double-reciprocal plots. The results showed the Michaelis constant (Km) of LDH-C4 for pyruvate and lactate was 0.052 and 4.934 mmol/L, respectively, with an approximate 90 times higher affinity of LDH-C4 for pyruvate than for lactate. At relatively high concentrations of lactate, the inhibition constant (Ki) of the LDH isoenzymes varied: LDH-A4 (Ki = 26.900 mmol/L), LDH-B4 (Ki = 23.800 mmol/L), and LDH-C4 (Ki = 65.500 mmol/L). These data suggest that inhibition of lactate by LDH-A4 and LDH-B4 were stronger than LDH-C4. In light of the enzymatic kinetics properties, we suggest that the plateau pika can reduce reliance on oxygen supply and enhance its adaptation to the hypoxic environments due to increased anaerobic glycolysis by LDH-C4. PMID:26751442

  12. Effect of Intramuscular or Intrahepatic Injections of Clostridium perfringens on Rabbit Serum Lactate Dehydrogenase 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Dwayne

    1970-01-01

    Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, LDH isoenzyme pattern, phospholipase C activity, phosphorous level, hemoglobin, and erythrocyte osmotic fragility were followed in rabbits after intramuscular (IM) or intrahepatic (IH) injections of Clostridium perfringens. On the first day after IM injection, there was a drop in LDH activity; this was followed by an increase of LDH activity on the third and sixth day. On the seventh day, LDH activity began to decline, and by the ninth day it had almost returned to normal. On the sixth day after IM injection, there was an increase in serum LDH isoenzyme 5, hemoglobin, and erythrocyte osmotic fragility, but the increase of erythrocyte osmotic fragility and serum hemoglobin could not be attributed to phospholipase C activity since that enzyme was not detected nor was there an increase in serum phosphorus. C. perfringens was recovered by culturing the wound of IM-injected rabbits but not recovered from IH-injected rabbits. Rabbits injected IH showed no change from normal values in any of the tests performed. PMID:16557808

  13. Temporal changes in the involvement of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in muscle lactate accumulation during lipopolysaccharide infusion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Alamdari, N; Constantin-Teodosiu, D; Murton, A J; Gardiner, S M; Bennett, T; Layfield, R; Greenhaff, P L

    2008-01-01

    A characteristic manifestation of sepsis is muscle lactate accumulation. This study examined any putative (causative) association between pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) inhibition and lactate accumulation in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle of rats infused with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and explored the involvement of increased transcription of muscle-specific pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) isoenzymes. Conscious, male Sprague–Dawley rats were infused i.v. with saline (0.4 ml h−1, control) or LPS (150 μg kg−1 h−1) for 2 h, 6 h or 24 h (n = 6–8). Muscle lactate concentration was elevated after 2, 6 and 24 h LPS infusion. Muscle PDC activity was the same at 2 h and 6 h, but was 65% lower after 24 h of LPS infusion (P < 0.01), when there was a 47% decrease in acetylcarnitine concentration (P < 0.05), and a 24-fold increase in PDK4 mRNA expression (P < 0.001). These changes were preceded by marked increases in tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 mRNA expression at 2 h. The findings indicate that the early (2 and 6 h) elevation in muscle lactate concentration during LPS infusion was not attributable to limited muscle oxygen availability or ATP production (evidenced by unchanged ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr) concentrations) or to PDC inhibition, whereas after 24 h, muscle lactate accumulation appears to have resulted from PDC activation status limiting pyruvate flux, most probably due to cytokine-mediated up-regulation of PDK4 transcription. PMID:18218678

  14. The drs tumor suppressor regulates glucose metabolism via lactate dehydrogenase-B.

    PubMed

    Tambe, Yukihiro; Hasebe, Masahiro; Kim, Chul Jang; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Inoue, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we showed that drs contributes to suppression of malignant tumor formation in drs-knockout (KO) mice. In this study, we demonstrate the regulation of glucose metabolism by drs using comparisons of drs-KO and wild-type (WT) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Extracellular acidification, lactate concentration, and glucose consumption in drs-KO cells were significantly greater than those in WT cells. Metabolomic analyses also confirmed enhanced glycolysis in drs-KO cells. Among glycolysis-regulating proteins, expression of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-B was upregulated at the post-transcriptional level in drs-KO cells and increased LDH-B expression, LDH activity, and acidification of culture medium in drs-KO cells were suppressed by retroviral rescue of drs, indicating that LDH-B plays a critical role for glycolysis regulation mediated by drs. In WT cells transformed by activated K-ras, expression of endogenous drs mRNA was markedly suppressed and LDH-B expression was increased. In human cancer cell lines with low drs expression, LDH-B expression was increased. Database analyses also showed the correlation between downregulation of drs and upregulation of LDH-B in human colorectal cancer and lung adenocarcinoma tissues. Furthermore, an LDH inhibitor suppressed anchorage-independent growth of human cancer cells and MEF cells transformed by activated K-ras. These results indicate that drs regulates glucose metabolism via LDH-B. Downregulating drs may contribute to the Warburg effect, which is closely associated with malignant progression of cancer cells. PMID:25620379

  15. Single motoneuron succinate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, G R; Edgerton, V R

    1989-07-01

    We have developed a quantitative histochemical assay for measurement of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity in single motoneurons. A computer image processing system was used to quantify the histochemical enzyme reaction product and to follow the time course of the reaction. The optimal concentration for each of the ingredients of the incubation medium for the SDH reaction was determined and the importance of using histochemical "blanks" in the determination of enzymatic activity was demonstrated. The enzymatic activity was linear with respect to reaction time and tissue thickness. The procedure described meets the criteria generally considered essential for establishment of a quantitative histochemical assay. The assay was then used to examine the SDH activity of cat and rat motoneurons. It was found that motoneurons with a small soma size had a wide range of SDH activity, whereas those with a large soma size were restricted to low SDH activity. PMID:2732457

  16. The preparation and kinetics of lactate dehydrogenase attached to water-insoluble particles and sheets

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, R. J. H.; Kay, G.; Lilly, M. D.

    1968-01-01

    1. The preparation of lactate dehydrogenase covalently attached to anion-exchange cellulose particles and sheets by use of a dichloro-sym-triazinyl dyestuff, Procion brilliant orange MGS, is described. 2. The stability and kinetic properties of these preparations were investigated. 3. An equation is derived to describe the change in concentration of a substrate when passed through a uniform bed of a substrate-inhibited enzyme. A number of theoretical curves are shown to illustrate the system. 4. A titrimetric assay for lactate dehydrogenase is described, and shown to be stoicheiometric over the range pH5·0–9·2. 5. The results are discussed in relation to previous work, and the effects of charged groups on the support, and of the diffusion film surrounding any particle in suspension, are treated qualitatively. PMID:5673529

  17. Gradual neofunctionalization in the convergent evolution of trichomonad lactate and malate dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Steindel, Phillip A.; Chen, Emily H.; Wirth, Jacob D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lactate and malate dehydrogenases (LDH and MDH) are homologous, core metabolic enzymes common to nearly all living organisms. LDHs have evolved convergently from MDHs at least four times, achieving altered substrate specificity by a different mechanism each time. For instance, the LDH of anaerobic trichomonad parasites recently evolved independently from an ancestral trichomonad MDH by gene duplication. LDH plays a central role in trichomonad metabolism by catalyzing the reduction of pyruvate to lactate, thereby regenerating the NAD+ required for glycolysis. Using ancestral reconstruction methods, we identified the biochemical and evolutionary mechanisms responsible for this convergent event. The last common ancestor of these enzymes was a highly specific MDH, similar to modern trichomonad MDHs. In contrast, the LDH lineage evolved promiscuous activity by relaxing specificity in a gradual process of neofunctionalization involving one highly detrimental substitution at the “specificity residue” (R91L) and many additional mutations of small effect. L91 has different functional consequences in LDHs and in MDHs, indicating a prominent role for epistasis. Crystal structures of modern‐day and ancestral enzymes show that the evolution of substrate specificity paralleled structural changes in dimerization and α‐helix orientation. The relatively small “specificity residue” of the trichomonad LDHs can accommodate a range of substrate sizes and may permit solvent to access the active site, both of which promote substrate promiscuity. The trichomonad LDHs present a multi‐faceted counterpoint to the independent evolution of LDHs in other organisms and illustrate the diverse mechanisms by which protein function, structure, and stability coevolve. PMID:26889885

  18. Structural basis for discriminatory recognition of Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase by a DNA aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Yee-Wai; Kwok, Jane; Law, Alan W. L.; Watt, Rory M.; Kotaka, Masayo; Tanner, Julian A.

    2013-01-01

    DNA aptamers have significant potential as diagnostic and therapeutic agents, but the paucity of DNA aptamer-target structures limits understanding of their molecular binding mechanisms. Here, we report a distorted hairpin structure of a DNA aptamer in complex with an important diagnostic target for malaria: Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH). Aptamers selected from a DNA library were highly specific and discriminatory for Plasmodium as opposed to human lactate dehydrogenase because of a counterselection strategy used during selection. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed aptamer binding to PfLDH with a dissociation constant of 42 nM and 2:1 protein:aptamer molar stoichiometry. Dissociation constants derived from electrophoretic mobility shift assays and surface plasmon resonance experiments were consistent. The aptamer:protein complex crystal structure was solved at 2.1-Å resolution, revealing two aptamers bind per PfLDH tetramer. The aptamers showed a unique distorted hairpin structure in complex with PfLDH, displaying a Watson–Crick base-paired stem together with two distinct loops each with one base flipped out by specific interactions with PfLDH. Aptamer binding specificity is dictated by extensive interactions of one of the aptamer loops with a PfLDH loop that is absent in human lactate dehydrogenase. We conjugated the aptamer to gold nanoparticles and demonstrated specificity of colorimetric detection of PfLDH over human lactate dehydrogenase. This unique distorted hairpin aptamer complex provides a perspective on aptamer-mediated molecular recognition and may guide rational design of better aptamers for malaria diagnostics. PMID:24043813

  19. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the Lactobacillus casei lactate dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S F; Baek, S J; Pack, M Y

    1991-01-01

    An allosteric L-(+)-lactate dehydrogenase gene of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 was cloned in Escherichia coli, and the nucleotide sequence of the gene was determined. The gene was composed of an open reading frame of 981 bp, starting with a GTG codon and ending with a TAA codon. The sequences for the promoter and ribosome binding site were identified, and a sequence for a structure resembling a rho-independent transcription terminator was also found. Images PMID:1768113

  20. A Role for Lactate Dehydrogenases in the Survival of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes and Cervical Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Atack, John M.; Ibranovic, Ines; Ong, Cheryl-Lynn Y.; Djoko, Karrera Y.; Chen, Nathan H.; vanden Hoven, Rachel; Jennings, Michael P.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; McEwan, Alastair G.

    2014-01-01

    Lactate is an abundant metabolite, produced by host tissues and commensal organisms, and it represents an important potential carbon source for bacterial pathogens. In the case of Neisseria spp., the importance of the lactate permease in colonization of the host has been demonstrated, but there have been few studies of lactate metabolism in pathogenic Neisseria in the postgenomic era. We describe herein the characterization of genome-annotated, respiratory, and substrate-level lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs) from the obligate human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Biochemical assays using N. gonorrhoeae 1291 wild type and isogenic mutant strains showed that cytoplasmic LdhA (NAD+-dependent D-lactate dehydrogenase) and the membrane-bound respiratory enzymes, LdhD (D-lactate dehydrogenase) and LldD (L-lactate dehydrogenase) are correctly annotated. Mutants lacking LdhA and LdhD showed greatly reduced survival in neutrophils compared with wild type cells, highlighting the importance of D-lactate metabolism in gonococcal survival. Furthermore, an assay of host colonization using the well-established human primary cervical epithelial cell model revealed that the two respiratory enzymes make a significant contribution to colonization of and survival within the microaerobic environment of the host. Taken together, these data suggest that host-derived lactate is critical for the growth and survival of N. gonorrhoeae in human cells. PMID:24737798

  1. Role of lactate dehydrogenase in metmyoglobin reduction and color stability of different bovine muscles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y H; Keeton, J T; Smith, S B; Berghman, L R; Savell, J W

    2009-11-01

    The role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in metmyoglobin reducing activity (MRA) and color stability of different bovine muscles was studied in two consecutive experiments. In experiment 1, three different bovine muscles -M. longissimus lumborum (LL), M. semimembranosus (SM), and M. psoas major (PM) - were obtained (n=7, respectively), cut into steaks, PVC packaged, and then displayed for 7days at 1°C. The LL was the most red over display time and had more (P<0.05) LDH-B activity (catalyzing toward NADH generation), LDH1 isoform expression, NADH, and higher (P<0.05) MRA than the other two muscles studied. The PM had the least color stability and lowest MRA. In experiment 2, LL steaks (n=8) were cut in half, one side syringe-injected with oxamate, and the other injected with distilled water. Inclusion of oxamate decreased (P<0.05) LDH-B activity, NADH, and a* values after 10days display at 1°C. These results suggest that variation in color stability of physiologically different muscles is regulated by different replenishment rates of NADH via different LDH isozymes. PMID:20416707

  2. Clinical research on neuroblastoma based on serum lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Pang, Q M; Li, K; Ma, L J; Sun, R P

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, more and more scholars tend to study neuroblastoma (NB) since it possesses increasing morbidity, but lack of effective treatment. This paper aims to investigate variation and clinical significance of the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) level in serum of children with NB before and after Auto Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (APBSCT). A total of 90 children with NB from various hospitals were included in this research, and we analyzed the relationship between levels of NSE and LDH and the change of disease by comparing the two levels before and after APBSCT treatment. The results indicated that the positive rate of NSE in serum was high before treatment, and the levels of NSE and LDH were remarkably higher than those when the treatment was valid; after comprehensive treatment of chemotherapy, excision and radiotherapy, there was a significant difference of NSE and LDH levels in serum between children with complete remission (CR) and those with partial remission (PR); however, no significant differences of NSE and LDH levels were found among children in progressive stage compared to before treatment. It is believed that NSE and LDH levels are associated to the recurrence and treatment effect of NB, proving that both can reflect tumor load, therefore they can be taken as the auxiliary indicators for monitoring curative effects of NB treatment. PMID:25864749

  3. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and transcriptional analysis of the Pediococcus acidilactici L-(+)-lactate dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Garmyn, D; Ferain, T; Bernard, N; Hols, P; Delcour, J

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant plasmids containing the Pediococcus acidilactici L-(+)-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhL) were isolated by complementing for growth under anaerobiosis of an Escherichia coli lactate dehydrogenase-pyruvate formate lyase double mutant. The nucleotide sequence of the ldhL gene predicted a protein of 323 amino acids showing significant similarity with other bacterial L-(+)-lactate dehydrogenases and especially with that of Lactobacillus plantarum. The ldhL transcription start points in P. acidilactici were defined by primer extension, and the promoter sequence was identified as TCAAT-(17 bp)-TATAAT. This sequence is closely related to the consensus sequence of vegetative promoters from gram-positive bacteria as well as from E. coli. Northern analysis of P. acidilactici RNA showed a 1.1-kb ldhL transcript whose abundance is growth rate regulated. These data, together with the presence of a putative rho-independent transcriptional terminator, suggest that ldhL is expressed as a monocistronic transcript in P. acidilactici. PMID:7887607

  4. The Contribution of Electrostatic and van der Waals Interactions to the Stereospecificity of the Reaction Catalyzed by Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Jeroen; Callender, Robert; Gunner, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    Continuum electrostatic calculations in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the source of the stereospecificity in the hydride transfer reaction catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). These studies show that favorable electrostatic interactions between the carboxamide group of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide coenzyme and protein residues of the active site of LDH can account for much if not all of the stereospecificity of the LDH-catalyzed reaction, with A-side hydride transfer more than 107 times greater than B-side transfer. Unfavorable steric interactions within the binding complex for B-side transfer are not found. ImagesFIGURE 2 PMID:9017191

  5. An atomic-resolution view of neofunctionalization in the evolution of apicomplexan lactate dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Jeffrey I; Jacobowitz, Joseph R; Beckett, Brian C; Classen, Scott; Theobald, Douglas L

    2014-01-01

    Malate and lactate dehydrogenases (MDH and LDH) are homologous, core metabolic enzymes that share a fold and catalytic mechanism yet possess strict specificity for their substrates. In the Apicomplexa, convergent evolution of an unusual LDH from MDH produced a difference in specificity exceeding 12 orders of magnitude. The mechanisms responsible for this extraordinary functional shift are currently unknown. Using ancestral protein resurrection, we find that specificity evolved in apicomplexan LDHs by classic neofunctionalization characterized by long-range epistasis, a promiscuous intermediate, and few gain-of-function mutations of large effect. In canonical MDHs and LDHs, a single residue in the active-site loop governs substrate specificity: Arg102 in MDHs and Gln102 in LDHs. During the evolution of the apicomplexan LDH, however, specificity switched via an insertion that shifted the position and identity of this ‘specificity residue’ to Trp107f. Residues far from the active site also determine specificity, as shown by the crystal structures of three ancestral proteins bracketing the key duplication event. This work provides an unprecedented atomic-resolution view of evolutionary trajectories creating a nascent enzymatic function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02304.001 PMID:24966208

  6. Understanding interactions of functionalized nanoparticles with proteins: a case study on lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Stueker, Oliver; Ortega, Van A; Goss, Greg G; Stepanova, Maria

    2014-05-28

    Nanomaterials in biological solutions are known to interact with proteins and have been documented to affect protein function, such as enzyme activity. Understanding the interactions of nanoparticles with biological components at the molecular level will allow for rational designs of nanomaterials for use in medical technologies. Here we present the first detailed molecular mechanics model of functionalized gold nanoparticle (NP) interacting with an enzyme (L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the response of LDH to the NP binding demonstrate that although atomic motions (dynamics) of the main chain exhibit only a minor response to the binding, the dynamics of side chains are significantly constrained in all four active sites that predict alteration in kinetic properties of the enzyme. It is also demonstrated that the 5 nm gold NPs cause a decrease in the maximal velocity of the enzyme reaction (V(max)) and a trend towards a reduced affinity (increased K(m)) for the β-NAD binding site, while pyruvate enzyme kinetics (K(m) and V(max)) are not significantly altered in the presence of the gold NPs. These results demonstrate that modeling of NP:protein interactions can be used to understand alterations in protein function. PMID:24591162

  7. Automated High Throughput Protein Crystallization Screening at Nanoliter Scale and Protein Structural Study on Lactate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Fenglei Li

    2006-08-09

    , evaporation rate can be controlled or adjusted in this method during the crystallization process to favor either nucleation or growing processes for optimizing crystallization process. The protein crystals gotten by this method were experimentally proven to possess high x-ray diffraction qualities. Finally, we crystallized human lactate dehydrogenase 1 (H4) complexed with NADH and determined its structure by x-ray crystallography. The structure of LDH/NADH displays a significantly different structural feature, compared with LDH/NADH/inhibitor ternary complex structure, that subunits in LDH/NADH complex show open conformation or two conformations on the active site while the subunits in LDH/NADH/inhibitor are all in close conformation. Multiple LDH/NADH crystals were obtained and used for x-ray diffraction experiments. Difference in subunit conformation was observed among the structures independently solved from multiple individual LDH/NADH crystals. Structural differences observed among crystals suggest the existence of multiple conformers in solution.

  8. Evaluation of antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) measurement.

    PubMed

    Broussas, Matthieu; Broyer, Lucile; Goetsch, Liliane

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve therapeutic antibodies efficacy in cancer patients, several strategies were developed. One of these strategies consists in the enhancement of effector functions. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) was shown to mediate the activity of several therapeutic antibodies through interaction of the constant fragment (Fc) with immune cells. The interactions of Fc fragment can be modulated by engineering through modifications of the carbohydrate moieties or through modifications of some critical amino acids for its binding. Such modifications have to be studied in an in vitro assay to evaluate their impact on the regulation of effector functions. Here, we described a method to evaluate ADCC using a nonradioactive assay based on the measurement of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. NK cells were purified by negative immunomagnetic selection and used as effector cells to trigger ADCC against specific target tumor cells. The LDH release measurement from lysed cells is performed after 4 h incubation. This method can replace the (51)Cr release assay since it is less restrictive and highly sensitive. PMID:23475728

  9. A single amino acid substitution deregulates a bacterial lactate dehydrogenase and stabilizes its tetrameric structure.

    PubMed

    Clarke, A R; Wigley, D B; Barstow, D A; Chia, W N; Atkinson, T; Holbrook, J J

    1987-05-27

    We have engineered a variant of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme from Bacillus stearothermophilus in which arginine-173 at the proposed regulatory site has been replaced by glutamine. Like the wild-type enzyme, this mutant undergoes a reversible, protein-concentration-dependent subunit assembly, from dimer to tetramer. However, the mutant tetramer is much more stable (by a factor of 400) than the wild type and is destabilized rather than stabilized by binding the allosteric regulator, fructose 1,6-biphosphate (Fru-1,6-P2). The mutation has not significantly changed the catalytic properties of the dimer (Kd NADH, Km pyruvate, Ki oxamate and kcat), but has weakened the binding of Fru-1,6-P2 to both the dimeric and tetrameric forms of the enzyme and has almost abolished any stimulatory effect. We conclude that the Arg-173 residue in the wild-type enzyme is directly involved in the binding of Fru-1,6-P2, is important for allosteric communication with the active site, and, in part, regulates the state of quaternary structure through a charge-repulsion mechanism. PMID:3580377

  10. Immunomagnetic capture and colorimetric detection of malarial biomarker Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Markwalter, Christine F; Davis, Keersten M; Wright, David W

    2016-01-15

    We report a sensitive, magnetic bead-based colorimetric assay for Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) in which the biomarker is extracted from parasitized whole blood and purified based on antigen binding to antibody-functionalized magnetic particles. Antigen-bound particles are washed, and PfLDH activity is measured on-bead using an optimized colorimetric enzyme reaction (limit of detection [LOD] = 21.1 ± 0.4 parasites/μl). Enhanced analytical sensitivity is achieved by removal of PfLDH from the sample matrix before detection and elimination of nonspecific reductases and species that interfere with the optimal detection wavelength for measuring assay development. The optimized assay represents a simple and effective diagnostic strategy for P. falciparum malaria with time-to-result of 45 min and detection limits similar to those of commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits, which can take 4-6 h. This method could be expanded to detect all species of malaria by switching the capture antibody on the magnetic particles to a pan-specific Plasmodium LDH antibody. PMID:26475567

  11. Detection of an intermediate late in the unfolding pathway of bacillus stearothermophilus lactate dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleigh, Roger N.; Halsall, David J.; Clarke, Anthony R.; Behan-Martin, Moira; Holbrook, J. J.

    1994-08-01

    In vivo proteins fold to form one active structure in minutes or seconds, ruling out the possibility that a polypeptide samples all possible conformational space during folding. We have used site directed mutagenesis to produce 15 single tryptophan containing mutants of Bacillus stearothermophilus lactate dehydrogenase (BS LDH) thus enabling the equilibria of unfolding to be seen from 15 defined positions. These mutant versions of BS LDH have the same X-ray structure as the wild type protein8. Previously Smith et al.11 had detected and assigned structures to 4 folding states. The first intermediate, a monomer with secondary and super secondary structure largely intact, is formed after the dimer dissociates at 0.55 M guanidinium hydrochloride (GuHCl). The second intermediate on the unfolding pathway is stable at 2.2 M GuHCl. It had been assumed previously that the transition from this molten-globule structure to the fully denatured form occurred as a single process. We have now identified a core folding motif. In this, helix (alpha) -1F forms a helix-sheet interaction with (beta) -K and (beta) -K has interactions with both (alpha) -2G and (alpha) -3G. This super secondary interaction forms the most stable folding motif in BS LDH and is lost at 2.8 M GuHCl leaving helix (alpha) -1F, (alpha) -2G, and (alpha) -3G which are stable until 3 M GuHCl.

  12. Identification of proteins interacting with lactate dehydrogenase in claw muscle of the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes

    PubMed Central

    Cayenne, Andrea P.; Gabert, Beverly; Stillman, Jonathon H.

    2011-01-01

    Biochemical adaptation of enzymes involves conservation of activity, stability and affinity across a wide range of intracellular and environmental conditions. Enzyme adaptation by alteration of primary structure is well known, but the roles of protein-protein interactions in enzyme adaptation are less well understood. Interspecific differences in thermal stability of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in porcelain crabs (genus Petrolisthes) are related to intrinsic differences among LDH molecules and by interactions with other stabilizing proteins. Here, we identified proteins that interact with LDH in porcelain crab claw muscle tissue using co-immunoprecipitation, and showed LDH exists in high molecular weight complexes using size exclusion chromatography and Western blot analyses. Co-immunoprecipitated proteins were separated using 2D SDS PAGE and analyzed by LC/ESI using peptide MS/MS. Peptide MS/MS ions were compared to an EST database for Petrolisthes cinctipes to identify proteins. Identified proteins included cytoskeletal elements, glycolytic enzymes, a phosphagen kinase, and the respiratory protein hemocyanin. Our results support the hypothesis that LDH interacts with glycolytic enzymes in a metabolon structured by cytoskeletal elements that may also include the enzyme for transfer of the adenylate charge in glycolytically produced ATP. Those interactions may play specific roles in biochemical adaptation of glycolytic enzymes. PMID:21968246

  13. The enzymatic reaction catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase exhibits one dominant reaction path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterson, Jean E.; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2014-10-01

    Enzymes are the most efficient chemical catalysts known, but the exact nature of chemical barrier crossing in enzymes is not fully understood. Application of transition state theory to enzymatic reactions indicates that the rates of all possible reaction paths, weighted by their relative probabilities, must be considered in order to achieve an accurate calculation of the overall rate. Previous studies in our group have shown a single mechanism for enzymatic barrier passage in human heart lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). To ensure that this result was not due to our methodology insufficiently sampling reactive phase space, we implement high-perturbation transition path sampling in both microcanonical and canonical regimes for the reaction catalyzed by human heart LDH. We find that, although multiple, distinct paths through reactive phase space are possible for this enzymatic reaction, one specific reaction path is dominant. Since the frequency of these paths in a canonical ensemble is inversely proportional to the free energy barriers separating them from other regions of phase space, we conclude that the rarer reaction paths are likely to have a negligible contribution. Furthermore, the non-dominate reaction paths correspond to altered reactive conformations and only occur after multiple steps of high perturbation, suggesting that these paths may be the result of non-biologically significant changes to the structure of the enzymatic active site.

  14. Microchip-based capillary electrophoresis for determination of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Gui-Sheng; Liu, Jing; Jia, Chun-Ping; Jin, Qing-Hui; Zhao, Jian-Long; Wang, Hui-min

    2007-06-01

    This article describes a novel microchip-based capillary electrophoresis and oncolumn enzymatic reaction analysis protocol for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzymes with a home-made xenon lamp-induced fluorescence detection system. A microchip integrated with a temperature-control unit is designed and fabricated for low-temperature electrophoretic separation of LDH isoenzymes, optimal enzyme reaction temperature control, and product detection. A four-step operation and temperature control are employed for the determination of LDH activity by on-chip monitoring of the amount of incubation product of NADH during the fixed incubation period and at a fixed temperature. Experiments on the determination of LDH standard sample and serum LDH isoenzymes from a healthy adult donor are carried out. The results are comparable with those obtained by conventional CE. Shorter analysis times and a more stable and lower background baseline can be achieved. The efficient separation of different LDH forms indicates the potential of microfluidic devices for isoenzyme assay. PMID:17623478

  15. Establishment of permanent chimerism in a lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mouse mutant with hemolytic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, T.; Doermer, P.

    1987-12-01

    Pluripotent hemopoietic stem cell function was investigated in the homozygous muscle type lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-A) mutant mouse using bone marrow transplantation experiments. Hemopoietic tissues of LDH-A mutants showed a marked decreased in enzyme activity that was associated with severe hemolytic anemia. This condition proved to be transplantable into wild type mice (+/+) through total body irradiation (TBI) at a lethal dose of 8.0 Gy followed by engraftment of mutant bone marrow cells. Since the mutants are extremely radiosensitive (lethal dose50/30 4.4 Gy vs 7.3 Gy in +/+ mice), 8.0-Gy TBI followed by injection of even high numbers of normal bone marrow cells did not prevent death within 5-6 days. After a nonlethal dose of 4.0 Gy and grafting of normal bone marrow cells, a transient chimerism showing peripheral blood characteristics of the wild type was produced that returned to the mutant condition within 12 weeks. The transfusion of wild type red blood cells prior to and following 8.0-Gy TBI and reconstitution with wild type bone marrow cells prevented the early death of the mutants and permanent chimerism was achieved. The chimeras showed all hematological parameters of wild type mice, and radiosensitivity returned to normal. It is concluded that the mutant pluripotent stem cells are functionally comparable to normal stem cells, emphasizing the significance of this mouse model for studies of stem cell regulation.

  16. Efficient production of enantiomerically pure D-phenyllactate from phenylpyruvate by structure-guided design of an engineered D-lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Zhu, Lingfeng; Xu, Xiaoling; Wang, Limin; Yin, Ruochun; Yu, Bo

    2016-09-01

    3-Phenyllactic acid (PLA) is an antimicrobial compound with broad-spectrum activity against bacteria and fungi that could be widely used in the food industry and livestock feeds. Notably, D-PLA exhibits higher antibacterial activity, which gains more attention than L-PLA. In this report, the D-lactate dehydrogenase DLDH744 from Sporolactobacillus inulinus CASD was engineered to increase the enzymatic activities toward phenylpyruvate by protein structure-guided modeling analysis. The phenylpyruvate molecule was first docked in the active center of DLDH744. The residues that might tightly pack around the benzene ring of phenylpyruvate were all selected for mutation. The single site mutant M307L showed the highest increased activity toward bulkier substrate phenylpyruvate than the wild type. By using the engineered D-lactate dehydrogenase M307L expressed in Escherichia coli strains, without coexpression of the cofactor regeneration system, 21.43 g/L D-PLA was produced from phenylpyruvate with a productivity of 1.58 g/L/h in the fed-batch biotransformation process, which ranked in the list as the highest production titer of D-PLA by D-lactate dehydrogenase. The enantiomeric excess value of produced D-PLA in the broth was higher than 99.7 %. Additionally, the structure-guided design of this enzyme will also provide referential information for further engineering other 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases, which are useful for a wide range of fine chemical synthesis. PMID:27020295

  17. Lactate dehydrogenase regulation in aged skeletal muscle: Regulation by anabolic steroids and functional overload.

    PubMed

    Washington, Tyrone A; Healey, Julie M; Thompson, Raymond W; Lowe, Larry L; Carson, James A

    2014-09-01

    Aging alters the skeletal muscle response to overload-induced growth. The onset of functional overload is characterized by increased myoblast proliferation and an altered muscle metabolic profile. The onset of functional overload is associated with increased energy demands that are met through the interconversion of lactate and pyruvate via the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Testosterone targets many of the processes activated at the onset of functional overload. However, the effect of aging on this metabolic plasticity at the onset of functional overload and how anabolic steroid administration modulates this response is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine if aging would alter overload-induced LDH activity and expression at the onset of functional overload and whether anabolic steroid administration would modulate this response. Five-month and 25-month male Fischer 344xF1 BRN were given nandrolone decanoate (ND) or sham injections for 14days and then the plantaris was functionally overloaded (OV) for 3days by synergist ablation. Aging reduced muscle LDH-A & LDH-B activity 70% (p<0.05). Aging also reduced LDH-A mRNA abundance, however there was no age effect on LDH-B mRNA abundance. In 5-month muscle, both ND and OV decreased LDH-A and LDH-B activity. However, there was no synergistic or additive effect. In 5-month muscle, ND and OV decreased LDH-A mRNA expression with no change in LDH-B expression. In 25-month muscle, ND and OV increased LDH-A and LDH-B activity. LDH-A mRNA expression was not altered by ND or OV in aged muscle. However, there was a main effect of OV to decrease LDH-B mRNA expression. There was also an age-induced LDH isoform shift. ND and OV treatment increased the "fast" LDH isoforms in aged muscle, whereas ND and OV increased the "slow" isoforms in young muscle. Our study provides evidence that aging alters aspects of skeletal muscle metabolic plasticity normally induced by overload and anabolic steroid

  18. IFCC primary reference procedures for the measurement of catalytic activity concentrations of enzymes at 37 degrees C. International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. Part 7. Certification of four reference materials for the determination of enzymatic activity of gamma-glutamyltransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase and creatine kinase accord.

    PubMed

    Siekmann, Lothar; Bonora, Roberto; Burtis, Carl A; Ceriotti, Ferruccio; Clerc-Renaud, Pascale; Férard, Georges; Ferrero, Carlo A; Forest, Jean-Claude; Franck, Paul F H; Gella, F-Javier; Hoelzel, Wieland; Jørgensen, Poul Jørgen; Kanno, Takashi; Kessner, Art; Klauke, Rainer; Kristiansen, Nina; Lessinger, Jean-Marc; Linsinger, Thomas P J; Misaki, Hideo; Mueller, Mathias M; Panteghini, Mauro; Pauwels, Jean; Schiele, Françoise; Schimmel, Heinz G; Vialle, Arlette; Weidemann, Gerhard; Schumann, Gerhard

    2002-07-01

    This paper is the seventh in a series dealing with reference procedures for the measurement of catalytic activity concentrations of enzymes at 37 degrees C and the certification of reference preparations. Other parts deal with: Part 1. The Concept of Reference Procedures for the Measurement of Catalytic Activity Concentrations of Enzymes; Part 2. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Creatine Kinase; Part 3. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Lactate Dehydrogenase; Part 4. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Alanine Aminotransferase; Part 5. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Aspartate Aminotransferase; Part 6. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Gamma-Glutamyltransferase. A document describing the determination of preliminary reference values is also in preparation. The certification of the catalytic activity concentrations as determined by the recently elaborated IFCC primary reference methods at 37 degrees C of four enzyme preparations, namely IRMM/IFCC 452 (gamma-glutamyltransferase), IRMM/IFCC 453 (lactate dehydrogenase 1), IRMM/IFCC 454 (alanine aminotransferase) and IRMM/IFCC 455 (creatine kinase) is described. Homogeneity data were derived from previous results. Stability was assessed using recently obtained data as well as data from previous stability studies. The collaborative study for value assignment was performed under a strict quality control scheme to ensure traceability to the primary reference method. Uncertainty of the materials was assessed in compliance with the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement. The certified values obtained at 37 degrees C are 1.90 microkat/l +/- 0.04 microkat/l (114.1 U/l +/- 2.4 U/l), for gamma-glutamyltransferase, 8.37 microkat/l +/- 0.12 microkat/l (502 U/l +/- 7 U/l), for lactate dehydrogenase 1, 3.09 microkat/l +/- 0.07 microkat

  19. The influence of oxygen on radiation-induced structural and functional changes in glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Bubinski, Michal; Krokosz, Anita; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2012-07-01

    Proteins are major targets for oxidative damage due to their abundance in cells and high reactivity with free radicals. In the present study we examined the influence of oxygen on radiation-induced inactivation and structural changes of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We chose these two enzymes because they occur at high concentrations and participate in the most important processes in organisms; furthermore, they show considerable similarity in their structure. Protein solutions were irradiated with X-rays in doses ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 kGy, in air and N2O. The much higher radiation inactivation of GAPDH as compared to LDH is correlated with substantially greater structural changes in this protein, mainly involving the loss of free thiol groups (-SH). Of lesser importance in the differentiation of the radiosensitivity of the studied enzymes are tryptophan residues. Molecular oxygen, present during irradiation, increased to a significantly greater extent the inactivation and structural changes of GAPDH than that of LDH. The results suggest that the greater effect of oxygen on GAPDH is due to the higher efficiency of the superoxide radical, the higher amount of hydroperoxides generated, and the higher degree of unfolding of this protein.

  20. An electrochemical biosensor with nanointerface for lactate detection based on lactate dehydrogenase immobilized on zinc oxide nanorods.

    PubMed

    Nesakumar, Noel; Thandavan, Kavitha; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Rayappan, John Bosco Balaguru

    2014-01-15

    Hepatic immaturity is observed particularly in children whose age is under three, when the lactate concentration is greater than the normal level in blood. An electrochemical lactate biosensor was developed by immobilizing lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) on to ZnO nanorods at pH 7.4 via chitosan. Growth of polycrystalline ZnO nanorods towards (101) plane was confirmed using XRD. The FE-SEM study revealed the formation of ZnO nanorods with an aspect ratio of 3.24. Immobilization of LDH on ZnO nanorods was confirmed using FTIR spectra and surface coverage. Electrochemical studies were carried out through cyclic voltammetry and amperometry using three electrode system with Au/NanoZnO/LDH as working electrode, Ag/AgCl in 0.1 M KCl as reference electrode and Pt wire as counter electrode. The sensitivity of the biosensor was found to be 1.832 μA μmol(-1) L exhibiting linearity 0.2-0.8 μmol L(-1) with the detection and quantification limits of 4.73 and 15.75 nmol L(-1) respectively. The response time of Au/NanoZnO/LDH bioelectrode was found to be <1 s. Prediction band for net current was framed to enhance specificity. Michaelis-Menten constant (KM(app)) and maximum rate (Imax) values for immobilized LDH were found to be 0.38 μmol L(-1) and 2.798 μA respectively. Repeatability and reproducibility of LDH biosensor were also reported. PMID:24231089

  1. Cariogenicity of a lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant of Streptococcus mutans serotype c in gnotobiotic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, R J; Adams, B O; Sandham, H J; Abhyankar, S

    1989-01-01

    A lactate dehydrogenase-deficient (Ldh-) mutant of a human isolate of Streptococcus mutans serotype c was tested in a gnotobiotic rat caries model. Compared with the wild-type Ldh-positive (Ldh+) strains, it was significantly (alpha less than or equal to 0.005) less cariogenic in experiments with two different sublines of Sprague-Dawley rats. The Ldh- mutant strain 044 colonized the oral cavity of the test animals to the same extent as its parent strain 041, although its initial implantation was slightly but not significantly (P greater than or equal to 0.2) less. Multiple oral or fecal samples plated on 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium indicator medium revealed no evidence of back mutation from Ldh- to Ldh+ in vivo. Both Ldh+ strain 041 and Ldh- strain 044 demonstrated bacteriocinlike activity in vitro against a number of human strains of mutans streptococci representing serotype a (S. cricetus) and serotypes c and e (S. mutans). Serotypes b (S. rattus) and f (S. mutans) and strains of S. mitior, S. sanguis, and S. salivarius were not inhibited. Thus, Ldh mutant strain 044 possesses a number of desirable traits that suggest it should be investigated further as a possible effector strain for replacement therapy of dental caries. These traits include its stability and low cariogenicity in the sensitive gnotobiotic rat caries model, its bacteriocinlike activity against certain other cariogenic S. mutans (but not against more inocuous indigenous oral streptococci), and the fact that it is a member of the most prevalent human serotype of cariogenic streptococci. PMID:2917788

  2. Evaluation of D-dimer and lactate dehydrogenase plasma levels in patients with relapsed acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    HU, WANGQIANG; WANG, XIAOXIA; YANG, RONGRONG

    2016-01-01

    Despite the outstanding advances made over the past decade regarding our knowledge of acute leukemia (AL), relapsed AL remains to be associated with a dismal prognosis. A better understanding of AL relapse and monitoring of the D-dimer and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) plasma levels following chemotherapy may aid clinicians in determining whether relapse may occur in the subsequent phases of the disease. The present study evaluated D-dimer and LDH levels in 204 patients with relapsed AL. Data were collected at the initial onset of AL, at complete remission (CR) and in patients with relapsed AL. D-dimer plasma levels were significantly increased in patients with initial AL and in patients with relapsed AL (P=0.005 and P=0.007, respectively) but not in those with CR. LDH levels were significantly increased in AL patients at the initial onset of disease and at relapse compared with patients achieving CR, irrespective of cell type. Plasma prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and fibrinogen levels were not significantly different across patients (with the exception of acute promyelocytic leukemia patients) at the initial onset, relapsed AL or CR. Routine hematological parameters (white blood cell count, hemoglobin, platelet count) were significantly different at the initial onset of AL (P=0.002, P<0.001 and P=0.001, respectively) and during relapsed AL (P=0.009, P=0.003 and P<0.001, respectively) compared with patients achieving CR, suggesting an association between D-dimer, LDH and relapsed AL. These results also indicate that determination of D-dimer and LDH levels may be useful for predicting the probability of relapse during chemotherapy, but should also be combined with routine hematological parameters. PMID:27347185

  3. Crystal structure and thermodynamic properties of d-lactate dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus jensenii.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangwoo; Gu, Sol-A; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2014-07-01

    The thermostable d-lactate dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus jensenii (Ljd-LDH) is a key enzyme in the production of the d-form of lactic acid from pyruvate concomitant with the oxidation of NADH to NAD(+). The polymers of d-lactic acid are used as biodegradable bioplastics. The crystal structures of Ljd-LDH and in complex with NAD(+) were determined at 2.13 and 2.60Å resolutions, respectively. The Ljd-LDH monomer consists of the N-terminal substrate-binding domain and the C-terminal NAD-binding domain. The Ljd-LDH forms a homodimeric structure, and the C-terminal NAD-binding domain mostly enables the dimerization of the enzyme. The NAD cofactor is bound to the GxGxxG NAD-binding motif located between the two domains. Structural comparisons of Ljd-LDH with other d-LDHs reveal that Ljd-LDH has unique amino acid residues at the linker region, which indicates that the open-close dynamics of Ljd-LDH might be different from that of other d-LDHs. Moreover, thermostability experiments showed that the T50(10) value of Ljd-LDH (54.5°C) was much higher than the commercially available d-lactate dehydrogenase (42.7°C). In addition, Ljd-LDH has at least a 7°C higher denaturation temperature compared to commercially available d-LDHs. PMID:24794195

  4. Identification of substituted 2-thio-6-oxo-1,6-dihydropyrimidines as inhibitors of human lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Dragovich, Peter S; Fauber, Benjamin P; Corson, Laura B; Ding, Charles Z; Eigenbrot, Charles; Ge, HongXiu; Giannetti, Anthony M; Hunsaker, Thomas; Labadie, Sharada; Liu, Yichin; Malek, Shiva; Pan, Borlan; Peterson, David; Pitts, Keith; Purkey, Hans E; Sideris, Steve; Ultsch, Mark; VanderPorten, Erica; Wei, BinQing; Xu, Qing; Yen, Ivana; Yue, Qin; Zhang, Huihui; Zhang, Xuying

    2013-06-01

    A novel 2-thio-6-oxo-1,6-dihydropyrimidine-containing inhibitor of human lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was identified by high-throughput screening (IC50=8.1 μM). Biochemical, surface plasmon resonance, and saturation transfer difference NMR experiments indicated that the compound specifically associated with human LDHA in a manner that required simultaneous binding of the NADH co-factor. Structural variation of the screening hit resulted in significant improvements in LDHA biochemical inhibition activity (best IC50=0.48 μM). A crystal structure of an optimized compound bound to human LDHA was obtained and explained many of the observed structure-activity relationships. PMID:23628333

  5. Isolation and characterization of two cDNA clones of anaerobically induced lactate dehydrogenase from barley roots

    SciTech Connect

    Hondred, D.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1990-05-01

    In barley roots during hypoxia, five lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isozymes accumulate with a concomitant increase in enzyme activity ({approximately}20-fold). These isozymes are thought to be tetramers resulting from the random association of the products of two Ldh loci. To investigate this system, cDNA clones of LDH have been isolated from a {lambda}gt11 library using antiserum raised against barley LDH purified {approximately}3,000-fold and using nucleic acid probes synthesized by the polymerase chain reaction. Two cDNA clones were obtained (1,305 and 1,166 bp). The deduced amino acid sequences of the two barley LDHs are 96% identical to each other, and 50% and 40% identical to vertebrate and bacterial LDHs, respectively. Northern blots identified a single mRNA band ({approximately}1.5 kb) whose level rose 8-fold during hypoxia.

  6. Lactate dehydrogenase and its isoenzymes in serum from patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Copur, S; Kus, S; Kars, A; Renda, N; Tekuzman, G; Firat, D

    1989-09-01

    Concentrations of total lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27) and LDH isoenzyme patterns were studied in serum of 19 patients with multiple myeloma and in 19 healthy controls. Patients were divided into three groups (pretreatment, nonresponders, and responders to treatment), based on their clinical status at the time of blood sampling for LDH. The LDH values were found to be significantly higher (P less than 0.05) in the pretreatment group and in the nonresponders than in the responders and the control group, the mean +/- SE values being 445 +/- 35 and 532 +/- 75 units/mL vs 349 +/- 75 and 190 +/- 7.1 units/mL, respectively. Compared with responders and healthy controls, newly diagnosed patients and nonresponders had slight diminutions in LDH-1 and LDH-2, but increased LDH-3. We conclude that determination of LDH and its isoenzymes in serum can be of value as prognostic factors in patients with multiple myeloma. PMID:2776328

  7. Distribution of metabolic fluxes towards glycerol phosphate and L-lactate from fructose 1,6-biphosphate in vitro: effect of glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Riol-Cimas, J M; Meléndez-Hevia, E

    1986-01-01

    A metabolic system in vitro, which converts fructose 1,6-biphosphate into the two alternative products, lactate and glycerol phosphate, was designed to study the distribution of metabolic fluxes and, specifically, the control of glycerol phosphate production rate in rat muscle extract. Experiments were carried out at several protein concentrations by dilution of rat muscle extract, showing non-linear behaviours of flux versus protein concentration. These were hyperbolic for glycerol phosphate and logarithmic for L-lactate. The influence of the flux towards any alternate product on the rate giving the other was studied by stimulation of each. Results obtained show that in this system, flux towards glycerol phosphate is not affected by lactate production and the same occurs for the contrary case. Glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase seems to be the only enzyme in this system whose activity controls the flux towards glycerol phosphate. PMID:3758466

  8. Development of L-lactate dehydrogenase biosensor based on porous silicon resonant microcavities as fluorescence enhancers.

    PubMed

    Jenie, S N Aisyiyah; Prieto-Simon, Beatriz; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-12-15

    The up-regulation of L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), an intracellular enzyme present in most of all body tissues, is indicative of several pathological conditions and cellular death. Herein, we demonstrate LDH detection using porous silicon (pSi) microcavities as a luminescence-enhancing optical biosensing platform. Non-fluorescent resazurin was covalently attached onto the pSi surface via thermal hydrocarbonisation, thermal hydrosylilation and acylation. Each surface modification step was confirmed by means of FTIR and the optical shifts of the resonance wavelength of the microcavity. Thermal hydrocarbonisation also afforded excellent surface stability, ensuring that the resazurin was not reduced on the pSi surface. Using a pSi microcavity biosensor, the fluorescence signal upon detection of LDH was amplified by 10 and 5-fold compared to that of a single layer and a detuned microcavity, respectively, giving a limit of detection of 0.08 U/ml. The biosensor showed a linear response between 0.16 and 6.5 U/ml, covering the concentration range of LDH in normal as well as damaged tissues. The biosensor was selective for LDH and did not produce a signal upon incubation with another NAD-dependant enzyme L-glutamic dehydrogenase. The use of the pSi microcavity as a sensing platform reduced reagent usage by 30% and analysis time threefold compared to the standard LDH assay in solution. PMID:26201980

  9. Epitopes of human testis-specific lactate dehydrogenase deduced from a cDNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, J.L.; Driscoll, C.E.; LeVan, K.M.; Goldberg, E.

    1987-08-01

    The sequence and structure of human testis-specific L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDHC/sub 4/, LDHX; (L)-lactate:NAD/sup +/ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.27) has been derived from analysis of a complementary DNA (cDNA) clone comprising the complete protein coding region of the enzyme. From the deduced amino acid sequence, human LDHC/sub 4/ is as different from rodent LDHC/sub 4/ (73% homology) as it is from human LDHA/sub 4/ (76% homology) and porcine LDHB/sub 4/ (68% homology). Subunit homologies are consistent with the conclusion that the LDHC gene arose by at least two independent duplication events. Furthermore, the lower degree of homology between mouse and human LDHC/sub 4/ and the appearance of this isozyme late in evolution suggests a higher rate of mutation in the mammalian LDHC genes than in the LDHA and -B genes. Comparison of exposed amino acid residues of discrete anti-genic determinants of mouse and human LDHC/sub 4/ reveals significant differences. Knowledge of the human LDHC/sub 4/ sequence will help design human-specific peptides useful in the development of a contraceptive vaccine.

  10. Lactate dehydrogenase-A inhibition induces human glioblastoma multiforme stem cell differentiation and death

    PubMed Central

    Daniele, Simona; Giacomelli, Chiara; Zappelli, Elisa; Granchi, Carlotta; Trincavelli, Maria Letizia; Minutolo, Filippo; Martini, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Therapies that target the signal transduction and metabolic pathways of cancer stem cells (CSCs) are innovative strategies to effectively reduce the recurrence and significantly improve the outcome of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). CSCs exhibit an increased rate of glycolysis, thus rendering them intrinsically more sensitive to prospective therapeutic strategies based on the inhibition of the glycolytic pathway. The enzyme lactate dehydrogenase-A (LDH-A), which catalyses the interconversion of pyruvate and lactate, is up-regulated in human cancers, including GBM. Although several papers have explored the benefits of targeting cancer metabolism in GBM, the effects of direct LDH-A inhibition in glial tumours have not yet been investigated, particularly in the stem cell subpopulation. Here, two representative LDH-A inhibitors (NHI-1 and NHI-2) were studied in GBM-derived CSCs and compared to differentiated tumour cells. LDH-A inhibition was particularly effective in CSCs isolated from different GBM cell lines, where the two compounds blocked CSC formation and elicited long-lasting effects by triggering both apoptosis and cellular differentiation. These data demonstrate that GBM, particularly the stem cell subpopulation, is sensitive to glycolytic inhibition and shed light on the therapeutic potential of LDH-A inhibitors in this tumour type. PMID:26494310

  11. Direct Evidence of Catalytic Heterogeneity in Lactate Dehydrogenase by Temperature Jump Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein conformational heterogeneity and dynamics are known to play an important role in enzyme catalysis, but their influence has been difficult to observe directly. We have studied the effects of heterogeneity in the catalytic reaction of pig heart lactate dehydrogenase using isotope edited infrared spectroscopy, laser-induced temperature jump relaxation, and kinetic modeling. The isotope edited infrared spectrum reveals the presence of multiple reactive conformations of pyruvate bound to the enzyme, with three major reactive populations having substrate C2 carbonyl stretches at 1686, 1679, and 1674 cm–1, respectively. The temperature jump relaxation measurements and kinetic modeling indicate that these substates form a heterogeneous branched reaction pathway, and each substate catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to lactate with a different rate. Furthermore, the rate of hydride transfer is inversely correlated with the frequency of the C2 carbonyl stretch (the rate increases as the frequency decreases), consistent with the relationship between the frequency of this mode and the polarization of the bond, which determines its reactivity toward hydride transfer. The enzyme does not appear to be optimized to use the fastest pathway preferentially but rather accesses multiple pathways in a search process that often selects slower ones. These results provide further support for a dynamic view of enzyme catalysis where the role of the enzyme is not just to bring reactants together but also to guide the conformational search for chemically competent interactions. PMID:25149276

  12. Free energy landscape of the Michaelis complex of lactate dehydrogenase: A network analysis of atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaoliang; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    It has long been recognized that the structure of a protein is a hierarchy of conformations interconverting on multiple time scales. However, the conformational heterogeneity is rarely considered in the context of enzymatic catalysis in which the reactant is usually represented by a single conformation of the enzyme/substrate complex. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) catalyzes the interconversion of pyruvate and lactate with concomitant interconversion of two forms of the cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD+). Recent experimental results suggest that multiple substates exist within the Michaelis complex of LDH, and they are catalytic competent at different reaction rates. In this study, millisecond-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations were performed on LDH to explore the free energy landscape of the Michaelis complex, and network analysis was used to characterize the distribution of the conformations. Our results provide a detailed view of the kinetic network the Michaelis complex and the structures of the substates at atomistic scale. It also shed some light on understanding the complete picture of the catalytic mechanism of LDH.

  13. The contribution of lactic acid to acidification of tumours: studies of variant cells lacking lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, M.; Hasuda, K.; Stamato, T.; Tannock, I. F.

    1998-01-01

    Solid tumours develop an acidic extracellular environment with high concentration of lactic acid, and lactic acid produced by glycolysis has been assumed to be the major cause of tumour acidity. Experiments using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-deficient ras-transfected Chinese hamster ovarian cells have been undertaken to address directly the hypothesis that lactic acid production is responsible for tumour acidification. The variant cells produce negligible quantities of lactic acid and consume minimal amounts of glucose compared with parental cells. Lactate-producing parental cells acidified lightly-buffered medium but variant cells did not. Tumours derived from parental and variant cells implanted into nude mice were found to have mean values of extracellular pH (pHe) of 7.03 +/- 0.03 and 7.03 +/- 0.05, respectively, both of which were significantly lower than that of normal muscle (pHe = 7.43 +/- 0.03; P < 0.001). Lactic acid concentration in variant tumours (450 +/- 90 microg g(-1) wet weight) was much lower than that in parental tumours (1880 +/- 140 microg/g(-1)) and similar to that in serum (400 +/- 35 microg/g(-1)). These data show discordance between mean levels of pHe and lactate content in tumours; the results support those of Newell et al (1993) and suggest that the production of lactic acid via glycolysis causes acidification of culture medium, but is not the only mechanism, and is probably not the major mechanism responsible for the development of an acidic environment within solid tumours. PMID:9667639

  14. Lactate does not activate NF-κB in oxidative tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Van Hée, Vincent F.; Pérez-Escuredo, Jhudit; Cacace, Andrea; Copetti, Tamara; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The lactate anion is currently emerging as an oncometabolite. Lactate, produced and exported by glycolytic and glutaminolytic cells in tumors, can be recycled as an oxidative fuel by oxidative tumors cells. Independently of hypoxia, it can also activate transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) in tumor and endothelial cells, promoting angiogenesis. These protumoral activities of lactate depend on lactate uptake, a process primarily facilitated by the inward, passive lactate-proton symporter monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1); the conversion of lactate and NAD+ to pyruvate, NADH and H+ by lactate dehydrogenase-1 (LDH-1); and a competition between pyruvate and α-ketoglutarate that inhibits prolylhydroxylases (PHDs). Endothelial cells do not primarily use lactate as an oxidative fuel but, rather, as a signaling agent. In addition to HIF-1, lactate can indeed activate transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in these cells, through a mechanism not only depending on PHD inhibition but also on NADH alimenting NAD(P)H oxidases to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). While NF-κB activity in endothelial cells promotes angiogenesis, NF-κB activation in tumor cells is known to stimulate tumor progression by conferring resistance to apoptosis, stemness, pro-angiogenic and metastatic capabilities. In this study, we therefore tested whether exogenous lactate could activate NF-κB in oxidative tumor cells equipped for lactate signaling. We report that, precisely because they are oxidative, HeLa and SiHa human tumor cells do not activate NF-κB in response to lactate. Indeed, while lactate-derived pyruvate is well-known to inhibit PHDs in these cells, we found that NADH aliments oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in mitochondria rather than NAD(P)H oxidases in the cytosol. These data were confirmed using oxidative human Cal27 and MCF7 tumor cells. This new information positions the malate-aspartate shuttle as a key player in the oxidative metabolism

  15. Development of an enzymatic assay system of D-lactate using D-lactate dehydrogenase and a UV-LED fluorescent spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Ming; Chen, Shih-Ming; Chien, Po-Jen; Yu, Han-Yin

    2015-12-10

    In this study, we aimed to develop a new enzymatic assay system of d-lactate with good precision, accuracy, and sensitivity for the determination of D-lactate concentrations in rat serum. D-Lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) was utilized to catalyze D-lactate and NAD(+) to pyruvate and NADH, respectively. The generated NADH was excited by using a 340-nm UV-light-emitting diode (LED), and the fluorescence at 491 nm was detected to determine the concentration of D-lactate in rat serum. The optics, consisting of the sample cuvette, were set on three-dimensional stages to receive the most intensive fluorescence signal into the spectrometer. The optimal conditions of the D-LDH reaction were pH 8.5 and 25 °C for 90 min. The results showed that the new D-lactate assay system had good linearity (R(2)=0.9964) in the calibration range from 5 to 150 μM. Intra-day and inter-day accuracies were in the range of 103.96-109.09% and 102.84-104.59%, respectively, and the intra-day and inter-day precision was 4.28-6.82% and 4.04-12.40%, respectively. Finally, serum D-lactate concentrations determined by the proposed enzymatic assay system were compared with those obtained by a conventional HPLC method. The newly developed D-lactate assay system could detect 10-15 samples in 90 min, whereas the HPLC method could detect only one sample over the same time period. PMID:26265307

  16. An atypical distribution of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes in the hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) brain may reflect a biochemical adaptation to diving.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Mariana Leivas Müller; Fabrizius, Andrej; Folkow, Lars P; Burmester, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    The brains of some diving mammals can withstand periods of severe hypoxia without signs of deleterious effects. This may in part be due to an enhanced cerebral capacity for anaerobic energy production. Here, we have tested this hypothesis by comparing various parameters of the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the brain of the hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) with those in the brains of the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) and mouse (Mus musculus). We found that mRNA and protein expression of lactate dehydrogenase a (LDHA) and lactate dehydrogenase b (LDHB), and also the LDH activity were significantly higher in the ferret brain than in brains of the hooded seal and the mouse (p < 0.0001). No conspicuous differences in the LDHA and LDHB sequences were observed. There was also no difference in the buffering capacities of the brains. Thus, an enhanced capacity for anaerobic energy production likely does not explain the higher hypoxia tolerance of the seal brain. However, the brain of the hooded seal had higher relative levels of LDHB isoenzymes (LDH1 and LDH2) compared to the non-diving mammals. Moreover, immunofluorescence studies showed more pronounced co-localization of LDHB and glial fibrillary acidic protein in the cortex of the hooded seal. Since LDHB isoenzymes primarily catalyze the conversion of lactate to pyruvate, this finding suggests that the contribution of astrocytes to the brain aerobic metabolism is higher in the hooded seal than in non-diving species. The cerebral tolerance of the hooded seal to hypoxia may therefore partly rely on different LDH isoenzymes distribution. PMID:26820264

  17. Prognostic significance of pretreated serum lactate dehydrogenase level in nasopharyngeal carcinoma among Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingwei; Wei, Shushan; Su, Li; Lv, Wenlong; Hong, Jinsheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: A large number of studies have investigated the prognostic value of pretreated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients while the role of it was inconsistent and inconclusive. Hence, the aim of the current study was to conduct a meta-analysis of all published studies to quantify the prognostic impact of pretreated serum LDH in NPC for Chinese population. Objectives: The aim of the current study was to conduct a meta-analysis of all published studies to quantify the prognostic impact of pretreated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) for Chinese population. Methods: The PubMed, Medline, Embase, and Web of Science databases were searched for studies that assessed survival outcome and LDH in NPC. Overall survival (OS) was the primary survival outcome. Distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were secondary outcomes. The pooled hazard ratios (HRs), associated with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), were combined to calculate overall effects. The Cochran Q and I2 statistics were used to assess heterogeneity. When apparent heterogeneity was observed, sensitivity and meta-regression analyses were performed to explore its origin. Results: Sixteen studies, which included 14,803 patients, were enrolled in the current meta-analysis to yield statistics. Overall, the pooled HR for OS in 11 eligible studies with high LDH level was 1.79 (95% CI = 1.47–2.12), and the pooled HR for DMFS in 9 eligible studies with high LDH level was 1.85 (95% CI = 1.48–2.22). Meanwhile, the pooled HR for DFS in 5 eligible studies with high LDH level was 1.63 (95% CI = 1.34–1.91). Egger test and funnel plots revealed that the publication bias in the current meta-analysis was insignificant. Conclusions: The present meta-analysis demonstrated that high pretreated LDH level is significantly associated with poorer OS, DMFS, and DFS, suggesting that pretreated LDH could

  18. Hypoxically inducible barley lactate dehydrogenase: cDNA cloning and molecular analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hondred, D. ); Hanson, A.D. Univ. de Montreal, Quebec )

    1990-09-01

    In the roots of barley and other cereals, hypoxia induces a set of five isozymes of L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; (S)-lactate:NADH oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.27). Biochemical and genetic data indicate that the five LDH isozymes are tetramers that arise from random association of the products of two Ldh loci. To investigate this system, cDNA clones of LDH were isolated from a {lambda}gt11 cDNA library derived from hypoxically treated barley roots. The library was screened with antiserum raised against barley LDH purified {approx}3,000-fold by an improved three-step procedure. Immunopositive clones were rescreened with a cDNA probe synthesized by the polymerase chain reaction using primers modeled from the amino acid sequences of two tryptic LDH peptides. Two types of LDH clones were found. Nucleotide sequence analysis of one representative insert of each type (respectively, 1,305 and 1,166 base pairs) revealed open reading framed encoding 10 peptide fragments of LDH. The 1,305-base-pair insert included the entire coding region of a 356-residue LDH monomer. The nucleotide sequences of the two LDH cDNAs were 92% identical in the coding region, but highly divergent in the 3{prime} noncoding region, and thus probably correspond to the two postulated Ldh loci. The deduced amino acid sequences of the two barley LDHs were 96% identical to each other and very similar to those from vertebrate and bacterial LDHs. RNA blot hybridization showed a single mRNA band of 1.5 kilobases whose level rose about 8-fold in roots during hypoxic induction, as did the level of translatable LDH message.

  19. Large scale dynamics of the Michaelis complex in Bacillus stearothermophilus lactate dehydrogenase revealed by a single-tryptophan mutant study.

    PubMed

    Nie, Beining; Deng, Hua; Desamero, Ruel; Callender, Robert

    2013-03-19

    Large scale dynamics within the Michaelis complex mimic of Bacillus stearothermophilus thermophilic lactate dehydrogenase, bsLDH·NADH·oxamate, were studied with site specific resolution by laser-induced temperature jump relaxation spectroscopy with a time resolution of 20 ns. NADH emission and Trp emission from the wild type and a series of single-tryptophan bsLDH mutants, with the tryptophan positions different distances from the active site, were used as reporters of evolving structure in response to the rapid change in temperature. Several distinct dynamical events were observed on the millisecond to microsecond time scale involving motion of atoms spread over the protein, some occurring concomitantly or nearly concomitantly with structural changes at the active site. This suggests that a large portion of the protein-substrate complex moves in a rather concerted fashion to bring about catalysis. The catalytically important surface loop undergoes two distinct movements, both needed for a competent enzyme. Our results also suggest that what is called "loop motion" is not just localized to the loop and active site residues. Rather, it involves the motion of atoms spread over the protein, even some quite distal from the active site. How these results bear on the catalytic mechanism of bsLDH is discussed. PMID:23428201

  20. Pressure-adaptive differences in lactate dehydrogenases of three hagfishes: Eptatretus burgeri, Paramyxine atami and Eptatretus okinoseanus.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Yoshikazu; Miwa, Tetsuya; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2008-05-01

    The tolerance of abyssal pressures likely depends on adaptive modifications of fish proteins. However, structural modifications of proteins which allow functioning at high pressure remain unclear. We compared the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), an important enzyme in glycolytic reaction, in three hagfishes inhabiting different depths under increased pressure. LDH in Eptatretus okinoseanus, found at a depth of 1,000 m, was highly active at high pressure of 100 MPa maintaining the activity at 70% of that at 0.1 MPa. In contrast, LDH activity in Paramyxine atami, found at 250-400 m, decreased to 55% at 15 MPa, and that in Eptatretus burgeri, found at 45-60 m, was completely absent at 5 MPa. The result suggests that subunit interaction of the LDH-tetramer is more stable in E. okinoseanus than that in P. atami and E. burgeri under high-pressure conditions. We found six amino acid substitutions between the three LDH primary structures. Accordingly, these amino acid residues are likely to contribute to the stability of the E. okinoseanus LDH under high-pressure conditions. PMID:18299796

  1. Re-design of Saccharomyces cerevisiae flavocytochrome b2: introduction of L-mandelate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, R; Reid, G A; Chapman, S K

    1998-07-01

    Flavocytochrome b2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an l-lactate dehydrogenase which exhibits only barely detectable activity levels towards another 2-hydroxyacid, l-mandelate. Using protein engineering methods we have altered the active site of flavocytochrome b2 and successfully introduced substantial mandelate dehydrogenase activity into the enzyme. Changes to Ala-198 and Leu-230 have significant effects on the ability of the enzyme to utilize l-mandelate as a substrate. The double mutation of Ala-198-->Gly and Leu-230-->Ala results in an enzyme with a kcat value (25 degrees C) with L-mandelate of 8.5 s-1, which represents an increase of greater than 400-fold over the wild-type enzyme. Perhaps more significantly, the mutant enzyme has a catalytic efficiency (as judged by kcat/Km values) that is 6-fold higher with l-mandelate than it is with L-lactate. Closer examination of the X-ray structure of S. cerevisiae flavocytochrome b2 led us to conclude that one of the haem propionate groups might interfere with the binding of L-mandelate at the active site of the enzyme. To test this idea, the activity with l-mandelate of the independently expressed flavodehydrogenase domain (FDH), was examined and found to be higher than that seen with the wild-type enzyme. In addition, the double mutation of Ala-198-->Gly and Leu-230-->Ala introduced into FDH produced the greatest mandelate dehydrogenase activity increase, with a kcat value more than 700-fold greater than that seen with the wild-type holoenzyme. In addition, the enzyme efficiency (kcat/Km) of this mutant enzyme was more than 20-fold greater with L-mandelate than with l-lactate. We have therefore succeeded in constructing an enzyme which is now a better mandelate dehydrogenase than a lactate dehydrogenase. PMID:9639570

  2. Purification and determination of the binding site of lactate dehydrogenase from chicken breast muscle on immobilized ferric ions.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G; Andersson, L; Porath, J

    1992-12-25

    Lactate dehydrogenase from chicken breast muscle was purified to homogeneity in one step by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. The purified enzyme was used to localize the binding site to immobilized Fe(III) ions. After cyanogen bromide degradation and digestion with trypsin, small enzyme fragments capable of binding to immobilized Fe(III) ions were obtained. It is proposed that several histidyl groups are involved in the binding. PMID:1487526

  3. Effects and Mechanism of Atmospheric-Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Cold Plasma on Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) Enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Xu, Zimu; Shen, Jie; Li, Xu; Ding, Lili; Ma, Jie; Lan, Yan; Xia, Weidong; Cheng, Cheng; Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Zelong; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-05-01

    Proteins are carriers of biological functions and the effects of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasmas on proteins are important to applications such as sterilization and plasma-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. Herein, we report our detailed investigation of the effects of helium-oxygen non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasmas on the inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme solutions. Circular dichroism (CD) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) indicate that the loss of activity stems from plasma-induced modification of the secondary molecular structure as well as polymerization of the peptide chains. Raising the treatment intensity leads to a reduced alpha-helix content, increase in the percentage of the beta-sheet regions and random sequence, as well as gradually decreasing LDH activity. However, the structure of the LDH plasma-treated for 300 seconds exhibits a recovery trend after storage for 24 h and its activity also increases slightly. By comparing direct and indirect plasma treatments, plasma-induced LDH inactivation can be attributed to reactive species (RS) in the plasma, especially ones with a long lifetime including hydrogen peroxide, ozone, and nitrate ion which play the major role in the alteration of the macromolecular structure and molecular diameter in lieu of heat, UV radiation, and charged particles.

  4. Effects and Mechanism of Atmospheric-Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Cold Plasma on Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Xu, Zimu; Shen, Jie; Li, Xu; Ding, Lili; Ma, Jie; Lan, Yan; Xia, Weidong; Cheng, Cheng; Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Zelong; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are carriers of biological functions and the effects of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasmas on proteins are important to applications such as sterilization and plasma-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. Herein, we report our detailed investigation of the effects of helium-oxygen non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasmas on the inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme solutions. Circular dichroism (CD) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) indicate that the loss of activity stems from plasma-induced modification of the secondary molecular structure as well as polymerization of the peptide chains. Raising the treatment intensity leads to a reduced alpha-helix content, increase in the percentage of the beta-sheet regions and random sequence, as well as gradually decreasing LDH activity. However, the structure of the LDH plasma-treated for 300 seconds exhibits a recovery trend after storage for 24 h and its activity also increases slightly. By comparing direct and indirect plasma treatments, plasma-induced LDH inactivation can be attributed to reactive species (RS) in the plasma, especially ones with a long lifetime including hydrogen peroxide, ozone, and nitrate ion which play the major role in the alteration of the macromolecular structure and molecular diameter in lieu of heat, UV radiation, and charged particles. PMID:25992482

  5. Common and rare variants associating with serum levels of creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Kristjansson, Ragnar P.; Oddsson, Asmundur; Helgason, Hannes; Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Arnadottir, Gudny A.; Jensson, Brynjar O.; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Bragi Walters, G.; Sulem, Gerald; Oskarsdottir, Arna; Benonisdottir, Stefania; Davidsson, Olafur B.; Masson, Gisli; Th Magnusson, Olafur; Holm, Hilma; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur I.; Olafsson, Isleifur; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Sulem, Patrick; Stefansson, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) are widely used markers of tissue damage. To search for sequence variants influencing serum levels of CK and LDH, 28.3 million sequence variants identified through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders were imputed into 63,159 and 98,585 people with CK and LDH measurements, respectively. Here we describe 13 variants associating with serum CK and 16 with LDH levels, including four that associate with both. Among those, 15 are non-synonymous variants and 12 have a minor allele frequency below 5%. We report sequence variants in genes encoding the enzymes being measured (CKM and LDHA), as well as in genes linked to muscular (ANO5) and immune/inflammatory function (CD163/CD163L1, CSF1, CFH, HLA-DQB1, LILRB5, NINJ1 and STAB1). A number of the genes are linked to the mononuclear/phagocyte system and clearance of enzymes from the serum. This highlights the variety in the sources of normal diversity in serum levels of enzymes. PMID:26838040

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of lactate dehydrogenase gene from Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hui; Wang, Yange; Zhao, Qiping; Han, Hongyu; Zhu, Shunhai; Li, Liujia; Wu, Youling; Huang, Bing

    2014-08-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a key enzyme in the glycolytic pathway and is crucial for parasite survival. In this study, we cloned and expressed the LDH of Eimeria tenella (EtLDH). Real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of EtLDH was developmentally regulated at the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels. EtLDH mRNA levels were higher in second-generation merozoites than in other developmental stages (unsporulated oocysts, sporulated oocysts, and sporozoites). EtLDH protein expression levels were most prominent in second-generation merozoites, moderately expressed in unsporulated oocysts and sporulated oocysts, and weakly detected in sporozoites. Immunostaining with anti-recombinant EtLDH (rEtLDH) antibody indicated that EtLDH was mainly located in the anterior region in free sporozoites and became concentrated in the anterior region of intracellular sporozoites except for the apex after invasion into DF-1 cells. Specific staining of EtLDH protein was more intense in trophozoites and immature first-generation schizonts, but decreased in mature first-generation schizonts. Inhibition of EtLDH function using specific antibodies cannot efficiently reduce the ability of E. tenella sporozoites to invade host cells. These results suggest that EtLDH may be involved in glycolysis during the first-generation merogony stage in E. tenella and has little role in host invasion. PMID:24906988

  7. Lactate Dehydrogenase Is an Important Prognostic Indicator for Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Partial Hepatectomy12

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Ping; Wang, Hong-Bo; Lin, Yue-Hao; Xu, Jing; Wang, Jun; Wang, Kai; Liu, Wan-Li

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) has been used as a prognostic indicator for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with sorafenib or undergoing transcatheter arterial chemoembolization, but its significance in predicting survival of HCC patients who received curative resection remains undefined. A total of 683 patients with histopathologically confirmed HCC were enrolled in this study. The prognostic significance of preoperative serum LDH was determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis and a Cox proportional hazards regression model. The association between the preoperative serum LDH and clinicopathological parameters was evaluated by the χ2 test or linear regression analysis when appropriate. Higher preoperative serum LDH level was associated with worse prognosis. In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis, the preoperative serum LDH level could predict overall survival and recurrence independently. Higher preoperative serum LDH level is associated with the elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein, the presence of hepatitis B surface antigen, larger tumor size, the presence of macrovascular invasion, the advanced tumor–lymph node–metastasis stage, worse tumor differentiation, and Child-Pugh B. Preoperative serum LDH level was an inexpensive, simple, convenient, and routinely measured biomarker exhibiting a potential to select patients at high risk with poor clinical outcome for appropriate treatment strategies. PMID:26692531

  8. [Expression, purification and characterization of a thermostable lactate dehydrogenase from Thermotoga maritima].

    PubMed

    Qian, Guojun; Chen, Caiping; Zhai, Ruying; Shao, Weilan; Mei, Yanzhen

    2014-04-01

    The gene encoding thermostable lactate dehydrogenase (Tm-LDH) was cloned into the plasmid pHsh from Thermotoga maritima, and expressed in Escherichia coli JM 109. The recombinant protein was purified to homogeneity by a simple step, heat treatment. The recombinant enzyme had a molecular mass of 33 kDa. The optimal temperature and pH of Tm-LDH were observed 95 degrees C and 7.0. The purified enzyme had a half-life of 2 h at 90 degrees C, and exhibited better stability over a pH range from 5.5 to 8.0. The K(m) and V(max) values were 1.7 mmol/L, 3.8 x 10(4) U/mg of protein for pyruvate, and 7.2 mmol/L and 1.1 x 10(5) U/mg for NADH, respectively. The expression of Tm-LDH in T7 system could not obtain high efficiency, but it has been soluble over-expression in pHsh system and reached 340 mg/L. The superior stability and productivity of Tm-LDH will lay the foundation of its industrial-scale fermentation and application in the NAD regeneration. PMID:25195245

  9. Synaptosomal lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme composition is shifted toward aerobic forms in primate brain evolution.

    PubMed

    Duka, Tetyana; Anderson, Sarah M; Collins, Zachary; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Ely, John J; Hof, Patrick R; Wildman, Derek E; Goodman, Morris; Grossman, Lawrence I; Sherwood, Chet C

    2014-01-01

    With the evolution of a relatively large brain size in haplorhine primates (i.e. tarsiers, monkeys, apes, and humans), there have been associated changes in the molecular machinery that delivers energy to the neocortex. Here we investigated variation in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) expression and isoenzyme composition of the neocortex and striatum in primates using quantitative Western blotting and isoenzyme analysis of total homogenates and synaptosomal fractions. Analysis of isoform expression revealed that LDH in synaptosomal fractions from both forebrain regions shifted towards a predominance of the heart-type, aerobic isoform LDH-B among haplorhines as compared to strepsirrhines (i.e. lorises and lemurs), while in the total homogenate of the neocortex and striatum there was no significant difference in LDH isoenzyme composition between the primate suborders. The largest increase occurred in synapse-associated LDH-B expression in the neocortex, with an especially remarkable elevation in the ratio of LDH-B/LDH-A in humans. The phylogenetic variation in the ratio of LDH-B/LDH-A was correlated with species-typical brain mass but not the encephalization quotient. A significant LDH-B increase in the subneuronal fraction from haplorhine neocortex and striatum suggests a relatively higher rate of aerobic glycolysis that is linked to synaptosomal mitochondrial metabolism. Our results indicate that there is a differential composition of LDH isoenzymes and metabolism in synaptic terminals that evolved in primates to meet increased energy requirements in association with brain enlargement. PMID:24686273

  10. SYNAPTOSOMAL LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE ISOENZYME COMPOSITION IS SHIFTED TOWARD AEROBIC FORMS IN PRIMATE BRAIN EVOLUTION

    PubMed Central

    Duka, Tetyana; Anderson, Sarah M.; Collins, Zachary; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Ely, John J.; Hof, Patrick R.; Wildman, Derek E.; Goodman, Morris; Grossman, Lawrence I.; Sherwood, Chet C.

    2014-01-01

    With the evolution of a relatively large brain size in haplorhine primates (i.e., tarsiers, monkeys, apes and humans), there have been associated changes in the molecular machinery that delivers energy to the neocortex. Here we investigated variation in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) expression and isoenzyme composition of the neocortex and striatum in primates using quantitative Western blotting and isoenzyme analysis of total homogenates and synaptosomal fractions. Analysis of isoform expression revealed that LDH in the synaptosomal fraction from both forebrain regions shifted towards a predominance of the heart-type, aerobic isoforms, LDHB, among haplorhines as compared to strepsirrhines (i.e., lorises and lemurs), while in total homogenate of neocortex and striatum there was no significant difference in the LDH isoenzyme composition between the primate suborders. The largest increase occurred in synapse-associated LDH-B expression in the neocortex, displaying an especially remarkable elevation in the ratio of LDH-B to LDH-A in humans. The phylogenetic variation in LDH-B to LDH-A ratio was correlated with species typical brain mass, but not encephalization quotient. A significant LDHB increase in the sub-neuronal fraction from haplorhine neocortex and striatum suggests a relatively higher rate of aerobic glycolysis that is linked to synaptosomal mitochondrial metabolism. Our results indicate that there is differential composition of LDH isoenzymes and metabolism in synaptic terminals that evolved in primates to meet increased energy requirements in association with brain enlargement. PMID:24686273

  11. Elevation of serum l-lactate dehydrogenase B correlated with the clinical stage of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Anjian; Li, Na; Liu, Jifu; Liu, Chuanjun; Lv, Dongxia; Wu, Shanshan; Huang, Lingyun; Yang, Shuanying; He, Dacheng; Xiao, Xueyuan

    2006-10-01

    To identify potential biomarkers related with lung cancer metastasis, conditional media (CM) proteins collected from a primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line NCI-H226 and its brain metastatic subline H226Br were analyzed by one-dimensional electrophoresis (1-D PAGE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Twelve biomarkers were identified, of which l-lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB) chain was significantly up-regulated in the CM of H226Br cell and was further validated in 105 lung cancer, 93 non-lung cancer, 41 benign lung disease, as well as 65 healthy individuals sera using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). It was found that the levels of LDHB were specifically elevated in NSCLC sera compared with other groups and were progressively increased with the clinical stage. At the cutoff point 0.260 (OD value) on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, LDHB could comparatively discriminate lung cancer from benign lung disease and healthy control groups with sensitivity 81%, specificity 70% and total accuracy 76%. These findings demonstrated that secretome could open up a possibility to find, identify, and characterize novel biomarkers related with invasion and metastasis. PMID:16890323

  12. Gene Expression Variation in Duplicate Lactate dehydrogenase Genes: Do Ecological Species Show Distinct Responses?

    PubMed Central

    Cristescu, Melania E.; Demiri, Bora; Altshuler, Ianina; Crease, Teresa J.

    2014-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) has been shown to play an important role in adaptation of several aquatic species to different habitats. The genomes of Daphnia pulex, a pond species, and Daphnia pulicaria, a lake inhabitant, encode two L-LDH enzymes, LDHA and LDHB. We estimated relative levels of Ldh gene expression in these two closely related species and their hybrids in four environmental settings, each characterized by one of two temperatures (10°C or 20°C), and one of two concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO; 6.5–7 mg/l or 2–3 mg/l). We found that levels of LdhA expression were 4 to 48 times higher than LdhB expression (p<0.005) in all three groups (the two parental species and hybrids). Moreover, levels of LdhB expression differed significantly (p<0.05) between D. pulex and D. pulicaria, but neither species differed from the hybrid. Consistently higher expression of LdhA relative to LdhB in both species and the hybrid suggests that the two isozymes could be performing different functions. No significant differences in levels of gene expression were observed among the four combinations of temperature and dissolved oxygen (p>0.1). Given that Daphnia dwell in environments characterized by fluctuating conditions with long periods of low dissolved oxygen concentration, we suggest that these species could employ regulated metabolic depression to survive in such environments. PMID:25080082

  13. Gene expression variation in duplicate lactate dehydrogenase genes: do ecological species show distinct responses?

    PubMed

    Cristescu, Melania E; Demiri, Bora; Altshuler, Ianina; Crease, Teresa J

    2014-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) has been shown to play an important role in adaptation of several aquatic species to different habitats. The genomes of Daphnia pulex, a pond species, and Daphnia pulicaria, a lake inhabitant, encode two L-LDH enzymes, LDHA and LDHB. We estimated relative levels of Ldh gene expression in these two closely related species and their hybrids in four environmental settings, each characterized by one of two temperatures (10°C or 20°C), and one of two concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO; 6.5-7 mg/l or 2-3 mg/l). We found that levels of LdhA expression were 4 to 48 times higher than LdhB expression (p<0.005) in all three groups (the two parental species and hybrids). Moreover, levels of LdhB expression differed significantly (p<0.05) between D. pulex and D. pulicaria, but neither species differed from the hybrid. Consistently higher expression of LdhA relative to LdhB in both species and the hybrid suggests that the two isozymes could be performing different functions. No significant differences in levels of gene expression were observed among the four combinations of temperature and dissolved oxygen (p>0.1). Given that Daphnia dwell in environments characterized by fluctuating conditions with long periods of low dissolved oxygen concentration, we suggest that these species could employ regulated metabolic depression to survive in such environments. PMID:25080082

  14. Regulation of cell growth and apoptosis through lactate dehydrogenase C over-expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tuo; Zhang, Cunchao; Jing, Yu; Jiang, Cheng; Li, Zhenhua; Wang, Shengyu; Ma, Kai; Zhang, Dapeng; Hou, Sheng; Dai, Jianxin; Kou, Geng; Wang, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Lactate has long been credited as a by-product, which jeopardizes cell growth and productivity when accumulated over a certain concentration during the manufacturing process of therapeutic recombinant proteins by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. A number of efforts to decrease the lactate concentration have been developed; however, the accumulation of lactate is still a critical issue by the late stage of fed-batch culture. Therefore, a lactate-tolerant cell line was developed through over-expression of lactate dehydrogenase C (LDH-C). In fed-batch culture, sodium lactate or sodium pyruvate was supplemented into the culture medium to simulate the environment of lactate accumulation, and LDH-C over-expression increased the highest viable cell density by over 30 and 50 %, respectively, on day 5, meanwhile the viability was also improved significantly since day 5 compared with that of the control. The percentages of cells suffering early and late apoptosis decreased by 3.2 to 12.5 and 2.0 to 4.3 %, respectively, from day 6 onwards in the fed-batch culture when 40 mM sodium pyruvate was added compared to the control. The results were confirmed by mitochondrial membrane potential assay. In addition, the expression of cleaved caspases 3 and 7 decreased in cells over-expressing LDH-C, suggesting the mitochondrial pathway was involved in the LDH-C regulated anti-apoptosis. In conclusion, a novel cell line with higher lactate tolerance, lowered lactate production, and alleviated apoptosis response was developed by over-expression of LDH-C, which may potentially represent an efficient and labor-saving approach in generating recombinant proteins. PMID:26841889

  15. Brain lactate kinetics: Modeling evidence for neuronal lactate uptake upon activation.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Agnès; Costalat, Robert; Magistretti, Pierre J; Pellerin, Luc

    2005-11-01

    A critical issue in brain energy metabolism is whether lactate produced within the brain by astrocytes is taken up and metabolized by neurons upon activation. Although there is ample evidence that neurons can efficiently use lactate as an energy substrate, at least in vitro, few experimental data exist to indicate that it is indeed the case in vivo. To address this question, we used a modeling approach to determine which mechanisms are necessary to explain typical brain lactate kinetics observed upon activation. On the basis of a previously validated model that takes into account the compartmentalization of energy metabolism, we developed a mathematical model of brain lactate kinetics, which was applied to published data describing the changes in extracellular lactate levels upon activation. Results show that the initial dip in the extracellular lactate concentration observed at the onset of stimulation can only be satisfactorily explained by a rapid uptake within an intraparenchymal cellular compartment. In contrast, neither blood flow increase, nor extracellular pH variation can be major causes of the lactate initial dip, whereas tissue lactate diffusion only tends to reduce its amplitude. The kinetic properties of monocarboxylate transporter isoforms strongly suggest that neurons represent the most likely compartment for activation-induced lactate uptake and that neuronal lactate utilization occurring early after activation onset is responsible for the initial dip in brain lactate levels observed in both animals and humans. PMID:16260743

  16. Purification of a recombinant histidine-tagged lactate dehydrogenase from the malaria parasite, Plasmodium vivax, and characterization of its properties.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Balamurugan; Varadarajan, Nandan Mysore; Subramani, Pradeep Annamalai; Ghosh, Susanta Kumar; Nagaraj, Viswanathan Arun

    2014-12-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium vivax (Pv), serves as a drug target and immunodiagnostic marker. The LDH cDNA generated from total RNA of a clinical isolate of the parasite was cloned into pRSETA plasmid. Recombinant his-tagged PvLDH was over-expressed in E. coli Rosetta2DE3pLysS and purified using Ni(2+)-NTA resin giving a yield of 25-30 mg/litre bacterial culture. The recombinant protein was enzymatically active and its catalytic efficiency for pyruvate was 5.4 × 10(8) min(-1) M(-1), 14.5 fold higher than a low yield preparation reported earlier to obtain PvLDH crystal structure. The enzyme activity was inhibited by gossypol and sodium oxamate. The recombinant PvLDH was reactive in lateral flow immunochromatographic assays detecting pan- and vivax-specific LDH. The soluble recombinant PvLDH purified using heterologous expression system can facilitate the generation of vivax LDH-specific monoclonals and the screening of chemical compound libraries for PvLDH inhibitors. PMID:25048245

  17. Semi-Rational Design of Geobacillus stearothermophilus L-Lactate Dehydrogenase to Access Various Chiral α-Hydroxy Acids.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Aşkın Sevinç; Birmingham, William R; Karagüler, Nevin Gül; Turner, Nicholas J; Binay, Barış

    2016-06-01

    Chiral α-hydroxy acids (AHAs) are rapidly becoming important synthetic building blocks, in particular for the production of pharmaceuticals and other fine chemicals. Chiral compounds of a variety of functionalities are now often derived using enzymes, and L-lactate dehydrogenase from the thermophilic organism Geobacillus stearothermophilus (bsLDH) has the potential to be employed for the industrial synthesis of chiral α-hydroxy acids. Despite the thorough characterization of this enzyme, generation of variants with high activity on non-natural substrates has remained difficult and therefore limits the use of bsLDH in industry. Here, we present the engineering of bsLDH using semi-rational design as a method of focusing screening in a small and smart library for novel biocatalysts. In this study, six mutant libraries were designed in an effort to expand the substrate range of bsLDH. The eight variants identified as having enhanced activity toward the selected α-keto acids belonged to the same library, which targeted two positions simultaneously. These new variants now may be useful biocatalysts for chiral synthesis of α-hydroxy acids. PMID:26852025

  18. Targeting lactate dehydrogenase-A inhibits tumorigenesis and tumor progression in mouse models of lung cancer and impacts tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Han; Hanai, Jun-ichi; Ren, Jian-Guo; Kats, Lev; Burgess, Kerri; Bhargava, Parul; Signoretti, Sabina; Billiard, Julia; Duffy, Kevin J.; Grant, Aaron; Wang, Xiaoen; Lorkiewicz, Pawel K.; Schatzman, Sabrina; Bousamra, Michael; Lane, Andrew N.; Higashi, Richard M.; Fan, Teresa W.M.; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Sukhatme, Vikas P.; Seth, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Summary The lactate dehydrogenase-A (LDH-A) enzyme catalyzes the inter-conversion of pyruvate and lactate, is upregulated in human cancers and is associated with aggressive tumor outcomes. Here we use a novel inducible murine model and demonstrate that inactivation of LDH-A in mouse models of NSCLC driven by oncogenic K-RAS or EGFR leads to decreased tumorigenesis and disease regression in established tumors. We also show that abrogation of LDH-A results in reprogramming of pyruvate metabolism, with decreased lactic fermentation in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo. This was accompanied by re-activation of mitochondrial function in vitro but not in vivo or ex vivo. Finally, using a specific small molecule LDH-A inhibitor, we demonstrated that LDH-A is essential for cancer initiating cell survival and proliferation. Thus, LDH-A can be a viable therapeutic target for NSCLC including cancer stem cell-dependent drug resistant tumors. PMID:24726384

  19. Amperometric lactate biosensor for flow injection analysis based on a screen-printed carbon electrode containing Meldola's Blue-Reinecke salt, coated with lactate dehydrogenase and NAD+.

    PubMed

    Piano, M; Serban, S; Pittson, R; Drago, G A; Hart, J P

    2010-06-30

    A biosensor for the measurement of lactate in serum has been developed, which is based on a screen-printed carbon electrode, modified with Meldola's Blue-Reinecke Salt (MBRS-SPCE), coated with the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase NAD(+) dependent (from Porcine heart), and NAD(+). A cellulose acetate layer was deposited on the top of the device to act as a permselective membrane. The biosensor was incorporated into a commercially available, thin-layer, amperometric flow cell operated at a potential of only +0.05 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The mobile phase consisted of 0.2 M phosphate buffer pH 10 containing 0.1 M potassium chloride solution; a flow rate of 0.8 ml min(-1) was used throughout the investigation. The biosensor response was linear over the range 0.55-10 mM lactate; the former represents the detection limit. The precision of the system was determined by carrying out 10 repeat injections of 10 mM l(+)lactic acid standard; the calculated coefficient of variation was 4.28%. It was demonstrated that this biosensor system could be applied to the direct measurement of lactate in serum without pre-treatment; therefore, this would allow high throughput-analysis, at low cost, for this clinically important analyte. PMID:20685431

  20. Cryptosporidium Lactate Dehydrogenase Is Associated with the Parasitophorous Vacuole Membrane and Is a Potential Target for Developing Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haili; Guo, Fengguang; Zhu, Guan

    2015-01-01

    The apicomplexan, Cryptosporidium parvum, possesses a bacterial-type lactate dehydrogenase (CpLDH). This is considered to be an essential enzyme, as this parasite lacks the Krebs cycle and cytochrome-based respiration, and mainly-if not solely, relies on glycolysis to produce ATP. Here, we provide evidence that in extracellular parasites (e.g., sporozoites and merozoites), CpLDH is localized in the cytosol. However, it becomes associated with the parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) during the intracellular developmental stages, suggesting involvement of the PVM in parasite energy metabolism. We characterized the biochemical features of CpLDH and observed that, at lower micromolar levels, the LDH inhibitors gossypol and FX11 could inhibit both CpLDH activity (Ki = 14.8 μM and 55.6 μM, respectively), as well as parasite growth in vitro (IC50 = 11.8 μM and 39.5 μM, respectively). These observations not only reveal a new function for the poorly understood PVM structure in hosting the intracellular development of C. parvum, but also suggest LDH as a potential target for developing therapeutics against this opportunistic pathogen, for which fully effective treatments are not yet available. PMID:26562790

  1. Synbiotics suppress the release of lactate dehydrogenase, promote non-specific immunity and integrity of jejunum mucosa in piglets.

    PubMed

    Andrejčáková, Zuzana; Sopková, Drahomíra; Vlčková, Radoslava; Kulichová, Lucia; Gancarčíková, Soňa; Almášiová, Viera; Holovská, Katarína; Petrilla, Vladimír; Krešáková, Lenka

    2016-09-01

    The aim of our experiment was to study how synbiotics are able to deal with the problems of post-weaning piglets. Lactobacillus plantarum - Biocenol(TM) LP96 (CCM 7512), Lactobacillus fermentum - Biocenol(TM) LF99 (CCM 7514) and flaxseed (rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids) were administered to 36 conventional piglets from a problematic breed with confirmed presence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Coronavirus. The experimental piglets were supplied with probiotic cheeses and crushed flax-seed in the period starting 10 days before weaning and lasting up to 14 days post-weaning. Piglets in the control group were supplied only control cheese. The impact of such additives on the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; spectroscopic and electrophoretic assay), alteration of immunity (index of metabolic activity), jejunum histology (light microscopy), and health of conventional piglets from a problematic breed (monitoring of hematology, consistency and moisture of feces and body temperature) were examined. We found significant decrease in LDH leakage in the blood serum and tissue extracts, indicating better cell membrane integrity in the individual organs of animals. Probiotics and flaxseed applied together seem to be a good source of nutrients to improve the immune status and the integrity of jejunum mucosa during infection. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science. PMID:27581561

  2. Cryptosporidium Lactate Dehydrogenase Is Associated with the Parasitophorous Vacuole Membrane and Is a Potential Target for Developing Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The apicomplexan, Cryptosporidium parvum, possesses a bacterial-type lactate dehydrogenase (CpLDH). This is considered to be an essential enzyme, as this parasite lacks the Krebs cycle and cytochrome-based respiration, and mainly–if not solely, relies on glycolysis to produce ATP. Here, we provide evidence that in extracellular parasites (e.g., sporozoites and merozoites), CpLDH is localized in the cytosol. However, it becomes associated with the parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) during the intracellular developmental stages, suggesting involvement of the PVM in parasite energy metabolism. We characterized the biochemical features of CpLDH and observed that, at lower micromolar levels, the LDH inhibitors gossypol and FX11 could inhibit both CpLDH activity (Ki = 14.8 μM and 55.6 μM, respectively), as well as parasite growth in vitro (IC50 = 11.8 μM and 39.5 μM, respectively). These observations not only reveal a new function for the poorly understood PVM structure in hosting the intracellular development of C. parvum, but also suggest LDH as a potential target for developing therapeutics against this opportunistic pathogen, for which fully effective treatments are not yet available. PMID:26562790

  3. An optimized lactate dehydrogenase release assay for screening of drug candidates in neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Kaja, Simon; Payne, Andrew J.; Singh, Tulsi; Ghuman, Jasleen K.; Sieck, Erin G.; Koulen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Quantification of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release is a widely accepted assay for the quantitative determination of cell viability and late-stage apoptosis. Major disadvantages of commercially available LDH assay kits include proprietary formulations, limited options for optimization and high cost, all resulting in limited reproducibility in research applications. New Method Here, we describe a novel, custom LDH assay suitable in the context of plate reader-based screening of drug candidates for glioprotection, but with wide applicability to other cell types and experimental paradigms. Results We developed a novel and highly reproducible LDH release assay that is more cost-effective than commercially available assays with comparable performance. The assay was validated by assessing 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid antioxidant protection against tert-butylhydroperoxide-induced oxidative stress in C6 astroglioma cells. Assay performance was validated by direct comparison and compatible with other methods of measuring cellular viability, namely 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and 6-carboxy-2′, 7′ dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate assays. Comparison with Existing Method(s) There was no statistically significant difference between results obtained with the novel custom assay and a commercially available assay CytoTox96® (Promega, Madison, WI). Conclusions The novel custom LDH release assay allows the reproducible quantification of cell viability and is highly cost-effective when compared to commercially available assays (approximately 25 times cheaper). In addition and in contrast to commercially available assays, the identification and detailed description of all assay components and procedures provide greater control over experimental conditions and design. We provide a detailed standard operating procedure permitting our novel assay to be readily adapted depending on experimental requirements

  4. Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax specific lactate dehydrogenase: genetic polymorphism study from Indian isolates.

    PubMed

    Keluskar, Priyadarshan; Singh, Vineeta; Gupta, Purva; Ingle, Sanjay

    2014-08-01

    Control and eradication of malaria is hindered by the acquisition of drug resistance by Plasmodium species. This has necessitated a persistent search for novel drugs and more efficient targets. Plasmodium species specific lactate dehydrogenase is one of the potential therapeutic and diagnostic targets, because of its indispensable role in endoerythrocytic stage of the parasite. A target molecule that is highly conserved in the parasite population can be more effectively used in diagnostics and therapeutics, hence, in the present study polymorphism in PfLDH (Plasmodiumfalciparum specific LDH) and PvLDH (Plasmodiumvivax specific LDH) genes was analyzed using PCR-single strand confirmation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and sequencing. Forty-six P. falciparum and thirty-five P. vivax samples were screened from different states of India. Our findings have revealed presence of a single PfLDH genotype and six PvLDH genotypes among the studied samples. Interestingly, along with synonymous substitutions, nonsynonymous substitutions were reported to be present for the first time in the PvLDH genotypes. Further, through amino acid sequence alignment and homology modeling studies we observed that the catalytic residues were conserved in all PvLDH genotypes and the nonsynonymous substitutions have not altered the enzyme structure significantly. Evolutionary genetics studies have confirmed that PfLDH and PvLDH loci are under strong purifying selection. Phylogenetic analysis of the pLDH gene sequences revealed that P. falciparum compared to P. vivax, has recent origin. The study therefore supports PfLDH and PvLDH as suitable therapeutic and diagnostic targets as well as phylogenetic markers to understand the genealogy of malaria species. PMID:24953504

  5. Lactation

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Lactation is the most energy-efficient way to provide for the dietary needs of young mammals, their mother's milk being actively protective, immunomodulatory, and ideal for their needs. Intrauterine mammary gland development in the human female is already apparent by the end of the sixth week of gestation. During puberty and adolescence secretions of the anterior pituitary stimulate the maturation of the graafian follicles in the ovaries and stimulate the secretion of follicular estrogens, which stimulate development of the mammary ducts. Pregnancy has the most dramatic effect on the breast, but development of the glandular breast tissue and deposition of fat and connective tissue continue under the influence of cyclic sex-hormone stimulation. Many changes occur in the nipple and breast during pregnancy and at delivery as a prelude to lactation. Preparation of the breasts is so effective that lactation could commence even if pregnancy were discontinued at 16 weeks. Following birth, placental inhibition of milk synthesis is removed, and a woman's progesterone blood levels decline rapidly. The breasts fill with milk, which is a high-density, low-volume feed called colostrum until about 30 hours after birth. Because it is not the level of maternal hormones, but the efficiency of infant suckling and/or milk removal that governs the volume of milk produced in each breast, mothers who permit their infants to feed ad libitum commonly observe that they have large volumes of milk 24-48 hours after birth. The two maternal reflexes involved in lactation are the milk-production and milk-ejection reflex. A number of complementary reflexes are involved when the infant feeds: the rooting reflex (which programmes the infant to search for the nipple), the sucking reflex (rhythmic jaw action creating negative pressure and a peristaltic action of the tongue), and the swallowing reflex. The infant's instinctive actions need to be consolidated into learned behaviour in the postpartum

  6. Changes in milk yield, lactate dehydrogenase, milking frequency, and interquarter yield ratio persist for up to 8 weeks after antibiotic treatment of mastitis.

    PubMed

    Fogsgaard, K K; Løvendahl, P; Bennedsgaard, T W; Østergaard, S

    2015-11-01

    Within the dairy industry, the appearance of milk and withdrawal time due to antibiotic residuals in the milk are used to determine recovery status after cases of treated mastitis. However, both milk production and dairy cow behavior have been shown to be affected after the normalization of milk appearance, indicating that animals may not have fully recovered. The aim of the present study was to describe the changes in milk yield, lactate dehydrogenase activity, milking frequency, and interquarter yield ratio (defined as the coefficient of variation between the active quarters) after cases of naturally occurring mastitis with special focus on the recovery period after antibiotic treatment. A second aim was to examine whether these changes were affected by the pathogens present at the time of mastitis diagnosis. This retrospective study was based on a cohort data set including 1,032 lactations from 795 dairy cows kept on 2 Danish farms and milked by an automatic milking system. A total of 174 treated mastitis cases were compared with nontreated control cows from 5 wk before treatment and until 8 wk after. Treated mastitis resulted in reduced milk yield, elevated lactate dehydrogenase activity, lower milking frequency, and elevated interquarter yield ratio. Within these measures, deviations from baseline levels and from the control cows were found as early as 1 to 3 wk before the antibiotic treatment and peaked around the days of treatment. In some cases, the mastitic cows returned to premastitis levels, whereas in others they remained affected throughout the rest of the observation period. To correctly estimate the effects of treated mastitis and the recovery status of cows, it is important to take the individual cow into account and not only compare with herd levels, as this might mask the true degree of the changes. The effects on each outcome variable depended on the involved pathogen and differences were found between primiparous cows and older animals. However

  7. [Characteristics of the lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme spectrum of the skin in the presence of thermal lesions].

    PubMed

    Nosova, I M; Zaets, T L; Kotkina, T I

    1977-09-01

    Experiments were conducted on rats; a study was made of the activity of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) and its isoenzymes in the zone of affection and in the adjacent areas of the skin at various periods after the burn infliction; on the 1st--8th day there occurred a reduction of the sum total LDH activity in the scab zone and the underlying tissue by 70--80%, and in the margin and the intact skin--by 50%. These changes were accompanied by shifts in the isoenzymatic LDH spectrum in the affected tissue; the activity of fraction 5 displayed a sharp rise on the 1st day and that of fractions 2 and 3--a reduction, on the contrary, by the 8th day there was seen some diminution of fraction 5 activity and an elevation of fractions 2 and 3 activity. The following picture is observed on the 14th--22nd day after the burn; the sum total LDH activity remains low, the isoenzymatic LDH spectrum in the margin and the scab is largely normalized, whereas in the underlying tissue there persist changes in the LDH enzyme ratio (a reduction of fractions 1--3 activity, and a rise of fraction 5 activity). PMID:912082

  8. Conformational Heterogeneity in the Michaelis Complex of Lactate Dehydrogenase: An Analysis of Vibrational Spectroscopy Using Markov and Hidden Markov Models.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoliang; Schwartz, Steven D

    2016-07-14

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) catalyzes the interconversion of pyruvate and lactate. Recent isotope-edited IR spectroscopy suggests that conformational heterogeneity exists within the Michaelis complex of LDH, and this heterogeneity affects the propensity toward the on-enzyme chemical step for each Michaelis substate. By combining molecular dynamics simulations with Markov and hidden Markov models, we obtained a detailed kinetic network of the substates of the Michaelis complex of LDH. The ensemble-average electric fields exerted onto the vibrational probe were calculated to provide a direct comparison with the vibrational spectroscopy. Structural features of the Michaelis substates were also analyzed on atomistic scales. Our work not only clearly demonstrates the conformational heterogeneity in the Michaelis complex of LDH and its coupling to the reactivities of the substates, but it also suggests a methodology to simultaneously resolve kinetics and structures on atomistic scales, which can be directly compared with the vibrational spectroscopy. PMID:27347759

  9. d-Lactate Dehydrogenase Gene (ldhD) Inactivation and Resulting Metabolic Effects in the Lactobacillus johnsonii Strains La1 and N312

    PubMed Central

    Lapierre, Luciane; Germond, Jacques-Edouard; Ott, Andreas; Delley, Michele; Mollet, Beat

    1999-01-01

    Lactobacillus johnsonii La1, a probiotic bacterium with demonstrated health effects, grows in milk, where it ferments lactose to d- and l-lactate in a 60:40% ratio. The d-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) gene (ldhD) of this strain was isolated, and an in vitro-truncated copy of that gene was used to inactivate the genomic copy in two strains, La1 and N312, by gene replacement. For that, an 8-bp deletion was generated within the cloned ldhD gene to inactivate its function. The plasmid containing the altered ldhD was transferred to L. johnsonii via conjugative comobilization with Lactococcus lactis carrying pAMβ1. Crossover integrations of the plasmid at the genomic ldhD site were selected, and appropriate resolution of the cointegrate structures resulted in mutants that had lost the plasmid and in which the original ldhD was replaced by the truncated copy. These mutants completely lacked D-LDH activity. Nevertheless, the lower remaining L-LDH activity of the cells was sufficient to reroute most of the accumulating pyruvate to l-lactate. Only a marginal increase in production of the secondary end products acetaldehyde, diacetyl, and acetoin was observed. It can be concluded that in L. johnsonii D- and L-LDH are present in substantial excess for their role to eliminate pyruvate and regenerate NAD+ and that accumulated pyruvate is therefore not easily redirected in high amounts to secondary metabolic routes. PMID:10473408

  10. Pre-treatment serum lactate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase as predictors of metastases in extremity osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Marais, Leonard C.; Bertie, Julia; Rodseth, Reitze; Sartorius, Benn; Ferreira, Nando

    2015-01-01

    Background The prognosis of patients with metastatic osteosarcoma remains poor. However, the chance of survival can be improved by surgical resection of all metastases. In this study we investigate the value of serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in predicting the presence of metastatic disease at time of diagnosis. Methods Sixty-one patients with histologically confirmed conventional osteosarcoma of the extremity were included in the study. Only 19.7% of cases presented without evidence of systemic spread of the disease. Pre-treatment serum ALP and LDH were analysed in patients with and without skeletal or pulmonary metastases. Results Serum LDH and ALP levels were not significantly different in patients with or without pulmonary metastases (p=0.88 and p=0.47, respectively). The serum LDH and ALP levels did however differ significantly in patients with or without skeletal metastases (p<0.001 and p=0.02, respectively). The optimal breakpoint for serum LDH as a marker of skeletal metastases was 849 IU/L (AUC 0.839; Sensitivity=0.88; Specificity=0.73). LDH >454 IU/L equated to 100% sensitivity for detected bone metastases (positive diagnostic likelihood ratio (DLR)=1.32). With a cut-off of 76 IU/L a sensitivity of 100% was reached for serum ALP predicting the presence of skeletal metastases (positive DLR=1.1). In a multivariate analysis both LDH ≥850 IU/L (odds ratio [OR]=9; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.8–44.3) and ALP ≥280 IU/L (OR=10.3; 95% CI 2.1–50.5) were predictive of skeletal metastases. LDH however lost its significance in a multivariate model which included pre-treatment tumour volume. Conclusion In cases of osteosarcoma with LDH >850 IU/L and/or ALP >280 IU/L it may be prudent to consider more sensitive staging investigations for detection of skeletal metastases. Further research is required to determine the value and the most sensitive cut-off points of serum ALP and LDH in the prediction of skeletal metastases. PMID

  11. Effect of neem limonoids on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) of the rice leaffolder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée) (Insecta: Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    PubMed

    Senthil Nathan, Sengottayan; Kalaivani, Kandaswamy; Chung, Paul Gene; Murugan, Kadarkarai

    2006-03-01

    Neem is derived from the neem tree Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (Meliaceae), and its primary insecticidal component is the tetranortriterpenoid azadirachtin and other limonoids. The effect of neem limonoids azadirachtin, salannin, deacetylgedunin, gedunin, 17-hydroxyazadiradione and deacetylnimbin on enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity of the rice leaffolder (RLF) Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) larvae was investigated. There was a decrease in enzyme activity relative to the control at all concentrations tested. When fed a diet of rice leaves treated with neem limonoids in bioassays, gut tissue enzyme, LDH levels in rice leaffolder larvae are affected. These results indicate neem limonoids affect LDH activity. These effects are most pronounced in early instar larvae. Azadirachtin was the most potent in of all the limonoids in all experiments indicating strong enzyme inhibition. Clear dose-response relationships were established with respect to LDH activity. PMID:16154614

  12. Aromatic Surfactant as Aggregating Agent for Aptamer-Gold Nanoparticle-Based Detection of Plasmodium Lactate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Jain, Priyamvada; Chakma, Babina; Singh, Naveen Kumar; Patra, Sanjukta; Goswami, Pranab

    2016-07-01

    A novel ssDNA aptamer (P38), with a 40 mer random region flanked by primer-binding sites on both sides, targeting Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) has been developed through systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), including counter SELEX against human lactate dehydrogenase A and B (hLDH A and B). The 2D structure of P38 shows the presence of three stem loops with a δG of -9.18 kcal/mol. EMSA studies on P38 complexes with the increasing concentration of PfLDH revealed a dissociation constant of 0.35 µM. P38 has been exploited for the quantitative detection of PfLDH using cationic surfactant-mediated aggregation of gold nanoparticles (16-nm diameter) as an optical probe. Among the three different cationic surfactants, characterized by different hydrocarbon tail groups, benzalkonium chloride (BCK) was found to be most efficient with a limit of detection of 281 ± 11 pM. This BCK-based approach with the novel highly selective aptamer provides simple and sensitive detection of PfLDH in the clinically relevant range. PMID:27189484

  13. Postischemic hyperoxia reduces hippocampal pyruvate dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Erica M.; Rosenthal, Robert E.; Kristian, Tibor; Fiskum, Gary

    2008-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate and represents the sole bridge between anaerobic and aerobic cerebral energy metabolism. Previous studies demonstrating loss of PDHC enzyme activity and immunoreactivity during reperfusion after cerebral ischemia suggest that oxidative modifications are involved. This study tested the hypothesis that hyperoxic reperfusion exacerbates loss of PDHC enzyme activity, possibly due to tyrosine nitration or S-nitrosation. We used a clinically relevant canine ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest model in which, after resuscitation and ventilation on either 100% O2 (hyperoxic) or 21–30% O2 (normoxic), animals were sacrificed at 2 h reperfusion and the brains removed for enzyme activity and immunoreactivity measurements. Animals resuscitated under hyperoxic conditions exhibited decreased PDHC activity and elevated 3-nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity in the hippocampus but not the cortex, compared to nonischemic controls. These measures were unchanged in normoxic animals. In vitro exposure of purified PDHC to peroxynitrite resulted in a dose-dependent loss of activity and increased nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity. These results support the hypothesis that oxidative stress contributes to loss of hippocampal PDHC activity during cerebral ischemia and reperfusion and suggest that PDHC is a target of peroxynitrite. PMID:16716897

  14. Biochemical and in silico Characterization of Recombinant L-Lactate Dehydrogenase of Theileria annulata.

    PubMed

    Nural, Belma; Erdemir, Aysegul; Mutlu, Ozal; Yakarsonmez, Sinem; Danis, Ozkan; Topuzogullari, Murat; Turgut-Balik, Dilek

    2016-04-01

    Theileria annulata is a parasite that causes theileriosis in cattle. Reports about drug resistance made essential to develop new drug. LDH of Theileria schizonts is the vital enzyme for its anaerobic metabolism. TaLDH gene was first cloned into pGEM-T cloning vector with two introns in our previous study. Here we report cloning of TaLDH without introns into pLATE 31 vector in E. coli BL21(DE3). Protein was in an inactive form. Two mutations were fixed to express the active protein. Protein was purified by affinity chromatography and evaluated by SDS-PAGE and size exclusion chromatography. Optimum pH of enzyme was performed in pH 7.5, and enzyme was stabilized at 20-40 °C. Enzyme kinetics of recombinant TaLDH were found to be in the direction of pyruvate to lactate K m 0.1324 and K i 4.295 mM, k cat, 44.55/s and k cat /K m, 3.3693 × 10(5)/M/s. 3D structure of TaLDH was predicted, and possible drug binding sites were determined by homology modelling. PMID:26921192

  15. Major Role of NAD-Dependent Lactate Dehydrogenases in the Production of l-Lactic Acid with High Optical Purity by the Thermophile Bacillus coagulans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Limin; Cai, Yumeng; Zhu, Lingfeng; Guo, Honglian; Yu, Bo

    2014-12-01

    Bacillus coagulans 2-6 is an excellent producer of optically pure l-lactic acid. However, little is known about the mechanism of synthesis of the highly optically pure l-lactic acid produced by this strain. Three enzymes responsible for lactic acid production-NAD-dependent l-lactate dehydrogenase (l-nLDH; encoded by ldhL), NAD-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase (d-nLDH; encoded by ldhD), and glycolate oxidase (GOX)-were systematically investigated in order to study the relationship between these enzymes and the optical purity of lactic acid. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus DSM 20081 (a d-lactic acid producer) and Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum DSM 20174 (a dl-lactic acid producer) were also examined in this study as comparative strains, in addition to B. coagulans. The specific activities of key enzymes for lactic acid production in the three strains were characterized in vivo and in vitro, and the levels of transcription of the ldhL, ldhD, and GOX genes during fermentation were also analyzed. The catalytic activities of l-nLDH and d-nLDH were different in l-, d-, and dl-lactic acid producers. Only l-nLDH activity was detected in B. coagulans 2-6 under native conditions, and the level of transcription of ldhL in B. coagulans 2-6 was much higher than that of ldhD or the GOX gene at all growth phases. However, for the two Lactobacillus strains used in this study, ldhD transcription levels were higher than those of ldhL. The high catalytic efficiency of l-nLDH toward pyruvate and the high transcription ratios of ldhL to ldhD and ldhL to the GOX gene provide the key explanations for the high optical purity of l-lactic acid produced by B. coagulans 2-6. PMID:25217009

  16. Major Role of NAD-Dependent Lactate Dehydrogenases in the Production of l-Lactic Acid with High Optical Purity by the Thermophile Bacillus coagulans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Cai, Yumeng; Zhu, Lingfeng; Guo, Honglian

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans 2-6 is an excellent producer of optically pure l-lactic acid. However, little is known about the mechanism of synthesis of the highly optically pure l-lactic acid produced by this strain. Three enzymes responsible for lactic acid production—NAD-dependent l-lactate dehydrogenase (l-nLDH; encoded by ldhL), NAD-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase (d-nLDH; encoded by ldhD), and glycolate oxidase (GOX)—were systematically investigated in order to study the relationship between these enzymes and the optical purity of lactic acid. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus DSM 20081 (a d-lactic acid producer) and Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum DSM 20174 (a dl-lactic acid producer) were also examined in this study as comparative strains, in addition to B. coagulans. The specific activities of key enzymes for lactic acid production in the three strains were characterized in vivo and in vitro, and the levels of transcription of the ldhL, ldhD, and GOX genes during fermentation were also analyzed. The catalytic activities of l-nLDH and d-nLDH were different in l-, d-, and dl-lactic acid producers. Only l-nLDH activity was detected in B. coagulans 2-6 under native conditions, and the level of transcription of ldhL in B. coagulans 2-6 was much higher than that of ldhD or the GOX gene at all growth phases. However, for the two Lactobacillus strains used in this study, ldhD transcription levels were higher than those of ldhL. The high catalytic efficiency of l-nLDH toward pyruvate and the high transcription ratios of ldhL to ldhD and ldhL to the GOX gene provide the key explanations for the high optical purity of l-lactic acid produced by B. coagulans 2-6. PMID:25217009

  17. Contribution of a buried aspartate residue towards the catalytic efficiency and structural stability of Bacillus stearothermophilus lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Nobbs, T J; Cortés, A; Gelpi, J L; Holbrook, J J; Atkinson, T; Scawen, M D; Nicholls, D J

    1994-01-01

    The X-ray structure of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) shows the side-chain carboxylate group of Asp-143 to be buried in the hydrophobic interior of the enzyme, where it makes hydrogen-bonding interactions with both the side-chain hydroxyl group of Ser-273 and the main-chain amide group of His-195. This is an unusual environment for a carboxylate side-chain as hydrogen bonding normally occurs with water molecules at the surface of the protein. A charged hydrogen-bonding interaction in the interior of a protein would be expected to be much stronger than a similar interaction on the solvent-exposed exterior. In this respect the side-chain carboxylate group of Asp-143 appears to be important for maintaining tertiary structure by providing a common linkage point between three discontinuous elements of the secondary structure, alpha 1F, beta K and the beta-turn joining beta G and beta H. The contribution of the Asp-143 side-chain to the structure and function of Bacillus stearothermophilus LDH was assessed by creating a mutant enzyme containing Asn-143. The decreased thermal stability of both unactivated and fructose-1,6-diphosphate (Fru-1,6-P2)-activated forms of the mutant enzyme support a structural role for Asp-143. Furthermore, the difference in stability of the wild-type and mutant enzymes in guanidinium chloride suggested that the carboxylate group of Asp-143 contributes at least 22 kJ/mol to the conformational stability of the wild-type enzyme. However, there was no alteration in the amount of accessible tryptophan fluorescence in the mutant enzyme, indicating that the mutation caused a structural weakness rather than a gross conformational change. Comparison of the wild-type and mutant enzyme steady-state parameters for various 2-keto acid substrates showed the mutation to have a general effect on catalysis, with an average difference in binding energy of 11 kJ/mol for the transition-state complexes. The different effects of pH and Fru-1,6-P2 on the wild-type and

  18. The Conformation of NAD+ Bound to Lactate Dehydrogenase Determined by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance with Suppression of Spin Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Sebastien J. F.; Zwahlen, Catherine; Post, Carol Beth; Burgner, John W.; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    1997-04-01

    We have reinvestigated the conformation of NAD+ bound to dogfish lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) by using an NMR experiment that allows one to exploit nuclear Overhauser effects to determine internuclear distances between pairs of protons, without perturbation of spin-diffusion effects from other protons belonging either to the cofactor or to the binding pocket of the enzyme. The analysis indicates that the structure of bound NAD+ is in accord with the conformation determined in the solid state by x-ray diffraction for the adenosine moiety, but deviates significantly from that of the nicotinamide. The NMR data indicate conformational averaging about the glycosidic bond of the nicotinamide nucleotide. In view of the strict stereospecificity of catalysis by LDH and the conformational averaging of bound NAD+ that we infer from solution-state NMR, we suggest that LDH binds the cofactor in both syn and anti conformations, but that binding interactions in the syn conformation are not catalytically productive.

  19. Combined inactivation of the Clostridium cellulolyticum lactate and malate dehydrogenase genes substantially increases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrass fermentations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongchao; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Engle, Nancy L; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Liao, James C; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Guss, Adam M; Yang, Yunfeng; Graham, David E

    2012-01-01

    Background: The model bacterium Clostridium cellulolyticum efficiently hydrolyzes crystalline cellulose and hemicellulose, using cellulosomes to degrade lignocellulosic biomass. Although it imports and ferments both pentose and hexose sugars to produce a mixture of ethanol, acetate, lactate, H2 and CO2, the proportion of ethanol is low, which impedes its use in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels. Therefore genetic engineering will likely be required to improve the ethanol yield. Random mutagenesis, plasmid transformation, and heterologous expression systems have previously been developed for C. cellulolyticum, but targeted mutagenesis has not been reported for this organism. Results: The first targeted gene inactivation system was developed for C. cellulolyticum, based on a mobile group II intron originating from the Lactococcus lactis L1.LtrB intron. This markerless mutagenesis system was used to disrupt both the paralogous L-lactate dehydrogenase (Ccel_2485; ldh) and L-malate dehydrogenase (Ccel_0137; mdh) genes, distinguishing the overlapping substrate specificities of these enzymes. Both mutations were then combined in a single strain. This double mutant produced 8.5-times more ethanol than wild-type cells growing on crystalline cellulose. Ethanol constituted 93% of the major fermentation products (by molarity), corresponding to a molar ratio of ethanol to organic acids of 15, versus 0.18 in wild-type cells. During growth on acid-pretreated switchgrass, the double mutant also produced four-times as much ethanol as wild-type cells. Detailed metabolomic analyses identified increased flux through the oxidative branch of the mutant s TCA pathway. Conclusions: The efficient intron-based gene inactivation system produced the first gene-targeted mutations in C. cellulolyticum. As a key component of the genetic toolbox for this bacterium, markerless targeted mutagenesis enables functional genomic research in C. cellulolyticum and rapid genetic engineering to

  20. Highly stereoselective biosynthesis of (R)-α-hydroxy carboxylic acids through rationally re-designed mutation of d-lactate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhaojuan; Sheng, Binbin; Gao, Chao; Zhang, Haiwei; Qin, Tong; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    An NAD-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase (d-nLDH) of Lactobacillus bulgaricus ATCC 11842 was rationally re-designed for asymmetric reduction of a homologous series of α-keto carboxylic acids such as phenylpyruvic acid (PPA), α-ketobutyric acid, α-ketovaleric acid, β-hydroxypyruvate. Compared with wild-type d-nLDH, the Y52L mutant d-nLDH showed elevated activities toward unnatural substrates especially with large substitutes at C-3. By the biocatalysis combined with a formate dehydrogenase for in situ generation of NADH, the corresponding (R)-α-hydroxy carboxylic acids could be produced at high yields and highly optical purities. Taking the production of chiral (R)-phenyllactic acid (PLA) from PPA for example, 50 mM PPA was completely reduced to (R)-PLA in 90 min with a high yield of 99.0% and a highly optical purity (>99.9% e.e.) by the coupling system. The results presented in this work suggest a promising alternative for the production of chiral α-hydroxy carboxylic acids. PMID:24292439

  1. The intrinsically disordered protein LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana protects the isolated enzyme lactate dehydrogenase and enzymes in a soluble leaf proteome during freezing and drying.

    PubMed

    Popova, Antoaneta V; Rausch, Saskia; Hundertmark, Michaela; Gibon, Yves; Hincha, Dirk K

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in plants is associated with tolerance against stresses such as freezing and desiccation. Two main functions have been attributed to LEA proteins: membrane stabilization and enzyme protection. We have hypothesized previously that LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana may stabilize membranes because it interacts with liposomes in the dry state. Here we show that LEA7, contrary to this expectation, did not stabilize liposomes during drying and rehydration. Instead, it partially preserved the activity of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) during drying and freezing. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed no evidence of aggregation of LDH in the dry or rehydrated state under conditions that lead to complete loss of activity. To approximate the complex influence of intracellular conditions on the protective effects of a LEA protein in a convenient in-vitro assay, we measured the activity of two Arabidopsis enzymes (glucose-6-P dehydrogenase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) in total soluble leaf protein extract (Arabidopsis soluble proteome, ASP) after drying and rehydration or freezing and thawing. LEA7 partially preserved the activity of both enzymes under these conditions, suggesting its role as an enzyme protectant in vivo. Further FTIR analyses indicated the partial reversibility of protein aggregation in the dry ASP during rehydration. Similarly, aggregation in the dry ASP was strongly reduced by LEA7. In addition, mixtures of LEA7 with sucrose or verbascose reduced aggregation more than the single additives, presumably through the effects of the protein on the H-bonding network of the sugar glasses. PMID:25988244

  2. Oligosaccharide-based Surfactant/Citric Acid Buffer System Stabilizes Lactate Dehydrogenase during Freeze-drying and Storage without the Addition of Natural Sugar.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shigesaburo; Kawai, Ryuichiro; Koga, Maito; Asakura, Kouichi; Takahashi, Isao; Osanai, Shuichi

    2016-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the maintenance effects of oligosaccharide-based surfactants on the enzymatic activity of a model protein, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), during freeze-drying and room temperature storage using the citric acid buffer system. Oligosaccharide-based surfactants, which exhibit a high glass transition temperature (Tg), promoted the eminent retention of enzymatic activity during these protocols, whereas monosaccharide-based surfactants with a low Tg displayed poor performance at high concentration, albeit much better than that of Tween 80 at middle concentration. The increase in the alkyl chain length did not exert positive effects as observed for the maintenance effect during freeze-thawing, but an amphiphilic nature and a glass forming ability were crucial for the effective stabilization at a low excipient concentration during freeze-drying. Even a low oligosaccharide-based surfactant content (0.1 mg mL(-1)) could maintain LDH activity during freeze-drying, but a high surfactant content (1.0 mg mL(-1)) was required to prevent buffer precipitation and retain high LDH activity on storage. Regarding storage, glass formation restricted molecular mobility in the lyophilized matrix, and LDH activity was effectively retained. The present results describe a strategy based on the glass-forming ability of surfactant-type excipients that affords a natural sugar-free formulation or an alternative use for polysorbate-type surfactants. PMID:27181251

  3. Insulin, CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Proteins and Lactate Regulate the Human 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2 Gene Expression in Colon Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Alikhani-Koupaei, Rasoul; Ignatova, Irena D.; Guettinger, Andreas; Frey, Felix J.; Frey, Brigitte M.

    2014-01-01

    11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11beta-HSD) modulate mineralocorticoid receptor transactivation by glucocorticoids and regulate access to the glucocorticoid receptor. The isozyme 11beta-HSD2 is selectively expressed in mineralocorticoid target tissues and its activity is reduced in various disease states with abnormal sodium retention and hypertension, including the apparent mineralocorticoid excess. As 50% of patients with essential hypertension are insulin resistant and hyperinsulinemic, we hypothesized that insulin downregulates the 11beta-HSD2 activity. In the present study we show that insulin reduced the 11beta-HSD2 activity in cancer colon cell lines (HCT116, SW620 and HT-29) at the transcriptional level, in a time and dose dependent manner. The downregulation was reversible and required new protein synthesis. Pathway analysis using mRNA profiling revealed that insulin treatment modified the expression of the transcription factor family C/EBPs (CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins) but also of glycolysis related enzymes. Western blot and real time PCR confirmed an upregulation of C/EBP beta isoforms (LAP and LIP) with a more pronounced increase in the inhibitory isoform LIP. EMSA and reporter gene assays demonstrated the role of C/EBP beta isoforms in HSD11B2 gene expression regulation. In addition, secretion of lactate, a byproduct of glycolysis, was shown to mediate insulin-dependent HSD11B2 downregulation. In summary, we demonstrate that insulin downregulates HSD11B2 through increased LIP expression and augmented lactate secretion. Such mechanisms are of interest and potential significance for sodium reabsorption in the colon. PMID:25133511

  4. Assessment of toxicity using dehydrogenases activity and mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Matyja, Konrad; Małachowska-Jutsz, Anna; Mazur, Anna K; Grabas, Kazimierz

    2016-07-01

    Dehydrogenase activity is frequently used to assess the general condition of microorganisms in soil and activated sludge. Many studies have investigated the inhibition of dehydrogenase activity by various compounds, including heavy metal ions. However, the time after which the measurements are carried out is often chosen arbitrarily. Thus, it can be difficult to estimate how the toxic effects of compounds vary during the reaction and when the maximum of the effect would be reached. Hence, the aim of this study was to create simple and useful mathematical model describing changes in dehydrogenase activity during exposure to substances that inactivate enzymes. Our model is based on the Lagergrens pseudo-first-order equation, the rate of chemical reactions, enzyme activity, and inactivation and was created to describe short-term changes in dehydrogenase activity. The main assumption of our model is that toxic substances cause irreversible inactivation of enzyme units. The model is able to predict the maximum direct toxic effect (MDTE) and the time to reach this maximum (TMDTE). In order to validate our model, we present two examples: inactivation of dehydrogenase in microorganisms in soil and activated sludge. The model was applied successfully for cadmium and copper ions. Our results indicate that the predicted MDTE and TMDTE are more appropriate than EC50 and IC50 for toxicity assessments, except for long exposure times. PMID:27021434

  5. Lactate dehydrogenase A as a highly abundant eye lens protein in platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus): upsilon (upsilon)-crystallin.

    PubMed

    van Rheede, Teun; Amons, Reinout; Stewart, Niall; de Jong, Wilfried W

    2003-06-01

    Vertebrate eye lenses mostly contain two abundant types of proteins, the alpha-crystallins and the beta/gamma-crystallins. In addition, certain housekeeping enzymes are highly expressed as crystallins in various taxa. We now observed an unusual approximately 41-kd protein that makes up 16% to 18% of the total protein in the platypus eye lens. Its cDNA sequence was determined, which identified the protein as muscle-type lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A). It is the first observation of LDH-A as a crystallin, and we designate it upsilon (upsilon)-crystallin. Interestingly, the related heart-type LDH-B occurs as an abundant lens protein, known as epsilon-crystallin, in many birds and crocodiles. Thus, two members of the ldh gene family have independently been recruited as crystallins in different higher vertebrate lineages, suggesting that they are particularly suited for this purpose in terms of gene regulatory or protein structural properties. To establish whether platypus LDH-A/upsilon-crystallin has been under different selective constraints as compared with other vertebrate LDH-A sequences, we reconstructed the vertebrate ldh-a gene phylogeny. No conspicuous rate deviations or amino acid replacements were observed. PMID:12716980

  6. Prognostic implications of dynamic serum lactate dehydrogenase assessments in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guan-Qun; Ren, Xian-Yue; Mao, Yan-Ping; Chen, Lei; Sun, Ying; Liu, Li-Zhi; Li, Li; Lin, Ai-Hua; Mai, Hai-Qiang; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic value of dynamic serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) hasn’t been explored. We retrospectively analyzed 1,428 cases of NPC treated with IMRT with or without chemotherapy. Elevated pre- and/or post-treatment LDH levels were found to be associated with unfavorable overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), but not with local relapse-free survival (LRFS). The dynamic variations in LDH levels were prognostic factors for OS, DFS and DMFS, but not for LRFS. Multivariate analysis revealed that the N category, T category, post-treatment serum LDH level and age were independent prognostic factors for OS. Our results demonstrated that dynamic variations in LDH levels were associated with risk of distant failure and death, which may shed light on the dynamics of the disease and the response to therapy. We consider that LDH measurements will be of great clinical importance in the management of NPC, especially, when considering “decision points” in treatment algorithms. Therefore, we strongly recommend that LDH levels should be determined before and after treatment in NPC patients and the results integrated into decisions regarding treatment strategies. PMID:26928265

  7. The value of lactate dehydrogenase serum levels as a prognostic and predictive factor for advanced pancreatic cancer patients receiving sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Giampieri, Riccardo; Sobrero, Alberto; Labianca, Roberto; Ferrari, Daris; Barni, Sandro; Aitini, Enrico; Zaniboni, Alberto; Boni, Corrado; Caprioni, Francesco; Mosconi, Stefania; Fanello, Silvia; Berardi, Rossana; Bittoni, Alessandro; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Cinquini, Michela; Torri, Valter; Scartozzi, Mario; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Although lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) serum levels, indirect markers of angiogenesis, are associated with a worse outcome in several tumours, their prognostic value is not defined in pancreatic cancer. Moreover, high levels are associated even with a lack of efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, contributing to explain negative results in clinical trials. We assessed the role of LDH in advanced pancreatic cancer receiving sorafenib. Seventy-one of 114 patients included in the randomised phase II trial MAPS (chemotherapy plus or not sorafenib) and with available serum LDH levels, were included in this analysis. Patients were categorized according to serum LDH levels (LDH ≤vs.> upper normal rate). A significant difference was found in progression free survival (PFS) and in overall survival (OS) between patients with LDH values under or above the cut-off (PFS: 5.2 vs. 2.7 months, p = 0.0287; OS: 10.7 vs. 5.9 months, p = 0.0021). After stratification according to LDH serum levels and sorafenib treatment, patients with low LDH serum levels treated with sorafenib showed an advantage in PFS (p = 0.05) and OS (p = 0.0012). LDH appears to be a reliable parameter to assess the prognosis of advanced pancreatic cancer patients, and it may be a predictive parameter to select patients candidate to receive sorafenib. PMID:26397228

  8. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis of d-lactate dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus jensenii

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangwoo; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2014-01-01

    The thermostable d-lactate dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus jensenii (Lj d-LDH) is a key enzyme for the production of the d-form of lactic acid from pyruvate concomitant with the oxidation of NADH to NAD+. The polymers of lactic acid are used as biodegradable bioplastics. The Lj d-LDH protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of 28%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 400, 100 mM Tris–HCl pH 9, 200 mM magnesium sulfate at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 2.1 Å. The crystal belonged to space group P3121, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 90.5, c = 157.8 Å. With two molecules per asymmetric unit, the crystal volume per unit protein weight (V M) is 2.58 Å3 Da−1, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 52.3%. The structure was solved by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion using a selenomethionine derivative. PMID:25084378

  9. The value of lactate dehydrogenase serum levels as a prognostic and predictive factor for advanced pancreatic cancer patients receiving sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Giampieri, Riccardo; Sobrero, Alberto; Labianca, Roberto; Ferrari, Daris; Barni, Sandro; Aitini, Enrico; Zaniboni, Alberto; Boni, Corrado; Caprioni, Francesco; Mosconi, Stefania; Fanello, Silvia; Berardi, Rossana; Bittoni, Alessandro; Andrikou, Kalliopi; Cinquini, Michela; Torri, Valter; Scartozzi, Mario; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-10-27

    Although lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) serum levels, indirect markers of angiogenesis, are associated with a worse outcome in several tumours, their prognostic value is not defined in pancreatic cancer. Moreover, high levels are associated even with a lack of efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, contributing to explain negative results in clinical trials. We assessed the role of LDH in advanced pancreatic cancer receiving sorafenib. Seventy-one of 114 patients included in the randomised phase II trial MAPS (chemotherapy plus or not sorafenib) and with available serum LDH levels, were included in this analysis. Patients were categorized according to serum LDH levels (LDH ≤ vs.> upper normal rate). A significant difference was found in progression free survival (PFS) and in overall survival (OS) between patients with LDH values under or above the cut-off (PFS: 5.2 vs. 2.7 months, p = 0.0287; OS: 10.7 vs. 5.9 months, p = 0.0021). After stratification according to LDH serum levels and sorafenib treatment, patients with low LDH serum levels treated with sorafenib showed an advantage in PFS (p = 0.05) and OS (p = 0.0012). LDH appears to be a reliable parameter to assess the prognosis of advanced pancreatic cancer patients, and it may be a predictive parameter to select patients candidate to receive sorafenib. PMID:26397228

  10. Dehydrogenase activity of forest soils depends on the assay used

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszek, Kazimierz; Długa, Joanna; Socha, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    Dehydrogenases are exclusively intracellular enzymes, which play an important role in the initial stages of oxidation of soil organic matter. One of the most frequently used methods to estimate dehydrogenase activity in soil is based on the use of triphenyltetrazolium chloride as an artificial electron acceptor. The purpose of this study was to compare the activity of dehydrogenases of forest soils with varied physicochemical properties using different triphenyltetrazolium chloride assays. The determination was carried out using the original procedure by Casida et al., a modification of the procedure which involves the use of Ca(OH)2 instead of CaCO3, the Thalmann method, and the assay by Casida et al. without addition of buffer or any salt. Soil dehydrogenase activity depended on the assay used. Dehydrogenase determined by the Casida et al. method without addition of buffer or any salt correlated with the pH values of soils. The autoclaved strongly acidic samples of control soils showed high concentrations of triphenylformazan, probably due to chemical reduction of triphenyltetrazolium chloride. There is, therefore, a need for a sterilization method other than autoclaving, ie a process that results in significant changes in soil properties, thus helping to increase the chemical reduction of triphenyltetrazolium chloride.

  11. Rationally re-designed mutation of NAD-independent l-lactate dehydrogenase: high optical resolution of racemic mandelic acid by the engineered Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background NAD-independent l-lactate dehydrogenase (l-iLDH) from Pseudomonas stutzeri SDM can potentially be used for the kinetic resolution of small aliphatic 2-hydroxycarboxylic acids. However, this enzyme showed rather low activity towards aromatic 2-hydroxycarboxylic acids. Results Val-108 of l-iLDH was changed to Ala by rationally site-directed mutagenesis. The l-iLDH mutant exhibited much higher activity than wide-type l-iLDH towards l-mandelate, an aromatic 2-hydroxycarboxylic acid. Using the engineered Escherichia coli expressing the mutant l-iLDH as a biocatalyst, 40 g·L-1 of dl-mandelic acid was converted to 20.1 g·L-1 of d-mandelic acid (enantiomeric purity higher than 99.5%) and 19.3 g·L-1 of benzoylformic acid. Conclusions A new biocatalyst with high catalytic efficiency toward an unnatural substrate was constructed by rationally re-design mutagenesis. Two building block intermediates (optically pure d-mandelic acid and benzoylformic acid) were efficiently produced by the one-pot biotransformation system. PMID:23176608

  12. Aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities in lactobacilli and streptococci.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Guillermo Hugo; Bergamini, Carina Viviana; Hynes, Erica Rut

    2016-01-01

    Aminotransferases and glutamate dehydrogenase are two main types of enzymes involved in the initial steps of amino acid catabolism, which plays a key role in the cheese flavor development. In the present work, glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferase activities were screened in twenty one strains of lactic acid bacteria of dairy interest, either cheese-isolated or commercial starters, including fifteen mesophilic lactobacilli, four thermophilic lactobacilli, and two streptococci. The strains of Streptococcus thermophilus showed the highest glutamate dehydrogenase activity, which was significantly elevated compared with the lactobacilli. Aspartate aminotransferase prevailed in most strains tested, while the levels and specificity of other aminotransferases were highly strain- and species-dependent. The knowledge of enzymatic profiles of these starter and cheese-isolated cultures is helpful in proposing appropriate combinations of strains for improved or increased cheese flavor. PMID:27266631

  13. Identification of a novel operon in Lactococcus lactis encoding three enzymes for lactic acid synthesis: phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, R M; Harris, C J; Hillier, A J; Davidson, B E

    1993-01-01

    The discovery of a novel multicistronic operon that encodes phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is reported. The three genes in the operon, designated pfk, pyk, and ldh, contain 340, 502, and 325 codons, respectively. The intergenic distances are 87 bp between pfk and pyk and 117 bp between pyk and ldh. Plasmids containing pfk and pyk conferred phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase activity, respectively, on their host. The identity of ldh was established previously by the same approach (R. M. Llanos, A. J. Hillier, and B. E. Davidson, J. Bacteriol. 174:6956-6964, 1992). Each of the genes is preceded by a potential ribosome binding site. The operon is expressed in a 4.1-kb transcript. The 5' end of the transcript was determined to be a G nucleotide positioned 81 bp upstream from the pfk start codon. The pattern of codon usage within the operon is highly biased, with 11 unused amino acid codons. This degree of bias suggests that the operon is highly expressed. The three proteins encoded on the operon are key enzymes in the Embden-Meyerhoff pathway, the central pathway of energy production and lactic acid synthesis in L. lactis. For this reason, we have called the operon the las (lactic acid synthesis) operon. Images PMID:8478320

  14. A Streamlined, Automated Protocol for the Production of Milligram Quantities of Untagged Recombinant Rat Lactate Dehydrogenase A Using ÄKTAxpressTM

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, Matthew W.; Blackburn, Elizabeth A.; McNae, Iain W.; Wear, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    We developed an efficient, automated 2-step purification protocol for the production of milligram quantities of untagged recombinant rat lactate dehydrogenase A (rLDHA) from E. coli, using the ÄKTAxpress™ chromatography system. Cation exchange followed by size exclusion results in average final purity in excess of 93% and yields ~ 14 milligrams per 50 ml of original cell culture in EnPresso B media, in under 8 hrs, including all primary sample processing and column equilibration steps. The protein is highly active and coherent biophysically and a viable alternative to the more problematic human homolog for structural and ligand-binding studies; an apo structure of untagged rLDHA was solved to a resolution 2.29 Å (PDB ID 5ES3). Our automated methodology uses generic commercially available pre-packed columns and simple buffers, and represents a robust standard method for the production of milligram amounts of untagged rLDHA, facilitating a novel fragment screening approach for new inhibitors. PMID:26717415

  15. Engineering a d-lactate dehydrogenase that can super-efficiently utilize NADPH and NADH as cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hengkai; Liu, Pi; Sun, Hongbing; Cai, Zhen; Zhou, Jie; Lin, Jianping; Li, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Engineering the cofactor specificity of a natural enzyme often results in a significant decrease in its activity on original cofactor. Here we report that a NADH-dependent dehydrogenase (d-LDH) from Lactobacillus delbrueckii 11842 can be rationally engineered to efficiently use both NADH and NADPH as cofactors. Point mutations on three amino acids (D176S, I177R, F178T) predicted by computational analysis resulted in a modified enzyme designated as d-LDH*. The Kcat/Km of the purified d-LDH* on NADPH increased approximately 184-fold while the Kcat/Km on NADH also significantly increased, showing for the first time that a rationally engineered d-LDH could exhibit comparable activity on both NADPH and NADH. Further kinetic analysis revealed that the enhanced affinity with NADH or NADPH and the significant increased Kcat of d-LDH* resulted in the significant increase of d-LDH* activity on both NADPH and NADH. This study thus demonstrated that the cofactor specificity of dehydrogenase can be broadened by using targeted engineering approach, and the engineered enzyme can efficiently function in NADH-rich, or NADPH-rich, or NADH and NADPH-rich environment. PMID:27109778

  16. Impact of Pre-Treatment Lactate Dehydrogenase Levels on Prognosis and Bevacizumab Efficacy in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Passardi, Alessandro; Scarpi, Emanuela; Tamberi, Stefano; Cavanna, Luigi; Tassinari, Davide; Fontana, Annalisa; Pini, Sara; Bernardini, Ilaria; Accettura, Caterina; Ulivi, Paola; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca; Amadori, Dino

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the impact of pre-treatment lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels on the outcome of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with first-line chemotherapy with or without the anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody, bevacizumab, in a phase III prospective multicentre randomized ITACa (Italian Trial in Advanced Colorectal Cancer) trial. Methods Three hundred and seventy patients enrolled onto the ITACa first-line trial were considered for this study, 176 receiving chemotherapy (either FOLFIRI or FOLFOX) plus bevacizumab and 194 receiving chemotherapy only. Pre-treatment LDH levels were evaluated to identify a potential correlation with progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and objective response rate. Results Information on pre-treatment LDH levels was available for 344 patients. High LDH levels were predictive of a lower median PFS (8.1 months vs. 9.2 months, p< 0.0001) and median OS (16.1 months vs. 25.2 months, p< 0.0001) in the overall population. In the chemotherapy plus bevacizumab group, median PFS was 9.1 and 9.8 months in patients with high LDH and low LDH, respectively (p= 0.073), whereas in the chemotherapy-only arm it was 6.9 and 9.1 months, respectively (p < 0.0001). In patients with high LDH, the addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy led to a reduction in the rate of progressive disease (16.4 vs. 30.5%, p= 0.081) and to a prolonged PFS (p= 0.028). Conclusion A high LDH value was confirmed as a marker of poor prognosis. Bevacizumab reduced the progressive disease rate and improved PFS in the high-LDH subgroup, making serum LDH a potentially effective an easily available and marker to select patients who benefit from bevacizumab. Trial Registration NCT01878422 ClinicalTrials.gov PMID:26244985

  17. Prognostic value of combined preoperative lactate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase levels in patients with resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ji, Fei; Fu, Shun-Jun; Guo, Zhi-Yong; Pang, Hui; Ju, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Dong-Ping; Hua, Yun-Peng; He, Xiao-Shun

    2016-07-01

    Serum enzymes, including lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), have recently been reported to play important roles in tumor growth. Increases in LDH and ALP have been confirmed to predict poor prognosis in patients with various cancers. However, their prognostic value in pancreatic cancer has not been well studied. Therefore, we reviewed the preoperative data on LDH and ALP in 185 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients who underwent surgery between July 2005 and December 2010 to explore the prognostic value of these markers. The cutoff points were determined based on the upper limit of their normal values. The Chi-square test was used to analyze the relationships between LDH/ALP and clinical characteristics. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the predictive value of the above factors for disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). We found that elevation of LDH was related to carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), lymph node involvement, tumor size, TNM, distant metastasis, and recurrence. Additionally, ALP was correlated to perineural invasion. After multivariate analysis, LDH and ALP were identified as independent prognostic factors for DFS and OS, and elevation of LDH/ALP was correlated with poor DFS and OS. Notably, there was a positive correlation between LDH and ALP. The predictive power of LDH combined with ALP was more sensitive than that of either one alone. Therefore, we conclude that the preoperative LDH and ALP values are prognostic factors for PADC, and the prognostic accuracy of testing can be enhanced by the combination of LDH and ALP. PMID:27399091

  18. Lactate dehydrogenase release as an indicator of dithranol-induced membrane injury in cultured human keratinocytes. A time profile study.

    PubMed

    Bonnekoh, B; Farkas, B; Geisel, J; Mahrle, G

    1990-01-01

    HaCaT cells, a rapidly multiplying human keratinocyte line, were tested for their sensitivity to antipsoriatic dithranol with regard to classical proliferation parameters and for the drug's action on the plasma membrane integrity by the dose- and time-dependent release of cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). In the case of 3H thymidine as well as 14C amino acid incorporation the 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) was 0.2 microM dithranol 24 h after initial exposure to the drug. For protein content of attached cells the IC50 proved to be greater than 3.0 microM. Using 0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 microM dithranol, significant (p less than 0.05) dose dependent LDH release of 0.866 +/- 0.387, 1.842 +/- 1.127 and 2.938 +/- 1.635 mU per hour and cm2 confluent culture area was measured between the 5th and the 24th hour, compared to an acetone control of 0.504 +/- 0.299 mU/h x cm2. Between the 2nd and the 4th hour as well as from the 25th to the 48th hour and the 49th to the 72nd hour the LDH release after dithranol treatment did not exceed the control value. In accordance with these findings dose-dependent morphological signs of cell injury were detected by phase contrast microscopy beyond the 4th hour. The data reveal that: HaCaT cells are a very sensitive target for the antiproliferative action of dithranol; the drug causes considerable plasma membrane damage even at concentrations as low as 0.3 microM; and this membrane damage becomes evident after a latency of at least 4 h and for a limited period of up to 24 h. PMID:2221984

  19. Pyruvate Kinase M2 and Lactate Dehydrogenase A Are Overexpressed in Pancreatic Cancer and Correlate with Poor Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Goran Hamid; Olde Damink, S. W. M.; Malago, Massimo; Dhar, Dipok Kumar; Pereira, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Despite advances in diagnostic technology, pancreatic cancer continues to be diagnosed at a late and incurable stage. Accurate biomarkers for early diagnosis and to predict treatment response are urgently needed. Since alteration of glucose metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer cells, we proposed that pyruvate kinase type M2 (M2PK) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) enzymes could represent novel diagnostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in pancreatic cancer. In 266 tissue sections from normal pancreas, pancreatic cystic neoplasms, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and cancer, we evaluated the expression of PKM2, LDHA, Ki-67 and CD8+ by immunohistochemistry and correlated these markers with clinicopathological characteristics and patient survival. PKM2 and LDHA expression was also assessed by Western blot in 10 human pancreatic cancer cell lines. PKM2 expression increased progressively from cyst through PanIN to cancer, whereas LDHA was overexpressed throughout the carcinogenic process. All but one cell line showed high expression of both proteins. Patients with strong PKM2 and LDHA expression had significantly worse survival than those with weak PKM2 and/or LDHA expression (7.0 months vs. 27.9 months, respectively, p = 0.003, log rank test). The expression of both PKM2 and LDHA correlated directly with Ki-67 expression, and inversely with intratumoral CD8+ cell count. PKM2 was significantly overexpressed in poorly differentiated tumours and both PKM2 and LDHA were overexpressed in larger tumours. Multivariable analysis showed that combined expression of PKM2 and LDHA was an independent poor prognostic marker for survival. In conclusion, our results demonstrate a high expression pattern of two major glycolytic enzymes during pancreatic carcinogenesis, with increased expression in aggressive tumours and a significant adverse effect on survival. PMID:26989901

  20. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and glucose metabolism in post-ischaemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Schöder, H; Knight, R J; Kofoed, K F; Schelbert, H R; Buxton, D B

    1998-02-27

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is regulated both by covalent modification and through modulation of the active enzyme by metabolites. In the isolated heart, post-ischaemic inhibition of PDH, leading to uncoupling of glycolysis and glucose oxidation and a decrease in cardiac efficiency, has been described. In vivo, post-ischaemic reperfusion leads to metabolic abnormalities consistent with PDH inhibition, but the effects of ischaemia/reperfusion on PDH are not well characterized. We therefore investigated PDH regulation following transient ischaemia in vivo. In 33 open-chest dogs, the left anterior descending (LAD) was occluded for 20 min followed by 4 h reperfusion. In 17 dogs, dichloroacetate (DCA) was injected prior to reperfusion, while 16 dogs served as controls. In dogs without DCA, glucose oxidation and lactate uptake were lower in reperfused than in remote tissue, suggesting reduced flux through PDH. However, percent active and total PDH measured in myocardial biopsies were similar in both territories, excluding covalent enzyme modification or loss of functional enzyme. DCA activated PDH activity similarly in both regions and abolished differences in glucose oxidation and lactate uptake. Thus, decreased PDH flux in reperfused myocardium does not result from covalent modification or loss of total enzyme activity, but more likely from metabolite inhibition of the active enzyme. DCA leads to essentially complete activation of PDH, increases overall glucose utilization and abolishes post-ischaemic inhibition of glucose oxidation. PMID:9545535

  1. Spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity in forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błońska, Ewa; Lasota, Jarosław

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity (DH) in forest soils using geostatistics. We have studied variability soil dehydrogenase and their relationship with variability of some physic-chemical properties. Two study areas (A and B) were set up in southern Poland in the Zlotoryja Forest District. Study areas were covered by different types of vegetation (A- broadleaf forest with beech, ash and sycamore), B- coniferous forest with Norway spruce). The soils were classified as Dystric Cambisols (WRB 2006). The samples for laboratory testing were collected from 49 places on each areas. 15 cm of surface horizon of soil were taken (with previously removed litter). Dehydrogenase activity was marked with Lenhard's method according to the Casida procedure. Soil pH, nitrogen (N) and soil organic carbon (C) content (by LECO CNS 2000 carbon analyzer) was marked. C/N ratio was calculated. Particle size composition was determined using laser diffraction. Statistical analysis were performed using STATISTICA 10 software. Geostatistical analysis and mapping were done by application of GS 9+ (Gamma Design) and Surfer 11 (Golden Software). The activity of DH ranged between 5,02 and 71,20 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1 on the A area and between 0,94 and 16,47 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1. Differences in spatial variability of the analised features were noted. The variability of dehydrogenase activity on the A study area was described by an exponential model, whereas on the B study area the spatial correlation has not been noted. The relationship of dehydrogenase activity with the remaining parameters of soil was noted only in the case of A study area. The variability of organic carbon content on the A and B study areas were described by an exponential model. The variability of nitrogen content on both areas were described by an spherical model.

  2. Effect of a Marathon Run on Serum Lipoproteins, Creatine Kinase, and Lactate Dehydrogenase in Recreational Runners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobayashi, Yoshio; Takeuchi, Toshiko; Hosoi, Teruo; Yoshizaki, Hidekiyo; Loeppky, Jack A.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a marathon run on serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations and serum muscle enzyme activities and follow their recovery after the run. These blood concentrations were measured before, immediately after, and serially after a marathon run in 15 male recreational runners. The triglyceride…

  3. The management of metastatic germ cell tumours and the clinical utility of lactate dehydrogenase estimations.

    PubMed

    Gill, P G; Abbott, R; Jones, A M; Thomas, D W

    1985-04-01

    Forty-five patients with metastatic germ cell tumour were treated with chemotherapy. Complete remission was achieved in 63% of all cases and in 65% of patients whose primary tumour arose in the testis or ovary. Surgical resection of abdominal masses persisting after chemotherapy was performed in seven patients, two of whom were found to have persistent tumours. Twenty-seven of the 33 patients with teratoma originating in the gonads remain in complete remission. Total serum LDH activity was elevated in 28 of the patients with measurable disease. The increased LDH was not accompanied by significant alteration in other hepatic enzymes nor were hepatic metastases demonstrable in these patients. Fractionation of the LDH demonstrated that the increased LDH in these patients was located in either iso-enzymes 1 or fractions 1 + 2. Alteration of the serum LDH activity correlated with the response to therapy and warrants further study. PMID:2412541

  4. Bioactivity-Guided Identification and Cell Signaling Technology to Delineate the Lactate Dehydrogenase A Inhibition Effects of Spatholobus suberectus on Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiyu; Wang, Dongmei; Han, Shouwei; Wang, Neng; Mo, Feizhi; Loo, Tjing Yung; Shen, Jiangang; Huang, Hui; Chen, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis is an important feature of cancer cells. In recent years, lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A) is emerging as a novel therapeutic target for cancer treatment. Seeking LDH-A inhibitors from natural resources has been paid much attention for drug discovery. Spatholobus suberectus (SS) is a common herbal medicine used in China for treating blood-stasis related diseases such as cancer. This study aims to explore the potential medicinal application of SS for LDH-A inhibition on breast cancer and to determine its bioactive compounds. We found that SS manifested apoptosis-inducing, cell cycle arresting and anti-LDH-A activities in both estrogen-dependent human MCF-7 cells and estrogen-independent MDA-MB-231 cell. Oral herbal extracts (1 g/kg/d) administration attenuated tumor growth and LDH-A expression in both breast cancer xenografts. Bioactivity-guided fractionation finally identified epigallocatechin as a key compound in SS inhibiting LDH-A activity. Further studies revealed that LDH-A plays a critical role in mediating the apoptosis-induction effects of epigallocatechin. The inhibited LDH-A activities by epigallocatechin is attributed to disassociation of Hsp90 from HIF-1α and subsequent accelerated HIF-1α proteasome degradation. In vivo study also demonstrated that epigallocatechin could significantly inhibit breast cancer growth, HIF-1α/LDH-A expression and trigger apoptosis without bringing toxic effects. The preclinical study thus suggests that the potential medicinal application of SS for inhibiting cancer LDH-A activity and the possibility to consider epigallocatechin as a lead compound to develop LDH-A inhibitors. Future studies of SS for chemoprevention or chemosensitization against breast cancer are thus warranted. PMID:23457597

  5. Molecular characterization of CcpA and involvement of this protein in transcriptional regulation of lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate formate-lyase in the ruminal bacterium Streptococcus bovis.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Narito; Yoshii, Takahiro; Hino, Tsuneo

    2004-09-01

    A ccpA gene that encodes global catabolite control protein A (CcpA) in Streptococcus bovis was identified and characterized, and the involvement of CcpA in transcriptional control of a gene (ldh) encoding lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and a gene (pfl) encoding pyruvate formate-lyase (PFL) was examined. The ccpA gene was shown to be transcribed as a monocistronic operon. A catabolite-responsive element (cre) was found in the promoter region of ccpA, suggesting that ccpA transcription in S. bovis is autogenously regulated. CcpA required HPr that was phosphorylated at the serine residue at position 46 (HPr-[Ser-P]) for binding to the cre site, but glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, and NADP had no effect on binding. Diauxic growth was observed when S. bovis was grown in a medium containing glucose and lactose, but it disappeared when ccpA was disrupted, which indicates that CcpA is involved in catabolite repression in S. bovis. The level of ccpA mRNA was higher when cells were grown on glucose than when they were grown on lactose, which was in line with the level of ldh mRNA. When cells were grown on glucose, the ldh mRNA level was lower but the pfl mRNA level was higher in a ccpA-disrupted mutant than in the parent strain, which suggests that ldh transcription is enhanced and pfl transcription is suppressed by CcpA. The ccpA-disrupted mutant produced less lactate and more formate than the parent, probably because the mutant had reduced LDH activity and elevated PFL activity. In the upper region of both ldh and pfl, a cre-like sequence was found, suggesting that the complex consisting of CcpA and HPr-[Ser-P] binds to the possible cre sites. Thus, CcpA appears to be involved in the global regulation of sugar utilization in S. bovis. PMID:15345406

  6. Cloning of the Staphylococcus aureus ddh gene encoding NAD+-dependent D-lactate dehydrogenase and insertional inactivation in a glycopeptide-resistant isolate.

    PubMed Central

    Boyle-Vavra, S; de Jonge, B L; Ebert, C C; Daum, R S

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of low-level glycopeptide resistance among staphylococci is not known. A cytoplasmic protein, provisionally called Ddh (W. M. Milewski, S. Boyle-Vavra, B. Moreira, C. C. Ebert, and R. S. Daum, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 40:166-172, 1996), and the RNA transcript that contains the ddh gene, which encodes Ddh, are present in increased amounts in a vancomycin-resistant isolate, 523k, compared with the susceptible parent isolate, 523. Sequence analysis had previously revealed that Ddh is related to NAD+-dependent D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-nLDH) and VanH. This latter protein is essential for high-level glycopeptide resistance in Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis by synthesizing the D-lactate needed for biosynthesis of D-lactate-terminating peptidoglycan precursors with low affinity for vancomycin. We now provide the direct evidence that the ddh gene product is Staphylococcus aureus D-nLDH and hereafter refer to the protein as D-nLDH. However, overproduction of this protein in isolate 523k did not result in production of D-lactate-containing peptidoglycan precursors, and susceptibility testing of ddh mutants of 523k demonstrated that S. aureus D-nLDH is not necessary for glycopeptide resistance in this isolate. We conclude that the mechanism of glycopeptide resistance in this isolate is distinct from that in enterococci. PMID:9352927

  7. Lactate dehydrogenase test

    MedlinePlus

    ... injury Muscle weakness and loss of muscle tissue ( muscular dystrophy ) New abnormal tissue formation (usually cancer) Pancreatitis Stroke ... test LDH isoenzyme blood test Liver disease Mononucleosis Muscular dystrophy Pernicious anemia Stroke Vitamin B12 deficiency anemia Update ...

  8. A thioredoxin fusion protein of VanH, a D-lactate dehydrogenase from Enterococcus faecium: cloning, expression, purification, kinetic analysis, and crystallization.

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, V. S.; Manohar, A. V.; Gillon, W.; MacFarlane, E. L.; Hynes, R. C.; Pai, E. F.

    1998-01-01

    The gene encoding the vancomycin resistance protein VanH from Enterococcus faecium, a D-lactate dehydrogenase, has been cloned into a thioredoxin expression system (pTRxFus) and expressed as a fusion protein. The use of several other expression systems yielded only inclusion bodies from which no functional protein could be recovered. Experiments to remove the thioredoxin moiety by enterokinase cleavage at the engineered recognition site under a variety of conditions resulted in nonspecific proteolysis and inactivation of the protein. The intact fusion protein was, therefore, used for kinetic studies and crystallization trials. It has been purified to greater than 90% homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by phenyl Sepharose chromatography. Based on k(cat)/KM for pyruvate, it is 20% as active as native VanH. Michaelis constants for NADPH, NADH, and pyruvate, of approximately 3.5 microM, 19.0 microM, and 1.5 mM, respectively, were comparable to those reported for the native VanH (Bugg TDH et al., 1991, Biochemistry 30:10408-10415). Like native VanH, maximum activity of the fusion protein requires the presence of an anion (phosphate or acetate), however, in addition, a strongly reducing environment is needed for optimal efficacy. Competitive inhibition constants for ADP-ribose, NAD+, and oxamate have also been determined. Crystallization by hanging drop vapor diffusion produced two different crystal forms, one hexagonal and the other tetragonal. Flash-frozen crystals of the tetragonal form diffracted to 3.0 A resolution at a synchrotron radiation source. PMID:9605319

  9. Novel yeast cell dehydrogenase activity assay in situ.

    PubMed

    Berłowska, Joanna; Kregiel, Dorota; Klimek, Leszek; Orzeszyna, Bartosz; Ambroziak, Wojciech

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a suitable method of succinate dehydrogenase activity assay in situ for different industrial yeast strains. For this purpose different compounds: EDTA, Triton X-100, sodium deoxycholate, digitonin, nystatin and beta-mercaptoethanol were used. The permeabilization process was controlled microscopically by primuline staining. Enzyme assay was conducted in whole yeast cells with Na-succinate as substrate, phenazine methosulfate (PMS) as electron carrier and in the presence one of two different tetrazolium salts: tetrazolium blue chloride (BT) or cyanoditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) reduced during the assay. In comparabile studies of yeast vitality the amount of intracellular ATP was determined according to luciferin/luciferase method. During the succinate dehydrogenase assay in intact yeast cells without permeabilization, BT formazans were partially visualized in the cells, but CTC formazans appeared to be totally extracellular or associated with the plasma membrane. Under these conditions there was no linear relationship between formazan color intensity signal and yeast cell density. From all chemical compounds tested, only digitonin was effective in membrane permeabilization without negative influence on cell morphology. Furthermore, with digitonin-treated cells a linear relationship between formazan color intensity signal and yeast cell number was noticed. Significant decreasing of succinate dehydrogenase activity and ATP content were observed during aging of the tested yeast strains. PMID:17419290

  10. Screening and isolation of potential lactate dehydrogenase inhibitors from five Chinese medicinal herbs: Soybean, Radix pueraria, Flos pueraria, Rhizoma belamcandae, and Radix astragali.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ying; Li, Senlin; Li, Sainan; Yang, Xiaojing; Qin, Yao; Zhang, Yuchi; Liu, Chunming

    2016-06-01

    Stroke is among the leading causes of death and severe disability worldwide. Flavonoids have been extensively used in the treatment of ischemic stroke by reducing lactate dehydrogenase levels and thereby enhancing blood perfusion to the ischemic region. Here, we used ultrafiltration high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array detection and mass spectrometry for the rapid screening and identification of flavonoids from five Chinese medicinal herbs: soybean, Radix pueraria, Flos pueraria, Rhizoma belamcandae, and Radix astragali. Using PC12 cells as a suitable in vitro model of toxicity, cell viability was quantitated using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The results showed that the extracts of soybean and the six major components, namely, acetyldaidzin, malonylgenistin, daidiain, glycitin, genistin, and acetylcitin; the extract of R. pueraria and its main component daidzein; the extract of F. pueraria and its three major components, tectorigenin, tectoridin, and tectorigenin-7-O-xylosylglucosid; and the extract of R. belamcandae and its main component, tectoridin, were strong lactate dehydrogenase inhibitors. Also, the components of R. astragali showed no bioactivity. These findings indicate that the ultrafltration high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array detection and mass spectrometry method could be utilized in rapid screening and separation of bioactive compounds from a complex matrix. PMID:27059876

  11. Chitosan promotes immune responses, ameliorates glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase and glutamic pyruvic transaminase, but enhances lactate dehydrogenase levels in normal mice in vivo

    PubMed Central

    YEH, MING-YANG; SHIH, YUNG-LUEN; CHUNG, HSUEH-YU; CHOU, JASON; LU, HSU-FENG; LIU, CHIA-HUI; LIU, JIA-YOU; HUANG, WEN-WEN; PENG, SHU-FEN; WU, LUNG-YUAN; CHUNG, JING-GUNG

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan, a naturally derived polymer, has been shown to possess antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties; however, little is known about the effect of chitosan on the immune responses and glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities in normal mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether chitosan has an effect on the immune responses and GOT, GPT and LDH activities in mice in vivo. BALB/c mice were divided into four groups. The negative control group was treated with a normal diet; the positive control group was treated with a normal diet plus orally administered acetic acid and two treatment groups were treated with a normal diet plus orally administered chitosan in acetic acid at doses of 5 and 20 mg/kg, respectively, every other day for 24 days. Mice were weighed during the treatment, and following the treatment, blood was collected, and liver and spleen samples were isolated and weighted. The blood samples were used for measurement of white blood cell markers, and the spleen samples were used for analysis of phagocytosis, natural killer (NK) cell activity and cell proliferation using flow cytometry. The results indicated that chitosan did not markedly affect the body, liver and spleen weights at either dose. Chitosan increased the percentages of CD3 (T-cell marker), CD19 (B-cell marker), CD11b (monocytes) and Mac-3 (macrophages) when compared with the control group. However, chitosan did not affect the phagocytic activity of macrophages in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, although it decreased it in the peritoneal cavity. Treatment with 20 mg/kg chitosan led to a reduction in the cytotoxic activity of NK cells at an effector to target ratio of 25:1. Chitosan did not significantly promote B-cell proliferation in lipopolysaccharide-pretreated cells, but significantly decreased T-cell proliferation in concanavalin A-pretreated cells, and decreased the activity of

  12. Lactic acid-producing yeast cells having nonfunctional L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome C oxidoreductase cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Matthew; Suominen, Pirkko; Aristidou, Aristos; Hause, Benjamin Matthew; Van Hoek, Pim; Dundon, Catherine Asleson

    2012-03-20

    Yeast cells having an exogenous lactate dehydrogenase gene ae modified by reducing L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome c oxidoreductase activity in the cell. This leads to reduced consumption of lactate by the cell and can increase overall lactate yields in a fermentation process. Cells having the reduced L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome c oxidoreductase activity can be screened for by resistance to organic acids such as lactic or glycolic acid.

  13. Evaluation of three parasite lactate dehydrogenase-based rapid diagnostic tests for the diagnosis of falciparum and vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, Elizabeth A; Touabi, Malek; Ahrer, Margareta; Hutagalung, Robert; Htun, Khayae; Luchavez, Jennifer; Dureza, Christine; Proux, Stephane; Leimanis, Mara; Lwin, Myo Min; Koscalova, Alena; Comte, Eric; Hamade, Prudence; Page, Anne-Laure; Nosten, François; Guerin, Philippe J

    2009-01-01

    Background In areas where non-falciparum malaria is common rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) capable of distinguishing malaria species reliably are needed. Such tests are often based on the detection of parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH). Methods In Dawei, southern Myanmar, three pLDH based RDTs (CareStart™ Malaria pLDH (Pan), CareStart™ Malaria pLDH (Pan, Pf) and OptiMAL-IT®)were evaluated in patients presenting with clinically suspected malaria. Each RDT was read independently by two readers. A subset of patients with microscopically confirmed malaria had their RDTs repeated on days 2, 7 and then weekly until negative. At the end of the study, samples of study batches were sent for heat stability testing. Results Between August and November 2007, 1004 patients aged between 1 and 93 years were enrolled in the study. Slide microscopy (the reference standard) diagnosed 213 Plasmodium vivax (Pv) monoinfections, 98 Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) mono-infections and no malaria in 650 cases. The sensitivities (sens) and specificities (spec), of the RDTs for the detection of malaria were- CareStart Malaria™ pLDH (Pan) test: sens 89.1% [CI95 84.2-92.6], spec 97.6% [CI95 96.5-98.4] OptiMal-IT®: Pf+/- other species detection: sens 95.2% [CI95 87.5-98.2], spec 94.7% [CI95 93.3-95.8]; non-Pf detection alone: sens 89.6% [CI95 83.6-93.6], spec 96.5% [CI95 94.8-97.7] CareStart Malaria™ pLDH (Pan, Pf): Pf+/- other species: sens 93.5% [CI9585.4-97.3], spec 97.4% [95.9-98.3]; non-Pf: sens 78.5% [CI9571.1-84.4], spec 97.8% [CI95 96.3-98.7] Inter-observer agreement was excellent for all tests (kappa > 0.9). The median time for the RDTs to become negative was two days for the CareStart™ Malaria tests and seven days for OptiMAL-IT®. Tests were heat stable up to 90 days except for OptiMAL-IT® (Pf specific pLDH stable to day 20 at 35°C). Conclusion None of the pLDH-based RDTs evaluated was able to detect non-falciparum malaria with high sensitivity, particularly at low

  14. [Lysozyme activity in the milk of sucking mares during lactation].

    PubMed

    Hatzipanagiotou, A; Rieland, E; Enbergs, H

    1998-04-01

    It was the aim of this project to investigate the changes of the lysozyme activity in the milk of mares during the lactation period. Further on the influence of race, date of conception and foaling, age and number of lactations on the lysozyme activities in milk was analysed. Milk samples were collected from 44 mares (trotters, warmblood, quarter horses) from eight farms between the 1st and 90th day p. p. The activity of the lysozyme was measured by a turbidometric method. Summarizing the following results are obtained: Lysozyme activities in mare milk of the 1st and 3rd day p. p. were higher than in mature milk. On average the highest lysozyme activity (Xa = 113.600 +/- 25.171 U/ml) was measured on the 3rd day p. p. Until the 9th day p. p. the activity decreased about 25%, afterwards there was only a slight decrease. The lowest activity (Xa = 57.509 +/- 14.606 U/ml) was measured at the 83rd day p. p. The influence of race and conception time proved to be statistically significant resp. highly significant. PMID:9618986

  15. Functional response of the isolated, perfused normoxic heart to pyruvate dehydrogenase activation by dichloroacetate and pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Jaimes, Rafael; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Brooks, Daina M.; Swift, Luther M.; Posnack, Nikki G.; Kay, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) and pyruvate activate pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), a key enzyme that modulates glucose oxidation and mitochondrial NADH production. Both compounds improve recovery after ischemia in isolated hearts. However, the action of DCA and pyruvate in normoxic myocardium is incompletely understood. We measured the effect of DCA and pyruvate on contraction, mitochondrial redox state, and intracellular calcium cycling in isolated rat hearts during normoxic perfusion. Normalized epicardial NADH fluorescence (nNADH) and left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) were measured before and after administering DCA (5 mM) or pyruvate (5 mM). Optical mapping of Rhod-2AM was used to measure cytosolic calcium kinetics. DCA maximally activated PDH, increasing the ratio of active to total PDH from 0.48±0.03 to 1.03 ±0.03. Pyruvate sub-maximally activated PDH to a ratio of 0.75±0.02. DCA and pyruvate increased LVDP. When glucose was the only exogenous fuel, pyruvate increased nNADH by 21.4±2.9 % while DCA reduced nNADH by 21.4±6.1 % and elevated the incidence of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). When lactate, pyruvate, and glucose were provided together as exogenous fuels, nNADH increased with DCA, indicating that PDH activation with glucose as the only exogenous fuel depletes PDH substrate. Calcium transient time-to-peak was shortened by DCA and pyruvate and SR calcium re-uptake was 30 % longer. DCA and pyruvate increased SR calcium load in myocyte monolayers. Overall, during normoxia when glucose is the only exogenous fuel, DCA elevates SR calcium, increases LVDP and contractility, and diminishes mitochondrial NADH. Administering DCA with plasma levels of lactate and pyruvate mitigates the drop in mitochondrial NADH and prevents PVCs. PMID:26142699

  16. Carbon Flux Trapping: Highly Efficient Production of Polymer-Grade d-Lactic Acid with a Thermophilic d-Lactate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Tao, Fei; Xu, Ping

    2016-08-17

    High production of polymer-grade d-lactic acid is urgently required, particularly for the synthesis of polylactic acid. High-temperature fermentation has multiple advantages, such as lower equipment requirement and energy consumption, which are essential for lowering operating costs. We identified and introduced a unique d-lactate dehydrogenase into a thermotolerant butane-2,3-diol-producing strain. Carbon flux "trapping" was achieved by a "trapping point" created by combination of the introduced enzyme and the host efflux pump, which afforded irreversible transport of d-lactic acid. The overall carbon flux of the engineered strain was significantly enhanced and was redistributed predominantly to d-lactic acid. Under optimized conditions at 50 °C, d-lactic acid reached the highest titer (226.6 g L(-1) ) reported to date. This discovery allows us to extend the carbon flux trapping strategy to engineering complex metabolic networks. PMID:27237045

  17. Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography on Co2+-carboxymethylaspartate-agarose Superflow, as demonstrated by one-step purification of lactate dehydrogenase from chicken breast muscle.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G; Hopp, J; Nelson, P

    1999-02-01

    A rapid method for the purification of lactate dehydrogenase from whole chicken muscle extract in one chromatographic step is reported. The purification procedure can be accomplished in less than 1 h. A new type of immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography adsorbent is used that can be utilized at linear flow rates higher than 5 cm/min. The final preparation of the enzyme was with purity higher than 95% as ascertained by SDS-PAGE. Three immobilized metal ions (Ni2+, Zn2+ and Co2+) were compared for their binding properties towards the purified enzyme. The binding site of the enzyme for immobilized intermediate metal ions was determined after cleavage with CNBr and binding studies of the derivative peptides on immobilized Co2+. A peptide located on the N-terminus of the enzyme, implicated in the binding, has great potential as a purification tag in fusion proteins. PMID:9889081

  18. Microbial metabolic activity in soil as measured by dehydrogenase determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The dehydrogenase technique for measuring the metabolic activity of microorganisms in soil was modified to use a 6-h, 37 C incubation with either glucose or yeast extract as the electron-donating substrate. The rate of formazan production remained constant during this time interval, and cellular multiplication apparently did not occur. The technique was used to follow changes in the overall metabolic activities of microorganisms in soil undergoing incubation with a limiting concentration of added nutrient. The sequence of events was similar to that obtained by using the Warburg respirometer to measure O2 consumption. However, the major peaks of activity occurred earlier with the respirometer. This possibly is due to the lack of atmospheric CO2 during the O2 consumption measurements.

  19. Elevated pretreatment serum levels of soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and lactate dehydrogenase as predictors of survival in cutaneous metastatic malignant melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Franzke, A.; Probst-Kepper, M.; Buer, J.; Duensing, S.; Hoffmann, R.; Wittke, F.; Volkenandt, M.; Ganser, A.; Atzpodien, J.

    1998-01-01

    Very rapid progression of disease with a median survival of 6-9 months is a common feature of metastatic cutaneous malignant melanoma. Nevertheless, substantial variability of survival suggests that metastatic cutaneous malignant melanoma can be divided into several biological subgroups. Pretreatment serum levels of soluble adhesion molecules and various clinical parameters in cutaneous metastatic malignant melanoma were evaluated to determine their prognostic value. In this study pretreatment serum levels of soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (sVCAM-1), soluble intercellular cell adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1), soluble endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 (sE-selectin) and multiple clinical factors were assessed in relation to overall survival of 97 consecutive patients with metastatic cutaneous malignant melanoma seen at our institution between May 1990 and April 1996. For statistical analysis, both univariate and multivariate Cox proportional-hazards models were used. Elevated pretreatment serum levels of sVCAM-1 (P < 0.005) and of lactate dehydrogenase (P < 0.002) were rendered statistically independent and were significantly associated with unfavourable outcome. Patients were assigned to one of three risk categories (low, intermediate and high) according to a cumulative risk score defined as the function of the sum of these two variables. There were significant differences in overall survival (P < 0.0001) between low- (n = 53, 5-year survival probability of 23.3%), intermediate- (n = 29, 5-year survival probability of 9.9%) and high-risk (n = 15) patients. Elevated pretreatment serum levels of sVCAM-1 and of lactate dehydrogenase correlate with poor outcome in metastatic cutaneous malignant melanoma. These data support risk stratification for future therapeutic trials and identify factors that need to be validated in prospective studies and may potentially influence decision-making in palliative management of patients with disseminated cutaneous

  20. Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and quantity decreases after coronary artery bypass grafting: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Lars W.; Liu, Xiaowen; Peng, Teng J.; Giberson, Tyler A.; Khabbaz, Kamal R.; Donnino, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is a key gatekeeper enzyme in aerobic metabolism. The main purpose of this study was to determine if PDH activity is affected by major stress in the form of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) which has previously been used as a model of critical illness. Methods We conducted a prospective, observational study of patients undergoing CABG at an urban, tertiary care hospital. We included adult patients undergoing CABG with or without concomitant valve surgery. Measurements of PDH activity and quantity and thiamine were obtained prior to surgery, at the completion of surgery, and 6 hours post-surgery. Results Fourteen patients were enrolled (age: 67 ± 10 years, 21 % female). Study subjects had a mean 41.7 % (SD: 27.7) reduction in PDH activity after surgery and a mean 32.0% (SD: 31.4) reduction 6 hours after surgery (p < 0.001). Eight patients were thiamine deficient (≤ 7 nmol/L) after surgery compared to none prior to surgery (p = 0.002). Thiamine level was a significantly associated with PDH quantity at all time points (p = 0.01). Post-surgery lactate levels were inversely correlated with post-surgery thiamine levels (r = −0.58 and p = 0.04). Conclusion The stress of major surgery causes decreased PDH activity and quantity, and depletion of thiamine levels. PMID:25526377

  1. Blood-derived proteins in milk at start of lactation: Indicators of active or passive transfer.

    PubMed

    Wall, Samantha K; Gross, Josef J; Kessler, Evelyne C; Villez, Kris; Bruckmaier, Rupert M

    2015-11-01

    Colostrum has a different composition compared with milk in established lactation. This difference is in part due to the partially open blood-milk barrier, which, when closed, is designed to prevent the interdiffusion of blood and milk components. In the first days of lactation, α-lactalbumin (α-LA), a milk protein, is typically present in blood and several blood-derived proteins are also present in milk, such as IgG1, IgG2, serum albumin (SA), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). With the exception of IgG1, which is known to be transferred by active transcellular transport, the other proteins are thought to pass paracellularly through the temporarily open barrier. Along with an exchange of blood and milk components, somatic cell count (SCC) is typically high in colostrum. The decline of these proteins and SCC can be used as indicators to determine transcellular or paracellular transport. Two hypotheses were tested. The first hypothesis was that the decline curve for a protein or SCC would be the same as IgG1, indicating transcellular transport, or the decline curve would be different than IgG1, indicating paracellular transport. The second hypothesis was that the decline curves of SCC and all proteins that are thought to have paracellular transport would be the same. Ten Holstein cows were milked at 4 h after parturition, the next 5 consecutive milkings, and the afternoon milking on d 5, 8, 10, and 14 of lactation for a total of 10 milking time points, and sequential jugular blood samples were also taken. Blood and milk samples were analyzed for the concentrations of LDH, SA, IgG1, IgG2, and α-LA and milk samples were measured for SCC. Protein concentration and SCC curves were generated from all 10 time points and were evaluated using the tau time constant model to determine the rate of decline of the slope of each protein. When examining the first hypothesis, the concentration of IgG1 declined significantly faster in the milk than the proteins IgG2 and LDH, but

  2. A chemically modified carbon paste electrode with d-lactate dehydrogenase and alanine aminotranferase enzyme sequences for d-lactic acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Shu, H C; Wu, N P

    2001-04-12

    An amperometric biosensor was constructed for the analysis of d-lactic acid based on immobilizing d-lactate dehydrogenase(d-LDH), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), NAD(+), a redox polymer and polyethylenimine in carbon paste. The effect of addition of ALT in the paste, using enzyme sequences of ALT/d-LDH, was insignificant for d-lactic acid analysis. The responses of d-lactic acid in ALT/d-LDH paste electrode are the same as those in d-LDH paste electrode. However, the interference effect of pyruvate in the sample can be substantially reduced if sodium glutamate was applied in the carrier solution. When ALT immobilized in control porous glass as an immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER) was mounted in flow injection analysis system with the d-LDH paste electrode as detector for d-lactate analysis, the interference of the pyruvate can be significantly eliminated. The adverse effect of pyruvate in the samples for d-lactic acid analysis was reduced more effectively in ALT IMER with d-LDH electrode than in ALT/d-LDH electrode. PMID:18968259

  3. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of L-lactate dehydrogenase and its H171C mutant from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Xiaoli

    2012-08-31

    L-Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is an important enzyme involved in the last step of glycolysis that catalyzes the reversible conversion of pyruvate to L-lactate with the simultaneous oxidation of NADH to NAD{sup +}. In this study, wild-type LDH from Bacillus subtilis (BsLDH-WT) and the H171C mutant (BsLDH-H171C) were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to near-homogeneity. BsLDH-WT was crystallized in the presence of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) and NAD{sup +} and the crystal diffracted to 2.38 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal belonged to space group P3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 171.04, c = 96.27 {angstrom}. BsLDH-H171C was also crystallized as the apoenzyme and in complex with NAD{sup +}, and data sets were collected to 2.20 and 2.49 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Both BsLDH-H171C crystals belonged to space group P3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 133.41, c = 99.34 {angstrom} and a = b = 133.43, c = 99.09 {angstrom}, respectively. Tetramers were observed in the asymmetric units of all three crystals.

  4. Metabolic fate of lactate after vigorous activity in the leopard frog, Rana pipiens.

    PubMed

    Fournier, P A; Guderley, H

    1992-02-01

    Although the ability of isolated frog muscle to synthesize glycogen from lactate has long been known, it has never been demonstrated that this metabolic activity occurs in the intact frog. Our results clearly indicate that lactate glycogenesis in frog muscle occurs to a significant extent in vivo. During recovery from strenuous exercise, most of the lactate accumulated by frogs seems to be recycled into muscle glycogen because the lactate that disappears during recovery could account nearly stoichiometrically for the glycogen that accumulates in muscle. Furthermore, the decrease in body lactate and the increase in muscle glycogen follow corresponding time courses, suggesting a precursor-product relationship between lactate and glycogen. During recovery from intense exercise, hepatectomized and normal frogs have nearly identical extents of lactate elimination and glycogen synthesis. This suggests that muscle is the main tissue responsible for the recycling of lactate into muscle glycogen and that liver plays a negligible role in lactate disposal. The negligible hepatic contribution to lactate recycling results in part from the liver's incapacity to produce glucose from lactate. In support of this proposition, we show that frog liver perfused in vitro is unable to incorporate any detectable labeled lactate into glucose despite its excellent physiological integrity. Changes in dietary status, training state, season at which the experiments were done, exercise status, and composition of the perfusion media (pH, hormonal composition, physiological saline vs. culture medium) did not give rise to lactate gluconeogenesis. Because frog liver contains all the regulatory enzymes of the gluconeogenic pathway, its inability to synthesize glucose from lactate is not due to an absence of pyruvate carboxylase. A limited ability for lactate uptake may explain why frog liver cannot produce glucose from lactate. PMID:1539733

  5. Mitochondrial Respiratory Defect Causes Dysfunctional Lactate Turnover via AMP-activated Protein Kinase Activation in Human-induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Im, Ilkyun; Jang, Mi-Jin; Park, Seung Ju; Lee, Sang-Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho; Yoo, Han-Wook; Kim, Seyun; Han, Yong-Mahn

    2015-12-01

    A defective mitochondrial respiratory chain complex (DMRC) causes various metabolic disorders in humans. However, the pathophysiology of DMRC in the liver remains unclear. To understand DMRC pathophysiology in vitro, DMRC-induced pluripotent stem cells were generated from dermal fibroblasts of a DMRC patient who had a homoplasmic mutation (m.3398T→C) in the mitochondrion-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (MTND1) gene and that differentiated into hepatocytes (DMRC hepatocytes) in vitro. DMRC hepatocytes showed abnormalities in mitochondrial characteristics, the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, the glycogen storage level, the lactate turnover rate, and AMPK activity. Intriguingly, low glycogen storage and transcription of lactate turnover-related genes in DMRC hepatocytes were recovered by inhibition of AMPK activity. Thus, AMPK activation led to metabolic changes in terms of glycogen storage and lactate turnover in DMRC hepatocytes. These data demonstrate for the first time that energy depletion may lead to lactic acidosis in the DMRC patient by reduction of lactate uptake via AMPK in liver. PMID:26491018

  6. Mutation of Arg-115 of human class III alcohol dehydrogenase: a binding site required for formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity and fatty acid activation.

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, K; Höög, J O; Holmquist, B; Estonius, M; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B L

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the fatty acid activation and formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that distinguishes human class III alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) from all other alcohol dehydrogenases has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis of its Arg-115 residue. The Ala- and Asp-115 mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The activities of the recombinant native and mutant enzymes toward ethanol are essentially identical, but mutagenesis greatly decreases the kcat/Km values for glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation. The catalytic efficiency for the Asp variant is < 0.1% that of the unmutated enzyme, due to both a higher Km and a lower kcat value. As with the native enzyme, neither mutant can oxidize methanol, be saturated by ethanol, or be inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole; i.e., they retain these class III characteristics. In contrast, however, their activation by fatty acids, another characteristic unique to class III alcohol dehydrogenase, is markedly attenuated. The Ala mutant is activated only slightly, but the Asp mutant is not activated at all. The results strongly indicate that Arg-115 in class III alcohol dehydrogenase is a component of the binding site for activating fatty acids and is critical for the binding of S-hydroxymethylglutathione in glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. PMID:8460164

  7. The lactate dehydrogenase--reduced nicotinamide--adenine dinucleotide--pyruvate complex. Kinetics of pyruvate binding and quenching of coeznyme fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Südi, J

    1974-04-01

    The stopped-flow kinetic studies described in this and the following paper (Südi, 1974) demonstrate that a Haldane-type description of the reversible lactate dehydrogenase reaction presents an experimentally feasible task. Combined results of these two papers yield numerical values for the six rate constants defined by the following equilibrium scheme, where E represents lactate dehydrogenase: [Formula: see text] The experiments were carried out at pH8.4 at a relatively low temperature (6.3 degrees C) with the pig heart enzyme. Identification of the above two intermediates and determination of the corresponding rate constants actually involve four series of independent observations in these studies, since (a) the reaction can be followed in both directions, and (b) both the u.v. absorption and the fluorescence of the coenzymes are altered in the reaction, and it is shown that these two spectral changes do not occur simultaneously. Kinetic observations made in the reverse direction are reported in this paper. It is demonstrated that the fluorescence of NADH can no longer be observed in the ternary complex E(NADH) (Pyr). Even though the oxidation-reduction reaction rapidly follows the formation of this complex, the numerical values of k(-4) (8.33x10(5)m(-1).s(-1)) and k(+4) (222s(-1)) are easily obtained from a directly observed second-order reaction step in which fluorescent but not u.v.-absorbing material is disappearing. U.v.-absorption measurements do not clearly resolve the subsequent oxidation-reduction step from the dissociation of lactate. It is shown that this must be due partly to the instrumental dead time, and partly to a low transient concentration of E(NAD+) (Lac) in the two-step sequential reaction in which the detectable disappearance of u.v.-absorbing material takes place. It is estimated that about one-tenth of the total change in u.v. absorption is due to a ;burst reaction' in which E(NAD+) (Lac) is produced, and this estimation yields, from k

  8. 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in canine pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza-Hernandez, G.; Lopez-Solache, I.; Rendon, J.L.; Diaz-Sanchez, V.; Diaz-Zagoya, J.C.

    1988-04-15

    The mitochondrial fraction of the dog pancreas showed NAD(H)-dependent enzyme activity of 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. The enzyme catalyzes oxidoreduction between androstenedione and testosterone. The apparent Km value of the enzyme for androstenedione was 9.5 +/- 0.9 microM, the apparent Vmax was determined as 0.4 nmol mg-1 min-1, and the optimal pH was 6.5. In phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, maximal rate of androstenedione reduction was observed at 37 degrees C. The oxidation of testosterone by the enzyme proceeded at the same rate as the reduction of the androstenedione at a pH of 6.8-7.0. The apparent Km value and the optimal pH of the enzyme for testosterone were 3.5 +/- 0.5 microM and 7.5, respectively.

  9. [Effect Of Polyelectrolytes on Catalytic Activity of Alcohol Dehydrogenase].

    PubMed

    Dubrovsky, A V; Musina, E V; Kim, A L; Tikhonenko, S A

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent and optical spectroscopy were used to study the interaction of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) with negatively charged polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) and dextran sulfate (DS), as well as positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium) (PDADMA). As found, DS and PDADMA did not affect the structural and catalytic enzyme properties. In contrast, PSS slightly decreased the protein self-fluorescence over 1 h of incubation, which is associated with partial destruction of its quaternary (globular) structure. Investigation of the ADH activity with and without PSS showed its dependency on the incubation time and the PSS presence. Sodium chloride (2.0 M and 0.2 M) or ammonium sulfate (0.1 M) added to the reaction mixture did not completely protect the enzyme quaternary structure from the PSS action. However ammonium sulfate or 0.2 M sodium chloride stabilized the enzyme and partially inhibited the negative PSS effect. PMID:27266256

  10. A Case of Hyperammonemia Associated with High Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase Activity.

    PubMed

    Nagaharu, Keiki; Ikemura, Kenji; Yamashita, Yoshiki; Oda, Hiroyasu; Ishihara, Mikiya; Sugawara, Yumiko; Tamaru, Satoshi; Mizuno, Toshiro; Katayama, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) has been widely used to treat several types of carcinoma, including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. In addition to its common side effects, including diarrhea, mucositis, neutropenia, and anemia, 5-FU treatment has also been reported to cause hyperammonemia. However, the exact mechanism responsible for 5-FU-induced hyperammonemia remains unknown. We encountered an esophageal carcinoma patient who developed hyperammonemia when receiving 5-FU-containing chemotherapy but did not exhibit any of the other common adverse effects of 5-FU treatment. At the onset of hyperammonemia, laboratory tests revealed high dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) activity and rapid 5-FU clearance. Our findings suggested that 5-FU hypermetabolism may be one of the key mechanisms responsible for hyperammonemia during 5-FU treatment. PMID:27195162

  11. A Case of Hyperammonemia Associated with High Dihydropyrimidine Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nagaharu, Keiki; Ikemura, Kenji; Yamashita, Yoshiki; Oda, Hiroyasu; Ishihara, Mikiya; Sugawara, Yumiko; Tamaru, Satoshi; Mizuno, Toshiro; Katayama, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) has been widely used to treat several types of carcinoma, including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. In addition to its common side effects, including diarrhea, mucositis, neutropenia, and anemia, 5-FU treatment has also been reported to cause hyperammonemia. However, the exact mechanism responsible for 5-FU-induced hyperammonemia remains unknown. We encountered an esophageal carcinoma patient who developed hyperammonemia when receiving 5-FU-containing chemotherapy but did not exhibit any of the other common adverse effects of 5-FU treatment. At the onset of hyperammonemia, laboratory tests revealed high dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) activity and rapid 5-FU clearance. Our findings suggested that 5-FU hypermetabolism may be one of the key mechanisms responsible for hyperammonemia during 5-FU treatment. PMID:27195162

  12. Hypoxic repression of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is necessary for metabolic reprogramming and growth of model tumours

    PubMed Central

    Golias, Tereza; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sun, Ramon; Kumar, Bhavna; Brown, Nicole V.; Swanson, Benjamin J.; Pai, Reetesh; Jaitin, Diego; Le, Quynh-Thu; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Denko, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cells fulfil the bioenergetic and biosynthetic needs of proliferation using the available environmental metabolites. Metabolic adaptation to hypoxia causes decreased mitochondrial function and increased lactate production. This work examines the biological importance of the hypoxia-inducible inhibitory phosphorylations on the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α subunit. Pancreatic cancer cell lines were genetically manipulated to alter the net phosphorylation of PDH E1α through reduced kinase expression or enhanced phosphatase expression. The modified cells were tested for hypoxic changes in phosphorylated E1α, mitochondrial metabolism and growth as xenografted tumours. Even though there are four PDHK genes, PDHK1 is essential for inhibitory PDH phosphorylation of E1α at serine 232, is partially responsible for modification of serines 293 and 300, and these phosphorylations are necessary for model tumour growth. In order to determine the clinical relevance, a cohort of head and neck cancer patient biopsies was examined for phosphorylated E1α and expression of PDHK1. Patients with detectable 232 phosphorylation or expression of PDHK1 tend to have worse clinical outcome. These data show that PDHK1 activity is unique and non-redundant in the family of PHDK enzymes and a PDHK1 specific inhibitor would therefore have anti-cancer activity with reduced chance of side effects from inhibition of other PDHKs. PMID:27498883

  13. Hypoxic repression of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity is necessary for metabolic reprogramming and growth of model tumours.

    PubMed

    Golias, Tereza; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sun, Ramon; Kumar, Bhavna; Brown, Nicole V; Swanson, Benjamin J; Pai, Reetesh; Jaitin, Diego; Le, Quynh-Thu; Teknos, Theodoros N; Denko, Nicholas C

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cells fulfil the bioenergetic and biosynthetic needs of proliferation using the available environmental metabolites. Metabolic adaptation to hypoxia causes decreased mitochondrial function and increased lactate production. This work examines the biological importance of the hypoxia-inducible inhibitory phosphorylations on the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α subunit. Pancreatic cancer cell lines were genetically manipulated to alter the net phosphorylation of PDH E1α through reduced kinase expression or enhanced phosphatase expression. The modified cells were tested for hypoxic changes in phosphorylated E1α, mitochondrial metabolism and growth as xenografted tumours. Even though there are four PDHK genes, PDHK1 is essential for inhibitory PDH phosphorylation of E1α at serine 232, is partially responsible for modification of serines 293 and 300, and these phosphorylations are necessary for model tumour growth. In order to determine the clinical relevance, a cohort of head and neck cancer patient biopsies was examined for phosphorylated E1α and expression of PDHK1. Patients with detectable 232 phosphorylation or expression of PDHK1 tend to have worse clinical outcome. These data show that PDHK1 activity is unique and non-redundant in the family of PHDK enzymes and a PDHK1 specific inhibitor would therefore have anti-cancer activity with reduced chance of side effects from inhibition of other PDHKs. PMID:27498883

  14. Differentiating inflamed and normal lungs by the apparent reaction rate constants of lactate dehydrogenase probed by hyperpolarized 13C labeled pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Xu, He N.; Kadlececk, Stephen; Shaghaghi, Hoora; Zhao, Huaqing; Profka, Harilla; Pourfathi, Mehrdad; Rizi, Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinically translatable hyperpolarized (HP) 13C-NMR can probe in vivo enzymatic reactions, e.g., lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-catalyzed reaction by injecting HP 13C-pyruvate into the subject, which is converted to 13C labeled lactate by the enzyme. Parameters such as 13C-lactate signals and lactate-to-pyruvate signal ratio are commonly used for analyzing the HP 13C-NMR data. However, the biochemical/biological meaning of these parameters remains either unclear or dependent on experimental settings. It is preferable to quantify the reaction rate constants with a clearer physical meaning. Here we report the extraction of the kinetic parameters of the LDH reaction from HP 13C-NMR data and investigate if they can be potential predictors of lung inflammation. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats (12 controls, 14 treated) were used. One dose of bleomycin (2.5 U/kg) was administered intratracheally to the treatment group. The lungs were removed, perfused, and observed by the HP-NMR technique, where a HyperSense dynamic nuclear polarization system was used to generate the HP 13C-pyruvate for injecting into the lungs. A 20 mm 1H/13C dual-tuned coil in a 9.4-T Varian vertical bore NMR spectrometer was employed to acquire the 13C spectral data every 1 s over a time period of 300 s using a non-selective, 15-degree radiofrequency pulse. The apparent rate constants of the LDH reaction and their ratio were quantified by applying ratiometric fitting analysis to the time series data of 13C labeled pyruvate and lactate. Results The apparent forward rate constant kp=(3.67±3.31)×10−4 s−1, reverse rate constant kl=(4.95±2.90)×10−2 s−1, rate constant ratio kp/kl=(7.53±5.75)×10−3 for the control lungs; kp=(11.71±4.35)×10−4 s−1, kl=(9.89±3.89)×10−2 s−1, and kp/kl=(12.39±4.18)×10−3 for the inflamed lungs at the 7th day post treatment. Wilcoxon rank-sum test showed that the medians of these kinetic parameters of the 7-day cohort were significantly

  15. RECIPIENT PRETRANSPLANT INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN NONMYELOABLATIVE HCT

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Meagan J.; Risler, Linda J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S.; Boeckh, Michael J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5’- monophosphate (IMP) to xanthosine 5’-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T-cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation, but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, non-relapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient’s pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient’s sensitivity to MMF, but confirmatory studies are needed. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  16. Analysis of rat cytosolic 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity and enzymatic characterization of rat ADHII.

    PubMed

    Popescu, G; Napoli, J L

    2000-01-01

    We report the characterization of two enzymes that catalyze NAD(+)-dependent 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity in rat liver cystol. Alcohol dehydrogenase class I (ADHI) contributes > 80% of the NA D+-dependent 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity recovered, whereas alcohol dehydrogenase class II (ADHII), not identified previously at the protein level, nor characterized enzymatically in rat, accounts for approximately 2% of the activity. Rat ADHII exhibits properties different from those described for human ADHII. Moreover, rat ADHII-catalyzed rates of ethanol dehydrogenation are markedly lower than octanol or retinoid dehydrogenation rates. Neither ethanol nor 4-methylpyrazole inhibits the 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity of rat ADHII. We propose that ADHII represents the previously observed additional retinoid oxidation activity of rat liver cytosol which occurred in the presence of either ethanol or 4-methylpyrazole. We also show that human and rat ADHII differ considerably in enzymatic properties. PMID:10606766

  17. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity promotes survival of human muscle precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Elise; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Notarnicola, Cécile; Rouger, Karl; Serratrice, Nicolas; Bonnieu, Anne; Gay, Stéphanie; Bacou, Francis; Duret, Cédric; Carnac, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are a family of enzymes that efficiently detoxify aldehydic products generated by reactive oxygen species and might therefore participate in cell survival. Because ALDH activity has been used to identify normal and malignant cells with stem cell properties, we asked whether human myogenic precursor cells (myoblasts) could be identified and isolated based on their levels of ALDH activity. Human muscle explant-derived cells were incubated with ALDEFLUOR, a fluorescent substrate for ALDH, and we determined by flow cytometry the level of enzyme activity. We found that ALDH activity positively correlated with the myoblast-CD56+ fraction in those cells, but, we also observed heterogeneity of ALDH activity levels within CD56-purified myoblasts. Using lentiviral mediated expression of shRNA we demonstrated that ALDH activity was associated with expression of Aldh1a1 protein. Surprisingly, ALDH activity and Aldh1a1 expression levels were very low in mouse, rat, rabbit and non-human primate myoblasts. Using different approaches, from pharmacological inhibition of ALDH activity by diethylaminobenzaldehyde, an inhibitor of class I ALDH, to cell fractionation by flow cytometry using the ALDEFLUOR assay, we characterized human myoblasts expressing low or high levels of ALDH. We correlated high ALDH activity ex vivo to resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cytotoxic effect and in vivo to improved cell viability when human myoblasts were transplanted into host muscle of immune deficient scid mice. Therefore detection of ALDH activity, as a purification strategy, could allow non-toxic and efficient isolation of a fraction of human myoblasts resistant to cytotoxic damage. PMID:19840193

  18. Beta-2 microglobulin and lactate dehydrogenase levels are useful prognostic markers in early stage primary gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Narváez, B R

    1998-10-01

    The optimal management of primary gastric lymphoma (PGL) remains undecided because a definitive classification for therapeutic decision is not available. The International Index Project has proved to be useful in patients with nodal disease, but in extranodal presentation it has not been tested. We reviewed 297 patients with early stage PGL. They were initially classified according to the prognostic features of the International Index Project. No influence on duration of time to treatment failure (TTF) or overall survival was observed. For this reason we developed a logistical model to identify prognostic factors in patients with early stage PGL. Levels of beta-2 microglobulin and lactic dehydrogenase were observed to have prognostic significance in both univariate and multivariate analysis. With these parameters we constructed a logistical model to identify patients at low risk (TTF = 76%; at 7 years overall survival was 96%), statistically different to patients at high risk (TTF = 34% and overall survival = 22%). The number of patients at intermediate risk were too small to compare with the other groups. Because pathological or other clinical or laboratory prognostic features cannot help in the identification of a prognostic model, we propose that the use beta-2 microglobulin and lactic dehydrogenase can define different groups at risk and develop a prognostic system to define the best therapeutic approach in this patients. PMID:9807677

  19. Utilization of Lactate Isomers by Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii: Regulatory Role for Intracellular Pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Vaughan L.

    1986-01-01

    Five strains of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii utilized the l-(+) isomer of lactate at a faster rate than they did the d-(−) isomer when grown with a mixture of lactate isomers under a variety of conditions. ATCC 9614, grown anaerobically in defined medium containing 160 mM dl-lactate, utilized only 4 and 15% of the d-(−)-lactate by the time 50 and 90%, respectively, of the l-(+)-lactate was used. The intracellular pyruvate concentration was high (>100 mM) in the initial stages of lactate utilization, when either dl-lactate or the l-(+) isomer was the starting substrate. The concentration of this intermediate dropped during dl-lactate fermentation such that when only d-(−)-lactate remained, the concentration was <20 mM. When only the d-(−) isomer was initially present, a similar relatively low concentration of intracellular pyruvate was present, even at the start of lactate utilization. The NAD+-independent lactate dehydrogenase activities in extracts showed different kinetic properties with regard to pyruvate inhibition, depending upon the lactate isomer present. Pyruvate gave a competitive inhibitor pattern with l-(+)-lactate and a mixed-type inhibitor pattern with d-(−)-lactate. It is suggested that these properties of the lactate dehydrogenases and the intracellular pyruvate concentrations explain the preferential use of the l-(+) isomer. PMID:16347134

  20. Lactate-Dehydrogenase 5 is overexpressed in non-small cell lung cancer and correlates with the expression of the transketolase-like protein 1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Aims As one of the five Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzymes, LDH5 has the highest efficiency to catalyze pyruvate transformation to lactate. LDH5 overexpression in cancer cells induces an upregulated glycolytic metabolism and reduced dependence on the presence of oxygen. Here we analyzed LDH5 protein expression in a well characterized large cohort of primary lung cancers in correlation to clinico-pathological data and its possible impact on patient survival. Methods Primary lung cancers (n = 269) and non neoplastic lung tissue (n = 35) were tested for LDH5 expression by immunohistochemistry using a polyclonal LDH5 antibody (ab53010). The results of LDH5 expression were correlated to clinico-pathological data as well as to patient's survival. In addition, the results of the previously tested Transketolase like 1 protein (TKTL1) expression were correlated to LDH5 expression. Results 89.5% (n = 238) of NSCLC revealed LDH5 expression whereas LDH5 expression was not detected in non neoplastic lung tissues (n = 34) (p < 0.0001). LDH5 overexpression was associated with histological type (adenocarcinoma = 57%, squamous cell carcinoma = 45%, large cell carcinoma = 46%, p = 0.006). No significant correlation could be detected with regard to TNM-stage, grading or survival. A two sided correlation between the expression of TKTL1 and LDH5 could be shown (p = 0.002) within the overall cohort as well as for each grading and pN group. A significant correlation between LDH5 and TKTL1 within each histologic tumortype could not be revealed. Conclusions LDH5 is overexpressed in NSCLC and could hence serve as an additional marker for malignancy. Furthermore, LDH5 correlates positively with the prognostic marker TKTL1. Our results confirm a close link between the two metabolic enzymes and indicate an alteration in the glucose metabolism in the process of malignant transformation. PMID:20385008

  1. [Enzyme activity in the subcellular fractions of the liver of rats following a flight on board the Kosmos-1129 biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Tigranian, R A; Vetrova, E G; Abraham, S; Lin, C; Klein, H

    1983-01-01

    The activities of malate, isocitrate, and lactate dehydrogenases were measured in the liver mitochondrial and cytoplasmatic fractions of rats flown for 18.5 days onboard Cosmos-1129. The activities of the oxidative enzymes, malate and isocitrate dehydrogenases, in the mitochondrial fraction and those of the glycolytic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase, in the cytoplasmatic fraction were found to decrease. PMID:6855177

  2. Validation of the in vivo assessment of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity using hyperpolarised 13C MRS.

    PubMed

    Atherton, Helen J; Schroeder, Marie A; Dodd, Michael S; Heather, Lisa C; Carter, Emma E; Cochlin, Lowri E; Nagel, Simon; Sibson, Nicola R; Radda, George K; Clarke, Kieran; Tyler, Damian J

    2011-02-01

    Many diseases of the heart are characterised by changes in substrate utilisation, which is regulated in part by the activity of the enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). Consequently, there is much interest in the in vivo evaluation of PDH activity in a range of physiological and pathological states to obtain information on the metabolic mechanisms of cardiac diseases. Hyperpolarised [1-(13)C]pyruvate, detected using MRS, is a novel technique for the noninvasive evaluation of PDH flux. PDH flux has been assumed to directly reflect in vivo PDH activity, although to date this assumption remains unproven. Control animals and animals undergoing interventions known to modulate PDH activity, namely high fat feeding and dichloroacetate infusion, were used to investigate the relationship between in vivo hyperpolarised MRS measurements of PDH flux and ex vivo measurements of PDH enzyme activity (PDH(a)). Further, the plasma concentrations of pyruvate and other important metabolites were evaluated following pyruvate infusion to assess the metabolic consequences of pyruvate infusion during hyperpolarised MRS experiments. Hyperpolarised MRS measurements of PDH flux correlated significantly with ex vivo measurements of PDH(a), confirming that PDH activity influences directly the in vivo flux of hyperpolarised pyruvate through cardiac PDH. The maximum plasma concentration of pyruvate reached during hyperpolarised MRS experiments was approximately 250 µM, equivalent to physiological pyruvate concentrations reached during exercise or with dietary interventions. The concentrations of other metabolites, including lactate, glucose and β-hydroxybutyrate, did not vary during the 60 s following pyruvate infusion. Hence, during the 60-s data acquisition period, metabolism was minimally affected by pyruvate infusion. PMID:20799252

  3. Indoleamine 2,3‑dioxygenase downregulates T‑cell receptor complex ζ‑chain and c‑Myc, and reduces proliferation, lactate dehydrogenase levels and mitochondrial glutaminase in human T‑cells.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Antoniadi, Georgia; Tsogka, Konstantina; Sounidaki, Maria; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3‑dioxygenase (IDO), through L‑tryptophan depletion, activates general control non‑derepressible (GCN) 2 kinase and suppresses T‑cell proliferation, in addition to suppressing aerobic glycolysis and glutaminolysis, which are required for these rapidly proliferating cells. A number of, however not all of these alterations, are partially mediated through IDO‑induced p53 upregulation. In two‑way mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs), IDO reduced cellular proliferation. In MLR‑derived T‑cells, IDO induced the expression levels of p53 and p21, however concurrently reduced the levels of ζ‑chain, c‑Myc, lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH‑A) and glutaminase (GLS)2. However, p53 had no effect on the expression of the above proteins. These results were recapitulated in T‑cells activated with anti‑CD2, anti‑CD3 and anti‑CD28 by direct activation of the GCN2 kinase with tryptophanol. In conclusion, IDO, through GCN2 kinase activation, downregulates the levels of TCR‑complex ζ‑chain and c‑Myc, resulting in the suppression of T‑cell proliferation and a reduction in the levels of LDH‑A and GLS2, which are key enzymes involved in aerobic glycolysis and glutaminolysis, respectively. PMID:26647830

  4. Furosemide and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity, in man.

    PubMed

    Palermo, M; Armanini, D; Shackleton, C H L; Sorba, G; Cossu, M; Roitman, E; Scaroni, C; Delitala, G

    2002-09-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptors possess the same affinity for aldosterone and for cortisol and preferential binding of aldosterone is modulated by the 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11 beta-OHSD) enzyme, which converts cortisol to its inactive metabolite cortisone. Several endogenous or exogenous compounds able to inhibit the enzyme have been described and, as a consequence, produce the syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME) characterized by hypertension, hypokalemia, volume repletion and suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. High doses of furosemide, a diuretic that works in the luminal surface of the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop, have been reported to inhibit 11 beta-OHSD activity to the same extent as licorice in vivo and in vitro, in rat. The aim of our study was to verify the effect of the drug on 11 beta-OHSD activity in man at the doses currently used in clinical practice. We tested the activity of 11 beta-OHSD following both acute and protracted administration of furosemide. In the acute study, the drug was administered at low (40 mg i.v. in bolo) and high doses (infusion of 10 mg/kg bw i.v for six hours); the protracted furosemide administration consisted in 50 mg/day for 20 days, by mouth. The ratios between the cortisol metabolites tetrahydrocortisol plus allo-tetrahydrocortisol to tetra-hydrocortisone and urinary free cortisol to urinary free cortisone were used to measure the activity of 11 beta-OHSD. Urinary cortisol, cortisone and their metabolites were tested by a gas-chromatographic/mass spectrometric method. Neither acute nor prolonged administration of furosemide did affect the activity of 11 beta-OHSD although the drug was able to modify plasma aldosterone and PRA secretion and to determine hypokalemia. Our results suggest that furosemide does not play a significant role in 11 beta-OHSD modulation in humans, at least at the dosage used in clinical practice. PMID:12373630

  5. 11 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in hypothalamic obesity.

    PubMed

    Tiosano, Dov; Eisentein, Israel; Militianu, Daniela; Chrousos, George P; Hochberg, Ze'ev

    2003-01-01

    After extensive suprasellar operations for hypothalamic tumor removal, some patients develop Cushing-like morbid obesity while they receive replacement doses of glucocorticoids. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that target tissue conversion of inactive 11-ketosteroids to active 11 beta-OH glucocorticoids might explain the obesity of some patients with hypothalamic lesions. Toward this aim, we studied 10 patients with hypothalamic obesity and secondary adrenal insufficiency and 6 control Addisonian patients while they were on glucocorticoid replacement therapy. Pituitary hormone deficiencies were replaced when medically indicated. Twenty-four-hour urine was collected after a single oral dose of 12 mg/m(2) hydrocortisone acetate. The ratios of free and conjugated cortisol (F) to cortisone (E) and their metabolites, [tetrahydrocortisol (THF)+5 alpha THF]/tetrahyrdocortisone (THE), dihydrocortisols/dihydrocortisones, cortols/cortolones, and (F+E)/(THF+THE+5 alpha THF), were considered to represent 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) activity. The 11-OH/11-oxo ratios were significantly higher in the urine of patients with hypothalamic obesity. The 11-OH/11-oxo ratios, however, did not correlate with the degree of obesity, yet a significant correlation was found between conjugated F/E and the ratio of visceral fat to sc fat measured by computerized tomography at the umbilical level. The consequence of increased 11 beta-HSD1 activity and the shift of the interconversion toward cortisol may contribute to the effects of the latter in adipose tissue. We propose that deficiency of hypothalamic messengers after surgical injury induces a paracrine/autocrine effect of enhanced glucocorticoid activity due to up-regulated 11 beta-HSD1 activity. PMID:12519880

  6. D-lactate metabolism in the alga, Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Husic, D.W.; Tolbert, N.E.

    1986-05-01

    (/sup 14/C)D-lactate rapidly accumulates in Chlamydomonas cells under anaerobic conditions from the sugar-phosphate pools which are labeled during photosynthesis with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/. A soluble D-lactate dehydrogenase (30 ..mu..mol NADH oxidized/h/mg Chl), which functions only in the direction of pyruvate reduction, has been partially purified and characterized. The D-lactate is reoxidized in Chlamydomonas by a mitochondrial membrane-bound dehydrogenase. This enzyme is known in the plant literature as glycolate dehydrogenase, an enzyme of the oxidative photosynthetic carbon (C/sub 2/) cycle. This dehydrogenase may be linked to the mitochondrial electron transport chain, although the direct electron acceptor is unknown. Therefore, D-lactate accumulation may be, in part, due to the shut down of electron transport during anaerobiosis. In vivo chase experiments have shown that the D-lactate turns over rapidly when algal cells, which have been grown with air levels of CO/sub 2/ (0.04%), are returned to aerobic conditions in the light. Such turnover is not observed in cells which had been grown with 1 to 5% CO/sub 2/. Cells grown with high CO/sub 2/ have lower levels of glycolate dehydrogenase activity. They are currently using mutants of Chlamydomonas deficient in mitochondrial respiration to study the role of D-lactate oxidation in these algae.

  7. Decreased Hematocrit-To-Viscosity Ratio and Increased Lactate Dehydrogenase Level in Patients with Sickle Cell Anemia and Recurrent Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Connes, Philippe; Lamarre, Yann; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Lemonne, Nathalie; Waltz, Xavier; Mougenel, Danièle; Mukisi-Mukaza, Martin; Lalanne-Mistrih, Marie-Laure; Tarer, Vanessa; Tressières, Benoit; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Romana, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Leg ulcer is a disabling complication in patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) but the exact pathophysiological mechanisms are unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the hematological and hemorheological alterations associated with recurrent leg ulcers. Sixty-two SCA patients who never experienced leg ulcers (ULC-) and 13 SCA patients with a positive history of recurrent leg ulcers (ULC+) - but with no leg ulcers at the time of the study – were recruited. All patients were in steady state condition. Blood was sampled to perform hematological, biochemical (hemolytic markers) and hemorheological analyses (blood viscosity, red blood cell deformability and aggregation properties). The hematocrit-to-viscosity ratio (HVR), which reflects the red blood cell oxygen transport efficiency, was calculated for each subject. Patients from the ULC+ group were older than patients from the ULC- group. Anemia (red blood cell count, hematocrit and hemoglobin levels) was more pronounced in the ULC+ group. Lactate dehydrogenase level was higher in the ULC+ group than in the ULC- group. Neither blood viscosity, nor RBC aggregation properties differed between the two groups. HVR was lower and RBC deformability tended to be reduced in the ULC+ group. Our study confirmed increased hemolytic rate and anemia in SCA patients with leg ulcers recurrence. Furthermore, our data suggest that although systemic blood viscosity is not a major factor involved in the pathophysiology of this complication, decreased red blood cell oxygen transport efficiency (i.e., low hematocrit/viscosity ratio) may play a role. PMID:24223994

  8. Inhibition of Growth by Combined Treatment with Inhibitors of Lactate Dehydrogenase and either Phenformin or Inhibitors of 6-Phosphofructo-2-kinase/Fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase 3.

    PubMed

    Lea, Michael A; Guzman, Yolanda; Desbordes, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced glycolysis in cancer cells presents a target for chemotherapy. Previous studies have indicated that proliferation of cancer cells can be inhibited by treatment with phenformin and with an inhibitor of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase 3 (PFKFB) namely 3-(3-pyridinyl)-1-(4-pyridinyl)-2-propen-1-one (3PO). In the present work, the action of two inhibitors that are effective at lower concentrations than 3PO, namely 1-(3-pyridinyl)-3-(2-quinolinyl)-2-propen-1-one (PQP) and 1-(4-pyridinyl)-3-(2-quinolinyl)-2-propen-1-one (PFK15) were investigated. The inhibitors of lactate dehydrogenase (LDHA) studied in order of half-maximal inhibitory concentrations were methyl 1-hydroxy-6-phenyl-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-indole-2-carboxylate (NHI-2) < isosafrole < oxamate. In colonic and bladder cancer cells, additive growth inhibitory effects were seen with the LDHA inhibitors, of which NHI-2 was effective at the lowest concentrations. Growth inhibition was generally greater with PFK15 than with PQP. The increased acidification of the culture medium and glucose uptake caused by phenformin was blocked by combined treatment with PFKFB3 or LDHA inhibitors. The results suggest that combined treatment with phenformin and inhibitors of glycolysis can cause additive inhibition of cell proliferation and may mitigate lactic acidosis caused by phenformin when used as a single agent. PMID:27069123

  9. Dynamics of a Lactate Dehydrogenase Polymorphism in the Wood Louse PORCELLIO SCABER Latr.: Evidence for Partial Assortative Mating and Heterosis in Natural Populations

    PubMed Central

    Sassaman, Clay

    1978-01-01

    Electrophoretic separation of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) of Porcellio scaber from 14 natural populations in California, and one each in Oregon, Delaware and Massachusetts, indicates a biallelic polymorphism. Phenotypes are recovered from laboratory matings of virgin females in frequencies agreeing with simple Mendelian inheritance, and the frequency distributions of phenotypes in natural populations are typically in agreement with the appropriate Hardy-Weinberg distributions for these same populations. The same allele predominates in all natural populations examined. Temporal stability within populations suggests that the polymorphism is at, or near, equilibrium. The spatial distribution of allele frequencies, however, is apparently mosaic. Abrupt discontinuities in gene frequency over short distances (50 m to 1 km) suggest that interpopulation migration is insufficient to swamp local differences in gene frequency. Analysis of the transmission dynamics of the polymorphism in natural populations using mother-offspring genotype comparisons suggests that the allelic frequencies of transmitted male gametes are not independent of female genotype. Specifically, the observed mating scheme in natural populations appears to be partially assortative. Comparisons of progeny genotype distributions with yearling (or adult) genotype distributions from the same populations indicate a superior post-partum viability of heterozygous individuals relative to homozygotes. The distortion of progeny genotypic distributions created by assortment is thus apparently counteracted by subsequent heterosis. PMID:640378

  10. Baseline Serum Lactate Dehydrogenase Levels for Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Predictor of Poor Prognosis and Subsequent Liver Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Guanqun; Tang Linglong; Mao Yanping; Chen Lei; Li Wenfei; Sun Ying; Liu Lizhi; Li Li; Lin Aihua; Ma Jun

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of baseline serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Cases of NPC (n = 465) that involved treatment with IMRT with or without chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The mean ({+-}SD) and median baseline serum LDH levels for this cohort were 172.77 {+-} 2.28 and 164.00 IU/L, respectively. Levels of LDH were significantly elevated in patients with locoregionally advanced disease (p = 0.016). Elevated LDH levels were identified as a prognostic factor for rates of overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), with p values <0.001 in the univariate analysis and p < 0.001, p = 0.004, and p = 0.003, respectively, in the multivariate analysis. Correspondingly, the prognostic impact of patient LDH levels was found to be statistically significant for rates of OS, DFS, and DMFS (p = 0.028, 0.024, and 0.020, respectively). For patients who experienced subsequent liver failure after treatment, markedly higher pretreatment serum LDH levels were detected compared with patients experiencing distant metastasis events at other sites (p = 0.032). Conclusions: Elevated baseline LDH levels are associated with clinically advanced disease and are a poor prognosticator for OS, DFS, and DMFS for NPC patients. These results suggest that elevated serum levels of LDH should be considered when evaluating treatment options.

  11. Adult-onset multiple acyl CoA dehydrogenation deficiency associated with an abnormal isoenzyme pattern of serum lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Fuminobu; Baba, Kousuke; Toyooka, Keiko; Liang, Wen-Chen; Nishino, Ichizo; Yamadera, Misaki; Sumi, Hisae; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Nishikawa, Yoshiro

    2012-02-01

    We report a case of a 37 year-old male with multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD). The patient had suffered from exercise intolerance in his hip and thigh muscles for one year. Then, restriction of carbohydrates for a diet made his symptoms rapidly deteriorate. Blood test revealed compound heterozygosity for two novel missense mutations in the electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase gene (ETFDH), and an abnormal LDH isoenzyme pattern: LDH-1 (60.0%) and LDH-2 (26.0%) predominated with abnormally elevated LDH-1/LDH-2 ratio (2.3), compared with muscle-derived LDH-5 (4.0%). Oral riboflavin treatment significantly improved his exercise intolerance and the LDH profile: LDH-1 (34.4%), LDH-2 (34.9%), LDH-5 (6.9%) and LDH-1/LDH-2 ratio (1.0). The abnormal LDH isoenzyme pattern may be one feature of adult-onset MADD selectively affecting type I muscle fibers with relatively high LDH-1 content. PMID:21907580

  12. Relationship of creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and proteinuria to cardiomyopathy in the owl monkey (Aotus vociferans)

    SciTech Connect

    Gozalo, Alfonso S.; Chavera, Alfonso; Montoya, Enrique J.; Takano, Juan; Weller, Richard E.

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine serum reference values for crea- tine kinase (CK), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and lactate dehydroge- nase (LDH) in captive-born and wild-caught owl monkeys to assess their usefulness for diagnosing myocardial disease. Urine samples were also collected and semi-quantitative tests performed. There was no statistically significant difference between CK, AST, and LDH when comparing both groups. However, when comparing monkeys with proteinuria to those without proteinuria, a statistically significant difference in CK value was observed (P = 0.021). In addition, the CK/AST ratio revealed that 29% of the animals included in this study had values suggesting cardiac infarction. Grossly, cardiac concentric hypertrophy of the left ventricle and small, pitted kidneys were the most common findings. Microscopically, myocardial fibrosis, contraction band necrosis, hypertrophy and hyperplasia of coronary arteries, medium-sized renal arteries, and afferent glomerular arteriolae were the most significant lesions, along with increased mesangial matrix and hypercellularity of glomeruli, Bowman’s capsule, and peritubular space fibroplasia. These findings suggest that CK, AST, and LDH along with urinalysis provide a reliable method for diagnosing cardiomyopathies in the owl monkey. In addition, CK/AST ratio, proteinuria, and the observed histological and ultrastructural changes suggest that Aotus vociferans suffer from arterial hypertension and chronic myocardial infarction.

  13. Insufficient filling of vacuum tubes as a cause of microhemolysis and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase levels. Use of a data-mining technique in evaluation of questionable laboratory test results.

    PubMed

    Tamechika, Yoshie; Iwatani, Yoshinori; Tohyama, Kaoru; Ichihara, Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    Experienced physicians noted unexpectedly elevated concentrations of lactate dehydrogenase in some patient samples, but quality control specimens showed no bias. To evaluate this problem, we used a "latent reference individual extraction method", designed to obtain reference intervals from a laboratory database by excluding individuals who have abnormal results for basic analytes other than the analyte in question, in this case lactate dehydrogenase. The reference interval derived for the suspected year was 264-530 U/L, while that of the previous year was 248-495 U/L. The only change we found was the introduction of an order entry system, which requests precise sampling volumes rather than complete filling of vacuum tubes. The effect of vacuum persistence was tested using ten freshly drawn blood samples. Compared with complete filling, 1/5 filling resulted in average elevations of lactate dehydrogenase, aspartic aminotransferase, and potassium levels of 8.0%, 3.8%, and 3.4%, respectively (all p<0.01). Microhemolysis was confirmed using a urine stick method. The length of time before centrifugation determined the degree of hemolysis, while vacuum during centrifugation did not affect it. Microhemolysis is the probable cause of the suspected pseudo-elevation noted by the physicians. Data-mining methodology represents a valuable tool for monitoring long-term bias in laboratory results. PMID:16681441

  14. Microbial and xanthine dehydrogenase inhibitory activity of some flavones.

    PubMed

    Khobragade, C N; Bodade, Ragini G; Shinde, M S; Jaju, Deepa R; Bhosle, R B; Dawane, B S

    2008-06-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) is responsible for the pathological condition called Gout. In the present study different flavones synthesized from chalcone were evaluated in vitro for their inhibitory activity. Inhibitory activity of flavones on XDH was determined in terms of inhibition of uric acid synthesis from Xanthine. The enzymatic activity was found maximum at pH 7.5 and temperature 40 degrees C. The flavones 6-chloro-2-[3-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one (F(1)) and 6-chloro-7methyl-2-[3-(4-chloro-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one(F(2)),were noncompetitive and competitive inhibitor with Ki values 1.1 and 0.22 respectively. The flavones (F(1)), (F(2)), 6-chloro-2-[3-(4-chloro-phenyl)-1phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one(F(3)), 8-bromo-6-chloro-2-[3-(4-chloro-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one (F(4)), 2-[3-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one (F(5)) and 6-methyl-2-[3-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)-1-phenyl-1-H-pyrazol-4-yl]-chromen-4-one (F(6)) were also screened for their antimicrobial activity, measured in terms of zone of inhibition. A broad spectrum antifungal activity was obtained against Trichoderma viridae, Candida albicans, Microsporum cannis, Penicillium chrysogenum and Fusarium moniliformae. In case of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavous only spore formation was affected, while antibacterial activity was observed against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Serratia marsecens only. The flavones were further analyzed for quantitative structural activity relationship study (QSAR) by using PASS, online software to determine their Pa value. Toxicity and drug relevant properties were revealed by PALLAS software in terms of their molecular weight. Log P values were also studied. The result showed both the F(1) and F(2) flavones as antigout and therefore supports the development of novel drugs for the treatment of gout. PMID:18569337

  15. Aerobic Production and Utilization of Lactate Satisfy Increased Energy Demands Upon Neuronal Activation in Hippocampal Slices and Provide Neuroprotection Against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Schurr, Avital; Gozal, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    Ever since it was shown for the first time that lactate can support neuronal function in vitro as a sole oxidative energy substrate, investigators in the field of neuroenergetics have been debating the role, if any, of this glycolytic product in cerebral energy metabolism. Our experiments employed the rat hippocampal slice preparation with electrophysiological and biochemical methodologies. The data generated by these experiments (a) support the hypothesis that lactate, not pyruvate, is the end-product of cerebral aerobic glycolysis; (b) indicate that lactate plays a major and crucial role in affording neural tissue to respond adequately to glutamate excitation and to recover unscathed post-excitation; (c) suggest that neural tissue activation is accompanied by aerobic lactate and NADH production, the latter being produced when the former is converted to pyruvate by mitochondrial lactate dehydrogenase (mLDH); (d) imply that NADH can be utilized as an endogenous scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to provide neuroprotection against ROS-induced neuronal damage. PMID:22275901

  16. Pretreatment serum lactate dehydrogenase is an independent prognostic factor for patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wu, Miao-Fang; Lu, Huai-Wu; Chen, Qing; Lin, Zhong-Qiu; Wang, Li-Juan

    2016-08-01

    For locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC), hypoxia is a characteristic property. This study aimed to investigate whether baseline lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) level, which is a marker of hypoxia, had clinical value in determining neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) response and prognosis for LACC patients. The study cohort included 418 patients with a median follow-up of 37.5 months. Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the prognostic value of baseline LDH levels. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of complete response after NACT. Backward stepwise selection with the Akaike information criterion was used to identify factors that could be entered into the multivariate regression model. Compared with patients with LDH levels <252.0 μ/L, patients with LDH levels ≥252.0 μ/L were more likely to have an elevated level of squamous cell carcinoma antigen, lymphatic vascular space involvement, lymph node metastasis, and positive parametrium and achieved lower complete remission rates. Baseline LDH levels ≥252.0 μ/L was an independent prognosticator for recurrence-free survival (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 3.56; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.22-5.69; P < 0.0001) and cancer-specific survival (adjusted HR, 3.08; 95% CI, 1.89-5.01; P < 0.0001). The predictive value of baseline LDH value remained significant in the subgroup analysis. LDH level ≥252.0 μ/L was identified as an independent predictor of complete remission after NACT (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.29; 95% CI, 0.15-0.58; P < 0.0001). Baseline LDH ≥252.0 μ/L is an independent prognostic predictor for patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy for LACC. It helps distinguish patients with different prognosis and select patients who are more likely to benefit from NACT. PMID:27350066

  17. A reagentless amperometric electrode based on carbon paste, chemically modified with D-lactate dehydrogenase, NAD(+), and mediator containing polymer for D-lactic acid analysis. I. Construction, composition, and characterization.

    PubMed

    Shu, H C; Mattiasson, B; Persson, B; Nagy, G; Gorton, L; Sahni, S; Geng, L; Boguslavsky, L; Skotheim, T

    1995-05-01

    A reagentless carbon paste electrode was designed for D-lactic acid analysis in a flow injection system for the monitoring of the production of D-lactate in a batch fermentation. D-Lactate dehydrogenase, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), a synthetic redox polymer containing covalently attached toluidine blue O as mediator, graphite powder, and paraffin oil were used for the construction of the modified carbon paste electrode. D-Lactate selectivity was indicated by insignificant responses from a variety of possible interfernces including L-lactate. The electrodes gave a linear response in the range between 0.05 and 5 mM D-lactate, with a detecting limit of 30 muM, allowing a sample throughput of 20 h(-1). Preliminary investigations were made by covering the electrode surface with electropolymerized membranes. Satisfactory stability was observed, indicated by a reproducibility of 3.3% relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 31), with a non-membrane-covered electrode for the analysis of D-lactate in fermentation broth. A long-term stability (230 broth samples) was proven, suggesting the electrodes to have a good potential for use in on-line monitoring of fermentation processes. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:18623311

  18. Human gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity: effect of age, sex, and alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, H K; Egerer, G; Simanowski, U A; Waldherr, R; Eckey, R; Agarwal, D P; Goedde, H W; von Wartburg, J P

    1993-01-01

    As various isoenzymes of gastric alcohol dehydrogenase exist and as the effect of sex and age on these enzymes is unknown, this study measured the activity of gastric alcohol dehydrogenase at high and low ethanol concentrations in endoscopic biopsy specimens from a total of 290 patients of various ages and from 10 patients with chronic alcoholism. Gastric alcohol dehydrogenase was also detected by immunohistological tests in biopsy specimens from 40 patients by the use of a polyclonal rabbit antibody against class I alcohol dehydrogenase. A significant correlation was found between the immunohistological reaction assessed by the intensity of the colour reaction in the biopsy specimen and the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase measured at 580 mM ethanol. While alcohol dehydrogenase activity measured at 16 mM ethanol was not significantly affected by age and sex, both factors influenced alcohol dehydrogenase activity measured at 580 mM ethanol. Young women below 50 years of age had significantly lower alcohol dehydrogenase activities in the gastric corpus and antrum when compared with age matched controls (SEM) (6.4 (0.7) v 8.8 (0.6) nmol/min/mg protein; p < 0.001 and 6.0 (1.3) v 9.5 (1.3) nmol/min/mg protein; p < 0.001). Over 50 years of age this sex difference was no longer detectable, as high Km gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity decreases with age only in men and not in women. In addition, extremely low alcohol dehydrogenase activities have been found in gastric biopsy specimens from young male alcoholics (2.2 (0.5) nmol/min/mg protein), which returned to normal after two to three weeks of abstinence. The activity of alcohol dehydrogenase in the human stomach measured at 580 mM ethanol is decreased in young women, in elderly men, and in the subject with alcoholism. This decrease in alcohol dehydrogenase activity may contribute to the reduced first pass metabolism of ethanol associated with raised ethanol blood concentrations seen in these people. Images Figure

  19. Lactate Effectively Covers Energy Demands during Neuronal Network Activity in Neonatal Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Anton; Mukhtarov, Marat; Bregestovski, Piotr; Zilberter, Yuri

    2011-01-01

    Although numerous experimental data indicate that lactate is efficiently used for energy by the mature brain, the direct measurements of energy metabolism parameters during neuronal network activity in early postnatal development have not been performed. Therefore, the role of lactate in the energy metabolism of neurons at this age remains unclear. In this study, we monitored field potentials and contents of oxygen and NAD(P)H in correlation with oxidative metabolism during intense network activity in the CA1 hippocampal region of neonatal brain slices. We show that in the presence of glucose, lactate is effectively utilized as an energy substrate, causing an augmentation of oxidative metabolism. Moreover, in the absence of glucose lactate is fully capable of maintaining synaptic function. Therefore, during network activity in neonatal slices, lactate can be an efficient energy substrate capable of sustaining and enhancing aerobic energy metabolism. PMID:21602909

  20. Lactate racemase is a nickel-dependent enzyme activated by a widespread maturation system

    PubMed Central

    Desguin, Benoît; Goffin, Philippe; Viaene, Eric; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Martin-Diaconescu, Vlad; Maroney, Michael J; Declercq, Jean-Paul; Soumillion, Patrice; Hols, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Racemases catalyze the inversion of stereochemistry in biological molecules, giving the organism the ability to use both isomers. Among them, lactate racemase remains unexplored due to its intrinsic instability and lack of molecular characterization. Here we determine the genetic basis of lactate racemization in Lactobacillus plantarum. We show that, unexpectedly, the racemase is a nickel-dependent enzyme with a novel α/β fold. In addition, we decipher the process leading to an active enzyme, which involves the activation of the apo-enzyme by a single nickel-containing maturation protein that requires preactivation by two other accessory proteins. Genomic investigations reveal the wide distribution of the lactate racemase system among prokaryotes, showing the high significance of both lactate enantiomers in carbon metabolism. The even broader distribution of the nickel-based maturation system suggests a function beyond activation of the lactate racemase and possibly linked with other undiscovered nickel-dependent enzymes. PMID:24710389

  1. Equating salivary lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) with LDH-5 expression in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma: An insight into metabolic reprogramming of cancer cell as a predictor of aggressive phenotype.

    PubMed

    Saluja, Tajindra Singh; Spadigam, Anita; Dhupar, Anita; Syed, Shaheen

    2016-04-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the sixth most common human malignancy. According to World Health Organization, oral cancer has been reported to have the highest morbidity and mortality and a survival rate of approximately 50 % at 5 years from diagnosis. This is attributed to the subjectivity in TNM staging and histological grading which may result in less than optimum treatment outcomes including tumour recurrence. One of the hallmarks of cancer is aerobic glycolysis also known as the Warburg effect. This glycolytic phenotype (hypoxic state) not only confers immortality to cancer cells, but also correlates with the belligerent behaviour of various malignancies and is reflected as an increase in the expression of lactate dehydrogenase 5 (LDH-5), the main isoform of LDH catalysing the conversion of pyruvate to lactate during glycolysis. The diagnostic role of salivary LDH in assessing the metabolic phenotype of oral cancer has not been studied. Since salivary LDH is mainly sourced from oral epithelial cells, any pathological changes in the epithelium should reflect diagnostically in saliva. Thus in our current research, we made an attempt to ascertain the biological behaviour and aggressiveness of OSCC by appraising its metabolic phenotype as indirectly reflected in salivary LDH activity. We found that salivary LDH can be used to assess the aggressiveness of different histological grades of OSCC. For the first time, an evidence of differing metabolic behaviour in similar histologic tumour grade is presented. Taken together, our study examines the inclusion of salivary LDH as potential diagnostic parameter and therapeutic index in OSCC. PMID:26577856

  2. D-Lactate transport and metabolism in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    de Bari, Lidia; Atlante, Anna; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Principato, Giovanni; Passarella, Salvatore

    2002-01-01

    In the present study we investigated whether isolated rat liver mitochondria can take up and metabolize D-lactate. We found the following: (1) externally added D-lactate causes oxygen uptake by mitochondria [P/O ratio (the ratio of mol of ATP synthesized to mol of oxygen atoms reduced to water during oxidative phosphorylation)=2] and membrane potential (Delta(psi)) generation in processes that are rotenone-insensitive, but inhibited by antimycin A and cyanide, and proton release from coupled mitochondria inhibited by alpha-cyanocinnamate, but not by phenylsuccinate; (2) the activity of the putative flavoprotein (D-lactate dehydrogenase) was detected in inside-out submitochondrial particles, but not in mitochondria and mitoplasts, as it is localized in the matrix phase of the mitochondrial inner membrane; (3) three novel separate translocators exist to mediate D-lactate traffic across the mitochondrial inner membrane: the D-lactate/H(+) symporter, which was investigated by measuring fluorimetrically the rate of endogenous flavin reduction, the D-lactate/oxoacid antiporter (which mediates both the D-lactate/pyruvate and D-lactate/oxaloacetate exchanges) and D-lactate/malate antiporter studied by monitoring photometrically the appearance of the D-lactate counteranions outside mitochondria. The D-lactate translocators, in the light of their different inhibition profiles separate from the monocarboxylate carrier, were found to differ from each other in the V(max) values and in the inhibition and pH profiles and were shown to regulate mitochondrial D-lactate metabolism in vitro. The D-lactate translocators and the D-lactate dehydrogenase could account for the removal of the toxic methylglyoxal from cytosol, as well as for D-lactate-dependent gluconeogenesis. PMID:11955284

  3. The primary pathway for lactate oxidation in Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Vita, Nicolas; Valette, Odile; Brasseur, Gaël; Lignon, Sabrina; Denis, Yann; Ansaldi, Mireille; Dolla, Alain; Pieulle, Laetitia

    2015-01-01

    The ability to respire sulfate linked to lactate oxidation is a key metabolic signature of the Desulfovibrio genus. Lactate oxidation by these incomplete oxidizers generates reductants through lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), with the latter catalyzing pyruvate conversion into acetyl-CoA. Acetyl-CoA is the source of substrate-level phosphorylation through the production of ATP. Here, we show that these crucial steps are performed by enzymes encoded by a nonacistronic transcriptional unit named now as operon luo (for lactate utilization operon). Using a combination of genetic and biochemical techniques, we assigned a physiological role to the operon genes DVU3027-28 and DVU3032-33. The growth of mutant Δ26-28 was highly disrupted on D-lactate, whereas the growth of mutant Δ32-33 was slower on L-lactate, which could be related to a decrease in the activity of D-lactate or L-lactate oxidase in the corresponding mutants. The DVU3027-28 and DVU3032-33 genes thus encode functional D-LDH and L-LDH enzymes, respectively. Scanning of the genome for lactate utilization revealed several lactate permease and dehydrogenase homologs. However, transcriptional compensation was not observed in any of the mutants except for lactate permease. Although there is a high degree of redundancy for lactate oxidase, it is not functionally efficient in LDH mutants. This result could be related to the identification of several operon enzymes, including LDHs, in the PFOR activity bands, suggesting the occurrence of a lactate-oxidizing supermolecular structure that can optimize the performance of lactate utilization in Desulfovibrio species. PMID:26167158

  4. Testis-Specific Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH-C4) in Skeletal Muscle Enhances a Pika's Sprint-Running Capacity in Hypoxic Environment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Lian; Wei, Dengbang; Li, Xiao; Xu, Lina; Wei, Linna

    2015-08-01

    LDH-C4 is a lactate dehydrogenase that catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to lactate. In mammals, ldh-c was originally thought to be expressed only in testis and spermatozoa. Plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae), which belongs to the genus Ochotona of the Ochotonidea family, is a hypoxia tolerant mammal living 3000-5000 m above sea level on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, an environment which is strongly hypoxic. Ldh-c is expressed not only in testis and sperm but also in somatic tissues of plateau pika. In this study, the effects of N-propyl oxamate and N-isopropyl oxamate on LDH isozyme kinetics were compared to screens for a selective inhibitor of LDH-C4. To reveal the role and physiological mechanism of LDH-C4 in skeletal muscle of plateau pika, we investigated the effect of N-isopropyl oxamate on the pika exercise tolerance as well as the physiological mechanism. Our results show that Ki of N-propyl oxamate and N-isopropyl oxamate for LDH-A4, LDH-B4, and LDH-C4 were 0.094 mmol/L and 0.462 mmol/L, 0.119 mmol/L and 0.248 mmol/L, and 0.015 mmol/L and 0.013 mmol/L, respectively. N-isopropyl oxamate is a powerful selective inhibitor of plateau pika LDH-C4. In our exercise tolerance experiment, groups treated with inhibitors had significantly lower swimming times than the uninhibited control group. The inhibition rates of LDH, LD, and ATP were 37.12%, 66.27%, and 32.42%, respectively. Our results suggested that ldh-c is expressed in the skeletal muscle of plateau pika, and at least 32.42% of ATP in the skeletal muscle is catalyzed by LDH-C4 by anaerobic glycolysis. This suggests that pika has reduced dependence on oxygen and enhanced adaptation to hypoxic environment due to increased anaerobic glycolysis by LDH-C4 in skeletal muscle. LDH-C4 in plateau pika plays the crucial role in anaerobic glycolysis and generates ATP rapidly since this is the role of LDH-A4 in most species on plain land, which provide evidence that the native humans and animals in Qinghai-Tibet plateau

  5. Karnofsky Performance Status and Lactate Dehydrogenase Predict the Benefit of Palliative Whole-Brain Irradiation in Patients With Advanced Intra- and Extracranial Metastases From Malignant Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Partl, Richard; Richtig, Erika; Avian, Alexander; Berghold, Andrea; Kapp, Karin S.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To determine prognostic factors that allow the selection of melanoma patients with advanced intra- and extracerebral metastatic disease for palliative whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) or best supportive care. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study of 87 patients who underwent palliative WBRT between 1988 and 2009 for progressive or multiple cerebral metastases at presentation. Uni- and multivariate analysis took into account the following patient- and tumor-associated factors: gender and age, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), neurologic symptoms, serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, number of intracranial metastases, previous resection or stereotactic radiosurgery of brain metastases, number of extracranial metastasis sites, and local recurrences as well as regional lymph node metastases at the time of WBRT. Results: In univariate analysis, KPS, LDH, number of intracranial metastases, and neurologic symptoms had a significant influence on overall survival. In multivariate survival analysis, KPS and LDH remained as significant prognostic factors, with hazard ratios of 3.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6-6.5) and 2.8 (95% CI 1.6-4.9), respectively. Patients with KPS ≥70 and LDH ≤240 U/L had a median survival of 191 days; patients with KPS ≥70 and LDH >240 U/L, 96 days; patients with KPS <70 and LDH ≤240 U/L, 47 days; and patients with KPS <70 and LDH >240 U/L, only 34 days. Conclusions: Karnofsky performance status and serum LDH values indicate whether patients with advanced intra- and extracranial tumor manifestations are candidates for palliative WBRT or best supportive care.

  6. Serum lactate dehydrogenase levels at presentation in stage IV non-small cell lung cancer: predictive value of metastases and relation to survival outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Soo; Park, Kyung Ran; Kim, Seung Joon; Chung, Mi Joo; Lee, Yun Hee; Chang, Ji Hyun; Kang, Jin Hyoung; Hong, Sook Hee; Kim, Myung Sin; Kim, Yeon Sil

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the clinical correlations between serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and tumor characteristics and to investigate the prognostic impact of serum LDH levels in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 394 patients were included in the present study between June 2007 and January 2013. All eligible patients had serum LDH levels available before treatment, and whole-body metastatic extent was measured using whole-body metastatic scores, as determined by 18(F)-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scans from 1 to 7 as the sum of each metastatic region. The diagnostic cutoff value for an abnormal serum LDH level was 450 IU/L. The median serum LDH level was 477 IU/L (range, 113-2850), and 224 (56.9 %) patients had abnormal serum LDH levels. The serum LDH levels showed no significant associations with age, gender, histology, tumor differentiation, and smoking history. However, the proportion of patients with abnormal serum LDH levels was statistically significantly higher in the high total metastatic score group (scores 3-7) than in the low total metastatic score group (scores 1-2) (65.3 vs 50.4 %, p = 0.001). In a multivariate survival analysis, age (p = 0.001), gender (p = 0.001), histology (p = 0.003), tumor differentiation (p = 0.001), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (p = 0.001), LDH levels (p = 0.046), and treatment factors (p = 0.001) proved to be independent prognostic factors for survival outcomes. The results of this study suggest that the serum LDH levels at presentation may be significantly correlated with whole-body tumor extent and might independently but modestly prognosticate OS in stage IV NSCLC. PMID:26240025

  7. The prognostic role of lactate dehydrogenase serum levels in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who are treated with sorafenib: the influence of liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yada, Masayoshi; Miyazaki, Masayuki; Motomura, Kenta; Masumoto, Akihide; Nakamuta, Makoto; Kohjima, Motoyuki; Sugimoto, Rie; Aratake, Yoshifusa; Higashi, Nobuhiko; Morizono, Shusuke; Takao, Shinichiro; Yamashita, Naoki; Satoh, Takeaki; Yamashita, Shinsaku; Kuniyoshi, Masami

    2016-01-01

    Background Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels could be a prognostic factor for sorafenib-treated patients with several types of solid tumor because it reflects hypoxic circumstances in aggressive tumors. For hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), however, the prognostic role of LDH has been controversial. Liver fibrosis can potentially cause hypoxia in the liver, which has not been previously studied in the patients with advanced HCC. Thus, we aimed to analyze the prognostic role of LDH based on the degree of fibrosis. Methods Eighty-nine consecutive patients with HCC (Child-Pugh class A) who were treated using sorafenib were enrolled into this study. Pretreatment characteristics and changes in hepatic functional tests based on early response to sorafenib and serum LDH levels were analyzed. The degree of fibrosis was estimated using the aspartate aminotransferase (AST) to platelet ratio index (APRI), and the tumor response was evaluated after 3 months of sorafenib treatment. Results Overall, five patients discontinued sorafenib within 4 weeks. For the other 84 patients, those with progressive disease (PD) had significantly high pretreatment LDH levels, which correlated with the APRI score but not with the tumor stage. Multivariate logistic analysis revealed that older age and lower pretreatment LDH levels were independent prognostic factors for a better response to sorafenib. In patients who discontinued sorafenib early, three experienced acute liver failure accompanied with an increase in serum LDH. Conclusions We demonstrated that baseline serum LDH levels in HCC patients were affected by liver fibrosis but not by the tumor stage, and these LDH levels could be a marker for early response to sorafenib. A marked increase in serum LDH levels during sorafenib administration might also indicate subsequent acute liver failure. Close observation of serum LDH levels before and during sorafenib treatment could be useful in managing treatment of patients receiving this

  8. Dacarbazine with or without oblimersen (a Bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotide) in chemotherapy-naive patients with advanced melanoma and low-normal serum lactate dehydrogenase: 'The AGENDA trial'.

    PubMed

    Bedikian, Agop Y; Garbe, Claus; Conry, Robert; Lebbe, Celeste; Grob, Jean J

    2014-06-01

    In a previous large randomized, open-label study, retrospective subset analysis revealed that the addition of the Bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotide oblimersen to dacarbazine (Dac) significantly improved overall survival, progression-free survival, and the response rate in chemotherapy-naive patients with advanced melanoma and normal baseline serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. To confirm and expand on this observation, we conducted a prospective double-blind, placebo-controlled study to determine whether oblimersen augmented the efficacy of Dac in advanced melanoma patients with low-normal baseline LDH levels. A total of 314 chemotherapy-naive patients were randomly assigned to receive Dac (1000 mg/m(2)) preceded by a 5-day continuous intravenous infusion of either oblimersen sodium (7 mg/kg/day) or placebo every 21 days for less than eight cycles. Co-primary efficacy endpoints were overall survival and progression-free survival. Response and progression of the disease were assessed by independent blinded review of computed tomography scan images. No difference in overall nor progression-free survival was observed between the Dac-oblimersen and Dac-placebo groups. Although the overall (17.2 vs. 12.1%) and durable (10.8 vs. 7.6%) response rates numerically favored Dac-oblimersen over Dac-placebo, they did not differ significantly (P=0.19 and 0.32, respectively). The incidence of hematologic adverse events, particularly thrombocytopenia and neutropenia, was higher in the Dac-oblimersen group than in the Dac-placebo group. Withdrawals from the study because of treatment-related adverse events were low (i.e. <2.5%) in both groups. The addition of oblimersen to Dac did not significantly improve overall survival nor progression-free survival in patients with advanced melanoma and low-normal levels of LDH at baseline. PMID:24667300

  9. Lactate metabolism in the fetal rabbit lung

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, M.J.; Brown, D.J.; Dooley, M.

    1986-05-01

    Lactate is frequently overlooked as a potential substrate for the fetal lung, even though it is present in the fetal circulation in concentrations as high as 8 mM. These high concentrations, coupled with the relatively low levels of glucose in the fetal blood, may indicate that lactate can substitute for glucose in pulmonary energy generation and phospholipid synthesis. A series of experiments was therefore undertaken in order to investigate the role of lactate in perinatal pulmonary development. Explants from 30 day gestation fetal rabbit lungs were incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer supplemented with 3 mM (U-/sup 14/C)-glucose and varying levels of lactate. In the absence of medium lactate, fetal rabbit lung explants were capable of producing lactate at a rate of approximately 200 etamoles/mg protein/hour. The addition of lactate to the bathing medium immediately reduced net lactate production and above 4 mM, fetal rabbit lung explants became net utilizers of lactate. Media lactate concentrations of 2.5 mM, 5 mM and 10 mM also decreased glucose incorporation into total tissue disaturated phosphatidylcholine by approximately 20%, 35%, and 45%, respectively. Glucose incorporation into surfactant phosphatidylcholine was also reduced by approximately 50%, when lactate was present in the incubation medium at a concentration of 5 mM. Additional experiments also revealed that fetal lung lactate dehydrogenase activity was almost twice that found in the adult rabbit lung. These data indicate that lactate may be an important carbon source for the developing lung and could be a significant component in the manufacture of surfactant phosphatidylcholine during late gestation.

  10. Hemichannel-mediated release of lactate.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Anastassios; Sylantyev, Sergiy; Hadjihambi, Anna; Hosford, Patrick S; Kasparov, Sergey; Gourine, Alexander V

    2016-07-01

    In the central nervous system lactate contributes to the extracellular pool of readily available energy substrates and may also function as a signaling molecule which mediates communication between glial cells and neurons. Monocarboxylate transporters are believed to provide the main pathway for lactate transport across the membranes. Here we tested the hypothesis that lactate could also be released via opening of pannexin and/or functional connexin hemichannels. In acute slices prepared from the brainstem, hippocampus, hypothalamus and cortex of adult rats, enzymatic amperometric biosensors detected significant tonic lactate release inhibited by compounds, which block pannexin/connexin hemichannels and facilitated by lowering extracellular [Ca(2+)] or increased PCO2 Enhanced lactate release triggered by hypoxia was reduced by ∼50% by either connexin or monocarboxylate transporter blockers. Stimulation of Schaffer collateral fibers triggered lactate release in CA1 area of the hippocampus, which was facilitated in conditions of low extracellular [Ca(2+)], markedly reduced by blockade of connexin hemichannels and abolished by lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor oxamate. These results indicate that lactate transport across the membranes may occur via mechanisms other than monocarboxylate transporters. In the central nervous system, hemichannels may function as a conduit of lactate release, and this mechanism is recruited during hypoxia and periods of enhanced neuronal activity. PMID:26661210

  11. Methylmalonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency: demonstration of defective valine and beta-alanine metabolism and reduced malonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity in cultured fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R.G.; Pollitt, R.J.; Webley, J.

    1987-08-01

    Intact cultured fibroblasts from a child with a new metabolic disorder, thought to be due to a deficiency of methylmalonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, produced labeled CO/sub 2/ normally from (1-/sup 14/C)valine but not from (2-/sup 14/C)valine. CO/sub 2/ production from labeled beta-alanine was also much reduced, confirming the suspicion that malonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase is also deficient in this condition. An assay for malonic semialdehyde dehydrogenase in cell homogenates showed low activity but it was impossible to assess the degree of reduction.

  12. 200th anniversary of lactate research in muscle.

    PubMed

    Gladden, L Bruce

    2008-07-01

    This year, 2008, marks the bicentennial of research into lactate metabolism in muscle. Berzelius linked lactate accumulation to exercise in 1807/1808 when he noted the presence of lactate in the muscles of "hunted stags." Today, the exact mechanism of intramuscular lactate oxidation and the relationship of lactate dehydrogenase to mitochondria remain unresolved as animated debate surrounds the intracellular lactate shuttle. PMID:18580290

  13. Construction of Mutant Glucose Oxidases with Increased Dye-Mediated Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Horaguchi, Yohei; Saito, Shoko; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Tsugawa, Wakako; Ferri, Stefano; Sode, Koji

    2012-01-01

    Mutagenesis studies on glucose oxidases (GOxs) were conducted to construct GOxs with reduced oxidase activity and increased dehydrogenase activity. We focused on two representative GOxs, of which crystal structures have already been reported—Penicillium amagasakiense GOx (PDB ID; 1gpe) and Aspergillus niger GOx (PDB ID; 1cf3). We constructed oxygen-interacting structural models for GOxs, and predicted the residues responsible for oxidative half reaction with oxygen on the basis of the crystal structure of cholesterol oxidase as well as on the fact that both enzymes are members of the glucose/methanol/choline (GMC) oxidoreductase family. Rational amino acid substitution resulted in the construction of an engineered GOx with drastically decreased oxidase activity and increased dehydrogenase activity, which was higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. As a result, the dehydrogenase/oxidase ratio of the engineered enzyme was more than 11-fold greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. These results indicate that alteration of the dehydrogenase/oxidase activity ratio of GOxs is possible by introducing a mutation into the putative functional residues responsible for oxidative half reaction with oxygen of these enzymes, resulting in a further increased dehydrogenase activity. This is the first study reporting the alteration of GOx electron acceptor preference from oxygen to an artificial electron acceptor. PMID:23203056

  14. Simulated ischaemia-reperfusion conditions increase xanthine dehydrogenase and oxidase activities in rat brain slices.

    PubMed

    Battelli, M G; Buonamici, L; Virgili, M; Abbondanza, A; Contestabile, A

    1998-01-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase and oxidase activities increased by 87% in rat brain slices after 30 min in vitro ischaemia. A further 41% increase was induced by 30 min simulated reperfusion of ischaemic slices. No conversion from the dehydrogenase to the oxidase activity was observed. The increment of enzyme activity was not due to neosynthesis of the enzyme, since it was not affected by the addition of cycloheximide during the ischaemic incubation. The increased oxygen-dependent form of the enzyme could aggravate the ischaemic brain injury by free radicals production, in particular after reperfusion. PMID:9460697

  15. Discovery of 2-((3-cyanopyridin-2-yl)thio)acetamides as human lactate dehydrogenase A inhibitors to reduce the growth of MG-63 osteosarcoma cells: Virtual screening and biological validation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Lv, Wei; Qu, Ying; Ma, Rui; Wang, Yi-Wei; Xu, Yong-Jun; Wu, Di; Chen, Xuanhuang

    2016-08-15

    Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) has emerged as an attractive target in the oncology field. In this paper, we present the identification of 2-((3-cyanopyridin-2-yl)thio)acetamide-containing compounds as LDHA inhibitors. The in vitro enzymatic assay suggested that inhibitor 9 had good inhibitory potency against LDHA with IC50 value as 1.24μM. Cytotoxicity assay showed that inhibitor 9 strongly inhibited the proliferation of cancer cell MG-63 (EC50=0.98μM). These findings indicated that inhibitor 9 could be employed as a lead for developing more potent LDHA inhibitor with anti-proliferative potency. PMID:27406795

  16. IL-4 and IL-13 induce protection from complement and melittin in endothelial cells despite initial loss of cytoplasmic proteins: membrane resealing impairs quantifying cytotoxicity with the lactate dehydrogenase permeability assay.

    PubMed

    Benson, Barbara A; Vercellotti, Gregory M; Dalmasso, Agustin P

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cell activation and injury by the terminal pathway of complement is important in various pathobiological processes, including xenograft rejection. Protection against injury by human complement can be induced in porcine endothelial cells (ECs) with IL-4 and IL-13 through metabolic activation. However, despite this resistance, the complement-treated ECs were found to lose membrane permeability control assessed with the small molecule calcein. Therefore, to define the apparent discrepancy of permeability changes vis-à-vis the protection from killing, we now investigated whether IL-4 and IL-13 influence the release of the large cytoplasmic protein lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in ECs incubated with complement or the pore-forming protein melittin. Primary cultures of ECs were pre-treated with IL-4 or IL-13 and then incubated with human serum as source of antibody and complement or melittin. Cell death was assessed using neutral red. Membrane permeability was quantitated measuring LDH release. We found that IL-4-/IL-13-induced protection of ECs from killing by complement or melittin despite loss of LDH in amounts similar to control ECs. However, the cytokine-treated ECs that were protected from killing rapidly regained effective control of membrane permeability. Moreover, the viability of the protected ECs was maintained for at least 2 days. We conclude that the protection induced by IL-4/IL-13 in ECs against lethal attack by complement or melittin is effective and durable despite severe initial impairment of membrane permeability. The metabolic changes responsible for protection allow the cells to repair the membrane injury caused by complement or melittin. PMID:26031609

  17. IL-4 and IL-13 induce protection from complement and melittin in endothelial cells despite initial loss of cytoplasmic proteins: Membrane resealing impairs quantifying cytotoxicity with the lactate dehydrogenase permeability assay

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Barbara A.; Vercellotti, Gregory M.; Dalmasso, Agustin P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Endothelial cell activation and injury by the terminal pathway of complement is important in various pathobiological processes, including xenograft rejection. Protection against injury by human complement can be induced in porcine endothelial cells (ECs) with IL-4 and IL-13 through metabolic activation. However, despite this resistance, the complement-treated ECs were found to lose membrane permeability control assessed with the small molecule calcein. Therefore to define the apparent discrepancy of permeability changes vis-à-vis the protection from killing we now investigated whether IL-4 and IL-13 influence the release of the large cytoplasmic protein lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in ECs incubated with complement or the pore-forming protein melittin. Methods Primary cultures of ECs were pretreated with IL-4 or IL-13 and then incubated with human serum as source of antibody and complement or melittin. Cell death was assessed using neutral red. Membrane permeability was quantitated measuring LDH release. Results We found that IL-4/IL-13 induced protection of ECs from killing by complement or melittin despite loss of LDH in amounts similar to control ECs. However, the cytokine-treated ECs that were protected from killing rapidly regained effective control of membrane permeability. Moreover, the viability of the protected ECs was maintained for at least 2 days. Conclusion We conclude that the protection induced by IL-4/IL-13 in ECs against lethal attack by complement or melittin is effective and durable despite severe initial impairment of membrane permeability. The metabolic changes responsible for protection allow the cells to repair the membrane injury caused by complement or melittin. PMID:26031609

  18. SDHAF4 promotes mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase activity and prevents neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G.; Bricker, Daniel K.; Dephoure, Noah; Gygi, Steven P.; Cox, James E.; Thummel, Carl S.; Rutter, Jared

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) occupies a central place in cellular energy production, linking the tricarboxylic cycle with the electron transport chain. As a result, a subset of cancers and neuromuscular disorders result from mutations affecting any of the four SDH structural subunits or either of two known SDH assembly factors. Herein we characterize a novel evolutionarily conserved SDH assembly factor designated Sdh8/SDHAF4, using yeast, Drosophila, and mammalian cells. Sdh8 interacts specifically with the catalytic Sdh1 subunit in the mitochondrial matrix, facilitating its association with Sdh2 and the subsequent assembly of the SDH holocomplex. These roles for Sdh8 are critical for preventing motility defects and neurodegeneration in Drosophila as well as the excess ROS generated by free Sdh1. These studies provide insights into the mechanisms by which SDH is assembled and raise the possibility that some forms of neuromuscular disease may be associated with mutations that affect this SDH assembly factor. PMID:24954416

  19. Utilization of d-Lactate as an Energy Source Supports the Growth of Gluconobacter oxydans

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Binbin; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Yingxin; Jiang, Tianyi; Deng, Sisi; Kong, Jian; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    d-Lactate was identified as one of the few available organic acids that supported the growth of Gluconobacter oxydans 621H in this study. Interestingly, the strain used d-lactate as an energy source but not as a carbon source, unlike other lactate-utilizing bacteria. The enzymatic basis for the growth of G. oxydans 621H on d-lactate was therefore investigated. Although two putative NAD-independent d-lactate dehydrogenases, GOX1253 and GOX2071, were capable of oxidizing d-lactate, GOX1253 was the only enzyme able to support the d-lactate-driven growth of the strain. GOX1253 was characterized as a membrane-bound dehydrogenase with high activity toward d-lactate, while GOX2071 was characterized as a soluble oxidase with broad substrate specificity toward d-2-hydroxy acids. The latter used molecular oxygen as a direct electron acceptor, a feature that has not been reported previously in d-lactate-oxidizing enzymes. This study not only clarifies the mechanism for the growth of G. oxydans on d-lactate, but also provides new insights for applications of the important industrial microbe and the novel d-lactate oxidase. PMID:25862219

  20. Lactate Activates HIF-1 in Oxidative but Not in Warburg-Phenotype Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Saedeleer, Christophe J.; Copetti, Tamara; Porporato, Paolo E.; Verrax, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Cancer can be envisioned as a metabolic disease driven by pressure selection and intercellular cooperativeness. Together with anaerobic glycolysis, the Warburg effect, formally corresponding to uncoupling glycolysis from oxidative phosphorylation, directly participates in cancer aggressiveness, supporting both tumor progression and dissemination. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a key contributor to glycolysis. It stimulates the expression of glycolytic transporters and enzymes supporting high rate of glycolysis. In this study, we addressed the reverse possibility of a metabolic control of HIF-1 in tumor cells. We report that lactate, the end-product of glycolysis, inhibits prolylhydroxylase 2 activity and activates HIF-1 in normoxic oxidative tumor cells but not in Warburg-phenotype tumor cells which also expressed lower basal levels of HIF-1α. These data were confirmed using genotypically matched oxidative and mitochondria-depleted glycolytic tumor cells as well as several different wild-type human tumor cell lines of either metabolic phenotype. Lactate activates HIF-1 and triggers tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth in vivo, an activity that we found to be under the specific upstream control of the lactate transporter monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) expressed in tumor cells. Because MCT1 also gates lactate-fueled tumor cell respiration and mediates pro-angiogenic lactate signaling in endothelial cells, MCT1 inhibition is confirmed as an attractive anticancer strategy in which a single drug may target multiple tumor-promoting pathways. PMID:23082126

  1. Amino ketone formation and aminopropanol-dehydrogenase activity in rat-liver preparations

    PubMed Central

    Turner, J. M.; Willetts, A. J.

    1967-01-01

    1. Rat tissue homogenates convert dl-1-aminopropan-2-ol into aminoacetone. Liver homogenates have relatively high aminopropanol-dehydrogenase activity compared with kidney, heart, spleen and muscle preparations. 2. Maximum activity of liver homogenates is exhibited at pH9·8. The Km for aminopropanol is approx. 15mm, calculated for a single enantiomorph, and the maximum activity is approx. 9mμmoles of aminoacetone formed/mg. wet wt. of liver/hr.at 37°. Aminoacetone is also formed from l-threonine, but less rapidly. An unidentified amino ketone is formed from dl-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyrate, the Km for which is approx. 200mm at pH9·8. 3. Aminopropanol-dehydrogenase activity in homogenates is inhibited non-competitively by dl-3-hydroxybutyrate, the Ki being approx. 200mm. EDTA and other chelating agents are weakly inhibitory, and whereas potassium chloride activates slightly at low concentrations, inhibition occurs at 50–100mm. 4. It is concluded that aminopropanol-dehydrogenase is located in mitochondria, and in contrast with l-threonine dehydrogenase can be readily solubilized from mitochondrial preparations by ultrasonic treatment. 5. Soluble extracts of disintegrated mitochondria exhibit maximum aminopropanol-dehydrogenase activity at pH9·1 At this pH, Km values for the amino alcohol and NAD+ are approx. 200 and 1·3mm respectively. Under optimum conditions the maximum velocity is approx. 70mμmoles of aminoacetone formed/mg. of protein/hr. at 37°. Chelating agents and thiol reagents appear to have little effect on enzyme activity, but potassium chloride inhibits at all concentrations tested up to 80mm. dl-3-Hydroxybutyrate is only slightly inhibitory. 6. Dehydrogenase activities for l-threonine and dl-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyrate appear to be distinct from that for aminopropanol. 7. Intraperitoneal injection of aminopropanol into rats leads to excretion of aminoacetone in the urine. Aminoacetone excretion proportional to the amount of the amino alcohol

  2. Transport and metabolism of D-lactate in Jerusalem artichoke mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Atlante, Anna; de Bari, Lidia; Valenti, Daniela; Pizzuto, Roberto; Paventi, Gianluca; Passarella, Salvatore

    2005-06-01

    We report here initial studies on D-lactate metabolism in Jerusalem artichoke. It was found that: 1) D-lactate can be synthesized by Jerusalem artichoke by virtue of the presence of glyoxalase II, the activity of which was measured photometrically in both isolated Jerusalem artichoke mitochondria and cytosolic fraction after the addition of S-D-lactoyl-glutathione. 2) Externally added D-lactate caused oxygen consumption by mitochondria, mitochondrial membrane potential increase and proton release, in processes that were insensitive to rotenone, but inhibited by both antimycin A and cyanide. 3) D-lactate was metabolized inside mitochondria by a flavoprotein, a putative D-lactate dehydrogenase, the activity of which could be measured photometrically in mitochondria treated with Triton X-100. 4) Jerusalem artichoke mitochondria can take up externally added D-lactate by means of a D-lactate/H(+) symporter investigated by measuring the rate of reduction of endogenous flavins. The action of the d-lactate translocator and of the mitochondrial D-lactate dehydrogenase could be responsible for the subsequent metabolism of d-lactate formed from methylglyoxal in the cytosol of Jerusalem artichoke. PMID:15949980

  3. Evidences of basal lactate production in the main white adipose tissue sites of rats. Effects of sex and a cafeteria diet.

    PubMed

    Arriarán, Sofía; Agnelli, Silvia; Sabater, David; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2015-01-01

    Female and male adult Wistar rats were fed standard chow or a simplified cafeteria diet for one month. Then, the rats were killed and the white adipose tissue (WAT) in four sites: perigonadal, retroperitoneal, mesenteric and subcutaneous (inguinal) were sampled and frozen. The complete WAT weight in each site was measured. Gene expression analysis of key lipid and glucose metabolism enzymes were analyzed, as well as tissue and plasma lactate and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase. Lactate gradients between WAT and plasma were estimated. The influence of sex and diet (and indirectly WAT mass) on lactate levels and their relationships with lactate dehydrogenase activity and gene expressions were also measured. A main conclusion is the high production of lactate by WAT, practically irrespective of site, diet or sex. Lactate production is a direct correlate of lactate dehydrogenase activity in the tissue. Furthermore, lactate dehydrogenase activity is again directly correlated with the expression of the genes Ldha and Ldhb for this enzyme. In sum, the ability to produce lactate by WAT is not directly dependent of WAT metabolic state. We postulate that, in WAT, a main function of the lactate dehydrogenase path may be that of converting excess available glucose to 3C fragments, as a way to limit tissue self-utilization as substrate, to help control glycaemia and/or providing short chain substrates for use as energy source elsewhere. More information must be gathered before a conclusive role of WAT in the control of glycaemia, and the full existence of a renewed glucose-lactate-fatty acid cycle is definitely established. PMID:25741703

  4. Evidences of Basal Lactate Production in the Main White Adipose Tissue Sites of Rats. Effects of Sex and a Cafeteria Diet

    PubMed Central

    Arriarán, Sofía; Agnelli, Silvia; Sabater, David; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2015-01-01

    Female and male adult Wistar rats were fed standard chow or a simplified cafeteria diet for one month. Then, the rats were killed and the white adipose tissue (WAT) in four sites: perigonadal, retroperitoneal, mesenteric and subcutaneous (inguinal) were sampled and frozen. The complete WAT weight in each site was measured. Gene expression analysis of key lipid and glucose metabolism enzymes were analyzed, as well as tissue and plasma lactate and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase. Lactate gradients between WAT and plasma were estimated. The influence of sex and diet (and indirectly WAT mass) on lactate levels and their relationships with lactate dehydrogenase activity and gene expressions were also measured. A main conclusion is the high production of lactate by WAT, practically irrespective of site, diet or sex. Lactate production is a direct correlate of lactate dehydrogenase activity in the tissue. Furthermore, lactate dehydrogenase activity is again directly correlated with the expression of the genes Ldha and Ldhb for this enzyme. In sum, the ability to produce lactate by WAT is not directly dependent of WAT metabolic state. We postulate that, in WAT, a main function of the lactate dehydrogenase path may be that of converting excess available glucose to 3C fragments, as a way to limit tissue self-utilization as substrate, to help control glycaemia and/or providing short chain substrates for use as energy source elsewhere. More information must be gathered before a conclusive role of WAT in the control of glycaemia, and the full existence of a renewed glucose-lactate-fatty acid cycle is definitely established. PMID:25741703

  5. Stringency of substrate specificity of Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase.

    SciTech Connect

    Boernke, W. E.; Millard, C. S.; Stevens, P. W.; Kakar, S. N.; Stevens, F. J.; Donnelly, M. I.; Nebraska Wesleyan Univ.

    1995-09-10

    Malate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase are members of the structurally and functionally homologous family of 2-ketoacid dehydrogenases. Both enzymes display high specificity for their respective keto substrates, oxaloacetate and pyruvate. Closer analysis of their specificity, however, reveals that the specificity of malate dehydrogenase is much stricter and less malleable than that of lactate dehydrogenase. Site-specific mutagenesis of the two enzymes in an attempt to reverse their specificity has met with contrary results. Conversion of a specific active-site glutamine to arginine in lactate dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus generated an enzyme that displayed activity toward oxaloacetate equal to that of the native enzyme toward pyruvate (H. M. Wilks et al. (1988) Science 242, 1541-1544). We have constructed a series of mutants in the mobile, active site loop of the Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase that incorporate the complementary change, conversion of arginine 81 to glutamine, to evaluate the role of charge distribution and conformational flexibility within this loop in defining the substrate specificity of these enzymes. Mutants incorporating the change R81Q all had reversed specificity, displaying much higher activity toward pyruvate than to the natural substrate, oxaloacetate. In contrast to the mutated lactate dehydrogenase, these reversed-specificity mutants were much less active than the native enzyme. Secondary mutations within the loop of the E. coli enzyme (A80N, A80P, A80P/M85E/D86T) had either no or only moderately beneficial effects on the activity of the mutant enzyme toward pyruvate. The mutation A80P, which can be expected to reduce the overall flexibility of the loop, modestly improved activity toward pyruvate. The possible physiological relevance of the stringent specificity of malate dehydrogenase was investigated. In normal strains of E. coli, fermentative metabolism was not affected by expression of the mutant

  6. The hormonal regulation of hepatic microsomal 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lax, E R; Ghraf, R; Schriefers, H

    1978-10-01

    Hepatic microsomal 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity is higher in male than in female rat liver. Gonadectomy on day 25 of life only affects the activity in the adult male animal, causing a decrease towards the normal female level. Administration of testosterone to gonadectomized rats of either sex causes the induction of typical male activity levels. On the basis of these experiments, this enzyme activity may be classified as an drogen-dependent. However, 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase differs from other known androgen-dependent activities in that administration of oestradiol to gonadectomized animals of either sex causes a further significant repression of the activity to levels close to the limits of detection. Hypophysectomy on day 50 of life does not affect the activity in 75 day-old male rats, but causes the appearance of typically male activity levels in females. These results indicate that the hypophysis exerts a repressive influence on hepatic 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in female rats. The facts that this activity is not influenced by androgen or oestrogen administration once the pituitary has been removed demonstrates the obligatory role of the hypophysis for sex hormone action. PMID:696183

  7. Highly efficient L-lactate production using engineered Escherichia coli with dissimilar temperature optima for L-lactate formation and cell growth

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    L-Lactic acid, one of the most important chiral molecules and organic acids, is produced via pyruvate from carbohydrates in diverse microorganisms catalyzed by an NAD+-dependent L-lactate dehydrogenase. Naturally, Escherichia coli does not produce L-lactate in noticeable amounts, but can catabolize it via a dehydrogenation reaction mediated by an FMN-dependent L-lactate dehydrogenase. In aims to make the E. coli strain to produce L-lactate, three L-lactate dehydrogenase genes from different bacteria were cloned and expressed. The L-lactate producing strains, 090B1 (B0013-070, ΔldhA::diflldD::Pldh-ldhLca), 090B2 (B0013-070, ΔldhA::diflldD::Pldh-ldhStrb) and 090B3 (B0013-070, ΔldhA::diflldD::Pldh-ldhBcoa) were developed from a previously developed D-lactate over-producing strain, E. coli strain B0013-070 (ack-ptappspflBdldpoxBadhEfrdA) by: (1) deleting ldhA to block D-lactate formation, (2) deleting lldD to block the conversion of L-lactate to pyruvate, and (3) expressing an L-lactate dehydrogenase (L-LDH) to convert pyruvate to L-lactate under the control of the ldhA promoter. Fermentation tests were carried out in a shaking flask and in a 25-l bioreactor. Strains 090B1, 090B2 or 090B3 were shown to metabolize glucose to L-lactate instead of D-lactate. However, L-lactate yield and cell growth rates were significantly different among the metabolically engineered strains which can be attributed to a variation between temperature optimum for cell growth and temperature optimum for enzymatic activity of individual L-LDH. In a temperature-shifting fermentation process (cells grown at 37°C and L-lactate formed at 42°C), E. coli 090B3 was able to produce 142.2 g/l of L-lactate with no more than 1.2 g/l of by-products (mainly acetate, pyruvate and succinate) accumulated. In conclusion, the production of lactate by E. coli is limited by the competition relationship between cell growth and lactate synthesis. Enzymatic properties, especially the thermodynamics of an L

  8. Validation of the In Vivo Assessment of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Activity Using Hyperpolarized 13C-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Michael S.; Heather, Lisa C.; Carter, Emma E.; Cochlin, Lowri E.; Nagel, Simon; Sibson, Nicola R.; Radda, George K.; Clarke, Kieran; Tyler, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Many diseases of the heart are characterised by changes in substrate utilisation, which is in part regulated by the activity of the enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). Consequently, there is much interest in the in vivo evaluation of PDH activity in a range of physiological and pathological states to obtain information regarding the metabolic mechanisms of cardiac diseases. Hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate, detected using MRS, is a novel technique for evaluating PDH flux non-invasively. PDH flux has been assumed to directly reflect in vivo PDH activity, although to date this assumption remains unproven. Methods Control animals and animals undergoing interventions known to modulate PDH activity, namely high fat feeding and dichloroacetate infusion, were used to investigate the relationship between in vivo hyperpolarized MRS measurements of PDH flux and ex vivo measurements of PDH enzyme activity (PDHa). Further, the plasma concentrations of pyruvate and other important metabolites were evaluated following pyruvate infusion to assess the metabolic consequences of the pyruvate infusion during hyperpolarized MRS experiments. Results Hyperpolarized MRS measurements of PDH flux significantly correlated with ex vivo measurements of PDHa, confirming that PDH activity directly influences the in vivo flux of hyperpolarized pyruvate through cardiac PDH. The maximum plasma concentration of pyruvate reached during hyperpolarized MRS experiments was ~250 μM, equivalent to physiological pyruvate concentrations reached during exercise or with dietary interventions. Concentrations of other metabolites, including lactate, glucose and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), did not vary during the 60 s following pyruvate infusion. Hence, during the 60 s data acquisition period, metabolism was minimally affected by pyruvate infusion. PMID:20799252

  9. Plasticity in gastrointestinal morphology and enzyme activity in lactating striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Ying; Zhao, Xiao-Ya; Wen, Jing; Tan, Song; Zhao, Zhi-Jun

    2016-05-01

    In small mammals, marked phenotypic plasticity of digestive physiology has been shown to make it easier for them to cope with energetically stressful periods, such as lactation. It has been proposed that the capacity of the gut to digest and absorb food is not the limiting factor to sustained energy intake (SusEI) during peak lactation. In this study, plasticity in energy intake and gastrointestinal morphology was examined in striped hamsters at different stages of reproduction and when raising litters of different sizes. Mechanisms associated with digestive enzymes and neuroendocrine hormones underpinning the plasticity were also examined. Females significantly increased energy intake, digestibility, digestive tract mass and the activity of stomach pepsin and small intestine maltase, sucrase and aminopeptidase in peak lactation compared with the non-productive and post-lactating periods. Further, females raising large litters significantly increased energy intake, digestibility, gastrointestinal mass and activity of digestive enzymes, and weaned heavier offspring compared with those nursing small and medium litters, indicating that the significant plasticity of digestive physiology increased reproductive performance. Agouti-related protein (AgRP) mRNA expression in the hypothalamus was up-regulated significantly in females raising large litters relative to those raising small litters. Serum leptin levels, and mRNA expression of hypothalamus neuropeptide Y (NPY) and the anorexigenic neuropeptides pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) did not differ among females raising small, medium and large litters. Leptin levels in lactation may only reflect a state of energy balance rather than being the prime driver of hyperphagia. Some hypothalamic neuropeptides, such as NPY, POMC and CART, may be involved in the limits to the SusEI during lactation. PMID:26944487

  10. Nicotinamide Cofactors Suppress Active-Site Labeling of Aldehyde Dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Stiti, Naim; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Strubl, Laura; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bartels, Dorothea; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-06-17

    Active site labeling by (re)activity-based probes is a powerful chemical proteomic tool to globally map active sites in native proteomes without using substrates. Active site labeling is usually taken as a readout for the active state of the enzyme because labeling reflects the availability and reactivity of active sites, which are hallmarks for enzyme activities. Here, we show that this relationship holds tightly, but we also reveal an important exception to this rule. Labeling of Arabidopsis ALDH3H1 with a chloroacetamide probe occurs at the catalytic Cys, and labeling is suppressed upon nitrosylation and oxidation, and upon treatment with other Cys modifiers. These experiments display a consistent and strong correlation between active site labeling and enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, however, labeling is suppressed by the cofactor NAD(+), and this property is shared with other members of the ALDH superfamily and also detected for unrelated GAPDH enzymes with an unrelated hydantoin-based probe in crude extracts of plant cell cultures. Suppression requires cofactor binding to its binding pocket. Labeling is also suppressed by ALDH modulators that bind at the substrate entrance tunnel, confirming that labeling occurs through the substrate-binding cavity. Our data indicate that cofactor binding adjusts the catalytic Cys into a conformation that reduces the reactivity toward chloroacetamide probes. PMID:26990764

  11. Activation of hepatic branched-chain 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase by rat liver cytosolic supernatant.

    PubMed

    Hauschildt, S

    1986-10-29

    Hepatic branched-chain 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase is inactivated by nutritional alterations. Reactivation occurs during preincubation of intact mitochondria in the presence of rat liver cytosolic supernatant. Cytosolic supernatant contains two factors capable of reactivating the enzyme. On gel-filtration (Sephadex G-100), one factor (AF1) elutes in the molecular range of 35,000-40,000 and the other factor (AF2) elutes slightly later than inorganic phosphate. AF2 is stable against heat denaturation and treatment with proteinases. It is destroyed by alkaline phosphatase and in the presence of Ap5A, atractyloside, CaCl2 and NaF its stimulatory effect on branched-chain 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase activity is abolished. Inhibition of activation by NaF suggests that a phosphatase might be involved in the activation process. PMID:3768411

  12. The dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of Aeromonas caviae ST exhibits NADH-dependent tellurite reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Castro, Miguel E; Molina, Roberto; Díaz, Waldo; Pichuantes, Sergio E; Vásquez, Claudio C

    2008-10-10

    Potassium tellurite (K(2)TeO(3)) is extremely toxic for most forms of life and only a limited number of organisms are naturally resistant to the toxic effects of this compound. Crude extracts prepared from the environmental isolate Aeromonas caviae ST catalize the in vitro reduction of TeO32- in a NADH-dependent reaction. Upon fractionation by ionic exchange column chromatography three major polypeptides identified as the E1, E2, and E3 components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex were identified in fractions exhibiting tellurite-reducing activity. Tellurite reductase and pyruvate dehydrogenase activities co-eluted from a Sephadex gel filtration column. To determine which component(s) of the PDH complex has tellurite reductase activity, the A. caviae ST structural genes encoding for E1 (aceE), E2 (aceF), and E3 (lpdA) were independently cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and their gene products purified. Results indicated that tellurite reductase activity lies almost exclusively in the E3 component, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. The E3 component of the PDH complex from E. coli, Zymomonas mobilis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus also showed NADH-dependent tellurite reductase in vitro suggesting that this enzymatic activity is widely distributed among microorganisms. PMID:18675788

  13. Succinate dehydrogenase activity and soma size of motoneurons innervating different portions of the rat tibialis anterior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihara, A.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1995-01-01

    The spatial distribution, soma size and oxidative enzyme activity of gamma and alpha motoneurons innervating muscle fibres in the deep (away from the surface of the muscle) and superficial (close to the surface of the muscle) portions of the tibialis anterior in normal rats were determined. The deep portion had a higher percentage of high oxidative fibres than the superficial portion of the muscle. Motoneurons were labelled by retrograde neuronal transport of fluorescent tracers: Fast Blue and Nuclear Yellow were injected into the deep portion and Nuclear Yellow into the superficial portion of the muscle. Therefore, motoneurons innervating the deep portion were identified by both a blue fluorescent cytoplasm and a golden-yellow fluorescent nucleus, while motoneurons innervating the superficial portion were identified by only a golden-yellow fluorescent nucleus. After staining for succinate dehydrogenase activity on the same section used for the identification of the motoneurons, soma size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of the motoneurons were measured. The gamma and alpha motoneurons innervating both the deep and superficial portions were located primarily at L4 and were intermingled within the same region of the dorsolateral portion of the ventral horn in the spinal cord. Mean soma size was similar for either gamma or alpha motoneurons in the two portions of the muscle. The alpha motoneurons innervating the superficial portion had a lower mean succinate dehydrogenase activity than those innervating the deep portion of the muscle. An inverse relationship between soma size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of alpha, but not gamma, motoneurons innervating both the deep and superficial portions was observed. Based on three-dimensional reconstructions within the spinal cord, there were no apparent differences in the spatial distribution of the motoneurons, either gamma or alpha, associated with the deep and superficial compartments of the muscle. The data

  14. Pattern of γ-glutamyl transferase activity in cow milk throughout lactation and relationships with metabolic conditions and milk composition.

    PubMed

    Calamari, L; Gobbi, L; Russo, F; Cappelli, F Piccioli

    2015-08-01

    The main objective of this experiment was to study the γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity in milk during lactation and its relationship with metabolic status of dairy cows, milk yield, milk composition, and cheesemaking properties. The study was performed in a tied stall barn and involved 20 lactations from 12 healthy multiparous Italian Friesian dairy cows. During lactation starting at d 10, milk samples were collected weekly and analyzed for composition, somatic cells count, titratable acidity, and milk coagulation properties. The GGT activity was measured in defatted samples. Blood samples were collected weekly to assess biochemical indicators related to energy, protein, and mineral metabolism, markers of inflammation and some enzyme activities. The lactations of each cow were retrospectively categorized into 2 groups according to their milk GGT activity value through lactation. A median value of GGT activity in the milk of all lactations was calculated (3,045 U/L), and 10 lactations with lower GGT activity were classified as low while 10 lactations with greater GGT activity were classified as high. The average value of milk GGT activity during lactation was 3,863 and 3,024 U/L for high and low, respectively. The GGT activity decreased in early lactation and reached minimum values in the second month (3,289 and 2,355 U/L for high and low, respectively). Thereafter GGT activity increased progressively, reaching values in late lactation of 4,511 and 3,540 U/L in high and low, respectively. On average, milk yield was 40.81 and 42.76 kg/d in high and low, respectively, and a negative partial correlation with milk GGT activity was observed. A greater milk protein concentration was observed in high (3.39%) compared with low (3.18%), and a positive partial correlation with milk GGT activity was observed. Greater titratable acidity in high than that in low (3.75 vs. 3.45 degrees Soxhlet-Henkel/50 mL, respectively) was also observed. Plasma glucose was greater in

  15. Determination of Dehydrogenase Activities Involved in D-Glucose Oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter Strains

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Florencia; Jesús Torija, María; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Kataoka, Naoya; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane-bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane-bound dehydrogenases [membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH), D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH) and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH)] involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA) was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains). Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites [GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA)] was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the Acetobacter malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h), which coincided with D-glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of Gluconobacter oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24 h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition. Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter

  16. Determination of Dehydrogenase Activities Involved in D-Glucose Oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter Strains.

    PubMed

    Sainz, Florencia; Jesús Torija, María; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Kataoka, Naoya; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane-bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane-bound dehydrogenases [membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH), D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH) and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH)] involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA) was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains). Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites [GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA)] was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the Acetobacter malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h), which coincided with D-glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of Gluconobacter oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24 h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition. Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter

  17. Effect of amines as activators on the alcohol-oxidizing activity of pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kouta; Ishida, Takuya; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenases (PQQ-ADH) require ammonia or primary amines as activators in in vitro assays with artificial electron acceptors. We found that PQQ-ADH from Pseudomonas putida KT2440 (PpADH) was activated by various primary amines, di-methylamine, and tri-methylamine. The alcohol oxidation activity of PpADH was strongly enhanced and the affinity for substrates was also improved by pentylamine as an activator. PMID:25229857

  18. Oxygen uptake on-kinetics in dog gastrocnemius in situ following activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase by dichloroacetate.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Bruno; Hogan, Michael C; Greenhaff, Paul L; Hamann, Jason J; Kelley, Kevin M; Aschenbach, William G; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Gladden, L Bruce

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) by dichloroacetate (DCA) is associated with faster O(2) uptake (V(O2)) on-kinetics. V(O2) on-kinetics was determined in isolated canine gastrocnemius muscles in situ (n = 6) during the transition from rest to 4 min of electrically stimulated isometric tetanic contractions, corresponding to approximately 60-70 % of peak V(O2). Two conditions were compared: (1) control (saline infusion, C); and (2) DCA infusion (300 mg (kg body mass)(-1), 45 min before contraction). Muscle blood flow (Q) was measured continuously in the popliteal vein; arterial and popliteal vein O(2) contents were measured at rest and at 5-7 s intervals during the transition. Muscle V(O2) was calculated as Q multiplied by the arteriovenous O(2) content difference. Muscle biopsies were taken before and at the end of contraction for determination of muscle metabolite concentrations. DCA activated PDC at rest, as shown by the 9-fold higher acetylcarnitine concentration in DCA (vs. C; P < 0.0001). Phosphocreatine degradation and muscle lactate accumulation were not significantly different between C and DCA. DCA was associated with significantly less muscle fatigue. Resting and steady-state V(O2) values during contraction were not significantly different between C and DCA. The time to reach 63 % of the V(O2) difference between the resting baseline and the steady-state V(O2) values during contraction was 22.3 +/- 0.5 s in C and 24.5 +/- 1.4 s in DCA (n.s.). In this experimental model, activation of PDC by DCA resulted in a stockpiling of acetyl groups at rest and less muscle fatigue, but it did not affect 'anaerobic' energy provision and V(O2) on-kinetics. PMID:11773328

  19. Evolutionary origins of retinoid active short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases of SDR16C family.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, Olga V; Chang, Chenbei; Berlett, Michael C; Kedishvili, Natalia Y

    2015-06-01

    Vertebrate enzymes that belong to the 16C family of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR16C) were shown to play an essential role in the control of retinoic acid (RA) levels during development. To trace the evolution of enzymatic function of SDR16C family, and to examine the origins of the pathway for RA biosynthesis from vitamin A, we identified putative SDR16C enzymes through the extensive search of available genome sequencing data in a subset of species representing major metazoan phyla. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that enzymes from protostome, non-chordate deuterostome and invertebrate chordate species are found in three clades of SDR16C family containing retinoid active enzymes, which are retinol dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10), retinol dehydrogenases E2 (RDHE2) and RDHE2-similar, and dehydrogenase reductase (SDR family) member 3 (DHRS3). For the initial functional analysis, we cloned RDH10- and RDHE2-related enzymes from the early developmental stages of a non-chordate deuterostome, green sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, and an invertebrate chordate, sea squirt Ciona intestinalis. In situ hybridization revealed that these proteins are expressed in a pattern relevant to development, while assays performed on proteins expressed in mammalian cell culture showed that they possess retinol-oxidizing activity as their vertebrate homologs. The existence of invertebrate homologs of DHRS3 was inferred from the analysis of phylogeny and cofactor-binding residues characteristic of preference for NADP(H). The presence of invertebrate homologs in the DHRS3 group of SDR16C is interesting in light of the complex mutually activating interaction, which we have recently described for human RDH10 and DHRS3 enzymes. Further functional analysis of these homologs will establish whether this interaction evolved to control retinoid homeostasis only in vertebrates, or is also conserved in pre-vertebrates. PMID:25451586

  20. Escherichia coli d-Malate Dehydrogenase, a Generalist Enzyme Active in the Leucine Biosynthesis Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Vorobieva, Anastassia A.; Khan, Mohammad Shahneawz; Soumillion, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The enzymes of the β-decarboxylating dehydrogenase superfamily catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of d-malate-based substrates with various specificities. Here, we show that, in addition to its natural function affording bacterial growth on d-malate as a carbon source, the d-malate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli (EcDmlA) naturally expressed from its chromosomal gene is capable of complementing leucine auxotrophy in a leuB− strain lacking the paralogous isopropylmalate dehydrogenase enzyme. To our knowledge, this is the first example of an enzyme that contributes with a physiologically relevant level of activity to two distinct pathways of the core metabolism while expressed from its chromosomal locus. EcDmlA features relatively high catalytic activity on at least three different substrates (l(+)-tartrate, d-malate, and 3-isopropylmalate). Because of these properties both in vivo and in vitro, EcDmlA may be defined as a generalist enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis highlights an ancient origin of DmlA, indicating that the enzyme has maintained its generalist character throughout evolution. We discuss the implication of these findings for protein evolution. PMID:25160617

  1. Metabolic control analysis of L-lactate synthesis pathway in Rhizopus oryzae As 3.2686.

    PubMed

    Ke, Wei; Chang, Shu; Chen, Xiaoju; Luo, Shuizhong; Jiang, Shaotong; Yang, Peizhou; Wu, Xuefeng; Zheng, Zhi

    2015-11-01

    The relationship between the metabolic flux and the activities of the pyruvate branching enzymes of Rhizopus oryzae As 3.2686 during L-lactate fermentation was investigated using the perturbation method of aeration. The control coefficients for five enzymes, pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), pyruvate carboxylase (PC), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), were calculated. Our results indicated significant correlations between PDH and PC, PDC and LDH, PDC and ADH, LDH and ADH, and PDC and PC. It also appeared that PDH, PC, and LDH strongly controlled the L-lactate flux; PDH and ADH strongly controlled the ethanol flux; while PDH and PC strongly controlled the acetyl coenzyme A flux and the oxaloacetate flux. Further, the flux control coefficient curves indicated that the control of the system gradually transferred from PDC to PC during the steady state. Therefore, PC was the key rate-limiting enzyme that controls the flux distribution. PMID:26288952

  2. Serotonin Regulates Calcium Homeostasis in Lactation by Epigenetic Activation of Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Laporta, Jimena; Keil, Kimberly P.; Weaver, Samantha R.; Cronick, Callyssa M.; Prichard, Austin P.; Crenshaw, Thomas D.; Heyne, Galen W.; Vezina, Chad M.; Lipinski, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium homeostasis during lactation is critical for maternal and neonatal health. We previously showed that nonneuronal/peripheral serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] causes the lactating mammary gland to synthesize and secrete PTHrP in an acute fashion. Here, using a mouse model, we found that genetic inactivation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in peripheral 5-HT synthesis, reduced circulating and mammary PTHrP expression, osteoclast activity, and maternal circulating calcium concentrations during the transition from pregnancy to lactation. Tph1 inactivation also reduced sonic hedgehog signaling in the mammary gland during lactation. Each of these deficiencies was rescued by daily injections of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (an immediate precursor of 5-HT) to Tph1-deficient dams. We used immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts to demonstrate that 5-HT induces PTHrP through a sonic hedgehog-dependent signal transduction mechanism. We also found that 5-HT altered DNA methylation of the Shh gene locus, leading to transcriptional initiation at an alternate start site and formation of a variant transcript in mouse embryonic fibroblasts in vitro and in mammary tissue in vivo. These results support a new paradigm of 5-HT-mediated Shh regulation involving DNA methylation remodeling and promoter switching. In addition to having immediate implications for lactation biology, identification and characterization of a novel functional regulatory relationship between nonneuronal 5-HT, hedgehog signaling, and PTHrP offers new avenues for the study of these important factors in development and disease. PMID:25192038

  3. A bifunctional enzyme from Rhodococcus erythropolis exhibiting secondary alcohol dehydrogenase-catalase activities.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rojas, Enriqueta; Kurt, Tutku; Schmidt, Udo; Meyer, Vera; Garbe, Leif-Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases have long been recognized as potential biocatalyst for production of chiral fine and bulk chemicals. They are relevant for industry in enantiospecific production of chiral compounds. In this study, we identified and purified a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SdcA) from Rhodococcus erythropolis oxidizing γ-lactols into γ-lactones. SdcA showed broad substrate specificity on γ-lactols; secondary aliphatic alcohols with 8 and 10 carbon atoms were also substrates and oxidized with (2S)-stereospecificity. The enzyme exhibited moderate stability with a half-life of 5 h at 40 °C and 20 days at 4 °C. Mass spectrometric identification revealed high sequence coverage of SdcA amino acid sequence to a highly conserved catalase from R. erythropolis. The corresponding encoding gene was isolated from genomic DNA and subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 DE3 cells. In addition, the recombinant SdcA was purified and characterized in order to confirm that the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase and catalase activity correspond to the same enzyme. PMID:24846734

  4. Modulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity in cultured hepatocytes by glucagon and n-octanoate.

    PubMed Central

    Fatania, H R; Vary, T C; Randle, P J

    1986-01-01

    The activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase in extracts of mitochondria from rat hepatocytes cultured for 21 h in medium 199 was increased 2.5-fold by the presence of 55 nM-glucagon and 1 mM-sodium n-octanoate in the culture medium. The change was comparable with that induced in vivo by 48 h starvation. The potential contribution of branched-chain complex to estimates of PDH-complex activity in rat liver mitochondria has been defined. PMID:3707545

  5. Differential effects of acute and chronic fructose administration on pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and lipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, L.

    1988-01-01

    These studies were undertaken to distinguish between the acute and chronic effects of fructose administration. In vivo, liver lipogenesis, as measured by {sup 3}H{sub 2}O incorporation, was greater in rats fed 60% fructose than in their glucose fed controls. Both fructose feeding, and fructose feeding plus intraperitoneal fructose injection increased the activities of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme. Liver PDH activity was increased by fructose feeding, and was increased even more by fructose feeding and injection of fructose, but this was not associated with any changes in hepatic ATP concentrations.

  6. Laboratory Prototype of Bioreactor for Oxidation of Toxic D-Lactate Using Yeast Cells Overproducing D-Lactate Cytochrome c Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Karkovska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    D-lactate is a natural component of many fermented foods like yogurts, sour milk, cheeses, and pickles vegetable products. D-lactate in high concentrations is toxic for children and people with short bowel syndrome and provokes encephalopathy. These facts convincingly demonstrate a need for effective tools for the D-lactate removal from some food products. The main idea of investigation is focused on application of recombinant thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha “tr6,” overproducing D-lactate: cytochrome c oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.2.4, D-lactate cytochrome c oxidoreductase, D-lactate dehydrogenase (cytochrome), DLDH). In addition to 6-fold overexpression of DLDH under a strong constitutive promoter (prAOX), the strain of H. polymorpha “tr6” (gcr1 catX/Δcyb2, prAOX_DLDH) is characterized by impairment in glucose repression of AOX promoter, devoid of catalase and L-lactate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activities. Overexpression of DLDH coupling with the deletion of L-lactate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activity opens possibility for usage of the strain as a base for construction of bioreactor for removing D-lactate from fermented products due to oxidation to nontoxic pyruvate. A laboratory prototype of column-type bioreactor for removing a toxic D-lactate from model solution based on permeabilized cells of the H. polymorpha “tr6” and alginate gel was constructed and efficiency of this process was tested. PMID:27446952

  7. Laboratory Prototype of Bioreactor for Oxidation of Toxic D-Lactate Using Yeast Cells Overproducing D-Lactate Cytochrome c Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Karkovska, Maria; Smutok, Oleh; Gonchar, Mykhailo

    2016-01-01

    D-lactate is a natural component of many fermented foods like yogurts, sour milk, cheeses, and pickles vegetable products. D-lactate in high concentrations is toxic for children and people with short bowel syndrome and provokes encephalopathy. These facts convincingly demonstrate a need for effective tools for the D-lactate removal from some food products. The main idea of investigation is focused on application of recombinant thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha "tr6," overproducing D-lactate: cytochrome c oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.2.4, D-lactate cytochrome c oxidoreductase, D-lactate dehydrogenase (cytochrome), DLDH). In addition to 6-fold overexpression of DLDH under a strong constitutive promoter (prAOX), the strain of H. polymorpha "tr6" (gcr1 catX/Δcyb2, prAOX_DLDH) is characterized by impairment in glucose repression of AOX promoter, devoid of catalase and L-lactate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activities. Overexpression of DLDH coupling with the deletion of L-lactate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activity opens possibility for usage of the strain as a base for construction of bioreactor for removing D-lactate from fermented products due to oxidation to nontoxic pyruvate. A laboratory prototype of column-type bioreactor for removing a toxic D-lactate from model solution based on permeabilized cells of the H. polymorpha "tr6" and alginate gel was constructed and efficiency of this process was tested. PMID:27446952

  8. Why are the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes so large? Generation of an active trimeric complex.

    PubMed

    Marrott, Nia L; Marshall, Jacqueline J T; Svergun, Dmitri I; Crennell, Susan J; Hough, David W; van den Elsen, Jean M H; Danson, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The four-component polypeptides of the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complex from the thermophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum assemble to give an active multienzyme complex possessing activity with the branched-chain 2-oxoacids derived from leucine, isoleucine and valine, and with pyruvate. The dihydrolipoyl acyl-transferase (E2) core of the complex is composed of identical trimer-forming units that assemble into a novel 42-mer structure comprising octahedral and icosahedral geometric aspects. From our previously determined structure of this catalytic core, the inter-trimer interactions involve a tyrosine residue near the C-terminus secured in a hydrophobic pocket of an adjacent trimer like a ball-and-socket joint. In the present study, we have deleted the five C-terminal amino acids of the E2 polypeptide (IIYEI) and shown by equilibrium centrifugation that it now only assembles into a trimeric enzyme. This was confirmed by SAXS analysis, although this technique showed the presence of approximately 20% hexamers. The crystal structure of the trimeric truncated E2 core has been determined and shown to be virtually identical with the ones observed in the 42-mer, demonstrating that removal of the C-terminal anchor does not significantly affect the individual monomer or trimer structures. The truncated E2 is still able to bind both 2-oxoacid decarboxylase (E1) and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) components to give an active complex with catalytic activity similar to the native multienzyme complex. This is the first report of an active mini-complex for this enzyme, and raises the question of why all 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes assemble into such large structures. PMID:25088564

  9. Effect of Hofmeister anions and protein concentration on the activity and stability of some immobilized made-independent dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Carrea, G.; Bovara, R.; Pasta, P.; Cremonesi, P.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of several factors on the activity and stability of alcohol dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and 20-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, both free and immobilized on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B, was investigated. Enzymes were immobilized under different conditions including various degrees of matrix activation, variable amounts of protein, in the presence, or in the absence of, additives (coenzymes, dithiothreitol, salts). Activity recovery was in general satisfactorily high with 20-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, low with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and markedly linked to the concentration of immobilized protein with alcohol dehydrogenase. In the latter case the advantageous stabilizing effect of high enzyme concentrations was notably diminished by the paralled decrease of the effectiveness factor. The effect of high concentrations of anions of the Hofmeister series was examined. It was found that 1M phosphate and 0.5M sulfate dramatically stabilize both free and immobilized enzymes against inactivation by temperature and urea. Km values of apolar substrates were considerably lowered by the two anions while Km values of polar substrates were not affected. In some cases Vmax values also were influenced by high concentrations of these anions. The present results appear of interest particularly in view of enzyme utilization for analytical as well as for preparative purposes. (Refs. 13).

  10. Effect of dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) on spontaneous activity in mice during pregnancy and lactation

    SciTech Connect

    Pitkow, H.S.; Rainieri, J.; Dwyer, P.

    1986-03-01

    Our laboratory has reported that DMBA, a carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, administered during pregnancy significantly depressed neonatal cerebrum growth and synthesis which was manifested by a retarded learning ability on day 32 post-partum. In order to determine the effects of DMBA on spontaneous movements during pregnancy and lactation, female CF-1C mice (23-25 g; 10 animals/group) were subcutaneously injected with 250 ..mu..g DMBA in 0.1 ml sesame oil on alternate days starting with day 8 of pregnancy to day 7 post-partum (i.e., day 27). On day 9 of pregnancy and on alternate days each female's cage, with pups removed, was individually placed on the stage of a Stoelting Electronic Activity Monitor for ten minutes and spontaneous movements per minute (mv/min) recorded. No significant differences were observed between control (64.1 +/- 7.3 mv/min) and DMBA (52.4 +/- 6.8 mv/min) groups during pregnancy. After parturition the spontaneous movements of the control mice significantly increased averaging 86.4 +/- 13.3 mv/min for days 1 to 7 post-partum, whereas, the DMBA group value decreased significantly averaging 41.8 +/- 3.7 mv/min during this time. Our data suggests that the effects of DMBA were manifested during lactation where it significantly depressed the lactating mother's nervous system and subsequent behavioral activity.

  11. [Activity of liver mitochondrial NAD+-dependent dehydrogenases of the krebs cycle in rats with acetaminophen-induced hepatitis developed under conditions of alimentary protein deficiency].

    PubMed

    Voloshchuk, O N; Kopylchuk, G P

    2016-01-01

    Activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and the NAD(+)/NADН ratio were studied in the liver mitochondrial fraction of rats with toxic hepatitis induced by acetaminophen under conditions of alimentary protein deprivation. Acetaminophen-induced hepatitis was characterized by a decrease of isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase activities, while the mitochondrial NAD(+)/NADН ratio remained at the control level. Modeling of acetaminophen-induced hepatitis in rats with alimentary protein caused a more pronounced decrease in the activity of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases studied and a 2.2-fold increase of the mitochondrial NAD(+)/NADН ratio. This suggests that alimentary protein deprivation potentiated drug-induced liver damage. PMID:27143375

  12. Antitumor activity of 7-aminocarboxycoumarin derivatives, a new class of potent inhibitors of lactate influx but not efflux.

    PubMed

    Draoui, Nihed; Schicke, Olivier; Seront, Emmanuel; Bouzin, Caroline; Sonveaux, Pierre; Riant, Olivier; Feron, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    High lactate concentration in tumors is associated with bad prognosis. Lactate is released by glycolytic cells in tumors and recaptured by oxidative cancer cells to feed the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle after conversion into pyruvate. Monocarboxylate transporters (MCT) mediate these fluxes of proton-linked lactate and represent attractive targets to interrupt lactate shuttle and to inhibit tumor growth. Here, we investigated the properties of 7-aminocarboxycoumarins (7ACC) developed to selectively interfere with lactate fluxes in the lactate-rich tumor microenvironment. The pharmacologic properties of two compounds of this family, including their effects on lactate influx and efflux and antitumor activity, were investigated using human cancer cell lines and mouse xenograft models. Contrary to the reference MCT1 inhibitor AR-C155858, 7ACC unexpectedly inhibited lactate influx but not efflux in tumor cells expressing MCT1 and MCT4 transporters. 7ACC delayed the growth of cervix SiHa tumors, colorectal HCT116 tumors, and orthoptopic MCF-7 breast tumors. MCT target engagement was confirmed by the lack of activity of 7ACC on bladder UM-UC-3 carcinoma that does not express functional MCT. 7ACC also inhibited SiHa tumor relapse after treatment with cisplatin. Finally, we found that contrary to AR-C155858, 7ACC did not prevent the cell entry of the substrate-mimetic drug 3-bromopyruvate (3BP) through MCT1, and contributed to the inhibition of tumor relapse after 3BP treatment. In conclusion, our results indicate that 7ACC selectively affects a single part of the MCT symporter translocation cycle, leading to strict inhibition of lactate influx. This singular activity is associated with antitumor effects less prone to resistance and side effects. PMID:24672058

  13. Regulation of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase in Rhodospirillum rubrum: Effects of CO and oxygen on synthesis and activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bonam, D.; Lehman, L.; Roberts, G.P.; Ludden, P.W.

    1989-06-01

    Exposure of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum to carbon monoxide led to increased carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase activities due to de novo protein synthesis of both enzymes. Two-dimensional gels of (/sup 35/S)methionine-pulse-labeled cells showed that induction of CO dehydrogenase synthesis was rapidly initiated (less than 5 min upon exposure to CO) and was inhibited by oxygen. Both CO dehydrogenase and the CO-induced hydrogenase were inactivated by oxygen in vivo and in vitro. In contrast to CO dehydrogenase, the CO-induced hydrogenase was 95% inactivated by heating at 70 degrees C for 5 min. Unlike other hydrogenases, this CO-induced hydrogenase was inhibited only 60% by a 100% CO gas phase.

  14. Effects of Al(III) and nano-Al13 species on malate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al(13) can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al(13) concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al(13) on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules. PMID:22163924

  15. Breast Milk Concentration of Rubidium in Lactating Mothers by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis Method

    PubMed Central

    Khatami, Seyedeh-Fatemeh; Parvaresh, Pouya; Parvaresh, Parviz; Madani Kouchak, Sara Sadat; Khorsandi, Jamshid

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Relatively little is known about the trace elements content of human milk from different countries. This has not been fully investigated especially among Iranian women. This study aimed to assess the concentration of Rubidium (Rb) as a poisonous trace element in transitional breast milk of lactating mothers living in Mashhad. Methods: Forty nursing mothers in early lactation 3 days to 15 days postpartum, free from any medical disorder and/or medication were randomly selected. We have applied Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) to assess the long-lived isotope trace element Rb in transitional milk of these economically moderate 18–39 year old Iranian women. Findings: The average concentration level of Rb was 32.176 ppm dry weight (min 8.660, max 107.210 ppm). No significant correlation was observed between Rb concentration and maternal weight and age (P=0.06, P=0.05 respectively) and newborns’ weight, age and sex (P=0.07, P=0.2, P=0.2 respectively). Conclusion: Although the Rubidium concentration found in this study is among the highest reported in the literature, it could not be compared to other studies because of differences in analytical performance, state of lactation, and unavailable reference ranges, so this finding needs further investigations. PMID:26019773

  16. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... control the activity of the complex: pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase turns on (activates) the complex, while pyruvate dehydrogenase ... binding protein (the PDHX gene), and pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase (the PDP1 gene) have been identified in people ...

  17. The respiratory molybdo-selenoprotein formate dehydrogenases of Escherichia coli have hydrogen: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli synthesizes three membrane-bound molybdenum- and selenocysteine-containing formate dehydrogenases, as well as up to four membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Two of the formate dehydrogenases (Fdh-N and Fdh-O) and two of the hydrogenases (Hyd-1 and Hyd-2) have their respective catalytic subunits located in the periplasm and these enzymes have been shown previously to oxidize formate and hydrogen, respectively, and thus function in energy metabolism. Mutants unable to synthesize the [NiFe]-hydrogenases retain a H2: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase activity. The aim of this study was to identify the enzyme or enzymes responsible for this activity. Results Here we report the identification of a new H2: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase enzyme activity in E. coli that is independent of the [NiFe]-hydrogenases. This enzyme activity was originally identified after non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and visualization of hydrogen-oxidizing activity by specific staining. Analysis of a crude extract derived from a variety of E. coli mutants unable to synthesize any [NiFe]-hydrogenase-associated enzyme activity revealed that the mutants retained this specific hydrogen-oxidizing activity. Enrichment of this enzyme activity from solubilised membrane fractions of the hydrogenase-negative mutant FTD147 by ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction and size-exclusion chromatographies followed by mass spectrometric analysis identified the enzymes Fdh-N and Fdh-O. Analysis of defined mutants devoid of selenocysteine biosynthetic capacity or carrying deletions in the genes encoding the catalytic subunits of Fdh-N and Fdh-O demonstrated that both enzymes catalyze hydrogen activation. Fdh-N and Fdh-O can also transfer the electrons derived from oxidation of hydrogen to other redox dyes. Conclusions The related respiratory molybdo-selenoproteins Fdh-N and Fdh-O of Escherichia coli have hydrogen-oxidizing activity. These findings demonstrate that the

  18. Inhibitory effects of ofloxacin and cefepime on enzyme activity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from chicken liver.

    PubMed

    Erat, Mustafa; Sakiroğlu, Halis

    2007-01-01

    In this study, effects of some antibiotics, namely, ofloxacin, cefepime, cefazolin, and ampicillin on the in vitro enzyme activity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase have been investigated. For this purpose, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase was purified from chicken liver 535-fold with a yield of 18% by using ammonium sulphate precipitation, 2',5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity chromatography, and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration chromatography. In order to check the purity of the enzyme, SDS polyacylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was performed. This analysis revealed a highly pure enzyme band on the gel. Among the antibiotics, ofloxacin and cefepime exhibited inhibitory effects, but cefazolin and ampicillin showed neither important inhibitory nor activatory effects on the enzyme activity. The measured I(50) values by plotting activity percent vs. inhibitor concentration, [I(50)] were 0.1713 mM for ofloxacin and 6.0028 mM for cefepime. Inhibition constants, K(i), for ofloxacin and cefepime were also calculated as 0.2740 +/- 0.1080 mM and 12.869 +/- 16.6540 mM by means of Lineweaver-Burk graphs, and inhibition types of the antibiotics were found out to be non-competitive and competitive, respectively. It has been understood from the calculated inhibitory parameters that the purified chicken enzyme has been quite inhibited by these two antimicrobials. PMID:17305608

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ɣ activation induces 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity in human alternative macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Copin, Corinne; Duhem, Christian; Derudas, Bruno; Neve, Bernardette; Noel, Benoit; Eeckhoute, Jerome; Lefebvre, Philippe; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Staels, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Objectives 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) catalyses the intracellular reduction of inactive cortisone to active cortisol, the natural ligand activating the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor controlling inflammation, lipid metabolism and the macrophage polarization state. In this study, we investigated the impact of macrophage polarization on the expression and activity of 11β-HSD1 and the role of PPAR therein. Methods and Results 11β-HSD1 gene expression is higher in pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages than in resting macrophages (RM), whereas its activity is highest in M2 macrophages. Interestingly, PPARγ activation induces 11β-HSD1 enzyme activity in M2 macrophages, but not in RM or M1 macrophages. Consequently, human M2 macrophages displayed enhanced responsiveness to the 11β-HSD1 substrate cortisone, an effect amplified by PPAR -induction of 11β-HSD1 activity, as illustrated by an increased expression of GR target genes. Conclusions Our data identify a positive cross-talk between PPARγ and GR in human M2 macrophages via the induction of 11β-HSD1 expression and activity. PMID:22207732

  20. Decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of gamma and alpha motoneurons in mouse spinal cords following 13 weeks of exposure to microgravity.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Akihiko; Nagatomo, Fumiko; Fujino, Hidemi; Kondo, Hiroyo; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2013-10-01

    Cell body size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of motoneurons in the dorsolateral region of the ventral horn in the lumbar and cervical segments of the mouse spinal cord were assessed after long-term exposure to microgravity and compared with those of ground-based controls. Mice were housed in a mouse drawer system on the International Space Station for 13 weeks. The mice were transported to the International Space Station by the Space Shuttle Discovery and returned to Earth by the Space Shuttle Atlantis. No changes in the cell body size of motoneurons were observed in either segment after exposure to microgravity, but succinate dehydrogenase activity of small-sized (<300 μm(2)) gamma and medium-sized (300-700 μm(2)) alpha motoneurons, which have higher succinate dehydrogenase activity than large-sized (>700 μm(2)) alpha motoneurons, in both segments was lower than that of ground-based controls. We concluded that exposure to microgravity for longer than 3 months induced decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of both gamma and slow-type alpha motoneurons. In particular, the decreased succinate dehydrogenase activity of gamma motoneurons was observed only after long-term exposure to microgravity. PMID:23943522

  1. Cytoplasm-to-myonucleus ratios and succinate dehydrogenase activities in adult rat slow and fast muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, B. S.; Kasper, C. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between myonuclear number, cellular size, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and myosin type was examined in single fiber segments (n = 54; 9 +/- 3 mm long) mechanically dissected from soleus and plantaris muscles of adult rats. One end of each fiber segment was stained for DNA before quantitative photometric analysis of succinate dehydrogenase activity; the other end was double immunolabeled with fast and slow myosin heavy chain monoclonal antibodies. Mean +/- S.D. cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus ratio was higher in fast and slow plantaris fibers (112 +/- 69 vs. 34 +/- 21 x 10(3) microns3) than fast and slow soleus fibers (40 +/- 20 vs. 30 +/- 14 x 10(3) microns3), respectively. Slow fibers always had small volumes/myonucleus, regardless of fiber diameter, succinate dehydrogenase activity, or muscle of origin. In contrast, smaller diameter (< 70 microns) fast soleus and plantaris fibers with high succinate dehydrogenase activity appeared to have low volumes/myonucleus while larger diameter (> 70 microns) fast fibers with low succinate dehydrogenase activity always had large volume/myonucleus. Slow soleus fibers had significantly greater numbers of myonuclei/mm than did either fast soleus or fast plantaris fibers (116 +/- 51 vs. 55 +/- 22 and 44 +/- 23), respectively. These data suggest that the myonuclear domain is more limited in slow than fast fibers and in the fibers with a high, compared to a low, oxidative metabolic capability.

  2. High blood alcohol levels in women. The role of decreased gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity and first-pass metabolism.

    PubMed

    Frezza, M; di Padova, C; Pozzato, G; Terpin, M; Baraona, E; Lieber, C S

    1990-01-11

    After consuming comparable amounts of ethanol, women have higher blood ethanol concentrations than men, even with allowance for differences in size, and are more susceptible to alcoholic liver disease. Recently, we documented significant "first-pass metabolism" of ethanol due to its oxidation by gastric tissue. We report a study of the possible contribution of this metabolism to the sex-related difference in blood alcohol concentrations in 20 men and 23 women. Six in each group were alcoholics. The first-pass metabolism was determined on the basis of the difference in areas under the curves of blood alcohol concentrations after intravenous and oral administration of ethanol (0.3 g per kilogram of body weight). Alcohol dehydrogenase activity was also measured in endoscopic gastric biopsies. In nonalcoholic subjects, the first-pass metabolism and gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity of the women were 23 and 59 percent, respectively, of those in the men, and there was a significant correlation (rs = 0.659) between first-pass metabolism and gastric mucosal alcohol dehydrogenase activity. In the alcoholic men, the first-pass metabolism and gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity were about half those in the nonalcoholic men; in the alcoholic women, the gastric mucosal alcohol dehydrogenase activity was even lower than in the alcoholic men, and first-pass metabolism was virtually abolished. We conclude that the increased bioavailability of ethanol resulting from decreased gastric oxidation of ethanol may contribute to the enhanced vulnerability of women to acute and chronic complications of alcoholism. PMID:2248624

  3. Lipid-mediated unfolding of 3-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase2 is essential for steroidogenic activity

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksha, Maheshinie; Thomas, James L.; Streeter, Michael; Prasad, Manoj; Whittal, Randy M.; Bell, John D.; Bose, Himangshu S.

    2011-01-01

    For inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) proteins that do not undergo N-terminal cleavage, their activity may occur in the absence of a receptor present in the mitochondrial membrane. One such protein is human 3-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2 (3βHSD2), the IMM resident protein responsible for catalyzing two key steps in steroid metabolism: the conversion of pregnenolone to progesterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) to androstenedione. Conversion requires that 3βHSD2 serves as both a dehydrogenase and isomerase. The dual functionality of 3βHSD2 results from a conformational change, but the trigger for this change remains unknown. Using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), we found that 3βHSD2 interacted strongly with a mixture of dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). 3βHSD2 became less stable when incubated with the individual lipids, as indicated by the decrease in thermal denaturation (Tm), from 42° C to 37° C. DPPG, alone or in combination with DPPC, led to a decrease in α-helical content without affecting the β-sheet conformation. With the exception of the N-terminal 20 amino acids, mixed vesicles protected 3βHSD2 from trypsin digestion. However, protein incubated with DPPC was only partially protected. The lipid-mediated unfolding completely supports the model in which a cavity forms between the α-helix and β-sheet. As 3βHSD2 lacks a receptor, opening the conformation may activate the protein. PMID:22106846

  4. Distribution of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Activities between Chloroplasts and Mitochondria from Leaves of Different Species.

    PubMed Central

    Lernmark, U.; Gardestrom, P.

    1994-01-01

    Protoplasts from barley (Hordeum vulgare), pea (Pisum sativum), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves were fractionated into chloroplast- and mitochondrion-enriched fractions. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex capacities in mitochondria (mtPDC) and chloroplasts (cpPDC) were measured in appropriate fractions under conditions optimal for each isozyme. The total cellular capacity of PDC was similar in barley and pea but about 50% lower in wheat and spinach. In pea a distribution of 87% mtPDC and 13% cpPDC was found on a cellular basis. In barley, wheat, and spinach the subcellular distribution was the opposite, with about 15% mtPDC and 85% cpPDC. cpPDC activity was constant at about 0.1 nmol cell-1 h-1 in cells from different regions along the developing barley leaf and showed no correlation with developmental patterns of photosynthetic parameters, such as increasing Chl and NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. Similarly, the capacity of the mitochondrial isoform did not change during barley leaf development and had a developmental pattern similar to that of citrate synthase and fumarase. Differences in subcellular distribution of PDCs in barley and pea are proposed to be due to differences in regulation, not to changes in isozyme proportions during leaf development or to species-specific differences in phosphorylation state of mtPDC after organelle separation. PMID:12232437

  5. SIRT3 DEACETYLATES AND INCREASES PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN CANCER CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Brett A.; Song, Ha Yong; Zhu, Yueming; Vassilopoulos, Athanassios; Jung, Barbara; Buettner, Garry R.; Gius, David

    2015-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 alpha (PDHE1α or PDHA1) is the first component enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDC) that transforms pyruvate, via pyruvate decarboxylation, into acetyl-CoA that is subsequently used by both the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation to generate ATP. As such, PDH links glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in normal as well as cancer cells. Herein we report that SIRT3 interacts with PDHA1 and directs its enzymatic activity via changes in protein acetylation. SIRT3 deacetylates PDHA1 lysine 321 (K321) and a PDHA1 mutant, mimicking a deacetylated lysine (PDHA1K321R) increases in PDH activity, as compared to the K321 acetylation mimic (PDHA1K321Q) or wild-type PDHA1. Finally, PDHA1K321Q exhibited a more transformed in vitro cellular phenotype as compared to PDHA1K321R. These results suggest that the acetylation of PDHA1 provides another layer of enzymatic regulation, in addition to phosphorylation, involving a reversible acetyl-lysine suggesting that the acetylome, as well as the kinome, links glycolysis to respiration. PMID:25152236

  6. Characterization and evolution of an activator-independent methanol dehydrogenase from Cupriavidus necator N-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tung-Yun; Chen, Chang-Ting; Liu, Jessica Tse-Jin; Bogorad, Igor W; Damoiseaux, Robert; Liao, James C

    2016-06-01

    Methanol utilization by methylotrophic or non-methylotrophic organisms is the first step toward methanol bioconversion to higher carbon-chain chemicals. Methanol oxidation using NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (Mdh) is of particular interest because it uses NAD(+) as the electron carrier. To our knowledge, only a limited number of NAD-dependent Mdhs have been reported. The most studied is the Bacillus methanolicus Mdh, which exhibits low enzyme specificity to methanol and is dependent on an endogenous activator protein (ACT). In this work, we characterized and engineered a group III NAD-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (Mdh2) from Cupriavidus necator N-1 (previously designated as Ralstonia eutropha). This enzyme is the first NAD-dependent Mdh characterized from a Gram-negative, mesophilic, non-methylotrophic organism with a significant activity towards methanol. Interestingly, unlike previously reported Mdhs, Mdh2 does not require activation by known activators such as B. methanolicus ACT and Escherichia coli Nudix hydrolase NudF, or putative native C. necator activators in the Nudix family under mesophilic conditions. This enzyme exhibited higher or comparable activity and affinity toward methanol relative to the B. methanolicus Mdh with or without ACT in a wide range of temperatures. Furthermore, using directed molecular evolution, we engineered a variant (CT4-1) of Mdh2 that showed a 6-fold higher K cat/K m for methanol and 10-fold lower K cat/K m for n-butanol. Thus, CT4-1 represents an NAD-dependent Mdh with much improved catalytic efficiency and specificity toward methanol compared with the existing NAD-dependent Mdhs with or without ACT activation. PMID:26846745

  7. Dosage Compensation in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER Triploids. II. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Maroni, Gustavo; Plaut, Walter

    1973-01-01

    The level of activity of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was determinel in flies having seven different chromosomic constitutions. All those having an integral number of chromosomes [XAA, XXAA, XAAA, XXAAA, and XXXAAA (X=X chromosome, A=set of autosomes)] were found to have similar units of enzyme activity/mg live weight, while diploid females with a duplication and triploid females with a deficiency showed dosage effect. The amount of enzyme activity per cell, on the other hand, is also independent of the number of X's present but appears roughly proportional to the number of sets of autosomes.—It is proposed that dosage-compensated sex-linked genes are controlled by a positively acting regulatory factor(s) of autosomal origin. With this hypothesis it is possible to explain dosage compensation as a consequence of general regulatory mechanisms without invoking a special device which applies only to the X chromosomes. PMID:17248620

  8. Designing a highly active soluble PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase for efficient glucose biosensors and biofuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, Fabien; Stines-Chaumeil, Claire; Flexer, Victoria; Andre, Isabelle; Mano, Nicolas

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} A new mutant of PQQ-GDH designed for glucose biosensors application. {yields} First mutant of PQQ-GDH with higher activity for D-glucose than the Wild type. {yields} Position N428 is a key point to increase the enzyme activity. {yields} Molecular modeling shows that the N428 C mutant displays a better interaction for PQQ than the WT. -- Abstract: We report for the first time a soluble PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase that is twice more active than the wild type for glucose oxidation and was obtained by combining site directed mutagenesis, modelling and steady-state kinetics. The observed enhancement is attributed to a better interaction between the cofactor and the enzyme leading to a better electron transfer. Electrochemical experiments also demonstrate the superiority of the new mutant for glucose oxidation and make it a promising enzyme for the development of high-performance glucose biosensors and biofuel cells.

  9. Plasma lactic dehydrogenase activities in men during bed rest with exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Juhos, L. T.; Young, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    Peak oxygen uptake and the activity of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH-T) and its five isoenzymes were measured by spectrophotometer in seven men before, during, and after bed rest and exercise training. Exercise training consisted of isometric leg exercises of 250 kcal/hr for a period of one hour per day. It is found that LDH-T was reduced by 0.05 percent in all three regimens by day 10 of bed rest, and that the decrease occurred at different rates. The earliest reduction in LDH-T activity in the no-exercise regimen was associated with a decrease in peak oxygen uptake of 12.3 percent. It is concluded that isometric (aerobic) muscular strength training appear to maintain skeletal muscle integrity better during bed rest than isotonic exercise training. Reduced hydrostatic pressure during bed rest, however, ultimately counteracts the effects of both moderate isometric and isotonic exercise training, and may result in decreased LDH-T activity.

  10. Lactate Racemization as a Rescue Pathway for Supplying d-Lactate to the Cell Wall Biosynthesis Machinery in Lactobacillus plantarum

    PubMed Central

    Goffin, Philippe; Deghorain, Marie; Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Tytgat, Isabelle; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Hols, Pascal

    2005-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a lactic acid bacterium that produces d- and l-lactate using stereospecific NAD-dependent lactate dehydrogenases (LdhD and LdhL, respectively). However, reduction of glycolytic pyruvate by LdhD is not the only pathway for d-lactate production since a mutant defective in this activity still produces both lactate isomers (T. Ferain, J. N. Hobbs, Jr., J. Richardson, N. Bernard, D. Garmyn, P. Hols, N. E. Allen, and J. Delcour, J. Bacteriol. 178:5431-5437, 1996). Production of d-lactate in this species has been shown to be connected to cell wall biosynthesis through its incorporation as the last residue of the muramoyl-pentadepsipeptide peptidoglycan precursor. This particular feature leads to natural resistance to high concentrations of vancomycin. In the present study, we show that L. plantarum possesses two pathways for d-lactate production: the LdhD enzyme and a lactate racemase, whose expression requires l-lactate. We report the cloning of a six-gene operon, which is involved in lactate racemization activity and is positively regulated by l-lactate. Deletion of this operon in an L. plantarum strain that is devoid of LdhD activity leads to the exclusive production of l-lactate. As a consequence, peptidoglycan biosynthesis is affected, and growth of this mutant is d-lactate dependent. We also show that the growth defect can be partially restored by expression of the d-alanyl-d-alanine-forming Ddl ligase from Lactococcus lactis, or by supplementation with various d-2-hydroxy acids but not d-2-amino acids, leading to variable vancomycin resistance levels. This suggests that L. plantarum is unable to efficiently synthesize peptidoglycan precursors ending in d-alanine and that the cell wall biosynthesis machinery in this species is specifically dedicated to the production of peptidoglycan precursors ending in d-lactate. In this context, the lactate racemase could thus provide the bacterium with a rescue pathway for d-lactate production upon

  11. Efficient Production of Optically Pure d-Lactic Acid from Raw Corn Starch by Using a Genetically Modified l-Lactate Dehydrogenase Gene-Deficient and α-Amylase-Secreting Lactobacillus plantarum Strain▿

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Kenji; Zhang, Qiao; Shinkawa, Satoru; Yoshida, Shogo; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    In order to achieve direct and efficient fermentation of optically pure d-lactic acid from raw corn starch, we constructed l-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhL1)-deficient Lactobacillus plantarum and introduced a plasmid encoding Streptococcus bovis 148 α-amylase (AmyA). The resulting strain produced only d-lactic acid from glucose and successfully expressed amyA. With the aid of secreting AmyA, direct d-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished. After 48 h of fermentation, 73.2 g/liter of lactic acid was produced with a high yield (0.85 g per g of consumed sugar) and an optical purity of 99.6%. Moreover, a strain replacing the ldhL1 gene with an amyA-secreting expression cassette was constructed. Using this strain, direct d-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished in the absence of selective pressure by antibiotics. This is the first report of direct d-lactic acid fermentation from raw starch. PMID:19011066

  12. Efficient production of optically pure D-lactic acid from raw corn starch by using a genetically modified L-lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient and alpha-amylase-secreting Lactobacillus plantarum strain.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenji; Zhang, Qiao; Shinkawa, Satoru; Yoshida, Shogo; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    In order to achieve direct and efficient fermentation of optically pure D-lactic acid from raw corn starch, we constructed L-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhL1)-deficient Lactobacillus plantarum and introduced a plasmid encoding Streptococcus bovis 148 alpha-amylase (AmyA). The resulting strain produced only D-lactic acid from glucose and successfully expressed amyA. With the aid of secreting AmyA, direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished. After 48 h of fermentation, 73.2 g/liter of lactic acid was produced with a high yield (0.85 g per g of consumed sugar) and an optical purity of 99.6%. Moreover, a strain replacing the ldhL1 gene with an amyA-secreting expression cassette was constructed. Using this strain, direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished in the absence of selective pressure by antibiotics. This is the first report of direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw starch. PMID:19011066

  13. A quantitative study of the biospecific desorption of rat liver (M4) lactate dehydrogenase from 10-carboxydecylamino-Sepharose. Determination of the number of ligand-binding sites blocked on adsorption.

    PubMed

    Kyprianou, P; Yon, R J

    1982-12-01

    1. The theory of Nichol, Ogston, Winzor & Sawyer [(1974) Biochem. J. 143, 435-443] for quantitative affinity chromatography, when adapted for use with a non-specific column from which a multi-site protein can be specifically desorbed by its free ligand, permits determination of the concentration of adsorption sites on the column, their adsorptive affinity (as an association constant) and either the intrinsic (site) constant for ligand-binding to the protein or an 'occlusion coefficient' (defined as the number of ligand-binding sites blocked on adsorption), one of which must be known. 2. The theory has been applied to the NADH-specific desorption of rat liver M4 lactate dehydrogenase from 10-carboxydecylamino-Sepharose. It suggests that most of the enzyme molecules are adsorbed with at least two NADH-binding sites blocked, indicating an extensive adsorption interface in relation to the protein surface. Other chromatographic parameters were also determined for the system. 3. Among topics discussed are (a) factors affecting the experimentally determined value for the number of blocked sites, (b) the nature of the adsorption sites on the column and (c) the similarity of the analysis to that for determining Hill coefficients, and other possible applications. PMID:7165707

  14. Phenylbutyrate increases pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity in cells harboring a variety of defects

    PubMed Central

    Ferriero, Rosa; Boutron, Audrey; Brivet, Michele; Kerr, Douglas; Morava, Eva; Rodenburg, Richard J; Bonafé, Luisa; Baumgartner, Matthias R; Anikster, Yair; Braverman, Nancy E; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Objective Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is the most common genetic disorder leading to lactic acidosis. PDHC deficiency is genetically heterogenous and most patients have defects in the X-linked E1-α gene but defects in the other components of the complex encoded by PDHB, PDHX, DLAT, DLD genes or in the regulatory enzyme encoded by PDP1 have also been found. Phenylbutyrate enhances PDHC enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo by increasing the proportion of unphosphorylated enzyme through inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases and thus, has potential for therapy of patients with PDHC deficiency. In the present study, we investigated response to phenylbutyrate of multiple cell lines harboring all known gene defects resulting in PDHC deficiency. Methods Fibroblasts of patients with PDHC deficiency were studied for their enzyme activity at baseline and following phenylbutyrate incubation. Drug responses were correlated with genotypes and protein levels by Western blotting. Results Large deletions affecting PDHA1 that result in lack of detectable protein were unresponsive to phenylbutyrate, whereas increased PDHC activity was detected in most fibroblasts harboring PDHA1 missense mutations. Mutations affecting the R349-α residue were directed to proteasome degradation and were consistently unresponsive to short-time drug incubation but longer incubation resulted in increased levels of enzyme activity and protein that may be due to an additional effect of phenylbutyrate as a molecular chaperone. Interpretation PDHC enzyme activity was enhanced by phenylbutyrate in cells harboring missense mutations in PDHB, PDHX, DLAT, DLD, and PDP1 genes. In the prospect of a clinical trial, the results of this study may allow prediction of in vivo response in patients with PDHC deficiency harboring a wide spectrum of molecular defects. PMID:25356417

  15. Effect of different mulch materials on the soil dehydrogenase activity (DHA) in an organic pepper crop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Marta M.; Peco, Jesús; Campos, Juan; Villena, Jaime; González, Sara; Moreno, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    The use biodegradable materials (biopolymers of different composition and papers) as an alternative to conventional mulches has increased considerably during the last years mainly for environmental reason. In order to assess the effect of these materials on the soil microbial activity during the season of a pepper crop organically grown in Central Spain, the soil dehydrogenase activity (DHA) was measured in laboratory. The mulch materials tested were: 1) black polyethylene (PE, 15 μm); black biopolymers (15 μm): 2) Mater-Bi® (corn starch based), 3) Sphere 4® (potato starch based), 4) Sphere 6® (potato starch based), 5) Bioflex® (polylactic acid based), 6) Ecovio® (polylactic acid based), 7) Mimgreen® (black paper, 85 g/m2). A randomized complete block design with four replications was adopted. The crop was drip irrigated following the water demand of each treatment. Soil samples (5-10 cm depth) under the different mulches were taken at different dates (at the beginning of the crop cycle and at different dates throughout the crop season). Additionally, samples of bare soil in a manual weeding and in an untreated control were taken. The results obtained show the negative effect of black PE on the DHA activity, mainly as result of the higher temperature reached under the mulch and the reduction in the gas interchange between the soil and the atmosphere. The values corresponding to the biodegradable materials were variable, although highlighting the low DHA activity observed under Bioflex®. In general, the uncovered treatments showed higher values than those reached under mulches, especially in the untreated control. Keywords: mulch, biodegradable, biopolymer, paper, dehydrogenase activity (DHA). Acknowledgements: the research was funded by Project RTA2011-00104-C04-03 from the INIA (Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness).

  16. Active site dynamics in the zinc-dependent medium chain alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Patrick J.; Britton, K. Linda; Fisher, Martin; Esclapez, Julia; Pire, Carmen; Bonete, Maria Jose; Ferrer, Juan; Rice, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Despite being the subject of intensive investigations, many aspects of the mechanism of the zinc-dependent medium chain alcohol dehydrogenase (MDR) superfamily remain contentious. We have determined the high-resolution structures of a series of binary and ternary complexes of glucose dehydrogenase, an MDR enzyme from Haloferax mediterranei. In stark contrast to the textbook MDR mechanism in which the zinc ion is proposed to remain stationary and attached to a common set of protein ligands, analysis of these structures reveals that in each complex, there are dramatic differences in the nature of the zinc ligation. These changes arise as a direct consequence of linked movements of the zinc ion, a zinc-bound bound water molecule, and the substrate during progression through the reaction. These results provide evidence for the molecular basis of proton traffic during catalysis, a structural explanation for pentacoordinate zinc ion intermediates, a unifying view for the observed patterns of metal ligation in the MDR family, and highlight the importance of dynamic fluctuations at the metal center in changing the electrostatic potential in the active site, thereby influencing the proton traffic and hydride transfer events. PMID:19131516

  17. Mixed lactate and caffeine compound increases satellite cell activity and anabolic signals for muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Yoshimi; Tsukamoto, Hayato; Yokokawa, Takumi; Hirotsu, Keisuke; Shimazu, Mariko; Uchida, Kenji; Tomi, Hironori; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Iwanaka, Nobumasa; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2015-03-15

    We examined whether a mixed lactate and caffeine compound (LC) could effectively elicit proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells or activate anabolic signals in skeletal muscles. We cultured C2C12 cells with either lactate or LC for 6 h. We found that lactate significantly increased myogenin and follistatin protein levels and phosphorylation of P70S6K while decreasing the levels of myostatin relative to the control. LC significantly increased protein levels of Pax7, MyoD, and Ki67 in addition to myogenin, relative to control. LC also significantly increased follistatin expression relative to control and stimulated phosphorylation of mTOR and P70S6K. In an in vivo study, male F344/DuCrlCrlj rats were assigned to control (Sed, n = 10), exercise (Ex, n = 12), and LC supplementation (LCEx, n = 13) groups. LC was orally administered daily. The LCEx and Ex groups were exercised on a treadmill, running for 30 min at low intensity every other day for 4 wk. The LCEx group experienced a significant increase in the mass of the gastrocnemius (GA) and tibialis anterior (TA) relative to both the Sed and Ex groups. Furthermore, the LCEx group showed a significant increase in the total DNA content of TA compared with the Sed group. The LCEx group experienced a significant increase in myogenin and follistatin expression of GA relative to the Ex group. These results suggest that administration of LC can effectively increase muscle mass concomitant with elevated numbers of myonuclei, even with low-intensity exercise training, via activated satellite cells and anabolic signals. PMID:25571987

  18. Oxygen control of breathing by an olfactory receptor activated by lactate

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Andy J.; Ortega, Fabian E.; Riegler, Johannes; Madison, Daniel V.; Krasnow, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Animals have evolved homeostatic responses to changes in oxygen availability that act on different time scales. Although the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) transcriptional pathway that controls long term responses to low oxygen (hypoxia) has been established1, the pathway that mediates acute responses to hypoxia in mammals is not well understood. Here we show that the olfactory receptor Olfr78 is highly and selectively expressed in oxygen-sensitive glomus cells of the carotid body, a chemosensory organ at the carotid artery bifurcation that monitors blood oxygen and stimulates breathing within seconds when oxygen declines2. Olfr78 mutants fail to increase ventilation in hypoxia but respond normally to hypercapnia. Glomus cells are present in normal numbers and appear structurally intact, but hypoxia-induced carotid body activity is diminished. Lactate, a metabolite that rapidly accumulates in hypoxia and induces hyperventilation3–6, activates Olfr78 in heterologous expression experiments, induces calcium transients in glomus cells, and stimulates carotid sinus nerve activity through Olfr78. We propose that in addition to its role in olfaction, Olfr78 acts as a hypoxia sensor in the breathing circuit by sensing lactate produced when oxygen levels decline. PMID:26560302

  19. Early lactate clearance for predicting active bleeding in critically ill patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wada, Tomoki; Hagiwara, Akiyoshi; Uemura, Tatsuki; Yahagi, Naoki; Kimura, Akio

    2016-08-01

    Not all patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require emergency endoscopy. Lactate clearance has been suggested as a parameter for predicting patient outcomes in various critical care settings. This study investigates whether lactate clearance can predict active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB. This single-center, retrospective, observational study included critically ill patients with UGIB who met all of the following criteria: admission to the emergency department (ED) from April 2011 to August 2014; had blood samples for lactate evaluation at least twice during the ED stay; and had emergency endoscopy within 6 h of ED presentation. The main outcome was active bleeding detected with emergency endoscopy. Classification and regression tree (CART) analyses were performed using variables associated with active bleeding to derive a prediction rule for active bleeding in critically ill UGIB patients. A total of 154 patients with UGIB were analyzed, and 31.2 % (48/154) had active bleeding. In the univariate analysis, lactate clearance was significantly lower in patients with active bleeding than in those without active bleeding (13 vs. 29 %, P < 0.001). Using the CART analysis, a prediction rule for active bleeding is derived, and includes three variables: lactate clearance; platelet count; and systolic blood pressure at ED presentation. The rule has 97.9 % (95 % CI 90.2-99.6 %) sensitivity with 32.1 % (28.6-32.9 %) specificity. Lactate clearance may be associated with active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB, and may be clinically useful as a component of a prediction rule for active bleeding. PMID:26837207

  20. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR observation of lactate kinetics in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Mo; Josan, Sonal; Mayer, Dirk; Hurd, Ralph E; Chung, Youngran; Bendahan, David; Spielman, Daniel M; Jue, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The production of glycolytic end products, such as lactate, usually evokes a cellular shift from aerobic to anaerobic ATP generation and O2 insufficiency. In the classical view, muscle lactate must be exported to the liver for clearance. However, lactate also forms under well-oxygenated conditions, and this has led investigators to postulate lactate shuttling from non-oxidative to oxidative muscle fiber, where it can serve as a precursor. Indeed, the intracellular lactate shuttle and the glycogen shunt hypotheses expand the vision to include a dynamic mobilization and utilization of lactate during a muscle contraction cycle. Testing the tenability of these provocative ideas during a rapid contraction cycle has posed a technical challenge. The present study reports the use of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]lactate and [2-(13)C]pyruvate in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR experiments to measure the rapid pyruvate and lactate kinetics in rat muscle. With a 3 s temporal resolution, (13)C DNP NMR detects both [1-(13)C]lactate and [2-(13)C]pyruvate kinetics in muscle. Infusion of dichloroacetate stimulates pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and shifts the kinetics toward oxidative metabolism. Bicarbonate formation from [1-(13)C]lactate increases sharply and acetyl-l-carnitine, acetoacetate and glutamate levels also rise. Such a quick mobilization of pyruvate and lactate toward oxidative metabolism supports the postulated role of lactate in the glycogen shunt and the intracellular lactate shuttle models. The study thus introduces an innovative DNP approach to measure metabolite transients, which will help delineate the cellular and physiological role of lactate and glycolytic end products. PMID:26347554

  1. Increased activity of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in purified cell suspensions and single cells from the uterine cervix in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, S. K.; Benedetto, C.; Flatman, A.; Hammond, R. H.; Micheletti, L.; Riley, C.; Riley, P. A.; Spargo, D. J.; Zonca, M.; Slater, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    The activities of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase have been measured in squamous epithelial cells of the uterine cervix from normal patients and cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). A biochemical cycling method, which uses only simple equipment and is suited to routine use and to automation, was applied to cells separated by gradient centrifugation. In addition, cells were examined cytochemically, and the intensity of staining in the cytoplasm of single whole cells was measured using computerised microcytospectrophotometry. Twenty per cent of cells in samples from normal patients (n=61) showed staining intensities above an extinction of 0.15 at 540 nm, compared to 71% of cases of CIN 1 (n=14), 91% of cases of CIN 2 (n=11) and 67% of cases of CIN 3 (n=15). The cytochemical data do not allow definitive distinctions to be made between different grades of CIN whereas the biochemical assay applied to cell lysates shows convincing differences between normal samples and cases of CIN. There are no false negatives for CIN 3 (n=14) and CIN 2 (n=10) and 11% false negatives for CIN 1 (n=9) and 14% of false positives for normal cases (n=21). The results of this preliminary study with reference to automation are discussed [corrected]. Images Figure 1 PMID:1637668

  2. From Alcohol Dehydrogenase to a “One-way” Carbonyl Reductase by Active-site Redesign

    PubMed Central

    Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Directional preference in catalysis is often used to distinguish alcohol dehydrogenases from carbonyl reductases. However, the mechanistic basis underpinning this discrimination is weak. In mannitol 2-dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens, stabilization of (partial) negative charge on the substrate oxyanion by the side chains of Asn-191 and Asn-300 is a key feature of catalysis in the direction of alcohol oxidation. We have disrupted this ability through individual and combined substitutions of the two asparagines by aspartic acid. Kinetic data and their thermodynamic analysis show that the internal equilibrium of enzyme-NADH-fructose and enzyme-NAD+-mannitol (Kint) was altered dramatically (104- to 105-fold) from being balanced in the wild-type enzyme (Kint ≈ 3) to favoring enzyme-NAD+-mannitol in the single site mutants, N191D and N300D. The change in Kint reflects a selective slowing down of the mannitol oxidation rate, resulting because Asn → Asp replacement (i) disfavors partial abstraction of alcohol proton by Lys-295 in a step preceding catalytic hydride transfer, and (ii) causes stabilization of a nonproductive enzyme-NAD+-mannitol complex. N191D and N300D appear to lose fructose binding affinity due to deprotonation of the respective Asp above apparent pK values of 5.3 ± 0.1 and 6.3 ± 0.2, respectively. The mutant incorporating both Asn→Asp substitutions behaved as a slow “fructose reductase” at pH 5.2, lacking measurable activity for mannitol oxidation in the pH range 6.8–10. A mechanism is suggested in which polarization of the substrate carbonyl by a doubly protonated diad of Asp and Lys-295 facilitates NADH-dependent reduction of fructose by N191D and N300D under optimum pH conditions. Creation of an effectively “one-way” reductase by active-site redesign of a parent dehydrogenase has not been previously reported and holds promise in the development of carbonyl reductases for application in organic synthesis. PMID:20639204

  3. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase and Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Expression in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer and Tumor-Associated Stroma1

    PubMed Central

    Koukourakis, Michael I; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Sivridis, Efthimios; Gatter, Kevin C; Harris, Adrian L; “Tumor and Angiogenesis Research Group”

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A, which enters into the Krebs cycle, providing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to the cell. PDH activity is under the control of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs). Under hypoxic conditions, conversion of pyruvate to lactate occurs, a reaction catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase 5 (LDH5). In cancer cells, however, pyruvate is transformed to lactate occurs, regardless of the presence of oxygen (aerobic glycolysis/Warburg effect). Although hypoxic intratumoral conditions account for HIF1α stabilization and induction of anaerobic metabolism, recent data suggest that high pyruvate concentrations also result in HIF1α stabilization independently of hypoxia. In the present immunohistochemical study, we provide evidence that the PDH/PDK pathway is repressed in 73% of non small cell lung carcinomas, which may be a key reason for HIF1α stabilization and “aerobic glycolysis.” However, about half of PDH-deficient carcinomas are not able to switch on the HIF pathway, and patients harboring these tumors have an excellent postoperative outcome. A small subgroup of clinically aggressive tumors maintains a coherent PDH and HIF/LDH5 expression. In contrast to cancer cells, fibroblasts in the tumor-supporting stroma exhibit an intense PDH but reduced PDK1 expression favoring maximum PDH activity. This means that stroma may use lactic acid produced by tumor cells, preventing the creation of an intolerable intratumoral acidic environment at the same time. PMID:15736311

  4. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2015-04-21

    Inosine 5´-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. Here, the structure of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5´-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with in vivo anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategymore » for the further optimization of C. parvum inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications.« less

  5. Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase: Identification of New Sites of Promoter Activity in Transgenic Poplar.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, S.; Samaj, J.; Lauvergeat, V.; Boudet, A.; Grima-Pettenati, J.

    1997-01-01

    Stem sections from poplar that were stably transformed with a eucalypt cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase promoter-[beta]-glucuronidase construct were prepared by using either a technique routinely used in herbaceous species or a technique designed to take into account the particular anatomy of woody plants. Although both preparation techniques confirmed the pattern of expression previously observed (C. Feuillet, V. Lauvergeat, C. Deswarte, G. Pilate, A. Boudet and J. Grima-Pettenati [1995] Plant Mol Biol 27: 651-657), the latter technique also allowed the detection of other sites of promoter activity not revealed by the first technique. In situ hybridization confirmed the expression pattern obtained with the second sample preparation technique. PMID:12223610

  6. The Hydrogenase Activity of the Molybdenum/Copper-containing Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase of Oligotropha carboxidovorans*

    PubMed Central

    Wilcoxen, Jarett; Hille, Russ

    2013-01-01

    The reaction of the air-tolerant CO dehydrogenase from Oligotropha carboxidovorans with H2 has been examined. Like the Ni-Fe CO dehydrogenase, the enzyme can be reduced by H2 with a limiting rate constant of 5.3 s−1 and a dissociation constant Kd of 525 μm; both kred and kred/Kd, reflecting the breakdown of the Michaelis complex and the reaction of free enzyme with free substrate in the low [S] regime, respectively, are largely pH-independent. During the reaction with H2, a new EPR signal arising from the Mo/Cu-containing active site of the enzyme is observed which is distinct from the signal seen when the enzyme is reduced by CO, with greater g anisotropy and larger hyperfine coupling to the active site 63,65Cu. The signal also exhibits hyperfine coupling to at least two solvent-exchangeable protons of bound substrate that are rapidly exchanged with solvent. Proton coupling is also evident in the EPR signal seen with the dithionite-reduced native enzyme, and this coupling is lost in the presence of bicarbonate. We attribute the coupled protons in the dithionite-reduced enzyme to coordinated water at the copper site in the native enzyme and conclude that bicarbonate is able to displace this water from the copper coordination sphere. On the basis of our results, a mechanism for H2 oxidation is proposed which involves initial binding of H2 to the copper of the binuclear center, displacing the bound water, followed by sequential deprotonation through a copper-hydride intermediate to reduce the binuclear center. PMID:24165123

  7. Lipid-mediated unfolding of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 is essential for steroidogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Rajapaksha, Maheshinie; Thomas, James L; Streeter, Michael; Prasad, Manoj; Whittal, Randy M; Bell, John D; Bose, Himangshu S

    2011-12-27

    For inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) proteins that do not undergo N-terminal cleavage, the activity may occur in the absence of a receptor present in the mitochondrial membrane. One such protein is human 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (3βHSD2), the IMM resident protein responsible for catalyzing two key steps in steroid metabolism: the conversion of pregnenolone to progesterone and dehydroepiandrosterone to androstenedione. Conversion requires that 3βHSD2 serve as both a dehydrogenase and an isomerase. The dual functionality of 3βHSD2 results from a conformational change, but the trigger for this change remains unknown. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we found that 3βHSD2 interacted strongly with a mixture of dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). 3βHSD2 became less stable when incubated with the individual lipids, as indicated by the decrease in thermal denaturation (T(m)) from 42 to 37 °C. DPPG, alone or in combination with DPPC, led to a decrease in α-helical content without an effect on the β-sheet conformation. With the exception of the 20 N-terminal amino acids, mixed vesicles protected 3βHSD2 from trypsin digestion. However, protein incubated with DPPC was only partially protected. The lipid-mediated unfolding completely supports the model in which a cavity forms between the α-helix and β-sheet. As 3βHSD2 lacks a receptor, opening the conformation may activate the protein. PMID:22106846

  8. Effect of various chemicals on the aldehyde dehydrogenase activity of the rat liver cytosol.

    PubMed

    Marselos, M; Vasiliou, V

    1991-01-01

    The cytosolic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) was studied in the rat liver, after acute administration of various carcinogenic and chemically related compounds. Male Wistar rats were treated with 27 different chemicals, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic amines, nitrosamines, azo dyes, as well as with some known direct-acting carcinogens. The cytosolic ALDH activity of the liver was determined either with propionaldehyde and NAD (P/NAD), or with benzaldehyde and NADP (B/NADP). The activity of ALDH remained unaffected after treatment with 1-naphthylamine, nitrosamines and also with the direct-acting chemical carcinogens tested. On the contrary, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls (Arochlor 1254) and 2-naphthylamine produced a remarkable increase of ALDH. In general, the response to the effectors was disproportionate between the two types of enzyme activity, being much in favour for the B/NADP activity. This fact resulted to an inversion of the ratio B/NADP vs. P/NAD, which under constitutive conditions is lower than 1. In this respect, the most potent compounds were found to be polychlorinated biphenyls, 3-methylcholanthrene, benzo(a)pyrene and 1,2,5,6-dibenzoanthracene. Our results suggest that the B/NADP activity of the soluble ALDH is greatly induced after treatment with compounds possessing aromatic ring(s) in their molecule. It is not known, if this response of the hepatocytes is related with the process of chemical carcinogenesis. PMID:2060039

  9. [Activity of digestive enzymes in offspring of rats fed a ration contaminated by heavy metals during lactation].

    PubMed

    Sadykov, B A; Kuchkarova, L S; Ermatova, S U; Ergashev, N A

    2009-01-01

    Is was shown the consumption of heavy metal's salts with food by lactating rats, essential influences on formation of mechanisms of cavity and membrane digestive in offspring. This influence is shown in repression of activity of pancreatic alpha-amylase and enteral saccrase, maltase as well as in induction of lactase activity in growing rats. PMID:19514343

  10. Recipient pretransplant inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Meagan J; Risler, Linda J; Phillips, Brian R; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S; Boeckh, Michael J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-10-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5'-monophosphate to xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, nonrelapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient's pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient's sensitivity to MMF. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  11. PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE (IMPDH) ACTIVITY IN MMF-TREATED HCT RECIPIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Storer, Barry E.; Boeckh, Michael J.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Risler, Linda J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach to personalizing postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients is evaluating inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity as a drug-specific biomarker of mycophenolic acid (MPA)-induced immunosuppression. This prospective study evaluated total MPA, unbound MPA, and total MPA glucuronide plasma concentrations and IMPDH activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) at five time points after the morning dose of oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on day +21 in 56 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Substantial interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics was observed and accurately characterized by the population pharmacokinetic/dynamic model. IMPDH activity decreased with increasing MPA plasma concentration, with maximum inhibition coinciding with maximum MPA concentration in most patients. The overall relationship between MPA concentration and IMPDH activity was described by a direct inhibitory Emax model with an IC50 = 3.23 mg/L total MPA and 57.3 ng/mL unbound MPA. The day +21 IMPDH area under the effect curve (AUEC) was associated with cytomegalovirus reactivation, non-relapse mortality, and overall mortality. In conclusion, a pharmacokinetic/dynamic model was developed that relates plasma MPA concentrations with PMNC IMPDH activity after an MMF dose in HCT recipients. Future studies should validate this model and confirm that day +21 IMPDH AUEC is a predictive biomarker. PMID:24727337

  12. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity in Lactococcus chungangensis: application in cream cheese to moderate alcohol uptake.

    PubMed

    Konkit, Maytiya; Choi, Woo Jin; Kim, Wonyong

    2015-09-01

    Many human gastrointestinal facultative anaerobic and aerobic bacteria possess alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity and are therefore capable of oxidizing ethanol to acetaldehyde. However, the ADH activity of Lactococcus spp., except Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, has not been widely determined, though they play an important role as the starter for most cheesemaking technologies. Cheese is a functional food recognized as an aid to digestion. In the current study, the ADH activity of Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) and 11 reference strains from the genus Lactococcus was determined. Only 5 strains, 3 of dairy origin, L. lactis ssp. lactis KCTC 3769(T), L. lactis ssp. cremoris KCCM 40699(T), and Lactococcus raffinolactis DSM 20443(T), and 2 of nondairy origin, Lactococcus fujiensis NJ317(T) and Lactococcus chungangensis CAU 28(T) KCTC 13185(T), showed ADH activity and possessed the ADH gene. All these strains were capable of making cheese, but the highest level of ADH activity was found in L. chungangensis, with 45.9nmol/min per gram in tryptic soy broth and 65.8nmol/min per gram in cream cheese. The extent that consumption of cheese, following imbibing alcohol, reduced alcohol uptake was observed by following the level of alcohol in the serum of mice. The results show a potential novel benefit of cheese as a dairy functional food. PMID:26142864

  13. Cytochrome b5 augments 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ5-Δ4 isomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Goosen, Pierre; Storbeck, Karl-Heinz; Swart, Amanda C; Conradie, Riaan; Swart, Pieter

    2011-11-01

    During adrenal steroidogenesis the competition between 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ(5)-Δ(4) isomerase (3βHSD) and cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxylase/17,20 lyase (CYP17A1) for Δ(5) steroid intermediates greatly influences steroidogenic output. Cytochrome-b(5) (Cyt-b(5)), a small electron transfer hemoprotein, known to augment the lyase activity of CYP17A1, has been shown to alter the steroidogenic outcome of this competition. In this study, the influence of Cyt-b(5) on 3βHSD activity was investigated. In COS-1 cells, Cyt-b(5) was shown to significantly increase the activity of both caprine and ovine 3βHSD towards pregnenolone, 17-OH pregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone in a substrate and species specific manner. Furthermore, kinetic studies revealed Cyt-b(5) to have no influence on the K(m) values while significantly increasing the V(max) values of ovine 3βHSD for all its respective substrates. In addition, the activity of ovine 3βHSD in microsomal preparations was significantly influenced by the addition of either purified Cyt-b(5) or anti-Cyt-b(5) IgG. The results presented in this study indicate that Cyt-b(5) augments 3βHSD activity and represents the first documentation of such augmentation in any species. PMID:21930205

  14. Influence of spaceflight on succinate dehydrogenase activity and soma size of rat ventral horn neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihara, A.; Ohira, Y.; Roy, R. R.; Nagaoka, S.; Sekiguchi, C.; Hinds, W. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1996-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activities and soma cross-sectional areas (CSA) of neurons in the dorsolateral region of the ventral horn at the L5 segmental level of the spinal cord in the rat were determined after 14 days of spaceflight and after 9 days of recovery on earth. The results were compared to those in age-matched ground-based control rats. Spinal cords were quick-frozen, and the SDH activity and CSA of a sample of neurons with a visible nucleus were determined using a digitizer and a computer-assisted image analysis system. An inverse relationship between CSA and SDH activity of neurons was observed in all groups of rats. No change in mean CSA or mean SDH activity or in the size distribution of neurons was observed following spaceflight or recovery. However, there was a selective decrease in the SDH activity of neurons with soma CSA between 500 and 800 microns2 in the flight rats, and this effect persisted for at least 9 days following return to 1 g. It remains to be determined whether the selected population of motoneurons or the specific motor pools affected by spaceflight may be restricted to specific muscles.

  15. Effect of feeding and of DDT on the activity of hepatic glucose 6- phosphate dehydrogenase in two salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buhler, Donald R.; Benville, P.

    1969-01-01

    The specific activity of liver glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase in yearling rainbow trout remained unchanged when the fish were starved for periods as long as 8 weeks and when starved animals were fed diets of various compositions. Injection of insulin concurrently with refeeding also failed to alter the specific activity of the enzyme in trout. The absence of a dietary or insulin influence on the teleost enzyme system is to be contrasted with studies in mammals in which the activity of hepatic glucose 6-P dehydrogenase was markedly stimulated after refeeding starved animals or injection of insulin.Ingestion of the pesticide DDT by juvenile coho salmon or adult rainbow trout also had no effect on the specific activity of liver glucose 6-P dehydrogenase and DDT failed to inhibit the rainbow trout enzyme in vitro. These results also differ considerably from those found in higher animals.These results suggest that the glucose 6-P dehydrogenase enzyme in teleosts may be under a different type of regulatory control from that found in mammals.

  16. Periplasmic nitrate reductase and formate dehydrogenase: similar molecular architectures with very different enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Nuno M F S A; Gonzalez, Pablo J; Fernandes, Pedro A; Moura, José J G; Ramos, Maria João

    2015-11-17

    It is remarkable how nature has been able to construct enzymes that, despite sharing many similarities, have simple but key differences that tune them for completely different functions in living cells. Periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) and formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) from the DMSOr family are representative examples of this. Both enzymes share almost identical three-dimensional protein foldings and active sites, in terms of coordination number, geometry and nature of the ligands. The substrates of both enzymes (nitrate and formate) are polyatomic anions that also share similar charge and stereochemistry. In terms of the catalytic mechanism, both enzymes have a common activation mechanism (the sulfur-shift mechanism) that ensures a constant coordination number around the metal ion during the catalytic cycle. In spite of these similarities, they catalyze very different reactions: Nap abstracts an oxygen atom from nitrate releasing nitrite, whereas FdH catalyzes a hydrogen atom transfer from formate and releases carbon dioxide. In this Account, a critical analysis of structure, function, and catalytic mechanism of the molybdenum enzymes periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) and formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) is presented. We conclude that the main structural driving force that dictates the type of reaction, catalyzed by each enzyme, is a key difference on one active site residue that is located in the top region of the active sites of both enzymes. In both enzymes, the active site is centered on the metal ion of the cofactor (Mo in Nap and Mo or W in Fdh) that is coordinated by four sulfur atoms from two pyranopterin guanosine dinucleotide (PGD) molecules and by a sulfido. However, while in Nap there is a Cys directly coordinated to the Mo ion, in FdH there is a SeCys instead. In Fdh there is also an important His that interacts very closely with the SeCys, whereas in Nap the same position is occupied by a Met. The role of Cys in Nap and SeCys in FdH is similar in both

  17. Effects of low molecular-weight organic acids and dehydrogenase activity in rhizosphere sediments of mangrove plants on phytoremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Fang, Ling; Lin, Li; Luan, Tiangang; Tam, Nora F Y

    2014-03-01

    This work evaluated the roles of the low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) from root exudates and the dehydrogenase activity in the rhizosphere sediments of three mangrove plant species on the removal of mixed PAHs. The results showed that the concentrations of LMWOAs and dehydrogenase activity changed species-specifically with the levels of PAH contamination. In all plant species, the concentration of citric acid was the highest, followed by succinic acid. For these acids, succinic acid was positively related to the removal of all the PAHs except Chr. Positive correlations were also found between the removal percentages of 4-and 5-ring PAHs and all LMWOAs, except citric acid. LMWOAs enhanced dehydrogenase activity, which positively related to PAH removal percentages. These findings suggested that LMWOAs and dehydrogenase activity promoted the removal of PAHs. Among three mangrove plants, Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, the plant with the highest root biomass, dehydrogenase activity and concentrations of LMWOAs, was most efficient in removing PAHs. PMID:24287262

  18. The Comparative Effects of Sports Massage, Active Recovery, and Rest in Promoting Blood Lactate Clearance After Supramaximal Leg Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Nancy A.; Zoeller, Robert F.; Robertson, Robert J.; Lephart, Scott M.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the comparative effect of sports massage, active recovery, and rest on promoting blood lactate clearance after maximal anaerobic (supramaximal) leg exercise. Design and Setting: A counterbalanced experimental design with repeated measures was used. The repeated measures were the three treatment conditions. The order of the conditions was determined by random assignment to a counterbalanced test sequence. All data were collected in the Human Energy Research Laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh. Subjects: Ten male competitive cyclists volunteered for this investigation. Measurements: Serial venous blood samples were drawn and analyzed for blood lactate concentration for each test condition. Results: There were significant main effects for both absolute and relative values of blood lactate concentration between the three treatment groups and across time within groups. Conclusions: After supramaximal leg exercise, active recovery produced significant decreases in both absolute and relative measures of blood lactate concentration when compared with the sports massage and rest conditions. No significant difference was found between sports massage and rest for either absolute or relative changes in blood lactate concentration. PMID:16558481

  19. Dengue Virus NS1 Protein Modulates Cellular Energy Metabolism by Increasing Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Allonso, Diego; Andrade, Iamara S.; Conde, Jonas N.; Coelho, Diego R.; Rocha, Daniele C. P.; da Silva, Manuela L.; Ventura, Gustavo T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue is one of the main public health concerns worldwide. Recent estimates indicate that over 390 million people are infected annually with the dengue virus (DENV), resulting in thousands of deaths. Among the DENV nonstructural proteins, the NS1 protein is the only one whose function during replication is still unknown. NS1 is a 46- to 55-kDa glycoprotein commonly found as both a membrane-associated homodimer and a soluble hexameric barrel-shaped lipoprotein. Despite its role in the pathogenic process, NS1 is essential for proper RNA accumulation and virus production. In the present study, we identified that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) interacts with intracellular NS1. Molecular docking revealed that this interaction occurs through the hydrophobic protrusion of NS1 and the hydrophobic residues located at the opposite side of the catalytic site. Moreover, addition of purified recombinant NS1 enhanced the glycolytic activity of GAPDH in vitro. Interestingly, we observed that DENV infection promoted the relocalization of GAPDH to the perinuclear region, where NS1 is commonly found. Both DENV infection and expression of NS1 itself resulted in increased GAPDH activity. Our findings indicate that the NS1 protein acts to increase glycolytic flux and, consequently, energy production, which is consistent with the recent finding that DENV induces and requires glycolysis for proper replication. This is the first report to propose that NS1 is an important modulator of cellular energy metabolism. The data presented here provide new insights that may be useful for further drug design and the development of alternative antiviral therapies against DENV. IMPORTANCE Dengue represents a serious public health problem worldwide and is caused by infection with dengue virus (DENV). Estimates indicate that half of the global population is at risk of infection, with almost 400 million cases occurring per year. The NS1 glycoprotein is found in both the

  20. Glutamate dehydrogenase in brain mitochondria: do lipid modifications and transient metabolon formation influence enzyme activity?

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Mary C.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolism of glutamate, the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in brain, is complex and of paramount importance to overall brain function. Thus, understanding the regulation of enzymes involved in formation and disposal of glutamate and related metabolites is crucial to understanding glutamate metabolism. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a pivotal enzyme that links amino acid metabolism and TCA cycle activity in brain and other tissues. The allosteric regulation of GDH has been extensively studied and characterized. Less is known about the influence of lipid modifications on GDH activity, and the participation of GDH in transient heteroenzyme complexes (metabolons) that can greatly influence metabolism by altering kinetic parameters and lead to channeling of metabolites. This review summarizes evidence for palmitoylation and acylation of GDH, information on protein binding, and information regarding the participation of GDH in transient heteroenzyme complexes. Recent studies suggest that a number of other proteins can bind to GDH altering activity and overall metabolism. It is likely that these modifications and interactions contribute additional levels of regulation of GDH activity and glutamate metabolism. PMID:21771624

  1. Determination of beta-hydroxyacyl CoA-dehydrogenase activity in meat by electrophoretically mediated microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda; Mazorra-Manzano, Miguel A; González-Córdova, Aarón F

    2003-01-01

    The combined use of an in-tube enzyme assay and capillary electrophoresis for determining beta-hydroxyacyl CoA-dehydrogenase (beta-HADH) activity in meat was investigated. Beta-HADH is a significant mitochondrial enzyme in food muscle; thus, the determination of its activity is important in food analysis. The enzymatic assay and the separation of the reaction products were carried out by electrophoretically mediated microanalysis (EMMA) using a plug-plug reaction mode at variable potential. For the quantification of beta-HADH activity, the rate of conversion of reduced beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) to beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) was calculated by determining NAD+ at 260 nm. A calibration curve for NAD+ concentration versus normalized areas showed a highly significant (p < 0.001) linear relationship (R2 = 0.993). Accurate quantification of beta-HADH activity was achieved since on-line monitoring allowed us to account for the NAD+ produced from NADH degradation by applying a correction factor. An average reaction time of 0.66 +/- 0.06 sec was determined for a protein concentration in the range of 0.1-0.5 mg protein/mL. The assay was reproducible since coefficients of variation of less than 6.2% were calculated for triplicate analyses. PMID:14596340

  2. Unexpected Histone H3 Tail-clipping Activity of Glutamate Dehydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Papita; Verma, Naveen; Chauhan, Sakshi; Tomar, Raghuvir S.

    2013-01-01

    Clipping of histone tails has been reported in several organisms. However, the significance and regulation of histone tail clipping largely remains unclear. According to recent discoveries H3 clipping has been found to be involved in regulation of gene expression and chromatin dynamics. Earlier we had provided evidence of tissue-specific proteolytic processing of histone H3 in White Leghorn chicken liver nuclei. In this study we identify a novel activity of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) as a histone H3-specific protease in chicken liver tissue. This protease activity is regulated by divalent ions and thiol-disulfide conversion in vitro. GDH specifically clips H3 in its free as well as chromatin-bound form. Furthermore, we have found an inhibitor that inhibits the H3-clipping activity of GDH. Like previously reported proteases, GDH too may have the potential to regulate/modulate post-translational modifications of histone H3 by removing the N-terminal residues of the histone. In short, our findings identify an unexpected proteolytic activity of GDH specific to histone H3 that is regulated by redox state, ionic concentrations, and a cellular inhibitor in vitro. PMID:23673664

  3. Affinity chromatography of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide-linked dehydrogenases on immobilized derivatives of the dinucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Standish; O'Carra, Pádraig

    1973-01-01

    1. Three established methods for immobilization of ligands through primary amino groups promoted little or no attachment of NAD+ through the 6-amino group of the adenine residue. Two of these methods (coupling to CNBr-activated agarose and to carbodi-imide-activated carboxylated agarose derivatives) resulted instead in attachment predominantly through the ribosyl residues. Other immobilized derivatives were prepared by azolinkage of NAD+ (probably through the 8 position of the adenine residue) to a number of different spacer-arm–agarose derivatives. 2. The effectiveness of these derivatives in the affinity chromatography of a variety of NAD-linked dehydrogenases was investigated, applying rigorous criteria to distinguish general or non-specific adsorption effects from truly NAD-specific affinity (bio-affinity). The ribosyl-attached NAD+ derivatives displayed negligible bio-affinity for any of the NAD-linked dehydrogenases tested. The most effective azo-linked derivative displayed strong bio-affinity for glycer-aldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, weaker bio-affinity for lactate dehydrogenase and none at all for malate dehydrogenase, although these three enzymes have very similar affinities for soluble NAD+. Alcohol dehydrogenase and xanthine dehydrogenase were subject to such strong non-specific interactions with the hydrocarbon spacer-arm assembly that any specific affinity was completely eclipsed. 3. It is concluded that, in practice, the general effectiveness of a general ligand may be considerably distorted and attenuated by the nature of the immobilization linkage. However, this attenuation can result in an increase in specific effectiveness, allowing dehydrogenases to be separated from one another in a manner unlikely to be feasible if the general effectiveness of the ligand remained intact. 4. The bio-affinity of the various derivatives for lactate dehydrogenase is correlated with the known structure of the NAD+-binding site of this enzyme. Problems

  4. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activation in heart failure restores mitochondrial function and improves ventricular function and remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Katia M.S.; Campos, Juliane C.; Bechara, Luiz R.G.; Queliconi, Bruno; Lima, Vanessa M.; Disatnik, Marie-Helene; Magno, Paulo; Chen, Che-Hong; Brum, Patricia C.; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Ferreira, Julio C.B.

    2014-01-01

    Aims We previously demonstrated that pharmacological activation of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) protects the heart against acute ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Here, we determined the benefits of chronic activation of ALDH2 on the progression of heart failure (HF) using a post-myocardial infarction model. Methods and results We showed that a 6-week treatment of myocardial infarction-induced HF rats with a selective ALDH2 activator (Alda-1), starting 4 weeks after myocardial infarction at a time when ventricular remodelling and cardiac dysfunction were present, improved cardiomyocyte shortening, cardiac function, left ventricular compliance and diastolic function under basal conditions, and after isoproterenol stimulation. Importantly, sustained Alda-1 treatment showed no toxicity and promoted a cardiac anti-remodelling effect by suppressing myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis. Moreover, accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE)-protein adducts and protein carbonyls seen in HF was not observed in Alda-1-treated rats, suggesting that increasing the activity of ALDH2 contributes to the reduction of aldehydic load in failing hearts. ALDH2 activation was associated with improved mitochondrial function, including elevated mitochondrial respiratory control ratios and reduced H2O2 release. Importantly, selective ALDH2 activation decreased mitochondrial Ca2+-induced permeability transition and cytochrome c release in failing hearts. Further supporting a mitochondrial mechanism for ALDH2, Alda-1 treatment preserved mitochondrial function upon in vitro aldehydic load. Conclusions Selective activation of mitochondrial ALDH2 is sufficient to improve the HF outcome by reducing the toxic effects of aldehydic overload on mitochondrial bioenergetics and reactive oxygen species generation, suggesting that ALDH2 activators, such as Alda-1, have a potential therapeutic value for treating HF patients. PMID:24817685

  5. Asp295 stabilizes the active-site loop structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase, facilitating phosphorylation of Ser292 by pyruvate dehydrogenase-kinase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have developed an invitro system for detailed analysis of reversible phosphorylation of the plant mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, comprising recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana a2b2-hetero tetrameric pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) plus A.thaliana E1-kinase (AtPDK). Upon addition of MgATP...

  6. Persistence of the effect of insulin on pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in rat white and brown adipose tissue during the preparation and subsequent incubation of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Denton, R M; McCormack, J G; Marshall, S E

    1984-01-15

    Increases in the amount of the active non-phosphorylated form of pyruvate dehydrogenase in rat epididymal adipose tissue, as a result of incubation with insulin, persist not only during the preparation of mitochondria but also during subsequent incubation of coupled mitochondria in the presence of respiratory substrates. No effect on insulin was found if the hormone was added directly to mitochondria in the presence or absence of added plasma membranes. Concentrations of several possible regulators of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (ATP, ADP, NADH, NAD+, acetyl-CoA, CoA and potassium) were measured in rat epididymal-adipose-tissue mitochondria incubated under conditions where differences in pyruvate dehydrogenase activity persist as a result of insulin action. No alterations were found, and it is suggested that inhibition of the kinase is not the principal means by which insulin activates pyruvate dehydrogenase. The intramitochondrial concentration of magnesium was also unaffected. Differences in pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in interscapular brown adipose tissue associated with manipulation of plasma insulin concentrations of cold-adapted rats were also shown to persist during the preparation and subsequent incubation of mitochondria in the presence or absence of GDP. It is pointed out that the persistence of the effect of insulin on pyruvate dehydrogenase in incubated mitochondria will facilitate the recognition of the mechanism of this action of the hormone. Evidence that the short-term action of insulin involves an increase in pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase activity rather than inhibition of that of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase is discussed. PMID:6320807

  7. Aldosterone impairs vascular reactivity by decreasing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Dam, Aamir; Maron, Bradley A.; Scribner, Anne W.; Liao, Ronglih; Handy, Diane E.; Stanton, Robert C.; Pitt, Bertram; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism is associated with impaired vascular reactivity; however, the mechanism by which aldosterone promotes endothelial dysfunction remains unknown. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6pd), the principal source of Nadph, modulates vascular function by limiting oxidant stress to preserve bioavailable nitric oxide (NO•). In these studies, we show that aldosterone (10−9-10−7 mol/l) decreases endothelial G6pd expression and activity in vitro resulting in increased oxidant stress and decreased cGMP levels similar to what is observed in G6pd-deficient cells. Aldosterone decreases G6pd expression by protein kinase A activation to increase expression of Crem, which interferes with Creb binding to the G6pd promoter. In vivo, infusion of aldosterone decreases vascular G6pd expression and impairs vascular reactivity. These effects are abrogated by spironolactone or vascular gene transfer of G6pd. These studies demonstrate that aldosterone induces a G6pd-deficient phenotype to impair endothelial function; aldosterone antagonism or gene transfer of G6pd improves vascular reactivity by restoring G6pd activity. PMID:17273168

  8. Myricetin is a novel inhibitor of human inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase with anti-leukemia activity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huiling; Hu, Qian; Wang, Jingyuan; Liu, Zehui; Wu, Dang; Lu, Weiqiang; Huang, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Human inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (hIMPDH) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo biosynthetic pathway of purine nucleotides, playing crucial roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and transformation. Dysregulation of hIMPDH expression and activity have been found in a variety of human cancers including leukemia. In this study, we found that myricetin, a naturally occurring phytochemical existed in berries, wine and tea, was a novel inhibitor of human type 1 and type 2 IMPDH (hIMPDH1/2) with IC50 values of 6.98 ± 0.22 μM and 4.10 ± 0.14 μM, respectively. Enzyme kinetic analysis using Lineweaver-Burk plot revealed that myricetin is a mix-type inhibitor for hIMPDH1/2. Differential scanning fluorimetry and molecular docking simulation data demonstrate that myricetin is capable of binding with hIMPDH1/2. Myricetin treatment exerts potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on K562 human leukemia cells in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, cytotoxicity of myricetin on K562 cells were markedly attenuated by exogenous addition of guanosine, a salvage pathway of maintaining intracellular pool of guanine nucleotides. Taking together, these results indicate that natural product myricetin exhibits potent anti-leukemia activity by interfering with purine nucleotides biosynthetic pathway through the suppression of hIMPDH1/2 catalytic activity. PMID:27378425

  9. Probing the promiscuous active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase using synthetic substrates, homology modeling, and active site modification.

    PubMed

    Daniellou, Richard; Zheng, Hongyan; Langill, David M; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2007-06-26

    The active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase (IDH, EC 1.1.1.18) from Bacillus subtilis recognizes a variety of mono- and disaccharides, as well as 1l-4-O-substituted inositol derivatives. It catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the axial alcohol of these substrates with comparable kinetic constants. We have found that 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol does not act as a substrate for IDH, in contrast to structurally similar compounds such as those bearing substituted benzyl substituents in the same position. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol and 4-O-(2-naphthyl)methyl-myo-inositol, which is a substrate for IDH, shows a distinct difference in the preferred conformation of the aryl substituent. Conformational analysis of known substrates of IDH suggests that this conformational difference may account for the difference in reactivity of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol in the presence of IDH. A sequence alignment of IDH with the homologous glucose-fructose oxidoreductase allowed the construction of an homology model of inositol dehydrogenase, to which NADH and 4-O-benzyl-scyllo-inosose were docked and the active site energy minimized. The active site model is consistent with all experimental results and suggests that a conserved tyrosine-glycine-tyrosine motif forms the hydrophobic pocket adjoining the site of inositol recognition. Y233F and Y235F retain activity, while Y233R and Y235R do not. A histidine-aspartate pair, H176 and D172, are proposed to act as a dyad in which H176 is the active site acid/base. The enzyme is inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate, and the mutants H176A and D172N show a marked loss of activity. Kinetic isotope effect experiments with D172N indicate that chemistry is rate-determining for this mutant. PMID:17539607

  10. Expression of constitutively activated Akt in the mammary gland leads to excess lipid synthesis during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Schwertfeger, Kathryn L; McManaman, James L; Palmer, Carol A; Neville, Margaret C; Anderson, Steven M

    2003-06-01

    Expression of constitutively activated Akt in the mammary glands of transgenic mice results in a delay in post-lactational involution. We now report precocious lipid accumulation in the alveolar epithelium of mouse mammary tumor virus-myr-Akt transgenic mice accompanied by a lactation defect that results in a 50% decrease in litter weight over the first 9 days of lactation. Although ductal structures and alveolar units develop normally during pregnancy, cytoplasmic lipid droplets appeared precociously in mammary epithelial cells in early pregnancy and were accompanied by increased expression of adipophilin, which is associated with lipid droplets. By late pregnancy the lipid droplets had become significantly larger than in nontransgenic mice, and they persisted into lactation. The fat content of milk from lactating myr-Akt transgenic mice was 65-70% by volume compared to 25-30% in wild-type mice. The diminished growth of pups nursed by transgenic mothers could result from the high viscosity of the milk and the inability of the pups to remove sufficient quantities of milk by suckling. Transduction of the CIT3 mammary epithelial cell line with a recombinant human adenovirus encoding myr-Akt resulted in an increase in glucose transport and lipid biosynthesis, suggesting that Akt plays an important role in regulation of lipid metabolism. PMID:12700340

  11. Lactate Stimulates Vasculogenic Stem Cells via the Thioredoxin System and Engages an Autocrine Activation Loop Involving Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1▿

    PubMed Central

    Milovanova, Tatyana N.; Bhopale, Veena M.; Sorokina, Elena M.; Moore, Jonni S.; Hunt, Thomas K.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Velazquez, Omaida C.; Thom, Stephen R.

    2008-01-01

    The recruitment and differentiation of circulating stem/progenitor cells (SPCs) in subcutaneous Matrigel in mice was assessed. There were over one million CD34+ SPCs per Matrigel plug 18 h after Matrigel implantation, and including a polymer to elevate the lactate concentration increased the number of SPCs by 3.6-fold. Intricate CD34+ cell-lined channels were linked to the systemic circulation, and lactate accelerated cell differentiation as evaluated based on surface marker expression and cell cycle entry. CD34+ SPCs from lactate-supplemented Matrigel exhibited significantly higher concentrations of thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) than cells from unsupplemented Matrigel, whereas Trx1 and HIF-1 in CD45+ leukocytes were not elevated by lactate. Results obtained using small inhibitory RNA (siRNA) specific to HIF-1 and mice with conditionally HIF-1 null myeloid cells indicated that SPC recruitment and lactate-mediated effects were dependent on HIF-1. Cells from lactate-supplemented Matrigel had higher concentrations of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2, Trx1, Trx reductase (TrxR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) than cells from unsupplemented Matrigel. SPC recruitment and protein changes were inhibited by siRNA specific to lactate dehydrogenase, TrxR, or HIF-1 and by oxamate, apocynin, U0126, N-acetylcysteine, dithioerythritol, and antibodies to VEGF or SDF-1. Oxidative stress from lactate metabolism by SPCs accelerated further SPC recruitment and differentiation through Trx1-mediated elevations in HIF-1 levels and the subsequent synthesis of HIF-1-dependent growth factors. PMID:18710947

  12. Communication between Thiamin Cofactors in the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex E1 Component Active Centers

    PubMed Central

    Nemeria, Natalia S.; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4′-aminopyrimidine N1′ atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu571, Glu235, and Glu237) and Arg606 resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. 1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. 2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. 3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. 4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu235 makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu571 residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time. PMID:20106967

  13. Stabilization of a formate dehydrogenase by covalent immobilization on highly activated glyoxyl-agarose supports.

    PubMed

    Bolivar, Juan M; Wilson, Lorena; Ferrarotti, Susana Alicia; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisan, Jose M; Mateo, Cesar

    2006-03-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) is a stable enzyme that may be readily inactivated by the interaction with hydrophobic interfaces (e.g., due to strong stirring). This may be avoided by immobilizing the enzyme on a porous support by any technique. Thus, even if the enzyme is going to be used in an ultra-membrane reactor, the immobilization presents some advantages. Immobilization on supports activated with bromocianogen, polyethylenimine, glutaraldehyde, etc., did not promote any stabilization of the enzyme under thermal inactivation. However, the immobilization of FDH on highly activated glyoxyl agarose has permitted increasing the enzyme stability against any distorting agent: pH, T, organic solvent, etc. The time of support-enzyme reaction, the temperature of immobilization, and the activation of the support need to be optimized to get the optimal stability-activity properties. Optimized biocatalyst retained 50% of the offered activity and became 50 times more stable at high temperature and neutral pH. Moreover, the quaternary structure of this dimeric enzyme becomes stabilized by immobilization under optimized conditions. Thus, at acidic pH (conditions where the subunit dissociation is the first step in the enzyme inactivation), the immobilization of both subunits of the enzyme on glyoxyl-agarose has allowed the enzyme to be stabilized by hundreds of times. Moreover, the optimal temperature of the enzyme has been increased (even by 10 degrees C at pH 4.5). Very interestingly, the activity with NAD(+)-dextran was around 60% of that observed with free cofactor. PMID:16529396

  14. Optimization of enzyme assisted extraction of Fructus Mori polysaccharides and its activities on antioxidant and alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qingfang; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Huaguo

    2014-10-13

    In the present study, enzyme assisted extraction of Fructus Mori polysaccharides (FMPS) from F. mori using four kinds of enzymes and three compound enzymes were examined. Research found that glucose oxidase offered a better performance in enhancement of the extraction yields of FMPS, antioxidant and activate alcohol dehydrogenase activities. The glucose oxidase assisted extraction process was further optimized by using response surface method (RSM) to obtain maximum yield of crude FMPS. The results showed that optimized extraction conditions were ratio of enzyme amount 0.40%, enzyme treated time 38 min, treated temperature 58 °C and liquid-solid radio 11.0. Under these conditions, the mean experimental value of extraction yield (16.16 ± 0.14%) corresponded well with the predicted values and increased 160% than none enzyme treated ones. Pharmacological verification tests showed that F. mori crude polysaccharides had good antioxidant and activate alcohol dehydrogenase activities in vitro. PMID:25037415

  15. Mitochondrial Dihydrolipoyl Dehydrogenase Activity Shapes Photosynthesis and Photorespiration of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Timm, Stefan; Wittmiß, Maria; Gamlien, Sabine; Ewald, Ralph; Florian, Alexandra; Frank, Marcus; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger; Fernie, Alisdair R; Bauwe, Hermann

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (mtLPD; L-protein) is an integral component of several multienzyme systems involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, photorespiration, and the degradation of branched-chain α-ketoacids. The majority of the mtLPD present in photosynthesizing tissue is used for glycine decarboxylase (GDC), necessary for the high-flux photorespiratory glycine-into-serine conversion. We previously suggested that GDC activity could be a signal in a regulatory network that adjusts carbon flux through the Calvin-Benson cycle in response to photorespiration. Here, we show that elevated GDC L-protein activity significantly alters several diagnostic parameters of cellular metabolism and leaf gas exchange in Arabidopsis thaliana. Overexpressor lines displayed markedly decreased steady state contents of TCA cycle and photorespiratory intermediates as well as elevated NAD(P)(+)-to-NAD(P)H ratios. Additionally, increased rates of CO2 assimilation, photorespiration, and plant growth were observed. Intriguingly, however, day respiration rates remained unaffected. By contrast, respiration was enhanced in the first half of the dark phase but depressed in the second. We also observed enhanced sucrose biosynthesis in the light in combination with a lower diel magnitude of starch accumulation and breakdown. These data thus substantiate our prior hypothesis that facilitating flux through the photorespiratory pathway stimulates photosynthetic CO2 assimilation in the Calvin-Benson cycle. They furthermore suggest that this regulation is, at least in part, dependent on increased light-capture/use efficiency. PMID:26116608

  16. Rotenone Decreases Intracellular Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David S.; Sullivan, Patti; Cooney, Adele; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Kopin, Irwin J.; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2015-01-01

    Repeated systemic administration of the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone produces a rodent model of Parkinson disease (PD). Mechanisms of relatively selective rotenone-induced damage to nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons remain incompletely understood. According to the “catecholaldehyde hypothesis,” buildup of the autotoxic dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL) contributes to PD pathogenesis. Vesicular uptake blockade increases DOPAL levels, and DOPAL is detoxified mainly by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We tested whether rotenone interferes with vesicular uptake and intracellular ALDH activity. Endogenous and F-labeled catechols were measured in PC12 cells incubated with rotenone (0-1000 nM, 180 minutes), without or with F-dopamine (2 μM) to track vesicular uptake and catecholamine metabolism. Rotenone dose-dependently increased DOPAL, F-DOPAL, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (DOPET) levels while decreasing dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels and the ratio of dopamine to the sum of its deaminated metabolites. In test tubes, rotenone did not affect conversion of DOPAL to DOPAC by ALDH when NAD+ was supplied, whereas the direct-acting ALDH inhibitor benomyl markedly increased DOPAL and decreased DOPAC concentrations in the reaction mixtures. We propose that rotenone builds up intracellular DOPAL by decreasing ALDH activity and attenuating vesicular sequestration of cytoplasmic catecholamines. The results provide a novel mechanism for selective rotenone-induced toxicity in dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25645689

  17. Characterization of 10-hydroxygeraniol dehydrogenase from Catharanthus roseus reveals cascaded enzymatic activity in iridoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Krithika, Ramakrishnan; Srivastava, Prabhakar Lal; Rani, Bajaj; Kolet, Swati P; Chopade, Manojkumar; Soniya, Mantri; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus [L.] is a major source of the monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs), which are of significant interest due to their therapeutic value. These molecules are formed through an intermediate, cis-trans-nepetalactol, a cyclized product of 10-oxogeranial. One of the key enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of MIAs is an NAD(P)(+) dependent oxidoreductase system, 10-hydroxygeraniol dehydrogenase (Cr10HGO), which catalyses the formation of 10-oxogeranial from 10-hydroxygeraniol via 10-oxogeraniol or 10-hydroxygeranial. This work describes the cloning and functional characterization of Cr10HGO from C. roseus and its role in the iridoid biosynthesis. Substrate specificity studies indicated that, Cr10HGO has good activity on substrates such as 10-hydroxygeraniol, 10-oxogeraniol or 10-hydroxygeranial over monohydroxy linear terpene derivatives. Further it was observed that incubation of 10-hydroxygeraniol with Cr10HGO and iridoid synthase (CrIDS) in the presence of NADP(+) yielded a major metabolite, which was characterized as (1R, 4aS, 7S, 7aR)-nepetalactol by comparing its retention time, mass fragmentation pattern, and co-injection studies with that of the synthesized compound. These results indicate that there is concerted activity of Cr10HGO with iridoid synthase in the formation of (1R, 4aS, 7S, 7aR)-nepetalactol, an important intermediate in iridoid biosynthesis. PMID:25651761

  18. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity Identifies a Population of Human Skeletal Muscle Cells With High Myogenic Capacities

    PubMed Central

    Vauchez, Karine; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Schmid, Michel; Khattar, Patricia; Chapel, Alain; Catelain, Cyril; Lecourt, Séverine; Larghéro, Jérôme; Fiszman, Marc; Vilquin, Jean-Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH) activity is one hallmark of human bone marrow (BM), umbilical cord blood (UCB), and peripheral blood (PB) primitive progenitors presenting high reconstitution capacities in vivo. In this study, we have identified ALDH+ cells within human skeletal muscles, and have analyzed their phenotypical and functional characteristics. Immunohistofluorescence analysis of human muscle tissue sections revealed rare endomysial cells. Flow cytometry analysis using the fluorescent substrate of ALDH, Aldefluor, identified brightly stained (ALDHbr) cells with low side scatter (SSClo), in enzymatically dissociated muscle biopsies, thereafter abbreviated as SMALD+ (for skeletal muscle ALDH+) cells. Phenotypical analysis discriminated two sub-populations according to CD34 expression: SMALD+/CD34− and SMALD+/CD34+ cells. These sub-populations did not initially express endothelial (CD31), hematopoietic (CD45), and myogenic (CD56) markers. Upon sorting, however, whereas SMALD+/CD34+ cells developed in vitro as a heterogeneous population of CD56− cells able to differentiate in adipoblasts, the SMALD+/CD34− fraction developed in vitro as a highly enriched population of CD56+ myoblasts able to form myotubes. Moreover, only the SMALD+/CD34− population maintained a strong myogenic potential in vivo upon intramuscular transplantation. Our results suggest that ALDH activity is a novel marker for a population of new human skeletal muscle progenitors presenting a potential for cell biology and cell therapy. PMID:19738599

  19. Mitochondrial Dihydrolipoyl Dehydrogenase Activity Shapes Photosynthesis and Photorespiration of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Timm, Stefan; Wittmiß, Maria; Gamlien, Sabine; Ewald, Ralph; Florian, Alexandra; Frank, Marcus; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Bauwe, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (mtLPD; L-protein) is an integral component of several multienzyme systems involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, photorespiration, and the degradation of branched-chain α-ketoacids. The majority of the mtLPD present in photosynthesizing tissue is used for glycine decarboxylase (GDC), necessary for the high-flux photorespiratory glycine-into-serine conversion. We previously suggested that GDC activity could be a signal in a regulatory network that adjusts carbon flux through the Calvin-Benson cycle in response to photorespiration. Here, we show that elevated GDC L-protein activity significantly alters several diagnostic parameters of cellular metabolism and leaf gas exchange in Arabidopsis thaliana. Overexpressor lines displayed markedly decreased steady state contents of TCA cycle and photorespiratory intermediates as well as elevated NAD(P)+-to-NAD(P)H ratios. Additionally, increased rates of CO2 assimilation, photorespiration, and plant growth were observed. Intriguingly, however, day respiration rates remained unaffected. By contrast, respiration was enhanced in the first half of the dark phase but depressed in the second. We also observed enhanced sucrose biosynthesis in the light in combination with a lower diel magnitude of starch accumulation and breakdown. These data thus substantiate our prior hypothesis that facilitating flux through the photorespiratory pathway stimulates photosynthetic CO2 assimilation in the Calvin-Benson cycle. They furthermore suggest that this regulation is, at least in part, dependent on increased light-capture/use efficiency. PMID:26116608

  20. Modulation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity by surface functionalized quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Srabanti; Ray, Manju; Das, Mahua Rani; Chakrabarti, Adrita; Khan, Ali Hossain; Sarma, D D; Acharya, Somobrata

    2014-03-21

    Enzymatic regulation is a fast and reliable diagnosis tool via identification and design of inhibitors for modulation of enzyme function. Previous reports on quantum dots (QDs)-enzyme interactions reveal a protein-surface recognition ability leading to promising applications in protein stabilization, protein delivery, bio-sensing and detection. However, the direct use of QDs to control enzyme inhibition has never been revealed to date. Here we show that a series of biocompatible surface-functionalized metal-chalcogenide QDs can be used as potent inhibitors for malignant cells through the modulation of enzyme activity, while normal cells remain unaffected. The in vitro activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), an enzyme involved critically in the glycolysis of cancer cells, is inactivated selectively in a controlled way by the QDs at a significantly low concentration (nM). Cumulative kinetic studies delineate that the QDs undergo both reversible and irreversible inhibition mechanisms owing to the site-specific interactions, enabling control over the inhibition kinetics. These complementary loss-of-function probes may offer a novel route for rapid clinical diagnosis of malignant cells and biomedical applications. PMID:24496476

  1. Gossypol enantiomers potently inhibit human placental 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 and aromatase activities.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yaoyao; Mao, Baiping; Li, Linxi; Guan, Hongguo; Su, Ying; Li, Xiaoheng; Lian, Qingquan; Huang, Ping; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-03-01

    Gossypol is a chemical isolated from cotton seeds. It exists as (+) or (-) enantiomer and has been tested for anticancer, abortion-inducing, and male contraception. Progesterone formed from pregnenolone by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD3B1) and estradiol from androgen by aromatase (CYP19A1) are critical for the maintenance of pregnancy or associated with some cancers. In this study we compared the potencies of (+)- and (-)-gossypol enantiomers in the inhibition of HSD3B1 and aromatase activities as well as progesterone and estradiol production in human placental JEG-3 cells. (+) Gossypol showed potent inhibition on human placental HSD3B1 with IC50 value of 2.3 μM, while (-) gossypol weakly inhibited it with IC50 over 100 μM. In contrast, (-) gossypol moderately inhibited CYP19A1 activity with IC50 of 23 μM, while (+) gossypol had no inhibition when the highest concentration (100 μM) was tested. (+) Gossypol enantiomer competitively inhibited HSD3B1 against substrate pregnenolone and showed mixed mode against NAD(+). (-) Gossypol competitively inhibited CYP19A1 against substrate testosterone. Gossypol enantiomers showed different potency related to their inhibition on human HSD3B1 and CYP19A1. Whether gossypol enantiomer is used alone or in combination relies on its application and beneficial effects. PMID:26709042

  2. Characterization of 10-Hydroxygeraniol Dehydrogenase from Catharanthus roseus Reveals Cascaded Enzymatic Activity in Iridoid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Krithika, Ramakrishnan; Srivastava, Prabhakar Lal; Rani, Bajaj; Kolet, Swati P.; Chopade, Manojkumar; Soniya, Mantri; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V.

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus [L.] is a major source of the monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs), which are of significant interest due to their therapeutic value. These molecules are formed through an intermediate, cis-trans-nepetalactol, a cyclized product of 10-oxogeranial. One of the key enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of MIAs is an NAD(P)+ dependent oxidoreductase system, 10-hydroxygeraniol dehydrogenase (Cr10HGO), which catalyses the formation of 10-oxogeranial from 10-hydroxygeraniol via 10-oxogeraniol or 10-hydroxygeranial. This work describes the cloning and functional characterization of Cr10HGO from C. roseus and its role in the iridoid biosynthesis. Substrate specificity studies indicated that, Cr10HGO has good activity on substrates such as 10-hydroxygeraniol, 10-oxogeraniol or 10-hydroxygeranial over monohydroxy linear terpene derivatives. Further it was observed that incubation of 10-hydroxygeraniol with Cr10HGO and iridoid synthase (CrIDS) in the presence of NADP+ yielded a major metabolite, which was characterized as (1R, 4aS, 7S, 7aR)-nepetalactol by comparing its retention time, mass fragmentation pattern, and co-injection studies with that of the synthesized compound. These results indicate that there is concerted activity of Cr10HGO with iridoid synthase in the formation of (1R, 4aS, 7S, 7aR)-nepetalactol, an important intermediate in iridoid biosynthesis. PMID:25651761

  3. Acyl carrier protein-specific 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase activates 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kyle C; Hoeferlin, L Alexis; Oleinik, Natalia V; Krupenko, Natalia I; Krupenko, Sergey A

    2010-01-15

    4'-Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTs) catalyze the transfer of 4'-phosphopantetheine (4-PP) from coenzyme A to a conserved serine residue of their protein substrates. In humans, the number of pathways utilizing the 4-PP post-translational modification is limited and may only require a single broad specificity PPT for all phosphopantetheinylation reactions. Recently, we have shown that one of the enzymes of folate metabolism, 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (FDH), requires a 4-PP prosthetic group for catalysis. This moiety acts as a swinging arm to couple the activities of the two catalytic domains of FDH and allows the conversion of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate to tetrahydrofolate and CO2. In the current study, we demonstrate that the broad specificity human PPT converts apo-FDH to holoenzyme and thus activates FDH catalysis. Silencing PPT by small interfering RNA in A549 cells prevents FDH modification, indicating the lack of alternative enzymes capable of accomplishing this transferase reaction. Interestingly, PPT-silenced cells demonstrate significantly reduced proliferation and undergo strong G(1) arrest, suggesting that the enzymatic function of PPT is essential and nonredundant. Our study identifies human PPT as the FDH-modifying enzyme and supports the hypothesis that mammals utilize a single enzyme for all phosphopantetheinylation reactions. PMID:19933275

  4. The role of cysteine in the alteration of bovine liver dihydrodiol dehydrogenase 3 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Nanjo, H; Adachi, H; Aketa, M; Mizoguchi, T; Nishihara, T; Terada, T

    1995-01-01

    Bovine liver NADP(+)-dependent dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (DD3) is extremely sensitive to SH reagents such as N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid). NEM produced time- and concentration-dependent inactivation of DD3 in a pseudo-first-order reaction manner. This inactivation was prevented by NADP+, 3-acetylpyridine-adenine dinucleotide phosphate, 2',5'-ADP and 2'-AMP but not by substrates, NAD+, nicotinamide mononucleotide or 5'-ADP.DD3 was absorbed by an affinity column of thiopropyl-Sepharose 6B, but enzyme incubated with both NEM and NADP+ was not. Moreover, one [14C]NEM molecule was incorporated into a cysteine of DD3 in the presence, and two cysteines of DD3 in the absence, of NADP+. These results suggested that two cysteine residues were modified per enzyme molecule by NEM, one was protected by NADP+ and the other had no significant function for the enzyme activity. Two radiolabelled peptides (P1 and P2) produced by the digestion with lysyl endopeptidase of [14C]NEM-modified DD3 could be separated by reverse-phase HPLC. P1, which was radiolabelled by [14C]NEM only in the absence of NADP+, showed the following sequence; H2N-Tyr-Lys-Pro-Val-Xaa-Asn-Gln-Val-Glu- NEM.Cys-His-Pro-Tyr-Phe-Asn-Gln-Ser-Lys-COOH (Xaa indicates a possible cysteine residue). This sequence was very similar to that of rat liver 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid/dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (3 alpha-HSD/DD) (residues 184 to 201) and was also highly conserved in the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. The sequence of P2, which had radioactivity in both the absence and presence of NADP+, also contained an NEM-modified cysteine and was similar in sequence to the regions located in loop A of rat 3 alpha-HSD/DD. The present study suggests that P1, which may have a cysteine residue corresponding to Cys-193 of rat 3 alpha-HSD/DD, functions in the alteration of DD3 activity depending on the modulation of NADP(+)-binding ability through a thiol/disulphide exchange reaction similar to that of

  5. Biophysical and mutagenic analysis of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase activity and specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, D S; Secundo, F; Phillips, R S; Dong, J; Scott, R A; Zeikus, J G

    1997-01-01

    The Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E adhB gene encoding the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (secondary ADH) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli at more than 10% of total protein. The recombinant enzyme was purified in high yield (67%) by heat-treatment at 85 degrees C and (NH4)2SO4 precipitation. Site-directed mutants (C37S, H59N, D150N, D150Eand D150C were analysed to test the peptide sequence comparison-based predictions of amino acids responsible for putative catalytic Zn binding. X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the presence of a protein-bound Zn atom with ZnS1(imid)1(N,O)3 co-ordination sphere. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry measured 0.48 Zn atoms per wild-type secondary ADH subunit. The C37S, H59N and D150N mutant enzymes bound only 0.11, 0.13 and 0.33 Zn per subunit respectively,suggesting that these residues are involved in Zn liganding. The D150E and D150C mutants retained 0.47 and 1.2 Zn atoms per subunit, indicating that an anionic side-chain moiety at this position preserves the bound Zn. All five mutant enzymes had activity, suggesting that the T. ethanolicus secondary ADH requires a properly co-ordinated catalytic Zn atom. The His-59 and Asp-150 mutations also altered secondary ADH affinity for propan-2-ol over a 140-fold range, whereas the overall change in affinity for ethanol spanned a range of only 7-fold, supporting the importance of the metal in secondary ADH substrate binding. The lack of significant changes in cofactor affinity as a result of these catalytic Zn ligand mutations suggested that secondary ADH substrate-and cofactor-binding sites are structurally distinct. Altering Gly198 to Asp reduced the enzyme specific activity 2.7-fold, increased the Km(app) for NADP+ 225-fold, and decreased the Km(app) for NAD+ 3-fold, supporting the prediction that the enzyme binds nicotinamide cofactor in a Rossmann fold. Our data indicate therefore that, unlike the liver primary ADH

  6. Cellular recovery of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and thiol status after exposure to hydroperoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, A.E.; Reed, D.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The activity of the thiol-dependent enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD), in vertebrate cells, was modulated by a change in the intracellular thiol:disulfide redox status. Human lung carcinoma cells (A549) were incubated with 1-120 mM H2O2, 1-120 mM t-butyl hydroperoxide, 1-6 mM ethacrynic acid, or 0.1-10 mM N-ethylmaleimide for 5 min. Loss of reduced protein thiols, as measured by binding of the thiol reagent iodoacetic acid to GPD, and loss of GPD enzymatic activity occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Incubation of the cells, following oxidative treatment, in saline for 30 min or with 20 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) partially reversed both changes in GPD. The enzymatic recovery of GPD activity was observed either without addition of thiols to the medium or by incubation of a sonicated cell mixture with 2 mM cysteine, cystine, cysteamine, or glutathione (GSH); GSSG had no effect. Treatment of cells with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) to decrease cellular GSH by varying amounts caused a dose-related increase in sensitivity of GPD activity to inactivation by H2O2 and decreased cellular ability for subsequent recovery. GPD responded in a similar fashion with oxidative treatment of another lung carcinoma cell line (A427) as well as normal lung tissue from human and rat. These findings indicate that the cellular thiol redox status can be important in determining GPD enzymatic activity.

  7. Subcellular Characterization of Porcine Oocytes with Different Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Bo; Ren, Liang; Liu, Di; Ma, Jian-Zhang; An, Tie-Zhu; Yang, Xiu-Qin; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Dong-Jie; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Guo, Yun-Yun; Zhu, Meng; Bai, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro maturation (IVM) efficiency of porcine embryos is still low because of poor oocyte quality. Although brilliant cresyl blue positive (BCB+) oocytes with low glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activity have shown superior quality than BCB negative (−) oocytes with high G6PDH activity, the use of a BCB staining test before IVM is still controversial. This study aimed to shed more light on the subcellular characteristics of porcine oocytes after selection using BCB staining. We assessed germinal vesicle chromatin configuration, cortical granule (CG) migration, mitochondrial distribution, the levels of acetylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (AcH3K9) and nuclear apoptosis features to investigate the correlation between G6PDH activity and these developmentally related features. A pattern of chromatin surrounding the nucleoli was seen in 53.0% of BCB+ oocytes and 77.6% of BCB+ oocytes showed peripherally distributed CGs. After IVM, 48.7% of BCB+ oocytes had a diffused mitochondrial distribution pattern. However, there were no significant differences in the levels of AcH3K9 in the nuclei of blastocysts derived from BCB+ and BCB− oocytes; at the same time, we observed a similar incidence of apoptosis in the BCB+ and control groups. Although this study indicated that G6PDH activity in porcine oocytes was correlated with several subcellular characteristics such as germinal vesicle chromatin configuration, CG migration and mitochondrial distribution, other features such as AcH3K9 level and nuclear apoptotic features were not associated with G6PDH activity and did not validate the BCB staining test. In using this test for selecting porcine oocytes, subcellular characteristics such as the AcH3K9 level and apoptotic nuclear features should also be considered. Adding histone deacetylase inhibitors or apoptosis inhibitors into the culture medium used might improve the efficiency of IVM of BCB+ oocytes. PMID:26580437

  8. DNA binding, antioxidant, cytotoxicity (MTT, lactate dehydrogenase, NO), and cellular uptake studies of structurally different nickel(II) thiosemicarbazone complexes: synthesis, spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, R; Kalaivani, P; Huang, R; Poornima, P; Vijaya Padma, V; Dallemer, F; Natarajan, K

    2013-02-01

    Three new nickel(II) thiosemicarbazone complexes have been synthesized and characterized by analytical, spectral, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. In complex 1, the ligand 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehydethiosemicarbazone coordinated as a monobasic tridentate donor, whereas in complexes 2 and 3, the ligands salicylaldehyde-4(N)-ethylthiosemicarbazone and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde-4(N)-ethylthiosemicarbazone coordinated as a dibasic tridentate donor. The DNA binding ability of the complexes in calf thymus DNA was explored by absorption and emission titration experiments. The antioxidant property of the new complexes was evaluated to test their free-radical scavenging ability. In vitro cytotoxicity assays were performed for the new complexes in A549 and HepG2 cell lines. The new compounds overcome cisplatin resistance in the A549 cell line and they were also active in the HepG2 cell line. The cellular uptake study showed the accumulation of the complexes in tumor cells depended on the nature of the ligand attached to the nickel ion. PMID:23274397

  9. Redox balance and mitochondrial glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase activity in trained rats.

    PubMed

    Casimiro-Lopes, Gustavo; Ramos, Dionizio; Sorenson, Martha M; Salerno, Verônica P

    2012-11-01

    Free radical production is increased in many disease states and during exercise, but in the latter the concurrent stimulation of the antioxidant defense system seems to protect the organism from excessive production of reactive oxygen species. Chronic exercise can exert negative effects on the activity of mitochondrial glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPdH), which may offer some explanation for the antioxidant effects of training, since this enzyme is a relevant producer of free radicals. To test this correlation, we compared mGPdH activity, two antioxidant defense markers and two markers of oxidative stress in sedentary and trained (Tr) rats. Training was through a swimming exercise 3 days a week. After 8 weeks, Tr rats lasted twice as long as controls in an acute swimming test with a 5% load. Forty-eight hours after the last exercise, the animals were killed to collect blood and tissues. Tr animals presented lower body weight and visceral fat mass with lower triglyceride content in visceral fat and plasma (p < 0.05). The specific activity of mGPdH in muscle mitochondria was reduced in Tr rats by 88% (p < 0.05). Total antioxidant capacity, lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione (GSH) in liver and muscle were unaltered, while plasma GSH increased by 21% (p < 0.05). These data suggest a profile of successful redox equilibrium maintenance in Tr rats, with a potentially significant contribution from the lower level of mGPdH activity in muscle. This training protocol appears to be suitable for use in detailed studies of biochemical adaptations to oxidative stress. PMID:22391683

  10. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and citric acid cycle intermediates during high cardiac power generation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naveen; Okere, Isidore C; Brunengraber, Daniel Z; McElfresh, Tracy A; King, Kristen L; Sterk, Joseph P; Huang, Hazel; Chandler, Margaret P; Stanley, William C

    2005-01-01

    A high rate of cardiac work increases citric acid cycle (CAC) turnover and flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH); however, the mechanisms for these effects are poorly understood. We tested the hypotheses that an increase in cardiac energy expenditure: (1) activates PDH and reduces the product/substrate ratios ([NADH]/[NAD+] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA-SH]); and (2) increases the content of CAC intermediates. Measurements were made in anaesthetized pigs under control conditions and during 15 min of a high cardiac workload induced by dobutamine (Dob). A third group was made hyperglycaemic (14 mm) to stimulate flux through PDH during the high work state (Dob + Glu). Glucose and fatty acid oxidation were measured with 14C-glucose and 3H-oleate. Compared with control, the high workload groups had a similar increase in myocardial oxygen consumption ( and cardiac power. Dob increased PDH activity and glucose oxidation above control, but did not reduce the [NADH]/[NAD+] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA-SH] ratios, and there were no differences between the Dob and Dob + Glu groups. An additional group was treated with Dob + Glu and oxfenicine (Oxf) to inhibit fatty acid oxidation: this increased [CoA-SH] and glucose oxidation compared with Dob; however, there was no further activation of PDH or decrease in the [NADH]/[NAD+] ratio. Content of the 4-carbon CAC intermediates succinate, fumarate and malate increased 3-fold with Dob, but there was no change in citrate content, and the Dob + Glu and Dob + Glu + Oxf groups were not different from Dob. In conclusion, compared with normal conditions, at high myocardial energy expenditure (1) the increase in flux through PDH is regulated by activation of the enzyme complex and continues to be partially controlled through inhibition by fatty acid oxidation, and (2) there is expansion of the CAC pool size at the level of 4-carbon intermediates that is largely independent of myocardial fatty acid oxidation. PMID:15550462

  11. Lack of Skeletal Muscle IL-6 Affects Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Activity at Rest and during Prolonged Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Gudiksen, Anders; Schwartz, Camilla Lindgren; Bertholdt, Lærke; Joensen, Ella; Knudsen, Jakob G.; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) plays a key role in the regulation of skeletal muscle substrate utilization. IL-6 is produced in skeletal muscle during exercise in a duration dependent manner and has been reported to increase whole body fatty acid oxidation, muscle glucose uptake and decrease PDHa activity in skeletal muscle of fed mice. The aim of the present study was to examine whether muscle IL-6 contributes to exercise-induced PDH regulation in skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle-specific IL-6 knockout (IL-6 MKO) mice and floxed littermate controls (control) completed a single bout of treadmill exercise for 10, 60 or 120 min, with rested mice of each genotype serving as basal controls. The respiratory exchange ratio (RER) was overall higher (P<0.05) in IL-6 MKO than control mice during the 120 min of treadmill exercise, while RER decreased during exercise independent of genotype. AMPK and ACC phosphorylation also increased with exercise independent of genotype. PDHa activity was in control mice higher (P<0.05) at 10 and 60 min of exercise than at rest but remained unchanged in IL-6 MKO mice. In addition, PDHa activity was higher (P<0.05) in IL-6 MKO than control mice at rest and 60 min of exercise. Neither PDH phosphorylation nor acetylation could explain the genotype differences in PDHa activity. Together, this provides evidence that skeletal muscle IL-6 contributes to the regulation of PDH at rest and during prolonged exercise and suggests that muscle IL-6 normally dampens carbohydrate utilization during prolonged exercise via effects on PDH. PMID:27327080

  12. [Effect of temperature acclimation on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in various tissues of the Mullus barbatus ponticus].

    PubMed

    Rusinova, O S

    1997-01-01

    Acclimation of the Mullus barbatus ponticus to the temperature fall (from 16 to 8 degrees C) induces an increase in the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase both in summer and in autumn. These changes are more expressed in the liver and red muscle than in the white ones. The values of Km of glucose-6-phosphate (only in autumn) and NADP are also higher at 8 than at 16 degrees C. Actinomycin D does not prevent from cold activation of this enzyme in liver only in autumn, when the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase is 8-10 times higher than in summer, and in the red muscle in the both seasons, although this injection decreases the level of enzyme activity in this muscle. This injection does not change the values of Km for glucose-6-phosphate and NADP. It is supposed that the activation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the liver and red muscle during cold adaptation may be a result of change of substrate-binding ability and enzyme interaction with NADP without changes in the enzyme biosynthesis. PMID:9606826

  13. Revascularization of ischemic limbs after transplantation of human bone marrow cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Capoccia, Benjamin J.; Robson, Debra L.; Levac, Krysta D.; Maxwell, Dustin J.; Hohm, Sarah A.; Neelamkavil, Marian J.; Bell, Gillian I.; Xenocostas, Anargyros; Link, Daniel C.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Nolta, Jan A.

    2009-01-01

    The development of cell therapies to treat peripheral vascular disease has proven difficult because of the contribution of multiple cell types that coordinate revascularization. We characterized the vascular regenerative potential of transplanted human bone marrow (BM) cells purified by high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDHhi) activity, a progenitor cell function conserved between several lineages. BM ALDHhi cells were enriched for myelo-erythroid progenitors that produced multipotent hematopoietic reconstitution after transplantation and contained nonhematopoietic precursors that established colonies in mesenchymal-stromal and endothelial culture conditions. The regenerative capacity of human ALDHhi cells was assessed by intravenous transplantation into immune-deficient mice with limb ischemia induced by femoral artery ligation/transection. Compared with recipients injected with unpurified nucleated cells containing the equivalent of 2- to 4-fold more ALDHhi cells, mice transplanted with purified ALDHhi cells showed augmented recovery of perfusion and increased blood vessel density in ischemic limbs. ALDHhi cells transiently recruited to ischemic regions but did not significantly integrate into ischemic tissue, suggesting that transient ALDHhi cell engraftment stimulated endogenous revascularization. Thus, human BM ALDHhi cells represent a progenitor-enriched population of several cell lineages that improves perfusion in ischemic limbs after transplantation. These clinically relevant cells may prove useful in the treatment of critical ischemia in humans. PMID:19324906

  14. Lactate Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (LATEST) Imaging in vivo A Biomarker for LDH Activity

    PubMed Central

    DeBrosse, Catherine; Nanga, Ravi Prakash Reddy; Bagga, Puneet; Nath, Kavindra; Haris, Mohammad; Marincola, Francesco; Schnall, Mitchell D.; Hariharan, Hari; Reddy, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive imaging of lactate is of enormous significance in cancer and metabolic disorders where glycolysis dominates. Here, for the first time, we describe a chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method (LATEST), based on the exchange between lactate hydroxyl proton and bulk water protons to image lactate with high spatial resolution. We demonstrate the feasibility of imaging lactate with LATEST in lactate phantoms under physiological conditions, in a mouse model of lymphoma tumors, and in skeletal muscle of healthy human subjects pre- and post-exercise. The method is validated by measuring LATEST changes in lymphoma tumors pre- and post-infusion of pyruvate and correlating them with lactate determined from multiple quantum filtered proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (SEL-MQC 1H-MRS). Similarly, dynamic LATEST changes in exercising human skeletal muscle are correlated with lactate determined from SEL-MQC 1H-MRS. The LATEST method does not involve injection of radioactive isotopes or labeled metabolites. It has over two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity compared to conventional 1H-MRS. It is anticipated that this technique will have a wide range of applications including diagnosis and evaluation of therapeutic response of cancer, diabetes, cardiac, and musculoskeletal diseases. The advantages of LATEST over existing methods and its potential challenges are discussed. PMID:26794265

  15. Lactate Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (LATEST) Imaging in vivo A Biomarker for LDH Activity.

    PubMed

    DeBrosse, Catherine; Nanga, Ravi Prakash Reddy; Bagga, Puneet; Nath, Kavindra; Haris, Mohammad; Marincola, Francesco; Schnall, Mitchell D; Hariharan, Hari; Reddy, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive imaging of lactate is of enormous significance in cancer and metabolic disorders where glycolysis dominates. Here, for the first time, we describe a chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method (LATEST), based on the exchange between lactate hydroxyl proton and bulk water protons to image lactate with high spatial resolution. We demonstrate the feasibility of imaging lactate with LATEST in lactate phantoms under physiological conditions, in a mouse model of lymphoma tumors, and in skeletal muscle of healthy human subjects pre- and post-exercise. The method is validated by measuring LATEST changes in lymphoma tumors pre- and post-infusion of pyruvate and correlating them with lactate determined from multiple quantum filtered proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (SEL-MQC (1)H-MRS). Similarly, dynamic LATEST changes in exercising human skeletal muscle are correlated with lactate determined from SEL-MQC (1)H-MRS. The LATEST method does not involve injection of radioactive isotopes or labeled metabolites. It has over two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity compared to conventional (1)H-MRS. It is anticipated that this technique will have a wide range of applications including diagnosis and evaluation of therapeutic response of cancer, diabetes, cardiac, and musculoskeletal diseases. The advantages of LATEST over existing methods and its potential challenges are discussed. PMID:26794265

  16. [Pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency and cerebral malformations].

    PubMed

    Eirís, J; Alvarez-Moreno, A; Briones, P; Alonso-Alonso, C; Castro-Gago, M

    1996-10-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) deficiency is a major cause of primary lactic acidosis and severe global developmental delay. A deficiency of PDH E1 alpha, a subunit of the PDH complex is a prominent cause of congenital lactic acidosis. The E1 alpha cDNA and corresponding genomic DNA have been located in the short arm of the X-chromosome (Xp22-1). A isolated 'cerebral' lactic acidosis with cerebral dysgenesis is a recognized pattern of presentation of PDH deficiency. Here, we report clinical features, magnetic resonance, and biochemical studies of two females aged 6 months (case 1) and 26 months (case 2). Both had severe development delay, minor dysmorphic features, microcephaly, severe hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, cerebral atrophy, ventricular dilatation and increase in serum lactate levels without systemic acidosis. Urinary organic acid profile was compatible with PDH deficiency. Increased CSF lactate and pyruvate levels and reduced total PDH and PDH E1 activities in muscle and fibroblasts were observed in case 1. Otherwise, decreased total PDH activity in muscle but not in fibroblasts was seen in case 2. The PDH E1á gene was sequenced in the case 1 and a deletion in exon 7 was demonstrated. Dysmorphism with severe cerebral malformations in female patients merits a metabolic evaluation, including determination of lactate and pyruvate levels in CSF. PMID:8983728

  17. Cytotoxicity and characterization of an active metabolite of benzamide riboside, a novel inhibitor of IMP dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Gharehbaghi, K; Paull, K D; Kelley, J A; Barchi, J J; Marquez, V E; Cooney, D A; Monks, A; Scudiero, D; Krohn, K; Jayaram, H N

    1994-03-15

    Benzamide riboside exhibits significant cytotoxicity against a variety of human tumor cells in culture. On the basis of metabolic studies, the primary target of this drug's action appears to be IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH). Incubation of human myelogenous leukemia K562 cells with an IC50 concentration of benzamide riboside resulted in an expansion of IMP pools (5.9-fold), with a parallel reduction in the concentration of GMP (90%), GDP (63%), GTP (55%) and dGTP (40%). On kinetic grounds, it was deduced that benzamide riboside (whose Ki versus IMPDH is 6.4 mM, while that of its 5'-monophosphate is 3.9 mM) or its 5'-monophosphate were unlikely to be responsible for inhibition of this target enzyme, IMPDH, since only micromolar concentrations of benzamide riboside were needed to exert potent inhibition of tumor-cell growth. Studies on the metabolism of this C-nucleoside have revealed the presence of a new peak eluting in the nucleoside diphosphate area on HPLC. Treatment of this peak with venom phosphodiesterase degraded it and concurrently nullified its inhibitory activity versus IMPDH; alkaline phosphatase, on the other hand, totally failed to digest the anabolite. These results suggest that the metabolite in question is the phosphodiester, benzamide adenine dinucleotide (BAD). Evidence that the inhibitor was an analog of NAD, wherein the nicotinamide moiety has been replaced by benzamide, was provided by both NMR and mass spectrometric analysis and confirmed by enzymatic synthesis. Further insight into the nature of the active principle was obtained from kinetic studies, which established that BAD competitively inhibited NAD utilization by partially purified IMPDH from K562 cells with a Ki of 0.118 microM. In concert, these studies establish that benzamide riboside exhibits potent antiproliferative activity by inhibiting IMPDH through BAD. PMID:7907081

  18. Substitution of Tyr254 with Phe at the active site of flavocytochrome b2: consequences on catalysis of lactate dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, J.; Chapman, S.K.; Mathews, F.S.; Reid, G.A.; Lederer, F. )

    1990-07-10

    A role for Tyr254 in L-lactate dehydrogenation catalyzed by flavocytochrome b2 has recently been proposed on the basis of the known active-site structure and of studies that had suggested a mechanism involving the initial formation of a lactate carbanion. This role is now examined after replacement of Tyr254 with phenylalanine. The kcat is decreased about 40-fold, Km for lactate appears unchanged, and the mainly rate-limiting step is still alpha-hydrogen abstraction, as judged from the steady-state deuterium isotope effect. Modeling studies with lactate introduced into the active site indicate two possible substrate conformations with different hydrogen-bonding partners for the substrate hydroxyl. If the hydrogen bond is formed with Tyr254, as was initially postulated, the mechanism must involve removal by His373 of the C2 hydrogen, with carbanion formation. If, in the absence of the Tyr254 phenol group, the hydrogen bond is formed with His373 N3, the substrate is positioned in such a way that the reaction must proceed by hydride transfer. Therefore the mechanism of the Y254F enzyme was investigated so as to distinguish between the two mechanistic possibilities. 2-Hydroxy-3-butynoate behaves with the mutant as a suicide reagent, as with the wild-type enzyme. Similarly, the mutant protein also catalyzes the reduction and the dehydrohalogenation of bromopyruvate under transhydrogenation conditions.

  19. Enhanced aldehyde dehydrogenase activity by regenerating NAD+ in Klebsiella pneumoniae and implications for the glycerol dissimilation pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Su, Mingyue; Ge, Xizhen; Tian, Pingfang

    2013-10-01

    In Klebsiella pneumoniae, 3-hydroxypropaldehyde is converted to 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) with NAD(+) as a cofactor. Although ALDH overexpression stimulates the formation of 3-HP, it ceases to accumulate when NAD(+) is exhausted. Here we show that NAD(+) regeneration, together with ALDH overexpression, facilitates 3-HP production and benefits cell growth. Three distinct NAD(+)-regenerating enzymes: NADH oxidase and NADH dehydrogenase from K. pneumoniae, and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, were individually expressed in K. pneumoniae. In vitro assay showed their higher activities than that of the control, indicating their capacities to regenerate NAD(+). When they were respectively co-expressed with ALD4, an ALDH from S. cerevisiae, the activities of ALD4 were significantly elevated compared with that expressing ALD4 alone, suggesting that the regenerated NAD(+) enhanced the activity of ALD4. More interestingly, the growth rates of all NAD(+)-regenerating strains were prolonged in comparison with the control, indicating that NAD(+) regeneration stimulated cell proliferation. This study not only reveals the reliance of ALD4 activity on NAD(+) availability but also provides a method for regulating the dha regulon. PMID:23794046

  20. Induction of Xylose Reductase and Xylitol Dehydrogenase Activities in Pachysolen tannophilus and Pichia stipitis on Mixed Sugars

    PubMed Central

    Bicho, Paul A.; Runnals, P. Lynn; Cunningham, J. Douglas; Lee, Hung

    1988-01-01

    The induction of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase activities on mixed sugars was investigated in the yeasts Pachysolen tannophilus and Pichia stipitis. Enzyme activities induced on d-xylose served as the controls. In both yeasts, d-glucose, d-mannose, and 2-deoxyglucose inhibited enzyme induction by d-xylose to various degrees. Cellobiose, l-arabinose, and d-galactose were not inhibitory. In liquid batch culture, P. tannophilus utilized d-glucose and d-mannose rapidly and preferentially over d-xylose, while d-galactose consumption was poor and lagged behind that of the pentose sugar. In P. stipitis, all three hexoses were used preferentially over d-xylose. The results showed that the repressibility of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase may limit the potential of yeast fermentation of pentose sugars in hydrolysates of lignocellulosic substrates. PMID:16347538

  1. Effect of metals and other inorganic ions on soil microbial activity: soil dehydrogenase assay as a simple toxicity test

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.E.; Li, S.W.

    1985-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to illustrate the utility of the soil dehydrogenase assay as an effective primary test for assessing the potential toxicity of chemicals to soil microbial activity. In this manuscript the authors describe their use of the soil dehydrogenase assay in determining the effects of a number of potential toxic inorganic ions on soil microbial activity. The ions include Cu/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, Ni/sup 2 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, NH/sub 4//sup +/, Cd/sup 2 +/, Cr/sup 32/, F/sup -/, AsO/sub 4//sup 3 -/, BO/sub 3//sup 3 -/, and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/.

  2. Structure-Activity Relationship Studies and Biological Characterization of Human NAD+-dependent 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Duveau, Damien Y.; Yasgar, Adam; Wang, Yuhong; Hu, Xin; Kouznetsova, Jennifer; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Thomas, Craig J.; Maloney, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of two chemotypes identified as inhibitors of the human NAD+-dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD, 15-PGDH) was conducted. Top compounds from both series displayed potent inhibition (IC50 <50 nM), demonstrate excellent selectivity towards HPGD and potently induce PGE2 production in A549 lung cancer and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. PMID:24360556

  3. Regional and systemic oxygen delivery/uptake relations and lactate flux in hyperdynamic, endotoxin-treated dogs.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S E; Cain, S M

    1992-02-01

    Pathologic oxygen supply dependency (PO2SD) may be etiologic in multisystem organ failure (MSOF) and has been related to mortality in sepsis. Although elevated lactate levels are generally assumed to be a marker of anaerobiosis in these patients, endotoxin may increase serum lactate by inactivation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), unrelated to tissue PO2. We hypothesized that regional lactate flux may correlate poorly with local oxygen delivery in sepsis. This study examined both the whole-body (WB) and regional (isolated hind limb L and gut G) responses to endotoxin infusion in terms of oxygen delivery, oxygen uptake, and lactate flux in 12 pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. To separate hypoxia-induced lactate production from that related to inactivation of PDH by endotoxin, half the dogs received dichloroacetate (DCA), a PDH activator. After endotoxin and volume resuscitation, each animal had low systemic vascular resistance with normal to high cardiac output. Despite adequate oxygen delivery to WB, L, and G, arterial lactate levels rose significantly. A 30-min hypoxic challenge (12% FIO2) did not increase lactate levels but did increase WB O2 uptake. DCA normalized lactate levels without influencing oxygen delivery and uptake relations. These data show that lactate levels in endotoxic states may be a poor marker of tissue hypoxia and may be more related to PDH activity. PMID:1736740

  4. Inhibition of Cancer-Associated Mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenases: Synthesis, Structure–Activity Relationship, and Selective Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are frequently found in certain cancers such as glioma. Different from the wild-type (WT) IDH1, the mutant enzymes catalyze the reduction of α-ketoglutaric acid to d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid (D2HG), leading to cancer initiation. Several 1-hydroxypyridin-2-one compounds were identified to be inhibitors of IDH1(R132H). A total of 61 derivatives were synthesized, and their structure–activity relationships were investigated. Potent IDH1(R132H) inhibitors were identified with Ki values as low as 140 nM, while they possess weak or no activity against WT IDH1. Activities of selected compounds against IDH1(R132C) were found to be correlated with their inhibitory activities against IDH1(R132H), as well as cellular production of D2HG, with R2 of 0.83 and 0.73, respectively. Several inhibitors were found to be permeable through the blood–brain barrier in a cell-based model assay and exhibit potent and selective activity (EC50 = 0.26–1.8 μM) against glioma cells with the IDH1 R132H mutation. PMID:25271760

  5. Inhibition of cancer-associated mutant isocitrate dehydrogenases: synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and selective antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Yao, Yuan; Kogiso, Mari; Zheng, Baisong; Deng, Lisheng; Qiu, Jihui J; Dong, Shuo; Lv, Hua; Gallo, James M; Li, Xiao-Nan; Song, Yongcheng

    2014-10-23

    Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are frequently found in certain cancers such as glioma. Different from the wild-type (WT) IDH1, the mutant enzymes catalyze the reduction of α-ketoglutaric acid to d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid (D2HG), leading to cancer initiation. Several 1-hydroxypyridin-2-one compounds were identified to be inhibitors of IDH1(R132H). A total of 61 derivatives were synthesized, and their structure-activity relationships were investigated. Potent IDH1(R132H) inhibitors were identified with Ki values as low as 140 nM, while they possess weak or no activity against WT IDH1. Activities of selected compounds against IDH1(R132C) were found to be correlated with their inhibitory activities against IDH1(R132H), as well as cellular production of D2HG, with R(2) of 0.83 and 0.73, respectively. Several inhibitors were found to be permeable through the blood-brain barrier in a cell-based model assay and exhibit potent and selective activity (EC50 = 0.26-1.8 μM) against glioma cells with the IDH1 R132H mutation. PMID:25271760

  6. Highly selective anti-Prelog synthesis of optically active aryl alcohols by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Nie, Yao; Mu, Xiao Qing; Zhang, Rongzhen; Xu, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Biocatalytic asymmetric synthesis has been widely used for preparation of optically active chiral alcohols as the important intermediates and precursors of active pharmaceutical ingredients. However, the available whole-cell system involving anti-Prelog specific alcohol dehydrogenase is yet limited. A recombinant Escherichia coli system expressing anti-Prelog stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase from Candida parapsilosis was established as a whole-cell system for catalyzing asymmetric reduction of aryl ketones to anti-Prelog configured alcohols. Using 2-hydroxyacetophenone as the substrate, reaction factors including pH, cell status, and substrate concentration had obvious impacts on the outcome of whole-cell biocatalysis, and xylose was found to be an available auxiliary substrate for intracellular cofactor regeneration, by which (S)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol was achieved with an optical purity of 97%e.e. and yield of 89% under the substrate concentration of 5 g/L. Additionally, the feasibility of the recombinant cells toward different aryl ketones was investigated, and most of the corresponding chiral alcohol products were obtained with an optical purity over 95%e.e. Therefore, the whole-cell system involving recombinant stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase was constructed as an efficient biocatalyst for highly enantioselective anti-Prelog synthesis of optically active aryl alcohols and would be promising in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:26178068

  7. Stearic acid induces proinflammatory cytokine production partly through activation of lactate-HIF1α pathway in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Hongming; Chen, Liang; Hao, Lijun; Zhang, Xuan; Chen, Yujuan; Ruan, Zhihua; Liang, Houjie

    2015-01-01

    The biomechanics stress and chronic inflammation in obesity are causally linked to osteoarthritis. However, the metabolic factors mediating obesity-related osteoarthritis are still obscure. Here we scanned and identified at least two elevated metabolites (stearic acid and lactate) from the plasma of diet-induced obese mice. We found that stearic acid potentiated LDH-a-dependent production of lactate, which further stabilized HIF1α protein and increased VEGF and proinflammatory cytokine expression in primary mouse chondrocytes. Treatment with LDH-a and HIF1α inhibitors notably attenuated stearic acid-or high fat diet-stimulated proinflammatory cytokine production in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, positive correlation of plasma lactate, cartilage HIF1α and cytokine levels with the body mass index was observed in subjects with osteoarthritis. In conclusion, saturated free fatty acid induced proinflammatory cytokine production partly through activation of a novel lactate-HIF1α pathway in chondrocytes. Our findings hold promise of developing novel clinical strategies for the management of obesity-related diseases such as osteoarthritis. PMID:26271607

  8. Influence of fat addition on the antimicrobial activity of sodium lactate, lauric arginate and methylparaben in minced meat.

    PubMed

    Magrinyà, Núria; Terjung, Nino; Loeffler, Myriam; Gibis, Monika; Bou, Ricard; Weiss, Jochen

    2015-12-23

    A minced meat model system containing three different fat levels (0, 15, and 50 wt.%) was used to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of three antimicrobials with different aqueous solubilities (sodium lactate>lauric arginate (Nα-lauroyl-L-arginine ethyl ester, LAE)>methylparaben). Various concentrations of sodium lactate (20, 40, and 60 mg/g), lauric arginate (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 mg/g) and methylparaben (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/g) were used to evaluate the antimicrobial activity against natural meat microbiota (total aerobic mesophilic colony counts, coliform bacteria, and lactic acid bacteria). The results indicate that the three antimicrobials tested are influenced at different strengths by the changes of the fat addition of the minced meat. The antimicrobial efficacy of LAE and methylparaben is increased by a higher fat content in the meat batter, whereas for lactate no clear lactate proportionality relationship can be seen. This structure sensitivity is most strongly pronounced with lauric arginate, which we attributed to the amphiphilic character of the molecule. PMID:26344644

  9. Muscle activation, blood lactate, and perceived exertion responses to changing resistance training programming variables.

    PubMed

    Hiscock, Daniel J; Dawson, Brian; Donnelly, Cyril J; Peeling, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE: 0-10) during resistance training with varying programming demands were examined. Blood lactate (BLa) and muscle activation (using surface electromyography: EMG) were measured as potential mediators of RPE responses. Participants performed three sets of single arm (preferred side) bicep curls at 70% of 1 repetition maximum over 4 trials: Trial (A) 3 sets × 8 repetitions × 120 s recovery between sets; (B) 3 sets × 8 repetitions × 240 s recovery; (C) 3 sets × maximum number of repetitions (MNR) × 120 s recovery; (D) 3 sets × MNR × 240 s recovery. Overall body (RPE-O) and active muscle (RPE-AM) perceptual responses were assessed following each set in each trial. Biceps brachii and brachioradialis muscle EMG was measured during each set for each trial. RPE-O and RPE-AM were not different between Trial A (3.5 ± 1 and 6 ± 1, respectively) and Trial B (3.5 ± 1 and 5.5 ± 1, respectively) (p < .05). However, RPE-AM was significantly greater in Trial C (7.5 ± 1.5) and Trial D (7.5 ± 1.5) than in Trial B (p < .05). There were no significant differences in muscle activation or BLa between trials; however, work rate (tonnage/min) was greater in Trials C and D compared to Trial B. In conclusion, BLa and muscle activation were not related to RPE, but resistance training variables, such as work rate, may impact on RPE when intensity (%1RM) and the number of sets completed remain constant. PMID:26267339

  10. Cryopreservation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity inside red blood cells: developing a specimen repository in support of development and evaluation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency tests

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common human enzyme deficiency. It is characterized by abnormally low levels of G6PD activity. Individuals with G6PD deficiency are at risk of undergoing acute haemolysis when exposed to 8‒aminoquinoline-based drugs, such as primaquine. For this reason it is imperative to identify individuals with G6PD deficiency prior to administering these anti-malarial drugs. There is a need for the development and evaluation of point-of-care G6PD deficiency screening tests suitable for areas of the developing world where malarial treatments are frequently administered. The development and evaluation of new G6PD tests will be greatly assisted with the availability of specimen repositories. Methods Cryopreservation of erythrocytes was evaluated as a means to preserve G6PD activity. Blood specimens from 31 patients including ten specimens with normal G6PD activity, three with intermediate activity, and 18 with deficient activity were cryopreserved for up to six months. Results Good correlation in G6PD activity between fresh and cryopreserved specimens (R2 = 0.95). The cryopreserved specimens show an overall small drop in mean G6PD activity of 0.23 U/g Hb (P=0.23). Cytochemical staining showed that intracellular G6PD activity distribution within the red blood cell populations is preserved during cryopreservation. Furthermore, the mosaic composition of red blood cells in heterozygous women is also preserved for six months or more. The fluorescent spot and the BinaxNOW qualitative tests for G6PD deficiency also showed high concordance in G6PD status determination between cryopreserved specimens and fresh specimens. Conclusions A methodology for establishing a specimen panel for evaluation of G6PD tests is described. The approach is similar to that used in several malaria research facilities for the cryopreservation of parasites in clinical specimens and axenic cultures. Specimens stored in this manner will aid

  11. L-Lactate transport into rat heart mitochondria and reconstruction of the L-lactate/pyruvate shuttle.

    PubMed Central

    Valenti, Daniela; de Bari, Lidia; Atlante, Anna; Passarella, Salvatore

    2002-01-01

    In vitro reconstruction of the L-lactate/pyruvate shuttle has been performed, which allows NADH oxidation outside rat heart mitochondria. Such a shuttle occurs due to the combined action of the novel mitochondrial L-lactate/pyruvate antiporter, which differs from the monocarboxylate carrier, and the mitochondrial L-lactate dehydrogenase. The rate of L-lactate/pyruvate antiport proved to regulate the shuttle in vitro. PMID:11988081

  12. L-Lactate transport into rat heart mitochondria and reconstruction of the L-lactate/pyruvate shuttle.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Daniela; de Bari, Lidia; Atlante, Anna; Passarella, Salvatore

    2002-05-15

    In vitro reconstruction of the L-lactate/pyruvate shuttle has been performed, which allows NADH oxidation outside rat heart mitochondria. Such a shuttle occurs due to the combined action of the novel mitochondrial L-lactate/pyruvate antiporter, which differs from the monocarboxylate carrier, and the mitochondrial L-lactate dehydrogenase. The rate of L-lactate/pyruvate antiport proved to regulate the shuttle in vitro. PMID:11988081

  13. Influence of lactose and lactate on growth and β-galactosidase activity of potential probiotic Propionibacterium acidipropionici.

    PubMed

    Zárate, Gabriela; Chaia, Adriana Pérez

    2012-02-01

    Dairy propionibacteria are microorganisms of interest for their role as starters in cheese technology and as well as their functions as probiotics. Previous studies have demonstrated that Propionibacterium acidipropionici metabolize lactose by a β-galactosidase that resists the gastrointestinal transit and the manufacture of a Swiss-type cheese, so that could be considered for their inclusion in a probiotic product assigned to intolerant individuals. In the present work we studied the effect of the sequential addition of lactose and lactate as first or second energy sources on the growth and β-galactosidase activity of P. acidipropionici Q4. The highest β-galactosidase activity was observed in a medium containing only lactate whereas higher final biomass was obtained in a medium with lactose. When lactate was used by this strain as a second energy source, a marked increase of the intracellular pyruvate level was observed, followed by lactate consumption and increase of specific β-galactosidase activity whereas lactose consumption became negligible. On the contrary, when lactose was provided as second energy source, lactic acid stopped to be metabolized, a decrease of the intracellular pyruvate concentration was observed and β-galactosidase activity sharply returned to a value that resembled the observed during the growth on lactose alone. Results suggest that the relative concentration of each substrate in the culture medium and the intracellular pyruvate level were decisive for both the choice of the energetic substrate and the β-galactosidase activity in propionibacteria. This information should be useful to decide the most appropriate vehicle to deliver propionibacteria to the host in order to obtain the highest β-galactosidase activity. PMID:22202442

  14. Factors affecting expression of estrus measured by activity monitors and conception risk of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Madureira, A M L; Silper, B F; Burnett, T A; Polsky, L; Cruppe, L H; Veira, D M; Vasconcelos, J L M; Cerri, R L A

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine risk-factors affecting increase in physical activity during estrus and pregnancy per artificial insemination (P/AI) in lactating dairy cows. Cows were monitored continuously by 2 automated activity monitors [a collar-mounted accelerometer (HT; Heatime, SCR Engineers, Netanya, Israel) and a leg-mounted pedometer (BO; Boumatic Heat-seeker-TX, Boumatic Dairy Equipment, Madison, WI)]. When an increase in activity was detected, body condition score (BCS) and blood samples were collected, ovaries were scanned by ultrasonography, and, if the cow was eligible for breeding, artificial insemination was performed. Milk production and health-related data were recorded throughout the experimental period. Pregnancy diagnosis was performed at 42 ± 7 d of gestation. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation, ANOVA, and logistic regression. A total of 1,099 true events of estrus from 318 lactating Holstein cows were recorded, averaging 3.46 ± 1.1 events per cow. Positive predictive value for estrus episodes detected by the HT and BO systems were 89.6 and 85.5%, respectively. Mean peak activity at estrus (PA) recorded by the HT system was 71.6 ± 20.7 index-value, and 334.3 ± 155.7% relative increase by the BO system. Compared with primiparous, multiparous cows expressed estrus with lower PA (69.3 ± 0.8 vs. 75.9 ± 1.1 index for HT; 323.9 ± 6.0 vs. 354.8 ± 8.48% for BO) and shorter duration (DU; 10.7 ± 0.2 vs. 12.0 ± 0.3 h); DU was measured by HT only. Lower BCS was associated with decreased PA measured by both systems, estrus DU, and P/AI. Peak activity was weakly correlated with milk production on the day of artificial insemination (r = -0.20); however, when categorized into quartiles, the highest-yield cows had lower PA and DU. Follicle diameter was not correlated with PA or DU, but cows with greater concentrations of estradiol had higher PA. Cows with greater PA in both systems had greater P/AI than those with lower PA (36

  15. Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Is an Important Component of CXCL10-Mediated Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schutte, Kirsten M.; Fisher, Debra J.; Burdick, Marie D.; Mehrad, Borna; Mathers, Amy J.; Mann, Barbara J.; Nakamoto, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are best recognized for their role within the innate immune system as chemotactic cytokines, signaling and recruiting host immune cells to sites of infection. Certain chemokines, such as CXCL10, have been found to play an additional role in innate immunity, mediating CXCR3-independent killing of a diverse array of pathogenic microorganisms. While this is still not clearly understood, elucidating the mechanisms underlying chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity may facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies effective against antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. Here, we show that CXCL10 exerts antibacterial effects on clinical and laboratory strains of Escherichia coli and report that disruption of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc), which converts pyruvate to acetyl coenzyme A, enables E. coli to resist these antimicrobial effects. Through generation and screening of a transposon mutant library, we identified two mutants with increased resistance to CXCL10, both with unique disruptions of the gene encoding the E1 subunit of PDHc, aceE. Resistance to CXCL10 also occurred following deletion of either aceF or lpdA, genes that encode the remaining two subunits of PDHc. Although PDHc resides within the bacterial cytosol, electron microscopy revealed localization of immunogold-labeled CXCL10 to the bacterial cell surface in both the E. coli parent and aceE deletion mutant strains. Taken together, our findings suggest that while CXCL10 interacts with an as-yet-unidentified component on the cell surface, PDHc is an important mediator of killing by CXCL10. To our knowledge, this is the first description of PDHc as a key bacterial component involved in the antibacterial effect of a chemokine. PMID:26553462

  16. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of ascites tumour. Activation by AMP and other properties of potential significance in metabolic regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Lazo, P A; Sols, A

    1980-01-01

    1. AMP is an activator of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of the Ehrlich--Lettré ascites tumour, increasing its V up to 2-fold, with Ka of 40 microM at pH 7.4. This activation appears to be an allosteric effect on the decarboxylase subunit of the complex. 2. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex has a Km for pyruvate within the range 17--36 microM depending on the pH, the optimum pH being approx. 7.4, with a V of approx. 0.1 unit/g of cells. The rate-limiting step is dependent on the transformation of the enzyme--substrate complex. The Km for CoA is 15 microM. The Km for NAD+ is 0.7 mM for both the complex and the lipoamide dehydrogenase. The complex is inhibited by acetyl-CoA competitively with CoA; the Ki is 60 microM. The lipoamide dehydrogenase is inhibited by NADH and NADPH competitively with NAD+, with Ki values of 80 and 90 microM respectively. In the reverse reaction the Km values for NADH and NADPH are essentially equal to their Ki values for the forward reaction, the V for the latter being 0.09 of that of the former. Hence the reaction rate of the complex in vivo is likely to be markedly affected by feedback isosteric inhibition by reduced nicotinamide nucleotides and possibly acetyl-CoA. PMID:7193456

  17. Threonine-Insensitive Homoserine Dehydrogenase From Soybean: Genomic Organization, Kinetic Mechanism, and In vivo Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspartate kinase (AK) and homoserine dehydrogenase (HSD) functions as key regulatory enzymes at branch points in the aspartate amino acid pathway and are feedback inhibited by threonine. In plants, the biochemical properties of AK and bifunctional AK-HSD enzymes have been characterized, but the mol...

  18. Potato tuber cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase genes: Biochemical properties, activity, and expression during tuber dormancy progression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enzymatic and biochemical properties of the proteins encoded by five potato cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKX)-like genes functionally expressed in yeast and the effects of tuber dormancy progression on StCKX expression and cytokinin metabolism were examined in meristems isolated from field-g...

  19. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity selects for the holoclone phenotype in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, R.E.; Haywood-Small, S.L.; Sisley, K.; Cross, N.A.

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolated ALDH{sup Hi} PC3 cells preferentially form primitive holoclone-type colonies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Primitive holoclone colonies are predominantly ALDH{sup Lo} but contain rare ALDH{sup Hi} cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Holoclone-forming cells are not restricted to the ALDH{sup Hi} population. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ALDH phenotypic plasticity occurs in PC3 cells (ALDH{sup Lo} to ALDH{sup Hi} and vice versa). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ALDH{sup Hi} cells are observed but very rare in PC3 spheroids grown in stem cell medium. -- Abstract: Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH) activity is considered to be a marker of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in many tumour models, since these cells are more proliferative and tumourigenic than ALDH{sup Lo} cells in experimental models. However it is unclear whether all CSC-like cells are within the ALDH{sup Hi} population, or whether all ALDH{sup Hi} cells are highly proliferative and tumourigenic. The ability to establish a stem cell hierarchy in vitro, whereby sub-populations of cells have differing proliferative and differentiation capacities, is an alternate indication of the presence of stem cell-like populations within cell lines. In this study, we have examined the interaction between ALDH status and the ability to establish a stem cell hierarchy in PC3 prostate cancer cells. We demonstrate that PC3 cells contain a stem cell hierarchy, and isolation of ALDH{sup Hi} cells enriches for the most primitive holoclone population, however holoclone formation is not restricted to ALDH{sup Hi} cells. In addition, we show that ALDH activity undergoes phenotypic plasticity, since the ALDH{sup Lo} population can develop ALDH{sup Hi} populations comparable to parental cells within 2 weeks in culture. Furthermore, we show that the majority of ALDH{sup Hi} cells are found within the least primitive paraclone population, which is circumvented by culturing PC3 cells as spheroids in

  20. Direct evidence for activity-dependent glucose phosphorylation in neurons with implications for the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anant B.; Lai, James C. K.; Chowdhury, Golam M. I.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Rothman, Douglas L.; Shulman, Robert G.; Behar, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    Previous 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments have shown that over a wide range of neuronal activity, approximately one molecule of glucose is oxidized for every molecule of glutamate released by neurons and recycled through astrocytic glutamine. The measured kinetics were shown to agree with the stoichiometry of a hypothetical astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle model, which predicted negligible functional neuronal uptake of glucose. To test this model, we measured the uptake and phosphorylation of glucose in nerve terminals isolated from rats infused with the glucose analog, 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) in vivo. The concentrations of phosphorylated FDG (FDG6P), normalized with respect to known neuronal metabolites, were compared in nerve terminals, homogenate, and cortex of anesthetized rats with and without bicuculline-induced seizures. The increase in FDG6P in nerve terminals agreed well with the increase in cortical neuronal glucose oxidation measured previously under the same conditions in vivo, indicating that direct uptake and oxidation of glucose in nerve terminals is substantial under resting and activated conditions. These results suggest that neuronal glucose-derived pyruvate is the major oxidative fuel for activated neurons, not lactate-derived from astrocytes, contradicting predictions of the original astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle model under the range of study conditions. PMID:24706914

  1. Growth and antioxidant activity of Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans DSM 771 cultivated in acetate or lactate containing media.

    PubMed

    Pawłowska-Cwiek, Lucyna; Pado, Ryszard

    2007-01-01

    Three independent 28 or 32-day stationary cultures of Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans DSM 771 strain were carried out under anoxic conditions in acetate or lactate-containing media. The acids were the sole carbon and energy sources in these media. During cultivation the turbidity (for calculation of cell division index) and hydrogen sulfide contents were determined in culture broth and reduced glutathione and protein concentrations were assayed in culture broth supernatant. In these three successive cultures, the bacterium initially grew much faster on lactate than on acetate. However, after two weeks of culture this difference disappeared and in fact the growth rate was higher on acetate than on lactate. The level of H2S formed (product of the dissimilatory pathway of sulfate reduction) demonstrated that this pathway was more effective when lactate was a carbon source and the average H2S concentration was from over 3-fold to about 9-fold greater in lactate than in acetate cultures. Also GSH (glutathione, product of the assimilatory sulfate reduction pathway) average level was about 2-fold higher in lactate-grown cultures. The high negative values of the correlation coefficients between GSH and O2 levels, especially during the first 4 days of cultivation, indicate that GSH is a very important antioxidizing extracellular agent of D. acetoxidans. The rapid increase in GSH level, preceding the release of H2S, indicates the metabolic priority of the assimilation pathway of sulfate reduction. For both carbon sources the highest coefficient of correlation was found between protein and H2S levels. These results suggest that hydrogen sulfide is bound by proteins (which contain cysteinyl residues) secreted by D. acetoxidans cells. Indicated way of H2S bounding could result in its accumulation. This coefficient of correlation increased gradually in the successive cultures. The ratio of H2S concentration to protein concentration increased gradually in the successive cultures

  2. [The effect of a water-soluble vitamins on the activity of some enzymes in diabetes].

    PubMed

    Petrov, S A; Danilova, A O; Karpov, L M

    2014-01-01

    Intramuscular injections of the vitamin complex containing: thiamine chloride (B1), riboflavin (B2), lipoic acid (N), calcium pantothenate (B5), pyridoxine hydrochloride (B6), folic acid (B9), ascorbic acid (C) can reduce the blood glucose level in serum of rats with alloxan diabetes, stabilize activity of some enzymes of energy metabolism, lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. PMID:25552500

  3. Behaviour of mesotrione in maize and soil system and its influence on soil dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Kaczynski, Piotr; Lozowicka, Bozena; Hrynko, Izabela; Wolejko, Elzbieta

    2016-11-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dissipation of mesotrione and effect on dehydrogenase activity (DHA) in maize and soil system. The paper for the first time describes behaviour of this herbicide applied at various doses (separately or in mixture with other herbicide) in acidic and alkaline environment. The experiments were conducted using the method randomized blocks in four repetition cycles. Chemical application in seven variants at recommended doses of herbicide were performed. The sample preparation was performed by a modified QuEChERS method and the concentrations of mesotrione in maize and soil were determined by the liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The limit of detection was 0.0005mgkg(-1) and quantification 0.001mgkg(-1). The dissipation of mesotrione were described according to first-order (FO) kinetics equation with R(2) were between 0.8794 and 0.9934. The initial deposit of herbicide in soil and maize was higher in an acidic environment (0.06-0.18mgkg(-1)). A positive correlation between an alkaline pH and the rate of dissipation in soil was observed. The results showed that the time after which 50% (DT50) of substance has been degraded was different for both plant and soil. DT50 for soil was within the range 3.2-6.0days and 2.9-4.4days, for the maize 3.9-4.8days and 3.4-4.5days in an alkaline and an acidic environment, respectively. Concentration of mesotrione at applicable MRL level of 0.05mgkg(-1) in maize was achieved at 0.5-5.9days and at proposed MRL of 0.01mgkg(-1) at 8.8-15.8days. The results indicate that the application of mesotrione affected on DHA in the soil. One day after application this herbicide, concentration of DHA in soil was lower than in control plots, but after 21days was observed trend of increasing DHA. PMID:27492351

  4. Lactate Stimulates IL-4 and IL-13 Production in Activated HuT-78 T Lymphocytes Through a Process That Involves Monocarboxylate Transporters and Protein Hyperacetylation.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Waldemar; Ciszewski, Wojciech; Kania, Katarzyna; Dastych, Jarosław

    2016-05-01

    Mucosal cells of the gastrointestinal and female reproductive tract are constantly exposed to l- and d-lactate of bacterial origin. These compounds not only protect the host from pathogen colonization but also modulate the activity of mucosal immune cells, thereby playing an important role in inflammatory host responses. In this study, we demonstrated that exposure of anti-CD3/CD28 or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)/ionomycin-activated HuT-78 T lymphocyte cells to 10-20 mM d-lactate significantly increased IL-4 and IL-13 production. Interestingly, the d-lactate isomer, exclusively produced locally by gut or cervicovaginal microbiota, was found to be more potent than the l-isomer. Interestingly, neither of the strong histone deacetylase inhibitors [structurally similar butyrate and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA)] was as effective in the stimulation of IL-13 production as d-lactate. Lactate transport through monocarboxylate transporters was required for lactate-enhanced IL-13 production in a manner that was not hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 1-dependent. Furthermore, lactate treatment increased the acetylation of GATA-3, a critical regulator of Th1/Th2 differentiation and resulted in H3 and H4 histone hyperacetylation state, which is a characteristic feature of transcriptionally active chromatin. Both lactate isomers also enhanced IL4 and IL13 promoter-driven activity of reporter constructs in murine and human cells. Together, these findings demonstrate that a local millimolar concentration of l- or d-lactate may play an important role in the modulation of inflammation-mediated processes. PMID:27119568

  5. Biological activity of pyrazole and imidazole-dehydroepiandrosterone derivatives on the activity of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Marisa; Posada, Alejandro; Sánchez-Márquez, Araceli; Heuze, Yvonne; Moreno, Isabel; Soriano, Juan; Garrido, Mariana; Cortés, Francisco; Bratoeff, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme type 5 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 5 (17β-HSD5) catalyzes the transformation of androstenedione (4-dione) to testosterone (T) in the prostate. This metabolic pathway remains active in cancer patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy. Since physicians seek to develop advantageous and better new treatments to increase the average survival of these patients, we synthesized several different dehydroepiandrosterone derivatives. These compounds have a pyrazole or imidazole function at C-17 and an ester moiety at C-3 and were studied as inhibitors of 17β-HSD5. The kinetic parameters of this enzyme were determined for use in inhibition assays. Their pharmacological effect was also determined on gonadectomized hamsters treated with Δ(4)-androstenedione (4-dione) or testosterone (T) and/or the novel compounds. The results indicated that the incorporation of a heterocycle at C-17 induced strong 17β-HSD5 inhibition. These derivatives decreased flank organ diameter and prostate weight in castrated hamsters treated with T or 4-dione. Inhibition of 17β-HSD5 by these compounds could have therapeutic potential for the treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:25690043

  6. Immunocapture and microplate-based activity and quantity measurement of pyruvate dehydrogenase in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaowen; Pervez, Hira; Andersen, Lars W; Uber, Amy; Montissol, Sophia; Patel, Parth; Donnino, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Background Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity is altered in many human disorders. Current methods require tissue samples and yield inconsistent results. We describe a modified method for measuring PDH activity from isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results/Methodology We found that PDH activity and quantity can be successfully measured in human PBMCs. Freeze-thaw cycles cannot efficiently disrupt the mitochondrial membrane. Processing time of up to 20 h does not affect PDH activity with proteinase inhibitor addition and a detergent concentration of 3.3% showed maximum yield. Sample protein concentration is correlated to PDH activity and quantity in human PBMCs from healthy subjects. Conclusion Measuring PDH activity from PBMCs is a novel, easy and less invasive way to further understand the role of PDH in human disease. PMID:25826140

  7. [Activity of NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in wheat leaves under water stress].

    PubMed

    Cherniad'ev, I I; Monakhova, O F

    2006-01-01

    The activities of NADP: glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), an enzyme complex comprising of phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) and glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPK; EC 4.1.1.31) in seedlings and leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants of the cultivars Mironovskaya 808 and Lutescens 758 have been compared under conditions of normal water supply, water deficiency, and subsequent rehydration. GAPDH activity, which determines the carbohydrate route of photosynthetic metabolism at the initial stages, is decreased by water stress to a greater extent than that of PEPK, on the activity of which non-carbohydrate metabolic pathways depend. Pretreatment of seedlings and mature plants with natural (6-benzylaminopurine) and synthetic (tidiazuron, kartolin-2, and kartolin-4) cytokinins attenuates the loss of enzyme activities during drought and facilitates their recovery within the period of rehydration; both effects are underlain by augmentation of reparation processes. The relative intensification of non-carbohydrate pathways of photosynthetic metabolism, observed under conditions of water deficiency, is accompanied by an increase in the osmotic pressure of cell sap. Possible mechanisms of this protector effect of cytokinin preparations are discussed. PMID:16878554

  8. Mitigation of Radiation-Induced Dermatitis by Activation of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Using Topical Alda-1 in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Shoucheng; Budas, Grant R.; Churchill, Eric N.; Chen, Che-Hong; Knox, Susan J.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2012-01-01

    Ning, S., Budas, G. R., Churchill, E. N., Chen, C., Knox, S. J. and Mochly-Rosen, D. Mitigation of Radiation-Induced Dermatitis by Activation of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Using Topical Alda-1 in Mice. Radiation-induced dermatitis is a debilitating clinical problem in cancer patients undergoing cancer radiation therapy. It is also a possible outcome of exposure to high levels of radiation due to accident or hostile activity. We report that activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) enzymatic activity using the allosteric agonist, Alda-1, significantly reduced 4-hydroxynonenal adducts accumulation, delayed the onset of radiation dermatitis and substantially reduced symptoms in a clinically-relevant model of radiation-induced dermatitis. Importantly, Alda-1 did not radioprotect tumors in mice. Rather, it increased the sensitivity of the tumors to radiation therapy. This is the first report of reactive aldehydes playing a role in the intrinsic radiosensitivity of normal and tumor tissues. Our findings suggest that ALDH2 represents a novel target for the treatment of radiation dermatitis without reducing the benefit of radiotherapy. PMID:22404739

  9. The effect of five fasciolicides on malate dehydrogenase activity and mortality of Fasciola gigantica, Fasciolopsis buski and Paramphistomum explanatum.

    PubMed

    Probert, A J; Sharma, R K; Singh, K; Saxena, R

    1981-06-01

    The effect of oxyclozanide, hexachlorophene, nitroxynil, rafoxanide and diamphenethide on malate dehydrogenase activity of homogenates of Fasciola gigantica, Fasciolopsis buski and Paramphistomum explanatum was investigated. The ratio of oxaloacetate reduction to malate oxidation in homogenates of Fasciola gigantica, Fasciolopsis buski and P. explanatum was 4.5:1, 3.6:1 and 5.2:1 respectively. Oxyclozanide and rafoxanide at 10(-3) M inhibited enzyme activity by 100% in homogenates from all three species while hexachlorophene at 10(-3) M also caused 100% inhibition in homogenates from Fasciola gagantica and P. explanatum but only 65% of malate oxidation in Fasciolopsis buski homogenates. Nitroxynil at 10(-3) M produced 60% inhibition in F. buski homogenates yet had little effect at this concentration on preparations from the other species. Little inhibition was seen with diamphenethide, even at high concentrations. Rapid death of Fasicola gigantica and P. explanatum resulted in vitro when 10(-3) M oxyclozanide, hexachlorophene, nitroxynil or rafoxanide, were added to the incubation medium. Fasciolopsis buski was killed by 10(-3) M oxyclozanide but at this concentration the remaining compounds only caused reduced activity. Assay of malate dehydrogenase following drug treatment in vitro failed to show any appreciable reduction in enzyme activity in Fasciola gigantica and P. explanatum but oxyclozanide and hexachlorophene produced inhibition in Fasciolopsis buski. The mode of action of these compounds is discussed. PMID:7264272

  10. Purification and Characterization of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase, 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase, and Glutathione Reductase from Rat Heart and Inhibition Effects of Furosemide, Digoxin, and Dopamine on the Enzymes Activities.

    PubMed

    Adem, Sevki; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2016-06-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate characterization and purification of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and glutathione reductase from rat heart and the inhibitory effect of three drugs. The purification of the enzymes was performed using 2',5'-ADP sepharose 4B affinity material. The subunit and the natural molecular weights were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. Biochemical characteristics such as the optimum temperature, pH, stable pH, and salt concentration were examined for each enzyme. Types of product inhibition and Ki values with Km and Vmax values of the substrates and coenzymes were determined. According to the obtained Ki and IC50 values, furosemide, digoxin, and dopamine showed inhibitory effect on the enzyme activities at low millimolar concentrations in vitro conditions. Dopamine inhibited the activity of these enzymes as competitive, whereas furosemide and digoxin inhibited the activity of the enzyme as noncompetitive. PMID:26820767

  11. Activity of hepatic but not skeletal muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase enzyme is depressed by intravenous glucose infusions in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Al-Trad, B; Wittek, T; Gäbel, G; Fürll, M; Reisberg, K; Aschenbach, J R

    2010-12-01

    A positive energy balance in dairy cows pre-partum may decrease hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) enzyme activity, which might contribute to disturbances of lipid metabolism post-partum. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether skeletal muscle CPT activity can also be downregulated during positive energy balance. Mid-lactating dairy cows were maintained on intravenous infusion of either saline (control) or glucose solutions that increased linearly over 24 days, remained at the 24-day level until day 28 and were suspended thereafter. Liver and skeletal muscle biopsies, as well as four diurnal blood samples, were taken on days 0, 8, 16, 24, and 32, representing infusion levels equivalent to 0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 0% of the net energy for lactation (NE(L)) requirement respectively. Glucose infusion increased serum insulin concentrations on day 16 and 24 while plasma glucose levels were increased at only a single time point on day 24. Serum beta-hydroxybutyric acid concentrations decreased between day 8 and 24; whereas changes in non-esterified fatty acids were mostly insignificant. Total lipid contents of liver and skeletal muscle were not affected by treatment. Hepatic CPT activity decreased with glucose infusion (by 35% on day 24) and remained decreased on day 32. Hepatic expression levels of CPT-1A and CPT-2 mRNA were not significantly altered but tended to reflect the changes in enzyme activity. In contrast to the liver, no effect of glucose infusion was observed on skeletal muscle CPT activity. We conclude that suppression of CPT activity by positive energy balance appears to be specific for the liver in mid-lactating dairy cows. PMID:20546068

  12. Carbon Dioxide Effects on Ethanol Production, Pyruvate Decarboxylase, and Alcohol Dehydrogenase Activities in Anaerobic Sweet Potato Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ling A.; Hammett, Larry K.; Pharr, David M.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of varied anaerobic atmospheres on the metabolism of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam.) roots was studied. The internal gas atmospheres of storage roots changed rapidly when the roots were submerged under water. O2 and N2 gases disappeared quickly and were replaced by CO2. There were no appreciable differences in gas composition among the four cultivars that were studied. Under different anaerobic conditions, ethanol concentration in the roots was highest in a CO2 environment, followed by submergence and a N2 environment in all the cultivars except one. A positive relationship was found between ethanol production and pyruvate decarboxylase activity from both 100% CO2-treated and 100% N2-treated roots. CO2 atmospheres also resulted in higher pyruvate decarboxylase activity than did N2 atmospheres. Concentrations of CO2 were higher within anaerobic roots than those in the ambient anaerobic atmosphere. The level of pyruvate decarboxylase and ethanol in anaerobic roots was proportional to the ambient CO2 concentration. The measurable activity of pyruvate decarboxylase that was present in the roots was about 100 times less than that of alcohol dehydrogenase. Considering these observations, it is suggested that the rate-limiting enzyme for ethanol biosynthesis in sweet potato storage roots under anoxia is likely to be pyruvate decarboxylase rather than alcohol dehydrogenase. PMID:16662798

  13. 3D-QSAR Studies on a Series of Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Inhibitors: Analogues of the Active Metabolite of Leflunomide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shun-Lai; He, Mao-Yu; Du, Hong-Guang

    2011-01-01

    The active metabolite of the novel immunosuppressive agent leflunomide has been shown to inhibit the enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH). This enzyme catalyzes the fourth step in de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. Self-organizing molecular field analysis (SOMFA), a simple three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) method is used to study the correlation between the molecular properties and the biological activities of a series of analogues of the active metabolite. The statistical results, cross-validated rCV2 (0.664) and non cross-validated r2 (0.687), show a good predictive ability. The final SOMFA model provides a better understanding of DHODH inhibitor-enzyme interactions, and may be useful for further modification and improvement of inhibitors of this important enzyme. PMID:21686163

  14. Triiodothyronine activates lactate oxidation without impairing fatty acid oxidation and improves weaning from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Kajimoto, Hidemi; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides a rescue for children with severe cardiac failure. We previously showed that triiodothyronine (T3) improves cardiac function by modulating pyruvate oxidation during weaning. This study was focused on fatty acid (FA) metabolism modulated by T3 for weaning from ECMO after cardiac injury. Methods: Nineteen immature piglets (9.1-15.3 kg) were separated into 3 groups with ECMO (6.5 hours) and wean: normal circulation (Group-C);transient coronary occlusion (10 minutes) followed by ECMO (Group-IR); and IR with T3 supplementation (Group-IR-T3). 13-Carbon labeled lactate, medium-chain and long-chain FAs were infused as oxidative substrates. Substrate fractional contribution to the citric acid cycle (FC) was analyzed by 13-Carbon nuclear magnetic resonance. Results: ECMO depressed circulating T3 levels to 40% baseline at 4 hours and were restored in Group-IR-T3. Group-IR decreased cardiac power, which was not fully restorable and 2 pigs were lost because of weaning failure. Group-IR also depressed FC-lactate, while the excellent contractile function and energy efficiency in Group-IR-T3 occurred along with a marked FC-lactate increase and [ATP]/[ADP] without either decreasing FC-FAs or elevating myocardial oxygen consumption over Group-C or -IR. Conclusions: T3 releases inhibition of lactate oxidation following ischemia-reperfusion injury without impairing FA oxidation. These findings indicate that T3 depression during ECMO is maladaptive, and that restoring levels improves metabolic flux and enhances contractile function during weaning.

  15. Effect of anthocyanin-rich corn silage on digestibility, milk production and plasma enzyme activities in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Kenji; Eruden, Bayaru; Matsuyama, Hiroki; Shioya, Shigeru

    2012-06-01

    Anthocyanin in purple corn (Zea mays L.) has been reported to show several functional and biological attributes, displaying antioxidant, antiobesity and antidiabetic effects in monogastric animals. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of feeding anthocyanin-rich corn (Zea mays L., Choko C922) silage on digestibility, milk production and plasma enzyme activities in lactating dairy cows. The cows were fed diets based on the control corn or the anthocyanin-rich corn silage (AR treatment) in a crossover design. The anthocyanin-rich corn silage-based diet had a lower starch content, nutrient digestibility and total digestible nutrients content when compared to the control diet. The milk yield, lactose and solids-not-fat contents in the AR-treatment cows were lower than in the control cows. The feeding of the anthocyanin-rich corn silage led to a reduction in aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity and an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the plasma. These data suggest that the anthocyanin-rich corn has a lowering effect on AST activity with concomitant enhancement of SOD activity in lactating dairy cows. However, a new variety of anthocyanin-rich corn with good nutritional value is needed for practical use as a ruminant feed. PMID:22694328

  16. Lactate Utilization Is Regulated by the FadR-Type Regulator LldR in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chao; Hu, Chunhui; Zheng, Zhaojuan; Jiang, Tianyi; Dou, Peipei; Zhang, Wen; Che, Bin; Wang, Yujiao; Lv, Min

    2012-01-01

    NAD-independent l-lactate dehydrogenase (l-iLDH) and NAD-independent d-lactate dehydrogenase (d-iLDH) activities are induced coordinately by either enantiomer of lactate in Pseudomonas strains. Inspection of the genomic sequences of different Pseudomonas strains revealed that the lldPDE operon comprises 3 genes, lldP (encoding a lactate permease), lldD (encoding an l-iLDH), and lldE (encoding a d-iLDH). Cotranscription of lldP, lldD, and lldE in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain XMG starts with the base, C, that is located 138 bp upstream of the lldP ATG start codon. The lldPDE operon is located adjacent to lldR (encoding an FadR-type regulator, LldR). The gel mobility shift assays revealed that the purified His-tagged LldR binds to the upstream region of lldP. An XMG mutant strain that constitutively expresses d-iLDH and l-iLDH was found to contain a mutation in lldR that leads to an Ile23-to-serine substitution in the LldR protein. The mutated protein, LldRM, lost its DNA-binding activity. A motif with a hyphenated dyad symmetry (TGGTCTTACCA) was identified as essential for the binding of LldR to the upstream region of lldP by using site-directed mutagenesis. l-Lactate and d-lactate interfered with the DNA-binding activity of LldR. Thus, l-iLDH and d-iLDH were expressed when the operon was induced in the presence of l-lactate or d-lactate. PMID:22408166

  17. Fermentation and alternative respiration compensate for NADH dehydrogenase deficiency in a prokaryotic model of DJ-1-associated Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Messaoudi, Nadia; Gautier, Valérie; Dairou, Julien; Mihoub, Mouhad; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Bouloc, Philippe; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Richarme, Gilbert

    2015-11-01

    YajL is the closest prokaryotic homologue of Parkinson's disease-associated DJ-1, a protein of undefined function involved in the oxidative stress response. We reported recently that YajL and DJ-1 protect cells against oxidative stress-induced protein aggregation by acting as covalent chaperones for the thiol proteome, including the NuoG subunit of NADH dehydrogenase 1, and that NADH dehydrogenase 1 activity is negligible in the yajL mutant. We report here that this mutant compensates for low NADH dehydrogenase activity by utilizing NADH-independent alternative dehydrogenases, including pyruvate oxidase PoxB and d-amino acid dehydrogenase DadA, and mixed acid aerobic fermentations characterized by acetate, lactate, succinate and ethanol excretion. The yajL mutant has a low adenylate energy charge favouring glycolytic flux, and a high NADH/NAD ratio favouring fermentations over pyruvate dehydrogenase and the Krebs cycle. DNA array analysis showed upregulation of genes involved in glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways and alternative respiratory pathways. Moreover, the yajL mutant preferentially catabolized pyruvate-forming amino acids over Krebs cycle-related amino acids, and thus the yajL mutant utilizes pyruvate-centred respiro-fermentative metabolism to compensate for the NADH dehydrogenase 1 defect and constitutes an interesting model for studying eukaryotic respiratory complex I deficiencies, especially those associated with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. PMID:26377309

  18. Reduction of d-lactate content in sauerkraut using starter cultures of recombinant Leuconostoc mesenteroides expressing the ldhL gene.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qing; Li, Ling; Moon, Jin Seok; Cho, Seung Kee; Kim, Yu Jin; Lee, Soo Jin; Han, Nam Soo

    2016-05-01

    The d-form of lactate, which causes metabolic stress upon excessive dietary intake, is mainly produced by Leuconostoc sp., the predominant species in sauerkraut. To shift the metabolic flux of d-lactate from pyruvate to l-lactate, we expressed the l-lactate dehydrogenase (ldhL) gene in Leuconostoc mesenteroides ATCC 8293. The ldhL gene from Lactobacillus plantarum was introduced into L. mesenteroides using the shuttle vectors pLeuCM and pLeuCM42. To elevate the expression level of ldhL in L. mesenteroides, the nucleotides for pyruvate kinase promoter were fused to ldhL and cloned into above vectors to construct pLC18pkL and pLC42pkL. As results, introduction of pLC42pkL in L. mesenteroides significantly improved both l-LDH activity and l-lactate productivity during fermentation, decreasing the d-/l-lactate ratio. When used as a starter culture for sauerkraut fermentation, recombinant L. mesenteroides harboring pLC42pkL increased l-lactate concentration and decreased d-lactate concentration compared to the wild type strain. We newly developed a recombinant L. mesenteroides which has high l-lactate dehydrogenase activity and applied this strain to minimize the harmful effect of d-lactate during the sauerkraut fermentation. To the best of our knowledge, we demonstrate for the first time the effective use of recombinant Leuconostoc sp. for quality improvement of fermented foods. PMID:26472127

  19. Enhanced photosynthetic performance and growth as a consequence of decreasing mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity in transgenic tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Carrari, Fernando; Lytovchenko, Anna; Smith, Anna M O; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers; Ratcliffe, R George; Sweetlove, Lee J; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2005-02-01

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants expressing a fragment of the mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase gene in the antisense orientation and exhibiting reduced activity of this isoform of malate dehydrogenase show enhanced photosynthetic activity and aerial growth under atmospheric conditions (360 ppm CO2). In comparison to wild-type plants, carbon dioxide assimilation rates and total plant dry matter were up to 11% and 19% enhanced in the transgenics, when assessed on a whole-plant basis. Accumulation of carbohydrates and redox-related compounds such as ascorbate was also markedly elevated in the transgenics. Also increased in the transgenic plants was the capacity to use L-galactono-lactone, the terminal precursor of ascorbate biosynthesis, as a respiratory substrate. Experiments in which ascorbate was fed to isolated leaf discs also resulted in increased rates of photosynthesis providing strong indication for an ascorbate-mediated link between the energy-generating processes of respiration and photosynthesis. This report thus shows that the repression of this mitochondrially localized enzyme improves both carbon assimilation and aerial growth in a crop species. PMID:15665243

  20. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) protein regulates long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase by deacetylating conserved lysines near the active site.

    PubMed

    Bharathi, Sivakama S; Zhang, Yuxun; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Uppala, Radha; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Schreiber, Emanuel; Uechi, Guy; Beck, Megan E; Rardin, Matthew J; Vockley, Jerry; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W; Hirschey, Matthew D; Goetzman, Eric S

    2013-11-22

    Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) is a key mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation enzyme. We previously demonstrated increased LCAD lysine acetylation in SIRT3 knockout mice concomitant with reduced LCAD activity and reduced fatty acid oxidation. To study the effects of acetylation on LCAD and determine sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) target sites, we chemically acetylated recombinant LCAD. Acetylation impeded substrate binding and reduced catalytic efficiency. Deacetylation with recombinant SIRT3 partially restored activity. Residues Lys-318 and Lys-322 were identified as SIRT3-targeted lysines. Arginine substitutions at Lys-318 and Lys-322 prevented the acetylation-induced activity loss. Lys-318 and Lys-322 flank residues Arg-317 and Phe-320, which are conserved among all acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and coordinate the enzyme-bound FAD cofactor in the active site. We propose that acetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 causes a conformational change which reduces hydride transfer from substrate to FAD. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9, two related enzymes with lysines at positions equivalent to Lys-318/Lys-322, were also efficiently deacetylated by SIRT3 following chemical acetylation. These results suggest that acetylation/deacetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 is a mode of regulating fatty acid oxidation. The same mechanism may regulate other acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. PMID:24121500

  1. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) Protein Regulates Long-chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase by Deacetylating Conserved Lysines Near the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Bharathi, Sivakama S.; Zhang, Yuxun; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Uppala, Radha; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Schreiber, Emanuel; Uechi, Guy; Beck, Megan E.; Rardin, Matthew J.; Vockley, Jerry; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W.; Hirschey, Matthew D.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2013-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) is a key mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation enzyme. We previously demonstrated increased LCAD lysine acetylation in SIRT3 knockout mice concomitant with reduced LCAD activity and reduced fatty acid oxidation. To study the effects of acetylation on LCAD and determine sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) target sites, we chemically acetylated recombinant LCAD. Acetylation impeded substrate binding and reduced catalytic efficiency. Deacetylation with recombinant SIRT3 partially restored activity. Residues Lys-318 and Lys-322 were identified as SIRT3-targeted lysines. Arginine substitutions at Lys-318 and Lys-322 prevented the acetylation-induced activity loss. Lys-318 and Lys-322 flank residues Arg-317 and Phe-320, which are conserved among all acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and coordinate the enzyme-bound FAD cofactor in the active site. We propose that acetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 causes a conformational change which reduces hydride transfer from substrate to FAD. Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9, two related enzymes with lysines at positions equivalent to Lys-318/Lys-322, were also efficiently deacetylated by SIRT3 following chemical acetylation. These results suggest that acetylation/deacetylation at Lys-318/Lys-322 is a mode of regulating fatty acid oxidation. The same mechanism may regulate other acyl-CoA dehydrogenases. PMID:24121500

  2. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase-4 Structures Reveal a Metastable Open Conformation Fostering Robust Core-free Basal Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wynn, R. Max; Kato, Masato; Chuang, Jacinta L.; Tso, Shih-Chia; Li, Jun; Chuang, David T.

    2008-10-21

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is down-regulated by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) isoforms 1-4. PDK4 is overexpressed in skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetes, resulting in impaired glucose utilization. Here we show that human PDK4 has robust core-free basal activity, which is considerably higher than activity levels of other PDK isoforms stimulated by the PDC core. PDK4 binds the L3 lipoyl domain, but its activity is not significantly stimulated by any individual lipoyl domains or the core of PDC. The 2.0-{angstrom} crystal structures of the PDK4 dimer with bound ADP reveal an open conformation with a wider active-site cleft, compared with that in the closed conformation epitomized by the PDK2-ADP structure. The open conformation in PDK4 shows partially ordered C-terminal cross-tails, in which the conserved DW (Asp{sup 394}-Trp{sup 395}) motif from one subunit anchors to the N-terminal domain of the other subunit. The open conformation fosters a reduced binding affinity for ADP, facilitating the efficient removal of product inhibition by this nucleotide. Alteration or deletion of the DW-motif disrupts the C-terminal cross-tail anchor, resulting in the closed conformation and the nearly complete inactivation of PDK4. Fluorescence quenching and enzyme activity data suggest that compounds AZD7545 and dichloroacetate lock PDK4 in the open and the closed conformational states, respectively. We propose that PDK4 with bound ADP exists in equilibrium between the open and the closed conformations. The favored metastable open conformation is responsible for the robust basal activity of PDK4 in the absence of the PDC core.

  3. Active dry Saccharomyces cerevisiae can alleviate the effect of subacute ruminal acidosis in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    AlZahal, O; Dionissopoulos, L; Laarman, A H; Walker, N; McBride, B W

    2014-12-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of active dry Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ADSC) supplementation on dry matter intake, milk yield, milk components, ruminal pH, and microbial community during a dietary regimen that leads to subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA). Sixteen multiparous, rumen-cannulated lactating Holstein cows were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 dietary treatments that included ADSC (Biomate; AB Vista, Marlborough, UK; 8 × 10(10) cfu/head per day) or control. During wk 1 to 6, all cows received a high-forage (HF) diet (77:23, forage:concentrate). Cows were then abruptly switched during wk 7 to a high-grain (HG) diet (49:51, forage:concentrate) and remained on the HG until the end of wk 10. Feed intake and milk yields were recorded daily. Ruminal pH was recorded continuously using an indwelling system for 1 to 2 d per week during the pre-experimental phase, and wk 6, 7, and 10. Ruminal digesta samples were collected at the end of the experiment and analyzed for relative change in microbial communities using real-time quantitative PCR. Cows were considered to have SARA if the duration below pH 5.6 was ≥300 min/d. Ruminal pH during wk 6 (HF plateau) was not different across treatments (15 ± 46 min/d at pH <5.6). The dietary regimen successfully induced SARA during wk 7 (transition from HF to HG diet), and ruminal pH (551 ± 46 min/d at pH <5.6) was not different across treatments. However, cows receiving ADSC had an improved ruminal pH (122 ± 57 vs. 321 ± 53 min/d at pH <5.6) during wk 10 (HG plateau) compared with control. Additionally, cows receiving ADSC had a better dry matter intake (23.3 ± 0.66 vs. 21.6 ± 0.61 kg/d) and 4% fat-corrected milk yield (29.6 ± 1.2 vs. 26.5 ± 1.2 kg/d) than control cows during the HG phase (wk 8 to 10). During HG feeding, cows receiving ADSC had greater total volatile fatty acid and propionate concentrations (175 ± 7.5 vs. 154 ± 7.5 and 117 ± 6.1 vs. 94 ± 5.7 mM for ADSC and control, respectively

  4. Bioinformatics based structural characterization of glucose dehydrogenase (gdh) gene and growth promoting activity of Leclercia sp. QAU-66

    PubMed Central

    Naveed, Muhammad; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Khalid, Nauman; Mumtaz, Abdul Samad

    2014-01-01

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