Science.gov

Sample records for activity learners follow

  1. Facilitating Active Learner Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Steven; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Project Participate has developed and implemented a model for making decisions about interventions that enhance the ability of a preschool child with severe motor disabilities to actively participate in educational programs. The effectiveness of the process in increasing child participation in play, communication, social interaction, and mobility…

  2. Language Learning Activities of Distance EFL Learners in the Turkish Open Education System as the Indicator of Their Learner Autonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altunay, Dilek

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the noncompulsory language learning activities performed by a group of distance EFL learners in the Turkish Open Education System. Performance of these activities has been considered as an indicator of their learner autonomy. The data were collected through an online questionnaire and interviews. The study shows that in…

  3. Interactions between and among Heritage Language Learners and Second Language Learners during Collaborative Writing Activities: How Learners Attend to Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walls, Laura

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the dynamics in the Spanish classroom between heritage language learner (HLL) dyads, second language learner (L2L) dyads, and mixed HLL-L2L dyads. Specifically, it examines oral, written and embodied discourse that informs our understanding of how learners attend to language. Analysis for this dissertation examined…

  4. Teaching Students to Be Active Learners; The Principal's Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson-Nasca, Donald

    1993-01-01

    Learning is not a spectator sport but requires active learners who integrate new experiences into existing cognitive structures. Principals can help students develop self-responsibility by initiating discussions on this topic, identifying and sharing multiple learning resources for student use, and modeling uses of assignments based on mastery…

  5. Does Translation Contribute to Learners' Free Active Vocabulary?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiyaban, Amir R.; Bagheri, Mohammad S.

    2012-01-01

    This research was conducted to find out whether or not using "translation" technique in vocabulary teaching would have any positive effects on the "free active" vocabulary of Iranian learners of English. To carry out the research, eighty-eight intermediate male and female students were chosen. The participants were divided into four "male…

  6. Creating Active Learners on Hawaiian Adventures through Project ALOHA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Claire; Anderson, Thomas; Sakuda, Katherine

    1998-01-01

    Describes an integrated curriculum project for fourth graders in a Hawaiian elementary school with a highly transient population. The project, ALOHA (Active Learners on Hawaiian Adventures) was developed to motivate students in learning about Hawaii's culture and ecosystems. Cooperation between the library media specialist, technology coordinator,…

  7. Methods for Evaluating Learner Activities with New Technologies: Guidelines for the Lab@Future Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwanza-Simwami, Daisy; Engestrom, Yrjo; Amon, Tomaz

    2009-01-01

    The task of evaluating learner activities with new technologies is becoming increasingly complex because traditional evaluation strategies do not adequately consider the unique and often dynamic characteristics of learners and activities carried out. Learner activities are largely driven by motives and relationships that exist in the context in…

  8. Acquisition of Mathematical Language: Suggestions and Activities for English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirillo, Michelle; Bruna, Katherine Richardson; Herbel-Eisenmann, Beth

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we describe aspects of mathematical language that could be problematic to English-language learners, provide recommendations for teaching English-language learners, and suggest activities intended to foster language development in mathematics. (Contains 1 figure.)

  9. Older Adult Learners: A Comparison of Active and Non-Active Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloane-Seale, Atlanta; Kops, Bill

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a 2004 follow-up study conducted in partnership with the University of Manitoba Continuing Education Division and local senior's organizations. The partnership was formed in 2002-03 to promote applied research on lifelong learning and older adults, develop new and complement existing educational activities, and explore new…

  10. Discovering Me: Music Activities for Special Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Keith P.; And Others

    The book contains information on musical activities which were field tested in Project PASE (Program in the Arts for Special Education, Pennsylvania) classrooms with a wide range of exceptionalities from preschool age to adolescence. Activities are seen to help children become more aware of their bodies, feelings, and themselves; feel important…

  11. Learners' Perceptions of Instructional Design Practice in a Situated Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, Nicholas; Quinn, James

    2009-01-01

    This case study investigated learners' perceptions of value from participating in a learning activity designed to model professional instructional design practice. Learners developed instructional design products for a corporate client in the context of a classroom-based course. The findings indicate that learners perceived different kinds of…

  12. A Follow-Up Study of the Facebook Project for Japanese University Students: Has It Been Enhancing Student Interaction, Learner Autonomy, and English Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamada, Mayumi

    2014-01-01

    This is a follow-up study of the Facebook (FB) project conducted from October 2011 to January 2013. The purpose of the project was to investigate how FB can help Japanese university students improve their English, and determine whether FB can facilitate student interaction and learner autonomy by integrating FB activities into English lessons. In…

  13. Does Active Learning Enhance Learner Outcomes? Evidence from Discussion Participation in Online Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Bruce M.; Pollock, Philip H.; Hamann, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    Discussion is one form of active learning, which has been linked to better learner outcomes. Little is known about the relationship between active learning through discussion and learner outcome in the online environment. Here, we construct an index of active learning online that includes the number of postings a student has read, the number of…

  14. Learners' Evaluations of Teacher-Fronted and Student-Centred Classroom Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Peter; Shortall, Terry

    2002-01-01

    Investigates language learners beliefs about their experiences with different types of classroom activities, specifically teacher-fronted activities and student-centered pairwork activities. Discusses the usefulness of studying learners' beliefs about their learning experiences, their perceptions of affective and learning outcomes from these…

  15. Cross-language activation in children's speech production: evidence from second language learners, bilinguals, and trilinguals.

    PubMed

    Poarch, Gregory J; van Hell, Janet G

    2012-03-01

    In five experiments, we examined cross-language activation during speech production in various groups of bilinguals and trilinguals who differed in nonnative language proficiency, language learning background, and age. In Experiments 1, 2, 3, and 5, German 5- to 8-year-old second language learners of English, German-English bilinguals, German-English-Language X trilinguals, and adult German-English bilinguals, respectively, named pictures in German and in English; in Experiment 4, 6- to 8-year-old German monolinguals named pictures in German. In both language conditions, cognate status was manipulated. We found that the bidirectional cognate facilitation effect was significant in all groups except the German monolinguals (Experiment 4) and, critically, the child second language learners (Experiment 1) in whom only native language (L1) German had an effect on second language (L2) English. The findings demonstrate how the integration of languages into a child's system follows a developmental path that, at lower levels of proficiency, allows only limited cross-language activation. The results are interpreted against the backdrop of the developing language systems of the children both for early second language learners and for early bi- and trilinguals. PMID:22138311

  16. How Do Distance Learners Use Activities in Self-Instructional Materials?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Sanjaya; Gaba, Ashok Kumar

    2001-01-01

    Presents results of a study on the use of learning activities in self-instructional materials by distance learners of the Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU). It shows that learners make use of the activities extensively as they have positive perceptions about benefits of Self-Assessment Questions and Terminal Questions given in the…

  17. The Child as an Active Learner: Views, Practices, and Barriers in Chinese Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Fengling

    2006-01-01

    The Chinese view of the child is in the process of changing from the dependent child of traditional Chinese society to the child as an active learner in contemporary China. The view of the child as an active learner forces early childhood practitioners to rethink the features of the child's learning and development, individuality, and needs and…

  18. Investigating Learner Attitudes toward E-Books as Learning Tools: Based on the Activity Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liaw, Shu-Sheng; Huang, Hsiu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of e-books as learning tools in terms of learner satisfaction, usefulness, behavioral intention, and learning effectiveness. Based on the activity theory approach, this research develops a research model to understand learner attitudes toward e-books in two physical sizes: 10? and 7?. Results suggest that screen…

  19. Transformational Processes and Learner Outcomes for Online Learning: An Activity Theory Case Study of Spanish Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terantino, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine the actions of online language learners from an activity theoretical perspective. It also attempted to explain how the students' learning outcomes evolved from their online learning experiences. This explanation placed an emphasis on the learners' previous experiences, defining their activity…

  20. Training Learners to Use Quizlet Vocabulary Activities on Mobile Phones in Vietnam with Facebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tran, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phone ownership among university students in Vietnam has reached almost 100%, exceeding that of Internet-capable desktop computers. This has made them increasingly popular to allow learners to carry out learning activities outside of the classroom, but some studies have suggested that learners are not always willing to engage in activities…

  1. Beginning Learners' Development of Interactional Competence: Alignment Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tecedor, Marta

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the development of interactional competence (Hall, 1993; He & Young, 1998) by beginning learners of Spanish as indexed by their use of alignment moves. Discourse analysis techniques and quantitative data analysis were used to explore how 52 learners expressed alignment and changes in participation patterns in two sets of…

  2. Automated Student and Adult Learner Follow-up System. Final Report for Program Year 1993-94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Occupational Information Coordinating Committee, Austin.

    The Texas Automated Student and Adult Learner Follow-Up System was developed as part of a larger effort to improve and coordinate the delivery of education and training of a skilled work force. The primary task of the Follow-Up System in Program Year 1993-94 was to obtain outcome information on the former students and participants of the work…

  3. Learners' Interpersonal Beliefs and Generated Feedback in an Online Role-Playing Peer-Feedback Activity: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Yu-Hui; Hsu, Yu-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Peer feedback affords interaction and critical thinking opportunities for learners in online courses. However, various factors prevent learners from taking advantage of these promising benefits. This study explored learners' perceptions of the interpersonal factors in a role-playing peer-feedback activity, and examined the types of peer feedback…

  4. Active Ageing and Universities: Engaging Older Learners. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillipson, Chris; Ogg, Jim

    2010-01-01

    This report reviews the engagement of older learners (defined as those aged 50 and over) in education and training with particular reference to their involvement in higher education. The ageing of populations was one of the most important trends in the 20th century and will raise major challenges in this century. Appended are: (1) Selected UK…

  5. A Development of Game-Based Learning Environment to Activate Interaction among Learners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaoka, Ryo; Shimokawa, Masayuki; Okamoto, Toshio

    Many studies and systems that incorporate elements such as “pleasure” and “fun” in the game to improve a learner's motivation have been developed in the field of learning environments. However, few are the studies of situations where many learners gather at a single computer and participate in a game-based learning environment (GBLE), and where the GBLE designs the learning process by controlling the interactions between learners such as competition, collaboration, and learning by teaching. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to propose a framework of educational control that induces and activates interaction between learners intentionally to create a learning opportunity that is based on the knowledge understanding model of each learner. In this paper, we explain the design philosophy and the framework of our GBLE called “Who becomes the king in the country of mathematics?” from a game viewpoint and describe the method of learning support control in the learning environment. In addition, we report the results of the learning experiment with our GBLE, which we carried out in a junior high school, and include some comments by a principal and a teacher. From the results of the experiment and some comments, we noticed that a game may play a significant role in weakening the learning relationship among students and creating new relationships in the world of the game. Furthermore, we discovered that learning support control of the GBLE has led to activation of the interaction between learners to some extent.

  6. What Does Metalinguistic Activity in Learners' Interaction during a Collaborative L2 Writing Task Look Like?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the metalinguistic activity that arose in the interaction of 7 groups of bilingual learners writing collaboratively in their second language (L2), English. A microanalysis of this interaction reveals that metalinguistic activity comprises 3 types of oral production: comments, speech actions, and text reformulations. Text…

  7. Discussion Activities To Increase Intercultural Communication Skills for Japanese Learners in EFL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kresovich, Brant M.

    1988-01-01

    The study describes ten discussion activities designed to improve the communicative abilities of Japanese learners of English based on cultural instruction goals. The activities target intermediate and advanced students, but teachers can modify the lessons for false beginners. All exercises stress speaking and listening. They focus on topics…

  8. Learner-Centered Activities from the DVD-Format "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Li-Yun

    This paper demonstrates how Taiwanese English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) college teachers and students collaborate and negotiate to design various learner-centered activities based on the Chinese film, "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon." These activities are intended to enhance students' listening and speaking abilities. The paper demonstrates eight…

  9. Inclusive Instructional Design: Creating a "Learner" Version of Instructional Design That Fosters Active Learner Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gropper, George L.

    2015-01-01

    The author notes: "A personal anecdote is an apt opening to this article. An assignment I once had called for assessing texts in a pre-med curriculum. In reviewing a calculus text, a subject in which I had no expertise then or now, I had trouble following an "explanation." I was able to identify where and why the text let me down.…

  10. 78 FR 11965 - Agency Information Collection (Learner's Perception (LP) Survey) Activities Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Learner's Perception (LP) Survey) Activities Under OMB Review...'s Perception (LP) Survey, VA Form 10-0439. OMB Control Number: 2900-0691. Type of Review: Extension... trainees perception of their clinical experience with VA versus non-VA facilities. VA will use the data...

  11. Flipping the Classroom for English Language Learners to Foster Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Hsiu-Ting

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a structured attempt to integrate flip teaching into language classrooms using a WebQuest active learning strategy. The purpose of this study is to examine the possible impacts of flipping the classroom on English language learners' academic performance, learning attitudes, and participation levels. Adopting a…

  12. Active Learning for Discovery and Innovation in Criminology with Chinese Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jessica C. M.; Wu, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Whereas a great deal of literature based upon the context of Western societies has concluded criminology is an ideal discipline for active learning approach, it remains uncertain if this learning approach is applicable to Chinese learners in the discipline of criminology. This article describes and provides evidence of the benefits of using active…

  13. An Emergent Language Program Framework: Actively Involving Learners in Needs Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, William; Storer, Graeme

    1992-01-01

    Relates the experience of the staff of an aquaculture outreach program in Northeast Thailand in implementing an English for special purposes program. By actively involving learners in both the needs analysis and program design, teachers were able to adapt the program content to the requirements of the students. (15 references) (JL)

  14. Synthesizing Technology Adoption and Learners' Approaches towards Active Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Kevin; Cheung, George; Wan, Kelvin; Brown, Ian; Luk, Green

    2015-01-01

    In understanding how active and blended learning approaches with learning technologies engagement in undergraduate education, current research models tend to undermine the effect of learners' variations, particularly regarding their styles and approaches to learning, on intention and use of learning technologies. This study contributes to further…

  15. A "Dialogic" Approach to the Design of a Transcultural Communication Classroom Activity for Multilingual Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Celia Helen

    2011-01-01

    When preparing teaching materials about communication between people from different linguistic backgrounds, many factors require consideration; these include theoretical orientation, purpose, context, educational needs, study level, as well as the cultural backgrounds of the teachers and their target learners. The classroom activity described in…

  16. Fashion Design: Designing a Learner-Active, Multi-Level High School Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Diane

    2009-01-01

    A high school fashion design teacher has much in common with the ringmaster of a three-ring circus. The challenges of teaching a hands-on course are to facilitate the entire class and to meet the needs of individual students. When teaching family and consumer sciences, the goal is to have a learner-active classroom. Revamping the high school's…

  17. Cross-Language Activation in Children's Speech Production: Evidence from Second Language Learners, Bilinguals, and Trilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poarch, Gregory J.; van Hell, Janet G.

    2012-01-01

    In five experiments, we examined cross-language activation during speech production in various groups of bilinguals and trilinguals who differed in nonnative language proficiency, language learning background, and age. In Experiments 1, 2, 3, and 5, German 5- to 8-year-old second language learners of English, German-English bilinguals,…

  18. Investigating the Use of Inquiry & Web-Based Activities with Inclusive Biology Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodzin, Alec M.; Waller, Patricia L.; Edwards, Lana; Darlene Kale, Santoro

    2007-01-01

    A Web-integrated biology program is used to explore how to best assist inclusive high school students to learn biology with inquiry-based activities. Classroom adaptations and instructional strategies teachers may use to assist in promoting biology learning with inclusive learners are discussed.

  19. The Efficacy of Some Proposed Activities For Developing Creative Thinking of English Learners at the Preparatory Stage (Second Year)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakr, Samira M.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of some proposed activities for developing creative thinking of English learners at the preparatory stage. The current study adopted the quasi- experimental design. Two groups of English learners were randomly chosen from one of Port- Said governmental preparatory schools. The experimental…

  20. Synergy between Authentic Assessment Activities and Learner Autonomy: How Does This Promote Shared Authenticity in Online Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gikandi, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish whether and how authentic assessment activities and learner autonomy converged to productively engage both the teacher and learners in shared authenticity. The study employed case study methodology to investigate the phenomena within an online course in ICT designed for continuing professionals in…

  1. Fluency-dependent cortical activation associated with speech production and comprehension in second language learners.

    PubMed

    Shimada, K; Hirotani, M; Yokokawa, H; Yoshida, H; Makita, K; Yamazaki-Murase, M; Tanabe, H C; Sadato, N

    2015-08-01

    This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigated the brain regions underlying language task performance in adult second language (L2) learners. Specifically, we identified brain regions where the level of activation was associated with L2 fluency levels. Thirty Japanese-speaking adults participated in the study. All participants were L2 learners of English and had achieved varying levels of fluency, as determined by a standardized L2 English proficiency test, the Versant English Test (Pearson Education Inc., 2011). When participants performed the oral sentence building task from the production tasks administered, the dorsal part of the left inferior frontal gyrus (dIFG) showed activation patterns that differed depending on the L2 fluency levels: The more fluent the participants were, the more dIFG activation decreased. This decreased activation of the dIFG might reflect the increased automaticity of a syntactic building process. In contrast, when participants performed an oral story comprehension task, the left posterior superior temporal gyrus (pSTG) showed increased activation with higher fluency levels. This suggests that the learners with higher L2 fluency were actively engaged in post-syntactic integration processing supported by the left pSTG. These data imply that L2 fluency predicts neural resource allocation during language comprehension tasks as well as in production tasks. This study sheds light on the neural underpinnings of L2 learning by identifying the brain regions recruited during different language tasks across different modalities (production vs. comprehension). PMID:26026679

  2. Listening and Speaking Activities for Foreign Language Learners: Second Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, James M.

    The 30 listening and speaking activities in this collection are designed to motivate students to use foreign languages for communicating their ideas and to encourage students to be creative. The criteria for including the activities were: (1) proven effectiveness toward improving students' oral language proficiency; (2) ease of adaptability to any…

  3. Sharing a Small World: Environmental Activities for Young Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zero Population Growth, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This booklet contains a collection of activities developed for pre-K through second grade students. All of the activities in this teacher's guide use an interdisciplinary approach and explore the human connection with all living things and their environment. Contents include: (1) "Sharing Space and Working Together"; (2) "Sharing Resources and…

  4. The Slow Learner in Mathematics: Aids and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maletsky, Evan M.

    1973-01-01

    Specific examples of effective use of multisensory aids are given. All can easily and inexpensively be made by the teacher or the students. Examples are grouped under the following major headings: number patterns, arithmetic skills, geometric concepts, algebraic concepts, and models. (LS)

  5. The effect of curricular activities on learner autonomy: the perspective of undergraduate mechanical engineering students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, M.; Leite, C.; Mouraz, A.

    2016-01-01

    This study researches how first-year engineering students perceived the influence of curricular activities on their own learning autonomy, measured with an adaptation of the Personal Responsibility Orientation to Self-direction in Learning Scale (PRO-SDLS). Participants were questioned to assess the influence of the teacher's role. The results indicate that learners' characteristics (motivation and self-efficacy) contribute more to learner autonomy (LA) than the teaching-learning transaction (control and initiative), as in the original PRO-SDLS validation. The most autonomous learners presented higher values in all LA components and dimensions, but the differences were greater in motivation and initiative. The participants with higher LA were not as dependent on the teacher, regarding assessment, the completion of classroom tasks and deadlines. Regardless of the degree of autonomy in learning, all participants viewed teachers as the main source of information. Therefore, LA plays an important role in teaching activities planning. Suggestions for adjustments and more flexible learning scenarios are formulated.

  6. Model Eliciting Activities: Fostering 21st Century Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stohlmann, Micah

    2013-01-01

    Real world mathematical modeling activities can develop needed and valuable 21st century skills. The knowledge and skills to become adept at mathematical modeling need to develop over time and students in the elementary grades should have experiences with mathematical modeling. For this to occur elementary teachers need to have positive…

  7. Total Participation Techniques: Making Every Student an Active Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himmele, Persida; Himmele, William

    2011-01-01

    Yes, there are easy-to-use and incredibly effective alternatives to the "stand and deliver" approach to teaching that causes so many students to tune out--or even drop out. Here's your opportunity to explore dozens of ways to engage K-12 students in active learning and allow them to demonstrate the depth of their knowledge and understanding. The…

  8. Active Lessons for Active Brains: Teaching Boys and Other Experiential Learners, Grades 3-10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Abigail Norfleet; Allison, Sandra Boyd; McKenzie, Caitlin Zimmerman

    2011-01-01

    If you're tired of repeating yourself to students who aren't listening, try a little less talk and a lot more action. The authors follow the best-selling "Teaching the Male Brain and Teaching the Female Brain" with this ready-to-use collection of mathematics, language arts, science, and classroom management strategies. Designed for active,…

  9. Innovative Strategies for Empowering Your Students to Become Active, Responsible Learners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufnagel, B.

    2011-09-01

    The economy continues to sputter along, and the repercussions are now hitting hard at publicly-funded colleges and universities, with enrollment increasing and funding decreasing. Funding agencies are starting to look at retention and completion rates as a way to allocate scarce dollars. Improving these rates is also one way to increase the future stream of tuition; students who can't pass introductory classes like ASTRO101 won't enroll and pay tuition for the next level, and they won't complete their degree. So what can you, a mere professor of astronomy, do? Tired of the "What do you want me to know?" questions? Provide your students with learner-centered structures to help them learn more deeply. Do your students resist active-engagement techniques and hate group work? Share empowerment strategies for helping students become active, responsible learners who can thrive in a learner-centered environment. Do you think that it's wrong for the freshman classes to be over-crowded, yet your sophomore classes don't get enough students or don't even exist? After using the proven curriculum of On Course, college and universities across the country have improved their retention across a wide range of disciplines (http://www.OnCourseWorkshop.com/Data.htm). Experience a sample of the fun and engaging activities developed over two decades to help students (1) accept personal responsibility, (2) discover self motivation, (3) master self-management, (4) use interdependence, (5) gain self-awareness, (6) adopt lifelong learning, (7) develop emotional intelligence, and (8) believe in themselves. Since this is only a one-hour workshop, we will focus on choices one and four: to be successful, students need to see themselves as the primary cause of their outcomes and experiences and to build mutually supportive relationships in our classroom and labs. Outcomes: (1) one ASTRO101 Course-ready activity to help students accept personal responsibility; (2) one ASTRO101 Course

  10. [Daily life activities following cerebrovascular infarct].

    PubMed

    Pradat-Diehl, Pascale; Peskine, Anne

    2006-09-15

    Cerebro-vascular disease is the first cause of handicap in France. Disabilities in daily life activities are due to motor, visual and cognitive impairments following a stroke. Difficulties arise while grooming, getting dressed, eating, moving around ... the WHO presents with a new classification of functioning, that has been followed by a recent law in France. The aim is to place the handicapped citizen in daily life and not just to list his/her deficiencies. Rehabilitation after stroke has to establish functional objectives early so as to include daily life goals in re-education. PMID:17002070

  11. The Impact of Vocabulary Enhancement Activities on Vocabulary Acquisition and Retention among Male and Female EFL Learners in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharafi-Nejad, Maryam; Raftari, Shohreh; Bijami, Maryam; Khavari, Zahra; Ismail, Shaik Abdul Malik Mohamed; Eng, Lin Siew

    2014-01-01

    In general, incidental vocabulary acquisition is represented as the "picking up" of new vocabularies when students are engaged in a variety of reading, listening, speaking, or writing activities. Research has shown when learners read extensively incidental vocabulary acquisition happens. Many EFL students cannot be involved in reading…

  12. MAI (Multi-Dimensional Activity Based Integrated Approach): A Strategy for Cognitive Development of the Learners at the Elementary Stage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basantia, Tapan Kumar; Panda, B. N.; Sahoo, Dukhabandhu

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive development of the learners is the prime task of each and every stage of our school education and its importance especially in elementary state is quite worth mentioning. Present study investigated the effectiveness of a new and innovative strategy (i.e., MAI (multi-dimensional activity based integrated approach)) for the development of…

  13. Comparison of the Effects of Reflection and Contemplation Activities on Service-Learners' Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Trae; Alrutz, Megan

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the extent to which service-learners' mindfulness is affected by engagement in reflection (e.g., dialogue) and contemplation activities (e.g., labyrinth tracing). The results are compared within and between treatment groups, while covarying for participants' initial levels of mindfulness. While both dialogue and…

  14. From Passive to Active Learners: The "Lived Experience" of Nurses in a Specialist Nephrology Nursing Education Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridger, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore the lived experience of learning for a group of staff nurses in the Middle East, who undertook a post-registration nursing education programme in the speciality of nephrology nursing (the NNP) between 2001 and 2002. The broad-based curriculum seeks to develop the staff nurses into active learners, able to…

  15. When Are Powerful Learning Environments Effective? The Role of Learner Activities and of Students' Conceptions of Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerjets, Peter H.; Hesse, Friedrich W.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this chapter is to outline a theoretical and empirical perspective on how learners' conceptions of educational technology might influence their learning activities and thereby determine the power of computer-based learning environments. Starting with an introduction to the concept of powerful learning environments we outline how recent…

  16. Identifying and Enhancing the Strengths of Gifted Learners, K-8: Easy-to-Use Activities and Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maccagnano, Ann Marie

    2007-01-01

    Educators can identify children's strengths early on and gain insight into each student's unique abilities by using the numerous ideas and informal assessments in this exciting guide. Gifted and talented specialist Ann Maccagnano offers K-8 teachers challenging activities and engaging lessons to develop and nurture gifted learners' talents.…

  17. Development of Reading Skills from K-3 in Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners Following Three Programs of Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamoto, Jonathan; Lindsey, Kim A.; Manis, Franklin R.

    2012-01-01

    The development of English and Spanish reading and oral language skills from kindergarten to third grade was examined with a sample of 502 Spanish-speaking English language learners (ELLs) enrolled in three instructional programs. The students in the transitional bilingual and dual-language programs had significantly higher scores than the…

  18. The Lifelong Learner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Ronald

    Designed to provide a general guide and stimuli for lifelong learning, this book examines all the positive factors of independent study. Lifelong learning is defined as self-directed growth free from the traditional schooling procedures. Chapters discuss the following: the lifelong learner; profiles of such learners in action; how to be…

  19. CALL and the Development of Learner Autonomy: Towards an Activity-Theoretical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blin, Francoise

    2004-01-01

    While the concepts and principles associated with learner autonomy underpin a broad range of CALL applications and research projects, current debates and research paradigms in CALL do not provide adequate tools and models to investigate in depth the relationship between CALL and the development of learner autonomy. This paper explores the…

  20. Elementary School EFL Learners' Vocabulary Learning: The Effects of Post-Reading Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atay, Derin; Kurt, Gokce

    2006-01-01

    As language learning involves the acquisition of thousands of words, teachers and learners alike would like to know how vocabulary learning can be fostered, especially in EFL settings where learners frequently acquire impoverished lexicons, despite years of formal study. Research indicates that reading is important but not sufficient for…

  1. Using Web-Based Instruction to Promote Active Learning: Learners' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lina

    2005-01-01

    This article reports classroom research on learners' perspectives on Web-based instruction that utilizes the "Blackboard" course management system. The Web-based instruction aims to provide and support collaborative learning while fostering learners' autonomy and accountability. The article also provides a description of the course design along…

  2. Cardiovascular function following reduced aerobic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raven, P. B.; Welch-O'Connor, R. M.; Shi, X.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a sustained reduction of physical activity (deconditioning) would alter the cardiovascular regulatory function. METHODS: Nineteen young, healthy volunteers participated in physical deconditioning for a period of 8 wk. Before (pre) and following (post) physical deconditioning, the responses of heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP, measured by Finapres), central venous pressure (CVP), stroke volume (SV, Doppler), and forearm blood flow (FBF, plethysmography) were determined during lower body negative pressure (LBNP). The carotid baroreflex (CBR) function was assessed using a train of pulsatile neck pressure (NP) and suction, and the aortic baroreflex control of HR was assessed during steady-state phenylephrine (PE) infusion superimposed by LBNP and NP to counteract the PE increased CVP and carotid sinus pressure, respectively. RESULTS: Active physical deconditioning significantly decreased maximal oxygen uptake (-7%) and LBNP tolerance (-13%) without a change in baseline hemodynamics. Plasma volume (-3% at P = 0.135), determined by Evans Blue dilution, and blood volume (-4% at P = 0.107) were not significantly altered. During LBNP -20 to -50 torr, there was a significantly greater drop of SV per unit decrease in CVP in the post- (14.7 +/- 1.6%/mm Hg) than predeconditioning (11.2 +/- 0.7%/mm Hg) test accompanied by a greater tachycardia. Deconditioning increased the aortic baroreflex sensitivity (pre vs post: -0.61 +/- 0.12 vs -0.84 +/- 0.14 bpm.mm-1 Hg, P = 0.009) and the slope of forearm vascular resistance (calculated from [MAP-CVP]/FBF) to CVP (-2.75 +/- 0.26 vs -4.94 +/- 0.97 PRU/mm Hg, P = 0.086). However, neither the CBR-HR (-0.28 +/- 0.03 VS -0.39 +/- 0.10 bpm.mm-1 Hg) nor the CBR-MAP (-0.37 +/- 0.16 vs -0.25 +/- 0.07 mm Hg/mm Hg) gains were statistically different between pre- and postdeconditioning. CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that the functional modification of the cardiac pressure

  3. Investigative Research: How It Changes Learner Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Brian

    1993-01-01

    What matters about an educational activity is how learners respond to it. This article examines a program concerned with the learners' needs, through the expression of learners' own meanings, and advances the concept of investigative research as a suitable vehicle for more autonomous learning, through a change in learner status. (26 references)…

  4. Air Activation Following an Atmospheric Explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Gesh, Christopher J.

    2013-03-13

    In addition to thermal radiation and fission products, nuclear explosions result in a very high flux of unfissioned neutrons. Within an atmospheric nuclear explosion, these neutrons can activate the various elemental components of natural air, potentially adding to the radioactive signature of the event as a whole. The goal of this work is to make an order-of-magnitude estimate of the total amount of air activation products that can result from an atmospheric nuclear explosion.

  5. Building a Tool to Help Teachers Analyse Learners' Interactions in a Networked Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petropoulou, O.; Altanis, I.; Retalis, S.; Nicolaou, C. A.; Kannas, C.; Vasiliadou, M.; Pattis, Ireneos

    2010-01-01

    Educators participating in networked learning communities have very little support from integrated tools in evaluating students' learning activities flow and examining learners' online behaviour. There is a need for non-intrusive ways to monitor learners' progress in order better to follow their learning process and appraise the online course…

  6. Enhanced interleukin activity following asbestos inhalation.

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, D P; Georgian, M M; Oghiso, Y; Kagan, E

    1984-01-01

    Asbestos inhalation can cause pulmonary fibrosis and is associated with a variety of immunological abnormalities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of asbestos inhalation on interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) production in a rodent model. Two groups of rats were exposed, by intermittent inhalation, to either amphibole (crocidolite) or serpentine (chrysotile) asbestos. A third (control) group of rats was sham exposed to clean air. Animals from the three exposure groups were thereafter immunized (or not immunized) with fetal calf serum antigens. In order to assay interleukin activity, supernatants were generated from cultures containing alveolar macrophages and autologous splenic lymphocytes, and from cultures containing alveolar macrophages alone. Using assay systems designed to detect IL-1 and IL-2 functional activity, the supernatants were evaluated for their capacity to stimulate lymphoproliferation and fibroblast DNA synthesis. Macrophage-lymphocyte co-culture supernatants, when obtained from immunized, asbestos exposed rats, contained greater IL-1 and IL-2 activity than identical supernatants from immunized, sham exposed animals. These between group differences were not, however, observed in supernatants from unimmunized rats, or when supernatants were generated in the absence of immune lymphocytes. These observations suggest that asbestos exposure is associated with enhanced activation of lymphocytes by antigens. The possible relevance of these findings to asbestos related fibrogenesis and immunological stimulation is discussed. PMID:6608427

  7. Impact of Consciousness-Raising Activities on Young English Language Learners' Grammar Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemipour, Hamidreza; Hemmati, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    Grammar Consciousness-Raising (GCR) is an approach to teaching of grammar which learners instead of being taught the given rules, experience language data. The data challenge them to rethink, restructure their existing mental grammar and construct an explicit rule to describe the grammatical feature which the data illustrate (Ellis, 2002). And…

  8. Fostering Active Processing of Instructional Explanations of Learners with High and Low Prior Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acuna, Santiago R.; Garcia Rodicio, Hector; Sanchez, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Despite the potential advantages of instructional explanations, evidence indicates that they are usually ineffective. Subsequent work has shown that in order to make instructional explanations effective indeed, one successful strategy is to combine them with indications of the limitations in learners' understanding that they are intended to…

  9. Developing Learners' Second Language Communicative Competence through Active Learning: Clickers or Communicative Approach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agbatogun, Alaba Olaoluwakotansibe

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of clickers, the communicative approach and the lecture method on the communicative competence development of learners who were taught English a second language (ESL). Ninety nine pupils from three primary schools participated in the study. Quasi-experimental non-randomised pre-test posttest…

  10. An Analysis of Spanish L2 Learners' Orientation through Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tocaimaza-Hatch, C. Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Orientation is defined as the way in which individuals view a task and the means they devise to fulfill it (Appel & Lantolf, 1994; Roebuck, 2000). This study investigated the orientation of twelve learners enrolled in a fourth-semester Spanish L2 university course through the analysis of their interactions during a collaborative…

  11. Online Social Networks as Formal Learning Environments: Learner Experiences and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veletsianos, George; Navarrete, Cesar C.

    2012-01-01

    While the potential of social networking sites to contribute to educational endeavors is highlighted by researchers and practitioners alike, empirical evidence on the use of such sites for formal online learning is scant. To fill this gap in the literature, we present a case study of learners' perspectives and experiences in an online course…

  12. The effects of data-driven learning activities on EFL learners' writing development.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qinqin

    2016-01-01

    Data-driven learning has been proved as an effective approach in helping learners solve various writing problems such as correcting lexical or grammatical errors, improving the use of collocations and generating ideas in writing, etc. This article reports on an empirical study in which data-driven learning was accomplished with the assistance of the user-friendly BNCweb, and presents the evaluation of the outcome by comparing the effectiveness of BNCweb and a search engine Baidu which is most commonly used as reference resource by Chinese learners of English as a foreign language. The quantitative results about 48 Chinese college students revealed that the experimental group which used BNCweb performed significantly better in the post-test in terms of writing fluency and accuracy, as compared with the control group which used the search engine Baidu. However, no significant difference was found between the two groups in terms of writing complexity. The qualitative results about the interview revealed that learners generally showed a positive attitude toward the use of BNCweb but there were still some problems of using corpora in the writing process, thus the combined use of corpora and other types of reference resource was suggested as a possible way to counter the potential barriers for Chinese learners of English. PMID:27536538

  13. Activities for Challenging Gifted Learners by Increasing Complexity in the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeone, Alyssa; Caruso, Lenora; Bettle, Kailyn; Chase, Ashley; Bryson, Bridget; Schneider, Jean S.; Rule, Audrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Gifted learners need opportunities for critical and creative thinking to stretch their minds and imaginations. Strategies for increasing complexity in the four core areas of language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies were addressed using the Common Core and Iowa Core Standards through several methods. Descriptive adjective object…

  14. Mathematics Learning with Multiple Solution Methods: Effects of Types of Solutions and Learners' Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Große, Cornelia S.

    2014-01-01

    It is commonly suggested to mathematics teachers to present learners different methods in order to solve one problem. This so-called "learning with multiple solution methods" is also recommended from a psychological point of view. However, existing research leaves many questions unanswered, particularly concerning the effects of…

  15. Using Netbooks to Support Mobile Learners' Investigations across Activities and Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaved, Mark; Collins, Trevor; Mulholland, Paul; Kerawalla, Lucinda; Jones, Ann; Scanlon, Eileen; Littleton, Karen; Blake, Canan; Petrou, Marilena; Clough, Gill; Twiner, Alison

    2010-01-01

    We explore how small-format laptops ("netbooks") have been used within evidence-based investigations undertaken by secondary school students, to what extent these are suitable for effectively supporting learners across different locations and contexts, and their implications for open learning. Over the course of seven trials with 300 students and…

  16. Spreading Dynamics Following Bursty Activity Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Alexei

    The dynamics of many social, technological and economic phenomena are driven by individual human actions, turning the quantitative understanding of human behavior into a central question of modern science. Recent empirical evidence indicates that the timing of individual human actions follow non-Poisson statistics, characterized by bursts of rapidly occurring events separated by long periods of inactivity. In this work we analyze how this bursty dynamics impacts the dynamics of spreading processes in computer and social systems. We demonstrate that the non-Poisson nature of the contact dynamics results in prevalence decay times significantly larger than predicted by the standard Poisson process based models. Thanks to this slow dynamics the spreading entity, namely a virus, rumor, etc., can persist in the system for long times.

  17. Life Skills Resource Guide for Senior Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon County Schools, Tallahassee, FL.

    This life resources guide for senior adult learners contains activities in the life skills curriculum. The manual is organized by content area and instructional goal. Under each instructional goal, one or more activities is given. A list of resources is at the end of each section. The activities cover the following topics: (1) consumer education;…

  18. The Adult Learner: Four Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, John A., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Topics concerning the adult learner that are relevant to institutional researchers are addressed in four articles: marketing, predicting success for adult students, enrollment projection, and follow-up studies of adult learners. In "Institutional Research in Support of Marketing the Adult Student," Lydia Jurand notes the importance of identifying…

  19. The Role of Private Speech in Cognitive Regulation of Learners: The Case of English as a Foreign Language Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarab, Mohamad Reza Anani; Gordani, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Investigations into the use of private speech by adult English foreign language (EFL) learners in regulating their mental activities have been an interesting area of research with a sociocultural framework. Following this line of research, 30 advanced adult EFL learners were selected via the administration of Oxford quick placement test and took a…

  20. Using What Learners Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary; Adams, Sharon

    2000-01-01

    This issue of "TAP into Learning" focuses on technology-assisted learning activities for students, in particular on those that use spreadsheets. Articles include: "Using What Learners Know"; "Activity: Grade 7 and 8 Math, Social Studies and Language Arts"; "Managing Growth: Collaborative Decision-Making in Urban Planning"; "Spreadsheets"; "Getting…

  1. Participatory Multimedia Learning: Engaging Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiili, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a participatory multimedia learning model for use in designing multimedia learning environments that support an active learning process, creative participation, and learner engagement. Participatory multimedia learning can be defined as learning with systems that enable learners to produce part of the…

  2. School Learners & Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Jenni, Ed.

    This document presents papers from a conference held in November 1995 in Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, convened by the Education Policy Unit (EPU) of the University of Natal as part of research concerning the provision of library-based resources for school learners. Following an introduction are two chapters: "Identifying the Inherited Problems in the…

  3. The Development and Evaluation of an Achievement Test for Measuring the Efficacy of Task-Based Writing Activities to Enhance Iranian EFL Learners' Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nejad, Ferdows Mohsen; Khosravian, Fereshteh

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the reliability of an achievement test to measure the efficacy of task-based writing activities to improve Iranian EFL learners' reading comprehension at the intermediate level in a private language institute in Ilam, Iran, namely Alefba language institute. To achieve the goal, the techniques for evaluating reliability…

  4. Effects of an Online Learning Community on Active and Reflective Learners' Learning Performance and Attitudes in a Face-to-Face Undergraduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhan, Zehui; Xu, Fuyin; Ye, Huiwen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an Online Learning Community (OLC) on active and reflective learners' learning performance and attitude in a face-to-face undergraduate digital design course. 814 freshmen in an introductory digital design course were randomly assigned to one of two treatments: one offered students an OLC,…

  5. The Effects of Pragmatic Consciousness-Raising Activities on the Development of Pragmatic Awareness and Use of Hearsay Evidential Markers for Learners of Japanese as a Foreign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narita, Ritsuko

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates the effectiveness of pragmatic consciousness-raising (PCR) activities in the L2 pragmatic acquisition of hearsay evidential markers by learners of Japanese as a foreign language (JFL). PCR is essentially an inductive approach to facilitating awareness of how language forms are used appropriately in a given context.…

  6. Reaching English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    In the authors' science classroom, students who are English Language Learners (ELL) seem to struggle less than they do with other content areas. She believes the "handson" nature of science motivates and encourages students to interact with others. This interaction spurs conversation among the students involved in the activity. If a child is…

  7. "Dealing With" Unexpected Learner Contributions in Whole Group Activities: An Examination of Novice Language Teacher Discursive Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Drew S.

    2012-01-01

    The current paper examines the discursive practices of one novice English as a Second Language (ESL) teacher "dealing with" learners' unexpected contributions in whole group classroom interactions during teacher- and learner-initiated sequences-of-talk. The study draws from two fields of research: classroom discourse studies…

  8. Curriculum Guides: Programming for the Adult Mentally Handicapped Learner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klugerman, Phyllis B., Ed.; Toye, Bernadette, Ed.

    This volume includes a series of curricula designed specifically for adult mentally handicapped learners. Addressed in the individual curricula are the following topics: basic skills; bicycle maintenance and repair; manual wheelchair maintenance and repair; personal awareness; social, recreational, and art activity groups; woodworking; and…

  9. Exploring Shifts in Middle School Learners' Modeling Activity While Generating Drawings, Animations, and Computational Simulations of Molecular Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson-Jerde, Michelle H.; Gravel, Brian E.; Macrander, Christopher A.

    2015-04-01

    Modeling and using technology are two practices of particular interest to K-12 science educators. These practices are inextricably linked among professionals, who engage in modeling activity with and across a variety of representational technologies. In this paper, we explore the practices of five sixth-grade girls as they generated models of smell diffusion using drawing, stop-motion animation, and computational simulation during a multi-day workshop. We analyze video, student discourse, and artifacts to address the questions: In what ways did learners' modeling practices, reasoning about mechanism, and ideas about smell shift as they worked across this variety of representational technologies? And, what supports enabled them to persist and progress in the modeling activity? We found that the girls engaged in two distinct modeling cycles that reflected persistence and deepening engagement in the task. In the first, messing about, they focused on describing and representing many ideas related to the spread of smell at once. In the second, digging in, they focused on testing and revising specific mechanisms that underlie smell diffusion. Upon deeper analysis, we found these cycles were linked to the girls' invention of "oogtom," a representational object that encapsulated many ideas from the first cycle and allowed the girls to restart modeling with the mechanistic focus required to construct simulations. We analyze the role of activity design, facilitation, and technological infrastructure in this pattern of engagement over the course of the workshop and discuss implications for future research, curriculum design, and classroom practice.

  10. Cortical motor activation patterns following hand transplantation and replantation.

    PubMed

    Brenneis, C; Löscher, W N; Egger, K E; Benke, T; Schocke, M; Gabl, M F; Wechselberger, G; Felber, S; Pechlaner, S; Margreiter, R; Piza-Katzer, H; Poewe, W

    2005-10-01

    We studied cortical activation patterns by functional MRI in a patient who received bilateral hand transplantation after amputation 6 years ago and in a patient who had received unilateral hand replantation within 2 hours after amputation. In the early postoperative period, the patient who had had the hand transplantation revealed strong activation of a higher motor area, only weak activation of the primary sensorimotor motor cortex and no activation of the primary somatosensory cortex. At 1-year follow-up, a small increase in primary sensorimotor motor cortex activation was observed. Activation of the primary somatosensory cortex was only seen at the 2 year follow-up. By contrast, after hand replantation, the activation pattern was similar to that of the uninjured hand within 6 weeks. This included activation of the primary sensorimotor motor cortex, higher motor areas and primary somatosensory cortex. Transplantation after long-standing amputation results in cortical reorganization occurring over a 2-year period. In contrast, hand replantation within a few hours preserves a normal activation pattern. PMID:16055246

  11. Changes in Second-Language Learners' Oral Skills and Socio-Affective Profiles Following Study Abroad: A Mixed-Methods Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardison, Debra M.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the effectiveness of short-term study-abroad (SA) programs for improving oral skills has shown mixed results. In this study, 24 L2 German learners (L1 English) provided pre- and post-SA speech samples addressing a hypothetical situation and completed surveys on cross-cultural interest and adaptability; L2 communication affect,…

  12. A PROTECTIVE ROLE FOR INFLAMMASOME ACTIVATION FOLLOWING INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Osuka, Akinori; Hanschen, Marc; Stoecklein, Veit; Lederer, James A.

    2011-01-01

    The inflammasome is activated in response to pathogen or endogenous danger signals and acts as an initiator and mediator of inflammatory reactions. In this study, we wished to identify whether the inflammasome is activated in vivo by injury. And if so, we wanted to characterize the kinetics, the immune cell distribution, and the functional impact of inflammasome activation on the injury response. Since caspase-1 activation is the final product of the inflammasome pathway, we used cleaved caspase-1 p10 and p20 as a measure for inflammasome activation in cells. We first developed a procedure to stain for caspase-1 p10 and p20 by flow cytometry (FACS) in LPS + ATP stimulated spleen cells. This method for measuring caspase-1 activation was validated using FLICA, a fluorescently-tagged specific binding reagent for activated caspase-1. Once validated by in vitro studies, we measured caspase-1 activation by FACS in immune cell subsets prepared from the lymph nodes and spleens of sham- or burn-injured mice at different time points. Lastly, the functional significance of inflammasome activation following burn injury was tested in mice treated with the specific caspase-1 inhibitor, AC-YVAD-CMK. The results of in vitro studies indicated that ATP and LPS stimulation induced significant caspase-1 activation in dendritic cells, macrophages, and NK cells. This approach also revealed caspase-1 activation in CD4 and CD8 T cells as well as B cells. We then measured caspase-1 activation in cells prepared from the lymph nodes and spleens of sham- or burn-injured mice. Significant caspase-1 activation was detected in macrophages and dendritic cells by 4 hours after injury and peaked by day 1 after injury. FLICA staining confirmed that caspase-1 activation occurred in these cells at 1 day after injury. We also found significant injury-induced caspase-1 activation in NK cells, CD4 T cells, and B cells, but CD8 T cells did not demonstrate caspase-1 activation. Surprisingly, we found that

  13. A protective role for inflammasome activation following injury.

    PubMed

    Osuka, Akinori; Hanschen, Marc; Stoecklein, Veit; Lederer, James A

    2012-01-01

    The inflammasome is activated in response to pathogen or endogenous danger signals and acts as an initiator and mediator of inflammatory reactions. In this study, we wished to identify whether the inflammasome is activated in vivo by injury. And if so, we wanted to characterize the kinetics, the immune cell distribution, and the functional impact of inflammasome activation on the injury response. Because caspase-1 activation is the final product of the inflammasome pathway, we used cleaved caspase-1 p10 and p20 as a measure for inflammasome activation in cells. We first developed a procedure to stain for caspase-1 p10 and p20 by flow cytometry (FACS) in lipopolysaccharide + adenosine triphosphate-stimulated spleen cells. This method for measuring caspase-1 activation was validated using FLICA (fluorochrome inhibitor of caspase), a fluorescently tagged specific binding reagent for activated caspase-1. Once validated by in vitro studies, we measured caspase-1 activation by FACS in immune cell subsets prepared from the lymph nodes and spleens of sham- or burn-injured mice at different time points. Lastly, the functional significance of inflammasome activation following burn injury was tested in mice treated with the specific caspase-1 inhibitor, AC-YVAD-CMK. The results of in vitro studies indicated that adenosine triphosphate and lipopolysaccharide stimulation induced significant caspase-1 activation in dendritic cells, macrophages, and natural killer (NK) cells. This approach also revealed caspase-1 activation in CD4 and CD8 T cells as well as B cells. We then measured caspase-1 activation in cells prepared from the lymph nodes and spleens of sham- or burn-injured mice. Significant caspase-1 activation was detected in macrophages and dendritic cells by 4 h after injury and peaked by day 1 after injury. FLICA staining confirmed that caspase-1 activation occurred in these cells at 1 day after injury. We also found significant injury-induced caspase-1 activation in NK

  14. Early active mobilization following UCL repair With Mitek bone anchor.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Timothy P; Stevenson, Susan; Taghizadeh, Reika; Addison, Patrick; Milner, Richard H

    2013-09-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injuries of the thumb are common. Surgical repair is accepted as the treatment of choice for complete rupture of the ligament. Biomechanical studies have suggested that Mitek bone anchor repairs are potentially safe and strong enough to allow early controlled active mobilization. To date, there have been no studies to compare early active mobilization following Mitek bone anchor repair to standard postoperative rehabilitation involving thumb spica immobilization for the first 4 to 6 weeks. We performed a small pilot randomized control trial to assess the outcome of this new rehabilitation technique to that of standard immobilization following UCL repair with Mitek bone anchor. Our results show that on average early active mobilization leads to an earlier return to full hand function (6 vs. 8 wk) and an earlier return to work (7 vs. 11 wk). There is no difference in the final range of motion achieved. We suggest that Mitek bone anchor repairs for UCL ruptures are robust enough to allow early active mobilization and that a larger trial is warranted to assess whether early active mobilization is superior to standard rehabilitation. PMID:23970193

  15. Return to activity following fasciotomy for chronic exertional compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Irion, Val; Magnussen, Robert A; Miller, Timothy L; Kaeding, Christopher C

    2014-10-01

    Diagnosis of chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) is relatively rare but has been well documented in athletes. There are, however, few reports regarding return to athletic activity after surgery among elite-level athletes. We hypothesized that a majority of elite-level athletes would successfully return to their previous level of competition following fasciotomy for CECS. A retrospective chart review was performed to identify elite-level athletes (collegiate or professional sport participation) who underwent fasciotomy for CECS over a 3-year period. Data collected included sport or activity, treatment and surgical details, time away from sport/activity after surgery, and ability to return to prior level of activity. Six males and seven females were included in the analysis. Patient age ranged from 17 to 24 years with a mean of 19.7 years. Six patients underwent unilateral lower extremity compartment release, and seven underwent bilateral lower extremity compartment release. The anterior and lateral compartments alone were released in 11 patients (84.6%). Two patients (15.4%) underwent four-compartment releases. Eleven patients (84.6%) were able to return to their previous elite level of sport participation at a mean of 10.6 weeks following surgical fasciotomy. Patients who had four-compartment release had a more than 3.5 week average longer return to full sporting activities (p = 0.011). Fasciotomy is effective in allowing elite athletes with CECS to return to sport. PMID:24664450

  16. Rapid Inflammasome Activation following Mucosal SIV Infection of Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Barouch, Dan H; Ghneim, Khader; Bosche, William J; Li, Yuan; Berkemeier, Brian; Hull, Michael; Bhattacharyya, Sanghamitra; Cameron, Mark; Liu, Jinyan; Smith, Kaitlin; Borducchi, Erica; Cabral, Crystal; Peter, Lauren; Brinkman, Amanda; Shetty, Mayuri; Li, Hualin; Gittens, Courtney; Baker, Chantelle; Wagner, Wendeline; Lewis, Mark G; Colantonio, Arnaud; Kang, Hyung-Joo; Li, Wenjun; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Piatak, Michael; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre

    2016-04-21

    The earliest events following mucosal HIV-1 infection, prior to measurable viremia, remain poorly understood. Here, by detailed necropsy studies, we show that the virus can rapidly disseminate following mucosal SIV infection of rhesus monkeys and trigger components of the inflammasome, both at the site of inoculation and at early sites of distal virus spread. By 24 hr following inoculation, a proinflammatory signature that lacked antiviral restriction factors was observed in viral RNA-positive tissues. The early innate response included expression of NLRX1, which inhibits antiviral responses, and activation of the TGF-β pathway, which negatively regulates adaptive immune responses. These data suggest a model in which the virus triggers specific host mechanisms that suppress the generation of antiviral innate and adaptive immune responses in the first few days of infection, thus facilitating its own replication. These findings have important implications for the development of vaccines and other strategies to prevent infection. PMID:27085913

  17. The Structural Challenge: A Simple Design-Based Science Activity to Foster Creativity among Kinaesthetic Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amir, Nazir; Subramaniam, R.

    2014-01-01

    A suitable way for teachers to present science content and foster creativity in less academically inclined students is by getting them to engage in design-based science activities and guiding them along the way. This study illustrates how a design-and-make activity was carried out with the aim of getting students to showcase their creativity while…

  18. Regional Triggering of Volcanic Activity Following Large Magnitude Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill-Butler, Charley; Blackett, Matthew; Wright, Robert

    2015-04-01

    There are numerous reports of a spatial and temporal link between volcanic activity and high magnitude seismic events. In fact, since 1950, all large magnitude earthquakes have been followed by volcanic eruptions in the following year - 1952 Kamchatka M9.2, 1960 Chile M9.5, 1964 Alaska M9.2, 2004 & 2005 Sumatra-Andaman M9.3 & M8.7 and 2011 Japan M9.0. While at a global scale, 56% of all large earthquakes (M≥8.0) in the 21st century were followed by increases in thermal activity. The most significant change in volcanic activity occurred between December 2004 and April 2005 following the M9.1 December 2004 earthquake after which new eruptions were detected at 10 volcanoes and global volcanic flux doubled over 52 days (Hill-Butler et al. 2014). The ability to determine a volcano's activity or 'response', however, has resulted in a number of disparities with <50% of all volcanoes being monitored by ground-based instruments. The advent of satellite remote sensing for volcanology has, therefore, provided researchers with an opportunity to quantify the timing, magnitude and character of volcanic events. Using data acquired from the MODVOLC algorithm, this research examines a globally comparable database of satellite-derived radiant flux alongside USGS NEIC data to identify changes in volcanic activity following an earthquake, February 2000 - December 2012. Using an estimate of background temperature obtained from the MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) product (Wright et al. 2014), thermal radiance was converted to radiant flux following the method of Kaufman et al. (1998). The resulting heat flux inventory was then compared to all seismic events (M≥6.0) within 1000 km of each volcano to evaluate if changes in volcanic heat flux correlate with regional earthquakes. This presentation will first identify relationships at the temporal and spatial scale, more complex relationships obtained by machine learning algorithms will then be examined to establish favourable

  19. Ute Unit: Study Guide and Follow Up Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Conejos School District, Capulin, CO.

    The study guide and follow-up activities were designed primarily to give students a feeling of Ute life in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. The unit begins with six Southern Ute stories about the wolf and coyote, the race between the skunk and the coyote, the frog and the eagle, why the frog croaks, the bear (Que Ye Qat), and the two Indian…

  20. Intestinal disaccharidase activity following pancreatic duct occlusion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hauer-Jensen, M; Christensen, K; Wilson, H D; Schedl, H P

    1987-01-01

    The influence of pancreatic secretions on growth and brush-border enzyme activity, throughout the entire small intestine, was examined in the rat. Pancreatic secretions were excluded from the gut lumen by stapling the pancreatic ducts, without interruption of bile flow. The entire small intestine was studied as four segments; the duodenum and three distal segments of equal length. Weight of intestine and mucosa, and mucosal sucrase, isomaltase, lactase, and alkaline phosphatase activity were measured 10-15 days following pancreatic duct occlusion, or sham-operation. The duodenum of pancreatic duct-occluded animals exhibited significant hypertrophy. In general, specific and total disaccharidase activities were greater in duct-occluded animals than in controls throughout the intestine. The increase was more pronounced in distal than in proximal segments. The sucrase/isomaltase ratio was significantly greater in pancreatic duct-occluded animals than in controls in the two distal segments. Alkaline phosphatase activity was not affected by pancreatic duct occlusion. The greater relative increase of disaccharidase activities and sucrase/isomaltase activity ratios in the distal segments of duct-occluded animals, indicates a more important regulatory role of pancreatic enzymes in the distal small intestine. It is concluded that regulation of intestinal brush-border enzyme activity by pancreatic secretion is selective for enzyme and site as follows: disaccharidases, but not alkaline phosphatase, are regulated; the sucrase subunit of the sucrase/isomaltase complex is most sensitive to regulation, while lactase is least sensitive; and the regulatory effect on disaccharidases is greater in distal than in proximal intestine. PMID:3114740

  1. Return to Sports Activity following UKA and TKA.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jason C; Stitzlein, Russell N; Green, Charles J; Stoner, Travis; Froimson, Mark I

    2016-04-01

    Unicompartmental medial knee arthritis can be successfully treated with either unicompartmental or total knee arthroplasty (UKA or TKA). Active patients often inquire about the relative likelihood of returning to a sport-related activity after surgery. Some advocates of UKA suggest that UKA can lead to a higher rate of return to sports activity postoperatively, but little information is available comparing the outcomes of UKA versus TKA. We identified 33 patients with UKA and 39 patients with TKA with minimum 2-year follow-up (4 ± 1.2 years) who had similar preoperative clinical and radiographic examinations. Clinical evaluation revealed no difference in the number of patients who returned to sports or their satisfaction, but patients with UKA returned to sports more quickly and exhibited better postoperative knee scores than TKA patients. PMID:26166426

  2. The syndrome of continuous muscle fibre activity following gold therapy.

    PubMed

    Grisold, W; Mamoli, B

    1984-01-01

    A 72-year-old man suffering from arthritis received a total dose of 500 mg sodium aurothiomalate during a period of 5 months. His clinical state then deteriorated and he had to be hospitalized. Upon admission he was bedridden, his level of consciousness was slightly impaired, he was confused and respiration was laboured. Continuous muscle activity was noted on all extremities and at first, erroneously, fasciculations were diagnosed. The EMG exhibited continuous muscle fibre activity consisting of duplets, triplets and multiplets. The discharges occurred in an irregular pattern; when various muscles were examined at the same time no synchronicity could be observed between muscle discharges. In the left m. deltoideus an increased percentage of polyphasic potentials was found, whereas mean duration of motor unit potentials was normal. Spontaneous activity remained unchanged during sleep and administration of intravenous diazepam or phenytoin. Blocking of ulnar nerve at either elbow or wrist level did not stop spontaneous activity in m. abductor digiti quinti. Ischaemia increased the amount of discharges after 7 min. Within 4 months after termination of gold therapy the patient's condition improved and he was discharged from hospital. Regular EMG follow-up after 8 months showed complete cessation of abnormal spontaneous activities. Nerve conduction velocities were normal except for markedly reduced compound action potential in peroneal nerves. Continuous muscle fibre activity as a side-effect of gold therapy is described. PMID:6440953

  3. Objects prompt authentic scientific activities among learners in a museum programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achiam, Marianne; Simony, Leonora; Kramer Lindow, Bent Erik

    2016-04-01

    Although the scientific disciplines conduct practical work in different ways, all consider practical work as the essential way of connecting objects and phenomena with ideas and the abstract. Accordingly, practical work is regarded as central to science education as well. We investigate a practical, object-based palaeontology programme at a natural history museum to identify how palaeontological objects prompt scientific activity among upper secondary school students. We first construct a theoretical framework based on an analysis of the programme's palaeontological content. From this, we build our reference model, which considers the specimens used in the programme, possible palaeontological interpretations of these specimens, and the conditions inherent in the programme. We use the reference model to analyse the activities of programme participants, and illustrate how these activities are palaeontologically authentic. Finally, we discuss our findings, examining the mechanism by which the specimens prompt scientific activities. We also discuss our discipline-based approach, and how it allows us to positively identify participants' activities as authentic. We conclude by discussing the implications of our findings.

  4. The Effect of Curricular Activities on Learner Autonomy: The Perspective of Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duarte, M.; Leite, C.; Mouraz, A.

    2016-01-01

    This study researches how first-year engineering students perceived the influence of curricular activities on their own learning autonomy, measured with an adaptation of the Personal Responsibility Orientation to Self-direction in Learning Scale (PRO-SDLS). Participants were questioned to assess the influence of the teacher's role. The results…

  5. The Effect of Post-Teaching Activity Type on Vocabulary Learning of Elementary EFL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeghi, Karim; Sharifi, Faranak

    2013-01-01

    Considering the significant role of vocabulary in learning a language, and teachers' great responsibility in providing opportunities to facilitate this learning, many studies have focused on the best means of achieving a good knowledge of vocabulary. This study set out to investigate the effect of four post-teaching activities, namely game,…

  6. Growing into Greatness: A Study of a Local History Group of Active-Retired Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Trudy; Byrne, Brid; Harris, Phyllis; Lalor, Maureen; O'Connor, Maura; O'Reilly, Kathleen; Quinn, Frank; Forde, Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    Research in Canada on the learning needs of older people looked at such issues as how to cope with changes in society, the need to make a contribution and the need to be influential. The White Paper on Adult Education "Learning for Life" notes that strategies for active ageing stress the critical importance of access to learning as a key tool in…

  7. Collaborative Syntactic Priming Activities and EFL Learners' Production of Wh-questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Kim; Chaikitmongkol, Wanpen

    2010-01-01

    Syntactic priming is the tendency for a speaker to produce a structure that was encountered in recent discourse and is measured by calculating how frequently speakers use the modelled structures as opposed to alternatives. Recent lab-based studies have shown that carrying out syntactic priming activities with trained interlocutors positively…

  8. Research on the Healthy Lifestyle Model, Active Ageing, and Loneliness of Senior Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Jui-Ying; Lu, Kuo-Song

    2014-01-01

    Taiwan has the fastest ageing population in the world. Thus, the government and local policy makers need to formulate policies not just for the nursing and care needs of the aged. They also need to actively promote the need for lifelong learning among seniors in order to achieve elderly-friendly objectives, such as health promotion and delays in…

  9. Towards Flexible Learning for Adult Learners in Professional Contexts: An Activity-Focused Course Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelius, Sarah; Gordon, Carole; Ackland, Aileen

    2011-01-01

    This article argues for a flexible model of learning for adults which allows them to make choices and contextualise their learning in a manner appropriate to their own professional practice whilst also developing as a member of a learning community. It presents a design based around online "learning activities" which draws on ideas of…

  10. THE MORE CAPABLE LEARNER, GRADE 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HANSEN, WILLIAM; AND OTHERS

    ENRICHMENT ACTIVITIES FOR TEACHER USE WITH CAPABLE LEARNERS ARE DISCUSSED. THE TEACHER'S SECTION CONTAINS--SUGGESTIONS FOR USING PUPIL MATERIALS, CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MORE ABLE STUDENT, A CHECKLIST FOR IDENTIFYING THE MORE ABLE STUDENTS, A CHART OF ACTIVITIES FOR THE CAPABLE LEARNER, AND A LIST OF MATERIALS AVAILABLE FROM THE CURRICULUM…

  11. Turning Reluctant Learners into Inspired Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanacore, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Motivation is a key factor in promoting academic success, and intrinsic motivation is especially important for developing autonomous learners. Reluctant learners, in particular, benefit from intrinsic motivation that makes learning relevant to their lives. In this article, the author describes commonalities of reluctant learners and presents…

  12. Caregiver Reports of Children's Activity Participation Following Serious Injury.

    PubMed

    Braaf, Sandra; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Teague, Warwick; Jowett, Helen; Gabbe, Belinda

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric trauma can result in significant levels of on-going disability. The aim of this study was to explore the restrictions on activity participation that children experience following serious injury from the perspective of their caregivers. We performed a thematic analysis of transcripts of semi-structured in-depth interviews with the caregivers of 44 seriously injured children, conducted three-years after the injury, and purposively sampled from a population-based cohort study. Both temporary and on-going restrictions on school, sport, leisure and social activities were identified, some of which were imposed by caregivers, schools, or recommended by health providers. The perceived risk of further injury, physical restrictions, emotional state and fatigue levels were important influences on degrees of activity restriction. Children who were socially less engaged, especially those who were more severely injured, had difficulty making and retaining friends, and exhibited signs of depression or social withdrawal. The activities of pre-school children were strongly regulated by their caregivers, while school age children faced obstacles with participation in aspects such as study, sport, and peer and teacher relationships, affecting learning, school attendance and enjoyment. The findings highlight the need for primary prevention and reducing the impacts of serious injury throughout the continuum of care. PMID:27399741

  13. Adult Language Learners: Context and Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ann F. V., Ed.; Strong, Gregory, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Adult Language Learners: Context and Innovation" presents instructional practices that are particularly successful with adults. Adult language learners are goal oriented and direct their learning to fulfill particular needs or demands: to advance their studies, to progress up the career ladder, to follow business opportunities, to pass a driving…

  14. Life Skills Curriculum for Senior Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon County Schools, Tallahassee, FL.

    This life skills curriculum helps adult basic educators meet the needs of senior adult learners. An introduction contains the following sections: purpose statement; description of the senior adult learner; tips to remember on teaching senior adults; physiology of aging; teaching the hearing impaired; and teaching the visually impaired. The life…

  15. Learner Personas in CALL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heift, Trude

    2007-01-01

    In examining the titles of this year's conference presentations, the author noticed quite a few papers that focus on learner-specific issues, for instance, papers that address learning styles, learner needs, personality and learning, learner modeling and, more generally, pedagogical issues that deal with individual learner differences in…

  16. Morphing into Adolescents: Active Word Learning for English-Language Learners and Their Classmates in Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieffer, Michael J.; Lesaux, Nonie K.

    2010-01-01

    Many students arrive at middle school without the academic language skills they need to read sophisticated texts with comprehension. In particular, English language learners and students from low-income backgrounds attending underresourced, urban middle schools lack opportunities to learn the thousands of academic words they need to succeed. To…

  17. Teacher-Made Tactile Science Materials with Critical and Creative Thinking Activities for Learners Including Those with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teske, Jolene K.; Gray, Phyllis; Kuhn, Mason A.; Clausen, Courtney K.; Smith, Latisha L.; Alsubia, Sukainah A.; Ghayoorad, Maryam; Rule, Audrey C.; Schneider, Jean Suchsland

    2014-01-01

    Gifted students with visual impairments are twice exceptional learners and may not evidence their advanced science aptitudes without appropriate accommodations for learning science. However, effective tactile science teaching materials may be easily made. Recent research has shown that when tactile materials are used with "all" students…

  18. We Are What We Do: Examining Learner-Generated Content in the Anatomy Laboratory through the Lens of Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doubleday, Alison F.; Wille, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Video and photography are often used for delivering content within the anatomical sciences. However, instructors typically produce these resources to provide instructional or procedural information. Although the benefits of learner-generated content have been explored within educational research, virtually no studies have investigated the use of…

  19. Guiding Learners to near Native Fluency in English through an Adaptive Programme of Activities Which Includes Phoneme and Prosody Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Alistair; Attridge, Ann; Lapok, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Many students of English language find pronunciation difficult to master. This work in progress paper discusses an incremental and iterative approach towards developing requirements for software applications to assist learners with the perception and production of English pronunciation in terms of phonemes and prosody. It was found that prompts…

  20. Style Shifts among Japanese Learners before and after Study Abroad in Japan: Becoming Active Social Agents in Japanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwasaki, Noriko

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies on L2 Japanese sojourners often reported that learners overuse the plain style or haphazardly mix the plain and polite styles upon return. These styles, which are often associated with formal or informal contexts, also index complex social and situational meanings, and native speakers are reported to shift their styles to create…

  1. Examining Student Cognitive and Affective Engagement and Reading Instructional Activities: Spanish-Speaking English Learners' Reading Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Ana Taboada; Gallagher, Melissa; Smith, Peet; Buehl, Michelle M.; Beck, Jori S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has emphasized the key role of engagement in helping students succeed in school and beyond. Given the academic struggles that many English learners (ELs) face as they transition to middle school, exploring the facets of engagement in middle school ELs is needed. We established reader profiles for eight sixth grade Hispanic ELs and…

  2. An Assessment-Prescriptive-Instructional Packet for Older Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scales, Alice M.

    The purpose of this document is to suggest an assessment/prescriptive/instructional (API) process for working with older learners experiencing reading difficulties. Following a justification for the designing of materials specifically for older learners, the document explains how to collect data about learner's interests, attitudes, and reading…

  3. Upside-Down Brilliance: The Visual-Spatial Learner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Linda Kreger

    This book describes the unique characteristics of visual-spatial learners and teaching techniques designed for this population. Following a quiz to identify visual-spatial learners, chapters address: (1) how visual-spatial learners think and the plight of being non-sequential; (2) the power of the right hemisphere, eye movement patterns, and…

  4. A prospective follow-up study of the effects of chronic aircraft noise exposure on learners' reading comprehension in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Seabi, Joseph; Cockcroft, Kate; Goldschagg, Paul; Greyling, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this epidemiological study was to investigate the long-term effects of exposure to aircraft noise on reading comprehension on a sample of South African children. Given the impairment of reading comprehension found within the noised-exposed group before the relocation of the airport, it was the intention of this study to determine whether the effects of aircraft noise on reading comprehension remained after the relocation of the airport or whether they disappeared. A cohort of 732 learners with a mean age of 11.1 years participated at baseline measurements in 2009 and 650 (mean age=12.3) and 178 (mean age=13.1) learners were reassessed after the relocation of the airport in 2010 and 2011, respectively. The results revealed no significant effect of the groups on reading comprehension across the testing periods, but significant effects of home language were demonstrated on reading comprehension. These findings suggest that exposure to chronic aircraft noise may have a lasting impact on children's reading comprehension functioning. PMID:24169877

  5. Lurking and L2 Learners on a Facebook Group: The Voices of the Invisibles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafie, Latisha Asmaak; Yaacob, Aizan; Singh, Paramjit Kaur Karpal

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative research investigates the practice of lurking among English as a second language (ESL) learners in a Facebook group discussion. Lurking is a term used to describe the activity of following and observing any online discussions or activities without contributing to the discussions. Lurkers are often accused of being invisible and…

  6. Purkinje Activation Precedes Myocardial Activation After Defibrillation Following Long Duration Ventricular Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Dosdall, Derek J.; Osorio, Jose; Robichaux, Robert P.; Huang, Jian; Li, Li; Ideker, Raymond E.

    2010-01-01

    Background While reentry within the ventricular myocardium (VM) is responsible for the maintenance of short duration ventricular fibrillation (SDVF, VF duration < 1 min), Purkinje fibers (PFs) are important in the maintenance of long duration ventricular fibrillation (LDVF, VF duration > 1 min). Objective We hypothesized that the mechanisms of defibrillation may also be different for SDVF and LDVF. Methods A multielectrode basket catheter was deployed in the left ventricle of 8 beagles. External defibrillation shocks were delivered with a ramp-up protocol following SDVF (20 s) and LDVF (150 s). Earliest VM and PF activations were identified following the highest energy shock that failed to terminate VF and the successful shock. Results Defibrillation was successful after 36±12 s and 181±14 s for SDVF and LDVF, respectively. The time after shock delivery until earliest activation was detected for failed shocks and was significantly longer following LDVF (138.7±24.1 ms) than SDVF (75.6±8.7 ms). Earliest postshock activation following SDVF typically initiated in the VM (14 of 16 episodes) while it always initiated in the PF (16 of 16 episodes) following LDVF. Sites of earliest activity during sinus rhythm correlated with sites of earliest postshock activation for PF-led cycles but not VM-led cycles. Conclusion Earliest recorded postshock activation is in the Purkinje system following LDVF but not SDVF. This difference raises the possibility that the optimal defibrillation strategy is different for SDVF and LDVF. PMID:20061187

  7. Engaging Learner Support: An Investigation of Faculty-Library Collaboration to Provide Live Course-Specific Learner Support in the Online Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration between faculty and learner support can create seamless services for e-learners. Providing access to learning materials and activities with co-located tailored learner support creates an environment in which e-learners can easily access everything they need for an enhanced, supported, and more focused learning experience. The…

  8. The Development of Expert Learners in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Saemah; Mahmud, Zuria; Yassin, Siti Fatimah Mohd; Amir, Ruslin; Ilias, Khadijah Wan

    2010-01-01

    The term "expert learner" refers to students who are actively engaged with the materials learned and take responsibility for their own learning. Literature reviews suggested the use of metacognitive approach to help develop students to become expert learners. Research on development of expert learners can be traced from movements that…

  9. Using Blended Learning to Increase Learner Support and Improve Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Gwyneth

    2007-01-01

    Improving retention and identifying "at risk" learners are high profile issues in higher education, and a proposed solution is to provide good learner support. Blending of online learning with classroom sessions offers the potential to use a virtual learning environment to deliver learning activities, and to support learners using a distance…

  10. The Tip of the Iceberg: Factors Affecting Learner Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlejohn, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Teachers' informal discussions of learner motivation often emphasize the need to find ways to motivate learners, most usually through "fun" or "dynamic" activities. This paper starts from the assumption, however, that part of the work of the teacher is to avoid the "demotivation" of learners, and that there is a need to consider the overall…

  11. Hippocampal electrical activity following local tetanization. I. Afterdischarges.

    PubMed

    Leung, L W

    1987-09-01

    Following a short (1-10 s) train of repetitive stimulation delivered to the hippocampal CA1 region, the following sequelae of afterdischarges (ADs) was seen: (1) a silent period of 2-4 s, (2) a large primary (1 degree) AD usually alvear-surface negative and deep positive, (3) a period of suppressed hippocampal EEG, (4) a secondary (2 degrees) hippocampal AD, and after 3-6 min, (5) 15-25 min of enhanced (up to 10 times normal) fast (30-70 Hz) waves. The 2 degrees hippocampal AD was preceded by or simultaneous with large AD at the amygdaloid electrodes. Electrolytic lesions (n = 7) or large heat lesions of the amygdala (n = 5) or electrolytic lesions of the medial septum (n = 10) were not successful in suppressing the 2 degrees hippocampal AD. However, 4 rats with radiofrequency lesion and 3 rats with bilateral aspiration lesion of the entorhinal cortex had diminished or no 2 degrees hippocampal AD. The fast waves after tetanization were reversed 180 degrees across surface and deep CA1 electrodes. The fast wave increase was blocked by atropine sulfate (25-50 mg/kg i.p.), scopolamine hydrochloride (5 mg/kg i.p.) and medial septal lesions. It was concluded that the 2 degrees hippocampal AD may depend on a reverberation of neural circuitry involving the entorhinal cortex. The 2 degrees AD recorded from amygdala electrodes may partly reflect spreading of activities from the entorhinal cortex. On the other hand, the increase in fast waves after tetanization requires an intact septohippocampal, muscarinic cholinergic input, and may depend on an enhanced cholinergic input or an increased response. PMID:3676723

  12. Seven Things Adult Learners Dislike.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strzalka, Agnieszka

    1998-01-01

    A questionnaire was designed to elicit what adult learners disliked most about learning English. Seven dislikes were identified, including the following: textbooks in English only, role plays, drills, textbooks with no reading material or with artificial texts, homework, inflexible teachers, and audiotapes. (Author/VWL)

  13. Learners in Action, Summer 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Movement for Canadian Literacy, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This Summer 2005 issue of "Learners in Action" contains the following articles: (1) Bridging Barriers to Learning (Glenn Kissman); (2) Education Really Is a Family Affair; (3) Sabrina's Story; (4) SARAW Helps Students Find Their Voice; (5) Literacy Changes Lives; and (6) Seeing STARs in Alberta.

  14. Expanded Perspectives on Autonomous Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxford, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores two general perspectives on autonomous learners: psychological and sociocultural. These perspectives introduce a range of theoretically grounded facets of autonomous learners, facets such as the self-regulated learner, the emotionally intelligent learner, the self-determined learner, the mediated learner, the socioculturally…

  15. Effective instruction for English learners.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Margarita; Slavin, Robert; Sánchez, Marta

    2011-01-01

    The fastest-growing student population in U.S. schools today is children of immigrants, half of whom do not speak English fluently and are thus labeled English learners. Although the federal government requires school districts to provide services to English learners, it offers states no policies to follow in identifying, assessing, placing, or instructing them. Margarita Calderón, Robert Slavin, and Marta Sánchez identify the elements of effective instruction and review a variety of successful program models. During 2007-08, more than 5.3 million English learners made up 10.6 percent of the nation's K-12 public school enrollment. Wide and persistent achievement disparities between these English learners and English-proficient students show clearly, say the authors, that schools must address the language, literacy, and academic needs of English learners more effectively. Researchers have fiercely debated the merits of bilingual and English-only reading instruction. In elementary schools, English learners commonly receive thirty minutes of English as a Second Language (ESL) instruction but attend general education classes for the rest of the day, usually with teachers who are unprepared to teach them. Though English learners have strikingly diverse levels of skills, in high school they are typically lumped together, with one teacher to address their widely varying needs. These in-school factors contribute to the achievement disparities. Based on the studies presented here, Calderón, Slavin, and Sánchez assert that the quality of instruction is what matters most in educating English learners. They highlight comprehensive reform models, as well as individual components of these models: school structures and leadership; language and literacy instruction; integration of language, literacy, and content instruction in secondary schools; cooperative learning; professional development; parent and family support teams; tutoring; and monitoring implementation and outcomes

  16. Listening to Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravenhall, Mark

    This booklet looks at the role of learner feedback in the quality improvement process. It suggests how adult and community learning (ACL) providers can adapt and improve their practice to meet the needs of learners in the changed policy context. Chapter 1 explores why providers should listen to learners and finds that listening to learners…

  17. Learner and Faculty Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guan, Sharon; Stanford, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This chapter identifies effective ways to address learner and faculty support. It introduces methods for building a successful learner support system by providing sufficient resources and proactively addressing learner motivation. It also addresses effective faculty support through institutional policies, resources, training, and course…

  18. Between the Social and the Selfish: Learner Autonomy in Online Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Tim

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores what it means to be an autonomous learner in an online social context. Using distinctions originally drawn by Jürgen Habermas, it argues that classic accounts of learner autonomy as teleological action are inadequate to explain learner activity in group settings. It points out that learners in such settings display attitudes…

  19. "Sharing Time" with Young Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazigi, Rana; Seedhouse, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Although "Sharing Time" is a popular and widespread activity in English for Young Learners (L2) classrooms around the world, there have so far been no research studies of the interaction that is generated and its relationship to learning processes. The aims of this study were to find out how interaction is organized during "Sharing…

  20. Using Computers to Motivate Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levesque, Jeri A.

    1989-01-01

    Maintains that the use of computers in the classroom produces motivated students, empowered learners, and increased literacy. Gives an example of the computer program "The Oregon Trail" in which students participate actively in a wagon train journey from Missouri to Oregon. Urges teachers to encourage students in their mastery of computer skills.…

  1. Staff Members as Lifelong Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Joanne V.

    Based on the assumption that all community college staff members should be lifelong learners, this paper outlines the purposes and principles underlying a quality staff development program and enumerates the elements, activities, incentives, and other considerations that are necessary for the program to be successful. First, the purposes of staff…

  2. Learning L2 Vocabulary with American TV Drama "From the Learner's Perspective"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yu-Chia

    2012-01-01

    Following the trend of computer assisted language learning (CALL), in Taiwan, most language classes now have equivalent media support for language teachers and learners. Implementing videos into classroom activities is one of the choices. The current study explores the process of implementing American TV drama in L2 vocabulary learning from…

  3. Active following fuzzy output feedback sliding mode control of real-vehicle semi-active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Nonami, K.; Hagiwara, T.

    2008-07-01

    Many semi-active suspension systems have been investigated in various literatures in order to achieve lower energy consumption and as good performance as full-active suspension systems. Full-active suspension systems can achieve a good ride quality by actuators; however, their implementation equipments are expensive. The full-active suspensions are perfect from the point of view of control; hence, semi-active control laws with performance similar to full-active controls have attracted the engineering community for their ease and lower cost of implementation. This paper presents a new active following fuzzy output feedback sliding mode control for a real-vehicle semi-active suspension system. The performance of the proposed controller has been verified by comparing it with passive control and also with the full-active target semi-active approximation control method. In the experiment, it was shown that the proposed method has the effectiveness in stabilizing heave, roll and pitch movement of the car body.

  4. Assessment Results Following Inquiry and Traditional Physics Laboratory Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Joel Arthur

    2006-01-01

    Preservice elementary teachers in a conceptual physics course were given multiple resources to use during several inquiry activities in order to investigate how materials were chosen, used, and valued. These students performed significantly better on assessment items related to the inquiry physics activities than on items related to traditional…

  5. Modulation of pulmonary macrophage superoxide release and tumoricidal activity following activation by biological response modifiers.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B

    1986-10-01

    Following immunologic activation, pulmonary macrophages may prevent or cause regression of lung metastases by mechanisms which remain largely unknown. The studies described here were designed to determine if enhanced oxygen metabolite release was related to postactivation tumoricidal activity. We have shown that in vitro activation of Fischer 344 rat pulmonary macrophages by either free or liposome-encapsulated muramyl dipeptide leads to both enhanced release of superoxide anions and marked tumoricidal activity against syngenic (Fischer 13762), allogeneic (Schmidt-Ruppin RR 1022) and xenogeneic (Fibrosarcoma MCA-F) 125I-deoxyuridine-labeled target cells. This immune modulator did not, however, metabolically activate pulmonary macrophages as effectively as liposome-encapsulated lipopolysaccharide. A 24-h in vitro incubation with either 150 U or 300 U of interferon-gamma (3 X 10(6) U/mg) or 30 U, 150 U or 300 U of interferon-alpha (6 X 10(5) U/mg) caused a significant elevation in superoxide release above controls, whereas short-term exposure (2 or 4 h) had little or no effect. Free or encapsulated 6-O-stearoyl muramyl dipeptide, on the other hand, did increase superoxide levels at all 3 time periods. When either interferon-gamma or free or encapsulated muramyl dipeptide derivative were administered to intact rats by either i.v. injection, intratracheal instillation or osmotic minipump infusion, pulmonary macrophage tumoricidal activity was observed 96 h after cell harvesting. Zymosan-stimulated superoxide release, however, was not consistently elevated above control or empty liposome treatment following this course of in vivo activation. The data collectively suggest that in vivo pulmonary macrophage activation to a tumoricidal state and metabolic activation resulting in enhanced superoxide may be separable events. PMID:3021650

  6. Retrotransposon activation followed by rapid repression in introgressed rice plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Wendel, J F

    2000-10-01

    Plant retrotransposons are largely inactive during normal development, but may be activated by stresses. Both copia-like and gypsy-like retrotransposons of rice were activated by introgression of DNA from the wild species Zizania latifolia Griseb. The copy number increase was associated with cytosine methylation changes of the elements. Activity of the elements was ephemeral, as evidenced by nearly identical genomic Southern hybridization patterns among randomly chosen individuals both within and between generations for a given line, and the absence of transcripts based on Northern analysis. DNA hypermethylation, internal sequence deletion, and possibly other mechanisms are likely responsible for the rapid element repression. Implications of the retroelement dynamics on plant genome evolution are discussed. PMID:11081978

  7. Neural activity triggers neuronal oxidative metabolism followed by astrocytic glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Kasischke, Karl A; Vishwasrao, Harshad D; Fisher, Patricia J; Zipfel, Warren R; Webb, Watt W

    2004-07-01

    We have found that two-photon fluorescence imaging of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) provides the sensitivity and spatial three-dimensional resolution to resolve metabolic signatures in processes of astrocytes and neurons deep in highly scattering brain tissue slices. This functional imaging reveals spatiotemporal partitioning of glycolytic and oxidative metabolism between astrocytes and neurons during focal neural activity that establishes a unifying hypothesis for neurometabolic coupling in which early oxidative metabolism in neurons is eventually sustained by late activation of the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle. Our model integrates existing views of brain energy metabolism and is in accord with known macroscopic physiological changes in vivo. PMID:15232110

  8. Modeling Learner Variability in CALL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heift, Trude

    2008-01-01

    This article describes challenges and benefits of modeling learner variability in Computer-Assisted Language Learning. We discuss the learner model of "E-Tutor," a learner model that addresses learner variability by focusing on certain aspects and/or features of the learner's interlanguage. Moreover, we introduce the concept of phrase descriptors,…

  9. Mediators of change following a senior school physical activity intervention.

    PubMed

    Lubans, David R; Sylva, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested that the low level of effectiveness of youth interventions is due to a lack of knowledge regarding the mechanisms responsible for behaviour change. The identification of behaviour mediators is necessary for the progression of physical activity research, as it allows researchers to determine which components of an intervention are responsible for mediating behaviour change. The purpose of this study was to identify mediators of behaviour change in a physical activity intervention for senior school students. Participants (n=78) were randomly allocated to control or intervention conditions for a period of 10 weeks. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and potential mediators were assessed at baseline and post-intervention (10 weeks). Hypothesized mediators were derived from Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory and included: peer support, exercise self-efficacy and outcome expectancy. Mediation was assessed using the product-of-coefficients test described by MacKinnon and colleagues, based on the criteria for mediation identified by Baron and Kenny. While none of the variables satisfied all four criteria for mediation among males or females, self-efficacy was able to satisfy the first three criteria among females in the study. Exercise self-efficacy may be a mediator of physical activity behaviour in adolescent girls. PMID:18069061

  10. Improving Learners' Research Process Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, T. K.; Hunter, L.; Kluger-Bell, B.; Seagroves, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Professional Development Program (PDP) supports participants as they design inquiry activities that help learners improve their research process skills. These skills include the cognitive or reasoning skills that scientists and engineers use while doing research; for example, making a testable hypothesis, coordinating results from multiple experiments, or identifying and evaluating tradeoffs. Past work in the PDP indicated that additional support was needed to help participants design instructional activities that would teach these important skills. A new workshop was therefore developed for the 2009 PDP cycle, entitled "Improving Learners' Process Skills." In this workshop, participants worked in small groups to define specific science and engineering skills found in four past PDP activity designs. Participants distinguished between "simple tasks" and "authentic inquiry" activities that learners could perform as demonstration of the skill. Through this new workshop, participants were able to explicitly discuss ways in which individual process skills are unique or inter-related. In addition, by identifying a "simple task," participants were able to pinpoint areas in which their own designs could be improved to better focus on authentic inquiry tasks. In 2010, the workshop was slightly modified to help participants reconnect the research process skills with the activity content. In addition, the idea of using generic and context-specific scaffolds was also introduced. To make the participants feel like they were contributing to the PDP community, four activity designs actively being worked on in the 2010 cycle were used. Based on participant feedback, this "Improving Learners' Process Skills" workshop should be strongly considered for future returning participants.

  11. Localised mitogenic activity in horses following infection with Streptococcus equi.

    PubMed

    McLean, R; Rash, N L; Robinson, C; Waller, A S; Paillot, R

    2015-06-01

    Streptococcus equi subspecies equi (S. equi) is the causative agent of strangles, a highly contagious upper respiratory disease of equids. Streptococcus equi produces superantigens (sAgs), which are thought to contribute to strangles pathogenicity through non-specific T-cell activation and pro-inflammatory response. Streptococcus equi infection induces abscesses in the lymph nodes of the head and neck. In some individuals, some abscess material remains into the guttural pouch and inspissates over time to form chondroids which can harbour live S. equi. The aim of this study was to determine the sites of sAg production during infection and therefore improve our understanding of their role. Abscess material, chondroids and serum collected from Equidae with signs of strangles were tested in mitogenic assays. Mitogenic sAg activity was only detected in abscess material and chondroids. Our data support the localised in vivo activity of sAg during both acute and carrier phases of S. equi infection. PMID:25841794

  12. Learner Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mick, Carola

    2011-01-01

    This article presents first results of an ethnographic research project in a Luxembourgish primary school that accompanied the development of a school project by children from the fifth grade. Analysing the data children themselves collected with Kodak Zi8 cameras in order to document their project activities, it investigates their possibilities…

  13. Getting Ready for Reading: A Follow-up Study of Inner City Second Language Learners at the End of Key Stage 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, M.

    2004-01-01

    Background: A previous study (Stuart, 1999) showed that early phoneme awareness and phonics teaching improved reading and spelling ability in inner-city schoolchildren in Key Stage 1, most of whom were learning English as a second language. Aims: The present study, a follow-up of these children at the end of Key Stage 1, addresses four main…

  14. Fragmentation efficiencies of peptide ions following low energy collisional activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerfield, Scott G.; Gaskell, Simon J.

    1997-11-01

    Low energy fragmentations of protonated peptides in the gas phase are generally attributed to charge-directed processes. The extent and location of peptide backbone fragmentation is accordingly influenced by the extent to which charge is sequestered on amino acid side-chains. We describe systematic studies of the efficiencies of decomposition of peptide ions to assess in particular the influence of the presence of basic amino acid residues and of the protonation state. In a set of analogues containing two arginine, two histidine or two lysine residues, the extent of fragmentation of [M + 2H]2+ ions decreases with increased basicity, reflecting decreased backbone protonation. The collisionally activated dissociation of multiply protonated melittin ions shows an increase in fragmentation efficiency with higher charge state (using activation conditions which are similar for each charge state). For a single charge state, acetylation of primary amine groups increases fragmentation efficiency, consistent with the reduction in basicity of lysine side-chains. Conversion of arginine residues to the less basic dimethylpyrimidylornithine, however, decreases fragmentation efficiency, suggesting more effective sequestering of ionizing protons; the effect may be attributable to a disfavouring of proton-bridged structures but this hypothesis requires further study. Preliminary data for the decompositions of [M- 2H]2- ions derived from peptides containing two acidic residues suggest that the sequestration of charge away from the backbone is again detrimental to efficient fragmentation. Apparently diagnostic cleavages adjacent to aspartic acid residues are observed.

  15. Activation of bone marrow phagocytes following benzene treatment of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Laskin, D L; MacEachern, L; Snyder, R

    1989-01-01

    Techniques in flow cytometry/cell sorting were used to characterize the effects of benzene and its metabolites on subpopulations of bone marrow cells. Treatment of male Balb/c mice with benzene (880 mg/kg) or a combination of its metabolites, hydroquinone and phenol (50 mg/kg), resulted in a 30 to 40% decrease in bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed two subpopulations of bone marrow cells that could be distinguished by their size and density or granularity. The larger, more dense subpopulation was found to consist predominantly of macrophages and granulocytes as determined by monoclonal antibody binding and by cell sorting. Benzene treatment had no selective cytotoxic effects on subpopulations of bone marrow cells. To determine if benzene treatment activated bone marrow phagocytes, we quantified production of hydrogen peroxide by these cells using the fluorescent indicator dye, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate. We found that macrophages and granulocytes from bone marrow of treated mice produced 50% more hydrogen peroxide in response to the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate than did cells from control animals. It is hypothesized that phagocyte activation and production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen intermediates may contribute to hematotoxicity induced by benzene. PMID:2676504

  16. Tissue plasminogen activator prevents white matter damage following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Fernando; Gauberti, Maxime; Parcq, Jérôme; Macrez, Richard; Hommet, Yannick; Obiang, Pauline; Hernangómez, Miriam; Montagne, Axel; Liot, Géraldine; Guaza, Carmen; Maubert, Eric; Ali, Carine; Vivien, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only available treatment for acute stroke. In addition to its vascular fibrinolytic action, tPA exerts various effects within the brain, ranging from synaptic plasticity to control of cell fate. To date, the influence of tPA in the ischemic brain has only been investigated on neuronal, microglial, and endothelial fate. We addressed the mechanism of action of tPA on oligodendrocyte (OL) survival and on the extent of white matter lesions in stroke. We also investigated the impact of aging on these processes. We observed that, in parallel to reduced levels of tPA in OLs, white matter gets more susceptible to ischemia in old mice. Interestingly, tPA protects murine and human OLs from apoptosis through an unexpected cytokine-like effect by the virtue of its epidermal growth factor–like domain. When injected into aged animals, tPA, although toxic to the gray matter, rescues white matter from ischemia independently of its proteolytic activity. These studies reveal a novel mechanism of action of tPA and unveil OL as a target cell for cytokine effects of tPA in brain diseases. They show overall that tPA protects white matter from stroke-induced lesions, an effect which may contribute to the global benefit of tPA-based stroke treatment. PMID:21576385

  17. Monitoring contractile dermal lymphatic activity following uniaxial mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Gray, R J; Worsley, P R; Voegeli, D; Bader, D L

    2016-09-01

    It is proposed that direct mechanical loading can impair dermal lymphatic function, contributing to the causal pathway of pressure ulcers. The present study aims to investigate the effects of loading on human dermal lymphatic vessels. Ten participants were recruited with ages ranging from 24 to 61 years. Participants had intradermal Indocyanine Green injections administrated between left finger digits. Fluorescence was imaged for 5min sequences with an infra-red camera prior to lymph vessel loading, immediately after axial loading (60mmHg) and following a recovery period. Image processing was employed to defined transient lymph packets and compare lymph function between each test phase. The results revealed that between 1-8 transient events (median=4) occurred at baseline, with a median velocity of 8.1mm/sec (range 4.1-20.1mm/sec). Immediately post-loading, there was a significant (p<0.05) reduction in velocity (median=6.4, range 2.2-13.5mm/sec), although the number of transient lymph packages varied between participants. During the recovery period the number (range 1-7) and velocity (recovery median=9.6mm/sec) of transient packets were largely restored to basal values. The present study revealed that some individuals present with impaired dermal lymphatic function immediately after uniaxial mechanical loading. More research is needed to investigate the effects of pressure and shear on lymphatic vessel patency. PMID:27245749

  18. Motor activity following the silent period in human muscle

    PubMed Central

    Alston, W.; Angel, R. W.; Fink, F. S.; Hofmann, W. W.

    1967-01-01

    1. When a muscle is unloaded during voluntary contraction, there is normally a silent period in the electromyogram. The silence is terminated by a sudden return of muscle action potentials. 2. In order to investigate the mechanism of the terminal motor volley, the unloading reflex was studied in six human subjects. The independent variables were the initial muscular force, the inertia of the limb and the amount of motion permitted. The dependent variables were the size and latency of the terminal volley. 3. During isometric contraction, the amplitude of the surface-recorded muscle action potentials increased monotonically with increasing muscular tension. 4. The action potentials were significantly larger during the terminal volley than during the period before unloading. 5. When acceleration of the limb was reduced by increasing the inertia, the terminal volley was decreased in size, but the latency was not affected. 6. When movement was interrupted by a mechanical block, the latency of the terminal volley was reduced, but the size was not affected. 7. The results suggest that the terminal motor volley is not the result of a decrease in Renshaw feed-back or in autogenetic inhibition. 8. The motor volley must be regulated by proprioceptive feed-back, because it is affected by the velocity and displacement of the limb. 9. The muscle frequently responded within 20 msec after motion of the limb was blocked. Hence it appears that the mechanism involves a spinal reflex. 10. Because the motor discharge occurs while the muscle is shortening, it cannot be an ordinary stretch reflex. If the discharge is attributed to spindle afferent driving, one must assume that the gamma motor neurones are active during the silent period. 11. The authors postulate a fusimotor reflex, which is driven by afferent impulses from the moving limb and excites the alpha motoneurones by way of the `gamma loop'. PMID:6038019

  19. Plasma catecholamines and renin activity in wrestlers following vigorous swimming.

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Celko, J; Juránková, E; Jezová, D; Kvetnanský, R

    1998-01-01

    Cardiovascular and neuroendocrine responses to exercise in a physically fit and an untrained group of young healthy subjects were compared to study the significance of physical fitness for performance in a discipline for which the athletes were not trained. Ten wrestlers of national rank prepared for an international competition (age 18 years) and 9 untrained healthy males (age 21 years). Exercise consisted of 27-min swimming, freestyle, in water of 29 degrees C, with last 3 min increased to maximal effort. The blood pressure, heart rate and sublingual temperature were measured and blood samples were withdrawn before exercise, immediately after and after a 30 min period of rest. Catecholamines were analyzed by radioenzymatic method and plasma renin activity (PRA) using commercial kits. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate after swimming were increased comparably in the two groups, diastolic pressure was unchanged in the controls and decreased in the wrestlers. Plasma cortisol remained unchanged. Plasma glucose tended to increase in the controls and so decrease in wrestlers, with a significant difference between them after swimming (p < 0.05). However, plasma adrenaline was concomitantly increased in both groups (p < 0.01). Noradrenaline and PRA were increased after swimming in both the control and trained group. The increments of noradrenaline and PRA in wrestlers were significantly reduced compared to the control group (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively). Higher physical fitness in athletes significantly reduced plasma noradrenaline and angiotensin responses to maximal exercise demanding special skill in work performance which had not been included in their training program. Training of wrestlers did not cause an exaggerated plasma adrenaline response to exercise. PMID:9803484

  20. The Learner's Permit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayhew, Daniel R.

    2003-01-01

    Considers the role and value of an extended learner's period in a graduated driver-licensing system through a review of the literature. Concludes that further research is needed on the safety benefits and optional features of the learner period. (Contains 1 figure, 3 tables, and 41 references.) (AUTHOR/WFA)

  1. Understanding Oral Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, W. Jay

    2012-01-01

    A five-year research project of seminary students from various cultural backgrounds revealed that the slight majority of contemporary seminary students studied are oral learners. Oral learners learn best and have their lives most transformed when professors utilize oral teaching and assessment methods. After explaining several preferences of oral…

  2. Adult Learners in Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Janette, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Theories on adult development and learning and some of the Ontario universities' programs and services for the adult learner are examined, and Athabasca University, Alberta's answer to the British Open University, is described. Peter O'Donnell discusses adult learners' needs and explains how Athabasca University serves this specific type of…

  3. A Learner Centered Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Florence N.

    This paper proposes a learner-centered educational system, focusing on aspects that are intrinsically associated with the modern educational system, such as the curriculum, school community, parents, learners, and educational support personnel. It examines: primary level preparation (literacy, numeracy, and basic knowledge; examination and…

  4. Grading Exceptional Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Lee Ann; Guskey, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Teachers often grapple with the challenge of giving report card grades to students with learning disabilities and English language learners. The authors offer a five-step model that "offers a fair, accurate, and legal way to adapt the grading process for exceptional learners." The model begins with a high-quality reporting system for all students…

  5. Learner-Centered Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Robert M.

    There is no clear consensus of the term "learner-centered reform." Learner-centered reform has become by implication either the cause or the consequence of inflated grades, lowered admission requirements, affirmative action, elimination of language and other requirements, student evaluation of teaching, abandonment of research, and many other ills…

  6. Learner-Centered Teaching Techniques in Astronomy 101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, L. V.; Marschall, L. A.; Prather, E.

    2003-12-01

    We present preliminary results of studies done on learner-centered teaching techniques with students in Astronomy 101. Results for two classes taught at Gettysburg College this fall will be presented. One class used learner-centered activities, the other did not. A diagnostic survey was given to both classes before and after. Specific newly designed activities were tested as well.

  7. Learner-Content-Interface as an Approach for Self-Reliant and Student-Centered Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolay, Robin; Schwennigcke, Bastian; Sahl, Sarah; Martens, Alke

    2015-01-01

    Conceptualization and implementation of computer supported teaching and training is currently not tailored to the paradigm of learner centration. Many technical solutions lack transparency and consistency regarding the supported learner activities. An insight into learners activities correlated to learning tasks is needed. In this paper we outline…

  8. The Confident Learner: Help Your Child Succeed in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simic, Marjorie R.; And Others

    This book is intended to assist parents in helping their children become confident learners and self-reliant individuals who succeed in school. The book maintains that children become confident learners by developing high self-esteem, strong motivation, self-discipline, good health and fitness, and the ability to deal with stress. Following an…

  9. English Learners: Reaching the Highest Level of English Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Gilbert C., Ed.

    This collection of papers examines the critical literacy development of English learners, focusing on English reading instruction in an immersion setting, English language development, and cultural issues pertaining to English learners in and out of the classroom. The 16 papers include the following: (1) "Reading and the Bilingual Student: Fact…

  10. Biography and Young Gifted Learners: Connecting to Commercially Available Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Ann; Cotabish, Alicia

    2005-01-01

    Biographies are an important resource for extending and differentiating the curriculum for high-ability learners. To include biography in curriculum, educators need answers to the following four questions: (1) How are commercially available biographies located?; (2) What criteria are useful in selecting biographies for high-ability learners?; (3)…

  11. Sensitizing Young English Language Learners Towards Environmental Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Rigoberto; Rojas, María del Pilar

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports an action research study aimed at understanding how to sensitize young English language learners towards caring for the environment. The pedagogical intervention in a 5th grade class consisted in the use of creative writing strategies to express learners' ideas. Three stages were followed: "recognizing facts,"…

  12. Adult Learners in Postsecondary Education. Practice Application Brief No. 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imel, Susan

    Research on various facets of adult learners' experiences in postsecondary education has established the following facts: (1) instructors who help adult learners connect their real-world experiences and what they already know to what they are learning in the classroom are perceived as most helpful and motivating; (2) adult undergraduates generally…

  13. Higher Education and Lifelong Learners: International Perspectives on Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuetze, Hans G., Ed.; Slowey, Maria, Ed.

    This book contains 11 papers on higher education and lifelong learners. The following papers are included: "Traditions and New Directions in Higher Education: A Comparative Perspective on Non-Traditional Students and Lifelong Learners" (Hans G. Schuetze, Maria Slowey); "Austria: The Enduring Myth of the Full-Time Student: An Exploration of the…

  14. Predictors of Reading Literacy for First and Second Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netten, Andrea; Droop, Mienke; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2011-01-01

    In this study an attempt was made to construct a multi-factor model predicting the development of reading literacy in the upper grades of primary school in the Netherlands for subgroups of 729 first language (L1) learners and 93 second language (L2) learners. Following a longitudinal design, it was explored to what extent the variation in reading…

  15. Chinese Learners' Acquisition of English Verbs: A Corpus-Driven Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Linxiao; Jo, Hie-myung

    2012-01-01

    Limited research has investigated advanced language learners' acquisition of English verbs. The current study examines and compares the acquisition pattern of English verbs among Chinese second language (L2) learners at both intermediate and advanced levels to answer the following questions: (1) Do L2 learners acquire regular verbs and irregular…

  16. Modeling Learner Satisfaction in an Electronic Instrumentation and Measurement Course Using Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toral, S. L.; Barrero, F.; Martinez-Torres, M. R.; Gallardo, S.; Duran, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    The prevailing tendency in modern university reforms is towards "how people learn," following a learner-centered approach in which the learner is the main actor of the teaching-learning process. As a consequence, one of the key indicators of the teaching-learning process is the measurement of learner satisfaction within the classroom. Learner…

  17. Idiomobile for Learners of English: A Study of Learners' Usage of a Mobile Learning Application for Learning Idioms and Collocations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amer, Mahmoud Atiah

    2010-01-01

    This study explored how four groups of English learners used a mobile software application developed by the researcher for learning idiomatic expressions and collocations. A total of 45 learners in the study used the application for a period of one week. Data for this study was collected from a questionnaire, the application, and follow-up…

  18. Schoolyard Inquiry for English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westervelt, Miriam

    2007-01-01

    This article presents outdoor inquiry activities to help English Language Learner (ELL) students learn life science concepts. As a public high school ELL science teacher, the author of this article use these place-based and scaffolded inquiry activities outside to reinforce concepts she teaches in the classroom all year long. Through inductive…

  19. Practices and Prospects of Learner Autonomy: Teachers' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Asmari, AbdulRahman

    2013-01-01

    Language learning process works through the learners' own reflection on how they learn and it makes learners active in the sense that they learn to analyze their learning strategies. So they start making decisions, e.g., whether to improve them or not, and in which way. Generally, this trait is missing in traditional language teaching process and…

  20. Factors Driving Learner Success in Online Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vu, Phu; Cao, Vien; Vu, Lan; Cepero, Jude

    2014-01-01

    This study examined factors that contributed to the success of online learners in an online professional development course. Research instruments included an online survey and learners' activity logs in an online professional development course for 512 in-service teachers. The findings showed that there were several factors affecting online…

  1. Building a Dynamic Online Learning Community among Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Minjuan; Sierra, Christina; Folger, Terre

    2003-01-01

    Examines the nature of learning communities constructed among a diverse group of adult learners in an international online graduate-level course. Discusses independent work, team tasks, the variety of computer-mediated communication tools used, and implications for promoting adult learners' active participation in online learning and instructional…

  2. Assessing the Literacy Needs of Adult Learners of ESL. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santopietro, Kathleen; Peyton, Joy Kreeft

    Traditionally, student assessment has focused on measuring learner skills. Assessment of literacy needs, from the learner's perspective, is also an important part of an instructional program. This digest focuses on ways to determine what learners want or believe they need to learn. Many of the activities described can include or lead to assessment…

  3. Comparing Learner Community Behavior in Multiple Presentations of a Massive Open Online Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Silvia Elena; Savage, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs) can create large scale communities of learners who collaborate, interact and discuss learning materials and activities. MOOCs are often delivered multiple times with similar content to different cohorts of learners. However, research into the differences of learner communication, behavior and expectation between…

  4. Learner Autonomy as a Predictor of Course Success and Final Grades in Community College Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Cherng-Jyh; Liu, Simon

    2009-01-01

    This study employed a quantitative research design to examine the predictive relationships between: (a) learner autonomy and course success; and (b) learner autonomy and final grades in community college online courses. Learner autonomy was defined as the characteristic of an individual who exhibited intentional behavior in learning activities.…

  5. Exploring South African Grade 11 Learners' Perceptions of Classroom Inquiry: Validation of a Research Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudu, Washington T.; Vhurumuku, Elaosi

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the adoption and validation of a research instrument, on determining learners' levels of perception of classroom inquiry based on data collected from South African Grade 11 learners. The Learners' Perception of Classroom Inquiry (LPCI) instrument consists only of Likert-type items which rank activities according to how often…

  6. The Effect of Reading on Second-Language Learners' Production in Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collentine, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Tasks provide engaging ways to involve learners in meaningful, real-world activities with the foreign language (FL). Yet selecting classroom tasks suitable to learners' linguistic readiness is challenging, and task-based research is exploring the relationship between learners' overall abilities (e.g., reading, grammatical) and the complexity and…

  7. You Can Be in a Group and Still Not Cooperate. Collaborative Approaches and Cooperative Learning Activities for Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parma City School District, OH.

    This handbook defines and describes the benefits of both collaborative approaches and cooperative techniques. An introduction uses watercolor marbling as a metaphor for collaborative approaches and cooperative activities. Section I provides research results regarding problems of adult literacy programs, skills employers want, and Bloom's taxonomy.…

  8. Exploring Shifts in Middle School Learners' Modeling Activity While Generating Drawings, Animations, and Computational Simulations of Molecular Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson-Jerde, Michelle H.; Gravel, Brian E.; Macrander, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Modeling and using technology are two practices of particular interest to K-12 science educators. These practices are inextricably linked among professionals, who engage in modeling activity with and across a variety of representational technologies. In this paper, we explore the practices of five sixth-grade girls as they generated models of…

  9. Design Issues Related to the Evaluation of Learner--Computer Interaction in a Web-Based Environment: Activities v. Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemard, Dominique

    2006-01-01

    If web-based technology is increasingly becoming the central plank of contemporary teaching and learning processes, there is still too little evidence to suggest that it is delivering purposeful learning activities beyond its widely perceived potential as a learning resource providing content and learning objects. This is due in part to the…

  10. EFL Learner Collaborative Interaction in Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the task-based interaction of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners in the 3D multiuser virtual environment (MUVE) Second Life. The discussion first explores research on the precursors of MUVEs, text-based 2D virtual worlds known as MOOs. This is followed by an examination of studies on the use of MUVEs in Computer…

  11. Tussle Over English-Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade, Harrisonburg, Virginia, has become a magnet for immigrant families drawn to jobs in the poultry and construction industries. More than 1,600 of the school district's 4,400 students are English-learners. The largest group of newcomers are Latinos, followed by Kurdish and Russian refugees. In this article, the author discusses a…

  12. Mediated Learning Experience and Deaf Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, David S.

    A classroom cognitive intervention model for adolescents and adults who are deaf is described. The model provides mediated learning experiences whereby a person assists the learner in interpreting experience and learning problem-solving strategies. The program, entitled instrumental enrichment (IE), is based on the following principles: IE uses a…

  13. Similar English Learner Students, Different Results: Why Do Some Schools Do Better? A Follow-Up Analysis, Based upon a Large-Scale Survey of California Elementary Schools Serving High Proportions of Low-Income and EL Students. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Trish; Perry, Mary; Oregon, Isabel; Brazil, Noli; Hakuta, Kenji; Haertel, Edward; Kirst, Michael; Levin, Jesse

    2007-01-01

    In spring 2006 California released its first ever school-level Academic Performance Index (API) scores for English Learners (ELs). These EL-API scores were based on California Standards Tests taken in the spring of 2005, and make it possible to identify how well schools were doing with this student population. It is not unexpected that elementary…

  14. Learner Characteristics, Learning Environments and Constructivist Epistemologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Gary

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on a current research project that examines the measurement of learner characteristics (multiple intelligence, learning style, learner ability), learner perceptions of the classroom (constructivist learning environment survey and views about teaching and learning), and learner constructs. (Author/MM)

  15. A Novel Method for Learner Assessment Based on Learner Annotations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noorbehbahani, Fakhroddin; Samani, Elaheh Biglar Beigi; Jazi, Hossein Hadian

    2013-01-01

    Assessment is one of the most essential parts of any instructive learning process which aims to evaluate a learner's knowledge about learning concepts. In this work, a new method for learner assessment based on learner annotations is presented. The proposed method exploits the M-BLEU algorithm to find the most similar reference annotations…

  16. Young Adult Follow-Up of Hyperactive Children: Antisocial Activities and Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Russell A.; Fischer, Mariellen; Smallish, Lori; Fletcher, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    Background: Hyperactive/ADHD children are believed to be a greater risk for adolescent and young adult antisocial activity and drug use/abuse, particularly that subset having comorbid conduct problems/disorder. Method: We report on the lifetime antisocial activities and illegal drug use self-reported at young adult follow-up (mean age 20-21 years;…

  17. Environmental Resources in Maintenance of Physical Activity 6 Months Following Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Adriana; Fleury, Julie; Belyea, Michael

    2016-08-01

    This study examined differences in weekly time spent in physical activity by level of perceived environmental resources, 6 months following graduation from cardiac rehabilitation. A descriptive, longitudinal design used standardized measures to evaluate perceived environmental resources and physical activity levels. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to examine mean differences in weekly time spent in physical activity by level of perceived environmental resources. Adults 51 to 86 years old (N = 150) diagnosed with coronary heart disease were included. There was a significant change over time in physical activity as measured by minutes per week, F(2, 148) = 7.915, p = .001, where activity increased between baseline and 3 months, and then dropped slightly at 6 months. This change over time differed by the level of perceived neighborhood resources, F(2, 148) = 3.545, p = .032. Home and neighborhood resources may positively influence physical activity maintenance following cardiac rehabilitation. PMID:26826141

  18. Morphological Family Size Effects in Young First and Second Language Learners: Evidence of Cross-Language Semantic Activation in Visual Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Zeeuw, Marlies; Verhoeven, Ludo; Schreuder, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study examined to what extent young second language (L2) learners showed morphological family size effects in L2 word recognition and whether the effects were grade-level related. Turkish-Dutch bilingual children (L2) and Dutch (first language, L1) children from second, fourth, and sixth grade performed a Dutch lexical decision task on words…

  19. Instructional Prescriptions for Learner Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Jaesam; Reigeluth, Charles M.

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of learner control in instructional management describes six learner control methods: (1) content control; (2) sequence control; (3) pace control; (4) display or strategy control; (5) internal processing control; and (6) advisor strategies. Relevant literature, both theoretical and empirical, is reviewed, and learner control and…

  20. Motivating Literacy Learners in Today's World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, J., Ed.; Parkhill, F., Ed.; Gillon, G., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Motivating Literacy Learners in Today's World" provides insights into a broad spectrum of children's literacy learning. Motivation is the key theme and the authors show how this can be achieved through reading for pleasure; in writing activities at a number of levels; and through oral language development. Chapters include: (1) Motivating…

  1. Goals, the Learner, and the Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Teachers, principals, and supervisors need to determine the kinds of learners being taught in the school/class setting. Are pupils good by nature, bad, or neutral? Concepts held pertaining to each pupil assist in determining objectives, learning activities, and evaluation techniques. The Puritans believed that individuals were born evil or sinful.…

  2. Learner Generated versus Instructor Induced Visual Imagery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenze, James S.

    The concepts of imagery, mathemagenic behaviors, and generative imagery are reviewed; and the learner's use of visual imagery is discussed. Several studies have supported the idea that imagery is an active mental process that gives birth to learning. The concept of mathemagenic control or manipulation is of interest to the instructional designer.…

  3. Effective Strategies for Engaging Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karge, Belinda Dunnick; Phillips, Kathleen M.; Jessee, Tammy; McCabe, Marjorie

    2011-01-01

    Innovative methods in teaching should be used in every college classroom to enhance student engagement, support any teaching environment and encourage inquiry among learners. Adults learn best by participation in relevant experiences and utilization of practical information. When adult students are active in their learning they are able to develop…

  4. Workplace Learning in Malaysia: The Learner's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Idris, Khairuddin

    2005-01-01

    This paper offers a scenario of workplace learning as practiced in Malaysia. Based on survey research, the article describes learner profiles, learning provision and pattern. The analysis shows that Malaysians participate in formal workplace learning as part of their employment activities. Workplace learning in Malaysia is contextual, promoted by…

  5. Supporting a Learner Community with Software Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taurisson, Neil; Tchounikine, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a multi-agent approach that aims at supporting learners involved in a collective activity. We consider pedagogical situations where students have to explicitly define the articulation of their collective work and then achieve the different tasks they have defined. Our objective is to support these students by taking some of…

  6. Doing Your Part To Help Your Child Become SMART (Successful, Motivated, Autonomous, Responsible, Thoughtful): Six Workshops on Parenting SMART Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattes, Beth; Walsh, Jackie; Hickman, Mickey

    A SMART Learner is a lifelong learner who can adapt to rapid change and who possesses characteristics associated with success in and out of school. These workshop materials to help parents help their children become SMART learners provide: information from current research and best practice; learning activities that will actively engage parents in…

  7. Fragile Identities: Exploring Learner Identity, Learner Autonomy and Motivation through Young Learners' Voices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Terry Eric

    2011-01-01

    Recent research in the fields of motivation and learner autonomy in language learning has begun to explore their relationships to the construct of identity. This article builds on this through the voices of a group of six learners of French or German in a secondary school in England, over a two-year period. These young learners initially reveal a…

  8. The Older Language Learner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleppegrell, Mary

    Research on adult learning shows that there is no decline in ability to learn as people get older, that except for minor considerations such as hearing and vision loss, the age of the adult learner is not a major factor in language acquisition, and that the context in which adults learn is the major influence on their ability to acquire a new…

  9. Supporting Learners in Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montague, Ann; Hopkins, Linda

    A project was conducted in Australia to investigate the most effective ways whereby learners receive informal and formal support to assist them to successfully complete vocational education and training (VET), either in school or in business job-training programs. Data were collected through a literature review, a case study of 11 organizations,…

  10. Serving the Online Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boettcher, Judith V.

    2007-01-01

    Systems and services for recruiting, advising, and support of online students have seldom been at the top of the list when planning online and distance learning programs. That is now changing: Forces pushing advising and support services into the foreground include recognition of the student learner as "customer" and the increasing expectations…

  11. Helping Young Hispanic Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Eugene E.; Jensen, Bryant

    2007-01-01

    Hispanics are the largest and youngest ethnic group in the United States. Moreover, young Hispanic children make up approximately 80 percent of the U.S. English language learner population. They are a heterogeneous group, born both inside and outside the United States and having origins in Mexico, Cuba, Central America, South America, and the…

  12. Empowering Leaders & Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umphrey, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Trevor Greene, the 2013 MetLife/NASSP National High School Principal of the Year, empowers staff members and students to be the best teachers and learners they can be and provides the community resources to support them. In this article, Greene, principal of Toppenish High School in Washington, shares his biggest motivator as a school leader and…

  13. Novice Learners in Cyberspace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youn, Soonkyoung

    2004-01-01

    Since the Internet was introduced in the field of Educational Technology, it has predominantly been seen as an instructional tool. A number of educational technologists point out that the Internet can be a powerful instructional tool that encourages learners to be involved in problem-solving by using a great deal of information and to enlarge and…

  14. Learner Autonomy Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illes, Eva

    2012-01-01

    This article explores whether the perception of learner autonomy that is promoted in language pedagogy is suitable for preparing students to perform successfully in the changed circumstances of the use of English. Recent developments, which include the growing role of English as a lingua franca and computer-mediated communication (CMC), give rise…

  15. Libraries and Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josey, E. J., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Of the 13 essays presented in this special issue on libraries and adult education, 8 focus on programs and services from the public library for adult learners. These essays provide information on: (1) an Education Information Centers Program (EIC) designed to complement employment skills training provided under the Comprehensive Employment and…

  16. Connecting with Latino Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubinstein-Avila, Eliane

    2006-01-01

    The English-only initiatives sweeping the United States are mainstreaming English language learners into content-area classes designed for native or fluent English speakers, with little, if any, English as a second language (ESL) support. This spells trouble for the ever-growing population of Latinos because ESL teachers are not likely to have the…

  17. Gender and Learner Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hindal, Huda; Reid, Norman; Whitehead, Rex

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that girls and boys perform differently in traditional examinations in most countries. This study looks at a sample of 754 school students in Kuwait (aged about 13) and explores how boys and girls differ in the performance in a range of tests related to learner characteristics. The fundamental question is how boys and girls…

  18. of Iranian EFL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rashidi, Nasser; Mortazavi, Fariba

    2012-01-01

    This research investigated the relationship between vocabulary learning strategies and vocabulary size of Iranian university EFL students. Participants in the present study were a total of 67 EFL learners, studying at Shiraz Azad University as senior English Translation students. The instruments utilized for data collection were three tests: A…

  19. Teachers as Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feiman-Nemser, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    In "Teachers as Learners", a collection of landmark essays, noted teacher educator and scholar Sharon Feiman-Nemser shines a light on teacher learning. Arguing that serious and sustained teacher learning is a necessary condition for ambitious student learning, she examines closely how teachers acquire, generate, and use knowledge about teaching…

  20. California's English Learner Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Laura E.

    2012-01-01

    English Learner (EL) students in California's schools are numerous and diverse, and they lag behind their native-English-speaking peers. Closing the achievement gap for EL students has been a long-standing goal for California educators, and there are some signs of success. Now that EL funding and curriculum issues are receiving a fresh level of…

  1. The Transliterate Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Thomas et al. have defined transliteracy as "the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and film, to digital social networks" (Transliteracy Research Group). The learner who is transliterate builds knowledge, communicates, and interacts across…

  2. Evolution of Active Sensing for Wall-Following Navigation of Snake-Like Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanev, Ivan; Shimohara, Katsunori

    We propose an approach of automated co-evolution of the optimal values of attributes of active sensing (orientation, range and timing of activation of sensors) and the control of locomotion gaits of a simulated snake-like robot (Snakebot) that result in a fast speed of locomotion in a confined environment. The experimental results illustrate the emergence of a contactless wall-following navigation of fast sidewinding Snakebots. The wall-following is accomplished by means of differential steering, facilitated by the evolutionary defined control sequences incorporating the readings of evolutionary optimized sensors.

  3. Preservice elementary teachers' development of PCK-readiness about learners' science ideas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithey, Julie Faye

    Preservice elementary teachers face many daunting challenges as they learn to teach science. Teacher educators try to design methods courses that help them meet these challenges and prepare them for the experiences they will have as student teachers and new teachers. Because they often do not spend much time with students, it is a general assumption that preservice teachers are unable to develop pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) with respect to their learners. Rather than focus on what they are unable to do, however, this dissertation explores how a methods course might foster consideration of learners' science ideas, an important component of PCK. Perhaps preservice teachers can learn to develop PCK-readiness, thus putting them in a good position to develop rich usable PCK once they have more experience in the classroom. This study follows a class of preservice teachers through an elementary science methods course. It describes the trajectories of eight focus preservice teachers' thinking about their learners. It also explores how the entire class made sense of a set of activities designed to foster consideration of learners' ideas. Results indicate that with scaffolds, preservice teachers are able to think in complex ways about their learners' ideas, including considering how to use those ideas in instruction. The trajectories of the preservice teachers varied but generally showed growth in thinking about learners' ideas, although some were focused on or influenced by particular aspects while others made more consistent growth in several areas. Generally, the course activities supported thinking about how to deal with learners' ideas but not the characteristics of those ideas. This study contributes to the field by providing a description of how a range of preservice teachers engaged with the activities in the methods course. In addition, it describes the kind of influence that a methods course might have on preservice teachers' development of a crucial aspect

  4. Activation of a distinct subpopulation of pulmonary macrophages following exposure to biological response modifiers.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Do, C; Burd, T; Hong, L L

    1994-03-01

    A distinct subpopulation of tissue-associated pulmonary macrophages (TAPM) displayed tumoricidal activity towards syngeneic and xenogeneic targets following in vitro incubation with N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP). This subpopulation, as well as, the predominant population of freely lavagable alveolar macrophages destroyed allogeneic targets following a similar incubation with either 6-0-stearoyl MDP (S-MDP) or recombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). IFN-gamma-induced in vivo tumoricidal activation of both populations of pulmonary macrophage was most effective when delivered either intravenously or via osmotic minipump infusion and least effective when administered by direct intratracheal instillation. The separate populations also displayed in vivo activation in response to liposome-encapsulated i.v. administered S-MDP. Under comparable conditions, IFN-alpha was not nearly as effective. Metabolic activation of TAPM, assessed by the release of increased levels of superoxide free radicals during phagocytosis, occurred following 24 hr exposure to S-MDP or lipopolysaccharide. Incorporation of these agents into multilamellar vesicle liposomes further augmented the release of superoxide observed at 24 hrs. Our results collectively demonstrated that a subpopulation of lung macrophage, a tissue-associated pulmonary macrophage, may be activated to a tumoricidal state and to release pronounced levels of oxygen free radicals following either in vitro or in situ treatment with several biological response modifiers. PMID:8194852

  5. Analysis of Germline Stem Cell Differentiation Following Loss of GLP-1 Notch Activity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Paul M.; Schedl, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells generate the differentiated progeny cells of adult tissues. Stem cells in the Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite germline are maintained within a proliferative zone of ∼230 cells, ∼20 cell diameters in length, through GLP-1 Notch signaling. The distal tip cell caps the germline and supplies GLP-1-activating ligand, and the distal-most germ cells that occupy this niche are likely self-renewing stem cells with active GLP-1 signaling. As germ cells are displaced from the niche, GLP-1 activity likely decreases, yet mitotically cycling germ cells are found throughout the proliferative zone prior to overt meiotic differentiation. Following loss of GLP-1 activity, it remains unclear whether stem cells undergo transit-amplifying (TA) divisions or more directly enter meiosis. To distinguish between these possibilities we employed a temperature-sensitive (ts) glp-1 mutant to manipulate GLP-1 activity. We characterized proliferative zone dynamics in glp-1(ts) mutants at permissive temperature and then analyzed the kinetics of meiotic entry of proliferative zone cells after loss of GLP-1. We found that entry of proliferative zone cells into meiosis following loss of GLP-1 activity is largely synchronous and independent of their distal-proximal position. Furthermore, the majority of cells complete only a single mitotic division before entering meiosis, independent of their distal-proximal position. We conclude that germ cells do not undergo TA divisions following loss of GLP-1 activity. We present a model for the dynamics of the proliferative zone that utilizes cell cycle rate and proliferative zone size and output and incorporates the more direct meiotic differentiation of germ cells following loss of GLP-1 activity. PMID:26158953

  6. Erythropoietin Modulates Cerebral and Serum Degradation Products from Excess Calpain Activation following Prenatal Hypoxia-Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Jantzie, Lauren L; Winer, Jesse L; Corbett, Christopher J; Robinson, Shenandoah

    2016-01-01

    Preterm infants suffer central nervous system (CNS) injury from hypoxia-ischemia and inflammation - termed encephalopathy of prematurity. Mature CNS injury activates caspase and calpain proteases. Erythropoietin (EPO) limits apoptosis mediated by activated caspases, but its role in modulating calpain activation has not yet been investigated extensively following injury to the developing CNS. We hypothesized that excess calpain activation degrades developmentally regulated molecules essential for CNS circuit formation, myelination and axon integrity, including neuronal potassium-chloride co-transporter (KCC2), myelin basic protein (MBP) and phosphorylated neurofilament (pNF), respectively. Further, we predicted that post-injury EPO treatment could mitigate CNS calpain-mediated degradation. Using prenatal transient systemic hypoxia-ischemia (TSHI) in rats to mimic CNS injury from extreme preterm birth, and postnatal EPO treatment with a clinically relevant dosing regimen, we found sustained postnatal excess cortical calpain activation following prenatal TSHI, as shown by the cleavage of alpha II-spectrin (αII-spectrin) into 145-kDa αII-spectrin degradation products (αII-SDPs) and p35 into p25. Postnatal expression of the endogenous calpain inhibitor calpastatin was also reduced following prenatal TSHI. Calpain substrate expression following TSHI, including cortical KCC2, MBP and NF, was modulated by postnatal EPO treatment. Calpain activation was reflected in serum levels of αII-SDPs and KCC2 fragments, and notably, EPO treatment also modulated KCC2 fragment levels. Together, these data indicate that excess calpain activity contributes to the pathogenesis of encephalopathy of prematurity. Serum biomarkers of calpain activation may detect ongoing cerebral injury and responsiveness to EPO or similar neuroprotective strategies. PMID:26551007

  7. Platelet Activation Following Implant of the Levitronix PediVAS in the Ovine Model

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carl A.; Shankarraman, Venkat; Wearden, Peter D.; Kocyildirim, Ergin; Maul, Timothy M.; Marks, John D.; Richardson, J. Scott; Gellman, Barry N.; Borovetz, Harvey S.; Dasse, Kurt A.; Wagner, William R.

    2011-01-01

    The Levitronix PediVAS is an extracorporeal magnetically levitated pediatric ventricular assist system with an optimal flow rate range of 0.3 – 1.5 L/min. The system is being tested in preclinical studies to assess hemodynamic performance and biocompatibility. The PediVAS was implanted in 9 ovines for 30 days duration using either commercially available cannulae (N = 3) or customized Levitronix cannulae (N = 6). Blood biocompatibility in terms of circulating activated platelets was measured by flow cytometric assays to detect P-selectin. Platelet activation was further examined following exogenous agonist stimulation. Platelet activation rose following surgery and eventually returned to baseline in animal studies where minimal kidney infarcts were observed. Platelet activation remained elevated for the duration of the study in animals where a moderate number of kidney infarcts with or without thrombotic deposition in the cannulae were observed. When platelet activation did return to baseline, platelets appropriately responded to agonist stimulation signifying conserved platelet function following PediVAS implant. Platelet activation returned to baseline in the majority of studies, representing a promising biocompatibility result for the Levitronix PediVAS. PMID:21989419

  8. Toward Local Collaborative Networks for Adult Learners. Final Report of the Adult Learner Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Gerard G.

    The Adult Learner Project was a two-phase program in which a total of 10 community-level projects received funding to develop collaborative agendas that would meet the learning needs of adults in their respective communities. During the second phase of the project, the following community-level collaborative councils were also given $20,000 each:…

  9. Techniques: Paying Attention to the Place. Part 1--Activities for Instructors and Adult Learners [and] Part 2--Activities for Planning Places for Adult Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Rodney D.

    1992-01-01

    This two-part article discusses the role of the physical environment in adult learning. In the first part, two activities--environment introduction and visualization--are discussed as ways to develop an awareness for improving the learning environment. In the second part, two planning activities--mapping and geometric coding--are discussed as ways…

  10. Tumor necrosis factor gene expression is mediated by protein kinase C following activation by ionizing radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hallahan, D. E.; Virudachalam, S.; Sherman, M. L.; Huberman, E.; Kufe, D. W.; Weichselbaum, R. R.; Univ. of Chicago; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Univ. of Chicago

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production following X-irradiation has been implicated in the biological response to ionizing radiation. Protein kinase C (PKC) is suggested to participate in TNF transcriptional induction and X-ray-mediated gene expression. We therefore studied radiation-mediated TNF expression in HL-60 cells with diminished PKC activity produced by either pretreatment with protein kinase inhibitors or prolonged 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment. Both treatments resulted in attenuation of radiation-mediated TNF induction. Consistent with these results, we found no detectable induction of TNF expression following X-irradiation in the HL-60 variant deficient in PKC-mediated signal transduction. The rapid activation of PKC following {gamma}-irradiation was established using an in vitro assay measuring phosphorylation of a PKC specific substrate. A 4.5-fold increase in PKC activity occurred 15 to 30 s following irradiation, which declined to baseline at 60 s. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of phosphoproteins extracted from irradiated cells demonstrated in vivo phosphorylation of the PKC specific substrate Mr 80,000 protein at 45 s following X-irradiation. These findings indicate that signal transduction via the PKC pathway is required for the induction of TNF gene expression by ionizing radiation.

  11. Creatine Kinase Activity Weakly Correlates to Volume Completed Following Upper Body Resistance Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado, Marco; Willardson, Jeffrey M.; Silva, Dailson P.; Frigulha, Italo C.; Koch, Alexander J.; Souza, Sergio C.

    2012-01-01

    In the current study, we examined the relationship between serum creatine kinase (CK) activity following upper body resistance exercise with a 1- or 3-min rest between sets. Twenty men performed two sessions, each consisting of four sets with a 10-repetition maximum load. The results demonstrated significantly greater volume for the 3-min…

  12. Children's Retention of Topical and Factual Information Following Oral Report Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glynn, Shawn M.; Hartzell, Linda D.

    This experiment was designed to determine how oral report activities, following exposure to an informative message, can influence children's retention of topical and factual information from the message. The message was a prose passage about modes of transportation. Second grade students (N=51) were subjects. A third of the children presented oral…

  13. Molluscum contagiosum and herpes simplex in Maasai pastoralists; refeeding activation of virus infection following famine?

    PubMed

    Murray, M J; Murray, A B; Murray, N J; Murray, M B; Murray, C J

    1980-01-01

    An epidemic of molluscum contagiosum and oro-genital herpes simplex was observed in Maasai pastoralists of the Rift Valley. It coincided with a period of refeeding following famine, when the relief diet was different from normal milk fare. We propose that refeeding may be an important mechanism for activation of certain viral infections previously suppressed by famine. PMID:7434431

  14. Mothers' Knowledge of Early Adolescents' Activities following the Middle School Transition and Pubertal Maturation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Robert D.; Marrero, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    This study tested a sequential mediation model to determine whether experiences, social cognitions, or parent-adolescent interactional processes account for lower levels of mothers' knowledge of adolescents' whereabouts and activities following early adolescents' transition into middle school (MS) and pubertal development. Cross-sectional data…

  15. Elbow Joint Active Replication in College Pitchers Following Simulated Game Throwing

    PubMed Central

    Manske, Robert; Stovak, Mark; Cox, Kara; Smith, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Background: Elbow injuries are common in college baseball players. Pitching creates stress and fatigue in and around the elbow. Lack of joint proprioception can contribute to nonphysiological joint loading and injury. Hypothesis: There will be no difference in elbow joint active reproduction sense following a simulated 3-inning pitching sequence. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Seventeen collegiate pitchers participated. Each pitcher was bilaterally tested for active elbow range of motion using goniometric technique. Percentages of motion determined positions for further study of elbow joint active replication sense (20%, 35%, 50%, 80%). The elbow was passively taken to a position and held for 10 seconds, then returned to full extension. Pitchers were asked to actively reproduce the angle. The opposite elbow was tested in the same manner. One week later, prethrowing joint position reproduction was tested; then a simulated 3-inning game was thrown. Immediately afterward, elbow joint active replication testing was performed. A repeated-measures analysis of variance analyzed differences. Results: No change in active joint reproduction occurred in the nondominant elbow at any angle tested. Dominant elbows demonstrated significant losses of active joint reproduction following throwing. Significant differences occurred at the 35% and 80% angles (P < .05). Conclusion: Active elbow joint replication sense may be compromised following 3 innings of throwing. Because joint proprioception is thought to be an important component of joint stabilization, an alteration in joint position sense may increase the risk of elbow injury during throwing. Clinical Relevance: Pitching may cause a loss of active elbow joint replication. PMID:23015958

  16. Incidence and Location of Pain in Young, Active Patients Following Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nam, Denis; Nunley, Ryan M; Sauber, Timothy J; Johnson, Staci R; Brooks, Peter J; Barrack, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Persistent pain following hip arthroplasty remains a concern, especially in young, active patients. Four hundred twenty patients less than 60 years of age with a pre-symptomatic UCLA score ≥ 6 (196 total hip arthroplasty [THA]; 224 surface replacement arthroplasty [SRA]) completed a pain-drawing questionnaire investigating the location, severity, and frequency of pain around the hip. At a mean of 2.9 years of follow-up, 40% reported pain in at least one location around the hip. There was no difference in the incidence of groin pain between SRA and THA patients (32% vs. 29%, P=0.6), but THA patients had a greater incidence of anterior (25% vs. 8%, P<0.001) and lateral (20% vs. 10%, P=0.01) thigh pain. A high percentage of young, active patients experience persistent pain following hip arthroplasty. PMID:26067707

  17. Fostering learners' interaction with content: A learner-centered mobile device interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdous, M.

    2015-12-01

    With the ever-increasing omnipresence of mobile devices in student life, leveraging smart devices to foster students' interaction with course content is critical. Following a learner-centered design iterative approach, we designed a mobile interface that may enable learners to access and interact with online course content efficiently and intuitively. Our design process leveraged recent technologies, such as bootstrap, Google's Material Design, HTML5, and JavaScript to design an intuitive, efficient, and portable mobile interface with a variety of built-in features, including context sensitive bookmarking, searching, progress tracking, captioning, and transcript display. The mobile interface also offers students the ability to ask context-related questions and to complete self-checks as they watch audio/video presentations. Our design process involved ongoing iterative feedback from learners, allowing us to refine and tweak the interface to provide learners with a unified experience across platforms and devices. The innovative combination of technologies built around well-structured and well-designed content seems to provide an effective learning experience to mobile learners. Early feedback indicates a high level of satisfaction with the interface's efficiency, intuitiveness, and robustness from both students and faculty.

  18. Patient Participation and Physical Activity during Rehabilitation and Future Functional Outcomes in Patients following Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lenze, Eric J.; Munin, Michael C.; Harrison, Christopher C; Brach, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Objective We examined the association between physical activity recorded by Actigraphy during therapy sessions (therapy) to therapist rated patient participation and self reported future functional outcomes. We hypothesized those participants who were more active during rehab would have higher participation scores and better functional outcomes following hip fracture compared to those who were less active. Design Longitudinal study with 3 and 6 month follow-up. Setting Participants were recruited from skilled nursing (SN) and inpatient rehabilitation (IR) facilities. Participants Participants included 18 community dwelling older adults admitted to SN or IR facilities after hip fracture. Participants were included if they were ≥ 60 years of age and ambulatory with or without assistance from a device or another person. Intervention Not Applicable Main Outcome Measure Physical activity was quantified during participants’ rehab using the Actigraph accelerometer worn consecutively over 5 days. The Pittsburgh Participation Rating Scale was used to quantify patient participation during their inpatient therapy sessions. Self reported functional outcomes were measured by the Hip Fracture Functional Recovery Scale (HFRS) at baseline, 3 and 6 months following fracture. Results Participants with higher Actigraphy counts during rehab were ranked by their therapists as having excellent participation compared to those who were less active. Participants who were more active reported better functional abilities at both 3 and 6 month time points and achieved 78% and 91% recovery of self reported pre-fracture function compared to those who were less active achieving 64% and 73% recovery. Conclusion Actigraphy provides an objective measure of physical activity exhibiting predictive validity for future functional outcomes and concurrent validity against patient participation in patients after hip fracture. PMID:19345777

  19. Changes in leisure-time physical activity after transition to retirement: a follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Retirement is a major life change that is likely to affect lifestyles. The aim of this study was to examine changes in leisure-time physical activity of moderate and vigorous intensity among ageing employees facing transition to retirement over a follow-up of 5-7 years. Methods The baseline data were collected by questionnaire surveys in 2000-2002 among 40-60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki. A follow-up survey was conducted among the baseline respondents in 2007 (n = 7332, response rate 83%). Those who were on disability retirement at the follow-up were distinguished from old-age retirees. Leisure-time physical activity was measured using similar questions in both surveys. Results Old-age retirees increased significantly their time spent in moderate-intensity physical activity: women 31 minutes per week and men 42 minutes per week on average. Such changes were not found among disability retirees or those remaining employed. There were no changes in vigorous activity. Leisure-time physical inactivity at follow-up was lower among old-age retirees compared with employees of nearly the same age. Adjustments made for potential baseline covariates had no effects on these findings. Conclusions Transition to old-age retirement was associated with an increase in moderate-intensity leisure-time physical activity and a decrease in the proportion of inactive. Encouraging people to leisure-time physical activity after retirement is worthwhile as the increase in free time brings new possibilities for it. PMID:21513555

  20. In Search of the Optimal Path: How Learners at Task Use an Online Dictionary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamel, Marie-Josee

    2012-01-01

    We have analyzed circa 180 navigation paths followed by six learners while they performed three language encoding tasks at the computer using an online dictionary prototype. Our hypothesis was that learners who follow an "optimal path" while navigating within the dictionary, using its search and look-up functions, would have a high chance of…

  1. Educating elementary-aged English learners in science: Scientists and teachers working together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banuelos, Gloria Rodriguez

    California's K-12 schools contain 40% of the nation's English learners, the majority of them enrolled at the elementary level. Traditionally, English learners in California have difficulty performing at the same level as their native English speaking counterparts on national achievement tests, such as the National Assessment of Educational Progress. In 1998, California voters passed Proposition 227 mandating that English learners be taught "overwhelmingly" in English, thus making teachers, many without expertise, responsible for teaching multilevel English proficient students subject matter. I studied the use of scientist-teacher partnerships as a resource for teachers of English learners. University scientists (graduate students) partnered with local elementary school teachers designed and implemented integrated science and English lessons for classrooms with at least 30% English learners. The study explored two major foci. First, integrated science and language lessons implemented by six scientist-teacher partnerships were investigated. Second, the responsibilities taken on by the team members during the implementation of integrated science and language lessons were examined. Three data sources were analyzed: (1) six lesson sequences comprised of 28 lessons; (2) 18 lesson worksheet; and (3) 24 participant Retrospective interview transcripts (12 scientists and 12 teachers). Lessons across were examined according to four analytical categories which included the following: (1) nature of the science activities (e.g. hands-on); nature of language activities (e.g. speaking); (2) nature of instructional practices (e.g. student grouping); and (3) responsibilities of teachers and scientists (e.g. classroom). A micro level analysis illustrates how one scientist-teacher team innovatively used a children's story, Goldilocks and the Three Bears, to teach the measurement of length and temperature. A macro level analysis identified three characteristics of science activities

  2. Functional Improvement Following Diastasis Rectus Abdominus Repair in an Active Duty Navy Female.

    PubMed

    Gallus, Katerina M; Golberg, Kathy F; Field, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Return to physical activity following childbirth can be a difficult process complicated by structural changes during pregnancy. A common problem is the development of a diastasis of the rectus abdominus (DRA), defined as a horizontal separation of the abdominus muscles at the linea alba. Recent data indicate that the greater the distance of separation of the muscle, the worse the functional ability. We describe a 24-year-old active duty U.S. Navy female G1P2 with a diagnosis of DRA. At 2 months postpartum, she was referred to physical therapy because of back pain and inability to meet baseline activities of daily living. After 4 months of physical therapy, she was unable to complete curl ups as required by U.S. Navy physical fitness standards. Abdominoplasty with imbrication of the abdominal wall diastasis was performed followed by additional physical therapy, after which she returned to baseline functioning. The restoration of functional ability postoperatively suggests there is a therapeutic indication for surgical correction of DRA. In high-functioning military patients with DRA who fail to return to baseline level of activity following a trial of physical therapy, surgical intervention should be considered to obtain the optimal functional ability. PMID:27483541

  3. Activation of NF-κB and respiratory burst following Aspergillus fumigatus stimulation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sun, He; Xu, Xiao-yong; Tian, Xiao-li; Shao, Hong-tao; Wu, Xiao-dong; Wang, Quan; Su, Xin; Shi, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Dectin-2, a C-type lectin receptor (CLR), plays an essential role in mediating nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation and anti-fungal immunity in response to Candida albicans infection. However, the molecular mechanisms and function of Dectin-2 signaling in response to infection by the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus have not been characterized. In order to characterize Dectin-2 signaling in response to A. fumigatus infection, activation of Dectin-2 was analyzed at both transcriptional and translational levels. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) phosphorylation, NF-κB activation and cytokine production downstream of Dectin-2 activation were also investigated. In addition, Dectin-2-Syk function and its ability to mediate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and elimination of A. fumigatus conidia was examined. We demonstrate that Syk is involved in Dectin-2-induced IκBα (inhibitor of kappa B protein) phosphorylation and NF-κB activation following A. fumigatus stimulation in a time dependent manner. Silencing of Dectin-2 and Syk as well as Syk inhibition blocks NF-κB activation and cytokine secretion. Furthermore, the killing of A. fumigatus conidia and ROS production are significantly affected by Dectin-2 or Syk silencing as well as Syk inhibition. Swelling and germination of the fungus followed by hyphae formation and not the resting and heat-inactivated form of A. fumigatus mediate the activation of Dectin-2 signaling. In conclusion, Syk plays an essential role in IκBα kinase phosphorylation, NF-κB activation, and ROS production mediated by Dectin-2 activation in response to A. fumigatus infection. PMID:23886693

  4. Spontaneous brain activity following fear reminder of fear conditioning by using resting-state functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Pan; Zheng, Yong; Feng, Tingyong

    2015-01-01

    Although disrupting reconsolidation may be a promising approach to attenuate or erase the expression of fear memory, it is not clear how the neural state following fear reminder contribute to the following fear extinction. To address this question, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) to measure spontaneous neuronal activity and functional connectivity (RSFC) following fear reminder. Some brain regions such as dorsal anterior cingulate (dACC) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) showed increased amplitude of LFF (ALFF) in the fear reminder group than the no reminder group following fear reminder. More importantly, there was much stronger functional connectivity between the amygdala and vmPFC in the fear reminder group than those in the no reminder group. These findings suggest that the strong functional connectivity between vmPFC and amygdala following a fear reminder could serve as a key role in the followed-up fear extinction stages, which may contribute to the erasing of fear memory. PMID:26576733

  5. Increased atypical PKC expression and activity in the phrenic motor nucleus following cervical spinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Guenther, C.H.; Windelborn, J.A.; Tubon, T.C.; Yin, J.C.P.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2012-01-01

    Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) isoforms are expressed in phrenic motor neurons, a group of motor neurons critical for breathing. Following C2 cervical hemisection (C2HS), spontaneous plasticity occurs in crossed-spinal synaptic pathways to phrenic motor neurons, at least partially restoring inspiratory phrenic activity below the injury. Since aPKCs are necessary for synaptic plasticity in other systems, we tested the hypothesis that C2HS increases aPKC expression and activity in spinal regions associated with the phrenic motor nucleus. C2 laminectomy (sham) or C2HS was performed on adult, male Lewis rats. Ventral spinal segments C3–5 were harvested 1, 3 or 28 days post-surgery, and prepared for aPKC enzyme activity assays and immunoblots. Ventral cervical aPKC activity was elevated 1 and 28, but not 3, days post-C2HS (1 day: 63% vs sham ipsilateral to injury; p<0.05; 28 day: 426% vs sham; p<0.05; no difference in ipsilateral vs contralateral response). Total PKCζ/ι protein expression was unchanged by C2HS, but total and phosphorylated PKMζ (constitutively active PKCζ isoform) increased ipsilateral to injury 28 days post-C2HS (p<0.05). Ipsilateral aPKC activity and expression were strongly correlated (r2=0.675, p<0.001). In a distinct group of rats, immunohistochemistry confirmed that aPKCs are expressed in neurons 28 days post-C2HS, including large, presumptive phrenic motor neurons; aPKCs were not detected in adjacent microglia (OX-42 positive cells) or astrocytes (GFAP positive cells). Changes in aPKC expression in the phrenic motor nucleus following C2HS suggests that aPKCs may contribute to functional recovery following cervical spinal injury. PMID:22329943

  6. Active video games to promote physical activity in children with cancer: a randomized clinical trial with follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low levels of physical activity, musculoskeletal morbidity and weight gain are commonly reported problems in children with cancer. Intensive medical treatment and a decline in physical activity may also result in reduced motor performance. Therefore, simple and inexpensive ways to promote physical activity and exercise are becoming an increasingly important part of children’s cancer treatment. Methods The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of active video games in promotion of physical activity in children with cancer. The research is conducted as a parallel randomized clinical trial with follow-up. Patients between 3 and 16 years old, diagnosed with cancer and treated with vincristine in two specialized medical centers are asked to participate. Based on statistical estimates, the target enrollment is 40 patients. The intervention includes playing elective active video games and, in addition, education and consultations for the family. The control group will receive a general recommendation for physical activity for 30 minutes per day. The main outcomes are the amount of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Other outcomes include motor performance, fatigue and metabolic risk factors. The outcomes are examined with questionnaires, diaries, physical examinations and blood tests at baseline and at 2, 6, 12 and 30 months after the baseline. Additionally, the children’s perceptions of the most enjoyable activation methods are explored through an interview at 2 months. Discussion This trial will help to answer the question of whether playing active video games is beneficial for children with cancer. It will also provide further reasoning for physical activity promotion and training of motor skills during treatment. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01748058 (October 15, 2012). PMID:24708773

  7. Active extravasation of gadolinium-based contrast agent into the subdural space following lumbar puncture.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Pranay D; Hanser, Evelyn M; Wang, Harrison; Farid, Nikdokht

    2016-01-01

    A 38year-old male presented with cauda equina syndrome following multiple lumbar puncture attempts. Lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a subdural hematoma and an area of apparent contrast enhancement in the spinal canal on sagittal post-contrast images. Axial post-contrast images obtained seven minutes later demonstrated an increase in size and change in shape of the region of apparent contrast enhancement, indicating active extravasation of the contrast agent. This is the first reported case of active extravasation of gadolinium-based contrast agent in the spine. PMID:27317202

  8. An Overview of Follow-On Testing Activities of the A-3 Subscale Diffuser Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James E.

    2009-01-01

    An overview of NASA Stennis Space Center's (SSC) A-3 Subscale Diffuser Test (SDT) Project is presented. The original scope of the SDT Project, conducted from April 2007 to January 2008, collected data to support mitigation of risk associated with design and procurement activities of the A-3 Test Stand Project, an effort to construct a simulated altitude test facility at SSC in support of NASA's Constellation Program. Follow-on tests were conducted from May 2008 through August 2009, utilizing the SDT test setup as a testbed for additional risk mitigation activities. Included are descriptions of the Subscale Diffuser (SD) test article, the test facility configuration, and test approaches.

  9. Return to Sport and Recreational Activity Following Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Bugbee, William; Nielsen, Evan Scott; McCauley, Julie C.; Pulido, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation is an integral part of the cartilage repair paradigm. There is little data regarding return to sport or recreational activity after OCA. The purpose of the present study was to 1) determine if athletic patients undergoing OCA returned to sport, 2) assess reason(s) why in those who did not, 3) and ascertain patient and graft-related characteristics that differed between those who returned or did not return to sport. Methods: Our institution’s OCA database was used to identify 149 knees in 142 patients who participated in sport or recreational activity prior to cartilage injury (45% highly-competitive athletes and 55% well-trained and frequently sporting) and had a minimum follow-up of 1 year (Table 1). The average age was 31 years and 59% were male. The majority of patients (68%) sustained a sports-related injury to their knee and 89% had undergone previous surgery (mean 2.1). Median time from onset of symptoms to OCA transplantation was 2.7 years. Pre-injury and postoperative participation in sport or recreational activity was collected. Patients not returning to their pre-injury level of sport were mailed a questionnaire to assess why, which included knee and lifestyle-related reason(s). Standard objective and subjective outcome measures were also obtained. Further surgery on the operative knee was documented. Results: At a mean follow-up of 6 years, 76% (113 of 149 knees) returned to sport or recreational activity. Among the 113, 28% returned to the same level of pre-injury sport, 48% partially returned (returned to one or more but not all of the same sports or activities), and 25% returned to a different sport or activity. Among the 24% (36 of 149 knees) who did not return to sport or activity, reasons included lifestyle events such as starting a family, changing careers, end of organized sports, knee-related issues, and worry about re-injuring the knee. Postoperatively, 79% of knees were able to

  10. Reduced motor cortex activity during movement preparation following a period of motor skill practice.

    PubMed

    Wright, David J; Holmes, Paul; Di Russo, Francesco; Loporto, Michela; Smith, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Experts in a skill produce movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs) of smaller amplitude and later onset than novices. This may indicate that, following long-term training, experts require less effort to plan motor skill performance. However, no longitudinal evidence exists to support this claim. To address this, EEG was used to study the effect of motor skill training on cortical activity related to motor planning. Ten non-musicians took part in a 5-week training study learning to play guitar. At week 1, the MRCP was recorded from motor areas whilst participants played the G Major scale. Following a period of practice of the scale, the MRCP was recorded again at week 5. Results showed that the amplitude of the later pre-movement components were smaller at week 5 compared to week 1. This may indicate that, following training, less activity at motor cortex sites is involved in motor skill preparation. This supports claims for a more efficient motor preparation following motor skill training. PMID:23251647

  11. Preliminary evidence of reduced brain network activation in patients with post-traumatic migraine following concussion.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Anthony P; Reches, Amit; Elbin, R J; Dickman, Dalia; Laufer, Ilan; Geva, Amir B; Shacham, Galit; DeWolf, Ryan; Collins, Michael W

    2016-06-01

    Post-traumatic migraine (PTM) (i.e., headache, nausea, light and/or noise sensitivity) is an emerging risk factor for prolonged recovery following concussion. Concussions and migraine share similar pathophysiology characterized by specific ionic imbalances in the brain. Given these similarities, patients with PTM following concussion may exhibit distinct electrophysiological patterns, although researchers have yet to examine the electrophysiological brain activation in patients with PTM following concussion. A novel approach that may help differentiate brain activation in patients with and without PTM is brain network activation (BNA) analysis. BNA involves an algorithmic analysis applied to multichannel EEG-ERP data that provides a network map of cortical activity and quantitative data during specific tasks. A prospective, repeated measures design was used to evaluate BNA (during Go/NoGo task), EEG-ERP, cognitive performance, and concussion related symptoms at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks post-injury intervals among athletes with a medically diagnosed concussion with PTM (n = 15) and without (NO-PTM) (n = 22); and age, sex, and concussion history matched controls without concussion (CONTROL) (n = 20). Participants with PTM had significantly reduced BNA compared to NO-PTM and CONTROLS for Go and NoGo components at 3 weeks and for NoGo component at 4 weeks post-injury. The PTM group also demonstrated a more prominent deviation of network activity compared to the other two groups over a longer period of time. The composite BNA algorithm may be a more sensitive measure of electrophysiological change in the brain that can augment established cognitive assessment tools for detecting impairment in individuals with PTM. PMID:26091725

  12. Learner Preferences and Achievement Under Differing Amounts of Learner Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnackenberg, Heidi L.; Sullivan, Howard J.; Leader, Lars F.; Jones, Elizabeth E. K.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the effects of program mode (i.e., a lean program version containing a basic amount of learner practice versus a full mode containing expanded practice) and learner preference (matched or unmatched) for amount of practice on the achievement, time-in-program, and attitudes of university undergraduate students. Students preferred the lean…

  13. Discomfort and muscle activation during car egress in drivers with hemiplegia following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Nam-hae; Kim, Hwanhee; Chang, Moonyoung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated and compared the discomfort experienced during car egress with the car door opened at different angles and muscle activation in drivers with hemiplegia following stroke and non-disabled drivers. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were five drivers with hemiplegia and five non-disabled drivers. The discomfort experienced during car egress was measured using the nine-point Likert scale when the door was opened wide and when it was opened 45°. Muscle activation was measured using the TeleMyo 2400T G2 electromyography system. Electromyograph electrodes were placed on the erector spinae, rectus abdominis, and rectus femoris muscles. [Results] In the non-disabled drivers, there was no significant difference in the discomforts they experienced during car egress when the door was opened wide and when it was opened 45°. However, the discomfort experienced by drivers with hemiplegia when the door was opened 45° was significantly higher than that experienced when it was opened wide. There was a significant difference in the activation of the erector spinae, but no difference in the activation of the rectus abdominis or rectus femoris muscles. [Conclusion] This study will help to understand the difficulties experienced by drivers with hemiplegia following stroke during car ingress and egress. PMID:26834350

  14. Managing urine leakage following laparoscopic radical prostatectomy with active suction of the prevesical space

    PubMed Central

    Stránský, Petr; Klečka, Jiří; Trávníček, Ivan; Ürge, Tomáš; Eret, Viktor; Ferda, Jiří; Petersson, Fredrik; Hes, Ondřej

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Urine leakage following laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) is a possible complication that may herald chronic urine incontinence. Intraoperative measures aiming to prevent this is not standardised. Aim Presentation of experience with active suction of the prevesical space in managing postoperative urine leakage. Material and methods At the Department of Urology, where laparoscopy of the upper abdomen and open RP were performed, a protocol for extraperitoneal LRP was established in 8/2008. Until 5/2011, 154 LRPs have been performed. Urine leakage from a suction drain appeared in 9 cases (5.8%). Permanent active suction (with a machine for Büllae thoracic drainage) of the prevesical space with negative pressure of 7-12 cm of H2O was started immediately. Results Urine leakage started after a mean of 0.9 (0-2) days postoperatively and stopped after a mean of 8.1 (15-42) days. Leakage stopped with only suctioning in 7 cases. In one case, open re-anastomosis was performed on the 7th postoperative day (POD). In another case, ineffective active suction was replaced on the 10th POD by needle vented suction without effect and the leakage stopped following gradual shortening of the drain up to the 15th POD. Conclusions Active suction of the prevesical space seems to be an effective intervention to stop postoperative urine leakage after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. PMID:23630554

  15. Differential Activation of Calpain-1 and Calpain-2 following Kainate-Induced Seizure Activity in Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seinfeld, Jeff; Xu, Xiaobo; Bi, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    Systemic injection of kainate produces repetitive seizure activity in both rats and mice. It also results in short-term synaptic modifications as well as delayed neurodegeneration. The signaling cascades involved in both short-term and delayed responses are not clearly defined. The calcium-dependent protease calpain is activated in various brain structures following systemic kainate injection, although the precise involvement of the two major brain calpain isoforms, calpain-1 and calpain-2, remains to be defined. It has recently been reported that calpain-1 and calpain-2 play opposite roles in NMDA receptor-mediated neuroprotection or neurodegeneration, with calpain-1 being neuroprotective and calpain-2 being neurodegenerative. In the present study, we determined the activation pattern of calpain-1 and calpain-2 by analyzing changes in levels of different calpain substrates, including spectrin, drebrin, and PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog; a specific calpain-2 substrate) in both rats, and wild-type and calpain-1 knock-out mice. The results indicate that, while calpain-2 is rapidly activated in pyramidal cells throughout CA1 and CA3, rapid calpain-1 activation is restricted to parvalbumin-positive and to a lesser extent CCK-positive, but not somatostatin-positive, interneurons. In addition, calpain-1 knock-out mice exhibit increased long-term neurodegeneration in CA1, reinforcing the notion that calpain-1 activation is neuroprotective. PMID:27622212

  16. Differential Activation of Calpain-1 and Calpain-2 following Kainate-Induced Seizure Activity in Rats and Mice.

    PubMed

    Seinfeld, Jeff; Baudry, Neema; Xu, Xiaobo; Bi, Xiaoning; Baudry, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Systemic injection of kainate produces repetitive seizure activity in both rats and mice. It also results in short-term synaptic modifications as well as delayed neurodegeneration. The signaling cascades involved in both short-term and delayed responses are not clearly defined. The calcium-dependent protease calpain is activated in various brain structures following systemic kainate injection, although the precise involvement of the two major brain calpain isoforms, calpain-1 and calpain-2, remains to be defined. It has recently been reported that calpain-1 and calpain-2 play opposite roles in NMDA receptor-mediated neuroprotection or neurodegeneration, with calpain-1 being neuroprotective and calpain-2 being neurodegenerative. In the present study, we determined the activation pattern of calpain-1 and calpain-2 by analyzing changes in levels of different calpain substrates, including spectrin, drebrin, and PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog; a specific calpain-2 substrate) in both rats, and wild-type and calpain-1 knock-out mice. The results indicate that, while calpain-2 is rapidly activated in pyramidal cells throughout CA1 and CA3, rapid calpain-1 activation is restricted to parvalbumin-positive and to a lesser extent CCK-positive, but not somatostatin-positive, interneurons. In addition, calpain-1 knock-out mice exhibit increased long-term neurodegeneration in CA1, reinforcing the notion that calpain-1 activation is neuroprotective. PMID:27622212

  17. Fracture of the cemented femoral component following hemiarthroplasty in physically active patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Cankaya, Deniz; Yoldas, Burak; Yılmaz, Serdar; Tecirli, Ali; Ozkurt, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Fracture of the femoral stem following hip arthroplasty has become very rare since the developments in modern prosthetic designs. Prevention by identifying the risk factors is the best way to overcome these complex problems, as treatment is difficult. Case Report: Femoral component fracture after cemented hemiarthroplasty in a physically active 64-year-old, male patient is reported in this present article. Conclusion: The present case emphasizes the importance of preserving the joint after hip fracture and avoidance of using mono block prosthesis in younger patients. If the patient is physically active, he/she should be advised to limit her/his daily activities to moderate intensity after hemiarthroplasty surgery. PMID:27299090

  18. Reconstruction of 137Cs activity in the ocean following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumune, Daisuke; Aoyama, Michio; Tsubono, Takaki; Tateda, Yutaka; Misumi, Kazuhiro; Hayami, Hiroshi; Toyoda, Yasuhiro; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Yoshikatsu; Uematsu, Mitsuo

    2014-05-01

    A series of accidents at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant following the earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011 resulted in the release of radioactive materials to the ocean by two major pathways, direct release from the accident site and atmospheric deposition. We reconstructed spatiotemporal variability of 137Cs activity in the ocean by the comparison model simulations and observed data. We employed a regional scale and the North Pacific scale oceanic dispersion models, an atmospheric transport model, a sediment transport model, a dynamic biological compartment model for marine biota and river runoff model to investigate the oceanic contamination. Direct releases of 137Cs were estimated for more than 2 years after the accident by comparing simulated results and observed activities very close to the site. The estimated total amounts of directly released 137Cs was 3.6±0.7 PBq. Directly release rate of 137Cs decreased exponentially with time by the end of December 2012 and then, was almost constant. The daily release rate of 137Cs was estimated to be 3.0 x 1010 Bq day-1 by the end of September 2013. The activity of directly released 137Cs was detectable only in the coastal zone after December 2012. Simulated 137Cs activities attributable to direct release were in good agreement with observed activities, a result that implies the estimated direct release rate was reasonable, while simulated 137Cs activities attributable to atmospheric deposition were low compared to measured activities. The rate of atmospheric deposition onto the ocean was underestimated because of a lack of measurements of dose rate and air activity of 137Cs over the ocean when atmospheric deposition rates were being estimated. Observed 137Cs activities attributable to atmospheric deposition in the ocean helped to improve the accuracy of simulated atmospheric deposition rates. Although there is no observed data of 137Cs activity in the ocean from 11 to 21 March 2011, observed data of

  19. Improvements to executive function during exercise training predict maintenance of physical activity over the following year

    PubMed Central

    Best, John R.; Nagamatsu, Lindsay S.; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that exercise training benefits cognitive, neural, and physical health markers in older adults. It is likely that these positive effects will diminish if participants return to sedentary lifestyles following training cessation. Theory posits that that the neurocognitive processes underlying self-regulation, namely executive function (EF), are important to maintaining positive health behaviors. Therefore, we examined whether better EF performance in older women would predict greater adherence to routine physical activity (PA) over 1 year following a 12-month resistance exercise training randomized controlled trial. The study sample consisted of 125 community-dwelling women aged 65–75 years old. Our primary outcome measure was self-reported PA, as measured by the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE), assessed on a monthly basis from month 13 to month 25. Executive function was assessed using the Stroop Test at baseline (month 0) and post-training (month 12). Latent growth curve analyses showed that, on average, PA decreased during the follow-up period but at a decelerating rate. Women who made greater improvements to EF during the training period showed better adherence to PA during the 1-year follow-up period (β = −0.36, p < 0.05); this association was unmitigated by the addition of covariates (β = −0.44, p < 0.05). As expected, EF did not predict changes in PA during the training period (p > 0.10). Overall, these findings suggest that improving EF plays an important role in whether older women maintain higher levels of PA following exercise training and that this association is only apparent after training when environmental support for PA is low. PMID:24904387

  20. Learning on the IGT follows emergence of knowledge but not differential somatic activity.

    PubMed

    Fernie, Gordon; Tunney, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    The importance of unconscious autonomic activity vs. knowledge in influencing behavior on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) has been the subject of debate. The task's developers, Bechara and colleagues, have claimed that behavior on the IGT is influenced by somatic activity and that this activity precedes the emergence of knowledge about the task contingencies sufficient to guide behavior. Since then others have claimed that this knowledge emerges much earlier on the task. However, it has yet to be established whether somatic activity which differentiates between advantageous and disadvantageous choices on the IGT is found before this point. This study describes an experiment to determine whether knowledge sufficient to guide behavior precedes differential autonomic activity or vice versa. This experiment used a computerized version of the IGT, knowledge probes after every 10 trials and skin conductance recording to measure somatic activity. Whereas in previous reports the majority of participants end the task with full conceptual knowledge of the IGT contingencies we found little evidence in support of this conclusion. However, full conceptual knowledge was not critical for advantageous deck selection to occur and most participants had knowledge sufficient to guide behavior after approximately 40 trials. We did not find anticipatory physiological activity sufficient to differentiate between deck types in the period prior to acquiring this knowledge. However, post-punishment physiological activity was found to be larger for the disadvantageous decks in the pre-knowledge period, but only for participants who displayed knowledge. Post-reward physiological activity distinguished between the advantageous and disadvantageous decks across the whole experiment but, again, only in participants who displayed knowledge and then only in later trials following their display of knowledge. PMID:24109462

  1. Cortical activation following chronic passive implantation of a wide-field suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos, Joel; Fallon, James B.; Nayagam, David A. X.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Luu, Chi D.; Allen, Penelope J.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Williams, Chris E.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. The research goal is to develop a wide-field retinal stimulating array for prosthetic vision. This study aimed at evaluating the efficacy of a suprachoroidal electrode array in evoking visual cortex activity after long term implantation. Approach. A planar silicone based electrode array (8 mm × 19 mm) was implanted into the suprachoroidal space in cats (ntotal = 10). It consisted of 20 platinum stimulating electrodes (600 μm diameter) and a trans-scleral cable terminated in a subcutaneous connector. Three months after implantation (nchronic = 6), or immediately after implantation (nacute = 4), an electrophysiological study was performed. Electrode total impedance was measured from voltage transients using 500 μs, 1 mA pulses. Electrically evoked potentials (EEPs) and multi-unit activity were recorded from the visual cortex in response to monopolar retinal stimulation. Dynamic range and cortical activation spread were calculated from the multi-unit recordings. Main results. The mean electrode total impedance in vivo following 3 months was 12.5 ± 0.3 kΩ. EEPs were recorded for 98% of the electrodes. The median evoked potential threshold was 150 nC (charge density 53 μC cm-2). The lowest stimulation thresholds were found proximal to the area centralis. Mean thresholds from multiunit activity were lower for chronic (181 ± 14 nC) compared to acute (322 ± 20 nC) electrodes (P < 0.001), but there was no difference in dynamic range or cortical activation spread. Significance. Suprachoroidal stimulation threshold was lower in chronic than acute implantation and was within safe charge limits for platinum. Electrode-tissue impedance following chronic implantation was higher, indicating the need for sufficient compliance voltage (e.g. 12.8 V for mean impedance, threshold and dynamic range). The wide-field suprachoroidal array reliably activated the retina after chronic implantation.

  2. Detection of abnormal muscle activations during walking following spinal cord injury (SCI).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Low, K H; McGregor, Alison H; Tow, Adela

    2013-04-01

    In order to identify optimal rehabilitation strategies for spinal cord injury (SCI) participants, assessment of impaired walking is required to detect, monitor and quantify movement disorders. In the proposed assessment, ten healthy and seven SCI participants were recruited to perform an over-ground walking test at slow walking speeds. SCI participants were given assistance from physiotherapists, if required, while they were walking. In agreement with other research, larger cadence and smaller step length and swing phase of SCI gait were observed as a result of muscle weakness and resultant gait instability. Muscle activation patterns of seven major leg muscles were collected. The EMG signal was processed by the RMS in frequency domain to represent the muscle activation power, and the distribution of muscle activation was compared between healthy and SCI participants. The alternations of muscle activation within the phases of the gait cycle are highlighted to facilitate our understanding of the underlying muscular activation following SCI. Key differences were observed (p-value=0.0006) in the reduced activation of tibialis anterior (TA) in single stance phase and rectus femoris (RF) in swing phase (p-value=0.0011). We can then conclude that the proposed assessment approach of gait provides valuable information that can be used to target and define therapeutic interventions and their evaluation; hence impacting the functional outcome of SCI individuals. PMID:23396198

  3. Metabolic maintenance of cell asymmetry following division in activated T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Verbist, Katherine C; Guy, Cliff S; Milasta, Sandra; Liedmann, Swantje; Kamiński, Marcin M; Wang, Ruoning; Green, Douglas R

    2016-04-21

    Asymmetric cell division, the partitioning of cellular components in response to polarizing cues during mitosis, has roles in differentiation and development. It is important for the self-renewal of fertilized zygotes in Caenorhabditis elegans and neuroblasts in Drosophila, and in the development of mammalian nervous and digestive systems. T lymphocytes, upon activation by antigen-presenting cells (APCs), can undergo asymmetric cell division, wherein the daughter cell proximal to the APC is more likely to differentiate into an effector-like T cell and the distal daughter is more likely to differentiate into a memory-like T cell. Upon activation and before cell division, expression of the transcription factor c-Myc drives metabolic reprogramming, necessary for the subsequent proliferative burst. Here we find that during the first division of an activated T cell in mice, c-Myc can sort asymmetrically. Asymmetric distribution of amino acid transporters, amino acid content, and activity of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is correlated with c-Myc expression, and both amino acids and mTORC1 activity sustain the differences in c-Myc expression in one daughter cell compared to the other. Asymmetric c-Myc levels in daughter T cells affect proliferation, metabolism, and differentiation, and these effects are altered by experimental manipulation of mTORC1 activity or c-Myc expression. Therefore, metabolic signalling pathways cooperate with transcription programs to maintain differential cell fates following asymmetric T-cell division. PMID:27064903

  4. Hydrogen Sulfide Attenuates Tissue Plasminogen Activator-Induced Cerebral Hemorrhage Following Experimental Stroke.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Wang, Yi; Xiao, Yunqi; Hua, Zichun; Cheng, Jian; Jia, Jia

    2016-06-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), the only approved drug for the treatment of ischemic stroke, increases the risk of cerebral hemorrhage. Here, we investigated whether the newly identified gaso-transmitter hydrogen sulfide (H2S), when used in combination with tPA, reduced the hemorrhagic transformation following stroke. In a mouse model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), intravenous injection of tPA enhanced cerebral hemorrhage, which was significantly attenuated by the co-administration of two structurally unrelated H2S donors, ADT-OH and NaHS. By assessing extravasation of Evans blue into the ischemic hemisphere as well as brain edema following MCAO, we further showed that a tPA-exacerbated BBB disruption was significantly ameliorated by the co-administration of ADT-OH. In the mouse MCAO model, tPA upregulated Akt activation, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) activity in the ischemic brain, which was remarkably attenuated by ADT-OH. In the in vitro glucose-oxygen deprivation (OGD) model, ADT-OH markedly attenuated tPA-enhanced Akt activation and VEGF expression in brain microvascular endothelial cells. Finally, ADT-OH improved functional outcomes in mice subjected to MCAO and tPA infusion. In conclusion, H2S donors reduced tPA-induced cerebral hemorrhage by possibly inhibiting the Akt-VEGF-MMP9 cascade. Administration of H2S donors has potential as a novel modality to improve the safety of tPA following stroke. PMID:27018013

  5. Subpallial and hypothalamic areas activated following sexual and agonistic encounters in male chickens.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingjing; Kuenzel, Wayne J; Anthony, Nicholas B; Jurkevich, Alexander

    2010-10-01

    Male sexual and agonistic behaviors are controlled by the common social behavior network, involving subpallial and hypothalamic brain areas. In order to understand how this common network generates different behavioral outcomes, induction of FOS protein was used to examine the patterns of neuronal activation in adult male chickens following interaction with a female or a male. Males were subjected to one of the following treatments: handling control, non-contact interaction with a female, contact interaction with a live female, a taxidermy female model or another male. The number of FOS-immunoreactive (FOS-ir) cells, and the area and immunostaining density of individual cells were quantified in the medial preoptic nucleus (POM), medial extended amygdala (nucleus taeniae of the amygdala, TnA, and dorsolateral and ventromedial subdivisions of the medial portion of the bed nucleus of stria terminalis, BSTM1 and BSTM2, respectively), lateral septum (SL), hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), bed nucleus of the pallial commissure (NCPa) and ventrolateral thalamic nucleus (VLT). An increase in FOS-ir cells following appetitive sexual behavior was found in BSTM2 and NCPa. Copulation augmented FOS-ir in POM, SL, VLT, and PVN. Intermale interactions increased FOS-ir in all examined brain regions except the TnA and BSTM. Within the SL, copulatory and agonistic behavior activated spatially segregated cell groups. In the PVN, different social behaviors induced significant changes in the distribution of FOS-ir cell sizes suggesting activation of heterogeneous subpopulations of cells. Collectively, behavioral outcomes of male-female and male-male interactions are associated with a combination of common and site-specific patterns of neural activation. PMID:20600197

  6. Vaxtracker: Active on-line surveillance for adverse events following inactivated influenza vaccine in children.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Patrick; Moberley, Sarah; Dalton, Craig; Stephenson, Jody; Elvidge, Elissa; Butler, Michelle; Durrheim, David N

    2014-09-22

    Vaxtracker is a web based survey for active post marketing surveillance of Adverse Events Following Immunisation. It is designed to efficiently monitor vaccine safety of new vaccines by early signal detection of serious adverse events. The Vaxtracker system automates contact with the parents or carers of immunised children by email and/or sms message to their smart phone. A hyperlink on the email and text messages links to a web based survey exploring adverse events following the immunisation. The Vaxtracker concept was developed during 2011 (n=21), and piloted during the 2012 (n=200) and 2013 (n=477) influenza seasons for children receiving inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in the Hunter New England Local Health District, New South Wales, Australia. Survey results were reviewed by surveillance staff to detect any safety signals and compare adverse event frequencies among the different influenza vaccines administered. In 2012, 57% (n=113) of the 200 participants responded to the online survey and 61% (290/477) in 2013. Vaxtracker appears to be an effective method for actively monitoring adverse events following influenza vaccination in children. PMID:25077424

  7. Grammatical Processing in Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clahsen, Harald; Felser, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    The ability to process the linguistic input in real time is crucial for successfully acquiring a language, and yet little is known about how language learners comprehend or produce language in real time. Against this background, we have conducted a detailed study of grammatical processing in language learners using experimental psycholinguistic…

  8. Learner Autonomy and New Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raya, Manuel Jimenez; Fernandez, Jose Maria Perez

    2002-01-01

    Presents paths for theoretical research and practical procedures that may help teachers make new technology pedagogically relevant. Discusses the need to develop learner autonomy to help students process information in meaningful ways and become independent learners by developing effective learning strategies, transfer skills, and a greater sense…

  9. The Generative Adolescent Mathematical Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to consider the personal epistemologies of generative adolescent mathematical learners. A generative disposition defined a learner who operated mathematically in ways that reflect an internalized authority for knowing and a constructive orientation to knowledge. Drawing upon the radical constructivist teaching…

  10. Chinese English Learners' Strategic Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Dianjian; Lai, Hongling; Leslie, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate Chinese English learners' ability to use communication strategies (CSs). The subjects are put in a relatively real English referential communication setting and the analyses of the research data show that Chinese English learners, when encountering problems in foreign language (FL) communication, are…

  11. Sensitizing ESL Learners to Genre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swami, Jasti Appa

    2008-01-01

    This article evaluates the efficacy of explicit genre-based instruction by sensitizing the ESL learners to the concept of genre. The main questions addressed are: How does sensitizing ESL learners to the rhetorical move structure of a genre, the communicative purposes of these moves, and linguistic features that realize these moves help them to…

  12. Iranian EFL Learners' Compliment Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allami, Hamid; Montazeri, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed at examining the knowledge of Iranian EFL learners in responding to compliments in English, with a focus on the variables of gender, age and educational background. The data were collected through a 24-item English Discourse Completion Task (DCT) to which 40 male and female EFL learners were asked to provide short…

  13. High Ability and Learner Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hindal, Huda; Reid, Norman; Whitehead, Rex

    2013-01-01

    The outstandingly able learner has been conceptualised, in terms of test and examination performance, as the learner showing superior academic performance which is markedly better than that of peers and in ways regarded as of value by wider society. In Kuwait, such superior examination performance leads to a classification regarded as being…

  14. Profiling Mobile English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Jason; Diem, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use an app-embedded survey to profile language learner demographics. A total of 3,759 EFL language learners from primarily eight L1 backgrounds (French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Russian, Spanish and Thai) responded to the survey embedded within a popular English grammar app. This app has over 500,000…

  15. Assistive Software for Disabled Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sharon; Baggaley, Jon

    2004-01-01

    Previous reports in this series (#32 and 36) have discussed online software features of value to disabled learners in distance education. The current report evaluates four specific assistive software products with useful features for visually and hearing impaired learners: "ATutor", "ACollab", "Natural Voice", and "Just Vanilla". The evaluative…

  16. Biochemical characterization of a halotolerant feruloyl esterase from Actinomyces spp.: refolding and activity following thermal deactivation.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Cameron J; Tanksale, Akshat; Haritos, Victoria S

    2016-02-01

    Ferulic acid esterases (FAE, EC. 3.1.1.73) hydrolyse the linkage between hemicellulose and lignin and thus have potential for use in mild enzymatic pretreatment of biomass as an alternative to thermochemical approaches. Here, we report the characterization of a novel FAE (ActOFaeI) obtained from the bacterium, Actinomyces sp. oral which was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 in two forms: with and without its putative signal peptide. The truncated form was found to have <10 % relative activity compared to the full length and was more prone to aggregation after purification. The enzyme with retained peptide demonstrated 2 to 4-fold higher activity against methyl caffeate and methyl p-coumarate, with specific activities of 477.6 and 174.4 U mg(-1) respectively, than the equivalent activities of the benchmark FAE from Aspergillus niger A and B. ActOFaeI retained activity over a broad pH range with a maximum at 9 but >90 % relative activity at pH 6.5 and an optimum reaction temperature of 30 °C. ActOFaeI increased activity by 15% in high salt conditions (1000 mMNaCl) and its thermal unfolding temperature improved from 41.5 °C in standard buffer to 74 °C in the presence of 2500 mM sodium malonate. ActOFaeI also released ferulic acid from destarched wheat bran when combined with a xylanase preparation. After treatment above the thermal denaturation temperature followed by cooling to room temperature, ActOFaeI demonstrated spontaneous refolding into an active state. ActOFaeI displays many useful characteristics for enzymatic pretreatment of lignocellulose and contributes to our understanding of this important family. PMID:26497017

  17. Genotoxicity induced by a shale oil byproduct in Chinese hamster cells following metabolic activation

    SciTech Connect

    Okinaka, R.T.; Nickols, J.W.; Chen, D.J.; Strniste, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    A process water obtained from a holding tank during the surface retorting of oil shale has been shown to induce a linear dose response of 100 histidine revertants/sub ..mu../1 in the Ames/Salmonella test. The complex mixture has also previously been shown to induce genotoxicity in mammalian cells following activation by near ultraviolet light and natural sunlight. This report focuses on the effects of a particular oil shale retort process water on cultured Chinese hamster cells following metabolic activation by either rat liver homogenate or lethally irradiated but metabolically competent Syrian hamster embryonic cells. Cytotoxic and mutagenic responses induced by the process water and a fractionated sample from it containing the majority of the mutagenic activity (as assessed by the Salmonella test) were measured under conditions designed to optimally measure the mutagenic potency of the promutagen, benzo(a)pyrene. These results suggest a possible discrepancy in the genotoxic potential of this complex mixture when various methods are utilized to measure its potential.

  18. NRF2-mediated Notch pathway activation enhances hematopoietic reconstitution following myelosuppressive radiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Thimmulappa, Rajesh K.; Kumar, Vineet; Cui, Wanchang; Kumar, Sarvesh; Kombairaju, Ponvijay; Zhang, Hao; Margolick, Joseph; Matsui, William; Macvittie, Thomas; Malhotra, Sanjay V.; Biswal, Shyam

    2014-01-01

    A nuclear disaster may result in exposure to potentially lethal doses of ionizing radiation (IR). Hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS) is characterized by severe myelosuppression, which increases the risk of infection, bleeding, and mortality. Here, we determined that activation of nuclear factor erythroid-2–related factor 2 (NRF2) signaling enhances hematopoietic stem progenitor cell (HSPC) function and mitigates IR-induced myelosuppression and mortality. Augmenting NRF2 signaling in mice, either by genetic deletion of the NRF2 inhibitor Keap1 or by pharmacological NRF2 activation with 2-trifluoromethyl-2′-methoxychalone (TMC), enhanced hematopoietic reconstitution following bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Strikingly, even 24 hours after lethal IR exposure, oral administration of TMC mitigated myelosuppression and mortality in mice. Furthermore, TMC administration to irradiated transgenic Notch reporter mice revealed activation of Notch signaling in HSPCs and enhanced HSPC expansion by increasing Jagged1 expression in BM stromal cells. Administration of a Notch inhibitor ablated the effects of TMC on hematopoietic reconstitution. Taken together, we identified a mechanism by which NRF2-mediated Notch signaling improves HSPC function and myelosuppression following IR exposure. Our data indicate that targeting this pathway may provide a countermeasure against the damaging effects of IR exposure. PMID:24463449

  19. Motivation Classification and Grade Prediction for MOOCs Learners

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Yang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    While MOOCs offer educational data on a new scale, many educators find great potential of the big data including detailed activity records of every learner. A learner's behavior such as if a learner will drop out from the course can be predicted. How to provide an effective, economical, and scalable method to detect cheating on tests such as surrogate exam-taker is a challenging problem. In this paper, we present a grade predicting method that uses student activity features to predict whether a learner may get a certification if he/she takes a test. The method consists of two-step classifications: motivation classification (MC) and grade classification (GC). The MC divides all learners into three groups including certification earning, video watching, and course sampling. The GC then predicts a certification earning learner may or may not obtain a certification. Our experiment shows that the proposed method can fit the classification model at a fine scale and it is possible to find a surrogate exam-taker. PMID:26884747

  20. Delayed healing of a navicular stress fracture, following limited weight-bearing activity

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Matthew; Fulcher, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a 21-year-old man, a semiprofessional football (soccer) player, with a navicular stress fracture. It highlights the difficulty in diagnosing the condition and the complications arising from inadequate management. The case discusses the optimal management of these stress fractures and the detrimental role of weight-bearing recovery. The diagnosis of navicular stress fractures is challenging, and a high index of suspicion is required. The available literature indicates that limited weightbearing is not an appropriate treatment for navicular stress injuries. Non-weight-bearing (NWB) cast immobilisation for 6–8 weeks appears to be the gold standard treatment; however, open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF) has similar success rates and an equal return-to-play time but should also be followed by a period of NWB. NWB cast immobilisation for 6 weeks remains a good second option at any time following failed limited weight-bearing activity. PMID:24618870

  1. Specific activation of dendritic cells enhances clearance of Bacillus anthracis following infection.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Iain J T; Mann, Elizabeth R; Stokes, Margaret G; English, Nicholas R; Knight, Stella C; Williamson, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells are potent activators of the immune system and have a key role in linking innate and adaptive immune responses. In the current study we have used ex vivo pulsed bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDC) in a novel adoptive transfer strategy to protect against challenge with Bacillus anthracis, in a murine model. Pre-pulsing murine BMDC with either recombinant Protective Antigen (PA) or CpG significantly upregulated expression of the activation markers CD40, CD80, CD86 and MHC-II. Passive transfusion of mice with pulsed BMDC, concurrently with active immunisation with rPA in alum, significantly enhanced (p<0.001) PA-specific splenocyte responses seven days post-immunisation. Parallel studies using ex vivo DCs expanded from human peripheral blood and activated under the same conditions as the murine DC, demonstrated that human DCs had a PA dose-related significant increase in the markers CD40, CD80 and CCR7 and that the increases in CD40 and CD80 were maintained when the other activating components, CpG and HK B. anthracis were added to the rPA in culture. Mice vaccinated on a single occasion intra-muscularly with rPA and alum and concurrently transfused intra-dermally with pulsed BMDC, demonstrated 100% survival following lethal B. anthracis challenge and had significantly enhanced (p<0.05) bacterial clearance within 2 days, compared with mice vaccinated with rPA and alum alone. PMID:25380285

  2. Activation of Neutrophils via IP3 Pathway Following Exposure to Demodex-Associated Bacterial Proteins.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Fred; Banville, Nessa; Bergin, David A; Smedman, Christian; Paulie, Staffan; Reeves, Emer; Kavanagh, Kevin

    2016-02-01

    Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory condition that predominantly affects the skin of the face. Sera from rosacea patients display elevated reactivity to proteins from a bacterium (Bacillus oleronius) originally isolated from a Demodex mite from a rosacea patient suggesting a possible role for bacteria in the induction and persistence of this condition. This work investigated the ability of B. oleronius proteins to activate neutrophils and demonstrated activation via the IP3 pathway. Activated neutrophils displayed increased levels of IP1 production, F-actin formation, chemotaxis, and production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6 following stimulation by pure and crude B. oleronius protein preparations (2 μg/ml), respectively. In addition, neutrophils exposed to pure and crude B. oleronius proteins (2 μg/ml) demonstrated increased release of internally stored calcium (Ca(2+)), a hallmark of the IP3 pathway of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils play a significant role in the inflammation associated with rosacea, and this work demonstrates how B. oleronius proteins can induce neutrophil recruitment and activation. PMID:26433579

  3. Visualization of Active Glucocerebrosidase in Rodent Brain with High Spatial Resolution following In Situ Labeling with Fluorescent Activity Based Probes

    PubMed Central

    Herrera Moro Chao, Daniela; Kallemeijn, Wouter W.; Marques, Andre R. A.; Orre, Marie; Ottenhoff, Roelof; van Roomen, Cindy; Foppen, Ewout; Renner, Maria C.; Moeton, Martina; van Eijk, Marco; Boot, Rolf G.; Kamphuis, Willem; Hol, Elly M.; Aten, Jan; Overkleeft, Hermen S.; Kalsbeek, Andries; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease is characterized by lysosomal accumulation of glucosylceramide due to deficient activity of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GBA). In cells, glucosylceramide is also degraded outside lysosomes by the enzyme glucosylceramidase 2 (GBA2) of which inherited deficiency is associated with ataxias. The interest in GBA and glucosylceramide metabolism in the brain has grown following the notion that mutations in the GBA gene impose a risk factor for motor disorders such as α-synucleinopathies. We earlier developed a β-glucopyranosyl-configured cyclophellitol-epoxide type activity based probe (ABP) allowing in vivo and in vitro visualization of active molecules of GBA with high spatial resolution. Labeling occurs through covalent linkage of the ABP to the catalytic nucleophile residue in the enzyme pocket. Here, we describe a method to visualize active GBA molecules in rat brain slices using in vivo labeling. Brain areas related to motor control, like the basal ganglia and motor related structures in the brainstem, show a high content of active GBA. We also developed a β-glucopyranosyl cyclophellitol-aziridine ABP allowing in situ labeling of GBA2. Labeled GBA2 in brain areas can be identified and quantified upon gel electrophoresis. The distribution of active GBA2 markedly differs from that of GBA, being highest in the cerebellar cortex. The histological findings with ABP labeling were confirmed by biochemical analysis of isolated brain areas. In conclusion, ABPs offer sensitive tools to visualize active GBA and to study the distribution of GBA2 in the brain and thus may find application to establish the role of these enzymes in neurodegenerative disease conditions such as α-synucleinopathies and cerebellar ataxia. PMID:26418157

  4. T-cell death following immune activation is mediated by mitochondria-localized SARM.

    PubMed

    Panneerselvam, P; Singh, L P; Selvarajan, V; Chng, W J; Ng, S B; Tan, N S; Ho, B; Chen, J; Ding, J L

    2013-03-01

    Following acute-phase infection, activated T cells are terminated to achieve immune homeostasis, failure of which results in lymphoproliferative and autoimmune diseases. We report that sterile α- and heat armadillo-motif-containing protein (SARM), the most conserved Toll-like receptors adaptor, is proapoptotic during T-cell immune response. SARM expression is significantly reduced in natural killer (NK)/T lymphoma patients compared with healthy individuals, suggesting that decreased SARM supports NK/T-cell proliferation. T cells knocked down of SARM survived and proliferated more significantly compared with wild-type T cells following influenza infection in vivo. During activation of cytotoxic T cells, the SARM level fell before rising, correlating inversely with cell proliferation and subsequent T-cell clearance. SARM knockdown rescued T cells from both activation- and neglect-induced cell deaths. The mitochondria-localized SARM triggers intrinsic apoptosis by generating reactive oxygen species and depolarizing the mitochondrial potential. The proapoptotic function is attributable to the C-terminal sterile alpha motif and Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domains. Mechanistically, SARM mediates intrinsic apoptosis via B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family members. SARM suppresses B cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) and downregulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, which are cell survival effectors. Overexpression of Bcl-xL and double knockout of Bcl-2 associated X protein and Bcl-2 homologous antagonist killer substantially reduced SARM-induced apoptosis. Collectively, we have shown how T-cell death following infection is mediated by SARM-induced intrinsic apoptosis, which is crucial for T-cell homeostasis. PMID:23175186

  5. Physical Activity and Prostate Tumor Vessel Morphology: Data from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study.

    PubMed

    Van Blarigan, Erin L; Gerstenberger, John P; Kenfield, Stacey A; Giovannucci, Edward L; Stampfer, Meir J; Jones, Lee W; Clinton, Steven K; Chan, June M; Mucci, Lorelei A

    2015-10-01

    Vigorous activity is associated with lower risk of prostate cancer progression, but the biologic mechanisms are unknown. Exercise affects vascularization of tumors in animal models, and small, irregularly shaped vessels in prostate tumors are associated with fatal prostate cancer. We hypothesized that men who engaged in vigorous activity or brisk walking would have larger, more regularly shaped vessels in their prostate tumors. We prospectively examined whether physical activity was associated with prostate tumor microvessel morphology among 571 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study using ordinal logistic regression. Vessel size (μm(2)), vessel lumen regularity (perimeter(2)/4 · Π · area), and microvessel density (number/high-powered field) were ascertained in tumor sections stained for endothelial cell marker CD34. Vigorous activity [metabolic equivalent task (MET) ≥ 6], nonvigorous activity (MET < 6), and walking pace were assessed a median of 14 months before diagnosis. Prostate tumors from men who reported a brisk walking pace (3+ mph) had larger, more regularly shaped blood vessels compared with those of men who walked at a less than brisk pace [vessel regularity OR, 1.59; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11-2.27; P value, 0.01; vessel size OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.04-2.12; P value, 0.03]. Brisk walking was not associated with microvessel density; total vigorous and nonvigorous activities were not associated with vessel size, shape, or number. Brisk walking may be associated with larger, more regularly shaped vessels in prostate tumors. Additional research elucidating the effect of physical activity on prostate tumor biology is needed. PMID:26276753

  6. Increased Mucosal CD4+ T Cell Activation in Rhesus Macaques following Vaccination with an Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Bukh, Irene; Calcedo, Roberto; Roy, Soumitra; Carnathan, Diane G.; Grant, Rebecca; Qin, Qiuyue; Boyd, Surina; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Veeder, Christin L.; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Betts, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The possibility that vaccination with adenovirus (AdV) vectors increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of HIV acquisition within the Step trial. Modeling this within rhesus macaques is complicated because human adenoviruses, including human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5), are not endogenous to macaques. Here, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector (simian adenovirus 7 [SAdV-7]) enhances mucosal T cell activation within rhesus macaques. Following intramuscular SAdV-7 vaccination, we observed a pronounced increase in SAdV-7-specific CD4+ T cell responses in peripheral blood and, more dramatically, in rectal mucosa tissue. Vaccination also induced a significant increase in the frequency of activated memory CD4+ T cells in SAdV-7- and HAdV-5-vaccinated animals in the rectal mucosa but not in peripheral blood. These fluctuations within the rectal mucosa were also associated with a pronounced decrease in the relative frequency of naive resting CD4+ T cells. Together, these results indicate that peripheral vaccination with an AdV vector can increase the activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells, potentially providing an experimental model to further evaluate the role of host-vector interactions in increased HIV acquisition after AdV vector vaccination. IMPORTANCE The possibility that vaccination with a human adenovirus 5 vector increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition within the Step trial. In this study, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector in rhesus macaques enhances mucosal CD4+ T cell activation, the main cell target of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/HIV. The results showed that vaccination with an adenoviral vector indeed increases activation of mucosal CD4+ T cells and potentially increases susceptibility to SIV

  7. Data on antioxidant activity in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) following cryopreservation by vitrification

    PubMed Central

    Lazo-Javalera, María Fernanda; Tiznado-Hernández, Martín Ernesto; Vargas-Arispuro, Irasema; Valenzuela-Soto, Elisa; Rocha-Granados, María del Carmen; Martínez-Montero, Marcos Edel; Rivera-Domínguez, Marisela

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreservation is used for the long-term conservation of plant genetic resources. This technique very often induces lethal injury or tissue damage. In this study, we measured indicators of viability and cell damage following cryopreservation and vitrification-cryopreservation in Vitis vinifera L. axillary buds cv. “Flame seedless” stored in liquid nitrogen (LN) for: three seconds, one hour, one day, one week and one month; after LN thawed at 38 °C for three minutes. The enzymatic activity of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as the amount of malondialdehyde (MDA), total protein and viability were assayed. PMID:26958607

  8. Shear Punch Properties of Low Activation Ferritic Steels Following Irradiation in ORR

    SciTech Connect

    Ermi, Ruby M.; Hamilton, Margaret L.; Gelles, David S.; Ermi, August M.

    2001-10-01

    Shear punch post-irradiation test results are reported for a series of low activation steels containing Mn following irradiation in the Oak Ridge Reactor at 330 and 400 degrees centigrade to {approx}10 dpa. Alloy compositions included 2Cr, 9Cr and 12Cr steels with V to 1.5% and W to 1.0%. Comparison of results with tensile test results showed good correlations with previously observed trends except where disks were improperly manufactured because they were too thin or because engraving was faulty.

  9. Data on antioxidant activity in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) following cryopreservation by vitrification.

    PubMed

    Lazo-Javalera, María Fernanda; Tiznado-Hernández, Martín Ernesto; Vargas-Arispuro, Irasema; Valenzuela-Soto, Elisa; Rocha-Granados, María Del Carmen; Martínez-Montero, Marcos Edel; Rivera-Domínguez, Marisela

    2015-12-01

    Cryopreservation is used for the long-term conservation of plant genetic resources. This technique very often induces lethal injury or tissue damage. In this study, we measured indicators of viability and cell damage following cryopreservation and vitrification-cryopreservation in Vitis vinifera L. axillary buds cv. "Flame seedless" stored in liquid nitrogen (LN) for: three seconds, one hour, one day, one week and one month; after LN thawed at 38 °C for three minutes. The enzymatic activity of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as the amount of malondialdehyde (MDA), total protein and viability were assayed. PMID:26958607

  10. Optical Activity Follow Up MASTER Detection of the Blazar B2 2308+34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisenko, D.; Grigoreva, E.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Lipunov, V.; Tiurina, N.; Yecheistov, V.; Balanutsa, P.; Kornilov, V.; Chazov, V.; Kuznetsov, A.; Vladimirov, V.; Cheryasov, D.; Kornilov, M.; Safonov, B.; Gareyeva, D.; Yurkov, V.; Sergienko, Y.; Varda, D.; Sinyakov, E.; Gabovich, A.; Ivanov, K.; Yazev, S.; Budnev, N.; Konstantinov, E.; Chuvalaev, O.; Poleshchuk, V.; Gress, O.; Frolova, A.; Parkhomenko, A.; Tlatov, A.; Dormidontov, D.; Senik, V.; Krushinsky, V.; Zalozhnih, I.; Popov, A.; Bourdanov, A.; Podvorotny, P.; Shumkov, V.; Shurpakov, S.; Levato, H.; Saffe, C.; Mallamaci, C.; Lopez, C.; Podest, F.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Svertilov, S. I.; Iyudin, A. F.; Kuzmichev, L. A.

    2013-10-01

    Follow-up Fermi LAT Detection of Renewed Activity from B2 2308+34 (S.Buson, Atel #5477) MASTER-Tunka auto-detection system discovered strong brightening source at (RA, Dec) = 23h 11m 05.30s +34d 25m 11.3s on 2013-10-18.58796 UT. The B2 2308+34 unfiltered magnitude is 15.4 (limit 17.4m). One magnitude more than historical maximum during Catalina observations (http://master.sai.msu.ru/static/OT/J231105+342511-CRTS_LC.gif).

  11. Treatment of active duty military with PTSD in primary care: A follow-up report.

    PubMed

    Cigrang, Jeffrey A; Rauch, Sheila A M; Mintz, Jim; Brundige, Antoinette; Avila, Laura L; Bryan, Craig J; Goodie, Jeffrey L; Peterson, Alan L

    2015-12-01

    First-line trauma-focused therapies offered in specialty mental health clinics do not reach many veterans and active duty service members with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Primary care is an ideal environment to expand access to mental health care. Several promising clinical case series reports of brief PTSD therapies adapted for primary care have shown positive results, but the long-term effectiveness with military members is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term outcome of an open trial of a brief cognitive-behavioral primary care-delivered protocol developed specifically for deployment-related PTSD in a sample of 24 active duty military (15 men, 9 women). Measures of PTSD symptom severity showed statistically and clinically significant reductions from baseline to posttreatment that were maintained at the 6-month and 1-year follow-up assessments. Similar reductions were maintained in depressive symptoms and ratings of global mental health functioning. PMID:26519833

  12. Following atomistic kinetics on experimental timescales with the kinetic Activation Relaxation Technique

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mousseau, Normand; Beland, Laurent K; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-Francois; N'Tsouaglo, Gawonou Kokou; Restrepo, Oscar; Trochet, Mickael

    2015-01-01

    The properties of materials, even at the atomic level, evolve on macroscopic time scales. Following this evolution through simulation has been a challenge for many years. For lattice-based activated diffusion, kinetic Monte Carlo has turned out to be an almost perfect solution. Various accelerated molecular dynamical schemes, for their part, have allowed the study on long time scale of relatively simple systems. There is still a need, however, for methods able to handle complex materials such as alloys and disordered systems. Here, we review the kinetic Activation Relaxation Technique (k-ART), one of a handful of off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo methods,more » with on-the-fly cataloging, that have been proposed in the last few years.« less

  13. Neural Changes following Behavioral Activation for a Depressed Breast Cancer Patient: A Functional MRI Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Gawrysiak, Michael J.; Carvalho, John P.; Rogers, Baxter P.; Nicholas, Christopher R. N.; Dougherty, John H.; Hopko, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging is an innovative but at this stage underutilized method to assess the efficacy of psychotherapy for depression. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used in this case study to examine changes in brain activity in a depressed breast cancer patient receiving an 8-session Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD), based on the work of Hopko and Lejuez (2007). A music listening paradigm was used during fMRI brain scans to assess reward responsiveness at pre- and posttreatment. Following treatment, the patient exhibited attenuated depression and changes in blood oxygenation level dependence (BOLD) response in regions of the prefrontal cortex and the subgenual cingulate cortex. These preliminary findings outline a novel means to assess psychotherapy efficacy and suggest that BATD elicits functional brain changes in areas implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. Further research is necessary to explore neurobiological mechanisms of change in BATD, particularly the potential mediating effects of reward responsiveness and associated brain functioning. PMID:22953146

  14. Glucose transporter 2 expression is down regulated following P2X7 activation in enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Bourzac, Jean-François; L'Ériger, Karine; Larrivée, Jean-François; Arguin, Guillaume; Bilodeau, Maude S; Stankova, Jana; Gendron, Fernand-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    With the diabetes epidemic affecting the world population, there is an increasing demand for means to regulate glycemia. Dietary glucose is first absorbed by the intestine before entering the blood stream. Thus, the regulation of glucose absorption by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) could represent a way to regulate glycemia. Among the molecules involved in glycemia homeostasis, extracellular ATP, a paracrine signaling molecule, was reported to induce insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells by activating P2Y and P2X receptors. In rat's jejunum, P2X7 expression was previously immunolocalized to the apex of villi, where it has been suspected to play a role in apoptosis. However, using an antibody recognizing the receptor extracellular domain and thus most of the P2X7 isoforms, we showed that expression of this receptor is apparent in the top two-thirds of villi. These data suggest a different role for this receptor in IECs. Using the non-cancerous IEC-6 cells and differentiated Caco-2 cells, glucose transport was reduced by more than 30% following P2X7 stimulation. This effect on glucose transport was not due to P2X7-induced cell apoptosis, but rather was the consequence of glucose transporter 2 (Glut2)'s internalization. The signaling pathway leading to P2X7-dependent Glut2 internalization involved the calcium-independent activation of phospholipase Cγ1 (PLCγ1), PKCδ, and PKD1. Although the complete mechanism regulating Glut2 internalization following P2X7 activation is not fully understood, modulation of P2X7 receptor activation could represent an interesting approach to regulate intestinal glucose absorption. PMID:22566162

  15. Apoptotic and proliferative activity of mouse gastric mucosa following oral administration of fumonisin B1

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Mohammadghasemi, Fahimeh; Zendehdel, Kazem; Kamyabi-moghaddam, Zahra; Tavassoli, Abbas; Amini-najafi, Fatemeh; Khosravi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Fumonisins are a group of toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxins, which contaminate the grains and their products. The aim of this study was to examine the apoptotic and proliferative activity of mouse gastric mucosa following administration of fumonisin B1 (FB1). Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine female mice divided into treatment (n=15) and control (n=14) groups. The treatment group received FB1 (150 mg/kg diet) for 16 weeks. The gastric atrophy was allocated using grading criteria modeled on the updated Sydney System. Immunohistochemistry studies were performed for evaluation of apoptosis and proliferative activity in gastric mucosa. Results: Mild to moderate gastric atrophy were observed in microscopic findings of the gastric mucosa in treated animals (P<0.05). Number of parietal cells significantly decreased in the treatment group in comparison with the control (P<0.05). Treatment with FB1 for 16 weeks significantly reduced both gastric mucosa height and mitotic index in the gastric glands (P<0.05). TUNEL- and Bax-labeled positive cell numbers significantly increased in the FB1-treated group compared to the control (P<0.05). In addition, proliferative activity of gastric glands in the treated group was significantly lower than the control (P<0.05). Conclusion: Oral administration of FB1 caused atrophy in gastric mucosa both via increasing of apoptosis and suppressing the mitotic activity of these cells. PMID:25810870

  16. Thalamic activity and biochemical changes in individuals with neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Gustin, S.M.; Wrigley, P.J.; Youssef, A.M.; McIndoe, L.; Wilcox, S.L.; Rae, C.D.; Edden, R; Siddall, P.J.; Henderson, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence relating thalamic changes to the generation and/or maintenance of neuropathic pain. We have recently reported that neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with altered thalamic anatomy, biochemistry and activity, which may result in disturbed thalamocortical oscillatory circuits. Despite this evidence, it is possible that these thalamic changes are not responsible for the presence of pain per se, but result as a consequence of the injury. To clarify this subject, we compared brain activity and biochemistry in 12 people with below-level neuropathic pain after complete thoracic spinal cord injury to 11 people with similar injuries and no neuropathic pain and 21 age and gender matched healthy controls. Quantitative arterial spinal labelling was used to measure thalamic activity and magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine changes in neuronal variability quantifying N-acetylaspartate and alterations in inhibitory function quantifying gamma amino butyric acid. This study revealed that the presence of neuropathic pain is associated with significant changes in thalamic biochemistry and neuronal activity. More specifically, the presence of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury is associated with significant reductions in thalamic N-acetylaspartate, gamma amino butyric acid content and blood flow in the region of the thalamic reticular nucleus. Spinal cord injury on its own did not account for these changes. These findings support the hypothesis that neuropathic pain is associated with altered thalamic structure and function, which may disturb central processing and play a key role in the experience of neuropathic pain. PMID:24530612

  17. Evidence of altered corticomotor excitability following targeted activation of gluteus maximus training in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Beth E; Southam, Anna C; Kuo, Yi-Ling; Lee, Ya-Yun; Powers, Christopher M

    2016-04-13

    It has been proposed that strengthening and skill training of gluteus maximus (GM) may be beneficial in treating various knee injuries. Given the redundancy of the hip musculature and the small representational area of GM in the primary motor cortex (M1), learning to activate this muscle before prescribing strength exercises and modifying movement strategy would appear to be important. This study aimed to determine whether a short-term activation training program targeting the GM results in neuroplastic changes in M1. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were obtained in 12 healthy individuals at different stimulation intensities while they performed a double-leg bridge. Participants then completed a home exercise program for ∼1 h/day for 6 days that consisted of a single exercise designed to selectively target the GM. Baseline and post-training input-output curves (IOCs) were generated by graphing average MEP amplitudes and cortical silent period durations against corresponding stimulation intensities. Following the GM activation training, the linear slope of both the MEP IOC and cortical silent period IOC increased significantly. Short-term GM activation training resulted in a significant increase in corticomotor excitability as well as changes in inhibitory processes of the GM. We propose that the observed corticomotor plasticity will enable better utilization of the GM in the more advanced stages of a rehabilitation/training program. PMID:26981714

  18. Ligand stimulation of CD95 induces activation of Plk3 followed by phosphorylation of caspase-8

    PubMed Central

    Helmke, Christina; Raab, Monika; Rödel, Franz; Matthess, Yves; Oellerich, Thomas; Mandal, Ranadip; Sanhaji, Mourad; Urlaub, Henning; Rödel, Claus; Becker, Sven; Strebhardt, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Upon interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand, sequential association of the adaptor molecule FADD (MORT1), pro-forms of caspases-8/10, and the caspase-8/10 regulator c-FLIP leads to the formation of a death-inducing signaling complex. Here, we identify polo-like kinase (Plk) 3 as a new interaction partner of the death receptor CD95. The enzymatic activity of Plk3 increases following interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand. Knockout (KO) or knockdown of caspase-8, CD95 or FADD prevents activation of Plk3 upon CD95 stimulation, suggesting a requirement of a functional DISC for Plk3 activation. Furthermore, we identify caspase-8 as a new substrate for Plk3. Phosphorylation occurs on T273 and results in stimulation of caspase-8 proapoptotic function. Stimulation of CD95 in cells expressing a non-phosphorylatable caspase-8-T273A mutant in a rescue experiment or in Plk3-KO cells generated by CRISPR/Cas9 reduces the processing of caspase-8 prominently. Low T273 phosphorylation correlates significantly with low Plk3 expression in a cohort of 95 anal tumor patients. Our data suggest a novel mechanism of kinase activation within the Plk family and propose a new model for the stimulation of the extrinsic death pathway in tumors with high Plk3 expression. PMID:27325299

  19. Ligand stimulation of CD95 induces activation of Plk3 followed by phosphorylation of caspase-8.

    PubMed

    Helmke, Christina; Raab, Monika; Rödel, Franz; Matthess, Yves; Oellerich, Thomas; Mandal, Ranadip; Sanhaji, Mourad; Urlaub, Henning; Rödel, Claus; Becker, Sven; Strebhardt, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    Upon interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand, sequential association of the adaptor molecule FADD (MORT1), pro-forms of caspases-8/10, and the caspase-8/10 regulator c-FLIP leads to the formation of a death-inducing signaling complex. Here, we identify polo-like kinase (Plk) 3 as a new interaction partner of the death receptor CD95. The enzymatic activity of Plk3 increases following interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand. Knockout (KO) or knockdown of caspase-8, CD95 or FADD prevents activation of Plk3 upon CD95 stimulation, suggesting a requirement of a functional DISC for Plk3 activation. Furthermore, we identify caspase-8 as a new substrate for Plk3. Phosphorylation occurs on T273 and results in stimulation of caspase-8 proapoptotic function. Stimulation of CD95 in cells expressing a non-phosphorylatable caspase-8-T273A mutant in a rescue experiment or in Plk3-KO cells generated by CRISPR/Cas9 reduces the processing of caspase-8 prominently. Low T273 phosphorylation correlates significantly with low Plk3 expression in a cohort of 95 anal tumor patients. Our data suggest a novel mechanism of kinase activation within the Plk family and propose a new model for the stimulation of the extrinsic death pathway in tumors with high Plk3 expression. PMID:27325299

  20. Caregiver Reports of Children’s Activity Participation Following Serious Injury

    PubMed Central

    Braaf, Sandra; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Teague, Warwick; Jowett, Helen; Gabbe, Belinda

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric trauma can result in significant levels of on-going disability. The aim of this study was to explore the restrictions on activity participation that children experience following serious injury from the perspective of their caregivers. We performed a thematic analysis of transcripts of semi-structured in-depth interviews with the caregivers of 44 seriously injured children, conducted three-years after the injury, and purposively sampled from a population-based cohort study. Both temporary and on-going restrictions on school, sport, leisure and social activities were identified, some of which were imposed by caregivers, schools, or recommended by health providers. The perceived risk of further injury, physical restrictions, emotional state and fatigue levels were important influences on degrees of activity restriction. Children who were socially less engaged, especially those who were more severely injured, had difficulty making and retaining friends, and exhibited signs of depression or social withdrawal. The activities of pre-school children were strongly regulated by their caregivers, while school age children faced obstacles with participation in aspects such as study, sport, and peer and teacher relationships, affecting learning, school attendance and enjoyment. The findings highlight the need for primary prevention and reducing the impacts of serious injury throughout the continuum of care. PMID:27399741

  1. Investigating Attitude and Motivation of Iranian University Learners toward English as a Foreign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayadian, Sima; Lashkarian, Anita

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the attitudes and motivation Iranian learners have toward learning EFL at their university level. Although research of a similar nature has been done in other countries, the present study complements others by following 500 university learners and it provides another avenue for examining the language situation in Iran. To…

  2. Public Libraries and Adult Independent Learners. Final Report of the PLAIL Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denbighshire County Council, Mold (Wales).

    The Public Libraries and Adult Independent Learners (PLAIL) Project was conducted in the United Kingdom, Portugal, and Spain to identify the following: needs of adult independent learners; services required to meet those needs; extent to which those services rely on existing and new technology; and skills and competencies required to provide the…

  3. 'The Secret Is the Teacher': The Learners View of Online Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashion, Joan; Palmieri, Phoebe

    Learner perceptions of online learning were examined in a study of the views of learners enrolled in online vocational education and training (VET) courses across Australia. Data were collected from the following sources: an online questionnaire completed by 356 students and 63 educators; case studies of 6 VET organizations; and interviews and…

  4. Model Learner Outcomes for Health Education. A Mission toward Healthy People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wandberg, Robert; And Others

    This document provides a structure within which teaching staff can improve students' learning experiences and predict specific learner outcomes in health education. The material is presented in four chapters followed by an appendix. Chapters 1-3 examine the system's values, learner values, philosophy of education, mission for public education and…

  5. The Achievement Progress of English Learner Students in Arizona. REL 2015-098

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Eric; Tran, Loan; Huang, Min; Yu, Airong

    2015-01-01

    To understand the learning trajectories of the growing numbers of English learner students in the West, especially those who struggle to pass state English language arts and math content tests, this study followed three cohorts of English learner students in Arizona over six school years, 2006/07 through 2011/12, to assess their progress in…

  6. "Co-Constructing" Explicit L2 Knowledge with High School Spanish Learners through Guided Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toth, Paul D.; Wagner, Elvis; Moranski, Kara

    2013-01-01

    This article documents how second language (L2) Spanish learners in an American high school formulated explicit grammar rules during three inductive lessons on the pronominal clitic "se." Following Adair-Hauck "et al." (2010), each lesson first presented a property of "se" within a narrative text, and then had learners inductively "Co-construct"…

  7. English Learner (EL) Students Who Are Black. Fast Facts [2 of 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of English Language Acquisition, US Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Office of English Language Acquisition (OELA) has synthesized key data on English learners (ELs) into two-page PDF sheets, by topic, with graphics, plus key contacts. This fact sheet uses data from the 2013 American Community Survey (ACS), and applies the following definitions: An "English learner" student: (1) is ages 5 to 18; (2)…

  8. New Wine in Old Skins: Changing Patterns in the Governing of the Adult Learner in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fejes, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the ways in which the adult learner has been governed in recent years and whether the techniques for doing this have changed over the last 50 years. The focus is first on which adult subject (adult learner) is constructed in the material analysed. What kinds of subjects are governed? This is followed by an analysis of what…

  9. Research on Learners' Preferences for Reading from a Printed Text or from a Computer Screen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Carrie

    2006-01-01

    In this study, 254 Royal Roads University School of Business learners (graduates and undergraduates) were surveyed on their online course-related reading habits and choices. Based on their responses and anecdotal comments and the data from follow-up interviews with six of the participants, learners preferred print copies of text materials for…

  10. Strategies and Resources for Mainstream Teachers of English Language Learners. By Request Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Bracken; Railsback, Jennifer

    This booklet presents practical, research-based principles and instructional strategies that mainstream teachers can use to meet the needs of linguistically diverse students who are English Language Learners (ELLs), focusing on the following: "In Context: English Language Learners and No Child Left Behind"; "The Implications of No Child Left…

  11. Learner Autonomy: New Insights. = Autonomie de l'apprenant: nouvelles pistes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dam, Leni, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This book presents papers, written in both English and French, from a symposium entitled "Promoting Learner Autonomy: New Insights." After "Introduction" (Leni Dam), the eight papers include the following: "Examining the Discourse of Learner Advisory Sessions" (David Crabbe, Alison Hoffman, and Sara Cotteral); "Approaches to Advising for…

  12. Effectiveness of Adaptive Assessment versus Learner Control in a Multimedia Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ching-Huei; Chang, Shu-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effectiveness of adaptive assessment versus learner control in a multimedia learning system designed to help secondary students learn science. Unlike other systems, this paper presents a workflow of adaptive assessment following instructional materials that better align with learners' cognitive…

  13. Alterations in enterocyte mitochondrial respiratory function and enzyme activities in gastrointestinal dysfunction following brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ke-Jun; Huang, Hong; Chu, Hui; Yu, Hang; Zhang, Shi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the alterations in rat enterocyte mitochondrial respiratory function and enzyme activities following traumatic brain injury (TBI). METHODS: Fifty-six male SD rats were randomly divided into seven groups (8 rats in each group): a control group (rats with sham operation) and traumatic brain injury groups at 6, 12, 24 h, days 2, 3, and 7 after operation. TBI models were induced by Feendy’s free-falling method. Mitochondrial respiratory function (respiratory control ratio and ADP/O ratio) was measured with a Clark oxygen electrode. The activities of respiratory chain complex I-IV and related enzymes were determined by spectrophotometry. RESULTS: Compared with the control group, the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio (RCR) declined at 6 h and remained at a low level until day 7 after TBI (control, 5.42 ± 0.46; 6 h, 5.20 ± 0.18; 12 h, 4.55 ± 0.35; 24 h, 3.75 ± 0.22; 2 d, 4.12 ± 0.53; 3 d, 3.45 ± 0.41; 7 d, 5.23 ± 0.24, P < 0.01). The value of phosphate-to-oxygen (P/O) significantly decreased at 12, 24 h, day 2 and day 3, respectively (12 h, 3.30 ± 0.10; 24 h, 2.61 ± 0.21; 2 d, 2.95 ± 0.18; 3 d, 2.76 ± 0.09, P < 0.01) compared with the control group (3.46 ± 0.12). Two troughs of mitochondrial respiratory function were seen at 24 h and day 3 after TBI. The activities of mitochondrial complex I (6 h: 110 ± 10, 12 h: 115 ± 12, 24 h: 85 ± 9, day 2: 80 ± 15, day 3: 65 ± 16, P < 0.01) and complex II (6 h: 105 ± 8, 12 h: 110 ± 92, 24 h: 80 ± 10, day 2: 76 ± 8, day 3: 68 ± 12, P < 0.01) were increased at 6 h and 12 h following TBI, and then significantly decreased at 24 h, day 2 and day 3, respectively. However, there were no differences in complex I and II activities between the control and TBI groups. Furthermore, pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity was significantly decreased at 6 h and continued up to 7 d after TBI compared with the control group (6 h: 90 ± 8, 12 h: 85 ± 10, 24 h: 65 ± 12, day 2: 60 ± 9, day 3: 55

  14. Persistent Activation of the Innate Immune Response in Adult Drosophila Following Radiation Exposure During Larval Development

    PubMed Central

    Sudmeier, Lisa J.; Samudrala, Sai-Suma; Howard, Steven P.; Ganetzky, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy (CRT) is an effective treatment for pediatric central nervous system malignancies, but survivors often suffer from neurological and neurocognitive side effects that occur many years after radiation exposure. Although the biological mechanisms underlying these deleterious side effects are incompletely understood, radiation exposure triggers an acute inflammatory response that may evolve into chronic inflammation, offering one avenue of investigation. Recently, we developed a Drosophila model of the neurotoxic side effects of radiation exposure. Here we use this model to investigate the role of the innate immune system in response to radiation exposure. We show that the innate immune response and NF-ĸB target gene expression is activated in the adult Drosophila brain following radiation exposure during larval development, and that this response is sustained in adult flies weeks after radiation exposure. We also present preliminary data suggesting that innate immunity is radioprotective during Drosophila development. Together our data suggest that activation of the innate immune response may be beneficial initially for survival following radiation exposure but result in long-term deleterious consequences, with chronic inflammation leading to impaired neuronal function and viability at later stages. This work lays the foundation for future studies of how the innate immune response is triggered by radiation exposure and its role in mediating the biological responses to radiation. These studies may facilitate the development of strategies to reduce the deleterious side effects of CRT. PMID:26333838

  15. Using Visual Methods to Understand Physical Activity Maintenance following Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Sarah J; McNamara, Keira; Tritton, Larette

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have explored the factors associated with long-term maintenance of exercise following cardiac rehabilitation. The present study used auto-photography and interviews to explore the factors that influence motivation and continued participation in physical activity among post cardiac rehabilitation patients. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were conducted alongside participant-selected photographs or drawings with participants that had continued participation in physical activity for at least two years following the cardiac rehabilitation programme. Participants were recruited from circuit training classes in East Sussex in the UK. Thematic content analysis revealed seven main themes: fear of death and ill health avoidance, critical incidents, overcoming aging, social influences, being able to enjoy life, provision of routine and structure, enjoyment and psychological well-being. Fear of death, illness avoidance, overcoming aging, and being able to enjoy life were powerful motives for continued participation in exercise. The social nature of the exercise class was also identified as a key facilitator of continued participation. Group-based exercise suited those that continued exercise participation post cardiac rehabilitation and fostered adherence. PMID:26381147

  16. Prothrombin activator-like toxin appears to mediate cardiovascular collapse following envenoming by Pseudonaja textilis.

    PubMed

    Chaisakul, Janeyuth; Isbister, Geoffrey K; O'Leary, Margaret A; Parkington, Helena C; Smith, A Ian; Hodgson, Wayne C; Kuruppu, Sanjaya

    2015-08-01

    Brown snake (Pseudonaja spp.)-induced early cardiovascular collapse is a life-threatening medical emergency in Australia. We have previously shown that this effect can be mimicked in animals and is mediated via the release of endogenous mediators. In the present study, we aimed to purify and characterize the component in Pseudonaja textilis venom which induces cardiovascular collapse following envenoming. The component (fraction 3) was isolated using a combination of techniques including hydroxyapatite and reverse phase chromatography. Fraction 3 (10 or 20 μg/kg, i.v.) produced a rapid decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) followed by cardiovascular collapse. Fraction 3-induced early collapse was abolished by prior administration of smaller priming doses of fraction 3 (i.e. 2 and 5 μg/kg, i.v.) or heparin (300 units/kg, i.v.). P. textilis whole venom (1 and 3 μg/ml), but not fraction 3 (1 or 3 μg/ml), induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in isolated rat mesenteric arteries. SDS-PAGE gel indicated the presence of 9-10 protein bands of fraction 3. Using proteomic based analysis some protein bands of fraction 3 were identified as subunits of venom prothrombin activator, pseutarin C of P. textilis venom. Our results conclude that prothrombin activator-like toxin is likely to be a contributor to the rapid collapse induced by P. textilis venom. PMID:25959508

  17. Using Visual Methods to Understand Physical Activity Maintenance following Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Hardcastle, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have explored the factors associated with long-term maintenance of exercise following cardiac rehabilitation. The present study used auto-photography and interviews to explore the factors that influence motivation and continued participation in physical activity among post cardiac rehabilitation patients. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were conducted alongside participant-selected photographs or drawings with participants that had continued participation in physical activity for at least two years following the cardiac rehabilitation programme. Participants were recruited from circuit training classes in East Sussex in the UK. Thematic content analysis revealed seven main themes: fear of death and ill health avoidance, critical incidents, overcoming aging, social influences, being able to enjoy life, provision of routine and structure, enjoyment and psychological well-being. Fear of death, illness avoidance, overcoming aging, and being able to enjoy life were powerful motives for continued participation in exercise. The social nature of the exercise class was also identified as a key facilitator of continued participation. Group-based exercise suited those that continued exercise participation post cardiac rehabilitation and fostered adherence. PMID:26381147

  18. Memory impairment and alterations in prefrontal cortex gamma band activity following methamphetamine sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Linsenbardt, David N.; Lapish, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Repeated methamphetamine (MA) use leads to increases in the incentive motivational properties of the drug as well as cognitive impairments. These behavioral alterations persist for some time following abstinence, and neuroadaptations in the structure and function of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) are particularly important for their expression. However, there is a weak understanding of the changes in neural firing and oscillatory activity in the PFC evoked by repeated drug use, thus complicating the development of novel treatment strategies for addiction. Objectives The purpose of the current study was to assess changes in cognitive and brain function following MA sensitization. Methods Sensitization was induced in rats, then temporal and recognition memory were assessed after 1 or 30 days of abstinence. Electrophysiological recordings from the medial PFC were also acquired from rats whereupon simultaneous measures of oscillatory and spiking activity were examined. Results Impaired temporal memory was observed after 1 and 30 days of abstinence. However, recognition memory was only impaired after 1 day of abstinence. An injection of MA profoundly decreased neuronal firing rate and the anesthesia-induced slow oscillation (SO) in both sensitized (SENS) and control (CTRL) rats. Strong correlations were observed between the SO and gamma band power, which was altered in SENS animals. A decrease in the number of neurons phase-locked to the gamma oscillation was also observed in SENS animals. Conclusions The changes observed in PFC function may play an integral role in the expression of the altered behavioral phenotype evoked by MA sensitization. PMID:25572530

  19. Rapid accumulation of Akt in mitochondria following phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Bijur, Gautam N; Jope, Richard S

    2003-12-01

    We describe here a new component of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway that directly impacts mitochondria. Akt (protein kinase B) was shown for the first time to be localized in mitochondria, where it was found to reside in the matrix and the inner and outer membranes, and the level of mitochondrial Akt was very dynamically regulated. Stimulation of a variety of cell types with insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin, or stress (induced by heat shock), induced translocation of Akt to the mitochondria within only several minutes of stimulation, causing increases of nearly eight- to 12-fold, and the mitochondrial Akt was in its phosphorylated, active state. Two mitochondrial proteins were identified to be phosphorylated following stimulation of mitochondrial Akt, the beta-subunit of ATP synthase and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta. The finding that mitochondrial glycogen synthase kinase-3beta was rapidly and substantially modified by Ser9 phosphorylation, which inhibits its activity, following translocation of Akt to the mitochondria is the first evidence for a regulatory mechanism affecting mitochondrial glycogen synthase kinase-3beta. These results demonstrate that signals emanating from plasma membrane receptors or generated by stress rapidly modulate Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta in mitochondria. PMID:14713298

  20. Augmented force output in skeletal muscle fibres of Xenopus following a preceding bout of activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bruton, J D; Westerblad, H; Katz, A; Lännergren, J

    1996-01-01

    1. The effect of a brief period of activity on subsequent isometric tetanic force production was investigated in single muscle fibres of Xenopus laevis. 2. Following a train of ten tetani separated by 4 s intervals, tetanic force was significantly augmented by about 10%. The tetanic force augmentation persisted for at least 15 min and then slowly subsided. A similar potentiation was seen following trains of five and twenty tetani. 3. During the period of tetanic force potentiation, tetanic calcium was reduced by more than 30%, and intracellular pH was reduced from 7.15 +/- 0.07 to 7.03 +/- 0.11 (n = 4). 4. Fibre swelling was greatest at 1 min and then subsided over 15-20 min and possibly accounted for a small part of the observed force potentiation. 5. A reduction in the inorganic phosphate (P1) concentration of more than 40% was found in fibres frozen in liquid nitrogen at the peak of force potentiation compared with resting fibres. 6. It is concluded that the augmentation of tetanic force found after a brief preceding bout of activity is due to a reduction in inorganic phosphate. This mechanism may underlie the improved performance observed in athletes after warm-up. Images Figure 2 PMID:8735706

  1. Focal hyperemia followed by spreading oligemia and impaired activation of rCBF in classic migraine

    SciTech Connect

    Olesen, J.; Larsen, B.; Lauritzen, M.

    1981-04-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 254 areas of a hemisphere with the xenon 133 intraarterial injection method. Six cases of classic migraine were followed from the normal state into the prodromal phase, and in 3 cases further into the headache phase. One patient with common migraine was similarly followed during his only classic attack. The attacks were initiated by focal hyperemia in 3 patients. During prodromes all patients displayed occipitoparietal rCBF reduction (oligemia), but in only 1 case did the reduction approach critical values. Oligemia gradually spread anteriorly in the course of 15 to 45 minutes. In 4 patients a global oligemia was observed. In 4 patients severe headache was present concomitantly with oligemia and with no sign of hyperemia or nonhomogeneous brain perfusion. The normal rCBF increase during cortical activity (hand movement, speech, and similar activities) was impaired in 6 patients. The results indicate that the vasospastic model of the migraine attack is too simplistic.

  2. Plasminogen activator induction facilitates recovery of respiratory function following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Minor, Kenneth H; Seeds, Nicholas W

    2008-01-01

    The possibility that plasminogen activator (PA) plays a role in synaptic plasticity was explored in the spinal cord during the crossed phrenic phenomenon (CPP), where respiratory functional plasticity develops following spinal cord injury. Synaptic remodeling on phrenic motorneurons occurs during the characteristic delay period following spinal cord injury before CPP recovery of respiratory function. The molecular mechanisms underlying this plasticity are not well-defined. During the critical 1-2 h delay period required for this synaptic plasticity following a C2 hemisection in mice, uPA and tPA mRNAs are rapidly induced in C4-5 ventral spinal cord neurons in the ipsilateral phrenic motor nucleus (PMN), as are uPA and tPA protein levels. A role for uPA in CPP spinal cord plasticity is confirmed by the impaired ability of uPA knockout mice to acquire a good CPP response by 6 h post-hemisection and their lack of structural remodeling of PMN synapses that underlies development of the CPP response. PMID:18042398

  3. Model Learner Outcomes for Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Richard C.; Hessler, Edward

    This document provides curriculum planners with models of learner outcomes that can be incorporated into a science curriculum and science essential learner outcomes. The first chapter includes a list of educational system values and learner values, philosophy of education, the mission for public education, and learner goals that describe the…

  4. Learning Difficulties in English for Rural Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singaravelu, G.

    2010-01-01

    The present study illuminates and diagnoses the learning problems of the rural learners in English Grammar at standard VI. Present study may be useful to ameliorate the rural learners for acquiring competencies in English and eliminates the problems of the learners. It paves way to the teachers to diagnose the learning hurdles of the learners and…

  5. 30 CFR 280.3 - What requirements must I follow when I conduct prospecting or research activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... research activities? You must conduct G&G prospecting activities or scientific research activities under... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What requirements must I follow when I conduct prospecting or research activities? 280.3 Section 280.3 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT...

  6. 30 CFR 580.3 - What requirements must I follow when I conduct prospecting or research activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... research activities? You must conduct G&G prospecting activities or scientific research activities under... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What requirements must I follow when I conduct prospecting or research activities? 580.3 Section 580.3 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY...

  7. 30 CFR 580.3 - What requirements must I follow when I conduct prospecting or research activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... research activities? You must conduct G&G prospecting activities or scientific research activities under... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What requirements must I follow when I conduct prospecting or research activities? 580.3 Section 580.3 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY...

  8. 30 CFR 580.3 - What requirements must I follow when I conduct prospecting or research activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... research activities? You must conduct G&G prospecting activities or scientific research activities under... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What requirements must I follow when I conduct prospecting or research activities? 580.3 Section 580.3 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY...

  9. The Formulated Microbicide RC-101 Was Safe and Antivirally Active Following Intravaginal Application in Pigtailed Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Amy L.; Cosgrove-Sweeney, Yvonne; Rogers, Nicole A.; Ratner, Deena; Sassi, Alexandra B.; Lackman-Smith, Carol; Tarwater, Patrick; Ramratnam, Bharat; Ruchala, Piotr; Lehrer, Robert I.; Waring, Alan J.; Gupta, Phalguni

    2010-01-01

    Background RC-101 is a congener of the antiretroviral peptide retrocyclin, which we and others have reported is active against clinical HIV-1 isolates from all major clades, does not hemagglutinate, and is non-toxic and non-inflammatory in cervicovaginal cell culture. Herein, film-formulated RC-101 was assessed for its antiviral activity in vitro, safety in vivo, retention in the cervix and vagina, and ability to remain active against HIV-1 and SHIV after intravaginal application in macaques. Methodology/Principal Findings RC-101 was formulated as a quick-dissolving film (2000 µg/film), retained complete activity in vitro as compared to unformulated peptide, and was applied intravaginally in six pigtailed macaques daily for four days. At one and four days following the final application, the presence of RC-101 was assessed in peripheral blood, cervicovaginal lavage, cytobrushed cervicovaginal cells, and biopsied cervical and vaginal tissues by quantitative western blots. One day following the last film application, cervical biopsies from RC-101-exposed and placebo-controlled macaques were collected and were subjected to challenge with RT-SHIV in an ex vivo organ culture model. RC-101 peptide was detected primarily in the cytobrush and biopsied cervical and vaginal tissues, with little to no peptide detected in lavage samples, suggesting that the peptide was associated with the cervicovaginal epithelia. RC-101 remained in the tissues and cytobrush samples up to four days post-application, yet was not detected in any sera or plasma samples. RC-101, extracted from cytobrushes obtained one day post-application, remained active against HIV-1 BaL. Importantly, cervical biopsies from RC-101-treated animals reduced RT-SHIV replication in ex vivo organ culture as compared to placebo-treated animals. Conclusions/Significance Formulated RC-101 was stable in vivo and was retained in the mucosa. The presence of antivirally active RC-101 after five days in vivo suggests that RC

  10. High endogenous salivary amylase activity is associated with improved glycemic homeostasis following starch ingestion in adults.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Abigail L; Breslin, Paul A S

    2012-05-01

    In the current study, we determined whether increased digestion of starch by high salivary amylase concentrations predicted postprandial blood glucose following starch ingestion. Healthy, nonobese individuals were prescreened for salivary amylase activity and classified as high (HA) or low amylase (LA) if their activity levels per minute fell 1 SD higher or lower than the group mean, respectively. Fasting HA (n = 7) and LA (n = 7) individuals participated in 2 sessions during which they ingested either a starch (experimental) or glucose solution (control) on separate days. Blood samples were collected before, during, and after the participants drank each solution. The samples were analyzed for plasma glucose and insulin concentrations as well as diploid AMY1 gene copy number. HA individuals had significantly more AMY1 gene copies within their genomes than did the LA individuals. We found that following starch ingestion, HA individuals had significantly lower postprandial blood glucose concentrations at 45, 60, and 75 min, as well as significantly lower AUC and peak blood glucose concentrations than the LA individuals. Plasma insulin concentrations in the HA group were significantly higher than baseline early in the testing session, whereas insulin concentrations in the LA group did not increase at this time. Following ingestion of the glucose solution, however, blood glucose and insulin concentrations did not differ between the groups. These observations are interpreted to suggest that HA individuals may be better adapted to ingest starches, whereas LA individuals may be at greater risk for insulin resistance and diabetes if chronically ingesting starch-rich diets. PMID:22492122

  11. Mesenteric lymph diversion abrogates 5-lipoxygenase activation in the kidney following trauma and hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Stringham, John R.; Moore, Ernest E.; Gamboni, Fabia; Harr, Jeffrey N.; Fragoso, Miguel; Chin, Theresa L.; Carr, Caitlin E.; Silliman, Christopher C.; Banerjee, Anirban

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Early acute kidney injury (AKI) following trauma is associated with multiorgan failure and mortality. Leukotrienes have been implicated both in AKI and in acute lung injury. Activated 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) colocalizes with 5-LO–activating protein (FLAP) in the first step of leukotriene production following trauma and hemorrhagic shock (T/HS). Diversion of postshock mesenteric lymph, which is rich in the 5-LO substrate of arachidonate, attenuates lung injury and decreases 5-LO/FLAP associations in the lung after T/HS. We hypothesized that mesenteric lymph diversion (MLD) will also attenuate postshock 5-LO–mediated AKI. METHODS Rats underwent T/HS (laparotomy, hemorrhagic shock to a mean arterial pressure of 30 mm Hg for 45 minutes, and resuscitation), and MLD was accomplished via cannulation of the mesenteric duct. Extent of kidney injury was determined via histology score and verified by urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin assay. Kidney sections were immunostained for 5-LO and FLAP, and colocalization was determined by fluorescence resonance energy transfer signal intensity. The end leukotriene products of 5-LO were determined in urine. RESULTS AKI was evident in the T/HS group by derangement in kidney tubule architecture and confirmed by neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin assay, whereas MLD during T/HS preserved renal tubule morphology at a sham level. MLD during T/HS decreased the associations between 5-LO and FLAP demonstrated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy and decreased leukotriene production in urine. CONCLUSION 5-LO and FLAP colocalize in the interstitium of the renal medulla following T/HS. MLD attenuates this phenomenon, which coincides with pathologic changes seen in tubules during kidney injury and biochemical evidence of AKI. These data suggest that gut-derived leukotriene substrate predisposes the kidney and the lung to subsequent injury. PMID:24747451

  12. Melatonin preserves superoxide dismutase activity in hypoglossal motoneurons of adult rats following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hung-Ming; Huang, Yi-Lun; Lan, Chyn-Tair; Wu, Un-In; Hu, Ming-E; Youn, Su-Chung

    2008-03-01

    Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) produces functional changes in lesioned neurons in which oxidative stress is considered to be the main cause of neuronal damage. As superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an important antioxidative enzyme involved in redox regulation of oxidative stress, the present study determined whether melatonin would exert its beneficial effects by preserving the SOD reactivity following PNI. Adult rats subjected to hypoglossal nerve transection were intraperitoneally injected with melatonin at ones for 3, 7, 14, 30 and 60 days successively. The potential neuroprotective effects of melatonin were quantitatively demonstrated by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), mitochondrial manganese SOD (Mn-SOD), and cytosolic copper-zinc SOD (Cu/Zn-SOD) immunohistochemistry. The functional recovery of the lesioned neurons was evaluated by choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunohistochemistry along with the electromyographic (EMG) recordings of denervation-induced fibrillation activity. The results indicate that following PNI, the nNOS immunoreactivity was significantly increased in lesioned neurons peaking at 14 days. The up-regulation of nNOS temporally coincided with the reduction of ChAT and SOD in which the Cu/Zn-SOD showed a greater diminution than Mn-SOD. However, following melatonin administration, the nNOS augmentation was successfully suppressed and the activities of Mn-SOD, Cu/Zn-SOD, and ChAT were effectively preserved at all postaxotomy periods. EMG data also showed a decreased fibrillation in melatonin-treated groups, suggesting a potential effect of melatonin in promoting functional recovery. In association with its significant capacity in preserving SOD reactivity, melatonin is suggested to serve as a powerful therapeutic agent for treating PNI-relevant oxidative damage. PMID:18289169

  13. Activity-dependent plasticity in the isolated embryonic avian brainstem following manipulations of rhythmic spontaneous neural activity.

    PubMed

    Vincen-Brown, Michael A; Revill, Ann L; Pilarski, Jason Q

    2016-07-15

    When rhythmic spontaneous neural activity (rSNA) first appears in the embryonic chick brainstem and cranial nerve motor axons it is principally driven by nicotinic neurotransmission (NT). At this early age, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonist nicotine is known to critically disrupt rSNA at low concentrations (0.1-0.5μM), which are levels that mimic the blood plasma levels of a fetus following maternal cigarette smoking. Thus, we quantified the effect of persistent exposure to exogenous nicotine on rSNA using an in vitro developmental model. We found that rSNA was eliminated by continuous bath application of exogenous nicotine, but rSNA recovered activity within 6-12h despite the persistent activation and desensitization of nAChRs. During the recovery period rSNA was critically driven by chloride-mediated membrane depolarization instead of nicotinic NT. To test whether this observed compensation was unique to the antagonism of nicotinic NT or whether the loss of spiking behavior also played a role, we eliminated rSNA by lowering overall excitatory drive with a low [K(+)]o superfusate. In this context, rSNA again recovered, although the recovery time was much quicker, and exhibited a lower frequency, higher duration, and an increase in the number of bursts per episode when compared to control embryos. Importantly, we show that the main compensatory response to lower overall excitatory drive, similar to nicotinergic block, is a result of potentiated chloride mediated membrane depolarization. These results support increasing evidence that early neural circuits sense spiking behavior to maintain primordial bioelectric rhythms. Understanding the nature of developmental plasticity in the nervous system, especially versions that preserve rhythmic behaviors following clinically meaningful environmental stimuli, both normal and pathological, will require similar studies to determine the consequences of feedback compensation at more mature chronological ages

  14. Learner characteristics involved in distance learning

    SciTech Connect

    Cernicek, A.T.; Hahn, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    Distance learning represents a strategy for leveraging resources to solve educational and training needs. Although many distance learning programs have been developed, lessons learned regarding differences between distance learning and traditional education with respect to learner characteristics have not been well documented. Therefore, we conducted a survey of 20 distance learning professionals. The questionnaire was distributed to experts attending the second Distance Learning Conference sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This survey not only acquired demographic information from each of the respondents but also identified important distance learning student characteristics. Significant distance learner characteristics, which were revealed statistically and which influence the effectiveness of distance learning, include the following: reading level, student autonomy, and self-motivation. Distance learning cannot become a more useful and effective method of instruction without identifying and recognizing learner characteristics. It will be important to consider these characteristics when designing all distance learning courses. This paper will report specific survey findings and their implications for developing distance learning courses. 9 refs., 6 tabs.

  15. Inhibition of Myostatin Signaling through Notch Activation following Acute Resistance Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Mark; Patton, Amy; Baar, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Myostatin is a TGFβ family member and negative regulator of muscle size. Due to the complexity of the molecular pathway between myostatin mRNA/protein and changes in transcription, it has been difficult to understand whether myostatin plays a role in resistance exercise-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy. To circumvent this problem, we determined the expression of a unique myostatin target gene, Mighty, following resistance exercise. Mighty mRNA increased by 6 h (82.9±24.21%) and remained high out to 48 h (56.5±19.67%) after resistance exercise. Further examination of the soleus, plantaris and tibialis anterior muscles showed that the change in Mighty mRNA at 6 h correlated with the increase in muscle size associated with this protocol (R2 = 0.9996). The increase in Mighty mRNA occurred both independent of Smad2 phosphorylation and in spite of an increase in myostatin mRNA (341.8±147.14% at 3 h). The myostatin inhibitor SKI remained unchanged. However, activated Notch, another potential inhibitor of TGFβ signaling, increased immediately following resistance exercise (83±11.2%) and stayed elevated out to 6 h (78±16.6%). Electroportion of the Notch intracellular domain into the tibialis anterior resulted in an increase in Mighty mRNA (63±13.4%) that was equivalent to the canonical Notch target HES-1 (94.4±7.32%). These data suggest that acute resistance exercise decreases myostatin signaling through the activation of the TGFβ inhibitor Notch resulting in a decrease in myostatin transcriptional activity that correlates well with muscle hypertrophy. PMID:23844238

  16. Increased Risk of Active Tuberculosis following Acute Kidney Injury: A Nationwide, Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Hsui; Huang, Hui-Yu; Huang, Tao-Min; Lai, Chun-Fu; Lin, Meng-Chun; Ko, Wen-Je; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Yu, Chong-Jen; Shu, Chin-Chung; Lee, Chih-Hsin; Wang, Jann-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Background Profound alterations in immune responses associated with uremia and exacerbated by dialysis increase the risk of active tuberculosis (TB). Evidence of the long-term risk and outcome of active TB after acute kidney injury (AKI) is limited. Methods This population-based-cohort study used claim records retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database. We retrieved records of all hospitalized patients, more than 18 years, who underwent dialysis for acute kidney injury (AKI) during 1999–2008 and validated using the NSARF data. Time-dependent Cox proportional hazards model to adjust for the ongoing effect of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) was conducted to predict long-term de novo active TB after discharge from index hospitalization. Results Out of 2,909 AKI dialysis patients surviving 90 days after index discharge, 686 did not require dialysis after hospital discharge. The control group included 11,636 hospital patients without AKI, dialysis, or history of TB. The relative risk of active TB in AKI dialysis patients, relative to the general population, after a mean follow-up period of 3.6 years was 7.71. Patients who did (hazard ratio [HR], 3.84; p<0.001) and did not (HR, 6.39; p<0.001) recover from AKI requiring dialysis had significantly higher incidence of TB than patients without AKI. The external validated data also showed nonrecovery subgroup (HR = 4.37; p = 0.049) had high risk of developing active TB compared with non-AKI. Additionally, active TB was associated with long-term all-cause mortality after AKI requiring dialysis (HR, 1.34; p = 0.032). Conclusions AKI requiring dialysis seems to independently increase the long-term risk of active TB, even among those who weaned from dialysis at discharge. These results raise concerns that the increasing global burden of AKI will in turn increase the incidence of active TB. PMID:23936044

  17. Progressive development of cardiomyopathy following altered autonomic activity in status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Read, Morgayn I; McCann, Dominic M; Millen, Rebecca N; Harrison, Joanne C; Kerr, D Steven; Sammut, Ivan A

    2015-11-01

    Seizures are associated with altered autonomic activity, which has been implicated in the development of cardiac dysfunction and structural damage. This study aimed to investigate the involvement of the autonomic nervous system in seizure-induced cardiomyopathy. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (320-350 g) were implanted with EEG/ECG electrodes to allow simultaneous telemetric recordings during seizures induced by intrahippocampal (2 nmol, 1 μl/min) kainic acid and monitored for 7 days. Seizure activity occurred in conjunction with increased heart rate (20%), blood pressure (25%), and QTc prolongation (15%). This increased sympathetic activity was confirmed by the presence of raised plasma noradrenaline levels at 3 h post-seizure induction. By 48 h post-seizure induction, sympathovagal balance was shifted in favor of sympathetic dominance, as indicated by both heart rate variability (LF/HF ratio of 3.5 ± 1.0) and pharmacological autonomic blockade. Functional cardiac deficits were evident at 7 and 28 days, as demonstrated by echocardiography showing a decreased ejection fraction (14% compared with control, P < 0.05) and dilated cardiomyopathy present at 28 days following seizure induction. Histological changes, including cardiomyocyte vacuolization, cardiac fibrosis, and inflammatory cell infiltration, were evident within 48 h of seizure induction and remained present for up to 28 days. These structural changes most probably contributed to an increased susceptibility to aconitine-induced arrhythmias. This study confirms that prolonged seizure activity results in acute and chronic alterations in cardiovascular control, leading to a deterioration in cardiac structure and function. This study further supports the need for modulation of sympathetic activity as a promising therapeutic approach in seizure-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:26342065

  18. FUNCTION FOLLOWS FORM: ACTIVATION OF SHAPE & FUNCTION FEATURES DURING OBJECT IDENTIFICATION

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Eiling; Huffstetler, Stacy; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    Most theories of semantic memory characterize knowledge of a given object as comprising a set of semantic features. But how does conceptual activation of these features proceed during object identification? We present the results of a pair of experiments that demonstrate that object recognition is a dynamically unfolding process in which function follows form. We used eye movements to explore whether activating one object’s concept leads to the activation of others that share perceptual (shape) or abstract (function) features. Participants viewed four-picture displays and clicked on the picture corresponding to a heard word. In critical trials, the conceptual representation of one of the objects in the display was similar in shape or function (i.e., its purpose) to the heard word. Importantly, this similarity was not apparent in the visual depictions (e.g., for the target “frisbee,” the shape-related object was a triangular slice of pizza – a shape that a frisbee cannot take); preferential fixations on the related object were therefore attributable to overlap of the conceptual representations on the relevant features. We observed relatedness effects for both shape and function, but shape effects occurred earlier than function effects. We discuss the implications of these findings for current accounts of the representation of semantic memory. PMID:21417543

  19. Superoxide dismutase activity as a measure of hepatic oxidative stress in cattle following ethionine administration.

    PubMed

    Abd Ellah, Mahmoud R; Okada, Keiji; Goryo, Masanobu; Oishi, Akihiro; Yasuda, Jun

    2009-11-01

    The goal of this study was to assess if oxidative stress, as measured by alterations in the concentrations of antioxidant enzymes in the liver and erythrocytes of cattle, could be induced following dl-ethionine administration. Whole blood, serum and liver biopsy samples were collected 0, 4, 7 and 10 days after intra-peritoneal ethionine administration to five cows. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes copper zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu, Zn SOD) and catalase were assessed in the liver biopsies which were also examined histopathologically. Significant increases in hepatic Cu, Zn SOD concentrations (P<0.01) were noted on days 7 and 10 post-treatment. Hepatic catalase activity decreased significantly (P<0.01) on days 4, 7 and 10 post-treatment and erythrocyte Cu, Zn SOD activity was significantly increased on day 10. Serum biochemical analysis revealed a significant increase (P<0.01) in non-esterified fatty acid concentrations on day 4 and significant decreases in total cholesterol and phospholipid levels on days 4 (P<0.05), 7 (P<0.01) and 10 (P<0.01). In this model system, dl-ethionine administration was effective in inducing oxidative stress particularly reflected in the liver. PMID:18585936

  20. Diminished amygdala activation and behavioral threat response following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christopher P; Metheny, Hannah E; Elkind, Jaclynn A; Cohen, Akiva S

    2016-03-01

    Each year, approximately 3.8 million people suffer mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) that result in an array of neuropsychological symptoms and disorders. Despite these alarming statistics, the neurological bases of these persistent, debilitating neuropsychological symptoms are currently poorly understood. In this study we examined the effects of mTBI on the amygdala, a brain structure known to be critically involved in the processing of emotional stimuli. Seven days after lateral fluid percussion injury (LFPI), mice underwent a series of physiological and behavioral experiments to assess amygdala function. Brain-injured mice exhibited a decreased threat response in a cued fear conditioning paradigm, congruent with a decrease in amygdala excitability determined with basolateral amygdala (BLA) field excitatory post-synaptic potentials together with voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSD). Furthermore, beyond exposing a general decrease in the excitability of the primary input of the amygdala, the lateral amygdala (LA), VSD also revealed a decrease in the relative strength or activation of internuclear amygdala circuit projections after LFPI. Thus, not only does activation of the LA require increased stimulation, but the proportion of this activation that is propagated to the primary output of the amygdala, the central amygdala, is also diminished following LFPI. Intracellular recordings revealed no changes in the intrinsic properties of BLA pyramidal neurons after LFPI. This data suggests that mild to moderate TBI has prominent effects on amygdala function and provides a potential neurological substrate for many of the neuropsychological symptoms suffered by TBI patients. PMID:26791254

  1. Dynamic changes in brain aromatase activity following sexual interactions in males: where, when and why?

    PubMed Central

    de Bournonville, Catherine; Dickens, Molly J.; Ball, Gregory F.; Balthazart, Jacques; Cornil, Charlotte A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary It is increasingly recognized that estrogens produce rapid and transient effects at many neural sites ultimately impacting physiological and behavioral endpoints. The ability of estrogens to acutely regulate cellular processes implies that their concentration should also be rapidly fine-tuned. Accordingly, rapid changes in the catalytic activity of aromatase, the limiting enzyme for estrogen synthesis, have been identified that could serve as a regulatory mechanism of local estrogen concentrations. However, the precise anatomical localization, time-course, triggering stimuli and functional significance of these enzymatic changes in vivo are not well understood. To address these issues as to where, when and why aromatase activity (AA) rapidly changes after sexual interactions, AA was assayed in six populations of aromatase-expressing cells microdissected from the brain of male quail that experienced varying durations of visual exposure to or copulation with a female. Sexual interactions resulted in a rapid AA inhibition. This inhibition occurred in specific brain regions (including the medial preoptic nucleus), in a context-dependent fashion and time-scale suggestive of post-translational modifications of the enzyme. Interestingly, the enzymatic fluctuations occurring in the preoptic area followed rather than preceded copulation and were tied specifically to the female's presence. This pattern of enzymatic changes suggests that rapid estrogen effects are important during the motivational phase of the behavior to trigger physiological events essential to activate mate search and copulation. PMID:22999655

  2. Serum proteome changes in acromegalic patients following transsphenoidal surgery: novel biomarkers of disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Topete, Diana; Christensen, Britt; Sackmann-Sala, Lucila; Okada, Shigeru; Jorgensen, Jens Otto L; Kopchick, John J

    2014-01-01

    Context Transsphenoidal adenomectomy is the primary treatment for acromegaly. However, assessment of the therapeutical outcome remains problematic since the existing biomarkers of disease activity frequently show discordant results. Objective To discover novel serum biomarkers of disease activity in acromegalic patients before and after surgery. Design Serum samples of eight newly diagnosed acromegaly patients before and after transsphenoidal surgery were analyzed for proteomic changes by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein spots displaying statistically significant changes, pre- versus post-surgery, were identified by mass spectrometry (MS), tandem MS (MS/MS), and western blot analysis. Results Six protein spots displaying decreased intensities after surgery were identified as transthyretin (two isoforms), haptoglobin a2, b-hemoglobin, and apolipoprotein A-1 (two isoforms). One protein spot, identified as complement C4B precursor, was increased after the surgery. Conclusions Seven serum protein spots were differentially expressed following surgery in acromegalic patients. The identified proteins represent potential novel biomarkers to assess the effectiveness of surgical treatment in acromegalic individuals. Future studies will validate the use of the identified proteins as biomarkers of disease activity after medical treatment of acromegaly. PMID:21059862

  3. Phosphate-activated glutaminase activity is enhanced in brain, intestine and kidneys of rats following portacaval anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Gómez, Manuel; Jover, María; Díaz-Gómez, Daniel; de Terán, Laura Collantes; Rodrigo, Regina; Camacho, Inés; Echevarría, Miriam; Felipo, Vicente; Bautista, Juan D

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether portacaval anastomosis (PCA) in rats affects the protein expression and/or activity of glutaminase in kidneys, intestines and in three brain areas of cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum and to explain the neurological alterations found in hepatic encephalopathy (HE). METHODS: Sixteen male Wistar rats weighing 250-350 g were grouped into sham-operation control (n = 8) or portacaval shunt (n = 8). Twenty-eight days after the procedure, the animals were sacrificed. The duodenum, kidney and brain were removed, homogenised and mitochondria were isolated. Ammonia was measured in brain and blood. Phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) activity was determined by measuring ammonia production following incubation for one hour at 37 °C with O-phthalaldehyde (OPA) and specific activity expressed in units per gram of protein (µkat/g of protein). Protein expression was measured by immunoblotting. RESULTS: Duodenal and kidney PAG activities together with protein content were significantly higher in PCA group than in control or sham-operated rats (duodenum PAG activity was 976.95±268.87 µkat/g of protein in PCA rats vs 429.19±126.92 µkat/g of protein in sham-operated rats; kidneys PAG activity was 1259.18 ± 228.79 µkat/g protein in PCA rats vs 669.67± 400.8 µkat/g of protein in controls, P < 0.05; duodenal protein content: 173% in PCA vs sham-operated rats; in kidneys the content of protein was 152% in PCA vs sham-operated rats). PAG activity and protein expression in PCA rats were higher in cortex and basal ganglia than those in sham-operated rats (cortex: 6646.6 ± 1870.4 µkat/g of protein vs 3573.8 ± 2037.4 µkat/g of protein in control rats, P < 0.01; basal ganglia, PAG activity was 3657.3 ± 1469.6 μkat/g of protein in PCA rats vs 2271.2 ± 384 μkat/g of protein in sham operated rats, P < 0.05; In the cerebellum, the PAG activity was 2471.6 ± 701.4 μkat/g of protein vs 1452.9 ± 567.8

  4. Mitochondrial and lysosomal biogenesis are activated following PINK1/parkin-mediated mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Ivankovic, Davor; Chau, Kai-Yin; Schapira, Anthony H V; Gegg, Matthew E

    2016-01-01

    Impairment of the autophagy-lysosome pathway is implicated with the changes in α-synuclein and mitochondrial dysfunction observed in Parkinson's disease (PD). Damaged mitochondria accumulate PINK1, which then recruits parkin, resulting in ubiquitination of mitochondrial proteins. These can then be bound by the autophagic proteins p62/SQSTM1 and LC3, resulting in degradation of mitochondria by mitophagy. Mutations in PINK1 and parkin genes are a cause of familial PD. We found a significant increase in the expression of p62/SQSTM1 mRNA and protein following mitophagy induction in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. p62 protein not only accumulated on mitochondria, but was also greatly increased in the cytosol. Increased p62/SQSMT1 expression was prevented in PINK1 knock-down cells, suggesting increased p62 expression was a consequence of mitophagy induction. The transcription factors Nrf2 and TFEB, which play roles in mitochondrial and lysosomal biogenesis, respectively, can regulate p62/SQSMT1. We report that both Nrf2 and TFEB translocate to the nucleus following mitophagy induction and that the increase in p62 mRNA levels was significantly impaired in cells with Nrf2 or TFEB knockdown. TFEB translocation also increased expression of itself and lysosomal proteins such as glucocerebrosidase and cathepsin D following mitophagy induction. We also report that cells with increased TFEB protein have significantly higher PGC-1α mRNA levels, a regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, resulting in increased mitochondrial content. Our data suggests that TFEB is activated following mitophagy to maintain autophagy-lysosome pathway and mitochondrial biogenesis. Therefore, strategies to increase TFEB may improve both the clearance of α-synuclein and mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. Damaged mitochondria are degraded by the autophagy-lysosome pathway and is termed mitophagy. Following mitophagy induction, the transcription factors Nrf2 and TFEB translocate to the nucleus, inducing

  5. Spiking in auditory cortex following thalamic stimulation is dominated by cortical network activity

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Bryan M.; Raz, Aeyal; Uhlrich, Daniel J.; Smith, Philip H.; Banks, Matthew I.

    2014-01-01

    The state of the sensory cortical network can have a profound impact on neural responses and perception. In rodent auditory cortex, sensory responses are reported to occur in the context of network events, similar to brief UP states, that produce “packets” of spikes and are associated with synchronized synaptic input (Bathellier et al., 2012; Hromadka et al., 2013; Luczak et al., 2013). However, traditional models based on data from visual and somatosensory cortex predict that ascending sensory thalamocortical (TC) pathways sequentially activate cells in layers 4 (L4), L2/3, and L5. The relationship between these two spatio-temporal activity patterns is unclear. Here, we used calcium imaging and electrophysiological recordings in murine auditory TC brain slices to investigate the laminar response pattern to stimulation of TC afferents. We show that although monosynaptically driven spiking in response to TC afferents occurs, the vast majority of spikes fired following TC stimulation occurs during brief UP states and outside the context of the L4>L2/3>L5 activation sequence. Specifically, monosynaptic subthreshold TC responses with similar latencies were observed throughout layers 2–6, presumably via synapses onto dendritic processes located in L3 and L4. However, monosynaptic spiking was rare, and occurred primarily in L4 and L5 non-pyramidal cells. By contrast, during brief, TC-induced UP states, spiking was dense and occurred primarily in pyramidal cells. These network events always involved infragranular layers, whereas involvement of supragranular layers was variable. During UP states, spike latencies were comparable between infragranular and supragranular cells. These data are consistent with a model in which activation of auditory cortex, especially supragranular layers, depends on internally generated network events that represent a non-linear amplification process, are initiated by infragranular cells and tightly regulated by feed-forward inhibitory

  6. The Role of Hippocampal NMDA Receptors in Long-Term Emotional Responses following Muscarinic Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hoeller, Alexandre A.; Costa, Ana Paula R.; Bicca, Maíra A.; Matheus, Filipe C.; Lach, Gilliard; Spiga, Francesca; Lightman, Stafford L.; Walz, Roger; Collingridge, Graham L.; Bortolotto, Zuner A.; de Lima, Thereza C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates the influence of the cholinergic system on emotional processing. Previous findings provided new insights into the underlying mechanisms of long-term anxiety, showing that rats injected with a single systemic dose of pilocarpine—a muscarinic receptor (mAChR) agonist—displayed persistent anxiogenic-like responses when evaluated in different behavioral tests and time-points (24 h up to 3 months later). Herein, we investigated whether the pilocarpine-induced long-term anxiogenesis modulates the HPA axis function and the putative involvement of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) following mAChRs activation. Accordingly, adult male Wistar rats presented anxiogenic-like behavior in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) after 24 h or 1 month of pilocarpine injection (150 mg/kg, i.p.). In these animals, mAChR activation disrupted HPA axis function inducing a long-term increase of corticosterone release associated with a reduced expression of hippocampal GRs, as well as consistently decreased NMDAR subunits expression. Furthermore, in another group of rats injected with memantine–an NMDARs antagonist (4 mg/kg, i.p.)–prior to pilocarpine, we found inhibition of anxiogenic-like behaviors in the EPM but no further alterations in the pilocarpine-induced NMDARs downregulation. Our data provide evidence that behavioral anxiogenesis induced by mAChR activation effectively yields short- and long-term alterations in hippocampal NMDARs expression associated with impairment of hippocampal inhibitory regulation of HPA axis activity. This is a novel mechanism associated with anxiety-like responses in rats, which comprise a putative target to future translational studies. PMID:26795565

  7. Delayed synchronization of activity in cortex and subthalamic nucleus following cortical stimulation in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Magill, Peter J; Sharott, Andrew; Bolam, J Paul; Brown, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Oscillations may play a role in the functional organization of cortico-basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuits, and it is important to understand their underlying mechanisms. The cortex often drives basal ganglia (BG) activity, and particularly, oscillatory activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). However, the STN may also indirectly influence cortex. The aim of this study was to characterize the delayed (>200 ms) responses of STN neurons to synchronized cortical inputs, focusing on their relationship with oscillatory cortical activity. We recorded the short-latency and delayed responses of STN units and frontal electrocorticogram (ECoG) to cortical stimulation in anaesthetized rats. Similar to previous studies, stimulation of ipsilateral frontal cortex, but not temporal cortex, evoked a short-latency triphasic response, followed by a sustained reduction or pause in firing, in rostral STN units. Caudal STN units did not show the short-latency triphasic response but often displayed a prolonged firing reduction. Oscillations in STN unit activity and ECoG were common after this sustained firing reduction, particularly between 200 and 600 ms after frontal cortical stimulation. These delayed oscillations were significantly coherent in a broad frequency band of 5–30 Hz. Coherence with ECoG at 5–15 Hz was observed throughout STN, though coherence at 15–30 Hz was largely restricted to rostral STN. Furthermore, oscillatory responses at 5–30 Hz in rostral STN predominantly led those in cortex (mean latency of 29 ms) after frontal cortical stimulation. These findings suggest that STN neurons responding to corticosubthalamic inputs may provide a delayed input to cortex, via BG output nuclei, and thence, thalamocortical pathways. PMID:16709634

  8. Following [FeFe] Hydrogenase Active Site Intermediates by Time-Resolved Mid-IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mirmohades, Mohammad; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Sommer, Constanze; Reijerse, Edward; Lomoth, Reiner; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-08-18

    Time-resolved nanosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy is for the first time employed to study the [FeFe] hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and to investigate relevant intermediates of the enzyme active site. An actinic 355 nm, 10 ns laser flash triggered photodissociation of a carbonyl group from the CO-inhibited state Hox-CO to form the state Hox, which is an intermediate of the catalytic proton reduction cycle. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy allowed us to directly follow the subsequent rebinding of the carbonyl, re-forming Hox-CO, and determine the reaction half-life to be t1/2 ≈ 13 ± 5 ms at room temperature. This gives direct information on the dynamics of CO inhibition of the enzyme. PMID:27494400

  9. Activation of Autophagy in a Rat Model of Retinal Ischemia following High Intraocular Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Piras, Antonio; Gianetto, Daniele; Conte, Daniele; Bosone, Alex; Vercelli, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Acute primary open angle glaucoma is an optic neuropathy characterized by the elevation of intraocular pressure, which causes retinal ischemia and neuronal death. Rat ischemia/reperfusion enhances endocytosis of both horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or fluorescent dextran into ganglion cell layer (GCL) neurons 24 h after the insult. We investigated the activation of autophagy in GCL-neurons following ischemia/reperfusion, using acid phosphatase (AP) histochemistry and immunofluorescence against LC3 and LAMP1. Retinal I/R lead to the appearance of AP-positive granules and LAMP1-positive vesicles 12 and 24 h after the insult, and LC3 labelling at 24 h, and induced a consistent retinal neuron death. At 48 h the retina was negative for autophagic markers. In addition, Western Blot analysis revealed an increase of LC3 levels after damage: the increase in the conjugated, LC3-II isoform is suggestive of autophagic activity. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine partially prevented death of neurons and reduces apoptotic markers, 24 h post-lesion. The number of neurons in the GCL decreased significantly following I/R (I/R 12.21±1.13 vs controls 19.23±1.12 cells/500 µm); this decrease was partially prevented by 3-methyladenine (17.08±1.42 cells/500 µm), which potently inhibits maturation of autophagosomes. Treatment also prevented the increase in glial fibrillary acid protein immunoreactivity elicited by I/R. Therefore, targeting autophagy could represent a novel and promising treatment for glaucoma and retinal ischemia. PMID:21799881

  10. Can Commercially Available Pedometers Be Used For Physical Activity Monitoring In Patients With COPD Following Exacerbations?

    PubMed Central

    Prieto-Centurion, Valentin; Bracken, Nina; Norwick, Lourdes; Zaidi, Farhan; Mutso, Amelia A.; Morken, Victoria; Coultas, David B.; Rand, Cynthia S.; Marquez, David X.; Krishnan, Jerry A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Commercially available pedometers have been used as tools to measure endpoints in studies evaluating physical activity promotion programs. However, their accuracy in patients recovering from COPD exacerbations is unknown. The objectives of this study were to 1) assess the relative accuracy of different commercially available pedometers in healthy volunteers and 2) evaluate the accuracy of the top-performing commercially available pedometer in patients recovering from COPD exacerbations following hospital discharge. Methods Twelve healthy volunteers wore 2 pedometers, 2 smartphones with pedometer apps and an accelerometer for 15 minutes of indoor activity. The top-performing device in healthy volunteers was evaluated in 4 patients recovering from COPD exacerbations following hospital discharge during 6 minutes of walking performed at home. Bland-Altman plots were employed to evaluate accuracy of each device compared with direct observation (the reference standard). Results In healthy volunteers, the mean percent error compared to direct observation of the various devices ranged from −49% to +1%. The mean percent error [95% confidence interval (CI)] of the top-performing device in healthy volunteers, the Fitbit Zip®, was +1% [−33 to +35%], significantly lower than that of the accelerometer (−13% [−56 to +29%], p=0.01). The mean percent error [95% CI] for the Fitbit Zip® in patients recovering from COPD exacerbations was −3% [−7 to +12%]. Conclusions The accuracy of commercially available pedometers in healthy volunteers is highly variable. The top-performing pedometer in our study, the Fitbit Zip,® accurately measures step counts in both healthy volunteers and patients recovering from COPD exacerbations. PMID:27547817

  11. Recovery of brain biomarkers following peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonist neuroprotective treatment before ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipid lowering agent such as agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) are suggested as neuroprotective agents and may protect from the sequelae of brain ischemic stroke. Although the demonstration is not clearly established in human, the underlying molecular mechanism may be of interest for future therapeutic purposes. To this end, we have used our well established rodent model of ischemia-reperfusion pre-treated or not with fenofibrate or atorvastatin and performed a differential proteomics analyses of the brain and analysed the protein markers which levels returned to “normal” following pre-treatments with PPARα agonists. Results In order to identify potential therapeutic targets positively modulated by pre-treatment with the PPARα agonists, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis proteome profiles between control, ischemia-reperfusion and pre-treated or not, were compared. The polypeptide which expression was altered following ischemia – reperfusion but whose levels remain unchanged after pre-treatment were characterized by mass spectrometry and further investigated by Western-blotting and immunohistochemistry. A series of 28 polypeptides were characterized among which the protein disulfide isomerase reduction – a protein instrumental to the unfolded protein response system - was shown to be reduced following PPARα agonists treatment while it was strongly increased in ischemia-reperfusion. Conclusions Pre-treatment with PPARα agonist or atorvastatin show potential neuroprotective effects by inhibiting the PDI overexpression in conjunction with the preservation of other neuronal markers, several of which are associated with the regulation of protein homeostasis, signal transduction and maintenance of synaptic plasticity. This proteomic study therefore suggests that neuroprotective effect of PPARα agonists supposes the preservation of the expression of several proteins essential for the maintenance of protein homeostasis

  12. Reduction in Neural Performance following Recovery from Anoxic Stress Is Mimicked by AMPK Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Money, Tomas G. A.; Sproule, Michael K. J.; Hamour, Amr F.; Robertson, R. Meldrum

    2014-01-01

    Nervous systems are energetically expensive to operate and maintain. Both synaptic and action potential signalling require a significant investment to maintain ion homeostasis. We have investigated the tuning of neural performance following a brief period of anoxia in a well-characterized visual pathway in the locust, the LGMD/DCMD looming motion-sensitive circuit. We hypothesised that the energetic cost of signalling can be dynamically modified by cellular mechanisms in response to metabolic stress. We examined whether recovery from anoxia resulted in a decrease in excitability of the electrophysiological properties in the DCMD neuron. We further examined the effect of these modifications on behavioural output. We show that recovery from anoxia affects metabolic rate, flight steering behaviour, and action potential properties. The effects of anoxia on action potentials can be mimicked by activation of the AMPK metabolic pathway. We suggest this is evidence of a coordinated cellular mechanism to reduce neural energetic demand following an anoxic stress. Together, this represents a dynamically-regulated means to link the energetic demands of neural signaling with the environmental constraints faced by the whole animal. PMID:24533112

  13. Reduction in neural performance following recovery from anoxic stress is mimicked by AMPK pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Money, Tomas G A; Sproule, Michael K J; Hamour, Amr F; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2014-01-01

    Nervous systems are energetically expensive to operate and maintain. Both synaptic and action potential signalling require a significant investment to maintain ion homeostasis. We have investigated the tuning of neural performance following a brief period of anoxia in a well-characterized visual pathway in the locust, the LGMD/DCMD looming motion-sensitive circuit. We hypothesised that the energetic cost of signalling can be dynamically modified by cellular mechanisms in response to metabolic stress. We examined whether recovery from anoxia resulted in a decrease in excitability of the electrophysiological properties in the DCMD neuron. We further examined the effect of these modifications on behavioural output. We show that recovery from anoxia affects metabolic rate, flight steering behaviour, and action potential properties. The effects of anoxia on action potentials can be mimicked by activation of the AMPK metabolic pathway. We suggest this is evidence of a coordinated cellular mechanism to reduce neural energetic demand following an anoxic stress. Together, this represents a dynamically-regulated means to link the energetic demands of neural signaling with the environmental constraints faced by the whole animal. PMID:24533112

  14. Reduced choice-related activity and correlated noise accompany perceptual deficits following unilateral vestibular lesion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sheng; Dickman, J. David; Newlands, Shawn D.; DeAngelis, Gregory C.; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2013-01-01

    Signals from the bilateral vestibular labyrinths work in tandem to generate robust estimates of our motion and orientation in the world. The relative contributions of each labyrinth to behavior, as well as how the brain recovers after unilateral peripheral damage, have been characterized for motor reflexes, but never for perceptual functions. Here we measure perceptual deficits in a heading discrimination task following surgical ablation of the neurosensory epithelium in one labyrinth. We found large increases in heading discrimination thresholds and large perceptual biases at 1 wk postlesion. Repeated testing thereafter improved heading perception, but vestibular discrimination thresholds remained elevated 3 mo postlesion. Electrophysiological recordings from the contralateral vestibular and cerebellar nuclei revealed elevated neuronal discrimination thresholds, elevated neurometric-to-psychometric threshold ratios, and reduced trial-by-trial correlations with perceptual decisions [“choice probabilities” (CPs)]. The relationship between CP and neuronal threshold was shallower, but not significantly altered, suggesting that smaller CPs in lesioned animals could be largely attributable to greater neuronal thresholds. Simultaneous recordings from pairs of neurons revealed that correlated noise among neurons was also reduced following the lesion. Simulations of a simple pooling model, which takes into account the observed changes in tuning slope and correlated noise, qualitatively accounts for the elevated psychophysical thresholds and neurometric-to-psychometric ratios, as well as the decreased CPs. Thus, cross-labyrinthine interactions appear to play important roles in enhancing neuronal and perceptual sensitivity, strengthening interneuronal correlations, and facilitating correlations between neural activity and perceptual decisions. PMID:24127575

  15. Older Learners: A Viable Clientele.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Kathleen M.

    1980-01-01

    As enrollments decline and financial pressures increase, many institutions have developed an interest in older learners as an alternative market for continuing education. Demographic and social factors behind this rising concern with adult education are examined. (JSR)

  16. Evoking the Power of Learners

    PubMed Central

    Hotelling, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    Our mandate, as Lamaze International childbirth educators, is to assist women in making healthy pregnancy, birth, and parenting choices. Being mindful of health promotion theory and using learning tasks and dialogue education to provide information creates a collaborative Lamaze class where the teacher is the facilitator and the learners are accountable for their learning. This column offers Lamaze educators a deeper understanding of adult learners and our roles in their birth education. PMID:22942625

  17. XMM FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF THREE SWIFT BAT-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Trippe, M. L.; Reynolds, C. S.; Koss, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Winter, L. M.

    2011-08-01

    We present XMM-Newton observations of three active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taken as part of a hunt to find very heavily obscured Compton-thick AGNs. For obscuring columns greater than 10{sup 25} cm{sup -2}, AGNs are only visible at energies below 10 keV via reflected/scattered radiation, characterized by a flat power law. We therefore selected three objects (ESO 417-G006, IRAS 05218-1212, and MCG -01-05-047) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) hard X-ray survey catalog with Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) 0.5-10 keV spectra with flat power-law indices as candidate Compton-thick sources for follow-up observations with the more sensitive instruments on XMM-Newton. The XMM spectra, however, rule out reflection-dominated models based on the weakness of the observed Fe K{alpha} lines. Instead, the spectra are well fit by a model of a power-law continuum obscured by a Compton-thin absorber plus a soft excess. This result is consistent with previous follow-up observations of two other flat-spectrum BAT-detected AGNs. Thus, out of the six AGNs in the 22 month BAT catalog with apparently flat Swift XRT spectra, all five that have had follow-up observations are not likely Compton thick. We also present new optical spectra of two of these objects, IRAS 05218-1212 and MCG -01-05-047. Interestingly, though both the AGNs have similar X-ray spectra, their optical spectra are completely different, adding evidence against the simplest form of the geometric unified model of AGNs. IRAS 05218-1212 appears in the optical as a Seyfert 1, despite the {approx}8.5 x 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} line-of-sight absorbing column indicated by its X-ray spectrum. MCG -01-05-047's optical spectrum shows no sign of AGN activity; it appears as a normal galaxy.

  18. Improved cognitive, affective and anxiety measures in patients with chronic systemic disorders following structured physical activity.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Robson Bonoto; Marins, João Carlos Bouzas; de Sá Junior, Antonio Reis; de Carvalho, Cristiane Junqueira; da Silva Moura, Tiago Augusto; Lade, Carlos Gabriel; Rizvanov, Albert A; Kiyasov, Andrey P; Mukhamedyarov, Marat A; Zefirov, Andrey L; Palotás, András; Lima, Luciana Moreira

    2015-11-01

    Mental illnesses are frequent co-morbid conditions in chronic systemic diseases. High incidences of depression, anxiety and cognitive impairment complicate cardiovascular and metabolic disorders such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Lifestyle changes including regular exercise have been advocated to reduce blood pressure and improve glycaemic control. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the effect of physical training on the most prevalent corollary psychiatric problems in patients with chronic organic ailments. This longitudinal study assessed the mental health of hypertensive (age: 57 ± 8 years) and/or diabetic (age: 53 ± 8 years) patients using mini-mental state examination, Beck's depression inventory, Beck's anxiety inventory and self-reporting questionnaire-20 before and after a 3-month supervised resistance and aerobic exercise programme comprising structured physical activity three times a week. Clinically relevant improvement was observed in the Beck's depression inventory and Beck's anxiety inventory scores following the 12-week training (61%, p = 0.001, and 53%, p = 0.02, respectively). Even though statistically not significant (p = 0.398), the cognitive performance of this relatively young patient population also benefited from the programme. These results demonstrate positive effects of active lifestyle on non-psychotic mental disorders in patients with chronic systemic diseases, recommending exercise as an alternative treatment option. PMID:26410835

  19. Changes in potassium channel activity following axotomy of B-cells in bullfrog sympathetic ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Jassar, B S; Pennefather, P S; Smith, P A

    1994-01-01

    1. Whole-cell and microelectrode voltage-clamp techniques were used to investigate the changes in ionic currents and action potential shape that follow axotomy of bullfrog paravertebral sympathetic ganglion B-cells. 2. Axotomy increased M-conductance (gM; muscarine-sensitive, voltage- and time-dependent K+ conductance) by 35% at -30 mV and slowed its deactivation kinetics. 3. The delayed rectifier K+ current (IK; at +50 mV) was reduced in axotomized neurones to 61% of control without any change in activation or deactivation kinetics. Steady-state intracellular Ca2+ levels and leak conductance were unchanged. 4. The fast, voltage-sensitive, Ca(2+)-activated K+ current (IC), evoked from -40 mV, was decreased to about 71% of control (at +30 mV) in axotomized neurones, whereas that evoked from -80 mV was largely unaffected. IC kinetics were also similar in control and axotomized neurones. This suggests that IC channels are not changed after axotomy. 5. In axotomized neurones, commands to +10 from -40 mV had to be extended by 16 ms to evoke voltage-insensitive Ca(2+)-dependent K+ current (IAHP) responses that were similar in magnitude to those observed in control cells. 6. The previously documented, axotomy-induced decrease in Ca2+ current (ICa) due to increased resting inactivation can account for the reduction in IC and IAHP and for the change in the shape of the action potential. PMID:7837094

  20. Akt Specific Activator SC79 Protects against Early Brain Injury following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingding; Zhang, Huasheng; Hao, Shuangying; Yan, Huiying; Zhang, Zihuan; Hu, Yangchun; Zhuang, Zong; Li, Wei; Zhou, Mengliang; Li, Kuanyu; Hang, Chunhua

    2016-06-15

    A growing body of evidence demonstrates that Akt may serve as a therapeutic target for treatment of early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of Akt specific activator SC79 in an experimental rat model of SAH. SAH was induced by injecting 300 μL of blood into the prechiasmatic cistern. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of SC79 (30 min post-SAH) induced the p-Akt (Ser473) expression in a dose-dependent manner. A single ICV dose treatment of SC79 (100 μg/rat) significantly increased the expression of Bcl-2 and p-GSK-3β (Ser9), decreased the protein levels of Bax, cytoplasm cytochrome c, and cleaved caspase-3, indicating the antiapoptotic effect of SC79. As a result, the number of apoptotic cells was reduced 24 h post SAH. Moreover, SC79 treatment alleviated SAH-induced oxidative stress, restored mitochondrial morphology, and improved neurological deficits. Strikingly, treatment of SC79 provided a beneficial outcome against neurologic deficit with a therapeutic window of at least 4 h post SAH by ICV injection and 30 min post SAH by intraperitoneal injection. Collectively, SC79 exerts its neuroprotective effect likely through the dual activities of antioxidation and antiapoptosis. These data provide a basic platform to consider SC79 as a novel therapeutic agent for treatment of SAH. PMID:26983552

  1. Choosing to Interact: Exploring the Relationship between Learner Personality, Attitudes, and Tutorial Dialogue Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ezen-Can, Aysu; Boyer, Kristy Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The tremendous effectiveness of intelligent tutoring systems is due in large part to their interactivity. However, when learners are free to choose the extent to which they interact with a tutoring system, not all learners do so actively. This paper examines a study with a natural language tutorial dialogue system for computer science, in which…

  2. The Interplay between Language, Gestures, Dragging and Diagrams in Bilingual Learners' Mathematical Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Oi-Lam

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of considering bilingual learners' non-linguistic forms of communication for understanding their mathematical thinking. In particular, I provide a detailed analysis of communication involving a pair of high school bilingual learners during an exploratory activity where a touchscreen-based dynamic geometry…

  3. Toward a Unified Modeling of Learner's Growth Process and Flow Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Challco, Geiser C.; Andrade, Fernando R. H.; Borges, Simone S.; Bittencourt, Ig I.; Isotani, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Flow is the affective state in which a learner is so engaged and involved in an activity that nothing else seems to matter. In this sense, to help students in the skill development and knowledge acquisition (referred to as learners' growth process) under optimal conditions, the instructional designers should create learning scenarios that favor…

  4. Create Independent Learners: Teacher-Tested Strategies for ALL Ability Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavelka, Patricia

    Noting that teachers' ultimate goal for their students is that they begin to apply strategies on their own and learn how to be independent, strategic, successful learners, this book presents numerous activities, strategies, and ideas to help students of all learning abilities in grades 1 through 5 become independent learners. The guide was…

  5. "Can We Do That Again?" Engaging Learners and Developing beyond the "Wow" Factor in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astall, Chris; Bruce, Warren

    2010-01-01

    Adding Mentos to an open bottle of Diet Coke can produce a fountain of liquid and froth extending several metres high. This activity can engage a wide audience of learners in a relevant and meaningful way, provide a model for creative science teaching, and help to develop learners' attitudes towards school science as a subject. In this paper, the…

  6. Learner-Centered Psychological Principles: A Framework for School Redesign and Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychological Association, Washington, D.C.

    Educators, concerned with disturbing trends in school failure, are arguing for more learner-centered models of schooling. Such a reform effort requires set principles that emphasize the active and reflective nature of learning and learners; 14 such principles are reported here. The immediate goal of this report is to provide a framework that can…

  7. Student Choice of Anonymity for Learner Identity in Online Learning Discussion Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Mark; Bamford, Anne

    2004-01-01

    Academics have a range of learning activities and tools they can incorporate to enable students to achieve the objectives of their courses. Strategies such as role-play have been used with learners in face-to-face settings to allow students to experience learning using a range of learner identities. Yet, with the exception of role-plays,…

  8. Effectiveness of a Learner-Directed Model for e-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Stella; Barker, Trevor; Kumar, Vivekanandan Suresh

    2016-01-01

    It is a hard task to strike a balance between extents of control a learner exercises and the amount of guidance, active or passive, afforded by the learning environment to guide, support, and motivate the learner. Adaptive systems strive to find the right balance in a spectrum that spans between self-control and system-guidance. They also concern…

  9. The Development of Adult Learner Autonomy and Self-Directedness in Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasworm, Carol E.; Yao, Bing

    Distance education's use of the instructional systems design model has been challenged by critics who suggest that the learner is passive and learning is superficial. A suggestion is that distance education should be structured so that learners assume a more active role in the development and use of autonomous and self-directed learning…

  10. The Relationship between Reading Proficiency and Reading Strategy Use: A Study of Adult ESL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Jiuhan; Nisbet, Deanna

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between reading strategy use and reading proficiency among 121 adult ESL learners. Reading strategy use was measured by the SORS, and reading proficiency was determined by the CASAS Reading Test and BEST Literacy Test. Findings of the study reveal that (a) adult ESL learners are active strategies users; (b)…

  11. Learner Agency and the Use of Affordances in Language-Exchange Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Tae youn

    2016-01-01

    Language exchange refers to a learning partnership between two learners with different native languages who collaborate to help each other improve their proficiency in the other's language. The purpose of this study is to examine the ways in which language-exchange participants activate learner agency to construct opportunities for learning in…

  12. Language-Related Computer Use: Focus on Young L2 English Learners in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundqvist, Pia; Sylvén, Liss Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a study investigating young English language learners (YELLs) in Sweden in 4th grade (N = 76, aged 10-11). Data were collected with the help of a questionnaire and a one-week language diary. The main purpose was to examine the learners' L2 English language-related activities outside of school in general, and…

  13. A Critical Analysis of Learner Participation in Virtual Worlds: How Can Virtual Worlds Inform Our Pedagogy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panichi, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory case study of learner participation within the context of online language learning in virtual world platforms. Data for this investigation was collected through a case study of a Business English course within a qualitative Case-Study Research framework. This study examines learner activity in virtual worlds in…

  14. Capitalising on Learner Agency and Group Work in Learning Writing in English as a Foreign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the roles of learner agency and group work in learning writing in English as a foreign language (EFL). Through exploratory and participatory action research, this study examines how learner agency and group work function amidst the activity system of task-based EFL writing, especially how they influence and are influenced…

  15. Chinese English Learners' Strategic Competence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dianjian; Lai, Hongling; Leslie, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The present study aims to investigate Chinese English learners' ability to use communication strategies (CSs). The subjects are put in a relatively real English referential communication setting and the analyses of the research data show that Chinese English learners, when encountering problems in foreign language (FL) communication, are characterized by the frequent use of substitution, approximation, circumlocution, literal translation, exemplification, word-coinage, repetition, and the infrequent use of cultural-knowledge and paralinguistic CSs. The rare use of paralinguistic strategies is found to be typical of Chinese English learners. The high frequency of literal translation, one first language (L1)-based strategy in our study sample, suggests that FL learners' use of L1-based CSs may depend more upon the developmental stage of their target language than the typology distance between L1 and the target language. The frequency of repetition reveals one fact that the Chinese English learners lack variety and flexibility in their use of CSs. Based on these findings, it was indicated that learners' use of CSs is influenced by a variety of factors, among which the development stage of their interlanguage and their cultural background are identified as two important factors. Some implications are finally suggested for the English foreign language teaching practice in China. PMID:25134668

  16. Imaging activity in astrocytes and neurons with genetically encoded calcium indicators following in utero electroporation.

    PubMed

    Gee, J Michael; Gibbons, Meredith B; Taheri, Marsa; Palumbos, Sierra; Morris, S Craig; Smeal, Roy M; Flynn, Katherine F; Economo, Michael N; Cizek, Christian G; Capecchi, Mario R; Tvrdik, Petr; Wilcox, Karen S; White, John A

    2015-01-01

    Complex interactions between networks of astrocytes and neurons are beginning to be appreciated, but remain poorly understood. Transgenic mice expressing fluorescent protein reporters of cellular activity, such as the GCaMP family of genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs), have been used to explore network behavior. However, in some cases, it may be desirable to use long-established rat models that closely mimic particular aspects of human conditions such as Parkinson's disease and the development of epilepsy following status epilepticus. Methods for expressing reporter proteins in the rat brain are relatively limited. Transgenic rat technologies exist but are fairly immature. Viral-mediated expression is robust but unstable, requires invasive injections, and only works well for fairly small genes (<5 kb). In utero electroporation (IUE) offers a valuable alternative. IUE is a proven method for transfecting populations of astrocytes and neurons in the rat brain without the strict limitations on transgene size. We built a toolset of IUE plasmids carrying GCaMP variants 3, 6s, or 6f driven by CAG and targeted to the cytosol or the plasma membrane. Because low baseline fluorescence of GCaMP can hinder identification of transfected cells, we included the option of co-expressing a cytosolic tdTomato protein. A binary system consisting of a plasmid carrying a piggyBac inverted terminal repeat (ITR)-flanked CAG-GCaMP-IRES-tdTomato cassette and a separate plasmid encoding for expression of piggyBac transposase was employed to stably express GCaMP and tdTomato. The plasmids were co-electroporated on embryonic days 13.5-14.5 and astrocytic and neuronal activity was subsequently imaged in acute or cultured brain slices prepared from the cortex or hippocampus. Large spontaneous transients were detected in slices obtained from rats of varying ages up to 127 days. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of this toolset for interrogating astrocytic and neuronal activity

  17. Distinct BOLD Activation Profiles Following Central and Peripheral Oxytocin Administration in Awake Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Craig F.; Yee, Jason R.; Kenkel, William M.; Dumais, Kelly Marie; Moore, Kelsey; Veenema, Alexa H.; Kulkarni, Praveen; Perkybile, Allison M.; Carter, C. Sue

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of literature has suggested that intranasal oxytocin (OT) or other systemic routes of administration can alter prosocial behavior, presumably by directly activating OT sensitive neural circuits in the brain. Yet there is no clear evidence that OT given peripherally can cross the blood–brain barrier at levels sufficient to engage the OT receptor. To address this issue we examined changes in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity in response to peripheral OT injections (0.1, 0.5, or 2.5 mg/kg) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in awake rats imaged at 7.0 T. These data were compared to OT (1 μg/5 μl) given directly to the brain via the lateral cerebroventricle. Using a 3D annotated MRI atlas of the rat brain segmented into 171 brain areas and computational analysis, we reconstructed the distributed integrated neural circuits identified with BOLD fMRI following central and peripheral OT. Both routes of administration caused significant changes in BOLD signal within the first 10 min of administration. As expected, central OT activated a majority of brain areas known to express a high density of OT receptors, e.g., lateral septum, subiculum, shell of the accumbens, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. This profile of activation was not matched by peripheral OT. The change in BOLD signal to peripheral OT did not show any discernible dose–response. Interestingly, peripheral OT affected all subdivisions of the olfactory bulb, in addition to the cerebellum and several brainstem areas relevant to the autonomic nervous system, including the solitary tract nucleus. The results from this imaging study do not support a direct central action of peripheral OT on the brain. Instead, the patterns of brain activity suggest that peripheral OT may interact at the level of the olfactory bulb and through sensory afferents from the autonomic nervous system to influence brain activity. PMID:26441574

  18. Increased oxygen consumption following activation of brain: theoretical footnotes using spectroscopic data from barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, J; Johnston, D; Martindale, J; Jones, M; Berwick, J; Zheng, Y

    2001-06-01

    indicated changes in the diffusivity of the capillary bed, but in this case the changes were negative; i.e., oxygen transport from the capillary decreased relative to baseline under hypercapnia. Neither of the models could account for the differences between the hypercapnia and activation data when matched for equivalent flow changes. A modification to the models to allow non-null tissue oxygen concentrations that can be moderated by changes due to increased metabolic demand following increased neural activity is proposed. This modification would allow modulation of oxygen transport from the capillary bed (e.g., changes in diffusivity) by tissue oxygen tension and would allow a degree of decoupling of flow and oxygen delivery, which can encompass both the data from stimulation and from hypercapnia. PMID:11352604

  19. A Learner-led, Discussion-based Elective on Emerging Infectious Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To implement a learner-led, discussion-based course aimed at exposing second-year pharmacy learners to the study of emerging infectious diseases from a global health perspective and to assess the role and importance of pharmacists in the management of disease outbreaks. Design. Learners examined literature pertinent to an emerging infectious disease in a 3-credit, discussion-based course and participated in peer discussion led by a designated learner. Instructional materials included journal articles, audio-visual presentations, documentaries, book chapters, movies, newspaper/magazine articles, and other materials. Learning outcomes were measured based on the ability of learners to perform critical thinking and analysis, communicate with their peers, and participate in class discussions. Assessment. The course was offered to 2 consecutive cohorts consisting of 14 and 16 learners, respectively. Overall, every learner in the first cohort achieved a final grade of A for the course. In the second cohort, the overall grade distribution consisted of grades of A, B, and C for the course. Learner evaluations indicated that the active-learning, discussion-based environment significantly enhanced interest in the topic and overall performance in the course. Conclusion. The elective course on emerging infectious diseases provided in-depth exposure to disease topics normally not encountered in the pharmacy curriculum. Learners found the material and format valuable, and the course enhanced their appreciation of infectious diseases, research methodology, critical thinking and analysis, and their roles as pharmacists. PMID:26430268

  20. Learners' Satisfaction Level with Online Student Portal as a Support System in an Open and Distance eLearning Environment (ODeL)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secreto, Percia V.; Pamulaklakin, Rhodora L.

    2015-01-01

    Learner support in an open, distance and online learning is defined as "all activities and elements in education that respond to a known learner or group of learners, and which are designed to assist in the cognitive, affective, and systemic realms of the learning process" (Brindley, et. al, 2004). Teaching and tutoring, advising and…

  1. Women Bound to be Active: one year follow-up to an innovative pilot intervention to increase physical activity and self-worth in women.

    PubMed

    Huberty, Jennifer L; Vener, Jamie; Schulte, Laura; Roberts, Sara M; Stevens, Beth; Ransdell, Lynda

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effectiveness of a lifestyle intervention (a women's book club; Women Bound to be Active) in promoting long-term physical activity. Thirty-five women (26-70 years; mean age 50.6 years) completed the 8-month intervention and participated in the one-year follow-up. At follow-up, physical activity returned to baseline levels; however, self-worth and body mass index significantly improved. Women were more knowledgeable about physical activity at follow-up; however, they failed to maintain physical activity after the intervention. Components of the intervention were effective in improving self-worth and lowering BMI at one-year follow-up. To enhance long-term physical activity adherence, continued research and intervention modifications are needed. PMID:20013519

  2. Simplified greywater treatment systems: Slow filters of sand and slate waste followed by granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zipf, Mariah Siebert; Pinheiro, Ivone Gohr; Conegero, Mariana Garcia

    2016-07-01

    One of the main actions of sustainability that is applicable to residential, commercial, and public buildings is the rational use of water that contemplates the reuse of greywater as one of the main options for reducing the consumption of drinking water. Therefore, this research aimed to study the efficiencies of simplified treatments for greywater reuse using slow sand and slow slate waste filtration, both followed by granular activated carbon filters. The system monitoring was conducted over 28 weeks, using analyses of the following parameters: pH, turbidity, apparent color, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), surfactants, total coliforms, and thermotolerant coliforms. The system was run at two different filtration rates: 6 and 2 m(3)/m(2)/day. Statistical analyses showed no significant differences in the majority of the results when filtration rate changed from 6 to 2 m(3)/m(2)/day. The average removal efficiencies with regard to the turbidity, apparent color, COD and BOD were 61, 54, 56, and 56%, respectively, for the sand filter, and 66, 61, 60, and 51%, respectively, for the slate waste filter. Both systems showed good efficiencies in removing surfactants, around 70%, while the pH reached values of around 7.80. The average removal efficiencies of the total and thermotolerant coliforms were of 61 and 90%, respectively, for the sand filter, and 67 and 80%, respectively, for the slate waste filter. The statistical analysis found no significant differences between the responses of the two systems, which attest to the fact that the slate waste can be a substitute for sand. The maximum levels of efficiency were high, indicating the potential of the systems, and suggesting their optimization in order to achieve much higher average efficiencies. PMID:27045540

  3. Engaging the Learner in Whole Literacy: An Immersion Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemmons, Joan; And Others

    This collection of administrative, planning, and teaching materials focuses on an immersion approach to engaging learners in whole literacy. The collection's 6 sections are as follows: (1) Role of the Administrator (Mary Dill); (2) Role of the Reading Teacher (Carleen Payne); (3) Batteries and Bulbs (DonnaLynn Estes); (4) Bears (Lois Laase); (5)…

  4. Different Demotivators for Japanese Junior High and High School Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamada, Yo

    2011-01-01

    Motivation has been studied throughout the field of language acquisition for the past 20 years. Demotivation has also been researched in Japan at primarily the university and high school level. To provide a deeper understanding of demotivation for Japanese junior and senior high school learners, this study explores the following three questions.…

  5. Perception and Production of Thai Learners on English Prepositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruangjaroon, Sugunya

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I adopt Best's (2001) Perceptual Assimilation Model (PAM) to account for how Thai learners acquire English prepositions in prepositional phrases and propose the ranking order of English preposition acquisition into three different categories. The ranking is as follows: Category A is a one-to-one semantic mapping between English and…

  6. Feedback in Technology-Based Instruction: Learner Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefevre, David; Cox, Benita

    2016-01-01

    This research investigates learner preferences for the format of feedback?when using technology-based instruction (TBI). The primary method of data collection was to provide subjects with a range of options for TBI feedback following responses to multiple-choice questions and then observe their choices. A software tool both presented the feedback…

  7. Factors Affecting Learners' Discourse Participation in a Computer Conferencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, In-Sook

    This research examined what factors affect learners' discourse participation in a Web-conferencing environment operated in a graduate course. Subjects were nine master's degree students, majoring in Educational Technology at a women's university in Seoul, Korea. Results suggest seven factors that affect students' discourse in the following ways:…

  8. English Learner (EL) Students Who Are Black. Fast Facts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of English Language Acquisition, US Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Office of English Language Acquisition (OELA) has synthesized key data on English learners (ELs) into two-page PDF sheets, by topic, with graphics, plus key contacts. This Fast Facts covers data in the following categories: (1) States, Including D.C., with the Highest Concentration of ELs Who Are Black; (2) States, Including D.C., with the…

  9. Technology Integration for the "New" 21st Century Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Nancye

    2012-01-01

    A dramatic shift is sweeping through the schools. Third graders texting on their cell phones. Kindergarteners who can navigate an iPod Touch better than educators can. Middle schoolers who already have an Internet following on their blog or YouTube channel. These are not the same 21st century learners people came to know over the first decade of…

  10. A mechanistic study of limonene oxidation products and pathways following cleaning activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carslaw, Nicola

    2013-12-01

    Indoor air pollution has caused increasing concern since the 1970s, when the advent of stricter energy efficiency measures lead to increased reports of building related symptoms. Cleaning activities have been linked to adverse health effects indoors, although it is unclear which of the components of cleaning products cause these reported health effects. This paper uses a detailed chemical model for indoor air chemistry, to identify the species formed at the highest concentrations following use of a limonene-based cleaning product. The explicit nature of the chemical mechanism also permits the key pathways to their formation to be identified. The results show that the key species in terms of gas-phase concentration are multi-functional carbonyl species including limonaldehyde, 4-acetyl-1-methyl-1-cyclohexene and other dicarbonyl species. The particle-phase was dominated by peroxide species. The predicted gas-phase concentrations for three limonene-oxidation products were compared to recently published human reference values, but found not to be high enough to cause concern for typical indoor conditions, or under high indoor ozone conditions. However, cleaning products contain a range of terpenes other than limonene, which could also produce some of the secondary products identified here, as well as more common species such as formaldehyde, glyoxal and hydrogen peroxide. A mechanistic pathway analysis shows that the secondary products formed through limonene oxidation indoors depend critically on the competition between ozone and hydroxyl radicals, such that indoor pollutant concentrations and composition could vary widely in different locations for a nominally similar residence and indoor activities. Future studies should focus on aiming to measure multi-functional carbonyl species indoors to help validate models, whilst human reference values are needed for many more relevant species indoors.

  11. Pattern of Forebrain Activation in High Novelty-Seeking Rats Following Aggressive Encounter

    PubMed Central

    Clinton, Sarah M.; Kerman, Ilan A.; Orr, Hailey R.; Bedrosian, Tracy A.; Abraham, Antony D.; Simpson, Danielle N.; Watson, Stanley J.; Akil, Huda

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that selectively-bred High (bHR) and Low (bLR) novelty-seeking rats exhibit agonistic differences, with bHRs acting in a highly aggressive manner when facing homecage intrusion. In order to discover the specific neuronal pathways responsible for bHRs’ high levels of aggression, the present study compared c-fos mRNA expression in several forebrain regions of bHR/bLR males following this experience. bHR/bLR males were housed with female rats for two weeks, and then the females were replaced with a male intruder for 10 min. bHR/bLR residents were subsequently sacrificed by rapid decapitation, and their brains were removed and processed for c-fos in situ hybridization. Intrusion elicited robust c-fos mRNA expression in both phenotypes throughout the forebrain, including the septum, amygdala, hippocampus, cingulate cortex, and the hypothalamus. However, bHRs and bLRs exhibited distinct activation patterns in select areas. Compared to bHR rats, bLRs expressed greater c-fos in the lateral septum and within multiple hypothalamic nuclei, while bHRs showed greater activation in the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus and in the hippocampus. No bHR/bLR differences in c-fos expression were detected in the amygdala, cortical regions, and striatum. We also found divergent 5-HT1A receptor mRNA expression within some of these same areas, with bLRs having greater 5-HT1A, but not 5-HT1B, receptor mRNA levels in the septum, hippocampus and cingulate cortex. These findings, together with our earlier work, suggest that bHRs exhibit altered serotonergic functioning within select circuits during an aggressive encounter. PMID:21974861

  12. Differences in HIV knowledge and sexual practices of learners with intellectual disabilities and non-disabled learners in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Aderemi, Toyin J; Pillay, Basil J; Esterhuizen, Tonya M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with intellectual disabilities are rarely targeted by the current human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) response, thereby reducing their access to HIV information and services. Currently, little is known about the HIV knowledge and sexual practices of young Nigerians with intellectual disabilities. Thus, this study sought to compare the HIV knowledge and sexual practices of learners with mild/moderate intellectual disabilities and non-disabled learners (NDL) in Nigeria. Findings could help in the development of HIV interventions that are accessible to Nigerian learners with intellectual impairments. Methods This cross-sectional, comparative study utilized a survey to investigate HIV knowledge and sexual practices among learners with mild/moderate intellectual disabilities and NDL in Nigeria. Learners with mild/moderate intellectual disabilities (n=300) and NDL (n=300) within the age range of 12 to 19 years drawn from schools across Oyo State, Nigeria, completed a structured questionnaire to assess their knowledge of HIV transmission and sexual practices. Results Significantly more learners with mild/moderate intellectual disabilities (62.2%) than NDL 48 (37.8%) reported having sexual experience (p=0.002). Of the sexually experienced female learners with mild/moderate intellectual disabilities, 28 (68.3%) reported history of rape compared with 9 (2.9%) of female NDL (p=0.053). Intellectual impairment was significantly associated with lower HIV transmission knowledge scores (p<0.001). Learners with mild/moderate intellectual disabilities were less likely than NDL (p<0.001) to have heard about HIV from most of the common sources of HIV information. In addition, when compared with non-disabled learners, learners with mild/moderate intellectual disabilities were significantly more likely to have reported inconsistent condom use with boyfriends/girlfriends (p<0.001), with casual sexual partners (p<0.001) and non-use of condom during last sexual

  13. Learning Journeys: Learners' Voice. North East Learners' Views on Progress and Achievement in Literacy and Numeracy. Summary Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregson, Maggie; Spedding, Trish; Banks, Andy; Stewart, Jennifer; Staley, Jim; Edmonds, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the processes and findings of a north east Learning and Skills Development Agency (LSDA) research project. This was a collaborative research study, which followed from a similar, much larger project in the north west, which looked into how learners view their own progress and achievement in the acquisition of literacy and…

  14. Implicit theories about willpower predict the activation of a rest goal following self-control exertion.

    PubMed

    Job, Veronika; Bernecker, Katharina; Miketta, Stefanie; Friese, Malte

    2015-10-01

    Past research indicates that peoples' implicit theories about the nature of willpower moderate the ego-depletion effect. Only people who believe or were led to believe that willpower is a limited resource (limited-resource theory) showed lower self-control performance after an initial demanding task. As of yet, the underlying processes explaining this moderating effect by theories about willpower remain unknown. Here, we propose that the exertion of self-control activates the goal to preserve and replenish mental resources (rest goal) in people with a limited-resource theory. Five studies tested this hypothesis. In Study 1, individual differences in implicit theories about willpower predicted increased accessibility of a rest goal after self-control exertion. Furthermore, measured (Study 2) and manipulated (Study 3) willpower theories predicted an increased preference for rest-conducive objects. Finally, Studies 4 and 5 provide evidence that theories about willpower predict actual resting behavior: In Study 4, participants who held a limited-resource theory took a longer break following self-control exertion than participants with a nonlimited-resource theory. Longer resting time predicted decreased rest goal accessibility afterward. In Study 5, participants with an induced limited-resource theory sat longer on chairs in an ostensible product-testing task when they had engaged in a task requiring self-control beforehand. This research provides consistent support for a motivational shift toward rest after self-control exertion in people holding a limited-resource theory about willpower. PMID:26075793

  15. Activity of retinal ganglion cells following intense, nanosecond laser flashes. Final report, 1983-1986

    SciTech Connect

    Glickman, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of intense, but nonlesion-producing, laser exposures of 20-ns duration were determined on the light responses and spontaneous activity of retinal ganglion cells recorded in situ from the rhesus monkey. (Following a single, 20-ns exposure centered on its receptive field, a ganglion cell produced an 'afterdischarge' of maintained action potentials). The duration of the afterdischarge depended on the diameter of the laser beam on the retina and on the beam's intensity. Laser exposures subtending 0.5 to 2.0 deg, and delivering 45 to 60% of the maximum permissible exposure, elicited afterdischarges that lasted up to 80 s. When the beam diameter was decreased to 0.25 deg, the afterdischarge was reduced to 30 s, and to less than 5 s with the 0.12-deg beam. Light sensitivity after the laser exposure recovered rapidly during the first 10 s and then more slowly, but exponentially, until it reached the preflash level. Color-opponent ganglion cells exhibited a phenomenon called 'response-reversal' after the laser exposure, presumably due to selective adaptation of a mid-wavelength cone-input. Because a 20-ns exposure, regardless of intensity, is likely to photoregenerate more than half of the available visual pigment, the effects of ganglion cell response described here are not likely to be due solely to pigment bleaching.

  16. What Happens in Classrooms after Earth Science Fieldwork? Supporting Student Learning Processes during Follow-Up Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remmen, Kari Beate; Frøyland, Merethe

    2015-01-01

    Follow-up activities after fieldwork are recommended, yet little research has been conducted in this area. This study investigates six cases of follow-up work carried out by three teachers and their students in three upper secondary schools in Norway. The data comprises video observations of teachers and students, instructional artifacts,…

  17. Imaging activity in astrocytes and neurons with genetically encoded calcium indicators following in utero electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Gee, J. Michael; Gibbons, Meredith B.; Taheri, Marsa; Palumbos, Sierra; Morris, S. Craig; Smeal, Roy M.; Flynn, Katherine F.; Economo, Michael N.; Cizek, Christian G.; Capecchi, Mario R.; Tvrdik, Petr; Wilcox, Karen S.; White, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Complex interactions between networks of astrocytes and neurons are beginning to be appreciated, but remain poorly understood. Transgenic mice expressing fluorescent protein reporters of cellular activity, such as the GCaMP family of genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs), have been used to explore network behavior. However, in some cases, it may be desirable to use long-established rat models that closely mimic particular aspects of human conditions such as Parkinson's disease and the development of epilepsy following status epilepticus. Methods for expressing reporter proteins in the rat brain are relatively limited. Transgenic rat technologies exist but are fairly immature. Viral-mediated expression is robust but unstable, requires invasive injections, and only works well for fairly small genes (<5 kb). In utero electroporation (IUE) offers a valuable alternative. IUE is a proven method for transfecting populations of astrocytes and neurons in the rat brain without the strict limitations on transgene size. We built a toolset of IUE plasmids carrying GCaMP variants 3, 6s, or 6f driven by CAG and targeted to the cytosol or the plasma membrane. Because low baseline fluorescence of GCaMP can hinder identification of transfected cells, we included the option of co-expressing a cytosolic tdTomato protein. A binary system consisting of a plasmid carrying a piggyBac inverted terminal repeat (ITR)-flanked CAG-GCaMP-IRES-tdTomato cassette and a separate plasmid encoding for expression of piggyBac transposase was employed to stably express GCaMP and tdTomato. The plasmids were co-electroporated on embryonic days 13.5–14.5 and astrocytic and neuronal activity was subsequently imaged in acute or cultured brain slices prepared from the cortex or hippocampus. Large spontaneous transients were detected in slices obtained from rats of varying ages up to 127 days. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of this toolset for interrogating astrocytic and neuronal

  18. A Support Method with Changeable Training Strategies Based on Mutual Adaptation between a Ubiquitous Pet and a Learner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xianzhi; Jing, Lei; Kansen, Mizuo; Wang, Junbo; Ota, Kaoru; Cheng, Zixue

    With the progress of ubiquitous technology, ubiquitous learning presents new opportunities to learners. Situations of a learner can be grasped through analyzing the learner's actions collected by sensors, RF-IDs, or cameras in order to provide support at proper time, proper place, and proper situation. Training for acquiring skills and enhancing physical abilities through exercise and experience in the real world is an important domain in u-learning. A training program may last for several days and has one or more training units (exercises) for a day. A learner's performance in a unit is considered as short term state. The performance in a series of units may change with patterns: progress, plateau, and decline. Long term state in a series of units is accumulatively computed based on short term states. In a learning/training program, it is necessary to apply different support strategies to adapt to different states of the learner. Adaptation in learning support is significant, because a learner loses his/her interests easily without adaptation. Systems with the adaptive support usually provide stimulators to a learner, and a learner can have a great motivation in learning at beginning. However, when the stimulators reach some levels, the learner may lose his/her motivation, because the long term state of the learner changes dynamically, which means a progress state may change to a plateau state or a decline state. In different long term learning states, different types of stimulators are needed. However, the stimulators and advice provided by the existing systems are monotonic without changeable support strategies. We propose a mutual adaptive support. The mutual adaptation means each of the system and the learner has their own states. On one hand, the system tries to change its state to adapt to the learner's state for providing adaptive support. On the other hand, the learner can change its performance following the advice given based on the state of the system

  19. Reducing length of stay and satisfying learner needs.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Lisa; Chahine, Saad; Klingel, Michelle; Zibrowski, Elaine; Meiwald, Allison; Lingard, Lorelei

    2016-06-01

    A complicated relationship exists between emergency department (ED) learner needs and patient flow with solutions to one issue often negatively affecting the other. Teaching shifts that allow clinical teachers and learners to interact without the pressure of patient care may offer a mutually beneficial solution. This study investigated the relationship between teaching shifts on ED length of stay, student self-efficacy and knowledge application.In 2012-2013, a prospective, cohort study was undertaken in a large Canadian acute-care teaching centre. All 132 clinical clerks completing their mandatory two-week emergency medicine rotation participated in three teaching shifts supervised by one faculty member without patient care responsibilities. The curriculum emphasized advanced clinical skills and included low fidelity simulation exercises, a suturing lab, image interpretation modules and discussion about psychosocial issues in emergency medicine. The clerks then completed seven clinical shifts in the traditional manner caring for patients under the supervision of an ED attending physician. Length of stay was compared during and one week following teaching shifts. A self-efficacy questionnaire was validated through exploratory factor analysis. Pre/post knowledge application was assessed using a paper-based clinical case activity.Across 40.998 patient visits, median length of stay was shortened overall by 5 minutes (95 % CI:1.2, 8.8) when clerks were involved in their teaching shifts. In the first academic block, median length of stay was reduced by 20 minutes per patient (95 % CI:12.7, 27.3). Self-efficacy showed significant improvement post teaching shifts (p < 0.001) with large effect sizes (d > 1.25) on dimensions of knowledge base, suturing, trauma and team efficacy. Students' knowledge application scores improved from pre to post (p < 0.01), with notable gains in the generation of differential diagnoses.Teaching shifts are an effective

  20. Interaction of African American Learners Online: An Adult Education Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Haijun; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how various life factors and personal attributes affect African American adult learners' use of the three types of learning interaction-learner-content, learner-instructor, and learner-learner. Multivariate multiple regression analyses were used. The aggregate effect of life factors on African American adult learners' use of…

  1. Kinetics of force recovery following length changes in active skinned single fibres from rabbit psoas muscle

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Kevin; Simmons, Robert M; Sleep, John; Smith, David A

    2006-01-01

    Redevelopment of isometric force following shortening of skeletal muscle is thought to result from a redistribution of cross-bridge states. We varied the initial force and cross-bridge distribution by applying various length-change protocols to active skinned single fibres from rabbit psoas muscle, and observed the effect on the slowest phase of recovery (‘late recovery’) that follows transient changes. In response to step releases that reduced force to near zero (∼8 nm (half sarcomere)−1) or prolonged shortening at high velocity, late recovery was well described by two exponentials of approximately equal amplitude and rate constants of ∼2 s−1 and ∼9 s−1 at 5°C. When a large restretch was applied at the end of rapid shortening, recovery was accelerated by (1) the introduction of a slow falling component that truncated the rise in force, and (2) a relative increase in the contribution of the fast exponential component. The rate of the slow fall was similar to that observed after a small isometric step stretch, with a rate of 0.4–0.8 s−1, and its effects could be reversed by reducing force to near zero immediately after the stretch. Force at the start of late recovery was varied in a series of shortening steps or ramps in order to probe the effect of cross-bridge strain on force redevelopment. The rate constants of the two components fell by 40–50% as initial force was raised to 75–80% of steady isometric force. As initial force increased, the relative contribution of the fast component decreased, and this was associated with a length constant of about 2 nm. The results are consistent with a two-state strain-dependent cross-bridge model. In the model there is a continuous distribution of recovery rate constants, but two-exponential fits show that the fast component results from cross-bridges initially at moderate positive strain and the slow component from cross-bridges at high positive strain. PMID:16497718

  2. The Effects of Instructor-Learner Interactions on Learner Satisfaction in Online Masters Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaren, Angelene C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to investigate the extent instructor-learner interactions affected learner satisfaction in online, semester-long Masters courses. This research study lent itself to several questions: To what extent do instructor-learner interactions affect learner satisfaction in online Masters courses; To what extent does…

  3. Teacher Perceptions of Learner-Learner Engagement at a Cyber High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borup, Jered

    2016-01-01

    Distance education has historically contained little or no learner-learner interactions. Currently the Internet allows for unprecedented levels of learner-learner interaction and has the potential to transform how students learn online. However, many courses offered online focus more on flexibility and independence than on interaction and…

  4. Study Partners Recommendation for xMOOCs Learners

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Yang, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) provide an opportunity for people to access free courses offered by top universities in the world and therefore attracted great attention and engagement from college teachers and students. However, with contrast to large scale enrollment, the completion rate of these courses is really low. One of the reasons for students to quit learning process is problems which they face that could not be solved by discussing them with classmates. In order to keep them staying in the course, thereby further improving the completion rate, we address the task of study partner recommendation for students based on both content information and social network information. By analyzing the content of messages posted by learners in course discussion forum, we investigated the learners' behavior features to classify the learners into three groups. Then we proposed a topic model to measure learners' course knowledge awareness. Finally, a social network was constructed based on their activities in the course forum, and the relationship in the network was then employed to recommend study partners for target learner combined with their behavior features and course knowledge awareness. The experiment results show that our method achieves better performance than recommending method only based on content information. PMID:25663836

  5. Study Partners Recommendation for xMOOCs learners.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Yang, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) provide an opportunity for people to access free courses offered by top universities in the world and therefore attracted great attention and engagement from college teachers and students. However, with contrast to large scale enrollment, the completion rate of these courses is really low. One of the reasons for students to quit learning process is problems which they face that could not be solved by discussing them with classmates. In order to keep them staying in the course, thereby further improving the completion rate, we address the task of study partner recommendation for students based on both content information and social network information. By analyzing the content of messages posted by learners in course discussion forum, we investigated the learners' behavior features to classify the learners into three groups. Then we proposed a topic model to measure learners' course knowledge awareness. Finally, a social network was constructed based on their activities in the course forum, and the relationship in the network was then employed to recommend study partners for target learner combined with their behavior features and course knowledge awareness. The experiment results show that our method achieves better performance than recommending method only based on content information. PMID:25663836

  6. Ascorbic acid supplementation diminishes microparticle elevations and neutrophil activation following SCUBA diving.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Barak, Otto F; Dujic, Zeljko; Madden, Dennis; Bhopale, Veena M; Bhullar, Jasjeet; Thom, Stephen R

    2015-08-15

    Predicated on evidence that diving-related microparticle generation is an oxidative stress response, this study investigated the role that oxygen plays in augmenting production of annexin V-positive microparticles associated with open-water SCUBA diving and whether elevations can be abrogated by ascorbic acid. Following a cross-over study design, 14 male subjects ingested placebo and 2-3 wk later ascorbic acid (2 g) daily for 6 days prior to performing either a 47-min dive to 18 m of sea water while breathing air (∼222 kPa N2/59 kPa O2) or breathing a mixture of 60% O2/balance N2 from a tight-fitting face mask at atmospheric pressure for 47 min (∼40 kPa N2/59 kPa O2). Within 30 min after the 18-m dive in the placebo group, neutrophil activation, and platelet-neutrophil interactions occurred, and the total number of microparticles, as well as subgroups bearing CD66b, CD41, CD31, CD142 proteins or nitrotyrosine, increased approximately twofold. No significant elevations occurred among divers after ingesting ascorbic acid, nor were elevations identified in either group after breathing 60% O2. Ascorbic acid had no significant effect on post-dive intravascular bubble production quantified by transthoracic echocardiography. We conclude that high-pressure nitrogen plays a key role in neutrophil and microparticle-associated changes with diving and that responses can be abrogated by dietary ascorbic acid supplementation. PMID:26084697

  7. Temporal lobe epileptiform activity following systemic administration of 4-aminopyridine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Maxime; Salami, Pariya; Behr, Charles; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Purpose The K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4AP) induces epileptiform synchronization in brain slices maintained in vitro without interfering with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor–mediated inhibition and, actually, even enhancing it. The hypothesis that similar electrographic epileptiform patterns occur in vivo following systemic 4AP injection was tested here. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 13) were implanted with bipolar electrodes aimed at the hippocampal CA3 region, entorhinal cortex, subiculum, dentate gyrus, and amygdala. They were then injected with a single dose of 4AP (4–5 mg/kg, i.p.), and video-monitoring/electroencephalography (EEG) recordings were performed. Key Findings 4AP induced convulsive or nonconvulsive seizures in 12 of 13 rats, along with generalized fascicular twitching, wet-dog shakes, and myoclonic jerks. On EEG, we observed in 7 (58.3%) of 12 animals long-lasting interictal spikes from the subiculum before the occurrence of the first seizure. Once seizures had started, interictal spikes occurred in all areas with no fixed site of origin. Most seizures (41/60, 68.3%) were characterized by a low-voltage fast-activity onset pattern and were convulsive (48/60, 80%). 4AP also induced highly rhythmic theta (6–11 Hz) oscillations in CA3 and entorhinal cortex before seizure occurrence. Significance Our study shows that systemic 4AP administration in vivo can enhance theta oscillations and induce slow interictal spikes and low-voltage fast-onset seizures similar to those reported in brain slices. We propose that these effects may reflect, at least in part, enhanced GABAA receptor–mediated inhibition as reported in in vitro studies. PMID:23521339

  8. Explicit and Implicit Feedback, Modified Output, and SLA: Does Explicit and Implicit Feedback Promote Learning and Learner-Learner Interactions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Rebecca; Nuevo, Ana Maria; Egi, Takako

    2011-01-01

    Research on interactional feedback has typically focused on feedback learners receive from native speakers (i.e., NS-learner contexts). However, for many second language (L2) learners, the majority of their opportunities to engage in interaction occur with other learners (i.e., learner-learner contexts). The literature has suggested that feedback…

  9. Adult Learner Characteristics and Instructional Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etter, David Campbell George

    Using 40 male and 40 female part time learners with an average age of 36.6, this program planning study explored relationships between selected learner characteristics and behaviorally stated cognitive instructional objectives (IOs). Variables included age, sex, socioeconomic status, verbal ability, and a measure of learners' goals or learning…

  10. Alternative Model Learner Verification and Revision Statutes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geffert, Hannah N.; And Others

    A learner verification and revision (LVR) process attempts to discover difficulties learners experience in using instructional materials and to formulate possible ways of modifying the instructional materials to eliminate the difficulties. It is a means of ensuring useful learner input into the prepublication development and postpublication…

  11. An Open Learner Model for Trainee Pilots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gakhal, Inderdip; Bull, Susan

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential for simple open learner models for highly motivated, independent learners, using the example of trainee pilots. In particular we consider whether such users access their learner model to help them identify their current knowledge level, areas of difficulty and specific misconceptions, to help them plan their…

  12. The Adult Learner: Some Things We Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogarty, Robin J.; Pete, Brian M.

    2007-01-01

    This book addresses the "warrior" who rises to the challenge of teaching the adult learner. The discussion is designed as a catalyst for dialogue about the adult learner and to uncover the complexities of teaching this rare and riveting species. This book is organized around three interlocking themes: some things we know about the adult learner;…

  13. Slow Learners: Are Educators Leaving Them Behind?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaznowski, Kimberly

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the school performance of a sample of slow learners who qualified for special education as learning disabled with a sample of slow learners who did not qualify for special education. The intent of the study was to determine which group of slow learners was more successful in school in order to know if special education or…

  14. Appropriateness and the Foreign-Language Learner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Roger E.

    1980-01-01

    The attitude of the target-language community toward the foreign language learner has been overlooked in language teaching. The teacher should consider the native speaker's attitude toward the language learner's command of the language, whether the native speaker views the learner's proficiency as an intrusion, and whether situations dictate…

  15. Becoming a Strategic Language Learner in CALL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Andrew D.

    2007-01-01

    This article outlines what it means to be a strategic language learner in the context of Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL). It looks at the possible roles for language learner strategies at their crucial intersection with language learning technology. We will first consider what language learner strategies have been represented in…

  16. Characteristics of Successful Adult Distance Instructors for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nora N.

    2003-01-01

    In this age of rapid technological and economic change, life-long learning is becoming a way of life. The average age of students will become greater. Participation in learning activities by learners 18 and over increased from 38 percent in 1991 to 50 percent in 1999 (U.S. Department of Education, NCES, 1999). As the population seeks more…

  17. A Problem Solving Strategy for Gifted Learners in South Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Horst, Helen v R.

    2000-01-01

    A strategy of problem solving in the teaching of gifted learners is explored as a possible way of differentiating the curriculum in order to optimize learning. The Teaching Actively in a Social Context Model (TASC) and Renzulli's Enrichment Triad Model are cited as valuable teaching-learning programs. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  18. Collaborative Revision in L2 Writing: Learners' Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memari Hanjani, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    L2 learning literature has reflected on the problems surrounding the application of teacher written feedback and peer feedback in EFL contexts. To address the disadvantages of these feedback forms, this exploratory case study examined EFL learners' reactions to a collaborative revision activity. Interview data were collected from eight native…

  19. Language Development for English Language Learners. Facilitator's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, Mabel O.; Moughamian, Ani; Francis, David J.

    2009-01-01

    This Facilitator's Guide has been prepared for presenters of the "Language Development for English Language Learners" professional development module. It accompanies the 67-slide PowerPoint presentation with speaker's notes and contains materials to help prepare for a professional development session, including activity instructions, handouts,…

  20. Understanding the Learner-Environment Relationship: A Matrix of Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowler, Josephine; Annan, Jean; Mentis, Mandia

    2007-01-01

    This conceptual article re-examines the contribution of a contextual perspective to the practice of educational psychology. The two dimensions of environment and learner are placed along a continuum of active to passive. A range of theory is then situated within this matrix. The article explains and illustrates how the matrix encompasses different…

  1. Shared Pedagogical Understandings: Schoolwide Inclusion Practices Supporting Learner Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abawi, Lindy; Oliver, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Educational perspectives that recommend inclusion of children with special needs into mainstream classrooms remain a controversial topic. The Melbourne Declaration declares that all young Australians should be supported to become successful learners; confident and creative individuals; and active and informed citizens. So the question remains how…

  2. Motivation and Interlanguage Pragmatics in Iranian English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khorshidi, Hassan Rasouli; Nimchahi, Abdolreza Bagherzadeh

    2013-01-01

    It is generally believed that interlanguage pragmatics and motivation play important roles in learning. Motivation is important because it determines the extent of the learner's active involvement and attitude toward learning. The major purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of integrative and instrumental motivation on the…

  3. Boosting Language Skills of English Learners through Dramatization and Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfader, Christa Mulker; Brouillette, Liane

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an arts integration program that uses drama and dance to promote foundational literacy skills, with an emphasis on the oral development of English Language Learners (ELLs). Previous research indicates that arts activities afford a beneficial opportunity for young students to practice language skills, but many teachers have…

  4. Are Online Learners Frustrated with Collaborative Learning Experiences?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capdeferro, Neus; Romero, Margarida

    2012-01-01

    Online education increasingly puts emphasis on collaborative learning methods. Despite the pedagogical advantages of collaborative learning, online learners can perceive collaborative learning activities as frustrating experiences. The purpose of this study was to characterize the feelings of frustration as a negative emotion among online learners…

  5. Learner Experiences in Web-Based Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Son, Jeong-Bae

    2007-01-01

    The World Wide Web offers a global database of authentic materials that can enhance language learning and teaching. This study examines the use of the web for language learning through a study of English as a second language (ESL) learners' experiences in web-based language learning (WBLL) activities in an English language intensive course for…

  6. Interactive TV: An Effective Instructional Mode for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Li-Ling; Iris, Carole

    2004-01-01

    The inclusion of interactive television (iTV) programs for learning is an emerging genre in education. Literature has concluded that any aspect of learning requires some form of interaction or feedback to be most effective. As television (TV) evolves from being a passive to an active medium, it has the potential to engage learners and reach a mass…

  7. Language Development of Children Born Following Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI) Combined with Assisted Oocyte Activation (AOA)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'haeseleer, Evelien; Vanden Meerschaut, Frauke; Bettens, Kim; Luyten, Anke; Gysels, Hannelore; Thienpont, Ylenia; De Witte, Griet; Heindryckx, Björn; Oostra, Ann; Roeyers, Herbert; De Sutter, Petra; van Lierde, Kristiane

    2014-01-01

    Background: The effect of assisted reproduction technology (ART) on language development is still unclear. Moreover, different techniques are introduced at rapid pace and are not always accompanied by extensive follow-up programmes. Aims: To investigate the language development of 3-10-year-old children born following ART using intracytoplasmic…

  8. Vascular expression, activity and function of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 following cerebral ischaemia-reperfusion in mice.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Katherine A; Brait, Vanessa H; Wang, Yutang; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Ball, Helen J; McKenzie, Gavin; De Silva, T Michael; Stocker, Roland; Sobey, Christopher G

    2011-05-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenases-1 (Ido1) and -2 initiate the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. In addition to the established immune regulatory effects of Ido1 and the ability of nitric oxide to regulate Ido1 activity, it is now also known that Ido1-mediated metabolism of tryptophan to kynurenine can modulate vascular tone. Ido activity is reportedly elevated in stroke patients and correlates with increased risk of death. Thus, the present goals were to test whether, following cerebral ischaemia, Ido activity and cerebrovascular Ido1 expression are altered and whether expression of Ido1 contributes to stroke outcome. Transient cerebral ischaemia was induced in wild-type and Ido1 gene-deficient (Ido1 (-/-)) mice. Mice were pre-treated with vehicle, the Ido1 inhibitor, 1-methyl-D-tryptophan (1-MT; 50 mg/kg i.p.) or the inducible nitric oxide synthase (Nos2) inhibitor, aminoguanidine (AG, 100 mg/kg i.p.). At 24 h, neurological function, brain infarct size and swelling were assessed. In addition, Ido activity was estimated by plasma kynurenine and tryptophan, and Ido1 expression was examined in cerebral arterioles. Cerebral ischaemia-reperfusion in wild-type mice increased Ido activity and its expression in cerebral arterioles. Ido1 (-/-) and 1-MT-treated wild-type mice had lower Ido activity but similar post-stroke neurological function and similar total brain infarct volume and swelling, relative to control mice. Inhibition of Nos2 with AG also did not affect Ido activity or outcome following stroke. This study provides molecular and pharmacological evidence that the expression and the activity of Ido1 increase following stroke. However, such Ido1 expression does not appear to affect overall outcome following acute ischaemic stroke, and furthermore, a regulatory role of Nos2-derived nitric oxide on Ido activity following cerebral ischaemia-reperfusion appears unlikely. PMID:21359968

  9. Behavioral and Neural Plasticity of Ocular Motor Control: Changes in Performance and fMRI Activity Following Antisaccade Training

    PubMed Central

    Jamadar, Sharna D.; Johnson, Beth P.; Clough, Meaghan; Egan, Gary F.; Fielding, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    The antisaccade task provides a model paradigm that sets the inhibition of a reflexively driven behavior against the volitional control of a goal-directed behavior. The stability and adaptability of antisaccade performance was investigated in 23 neurologically healthy individuals. Behavior and brain function were measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) prior to and immediately following 2 weeks of daily antisaccade training. Participants performed antisaccade trials faster with no change in directional error rate following 2 weeks of training; however this increased speed came at the cost of the spatial accuracy of the saccade (gain) which became more hypometric following training. Training on the antisaccade task resulted in increases in fMRI activity in the fronto-basal ganglia-parietal-cerebellar ocular motor network. Following training, antisaccade latency was positively associated with fMRI activity in the frontal and supplementary eye fields, anterior cingulate and intraparietal sulcus; antisaccade gain was negatively associated with fMRI activity in supplementary eye fields, anterior cingulate, intraparietal sulcus, and cerebellar vermis. In sum, the results suggest that following training, larger antisaccade latency is associated with larger activity in fronto-parietal-cerebellar ocular motor regions, and smaller antisaccade gain is associated with larger activity in fronto-parietal ocular motor regions. PMID:26733841

  10. Changes in physical activity levels following 12-week family intervention in Hispanic girls: Bounce study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pediatric obesity is a major health problem among Hispanic girls. Physical activity guidelines recommend that children engage in at least 60 min of moderate to vigorous activity daily. To examine the changes in physical activity level pre- and post-intervention. Hispanic girls in control (CG; N=26, ...

  11. Morphosyntactic processing in late second-language learners.

    PubMed

    Dowens, Margaret Gillon; Vergara, Marta; Barber, Horacio A; Carreiras, Manuel

    2010-08-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the electrophysiological correlates of second-language (L2) morphosyntactic processing in highly proficient late learners of an L2 with long exposure to the L2 environment. ERPs were collected from 22 English-Spanish late learners while they read sentences in which morphosyntactic features of the L2 present or not present in the first language (number and gender agreement, respectively) were manipulated at two different sentence positions-within and across phrases. The results for a control group of age-matched native-speaker Spanish participants included an ERP pattern of LAN-type early negativity followed by P600 effect in response to both agreement violations and for both sentence positions. The late L2 learner results included a similar pattern, consisting of early negativity followed by P600, in the first sentence position (within-phrase agreement violations) but only P600 effects in the second sentence position (across-phrase agreement violation), as well as significant amplitude and onset latency differences between the gender and the number violation effects in both sentence positions. These results reveal that highly proficient learners can show electrophysiological correlates during L2 processing that are qualitatively similar to those of native speakers, but the results also indicate the contribution of factors such as age of acquisition and transfer processes from first language to L2. PMID:19580390

  12. Educating Young Children: Active Learning Practices for Preschool and Child Care Programs [and] A Study Guide to Educating Young Children: Exercises for Adult Learners. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohmann, Mary; Weikart, David P.

    High/Scope preschool curriculum is a model for developing high-quality early childhood programs that encourage and support children's initiatives and active learning experiences. This revised manual for early childhood practitioners and students presents essential strategies adults can use to make active learning a reality in their programs. The…

  13. A Cultural-Historical Activity Theory Investigation of Contradictions in Open and Distance Higher Education among Alienated Adult Learners in Korea National Open University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joo, K. P.

    2014-01-01

    Drawing upon cultural-historical activity theory, this research analyzed the structural contradictions existing in a variety of educational activities among a group of alienated adult students in Korea National Open University (KNOU). Despite KNOU's quantitative development in student enrollment, the contradictions shed light on how the…

  14. OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND ACTIVATION OF MITOGEN ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES (MAPK) FOLLOWING AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE EXPOSURE (PM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND ACTIVATION OF MITOGEN ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES (MAPK) FOLLOWING AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE EXPOSURE (PM). E S Roberts1, R Jaskot2, J Richards2, and K L Dreher2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC a...

  15. Introducing OVAL Writing: A New Approach to Chinese Character Retention for Secondary Non-Chinese-Speaking Background Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ren, Guanxin

    2004-01-01

    One of the difficulties secondary non-Chinese-speaking background (NCSB) learners are facing is to remember the characters learned in order to recall them when necessary. The traditional way of teaching secondary NCSB learners to remember Chinese characters is through mere repetition, e.g. writing out each single character by following its stroke…

  16. A Learning Methodology Using Matlab/Simulink for Undergraduate Electrical Engineering Courses Attending to Learner Satisfaction Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duran, Mario J.; Gallardo, Sergio; Toral, Sergio L.; Martinez-Torres, Rocio; Barrero, Federico J.

    2007-01-01

    Learner-centred approaches follow the prevailing tendency in modern University reforms which are primarily concerned about "how people learn". The methodologies can be learner-centred in the sense of placing the student as the main actor of the teaching-learning process by increasing his interactivity and participation, but also considering what…

  17. A Corpus-Based System of Error Detection and Revision Suggestion for Spanish Learners in Taiwan: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Hui-Chuan; Chu, Yu-Hsin; Chang, Cheng-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Compared with English learners, Spanish learners have fewer resources for automatic error detection and revision and following the current integrative Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL), we combined corpus-based approach and CALL to create the System of Error Detection and Revision Suggestion (SEDRS) for learning Spanish. Through…

  18. iSELF: The Development of an Internet-Tool for Self-Evaluation and Learner Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theunissen, Nicolet; Stubbé, Hester

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the theoretical basis and development of the iSELF: an Internet-tool for Self-Evaluation and Learner Feedback to stimulate self-directed learning in ubiquitous learning environments. In ubiquitous learning, learners follow their own trails of interest, scaffolded by coaches, peers and tools for thinking and learning.…

  19. Learner-Centered Online Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCombs, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    This chapter offers a theoretical rationale and an explanation of evidence for using research-validated, learner-centered principles and practices in online course development, highlighting the evidence-based practices that have been used successfully to develop online courses that engage and retain students.

  20. Options for English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minaya-Rowe, Liliana

    2008-01-01

    Between 69 percent and 90 percent of English language learners (ELLs) in middle and high schools were born in the United States and have been in U.S. schools since kindergarten still have not achieved the academic proficiency to succeed in an all-English mainstream program. Various ELL program options are available for school districts to…

  1. Individual Learner Differences in SLA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arabski, Janusz; Wojtaszek, Adam

    2011-01-01

    "Individual Learner Differences in SLA" addresses the apparently insoluble conflict between the unquestionably individual character of the process of second language acquisition/foreign language learning and the institutionalised, often inflexible character of formal instruction in which it takes place. How, then, is success in SLA so prevalent?

  2. Grading Exceptional and Struggling Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Lee Ann; Guskey, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    How can you ensure that you are grading your exceptional students fairly? Teachers receive very little guidance for grading students with disabilities, English learners, and those receiving services through a response-to-intervention (RTI) process. This practitioner-friendly book provides teachers and administrators with an effective framework for…

  3. Are Deaf Students Visual Learners?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marschark, Marc; Morrison, Carolyn; Lukomski, Jennifer; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol

    2013-01-01

    It is frequently assumed that by virtue of their hearing losses, deaf students are visual learners. Deaf individuals have some visual-spatial advantages relative to hearing individuals, but most have been linked to use of sign language rather than auditory deprivation. How such cognitive differences might affect academic performance has been…

  4. Learner Differences in Hint Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldin, Ilya M.; Koedinger, Kenneth R.; Aleven, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Although ITSs are supposed to adapt to differences among learners, so far, little attention has been paid to how they might adapt to differences in how students learn from help. When students study with an Intelligent Tutoring System, they may receive multiple types of help, but may not comprehend and make use of this help in the same way. To…

  5. English Language Learners: Annotated Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hector-Mason, Anestine; Bardack, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    This annotated bibliography represents a first step toward compiling a comprehensive overview of current research on issues related to English language learners (ELLs). It is intended to be a resource for researchers, policymakers, administrators, and educators who are engaged in efforts to bridge the divide between research, policy, and practice…

  6. Learner Diaries: Possibilities and Pitfalls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell-Richardson, Christina; Parkinson, Brian

    Learner diaries, or dialogue journals, are popular in second language teaching. Numerous teaching, learning, evaluative, and research-related uses for them have evolved. Pedagogically, they are used to identify and allay anxiety, offer advice on specific difficulties, provide study skill and individual feedback, encourage student self-assessment,…

  7. Distance Learners: Welcome to Campus!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwitzer, Alan M.; Duggan, Mary H.

    2005-01-01

    Old Dominion University's distance learning program, called TELETECHNET, brings the main-campus college experience to geographically distant learners at sites across Virginia and as far away as the state of Washington, as well as to military personnel on Navy bases, carriers, and submarines. In an interesting turnabout, the Summer Institute for…

  8. for Teachers of English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molle, Daniella

    2013-01-01

    For more than a decade, the professional development literature has shown that most teachers are not adequately prepared to teach English learners (ELs)--that holds true for both specialist and mainstream teachers (see, for example, August & Hakuta, 1997; Beykont, 2002). Research that focuses on professional development for teachers of ELs,…

  9. Reading and the Special Learner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedley, Carolyn N., Ed.; Hicks, John S., Ed.

    Compiled from papers presented at the annual Reading/Special Education Institute at Fordham University, this collection of essays addresses reading problems of special education students. The book is divided into three sections. The first section covers reading assessment and reading intervention; section 2 addresses the specific learner and the…

  10. Learners' Use of Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ally, Mohamed; Cleveland-Innes, Martha; Boskic, Natasha; Larwill, Sandra

    2006-01-01

    This article reports findings from a study exploring the generativity (Gibbons, Nelson, & Richards, 2000; Parrish, 2004) and discoverability (Friesen, 2001) of learning objects in the hands of the learner. Through the convergence of two separate pilot projects--the Canadian EduSource initiative through Athabasca University, and the researchers'…

  11. Building a Community of Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Leaders for Urban Schools, 1995

    1995-01-01

    The theme of this inaugural serial issue is "Building a Community of Learners." The serial has been designed to address school restructuring and reform and the roles of teachers, administrators, and parents. The first essay, "Constructing Communities of Cooperation" by Anne Turnbaugh Lockwood examines structural change in schools and what is meant…

  12. Building Resilience in Literacy Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanacore, Joseph

    Although an increasing number of young people encounter adversity in their environments, many manage to rebound and live successful lives while others repeat patterns of adversity in their adult lives. Classroom educators and special educators should therefore establish a learning environment that builds resilience in all learners. Educational…

  13. Teacher Investment in Learner Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Jenelle

    2009-01-01

    From a sociocultural perspective, teacher identity is constructed in relation to others, including other teachers and students. Drawing on positioning theory and the concept of investment, this study analyzed the case of a secondary English teacher who negotiated his teacher identity in relation to English language learners (ELLs). Findings…

  14. Adult Learners' Week in Switzerland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jermann, Ruth

    2002-01-01

    The slogan of International Adult Learners Week in Switzerland is "one hour a day for learning." Four goals of the lifelong learning agenda are government policies to promote access, public awareness campaigns, creation of public learning places, and development of networks for real and virtual learning. (SK)

  15. Developing Collections to Empower Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmel, Sue C.

    2014-01-01

    "Developing Collections to Empower Learners" examines collection development in the context of today's shifts toward digital resources while emphasizing the foundational beliefs of the school library profession. Writer Sue Kimmel includes practical advice about needs assessment, planning, selection, acquisitions, evaluation, and…

  16. Rich Environments for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentham, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Unaware of the messages a bare adult learning environment sends and its effect on adult learners, a trainer attends an intensive Reggio Emilia course and learns that the physical environment is the "third teacher"--for adults as well as for children. Using principles of Reggio, she offers suggestions for enhancing adult learning spaces and…

  17. Confessions of a Language Learner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulton, William G.

    1974-01-01

    This Middlebury College summer 1974 commencement address is an informal presentation of the author's experiences as a language learner. The effectiveness of such pedagogical methods as the grammar-translation, audio-lingual, and "balanced" approaches, and of language learning with the aid of an informant, is discussed. It is concluded that, given…

  18. Teaching Reading to Struggling Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minskoff, Esther

    2005-01-01

    Identifying the best way to help students who struggle with reading--whether they have learning disabilities, are English language learners, or just need extra support--is a challenge for any teacher. Schools can make that task easier with this indispensable resource, a complete guide to addressing each student's specific instructional needs and…

  19. The Learner and the Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayers, George E.

    The revolution in computers begun in the mid 1950's will help education to meet the new challenges of the future generated by the predicted drastic declines in student enrollment and by changes in the types of learners served. Projects such as PLATO and TICCIT have proved that computers can provide useful and timely instruction for such learners…

  20. English Learners Program Guide. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This guide is designed as a reference for District and School personnel working with English learners (ELs). The content of the guide represents a compilation of information, examples, and resources. This guide is a living document and subject to frequent updates. It is recommended to review the document online rather than printing a hard copy.

  1. More than a "Basic Skill": Breaking down the Complexities of Summarizing for ABE/ESL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouellette-Schramm, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the complex cognitive and linguistic challenges of summarizing expository text at vocabulary, syntactic, and rhetorical levels. It then outlines activities to help ABE/ESL learners develop corresponding skills.

  2. Loss of vascular fibrinolytic activity following irradiation of the liver - an aspect of late radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, B.W.; Bicher, H.I.; Johnson, R.J.

    1983-09-01

    The vascular fibrinolytic activity, known to originate from the endothelium, was studied histochemically by fibrinolysis autography in liver samples from beagles exposed to radiation treatment. Eighteen to thirty months prior to sacrifice, six dogs received x irradiation (4600 rad in 5 weeks) and three dogs received x irradiation plus aspirin (1 g/kg). Two dogs served as untreated controls. Control livers showed extensive fibrinolytic activity related to large and small vascular structures. The vascular fibrinolytic activity had been lost from all vessels except the major portal branches in five irradiated livers and was severaly diminished in three. One irradiated liver appeared to possess normal fibrinolytic activity.

  3. A Prospective, Longitudinal Study of Patient Activity Levels Following Total Knee Arthroplasty Stratified by Demographic and Comorbid Factors.

    PubMed

    Issa, Kimona; Jauregui, Julio J; Given, Kristin; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    With the marked increase in the annual number of total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) in the United States, there has been an increased interest in evaluating patient-reported outcomes. The purpose of this study was to prospectively and longitudinally evaluate temporal trends in patient activity levels following TKA and to identify potential demographic and comorbid factors that may affect these outcomes. This prospective study evaluated 281 patients, including 108 men and 173 women, who had a mean age of 66 years (39-80 years) and underwent primary TKA. All patients were followed for a minimum of 2 years. Medical comorbidities were recorded preoperatively and activity scores were evaluated at each follow-up visit. The effects of different patient demographics and systemic comorbidities on activity outcomes were further analyzed using multivariate regression analysis. Compared with preoperative levels, the activity score was observed to initially significantly decrease at 6 weeks postoperatively to below preoperative levels (9.2 vs. 8.1 points). By 3 months, scores were above preoperative levels (10.3 points), but below peak levels. A significant peak in the activity score was observed at 2-year follow-up after which there were no significant differences in scores at 5 years (11.49 vs. 11.47 points). In evaluating patient demographics and comorbidities, significant negative impact of older age, tobacco use, history of cancer, cardiovascular disease, lymphatic disease, and renal disease can be seen on activity levels. Activity scores following TKA follow a temporal trend in which scores initially drop below preoperative levels after surgery, but recover and reach a peak at 2 years postoperatively. This peak was maintained at 5-year follow-up. Surgeons should counsel their patients that they will not perceive the full benefit of a TKA until 1 to 2 years after surgery, in addition, patients may actually perceive their progress to decrease initially. Also, their

  4. Differential activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases following high and low LET radiation in murine macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Narang, Himanshi; Bhat, Nagesh; Gupta, S K; Santra, S; Choudhary, R K; Kailash, S; Krishna, Malini

    2009-04-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases have been shown to respond to various stimuli including cytokines, mitogens and gamma irradiation, leading to cell proliferation, differentiation, or death. The duration of their activation determines the specificity of response to each stimulus in various cells. In this study, the crucial intracellular kinases, ERK, JNK, and p38 kinase involved in cell survival, death, or damage and repair were examined for their activity in RAW 264.7 cells at various time points after irradiation with 2 Gy doses of proton ions or X-rays. This is the first report that shows that the MAPK signaling induced after heavy ion or X-ray exposure is not the same. Unlike gamma irradiation, there was prolonged but marginal activation of prosurvival ERK pathway and significant activation of proapoptotic p38 pathway in response to high LET radiation. PMID:19112558

  5. Big Bang! An Evaluation of NASA's Space School Musical Program for Elementary and Middle School Learners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haden, C.; Styers, M.; Asplund, S.

    2015-12-01

    Music and the performing arts can be a powerful way to engage students in learning about science. Research suggests that content-rich songs enhance student understanding of science concepts by helping students develop content-based vocabulary, by providing examples and explanations of concepts, and connecting to personal and situational interest in a topic. Building on the role of music in engaging students in learning, and on best practices in out-of-school time learning, the NASA Discovery and New Frontiers program in association with Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Marshall Space Flight Center, and KidTribe developed Space School Musical. Space School Musical consists of a set of nine songs and 36 educational activities to teach elementary and middle school learners about the solar system and space science through an engaging storyline and the opportunity for active learning. In 2014, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory contracted with Magnolia Consulting, LLC to conduct an evaluation of Space School Musical. Evaluators used a mixed methods approach to address evaluation questions related to educator professional development experiences, program implementation and perceptions, and impacts on participating students. Measures included a professional development feedback survey, facilitator follow-up survey, facilitator interviews, and a student survey. Evaluation results showed that educators were able to use the program in a variety of contexts and in different ways to best meet their instructional needs. They noted that the program worked well for diverse learners and helped to build excitement for science through engaging all learners in the musical. Students and educators reported positive personal and academic benefits to participating students. We present findings from the evaluation and lessons learned about integration of the arts into STEM education.

  6. Focus on the Foreign Language Learner: Priorities and Strategies. Selected Papers from the Central States Conference on the Teaching of Foreign Language (23rd, Indianapolis, Indiana, March 21-24, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasheim, Lorraine A. Ed.; And Others

    Eight selected papers from a conference on the teaching of foreign languages cover three main topics: learner-centered priorities; learner-directed strategies; and planning strategies. After an introduction by Lorraine A. Strasheim on learners and learning outcomes, the papers and authors are as follows: "The Developing Child: What Every FLES…

  7. INHIBITION OF HUMAN NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY FOLLOWING IN VITRO EXPOSURE TO OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study we have examined the effect of in vitro ozone exposure on human peripheral blood natural killer (NK) cell activity measured against K562 tumor cells. he data showed that NK activity was nhibited in a time dependent manner with marked suppression observed after 6 hou...

  8. CONTRIBUTIONS OF CHILDREN'S ACTIVITIES TO PESTICIDE HAND LOADINGS FOLLOWING RESIDENTIAL PESTICIDE APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of children's activities in leading to pesticide exposure was evaluated by comparing pesticide loadings on the hands of children with the activities of the same children observed over a 4 hour period. Ten children ranging in age from 24-55 months were videotaped on the s...

  9. Activity Limitations among Young Adults with Developmental Disabilities: A Population-Based Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Kim Van Naarden; Yeargin-Allsopp, Marshalyn; Lollar, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Developmental disabilities are a heterogeneous group of chronic conditions that may result in substantial activity limitations. The type and number of limitations may vary by impairment characteristics. Economic and social constraints may impact activity limitations beyond those attributable to their impairment. Using the International…

  10. Following a protein kinase activity using a field-effect transistor device.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Ronit; Gill, Ron; Willner, Itamar

    2007-09-01

    The specific phosphorylation of a peptide-functionalized ion-sensitive field-effect transistor device by casein kinase II in the presence of ATP enables the electronic readout of the protein kinase activity; treatment of the phosphorylated surface with alkaline phosphatase results in the regeneration of the active sensing surface. PMID:17700878

  11. Transcription factor activation following exposure of an intact lung preparation to metallic particulate matter.

    PubMed Central

    Samet, James M; Silbajoris, Robert; Huang, Tony; Jaspers, Ilona

    2002-01-01

    Metallic constituents contained in ambient particulate matter have been associated with adverse effects in a number of epidemiologic, in vitro, and in vivo studies. Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) is a metallic by-product of the combustion of fossil fuel oil, which has been shown to induce a variety of proinflammatory responses in lung cells. We have examined signaling pathways activated in response to ROFA exposure and recently reported that ROFA treatment activates multiple mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases in the rat lung. In the present study we extended our investigations on the mechanism of toxicity of ROFA to include transcription factors whose activities are regulated by MAP kinases as well as possible effectors of transcriptional changes that mediate the effects of ROFA. We applied immunohistochemical methods to detect ROFA-induced activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF kappa B), activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2), c-Jun, and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in intact lung tissue and confirmed and characterized their functional activation using DNA binding assays. We performed these studies using a perfused rabbit lung model that is devoid of blood elements in order to distinguish between intrinsic lung cell effects and effects that are secondary to inflammatory cell influx. We report here that exposure to ROFA results in a rapid activation of all of the transcription factors studied by exerting direct effects on lung cells. These findings validate the use of immunohistochemistry to detect transcription factor activation in vivo and demonstrate the utility of studying signaling changes in response to environmental exposures. PMID:12361922

  12. Beyond Classroom Discourse: Learning as Participation in Native Speaker-Learner and Learner-Learner Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoshi, Saori

    2015-01-01

    Consistent with the notion of learning as changing participation (Lave & Wenger, 1991; Rogoff, 1998; Sfard, 1998; Young & Miller, 2004), the present qualitative study investigated how social interaction between learners of Japanese as a foreign language and native speaker classroom guests contributed to the students' use of second language…

  13. Plurilingual Learners' Beliefs and Practices toward Native and Nonnative Language Mediation during Learner-Learner Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payant, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Due to the growing number of plurilingual learners in the world today (Hammarberg, 2010), the present multiple case study examines four plurilingual participants' beliefs toward first language (L1) and second language (L2) mediation in the acquisition of French as a third language (L3). During a 16-week classroom-based study in a French university…

  14. Aligning Game Activity with Educational Goals: Following a Constrained Design Approach to Instructional Computer Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Brett E.; Scoresby, Jon

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the design, creation and implementation of an instructional game for use in a high school poetry class following a commitment to an educational game design principle of "alignment". We studied groups of instructional designers and an interactive fiction computer game they built. The game was implemented in a 9th grade English classroom…

  15. 77 FR 69896 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Follow-Up...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ...; Follow-Up Survey Information for Green Jobs and Health Care Impact Evaluation, American Recovery... Survey Information for Green Jobs and Health Care Impact Evaluation, American Recovery Reinvestment Act... Health Care Grants Impact Evaluation (OMB 1205-0486), and in March, 2012, the OMB approved a...

  16. Following fluctuating signs: Anomalous active superdiffusion of swimmers in anisotropic media.

    PubMed

    Toner, John; Löwen, Hartmut; Wensink, Henricus H

    2016-06-01

    Active (i.e., self-propelled or swimming) particles moving through an isotropic fluid exhibit conventional diffusive behavior. We report anomalous diffusion of an active particle moving in an anisotropic nematic background. While the translational motion parallel to the nematic director shows ballistic behavior, the long-time transverse motion is superdiffusive, with an anomalous scaling proportional to tlnt of the mean-square displacement with time t. This behavior is predicted by an analytical theory that we present here and is corroborated by numerical simulation of active particle diffusion in a simple lattice model for a nematic liquid crystal. It is universal for any collection of self-propelled elements (e.g., bacteria or active rods) moving in a nematic background, provided only that the swimmers are sufficiently dilute that their interactions with each other can be neglected and that they do not perform hairpin turns. PMID:27415323

  17. Following fluctuating signs: Anomalous active superdiffusion of swimmers in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, John; Löwen, Hartmut; Wensink, Henricus H.

    2016-06-01

    Active (i.e., self-propelled or swimming) particles moving through an isotropic fluid exhibit conventional diffusive behavior. We report anomalous diffusion of an active particle moving in an anisotropic nematic background. While the translational motion parallel to the nematic director shows ballistic behavior, the long-time transverse motion is superdiffusive, with an anomalous scaling proportional to t lnt of the mean-square displacement with time t . This behavior is predicted by an analytical theory that we present here and is corroborated by numerical simulation of active particle diffusion in a simple lattice model for a nematic liquid crystal. It is universal for any collection of self-propelled elements (e.g., bacteria or active rods) moving in a nematic background, provided only that the swimmers are sufficiently dilute that their interactions with each other can be neglected and that they do not perform hairpin turns.

  18. Spontaneous activations follow a common developmental course across primary sensory areas in mouse neocortex.

    PubMed

    Frye, Charles G; MacLean, Jason N

    2016-08-01

    Spontaneous propagation of spiking within the local neocortical circuits of mature primary sensory areas is highly nonrandom, engaging specific sets of interconnected and functionally related neurons. These spontaneous activations promise insight into neocortical structure and function, but their properties in the first 2 wk of perinatal development are incompletely characterized. Previously, we have found that there is a minimal numerical sample, on the order of 400 cells, necessary to fully capture mature neocortical circuit dynamics. Therefore we maximized our numerical sample by using two-photon calcium imaging to observe spontaneous activity in populations of up to 1,062 neurons spanning multiple columns and layers in 52 acute coronal slices of mouse neocortex at each day from postnatal day (PND) 3 to PND 15. Slices contained either primary auditory cortex (A1) or somatosensory barrel field (S1BF), which allowed us to compare sensory modalities with markedly different developmental timelines. Between PND 3 and PND 8, populations in both areas exhibited activations of anatomically compact subgroups on the order of dozens of cells. Between PND 9 and PND 13, the spatiotemporal structure of the activity diversified to include spatially distributed activations encompassing hundreds of cells. Sparse activations covering the entire field of view dominated in slices taken on or after PND 14. These and other findings demonstrate that the developmental progression of spontaneous activations from active local modules in the first postnatal week to sparse, intermingled groups of neurons at the beginning of the third postnatal week generalizes across primary sensory areas, consistent with an intrinsic developmental trajectory independent of sensory input. PMID:27146981

  19. Long-term facilitation of expiratory and sympathetic activities following acute intermittent hypoxia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lemes, Eduardo V.; Aiko, Simone; Orbem, Caroline B.; Formentin, Cleiton; Bassi, Mirian; Colombari, Eduardo; Zoccal, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) promotes persistent increases in ventilation and sympathetic activity, referred as long-term facilitation (LTF). Augmented inspiratory activity is suggested as a major component of respiratory LTF. In the present study, we hypothesized that AIH also elicits a sustained increase in expiratory motor activity. We also investigated whether the expiratory LTF contributes to the development of sympathetic LTF after AIH. Methods Rats were exposed to AIH (10 × 6–7 % O2 for 45 s, every 5 min) and the cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated during 60 min using in vivo and in situ approaches. Results In unanesthetized conditions (n=9), AIH elicited a modest but sustained increase in baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP, 104±2 vs 111±3 mmHg, P<0.05) associated with enhanced sympathetic and respiratory-related variabilities. In the in situ preparations (n=9), AIH evoked LTF in phrenic (33±12%), thoracic sympathetic (75±25%) and abdominal nerve activities (69±14%). The sympathetic overactivity after AIH was phase-locked with the emergence of bursts in abdominal activity during the late-expiratory phase. In anesthetized vagus-intact animals, AIH increased baseline MAP (113±3 vs 122±2 mmHg, P<0.05) and abdominal muscle activity (535±94%), which were eliminated after pharmacological inhibition of the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory group (RTN/pFRG). Conclusion These findings indicate that increased expiratory activity is also an important component of AIH-elicited respiratory LTF. Moreover, the development of sympathetic LTF after AIH is linked to the emergence of active expiratory pattern and depends on the integrity of the neurones of the RTN/pFRG. PMID:26910756

  20. Physical Activity Patterns in University Students: Do They Follow the Public Health Guidelines?

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Filipe Manuel; Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theodoros; Martins, Fernando Manuel Lourenço; Mendes, Rui Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity is associated with health. The aim of this study was (a) to access if Portuguese university students meet the public health recommendations for physical activity and (b) the effect of gender and day of the week on daily PA levels of university students. This observational cross-sectional study involved 126 (73 women) healthy Portuguese university students aged 18–23 years old. Participants wore the ActiGraph wGT3X-BT accelerometer for seven consecutive days. Number of steps, time spent sedentary and in light, moderate and vigorous physical activity were recorded. The two-way MANOVA revealed that gender (p-value = 0.001; η2 = 0.038; minimum effect) and day of the week (p-value = 0.001; η2 = 0.174; minimum effect) had significant main effects on the physical activity variables. It was shown that during weekdays, male students walked more steps (65.14%), spent less time sedentary (6.77%) and in light activities (3.11%) and spent more time in moderate (136.67%) and vigorous activity (171.29%) in comparison with weekend days (p < 0.05). The descriptive analysis revealed that female students walked more steps (51.18%) and spent more time in moderate (125.70%) and vigorous (124.16%) activities during weekdays than in weekend days (p < 0.05). Women students did not achieve the recommended 10,000 steps/day on average during weekdays and weekend days. Only male students achieved this recommendation during weekdays. In summary, this study showed a high incidence of sedentary time in university students, mainly on weekend days. New strategies must be adopted to promote physical activity in this population, focusing on the change of sedentary behaviour. PMID:27022993

  1. Respiratory modulation of sympathetic nerve activity is enhanced in male rat offspring following uteroplacental insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Menuet, C; Wlodek, M E; Fong, A Y; Allen, A M

    2016-06-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity to the cardiovascular system displays prominent respiratory-related modulation which leads to the generation of rhythmic oscillations in blood pressure called Traube-Hering waves. An amplification of this respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity is observed in hypertension of both genetic, the spontaneously hypertensive rat, and induced, chronic intermittent hypoxia or maternal protein restriction during gestation, origin. Male offspring of mothers with uteroplacental insufficiency, induced by bilateral uterine vessel ligation at 18 days of gestation, are also hypertensive in adulthood. In this study we examined whether these male offspring display altered respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity at pre-hypertensive ages compared to controls. Respiratory, cardiovascular and sympathetic parameters were examined using the working heart-brainstem preparation in 35 day old male rats that had reduced birth weight due to uteroplacental insufficiency. Whilst all respiratory parameters were not different between groups, we observed an enhanced respiratory-related burst of thoracic sympathetic nerve activity and amplified Traube-Hering waves in the growth-restricted group. This group also showed an increased sympathetic and bradycardic response to activation of peripheral chemoreceptors. The observations add support to the view that altered respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity represents a common mechanism involved in the development of several forms of hypertension. PMID:26593642

  2. The Effect of Reflective Discussions following Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities on Students' Views of Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yacoubian, Hagop A.; BouJaoude, Saouma

    2010-01-01

    This research investigated the effect of reflective discussions following inquiry-based laboratory activities on students' views of the tentative, empirical, subjective, and social aspects of nature of science (NOS). Thirty-eight grade six students from a Lebanese school participated in the study. The study used a pretest-posttest control-group…

  3. Visual Literacy Skills of Students in College-Level Biology: Learning Outcomes Following Digital or Hand-Drawing Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Justine C.

    2014-01-01

    To test the claim that digital learning tools enhance the acquisition of visual literacy in this generation of biology students, a learning intervention was carried out with 33 students enrolled in an introductory college biology course. This study compared learning outcomes following two types of learning tools: a traditional drawing activity, or…

  4. Occupational Physical Activity, Overweight, and Mortality: A Follow-Up Study of 47,405 Norwegian Women and Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graff-Iversen, Sidsel; Selmer, Randi; Sorensen, Marit; Skurtveit, Svetlana

    2007-01-01

    This population-based 24-year follow-up study evaluated the association of occupational physical activity (OPA) with overweight and mortality in 47,405 men and women, healthy at baseline, and reporting OPA as sedentary (reference), light, moderately heavy, or heavy. The adjusted odds ratio for overweight was slightly less than 1 for all categories…

  5. Changes in the spectrum and rates of extracellular enzyme activities in seawater following aggregate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziervogel, K.; Steen, A. D.; Arnosti, C.

    2010-03-01

    Marine snow aggregates are heavily colonized by heterotrophic microorganisms that express high levels of hydrolytic activities, making aggregates hotspots for carbon remineralization in the ocean. To assess how aggregate formation influences the ability of seawater microbial communities to access organic carbon, we compared hydrolysis rates of six polysaccharides in coastal seawater after aggregates had been formed (via incubation on a roller table) with hydrolysis rates in seawater from the same site that had not incubated on a roller table (referred to as whole seawater). Hydrolysis rates in the aggregates themselves were up to three orders of magnitude higher on a volume basis than in whole seawater. The enhancement of enzyme activity in aggregates relative to whole seawater differed by substrate, suggesting that the enhancement was under cellular control, rather than due to factors such as lysis or grazing. A comparison of hydrolysis rates in whole seawater with those in aggregate-free seawater, i.e. the fraction of water from the roller bottles that did not contain aggregates, demonstrated a nuanced microbial response to aggregate formation. Activities of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were higher than in whole seawater, while activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinogalactan hydrolyzing enzymes were lower than in whole seawater. These data suggest that aggregate formation enhanced production of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes, and the enhancement also affected the surrounding seawater. Decreased activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinoglactan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawaters relative to whole seawater are likely due to shifts in enzyme production by the aggregate-associated community, coupled with the effects of enzyme degradation. Enhanced activities of laminarin- and xylan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were due at least in part to cell-free enzymes. Measurements of enzyme

  6. Activities of Extracellular Enzymes in Soils Following Woody Plant Invasion of Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filley, T. R.; Stott, D. E.; Dooling, V.; Sorg, L.; Boutton, T.

    2008-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes produced by microbes and immobilize in the soil environment are the principle means by which complex plant and microbial compounds are degraded. The concentration of these enzymes and their ability to interact with litter and soil organic matter contributes both to the stabilization and destabilization of soil carbon. We quantified the activities of three extracellular enzymes, B-glucosidase, B- glucosaminidase, polyphenol oxidase (PPO), and a general marker for hydrolytic activity through fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis activity, in a subtropical savanna parkland in southern Texas where woody plants have invaded a once open grassland. Previous research has demonstrated that areas which have shifted to woody vegetation are accruing soil carbon, undergoing a dramatic shift in the chemistry of plant input, and increasing in hyphal biomass. Soils were obtained along a successional chronosequence from grassland dominated by C4 grasses to woody patches dominated by C3 trees/shrubs in Oct 2006 and stored immediately frozen until thawing for enzyme assay. Most enzymes, with the exception of PPO, show distinct behavior when comparing grassland and clusters in that grasslands exhibit far lower mass normalized activity than clusters and no activity trend with respect to age of the adjacent cluster. Both FDA and B- glucosaminidase activities are positively correlated with the age of the woody clusters and increase their activity by as much as 10-fold across the age gradient from 14 yr to 86 yr old clusters. The cellulose degrading enzyme, B-glucosidase, always exhibited greater activity (1.5 -4 fold) in woody clusters than in grasslands, but did not exhibit a trend with increasing cluster age. The PPO activity is anomalous in that there is no quantitative difference in mass normalized activity between grassland and cluster and no trend with cluster age. The results for the FDA and B-glucosaminidase assays are consistent with concurrent studies

  7. Early learners' discrimination of second-language vowels.

    PubMed

    Højen, Anders; Flege, James E

    2006-05-01

    It is uncertain from previous research to what extent the perceptual system retains plasticity after attunement to the native language (L1) sound system. This study evaluated second-language (L2) vowel discrimination by individuals who began learning the L2 as children ("early learners"). Experiment 1 identified procedures that lowered discrimination scores for foreign vowel contrasts in an AXB test (with three physically different stimuli per trial, where "X" was drawn from the same vowel category as "A" or "B"). Experiment 2 examined the AXB discrimination of English vowels by native Spanish early learners and monolingual speakers of Spanish and English (20 per group) at interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 1000 and 0 ms. The Spanish monolinguals obtained near-chance scores for three difficult vowel contrasts, presumably because they did not perceive the vowels as distinct phonemes and because the experimental design hindered low-level encoding strategies. Like the English monolinguals, the early learners obtained high scores, indicating they had shown considerable perceptual learning. However, statistically significant differences between early learners and English monolinguals for two of three difficult contrasts at the 0-ms ISI suggested that their underlying perceptual systems were not identical. Implications for claims regarding perceptual plasticity following L1 attunement are discussed. PMID:16708962

  8. Thalamic neuronal activity in rats with mechanical allodynia following contusive spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gerke, M B; Duggan, A W; Xu, L; Siddall, P J

    2003-01-01

    Pain and allodynia following spinal cord injury are poorly understood and difficult to treat. Since there is evidence that supraspinal mechanisms are important in such pain, we have studied the role of the thalamus in an experimental model of spinal injury. Extracellular recordings were obtained from neurones of the thalamic nucleus ventralis postero-lateralis (VPL) in normal rats and those which had sustained a contusive spinal cord injury to the thoraco-lumbar junction 7 days previously. Behavioural testing with von Frey hairs established that 11 spinally injured rats showed exaggerated vocal responses to normally innocuous mechanical stimulation (allodynia) whereas eight were non-allodynic. Thalamic VPL neurones in spinally injured rats (both allodynic and non-allodynic) exhibited a dysrhythmia in that a significantly higher proportion fired spontaneously in an oscillatory mode when compared with neurones in uninjured rats. Thus this dysrhythmia was linked to spinal injury, not to allodynia. The evoked responses of VPL thalamic neurones to brushing the skin, however, were significantly elevated in allodynic rats when compared with those in uninjured rats and neuronal afterdischarges to these stimuli (which were absent in uninjured rats) were more common in allodynic than in non-allodynic rats. We have previously reported that a proportion of spinal neurones in allodynic spinally injured rats show increased evoked responses and afterdischarges following brushing the skin and hence the enhanced thalamic responses may reflect a greater spinal input. In view of the increasing evidence that thalamo-cortical rhythmical firing is linked to sensorimotor and cognitive brain functions, we propose that pain following brushing the skin results from an exaggerated spinal input being processed by a dysrhythmic thalamus. Thus both spinal and thalamic mechanisms may be important in the genesis of pain and allodynia following spinal cord injury. PMID:12617975

  9. Activation patterns of embryonic chick hind-limb muscles following blockade of activity and motoneurone cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Landmesser, L T; Szente, M

    1986-01-01

    Motoneurone cell death and spontaneous embryonic motility were blocked in chick embryos by daily in ovo injections of d-tubocurarine from stage 28-36 (E5-10). Isolated spinal cord-hind-limb preparations were prepared from these embryos and movement sequences in response to electrical stimulation of the thoracic cord were assessed, after drug wash-out, by electromyogram (e.m.g.) or muscle-nerve recordings. In embryos in which complete blockade of lumbar motoneurone cell death was later confirmed histologically, flexor and extensor motoneurone pools were found to be activated in alternating bursts as occurs in control embryos. Thus the development of the basic cord circuits responsible for these patterns of motoneurone activation does not require motoneurone cell death. Partial blockade of motoneurone cell death by guanosine 3',5'-phosphate (cyclic GMP) was also without effect on muscle activation patterns. In ovo injection of d-tubocurarine or alpha-bungarotoxin in doses sufficient to block embryonic motility was found to have a direct effect on the spinal cord, preventing the patterned activation of motoneurone pools in alternating bursts. Cords removed from treated embryos behaved similarly to cords in which these drugs were applied acutely in the bath. Minor changes in muscle activation patterns that occurred with chronic drug treatment were also observed in acutely treated cords and appear to be a direct and persistent effect of the drugs on cord circuits. It is possible to conclude that cholinergic circuits within the chick lumbar cord play a role in the normal patterned activation of flexor and extensor motoneurone pools. Systemically applied drugs can have access to these circuits, indicating a need for caution when interpreting the results of drugs applied in this manner to developing embryos. We also conclude that neither the activation of motoneurones in patterned bursts, nor the afferent feed-back from the movements that result, are required to form the

  10. Formation of tissue factor activity following incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein with plasma lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, T.; Kisiel, W. )

    1990-11-01

    Incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein (Apo-TF) with human plasma decreased the recalcified clotting time of this plasma in a time-and dose-dependent manner suggesting relipidation of the Apo-TF by plasma lipoproteins. Incubation of Apo-TF with purified preparations of human very low density, low density and high density lipoproteins resulted in tissue factor activity in a clotting assay. The order of effectiveness was VLDL greater than LDL much greater than HDL. Tissue factor activity generated by incubation of a fixed amount of Apo-TF with plasma lipoproteins was lipoprotein concentration-dependent and saturable. The association of Apo-TF with lipoprotein particles was supported by gel filtration studies in which {sup 125}I-Apo-TF coeluted with the plasma lipoprotein in the void volume of a Superose 6 column in the presence and absence of calcium ions. In addition, void-volume Apo-TF-lipoprotein fractions exhibited tissue factor activity. These results suggest that the factor VIII-bypassing activity of bovine Apo-TF observed in a canine hemophilic model may be due, in part, to its association with plasma lipoproteins and expression of functional tissue factor activity.

  11. Acupuncture for ischemic stroke: cerebellar activation may be a central mechanism following Deqi

    PubMed Central

    Li, Miao-keng; Li, Yu-jie; Zhang, Gui-feng; Chen, Jun-qi; Zhang, Ji-ping; Qi, Ji; Huang, Yong; Lai, Xin-sheng; Tang, Chun-zhi

    2015-01-01

    The needling sensation of Deqi during acupuncture is a key factor of influencing acupuncture outcome. Recent studies have mainly focused on the brain function effects of Deqi in a physiological state. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on the effects of acupuncture at Waiguan (SJ5) in pathological and physiological states is controversial. In this study, 12 patients with ischemic stroke received acupuncture at Waiguan (SJ5) and simultaneously underwent fMRI scanning of the brain, with imaging data of the activated areas obtained. Based on the patient's sensation, imaging data were allocated to either the Deqi group or non-Deqi group. In the Deqi group, the activated/deactivated areas were the left superior temporal gyrus (BA39)/right anterior lobe of the cerebellum and left thalamus. In the non-Deqi group, the activated areas included the medial frontal gyrus of the right frontal lobe (BA11), right limbic lobe (BA30, 35), and left frontal lobe (BA47), while the only deactivated area was the right parietal lobe (BA40). Compared with the non-Deqi group, the Deqi group exhibited marked activation of the right anterior lobe of the cerebellum and right limbic lobe (BA30). These findings confirm that the clinical effect of Deqi during acupuncture is based on brain functional changes. Cerebellar activation may be one of the central mechanisms of acupuncture in the treatment of ischemic stroke. PMID:26889189

  12. Plasma Membrane ATPase Activity following Reversible and Irreversible Freezing Injury 1

    PubMed Central

    Iswari, S.; Palta, Jiwan P.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma membrane ATPase has been proposed as a site of functional alteration during early stages of freezing injury. To test this, plasma membrane was purified from Solanum leaflets by a single step partitioning of microsomes in a dextran-polyethylene glycol two phase system. Addition of lysolecithin in the ATPase assay produced up to 10-fold increase in ATPase activity. ATPase activity was specific for ATP with a Km around 0.4 millimolar. Presence of the ATPase enzyme was identified by immunoblotting with oat ATPase antibodies. Using the phase partitioning method, plasma membrane was isolated from Solanum commersonii leaflets which had four different degrees of freezing damage, namely, slight (reversible), partial (partially reversible), substantial and total (irreversible). With slight (reversible) damage the plasma membrane ATPase specific activity increased 1.5- to 2-fold and its Km was decreased by about 3-fold, whereas the specific activity of cytochrome c reductase and cytochrome c oxidase in the microsomes were not different from the control. However, with substantial (lethal, irreversible) damage, there was a loss of membrane protein, decrease in plasma membrane ATPase specific activity and decrease in Km, while cytochrome c oxidase and cytochrome c reductase were unaffected. These results support the hypothesis that plasma membrane ATPase is altered by slight freeze-thaw stress. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16666856

  13. Allopregnanolone Elevations Following Pregnenolone Administration are Associated with Enhanced Activation of Emotion Regulation Neurocircuits

    PubMed Central

    Sripada, Rebecca K.; Marx, Christine E.; King, Anthony P.; Rampton, Jessica C.; Ho, Shaun; Liberzon, Israel

    2013-01-01

    Background The neurosteroid allopregnanolone is a potent allosteric modulator of the GABA(A) receptor with anxiolytic properties. Exogenous administration of allopregnanolone reduces anxiety, and allopregnanolone blockade impairs social and affective functioning. However, the neural mechanism whereby allopregnanolone improves mood and reduces anxiety is unknown. In particular, brain imaging has not been used to link neurosteroid effects to emotion regulation neurocircuitry. Methods To investigate the brain basis of allopregnanolone’s impact on emotion regulation, participants were administered 400mg of pregnenolone (N=16) or placebo (N=15) and underwent 3T fMRI while performing the Shifted-Attention Emotion Appraisal Task (SEAT), which probes emotional processing and regulation. Results Compared to placebo, allopregnanolone was associated with reduced activity in the amygdala and insula across all conditions. During the appraisal condition, allopregnanolone increased activity in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex and enhanced connectivity between the amygdala and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex, an effect that was associated with reduced self-reported anxiety. Conclusions These results demonstrate that in response to emotional stimuli, allopregnanolone reduces activity in regions associated with generation of negative emotion. Furthermore, allopregnanolone may enhance activity in regions linked to regulatory processes. Aberrant activity in these regions has been linked to anxiety psychopathology. These results thus provide initial neuroimaging evidence that allopregnanolone may be a target for pharmacological intervention in the treatment of anxiety disorders, and suggest potential future directions for research into neurosteroid effects on emotion regulation neurocircuitry. PMID:23348009

  14. Stress-activated signaling responses leading to apoptosis following photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleinick, Nancy L.; He, Jin; Xue, Liang-yan; Separovic, Duska

    1998-05-01

    Photodynamic treatment with the phthalocyanine Pc 4, a mitochondrially localizing photosensitizer, is an efficient inducer of cell death by apoptosis, a cell suicide pathway that can be triggered by physiological stimuli as well as by various types of cellular damage. Upon exposure of the dye- loaded cells to red light, several stress signalling pathways are rapidly activated. In murine L5178Y-R lymphoblasts, caspase activation and other hallmarks of the final phase of apoptosis are observed within a few minutes post-PDT. In Chinese hamster CHO-K1 cells, the first signs of apoptosis are not observed for 1 - 2 hours. The possible involvement of three parallel mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathways has been investigated. The extracellular- regulated kinases (ERK-1 and ERK-2), that are thought to promote cell growth, are not appreciably altered by PDT. However, PDT causes marked activation of the stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) cascade in both cell types and of the p38/HOG-type kinase in CHO cells. Both of these latter pathways have been demonstrated to be associated with apoptosis. A specific inhibitor of the ERK pathway did not alter PDT-induced apoptosis; however, an inhibitor of the p38 pathway partially blocked PDT-induced apoptosis. Blockage of the SAPK pathway is being pursued by a genetic approach. It appears that the SAPK and p38 pathways may participate in signaling apoptosis in response to PDT with Pc 4.

  15. Antigen-dependent and –independent contributions to primary memory CD8 T cell activation and protection following infection

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Matthew D.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    Memory CD8 T-cell activation, including expression of IFN-γ and granzymeB, can be induced by antigen (Ag)-dependent signals through the T-cell-receptor, or by pathogen-derived inflammatory cytokines in an Ag-independent manner. Recent studies have come to conflicting results regarding the contributions of Ag and/or inflammation to memory CD8 T-cell activation. Additionally, research has indicated that inflammation-driven CD8 T-cell responses during un-related infections (bystander activation) have the potential to provide protection, but whether protection occurs in immuno-competent hosts is unclear. To investigate these questions, we examined activation of virus-specific memory CD8 T-cells following infection with L. monocytogenes either expressing or not cognate Ag. We show that Ag and inflammation act synergistically in vitro to induce memory activation. In vivo, we found that when memory CD8 T-cells significantly contribute to clearance of infection, early activation and continued responses by these cells are enhanced by cognate Ag recognition. Mechanistically, we show that bystander responses by memory are dependent upon the dose of infection and the amount of inflammation elicited following infection and are able to provide protection in IFN-γ deficient mice, but not in immuno-competent hosts. The data elucidate the requirements for memory CD8 T-cell activation and the protective role of bystander responses. PMID:26658291

  16. The changing face(book) of psychiatry: can we justify 'following' patients' social media activity?

    PubMed

    Cox-George, Chantal

    2015-12-01

    Individuals with mental health issues may post information on social networking sites that can provide an insight into their mental health status. It could be argued that doctors (and specifically psychiatrists) should understand the way in which social media is used by their patients to gain a better insight into their illnesses. However, choosing to actively monitor a patient's social media activity raises important questions about the way in which medical students, qualified clinicians and other healthcare professionals obtain information about patients. While this may be framed as a mere form of 'collateral history-taking', there are obvious practical and ethical problems with doing so. Here, a case is made against monitoring the social media activity of patients involved with psychiatric services. PMID:26755986

  17. Combined approach to demonstrate acetylcholinesterase activity changes in the rat brain following tabun intoxication and its treatment.

    PubMed

    Bajgar, Jiri; Hajek, Petr; Kassa, Jiri; Slizova, Dasa; Krs, Otakar; Karasova, Jana Zdarova; Fusek, Josef; Capek, Lukas; Voicu, Victor A

    2012-01-01

    Reactivation effects of K203 and currently available oximes (obidoxime, HI-6) in combination with atropine on acetylcholinesterase activities in the brain parts of rats poisoned with tabun were studied. The activity was determined by quantitative histochemical and biochemical methods correlating between them very well. The tabun-induced changes in acetylcholinsterase activity as well as in reactivation potency of reactivators used were different in various parts of the brain. Pontomedullar area seems to be important for observed changes following tabun intoxication and its treatment. From the oximes studied, the reactivation effect of K203 was comparable with obidoxime; HI-6 was ineffective. Combination of bio- and histochemical methods allow fine differentiation among the action of different oximes following tabun poisoning. PMID:21851296

  18. Repressors report fewer intrusions following a laboratory stressor: the role of reduced stressor-relevant concept activation and inhibitory functioning.

    PubMed

    Overwijk, Sippie; Wessel, Ineke; de Jong, Peter J

    2009-03-01

    This study investigated whether a repressive coping style is associated with fewer intrusions following an experimentally controlled stressor. Furthermore, we examined whether lower activation of stressor-relevant concepts in long-term memory and better inhibitory functioning may contribute to this association. Extreme-scoring participants on a trait anxiety and a social desirability scale were selected to form repressor (n=35), low anxious (n=15), high anxious (n=30), and defensive (n=21) groups. In line with predictions, repressors reported fewer intrusions following a failure manipulation compared to non-repressors. Furthermore, pre-stressor inhibitory functioning was negatively associated with color-naming interference of stressor-related words. This suggests that overall, higher inhibitory control is related to lower activation of failure-related concepts. However, there was no evidence that concept activation and inhibitory control were responsible for repressors' lower number of self-reported intrusions. PMID:18937086

  19. Following the Trajectory of Osteoarthritis Development Through Serial Near Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of MMP Activities

    PubMed Central

    Leahy, Averi A.; Esfahani, Shadi A.; Foote, Andrea T.; Hui, Carrie K.; Rainbow, Roshni S.; Nakamura, Daisy S.; Tracey, Brian H.; Mahmood, Umar; Zeng, Li

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A major hurdle in osteoarthritis (OA) research is the lack of sensitive detection and monitoring methods. It is hypothesized that proteases, such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), are upregulated at early stages of OA development. The aim of this study was to investigate if a near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) probe activated by MMPs could visualize in vivo OA progression starting from its early stages. Methods Using an MMP activatable NIRF probe (MMPSense680), we assessed the upregulation of MMP activity in vitro by incubating human chondrocytes with the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. MMP activity was then evaluated in vivo serially in a chronic, injury-induced OA mouse model. For tracking MMP activity over time, mice were imaged 1 – 8 weeks post OA inducing surgery. Imaging results were correlated with histology. Results In vitro studies confirmed that NIRF imaging could identify enhanced MMP activity in IL-1β-treated human chondrocytes. In vivo imaging showed significantly higher fluorescent intensity in OA knees compared to sham knees (control) of the same mice. Additionally, the total emitted fluorescence intensity steadily increased over the entire course of OA progression that was examined. NIRF imaging results correlated with histological analysis, which showed an increase in articular cartilage structural damage over time. Conclusions Imaging of MMP activity in an OA mouse model provided sensitive and consistent visualization of OA progression, beginning from the early stages of OA. In addition to facilitating the preclinical study of OA modulators, this approach has the potential for future human translation. PMID:25385707

  20. Changes in the spectrum and rates of extracellular enzyme activities in seawater following aggregate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziervogel, K.; Steen, A. D.; Arnosti, C.

    2009-12-01

    Marine snow aggregates are heavily colonized by heterotrophic microorganisms that express high levels of hydrolytic activities, making aggregates hotspots for carbon remineralization in the ocean. To assess how aggregate formation influences the ability of seawater microbial communities to access organic carbon, we compared hydrolysis rates of six polysaccharides in coastal seawater after aggregates had been formed (via incubation on a roller table) with hydrolysis rates in seawater from the same site that had not incubated on a roller table (referred to as whole seawater). Hydrolysis rates in the aggregates themselves were up to three orders of magnitude higher on a volume basis than in whole seawater. The enhancement of enzyme activity in aggregates relative to whole seawater differed by substrate, suggesting that the enhancement was under cellular control, rather than due to factors such as lysis or grazing. A comparison of hydrolysis rates in whole seawater with those in aggregate-free seawater, i.e. the fraction of water from the roller bottles that did not contain aggregates, demonstrated a nuanced microbial response to aggregate formation. Activities of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were higher than in whole seawater, while activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinogalactan hydrolyzing enzymes were lower than in whole seawater. These data suggest that aggregate formation enhanced production of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes, and the enhancement also affected the surrounding seawater. Decreased activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinoglactan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawater relative to whole seawater are likely due to shifts in enzyme production by the aggregate-associated community, coupled with the effects of enzyme degradation. Enhanced activities of laminarin- and xylan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were due at least in part to cell-free enzymes. Measurements of enzyme lifetime