Science.gov

Sample records for activity materials needed

  1. Impact of Modifying Activity-Based Instructional Materials for Special Needs Students in Middle School Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Julia K.; Slater, Timothy F.

    Middle school students who have special needs because they are learning disabled require targeted attention in our nation's pursuit of improved science achievement for all students. In early 2006, the Lawrence Hall of Science conducted a national field test of a newly developed GEMS (Great Explorations in Math and Science) space science curriculum package for middle school students. During this field testing, we modified a subset of the curriculum materials to reflect the principles of best practices in working with special needs students, specifically learning disabled students, in a subset of the field test classrooms to determine if these students scored differently on the assessments than students in the larger assessment database. Results suggest that many students, not just those with special needs, demonstrate achievement gains using instructional materials purposefully aligned with research- informed principles of best practices for special needs students.

  2. Impact of Modifying Activity-Based Instructional Materials for Special Needs Students in Middle School Astronomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Julia K.; Slater, Timothy F.

    2009-01-01

    Middle school students who have special needs because they are learning disabled require targeted attention in our nation's pursuit of improved science achievement for all students. In early 2006, the Lawrence Hall of Science conducted a national field test of a newly developed GEMS (Great Explorations in Math and Science) space science curriculum…

  3. Reentry systems: Material technology needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehret, Richard Michael

    1993-01-01

    The material technology needs are: (1) lightweight and durable rigid insulating and higher temperature flexible materials; and (2) inspection, repair, producibility, and maintainability of refractory composites. The direction of efforts are: (1) funding base is relatively small for future years; (2) to minimize returns, collaborative programs appear to be practical; and (3) SSD's approach is to implement NASA developed technology.

  4. Composite Materials: An Educational Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saliba, Tony E.; Snide, James A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is the need to incorporate the concepts and applications of advanced composite materials into existing chemical engineering programs. Discussed are the justification for, and implementation of topics including transport phenomena, kinetics and reactor design, unit operations, and product and process design. (CW)

  5. Needs assessment activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    As part of a Transportation Management Division task (TMD), the Packaging Programs and Testing Group within Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has assessed the packaging needs of some of the mid- and small-sized US Department of Energy (DOE) sites by visiting them and meeting with their transportation and packaging personnel. To date, ten DOE facilities have been visited. As a result, these sites have been informed of some of the packaging activities that TMD has sponsored and is sponsoring, have been apprised of possible upcoming changes to transportation regulations, have discussed their short-term packaging needs, and have shared unique packaging they have developed which may be of use to other DOE facilities.. This report summarizes the findings from visits to the following sites: Fermi National Laboratory; Argonne National Laboratory; New Brunswick Laboratory; EG and G Mound Applied Technologies; Fernald Environmental Management Project; West Valley Demonstration Project; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Brookhaven National Laboratory; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory.

  6. Nuclear Materials Safeguards - Manpower Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanter, Manuel A.

    Nuclear safeguard systems, their operation and implications for future manpower needs, and the need for these topics to be integrated into the engineering education curriculum, are focused on in this paper. The elements of a safeguard system and factors influencing the selection of a particular system are presented. Projections concerning the use…

  7. The need for new isotope reference materials.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Jochen; Rosner, Martin; Pritzkow, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    Isotope reference materials are needed to calibrate and validate analytical procedures used for the determination of isotope amount ratios, procedurally defined isotope ratios or so-called δ values. In contrast to the huge analytical progress in isotope ratio analytics, the production of isotope reference materials has not kept pace with the increasing needs of isotope analysts. Three representative isotope systems are used to explain the technical and non-technical difficulties and drawbacks, on one hand, and to demonstrate what can be achieved at its best, on the other hand. A clear statement is given that new isotope reference materials are needed to obtain traceable and thus comparable data, which is essential for all kinds of isotope research. The range of available isotope reference materials and δ reference materials should be increased and matrix reference materials certified for isotope compositions or δ values, which do not exist yet, should be provided.

  8. Advanced materials: Information and analysis needs

    SciTech Connect

    Curlee, T.R.; Das, S.; Lee, R.; Trumble, D.

    1990-09-01

    This report presents the findings of a study to identify the types of information and analysis that are needed for advanced materials. The project was sponsored by the US Bureau of Mines (BOM). It includes a conceptual description of information needs for advanced materials and the development and implementation of a questionnaire on the same subject. This report identifies twelve fundamental differences between advanced and traditional materials and discusses the implications of these differences for data and analysis needs. Advanced and traditional materials differ significantly in terms of physical and chemical properties. Advanced material properties can be customized more easily. The production of advanced materials may differ from traditional materials in terms of inputs, the importance of by-products, the importance of different processing steps (especially fabrication), and scale economies. The potential for change in advanced materials characteristics and markets is greater and is derived from the marriage of radically different materials and processes. In addition to the conceptual study, a questionnaire was developed and implemented to assess the opinions of people who are likely users of BOM information on advanced materials. The results of the questionnaire, which was sent to about 1000 people, generally confirm the propositions set forth in the conceptual part of the study. The results also provide data on the categories of advanced materials and the types of information that are of greatest interest to potential users. 32 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

  9. Relating practitioner needs to research activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.; Menzies, T.; Connelly, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    We present an approach to matching needs (practioner requirements) to solutions (researcher activities). A taxonomical classification scheme acts as intermediary between needs and activities. Expert practitioners exprss their needs in terms of this taxonomy. Researchers express their activities in the same terms. A decision support tool is used to assist in the combination and study of their expressions of needs and activities.

  10. Materials needs for compact fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The economic prospects for magnetic fusion energy can be dramatically improved if for the same total power output the fusion neutron first-wall (FW) loading and the system power density can be increased by factors of 3 to 5 and 10 to 30, respectively. A number of compact fusion reactor embodiments have been proposed, all of which would operate with increased FW loadings, would use thin (0.5 to 0.6 m) blankets, and would confine quasi-steady-state plasma with resistive, water-cooled copper or aluminum coils. Increased system power density (5 to 15 MWt/m/sup 3/ versus 0.3 to 0.5 MW/m/sup 3/), considerably reduced physical size of the fusion power core (FPC), and appreciably reduced economic leverage exerted by the FPC and associated physics result. The unique materials requirements anticipated for these compact reactors are outlined against the well documented backdrop provided by similar needs for the mainline approaches. Surprisingly, no single materials need that is unique to the compact systems is identified; crucial uncertainties for the compact approaches must also be addressed by the mainline approaches, particularly for in-vacuum components (FWs, limiters, divertors, etc.).

  11. Needs assessment activity report: Fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Needs Assessment program has assessed the packaging requirements of many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. These assessments have involved site visits and meetings with personnel involved with transportation and packaging of hazardous materials. By September 1995, 24 DOE facilities had been visited, with 14 site visits occurring in fiscal year 1995. As a result, these sites have been informed of some of the packaging activities that DOE has sponsored and is sponsoring, have been apprised of the affects of upcoming changes to transportation regulations, have discussed their near-term packaging needs, and have shared unique packaging they have developed, which may be of use to other DOE facilities. Program successes include discovery of a need for a reusable Type A liquid sample packaging and its development within another DOE task and establishing communications pathways between DOE sites that have similar transportation and packaging needs. This report recommends that the Needs Assessment activity continue to pursue the strategy of visiting DOE sites to meet with their transportation and packaging personnel. These visits will ensure that DOE needs are met, communications pathways between DOE sites are established and cultivated, and redundant packaging development is identified. The site visits should be expanded to include meetings with the long-range and strategic planners at each site, and at the DOE-Headquarters level, to ensure that all future transportation and packaging needs are identified early enough to allow adequate transportation assessment and packaging development. This activity could become a permanent conduit for information and will ensure that all future DOE transportation and packaging needs are satisfied in a cost-effective, timely, and efficient manner.

  12. Ceramic breeder materials : status and needs.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.E.

    1998-02-02

    The tritium breeding blanket is one of the most important components of a fusion reactor because it directly involves both energy extraction and tritium production, both of which are critical to fusion power. Because of their overall desirable properties, lithium-containing ceramic solids are recognized as attractive tritium breeding materials for fusion reactor blankets. Indeed, their inherent thermal stability and chemical inertness are significant safety advantages. In numerous in-pile experiments, these materials have performed well, showing good thermal stability and good tritium release characteristics. Tritium release is particularly facile when an argon or helium purge gas containing hydrogen, typically at levels of about 0.1%, is used. However, the addition of hydrogen to the purge gas imposes a penalty when it comes to recovery of the tritium produced in the blanket. In particular, a large amount of hydrogen in the purge gas will necessitate a large multiple-stage tritium purification unit, which could translate into higher costs. Optimizing tritium release while minimizing the amount of hydrogen necessary in the purge gas requires a deeper understanding of the tritium release process, especially the interactions of hydrogen with the surface of the lithium ceramic. This paper reviews the status of ceramic breeder research and highlights several issues and data needs.

  13. Needs assessment activity report: April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    As part of a US Department of Energy Headquarters task (DOE-HQ), the Packaging Operations and Development Group within Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has assessed the packaging needs of many DOE sites. These assessments have involved site visits and meetings with personnel involved with transportation and packaging of hazardous materials. By March 1995, 20 DOE facilities had been visited. As a result, these sites been informed of some of the packaging activities that DOE has sponsored and is sponsoring, have been apprised of the affects of upcoming changes to transportation regulations, have discussed their short-term packaging needs, and have shared unique packaging they have developed which may be of use to other DOE facilities. Program successes include discovery of a need for a reusable Type A liquid sample packaging and its development within another DOE task, establishing communications pathways between DOE sites that have similar transportation and packaging needs, and starting to establish a centralized packaging clearinghouse that will coordinate DOE Complex needs and improve the cost-effectiveness of transportation and packaging activities.

  14. Matching software practitioner needs to researcher activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.; Menzies, T.; Connelly, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    We present an approach to matching software practitioners' needs to software researchers' activities. It uses an accepted taxonomical software classfication scheme as intermediary, in terms of which practitioners express needs, and researchers express activities.

  15. Overview of Materials Qualification Needs for Metal Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifi, Mohsen; Salem, Ayman; Beuth, Jack; Harrysson, Ola; Lewandowski, John J.

    2016-03-01

    This overview highlights some of the key aspects regarding materials qualification needs across the additive manufacturing (AM) spectrum. AM technology has experienced considerable publicity and growth in the past few years with many successful insertions for non-mission-critical applications. However, to meet the full potential that AM has to offer, especially for flight-critical components (e.g., rotating parts, fracture-critical parts, etc.), qualification and certification efforts are necessary. While development of qualification standards will address some of these needs, this overview outlines some of the other key areas that will need to be considered in the qualification path, including various process-, microstructure-, and fracture-modeling activities in addition to integrating these with lifing activities targeting specific components. Ongoing work in the Advanced Manufacturing and Mechanical Reliability Center at Case Western Reserve University is focusing on fracture and fatigue testing to rapidly assess critical mechanical properties of some titanium alloys before and after post-processing, in addition to conducting nondestructive testing/evaluation using micro-computerized tomography at General Electric. Process mapping studies are being conducted at Carnegie Mellon University while large area microstructure characterization and informatics (EBSD and BSE) analyses are being conducted at Materials Resources LLC to enable future integration of these efforts via an Integrated Computational Materials Engineering approach to AM. Possible future pathways for materials qualification are provided.

  16. HYDROGEN DELIVERY: INFRASTRUCTURE, CHALLENGES, AND MATERIALS NEEDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J; Gardiner, Monterey

    2009-01-01

    Current domestic energy policy is aimed at encouraging the development of alternative fuels such as hydrogen for use as a renewable and environmentally-friendly alternative to traditional petroleum-based fuels for transportation and stationary power. The purpose of the Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team is to provide insight and input on hydrogen delivery infrastructure research. Ongoing research has identified materials R&D challenges required to support this infrastructure. A few of these challenges are summarized with emphasis placed on materials.

  17. Fabrication in Space - What Materials are Needed?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, J

    2007-01-01

    In order to sustain life on the moon, and especially on Mars, the inhabitants must be self-sufficient. As on Earth, electronic and mechanical systems will break down and must be repaired. It is not realistic to "send" parts to the moon or Mars in an effort to replace failed ones or have spares for all components. It will be important to have spares on hand and even better would be to have the capability to fabricate parts in situ. The In Situ Fabrication and Repair (ISFR) team is working to develop the Arcam Electron Beam Melting (EBM) machine as the manufacturing process that will have the capability to produce repair parts, as well as new designs, and tooling on the lunar surface and eventually on Mars. What materials will be available for the inhabitants to use? What materials would be most useful? The EBM process is versatile and can handle a multitude of materials. These include titanium, stainless steels, aluminums, inconels, and copper alloys. Research has shown what parts have failed during past space missions and this data has been compiled and assessed. The EBM machine is fully capable of processing these materials of choice. Additionally, the long-term goal is to use the lunar regolith as a viable feedstock. Preliminary work has been performed to assess the feasibility of using raw lunar regolith as a material source or use a binder combined with the regolith to achieve a good melt.

  18. Calculator-Active Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy, Ed.; Harris, Julia, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This journal contains brief descriptions of calculator-active materials that were found using Resource Finder, the searchable online catalog of curriculum resources from the Eisenhower National Clearinghouse (ENC). It features both the calculators themselves and the activity books that are used with them. Among the calculators included are those…

  19. Space Exploration: Oh, the Materials You'll Need!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2016-01-01

    Space exploration has many challenges and materials are critical for many of the systems required to enable robotic or human space exploration. This talk will highlight challenges for materials with an emphasis on thermal protection materials and systems. Solving the materials issues will require thinking about materials in the systems and environments where are they to be used. In many cases the materials must be designed for the application, and the system needs to be designed with the materials in mind. The talk will conclude with some thoughts on the skills needed for materials scientists and engineers working on materials for space.

  20. The Elderly's Need for Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foret, Claire M.; Clemons, James M.

    1996-01-01

    This article provides: information on the importance of physical activity for older adults and guidelines to ensure safe and successful activity. It discusses the need for activity, risk levels, prescription of exercise intensity, determination of entry level fitness and monitoring of improvement, and the role of the professional. (SM)

  1. Cosmogenic activation of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Amare, J.; Beltran, B.; Carmona, J.M.; Cebrian, S.; Garcia, E.; Irastorza, I.G.; Gomez, H.; Luzon, G.; Martinez, M.; Morales, J.; Ortiz de Solorzano, A.; Pobes, C.; Puimedon, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Ruz, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Torres, L.; Villar, J.A.; Capelli, S.; Capozzi, F.

    2005-09-08

    The problem of cosmogenic activation produced at sea level in materials typically used in underground experiments looking for rare events is being studied. Several nuclear data libraries have been screened looking for relevant isotope production cross-sections and different codes which can be applied to activation studies have been reviewed. The excitation functions for some problems of interest like production of 60Co and 68Ge in germanium and production of 60Co in tellurium have been obtained taking into account both measurements and calculations and a preliminary estimate of the corresponding rates of production at sea level has been performed.

  2. Activated carbon material

    DOEpatents

    Evans, A. Gary

    1978-01-01

    Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

  3. Geothermal materials development activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1993-06-01

    This ongoing R&D program is a part of the Core Research Category of the Department of Energy/Geothermal Division initiative to accelerate the utilization of geothermal resources. High risk materials problems that if successfully solved will result in significant reductions in well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs, are emphasized. The project has already developed several advanced materials systems that are being used by the geothermal industry and by Northeastern Electric, Gas and Steam Utilities. Specific topics currently being addressed include lightweight C0{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive scale and corrosion resistant liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, elastomer-metal bonding systems, and corrosion mitigation at the Geysers. Efforts to enhance the transfer of the technologies developed in these activities to other sectors of the economy are also underway.

  4. Vocational Instructional Materials for Students with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towne, Douglas C.; Wallace, Sydney

    This directory of instructional materials is designed for use by vocational education teachers of the disadvantaged or handicapped student. Representing a number of sources and a variety of approaches to curricular materials for students with special needs, this listing covers 24 topics, from individualized curriculums to instructional support…

  5. Material Development and Meeting Learner's Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the aim was to show that learners' needs can be met using simple and cheap materials that can be found everywhere in 9th to 11th grade Chemistry courses. To this end, materials were developed using simple everyday life materials for 9th to 11th grade Chemistry courses. In the research, the project method was employed. The study…

  6. Mechanically Active Electrospun Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Jaimee M.

    Electrospinning, a technique used to fabricate small diameter polymer fibers, has been employed to develop unique, active materials falling under two categories: (1) shape memory elastomeric composites (SMECs) and (2) water responsive fiber mats. (1) Previous work has characterized in detail the properties and behavior of traditional SMECs with isotropic fibers embedded in an elastomer matrix. The current work has two goals: (i) characterize laminated anisotropic SMECs and (ii) develop a fabrication process that is scalable for commercial SMEC manufacturing. The former ((i)) requires electrospinning aligned polymer fibers. The aligned fibers are similarly embedded in an elastomer matrix and stacked at various fiber orientations. The resulting laminated composite has a unique response to tensile deformation: after stretching and releasing, the composite curls. This curling response was characterized based on fiber orientation. The latter goal ((ii)) required use of a dual-electrospinning process to simultaneously electrospin two polymers. This fabrication approach incorporated only industrially relevant processing techniques, enabling the possibility of commercial application of a shape memory rubber. Furthermore, the approach had the added benefit of increased control over composition and material properties. (2) The strong elongational forces experienced by polymer chains during the electrospinning process induce molecular alignment along the length of electrospun fibers. Such orientation is maintained in the fibers as the polymer vitrifies. Consequently, residual stress is stored in electrospun fiber mats and can be recovered by heating through the polymer's glass transition temperature. Alternatively, the glass transition temperature can be depressed by introducing a plasticizing agent. Poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) is plasticized by water, and its glass transition temperature is lowered below room temperature. Therefore, the residual stress can be relaxed at room

  7. Vocational Instructional Materials in Horticulture for Students with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ethridge, James I.

    This resource catalog of horticulture curriculum materials for students with special needs is divided into twenty-seven instructional areas: aboriculture; annuals; entomology; floral crops production; floral design and flower shop operations; garden center; greenhouse; ground covers and hedges; herbs; house plants; landscape construction and…

  8. [Active career management needed for female doctors].

    PubMed

    Maas, Angela H E M; ter Braak, Edith W M T; Verbon, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    For more than 15 years two-thirds of medical students have been women. Despite this, they represent a minority (16-25 %) of professors in academic medicine. There is still a major gender gap to the disadvantage of women in leading positions in academia, with women earning only 80% of the salary of their male counterparts and fewer opportunities for scientific grants. Recent studies have shown that career ambition among men and women in medicine is comparable. However, successful women more often doubt their own achievements than men do. This is known as the 'imposter phenomenon' and acts as a barrier to career progression. Female leadership should be more actively promoted and encouraged to establish the diversity and creativity that we need in our current healthcare system.

  9. [Active career management needed for female doctors].

    PubMed

    Maas, Angela H E M; ter Braak, Edith W M T; Verbon, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    For more than 15 years two-thirds of medical students have been women. Despite this, they represent a minority (16-25 %) of professors in academic medicine. There is still a major gender gap to the disadvantage of women in leading positions in academia, with women earning only 80% of the salary of their male counterparts and fewer opportunities for scientific grants. Recent studies have shown that career ambition among men and women in medicine is comparable. However, successful women more often doubt their own achievements than men do. This is known as the 'imposter phenomenon' and acts as a barrier to career progression. Female leadership should be more actively promoted and encouraged to establish the diversity and creativity that we need in our current healthcare system. PMID:26959735

  10. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, K.A.; Bolton, P.A.; Robinson, R.K.

    1993-09-01

    For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center.

  11. Assessment of research needs for wind turbine rotor materials technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araj, Kamal J.; Fisher, Theresa A.; Kronenburg, Jan C.

    Wind-driven power systems represent a renewable technology that is still in the early stages of its development and maturation. It is a renewable power technology that, during the course of its rapid evolution over the last decade, has accumulated significant, large-scale, utility-connected experience. The focus is on the need for improved knowledge of materials properties and advanced, economical, high volume manufacturing processes. The first chapter: (1) traces the evolution of wind power systems in the United States; (2) identifies the principle components of a power-generating wind turbine; and (3) presents a simplified description of the relationship between the power in the wind and the power flow through the turbine drive train, and describes the characteristics of the wind environment that impact both the short and long term structural integrity of wind turbines. The remaining chapters of this report explore and further define the need for improved materials properties, manufacturing processes, and control systems.

  12. Materials needs and opportunities in the pulp and paper industry

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, P.

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) supports research and development (R&D) in industry, the DOE national laboratories, and in universities to develop energy efficient, environmentally-acceptable industrial technologies. The Office of Industrial Technologies is working with seven energy-intensive industries to develop R&D roadmaps that will facilitate cooperative government-industry efforts to achieve energy-efficient, environmentally-acceptable, sustainable industries of the future. The forest products industry is one of the industries with which OIT is working to develop an R&D roadmap. The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program of the Office of Industrial Technologies sponsors long-term, directed research on materials that will enable industry to develop and utilize more energy-efficient, sustainable processes and technologies. The purpose of the study described in this report was to identify the material R&D needs and opportunities for the pulp and paper mill of the future.

  13. Materials Needs for Future In-Space Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les

    2006-01-01

    NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Project is developing the next generation of in-space propulsion systems in support of robotic exploration missions throughout the solar system. The propulsion technologies being developed are non-traditional and have stressing materials performance requirements. Earth-storable bipropellant performance is constrained by temperature limitations of the columbium used in the chamber. Iridium/rhenium (Ir/Re) is now available and has been implemented in initial versions of Earth- Storable rockets with specific impulses about 10 seconds higher than columbium rocket chambers. New chamber fabrication methods that improve process and performance of Ir/Re and other promising material systems are needed. The solar sail is a propellantless propulsion system that gains momentum by reflecting sunlight. The sails need to be very large in area (from 10000 sq m up to 62500 sq m) yet be very lightweight in order to achieve adequate accelerations for realistic mission times. Lightweight materials that can be manufactured in thicknesses of less than 1 micron and that are not harmed by the space environment are desired. Blunt Body Aerocapture uses aerodynamic drag to slow an approaching spacecraft and insert it into a science orbit around any planet or moon with an atmosphere. The spacecraft is enclosed by a rigid aeroshell that protects it from the entry heating and aerodynamic environment. Lightweight, high-temperature structural systems, adhesives, insulators, and ablatives are key components for improving aeroshell efficiencies at heating rates of 1000-2000 W/sq cm and beyond. Inflatable decelerators in the forms of ballutes and inflatable aeroshells will use flexible polymeric thin film materials, high temperature fabrics, and structural adhesives. The inflatable systems will be tightly packaged during cruise and will be inflated prior to entry interface at the destination. Materials must maintain strength and flexibility while packaged at

  14. Materials Needs for Future In-space Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles Les

    2008-01-01

    NASA is developing the next generation of in-space propulsion systems in support of robotic exploration missions throughout the solar system. The propulsion technologies being developed are non-traditional and have stressing materials performance requirements. (Chemical Propulsion) Earth-storable chemical bipropellant performance is constrained by temperature limitations of the columbium used in the chamber. Iridium/rhenium (Ir/Re) is now available and has been implemented in initial versions of Earth-Storable rockets with specific impulses (Isp) about 10 seconds higher than columbium rocket chambers. New chamber fabrication methods that improve process and performance of Ir/Re and other promising material systems are needed. (Solar Sail Propulsion) The solar sail is a propellantless propulsion system that gains momentum by reflecting sunlight. The sails need to be very large in area (from 10000 m2 up to 62500 m2) yet be very lightweight in order to achieve adequate accelerations for realistic mission times. Lightweight materials that can be manufactured in thicknesses of less than 1 micron and that are not harmed by the space environment are desired. (Aerocapture) Blunt Body Aerocapture uses aerodynamic drag to slow an approaching spacecraft and insert it into a science orbit around any planet or moon with an atmosphere. The spacecraft is enclosed by a rigid aeroshell that protects it from the entry heating and aerodynamic environment. Lightweight, high-temperature structural systems, adhesives, insulators, and ablatives are key components for improving aeroshell efficiencies at heating rates of 1000-2000 W/cu cm and beyond. Inflatable decelerators in the forms of ballutes and inflatable aeroshells will use flexible polymeric thin film materials, high temperature fabrics, and structural adhesives. The inflatable systems will be tightly packaged during cruise and will be inflated prior to entry interface at the destination. Materials must maintain strength and

  15. Professional Activities, Needed Competencies and Training Needs of Medical Librarians in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullah, Midrar; Ameen, Kanwal; Bakhtar, Salman

    2011-01-01

    The study aims to explore the professional activities, needed competencies and education/training needs of medical librarians in Pakistan. The following questions guided the study: what are the current professional activities of medical librarians in Pakistan? What is their perception of the competencies needed of medical librarians? And what are…

  16. Advanced Materials in Support of EERE Needs to Advance Clean Energy Technologies Program Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Liby, Alan L; Rogers, Hiram

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this activity was to carry out program implementation and technical projects in support of the ARRA-funded Advanced Materials in Support of EERE Needs to Advance Clean Energy Technologies Program of the DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) (formerly the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP)). The work was organized into eight projects in four materials areas: strategic materials, structural materials, energy storage and production materials, and advanced/field/transient processing. Strategic materials included work on titanium, magnesium and carbon fiber. Structural materials included work on alumina forming austentic (AFA) and CF8C-Plus steels. The advanced batteries and production materials projects included work on advanced batteries and photovoltaic devices. Advanced/field/transient processing included work on magnetic field processing. Details of the work in the eight projects are available in the project final reports which have been previously submitted.

  17. Analyses of Oxyanion Materials by Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B; Perry, D.L.; English, G.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Leung, K.-N.; Garabedian, G.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay, Zs.

    2008-03-24

    Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) has been used to analyze metal ion oxyanion materials that have multiple applications, including medicine, materials, catalysts, and electronics. The significance for the need for accurate, highly sensitive analyses for the materials is discussed in the context of quality control of end products containing the parent element in each material. Applications of the analytical data for input to models and theoretical calculations related to the electronic and other properties of the materials are discussed.

  18. Sodium fast reactor fuels and materials : research needs.

    SciTech Connect

    Denman, Matthew R.; Porter, Douglas; Wright, Art; Lambert, John; Hayes, Steven; Natesan, Ken; Ott, Larry J.; Garner, Frank; Walters, Leon; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2011-09-01

    An expert panel was assembled to identify gaps in fuels and materials research prior to licensing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) design. The expert panel considered both metal and oxide fuels, various cladding and duct materials, structural materials, fuel performance codes, fabrication capability and records, and transient behavior of fuel types. A methodology was developed to rate the relative importance of phenomena and properties both as to importance to a regulatory body and the maturity of the technology base. The technology base for fuels and cladding was divided into three regimes: information of high maturity under conservative operating conditions, information of low maturity under more aggressive operating conditions, and future design expectations where meager data exist.

  19. Life Insurance: Who Needs It? Teacher's Guide [and] Student Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Elaine

    A unit to acquaint secondary school students with the basics of life insurance is presented. The document contains student materials and a teacher's guide. Objectives are to evaluate the four basic types of life insurance (term, whole life, limited payment life, and endowment), compare prices of policies, recognize the difference between…

  20. What Curriculum Leaders Need to Know about Selecting Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komoski, P. Kenneth

    Recent information drawn from the Educational Products Information Exchange (EPIE) Institute's six-year survey and assessment of instructional materials used in United States schools is reported in this paper. Among the conclusions, observations, and recommendations reported are the following: as currently practiced in most schools, the selection…

  1. Information and Service Needs among Active and Former Family Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortinsky, Richard H.; Hathaway, Tania Jo

    1990-01-01

    Interpreted results of needs assessment completed by active caregivers (n=58) and former caregivers (n=57) of relatives with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Results imply need for high-quality educational material throughout caregiving, improved training for health professionals about AD, and role for former caregivers as information resources.…

  2. Basic research needs and opportunities on interfaces in solar materials

    SciTech Connect

    Czanderna, A. W.; Gottschall, R. J.

    1981-04-01

    The workshop on research needs and recommended research programs on interfaces in solar energy conversion devices was held June 30-July 3, 1980. The papers deal mainly with solid-solid, solid-liquid, and solid-gas interfaces, sometimes involving multilayer solid-solid interfaces. They deal mainly with instrumental techniques of studying these interfaces so they can be optimized, so they can be fabricated with quality control and so changes with time can be forecast. The latter is required because a long lifetime (20 yrs is suggested) is necessary for economic reasons. Fifteen papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  3. Astronomy Outreach Activities for Special Needs Children and Their Families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, Donald A.

    2008-05-01

    While there are outreach programs for the public and for children, there are few programs for special needs children. Here I describe two NASA-IDEAS/STSc funded outreach programs I created for special needs children using telescope observations (including remote and robotic observations) and hands-on astronomy activities. The target audience is seriously ill children and their families who are staying at the Ronald McDonald House of Long Island in conjunction the children's surgery and medical treatments or children hospitalized at the Hagedorn Pediatric Inpatient Center at Winthrop University Hospital. These educational activities help children and their families learn about astronomy while providing a diversion to take their minds off their illness during a stressful time. I have also conducted a similar program in camps for special needs children. These programs should be expanded so that special needs children and their families part of the IYA 2009 activities.

  4. Astronomy Outreach Activities for Special Needs Children and Their Families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D.

    2008-11-01

    While there are outreach programs for the public and for children, there are few programs for special needs children. Here I describe two NASA-IDEAS/STScI funded outreach programs I created for special needs children using telescope observations (including remote observations) and hands-on astronomy activities. The target audience is seriously ill children and their families who are staying at the Ronald McDonald House of Long Island in conjunction the children's medical treatments or children hospitalized at the Children's Medical Center at Winthrop University Hospital. These educational activities help children and their families learn about astronomy while providing a diversion to take their minds off their illness during a stressful time. I have also conducted a similar program in camps for special needs children. These programs should be expanded so that special needs children and their families are part of the IYA2009 activities.

  5. Life Skills Activities for Secondary Students with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannix, Darlene

    This resource for life skills activities for adolescents with special needs covers aspects of interpersonal relationships, communication skills, academic and school skills, practical living skills, vocational skills, problem-solving skills, and lifestyle choices. Included are 190 illustrated activity sheets with related exercises, discussion…

  6. Active vibration damping using smart material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baras, John S.; Yan, Zhuang

    1994-01-01

    We consider the modeling and active damping of an elastic beam using distributed actuators and sensors. The piezoelectric ceramic material (PZT) is used to build the actuator. The sensor is made of the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). These materials are glued on both sides of the beam. For the simple clamped beam, the closed loop controller has been shown to be able to extract energy from the beam. The shape of the actuator and its influence on the closed loop system performance are discussed. It is shown that it is possible to suppress the selected mode by choosing the appropriate actuator layout. It is also shown that by properly installing the sensor and determining the sensor shape we can further extract and manipulate the sensor signal for our control need.

  7. Factors Predicting Physical Activity Among Children With Special Needs

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Chu Tang; Chung, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is especially prevalent among children with special needs. Both lack of physical activity and unhealthful eating are major contributing factors. The objective of our study was to investigate barriers to physical activity among these children. Methods We surveyed parents of the 171 children attending Vista Del Mar School in Los Angeles, a nonprofit school serving a socioeconomically diverse group of children with special needs from kindergarten through 12th grade. Parents were asked about their child’s and their own physical activity habits, barriers to their child’s exercise, and demographics. The response rate was 67%. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine predictors of children being physically active at least 3 hours per week. Results Parents reported that 45% of the children were diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, 38% with autism, and 34% with learning disabilities; 47% of children and 56% of parents were physically active less than 3 hours per week. The top barriers to physical activity were reported as child’s lack of interest (43%), lack of developmentally appropriate programs (33%), too many behavioral problems (32%), and parents’ lack of time (29%). However, child’s lack of interest was the only parent-reported barrier independently associated with children’s physical activity. Meanwhile, children whose parents were physically active at least 3 hours per week were 4.2 times as likely to be physically active as children whose parents were less physically active (P = .01). Conclusion In this group of students with special needs, children’s physical activity was strongly associated with parental physical activity; parent-reported barriers may have had less direct effect. Further studies should examine the importance of parental physical activity among children with special needs. PMID:23866163

  8. Effect of Need for Approval and Situational Variables on the Viewing of Erotic Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschner, Neil M.

    1976-01-01

    The role of social desirability on willingness to view erotic materials under conditions of implicit approval and disapproval was studied. Low need-for-approval subjects were more influenced by situational cues than high need-for-approval subjects. (NG)

  9. Electroviscoelastic materials as active dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggerstaff, Janet M.; Kosmatka, John B.

    2002-07-01

    Electroviscoelastic materials (EVEMs) are polymeric materials that exhibit changes in structural properties when a voltage is applied across it. In the current study, an EVEM is developed that produce large changes in stiffness and damping materials with applied voltage. The resulting material exhibits many of the same properties as an electrorheological (ER) material, except the current material is self-supporting and thus can be used to applications where viscoelastic materials are used. The EVEM is composed of three components: 20% (by mass) of poly (p-phenylene) (PPP) particles doped with CuCl2 or FeCl3, 64% of Dow Sylgard 527 silicone gel, and 16% Dow Corning Sylgard 182 silicone elastomer, where the elastomer is added to for stiffening. Experimental harmonic tests using a double-lap shear test and a 0.025 thick specimens between 1 and 150 Hz reveal a factor six increase in stiffening and a factor of three decrease in damping with applied voltage (1500v).

  10. Organic active materials for batteries

    DOEpatents

    Abouimrane, Ali; Weng, Wei; Amine, Khalil

    2016-08-16

    A rechargeable battery includes a compound having at least two active sites, R.sup.1 and R.sup.2; wherein the at least two active sites are interconnected by one or more conjugated moieties; each active site is coordinated to one or more metal ions M.sup.a+ or each active site is configured to coordinate to one or more metal ions; and "a" is 1, 2, or 3.

  11. THE NEED FOR A NEW JOINING TECHNOLOGY FOR THE CLOSURE WELDING OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    CANNELL GR; HILL BE; GRANT GJ

    2008-10-29

    One of the activities associated with cleanup throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex is packaging radioactive materials into storage containers. Much of this work will be performed in high-radiation environments requiring fully remote operations, for which existing, proven systems do not currently exist. These conditions demand a process that is capable of producing acceptable (defect-free) welds on a consistent basis; the need to perform weld repair, under fully-remote operations, can be extremely costly and time consuming. Current closure welding technology (fusion welding) is not well suited for this application and will present risk to cleanup cost and schedule. To address this risk, Fluor and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are proposing that a new and emerging joining technology, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), be considered for this work. FSW technology has been demonstrated in other industries (aerospace and marine) to produce near flaw-free welds on a consistent basis. FSW is judged capable of providing the needed performance for fully-remote closure welding of containers for radioactive materials for the following reasons: FSW is a solid-state process; material is not melted. As such, FSW does not produce the type of defects associated with fusion welding, e.g., solidification-induced porosity, cracking, distortion due to weld shrinkage, and residual stress. In addition, because FSW is a low-heat input process, material properties (mechanical, corrosion and environmental) are preserved and not degraded as can occur with 'high-heat' fusion welding processes. When compared to fusion processes, FSW produces extremely high weld quality. FSW is performed using machine-tool technology. The equipment is simple and robust and well-suited for high radiation, fully-remote operations compared to the relatively complex equipment associated with the fusion-welding processes. Additionally, for standard wall thicknesses of radioactive materials

  12. Child Care and Children with Special Health Needs: Materials from the NCEMCH Reference Collection, September 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Arlington, VA.

    Materials included in this annotated bibliography cover topics related to child care and children with special health needs. Included are 68 resources that address: (1) the Americans with Disabilities Act and implications for child care; (2) nutrition of children with special health needs specific to the child care setting; (3) materials for…

  13. Beyond the zone: protein needs of active individuals.

    PubMed

    Lemon, P W

    2000-10-01

    There has been debate among athletes and nutritionists regarding dietary protein needs for centuries. Although contrary to traditional belief, recent scientific information collected on physically active individuals tends to indicate that regular exercise increases daily protein requirements; however, the precise details remain to be worked out. Based on laboratory measures, daily protein requirements are increased by perhaps as much as 100% vs. recommendations for sedentary individuals (1.6-1.8 vs. 0.8 g/kg). Yet even these intakes are much less than those reported by most athletes. This may mean that actual requirements are below what is needed to optimize athletic performance, and so the debate continues. Numerous interacting factors including energy intake, carbohydrate availability, exercise intensity, duration and type, dietary protein quality, training history, gender, age, timing of nutrient intake and the like make this topic extremely complex. Many questions remain to be resolved. At the present time, substantial data indicate that the current recommended protein intake should be adjusted upward for those who are physically active, especially in populations whose needs are elevated for other reasons, e.g., growing individuals, dieters, vegetarians, individuals with muscle disease-induced weakness and the elderly. For these latter groups, specific supplementation may be appropriate, but for most North Americans who consume a varied diet, including complete protein foods (meat, eggs, fish and dairy products), and sufficient energy the increased protein needs induced by a regular exercise program can be met in one's diet.

  14. Activation of porous MOF materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2013-04-23

    A method for the treatment of solvent-containing MOF material to increase its internal surface area involves introducing a liquid into the MOF in which liquid the solvent is miscible, subjecting the MOF to supercritical conditions for a time to form supercritical fluid, and releasing the supercritical conditions to remove the supercritical fluid from the MOF. Prior to introducing the liquid into the MOF, occluded reaction solvent, such as DEF or DMF, in the MOF can be exchanged for the miscible solvent.

  15. Activation of porous MOF materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2014-04-01

    A method for the treatment of solvent-containing MOF material to increase its internal surface area involves introducing a liquid into the MOF in which liquid the solvent is miscible, subjecting the MOF to supercritical conditions for a time to form supercritical fluid, and releasing the supercritical conditions to remove the supercritcal fluid from the MOF. Prior to introducing the liquid into the MOF, occluded reaction solvent, such as DEF or DMF, in the MOF can be exchanged for the miscible solvent.

  16. Perceived Views of Language Teachers on the Use of Needs Analysis in ESP Materials Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Holi Ibrahim Holi; Salih, Abdel Rahman Abdalla

    2013-01-01

    Needs analysis is generally believed to be important in ESP/EAP context because it enables practitioners and materials writers to find out about their real learners' needs. Therefore, this study is set out to investigate EFL teachers' beliefs and views about need analysis use and practices, specifically in the ESP/EAP tertiary context of the…

  17. Near term and long term materials issues and development needs for plasma interactive components

    SciTech Connect

    Mattas, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma interactive components (PICs), including the first wall, limiter blades, divertor collector plates, halo scrapers, and RF launchers, are exposed to high particle fluxes that can result in high sputtering erosion rates and high heat fluxes. In addition, the materials in reactors are exposed to high neutron fluxes which will degrade the bulk properties. This severe environment will limit the materials and designs which can be used in fusion devices. In order to provide a reasonable degree of confidence that plasma interactive components will operate successfully, a comprehensive development program is needed. Materials research and development plays a key role in the successful development of PICs. The range of operating conditions along with a summary of the major issues for materials development is described. The areas covered include plasma/materials interactions, erosion/redeposition, baseline materials properties, fabrication, and irradiation damage effects. Candidate materials and materials development needs in the near term and long term are identified.

  18. What Preparatory Science is Needed in Coronal Structure and Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus will launch in six short years! Before then, we need to accomplish a great deal of science in order to be able to maximize the return of these missions. Preparatory science is especially important for exploratory missions such as SO and SPP, because they truly will be going "where no mission has gone before". Such preparatory science may include all types of research: theory, modeling, data exploitation, and supporting observations. This meeting provides an opportunity for the community to define and begin this critical preparatory work. In this talk I will provide an overview of our state of knowledge in coronal structure and activity, describe what I believe are the most promising opportunities for advances by SO and SPP, and lead a discussion on what programs need to be implemented now in order to achieve these science advances by the time SO and SPP launch.

  19. Risk assessment activities at NIOSH: Information resources and needs

    SciTech Connect

    Stayner, L.T.; Meinhardt, T.; Hardin, B.

    1990-12-31

    Under the Occupational Safety and Health, and Mine Safety and Health Acts, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is charged with development of recommended occupational safety and health standards, and with conducting research to support the development of these standards. Thus, NIOSH has been actively involved in the analysis of risk associated with occupational exposures, and in the development of research information that is critical for the risk assessment process. NIOSH research programs and other information resources relevant to the risk assessment process are described in this paper. Future needs for information resources are also discussed.

  20. The need for culturally safe physical activity promotion and programs.

    PubMed

    Giles, Audrey R; Darroch, Francine E

    2014-01-01

    Cultural safety is an approach currently used in health care that is meant to address health disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples and colonizing practices in health care. It has been found to empower patient decision-making and result in a relationship where patients and providers work together towards effective care. In this commentary, we argue that such an approach needs to be employed in physical activity promotion and programs as another way of addressing health disparities that continue to exist between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada. Further, we assert that cultural safety can address the critiques that have been made of attempts to use cultural sensitivity, cultural relevancy, and cultural competency training for physical activity providers and in implementing physical activity programs. Cultural safety in physical activity promotion and programs is not only an ethical practice, but also one that has the potential to significantly improve the health of Indigenous peoples, which could lead to related improvements in quality of life, lowering rates of morbidity and mortality, and resulting in considerable savings to the health care sector. PMID:25166136

  1. Individualized Instructional Materials for Special Needs Students in Junior High School Home Economics Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteford, Emma B.

    As a part of the general project investigating how home economics teachers can adapt their teaching methods and materials to the special needs students, this individualized instructional guide is designed to provide practical information, suggestions, and guidance for the classroom teacher. Following a brief description of special needs students,…

  2. Exploring Educational Material Needs and Resources for Children Living in Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahabir, Indramati Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was two-fold. It was first to find out what the educational materials needs were for children living in poverty, and second, to learn of the challenges, obstacles, and strengths by the programs already in place that were supplying educational materials to these children. This study used interviews and surveys as data…

  3. Researchers at Work: Assessing Needs for Content and Presentation of Archival Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison-Bunnell, Jodi; Yakel, Elizabeth; Hauck, Janet

    2011-01-01

    In the past, systems that present digitized archival materials were often created with limited knowledge of their audiences' needs and greater focus on the materials. Organizations must ask whether digital delivery systems are sufficiently effective to merit financial support. As part of the planning process for a digital delivery system at the…

  4. Guidelines and Standards for Children with Special Health Needs: Bibliography of Materials from the NCEMCH Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Arlington, VA.

    Culled from the National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health reference collection, this list contains 102 materials concerning guidelines or standards for any aspect of care for children with special health needs. Each listing contains a brief description of the resource and information for obtaining the materials. Topics include:…

  5. Office Education Materials. A Resource Guide. Vocational Special Needs Lending Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kok, Marilyn R., Ed.

    This resource guide, one of a series of annotated bibliographies describing the collection of the lending library of the Vocational Special Needs (VSN) Program at Texas A&M University, lists available materials for and about office education. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: instructional materials,…

  6. Hazardous Materials Technology: A Community College's Response to a Critical Employment Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedel, Janice N.; And Others

    Studies conducted by the Eastern Iowa Community College District in 1986 revealed a lack of credit programs and curricula for training individuals in the technical aspects of hazardous materials management and need for hazardous materials technicians by local industry. In response, an associate of applied science (AAS) degree program in Hazardous…

  7. Magnesium Based Materials and their Antimicrobial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Duane Allan

    The overall goals of this body of work were to characterize the antimicrobial properties of magnesium (Mg) metal and nano-magnesium oxide (nMgO) in vitro, to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxicity of Mg metal, and to incorporate MgO nanoparticles into a polymeric implant coating and evaluate its in vitro antimicrobial properties. In the course of this work it was found that Mg metal, Mg-mesh, and nMgO have in vitro antimicrobial properties that are similar to a bactericidal antibiotic. For Mg metal, the mechanism of this activity appears to be related to an increase in pH (i.e. a more alkaline environment) and not an increase in Mg2+. Given that Mg-mesh is a Mg metal powder, the assumption is that it has the same mechanism of activity as Mg metal. The mechanism of activity for nMgO remains to be elucidated and may be related to a combination of interaction of the nanoparticles with the bacteria and the alkaline pH. It was further demonstrated that supernatants from suspensions of Mg-mesh and nMgO had the same antimicrobial effect as was noted when the particles were used. The supernatant from Mg-mesh and nMgO was also noted to prevent biofilm formation for two Staphylococcus strains. Finally, poly-epsilon-caprolactone (PCL) composites of Mg-mesh (PCL+Mg-mesh) and nMgO (PCL+nMgO) were produced. Coatings applied to screws inhibited growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and in thin disc format inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus in addition to the E. coli and P. aeruginosa. Pure Mg metal was noted to have some cytotoxic effect on murine fibroblast and osteoblast cell lines, although this effect needs to be characterized further. To address the need for an in vivo model for evaluating implant associated infections, a new closed fracture osteomyelitis model in the femur of the rat was developed. Magnesium, a readily available and inexpensive metal was shown to have antimicrobial properties that appear to be related to its corrosion products and

  8. Material need support interventions for diabetes prevention and control: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Lily S; Wexler, Deborah J; DeWalt, Darren; Berkowitz, Seth A

    2015-02-01

    Unmet material needs, such as food insecurity and housing instability, are associated with increased risk of diabetes and worse outcomes among diabetes patients. Healthcare delivery organizations are increasingly held accountable for health outcomes that may be related to these "social determinants," which are outside the scope of traditional medical intervention. This review summarizes the current literature regarding interventions that provide material support for income, food, housing, and other basic needs. In addition, we propose a conceptual model of the relationship between unmet needs and diabetes outcomes and provide recommendations for future interventional research. PMID:25620406

  9. Need Support, Need Satisfaction, Intrinsic Motivation, and Physical Activity Participation among Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Tao; Solmon, Melinda A.; Kosma, Maria; Carson, Russell L.; Gu, Xiangli

    2011-01-01

    Using self-determination theory as a framework, the purpose of this study was to test a structural model of hypothesized relationships among perceived need support from physical education teachers (autonomy support, competence support, and relatedness support), psychological need satisfaction (autonomy, competence, and relatedness), intrinsic…

  10. Amyloid precursor protein controls cholesterol turnover needed for neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Pierrot, Nathalie; Tyteca, Donatienne; D'auria, Ludovic; Dewachter, Ilse; Gailly, Philippe; Hendrickx, Aurélie; Tasiaux, Bernadette; Haylani, Laetitia El; Muls, Nathalie; N'Kuli, Francisca; Laquerrière, Annie; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste; Campion, Dominique; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Courtoy, Pierre J; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; Octave, Jean-Noël

    2013-01-01

    Perturbation of lipid metabolism favours progression of Alzheimer disease, in which processing of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) has important implications. APP cleavage is tightly regulated by cholesterol and APP fragments regulate lipid homeostasis. Here, we investigated whether up or down regulation of full-length APP expression affected neuronal lipid metabolism. Expression of APP decreased HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR)-mediated cholesterol biosynthesis and SREBP mRNA levels, while its down regulation had opposite effects. APP and SREBP1 co-immunoprecipitated and co-localized in the Golgi. This interaction prevented Site-2 protease-mediated processing of SREBP1, leading to inhibition of transcription of its target genes. A GXXXG motif in APP sequence was critical for regulation of HMGCR expression. In astrocytes, APP and SREBP1 did not interact nor did APP affect cholesterol biosynthesis. Neuronal expression of APP decreased both HMGCR and cholesterol 24-hydroxylase mRNA levels and consequently cholesterol turnover, leading to inhibition of neuronal activity, which was rescued by geranylgeraniol, generated in the mevalonate pathway, in both APP expressing and mevastatin treated neurons. We conclude that APP controls cholesterol turnover needed for neuronal activity. PMID:23554170

  11. Manifestation of optical activity in different materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinova, A. F.; Golovina, T. G.; Konstantinov, K. K.

    2014-07-01

    Various manifestations of optical activity (OA) in crystals and organic materials are considered. Examples of optically active enantiomorphic and nonenantiomorphic crystals of 18 symmetry classes are presented. The OA of enantiomorphic organic materials as components of living nature (amino acids, sugars, and proteins) is analyzed. Questions related to the origin of life on earth are considered. Examples of differences in the enantiomers of drugs are shown. The consequences of replacing conventional left-handed amino acids with additionally right-handed amino acids for living organisms are indicated.

  12. Survey of operation and maintenance-related materials needs in geothermal power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.L.

    1998-06-01

    A survey was conducted to determine operation and maintenance (O and M)-related materials needs in geothermal power plants and to identify future research and development to address these needs. A total of 44 questionnaires was mailed to geothermal plant operators and industry consultants. The response rate was 54%. The participants were asked to describe type and frequency of materials problems, strategies currently used to mitigate such problems, barriers to using new or alternative materials and technologies, sources of information and give their views on research and development priorities. A wide range of opinions was obtained, reflecting each individual respondent`s perspective and the site-specific nature of some problems. However, the consensus is that corrosion and scaling remain major issues and that components requiring performance improvements include pipelines, well casing, turbines, heat exchangers, condensers, valves and cooling towers. It is recommended that appropriate research and development continue to be directed at reducing O and M costs associated with materials failure or inadequate service. There should be a balance between optimizing existing materials through better design and understanding of behavior in geothermal environments and development of new materials. Life extension of existing equipment, service life prediction, education of plant personnel in materials and methods for mitigating corrosion, and improvements in inhibitors and biocides would also be beneficial.

  13. SURVEY OF OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE-RELATED MATERIALS NEEDS IN GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    ALLAN,M.L.

    1998-06-01

    A survey was conducted to determine operation and maintenance (O and M)-related materials needs in geothermal power plants and to identify future research and development to address these needs. A total of 44 questionnaires was mailed to geothermal plant operators and industry consultants. The response rate was 54%. The participants were asked to describe type and frequency of materials problems, strategies currently used to mitigate such problems, barriers to using new or alternative materials and technologies, sources of information and give their views research and development priorities. A. wide range of opinions was obtained, reflecting each individual respondent's perspective and the site-specific nature of some problems. However, the consensus is that corrosion and scaling remain major issues and that components requiring performance improvements include pipelines, well casing, turbines, heat exchangers, condensers, valves and cooling towers. It is recommended that appropriate research and development continue to be directed at reducing O and M costs associated with materials failure or inadequate service. There should be a balance between optimizing existing materials through better design and understanding of behavior in geothermal environments and development of new materials. Life extension of existing equipment, service life prediction, education of plant personnel in materials and methods for mitigating corrosion, and improvements in inhibitors and biocides would also be beneficial.

  14. Geopolymers and Related Alkali-Activated Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provis, John L.; Bernal, Susan A.

    2014-07-01

    The development of new, sustainable, low-CO2 construction materials is essential if the global construction industry is to reduce the environmental footprint of its activities, which is incurred particularly through the production of Portland cement. One type of non-Portland cement that is attracting particular attention is based on alkali-aluminosilicate chemistry, including the class of binders that have become known as geopolymers. These materials offer technical properties comparable to those of Portland cement, but with a much lower CO2 footprint and with the potential for performance advantages over traditional cements in certain niche applications. This review discusses the synthesis of alkali-activated binders from blast furnace slag, calcined clay (metakaolin), and fly ash, including analysis of the chemical reaction mechanisms and binder phase assemblages that control the early-age and hardened properties of these materials, in particular initial setting and long-term durability. Perspectives for future research developments are also explored.

  15. Activity measurements of radon from construction materials.

    PubMed

    Fior, L; Nicolosi Corrêa, J; Paschuk, S A; Denyak, V V; Schelin, H R; Soreanu Pecequilo, B R; Kappke, J

    2012-07-01

    This work presents the results of radon concentration measurements of construction materials used in the Brazilian industry, such as clay (red) bricks and concrete blocks. The measurements focused on the detection of indoor radon activity during different construction stages and the analysis of radionuclides present in the construction materials. For this purpose, sealed chambers with internal dimensions of approximately 60×60×60 cm3 were built within a protected and isolated laboratory environment, and stable air humidity and temperature levels were maintained. These chambers were also used for radon emanation reduction tests. The chambers were built in four major stages: (1) assembly of the walls using clay (red) bricks, concrete blocks, and mortar; (2) installation of plaster; (3) finishing of wall surface using lime; and (4) insulation of wall surface and finishing using paint. Radon measurements were performed using polycarbonate etched track detectors. By comparing the three layers applied to the masonry walls, it was concluded that only the last step (wall painting using acrylic varnish) reduced the radon emanation, by a factor of approximately 2. Samples of the construction materials (clay bricks and concrete blocks) were ground, homogenized, and subjected to gamma-ray spectrometry analysis to evaluate the activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K. The values for the index of the activity concentration (I), radium equivalent activity (Raeq), and external hazard index (Hext) showed that these construction materials could be used without restrictions or concern about the equivalent dose limit (1 mSv/year).

  16. Investigating the Application of Needs Analysis on EAP Business Administration Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Saifalislam Abdalla Hajahmed

    2016-01-01

    This study is conducted to investigate the application of needs analysis in developing EAP materials for business administration students in two Sudanese universities. The subjects are 2 head departments of English language. To collect data, the researcher uses interview and content analysis. The study adopts the descriptive approach. The data of…

  17. Marketing and Distributive Education Materials. A Resource Guide. Vocational Special Needs Lending Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kok, Marilyn R., Ed.

    This resource guide, one of a series of annotated bibliographies describing the collection of the lending library of the Vocational Special Needs (VSN) Program at Texas A&M University, lists available materials dealing with marketing and distributive education. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: instructional…

  18. Survey of Materials Development Needs in the Less Commonly Taught Languages. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Charles W.; Galloway, Ann

    A project surveyed the instructional materials development needs of the less commonly taught languages (LCTLs) language teaching community. The national survey in 1992 covered 82 languages and surveyed approximately 1,000 language course instructors and program directors at national resource centers and universities in the United States receiving…

  19. Active Learning for Creating Innovators: Employability Skills beyond Industrial Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ito, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, Japan's Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology initiated a project entitled "Improving Higher Education for Industrial Needs" in which 147 universities have participated. One of the main purposes of this project is to identify what industrial needs and help develop university students' employability…

  20. Automated technologies needed to prevent radioactive materials from reentering the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, David; Angelo, Joseph A., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Project SIREN (Search, Intercept, Retrieve, Expulsion Nuclear) has been created to identify and evaluate the technologies and operational strategies needed to rendezvous with and capture aerospace radioactive materials (e.g., a distressed or spent space reactor core) before such materials can reenter the terrestrial atmosphere and then to safely move these captured materials to an acceptable space destination for proper disposal. A major component of the current Project SIREN effort is the development of an interactive technology model (including a computerized data base) that explores in building block fashion the interaction of the technologies and procedures needed to successfully accomplish a SIREN mission. This SIREN model will include appropriate national and international technology elements-both contemporary and projected into the next century. To permit maximum flexibility and use, the SIREN technology data base is being programmed for use on 386-class PC's.

  1. Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

    2006-05-01

    Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

  2. Clad and duct materials property needs for sodium fast reactors: US perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, Stuart A

    2009-01-01

    In the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, the clad and duct materials property needs are driven by the program direction of using a fast reactor to transmute minor actinides. To economically perform transmutation requires fuels to be irradiated to at least 200/0 burnup before discharge and recycle. The cladding materials used in sllch high dose irradiations will experience at least 200 dpa of exposure. The requirements are that the cladding must contain the fuel until discharge and the duct must maintain ductility and mechanical strength to direct the sodium coolant and withdraw the fuel at discharge. Presently, achieving a bumup of 20% in fast reactor fuels is a significant challenge. The materials property needs for clad materials are the following in order of importance: (1) Radiation resistance: the material must be tolerant of radiation damage up to 200 dpa or greater depending on the final burnup desired at temperatures ranging from 350-600 C (temperature range for maximum dose is 400-500 C). Thus, the material must be tolerant of swelling, irradiation creep, and embrittlement effects. (2) Mechanical properties: tensile properties (strength, ductility), creep resistance, fracture toughness and fatigue resistance must all sufficient to contain the fuel during irradiation and discharge. (3) Fuel Clad Chemical Interaction: the cladding must be resistant to chemical interaction with the fuel during irradiation to prevent clad failure. (4) Fabrication and joining: the material must be able to be fabricated into component parts and joined to contain the fuel during the irradiation and during discharge. (5) Corrosion resistance: the material must be tolerant of the sodium coolant, with minimal corrosion rate. (6) Reprocessing: the cladding must be dissolvable to enable fuel reprocessing. (7) Long-term stability: the clad and duct materials must be stable through 6 or more years of irradiation depending on the final fuel burnup desired. (8) Thermal properties: thermal

  3. Impact of Inquiry-Oriented Curriculum Materials Modified to Provide Better Access for Special Needs Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Julia K.; Slater, T. F.

    2006-12-01

    In early 2006, the Lawrence Hall of Science conducted a national field-test of a new GEMS space science curriculum package for middle school students which they had developed. LHS collected preand post-test data for each unit based on student work samples. These data were tagged with whether or not students had an individualized education plan. During this field-testing, we modified a subset of the curriculum materials so that they could be delivered via computer mediated instruction for the students in a subset of the field-test classrooms in order to determine if the students in the classrooms using the curriculum modified for computer mediated instruction scored differently on the assessments than students in the larger assessment database. Results suggest that many students, not just those with special needs, demonstrate greater achievement gains using materials modified using the principles of best practice for special needs students.

  4. 77 FR 31690 - Proposed Information Collection (Rehabilitation Needs Inventory) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-29

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Rehabilitation Needs Inventory) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY... information needed to determine a claimant's entitlement to vocational rehabilitation services. DATES: Written... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Rehabilitation Needs Inventory...

  5. Materials and other needs for advanced phase change memory (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa, Norma E.

    2015-09-01

    Phase change memory (PCM), with its long history, may now hold its brightest promise to date. This bright future is being fueled by the "push" from big data. PCM is a non-volatile memory technology used to create solid-state random access memory devices that operate based the resistance properties of materials. Employing the electrical resistance differences-as opposed to differences in charge stored-between the amorphous and crystalline phases of the material, PCM can store bits, namely one's and zero's. Indeed, owing to the method of storage, PCM can in fact be designed to hold multiple bits thus leading to a high-density technology twice the storage density and less than half the cost of DRAM, the main kind found in typical personal computers. It has been long known that PCM can fill a need gap that spans 3 decades in performance from DRAM to solid state drive (NAND Flash). Furthermore, PCM devices can lead to performance and reliability improvements essential to enabling significant steps forward to supporting big data centric computing. This talk will focus on the science and challenges of aggressive scaling to realize the density needed, how this scaling challenge is intertwined with materials needs for endurance into the giga-cycles, and the associated forefront research aiming to realizing multi-level functionality into these nanoscale programmable resistor devices.

  6. Automated technologies needed to prevent radioactive materials from reentering the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, David; Angelo, Joseph A., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Project SIREN (Search, Intercept, Retrieve, Expulsion Nuclear) was created to identify and evaluate the technologies and operational strategies needed to rendezvous with and capture aerospace radioactive materials (e.g., a distressed or spent space reactor core) before such materials can reenter the terrestrial atmosphere and then to safely move these captured materials to an acceptable space destination for proper disposal. A major component of the current project SIREN effort is the development of an interactive technology model (including a computerized data base) that explores, in building-block fashion, the interaction of the technologies and procedures needed to successfully accomplish a SIREN mission. The SIREN model will include appropriate national and international technology elements--both contemporary and projected into the next century. To obtain maximum flexibility and use, the SIREN technology data base is being programmed for use on 286-class PC's. The major technical elements for a successful SIREN mission include: ground and space-based tracking, launch vehicles of needed payload capacity, telerobotic systems, sensors, capture technologies, and space transport and disposal. However, Project SIREN also will impose specialized requirements including the use of dextrous aerospace systems capable of properly functioning in intense radiation and thermal environments.

  7. Active Surfaces and Interfaces of Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiming

    A variety of intriguing surface patterns have been observed on developing natural systems, ranging from corrugated surface of white blood cells at nanometer scales to wrinkled dog skins at millimeter scales. To mimetically harness functionalities of natural morphologies, artificial transformative skin systems by using soft active materials have been rationally designed to generate versatile patterns for a variety of engineering applications. The study of the mechanics and design of these dynamic surface patterns on soft active materials are both physically interesting and technologically important. This dissertation starts with studying abundant surface patterns in Nature by constructing a unified phase diagram of surface instabilities on soft materials with minimum numbers of physical parameters. Guided by this integrated phase diagram, an electroactive system is designed to investigate a variety of electrically-induced surface instabilities of elastomers, including electro-creasing, electro-cratering, electro-wrinkling and electro-cavitation. Combing experimental, theoretical and computational methods, the initiation, evolution and transition of these instabilities are analyzed. To apply these dynamic surface instabilities to serving engineering and biology, new techniques of Dynamic Electrostatic Lithography and electroactive anti-biofouling are demonstrated.

  8. Activation of accelerator construction materials by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katrík, P.; Mustafin, E.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Pavlovič, M.; Strašík, I.

    2015-12-01

    Activation data for an aluminum target irradiated by 200 MeV/u 238U ion beam are presented in the paper. The target was irradiated in the stacked-foil geometry and analyzed using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The purpose of the experiment was to study the role of primary particles, projectile fragments, and target fragments in the activation process using the depth profiling of residual activity. The study brought information on which particles contribute dominantly to the target activation. The experimental data were compared with the Monte Carlo simulations by the FLUKA 2011.2c.0 code. This study is a part of a research program devoted to activation of accelerator construction materials by high-energy (⩾200 MeV/u) heavy ions at GSI Darmstadt. The experimental data are needed to validate the computer codes used for simulation of interaction of swift heavy ions with matter.

  9. What I Need to Know about Physical Activity and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guide from the National Institute on Aging . Do Strength Training to Build Muscle Strength training is a light to moderate physical activity that ... a man or a woman, you can do strength training with hand weights, elastic bands, or weight machines ...

  10. Astronomy Outreach Activities for Special Needs Children and Their Families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D.

    2010-08-01

    I present the results of two NASA-IDEAS/STScI sponsored astronomy outreach programs for seriously ill children and their families staying at the Ronald McDonald House of Long Island (New Hyde Park, NY) and for children hospitalized at the Children's Medical Center, Winthrop University Hospital (Mineola, NY). These programs are designed for children of all ages and include STSCi's Tonight's Sky (monthly guide to the sky); telescope observations of the Moon, Sun, planets, nebulae, and stars; and hands-on activities. During cloudy weather remote/robotic telescope observations are shown. Edible demonstrations using chocolate, marshmallows, and popcorn are used to stimulate interest. The staff at the Ronald McDonald House and Children's Medical Center are being trained to use the telescope and to do demonstrations. These educational activities help children and their families learn about astronomy while providing a diversion to take their minds off their illness during a stressful time.

  11. Active Shooters: What Emergency Nurses Need to Know.

    PubMed

    Palestis, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Active shooter incidents have been on the rise in the United States in the last 2 decades, specifically events occurring in public areas traditionally considered safe such as churches, schools, and hospitals. An examination of historical events shows that the emergency department (ED) nurse must be equipped to handle any situation that may arise, including the increasing likelihood of an active shooter situation. Hospital response to these occurrences is changing, and protocols for staff response are being adjusted on a regular basis. Immediate response, postevent actions, and evidence collection procedures must be a part of the ED nurses' ongoing education. Lessons learned from events that have occurred must be examined so ED nurses can be more aware and ready to respond to the increasing chance of an event such as this occurring in their ED. PMID:27195928

  12. Plasmonic Biofoam: A Versatile Optically Active Material.

    PubMed

    Tian, Limei; Luan, Jingyi; Liu, Keng-Ku; Jiang, Qisheng; Tadepalli, Sirimuvva; Gupta, Maneesh K; Naik, Rajesh R; Singamaneni, Srikanth

    2016-01-13

    Owing to their ability to confine and manipulate light at the nanoscale, plasmonic nanostructures are highly attractive for a broad range of applications. While tremendous progress has been made in the synthesis of size- and shape-controlled plasmonic nanostructures, their integration with other materials and application in solid-state is primarily through their assembly on rigid two-dimensional (2D) substrates, which limits the plasmonically active space to a few nanometers above the substrate. In this work, we demonstrate a simple method to create plasmonically active three-dimensional biofoams by integrating plasmonic nanostructures with highly porous biomaterial aerogels. We demonstrate that plasmonic biofoam is a versatile optically active platform that can be harnessed for numerous applications including (i) ultrasensitive chemical detection using surface-enhanced Raman scattering; (ii) highly efficient energy harvesting and steam generation through plasmonic photothermal heating; and (iii) optical control of enzymatic activity by triggered release of biomolecules encapsulated within the aerogel. Our results demonstrate that 3D plasmonic biofoam exhibits significantly higher sensing, photothermal, and loading efficiency compared to conventional 2D counterparts. The design principles and processing methodology of plasmonic aerogels demonstrated here can be broadly applied in the fabrication of other functional foams. PMID:26630376

  13. [Knowledge about sexuality and sex behavior in university students with visual impairment: need of educational materials].

    PubMed

    López Jaime, P; Santos Ortíz, M C; Dávila Torres, R R; Torres, L; Díaz, L

    2001-09-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the knowledge about sexuality (including STD/HIV/AIDS), the sexual practices more frequents and sexuality education sources in a group of students with visual impairments. A self administered questionnaire was utilized in 50 students with visual impairment. Descriptive statistics were utilized. Seventy six percent (76.0%) of the participants presented a high knowledge about sexuality and 22.0% presented moderated knowledge. The no penetrative sexual practice more frequent was corporal caress (82.0%) and the penetrative was penis-vagina (74.0%). The source of sexuality education most common was the conferences (83.9%). Although, in general, the knowledge about sexuality was high, there are "gaps" in them. There is the need to develop educational materials adapted to the needs of the studied population.

  14. Photonic crystals with active organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yeheng

    The concept of photonic crystals, which involves periodically arranged dielectrics that form a new type of material having novel photonic properties, was first proposed about two decades ago. Since then, a number of applications in photonic technology have been explored. Specifically, organic and hybrid photonic crystals are promising because of the unique advantages of the organic materials. A one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal (multilayer) has high reflectance across a certain wavelength range. We report on studies of 1D multilayer polymer films that were fabricated using spin-coating, free film stacking, and co-extrusion techniques. For example, a stack fabricated by placing a laser dye-doped gain medium between two multilayer reflecting polymer films forms a micro-resonator laser or distributed Bragg laser. The resulting laser system is made entirely of plastic and is only several tens of micrometers in thickness. When the gain, a dye-doped medium, comprises one type of a two-type multilayer film, it results a laser exhibiting distributed feedback. At the edge of the photonic band, the group velocity becomes small and the density of photon states becomes high, which leads to laser emission. Such distributed feedback lasers were fabricated using the co-extrusion technique. The refractive indices and the photonic lattice determine the photonic band gap, which can be tuned by changing these parameters. Materials with Kerr nonlinearity exhibit a change in refractive index depending on the incident intensity of the light. To demonstrate such switching, electrochemical etching techniques on silicon wafers were used to form two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals. By incorporating the nonlinear organic material into the 2D structure, we have made all-optical switches. The reflection of a beam from the 2D photonic crystal can be controlled by another beam because it induces a refractive index change in the active material by altering the reflection band. A mid

  15. Advanced Rankine and Brayton cycle power systems: Materials needs and opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisaffe, S. J.; Guentert, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    Conceptual advanced potassium Rankine and closed Brayton power conversion cycles offer the potential for improved efficiency over steam systems through higher operating temperatures. However, for utility service of at least 100,000 hours, materials technology advances will be needed for such high temperature systems. Improved alloys and surface protection must be developed and demonstrated to resist coal combustion gases as well as potassium corrosion or helium surface degradation at high temperatures. Extensions in fabrication technology are necessary to produce large components of high temperature alloys. Long time property data must be obtained under environments of interest to assure high component reliability.

  16. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Survey of Materials Research and Development Needs to Support Early Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Shaber; G. Baccaglini; S. Ball; T. Burchell; B. Corwin; T. Fewell; M. Labar; P. MacDonald; P. Rittenhouse; Russ Vollam; F. Southworth

    2003-01-01

    The VHTR reference concept is a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. It is expected that the VHTR will be purchased in the future as either an electricity producing plant with a direct cycle gas turbine or a hydrogen producing (or other process heat application) plant. The process heat version of the VHTR will require that an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and primary gas circulator be located in an adjoining power conversion vessel. A third VHTR mission - actinide burning - can be accomplished with either the hydrogen-production or gas turbine designs. The first ''demonstration'' VHTR will produce both electricity and hydrogen using the IHX to transfer the heat to either a hydrogen production plant or the gas turbine. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. The purpose of this report is to identify the materials research and development needs for the VHTR. To do this, we focused on the plant design described in Section 2, which is similar to the GT-MHR plant design (850 C core outlet temperature). For system or component designs that present significant material challenges (or far greater expense) there may be some viable design alternatives or options that can reduce development needs or allow use of available (cheaper) materials. Nevertheless, we were not able to assess those alternatives in the time allotted for this report and, to move forward with this material research and development assessment, the authors of this report felt that it was necessary to use a GT-MHR type design as the baseline design.

  17. 77 FR 24269 - Proposed Information Collection (Description of Materials) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... information needed to determine if proposed construction material meets regulatory requirements and if the...-1852 is used to document material used in the construction of a dwelling or specially adapted housing... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Description of Materials) Activity: Comment Request...

  18. IAEA Inspections for Undeclared and Declared Activities: Is a More Robust Approach Needed?

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Schanfein

    2009-07-01

    The United States has long supported a strong international safeguards system and for many years has served as the foremost supplier of technology, equipment, and training to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In doing so, it drew in many instances on DOE sponsored R&D and training that was directed towards domestic safeguards and then adapted for IAEA purposes. This was relatively straightforward because of the strong overlap between the development of nuclear material accountancy measures needed for both domestic and international purposes. Two factors have emerged that have made this strong reliance on domestic measures less and less able to be a source of support for the IAEA. One is the shift by the IAEA safeguards system towards detecting undeclared activities. The second is the shift of domestic attention away from nuclear material accountancy and towards physical protection. As a result, a gap in US sponsored R&D and training relevant to international safeguards has developed. The NNSA Next Generation Safeguards Initiative and the DOE NA-22 Safeguards R&D program are intended to help fill this gap and, thereby, permit the U.S. to remain as the pre-eminent supplier of technology for international safeguards purposes. In this context, IAEA challenges have been examined from the perspective of detecting the diversion of nuclear material from declared stocks; detecting undeclared production of nuclear material and activities at locations declared under INFCIRC/153; and detecting undeclared nuclear material and activities elsewhere in a state. Of these, the detection of undeclared nuclear material and activities is, perhaps, the IAEA’s most significant challenge. It is a challenge that even the international community finds difficult to meet because of the scope and the geographic scale of the problem, the technical constraints, the knowledge required, and the significant resources needed to deploy effective systems world-wide (e.g., satellite

  19. Materialism and well-being among Chinese college students: the mediating role of basic psychological need satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongjie; Yao, Meilin; Yan, Wenfan

    2014-10-01

    Based on self-determination theory, this study explored the potential mediating role of basic psychological need satisfaction in the relationship between materialism and well-being among Chinese college students. The results showed that basic psychological need satisfaction partially mediated the relationship between materialism and life satisfaction and fully mediated the relationships among materialism and emotional well-being, subjective vitality, and self-actualization. The findings indicated the importance of considering both subjective and psychological well-being and the interpretative power of basic psychological need satisfaction and Chinese culture in the flow from materialism to well-being.

  20. Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) - Survey of Materials Research and Development Needs to Assess Viability

    SciTech Connect

    Philip E. MacDonald

    2003-09-01

    Supercritical water-cooled reactors (SCWRs) are among the most promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency [i.e., about 45% vs. 33% of current light water reactors (LWRs)] and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs achieve this with superior thermodynamic conditions (i.e., high operating pressure and temperature), and by reducing the containment volume and eliminating the need for recirculation and jet pumps, pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators and dryers. The reference SCWR design in the U.S. is a direct cycle, thermal spectrum, light-water-cooled and moderated reactor with an operating pressure of 25 MPa and inlet/outlet coolant temperature of 280/500 °C. The inlet flow splits, partly to a down-comer and partly to a plenum at the top of the reactor pressure vessel to flow downward through the core in special water rods to the inlet plenum. This strategy is employed to provide good moderation at the top of the core, where the coolant density is only about 15-20% that of liquid water. The SCWR uses a power conversion cycle similar to that used in supercritical fossil-fired plants: high- intermediate- and low-pressure turbines are employed with one moisture-separator re-heater and up to eight feedwater heaters. The reference power is 3575 MWt, the net electric power is 1600 MWe and the thermal efficiency is 44.8%. The fuel is low-enriched uranium oxide fuel and the plant is designed primarily for base load operation. The purpose of this report is to survey existing materials for fossil, fission and fusion applications and identify the materials research and development needed to establish the SCWR viabilitya with regard to possible materials of construction. The two most significant materials related factors in going from the current LWR designs to the SCWR are the increase in outlet coolant temperature from 300 to 500 °C and the possible compatibility issues associated with the supercritical water environment.

  1. 36 CFR 1254.6 - Do I need a researcher identification card to use archival materials at a NARA facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... identification card to use archival materials at a NARA facility? 1254.6 Section 1254.6 Parks, Forests, and... card to use archival materials at a NARA facility? (a) Yes, you need a researcher identification card to use original archival materials at a NARA facility. See §§ 1254.8 and 1254.10 for information...

  2. Aligning Curriculum Materials with the Australian Curriculum: What Is Happening in the Field and What Needs to Be Done?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to inform the deliberations of a policymakers' working group by investigating what key actors in the materials' marketplace are doing to align digital and print-based materials with the Australian Curriculum and what steps need to be taken to deliver aligned materials to schools. Content analysis method was used to…

  3. 10 CFR 30.72 - Schedule C-Quantities of radioactive materials requiring consideration of the need for an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Schedule C-Quantities of radioactive materials requiring... § 30.72 Schedule C—Quantities of radioactive materials requiring consideration of the need for an emergency plan for responding to a release. Radioactive material 1 Release fraction Quantity...

  4. 10 CFR 30.72 - Schedule C-Quantities of radioactive materials requiring consideration of the need for an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Schedule C-Quantities of radioactive materials requiring... § 30.72 Schedule C—Quantities of radioactive materials requiring consideration of the need for an emergency plan for responding to a release. Radioactive material 1 Release fraction Quantity...

  5. Examples of reference material data needed for LBB analysis derived from WGCS-EC-DGXI studies

    SciTech Connect

    Petrequin, P.; Houssin, B.; Guinovart, J.

    1997-04-01

    Mechanical data collected through the sponsorship of the Activity Group 3 <<Materials>> of the Working Group Codes and Standards of DG XI European Commission are pointed out to illustrate their potential use for Leak Before Break analyses. Most of the tensile, fatigue, creep and fracture toughness data have been generated for stainless steels, mainly on modified type 316 L (N), selected for the Super Phoenix LMFBR. Trends for ongoing programs and future works on C-Mn and MnNiMo low alloy steels are provided.

  6. Structures and materials technology needs for communications and remote sensing spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gronet, M. J.; Jensen, G. A.; Hoskins, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    This report documents trade studies conducted from the perspective of a small spacecraft developer to determine and quantify the structures and structural materials technology development needs for future commercial and NASA small spacecraft to be launched in the period 1999 to 2005. Emphasis is placed on small satellites weighing less than 1800 pounds for two focus low-Earth orbit missions: commercial communications and remote sensing. The focus missions are characterized in terms of orbit, spacecraft size, performance, and design drivers. Small spacecraft program personnel were interviewed to determine their technology needs, and the results are summarized. A systems-analysis approach for quantifying the benefits of inserting advanced state-of-the-art technologies into a current reference, state-of-the-practice small spacecraft design is developed and presented. This approach is employed in a set of abbreviated trade studies to quantify the payoffs of using a subset of 11 advanced technologies selected from the interview results The 11 technology development opportunities are then ranked based on their relative payoff. Based on the strong potential for significant benefits, recommendations are made to pursue development of 8 and the 11 technologies. Other important technology development areas identified are recommended for further study.

  7. Need for Cognition and Active Information Search in Small Student Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curseu, Petru Lucian

    2011-01-01

    In a sample of 213 students organized in 44 groups this study tests the impact of need for cognition on active information search by using a multilevel analysis. The results show that group members with high need for cognition seek more advice in task related issues than those with low need for cognition and this pattern of information exchange is…

  8. 75 FR 6793 - Proposed Information Collection (Rehabilitation Needs Inventory) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Rehabilitation Needs Inventory) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY... information needed to determine a claimant's entitlement to vocational rehabilitation services. DATES: Written...: Rehabilitation Needs Inventory (Chapter 31, Title 38 U.S. Code, VA Form 28-1902w. OMB Control Number:...

  9. Vibration attenuation of aircraft structures utilizing active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnes, Gregory S.; Whitehouse, Stephen R.; Mackaman, John R.

    1993-09-01

    The need for active vibration control for airborne laser systems was demonstrated during the late 1970s by the Airborne Laser Laboratory. Other possible applications include sonic fatigue alleviation, reduction of buffet induced fatigue, vibration control for embedded antennae, and active aeroelastic control. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of active vibration control technology and its application to aircraft. Classification of classic aircraft vibration problems and currently available solutions are used to provide a framework for the study. Current solutions are classified as being either passive or active and by the methodology (modal modification or addition) used to reduce vibration. Possible applications for this technology in aircraft vibration control are presented within this framework to demonstrate the increased versatility active materials technologies provide the designer. An in- depth study of an active pylon to reduce wing/store vibration is presented as an example. Finally, perceived gaps in the existing technology base are identified and both on-going and future research plans in these areas are discussed.

  10. Secrecy vs. the need for ecological information: challenges to environmental activism in Russia.

    PubMed

    Jandl, T

    1998-01-01

    This article identifies the lessons learned from the Nikitin case study in Russia. The Nikitin case involves the analysis of sources of radioactive contamination in several Russian counties and in the Russian Northern Fleet. Norway was interested in the issue due to proximity to the storage sites. The issue involved national security and environmental protection. It was learned that mixing national security issues with environmental issues offers dangerous and multiple challenges. Environmental groups must build relationships with a wide audience. International security policy must include the issues of globalization of trade and the spread of environmental problems into the global commons (oceans and atmosphere). The risk of an environmentally dangerous accident as a consequence of Cold War activities is greater than the risk of nuclear war. Secrecy in military affairs is not justified when there is inadequate storage of nuclear weapons and contaminated materials. In Russia, the concern is great due to their economic transition and shortages of funds for even the most basic needs, which excludes nuclear waste clean up. The Bellona Foundation studied the extent of nuclear pollution from military nuclear reactors in the Kola peninsula of northwest Russia, in 1994 and 1996. Russian security police arrested one of the report authors for alleged national security violations. A valuable lesson learned was that local Russian environmental groups needed international support. The military nuclear complex poses an enormous hazard. Limiting inspections is an unacceptable national security risk. The new Russian law on state secrets is too broad. PMID:12321718

  11. Secrecy vs. the need for ecological information: challenges to environmental activism in Russia.

    PubMed

    Jandl, T

    1998-01-01

    This article identifies the lessons learned from the Nikitin case study in Russia. The Nikitin case involves the analysis of sources of radioactive contamination in several Russian counties and in the Russian Northern Fleet. Norway was interested in the issue due to proximity to the storage sites. The issue involved national security and environmental protection. It was learned that mixing national security issues with environmental issues offers dangerous and multiple challenges. Environmental groups must build relationships with a wide audience. International security policy must include the issues of globalization of trade and the spread of environmental problems into the global commons (oceans and atmosphere). The risk of an environmentally dangerous accident as a consequence of Cold War activities is greater than the risk of nuclear war. Secrecy in military affairs is not justified when there is inadequate storage of nuclear weapons and contaminated materials. In Russia, the concern is great due to their economic transition and shortages of funds for even the most basic needs, which excludes nuclear waste clean up. The Bellona Foundation studied the extent of nuclear pollution from military nuclear reactors in the Kola peninsula of northwest Russia, in 1994 and 1996. Russian security police arrested one of the report authors for alleged national security violations. A valuable lesson learned was that local Russian environmental groups needed international support. The military nuclear complex poses an enormous hazard. Limiting inspections is an unacceptable national security risk. The new Russian law on state secrets is too broad.

  12. Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE): Overview, Accomplishments and Future Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Pippin, Gary; Jenkins, Philip P.; Walters, Robert J.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Palusinski, Iwona; Lorentzen, Justin R.

    2014-01-01

    Materials and devices used on the exterior of spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) are subjected to environmental threats that can cause degradation in material properties, possibly threatening spacecraft mission success. These threats include: atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet and x-ray radiation, charged particle radiation, temperature extremes and thermal cycling, micrometeoroid and debris impacts, and contamination. Space environmental threats vary greatly based on spacecraft materials, thicknesses and stress levels, and the mission environment and duration. For more than a decade the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) has enabled the study of the long duration environmental durability of spacecraft materials in the LEO environment. The overall objective of MISSE is to test the stability and durability of materials and devices in the space environment in order to gain valuable knowledge on the performance of materials in space, as well as to enable lifetime predictions of new materials that may be used in future space flight. MISSE is a series of materials flight experiments, which are attached to the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS). Individual experiments were loaded onto suitcase-like trays, called Passive Experiment Containers (PECs). The PECs were transported to the ISS in the Space Shuttle cargo bay and attached to, and removed from, the ISS during extravehicular activities (EVAs). The PECs were retrieved after one or more years of space exposure and returned to Earth enabling post-flight experiment evaluation. MISSE is a multi-organization project with participants from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Department of Defense (DoD), industry and academia. MISSE has provided a platform for environmental durability studies for thousands of samples and numerous devices, and it has produced many tangible impacts. Ten PECs (and one smaller tray) have been flown, representing MISSE 1 through MISSE

  13. Supplying materials needed for grain growth characterizations of nano-grained UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Yun, Di; Jamison, Laura M.; Lian, Jie; Yao, Tiankei

    2015-09-30

    This activity is supported by the US Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Fuels Product Line (FPL) and aims at providing experimental data for the validation of the mesoscale simulation code MARMOT. MARMOT is a mesoscale multiphysics code that predicts the coevolution of microstructure and properties within reactor fuel during its lifetime in the reactor. It is an important component of the Moose-Bison-Marmot (MBM) code suite that has been developed by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to enable next generation fuel performance modeling capability as part of the NEAMS Program FPL. In order to ensure the accuracy of the microstructure based materials models being developed within the MARMOT code, extensive validation efforts must be carried out. In this report, we summarize our preliminary synchrotron radiation experiments at APS to determine the grain size of nanograin UO2. The methodology and experimental setup developed in this experiment can directly apply to the proposed in-situ grain growth measurements. The investigation of the grain growth kinetics was conducted based on isothermal annealing and grain growth characterization as functions of duration and temperature. The kinetic parameters such as activation energy for grain growth for UO2 with different stoichiometry are obtained and compared with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.

  14. Investigating Informatics Activity, Control, and Training Needs in Large, Medium, and Small Health Departments

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Ryan; Yang, Biru

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A recent National Association of City & County Health Officials survey shed light on informatics workforce development needs. Local health departments (LHDs) of various jurisdictional sizes and control over informatics may differ on training needs and activity. Understanding the precise nature of this variation will allow stakeholders to appropriately develop workforce development tools to advance the field. Objective: To understand the informatics training needs for LHDs of different jurisdictional sizes. Methods: Survey responses were analyzed by comparing training needs and LHD population size. Results: Larger health departments consistently reported having greater informatics-related capacity and informatics-related training needs. Quantitative data analysis was identified as a primary need for large LHDs. In addition, LHDs that report higher control of informatics/information technology were able to engage in more informatics activities. Conclusion: Smaller LHDs need additional resources to improve informatics-related capacity and engagement with the field. PMID:27684621

  15. Adapting Classroom Activities for Multiple Needs and Purposes: "Find Someone Who..."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Ken

    1994-01-01

    An English-as-a-Foreign Language instructor's repertoire of effective classroom activities is extended not only through acquiring useful, new ideas, but through adapting these activities (new and old) for varied needs and purposes. This article focuses on the potential for adaptation of one popular, communicative activity: "Find someone who..."…

  16. Activation of materials proposed for use in superconducting linac applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.L.; Snead, C.L.; Greene, G.A.; Chan, K.C.D.; Safa, H.

    1998-01-01

    Samples of construction materials proposed for use in both superconducting and conventional high-power linear accelerators have been activated with 800 and 2,000 MeV protons to study the decay characteristics of these activated materials. Irradiation times ranged from 10 minutes to 18.67 hours. The decay characteristics of these activated materials were measured and compared to calculated decay curves based on simplified assumptions.

  17. Activation and waste management considerations of fusion materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, E. T.; Saji, G.

    1994-09-01

    Inconel-625 (Ni625), SS316, Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64), ferritic steel (FS), reduced activity ferritic steel (RAFS), manganese steel (Mn-steel), and V5Cr5Ti (V55), were examined for a near-term experimental D-T fueled fusion power reactor with respect to waste management. Activation calculations for these materials were performed assuming one year continuous operation at 1 MW/m 2 wall loading. The results show that the blanket components made of V55, Ti64, Mn-steel, and FS will be allowed for transfer to an on-site dry storage facility after 10 years of cooling after discharge. To transport the discharged blanket components to a permanent disposal site, the cooling time needed can be within 10 years for Ti64 and V55, provided that the impurities (mainly Ni, Nb and Mo) be controlled to an acceptable level. The RAFS and Mn-steel will need about 30 y cooling time because of its Fe and Mn contents. Ni625, 316SS, and FS, however, will require more than 50000 y cooling time because of their Nb and Mo contents. The RAFS, Mn-steel, Ti64 and V55 can be shallow-land wastes if the impurity level for Nb and Mo is dropped below 10 ppm.

  18. Potential active materials for photo-supercapacitor: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. H.; Lim, H. N.; Hayase, S.; Harrison, I.; Pandikumar, A.; Huang, N. M.

    2015-11-01

    The need for an endless renewable energy supply, typically through the utilization of solar energy in most applications and systems, has driven the expansion, versatility, and diversification of marketed energy storage devices. Energy storage devices such as hybridized dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC)-capacitors and DSSC-supercapacitors have been invented for energy reservation. The evolution and vast improvement of these devices in terms of their efficiencies and flexibilities have further sparked the invention of the photo-supercapacitor. The idea of coupling a DSSC and supercapacitor as a complete energy conversion and storage device arose because the solar energy absorbed by dye molecules can be efficiently transferred and converted to electrical energy by adopting a supercapacitor as the energy delivery system. The conversion efficiency of a photo-supercapacitor is mainly dependent on the use of active materials during its fabrication. The performances of the dye, photoactive metal oxide, counter electrode, redox electrolyte, and conducting polymer are the primary factors contributing to high-energy-efficient conversion, which enhances the performance and shelf-life of a photo-supercapacitor. Moreover, the introduction of compact layer as a primary adherent film has been earmarked as an effort in enhancing power conversion efficiency of solar cell. Additionally, the development of electrolyte-free solar cell such as the invention of hole-conductor or perovskite solar cell is currently being explored extensively. This paper reviews and analyzes the potential active materials for a photo-supercapacitor to enhance the conversion and storage efficiencies.

  19. Innovative Resources Based on ICTs and Authentic Materials to Improve EFL Students' Communicative Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González Otero, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    Our global society and our current communication needs have put a strain on English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teaching, since common resources such as textbooks may fail to adapt to the needs and interests of our students. The present action research study aims at identifying EFL students' communicative needs and developing their oral skills…

  20. A Call for Improvement: The Need for Research-Based Materials in American Sign Language Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoryk, Robertta

    2010-01-01

    Educational reform and financial considerations have emphasized accountability and use of research-based materials and strategies in education. Simultaneously, with growing enrollment in elementary, secondary, and postsecondary ASL programs, the number of commercially marketed materials has grown. Do such materials stand up under scrutiny when…

  1. 78 FR 3403 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Financial Education Content Needs Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION Agency Information Collection Activities: Financial Education Content Needs Survey AGENCY... often the respondents would like to receive content from CFTC, the format in which the respondents...

  2. 77 FR 47705 - Agency Information Collection (Rehabilitation Needs Inventory) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Rehabilitation Needs Inventory) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY...: Rehabilitation Needs Inventory (RNI), VA Form 28-1902w. OMB Control Number: 2900-0092. Type of Review: Revision... disabled veterans who submitted an application for vocational rehabilitation benefits. VA will use...

  3. 75 FR 20427 - Agency Information Collection (Rehabilitation Needs Inventory) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Rehabilitation Needs Inventory) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY...: Title: Rehabilitation Needs Inventory (Chapter 31, Title 38 U. S. Code, VA Form 28-1902w. OMB Control... rehabilitation benefits. VA will use data collected to determine the types of rehabilitation program the...

  4. 77 FR 35114 - Agency Information Collection (NCA PreNeed Burial Planning) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... OMB Desk Officer, OMB Human Resources and Housing Branch, New Executive Office Building, Room 10235... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (NCA PreNeed Burial Planning) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY... INFORMATION: Title: NCA PreNeed Burial Planning, VA Form 40-10007. OMB Control Number: 2900--New. Type...

  5. Behavioral science in video games for children's diet and physical activity change: Key research needs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Innovative intervention programs are needed to overcome the limitations in previous programs that promoted change in diabetes risk behaviors in children. Serious video games show promise of changing dietary and physical activity behaviors, but research is needed on the optimal design of behavior-cha...

  6. Physical Activity and Movement Proficiency: The Need for a Biocultural Approach.

    PubMed

    Malina, Robert M; Cumming, Sean P; Coelho E Silva, Manuel J

    2016-05-01

    "Gaps in Our Knowledge" are discussed in the context of the need to integrate biological and behavioral factors in a biocultural approach to physical activity and movement proficiency. Specific issues considered include outdoor play, organized and informal activity, biological maturation, tracking of activity, development of movement proficiency, and individual differences. Studies considered are largely based on youth in economically better-off, developed countries in the western culture context. There is a need to extend studies of physical activity and movement proficiency to different cultural contexts. PMID:27137170

  7. Active nematic materials with substrate friction.

    PubMed

    Thampi, Sumesh P; Golestanian, Ramin; Yeomans, Julia M

    2014-12-01

    Active turbulence in dense active systems is characterized by high vorticity on a length scale that is large compared to that of individual entities. We describe the properties of active turbulence as momentum propagation is screened by frictional damping. As friction is increased, the spacing between the walls in the nematic director field decreases as a consequence of the more rapid velocity decays. This leads to, first, a regime with more walls and an increased number of topological defects, and then to a jammed state in which the walls deliminate bands of opposing flow, analogous to the shear bands observed in passive complex fluids. PMID:25615093

  8. USGS Reference Materials Program: Serving the Needs of the Global Analytical Community

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, Ruth E.; Wilson, Stephen A.

    2007-01-01

    Every year in the United States, millions of measurements are made on the chemical composition of items that affect us on a daily basis. The accuracy of these measurements is routinely determined by the analysis of appropriate reference materials. In the field of earth science, reference materials are particularly important because they help us develop a better understanding of the processes that have shaped, and continue to shape the world around us. USGS reference materials are distributed internationally to organizations involved in geochemical and environmental analysis, instrumentation and methods development, and industrial research and quality assurance. Reference materials are widely used in the development and validation of geochemical models used by the USGS.

  9. Biodegradation and biocompatibility of mechanically active magnetoelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Hal R.; DeRouin, Andrew; Wright, Samantha; Riedemann, Travor M.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Rajachar, Rupak M.; Ghee Ong, Keat

    2014-09-01

    Magnetoelastic (ME) materials have many advantages for use as sensors and actuators due to their wireless, passive nature. This paper describes the application of ME materials as biodegradable implants with controllable degradation rates. Experiments have been conducted to show that degradation rates of ME materials are dependent on the material compositions. In addition, it was shown that the degradation rates of the ME materials can be controlled remotely by applying a magnetic field, which causes the ME materials to generate low-magnitude vibrations that hasten their degradation rates. Another concern of ME materials for medical applications is biocompatibility. Indirect cytotoxicity analyses were performed on two types of ME materials: Metglas™ 2826 MB (FeNiMoB) and iron-gallium alloy. While results indicate Metglas is not biocompatible, the degradation products of iron-gallium materials have shown no adverse effects on cell viability. Overall, these results present the possibility of using ME materials as biodegradable, magnetically-controlled active implants.

  10. Forecasting Price Increase Needs for Library Materials: The University of California Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Dennis

    1984-01-01

    Examines steps taken by the University of California to establish an adequate base library book budget and to measure price increase needs to maintain budgeted acquisition rates. The Voigt/Susskind Acquisitions Model, securing adequate funding for price increase needs, and the university's price increase justification are highlighted. (EJS)

  11. Teachers and Science Curriculum Materials: Where We Are and Where We Need to Go

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elizabeth A.; Janssen, Fred J. J. M.; Van Driel, Jan H.

    2016-01-01

    Curriculum materials serve as a key conceptual tool for science teachers, and better understanding how science teachers use these tools could help to improve both curriculum design and theory related to teacher learning and decision-making. The authors review the literature on teachers and science curriculum materials. The review is organised…

  12. Robotics for Nuclear Material Handling at LANL:Capabilities and Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Harden, Troy A; Lloyd, Jane A; Turner, Cameron J

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear material processing operations present numerous challenges for effective automation. Confined spaces, hazardous materials and processes, particulate contamination, radiation sources, and corrosive chemical operations are but a few of the significant hazards. However, automated systems represent a significant safety advance when deployed in place of manual tasks performed by human workers. The replacement of manual operations with automated systems has been desirable for nearly 40 years, yet only recently are automated systems becoming increasingly common for nuclear materials handling applications. This paper reviews several automation systems which are deployed or about to be deployed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for nuclear material handling operations. Highlighted are the current social and technological challenges faced in deploying automated systems into hazardous material handling environments and the opportunities for future innovations.

  13. In vitro antibacterial activity of different pulp capping materials

    PubMed Central

    Beltrami, Riccardo; Colombo, Marco; Ceci, Matteo; Dagna, Alberto; Chiesa, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background Direct pulp capping involves the application of a dental material to seal communications between the exposed pulp and the oral cavity (mechanical and carious pulp exposures) in an attempt to act as a barrier, protect the dental pulp complex and preserve its vitality. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare, by the agar disc diffusion test, the antimicrobial activity of six different pulp-capping materials: Dycal (Dentsply), Calcicur (Voco), Calcimol LC (Voco), TheraCal LC (Bisco), MTA Angelus (Angelus), Biodentine (Septodont). Material and Methods Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mutans strains were selected to evaluate the antimicrobial activity by the agar disc diffusion test of different pulp capping materials. Paper disks were impregnated whit each pulp capping materials and placed onto culture agar-plates pre-adsorbed with bacterial cells and further incubated for 24 h at 37°C. The growth inhibition zones around each pulp capping materials were recorded and compared for each bacterial strain. Results For the investigation of the antibacterial properties the ANOVA showed the presence of significant differences among the various materials. Tukey test showed that MTA-based materials induced lower growth inhibition zones. Conclusions MTA-based products show a discrete antibacterial activity varying from calcium hydroxide-based materials which present an higher antibacterial activity. Key words:Agar disc diffusion test, antimicrobial activity, calcium hydroxide, MTA, pulp capping materials. PMID:26644833

  14. Learning Needs and Activity Limitations of Elderly Japanese with Physical Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hori, Shigeo; Fujiwara, Mizuho

    2003-01-01

    A survey of 364 Japanese adults over 60 with physical disabilities found that 87% have learning needs in the areas of health care, communication, and leisure activities. Instrumental/social learning ranked higher among those with serious activity limitations. Expressive/communicative learning was more important for those with moderate limitations.…

  15. Basic Psychological Need Satisfaction in Leisure Activities and Adolescents' Life Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leversen, Ingrid; Danielsen, Anne G.; Birkeland, Marianne S.; Samdal, Oddrun

    2012-01-01

    Participation in leisure activities is an important arena for the positive psychological development of adolescents. The present study set out to examine the relationship between adolescents' satisfaction of the psychological needs for competence, relatedness, and autonomy in their participation in leisure activities and their perceived life…

  16. Leisure Activity Participation and Handicapped Populations: An Assessment of Research Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhoven, Peter J.; Goldstein, Judith E.

    Presented is a report of a conference on research needs in the area of leisure time activity for handicapped persons. Reviewed are the initial conference concept and its evaluation into five categories of concern (leisure concepts, attitudinal barriers, activity analysis, design/adaptation considerations, and education/counseling). Discussed are…

  17. Child's Play: An Activities and Materials Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trencher, Barbara R.

    This handbook, the third printing of the original 1976 edition, presents an eclectic combination of activities gathered from parents and teachers of preschool children, with a focus on the process rather than the product of learning. Its goal is the establishment of positive experiences and sound interpersonal relationships between adults and…

  18. Microscale damping using thin film active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerrigan, Catherine A.; Ho, Ken K.; Mohanchandra, K. P.; Carman, Gregory P.

    2007-04-01

    This paper focuses on understanding and developing a new approach to dampen MEMS structures using both experiments and analytical techniques. Thin film Nitinol and thin film Terfenol-D are evaluated as a damping solution to the micro scale damping problem. Stress induced twin boundary motion in Nitinol is used to passively dampen potentially damaging vibrations. Magnetic domain wall motion is used to passively dampen vibration in Terfenol-D. The thin films of Nitinol, Nitinol/Silicon laminates and Nitinol/Terfenol-D/Nickel laminates have been produced using a sputter deposition process and damping properties have been evaluated. Dynamic testing shows substantial damping (tan δ) measurable in each case. Nitinol film samples were tested in the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) to determine phase transformation temperatures. The twin boundary mechanism by which energy absorption occurs is present at all points below the Austenite start temperature (approximately 69°C in our film) and therefore allows damping at cold temperatures where traditional materials fail. Thin film in the NiTi/Si laminate was found to produce substantially higher damping (tan δ = 0.28) due to the change in loading condition. The NiTi/Si laminate sample was tested in bending allowing the twin boundaries to be reset by cyclic tensile and compressive loads. The thin film Terfenol-D in the Nitinol/Terfenol-D/Nickel laminate was shown to produce large damping (tan δ = 0.2). In addition to fabricating and testing, an analytical model of a heterogeneous layered thin film damping material was developed and compared to experimental work.

  19. Activation of a photosensitive pharmaceutical agent by a triboluminescent material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Stacey; Schreyer, Magdalena; Finlay, W. H.; Löbenberg, R.; Moussa, W.

    2006-03-01

    Given the recent emphasis on applications of triboluminescent materials, we investigate the ability of a triboluminescent material to activate a photosensitive pharmaceutical agent. Using compressed sucrose doped with wintergreen, which luminesces when fractured, we demonstrate the activation of riboflavin (vitamin B2), a photosensitizer. A product of activation is the highly reactive singlet oxygen. We add ascorbic acid (vitamin C), an antioxidant, and measure the amount of ascorbic acid oxidation to correlate with the amount of riboflavin activation. Up to 17% ascorbic acid oxidation is observed, indicating triboluminescence is worth exploring as a mechanism for activation of photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy.

  20. Activation of a photosensitive pharmaceutical agent by a triboluminescent material

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, Stacey; Schreyer, Magdalena; Finlay, W.H.; Loebenberg, R.; Moussa, W.

    2006-03-20

    Given the recent emphasis on applications of triboluminescent materials, we investigate the ability of a triboluminescent material to activate a photosensitive pharmaceutical agent. Using compressed sucrose doped with wintergreen, which luminesces when fractured, we demonstrate the activation of riboflavin (vitamin B2), a photosensitizer. A product of activation is the highly reactive singlet oxygen. We add ascorbic acid (vitamin C), an antioxidant, and measure the amount of ascorbic acid oxidation to correlate with the amount of riboflavin activation. Up to 17% ascorbic acid oxidation is observed, indicating triboluminescence is worth exploring as a mechanism for activation of photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy.

  1. Do We Need More "Doing" Activities or "Thinking" Activities in the Field Practicum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Mingun; Fortune, Anne E.

    2013-01-01

    How do MSW students learn new professional skills in the field practicum? Does students' reflection affect the use of other learning activities during the field practicum? Students in field practica participate in activities that involve observation, doing (participatory), and conceptual linkage. In this study of MSW students, conceptual…

  2. Hidden Uses of Presentation Software--The Ideal Tool for Making Customized Materials for Special Needs Students and Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilden, Deborah

    This paper discusses how presentation software can be used to design custom materials for a variety of people with special needs, including children and adults with low vision, people with developmental disabilities, and stroke patients with cognitive impairments. Benefits of using presentation software include: (1) presentation software gives the…

  3. How Can the Classroom Teacher Match Content Area Reading Materials with the Needs and Abilities of Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aukerman, Robert

    Teachers can match content reading materials with student needs and abilities in a number of ways. If textbooks are the main or only source, teachers can group students according to textbook difficulty, conduct student surveys of specific topics in the textbook, and use the textbook as a sampler or starting point for more in-depth studies of…

  4. All Health Plans Need CLAMS: Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Materials for Diverse Populations Can Overcome Language Barriers to Effective Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sandra; Gonzales, Virginia

    2000-01-01

    CLAMs are "Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Materials" designed for diverse populations to help them overcome language barriers to effective treatment. The demographic shift underway in the United States is making the country more linguistically diverse. Health plans need to accommodate this shift, because without information patients…

  5. Hospital materials managers need to be aware of actions that constitute legal acceptance.

    PubMed

    Decker, R

    1990-12-01

    A hospital invited bids for building materials for a hospital construction project. A supplier submitted a bid which asked the hospital to sign and return a trade association form contract. The hospital didn't return the form but used the supplier's bid as part of the general contract for the entire project and notified the supplier and the general contractor. Later, the supplier submitted a higher bid for the same material contending that the hospital hadn't accepted the first bid as they hadn't followed the instructions. The hospital materials manager feels that the bid was properly accepted. In this dialogue, Dr. Decker reviews the legal issues involved in the different ways of accepting an offer. PMID:10108690

  6. Sanitary Survey Training. The Need-to-Know Material. Instructor's Technical Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Anne, Ed.

    This manual, developed as an aid to state agencies who provide instruction to inspectors of water systems, is based on the minimum information that an inspector with limited experience needs to know to successfully assess a public water system. The manual is designed for use by individuals who are experts in the field of water systems and sanitary…

  7. Curriculum Materials for Teaching Students the Competencies Needed for Employment in Nonfarm Agricultural Business. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David L.; And Others

    Developed by means of a research project, this teaching guide includes five instructional modules in which competencies for agribusiness occupations are stressed. These competencies were identified from a review of the literature and evaluated by a jury of teachers and agribusinessmen in terms of qualifications needed for entry-level employment.…

  8. Educational Needs and Employment Trends of Environmental Hazardous Materials Technicians and Related Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudis, Paula M.; And Others

    A study was conducted to assess trends in the supply and demand for environmental hazardous materials (EHM) technical and related workers and to identify the skills and knowledge required of personnel in these positions. Information for the study was gathered through interviews, focus groups, and data from a mailed survey of employers of EHM…

  9. Archiving Web-Published Materials: A Needs Assessment of Librarians, Researchers, and Content Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Kathleen R.; Hsieh, Inga K.

    2008-01-01

    The Web-at-Risk project is a digital preservation project funded by the Library of Congress as part of the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program. The project is developing a Web archiving service to enable curators to build, store, and manage archived collections of Web-published materials captured largely from U.S.…

  10. Workshop on Measurement Needs for Local-Structure Determination in Inorganic Materials

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Igor; Vanderah, Terrell

    2008-01-01

    The functional responses (e.g., dielectric, magnetic, catalytic, etc.) of many industrially-relevant materials are controlled by their local structure—a term that refers to the atomic arrangements on a scale ranging from atomic (sub-nanometer) to several nanometers. Thus, accurate knowledge of local structure is central to understanding the properties of nanostructured materials, thereby placing the problem of determining atomic positions on the nanoscale—the so-called “nanostructure problem”—at the center of modern materials development. Today, multiple experimental techniques exist for probing local atomic arrangements; nonetheless, finding accurate comprehensive, and robust structural solutions for the nanostructured materials still remains a formidable challenge because any one of these methods yields only a partial view of the local structure. The primary goal of this 2-day NIST-sponsored workshop was to bring together experts in the key experimental and theoretical areas relevant to local-structure determination to devise a strategy for the collaborative effort required to develop a comprehensive measurement solution on the local scale. The participants unanimously agreed that solving the nanostructure problem—an ultimate frontier in materials characterization—necessitates a coordinated interdisciplinary effort that transcends the existing capabilities of any single institution, including national laboratories, centers, and user facilities. The discussions converged on an institute dedicated to local structure determination as the most viable organizational platform for successfully addressing the nanostructure problem. The proposed “institute” would provide an intellectual infrastructure for local structure determination by (1) developing and maintaining relevant computer software integrated in an open-source global optimization framework (Fig. 2), (2) connecting industrial and academic users with experts in measurement techniques, (3

  11. Alkali-activated cementitious materials: Mechanisms, microstructure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weimin

    The goal of this study was to examine the activation reaction, microstructure, properties, identify the mechanisms of activation, and achieve an enhanced understanding of activation processes occurring during the synthesis of alkali activated cementitious materials (AAC). The discussions classify the following categories. (1) alkali activated slag cement; (2) alkali activated portland-slag cement; (3) alkali activated fly ash-slag cement; (4) alkali activated pozzolana-lime cement; (5) alkali activated pozzolana cement. The activators involved are NaOH, KOH; Nasb2SOsb4;\\ Nasb2COsb3;\\ CaSOsb4, and soluble silicate of sodium and potassium. The effect of alkali activation on the microstructure of these materials were analyzed at the micro-nanometer scale by SEM, EDS, ESEM, and TEM. Also sp{29}Si and sp{27}Al MAS-NMR, IR, Raman, TGA, and DTA were performed to characterize the phase in these systems. Slag, fly ash, silica fume, as well as blended cements containing mixtures of these and other components were characterized. A set of ordinary portland cement paste samples served as a control. This study confirmed that AAC materials have great potential because they could generate very early high strength, greater durability and high performance. Among the benefits to be derived from this research is a better understanding of the factors that control concrete properties when using AAC materials, and by controlling the chemistry and processing to produce desired microstructures and properties, as well as their durability.

  12. Advanced low-activation materials. Fibre-reinforced ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenici, P.; Scholz, H. W.

    1994-09-01

    A serious safety and environmental concern for thermonuclear fusion reactor development regards the induced radioactivity of the first wall and structural components. The use of low-activation materials (LAM) in a demonstration reactor would reduce considerably its potential risk and facilitate its maintenance. Moreover, decommissioning and waste management including disposal or even recycling of structural materials would be simplified. Ceramic fibre-reinforced SiC materials offer highly appreciable low activation characteristics in combination with good thermomechanical properties. This class of materials is now under experimental investigation for structural application in future fusion reactors. An overview on the recent results is given, covering coolant leak rates, thermophysical properties, compatibility with tritium breeder materials, irradiation effects, and LAM-consistent purity. SiC/SiC materials present characteristics likely to be optimised in order to meet the fusion application challenge. The scope is to put into practice the enormous potential of inherent safety with fusion energy.

  13. ReflectoActive{trademark} Seals for Materials Control and Accountability

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, G.D.; Younkin, J.R.; Bell, Z.W.

    2002-01-01

    The ReflectoActive{trademark} Seals system, a continuously monitored fiber optic, active seal technology, provides real-time tamper indication for large arrays of storage containers. The system includes a PC running the RFAS software, an Immediate Detection Unit (IDU), an Optical Time Domain Reflectometer (OTDR), links of fiber optic cable, and the methods and devices used to attach the fiber optic cable to the containers. When a breach on any of the attached fiber optic cable loops occurs, the IDU immediately signals the connected computer to control the operations of an OTDR to seek the breach location. The ReflectoActive{trademark} Seals System can be adapted for various types of container closure designs and implemented in almost any container configuration. This automatic protection of valued assets can significantly decrease the time and money required for surveillance. The RFAS software is the multi-threaded, client-server application that monitors and controls the components of the system. The software administers the security measures such as a two-person rule as well as continuous event logging. Additionally the software's architecture provides a secure method by which local or remote clients monitor the system and perform administrative tasks. These features provide the user with a robust system to meet today's material control and accountability needs. A brief overview of the hardware, and different hardware configurations will be given. The architecture of the system software, and its benefits will then be discussed. Finally, the features to be implemented in future versions of the system will be presented.

  14. Need for development of higher strength cryogenic structural materials for fusion magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Arata

    2014-01-27

    A prototype fusion reactor is targeted as a beyond ITER project which is so called DEMO. Several conceptual designs have been carried out. Recently, in order to recognize practical aspects on maintenance of the prototype reactor, the replacement procedure of in-vessel components was focused and “sector process” was proposed. The process is that the reactor consists of sectors and all sectors will be drowned and replaced in a short time. The slim coil which generated higher magnetic field is required to realize the sector process. From the point of coil design, the occupancy of the structural material on the cross section of the coil increases with an increase of magnetic field. To realize the slim coil, the cryogenic structural material with higher yield strength and the proper toughness is desired.

  15. Need for development of higher strength cryogenic structural materials for fusion magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Arata

    2014-01-01

    A prototype fusion reactor is targeted as a beyond ITER project which is so called DEMO. Several conceptual designs have been carried out. Recently, in order to recognize practical aspects on maintenance of the prototype reactor, the replacement procedure of in-vessel components was focused and "sector process" was proposed. The process is that the reactor consists of sectors and all sectors will be drowned and replaced in a short time. The slim coil which generated higher magnetic field is required to realize the sector process. From the point of coil design, the occupancy of the structural material on the cross section of the coil increases with an increase of magnetic field. To realize the slim coil, the cryogenic structural material with higher yield strength and the proper toughness is desired.

  16. Calcium alloy as active material in secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Roche, Michael F.; Preto, Sandra K.; Martin, Allan E.

    1976-01-01

    Calcium alloys such as calcium-aluminum and calcium-silicon, are employed as active material within a rechargeable negative electrode of an electrochemical cell. Such cells can use a molten salt electrolyte including calcium ions and a positive electrode having sulfur, sulfides, or oxides as active material. The calcium alloy is selected to prevent formation of molten calcium alloys resulting from reaction with the selected molten electrolytic salt at the cell operating temperatures.

  17. Optically Active Hybrid Materials Constructed from Helically Substituted Polyacetylenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huanyu; Zhao, Biao; Deng, Jianping

    2016-04-01

    Functional materials derived from synthetic helical polymers are attracting increasing interest. Helically substituted polyacetylenes (HSPAs) are especially interesting as typical artificial helical polymers. In recent years, we designed and prepared a series of functional materials based on HSPAs and inorganic materials. The target is to establish some novel hybrid materials that combine the superior properties of both. The examined inorganic materials include silica, graphene, and magnetic Fe3 O4 nanoparticles. Such new functional materials hold great promise and are expected to find practical applications, for instance, as chiral absorbents, chiral sensors, chiral selectors for inducing enantioselective crystallization, chiral catalysts towards asymmetric catalysis, and chiral carriers for enantioselective release. The Personal Account summarizes our major achievements in preparing optically active hybrid materials. We hope it will speed up progress in chiral-related research areas.

  18. Older women's fears of violence: the need for interventions that enable active ageing.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Karen; Buys, Laurie; Lovie-Kitchin, Jan; Boulton-Lewis, Gillian; Smith, Dianne; Heffernan, Maree

    2007-01-01

    Women's fear of violence can impact negatively on their active participation in life. An ageing survey conducted with 2,620 Australian respondents aged 50 to 90 years examined aspects of work, learning, social, spiritual and emotional status, health, vision, home, life events, demographics, and asked an open-ended question about what being actively engaged in life meant. Ordinal regression was carried out on two dependent variables: wanting and needing to learn to discourage violence. Analyses found that as women's age increased, those on lower incomes were more likely than others to say they needed to learn how to discourage violence against them. This paper investigates the variables associated with the findings-transport, finances, news media, home safety, and reduced social interactions. Results highlight the importance of understanding women's fear in the context of personal and social issues, and the need to provide learning opportunities to improve safety and social engagement.

  19. Psychological Needs Satisfaction, Motivational Regulations and Physical Activity Intention among Elementary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Weiyun

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between psychological needs satisfaction, motivational regulations in physical education and physical activity intention among elementary school students. A total of 291 elementary school students in grades 3-6 voluntarily completed the three measures. This study indicated that satisfaction of three basic…

  20. Achieving Professional Competency in Developmental Physical Activity: The Need for a Consensual Body of Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Earle F.

    1994-01-01

    Physical education must change its image of being "jack of all trades, master of none" and create an appropriate name and consensual taxonomy of knowledge for its work. There is an urgent need for proven professional competency in developmental physical activity based on a consensual body of knowledge. (SM)

  1. An Emergent Language Program Framework: Actively Involving Learners in Needs Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, William; Storer, Graeme

    1992-01-01

    Relates the experience of the staff of an aquaculture outreach program in Northeast Thailand in implementing an English for special purposes program. By actively involving learners in both the needs analysis and program design, teachers were able to adapt the program content to the requirements of the students. (15 references) (JL)

  2. The Effect of Active Support Training on Engagement, Opportunities for Choice, Challenging Behaviour and Support Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koritsas, Stella; Iacono, Teresa; Hamilton, David; Leighton, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate active support (AS) training and to investigate changes to perceived engagement in domestic tasks, opportunities for choice, frequency of challenging behaviour, and level of support needs. Method: Participants were 12 adults with ID aged 27-57 years (M = 37 years) residing in three group homes, and…

  3. Determining the functional and material properties needed for abrasive wear prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, I.

    2016-08-01

    Abrassive wear is a complex mechanical process with specific characteristics, dependent on the bodies velocities and load, the quality of contact surfaces, the mechanical properties of the superficial layers, lubrication etc. During the friction of the bodies in contact, the mechanical properties and the micro-topography of superficial layers change, most of the time irrecoverable, leading to the shut-down of the technical system they are part of. The present paper proposes a theoretical and experimental analysis of the abrassive wear behaviour of a coupling made of steel/cast iron as well as the detection of the wear trace dependent on the inclination angle of the harder material asperities (penetrator).

  4. Low Specific Activity materials concepts are being reevaluated

    SciTech Connect

    Rawl, R.R.

    1993-10-01

    Many types of radioactive low-level waste are classified, packaged, and transported as Low-Specific Activity (LSA) material. The transportation regulations allow LSA materials to be shipped in economical packagings and, under certain conditions, waives compliance with other detailed requirements such as labeling. The fundamental concepts which support the LSA category are being thoroughly reevaluated to determine the defensibility of the provisions. A series of national and international events are leading to the development of new dose models which are likely to fundamentally change the ways these materials are defined. Similar basis changes are likely for the packaging requirements applicable to these materials.

  5. Fusion materials development program in the broader approach activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishitani, T.; Tanigawa, H.; Jitsukawa, S.; Nozawa, T.; Hayashi, K.; Yamanishi, T.; Tsuchiya, K.; Möslang, A.; Baluc, N.; Pizzuto, A.; Hodgson, E. R.; Laesser, R.; Gasparotto, M.; Kohyama, A.; Kasada, R.; Shikama, T.; Takatsu, H.; Araki, M.

    2009-04-01

    Breeding blankets are the most important components in DEMO. The DEMO blanket has to withstand high neutron flux typically 15-30 dpa/year under continuous operation. Therefore integrated and effective development of blanket structural materials and breeding/multiplying materials is essential in the blanket development for DEMO. In parallel to the ITER program, broader approach (BA) activities are initiated by EU and Japan. Based on the common interest of each party towards DEMO, R&D on reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steels as a DEMO blanket structural material, SiC f/SiC composites which have potential for use in DEMO blankets, advanced tritium breeders and neutron multiplier for DEMO blankets, and tritium technologies including tritium behavior studies in advanced materials for DEMO blanket applications will be carried out as a part of the BA activities.

  6. Equipment and Materials for Initiating Musical Activities in the Preschool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Samuel D.

    Music activities are an important part of the preschool experience, yet these activities are often guided by teachers who have had little musical training. Lack of formal music training can be greatly compensated for by access to quality equipment and materials. These resources include a basic accompanying instrument, toy instruments, a durable…

  7. 10 CFR 30.72 - Schedule C-Quantities of radioactive materials requiring consideration of the need for an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Schedule C-Quantities of radioactive materials requiring consideration of the need for an emergency plan for responding to a release. 30.72 Section 30.72 Energy NUCLEAR...-198 .01 30,000 Hafnium-172 .01 400 Hafnium-181 .01 7,000 Holmium-166m .01 100 Hydrogen-3 .5...

  8. 10 CFR 30.72 - Schedule C-Quantities of radioactive materials requiring consideration of the need for an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Schedule C-Quantities of radioactive materials requiring consideration of the need for an emergency plan for responding to a release. 30.72 Section 30.72 Energy NUCLEAR...-198 .01 30,000 Hafnium-172 .01 400 Hafnium-181 .01 7,000 Holmium-166m .01 100 Hydrogen-3 .5...

  9. 10 CFR 30.72 - Schedule C-Quantities of radioactive materials requiring consideration of the need for an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Schedule C-Quantities of radioactive materials requiring consideration of the need for an emergency plan for responding to a release. 30.72 Section 30.72 Energy NUCLEAR...-198 .01 30,000 Hafnium-172 .01 400 Hafnium-181 .01 7,000 Holmium-166m .01 100 Hydrogen-3 .5...

  10. Behavioral science in video games for children's diet and physical activity change: key research needs.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, Tom; Baranowski, Janice; Thompson, Debbe; Buday, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Innovative intervention programs are needed to overcome the limitations in previous programs that promoted change in diabetes risk behaviors in children. Serious video games show promise of changing dietary and physical activity behaviors, but research is needed on the optimal design of behavior-change procedures in video games, the mechanisms that account for changes obtained, and the groups in which these interventions work best. Such research will permit the optimal design of serious video games for diabetes and obesity prevention in the future.

  11. Using thermal balance model to determine optimal reactor volume and insulation material needed in a laboratory-scale composting reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjiang; Pang, Li; Liu, Xinyu; Wang, Yuansheng; Zhou, Kexun; Luo, Fei

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive model of thermal balance and degradation kinetics was developed to determine the optimal reactor volume and insulation material. Biological heat production and five channels of heat loss were considered in the thermal balance model for a representative reactor. Degradation kinetics was developed to make the model applicable to different types of substrates. Simulation of the model showed that the internal energy accumulation of compost was the significant heat loss channel, following by heat loss through reactor wall, and latent heat of water evaporation. Lower proportion of heat loss occurred through the reactor wall when the reactor volume was larger. Insulating materials with low densities and low conductive coefficients were more desirable for building small reactor systems. Model developed could be used to determine the optimal reactor volume and insulation material needed before the fabrication of a lab-scale composting system.

  12. Readability of American Online Patient Education Materials in Urologic Oncology: a Need for Simple Communication

    PubMed Central

    Pruthi, Amanda; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Raynor, Mathew C.; Woods, Michael E.; Wallen, Eric M.; Smith, Angela B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine readability levels of reputable cancer and urologic websites addressing bladder, prostate, kidney and testicular cancers. Methods Online patient education materials (PEMs) for bladder, prostate, kidney and testicular malignancies were evaluated from the American Cancer Society, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), National Cancer Institute (NCI), Urology Care Foundation (AUA-UCF), Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN), Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF), Kidney Cancer Association (KCA), and Testicular Cancer Resource Center (TCRC). Grade level was determined using several readability indices, and analyses were performed based on cancer type, website, and content area (general, causes, risk factors and prevention, diagnosis and staging, treatment, and post-treatment). Results Estimated grade level of online PEMs ranged from 9.2 to 14.2 with an overall mean of 11.7. Websites for kidney cancer had the least difficult readability (11.3) and prostate cancer had the most difficult readability (12.1). Among specific websites, the most difficult readability levels were noted for the AUA-UCF website for bladder and prostate cancer and the KCA and TCRC for kidney and testes cancer. Readability levels within content areas varied based on disease and website. Conclusion Online PEMs in urologic oncology are written at a level above the average American reader. Simplification of these resources are necessary to improve patient understanding of urologic malignancy. PMID:25623686

  13. Design of electro-active polymer gels as actuator materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Suzana

    Smart materials, alternatively called active or adaptive, differ from passive materials in their sensing and activation capability. These materials can sense changes in environment such as: electric field, magnetic field, UV light, pH, temperature. They are capable of responding in numerous ways. Some change their stiffness properties (electro-rheological fluids), other deform (piezos, shape memory alloys, electrostrictive materials) or change optic properties (electrochromic polymers). Polymer gels are one of such materials which can change the shape, volume and even optical properties upon different applied stimuli. Due to their low stiffness property they are capable of having up to 100% of strain in a short time, order of seconds. Their motion resembles the one of biosystems, and they are often seen as possible artificial muscle materials. Despite their delicate nature, appropriate design can make them being used as actuator materials which can form controllable surfaces and mechanical switches. In this study several different groups of polymer gel material were investigated: (a) acrylamide based gels are sensitive to pH and electric field and respond in volume change, (b) polyacrylonitrile (PAN) gel is sensitive to pH and electric field and responds in axial strain and bending, (c) polyvinylalcohol (PVA) gel is sensitive to electric field and responds in axial strain and bending and (d) perfluorinated sulfonic acid membrane, Nafion RTM, is sensitive to electric field and responds in bending. Electro-mechanical and chemo-mechanical behavior of these materials is a function of a variety of phenomena: polymer structure, affinity of polymer to the solvent, charge distribution within material, type of solvent, elasticity of polymer matrix, etc. Modeling of this behavior is a task aimed to identify what is driving mechanism for activation and express it in a quantitative way in terms of deformation of material. In this work behavior of the most promising material as

  14. Activity based financing in England: the need for continual refinement of payment by results.

    PubMed

    Street, Andrew; Maynard, Alan

    2007-10-01

    The English National Health Service is introducing activity based tariff systems or Payment by Results (PbR) as the basis for hospital funding. The funding arrangements provide incentives for increasing activity, particularly day surgery, and, uniquely, are based on costing data from all hospitals. But prices should not be based on average costs and the potential of PbR to improve the quality of care is yet to be exploited. Without refinement, PbR threatens to undermine expenditure control, to divert resources away from primary care, and to distort needs based funding. PMID:18634642

  15. Long-lived activation products in reactor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.C.; Lepel, E.L.; Sanders, R.W.; Wilkerson, C.L.; Silker, W.; Thomas, C.W.; Abel, K.H.; Robertson, D.R.

    1984-08-01

    The purpose of this program was to assess the problems posed to reactor decommissioning by long-lived activation products in reactor construction materials. Samples of stainless steel, vessel steel, concrete, and concrete ingredients were analyzed for up to 52 elements in order to develop a data base of activatable major, minor, and trace elements. Large compositional variations were noted for some elements. Cobalt and niobium concentrations in stainless steel, for example, were found to vary by more than an order of magnitude. A thorough evaluation was made of all possible nuclear reactions that could lead to long lived activation products. It was concluded that all major activation products have been satisfactorily accounted for in decommissioning planning studies completed to date. A detailed series of calculations was carried out using average values of the measured compositions of the appropriate materials to predict the levels of activation products expected in reactor internals, vessel walls, and bioshield materials for PWR and BWR geometries. A comparison is made between calculated activation levels and regulatory guidelines for shallow land disposal according to 10 CFR 61. This analysis shows that PWR and BWR shroud material exceeds the Class C limits and is, therefore, generally unsuitable for near-surface disposal. The PWR core barrel material approaches the Class C limits. Most of the remaining massive components qualify as either Class A or B waste with the bioshield clearly Class A, even at the highest point of activation. Selected samples of activated steel and concrete were subjected to a limited radiochemical analysis program as a verification of the computer model. Reasonably good agreement with the calculations was obtained where comparison was possible. In particular, the presence of /sup 94/Nb in activated stainless steel at or somewhat above expected levels was confirmed.

  16. Active Neutron Interrogation of Non-Radiological Materials with NMIS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Mark E; Mihalczo, John T

    2012-02-01

    The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), although primarily designed for analyzing special nuclear material, is capable of identifying nonradiological materials with a wide range of measurement techniques. This report demonstrates four different measurement methods, complementary to fast-neutron imaging, which can be used for material identification: DT transmission, DT scattering, californium transmission, and active time-tagged gamma spectroscopy. Each of the four techniques was used to evaluate how these methods can be used to identify four materials: aluminum, polyethylene, graphite, and G-10 epoxy. While such measurements have been performed individually in the past, in this project, all four measurements were performed on the same set of materials. The results of these measurements agree well with predicted results. In particular, the results of the active gamma spectroscopy measurements demonstrate the technique's applicability in a future version of NMIS which will incorporate passive and active gamma-ray spectroscopy. This system, designated as a fieldable NMIS (FNMIS), is under development by the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Verification.

  17. Active thermography in qualitative evaluation of protective materials.

    PubMed

    Gralewicz, Grzegorz; Wiecek, Bogusław

    2009-01-01

    This is a study of the possibilities of a qualitative evaluation of protective materials with active thermography. It presents a simulation of a periodic excitation of a multilayer composite material. Tests were conducted with lock-in thermography on Kevlar composite consisting of 16 layers of Kevlar fabric reinforced with formaldehyde resin with implanted delamination defects. Lock-in thermography is a versatile tool for nondestructive evaluation. It is a fast, remote and nondestructive procedure. Hence, it was used to detect delaminations in the composite structure of materials used in the production of components designed for personal protection. This method directly contributes to an improvement in safety.

  18. On the propagation of Voigt waves in energetically active materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Tom G.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2016-11-01

    If Voigt-wave propagation is possible in a dissipative anisotropic dielectric material characterised by the permittivity dyadic \\mathop{\\varepsilon }\\limits\\raise{2pt=}, then it is also possible in the analogous energetically active material characterised by the permittivity dyadic \\mathop{\\tilde{\\varepsilon }}\\limits\\raise{2pt=}, where \\mathop{\\tilde{\\varepsilon }}\\limits\\raise{2pt=} is the hermitian conjugate of \\mathop{\\varepsilon }\\limits\\raise{2pt=}. This symmetry follows directly from a theoretical analysis of the necessary and sufficient conditions for Voigt-wave propagation in anisotropic materials. As a consequence of this symmetry, a porous dissipative material that exhibits Voigt-wave propagation can be used to construct a material that allows the propagation of Voigt waves with attendant linear gain in amplitude with propagation distance, by means of infiltration with an electrically or optically activated dye, for example. This phenomenon is captured by the Bruggeman formalism for homogenised composite materials based on isotropic dielectric component materials that are randomly distributed as oriented spheroidal particles.

  19. Motivation for physical activity in children: a moving matter in need for study.

    PubMed

    Pannekoek, Linda; Piek, Jan P; Hagger, Martin S

    2013-10-01

    Motivation for physical activity in children below the age of 12 years is a largely underrepresented issue in contemporary research. Although engagement in sufficient physical activity is highly important for children's current and later health, relatively little is known of the factors that motivate children to be physically active. Various theories have been developed in an attempt to explain motivation toward physical activity in adults. Recent developments have focussed on integrating constructs of these theories in order to attain a comprehensive account of motivated behavior. The relationships between different motivational constructs have generally been investigated in healthy adolescents and adults. This manuscript outlines why more theoretically driven research into children's motivation toward physical activity is needed. Constructs stemming from various motivational theories and their interrelationship as evidenced in youth and adults will be summarized. The current state of research on the applicability of these motivational constructs to children, and the generalizability of the interrelationship between the constructs to child samples will be outlined. A deeper insight into the motivational determinants of physical activity participation in children could inform the design of interventions to facilitate the development of physically active lifestyles that persist at older ages. PMID:24100193

  20. Material Flows in an Active Nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decamp, Stephen; Redner, Gabriel; Baskaran, Aparna; Hagan, Michael; Dogic, Zvonimir

    Active matter systems are composed of energy consuming constituent components which drive far-from-equilibrium dynamics. As such, active materials exhibit energetic states which would be unfavorable in passive, equilibrium materials. We study one such material; an active nematic liquid crystal which exists in a dynamical steady state where +/-1/2 defects are continuously generated and annihilated at a constant rate. The active nematic is composed of micron-sized microtubule filaments which are highly concentrated into a quasi-2D film that resides on an oil-water interface. Kinesin motor proteins drive inter-filament sliding which results in net extensile motion of the microtubule film. Notably, we find a mesophase in which motile +1/2 defects, acquire system-spanning orientational order. Currently, we are tracking material flows generated by the active stresses in the system to measure length scales at which energy is dissipated, and to measure the relation between internally generated flows and bend in the nematic field.

  1. Mechanical Activation of Construction Binder Materials by Various Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fediuk, R. S.

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with the mechanical grinding down to the nano powder of construction materials. During mechanical activation a composite binder active molecules cement minerals occur in the destruction of the molecular defects in the areas of packaging and breaking metastable phase decompensation intermolecular forces. The process is accompanied by a change in the kinetics of hardening of portland cement. Mechanical processes during grinding mineral materials cause, along with the increase in their surface energy, increase the Gibbs energy of powders and, respectively, their chemical activity, which also contributes to the high adhesion strength when contacting them with binders. Thus, the set of measures for mechanical activation makes better use of the weight of components filled with cement systems and adjust their properties. At relatively low cost is possible to provide a spectacular and, importantly, easily repeatable results in a production environment.

  2. Nonlinear active materials: an illustration of controllable phase matchability.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongcheng; Gautier, Romain; Donakowski, Martin D; Tran, T Thao; Edwards, Bryce W; Nino, Juan C; Halasyamani, P Shiv; Liu, Zhengtang; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R

    2013-08-14

    For a crystal to exhibit nonlinear optical (NLO) activity such as second-harmonic generation (SHG), it must belong to a noncentrosymmetric (NCS) space group. Moreover, for these nonlinear optical (NLO) materials to be suitable for practical uses, the synthesized crystals should be phase-matchable (PM). Previous synthetic research into SHG-active crystals has centered on (i) how to create NCS compounds and/or (ii) how to obtain NCS compounds with high SHG efficiencies. With these tactics, one can synthesize a material with a high SHG efficiency, but the material could be unusable if the material was nonphase-matchable (non-PM). To probe the origin of phase matchability of NCS structures, we present two new chemically similar hybrid compounds within one composition space: (I) [Hdpa]2NbOF5·2H2O and (II) HdpaNbOF4 (dpa = 2,2'-dipyridylamine). Both compounds are NCS and chemically similar, but (I) is non-PM while (II) is PM. Our results indicate--consistent with organic crystallography--the arrangement of the organic molecule within hybrid materials dictates whether the material is PM or non-PM.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Heben, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Kelley, R. D.; Kini, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    Carbon SWNTs are attractive materials for supporting electrocatalysts. The properties of SWNTs are highly tunable and controlled by the nanotube's circumferential periodicity and their surface chemistry. These unique characteristics suggest that architectures constructed from these types of carbon support materials would exhibit interesting and useful properties. Here, we expect that the structure of the carbon nanotube support will play a major role in stabilizing metal electrocatalysts under extreme operating conditions and suppress both catalyst and support degradation. Furthermore, the chemical modification of the carbon nanotube surfaces can be expected to alter the interface between the catalyst and support, thus, enhancing the activity and utilization of the electrocatalysts. We plan to incorporate discrete reaction sites into the carbon nanotube lattice to create intimate electrical contacts with the catalyst particles to increase the metal catalyst activity and utilization. The work involves materials synthesis, design of electrode architectures on the nanoscale, control of the electronic, ionic, and mass fluxes, and use of advanced optical spectroscopy techniques.

  4. Spontaneous Motion in Hierarchically Assembled Active Cellular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    With exquisite precision and reproducibility, cells orchestrate the cooperative action of thousands of nanometer-sized molecular motors to carry out mechanical tasks at much larger length scales, such as cell motility, division and replication. Besides their biological importance, such inherently far-from-equilibrium processes are an inspiration for the development of soft materials with highly sought after biomimetic properties such as autonomous motility and self-healing. I will describe our exploration of such a class of biologically inspired soft active materials. Starting from extensile bundles comprised of microtubules and kinesin, we hierarchically assemble active analogs of polymeric gels, liquid crystals and emulsions. At high enough concentration, microtubule bundles form an active gel network capable of generating internally driven chaotic flows that enhance transport and fluid mixing. When confined to emulsion droplets, these 3D networks buckle onto the water-oil interface forming a dense thin film of bundles exhibiting cascades of collective buckling, fracture, and self-healing driven by internally generated stresses from the kinesin clusters. When compressed against surfaces, this active nematic cortex exerts traction stresses that propel the locomotion of the droplet. Taken together, these observations exemplify how assemblies of animate microscopic objects exhibit collective biomimetic properties that are fundamentally distinct from those found in materials assembled from inanimate building blocks. These assemblies, in turn, enable the generation of a new class of materials that exhibit macroscale flow phenomena emerging from nanoscale components.

  5. The Empirical Attitude, Material Practice and Design Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apedoe, Xornam; Ford, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article is an argument about something that is both important and severely underemphasized in most current science curricula. The empirical attitude, fundamental to science since Galileo, is a habit of mind that motivates an active search for feedback on our ideas from the material world. Although more simple views of science manifest the…

  6. Characterization of surface active materials derived from farm products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface active materials obtained by chemical modification of plant protein isolates (lupin, barley, oat), corn starches (dextrin, normal, high amylose, and waxy) and soybean oil (soybean oil based polysoaps, SOPS) were investigated for their surface and interfacial properties using axisymmetric dro...

  7. Conducting polymers as active materials in electrochemical capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudge, Andy; Davey, John; Raistrick, Ian; Gottesfeld, Shimshon; Ferraris, John P.

    Electronically conducting polymer represent an interesting clas of materials for use in electrochemical capacitors thanks to the combination of high capacitive energy density and low materials cost. Three generalized typed of electrochemical capacitors can be constructed using conducting polymers as active material, and in the third of these, which utilized conducting polymers that can be both n- and p-doped, energy densities of up to 39 Wh per kg of active material on both electrodes have been demonstrated. This energy density is obtained using poly-3-(4-fluorophenyl)-thiophene (PEPT) in an electrolyte of 1 M tetramethylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate (TMATFMS) in acetonitrile. This unique system exhibits reversible n- and p-doping to high charge density in relatively thich films of the active polymer and a cell voltage exceeding 3 V in the fully charged state. Impedance data for both n- and p-doped PFPT suggest that high power densities can be obtained in electrochemical capacitors based on this active conducting polymer.

  8. Getting Started: Materials and Equipment for Active Learning Preschools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Nancy

    This book provides information to guide the development of an active learning early childhood program by assisting in the selection of materials and equipment to support children's cognitive, physical and social development. The guide considers the arrangement of classroom areas, and elements of the daily routine. The following classroom interest…

  9. Transport of biologically active material in laser cutting.

    PubMed

    Frenz, M; Mathezloic, F; Stoffel, M H; Zweig, A D; Romano, V; Weber, H P

    1988-01-01

    The transport of biologically active material during laser cutting with CO2 and Er lasers is demonstrated. This transport mechanism removes particles from the surface of gelatin, agar, and liver samples into the depth of the laser-formed craters. The transport phenomenon is explained by a contraction and condensation of enclosed hot water vapor. We show by cultivating transported bacteria in agar that biological particles can survive the shock of the transport. Determination of the numbers of active cells evidences a more pronounced activity of the cultivated bacteria after impact with an Er laser than with a CO2 laser.

  10. Comparison of activation effects in {gamma}-ray detector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Truscott, P.R.; Evans, H.E.; Dyer, C.S.; Peerless, C.L.; Flatman, J.C.; Cosby, M.; Knight, P.; Moss, C.E.

    1996-06-01

    Activation induced by cosmic and trapped radiation in {gamma}-ray detector materials represents a significant source of background for space-based detector systems. Selection of detector materials should therefore include consideration of this background source. Results are presented from measurements of induced radioactivity in different scintillators activated either as a result of irradiation by mono-energetic protons at accelerator facilities, or flight on board the Space Shuttle. Radiation transport computer codes are used to help compare the effects observed from the scintillators, by identifying and quantifying the influence on the background spectra from more than one hundred of the radionuclides produced by spallation. For the space experiment data, the simulation results also permit determination of the contributions to detector activation from the different sources of radiation in the Shuttle cabin.

  11. Need satisfaction of older persons living in the community and in institutions, part 2. Role of activity.

    PubMed

    Tickle, L S; Yerxa, E J

    1981-10-01

    A descriptive study was conducted in order to examine the types of need satisfaction older persons gained from activities they performed in their living environments. This is the second of two articles that examines the relationships among need satisfaction, environment, and activity. Subjects included 20 community and 21 institutionalized older persons. It was found that the subjects' most important activities were visiting and being involved in church functions. Using Maslow's need hierarchy as the theoretical framework, both of these activities were found to be associated with satisfying belongingness/love needs. The implications the findings have for occupational therapy intervention with older persons are included.

  12. Activation of a Ca-bentonite as buffer material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Hsing; Chen, Wen-Chuan

    2016-04-01

    Swelling behavior is an important criterion in achieving the low-permeability sealing function of buffer material. A potential buffer material may be used for radioactive waste repository in Taiwan is a locally available clayey material known as Zhisin clay, which has been identified as a Ca-bentonite. Due to its Ca-based origin, Zhisin was found to exhibit swelling capacity much lower than that of Na-bentonite. To enhance the swelling potential of Zhisin clay, a cation exchange process by addition of Na2CO3 powder was introduced in this paper. The addition of Na2CO3 reagent to Zhisin clay, in a liquid phase, caused the precipitation of CaCO3 and thereby induced a replacement of Ca2+ ions by Na+ ions on the surface of bentonite. Characterization test conducted on Zhisin clay includes chemical analysis, cation exchange capacity, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetry (TG). Free-swelling test apparatus was developed according to International Society of Rock Mechanics recommendations. A series of free-swelling tests were conducted on untreated and activated specimens to characterize the effect of activation on the swelling capacity of Zhisin clay. Efforts were made to determine an optimum dosage for the activation, and to evaluate the aging effect. Also, the activated material was evaluated for its stability in various hydrothermal conditions for potential applications as buffer material in a repository. Experimental results show that Na2CO3-activated Zhisin clay is superior in swelling potential to untreated Zhisin clay. Also, there exists an optimum amount of activator in terms of improvements in the swelling capacity. A distinct time-swell relationship was discovered for activated Zhisin clay. The corresponding mechanism refers to exchange of cations and breakdown of quasi-crystal, which results in ion exchange hysteresis of Ca-bentonite. Due to the ion exchange hysteresis, activated bentonite shows a post-rise time-swell relationship different than the sigmoid

  13. Material need insecurities, diabetes control, and care utilization: Results from the Measuring Economic iNsecurity in Diabetes (MEND) study

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Seth A.; Meigs, James B.; DeWalt, Darren; Seligman, Hilary K.; Barnard, Lily S.; Bright, Oliver-John M.; Schow, Marie; Atlas, Steven J.; Wexler, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Increasing access to care may be insufficient to improve health for diabetes patients with unmet basic needs. However, how specific material need insecurities relate to clinical outcomes and care utilization in a setting of near-universal care access is unclear. Objective To determine the association of food insecurity, cost-related medication underuse, housing instability, and energy insecurity with diabetes control and healthcare utilization. Design Cross-sectional(data collected June 2012 -- October 2013). Setting One academic primary care clinic, two community health centers and one specialty diabetes center in Massachusetts. Participants Random sample, stratified by clinic, of adult(age >20 years) diabetes patients. 411 patients were included(response rate: 62.3%). Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s) The pre-specified primary outcome was a composite indicator of poor diabetes control(Hemoglobin A1c >9.0%, LDL cholesterol >100mg/dL, or blood pressure >140/90mm/Hg). Pre-specified secondary outcomes included outpatient visits and emergency department visits/acute care hospitalizations (ED/inpatient). Results Overall, 19% of respondents reported food insecurity, 28% cost-related medication underuse, 11% housing instability, and 14% energy insecurity; 40% reported at least one material need insecurity. Forty-two percent of respondents had poor diabetes control. In multivariable models, food insecurity was associated with greater odds of poor diabetes control(adjusted Odds Ratio[OR] 1.97, 95% confidence interval[95%CI]1.58 – 2.47) and increased outpatient visits(adjusted Incident Rate Ratio[IRR] 1.19 95%CI 1.05 – 1.36), but not increased ED/inpatient visits(IRR 1.00 95%CI 0.51 – 1.97). Cost-related medication underuse was associated with poor diabetes control(OR 1.91 95%CI 1.35 – 2.70) and greater ED/inpatient utilization(IRR 1.68 95%CI 1.21 – 2.34), but not outpatient visits(IRR 1.07 95%CI 0.95 – 1.21). Housing instability(IRR 1.31 95%CI 1.14– 1

  14. Improvements Needed in the Army's Program for Developing Extension Training Materials for Use by Soldiers in Field Units. Report to the Secretary of the Army.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    This report addresses three major issues concerning the Army's program for developing extension training materials: (1) indications of low usage of Army Training Extension Course lessons by soldiers in the field; (2) improvements needed in the process for developing extension training materials; and (3) the need for further evaluation before the…

  15. Protists as bioindicators in activated sludge: Identification, ecology and future needs.

    PubMed

    Foissner, Wilhelm

    2016-08-01

    When the activated sludge process was developed, operators and scientists soon recognized protists as valuable indicators. However, only when Curds et al. (1968) showed with a few photographs the need of ciliates for a clear plant effluent, sewage protistology began to bloom but was limited by the need of species identification. Still, this is a major problem although several good guides are available. Thus, molecular kits should be developed for identification. Protists are indicators in two stages of wastewater treatment, viz., in the activated sludge and in the environmental water receiving the plant effluent. Continuous control of the protist and bacterial communities can prevent biological sludge foaming and bulking and may greatly save money for sludge oxygenation because several protist species are excellent indicators for the amount of oxygen present. The investigation of the effluent-receiving rivers gives a solid indication about the long term function of sewage works. The literature on protist bioindication in activated sludge is widely distributed. Thus, I compiled the data in a simple Table, showing which communities and species indicate good, mediocre, or poor plant performance. Further, many details on indication are provided, such as sludge loading and nitrifying conditions. Such specific features should be improved by appropriate statistics and more reliable identification of species. Then, protistologists have a fair chance to become important in wastewater works. Activated sludge is a unique habitat for particular species, often poorly or even undescribed. As an example, I present two new species. The first is a minute (∼30μm) Metacystis that makes an up to 300μm-sized mucous envelope mimicking a sludge floc. The second is a Phialina that is unique in having the contractile vacuole slightly posterior to mid-body. Finally, I provide a list of species which have the type locality in sewage plants.

  16. An Assessment of the Current LEO Debris Environment and the Need for Active Debris Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi

    2010-01-01

    The anti-satellite test on the Fengun-1 C weather satellite in early 2007 and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 in 2009 dramatically altered the landscape of the human-made orbital debris environment in the low Earth orbit (LEO). The two events generated approximately 5500 fragments large enough to be tracked by the U.S. Space Surveillance Network. Those fragments account for more than 60% increase to the debris population in LEO. However, even before the ASAT test, model analyses already indicated that the debris population (for those larger than 10 cm) in LEO had reached a point where the population would continue to increase, due to collisions among existing objects, even without any future launches. The conclusion implies that as satellites continue to be launched and unexpected breakup events continue to occur, commonly-adopted mitigation measures will not be able to stop the collision-driven population growth. To remediate the debris environment in LEO, active debris removal must be considered. This presentation will provide an updated assessment of the debris environment after the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 collision, an analysis of several future environment projections based on different scenarios, and a projection of collision activities in LEO in the near future. The need to use active debris removal to stabilize future debris environment will be demonstrated and the effectiveness of various active debris removal strategies will be quantified.

  17. Research in active composite materials and structures: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Devendra P.; Anderson, Gary L.

    2000-06-01

    During the past several years, the Materials Science Division and the Mechanical and Environmental Sciences Division of the Army Research Office have been supporting projects focusing on basic resaserch in the area of smart materials and structures. The major emphasis of the ARO Structures and Dynamics Program has been on the theoretical, computational, and experimental analysis of smart structures and structural dynamics, damping, active control, and health monitoring as applied to rotor craft, electromagnetic antenna structures, missiles, land vehicles, and weapon systems. The research projects supported by the program have been primarily directed towards improving the ability to predict, control, and optimize the dynamic response of complex, multi-body deformable structures. The projects in the field of smart materials and structures have included multi-disciplinary research conducted by teams of several faculty members as well as research performed by individual investigators.

  18. Module Design, Materials, and Packaging Research Team: Activities and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, T. J.; del Cueto, J.; Glick, S.; Jorgensen, G.; Kempe, M.; Kennedy, C.; Pern, J.; Terwilliger, K

    2005-01-01

    Our team activities are directed at improving PV module reliability by incorporating new, more effective, and less expensive packaging materials and techniques. New and existing materials or designs are evaluated before and during accelerated environmental exposure for the following properties: (1) Adhesion and cohesion: peel strength and lap shear. (2) Electrical conductivity: surface, bulk, interface and transients. (3) Water vapor transmission: solubility and diffusivity. (4) Accelerated weathering: ultraviolet, temperature, and damp heat tests. (5) Module and cell failure diagnostics: infrared imaging, individual cell shunt characterization, coring. (6) Fabrication improvements: SiOxNy barrier coatings and enhanced wet adhesion. (7) Numerical modeling: Moisture ingress/egress, module and cell performance, and cell-to-frame leakage current. (8) Rheological properties of polymer encapsulant and sheeting materials. Specific examples will be described.

  19. NASA's activities in the conservation of strategic aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    The primary objective of the Conservation of Strategic Aerospace Materials (COSAM) Program is to help reduce the dependence of the United States aerospace industry on strategic metals by providing the materials technology needed to minimize the strategic metal content of critical aerospace components with prime emphasis on components for gas turbine engines. Initial emphasis was placed in the area of strategic element substinction. Specifically, the role of cobalt in nickel base and cobalt base superalloys vital to the aerospace industry is being examined in great detail by means of cooperative university-industry-government research efforts. Investigations are underway in the area of "new classes" of alloys. Specifically, a study was undertaken to investigate the mechanical and physical properties of intermetallics that contain a minimum of the strategic metals. Current plans for the much larger COSAM Program are also presented.

  20. Obesity, physical activity, and the urban environment: public health research needs

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Russell P; Hynes, H Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Persistent trends in overweight and obesity have resulted in a rapid research effort focused on built environment, physical activity, and overweight. Much of the focus of this research has been on the design and form of suburbs. It suggests that several features of the suburban built environment such as low densities, poor street connectivity and the lack of sidewalks are associated with decreased physical activity and an increased risk of being overweight. But compared to suburban residents, inner city populations have higher rates of obesity and inactivity despite living in neighborhoods that are dense, have excellent street connectivity and who's streets are almost universally lined with sidewalks. We suggest that the reasons for this apparent paradox are rooted in the complex interaction of land use, infrastructure and social factors affecting inner city populations. Sometimes seemingly similar features are the result of very different processes, necessitating different policy responses to meet these challenges. For example, in suburbs, lower densities can result from government decision making that leads to restrictive zoning and land use issues. In the inner city, densities may be lowered because of abandonment and disinvestment. In the suburbs, changes in land use regulations could result in a healthier built environment. In inner cities, increasing densities will depend on reversing economic trends and investment decisions that have systematically resulted in distressed housing, abandoned buildings and vacant lots. These varying issues need to be further studied in the context of the totality of urban environments, incorporating what has been learned from other disciplines, such as economics and sociology, as well as highlighting some of the more successful inner city policy interventions, which may provide examples for communities working to improve their health. Certain disparities among urban and suburban populations in obesity and overweight, physical

  1. Obesity, physical activity, and the urban environment: public health research needs.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Russell P; Hynes, H Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Persistent trends in overweight and obesity have resulted in a rapid research effort focused on built environment, physical activity, and overweight. Much of the focus of this research has been on the design and form of suburbs. It suggests that several features of the suburban built environment such as low densities, poor street connectivity and the lack of sidewalks are associated with decreased physical activity and an increased risk of being overweight. But compared to suburban residents, inner city populations have higher rates of obesity and inactivity despite living in neighborhoods that are dense, have excellent street connectivity and who's streets are almost universally lined with sidewalks. We suggest that the reasons for this apparent paradox are rooted in the complex interaction of land use, infrastructure and social factors affecting inner city populations. Sometimes seemingly similar features are the result of very different processes, necessitating different policy responses to meet these challenges. For example, in suburbs, lower densities can result from government decision making that leads to restrictive zoning and land use issues. In the inner city, densities may be lowered because of abandonment and disinvestment. In the suburbs, changes in land use regulations could result in a healthier built environment. In inner cities, increasing densities will depend on reversing economic trends and investment decisions that have systematically resulted in distressed housing, abandoned buildings and vacant lots. These varying issues need to be further studied in the context of the totality of urban environments, incorporating what has been learned from other disciplines, such as economics and sociology, as well as highlighting some of the more successful inner city policy interventions, which may provide examples for communities working to improve their health. Certain disparities among urban and suburban populations in obesity and overweight, physical

  2. Electro-active material (EAM) based bend sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaComb, Ronald; LaComb, Julie

    2010-04-01

    The capability to accurately estimate strain and orientation of cables in an undersea environment is important for a multitude of applications. One way to estimate the positional location of a submersed cable is to utilize a network of distributed bend sensors providing inputs to a curve fitting algorithm. In this work commercially available bend sensors are characterized for small deflections. In addition proto-type devices are presented which can potentially improve device sensitivity. Commercially available bend sensors are based upon electro-active materials and variable resistance materials. Electro-active materials (EAM) are known for their actuator functionality but certain EAMs are capable of sensing as well. New advances in materials such as Ionic Polymer Metal Composites (IPMC) are proving suitable for quasi-static sensor applications. These sensors are low power, conformal and produce directionally dependent output voltages which are linearly proportional to deflection, with voltage polarity representative of the deflection direction. IPMCs are capable of being morphed for increased sensitivity. Variable resistivity sensors are based on smart epoxy polymer and carbon loaded inks. These sensors are inexpensive and conformal and unlike EAMs provide static measurements.

  3. Positive Active Material For Alkaline Electrolyte Storage Battert Nickel Electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Bernard, Patrick; Baudry, Michelle

    2000-12-05

    A method of manufacturing a positive active material for nickel electrodes of alkaline storage batteries which consists of particles of hydroxide containing mainly nickel and covered with a layer of a hydroxide phase based on nickel and yttrium is disclosed. The proportion of the hydroxide phase is in the range 0.15% to 3% by weight of yttrium expressed as yttrium hydroxide relative to the total weight of particles.

  4. Final Report: Imaging of Buried Nanoscale Optically Active Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbaum, Ian

    2011-07-05

    This is a final report covering work done at University of Maryland to develop a Ballistic Electron Emission Luminescence (BEEL) microscope. This technique was intended to examine the carrier transport and photon emission in deeply buried optically-active layers and thereby provide a means for materials science to unmask the detailed consequences of experimentally controllable growth parameters, such as quantum dot size, statistics and orientation, and defect density and charge recombination pathways.

  5. Engineering Analysis of Intermediate Loop and Process Heat Exchanger Requirements to Include Configuration Analysis and Materials Needs

    SciTech Connect

    T.M. Lillo; R.L. Williamson; T.R. Reed; C.B. Davis; D.M. Ginosar

    2005-09-01

    The need to locate advanced hydrogen production facilities a finite distance away from a nuclear power source necessitates the need for an intermediate heat transport loop (IHTL). This IHTL must not only efficiently transport energy over distances up to 500 meters but must also be capable of operating at high temperatures (>850oC) for many years. High temperature, long term operation raises concerns of material strength, creep resistance and general material stability (corrosion resistance). IHTL design is currently in the initial stages. Many questions remain to be answered before intelligent design can begin. The report begins to look at some of the issues surrounding the main components of an IHTL. Specifically, a stress analysis of a compact heat exchanger design under expected operating conditions is reported. Also the results of a thermal analysis performed on two ITHL pipe configurations for different heat transport fluids are presented. The configurations consist of separate hot supply and cold return legs as well as annular design in which the hot fluid is carried in an inner pipe and the cold return fluids travels in the opposite direction in the annular space around the hot pipe. The effects of insulation configurations on pipe configuration performance are also reported. Finally, a simple analysis of two different process heat exchanger designs, one a tube in shell type and the other a compact or microchannel reactor are evaluated in light of catalyst requirements. Important insights into the critical areas of research and development are gained from these analyses, guiding the direction of future areas of research.

  6. Materials Issues in Advanced Nuclear Systems: Executive Summary of DOE Basic Research Needs Workshop, "Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems"

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto, James B; Diaz de la Rubia, Tomas

    2007-01-01

    This article is reproduced from excerpts from the Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, U.S. Department of Energy, October 2006, www.sc.doe.gov/bes/reports/files/ANES_rpt.pdf.

  7. Using DFT Methods to Study Activators in Optical Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-08-17

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of various activators (ranging from transition metal ions, rare-earth ions, ns2 ions, to self-trapped and dopant-bound excitons) in phosphors and scintillators are reviewed. As a single-particle ground-state theory, DFT calculations cannot reproduce the experimentally observed optical spectra, which involve transitions between multi-electronic states. However, DFT calculations can generally provide sufficiently accurate structural relaxation and distinguish different hybridization strengths between an activator and its ligands in different host compounds. This is important because the activator-ligand interaction often governs the trends in luminescence properties in phosphors and scintillators, and can be used to search for new materials. DFT calculations of the electronic structure of the host compound and the positions of the activator levels relative to the host band edges in scintillators are also important for finding optimal host-activator combinations for high light yields and fast scintillation response. Mn4+ activated red phosphors, scintillators activated by Ce3+, Eu2+, Tl+, and excitons are shown as examples of using DFT calculations in phosphor and scintillator research.

  8. Using DFT Methods to Study Activators in Optical Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-08-17

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of various activators (ranging from transition metal ions, rare-earth ions, ns2 ions, to self-trapped and dopant-bound excitons) in phosphors and scintillators are reviewed. As a single-particle ground-state theory, DFT calculations cannot reproduce the experimentally observed optical spectra, which involve transitions between multi-electronic states. However, DFT calculations can generally provide sufficiently accurate structural relaxation and distinguish different hybridization strengths between an activator and its ligands in different host compounds. This is important because the activator-ligand interaction often governs the trends in luminescence properties in phosphors and scintillators, and can be used to search for new materials.more » DFT calculations of the electronic structure of the host compound and the positions of the activator levels relative to the host band edges in scintillators are also important for finding optimal host-activator combinations for high light yields and fast scintillation response. Mn4+ activated red phosphors, scintillators activated by Ce3+, Eu2+, Tl+, and excitons are shown as examples of using DFT calculations in phosphor and scintillator research.« less

  9. Active-Site-Accessible, Porphyrinic Metal;#8722;Organic Framework Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Farha, Omar K.; Shultz, Abraham M.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2012-02-06

    On account of their structural similarity to cofactors found in many metallo-enzymes, metalloporphyrins are obvious potential building blocks for catalytically active, metal-organic framework (MOF) materials. While numerous porphyrin-based MOFs have already been described, versions featuring highly accessible active sites and permanent microporosity are remarkably scarce. Indeed, of the more than 70 previously reported porphyrinic MOFs, only one has been shown to be both permanently microporous and contain internally accessible active sites for chemical catalysis. Attempts to generalize the design approach used in this single successful case have failed. Reported here, however, is the synthesis of an extended family of MOFs that directly incorporate a variety of metalloporphyrins (specifically Al{sup 3+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Pd{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 3+}, and Fe{sup 3+} complexes). These robust porphyrinic materials (RPMs) feature large channels and readily accessible active sites. As an illustrative example, one of the manganese-containing RPMs is shown to be catalytically competent for the oxidation of alkenes and alkanes.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of filling materials used in primary teeth pulpotomy.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Hévelin Couto; Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Neves, Ana Thereza Sabóia; Fontes, Rodrigo Gusmão; da Silva, Priscila Vieira; Aranha, Andreza Maria Fábio

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of pulp capping materials used in primary teeth (formocresol [FC], zinc oxide and eugenol cement [ZOE], ZOE mixed with FC [ZOEFC], mineral trioxide aggregate [MTA] and calcium hydroxide [CH]) against cariogenic bacteria. The agar plate diffusion test was used for the cultures, including saline solution as a negative control. A base layer of 15 mL of brain heart infusion agar was inoculated with 300 mL of each inoculum. Twelve wells were made and completely filled with one of the testing materials for each bacteria strain. The plates were incubated at 37°C for 48 h. Zones of microbial inhibition and material diffusion were measured and photographed. The results obtained were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney non-parametric tests. Respectively, the medium zones of bacteria inhibition of FC, ZOE, ZOEFC, MTA and CH against Streptococcus mutans growth were 28.5, 15.2, 20.8, 9.3 and 11.6; against Lactobacillus acidophilus growth were 28.7, 14.8, 15.3, 15.2 and 20.0, and against Actinomyces viscosus growth were 13.6, 13.5, 14.7, 10.0 and 13.6. We might confirmed the high antibacterial activity of FC solution, especially against S. mutans and L. acidophilus, as wells as, the low inhibitory effect of MTA cement on the cariogenic bacteria studied.

  11. Antimicrobial Activity of Filling Materials Used in Primary Teeth Pulpotomy

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, Hévelin Couto; Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Neves, Ana Thereza Sabóia; Fontes, Rodrigo Gusmão; da Silva, Priscila Vieira; Aranha, Andreza Maria Fábio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of pulp capping materials used in primary teeth (formocresol [FC], zinc oxide and eugenol cement [ZOE], ZOE mixed with FC [ZOEFC], mineral trioxide aggregate [MTA] and calcium hydroxide [CH]) against cariogenic bacteria. The agar plate diffusion test was used for the cultures, including saline solution as a negative control. A base layer of 15 mL of brain heart infusion agar was inoculated with 300 mL of each inoculum. Twelve wells were made and completely filled with one of the testing materials for each bacteria strain. The plates were incubated at 37°C for 48 h. Zones of microbial inhibition and material diffusion were measured and photographed. The results obtained were analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney non-parametric tests. Respectively, the medium zones of bacteria inhibition of FC, ZOE, ZOEFC, MTA and CH against Streptococcus mutans growth were 28.5, 15.2, 20.8, 9.3 and 11.6; against Lactobacillus acidophilus growth were 28.7, 14.8, 15.3, 15.2 and 20.0, and against Actinomyces viscosus growth were 13.6, 13.5, 14.7, 10.0 and 13.6. We might confirmed the high antibacterial activity of FC solution, especially against S. mutans and L. acidophilus, as wells as, the low inhibitory effect of MTA cement on the cariogenic bacteria studied. PMID:25954072

  12. Design of Responsive and Active (Soft) Materials Using Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Bukusoglu, Emre; Bedolla Pantoja, Marco; Mushenheim, Peter C; Wang, Xiaoguang; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2016-06-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) are widely known for their use in liquid crystal displays (LCDs). Indeed, LCDs represent one of the most successful technologies developed to date using a responsive soft material: An electric field is used to induce a change in ordering of the LC and thus a change in optical appearance. Over the past decade, however, research has revealed the fundamental underpinnings of potentially far broader and more pervasive uses of LCs for the design of responsive soft material systems. These systems involve a delicate interplay of the effects of surface-induced ordering, elastic strain of LCs, and formation of topological defects and are characterized by a chemical complexity and diversity of nano- and micrometer-scale geometry that goes well beyond that previously investigated. As a reflection of this evolution, the community investigating LC-based materials now relies heavily on concepts from colloid and interface science. In this context, this review describes recent advances in colloidal and interfacial phenomena involving LCs that are enabling the design of new classes of soft matter that respond to stimuli as broad as light, airborne pollutants, bacterial toxins in water, mechanical interactions with living cells, molecular chirality, and more. Ongoing efforts hint also that the collective properties of LCs (e.g., LC-dispersed colloids) will, over the coming decade, yield exciting new classes of driven or active soft material systems in which organization (and useful properties) emerges during the dissipation of energy. PMID:26979412

  13. Design of Responsive and Active (Soft) Materials Using Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Bukusoglu, Emre; Bedolla Pantoja, Marco; Mushenheim, Peter C; Wang, Xiaoguang; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2016-06-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) are widely known for their use in liquid crystal displays (LCDs). Indeed, LCDs represent one of the most successful technologies developed to date using a responsive soft material: An electric field is used to induce a change in ordering of the LC and thus a change in optical appearance. Over the past decade, however, research has revealed the fundamental underpinnings of potentially far broader and more pervasive uses of LCs for the design of responsive soft material systems. These systems involve a delicate interplay of the effects of surface-induced ordering, elastic strain of LCs, and formation of topological defects and are characterized by a chemical complexity and diversity of nano- and micrometer-scale geometry that goes well beyond that previously investigated. As a reflection of this evolution, the community investigating LC-based materials now relies heavily on concepts from colloid and interface science. In this context, this review describes recent advances in colloidal and interfacial phenomena involving LCs that are enabling the design of new classes of soft matter that respond to stimuli as broad as light, airborne pollutants, bacterial toxins in water, mechanical interactions with living cells, molecular chirality, and more. Ongoing efforts hint also that the collective properties of LCs (e.g., LC-dispersed colloids) will, over the coming decade, yield exciting new classes of driven or active soft material systems in which organization (and useful properties) emerges during the dissipation of energy.

  14. Active Neutron Interrogation to Detect Shielded Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2009-05-01

    Portable electronic neutron generators (ENGs) may be used to interrogate suspicious items to detect, characterize, and quantify the presence fissionable material based upon the measurement of prompt and/or delayed emissions of neutrons and/or photons resulting from fission. The small size (<0.2 m3), light weight (<12 kg), and low power consumption (<50 W) of modern ENGs makes them ideally suited for use in field situations, incorporated into systems carried by 2-3 individuals under rugged conditions. At Idaho National Laboratory we are investigating techniques and portable equipment for performing active neutron interrogation of moderate sized objects less than ~2-4 m3 to detect shielded fissionable material. Our research in this area relies upon the use of pulsed deuterium-tritium ENGs and the measurement of die-away prompt fission neutrons and other neutron signatures in-between neutron pulses from the ENG and after the ENG is turned off.

  15. Enhancing activated-peroxide formulations for porous materials :

    SciTech Connect

    Krauter, Paula; Tucker, Mark D.; Tezak, Matthew S.; Boucher, Raymond

    2012-12-01

    During an urban wide-area incident involving the release of a biological warfare agent, the recovery/restoration effort will require extensive resources and will tax the current capabilities of the government and private contractors. In fact, resources may be so limited that decontamination by facility owners/occupants may become necessary and a simple decontamination process and material should be available for this use. One potential process for use by facility owners/occupants would be a liquid sporicidal decontaminant, such as pHamended bleach or activated-peroxide, and simple application devices. While pH-amended bleach is currently the recommended low-tech decontamination solution, a less corrosive and toxic decontaminant is desirable. The objective of this project is to provide an operational assessment of an alternative to chlorine bleach for low-tech decontamination applications activated hydrogen peroxide. This report provides the methods and results for activatedperoxide evaluation experiments. The results suggest that the efficacy of an activated-peroxide decontaminant is similar to pH-amended bleach on many common materials.

  16. How Much Walking Is Needed to Improve Cardiorespiratory Fitness? An Examination of the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anton, Stephen D.; Duncan, Glenn E.; Limacher, Marian C.; Martin, Anthony D.; Perri, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2008) indicated that two approaches can be used to achieve the activity threshold needed to derive health benefits. Individuals may engage in either 150 min (2 hr 30 min) of moderate intensity activity (e.g., moderate-paced walking), or 75 min (1 hr…

  17. Active Printed Materials for Complex Self-Evolving Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raviv, Dan; Zhao, Wei; McKnelly, Carrie; Papadopoulou, Athina; Kadambi, Achuta; Shi, Boxin; Hirsch, Shai; Dikovsky, Daniel; Zyracki, Michael; Olguin, Carlos; Raskar, Ramesh; Tibbits, Skylar

    2014-12-01

    We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated models are designed and printed as static objects. Here, we introduce a novel approach for simulating and fabricating self-evolving structures that transform into a predetermined shape, changing property and function after fabrication. The new locally coordinated bending primitives combine into a single system, allowing for a global deformation which can stretch, fold and bend given environmental stimulus.

  18. Active printed materials for complex self-evolving deformations.

    PubMed

    Raviv, Dan; Zhao, Wei; McKnelly, Carrie; Papadopoulou, Athina; Kadambi, Achuta; Shi, Boxin; Hirsch, Shai; Dikovsky, Daniel; Zyracki, Michael; Olguin, Carlos; Raskar, Ramesh; Tibbits, Skylar

    2014-12-18

    We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated models are designed and printed as static objects. Here, we introduce a novel approach for simulating and fabricating self-evolving structures that transform into a predetermined shape, changing property and function after fabrication. The new locally coordinated bending primitives combine into a single system, allowing for a global deformation which can stretch, fold and bend given environmental stimulus.

  19. Evaluation of Need and Location for a Thermogravimetric Analyzer in the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Materials Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    WILLIS, H.T.

    2000-01-20

    This plan provides an analysis for locating a TGA to support PFP Thermal Stabilization processes. The scope of this document is to evaluate the need for, and location for, installation of a TGA system as a supplement to the SFE equipment for moisture measurement in pure oxides. A location assessment for the SFE equipment was previously performed (HNF 1999). Based on that assessment, co-location of the TGA system with the SFE system is the preferred option. This would enable thermally stabilized material to be analyzed for residual moisture by either the TGA system or SFE system or both This evaluation considers glovebox locations in the PFP 234-52 Building Analytical Laboratory or operating areas for the installation of the TGA system and it's supporting equipment. This evaluation considers using existing gloveboxes along with an alternative of adding a new glovebox to existing process lines. The location evaluation criteria focuses mainly on glovebox size, with qualitative consideration of relative cost and schedule impacts associated with system implementation, radiological control, and interaction with other laboratory operations and processes. In addition, the possible co-location of a TGA furnace system with the SFE system was considered.

  20. Arabian nights—1001 tales of how pharmaceutical companies cater to the material needs of doctors: case report

    PubMed Central

    Giannakakis, Ioannis A; Ioannidis, John P A

    2000-01-01

    Objective To describe how pharmaceutical companies cater to the material needs of doctors. Design Case report of memoirs. Setting Facilities that have nothing to do with medicine, somewhere in the Arabian peninsula. Patient population Random sample of doctors. Interventions Promotion by the pharmaceutical industry. Main outcome measures Short term outcomes were travel, pleasure, amusement, and gifts, and long term outcomes were the market share of specific companies. Results Short term outcomes were heterogeneous, underlying the diversity of the means employed by the pharmaceutical industry to subvert, divert, and influence medical practice. Overall, 200 doctors were dressed in white gowns, a doctor in preventive medicine quoted Hippocrates in favour of smoking, a senior doctor became a poet, a doctor trying to understand the Methods section of a poster paper wondered whether he should have been sunbathing at the beach instead, and two women doctors were kidnapped by Bedouin warriors. Long term outcomes on the sales of the company drugs are pending but are likely to be most favourable. Conclusions Eat, drink, be merry, and boost prescriptions. PMID:11124175

  1. Materials for Consideration in Standardized Canister Design Activities.

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Charles R.; Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Enos, David George; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest

    2014-10-01

    This document identifies materials and material mitigation processes that might be used in new designs for standardized canisters for storage, transportation, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. It also addresses potential corrosion issues with existing dual-purpose canisters (DPCs) that could be addressed in new canister designs. The major potential corrosion risk during storage is stress corrosion cracking of the weld regions on the 304 SS/316 SS canister shell due to deliquescence of chloride salts on the surface. Two approaches are proposed to alleviate this potential risk. First, the existing canister materials (304 and 316 SS) could be used, but the welds mitigated to relieve residual stresses and/or sensitization. Alternatively, more corrosion-resistant steels such as super-austenitic or duplex stainless steels, could be used. Experimental testing is needed to verify that these alternatives would successfully reduce the risk of stress corrosion cracking during fuel storage. For disposal in a geologic repository, the canister will be enclosed in a corrosion-resistant or corrosion-allowance overpack that will provide barrier capability and mechanical strength. The canister shell will no longer have a barrier function and its containment integrity can be ignored. The basket and neutron absorbers within the canister have the important role of limiting the possibility of post-closure criticality. The time period for corrosion is much longer in the post-closure period, and one major unanswered question is whether the basket materials will corrode slowly enough to maintain structural integrity for at least 10,000 years. Whereas there is extensive literature on stainless steels, this evaluation recommends testing of 304 and 316 SS, and more corrosion-resistant steels such as super-austenitic, duplex, and super-duplex stainless steels, at repository-relevant physical and chemical conditions. Both general and localized corrosion testing methods would be used to

  2. Active millimeter wave detection of concealed layers of dielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowring, N. J.; Baker, J. G.; Rezgui, N. D.; Southgate, M.; Alder, J. F.

    2007-04-01

    Extensive work has been published on millimetre wave active and passive detection and imaging of metallic objects concealed under clothing. We propose and demonstrate a technique for revealing the depth as well as the outline of partially transparent objects, which is especially suited to imaging layer materials such as explosives and drugs. The technique uses a focussed and scanned FMCW source, swept through many GHz to reveal this structure. The principle involved is that a parallel sided dielectric slab produces reflections at both its upper and lower surfaces, acting as a Fabry-Perot interferometer. This produces a pattern of alternating reflected peaks and troughs in frequency space. Fourier or Burg transforming this pattern into z-space generates a peak at the thickness of the irradiated sample. It could be argued that though such a technique may work for single uniform slabs of dielectric material, it will give results of little or no significance when the sample both scatters the incident radiation and gives erratic reflectivities due to its non-uniform thickness and permittivity . We show results for a variety of materials such as explosive simulants, powder and drugs, both alone and concealed under clothing or in a rucksack, which display strongly directional reflectivities at millimeter wavelengths, and whose location is well displayed by a varying thickness parameter as the millimetre beam is scanned across the target. With this system we find that samples can easily be detected at standoff distances of at least 4.6m.

  3. Review of atomic data needs for active charge-exchange spectroscopy on ITERa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchuk, O.; Bertschinger, G.; Biel, W.; Delabie, E.; von Hellermann, M. G.; Jaspers, R.; Reiter, D.

    2008-10-01

    The quantitative exploitation of active beam spectra is largely based on an advanced atomic modeling. Under the ITER operating conditions the penetration depth of a diagnostic beam into the plasma core crucially affects the intensities of spectral lines and hence the uncertainties of derived plasma parameters. A critical review of atomic data and an assessment of its error margins are, therefore, urgently needed. The aim of the present work is to verify the existing beam-stopping and beam-emission data for hydrogen beam in fusion plasmas. The agreement between the ADAS database and the present calculations is found to be within 5% for the beam-stopping data in a H-plasma. The calculation of beam attenuation in the presence of He-ash (4%) and Be ions (2%) demonstrates the agreement between the present data and the ADAS database within 10%. Finally, the maximum deviation of 15% is found only for beam-emission data at the electron density of 1×1012-2×1012cm-3, which is significantly below the ITER density of 1014cm-3.

  4. Materials and Process Activities for NASA's Composite Crew Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polis, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    In January 2007, the NASA Administrator and Associate Administrator for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate chartered the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) to design, build, and test a full-scale Composite Crew Module (CCM). The overall goal of the CCM project was to develop a team from the NASA family with hands-on experience in composite design, manufacturing, and testing in anticipation of future space exploration systems being made of composite materials. The CCM project was planned to run concurrently with the Orion project s baseline metallic design within the Constellation Program so that features could be compared and discussed without inducing risk to the overall Program. The materials and process activities were prioritized based on a rapid prototype approach. This approach focused developmental activities on design details with greater risk and uncertainty, such as out-of-autoclave joining, over some of the more traditional lamina and laminate building block levels. While process development and associated building block testing were performed, several anomalies were still observed at the full-scale level due to interactions between process robustness and manufacturing scale-up. This paper describes the process anomalies that were encountered during the CCM development and the subsequent root cause investigations that led to the final design solutions. These investigations highlight the importance of full-scale developmental work early in the schedule of a complex composite design/build project.

  5. Physical activity levels and supportive care needs for physical activity among breast cancer survivors with different psychosocial profiles: a cluster-analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Charlier, C; Pauwels, E; Lechner, L; Spittaels, H; Bourgois, J; DE Bourdeaudhuij, I; VAN Hoof, E

    2012-11-01

    The transition from breast cancer patient to survivor is associated with many treatment-related and psychosocial factors, which can influence health behaviour and associated needs. First, this study aimed to identify clusters of treatment-related and psychosocial factors among breast cancer survivors. Second, clusters' physical activity levels and care needs for physical activity were evaluated. Breast cancer survivors (n= 440; 52 ± 8 years) (3 weeks to 6 months post treatment) completed self-reports on physical and psychological symptoms; illness representations; social support and coping; physical activity and care needs for physical activity. Analyses identified four clusters: (1) a low distress-active approach group; (2) a low distress-resigned approach group; (3) a high distress-active approach group; and (4) a high distress-emotional approach group. Physical activity levels were higher in the low distress groups than in the high distress-emotional approach group. However, women with low distress and an active approach reported equal care needs for physical activity than women with high distress and an emotional approach. These findings suggest that care needs for physical activity are unrelated to distress and actual physical activity levels. The results emphasise the importance of screening for needs and provide a framework supporting the referral of breast cancer survivors to tailored interventions.

  6. Manipulating lipid bilayer material properties using biologically active amphipathic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md; Lampson, M. A.; Greathouse, D. V.; Koeppe, R. E., II; Andersen, O. S.

    2006-07-01

    Lipid bilayers are elastic bodies with properties that can be manipulated/controlled by the adsorption of amphipathic molecules. The resulting changes in bilayer elasticity have been shown to regulate integral membrane protein function. To further understand the amphiphile-induced modulation of bilayer material properties (thickness, intrinsic monolayer curvature and elastic moduli), we examined how an enantiomeric pair of viral anti-fusion peptides (AFPs)—Z-Gly-D-Phe and Z-Gly-Phe, where Z denotes a benzyloxycarbonyl group, as well as Z-Phe-Tyr and Z-D-Phe-Phe-Gly—alters the function of enantiomeric pairs of gramicidin channels of different lengths in planar bilayers. For both short and long channels, the channel lifetimes and appearance frequencies increase as linear functions of the aqueous AFP concentration, with no apparent effect on the single-channel conductance. These changes in channel function do not depend on the chirality of the channels or the AFPs. At pH 7.0, the relative changes in channel lifetimes do not vary when the channel length is varied, indicating that these compounds exert their effects primarily by causing a positive-going change in the intrinsic monolayer curvature. At pH 4.0, the AFPs are more potent than at pH 7.0 and have greater effects on the shorter channels, indicating that these compounds now change the bilayer elastic moduli. When AFPs of different anti-fusion potencies are compared, the rank order of the anti-fusion activity and the channel-modifying activity is similar, but the relative changes in anti-fusion potency are larger than the changes in channel-modifying activity. We conclude that gramicidin channels are useful as molecular force transducers to probe the influence of small amphiphiles upon lipid bilayer material properties.

  7. A Curriculum Activities Guide to Environment Studies with Students with Special Education Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tully, Randolph R., Jr., Ed.

    Developed by teachers, the curriculum guide provides information on environmental studies activities for use with handicapped students. Activities are divided into three areas: awareness level activities (aesthetics, cemeteries, water, soil, air, noise, and miscellaneous activities); transition level activities (playgrounds, cemeteries, wildlife,…

  8. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 7: Material (M-1). A. Statement. B. Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The approach of matching technology areas with various themes needs was not effective for the materials and thermal control discipline because of the diversity of requirements for each. Top priorities were evolved from the advanced space transportation system and the space power platform because these are essential building blocks in fulfilling some of the other themes. Important needs identified include life long-life cryogenic cooling systems for sensors, masers, and other devices and the needs for lightweight nuclear shielding materials for nuclear electric propulsion.

  9. Active smart material control system for buffet alleviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheta, Essam F.; Moses, Robert W.; Huttsell, Lawrence J.

    2006-05-01

    Vertical tail buffeting is a serious multidisciplinary problem that limits the performance and maneuverability of twin-tail fighter aircraft. The buffet problem occurs at high angles of attack when the vortical flow breaks down ahead of the vertical tails resulting in unsteady and unbalanced loads on the tails leading to their premature fatigue failure. An active smart material control system, using distributed piezoelectric (PZT) actuators, is developed for buffet alleviation and is presented. The surfaces of the vertical tail are equipped with PZT actuators to control the buffet responses in the first bending and torsion modes. The electrodynamics of the PZT actuators are modeled using a finite-element model. A single-input/single-output controller is designed to drive the active PZT actuators. High-fidelity analysis modules for the fluid dynamics, structural dynamics, electrodynamics of the PZT actuators, control law, fluid-structure interfacing, and grid motion are integrated into a multidisciplinary computing environment that controls the temporal synchronization of the analysis modules. The results of this study indicate that the actively controlled PZT actuators are an effective tool for buffet alleviation over wide range of angels of attack. Peak values of power spectral density of tail-tip acceleration are reduced by as much as 22% in the first bending mode and by as much as 82% in the first torsion mode. The root mean square values of tail-tip acceleration are reduced by as much as 12%.

  10. Development of active and sensitive material systems based on composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, Hiroshi

    2002-07-01

    This paper describes new concepts proposed by the author to realize active and sensitive structural material systems. Two examples of multifunctional composites were fabricated and evaluated in this study as follows: (1) An active laminate of aluminum plate (works as muscle), epoxy film (as insulator), unidirectional CFRP prepreg (as bone and blood vessel) and copper foil electrode (to apply voltage on CFRP) was made with an embedded optical fiber multiply fractured in the CFRP layer (works as nerve), of which curvature change could be effectively monitored with the fractured optical fiber. (2) A stainless steel fiber/aluminum active composite with embedded Ti oxide/Ti composite fiber was fabricated. The Ti oxide/Ti fiber could work as a sensor for temperature by removing a part of the oxide before embedment to make a metallic contact between the embedded titanium fiber and aluminum matrix to be able to generate thermal electromotive force, and also could work as a sensor for strain and as a heater for actuation. In the both cases, the outputs from their embedded sensors can be used to control their actuations.

  11. Addressing Different Active Neutron Interrogation Signatures from Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2009-10-01

    In a continuing effort to examine portable methods for implementing active neutron interrogation for detecting shielded fissionable material research is underway to investigate the utility of analyzing multiple time-correlated signatures. Time correlation refers here to the existence of unique characteristics of the fission interrogation signature related to the start and end of an irradiation, as well as signatures present in between individual pulses of an irradiating source. Traditional measurement approaches in this area have typically worked to detect die-away neutrons after the end of each pulse, neutrons in between pulses related to the decay of neutron emitting fission products, or neutrons or gamma rays related to the decay of neutron emitting fission products after the end of an irradiation exposure. In this paper we discus the potential weaknesses of assessing only one signature versus multiple signatures and make the assertion that multiple complimentary and orthogonal measurements should be used to bolster the performance of active interrogation systems, helping to minimize susceptibility to the weaknesses of individual signatures on their own. Recognizing that the problem of detection is a problem of low count rates, we are exploring methods to integrate commonly used signatures with rarely used signatures to improve detection capabilities for these measurements. In this paper we will discuss initial activity in this area with this approach together with observations of some of the strengths and weaknesses of using these different signatures.

  12. Canada's Physical Activity Guide: examining print-based material for motivating physical activity in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Todosijczuk, Ivan; Johnson, Steven T; Karunamuni, Nandini

    2012-01-01

    The authors conducted a secondary analysis on 202 adults from the Physical Activity Workplace Study. The aim of this analysis was to examine demographic characteristics associated with reading Canada's Physical Activity Guide (CPAG), being motivated by the guide, and whether participants in the Physical Activity Workplace Study who read the CPAG increased their physical activity levels over 1 year. Results revealed that less than 50% of participants read the full version of CPAG, and less than 10% were motivated by it. The CPAG also appears to be more appealing to and effective for women than for men. Although the CPAG had some influence in increasing mild physical activity levels in a workplace sample, there was also a decrease in physical activity levels among some members of the group. Overall, the effectiveness of CPAG was not substantial, and the findings of this analysis could help guide future targeted intervention materials and programs.

  13. Cross Sections Needed for the Interpretation of Long-Lived and Short-Lived Cosmogenic Nuclide Production in Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Beverding, A.; Kim, K. J.; Englert, P. A. J.; Jull, A. J. T.; Donahue, D. J.; Cloudt, S.; Castaneda, C.; Vincent, J.; Caffee, M. W.; Osazuwa, C. O.; Reedy, R. C.

    1995-09-01

    Radionuclides produced by cosmic rays in extraterrestrial materials archive information that can be used to determine cosmic-ray fluxes and to study the history of the irradiated object. Long-lived radionuclides give information about the last ~5 Myr; short-lived radionuclides give information about recent events. To calculate the solar cosmic ray (SCR) flux from measured depth profiles for cosmogenic radionuclides produced in lunar rocks, accurate and precise cross section values for the production of these radionuclides from all relevant elements are needed. About 98% of SCR and ~87% of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) falling on extraterrestrial materials are protons. Cross section measurements were made using three proton accelerators to cover the energy range ~20 - 500 MeV. Thin target techniques used in the irradiations minimized the number of protons scattered out of the stack and the neutron production within the stack. After irradiation, the short-lived radionuclides e.g. 22Na, 7Be, 24Na, 54Mn, and 56Co were determined using gamma-ray spectroscopy. 14C, 10Be, and 26Al were determined using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Our main objective is to measure the production cross sections of long-lived radionuclides. We have reported new cross section values for making 10Be from O and 14C from O, Mg, Al, Si, Fe, and Ni [1,2]. Using these new results, better estimates for the solar proton flux over several time periods in the past were determined [3]. However, no single value for the SCR flux could explain the measured data from different time periods. Further cross section measurements are being made to verify that the values used in these estimates were accurate. Irradiations designed to give good cross section measurements for long-lived radionuclides also give good cross section measurements for short-lived radionuclides. Results will be presented for proton production cross sections of 22Na from Mg, Al and Si, and 54Mn and 56Co from Fe and Ni; some values at low

  14. How the University of Texas system responded to the need for interim storage of low-level radioactive waste materials.

    PubMed

    Emery, Robert J

    2012-11-01

    Faced with the prospect of being unable to permanently dispose of low-level radioactive wastes (LLRW) generated from teaching, research, and patient care activities, component institutions of the University of Texas System worked collaboratively to create a dedicated interim storage facility to be used until a permanent disposal facility became available. Located in a remote section of West Texas, the University of Texas System Interim Storage Facility (UTSISF) was licensed and put into operation in 1993, and since then has provided safe and secure interim storage for up to 350 drums of dry solid LLRW at any given time. Interim storage capability provided needed relief to component institutions, whose on-site waste facilities could have possibly become overburdened. Experiences gained from the licensing and operation of the site are described, and as a new permanent LLRW disposal facility emerges in Texas, a potential new role for the storage facility as a surge capacity storage site in times of natural disasters and emergencies is also discussed.

  15. How the University of Texas system responded to the need for interim storage of low-level radioactive waste materials.

    PubMed

    Emery, Robert J

    2012-11-01

    Faced with the prospect of being unable to permanently dispose of low-level radioactive wastes (LLRW) generated from teaching, research, and patient care activities, component institutions of the University of Texas System worked collaboratively to create a dedicated interim storage facility to be used until a permanent disposal facility became available. Located in a remote section of West Texas, the University of Texas System Interim Storage Facility (UTSISF) was licensed and put into operation in 1993, and since then has provided safe and secure interim storage for up to 350 drums of dry solid LLRW at any given time. Interim storage capability provided needed relief to component institutions, whose on-site waste facilities could have possibly become overburdened. Experiences gained from the licensing and operation of the site are described, and as a new permanent LLRW disposal facility emerges in Texas, a potential new role for the storage facility as a surge capacity storage site in times of natural disasters and emergencies is also discussed. PMID:23026972

  16. Meeting Student Needs in the Freedom Writers Movie: An Activity in a Classroom Management Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanase, Madalina

    2013-01-01

    The study described in this paper explored the understanding pre-service teachers' have of PK-12 student needs (i.e. Belonging, Mastery, Independence, and Generosity) and the importance of meeting these needs in a climate of Invitational Education. 71 undergraduate teacher education candidates enrolled in a Classroom Management course at a…

  17. The Role of Psychological Needs in Ceasing Music and Music Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Paul; McPherson, Gary E.; Davidson, Jane W.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses individuals' decisions to continue or cease playing a musical instrument from a basic psychological needs perspective. Participants began learning music 10 years prior to the study and were the subject of previous longitudinal research. They completed a survey investigating the three psychological needs of competence,…

  18. Surface modification of active material structures in battery electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Michael; Tikhonov, Konstantin

    2016-02-02

    Provided herein are methods of processing electrode active material structures for use in electrochemical cells or, more specifically, methods of forming surface layers on these structures. The structures are combined with a liquid to form a mixture. The mixture includes a surface reagent that chemically reacts and forms a surface layer covalently bound to the structures. The surface reagent may be a part of the initial liquid or added to the mixture after the liquid is combined with the structures. In some embodiments, the mixture may be processed to form a powder containing the structures with the surface layer thereon. Alternatively, the mixture may be deposited onto a current collecting substrate and dried to form an electrode layer. Furthermore, the liquid may be an electrolyte containing the surface reagent and a salt. The liquid soaks the previously arranged electrodes in order to contact the structures with the surface reagent.

  19. Volunteer Activities and Their Relationship to Motivational Needs: A Study of the Stamp Union Program Research Report 18-89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balenger, Victoria J.; And Others

    Volunteer student union programming board members at the University of Maryland, College Park were asked to designate the five programming board activities or experiences that they considered to be the most appealing. Activities and experiences had been previously rated according to how they met motivational needs for achievement, affiliation, or…

  20. Overview of Indian activities on fusion reactor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Srikumar

    2014-12-01

    This paper on overview of Indian activities on fusion reactor materials describes in brief the efforts India has made to develop materials for the first wall of a tokamak, its blanket and superconducting magnet coils. Through a systematic and scientific approach, India has developed and commercially produced reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel that is comparable to Eurofer 97. Powder of low activation ferritic/martensitic oxide dispersion strengthened steel with characteristics desired for its application in the first wall of a tokamak has been produced on the laboratory scale. V-4Cr-4Ti alloy was also prepared in the laboratory, and kinetics of hydrogen absorption in this was investigated. Cu-1 wt%Cr-0.1 wt%Zr - an alloy meant for use as heat transfer elements for hypervapotrons and heat sink for the first wall - was developed and characterized in detail for its aging behavior. The role of addition of a small quantity of Zr in its improved fatigue performance was delineated, and its diffusion bonding with both W and stainless steel was achieved using Ni as an interlayer. The alloy was produced in large quantities and used for manufacturing both the heat transfer elements and components for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). India has proposed to install and test a lead-lithium cooled ceramic breeder test blanket module (LLCB-TBM) at ITER. To meet this objective, efforts have been made to produce and characterize Li2TiO3 pebbles, and also improve the thermal conductivity of packed beds of these pebbles. Liquid metal loops have been set up and corrosion behavior of RAFM steel in flowing Pb-Li eutectic has been studied in the presence as well as absence of magnetic fields. To prevent permeation of tritium and reduce the magneto-hydro-dynamic drag, processes have been developed for coating alumina on RAFM steel. Apart from these activities, different approaches being attempted to make the U-shaped first wall of the TBM box

  1. Engineering Fluorogen Activating Proteins into Self-Assembling Materials

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Matthew J.; Liu, Wen; Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Wen, Yi; Drennen, Zachary; Waggoner, Alan S.; Meng, Wilson S.

    2013-01-01

    We present herein characteristics of a conjugate in which dL5, a fluorogen-activating protein (FAP) and AEAEAKAK, an amphiphilic peptide are combined to form a solid-phase fluorescence-detection platform. The FAP dL5 is a covalently linked dimer of two identical light chain variable fragments which activates the fluorescence of the fluorogen malachite green (MG). The amphiphilic peptide of sequence AEAEAKAK is a building block of stimuli-responsive materials that undergoes sol-gel phase transition at high ionic strengths. We hypothesize that the novel bi-functional protein containing both the FAP and the amphiphile, termed dL5_EAK, co-assembles with the self-assembling peptide [AEAEAKAK]2 (EAK16-II) to form an insoluble membrane composite whereby the fluorescence enhancement function of the FAP domain remains intact. Denaturing polyacrylamide electrophoresis indicated that greater than 78% of dL5_EAK incorporates into the EAK16-II membrane. Conversely, less than 32% of dL5 without the EAK sequence associates with the insoluble fraction of EAK16-II in buffers. Membranes containing dL5_EAK and EAK16-II exhibited at least 4-fold higher fluorescence intensity compared to mixtures containing dL5 and EAK16-II. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of particulates, presumably FAPs, scattering on the membrane fibrils. The evidence suggests a system of materials that can be developed into in situ-forming local sensors by immobilizing dL5 into coacervate, on which MG can be detected. It is envisioned that dL5 membranes can be established in diseased locales to monitor infiltration and migration of inflammatory cells marked with antibodies conjugated to MG. PMID:23573960

  2. 77 FR 38395 - Agency Information Collection Activities (Advertising, Sales, and Enrollment Materials, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activities (Advertising, Sales, and Enrollment Materials, and... ``OMB Control No. 2900-0682.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Advertising, Sales, and Enrollment... advertising, sales materials, enrollment materials, or candidate handbooks that educational institutions...

  3. Activities for Teaching about Hazardous Materials in the Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Robert W.; And Others

    Materials containing hazardous substances present serious problems to human health and to the health of the environment. There are many potential problems related to the site of a house or apartment, the construction materials used in the house or the apartment, products and materials used in and around the home, and disposal of materials.…

  4. Estrogenic activity of dental materials and bisphenol-A related chemicals in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Y; Nakamura, M

    2000-09-01

    Twenty-eight chemicals used as dental materials and bisphenol-A related chemicals were diluted with DMSO to concentrations ranging from 10(-7) to 10(-3) M and tested for estrogenicity. Bisphenol-A (BPA), bisphenol-F (BPF) and bisphenol-A-bischloroformate (BPACF) showed estrogenic activity using the yeast two-hybrid system, and BPA, BPF, BPACF and bisphenol-S (BPS) showed estrogenic activity using the fluorescence polarization system. However, none of the remaining chemicals and none of the dental materials showed any activity at concentrations between 10(-7) and 10(-3) M. Although BPA, BPF, BPACF, bisphenol-A-dimethacrylate and BPS showed estrogenic activity in the E-screen test, the remaining chemicals did not. Thus, most of the chemicals showed consistent results, either positive or negative, by the three testing methods, while two chemicals showed conflicting results. Further studies, together with in vivo and epidemiological examinations, are required. Elucidation of the structure-activity relationships of these chemicals is also needed to estimate the estrogenicity of a chemical from its structure.

  5. The Need for Play & Play-Like Activities in the Junior Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Allan

    1992-01-01

    Draws from personal experiences in teaching a fourth-grade class in Canada to highlight the benefits for students of incorporating into the curriculum such playlike activities as shaping plasticine models, painting, cutting and pasting, and playing games. Identifies skills reinforced by particular activities and the benefits of the activities to…

  6. [Physical activity adapted to the obese patients' needs: which assessments for what kind of prescription?].

    PubMed

    Lecoultre, V; Giusti, V

    2015-03-25

    Physical activity is a key element for the obese patient willing to lose weight. The main aim of physical activity is to contribute to produce, and maintain, a negative energy balance. A recent approach suggests to focus on the intensity eliciting the maximal lipid oxidation rate. Physical activity prescription should however be adapted to the patient's physiological and metabolic profile. Determining the physical fitness of the patient during an incremental test and assessing body composition may be central elements determining physical activity prescription. Provided the activities are adapted to the patient's profile, numerous physical activities may be performed by the obese patient. A practical, clinical approach, based upon the metabolic profiling of the patient is proposed in this article.

  7. Moonstruck primates: owl monkeys (Aotus) need moonlight for nocturnal activity in their natural environment.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Duque, Eduardo; de la Iglesia, Horacio; Erkert, Hans G

    2010-01-01

    Primates show activity patterns ranging from nocturnality to diurnality, with a few species showing activity both during day and night. Among anthropoids (monkeys, apes and humans), nocturnality is only present in the Central and South American owl monkey genus Aotus. Unlike other tropical Aotus species, the Azara's owl monkeys (A. azarai) of the subtropics have switched their activity pattern from strict nocturnality to one that also includes regular diurnal activity. Harsher climate, food availability, and the lack of predators or diurnal competitors, have all been proposed as factors favoring evolutionary switches in primate activity patterns. However, the observational nature of most field studies has limited an understanding of the mechanisms responsible for this switch in activity patterns. The goal of our study was to evaluate the hypothesis that masking, namely the stimulatory and/or inhibitory/disinhibitory effects of environmental factors on synchronized circadian locomotor activity, is a key determinant of the unusual activity pattern of Azara's owl monkeys. We use continuous long-term (6-18 months) 5-min-binned activity records obtained with actimeter collars fitted to wild owl monkeys (n =  10 individuals) to show that this different pattern results from strong masking of activity by the inhibiting and enhancing effects of ambient luminance and temperature. Conclusive evidence for the direct masking effect of light is provided by data showing that locomotor activity was almost completely inhibited when moonlight was shadowed during three lunar eclipses. Temperature also negatively masked locomotor activity, and this masking was manifested even under optimal light conditions. Our results highlight the importance of the masking of circadian rhythmicity as a determinant of nocturnality in wild owl monkeys and suggest that the stimulatory effects of dim light in nocturnal primates may have been selected as an adaptive response to moonlight. Furthermore

  8. Moonstruck primates: owl monkeys (Aotus) need moonlight for nocturnal activity in their natural environment.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Duque, Eduardo; de la Iglesia, Horacio; Erkert, Hans G

    2010-09-03

    Primates show activity patterns ranging from nocturnality to diurnality, with a few species showing activity both during day and night. Among anthropoids (monkeys, apes and humans), nocturnality is only present in the Central and South American owl monkey genus Aotus. Unlike other tropical Aotus species, the Azara's owl monkeys (A. azarai) of the subtropics have switched their activity pattern from strict nocturnality to one that also includes regular diurnal activity. Harsher climate, food availability, and the lack of predators or diurnal competitors, have all been proposed as factors favoring evolutionary switches in primate activity patterns. However, the observational nature of most field studies has limited an understanding of the mechanisms responsible for this switch in activity patterns. The goal of our study was to evaluate the hypothesis that masking, namely the stimulatory and/or inhibitory/disinhibitory effects of environmental factors on synchronized circadian locomotor activity, is a key determinant of the unusual activity pattern of Azara's owl monkeys. We use continuous long-term (6-18 months) 5-min-binned activity records obtained with actimeter collars fitted to wild owl monkeys (n =  10 individuals) to show that this different pattern results from strong masking of activity by the inhibiting and enhancing effects of ambient luminance and temperature. Conclusive evidence for the direct masking effect of light is provided by data showing that locomotor activity was almost completely inhibited when moonlight was shadowed during three lunar eclipses. Temperature also negatively masked locomotor activity, and this masking was manifested even under optimal light conditions. Our results highlight the importance of the masking of circadian rhythmicity as a determinant of nocturnality in wild owl monkeys and suggest that the stimulatory effects of dim light in nocturnal primates may have been selected as an adaptive response to moonlight. Furthermore

  9. Moonstruck Primates: Owl Monkeys (Aotus) Need Moonlight for Nocturnal Activity in Their Natural Environment

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Duque, Eduardo; de la Iglesia, Horacio; Erkert, Hans G.

    2010-01-01

    Primates show activity patterns ranging from nocturnality to diurnality, with a few species showing activity both during day and night. Among anthropoids (monkeys, apes and humans), nocturnality is only present in the Central and South American owl monkey genus Aotus. Unlike other tropical Aotus species, the Azara's owl monkeys (A. azarai) of the subtropics have switched their activity pattern from strict nocturnality to one that also includes regular diurnal activity. Harsher climate, food availability, and the lack of predators or diurnal competitors, have all been proposed as factors favoring evolutionary switches in primate activity patterns. However, the observational nature of most field studies has limited an understanding of the mechanisms responsible for this switch in activity patterns. The goal of our study was to evaluate the hypothesis that masking, namely the stimulatory and/or inhibitory/disinhibitory effects of environmental factors on synchronized circadian locomotor activity, is a key determinant of the unusual activity pattern of Azara's owl monkeys. We use continuous long-term (6–18 months) 5-min-binned activity records obtained with actimeter collars fitted to wild owl monkeys (n = 10 individuals) to show that this different pattern results from strong masking of activity by the inhibiting and enhancing effects of ambient luminance and temperature. Conclusive evidence for the direct masking effect of light is provided by data showing that locomotor activity was almost completely inhibited when moonlight was shadowed during three lunar eclipses. Temperature also negatively masked locomotor activity, and this masking was manifested even under optimal light conditions. Our results highlight the importance of the masking of circadian rhythmicity as a determinant of nocturnality in wild owl monkeys and suggest that the stimulatory effects of dim light in nocturnal primates may have been selected as an adaptive response to moonlight

  10. A Needs Assessment of Professional Development Activities for Probationary Faculty at Seneca College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Kerry

    Thirty-one probationary faculty from Seneca College of Applied Arts and Technology (Ontario, Canada) participated in a research study that examined their individual and collective professional development needs. The study was conducted in the fall of 1991. Probationary faculty completed a survey instrument that was comprised of three parts. Part 1…

  11. Needs Assessment Project: Content Analysis of Legislative Activities and Newspaper Articles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shively, Joe E.; Prentis, Catherine

    Following issuance of an administrative policy statement detailing procedures for establishing long-term institutional relationships, the National Institute of Education (NIE) formally requested the Appalachia Educational Laboratory (AEL) to conduct a regionwide assessment of educational needs. Four major events are associated with the…

  12. Opening the Creative Mind of High Need for Cognitive Closure Individuals through Activation of Uncreative Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Lay See; Leung, Angela K.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on the integrative system theory of creativity combining the person, process, and press perspectives, this research offers the first evidence of how high-need-for-cognitive-closure (NFC) individuals' creative mind can be opened up, by making them become more cognizant of uncreative ideas as consensually invalid solutions to creative…

  13. Competency Gauged Writing Activities for Middle Grade Students Prompted by Needs of Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Jan; And Others

    A cooperative program conducted by the Logan (Utah) City School District and IBM Corporation used computers in the classroom to develop new teaching and career guidance approaches while enhancing students' process writing skills. The program included units designed for student and teacher awareness of the impacts of technology, the need for a new…

  14. (Bio)hybrid materials based on optically active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitzig, Manuela; Härtling, Thomas; Opitz, Jörg

    2014-03-01

    In this contribution we provide an overview of current investigations on optically active particles (nanodiamonds, upconversion phospors) for biohybrid and sensing applications. Due to their outstanding properties nanodiamonds gain attention in various application elds such as microelectronics, optical monitoring, medicine, and biotechnology. Beyond the typical diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity and extreme hardness, the carbon surface and its various functional groups enable diverse chemical and biological surface functionalization. At Fraunhofer IKTS-MD we develop a customization of material surfaces via integration of chemically modi ed nanodiamonds at variable surfaces, e.g bone implants and pipelines. For the rst purpose, nanodiamonds are covalently modi ed at their surface with amino or phosphate functionalities that are known to increase adhesion to bone or titanium alloys. The second type of surface is approached via mechanical implementation into coatings. Besides nanodiamonds, we also investigate the properties of upconversion phosphors. In our contribution we show how upconversion phosphors are used to verify sterilization processes via a change of optical properties due to sterilizing electron beam exposure.

  15. Relationship Status and Activated Kin Support: The Role of Need and Norms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazelis, Joan Maya; Mykyta, Laryssa

    2011-01-01

    Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, we examined whether mothers' (N = 4,127) and fathers' (N = 3,405) relationship status influenced their activation of financial support from relatives over time. We found that relationship status influenced the activation of financial support from relatives but that the effects…

  16. Physical Activity Benefits and Needs in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Systematic Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlo, Pamela; Klein, Penelope J.

    2011-01-01

    Regular physical activity is vital for adult individuals with intellectual disabilities. The purpose of this review was to assess critically the evidence on effectiveness of physical activity interventions for adults with intellectual disability. An electronic database search was conducted. Research was then assessed for methodological rigor, and…

  17. The Need for a Harmonized Repository for Next-Generation Human Activity Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multi-tiered human time-activity-location data can inform many efforts to describe human exposures to air pollutants and other chemicals on a range of temporal and spatial scales. In the last decade, EPA's Consolidated Human Activity Database (CHAD) has served as a harmonized rep...

  18. Out-of-School Literacy Activities of Affluent Early Adolescents: Selective Competencies and Hidden Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hester, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have documented the literacy activities in an after-school setting of affluent early adolescents assigned to remedial reading. This may be because these students are not considered to be at risk of academic failure. The out-of-school literacy activities of 3 sixth-grade students were examined in this qualitative research. Multiple data…

  19. Models, Databases, and Simulation Tools Needed for the Realization of Integrated Computational Materials Engineering. Proceedings of the Symposium Held at Materials Science and Technology 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M. (Editor); Wong, Terry T. (Editor)

    2011-01-01

    Topics covered include: An Annotative Review of Multiscale Modeling and its Application to Scales Inherent in the Field of ICME; and A Multiscale, Nonlinear, Modeling Framework Enabling the Design and Analysis of Composite Materials and Structures.

  20. A decaying factor accounts for contained activity in neuronal networks with no need of hierarchical or modular organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amancio, Diego R.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N., Jr.; Costa, Luciano da F.

    2012-11-01

    The mechanisms responsible for containing activity in systems represented by networks are crucial in various phenomena, for example, in diseases such as epilepsy that affect the neuronal networks and for information dissemination in social networks. The first models to account for contained activity included triggering and inhibition processes, but they cannot be applied to social networks where inhibition is clearly absent. A recent model showed that contained activity can be achieved with no need of inhibition processes provided that the network is subdivided into modules (communities). In this paper, we introduce a new concept inspired in the Hebbian theory, through which containment of activity is achieved by incorporating a dynamics based on a decaying activity in a random walk mechanism preferential to the node activity. Upon selecting the decay coefficient within a proper range, we observed sustained activity in all the networks tested, namely, random, Barabási-Albert and geographical networks. The generality of this finding was confirmed by showing that modularity is no longer needed if the dynamics based on the integrate-and-fire dynamics incorporated the decay factor. Taken together, these results provide a proof of principle that persistent, restrained network activation might occur in the absence of any particular topological structure. This may be the reason why neuronal activity does not spread out to the entire neuronal network, even when no special topological organization exists. .

  1. The Need for a Strategic R&D Roadmap for Active Ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarinha-Matos, Luis; Afsarmanesh, Hamideh

    The application of the collaborative networks paradigm, combined with a new generation of collaboration-support platforms, can offer a promising approach to active ageing and better use of the talents of senior professionals. This paper introduces a roadmapping initiative focused on elaboration of a new vision for extending professional active life. To support this vision, a strategic research plan for the development of a new collaborative ecosystem, covering the social, organizational, and technological perspectives, is being designed.

  2. A Profile of Adults Needing Assistance with Activities of Daily Living, 1991-1992. Disability Statistics Report 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Jae; LaPlante, Mitchell P.

    This report uses data from the 1990 and 1991 samples of the Survey of Income and Program Participation to construct a profile of the U.S. noninstitutionalized adult population needing assistance with activities of daily living (ADL) and to estimate the size of the population eligible for federal personal assistance services (PAS) under different…

  3. [Need for rheologically active, vasoactive and metabolically active substances in the initial treatment of acute acoustic trauma].

    PubMed

    Pilgramm, M; Schumann, K

    1986-10-01

    Two rheologically active and 8 vasoactive and metabolically active substances were compared in eight independent studies, some of which were randomised and double blind, on 400 patients who had suffered acute acoustic trauma. The control group was given saline. Spontaneous recovery was excluded as far as possible. The following substances were tested: Dextran 40, hydroxyethyl starch 40/0.5, naftidrofurylhydrogenoxalate, Vinpocetin, betahistine, pentoxifylline, flunaricine, Regeneresen AU 4 and 0.9% saline. All groups showed superior results to the control group in both long-term and short-term tests with respect to hearing gain and tinnitis improvement. The rheologically effective substances showed no statistically significant variations. None of the vasoactive or metabolically active substances used as adjunctive therapy improved the results achieved with rheologically effective substances alone. These results demonstrate that acute acoustic trauma can be most effectively treated by rheologically active substances; vasoactive and metabolically active substances are unnecessary. Hyperbaric oxygenation is advantageous as an adjunctive therapy. PMID:2432041

  4. Determining the amount of physical activity needed for long-term weight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wier, L. T.; Ayers, G. W.; Jackson, A. S.; Rossum, A. C.; Poston, W. S.; Foreyt, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate prospectively the influence of habitual physical activity on body weight of men and women and to develop a model that defines the role of physical activity on longitudinal weight change. DESIGN AND SETTING: Occupational cohort study conducted for a mean of 5.5 y. SUBJECTS: A total of 496 (341 male and 155 female) NASA/Johnson Space Center employees who completed the 3 month education component of the employee health-related fitness program and remained involved for a minimum of 2 y. MEASUREMENTS: Body weights were measured at baseline (T1) and follow-up (T2), and habitual physical activity was obtained from the mean of multiple ratings of the 11-point (0-10) NASA Activity Scale (NAS) recorded quarterly between T1 and T2. Other measures included age, gender, VO(2 max) obtained from maximal treadmill testing, body mass index (BMI), and body fat percentage. RESULTS: Multiple regression demonstrated that mean NAS, T1 weight, aging and gender all influence long-term T2 weight. T1 age was significant for the men only. Independently, each increase in mean NAS significantly (P<0.01) reduced T2 weight in men (b=-0.91 kg; 95% CI:-1.4 to-0.42 kg) and women (b=-2.14 kg; 95% CI:-2.93 to-1.35 kg). Mean NAS had a greater effect on T2 weight as T1 weight increased, and the relationship was dose-dependent. CONCLUSIONS: Habitual physical activity is a significant source of long-term weight change. The use of self-reported activity level is helpful in predicting long-term weight changes and may be used by health care professionals when counseling patients about the value of physical activity for weight control.

  5. Characteristics and antimicrobial activity of copper-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bowen

    In this study, copper vermiculite was synthesized, and the characteristics, antimicrobial effects, and chemical stability of copper vermiculite were investigated. Two types of copper vermiculite materials, micron-sized copper vermiculite (MCV) and exfoliated copper vermiculite (MECV), are selected for this research. Since most of the functional fillers used in industry products, such as plastics, paints, rubbers, papers, and textiles prefer micron-scaled particles, micron-sized copper vermiculite was prepared by jet-milling vermiculite. Meanwhile, since the exfoliated vermiculite has very unique properties, such as high porosity, specific surface area, high aspect ratio of laminates, and low density, and has been extensively utilized as a functional additives, exfoliated copper vermiculite also was synthesized and investigated. The antibacterial efficiency of copper vermiculite was qualitatively evaluated by the diffusion methods (both liquid diffusion and solid diffusion) against the most common pathogenic species: Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae). The result showed that the release velocity of copper from copper vermiculite is very slow. However, copper vermiculite clearly has excellent antibacterial efficiency to S. aureus, K. pneumoniae and E. coli. The strongest antibacterial ability of copper vermiculite is its action on S. aureus. The antibacterial efficiency of copper vermiculite was also quantitatively evaluated by determining the reduction rate (death rate) of E. coli versus various levels of copper vermiculite. 10 ppm of copper vermiculite in solution is sufficient to reduce the cell population of E. coli, while the untreated vermiculite had no antibacterial activity. The slow release of copper revealed that the antimicrobial effect of copper vermiculite was due to the strong interactions between copper ions and bacteria cells. Exfoliated copper vermiculite has even stronger

  6. A Model of Research Paper Writing Instructional Materials for Academic Writing Course: "Needs & Documents Analysis and Model Design"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghufron, M. Ali; Saleh, Mursid; Warsono; Sofwan, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at designing a model of instructional materials for Academic Writing Course focusing on research paper writing. The model was designed based on the Curriculum at the English Education Study Program, Faculty of Language and Art Education of IKIP PGRI Bojonegoro, East Java, Indonesia. This model was developed in order to improve…

  7. E-Learning Activity-Based Material Recommendation System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Feng-jung; Shih, Bai-jiun

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Computer based systems have great potential for delivering learning material. However, problems are encountered, such as: difficulty of Learning resource sharing, high redundancy of learning material, and deficiency of the course brief. In order to solve these problems, this paper aims to propose an automatic inquiring system for learning…

  8. Parents' Perceptions of Health and Physical Activity Needs of Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menear, Kristi Sayers

    2007-01-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome typically have low fitness levels and obesity despite data that indicate physiological gains from physical activity and exercise interventions. Low fitness levels and obesity in individuals with Down syndrome may be related to sedentary lifestyles, social and recreational opportunities, or low motivation to be…

  9. Promoting Physical Activity in Elementary Schools: Needs Assessment and a Pilot Study of Brain Breaks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perera, Thushanthi; Frei, Simone; Frei, Balz; Bobe, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    A sedentary life style contributes to many chronic diseases and poor educational performance. Since elementary school-aged children spend most wakeful hours in school, classroom teachers are essential for providing physical activity (PA) breaks during school. As first objective, we assessed current PA levels for Oregon public elementary schools…

  10. Dissolution of a surfactant-containing active porous material.

    PubMed

    Brielles, Nelly; Chantraine, Florence; Viana, Marylène; Chulia, Dominique; Branlard, Paul; Rubinstenn, Gilles; Lequeux, François; Mondain-Monval, Olivier

    2008-12-15

    We have studied the imbibition and dissolution of a porous material in two separate scenarios: (1) when the porous material contains a surfactant powder and (2) when the porous material is dissolved in a surfactant solution. We show that the dissolution kinetics in both scenarios is significantly affected by the presence of the surfactant and results in an increase in the characteristic imbibition time of the porous material, which can be well understood in the framework of the classical law of capillarity. Slowing of the imbibition kinetics was found to be affected by a modification of the liquid wetting properties, but is also affected by a variation in the solubility of the porous material in the presence of the surfactant. Furthermore, there is a depletion effect of the surfactant inside the rising liquid, which is in good agreement with previous work and theoretical predictions.

  11. Reference activity and the external user: confluence of community needs at a medical school branch library.

    PubMed Central

    Landwirth, T K; Wilson, M L; Dorsch, J

    1988-01-01

    The allocation of reference services between primary and secondary users constantly challenges academic medical libraries. Routine statistics at a medical school branch library suggested that over 40% of its reference transactions involved persons not affiliated with the university. To investigate this finding, a survey of reference activity was conducted using measurement techniques unobtrusive to the user. Fifteen data items were recorded, including user status, type of question, intended use of information requested, status of staff taking request, and staff time spent. Survey results showed that nonaffiliates accounted for 51% of reference activity. Based on this documented data, definitive reference guidelines addressing hours, priority of requests, charges, and staffing patterns can now be developed. Findings will also assist in evaluating the library's regional role, in formulating marketing strategies, and in determining library objectives. PMID:3416093

  12. Unsatisfied basic needs of older patients in emergency care environments - obstacles to an active role in decision making.

    PubMed

    Nydén, Kristoffer; Petersson, Martin; Nyström, Maria

    2003-03-01

    Little attention is paid in Emergency Care Units (ECUs) in Sweden to the special needs of older people. The aim of this study was thus to analyse older people's basic needs in the emergency care environment. The study was carried out with a life-world interpretative approach, and the theoretical framework for interpretation was Abraham Maslow's theory of motivation and personality. Seven informants aged between 65 and 88 years, with various experiences of being patients with urgent as well as non-urgent health-related problems, were interviewed about their experiences of ECU care. Their basic needs at the lower levels of Maslow's hierarchy were well-represented in the data. Higher needs, such as desire to know and understand, appeared to be totally neglected. Safety needs dominated the whole situation. Our conclusion is that standards of care must be developed in Sweden to make older patients feel safer and more secure in ECUs. Furthermore, the principles of nursing care for older patients need to be defined in order to encourage them to take an active part in their own health process.

  13. Assessment of the nutrition and physical activity education needs of low-income, rural mothers: can technology play a role?

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Nancy L; Billing, Amy S; Desmond, Sharon M; Gold, Robert S; Tournas-Hardt, Amy

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of low-income, rural mothers regarding their need for nutrition and physical activity education and the role of technology in addressing those needs. Quantitative and qualitative research was combined to examine the nature and scope of the issues faced by this target population. Women who were currently receiving food stamps and had children in nursery school to eighth grade were recruited through a state database to participate in a telephone survey (N = 146) and focus groups (N = 56). Low-income, rural mothers were aware of and practiced many health behaviors related to nutrition and physical activity, but they faced additional barriers due to their income level, rural place of residence, and having children. They reported controlling the fat content in the food they cooked and integrating fruits and vegetables but showed less interest in increasing fiber consumption. They reported knowing little about physical activity recommendations, and their reported activity patterns were likely inflated because of seeing housework and child care as exercise. To stretch their food budget, the majority reported practicing typical shopping and budgeting skills, and many reported skills particularly useful in rural areas: hunting, fishing, and canning. Over two-thirds of the survey respondents reported computer access and previous Internet use, and most of those not yet online intended to use the Internet in the future. Those working in rural communities need to consider technology as a way to reach traditionally underserved populations like low-income mothers. PMID:17696049

  14. Assessment of the nutrition and physical activity education needs of low-income, rural mothers: can technology play a role?

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Nancy L; Billing, Amy S; Desmond, Sharon M; Gold, Robert S; Tournas-Hardt, Amy

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of low-income, rural mothers regarding their need for nutrition and physical activity education and the role of technology in addressing those needs. Quantitative and qualitative research was combined to examine the nature and scope of the issues faced by this target population. Women who were currently receiving food stamps and had children in nursery school to eighth grade were recruited through a state database to participate in a telephone survey (N = 146) and focus groups (N = 56). Low-income, rural mothers were aware of and practiced many health behaviors related to nutrition and physical activity, but they faced additional barriers due to their income level, rural place of residence, and having children. They reported controlling the fat content in the food they cooked and integrating fruits and vegetables but showed less interest in increasing fiber consumption. They reported knowing little about physical activity recommendations, and their reported activity patterns were likely inflated because of seeing housework and child care as exercise. To stretch their food budget, the majority reported practicing typical shopping and budgeting skills, and many reported skills particularly useful in rural areas: hunting, fishing, and canning. Over two-thirds of the survey respondents reported computer access and previous Internet use, and most of those not yet online intended to use the Internet in the future. Those working in rural communities need to consider technology as a way to reach traditionally underserved populations like low-income mothers.

  15. Electron-beam activated thermal sputtering of thermoelectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jinsong; Dravid, Vinayak P.; He Jiaqing; Han, Mi-Kyung; Sootsman, Joseph R.; Girard, Steven; Arachchige, Indika U.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2011-08-15

    Thermoelectricity and Seebeck effect have long been observed and validated in bulk materials. With the development of advanced tools of materials characterization, here we report the first observation of such an effect in the nanometer scale: in situ directional sputtering of several thermoelectric materials inside electron microscopes. The temperature gradient introduced by the electron beam creates a voltage-drop across the samples, which enhances spontaneous sputtering of specimen ions. The sputtering occurs along a preferential direction determined by the direction of the temperature gradient. A large number of nanoparticles form and accumulate away from the beam location as a result. The sputtering and re-crystallization are found to occur at temperatures far below the melting points of bulk materials. The sputtering occurs even when a liquid nitrogen cooling holder is used to keep the overall temperature at -170 deg. C. This unique phenomenon that occurred in the nanometer scale may provide useful clues to understanding the mechanism of thermoelectric effect.

  16. Electron-beam activated thermal sputtering of thermoelectric materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; He, J.; Han, M-K.; Sootsman, J. R.; Girard, S.; Arachchige, I. U.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Dravid, V. P.

    2011-08-01

    Thermoelectricity and Seebeck effect have long been observed and validated in bulk materials. With the development of advanced tools of materials characterization, here we report the first observation of such an effect in the nanometer scale: in situ directional sputtering of several thermoelectric materials inside electron microscopes. The temperature gradient introduced by the electron beam creates a voltage-drop across the samples, which enhances spontaneous sputtering of specimen ions. The sputtering occurs along a preferential direction determined by the direction of the temperature gradient. A large number of nanoparticles form and accumulate away from the beam location as a result. The sputtering and re-crystallization are found to occur at temperatures far below the melting points of bulk materials. The sputtering occurs even when a liquid nitrogen cooling holder is used to keep the overall temperature at -170 C. This unique phenomenon that occurred in the nanometer scale may provide useful clues to understanding the mechanism of thermoelectric effect.

  17. Number of accelerometer monitoring days needed for stable group-level estimates of activity.

    PubMed

    Wolff-Hughes, Dana L; McClain, James J; Dodd, Kevin W; Berrigan, David; Troiano, Richard P

    2016-09-01

    To determine the number and distribution of days required to produce stable group-level estimates of a 7 d mean for common accelerometer-derived activity measures. Data from the 2003-2006 NHANES were used in this analysis. The sample included 986 youth (6-19 year) and 2532 adults (⩾20 year) with 7 d of  ⩾10 h of wear. Accelerometer measures included minutes of inactive, light physical activity, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA); and total activity counts/d. Twenty-five alternative protocols were bootstrapped with 50 000 samples drawn for each protocol. Alternative protocols included: 1-6 random days, Saturday plus 1-5 random weekdays (WD), Sunday plus 1-5 random WD, 1 random weekend day (WE) plus 1-5 WD, and both WE plus 1-4 random WD. Relative difference was calculated between the 7 d mean and alternative protocol mean (((alternative protocol mean - 7 d mean)/7 d mean) (*) 100). Adult MVPA is used as an example; however, similar trends were observed across age groups and variables except adult inactive time, which was stable across protocols. The 7 d mean for adult MVPA was 44.1(0.9) min d(-1). The mean bias for any 1-6 random days ranged from  -0.0(0.3) to 0.0(0.2) min d(-1) with a relative difference of  -0.1 to 0.0%. For protocols with non-random components, bias ranged from  -1.4(0.2) to 0.6(0.1) min d(-1) with relative difference ranging from  -7.2 to 3.1%. Simulation data suggest that stable estimates of group-level means can be obtained from as few as one randomly selected monitoring day from a sampled week. On the other hand, estimates using non-random selection of weekend days may be significantly biased. Purposeful sampling that disproportionally forces inclusion of weekend data in analyses should be discouraged. PMID:27510765

  18. Long-term effectiveness and mediators of a need-supportive physical activity coaching among Flemish sedentary employees.

    PubMed

    Van Hoecke, Ann-Sophie; Delecluse, Christophe; Opdenacker, Joke; Lipkens, Luc; Martien, Sofie; Boen, Filip

    2013-09-01

    This study examined the long-term and mediation effects of a need-supportive coaching programme on physical activity. Sedentary employees (n = 92) of the university of Leuven received 4 months of physical activity coaching, based on the self-determination theory, by coaches with a bachelor's degree in kinesiology who are specializing in health-related physical activity (n = 30). The programme consisted of a limited number of individual contact moments (i.e. an intake session, three follow-up contacts and an out-take session), either face-to-face, by phone or by e-mail. Self-reported physical activity, social support, self-efficacy and autonomous motivation were assessed in the coaching group (n = 92) and a control group (n = 34) at three moments: before the intervention (i.e. pre-test), after the intervention (i.e. post-test) and 1 year after pre-test measurements (i.e. follow-up test). Results revealed significant 3 (time) × 2 (groups) interaction effects on strenuous and total physical activity. Moreover, whereas the control group remained stable from pre- to post-test, the coaching group increased significantly in moderate, strenuous and total physical activity. Additionally, the coaching group increased significantly in mild, moderate, strenuous and total physical activity from pre- to follow-up tests, whereas the control group did not change. Bootstrapping analyses indicated that self-efficacy and autonomous motivation significantly mediated the intervention effect on physical activity from pre- to post-test, while social support significantly mediated the long-term effect. This study provides evidence for the long-term effectiveness of a need-supportive physical activity programme that might be efficient at the community level.

  19. Characteristics and antimicrobial activity of copper-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bowen

    In this study, copper vermiculite was synthesized, and the characteristics, antimicrobial effects, and chemical stability of copper vermiculite were investigated. Two types of copper vermiculite materials, micron-sized copper vermiculite (MCV) and exfoliated copper vermiculite (MECV), are selected for this research. Since most of the functional fillers used in industry products, such as plastics, paints, rubbers, papers, and textiles prefer micron-scaled particles, micron-sized copper vermiculite was prepared by jet-milling vermiculite. Meanwhile, since the exfoliated vermiculite has very unique properties, such as high porosity, specific surface area, high aspect ratio of laminates, and low density, and has been extensively utilized as a functional additives, exfoliated copper vermiculite also was synthesized and investigated. The antibacterial efficiency of copper vermiculite was qualitatively evaluated by the diffusion methods (both liquid diffusion and solid diffusion) against the most common pathogenic species: Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae). The result showed that the release velocity of copper from copper vermiculite is very slow. However, copper vermiculite clearly has excellent antibacterial efficiency to S. aureus, K. pneumoniae and E. coli. The strongest antibacterial ability of copper vermiculite is its action on S. aureus. The antibacterial efficiency of copper vermiculite was also quantitatively evaluated by determining the reduction rate (death rate) of E. coli versus various levels of copper vermiculite. 10 ppm of copper vermiculite in solution is sufficient to reduce the cell population of E. coli, while the untreated vermiculite had no antibacterial activity. The slow release of copper revealed that the antimicrobial effect of copper vermiculite was due to the strong interactions between copper ions and bacteria cells. Exfoliated copper vermiculite has even stronger

  20. Drivers` activities and information needs in an automated highway system. Working paper, August 1995-May 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Levitan, L.; Bloomfield, J.

    1996-10-01

    In most visions of the AHS--including that of the National Automated Highway System Consortium--it has been assumed that when a vehicle was under automated control, the driver would be allowed to engage in any of a variety of activities not related to driving (e.g, working, reading, sleeping). The objective of the first study reported here--one of the noncommuter studies--was to determine what drivers do when traveling under automated control, and whether the age of and/gender or the driver and/or the intrastring gap have an influence on those activities. One the objectives of the commuter experiment--of relevance for this report--was to determine whether what drivers do when traveling under automated control changes as a function of experience with the AHS (i.e., across trials). As conceptualization of the AHS proceeds, the details of the interface between the driver and the in-vehicle system will become more important. One part of that interface will be information supplied by the AHS to the driver, perhaps about such things as traffic conditions ahead predicted trip time to the driver`s selected exit, and so on. To maximize the utility of that information, it is important to determine what it is that drivers would like to know when traveling under automated control. The objective of the third study reported here--the second of the five noncommuter experiments--was to provide a first investigation of that issue.

  1. Essential trauma management training: addressing service delivery needs in active conflict zones in eastern Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Allison J; Lee, Catherine I; Richard, Matthew G; Oo, Eh Kalu Shwe; Lee, Thomas; Stock, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Access to governmental and international nongovernmental sources of health care within eastern Myanmar's conflict regions is virtually nonexistent. Historically, under these circumstances effective care for the victims of trauma, particularly landmine injuries, has been severely deficient. Recognizing this, community-based organizations (CBOs) providing health care in these regions sought to scale up the capacity of indigenous health workers to provide trauma care. Case description The Trauma Management Program (TMP) was developed by CBOs in cooperation with a United States-based health care NGO. The goal of the TMP is to improve the capacity of local health workers to deliver effective trauma care. From 2000 to the present, international and local health care educators have conducted regular workshops to train indigenous health workers in the management of landmine injuries, penetrating and blunt trauma, shock, wound and infection care, and orthopedics. Health workers have been regularly resupplied with the surgical instruments, supplies and medications needed to provide the care learnt through TMP training workshops. Discussion and Evaluation Since 2000, approximately 300 health workers have received training through the TMP, as part of a CBO-run health system providing care for approximately 250 000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) and war-affected residents. Based on interviews with health workers, trauma registry inputs and photo/video documentation, protocols and procedures taught during training workshops have been implemented effectively in the field. Between June 2005 and June 2007, more than 200 patients were recorded in the trauma patient registry. The majority were victims of weapons-related trauma. Conclusion This report illustrates a method to increase the capacity of indigenous health workers to manage traumatic injuries. These health workers are able to provide trauma care for otherwise inaccessible populations in remote and

  2. Memory Training in the ACTIVE study: How Much is Needed and Who Benefits?

    PubMed Central

    Rebok, George W.; Langbaum, Jessica B.S.; Jones, Richard N.; Gross, Alden L.; Parisi, Jeanine M.; Spira, Adam P.; Kueider, Alexandra; Petras, Hanno; Brandt, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Objectives and Methods Data from the memory training arm (n = 629) of the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) trial were examined to characterize change in memory performance through five years of follow-up as a function of memory training, booster training, adherence to training, and other characteristics. Results Latent growth model analyses revealed that memory training was associated with improved memory performance through year five, but that neither booster training nor training adherence significantly influenced this effect. Baseline age was associated with change in memory performance attributable to the passage of time alone (i.e., to aging). Higher education and better self-rated health were associated with greater change in memory performance after training. Discussion These findings confirm that memory training can aid in maintaining long-term improvements in memory performance. Booster training and adherence to training do not appear to attenuate rates of normal age-related memory decline. PMID:23103452

  3. Chemically active organically doped sol-gel materials: enzymatic sensors, chemical sensors, and photoactive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avnir, David; Braun, S.; Lev, Ovadia; Ottolenghi, M.

    1992-12-01

    Organically-doped porous sol-gel matrices of optical grade have evolved in recent years into a wide class of materials with diverse applications. We review recent progress made in our laboratories in three domains of applications: the trapping of enzymes with the consequent design of (e.g. glucose) sensors; the development of chemical sensors; and the design of photoactive material for (solar) light energy conversion.

  4. NASA's activities in the conservation of strategic aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    The United States imports 50-100 percent of certain metals critical to the aerospace industry, namely, cobalt, columbium, chromium, and tantalum. In an effort to reduce this dependence on foreign sources, NASA is planning a program called Conservation of Strategic Aerospace Materials (COSAM), which will provide technology minimizing strategic metal content in the components of aerospace structures such as aircraft engines. With a proposed starting date of October 1981, the program will consist of strategic element substitution, process technology development, and alternate materials research. NASA's two-fold pre-COSAM studies center on, first, substitution research involving nickel-base and cobalt-base superalloys (Waspaloy, Udimet-700, MAE-M247, Rene 150, HA-188) used in turbine disks, low-pressure blades, turbine blades, and combustors; and, second, alternate materials research devoted initially to investigating possible structural applications of the intermetallic alloys nickel aluminide and iron aluminide.

  5. Transfer having a coupling coefficient higher than its active material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesieutre, George A. (Inventor); Davis, Christopher L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A coupling coefficient is a measure of the effectiveness with which a shape-changing material (or a device employing such a material) converts the energy in an imposed signal to useful mechanical energy. Device coupling coefficients are properties of the device and, although related to the material coupling coefficients, are generally different from them. This invention describes a class of devices wherein the apparent coupling coefficient can, in principle, approach 1.0, corresponding to perfect electromechanical energy conversion. The key feature of this class of devices is the use of destabilizing mechanical pre-loads to counter inherent stiffness. The approach is illustrated for piezoelectric and thermoelectrically actuated devices. The invention provides a way to simultaneously increase both displacement and force, distinguishing it from alternatives such as motion amplification, and allows transducer designers to achieve substantial performance gains for actuator and sensor devices.

  6. Neutron Activation Analysis of the Rare Earth Elements (REE) - With Emphasis on Geological Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stosch, Heinz-Günter

    2016-08-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) has been the analytical method of choice for rare earth element (REE) analysis from the early 1960s through the 1980s. At that time, irradiation facilitieswere widely available and fairly easily accessible. The development of high-resolution gamma-ray detectors in the mid-1960s eliminated, formany applications, the need for chemical separation of the REE from the matrix material, making NAA a reliable and effective analytical tool. While not as precise as isotopedilution mass spectrometry, NAA was competitive by being sensitive for the analysis of about half of the rare earths (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb, Lu). The development of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry since the 1980s, together with decommissioning of research reactors and the lack of installation of new ones in Europe and North America has led to the rapid decline of NAA.

  7. Physical activity for an ethnically diverse sample of endometrial cancer survivors: a needs assessment and pilot intervention

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Amerigo; Moadel-Robblee, Alyson; Garber, Carol Ewing; Kuo, Dennis; Goldberg, Gary; Einstein, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the physical activity (PA) behavior, needs and preferences for underserved, ethnically diverse women with a history of endometrial cancer (EC). Methods Women with a history of EC (41 non-Hispanic black, 40 non-Hispanic white, and 18 Hispanic) completed a needs assessment during their regular follow-up appointments at Montefiore Medical Center in Bronx, NY, USA. An 8-week pilot PA intervention based on the results of the needs assessment was conducted with 5 EC survivors. Results Mean body mass index (BMI) among the 99 respondents was 34.1±7.6 kg/m2, and 66% did not exercise regularly. Self-described weight status was significantly lower than actual BMI category (p<0.001). Of the 86% who were interested in joining an exercise program, 95% were willing to attend at least once weekly. The primary motivations were improving health, losing weight, and feeling better physically. Despite the high interest in participation, volunteer rate was very low (8%). However, adherence to the 8-week pilot PA intervention was high (83%), and there were no adverse events. Body weight decreased in all pilot participants. Conclusion These data show that ethnically diverse EC survivors have a great need for, and are highly interested in, PA interventions. However, greater care needs to be taken to assess and identify barriers to increase participation in such programs. PMID:25872894

  8. Review of activities in USA on HTS materials

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    Rapid progress in attaining practical applications of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) has been made since the discovery of these new materials. Many critical parameters influencing HTS powder synthesis and wire processing have been identified through a combination of fundamental exploration and applied research. The complexity of these novel materials with regard to phase behavior and physical properties has become evident as a result of these careful studies. Achieving optimal mechanical and superconducting properties in wires and tapes will require further understanding and synergy among several different technical disciplines. Highlights of efforts towards producing practical superconductors for electric power applications based on rare earth-, bismuth-, and thallium-based systems are reviewed.

  9. Examination of the haemolytic activity of sol-gel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulatowska-Jarza, Agnieszka; Podbielska, Halina; Holowacz, Iwona; Lechna-Marczynska, Monika I.; Szymonowicz, Maria; Staniszewska-Kus, Jolanta; Paluch, Danuta

    2001-10-01

    Recently, the sol-gel based biomaterials are extendedly investigated with emphasis on theirs various applications, including medical ones. In this respect it is important to investigate the influence of sol-gel matrices on biological systems. The results of laboratory and biological testing of aqueous extracts of sol-gels are presented in this work. It was proved that it is possible to produce the sol-gel derived materials that will be non-haemolytic. This can be achieved by heating the materials in elevated temperatures. This effect can also be reached by suitably long aging (minimum 6 months).

  10. Cosmogenic activation of materials used in rare event search experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Mei, D.-M.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Fiorucci, S.

    2016-11-01

    We evaluate the cosmogenic production rates in some materials that are commonly used as targets and shielding/supporting components for detecting rare events. The results from Geant4 simulations and the calculations of ACTIVIA are compared with the available experimental data. We demonstrate that the production rates from the Geant4-based simulations agree with the available data reasonably well. As a result, we report that the cosmogenic production of several isotopes in various materials can generate potential backgrounds for direct detection of dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay.

  11. Job Creation: Creative Materials, Activities, & Strategies for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smutny, Joan Franklin; And Others

    Designed for use by high school students, their teachers, and counselors, these six learning modules contain creative materials to encourage individuals to think about their own talents, skills, interests, and capacities for job creation. Each module consists of student worksheets and teacher guides. Covered in the first five modules are the…

  12. R&D-needs and opportunities to broaden the data base on materials and technology for liquid metal spallation targets

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.S.

    1996-06-01

    Liquid metals have so far only been used to a very limited extent as spallation targets, notably at the ISOLDE-facility at CERN (Pb and La) to produce radioactive isotopes. Virtually no systematic studies have been carried out so far. The available data base is by no means sufficient to answer conclusively very important questions such as predicting reliably the service time of medium-to-high power target systems or determining precisely what technological measures are required and appropriate to maintain an optimum coolant quality, to mitigate the effects of pressure waves in short pulse sources and others. During the workshop several areas have been identified, where there exists an urgent need for improved knowledge and reliable data, and opportunities have been presented to acquire such knowledge and to generate such data. Opportunities to do such research and pertinent know-how, although scarce, are spread over institutions in several countries, and efforts to use these opportunities often require substantial resources both in man power and money. The workshop participants therefore unanimously supported the view that a coordinated and internationally concerted effort should be undertaken to make the best possible use of existing opportunities and available resources in order to develop the knowledge and technology necessary for the deployment and safe operation of target systems suitable for pulsed spallation neutron sources in the multi-megawatt range of beam power.

  13. Progress in antimicrobial activities of chitin, chitosan and its oligosaccharides: a systematic study needs for food applications.

    PubMed

    Dutta, J; Tripathi, S; Dutta, P K

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, active biomolecules such as chitosan and its derivatives are undergoing a significant and very fast development in food application area. Due to recent outbreaks of contaminations associated with food products, there have been growing concerns regarding the negative environmental impact of packaging materials of antimicrobial biofilms, which have been studied. Chitosan has a great potential for a wide range of applications due to its biodegradability, biocompatibility, antimicrobial activity, nontoxicity and versatile chemical and physical properties. It can be formed into fibers, films, gels, sponges, beads or nanoparticles. Chitosan films have been used as a packaging material for the quality preservation of a variety of foods. Chitosan has high antimicrobial activities against a wide variety of pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, including fungi, and Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. A tremendous effort has been made over the past decade to develop and test films with antimicrobial properties to improve food safety and shelf-life. This review highlights the preparation, mechanism, antimicrobial activity, optimization of biocide properties of chitosan films and applications including biocatalysts for the improvement of quality and shelf-life of foods.

  14. Review of smart material technologies for active parachute applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favini, Eric; Niezrecki, Christopher; Chen, Julie; Willis, David; Niemi, Eugene; Desabrais, Kenneth

    2010-04-01

    The performance (drag, lift, stability, etc.) of a parachute is a function of the physical properties of the canopy fabric (such as porosity) and geometry of the canopy (such as air-vent openings). These variables typically remain constant during descent and therefore the parachute retains constant drag and lift. The ability to change these variables and the parachute drag and lift characteristics during flight will greatly widen the performance envelope of a parachute, the maneuverability, and versatility of the airdrop mission. This paper provides a literature review of existing smart material technologies in an effort to improve the performance characteristics and enhance the safety of existing parachutes and parafoils by incorporating these advanced materials into parachute systems.

  15. Investigating the effect of education based on need to prevent falling during activities of daily living among the elderlies referring to health centers of Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Marziyeh; RezaeiDehaghani, Abdollah; Mehrabi, Tayebeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Falling has a great importance among the elderlies. Even if no physical injury occurs, it can cause fear of falling down again and, consequently, reduce older adults’ activities. With regard to the prevalence of falling among older adults, its prevention is essential. Therefore, the present study was aimed to define the effect of need-based education on prevention of older adults’ falling during their everyday life activities. Materials and Methods: This is a quasi-experimental study. Study population comprised all the older adults of age 60 years and over referring to health care centers in Isfahan. Through multiple random sampling, 15 older adults were selected from four health care centers. Data collection tool in the present study was Daily Activity Questionnaire. Results: Results showed a significant difference between the mean of daily activity scores in the intervention group before, immediately after, and 1 month after the intervention (12, 13.6, and 13.5, respectively; P = 0.01). Meanwhile, there was no significant deference between the scores immediately after and 1 month after the intervention. There was no significant difference observed between the three time points in the control group (mean = 12.3; P = 0.907). Conclusion: Implementation of education concerning prevention of older adults’ falling led to improvement of their daily activity in the intervention group. PMID:27563329

  16. Passive and active sol-gel materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Mark P.; Najafi, S. Iraj

    1997-07-01

    This paper examines sol-gel materials for photonics in terms of partnerships with other material contenders for processing optical devices. The discussion in four sections identifies semiconductors, amorphous and crystalline inorganic dielectrics, and amorphous and crystalline organic dielectrics as strategic agents in the rapidly evolving area of materials and devices for data communications and telecommunications. With Zyss, we trace the hierarchical lineage that connects molecular hybridization (chemical functionality), through supramolecular hybridization (collective properties and responses), to functional hybridization (device and system level constructs). These three concepts thread their way through discussions of the roles sol-gel glasses might be anticipated to assume in a photonics marketplace. We assign a special place to glass integrated optics and show how high temperature consolidated sol-gel derived glasses fit into competitive glass fabrication technologies. Low temperature hybrid sol-gel glasses that combine attractive features of organic polymers and inorganic glasses are considered by drawing on examples of our own new processes for fabricating couplers, power splitters, waveguides and gratings by combining chemical synthesis and sol-gel processing with simple photomask techniques.

  17. Active millimeter-wave imaging system for material analysis and object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, Christian; Hülsmann, Axel; Kallfass, Ingmar; Tessmann, Axel; Zink, Martin; Schlechtweg, Michael; Leuther, Arnulf; Ambacher, Oliver

    2011-11-01

    The use of millimeter-waves for imaging purposes is becoming increasingly important, as millimeter-waves can penetrate most clothing and packaging materials, so that the detector does not require physical contact with the object. This will offer a view to the hidden content of e.g. packets or bags without the need to open them, whereby packaging and content will not be damaged. Nowadays X-ray is used, but as the millimeter-wave quantum energy is far below the ionization energy, it is less harmful for the human health. In this paper we report an active millimeter-wave imaging tomograph for material analysis and concealed object detection purposes. The system is build using in-house W-band components. The object is illuminated with low-power millimeter-waves in the frequency range between 89 and 96GHz; mirrors are used to guide and focus the beam. The object is moved through the focus point to scan the object pixel by pixel. Depending on the actual material some parts of the waves are reflected, the other parts penetrate the object. A single-antenna transmit and receive module is used for illumination and measurement of the material-specific reflected power. A second receiver module is used to measure the transmitted wave. All information is processed for amplitude and phase images by a computer algorithm. The system can be used for security, such as detecting concealed weapons, explosives or contrabands at airports and other safety areas, but also quality assurance applications, e.g. during production to detect defects. Some imaging results will be presented in this paper.

  18. Impacts of technology-based differentiated instruction on special needs students in the context of an activity-based middle school science instructional unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Julia K.

    The purpose of this study was to explore technology as a tool for increasing student achievement within the middle school science classroom and specifically to support the learning of special needs students. Utilizing field-test curriculum from the Lawrence Hall of Science's Great Explorations in Math and Science (GEMS) Space Science Curriculum Sequence, software modules were designed to mediate instruction in specific problem areas which special needs students, especially those with learning disabilities, face in learning science. Participants in this research were middle school students who were classified as receiving special education services, but were enrolled in regular education science classes. Students in the control classrooms participated in an activity-oriented field-test curriculum which was common to all students within a particular class. Students in the modified treatment group received modified instructional activities which were mediated by a computer and utilized best practices. Regular education students using unmodified curriculum showed an 8% average gain from pre- to post-test whereas special education students showed a 7% decrease. On the other hand, regular education students using the modified curriculum averaged a 9% gain in their pre- to post-test scores whereas special education students averaged a 7% gain. Gains in students' pretest to posttest scores were notably higher for the special education students who used computer-mediated instructional approaches designed utilizing best practices. In addition, the proportion of special needs students who provided more scientifically accurate and extended responses was much greater among those who used the modified materials. Most importantly, special needs students in this study who used the modified materials demonstrated more conceptual growth than did the special education students in using the unmodified materials. The major finding of this work is that most special education students

  19. Developing new products in cystic fibrosis: needs and obstacles for activities of small and middle-sized companies.

    PubMed

    Schlangen, Miriam; Reimann, Andreas L G

    2011-06-01

    Small and middle-sized enterprises (SMEs) can make important contributions to medical progress through the development of new safe and effective drugs that address the greatest unmet needs of patients. Regulatory inconsistencies across agencies in various countries, however, remain major challenges in cystic fibrosis (CF) drug development. Clear and consistent treatment guidelines, well educated clinical trial sites, a patient registry and grant funding for early development programs are important success-factors for an efficient development process. SMEs developing products for CF need partners in the CF community to assist with disease education and awareness for ongoing clinical trials. SMEs should collaborate and communicate with the CF community in a legally compliant way to take a patient-centric approach to drug design, development and administration. Furthermore, they can help to develop educational tools and fund medical education activities to increase the understanding of the underlying defects and mechanisms of CF disease.

  20. Developing new products in cystic fibrosis: needs and obstacles for activities of small and middle-sized companies.

    PubMed

    Schlangen, Miriam; Reimann, Andreas L G

    2011-06-01

    Small and middle-sized enterprises (SMEs) can make important contributions to medical progress through the development of new safe and effective drugs that address the greatest unmet needs of patients. Regulatory inconsistencies across agencies in various countries, however, remain major challenges in cystic fibrosis (CF) drug development. Clear and consistent treatment guidelines, well educated clinical trial sites, a patient registry and grant funding for early development programs are important success-factors for an efficient development process. SMEs developing products for CF need partners in the CF community to assist with disease education and awareness for ongoing clinical trials. SMEs should collaborate and communicate with the CF community in a legally compliant way to take a patient-centric approach to drug design, development and administration. Furthermore, they can help to develop educational tools and fund medical education activities to increase the understanding of the underlying defects and mechanisms of CF disease. PMID:21658629

  1. Activated Charcoal—A Potential Material in Glucoamylase Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Kareem, S. O.; Akpan, I.; Popoola, T. O. S.; Sanni, L. O.

    2011-01-01

    The potential of activated charcoal in the purification of fungal glucoamylase was investigated. Various concentrations of activated charcoal (1–4% w/v) were used to concentrate crude glucoamylase from Rhizopus oligosporus at different temperature values (30–50°C). Effects of pH (3.0–6.0) and contact time (0–60 min) on enzyme purification were also monitored. Activated charcoal (3% w/v) gave a 16-fold purification in a single-step purification at 50°C for 20 min and pH 5.5. The result of SDS-PAGE analysis of purified glucoamylase showed two major protein bands with corresponding molecular weight of 36 kDa and 50 kDa. The method is inexpensive, rapid, and simple which could facilitate downstream processing of industrial enzyme. PMID:22235364

  2. Using luminescent materials as the active element for radiation sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollerman, William A.; Fontenot, Ross S.; Williams, Stephen; Miller, John

    2016-05-01

    Ionizing radiation poses a significant challenge for Earth-based defense applications as well as human and/or robotic space missions. Practical sensors based on luminescence will depend heavily upon research investigating the resistance of these materials to ionizing radiation and the ability to anneal or self-heal from damage caused by such radiation. In 1951, Birks and Black showed experimentally that the luminescent efficiency of anthracene bombarded by alphas varies with total fluence (N) as (I/I0) = 1/(1 + AN), where I is the luminescence yield, I0 is the initial yield, and A is a constant. The half brightness (N1/2) is defined as the fluence that reduce the emission light yield to half and is equal to is the inverse of A. Broser and Kallmann developed a similar relationship to the Birks and Black equation for inorganic phosphors irradiated using alpha particles. From 1990 to the present, we found that the Birks and Black relation describes the reduction in light emission yield for every tested luminescent material except lead phosphate glass due to proton irradiation. These results indicate that radiation produced quenching centers compete with emission for absorbed energy. The purpose of this paper is to present results from research completed in this area over the last few years. Particular emphasis will be placed on recent measurements made on new materials such as europium tetrakis dibenzoylmethide triethylammonium (EuD4TEA). Results have shown that EuD4TEA with its relatively small N1/2 might be a good candidate for use as a personal proton fluence sensor.

  3. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2000-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  4. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Weaver, Charles E.; Chilcoat, Bill R.; Derbyshire, Frank; Jagtoyen, Marit

    2001-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  5. Materials and Activities for Teachers and Children (MATCH). Program Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bye, Margaret

    Self contained multi-media kits for grades 1 through 6 involve students directly in the learning process. Emphasis is on non-verbal learning which takes place when youngsters examine real objects and engage in learning activities. Involved in the discovery and inquiry process, students hypothesize, classify, and categorize. In an interdisciplinary…

  6. Digital active material processing platform effort (DAMPER), SBIR phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, John; Smith, Dennis

    1992-01-01

    Applied Technology Associates, Inc., (ATA) has demonstrated that inertial actuation can be employed effectively in digital, active vibration isolation systems. Inertial actuation involves the use of momentum exchange to produce corrective forces which act directly on the payload being actively isolated. In a typical active vibration isolation system, accelerometers are used to measure the inertial motion of the payload. The signals from the accelerometers are then used to calculate the corrective forces required to counteract, or 'cancel out' the payload motion. Active vibration isolation is common technology, but the use of inertial actuation in such systems is novel, and is the focus of the DAMPER project. A May 1991 report was completed which documented the successful demonstration of inertial actuation, employed in the control of vibration in a single axis. In the 1 degree-of-freedom (1DOF) experiment a set of air bearing rails was used to suspend the payload, simulating a microgravity environment in a single horizontal axis. Digital Signal Processor (DSP) technology was used to calculate in real time, the control law between the accelerometer signals and the inertial actuators. The data obtained from this experiment verified that as much as 20 dB of rejection could be realized by this type of system. A discussion is included of recent tests performed in which vibrations were actively controlled in three axes simultaneously. In the three degree-of-freedom (3DOF) system, the air bearings were designed in such a way that the payload is free to rotate about the azimuth axis, as well as translate in the two horizontal directions. The actuator developed for the DAMPER project has applications beyond payload isolation, including structural damping and source vibration isolation. This report includes a brief discussion of these applications, as well as a commercialization plan for the actuator.

  7. Activating people to address their health care needs: learning from people with lived experience of chronic illnesses.

    PubMed

    Stanhope, Victoria; Henwood, Benjamin F

    2014-08-01

    One of the primary goals of health care reform is improving the quality and reducing the costs of care for people with co-morbid mental health and physical health conditions. One strategy is to integrate primary and behavioral health care through care coordination and patient activation. This qualitative study using community based participatory research methods informs the development of integrated care by presenting the perspectives of those with lived experience of chronic illnesses and homelessness. Themes presented include the internal and external barriers to addressing health needs and the key role of peer support in overcoming these barriers.

  8. Gasification characteristics of an activated carbon catalyst during the decomposition of hazardous waste material in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Yukihiko; Nuessle, F.W.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Recently, carbonaceous materials including activated carbon were proven to be effective catalysts for hazardous waste gasification in supercritical water. Using coconut shell activated carbon catalyst, complete decomposition of industrial organic wastes including methanol and acetic acid was achieved. During this process, the total mass of the activated carbon catalyst changes by two competing processes: a decrease in weight via gasification of the carbon by supercritical water, or an increase in weight by deposition of carbonaceous materials generated by incomplete gasification of the biomass feedstocks. The deposition of carbonaceous materials does not occur when complete gasification is realized. Gasification of the activated carbon in supercritical water is often favored, resulting in changes in the quality and quantity of the catalyst. To thoroughly understand the hazardous waste decomposition process, a more complete understanding of the behavior of activated carbon in pure supercritical water is needed. The gasification rate of carbon by water vapor at subcritical pressures was studied in relation to coal gasification and generating activated carbon.

  9. Exploratory research on mutagenic activity of coal-related materials

    SciTech Connect

    Warshawsky, D.; Schoeny, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    The following samples were found to be mutagenic for strains TA1538, TA98 and TA100 Salmonella typhimurium: ETTM-10, ETTM-11, ETTM-15, ETTM-16, and ETTM-17. ETTM-13 was marginally mutagenic for TA1537. ETTM-14 was slightly mutagenic for TA1537, TA1538, and TA98. Mutagenicity by all samples was demonstrated only in the presence of hepatic enzyme extracts (S9) which provided metabolic activation. ETTM-11 was shown to be the most mutagenic sample assayed thus far; specific activity was 2.79 x 10/sup 4/ TA98 revertants/mg sample. Fractionation by serial extractions with increasingly polar organic solvents was done at least 2 x with ETTM-10, ETTM-11, ETTM-15, ETTM-16 and ETTM-17. For some samples highly mutagenic fractions were observed.

  10. Innovative active control of gun barrels using smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattice, Michael S.; LaVigna, Chris

    1997-06-01

    The accuracy of stabilized, turreted gun systems like the 120mm gun on the M1A2 Abrams tank and the 30mm gun on the Apache helicopter are limited by, among other things, structural flexure of the gun barrel and support structure. An advanced actuation system based on piezoelectric translators and an optical fiber strain sensing system are described in conjunction with a rapid prototyping workstation for the design of distributed parameter control systems to actively minimize the effects of vibrations caused by traversing rough terrain or weapon firing.

  11. Activation analysis of admixtures in certain semiconductive materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artyukhin, P. I.; Gilbert, E. P.; Pronin, V. A.

    1978-01-01

    The use of extractions and chromatographic operations to separate macrobases, and to divide elements into groups convenient for gamma-spectrometric analysis is discussed. Methods are described for the activation detection of some impurities in silicon, arsenic, thallium, and trichloromethylsilane, on the basis of the extraction properties of bis(2-chlorethyl ether) and dimethylbenzylalkylammonium chloride. A schematic diagram of the extraction separation of elements-admixture is presented showing the aqueous and organic phases. The content percentage of the various elements are given in tables.

  12. Science-based material modeling activities at Sandia National Laboratories/California : an overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Er-Ping

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of the science-based materials modeling activities at Sandia National Laboratories, California. The main mission driver for the work is the development of predictive modeling and simulation capabilities leveraging high performance computing software and hardware. Presentation will highlight research accomplishments in several specific topics of current interest. Sandia/California has been engaged in the development of high performance computing based predictive modeling and simulation capabilities in support of the Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship Program of the U. S. Department of Energy. Of particular interest is the development of constitutive models that can efficiently and accurately predict post-failure material response and load-redistribution in systems and components. Fracture and failure are inherently multi-scale and our philosophy is to include required physics in our models at all appropriate scales. We approach the problems from the continuum point of view and intend to provide continuum models that include dominant subscale mechanisms. Moreover, numerical algorithms are needed to allow implementation of physical models in high performance computing codes such that large-scale modeling and simulation can be conducted. Other drivers of our effort include the emerging application of micro- and nano-systems and the increasing interest in biotechnology. In this presentation, our research in fracture and failure modeling, atomic-continuum coupling code development, microstructure-material properties relationships exploration, and general continuum theories advancement will be presented. Where appropriate, examples will be given to demonstrate the utility of the models.

  13. Photocatalytic degradation of sunscreen active ingredients mediated by nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-Vazquez, Loraine

    Water scarcity and pollution are environmental issues with terrible consequences. In recent years several pharmaceutical and personal care products, such as sunscreen active ingredients, have been detected in different water matrices. Its recalcitrant behavior in the environment has caused controversies and generated countless questions about its safety. During this research, we employed an advanced oxidation process (photocatalysis) to degrade sunscreen active ingredients. For this study, we used a 3x3 system, evaluating three photocatalysts and three different contaminants. From the three catalysts employed, two of them were synthesized. ZnO nanoparticles were obtained using zinc acetate dihydrated as the precursor, and TiO2 nanowires were synthesized from titanium tetrachloride precursor. The third catalyst employed (namely, P25) was obtained commercially. The synthesized photocatalysts were characterized in terms of the morphology, elemental composition, crystalline structure, elemental oxidation states, vibrational modes and surface area, using SEM-EDS, XRD, XPS, Raman spectroscopy and BET measurements, respectively. The photocatalysts were employed during the study of the degradation of p-aminobenzoic acid, phenylbenzimidazole sulfonic acid, and benzophenone-4. In all the cases, at least 50% degradation was achieved. P25 showed degradation efficiencies above 90%, and from the nine systems, 7 of them degraded at least 86%.

  14. Supercritical adsorption testing of porous silicon, activated carbon, and zeolite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Brendan

    The supercritical adsorption of methane gas on porous silicon, activated carbon, and zeolite materials was studied. An apparatus that utilizes the volumetric adsorption measurement technique was designed and constructed to conduct the experiments. Activated carbon materials consisted of Norit RX3 Extra, Zorflex FM30K woven activated carbon cloth, and Zorflex FM10 knitted activated carbon cloth. Zeolite materials consisted of 3A, 4A, 5A, and 13X zeolites. Porous silicon materials consisted of stain etched and electrochemically etched porous films, and stain etched porous powder. All adsorption tests were conducted at room temperature (approximately 298 K) and pressures up to approximately 5 MPa. Overall, the Norit RX3 Extra granulated activated carbon produced the highest excess adsorption and effective storage capacities. Effective storage and delivery capacities of 109 and 90 stpmlml were obtained at a pressure of 3.5 MPa and a temperature of approximately 298 K.

  15. Characterization of the airborne activity confinement system prefilter material

    SciTech Connect

    Long, T.A.; Monson, P.R.

    1992-05-01

    A general concern with assessing the effects of postulated severe accidents is predicting and preventing the release of radioactive isotopes to the environment at the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor. Unless the confinement systems are breached in an accident the Airborne Activity Confinement System forces all of the internal air through the filter compartments. Proper modeling of the radioactivity released to the environment requires knowledge of the filtering characteristics of the demisters, the HEPA`s, and the charcoal beds. An investigation of the mass loading characteristics for a range of particle sizes was performed under the direction of Vince Novick of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) in connection with the restart of the K reactor. Both solid and liquid aerosols were used to challenge sample prefilter and HEPA filters. The results of the ANL investigation are reported in this document.

  16. Characterization of the airborne activity confinement system prefilter material

    SciTech Connect

    Long, T.A.; Monson, P.R.

    1992-05-01

    A general concern with assessing the effects of postulated severe accidents is predicting and preventing the release of radioactive isotopes to the environment at the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor. Unless the confinement systems are breached in an accident the Airborne Activity Confinement System forces all of the internal air through the filter compartments. Proper modeling of the radioactivity released to the environment requires knowledge of the filtering characteristics of the demisters, the HEPA's, and the charcoal beds. An investigation of the mass loading characteristics for a range of particle sizes was performed under the direction of Vince Novick of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) in connection with the restart of the K reactor. Both solid and liquid aerosols were used to challenge sample prefilter and HEPA filters. The results of the ANL investigation are reported in this document.

  17. Active nondestructive assay of nuclear materials: principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gozani, Tsahi

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to present, coherently and comprehensively, the wealth of available but scattered information on the principles and applications of active nondestructive analysis (ANDA). Chapters are devoted to the following: background and overview; interactions of neutrons with matter; interactions of ..gamma..-rays with matter; neutron production and sources; ..gamma..-ray production and sources; effects of neutron and ..gamma..-ray transport in bulk media; signatures of neutron- and photon-induced fissions; neutron and photon detection systems and electronics; representative ANDA systems; and instrument analysis, calibration, and measurement control for ANDA. Each chapter has an introductory section describing the relationship of the topic of that chapter to ANDA. Each chapter ends with a section that summarizes the main results and conclusions of the chapter, and a reference list.

  18. Poly(3-phenylthiophene) derivatives as active materials for electrochemical capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissa, Mona M.

    Poly(3-(4-methylsulfonylphenyl)thiophenes) (PMSPT), (3-(4-cyanophenyl)-thiophene) (PCNPT), (3-(3,4-difluorophenyl)thiophene) (MPFPT), (3-(3,5difluorophenyl)thiophene) (MMFPT), and (3-(3-fluorophenyl)thiophene) (MFPT) polymers were prepared and electrochemically characterized in various organic electrolytes. The morphologies and electrochemical performance of the films were shown to depend on both the growth and cycling electrolytes. Constant current multicycle tests were performed on single cell devices using the type III capacitor configuration at high voltage (2.8-2.9 V) employing MPFPT, PCNPT, PMSPT and PFPT polymers. Energy and power densities of up to 50 Wh/kg and 5 kW/kg were achieved and excellent stabilities (up to 1200 n-doping/dedoping cycles) were demonstrated. Industrial practicum. The industrial practicum report on "Chemical Vapor Deposition of High Performance Polymeric Thin Films for Advanced Interconnect Applications" determined the copolymerization and characterization of four novel copolymers of Parylene-N by a CVD process at low temperature. These copolymers retain the advantages of the CVD process and also modify the properties of the Parylene homopolymer significantly such as lowering the dielectric constant from 2.65 to ˜2.0, increasing the thermal stability and enhancing the adhesion. Apprenticeship practicum. The study on "Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Activity of The Zeolite Encapsulated Ruthenium hexadeca-fluorophthalocyanine Complexes" determined the catalytic activity of this fluorinated ruthenium phthalocyanine which was encapsulated in zeolite NaX during crystallization. Both the free complex RuFsb{16}Pc and the encapsulated (RuFsb{16}Pc-NaX) were found to be effective catalysts for the oxidation of cyclohexane with high efficiency and stability.

  19. Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Schoeppner, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has successfully developed an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process, a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF3 process can be used to build a complex, unitized part in a layer-additive fashion, although the more immediate payoff is for use as a manufacturing process for adding details to components fabricated from simplified castings and forgings or plate products. The EBF3 process produces structural metallic parts with strengths comparable to that of wrought product forms and has been demonstrated on aluminum, titanium, and nickel-based alloys to date. The EBF3 process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Operation in a vacuum ensures a clean process environment and eliminates the need for a consumable shield gas. Advanced metal manufacturing methods such as EBF3 are being explored for fabrication and repair of aerospace structures, offering potential for improvements in cost, weight, and performance to enhance mission success for aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. Near-term applications of the EBF3 process are most likely to be implemented for cost reduction and lead time reduction through addition of details onto simplified preforms (casting or forging). This is particularly attractive for components with protruding details that would require a significantly large volume of material to be machined away from an oversized forging, offering significant reductions to the buy-to-fly ratio. Future far-term applications promise improved structural efficiency through reduced weight and improved performance by exploiting the layer-additive nature of the EBF3 process to fabricate tailored unitized structures with functionally graded microstructures and compositions.

  20. THERMAL IMAGING OF ACTIVE MAGNETIC REGERNERATOR MCE MATERIALS DURING OPERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Shassere, Benjamin; West, David L; Abdelaziz, Omar; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen

    2012-01-01

    An active magnetic regenerator (AMR) prototype was constructed that incorporates a Gd sheet into the regenerator wall to enable visualization of the system s thermal transients. In this experiment, the thermal conditions inside the AMR are observed under a variety of operating conditions. An infrared (IR) camera is employed to visualize the thermal transients within the AMR. The IR camera is used to visually and quantitatively evaluate the temperature difference and thus giving means to calculate the performance of the system under the various operating conditions. Thermal imaging results are presented for two differing experimental test runs. Real time imaging of the thermal state of the AMR has been conducted while operating the system over a range of conditions. A 1 Tesla twin-coil electromagnet (situated on a C frame base) is used for this experiment such that all components are stationary during testing. A modular, linear reciprocating system has been realized in which the effects of regenerator porosity and utilization factor can be investigated. To evaluate the performance variation in porosity and utilization factor the AMR housing was constructed such that the plate spacing of the Gd sheets may be varied. Each Gd sheet has dimensions of 38 mm wide and 66 mm long with a thickness of 1 mm and the regenerator can hold a maximum of 29 plates with a spacing of 0.25 mm. Quantitative and thermal imaging results are presented for several regenerator configurations.

  1. Active smart material system for buffet load alleviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, Kenneth B.; Saarmaa, Erik; Agnes, Gregory S.

    1995-05-01

    This paper addressed the feasibility of using an active piezoelectric buffet suppression system to reduce buffet vibrations in vertical tail aircraft. During the assessment, functional requirements were defined, models were developed, and full-scale piezoelectric buffet suppression systems were designed and evaluated. A variety of actuator distributions, sensor locations and controller architectures were examined and it was found that significant performance improvements could be achieved (greater than 70 percent) with minimal weight penalties (less than 8 percent). This work enabled the evaluation of issues such as system performance versus added weight and piezoelectric actuator control authority and power requirements. The study showed that the added performance benefit (in terms of vibration reduction and fatigue life) are far greater than the weight penalty, and that piezoelectric actuators have the control authority required to suppress high energy buffet forces within aircraft geometry, weight, and power constraints. Further, the high performance achieved (much greater than that defined in the functional requirements) suggests that systems can be designed with a much lower weight penalty (1/2 to 1/4) than that assumed in this study.

  2. Active control of acoustic pressure fields using smart material technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Smith, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    An overview describing the use of piezoceramic patches in reducing noise in a structural acoustics setting is presented. The passive and active contributions due to patches which are bonded to an Euler-Bernoulli beam or thin shell are briefly discussed and the results are incorporated into a 2-D structural acoustics model. In this model, an exterior noise source causes structural vibrations which in turn lead to interior noise as a result of nonlinear fluid/structure coupling mechanism. Interior sound pressure levels are reduced via patches bonded to the flexible boundary (a beam in this case) which generate pure bending moments when an out-of-phase voltage is applied. Well-posedness results for the infinite dimensional system are discussed and a Galerkin scheme for approximating the system dynamics is outlined. Control is implemented by using linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal control theory to calculate gains for the linearized system and then feeding these gains back into the nonlinear system of interest. The effectiveness of this strategy for this problem is illustrated in an example.

  3. Micro- and Nanostructured Materials for Active Devices and Molecular Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.; Graff, Gordon L.; Gross, Mark E.; Burrows, Paul E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Mast, Eric S.; Hall, Michael G.; Bonham, Charles C.; Zumhoff, Mac R.; Williford, Rick E.

    2003-10-01

    Traditional single layer barrier coatings are not adequate in preventing degradation of the performance of organic molecular electronic and other active devices. Most advanced devices used in display technology now consist of micro and nanostructured small molecule, polymer and inorganic coatings with thin high reactive group 1A metals. This includes organic electronics such as organic light emitting devices (OLED). The lifetimes of these devices rapidly degrades when they are exposed to atmospheric oxygen and water vapor. Thin film photovoltaics and batteries are also susceptible to degradation by moisture and oxygen. Using in-line coating techniques we apply a composite nanostructured inorganic/polymer thin film barrier that restricts moisture and oxygen permeation to undetectable levels using conventional permeation test equipment. We describe permeation mechanisms for this encapsulation coating and flat panel display and other device applications. Permeation through the multilayer barrier coating is defect and pore limited and can be described by Knudsen diffusion involving a long and tortuous path. Device lifetime is also enhanced by the long lag times required to reach the steady state flux regime. Permeation rates in the range of 10-6 cc,g/m2/d have been achieved and OLED device lifetimes. The structure is robust, yet flexible. The resulting device performance and lifetimes will also be described. The barrier film can be capped with a thin film of transparent conductive oxide yielding an engineered nanostructured device for next generation, rugged, lightweight or flexible displays. This enables, for the first time, thin film encapsulation of emissive organic displays.

  4. Progress Report {number_sign}1 on the materials identification, characterization and evaluation activity: Acquisition of materials data from the Exploratory Studies Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Meike, A., LLNL

    1998-02-01

    This paper reports on the initial work within the Materials Identification, Characterization and Evaluation Sub-activity Integration Activity within the Introduced Materials Task (IMT) (WBS 1.2.3.12.5). The goals of this activity are twofold.: (1) to identify and characterize types and usage of materials that are most likely to be introduced into a potential High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a result of its construction and operation and (2) to provide tools for the Integration Activity to evaluate the chemical impact on the repository based on information gathered from sources external and internal to the Introduced Materials Task-by the Literature Survey Sub-activity (Integration Activity, IMT). Based on this information and assessment, the Integration Activity activates relevant activities within the Introduced Materials Task and provides information to other Tasks within the Yucca Mountain Project.

  5. Micromechanics and constitutive models for soft active materials with phase evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Binglian

    Soft active materials, such as shape memory polymers, liquid crystal elastomers, soft tissues, gels etc., are materials that can deform largely in response to external stimuli. Micromechanics analysis of heterogeneous materials based on finite element method is a typically numerical way to study the thermal-mechanical behaviors of soft active materials with phase evolution. While the constitutive models that can precisely describe the stress and strain fields of materials in the process of phase evolution can not be found in the databases of some commercial finite element analysis (FEA) tools such as ANSYS or Abaqus, even the specific constitutive behavior for each individual phase either the new formed one or the original one has already been well-known. So developing a computationally efficient and general three dimensional (3D) thermal-mechanical constitutive model for soft active materials with phase evolution which can be implemented into FEA is eagerly demanded. This paper first solved this problem theoretically by recording the deformation history of each individual phase in the phase evolution process, and adopted the idea of effectiveness by regarding all the new formed phase as an effective phase with an effective deformation to make this theory computationally efficient. A user material subroutine (UMAT) code based on this theoretical constitutive model has been finished in this work which can be added into the material database in Abaqus or ANSYS and can be easily used for most soft active materials with phase evolution. Model validation also has been done through comparison between micromechanical FEA and experiments on a particular composite material, shape memory elastomeric composite (SMEC) which consisted of an elastomeric matrix and the crystallizable fibre. Results show that the micromechanics and the constitutive models developed in this paper for soft active materials with phase evolution are completely relied on.

  6. Problems in Silverman's work indicate the need for a new approach to research on subliminal psychodynamic activation.

    PubMed

    Fudin, R

    2001-06-01

    The basic assumption in subliminal psychodynamic activation research is that participants can unconsciously perceive the psychodynamic meaning of a complete message as it is intended by the experimenter. In attempts to account for negative findings Silverman contended that this assumption holds only under certain luminance conditions and visual field positions of a message. Paradoxically, almost all of his findings, his major evidence in support of the basic assumption, came from experiments in violation of those strictures. Further, Silverman never presented MOMMY AND I ARE ONE under a critical condition required for it to be effective. These and other considerations identify the need for an account of empirical findings other than his and for changes in his experimental method. Such research must take into account the encoding of subliminal stimuli, an area neglected almost completely by Silverman. Shevrin and his colleagues' 1996 work is outlined as a model for the use of subliminal stimuli to investigate psychoanalytically generated hypotheses. PMID:11453183

  7. Oil-containing waste water treating material consisting of modified active carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, H.; Shigeta, S.; Takenaka, Y.

    1982-03-16

    An oil-containing waste water treating material comprises an active carbon upon whose surface is chemically bonded at least one nitrogenous compound which is an amine or a quaternarized derivative thereof.

  8. Understanding Scientists' Involvement in Education--Their Interests, Activities, and Needs: Research Results from the ReSciPE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiry, H.; Hunter, A.; Laursen, S.; Melton, G.

    2006-12-01

    The involvement of scientists in education has been cited by national leaders as essential for strengthening US science education at the K-12 and higher levels. While many individuals and groups have developed expertise in designing and implementing programs that engage scientists with students or teachers, there is little research evidence that helps us understand what motivates or discourages scientists from such involvement, the benefits and costs to them of participating, and the barriers they face that must be addressed to involve them effectively. The ReSciPE Project (Resources for Scientists in Partnership with Education) has offered a workshop on "Scientific Inquiry in the K-12 Classroom" to over 300 scientists and science educators across the US. These workshops have reached a wide audience of science professionals who undertake activities in science education, whether individual or institution-based work, for work or as a volunteer. The project aims to help these "education-engaged scientists" pursue their education work more effectively, but has also drawn on this group as a research sample for an evaluation-with-research study to investigate scientists' involvement in education. Pre- and post-surveys have enabled us to characterize the demographics of the participants and measure their self-reported knowledge and learning about education, especially inquiry-based science. Follow- up interviews have provided insight into their education activities, motivations, interests, difficulties, and needs. We will report on recent research findings from this study and place them in context of national needs and efforts to engage scientists in education.

  9. "Go Be a Writer": Intra-Activity with Materials, Time and Space in Literacy Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuby, Candace R.; Rucker, Tara Gutshall; Kirchhofer, Jessica M.

    2015-01-01

    This article is based on research in a United States second-grade classroom during a multimodal literacy workshop. Observing students working with tissue paper, foam board, string, pipe cleaners and other materials, we asked how is intra-activity with materials, time and space influencing literacy learning in Room 203? While the research…

  10. Quantum dots as active material for quantum cascade lasers: comparison to quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Stephan; Chow, Weng W.; Schneider, Hans Christian

    2016-03-01

    We review a microscopic laser theory for quantum dots as active material for quantum cascade lasers, in which carrier collisions are treated at the level of quantum kinetic equations. The computed characteristics of such a quantum-dot active material are compared to a state-of-the-art quantum-well quantum cascade laser. We find that the current requirement to achieve a comparable gain-length product is reduced compared to that of the quantum-well quantum cascade laser.

  11. Surface activity and film formation from the surface associated material of artificial surfactant preparations.

    PubMed

    Palmblad, M; Gustafsson, M; Curstedt, T; Johansson, J; Schürch, S

    2001-02-01

    Surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and SP-C) are present in natural derived surfactant preparations used for treatment of respiratory distress syndrome. Herein the surface activity of an SP-C analogue (SP-C(LKS)), a hybrid peptide between SP-C and bacteriorhodopsin (SP-C/BR) and a model peptide (KL(4)) was studied with a captive bubble surfactometer (CBS). The peptides were mixed with either 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC)/phosphatidylglycerol (PG) (7:3, by weight) or DPPC/PG/palmitic acid (68:22:9, by weight) at a concentration of 1 mg/ml in HEPES buffer, pH 6.9 and a polypeptide/lipid weight ratio of 0.02--0.03. In some lipid/peptide preparations also 2% of SP-B was included. Adsorption, monitored as surface tension vs. time for 10 min after bubble formation did not show discernible differences for the whole set of preparations. Equilibrium surface tensions of approximately 25 mN/m were reached after 5--10 min for all preparations, although those with SP-C/BR appeared not to reach end point of adsorption within 10 min. Area compression needed to reach minimum surface tension of 0.5--2.0 mN/m was least for the KL(4) preparation, about 13% in the first cycle. 3% SP-C(LKS) in DPPC:PG (7:3, by weight) reached minimum surface tension upon 27% compression in the first cycle. If DPPC:PG:PA (68:22:9, by weight) was used instead only 16% area compression was needed and 14% if also 2% SP-B was included. 3% SP-C(LKS) in DPPC:PG (7:3, by weight)+2% SP-B needed 34% compression to reach minimum surface tension. The replenishment of material from a surface associated surfactant reservoir was estimated with subphase depletion experiments. With the 2% KL(4) preparation incorporation of excess material took place at a surface tension of 25--35 mN/m during stepwise bubble expansion and excess material equivalent to 4.3 monolayers was found. When 2% SP-B was added to 3% SP-C(LKS) in DPPC:PG (7:3, by weight) the number of excess monolayers increased from 1.5 to 3

  12. Rattling Nucleons: New Developments in Active Interrogation of Special Nuclear Material

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Runkle; David L. Chichester; Scott J. Thompson

    2012-01-01

    Active interrogation is a vigorous area of research and development due to its promise of offering detection and characterization capabilities of special nuclear material in environments where passive detection fails. The primary value added by active methods is the capability to penetrate shielding - special nuclear material itself, incidental materials, or intentional shielding - and advocates hope that active interrogation will provide a solution to the problem of detecting shielded uranium, which is at present the greatest obstacle to interdiction efforts. The technique also provides a unique benefit for quantifying nuclear material in high background-radiation environments, an area important for nuclear material safeguards and material accountancy. Progress has been made in the field of active interrogation on several fronts, most notably in the arenas of source development, systems integration, and the integration and exploitation of multiple fission and non-fission signatures. But penetration of interrogating radiation often comes at a cost, not only in terms of finance and dose but also in terms of induced backgrounds, system complexity, and extended measurement times (including set up and acquisition). These costs make the calculus for deciding to implement active interrogation more subtle than may be apparent. The purpose of this review is thus to examine existing interrogation methods, compare and contrast their attributes and limitations, and identify missions where active interrogation may hold the most promise.

  13. Research activities of the Solid State Sciences Committee in the development of a Federal initiative on advanced materials and processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Ronald

    The Solid State Sciences Committee (SSSC) of the National Research Council (NRC) is charged with monitoring the health of the field of materials science in the United States. Accordingly, the committee identifies and examines both broad and specific issues affecting the field. Regular meetings, teleconferences, briefings from agencies and the scientific community, the formation of study panels to prepare reports, and special forums are among the mechanisms used by the SSSC to meet its charge. This progress report presents a review of SSSC activities from May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993. The details of prior activities are discussed in earlier reports. During the above period, the SSSC has continued to track and participate, when requested, in the development of a federal initiative on advanced materials and processing. Specifically, the SSSC is presently planning the 1993 SSSC Forum (to be cosponsored with the National Materials Advisory Board (NMAB) and the Washington Materials Forum (WMF)). The thrust will be to highlight the Federal Advanced Materials and Processing Program (AMPP). In keeping with its charge to identify and highlight specific areas for scientific and technological opportunities, the SSSC continued to oversee the conduct of a study on biomolecular materials. Preliminary plans also were developed for a study on neutron science; however, further activity is pending. A proposed study on ultrasmall devices has been expanded and absorbed into a broader context; the Board on Physics and Astronomy (BPA), with SSSC participation, is preparing to hold a program initiation meeting to evaluate the need for a study on information technology and hardware.

  14. Efficiency of biological activator formulated material (BAFM) for volatile organic compounds removal--preliminary batch culture tests with activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Corre, Charline; Couriol, Catherine; Amrane, Abdeltif; Dumont, Eric; Andrès, Yves; Le Cloirec, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    During biological degradation, such as biofiltration of air loaded with volatile organic compounds, the pollutant is passed through a bed packed with a solid medium acting as a biofilm support. To improve microorganism nutritional equilibrium and hence to enhance the purification capacities, a Biological Activator Formulated Material (BAFM) was developed, which is a mixture of solid nutrients dissolving slowly in a liquid phase. This solid was previously validated on mineral pollutants: ammonia and hydrogen sulphide. To evaluate the efficiency of such a material for biodegradation of some organic compounds, a simple experiment using an activated sludge batch reactor was carried out. The pollutants (sodium benzoate, phenol, p-nitrophenol and 2-4-dichlorophenol) were in the concentration range 100 to 1200 mg L(-1). The positive impact of the formulated material was shown. The improvement of the degradation rates was in the range 10-30%. This was the consequence of the low dissolution of the nutrients incorporated during material formulation, followed by their consumption by the biomass, as shown for urea used as a nitrogen source. Owing to its twofold interest (mechanical resistance and nutritional supplementation), the Biological Activator Formulated Material seems to be a promising material. Its addition to organic or inorganic supports should be investigated to confirm its relevance for implementation in biofilters. PMID:22988627

  15. Electrode-active material for electrochemical batteries and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Ravi

    1987-01-01

    A battery electrode material comprising a non-stoichiometric electrode-active material which forms a redox pair with the battery electrolyte, an electrically conductive polymer present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 5% by weight of the electrode-active material, and a binder. The conductive polymer provides improved proton or ion conductivity and is a ligand resulting in metal ion or negative ion vacancies of less than about 0.1 atom percent. Specific electrodes of nickel and lead are disclosed.

  16. Electrode-active material for electrochemical batteries and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Varma, R.

    1983-11-07

    A battery electrode material comprises a non-stoichiometric electrode-active material which forms a redox pair with the battery electrolyte, an electrically conductive polymer present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 5% by weight of the electrode-active material, and a binder. The conductive polymer provides improved proton or ion conductivity and is a ligand resulting in metal ion or negative ion vacancies of less than about 0.1 atom percent. Specific electrodes of nickel and lead are disclosed.

  17. Determination of contamination in rare earth materials by promptgamma activation analysis (PGAA)

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, D.L.; English, G.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay,Zs.

    2004-11-09

    Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) has been used to detect and quantify impurities in the analyses of rare earth (RE) oxides. The analytical results are discussed with respect to the importance of having a thorough identification and understanding of contaminant elements in these compounds regarding the function of the materials in their various applications. Also, the importance of using PGAA to analyze materials in support of other physico-chemical studies of the materials is discussed, including the study of extremely low concentrations of ions such as the rare earth ions themselves in bulk material matrices.

  18. Status of R&D activities on materials for fusion power reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluc, N.; Abe, K.; Boutard, J. L.; Chernov, V. M.; Diegele, E.; Jitsukawa, S.; Kimura, A.; Klueh, R. L.; Kohyama, A.; Kurtz, R. J.; Lässer, R.; Matsui, H.; Möslang, A.; Muroga, T.; Odette, G. R.; Tran, M. Q.; van der Schaaf, B.; Wu, Y.; Yu, J.; Zinkle, S. J.

    2007-10-01

    Current R&D activities on materials for fusion power reactors are mainly focused on plasma facing, structural and tritium breeding materials for plasma facing (first wall, divertor) and breeding blanket components. Most of these activities are being performed in Europe, Japan, the People's Republic of China, Russia and the USA. They relate to the development of new high temperature, radiation resistant materials, the development of coatings that will act as erosion, corrosion, permeation and/or electrical/MHD barriers, characterization of candidate materials in terms of mechanical and physical properties, assessment of irradiation effects, compatibility experiments, development of reliable joints, and development and/or validation of design rules. Priorities defined worldwide in the field of materials for fusion power reactors are summarized, as well as the main achievements obtained during the last few years and the near-term perspectives in the different investigation areas.

  19. The dissolution mechanism of cathodic active materials of spent Zn-Mn batteries in HCl.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunqing; Xi, Guoxi

    2005-12-01

    The cathodic active materials of spent Zn-Mn batteries are complicated. The majority materials that they contain are Mn(OH)(2), Mn(2)O(4), lambda-Mn(2)O(2), ZnMn(2)O(4), Zn(NH(3))(2)Cl(2), [Zn(OH)(2)](4).ZnCl(2), etc. Dissolving these kinds of materials is important to the environmental pollution control and materials recycle. In present paper we investigated the dissolution mechanism of the cathodic active materials in HCl by testing the factors that can influence the dissolution procedure, including temperature, time, and the concentration of HCl and H(2)O(2). Our results showed that both neutralization and oxidation-reduction reactions occurred in the dissolution process, and that H(2)O(2) had a great effect on the dissolution efficiency.

  20. IFMIF - International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility Conceptual Design Activity/Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rennich, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    Environmental acceptability, safety, and economic viability win ultimately be the keys to the widespread introduction of fusion power. This will entail the development of radiation- resistant and low- activation materials. These low-activation materials must also survive exposure to damage from neutrons having an energy spectrum peaked near 14 MeV with annual radiation doses in the range of 20 displacements per atom (dpa). Testing of candidate materials, therefore, requires a high-flux source of high energy neutrons. The problem is that there is currently no high-flux source of neutrons in the energy range above a few MeV. The goal, is therefore, to provide an irradiation facility for use by fusion material scientists in the search for low-activation and damage-resistant materials. An accellerator-based neutron source has been established through a number of international studies and workshops` as an essential step for materials development and testing. The mission of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is to provide an accelerator-based, deuterium-lithium (D-Li) neutron source to produce high energy neutrons at sufficient intensity and irradiation volume to test samples of candidate materials up to about a full lifetime of anticipated use in fusion energy reactors. would also provide calibration and validation of data from fission reactor and other accelerator-based irradiation tests. It would generate material- specific activation and radiological properties data, and support the analysis of materials for use in safety, maintenance, recycling, decommissioning, and waste disposal systems.

  1. Performance of Nonmigratory Iron Chelating Active Packaging Materials in Viscous Model Food Systems.

    PubMed

    Roman, Maxine J; Decker, Eric A; Goddard, Julie M

    2015-09-01

    Many packaged food products undergo quality deterioration due to iron promoted oxidative reactions. Recently, we have developed a nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging material that represents a novel approach to inhibit oxidation of foods while addressing consumer demands for "cleanˮ labels. A challenge to the field of nonmigratory active packaging is ensuring that surface-immobilized active agents retain activity in a true food system despite diffusional limitations. Yet, the relationship between food viscosity and nonmigratory active packaging activity retention has never been characterized. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of food viscosity on iron chelation by a nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging material. Methyl cellulose was added to aqueous buffered iron solutions to yield model systems with viscosities ranging from ∼1 to ∼10(5)  mPa·s, representing viscosities ranging from beverage to mayonnaise. Iron chelation was quantified by material-bound iron content using colorimetry and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES).  Maximum iron chelation was reached in solutions up to viscosity ∼10(2)  mPa·s. In more viscous solutions (up to ∼10(4)  mPa·s), there was a significant decrease in iron chelating capacity (P < 0.05). However, materials still retained at least 76% iron chelating capacity. Additionally, the influence of different food hydrocolloids on the performance of nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging was characterized. Methyl cellulose and carrageenan did not compete with the material for specific iron chelation (P > 0.05). Materials retained 32% to 45% chelating capacity when in contact with competitively chelating hydrocolloids guar gum, locust bean gum, and xanthan gum. This work demonstrates the potential application of nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging in liquid and semi-liquid foods to allow for the removal of synthetic chelators, while

  2. Performance of Nonmigratory Iron Chelating Active Packaging Materials in Viscous Model Food Systems.

    PubMed

    Roman, Maxine J; Decker, Eric A; Goddard, Julie M

    2015-09-01

    Many packaged food products undergo quality deterioration due to iron promoted oxidative reactions. Recently, we have developed a nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging material that represents a novel approach to inhibit oxidation of foods while addressing consumer demands for "cleanˮ labels. A challenge to the field of nonmigratory active packaging is ensuring that surface-immobilized active agents retain activity in a true food system despite diffusional limitations. Yet, the relationship between food viscosity and nonmigratory active packaging activity retention has never been characterized. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of food viscosity on iron chelation by a nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging material. Methyl cellulose was added to aqueous buffered iron solutions to yield model systems with viscosities ranging from ∼1 to ∼10(5)  mPa·s, representing viscosities ranging from beverage to mayonnaise. Iron chelation was quantified by material-bound iron content using colorimetry and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES).  Maximum iron chelation was reached in solutions up to viscosity ∼10(2)  mPa·s. In more viscous solutions (up to ∼10(4)  mPa·s), there was a significant decrease in iron chelating capacity (P < 0.05). However, materials still retained at least 76% iron chelating capacity. Additionally, the influence of different food hydrocolloids on the performance of nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging was characterized. Methyl cellulose and carrageenan did not compete with the material for specific iron chelation (P > 0.05). Materials retained 32% to 45% chelating capacity when in contact with competitively chelating hydrocolloids guar gum, locust bean gum, and xanthan gum. This work demonstrates the potential application of nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging in liquid and semi-liquid foods to allow for the removal of synthetic chelators, while

  3. How Do Distance Learners Use Activities in Self-Instructional Materials?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Sanjaya; Gaba, Ashok Kumar

    2001-01-01

    Presents results of a study on the use of learning activities in self-instructional materials by distance learners of the Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU). It shows that learners make use of the activities extensively as they have positive perceptions about benefits of Self-Assessment Questions and Terminal Questions given in the…

  4. Real space mapping of ionic diffusion and electrochemical activity in energy storage and conversion materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Balke, Nina; Kumar, Amit; Dudney, Nancy J; Jesse, Stephen

    2014-05-06

    A method and system for probing mobile ion diffusivity and electrochemical reactivity on a nanometer length scale of a free electrochemically active surface includes a control module that biases the surface of the material. An electrical excitation signal is applied to the material and induces the movement of mobile ions. An SPM probe in contact with the surface of the material detects the displacement of mobile ions at the surface of the material. A detector measures an electromechanical strain response at the surface of the material based on the movement and reactions of the mobile ions. The use of an SPM tip to detect local deformations allows highly reproducible measurements in an ambient environment without visible changes in surface structure. The measurements illustrate effective spatial resolution comparable with defect spacing and well below characteristic grain sizes of the material.

  5. Turning Waste into Value: Nanosized Natural Plant Materials of Solanum incanum L. and Pterocarpus erinaceus Poir with Promising Antimicrobial Activities

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Sharoon; Tittikpina, Nassifatou Koko; Al-marby, Adel; Alkhayer, Reem; Denezhkin, Polina; Witek, Karolina; Gbogbo, Koffi Apeti; Batawila, Komlan; Duval, Raphaël Emmanuel; Nasim, Muhammad Jawad; Awadh-Ali, Nasser A.; Kirsch, Gilbert; Chaimbault, Patrick; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Keck, Cornelia M.; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Jacob, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Numerous plants are known to exhibit considerable biological activities in the fields of medicine and agriculture, yet access to their active ingredients is often complicated, cumbersome and expensive. As a consequence, many plants harbouring potential drugs or green phyto-protectants go largely unnoticed, especially in poorer countries which, at the same time, are in desperate need of antimicrobial agents. As in the case of plants such as the Jericho tomato, Solanum incanum, and the common African tree Pterocarpus erinaceus, nanosizing of original plant materials may provide an interesting alternative to extensive extraction and isolation procedures. Indeed, it is straightforward to obtain considerable amounts of such common, often weed-like plants, and to mill the dried material to more or less uniform particles of microscopic and nanoscopic size. These particles exhibit activity against Steinernema feltiae or Escherichia coli, which is comparable to the ones seen for processed extracts of the same, respective plants. As S. feltiae is used as a model nematode indicative of possible phyto-protective uses in the agricultural arena, these findings also showcase the potential of nanosizing of crude “waste” plant materials for specific practical applications, especially—but not exclusively—in developing countries lacking a more sophisticated industrial infrastructure. PMID:27104554

  6. Turning Waste into Value: Nanosized Natural Plant Materials of Solanum incanum L. and Pterocarpus erinaceus Poir with Promising Antimicrobial Activities.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Sharoon; Tittikpina, Nassifatou Koko; Al-Marby, Adel; Alkhayer, Reem; Denezhkin, Polina; Witek, Karolina; Gbogbo, Koffi Apeti; Batawila, Komlan; Duval, Raphaël Emmanuel; Nasim, Muhammad Jawad; Awadh-Ali, Nasser A; Kirsch, Gilbert; Chaimbault, Patrick; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Keck, Cornelia M; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Jacob, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Numerous plants are known to exhibit considerable biological activities in the fields of medicine and agriculture, yet access to their active ingredients is often complicated, cumbersome and expensive. As a consequence, many plants harbouring potential drugs or green phyto-protectants go largely unnoticed, especially in poorer countries which, at the same time, are in desperate need of antimicrobial agents. As in the case of plants such as the Jericho tomato, Solanum incanum, and the common African tree Pterocarpus erinaceus, nanosizing of original plant materials may provide an interesting alternative to extensive extraction and isolation procedures. Indeed, it is straightforward to obtain considerable amounts of such common, often weed-like plants, and to mill the dried material to more or less uniform particles of microscopic and nanoscopic size. These particles exhibit activity against Steinernema feltiae or Escherichia coli, which is comparable to the ones seen for processed extracts of the same, respective plants. As S. feltiae is used as a model nematode indicative of possible phyto-protective uses in the agricultural arena, these findings also showcase the potential of nanosizing of crude "waste" plant materials for specific practical applications, especially-but not exclusively-in developing countries lacking a more sophisticated industrial infrastructure. PMID:27104554

  7. Turning Waste into Value: Nanosized Natural Plant Materials of Solanum incanum L. and Pterocarpus erinaceus Poir with Promising Antimicrobial Activities.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Sharoon; Tittikpina, Nassifatou Koko; Al-Marby, Adel; Alkhayer, Reem; Denezhkin, Polina; Witek, Karolina; Gbogbo, Koffi Apeti; Batawila, Komlan; Duval, Raphaël Emmanuel; Nasim, Muhammad Jawad; Awadh-Ali, Nasser A; Kirsch, Gilbert; Chaimbault, Patrick; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Keck, Cornelia M; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Jacob, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Numerous plants are known to exhibit considerable biological activities in the fields of medicine and agriculture, yet access to their active ingredients is often complicated, cumbersome and expensive. As a consequence, many plants harbouring potential drugs or green phyto-protectants go largely unnoticed, especially in poorer countries which, at the same time, are in desperate need of antimicrobial agents. As in the case of plants such as the Jericho tomato, Solanum incanum, and the common African tree Pterocarpus erinaceus, nanosizing of original plant materials may provide an interesting alternative to extensive extraction and isolation procedures. Indeed, it is straightforward to obtain considerable amounts of such common, often weed-like plants, and to mill the dried material to more or less uniform particles of microscopic and nanoscopic size. These particles exhibit activity against Steinernema feltiae or Escherichia coli, which is comparable to the ones seen for processed extracts of the same, respective plants. As S. feltiae is used as a model nematode indicative of possible phyto-protective uses in the agricultural arena, these findings also showcase the potential of nanosizing of crude "waste" plant materials for specific practical applications, especially-but not exclusively-in developing countries lacking a more sophisticated industrial infrastructure.

  8. Enhanced Immunostimulating Activity of Lactobacilli-Mimicking Materials by Controlling Size.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Koji; Kumano, Takayuki; Nakagawa, Yuichi; Oyama, Naho; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Moriyama, Kaoru; Shida, Kan; Nomoto, Koji; Chiba, Katsuyoshi; Koumoto, Kazuya; Matsui, Jun

    2015-08-19

    The design and synthesis of materials capable of activating the immune system in a safe manner is of great interest in immunology and related fields. Lactobacilli activate the innate immune system of a host when acting as probiotics. Here, we constructed lactobacilli-mimicking materials in which polysaccharide-peptidoglycan complexes (PS-PGs) derived from lactobacilli were covalently conjugated to the surfaces of polymeric microparticles with a wide variety of sizes, ranging from 200 nm to 3 μm. The artificial lactobacilli successfully stimulated macrophages without cytotoxicity. Importantly, we found that the size of artificial lactobacilli strongly influenced their immunostimulating activities, and that artificial lactobacilli of 1 μm exhibited 10-fold higher activity than natural lactobacilli. One major advantage of the artificial lactobacilli is facile control of size, which cannot be changed in natural lactobacilli. These findings provide new insights into the design of materials for immunology as well as the molecular biology of lactobacillus.

  9. Material Activation Benchmark Experiments at the NuMI Hadron Absorber Hall in Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, H.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Toyoda, A.; Yashima, H.; Sekimoto, S.; Iwase, H.; Oishi, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Leveling, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Lauten, G.; Mokhov, N.; Vaziri, K.

    2014-06-15

    In our previous study, double and mirror symmetric activation peaks found for Al and Au arranged spatially on the back of the Hadron absorber of the NuMI beamline in Fermilab were considerably higher than those expected purely from muon-induced reactions. From material activation bench-mark experiments, we conclude that this activation is due to hadrons with energy greater than 3 GeV that had passed downstream through small gaps in the hadron absorber.

  10. A New Way of Sensing: Need-Based Activation of Antibiotic Resistance by a Flux-Sensing Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Georg; Dintner, Sebastian; Treichel, Nicole Simone; Radeck, Jara; Gerland, Ulrich; Gebhard, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sensing of and responding to environmental changes are of vital importance for microbial cells. Consequently, bacteria have evolved a plethora of signaling systems that usually sense biochemical cues either via direct ligand binding acting as “concentration sensors” or by responding to downstream effects on bacterial physiology, such as structural damage to the cell. Here, we describe a novel, alternative signaling mechanism that effectively implements a “flux sensor” to regulate antibiotic resistance. It relies on a sensory complex consisting of a histidine kinase and an ABC transporter, in which the transporter fulfills the dual role of both the sensor of the antibiotic and the mediator of resistance against it. Combining systems biological modeling with in vivo experimentation, we show that these systems in fact respond to changes in activity of individual resistance transporters rather than to changes in the antibiotic concentration. Our model shows that the cell thereby adjusts the rate of de novo transporter synthesis to precisely the level needed for protection. Such a flux-sensing mechanism may serve as a cost-efficient produce-to-demand strategy, controlling a widely conserved class of antibiotic resistance systems. PMID:26199330

  11. Loading and utilization of active material in nickel composite electrodes: optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.W.; Ferrando, W.A.; Sutula, R.A.

    1984-12-01

    As an attempt to reduce nickel battery weight, the nickel composite electrode, has been under development. Investigations were undertaken to determine the optimum conditions for loading and utilizing nickel hydroxide active material in nickel composite electrodes. The main emphasis was placed on the improvement of both loading efficiency by electrochemical impregnation and utilization efficiency of the Ni(OH)2 active material. The efficiencies were examined as functions of such electrochemical conditions as current density, nickel concentration, pH, temperature of the impregnating bath, the continuity of current flow and manner of adding Co(OH)S additive. Also studied was the loading efficiency of chemical impregnation (polarization method) and the suspension method which enables a direct loading of externally prepared active material into the composite body. The most important factor for a quick utilization of the active material was found to be the additive distribution. A model of the additive distribution in the active material is proposed to account for different patterns of utilization exhibited by the electrodes.

  12. Scientific activity and needs among medical oncology units in sicily: a survey of the italian association of medical oncology.

    PubMed

    Amadio, P; Bordonaro, R; Borsellino, N; Butera, A; Caruso, M; Ferraù, F; Russello, R; Savio, G; Valenza, R; Zerilli, F; Gebbia, V

    2010-02-01

    In the era of targeted therapies and combined modalities of treatment, scientific research plays a role of paramount importance in improving knowledge of cancer treatment. The aim of this survey was to review the scientific activity of medical oncology units in Sicily and to analyze their needs and possible pitfalls in order to improve future scientific cooperation.The regional section of the Italian Association of medical Oncology (AIOM) approved this survey in November, 2007. A systematic review of scientific activity produced by medical oncology units in Sicily during the last 5 years has been reviewed. papers dealing with solid tumors reported in the pubmed web site have been included in the analysis. Data were reported as absolute number of published papers and impact factor per medical oncology unit and also as a ratio between global impact factor and the number of personnel working in each single unit to analyze scientific production according to the workforce of each institution.We identified a total of 283 papers reported in pubmed between 2004 and march, 2009. The mean number of publications/unit was 10.9 with a range of 0-50. The mean number of publications/year was 11.7 with a range of 0.2-10. The 15 units included in the impact factor evaluation published 252 papers with a total impact factor of 1014.6 points in 5 years with a mean of 63.4 points per institution and a mean of 4.02 points/paper. However only four medical oncology units reported a cumulative 5-year impact factor >100 points.This survey has shown that a minority of medical oncology units in Sicily is constantly involved in clinical research although at different levels of activity. Overall the percentage of patients enrolled in clinical trials is very low. The main reasons for lack of participation in clinical trials include insufficient medical personnel, the absence of a specifically dedicated research unit inside the medical oncology structures and in some cases lack of research

  13. Preliminary Results from a Survey of DPS Scientist’s Attitudes, Activities and Needs in Education and Public Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, Jennifer A.; Buxner, Sanlyn; Schneider, Nick

    2014-11-01

    The NASA SMD Planetary Sciences Forum, in partnership with the AAS DPS Education officer has conducted a semi-structured series of interviews with two-dozen DPS members to ascertain: the nature E/PO activities pursued by scientists, what resources and professional development opportunities are needed by scientists, how to increase the impact of scientists’ E/PO efforts, scientists’ concerns and questions regarding E/PO, and what we can do to identify opportunities to address these issues, both from the SMD and DPS perspectives. Members were contacted by phone, and responded to a loose script of questions over a time span of 20 to 90 minutes, depending on the individual. Members were chosen to represent a variety of career experience, home institutions and affiliations, and level of involvement with E/PO. Questions included: What is your level of involvement in E/PO? What sort of professional development or resources would you like to have to increase the efficiency of your E/PO efforts? What barriers to E/PO involvement have you encountered? How do you use social media in your E/PO efforts, if at all? What are your motivations for involvement in E/PO? etc. Our results are consistent with previous research conducted regarding this issue, but they do offer insight specific to the nature of DPS members and their views about E/PO. We will present a subset of these results, the opportunities they present, and the responses of both the PS Forum and the DPS. Based on this survey, the SMD PS Forum was able to identify specific new resources needed by scientists, and therefore developed the brief-one page guides, “The Quick Introduction to Education and Public Outreach,” and “Making the Most of Your E/PO Time - Increasing Your Efficiency and Impact.” Further resources and professional development opportunities will be developed as the data continue to be reviewed. This data collection effort is ongoing. If you would like to become involved, contact Jennifer

  14. Estimated neutron-activation data for TFTR. Part II. Biological dose rate from sample-materials activation

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, L.; Kolibal, J.G.

    1982-06-01

    The neutron induced material activation dose rate data are summarized for the TFTR operation. This report marks the completion of the second phase of the systematic study of the activation problem on the TFTR. The estimations of the neutron induced activation dose rates were made for spherical and slab objects, based on a point kernel method, for a wide range of materials. The dose rates as a function of cooling time for standard samples are presented for a number of typical neutron spectrum expected during TFTR DD and DT operations. The factors which account for the variations of the pulsing history, the characteristic size of the object and the distance of observation relative to the standard samples are also presented.

  15. Use of silicon carbide sludge to form porous alkali-activated materials for insulating application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prud'homme, E.; Joussein, E.; Rossignol, S.

    2015-07-01

    One of the objectives in the field of alkali-activated materials is the development of materials having greater thermal performances than conventional construction materials such as aerated concrete. The aim of this paper is to present the possibility to obtain controlled porosity and controlled thermal properties with geopolymer materials including a waste like silicon carbide sludge. The porosity is created by the reaction of free silicon contains in silicon carbide sludge leading to the formation of hydrogen. Two possible ways are investigated to control the porosity: modification of mixture formulation and additives introduction. The first way is the most promising and allowed the formation of materials presenting the same density but various porosities, which shows that the material is adaptable to the application. The insulation properties are logically linked to the porosity and density of materials. A lower value of thermal conductivity of 0.075 W.m-1.K-1 can be reached for a material with a low density of 0.27 g.cm-3. These characteristics are really good for a mineral-based material which always displays non-negligible resistance to manipulation.

  16. Electrode including porous particles with embedded active material for use in a secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Vissers, Donald R.; Nelson, Paul A.; Kaun, Thomas D.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

    1978-04-25

    Particles of carbonaceous matrices containing embedded electrode active material are prepared for vibratory loading within a porous electrically conductive substrate. In preparing the particles, active materials such as metal chalcogenides, solid alloys of alkali or alkaline earth metals along with other metals and their oxides in powdered or particulate form are blended with a thermosetting resin and particles of a volatile to form a paste mixture. The paste is heated to a temperature at which the volatile transforms into vapor to impart porosity at about the same time as the resin begins to cure into a rigid, solid structure. The solid structure is then comminuted into porous, carbonaceous particles with the embedded active material.

  17. Method of preparing porous, active material for use in electrodes of secondary electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Vissers, Donald R.; Nelson, Paul A.; Kaun, Thomas D.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

    1977-01-01

    Particles of carbonaceous matrices containing embedded electrode active material are prepared for vibratory loading within a porous electrically conductive substrate. In preparing the particles, active materials such as metal chalcogenides, solid alloys of alkali or alkaline earth metals along with other metals and their oxides in powdered or particulate form are blended with a thermosetting resin and particles of a volatile to form a paste mixture. The paste is heated to a temperature at which the volatile transforms into vapor to impart porosity at about the same time as the resin begins to cure into a rigid, solid structure.The solid structure is then comminuted into porous, carbonaceous particles with the embedded active material.

  18. KCP Activities Supporting the W76LEP Stress Cushions and LK3626 RTV Replacement Material Development

    SciTech Connect

    J. W. Schneider

    2009-10-01

    The S-5370 RTV blown foam previously produced by Dow Corning is no longer commercially available. The S-5370 material has been used on all of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) programs to manufacture Stress Cushions up through the W88. The Kansas City Plant (KCP) did not have a sufficient supply of S-5370 material to cover the schedule requirements for the Program. This report provides information on the numerous activities conducted at KCP involving the development of the Program Stress Cushion and replacement RTV material.

  19. Activity concentration of natural radioactive nuclides in nonmetallic industrial raw materials in Japan.

    PubMed

    Iwaoka, Kazuki; Tabe, Hiroyuki; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2014-11-01

    Natural materials such as rock, ore, and clay, containing natural radioactive nuclides are widely used as industrial raw materials in Japan. If these are high concentrations, the workers who handle the material can be unknowingly exposed to radiation at a high level. In this study, about 80 nonmetallic natural materials frequently used as industrial raw materials in Japan were comprehensively collected from several industrial companies, and the activity concentrations of (238)U series, (232)Th series and (40)K in the materials was determined by ICP-MS (inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometer) and gamma ray spectrum analyses. Effective doses to workers handling them were estimated by using methods for dose estimation given in the RP 122. We found the activity concentrations to be lower than the critical values defined by regulatory requirements as described in the IAEA Safety Guide. The maximum estimated effective dose to workers handling these materials was 0.16 mSv y(-1), which was lower than the reference level (1-20 mSv y(-1)) for existing situation given in the ICRP Publ.103.

  20. Particles, processes and materials for modern energy needs: Development of a DOE-EPSCoR project in Puerto Rico. Final report for September 30, 1997 - August 31, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, Brad R.

    2000-09-29

    Twenty-eight (28) faculty researchers focused on High Energy Particle Physics, Novel Thin Film Materials for Optoelectronic Applications, and Catalytic Processes for Energy Sources and Environmental Detoxification to address problems cited as priorities by the DOE and local agencies. The High Energy Particle Physics cluster has DOE-competitive funding, and the number of cluster investigators who have competitive mainstream funding has increased from 2 to 13 since the inception of the program. In this reporting period, 8 postdoctorals, 38 graduate studnets, and 23 undergraduates were involved in DOE projects, and 191 publications and 238 presentations were generated. The UPR-Arecibo Integrated Science Multi-Use Laboratory provided workshops and other activities that directly impacted 360 teachers and 600 students and indirectly impacted over 25,000 through the enhancement of teachers' skills and knowledge.

  1. Determination of elements in National Bureau of Standards' geological Standard Reference Materials by neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.C.; Glascock, M.D.; Carni, J.J.; Vogt, J.R.; Spalding, T.G.

    1982-08-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) have been used to determine elemental concentrations in two recently issued National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Standard Reference Materials (SRM's). The results obtained are in good agreement with the certified and information values reported by NBS for those elements in each material for which comparisons are available. Average concentrations of 35 elements in SRM 278 obsidian rock and 32 elements in SRM 688 basalt rock are reported for comparison with results that may be obtained by other laboratories.

  2. Graphical computational method for active materials in simulation of optical electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potasek, M.; Parilov, E.; Beeson, K.

    2014-03-01

    Traditional numerical analyses of laser beam transmission through "active" nonlinear materials have involved many assumptions that narrow their general applicability. As more complex optical phenomena are widely employed in research and industry, it is necessary to expand the use of numerical simulation methods. Historically, laser-matter interactions have involved calculations of "classical" wave propagation by Maxwell's equations and photon absorption through rate equations using numerous approximations. We describe a novel numerical modeling framework that adapts itself for simulation of different types of active materials provided by a simple graphical input. Our framework combines classical electric field propagation with "active" photon absorption kinetics using computational active photonic building blocks (APBB). It allows investigating a plane electromagnetic wave propagating through generic organic or inorganic photoactive materials; while, "active" photo-transitions are implemented using the APBB algorithm on the user interface. To date we have used the method in multiphoton absorbers, upconversion, semiconductor quantum dots, rare earth ions, organic chromophores, singlet oxygen formation, energy transfer, and optically-induced chemical reactions. We will demonstrate the method with applications of amplification in rare-earth ions and multiple two-photon absorbers materials in tandem.

  3. Evaluation of Light-Activated Provisional Resin Materials for Periodontal Soft Tissue Management

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine mechanical properties using a compressive test with cylinder specimen (h = 6 mm and ϕ = 4 mm) as well as cytotoxicity using elutes from disk specimen (ϕ = 10 mm and h = 2 mm) against human gingival fibroblasts and oral keratinocytes with light-activated provisional resin materials (Revotek LC and Luxatemp Solar) compared to chemically activated counterpart (Snap, Trim II, and Jet). Significantly increased compressive strength (210~280 MPa) was detected in light-activated products compared to chemically activated ones (20~65 MPa, P < 0.05) and similar compressive modulus was detected in both types (0.8~1.5 and 0.5~1.3 GPa). Simultaneously, the light-activated products showed less adverse effects on the periodontal soft tissue cells in any polymerization stage compared to the chemically activated products. Particularly, chemically activated products had significantly greater adverse effects during the “polymerizing” phase compared to those that were “already set” (P < 0.05), as shown in confocal microscopic images of live and dead cells. In conclusion, light-activated provisional resin materials have better mechanical properties as well as biocompatibility against two tested types of oral cells compared to the chemically activated counterpart, which are considered as more beneficial choice for periodontal soft tissue management. PMID:27672651

  4. Evaluation of Light-Activated Provisional Resin Materials for Periodontal Soft Tissue Management

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine mechanical properties using a compressive test with cylinder specimen (h = 6 mm and ϕ = 4 mm) as well as cytotoxicity using elutes from disk specimen (ϕ = 10 mm and h = 2 mm) against human gingival fibroblasts and oral keratinocytes with light-activated provisional resin materials (Revotek LC and Luxatemp Solar) compared to chemically activated counterpart (Snap, Trim II, and Jet). Significantly increased compressive strength (210~280 MPa) was detected in light-activated products compared to chemically activated ones (20~65 MPa, P < 0.05) and similar compressive modulus was detected in both types (0.8~1.5 and 0.5~1.3 GPa). Simultaneously, the light-activated products showed less adverse effects on the periodontal soft tissue cells in any polymerization stage compared to the chemically activated products. Particularly, chemically activated products had significantly greater adverse effects during the “polymerizing” phase compared to those that were “already set” (P < 0.05), as shown in confocal microscopic images of live and dead cells. In conclusion, light-activated provisional resin materials have better mechanical properties as well as biocompatibility against two tested types of oral cells compared to the chemically activated counterpart, which are considered as more beneficial choice for periodontal soft tissue management.

  5. Trace element analysis of K, U and Th in high purity materials by neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pillalamarri, Ila

    2005-09-08

    The concept and usage of 'high purity' are explained. Trace element analysis of K, U and Th by neutron activation analysis is described, the radio-isotopes and their corresponding gamma-rays used to identify the elements are listed. The interfering elements are described. The advantages and disadvantages of using neutron activation analysis are discussed. Some examples of trace impurity determinations in high purity materials are provided.

  6. Comparison of dielectric materials for the activation of a macro-scale hinge configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordi, C.; Schmidt, A.; Kovacs, G.; Ermanni, Paolo

    2011-04-01

    While much of the research on dielectric elastomer actuators used to concentrate on VHB 4910 as dielectric material, lately many new, specifically developed materials have come into focus. The acrylic VHB has been thoroughly characterized in a macro-scale agonist-antagonist configuration on an active hinge. This was carried out with the aim of using it on an airship, which was activated, undulating body and a fin and thus propelled in a fish-like manner. The concept was proved in flight, but still lifetime and viscosity of the actuators and the time-costing fabrication due to the necessary large pre-stretches of the dielectric membrane caused severe inconveniences. In order to evaluate the usability of other materials for this specific purpose, two other materials, a corrugated silicone with silver electrodes (by PolyPower) and an acrylic with interpenetrating network (IPN) developed by Pei et al. were characterized under similar conditions. The influence of the material on performance and design of the actuators and the conclusions for the use of the materials on the airship (and on applications with similar performance requirements) are presented.

  7. Active Interrogation of Sensitive Nuclear Material Using Laser Driven Neutron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2015-05-01

    An investigation of the viability of a laser-driven neutron source for active interrogation is reported. The need is for a fast, movable, operationally safe neutron source which is energy tunable and has high-intensity, directional neutron production. Reasons for the choice of neutrons and lasers are set forth. Results from the interrogation of an enriched U sample are shown.

  8. Summary Report for the Technical Interchange Meeting on Development of Baseline Material Properties and Design Guidelines for In-Space Manufacturing Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prater, T. J.; Bean, Q. A.; Werkheiser, N. J.; Johnston, M. M.; Ordonez, E. A.; Ledbetter, F. E.; Risdon, D. L.; Stockman, T. J.; Sandridge, S. K. R.; Nelson, G. M.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the Agency as a whole are currently engaged in a number of in-space manufacturing (ISM) activities that have the potential to reduce launch costs, enhance crew safety, and provide the capabilities needed to undertake long-duration spaceflight. The recent 3D Printing in Zero-G experiment conducted on board the International Space Station (ISS) demonstrated that parts of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastic can be manufactured in microgravity using fused deposition modeling (FDM). This project represents the beginning of the development of a capability that is critical to future NASA missions. Current and future ISM activities will require the development of baseline material properties to facilitate design, analysis, and certification of materials manufactured using in-space techniques. The purpose of this technical interchange meeting (TIM) was to bring together MSFC practitioners and experts in materials characterization and development of baseline material properties for emerging technologies to advise the ISM team as we progress toward the development of material design values, standards, and acceptance criteria for materials manufactured in space. The overall objective of the TIM was to leverage MSFC's shared experiences and collective knowledge in advanced manufacturing and materials development to construct a path forward for the establishment of baseline material properties, standards development, and certification activities related to ISM. Participants were asked to help identify research and development activities that will (1) accelerate acceptance and adoption of ISM techniques among the aerospace design community; (2) benefit future NASA programs, commercial technology developments, and national needs; and (3) provide opportunities and avenues for further collaboration.

  9. Capacitance improvement of supercapacitor active material based on activated carbon fiber working with a Li-ion containing electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamura, Tsutomu; Sato, Youh; Sato, Yuichi

    In an attempt to provide a favorable active material of Li + supercapacitor for HEV use, we modified the surface of an activated carbon fiber felt by coating with some transition metal oxides after mild-oxidation treatment. Major source of enhancing capacitance is attributed to be due to the nano-ionics mechanism proposed by Maier and coworkers. Cyclic voltammetry and constant current charge-discharge performance were examined for the surface modified samples in view of power capability. The oxides of Ag, Cu, Pd, and Sn were found effective to enhance the capacitance and high rate charge/discharge performance. The cycleability test was performed as well.

  10. Active Optical Metasurfaces Based on Defect-Engineered Phase-Transition Materials.

    PubMed

    Rensberg, Jura; Zhang, Shuyan; Zhou, You; McLeod, Alexander S; Schwarz, Christian; Goldflam, Michael; Liu, Mengkun; Kerbusch, Jochen; Nawrodt, Ronny; Ramanathan, Shriram; Basov, D N; Capasso, Federico; Ronning, Carsten; Kats, Mikhail A

    2016-02-10

    Active, widely tunable optical materials have enabled rapid advances in photonics and optoelectronics, especially in the emerging field of meta-devices. Here, we demonstrate that spatially selective defect engineering on the nanometer scale can transform phase-transition materials into optical metasurfaces. Using ion irradiation through nanometer-scale masks, we selectively defect-engineered the insulator-metal transition of vanadium dioxide, a prototypical correlated phase-transition material whose optical properties change dramatically depending on its state. Using this robust technique, we demonstrated several optical metasurfaces, including tunable absorbers with artificially induced phase coexistence and tunable polarizers based on thermally triggered dichroism. Spatially selective nanoscale defect engineering represents a new paradigm for active photonic structures and devices.

  11. Active packaging materials from Poly(Lactic Acid)and Pectin composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Active packaging of foods is receiving considerable attention from the food industry and food researchers. The ability to wrap foods in packaging materials that can provide additional functions, such as retaining freshness or preventing spoilage and pathogen growth, would be very important for the f...

  12. Hot-wire detector for chemically active materials used in gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Hot-filament detector analyzes chemically active materials used in gas chromatography. The detector reacts chemically with the effluent vapors in the gas chromatographic apparatus to change the electrical resistance of the filament as a function of the affluent composition. Due to the changes produced by chemical action on the filament, the system is often calibrated.

  13. UPLC-Q-TOF-MS analysis of non-volatile migrants from new active packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Aznar, M; Rodriguez-Lafuente, A; Alfaro, P; Nerin, C

    2012-10-01

    Ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) is a useful tool in the analysis of non-volatile compounds, and the use of a quadrupole-time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass analyzer allows a high sensitivity and accuracy when acquiring full fragment mode, providing a high assurance of correct identification of unknown compounds. In this work, UPLC-Q-TOF-MS technology has been applied to the analysis of non-volatile migrants from new active packaging materials. The materials tested were based on polypropylene (PP), ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer (EVOH), and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). The active packaging materials studied were one PP film containing a natural antioxidant, and two PP/EVOH films, two PET/EVOH films and one coextruded PP/EVOH/PP film containing natural antimicrobials. The chemical structure of several compounds was unequivocally identified. The analysis revealed the migration of some of the active substances used in the manufacture of active packaging, such as caffeine (0.07 ± 0.01 μg/g), carvacrol (0.31 ± 0.03 μg/g) and citral (0.20 ± 0.01 μg/g). Unintentionally added substances were also found, such as citral reaction compounds, or citral impurities present in the raw materials. PMID:22836481

  14. NREL Develops Accelerated Sample Activation Process for Hydrogen Storage Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in developing a new sample activation process that reduces the time to prepare samples for measurement of hydrogen storage from several days to five minutes and provides more uniform samples. Work was performed by NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center.

  15. People* Working . . . *Especially Women . . . A Book of Materials, Activities, and Ideas for the Classroom Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valiant, Sharon

    This bibliography lists publications and other media, historical facts, and suggestions for activities that show women as working and accomplishing people. Materials are from all grade levels (K-12) and many subject areas. Arrangement is in three sections. Part I deals with women who have worked but not for wages, the pioneer, the homemaker, and…

  16. Metabolic activity of moulds as a factor of building materials biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Gutarowska, Beata

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the effect of building materials on the growth and metabolic activity of moulds. In cultures of Aspergillus and Penicillium moulds grown on a model medium with the addition of building materials, the biomass of mycelium, its cellular components--glucan, chitin, ergosterol and the spectrum of enzymes and organic acids produced in the medium were investigated. It was found that on the medium with wallpaper moulds produced more biomass and extracellular enzymes, mainly glycolytic ones. On medium with mortar the growth of mycelium was impeded, production of biomass was 60% smaller, the quantity of chitin, glucan and ergosterol decreased 13-41%, and the activity of most enzymes was reduced; however the moulds intensively produced organic acids: malic, succinic and oxalic acid. The largest acid production activity was found in medium with addition of mortar; moulds produced the greatest variety of acids and in greater quantities than in the control medium. Metabolic activity of the moulds depends on the type of building material, and may lead to biodeterioration of these materials.

  17. Sorptive uptake of selenium with magnetite and its supported materials onto activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jae H; Wilson, Lee D; Sammynaiken, R

    2015-11-01

    Kinetic and equilibrium uptake studies of selenite in aqueous solution with synthetic magnetite (Mag-P), commercial magnetite (Mag-C), goethite, activated carbon (AC), and a composite material containing 19% magnetite supported on activated carbon (CM-19) were investigated. Kinetic uptake studies used a one-pot setup at pH 5.26 at variable temperature. Sampling of unbound selenite in-situ was achieved with analytical detection by atomic absorbance. The sorptive uptake at equilibrium and kinetic conditions are listed in descending order: goethite>Mag-P>Mag-C>CM-19. Kinetic uptake parameters reveal that Mag-P showed apparent negative values for the activation energy (E(a)) and the enthalpy of activation (ΔH(‡)), in agreement with a multi-step process for the kinetic uptake of selenite. By contrast, Mag-C, CM-19, and goethite showed positive values for E(a) and ΔH(‡). The uptake properties of the various sorbent materials with selenite are in accordance with the formation of inner- and out-sphere complexes. Leaching of iron from the composite material (CM-19) was attenuated due to the stabilizing effect of the magnetite within the pore sites and the surface of AC. Supported iron oxide nanomaterial composites represent a unique sorbent material with tunable uptake properties toward inorganic selenite in aqueous solution.

  18. MOF@activated carbon: a new material for adsorption of aldicarb in biological systems.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Carlos Alberto Fernandes; da Silva, Fausthon Fred; Jimenez, George Chaves; Neto, José Ferreira da S; de Souza, Daniela Maria Bastos; de Souza, Ivone Antônia; Alves, Severino

    2013-07-25

    A new composite was synthesized by the hydrothermal method using a 3D coordination network [Ln2(C4H4O4)3(H2O)2]·H2O (Ln = Eu and Tb) and activated carbon. The coordination network is formed within the pores of the charcoal, allowing for the use of this material as a detoxifying agent.

  19. Active Learning and Just-in-Time Teaching in a Material and Energy Balances Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberatore, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    The delivery of a material and energy balances course is enhanced through a series of in-class and out-of-class exercises. An active learning classroom is achieved, even at class sizes over 150 students, using multiple instructors in a single classroom, problem solving in teams, problems based on YouTube videos, and just-in-time teaching. To avoid…

  20. Poly(exTTF): a novel redox-active polymer as active material for li-organic batteries.

    PubMed

    Häupler, Bernhard; Burges, René; Friebe, Christian; Janoschka, Tobias; Schmidt, Daniel; Wild, Andreas; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2014-08-01

    The first polymer bearing exTTF units intended for the use in electrical charge storage is presented. The polymer undergoes a redox reaction involving two electrons at -0.20 V vs Fc/Fc(+) and is applied as active cathode material in a Li-organic battery. The received coin cells feature a theoretical capacity of 132 mAh g(-1) , a cell potential of 3.5 V, and a lifetime exceeding more than 250 cycles.

  1. Large-Area, Highly Ordered Array of Graphitic Carbon Materials Using Surface Active Chitosan Prepatterns.

    PubMed

    Baek, Youn-Kyoung; Kim, Dae Woo; Yang, Seung Bo; Lee, Jung-Goo; Kim, Young Kuk; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that chitosan prepatterns can generate not only highly periodic DNA pattern but also various types of graphitic carbon materials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fluorescence imaging and Raman spectroscopic results revealed that the graphitic carbon materials were selectively deposited on the surface of the periodic chitosan patterns by the electrostatic interaction between protonated amine groups of chitosan and the negative charged carbon materials. One proof-of-concept application of the system to the fabrication of electrical devices based on the micropatterns of SWNTs and RGO was also demonstrated. The strategy to use highly surface active chitosan pattern that can easily fabricate highly periodic pattern via a variety of lithographic tools may pave the way for the production of periodic arrays of graphitic carbon materials for large area device integration. PMID:26353637

  2. UV Raman spectroscopic studies on active sites and synthesis mechanisms of transition metal-containing microporous and mesoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fengtao; Feng, Zhaochi; Li, Can

    2010-03-16

    Microporous and mesoporous materials are widely used as catalysts and catalyst supports. Although the incorporation of transition metal ions into the framework of these materials (by isomorphous substitution of Al and Si) is an effective means of creating novel catalytic activity, the characterization of the transition metal species within these materials is difficult. Both the low concentration of the highly dispersed transition metal and the coexistence of extraframework transition metal species present clear challenges. Moreover, the synthetic mechanisms that operate under the highly inhomogeneous conditions of hydrothermal synthesis are far from well understood. A useful technique for addressing these challenges is UV Raman spectroscopy, which is a powerful technique for catalyst characterization and particularly for transition metal-containing microporous and mesoporous materials. Conventional Raman spectroscopy, using visible and IR wavelengths, often fails to provide the information needed for proper characterization as a result of fluorescence interference. But shifting the excitation source to the UV range addresses this difficulty: interference from fluorescence (which typically occurs at 300-700 nm or greater) is greatly diminished. Moreover, signal intensity is enhanced because Raman intensity is proportional to the fourth power of the scattered light frequency. In this Account, we review recent advances in UV Raman spectroscopic characterization of (i) highly dispersed transition metal oxides on supports, (ii) transition metal ions in the framework of microporous and mesoporous materials, and (iii) the synthetic mechanisms involved in making microporous materials. By taking advantage of the strong UV resonance Raman effect, researchers have made tremendous progress in the identification of isolated transition metal ions incorporated in the framework of microporous and mesoporous materials such as TS-1, Ti-MCM-41, Fe-ZSM-5, and Fe-SBA-15. The synthetic

  3. Ultrastrong Chemiluminescence Activity of Nanocarbon Materials after Ozonation and Their Effects on Different Chemiluminescent Systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; He, Duhong; Wang, Meina; Zheng, Baozhan; Wu, Li; Xiao, Dan; Guo, Yong

    2016-06-20

    Ozonized nanocarbon materials with different dimensionalities, structures, and components exhibited significantly different chemiluminescence (CL) activities. The ozonation time and the weight ratio of hydroxyl carbon nanotubes (d≈8 nm, hyCNTs-8) and graphene oxide (GO) strongly affected the CL activity of ozonized hybrids. Among GO, hyCNTs-8, and GO/hyCNTs-8, the GO/hyCNTs-8 hybrids exhibited the strongest CL-enhancing properties toward the luminol/H2 O2 system, in contrast to previous reports. This study provides new understanding of the CL activity and CL-enhancing properties of nanocarbon materials in signal-enhanced analytical and biomedical fields. PMID:27144483

  4. Effect of wall material on the antioxidant activity and physicochemical properties of Rubus fruticosus juice microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Dafne I; Beristain, Cesar I; Azuara, Ebner; Luna, Guadalupe; Jimenez, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    Blackberry (Rubus fruticosus) juice possesses compounds with antioxidant activity, which can be protected by different biopolymers used in the microencapsulation. Therefore, the effects of cell wall material including maltodextrin (MD), Arabic gum (GA) and whey protein concentrate (WPC) were evaluated on the physicochemical and antioxidant properties of encapsulated blackberries using a spray-drying technique. Anthocyanin concentration, polymeric colour, total polyphenols, radical scavenging activity of the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrilhydrazil radical, reducing power and the stability at different storage conditions were evaluated. GA and MD conferred a similar protection to the antioxidant compounds when the microcapsules were stored at low water activities (aw < 0.515) in contrast to at a high moisture content (aw > 0.902), whereas WPC presented a high protection. Therefore, the selection of the best wall material for blackberry juice encapsulation depends of the conditions of storage of the powder.

  5. Integration of active materials with silicon micromachining: applications to optical MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouy, Jean-Philippe; Arakawa, Yasuhiko; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2001-11-01

    Most of the MOEMS including optical switches and micro optical benches are developed on silicon. As for the MEMS, the main reason is that silicon has consistently been the material of choice for the microelectronics industry, due to a mature processing technology which offers the possibility to integrate MEMS devices with Integrated Circuits in a low cost batch fabrication process. However, since the beginning of Optoelectronic, silicon has been suffering from its poor efficiency to emit light because of its indirect band gap. Optical active devices can be integrated on silicon by combining specific active materials in order to keep the main advantage of silicon micromachining for MOEMS applications. This paper illustrates this purpose through one project developed in the frame of the LIMMS, joint laboratory between France and Japan. This project deals with optical active devices for which silicon micromachining technology has been employed to fabricate an organic semiconductors based light emitted diode on silicon substrate.

  6. Enhancing physical activity guidelines: a needs survey of adults with spinal cord injury and health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Foulon, Brianne L; Lemay, Valérie; Ainsworth, Victoria; Martin Ginis, Kathleen A

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine preferences of people with spinal cord injury (SCI) and health care professionals (HCP) regarding the content and format of a SCI physical activity guide to support recently released SCI physical activity guidelines. Seventy-eight people with SCI and 80 HCP completed a survey questionnaire. Participants with SCI identified desired content items and their preferences for format. HCP rated the helpfulness of content items to prescribe physical activity. All content items were rated favorably by participants with SCI and useful by HCP. The risks and benefits of activity and inactivity, and strategies for becoming more active, were rated high by both samples. Photographs and separate information for those with paraplegia versus tetraplegia were strongly endorsed. These data were used to guide the development of an SCI physical activity guide to enhance the uptake of physical activity guidelines for people with SCI. The guide was publically released November 11, 2011.

  7. GUIDANCE FOR THE PROPER CHARACTERIZATION AND CLASSIFICATION OF LOW SPECIFIC ACTIVITY MATERIALS AND SURFACE CONTAMINATED OBJECTS FOR DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect

    PORTSMOUTH JH; BLACKFORD LT

    2012-02-13

    Regulatory concerns over the proper characterization of certain waste streams led CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) to develop written guidance for personnel involved in Decontamination & Decommissioning (D&D) activities, facility management and Waste Management Representatives (WMRs) involved in the designation of wastes for disposal on and off the Hanford Site. It is essential that these waste streams regularly encountered in D&D operations are properly designated, characterized and classified prior to shipment to a Treatment, Storage or Disposal Facility (TSDF). Shipments of waste determined by the classification process as Low Specific Activity (LSA) or Surface Contaminated Objects (SCO) must also be compliant with all applicable U.S. Department of Transportation (DOE) regulations as well as Department of Energy (DOE) orders. The compliant shipment of these waste commodities is critical to the Hanford Central Plateau cleanup mission. Due to previous problems and concerns from DOE assessments, CHPRC internal critiques as well as DOT, a management decision was made to develop written guidance and procedures to assist CHPRC shippers and facility personnel in the proper classification of D&D waste materials as either LSA or SCO. The guidance provides a uniform methodology for the collection and documentation required to effectively characterize, classify and identify candidate materials for shipping operations. A primary focus is to ensure that waste materials generated from D&D and facility operations are compliant with the DOT regulations when packaged for shipment. At times this can be difficult as the current DOT regulations relative to the shipment of LSA and SCO materials are often not clear to waste generators. Guidance is often sought from NUREG 1608/RAMREG-003 [3]: a guidance document that was jointly developed by the DOT and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and published in 1998. However, NUREG 1608 [3] is now thirteen years old and

  8. Microstructure design of metal composite for active material in sodium nickel-iron chloride battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Cheol-Woo; Kim, Mangi; Hahn, Byung-Dong; Hong, Inchul; Kim, Woosung; Moon, Goyoung; Lee, Heesoo; Jung, Keeyoung; Park, Yoon-Cheol; Choi, Joon-Hwan

    2016-10-01

    In this manuscript, it is reported how the microstructure of metal composites can be designed to obtain excellent cycle performance in Na-(Ni,Fe)Cl2 battery. The microstructure consists of an active material and a conducting material. The conducting material is an active material as well as a conducting chain (an electron path). In Na-(Ni,Fe)Cl2 cells, it is preferable that Ni is selected as the conducting material, since the nickel chloride is not formed on the surface of Ni particles during the electrochemical reaction of Fe particles. In addition, the particle size of Ni should be smaller than that of Fe, in order to ensure that the conducting chain is well-connected. Through this design, the cycle performance of a Na-(Ni,Fe)Cl2 cell was significantly improved, compared to that of a Na-NiCl2 cell. At the 100th cycle, the charge/discharge capacity of a Na-(Ni,Fe)Cl2 cell was much higher than that of a Na-NiCl2 cell, approximately 42%.

  9. Effect of packing material on methane activation in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Sungkwon; Hoon Lee, Dae; Seok Kang, Woo; Song, Young-Hoon

    2013-12-15

    The conversion of methane is measured in a planar-type dielectric barrier discharge reactor using γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (sphere), α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (sphere), and γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (16–20 mesh). Investigations on the surface properties and shape of the three packing materials clearly indicate that methane activation is considerably affected by the material used. Capacitances inside the discharge gap are estimated from charge–voltage plots, and a comparison of the generated and transferred charges for different packing conditions show that the difference in surface properties between γ- and α-phase Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} affects the discharge characteristics. Moreover, all packing conditions show different charge characteristics that are related to the electron density. Finally, the packing material's shape affects the local electron temperature, which is strongly related to methane conversion. The combined results indicate that both microscale and macroscale variations in a packing material affect the discharge characteristics, and a packing material should be considered carefully for effective methane activation.

  10. Effect of packing material on methane activation in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Sungkwon; Hoon Lee, Dae; Seok Kang, Woo; Song, Young-Hoon

    2013-12-01

    The conversion of methane is measured in a planar-type dielectric barrier discharge reactor using γ-Al2O3 (sphere), α-Al2O3 (sphere), and γ-Al2O3 (16-20 mesh). Investigations on the surface properties and shape of the three packing materials clearly indicate that methane activation is considerably affected by the material used. Capacitances inside the discharge gap are estimated from charge-voltage plots, and a comparison of the generated and transferred charges for different packing conditions show that the difference in surface properties between γ- and α-phase Al2O3 affects the discharge characteristics. Moreover, all packing conditions show different charge characteristics that are related to the electron density. Finally, the packing material's shape affects the local electron temperature, which is strongly related to methane conversion. The combined results indicate that both microscale and macroscale variations in a packing material affect the discharge characteristics, and a packing material should be considered carefully for effective methane activation.

  11. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, M.M.; Peng, M.Y.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.C.

    1996-09-24

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M{sub x}Z{sub y}Mn{sub (1{minus}y)}O{sub 2}, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell. 11 figs.

  12. Performance evaluation of polyaniline as an active material for electrochemical capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Rudge, A.; Davey, J.; Uribe, F.; Landeros, J. Jr.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1994-08-01

    This paper describes experiments which evaluate the performance of polyaniline (PAni) as an active material in electrochemical capacitors. We have performed constant current multicycle tests on prototype symmetric devices where the same conducting polymer serves as the active material on both electrodes. When electropolymerized at high current density in aqueous acid solution, PAni exhibits a micro-morphology consisting of a network of interwoven fibrils with high porosity. Thick PAni layers (>250 {mu}m) of the material can thus be electropolymerized onto a planar metal substrate without affecting the fast dynamics of the charge-discharge process. The aqueous PAni electrochemical capacitors exhibit rather low energy content because of limitations on the maximum applied voltage. However, due to their optimized morphology and the high conductivity of the aqueous acid solution, they exhibit relatively high power density. The PAni capacitor exhibits excellent cycle life (more than 25,000 cycles), provided the requirements on restricted cell voltage are met. This is a key result in the evaluation of conducting polymers as active materials in electrochemical capacitors. Scanning electron microscopy and impedance spectroscopy are used to provide information on this system.

  13. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, Marca M.; Peng, Marcus Y.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    1996-01-01

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M.sub.x Z.sub.y Mn.sub.(1-y) O.sub.2, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell.

  14. CO2 Activated Carbon Aerogel with Enhanced Electrochemical Performance as a Supercapacitor Electrode Material.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eo Jin; Lee, Yoon Jae; Kim, Jeong Kwon; Hong, Ung Gi; Yi, Jongheop; Yoon, Jung Rag; Song, In Kyu

    2015-11-01

    Carbon aerogel (CA) was prepared by a sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol and formaldehyde in ambient conditions. A series of activated carbon aerogels (ACA-X, X = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 h) were then prepared by CO2 activation of CA with a variation of activation time (X) for use as an electrode material for supercapacitor. Specific capacitances of CA and ACA-X electrodes were measured by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge methods in 6 M KOH electrolyte. Among the samples, ACA-5 h showed the highest BET surface area (2574 m2/g) and the highest specific capacitance (100 F/g). It was found that CO2 activation was a very efficient method for enhancing physicochemical property and supercapacitive electrochemical performance of activated carbon aerogel.

  15. Biopolymer-Activated Graphitic Carbon Nitride towards a Sustainable Photocathode Material

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanjian; Schnepp, Zoë; Cao, Junyu; Ouyang, Shuxin; Li, Ying; Ye, Jinhua; Liu, Songqin

    2013-01-01

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) conversion of solar light into chemical fuels is one of the most promising solutions to the challenge of sustainable energy. Graphitic carbon (IV) nitride polymer (g-CN) is an interesting sustainable photocathode material due to low-cost, visible-light sensitivity, and chemical stability up to 500°C in air. However, grain boundary effects and limited active sites greatly hamper g-CN activity. Here, we demonstrate biopolymer-activation of g-CN through simultaneous soft-templating of a sponge-like structure and incorporation of active carbon-dopant sites. This facile approach results in an almost 300% increase in the cathodic PEC activity of g-CN under simulated solar-irradiation. PMID:23831846

  16. CO2 Activated Carbon Aerogel with Enhanced Electrochemical Performance as a Supercapacitor Electrode Material.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eo Jin; Lee, Yoon Jae; Kim, Jeong Kwon; Hong, Ung Gi; Yi, Jongheop; Yoon, Jung Rag; Song, In Kyu

    2015-11-01

    Carbon aerogel (CA) was prepared by a sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol and formaldehyde in ambient conditions. A series of activated carbon aerogels (ACA-X, X = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 h) were then prepared by CO2 activation of CA with a variation of activation time (X) for use as an electrode material for supercapacitor. Specific capacitances of CA and ACA-X electrodes were measured by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge methods in 6 M KOH electrolyte. Among the samples, ACA-5 h showed the highest BET surface area (2574 m2/g) and the highest specific capacitance (100 F/g). It was found that CO2 activation was a very efficient method for enhancing physicochemical property and supercapacitive electrochemical performance of activated carbon aerogel. PMID:26726618

  17. Carbon fibers: Thermochemical recovery from advanced composite materials and activation to an adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, Todd Andrew

    This research addresses an expanding waste disposal problem brought about by the increasing use of advanced composite materials, and the lack of technically and environmentally viable recycling methods for these materials. A thermochemical treatment process was developed and optimized for the recycling of advanced composite materials. Counter-current gasification was employed for the treatment of carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy resin composite wastes. These materials were treated, allowing the reclamation of the material's valuable components. As expected in gasification, the organic portion of the waste was thermochemically converted to a combustible gas with small amounts of organic compounds that were identified by GC/MS. These compounds were expected based on data in the literature. The composites contain 70% fiber reinforcement, and gasification yielded approximately 70% recovered fibers, representing nearly complete recovery of fibers from the waste. Through SEM and mechanical testing, the recovered carbon fibers were found to be structurally and mechanically intact, and amenable to re-use in a variety of applications, some of which were identified and tested. In addition, an application was developed for the carbon fiber component of the waste, as an activated carbon fiber adsorbent for the treatment of wastewaters. This novel class of adsorbent was found to have adsorption rates, for various organic molecules, up to a factor of ten times those of commercial granular activated carbon, and adsorption capacities similar to conventional activated carbons. Overall, the research addresses an existing environmental waste problem, employing a thermochemical technique to recycle and reclaim the waste. Components of the reclaimed waste material are then employed, after further modification, to address other existing and potential environmental waste problems.

  18. Evaluation of cytotoxicity, antimicrobial activity and physicochemical properties of a calcium aluminate-based endodontic material

    PubMed Central

    SILVA, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; HERRERA, Daniel Rodrigo; ROSA, Tiago Pereira; DUQUE, Thais Mageste; JACINTO, Rogério Castilho; GOMES, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida; ZAIA, Alexandre Augusto

    2014-01-01

    A calcium aluminate-based endodontic material, EndoBinder, has been developed in order to reduce MTA negative characteristics, preserving its biological properties and clinical applications. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity, antimicrobial activity, pH, solubility and water sorption of EndoBinder and to compare them with those of white MTA (WMTA). Material and Methods Cytotoxicity was assessed through a multiparametric analysis employing 3T3 cells. Antimicrobial activity against Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212), Staphylococcus aureus. (ATCC 25923) and Candida albicans (ATCC 10556) was determined by the agar diffusion method. pH was measured at periods of 3, 24, 72 and 168 hours. Solubility and water sorption evaluation were performed following ISO requirements. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey`s test with a significance level of 5%. Results EndoBinder and WMTA were non-cytotoxic in all tested periods and with the different cell viability parameters. There was no statistical differences between both materials (P>.05). All tested materials were inhibitory by direct contact against all microbial strains tested. EndoBinder and WMTA presented alkaline pH in all tested times with higher values of pH for WMTA (P<.05). Both materials showed values complying with the solubility minimum requirements. However, EndoBinder showed lower solubility than WMTA (P<.05). No statistical differences were observed regarding water sorption (P>.05). Conclusion Under these experimental conditions, we concluded that the calcium aluminate-based endodontic material EndoBinder demonstrated suitable biological and physicochemical properties, so it can be suggested as a material of choice in root resorption, perforations and root-end filling. PMID:24626250

  19. Push for new materials, chemicals from biomass sparks active R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Borman, S. )

    1990-09-01

    This paper discusses how a resurgence of interest in the production of new materials, chemicals, and fuels from biomass resources such as wood, cellulose, lignin, starch, and chitin is sparking active R and D efforts in these areas. Biobased materials and chemicals currently under development include composites of conventional plastics with lignocellulosics (chemicals from wood and other plant sources); lignocellulosic nonwoven mates that can be pressed into rigid shapes to form doors, walls, and even auto body parts; phenolic chemicals produced from wood waste and bark; membranes made from chitosan (a substance derived from crustacean shells); and biodegradable plastics containing starch.

  20. The feasibility of recycling and clearance of active materials from fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchetti, M.; El-Guebaly, L. A.; Forrest, R. A.; Marshall, T. D.; Taylor, N. P.; Tobita, K.

    2007-08-01

    In order to minimize the quantity of active materials that require long-term storage, arising during operation and after fusion power plant decommissioning, maximum use should be made of both recycling within the nuclear industry and clearance. For the latter, revised limits have been recently issued at the international level and in the US and Europe. In this paper the implications for fusion materials of these new levels are considered. Concerning recycling, power plant studies have employed criteria based solely on radiological parameters. Reviews of remote procedures currently used within the nuclear industry suggest that these criteria have been unduly conservative and should be revised.

  1. Sun-tracking optical element realized using thermally activated transparency-switching material.

    PubMed

    Apostoleris, Harry; Stefancich, Marco; Lilliu, Samuele; Chiesa, Matteo

    2015-07-27

    We present a proof of concept demonstration of a novel optical element: a light-responsive aperture that can track a moving light beam. The element is created using a thermally-activated transparency-switching material composed of paraffin wax and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Illumination of the material with a focused beam causes the formation of a localized transparency at the focal spot location, due to local heating caused by absorption of a portion of the incident light. An application is proposed in a new design for a self-tracking solar collector. PMID:26367692

  2. Evaluation of homogeneity of a certified reference material by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kratochvil, B.; Duke, M.J.M.; Ng, D.

    1986-01-01

    The homogeneity of the marine reference material TORT-1, a spray-dried and acetone-extracted hepatopancreatic material from the lobster, was tested for 26 elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Through a one-way analysis of variance based on six analyses on each of six bottles of TORT-1, it was concluded that the between-bottle heterogeneity is no greater than the within-bottle heterogeneity. The analytical results for those elements for which values were provided by NRC agree with the NRC values within 95% confidence limits. 8 references, 6 tables.

  3. Nanocrosses of lead sulphate as the negative active material of lead acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Gao, Pengran; Bu, Xianfu; Kuang, Guizhi; Liu, Wei; Lei, Lixu

    2014-10-01

    Lead sulphate transforms into PbO2 and Pb in the positive and negative electrodes, respectively, when a lead acid battery is charged, thus, it is an active material. It is also generally acknowledged that sulphation results in the failure of lead acid batteries; therefore, it is very interesting to find out how to make lead sulphate more electrochemically active. Here, we demonstrate that nanocrystalline lead sulphate can be used as excellent negative active material in lead acid batteries. The lead sulphate nanocrystals, which are prepared by a facile chemical precipitation of aqueous lead acetate and sodium sulphate in a few minutes, look like crosses with diameter of each arm being 100 nm to 3 μm. The electrode is effectively formed in much shorter time than traditional technique, yet it discharges a capacity of 103 mA h g-1 at the current density of 120 mA g-1, which is 24% higher than that discharged by the electrode made from leady oxide under the same condition. During 100% DOD cycles, more than 80% of that capacity remains in 550 cycles. These results show that lead sulphate can be a nice negative active material in lead acid batteries.

  4. Job Characteristics and Off-Job Activities as Predictors of Need for Recovery, Well-Being, and Fatigue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnentag, Sabine; Zijlstra, Fred R. H.

    2006-01-01

    Two empirical studies examined need for recovery (i.e., a person's desire to be temporarily relieved from demands in order to restore his or her resources) as a mediator in the relationship between poor job characteristics (high job demands, low job control) and high off-job demands, on the one hand, and fatigue and poor individual well-being, on…

  5. Identification of primary aromatic amines in mutagenically active subfractions from coal liquefaction materials.

    PubMed

    Wilson, B W; Pelroy, R; Cresto, J T

    1980-11-01

    Gas-chromatographic mass spectral (GCMS) analyses were performed on mutagenically active components from the basic, basic tar and neutral tar subfractions of a coal-derived liquid heavy distillate. The latter material is a component fraction of an experimental oil produced in a solvent refined coal process (SRC II) pilot plant. Mutagenicity was determined with the Ames/Salmonella assay system. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) was used to separate mutagenically active components of the basic, basic tar and neutral tar fractions from some of the other compounds contained in these complex materials. For the 3 fractions tested, mutagenic activity was localized in approx. the same TLC regions, with relative mobilities (Rf) ranging from 0.1 to 0.3. GCMS analysis of the TLC regions showed that the concentrations of primary aromatic amines, as obtained by measuring peak areas for the (M + 1)+ ion as formed in the chemical ionization mode, followed essentially the same distribution as the mutagenic activity. Primary aromatic amines identified in the active regions included aminonaphthalenes, aminoanthracenes, aminophenanthrenes, aminopyrenes and aminochrysenes. With the exception of small amounts of aminonaphthalene, primary aromatic amines were not found in TLC regions that lacked mutagenic activity.

  6. Effect of different mulch materials on the soil dehydrogenase activity (DHA) in an organic pepper crop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Marta M.; Peco, Jesús; Campos, Juan; Villena, Jaime; González, Sara; Moreno, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    The use biodegradable materials (biopolymers of different composition and papers) as an alternative to conventional mulches has increased considerably during the last years mainly for environmental reason. In order to assess the effect of these materials on the soil microbial activity during the season of a pepper crop organically grown in Central Spain, the soil dehydrogenase activity (DHA) was measured in laboratory. The mulch materials tested were: 1) black polyethylene (PE, 15 μm); black biopolymers (15 μm): 2) Mater-Bi® (corn starch based), 3) Sphere 4® (potato starch based), 4) Sphere 6® (potato starch based), 5) Bioflex® (polylactic acid based), 6) Ecovio® (polylactic acid based), 7) Mimgreen® (black paper, 85 g/m2). A randomized complete block design with four replications was adopted. The crop was drip irrigated following the water demand of each treatment. Soil samples (5-10 cm depth) under the different mulches were taken at different dates (at the beginning of the crop cycle and at different dates throughout the crop season). Additionally, samples of bare soil in a manual weeding and in an untreated control were taken. The results obtained show the negative effect of black PE on the DHA activity, mainly as result of the higher temperature reached under the mulch and the reduction in the gas interchange between the soil and the atmosphere. The values corresponding to the biodegradable materials were variable, although highlighting the low DHA activity observed under Bioflex®. In general, the uncovered treatments showed higher values than those reached under mulches, especially in the untreated control. Keywords: mulch, biodegradable, biopolymer, paper, dehydrogenase activity (DHA). Acknowledgements: the research was funded by Project RTA2011-00104-C04-03 from the INIA (Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness).

  7. Evaluation of Activity Concentration Values and Doses due to the Transport of Low Level Radioactive Material

    SciTech Connect

    Rawl, Richard R; Scofield, Patricia A; Leggett, Richard Wayne; Eckerman, Keith F

    2010-04-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated an international Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to evaluate the safety of transport of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This report presents the United States contribution to that IAEA research program. The focus of this report is on the analysis of the potential doses resulting from the transport of low level radioactive material. Specific areas of research included: (1) an examination of the technical approach used in the derivation of exempt activity concentration values and a comparison of the doses associated with the transport of materials included or not included in the provisions of Paragraph 107(e) of the IAEA Safety Standards, Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, Safety Requirements No. TS-R-1; (2) determination of the doses resulting from different treatment of progeny for exempt values versus the A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values; and (3) evaluation of the dose justifications for the provisions applicable to exempt materials and low specific activity materials (LSA-I). It was found that the 'previous or intended use' (PIU) provision in Paragraph 107(e) is not risk informed since doses to the most highly exposed persons (e.g., truck drivers) are comparable regardless of intended use of the transported material. The PIU clause can also have important economic implications for co-mined ores and products that are not intended for the fuel cycle but that have uranium extracted as part of their industrial processing. In examination of the footnotes in Table 2 of TS-R-1, which identifies the progeny included in the exempt or A1/A2 values, there is no explanation of how the progeny were selected. It is recommended that the progeny for both the exemption and A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values should be similar regardless of application, and that the same physical information should be used in deriving the limits. Based on the evaluation of doses due to the transport of low-level NORM

  8. The development of the Be Active & Relax “Vitality in Practice” (VIP) project and design of an RCT to reduce the need for recovery in office employees

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is strong evidence to suggest that multiple work-related health problems are preceded by a higher need for recovery. Physical activity and relaxation are helpful in decreasing the need for recovery. This article aims to describe (1) the development and (2) the design of the evaluation of a daily physical activity and relaxation intervention to reduce the need for recovery in office employees. Methods/Design The study population will consist of employees of a Dutch financial service provider. The intervention was systematically developed, based on parts of the Intervention Mapping (IM) protocol. Assessment of employees needs was done by combining results of face-to-face interviews, a questionnaire and focus group interviews. A set of theoretical methods and practical strategies were selected which resulted in an intervention program consisting of Group Motivational Interviewing (GMI) supported by a social media platform, and environmental modifications. The Be Active & Relax program will be evaluated in a modified 2 X 2 factorial design. The environmental modifications will be pre-stratified and GMI will be randomised on department level. The program will be evaluated, using 4 arms: (1) GMI and environmental modifications; (2) environmental modifications; (3) GMI; (4) no intervention (control group). Questionnaire data on the primary outcome (need for recovery) and secondary outcomes (daily physical activity, sedentary behaviour, relaxation/detachment, work- and health-related factors) will be gathered at baseline (T0), at 6 months (T1), and at 12 months (T2) follow-up. In addition, an economic and a process evaluation will be performed. Discussion Reducing the need for recovery is hypothesized to be beneficial for employees, employers and society. It is assumed that there will be a reduction in need for recovery after 6 months and 12 months in the intervention group, compared to the control group. Results are expected in 2013. Trial

  9. Facile synthesis, characterization, and antimicrobial activity of cellulose-chitosan-hydroxyapatite composite material: a potential material for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mututuvari, Tamutsiwa M; Harkins, April L; Tran, Chieu D

    2013-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is often used as a bone-implant material because it is biocompatible and osteoconductive. However, HAp possesses poor rheological properties and it is inactive against disease-causing microbes. To improve these properties, we developed a green method to synthesize multifunctional composites containing: (1) cellulose (CEL) to impart mechanical strength; (2) chitosan (CS) to induce antibacterial activity thereby maintaining a microbe-free wound site; and (3) HAp. In this method, CS and CEL were co-dissolved in an ionic liquid (IL) and then regenerated from water. HAp was subsequently formed in situ by alternately soaking [CEL+CS] composites in aqueous solutions of CaCl2 and Na2 HPO4 . At least 88% of IL used was recovered for reuse by distilling the aqueous washings of [CEL+CS]. The composites were characterized using FTIR, XRD, and SEM. These composites retained the desirable properties of their constituents. For example, the tensile strength of the composites was enhanced 1.9 times by increasing CEL loading from 20% to 80%. Incorporating CS in the composites resulted in composites which inhibited the growth of both Gram positive (MRSA, S. aureus and VRE) and Gram negative (E. coli and P. aeruginosa) bacteria. These findings highlight the potential use of [CEL+CS+HAp] composites as scaffolds in bone tissue engineering.

  10. FACILE SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF CELLULOSE-CHITOSAN-HYDROXYAPATITE COMPOSITE MATERIAL, A POTENTIAL MATERIAL FOR BONE TISSUE ENGINEERING

    PubMed Central

    Mututuvari, Tamutsiwa M.; Harkins, April L.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is often used as a bone-implant material because it is biocompatible and osteoconductive. However, HAp possesses poor rheological properties and it is inactive against disease-causing microbes. To improve these properties, we developed a green method to synthesize multifunctional composites containing: (1) cellulose (CEL) to impart mechanical strength; (2) chitosan (CS) to induce antibacterial activity thereby maintaining a microbe-free wound site; and (3) HAp. In this method, CS and CEL were co-dissolved in an ionic liquid (IL) and then regenerated from water. HAp was subsequently formed in situ by alternately soaking [CEL+CS] composites in aqueous solutions of CaCl2 and Na2HPO4. At least 88% of IL used was recovered for reuse by distilling the aqueous washings of [CEL+CS]. The composites were characterized using FTIR, XRD and SEM. These composites retained the desirable properties of their constituents. For example, the tensile strength of the composites was enhanced 1.9X by increasing CEL loading from 20% to 80%. Incorporating CS in the composites resulted in composites which inhibited the growth of both Gram positive (MRSA, S. aureus and VRE) and Gram negative (E. coli and P. aeruginosa) bacteria. These findings highlight the potential use of [CEL+CS+HAp] composites as scaffolds in bone tissue engineering. PMID:23595871

  11. Recognition of wall materials through active thermography coupled with numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Pietrarca, Francesca; Mameli, Mauro; Filippeschi, Sauro; Fantozzi, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    In the framework of historical buildings, wall thickness as well as wall constituents are not often known a priori, and active IR thermography can be exploited as a nonintrusive method for detecting what kind of material lies beneath the external plaster layer. In the present work, the wall of a historical building is subjected to a heating stimulus, and the surface temperature temporal trend is recorded by an IR camera. A hybrid numerical model is developed in order to simulate the transient thermal response of a wall made of different known materials underneath the plaster layer. When the numerical thermal contrast and the appearance time match with the experimental thermal images, the material underneath the plaster can be qualitatively identified. PMID:27607254

  12. Study of passive and active optical waveguides: Synthesis, processing and characterization of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Makoto

    Photonics uses photons for information and image processing, and has been touted as the technology of the 21 st century. An optical waveguide is a key component of an optical integrated circuit which is the optical analog of an electrical integrated circuit (IC). Electrical transistor IC technology resulted in an enormous impact on society, and it changed our life styles from the age of the vacuum tube. The advent of the optical integrated circuit is expected to have the same impact on society as the electronic IC. Various optical circuit elements are interrelated to materials, therefore, the study and the better understanding of materials and processing have been receiving a great deal of attention. My research focuses on the study of optical waveguide materials and their processings in terms of passive and active optical waveguides. The first target was to establish a method for measuring the refractive index and optical propagation loss of optical waveguides. The second target was to develop passive waveguide materials which can route, split and combine optical signals on a substrate. There are several requirements for waveguiding, such as high optical transparency, proper refractive index, and proper thickness. The sol-gel technique was used to meet the requirements, and several types of organic: inorganic composite materials were developed. The third target involved the development of processing methods to fabricate channel waveguides using the above-mentioned passive and active waveguide materials. Selective laser densification was developed for sol-gel composite materials. Use of trenched substrates and photobleaching were also studied. The last target was to develop an active material which could process optical signals using the electrooptic effect. A crosslinked urethane polymer with a newly synthesized chromophore was used due to its high thermal stability and optical transparency. In order to obtain second order nonlinearity, macroscopic molecular

  13. Broad spectrum antibacterial and antifungal polymeric paint materials: synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and membrane-active mode of action.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Jiaul; Akkapeddi, Padma; Yadav, Vikas; Manjunath, Goutham B; Uppu, Divakara S S M; Konai, Mohini M; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Sanyal, Kaustuv; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-28

    Microbial attachment and subsequent colonization onto surfaces lead to the spread of deadly community-acquired and hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infections. Noncovalent immobilization of water insoluble and organo-soluble cationic polymers onto a surface is a facile approach to prevent microbial contamination. In the present study, we described the synthesis of water insoluble and organo-soluble polymeric materials and demonstrated their structure-activity relationship against various human pathogenic bacteria including drug-resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and beta lactam-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae as well as pathogenic fungi such as Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. The polymer coated surfaces completely inactivated both bacteria and fungi upon contact (5 log reduction with respect to control). Linear polymers were more active and found to have a higher killing rate than the branched polymers. The polymer coated surfaces also exhibited significant activity in various complex mammalian fluids such as serum, plasma, and blood and showed negligible hemolysis at an amount much higher than minimum inhibitory amounts (MIAs). These polymers were found to have excellent compatibility with other medically relevant polymers (polylactic acid, PLA) and commercial paint. The cationic hydrophobic polymer coatings disrupted the lipid membrane of both bacteria and fungi and thus showed a membrane-active mode of action. Further, bacteria did not develop resistance against these membrane-active polymers in sharp contrast to conventional antibiotics and lipopeptides, thus the polymers hold great promise to be used as coating materials for developing permanent antimicrobial paint. PMID:25541751

  14. Broad spectrum antibacterial and antifungal polymeric paint materials: synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and membrane-active mode of action.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Jiaul; Akkapeddi, Padma; Yadav, Vikas; Manjunath, Goutham B; Uppu, Divakara S S M; Konai, Mohini M; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Sanyal, Kaustuv; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-28

    Microbial attachment and subsequent colonization onto surfaces lead to the spread of deadly community-acquired and hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infections. Noncovalent immobilization of water insoluble and organo-soluble cationic polymers onto a surface is a facile approach to prevent microbial contamination. In the present study, we described the synthesis of water insoluble and organo-soluble polymeric materials and demonstrated their structure-activity relationship against various human pathogenic bacteria including drug-resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and beta lactam-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae as well as pathogenic fungi such as Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. The polymer coated surfaces completely inactivated both bacteria and fungi upon contact (5 log reduction with respect to control). Linear polymers were more active and found to have a higher killing rate than the branched polymers. The polymer coated surfaces also exhibited significant activity in various complex mammalian fluids such as serum, plasma, and blood and showed negligible hemolysis at an amount much higher than minimum inhibitory amounts (MIAs). These polymers were found to have excellent compatibility with other medically relevant polymers (polylactic acid, PLA) and commercial paint. The cationic hydrophobic polymer coatings disrupted the lipid membrane of both bacteria and fungi and thus showed a membrane-active mode of action. Further, bacteria did not develop resistance against these membrane-active polymers in sharp contrast to conventional antibiotics and lipopeptides, thus the polymers hold great promise to be used as coating materials for developing permanent antimicrobial paint.

  15. Electrodes and electrochemical storage cells utilizing tin-modified active materials

    DOEpatents

    Anani, Anaba; Johnson, John; Lim, Hong S.; Reilly, James; Schwarz, Ricardo; Srinivasan, Supramaniam

    1995-01-01

    An electrode has a substrate and a finely divided active material on the substrate. The active material is ANi.sub.x-y-z Co.sub.y Sn.sub.z, wherein A is a mischmetal or La.sub.1-w M.sub.w, M is Ce, Nd, or Zr, w is from about 0.05 to about 1.0, x is from about 4.5 to about 5.5, y is from 0 to about 3.0, and z is from about 0.05 to about 0.5. An electrochemical storage cell utilizes such an electrode as the anode. The storage cell further has a cathode, a separator between the cathode and the anode, and an electrolyte.

  16. Assessment of alpha activity of building materials commonly used in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Dipak; Deb, Argha; Bera, Sukumar; Sengupta, Rosalima; Patra, Kanchan Kumar

    2008-02-01

    This paper, reports for the first time, an extensive study of alpha activity of all widely used building materials (plaster of Paris, stone chips, marble, white cement, mosaic stone, limestone, sand, granite, cement brick, asbestos, red brick, cement tile, ceramic tile and ceramics) in West Bengal, India. The alpha activities have been measured using Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD), a very sensitive detector for alpha particles. The samples were collected from local markets of Kolkata. The measured average alpha activities ranged from 22.7+/-2.5 to 590.6+/-16.8Bqkg(-1). The alpha activity of ceramic tiles was highest and provides additional data to estimate the effect of environmental radiation exposure on human health.

  17. Structural materials for fusion power reactors—the RF R&D activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. M.; Leonteva-Smirnova, M. V.; Potapenko, M. M.; Budylkin, N. I.; Devyatko, Yu. N.; Ioltoukhovskiy, A. G.; Mironova, E. G.; Shikov, A. K.; Sivak, A. B.; Yermolaev, G. N.; Kalashnikov, A. N.; Kuteev, B. V.; Blokhin, A. I.; Loginov, N. I.; Romanov, V. A.; Belyakov, V. A.; Kirillov, I. R.; Bulanova, T. M.; Golovanov, V. N.; Shamardin, V. K.; Strebkov, Yu. S.; Tyumentsev, A. N.; Kardashev, B. K.; Mishin, O. V.; Vasiliev, B. A.

    2007-08-01

    Recent progress in the RF low activation structural materials R&D road map towards DEMO via the FBR tests (BOR-60, BN-600, BN-800) and the TBM tests in ITER is overviewed. The properties of the RAFMS RUSFER-EK-181 (Fe-12Cr-2W-Ta-V-B-C) and the V-4Ti-4Cr alloys are presented. The next important steps include further studies on the influence of high dose and high-temperature irradiation on the properties of base structural materials and joints. Activation, transmutation and radiation damage of the materials in BN-600 and DEMO-RF (Kurchatov Institute project) neutron spectra are calculated. The results of the application of the internal friction (ultrasonic) non-destructive method to research the DBTT are in good agreement with the results of the destructive impact method. The important influence of boron on the heat resistance of materials and the He concentration level under irradiation are calculated. The new special regimes of the heat treatments of the alloys are suggested to widen the temperature windows of the applications. The results of the BOR-60 examinations of RUSFER-EK-181 (irradiation temperature 320-340 °C and doses up to 15 dpa) are presented. The BN-600 projects for the high dose and high-temperature irradiation tests of manufactured alloys are presented.

  18. Recent progress in blanket materials development in the Broader Approach activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishitani, T.; Tanigawa, H.; Nozawa, T.; Jitsukawa, S.; Nakamichi, M.; Hoshino, T.; Yamanishi, T.; Baluc, N.; Möslang, A.; Lindou, R.; Tosti, S.; Hodgson, E. R.; Clement Lorenzo, S.; Kohyama, A.; Kimura, A.; Shikama, T.; Hayashi, K.; Araki, M.

    2011-10-01

    As a part of the Broader Approach activities, R&D on blanket related materials, reduced-activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steels as a structural material, SiC f/SiC composites for flow channel insert in the liquid blanket and/or use as advanced structural material, advanced tritium breeders and neutron multiplier, has been initiated directed at DEMO. As part of the RAFM steel mass production development, a 5 ton heat of RAFM steel (F82H) was procured by Electro Slag Re-melting as the secondary melting method, which was effective in controlling unwanted impurities. An 11 ton heat of EUROFER was also produced. For the SiC f/SiC composite development, NITE- and CVI-SiC f/SiC composites were prepared as reference materials and preliminary mechanical and physical properties were measured. Also compatibility tests between SiC and Pb-17Li have been prepared, related to the He-cooled Li-Pb blanket concept. For the beryllide neutron multiplayer Be-Ti alloy development, large size rods of about 30 mm diameter were fabricated successfully in EU.

  19. Verification of cardiac mechanics software: benchmark problems and solutions for testing active and passive material behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Gurev, Viatcheslav; Arens, Sander; Augustin, Christoph M.; Baron, Lukas; Blake, Robert; Bradley, Chris; Castro, Sebastian; Crozier, Andrew; Favino, Marco; Fastl, Thomas E.; Fritz, Thomas; Gao, Hao; Gizzi, Alessio; Griffith, Boyce E.; Hurtado, Daniel E.; Krause, Rolf; Luo, Xiaoyu; Nash, Martyn P.; Pezzuto, Simone; Plank, Gernot; Rossi, Simone; Ruprecht, Daniel; Seemann, Gunnar; Smith, Nicolas P.; Sundnes, Joakim; Rice, J. Jeremy; Trayanova, Natalia; Wang, Dafang; Jenny Wang, Zhinuo; Niederer, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Models of cardiac mechanics are increasingly used to investigate cardiac physiology. These models are characterized by a high level of complexity, including the particular anisotropic material properties of biological tissue and the actively contracting material. A large number of independent simulation codes have been developed, but a consistent way of verifying the accuracy and replicability of simulations is lacking. To aid in the verification of current and future cardiac mechanics solvers, this study provides three benchmark problems for cardiac mechanics. These benchmark problems test the ability to accurately simulate pressure-type forces that depend on the deformed objects geometry, anisotropic and spatially varying material properties similar to those seen in the left ventricle and active contractile forces. The benchmark was solved by 11 different groups to generate consensus solutions, with typical differences in higher-resolution solutions at approximately 0.5%, and consistent results between linear, quadratic and cubic finite elements as well as different approaches to simulating incompressible materials. Online tools and solutions are made available to allow these tests to be effectively used in verification of future cardiac mechanics software. PMID:26807042

  20. Photo-induced optical activity in phase-change memory materials.

    PubMed

    Borisenko, Konstantin B; Shanmugam, Janaki; Williams, Benjamin A O; Ewart, Paul; Gholipour, Behrad; Hewak, Daniel W; Hussain, Rohanah; Jávorfi, Tamás; Siligardi, Giuliano; Kirkland, Angus I

    2015-03-05

    We demonstrate that optical activity in amorphous isotropic thin films of pure Ge2Sb2Te5 and N-doped Ge2Sb2Te5N phase-change memory materials can be induced using rapid photo crystallisation with circularly polarised laser light. The new anisotropic phase transition has been confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. This opens up the possibility of controlled induction of optical activity at the nanosecond time scale for exploitation in a new generation of high-density optical memory, fast chiroptical switches and chiral metamaterials.

  1. Determination of sodium in biological materials by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, W C; Capar, S G; Anderson, D L

    1997-01-01

    A formalized method for determining sodium in biological materials by instrumental neutron activation analysis is presented. The method includes common procedures from the numerous options available to this historically nonformalized analytical technique. The number of procedural options is restricted to minimize the method's complexity, yet the method is still applicable to a variety of neutron activation facilities. High accuracy and precision are achieved by placing bounds on allowed uncertainty at critical stages of the analysis. Analytical results from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration laboratory and 4 other laboratories demonstrate the method's performance.

  2. Studies on Supercapacitor Electrode Material from Activated Lignin-Derived Mesoporous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Dipendu; Li, Yunchao; Bi, Zhonghe; Chen, Jihua; Keum, Jong Kahk; Hensley, Dale K; Grappe, Hippolyte A.; Meyer III, Harry M; Dai, Sheng; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Naskar, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized mesoporous carbon from pre-cross-linked lignin gel impregnated with a surfactant as the pore-forming agent, and then activated the carbon through physical and chemical methods to obtain activated mesoporous carbon. The activated mesoporous carbons exhibited 1.5- to 6-fold increases in porosity with a maximum BET specific surface area of 1148 m2/g and a pore volume of 1.0 cm3/g. Slow physical activation helped retain dominant mesoporosity; however, aggressive chemical activation caused some loss of the mesopore volume fraction. Plots of cyclic voltammetric data with the capacitor electrode made from these carbons showed an almost rectangular curve depicting the behavior of ideal double-layer capacitance. Although the pristine mesoporous carbon exhibited the same range of surface-area-based capacitance as that of other known carbon-based supercapacitors, activation decreased the surface-area-based specific capacitance and increased the gravimetric-specific capacitance of the mesoporous carbons. Surface activation lowered bulk density and electrical conductivity. Warburg impedance as a vertical tail in the lower frequency domain of Nyquist plots supported good supercapacitor behavior for the activated mesoporous carbons. Our work demonstrated that biomass-derived mesoporous carbon materials continue to show potential for use in specific electrochemical applications.

  3. Energetic materials research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories supported under DP-10 programs

    SciTech Connect

    Ratzel, A.C. III

    1998-09-01

    This report provides summary descriptions of Energetic Materials (EM) Research and Development activities performed at Sandia National Laboratories and funded through the Department of Energy DP-10 Program Office in FY97 and FY98. The work falls under three major focus areas: EM Chemistry, EM Characterization, and EM Phenomenological Model Development. The research supports the Sandia component mission and also Sandia's overall role as safety steward for the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex.

  4. Nutritional Needs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dramatic growth of infants during the 1st yr of life (a 3-fold increase in weight; a 50% increase in length) and continued growth, albeit at lower rates, from 1 yr of age through adolescence impose unique nutritional needs. The needs for growth are superimposed on relatively high maintenance nee...

  5. An Illustration of a Methodology to Maximize Mail Survey Response Rates in a Provincial School-Based Physical Activity Needs Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, John J. M.; Allison, Kenneth R.; Lysy, Daria C.; LeMoine, Karen N.; Adlaf, Edward M.; Faulkner, Guy E. J.; Goodman, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Two mail surveys were conducted as a province-wide needs assessment to examine the opportunities for, barriers to, and participation in physical activity in Ontario elementary and secondary schools. Dillman's Tailored Design Method (TDM) was used to maximize the quality of responses and the response rate. Both surveys entailed five mailings to key…

  6. Assessment of Professional Development Activities, Instructional Needs, and Delivery Methods of Part-Time Technical and Occupational Faculty in U.S. Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Brian A.; McCaslin, N. L.

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to describe the frequency of professional development activities provided to part-time occupational and technical program faculty. Additionally, the perceptions of occupational education officers concerning the instructional professional development needs and their appropriate delivery method(s) for these faculty members…

  7. Perceptions of North Carolina High School Agricultural Educators regarding Students with Special Needs Participating in Supervised Agricultural Experience and FFA Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lendy; Wilson, Elizabeth; Flowers, Jim; Croom, Barry

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of North Carolina high school agricultural educators toward including students with special needs when implementing Supervised Agricultural Experience and participating in FFA activities. The population was all high school agricultural educators in North Carolina with 12 month employment (N…

  8. Searching the Future for the Legal Regime of Space Activities: the Need for Unification of National Space Legislation' Provisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoda, S. A.

    2002-01-01

    space activities. For the future legal regime of space activities it is vital to preserve the existed principles and main provisions of the international space law. related legislations are developing rapidly. They become serious instrument for legal regulation of space activities. those projects with a foreign party involvement. Quite often partners in international space projects agree to choice a domestic law of one of them. They do this for defining a certain organizational and/or contractual issue (disputes settlement, for example) of the project. that such practice will spread widely. could help to preserve the existed important provisions of international space law (responsibility of states for their national activities, for instance). development of international space private law. We believe that solely special laws and regulations of national legislations could not regulate modern space activities. Being more and more commercial, space activities are becoming a real part of "downed to Earth" commercial activities. Therefore, in many countries provisions of civil, commercial, investment and other branches of national law are applied to such activities. which could low possible risks of such activities and to control them. Such unification seems to be suitable in the following fields: 1)implementation of provisions of international space law in national space laws; 2)definition of unified terminology, accepted by national laws of all parties; 3)unification in national legislations of a certain standards (insurance rates and rules, for instance); 4)unification in national laws of issues related to liability (for instance, a mutual wave of liability in certain types of 5)implementation in national laws of unified rules and procedures of space-related commercial disputes settlement; 6)unification of mechanisms for protection of space-related intellectual property. unification of their provisions. Special attention is paid to provisions of private law

  9. Using Photon Activation Analysis To Determine Concentrations Of Unknown Components In Reference Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Jaromy; Sun, Zaijing; Wells, Doug; Maschner, Herb

    2011-06-01

    Using certified multi-element reference materials for instrumental analyses one frequently is confronted with the embarrassing fact that the concentration of some desired elements are not given in the respective certificate, nonetheless are detectable, e.g. by photon activation analysis (PAA). However, these elements might be determinable with sufficient quality of the results using scaling parameters and the well-known quantities of a reference element within the reference material itself. Scaling parameters include: activation threshold energy, Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) peak and endpoint energy of the bremsstrahlung continuum; integrated photo-nuclear cross sections for the isotopes of the reference element; bremsstrahlung continuum integral; target thickness; photon flux density. Photo-nuclear cross sections from the unreferenced elements must be known, too. With these quantities, the integral was obtained for both the known and unknown elements resulting in an inference of the concentration of the unreported element based upon the reported value, thus also the concentration of the unreferenced element in the reference material. A similar method to determine elements using the basic nuclear and experimental data has been developed for thermal neutron activation analysis some time ago (k{sub 0} Method).

  10. Mutagenicity studies in a tyre plant: in vitro activity of workers' urinary concentrates and raw materials.

    PubMed

    Crebelli, R; Paoletti, A; Falcone, E; Aquilina, G; Fabri, G; Carere, A

    1985-07-01

    The possible contribution to urinary mutagenicity of occupational exposures in the rubber industry was studied by assaying the urine concentrates of 72 workmen (44 smokers) employed in a tyre plant. Twenty three clerks (16 smokers) engaged in the administrative department of the same factory served as presumptive unexposed controls. XAD-2 resin concentrates of urine samples were assayed in the plate incorporation test and in the microtitre fluctuation assay with Salmonella typhimurium strains TA1535, TA98, and TA100. Furthermore, the in vitro mutagenicity of the major raw materials in use at the plant was determined in the plate incorporation assay with S typhimurium strains TA1535, TA1537, TA98, and TA100. The results obtained from the urinary mutagenicity study show that smoking habits, but not occupation, were statistically significantly related to the appearance of a urinary mutagenicity that was detectable with strain TA98. A possible synergistic effect of occupation with smoking was observed among tyre builders who were also smokers. The study of the raw materials showed that three technical grade materials were weakly active as mutagens in strain TA98 in the absence (poly-p-dinitrosobenzene) or in the presence of metabolic activation (mixed diaryl-p-phenylendiamines and tetramethyltiuram disulphide). The latter chemical was also weakly active in strain TA100. PMID:4015996

  11. Alkali-Activated Aluminium-Silicate Composites as Insulation Materials for Industrial Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembovska, L.; Bajare, D.; Pundiene, I.; Bumanis, G.

    2015-11-01

    The article reports on the study of thermal stability of alkali-activated aluminium- silicate composites (ASC) at temperature 800-1100°C. ASC were prepared by using calcined kaolinite clay, aluminium scrap recycling waste, lead-silicate glass waste and quartz sand. As alkali activator, commercial sodium silicate solution modified with an addition of sodium hydroxide was used. The obtained alkali activation solution had silica modulus Ms=1.67. Components of aluminium scrap recycling waste (aluminium nitride (AlN) and iron sulphite (FeSO3)) react in the alkali media and create gases - ammonia and sulphur dioxide, which provide the porous structure of the material [1]. Changes in the chemical composition of ASC during heating were identified and quantitatively analysed by using DTA/TG, dimension changes during the heating process were determined by using HTOM, pore microstructure was examined by SEM, and mineralogical composition of ASC was determined by XRD. The density of ASC was measured in accordance with EN 1097-7. ASC with density around 560 kg/m3 and heat resistance up to 1100°C with shrinkage less than 5% were obtained. The intended use of this material is the application as an insulation material for industrial purposes at elevated temperatures.

  12. Critical Dimensions of Water-tamped Slabs and Spheres of Active Material

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Greuling, E.; Argo, H.: Chew, G.; Frankel, M. E.; Konopinski, E.J.; Marvin, C.; Teller, E.

    1946-08-06

    The magnitude and distribution of the fission rate per unit area produced by three energy groups of moderated neutrons reflected from a water tamper into one side of an infinite slab of active material is calculated approximately in section II. This rate is directly proportional to the current density of fast neutrons from the active material incident on the water tamper. The critical slab thickness is obtained in section III by solving an inhomogeneous transport integral equation for the fast-neutron current density into the tamper. Extensive use is made of the formulae derived in "The Mathematical Development of the End-Point Method" by Frankel and Goldberg. In section IV slight alterations in the theory outlined in sections II and III were made so that one could approximately compute the critical radius of a water-tamper sphere of active material. The derived formulae were applied to calculate the critical dimensions of water-tamped slabs and spheres of solid UF{sub 6} leaving various (25) isotope enrichment fractions. Decl. Dec. 16, 1955.

  13. Using Electronic Neutron Generators in Active Interrogation to Detect Shielded Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2008-10-01

    Experiments have been performed at Idaho National Laboratory to study methodology and instrumentation for performing neutron active interrogation die-away analyses for the purpose of detecting shielded fissionable material. Here we report initial work using a portable DT electronic neutron generator with a He-3 fast neutron detector to detect shielded fissionable material including >2 kg quantities of enriched uranium and plutonium. Measurements have been taken of bare material as well as of material hidden within a large plywood cube. Results from this work have demonstrated the efficacy of the die-away neutron measurement technique for quickly detecting the presence of special nuclear material hidden within plywood shields by analyzing the time dependent neutron signals in-between neutron generator pulses. Using a DT electronic neutron generator operating at 300 Hz with a yield of approximately 0.36 x 10**8 neutrons per second, 2.2 kg of enriched uranium hidden within a 0.60 m x 0.60 m x 0.70 m volume of plywood was positively detected with a measurement signal 2-sigma above the passive background within 1 second. Similarly, for a 500 second measurement period a lower detection limit of approaching the gram level could be expected with the same simple set-up.

  14. Short communication: Effect of active food packaging materials on fluid milk quality and shelf life.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dana E; Goddard, Julie M

    2014-01-01

    Active packaging, in which active agents are embedded into or on the surface of food packaging materials, can enhance the nutritive value, economics, and stability of food, as well as enable in-package processing. In one embodiment of active food packaging, lactase was covalently immobilized onto packaging films for in-package lactose hydrolysis. In prior work, lactase was covalently bound to low-density polyethylene using polyethyleneimine and glutaraldehyde cross-linkers to form the packaging film. Because of the potential contaminants of proteases, lipases, and spoilage organisms in typical enzyme preparations, the goal of the current work was to determine the effect of immobilized-lactase active packaging technology on unanticipated side effects, such as shortened shelf-life and reduced product quality. Results suggested no evidence of lipase or protease activity on the active packaging films, indicating that such active packaging films could enable in-package lactose hydrolysis without adversely affecting product quality in terms of dairy protein or lipid stability. Storage stability studies indicated that lactase did not migrate from the film over a 49-d period, and that dry storage resulted in 13.41% retained activity, whereas wet storage conditions enabled retention of 62.52% activity. Results of a standard plate count indicated that the film modification reagents introduced minor microbial contamination; however, the microbial population remained under the 20,000 cfu/mL limit through the manufacturer's suggested 14-d storage period for all film samples. This suggests that commercially produced immobilized lactase active packaging should use purified cross-linkers and enzymes. Characterization of unanticipated effects of active packaging on food quality reported here is important in demonstrating the commercial potential of such technologies. PMID:24239074

  15. Short communication: Effect of active food packaging materials on fluid milk quality and shelf life.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dana E; Goddard, Julie M

    2014-01-01

    Active packaging, in which active agents are embedded into or on the surface of food packaging materials, can enhance the nutritive value, economics, and stability of food, as well as enable in-package processing. In one embodiment of active food packaging, lactase was covalently immobilized onto packaging films for in-package lactose hydrolysis. In prior work, lactase was covalently bound to low-density polyethylene using polyethyleneimine and glutaraldehyde cross-linkers to form the packaging film. Because of the potential contaminants of proteases, lipases, and spoilage organisms in typical enzyme preparations, the goal of the current work was to determine the effect of immobilized-lactase active packaging technology on unanticipated side effects, such as shortened shelf-life and reduced product quality. Results suggested no evidence of lipase or protease activity on the active packaging films, indicating that such active packaging films could enable in-package lactose hydrolysis without adversely affecting product quality in terms of dairy protein or lipid stability. Storage stability studies indicated that lactase did not migrate from the film over a 49-d period, and that dry storage resulted in 13.41% retained activity, whereas wet storage conditions enabled retention of 62.52% activity. Results of a standard plate count indicated that the film modification reagents introduced minor microbial contamination; however, the microbial population remained under the 20,000 cfu/mL limit through the manufacturer's suggested 14-d storage period for all film samples. This suggests that commercially produced immobilized lactase active packaging should use purified cross-linkers and enzymes. Characterization of unanticipated effects of active packaging on food quality reported here is important in demonstrating the commercial potential of such technologies.

  16. Effectiveness of a Worksite Social & Physical Environment Intervention on Need for Recovery, Physical Activity and Relaxation; Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Coffeng, Jennifer K.; Boot, Cécile R. L.; Duijts, Saskia F. A.; Twisk, Jos W. R.; van Mechelen, Willem; Hendriksen, Ingrid J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness of a worksite social and physical environment intervention on need for recovery (i.e., early symptoms of work-related mental and physical fatigue), physical activity and relaxation. Also, the effectiveness of the separate interventions was investigated. Methods In this 2×2 factorial design study, 412 office employees from a financial service provider participated. Participants were allocated to the combined social and physical intervention, to the social intervention only, to the physical intervention only or to the control group. The primary outcome measure was need for recovery. Secondary outcomes were work-related stress (i.e., exhaustion, detachment and relaxation), small breaks, physical activity (i.e., stair climbing, active commuting, sport activities, light/moderate/vigorous physical activity) and sedentary behavior. Outcomes were measured by questionnaires at baseline, 6 and 12 months follow-up. Multilevel analyses were performed to investigate the effects of the three interventions. Results In all intervention groups, a non-significant reduction was found in need for recovery. In the combined intervention (n = 92), exhaustion and vigorous physical activities decreased significantly, and small breaks at work and active commuting increased significantly compared to the control group. The social intervention (n = 118) showed a significant reduction in exhaustion, sedentary behavior at work and a significant increase in small breaks at work and leisure activities. In the physical intervention (n = 96), stair climbing at work and active commuting significantly increased, and sedentary behavior at work decreased significantly compared to the control group. Conclusion None of the interventions was effective in improving the need for recovery. It is recommended to implement the social and physical intervention among a population with higher baseline values of need for recovery. Furthermore, the intervention

  17. Incorporation of inorganic material in anoxic/aerobic-activated sludge system mixed liquor.

    PubMed

    Wentzel, M C; Ubisi, M F; Lakay, M T; Ekama, G A

    2002-12-01

    In the bioreactor of the nitrification denitrification (ND)-activated sludge system, the mixed liquor is made up of organic and inorganic materials. In the current design procedures and simulation models, the influent wastewater characteristics and biological processes that influence the bioreactor mixed liquor organic solids (as volatile suspended solids, VSS, or COD) are explicitly included. However, the mixed liquor total suspended solids (TSS, i.e. organic + inorganic solids) are calculated simply from empirical ratios of VSS/TSS. The TSS concentration is fundamental in the design of secondary settling tanks and waste activated sludge disposal. Clearly, the empirical approach to obtaining an estimate for TSS is not satisfactory within the framework of a fundamentally based model. Accordingly, the incorporation of the inorganic material present in the influent wastewater into ND-activated sludge system mixed liquor was investigated. From an experimental investigation into the distribution of inorganics in the influent, mixed liquor and effluent of a laboratory-scale ND-activated sludge system, it was concluded inter alia that (i) of the total inorganic solids in the influent, only a small fraction (2.8-7.5%) is incorporated into the mixed liquor, (ii) most of the inorganics in the influent (mean 88%) and effluent (mean 98.5%) are in the dissolved form, the balance being particulate, and (iii) the influent and effluent inorganic dissolved solids concentrations are closely equal (mean effluent to influent ratio 100%). Further, a number of models were developed to quantify the mixed liquor inorganic, and, hence, total solids. From an evaluation of these models against the experimental data, it would appear that the best approach to model the incorporation of inorganics into the activated sludge mixed liquor is to follow the concepts and principles used to develop the existing models for organic materials. With this approach, reasonably close correlation between

  18. The Words Students Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Joshua F.; White, Claire; Snow, Catherine E.

    2010-01-01

    Students who struggle with reading comprehension in middle school often lack the academic vocabulary the need to understand grade-level textbooks and other instructional materials. Research shows that to learn a new word well, students need to encounter and use it multiple times in different contexts. The authors describe Word Generation, a…

  19. Assessment of Uncertainty in the Determination of Activation Energy for Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darby, Stephania P.; Landrum, D. Brian; Coleman, Hugh W.

    1998-01-01

    An assessment of the experimental uncertainty in obtaining the kinetic activation energy from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data is presented. A neat phenolic resin, Borden SC1O08, was heated at three heating rates to obtain weight loss vs temperature data. Activation energy was calculated by two methods: the traditional Flynn and Wall method based on the slope of log(q) versus 1/T, and a modification of this method where the ordinate and abscissa are reversed in the linear regression. The modified method produced a more accurate curve fit of the data, was more sensitive to data nonlinearity, and gave a value of activation energy 75 percent greater than the original method. An uncertainty analysis using the modified method yielded a 60 percent uncertainty in the average activation energy. Based on this result, the activation energy for a carbon-phenolic material was doubled and used to calculate the ablation rate In a typical solid rocket environment. Doubling the activation energy increased surface recession by 3 percent. Current TGA data reduction techniques that use the traditional Flynn and Wall approach to calculate activation energy should be changed to the modified method.

  20. Group belongingness and collective action: Effects of need to belong and rejection sensitivity on willingness to participate in protest activities.

    PubMed

    Bäck, Emma A; Bäck, Hanna; Knapton, Holly M

    2015-10-01

    Engaging in political protests are becoming increasingly common, and considering the potential, individual, costs and the low probability of affecting the political outcome, it is necessary to understand the motivations behind such actions. The desire to be part of a social group is deeply rooted in human nature, and previous research proposes that the groups one belongs to may influence the decision to engage in protests. We build on this research and suggest that social exclusion, individual fear of exclusion and need to belong interact in explaining who is likely to become engaged. In two studies, one natural experiment and one lab-experiment, we show that social exclusion increase willingness to participate in protests for individuals high in both rejection sensitivity and need to belong. We conclude that contextual factors, such as exclusion or marginalization should be considered in relation to individual level personality factors when explaining who is likely to become engaged in political protests. These results are important since they suggest that some people engage in politics simply due to social reasons and are less ideologically motivated. PMID:26031961

  1. Impedance spectroscopy study of a catechol-modified activated carbon electrode as active material in electrochemical capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cougnon, C.; Lebègue, E.; Pognon, G.

    2015-01-01

    Modified activated carbon (Norit S-50) electrodes with electrochemical double layer (EDL) capacitance and redox capacitance contributions to the electric charge storage were tested in 1 M H2SO4 to quantify the benefit and the limitation of the surface redox reactions on the electrochemical performances of the resulting pseudo-capacitive materials. The electrochemical performances of an electrochemically anodized carbon electrode and a catechol-modified carbon electrode, which make use both EDL capacitance of the porous structure of the carbon and redox capacitance, were compared to the performances obtained for the pristine carbon. Nitrogen gas adsorption measurements have been used for studying the impact of the grafting on the BET surface area, pore size distribution, pore volume and average pore diameter. The electrochemical behavior of carbon materials was studied by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The EIS data were discussed by using a complex capacitance model that allows defining the characteristic time constant, the global capacitance and the frequency at which the maximum charge stored is reached. The EIS measurements were achieved at different dc potential values where a redox activity occurs and the evolution of the capacitance and the capacitive relaxation time with the electrode potential are presented. Realistic galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements performed at different current rates corroborate the results obtained by impedance.

  2. The need for and development of a method to measure carry-over amylase activity in raw and refined sugars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, there has been increased world-wide concern over carry-over activity of mostly high temperature (HT) and very high temperature (VHT) stable amylases in refined sugars to various food and end-user industries. HT and VHT stable amylases were developed for much larger markets than the...

  3. Using Activity Theory to Understand Prospective Teachers' Attitudes to and Construction of Special Educational Needs and/or Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Sue

    2009-01-01

    Appropriate professional development, including that initial teacher training, is regarded as a cornerstone of the development of inclusive education. This research is concerned with prospective teachers' conceptualisations of terms such as "disability" and "special education". Activity theory is proposed as a lens through which to consider the…

  4. Psychological Needs as Mediators? The Relationship between Leisure-Time Physical Activity and Well Being in People Diagnosed with Osteoporosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnell, Katie E.; Mack, Diane E.; Wilson, Philip M.; Adachi, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease characterized by reduced bone mass and micro-architectural deterioration of bone tissue resulting in compromised bone strength, increased fracture risk, and reduced well being. With evidence attesting to the positive effects of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) on biomedical health in people with…

  5. In vitro metabolism and bioavailability tests for endocrine active substances: What is needed next for regulatory purposes?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Legistation and prospective legislative proposals internationally (may) require that chemicals be tested for their ability to disrupt the hormonal systems of mammals. Chemicals found to test positive in vitro are considered to be endocrine active substances (EAS) and may be puta...

  6. Photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide modified concrete materials - influence of utilizing recycled glass cullets as aggregates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2009-08-01

    Combining the use of photocatalysts with cementitious materials is an important development in the field of photocatalytic air pollution mitigation. This paper presents the results of a systematic study on assessing the effectiveness of pollutant degradation by concrete surface layers that incorporate a photocatalytic material - Titanium Dioxide. The photocatalytic activity of the concrete samples was determined by photocatalytic oxidation of nitric oxide (NO) in the laboratory. Recycled glass cullets, derived from crushed waste beverage bottles, were used to replace sand in preparing the concrete surface layers. Factors, which may affect the pollutant removal performance of the concrete layers including glass color, aggregate size and curing age, were investigated. The results show a significant enhancement of the photocatalytic activity due to the use of glass cullets as aggregates in the concrete layers. The samples fabricated with clear glass cullets exhibited threefold NO removal efficiency compared to the samples fabricated with river sand. The light transmittance property of glass was postulated to account for the efficiency improvement, which was confirmed by a separate simulation study. But the influence of the size of glass cullets was not evident. In addition, the photocatalytic activity of concrete surface layers decreased with curing age, showing a loss of 20% photocatalytic activity after 56-day curing. PMID:19540649

  7. Photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide modified concrete materials - influence of utilizing recycled glass cullets as aggregates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2009-08-01

    Combining the use of photocatalysts with cementitious materials is an important development in the field of photocatalytic air pollution mitigation. This paper presents the results of a systematic study on assessing the effectiveness of pollutant degradation by concrete surface layers that incorporate a photocatalytic material - Titanium Dioxide. The photocatalytic activity of the concrete samples was determined by photocatalytic oxidation of nitric oxide (NO) in the laboratory. Recycled glass cullets, derived from crushed waste beverage bottles, were used to replace sand in preparing the concrete surface layers. Factors, which may affect the pollutant removal performance of the concrete layers including glass color, aggregate size and curing age, were investigated. The results show a significant enhancement of the photocatalytic activity due to the use of glass cullets as aggregates in the concrete layers. The samples fabricated with clear glass cullets exhibited threefold NO removal efficiency compared to the samples fabricated with river sand. The light transmittance property of glass was postulated to account for the efficiency improvement, which was confirmed by a separate simulation study. But the influence of the size of glass cullets was not evident. In addition, the photocatalytic activity of concrete surface layers decreased with curing age, showing a loss of 20% photocatalytic activity after 56-day curing.

  8. Effect of gamma irradiation on fluoride release and antibacterial activity of resin dental materials.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fabíola Galbiatti de; Fucio, Suzana Beatriz Portugal de; Pascon, Fernanda Miori; Kantovitz, Kamila Rosamilia; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of gamma irradiation on fluoride release and antibacterial activity of FluroShield (FS) and Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB). Four groups were formed: G1-FS + gamma; G2-FS without gamma; G3-CPB + gamma; G4-CPB without gamma. For fluoride release analysis, 12 disks of each material were prepared and covered with nail polish, except for one side (50.4 mm(2) area). G1 and G3 were sterilized with a 14.5 KGy dose at 27 degrees C for 24 h, while G2 and G4 (controls) were not sterilized and were maintained under the same time and temperature conditions. Fluoride release measurements were made in duplicate (n=6) by an ion specific electrode. The antibacterial activity of the CPB and FS against Streptococcus mutans after gamma sterilization was evaluated by the agar-disc diffusion method. The diameter of the zones of microbial growth inhibition was recorded after 48 h. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=5%). Gamma sterilization decreased the fluoride release of FS by approximately 50%, while CPB was not affected. There was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) in the antibacterial effect of CPB between gamma and non-gamma sterilization groups. FS presented no antibacterial activity. Gamma irradiation decreased the fluoride release of FS, but did not affect the antibacterial activity of the studied materials. PMID:19738944

  9. Natural sisal fibers derived hierarchical porous activated carbon as capacitive material in lithium ion capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhewei; Guo, Huajun; Li, Xinhai; Wang, Zhixing; Yan, Zhiliang; Wang, Yansen

    2016-10-01

    Lithium-ion capacitor (LIC) is a novel advanced electrochemical energy storage (EES) system bridging gap between lithium ion battery (LIB) and electrochemical capacitor (ECC). In this work, we report that sisal fiber activated carbon (SFAC) was synthesized by hydrothermal treatment followed by KOH activation and served as capacitive material in LIC for the first time. Different particle structure, morphology, specific surface area and heteroatoms affected the electrochemical performance of as-prepared materials and corresponding LICs. When the mass ratio of KOH to char precursor was 2, hierarchical porous structured SFAC-2 was prepared and exhibited moderate specific capacitance (103 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1), superior rate capability and cyclic stability (88% capacity retention after 5000 cycles at 1 A g-1). The corresponding assembled LIC (LIC-SC2) with optimal comprehensive electrochemical performance, displayed the energy density of 83 Wh kg-1, the power density of 5718 W kg-1 and superior cyclic stability (92% energy density retention after 1000 cycles at 0.5 A g-1). It is worthwhile that the source for activated carbon is a natural and renewable one and the synthesis method is eco-friendly, which facilitate that hierarchical porous activated carbon has potential applications in the field of LIC and other energy storage systems.

  10. Examining porous bio-active glass as a potential osteo-odonto-keratoprosthetic skirt material.

    PubMed

    Huhtinen, Reeta; Sandeman, Susan; Rose, Susanna; Fok, Elsie; Howell, Carol; Fröberg, Linda; Moritz, Niko; Hupa, Leena; Lloyd, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Bio-active glass has been developed for use as a bone substitute with strong osteo-inductive capacity and the ability to form strong bonds with soft and hard tissue. The ability of this material to enhance tissue in-growth suggests its potential use as a substitute for the dental laminate of an osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis. A preliminary in vitro investigation of porous bio-active glass as an OOKP skirt material was carried out. Porous glass structures were manufactured from bio-active glasses 1-98 and 28-04 containing varying oxide formulation (1-98, 28-04) and particle size range (250-315 μm for 1-98 and 28-04a, 315-500 μm for 28-04b). Dissolution of the porous glass structure and its effect on pH was measured. Structural 2D and 3D analysis of porous structures were performed. Cell culture experiments were carried out to study keratocyte adhesion and the inflammatory response induced by the porous glass materials. The dissolution results suggested that the porous structure made out of 1-98 dissolves faster than the structures made from glass 28-04. pH experiments showed that the dissolution of the porous glass increased the pH of the surrounding solution. The cell culture results showed that keratocytes adhered onto the surface of each of the porous glass structures, but cell adhesion and spreading was greatest for the 98a bio-glass. Cytokine production by all porous glass samples was similar to that of the negative control indicating that the glasses do not induce a cytokine driven inflammatory response. Cell culture results support the potential use of synthetic porous bio-glass as an OOKP skirt material in terms of limited inflammatory potential and capacity to induce and support tissue ingrowth.

  11. Development of Pupils' Transfer Skills by Means of Hands On Activities with Artisan Materials in Natural Sciences Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciascai, Liliana; Chicinas, Luminita

    2008-01-01

    Hands on activities with artisan materials used in order to realize different practical devices helpful in learning process are one of the most frequently used activity in science classes. Usually, the main strength of these activities are: a deeper learning, an increased motivation of pupils for actively learning and development of practical…

  12. Partially Hydrogenated Graphene Materials Exhibit High Electrocatalytic Activities Related to Unintentional Doping with Metallic Impurities.

    PubMed

    Jankovský, Ondřej; Libánská, Alena; Bouša, Daniel; Sedmidubský, David; Matějková, Stanislava; Sofer, Zdeněk

    2016-06-13

    Partially hydrogenated graphene materials, synthesized by the chemical reduction/hydrogenation of two different graphene oxides using zinc powder in acidic environment or aluminum powder in alkaline environment, exhibit high electrocatalytic activities, as well as electrochemical sensing properties. The starting graphene oxides and the resultant hydrogenated graphenes were characterized in detail. Their electrocatalytic activity was examined in the oxygen reduction reaction, whereas sensing properties towards explosives were tested by using picric acid as a redox probe. Findings indicate that the high electrocatalytic performance originates not only from the hydrogenation of graphene, but also from unintentional contamination of graphene with manganese and other metals during synthesis. A careful evaluation of the obtained data and a detailed chemical analysis are necessary to identify the origin of this anomalous electrocatalytic activity. PMID:27167069

  13. Nomex-derived activated carbon fibers as electrode materials in carbon based supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, K.; Lerf, A.; Winter, M.; Besenhard, J. O.; Villar-Rodil, S.; Suárez-García, F.; Martínez-Alonso, A.; Tascón, J. M. D.

    Electrochemical characterization has been carried out for electrodes prepared of several activated carbon fiber samples derived from poly (m-phenylene isophthalamide) (Nomex) in an aqueous solution. Depending on the burn-off due to activation the BET surface area of the carbons was in the order of 1300-2800 m 2 g -1, providing an extensive network of micropores. Their capability as active material for supercapacitors was evaluated by using cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. Values for the capacitance of 175 F g -1 in sulfuric acid were obtained. Further on, it was observed that the specific capacitance and the performance of the electrode increase significantly with increasing burn-off degree. We believe that this fact can be attributed to the increase of surface area and porosity with increasing burn-off.

  14. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of acid-base bifunctional materials through protection of amino groups

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yanqiu; Liu, Heng; Yu, Xiaofang; Guan, Jingqi; Kan, Qiubin

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acid-base bifunctional material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized through protection of amino groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} catalyst containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties. -- Abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, transmission electron micrographs (TEM), back titration, {sup 13}C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR and {sup 29}Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR were employed to characterize the synthesized materials. The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation reaction between acetone and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde. Compared with monofunctional catalysts of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15 and SBA-15-NH{sub 2}, the bifunctional sample of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties, which make it possess high activity for the aldol condensation.

  15. Active investigation of material damage under load using micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navalgund, Megha; Zunjarrao, Suraj; Mishra, Debasish; Manoharan, V.

    2015-03-01

    Due the growth of composite materials across multiple industries such as Aviation, Wind there is an increasing need to not just standardize and improve manufacturing processes but also to design these materials for the specific applications. One of the things that this translates to is understanding how failure initiates and grows in these materials and at what loads, especially around internal flaws such as voids or features such as ply drops. Traditional methods of investigating internal damage such as CT lack the resolution to resolve ply level damage in composites. Interrupted testing with layer removal can be used to investigate internal damage using microscopy; however this is a destructive method. Advanced techniques such as such as DIC are useful for in-situ damage detection, however are limited to surface information and would not enable interrogating the volume. Computed tomography has become a state of the art technique for metrology and complete volumetric investigation especially for metallic components. However, its application to the composite world is still nascent. This paper demonstrates micro-CT's capability as a gauge to quantitatively estimate the extent of damage & understand the propagation of damage in PMC composites while the component is under stress.

  16. Active investigation of material damage under load using micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Navalgund, Megha Mishra, Debasish; Manoharan, V.; Zunjarrao, Suraj

    2015-03-31

    Due the growth of composite materials across multiple industries such as Aviation, Wind there is an increasing need to not just standardize and improve manufacturing processes but also to design these materials for the specific applications. One of the things that this translates to is understanding how failure initiates and grows in these materials and at what loads, especially around internal flaws such as voids or features such as ply drops. Traditional methods of investigating internal damage such as CT lack the resolution to resolve ply level damage in composites. Interrupted testing with layer removal can be used to investigate internal damage using microscopy; however this is a destructive method. Advanced techniques such as such as DIC are useful for in-situ damage detection, however are limited to surface information and would not enable interrogating the volume. Computed tomography has become a state of the art technique for metrology and complete volumetric investigation especially for metallic components. However, its application to the composite world is still nascent. This paper demonstrates micro-CT’s capability as a gauge to quantitatively estimate the extent of damage and understand the propagation of damage in PMC composites while the component is under stress.

  17. Physical Activity and Fitness of First Nations Youth in a Remote and Isolated Northern Ontario Community: A Needs Assessment.

    PubMed

    Gates, Michelle; Hanning, Rhona; Gates, Allison; Stephen, Judy; Fehst, Andrew; Tsuji, Leonard

    2016-02-01

    Among a group of First Nations youth, this research aimed to obtain objective measures of anthropometry, physical activity (PA) and fitness; to identify any group-level differences by sex, body mass index, waist circumference and body fat categories; to assess the barriers and supports to PA. Youth participated in anthropometric measures (BMI, waist circumference, body fat percentage), PA assessment (3 days of accelerometry) and fitness testing (guided by the Canadian Physical Activity, Fitness and Lifestyle Approach). Barriers and supports were assessed via environmental scan and focus groups. Descriptive statistics were compared to reference data. Group differences by sex, BMI status, waist circumference and body fat categories were tested using Mann-Whitney U and Chi square tests (p ≤ 0.05). Qualitative data were assembled into one file and coded manually for categories and themes. Seventy-two youth (12.1 ± 1.1 years, 61.1% male) participated in at least one measure; 36 completed the accelerometry. Sixty-three percent were overweight or obese, 51% were abdominally obese and 21% had excess body fat. Most (86.1%) met Canada's PA guidelines. Boys were more active than girls (p = 0.025) and had greater cardiorespiratory endurance (p = 0.003). Overweight, obese, or abdominally obese youth had lower cardiorespiratory endurance than normal weight youth (p < 0.001). Barriers and supports fell under the main themes: motivation, role models, personnel and facilities, environment and programs. Based on this assessment, youth in this community are active, but not sufficiently physically fit, especially among those affected by obesity and abdominal obesity. The findings, in addition to the numerous barriers to PA, support the community's desire for school-based PA programming.

  18. Do They Need Goals or Support? A Report from a Goal-Setting Intervention Using Physical Activity Monitors in Youth.

    PubMed

    Bronikowski, Michal; Bronikowska, Malgorzata; Glapa, Agata

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association between physical activity (PA) and different goal setting and strategies in youth. The study took into consideration different sources of support as well as gender variations. Classmate and Teacher Support scales were used to evaluate support in physical education (PE) classes, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was reported. Garmin Vivofit(®) activity trackers were used during an 8 week-long intervention to count daily steps. Data was collected from 65 adolescents (mean age 17.2 ± 0.2), 74 young adolescents (mean age 15.3 ± 0.2) and 57 children (mean age 11.5 ± 0.4). An experimental design was employed, with "goal" and "do your best" groups given different step goal strategies. The results show that both groups achieved a comparable number of steps. Two-way ANOVA showed interactional effects between gender and teacher support. There were no such effects for MVPA and number of steps. Although classmate support in PE was reported to be reasonably high, the findings show that it does not play a significant role in increasing MVPA behaviors in youths. However, the problem of significantly lower support given to adolescent girls by PE teachers should be embedded into the teaching context of PE students and counteracted in school setting realities.

  19. Do They Need Goals or Support? A Report from a Goal-Setting Intervention Using Physical Activity Monitors in Youth.

    PubMed

    Bronikowski, Michal; Bronikowska, Malgorzata; Glapa, Agata

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association between physical activity (PA) and different goal setting and strategies in youth. The study took into consideration different sources of support as well as gender variations. Classmate and Teacher Support scales were used to evaluate support in physical education (PE) classes, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was reported. Garmin Vivofit(®) activity trackers were used during an 8 week-long intervention to count daily steps. Data was collected from 65 adolescents (mean age 17.2 ± 0.2), 74 young adolescents (mean age 15.3 ± 0.2) and 57 children (mean age 11.5 ± 0.4). An experimental design was employed, with "goal" and "do your best" groups given different step goal strategies. The results show that both groups achieved a comparable number of steps. Two-way ANOVA showed interactional effects between gender and teacher support. There were no such effects for MVPA and number of steps. Although classmate support in PE was reported to be reasonably high, the findings show that it does not play a significant role in increasing MVPA behaviors in youths. However, the problem of significantly lower support given to adolescent girls by PE teachers should be embedded into the teaching context of PE students and counteracted in school setting realities. PMID:27649219

  20. Do They Need Goals or Support? A Report from a Goal-Setting Intervention Using Physical Activity Monitors in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Bronikowski, Michal; Bronikowska, Malgorzata; Glapa, Agata

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association between physical activity (PA) and different goal setting and strategies in youth. The study took into consideration different sources of support as well as gender variations. Classmate and Teacher Support scales were used to evaluate support in physical education (PE) classes, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was reported. Garmin Vivofit® activity trackers were used during an 8 week-long intervention to count daily steps. Data was collected from 65 adolescents (mean age 17.2 ± 0.2), 74 young adolescents (mean age 15.3 ± 0.2) and 57 children (mean age 11.5 ± 0.4). An experimental design was employed, with “goal” and “do your best” groups given different step goal strategies. The results show that both groups achieved a comparable number of steps. Two-way ANOVA showed interactional effects between gender and teacher support. There were no such effects for MVPA and number of steps. Although classmate support in PE was reported to be reasonably high, the findings show that it does not play a significant role in increasing MVPA behaviors in youths. However, the problem of significantly lower support given to adolescent girls by PE teachers should be embedded into the teaching context of PE students and counteracted in school setting realities. PMID:27649219

  1. Kraft lignin/silica-AgNPs as a functional material with antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Klapiszewski, Łukasz; Rzemieniecki, Tomasz; Krawczyk, Magdalena; Malina, Dagmara; Norman, Małgorzata; Zdarta, Jakub; Majchrzak, Izabela; Dobrowolska, Anna; Czaczyk, Katarzyna; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2015-10-01

    Advanced functional silica/lignin hybrid materials, modified with nanosilver, were obtained. The commercial silica Syloid 244 was used, modified with N-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane to increase its chemical affinity to lignin. Similarly, kraft lignin was oxidized using a solution of sodium periodate to activate appropriate functional groups on its surface. Silver nanoparticles were grafted onto the resulting silica/lignin hybrids. The systems obtained were comprehensively tested using available techniques and methods, including transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, elemental analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. An evaluation was also made of the electrokinetic stability of the systems with and without silver nanoparticles. Conclusions were drawn concerning the chemical nature of the bonds between the precursors and the effectiveness of the method of binding nanosilver to the hybrid materials. The antimicrobial activity of the studied materials was tested against five species of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The addition of silver nanoparticles to the silica/lignin hybrids led to inhibition of the growth of the analyzed bacteria. The best results were obtained against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a dangerous human pathogen.

  2. Towards multifunctional materials incorporating elastomers and reversible redox-active fragments.

    PubMed

    Tarrés, Màrius; Viñas, Clara; Cioran, Ana M; Hänninen, Mikko M; Sillanpää, Reijo; Teixidor, Francesc

    2014-11-24

    This paper presents a novel and unique feature of metallacarboranes, consisting of the linkage of this redox electro-active site to a stretchable polymer. This is based on polyTHF, a known and applied material. This hybrid material has the two ends functionalized: one with the aforementioned redox molecule and the other with a terminal OH group, both linked by a molecular spring. Moreover, the redox electro-active molecules can be synthesized with either cobalt (cobaltabisdicarbollide) or with iron (ferrabisdicarbollide), species whose respective E(1/2) value differs by almost 1 V. The polymerization mechanism, based on an intermediate molecular crystal structure, is explained through an unexpected cyclization process of the dioxanate derivative of the metallacarboranes with an additional THF molecule. This is achieved in the absence of any metal or external electrophile. Surface functionalization of a Pt electrode by the electropolymerization of pyrrole doped with the pristine metallacarboranes and with the polyTHF hybrid materials is reported in this paper.

  3. Microscopic theory of the glassy dynamics of passive and active network materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shenshen; Wolynes, Peter G

    2013-03-28

    Signatures of glassy dynamics have been identified experimentally for a rich variety of materials in which molecular networks provide rigidity. Here we present a theoretical framework to study the glassy behavior of both passive and active network materials. We construct a general microscopic network model that incorporates nonlinear elasticity of individual filaments and steric constraints due to crowding. Based on constructive analogies between structural glass forming liquids and random field Ising magnets implemented using a heterogeneous self-consistent phonon method, our scheme provides a microscopic approach to determine the mismatch surface tension and the configurational entropy, which compete in determining the barrier for structural rearrangements within the random first order transition theory of escape from a local energy minimum. The influence of crosslinking on the fragility of inorganic network glass formers is recapitulated by the model. For active network materials, the mapping, which correlates the glassy characteristics to the network architecture and properties of nonequilibrium motor processes, is shown to capture several key experimental observations on the cytoskeleton of living cells: Highly connected tense networks behave as strong glass formers; intense motor action promotes reconfiguration. The fact that our model assuming a negative motor susceptibility predicts the latter suggests that on average the motorized processes in living cells do resist the imposed mechanical load. Our calculations also identify a spinodal point where simultaneously the mismatch penalty vanishes and the mechanical stability of amorphous packing disappears.

  4. Synthesis of Iminodiacetate Functionalized Polypropylene Films and Their Efficacy as Antioxidant Active-Packaging Materials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhuangsheng; Roman, Maxine J; Decker, Eric A; Goddard, Julie M

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of metal-chelating ligands to the food-contact surface of packaging materials may enable the removal of synthetic chelators (e.g., ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA)) from food products. In this study, the metal-chelating ligand iminodiacetate (IDA) was covalently grafted onto polypropylene surfaces to produce metal-chelating active-packaging films. The resulting films were able to chelate 138.1 ± 26 and 210.0 ± 28 nmol/cm(2) Fe(3+) and Cu(2+) ions, respectively, under acidic conditions (pH 3.0). The films demonstrated potent antioxidant efficacy in two model food systems. In an emulsified-oil system, the chelating materials extended the lag phase of both lipid hydroperoxide and hexanal formation from 5 to 25 days and were as effective as EDTA. The degradation half-life of ascorbic acid in an aqueous solution was extended from 5 to 14 days. This work demonstrates the potential application of surface-grafted chelating IDA ligands as effective antioxidant active food-packaging materials. PMID:27243793

  5. Studies on supercapacitor electrode material from activated lignin-derived mesoporous carbon.

    PubMed

    Saha, Dipendu; Li, Yunchao; Bi, Zhonghe; Chen, Jihua; Keum, Jong K; Hensley, Dale K; Grappe, Hippolyte A; Meyer, Harry M; Dai, Sheng; Paranthaman, M Parans; Naskar, A K

    2014-01-28

    We synthesized mesoporous carbon from pre-cross-linked lignin gel impregnated with a surfactant as the pore-forming agent and then activated the carbon through physical and chemical methods to obtain activated mesoporous carbon. The activated mesoporous carbons exhibited 1.5- to 6-fold increases in porosity with a maximum Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area of 1148 m(2)/g and a pore volume of 1.0 cm(3)/g. Both physical and chemical activation enhanced the mesoporosity along with significant microporosity. Plots of cyclic voltammetric data with the capacitor electrode made from these carbons showed an almost rectangular curve depicting the behavior of ideal double-layer capacitance. Although the pristine mesoporous carbon exhibited a range of surface-area-based capacitance similar to that of other known carbon-based supercapacitors, activation decreased the surface-area-based specific capacitance and enhanced the gravimetric specific capacitance of the mesoporous carbons. A vertical tail in the lower-frequency domain of the Nyquist plot provided additional evidence of good supercapacitor behavior for the activated mesoporous carbons. We have modeled the equivalent circuit of the Nyquist plot with the help of two constant phase elements (CPE). Our work demonstrated that biomass-derived mesoporous carbon materials continue to show potential for use in specific electrochemical applications.

  6. Evaluation of precision and accuracy of selenium measurements in biological materials using neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, the accurate determination of selenium in biological materials has become increasingly important in view of the essential nature of this element for human nutrition and its possible role as a protective agent against cancer. Unfortunately, the accurate determination of selenium in biological materials is often difficult for most analytical techniques for a variety of reasons, including interferences, complicated selenium chemistry due to the presence of this element in multiple oxidation states and in a variety of different organic species, stability and resistance to destruction of some of these organo-selenium species during acid dissolution, volatility of some selenium compounds, and potential for contamination. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) can be one of the best analytical techniques for selenium determinations in biological materials for a number of reasons. Currently, precision at the 1% level (1s) and overall accuracy at the 1 to 2% level (95% confidence interval) can be attained at the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS) for selenium determinations in biological materials when counting statistics are not limiting (using the {sup 75}Se isotope). An example of this level of precision and accuracy is summarized. Achieving this level of accuracy, however, requires strict attention to all sources of systematic error. Precise and accurate results can also be obtained after radiochemical separations.

  7. Recovery of valuable metals from cathodic active material of spent lithium ion batteries: Leaching and kinetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Meshram, Pratima; Pandey, B D; Mankhand, T R

    2015-11-01

    This work is focussed on the processing of cathodic active material of spent lithium ion batteries (LIBs) to ensure resource recovery and minimize environmental degradation. The sulfuric acid leaching of metals was carried out for the recovery of all the valuable metals including nickel and manganese along with the frequently targeted metals like lithium and cobalt. The process parameters such as acid concentration, pulp density, time and temperature for the leaching of metals from the cathode powder containing 35.8% Co, 6.5% Li, 11.6% Mn and 10.06% Ni, were optimized. Results show the optimized leach recovery of 93.4% Li, 66.2% Co, 96.3% Ni and 50.2% Mn when the material was leached in 1M H2SO4 at 368 K and 50 g/L pulp density for 240 min. The need of a reductant for improved recovery of cobalt and manganese has been explained by the thermodynamic analysis (Eh-pH diagram) for these metals. Leaching of the valuable metals was found to follow the logarithmic rate law controlled by surface layer diffusion of the lixiviant reacting with the particles. The mode of leaching of the metals from the spent LIBs was further examined by chemical analysis of the samples at various stage of processing which was further corroborated by characterizing the untreated sample and the leach residues by XRD phase identification and the SEM-EDS studies.

  8. Recovery of valuable metals from cathodic active material of spent lithium ion batteries: Leaching and kinetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Meshram, Pratima; Pandey, B D; Mankhand, T R

    2015-11-01

    This work is focussed on the processing of cathodic active material of spent lithium ion batteries (LIBs) to ensure resource recovery and minimize environmental degradation. The sulfuric acid leaching of metals was carried out for the recovery of all the valuable metals including nickel and manganese along with the frequently targeted metals like lithium and cobalt. The process parameters such as acid concentration, pulp density, time and temperature for the leaching of metals from the cathode powder containing 35.8% Co, 6.5% Li, 11.6% Mn and 10.06% Ni, were optimized. Results show the optimized leach recovery of 93.4% Li, 66.2% Co, 96.3% Ni and 50.2% Mn when the material was leached in 1M H2SO4 at 368 K and 50 g/L pulp density for 240 min. The need of a reductant for improved recovery of cobalt and manganese has been explained by the thermodynamic analysis (Eh-pH diagram) for these metals. Leaching of the valuable metals was found to follow the logarithmic rate law controlled by surface layer diffusion of the lixiviant reacting with the particles. The mode of leaching of the metals from the spent LIBs was further examined by chemical analysis of the samples at various stage of processing which was further corroborated by characterizing the untreated sample and the leach residues by XRD phase identification and the SEM-EDS studies. PMID:26087645

  9. The long-term effectiveness of need-supportive physical activity counseling compared with a standard referral in sedentary older adults.

    PubMed

    Van Hoecke, Ann-Sophie; Delecluse, Christophe; Bogaerts, An; Boen, Filip

    2014-04-01

    This study compared the long-term effectiveness of three physical activity counseling strategies among sedentary older adults: a 1-contact referral (REFER), a 1-contact individualized walking program (WALK), and multiple-contact, individually tailored, and need-supportive coaching based on the self-determination theory (COACH). Participants (n = 442) completed measurements before (pretest), immediately after (posttest), and 1 yr after (follow-up test) a 10-wk intervention. Linear mixed models demonstrated significant time-by-condition interaction effects from pre- to posttest. More specifically, WALK and COACH yielded larger increases in daily steps and self-reported physical activity than REFER. Similarly, self-reported physical activity increased more from pre- to follow-up test in WALK and COACH compared with REFER. Autonomous motivation mediated the effect of perceived need-support on physical activity, irrespective of counseling strategy. These results demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of both a 1-contact individualized walking program and a more time-consuming, need-supportive coaching, especially in comparison with a standard referral to local opportunities.

  10. Initial evaluation of an active/passive structural neural system for health monitoring of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirikera, G. R.; Lee, J. W.; Schulz, M. J.; Ghoshal, A.; Sundaresan, M. J.; Allemang, R. J.; Shanov, V. N.; Westheider, H.

    2006-10-01

    Structural health monitoring is an underlying technology that can help to ensure safe operation and provide cost effective maintenance of advanced composite structures. While several general methods of health monitoring have evolved in recent years, there is still the goal of reducing the overall cost of applying health monitoring to large structures. Data acquisition hardware typically consumes most of the investment in a structural monitoring system. On a conventional system based on acoustic emission monitoring, a separate high sampling rate data acquisition channel is needed for each sensor to convert analog signals to digital signals to locate damage. Other methods of damage detection are likewise complicated, and require many sensors and actuators, auxiliary signal processing, and data storage instrumentation. This paper proposes a structural neural system that uses firing of sensor neurons to reduce the number of data acquisition channels needed for damage detection. The neural system can perform passive acoustic emission sensing or active wave propagation monitoring. A prototype structural neural system with four sensor inputs was built and tested, and experimental results are presented in the paper. One signal output from the structural neural system is used to predict the location of damage. A second signal provides the time domain response of the sensors. Therefore, passive and active health monitoring can be performed using two channels of data acquisition. The structural neural system significantly reduces the data acquisition hardware required for health monitoring, and combines some of the advantages that exist individually for passive and active health monitoring.

  11. Multifunctional radical-doped polyoxometalate-based host-guest material: photochromism and photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jian-Zhen; Zhang, Hai-Long; Wang, Sa-Sa; Yong, Jian-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Yuan; Yu, Rongmin; Lu, Can-Zhong

    2015-05-01

    An effective strategy to synthesize multifunctional materials is the incorporation of functional organic moieties and metal oxide clusters via self-assembly. A rare multifunctional radical-doped zinc-based host-guest crystalline material was synthesized with a fast-responsive reversible ultraviolet visible light photochromism, photocontrolled tunable luminescence, and highly selective photocatalytic oxidation of benzylic alcohols as a result of blending of distinctively different functional components, naphthalenediimide tectons, and polyoxometalates (POMs). It is highly unique to link π-electron-deficient organic tectons and POMs by unusual POMs anion-π interactions, which are not only conducive to keeping the independence of each component but also effectively promoting the charge transfer or exchange among the components to realize the fast-responsive photochromism, photocontrolled tunable luminescence, and photocatalytic activity.

  12. Analysis of marine sediment and lobster hepatopancreas reference materials by instrumental photon activation

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, S.; Davidson, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    By use of instrumental photon activation analysis, twelve trace (As, Ba, Cr, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sr, U, Zn, and Zr) and eight minor (C, Na, Mg, Co, K, Ca, Tl, and Fe) elements were determined in a certified marine sediment standard reference material as well as eight trace (Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Cd, and Pb) and four minor (Na, Mg, Cl, and Ca) elements in a certified marine tissue (lobster hepatopancreas) standard reference material. The precision and accuracy of the present results when compared to the accepted values clearly demonstrate the reliability of this nondestructive technique and its applicability to marine environmental or marine geochemical studies. 24 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Removal of Basic Violet 14 from aqueous solution using sulphuric acid activated materials.

    PubMed

    Suresh, S

    2016-01-01

    In this study the adsorption of Basic Violet, 14 from aqueous solution onto sulphuric acid activated materials prepared from Calophyllum inophyllum (CS) and Theobroma cacao (TS) shells were investigated. The experimental data were analysed by Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models. The results showed that CS has a superior adsorption capacity compared to the TS. The adsorption capacity was found to be 1416.43 mg/g for CS and 980.39 mg/g for TS. The kinetic data results at different concentrations were analysed using pseudo first-order and pseudo-second order model. Boyd plot indicates that the dye adsorption onto CS and TS is controlled by film diffusion. The adsorbents were characterised by scanning electron microscopy. The materials used in this study were economical waste products and hence can be an attractive alternative to costlier adsorbents for dye removal in industrial wastewater treatment processes. PMID:27330899

  14. Multifunctional radical-doped polyoxometalate-based host-guest material: photochromism and photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jian-Zhen; Zhang, Hai-Long; Wang, Sa-Sa; Yong, Jian-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Yuan; Yu, Rongmin; Lu, Can-Zhong

    2015-05-01

    An effective strategy to synthesize multifunctional materials is the incorporation of functional organic moieties and metal oxide clusters via self-assembly. A rare multifunctional radical-doped zinc-based host-guest crystalline material was synthesized with a fast-responsive reversible ultraviolet visible light photochromism, photocontrolled tunable luminescence, and highly selective photocatalytic oxidation of benzylic alcohols as a result of blending of distinctively different functional components, naphthalenediimide tectons, and polyoxometalates (POMs). It is highly unique to link π-electron-deficient organic tectons and POMs by unusual POMs anion-π interactions, which are not only conducive to keeping the independence of each component but also effectively promoting the charge transfer or exchange among the components to realize the fast-responsive photochromism, photocontrolled tunable luminescence, and photocatalytic activity. PMID:25859742

  15. Prompt gamma activation analysis of boron in reference materials using diffracted polychromatic neutron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, S. H.; Sun, G. M.; Choi, H. D.

    2004-01-01

    Boron concentrations were analyzed for standard reference materials by prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA). The measurements were performed at the SNU-KAERI PGAA facility installed at Hanaro, the research reactor of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The facility uses a diffracted polychromatic beam with a neutron flux of 7.9 × 10 7 n/cm 2 s. Elemental sensitivity for boron was calibrated from the prompt gamma-ray spectra of boric acid samples containing 2-45 μg boron. The sensitivity of 2131 cps/mg-B was obtained from the linearity of the boron peak count rate versus the boron mass. The detection limit for boron was estimated to be 67 ng from an empty sample bag spectrum for a counting time of 10,000 s. The measured boron concentrations for standard reference materials showed good consistency with the certified or information values.

  16. Use of electrochemically activated aqueous solutions in the manufacture of fur materials.

    PubMed

    Danylkovych, Anatoliy G; Lishchuk, Viktor I; Romaniuk, Oksana O

    2016-01-01

    The influence of characteristics of electrochemically activated aqueous processing mediums in the treatment of fur skins with different contents of fatty substances was investigated. The use of electroactive water, namely anolytes and catholytes, forgoing antiseptics or surface-active materials, helped to restore the hydration of fur skins and to remove from them soluble proteins, carbohydrates and fatty substances. The activating effect of anolyte and catholyte in solutions of water on the processes of treating raw furs is explained by their special physical and chemical properties, namely the presence of free radicals, ions and molecules of water which easily penetrate cells' membranes and into the structure of non-collagen components and microfiber structure of dermic collagen. The stage of lengthy acid and salt treatment is excluded from the technical treatment as a result of using electroactivated water with high oxidizing power. A low-cost technology of processing different kinds of fur with the use of electroactivated water provides for substantial economy of water and chemical reagents, a two to threefold acceleration of the soaking and tanning processes and creation of highly elastic fur materials with a specified set of physical and chemical properties. At the same time the technology of preparatory processes of fur treatment excludes the use of such toxic antiseptics as formalin and sodium silicofluoride, which gives grounds to regard it as ecologically safe.

  17. Anthropogenic activities have contributed moderately to increased inputs of organic materials in marginal seas off China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang-Ying; Wei, Gao-Ling; Wang, Ji-Zhong; Guan, Yu-Feng; Wong, Charles S; Wu, Feng-Chang; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2013-10-15

    Sediment has been recognized as a gigantic sink of organic materials and therefore can record temporal input trends. To examine the impact of anthropogenic activities on the marginal seas off China, sediment cores were collected from the Yellow Sea, the inner shelf of the East China Sea (ECS), and the South China Sea (SCS) to investigate the sources and spatial and temporal variations of organic materials, i.e., total organic carbon (TOC) and aliphatic hydrocarbons. The concentration ranges of TOC were 0.5-1.29, 0.63-0.83, and 0.33-0.85%, while those of Σn-C14-35 (sum of n-alkanes with carbon numbers of 14-35) were 0.08-1.5, 0.13-1.97, and 0.35-0.96 μg/g dry weight in sediment cores from the Yellow Sea, ECS inner shelf, and the SCS, respectively. Terrestrial higher plants were an important source of aliphatic hydrocarbons in marine sediments off China. The spatial distribution of Σn-C14-35 concentrations and source diagnostic ratios suggested a greater load of terrestrial organic materials in the Yellow Sea than in the ECS and SCS. Temporally, TOC and Σn-C14-35 concentrations increased with time and peaked at either the surface or immediate subsurface layers. This increase was probably reflective of elevated inputs of organic materials to marginal seas off China in recent years, and attributed partly to the impacts of intensified anthropogenic activities in mainland China. Source diagnostics also suggested that aliphatic hydrocarbons were mainly derived from biogenic sources, with a minority in surface sediment layers from petroleum sources, consistent with the above-mentioned postulation.

  18. An active thermography approach for thermal and electrical characterization of thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streza, M.; Longuemart, S.; Guilmeau, E.; Strzalkowski, K.; Touati, K.; Depriester, M.; Maignan, A.; Sahraoui, A. Hadj

    2016-07-01

    The enhancement of figure of merit (ZT) of thermoelectrics is becoming extremely important for an efficient conversion of thermal energy into electrical energy. In this respect, reliable measurements of thermal and electrical parameters are of paramount importance in order to characterize thermoelectric materials in terms of their efficiency. In this work, a combined theoretical-experimental active thermography approach is presented. The method consists of selecting the right sequential interdependence between the excitation frequency and the sampling rate of the infrared camera, by computing a temporal Fourier analysis of each pixel of the recorded IR image. The method is validated by using a reference sample which is then applied to a recent synthesized titanium trisulphide thermoelectric material (TiS3). By combining AC and steady-state experiments, one can obtain information on both thermal and electrical parameters of TE materials (namely thermal diffusivity, Seebeck coefficient). The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of TiS3 are also measured using photothermal radiometry technique (PTR) and the resulting values of these parameters are α  =  9.7*10-7 m2 s-1 and k  =  2.2 W m-1 K, respectively. The results obtained with the two techniques are in good agreement. In the case of TE materials, the main benefit of the proposed method is related to its non-contact nature and the possibility of obtaining the electric potential and temperature at the same probes. The Seebeck coefficient obtained by active IR thermography (S  =  -554 μV K-1) is consistent with the one obtained using an ULVAC-ZEM3 system (S  =  -570 μV K-1). For a large number of users of thermographic cameras, which are not equipped with a lock-in thermography module, the present approach provides an affordable and cheaper solution.

  19. An active thermography approach for thermal and electrical characterization of thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streza, M.; Longuemart, S.; Guilmeau, E.; Strzalkowski, K.; Touati, K.; Depriester, M.; Maignan, A.; Sahraoui, A. Hadj

    2016-07-01

    The enhancement of figure of merit (ZT) of thermoelectrics is becoming extremely important for an efficient conversion of thermal energy into electrical energy. In this respect, reliable measurements of thermal and electrical parameters are of paramount importance in order to characterize thermoelectric materials in terms of their efficiency. In this work, a combined theoretical-experimental active thermography approach is presented. The method consists of selecting the right sequential interdependence between the excitation frequency and the sampling rate of the infrared camera, by computing a temporal Fourier analysis of each pixel of the recorded IR image. The method is validated by using a reference sample which is then applied to a recent synthesized titanium trisulphide thermoelectric material (TiS3). By combining AC and steady-state experiments, one can obtain information on both thermal and electrical parameters of TE materials (namely thermal diffusivity, Seebeck coefficient). The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of TiS3 are also measured using photothermal radiometry technique (PTR) and the resulting values of these parameters are α  =  9.7*10‑7 m2 s‑1 and k  =  2.2 W m‑1 K, respectively. The results obtained with the two techniques are in good agreement. In the case of TE materials, the main benefit of the proposed method is related to its non-contact nature and the possibility of obtaining the electric potential and temperature at the same probes. The Seebeck coefficient obtained by active IR thermography (S  =  ‑554 μV K‑1) is consistent with the one obtained using an ULVAC-ZEM3 system (S  =  ‑570 μV K‑1). For a large number of users of thermographic cameras, which are not equipped with a lock-in thermography module, the present approach provides an affordable and cheaper solution.

  20. The Astronomy Workshop: Computer Assisted Learning Tools with Instructor Support Materials and Student Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Grace; Hamilton, D.; Hayes-Gehrke, M.

    2006-12-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is a collection of interactive World Wide Web tools that were developed under the direction of Doug Hamilton for use in undergraduate classes, as supplementary materials appropriate for grades 9-12, and by the general public. The philosophy of the website is to foster student and public interest in astronomy by capitalizing on their fascination with computers and the internet. Many of the tools were developed by graduate and undergraduate students at UMD. This website contains over 20 tools on topics including scientific notation, giant impacts, extrasolar planets, astronomical distances, planets, moons, comets, and asteroids. Educators around the country at universities, colleges, and secondary schools have used the Astronomy Workshop’s tools and activities as homework assignments, in-class demos, or extra credit. Since 2005, Grace Deming has assessed several of the Astronomy Workshop’s tools for clarity and effectiveness by interviewing students as they used tools on the website. Based on these interviews, Deming wrote student activities and instructor support materials and posted them to the website. Over the next three years, we will continue to interview students, develop web materials, and field-test activities. We are targeting classes in introductory undergraduate astronomy courses and grades 11-12 for our Spring 2007 field tests. We are interested in hearing your ideas on how we can make the Astronomy Workshop more appealing to educators, museum directors, specialty programs, and professors. This research is funded by NASA EPO grants NNG04GM18G and NNG06GGF99G.

  1. Optimizing vermistabilization of waste activated sludge using vermicompost as bulking material.

    PubMed

    Hait, Subrata; Tare, Vinod

    2011-03-01

    An integrated composting-vermicomposting system has been developed for stabilization of waste activated sludge (WAS) using matured vermicompost as bulking material and Eisenia fetida as earthworm species. Composting was considered as the main processing unit and vermicomposting as polishing unit. The integrated system was optimized by successive recycling and mixing of bulking material with WAS during composting and examining the effects of environmental condition (i.e. temperature: 10-30°C and relative humidity: 50 and 90%) and stocking density (0-5 kg/m(2)) on vermicomposting. The composting stage resulted in sufficient enrichment of bulking material with organic matter after 20 cycles of recycling and mixing with WAS and produced materials acceptable for vermicomposting. Vermicomposting of composted material caused significant reduction in pH, volatile solids (VS), specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR), total carbon (TC), total organic carbon (TOC), C/N ratio and pathogens and a substantial increase in electrical conductivity (EC), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorous (TP). The environmental conditions (i.e. temperature: 10-30°C and relative humidity: 50 and 90%) and stocking density (0-5 kg/m(2)) have profound effects on vermicomposting. Temperature of 20°C with high humidity is the best suited environmental condition for vermicomposting employing E. fetida. The favorable stocking density range for vermiculture is 0.5-2.0 kg/m(2) (optimum: 0.5 kg/m(2)) and for vermicomposting is 2.0-4.0 kg/m(2) (optimum: 3.0 kg/m(2)), respectively. The integrated composting-vermicomposting system potentially stabilizes and converts the hazardous WAS into quality organic manure for agronomic applications without any adverse effects.

  2. Activated carbon made from cow dung as electrode material for electrochemical double layer capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjya, Dhrubajyoti; Yu, Jong-Sung

    2014-09-01

    Cow dung is one of the most abundant wastes generated on earth and has been traditionally used as fertilizer and fuel in most of the developing countries. In this study activated carbon is synthesized from cow dung by a modified chemical activation method, where partially carbonized cow dung is treated with KOH in different ratio. The synthesized activated carbon possesses irregular surface morphology with high surface area in the range of 1500-2000 m2 g-1 with proper amount of micropore and mesopore volume. In particular, we demonstrate that the surface morphology and porosity parameters change with increase in KOH ratio. These activated carbons are tested as electrode material in two-electrode symmetric supercapacitor system in non-aqueous electrolyte and found to exhibit high specific capacitance with excellent retention of it at high current density and for long term operation. In particular, the activated carbon synthesized at 2:1 ratio of KOH and the pre-carbonized char shows the best performance with specific capacitance of 124 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1 and retains up to 117 F g-1 at 1.0 A g-1 current density. The performance is attributed to high surface area along with optimum amount of micropore and mesopore volume.

  3. The great East Japan earthquake disaster: a compilation of published literature on health needs and relief activities, march 2011-september 2012.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Sae; Murray, Virginia; Hodgson, Susan

    2013-05-13

    Objective To provide an overview of the health needs following the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster and the lessons identified. Methods The relevant of peer review and grey literature articles in English and Japanese, and books in Japanese, published from March 2011 to September 2012 were searched. Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and HMIC were searched for journal articles in English, CiNii for those in Japanese, and Amazon.co.jp. for books. Descriptions of the health needs at the time of the disaster were identified using search terms and relevant articles were reviewed. Findings 85 English articles, 246 Japanese articles and 13 books were identified, the majority of which were experience/activity reports. Regarding health care needs, chronic conditions such as hypertension and diabetes were reported to be the greatest burden from the early stages of the disaster. Loss of medication and medical records appeared to worsen the situation. Many sub-acute symptoms were attributed to the contaminated sludge of the tsunamis and the poor living environment at the evacuation centres. Particularly vulnerable groups were identified as the elderly, those with mental health illnesses and the disabled. Although the response of the rescue activities was prompt, it sometimes failed to meet the on-site needs due to the lack of communication and coordination. Conclusion The lessons identified from this mega-disaster highlighted the specific health needs of the vulnerable populations, particularly the elderly and those with non-communicable diseases. Further research is needed so that the lessons identified can be incorporated into future contingency plans in Japan and elsewhere.

  4. The great East Japan earthquake disaster: a compilation of published literature on health needs and relief activities, march 2011-september 2012.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Sae; Murray, Virginia; Hodgson, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To provide an overview of the health needs following the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster and the lessons identified. Methods The relevant of peer review and grey literature articles in English and Japanese, and books in Japanese, published from March 2011 to September 2012 were searched. Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and HMIC were searched for journal articles in English, CiNii for those in Japanese, and Amazon.co.jp. for books. Descriptions of the health needs at the time of the disaster were identified using search terms and relevant articles were reviewed. Findings 85 English articles, 246 Japanese articles and 13 books were identified, the majority of which were experience/activity reports. Regarding health care needs, chronic conditions such as hypertension and diabetes were reported to be the greatest burden from the early stages of the disaster. Loss of medication and medical records appeared to worsen the situation. Many sub-acute symptoms were attributed to the contaminated sludge of the tsunamis and the poor living environment at the evacuation centres. Particularly vulnerable groups were identified as the elderly, those with mental health illnesses and the disabled. Although the response of the rescue activities was prompt, it sometimes failed to meet the on-site needs due to the lack of communication and coordination. Conclusion The lessons identified from this mega-disaster highlighted the specific health needs of the vulnerable populations, particularly the elderly and those with non-communicable diseases. Further research is needed so that the lessons identified can be incorporated into future contingency plans in Japan and elsewhere. PMID:23787732

  5. The Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster: a Compilation of Published Literature on Health Needs and Relief Activities, March 2011-September 2012

    PubMed Central

    Ochi, Sae; Murray, Virginia; Hodgson, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To provide an overview of the health needs following the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster and the lessons identified. Methods The relevant of peer review and grey literature articles in English and Japanese, and books in Japanese, published from March 2011 to September 2012 were searched. Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and HMIC were searched for journal articles in English, CiNii for those in Japanese, and Amazon.co.jp. for books. Descriptions of the health needs at the time of the disaster were identified using search terms and relevant articles were reviewed. Findings 85 English articles, 246 Japanese articles and 13 books were identified, the majority of which were experience/activity reports. Regarding health care needs, chronic conditions such as hypertension and diabetes were reported to be the greatest burden from the early stages of the disaster. Loss of medication and medical records appeared to worsen the situation. Many sub-acute symptoms were attributed to the contaminated sludge of the tsunamis and the poor living environment at the evacuation centres. Particularly vulnerable groups were identified as the elderly, those with mental health illnesses and the disabled. Although the response of the rescue activities was prompt, it sometimes failed to meet the on-site needs due to the lack of communication and coordination. Conclusion The lessons identified from this mega-disaster highlighted the specific health needs of the vulnerable populations, particularly the elderly and those with non-communicable diseases. Further research is needed so that the lessons identified can be incorporated into future contingency plans in Japan and elsewhere. PMID:23787732

  6. Air Pollution Exposure and Physical Activity in China: Current Knowledge, Public Health Implications, and Future Research Needs

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Jiaojiao; Liang, Leichao; Feng, Yi; Li, Rena; Liu, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Deteriorating air quality in China has created global public health concerns in regard to health and health-related behaviors. Although emerging environmental regulations address ambient air pollution in China, the level of enforcement and long-term impact of these measures remain unknown. Exposure to air pollution has been shown to lead to multiple adverse health outcomes, including increased rates of heart disease and mortality. However, a lesser-known but increasingly significant concern is the relationship between air pollution and its effects on outdoor exercise. This is especially important in China, which has a culturally rooted lifestyle that encourages participation in outdoor physical activity. This article evaluates the intersection of air pollution and outdoor exercise and provides a discussion of issues related to its public health impact in China, where efforts to promote a healthy lifestyle may be adversely affected by the ambient air pollution that has accompanied rapid economic development and urbanization. PMID:26610539

  7. Air Pollution Exposure and Physical Activity in China: Current Knowledge, Public Health Implications, and Future Research Needs.

    PubMed

    Lü, Jiaojiao; Liang, Leichao; Feng, Yi; Li, Rena; Liu, Yu

    2015-11-20

    Deteriorating air quality in China has created global public health concerns in regard to health and health-related behaviors. Although emerging environmental regulations address ambient air pollution in China, the level of enforcement and long-term impact of these measures remain unknown. Exposure to air pollution has been shown to lead to multiple adverse health outcomes, including increased rates of heart disease and mortality. However, a lesser-known but increasingly significant concern is the relationship between air pollution and its effects on outdoor exercise. This is especially important in China, which has a culturally rooted lifestyle that encourages participation in outdoor physical activity. This article evaluates the intersection of air pollution and outdoor exercise and provides a discussion of issues related to its public health impact in China, where efforts to promote a healthy lifestyle may be adversely affected by the ambient air pollution that has accompanied rapid economic development and urbanization.

  8. Comprehensive modeling of critical health care activities, costs, and data needs within the context of addiction rehabilitiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Kenneth J.; Keithley, Hudson

    1994-12-01

    There are few systems which aggregate standardized pertinent clinical observations of discrete patient problems and resolutions. The systematic information supplied by clinicians is generally provided to justify reimbursement from insurers. Insurers, by their nature, and expert in modeling health care costs by diagnosis, procedures, and population risk groups. Medically, they rely on clinician generated diagnostic and coded procedure information. Clinicians will document a patient's status at a discrete point in time through narrative. Clinical notes do not support aggregate and systematic analysis of outcome. A methodology exists and has been used by the US Army Drug and Alcohol Program to model the clinical activities, associated costs, and data requirements of an outpatient clinic. This has broad applicability for a comprehensive health care system to which patient costs and data requirements can be established.

  9. Assessment of Preschool Early Literacy Skills: Linking Children’s Educational Needs with Empirically Supported Instructional Activities

    PubMed Central

    Lonigan, Christopher J.; Allan, Nicholas P.; Lerner, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of the preschool period for becoming a skilled reader is highlighted by a significant body of evidence that preschool children’s development in the areas of oral language, phonological awareness, and print knowledge is predictive of how well they will learn to read once they are exposed to formal reading instruction in elementary school. Although there are now a number of empirically supported instructional activities for helping children who are at -risk of later reading difficulties acquire these early literacy skills, limitations in instructional time and opportunities in most preschool settings requires the use of valid assessment procedures to ensure that instructional resources are utilized efficiently. In this paper, we discuss the degree to which informal, diagnostic, screening, and progress-monitoring assessments of preschool early literacy skills can inform instructional decisions by considering the strengths and weaknesses of each approach to assessment. PMID:22180666

  10. A history of semi-active laser dome and window materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Roger M.

    2014-05-01

    Semi-Active Laser (SAL) guidance systems were developed starting in the mid-1960's and today form an important class of precision guided weapons. The laser wavelengths generally fall in the short wave infrared region of the spectrum. Relative to passive, image based, infrared seekers the optical demands placed on the domes or windows of SAL seekers is very modest, allowing the use of low cost, easily manufactured materials, such as polycarbonate. This paper will examine the transition of SAL window and dome science and technology from the laboratory to battlefield, with special emphasis on the story of polycarbonate domes.

  11. Magnesium as Novel Material for Active Plasmonics in the Visible Wavelength Range.

    PubMed

    Sterl, Florian; Strohfeldt, Nikolai; Walter, Ramon; Griessen, Ronald; Tittl, Andreas; Giessen, Harald

    2015-12-01

    Investigating new materials plays an important role for advancing the field of nanoplasmonics. In this work, we fabricate nanodisks from magnesium and demonstrate tuning of their plasmon resonance throughout the whole visible wavelength range by changing the disk diameter. Furthermore, we employ a catalytic palladium cap layer to transform the metallic Mg particles into dielectric MgH2 particles when exposed to hydrogen gas. We prove that this transition can be reversed in the presence of oxygen. This yields plasmonic nanostructures with an extinction spectrum that can be repeatedly switched on or off or kept at any intermediate state, offering new perspectives for active plasmonic metamaterials.

  12. Impact of the excitation source and plasmonic material on cylindrical active coated nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Arslanagic, Samel; Liu, Yan; Malureanu, Radu; Ziolkowski, Richard W

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic properties of cylindrical active coated nano-particles comprised of a silica nano-cylinder core layered with a plasmonic concentric nano-shell are investigated for potential nano-sensor applications. Particular attention is devoted to the near-field properties of these particles, as well as to their far-field radiation characteristics, in the presence of an electric or a magnetic line source. A constant frequency canonical gain model is used to account for the gain introduced in the dielectric part of the nano-particle, whereas three different plasmonic materials (silver, gold, and copper) are employed and compared for the nano-shell layers.

  13. Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braswell, Ray, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on special needs instruction and technology: (1) "Hawaii Special Education Teacher Induction" (Kalena Oliva and Quinn Avery); (2) "The Impact of Group v Individual Use of Hypermedia-Based Instruction" (Lewis R. Johnson, Louis P. Semrau, and Gail E. Fitzgerald); (3) "Assistive Technology Meets…

  14. Quantitative structure-activity relationship modelling of oral acute toxicity and cytotoxic activity of fragrance materials in rodents.

    PubMed

    Papa, E; Luini, M; Gramatica, P

    2009-10-01

    Fragrance materials are used as ingredients in many consumer and personal care products. The wide and daily use of these substances, as well as their mainly uncontrolled discharge through domestic sewage, make fragrance materials both potential indoor and outdoor air pollutants which are also connected to possible toxic effects on humans (asthma, allergies, headaches). Unfortunately, little is known about the environmental fate and toxicity of these substances. However, the use of alternative, predictive approaches, such as quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs), can help in filling the data gap and in the characterization of the environmental and toxicological profile of these substances. In the proposed study, ordinary least squares regression-based QSAR models were developed for three toxicological endpoints: mouse oral LD(50), inhibition of NADH-oxidase (EC(50) NADH-Ox) and the effect on mitochondrial membrane potential (EC(50) DeltaPsim). Theoretical molecular descriptors were calculated by using DRAGON software, and the best QSAR models were developed according to the principles defined by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development.

  15. A Promotion Program of Academic-Industrial Collaboration with Active and Joint Participation by Technical College Students Utilizing the Support Program for Contemporary Educational Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusaki, Tsuyoshi; Ueda, Shigeta; Kojima, Yoichiro; Ikeda, Shin-Ichi; Abe, Tsukasa; Yoshizawa, Kousuke; Tada, Mitsuhiro

    Since 2005, Tomakomai National College of Technology has been conducting “A Promotion Program of Academic-Industrial Collaboration with Active and Joint Participation by Technical College Students” , in which the students actively challenged to resolve technical problems of local companies through internships and graduation researches. This project was adopted as part of the Support Program for Contemporary Educational Needs by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. It has been revealed that the program is practical and effective engineering education for the students, i.e. “Future Engineers” . In addition, it leads to the revitalization of local companies which carried out collaborative researches with the participating students.

  16. Scarcity of HIV-AIDS Risk-Reduction Materials Targeting the Needs of Older Adults among State Departments of Public Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orel, Nancy A.; Wright, Jeanne M.; Wagner, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the availability of printed human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) education/prevention materials from state departments of public health within the United States, which specifically targeted the older adult population. Information on HIV/AIDS from public health departments in each of…

  17. History and Status of Vernacular School Materials and Instruction in the Micronesian Region, with Comments on Literacy and Emerging Local Educational Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Mary L.

    A discussion of vernacular instruction and instructional materials in Micronesia, a group of Western Pacific islands north of the equator, chronicles the development and recent history of vernacular and English literacy, reports on historical and contemporary efforts to develop a written vernacular, and documents the status of oral and literacy…

  18. Low-background instrumental neutron activation analysis of silicon semiconductor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.R.; McDonald, R.J.; Manini, H.; Hurley, D.L.; Norman, E.B.; Vella, M.C.; Odom, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Samples of silicon wafers, some implanted with zinc, some with memory circuits fabricated on them, and some with oxide coatings were activated with neutrons and analyzed for trace element impurities with low-background germanium gamma-ray spectrometers. Results are presented for these samples as well as for a reference material. Because the silicon matrix activation is so small, reduced spectrometer system background permits the detection of significantly lower impurity concentrations than would otherwise be possible. For the highest efficiency and lowest background system, limits on the lowest levels of trace element concentrations have been measured for wafer sized (1 to 10 g) samples and inferred for bulk sized (365 g) samples. For wafer-sized samples, part-per-trillion detection capabilities are demonstrated for a variety of elemental contaminants important in semiconductor fabrication.

  19. [Daptomycin: revitalizing a former drug due to the need of new active agents against grampositive multiresistant bacterias].

    PubMed

    Hernández Martí, V; Romá Sánchez, E; Salavert Lletí, M; Bosó Ribelles, V; Poveda Andrés, J L

    2007-09-01

    The development of mechanisms of resistance of many Gram-positive bacterial strains that cause complicated skin and soft tissue infections, as well as sepsis and bacteremia, has necessitated the search for new drugs that will improve treatment strategies. Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide antibacterial that was launched for the treatment of complicated skin and soft tissue infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. The drug's mechanism of action is different from that of any other antibiotic. It binds to bacterial membranes and causes a rapid depolarization of membrane potential. This loss of membrane potential causes inhibition of protein, DNA and RNA synthesis, which results in bacterial cell death. The in vitro spectrum of activity of daptomycin encompasses most clinically relevant aerobic Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria. Compared to other antibiotics with a similar antibacterial spectrum, daptomycin does not cause nephrotoxicity. Taking these and other characteristics into consideration, daptomycin appears to be a good alternative to other drugs used in the treatment of complicated skin and soft tissue infections and in Gram-positive bacteremial infections.

  20. Characterizing proton-activated materials to develop PET-mediated proton range verification markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Kerr, Matthew D.; Amos, Richard A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Marom, Edith M.; Truong, Mylene T.; Palacio, Diana M.; Betancourt, Sonia L.; Erasmus, Jeremy J.; DeGroot, Patricia M.; Carter, Brett W.; Gladish, Gregory W.; Sabloff, Bradley S.; Benveniste, Marcelo F.; Godoy, Myrna C.; Patil, Shekhar; Sorensen, James; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2016-06-01

    Conventional proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) relies on tissue activation alone and therefore requires particle therapy PET whose installation can represent a large financial burden for many centers. Previously, we showed the feasibility of developing patient implantable markers using high proton cross-section materials (18O, Cu, and 68Zn) for in vivo proton range verification using conventional PET scanners. In this technical note, we characterize those materials to test their usability in more clinically relevant conditions. Two phantoms made of low-density balsa wood (~0.1 g cm‑3) and beef (~1.0 g cm‑3) were embedded with Cu or 68Zn foils of several volumes (10–50 mm3). The metal foils were positioned at several depths in the dose fall-off region, which had been determined from our previous study. The phantoms were then irradiated with different proton doses (1–5 Gy). After irradiation, the phantoms with the embedded foils were moved to a diagnostic PET scanner and imaged. The acquired data were reconstructed with 20–40 min of scan time using various delay times (30–150 min) to determine the maximum contrast-to-noise ratio. The resultant PET/computed tomography (CT) fusion images of the activated foils were then examined and the foils’ PET signal strength/visibility was scored on a 5 point scale by 13 radiologists experienced in nuclear medicine. For both phantoms, the visibility of activated foils increased in proportion to the foil volume, dose, and PET scan time. A linear model was constructed with visibility scores as the response variable and all other factors (marker material, phantom material, dose, and PET scan time) as covariates. Using the linear model, volumes of foils that provided adequate visibility (score 3) were determined for each dose and PET scan time. The foil volumes that were determined will be used as a guideline in developing practical implantable markers.