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Sample records for activity median aerodynamic

  1. A correlation equation for the mass median aerodynamic diameter of the aerosol emitted by solution metered dose inhalers.

    PubMed

    Ivey, James W; Lewis, David; Church, Tanya; Finlay, Warren H; Vehring, Reinhard

    2014-04-25

    A correlation equation for the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of the aerosol emitted by solution metered dose inhalers (MDIs) is presented. A content equivalent diameter is defined and used to describe aerosols generated by evaporating metered dose inhaler sprays. A large set of cascade impaction data is analyzed, and the MMAD and geometric standard deviation is calculated for each datum. Using dimensional analysis, the mass median content equivalent diameter is correlated with formulation variables. Based on this correlation in combination with mass balance considerations and the definition of the aerodynamic diameter, an equation for prediction of the MMAD of an inhaler given the pressure of the propellant in the metering chamber of the MDI valve and the surface tension of the propellant is derived. The accuracy of the correlation equation is verified by comparison with literature results. The equation is applicable to both HFA (hydrofluoroalkane) propellants 134a and 227ea, with varying levels of co-solvent ethanol.

  2. Aerodynamic Control using Distributed Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    The global aerodynamic loads on a stationary and pitching airfoil at angles of attack beyond the static and dynamic stall margins, respectively are controlled in wind tunnel experiments using regulated distributed bleed driven by surface pressure differences. High-speed PIV and proper orthogonal decomposition of the vorticity flux on the static airfoil show that the bleed engenders trains of discrete vortices that advect along the surface and are associated with a local instability that is manifested by a time-averaged bifurcation of the vorticity layer near the bleed outlets and alters the vorticity flux over the airfoil and thereby the aerodynamic loads. Active bleed is used on a dynamically pitching airfoil (at reduced frequencies up to k = 0.42) to modulate the evolution of vorticity concentrations during dynamic stall. Time-periodic bleed improved the pitch stability by reducing adverse pitching moment (``negative damping'') that can precipitate structural instabilities. At the same time, the maintains the cycle-average loads to within 5% of the base flow levels by segmenting the vorticity layer during upstroke and promoting early flow attachment during downstroke segments of the pitch cycle. Supported by Georgia Tech VLRCOE.

  3. Advanced aerodynamics and active controls. Selected NASA research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Aerodynamic and active control concepts for application to commercial transport aircraft are discussed. Selected topics include in flight direct strike lightning research, triply redundant digital fly by wire control systems, tail configurations, winglets, and the drones for aerodynamic and structural testing (DAST) program.

  4. Active Control of Aerodynamic Noise Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Gregory A.

    2001-01-01

    Aerodynamic noise sources become important when propulsion noise is relatively low, as during aircraft landing. Under these conditions, aerodynamic noise from high-lift systems can be significant. The research program and accomplishments described here are directed toward reduction of this aerodynamic noise. Progress toward this objective include correction of flow quality in the Low Turbulence Water Channel flow facility, development of a test model and traversing mechanism, and improvement of the data acquisition and flow visualization capabilities in the Aero. & Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. These developments are described in this report.

  5. Learning Activities: Students and Recycling. [and] Automobile Aerodynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Charles H., Jr.; Schieber, Rich

    1994-01-01

    The first learning activity is intended to heighten students' awareness of the need for recycling, reuse, and reduction of materials; the second explores the aerodynamics of automobiles. Both include context, concept, objectives, procedure, and materials needed. (SK)

  6. Aerodynamic Characteristic of the Active Compliant Trailing Edge Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Rui; Qiu, Jinhao; Ji, Hongli; Li, Dawei

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces a novel Morphing Wing structure known as the Active Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE). ACTE structures are designed using the concept of “distributed compliance” and wing skins of ACTE are fabricated from high-strength fiberglass composites laminates. Through the relative sliding between upper and lower wing skins which are connected by a linear guide pairs, the wing is able to achieve a large continuous deformation. In order to present an investigation about aerodynamics and noise characteristics of ACTE, a series of 2D airfoil analyses are established. The aerodynamic characteristics between ACTE and conventional deflection airfoil are analyzed and compared, and the impacts of different ACTE structure design parameters on aerodynamic characteristics are discussed. The airfoils mentioned above include two types (NACA0012 and NACA64A005.92). The computing results demonstrate that: compared with the conventional plane flap airfoil, the morphing wing using ACTE structures has the capability to improve aerodynamic characteristic and flow separation characteristic. In order to study the noise level of ACTE, flow field analysis using LES model is done to provide noise source data, and then the FW-H method is used to get the far field noise levels. The simulation results show that: compared with the conventional flap/aileron airfoil, the ACTE configuration is better to suppress the flow separation and lower the overall sound pressure level.

  7. Aerodynamic Design Study of an Advanced Active Twist Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekula, Martin K.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Yeager, William T., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    An Advanced Active Twist Rotor (AATR) is currently being developed by the U.S. Army Vehicle Technology Directorate at NASA Langley Research Center. As a part of this effort, an analytical study was conducted to determine the impact of blade geometry on active-twist performance and, based on those findings, propose a candidate aerodynamic design for the AATR. The process began by creating a baseline design which combined the dynamic design of the original Active Twist Rotor and the aerodynamic design of a high lift rotor concept. The baseline model was used to conduct a series of parametric studies to examine the effect of linear blade twist and blade tip sweep, droop, and taper on active-twist performance. Rotor power requirements and hub vibration were also examined at flight conditions ranging from hover to advance ratio = 0.40. A total of 108 candidate designs were analyzed using the second-generation version of the Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics (CAMRAD II) code. The study concluded that the vibration reduction capabilities of a rotor utilizing controlled, strain-induced twisting are enhanced through the incorporation of blade tip sweep, droop, and taper into the blade design, while they are degraded by increasing the nose-down linear blade twist. Based on the analysis of rotor power, hub vibration, and active-twist response, a candidate aerodynamic design for the AATR consisting of a blade with approximately 10 degrees of linear blade twist and a blade tip design with 30 degree sweep, 10 degree droop, and 2.5:1 taper ratio over the outer five percent of the blade is proposed.

  8. Active aerodynamic control of wake-airfoil interaction noise - Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Lavrich, P. L.; Sofrin, T. G.; Topol, D. A.

    A proof of concept experiment is conducted that shows the potential for active aerodynamic control of rotor wake/stator interaction noise in a simplified manner. A single airfoil model representing the stator was fitted with a moveable trailing edge flap controlled by a servo motor. The control system moves the motor driven flap in the correct angular displacement phase and rate to reduce the unsteady load on the airfoil during the wake interaction.

  9. Geomagnetic activity that corresponds to the median of the F2-layer critical frequency at various latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deminov, M. G.; Deminova, G. F.

    2016-09-01

    On the basis of the F2-layer critical frequency foF2 for the noon at some European stations for 1958-2005, it is found that the geomagnetic activity corresponding to the foF2 median is systematically lower than that averaged over the month; the difference increases with an increase in latitude. Moreover, the dispersion of geomagnetic activity for the foF2 median at relatively high latitudes is lower than at middle latitudes. These regularities are related to the fact that high geomagnetic activity usually leads to a distinct deviation of foF2 from the typical average value, i.e., from the foF2 median, and such deviation is more substantial at relatively high latitudes. That is why the geomagnetic activity for the foF2 median is lower at relatively high latitudes than at middle latitudes.

  10. The Benchmark Active Controls Technology Model Aerodynamic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Robert C.; Hoadley, Sherwood T.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Durham, Michael H.

    1997-01-01

    The Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) model is a part of the Benchmark Models Program (BMP). The BMP is a NASA Langley Research Center program that includes a series of models which were used to study different aeroelastic phenomena and to validate computational fluid dynamics codes. The primary objective of BACT testing was to obtain steady and unsteady loads, accelerations, and aerodynamic pressures due to control surface activity in order to calibrate unsteady CFD codes and active control design tools. Three wind-tunnel tests in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) have been completed. The first and parts of the second and third tests focused on collecting open-loop data to define the model's aeroservoelastic characteristics, including the flutter boundary across the Mach range. It is this data that is being presented in this paper. An extensive database of over 3000 data sets was obtained. This database includes steady and unsteady control surface effectiveness data, including pressure distributions, control surface hinge moments, and overall model loads due to deflections of a trailing edge control surface and upper and lower surface

  11. Unsteady aerodynamic modeling for arbitrary motions. [for active control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Results indicating that unsteady aerodynamic loads derived under the assumption of simple harmonic motions executed by airfoil or wing can be extended to arbitrary motions are summarized. The generalized Theodorsen (1953) function referable to loads due to simple harmonic oscillations of a wing section in incompressible flow, the Laplace inversion integral for unsteady aerodynamic loads, calculations of root loci of aeroelastic loads, and analysis of generalized compressible transient airloads are discussed.

  12. Aerodynamic Control of a Pitching Airfoil using Distributed Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2012-11-01

    Aero-effected flight control using distributed active bleed driven by pressure differences across lifting surface and regulated by integrated louver actuators is investigated in wind tunnel experiments. The interaction between unsteady bleed and the cross flows alters the apparent aerodynamic shape of the lifting surface by regulating the accumulation and shedding of vorticity concentrations, and consequently the distributions of forces and moments. The present experiments are conducted using a 2-D dynamically-pitching VR-7 airfoil model from pre- to post-stall angles of attack. The effects of leading edge bleed at high angles of attack on the formation and evolution of the dynamic stall vorticity concentrations are investigated at high reduced frequencies (k > 0.1) using PIV phase-locked to the airfoil's motion. The time-dependent bleed enables broad-range variation in lift and pitching moment with significant extension of the stall margin. In particular, bleed actuation reduces the extent of ``negative damping'' or pitching moment instability with minimal lift penalty. Supported by NTRC-VLRCOE, monitored by Dr. Mike Rutkowski.

  13. Does an active adjustment of aerodynamic drag make sense?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Marek

    2016-09-01

    The article concerns evaluation of the possible impact of the gap between the tractor and semitrailer on the aerodynamic drag coefficient. The aim here is not to adjust this distance depending on the geometrical shape of the tractor and trailer, but depending solely on the speed of articulated vehicle. All the tests have form of numerical simulations. The method of simulation is briefly explained in the article. It considers various issues such as the range and objects of tests as well as the test conditions. The initial (pre-adaptive) and final (after adaptation process) computational meshes have been presented as illustrations. Some of the results have been presented in the form of run chart showing the change of value of aerodynamic drag coefficients in time, for different geometric configurations defined by a clearance gap between the tractor and semitrailer. The basis for a detailed analysis and conclusions were the averaged (in time) aerodynamic drag coefficients as a function of the clearance gap.

  14. Properties of the F2-layer critical frequency median in the nocturnal subauroral ionosphere during low and moderate solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deminov, M. G.; Deminov, R. G.; Shubin, V. N.

    2016-11-01

    Based on an analysis of data from the European ionospheric stations at subauroral latitudes, it has been found that the main ionospheric trough (MIT) is not characteristic for the monthly median of the F2-layer critical frequency ( foF2), at least for low and moderate solar activity. In order to explain this effect, the properties of foF2 in the nocturnal subauroral ionosphere have been additionally studied for low geomagnetic activity, when the MIT localization is known quite reliably. It has been found that at low and moderate solar activity during night hours in winter, the foF2 data from ionospheric stations are often absent in the MIT area. For this reason, a model of the foF2 monthly median, which was constructed from the remaining data of these stations, contains no MIT or a very weakly pronounced MIT.

  15. The Median-Median Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Graphing bivariate data in a scatter plot and drawing an approximate line of best fit for the data have become commonly recommended activities for middle school and high school students. The graphing calculator has provided a mechanism for students both to approximate a best-fit line and to calculate the best-fit line using a built-in option. Two…

  16. Hippocampal EEG and Unit Activity Responses to Modulation of Serotonergic Median Raphe Neurons in the Freely Behaving Rat

    PubMed Central

    Nitz, Douglas A.; McNaughton, Bruce L.

    1999-01-01

    Hippocampal EEG, GABAergic interneurons, and principal cells were recorded simultaneously as rats foraged within one of three environments both before and after modulation of serotonergic inputs to the hippocampus. Median raphe microinjections of the 5-HT1a receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT were made to produce inhibition of serotonergic neurons in this region. Such microinjections produced behavioral arousal and increases in the amplitude of hippocampal EEG theta. Consistent with the pattern of serotonergic innervation of the hippocampus, the GABAergic interneuron population was affected differentially by the microinjections. Principal cells were generally unaffected by the manipulation and maintained robust spatial firing correlates within the foraging environment. The results provide basic data on the relationship between serotonergic median raphe neurons and hippocampal activity in a behaving animal. The data suggest that behavioral responses to manipulation of the serotonergic system are mediated by brain regions other than the hippocampus or are mediated through changes in the activity of hippocampal interneurons. PMID:10327240

  17. X-38 NASA/DLR/ESA-Dassault Aviation Integrated Aerodynamic and Aerothermodynamic Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labbe, Steve G.; Perez, Leo F.; Fitzgerald, Steve; Longo, Jose; Rapuc, Marc; Molina, Rafael; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The characterization of the aeroshape selected for the X-38 [Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) demonstrator] is presently being performed as a cooperative endeavour between NASA, DLR (through its TETRA Program), and European Space Agency (ESA) with Dassault Aviation integrating the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic activities. The methodologies selected for characterizing the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic environment of the X-38 are presented. Also, the implications for related disciplines such as Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) with its corresponding Flight Control System (FCS), Structural, and Thermal Protection System (TPS) design are discussed. An attempt is made at defining the additional activities required to support the design of a derived operational CRV.

  18. Variable Camber Continuous Aerodynamic Control Surfaces and Methods for Active Wing Shaping Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An aerodynamic control apparatus for an air vehicle improves various aerodynamic performance metrics by employing multiple spanwise flap segments that jointly form a continuous or a piecewise continuous trailing edge to minimize drag induced by lift or vortices. At least one of the multiple spanwise flap segments includes a variable camber flap subsystem having multiple chordwise flap segments that may be independently actuated. Some embodiments also employ a continuous leading edge slat system that includes multiple spanwise slat segments, each of which has one or more chordwise slat segment. A method and an apparatus for implementing active control of a wing shape are also described and include the determination of desired lift distribution to determine the improved aerodynamic deflection of the wings. Flap deflections are determined and control signals are generated to actively control the wing shape to approximate the desired deflection.

  19. Estimating the voltage-dependent free energy change of ion channels using the median voltage for activation.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Sandipan; Chanda, Baron

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are crucial for electrical activity and chemical signaling in a variety of cell types. Structure-activity studies involving electrophysiological characterization of mutants are widely used and allow us to quickly realize the energetic effects of a mutation by measuring macroscopic currents and fitting the observed voltage dependence of conductance to a Boltzmann equation. However, such an approach is somewhat limiting, principally because of the inherent assumption that the channel activation is a two-state process. In this analysis, we show that the area delineated by the gating charge displacement curve and its ordinate axis is related to the free energy of activation of a voltage-gated ion channel. We derive a parameter, the median voltage of charge transfer (V(m)), which is proportional to this area, and prove that the chemical component of free energy change of a system can be obtained from the knowledge of V(m) and the maximum number of charges transferred. Our method is not constrained by the number or connectivity of intermediate states and is applicable to instances in which the observed responses show a multiphasic behavior. We consider various models of ion channel gating with voltage-dependent steps, latent charge movement, inactivation, etc. and discuss the applicability of this approach in each case. Notably, our method estimates a net free energy change of approximately -14 kcal/mol associated with the full-scale activation of the Shaker potassium channel, in contrast to -2 to -3 kcal/mol estimated from a single Boltzmann fit. Our estimate of the net free energy change in the system is consistent with those derived from detailed kinetic models (Zagotta et al. 1994. J. Gen. Physiol. doi:10.1085/jgp.103.2.321). The median voltage method can reliably quantify the magnitude of free energy change associated with activation of a voltage-dependent system from macroscopic equilibrium measurements. This will be particularly useful

  20. Computational investigation on the application of using microjets as active aerodynamic load control for wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaylock, Myra Louise

    A fast, efficient way to control loads on industrial scale turbines is important for the growth of the wind industry. Active Aerodynamic Load Control (AALC) is one area which addresses this need. In particular, microjets, which are pneumatic jets located at the trailing edge of a wind turbine blade and blow perpendicular to the blade surface, are a possible AALC candidate. First, the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver OVERFLOW is used to explore the effects of a microjet on lift, drag, and pitching moment. Then the interaction between an aerodynamic disturbance and an airfoil equipped with a microjet is modeled. The object of this dissertation is to investigate microtabs as viable AALC devices by presenting their aerodynamic properties and testing whether a proportional-integral (PI) controlled jets can alleviate loads caused by wind gusts. The use of CFD to simulate a microjet is validated by comparing the results to both previous experiments found in the literature as well as wind tunnel tests completed at UC Davis. The aerodynamic effectiveness of the jet is investigated as a function of various parameters such as Reynolds number, angle of attack, and the momentum coefficient of the jet. The effects of the microjet are found to be very similar to another AALC device, the microtab. An aerodynamic disturbance is simulated, and a control algorithm which is incorporated into the OVERFLOW code is used to activate the microjet, thus reducing the change of the blade load due to the gust. Finally, a more realistic model is made by adding both a linear and a torsional spring and damper to represent the blade movement. This two-degree of freedom system shows that during a gust the vertical blade movement is reduced when the microjets are activated. Microjets are found to work well to alleviate the changes in aerodynamic loads felt by the airfoil, and are therefore a good candidate for a practical AALC device. However, further investigation is needed in the areas of

  1. A Digital Program for Calculating the Interaction Between Flexible Structures, Unsteady Aerodynamics and Active Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peele, E. L.; Adams, W. M., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A computer program, ISAC, is described which calculates the stability and response of a flexible airplane equipped with active controls. The equations of motion relative to a fixed inertial coordinate system are formulated in terms of the airplane's rigid body motion and its unrestrained normal vibration modes. Unsteady aerodynamic forces are derived from a doublet lattice lifting surface theory. The theoretical basis for the program is briefly explained together with a description of input data and output results.

  2. Selected advanced aerodynamic and active control concepts development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A summary is presented of results obtained during analysis, design and test activities on six selected technical tasks directed at exploratory improvement of fuel efficiency for new and derivative transports. The work included investigations into the potential offered by natural laminar flow, improved surface coatings and advanced high lift concepts. Similar investigations covering optimum low-energy flight path control, integrated application of active controls and evaluation of primary flight control systems reliability and maintenance are also summarized. Recommendations are included for future work needed to exploit potential advancements.

  3. Progressive failure during the 1596 Keicho earthquakes on the Median Tectonic Line active fault zone, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, M.; Toda, S.; Nishizaka, N.; Onishi, K.; Suzuki, S.

    2015-12-01

    Rupture patterns of a long fault system are controlled by spatial heterogeneity of fault strength and stress associated with geometrical characteristics and stress perturbation history. Mechanical process for sequential ruptures and multiple simultaneous ruptures, one of the characteristics of a long fault such as the North Anatolian fault, governs the size and frequency of large earthquakes. Here we introduce one of the cases in southwest Japan and explore what controls rupture initiation, sequential ruptures and fault branching on a long fault system. The Median Tectonic Line active fault zone (hereinafter MTL) is the longest and most active fault in Japan. Based on historical accounts, a series of M ≥ 7 earthquakes occurred on at least a 300-km-long portion of the MTL in 1596. On September 1, the first event occurred on the Kawakami fault segment, in Central Shikoku, and the subsequent events occurred further west. Then on September 5, another rupture initiated from the Central to East Shikoku and then propagated toward the Rokko-Awaji fault zone to Kobe, a northern branch of the MTL, instead of the eastern main extent of the MTL. Another rupture eventually extended to near Kyoto. To reproduce this progressive failure, we applied two numerical models: one is a coulomb stress transfer; the other is a slip-tendency analysis under the tectonic stress. We found that Coulomb stress imparted from historical ruptures have triggered the subsequent ruptures nearby. However, stress transfer does not explain beginning of the sequence and rupture directivities. Instead, calculated slip-tendency values show highly variable along the MTL: high and low seismic potential in West and East Shikoku. The initiation point of the 1596 progressive failure locates near the boundary in the slip-tendency values. Furthermore, the slip-tendency on the Rokko-Awaji fault zone is far higher than that of the MTL in Wakayama, which may explain the rupture directivity toward Kobe-Kyoto.

  4. Mechanisms of Active Aerodynamic Load Reduction on a Rotorcraft Fuselage With Rotor Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffler, Norman W.; Allan, Brian G.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Bartram, Scott M.; Mace, W. Derry; Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    The reduction of the aerodynamic load that acts on a generic rotorcraft fuselage by the application of active flow control was investigated in a wind tunnel test conducted on an approximately 1/3-scale powered rotorcraft model simulating forward flight. The aerodynamic mechanisms that make these reductions, in both the drag and the download, possible were examined in detail through the use of the measured surface pressure distribution on the fuselage, velocity field measurements made in the wake directly behind the ramp of the fuselage and computational simulations. The fuselage tested was the ROBIN-mod7, which was equipped with a series of eight slots located on the ramp section through which flow control excitation was introduced. These slots were arranged in a U-shaped pattern located slightly downstream of the baseline separation line and parallel to it. The flow control excitation took the form of either synthetic jets, also known as zero-net-mass-flux blowing, and steady blowing. The same set of slots were used for both types of excitation. The differences between the two excitation types and between flow control excitation from different combinations of slots were examined. The flow control is shown to alter the size of the wake and its trajectory relative to the ramp and the tailboom and it is these changes to the wake that result in a reduction in the aerodynamic load.

  5. On the aerodynamics and performance of active vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Ron; Farokhi, Saeed

    1993-01-01

    As a building block in the development of smart lift-enhancement devices, a new concept for flow control using active vortex generators (AVGs) is presented. Ramp, wedge, and doublet wedge (Wheeler) VG configurations are investigated. The AVGs are designed to conform to the surface of the wing section at low alpha. As the section approaches the stall, they are deployed and accordingly, alpha(stall) and C(lmax) are increased. A qualitative analysis of the flow around the various VG configurations was conducted in a low speed wind tunnel at 1.6 ft/s and a Reynolds number of approximately 3400. The results demonstrate that ramp VGs produce vortices that have the longest distance at breakdown. The VGs were also applied to a 25-in. span, 8-in. chord NACA 4415 wing section. Optimization studies were conducted on the spanwise spacing, chordwise position, and size of statically deployed VGs. The test results demonstrate a 14-percent increase in C(lmax) while increasing alpha (stall) by up to 3.

  6. Benchmarking aerodynamic prediction of unsteady rotor aerodynamics of active flaps on wind turbine blades using ranging fidelity tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlas, Thanasis; Jost, Eva; Pirrung, Georg; Tsiantas, Theofanis; Riziotis, Vasilis; Navalkar, Sachin T.; Lutz, Thorsten; van Wingerden, Jan-Willem

    2016-09-01

    Simulations of a stiff rotor configuration of the DTU 10MW Reference Wind Turbine are performed in order to assess the impact of prescribed flap motion on the aerodynamic loads on a blade sectional and rotor integral level. Results of the engineering models used by DTU (HAWC2), TUDelft (Bladed) and NTUA (hGAST) are compared to the CFD predictions of USTUTT-IAG (FLOWer). Results show fairly good comparison in terms of axial loading, while alignment of tangential and drag-related forces across the numerical codes needs to be improved, together with unsteady corrections associated with rotor wake dynamics. The use of a new wake model in HAWC2 shows considerable accuracy improvements.

  7. Building Integrated Active Flow Control: Improving the Aerodynamic Performance of Tall Buildings Using Fluid-Based Aerodynamic Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menicovich, David

    material and energy consumption profiles of tall building. To date, the increasing use of light-weight and high-strength materials in tall buildings, with greater flexibility and reduced damping, has increased susceptibility to dynamic wind load effects that limit the gains afforded by incorporating these new materials. Wind, particularly fluctuating wind and its interaction with buildings induces two main responses; alongwind - in the direction of the flow and crosswind - perpendicular to the flow. The main risk associated with this vulnerability is resonant oscillations induced by von-Karman-like vortex shedding at or near the natural frequency of the structure caused by flow separation. Dynamic wind loading effects often increase with a power of wind speed greater than 3, thus increasingly, tall buildings pay a significant price in material to increase the natural frequency and/or the damping to overcome this response. In particular, crosswind response often governs serviceability (human habitability) design criteria of slender buildings. Currently, reducing crosswind response relies on a Solid-based Aerodynamic Modification (SAM), either by changing structural or geometric characteristics such as the tower shape or through the addition of damping systems. While this approach has merit it has two major drawbacks: firstly, the loss of valuable rentable areas and high construction costs due to increased structural requirements for mass and stiffness, further contributing towards the high consumption of non-renewable resources by the commercial building sector. For example, in order to insure human comfort within an acceptable range of crosswind response induced accelerations at the top of a building, an aerodynamically efficient plan shape comes at the expense of floor area. To compensate for the loss of valuable area compensatory stories are required, resulting in an increase in wind loads and construction costs. Secondly, a limited, if at all, ability to adaptively

  8. Control of Pitching Airfoil Aerodynamics by Vorticity Flux Modification using Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2014-11-01

    Distributed active bleed driven by pressure differences across a pitching airfoil is used to regulate the vorticity flux over the airfoil's surface and thereby to control aerodynamic loads in wind tunnel experiments. The range of pitch angles is varied beyond the static stall margin of the 2-D VR-7 airfoil at reduced pitching rates up to k = 0.42. Bleed is regulated dynamically using piezoelectric louvers between the model's pressure side near the trailing edge and the suction surface near the leading edge. The time-dependent evolution of vorticity concentrations over the airfoil and in the wake during the pitch cycle is investigated using high-speed PIV and the aerodynamic forces and moments are measured using integrated load cells. The timing of the dynamic stall vorticity flux into the near wake and its effect on the flow field are analyzed in the presence and absence of bleed using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). It is shown that bleed actuation alters the production, accumulation, and advection of vorticity concentrations near the surface with significant effects on the evolution, and, in particular, the timing of dynamic stall vortices. These changes are manifested by alteration of the lift hysteresis and improvement of pitch stability during the cycle, while maintaining cycle-averaged lift to within 5% of the base flow level with significant implications for improvement of the stability of flexible wings and rotor blades. This work is supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  9. Selected advanced aerodynamics and active controls technology concepts development on a derivative B-747

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of applying wing tip extensions, winglets, and active control wing load alleviation to the Boeing 747 is investigated. Winglet aerodynamic design methods and high speed wind tunnel test results of winglets and of symmetrically deflected ailerons are presented. Structural resizing analyses to determine weight and aeroelastic twist increments for all the concepts and flutter model test results for the wing with winglets are included. Control law development, system mechanization/reliability studies, and aileron balance tab trade studies for active wing load alleviation systems are discussed. Results are presented in the form of incremental effects on L/D, structural weight, block fuel savings, stability and control, airplane price, and airline operating economics.

  10. Human cortical potentials evoked by stimulation of the median nerve. II. Cytoarchitectonic areas generating long-latency activity.

    PubMed

    Allison, T; McCarthy, G; Wood, C C; Williamson, P D; Spencer, D D

    1989-09-01

    1. The anatomic generators of human median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) in the 40 to 250-ms latency range were investigated in 54 patients by means of cortical-surface and transcortical recordings obtained during neurosurgery. 2. Contralateral stimulation evoked three groups of SEPs recorded from the hand representation area of sensorimotor cortex: P45-N80-P180, recorded anterior to the central sulcus (CS) and maximal on the precentral gyrus; N45-P80-N180, recorded posterior to the CS and maximal on the postcentral gyrus; and P50-N90-P190, recorded near and on either side of the CS. 3. P45-N80-P180 inverted in polarity to N45-P80-N180 across the CS but was similar in polarity from the cortical surface and white matter in transcortical recordings. These spatial distributions were similar to those of the short-latency P20-N30 and N20-P30 potentials described in the preceding paper, suggesting that these long-latency potentials are generated in area 3b of somatosensory cortex. 4. P50-N90-P190 was largest over the anterior one-half of somatosensory cortex and did not show polarity inversion across the CS. This spatial distribution was similar to that of the short-latency P25-N35 potentials described in the preceding paper and, together with our and Goldring et al. 1970; Stohr and Goldring 1969 transcortical recordings, suggest that these long-latency potentials are generated in area 1 of somatosensory cortex. 5. SEPs of apparently local origin were recorded from several regions of sensorimotor cortex to stimulation of the ipsilateral median nerve. Surface and transcortical recordings suggest that the ipsilateral potentials are generated not in area 3b, but rather in other regions of sensorimotor cortex perhaps including areas 4, 1, 2, and 7. This spatial distribution suggests that the ipsilateral potentials are generated by transcallosal input from the contralateral hemisphere. 6. Recordings from the periSylvian region were characterized by P100 and N

  11. Human cortical potentials evoked by stimulation of the median nerve. I. Cytoarchitectonic areas generating short-latency activity.

    PubMed

    Allison, T; McCarthy, G; Wood, C C; Darcey, T M; Spencer, D D; Williamson, P D

    1989-09-01

    1. The anatomic generators of human median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) in the 40 to 250-ms latency range were investigated in 54 patients by means of cortical-surface and transcortical recordings obtained during neurosurgery. 2. Contralateral stimulation evoked three groups of SEPs recorded from the hand representation area of sensorimotor cortex: P45-N80-P180, recorded anterior to the central sulcus (CS) and maximal on the precentral gyrus; N45-P80-N180, recorded posterior to the CS and maximal on the postcentral gyrus; and P50-N90-P190, recorded near and on either side of the CS. 3. P45-N80-P180 inverted in polarity to N45-P80-N180 across the CS but was similar in polarity from the cortical surface and white matter in transcortical recordings. These spatial distributions were similar to those of the short-latency P20-N30 and N20-P30 potentials described in the preceding paper, suggesting that these long-latency potentials are generated in area 3b of somatosensory cortex. 4. P50-N90-P190 was largest over the anterior one-half of somatosensory cortex and did not show polarity inversion across the CS. This spatial distribution was similar to that of the short-latency P25-N35 potentials described in the preceding paper and, together with our and Goldring et al. 1970; Stohr and Goldring 1969 transcortical recordings, suggest that these long-latency potentials are generated in area 1 of somatosensory cortex. 5. SEPs of apparently local origin were recorded from several regions of sensorimotor cortex to stimulation of the ipsilateral median nerve. Surface and transcortical recordings suggest that the ipsilateral potentials are generated not in area 3b, but rather in other regions of sensorimotor cortex perhaps including areas 4, 1, 2, and 7. This spatial distribution suggests that the ipsilateral potentials are generated by transcallosal input from the contralateral hemisphere. 6. Recordings from the periSylvian region were characterized by P100 and N

  12. PREFACE: Aerodynamic sound Aerodynamic sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishita, Sadao

    2010-02-01

    reduction of bluff-body noise. Xiaoyu Wang and Xiaofeng Sun discuss the interaction of fan stator and acoustic treatments using the transfer element method. S Saito and his colleagues in JAXA report the development of active devices for reducing helicopter noise. The paper by A Tamura and M Tsutahara proposes a brand new methodology for aerodynamic sound by applying the lattice Boltzmann finite difference method. As the method solves the fluctuation of air density directly, it has the advantage of not requiring modeling of the sound generation. M A Langthjem and M Nakano solve the hole-tone feedback cycle in jet flow by a numerical method. Y Ogami and S Akishita propose the application of a line-vortex method to the three-dimensional separated flow from a bluff body. I hope that a second issue on aerodynamic sound will be published in FDR in the not too distant future.

  13. Handling and safety enhancement of race cars using active aerodynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diba, Fereydoon; Barari, Ahmad; Esmailzadeh, Ebrahim

    2014-09-01

    A methodology is presented in this work that employs the active inverted wings to enhance the road holding by increasing the downward force on the tyres. In the proposed active system, the angles of attack of the vehicle's wings are adjusted by using a real-time controller to increase the road holding and hence improve the vehicle handling. The handling of the race car and safety of the driver are two important concerns in the design of race cars. The handling of a vehicle depends on the dynamic capabilities of the vehicle and also the pneumatic tyres' limitations. The vehicle side-slip angle, as a measure of the vehicle dynamic safety, should be narrowed into an acceptable range. This paper demonstrates that active inverted wings can provide noteworthy dynamic capabilities and enhance the safety features of race cars. Detailed analytical study and formulations of the race car nonlinear model with the airfoils are presented. Computer simulations are carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed active aerodynamic system.

  14. Analysis of dimensions, activation and median frequency of cervical flexor muscles in young women with migraine or tension-type headache

    PubMed Central

    Wanderley, Débora; Moura, Alberto G.; Costa, Joaquim J. S.; Siqueira, Gisela R.; de Oliveira, Daniella A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Central and peripheral mechanisms may be involved in migraine and tension-type headache pathogenesis, however the role of muscle disorders in their pathophysiological mechanisms remains unclear. Objectives: To assess the association between the presence of migraine or tension-type headache and changes in longus colli muscle dimensions and sternocleidomastoid muscle activity. Method: An observational study with 48 women comparing the following groups: migraine (n=21), tension-type headache (n=16), and control (n=11). The cross-sectional area, lateral and anteroposterior dimensions, and shape ratio of the longus colli muscle were measured using ultrasound. The activation of the sternocleidomastoid muscle was assessed by signal amplitude and the decline in median frequency using surface electromyographic analysis. Results: The dimensions of the longus colli muscle did not differ between groups (p>0.05). Post-test analysis showed lower sternocleidomastoid muscle activation on both sides, at the onset of contraction, in the group with tension-type headache when compared to the control group {right sternocleidomastoid [tension-type headache: 0.39 (0.30-0.49); control: 0.58 (0.42-0.76); p=0.026] and left sternocleidomastoid [tension-type headache: 0.39 (0.31-0.48); control: 0.60 (0.42-0.79); p=0.039], Tukey's post hoc test}. There was no difference between the three groups in sternocleidomastoid muscle activation, on both sides, at the end of contraction (p>0.05). Intergroup analysis showed no difference in the rate of decline in median frequency (p>0.05). Conclusion: The group with tension-type headache exhibited less activation at the onset of sternocleidomastoid muscle contraction. No association was observed between the presence of headache and alterations in longus colli muscle dimensions, median frequency, and sternocleidomastoid muscle activation at the end of contraction. PMID:26083605

  15. Divergent in vivo activity of non‐serotonergic and serotonergic VGluT3–neurones in the median raphe region

    PubMed Central

    Domonkos, Andor; Nikitidou Ledri, Litsa; Laszlovszky, Tamás; Cserép, Csaba; Borhegyi, Zsolt; Papp, Edit; Nyiri, Gábor; Freund, Tamás F.

    2016-01-01

    Key points The median raphe is a key subcortical modulatory centre involved in several brain functions, such as regulation of the sleep–wake cycle, emotions and memory storage.A large proportion of median raphe neurones are glutamatergic and implement a radically different mode of communication compared to serotonergic cells, although their in vivo activity is unknown.We provide the first description of the in vivo, brain state‐dependent firing properties of median raphe glutamatergic neurones identified by immunopositivity for the vesicular glutamate transporter type 3 (VGluT3) and serotonin (5‐HT). Glutamatergic populations (VGluT3+/5‐HT– and VGluT3+/5‐HT+) were compared with the purely serotonergic (VGluT3–/5‐HT+ and VGluT3–/5‐HT–) neurones.VGluT3+/5‐HT+ neurones fired similar to VGluT3–/5‐HT+ cells, whereas they significantly diverged from the VGluT3+/5‐HT– population. Activity of the latter subgroup resembled the spiking of VGluT3–/5‐HT– cells, except for their diverging response to sensory stimulation.The VGluT3+ population of the median raphe may broadcast rapidly varying signals on top of a state‐dependent, tonic modulation. Abstract Subcortical modulation is crucial for information processing in the cerebral cortex. Besides the canonical neuromodulators, glutamate has recently been identified as a key cotransmitter of numerous monoaminergic projections. In the median raphe, a pure glutamatergic neurone population projecting to limbic areas was also discovered with a possibly novel, yet undetermined function. In the present study, we report the first functional description of the vesicular glutamate transporter type 3 (VGluT3)‐expressing median raphe neurones. Because there is no appropriate genetic marker for the separation of serotonergic (5‐HT+) and non‐serotonergic (5‐HT–) VGluT3+ neurones, we utilized immunohistochemistry after recording and juxtacellular labelling in anaesthetized rats. VGluT3+/5

  16. Active Aerodynamic Load Reduction on a Rotorcraft Fuselage With Rotor Effects: A CFD Validation Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    A rotorcraft fuselage is typically designed with an emphasis on operational functionality with aerodynamic efficiency being of secondary importance. This results in a significant amount of drag during high-speed forward flight that can be a limiting factor for future high-speed rotorcraft designs. To enable higher speed flight, while maintaining a functional fuselage design (i.e., a large rear cargo ramp door), the NASA Rotary Wing Project has conducted both experimental and computational investigations to assess active flow control as an enabling technology for fuselage drag reduction. This paper will evaluate numerical simulations of a flow control system on a generic rotorcraft fuselage with a rotor in forward flight using OVERFLOW, a structured mesh Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver developed at NASA. The results are compared to fuselage forces, surface pressures, and PN flow field data obtained in a wind tunnel experiment conducted at the NASA Langley 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel where significant drag and download reductions were demonstrated using flow control. This comparison showed that the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver was unable to predict the fuselage forces and pressure measurements on the ramp for the baseline and flow control cases. While the CFD was able to capture the flow features, it was unable to accurately predict the performance of the flow control.

  17. Aerodynamic Performance of an Active Flow Control Configuration Using Unstructured-Grid RANS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Viken, Sally A.

    2001-01-01

    This research is focused on assessing the value of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methodology for active flow control applications. An experimental flow control database exists for a TAU0015 airfoil, which is a modification of a NACA0015 airfoil. The airfoil has discontinuities at the leading edge due to the implementation of a fluidic actuator and aft of mid chord on the upper surface. This paper documents two- and three-dimensional computational results for the baseline wing configuration (no control) with tile experimental results. The two-dimensional results suggest that the mid-chord discontinuity does not effect the aerodynamics of the wing and can be ignored for more efficient computations. The leading-edge discontinuity significantly affects tile lift and drag; hence, the integrity of the leading-edge notch discontinuity must be maintained in the computations to achieve a good match with the experimental data. The three-dimensional integrated performance results are in good agreement with the experiments inspite of some convergence and grid resolution issues.

  18. Crucifixion and median neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Jacqueline M; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Watson, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    Crucifixion as a means of torture and execution was first developed in the 6th century B.C. and remained popular for over 1000 years. Details of the practice, which claimed hundreds of thousands of lives, have intrigued scholars as historical records and archaeological findings from the era are limited. As a result, various aspects of crucifixion, including the type of crosses used, methods of securing victims to crosses, the length of time victims survived on the cross, and the exact mechanisms of death, remain topics of debate. One aspect of crucifixion not previously explored in detail is the characteristic hand posture often depicted in artistic renditions of crucifixion. In this posture, the hand is clenched in a peculiar and characteristic fashion: there is complete failure of flexion of the thumb and index finger with partial failure of flexion of the middle finger. Such a “crucified clench” is depicted across different cultures and from different eras. A review of crucifixion history and techniques, median nerve anatomy and function, and the historical artistic depiction of crucifixion was performed to support the hypothesis that the “crucified clench” results from proximal median neuropathy due to positioning on the cross, rather than from direct trauma of impalement of the hand or wrist. PMID:23785656

  19. Dynamic control of aerodynamic forces on a moving platform using active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, Daniel P.

    The unsteady interaction between trailing edge aerodynamic flow control and airfoil motion in pitch and plunge is investigated in wind tunnel experiments using a two degree-of-freedom traverse which enables application of time-dependent external torque and forces by servo motors. The global aerodynamic forces and moments are regulated by controlling vorticity generation and accumulation near the trailing edge of the airfoil using hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The dynamic coupling between the actuation and the time-dependent flow field is characterized using simultaneous force and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. The effect of the unsteady motion on the model-embedded flow control is assessed in both trajectory tracking and disturbance rejection maneuvers. The time-varying aerodynamic lift and pitching moment are estimated from a PIV wake survey using a reduced order model based on classical unsteady aerodynamic theory. These measurements suggest that the entire flow over the airfoil readjusts within 2--3 convective time scales, which is about two orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time associated with the controlled maneuver of the wind tunnel model. This illustrates that flow-control actuation can be typically effected on time scales that are commensurate with the flow's convective time scale, and that the maneuver response is primarily limited by the inertia of the platform.

  20. Structural and aerodynamic considerations of an active piezoelectric trailing-edge tab on a helicopter rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Gabriel Jon

    This dissertation is concerned with an active tab for use on a rotorcraft for noise and vibration reduction. The tab is located at the trailing edge of the airfoil. The tab consists of a shim sandwiched by layers of the piezoelectric actuators, macro fiber composites, of varying length. This configuration is similar to a bimorph. The modus operandi is similar to that of a trailing edge flap. The actuators deform the tab, bending it to achieve a tip displacement. This provides a change in the lift, moment, and drag coefficients of the airfoil. By actuating the system at 3/rev to 5/rev, reductions in noise and vibration can be realized. The system was examined and designed around using the UH-60 Blackhawk as the model rotorcraft. The tab is envisioned to operate between 65% to 85% of the main rotor span. The tab's chordwise dimensions considered were 20% and 15% of the blade chord. In order to assess the potential of the tab to change the lift and moment coefficients of the airfoil-tab system, a steady computational fluid dynamics study was conducted. The results were generated via the University of Maryland's Transonic Unsteady Navier-Stokes code. Various tab deflection angles, Mach numbers, and angle-of-attack values were computed. These results were compared to a trailing edge flap of similar size. The comparison shows that the tab produces lift and moment increments similar to that of the trailing edge flap. The design of the tab---composed of both active piezoelectric actuators and passive materials---was conducted using finite element analysis. The objectives were to maximize the tip deflection due to the actuators, while minimizing the deformation due to inertial and aerodynamic forces and loads. The inertial loads (acceleration terms) come from both blade motion, such as flapping and pitch, as well as the rotation of the rotor (centrifugal force). All of these previously mentioned terms cause the tab to undergo undesirable deflections. The original concept

  1. Application of the aerodynamic energy concept to flutter suppression and gust alleviation by use of active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Caspi, A.; Lottati, I.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of active controls on flutter suppression and gust alleviation of the Arava twin turboprop STOL transport and the Westwind twinjet business transport are investigated. The active control surfaces are introduced in pairs which include, in any chosen wing strip, a 20-percent chord leading-edge control and a 20-percent chord trailing-edge control. Each control surface is driven by a combined linear-rotational sensor system located on the activated strip. The control law is based on the concept of aerodynamic energy and utilizes previously optimized control law parameters based on two-dimensional aerodynamic theory. The best locations of the activated system along the span of the wing are determined for bending-moment alleviation, reduction in fuselage accelerations, and flutter suppression. The effectiveness of the activated system over a wide range of maximum control deflections is also determined. Two control laws are investigated. The first control law utilizes both rigid-body and elastic contributions of the motion. The second control law employs primarily the elastic contribution of the wing and leads to large increases in the activated control effectiveness as compared with the basic control law. The results indicate that flutter speed can be significantly increased (over 70 percent increase) and that the bending moment due to gust loading can be almost totally eliminated by a control system of about 10 to 20 percent span with reasonable control-surface rotations.

  2. Initial Aerodynamic and Acoustic Study of an Active Twist Rotor Using a Loosely Coupled CFD/CSD Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, David D. Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary aerodynamic and performance predictions for an active twist rotor for a HART-II type of configuration are performed using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, OVERFLOW2, and a computational structural dynamics (CSD) code, CAMRAD -II. These codes are loosely coupled to compute a consistent set of aerodynamics and elastic blade motions. Resultant aerodynamic and blade motion data are then used in the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkins solver, PSU-WOPWOP, to compute noise on an observer plane under the rotor. Active twist of the rotor blade is achieved in CAMRAD-II by application of a periodic torsional moment couple (of equal and opposite sign) at the blade root and tip at a specified frequency and amplitude. To provide confidence in these particular active twist predictions for which no measured data is available, the rotor system geometry and computational set up examined here are identical to that used in a previous successful Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) computational study. For a single frequency equal to three times the blade passage frequency (3P), active twist is applied across a range of control phase angles at two different amplitudes. Predicted results indicate that there are control phase angles where the maximum mid-frequency noise level and the 4P non -rotating hub vibrations can be reduced, potentially, both at the same time. However, these calculated reductions are predicted to come with a performance penalty in the form of a reduction in rotor lift-to-drag ratio due to an increase in rotor profile power.

  3. Development of the method of an electrohydrodynamic force effect on a boundary layer for active control of aerodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshin, B. S.; Khomich, V. Yu.; Chernyshev, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    The results of investigations on the possibility of an electrohydrodynamic force effect on a gas flow implemented with the help of a barrier discharge are presented. A new method of controlling the laminar flow around a base with suppression of instabilities of the incoming flow due to electrohydrodynamic force action on the boundary layer near the forward edge of a swept wing is proposed. An efficient multidischarge actuator system is developed and created for active control of aerodynamic flows with induced-air-flow characteristics exceeding the world analogues.

  4. Anomalous median nerve associated with persistent median artery.

    PubMed Central

    Sañudo, J R; Chikwe, J; Evans, S E

    1994-01-01

    A right human forearm showed persistence of the median artery in combination with anomalies of the median nerve and of the palmar circulation. The median nerve formed a ring enclosing the median artery, gave off its 3rd palmar digital branch in the forearm, and had a high palmar cutaneous nerve origin and a double thenar supply. The superficial palmar arch was incomplete. The median artery extended into the hand, providing the 2nd common palmar digital artery and the artery to the radial side of the index finger. It anastomosed with the radial artery in the 1st web space. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7961153

  5. A Review of Hypersonics Aerodynamics, Aerothermodynamics and Plasmadynamics Activities within NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, Manuel D.

    2007-01-01

    The research program of the aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics and plasmadynamics discipline of NASA's Hypersonic Project is reviewed. Details are provided for each of its three components: 1) development of physics-based models of non-equilibrium chemistry, surface catalytic effects, turbulence, transition and radiation; 2) development of advanced simulation tools to enable increased spatial and time accuracy, increased geometrical complexity, grid adaptation, increased physical-processes complexity, uncertainty quantification and error control; and 3) establishment of experimental databases from ground and flight experiments to develop better understanding of high-speed flows and to provide data to validate and guide the development of simulation tools.

  6. Active Aeroelastic Wing Aerodynamic Model Development and Validation for a Modified F/A-18A Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Diebler, Corey G.

    2005-01-01

    A new aerodynamic model has been developed and validated for a modified F/A-18A airplane used for the Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) research program. The goal of the program was to demonstrate the advantages of using the inherent flexibility of an aircraft to enhance its performance. The research airplane was an F/A-18A with wings modified to reduce stiffness and a new control system to increase control authority. There have been two flight phases. Data gathered from the first flight phase were used to create the new aerodynamic model. A maximum-likelihood output-error parameter estimation technique was used to obtain stability and control derivatives. The derivatives were incorporated into the National Aeronautics and Space Administration F-18 simulation, validated, and used to develop new AAW control laws. The second phase of flights was used to evaluate the handling qualities of the AAW airplane and the control law design process, and to further test the accuracy of the new model. The flight test envelope covered Mach numbers between 0.85 and 1.30 and dynamic pressures from 600 to 1250 pound-force per square foot. The results presented in this report demonstrate that a thorough parameter identification analysis can be used to improve upon models that were developed using other means. This report describes the parameter estimation technique used, details the validation techniques, discusses differences between previously existing F/A-18 models, and presents results from the second phase of research flights.

  7. A New Compendium of Unsteady Aerodynamic Test Cases for CFD: Summary of AVT WG-003 Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz-Calavera, Luis P.; Bennett, Robert; Fox, John H.; Galbraith, Robert W.; Geurts, Evert; Henshaw, Micahel J. deC.; Huang, XingZhong; Kaynes, Ian W.; Loeser, Thomas; Naudin, Pierre; Tamayama, Masato

    1999-01-01

    With the continuous progress in hardware and numerical schemes, Computational Unsteady Aerodynamics (CUA), that is, the application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to unsteady flowfields, is slowly finding its way as a useful and reliable tool (turbulence and transition modeling permitting) in the aircraft, helicopter, engine and missile design and development process. Before a specific code may be used with confidence it is essential to validate its capability to describe the physics of the flow correctly, or at least to the level of approximation required, for which purpose a comparison with accurate experimental data is needed. Unsteady wind tunnel testing is difficult and expensive; two factors which dramatically limit the number of organizations with the capability and/or resources to perform it. Thus, unsteady experimental data is scarce, often classified and scattered in diverse documents. Additionally, access to the reports does not necessarily assure access to the data itself. The collaborative effort described in this paper was conceived with the aim of collecting into a single easily accessible document as much quality data as possible. The idea is not new. In the early 80's NATO's AGARD (Advisory Group for Aerospace Research & Development) Structures and Material Panel (SMP) produced AGARD Report No. 702 "Compendium of Unsteady Aerodynamic Measurements", which has found and continues to find extensive use within the CUA Community. In 1995 AGARD's Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) decided to update and expand the former database with new geometries and physical phenomena, and launched Working Group WG-22 on "Validation Data for Computational Unsteady Aerodynamic Codes". Shortly afterwards AGARD was reorganized as the RTO (Research and Technology Organization) and the WG was renamed as AVT (Applied Vehicle Technolology) WG-003. Contributions were received from AEDC, BAe, DLR, DERA, Glasgow University, IAR, NAL, NASA, NLR, and ONERA. The final publication

  8. Aerodynamic aircraft design methods and their notable applications: Survey of the activity in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujii, Kozo; Takanashi, Susumu

    1991-01-01

    An overview of aerodynamic aircraft design methods and their recent applications in Japan is presented. A design code which was developed at the National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL) and is in use now is discussed, hence, most of the examples are the result of the collaborative work between heavy industry and the National Aerospace Laboratory. A wide variety of applications in transonic to supersonic flow regimes are presented. Although design of aircraft elements for external flows are the main focus, some of the internal flow applications are also presented. Recent applications of the design code, using the Navier Stokes and Euler equations in the analysis mode, include the design of HOPE (a space vehicle) and Upper Surface Blowing (USB) aircraft configurations.

  9. Applications of active magnetic bearings to high speed turbomachinery with aerodynamic rotor disturbance

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, R.R.; Bornstein, K.R.; Jayawant, R.A.C.; Leung, R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the application of Glacier magnetic bearings in three high speed turbomachinery applications. The three turbomachinery applications described are: (1) A single stage gas turbine coupled to a high frequency alternator for portable power generation. The gas turbine operating speed is 80,000 RPM and the magnetic bearings see temperatures in excess of 450{degrees}C due to the heat generation from combustion. (2) A single stage centrifugal compressor for impeller efficiency evaluation. The compressor is installed in a test loop and is driven with an electric motor through a step-up gearbox and the maximum speed is 23,000 RPM. (3) Two 600 KW turboexpanders with normal operating-speeds of 27,000 RPM. The turboexpanders are installed in tandem in an ethylene plant and are used for plant pressure control and efficiency enhancement. The expanders are designed for a 36,000 RPM overspeed and have been operated at 33,000 RPM. Each turbomachine generates unique, non-synchronous aerodynamically induced disturbances. Current aerodynamic technology does not allow the turbomachinery OEMs to accurately predict these disturbances. The magnetic bearing system monitoring capabilities are vital to characterize the disturbances and identify the control system optimization for attenuation of rotor response. Advantages of a velocity feedback control system are highlighted. The auxiliary bearing requirements for these high speed machines are severe with requirements for initial testing sometimes being more severe than normal operation. Each application uses a different embodiment of a self lubricated dry bushing type auxiliary bearing. Various aspects of these designs are presented.

  10. Chaff Aerodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-01

    further improve the contrast all of the interior surfaces of the test chamber are painted flat black and the bac!-,ground walls in view of the cameras...to be adequate to eliminate wall effects on the chaff aerodynamics. Secondly, the chamber air mass had to be sufficiently small that it would damp out...independently- supported special rotating-shutter system to "strobe" the dipole images. The integral shutter in each lens assembly is also retained for

  11. An IIR median hybrid filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Peter H.; Sartori, Michael A.; Bryden, Timothy M.

    1992-01-01

    A new class of nonlinear filters, the so-called class of multidirectional infinite impulse response median hybrid filters, is presented and analyzed. The input signal is processed twice using a linear shift-invariant infinite impulse response filtering module: once with normal causality and a second time with inverted causality. The final output of the MIMH filter is the median of the two-directional outputs and the original input signal. Thus, the MIMH filter is a concatenation of linear filtering and nonlinear filtering (a median filtering module). Because of this unique scheme, the MIMH filter possesses many desirable properties which are both proven and analyzed (including impulse removal, step preservation, and noise suppression). A comparison to other existing median type filters is also provided.

  12. Measurement of the underlying event activity in pp collisions at sqrt {s} = 0.9 and 7 TeV with the novel jet-area/median approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Teischinger, F.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Cerny, K.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Rios, A. A. Ocampo; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Martins, M. Correa; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. Fonseca; Figueiredo, D. Matos; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Da Silva, W. L. Prado; Santoro, A.; Amaral, S. M. Silva Do; Jorge, L. Soares; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Karadzhinova, A.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, S.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Kamel, A. Ellithi; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Czellar, S.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Sillou, D.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Karim, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Baty, C.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bedjidian, M.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Boumediene, D.; Brun, H.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Falkiewicz, A.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Le Grand, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.

    2012-08-01

    The first measurement of the charged component of the underlying event using the novel "jet-area/median" approach is presented for proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 0.9 and 7 TeV. The data were recorded in 2010 with the CMS experiment at the LHC. A new observable, sensitive to soft particle production, is introduced and investigated inclusively and as a function of the event scale defined by the transverse momentum of the leading jet. Various phenomenological models are compared to data, with and without corrections for detector effects. None of the examined models describe the data satisfactorily.

  13. GPU Accelerated Vector Median Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Noise reduction is an important step for most image processing tasks. For three channel color images, a widely used technique is vector median filter in which color values of pixels are treated as 3-component vectors. Vector median filters are computationally expensive; for a window size of n x n, each of the n(sup 2) vectors has to be compared with other n(sup 2) - 1 vectors in distances. General purpose computation on graphics processing units (GPUs) is the paradigm of utilizing high-performance many-core GPU architectures for computation tasks that are normally handled by CPUs. In this work. NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) paradigm is used to accelerate vector median filtering. which has to the best of our knowledge never been done before. The performance of GPU accelerated vector median filter is compared to that of the CPU and MPI-based versions for different image and window sizes, Initial findings of the study showed 100x improvement of performance of vector median filter implementation on GPUs over CPU implementations and further speed-up is expected after more extensive optimizations of the GPU algorithm .

  14. Lasers for median lobe hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Muschter, R; Gilling, A P

    2001-08-01

    Laser treatment encompases a variety of techniques using different laser wavelengths, application systems, and surgical techniques to achieve contrasting tissue effects such as incision, resection, vaporization, or coagulation. Many studies have proven the clinical efficacy of the various laser techniques for the treatment of benign prostatiuc hyperplasia, including randomized studies versus transurethral prostatectomy (TURP). Recently, long-term follow-up of up to 5 years has demonstrated the durability of the results, although in some of the studies, retreatment rates were higher than after TURP. Median lobes were never seen as a contraindication for treatment in the laser based procedures. Technically, laser treatment techniques such as side-firing transurethral coagulation, contact- and free-beam laser vaporization, interstitial laser coagulation, and the holmium laser-based resection and enucleation are fully suitable for treatment of median lobes. Surprisingly, no studies focussing specifically on laser treatment of median lobes have been published.

  15. Non-Local Euclidean Medians.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Kunal N; Singer, Amit

    2012-11-01

    In this letter, we note that the denoising performance of Non-Local Means (NLM) can be improved at large noise levels by replacing the mean by the Euclidean median. We call this new denoising algorithm the Non-Local Euclidean Medians (NLEM). At the heart of NLEM is the observation that the median is more robust to outliers than the mean. In particular, we provide a simple geometric insight that explains why NLEM performs better than NLM in the vicinity of edges, particularly at large noise levels. NLEM can be efficiently implemented using iteratively reweighted least squares, and its computational complexity is comparable to that of NLM. We provide some preliminary results to study the proposed algorithm and to compare it with NLM.

  16. Current research activities: Applied and numerical mathematics, fluid mechanics, experiments in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics including fluid dynamics, acoustics, and combustion, aerodynamics, and computer science during the period 1 Apr. 1992 - 30 Sep. 1992 is summarized.

  17. Parameter Estimation of Actuators for Benchmark Active Control Technology (BACT) Wind Tunnel Model with Analysis of Wear and Aerodynamic Loading Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Fung, Jimmy

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the development of transfer function models for the trailing-edge and upper and lower spoiler actuators of the Benchmark Active Control Technology (BACT) wind tunnel model for application to control system analysis and design. A simple nonlinear least-squares parameter estimation approach is applied to determine transfer function parameters from frequency response data. Unconstrained quasi-Newton minimization of weighted frequency response error was employed to estimate the transfer function parameters. An analysis of the behavior of the actuators over time to assess the effects of wear and aerodynamic load by using the transfer function models is also presented. The frequency responses indicate consistent actuator behavior throughout the wind tunnel test and only slight degradation in effectiveness due to aerodynamic hinge loading. The resulting actuator models have been used in design, analysis, and simulation of controllers for the BACT to successfully suppress flutter over a wide range of conditions.

  18. Investigation of Active Flow Control to Improve Aerodynamic Performance of Oscillating Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narducci, Robert P.; Bowersox, Rodney; Bussom, Richard; McVeigh, Michael; Raghu, Surya; White, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to design a promising active flow control concept on an oscillating airfoil for on-blade alleviation of dynamic stall. The concept must be designed for a range of representative Mach numbers (0.2 to 0.5) and representative reduced frequency characteristics of a full-scale rotorcraft. Specifications for a sweeping-jet actuator to mitigate the detrimental effects of retreating blade stall experienced by edgewise rotors in forward flight has been performed. Wind tunnel modifications have been designed to accommodate a 5x6 test section in the Oran W. Nicks Low Speed Wind Tunnel at Texas A&M University that will allow the tunnel to achieve Mach 0.5. The flow control design is for a two-dimensional oscillating VR-7 blade section with a 15- inch chord at rotor-relevant flow conditions covering the range of reduced frequencies from 0.0 to 0.15 and Mach numbers from 0.2 to 0.5. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to influence the placement of the flow control devices for optimal effectiveness.

  19. Classical Aerodynamic Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T. (Compiler)

    1979-01-01

    A collection of papers on modern theoretical aerodynamics is presented. Included are theories of incompressible potential flow and research on the aerodynamic forces on wing and wing sections of aircraft and on airship hulls.

  20. Aerodynamics at NASA JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicker, Darby

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing aerodynamics at NASA Johnson Space Center is shown. The topics include: 1) Personal Background; 2) Aerodynamic Tools; 3) The Overset Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Process; and 4) Recent Applicatoins.

  1. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Louis J.; Hessenius, Kristin A.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Hicks, Gary; Richardson, Pamela F.; Unger, George; Neumann, Benjamin; Moss, Jim

    1992-01-01

    The annual accomplishments is reviewed for the Aerodynamics Division during FY 1991. The program includes both fundamental and applied research directed at the full spectrum of aerospace vehicles, from rotorcraft to planetary entry probes. A comprehensive review is presented of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications; CFD validation; transition and turbulence physics; numerical aerodynamic simulation; test techniques and instrumentation; configuration aerodynamics; aeroacoustics; aerothermodynamics; hypersonics; subsonics; fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  2. NASA aerodynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Schairer, Edward; Hicks, Gary; Wander, Stephen; Blankson, Isiaiah; Rose, Raymond; Olson, Lawrence; Unger, George

    1990-01-01

    Presented here is a comprehensive review of the following aerodynamics elements: computational methods and applications, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation, transition and turbulence physics, numerical aerodynamic simulation, drag reduction, test techniques and instrumentation, configuration aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, aerothermodynamics, hypersonics, subsonic transport/commuter aviation, fighter/attack aircraft and rotorcraft.

  3. Configuration Aerodynamics: Past - Present - Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Bencze, Daniel P.; Kulfan, Robert M.; Wilson, Douglas L.

    1999-01-01

    The Configuration Aerodynamics (CA) element of the High Speed Research (HSR) program is managed by a joint NASA and Industry team, referred to as the Technology Integration Development (ITD) team. This team is responsible for the development of a broad range of technologies for improved aerodynamic performance and stability and control characteristics at subsonic to supersonic flight conditions. These objectives are pursued through the aggressive use of advanced experimental test techniques and state of the art computational methods. As the HSR program matures and transitions into the next phase the objectives of the Configuration Aerodynamics ITD are being refined to address the drag reduction needs and stability and control requirements of High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft. In addition, the experimental and computational tools are being refined and improved to meet these challenges. The presentation will review the work performed within the Configuration Aerodynamics element in 1994 and 1995 and then discuss the plans for the 1996-1998 time period. The final portion of the presentation will review several observations of the HSR program and the design activity within Configuration Aerodynamics.

  4. Transpiration Control Of Aerodynamics Via Porous Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.; Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1993-01-01

    Quasi-active porous surface used to control pressure loading on aerodynamic surface of aircraft or other vehicle, according to proposal. In transpiration control, one makes small additions of pressure and/or mass to cavity beneath surface of porous skin on aerodynamic surface, thereby affecting rate of transpiration through porous surface. Porous skin located on forebody or any other suitable aerodynamic surface, with cavity just below surface. Device based on concept extremely lightweight, mechanically simple, occupies little volume in vehicle, and extremely adaptable.

  5. Unsteady transonic aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, D.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on unsteady transonic aerodynamics are presented. The topics addressed include: physical phenomena associated with unsteady transonic flows, basic equations for unsteady transonic flow, practical problems concerning aircraft, basic numerical methods, computational methods for unsteady transonic flows, application of transonic flow analysis to helicopter rotor problems, unsteady aerodynamics for turbomachinery aeroelastic applications, alternative methods for modeling unsteady transonic flows.

  6. Uncertainty in Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.; Hemsch, M. J.; Morrison, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    An approach is presented to treat computational aerodynamics as a process, subject to the fundamental quality assurance principles of process control and process improvement. We consider several aspects affecting uncertainty for the computational aerodynamic process and present a set of stages to determine the level of management required to meet risk assumptions desired by the customer of the predictions.

  7. Iced-airfoil aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, M. B.; Broeren, A. P.; Blumenthal, L. A.

    2005-07-01

    Past research on airfoil aerodynamics in icing are reviewed. This review emphasizes the time period after the 1978 NASA Lewis workshop that initiated the modern icing research program at NASA and the current period after the 1994 ATR accident where aerodynamics research has been more aircraft safety focused. Research pre-1978 is also briefly reviewed. Following this review, our current knowledge of iced airfoil aerodynamics is presented from a flowfield-physics perspective. This article identifies four classes of ice accretions: roughness, horn ice, streamwise ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. For each class, the key flowfield features such as flowfield separation and reattachment are discussed and how these contribute to the known aerodynamic effects of these ice shapes. Finally Reynolds number and Mach number effects on iced-airfoil aerodynamics are summarized.

  8. Means for controlling aerodynamically induced twist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elber, W. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A control mechanism which provides active compensation for aerodynamically induced twist deformation of high aspect ratio wings consists of a torque tube, internal to each wing and rigidly attached near the tip of each wing, which is moved by an actuator located in the aircraft fuselage. As changes in the aerodynamic loads on the wings occur the torque tube is rotated to compensate for the induced wing twist.

  9. Switchable and Tunable Aerodynamic Drag on Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttag, Mark; Lopéz Jiménez, Francisco; Upadhyaya, Priyank; Kumar, Shanmugam; Reis, Pedro

    We report results on the performance of Smart Morphable Surfaces (Smporhs) that can be mounted onto cylindrical structures to actively reduce their aerodynamic drag. Our system comprises of an elastomeric thin shell with a series of carefully designed subsurface cavities that, once depressurized, lead to a dramatic deformation of the surface topography, on demand. Our design is inspired by the morphology of the giant cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) which possesses an array of axial grooves, thought to help reduce aerodynamic drag, thereby enhancing the structural robustness of the plant under wind loading. We perform systematic wind tunnel tests on cylinders covered with our Smorphs and characterize their aerodynamic performance. The switchable and tunable nature of our system offers substantial advantages for aerodynamic performance when compared to static topographies, due to their operation over a wider range of flow conditions.

  10. Switchable and Tunable Aerodynamic Drag on Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttag, Mark; Lopez Jimenez, Francisco; Reis, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    We report results on the performance of Smart Morphable Surfaces (Smporhs) that can be mounted onto cylindrical structures to actively reduce their aerodynamic drag. Our system comprises of an elastomeric thin shell with a series of carefully designed subsurface cavities that, once depressurized, lead to a dramatic deformation of the surface topography, on demand. Our design is inspired by the morphology of the giant cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) which possesses an array of axial grooves, which are thought to help reduce aerodynamic drag, thereby enhancing the structural robustness of the plant under wind loading. We perform systematic wind tunnel tests on cylinders covered with our Smorphs and characterize their aerodynamic performance. The switchable and tunable nature of our system offers substantial advantages for aerodynamic performance when compared to static topographies, due to their operation over a wider range of flow conditions.

  11. Adaptive marginal median filter for colour images.

    PubMed

    Morillas, Samuel; Gregori, Valentín; Sapena, Almanzor

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a new filter for impulse noise reduction in colour images which is aimed at improving the noise reduction capability of the classical vector median filter. The filter is inspired by the application of a vector marginal median filtering process over a selected group of pixels in each filtering window. This selection, which is based on the vector median, along with the application of the marginal median operation constitutes an adaptive process that leads to a more robust filter design. Also, the proposed method is able to process colour images without introducing colour artifacts. Experimental results show that the images filtered with the proposed method contain less noisy pixels than those obtained through the vector median filter.

  12. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  13. Aerodynamic Shutoff Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Raymond H.

    1992-01-01

    Aerodynamic flow achieved by adding fixed fairings to butterfly valve. When valve fully open, fairings align with butterfly and reduce wake. Butterfly free to turn, so valve can be closed, while fairings remain fixed. Design reduces turbulence in flow of air in internal suction system. Valve aids in development of improved porous-surface boundary-layer control system to reduce aerodynamic drag. Applications primarily aerospace. System adapted to boundary-layer control on high-speed land vehicles.

  14. Unsteady Aerodynamic Force Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2016-01-01

    , velocity, and acceleration sensors. This research demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining induced drag and lift forces through the use of distributed sensor technology with measured strain data. An active induced drag control system thus can be designed using the two computed aerodynamic forces, induced drag and lift, to improve the fuel efficiency of an aircraft. Interpolation elements between structural finite element grids and the CFD grids and centroids are successfully incorporated with the unsteady aeroelastic computation scheme. The most critical technology for the success of the proposed approach is the robust on-line parameter estimator, since the least-squares curve fitting method depends heavily on aeroelastic system frequencies and damping factors.

  15. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  16. Adaptive Mallow's optimization for weighted median filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachuri, Raghu; Rao, Sathyanarayana S.

    2002-05-01

    This work extends the idea of spectral optimization for the design of Weighted Median filters and employ adaptive filtering that updates the coefficients of the FIR filter from which the weights of the median filters are derived. Mallows' theory of non-linear smoothers [1] has proven to be of great theoretical significance providing simple design guidelines for non-linear smoothers. It allows us to find a set of positive weights for a WM filter whose sample selection probabilities (SSP's) are as close as possible to a SSP set predetermined by Mallow's. Sample selection probabilities have been used as a basis for designing stack smoothers as they give a measure of the filter's detail preserving ability and give non-negative filter weights. We will extend this idea to design weighted median filters admitting negative weights. The new method first finds the linear FIR filter coefficients adaptively, which are then used to determine the weights of the median filter. WM filters can be designed to have band-pass, high-pass as well as low-pass frequency characteristics. Unlike the linear filters, however, the weighted median filters are robust in the presence of impulsive noise, as shown by the simulation results.

  17. Applied computational aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    The present volume discusses the original development of the panel method, the mapping solutions and singularity distributions of linear potential schemes, the capabilities of full-potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes schemes, the use of the grid-generation methodology in applied aerodynamics, subsonic airfoil design, inverse airfoil design for transonic applications, the divergent trailing-edge airfoil innovation in CFD, Euler and potential computational results for selected aerodynamic configurations, and the application of CFD to wing high-lift systems. Also discussed are high-lift wing modifications for an advanced-capability EA-6B aircraft, Navier-Stokes methods for internal and integrated propulsion system flow predictions, the use of zonal techniques for analysis of rotor-stator interaction, CFD applications to complex configurations, CFD applications in component aerodynamic design of the V-22, Navier-Stokes computations of a complete F-16, CFD at supersonic/hypersonic speeds, and future CFD developments.

  18. Computational aerodynamics and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The role of computational aerodynamics in design is reviewed with attention given to the design process; the proper role of computations; the importance of calibration, interpretation, and verification; the usefulness of a given computational capability; and the marketing of new codes. Examples of computational aerodynamics in design are given with particular emphasis on the Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology. Finally, future prospects are noted, with consideration given to the role of advanced computers, advances in numerical solution techniques, turbulence models, complex geometries, and computational design procedures. Previously announced in STAR as N82-33348

  19. Nonlinear aerodynamic wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, Ellwood

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of new nonlinear theoretical techniques is demonstrated for supersonic wing design. The new technology was utilized to define outboard panels for an existing advanced tactical fighter model. Mach 1.6 maneuver point design and multi-operating point compromise surfaces were developed and tested. High aerodynamic efficiency was achieved at the design conditions. A corollary result was that only modest supersonic penalties were incurred to meet multiple aerodynamic requirements. The nonlinear potential analysis of a practical configuration arrangement correlated well with experimental data.

  20. Mean, Median and Mode from a Decision Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Melinda Miller; Scariano, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    The classroom activity described here allows mathematically mature students to explore the role of mean, median and mode in a decision-making environment. While students discover the importance of choosing a measure of central tendency, their understanding of probability distributions, maximization, and prediction is reinforced through active…

  1. Computer graphics in aerodynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cozzolongo, J. V.

    1984-01-01

    The use of computer graphics and its application to aerodynamic analyses on a routine basis is outlined. The mathematical modelling of the aircraft geometries and the shading technique implemented are discussed. Examples of computer graphics used to display aerodynamic flow field data and aircraft geometries are shown. A future need in computer graphics for aerodynamic analyses is addressed.

  2. Application of the aerodynamic energy concept to the selection of transfer functions for flutter suppression and gust alleviation using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1977-01-01

    Changes are introduced in the aerodynamic energy approach which lead to an increase in the effectiveness of both the trailing-edge (TE) and the leading-edge (LE)-TE control systems. Control laws are determined, using realizable transfer functions, which permit the introduction of aerodynamic damping and stiffness terms in accordance with the requirements of any specific system. It is shown that flutter suppression and gust alleviation problems can successfully be treated either by a TE or by a LE-TE control system. The results obtained are applicable to a very wide class of aircraft operating within the subsonic Mach number range.

  3. Median Citation Index vs Journal Impact Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonoyiannakis, Manolis

    2015-03-01

    The Journal Impact Factor is an arithmetic mean: It is the average number of citations, in a year, to a journal's articles that were published the previous two years. But for the vast majority of scholarly journals, the distribution of these citations is skewed (non-symmetric). We argue that a more representative member of the skewed distribution of citations is its median, not the mean. We thus introduce the Median Citation Index (MCI) and compare it to the journal Impact Factor (JIF) as a potentially more suitable choice of the ``center'' of the distribution, or its typical value. Unlike the JIF, the MCI is far less sensitive to outlier (very highly cited) papers or to gaming, and does not lend itself to the hype of calculating it to three decimal digits.

  4. A semblance-guided median filter

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, E.C. ); Toksoz, M.N. ); Purdy, G.M. )

    1993-01-01

    A slowness selective median filter based on information from a local set of traces is described and implemented. The filter is constructed in two steps, the first being an estimation of a preferred slowness and the second, the selection of a median or trimmed mean value to replace the original data point. A symmetric window of traces defining the filter aperture is selected about each trace to be filtered and the filter applied repeatedly to each time point. The preferred slowness is determined by scanning a range of linear moveouts within the user-specified slowness passband. Semblance is computed for each trial slowness and the preferred slowness selected from the peak semblance value. Data points collected along this preferred slowness are then sorted from lowest to highest and in the case of a pure median filter, the middle point(s) selected to replace the original data point. This approach may be sued as a velocity filter to estimate coherent signal within a specified slowness passband and reject coherent energy outside this range. For applications of this type, other velocity estimators may be used in place of the authors semblance measure to provide improved velocity estimation and better filter performance. The filter aperture may also be extended to provide increased velocity estimation, but will result in additional lateral smearing of signal. The authors show that, in addition to a velocity filter, their approach may be used to improve signal-to-noise ratios in noisy data. The median filter tends to suppress the amplitude of random background noise and semblance weighting may be used to reduce the amplitude of background noise further while enhancing coherent signal.

  5. Portfolio optimization using median-variance approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan Mohd, Wan Rosanisah; Mohamad, Daud; Mohamed, Zulkifli

    2013-04-01

    Optimization models have been applied in many decision-making problems particularly in portfolio selection. Since the introduction of Markowitz's theory of portfolio selection, various approaches based on mathematical programming have been introduced such as mean-variance, mean-absolute deviation, mean-variance-skewness and conditional value-at-risk (CVaR) mainly to maximize return and minimize risk. However most of the approaches assume that the distribution of data is normal and this is not generally true. As an alternative, in this paper, we employ the median-variance approach to improve the portfolio optimization. This approach has successfully catered both types of normal and non-normal distribution of data. With this actual representation, we analyze and compare the rate of return and risk between the mean-variance and the median-variance based portfolio which consist of 30 stocks from Bursa Malaysia. The results in this study show that the median-variance approach is capable to produce a lower risk for each return earning as compared to the mean-variance approach.

  6. Rarefied-flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. Leith

    1992-01-01

    Means for relatively simple and quick procedures are examined for estimating aerodynamic coefficients of lifting reentry vehicles. The methods developed allow aerospace designers not only to evaluate the aerodynamics of specific shapes but also to optimize shapes under given constraints. The analysis was also studied of the effect of thermomolecular flow on pressures measured by an orifice near the nose of a Space Shuttle Orbiter at altitudes above 75 km. It was shown that pressures corrected for thermomolecular flow effect are in good agreement with values predicted by independent theoretical methods. An incidental product was the insight gained about the free molecular thermal accommodation coefficient applicable under 'real' conditions of high speed flow in the Earth's atmosphere. The results are presented as abstracts of referenced papers. One reference paper is presented in its entirety.

  7. HYSHOT-2 Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, T.; Owen, R.; Walton, C.

    2005-02-01

    The scramjet flight test Hyshot-2, flew on the 30 July 2002. The programme, led by the University of Queensland, had the primary objective of obtaining supersonic combustion data in flight for comparison with measurements made in shock tunnels. QinetiQ was one of the sponsors, and also provided aerodynamic data and trajectory predictions for the ballistic re-entry of the spinning sounding rocket. The unconventional missile geometry created by the nose-mounted asymmetric-scramjet in conjunction with the high angle of attack during re-entry makes the problem interesting. This paper presents the wind tunnel measurements and aerodynamic calculations used as input for the trajectory prediction. Indirect comparison is made with data obtained in the Hyshot-2 flight using a 6 degree-of-freedom trajectory simulation.

  8. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  9. Aerodynamic Leidenfrost effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Anaïs; Bird, James C.; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2016-12-01

    When deposited on a plate moving quickly enough, any liquid can levitate as it does when it is volatile on a very hot solid (Leidenfrost effect). In the aerodynamic Leidenfrost situation, air gets inserted between the liquid and the moving solid, a situation that we analyze. We observe two types of entrainment. (i) The thickness of the air gap is found to increase with the plate speed, which is interpreted in the Landau-Levich-Derjaguin frame: Air is dynamically dragged along the surface and its thickness results from a balance between capillary and viscous effects. (ii) Air set in motion by the plate exerts a force on the levitating liquid. We discuss the magnitude of this aerodynamic force and show that it can be exploited to control the liquid and even to drive it against gravity.

  10. Aerodynamics: The Wright Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Jennifer Hansen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the basic principles of aerodynamics. Included in the presentation are: a few demonstrations of the principles, an explanation of the concepts of lift, drag, thrust and weight, a description of Bernoulli's principle, the concept of the airfoil (i.e., the shape of the wing) and how that effects lift, and the method of controlling an aircraft by manipulating the four forces using control surfaces.

  11. Comparisons of several aerodynamic methods for application to dynamic loads analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, R. I.; Miller, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a study are presented in which the applicability at subsonic speeds of several aerodynamic methods for predicting dynamic gust loads on aircraft, including active control systems, was examined and compared. These aerodynamic methods varied from steady state to an advanced unsteady aerodynamic formulation. Brief descriptions of the structural and aerodynamic representations and of the motion and load equations are presented. Comparisons of numerical results achieved using the various aerodynamic methods are shown in detail. From these results, aerodynamic representations for dynamic gust analyses are identified. It was concluded that several aerodynamic methods are satisfactory for dynamic gust analyses of configurations having either controls fixed or active control systems that primarily affect the low frequency rigid body aircraft response.

  12. Robust non-local median filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Jyohei; Koga, Takanori; Suetake, Noriaki; Uchino, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a novel image filter with superior performance on detail-preserving removal of random-valued impulse noise superimposed on natural gray-scale images. The non-local means filter is in the limelight as a way of Gaussian noise removal with superior performance on detail preservation. By referring the fundamental concept of the non-local means, we had proposed a non-local median filter as a specialized way for random-valued impulse noise removal so far. In the non-local processing, the output of a filter is calculated from pixels in blocks which are similar to the block centered at a pixel of interest. As a result, aggressive noise removal is conducted without destroying the detailed structures in an original image. However, the performance of non-local processing decreases enormously in the case of high noise occurrence probability. A cause of this problem is that the superimposed noise disturbs accurate calculation of the similarity between the blocks. To cope with this problem, we propose an improved non-local median filter which is robust to the high level of corruption by introducing a new similarity measure considering possibility of being the original signal. The effectiveness and validity of the proposed method are verified in a series of experiments using natural gray-scale images.

  13. Compendium of NASA Langley reports on hypersonic aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabo, Frances E.; Cary, Aubrey M.; Lawson, Shirley W.

    1987-01-01

    Reference is made to papers published by the Langley Research Center in various areas of hypersonic aerodynamics for the period 1950 to 1986. The research work was performed either in-house by the Center staff or by other personnel supported entirely or in part by grants or contracts. Abstracts have been included with the references when available. The references are listed chronologically and are grouped under the following general headings: (1) Aerodynamic Measurements - Single Shapes; (2) Aerodynamic Measurements - Configurations; (3) Aero-Heating; (4) Configuration Studies; (5) Propulsion Integration Experiment; (6) Propulsion Integration - Study; (7) Analysis Methods; (8) Test Techniques; and (9) Airframe Active Cooling Systems.

  14. Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Sean; Bigatel, Patrick

    2004-10-17

    Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by this DOE category one Inventions and Innovations grant to successfully research, develop, test, patent, market, and sell innovative fuel and emissions saving aerodynamic attachments for the trucking industry. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck's fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Market research early in this project revealed the demands of truck fleet operators regarding aerodynamic attachments. Products must not only save fuel, but cannot interfere with the operation of the truck, require significant maintenance, add significant weight, and must be extremely durable. Furthermore, SAE/TMC J1321 tests performed by a respected independent laboratory are necessary for large fleets to even consider purchase. Freight Wing used this information to create a system of three practical aerodynamic attachments for the front, rear and undercarriage of standard semi trailers. SAE/TMC J1321 Type II tests preformed by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy with all three products. If Freight Wing is successful in its continued efforts to gain market penetration, the energy and environmental savings would be considerable. Each truck outfitted saves approximately 1,100 gallons of fuel every 100,000 miles, which prevents over 12 tons of CO2 from entering the atmosphere. If all applicable trailers used the technology, the country could save approximately 1.8 billion gallons of diesel fuel, 18 million tons of emissions and 3.6 billion dollars annually.

  15. TAD- THEORETICAL AERODYNAMICS PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrowman, J.

    1994-01-01

    This theoretical aerodynamics program, TAD, was developed to predict the aerodynamic characteristics of vehicles with sounding rocket configurations. These slender, axisymmetric finned vehicle configurations have a wide range of aeronautical applications from rockets to high speed armament. Over a given range of Mach numbers, TAD will compute the normal force coefficient derivative, the center-of-pressure, the roll forcing moment coefficient derivative, the roll damping moment coefficient derivative, and the pitch damping moment coefficient derivative of a sounding rocket configured vehicle. The vehicle may consist of a sharp pointed nose of cone or tangent ogive shape, up to nine other body divisions of conical shoulder, conical boattail, or circular cylinder shape, and fins of trapezoid planform shape with constant cross section and either three or four fins per fin set. The characteristics computed by TAD have been shown to be accurate to within ten percent of experimental data in the supersonic region. The TAD program calculates the characteristics of separate portions of the vehicle, calculates the interference between separate portions of the vehicle, and then combines the results to form a total vehicle solution. Also, TAD can be used to calculate the characteristics of the body or fins separately as an aid in the design process. Input to the TAD program consists of simple descriptions of the body and fin geometries and the Mach range of interest. Output includes the aerodynamic characteristics of the total vehicle, or user-selected portions, at specified points over the mach range. The TAD program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 360 computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 123K of 8 bit bytes. The TAD program was originally developed in 1967 and last updated in 1972.

  16. Lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Lipofibromatous hamartoma is a rare tumour of peripheral nerves which is characterised by an excessive infiltration of the epineurium and perineurium by fibroadipose tissue. To the best of our knowledge, only approximately 88 cases are reported in the literature. We report a rare case of lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve causing secondary carpal tunnel syndrome in a 25 year old patient. This patient was treated conservatively with decompression and biopsy and experienced a complete resolution of symptoms post-operatively. Magnetic resonance imaging may be used to diagnose this lesion as it has very distinctive characteristics. Multiple conditions have been associated with this lesion and a greater understanding of these associations may clarify the pathogenesis. The architecture of the tumour makes excision very challenging and the surgical management remains controversial. A review of the literature regarding the etiology, pathogenesis and surgical management of lipofibromatous hamartoma is included. PMID:20920178

  17. Censored Median Regression and Profile Empirical Likelihood

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sundarraman

    2007-01-01

    We implement profile empirical likelihood based inference for censored median regression models. Inference for any specified sub-vector is carried out by profiling out the nuisance parameters from the “plug-in” empirical likelihood ratio function proposed by Qin and Tsao. To obtain the critical value of the profile empirical likelihood ratio statistic, we first investigate its asymptotic distribution. The limiting distribution is a sum of weighted chi square distributions. Unlike for the full empirical likelihood, however, the derived asymptotic distribution has intractable covariance structure. Therefore, we employ the bootstrap to obtain the critical value, and compare the resulting confidence intervals with the ones obtained through Basawa and Koul’s minimum dispersion statistic. Furthermore, we obtain confidence intervals for the age and treatment effects in a lung cancer data set. PMID:19112527

  18. Prediction of Aerodynamic Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    predictable even with knowledge of the motion and the quasi- steady aerodynamic coefficients . It sems likely that the unsteady boundary-layer...build up, which are explainable 41 terams of the stability coefficients . More research is needed on the former type of undemanded manoeuvre. In some...drag 81, 82... B5 body sections I. kg lift St strdke 1M kg m pitching moment N kg normal force T kg axial force a 0 angle of attack Coefficie its: CD, cD

  19. On Wings: Aerodynamics of Eagles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millson, David

    2000-01-01

    The Aerodynamics Wing Curriculum is a high school program that combines basic physics, aerodynamics, pre-engineering, 3D visualization, computer-assisted drafting, computer-assisted manufacturing, production, reengineering, and success in a 15-hour, 3-week classroom module. (JOW)

  20. Aerodynamics of a Party Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2007-01-01

    It is well-known that a party balloon can be made to fly erratically across a room, but it can also be used for quantitative measurements of other aspects of aerodynamics. Since a balloon is light and has a large surface area, even relatively weak aerodynamic forces can be readily demonstrated or measured in the classroom. Accurate measurements…

  1. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  2. The Aerodynamic Plane Table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    This report gives the description and the use of a specially designed aerodynamic plane table. For the accurate and expeditious geometrical measurement of models in an aerodynamic laboratory, and for miscellaneous truing operations, there is frequent need for a specially equipped plan table. For example, one may have to measure truly to 0.001 inch the offsets of an airfoil at many parts of its surface. Or the offsets of a strut, airship hull, or other carefully formed figure may require exact calipering. Again, a complete airplane model may have to be adjusted for correct incidence at all parts of its surfaces or verified in those parts for conformance to specifications. Such work, if but occasional, may be done on a planing or milling machine; but if frequent, justifies the provision of a special table. For this reason it was found desirable in 1918 to make the table described in this report and to equip it with such gauges and measures as the work should require.

  3. Aerodynamic challenges of ALT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, I.; Homan, D.; Romere, P. O.

    1985-01-01

    The approach and landing test (ALT) of the Space Shuttle Orbiter presented a number of unique challenges in the area of aerodynamics. The purpose of the ALT program was both to confirm the use of the Boeing 747 as a transport vehicle for ferrying the Orbiter across the country and to demonstrate the flight characteristics of the Orbiter in its approach and landing phase. Concerns for structural fatigue and performance dictated a tailcone be attached to the Orbiter for ferry and for the initial landing tests. The Orbiter with a tailcone attached presented additional challenges to the normal aft sting concept of wind tunnel testing. The landing tests required that the Orbiter be separated from the 747 at approximately 20,000 feet using aerodynamic forces to fly the vehicles apart. The concept required a complex test program to determine the relative effects of the two vehicles on each other. Also of concern, and tested, was the vortex wake created by the 747 and the means for the Orbiter to avoid it following separation.

  4. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  5. Unsteady aerodynamics of blade rows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.

    1989-01-01

    The requirements placed on an unsteady aerodynamic theory intended for turbomachinery aeroelastic or aeroacoustic applications are discussed along with a brief description of the various theoretical models that are available to address these requirements. The major emphasis is placed on the description of a linearized inviscid theory which fully accounts for the affects of a nonuniform mean or steady flow on unsteady aerodynamic response. Although this linearization was developed primarily for blade flutter prediction, more general equations are presented which account for unsteady excitations due to incident external aerodynamic disturbances as well as those due to prescribed blade motions. The motivation for this linearized unsteady aerodynamic theory is focused on, its physical and mathematical formulation is outlined and examples are presented to illustrate the status of numerical solution procedures and several effects of mean flow nonuniformity on unsteady aerodynamic response.

  6. Geometric median for missing rainfall data imputation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burhanuddin, Siti Nur Zahrah Amin; Deni, Sayang Mohd; Ramli, Norazan Mohamed

    2015-02-01

    Missing data is a common problem faced by researchers in environmental studies. Environmental data, particularly, rainfall data are highly vulnerable to be missed, which is due to several reasons, such as malfunction instrument, incorrect measurements, and relocation of stations. Rainfall data are also affected by the presence of outliers due to the temporal and spatial variability of rainfall measurements. These problems may harm the quality of rainfall data and subsequently, produce inaccuracy in the results of analysis. Thus, this study is aimed to propose an imputation method that is robust towards the presence of outliers for treating the missing rainfall data. Geometric median was applied to estimate the missing values based on the available rainfall data from neighbouring stations. The method was compared with several conventional methods, such as normal ratio and inverse distance weighting methods, in order to evaluate its performance. Thirteen rainfall stations in Peninsular Malaysia were selected for the application of the imputation methods. The results indicated that the proposed method provided the most accurate estimation values compared to both conventional methods based on the least mean absolute error. The normal ratio was found to be the worst method in estimating the missing rainfall values.

  7. Median filtering algorithms for multichannel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovhannisyan, A.; Chilingarian, A.

    2011-05-01

    Particle detectors of worldwide networks are continuously measuring various secondary particle fluxes incident on Earth surface. At the Aragats Space Environmental Center (ASEC), the data of 12 cosmic ray particle detectors with a total of ˜280 measuring channels (count rates of electrons, muons and neutrons channels) are sent each minute via wireless bridges to a MySQL database. These time series are used for the different tasks of off-line physical analysis and for online forewarning services. Usually long time series contain several types of errors (gaps due to failures of high or low voltage power supply, spurious spikes due to radio interferences, abrupt changes of mean values of several channels or/and slowly trends in mean values due to aging of electronics components, etc.). To avoid erroneous physical inference and false alarms of alerting systems we introduce offline and online filters to "purify" multiple time-series. In the presented paper we classify possible mistakes in time series and introduce median filtering algorithms for online and off-line "purification" of multiple time-series.

  8. Aerodynamic preliminary analysis system 2. Part 1: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, E.; Clever, W.; Dunn, K.

    1981-01-01

    A subsonic/supersonic/hypersonic aerodynamic analysis was developed by integrating the Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System (APAS), and the inviscid force calculation modules of the Hypersonic Arbitrary Body Program. APAS analysis was extended for nonlinear vortex forces using a generalization of the Polhamus analogy. The interactive system provides appropriate aerodynamic models for a single input geometry data base and has a run/output format similar to a wind tunnel test program. The user's manual was organized to cover the principle system activities of a typical application, geometric input/editing, aerodynamic evaluation, and post analysis review/display. Sample sessions are included to illustrate the specific task involved and are followed by a comprehensive command/subcommand dictionary used to operate the system.

  9. Accomplishments at NASA Langley Research Center in rotorcraft aerodynamics technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, the development of aerodynamic technology for rotorcraft has continued successfully at NASA LaRC. Though the NASA Langley Research Center is not the lead NASA center in this area, the activity was continued due to facilities and individual capabilities which are recognized as contributing to helicopter research needs of industry and government. Noteworthy accomplishments which contribute to advancing the state of rotorcraft technology in the areas of rotor design, airfoil research, rotor aerodynamics, and rotor/fuselage interaction aerodynamics are described. Rotor designs were defined for current helicopters and evaluated in wind tunnel testing. These designs have incorporated advanced airfoils defined analytically and also proven in wind tunnel tests. A laser velocimetry system has become a productive tool for experimental definition of rotor inflow/wake and is providing data for rotorcraft aerodynamic code validation.

  10. Vortex flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. H. B.; Campbell, J. F.; Young, A. D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The principal emphasis of the meeting was to be on the understanding and prediction of separation-induced vortex flows and their effects on vehicle performance, stability, control, and structural design loads. This report shows that a substantial amount of the papers covering this area were received from a wide range of countries, together with an attendance that was even more diverse. In itself, this testifies to the current interest in the subject and to the appropriateness of the Panel's choice of topic and approach. An attempt is made to summarize each paper delivered, and to relate the contributions made in the papers and in the discussions to some of the important aspects of vortex flow aerodynamics. This reveals significant progress and important clarifications, but also brings out remaining weaknesses in predictive capability and gaps in understanding. Where possible, conclusions are drawn and areas of continuing concern are identified.

  11. Payload vehicle aerodynamic reentry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Donald

    An approach for analyzing the dynamic behavior of a cone-cylinder payload vehicle during reentry to insure proper deployment of the parachute system and recovery of the payload is presented. This analysis includes the study of an aerodynamic device that is useful in extending vehicle axial rotation through the maximum dynamic pressure region. Attention is given to vehicle configuration and reentry trajectory, the derivation of pitch static aerodynamics, the derivation of the pitch damping coefficient, pitching moment modeling, aerodynamic roll device modeling, and payload vehicle reentry dynamics. It is shown that the vehicle dynamics at parachute deployment are well within the design limit of the recovery system, thus ensuring successful payload recovery.

  12. Integrated aerodynamic-structural-control wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rais-Rohani, M.; Haftka, R. T.; Grossman, B.; Unger, E. R.

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic-structural-control design of a forward-swept composite wing for a high subsonic transport aircraft is considered. The structural analysis is based on a finite-element method. The aerodynamic calculations are based on a vortex-lattice method, and the control calculations are based on an output feedback control. The wing is designed for minimum weight subject to structural, performance/aerodynamic and control constraints. Efficient methods are used to calculate the control-deflection and control-effectiveness sensitivities which appear as second-order derivatives in the control constraint equations. To suppress the aeroelastic divergence of the forward-swept wing, and to reduce the gross weight of the design aircraft, two separate cases are studied: (1) combined application of aeroelastic tailoring and active controls; and (2) aeroelastic tailoring alone. The results of this study indicated that, for this particular example, aeroelastic tailoring is sufficient for suppressing the aeroelastic divergence, and the use of active controls was not necessary.

  13. Assessment of aerodynamic performance of V/STOL and STOVL fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of V/STOL and STOVL fighter/attack aircraft was assessed. Aerodynamic and propulsion/airframe integration activities are described and small and large scale research programs are considered. Uncertainties affecting aerodynamic performance that are associated with special configuration features resulting from the V/STOL requirement are addressed. Example uncertainties relate to minimum drag, wave drag, high angle of attack characteristics, and power induced effects.

  14. Computational aerodynamics and artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U. B.; Kutler, P.

    1984-01-01

    The general principles of artificial intelligence are reviewed and speculations are made concerning how knowledge based systems can accelerate the process of acquiring new knowledge in aerodynamics, how computational fluid dynamics may use expert systems, and how expert systems may speed the design and development process. In addition, the anatomy of an idealized expert system called AERODYNAMICIST is discussed. Resource requirements for using artificial intelligence in computational fluid dynamics and aerodynamics are examined. Three main conclusions are presented. First, there are two related aspects of computational aerodynamics: reasoning and calculating. Second, a substantial portion of reasoning can be achieved with artificial intelligence. It offers the opportunity of using computers as reasoning machines to set the stage for efficient calculating. Third, expert systems are likely to be new assets of institutions involved in aeronautics for various tasks of computational aerodynamics.

  15. Dynamic soaring: aerodynamics for albatrosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Albatrosses have evolved to soar and glide efficiently. By maximizing their lift-to-drag ratio L/D, albatrosses can gain energy from the wind and can travel long distances with little effort. We simplify the difficult aerodynamic equations of motion by assuming that albatrosses maintain a constant L/D. Analytic solutions to the simplified equations provide an instructive and appealing example of fixed-wing aerodynamics suitable for undergraduate demonstration.

  16. Supersonic aerodynamics of delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    Through the empirical correlation of experimental data and theoretical analysis, a set of graphs has been developed which summarize the inviscid aerodynamics of delta wings at supersonic speeds. The various graphs which detail the aerodynamic performance of delta wings at both zero-lift and lifting conditions were then employed to define a preliminary wing design approach in which both the low-lift and high-lift design criteria were combined to define a feasible design space.

  17. Aerodynamic Design Opportunities for Future Supersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.

    2002-01-01

    A discussion of a diverse set of aerodynamic opportunities to improve the aerodynamic performance of future supersonic aircraft has been presented and discussed. These ideas are offered to the community in a hope that future supersonic vehicle development activities will not be hindered by past efforts. A number of nonlinear flow based drag reduction technologies are presented and discussed. The subject technologies are related to the areas of interference flows, vehicle concepts, vortex flows, wing design, advanced control effectors, and planform design. The authors also discussed the importance of improving the aerodynamic design environment to allow creativity and knowledge greater influence. A review of all of the data presented show that pressure drag reductions on the order of 50 to 60 counts are achievable, compared to a conventional supersonic cruise vehicle, with the application of several of the discussed technologies. These drag reductions would correlate to a 30 to 40% increase in cruise L/D (lift-to-drag ratio) for a commercial supersonic transport.

  18. The Heterogeneous P-Median Problem for Categorization Based Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Simon J.; Aloise, Daniel; DeSarbo, Wayne S.

    2012-01-01

    The p-median offers an alternative to centroid-based clustering algorithms for identifying unobserved categories. However, existing p-median formulations typically require data aggregation into a single proximity matrix, resulting in masked respondent heterogeneity. A proposed three-way formulation of the p-median problem explicitly considers…

  19. Introduction. Computational aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Paul G

    2007-10-15

    The wide range of uses of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for aircraft design is discussed along with its role in dealing with the environmental impact of flight. Enabling technologies, such as grid generation and turbulence models, are also considered along with flow/turbulence control. The large eddy simulation, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and hybrid turbulence modelling approaches are contrasted. The CFD prediction of numerous jet configurations occurring in aerospace are discussed along with aeroelasticity for aeroengine and external aerodynamics, design optimization, unsteady flow modelling and aeroengine internal and external flows. It is concluded that there is a lack of detailed measurements (for both canonical and complex geometry flows) to provide validation and even, in some cases, basic understanding of flow physics. Not surprisingly, turbulence modelling is still the weak link along with, as ever, a pressing need for improved (in terms of robustness, speed and accuracy) solver technology, grid generation and geometry handling. Hence, CFD, as a truly predictive and creative design tool, seems a long way off. Meanwhile, extreme practitioner expertise is still required and the triad of computation, measurement and analytic solution must be judiciously used.

  20. Aerodynamics of bird flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, Rudolf

    2016-03-01

    Unlike airplanes birds must have either flapping or oscillating wings (the hummingbird). Only such wings can produce both lift and thrust - two sine qua non attributes of flying.The bird wings have several possibilities how to obtain the same functions as airplane wings. All are realized by the system of flight feathers. Birds have also the capabilities of adjusting the shape of the wing according to what the immediate flight situation demands, as well as of responding almost immediately to conditions the flow environment dictates, such as wind gusts, object avoidance, target tracking, etc. In bird aerodynamics also the tail plays an important role. To fly, wings impart downward momentum to the surrounding air and obtain lift by reaction. How this is achieved under various flight situations (cruise flight, hovering, landing, etc.), and what the role is of the wing-generated vortices in producing lift and thrust is discussed.The issue of studying bird flight experimentally from in vivo or in vitro experiments is also briefly discussed.

  1. Aerodynamic Analysis of Morphing Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Caleb; Macphee, David; Carlisle, Madeline

    2016-11-01

    Interest in morphing blades has grown with applications for wind turbines and other aerodynamic blades. This passive control method has advantages over active control methods such as lower manufacturing and upkeep costs. This study has investigated the lift and drag forces on individual blades with experimental and computational analysis. The goal has been to show that these blades delay stall and provide larger lift-to-drag ratios at various angles of attack. Rigid and flexible airfoils were cast from polyurethane and silicone respectively, then lift and drag forces were collected from a load cell during 2-D testing in a wind tunnel. Experimental data was used to validate computational models in OpenFOAM. A finite volume fluid-structure-interaction solver was used to model the flexible blade in fluid flow. Preliminary results indicate delay in stall and larger lift-to-drag ratios by maintaining more optimal angles of attack when flexing. Funding from NSF REU site Grant EEC 1358991 is greatly appreciated.

  2. Aerodynamics Via Acoustics: Application of Acoustic Formulas for Aerodynamic Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Myers, M. K.

    1986-01-01

    Prediction of aerodynamic loads on bodies in arbitrary motion is considered from an acoustic point of view, i.e., in a frame of reference fixed in the undisturbed medium. An inhomogeneous wave equation which governs the disturbance pressure is constructed and solved formally using generalized function theory. When the observer is located on the moving body surface there results a singular linear integral equation for surface pressure. Two different methods for obtaining such equations are discussed. Both steady and unsteady aerodynamic calculations are considered. Two examples are presented, the more important being an application to propeller aerodynamics. Of particular interest for numerical applications is the analytical behavior of the kernel functions in the various integral equations.

  3. Aerodynamic drag on intermodal railcars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinghorn, Philip; Maynes, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    The aerodynamic drag associated with transport of commodities by rail is becoming increasingly important as the cost of diesel fuel increases. This study aims to increase the efficiency of intermodal cargo trains by reducing the aerodynamic drag on the load carrying cars. For intermodal railcars a significant amount of aerodynamic drag is a result of the large distance between loads that often occurs and the resulting pressure drag resulting from the separated flow. In the present study aerodynamic drag data have been obtained through wind tunnel testing on 1/29 scale models to understand the savings that may be realized by judicious modification to the size of the intermodal containers. The experiments were performed in the BYU low speed wind tunnel and the test track utilizes two leading locomotives followed by a set of five articulated well cars with double stacked containers. The drag on a representative mid-train car is measured using an isolated load cell balance and the wind tunnel speed is varied from 20 to 100 mph. We characterize the effect that the gap distance between the containers and the container size has on the aerodynamic drag of this representative rail car and investigate methods to reduce the gap distance.

  4. Force balance in the take-off of a pierid butterfly: relative importance and timing of leg impulsion and aerodynamic forces.

    PubMed

    Bimbard, Gaëlle; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Bouteleux, Olivier; Casas, Jérôme; Godoy-Diana, Ramiro

    2013-09-15

    Up to now, the take-off stage has remained an elusive phase of insect flight that was relatively poorly explored compared with other maneuvers. An overall assessment of the different mechanisms involved in force production during take-off has never been explored. Focusing on the first downstroke, we have addressed this problem from a force balance perspective in butterflies taking off from the ground. In order to determine whether the sole aerodynamic wing force could explain the observed motion of the insect, we have firstly compared a simple analytical model of the wing force with the acceleration of the insect's center of mass estimated from video tracking of the wing and body motions. Secondly, wing kinematics were also used for numerical simulations of the aerodynamic flow field. Similar wing aerodynamic forces were obtained by the two methods. However, neither are sufficient, nor is the inclusion of the ground effect, to predict faithfully the body acceleration. We have to resort to the leg forces to obtain a model that best fits the data. We show that the median and hind legs display an active extension responsible for the initiation of the upward motion of the insect's body, occurring before the onset of the wing downstroke. We estimate that legs generate, at various times, an upward force that can be much larger than all other forces applied to the insect's body. The relative timing of leg and wing forces explains the large variability of trajectories observed during the maneuvers.

  5. Aerodynamics/ACEE: aircraft energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    An overview is presented of a 10 year program managed by NASA which seeks to make possible the most efficient use of energy for aircraft propulsion and lift as well as provide a technology that can be used by U.S. manufacturers of air transports and engines. Supercritical wings, winglets, vortex drag reduction, high lift, active control, laminar flow control, and aerodynamics by computer are among the topics discussed. Wind tunnel models in flight verification of advanced technology, and the design, construction and testing of various aircraft structures are also described.

  6. Aerodynamics/ACEE: Aircraft energy efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    An overview is presented of a 10 year program managed by NASA which seeks to make possible the most efficient use of energy for aircraft propulsion and lift as well as provide a technology that can be used by U.S. manufacturers of air transports and engines. Supercritical wings, winglets, vortex drag reduction, high lift, active control, laminar flow control, and aerodynamics by computer are among the topics discussed. Wind tunnel models in flight verification of advanced technology, and the design, construction and testing of various aircraft structures are also described.

  7. Special opportunities in helicopter aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccroskey, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Aerodynamic research relating to modern helicopters includes the study of three dimensional, unsteady, nonlinear flow fields. A selective review is made of some of the phenomenon that hamper the development of satisfactory engineering prediction techniques, but which provides a rich source of research opportunities: flow separations, compressibility effects, complex vortical wakes, and aerodynamic interference between components. Several examples of work in progress are given, including dynamic stall alleviation, the development of computational methods for transonic flow, rotor-wake predictions, and blade-vortex interactions.

  8. Aerodynamics Research Revolutionizes Truck Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, researchers at Dryden Flight Research Center conducted numerous tests to refine the shape of trucks to reduce aerodynamic drag and improved efficiency. During the 1980s and 1990s, a team based at Langley Research Center explored controlling drag and the flow of air around a moving body. Aeroserve Technologies Ltd., of Ottawa, Canada, with its subsidiary, Airtab LLC, in Loveland, Colorado, applied the research from Dryden and Langley to the development of the Airtab vortex generator. Airtabs create two counter-rotating vortices to reduce wind resistance and aerodynamic drag of trucks, trailers, recreational vehicles, and many other vehicles.

  9. Papillary Carcinoma in Median Aberrant Thyroid (Ectopic) - Case Report

    PubMed Central

    K, Shashidhar; Deshmane, Vijaya Laxmi; Kumar, Veerendra; Arjunan, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Median ectopic thyroid may be encountered anywhere from the foramen caecum to the diaphragm. Non lingual median aberrant thyroid (incomplete descent) usually found in the infrahyoid region and malignant transformation in this ectopic thyroid tissue is very rare. We report an extremely rare case of papillary carcinoma in non lingual median aberrant thyroid in a 25-year-old female. The differentiation between a carcinoma arising in the median ectopic thyroid tissue and a metastatic papillary carcinoma from an occult primary in the main thyroid gland is also discussed. PMID:25121039

  10. Langley Symposium on Aerodynamics, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, Sharon H. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to present current work and results of the Langley Aeronautics Directorate covering the areas of computational fluid dynamics, viscous flows, airfoil aerodynamics, propulsion integration, test techniques, and low-speed, high-speed, and transonic aerodynamics. The following sessions are included in this volume: theoretical aerodynamics, test techniques, fluid physics, and viscous drag reduction.

  11. POEMS in Newton's Aerodynamic Frustum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampedro, Jaime Cruz; Tetlalmatzi-Montiel, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The golden mean is often naively seen as a sign of optimal beauty but rarely does it arise as the solution of a true optimization problem. In this article we present such a problem, demonstrating a close relationship between the golden mean and a special case of Newton's aerodynamical problem for the frustum of a cone. Then, we exhibit a parallel…

  12. Aerodynamic laboratory at Cuatro Vientos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    JUBERA

    1922-01-01

    This report presents a listing of the many experiments in aerodynamics taking place at Cuatro Vientos. Some of the studies include: testing spheres, in order to determine coefficients; mechanical and chemical tests of materials; and various tests of propeller strength and flexibility.

  13. Aerodynamic design via control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony

    1988-01-01

    The question of how to modify aerodynamic design in order to improve performance is addressed. Representative examples are given to demonstrate the computational feasibility of using control theory for such a purpose. An introduction and historical survey of the subject is included.

  14. Dynamic Soaring: Aerodynamics for Albatrosses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Albatrosses have evolved to soar and glide efficiently. By maximizing their lift-to-drag ratio "L/D", albatrosses can gain energy from the wind and can travel long distances with little effort. We simplify the difficult aerodynamic equations of motion by assuming that albatrosses maintain a constant "L/D". Analytic solutions to the simplified…

  15. Feedback Control for Aerodynamics (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    AFRL-VA-WP-TP-2006-348 FEEDBACK CONTROL FOR AERODYNAMICS (PREPRINT) R. Chris Camphouse, Seddik M. Djouadi, and James H. Myatt...CONSTRUCTION FOR THE DESIGN OF BOUNDARY FEEDBACK CONTROLS FROM REDUCED ORDER MODELS (PREPRINT) 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 0601102F 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...

  16. Fluidic Control of Aerodynamic Forces on an Axisymmetric Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Philip; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2007-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on a wind tunnel model of an axisymmetric bluff body are modified by induced local vectoring of the separated base flow. Control is effected by an array of four integrated aft-facing synthetic jets that emanate from narrow, azimuthally-segmented slots, equally distributed around the perimeter of the circular tail end within a small backward facing step that extends into a Coanda surface. The model is suspended in the wind tunnel by eight thin wires for minimal support interference with the wake. Fluidic actuation results in a localized, segmented vectoring of the separated base flow along the rear Coanda surface and induces asymmetric aerodynamic forces and moments to effect maneuvering during flight. The aerodynamic effects associated with quasi-steady and transitory differential, asymmetric activation of the Coanda effect are characterized using direct force and PIV measurements.

  17. Neural Organization of the Median Ocellus of the Dragonfly

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Richard L.; Dowling, John E.

    1972-01-01

    Intracellular responses from receptors and postsynaptic units have been recorded in the median ocellus of the dragonfly. The receptors respond to light with a graded, depolarizing potential and a single, tetrodotoxin-sensitive impulse at "on." The postsynaptic units (ocellar nerve dendrites) hyperpolarize during illumination and show a transient, depolarizing response at "off." The light-evoked slow potential responses of the postsynaptic units are not altered by the application of tetrodotoxin to the ocellus. It appears, therefore, that the graded receptor potential, which survives the application of tetrodotoxin, is responsible for mediating synaptic transmission in the ocellus. Comparison of pre- and postsynaptic slow potential activity shows (a) longer latencies in postsynaptic units by 5–20 msec, (b) enhanced photosensitivity in postsynaptic units by 1–2 log units, and (c) more transient responses in postsynaptic units. It is suggested that enhanced photosensitivity of postsynaptic activity is a result of summation of many receptors onto the postsynaptic elements, and that transients in the postsynaptic responses are related to the complex synaptic arrangements in the ocellar plexus to be described in the following paper. PMID:5049075

  18. Median and ulnar antidromic sensory studies to the fourth digit.

    PubMed

    Berkson, Andrew; Lohman, James; Buschbacher, Ralph M

    2006-01-01

    The literature documents multiple reports of neurological injury resulting from both the implantation and the removal of orthopedic devices. These injuries can be easily and objectively evaluated with nerve conduction studies. This study was undertaken to derive a normative database for median and ulnar sensory conduction studies to the fourth digit. Testing was done utilizing a 14-cm antidromic technique on 192 asymptomatic subjects with no risk factors for neuropathy. The subjects were studied bilaterally. Onset latency, peak latency, onset-to-peak amplitude, peak-to-peak amplitude, rise time, and duration were recorded. Increasing age and body mass index were associated with decreasing amplitudes and area. No other demographic factors correlated with differences in waveform measurements. Mean onset latency was 2.7 +/- 0.3 ms for the median nerve and 2.6 +/- 0.2 for the ulnar nerve. Mean peak latency was 3.4 +/- 0.3 ms for the median nerve and 3.3 +/- 0.3 ms for the ulnar nerve. Mean onset-to-peak amplitude was 21 +/- 12 muV for the median nerve and 23 +/- 12muV for the ulnar nerve. Mean peak-to-peak amplitude was 34 +/- 20 muV for the median nerve and 36 +/- 23 muV for the ulnar nerve. Mean area was 25 +/- 17 nVs for the median nerve and 28 +/- 19 nVs for the ulnar nerve. Mean rise time was 0.7 +/- 0.1 ms for the median nerve and 0.7 +/- 0.2 ms for the ulnar nerve. Mean duration was 1.9 +/- 0.4 ms for the median nerve and 1.9 +/- 0.5 ms for the ulnar nerve. The mean difference in onset and peak latency between the median and ulnar nerves (median minus ulnar) was 0.1 +/- 0.2 ms. The upper limit of normal difference of median greater than ulnar onset and peak latency was 0.5 ms. The upper limit of normal difference of ulnar greater than median onset latency was 0.2 ms (0.3 ms for peak latency). The upper limit of normal drop in median peak-to-peak amplitude from one side to the other was 56%. For the ulnar nerve this value was 73%.

  19. 1. VIEW OF MEDIAN FROM GORDON HIGHWAY OVERPASS, LOOKING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF MEDIAN FROM GORDON HIGHWAY OVERPASS, LOOKING WEST SHOWING REVOLUTIONARY WAR MONUMENT 56/1 - Greene Street Historic District, Greene Street, Gordon Highway to Augusta Canal Bridge, Augusta, Richmond County, GA

  20. 2. HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH, VIEW FROM MEDIAN OF MERRITT PARKWAY TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH, VIEW FROM MEDIAN OF MERRITT PARKWAY TO EAST ROCKS ROAD BRIDGE, CA. 1940. COLLECTION CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION. - Merritt Parkway, East Rocks Road Bridge, Spanning Merritt Parkway, Norwalk, Fairfield County, CT

  1. 12. VIEW FROM PARKWAY MEDIAN TO SPORT HILL ROAD BRIDGE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW FROM PARKWAY MEDIAN TO SPORT HILL ROAD BRIDGE, Copy of photograph ca. 1940. Collection Connecticut Department of Transportation. - Merritt Parkway, Bridge No. 744, Spanning Merritt Parkway at Route 59, Fairfield, Fairfield County, CT

  2. Control of helicopter rotorblade aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabunmi, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a feasibility study of a method for controlling the aerodynamics of helicopter rotorblades using stacks of piezoelectric ceramic plates are presented. A resonant mechanism is proposed for the amplification of the displacements produced by the stack. This motion is then converted into linear displacement for the actuation of the servoflap of the blades. A design which emulates the actuation of the servoflap on the Kaman SH-2F is used to demonstrate the fact that such a system can be designed to produce the necessary forces and velocities needed to control the aerodynamics of the rotorblades of such a helicopter. Estimates of the electrical power requirements are also presented. A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 2 Program is suggested, whereby a bench-top prototype of the device can be built and tested. A collaborative effort between AEDAR Corporation and Kaman Aerospace Corporation is anticipated for future effort on this project.

  3. Median nerve (anatomical variations) and carpal tunel syndrome - revisited.

    PubMed

    Mizia, Ewa; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof; Depukat, Pawel; Klimek-Piotrowska, Wieslawa; Pasternak, Artur; Mroz, Izabela; Bonczar, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome belongs to the most common causative factors of surgical interventions in the wrist region. Anatomy of carpal tunnel and median nerve is a subject of current revision. Authors paid attention to etiology of the syndrome based on review of literature and their own anatomical studies. They remind basic knowledge on the median nerve and indicate that only based on number of dissections a good orthopedic surgeon may acquire experience necessary to perform procedures in a most appropriate way.

  4. Adaptive median filtering for preprocessing of time series measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paunonen, Matti

    1993-01-01

    A median (L1-norm) filtering program using polynomials was developed. This program was used in automatic recycling data screening. Additionally, a special adaptive program to work with asymmetric distributions was developed. Examples of adaptive median filtering of satellite laser range observations and TV satellite time measurements are given. The program proved to be versatile and time saving in data screening of time series measurements.

  5. Simulating Magneto-Aerodynamic Actuator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-20

    2005. 19. Boeuf, J.P., Lagmich, Y., Callegari, Th., and Pitchford , L.C., Electro- hydrodynamic Force and Acceleration in Surface Discharge, AIAA 2006...Plasmadynamics and Laser Award, 2004 AFRL Point of Contact Dr. Donald B. Paul , AFRL/VA WPAFB, OH 937-255-7329, met weekly. Dr. Alan Garscadden, AFRL/PR...validating database for numerical simulation of magneto-aerodynamic actuator for hypersonic flow control. Points of contact at the AFRL/VA are Dr. D. Paul

  6. Nonaxisymmetric Body Supersonic, Aerodynamic Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    wing - tail configuration are compared in Figure 27. CN comparisons are good. C. is a sensitive computation for xcp close to x’. 7.2...Analytical and Experimental Supersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Forward Control Missile , AIAA Paper No. 81-0398, AIAA 19th Aerospace Sciences...body diameter. The next computational example is for a body- wing - tail configuration from Reference 32 A body-alone comparison has been made earlier in

  7. Aerodynamics of Supersonic Lifting Bodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    verso of front cover. 19 Y WOROS (Continue on rt.’,;erso side i recessary and identily by block number) Theoretical Aerodynamics Lifting Bodies Wind ...waverider solution, developed from the supersonic wedge flow solution, is then i Fused to fashion vertLcal stabilizer-likh control surfaces. Wind ...served as Project Engineers ror thE wind tunnel work. Important contributions were also made bv: Mr. iis±ung Miin; Lee, -M. Beom-Soo Kim, Mtr. Martin Weeks

  8. Unsteady Aerodynamic Phenomena in Turbomachines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    The first part of a systematic variation of important parameters shows their influence on the aerodynamic forces and moments coefficients . 2-2...real physical phenomena. Besides, for reasons of stability it in necessary to introduce an additional damping coefficient , which depends on the... coefficients for the "Fourth Standard Configu- ration No. 4" /10/, using a mesh with 51 x 17 points (Fig. I). This grid represents a typical section of

  9. Aerodynamic Design Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan; Madavan, Nateri K.

    2003-01-01

    The design of aerodynamic components of aircraft, such as wings or engines, involves a process of obtaining the most optimal component shape that can deliver the desired level of component performance, subject to various constraints, e.g., total weight or cost, that the component must satisfy. Aerodynamic design can thus be formulated as an optimization problem that involves the minimization of an objective function subject to constraints. A new aerodynamic design optimization procedure based on neural networks and response surface methodology (RSM) incorporates the advantages of both traditional RSM and neural networks. The procedure uses a strategy, denoted parameter-based partitioning of the design space, to construct a sequence of response surfaces based on both neural networks and polynomial fits to traverse the design space in search of the optimal solution. Some desirable characteristics of the new design optimization procedure include the ability to handle a variety of design objectives, easily impose constraints, and incorporate design guidelines and rules of thumb. It provides an infrastructure for variable fidelity analysis and reduces the cost of computation by using less-expensive, lower fidelity simulations in the early stages of the design evolution. The initial or starting design can be far from optimal. The procedure is easy and economical to use in large-dimensional design space and can be used to perform design tradeoff studies rapidly. Designs involving multiple disciplines can also be optimized. Some practical applications of the design procedure that have demonstrated some of its capabilities include the inverse design of an optimal turbine airfoil starting from a generic shape and the redesign of transonic turbines to improve their unsteady aerodynamic characteristics.

  10. X-34 Vehicle Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauckmann, Gregory J.

    1998-01-01

    The X-34, being designed and built by the Orbital Sciences Corporation, is an unmanned sub-orbital vehicle designed to be used as a flying test bed to demonstrate key vehicle and operational technologies applicable to future reusable launch vehicles. The X-34 will be air-launched from an L-1011 carrier aircraft at approximately Mach 0.7 and 38,000 feet altitude, where an onboard engine will accelerate the vehicle to speeds above Mach 7 and altitudes to 250,000 feet. An unpowered entry will follow, including an autonomous landing. The X-34 will demonstrate the ability to fly through inclement weather, land horizontally at a designated site, and have a rapid turn-around capability. A series of wind tunnel tests on scaled models was conducted in four facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the X-34. Analysis of these test results revealed that longitudinal trim could be achieved throughout the design trajectory. The maximum elevon deflection required to trim was only half of that available, leaving a margin for gust alleviation and aerodynamic coefficient uncertainty. Directional control can be achieved aerodynamically except at combined high Mach numbers and high angles of attack, where reaction control jets must be used. The X-34 landing speed, between 184 and 206 knots, is within the capabilities of the gear and tires, and the vehicle has sufficient rudder authority to control the required 30-knot crosswind.

  11. Applied aerodynamics: Challenges and expectations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Victor L.; Smith, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    Aerospace is the leading positive contributor to this country's balance of trade, derived largely from the sale of U.S. commercial aircraft around the world. This powerfully favorable economic situation is being threatened in two ways: (1) the U.S. portion of the commercial transport market is decreasing, even though the worldwide market is projected to increase substantially; and (2) expenditures are decreasing for military aircraft, which often serve as proving grounds for advanced aircraft technology. To retain a major share of the world market for commercial aircraft and continue to provide military aircraft with unsurpassed performance, the U.S. aerospace industry faces many technological challenges. The field of applied aerodynamics is necessarily a major contributor to efforts aimed at meeting these technological challenges. A number of emerging research results that will provide new opportunities for applied aerodynamicists are discussed. Some of these have great potential for maintaining the high value of contributions from applied aerodynamics in the relatively near future. Over time, however, the value of these contributions will diminish greatly unless substantial investments continue to be made in basic and applied research efforts. The focus: to increase understanding of fluid dynamic phenomena, identify new aerodynamic concepts, and provide validated advanced technology for future aircraft.

  12. HIAD-2 (Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator)

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) project is a disruptive technology that will accommodate the atmospheric entry of heavy payloads to planetary bodies such as Mars. HIAD over...

  13. Aerodynamic lift effect on satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R.; Cleland, J. G.; Devries, L. L.

    1975-01-01

    Numerical quadrature is employed to obtain orbit perturbation results from the general perturbation equations. Both aerodynamic lift and drag forces are included in the analysis of the satellite orbit. An exponential atmosphere with and without atmospheric rotation is used. A comparison is made of the perturbations which are caused by atmospheric rotation with those caused by satellite aerodynamic effects. Results indicate that aerodynamic lift effects on the semi-major axis and orbit inclination can be of the same order as the effects of atmosphere rotation depending upon the orientation of the lift vector. The results reveal the importance of including aerodynamic lift effects in orbit perturbation analysis.

  14. Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome in a patient with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sturiale, Alessandro; Alemanno, Giovanni; Giudici, Francesco; Addasi, Rami; Bellucci, Francesco; Tonelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome is a rare condition characterized by postprandial abdominal pain, bowel function disorder and weight loss. We report the first case to our knowledge of Crohn's disease and Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome. PRESENTATION OF CASE The patient was a 33 year-old female with a previous diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Acute postprandial abdominal pain affected the patient every day; she was, therefore, referred to US-Doppler and magnetic resonance angiography of the abdominal vessels and received a diagnosis of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome. Consequently, the patient was surgically treated, releasing the vascular compression. After the operation, she reported a complete relief from postprandial pain which was one of her major concerns. Subocclusive symptoms occurred after six months due to the inflammatory reactivation of the terminal ileitis. DISCUSSION The diagnosis of Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome is mainly based on the exclusion of other intestinal disorders but it should be always confirmed using noninvasive tests such as US-Doppler, angio-CT or magnetic resonance angiography. CONCLUSION This case demonstrates that the Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome could be the major cause of symptoms, even in presence of other abdominal disorders. PMID:23500743

  15. Aerodynamics of seeing on large transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Data were obtained in the full scale flight environment of the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) on the nature of turbulent shear layer over the open cavity. These data were used to verify proposed aerodynamic scaling relationships to describe the behavior of the turbulent layers and to estimate the optical performance of systems of various wavelengths operating within the KAO environment. These data and wind tunnel data are used to scale the expected optical effects for a potential stratospheric observatory for infrared astronomy (SOFIA) in which a telescope approximately 3.5 times larger than that on the KAO is envisioned. It appears that the use of combinations of active and passive aeromechanical flow control techniques can improve the optical behavior of systems in the SOFIA environment. Experiments to verify these potential improvements can be performed on the KAO with sufficient modifications to the cavity and aero-mechanical technique installations.

  16. Interpolated histogram method for area optimised median computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Kaushal D.; Darji, Anand D.

    2013-04-01

    The article describes an area efficient algorithm for real-time approximate median computation on VLSI platforms. The improvement in performance and area optimisation are achieved through linear interpolation within a reduced number of histogram bins. In order to reduce the hardware utilisation further, an approximation technique for interpolation is also proposed. This approach extends the utility of the histogram method to data sets having a large dynamic range. The performance of the proposed algorithm in terms of mean squared error (MSE) and resource utilisation is provided and compared to that of the existing algorithms. This comparison indicates that more than 60% optimisation in resources is achieved with marginal compromise in the accuracy of the median. The proposed algorithm finds applications in the areas of image processing, time series analysis and median absolute deviation (MAD) computation.

  17. Landscaping of highway medians and roadway safety at unsignalized intersections.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongyun; Fabregas, Aldo; Lin, Pei-Sung

    2016-05-01

    Well-planted and maintained landscaping can help reduce driving stress, provide better visual quality, and decrease over speeding, thus improving roadway safety. Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Standard Index (SI-546) is one of the more demanding standards in the U.S. for landscaping design criteria at highway medians near intersections. The purposes of this study were to (1) empirically evaluate the safety results of SI-546 at unsignalized intersections and (2) quantify the impacts of geometrics, traffic, and landscaping design features on total crashes and injury plus fatal crashes. The studied unsignalized intersections were divided into (1) those without median trees near intersections, (2) those with median trees near intersections that were compliant with SI-546, and (3) those with median trees near intersections that were non-compliant with SI-546. A total of 72 intersections were selected, for which five-year crash data from 2006-2010 were collected. The sites that were compliant with SI-546 showed the best safety performance in terms of the lowest crash counts and crash rates. Four crash predictive models-two for total crashes and two for injury crashes-were developed. The results indicated that improperly planted and maintained median trees near highway intersections can increase the total number of crashes and injury plus fatal crashes at a 90% confidence level; no significant difference could be found in crash rates between sites that were compliant with SI-546 and sites without trees. All other conditions remaining the same, an intersection with trees that was not compliant with SI-546 had 63% more crashes and almost doubled injury plus fatal crashes than those at intersections without trees. The study indicates that appropriate landscaping in highway medians near intersections can be an engineering technology that not only improves roadway environmental quality but also maintains intersection safety.

  18. Aerodynamic performance of centrifugal compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Sayyed, S.

    1981-12-01

    Saving money with an efficient pipeline system design depends on accurately predicting compressor performance and ensuring that it meets the manufacturer's guaranteed levels. When shop testing with the actual gas is impractical, an aerodynamic test can ascertain compressor efficiency, but the accuracy and consistency of data acquisition in such tests is critical. Low test-pressure levels necessitate accounting for the effects of Reynolds number and heat transfer. Moreover, the compressor user and manufacturer must agree on the magnitude of the corrections to be applied to the test data.

  19. Multi-Disciplinary Computational Aerodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    However, as the DSV is shed and propagates along the wing it induces sudden and difficult to predict variations in aerodynamic forces and pitching ...circulation build- up around the airfoil. The pitching moment is also shifted to a lower value due to rotation- induced camber effects. Beyond a critical...on vortex breakdown,” AIAA J., Vol. 12, No. 5, 1974, pp. 602–607. 66Visbal, M. R., “Onset of vortex breakdown about a pitching delta wing ,” AIAA J

  20. Simulation of iced wing aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, M. G.; Bragg, M. B.; Kwon, O. J.; Sankar, L. N.

    1991-01-01

    The sectional and total aerodynamic load characteristics of moderate aspect ratio wings with and without simulated glaze leading edge ice were studied both computationally, using a three dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes solver, and experimentally. The wing has an untwisted, untapered planform shape with NACA 0012 airfoil section. The wing has an unswept and swept configuration with aspect ratios of 4.06 and 5.0. Comparisons of computed surface pressures and sectional loads with experimental data for identical configurations are given. The abrupt decrease in stall angle of attack for the wing, as a result of the leading edge ice formation, was demonstrated numerically and experimentally.

  1. Computational and theoretical investigation of Mars's atmospheric impact on the descent module "Exomars-2018" under aerodynamic deceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golomazov, M. M.; Ivankov, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Methods for calculating the aerodynamic impact of the Martian atmosphere on the descent module "Exomars-2018" intended for solving the problem of heat protection of the descent module during aerodynamic deceleration are presented. The results of the investigation are also given. The flow field and radiative and convective heat exchange are calculated along the trajectory of the descent module until parachute system activation.

  2. The aerodynamics of small Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics of wing model gliders and bird wings in particular are discussed. Wind tunnel measurements and aerodynamics of small Reynolds numbers are enumerated. Airfoil behavior in the critical transition from laminar to turbulent boundary layer, which is more important to bird wing models than to large airplanes, was observed. Experimental results are provided, and an artificial bird wing is described.

  3. A new technique for aerodynamic noise calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.; Pope, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    A novel method for the numerical analysis of aerodynamic noise generation is presented. The method involves first solving for the time-dependent incompressible flow for the given geometry. This fully nonlinear method that is tailored to extract the relevant acoustic fluctuations seems to be an efficient approach to the numerical analysis of aerodynamic noise generation.

  4. Future Computer Requirements for Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Recent advances in computational aerodynamics are discussed as well as motivations for and potential benefits of a National Aerodynamic Simulation Facility having the capability to solve fluid dynamic equations at speeds two to three orders of magnitude faster than presently possible with general computers. Two contracted efforts to define processor architectures for such a facility are summarized.

  5. Aerodynamics of Sounding-Rocket Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrowman, J.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical aerodynamics program TAD predicts aerodynamic characteristics of vehicles with sounding-rocket configurations. These slender, Axisymmetric finned vehicles have a wide range of aeronautical applications from rockets to high-speed armament. TAD calculates characteristics of separate portions of vehicle, calculates interference between portions, and combines results to form total vehicle solution.

  6. Aerodynamic seal assemblies for turbo-machinery

    DOEpatents

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Wolfe, Christopher; Fang, Biao

    2015-09-29

    The present application provides an aerodynamic seal assembly for use with a turbo-machine. The aerodynamic seal assembly may include a number of springs, a shoe connected to the springs, and a secondary seal positioned about the springs and the shoe.

  7. Iatrogenic selective lesion of the median nerve at the elbow.

    PubMed

    Di Fabio, Roberto; Casali, Carlo; Pierelli, Francesco

    2010-03-01

    A lesion of the median nerve may occur as a consequence of a compression by a haematoma or for a direct damage of the axons caused by a needle insertion. To date, no investigation reported a very selective lesion of the median nerve at the elbow, with the suffering limited only to the fibres for the first digit. A 53 year-old left-handed violinist underwent an arterial blood gas drawing. The patient complained immediately of an electrical shock impression going down the arm, followed by pin sensation into the first finger. A tingling sensation associated with numbness in the first fingertip and difficulty in the index-thumb pinch became progressively evident. The ENG-EMG findings showed an impairment mainly of the sensory fibres innervating the first digit and a drop of the motor action potential amplitude when the nerve was stimulated at the elbow. We reported a very partial lesion of the left median nerve at the elbow in a violinist who had a selective involvement of the fibres for his first digit. Even minimal lesions of the median nerve may impair severely the quality of life of patients.

  8. VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AND MEDIAN. REPLICATING WERNER HEGEMANN PHOTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AND MEDIAN. REPLICATING WERNER HEGEMANN PHOTO TAKEN CIRCA 1909 SEEN FROM TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT CHANNING WAY LOOKING NW. Photograph by Fredrica Drotos and Michael Kelly, July 9, 2006 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Elementary School Teachers' Understanding of the Mean and Median

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobbe, Tim

    2012-01-01

    This study provides a snapshot of elementary school teachers' understanding of the mean and median. The research is presented in light of recent work regarding preservice teachers' understanding of the mean. Common misconceptions are identified which lead to potential implications for teacher preparation programs. One of the primary concerns…

  10. Revision of the Solanum medians complex (Solanum section Petota)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solanum medians is a widely distributed wild potato species growing along the coast and along the western slopes of the Andes from central Peru and northern Chile, from along the coastal lomas near sea level to 3800 m. Fertile diploid and triploid cytotypes are common, are believed to associated wit...

  11. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will design, build, and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604BOO02G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate the aerodynamic flight database for the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. Al these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  12. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will build and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604B0002G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate an aerodynamic flight database i n the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. At these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  13. Orion Crew Module Aerodynamic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Bibb, Karen L.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Rhode, Matthew N.; Owens, Bruce; Chan, David T.; Walker, Eric L.; Bell, James H.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    The Apollo-derived Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), part of NASA s now-cancelled Constellation Program, has become the reference design for the new Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). The MPCV will serve as the exploration vehicle for all near-term human space missions. A strategic wind-tunnel test program has been executed at numerous facilities throughout the country to support several phases of aerodynamic database development for the Orion spacecraft. This paper presents a summary of the experimental static aerodynamic data collected to-date for the Orion Crew Module (CM) capsule. The test program described herein involved personnel and resources from NASA Langley Research Center, NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Johnson Space Flight Center, Arnold Engineering and Development Center, Lockheed Martin Space Sciences, and Orbital Sciences. Data has been compiled from eight different wind tunnel tests in the CEV Aerosciences Program. Comparisons are made as appropriate to highlight effects of angle of attack, Mach number, Reynolds number, and model support system effects.

  14. Aerodynamics of the hovering hummingbird.

    PubMed

    Warrick, Douglas R; Tobalske, Bret W; Powers, Donald R

    2005-06-23

    Despite profound musculoskeletal differences, hummingbirds (Trochilidae) are widely thought to employ aerodynamic mechanisms similar to those used by insects. The kinematic symmetry of the hummingbird upstroke and downstroke has led to the assumption that these halves of the wingbeat cycle contribute equally to weight support during hovering, as exhibited by insects of similar size. This assumption has been applied, either explicitly or implicitly, in widely used aerodynamic models and in a variety of empirical tests. Here we provide measurements of the wake of hovering rufous hummingbirds (Selasphorus rufus) obtained with digital particle image velocimetry that show force asymmetry: hummingbirds produce 75% of their weight support during the downstroke and only 25% during the upstroke. Some of this asymmetry is probably due to inversion of their cambered wings during upstroke. The wake of hummingbird wings also reveals evidence of leading-edge vortices created during the downstroke, indicating that they may operate at Reynolds numbers sufficiently low to exploit a key mechanism typical of insect hovering. Hummingbird hovering approaches that of insects, yet remains distinct because of effects resulting from an inherently dissimilar-avian-body plan.

  15. Perching aerodynamics and trajectory optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickenheiser, Adam; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2007-04-01

    Advances in smart materials, actuators, and control architecture have enabled new flight capabilities for aircraft. Perching is one such capability, described as a vertical landing maneuver using in-flight shape reconfiguration in lieu of high thrust generation. A morphing, perching aircraft design is presented that is capable of post stall flight and very slow landing on a vertical platform. A comprehensive model of the aircraft's aerodynamics, with special regard to nonlinear affects such as flow separation and dynamic stall, is discussed. Trajectory optimization using nonlinear programming techniques is employed to show the effects that morphing and nonlinear aerodynamics have on the maneuver. These effects are shown to decrease the initial height and distance required to initiate the maneuver, reduce the bounds on the trajectory, and decrease the required thrust for the maneuver. Perching trajectories comparing morphing versus fixed-configuration and stalled versus un-stalled aircraft are presented. It is demonstrated that a vertical landing is possible in the absence of high thrust if post-stall flight capabilities and vehicle reconfiguration are utilized.

  16. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will build and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604B0002G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate an aerodynamic flight database in the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. At these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  17. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will build and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604B0002G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate an aerodynamic flight database in the hypersonic regime, The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. At these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  18. Numerical aerodynamic simulation program long haul communications prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cmaylo, Bohden K.; Foo, Lee

    1987-01-01

    This document is a report of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Long Haul Communications Prototype (LHCP). It describes the accomplishments of the LHCP group, presents the results from all LHCP experiments and testing activities, makes recommendations for present and future LHCP activities, and evaluates the remote workstation accesses from Langley Research Center, Lewis Research Center, and Colorado State University to Ames Research Center. The report is the final effort of the Long Haul (Wideband) Communications Prototype Plan (PT-1133-02-N00), 3 October 1985, which defined the requirements for the development, test, and operation of the LHCP network and was the plan used to evaluate the remote user bandwidth requirements for the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Processing System Network.

  19. Aerodynamic effects of flexibility in flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Huang, Qingfeng; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P

    2010-03-06

    Recent work on the aerodynamics of flapping flight reveals fundamental differences in the mechanisms of aerodynamic force generation between fixed and flapping wings. When fixed wings translate at high angles of attack, they periodically generate and shed leading and trailing edge vortices as reflected in their fluctuating aerodynamic force traces and associated flow visualization. In contrast, wings flapping at high angles of attack generate stable leading edge vorticity, which persists throughout the duration of the stroke and enhances mean aerodynamic forces. Here, we show that aerodynamic forces can be controlled by altering the trailing edge flexibility of a flapping wing. We used a dynamically scaled mechanical model of flapping flight (Re approximately 2000) to measure the aerodynamic forces on flapping wings of variable flexural stiffness (EI). For low to medium angles of attack, as flexibility of the wing increases, its ability to generate aerodynamic forces decreases monotonically but its lift-to-drag ratios remain approximately constant. The instantaneous force traces reveal no major differences in the underlying modes of force generation for flexible and rigid wings, but the magnitude of force, the angle of net force vector and centre of pressure all vary systematically with wing flexibility. Even a rudimentary framework of wing veins is sufficient to restore the ability of flexible wings to generate forces at near-rigid values. Thus, the magnitude of force generation can be controlled by modulating the trailing edge flexibility and thereby controlling the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity. To characterize this, we have generated a detailed database of aerodynamic forces as a function of several variables including material properties, kinematics, aerodynamic forces and centre of pressure, which can also be used to help validate computational models of aeroelastic flapping wings. These experiments will also be useful for wing design for small

  20. August median streamflow on ungaged streams in Eastern Coastal Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2004-01-01

    Methods for estimating August median streamflow were developed for ungaged, unregulated streams in eastern coastal Maine. The methods apply to streams with drainage areas ranging in size from 0.04 to 73.2 square miles and fraction of basin underlain by a sand and gravel aquifer ranging from 0 to 71 percent. The equations were developed with data from three long-term (greater than or equal to 10 years of record) continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations, 23 partial-record streamflow- gaging stations, and 5 short-term (less than 10 years of record) continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations. A mathematical technique for estimating a standard low-flow statistic, August median streamflow, at partial-record streamflow-gaging stations and short-term continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations was applied by relating base-flow measurements at these stations to concurrent daily streamflows at nearby long-term continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations (index stations). Generalized least-squares regression analysis (GLS) was used to relate estimates of August median streamflow at streamflow-gaging stations to basin characteristics at these same stations to develop equations that can be applied to estimate August median streamflow on ungaged streams. GLS accounts for different periods of record at the gaging stations and the cross correlation of concurrent streamflows among gaging stations. Thirty-one stations were used for the final regression equations. Two basin characteristics?drainage area and fraction of basin underlain by a sand and gravel aquifer?are used in the calculated regression equation to estimate August median streamflow for ungaged streams. The equation has an average standard error of prediction from -27 to 38 percent. A one-variable equation uses only drainage area to estimate August median streamflow when less accuracy is acceptable. This equation has an average standard error of prediction from -30 to 43 percent. Model error is larger than

  1. Median polish for quality assurance of a PET scanner.

    PubMed

    Kearfott, K J; Rucker, R H

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity data for the PC 4600, a multiplanar positron emission tomograph system, were obtained over a period of several months during installation and routine clinical operation. These data were analyzed using the exploratory data analysis techniques of median polish (MP), box and whisker plots, and coded residuals. These techniques proved to be useful in spotting trends and identifying problems. Median polish had advantages over traditional percent difference techniques under some conditions because it allows separate study of more than one effect and is particularly resistant to the influence of outliers. The other exploratory data analysis techniques used are of value in interpreting the results of the MP procedure. The methods presented have direct application to any quantitative multiplanar emission tomographic imaging quality assurance program.

  2. Bayesian median regression for temporal gene expression data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Keming; Vinciotti, Veronica; Liu, Xiaohui; 't Hoen, Peter A. C.

    2007-09-01

    Most of the existing methods for the identification of biologically interesting genes in a temporal expression profiling dataset do not fully exploit the temporal ordering in the dataset and are based on normality assumptions for the gene expression. In this paper, we introduce a Bayesian median regression model to detect genes whose temporal profile is significantly different across a number of biological conditions. The regression model is defined by a polynomial function where both time and condition effects as well as interactions between the two are included. MCMC-based inference returns the posterior distribution of the polynomial coefficients. From this a simple Bayes factor test is proposed to test for significance. The estimation of the median rather than the mean, and within a Bayesian framework, increases the robustness of the method compared to a Hotelling T2-test previously suggested. This is shown on simulated data and on muscular dystrophy gene expression data.

  3. Fascicular Topography of the Human Median Nerve for Neuroprosthetic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Martínez, Ignacio; Badia, Jordi; Pascual-Font, Arán; Rodríguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    One of the most sought-after applications of neuroengineering is the communication between the arm and an artificial prosthetic device for the replacement of an amputated hand or the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. For that, an electrode is placed around or inside the median nerve to serve as interface for recording and stimulation of nerve signals coming from the fascicles that innervate the muscles responsible for hand movements. Due to the lack of a standard procedure, the electrode implantation by the surgeon is strongly based on intuition, which may result in poor performance of the neuroprosthesis because of the suboptimal location of the neural interface. To provide morphological data that can aid the neuroprosthetic surgeon with this procedure, we investigated the fascicular topography of the human median nerve along the forearm and upper arm. We first performed a description of the fascicular content and branching patterns along the length of the arm. Next we built a 3D reconstruction of the median nerve so we could analyze the fascicle morphological features in relation to the arm level. Finally, we characterized the motor content of the median nerve fascicles in the upper arm. Collectively, these results indicate that fascicular organization occurs in a short segment distal to the epicondyles and remains unaltered until the muscular branches leave the main trunk. Based on our results, overall recommendations based on electrode type and implant location can be drawn to help and aid the neuroprosthetic procedure. Invasive interfaces would be more convenient for the upper arm and the most proximal third of the forearm. Epineural electrodes seem to be most suitable for the forearm segment after fascicles have been divided from the main trunk. PMID:27445660

  4. NASA Iced Aerodynamics and Controls Current Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Gene

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the state of current research in the area of aerodynamics and aircraft control with ice conditions by the Aviation Safety Program, part of the Integrated Resilient Aircraft Controls Project (IRAC). Included in the presentation is a overview of the modeling efforts. The objective of the modeling is to develop experimental and computational methods to model and predict aircraft response during adverse flight conditions, including icing. The Aircraft icing modeling efforts includes the Ice-Contaminated Aerodynamics Modeling, which examines the effects of ice contamination on aircraft aerodynamics, and CFD modeling of ice-contaminated aircraft aerodynamics, and Advanced Ice Accretion Process Modeling which examines the physics of ice accretion, and works on computational modeling of ice accretions. The IRAC testbed, a Generic Transport Model (GTM) and its use in the investigation of the effects of icing on its aerodynamics is also reviewed. This has led to a more thorough understanding and models, both theoretical and empirical of icing physics and ice accretion for airframes, advanced 3D ice accretion prediction codes, CFD methods for iced aerodynamics and better understanding of aircraft iced aerodynamics and its effects on control surface effectiveness.

  5. Weighted median image sharpeners for the World Wide Web.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marco; Paredes, José L; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2002-01-01

    A class of robust weighted median (WM) sharpening algorithms is developed in this paper. Unlike traditional linear sharpening methods, weighted median sharpeners are shown to be less sensitive to background random noise or to image artifacts introduced by JPEG and other compression algorithms. These concepts are extended to include data dependent weights under the framework of permutation weighted medians leading to tunable sharpeners that, in essence, are insensitive to noise and compression artifacts. Permutation WM sharpeners are subsequently generalized to smoother/sharpener structures that can sharpen edges and image details while simultaneously filter out background random noise. A statistical analysis of the various algorithms is presented, theoretically validating the characteristics of the proposed sharpening structures. A number of experiments are shown for the sharpening of JPEG compressed images and sharpening of images with background film-grain noise. These algorithms can prove useful in the enhancement of compressed or noisy images posted on the World Wide Web (WWW) as well as in other applications where the underlying images are unavoidably acquired with noise.

  6. Microseismic event denoising via adaptive directional vector median filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jing; Lu, Ji-Ren; Jiang, Tian-Qi; Liang, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel denoising scheme via Radon transform-based adaptive vector directional median filters named adaptive directional vector median filter (AD-VMF) to suppress noise for microseismic downhole dataset. AD-VMF contains three major steps for microseismic downhole data processing: (i) applying Radon transform on the microseismic data to obtain the parameters of the waves, (ii) performing S-transform to determine the parameters for filters, and (iii) applying the parameters for vector median filter (VMF) to denoise the data. The steps (i) and (ii) can realize the automatic direction detection. The proposed algorithm is tested with synthetic and field datasets that were recorded with a vertical array of receivers. The P-wave and S-wave direct arrivals are properly denoised for poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) records. In the simulation case, we also evaluate the performance with mean square error (MSE) in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The result shows that the distortion of the proposed method is very low; the SNR is even less than 0 dB.

  7. Median statistics estimates of Hubble and Newton's constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethapudi, Suryarao; Desai, Shantanu

    2017-02-01

    Robustness of any statistics depends upon the number of assumptions it makes about the measured data. We point out the advantages of median statistics using toy numerical experiments and demonstrate its robustness, when the number of assumptions we can make about the data are limited. We then apply the median statistics technique to obtain estimates of two constants of nature, Hubble constant (H0) and Newton's gravitational constant ( G , both of which show significant differences between different measurements. For H0, we update the analyses done by Chen and Ratra (2011) and Gott et al. (2001) using 576 measurements. We find after grouping the different results according to their primary type of measurement, the median estimates are given by H0 = 72.5^{+2.5}_{-8} km/sec/Mpc with errors corresponding to 95% c.l. (2 σ) and G=6.674702^{+0.0014}_{-0.0009} × 10^{-11} Nm2kg-2 corresponding to 68% c.l. (1σ).

  8. Median Robust Extended Local Binary Pattern for Texture Classification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Lao, Songyang; Fieguth, Paul W; Guo, Yulan; Wang, Xiaogang; Pietikäinen, Matti

    2016-03-01

    Local binary patterns (LBP) are considered among the most computationally efficient high-performance texture features. However, the LBP method is very sensitive to image noise and is unable to capture macrostructure information. To best address these disadvantages, in this paper, we introduce a novel descriptor for texture classification, the median robust extended LBP (MRELBP). Different from the traditional LBP and many LBP variants, MRELBP compares regional image medians rather than raw image intensities. A multiscale LBP type descriptor is computed by efficiently comparing image medians over a novel sampling scheme, which can capture both microstructure and macrostructure texture information. A comprehensive evaluation on benchmark data sets reveals MRELBP's high performance-robust to gray scale variations, rotation changes and noise-but at a low computational cost. MRELBP produces the best classification scores of 99.82%, 99.38%, and 99.77% on three popular Outex test suites. More importantly, MRELBP is shown to be highly robust to image noise, including Gaussian noise, Gaussian blur, salt-and-pepper noise, and random pixel corruption.

  9. On Cup Anemometer Rotor Aerodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pindado, Santiago; Pérez, Javier; Avila-Sanchez, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The influence of anemometer rotor shape parameters, such as the cups' front area or their center rotation radius on the anemometer's performance was analyzed. This analysis was based on calibrations performed on two different anemometers (one based on magnet system output signal, and the other one based on an opto-electronic system output signal), tested with 21 different rotors. The results were compared to the ones resulting from classical analytical models. The results clearly showed a linear dependency of both calibration constants, the slope and the offset, on the cups' center rotation radius, the influence of the front area of the cups also being observed. The analytical model of Kondo et al. was proved to be accurate if it is based on precise data related to the aerodynamic behavior of a rotor's cup. PMID:22778638

  10. On cup anemometer rotor aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Pindado, Santiago; Pérez, Javier; Avila-Sanchez, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The influence of anemometer rotor shape parameters, such as the cups' front area or their center rotation radius on the anemometer's performance was analyzed. This analysis was based on calibrations performed on two different anemometers (one based on magnet system output signal, and the other one based on an opto-electronic system output signal), tested with 21 different rotors. The results were compared to the ones resulting from classical analytical models. The results clearly showed a linear dependency of both calibration constants, the slope and the offset, on the cups' center rotation radius, the influence of the front area of the cups also being observed. The analytical model of Kondo et al. was proved to be accurate if it is based on precise data related to the aerodynamic behavior of a rotor's cup.

  11. System for determining aerodynamic imbalance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Churchill, Gary B. (Inventor); Cheung, Benny K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A system is provided for determining tracking error in a propeller or rotor driven aircraft by determining differences in the aerodynamic loading on the propeller or rotor blades of the aircraft. The system includes a microphone disposed relative to the blades during the rotation thereof so as to receive separate pressure pulses produced by each of the blades during the passage thereof by the microphone. A low pass filter filters the output signal produced by the microphone, the low pass filter having an upper cut-off frequency set below the frequency at which the blades pass by the microphone. A sensor produces an output signal after each complete revolution of the blades, and a recording display device displays the outputs of the low pass filter and sensor so as to enable evaluation of the relative magnitudes of the pressure pulses produced by passage of the blades by the microphone during each complete revolution of the blades.

  12. Rarefaction Effects in Hypersonic Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    2011-05-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) technique is used for numerical analysis of rarefied-gas hypersonic flows near a blunt plate, wedge, two side-by-side plates, disk, torus, and rotating cylinder. The role of various similarity parameters (Knudsen and Mach numbers, geometrical and temperature factors, specific heat ratios, and others) in aerodynamics of the probes is studied. Important kinetic effects that are specific for the transition flow regime have been found: non-monotonic lift and drag of plates, strong repulsive force between side-by-side plates and cylinders, dependence of drag on torus radii ratio, and the reverse Magnus effect on the lift of a rotating cylinder. The numerical results are in a good agreement with experimental data, which were obtained in a vacuum chamber at low and moderate Knudsen numbers from 0.01 to 10.

  13. Aerodynamic seals for rotary machine

    DOEpatents

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Cirri, Massimiliano; Thatte, Azam Mihir; Williams, John Robert

    2016-02-09

    An aerodynamic seal assembly for a rotary machine includes multiple sealing device segments disposed circumferentially intermediate to a stationary housing and a rotor. Each of the segments includes a shoe plate with a forward-shoe section and an aft-shoe section having multiple labyrinth teeth therebetween facing the rotor. The sealing device segment also includes multiple flexures connected to the shoe plate and to a top interface element, wherein the multiple flexures are configured to allow the high pressure fluid to occupy a forward cavity and the low pressure fluid to occupy an aft cavity. Further, the sealing device segments include a secondary seal attached to the top interface element at one first end and positioned about the flexures and the shoe plate at one second end.

  14. Social Security: a financial appraisal for the median voter.

    PubMed

    Galasso, V

    Several explanations have been proposed for why voters continue to support unfunded social security systems. Browning (1975) suggests that the extremely large unfunded pension systems of most democracies depend on the existence of a voting majority composed of middle-aged and older people who fail to fully internalize the cost of financing the system. In fact, when voting, economically rational workers consider only their current and future contributions to the system and their expected pension benefits--not their past contributions, which they regard as sunk costs. If, for a majority of voters, the expected continuation return from social security exceeds the return from alternative assets, an unfunded social security system is politically sustainable. This article explores the validity of Browning's proposition by quantifying the returns that U.S. voters in presidential elections from 1964 to 1996 have obtained, or expect to obtain, from Social Security. Did "investments" in Social Security outperform alternative forms of investment, such as mutual funds or pension funds, for a majority of the voters? What can be expected for the future? The U.S. Social Security system redistributes income within age cohorts on the basis of sex, income, and marital status. To account for some of these features, the median voter is represented by a family unit whose members--a husband who accounts for 70 percent of household earnings and a wife who accounts for 30 percent--make joint economic and voting decisions. Thus, retirement and survival benefits paid out to the spouse of an insured worker can be included in the calculation of Social Security returns. Interval estimates of voters' family incomes from the U.S. Census Bureau were used to obtain the median voter's household earnings. The median voter's age is derived from the ages of those who voted in presidential elections, not from the ages of the entire electorate. The median voter's contributions to Social Security are the

  15. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  16. Some aspects of the aerodynamics of separating strap-ons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, K. K.; Krishnan, C. G.

    1994-11-01

    An aerodynamics model for analyzing strap-on separation is proposed. This model comprises both interference aerodynamics and free-body aerodynamics. The interference aerodynamics is primarily due to the close proximity of core and strap-ons. The free-body aerodynamics is solely due to the body geometry of the strap-ons. Using this aerodynamic model, the dynamics of separating strap-ons has been simulated in a six-degree-of-freedom mode to determine if a collision occurs. This aerodynamic model is very handy for various off-design studies relating to separating strap-ons.

  17. Using the HARV simulation aerodynamic model to determine forebody strake aerodynamic coefficients from flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messina, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    The method described in this report is intended to present an overview of a process developed to extract the forebody aerodynamic increments from flight tests. The process to determine the aerodynamic increments (rolling pitching, and yawing moments, Cl, Cm, Cn, respectively) for the forebody strake controllers added to the F/A - 18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) aircraft was developed to validate the forebody strake aerodynamic model used in simulation.

  18. 1999 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1999 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 8-12, 1999 in Anaheim, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in the areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to: (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working on HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and midpoint optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented, along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program. This Volume 1/Part 1 publication covers configuration aerodynamics.

  19. Aerodynamic Analyses Requiring Advanced Computers, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers given at the conference present the results of theoretical research on aerodynamic flow problems requiring the use of advanced computers. Topics discussed include two-dimensional configurations, three-dimensional configurations, transonic aircraft, and the space shuttle.

  20. Aerodynamic Analyses Requiring Advanced Computers, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Papers are presented which deal with results of theoretical research on aerodynamic flow problems requiring the use of advanced computers. Topics discussed include: viscous flows, boundary layer equations, turbulence modeling and Navier-Stokes equations, and internal flows.

  1. HSR Aerodynamic Performance Status and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, William P.; Antani, Tony; Ball, Doug; Calloway, Robert L.; Snyder, Phil

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes HSR (High Speed Research) Aerodynamic Performance Status and Challenges. The topics include: 1) Aero impact on HSR; 2) Goals and Targets; 3) Progress and Status; and 4) Remaining Challenges. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  2. Vertical Landing Aerodynamics of Reusable Rocket Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Satoshi; Nishida, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Inatani, Yoshifumi

    The aerodynamic characteristics of a vertical landing rocket are affected by its engine plume in the landing phase. The influences of interaction of the engine plume with the freestream around the vehicle on the aerodynamic characteristics are studied experimentally aiming to realize safe landing of the vertical landing rocket. The aerodynamic forces and surface pressure distributions are measured using a scaled model of a reusable rocket vehicle in low-speed wind tunnels. The flow field around the vehicle model is visualized using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) method. Results show that the aerodynamic characteristics, such as the drag force and pitching moment, are strongly affected by the change in the base pressure distributions and reattachment of a separation flow around the vehicle.

  3. Aerodynamics of a rolling airframe missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisserand, L. E.

    1981-05-01

    For guidance-related reasons, there is considerable interest in rolling missiles having single-plane steering capability. To aid the aerodynamic design of these airframes, a unique investigation into the aerodynamics of a rolling, steering missile has been carried out. It represents the first known attempt to measure in a wind tunnel the aerodynamic forces and moments that act on a spinning body-canard-tail configuration that exercises canard steering in phase with body roll position. Measurements were made with the model spinning at steady-state roll rates ranging from 15 to 40 Hz over an angle-of-attack range up to about 16 deg. This short, exploratory investigation has demonstrated that a better understanding and a more complete definition of the aerodynamics of rolling, steering vehicles can be developed by way of simulative wind-tunnel testing.

  4. Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF)

    NASA Video Gallery

    The HFFAF is the only aeroballistic range the nation currently capable of testing in gases other than air and at sub-atmospheric pressures. It is used primarily to study the aerodynamics, Aerotherm...

  5. Steady incompressible variable thickness shear layer aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    A shear flow aerodynamic theory for steady incompressible flows is presented for both the lifting and non lifting problems. The slow variation of the boundary layer thickness is considered. The slowly varying behavior is treated by using multitime scales. The analysis begins with the elementary wavy wall problem and, through Fourier superpositions over the wave number space, the shear flow equivalents to the aerodynamic transfer functions of classical potential flow are obtained. The aerodynamic transfer functions provide integral equations which relate the wall pressure and the upwash. Computational results are presented for the pressure distribution, the lift coefficient, and the center of pressure travel along a two dimensional flat plate in a shear flow. The aerodynamic load is decreased by the shear layer, compared to the potential flow. The variable thickness shear layer decreases it less than the uniform thickness shear layer based upon equal maximum shear layer thicknesses.

  6. Uniaxial aerodynamic attitude control of artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sazonov, V. V.

    1983-01-01

    Within the context of a simple mechanical model the paper examines the movement of a satellite with respect to the center of masses under conditions of uniaxial aerodynamic attitude control. The equations of motion of the satellite take account of the gravitational and restorative aerodynamic moments. It is presumed that the aerodynamic moment is much larger than the gravitational, and the motion equations contain a large parameter. A two-parameter integrated surface of these equations is constructed in the form of formal series in terms of negative powers of the large parameter, describing the oscillations and rotations of the satellite about its lengthwise axis, approximately oriented along the orbital tangent. It is proposed to treat such movements as nominal undisturbed motions of the satellite under conditions of aerodynamic attitude control. A numerical investigation is made for the above integrated surface.

  7. Aerodynamic Characterization of a Modern Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert M.; Holland, Scott D.; Blevins, John A.

    2011-01-01

    A modern launch vehicle is by necessity an extremely integrated design. The accurate characterization of its aerodynamic characteristics is essential to determine design loads, to design flight control laws, and to establish performance. The NASA Ares Aerodynamics Panel has been responsible for technical planning, execution, and vetting of the aerodynamic characterization of the Ares I vehicle. An aerodynamics team supporting the Panel consists of wind tunnel engineers, computational engineers, database engineers, and other analysts that address topics such as uncertainty quantification. The team resides at three NASA centers: Langley Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Ames Research Center. The Panel has developed strategies to synergistically combine both the wind tunnel efforts and the computational efforts with the goal of validating the computations. Selected examples highlight key flow physics and, where possible, the fidelity of the comparisons between wind tunnel results and the computations. Lessons learned summarize what has been gleaned during the project and can be useful for other vehicle development projects.

  8. Aerodynamics as a subway design parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    A parametric sensitivity study has been performed on the system operational energy requirement in order to guide subway design strategy. Aerodynamics can play a dominant or trivial role, depending upon the system characteristics. Optimization of the aerodynamic parameters may not minimize the total operational energy. Isolation of the station box from the tunnel and reduction of the inertial power requirements pay the largest dividends in terms of the operational energy requirement.

  9. Experimental Facilities and Modelling for Rarefied Aerodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    aerodynamic forces and moments that act on an object moving in the gas . The aerodynamics of rarefied gases also investigates the flow of gases in...Originally, theoretical models for rarefied gas flows were developed in the frame of the molecular kinetic theory. Thus the first self-consistent descriptions...method [7-11]. 3.0 EXPERIMENTAL FACILITIES FOR RAREFIED FLOWS 3.1 Overview Rarefied - gas (vacuum) wind tunnel is a wind tunnel operating at low pressures

  10. The oscillating wing with aerodynamically balanced elevator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussner, H G; Schwartz, I

    1941-01-01

    The two-dimensional problem of the oscillating wing with aerodynamically balanced elevator is treated in the manner that the wing is replaced by a plate with bends and stages and the airfoil section by a mean line consisting of one or more straights. The computed formulas and tables permit, on these premises, the prediction of the pressure distribution and of the aerodynamic reactions of oscillating elevators and tabs with any position of elevator hinge in respect to elevator leading edge.

  11. Physically weighted approximations of unsteady aerodynamic forces using the minimum-state method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpel, Mordechay; Hoadley, Sherwood Tiffany

    1991-01-01

    The Minimum-State Method for rational approximation of unsteady aerodynamic force coefficient matrices, modified to allow physical weighting of the tabulated aerodynamic data, is presented. The approximation formula and the associated time-domain, state-space, open-loop equations of motion are given, and the numerical procedure for calculating the approximation matrices, with weighted data and with various equality constraints are described. Two data weighting options are presented. The first weighting is for normalizing the aerodynamic data to maximum unit value of each aerodynamic coefficient. The second weighting is one in which each tabulated coefficient, at each reduced frequency value, is weighted according to the effect of an incremental error of this coefficient on aeroelastic characteristics of the system. This weighting yields a better fit of the more important terms, at the expense of less important ones. The resulting approximate yields a relatively low number of aerodynamic lag states in the subsequent state-space model. The formulation forms the basis of the MIST computer program which is written in FORTRAN for use on the MicroVAX computer and interfaces with NASA's Interaction of Structures, Aerodynamics and Controls (ISAC) computer program. The program structure, capabilities and interfaces are outlined in the appendices, and a numerical example which utilizes Rockwell's Active Flexible Wing (AFW) model is given and discussed.

  12. Fourier functional analysis for unsteady aerodynamic modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward; Chin, Suei

    1991-01-01

    A method based on Fourier analysis is developed to analyze the force and moment data obtained in large amplitude forced oscillation tests at high angles of attack. The aerodynamic models for normal force, lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients are built up from a set of aerodynamic responses to harmonic motions at different frequencies. Based on the aerodynamic models of harmonic data, the indicial responses are formed. The final expressions for the models involve time integrals of the indicial type advocated by Tobak and Schiff. Results from linear two- and three-dimensional unsteady aerodynamic theories as well as test data for a 70-degree delta wing are used to verify the models. It is shown that the present modeling method is accurate in producing the aerodynamic responses to harmonic motions and the ramp type motions. The model also produces correct trend for a 70-degree delta wing in harmonic motion with different mean angles-of-attack. However, the current model cannot be used to extrapolate data to higher angles-of-attack than that of the harmonic motions which form the aerodynamic model. For linear ramp motions, a special method is used to calculate the corresponding frequency and phase angle at a given time. The calculated results from modeling show a higher lift peak for linear ramp motion than for harmonic ramp motion. The current model also shows reasonably good results for the lift responses at different angles of attack.

  13. Prostate brachytherapy in patients with median lobe hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wallner, K; Smathers, S; Sutlief, S; Corman, J; Ellis, W

    2000-06-20

    Our aim was to document the technical and clinical course of prostate brachytherapy patients with radiographic evidence of median lobe hyperplasia (MLH). Eight patients with MLH were identified during our routine brachytherapy practice, representing 9% of the 87 brachytherapy patients treated during a 6-month period. No effort was made to avoid brachytherapy in patients noted to have MLH on diagnostic work-up. Cystoscopic evaluation was not routinely performed. Postimplant axial computed tomographic (CT) images of the prostate were obtained at 0.5 cm intervals. Preimplant urinary obstructive symptoms were quantified by the criteria of the American Urologic Association (AUA). Each patient was contacted during the writing of this report to update postimplant morbidity information. There was no apparent association between the degree of MLH and preimplant prostate volume or AUA score. Intraoperatively, we were able to visualize MLH by transrectal ultrasound and did not notice any particular difficulty placing sources in the MLH tissue or migration of sources out of the tissue. The prescription isodose covered from 81% to 99% of the postimplant CT-defined target volume, achieving adequate dose to the median lobe tissue in all patients. Two of the eight patients developed acute, postimplant urinary retention. The first patient required intermittent self-catheterization for 3 months and then resumed spontaneous urination. MLH does not appear to be a strong contraindication to prostate brachytherapy, and prophylactic resection of hypertrophic tissue in such patients is probably not warranted. Int. J. Cancer (Radiat. Oncol. Invest.) 90, 152-156 (2000).

  14. Neural Organization of the Median Ocellus of the Dragonfly

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, John E.; Chappell, Richard L.

    1972-01-01

    Two types of presumed synaptic contacts have been recognized by electron microscopy in the synaptic plexus of the median ocellus of the dragonfly. The first type is characterized by an electron-opaque, button-like organelle in the presynaptic cytoplasm, surrounded by a cluster of synaptic vesicles. Two postsynaptic elements are associated with these junctions, which we have termed button synapses. The second synaptic type is characterized by a dense cluster of synaptic vesicles adjacent to the presumed presynaptic membrane. One postsynaptic element is observed at these junctions. The overwhelming majority of synapses seen in the plexus are button synapses. They are found most commonly in the receptor cell axons where they synaptically contact ocellar nerve dendrites and adjacent receptor cell axons. Button synapses are also seen in the ocellar nerve dendrites where they appear to make synapses back onto receptor axon terminals as well as onto adjacent ocellar nerve dendrites. Reciprocal and serial synaptic arrangements between receptor cell axon terminals, and between receptor cell axon terminals and ocellar nerve dendrites are occasionally seen. It is suggested that the lateral and feedback synapses in the median ocellus of the dragonfly play a role in enhancing transients in the postsynaptic responses. PMID:5049076

  15. Morphometric studies of the muscular branch of the median nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Olave, E; Prates, J C; Gabrielli, C; Pardi, P

    1996-01-01

    The branch from the median nerve to the thenar muscles has a proximal and lateral (recurrent) course and is vulnerable to lesions that affect these muscles. Because of its anatomical-clinical importance, this branch was studied in 60 palmar regions from 30 cadavers of adult individuals of both sexes, aged between 23 and 77 y. It arose from the lateral branch of the median nerve in 83.3% of the cases. Its origin was distal to the flexor retinaculum in 48.3%, at the distal margin of the retinaculum in 31.6%, in the carpal tunnel in 18.3% and proximal to the retinaculum in 1.7%; it pierced the retinaculum in 15%. The point of recurrence of the branch was localised topographically to 34.6 +/- 3.6 mm from the distal wrist crease; the angle between its recurrent course and the longitudinal axis of the hand averaged 66.8 degrees. In 50% of the cases the muscular branch innervated abductor pollicis brevis (APB), opponens pollicis (OP) and the superficial head of flexor pollicis brevis (FPB), in 40% it supplied only APB and OP, and in 10% a short muscular branch gave rise to independent branches in the palm and which supplied APB, OP and the superficial head of FPB. The so called "accessory thenar branch' was found in 38.3%. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8886966

  16. Color demosaicking using deinterlacing and median-based filtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Tsung; Chen, Wen-Jan; Tai, Shen-Chuan

    2010-10-01

    Color demosaicking is critical to the image quality of single-sensor-based imaging devices. Caused by the sampling pattern of color filter array (CFA), the demosaicked images typically suffer from visual color artifacts in regions of high frequency and sharp edge structures, degrading the quality of camera output. We present a new high-quality demosaicking algorithm by taking advantage of deinterlacing and median-based filtering techniques. We treat the sampled green data of Bayer CFA as a form of diagonal interlaced green planes and make use of some key concepts about spatial deinterlacing to help the edge estimation in terms of both various directions and accuracy. In addition, a specific edge feature, sharp line edge of width 1 pixel, can also be handed well by the proposed method. The median-based filtering techniques are developed for suppressing most visual demosaicking artifacts, such as zipper effect, false color artifact, and interpolation artifact. Experimental results show that our algorithm is effective in suppressing visual artifacts, preserving the edges of image with sharpness and satisfying visual inspection, while keeping computational efficiency.

  17. Blunt Body Aerodynamics for Hypersonic Low Density Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Glass, Christopher E.; Greene, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed for the Apollo capsule from the hypersonic rarefied to the continuum regimes. The focus is on flow conditions similar to those experienced by the Apollo 6 Command Module during the high altitude portion of its reentry. The present focus is to highlight some of the current activities that serve as a precursor for computational tool assessments that will be used to support the development of aerodynamic data bases for future capsule flight environments, particularly those for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Results for aerodynamic forces and moments are presented that demonstrate their sensitivity to rarefaction; that is, free molecular to continuum conditions. Also, aerodynamic data are presented that shows their sensitivity to a range of reentry velocities, encompassing conditions that include reentry from low Earth orbit, lunar return, and Mars return velocities (7.7 to 15 km/s). The rarefied results obtained with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) codes are anchored in the continuum regime with data from Navier-Stokes simulations.

  18. Aerodynamic Effects in Weakly Ionized Gas: Phenomenology and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Svetozar

    2006-10-01

    Successful application of gas discharges in aerodynamics requires their efficient generation, sustaining and control at supersonic or hypersonic flow conditions. Wall-free plasma formations that meet the requirements may then act as time-controlled and space-localized actuators to modify the flow. Potential candidates for this challenging task are plasmas contained in open or linear-cavity microwave field structures. We present and discuss direct observations of aerodynamic effects activated or modified by wall-free discharges. Further, we compare two generic types of wall-free discharges. First group, applicable for inlet-type structures, consists of a periodic series of microwave-induced plasmoids generated in a linear cavity, using the outgoing wave from a microwave antenna and the reflected wave from a nearby on-axis concave reflector. The plasmoids are spaced at half-wavelength separations according to the standing-wave pattern. The plasmoids are enhanced by an ``effective focusing'' in the near field of the antenna (Fresnel region) as a result of diffraction effects and mode structure. Second group, applicable to supersonic and hypersonic boundary layers, are the surface microwave discharges enhanced by a structure of Hertz dipoles. Standard microwave discharge phenomenology, such as microwave breakdown, mode structure and plasma parameters, is revisited to present a quantitative interpretation of the observed effects. Special attention is given to complex phenomena specific to flow-plasma interaction (double electric layers, ionization waves, instabilities), which provide the physical basis for localized heating in the aerodynamic flow.

  19. Skylon Aerodynamics and SABRE Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel; Afosmis, Michael; Bowles, Jeffrey; Pandya, Shishir

    2015-01-01

    An independent partial assessment is provided of the technical viability of the Skylon aerospace plane concept, developed by Reaction Engines Limited (REL). The objectives are to verify REL's engineering estimates of airframe aerodynamics during powered flight and to assess the impact of Synergetic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) plumes on the aft fuselage. Pressure lift and drag coefficients derived from simulations conducted with Euler equations for unpowered flight compare very well with those REL computed with engineering methods. The REL coefficients for powered flight are increasingly less acceptable as the freestream Mach number is increased beyond 8.5, because the engineering estimates did not account for the increasing favorable (in terms of drag and lift coefficients) effect of underexpanded rocket engine plumes on the aft fuselage. At Mach numbers greater than 8.5, the thermal environment around the aft fuselage is a known unknown-a potential design and/or performance risk issue. The adverse effects of shock waves on the aft fuselage and plumeinduced flow separation are other potential risks. The development of an operational reusable launcher from the Skylon concept necessitates the judicious use of a combination of engineering methods, advanced methods based on required physics or analytical fidelity, test data, and independent assessments.

  20. Aerodynamics of Unsteady Sailing Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, Colin; Schutt, Riley; Borshoff, Jennifer; Alley, Philip; de Zegher, Maximilien; Williamson, Chk

    2015-11-01

    In small sailboats, the bodyweight of the sailor is proportionately large enough to induce significant unsteady motion of the boat and sail. Sailors use a variety of kinetic techniques to create sail dynamics which can provide an increment in thrust, thereby increasing the boatspeed. In this study, we experimentally investigate the unsteady aerodynamics associated with two techniques, ``upwind leech flicking'' and ``downwind S-turns''. We explore the dynamics of an Olympic class Laser sailboat equipped with a GPS, IMU, wind sensor, and camera array, sailed expertly by a member of the US Olympic team. The velocity heading of a sailing boat is oriented at an apparent wind angle to the flow. In contrast to classic flapping propulsion, the heaving of the sail section is not perpendicular to the sail's motion through the air. This leads to heave with components parallel and perpendicular to the incident flow. The characteristic motion is recreated in a towing tank where the vortex structures generated by a representative 2-D sail section are observed using Particle Image Velocimetry and the measurement of thrust and lift forces. Amongst other results, we show that the increase in driving force, generated due to heave, is larger for greater apparent wind angles.

  1. Parachute Aerodynamics From Video Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenenberger, Mark; Queen, Eric M.; Cruz, Juan R.

    2005-01-01

    A new data analysis technique for the identification of static and dynamic aerodynamic stability coefficients from wind tunnel test video data is presented. This new technique was applied to video data obtained during a parachute wind tunnel test program conducted in support of the Mars Exploration Rover Mission. Total angle-of-attack data obtained from video images were used to determine the static pitching moment curve of the parachute. During the original wind tunnel test program the static pitching moment curve had been determined by forcing the parachute to a specific total angle-of -attack and measuring the forces generated. It is shown with the new technique that this parachute, when free to rotate, trims at an angle-of-attack two degrees lower than was measured during the forced-angle tests. An attempt was also made to extract pitch damping information from the video data. Results suggest that the parachute is dynamically unstable at the static trim point and tends to become dynamically stable away from the trim point. These trends are in agreement with limit-cycle-like behavior observed in the video. However, the chaotic motion of the parachute produced results with large uncertainty bands.

  2. Microelectromechanical Systems for Aerodynamics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehregany, Mehran; DeAnna, Russell G.; Reshotko, Eli

    1996-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) embody the integration of sensors, actuators, and electronics on a single substrate using integrated circuit fabrication techniques and compatible micromachining processes. Silicon and its derivatives form the material base for the MEMS technology. MEMS devices, including micro-sensors and micro-actuators, are attractive because they can be made small (characteristic dimension about microns), be produced in large numbers with uniform performance, include electronics for high performance and sophisticated functionality, and be inexpensive. MEMS pressure sensors, wall-shear-stress sensors, and micromachined hot-wires are nearing application in aeronautics. MEMS actuators face a tougher challenge since they have to be scaled (up) to the physical phenomena that are being controlled. MEMS actuators are proposed, for example, for controlling the small structures in a turbulent boundary layer, for aircraft control, for cooling, and for mixing enhancement. Data acquisition or control logistics require integration of electronics along with the transducer elements with appropriate consideration of analog-to-digital conversion, multiplexing, and telemetry. Altogether, MEMS technology offers exciting opportunities for aerodynamics applications both in wind tunnels and in flight

  3. Aerodynamic characteristics of French consonants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demolin, Didier; Hassid, Sergio; Soquet, Alain

    2004-05-01

    This paper reports some aerodynamic measurements made on French consonants with a group of ten speakers. Speakers were recorded while saying nonsense words in phrases such as papa, dis papa encore. The nonsense words in the study combined each of the French consonants with three vowels /i, a, u/ to from two syllables words with the first syllable being the same as the second. In addition to the audio signal, recordings were made of the oral airflow, the pressure of the air in the pharynx above the vocal folds and the pressure of the air in the trachea just below the vocal folds. The pharyngeal pressure was recorded via a catheter (i.d. 5 mm) passed through the nose so that its open end could be seen in the pharynx below the uvula. The subglottal pressure was recorded via a tracheal puncture between the first and the second rings of the trachea or between the cricoid cartilage and the first tracheal ring. Results compare subglottal presssure, pharyngeal pressure, and airflow values. Comparisons are made between values obtained with male and female subjects and various types of consonants (voiced versus voiceless at the same place of articulation, stops, fricatives, and nasals).

  4. 1998 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, S. Naomi (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1998 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 9-13, in Los Angeles, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program.

  5. Modeling Powered Aerodynamics for the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle Aerodynamic Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, David T.; Walker, Eric L.; Robinson, Philip E.; Wilson, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Modeling the aerodynamics of the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) has presented many technical challenges to the developers of the Orion aerodynamic database. During a launch abort event, the aerodynamic environment around the LAV is very complex as multiple solid rocket plumes interact with each other and the vehicle. It is further complicated by vehicle separation events such as between the LAV and the launch vehicle stack or between the launch abort tower and the crew module. The aerodynamic database for the LAV was developed mainly from wind tunnel tests involving powered jet simulations of the rocket exhaust plumes, supported by computational fluid dynamic simulations. However, limitations in both methods have made it difficult to properly capture the aerodynamics of the LAV in experimental and numerical simulations. These limitations have also influenced decisions regarding the modeling and structure of the aerodynamic database for the LAV and led to compromises and creative solutions. Two database modeling approaches are presented in this paper (incremental aerodynamics and total aerodynamics), with examples showing strengths and weaknesses of each approach. In addition, the unique problems presented to the database developers by the large data space required for modeling a launch abort event illustrate the complexities of working with multi-dimensional data.

  6. 1998 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, S. Naomi (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1998 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 9-13, in Los Angeles, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry HighSpeed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in areas of. Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to: (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program.

  7. 1999 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's High-Speed Research Program sponsored the 1999 Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review on February 8-12, 1999 in Anaheim, California. The review was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in the areas of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High Lift, and Flight Controls. The review objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodynamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientists and engineers working on HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single and midpoint optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT simulation results were presented, along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas. The HSR Aerodynamic Performance Technical Review was held simultaneously with the annual review of the following airframe technology areas: Materials and Structures, Environmental Impact, Flight Deck, and Technology Integration. Thus, a fourth objective of the Review was to promote synergy between the Aerodynamic Performance technology area and the other technology areas of the HSR Program. This Volume 1/Part 2 publication covers the design optimization and testing sessions.

  8. Enhancement of Multispectral Chromosome Image Classification Using Vector Median Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karvelis, Petros S.; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I.

    Multiplex in-situ hybridization (M-FISH) is a combinatorial labeling technique in which each chromosome is labeled with 5 fluors and a DNA stain and is used for chromosome analysis. Although M-FISH facilitates the visual detection of gross anomalies, misclassified pixels and cross-hybridization often makes manual examination difficult and introduces operator bias. The success of the technique largely depends on the accuracy of pixel classification. In this work we study the use of nonlinear Vector Median Filtering (VMF) methods to induce the accuracy of pixel classification. We have evaluated our methodology using a subset of images publicly available and the classifier was trained and tested on non-overlapping chromosome images. An overall accuracy of 74.13% is reported when introducing VMF.

  9. 1997 NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop. Volume 1; Configuration Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Aerodynamic Performance Workshop on February 25-28, 1997. The workshop was designed to bring together NASA and industry High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Aerodynamic Performance technology development participants in area of Configuration Aerodynamics (transonic and supersonic cruise drag prediction and minimization), High-Lift, Flight Controls, Supersonic Laminar Flow Control, and Sonic Boom Prediction. The workshop objectives were to (1) report the progress and status of HSCT aerodyamic performance technology development; (2) disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; and (3) promote synergy among the scientist and engineers working HSCT aerodynamics. In particular, single- and multi-point optimized HSCT configurations, HSCT high-lift system performance predictions, and HSCT Motion Simulator results were presented along with executive summaries for all the Aerodynamic Performance technology areas.

  10. Missile Aerodynamics for Ascent and Re-entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Gaines L.; McCarter, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Aerodynamic force and moment equations are developed for 6-DOF missile simulations of both the ascent phase of flight and a tumbling re-entry. The missile coordinate frame (M frame) and a frame parallel to the M frame were used for formulating the aerodynamic equations. The missile configuration chosen as an example is a cylinder with fixed fins and a nose cone. The equations include both the static aerodynamic coefficients and the aerodynamic damping derivatives. The inclusion of aerodynamic damping is essential for simulating a tumbling re-entry. Appended information provides insight into aerodynamic damping.

  11. The aerodynamics of insect flight.

    PubMed

    Sane, Sanjay P

    2003-12-01

    The flight of insects has fascinated physicists and biologists for more than a century. Yet, until recently, researchers were unable to rigorously quantify the complex wing motions of flapping insects or measure the forces and flows around their wings. However, recent developments in high-speed videography and tools for computational and mechanical modeling have allowed researchers to make rapid progress in advancing our understanding of insect flight. These mechanical and computational fluid dynamic models, combined with modern flow visualization techniques, have revealed that the fluid dynamic phenomena underlying flapping flight are different from those of non-flapping, 2-D wings on which most previous models were based. In particular, even at high angles of attack, a prominent leading edge vortex remains stably attached on the insect wing and does not shed into an unsteady wake, as would be expected from non-flapping 2-D wings. Its presence greatly enhances the forces generated by the wing, thus enabling insects to hover or maneuver. In addition, flight forces are further enhanced by other mechanisms acting during changes in angle of attack, especially at stroke reversal, the mutual interaction of the two wings at dorsal stroke reversal or wing-wake interactions following stroke reversal. This progress has enabled the development of simple analytical and empirical models that allow us to calculate the instantaneous forces on flapping insect wings more accurately than was previously possible. It also promises to foster new and exciting multi-disciplinary collaborations between physicists who seek to explain the phenomenology, biologists who seek to understand its relevance to insect physiology and evolution, and engineers who are inspired to build micro-robotic insects using these principles. This review covers the basic physical principles underlying flapping flight in insects, results of recent experiments concerning the aerodynamics of insect flight, as well

  12. Experimental investigation of hypersonic aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intrieri, Peter F.

    1988-01-01

    An extensive series of ballistic range tests were conducted at the Ames Research Center to determine precisely the aerodynamic characteristics of the Galileo entry probe vehicle. Figures and tables are presented which summarize the results of these ballistic range tests. Drag data were obtained for both a nonablated and a hypothesized ablated Galileo configuration at Mach numbers from about 0.7 to 14 and at Reynolds numbers from 1000 to 4 million. The tests were conducted in air and the experimental results were compared with available Pioneer Venus data since these two configurations are similar in geometry. The nonablated Galileo configuration was also tested with two different center-of-gravity positions to obtain values of pitching-moment-curve slope which could be used in determining values of lift and center-of-pressure location for this configuration. The results indicate that the drag characteristics of the Galileo probe are qualitatively similar to that of Pioneer Venus, however, the drag of the nonablated Galileo is about 3 percent lower at the higher Mach numbers and as much as 5 percent greater at transonic Mach numbers of about 1.0 to 1.5. Also, the drag of the hypothesized ablated configuration is about 3 percent lower than that of the nonablated configuration at the higher Mach numbers but about the same at the lower Mach numbers. Additional tests are required at Reynolds numbers of 1000, 500, and 250 to determine if the dramatic rise in drag coefficient measured for Pioneer Venus at these low Reynolds numbers also occurs for Galileo, as might be expected.

  13. Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. Subba

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic space vehicles is an important factor to be considered in their design. Therefore the designers of such vehicles need reliable heat transfer data in this respect for a successful design. Such data is usually produced by testing the models of hypersonic surfaces in wind tunnels. Most of the hypersonic test facilities at present are conventional blow-down tunnels whose run times are of the order of several seconds. The surface temperatures on such models are obtained using standard techniques such as thin-film resistance gages, thin-skin transient calorimeter gages and coaxial thermocouple or video acquisition systems such as phosphor thermography and infrared thermography. The data are usually reduced assuming that the model behaves like a semi-infinite solid (SIS) with constant properties and that heat transfer is by one-dimensional conduction only. This simplifying assumption may be valid in cases where models are thick, run-times short, and thermal diffusivities small. In many instances, however, when these conditions are not met, the assumption may lead to significant errors in the heat transfer results. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate this aspect. Specifically, the objectives are as follows: (1) to determine the limiting conditions under which a model can be considered a semi-infinite body; (2) to estimate the extent of errors involved in the reduction of the data if the models violate the assumption; and (3) to come up with correlation factors which when multiplied by the results obtained under the SIS assumption will provide the results under the actual conditions.

  14. Aerodynamic Simulation of Ice Accretion on Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Bragg, Michael B.; Busch, Greg T.; Montreuil, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    This report describes recent improvements in aerodynamic scaling and simulation of ice accretion on airfoils. Ice accretions were classified into four types on the basis of aerodynamic effects: roughness, horn, streamwise, and spanwise ridge. The NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was used to generate ice accretions within these four types using both subscale and full-scale models. Large-scale, pressurized windtunnel testing was performed using a 72-in.- (1.83-m-) chord, NACA 23012 airfoil model with high-fidelity, three-dimensional castings of the IRT ice accretions. Performance data were recorded over Reynolds numbers from 4.5 x 10(exp 6) to 15.9 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers from 0.10 to 0.28. Lower fidelity ice-accretion simulation methods were developed and tested on an 18-in.- (0.46-m-) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model in a small-scale wind tunnel at a lower Reynolds number. The aerodynamic accuracy of the lower fidelity, subscale ice simulations was validated against the full-scale results for a factor of 4 reduction in model scale and a factor of 8 reduction in Reynolds number. This research has defined the level of geometric fidelity required for artificial ice shapes to yield aerodynamic performance results to within a known level of uncertainty and has culminated in a proposed methodology for subscale iced-airfoil aerodynamic simulation.

  15. Bat flight: aerodynamics, kinematics and flight morphology.

    PubMed

    Hedenström, Anders; Johansson, L Christoffer

    2015-03-01

    Bats evolved the ability of powered flight more than 50 million years ago. The modern bat is an efficient flyer and recent research on bat flight has revealed many intriguing facts. By using particle image velocimetry to visualize wake vortices, both the magnitude and time-history of aerodynamic forces can be estimated. At most speeds the downstroke generates both lift and thrust, whereas the function of the upstroke changes with forward flight speed. At hovering and slow speed bats use a leading edge vortex to enhance the lift beyond that allowed by steady aerodynamics and an inverted wing during the upstroke to further aid weight support. The bat wing and its skeleton exhibit many features and control mechanisms that are presumed to improve flight performance. Whereas bats appear aerodynamically less efficient than birds when it comes to cruising flight, they have the edge over birds when it comes to manoeuvring. There is a direct relationship between kinematics and the aerodynamic performance, but there is still a lack of knowledge about how (and if) the bat controls the movements and shape (planform and camber) of the wing. Considering the relatively few bat species whose aerodynamic tracks have been characterized, there is scope for new discoveries and a need to study species representing more extreme positions in the bat morphospace.

  16. The Sky's the Limit! With Math and Science. Aerodynamics. Book 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiebe, Arthur, Ed.; And Others

    Developed for use primarily with students of grades five through nine, the activities presented in this book provide teachers and students with opportunities of exploring the science of aerodynamics. The activities are designed so that students can practice and apply the 22 skills and concepts related to flight in problem-solving situations. Each…

  17. Selection of optimum median-filter-based ambiguity removal algorithm parameters for NSCAT. [NASA scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, Scott; Dunbar, R. Scott; Hsiao, S. Vincent; Long, David G.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Scatterometer, NSCAT, is an active spaceborne radar designed to measure the normalized radar backscatter coefficient (sigma0) of the ocean surface. These measurements can, in turn, be used to infer the surface vector wind over the ocean using a geophysical model function. Several ambiguous wind vectors result because of the nature of the model function. A median-filter-based ambiguity removal algorithm will be used by the NSCAT ground data processor to select the best wind vector from the set of ambiguous wind vectors. This process is commonly known as dealiasing or ambiguity removal. The baseline NSCAT ambiguity removal algorithm and the method used to select the set of optimum parameter values are described. An extensive simulation of the NSCAT instrument and ground data processor provides a means of testing the resulting tuned algorithm. This simulation generates the ambiguous wind-field vectors expected from the instrument as it orbits over a set of realistic meoscale wind fields. The ambiguous wind field is then dealiased using the median-based ambiguity removal algorithm. Performance is measured by comparison of the unambiguous wind fields with the true wind fields. Results have shown that the median-filter-based ambiguity removal algorithm satisfies NSCAT mission requirements.

  18. Photogrammetry of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kushner, Laura Kathryn; Littell, Justin D.; Cassell, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, two large-scale models of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic decelerator were tested in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center. One of the objectives of this test was to measure model deflections under aerodynamic loading that approximated expected flight conditions. The measurements were acquired using stereo photogrammetry. Four pairs of stereo cameras were mounted inside the NFAC test section, each imaging a particular section of the HIAD. The views were then stitched together post-test to create a surface deformation profile. The data from the photogram- metry system will largely be used for comparisons to and refinement of Fluid Structure Interaction models. This paper describes how a commercial photogrammetry system was adapted to make the measurements and presents some preliminary results.

  19. History of the numerical aerodynamic simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Victor L.; Ballhaus, William F., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) program has reached a milestone with the completion of the initial operating configuration of the NAS Processing System Network. This achievement is the first major milestone in the continuing effort to provide a state-of-the-art supercomputer facility for the national aerospace community and to serve as a pathfinder for the development and use of future supercomputer systems. The underlying factors that motivated the initiation of the program are first identified and then discussed. These include the emergence and evolution of computational aerodynamics as a powerful new capability in aerodynamics research and development, the computer power required for advances in the discipline, the complementary nature of computation and wind tunnel testing, and the need for the government to play a pathfinding role in the development and use of large-scale scientific computing systems. Finally, the history of the NAS program is traced from its inception in 1975 to the present time.

  20. Summary analysis of the Gemini entry aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitnah, A. M.; Howes, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    The aerodynamic data that were derived in 1967 from the analysis of flight-generated data for the Gemini entry module are presented. These data represent the aerodynamic characteristics exhibited by the vehicle during the entry portion of Gemini 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, 11, and 12 missions. For the Gemini, 5, 8, 10, 11, and 12 missions, the flight-generated lift-to-drag ratios and corresponding angles of attack are compared with the wind tunnel data. These comparisons show that the flight generated lift-to-drag ratios are consistently lower than were anticipated from the tunnel data. Numerous data uncertainties are cited that provide an insight into the problems that are related to an analysis of flight data developed from instrumentation systems, the primary functions of which are other than the evaluation of flight aerodynamic performance.

  1. Bat flight generates complex aerodynamic tracks.

    PubMed

    Hedenström, A; Johansson, L C; Wolf, M; von Busse, R; Winter, Y; Spedding, G R

    2007-05-11

    The flapping flight of animals generates an aerodynamic footprint as a time-varying vortex wake in which the rate of momentum change represents the aerodynamic force. We showed that the wakes of a small bat species differ from those of birds in some important respects. In our bats, each wing generated its own vortex loop. Also, at moderate and high flight speeds, the circulation on the outer (hand) wing and the arm wing differed in sign during the upstroke, resulting in negative lift on the hand wing and positive lift on the arm wing. Our interpretations of the unsteady aerodynamic performance and function of membranous-winged, flapping flight should change modeling strategies for the study of equivalent natural and engineered flying devices.

  2. Physics of badminton shuttlecocks. Part 1 : aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Caroline; Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2011-11-01

    We study experimentally shuttlecocks dynamics. In this part we show that shuttlecock trajectory is highly different from classical parabola. When one takes into account the aerodynamic drag, the flight of the shuttlecock quickly curves downwards and almost reaches a vertical asymptote. We solve the equation of motion with gravity and drag at high Reynolds number and find an analytical expression of the reach. At high velocity, this reach does not depend on velocity anymore. Even if you develop your muscles you will not manage to launch the shuttlecock very far because of the ``aerodynamic wall.'' As a consequence you can predict the length of the field. We then discuss the extend of the aerodynamic wall to other projectiles like sports balls and its importance.

  3. Miniature Trailing Edge Effector for Aerodynamic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hak-Tae (Inventor); Bieniawski, Stefan R. (Inventor); Kroo, Ilan M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Improved miniature trailing edge effectors for aerodynamic control are provided. Three types of devices having aerodynamic housings integrated to the trailing edge of an aerodynamic shape are presented, which vary in details of how the control surface can move. A bucket type device has a control surface which is the back part of a C-shaped member having two arms connected by the back section. The C-shaped section is attached to a housing at the ends of the arms, and is rotatable about an axis parallel to the wing trailing edge to provide up, down and neutral states. A flip-up type device has a control surface which rotates about an axis parallel to the wing trailing edge to provide up, down, neutral and brake states. A rotating type device has a control surface which rotates about an axis parallel to the chord line to provide up, down and neutral states.

  4. Aerodynamics of sounding rockets at supersonic speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vira, N. R.

    This dissertation presents a practical and low cost method of computing the aerodynamic characteristics of vehicles such as sounding rockets, high speed bombs, projectiles and guided missiles in supersonic flight. The vehicle configuration consists of a slender axisymmetric body with a conical or ogive noise, cylinders, shoulders and boattails, if any, and have sets of two, three or four fins. Geometry of the fin cross section can be single wedge, double wedge, modified single wedge or modified double wedge. First the aerodynamics of the fins and the body are analyzed separately; then fin body and fore and aft fin interferences are accounted for when they are combined to form the total vehicle. Results and formulas documented in this work are the basis of the supersonic portion of the Theoretical Aerodynamic Derivatives (TAD) computer program operating at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  5. Identification of aerodynamic models for maneuvering aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward; Hu, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    A Fourier analysis method was developed to analyze harmonic forced-oscillation data at high angles of attack as functions of the angle of attack and its time rate of change. The resulting aerodynamic responses at different frequencies are used to build up the aerodynamic models involving time integrals of the indicial type. An efficient numerical method was also developed to evaluate these time integrals for arbitrary motions based on a concept of equivalent harmonic motion. The method was verified by first using results from two-dimensional and three-dimensional linear theories. The developed models for C sub L, C sub D, and C sub M based on high-alpha data for a 70 deg delta wing in harmonic motions showed accurate results in reproducing hysteresis. The aerodynamic models are further verified by comparing with test data using ramp-type motions.

  6. Turbine disk cavity aerodynamics and heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Daniels, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to define the nature of the aerodynamics and heat transfer for the flow within the disk cavities and blade attachments of a large-scale model, simulating the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopump drive turbines. These experiments of the aerodynamic driving mechanisms explored the following: (1) flow between the main gas path and the disk cavities; (2) coolant flow injected into the disk cavities; (3) coolant density; (4) leakage flows through the seal between blades; and (5) the role that each of these various flows has in determining the adiabatic recovery temperature at all of the critical locations within the cavities. The model and the test apparatus provide close geometrical and aerodynamic simulation of all the two-stage cavity flow regions for the SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbopump and the ability to simulate the sources and sinks for each cavity flow.

  7. Aerodynamic optimization studies on advanced architecture computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chawla, Kalpana

    1995-01-01

    The approach to carrying out multi-discipline aerospace design studies in the future, especially in massively parallel computing environments, comprises of choosing (1) suitable solvers to compute solutions to equations characterizing a discipline, and (2) efficient optimization methods. In addition, for aerodynamic optimization problems, (3) smart methodologies must be selected to modify the surface shape. In this research effort, a 'direct' optimization method is implemented on the Cray C-90 to improve aerodynamic design. It is coupled with an existing implicit Navier-Stokes solver, OVERFLOW, to compute flow solutions. The optimization method is chosen such that it can accomodate multi-discipline optimization in future computations. In the work , however, only single discipline aerodynamic optimization will be included.

  8. Status of Nozzle Aerodynamic Technology at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; McDaniels, David M.; Smith, Bud; Owens, Zachary

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the status of nozzle aerodynamic technology at MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center). The objectives of this presentation were to provide insight into MSFC in-house nozzle aerodynamic technology, design, analysis, and testing. Under CDDF (Center Director's Discretionary Fund), 'Altitude Compensating Nozzle Technology', are the following tasks: Development of in-house ACN (Altitude Compensating Nozzle) aerodynamic design capability; Building in-house experience for all aspects of ACN via End-to-End Nozzle Test Program; Obtaining Experimental Data for Annular Aerospike: Thrust eta, TVC (thrust vector control) capability and surface pressures. To support selection/optimization of future Launch Vehicle propulsion we needed a parametric design and performance tool for ACN. We chose to start with the ACN Aerospike Nozzles.

  9. Aerodynamics of magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schetz, Joseph A.; Marchman, James F., III

    1996-01-01

    High-speed (500 kph) trains using magnetic forces for levitation, propulsion and control offer many advantages for the nation and a good opportunity for the aerospace community to apply 'high tech' methods to the domestic sector. One area of many that will need advanced research is the aerodynamics of such MAGLEV (Magnetic Levitation) vehicles. There are important issues with regard to wind tunnel testing and the application of CFD to these devices. This talk will deal with the aerodynamic design of MAGLEV vehicles with emphasis on wind tunnel testing. The moving track facility designed and constructed in the 6 ft. Stability Wind Tunnel at Virginia Tech will be described. Test results for a variety of MAGLEV vehicle configurations will be presented. The last topic to be discussed is a Multi-disciplinary Design approach that is being applied to MAGLEV vehicle configuration design including aerodynamics, structures, manufacturability and life-cycle cost.

  10. Posterolateral approach to ruptured median and paramedian cervical disk.

    PubMed

    Fager, C A

    1983-12-01

    The trend toward anterior diskectomy for median and paramedian cervical disk rupture has tended to obscure progressive development of the posterolateral approach to these lesions. Modifications of surgical technique from the classic posterior approach have allowed direct access to these lesions, provided for satisfactory decompression of the spinal cord, especially when there is associated spondylosis, and avoided all of the disadvantages of anterior disk surgery. Of 28 patients operated on since 1950, 26 have had significant preoperative myelopathy or myeloradiculopathy. Two patients with obvious spinal cord compression and massive myelographic defects had no neurologic deficit. Improvement has been observed in every patient; 16 patients have had full recovery, and 8 others have had minor residual symptoms and asymptomatic signs. Although four patients have been lost to follow-up, they were all seen at least once after operation. No instance of increased deficit has been seen postoperatively, in contrast to the author's experience with spondylotic myelopathy. Postoperative contrast studies, which have now been performed on eight patients, confirm satisfactory excision of these lesions and decompression.

  11. Approximate Median Regression for Complex Survey Data with Skewed Response

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Raphael André; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Sinha, Debajyoti; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Pan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ready availability of public-use data from various large national complex surveys has immense potential for the assessment of population characteristics using regression models. Complex surveys can be used to identify risk factors for important diseases such as cancer. Existing statistical methods based on estimating equations and/or utilizing resampling methods are often not valid with survey data due to complex survey design features. That is, stratification, multistage sampling and weighting. In this paper, we accommodate these design features in the analysis of highly skewed response variables arising from large complex surveys. Specifically, we propose a double-transform-both-sides (DTBS) based estimating equations approach to estimate the median regression parameters of the highly skewed response; the DTBS approach applies the same Box-Cox type transformation twice to both the outcome and regression function. The usual sandwich variance estimate can be used in our approach, whereas a resampling approach would be needed for a pseudo-likelihood based on minimizing absolute deviations (MAD). Furthermore, the approach is relatively robust to the true underlying distribution, and has much smaller mean square error than a MAD approach. The method is motivated by an analysis of laboratory data on urinary iodine (UI) concentration from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. PMID:27062562

  12. Propulsion System Airframe Integration Issues and Aerodynamic Database Development for the Hyper-X Flight Research Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelund, Walter C.; Holland, Scott D.; Cockrell, Charles E., Jr.; Bittner, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Hyper-X Research Vehicle will provide a unique opportunity to obtain data on an operational airframe integrated scramjet propulsion system at true flight conditions. The airframe integrated nature of the scramjet engine with the Hyper-X vehicle results in a strong coupling effect between the propulsion system operation and the airframe s basic aerodynamic characteristics. Comments on general airframe integrated scramjet propulsion system effects on vehicle aerodynamic performance, stability, and control are provided, followed by examples specific to the Hyper-X research vehicle. An overview is provided of the current activities associated with the development of the Hyper-X aerodynamic database, including wind tunnel test activities and parallel CFD analysis efforts. A brief summary of the Hyper-X aerodynamic characteristics is provided, including the direct and indirect effects of the airframe integrated scramjet propulsion system operation on the basic airframe stability and control characteristics.

  13. Aerodynamic detuning analysis of an unstalled supersonic turbofan cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyniak, D.; Fleeter, S.

    1985-01-01

    An approach to passive flutter control is aerodynamic detuning, defined as designed passage-to-passage differences in the unsteady aerodynamic flow field of a rotor blade row. Thus, aerodynamic detuning directly affects the fundamental driving mechanism for flutter. A model to demonstrate the enhanced supersonic aeroelastic stability associated with aerodynamic detuning is developed. The stability of an aerodynamically detuned cascade operating in a supersonic inlet flow field with a subsonic leading edge locus is analyzed, with the aerodynamic detuning accomplished by means of nonuniform circumferential spacing of adjacent rotor blades. The unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments on the blading are defined in terms of influence coefficients in a manner that permits the stability of both a conventional uniformally spaced rotor configuration as well as the detuned nonuniform circumferentially spaced rotor to be determined. With Verdon's uniformly spaced Cascade B as a baseline, this analysis is then utilized to demonstrate the potential enhanced aeroelastic stability associated with this particular type of aerodynamic detuning.

  14. Airfoil Ice-Accretion Aerodynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.; Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Guffond, Didier; Montreuil, E.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, ONERA, and the University of Illinois are conducting a major research program whose goal is to improve our understanding of the aerodynamic scaling of ice accretions on airfoils. The program when it is completed will result in validated scaled simulation methods that produce the essential aerodynamic features of the full-scale iced-airfoil. This research will provide some of the first, high-fidelity, full-scale, iced-airfoil aerodynamic data. An initial study classified ice accretions based on their aerodynamics into four types: roughness, streamwise ice, horn ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. Subscale testing using a NACA 23012 airfoil was performed in the NASA IRT and University of Illinois wind tunnel to better understand the aerodynamics of these ice types and to test various levels of ice simulation fidelity. These studies are briefly reviewed here and have been presented in more detail in other papers. Based on these results, full-scale testing at the ONERA F1 tunnel using cast ice shapes obtained from molds taken in the IRT will provide full-scale iced airfoil data from full-scale ice accretions. Using these data as a baseline, the final step is to validate the simulation methods in scale in the Illinois wind tunnel. Computational ice accretion methods including LEWICE and ONICE have been used to guide the experiments and are briefly described and results shown. When full-scale and simulation aerodynamic results are available, these data will be used to further develop computational tools. Thus the purpose of the paper is to present an overview of the program and key results to date.

  15. The aerodynamics and control of free flight manoeuvres in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Michael H; Muijres, Florian T

    2016-09-26

    A firm understanding of how fruit flies hover has emerged over the past two decades, and recent work has focused on the aerodynamic, biomechanical and neurobiological mechanisms that enable them to manoeuvre and resist perturbations. In this review, we describe how flies manipulate wing movement to control their body motion during active manoeuvres, and how these actions are regulated by sensory feedback. We also discuss how the application of control theory is providing new insight into the logic and structure of the circuitry that underlies flight stability.This article is part of the themed issue 'Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight'.

  16. Feasibility study for a numerical aerodynamic simulation facility: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, N. R.

    1979-01-01

    The Ames Research Center of NASA is engaged in the development and investigation of numerical methods and computer technologies to be employed in conjunction with physical experiments, particularly utilizing wind tunnels in the furtherance of the field of aircraft and aerodynamic body design. Several studies, aimed primarily at the areas of development and production of extremely high-speed computing facilities, were conducted. The studies focused on evaluating the aspects of feasibility, reliability, costs, and practicability of designing, constructing, and bringing into effect production of a special-purpose system. An executive summary of the activities for this project is presented in this volume.

  17. Aerodynamic investigations of a disc-wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrache, Alexandru; Frunzulica, Florin; Grigorescu, Sorin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics of a wing-disc, for a civil application in the fire-fighting system. The aerodynamic analysis is performed using a CFD code, named ANSYS Fluent, in the flow speed range up to 25 m/s, at lower and higher angle of attack. The simulation is three-dimensional, using URANS completed by a SST turbulence model. The results are used to examine the flow around the disc with increasing angle of attack and the structure of the wake.

  18. Aerodynamics of the upper surface blow flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, A. E., III

    1972-01-01

    The results of some preliminary wind-tunnel investigations made to provide fundamental aerodynamic information on the upper surface blown jet-flap concept incorporating high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines are summarized. The results of the investigation have shown the concept to have aerodynamic performance generally similar to that of other externally blown high-lift systems. A few of the more critical problems associated with this concept have been identified and preliminary solutions to some of these problems have been found. These results have proven to be sufficiently encouraging to warrant continuation of fundamental research efforts on the concept.

  19. Air flow testing on aerodynamic truck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    After leasing a cab-over tractor-trailer from a Southern California firm, Dryden researchers added sheet metal modifications like those shown here. They rounded the front corners and edges, and placed a smooth fairing on the cab's roofs and sides extending back to the trailer. During the investigation of truck aerodynamics, the techniques honed in flight research proved highly applicable. By closing the gap between the cab and the trailer, for example, researchers discovered a significant reduction in aerodynamic drag, one resulting in 20 to 25 percent less fuel consumption than the standard design. Many truck manufacturers subsequently incorporated similar modifications on their products.

  20. Rarefied Transitional Bridging of Blunt Body Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, R. G.; Blanchard, R. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1998-01-01

    The bridging procedures discussed provide an accurate engineering method for predicting rarefied transitional aerodynamics of spherically-blunted cone entry vehicles. The single-point procedure offers a way to improve the bridging procedures while minimizing the computational effort. However, the accuracy of these procedures ultimately depends on accurate knowledge of the aerodynamics in the free-molecular and continuum limits. The excellent agreement shown for DSMC predictions and bridging relations with the Viking flight data in transitional regime enhance the coincidence in these procedures.

  1. Unstructured mesh algorithms for aerodynamic calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The use of unstructured mesh techniques for solving complex aerodynamic flows is discussed. The principle advantages of unstructured mesh strategies, as they relate to complex geometries, adaptive meshing capabilities, and parallel processing are emphasized. The various aspects required for the efficient and accurate solution of aerodynamic flows are addressed. These include mesh generation, mesh adaptivity, solution algorithms, convergence acceleration, and turbulence modeling. Computations of viscous turbulent two-dimensional flows and inviscid three-dimensional flows about complex configurations are demonstrated. Remaining obstacles and directions for future research are also outlined.

  2. Transpiration effects in perforated plate aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwaba, R.; Ochrymiuk, T.

    2016-10-01

    Perforated walls find a wide use as a method of flow control and effusive cooling. Experimental investigations of the gas flow past perforated plate with microholes (110μm) were carried out. The wide range of pressure at the inlet were investigated. Two distinguishable flow regimes were obtained: laminar and turbulent regime.The results are in good agreement with theory, simulations and experiments on large scale perforated plates and compressible flows in microtubules. Formulation of the transpiration law was associated with the porous plate aerodynamics properties. Using a model of transpiration flow the “aerodynamic porosity” could be determined for microholes.

  3. Unsteady Aerodynamics - Subsonic Compressible Inviscid Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A. V.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a new analytical treatment of Unsteady Aerodynamics - the linear theory covering the subsonic compressible (inviscid) case - drawing on some recent work in Operator Theory and Functional Analysis. The specific new results are: (a) An existence and uniqueness proof for the Laplace transform version of the Possio integral equation as well as a new closed form solution approximation thereof. (b) A new representation for the time-domain solution of the subsonic compressible aerodynamic equations emphasizing in particular the role of the initial conditions.

  4. Predicted aerodynamic characteristics for HL-20 lifting-body using the aerodynamic preliminary analysis system (APAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Christopher I.; Ware, George M.

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of the HL-20 lifting body configuraiton obtained through the APAS and from wind-tunnel tests have been compared. The APAS is considered to be an easy-to-use, relatively simple tool for quick preliminary estimation of vehicle aerodynamics. The APAS estimates are found to be in good agreement with experimental results to be used for preliminary evaluation of the HL-20. The APAS accuracy in predicting aerodynamics of the HL-20 varied over the Mach range. The speed ranges of best agreement were subsonic and hypersonic, while least agreement was in the Mach range from 1.2 to about 2,5.

  5. Median nerve stimulation modulates extracellular signals in the primary motor area of a macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Papazachariadis, Odysseas; Dante, Vittorio; Ferraina, Stefano

    2013-08-29

    Aiming to better define the functional influence of somatosensory stimuli on the primary motor cortex (M1) of primates, we investigated changes in extracellular neural activity induced by repetitive median nerve stimulation (MNS). We described neural adaptation and signal integration in both the multiunit activity (MUA) and the local field potential (LFP). To identify integration of initial M1 activity in the MNS response, we tested the correlation between peak amplitude responses and band energy preceding the peaks. Most of the sites studied in the M1 resulted responsive to MNS. MUA response peak amplitude decreased significantly in time in all sites during repetitive MNS, LFP response peak amplitude instead resulted more variable. Similarly, correlation analysis with the initial activity revealed a significant influence when tested using MUA peak amplitude modulation and a less significant correlation when tested using LFP peak amplitude. Our findings improve current knowledge on mechanisms underlying early M1 changes consequent to afferent somatosensory stimuli.

  6. Droplet aerodynamics, cellular uptake, and efficacy of a nebulizable corticosteroid nanosuspension are superior to a micronized dosage form.

    PubMed

    Britland, Stephen; Finter, Wayne; Chrystyn, Henry; Eagland, Donald; Abdelrahim, Mohamed E

    2012-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids are considered to be an effective prophylactic against the morbid symptoms of several lung diseases, but scope remains for improvement in drug delivery technology to benefit bioavailability and treatment compliance. To ascertain whether dosage form might influence bioavailability, the emission characteristics and efficacy of a nanoparticulate budesonide formulation (Nanagel®) were compared with those of a proprietary micronized suspension (Pulmicort®) when delivered as a nebulized aerosol to human airway epithelial cells in a culture model. Having the visual appearance of a clear solution, Nanagel® was delivered by both jet and vibrating mesh nebulizers as an increased fine particle fraction and with a smaller mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) compared to the micronized suspension. Quantitative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of cultured epithelia one hour after treatment with Nanagel® revealed a significantly greater cellular accumulation of budesonide when compared with Pulmicort® for an equivalent dose, a differential which persisted 24 and 48 h later. A quantitative in vitro assay measuring the activity of enzymes involved in superoxide production revealed that stressed HaCaT cells (a long-lived, spontaneously immortalized human keratinocyte line) treated with Nanagel® continued to show significantly greater attenuation of inflammatory response compared with Pulmicort®-treated cells 24 h after the application of an equivalent budesonide dose. The present in vitro findings suggest that formulation of inhalable drugs such as budesonide as aerosolized nanoparticulate, rather than microparticulate, suspensions can enhance bioavailability with concomitant improvements in efficacy.

  7. 14 CFR 25.445 - Auxiliary aerodynamic surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Auxiliary aerodynamic surfaces. 25.445... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.445 Auxiliary aerodynamic surfaces. (a) When significant, the aerodynamic influence...

  8. Aerodynamics of high frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng; Roll, Jesse; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic performance of high frequency flapping wings using a 2.5 gram robotic insect mechanism developed in our lab. The mechanism flaps up to 65Hz with a pair of man-made wing mounted with 10cm wingtip-to-wingtip span. The mean aerodynamic lift force was measured by a lever platform, and the flow velocity and vorticity were measured using a stereo DPIV system in the frontal, parasagittal, and horizontal planes. Both near field (leading edge vortex) and far field flow (induced flow) were measured with instantaneous and phase-averaged results. Systematic experiments were performed on the man-made wings, cicada and hawk moth wings due to their similar size, frequency and Reynolds number. For insect wings, we used both dry and freshly-cut wings. The aerodynamic force increase with flapping frequency and the man-made wing generates more than 4 grams of lift at 35Hz with 3 volt input. Here we present the experimental results and the major differences in their aerodynamic performances.

  9. Aerodynamic and Kinetic Processes in Flames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    Soot Extinction by Aerodynamic Straining In Counterflow Diffusion Flames," by D. X. Du, R. L. Axelbaum, W. L. Flower and C. K. Law, to appear in Proc...8217 by R. L. Axelbaum, W. L. Flower and C. K. Law, submitted. 14. "Laminar Flame Speeds pf Methane/Air Mixtures Under Reduced and Elevated Pressures," by F

  10. Efficient Global Aerodynamic Modeling from Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    A method for identifying global aerodynamic models from flight data in an efficient manner is explained and demonstrated. A novel experiment design technique was used to obtain dynamic flight data over a range of flight conditions with a single flight maneuver. Multivariate polynomials and polynomial splines were used with orthogonalization techniques and statistical modeling metrics to synthesize global nonlinear aerodynamic models directly and completely from flight data alone. Simulation data and flight data from a subscale twin-engine jet transport aircraft were used to demonstrate the techniques. Results showed that global multivariate nonlinear aerodynamic dependencies could be accurately identified using flight data from a single maneuver. Flight-derived global aerodynamic model structures, model parameter estimates, and associated uncertainties were provided for all six nondimensional force and moment coefficients for the test aircraft. These models were combined with a propulsion model identified from engine ground test data to produce a high-fidelity nonlinear flight simulation very efficiently. Prediction testing using a multi-axis maneuver showed that the identified global model accurately predicted aircraft responses.

  11. Nozzle Aerodynamic Stability During a Throat Shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawecki, Edwin J.; Ribeiro, Gregg L.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on the internal aerodynamic stability of a family of two-dimensional (2-D) High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) nozzle concepts. These nozzles function during takeoff as mixer-ejectors to meet acoustic requirements, and then convert to conventional high-performance convergent-divergent (CD) nozzles at cruise. The transition between takeoff mode and cruise mode results in the aerodynamic throat and the minimum cross-sectional area that controls the engine backpressure shifting location within the nozzle. The stability and steadiness of the nozzle aerodynamics during this so called throat shift process can directly affect the engine aerodynamic stability, and the mechanical design of the nozzle. The objective of the study was to determine if pressure spikes or other perturbations occurred during the throat shift process and, if so, identify the caused mechanisms for the perturbations. The two nozzle concepts modeled in the test program were the fixed chute (FC) and downstream mixer (DSM). These 2-D nozzles differ principally in that the FC has a large over-area between the forward throat and aft throat locations, while the DSM has an over-area of only about 10 percent. The conclusions were that engine mass flow and backpressure can be held constant simultaneously during nozzle throat shifts on this class of nozzles, and mode shifts can be accomplished at a constant mass flow and engine backpressure without upstream pressure perturbations.

  12. Rarefield-Flow Shuttle Aerodynamics Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Larman, Kevin T.; Moats, Christina D.

    1994-01-01

    A model of the Shuttle Orbiter rarefied-flow aerodynamic force coefficients has been derived from the ratio of flight acceleration measurements. The in-situ, low-frequency (less than 1Hz), low-level (approximately 1 x 10(exp -6) g) acceleration measurements are made during atmospheric re-entry. The experiment equipment designed and used for this task is the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP), one of the sensor packages in the Orbiter Experiments Program. To date, 12 HiRAP re-entry mission data sets spanning a period of about 10 years have been processed. The HiRAP-derived aerodynamics model is described in detail. The model includes normal and axial hypersonic continuum coefficient equations as function of angle of attack, body-flap deflection, and elevon deflection. Normal and axial free molecule flow coefficient equations as a function of angle of attack are also presented, along with flight-derived rarefied-flow transition bridging formulae. Comparisons are made between the aerodynamics model, data from the latest Orbiter Operational Aerodynamic Design Data Book, applicable computer simulations, and wind-tunnel data.

  13. User's guide to program FLEXSTAB. [aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavin, R. K., III; Colunga, D.

    1975-01-01

    A manual is presented for correctly submitting program runs in aerodynamics on the UNIVAC 1108 computer system. All major program modules are included. Control cards are documented for the user's convenience, and card parameters are included in order to provide some idea as to reasonable time estimates for the program modules.

  14. Aerodynamic Design of Axial Flow Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, R. O. (Editor); Johnsen, I. A.

    1965-01-01

    An overview of 'Aerodynamic systems design of axial flow compressors' is presented. Numerous chapters cover topics such as compressor design, ptotential and viscous flow in two dimensional cascades, compressor stall and blade vibration, and compressor flow theory. Theoretical aspects of flow are also covered.

  15. Direct Numerical Simulation of Aerodynamic Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-29

    Noise First Annual Progress Report ONR Grant N00014-88-K-0592 Principal Investigator : Parviz Main Sr. Research Associate: Sanjiva K. Lele Research...of Aerodynamic Noise ONR Grant N00014-88-K-0592 Principal Investigator : Parviz Moin Sr. Research Associate : Sanjiva K. Lele Research Assistant : Tim

  16. An aerodynamic load criterion for airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    A simple aerodynamic bending moment envelope is derived for conventionally shaped airships. This criterion is intended to be used, much like the Naval Architect's standard wave, for preliminary estimates of longitudinal strength requirements. It should be useful in tradeoff studies between speed, fineness ratio, block coefficient, structure weight, and other such general parameters of airship design.

  17. NASA Aerodynamics Program Annual Report 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    95 ROTONET Phase IV System Multirotor Source Noise Module ...................................................... 97 Acoustic Results...94 Figure 6-7. ROTONET Phase IV System Multirotor Source Noise Module .................................. 96 Figure 6-8. Effects of Reduced...focusing on the areas of hybrid laminar flow technology and the reduction of aerodynamic interference between major aircraft components. A hybrid

  18. A Generic Nonlinear Aerodynamic Model for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2014-01-01

    A generic model of the aerodynamic coefficients was developed using wind tunnel databases for eight different aircraft and multivariate orthogonal functions. For each database and each coefficient, models were determined using polynomials expanded about the state and control variables, and an othgonalization procedure. A predicted squared-error criterion was used to automatically select the model terms. Modeling terms picked in at least half of the analyses, which totalled 45 terms, were retained to form the generic nonlinear aerodynamic (GNA) model. Least squares was then used to estimate the model parameters and associated uncertainty that best fit the GNA model to each database. Nonlinear flight simulations were used to demonstrate that the GNA model produces accurate trim solutions, local behavior (modal frequencies and damping ratios), and global dynamic behavior (91% accurate state histories and 80% accurate aerodynamic coefficient histories) under large-amplitude excitation. This compact aerodynamics model can be used to decrease on-board memory storage requirements, quickly change conceptual aircraft models, provide smooth analytical functions for control and optimization applications, and facilitate real-time parametric system identification.

  19. Identification of aerodynamic models for maneuvering aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Suei; Lan, C. Edward

    1990-01-01

    Due to the requirement of increased performance and maneuverability, the flight envelope of a modern fighter is frequently extended to the high angle-of-attack regime. Vehicles maneuvering in this regime are subjected to nonlinear aerodynamic loads. The nonlinearities are due mainly to three-dimensional separated flow and concentrated vortex flow that occur at large angles of attack. Accurate prediction of these nonlinear airloads is of great importance in the analysis of a vehicle's flight motion and in the design of its flight control system. A satisfactory evaluation of the performance envelope of the aircraft may require a large number of coupled computations, one for each change in initial conditions. To avoid the disadvantage of solving the coupled flow-field equations and aircraft's motion equations, an alternate approach is to use a mathematical modeling to describe the steady and unsteady aerodynamics for the aircraft equations of motion. Aerodynamic forces and moments acting on a rapidly maneuvering aircraft are, in general, nonlinear functions of motion variables, their time rate of change, and the history of maneuvering. A numerical method was developed to analyze the nonlinear and time-dependent aerodynamic response to establish the generalized indicial function in terms of motion variables and their time rates of change.

  20. Recent Experiments at the Gottingen Aerodynamic Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1925-01-01

    This report presents the results of various experiments carried out at the Gottingen Aerodynamic Institute. These include: experiments with Joukowski wing profiles; experiments on an airplane model with a built-in motor and functioning propeller; and the rotating cylinder (Magnus Effect).

  1. Aerodynamic beam generator for large particles

    DOEpatents

    Brockmann, John E.; Torczynski, John R.; Dykhuizen, Ronald C.; Neiser, Richard A.; Smith, Mark F.

    2002-01-01

    A new type of aerodynamic particle beam generator is disclosed. This generator produces a tightly focused beam of large material particles at velocities ranging from a few feet per second to supersonic speeds, depending on the exact configuration and operating conditions. Such generators are of particular interest for use in additive fabrication techniques.

  2. SIMP-1 model: Mapping of fo F2 monthly medians over the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leshchinskaya, T. Yu.; Mikhailov, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    The System of Ionosphere Monitoring and Prediction (SIMP-1), an empirical model of the monthly median state of the ionosphere, includes several blocks for a global description of the ionosphere in the D and E regions and F1 and F2 layers. In this paper, the principles of the creation of the block of the foF2 monthly medians over the Northern Hemisphere, including local models of foF2 based on data from groundbased ionospheric sounding stations and the multiquadric method of mapping, are described. It is shown that the use of effective ionospheric indices of solar activity, rather than the traditionally used sunspot number R 12 makes it possible to increase the accuracy of the approximated dependence of foF2 median values on the solar activity level. The local foF2 models are created in the form of a function of the ionospheric index T over 75 stations of the Northern Hemisphere for 12 months of the year and 24 moments of Universal Time. The multiquadric method, which enables the recovery of a surface exactly through foF2 values at the given station, is used for the foF2 mapping. A comparison of the SIMP-1 model with the CCIR, Prognoz MPCh, and SMI-88 (which is an ionospheric standard in RF) is performed. It is shown that the local models show a high accuracy of approximation of the foF2 observed variations, whereas the multiquadric method provides, on the whole, a higher accuracy of description of the foF2 planetary distribution. The results confirm the high efficiency of the proposed approach.

  3. Development of Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Reduced-Order Models Using the FUN3D Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Recent significant improvements to the development of CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic reduced-order models (ROMs) are implemented into the FUN3D unstructured flow solver. These improvements include the simultaneous excitation of the structural modes of the CFD-based unsteady aerodynamic system via a single CFD solution, minimization of the error between the full CFD and the ROM unsteady aero- dynamic solution, and computation of a root locus plot of the aeroelastic ROM. Results are presented for a viscous version of the two-dimensional Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) model and an inviscid version of the AGARD 445.6 aeroelastic wing using the FUN3D code.

  4. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform: from drones to birds.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas F; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2015-03-06

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on experiments with tethered robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here, we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for non-intrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, we verified that the method is accurate. We subsequently validated the method with a quadcopter that is suspended in the AFP and generates unsteady thrust profiles. These independent measurements confirm that the AFP is indeed accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the AFP by studying aerodynamic weight support of a freely flying bird in vivo. These measurements confirm earlier findings based on kinematics and flow measurements, which suggest that the avian downstroke, not the upstroke, is primarily responsible for body weight support during take-off and landing.

  5. In vivo recording of aerodynamic force with an aerodynamic force platform: from drones to birds

    PubMed Central

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas F.; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2015-01-01

    Flapping wings enable flying animals and biomimetic robots to generate elevated aerodynamic forces. Measurements that demonstrate this capability are based on experiments with tethered robots and animals, and indirect force calculations based on measured kinematics or airflow during free flight. Remarkably, there exists no method to measure these forces directly during free flight. Such in vivo recordings in freely behaving animals are essential to better understand the precise aerodynamic function of their flapping wings, in particular during the downstroke versus upstroke. Here, we demonstrate a new aerodynamic force platform (AFP) for non-intrusive aerodynamic force measurement in freely flying animals and robots. The platform encloses the animal or object that generates fluid force with a physical control surface, which mechanically integrates the net aerodynamic force that is transferred to the earth. Using a straightforward analytical solution of the Navier–Stokes equation, we verified that the method is accurate. We subsequently validated the method with a quadcopter that is suspended in the AFP and generates unsteady thrust profiles. These independent measurements confirm that the AFP is indeed accurate. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the AFP by studying aerodynamic weight support of a freely flying bird in vivo. These measurements confirm earlier findings based on kinematics and flow measurements, which suggest that the avian downstroke, not the upstroke, is primarily responsible for body weight support during take-off and landing. PMID:25589565

  6. Design of control laws for flutter suppression based on the aerodynamic energy concept and comparisons with other design methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, Eli

    1990-01-01

    The aerodynamic energy method is used to synthesize control laws for NASA's drone for aerodynamic and structural testing-aerodynamic research wing 1 (DAST-ARW1) mathematical model. The performance of these control laws in terms of closed-loop flutter dynamic pressure, control surface activity, and robustness is compared with other control laws that relate to the same model. A control law synthesis technique that makes use of the return difference singular values is developed. It is based on the aerodynamic energy approach and is shown to yield results that are superior to those results given in the literature and are based on optimal control theory. Nyquist plots are presented, together with a short discussion regarding the relative merits of the minimum singular value as a measure of robustness as compared with the more traditional measure involving phase and gain margins.

  7. Design of control laws for flutter suppression based on the aerodynamic energy concept and comparisons with other design methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1989-01-01

    The aerodynamic energy method is used in this paper to synthesize control laws for NASA's Drone for Aerodynamic and Structural Testing-Aerodynamic Research Wing 1 (DAST-ARW1) mathematical model. The performance of these control laws in terms of closed-loop flutter dynamic pressure, control surface activity, and robustness is compared against other control laws that appear in the literature and relate to the same model. A control law synthesis technique that makes use of the return difference singular values is developed in this paper. it is based on the aerodynamic energy approach and is shown to yield results superior to those given in the literature and based on optimal control theory. Nyquist plots are presented together with a short discussion regarding the relative merits of the minimum singular value as a measure of robustness, compared with the more traditional measure of robustness involving phase and gain margins.

  8. Aerodynamic shape optimization using control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James

    1996-01-01

    Aerodynamic shape design has long persisted as a difficult scientific challenge due its highly nonlinear flow physics and daunting geometric complexity. However, with the emergence of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) it has become possible to make accurate predictions of flows which are not dominated by viscous effects. It is thus worthwhile to explore the extension of CFD methods for flow analysis to the treatment of aerodynamic shape design. Two new aerodynamic shape design methods are developed which combine existing CFD technology, optimal control theory, and numerical optimization techniques. Flow analysis methods for the potential flow equation and the Euler equations form the basis of the two respective design methods. In each case, optimal control theory is used to derive the adjoint differential equations, the solution of which provides the necessary gradient information to a numerical optimization method much more efficiently then by conventional finite differencing. Each technique uses a quasi-Newton numerical optimization algorithm to drive an aerodynamic objective function toward a minimum. An analytic grid perturbation method is developed to modify body fitted meshes to accommodate shape changes during the design process. Both Hicks-Henne perturbation functions and B-spline control points are explored as suitable design variables. The new methods prove to be computationally efficient and robust, and can be used for practical airfoil design including geometric and aerodynamic constraints. Objective functions are chosen to allow both inverse design to a target pressure distribution and wave drag minimization. Several design cases are presented for each method illustrating its practicality and efficiency. These include non-lifting and lifting airfoils operating at both subsonic and transonic conditions.

  9. Advanced High-Temperature Flexible TPS for Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelCorso, Joseph A.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Bruce, Walter E., III; Hughes, Stephen J.; Calomino, Anthony M.

    2011-01-01

    Typical entry vehicle aeroshells are limited in size by the launch vehicle shroud. Inflatable aerodynamic decelerators allow larger aeroshell diameters for entry vehicles because they are not constrained to the launch vehicle shroud diameter. During launch, the hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerator (HIAD) is packed in a stowed configuration. Prior to atmospheric entry, the HIAD is deployed to produce a drag device many times larger than the launch shroud diameter. The large surface area of the inflatable aeroshell provides deceleration of high-mass entry vehicles at relatively low ballistic coefficients. Even for these low ballistic coefficients there is still appreciable heating, requiring the HIAD to employ a thermal protection system (TPS). This TPS must be capable of surviving the heat pulse, and the rigors of fabrication handling, high density packing, deployment, and aerodynamic loading. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of flexible TPS tests and results, conducted over the last three years. This paper also includes an overview of each test facility, the general approach for testing flexible TPS, the thermal analysis methodology and results, and a comparison with 8-foot High Temperature Tunnel, Laser-Hardened Materials Evaluation Laboratory, and Panel Test Facility test data. Results are presented for a baseline TPS layup that can withstand a 20 W/cm2 heat flux, silicon carbide (SiC) based TPS layup, and polyimide insulator TPS layup. Recent work has focused on developing material layups expected to survive heat flux loads up to 50 W/cm2 (which is adequate for many potential applications), future work will consider concepts capable of withstanding more than 100 W/cm2 incident radiant heat flux. This paper provides an overview of the experimental setup, material layup configurations, facility conditions, and planned future flexible TPS activities.

  10. FLPP IXV Re-Entry Vehicle, Hypersonic Aerodynamics Characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Ph.; Dormieux, M.; Fontaine, J.; Gülhan, A.; Tribot, J.-P.; Binetti, P.; Walloschek, T.

    2009-01-01

    The general objective of the IXV project (Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle), led by NGL Prime in the framework of the ESA FLPP programme (Future Launchers Preparatory Programme), is to improve European capabilities in the strategic field of atmospheric re-entry for space transportation, exploration, and scientific applications. One of the key objectives and challenges of the IXV project is the vehicle re-entry guidance and control demonstration which requires an accurate determination of the aerodynamic characteristics. This paper deals with all the aerodynamic characterization in the hypersonic flow regime. Wind tunnel tests (WTT) and CFD matrices have been defined in order to provide good coverage of the foreseen flight domain, account for uncertainties, and exploit the synergy between experimental and computational activity. WTT have been performed in DLR-H2K (M=6 and 8.7) and ONERA-S4Ma (M=10) facilities, gathering forces and moment data, as well as pressure in key areas. Consistency of the two campaigns results will be addressed. These results have highlighted some flow peculiarities in the deflected flap region. Comparisons with CFD show good agreement with ground experimental results. For flight conditions, real gas and viscous effects play a significant role in the trim conditions that only CFD can currently address; this identification was supported by different partners involved in the project (CFS engineering, DLR, CIRA, and the University of Rome) providing a valuable description of key flow phenomena affecting aerodynamic characteristics. Moreover, at high altitude, limited DSMC computations have been performed for bridging function correction.

  11. Unsteady aerodynamics of membrane wings with adaptive compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, Jillian; Breuer, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    Membrane wings are known to provide superior aerodynamic performance at low Reynolds numbers (Re =104 -105), primarily due to passive shape adaptation to flow conditions. In addition to this passive deformation, active control of the fluid-structure interaction and resultant aerodynamic properties can be achieved through the use of dielectric elastomer actuators as the wing membrane material. When actuated, membrane pretension is decreased and wing camber increases. Additionally, actuation at resonance frequencies allows additional control over wing camber. We present results using synchronized (i) time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) to resolve the flow field, (ii) 3D direct linear transformation (DLT) to recover membrane shape, (iii) lift/drag/torque measurements and (iv) near-wake hot wire anemometry measurements to characterize the fluid-structure interactions. Particular attention is paid to cases in which the vortex shedding frequency, the membrane resonance, and the actuation frequency coincide. In quantitatively examining both flow field and membrane shape at a range of actuation frequencies and vortex shedding frequencies, this work seeks to find actuation parameters that allow for active control of boundary layer separation over a range of flow conditions. Also at Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport.

  12. Short-Latency Median-Nerve Somatosensory-Evoked Potentials and Induced Gamma-Oscillations in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuda, Miho; Nishida, Masaaki; Juhasz, Csaba; Muzik, Otto; Sood, Sandeep; Chugani, Harry T.; Asano, Eishi

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that cortical gamma-oscillations are tightly linked with various forms of physiological activity. In the present study, the dynamic changes of intracranially recorded median-nerve somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) and somatosensory-induced gamma-oscillations were animated on a three-dimensional MR image, and the…

  13. Aerodynamic Simulation of the MARINTEK Braceless Semisubmersible Wave Tank Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Gordon; Muskulus, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Model scale experiments of floating offshore wind turbines are important for both platform design for the industry as well as numerical model validation for the research community. An important consideration in the wave tank testing of offshore wind turbines are scaling effects, especially the tension between accurate scaling of both hydrodynamic and aerodynamic forces. The recent MARINTEK braceless semisubmersible wave tank experiment utilizes a novel aerodynamic force actuator to decouple the scaling of the aerodynamic forces. This actuator consists of an array of motors that pull on cables to provide aerodynamic forces that are calculated by a blade-element momentum code in real time as the experiment is conducted. This type of system has the advantage of supplying realistically scaled aerodynamic forces that include dynamic forces from platform motion, but does not provide the insights into the accuracy of the aerodynamic models that an actual model-scale rotor could provide. The modeling of this system presents an interesting challenge, as there are two ways to simulate the aerodynamics; either by using the turbulent wind fields as inputs to the aerodynamic model of the design code, or by surpassing the aerodynamic model and using the forces applied to the experimental turbine as direct inputs to the simulation. This paper investigates the best practices of modeling this type of novel aerodynamic actuator using a modified wind turbine simulation tool, and demonstrates that bypassing the dynamic aerodynamics solver of design codes can lead to erroneous results.

  14. [Endoscopic fenestration of median supratentorial cerebrospinal fluid cysts].

    PubMed

    Melikian, A G; Ozerova, V I; Bragina, N N; Kolycheva, M V

    1999-01-01

    supplemented by ventricular septal fenestration and third-ventricular bottom perforation. Twelve patients were followed up for 6 to 36.5 months (mean 15 months). There has been no information about 6 patients since their discharge. In 12 (66.5%) surgery yielded expected results and the fenestration of cystic walls was followed by their retraction and a steady-state regression of local and/or hypertensive symptoms. In 5 (28%) patients, the complaints and clinical data remained unchanged despite although incomplete but objective cystic relaxation. This was most frequently noted in patients (n = 4) with arachnoidal cysts of the interpedicular cistern and the third ventricle who had endocrine disorders. In one case the operation was stopped due to bleeding. Totally, 5 patients were found to have complications (hemorrhage, ventriculitis). None patient died. Some aspects of indications for endoscopy and surgical techniques are considered. It is concluded that endoscopic internal bypass surgery in patients wit median cystic liquor malformations is the treatment of choice. When equipment is adjusted, fenestration of the membranous walls of these cysts by using an endoscope is reliable and safe. Such patients may be recommended endoscopic technology used as the method of choice.

  15. Coregistering 3D Models, Range, and Optical Imagery Using Least-Median Squares Fitting.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    coregistration estimation algorithms. We consider the use of median filtering in the construction of consistent correspondences. Finally, we test our coregistration with a median filtering system on real ATR data.

  16. Freight Wing Trailer Aerodynamics Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sean Graham

    2007-10-31

    Freight Wing Incorporated utilized the opportunity presented by a DOE category two Inventions and Innovations grant to commercialize and improve upon aerodynamic technology for semi-tuck trailers, capable of decreasing heavy vehicle fuel consumption, related environmental damage, and U.S. consumption of foreign oil. Major project goals included the demonstration of aerodynamic trailer technology in trucking fleet operations, and the development and testing of second generation products. A great deal of past scientific research has demonstrated that streamlining box shaped semi-trailers can significantly reduce a truck’s fuel consumption. However, significant design challenges have prevented past concepts from meeting industry needs. Freight Wing utilized a 2003 category one Inventions and Innovations grant to develop practical solutions to trailer aerodynamics. Fairings developed for the front, rear, and bottom of standard semi-trailers together demonstrated a 7% improvement to fuel economy in scientific tests conducted by the Transportation Research Center (TRC). Operational tests with major trucking fleets proved the functionality of the products, which were subsequently brought to market. This category two grant enabled Freight Wing to further develop, test and commercialize its products, resulting in greatly increased understanding and acceptance of aerodynamic trailer technology. Commercialization was stimulated by offering trucking fleets 50% cost sharing on trial implementations of Freight Wing products for testing and evaluation purposes. Over 230 fairings were implemented through the program with 35 trucking fleets including industry leaders such as Wal-Mart, Frito Lay and Whole Foods. The feedback from these testing partnerships was quite positive with product performance exceeding fleet expectations in many cases. Fleet feedback also was also valuable from a product development standpoint and assisted the design of several second generation products

  17. 76 FR 39474 - Monthly Median Cost of Funds Reporting, and Publication of Cost of Funds Indices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Monthly Median Cost of Funds Reporting, and Publication of Cost of Funds.... 1550-0021, Monthly Median Cost of Funds Reporting, and Publication of Cost of Funds Indices. SUMMARY: The OTS is terminating the collection of data used to calculate and publish the Monthly Median Cost...

  18. Aerodynamic Simulation of Runback Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Whalen, Edward A.; Busch, Greg T.; Bragg, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the results of recent investigations into the aerodynamics of simulated runback ice accretion on airfoils. Aerodynamic tests were performed on a full-scale model using a high-fidelity, ice-casting simulation at near-flight Reynolds (Re) number. The ice-casting simulation was attached to the leading edge of a 72-in. (1828.8-mm ) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model. Aerodynamic performance tests were conducted at the ONERA F1 pressurized wind tunnel over a Reynolds number range of 4.7?10(exp 6) to 16.0?10(exp 6) and a Mach (M) number ran ge of 0.10 to 0.28. For Re = 16.0?10(exp 6) and M = 0.20, the simulated runback ice accretion on the airfoil decreased the maximum lift coe fficient from 1.82 to 1.51 and decreased the stalling angle of attack from 18.1deg to 15.0deg. The pitching-moment slope was also increased and the drag coefficient was increased by more than a factor of two. In general, the performance effects were insensitive to Reynolds numb er and Mach number changes over the range tested. Follow-on, subscale aerodynamic tests were conducted on a quarter-scale NACA 23012 model (18-in. (457.2-mm) chord) at Re = 1.8?10(exp 6) and M = 0.18, using low-fidelity, geometrically scaled simulations of the full-scale castin g. It was found that simple, two-dimensional simulations of the upper- and lower-surface runback ridges provided the best representation of the full-scale, high Reynolds number iced-airfoil aerodynamics, whereas higher-fidelity simulations resulted in larger performance degrada tions. The experimental results were used to define a new subclassification of spanwise ridge ice that distinguishes between short and tall ridges. This subclassification is based upon the flow field and resulting aerodynamic characteristics, regardless of the physical size of the ridge and the ice-accretion mechanism.

  19. Does the median preoptic nucleus contribute to sympathetic hyperactivity in spontaneously hypertensive rats?

    PubMed

    Mourão, Aline A; Moreira, Marina C S; Melo, Aryanne B S; Lopes, Paulo R; Rebelo, Ana C S; Rosa, Daniel A; Freiria-Oliveira, André H; Colombari, Eduardo; Pedrino, Gustavo R

    2016-02-01

    The present study sought to determine the involvement of median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) in the regulation of the cardiovascular function and renal sympathetic activity in normotensive (NT) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). MnPO inhibition evoked by Muscimol (4mM) nanoinjections, elicited fall in MAP and renal sympathoinhibition in NT-rats. Surprisingly, in SHRs these responses were greater than in NT-rats. These results demonstrated, for the first time that MnPO was involved in the tonic control of sympathetic activity in NT and SHRs. Furthermore, our data suggest the MnPO involvement in the increased sympathetic outflow and consequent arterial hypertension observed in SHRs.

  20. Screening of the aerodynamic and biophysical properties of barley malt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodsvali, Alireza; Farzaneh, Vahid; Bakhshabadi, Hamid; Zare, Zahra; Karami, Zahra; Mokhtarian, Mohsen; Carvalho, Isabel. S.

    2016-10-01

    An understanding of the aerodynamic and biophysical properties of barley malt is necessary for the appropriate design of equipment for the handling, shipping, dehydration, grading, sorting and warehousing of this strategic crop. Malting is a complex biotechnological process that includes steeping; germination and finally, the dehydration of cereal grains under controlled temperature and humidity conditions. In this investigation, the biophysical properties of barley malt were predicted using two models of artificial neural networks as well as response surface methodology. Stepping time and germination time were selected as the independent variables and 1 000 kernel weight, kernel density and terminal velocity were selected as the dependent variables (responses). The obtained outcomes showed that the artificial neural network model, with a logarithmic sigmoid activation function, presents more precise results than the response surface model in the prediction of the aerodynamic and biophysical properties of produced barley malt. This model presented the best result with 8 nodes in the hidden layer and significant correlation coefficient values of 0.783, 0.767 and 0.991 were obtained for responses one thousand kernel weight, kernel density, and terminal velocity, respectively. The outcomes indicated that this novel technique could be successfully applied in quantitative and qualitative monitoring within the malting process.

  1. Wind turbine trailing-edge aerodynamic brake design

    SciTech Connect

    Quandt, G.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the design of a centrifugally actuated aerodynamic-overspeed device for a horizontal-axis wind turbine. The device will meet the following criteria; (1) It will be effective for airfoil angles of attack 0{degrees} to 45{degrees}. (2) It will be stowed inside the blade profile prior to deployment. (3) It will be capable of offsetting the positive torque produced by the overall blade. (4) Hinge moments will be minimized to lower actuator loads and cost. (5) It will be evaluated as a potential power modulating active rotor-control system. A literature review of aerodynamic braking devices was conducted. Information from the literature review was used to conceptualize the most effective devices for subsequent testing and design. Wind-tunnel test data for several braking devices are presented in this report. Using the data for the most promising configuration, a preliminary design was developed for a MICON 65/13 wind turbine with Phoenix 7.9-m rotor blades.

  2. Aerodynamic Control of a Pitching Airfoil by Distributed Bleed Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2013-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on a dynamically pitching 2-D airfoil model are controlled in wind tunnel experiments using distributed active bleed. Bleed flow on the suction surface downstream of the leading edge is driven by pressure differences across the airfoil and is regulated by low-power louver actuators. The bleed interacts with cross flows to effect time-dependent variations of the vorticity flux and thereby alters the local flow attachment, resulting in significant changes in pre- and post-stall lift and pitching moment (over 50% increase in baseline post-stall lift). The flow field over the airfoil is measured using high-speed (2000 fps) PIV, resolving the dynamics and characteristic time-scales of production and advection of vorticity concentrations that are associated with transient variations in the aerodynamic forces and moments. In particular, it is shown that the actuation improves the lift hysteresis and pitch stability during the oscillatory pitching by altering the evolution of the dynamic stall vortex and the ensuing flow attachment during the downstroke. Supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  3. Rule-based fuzzy vector median filters for 3D phase contrast MRI segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundareswaran, Kartik S.; Frakes, David H.; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2008-02-01

    Recent technological advances have contributed to the advent of phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PCMRI) as standard practice in clinical environments. In particular, decreased scan times have made using the modality more feasible. PCMRI is now a common tool for flow quantification, and for more complex vector field analyses that target the early detection of problematic flow conditions. Segmentation is one component of this type of application that can impact the accuracy of the final product dramatically. Vascular segmentation, in general, is a long-standing problem that has received significant attention. Segmentation in the context of PCMRI data, however, has been explored less and can benefit from object-based image processing techniques that incorporate fluids specific information. Here we present a fuzzy rule-based adaptive vector median filtering (FAVMF) algorithm that in combination with active contour modeling facilitates high-quality PCMRI segmentation while mitigating the effects of noise. The FAVMF technique was tested on 111 synthetically generated PC MRI slices and on 15 patients with congenital heart disease. The results were compared to other multi-dimensional filters namely the adaptive vector median filter, the adaptive vector directional filter, and the scalar low pass filter commonly used in PC MRI applications. FAVMF significantly outperformed the standard filtering methods (p < 0.0001). Two conclusions can be drawn from these results: a) Filtering should be performed after vessel segmentation of PC MRI; b) Vector based filtering methods should be used instead of scalar techniques.

  4. Aerodynamic control with passively pitching wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravish, Nick; Wood, Robert

    Flapping wings may pitch passively under aerodynamic and inertial loads. Such passive pitching is observed in flapping wing insect and robot flight. The effect of passive wing pitch on the control dynamics of flapping wing flight are unexplored. Here we demonstrate in simulation and experiment the critical role wing pitching plays in yaw control of a flapping wing robot. We study yaw torque generation by a flapping wing allowed to passively rotate in the pitch axis through a rotational spring. Yaw torque is generated through alternating fast and slow upstroke and and downstroke. Yaw torque sensitively depends on both the rotational spring force law and spring stiffness, and at a critical spring stiffness a bifurcation in the yaw torque control relationship occurs. Simulation and experiment reveal the dynamics of this bifurcation and demonstrate that anomalous yaw torque from passively pitching wings is the result of aerodynamic and inertial coupling between the pitching and stroke-plane dynamics.

  5. Mimicking the humpback whale: An aerodynamic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aftab, S. M. A.; Razak, N. A.; Mohd Rafie, A. S.; Ahmad, K. A.

    2016-07-01

    This comprehensive review aims to provide a critical overview of the work on tubercles in the past decade. The humpback whale is of interest to aerodynamic/hydrodynamic researchers, as it performs manoeuvres that baffle the imagination. Researchers have attributed these capabilities to the presence of lumps, known as tubercles, on the leading edge of the flipper. Tubercles generate a unique flow control mechanism, offering the humpback exceptional manoeuverability. Experimental and numerical studies have shown that the flow pattern over the tubercle wing is quite different from conventional wings. Research on the Tubercle Leading Edge (TLE) concept has helped to clarify aerodynamic issues such as flow separation, tonal noise and dynamic stall. TLE shows increased lift by delaying and restricting spanwise separation. A summary of studies on different airfoils and reported improvement in performance is outlined. The major contributions and limitations of previous work are also reported.

  6. Aerodynamics of the Mars Microprobe Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; Moss, J. N.; Cheatwood, F. M.; Greene, F. A.; Braun, R. D.

    1997-01-01

    The selection of the unique aeroshell shape for the Mars Microprobes is discussed. A description of its aerodynamics in hypersonic rarefied, hypersonic continuum, supersonic and transonic flow regimes is then presented. This description is based on Direct Simulation Monte Carlo analyses in the rarefied-flow regime, thermochemical nonequilibrium Computational Fluid Dynamics in the hypersonic regime, existing wind tunnel data in the supersonic and transonic regime, additional computational work in the transonic regime, and finally, ballistic range data. The aeroshell is shown to possess the correct combination of aerodynamic stability and drag to convert the probe's initial tumbling attitude and high velocity at atmospheric-interface into the desired surface-impact orientation and velocity.

  7. CFD research, parallel computation and aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James S.

    1995-01-01

    Over five years of research in Computational Fluid Dynamics and its applications are covered in this report. Using CFD as an established tool, aerodynamic optimization on parallel architectures is explored. The objective of this work is to provide better tools to vehicle designers. Submarine design requires accurate force and moment calculations in flow with thick boundary layers and large separated vortices. Low noise production is critical, so flow into the propulsor region must be predicted accurately. The High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) has been the subject of recent work. This vehicle is to be a passenger vehicle with the capability of cutting overseas flight times by more than half. A successful design must surpass the performance of comparable planes. Fuel economy, other operational costs, environmental impact, and range must all be improved substantially. For all these reasons, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer and other disciplines.

  8. Wind turbine trailing edge aerodynamic brakes

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P G; Miller, L S; Quandt, G A

    1995-04-01

    Five trailing-edge devices were investigated to determine their potential as wind-turbine aerodynamic brakes, and for power modulation and load alleviation. Several promising configurations were identified. A new device, called the spoiler-flap, appears to be the best alternative. It is a simple device that is effective at all angles of attack. It is not structurally intrusive, and it has the potential for small actuating loads. It is shown that simultaneous achievement of a low lift/drag ratio and high drag is the determinant of device effectiveness, and that these attributes must persist up to an angle of attack of 45{degree}. It is also argued that aerodynamic brakes must be designed for a wind speed of at least 45 m/s (100 mph).

  9. Transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doig, G.

    2014-08-01

    A review of recent and historical work in the field of transonic and supersonic ground effect aerodynamics has been conducted, focussing on applied research on wings and aircraft, present and future ground transportation, projectiles, rocket sleds and other related bodies which travel in close ground proximity in the compressible regime. Methods for ground testing are described and evaluated, noting that wind tunnel testing is best performed with a symmetry model in the absence of a moving ground; sled or rail testing is ultimately preferable, though considerably more expensive. Findings are reported on shock-related ground influence on aerodynamic forces and moments in and accelerating through the transonic regime - where force reversals and the early onset of local supersonic flow is prevalent - as well as more predictable behaviours in fully supersonic to hypersonic ground effect flows.

  10. Aerodynamic characteristics of the HL-20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, George M.; Cruz, Christopher I.

    1993-09-01

    Wind tunnel tests were made from subsonic to hypersonic speeds to define the aerodynamic characteristics of the HL-20 lifting-body configuration. The data have been assembled into an aerodynamic database for flight analysis of this proposed vehicle. The wind tunnel data indicates that the model is longitudinally and laterally stable (about a center-of-gravity location of 0.54 body length) over the test range from Mach 20 to 0.3. At hypersonic speeds, the HL-20 model trimmed at a lift/drag (L/D) ratio of 1.4. This value gives the vehicle a crossrange capability similar to that of the space shuttle. At subsonic speeds, the HL-20 has a trimmed L/D ratio of about 3.6. Replacing the flat-plate outboard fins with fins having an airfoil shape increased the maximum subsonic trimmed L/D to 4.2.

  11. The aerodynamic challenges of SRB recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacchus, D. L.; Kross, D. A.; Moog, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Recovery and reuse of the Space Shuttle solid rocket boosters was baselined to support the primary goal to develop a low cost space transportation system. The recovery system required for the 170,000-lb boosters was for the largest and heaviest object yet to be retrieved from exoatmospheric conditions. State-of-the-art design procedures were ground-ruled and development testing minimized to produce both a reliable and cost effective system. The ability to utilize the inherent drag of the boosters during the initial phase of reentry was a key factor in minimizing the parachute loads, size and weight. A wind tunnel test program was devised to enable the accurate prediction of booster aerodynamic characteristics. Concurrently, wind tunnel, rocket sled and air drop tests were performed to develop and verify the performance of the parachute decelerator subsystem. Aerodynamic problems encountered during the overall recovery system development and the respective solutions are emphasized.

  12. Aerodynamic shape optimization of arbitrary hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Sheffer, Scott G.

    1991-01-01

    A new method was developed to optimize, in terms of aerodynamic wave drag minimization, arbitrary (nonaxisymmetric) hypersonic vehicles in modified Newtonian flow, while maintaining the initial volume and length of the vehicle. This new method uses either a surface fitted Fourier series to represent the vehicle's geometry or an independent point motion algorithm. In either case, the coefficients of the Fourier series or the spatial locations of the points defining each cross section were varied and a numerical optimization algorithm based on a quasi-Newton gradient search concept was used to determine the new optimal configuration. Results indicate a significant decrease in aerodynamic wave drag for simple and complex geometries at relatively low CPU costs. In the case of a cone, the results agreed well with known analytical optimum ogive shapes. The procedure is capable of accepting more complex flow field analysis codes.

  13. Flight Test Maneuvers for Efficient Aerodynamic Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2011-01-01

    Novel flight test maneuvers for efficient aerodynamic modeling were developed and demonstrated in flight. Orthogonal optimized multi-sine inputs were applied to aircraft control surfaces to excite aircraft dynamic response in all six degrees of freedom simultaneously while keeping the aircraft close to chosen reference flight conditions. Each maneuver was designed for a specific modeling task that cannot be adequately or efficiently accomplished using conventional flight test maneuvers. All of the new maneuvers were first described and explained, then demonstrated on a subscale jet transport aircraft in flight. Real-time and post-flight modeling results obtained using equation-error parameter estimation in the frequency domain were used to show the effectiveness and efficiency of the new maneuvers, as well as the quality of the aerodynamic models that can be identified from the resultant flight data.

  14. High speed civil transport aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James S.

    1994-01-01

    This is a report of work in support of the Computational Aerosciences (CAS) element of the Federal HPCC program. Specifically, CFD and aerodynamic optimization are being performed on parallel computers. The long-range goal of this work is to facilitate teraflops-rate multidisciplinary optimization of aerospace vehicles. This year's work is targeted for application to the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), one of four CAS grand challenges identified in the HPCC FY 1995 Blue Book. This vehicle is to be a passenger aircraft, with the promise of cutting overseas flight time by more than half. To meet fuel economy, operational costs, environmental impact, noise production, and range requirements, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer, controls, and perhaps other disciplines. The fundamental goal of this project is to contribute to improved design tools for U.S. industry, and thus to the nation's economic competitiveness.

  15. Specialized computer architectures for computational aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. K.

    1978-01-01

    In recent years, computational fluid dynamics has made significant progress in modelling aerodynamic phenomena. Currently, one of the major barriers to future development lies in the compute-intensive nature of the numerical formulations and the relative high cost of performing these computations on commercially available general purpose computers, a cost high with respect to dollar expenditure and/or elapsed time. Today's computing technology will support a program designed to create specialized computing facilities to be dedicated to the important problems of computational aerodynamics. One of the still unresolved questions is the organization of the computing components in such a facility. The characteristics of fluid dynamic problems which will have significant impact on the choice of computer architecture for a specialized facility are reviewed.

  16. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using Hybridized Differential Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    2003-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization method that uses an evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution (DE) in conjunction with various hybridization strategies is described. DE is a simple and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems. Various hybridization strategies for DE are explored, including the use of neural networks as well as traditional local search methods. A Navier-Stokes solver is used to evaluate the various intermediate designs and provide inputs to the hybrid DE optimizer. The method is implemented on distributed parallel computers so that new designs can be obtained within reasonable turnaround times. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine. (The final paper will include at least one other aerodynamic design application). The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated.

  17. Aerodynamic interference between two Darrieus wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Schatzle, P.R.; Klimas, P.C.; Spahr, H.R.

    1981-04-01

    The effect of aerodynamic interference on the performance of two curved bladed Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbines has been calculated using a vortex/lifting line aerodynamic model. The turbines have a tower-to-tower separation distance of 1.5 turbine diameters, with the line of turbine centers varying with respect to the ambient wind direction. The effects of freestream turbulence were neglected. For the cases examined, the calculations showed that the downwind turbine power decrement (1) was significant only when the line of turbine centers was coincident with the ambient wind direction, (2) increased with increasing tipspeed ratio, and (3) is due more to induced flow angularities downstream than to speed deficits near the downstream turbine.

  18. Aerodynamic design of the National Rotor Testbed.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, Christopher Lee

    2015-10-01

    A new wind turbine blade has been designed for the National Rotor Testbed (NRT) project and for future experiments at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility with a specific focus on scaled wakes. This report shows the aerodynamic design of new blades that can produce a wake that has similitude to utility scale blades despite the difference in size and location in the atmospheric boundary layer. Dimensionless quantities circulation, induction, thrust coefficient, and tip-speed-ratio were kept equal between rotor scales in region 2 of operation. The new NRT design matched the aerodynamic quantities of the most common wind turbine in the United States, the GE 1.5sle turbine with 37c model blades. The NRT blade design is presented along with its performance subject to the winds at SWiFT. The design requirements determined by the SWiFT experimental test campaign are shown to be met.

  19. Performance of an aerodynamic particle separator

    SciTech Connect

    Ragland, K.; Han, J.; Aerts, D.

    1996-12-31

    This compact, high-flow device aerodynamically separates small particles from a gas stream by a series of annular truncated airfoils. The operating concept, design and performance of this novel particle separator are described. Tests results using corn starch and post-cyclone coal fly ash are presented. Particle collection efficiencies of 90% for corn starch and 70% for coal fly ash were measured at inlet velocities of 80 ft s{sup {minus}1} (2,700 cfm) and (6 inches) water pressure drop with particle loading up to 4 gr ft{sup {minus}3} in air at standard conditions. Results from computer modeling using FLUENT are presented and compared to the tests. The aerodynamic particle separator is an attractive alternative to a cyclone collector.

  20. Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance

    DOEpatents

    Graham, Sean C.

    2006-03-07

    A device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance for vehicles having a generally rectangular flat front face comprising a plurality of load bearing struts of a predetermined size attached to the flat front face adjacent the sides and top thereof, a pair of pliable opposing flat sheets having an outside edge portion attached to the flat front face adjacent the sides thereof and an upper edge with a predetermined curve; the opposing flat sheets being bent and attached to the struts to form effective curved airfoil shapes, and a top pliable flat sheet disposed adjacent the top of the flat front face and having predetermined curved side edges, which, when the top sheet is bent and attached to the struts to form an effective curved airfoil shape, mate with the curved upper edges of the opposing sheets to complete the aerodynamic device.

  1. Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance

    DOEpatents

    Graham, Sean C.

    2006-08-22

    A device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance for vehicles having a generally rectangular body disposed above rear wheels, comprising a plurality of load bearing struts attached to the bottom of the rectangular body adjacent its sides, a plurality of opposing flat sheets attached to the load bearing struts, and angled flaps attached to the lower edge of the opposing sheets defining an obtuse angle with the opposing flat sheets extending inwardly with respect to the sides of the rectangular body to a predetermined height above the ground, which, stiffen the opposing flat sheets, bend to resist damage when struck by the ground, and guide airflow around the rear wheels of the vehicle to reduce its aerodynamic resistance when moving.

  2. Unsteady aerodynamic modeling for arbitrary motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.; Ashley, H.; Breakwell, J. V.

    1977-01-01

    A study is presented on the unsteady aerodynamic loads due to arbitrary motions of a thin wing and their adaptation for the calculation of response and true stability of aeroelastic modes. In an Appendix, the use of Laplace transform techniques and the generalized Theodorsen function for two-dimensional incompressible flow is reviewed. New applications of the same approach are shown also to yield airloads valid for quite general small motions. Numerical results are given for the two-dimensional supersonic case. Previously proposed approximate methods, starting from simple harmonic unsteady theory, are evaluated by comparison with exact results obtained by the present approach. The Laplace inversion integral is employed to separate the loads into 'rational' and 'nonrational' parts, of which only the former are involved in aeroelastic stability of the wing. Among other suggestions for further work, it is explained how existing aerodynamic computer programs may be adapted in a fairly straightforward fashion to deal with arbitrary transients.

  3. An Interactive Educational Tool for Compressible Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    A workstation-based interactive educational tool was developed to aid in the teaching of undergraduate compressible aerodynamics. The tool solves for the supersonic flow past a wedge using the equations found in NACA 1135. The student varies the geometry or flow conditions through a graphical user interface and the new conditions are calculated immediately. Various graphical formats present the variation of flow results to the student. One such format leads the student to the generation of some of the graphs found in NACA-1135. The tool includes interactive questions and answers to aid in both the use of the tool and to develop an understanding of some of the complexities of compressible aerodynamics. A series of help screens make the simulator easy to learn and use. This paper will detail the numerical methods used in the tool and describe how it can be used and modified.

  4. Rarefaction effects on Galileo probe aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; LeBeau, Gerald J.; Blanchard, Robert C.; Price, Joseph M.

    1996-01-01

    Solutions of aerodynamic characteristics are presented for the Galileo Probe entering Jupiter's hydrogen-helium atmosphere at a nominal relative velocity of 47.4 km/s. Focus is on predicting the aerodynamic drag coefficient during the transitional flow regime using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Accuracy of the probe's drag coefficient directly impacts the inferred atmospheric properties that are being extracted from the deceleration measurements made by onboard accelerometers as part of the Atmospheric Structure Experiment. The range of rarefaction considered in the present study extends from the free molecular limit to continuum conditions. Comparisons made with previous calculations and experimental measurements show the present results for drag to merge well with Navier-Stokes and experimental results for the least rarefied conditions considered.

  5. Parameter identification and modeling of longitudinal aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aksteter, J. W.; Parks, E. K.; Bach, R. E., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Using a comprehensive flight test database and a parameter identification software program produced at NASA Ames Research Center, a math model of the longitudinal aerodynamics of the Harrier aircraft was formulated. The identification program employed the equation error method using multiple linear regression to estimate the nonlinear parameters. The formulated math model structure adhered closely to aerodynamic and stability/control theory, particularly with regard to compressibility and dynamic manoeuvring. Validation was accomplished by using a three degree-of-freedom nonlinear flight simulator with pilot inputs from flight test data. The simulation models agreed quite well with the measured states. It is important to note that the flight test data used for the validation of the model was not used in the model identification.

  6. Integrated structural-aerodynamic design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.; Kao, P. J.; Grossman, B.; Polen, D.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper focuses on the processes of simultaneous aerodynamic and structural wing design as a prototype for design integration, with emphasis on the major difficulty associated with multidisciplinary design optimization processes, their enormous computational costs. Methods are presented for reducing this computational burden through the development of efficient methods for cross-sensitivity calculations and the implementation of approximate optimization procedures. Utilizing a modular sensitivity analysis approach, it is shown that the sensitivities can be computed without the expensive calculation of the derivatives of the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix, and the derivatives of the structural flexibility matrix. The same process is used to efficiently evaluate the sensitivities of the wing divergence constraint, which should be particularly useful, not only in problems of complete integrated aircraft design, but also in aeroelastic tailoring applications.

  7. Nash equilibrium and multi criterion aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhili; Zhang, Lianhe

    2016-06-01

    Game theory and its particular Nash Equilibrium (NE) are gaining importance in solving Multi Criterion Optimization (MCO) in engineering problems over the past decade. The solution of a MCO problem can be viewed as a NE under the concept of competitive games. This paper surveyed/proposed four efficient algorithms for calculating a NE of a MCO problem. Existence and equivalence of the solution are analyzed and proved in the paper based on fixed point theorem. Specific virtual symmetric Nash game is also presented to set up an optimization strategy for single objective optimization problems. Two numerical examples are presented to verify proposed algorithms. One is mathematical functions' optimization to illustrate detailed numerical procedures of algorithms, the other is aerodynamic drag reduction of civil transport wing fuselage configuration by using virtual game. The successful application validates efficiency of algorithms in solving complex aerodynamic optimization problem.

  8. Aerodynamic design lowers truck fuel consumption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steers, L.

    1978-01-01

    Energy-saving concepts in truck design are emerging from developing new shapes with improved aerodynamic flow properties that can reduce air-drag coefficient of conventional tractor-trailers without requiring severe design changes or compromising load-carrying capability. Improvements are expected to decrease somewhat with increased wind velocities and would be affected by factors such as terrain, driving techniques, and mechanical condition.

  9. Aerodynamic considerations in open shelters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, R.G.

    1984-11-01

    Aerodynamic factors are addressed bearing on the suitability of open structures as blast shelters. Blast closures and attenuator designs are discussed. The research on shelter filling is reviewed; this includes both experimental and theoretical work on scale models and full-scale structures of large dimensions. Shock-dominated and pressure-gradient-dominated shelter-filling mechanisms are described and their potential effects on people are discussed.

  10. The aerodynamics of hovering flight in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Fry, Steven N; Sayaman, Rosalyn; Dickinson, Michael H

    2005-06-01

    Using 3D infrared high-speed video, we captured the continuous wing and body kinematics of free-flying fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, during hovering and slow forward flight. We then 'replayed' the wing kinematics on a dynamically scaled robotic model to measure the aerodynamic forces produced by the wings. Hovering animals generate a U-shaped wing trajectory, in which large drag forces during a downward plunge at the start of each stroke create peak vertical forces. Quasi-steady mechanisms could account for nearly all of the mean measured force required to hover, although temporal discrepancies between instantaneous measured forces and model predictions indicate that unsteady mechanisms also play a significant role. We analyzed the requirements for hovering from an analysis of the time history of forces and moments in all six degrees of freedom. The wing kinematics necessary to generate sufficient lift are highly constrained by the requirement to balance thrust and pitch torque over the stroke cycle. We also compare the wing motion and aerodynamic forces of free and tethered flies. Tethering causes a strong distortion of the stroke pattern that results in a reduction of translational forces and a prominent nose-down pitch moment. The stereotyped distortion under tethered conditions is most likely due to a disruption of sensory feedback. Finally, we calculated flight power based directly on the measurements of wing motion and aerodynamic forces, which yielded a higher estimate of muscle power during free hovering flight than prior estimates based on time-averaged parameters. This discrepancy is mostly due to a two- to threefold underestimate of the mean profile drag coefficient in prior studies. We also compared our values with the predictions of the same time-averaged models using more accurate kinematic and aerodynamic input parameters based on our high-speed videography measurements. In this case, the time-averaged models tended to overestimate flight

  11. Aerodynamic measurement techniques. [laser based diagnostic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, W. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Laser characteristics of intensity, monochromatic, spatial coherence, and temporal coherence were developed to advance laser based diagnostic techniques for aerodynamic related research. Two broad categories of visualization and optical measurements were considered, and three techniques received significant attention. These are holography, laser velocimetry, and Raman scattering. Examples of the quantitative laser velocimeter and Raman scattering measurements of velocity, temperature, and density indicated the potential of these nonintrusive techniques.

  12. HSCT high lift system aerodynamic requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, John A.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of high lift system aerodynamic requirements are provided. Low speed aerodynamics has been identified as critical to the successful development of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The airplane must takeoff and land at a sufficient number of existing or projected airports to be economically viable. At the same time, community noise must be acceptable. Improvements in cruise drag, engine fuel consumption, and structural weight tend to decrease the wing size and thrust required of engines. Decreasing wing size increases the requirements for effective and efficient low speed characteristics. Current design concepts have already been compromised away from better cruise wings for low speed performance. Flap systems have been added to achieve better lift-to-drag ratios for climb and approach and for lower pitch attitudes for liftoff and touchdown. Research to achieve improvements in low speed aerodynamics needs to be focused on areas most likely to have the largest effect on the wing and engine sizing process. It would be desirable to provide enough lift to avoid sizing the airplane for field performance and to still meet the noise requirements. The airworthiness standards developed in 1971 will be the basis for performance requirements for an airplane that will not be critical to the airplane wing and engine size. The lift and drag levels that were required to meet the performance requirements of tentative airworthiness standards established in 1971 and that were important to community noise are identified. Research to improve the low speed aerodynamic characteristics of the HSCT needs to be focused in the areas of performance deficiency and where noise can be reduced. Otherwise, the wing planform, engine cycle, or other parameters for a superior cruising airplane would have to be changed.

  13. New aspects of subsonic aerodynamic noise theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Howes, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    A theory of aerodynamic noise is presented which differs from Lighthill's theory primarily in the way in which convection of the noise sources is treated. The sound directivity pattern obtained from the present theory agrees better with jet-noise directivity data than does that obtained from Lighthill's theory. The results imply that the shear-noise contribution to jet noise is smaller than previously expected.

  14. Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance

    DOEpatents

    Graham, Sean C.

    2005-02-15

    A device for a vehicle with a pair of swinging rear doors, which converts flat sheets of pliable material hinged to the sides of the vehicle adjacent the rear thereof into effective curved airfoils that reduce the aerodynamic resistance of the vehicle, when the doors are closed by hand, utilizing a plurality of stiffeners disposed generally parallel to the doors and affixed to the sheets and a plurality of collapsible tension bearings struts attached to each stiffener and the adjacent door.

  15. Conformable M3 Microsystems for Aerodynamic Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    we have fabricated sensors, actuators, and electronics all on the same chip. Control: • A CMOS control circuit has been designed and sent to MOSIS ...macro aerodynamic devices. (3) After the chip from MOSIS is fabricated, it will be tested to confirm that it works as designed. (4) The process and...identify the separation point from the outputs of shear stress sensors and drive the corresponding actuators. The layout has been sent to MOSIS for

  16. Flapping wing aerodynamics: from insects to vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Chin, Diana D; Lentink, David

    2016-04-01

    More than a million insects and approximately 11,000 vertebrates utilize flapping wings to fly. However, flapping flight has only been studied in a few of these species, so many challenges remain in understanding this form of locomotion. Five key aerodynamic mechanisms have been identified for insect flight. Among these is the leading edge vortex, which is a convergent solution to avoid stall for insects, bats and birds. The roles of the other mechanisms - added mass, clap and fling, rotational circulation and wing-wake interactions - have not yet been thoroughly studied in the context of vertebrate flight. Further challenges to understanding bat and bird flight are posed by the complex, dynamic wing morphologies of these species and the more turbulent airflow generated by their wings compared with that observed during insect flight. Nevertheless, three dimensionless numbers that combine key flow, morphological and kinematic parameters - the Reynolds number, Rossby number and advance ratio - govern flapping wing aerodynamics for both insects and vertebrates. These numbers can thus be used to organize an integrative framework for studying and comparing animal flapping flight. Here, we provide a roadmap for developing such a framework, highlighting the aerodynamic mechanisms that remain to be quantified and compared across species. Ultimately, incorporating complex flight maneuvers, environmental effects and developmental stages into this framework will also be essential to advancing our understanding of the biomechanics, movement ecology and evolution of animal flight.

  17. Asymmetric Uncertainty Expression for High Gradient Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T

    2012-01-01

    When the physics of the flow around an aircraft changes very abruptly either in time or space (e.g., flow separation/reattachment, boundary layer transition, unsteadiness, shocks, etc), the measurements that are performed in a simulated environment like a wind tunnel test or a computational simulation will most likely incorrectly predict the exact location of where (or when) the change in physics happens. There are many reasons for this, includ- ing the error introduced by simulating a real system at a smaller scale and at non-ideal conditions, or the error due to turbulence models in a computational simulation. The un- certainty analysis principles that have been developed and are being implemented today do not fully account for uncertainty in the knowledge of the location of abrupt physics changes or sharp gradients, leading to a potentially underestimated uncertainty in those areas. To address this problem, a new asymmetric aerodynamic uncertainty expression containing an extra term to account for a phase-uncertainty, the magnitude of which is emphasized in the high-gradient aerodynamic regions is proposed in this paper. Additionally, based on previous work, a method for dispersing aerodynamic data within asymmetric uncer- tainty bounds in a more realistic way has been developed for use within Monte Carlo-type analyses.

  18. Rarefied-flow Shuttle aerodynamics model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Larman, Kevin T.; Moats, Christina D.

    1993-01-01

    A rarefied-flow shuttle aerodynamic model spanning the hypersonic continuum to the free molecule-flow regime was formulated. The model development has evolved from the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP) experiment conducted on the Orbiter since 1983. The complete model is described in detail. The model includes normal and axial hypersonic continuum coefficient equations as functions of angle-of-attack, body flap deflection, and elevon deflection. Normal and axial free molecule flow coefficient equations as a function of angle-of-attack are presented, along with flight derived rarefied-flow transition bridging formulae. Comparisons are made with data from the Operational Aerodynamic Design Data Book (OADDB), applicable wind-tunnel data, and recent flight data from STS-35 and STS-40. The flight-derived model aerodynamic force coefficient ratio is in good agreement with the wind-tunnel data and predicts the flight measured force coefficient ratios on STS-35 and STS-40. The model is not, however, in good agreement with the OADDB. But, the current OADDB does not predict the flight data force coefficient ratios of either STS-35 or STS-40 as accurately as the flight-derived model. Also, the OADDB differs with the wind-tunnel force coefficient ratio data.

  19. Mars Pathfider Rarefied Aerodynamics: Computations and Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Blanchard, Robert C.; Wilmoth, Richard G.; Braun, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    On July 4, 1997, after traveling close to 500 million km, the Pathfinder spacecraft successfully completed entry, descent, and landing at Mars. In the present paper, the focus is on the hypersonic rarefied portion of Pathfinder's atmospheric entry where the synergy of flight measurements, aerodynamic calculations, and atmospheric modeling tools are used to extract Pathfinder's attitude and the freestream density. Accuracy of the capsule aerodynamics directly impacts the inferred atmospheric properties extracted from deceleration measurements made by on-board accelerometers. The range of rarefaction considered in this study extends from the free molecular to continuum conditions and angles of attack from O to 30 deg. The aerodynamic computations are made with free-molecular and direct simulation Monte Carlo codes. The calculations show that Pathfinder is statically unstable for much of the transitional rarefied regime. Due to the relatively modest forces and the gyroscopic motion of the spacecraft, the angle of attack excursions were less than 5 deg as inferred from force measurements for the rarefied portion of entry and approached a nominal zero degree trim angle near hypersonic continuum conditions.

  20. Aerodynamics for the Mars Phoenix Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Desai, Prasun N.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Pre-flight aerodynamics data for the Mars Phoenix entry capsule are presented. The aerodynamic coefficients were generated as a function of total angle-of-attack and either Knudsen number, velocity, or Mach number, depending on the flight regime. The database was constructed using continuum flowfield computations and data from the Mars Exploration Rover and Viking programs. Hypersonic and supersonic static coefficients were derived from Navier-Stokes solutions on a pre-flight design trajectory. High-altitude data (free-molecular and transitional regimes) and dynamic pitch damping characteristics were taken from Mars Exploration Rover analysis and testing. Transonic static coefficients from Viking wind tunnel tests were used for capsule aerodynamics under the parachute. Static instabilities were predicted at two points along the reference trajectory and were verified by reconstructed flight data. During the hypersonic instability, the capsule was predicted to trim at angles as high as 2.5 deg with an on-axis center-of-gravity. Trim angles were predicted for off-nominal pitching moment (4.2 deg peak) and a 5 mm off-axis center-ofgravity (4.8 deg peak). Finally, hypersonic static coefficient sensitivities to atmospheric density were predicted to be within uncertainty bounds.

  1. Future Challenges and Opportunities in Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Hefner, Jerry N.

    2000-01-01

    Investments in aeronautics research and technology have declined substantially over the last decade, in part due to the perception that technologies required in aircraft design are fairly mature and readily available. This perception is being driven by the fact that aircraft configurations, particularly the transport aircraft, have evolved only incrementally, over last several decades. If however, one considers that the growth in air travel is expected to triple in the next 20 years, it becomes quickly obvious that the evolutionary development of technologies is not going to meet the increased demands for safety, environmental compatibility, capacity, and economic viability. Instead, breakthrough technologies will he required both in traditional disciplines of aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, materials, controls, and avionics as well as in the multidisciplinary integration of these technologies into the design of future aerospace vehicles concepts. The paper discusses challenges and opportunities in the field of aerodynamics over the next decade. Future technology advancements in aerodynamics will hinge on our ability, to understand, model, and control complex, three-dimensional, unsteady viscous flow across the speed range. This understanding is critical for developing innovative flow and noise control technologies and advanced design tools that will revolutionize future aerospace vehicle systems and concepts. Specifically, the paper focuses on advanced vehicle concepts, flow and noise control technologies, and advanced design and analysis tools.

  2. Lessons Learned in the High-Speed Aerodynamic Research Programs of the NACA/NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. Leroy

    2004-01-01

    The achievement of flight with manned, powered, heavier-than-air aircraft in 1903 marked the beginning of a new era in the means of transportation. A special advantage for aircraft was in speed. However, when an aircraft penetrates the air at very high speeds, the disturbed air is compressed and there are changes in the density, pressure and temperature of the air. These compressibility effects change the aerodynamic characteristics of an aircraft and introduce problems in drag, stability and control. Many aircraft designed in the post-World War II era were plagued with the effects of compressibility. Accordingly, the study of the aerodynamic behavior of aircraft, spacecraft and missiles at high-speed became a major part of the research activity of the NACA/NASA. The intent of the research was to determine the causes and provide some solutions for the aerodynamic problems resulting from the effects of compressibility. The purpose of this paper is to review some of the high-speed aerodynamic research work conducted at the Langley Research Center from the viewpoint of the author who has been active in much of the effort.

  3. Advanced aerodynamics. Selected NASA research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This Conference Publication contains selected NASA papers that were presented at the Fifth Annual Status Review of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Energy Efficient Transport (EET) Program held at Dryden Flight Research Center in Edwards, California on September 14 to 15, 1981. These papers describe the status of several NASA in-house research activities in the areas of advanced turboprops, natural laminar flow, oscillating control surfaces, high-Reynolds-number airfoil tests, high-lift technology, and theoretical design techniques.

  4. Post-Flight Aerodynamic and Aerothermal Model Validation of a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Chun; Muppidi, Suman; Bose, Deepak; Van Norman, John W.; Tanimoto, Rebekah; Clark, Ian

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Low Density Supersonic Decelerator Program is developing new technologies that will enable the landing of heavier payloads in low density environments, such as Mars. A recent flight experiment conducted high above the Hawaiian Islands has demonstrated the performance of several decelerator technologies. In particular, the deployment of the Robotic class Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD-R) was highly successful, and valuable data were collected during the test flight. This paper outlines the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis used to estimate the aerodynamic and aerothermal characteristics of the SIAD-R. Pre-flight and post-flight predictions are compared with the flight data, and a very good agreement in aerodynamic force and moment coefficients is observed between the CFD solutions and the reconstructed flight data.

  5. Aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.; Grafton, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    An introduction to, and a broad overiew of, the aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack are provided. Items include: (1) some important fundamental phenomena which determine the aerodynamic characteristics of airplanes at high angles of attack; (2) static and dynamic aerodynamic characteristics near the stall; (3) aerodynamics of the spin; (4) test techniques used in stall/spin studies; (5) applications of aerodynamic data to problems in flight dynamics in the stall/spin area; and (6) the outlook for future research in the area. Although stalling and spinning are flight dynamic problems of importance to all aircraft, including general aviation aircraft, commercial transports, and military airplanes, emphasis is placed on military configurations and the principle aerodynamic factors which influence the stability and control of such vehicles at high angles of attack.

  6. Aerodynamics for Revolutionary Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, William L., III; Singer, Bart A.; Leavitt, Laurence D.

    2003-01-01

    Aeronautics research has seriously declined partly because of the perception that it is a mature science and only incremental improvements are possible. Recent aeronautics roadmapping activities at NASA Langley paint a different picture of the future. Breakthroughs are still felt to be possible if we expand the current design space of today's vehicles and optimize the airspace and vehicles as a system. The paper describes some of the challenges that the aircraft and airline industry face. These challenges include political, technical and environmental issues. Examples of the opportunities and technologies that could provide a different vision for the future are discussed.

  7. System Identification of a Vortex Lattice Aerodynamic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Kholodar, Denis; Dowell, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    The state-space presentation of an aerodynamic vortex model is considered from a classical and system identification perspective. Using an aerodynamic vortex model as a numerical simulator of a wing tunnel experiment, both full state and limited state data or measurements are considered. Two possible approaches for system identification are presented and modal controllability and observability are also considered. The theory then is applied to the system identification of a flow over an aerodynamic delta wing and typical results are presented.

  8. Aerodynamic Decelerators for Planetary Exploration: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juna R.; Lingard, J. Stephen

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, aerodynamic decelerators are defined as textile devices intended to be deployed at Mach numbers below five. Such aerodynamic decelerators include parachutes and inflatable aerodynamic decelerators (often known as ballutes). Aerodynamic decelerators play a key role in the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) of planetary exploration vehicles. Among the functions performed by aerodynamic decelerators for such vehicles are deceleration (often from supersonic to subsonic speeds), minimization of descent rate, providing specific descent rates (so that scientific measurements can be obtained), providing stability (drogue function - either to prevent aeroshell tumbling or to meet instrumentation requirements), effecting further aerodynamic decelerator system deployment (pilot function), providing differences in ballistic coefficients of components to enable separation events, and providing height and timeline to allow for completion of the EDL sequence. Challenging aspects in the development of aerodynamic decelerators for planetary exploration missions include: deployment in the unusual combination of high Mach numbers and low dynamic pressures, deployment in the wake behind a blunt-body entry vehicle, stringent mass and volume constraints, and the requirement for high drag and stability. Furthermore, these aerodynamic decelerators must be qualified for flight without access to the exotic operating environment where they are expected to operate. This paper is an introduction to the development and application of aerodynamic decelerators for robotic planetary exploration missions (including Earth sample return missions) from the earliest work in the 1960s to new ideas and technologies with possible application to future missions. An extensive list of references is provided for additional study.

  9. Workshop on Aircraft Surface Representation for Aerodynamic Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J. (Editor); Ashbaugh, J. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Papers and discussions on surface representation and its integration with aerodynamics, computers, graphics, wind tunnel model fabrication, and flow field grid generation are presented. Surface definition is emphasized.

  10. Fundamental Aspects of the Aerodynamics of Turbojet Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrere, M.

    1978-01-01

    Aerodynamic considerations in the design of high performance combustors for turbojet engines are discussed. Aerodynamic problems concerning the preparation of the fuel-air mixture, the recirculation zone where primary combustion occurs, the secondary combustion zone, and the dilution zone were examined. An aerodynamic analysis of the entire primary chamber ensemble was carried out to determine the pressure drop between entry and exit. The aerodynamics of afterburn chambers are discussed. A model which can be used to investigate the evolution of temperature, pressure, and rate and efficiency of combustion the length of the chamber was developed.

  11. Integrated aerodynamic/structural design of a sailplane wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, B.; Gurdal, Z.; Haftka, R. T.; Strauch, G. J.; Eppard, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Using lifting-line theory and beam analysis, the geometry (planiform and twist) and composite material structural sizes (skin thickness, spar cap, and web thickness) were designed for a sailplane wing, subject to both structural and aerodynamic constraints. For all elements, the integrated design (simultaneously designing the aerodynamics and the structure) was superior in terms of performance and weight to the sequential design (where the aerodynamic geometry is designed to maximize the performance, following which a structural/aeroelastic design minimizes the weight). Integrated designs produced less rigid, higher aspect ratio wings with favorable aerodynamic/structural interactions.

  12. A climatology of formation conditions for aerodynamic contrails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierens, K.; Dilger, F.

    2013-06-01

    Aerodynamic contrails are defined in this paper as line shaped ice clouds caused by aerodynamically triggered cooling over the wings of an aircraft in cruise which become visible immediately at the trailing edge of the wing or close to it. Effects at low altitudes like condensation to liquid droplets and their potential heterogeneous freezing are excluded from our definition. We study atmospheric conditions that allow formation of aerodynamic contrails. These conditions are stated and then applied to atmospheric data, first to a special case where an aerodynamic contrail was actually observed and then to a full year of global reanalysis data. We show where, when (seasonal variation), and how frequently (probability) aerodynamic contrails can form, and how this relates to actual patterns of air traffic. We study the formation of persistent aerodynamic contrails as well. Finally we check whether aerodynamic and exhaust contrails can coexist in the atmosphere. We show that visible aerodynamic contrails are possible only in an altitude range between roughly 540 and 250 hPa, and that the ambient temperature is the most important parameter, not the relative humidity. Finally we give an argument for our believe that currently aerodynamic contrails have a much smaller climate effect than exhaust contrails, which may however change in future with more air traffic in the tropics.

  13. A method for determining the median line of measured cylindrical and conical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecki, Dariusz; Zwierzchowski, Jarosław

    2015-08-01

    The paper presents a novel method for the determination of the median line of the cylindrical and conical surfaces. This method can be incorporated into virtually any cylindricity measurement strategy, including the bird-cage strategy and the helical line strategy. In the study, a median line was determined by minimizing the functional made up of two components. The form of the first component results from the classic definition of the median line provided in the corresponding standard. The other, termed the bending energy, is responsible for ensuring appropriate smoothness of the median line. In order to solve this variational problem, the median line was approximated by means of linear combination of cubic B-spline functions. A simulation and experiments were conducted to establish the suitability of the algorithm developed for the determination of the median line using the helical-line and the cross-section measurement strategy.

  14. Numerical simulation of inducing characteristics of high energy electron beam plasma for aerodynamics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongfeng, DENG; Jian, JIANG; Xianwei, HAN; Chang, TAN; Jianguo, WEI

    2017-04-01

    The problem of flow active control by low temperature plasma is considered to be one of the most flourishing fields of aerodynamics due to its practical advantages. Compared with other means, the electron beam plasma is a potential flow control method for large scale flow. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics model coupled with a multi-fluid plasma model is established to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics induced by electron beam plasma. The results demonstrate that the electron beam strongly influences the flow properties, not only in the boundary layers, but also in the main flow. A weak shockwave is induced at the electron beam injection position and develops to the other side of the wind tunnel behind the beam. It brings additional energy into air, and the inducing characteristics are closely related to the beam power and increase nonlinearly with it. The injection angles also influence the flow properties to some extent. Based on this research, we demonstrate that the high energy electron beam air plasma has three attractive advantages in aerodynamic applications, i.e. the high energy density, wide action range and excellent action effect. Due to the rapid development of near space hypersonic vehicles and atmospheric fighters, by optimizing the parameters, the electron beam can be used as an alternative means in aerodynamic steering in these applications.

  15. Status, Plans and Initial Results for Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, Lawrence D.; Hall, Robert M.; Haynes, Davy A.; Pamadi, Bandu N.; Taylor, Terry L.; Seaford, C. Mark

    2008-01-01

    Following the completion of NASA s Exploration Systems Architecture Study in August 2004 for the NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD), the Ares Projects Office at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center was assigned project management responsibilities for the design and development of the first vehicle in the architecture, the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), which will be used to launch astronauts to low earth orbit and rendezvous with either the International Space Station or the ESMD s earth departure stage for lunar or other future missions beyond low Earth orbit. The primary elements of the Ares I CLV project are the first stage, the upper stage, the upper stage engine, and vehicle integration. Within vehicle integration is an effort in integrated design and analysis which is comprised of a number of technical disciplines needed to support vehicle design and development. One of the important disciplines throughout the life of the project is aerodynamics. This paper will present the status, plans, and initial results of Ares I CLV aerodynamics as the project was preparing for the Ares I CLV Systems Requirements Review. Following a discussion of the specific interactions with other technical panels and a status of the current activities, the plans for aerodynamic support of the Ares I CLV until the initial crewed flights will be presented. Keywords: Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, aerodynamics, wind tunnel testing, computational fluid dynamics

  16. In vivo measurement of aerodynamic weight support in freely flying birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentink, David; Haselsteiner, Andreas; Ingersoll, Rivers

    2014-11-01

    Birds dynamically change the shape of their wing during the stroke to support their body weight aerodynamically. The wing is partially folded during the upstroke, which suggests that the upstroke of birds might not actively contribute to aerodynamic force production. This hypothesis is supported by the significant mass difference between the large pectoralis muscle that powers the down-stroke and the much smaller supracoracoideus that drives the upstroke. Previous works used indirect or incomplete techniques to measure the total force generated by bird wings ranging from muscle force, airflow, wing surface pressure, to detailed kinematics measurements coupled with bird mass-distribution models to derive net force through second derivatives. We have validated a new method that measures aerodynamic force in vivo time-resolved directly in freely flying birds which can resolve this question. The validation of the method, using independent force measurements on a quadcopter with pulsating thrust, show the aerodynamic force and impulse are measured within 2% accuracy and time-resolved. We demonstrate results for quad-copters and birds of similar weight and size. The method is scalable and can be applied to both engineered and natural flyers across taxa. The first author invented the method, the second and third authors validated the method and present results for quadcopters and birds.

  17. Four-stage computational technology with adaptive numerical methods for computational aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaydurov, V.; Liu, T.; Zheng, Z.

    2012-10-01

    Computational aerodynamics is a key technology in aircraft design which is ahead of physical experiment and complements it. Of course all three components of computational modeling are actively developed: mathematical models of real aerodynamic processes, numerical algorithms, and high-performance computing. The most impressive progress has been made in the field of computing, though with a considerable complication of computer architecture. Numerical algorithms are developed more conservative. More precisely, they are offered and theoretically justified for more simple mathematical problems. Nevertheless, computational mathematics now has amassed a whole palette of numerical algorithms that can provide acceptable accuracy and interface between modern mathematical models in aerodynamics and high-performance computers. A significant step in this direction was the European Project ADIGMA whose positive experience will be used in International Project TRISTAM for further movement in the field of computational technologies for aerodynamics. This paper gives a general overview of objectives and approaches intended to use and a description of the recommended four-stage computer technology.

  18. Microneurography in relation to intraneural topography: somatotopic organisation of median nerve fascicles in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Hallin, R G

    1990-01-01

    Microneurography was performed in median nerve sensory fascicles with concentric needle electrodes and with conventional tungsten microneedles. The latter electrodes preferentially recorded activity from the myelinated fibres in the whole fascicle. By contrast, due to its special design, a concentric needle can record activity selectively from even a small part of a fascicle. High amplitude signals in C fibres can be discriminated close to Schwann cells that envelope unmyelinated axons. Apart from being biased for activity in thin fibres, the concentric needles can also record signals from nearby myelinated fibres. The palmar receptive fields of such fibre groups were not congruent with the areas traditionally attributed to multiunit skin afferents in humans, namely the innervation zone(s) of one or two adjacent digital nerve(s). Instead, the multiunit fields often comprised small parts of a digital nerve innervation area, frequently only the pulp of a finger. Single units were always localised within previously screened multiunit areas. Contrary to some previously accepted tenets it is probable that single unit activity in myelinated fibres in these studies is recorded extra-axonally near to a node of Ranvier. The findings also suggest the presence of a somatotopy in human limb nerve fascicles, comparable to that previously established in the spinal cord and the somatosensory cortex. Images PMID:2246655

  19. Aerodynamic Design Criteria for Class 8 Heavy Vehicles Trailer Base Devices to Attain Optimum Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Salari, K; Ortega, J

    2010-12-13

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of its Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), and Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) effort has investigated class 8 tractor-trailer aerodynamics for many years. This effort has identified many drag producing flow structures around the heavy vehicles and also has designed and tested many new active and passive drag reduction techniques and concepts for significant on the road fuel economy improvements. As part of this effort a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design for aerodynamic drag reduction devices has been established. The objective of this report is to provide design guidance for trailer base devices to improve their aerodynamic performance. These devices are commonly referred to as boattails, base flaps, tail devices, and etc. The information provided here is based on past research and our most recent full-scale experimental investigations in collaboration with Navistar Inc. Additional supporting data from LLNL/Navistar wind tunnel, track test, and on the road test will be published soon. The trailer base devices can be identified by 4 flat panels that are attached to the rear edges of the trailer base to form a closed cavity. These devices have been engineered in many different forms such as, inflatable and non-inflatable, 3 and 4-sided, closed and open cavity, and etc. The following is an in-depth discussion with some recommendations, based on existing data and current research activities, of changes that could be made to these devices to improve their aerodynamic performance. There are 6 primary factors that could influence the aerodynamic performance of trailer base devices: (1) Deflection angle; (2) Boattail length; (3) Sealing of edges and corners; (4) 3 versus 4-sided, Position of the 4th plate; (5) Boattail vertical extension, Skirt - boattail transition; and (6) Closed versus open cavity.

  20. Technology development for deployable aerodynamic decelerators at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masciarelli, James P.

    2002-01-01

    Parachutes used for Mars landing missions are only certified for deployment at Mars behind blunt bodies flying at low angles of attack, Mach numbers up to 2.2, and dynamic pressures of up to 800 Pa. NASA is currently studying entry vehicle concepts for future robotic missions to Mars that would require parachutes to be deployed at higher Mach numbers and dynamic pressures. This paper demonstrates the need for expanding the parachute deployment envelope, and describes a three-phase technology development activity that has been initiated to address the need. The end result of the technology development program will be a aerodynamic decelerator system that can be deployed at Mach numbers of up to 3.1 and dynamic pressures of up to 1400 Pa. .

  1. Acceptable differences in sensory and motor latencies between the median and ulnar nerves.

    PubMed

    Grossart, Elizabeth A; Prahlow, Nathan D; Buschbacher, Ralph M

    2006-01-01

    The median and ulnar nerves are often studied during the same electrodiagnostic examination. The sensory and motor latencies of these nerves have been compared to detect a common electrodiagnostic entity: median neuropathy at the wrist. However, this comparison could also be used to diagnose less common ulnar pathology. For this reason, it is important to establish normal values for comparing median and ulnar sensory and motor latencies. Previous research deriving these differences in latency has had some limitations. The purpose of this study was to derive an improved normative database for the acceptable differences in latency between the median and ulnar sensory and motor nerves of the same limb. Median and ulnar sensory and motor latencies were obtained from 219 and 238 asymptomatic risk-factor-free subjects, respectively. An analysis of variance was performed to determine whether physical characteristics, specifically age, race, gender, height, or body mass index (as an indicator of obesity), correlated with differences in latency. Differences in sensory latencies were unaffected by physical characteristics. The upper limit of normal difference between median and ulnar (median longer than ulnar) onset latency was 0.5 ms (97th percentile), whereas the peak latency value was 0.4 ms (97th percentile). The upper limit of normal difference between ulnar-versus-median (ulnar longer than median) onset latency was 0.3 ms (97th percentile), whereas the peak-latency value was 0.5 ms (97th percentile). The mean difference in motor latencies correlated with age, with older subjects having a greater variability. In subjects aged 50 and over, the mean difference in median-versus-ulnar latency was 0.9 ms +/- 0.4 ms. The upper limit of normal difference (median longer than ulnar) was 1.7 ms (97th percentile). The upper limit of normal ulnar motor latency is attained if the ulnar latency comes within 0.3 ms of the median latency. In individuals less than 50 years of age, the

  2. Calculation of subsonic and supersonic steady and unsteady aerodynamic forces using velocity potential aerodynamic elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.; Yoo, Y. S.

    1976-01-01

    Expressions for calculation of subsonic and supersonic, steady and unsteady aerodynamic forces are derived, using the concept of aerodynamic elements applied to the downwash velocity potential method. Aerodynamic elements can be of arbitrary out of plane polygon shape, although numerical calculations are restricted to rectangular elements, and to the steady state case in the supersonic examples. It is suggested that the use of conforming, in place of rectangular elements, would give better results. Agreement with results for subsonic oscillating T tails is fair, but results do not converge as the number of collocation points is increased. This appears to be due to the form of expression used in the calculations. The methods derived are expected to facilitate automated flutter analysis on the computer. In particular, the aerodynamic element concept is consistent with finite element methods already used for structural analysis. The method is universal for the complete Mach number range, and, finally, the calculations can be arranged so that they do not have to be repeated completely for every reduced frequency.

  3. Effects of ice accretions on aircraft aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Frank T.; Khodadoust, Abdollah

    2001-11-01

    This article is a systematic and comprehensive review, correlation, and assessment of test results available in the public domain which address the aerodynamic performance and control degradations caused by various types of ice accretions on the lifting surfaces of fixed wing aircraft. To help put the various test results in perspective, overviews are provided first of the important factors and limitations involved in computational and experimental icing simulation techniques, as well as key aerodynamic testing simulation variables and governing flow physics issues. Following these are the actual reviews, assessments, and correlations of a large number of experimental measurements of various forms of mostly simulated in-flight and ground ice accretions, augmented where appropriate by similar measurements for other analogous forms of surface contamination and/or disruptions. In-flight icing categories reviewed include the initial and inter-cycle ice accretions inherent in the use of de-icing systems which are of particular concern because of widespread misconceptions about the thickness of such accretions which can be allowed before any serious consequences occur, and the runback/ridge ice accretions typically associated with larger-than-normal water droplet encounters which are of major concern because of the possible potential for catastrophic reductions in aerodynamic effectiveness. The other in-flight ice accretion category considered includes the more familiar large rime and glaze ice accretions, including ice shapes with rather grotesque features, where the concern is that, in spite of all the research conducted to date, the upper limit of penalties possible has probably not been defined. Lastly, the effects of various possible ground frost/ice accretions are considered. The concern with some of these is that for some types of configurations, all of the normally available operating margins to stall at takeoff may be erased if these accretions are not

  4. Aerodynamic yawing moment characteristics of bird wings.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2005-06-21

    The aerodynamic yawing moments due to sideslip are considered for wings of birds. Reference is made to the experience with aircraft wings in order to identify features which are significant for the yawing moment characteristics. Thus, it can be shown that wing sweep, aspect ratio and lift coefficient have a great impact. Focus of the paper is on wing sweep which can considerably increase the yawing moment due to sideslip when compared with unswept wings. There are many birds the wings of which employ sweep. To show the effect of sweep for birds, the aerodynamic characteristics of a gull wing which is considered as a representative example are treated in detail. For this purpose, a sophisticated aerodynamic method is used to compute results of high precision. The yawing moments of the gull wing with respect to the sideslip angle and the lift coefficient are determined. They show a significant level of yaw stability which strongly increases with the lift coefficient. It is particularly high in the lift coefficient region of best gliding flight conditions. In order to make the effect of sweep more perspicuous, a modification of the gull wing employing no sweep is considered for comparison. It turns out that the unswept wing yields yawing moments which are substantially smaller than those of the original gull wing with sweep. Another feature significant for the yawing moment characteristics concerns the fact that sweep is at the outer part of bird wings. By considering the underlying physical mechanism, it is shown that this feature is most important for the efficiency of wing sweep. To sum up, wing sweep provides a primary contribution to the yawing moments. It may be concluded that this is an essential reason why there is sweep in bird wings.

  5. A climatology of formation conditions for aerodynamic contrails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierens, K.; Dilger, F.

    2013-11-01

    Aircraft at cruise levels can cause two kinds of contrails, the well known exhaust contrails and the less well-known aerodynamic contrails. While the possible climate impact of exhaust contrails has been studied for many years, research on aerodynamic contrails began only a few years ago and nothing is known about a possible contribution of these ice clouds to climate impact. In order to make progress in this respect, we first need a climatology of their formation conditions and this is given in the present paper. Aerodynamic contrails are defined here as line shaped ice clouds caused by aerodynamically triggered cooling over the wings of an aircraft in cruise which become visible immediately at the trailing edge of the wing or close to it. Effects at low altitudes like condensation to liquid droplets and their potential heterogeneous freezing are excluded from our definition. We study atmospheric conditions that allow formation of aerodynamic contrails. These conditions are stated and then applied to atmospheric data: first to a special case where an aerodynamic contrail was actually observed and then to a full year of global reanalysis data. We show where, when (seasonal variation), and how frequently (probability) aerodynamic contrails can form, and how this relates to actual patterns of air traffic. We study the formation of persistent aerodynamic contrails as well. Furthermore, we check whether aerodynamic and exhaust contrails can coexist in the atmosphere. We show that visible aerodynamic contrails are possible only in an altitude range between roughly 540 and 250 hPa, and that the ambient temperature is the most important parameter, not the relative humidity. Finally, we argue that currently aerodynamic contrails have a much smaller climate effect than exhaust contrails, which may however change in future with more air traffic in the tropics.

  6. Aerodynamics and Hovering Control of LTA Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    Cylinders (From Reference 7). 28 ~~0 0 - iI- ~43 0 C*4 JoJ o Di 29rtf IrI ALLEN ( NACA REPT 1048) f ( k a ~~ 01 WHER IS MAX.NEGATIVEdx2 FUR2...size, the propulsive power will decrease as che propeller remote inlet velocity V, decreases. Hence, a wake-immersed propeller can produce the same...M.: "The Aerodynamic Forces on Airship Hulls", NACA Report 184, 1924. 2. Milne-Thompson: THEORETICAL HYDRODYNAMICS, MacMillan, 1955. 3. Koebn, N. E

  7. Aerodynamic prediction techniques for hypersonic configuration design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    An investigation of approximate theoretical techniques for predicting aerodynamic characteristics and surface pressures for relatively slender vehicles at moderate hypersonic speeds was performed. Emphasis was placed on approaches that would be responsive to preliminary configuration design level of effort. Potential theory was examined in detail to meet this objective. Numerical pilot codes were developed for relatively simple three dimensional geometries to evaluate the capability of the approximate equations of motion considered. Results from the computations indicate good agreement with higher order solutions and experimental results for a variety of wing, body, and wing-body shapes for values of the hypersonic similarity parameter M delta approaching one.

  8. Aerodynamic design trends for commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbig, R.; Koerner, H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent research on advanced-configuration commercial aircraft at DFVLR is surveyed, with a focus on aerodynamic approaches to improved performance. Topics examined include transonic wings with variable camber or shock/boundary-layer control, wings with reduced friction drag or laminarized flow, prop-fan propulsion, and unusual configurations or wing profiles. Drawings, diagrams, and graphs of predicted performance are provided, and the need for extensive development efforts using powerful computer facilities, high-speed and low-speed wind tunnels, and flight tests of models (mounted on specially designed carrier aircraft) is indicated.

  9. Optimal impulsive manoeuvres and aerodynamic braking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezewski, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    A method developed for obtaining solutions to the aerodynamic braking problem, using impulses in the exoatmospheric phases is discussed. The solution combines primer vector theory and the results of a suboptimal atmospheric guidance program. For a specified initial and final orbit, the solution determines: (1) the minimum impulsive cost using a maximum of four impulses, (2) the optimal atmospheric entry and exit-state vectors subject to equality and inequality constraints, and (3) the optimal coast times. Numerical solutions which illustrate the characteristics of the solution are presented.

  10. Coupled Aerodynamic-Thermal-Structural (CATS) Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Coupled Aerodynamic-Thermal-Structural (CATS) Analysis is a focused effort within the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) program to streamline multidisciplinary analysis of aeropropulsion components and assemblies. Multidisciplinary analysis of axial-flow compressor performance has been selected for the initial focus of this project. CATS will permit more accurate compressor system analysis by enabling users to include thermal and mechanical effects as an integral part of the aerodynamic analysis of the compressor primary flowpath. Thus, critical details, such as the variation of blade tip clearances and the deformation of the flowpath geometry, can be more accurately modeled and included in the aerodynamic analyses. The benefits of this coupled analysis capability are (1) performance and stall line predictions are improved by the inclusion of tip clearances and hot geometries, (2) design alternatives can be readily analyzed, and (3) higher fidelity analysis by researchers in various disciplines is possible. The goals for this project are a 10-percent improvement in stall margin predictions and a 2:1 speed-up in multidisciplinary analysis times. Working cooperatively with Pratt & Whitney, the Lewis CATS team defined the engineering processes and identified the software products necessary for streamlining these processes. The basic approach is to integrate the aerodynamic, thermal, and structural computational analyses by using data management and Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS) based data mapping. Five software products have been defined for this task: (1) a primary flowpath data mapper, (2) a two-dimensional data mapper, (3) a database interface, (4) a blade structural pre- and post-processor, and (5) a computational fluid dynamics code for aerothermal analysis of the drum rotor. Thus far (1) a cooperative agreement has been established with Pratt & Whitney, (2) a Primary Flowpath Data Mapper has been prototyped and delivered to General Electric

  11. Aerodynamic noise emission from turbulent shear layers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. P.

    1973-01-01

    The Phillips (1960) convected wave equation is employed in this paper to study aerodynamic noise emission processes in subsonic and supersonic shear layers. The wave equation in three spatial dimensions is first reduced to an ordinary differential equation by Fourier transformation and then solved via the WKBJ method. Three typical solutions are required for discussions in this paper. The current results are different from the classical conclusions. The effects of refraction, convection, Mach-number dependence and temperature dependence of turbulent noise emission are analyzed in the light of solutions to the Phillips equation.

  12. Modification of Aerodynamic Surfaces Using Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    slading discharge (Task 3) ……………………………………………………………………..…………...35 § 2.1. Development of discharge physical model. General properties of sliding discharge...be called for solution of plasma aerodynamic problems. A sliding discharge possess a number of unique properties (simplicity of realization...investigation of sub-layer material effect on the discharge properties . 6. Test experiments on sliding discharge’s forming at a curvilinear surface

  13. Generic Wing-Body Aerodynamics Data Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.; Olsen, Thomas H.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The wing-body aerodynamics data base consists of a series of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations about a generic wing body configuration consisting of a ogive-circular-cylinder fuselage and a simple symmetric wing mid-mounted on the fuselage. Solutions have been obtained for Nonlinear Potential (P), Euler (E) and Navier-Stokes (N) solvers over a range of subsonic and transonic Mach numbers and angles of attack. In addition, each solution has been computed on a series of grids, coarse, medium and fine to permit an assessment of grid refinement errors.

  14. Aerodynamic Size Classification of Glass Fibers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laosmaa, Pekka J. J.

    The objective of this research was to examine a technique by which fibers may be aerodynamically classified by diameter and/or length. In this study a system for fiber preparation and generation as well as an in situ fiber classifier were constructed and evaluated. A recently developed technique, the size classification of particles by opposing jets, was modified. The research set-up consisted of (1) a vibrating bed fiber generator, which also functioned as a preselector, (2) an opposing-jet classifier equipped with electrodes and high voltage power supplies to create fiber-aligning electric fields inside the classifier and (3) an optoelectric fiber sensor to measure the concentration and length of fibers. The classified fibers were also collected on filters for the counting and dimensional analysis of the fibers. Some flow instability problems were found during the initial tests of the classifier. They were attributed to random flow fluctuations in the nozzles caused by very small perturbations upstream of the nozzles. Within a critical range of flow Reynolds numbers the flow becomes "intermittent", i.e. it alternates in time between being laminar and turbulent in a random sequence. Small disturbances upstream of the point of consideration can "trigger" the changes from laminar to turbulent flow and the initial disturbance may be "amplified", sending a turbulent flash through the flow system. The classifier performed well with test aerosols after the nozzle flowrate had been decreased to correspond to a lower and less critical Reynolds number and after some modifications had been made to smooth the flow inside the classifier inlet chambers. The cut-off of test aerosols was sharp, but the loss of particles greater than 2.5 (mu)m in aerodynamic diameter was unsatisfactorily high. The classifier was able to classify fibers by aerodynamic diameter, but not as predicted through calculations. The results were difficult to interpret because of the high loss of fibers

  15. Report of the Panel on Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Richard G.; Bushnell, Dennis

    1984-01-01

    Progress in aerodynamics over the past 50 years has been evidenced by the development of increasingly sophisticated and efficient flight vehicles throughout the flight spectrum. Advances have generally arisen in an evolutionary manner from experience gained in wind tunnel testing, flight testing, and improvements in analytical and computational capabilities. As a result of this evolutionary development, both military and commercial vehicles operate at a relatively high efficiency level. This observation plus the fact that airplanes have not changed appreciably in outward appearance over recent years has led some skeptics to conclude incorrectly that aerodynamics is a mature technology, with little to be gained from further developments in the field. It is of interest to note that progress in aerodynamics has occurred without a thorough understanding of the fundamental physics of flow, turbulence, vortex dynamics, and separated flow, for example. The present understanding of transition, turbulence, and boundary layer separation is actually very limited. However, these fundamental flow phenomena provide the key to reducing the viscous drag of aircraft. Drag reduction provides the greatest potential for increased flight efficiency from the standpoint of both saving energy and maximizing performance. Recent advances have led to innovative concepts for reducing turbulent friction drag by modifying the turbulent structure within the boundary layer. Further advances in this basic area should lead to methods for reducing skin friction drag significantly. The current challenges for military aircraft open entirely new fields of investigation for the aerodynamicist. The ability through very high speed information processing technology to totally integrate the flight and propulsion controls can permit an aircraft to fly with "complete abandon," avoiding departure, buffet, and other undesirable characteristics. To utilize these new control concepts, complex aerodynamic

  16. Dual nozzle aerodynamic and cooling analysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meagher, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical models to predict performance and operating characteristics of dual nozzle concepts were developed and improved. Aerodynamic models are available to define flow characteristics and bleed requirements for both the dual throat and dual expander concepts. Advanced analytical techniques were utilized to provide quantitative estimates of the bleed flow, boundary layer, and shock effects within dual nozzle engines. Thermal analyses were performed to define cooling requirements for baseline configurations, and special studies of unique dual nozzle cooling problems defined feasible means of achieving adequate cooling.

  17. Fluidization technologies: Aerodynamic principles and process engineering.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Rahul; Puthli, Shivanand

    2009-11-01

    The concept of fluidization has been adapted to different unit processes of pharmaceutical product development. Till date a lot of improvements have been made in the engineering design to achieve superior process performance. This review is focused on the fundamental principles of aerodynamics and hydrodynamics associated with the fluidization technologies. Fluid-bed coating, fluidized bed granulation, rotor processing, hot melt granulation, electrostatic coating, supercritical fluid based fluidized bed technology are highlighted. Developments in the design of processing equipments have been explicitly elucidated. This article also discusses processing problems from the operator's perspective along with latest developments in the application of these principles.

  18. Variable volume combustor with aerodynamic support struts

    DOEpatents

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Stewart, Jason Thurman; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-03-07

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles and a fuel injection system for providing a flow of fuel to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles. The fuel injection system may include a number of support struts supporting the fuel nozzles and providing the flow of fuel therethrough. The support struts may include an aerodynamic contoured shape so as to distribute evenly a flow of air to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles.

  19. Sensor Systems Collect Critical Aerodynamics Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    With the support of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Dryden Flight Research Center, Tao of Systems Integration Inc. developed sensors and other components that will ultimately form a first-of-its-kind, closed-loop system for detecting, measuring, and controlling aerodynamic forces and moments in flight. The Hampton, Virginia-based company commercialized three of the four planned components, which provide sensing solutions for customers such as Boeing, General Electric, and BMW and are used for applications such as improving wind turbine operation and optimizing air flow from air conditioning systems. The completed system may one day enable flexible-wing aircraft with flight capabilities like those of birds.

  20. Aerodynamic Focusing Of High-Density Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, D. E.; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-24

    High-density micron-sized particle aerosols might form the basis for a number of applications in which a material target with a particular shape might be quickly ionized to form a cylindrical or sheet shaped plasma. A simple experimental device was built in order to study the properties of high-density aerosol focusing for 1 m silica spheres. Preliminary results recover previous findings on aerodynamic focusing at low densities. At higher densities, it is demonstrated that the focusing properties change in a way which is consistent with a density dependent Stokes number.

  1. Aerodynamic sound generation caused by viscous processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermeier, F.

    1985-03-01

    A theoretical investigation of the effects of viscosity on aerodynamic sound generation by unheated low Mach-number flow is discussed. By means of the method of matched asymptotic expansions, which allows for a consistent estimation of the order of magnitude of each term in the hydrodynamic flow field as well as in the sound field, an analytical solution in terms of a multipole expansion is derived. The physical interpretation of the mathematical outcome of various theories by Morfey (1976), Kempton (1976), Hardin, and Kambe and Minota (1983) is compared and re-examined.

  2. Identification of Experimental Unsteady Aerodynamic Impulse Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Piatak, David J.; Scott, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    The identification of experimental unsteady aerodynamic impulse responses using the Oscillating Turntable (OTT) at NASA Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is described. Results are presented for two configurations: a Rigid Semispan Model (RSM) and a rectangular wing with a supercritical airfoil section. Both models were used to acquire unsteady pressure data due to pitching oscillations on the OTT. A deconvolution scheme involving a step input in pitch and the resultant step response in pressure, for several pressure transducers, is used to identify the pressure impulse responses. The identified impulse responses are then used to predict the pressure response due to pitching oscillations at several frequencies. Comparisons with the experimental data are presented.

  3. Effects of Cold Therapy on Pain and Breathing Exercises Among Median Sternotomy Patients.

    PubMed

    Zencir, Gülbanu; Eser, Ismet

    2016-12-01

    The most painful activities during the days following cardiac surgery are coughing and deep breathing exercises. Cold therapy is an effective nonpharmacological method that decreases the pain during coughing and mobilization. In this study, the effects of cold therapy on pain and breathing exercises among patients with median sternotomy following cardiac surgery were investigated in a randomized crossover clinical trial. Data were collected from patients with median sternotomy (N = 34) in the first two postoperative days. Because of the crossover design of the study, each patient was taken as a simultaneous control. Gel pack application was used as the cold therapy. Patients underwent four episodes of deep breathing and coughing exercises using an incentive spirometer (volumetric). Patients were evaluated according to the visual analogue scale for pain intensity before and after deep breathing and coughing exercise sessions. The pain score was 3.44 ± 2.45 at baseline for deep breathing and coughing exercises on the first day. The reported postoperative pain in the gel-pack group was not significantly different before and after the deep breathing and coughing exercises, but it significantly increased in the no-gel-pack group (p < .001). Although the interaction between the treatment and time was significant (partial eta-squared: .09), the gel-pack group had a lower change in average pain levels. This interaction was not significant in terms of spirometric values. In conclusion, cold therapy had a positive effect on pain management in the early period of post-cardiac surgery but was not effective for the pain associated with breathing exercises.

  4. Median sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Reser, Diana; Caliskan, Etem; Tolboom, Herman; Guidotti, Andrea; Maisano, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Sternotomy is considered to be the gold standard incision in cardiac surgery, resulting in low failure rates and excellent proven long-term outcomes. It can also be used in thoracic surgery for mediastinal, bilateral pulmonary or lower trachea and main stem bronchus surgery. Sternotomy has to be performed properly to avoid short- and long-term morbidity and mortality. The surgical technique is well established and certain principles are recognized to be crucial to minimize complications. The identification of the correct landmarks, midline tissue preparation, osteotomy with the avoidance of injury to underlying structures like pleura, pericardium, innominate vein, brachiocephalic artery and ectatic ascending aorta, and targeted bleeding control are important steps of the procedure. As important as the performance of a proper sternotomy is a correct sternal closure. An override or shift of the sternal edges has to be avoided by placing the wires at a proper distance from each other without injuring the thoracic pedicle. The two sternal halves have to be tightly re-approximated to facilitate healing of the bone and to avoid instability, which is a risk factor for wound infection. With a proper performance of sternotomy and sternal closure, instability and wound infections are rare and depend on patient-related risk factors.

  5. Comparing Aerodynamic Efficiency in Birds and Bats Suggests Better Flight Performance in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Muijres, Florian T.; Johansson, L. Christoffer; Bowlin, Melissa S.; Winter, York; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Flight is one of the energetically most costly activities in the animal kingdom, suggesting that natural selection should work to optimize flight performance. The similar size and flight speed of birds and bats may therefore suggest convergent aerodynamic performance; alternatively, flight performance could be restricted by phylogenetic constraints. We test which of these scenarios fit to two measures of aerodynamic flight efficiency in two passerine bird species and two New World leaf-nosed bat species. Using time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements of the wake of the animals flying in a wind tunnel, we derived the span efficiency, a metric for the efficiency of generating lift, and the lift-to-drag ratio, a metric for mechanical energetic flight efficiency. We show that the birds significantly outperform the bats in both metrics, which we ascribe to variation in aerodynamic function of body and wing upstroke: Bird bodies generated relatively more lift than bat bodies, resulting in a more uniform spanwise lift distribution and higher span efficiency. A likely explanation would be that the bat ears and nose leaf, associated with echolocation, disturb the flow over the body. During the upstroke, the birds retract their wings to make them aerodynamically inactive, while the membranous bat wings generate thrust and negative lift. Despite the differences in performance, the wake morphology of both birds and bats resemble the optimal wake for their respective lift-to-drag ratio regimes. This suggests that evolution has optimized performance relative to the respective conditions of birds and bats, but that maximum performance is possibly limited by phylogenetic constraints. Although ecological differences between birds and bats are subjected to many conspiring variables, the different aerodynamic flight efficiency for the bird and bat species studied here may help explain why birds typically fly faster, migrate more frequently and migrate longer distances

  6. Exploring the Aerodynamic Drag of a Moving Cyclist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theilmann, Florian; Reinhard, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Although the physics of cycling itself is a complex mixture of aerodynamics, physiology, mechanics, and heuristics, using cycling as a context for teaching physics has a tradition of certainly more than 30 years. Here, a possible feature is the discussion of the noticeable resistant forces such as aerodynamic drag and the associated power…

  7. Reliability and Applicability of Aerodynamic Measures in Dysphonia Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yiu, Edwin M.-L.; Yuen, Yuet-Ming; Whitehill, Tara; Winkworth, Alison

    2004-01-01

    Aerodynamic measures are frequently used to analyse and document pathological voices. Some normative data are available for speakers from the English-speaking population. However, no data are available yet for Chinese speakers despite the fact that they are one of the largest populations in the world. The high variability of aerodynamic measures…

  8. Aerodynamic tailoring of the Learjet Model 60 wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekharan, Reuben M.; Hawke, Veronica M.; Hinson, Michael L.; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Madson, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    The wing of the Learjet Model 60 was tailored for improved aerodynamic characteristics using the TRANAIR transonic full-potential computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. A root leading edge glove and wing tip fairing were shaped to reduce shock strength, improve cruise drag and extend the buffet limit. The aerodynamic design was validated by wind tunnel test and flight test data.

  9. Mathematical modeling of the aerodynamic characteristics in flight dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobak, M.; Chapman, G. T.; Schiff, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    Basic concepts involved in the mathematical modeling of the aerodynamic response of an aircraft to arbitrary maneuvers are reviewed. The original formulation of an aerodynamic response in terms of nonlinear functionals is shown to be compatible with a derivation based on the use of nonlinear functional expansions. Extensions of the analysis through its natural connection with ideas from bifurcation theory are indicated.

  10. Near-medians that avoid the corners; a combinatorial probability approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The breakpoint median for a set of k ≥ 3 random genomes tends to approach (any) one of these genomes ("corners") as genome length increases, although there are diminishing proportion of medians equidistant from all k ("medians in the middle"). Algorithms are likely to miss the latter, and this has consequences for the general case where input genomes share some or many gene adjacencies, where the tendency for the median to be closer to one input genome may be an artifact of the corner tendency. Results We present a simple sampling procedure for constructing a "near median" that represents a compromise among k random genomes and that has only a slightly greater breakpoint distance to all of them than the median does. We generalize to the realistic case where genomes share varying proportions of gene adjacencies. We present a supplementary sampling scheme that brings the constructed genome even closer to median status. Conclusions Our approach is of particular use in the phylogenetic context where medians are repeatedly calculated at ancestral nodes, and where the corner effect prevents different parts of the phylogeny from communicating with each other. PMID:25572274

  11. The Influence of the Elderly on School Spending in a Median Voter Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Deborah; Kenny, Lawrence W.

    2008-01-01

    How do the elderly influence school spending if they are a minority of the population? We estimate the determinants of school spending in a median voter model, comparing four assumptions about how the elderly influence the identity of the median voter. Using a county-level panel, we find that elderly preferences are best characterized by assuming…

  12. A case of epidermoid median raphe cyst traversing the corpora cavernosa

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Alice; Capolicchio, John-Paul

    2017-01-01

    Median raphe cysts are congenital lesions that typically have a superficial appearance. We present a very unusual case of a deep perineal mass in a six-year-old boy. The lesion extends into the corpus cavernosum, suggesting that the anomaly was an early embryological event. Histopathological features are consistent with an epidermoid type of median raphe cyst. PMID:28360959

  13. Short-term isotretinoin-induced elkonyxis and median nail dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Alli, Nuran; Dogan, Sibel

    2016-03-01

    Elkonyxis and median nail distrophy are very rare nail fold disorders due to the damage in nail matrix and proximal nail fold. Herein, we report a patient with both elkonyxis and median nail distrophy occured two months into a treatment course of isotretinoin that is to our knowledge for the first time.

  14. Rotor/wing aerodynamic interactions in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felker, F. F.; Light, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of rotor/wing aerodynamic interactions in hover is described. The experimental investigation consisted of both a large-scale and small-scale test. A 0.658-scale, V-22 rotor and wing was used in the large-scale test. Wind download, wing surface pressure, rotor performance, and rotor downwash data from the large-scale test are presented. A small-scale experiment was conducted to determine how changes in the rotor/wing geometry affected the aerodynamic interactions. These geometry variations included the distance between the rotor and wing, wing incidence angle, and configurations both with the rotor axis at the tip of the wing (tilt rotor configuration) and with the rotor axis at the center of the wing (compound helicopter configuration). A wing with boundary-layer control was also tested to evaluate the effect of leading and trailing edge upper surface blowing on the wing download. A computationally efficient, semi-empirical theory was developed to predict the download on the wing. Finally, correlations between the theoretical predictions and test data are presented.

  15. (Aerodynamic focusing of particles and heavy molecules)

    SciTech Connect

    de la Mora, J.F.

    1990-01-08

    By accelerating a gas containing suspended particles or large molecules through a converging nozzle, the suspended species may be focused and therefore used to write fine lines on a surface. Our objective was to study the limits on how narrow this focal region could be as a function of particle size. We find that, for monodisperse particles with masses m{sub p} some 3.6 {times} 10{sup 5} times larger than the molecular mass m of the carrier gas (diameters above some 100{angstrom}), there is no fundamental obstacle to directly write submicron features. However, this conclusion has been verified experimentally only with particles larger than 0.1 {mu}m. Experimental, theoretical and numerical studies on the defocusing role of Brownian motion for very small particles or heavy molecules have shown that high resolution (purely aerodynamic) focusing is impossible with volatile molecules whose masses are typically smaller than 1000 Dalton. For these, the minimal focal diameter after optimization appears to be 5{radical}(m/m{sub p}) times the nozzle diameter d{sub n}. But combinations of focused lasers and aerodynamic focusing appear as promising for direct writing with molecular precursors. Theoretical and numerical schemes capable of predicting the evolution of the focusing beam, including Brownian motion effects, have been developed, although further numerical work would be desirable. 11 refs.

  16. Cascade flutter analysis with transient response aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Stefko, George L.

    1991-01-01

    Two methods for calculating linear frequency domain aerodynamic coefficients from a time marching Full Potential cascade solver are developed and verified. In the first method, the Influence Coefficient, solutions to elemental problems are superposed to obtain the solutions for a cascade in which all blades are vibrating with a constant interblade phase angle. The elemental problem consists of a single blade in the cascade oscillating while the other blades remain stationary. In the second method, the Pulse Response, the response to the transient motion of a blade is used to calculate influence coefficients. This is done by calculating the Fourier Transforms of the blade motion and the response. Both methods are validated by comparison with the Harmonic Oscillation method and give accurate results. The aerodynamic coefficients obtained from these methods are used for frequency domain flutter calculations involving a typical section blade structural model. An eigenvalue problem is solved for each interblade phase angle mode and the eigenvalues are used to determine aeroelastic stability. Flutter calculations are performed for two examples over a range of subsonic Mach numbers.

  17. Cricket Ball Aerodynamics: Myth Versus Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.; Koga, Demmis J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerodynamics plays a prominent role in the flight of a cricket ball released by a bowler. The main interest is in the fact that the ball can follow a curved flight path that is not always under the control of the bowler. ne basic aerodynamic principles responsible for the nonlinear flight or "swing" of a cricket ball were identified several years ago and many papers have been published on the subject. In the last 20 years or so, several experimental investigations have been conducted on cricket ball swing, which revealed the amount of attainable swing, and the parameters that affect it. A general overview of these findings is presented with emphasis on the concept of late swing and the effects of meteorological conditions on swing. In addition, the relatively new concept of "reverse" swing, how it can be achieved in practice and the role in it of ball "tampering", are discussed in detail. A discussion of the "white" cricket ball used in last year's World Cup, which supposedly possesses different swing properties compared to a conventional red ball, is also presented.

  18. Aerodynamic Simulation of the MEXICO Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herraez, I.; Medjroubi, W.; Stoevesandt, B.; Peinke, J.

    2014-12-01

    CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations are a very promising method for predicting the aerodynamic behavior of wind turbines in an inexpensive and accurate way. One of the major drawbacks of this method is the lack of validated models. As a consequence, the reliability of numerical results is often difficult to assess. The MEXICO project aimed at solving this problem by providing the project partners with high quality measurements of a 4.5 meters rotor diameter wind turbine operating under controlled conditions. The large measurement data-set allows the validation of all kind of aerodynamic models. This work summarizes our efforts for validating a CFD model based on the open source software OpenFoam. Both steady- state and time-accurate simulations have been performed with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model for several operating conditions. In this paper we will concentrate on axisymmetric inflow for 3 different wind speeds. The numerical results are compared with pressure distributions from several blade sections and PIV-flow data from the near wake region. In general, a reasonable agreement between measurements the and our simulations exists. Some discrepancies, which require further research, are also discussed.

  19. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Effects of Ventricular Gap

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, Fariborz; Karnell, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Supraglottic compression is frequently observed in individuals with dysphonia. It is commonly interpreted as an indication of excessive circumlaryngeal muscular tension and ventricular medialization. The purpose of this study was to describe the aerodynamic and acoustic impact of varying ventricular medialization in a canine model. Methods Subglottal air pressure, glottal airflow, electroglottograph, acoustic signals and high-speed video images were recorded in seven excised canine larynges mounted in vitro for laryngeal vibratory experimentation. The degree of gap between the ventricular folds was adjusted and measured using sutures and weights. Data was recorded during phonation when the ventricular gap was narrow, neutral, and large. Glottal resistance was estimated by measures of subglottal pressure and glottal flow. Results Glottal resistance increased systematically as ventricular gap became smaller. Wide ventricular gaps were associated with increases in fundamental frequency and decreases in glottal resistance. Sound pressure level did not appear to be impacted by the adjustments in ventricular gap used in this research. Conclusions Increases in supraglottic compression and associated reduced ventricular width may be observed in a variety of disorders that affect voice quality. Ventricular compression may interact with true vocal fold posture and vibration resulting in predictable changes in aerodynamic, physiologic, acoustic, and perceptual measures of phonation. The data from this report supports the theory that narrow ventricular gaps may be associated with disordered phonation. In vitro and in vivo human data are needed to further test this association. PMID:24321590

  20. Aerodynamic Design of a Locomotive Fairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucki, Chad; Maynes, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Rising fuel cost has motivated increased fuel efficiency of freight trains. At cruising speed, the largest contributing factor to the fuel consumption is the aerodynamic drag. As a result of air stagnation at the front of the train and substantial flow separation behind, the leading locomotive and trailing railcar experience greater drag than intermediate cars. This work introduces the design of streamlined nose fairings to be attached to freight locomotives as a means of reducing the leading locomotive drag. The aerodynamic performance of each fairing design is modeled using a commercial CFD software package. The K-epsilon turbulence model is used, and fluid properties are equivalent to atmospheric air at standard conditions. A selection of isolated screening studies are performed, and a multidimensional regression is used to predict optimal-performing fairing designs. Between screening studies, careful examination of the flow field is performed to inspire subsequent fairing designs. Results are presented for 250 different nose fairings. The best performing fairing geometry predicts a nominal drag reduction of 17% on the lead locomotive in a train set. This drag reduction is expected to result in nearly 1% fuel savings for the entire train.

  1. Investigation of Factors Affecting Aerodynamic Performance of Nebulized Nanoemulsion

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Hosein; Abbasi, Shayan; Amini, Mohammad Ali; Amani, Amir

    2016-01-01

    This work aimed to prepare a nanoemulsion preparation containing budesonide and assess its aerodynamic behavior in comparison with suspension of budesonide. In-vitro aerodynamic performance of the corresponding micellar solution (ie. nanoemulsion preparation without oil) was investigated too. Nanoemulsions of almond oil containing budesonide, as a hydrophobic model drug molecule, were prepared and optimized. Then, the effect of variation of surfactant/co-surfactant concentration on the aerodynamic properties of the nebulized aerosol was studied. The results indicated that the most physically stable formulation makes the smallest aerodynamic size. The concentration of co-surfactant was also shown to be critical in determination of aerodynamic size. Furthermore, the optimized sample, with 3% w/w almond oil, 20% w/w Tween 80+Span 80 and 2% w/w ethanol showed a smaller MMAD in comparison with the commercially available suspension and the micellar solution. PMID:28243265

  2. A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    A flight experiment to measure rarefied-flow aerodynamics of a blunt lifting body is being developed by NASA. This experiment, called the Rarefied-Flow Aerodynamic Measurement Experiment (RAME), is part of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) mission, which is a Pathfinder design tool for aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles. The RAME will use flight measurements from accelerometers, rate gyros, and pressure transducers, combined with knowledge of AFE in-flight mass properties and trajectory, to infer aerodynamic forces and moments in the rarefied-flow environment, including transition into the hypersonic continuum regime. Preflight estimates of the aerodynamic measurements are based upon environment models, existing computer simulations, and ground test results. Planned maneuvers at several altitudes will provide a first-time opportunity to examine gas-surface accommondation effects on aerodynamic coefficients in an environment of changing atmospheric composition. A description is given of the RAME equipment design.

  3. Launch vehicle aerodynamic data base development comparison with flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, J. T.; Wallace, R. O.; Dill, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    The aerodynamic development plan for the Space Shuttle integrated vehicle had three major objectives. The first objective was to support the evolution of the basic configuration by establishing aerodynamic impacts to various candidate configurations. The second objective was to provide continuing evaluation of the basic aerodynamic characteristics in order to bring about a mature data base. The third task was development of the element and component aerodynamic characteristics and distributed air loads data to support structural loads analyses. The complexity of the configurations rendered conventional analytic methods of little use and therefore required extensive wind tunnel testing of detailed complex models. However, the ground testing and analyses did not predict the aerodynamic characteristics that were extracted from the Space Shuttle flight test program. Future programs that involve the use of vehicles similar to the Space Shuttle should be concerned with the complex flow fields characteristics of these types of complex configurations.

  4. Modeling of aircraft unsteady aerodynamic characteristics. Part 1: Postulated models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Vladislav; Noderer, Keith D.

    1994-01-01

    A short theoretical study of aircraft aerodynamic model equations with unsteady effects is presented. The aerodynamic forces and moments are expressed in terms of indicial functions or internal state variables. The first representation leads to aircraft integro-differential equations of motion; the second preserves the state-space form of the model equations. The formulations of unsteady aerodynamics is applied in two examples. The first example deals with a one-degree-of-freedom harmonic motion about one of the aircraft body axes. In the second example, the equations for longitudinal short-period motion are developed. In these examples, only linear aerodynamic terms are considered. The indicial functions are postulated as simple exponentials and the internal state variables are governed by linear, time-invariant, first-order differential equations. It is shown that both approaches to the modeling of unsteady aerodynamics lead to identical models.

  5. Shadow Probability of Detection and False Alarm for Median-Filtered SAR Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter; Miller, John A.; Bishop, Edward E.; Horndt, Volker

    2014-06-01

    Median filtering reduces speckle in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery while preserving edges, at the expense of coarsening the resolution, by replacing the center pixel of a sliding window by the median value. For shadow detection, this approach helps distinguish shadows from clutter more easily, while preserving shadow shape delineations. However, the nonlinear operation alters the shadow and clutter distributions and statistics, which must be taken into consideration when computing probability of detection and false alarm metrics. Depending on system parameters, median filtering can improve probability of detection and false alarm by orders of magnitude. Herein, we examine shadow probability of detection and false alarm in a homogeneous, ideal clutter background after median filter post-processing. Some comments on multi-look processing effects with and without median filtering are also made.

  6. Direct measurements of controlled aerodynamic forces on a wire-suspended axisymmetric body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Philip; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2011-06-01

    A novel in-line miniature force transducer is developed for direct measurements of the net aerodynamic forces and moments on a bluff body. The force transducers are integrated into each of the eight mounting wires that are utilized for suspension of an axisymmetric model in a wind tunnel having minimal wake interference. The aerodynamic forces and moments on the model are altered by induced active local attachment of the separated base flow. Fluidic control is effected by an array of four integrated aft-facing synthetic jet actuators that emanate from narrow, azimuthally segmented slots, equally distributed around the perimeter of the circular tail end. The jet orifices are embedded within a small backward-facing step that extends into a Coanda surface. The altered flow dynamics associated with both quasi-steady and transitory asymmetric activation of the flow control effect is characterized by direct force and PIV measurements.

  7. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion-extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating

  8. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion–extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating

  9. Subsonic and supersonic indicial aerodynamics and aerodynamic transfer function for complex configurations. [aerodynamic configurations for subsonic and supersonic speeds using the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morino, L.

    1974-01-01

    A general theory for indicial-potential-compressible aerodynamics around complex configurations is presented. The motion is assumed to consist of constant subsonic or supersonic speed (steady state) and small perturbations around the steady state. Using the finite-element method to discretize the space problem, a set of differential-difference equations in time relating the potential to its normal derivative on the surface of the body was obtained. The aerodynamics transfer function was derived by using standard method of operational calculus.

  10. Joint influences of aerodynamic flow field and aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of airborne optical systems.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Haosu; Zuo, Baojun; Tian, Yi; Zhang, Wang; Hao, Chenglong; Liu, Chaofeng; Li, Qi; Li, Fan; Zhang, Li; Fan, Zhigang

    2012-12-20

    We investigated the joint influences exerted by the nonuniform aerodynamic flow field surrounding the optical dome and the aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of an airborne optical system. The Spalart-Allmaras model provided by FLUENT was used for flow computations. The fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm based ray tracing program was used to simulate optical transmission through the aerodynamic flow field and the dome. Four kinds of imaging quality evaluation parameters were presented: wave aberration of the exit pupil, point spread function, encircled energy, and modulation transfer function. The results show that the aero-optical disturbance of the aerodynamic flow field and the aerodynamic heating of the dome significantly affect the imaging quality of an airborne optical system.

  11. The Aerodynamics of Deforming Wings at Low Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Albert

    Flapping flight has gained much attention in the past decade driven by the desire to understand capabilities observed in nature and the desire to develop agile small-scale aerial vehicles. Advancing our current understanding of unsteady aerodynamics is an essential component in the development of micro-air vehicles (MAV) intended to utilize flight mechanics akin to insect flight. Thus the efforts undertaken that of bio-mimicry. The complexities of insect wing motion are dissected and simplified to more tractable problems to elucidate the fundamentals of unsteady aerodynamics in biologically inspired kinematics. The MAV's fruition would satisfy long established needs in both the military and civilian sectors. Although recent studies have provided great insight into the lift generating mechanisms of flapping wings the deflection response of such wings remains poorly understood. This dissertation numerically and experimentally investigates the aerodynamic performance of passively and actively deflected wings in hover and rotary kinematics. Flexibility is distilled to discrete lines of flexion which acknowledging major flexion lines in insect wings to be the primary avenue for deformation. Of primary concern is the development of the leading-edge vortex (LEV), a high circulation region of low pressure above the wing to which much of the wing's lift generation is attributed. Two-dimensional simulations of wings with chord-wise flexibility in a freestream reveal a lift generating mechanism unavailable to rigid wings with origins in vortical symmetry breaking. The inclusion of flexibility in translating wings accelerated from rest revealed the formation time of the initial LEV was very weakly dependent on the flexible stiffness of the wing, maintaining a universal time scale of four to five chords of travel before shedding. The frequency of oscillatory shedding of the leading and trailing-edge vortices that develops after the initial vortex shedding was shown to be

  12. Drones for aerodynamic and structural testing /DAST/ - A status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, H. N.; Eckstrom, C. V.

    1978-01-01

    A program for providing research data on aerodynamic loads and active control systems on wings with supercritical airfoils in the transonic speed range is described. Analytical development, wind tunnel tests, and flight tests are included. A Firebee II target drone vehicle has been modified for use as a flight test facility. The program currently includes flight experiments on two aeroelastic research wings. The primary purpose of the first flight experiment is to demonstrate an active control system for flutter suppression on a transport-type wing. Design and fabrication of the wing are complete and after installing research instrumentation and the flutter suppression system, flight testing is expected to begin in early 1979. The experiment on the second research wing - a fuel-conservative transport type - is to demonstrate multiple active control systems including flutter suppression, maneuver load alleviation, gust load alleviation, and reduce static stability. Of special importance for this second experiment is the development and validation of integrated design methods which include the benefits of active controls in the structural design.

  13. Middle cerebral artery median peak systolic velocity validation: effect of measurement technique.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Tamula M; Alexander, Amy; Szychowski, Jeff M; Owen, John

    2010-09-01

    We sought to validate center-specific published medians and estimate the effects of sonologist and Doppler measurement techniques on middle cerebral artery (MCA) peak systolic velocity (PSV) values. We studied 154 gravidas with normal singletons who underwent MCA PSV measurement at 18 to 35 weeks' gestation by one of three experienced sonologists. Pregnancies complicated by a known fetal anomaly (structural or aneuploidy), amniotic fluid volume disturbance, intrauterine growth restriction, multiple gestation, or isoimmunization were excluded. MCA PSV was measured using both manual caliper and auto-trace techniques. Regression models of log-transformed PSV values and gestational age were developed. Although auto-trace medians were significantly lower than those obtained with manual calipers ( P < 0.0001), they more closely approximated published medians used in clinical practice. Minimal intersonologist differences (maximum mean difference <3 cm/s) were statistically significant ( P < 0.01). Compared with manual caliper, auto-trace measurement yielded significantly lower medians. However, center-specific medians obtained by our sonologists using auto-trace more closely approximated published standards. Estimated interobserver variability suggested that different sonologists may utilize the same median values. We suggest that centers that utilize Doppler velocimetry for the prediction of fetal anemia examine their measurement protocol and consider formal confirmation of their own center-specific median values.

  14. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 1: Orbiter aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the steady and unsteady aerodynamics of the space shuttle orbiter has been performed. It is shown that slender wing theory can be modified to account for the effect of Mach number and leading edge roundness on both attached and separated flow loads. The orbiter unsteady aerodynamics can be computed by defining two equivalent slender wings, one for attached flow loads and another for the vortex-induced loads. It is found that the orbiter is in the transonic speed region subject to vortex-shock-boundary layer interactions that cause highly nonlinear or discontinuous load changes which can endanger the structural integrity of the orbiter wing and possibly cause snap roll problems. It is presently impossible to simulate these interactions in a wind tunnel test even in the static case. Thus, a well planned combined analytic and experimental approach is needed to solve the problem.

  15. Embolization in a Patient with Ruptured Anterior Inferior Pancreaticoduodenal Arterial Aneurysm with Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yozo; Banno, Tatsuo; Arakawa, Toshinao; Hara, Masaki

    2002-08-15

    In median arcuate ligament syndrome, the root of the celiac artery is compressed and narrowed by the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm during expiration, causing abdominal angina.Aneurysm may be formed in arteries of the pancreas and duodenum due toa chronic increase in blood flow from the superior mesenteric artery into the celiac arterial region. We report a patient saved by embolization with coils of ruptured aneurysm that developed with markedly dilated anterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery due to median arcuate ligament syndrome.

  16. Anatomic variations of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel: a brief review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Demircay, Emre; Civelek, Erdinc; Cansever, Tufan; Kabatas, Serdar; Yilmaz, Cem

    2011-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common focal peripheral neuropathy. Increased pressure in the carpal tunnel results in median nerve compression and impaired nerve perfusion, leading to discomfort and paresthesia in the affected hand. Surgical division of the transverse carpal ligament is preferred in severe cases of CTS and should be considered when conservative measures fail. A through knowledge of the normal and variant anatomy of the median nerve in the wrist is fundamental in avoiding complications during carpal tunnel release. This paper aims to briefly review the anatomic variations of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel and its implications in carpal tunnel surgery.

  17. Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Characteristics of a Tension Cone Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ian G.; Cruz, Juan R.; Hughes, Monica F.; Ware, Joanne S.; Madlangbayan, Albert; Braun, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    The supersonic aerodynamic and aeroelastic characteristics of a tension cone inflatable aerodynamic decelerator were investigated by wind tunnel testing. Two sets of tests were conducted: one using rigid models and another using textile models. Tests using rigid models were conducted over a Mach number range from 1.65 to 4.5 at angles of attack from -12 to 20 degrees. The axial, normal, and pitching moment coefficients were found to be insensitive to Mach number over the tested range. The axial force coefficient was nearly constant (C(sub A) = 1.45 +/- 0.05) with respect to angle of attack. Both the normal and pitching moment coefficients were nearly linear with respect to angle of attack. The pitching moment coefficient showed the model to be statically stable about the reference point. Schlieren images and video showed a detached bow shock with no evidence of large regions of separated flow and/or embedded shocks at all Mach numbers investigated. Qualitatively similar static aerodynamic coefficient and flow visualization results were obtained using textile models at a Mach number of 2.5. Using inflatable textile models the torus pressure required to maintain the model in the fully-inflated configuration was determined. This pressure was found to be sensitive to details in the structural configuration of the inflatable models. Additional tests included surface pressure measurements on rigid models and deployment and inflation tests with inflatable models.

  18. Incremental Aerodynamic Coefficient Database for the USA2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Annie Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In March through May of 2016, a wind tunnel test was conducted by the Aerosciences Branch (EV33) to visually study the unsteady aerodynamic behavior over multiple transition geometries for the Universal Stage Adapter 2 (USA2) in the MSFC Aerodynamic Research Facility's Trisonic Wind Tunnel (TWT). The purpose of the test was to make a qualitative comparison of the transonic flow field in order to provide a recommended minimum transition radius for manufacturing. Additionally, 6 Degree of Freedom force and moment data for each configuration tested was acquired in order to determine the geometric effects on the longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients (Normal Force, Axial Force, and Pitching Moment). In order to make a quantitative comparison of the aerodynamic effects of the USA2 transition geometry, the aerodynamic coefficient data collected during the test was parsed and incorporated into a database for each USA2 configuration tested. An incremental aerodynamic coefficient database was then developed using the generated databases for each USA2 geometry as a function of Mach number and angle of attack. The final USA2 coefficient increments will be applied to the aerodynamic coefficients of the baseline geometry to adjust the Space Launch System (SLS) integrated launch vehicle force and moment database based on the transition geometry of the USA2.

  19. Ares I Aerodynamic Testing at the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.; Niskey, Charles J.; Hanke, Jeremy L.; Tomek, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Throughout three full design analysis cycles, the Ares I project within the Constellation program has consistently relied on the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel (PSWT) for aerodynamic testing of the subsonic, transonic and supersonic portions of the atmospheric flight envelope (Mach=0.5 to 4.5). Each design cycle required the development of aerodynamic databases for the 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) forces and moments, as well as distributed line-loads databases covering the full range of Mach number, total angle-of-attack, and aerodynamic roll angle. The high fidelity data collected in this facility has been consistent with the data collected in NASA Langley s Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) at the overlapping condition ofMach=1.6. Much insight into the aerodynamic behavior of the launch vehicle during all phases of flight was gained through wind tunnel testing. Important knowledge pertaining to slender launch vehicle aerodynamics in particular was accumulated. In conducting these wind tunnel tests and developing experimental aerodynamic databases, some challenges were encountered and are reported as lessons learned in this paper for the benefit of future crew launch vehicle aerodynamic developments.

  20. Aerodynamic and Aerothermal TPS Instrumentation Reference Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollard, Bryce A.; Braun, Robert D.; Bose, Deepack

    2016-01-01

    The hypersonic regime of planetary entry combines the most severe environments that an entry vehicle will encounter with the greatest amount of uncertainty as to the events unfolding during that time period. This combination generally leads to conservatism in the design of an entry vehicle, specifically that of the thermal protection system (TPS). Each planetary entry provides a valuable aerodynamic and aerothermal testing opportunity; the utilization of this opportunity is paramount in better understanding how a specific entry vehicle responds to the demands of the hypersonic entry environment. Previous efforts have been made to instrument entry vehicles in order to collect data during the entry period and reconstruct the corresponding vehicle response. The purpose of this paper is to cumulatively document past TPS instrumentation designs for applicable planetary missions, as well as to list pertinent results and any explainable shortcomings.

  1. Aerodynamic levitation : an approach to microgravity.

    SciTech Connect

    Glorieux, B.; Saboungi, M.-L.; Millot, F.; Enderby, J.; Rifflet, J.-C.

    2000-12-05

    Measurements of the thermophysical and structural properties of liquid materials at high temperature have undergone considerable development in the past few years. Following improvements in electromagnetic levitation, aerodynamic levitation associated with laser heating has shown promise for assessing properties of different molten materials (metals, oxides, and semiconductors), preserving sample purity over a wide range of temperatures and under different gas environments. The density, surface tension and viscosity are measured with a high-speed video camera and an image analysis system. Results on nickel and alumina show that small droplets can be considered in the first approximation to be under microgravity conditions. Using a non-invasive contactless technique recently developed to measure electrical conductivity, results have been extended to variety of materials ranging from liquid metals and liquid semiconductors to ionically conducting materials. The advantage of this technique is the feasibility of monitoring changes in transport occurring during phase transitions and in deeply undercooled states.

  2. Multiprocessing on supercomputers for computational aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarrow, Maurice; Mehta, Unmeel B.

    1991-01-01

    Little use is made of multiple processors available on current supercomputers (computers with a theoretical peak performance capability equal to 100 MFLOPS or more) to improve turnaround time in computational aerodynamics. The productivity of a computer user is directly related to this turnaround time. In a time-sharing environment, such improvement in this speed is achieved when multiple processors are used efficiently to execute an algorithm. The concept of multiple instructions and multiple data (MIMD) is applied through multitasking via a strategy that requires relatively minor modifications to an existing code for a single processor. This approach maps the available memory to multiple processors, exploiting the C-Fortran-Unix interface. The existing code is mapped without the need for developing a new algorithm. The procedure for building a code utilizing this approach is automated with the Unix stream editor.

  3. Improving the efficiency of aerodynamic shape optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgreen, Greg W.; Baysal, Oktay; Eleshaky, Mohamed E.

    1994-01-01

    The computational efficiency of an aerodynamic shape optimization procedure that is based on discrete sensitivity analysis is increased through the implementation of two improvements. The first improvement involves replacing a grid-point-based approach for surface representation with a Bezier-Bernstein polynomial parameterization of the surface. Explicit analytical expressions for the grid sensitivity terms are developed for both approaches. The second improvement proposes the use of Newton's method in lieu of an alternating direction implicit methodology to calculate the highly converged flow solutions that are required to compute the sensitivity coefficients. The modified design procedure is demonstrated by optimizing the shape of an internal-external nozzle configuration. Practically identical optimization results are obtained that are independent of the method used to represent the surface. A substantial factor of 8 decrease in computational time for the optimization process is achieved by implementing both of the design procedure improvements.

  4. Methods of reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag

    SciTech Connect

    Sirenko V.; Rohatgi U.

    2012-07-08

    A small scale model (length 1710 mm) of General Motor SUV was built and tested in the wind tunnel for expected wind conditions and road clearance. Two passive devices, rear screen which is plate behind the car and rear fairing where the end of the car is aerodynamically extended, were incorporated in the model and tested in the wind tunnel for different wind conditions. The conclusion is that rear screen could reduce drag up to 6.5% and rear fairing can reduce the drag by 26%. There were additional tests for front edging and rear vortex generators. The results for drag reduction were mixed. It should be noted that there are aesthetic and practical considerations that may allow only partial implementation of these or any drag reduction options.

  5. Upper surface blowing aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryle, D. M., Jr.; Braden, J. A.; Gibson, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance at cruise, and noise effects due to variations in nacelle and wing geometry and mode of operation are studied using small aircraft models that simulate upper surface blowing (USB). At cruise speeds ranging from Mach .50 to Mach .82, the key determinants of drag/thrust penalties are found to be nozzle aspect ratio, boattailing angle, and chordwise position; number of nacelles; and streamlined versus symmetric configuration. Recommendations are made for obtaining favorable cruise configurations. The acoustic studies, which concentrate on the noise created by the jet exhaust flow and its interaction with wing and flap surfaces, isolate several important sources of USB noise, including nozzle shape, exit velocity, and impingement angle; flow pathlength; and flap angle and radius of curvature. Suggestions for lessening noise due to trailing edge flow velocity, flow pathlength, and flow spreading are given, though compromises between some design options may be necessary.

  6. Faster Aerodynamic Simulation With Cart3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A NASA-developed aerodynamic simulation tool is ensuring the safety of future space operations while providing designers and engineers with an automated, highly accurate computer simulation suite. Cart3D, co-winner of NASA's 2002 Software of the Year award, is the result of over 10 years of research and software development conducted by Michael Aftosmis and Dr. John Melton of Ames Research Center and Professor Marsha Berger of the Courant Institute at New York University. Cart3D offers a revolutionary approach to computational fluid dynamics (CFD), the computer simulation of how fluids and gases flow around an object of a particular design. By fusing technological advancements in diverse fields such as mineralogy, computer graphics, computational geometry, and fluid dynamics, the software provides a new industrial geometry processing and fluid analysis capability with unsurpassed automation and efficiency.

  7. Parameter identification for nonlinear aerodynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Allan E.

    1990-01-01

    Parameter identification for nonlinear aerodynamic systems is examined. It is presumed that the underlying model can be arranged into an input/output (I/O) differential operator equation of a generic form. The algorithm estimation is especially efficient since the equation error can be integrated exactly given any I/O pair to obtain an algebraic function of the parameters. The algorithm for parameter identification was extended to the order determination problem for linear differential system. The degeneracy in a least squares estimate caused by feedback was addressed. A method of frequency analysis for determining the transfer function G(j omega) from transient I/O data was formulated using complex valued Fourier based modulating functions in contrast with the trigonometric modulating functions for the parameter estimation problem. A simulation result of applying the algorithm is given under noise-free conditions for a system with a low pass transfer function.

  8. Unsteady transonic aerodynamics - An aeronautics challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents a review of the historical development in unsteady transonic aerodynamics, along with the foundations and accomplishments of several approaches to solve the equations of unsteady transonic flow. The discussion covers the linearized unsteady flow theory, numerical solution of the exact equations for an inviscid compressible gas, nonlinear small disturbance theory of transonic flow and linearization of the unsteady component about the nonlinear solution for the steady state, local linearization solution for unsteady transonic flow, unsteady transonic flow theory for slender wings and bodies, and three-dimensional unsteady transonic flows. The relation between the calculated results and experiment is examined. It is shown that the newly emerging numerical methods are capable of solving the nonlinear equations for two-dimensional flow and can be extended to three-dimensional flows.

  9. Aerodynamic analysis of hypersonic waverider aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Pessin, David N.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate two existing codes used by the Systems Analysis Branch at NASA ARC, and to modify the codes so they can be used to generate and analyze waverider aircraft at on-design and off-design conditions. To generate waverider configurations and perform the on-design analysis, the appropriately named Waverider code is used. The Waverider code is based on the Taylor-Maccoll equations. Validation is accomplished via a comparison with previously published results. The Waverider code is modified to incorporate a fairing to close off the base area of the waverider configuration. This creates a more realistic waverider. The Hypersonic Aircraft Vehicle Optimization Code (HAVOC) is used to perform the off-design analysis of waverider configurations generated by the Waverider code. Various approximate analysis methods are used by HAVOC to predict the aerodynamic characteristics, which are validated via a comparison with experimental results from a hypersonic test model.

  10. Numerical aerodynamic simulation facility feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    There were three major issues examined in the feasibility study. First, the ability of the proposed system architecture to support the anticipated workload was evaluated. Second, the throughput of the computational engine (the flow model processor) was studied using real application programs. Third, the availability reliability, and maintainability of the system were modeled. The evaluations were based on the baseline systems. The results show that the implementation of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility, in the form considered, would indeed be a feasible project with an acceptable level of risk. The technology required (both hardware and software) either already exists or, in the case of a few parts, is expected to be announced this year. Facets of the work described include the hardware configuration, software, user language, and fault tolerance.

  11. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization using an Evolutionary Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoist, Terry L.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    A method for aerodynamic shape optimization based on an evolutionary algorithm approach is presented and demonstrated. Results are presented for a number of model problems to access the effect of algorithm parameters on convergence efficiency and reliability. A transonic viscous airfoil optimization problem-both single and two-objective variations is used as the basis for a preliminary comparison with an adjoint-gradient optimizer. The evolutionary algorithm is coupled with a transonic full potential flow solver and is used to optimize the inviscid flow about transonic wings including multi-objective and multi-discipline solutions that lead to the generation of pareto fronts. The results indicate that the evolutionary algorithm approach is easy to implement, flexible in application and extremely reliable.

  12. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization using an Evolutionary Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.; Pulliam, Thomas H.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for aerodynamic shape optimization based on an evolutionary algorithm approach is presented and demonstrated. Results are presented for a number of model problems to access the effect of algorithm parameters on convergence efficiency and reliability. A transonic viscous airfoil optimization problem, both single and two-objective variations, is used as the basis for a preliminary comparison with an adjoint-gradient optimizer. The evolutionary algorithm is coupled with a transonic full potential flow solver and is used to optimize the inviscid flow about transonic wings including multi-objective and multi-discipline solutions that lead to the generation of pareto fronts. The results indicate that the evolutionary algorithm approach is easy to implement, flexible in application and extremely reliable.

  13. Aerodynamics of advanced axial-flow turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serovy, G. K.; Kavanagh, P.; Kiishi, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-task research program on aerodynamic problems in advanced axial-flow turbomachine configurations was carried out at Iowa State University. The elements of this program were intended to contribute directly to the improvement of compressor, fan, and turbine design methods. Experimental efforts in intra-passage flow pattern measurements, unsteady blade row interaction, and control of secondary flow are included, along with computational work on inviscid-viscous interaction blade passage flow techniques. This final report summarizes the results of this program and indicates directions which might be taken in following up these results in future work. In a separate task a study was made of existing turbomachinery research programs and facilities in universities located in the United States. Some potentially significant research topics are discussed which might be successfully attacked in the university atmosphere.

  14. Transonic Blunt Body Aerodynamic Coefficients Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Jorge; Vargas, M.; Gonzalez, Ezequiel; Rodriguez, Manuel

    2011-05-01

    In the framework of EXPERT (European Experimental Re-entry Test-bed) accurate transonic aerodynamic coefficients are of paramount importance for the correct trajectory assessment and parachute deployment. A combined CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) modelling and experimental campaign strategy was selected to obtain accurate coefficients. A preliminary set of coefficients were obtained by CFD Euler inviscid computation. Then experimental campaign was performed at DNW facilities at NLR. A profound review of the CFD modelling was done lighten up by WTT results, aimed to obtain reliable values of the coefficients in the future (specially the pitching moment). Study includes different turbulence modelling and mesh sensitivity analysis. Comparison with the WTT results is explored, and lessons learnt are collected.

  15. Finite element concepts in computational aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    Finite element theory was employed to establish an implicit numerical solution algorithm for the time averaged unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. Both the multidimensional and a time-split form of the algorithm were considered, the latter of particular interest for problem specification on a regular mesh. A Newton matrix iteration procedure is outlined for solving the resultant nonlinear algebraic equation systems. Multidimensional discretization procedures are discussed with emphasis on automated generation of specific nonuniform solution grids and accounting of curved surfaces. The time-split algorithm was evaluated with regards to accuracy and convergence properties for hyperbolic equations on rectangular coordinates. An overall assessment of the viability of the finite element concept for computational aerodynamics is made.

  16. Aerodynamics modeling of towed-cable dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.W.; Latorre, V.R.

    1991-01-17

    The dynamics of a cable/drogue system being towed by an orbiting aircraft has been investigated as a part of an LTWA project for the Naval Air Systems Command. We present here a status report on the tasks performed under Phase 1. We have accomplished the following tasks under Phase 1: A literature survey on the towed-cable motion problem has been conducted. While both static (steady-state) and dynamic (transient) analyses exist in the literature, no single, comprehensive analysis exists that directly addresses the present problem. However, the survey also reveals that, when judiciously applied, these past analyses can serve as useful building blocks for approaching the present problem. A numerical model that addresses several aspects of the towed-cable dynamic problem has been adapted from a Canadian underwater code for the present aerodynamic situation. This modified code, called TOWDYN, analyzes the effects of gravity, tension, aerodynamic drag, and wind. Preliminary results from this code demonstrate that the wind effects alone CAN generate the drogue oscillation behavior, i.e., the yo-yo'' phenomenon. This code also will serve as a benchmark code for checking the accuracy of a more general and complete R D'' model code. We have initiated efforts to develop a general R D model supercomputer code that also takes into account other physical factors, such as induced oscillations and bending stiffness. This general code will be able to evaluate the relative impacts of the various physical parameters, which may become important under certain conditions. This R D code will also enable development of a simpler operational code that can be used by the Naval Air personnel in the field.

  17. Aerodynamic properties of turbulent combustion fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsiao, C. C.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    Flow fields involving turbulent flames in premixed gases under a variety of conditions are modeled by the use of a numerical technique based on the random vortex method to solve the Navier-Stokes equations and a flame propagation algorithm to trace the motion of the front and implement the Huygens principle, both due to Chorin. A successive over-relaxation hybrid method is applied to solve the Euler equation for flows in an arbitrarily shaped domain. The method of images, conformal transformation, and the integral-equation technique are also used to treat flows in special cases, according to their particular requirements. Salient features of turbulent flame propagation in premixed gases are interpreted by relating them to the aerodynamic properties of the flow field. Included among them is the well-known cellular structure of flames stabilized by bluff bodies, as well as the formation of the characteristic tulip shape of flames propagating in ducts. In its rudimentary form, the mechanism of propagation of a turbulent flame is shown to consist of: (1) rotary motion of eddies at the flame front, (2) self-advancement of the front at an appropriate normal burning speed, and (3) dynamic effects of expansion due to exothermicity of the combustion reaction. An idealized model is used to illustrate these fundamental mechanisms and to investigate basic aerodynamic features of flames in premixed gases. The case of a confined flame stabilized behind a rearward-facing step is given particular care and attention. Solutions are shown to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental results, especially with respect to global properties such as the average velocity profiles and reattachment length.

  18. Aerodynamics and vortical structures in hovering fruitflies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xue Guang; Sun, Mao

    2015-03-01

    We measure the wing kinematics and morphological parameters of seven freely hovering fruitflies and numerically compute the flows of the flapping wings. The computed mean lift approximately equals to the measured weight and the mean horizontal force is approximately zero, validating the computational model. Because of the very small relative velocity of the wing, the mean lift coefficient required to support the weight is rather large, around 1.8, and the Reynolds number of the wing is low, around 100. How such a large lift is produced at such a low Reynolds number is explained by combining the wing motion data, the computed vortical structures, and the theory of vorticity dynamics. It has been shown that two unsteady mechanisms are responsible for the high lift. One is referred as to "fast pitching-up rotation": at the start of an up- or downstroke when the wing has very small speed, it fast pitches down to a small angle of attack, and then, when its speed is higher, it fast pitches up to the angle it normally uses. When the wing pitches up while moving forward, large vorticity is produced and sheds at the trailing edge, and vorticity of opposite sign is produced near the leading edge and on the upper surface, resulting in a large time rate of change of the first moment of vorticity (or fluid impulse), hence a large aerodynamic force. The other is the well known "delayed stall" mechanism: in the mid-portion of the up- or downstroke the wing moves at large angle of attack (about 45 deg) and the leading-edge-vortex (LEV) moves with the wing; thus, the vortex ring, formed by the LEV, the tip vortices, and the starting vortex, expands in size continuously, producing a large time rate of change of fluid impulse or a large aerodynamic force.

  19. Control of maglev vehicles with aerodynamic and guideway disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flueckiger, Karl; Mark, Steve; Caswell, Ruth; Mccallum, Duncan

    1994-01-01

    A modeling, analysis, and control design methodology is presented for maglev vehicle ride quality performance improvement as measured by the Pepler Index. Ride quality enhancement is considered through active control of secondary suspension elements and active aerodynamic surfaces mounted on the train. To analyze and quantify the benefits of active control, the authors have developed a five degree-of-freedom lumped parameter model suitable for describing a large class of maglev vehicles, including both channel and box-beam guideway configurations. Elements of this modeling capability have been recently employed in studies sponsored by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). A perturbation analysis about an operating point, defined by vehicle and average crosswind velocities, yields a suitable linearized state space model for multivariable control system analysis and synthesis. Neglecting passenger compartment noise, the ride quality as quantified by the Pepler Index is readily computed from the system states. A statistical analysis is performed by modeling the crosswind disturbances and guideway variations as filtered white noise, whereby the Pepler Index is established in closed form through the solution to a matrix Lyapunov equation. Data is presented which indicates the anticipated ride quality achieved through various closed-loop control arrangements.

  20. Relapse after orthodontic correction of maxillary median diastema: a follow-up evaluation of consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Shashua, D; Artun, J

    1999-06-01

    An evaluation of 96 treated orthodontic patients with maxillary median diastema ranging from 0.50 mm to 5.62 mm (mean 1.22, SD 0.85) was performed 4.0 to 9.0 years after completion of active treatment. Pre- and posttreatment data were gathered from available records. Follow-up data were gathered from records and interviews of 37 patients, and from phone interviews of 59 patients. The incidence of diastema relapse was 49% when scored as either presence of a measurable space at follow-up, a history of orthodontic or prosthetic retreatment to close a reopened space, or continued use of a retainer to control relapse tendency. Logistic regression analysis revealed that pretreatment diastema size and presence of a family member with a similar condition were the only significant risk factors for relapse (p<0.05), while pretreatment spacing in the maxillary anterior dentition approached significance (p = 0.10). No association was found between relapse and presence of an abnormal frenum or an osseous intermaxillary cleft, although patients with an abnormal frenum had a wider pretreatment diastema than those with a normal frenum (p<0.05). Fremitus of the maxillary incisors was the only parameter at follow-up associated with space reopening (p<0.01).

  1. A median redshift of 2.4 for galaxies bright at submillimetre wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Chapman, S C; Blain, A W; Ivison, R J; Smail, Ian R

    2003-04-17

    A significant fraction of the energy emitted in the early Universe came from very luminous galaxies that are largely hidden at optical wavelengths (because of interstellar dust grains); this energy now forms part of the cosmic background radiation at wavelengths near 1 mm (ref. 1). Some submillimetre (submm) galaxies have been resolved from the background radiation, but they have been difficult to study because of instrumental limitations. This has impeded the determination of their redshifts (z), which is a crucial element in understanding their nature and evolution. Here we report spectroscopic redshifts for ten submm galaxies that were identified using high-resolution radio observations. The median redshift for our sample is 2.4, with a quartile range of 1.9-2.8. This population therefore coexists with the peak activity of quasars, suggesting a close relationship between the growth of massive black holes and luminous dusty galaxies. The space density of submm galaxies at redshifts over 2 is about 1,000 times greater than that of similarly luminous galaxies in the present-day Universe, so they represent an important component of star formation at high redshifts.

  2. An Aerodynamic Analysis of a Spinning Missile with Dithering Canards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meakin, Robert L.; Nygaard, Tor A.

    2003-01-01

    A generic spinning missile with dithering canards is used to demonstrate the utility of an overset structured grid approach for simulating the aerodynamics of rolling airframe missile systems. The approach is used to generate a modest aerodynamic database for the generic missile. The database is populated with solutions to the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. It is used to evaluate grid resolution requirements for accurate prediction of instantaneous missile loads and the relative aerodynamic significance of angle-of-attack, canard pitching sequence, viscous effects, and roll-rate effects. A novel analytical method for inter- and extrapolation of database results is also given.

  3. Aerodynamic Interaction Effects of a Helicopter Rotor and Fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, David D., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A three year Cooperative Research Agreements made in each of the three years between the Subsonic Aerodynamics Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Va. Tech) has been completed. This document presents results from this three year endeavor. The goal of creating an efficient method to compute unsteady interactional effects between a helicopter rotor and fuselage has been accomplished. This paper also includes appendices to support these findings. The topics are: 1) Rotor-Fuselage Interactions Aerodynamics: An Unsteady Rotor Model; and 2) Rotor/Fuselage Unsteady Interactional Aerodynamics: A New Computational Model.

  4. On ionospheric aerodynamics. [of rapidly moving charged bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, V. C.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents theoretical methods to determine the gas dynamic and the electrostatic effects due to the interaction caused by a rapidly moving body in the ionosphere. The principles of the methods are derived from the kinetic theory of collision-free plasma. It is shown that the collective behavior of the collision-free plasma makes it possible to use the fluid approach to treat the problems of ionospheric aerodynamics. Various solutions to the system of fluid and field equations that have direct bearing on the ionospheric aerodynamics are presented and discussed. Physical significances of the mathematical results are stressed. Some outstanding unsolved problems in ionospheric aerodynamics are elaborated and discussed.

  5. On simple aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives for use in interdisciplinary optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, Robert V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Low-aspect-ratio and piston aerodynamic theories are reviewed as to their use in developing aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives for use in multidisciplinary optimization applications. The basic equations relating surface pressure (or lift and moment) to normal wash are given and discussed briefly for each theory. The general means for determining selected sensitivity derivatives are pointed out. In addition, some suggestions in very general terms are included as to sample problems for use in studying the process of using aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives in optimization studies.

  6. Three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization of supersonic delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgreen, Greg W.; Baysal, Oktay

    1994-01-01

    A recently developed three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization procedure AeSOP(sub 3D) is described. This procedure incorporates some of the most promising concepts from the area of computational aerodynamic analysis and design, specifically, discrete sensitivity analysis, a fully implicit 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methodology, and 3D Bezier-Bernstein surface parameterizations. The new procedure is demonstrated in the preliminary design of supersonic delta wings. Starting from a symmetric clipped delta wing geometry, a Mach 1.62 asymmetric delta wing and two Mach 1. 5 cranked delta wings were designed subject to various aerodynamic and geometric constraints.

  7. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficients using Neural Networks for Sparse Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Basic aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of angles of attack and sideslip with vehicle lateral symmetry and compressibility effects. Most of the aerodynamic parameters can be well-fitted using polynomial functions. In this paper a fast, reliable way of predicting aerodynamic coefficients is produced using a neural network. The training data for the neural network is derived from wind tunnel test and numerical simulations. The coefficients of lift, drag, pitching moment are expressed as a function of alpha (angle of attack) and Mach number. The results produced from preliminary neural network analysis are very good.

  8. Fourier analysis of the aerodynamic behavior of cup anemometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pindado, Santiago; Pérez, Imanol; Aguado, Maite

    2013-06-01

    The calibration results (the transfer function) of an anemometer equipped with several cup rotors were analyzed and correlated with the aerodynamic forces measured on the isolated cups in a wind tunnel. The correlation was based on a Fourier analysis of the normal-to-the-cup aerodynamic force. Three different cup shapes were studied: typical conical cups, elliptical cups and porous cups (conical-truncated shape). Results indicated a good correlation between the anemometer factor, K, and the ratio between the first two coefficients in the Fourier series decomposition of the normal-to-the-cup aerodynamic force.

  9. High speed propeller acoustics and aerodynamics - A boundary element approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Myers, M. K.; Dunn, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is applied in this paper to the problems of acoustics and aerodynamics of high speed propellers. The underlying theory is described based on the linearized Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation. The surface pressure on the blade is assumed unknown in the aerodynamic problem. It is obtained by solving a singular integral equation. The acoustic problem is then solved by moving the field point inside the fluid medium and evaluating some surface and line integrals. Thus the BEM provides a powerful technique in calculation of high speed propeller aerodynamics and acoustics.

  10. Prediction of Hyper-X Stage Separation Aerodynamics Using CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Wong, Tin-Chee; Dilley, Arthur D.; Pao, Jenn L.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA X-43 "Hyper-X" hypersonic research vehicle will be boosted to a Mach 7 flight test condition mounted on the nose of an Orbital Sciences Pegasus launch vehicle. The separation of the research vehicle from the Pegasus presents some unique aerodynamic problems, for which computational fluid dynamics has played a role in the analysis. This paper describes the use of several CFD methods for investigating the aerodynamics of the research and launch vehicles in close proximity. Specifically addressed are unsteady effects, aerodynamic database extrapolation, and differences between wind tunnel and flight environments.

  11. Numerical study of aerodynamic effects on road vehicles lifting surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernat, Mihail Victor; Cernat Bobonea, Andreea

    2017-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance analysis of road vehicles depends on the study of engine intake and cooling flow, internal ventilation, tire cooling, and overall external flow as the motion of air around a moving vehicle affects all of its components in one form or another. Due to the complex geometry of these, the aerodynamic interaction between the various body components is significant, resulting in vortex flow and lifting surface shapes. The present study, however focuses on the effects of external aerodynamics only, and in particular on the flow over the lifting surfaces of a common compact car, designed especially for this study.

  12. Aerodynamic Characteristics of Caliber .22 Long Rifle Match Ammunition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    range. The Aerodynamic-s Range is an enclosed, cimate -controlled range, instrumented with spark-photography stations to record the motion of the...slant of groups in the wind from a right-hand twist of rifling is due to aerodynamic jump, which is an effective change in the vertical angle of...Director, USAHEL ATTN: SLCHE-IS, Mr. B. Corona Mr. P. Ellis Mr. J. Torre 64 USER EVALUArION SHEET/ CHANGE OF ADDRIESS9 This Uboray underk a c-effor- to imo t

  13. Potential Impacts of Highway Median Barriers on Wildlife: State of the Practice and Gap Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clevenger, Anthony P.; Kociolek, Angela V.

    2013-11-01

    Median barriers separate lanes of traffic moving in opposite directions on multilane highways. Such traffic safety devices can reduce head-on collisions but also have the potential to reduce landscape permeability by impeding wildlife movements across highways. Median barriers may also increase the risk of wildlife-vehicle collisions if an animal becomes trapped or confused amid barriers searching for a place to cross. A 2002 Transportation Research Board report highlighted the need to better understand the potential impacts of highway median barriers on wildlife. This lack of information can cause significant project delays and increase transportation project costs. This study represents the first attempt in North America to bring together information about highway median and roadside barriers and wildlife and provide preliminary guidelines to balance the needs of motorist safety and wildlife movements.

  14. Suppression of impulse noise in medical images with the use of Fuzzy Adaptive Median Filter.

    PubMed

    Toprak, Abdullah; Güler, Inan

    2006-12-01

    A new rule based fuzzy filter for removal of highly impulse noise, called Rule Based Fuzzy Adaptive Median (RBFAM) Filter, is aimed to be discussed in this paper. The RBFAM filter is an improved version of Adaptive Median Filter (AMF) and is presented in the aim of noise reduction of images corrupted with additive impulse noise. The filter has three stages. Two of those stages are fuzzy rule based and last stage is based on standard median and adaptive median filter. The proposed filter can preserve image details better then AMF while suppressing additive salt & pepper or impulse type noise. In this paper, we placed our preference on bell-shaped membership function instead of triangular membership function in order to observe better results. Experimental results indicates that the proposed filter is improvable with increased fuzzy rules to reduce more noise corrupted images and to remove salt and pepper noise in a more effective way than what AMF filter does.

  15. Removing Noises Induced by Gamma Radiation in Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging Using a Temporal Median Filter

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Zhan, Yonghua; Kang, Fei; Wang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) can provide information of medical radionuclides used in nuclear imaging based on Cerenkov radiation, which makes it possible for optical means to image clinical radionuclide labeled probes. However, the exceptionally weak Cerenkov luminescence (CL) from Cerenkov radiation is susceptible to lots of impulse noises introduced by high energy gamma rays generating from the decays of radionuclides. In this work, a temporal median filter is proposed to remove this kind of impulse noises. Unlike traditional CLI collecting a single CL image with long exposure time and smoothing it using median filter, the proposed method captures a temporal sequence of CL images with shorter exposure time and employs a temporal median filter to smooth a temporal sequence of pixels. Results of in vivo experiments demonstrated that the proposed temporal median method can effectively remove random pulse noises induced by gamma radiation and achieve a robust CLI image. PMID:27648450

  16. Potential impacts of highway median barriers on wildlife: state of the practice and gap analysis.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, Anthony P; Kociolek, Angela V

    2013-11-01

    Median barriers separate lanes of traffic moving in opposite directions on multilane highways. Such traffic safety devices can reduce head-on collisions but also have the potential to reduce landscape permeability by impeding wildlife movements across highways. Median barriers may also increase the risk of wildlife-vehicle collisions if an animal becomes trapped or confused amid barriers searching for a place to cross. A 2002 Transportation Research Board report highlighted the need to better understand the potential impacts of highway median barriers on wildlife. This lack of information can cause significant project delays and increase transportation project costs. This study represents the first attempt in North America to bring together information about highway median and roadside barriers and wildlife and provide preliminary guidelines to balance the needs of motorist safety and wildlife movements.

  17. Space Shuttle hypersonic aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic flight research and the comparison to ground test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Shafer, Mary F.

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic comparisons between flight and ground test for the Space Shuttle at hypersonic speeds are discussed. All of the comparisons are taken from papers published by researchers active in the Space Shuttle program. The aerodynamic comparisons include stability and control derivatives, center-of-pressure location, and reaction control jet interaction. Comparisons are also discussed for various forms of heating, including catalytic, boundary layer, top centerline, side fuselage, OMS pod, wing leading edge, and shock interaction. The jet interaction and center-of-pressure location flight values exceeded not only the predictions but also the uncertainties of the predictions. Predictions were significantly exceeded for the heating caused by the vortex impingement on the OMS pods and for heating caused by the wing leading-edge shock interaction.

  18. Aeroservoelastic modeling and applications using minimum-state approximations of the unsteady aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiffany, Sherwood H.; Karpel, Mordechay

    1989-01-01

    Various control analysis, design, and simulation techniques for aeroelastic applications require the equations of motion to be cast in a linear time-invariant state-space form. Unsteady aerodynamics forces have to be approximated as rational functions of the Laplace variable in order to put them in this framework. For the minimum-state method, the number of denominator roots in the rational approximation. Results are shown of applying various approximation enhancements (including optimization, frequency dependent weighting of the tabular data, and constraint selection) with the minimum-state formulation to the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model. The results demonstrate that good models can be developed which have an order of magnitude fewer augmenting aerodynamic equations more than traditional approaches. This reduction facilitates the design of lower order control systems, analysis of control system performance, and near real-time simulation of aeroservoelastic phenomena.

  19. An aerodynamic model for one and two degree of freedom wing rock of slender delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, John

    1993-01-01

    The unsteady aerodynamic effects due to the separated flow around slender delta wings in motion were analyzed. By combining the unsteady flow field solution with the rigid body Euler equations of motion, self-induced wing rock motion is simulated. The aerodynamic model successfully captures the qualitative characteristics of wing rock observed in experiments. For the one degree of freedom in roll case, the model is used to look into the mechanisms of wing rock and to investigate the effects of various parameters, like angle of attack, yaw angle, displacement of the separation point, and wing inertia. To investigate the roll and yaw coupling for the delta wing, an additional degree of freedom is added. However, no limit cycle was observed in the two degree of freedom case. Nonetheless, the model can be used to apply various control laws to actively control wing rock using, for example, the displacement of the leading edge vortex separation point by inboard span wise blowing.

  20. Estimates of Median Flows for Streams on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Charles A.; Wolock, David M.; Artman, Joshua C.

    2004-01-01

    The Kansas State Legislature, by enacting Kansas Statute KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., mandated the criteria for determining which Kansas stream segments would be subject to classification by the State. One criterion for the selection as a classified stream segment is based on the statistic of median flow being equal to or greater than 1 cubic foot per second. As specified by KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., median flows were determined from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging-station data by using the most-recent 10 years of gaged data (KSA) for each streamflow-gaging station. Median flows also were determined by using gaged data from the entire period of record (all-available hydrology, AAH). Least-squares multiple regression techniques were used, along with Tobit analyses, to develop equations for estimating median flows for uncontrolled stream segments. The drainage area of the gaging stations on uncontrolled stream segments used in the regression analyses ranged from 2.06 to 12,004 square miles. A logarithmic transformation of the data was needed to develop the best linear relation for computing median flows. In the regression analyses, the significant climatic and basin characteristics, in order of importance, were drainage area, mean annual precipitation, mean basin permeability, and mean basin slope. Tobit analyses of KSA data yielded a model standard error of prediction of 0.285 logarithmic units, and the best equations using Tobit analyses of AAH data had a model standard error of prediction of 0.250 logarithmic units. These regression equations and an interpolation procedure were used to compute median flows for the uncontrolled stream segments on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. Measured median flows from gaging stations were incorporated into the regression-estimated median flows along the stream segments where available. The segments that were uncontrolled were interpolated using gaged data weighted according to the drainage area and the bias between the

  1. Estimates of median flows for streams on the Kansas surface water register

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Charles A.; Wolock, David M.; Artman, Joshua C.

    2002-01-01

    The Kansas State Legislature, by enacting Kansas Statute KSA 82a-2001 et. seq., mandated the criteria for determining which Kansas stream segments would be subject to classification by the State. One criterion for the selection as a classified stream segment is based on the statistic of median flow being equal to or greater than 1 cubic foot per second. As specified by KSA 82a-2001 et. seq., median flows were determined from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging-station data by using the most-recent 10-years of gaged data (KSA) for each streamflow-gaging station. Median flows also were determined by using gaged data from the entire period of record (all-available hydrology, AAH). Least-squares multiple regression techniques were used, along with Tobit analyses, to develop equations for estimating median flows for uncontrolled stream segments. The drainage area of the uncontrolled gaging stations used in the regression analyses ranged from 2.06 to 12,004 square miles. A logarithmic transformation of the data was needed to develop the best linear relation for computing median flows. In the regression analyses, the significant climatic and basin characteristics, in order of importance, were drainage area, mean annual precipitation, mean basin permeability, and mean basin slope. Tobit analyses of KSA data yielded a root mean square error of 0.285 logarithmic units, and the best equations using Tobit analyses of AAH data had a root mean square error of 0.247 logarithmic units. These equations and an interpolation procedure were used to compute median flows for the uncontrolled stream segments on the Kansas Surface Water Register. Measured median flows from gaging stations were incorporated into the regression-estimated median flows along the stream segments where available. The segments that were uncontrolled were interpolated using gaged data weighted according to the drainage area and the bias between the regression-estimated and gaged flow information. On

  2. Analyzing the influence of median cross-section design on highway safety using vehicle dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Stine, Jason S; Hamblin, Bridget C; Brennan, Sean N; Donnell, Eric T

    2010-11-01

    Although vehicle dynamics simulations have long been used in vehicle design and crash reconstruction, their use for highway design is rare. This paper investigates the safety of highway medians through iterative simulations of off-road median encroachments. The commercially available software CarSim was used to simulate over one hundred thousand encroachments, representing the entire passenger vehicle fleet and a wide range of encroachment angles, departure speeds, steering inputs, and braking inputs. Each individual simulation output was then weighted using data from previous studies to reflect the probability of each specific accident scenario occurring in a real-life median encroachment. Results of this analysis illustrate the relative influence of median cross-section geometry on the resulting accident outcomes. The simulations indicate that the overall safety of a highway median depends on the occurrence of both vehicle rollover and median crossover events, and the cross-section shape, slope, and width are all shown to greatly affect each of these incidents. An evaluation of the simulation results was conducted with vehicle trajectories from previous experimental crash tests. Further assessment of the aggregate simulation results to actual crash data was achieved through comparison with several databases of crash statistics. Both efforts showed a strong agreement between the simulations and the real-life crash data.

  3. System Dynamic Analysis of a Wind Tunnel Model with Applications to Improve Aerodynamic Data Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph David

    1997-01-01

    The research investigates the effect of wind tunnel model system dynamics on measured aerodynamic data. During wind tunnel tests designed to obtain lift and drag data, the required aerodynamic measurements are the steady-state balance forces and moments, pressures, and model attitude. However, the wind tunnel model system can be subjected to unsteady aerodynamic and inertial loads which result in oscillatory translations and angular rotations. The steady-state force balance and inertial model attitude measurements are obtained by filtering and averaging data taken during conditions of high model vibrations. The main goals of this research are to characterize the effects of model system dynamics on the measured steady-state aerodynamic data and develop a correction technique to compensate for dynamically induced errors. Equations of motion are formulated for the dynamic response of the model system subjected to arbitrary aerodynamic and inertial inputs. The resulting modal model is examined to study the effects of the model system dynamic response on the aerodynamic data. In particular, the equations of motion are used to describe the effect of dynamics on the inertial model attitude, or angle of attack, measurement system that is used routinely at the NASA Langley Research Center and other wind tunnel facilities throughout the world. This activity was prompted by the inertial model attitude sensor response observed during high levels of model vibration while testing in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The inertial attitude sensor cannot distinguish between the gravitational acceleration and centrifugal accelerations associated with wind tunnel model system vibration, which results in a model attitude measurement bias error. Bias errors over an order of magnitude greater than the required device accuracy were found in the inertial model attitude measurements during dynamic testing of two model systems. Based on a theoretical modal

  4. Involvement of the median raphe nucleus in antinociception induced by morphine, buprenorphine and tilidine in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bryant, R M; Olley, J E; Tyers, M B

    1982-12-01

    1 Antinociception induced by three analgesics with differing profiles of activity, morphine, buprenorphine and tilidine, have been evaluated in the hot plate and paw pressure tests after administration by the subcutaneous route and directly into the median raphe nucleus in the conscious rat. 2 Behavioural and neurological effects of the three analgesics were also assessed. 3 The typical profiles of antinociceptive activity induced by the three analgesics were qualitatively similar after either route of administration. Morphine induced naloxone-sensitive dose-dependent effects in both tests. Buprenorphine showed naloxone-sensitive effects with a bell-shaped dose-response curve in the thermal test but dose-dependent activity in the pressure test. Tilidine induced naloxone-sensitive dose-dependent effects in the thermal test but demonstrated naloxone-insensitive activity in the paw pressure test. 4 The behavioural and neurological effects of the analgesics in the dose range used would not have affected the animals' ability to respond to the nociceptive stimuli. 5 The results suggest that the median raphe could participate in drug-induced antinociception. The mechanisms by which this might occur are discussed.

  5. Functional connectivity of the dorsal and median raphe nuclei at rest

    PubMed Central

    Beliveau, Vincent; Svarer, Claus; Frokjaer, Vibe G.; Knudsen, Gitte M.; Greve, Douglas N.; Fisher, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a neurotransmitter critically involved in a broad range of brain functions and implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric illnesses including major depression, anxiety and sleep disorders. Despite being widely distributed throughout the brain, there is limited knowledge on the contribution of 5-HT to intrinsic brain activity. The dorsal raphe (DR) and median raphe (MR) nuclei are the source of most serotonergic neurons projecting throughout the brain and thus provide a compelling target for a seed-based probe of resting-state activity related to 5-HT. Here we implemented a novel multimodal neuroimaging approach for investigating resting-state functional connectivity (FC) between DR and MR and cortical, subcortical and cerebellar target areas. Using [11C]DASB positron emission tomography (PET) images of the brain serotonin transporter (5-HTT) combined with structural MRI from 49 healthy volunteers, we delineated DR and MR and performed a seed-based resting-state FC analysis. The DR and MR seeds produced largely similar FC maps: significant positive FC with brain regions involved in cognitive and emotion processing including anterior cingulate, amygdala, insula, hippocampus, thalamus, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Significant negative FC was observed within pre- and postcentral gyri for the DR but not for the MR seed. We observed a significant association between DR and MR FC and regional 5-HTT binding. Our results provide evidence for a resting-state network related to DR and MR and comprising regions receiving serotonergic innervation and centrally involved in 5-HT related behaviors including emotion, cognition and reward processing. These findings provide a novel advance in estimating resting-state FC related to 5-HT signaling, which can benefit our understanding of its role in behavior and neuropsychiatric illnesses. PMID:25963733

  6. Acute and Subchronic Toxicity Study of the Median Septum of Juglans regia in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ravanbakhsh, Asma; Mahdavi, Majid; Jalilzade-Amin, Ghader; Javadi, Shahram; Maham, Masoud; Mohammadnejad, Daryosh; Rashidi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Median septum of Juglans regia L. (Juglandaceae) with anti-diabetic effects has been used in Iranian traditional medicine. The present study estimates both oral acute and subchronic toxicities. Methods: In the oral acute toxicity study, female Wistar rats were treated with doses of 10, 100, 1000, 1600, 2900 and 5000 mg/ kg of the Juglans regia septum of methanol extract (JRSME), and were monitored for 14 days. In subchronic study, JRSME was administered by gavage at dose of 1000 mg/kg daily in Wistar rats for 28 days. Antioxidant status and biochemical examinations were fulfilled, and the vital organs were subjected to pathological analyses. Results: The extract did not produce any toxic signs or deaths; the medium lethal dose must be higher than 5000 mg/kg. In subchronic study, No significant morphological and histopathological changes were observed in the studied tissues. There was a significant increase in serum malondialdehyde (MDA) level in treated group compared to control after 4 weeks of JRSME intake. The treatment of rats resulted in a significant reduction of serum urea level (p<0.05), kidney’s xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) activity (p<0.001) and elevation of aldehyde oxidase (AO) activity (p<0.05) in kidney. In the treated group, the mean diameter of glomerulus and proximal urine tube epithelium stature was slightly greater than control group. A significant increase in serum MDA level is subject for further studies. Conclusion: This study showed that the extract has no acute or subacute adverse effects with dose of 1000 mg/kg. The administration of JRSME may improve kidney structure and function and help in treatment of some chronic diseases. PMID:28101461

  7. Functional connectivity of the dorsal and median raphe nuclei at rest.

    PubMed

    Beliveau, Vincent; Svarer, Claus; Frokjaer, Vibe G; Knudsen, Gitte M; Greve, Douglas N; Fisher, Patrick M

    2015-08-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a neurotransmitter critically involved in a broad range of brain functions and implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric illnesses including major depression, anxiety and sleep disorders. Despite being widely distributed throughout the brain, there is limited knowledge on the contribution of 5-HT to intrinsic brain activity. The dorsal raphe (DR) and median raphe (MR) nuclei are the source of most serotonergic neurons projecting throughout the brain and thus provide a compelling target for a seed-based probe of resting-state activity related to 5-HT. Here we implemented a novel multimodal neuroimaging approach for investigating resting-state functional connectivity (FC) between DR and MR and cortical, subcortical and cerebellar target areas. Using [(11)C]DASB positron emission tomography (PET) images of the brain serotonin transporter (5-HTT) combined with structural MRI from 49 healthy volunteers, we delineated DR and MR and performed a seed-based resting-state FC analysis. The DR and MR seeds produced largely similar FC maps: significant positive FC with brain regions involved in cognitive and emotion processing including anterior cingulate, amygdala, insula, hippocampus, thalamus, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Significant negative FC was observed within pre- and postcentral gyri for the DR but not for the MR seed. We observed a significant association between DR and MR FC and regional 5-HTT binding. Our results provide evidence for a resting-state network related to DR and MR and comprising regions receiving serotonergic innervation and centrally involved in 5-HT related behaviors including emotion, cognition and reward processing. These findings provide a novel advance in estimating resting-state FC related to 5-HT signaling, which can benefit our understanding of its role in behavior and neuropsychiatric illnesses.

  8. Effect of lithium on behavioral disinhibition induced by electrolytic lesion of the median raphe nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Pezzato, Fernanda A.; Can, Adem; Hoshino, Katsumasa; Horta, José de Anchieta C.; Mijares, Miriam G.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Alterations in brainstem circuits have been proposed as a possible mechanism underlying the etiology of mood disorders. Projections from the median raphe nucleus (MnR) modulate dopaminergic activity in the forebrain and are also part of a behavioral disinhibition/inhibition system that produces phenotypes resembling behavioral variations manifested during manic and depressive phases of bipolar disorder. Objective Assess the effect of chronic lithium treatment on behavioral disinhibition induced by MnR lesions. Methods MnR electrolytic lesions were performed in C57BL/6J mice, with sham operated and intact animals as control groups. Following recovery, mice were chronically treated with lithium (LiCl, added in chow) followed by behavioral testing. Results MnR lesion induced manic-like behavioral alterations including hyperactivity in the open field (OF), stereotyped circling, anxiolytic/risk taking in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and light/dark box (LDB) tests, and increased basal body temperature. Lithium was specifically effective in reducing OF hyperactivity and stereotypy but did not reverse (EPM) or had a nonspecific effect (LDB) on anxiety/risk taking measures. Additionally, lithium decreased saccharin preference and prevented weight loss during single housing. Conclusions Our data support electrolytic lesions of the MnR as an experimental model of a hyper-excitable/disinhibited phenotype consistent with some aspects of mania that are attenuated by the mood stabilizer lithium. Given lithium’s relatively specific efficacy in treating mania, these data support the hypothesis that manic symptoms derive not only from the stimulation of excitatory systems but also from inactivation or decreased activity of inhibitory mechanisms. PMID:25345734

  9. The ascending median raphe projections are mainly glutamatergic in the mouse forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Szőnyi, András; Mayer, Márton I.; Cserép, Csaba; Takács, Virág T.; Watanabe, Masahiko; Freund, Tamás F.

    2015-01-01

    The median raphe region (MRR) is thought to be serotonergic and plays an important role in the regulation of many cognitive functions. In the hippocampus (HIPP), the MRR exerts a fast excitatory control, partially through glutamatergic transmission, on a subpopulation of GABAergic interneurons that are key regulators of local network activity. However, not all receptors of this connection in the HIPP and in synapses established by MRR in other brain areas are known. Using combined anterograde tracing and immunogold methods, we show that the GluN2A subunit of the NMDA receptor is present in the synapses established by MRR not only in the HIPP, but also in the medial septum (MS) and in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of the mouse. We estimated similar amounts of NMDA receptors in these synapses established by the MRR and in local adjacent excitatory synapses. Using retrograde tracing and confocal laser scanning microscopy, we found that the majority of the projecting cells of the mouse MRR contain the vesicular glutamate transporter type 3 (vGluT3). Furthermore, using double retrograde tracing, we found that single cells of the MRR can innervate the HIPP and mPFC or the MS and mPFC simultaneously, and these double-projecting cells are also predominantly vGluT3-positive. Our results indicate that the majority of the output of the MRR is glutamatergic and acts through NMDA receptor-containing synapses. This suggests that key forebrain areas receive precisely targeted excitatory input from the MRR, which is able to synchronously modify activity in those regions via individual MRR cells with dual projections. PMID:25381463

  10. Space Launch System Ascent Static Aerodynamic Database Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinier, Jeremy T.; Bennett, David W.; Blevins, John A.; Erickson, Gary E.; Favaregh, Noah M.; Houlden, Heather P.; Tomek, William G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the wind tunnel testing work and data analysis required to characterize the static aerodynamic environment of NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) ascent portion of flight. Scaled models of the SLS have been tested in transonic and supersonic wind tunnels to gather the high fidelity data that is used to build aerodynamic databases. A detailed description of the wind tunnel test that was conducted to produce the latest version of the database is presented, and a representative set of aerodynamic data is shown. The wind tunnel data quality remains very high, however some concerns with wall interference effects through transonic Mach numbers are also discussed. Post-processing and analysis of the wind tunnel dataset are crucial for the development of a formal ascent aerodynamics database.

  11. Validation and comparison of aerodynamic modelling approaches for wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blondel, F.; Boisard, R.; Milekovic, M.; Ferrer, G.; Lienard, C.; Teixeira, D.

    2016-09-01

    The development of large capacity Floating Offshore Wind Turbines (FOWT) is an interdisciplinary challenge for the design solvers, requiring accurate modelling of both hydrodynamics, elasticity, servodynamics and aerodynamics all together. Floating platforms will induce low-frequency unsteadiness, and for large capacity turbines, the blade induced vibrations will lead to high-frequency unsteadiness. While yawed inflow conditions are still a challenge for commonly used aerodynamic methods such as the Blade Element Momentum method (BEM), the new sources of unsteadiness involved by large turbine scales and floater motions have to be tackled accurately, keeping the computational cost small enough to be compatible with design and certification purposes. In the light of this, this paper will focus on the comparison of three aerodynamic solvers based on BEM and vortex methods, on standard, yawed and unsteady inflow conditions. We will focus here on up-to-date wind tunnel experiments, such as the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) database and the MexNext international project.

  12. Learn About SmartWay Verified Aerodynamic Devices

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Installing EPA-verified aerodynamic technologies on your trailer can help fleet and truck owners save fuel. Options include gap reducers, skirts, or tails and can be installed individually or in combination.

  13. Feathers of archaeopteryx: asymmetric vanes indicate aerodynamic function.

    PubMed

    Feduccia, A; Tordoff, H B

    1979-03-09

    Vanes in the primary flight feathers of Archaeopteryx conform to the asymmetric pattern in modern flying birds. The asymmetry has aerodynamic functions and can be assumed to have evolved in the selective context of flight.

  14. Computational Aerodynamic Analysis of Offshore Upwind and Downwind Turbines

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Qiuying; Sheng, Chunhua; Afjeh, Abdollah

    2014-01-01

    Aerodynamic interactions of the model NREL 5 MW offshore horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) are investigated using a high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Four wind turbine configurations are considered; three-bladed upwind and downwind and two-bladed upwind and downwind configurations, which operate at two different rotor speeds of 12.1 and 16 RPM. In the present study, both steady and unsteady aerodynamic loads, such as the rotor torque, blade hub bending moment, and base the tower bending moment of the tower, are evaluated in detail to provide overall assessment of different wind turbine configurations. Aerodynamic interactions between the rotor and tower are analyzed,more » including the rotor wake development downstream. The computational analysis provides insight into aerodynamic performance of the upwind and downwind, two- and three-bladed horizontal axis wind turbines.« less

  15. Aerodynamic Effects and Modeling of Damage to Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Gautam H.

    2008-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted to measure the aerodynamic effects of damage to lifting and stability/control surfaces of a commercial transport aircraft configuration. The modeling of such effects is necessary for the development of flight control systems to recover aircraft from adverse, damage-related loss-of-control events, as well as for the estimation of aerodynamic characteristics from flight data under such conditions. Damage in the form of partial or total loss of area was applied to the wing, horizontal tail, and vertical tail. Aerodynamic stability and control implications of damage to each surface are presented, to aid in the identification of potential boundaries in recoverable stability or control degradation. The aerodynamic modeling issues raised by the wind tunnel results are discussed, particularly the additional modeling requirements necessitated by asymmetries due to damage, and the potential benefits of such expanded modeling.

  16. Future requirements and roles of computers in aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    While faster computers will be needed to make solution of the Navier-Stokes equations practical and useful, most all of the other aerodynamic solution techniques can benefit from faster computers. There is a wide variety of computational and measurement techniques, the prospect of more powerful computers permits extension and an enhancement across all aerodynamic methods, including wind-tunnel measurement. It is expected that, as in the past, a blend of methods will be used to predict aircraft aerodynamics in the future. These will include methods based on solution of the Navier-Stokes equations and the potential flow equations as well as those based on empirical and measured results. The primary flows of interest in aircraft aerodynamics are identified, the predictive methods currently in use and/or under development are reviewed and two of these methods are analyzed in terms of the computational resources needed to improve their usefulness and practicality.

  17. Supersonic Parachute Aerodynamic Testing and Fluid Structure Interaction Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingard, J. S.; Underwood, J. C.; Darley, M. G.; Marraffa, L.; Ferracina, L.

    2014-06-01

    The ESA Supersonic Parachute program expands the knowledge of parachute inflation and flying characteristics in supersonic flows using wind tunnel testing and fluid structure interaction to develop new inflation algorithms and aerodynamic databases.

  18. Aerodynamic Surface Stress Intermittency and Conditionally Averaged Turbulence Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W.

    2015-12-01

    Aeolian erosion of dry, flat, semi-arid landscapes is induced (and sustained) by kinetic energy fluxes in the aloft atmospheric surface layer. During saltation -- the mechanism responsible for surface fluxes of dust and sediment -- briefly suspended sediment grains undergo a ballistic trajectory before impacting and `splashing' smaller-diameter (dust) particles vertically. Conceptual models typically indicate that sediment flux, q (via saltation or drift), scales with imposed aerodynamic (basal) stress raised to some exponent, n, where n > 1. Since basal stress (in fully rough, inertia-dominated flows) scales with the incoming velocity squared, u^2, it follows that q ~ u^2n (where u is some relevant component of the above flow field, u(x,t)). Thus, even small (turbulent) deviations of u from its time-averaged value may play an enormously important role in aeolian activity on flat, dry landscapes. The importance of this argument is further augmented given that turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer exhibits maximum Reynolds stresses in the fluid immediately above the landscape. In order to illustrate the importance of surface stress intermittency, we have used conditional averaging predicated on aerodynamic surface stress during large-eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary layer flow over a flat landscape with momentum roughness length appropriate for the Llano Estacado in west Texas (a flat agricultural region that is notorious for dust transport). By using data from a field campaign to measure diurnal variability of aeolian activity and prevailing winds on the Llano Estacado, we have retrieved the threshold friction velocity (which can be used to compute threshold surface stress under the geostrophic balance with the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory). This averaging procedure provides an ensemble-mean visualization of flow structures responsible for erosion `events'. Preliminary evidence indicates that surface stress peaks are associated with the passage of

  19. Biological and aerodynamic problems with the flight of animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, E. V.; Kuchemann, D.

    1980-01-01

    Biological and aerodynamic considerations related to birds and insects are discussed. A wide field is open for comparative biological, physiological, and aerodynamic investigations. Considerable mathematics related to the flight of animals is presented, including 20 equations. The 15 figures included depict the design of bird and insect wings, diagrams of propulsion efficiency, thrust, lift, and angles of attack and photographs of flapping wing free flying wing only models which were built and flown.

  20. Aerodynamic characteristics of reentry vehicles at supersonic velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamov, N. P.; Kharitonov, A. M.; Chasovnikov, E. A.; Dyad'kin, A. A.; Kazakov, M. I.; Krylov, A. N.; Skorovarov, A. Yu.

    2015-09-01

    Models of promising reentry vehicles, experimental equipment, and test program are described. The method used to determine the total aerodynamic characteristics of these models on the AB-313 mechanical balance in the T-313 supersonic wind tunnel and the method used for simulations are presented. The aerodynamic coefficients of the examined objects in wide ranges of Mach numbers and angles of attack are obtained. The experimental data are compared with the results of simulations.

  1. Coupled flow, thermal and structural analysis of aerodynamically heated panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Dechaumphai, Pramote

    1986-01-01

    A finite element approach to coupling flow, thermal and structural analyses of aerodynamically heated panels is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations for laminar compressible flow are solved together with the energy equation and quasi-static structural equations of the panel. Interactions between the flow, panel heat transfer and deformations are studied for thin stainless steel panels aerodynamically heated by Mach 6.6 flow.

  2. On a global aerodynamic optimization of a civil transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savu, G.; Trifu, O.

    1991-01-01

    An aerodynamic optimization procedure developed to minimize the drag to lift ratio of an aircraft configuration: wing - body - tail, in accordance with engineering restrictions, is described. An algorithm developed to search a hypersurface with 18 dimensions, which define an aircraft configuration, is discussed. The results, when considered from the aerodynamic point of view, indicate the optimal configuration is one that combines a lifting fuselage with a canard.

  3. High Speed Aerodynamic Characteristics of the GAF0PH Aerofoil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    upper surface of the aerofoil for angles of incidence greater than 210. POSTAL ADDRESS: Chief Superintendent, Aeronautical Research Laboratories, Box...kCLAERO-.NOTE3 98 -AR-002-223 -LEVEL m DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE 00 DEFENCE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ORGANISATION AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH LABORATORIES...MELBOURNE, VICTORIA AERODYNAMICS NOTE 398 ’,\\ HIGH SPEED AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THE GAFPH AEROFOIL by ~B D :, . , .IR-© Approved for Public Release

  4. Aerodynamic Reconstruction Applied to Parachute Test Vehicle Flight Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassady, Leonard D.; Ray, Eric S.; Truong, Tuan H.

    2013-01-01

    The aerodynamics, both static and dynamic, of a test vehicle are critical to determining the performance of the parachute cluster in a drop test and for conducting a successful test. The Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project is conducting tests of NASA's Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) parachutes at the Army Yuma Proving Ground utilizing the Parachute Test Vehicle (PTV). The PTV shape is based on the MPCV, but the height has been reduced in order to fit within the C-17 aircraft for extraction. Therefore, the aerodynamics of the PTV are similar, but not the same as, the MPCV. A small series of wind tunnel tests and computational fluid dynamics cases were run to modify the MPCV aerodynamic database for the PTV, but aerodynamic reconstruction of the flights has proven an effective source for further improvements to the database. The acceleration and rotational rates measured during free flight, before parachute inflation but during deployment, were used to con rm vehicle static aerodynamics. A multibody simulation is utilized to reconstruct the parachute portions of the flight. Aerodynamic or parachute parameters are adjusted in the simulation until the prediction reasonably matches the flight trajectory. Knowledge of the static aerodynamics is critical in the CPAS project because the parachute riser load measurements are scaled based on forebody drag. PTV dynamic damping is critical because the vehicle has no reaction control system to maintain attitude - the vehicle dynamics must be understood and modeled correctly before flight. It will be shown here that aerodynamic reconstruction has successfully contributed to the CPAS project.

  5. Determining median urinary iodine concentration that indicates adequate iodine intake at population level.

    PubMed Central

    Delange, François; de Benoist, Bruno; Burgi, Hans

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Urinary iodine concentration is the prime indicator of nutritional iodine status and is used to evaluate population-based iodine supplementation. In 1994, WHO, UNICEF and ICCIDD recommended median urinary iodine concentrations for populations of 100- 200 micro g/l, assuming the 100 micro g/l threshold would limit concentrations <50 micro g/l to median urinary iodine concentrations >100 micro g/l. The total population was 55 892, including 35 661 (64%) schoolchildren. Median urinary iodine concentrations were 111-540 (median 201) micro g/l for all populations, 100-199 micro g/l in 23 (48%) populations and >/=200 micro g/l in 25 (52%). The frequencies of values <50 micro g/l were 0-20.8 (mean 4.8%) overall and 7.2% and 2.5% in populations with medians of 100-199 micro g/l and >200 micro g/l, respectively. The frequency reached 20% only in two places where iodine had been supplemented for <2 years. CONCLUSION: The frequency of urinary iodine concentrations <50 micro g/l in populations with median urinary iodine concentrations >/=100 micro g/l has been overestimated. The threshold of 100 micro g/l does not need to be increased. In populations, median urinary iodine concentrations of 100-200 micro g/l indicate adequate iodine intake and optimal iodine nutrition. PMID:12219154

  6. Mechanics and aerodynamics of insect flight control.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G K

    2001-11-01

    Insects have evolved sophisticated fight control mechanisms permitting a remarkable range of manoeuvres. Here, I present a qualitative analysis of insect flight control from the perspective of flight mechanics, drawing upon both the neurophysiology and biomechanics literatures. The current literature does not permit a formal, quantitative analysis of flight control, because the aerodynamic force systems that biologists have measured have rarely been complete and the position of the centre of gravity has only been recorded in a few studies. Treating the two best-known insect orders (Diptera and Orthoptera) separately from other insects, I discuss the control mechanisms of different insects in detail. Recent experimental studies suggest that the helicopter model of flight control proposed for Drosophila spp. may be better thought of as a facultative strategy for flight control, rather than the fixed (albeit selected) constraint that it is usually interpreted to be. On the other hand, the so-called 'constant-lift reaction' of locusts appears not to be a reflex for maintaining constant lift at varying angles of attack, as is usually assumed, but rather a mechanism to restore the insect to pitch equilibrium following a disturbance. Differences in the kinematic control mechanisms used by the various insect orders are related to differences in the arrangement of the wings, the construction of the flight motor and the unsteady mechanisms of lift production that are used. Since the evolution of insect flight control is likely to have paralleled the evolutionary refinement of these unsteady aerodynamic mechanisms, taxonomic differences in the kinematics of control could provide an assay of the relative importance of different unsteady mechanisms. Although the control kinematics vary widely between orders, the number of degrees of freedom that different insects can control will always be limited by the number of independent control inputs that they use. Control of the moments

  7. DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Pointer, D; Browand, F; Ross, J; Storms, B

    2007-01-04

    Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At highway speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; (2) Develop innovative drag reducing concepts that are operationally and economically sound; and (3) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices. The studies described herein provide a demonstration of the applicability of the experience developed in the analysis of the standard configuration of the Generic Conventional Model. The modeling practices and procedures developed in prior efforts have been applied directly to the assessment of new configurations including a variety of geometric modifications and add-on devices. Application to the low-drag 'GTS' configuration of the GCM has confirmed that the error in predicted drag coefficients increases as the relative contribution of the base drag resulting from the vehicle wake to the total drag increases and it is recommended that more advanced turbulence modeling strategies be applied under those circumstances. Application to a commercially-developed boat tail device has confirmed that this restriction does not apply to geometries where the relative contribution of the base drag to the total drag is reduced by modifying the geometry in that region. Application to a modified GCM geometry with an open grille and radiator has confirmed that the underbody flow, while important for underhood cooling, has little impact on the drag coefficient of

  8. Supersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of Blunt Body Trim Tab Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korzun, Ashley M.; Murphy, Kelly J.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    Trim tabs are aerodynamic control surfaces that can allow an entry vehicle to meet aerodynamic performance requirements while reducing or eliminating the use of ballast mass and providing a capability to modulate the lift-to-drag ratio during entry. Force and moment data were obtained on 38 unique, blunt body trim tab configurations in the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The data were used to parametrically assess the supersonic aerodynamic performance of trim tabs and to understand the influence of tab area, cant angle, and aspect ratio. Across the range of conditions tested (Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.5, and 4.5; angles of attack from -4deg to +20deg; angles of sideslip from 0deg to +8deg), the effects of varying tab area and tab cant angle were found to be much more significant than effects from varying tab aspect ratio. Aerodynamic characteristics exhibited variation with Mach number and forebody geometry over the range of conditions tested. Overall, the results demonstrate that trim tabs are a viable approach to satisfy aerodynamic performance requirements of blunt body entry vehicles with minimal ballast mass. For a 70deg sphere-cone, a tab with 3% area of the forebody and canted approximately 35deg with no ballast mass was found to give the same trim aerodynamics as a baseline model with ballast mass that was 5% of the total entry mass.

  9. Forced response analysis of an aerodynamically detuned supersonic turbomachine rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyniak, D.; Fleeter, S.

    1985-01-01

    High performance aircraft-engine fan and compressor blades are vulnerable to aerodynamically forced vibrations generated by inlet flow distortions due to wakes from upstream blade and vane rows, atmospheric gusts, and maldistributions in inlet ducts. In this report, an analysis is developed to predict the flow-induced forced response of an aerodynamically detuned rotor operating in a supersonic flow with a subsonic axial component. The aerodynamic detuning is achieved by alternating the circumferential spacing of adjacent rotor blades. The total unsteady aerodynamic loading acting on the blading, as a result of the convection of the transverse gust past the airfoil cascade and the resulting motion of the cascade, is developed in terms of influence coefficients. This analysis is used to investigate the effect of aerodynamic detuning on the forced response of a 12-blade rotor, with Verdon's Cascade B flow geometry as a uniformly spaced baseline configuration. The results of this study indicate that, for forward traveling wave gust excitations, aerodynamic detuning is very beneficial, resulting in significantly decreased maximum-amplitude blade responses for many interblade phase angles.

  10. Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test: Trajectory, Atmosphere, and Aerodynamics Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutty, Prasad; Karlgaard, Christopher D.; Blood, Eric M.; O'Farrell, Clara; Ginn, Jason M.; Shoenenberger, Mark; Dutta, Soumyo

    2015-01-01

    The Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test is a full-scale flight test of a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator, which is part of the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator technology development project. The purpose of the project is to develop and mature aerodynamic decelerator technologies for landing large mass payloads on the surface of Mars. The technologies include a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator and Supersonic Parachutes. The first Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test occurred on June 28th, 2014 at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. This test was used to validate the test architecture for future missions. The flight was a success and, in addition, was able to acquire data on the aerodynamic performance of the supersonic inflatable decelerator. This paper describes the instrumentation, analysis techniques, and acquired flight test data utilized to reconstruct the vehicle trajectory, atmosphere, and aerodynamics. The results of the reconstruction show significantly higher lofting of the trajectory, which can partially be explained by off-nominal booster motor performance. The reconstructed vehicle force and moment coefficients fall well within pre-flight predictions. A parameter identification analysis indicates that the vehicle displayed greater aerodynamic static stability than seen in pre-flight computational predictions and ballistic range tests.

  11. Improved Aerodynamic Analysis for Hybrid Wing Body Conceptual Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gern, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of ongoing efforts to develop, evaluate, and validate different tools for improved aerodynamic modeling and systems analysis of Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft configurations. Results are being presented for the evaluation of different aerodynamic tools including panel methods, enhanced panel methods with viscous drag prediction, and computational fluid dynamics. Emphasis is placed on proper prediction of aerodynamic loads for structural sizing as well as viscous drag prediction to develop drag polars for HWB conceptual design optimization. Data from transonic wind tunnel tests at the Arnold Engineering Development Center s 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel was used as a reference data set in order to evaluate the accuracy of the aerodynamic tools. Triangularized surface data and Vehicle Sketch Pad (VSP) models of an X-48B 2% scale wind tunnel model were used to generate input and model files for the different analysis tools. In support of ongoing HWB scaling studies within the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) program, an improved finite element based structural analysis and weight estimation tool for HWB center bodies is currently under development. Aerodynamic results from these analyses are used to provide additional aerodynamic validation data.

  12. Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag: Presentations and Summary of Comments and Conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Browand, F; Gutierrez, W; Leonard, A; McBride, D; McCallen, R; Ross, J; Roth, K; Rutledge, W; Salari, K

    1998-09-28

    The first Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, New Mexico on August 28, 1998. The purpose of the meeting was to review the proposed Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) and provide an update on the Group"s progress. In addition, the technical details of each organization"s activities were presented and discussed. Presentations were given by representatives from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Transportation Technology Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology (OHVT), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), SNL, University of Southern California (USC), California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and NASA Ames Research Center. These presenters are part of a DOE appointed Technical Team assigned to developing the MYPP. The goal of the MYPP is to develop and demonstrate the ability to simulate and analyze aerodynamic flow around heavy truck vehicles using existing and advanced computational tools (A Multi-Year Program Plan for the Aerodynamic Design of Heavy Vehicles, R. McCallen, D. McBride, W. Rutledge, F. Browand, A. Leonard, .I. Ross, UCRL-PROP- 127753 Dr. Rev 2, May 1998). This report contains the technical presentations (viewgraphs) delivered at the Meeting, briefly summarizes the comments and conclusions from the Meeting participants, and outlines the future action items.

  13. Status, Plans and Initial Results for Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebner, L. D.; Hall, R. M.; Haynes, D. A.; Pamadi, B. N.; Taylor, T. L.; Seaford, C. M.

    Following the completion of NASA's Exploration Systems Architecture Study in August 2004 for the NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD), the Ares Projects Office at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center was assigned project management responsibilities for the design and development of the first vehicle in the architecture, the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), which will be used to launch astronauts to low earth orbit and rendezvous with either the International Space Station or the ESMD's earth departure stage for lunar or other future missions beyond low Earth orbit. The primary elements of the Ares I CLV project are the first stage, the upper stage, the upper stage engine, and vehicle integration. Within vehicle integration is an effort in integrated design and analysis which is comprised of a number of technical disciplines needed to support vehicle design and development. One of the important disciplines throughout the life of the project is aerodynamics. This paper will present the status, plans, and initial results of Ares I CLV aerodynamics as the project was preparing for the Ares I CLV Systems Requirements Review. Following a discussion of the specific interactions with other technical panels and a status of the current activities, the plans for aerodynamic support of the Ares I CLV until the initial crewed flights will be presented.

  14. Status, Plans, and Initial Results for ARES 1 Crew Launch Vehicle Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, Lawrence D.; Haynes, Davy A.; Taylor, Terry L.; Hall, Robert M.; Pamadi, Bandu N.; Seaford, C. Mark

    2006-01-01

    Following the completion of NASA's Exploration Systems Architecture Study in August 2004 for the NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD), the Exploration Launch Office at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center was assigned project management responsibilities for the design and development of the first vehicle in the architecture, the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), which will be used to launch astronauts to low earth orbit and rendezvous with either the International Space Station or the ESMD s earth departure stage for lunar or other future missions beyond low Earth orbit. The primary elements of the Ares I CLV project are the first stage, the upper stage, the upper stage engine, and vehicle integration. Within vehicle integration is an effort in integrated design and analysis which is comprised of a number of technical disciplines needed to support vehicle design and development. One of the important disciplines throughout the life of the project is aerodynamics. This paper will present the status, plans, and initial results of Ares I CLV aerodynamics as the project was preparing for the Ares I CLV Systems Requirements Review. Following a discussion of the specific interactions with other technical panels and a status of the current activities, the plans for aerodynamic support of the Ares I CLV until the initial crewed flights will be presented.

  15. Aerodynamic distortion propagation calculation in application of high-speed target detection by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yonghui; Sun, Huayan; Zhao, Yanzhong; Chen, Jianbiao

    2015-10-01

    Active laser detection technique has a broad application prospect in antimissile and air defense, however the aerodynamic flow field around the planes and missiles cause serious distortion effect on the detecting laser beams. There are many computational fluid dynamics(CFD) codes that can predict the air density distribution and also the density fluctuations of the flow field, it's necessary for physical optics to be used to predict the distortion properties after propagation through the complex process. Aiming at the physical process of laser propagation in "Cat-eye" lenses and aerodynamic flow field for twice, distortion propagation calculation method is researched in this paper. In the minds of dividing the whole process into two parts, and tread the aero-optical optical path difference as a phase distortion, the incidence and reflection process are calculated using Collins formula and angular spectrum diffraction theory respectively. In addition, turbulent performance of the aerodynamic flow field is estimated according to the electromagnetic propagation theory through a random medium, the rms optical path difference and Strehl ratio of the turbulent optical distortion are obtained. Finally, Computational fluid mechanics and aero-optical distortion properties of the detecting laser beams are calculated with the hemisphere-on-cylinder turret as an example, calculation results are showed and analysed.

  16. Estimation of morphing airfoil shape and aerodynamic load using artificial hair sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Nathan S.; Su, Weihua; Thapa Magar, Kaman S.; Reich, Gregory W.

    2016-04-01

    An active area of research in adaptive structures focuses on the use of continuous wing shape changing methods as a means of replacing conventional discrete control surfaces and increasing aerodynamic efficiency. Although many shape-changing methods have been used since the beginning of heavier-than-air flight, the concept of performing camber actuation on a fully-deformable airfoil has not been widely applied. A fundamental problem of applying this concept to real-world scenarios is the fact that camber actuation is a continuous, time-dependent process. Therefore, if camber actuation is to be used in a closed-loop feedback system, one must be able to determine the instantaneous airfoil shape as well as the aerodynamic loads at all times. One approach is to utilize a new type of artificial hair sensors developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory to determine the flow conditions surrounding deformable airfoils. In this work, the hair sensor measurement data will be simulated by using the flow solver XFoil, with the assumption that perfect data with no noise can be collected from the hair sensor measurements. Such measurements will then be used in an artificial neural network based process to approximate the instantaneous airfoil camber shape, lift coefficient, and moment coefficient at a given angle of attack. Various aerodynamic and geometrical properties approximated from the artificial hair sensor and artificial neural network system will be compared with the results of XFoil in order to validate the approximation approach.

  17. June and August median streamflows estimated for ungaged streams in southern Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2010-01-01

    Methods for estimating June and August median streamflows were developed for ungaged, unregulated streams in southern Maine. The methods apply to streams with drainage areas ranging in size from 0.4 to 74 square miles, with percentage of basin underlain by a sand and gravel aquifer ranging from 0 to 84 percent, and with distance from the centroid of the basin to a Gulf of Maine line paralleling the coast ranging from 14 to 94 miles. Equations were developed with data from 4 long-term continuous-record streamgage stations and 27 partial-record streamgage stations. Estimates of median streamflows at the continuous-record and partial-record stations are presented. A mathematical technique for estimating standard low-flow statistics, such as June and August median streamflows, at partial-record streamgage stations was applied by relating base-flow measurements at these stations to concurrent daily streamflows at nearby long-term (at least 10 years of record) continuous-record streamgage stations (index stations). Weighted least-squares regression analysis (WLS) was used to relate estimates of June and August median streamflows at streamgage stations to basin characteristics at these same stations to develop equations that can be used to estimate June and August median streamflows on ungaged streams. WLS accounts for different periods of record at the gaging stations. Three basin characteristics-drainage area, percentage of basin underlain by a sand and gravel aquifer, and distance from the centroid of the basin to a Gulf of Maine line paralleling the coast-are used in the final regression equation to estimate June and August median streamflows for ungaged streams. The three-variable equation to estimate June median streamflow has an average standard error of prediction from -35 to 54 percent. The three-variable equation to estimate August median streamflow has an average standard error of prediction from -45 to 83 percent. Simpler one-variable equations that use only

  18. August Median Streamflow on Ungaged Streams in Eastern Aroostook County, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lombard, Pamela J.; Tasker, Gary D.; Nielsen, Martha G.

    2003-01-01

    Methods for estimating August median streamflow were developed for ungaged, unregulated streams in the eastern part of Aroostook County, Maine, with drainage areas from 0.38 to 43 square miles and mean basin elevations from 437 to 1,024 feet. Few long-term, continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations with small drainage areas were available from which to develop the equations; therefore, 24 partial-record gaging stations were established in this investigation. A mathematical technique for estimating a standard low-flow statistic, August median streamflow, at partial-record stations was applied by relating base-flow measurements at these stations to concurrent daily flows at nearby long-term, continuous-record streamflow- gaging stations (index stations). Generalized least-squares regression analysis (GLS) was used to relate estimates of August median streamflow at gaging stations to basin characteristics at these same stations to develop equations that can be applied to estimate August median streamflow on ungaged streams. GLS accounts for varying periods of record at the gaging stations and the cross correlation of concurrent streamflows among gaging stations. Twenty-three partial-record stations and one continuous-record station were used for the final regression equations. The basin characteristics of drainage area and mean basin elevation are used in the calculated regression equation for ungaged streams to estimate August median flow. The equation has an average standard error of prediction from -38 to 62 percent. A one-variable equation uses only drainage area to estimate August median streamflow when less accuracy is acceptable. This equation has an average standard error of prediction from -40 to 67 percent. Model error is larger than sampling error for both equations, indicating that additional basin characteristics could be important to improved estimates of low-flow statistics. Weighted estimates of August median streamflow, which can be used when

  19. Application of the median method to estimate the kinetic constants of the substrate uncompetitive inhibition equation.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Pedro L; Astudillo-Castro, Carolina; Gajardo, Diego; Flores, Sebastián

    2017-04-07

    In 1974, Eisenthal and Cornish-Bowden published the direct linear plot method, which used the median to estimate the Vmax and Km from a set of initial rates as a function of substrate concentrations. The robustness of this non-parametric method was clearly demonstrated by comparing it with the least-squares method. The authors commented that the method cannot readily be generalized to equations of more than two parameters. Unfortunately, this comment has been misread by other authors. Comments such as "this method cannot be extended directly to equations with more than two parameters" were found in some publications. In addition, recently, the most drastic comment was published: "this method cannot be applied for the analysis of substrate inhibition." Given all of these presumptions, we have been motivated to publish a demonstration of the contrary: the median method can be applied to more than two-parameter equations, using as an example, the substrate uncompetitive inhibition equation. A computer algorithm was written to evaluate the effect of simulated experimental error of the initial rates on the estimation of Vmax, Km and KS. The error was assigned to different points of the experimental design. Four different KS/Km ratios were analyzed with the values 10, 100, 1000 and 10,000. The results indicated that the least-squares method was slightly better than the median method in terms of accuracy and variance. However, the presence of outliers affected the estimation of kinetic constants using the least-squares method more severely than the median method. The estimation of KS using the median method to estimate 1/KS was much better than the direct estimation of KS, causing a negative effect of non-linearity of KS in the kinetic equation. Considering that the median method is free from the assumptions of the least-squares method and the arbitrary assumptions implicit in the linearization methods to estimate the kinetic constants Vmax, Km and KS from the substrate

  20. Adaptive flow control of low-Reynolds number aerodynamics using dielectric barrier discharge actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Chang; Shyy, Wei

    2011-10-01

    Aerodynamic performance of low-Reynolds number flyers, for a chord-based Reynolds number of 10 5 or below, is sensitive to wind gusts and flow separation. Active flow control offers insight into fluid physics as well as possible improvements in vehicle performance. While facilitating flow control by introducing feedback control and fluidic devices, major challenges of achieving a target aerodynamic performance under unsteady flow conditions lie on the high-dimensional nonlinear dynamics of the flow system. Therefore, a successful flow control framework requires a viable as well as accessible control scheme and understanding of underlying flow dynamics as key information of the flow system. On the other hand, promising devices have been developed recently to facilitate flow control in this flow regime. The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) actuator is such an example; it does not have moving parts and provides fast impact on the flow field locally. In this paper, recent feedback flow control studies, especially those focusing on unsteady low-Reynolds number aerodynamics, are reviewed. As an example of an effective flow control framework, it is demonstrated that aerodynamic lift of a high angle-of-attack wing under fluctuating free-stream conditions can be stabilized using the DBD actuator and an adaptive algorithm based on general input-output models. System nonlinearities and control challenges are discussed by assessing control performance and the variation of the system parameters under various flow and actuation conditions. Other fundamental issues from the flow dynamics view point, such as the lift stabilization mechanism and the influence on drag fluctuation are also explored. Both potentiality and limitation of the linear modeling approach are discussed. In addition, guidelines on system identification and the controller and actuator setups are suggested.