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Sample records for activity membrane potential

  1. The relation between membrane potential, membrane currents and activation of contraction in ventricular myocardial fibres

    PubMed Central

    Beeler, G. W.; Reuter, H.

    1970-01-01

    1. Membrane currents and contractile responses have been measured in ventricular myocardial preparations under voltage clamp conditions. 2. In Tyrode solution, steady-state contraction was obtained only after 5-8 depolarizations to a given potential level. The threshold of steady-state tension was identical to the potential where the calcium inward current, ICa, was activated (about -35 mV). Both thresholds were shifted in the same direction along the voltage axis and by the same amount by changing [Ca]o or [Na]o. Maximum tension was obtained at inside positive potentials. 3. The time courses of steady-state tension and of activation of ICa were different by more than one order of magnitude in Tyrode solution. But in order to achieve any appreciable steady-state tension, ICa had to flow during several identical depolarizations. Tension decreased again at potentials above ECa. This suggests that calcium inward current must flow in order to fill intracellular calcium stores from which calcium can be released by an unknown mechanism. 4. The ability of a fibre bundle to contract again after a preceding twitch is greatly dependent on the membrane potential between two equal depolarizations. In Tyrode solutions with 1·8 and 7·2 mM-CaCl2 half restoration of this ability occurred at -45 ± 3 mV (± S.E. of mean) and -23 ± 4 mV, respectively. 5. In sodium-free bathing solutions, steady-state tension was attained upon the first depolarization provided ICa was activated. Furthermore, at different potentials, the time courses of activation of tension and of activation of ICa were identical, i.e. tension reached its maximum when ICa was fully activated. This suggests that in sodium-free solutions the flow of calcium ions into the fibre directly activates contraction. PMID:5503873

  2. Aldosterone secretion, measurements of membrane potential and intracellular potassium activity in the isolated adrenal zone glomerulosa.

    PubMed

    Wiederholt, M; Hampel, J; Belkien, L; Oelkers, W

    1984-09-01

    Cell membrane potential and intracellular potassium activity (microelectrodes filled with ion-sensitive liquid ion exchanger) were measured in the zona glomerulosa of superfused hemi-adrenals of rats kept on different diets. Simultaneously, samples of the superfusate were collected and analyzed by radioimmunoassay for aldosterone content. Cell membrane potential and intracellular potassium activity were not influenced by high sodium, low sodium or high potassium diet. However, aldosterone secretion significantly changed. These results suggest that membrane potential and intracellular potassium activity per se may not be linked to changes in aldosterone secretion.

  3. Modification of trout sperm membranes associated with activation and cryopreservation. Implications for fertilizing potential.

    PubMed

    Purdy, P H; Barbosa, E A; Praamsma, C J; Schisler, G J

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effects of two trout sperm activation solutions on sperm physiology and membrane organization prior to and following cryopreservation using flow cytometry and investigated their impact on in vitro fertility. Overall, frozen-thawed samples had greater phospholipid disorder when compared with fresh samples (high plasma membrane fluidity; P < 0.0001) and sperm activated with water also had high plasma membrane fluidity when compared to sperm activated with Lahnsteiner solution (LAS; P < 0.0001). Following cryopreservation water activated samples had membranes with greater membrane protein disorganization compared with LAS but the membrane protein organization of LAS samples was similar to samples prior to freezing (P < 0.0001). Post-thaw water activation resulted in significant increases in intracellular calcium compared to LAS (P < 0.002). In vitro fertility trials with frozen-thawed milt and LAS activation resulted in greater fertility (45%) compared to water activated samples (10%; P < 0.0001). Higher fertility rates correlated with lower intracellular calcium with water (R(2) = -0.9; P = 0.01) and LAS (R(2) = -0.85; P = 0.03) activation. Greater plasma membrane phospholipid (R(2) = -0.89; P = 0.02) and protein (R(2) = -0.84; P = 0.04) disorder correlated with lower water activation fertility rates. These membrane organization characteristics only approached significance with LAS activation in vitro fertility (P = 0.09, P = 0.06, respectively). Potentially the understanding of sperm membrane reorganizations and the physiology associated with activation following cryopreservation may enable users in a repository or hatchery setting to estimate the fertilizing potential of a sample and determine its value.

  4. One-dimensional potential of mean force underestimates activation barrier for transport across flexible lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopelevich, Dmitry I.

    2013-10-01

    Transport of a fullerene-like nanoparticle across a lipid bilayer is investigated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Potentials of mean force (PMF) acting on the nanoparticle in a flexible bilayer suspended in water and a bilayer restrained to a flat surface are computed by constrained MD simulations. The rate of the nanoparticle transport into the bilayer interior is predicted using one-dimensional Langevin models based on these PMFs. The predictions are compared with the transport rates obtained from a series of direct (unconstrained) MD simulations of the solute transport into the flexible bilayer. It is observed that the PMF acting on the solute in the flexible membrane underestimates the transport rate by more than an order of magnitude while the PMF acting on the solute in the restrained membrane yields an accurate estimate of the activation energy for transport into the flexible membrane. This paradox is explained by a coexistence of metastable membrane configurations for a range of the solute positions inside and near the flexible membrane. This leads to a significant reduction of the contribution of the transition state to the mean force acting on the solute. Restraining the membrane shape ensures that there is only one stable membrane configuration corresponding to each solute position and thus the transition state is adequately represented in the PMF. This mechanism is quite general and thus this phenomenon is expected to occur in a wide range of interfacial systems. A simple model for the free energy landscape of the coupled solute-membrane system is proposed and validated. This model explicitly accounts for effects of the membrane deformations on the solute transport and yields an accurate prediction of the activation energy for the solute transport.

  5. Sweetness-induced activation of membrane dipole potential in STC-1 taste cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Chun; Xie, Ning-Ning; Deng, Shao-Ping

    2016-12-01

    The biological functions of cell membranes strongly influence the binding and transport of molecular species. We developed STC-1 cell line stably expressing the sweet taste receptor (T1R2/T1R3), and explored the possible correlation between sweeteners and membrane dipole potential of STC-1 cells. In this study, sweetener-induced dipole potential activation was elucidated using a fluorescence-based measurement technique, by monitoring the voltage sensitive probe Di-8-ANEPPS using a dual wavelength ratiometric approach. It indicated that the presence of sweeteners resulted in cell membrane dipole potential change, and interaction of artificial sweeteners with taste cells resulted in a greater reduction in potential compared with natural sweeteners. Our work presents a newly developed approach using a fluorescence-based measurement technique to study sweetener-induced dipole potential activation of STC-1 cells. This new approach could be used as a complementary tool to study the function of sweet taste receptors or other GPCRs and helps to understand the basis sweetness mechanism. PMID:27374594

  6. Amphiphilic cationic β(3R3)-peptides: membrane active peptidomimetics and their potential as antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Simone; Keller, Janos; Azzouz, Nahid; Wagner, Stefanie; Titz, Alexander; Seeberger, Peter H; Brezesinski, Gerald; Hartmann, Laura

    2014-05-12

    We introduce a novel class of membrane active peptidomimetics, the amphiphilic cationic β(3R3)-peptides, and evaluate their potential as antimicrobial agents. The design criteria, the building block and oligomer synthesis as well as a detailed structure-activity relationship (SAR) study are reported. Specifically, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) was employed to investigate structural features of amphiphilic cationic β(3R3)-peptide sequences at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic air/liquid interface. Furthermore, Langmuir monolayers of anionic and zwitterionic phospholipids have been used to model the interactions of amphiphilic cationic β(3R3)-peptides with prokaryotic and eukaryotic cellular membranes in order to predict their membrane selectivity and elucidate their mechanism of action. Lastly, antimicrobial activity was tested against Gram-positive M. luteus and S. aureus as well as against Gram-negative E. coli and P. aeruginosa bacteria along with testing hemolytic activity and cytotoxicity. We found that amphiphilic cationic β(3R3)-peptide sequences combine high and selective antimicrobial activity with exceptionally low cytotoxicity in comparison to values reported in the literature. Overall, this study provides further insights into the SAR of antimicrobial peptides and peptidomimetics and indicates that amphiphilic cationic β(3R3)-peptides are strong candidates for further development as antimicrobial agents with high therapeutic index.

  7. Membrane Potential Controls the Efficacy of Catecholamine-induced β1-Adrenoceptor Activity.

    PubMed

    Birk, Alexandra; Rinne, Andreas; Bünemann, Moritz

    2015-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are membrane-located proteins and, therefore, are exposed to changes in membrane potential (V(M)) in excitable tissues. These changes have been shown to alter receptor activation of certain Gi-and Gq-coupled GPCRs. By means of a combination of whole-cell patch-clamp and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in single cells, we demonstrate that the activation of the Gs-coupled β1-adrenoreceptor (β1-AR) by the catecholamines isoprenaline (Iso) and adrenaline (Adr) is regulated by V(M). This voltage-dependence is also transmitted to G protein and arrestin 3 signaling. Voltage-dependence of β2-AR activation, however, was weak compared with β1-AR voltage-dependence. Drug efficacy is a major target of β1-AR voltage-dependence as depolarization attenuated receptor activation, even under saturating concentrations of agonists, with significantly faster kinetics than the deactivation upon agonist withdrawal. Also the efficacy of the endogenous full agonist adrenaline was reduced by depolarization. This is a unique finding since reports of natural full agonists at other voltage-dependent GPCRs only show alterations in affinity during depolarization. Based on a Boltzmann function fit to the relationship of V(M) and receptor-arrestin 3 interaction we determined the voltage-dependence with highest sensitivity in the physiological range of membrane potential. Our data suggest that under physiological conditions voltage regulates the activity of agonist-occupied β1-adrenoceptors on a very fast time scale.

  8. Membrane Potential Dynamics of Spontaneous and Visually Evoked Gamma Activity in V1 of Awake Mice

    PubMed Central

    Perrenoud, Quentin; Pennartz, Cyriel M. A.; Gentet, Luc J.

    2016-01-01

    Cortical gamma activity (30–80 Hz) is believed to play important functions in neural computation and arises from the interplay of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (PV) and pyramidal cells (PYRs). However, the subthreshold dynamics underlying its emergence in the cortex of awake animals remain unclear. Here, we characterized the intracellular dynamics of PVs and PYRs during spontaneous and visually evoked gamma activity in layers 2/3 of V1 of awake mice using targeted patch-clamp recordings and synchronous local field potentials (LFPs). Strong gamma activity patterned in short bouts (one to three cycles), occurred when PVs and PYRs were depolarizing and entrained their membrane potential dynamics regardless of the presence of visual stimulation. PV firing phase locked unconditionally to gamma activity. However, PYRs only phase locked to visually evoked gamma bouts. Taken together, our results indicate that gamma activity corresponds to short pulses of correlated background synaptic activity synchronizing the output of cortical neurons depending on external sensory drive. PMID:26890123

  9. Carbon dioxide, membrane potential and intracellular potassium activity in frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Huguenin, F; Reber, W; Zeuthen, T

    1980-01-01

    1. The membrane potential of isolated frog muscle fibres has been measured in absence and in presence of CO2, at constant external pH. 2. At a normal external Cl concentration, CO2 (PCO2 = 97 mmHg; pH = 7.0) applied for 10 min caused a highly variable depolarization, the average potential change being 8 mV after 5 min. The effect was reversible 3. In Cl-free solutions, CO2 (PCO2 = 97 mmHg; pH = 7.0) caused a biphasic depolarization of 20 mV after 5 min. The effect was fully reversible on CO2 removal. 4. The same effect appeared at a lower partial pressure (PCO2 = 38 mmHg; pH 7.3) in the presence of tetrodotoxin (10(-7) M). 5. In order to investigate the cause of the CO2-induced depolarization, membrane potential and intracellular K activity (ai/K,)( of surface muscle fibres were measured with voltage and ion-sensitive micro-electrodes. 6. At a normal external Cl concentration, CO2(PCO2 approximately equal to 97 mmHg; pH = 7.0) decreased ai/K by 5 mM after 5 min. 7. The same effect appeared at low external Cl concentration (11 mM). 8. At high partial pressure (PCO2 approximately equal to 588 mmHg; pH = 6.8), CO2 reduced ai/K by 19 mM in 10 min. 9. In long-term experiments performed over 4 h with a normal external Cl concentration, CO2 (PCO2 approximately equal to 97 mmHg; pH 5.8 or 7) changed practically neither membrane potential, nor ai/K. 10. It is concluded that increasing the PCO2 when keeping the external pH constant causes an early depolarization of muscle. This effect is particularly marked in the absence of chloride. It can be explained partly, in surface muscle fibres, by a decrease of the intracellular K activity. PMID:6776259

  10. Modification of trout sperm membranes associated with activation and cryopreservation. Implications for fertilizing potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract We investigated the effects of two trout sperm activation solutions on sperm physiology and membrane organization prior to and following cryopreservation using flow cytometry and investigated their impact on in vitro fertility. Cryopreservation caused greater phospholipid disorder (high pl...

  11. Relationship between membrane potential changes and superoxide-releasing capacity in resident and activated mouse peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kitagawa, S.; Johnston, R.B. Jr.

    1985-11-01

    To understand better the molecular basis for the enhanced respiratory burst of activated macrophages (M phi), the relationship between the stimulus-induced changes in membrane potential and release of superoxide anion (O/sub 2//sup -/) in mouse peritoneal M phi was investigated. Resident M phi and M phi elicited by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS-M phi) or obtained from animals infected with bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG-M phi) were used. LPS-M phi and BCG-M phi showed more pronounced changes in membrane potential (depolarization) and greater release of O/sub 2//sup -/ on contact with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) than did resident macrophages. The lag time between addition of stimulus and onset of release of O/sub 2//sup -/ was reduced in activated compared with resident cells. Membrane potential changes began 60 to 90 sec before release of O/sub 2//sup -/ could be detected in each cell type. The dose-response curves for triggering of membrane potential changes and O/sub 2//sup -/ release by PMA were identical. The magnitude of membrane potential changes and of O/sub 2//sup -/ release in LPS-M phi and BCG-M phi declined progressively during in vitro culture, and values on day 3 approached those in resident macrophages (deactivation). Extracellular glucose was required for effective stimulated change in membrane potential and O/sub 2//sup -/ release. These findings indicate that membrane potential changes are closely associated with O/sub 2//sup -/-releasing capacity in macrophages, and that the systems that mediate membrane potential changes and production of O/sub 2//sup -/ develop or decline concomitantly during activation or deactivation of the cells.

  12. Changes of plasma membrane AtPase activity, membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient in Kandelia candel and Avicennia marina seedlings with various salinities.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhong-Qiu; Zheng, Hai-Lei; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2004-01-01

    The salt-secreting mangrove, Avicennia marina, and non-salt-secreting mangrove, Kandelia candel were cultivated in sand with various salinities(0 per thousand, 10 per thousand, 20 per thousand, 30 per thousand, 40 per thousand) for 60 d. Plasma membrane vesicles of high-purity in leaves and roots of A. marina and K. candel seedlings were obtained by two-phase partitioning. The function of the plasma membranes, the activity of ATPase, membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient, at various salinities were investigated. The results showed that within a certain range of salinity (A. marina and roots of K. candel: 0-30 per thousand; leaves of K. candel: 0-20 per thousand), the activity of ATPase increased with increasing salinity, while high salinity (above 30 per thousand or 20 per thousand) inhibited ATPase activity. In comparison with A. marina, K. candel appeared to be more sensitive to salinity. The dynamics of membrane potential and transmembrane proton gradient in leaves and roots of A. marina and K. candel seedlings were similar to that of ATPase. When treated directly by NaCl all the indexes were inhibited markedly: there was a little increase within 0-10 per thousand (K. candel) or 0-20 per thousand (A. marina) followed by sharp declining. It indicated that the structure and function of plasma membrane was damaged severely.

  13. Membrane Potentials at Zero Current

    PubMed Central

    Sandblom, John P.; Eisenman, George

    1967-01-01

    The possibility has been examined that the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation for V0, the total membrane potential at zero current, can be derived with constant permeability ratios from a thermodynamic treatment. The flux equations have been integrated under zero current conditions subject only to the restriction that the total membrane potential should be independent of internal concentration profiles, which is the requirement for the premeability ratios to be phenomenological constants, independent of solution conditions. No assumptions have been made concerning the electric potential profile. It was found that a constant permeability ratio can only be characteristic of systems satisfying certain relationships between ionic conductances and chemical potentials. From these relationships it was possible to define the permeability ratio in terms of the thermodynamic properties of the membrane quite generally and to identify the permeability ratio as the product of mobility ratio and ratio of partition coefficients. Moreover, the ionic conductance ratio at any point in the membrane has been shown to be expressable explicitly in terms of the permeability ratio and the activities of an external solution which would be in equilibrium with the point under consideration. Lastly, a number of conclusions have been reached regarding the range of applicability of the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation with constant permeability ratios. PMID:6035122

  14. Membrane potential and cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Brackenbury, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane potential (Vm), the voltage across the plasma membrane, arises because of the presence of different ion channels/transporters with specific ion selectivity and permeability. Vm is a key biophysical signal in non-excitable cells, modulating important cellular activities, such as proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, the multiplicities of various ion channels/transporters expressed on different cells are finely tuned in order to regulate the Vm. It is well-established that cancer cells possess distinct bioelectrical properties. Notably, electrophysiological analyses in many cancer cell types have revealed a depolarized Vm that favors cell proliferation. Ion channels/transporters control cell volume and migration, and emerging data also suggest that the level of Vm has functional roles in cancer cell migration. In addition, hyperpolarization is necessary for stem cell differentiation. For example, both osteogenesis and adipogenesis are hindered in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) under depolarizing conditions. Therefore, in the context of cancer, membrane depolarization might be important for the emergence and maintenance of cancer stem cells (CSCs), giving rise to sustained tumor growth. This review aims to provide a broad understanding of the Vm as a bioelectrical signal in cancer cells by examining several key types of ion channels that contribute to its regulation. The mechanisms by which Vm regulates cancer cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation will be discussed. In the long term, Vm might be a valuable clinical marker for tumor detection with prognostic value, and could even be artificially modified in order to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:23882223

  15. ECUT: Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies program biocatalysis research activity. Potential membrane applications to biocatalyzed processes: Assessment of concentration polarization and membrane fouling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Separation and purification of the products of biocatalyzed fermentation processes, such as ethanol or butanol, consumes most of the process energy required. Since membrane systems require substantially less energy for separation than most alternatives (e.g., distillation) they have been suggested for separation or concentration of fermentation products. This report is a review of the effects of concentration polarization and membrane fouling for the principal membrane processes: microfiltration, ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, and electrodialysis including a discussion of potential problems relevant to separation of fermentation products. It was concluded that advanced membrane systems may result in significantly decreased energy consumption. However, because of the need to separate large amounts of water from much smaller amounts of product that may be more volatile than wate, it is not clear that membrane separations will necessarily be more efficient than alternative processes.

  16. Equilibrium Potentials of Membrane Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jui H.; Copeland, Eva

    1973-01-01

    A simple thermodynamic theory of the equilibrium potentials of membrane electrodes is formulated and applied to the glass electrode for measurement of pH. The new formulation assumes the selective adsorption or binding of specific ions on the surface of the membrane which may or may not be permeable to the ion, and includes the conventional derivation based on reversible ion transport across membranes as a special case. To test the theory, a platinum wire was coated with a mixture of stearic acid and methyl-tri-n-octyl-ammonium stearate. When this coated electrode was immersed in aqueous phosphate solution, its potential was found to be a linear function of pH from pH 2 to 12 with a slope equal to the theoretical value of 59.0 mV per pH unit at 24°. PMID:4516194

  17. Innervation of Gill Lateral Cells in the Bivalve Mollusc Crassostrea virginica Affects Cellular Membrane Potential and Cilia Activity

    PubMed Central

    Catapane, Edward J; Nelson, Michael; Adams, Trevon; Carroll, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    Gill lateral cells of Crassostrea virginica are innervated by the branchial nerve, which contains serotonergic and dopaminergic fibers that regulate cilia beating rate. Terminal release of serotonin or dopamine results in an increase or decrease, respectively, of cilia beating rate in lateral gill cells. In this study we used the voltage sensitive fluorescent probe DiBAC4(3) to quantify changes in gill lateral cell membrane potential in response to electrical stimulation of the branchial nerve or to applications of serotonin and dopamine, and correlate these changes to cilia beating rates. Application of serotonin to gill lateral cells caused prolonged membrane depolarization, similar to plateau potentials, while increasing cilia beating rate. Application of dopamine hyperpolarized the resting membrane while decreasing cilia beating rate. Low frequency (5 Hz) electrical stimulations of the branchial nerve, which cause terminal release of endogenous serotonin, or high frequency (20 Hz) stimulations, which cause terminal release of endogenous dopamine, had the same effects on gill lateral cell membrane potentials and cilia beating rate as the respective applications of serotonin or dopamine. The study shows that innervation of gill lateral cells by the branchial nerve affects membrane potential as well as cilia beating rate, and demonstrates a strong correlation between changes in membrane potential and regulation of cilia beating rate. The study furthers the understanding of serotonin and dopamine signaling in the innervation and regulation of gill cilia in bivalves. The study also shows that voltage sensitive fluorescent probes like DiBAC 4(3) can be successfully used as an alternative to microelectrodes to measure changes in membrane potential of ciliated gill cells and other small cells with fast moving cilia. PMID:27489887

  18. Measuring potential denitrification enzyme activity rates using the membrane inlet mass spectrometer

    EPA Science Inventory

    The denitrification enzyme activity (DEA) assay, provides a quantitative assessment of the multi enzyme, biological process of reactive nitrogen removal via the reduction of N03 to N2. Measured in soil, usually under non limiting carbon and nitrate concentrations, this short ter...

  19. A biophysically detailed model of neocortical Local Field Potentials predicts the critical role of active membrane currents

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, Michael W.; Anastassiou, Costas A.; Perin, Rodrigo; Hill, Sean; Markram, Henry; Koch, Christof

    2013-01-01

    Summary Brain activity generates extracellular voltage fluctuations recorded as local field potentials (LFPs). While known that the relevant micro-variables, the ionic currents across membranes, jointly generate the macro-variables, the extracellular voltage, neither the detailed biophysical knowledge nor the required computational power has been available to model these processes. We simulated the LFP in a model of the rodent neocortical column composed of >12,000 reconstructed, multi-compartmental and spiking cortical layer 4 and 5 pyramidal neurons and basket cells, including five million dendritic and somatic compartments with voltage- and ion-dependent currents, realistic connectivity and probabilistic AMPA, NMDA and GABA synapses. We found that, depending on a number of factors, the LFP reflects local and cross-layer processing and active currents dominate the generation of LFPs rather than synaptic ones. Spike-related currents impact the LFP not only at higher frequencies but lower than 50 Hz. This work calls for re-evaluating the genesis of LFPs. PMID:23889937

  20. Membrane Potential Generated by Ion Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Tamagawa, Hirohisa; Morita, Sachi

    2014-01-01

    It has been widely acknowledged that the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz (GHK) equation fully explains membrane potential behavior. The fundamental facet of the GHK equation lies in its consideration of permeability of membrane to ions, when the membrane serves as a separator for separating two electrolytic solutions. The GHK equation describes that: variation of membrane permeability to ion in accordance with ion species results in the variation of the membrane potential. However, nonzero potential was observed even across the impermeable membrane (or separator) separating two electrolytic solutions. It gave rise to a question concerning the validity of the GHK equation for explaining the membrane potential generation. In this work, an alternative theory was proposed. It is the adsorption theory. The adsorption theory attributes the membrane potential generation to the ion adsorption onto the membrane (or separator) surface not to the ion passage through the membrane (or separator). The computationally obtained potential behavior based on the adsorption theory was in good agreement with the experimentally observed potential whether the membrane (or separator) was permeable to ions or not. It was strongly speculated that the membrane potential origin could lie primarily in the ion adsorption on the membrane (or separator) rather than the membrane permeability to ions. It might be necessary to reconsider the origin of membrane potential which has been so far believed explicable by the GHK equation. PMID:24957176

  1. Anaerobic respiration sustains mitochondrial membrane potential in a prolyl hydroxylase pathway-activated cancer cell line in a hypoxic microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eiji; Sato, Michihiko

    2014-02-15

    To elucidate how tumor cells produce energy in oxygen-depleted microenvironments, we studied the possibility of mitochondrial electron transport without oxygen. We produced well-controlled oxygen gradients (ΔO2) in monolayer-cultured cells. We then visualized oxygen levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΦm) in individual cells by using the red shift of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence and a cationic fluorescent dye, respectively. In this two-dimensional tissue model, ΔΦm was abolished in cells >500 μm from the oxygen source [the anoxic front (AF)], indicating limitations in diffusional oxygen delivery. This result perfectly matched GFP-determined ΔO2. In cells pretreated with dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG), a prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein (PHD) inhibitor, the AF was expanded to 1,500-2,000 μm from the source. In these cells, tissue ΔO2 was substantially decreased, indicating that PHD pathway activation suppressed mitochondrial respiration. The expansion of the AF and the reduction of ΔO2 were much more prominent in a cancer cell line (Hep3B) than in the equivalent fibroblast-like cell line (COS-7). Hence, the results indicate that PHD pathway-activated cells can sustain ΔΦm, despite significantly decreased electron flux to complex IV. Complex II inhibition abolished the effect of DMOG in expanding the AF, although tissue ΔO2 remained shallow. Separate experiments demonstrated that complex II plays a substantial role in sustaining ΔΦm in DMOG-pretreated Hep3B cells with complex III inhibition. From these results, we conclude that PHD pathway activation can sustain ΔΦm in an otherwise anoxic microenvironment by decreasing tissue ΔO2 while activating oxygen-independent electron transport in mitochondria.

  2. Membrane potential and endocytic activity control disintegration of cell-cell adhesion and cell fusion in vinculin-injected MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Palovuori, Riitta; Myrsky, Essi; Eskelinen, Sinikka

    2004-09-01

    Cell fusion occurs during fertilization and in the formation of organs such as muscles, placenta, and bones. We have developed an experimental model for epithelial cell fusion which permits analysis of the processes during junction disintegration and formation of polykaryons (Palovuori and Eskelinen [2000] Eur. J. Cell. Biol. 79: 961-974). In the present work, we analyzed the process in detail. Cell fusion was achieved by microinjecting into the cytoplasm of kidney epithelial Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells TAMRA-tagged vinculin, which incorporated into lateral membranes, focal adhesions and nucleus, and, prior fusion, induced internalization of actin, cadherin and plakoglobin to small clusters in cytoplasm. Injected vinculin was still visible at lateral membranes after removal of junctional proteins indicating that it was tightly associated and perturbed the cell-cell contact sites resulting in membrane fragmentation. Injection of active Rac together with vinculin induced accumulation of cadherin to the membranes, but did not affect vinculin-membrane association. However, it hampered cell fusion probably by supporting adherens junctions. In order to stop endocytosis, we lowered intracellular pH of vinculin-injected cells to 5.5 with the aid of nigericin in KCl buffer. In acidified cells, injected vinculin delineated lateral membranes as thick layers, cadherin remained in situ, and cell fusion was completely inhibited. Since this treatment also leads to cell depolarization, we checked the vinculin incorporation in a KCl solution containing nigericin at neutral pH. In these circumstances, both endogenous and injected vinculin delineated lateral membranes as very thin discontinuous layers, but still fusion was hampered most likely due to perturbation in the initial vinculin-membrane association. We suggest that vinculin might function as a sensor of the environment triggering cell fusion during development in circumstances where membrane potential and local

  3. How Membrane-Active Peptides Get into Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Separovic, Frances

    2016-06-21

    mechanism by which these membrane-active peptides lyse membranes. The last class of membrane-active peptides discussed are the CPPs, which translocate across the lipid bilayer without inducing severe disruption and have potential as drug vehicles. CPPs are typically highly charged and can show antimicrobial activity by targeting an intracellular target rather than via a direct membrane lytic mechanism. A critical aspect in the structure-function relationship of membrane-active peptides is their specific activity relative to the lipid membrane composition of the cell target. Cell membranes have a wide diversity of lipids, and those of eukaryotic and prokaryotic species differ greatly in composition and structure. The activity of AMPs from Australian tree frogs, toxins, and CPPs has been investigated within various lipid systems to assess whether a relationship between peptide and membrane composition could be identified. NMR spectroscopy techniques are being used to gain atomistic details of how these membrane-active peptides interact with model membranes and cells, and in particular, competitive assays demonstrate the difference between affinity and activity for a specific lipid environment. Overall, the interactions between these relatively small sized peptides and various lipid bilayers give insight into how these peptides function at the membrane interface. PMID:27187572

  4. How Membrane-Active Peptides Get into Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Separovic, Frances

    2016-06-21

    mechanism by which these membrane-active peptides lyse membranes. The last class of membrane-active peptides discussed are the CPPs, which translocate across the lipid bilayer without inducing severe disruption and have potential as drug vehicles. CPPs are typically highly charged and can show antimicrobial activity by targeting an intracellular target rather than via a direct membrane lytic mechanism. A critical aspect in the structure-function relationship of membrane-active peptides is their specific activity relative to the lipid membrane composition of the cell target. Cell membranes have a wide diversity of lipids, and those of eukaryotic and prokaryotic species differ greatly in composition and structure. The activity of AMPs from Australian tree frogs, toxins, and CPPs has been investigated within various lipid systems to assess whether a relationship between peptide and membrane composition could be identified. NMR spectroscopy techniques are being used to gain atomistic details of how these membrane-active peptides interact with model membranes and cells, and in particular, competitive assays demonstrate the difference between affinity and activity for a specific lipid environment. Overall, the interactions between these relatively small sized peptides and various lipid bilayers give insight into how these peptides function at the membrane interface.

  5. Toxic effects of mercury on PSI and PSII activities, membrane potential and transthylakoid proton gradient in Microsorium pteropus.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunnuan; Zhang, Daoyong; Pan, Xiangliang; Chang, Fengqin; Wang, Shuzhi

    2013-10-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the top toxic metals in environment and it poses a great risk to organisms. This study aimed to elucidate the toxic effects of Hg(2+) on energy conversion of photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII), membrane potential and proton gradient of Microsorium pteropus (an aquatic plant species). Contents of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoids, quantum yield and electron transfer of PSI and PSII of M. pteropus exposed to various concentrations of Hg(2+) were measured. With increasing Hg(2+) concentration, quantum yield and electron transport of PSI [Y(I) and ETR(I)] and PSII [Y(II) and ETR(II)] decreased whereas limitation of donor side of PSI [Y(ND)] increased. At ⩾165μgL(-1) Hg(2+), quantum yield of non-light-induced non-photochemical fluorescence quenching in PSII [Y(NO)] significantly increased but quantum yield of light-induced non-photochemical fluorescence quenching [Y(NPQ)] decreased. Membrane potential (Δψ) and proton gradient (ΔpH) of M. pteropus were reduced significantly at 330μg L(-1) Hg(2+) compared to control. Mercury exposure affected multiple sites in PSII and PSI of M. pteropus.

  6. Active membrane phased array radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussessian, Alina; Del Castillo, Linda; Huang, John; Sadowy, Greg; Hoffman, James; Smith, Phil; Hatake, Toshiro; Derksen, Chuck; Lopez, Bernardo; Caro, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We have developed the first membrane-based active phased array in L-band (1.26GHz). The array uses membrane compatible Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules (membrane T/R) for each antenna element. We use phase shifters within each T/R module for electronic beam steering. We will discuss the T/R module design and integration with the membrane, We will also present transmit and receive beam-steering results for the array.

  7. Evaluation of the membrane permeability (PAMPA and skin) of benzimidazoles with potential cannabinoid activity and their relation with the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS).

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Figueroa, M Javiera; Pessoa-Mahana, C David; Palavecino-González, M Elisa; Mella-Raipán, Jaime; Espinosa-Bustos, Cristián; Lagos-Muñoz, Manuel E

    2011-06-01

    The permeability of five benzimidazole derivates with potential cannabinoid activity was determined in two models of membranes, parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) and skin, in order to study the relationship of the physicochemical properties of the molecules and characteristics of the membranes with the permeability defined by the Biopharmaceutics Classification System. It was established that the PAMPA intestinal absorption method is a good predictor for classifying these molecules as very permeable, independent of their thermodynamic solubility, if and only if these have a Log P(oct) value <3.0. In contrast, transdermal permeability is conditioned on the solubility of the molecule so that it can only serve as a model for classifying the permeability of molecules that possess high solubility (class I: high solubility, high permeability; class III: high solubility, low permeability).

  8. Influence of changes in external potassium and chloride ions on membrane potential and intracellular potassium ion activity in rabbit ventricular muscle.

    PubMed

    Fozzard, H A; Lee, C O

    1976-04-01

    1. The membrane responses of rabbit papillary muscles to rapid changes in [K](o) and [Cl](o) were measured with open-tipped micropipettes and with closed micropipettes made from K-selective glass.2. The muscle cells behaved primarily as a K electrode, and responses to changes in [K](o) with constant [Cl](o) or with constant [K](o) x [Cl](o) were substantially the same.3. When [Cl](o) was changed at a constant [K](o) the membrane potentials changed rapidly and symmetrically by a small value and remained constant for 30 min.4. Measurement of potential with K(+)-selective micro-electrodes in these experiments showed no change in intracellular K activity. In addition to permitting calculation of K permeability, these measurements reassured us that the K(+)-selective electrodes were well insulated and not influenced by electrical shunts at the impalement site.5. Although the membrane response to changes in [Cl](o) was small, it was possible to calculate that the permeability ratio (P(Cl)/P(K)), was 0.11. The Cl and K conductances were about 0.015 mmho/cm(2) and 0.09 mmho/cm(2) respectively, resulting in a conductance ratio (g(Cl)/g(K)) of about 0.17.6. The time course of depolarization by increase in [K](o) was rapid (half-time 5 sec), but repolarization on return to lower [K](o) was much slower (half-time 50 sec). The depolarization time course was easily fitted by the potential change calculated by assuming the need for K diffusion into the extracellular spaces and taking account of the logarithmic relation between membrane potential and [K](o). These calculations did not fit the time course of repolarization, which was slowed in the fashion expected from an inward-rectifying membrane.7. The influence of [K](i) on membrane potential was investigated by changes in tonicity of the external solution. Hypotonic solution produced a change in intracellular K activity close to that produced by ideal water movement. However, in hypertonic solution, intracellular K activity

  9. Membrane potential modulates plasma membrane phospholipid dynamics and K-Ras signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong; Wong, Ching-On; Cho, Kwang-jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Liang, Hong; Thakur, Dhananiay P.; Luo, Jialie; Babic, Milos; Zinsmaier, Konrad E.; Zhu, Michael X.; Hu, Hongzhen; Venkatachalam, Kartik; Hancock, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane depolarization can trigger cell proliferation, but how membrane potential influences mitogenic signaling is uncertain. Here, we show that plasma membrane depolarization induces nanoscale reorganization of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate but not other anionic phospholipids. K-Ras, which is targeted to the plasma membrane by electrostatic interactions with phosphatidylserine, in turn undergoes enhanced nanoclustering. Depolarization-induced changes in phosphatidylserine and K-Ras plasma membrane organization occur in fibroblasts, excitable neuroblastoma cells, and Drosophila neurons in vivo and robustly amplify K-Ras–dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Conversely, plasma membrane repolarization disrupts K-Ras nanoclustering and inhibits MAPK signaling. By responding to voltage-induced changes in phosphatidylserine spatiotemporal dynamics, K-Ras nanoclusters set up the plasma membrane as a biological field-effect transistor, allowing membrane potential to control the gain in mitogenic signaling circuits. PMID:26293964

  10. Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin-mediated cation entry depolarizes membrane potential and activates p38 MAP kinase in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Eiffler, Ina; Behnke, Jane; Ziesemer, Sabine; Müller, Christian; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter

    2016-09-01

    Membrane potential (Vm)-, Na(+)-, or Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent dyes were used to analyze changes in Vm or intracellular ion concentrations in airway epithelial cells treated with Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin (Hla), a major virulence factor of pathogenic strains of these bacteria. Gramicidin, a channel-forming peptide causing membrane permeability to monovalent cations, a mutated form of Hla, rHla-H35L, which forms oligomers in the plasma membranes of eukaryotic cells but fails to form functional transmembrane pores, or the cyclodextrin-derivative IB201, a blocker of the Hla pore, were used to investigate the permeability of the pore. Na(+) as well as Ca(2+) ions were able to pass the Hla pore and accumulated in the cytosol. The pore-mediated influx of calcium ions was blocked by IB201. Treatment of cells with recombinant Hla resulted in plasma membrane depolarization as well as in increases in the phosphorylation levels of paxillin (signaling pathway mediating disruption of the actin cytoskeleton) and p38 MAP kinase (signaling pathway resulting in defensive actions). p38 MAP kinase phosphorylation, but not paxillin phosphorylation, was elicited by treatment of cells with gramicidin. Although treatment of cells with rHla-H35L resulted in the formation of membrane-associated heptamers, none of these cellular effects were observed in our experiments. This indicates that formation of functional Hla-transmembrane pores is required to induce the cell physiological changes mediated by α-toxin. Specifically, the changes in ion equilibria and plasma membrane potential are important activators of p38 MAP kinase, a signal transduction module involved in host cell defense. PMID:27496896

  11. Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin-mediated cation entry depolarizes membrane potential and activates p38 MAP kinase in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Eiffler, Ina; Behnke, Jane; Ziesemer, Sabine; Müller, Christian; Hildebrandt, Jan-Peter

    2016-09-01

    Membrane potential (Vm)-, Na(+)-, or Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent dyes were used to analyze changes in Vm or intracellular ion concentrations in airway epithelial cells treated with Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin (Hla), a major virulence factor of pathogenic strains of these bacteria. Gramicidin, a channel-forming peptide causing membrane permeability to monovalent cations, a mutated form of Hla, rHla-H35L, which forms oligomers in the plasma membranes of eukaryotic cells but fails to form functional transmembrane pores, or the cyclodextrin-derivative IB201, a blocker of the Hla pore, were used to investigate the permeability of the pore. Na(+) as well as Ca(2+) ions were able to pass the Hla pore and accumulated in the cytosol. The pore-mediated influx of calcium ions was blocked by IB201. Treatment of cells with recombinant Hla resulted in plasma membrane depolarization as well as in increases in the phosphorylation levels of paxillin (signaling pathway mediating disruption of the actin cytoskeleton) and p38 MAP kinase (signaling pathway resulting in defensive actions). p38 MAP kinase phosphorylation, but not paxillin phosphorylation, was elicited by treatment of cells with gramicidin. Although treatment of cells with rHla-H35L resulted in the formation of membrane-associated heptamers, none of these cellular effects were observed in our experiments. This indicates that formation of functional Hla-transmembrane pores is required to induce the cell physiological changes mediated by α-toxin. Specifically, the changes in ion equilibria and plasma membrane potential are important activators of p38 MAP kinase, a signal transduction module involved in host cell defense.

  12. Influence of potassium ions and osmolality on the resting membrane potential of rabbit ventricular papillary muscle with estimation of the activity and the activity coefficient of internal potassium.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, T; Fozzard, H A

    1975-11-01

    Resting membrane potentials of rabbit right ventricular papillary muscles were measured in modified Tyrode's solutions that were isotonic (1.0 X T), hypertonic (1.58 X T), or hypotonic (0.76 X T) at eight different concentrations of external potassium, [K]o, ranging from 0.78 to 100 mM. The amount of hyperpolarization produced by exposure to the hypertonic solutions was relatively constant with an average of 4.6 mv at all levels of [K]o except 0.78 and 1.56 mM. This potential change is much less than the 10.6 mv which would be predicted if the papillary muscles behaved as nearly perfect osmometers and the activity coefficient of intracellular potassium (K) remained constant. The amount of depolarization produced by exposure to the 0.76 X T hypotonic solutions averaged 6.8 mv at all levels of [K]o except 0.78 mM; this value is close to the predicted value of 6.9 mv. Variations in the activity and the activity coefficient of intracellular K were introduced to explain these discrepancies. We estimated that the activity of intracellular K in 1.58 X T hypertonic solution was increased 15-23% compared with that in isotonic solution. This change is much less than the 58% that would be predicted if the papillary muscle behaved as a nearly perfect osmometer. We also estimated that the activity of intracellular K in 0.76 X T hypotonic solution fell 22-26%, which is very close to the predicted value of 24%. The activity coefficient of intracellular K appeared to fall in 1.58 X T hypertonic solution to about 0.76 of its value in isotonic solution. This decline in the estimated activity coefficient of intracellular K could not be attributed to an increase in Coulombic attractive and repulsive forces as predicted by the Debye-Hückel equation for a univalent electrolyte.

  13. Mechanism of depolarization of rat cortical synaptosomes at submicromolar external Ca2+ activity. The use of Ca2+ buffers to control the synaptosomal membrane potential.

    PubMed Central

    Schmalzing, G

    1985-01-01

    Rat cortical synaptosomes responded to a reduction of external Ca2+ from pCa 3.5 to pCa 4.8 in the absence of MgCl2 with a slight decrease of internal K+ and an increase of Na+. The effects were prevented by tetrodotoxin or millimolar concentrations of MgCl2. Further lowering of external pCa to 7.7 with N-hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetate evoked a rapid fall of internal K+, which was specifically blocked by Ruthenium Red; tetrodotoxin and nifedipine were ineffective. A linear relationship was established between K+ and methyltriphenylphosphonium cation distribution ratios by varying external pCa between 4.8 and 7.7, indicating that K+ efflux resulted from a depolarization of the plasma membrane. An increase of Na+ permeability was suggested by the synaptosomes' gain of Na+ and the disappearance of the depolarization in an Na+-free sucrose medium. According to the constant field equation, the permeability ratio PNa/PK increased from 0.029 at pCa4.8 to 0.090 at pCa 7.7 with plasma membrane potentials of -74mV and -47mV, respectively. Since the plasma membrane responded to variation of external Ca2+ activities in the micromolar range with a graded and sustained depolarization, the use of Ca2+ buffers to control membrane potentials is suggested. PMID:3977854

  14. [Search for nucleic acid influencing, as well as membrane active, potential cancerostatic fungal metabolites using microbiological and cytological screening methods].

    PubMed

    Dornberger, K; Gutsche, W; Horschak, R; Zureck, A

    1978-01-01

    A prescreening program including microbiological and cytological assays was employed in search of potential cancerostatic antibiotics in crude extracts of mushrooms. The microbiological tests based on agar diffusion techniques consist of prophage induction test and BIP-test. All active compounds selected by these microbiological models are potential inhibitors of nucleic acid metabolism. Cytological assays on leukemia L 1210 cells have been carried out by microscopic examination and by evaluation using an electronic particle counter. Activity was expressed as decrease of the number of single cells caused by agglutination or lysis of cells, changes in cell surface area, dye exclusion, and increase of cell volume. A wide variety of mushrooms was demonstrated to exhibit interesting activities in some of these screening systems. The influence of primary metabolic products of mushrooms on microbiological models was studied additionally. In vivo assays have not yet been accomplished.

  15. A Non-inactivating High-voltage-activated Two-Pore Na+ Channel that Supports Ultra-long Action Potentials and Membrane Bistability

    PubMed Central

    Cang, Chunlei; Aranda, Kimberly; Ren, Dejian

    2014-01-01

    Action potentials (APs) are fundamental cellular electrical signals. The genesis of short APs lasting milliseconds is well understood. Ultra-long APs (ulAPs) lasting seconds to minutes also occur in eukaryotic organisms, but their biological functions and mechanisms of generation are largely unknown. Here, we identify TPC3, a previously uncharacterized member of the two-pore channel protein family, as a new voltage-gated Na+ channel (NaV) that generates ulAPs, and that establishes membrane potential bistability. Unlike the rapidly inactivating NaVs that generate short APs in neurons, TPC3 has a high activation threshold, activates slowly, and does not inactivate—three properties that help generate long-lasting APs and guard the membrane against unintended perturbation. In amphibian oocytes, TPC3 forms a channel similar to channels induced by depolarization and sperm entry into eggs. TPC3 homologs are present in plants and animals, and they may be important for cellular processes and behaviors associated with prolonged membrane depolarization. PMID:25256615

  16. A non-inactivating high-voltage-activated two-pore Na+ channel that supports ultra-long action potentials and membrane bistability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cang, Chunlei; Aranda, Kimberly; Ren, Dejian

    2014-09-01

    Action potentials (APs) are fundamental cellular electrical signals. The genesis of short APs lasting milliseconds is well understood. Ultra-long APs (ulAPs) lasting seconds to minutes also occur in eukaryotic organisms, but their biological functions and mechanisms of generation are largely unknown. Here, we identify TPC3, a previously uncharacterized member of the two-pore channel protein family, as a new voltage-gated Na+ channel (NaV) that generates ulAPs, and that establishes membrane potential bistability. Unlike the rapidly inactivating NaVs that generate short APs in neurons, TPC3 has a high activation threshold, activates slowly and does not inactivate—three properties that help generate long-lasting APs and guard the membrane against unintended perturbation. In amphibian oocytes, TPC3 forms a channel similar to channels induced by depolarization and sperm entry into eggs. TPC3 homologues are present in plants and animals, and they may be important for cellular processes and behaviours associated with prolonged membrane depolarization.

  17. Changes in the Sterol Composition of the Plasma Membrane Affect Membrane Potential, Salt Tolerance and the Activity of Multidrug Resistance Pumps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kodedová, Marie; Sychrová, Hana

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the impact of the deletions of genes from the final steps in the biosynthesis of ergosterol (ERG6, ERG2, ERG3, ERG5, ERG4) on the physiological function of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae plasma membrane by a combination of biological tests and the diS-C3(3) fluorescence assay. Most of the erg mutants were more sensitive than the wild type to salt stress or cationic drugs, their susceptibilities were proportional to the hyperpolarization of their plasma membranes. The different sterol composition of the plasma membrane played an important role in the short-term and long-term processes that accompanied the exposure of erg strains to a hyperosmotic stress (effect on cell size, pH homeostasis and survival of yeasts), as well as in the resistance of cells to antifungal drugs. The pleiotropic drug-sensitive phenotypes of erg strains were, to a large extent, a result of the reduced efficiency of the Pdr5 efflux pump, which was shown to be more sensitive to the sterol content of the plasma membrane than Snq2p. In summary, the erg4Δ and erg6Δ mutants exhibited the most compromised phenotypes. As Erg6p is not involved in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, it may become a target for a new generation of antifungal drugs.

  18. Cobra cardiotoxins: membrane interactions and pharmacological potential.

    PubMed

    Dubovskii, P V; Konshina, A G; Efremov, R G

    2014-01-01

    Natural polycationic membrane-active peptides typically lack disulfide bonds and exhibit fusion, cell-penetrating, antimicrobial activities. They are mostly unordered in solution, but adopt a helical structure, when bound to phospholipid membranes. Structurally different are cardiotoxins (or cytotoxins, CTs) from cobra venom. They are fully β- structured molecules, characterized by the three-finger fold (TFF). Affinity of CTs to lipid bilayer was shown to depend on amino acid sequence in the tips of the three loops. In the present review, CT-membrane interactions are analyzed through the prism of data on binding of the toxins to phospholipid liposomes and detergent micelles, as well as their structural and computational studies in membrane mimicking environments. We assess different hydrophobicity scales to compare membrane partitioning of various CTs and their membrane effects. A comparison of hydrophobic/hydrophilic properties of CTs and linear polycationic peptides provides a key to their biological activity and creates a fundamental basis for rational design of new membrane-interacting compounds, including new promising drugs. For instance, from the viewpoint of the data obtained on model lipid membranes, cytotoxic activity of CTs against cancer cells is discussed.

  19. Activation of tumour cell ECM degradation by thrombin-activated platelet membranes: potentially a P-selectin and GPIIb/IIIa-dependent process.

    PubMed

    Pang, J H; Coupland, L A; Freeman, C; Chong, B H; Parish, Christopher R

    2015-06-01

    The promotion of tumour metastasis by platelets may occur through several mechanisms including the induction of a more metastatic phenotype in tumour cells and assisted extravasation of circulating tumour cells. Whilst the mechanisms underlying platelet-assisted extravasation have been extensively studied, much less attention has been paid to the mechanisms underlying platelet promotion of an aggressive phenotype within a tumour cell population. Herein, we demonstrate in vitro that MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells incubated with washed thrombin-activated platelet membranes adopt a Matrigel-degrading phenotype in a dose- and contact time-dependent manner. The same phenotypic change was observed with three other human tumour cell lines of diverse anatomical origin. Moreover, tumour cell lines that had been cultured with washed thrombin-activated platelet membranes had a greater metastatic capacity when injected into mice. This in vivo effect was reliant upon a co-incubation period of >2 h implying a mechanism involving more than platelet membrane binding that occurred within 5 min. Upon further investigation it was found that simultaneous blocking of the platelet-membrane proteins P-selectin and GPIIb/IIIa prevented interactions between platelet membranes and MDA-MB-231 cells but also significantly reduced the ability of tumour cells to degrade Matrigel. These results confirm that platelets induce a more aggressive phenotype in tumour cells but also identify the platelet proteins involved in this effect. P-selectin and GPIIb/IIIa also play a role in assisting tumour cell extravasation and, thus, are ideal targets for the therapeutic intervention of both stages of platelet-assisted metastasis.

  20. Genetically encoded fluorescent sensors of membrane potential

    PubMed Central

    Baker, B. J.; Mutoh, H.; Dimitrov, D.; Akemann, W.; Perron, A.; Iwamoto, Y.; Jin, L.; Cohen, L. B.; Isacoff, E. Y.; Pieribone, V. A.; Hughes, T.; Knöpfel, T.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging activity of neurons in intact brain tissue was conceived several decades ago and, after many years of development, voltage-sensitive dyes now offer the highest spatial and temporal resolution for imaging neuronal functions in the living brain. Further progress in this field is expected from the emergent development of genetically encoded fluorescent sensors of membrane potential. These fluorescent protein (FP) voltage sensors overcome the drawbacks of organic voltage sensitive dyes such as non-specificity of cell staining and the low accessibility of the dye to some cell types. In a transgenic animal, a genetically encoded sensor could in principle be expressed specifically in any cell type and would have the advantage of staining only the cell population determined by the specificity of the promoter used to drive expression. Here we critically review the current status of these developments. PMID:18679801

  1. Evaluation of potential implication of membrane estrogen binding sites on ERE-dependent transcriptional activity and intracellular estrogen receptor-alpha regulation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hye Sook; Leclercq, Guy

    2002-01-01

    The potential involvement of membrane estrogen binding sites in the induction of ERE-dependent transcriptional activity as well as in the regulation of intracellular estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha) level under estradiol (E2) stimulation was investigated. Our approach relied upon the use of two DCC-treated E2-BSA (bovine serum albumin) solutions (E2-6-BSA and E2-17-BSA). The absence of detectable free E2 in these solutions was established. Both E2-BSA conjugates led to a transient dose-dependent stimulation of the expression of ERE-luciferase (LUC) reporter gene in MVLN cells (MCF-7 cells stably transfected with a pVit-tk-LUC reporter plasmid), a property not recorded with free E2, which maintained enhanced transcriptional activity during the whole experiment. A very low concentration of E2 (10 pM) synergistically acted with E2-BSA conjugates. Hence, ERE-dependent transcriptional activity induced by these conjugates appeared to result from their known interactions with membrane estrogen binding sites. Anti-estrogens (AEs: 4-OH-TAM and RU 58,668), which antagonize genomic ER responses, abrogated the luciferase activity induced by E2-BSA conjugates, confirming a potential relationship between membrane-related signals and intracellular ER. Moreover, induction of luciferase was recorded when the cells were exposed to IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine) and cyclic nucleotides (cAMP/cGMP), suggesting the implication of the latter in the signal transduction pathway leading to the expression of the reporter gene. Growth factors (IGF-I, EGF and TGF-alpha) also slightly stimulated luciferase and synergistically acted with 10 pM E2, or 1 microM E2-BSA conjugates, in agreement with the concept of a cross-talk between steroids and peptides acting on the cell membrane. Remarkably, E2-BSA conjugates, IBMX and all investigated growth factors failed to down-regulate intracellular ER in MCF-7 cells, indicating the need for a direct intracellular interaction of the ligand with the

  2. Membrane potential genesis in Nitella cells, mitochondria, and thylakoids.

    PubMed

    Kitasato, Hiroshi

    2003-10-01

    The resting membrane potential of Nitella cells shifts in parallel with the change in H+ equilibrium potential, but is not equal to the H+ equilibrium potential. The deviation of the membrane potential from the H+ equilibrium potential depends on the extrusion rate of H+ by the electrogenic H+-pump. The activity of the electrogenic H+-pump was formulated in terms of the change in the free energy of ATP hydrolysis. The deviation of membrane potential from the H+ equilibrium potential induces a passive H+ flow. The passive inward H+ current may be coupled with Cl- uptake. The coupling rate of H+,Cl- co-transport was discussed. The membrane potential of mitochondria was electrochemically formulated in terms of oxidation-reduction H2/H+ half-cells spontaneously formed at the inner and outer boundaries of each trans-membrane electron-conducting pathway. The membrane potential formed by a pair of H2/H+ redox cells is pH-sensitive in its nature, but deviates from the H+ equilibrium potential to an extent that depends on the logarithm of the ratio of H2 concentrations at the inner and outer boundaries. The membrane potential of thylakoids is considered to be primarily due to the electromotive force of photocells embedded in the thylakoid membrane, as far as the anode and cathode of each photocell are in contact with the inner and outer solutions, respectively. The light-induced electronic current yields oxygen at the inner boundary and causes an increase in the H2 pool at the outer boundary of the electron-conducting pathway, which has no shunting plastoquinone chain between these two boundaries.

  3. Activity of the Na,K-ATPase alpha4 isoform is important for membrane potential, intracellular Ca2+, and pH to maintain motility in rat spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Tamara; Sánchez, Gladis; Wertheimer, Eva; Blanco, Gustavo

    2010-05-01

    While the function of the ubiquitous Na,K-ATPase alpha1 subunit has been well documented, the role of the sperm-specific alpha4 isoform of this ion transporter is less known. We have explored the importance of alpha4 in rat sperm physiology by taking advantage of the high sensitivity of this isoform for the inhibitor ouabain. Using concentrations that selectively block alpha4 activity, we found ouabain to reduce not only sperm total motility, but also multiple parameters of sperm movement, including progressive motility, straight line, curvilinear, and average path velocities, lateral head displacement, beat cross frequency, and linearity. According to a direct role of alpha4 in Na(+) transport, ouabain inhibition of alpha4 increased [Na(+)](i) in the male gametes. In addition, interference of alpha4 activity with ouabain produced cell membrane depolarization, diminished pH, and increased [Ca(2)(+)](i) in spermatozoa. Inhibition of alpha4 was sufficient to cause all these effects and additional blockage of alpha1, the other Na,K-ATPase alpha isoform expressed in sperm, and higher doses of ouabain did not result in further changes in the cell parameters studied. These results show that alpha4 is the Na,K-ATPase isoform primarily involved in controlling the transmembrane Na(+) gradient in sperm, and that alpha4 activity is necessary for maintaining membrane potential, [Ca(2)(+)](i), and [H(+)](i) in the cells. The high dependence of sperm motility on membrane excitability, [Ca(2)(+)](i), and acid-base balance suggests that their regulation is the mechanism by which alpha4 maintains motility of the male gametes.

  4. Combining Membrane Potential Imaging with Other Optical Techniques.

    PubMed

    Jaafari, Nadia; Vogt, Kaspar E; Saggau, Peter; Leslie, Loew M; Zecevic, Dejan; Canepari, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Membrane potential imaging using voltage-sensitive dyes can be combined with other optical techniques for a variety of applications. Combining voltage imaging with Ca2+ imaging allows correlating membrane potential changes with intracellular Ca2+ signals or with Ca2+ currents. Combining voltage imaging with uncaging techniques allows analyzing electrical signals elicited by photorelease of a particular molecule. This approach is also a useful tool to calibrate the change in fluorescence intensity in terms of membrane potential changes from different sites permitting spatial mapping of electrical activity. Finally, combining voltage imaging with optogenetics, in particular with channelrhodopsin stimulation, opens the gate to novel investigations of brain circuitries by allowing measurements of synaptic signals mediated by specific sets of neurons. Here we describe in detail the methods of membrane potential imaging in combination with other optical techniques and discus some important applications.

  5. Toward Better Genetically Encoded Sensors of Membrane Potential.

    PubMed

    Storace, Douglas; Sepehri Rad, Masoud; Kang, BokEum; Cohen, Lawrence B; Hughes, Thom; Baker, Bradley J

    2016-05-01

    Genetically encoded optical sensors of cell activity are powerful tools that can be targeted to specific cell types. This is especially important in neuroscience because individual brain regions can include a multitude of different cell types. Optical imaging allows for simultaneous recording from numerous neurons or brain regions. Optical signals of membrane potential are useful because membrane potential changes are a direct sign of both synaptic and action potentials. Here we describe recent improvements in the in vitro and in vivo signal size and kinetics of genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) and discuss their relationship to alternative sensors of neural activity.

  6. Study on the mitochondrial activity and membrane potential after exposing later stage oocytes of two gorgonian corals (Junceella juncea and Junceella fragilis) to cryoprotectants.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S; Spikings, E; Huang, I-C; Lin, C

    2011-01-01

    Coral reefs provide a valuable habitat for many economically valuable fish and invertebrates. However, they are in serious jeopardy, threatened by increasing over-exploitation, pollution, habitat destruction, disease and global climate change. Here, we examined the effect of cryoprotectant exposure on mitochondrial activity and membrane potential in coral oocytes in order to find suitable cryoprotectants towards their successful cryopreservation. According to the No Observed Effect Concentrations (NOECs), methanol was found to be the least toxic cryoprotectant whilst DMSO was the most toxic cryoprotectant. The results also demonstrated that there were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in ATP concentrations between Junceella juncea and Junceella fragilis after exposure to all concentrations of all cryoprotectants for 30 min. Using confocal microscopy, JC-1 (5,50,6,60-tetrachloro-1,10,3,30-tetraethyl-imidacarbocyanine iodide) staining indicated that the mitochondrial membrane potential of Junceella fragilis oocytes reduced after 1 M and 2 M methanol treatment and a loss of the mitochondrial distribution pattern and poor green fluorescence after 3M methanol treatment. Therefore, even oocytes that show no adverse effect of cryoprotectants on survival might suffer some more subtle impacts. The results obtained from this study will provide a basis for development of protocols to cryopreserve the oocytes of gorgonian corals.

  7. Modeling Electrically Active Viscoelastic Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sitikantha; Brownell, William E.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    The membrane protein prestin is native to the cochlear outer hair cell that is crucial to the ear's amplification and frequency selectivity throughout the whole acoustic frequency range. The outer hair cell exhibits interrelated dimensional changes, force generation, and electric charge transfer. Cells transfected with prestin acquire unique active properties similar to those in the native cell that have also been useful in understanding the process. Here we propose a model describing the major electromechanical features of such active membranes. The model derived from thermodynamic principles is in the form of integral relationships between the history of voltage and membrane resultants as independent variables and the charge density and strains as dependent variables. The proposed model is applied to the analysis of an active force produced by the outer hair cell in response to a harmonic electric field. Our analysis reveals the mechanism of the outer hair cell active (isometric) force having an almost constant amplitude and phase up to 80 kHz. We found that the frequency-invariance of the force is a result of interplay between the electrical filtering associated with prestin and power law viscoelasticity of the surrounding membrane. Paradoxically, the membrane viscoelasticity boosts the force balancing the electrical filtering effect. We also consider various modes of electromechanical coupling in membrane with prestin associated with mechanical perturbations in the cell. We consider pressure or strains applied step-wise or at a constant rate and compute the time course of the resulting electric charge. The results obtained here are important for the analysis of electromechanical properties of membranes, cells, and biological materials as well as for a better understanding of the mechanism of hearing and the role of the protein prestin in this mechanism. PMID:22701528

  8. Evaluation of gravity-dependent membrane potential shift in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Baba, S A; Mogami, Y; Otsu, T

    1999-01-01

    It is still debated whether or not gravity can stimulate unicellular organisms. This question may be settled by revealing changes in the membrane potential in a manner depending on the gravitational forces imposed on the cell. We estimated the gravity-dependent membrane potential shift to be about 1 mV G-1 for Paramecium showing gravikinesis at 1-5 G, on the basis of measurements of gravity-induced changes in active propulsion and those of propulsive velocity in solutions, in which the membrane potential has been measured electrophysiologically. The shift in membrane potential to this extent may occur from mechanoreceptive changes in K+ or Ca2+ conductance by about 1% and might be at the limit of electrophysiological measurement using membrane potential-sensitive dyes. Our measurements of propulsive velocity vs membrane potential also suggested that the reported propulsive force of Paramecium measured in a solution of graded densities with the aid of a video centrifuge microscope at 350 G was 11 times as large as that for -29 mV, i.e., the resting membrane potential at [K+]o = 1 mM and [Ca2+]o = 1 mM, and, by extrapolation, that Paramecium was hyperpolarized to -60 mV by gravity stimulation of 100-G equivalent, the value corrected by considering the reduction of density difference between the interior and exterior of the cell in the graded density solution. The estimated shift of the membrane potential from -29 mV to -60 mV by 100-G equivalent stimulation, i.e., 0.3 mV G -1, could reach the magnitude entirely feasible to be measured more directly.

  9. Purinergically induced membrane fluidization in ciliary cells: characterization and control by calcium and membrane potential.

    PubMed Central

    Alfahel, E; Korngreen, A; Parola, A H; Priel, Z

    1996-01-01

    To examine the role of membrane dynamics in transmembrane signal transduction, we studied changes in membrane fluidity in mucociliary tissues from frog palate and esophagus epithelia stimulated by extracellular ATP. Micromolar concentrations of ATP induced strong changes in fluorescence polarization, possibly indicating membrane fluidization. This effect was dosage dependent, reaching a maximum at 10-microM ATP. It was dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+ (or Mg2+), though it was insensitive to inhibitors of voltage-gated calcium channels. It was inhibited by thapsigargin and by ionomycin (at low extracellular Ca2+ concentration), both of which deplete Ca2+ stores. It was inhibited by the calcium-activated potassium channel inhibitors quinidine, charybdotoxin, and apamine and was reduced considerably by replacement of extracellular Na+ with K+. Hyperpolarization, or depolarization, of the mucociliary membrane induced membrane fluidization. The degree of membrane fluidization depended on the degree of hyperpolarization or depolarization of the ciliary membrane potential and was considerably lower than the effect induced by extracellular ATP. These results indicate that appreciable membrane fluidization induced by extracellular ATP depends both on an increase in intracellular Ca2+, mainly from its internal stores, and on hyperpolarization of the membrane. Calcium-dependent potassium channels couple the two effects. In light of recent results on the enhancement of ciliary beat frequency, it would appear that extracellular ATP-induced changes both in ciliary beat frequency and in membrane fluidity are triggered by similar signal transduction pathways. PMID:8789123

  10. Planar asymmetric lipid bilayers of glycosphingolipid or lipopolysaccharide on one side and phospholipids on the other: membrane potential, porin function, and complement activation.

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, A; Reiners, J O; Brandenburg, K; Kawahara, K; Zähringer, U; Seydel, U

    1996-01-01

    We have determined some physicochemical properties of the monosaccharide-type fraction (GSL-1) of glycosphingolipids, the major glycolipid components of the outer leaflet of the Gram-negative species Sphingomonas paucimobilis. These properties included the state of order of the hydrocarbon moiety, the effective molecular area, surface charge density, and intrinsic transmembrane potential profile of reconstituted planar asymmetric GSL-1/phospholipid bilayer membranes. We have, furthermore, investigated the insertion into and the function of porin channels in the reconstituted bilayers and the complement-activating capability of GSL-1 surfaces. All results were compared with respective data for deep rough mutant lipopolysaccharide of Salmonella minnesota R595. We found a remarkable agreement in most functional properties of the two glycolipids. PMID:8770208

  11. [Measurements of electric membrane potentials in lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Kowal, E; Malofiejew, M; Kostrzewska, A

    1975-01-01

    The interior of vital lymphocytes, as opposed to their outer environment, has a negative electric potential (rest potential), the magnitude of which depends on the potassium ion concentration of the extracellular medium. The bioelectric phenomena at the lymphocyte are determined not only by the functional state of the cell membrane, but also by the milieu of the blood cells which includes also the adsorbed proteins and lipids. PMID:1199616

  12. Genetically Encoded Protein Sensors of Membrane Potential.

    PubMed

    Storace, Douglas; Rad, Masoud Sepehri; Han, Zhou; Jin, Lei; Cohen, Lawrence B; Hughes, Thom; Baker, Bradley J; Sung, Uhna

    2015-01-01

    Organic voltage-sensitive dyes offer very high spatial and temporal resolution for imaging neuronal function. However these dyes suffer from the drawbacks of non-specificity of cell staining and low accessibility of the dye to some cell types. Further progress in imaging activity is expected from the development of genetically encoded fluorescent sensors of membrane potential. Cell type specificity of expression of these fluorescent protein (FP) voltage sensors can be obtained via several different mechanisms. One is cell type specificity of infection by individual virus subtypes. A second mechanism is specificity of promoter expression in individual cell types. A third, depends on the offspring of transgenic animals with cell type specific expression of cre recombinase mated with an animal that has the DNA for the FP voltage sensor in all of its cells but its expression is dependent on the recombinase activity. Challenges remain. First, the response time constants of many of the new FP voltage sensors are slower (2-10 ms) than those of organic dyes. This results in a relatively small fractional fluorescence change, ΔF/F, for action potentials. Second, the largest signal presently available is only ~40% for a 100 mV depolarization and many of the new probes have signals that are substantially smaller. Large signals are especially important when attempting to detect fast events because the shorter measurement interval results in a relatively small number of detected photons and therefore a relatively large shot noise (see Chap. 1). Another kind of challenge has occurred when attempts were made to transition from one species to another or from one cell type to another or from cell culture to in vivo measurements.Several laboratories have recently described a number of novel FP voltage sensors. Here we attempt to critically review the current status of these developments in terms of signal size, time course, and in vivo function.

  13. Pado, a fluorescent protein with proton channel activity can optically monitor membrane potential, intracellular pH, and map gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Bok Eum; Baker, Bradley J.

    2016-01-01

    An in silico search strategy was developed to identify potential voltage-sensing domains (VSD) for the development of genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs). Using a conserved charge distribution in the S2 α-helix, a single in silico search yielded most voltage-sensing proteins including voltage-gated potassium channels, voltage-gated calcium channels, voltage-gated sodium channels, voltage-gated proton channels, and voltage-sensing phosphatases from organisms ranging from mammals to bacteria and plants. A GEVI utilizing the VSD from a voltage-gated proton channel identified from that search was able to optically report changes in membrane potential. In addition this sensor was capable of manipulating the internal pH while simultaneously reporting that change optically since it maintains the voltage-gated proton channel activity of the VSD. Biophysical characterization of this GEVI, Pado, demonstrated that the voltage-dependent signal was distinct from the pH-dependent signal and was dependent on the movement of the S4 α-helix. Further investigation into the mechanism of the voltage-dependent optical signal revealed that inhibiting the dimerization of the fluorescent protein greatly reduced the optical signal. Dimerization of the FP thereby enabled the movement of the S4 α-helix to mediate a fluorescent response. PMID:27040905

  14. Fractionation of Plant Bioactives from Black Carrots (Daucus carota subspecies sativus varietas atrorubens Alef.) by Adsorptive Membrane Chromatography and Analysis of Their Potential Anti-Diabetic Activity.

    PubMed

    Esatbeyoglu, Tuba; Rodríguez-Werner, Miriam; Schlösser, Anke; Liehr, Martin; Ipharraguerre, Ignacio; Winterhalter, Peter; Rimbach, Gerald

    2016-07-27

    Black and purple carrots have attracted interest as colored extracts for coloring food due to their high content of anthocyanins. This study aimed to investigate the polyphenol composition of black carrots. Particularly, the identification and quantification of phenolic compounds of the variety Deep Purple carrot (DPC), which presents a very dark color, was performed by HPLC-PDA and HPLC-ESI-MS(n) analyses. The separation of polyphenols from a DPC XAD-7 extract into an anthocyanin fraction (AF) and co-pigment fraction (CF; primarily phenolic acids) was carried out by membrane chromatography. Furthermore, possible anti-diabetic effects of the DPC XAD-7 extract and its AF and CF were determined. DPC samples (XAD-7, CF, and AF) inhibited α-amylase and α-glucosidase in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, DPC XAD-7 and chlorogenic acid, but not DPC CF and DPC AF, caused a moderate inhibition of intestinal glucose uptake in Caco-2 cells. However, DPC samples did not affect glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-4) activity. Overall, DPC exhibits an inhibitory effect on α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity and on cellular glucose uptake indicating potential anti-diabetic properties.

  15. Fractionation of Plant Bioactives from Black Carrots (Daucus carota subspecies sativus varietas atrorubens Alef.) by Adsorptive Membrane Chromatography and Analysis of Their Potential Anti-Diabetic Activity.

    PubMed

    Esatbeyoglu, Tuba; Rodríguez-Werner, Miriam; Schlösser, Anke; Liehr, Martin; Ipharraguerre, Ignacio; Winterhalter, Peter; Rimbach, Gerald

    2016-07-27

    Black and purple carrots have attracted interest as colored extracts for coloring food due to their high content of anthocyanins. This study aimed to investigate the polyphenol composition of black carrots. Particularly, the identification and quantification of phenolic compounds of the variety Deep Purple carrot (DPC), which presents a very dark color, was performed by HPLC-PDA and HPLC-ESI-MS(n) analyses. The separation of polyphenols from a DPC XAD-7 extract into an anthocyanin fraction (AF) and co-pigment fraction (CF; primarily phenolic acids) was carried out by membrane chromatography. Furthermore, possible anti-diabetic effects of the DPC XAD-7 extract and its AF and CF were determined. DPC samples (XAD-7, CF, and AF) inhibited α-amylase and α-glucosidase in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, DPC XAD-7 and chlorogenic acid, but not DPC CF and DPC AF, caused a moderate inhibition of intestinal glucose uptake in Caco-2 cells. However, DPC samples did not affect glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-4) activity. Overall, DPC exhibits an inhibitory effect on α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity and on cellular glucose uptake indicating potential anti-diabetic properties. PMID:27362825

  16. Moderate activation of autophagy regulates the intracellular calcium ion concentration and mitochondrial membrane potential in beta-amyloid-treated PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhongfeng; Guo, Yalei; Fang, Yongqi

    2016-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related and progressive neurodegenerative disease. Aggregated beta-amyloid (Aβ) disturbs Ca(2+) homeostasis and causes mitochondrial dysfunction and finally underlies AD. Recent evidence suggests that autophagy initiation by Beclin-1 protein might be involved in the pathogenesis of AD. However, the effects of Beclin-1 dependent autophagy on intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) is unclear. The effects of Beclin-1 dependent autophagy that were activated by a gradient concentration of autophagy activator rapamycin or inhibited by autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) on cell viability and cell morphology were examined. Pretreatment with rapamycin significantly up-regulated the expression of Beclin-1 in response to Aβ1-42 application, but after pretreatment with 3-MA it was significantly down-regulated. Moderate activation of Beclin-1 dependent autophagy had an up regulation effect on cell viability and could maintain the original morphology of cells. Furthermore, rapamycin or 3-MA on [Ca(2+)]i and MMP in Aβ1-42 treatment of PC12 cells were evaluated. We also report that PC12 cells treated with Aβ1-42 showed an increase in [Ca(2+)]i but a decrease in MMP when compared to the normal control. However the application of rapamycin prior to this prevented the increase in [Ca(2+)]i and the decrease in MMP in response to Aβ1-42. When 3-MA was applied this exacerbated the effect of Aβ1-42 on the [Ca(2+)]i and the MMP. This shows that moderate activation of Beclin-1 dependent autophagy by rapamycin can modulate Ca(2+) homeostasis and maintain MMP in response to Aβ1-42 induced cytotoxicity and so may have a preventive function in AD. PMID:26923671

  17. The temperature-induced changes in membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Buzatu, Stefanu

    2009-01-01

    Excitability and response properties of a neuron may vary in different environmental conditions of temperature. Increase/decrease of membrane potential has been observed under increase/decrease of temperature in the external side of membrane compared with internal temperature, i.e. the internal cell environment becomes more electronegative/electropositive in relation to the external one. Changes in temperature affected the amplitude of action potentials, measured as the voltage difference between the threshold and the peak, and their duration, measured as the width of the action potential at the threshold. As the temperature is increased, the amplitude of action potential is decreased and its duration is reduced. This parameter may influence the functioning of a neuron through the temperature dependence of ion channel conductance and time constants of channel activation/inactivation factors. Alterations in temperature affect the rates of diffusion through ion channels, the rates of conformational changes that lead to their activation and inactivation, and the rates of the biochemical reactions with which ion channels are modulated and transported into and out of membranes. Measurements of the propagated action potentials at different temperatures show that temperature has a double effect on the action potential: an increase of the Nernst equilibrium potentials when the absolute temperature is decreased and a change of the rate constants by a temperature factor. Temperature induced changes in the equilibrium potentials alone have little effect on the duration and amplitude of any action potentials but, because the cell membranes are permeable to more than one ion, the relation between the membrane potential and the Nernst equilibrium potentials shows different importance of the different ionic species in determining both resting and action potentials. In contrast, the temperature induced scaling of the rate constants can have quite dramatic effects on the duration

  18. Membrane stretching triggers mechanosensitive Ca2+ channel activation in Chara.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Naoya; Kikuyama, Munehiro

    2009-03-01

    In order to confirm that mechanosensitive Ca(2+) channels are activated by membrane stretching, we stretched or compressed the plasma membrane of Chara by applying osmotic shrinkage or swelling of the cell by varying the osmotic potential of the bathing medium. Aequorin studies revealed that treatments causing membrane stretching induced a transient but large increase in cytoplasmic concentration of Ca(2+) (Delta[Ca(2+)](c)). However, the observed Delta[Ca(2+)](c) decreased during the treatments, resulting in membrane compression. A second experiment was carried out to study the relationship between changes in membrane potential (DeltaE(m)) and stretching or compression of the plasma membrane. Significant DeltaE(m) values, often accompanied by an action potential, were observed during the initial exchange of the bathing medium from a hypotonic medium to a hypertonic one (plasmolysis). DeltaE(m) appears to be triggered by a partial stretching of the membrane as it was peeled from the cell wall. After plasmolysis, other exchanges from hypertonic to hypotonic media, with their accompanying membrane stretching, always induced large DeltaE(m) values and were often accompanied by an action potential. By contrast, action potentials were scarcely observed during other exchanges from hypotonic to hypertonic solutions (=membrane compression). Thus, we concluded that activation of the mechanosensitive channels is triggered by membrane stretching in Chara.

  19. Membrane stretching triggers mechanosensitive Ca2+ channel activation in Chara.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Naoya; Kikuyama, Munehiro

    2009-03-01

    In order to confirm that mechanosensitive Ca(2+) channels are activated by membrane stretching, we stretched or compressed the plasma membrane of Chara by applying osmotic shrinkage or swelling of the cell by varying the osmotic potential of the bathing medium. Aequorin studies revealed that treatments causing membrane stretching induced a transient but large increase in cytoplasmic concentration of Ca(2+) (Delta[Ca(2+)](c)). However, the observed Delta[Ca(2+)](c) decreased during the treatments, resulting in membrane compression. A second experiment was carried out to study the relationship between changes in membrane potential (DeltaE(m)) and stretching or compression of the plasma membrane. Significant DeltaE(m) values, often accompanied by an action potential, were observed during the initial exchange of the bathing medium from a hypotonic medium to a hypertonic one (plasmolysis). DeltaE(m) appears to be triggered by a partial stretching of the membrane as it was peeled from the cell wall. After plasmolysis, other exchanges from hypertonic to hypotonic media, with their accompanying membrane stretching, always induced large DeltaE(m) values and were often accompanied by an action potential. By contrast, action potentials were scarcely observed during other exchanges from hypotonic to hypertonic solutions (=membrane compression). Thus, we concluded that activation of the mechanosensitive channels is triggered by membrane stretching in Chara. PMID:19234734

  20. Fluid transport by active elastic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Lauga, Eric

    2011-09-01

    A flexible membrane deforming its shape in time can self-propel in a viscous fluid. Alternatively, if the membrane is anchored, its deformation will lead to fluid transport. Past work in this area focused on situations where the deformation kinematics of the membrane were prescribed. Here we consider models where the deformation of the membrane is not prescribed, but instead the membrane is internally forced. Both the time-varying membrane shape and the resulting fluid motion result then from a balance between prescribed internal active stresses, internal passive resistance, and external viscous stresses. We introduce two specific models for such active internal forcing: one where a distribution of active bending moments is prescribed, and one where active inclusions exert normal stresses on the membrane by pumping fluid through it. In each case, we asymptotically calculate the membrane shape and the fluid transport velocities for small forcing amplitudes, and recover our results using scaling analysis.

  1. Association with the Plasma Membrane Is Sufficient for Potentiating Catalytic Activity of Regulators of G Protein Signaling (RGS) Proteins of the R7 Subfamily.

    PubMed

    Muntean, Brian S; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2016-03-25

    Regulators of G protein Signaling (RGS) promote deactivation of heterotrimeric G proteins thus controlling the magnitude and kinetics of responses mediated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). In the nervous system, RGS7 and RGS9-2 play essential role in vision, reward processing, and movement control. Both RGS7 and RGS9-2 belong to the R7 subfamily of RGS proteins that form macromolecular complexes with R7-binding protein (R7BP). R7BP targets RGS proteins to the plasma membrane and augments their GTPase-accelerating protein (GAP) activity, ultimately accelerating deactivation of G protein signaling. However, it remains unclear if R7BP serves exclusively as a membrane anchoring subunit or further modulates RGS proteins to increase their GAP activity. To directly answer this question, we utilized a rapidly reversible chemically induced protein dimerization system that enabled us to control RGS localization independent from R7BP in living cells. To monitor kinetics of Gα deactivation, we coupled this strategy with measuring changes in the GAP activity by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay in a cellular system containing μ-opioid receptor. This approach was used to correlate changes in RGS localization and activity in the presence or absence of R7BP. Strikingly, we observed that RGS activity is augmented by membrane recruitment, in an orientation independent manner with no additional contributions provided by R7BP. These findings argue that the association of R7 RGS proteins with the membrane environment provides a major direct contribution to modulation of their GAP activity.

  2. Mitochondrial membrane potential is regulated by vimentin intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Chernoivanenko, Ivan S; Matveeva, Elena A; Gelfand, Vladimir I; Goldman, Robert D; Minin, Alexander A

    2015-03-01

    This study demonstrates that the association of mitochondria with vimentin intermediate filaments (VIFs) measurably increases their membrane potential. This increase is detected by quantitatively comparing the fluorescence intensity of mitochondria stained with the membrane potential-sensitive dye tetramethylrhodamine-ethyl ester (TMRE) in murine vimentin-null fibroblasts with that in the same cells expressing human vimentin (∼35% rise). When vimentin expression is silenced by small hairpin RNA (shRNA) to reduce vimentin by 90%, the fluorescence intensity of mitochondria decreases by 20%. The increase in membrane potential is caused by specific interactions between a subdomain of the non-α-helical N terminus (residues 40 to 93) of vimentin and mitochondria. In rho 0 cells lacking mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and consequently missing several key proteins in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (ρ(0) cells), the membrane potential generated by an alternative anaerobic process is insensitive to the interactions between mitochondria and VIF. The results of our studies show that the close association between mitochondria and VIF is important both for determining their position in cells and their physiologic activity.

  3. NFAT activation by membrane potential follows a calcium pathway distinct from other activity-related transcription factors in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Juan Antonio; Gaggero, Eduardo; Hidalgo, Jorge; Leal, Nancy; Jaimovich, Enrique; Carrasco, M Angélica

    2008-03-01

    Depolarization of skeletal muscle cells triggers intracellular Ca2+ signals mediated by ryanodine and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors. Previously, we have reported that K+-induced depolarization activates transcriptional regulators ERK, cAMP response element-binding protein, c-fos, c-jun, and egr-1 through IP3-dependent Ca2+ release, whereas NF-kappa B activation is elicited by both ryanodine and IP3 receptor-mediated Ca2+ signals. We have further shown that field stimulation with electrical pulses results in an NF-kappa B activation increase dependent of the amount of pulses and independent of their frequency. In this work, we report the results obtained for nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-mediated transcription and translocation generated by both K+ and electrical stimulation protocols in primary skeletal muscle cells and C2C12 cells. The Ca2+ source for NFAT activation is through release by ryanodine receptors and extracellular Ca2+ entry. We found this activation to be independent of the number of pulses within a physiological range of stimulus frequency and enhanced by long-lasting low-frequency stimulation. Therefore, activation of the NFAT signaling pathway differs from that of NF-kappa B and other transcription factors. Calcineurin enzyme activity correlated well with the relative activation of NFAT translocation and transcription using different stimulation protocols. Furthermore, both K+-induced depolarization and electrical stimulation increased mRNA levels of the type 1 IP3 receptor mediated by calcineurin activity, which suggests that depolarization may regulate IP3 receptor transcription. These results confirm the presence of at least two independent pathways for excitation-transcription coupling in skeletal muscle cells, both dependent on Ca2+ release and triggered by the same voltage sensor but activating different intracellular release channels. PMID:18184878

  4. Mammalian plasma membrane proteins as potential biomarkers and drug targets.

    PubMed

    Rucevic, Marijana; Hixson, Douglas; Josic, Djuro

    2011-06-01

    Defining the plasma membrane proteome is crucial to understand the role of plasma membrane in fundamental biological processes. Change in membrane proteins is one of the first events that take place under pathological conditions, making plasma membrane proteins a likely source of potential disease biomarkers with prognostic or diagnostic potential. Membrane proteins are also potential targets for monoclonal antibodies and other drugs that block receptors or inhibit enzymes essential to the disease progress. Despite several advanced methods recently developed for the analysis of hydrophobic proteins and proteins with posttranslational modifications, integral membrane proteins are still under-represented in plasma membrane proteome. Recent advances in proteomic investigation of plasma membrane proteins, defining their roles as diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers and as target molecules in disease treatment, are presented.

  5. Cell membrane potentials induced during exposure to EMP fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gailey, P.C.; Easterly, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Internal current densities and electric fields induced in the human body during exposure to EMP fields are reviewed and used to predict resulting cell membrane potentials. Using several different approaches, membrane potentials of about 100 mV are predicted. These values are comparable to the static membrane potentials maintained by cells as a part of normal physiological function, but the EMP-induced potentials persist for only about 10 ns. Possible biological implications of EMP-induced membrane potentials including conformational changes and electroporation are discussed.

  6. Effect of EMP fields on cell membrane potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Gailey, P.C.; Easterly, C.E.

    1993-06-01

    A simple model is presented for cell membrane potentials induced during exposure to electromagnetic pulse (EMP). Using calculated values of internal electric field strength induced during EMP exposure, the model predicts that cell membrane potentials of about 100 mV may be induced for time frames on the order of 10 ns. Possible biological effects of these potentials including electroporation area discussed.

  7. Changes in membrane potential and delayed luminescence of Acetabularia acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Ho, M W; Triglia, A; Musumeci, F; Scordino, A

    2000-03-01

    This paper examines the effect of changes in membrane potential on the critical parameters of delayed luminescence of Acetabularia acetabulum. We show that these parameters are altered by changes in membrane potential in ways that may reflect concomitant changes in energy storage and energy coupling.

  8. Lysophosphatidylcholine cell depolarization: increased membrane permeability for use in the determination of cell membrane potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, R.L.; Wersto, R.P.; Notter, R.H.; Finkelstein, J.N.

    1984-12-01

    Current techniques for the determination of cellular membrane potentials based on the uptake of a radiolabeled lipophilic cation, (3H)triphenylmethylphosphonium, and the cyanine dye, DiOC5(3), were analyzed in terms of the proportions of these probes which are accumulated due to potential-dependent and potential-independent forces. Measurements were made of probe uptake in two model systems: rabbit type II pneumocytes and human promyelocytic HL60 cells. For both cell types, the membrane potential-independent component of triphenylmethylphosphonium uptake was found to be a function of several variables, including the length of exposure of the cells to the transport facilitator tetraphenylboron, the concentration of tetraphenylboron, and the integrity of the cell membrane. To accurately determine the magnitude of the potential-independent component of probe uptake by type II and HL60 cells, the cell-permeabilizing agent lysophosphatidylcholine was used. The ability of lysophosphatidylcholine to depolarize cell membranes and accurately predict membrane potential-independent accumulation was found to be equal to or superior to several other techniques commonly used to achieve membrane depolarization (e.g. gramicidin, valinomycin plus high external potassium). Lysophosphatidylcholine cell treatment was found to be a simple, rapid, and accurate technique to increase cell membrane permeability and allow equilibration of intra- and extracellular ions. The method is shown to be useful for determining membrane potential-independent accumulation of both radiolabeled and fluorescent probes of membrane potential.

  9. Membrane potential mediates the cellular binding of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Edwin H.; Li, Ye; Kumar, Umesh; Sureka, Hursh V.; Zhang, Xianren; Payne, Christine K.

    2013-06-01

    The use of nanoparticles for cellular therapeutic or sensing applications requires nanoparticles to bind, or adhere, to the cell surface. While nanoparticle parameters such as size, shape, charge, and composition are important factors in cellular binding, the cell itself must also be considered. All cells have an electrical potential across the plasma membrane driven by an ion gradient. Under standard conditions the ion gradient will result in a -10 to -100 mV potential across the membrane with a net negative charge on the cytosolic face. Using a combination of flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy experiments and dissipative particle dynamics simulations, we have found that a decrease in membrane potential leads to decreased cellular binding of anionic nanoparticles. The decreased cellular binding of anionic nanoparticles is a general phenomenon, independent of depolarization method, nanoparticle composition, and cell type. Increased membrane potential reverses this trend resulting in increased binding of anionic nanoparticles. The cellular binding of cationic nanoparticles is minimally affected by membrane potential due to the interaction of cationic nanoparticles with cell surface proteins. The influence of membrane potential on the cellular binding of nanoparticles is especially important when considering the use of nanoparticles in the treatment or detection of diseases, such as cancer, in which the membrane potential is decreased.The use of nanoparticles for cellular therapeutic or sensing applications requires nanoparticles to bind, or adhere, to the cell surface. While nanoparticle parameters such as size, shape, charge, and composition are important factors in cellular binding, the cell itself must also be considered. All cells have an electrical potential across the plasma membrane driven by an ion gradient. Under standard conditions the ion gradient will result in a -10 to -100 mV potential across the membrane with a net negative charge on the

  10. Imaging cellular membrane potential through ionization of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, Clare E.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael H.; Oh, Eunkeu; Mäkinen, Antti J.; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas J.; Kushto, Gary; Wolak, Mason A.; Erickson, Jeffrey S.; Efros, Alexander L.; Huston, Alan L.; Delehanty, James B.

    2016-03-01

    Recent interest in quantum dots (QDs) stems from the plethora of potential applications that arises from their tunable absorption and emission profiles, high absorption cross sections, resistance to photobleaching, functionalizable surfaces, and physical robustness. The emergent use of QDs in biological imaging exploits these and other intrinsic properties. For example, quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE), which describes changes in the photoluminescence (PL) of QDs driven by the application of an electric field, provides an inherent means of detecting changes in electric fields by monitoring QD emission and thus points to a ready mean of imaging membrane potential (and action potentials) in electrically active cells. Here we examine the changing PL of various QDs subjected to electric fields comparable to those found across a cellular membrane. By pairing static and timeresolved PL measurements, we attempt to understand the mechanism driving electric-field-induced PL quenching and ultimately conclude that ionization plays a substantial role in initiating PL changes in systems where QCSE has traditionally been credited. Expanding on these findings, we explore the rapidity of response of the QD PL to applied electric fields and demonstrate changes amply able to capture the millisecond timescale of cellular action potentials.

  11. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited.

    PubMed

    Laba, Justyna K; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker's yeast. PMID:26473931

  12. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Laba, Justyna K.; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker’s yeast. PMID:26473931

  13. Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy for living cell membrane potential measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, Namuna

    Recently, the existence of multiple micro-domains of extracellular potential around individual cells have been revealed by voltage reporter dye using fluorescence microscopy. One hypothesis is that these long lasting potential patterns play a vital role in regulating important cell activities such as embryonic patterning, regenerative repair and reduction of cancerous disorganization. We used multifunctional Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy (SICM) to study these extracellular potential patterns of single cell with higher spatial resolution. To validate this novel technique, we compared the extracellular potential distribution on the fixed HeLa cell surface and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface and found significant difference. We then measured the extracellular potential distributions of living melanocytes and melanoma cells and found both the mean magnitude and spatial variation of extracellular potential of the melanoma cells are bigger than those of melanocytes. As compared to the voltage reporter dye based fluorescence microscope method, SICM can achieve quantitative potential measurements of non-labeled living cell membranes with higher spatial resolution.

  14. Specific ion effects on membrane potential and the permselectivity of ion exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Geise, Geoffrey M; Cassady, Harrison J; Paul, Donald R; Logan, Bruce E; Hickner, Michael A

    2014-10-21

    Membrane potential and permselectivity are critical parameters for a variety of electrochemically-driven separation and energy technologies. An electric potential is developed when a membrane separates electrolyte solutions of different concentrations, and a permselective membrane allows specific species to be transported while restricting the passage of other species. Ion exchange membranes are commonly used in applications that require advanced ionic electrolytes and span technologies such as alkaline batteries to ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis, but membranes are often only characterized in sodium chloride solutions. Our goal in this work was to better understand membrane behaviour in aqueous ammonium bicarbonate, which is of interest for closed-loop energy generation processes. Here we characterized the permselectivity of four commercial ion exchange membranes in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, ammonium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, and ammonium bicarbonate. This stepwise approach, using four different ions in aqueous solution, was used to better understand how these specific ions affect ion transport in ion exchange membranes. Characterization of cation and anion exchange membrane permselectivity, using these ions, is discussed from the perspective of the difference in the physical chemistry of the hydrated ions, along with an accompanying re-derivation and examination of the basic equations that describe membrane potential. In general, permselectivity was highest in sodium chloride and lowest in ammonium bicarbonate solutions, and the nature of both the counter- and co-ions appeared to influence measured permselectivity. The counter-ion type influences the binding affinity between counter-ions and polymer fixed charge groups, and higher binding affinity between fixed charge sites and counter-ions within the membrane decreases the effective membrane charge density. As a result permselectivity decreases. The charge density and polarizability

  15. Membrane potential governs lateral segregation of plasma membrane proteins and lipids in yeast.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Guido; Opekarová, Miroslava; Malinsky, Jan; Weig-Meckl, Ina; Tanner, Widmar

    2007-01-10

    The plasma membrane potential is mainly considered as the driving force for ion and nutrient translocation. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism, we have discovered a novel role of the membrane potential in the organization of the plasma membrane. Within the yeast plasma membrane, two non-overlapping sub-compartments can be visualized. The first one, represented by a network-like structure, is occupied by the proton ATPase, Pma1, and the second one, forming 300-nm patches, houses a number of proton symporters (Can1, Fur4, Tat2 and HUP1) and Sur7, a component of the recently described eisosomes. Evidence is presented that sterols, the main lipid constituent of the plasma membrane, also accumulate within the patchy compartment. It is documented that this compartmentation is highly dependent on the energization of the membrane. Plasma membrane depolarization causes reversible dispersion of the H(+)-symporters, not however of the Sur7 protein. Mitochondrial mutants, affected in plasma membrane energization, show a significantly lower degree of membrane protein segregation. In accordance with these observations, depolarized membranes also considerably change their physical properties (detergent sensitivity).

  16. Organelle morphogenesis by active membrane remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Ipsen, John H.; Rao, Madan; Kumar, P. B. Sunil

    Intracellular organelles are subject to a steady flux of lipids and proteins through active, energy consuming transport processes. Active fission and fusion are promoted by GTPases, e.g., Arf-Coatamer and the Rab-Snare complexes, which both sense and generate local membrane curvature. Here we investigate through Dynamical Triangulation Monte Carlo simulations, the role that these active processes play in determining the morphology and compositional segregation in closed membranes. Our results suggest that the ramified morphologies of organelles observed in-vivo are a consequence of driven nonequilibrium processes rather than equilibrium forces.

  17. Aluminum chloride and membrane potentials of barley root cells

    SciTech Connect

    Etherton, B.; Shane, M.

    1986-04-01

    Aluminum chloride at pH 4 hyperpolarizes the membrane potentials of barley root epidermal cells. The authors tested to see whether this hyperpolarization could be caused by an aluminum induced alteration of the permeability of the membrane to potassium or sodium ions by measuring the effect of .04 mM aluminum ions (the Ca/sup + +/ conc. was 0.1 mM) on the membrane potential changes induced by changing the potassium or sodium concentrations in the medium bathing the roots. Aluminum ions did not change the magnitude of potassium or sodium induced changes in membrane potentials but significantly altered the rates of potassium and sodium induced changes of the potential. The results indicate that aluminum ions did not change sodium or potassium ion permeabilities of barley root cells.

  18. Plasma membrane potential of the alga dunaliella, and its relation to osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Oren-Shamir, M; Pick, U; Avron, M

    1990-06-01

    A fluorescent dye sensitive to membrane potential was used to follow the plasma-membrane potential in the unicellular halo-tolerant alga Dunaliella salina. The signal observed during dissipation of the plasma membrane potential by the addition of excess K(+) and valinomycin, or a protonophore, was taken as a measure of the preexisting potential. A resting potential of -85 to -100 millivolts (negative inside) was calculated. Following a hypertonic shock, the plasma membrane was rapidly hyperpolarized. This hyperpolarization was transient, and the algae resumed their resting potential about 30 minutes after the shock. The resting plasma membrane potential was decreased by vanadate and is concluded to be generated mostly by the plasma membrane ATPase of Dunaliella. The transient hyperpolarization following a hypertonic shock indicates, therefore, a transient activation of the ATPase. This is further corroborated by a rapid transient decrease in the intracellular ATP following a hypertonic shock and its inhibition by vanadate. It is suggested that activation of the plasma membrane ATPase may be the trigger for osmoregulation in Dunaliella. PMID:16667480

  19. T-2307 causes collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential in yeast.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Toshinari; Yamada, Eio; Kimura, Akiko; Nishikawa, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Hiroyoshi; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Mitsuyama, Junichi

    2012-11-01

    T-2307, an arylamidine compound, has been previously reported to have broad-spectrum in vitro and in vivo antifungal activities against clinically significant pathogens, including Candida species, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus species, and is now undergoing clinical trials. Here we investigated the mechanism of action of T-2307 using yeast cells and mitochondria isolated from yeast and rat liver. Nonfermentative growth of Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in glycerol medium, in which yeasts relied on mitochondrial respiratory function, was inhibited at 0.001 to 0.002 μg/ml (0.002 to 0.004 μM) of T-2307. However, fermentative growth in dextrose medium was not inhibited by T-2307. Microscopic examination using Mitotracker fluorescent dye, a cell-permeant mitochondrion-specific probe, demonstrated that T-2307 impaired the mitochondrial function of C. albicans and S. cerevisiae at concentrations near the MIC in glycerol medium. T-2307 collapsed the mitochondrial membrane potential in mitochondria isolated from S. cerevisiae at 20 μM. On the other hand, in isolated rat liver mitochondria, T-2307 did not have any effect on the mitochondrial membrane potential at 10 mM. Moreover, T-2307 had little inhibitory and stimulatory effect on mitochondrial respiration in rat liver mitochondria. In conclusion, T-2307 selectively disrupted yeast mitochondrial function, and it was also demonstrated that the fungal mitochondrion is an attractive antifungal target.

  20. [Modulation of myometrium mitochondrial membrane potential by calmodulin antagonists].

    PubMed

    Shlykov, S H; Babich, L H; Ievtushenko, M Ie; Karakhim, S O; Kosterin, S O

    2014-01-01

    Influence of calmodulin antagonists on mitochondrial membrane potential was investigated using a flow cytometry method, confocal microscopy and fluorescent potential-sensitive probes TMRM and MTG. Influence of different concentrations of calmodulin antagonists on mitochondrial membrane potential was studied using flow cytometry method and a fraction of myometrium mitochondria of unpregnant rats. It was shown that 1-10 microM calmidazolium gradually reduced mitochondria membrane potential. At the same time 10-100 microM trifluoperazine influenced as follows: 10 microM--increased polarization, while 100 microM--caused almost complete depolarization of mitochondrial membranes. In experiments which were conducted with the use of confocal microscopy method and myometrium cells it was shown, that MTG addition to the incubation medium led to the appearance of fluorescence signal in a green range. Addition of the second probe (TMRM) resulted in the appearance of fluorescent signal in a red range. Mitochondrial membrane depolarization by 1 microM CCCP or 10 mM NaN3 was accompanied by the decline of "red" fluorescence intensity, "green" fluorescence was kept. The 10-15 minute incubation of myometrium cells in the presence 10 microM calmidazolium or 100 microM trifluoperazine was accompanied by almost complete decrease of the TMRM fluorescent signal. Thus, with the use of potential-sensitive fluorescent probes TMRM and MTG it was shown, that calmodulin antagonists modulate mitochondrial membrane potential of myometrium cells.

  1. Sodium and potassium conductance changes during a membrane action potential

    PubMed Central

    Bezanilla, Francisco; Rojas, Eduardo; Taylor, Robert E.

    1970-01-01

    1. A method for turning a membrane potential control system on and off in less than 10 μsec is described. This method was used to record membrane currents in perfused giant axons from Dosidicus gigas and Loligo forbesi after turning on the voltage clamp system at various times during the course of a membrane action potential. 2. The membrane current measured just after the capacity charging transient was found to have an almost linear relation to the controlled membrane potential. 3. The total membrane conductance taken from these current—voltage curves was found to have a time course during the action potential similar to that found by Cole & Curtis (1939). 4. The instantaneous current voltage curves were linear enough to make it possible to obtain a good estimate of the individual sodium and potassium channel conductances, either algebraically or by clamping to the sodium, or potassium, reversal potentials. Good general agreement was obtained with the predictions of the Hodgkin—Huxley equations. 5. We consider these results to constitute the first direct experimental demonstration of the conductance changes to sodium and potassium during the course of an action potential. PMID:5505231

  2. Active membrane cholesterol as a physiological effector.

    PubMed

    Lange, Yvonne; Steck, Theodore L

    2016-09-01

    Sterols associate preferentially with plasma membrane sphingolipids and saturated phospholipids to form stoichiometric complexes. Cholesterol in molar excess of the capacity of these polar bilayer lipids has a high accessibility and fugacity; we call this fraction active cholesterol. This review first considers how active cholesterol serves as an upstream regulator of cellular sterol homeostasis. The mechanism appears to utilize the redistribution of active cholesterol down its diffusional gradient to the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, where it binds multiple effectors and directs their feedback activity. We have also reviewed a broad literature in search of a role for active cholesterol (as opposed to bulk cholesterol or lipid domains such as rafts) in the activity of diverse membrane proteins. Several systems provide such evidence, implicating, in particular, caveolin-1, various kinds of ABC-type cholesterol transporters, solute transporters, receptors and ion channels. We suggest that this larger role for active cholesterol warrants close attention and can be tested easily.

  3. Chemico-osmosis in geologic membranes: Role of membrane potential gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guanchu; Jim Hendry, M.

    2014-09-01

    Chemico-osmosis is conventionally regarded to occur in the positive direction, i.e., from low to high concentration reservoirs. However, experiments have shown that chemico-osmosis in clay membranes can occur in the opposite direction, i.e., from high to low concentration reservoirs. Conceptual interpretations of this negative osmosis suggest that the diffused electrolytes exert “drag” on water molecules, thus driving the entire solution toward the low concentration reservoir. This paper proposes a quantitative interpretation of this phenomenon considering the role of the induced membrane potential gradient. To this end, a model, which involves the expansion of pore-scale electrokinetics to continuum-scale chemico-osmosis behaviors, is developed for quantification of this membrane potential gradient. The numerical investigation based on the model shows that the membrane potential gradient (1) is caused by the requirement of electroneutrality in the solutions on either side of the membrane; (2) is directly proportional to the difference in effective diffusivity for cations and anions; and (3) contributes to retarding cation migration, enhancing anion migration, and driving the solution flux from low to high concentration reservoirs. These three observations thus suggest that a likely cause of negative osmosis is a decreasing tendency for the solution flux from low to high concentration reservoirs caused by a decreasing membrane potential gradient. Using these findings, previous experiments are discussed and interpreted with success from the electrodynamic perspective of the membrane potential gradient.

  4. Membrane potential shapes regulation of dopamine transporter trafficking at the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Ben D.; Saha, Kaustuv; Krout, Danielle; Cabrera, Elizabeth; Felts, Bruce; Henry, L. Keith; Swant, Jarod; Zou, Mu-Fa; Newman, Amy Hauck; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2016-01-01

    The dopaminergic system is essential for cognitive processes, including reward, attention and motor control. In addition to DA release and availability of synaptic DA receptors, timing and magnitude of DA neurotransmission depend on extracellular DA-level regulation by the dopamine transporter (DAT), the membrane expression and trafficking of which are highly dynamic. Data presented here from real-time TIRF (TIRFM) and confocal microscopy coupled with surface biotinylation and electrophysiology suggest that changes in the membrane potential alone, a universal yet dynamic cellular property, rapidly alter trafficking of DAT to and from the surface membrane. Broadly, these findings suggest that cell-surface DAT levels are sensitive to membrane potential changes, which can rapidly drive DAT internalization from and insertion into the cell membrane, thus having an impact on the capacity for DAT to regulate extracellular DA levels. PMID:26804245

  5. Fisetin inhibits growth, induces G₂ /M arrest and apoptosis of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells: role of mitochondrial membrane potential disruption and consequent caspases activation.

    PubMed

    Pal, Harish C; Sharma, Samriti; Elmets, Craig A; Athar, Mohammad; Afaq, Farrukh

    2013-07-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs), one of the most common neoplasms, cause serious morbidity and mortality. Therefore, identification of non-toxic phytochemicals for prevention/treatment of NMSCs is highly desirable. Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a dietary flavonoid, present in fruits and vegetables possesses anti-oxidant and antiproliferative properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the chemotherapeutic potential of fisetin in cultured human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Treatment of A431 cells with fisetin (5-80 μm) resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Employing clonogenic assay, we found that fisetin treatment significantly reduced colony formation in A431 cells. Fisetin treatment of A431 cells resulted in G₂ /M arrest and induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, treatment of A431 cells with fisetin resulted in (i) decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl2; Bcl-xL and Mcl-1); (ii) increased expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, Bak and Bad); (iii) disruption of mitochondrial potential; (iv) release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO from mitochondria; (v) activation of caspases; and (vi) cleavage of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein. Pretreatment of A431 cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) blocked fisetin-induced cleavage of caspases and PARP. Taken together, these data provide evidence that fisetin possesses chemotherapeutic potential against human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Overall, these results suggest that fisetin could be developed as a novel therapeutic agent for the management of NMSCs.

  6. THE NON-STEADY STATE MEMBRANE POTENTIAL OF ION EXCHANGERS WITH FIXED SITES.

    PubMed

    CONTI, F; EISENMAN, G

    1965-03-01

    A system of equations, based upon the assumption that the only force acting on each ionic species is due to the gradient of its electrochemical potential, is used to deduce, in the non-steady state for zero net current, the expression of the difference of electric potential between two solutions separated by an ion exchange membrane with fixed monovalent sites. The membrane is assumed to be solely permeable to cations or anions, depending on whether the charge of the sites is -1 or +1, and not to permit any flow of solvent. Under the assumptions that the difference of standard chemical potentials of any pair of permeant monovalent species and the ratio of their mobilities are constant throughout the membrane, even when the spacing of sites is variable, explicit expressions are derived for the diffusion potential and total membrane potential as functions of time and of solution activities. The expressions are valid for any number of permeant monovalent species having ideal behavior and for two permeant monovalent species having "n-type" non-ideal behavior. The results show that for a step change in solution composition the observable potential across a membrane having fixed, but not necessarily uniformly spaced, sites becomes independent of time once equilibria are established at the boundaries of the membrane and attains its steady-state value even while the ionic concentration profiles and the electric potential profile within the membrane are changing with time.

  7. Stability of membrane potential in heart mitochondria: Single mitochondrion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Uechi, Yukiko; Yoshioka, Hisashi; Morikawa, Daisuke; Ohta, Yoshihiro . E-mail: ohta@cc.tuat.ac.jp

    2006-06-16

    Mitochondrial membrane potential ({delta}{psi} {sub m}) plays an important role in cellular activity. Although {delta}{psi} {sub m} of intracellular mitochondria are relatively stable, the recent experiments with isolated mitochondria demonstrate that individual mitochondria show frequent fluctuations of {delta}{psi} {sub m}. The current study is performed to investigate the factors that stabilize {delta}{psi} {sub m} in cells by observing {delta}{psi} {sub m} of individual isolated mitochondria with fluorescence microscopy. Here, we report that (1) the transient depolarizations are also induced for mitochondria in plasma membrane permeabilized cells, (2) almost all mitochondria isolated from porcine hearts show the transient depolarizations that is enhanced with the net efflux of protons from the matrix to the intermembrane space, and (3) ATP and ADP significantly inhibit the transient depolarizations by plural mechanisms. These results suggest that the suppression of acute alkalinization of the matrix together with the presence of ATP and ADP contributes to the stabilization of {delta}{psi} {sub m} in cells.

  8. Simultaneous imaging of cell and mitochondrial membrane potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, D L; Wei, M D; Febbroriello, P; Carson, J H; Loew, L M

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of charged membrane-permeable molecular probes between intracellular organelles, the cytoplasm, and the outside medium is governed by the relative membrane electrical potentials of these regions through coupled equilibria described by the Nernst equation. A series of highly fluorescent cationic dyes of low membrane binding and toxicity (Ehrenberg, B., V. Montana, M.-D. Wei, J. P. Wuskell, and L. M. Loew, 1988. Biophys. J. 53:785-794) allows the monitoring of these equilibria through digital imaging video microscopy. We employ this combination of technologies to assess, simultaneously, the membrane potentials of cells and of their organelles in situ. We describe the methodology and optimal conditions for such measurements, and apply the technique to concomitantly follow, with good time resolution, the mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials in several cultured cell lines. The time course of variations induced by chemical agents (ionophores, uncouplers, electron transport, and energy transfer inhibitors) in either or both these potentials is easily quantitated, and in accordance with mechanistic expectations. The methodology should therefore be applicable to the study of more subtle and specific, biologically induced potential changes in cells. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:2611324

  9. Surface characterization of hemodialysis membranes based on streaming potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Werner, C; Jacobasch, H J; Reichelt, G

    1995-01-01

    Hemodialysis membranes made from cellulose (CUPROPHAN, HEMOPHAN) and sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES) were characterized using the streaming potential technique to determine the zeta potential at their interfaces against well-defined aqueous solutions of varied pH and potassium chloride concentrations. Streaming potential measurements enable distinction between different membrane materials. In addition to parameters of the electrochemical double layer at membrane interfaces, thermodynamic characteristics of adsorption of different solved species were evaluated. For that aim a description of double layer formation as suggested by Börner and Jacobasch (in: Electrokinetic Phenomena, p. 231. Institut für Technologie der Polymere, Dresden (1989)) was applied which is based on the generally accepted model of the electrochemical double layer according to Stern (Z. Elektrochemie 30, 508 (1924)) and Grahame (Chem. Rev. 41, 441 (1947)). The membranes investigated show different surface acidic/basic and polar/nonpolar behavior. Furthermore, alterations of membrane interfaces through adsorption processes of components of biologically relevant solutions were shown to be detectable by streaming potential measurements.

  10. A Potential Role for Bat Tail Membranes in Flight Control

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, James D.; Dimitriadis, Grigorios; Codd, Jonathan R.; Nudds, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests conducted on a model based on the long-eared bat Plecotus auritus indicated that the positioning of the tail membrane (uropatagium) can significantly influence flight control. Adjusting tail position by increasing the angle of the legs ventrally relative to the body has a two-fold effect; increasing leg-induced wing camber (i.e., locally increased camber of the inner wing surface) and increasing the angle of attack of the tail membrane. We also used our model to examine the effects of flying with and without a tail membrane. For the bat model with a tail membrane increasing leg angle increased the lift, drag and pitching moment (nose-down) produced. However, removing the tail membrane significantly reduced the change in pitching moment with increasing leg angle, but it had no significant effect on the level of lift produced. The drag on the model also significantly increased with the removal of the tail membrane. The tail membrane, therefore, is potentially important for controlling the level of pitching moment produced by bats and an aid to flight control, specifically improving agility and manoeuvrability. Although the tail of bats is different from that of birds, in that it is only divided from the wings by the legs, it nonetheless, may, in addition to its prey capturing function, fulfil a similar role in aiding flight control. PMID:21479137

  11. Ion separations based on electrical potentials nanoporous and microporous membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Jason

    This dissertation examines several types of ion separations in nanometer to micrometer pores in membranes. Membranes provide an attractive platform for ion separations, primarily because they operate continuously (i.e. not in a batch mode), and small pores offer the potential for ion separation based on charge and electrophoretic mobility differences. Initial studies employed charged, nanoporous membranes to separate monovalent and divalent ions. Adsorption of polyelectrolyte multilayers in nanoporous membranes afforded control over the surface charge and pore radii in track-etched membranes, and electrostatic ion-exclusion, particularly for divalent ions, occurred in these membranes because the electrical double layer filled the entire nanopore. Initial experiments employed adsorption of (PSS/PAH) multilayers in the 50-nm diameter pores of PCTE membranes to give a K+/Mg2+ selectivity of ~10 in pressure-driven dead-end filtration. Adsorption of (PSS/PAH) 1 films in 30-nm pores gave a similar K+/Mg2+ selectivity with a simpler modification procedure. Separations utilizing (PSS/PAH)1 films in 30-nm pores showed the lowest ion rejections with high ion concentrations, consistent with enhanced screening of the electrical double layer at high ionic strength. However, solutions with < 5 mM ionic strength exhibited essentially 100% Mg2+ rejections (the Mg2+ concentration in the permeate was below the method detection limit). Moreover, K+ rejections increased in the presence of Mg2+, which may stem from Mg2+-adsorption within the PEM and increased surface charge. Finally, separation of Br- and SO42- with a PSS1-modified, 30-nm PCTE membrane validated the exclusion mechanism for anions. The average Br-/SO42- selectivity was 3.4 +/- 0.8 for a solution containing 0.5 mM NaBr and 0.5 mM Na2SO4. The low selectivity in this case likely stems from a relatively large pore. The membranes used for the separation of monovalent and divalent ions also facilitated separation of

  12. The dependence of membrane potential on extracellular chloride concentration in mammalian skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Dulhunty, A F

    1978-01-01

    1. The steady-state intracellular membrane potential of fibres in thin bundles dissected from mouse extensor digitorum longus or soleus muscles or rat sternomastoid muscles was measured with 3 M-KCl glass micro-electrodes. The steady-state membrane potential was found to depend on the extracellular concentrations of Na, K and Cl ions. 2. The resting membrane potential (3.5 mM-[K]o, 160 mM-[Cl]o) was -74 +/- 1 mV (mean +/- S.E.) and a reduction in [Cl]o to 3.5 mM caused a reversible steady-state hyperpolarization to -94 +/- 1 mV (mean +/- S.E.). 3. The steady-state membrane potentials recorded in fibres exposed to different [K]o and zero [Cl]o were consistent with potentials predicted by the Goldman, Hodgkin & Katz (GHK) equation for Na and K. The results of similar experiments done with Cl as the major external anion could not be fitted by the same equation. 4. The GHK equation for Na, K and Cl did fit data obtained from fibres in solutions containing different [K]o with Cl as the major external anion if the intracellular Cl concentration was allowed to be out of equilibrium with the steady-state membrane potential. 5. It is suggested that an active influx of Cl ions controls the intracellular Cl concentrations in these fibres and hence maintains the Cl equilibrium potential at a depolarized value with respect to the resting membrane potential. 6. The steady-state membrane potential of rat diaphragm fibres was independent of [Cl]o and it seems likely that the intracellular Cl concentration of these fibres is not controlled by active Cl transport. PMID:650497

  13. Chemical Modulation of the Biological Activity of Reutericyclin: a Membrane-Active Antibiotic from Lactobacillus reuteri

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Philip T.; Wu, Xiaoqian; Maddox, Marcus M.; Singh, Aman P.; Lee, Richard E.; Hurdle, Julian G.

    2014-01-01

    Whilst the development of membrane-active antibiotics is now an attractive therapeutic concept, progress in this area is disadvantaged by poor knowledge of the structure-activity relationship (SAR) required for optimizing molecules to selectively target bacteria. This prompted us to explore the SAR of the Lactobacillus reuteri membrane-active antibiotic reutericyclin, modifying three key positions about its tetramic acid core. The SAR revealed that lipophilic analogs were generally more active against Gram-positive pathogens, but introduction of polar and charged substituents diminished their activity. This was confirmed by cytometric assays showing that inactive compounds failed to dissipate the membrane potential. Radiolabeled substrate assays indicated that dissipation of the membrane potential by active reutericyclins correlated with inhibition of macromolecular synthesis in cells. However, compounds with good antibacterial activities also showed cytotoxicity against Vero cells and hemolytic activity. Although this study highlights the challenge of optimizing membrane-active antibiotics, it shows that by increasing antibacterial potency the selectivity index could be widened, allowing use of lower non-cytotoxic doses. PMID:24739957

  14. Initial conditioning of polymer eelectrolyte membrane fuel cell by temperature and potential cycling.

    PubMed

    Bezmalinović, Dario; Radošević, Jagoda; Barbir, Frano

    2015-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells need initial conditioning, activation or break-in the first time they are operated after being assembled. During this period performance of the fuel cell improves until it reaches its nominal performance. The exact mechanism of this initial conditioning is not completely understood, but it is assumed that during the conditioning process the polymer membrane, as well as the polymer in the catalyst layer, get humidified, and the number of active catalyst sites increases. Activation procedure proposed here consists of temperature and potential cycling. Temperature cycling is a new approach for the conditioning and the idea is to rapidly cool the running cell at some point to allow the membrane to equilibrate with condensed water which should result in higher intake of water within the membrane. The results show that proposed procedure is better or at least comparable to some conventional procedures for the initial conditioning. PMID:25830963

  15. Chloride current in mammalian cardiac myocytes. Novel mechanism for autonomic regulation of action potential duration and resting membrane potential

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The properties of the autonomically regulated chloride current (ICl) were studied in isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes. This current was elicited upon exposure to isoproterenol (ISO) and reversed upon concurrent exposure to acetylcholine (ACh). ICl was time independent and exhibited outward rectification. The responses to ISO and ACh could be blocked by propranolol and atropine, respectively, and ICl was also elicited by forskolin, 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, and 3-isobutyl-l-methylxanthine, indicating that the current is regulated through a cAMP-dependent pathway. The reversal potential of the ISO- induced current followed the predicted chloride equilibrium potential, consistent with it being carried predominantly by Cl-. Activation of ICl produced changes in the resting membrane potential and action potential duration, which were Cl- gradient dependent. These results indicate that under physiological conditions ICl may play an important role in regulating action potential duration and resting membrane potential in mammalian cardiac myocytes. PMID:2165130

  16. Effect of Salinity upon Cell Membrane Potential in the Marine Halophyte, Salicornia bigelovii Torr.

    PubMed

    L'roy, A; Hendrix, D L

    1980-03-01

    The electrophysiology of root cells of the marine halophyte, Salicornia bigelovii Torr., has been investigated. Cellular concentrations of K(+), Cl(-), and Na(+) and resulting cell membrane potentials were determined as functions of time and exposure to dilutions of artificial seawater. Treatment of these data by the Nernst criterion suggests that Cl(-) is actively transported into these root cells, but that active transport need not be invoked to explain the accumulation of Na(+) at all salinities investigated nor for K(+) at moderate to high salinities. In low environmental salinity, the cell electropotential of Salicornia root cells was found to respond to inhibitors in a fashion similar to that observed in glycophytes; in high environmental salinity, root cell membrane potential appears to be insensitive to bathing salinity and m-chlorocarbonylcyanide phenylhydrazone induces membrane hyperpolarization, in contrast to the response of glycophytes to such treatments. The fact that measured membrane potentials exceed diffusion potentials for Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) and the observation of a rapid depolarization by CO in the dark suggests an electrogenic component in Salicornia root cell membrane potentials. PMID:16661232

  17. Mitochondrial membrane potential: a trait involved in organelle inheritance?

    PubMed

    Milani, Liliana

    2015-10-01

    Which mitochondria are inherited across generations? Are transmitted mitochondria functionally silenced to preserve the integrity of their genetic information, or rather are those mitochondria with the highest levels of function (as indicated by membrane potential Δψm) preferentially transmitted? Based on observations of the unusual system of doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondria and of the common strictly maternal inheritance mode, I formulate a general hypothesis to explain which mitochondria reach the primordial germ cells (PGCs), and how this happens. Several studies indicate that mitochondrial movements are driven by microtubules and that mitochondria with high Δψm are preferentially transported. This can be applied also to the mitochondria that eventually populate embryonic PGCs, so I propose that Δψm may be a trait that allows for the preferential transmission of the most active (and healthy) mitochondria. The topics discussed here are fundamental in cell biology and genetics but remain controversial and a subject of heated debate; I propose an explanation for how a Δψm-dependent mechanism can cause the observed differences in mitochondrial transmission. PMID:26490419

  18. Mitochondrial membrane potential: a trait involved in organelle inheritance?

    PubMed

    Milani, Liliana

    2015-10-01

    Which mitochondria are inherited across generations? Are transmitted mitochondria functionally silenced to preserve the integrity of their genetic information, or rather are those mitochondria with the highest levels of function (as indicated by membrane potential Δψm) preferentially transmitted? Based on observations of the unusual system of doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondria and of the common strictly maternal inheritance mode, I formulate a general hypothesis to explain which mitochondria reach the primordial germ cells (PGCs), and how this happens. Several studies indicate that mitochondrial movements are driven by microtubules and that mitochondria with high Δψm are preferentially transported. This can be applied also to the mitochondria that eventually populate embryonic PGCs, so I propose that Δψm may be a trait that allows for the preferential transmission of the most active (and healthy) mitochondria. The topics discussed here are fundamental in cell biology and genetics but remain controversial and a subject of heated debate; I propose an explanation for how a Δψm-dependent mechanism can cause the observed differences in mitochondrial transmission.

  19. Determination of intracellular reactive oxygen species and high mitochondrial membrane potential in Percoll-treated viable boar sperm using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R

    2006-08-01

    The use of frozen semen in the swine industry is limited by problems with viability and fertility compared with liquid semen. Part of the reduction in sperm motility and fertility associated with cryopreservation may be due to oxidative damage from excessive or inappropriate formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Chemiluminescence measurements of ROS are not possible in live cells and are problematic because of poor specificity. An alternative approach, flow cytometry, was developed to identify viable boar sperm containing ROS utilizing the dyes hydroethidine and 2', 7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate as oxidizable substrates and impermeant DNA dyes to exclude dead sperm. The percentage of sperm with high mitochondrial transmembrane potential was determined by flow cytometry using the mitochondrial probe 5, 5', 6, 6'-tetrachloro-1, 1', 3, 3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide with propidium iodide staining to exclude nonviable cells. Sperm were incubated with and without ROS generators and free radical scavengers. Basal ROS formation was low (less than 4%) and did not differ (P = 0.26) between viable fresh and frozen-thawed boar sperm. In addition, fresh and frozen-thawed viable sperm were equally susceptible (P = 0.20) to intracellular formation of ROS produced by xanthine/xanthine oxidase (94.4 and 87.9% of sperm, respectively). Menadione increased (P < 0.05) ROS formation, decreased (P < 0.05) JC-1-aggregate fluorescence intensity, and decreased (P < 0.05) motion variables by 25 to 60%. The mechanism of inhibition of motility by ROS formation may be related to a decrease in mitochondrial charge potential below a critical threshold. Catalase and superoxide dismutase treatment in the presence of xanthine/xanthine oxidase indicated that hydrogen peroxide was the primary intracellular ROS measured. Further, catalase, but not superoxide dismutase, was capable of attenuating ROS-induced inhibition of motility. Whereas basal intracellular hydrogen

  20. Flow cytometric-membrane potential detection of sodium channel active marine toxins: application to ciguatoxins in fish muscle and feasibility of automating saxitoxin detection.

    PubMed

    Manger, Ronald; Woodle, Doug; Berger, Andrew; Dickey, Robert W; Jester, Edward; Yasumoto, Takeshi; Lewis, Richard; Hawryluk, Timothy; Hungerford, James

    2014-01-01

    Ciguatoxins are potent neurotoxins with a significant public health impact. Cytotoxicity assays have allowed the most sensitive means of detection of ciguatoxin-like activity without reliance on mouse bioassays and have been invaluable in studying outbreaks. An improvement of these cell-based assays is presented here in which rapid flow cytometric detection of ciguatoxins and saxitoxins is demonstrated using fluorescent voltage sensitive dyes. A depolarization response can be detected directly due to ciguatoxin alone; however, an approximate 1000-fold increase in sensitivity is observed in the presence of veratridine. These results demonstrate that flow cytometric assessment of ciguatoxins is possible at levels approaching the trace detection limits of our earlier cytotoxicity assays, however, with a significant reduction in analysis time. Preliminary results are also presented for detection of brevetoxins and for automation and throughput improvements to a previously described method for detecting saxitoxins in shellfish extracts.

  1. Condurango (Gonolobus condurango) Extract Activates Fas Receptor and Depolarizes Mitochondrial Membrane Potential to Induce ROS-dependent Apoptosis in Cancer Cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bishayee, Kausik; Mondal, Jesmin; Sikdar, Sourav; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Condurango (Gonolobus condurango) extract is used by complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners as a traditional medicine, including homeopathy, mainly for the treatment of syphilis. Condurango bark extract is also known to reduce tumor volume, but the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain unclear. Methods: Using a cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) as our model, the molecular events behind condurango extract’s (CE’s) anticancer effect were investigated by using flow cytometry, immunoblotting and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Other included cell types were prostate cancer cells (PC3), transformed liver cells (WRL-68), and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results: Condurango extract (CE) was found to be cytotoxic against target cells, and this was significantly deactivated in the presence of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), a scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS), suggesting that its action could be mediated through ROS generation. CE caused an increase in the HeLa cell population containing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage at the G zero/Growth 1 (G0/G1) stage. Further, CE increased the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and the fas receptor (FasR) levels both at the ribonucleic acid (RNA) and the protein levels, indicating that CE might have a cytotoxic mechanism of action. CE also triggered a sharp decrease in the expression of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB ) both at the RNA and the protein levels, a possible route to attenuation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and caused an opening of the mitochondrial membrane’s permeability transition (MPT) pores, thus enhancing caspase activities. Conclusion: Overall, our results suggest possible pathways for CE mediated cytotoxicity in model cancer cells. PMID:26389000

  2. Membrane potential hyperpolarization in Mammalian cardiac cells by synchronization modulation of Na/K pumps.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Dando, Robin

    2008-02-01

    In previously reported work, we developed a new technique, synchronization modulation, to electrically activate Na/K pump molecules. The fundamental mechanism involved in this technique is a dynamic entrainment procedure of the pump molecules, carried out in a stepwise pattern. The entrainment procedure consists of two steps: synchronization and modulation. We theoretically predicted that the pump functions can be activated exponentially as a function of the membrane potential. We have experimentally demonstrated synchronization of the Na/K pump molecules and acceleration of their pumping rates by many fold through use of voltage-clamp techniques, directly monitoring the pump currents. We further applied this technique to intact skeletal muscle fibers from amphibians and found significant effects on the membrane resting potential. Here, we extend our study to intact mammalian cardiomyocytes. We employed a noninvasive confocal microscopic fluorescent imaging technique to monitor electric field-induced changes in ionic concentration gradient and membrane resting potential. Our results further confirm that the well-designed synchronization modulation electric field can effectively accelerate the Na/K pumping rate, increasing the ionic concentration gradient across the cell membrane and hyperpolarizing the membrane resting potential.

  3. Modulation of Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane Redox System Activity by Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prabhakar; Kesharwani, Rajesh Kumar; Misra, Krishna; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane redox system (PMRS) is an electron transport chain system ubiquitously present throughout all cell types. It transfers electron from intracellular substrates to extracellular acceptors for regulation of redox status. Curcumin, isolated from Curcuma longa, has modulatory effects on cellular physiology due to its membrane interaction ability and antioxidant potential. The present study investigates the effect of curcumin on PMRS activity of erythrocytes isolated from Wistar rats in vitro and in vivo and validated through an in silico docking simulation study using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD). Effects of curcumin were also evaluated on level of glutathione (GSH) and the oxidant potential of plasma measured in terms of plasma ferric equivalent oxidative potentials (PFEOP). Results show that curcumin significantly (p < 0.01) downregulated the PMRS activity in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking results suggest that curcumin interacts with amino acids at the active site cavity of cytochrome b5 reductase, a key constituent of PMRS. Curcumin also increased the GSH level in erythrocytes and plasma while simultaneously decreasing the oxidant potential (PFEOP) of plasma. Altered PMRS activity and redox status are associated with the pathophysiology of several health complications including aging and diabetes; hence, the above finding may explain part of the role of curcumin in health beneficial effects. PMID:26904287

  4. Modulation of Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane Redox System Activity by Curcumin.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prabhakar; Kesharwani, Rajesh Kumar; Misra, Krishna; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane redox system (PMRS) is an electron transport chain system ubiquitously present throughout all cell types. It transfers electron from intracellular substrates to extracellular acceptors for regulation of redox status. Curcumin, isolated from Curcuma longa, has modulatory effects on cellular physiology due to its membrane interaction ability and antioxidant potential. The present study investigates the effect of curcumin on PMRS activity of erythrocytes isolated from Wistar rats in vitro and in vivo and validated through an in silico docking simulation study using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD). Effects of curcumin were also evaluated on level of glutathione (GSH) and the oxidant potential of plasma measured in terms of plasma ferric equivalent oxidative potentials (PFEOP). Results show that curcumin significantly (p < 0.01) downregulated the PMRS activity in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking results suggest that curcumin interacts with amino acids at the active site cavity of cytochrome b 5 reductase, a key constituent of PMRS. Curcumin also increased the GSH level in erythrocytes and plasma while simultaneously decreasing the oxidant potential (PFEOP) of plasma. Altered PMRS activity and redox status are associated with the pathophysiology of several health complications including aging and diabetes; hence, the above finding may explain part of the role of curcumin in health beneficial effects. PMID:26904287

  5. The membrane potential modulates thrombin-stimulated Ca²⁺ mobilization and platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Albarrán, Letizia; Dionisio, Natalia; López, Esther; Salido, Ginés M; Rosado, Juan A

    2013-10-15

    G protein-coupled receptors can be directly modulated by changes in transmembrane voltage in a variety of cell types. Here we show that, while changes in the membrane voltage itself do not induce detectable modifications in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, platelet stimulation with thrombin or the PAR-1 and PAR-4 agonist peptides SFLLRN and AYPGKF, respectively, results in Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores that is sensitive to the membrane depolarisation. Direct activation of G proteins or phospholipase C by AlF4(-) and m-3M3FBS, respectively, leads to Ca(2+) release that is insensitive to changes in the membrane potential. Thapsigargin-, as well as OAG-induced Ca(2+) entry are affected by the membrane voltage, probably as a result of the modification in the driving force for Ca(2+) influx; however, hyperpolarisation does not enhance thrombin- or OAG-evoked Ca(2+) entry probably revealing the presence of a voltage-sensitive regulatory mechanism. Transmembrane voltage also modulates the activity of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) most likely due to a decrease in the phosphotyrosine content of the pump. Thrombin-stimulated platelet aggregation is modulated by membrane depolarisation by a mechanism that is, at least partially, independent of Ca(2+). These observations indicate that PAR-1 and PAR-4 receptors are modulated by the membrane voltage in human platelets. PMID:23988350

  6. Photomodification of the electrical properties of the plasma membrane: a comparison between 6 different membrane-active photosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Killig, F; Kunz, L; Stark, G

    2001-05-01

    The present study deals with photomodification of the electrical properties of the plasma membrane of an epithelial cell line (opossum kidney (OK) cells). The effect of photofrin II (previously investigated) is compared with that of 5 other membrane-active sensitizers: sulfonated Zn-phthalocyanine, merocyanine 540, rose bengal, methylene blue and protoporphyrin IX (an endogenous sensitizer induced by addition of its biosynthetic precursor 5-aminolaevulinic acid). The study was performed in order to investigate whether photomodification of the ion transport properties of the plasma membrane by membrane-active sensitizers is a general and early event in cellular photosensitization. The changes in the electrical properties were monitored by application of the whole-cell and the inside-out configuration of the patch-clamp technique. Illumination in the presence of the compounds (apart from merocyanine 540) gave rise to similar changes of the electrical properties of the membrane: depolarization of the membrane potential, inactivation of a large-conductance, Ca2+-dependent K+-channel (maxi-KCa), and a strong increase of the leak conductance of the membrane. This similarity indicates the general character of the functional photomodifications by membrane-active sensitizers previously reported for photofrin II.

  7. Peptidergic modulation of the membrane potential of the Schwann cell of the squid giant nerve fibre.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, P D; Reale, V; Villegas, J

    1986-01-01

    The effects of a range of neuropeptides were investigated on the membrane potential of the Schwann cells of the giant nerve fibre of the tropical squid. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) produced a dose-dependent, long-lasting hyperpolarization of the Schwann-cell membrane potential. Among peptides structurally related to VIP, similar effects were produced by peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI) but not by secretin and glucagon. Substance P and somatostatin also hyperpolarized the Schwann-cell membrane potential but via receptor systems distinct from those activated by VIP. Methionine enkephalin ([Met]-enkephalin) blocked the actions of all the above peptides as well as the effects of DL-octopamine and carbachol. The actions of [Met]-enkephalin upon the VIP responses were antagonized by naloxone. VIP produces its effects on the Schwann-cell membrane potential via a receptor system that is independent from those described previously which mediate the effects of carbachol and DL-octopamine. However, VIP can potentiate the effects of the latter systems. The actions of VIP on the Schwann cell are unlikely to be mediated via changes in adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) levels and are insensitive to changes in the level of extracellular calcium in the superfusate. The actions of VIP are, however, potentiated in the presence of low concentrations of lithium ions suggesting that the VIP receptor may mediate its effects by inducing the hydrolysis of polyphosphatidylinositols in the Schwann-cell membrane. Evidence is presented for the existence of an endogenous VIP-like component in the normal hyperpolarizing action of giant-axon activity on the membrane potential of the Schwann cell. PMID:2435897

  8. The potential and electric field in the cochlear outer hair cell membrane

    PubMed Central

    Harland, Ben; Lee, Wen-han; Brownell, William E.; Sun, Sean X.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Outer hair cell electromechanics, critically important to mammalian active hearing, is driven by the cell membrane potential. The membrane protein prestin is a crucial component of the active outer hair cell’s motor. The focus of the paper is the analysis of the local membrane potential and electric field resulting from the interaction of electric charges involved. Here the relevant charges are the ions inside and outside the cell, lipid bilayer charges, and prestin-associated charges (mobile-transferred by the protein under the action of the applied field and stationary-relatively unmoved by the field). The electric potentials across and along the membrane are computed for the case of an applied DC-field. The local amplitudes and phases of the potential under different frequencies are analyzed for the case of a DC+AC-field. We found that the effect of the system of charges alters the electric potential and internal field, which deviate significantly from their traditional linear and constant distributions. Under DC+AC conditions, the strong frequency dependence of the prestin mobile charge has a relatively small effect on the amplitude and phase of the resulting potential. The obtained results can help in a better understanding and experimental verification of the mechanism of prestin performance. PMID:25687712

  9. The potential and electric field in the cochlear outer hair cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Harland, Ben; Lee, Wen-han; Brownell, William E; Sun, Sean X; Spector, Alexander A

    2015-05-01

    Outer hair cell electromechanics, critically important to mammalian active hearing, is driven by the cell membrane potential. The membrane protein prestin is a crucial component of the active outer hair cell's motor. The focus of the paper is the analysis of the local membrane potential and electric field resulting from the interaction of electric charges involved. Here the relevant charges are the ions inside and outside the cell, lipid bilayer charges, and prestin-associated charges (mobile-transferred by the protein under the action of the applied field, and stationary-relatively unmoved by the field). The electric potentials across and along the membrane are computed for the case of an applied DC-field. The local amplitudes and phases of the potential under different frequencies are analyzed for the case of a DC + AC-field. We found that the effect of the system of charges alters the electric potential and internal field, which deviate significantly from their traditional linear and constant distributions. Under DC + AC conditions, the strong frequency dependence of the prestin mobile charge has a relatively small effect on the amplitude and phase of the resulting potential. The obtained results can help in a better understanding and experimental verification of the mechanism of prestin performance. PMID:25687712

  10. Excitable Membranes and Action Potentials in Paramecia: An Analysis of the Electrophysiology of Ciliates.

    PubMed

    Schlaepfer, Charles H; Wessel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The ciliate Paramecium caudatum possesses an excitable cell membrane whose action potentials (APs) modulate the trajectory of the cell swimming through its freshwater environment. While many stimuli affect the membrane potential and trajectory, students can use current injection and extracellular ionic concentration changes to explore how APs cause reversal of the cell's motion. Students examine these stimuli through intracellular recordings, also gaining insight into the practices of electrophysiology. Paramecium's large size of around 150 µm, simple care, and relative ease to penetrate make them ideal model organisms for undergraduate students' laboratory study. The direct link between behavior and excitable membranes has thought provoking evolutionary implications for the study of paramecia. Recording from the cell, students note a small resting potential around -30 mV, differing from animal resting potentials. By manipulating ion concentrations, APs of the relatively long length of 20-30 ms up to several minutes with depolarizations maxing over 0 mV are observed. Through comparative analysis of membrane potentials and the APs induced by either calcium or barium, students can deduce the causative ions for the APs as well as the mechanisms of paramecium APs. Current injection allows students to calculate quantitative electric characteristics of the membrane. Analysis will follow the literature's conclusion in a V-Gated Ca(++) influx and depolarization resulting in feedback from intracellular Ca(++) that inactivates V-Gated Ca(++) channels and activates Ca-Dependent K(+) channels through a secondary messenger cascade that results in the K(+) efflux and repolarization. PMID:26557800

  11. Estimation of the membrane potential of cultured macrophages from the fast potential transient upon microelectrode entry.

    PubMed

    Ince, C; Ypey, D L; Van Furth, R; Verveen, A A

    1983-03-01

    Analysis of membrane potential recordings upon microelectrode impalement of four types of macrophages (cell lines P388D1 and PU5-1.8, cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages, and cultured human monocytes) reveals that these cells have membrane potentials at least two times more negative than sustained potential values (E(s)) frequently reported. Upon microelectrode entry into the cell (P388D1), the recorded potential drops to a peak value (E(p)) (mean -37 mV for 50 cells, range -15 to -70 mV) within 2 ms, after which it decays to a depolarized potential (E(n)) (mean -12 mV) in about 20 ms. Thereafter, the membrane develops one or a series of slow hyperpolarizations before a final sustained membrane potential (E(s)) (mean -14 mV, range -5 to -40) is established. The mean value of the peak of the first hyperpolarization (E(h)) is -30 mV (range -10 to -55 mV). The initial fast peak transient, measured upon microelectrode entry, was first described and analyzed by Lassen et al. (Lassen, U.V., A.M. T. Nielson, L. Pape, and L. O. Simonsen, 1971, J. Membr. Biol. 6:269-288 for other change in the membrane potential from its real value before impalement to a sustained depolarized value. This was shown to be true for macrophages by two-electrode impalements of single cells. Values of E(p), E(n), E(h), E(s), and membrane resistance (R(m)) measured for the other macrophages were similar to those of P388D1. From these results we conclude that E(p) is a better estimate of the true membrane potential of macrophages than E(s), and that the slow hyperpolarizations upon impalement should be regarded as transient repolarizations back to the original membrane potentials. Thus, analysis of the initial fast impalement transient can be a valuable aid in the estimation of the membrane potential of various sorts of small isolated cells by microelectrodes.

  12. Electrochemical sensing of membrane potential and enzyme function using gallium arsenide electrodes functionalized with supported membranes.

    PubMed

    Gassull, Daniel; Ulman, Abraham; Grunze, Michael; Tanaka, Motomu

    2008-05-01

    We deposit phospholipid monolayers on highly doped p-GaAs electrodes that are precoated with methyl-mercaptobiphenyl monolayers and operate such a biofunctional electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) setup as an analogue of a metal-oxide-semiconductor setup. Electrochemical impedance spectra measured over a wide frequency range demonstrate that the presence of a lipid monolayer remarkably slows down the diffusion of ions so that the membrane-functionalized GaAs can be subjected to electrochemical investigations for more than 3 days with no sign of degradation. The biofunctional EIS setup enables us to translate changes in the surface charge density Q and bias potentials Ubias into the change in the interface capacitance Cp. Since Cp is governed by the capacitance of semiconductor space charge region CSC, the linear relationships obtained for 1/Cp2 vs Q and 1/Cp2 vs Ubias suggests that Cp can be used to detect the surface charges with a high sensitivity (1 charge per 18 nm2). Furthermore, the kinetics of phospholipids degradation by phospholipase A2 can also be monitored by a significant decrease in diffusion coefficients through the membrane by a factor of 104. Thus, the operation of GaAs membrane composites established here allows for electrochemical sensing of surface potential and barrier capability of biological membranes in a quantitative manner.

  13. Regulation of the plasma membrane potential in Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed

    VanderHeyden, N; McLaughlin, G L; Docampo, R

    2000-02-15

    Many protists use a H(+) gradient across the plasma membrane, the proton motive force, to drive nutrient uptake. This force is generated in part by the plasma membrane potential (DeltaPsi). We investigated the regulation of the DeltaPsi in Pneumocystis carinii using the potentiometric fluorescent dye bisoxonol. The steady state DeltaPsi in a buffer containing Na(+) and K(+) (standard buffer) was found to be -78+/-8 mV. In the absence of Na(+) and K(+) (NMG buffer) or Cl(-) (gluconate buffer), DeltaPsi was not significantly changed suggesting that cation and anion conductances do not play a significant role in the regulation of DeltaPsi in P. carinii. The DeltaPsi was also not affected by inhibitors of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, ouabain (1 mM), and the K(+)/H(+)-ATPase, omeprazole (1 mM). In contrast, inhibitors of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (100 microM), N-ethylmaleimide (100 microM) and diethylstilbestrol (25 microM), significantly depolarized the DeltaPsi to -43+/-7, -56+/-5 and -40+/-12 mV, respectively. The data support that the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase plays a significant role in the regulation of DeltaPsi in P. carinii.

  14. Contributions of electrogenic pumps to resting membrane potentials: the theory of electrogenic potentials.

    PubMed

    Sjodin, R A

    1984-01-01

    Pumped and transported components of ionic flux have been added to passive electrodiffusive components. This permits the derivation of equations for the resting membrane potential that take account of electrogenic mechanisms in which the transport mechanism or pump itself produces a net ionic current. Such equations are general in that they apply to non-steady-state conditions in which intracellular ionic concentrations are changing. The equations developed allow calculation of resting membrane potentials in terms of ionic concentrations, membrane permeability to ions, and kinetic relations for pumped ionic fluxes. When applied to skeletal muscle fibers, the equations predict a buffering effect of the Na/K pump on the membrane potential over a wide range in the values [K]i and [Na]i such that a fairly constant membrane potential occurs under conditions in which the passive ionic fluxes themselves would produce increasing degrees of depolarization. A plot of the membrane potential versus log [K]o with an electrogenic Na pump present gives a curve with slopes both greater than and less than 58 mV per 10-fold concentration change. Over a middle range of [K]o values, the slope is 58 mV. The slope of Em versus log [K]o curves is, therefore, not a very sensitive test for the presence of an electrogenic pump. For the same internal ionic concentrations, less electrogenic increment in membrane potential is observed the higher the value of [K]o, and the more depolarized the membrane. This is due to a rectification present in the pump current-voltage curve, which requires that more pump current be present to produce a given membrane hyperpolarization at depolarized values of the potential than at hyperpolarized values of the potential. A gain in Na and a loss of K by the fibers affects the rectification curve in such a way that less pump current is required to produce the same degree of hyperpolarization. This mechanism ensures that adequate internal negativity will be

  15. The sigma-1 receptor agonist 4-phenyl-1-(4-phenylbutyl) piperidine (PPBP) protects against newborn excitotoxic brain injury by stabilizing the mitochondrial membrane potential in vitro and inhibiting microglial activation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wegleiter, Karina; Hermann, Martin; Posod, Anna; Wechselberger, Karina; Stanika, Ruslan I; Obermair, Gerald J; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula; Urbanek, Martina; Griesmaier, Elke

    2014-11-01

    Premature birth represents a clinical situation of risk for brain injury. The diversity of pathophysiological processes complicates efforts to find effective therapeutic strategies. Excitotoxicity is one important factor in the pathogenesis of preterm brain injury. The observation that sigma-1 receptor agonists possess neuroprotective potential, at least partly mediated by a variety of anti-excitotoxic mechanisms, has generated great interest in targeting those receptors to counteract brain injury. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the highly specific sigma-1 receptor agonist, 4-phenyl-1-(4-phenylbutyl) piperidine (PPBP) to protect against excitotoxic developmental brain injury in vivo and in vitro. Primary hippocampal neurons were pre-treated with PPBP before glutamate was applied and subsequently analyzed for cell death (PI/calcein AM), mitochondrial activity (TMRM) and morphology of the neuronal network (WGA) using confocal microscopy. Using an established neonatal mouse model we also determined whether systemic injection of PPBP significantly attenuates excitotoxic brain injury. PPBP significantly reduced neuronal cell death in primary hippocampal neurons exposed to glutamate. Neurons treated with PPBP showed a less pronounced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and fewer morphological changes after glutamate exposure. A single intraperitoneal injection of PPBP given one hour after the excitotoxic insult significantly reduced microglial cell activation and lesion size in cortical gray and white matter. The present study provides strong support for the consideration of sigma-1 receptor agonists as a candidate therapy for the reduction of neonatal excitotoxic brain lesions and might offer a novel target to counteract developmental brain injury.

  16. K+ transport and membrane potentials in isolated rat parotid acini

    SciTech Connect

    Nauntofte, B.; Dissing, S.

    1988-10-01

    42K+ transport properties of isolated rat parotid acini were characterized concomitant with measurements of membrane potentials (Em) by means of the fluorescent dye diSC3-(5). In unstimulated acini suspended in a 5 mM K+ buffer, Em was governed by the K+ and Cl- gradients and amounted to about -59 mV, a value that remained unaffected on cholinergic stimulation. In unstimulated acini, 42K+ influx was largely mediated by the Na+-K+ pump, and the residual influxes were mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component (cotransport system) and by K+ channels. Efflux of 42K+ was largely mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component and by K+ channels. In the unstimulated state, the cotransport system was mediating K+-K+ exchange without contributing to the net uptake of K+. Within 10 s after stimulation, a approximately 10-fold increase in the acinar K+ conductance (gK) occurred, resulting in a rapid net efflux of K+ that amounted to approximately 3.8 mmol.l cells-1.s-1. Measurements of 42K+ fluxes as a function of the external K+ concentration revealed that in the stimulated state gK increases when external K+ is raised from 0.7 to 10 mM, consistent with an activation of acinar gK by the binding of external K+ to the channel. 42K+ flux ratios as well as the effect of the K+ channel inhibitor from scorpion venom (LQV) suggest that approximately 90% of K+ transport in the stimulated state is mediated by ''maxi'' K+ channels.

  17. The Amniotic Membrane: Development and Potential Applications - A Review.

    PubMed

    Favaron, P O; Carvalho, R C; Borghesi, J; Anunciação, A R A; Miglino, M A

    2015-12-01

    Foetal membranes are essential tissues for embryonic development, playing important roles related to protection, breathing, nutrition and excretion. The amnion is the innermost extraembryonic membrane, which surrounds the foetus, forming an amniotic sac that contains the amniotic fluid (AF). In recent years, the amniotic membrane has emerged as a potential tool for clinical applications and has been primarily used in medicine in order to stimulate the healing of skin and corneal diseases. It has also been used in vaginal reconstructive surgery, repair of abdominal hernia, prevention of surgical adhesions and pericardium closure. More recently, it has been used in regenerative medicine because the amniotic-derived stem cells as well as AF-derived cells exhibit cellular plasticity, angiogenic, cytoprotective, immunosuppressive properties, antitumoural potential and the ability to generate induced pluripotent stem cells. These features make them a promising source of stem cells for cell therapy and tissue engineering. In this review, we discussed the development of the amnion, AF and amniotic cavity in different species, as well as the applicability of stem cells from the amnion and AF in cellular therapy.

  18. Investigation of the effects of 2.1 GHz microwave radiation on mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), apoptotic activity and cell viability in human breast fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Esmekaya, Meric Arda; Seyhan, Nesrin; Kayhan, Handan; Tuysuz, Mehmet Zahid; Kurşun, Ayşe Canseven; Yağcı, Münci

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we aimed to investigate the effects of 2.1 GHz Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (W-CDMA) modulated Microwave (MW) Radiation on cell survival and apoptotic activity of human breast fibroblast cells. The cell cultures were exposed to W-CDMA modulated MW at 2.1 GHz at a SAR level of 0.607 W/kg for 4 and 24 h. The cell viability was assessed by MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] method. The percentage of apoptotic cells was analyzed by Annexin V-FITC and PI staining. 5,5',6,6'-Tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'- tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1) was used to measure Mitochondrial Membrane Potential (ΔΨm). sFasL and Fas/APO-1 protein levels were determined by ELISA method. 2.1 GHz MW radiation was shown to be able to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in human breast fibroblast cells. The cell viability of MW-exposed cells was decreased significantly. The percentages of Annexin V-FITC positive cells were higher in MW groups. ΔΨm was decreased significantly due to MW radiation exposure. However, neither sFas nor FasL level was significantly changed in MW-exposed fibroblast cells. The results of this study showed that 2.1 GHz W-CDMA modulated MW radiation-induced apoptotic cell death via the mitochondrial pathway.

  19. Thermoelectric Potential of Polymer-Scaffolded Ionic Liquid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, R. S.; Said, S. M.; Sahamir, S. R.; Karim, M. R.; Sabri, M. F. M.; Nakajo, T.; Kubouchi, M.; Hayashi, K.; Miyazaki, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Organic thin films have been viewed as potential thermoelectric (TE) materials, given their ease of fabrication, flexibility, cost effectiveness, and low thermal conductivity. However, their intrinsically low electrical conductivity is a main drawback which results in a relatively lower TE figure of merit for polymer-based TE materials than for inorganic materials. In this paper, a technique to enhance the ion transport properties of polymers through the introduction of ionic liquids is presented. The polymer is in the form of a nanofiber scaffold produced using the electrospinning technique. These fibers were then soaked in different ionic liquids based on substituted imidazolium such as 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride or 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide. This method was applied to electrospun polyacrylonitrile and a mixture of polyvinyl alcohol and chitosan polymers. The ion transport properties of the membranes have been observed to increase with increasing concentration of ionic liquid, with maximum electrical conductivity of 1.20 × 10-1 S/cm measured at room temperature. Interestingly, the maximum electrical conductivity value surpassed the value of pure ionic liquids. These results indicate that it is possible to significantly improve the electrical conductivity of a polymer membrane through a simple and cost-effective method. This may in turn boost the TE figures of merit of polymer materials, which are well known to be considerably lower than those of inorganic materials. Results in terms of the Seebeck coefficient of the membranes are also presented in this paper to provide an overall representation of the TE potential of the polymer-scaffolded ionic liquid membranes.

  20. Electric field strength of membrane lipids from vertebrate species: membrane lipid composition and Na+-K+-ATPase molecular activity.

    PubMed

    Starke-Peterkovic, Thomas; Turner, Nigel; Else, Paul L; Clarke, Ronald J

    2005-03-01

    Intramembrane electric field strength is a very likely determinant of the activity of ion-transporting membrane proteins in living cells. In the absence of any transmembrane electrical potential or surface potential, its magnitude is determined by the dipole potential of the membrane's lipid components and their associated water of hydration. Here we have used a fluorometric method to quantify the dipole potential of vesicles formed from lipids extracted from kidney and brain of 11 different animal species from four different vertebrate classes. The dipole potential was compared with the fatty acid composition and with the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase molecular activity of each preparation. The magnitude of the dipole potential was found to be relatively constant across all animal species, i.e., 236-334 mV for vesicles prepared from the total membrane lipids and 223-256 mV for phospholipids alone. The significantly lower value for phospholipids alone is potentially related to the removal of cholesterol and/or other common soluble lipid molecules from the membrane. Surprisingly, no significant dependence of the dipole potential on fatty acid composition was found. This may, however, be due to concomitant compensatory variations in lipid head group composition. The molecular activity of the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase was found to increase with increasing dipole potential. The fact that the dipole potential is maintained at a relatively constant value over a wide range of animal species suggests that it may play a fundamental role in ensuring correct ion pump conformation and function within the membrane.

  1. Transport of ions across bipolar membranes. 1. Theoretical and experimental examination of the membrane potential of KCl solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Higa, Mitsuru; Kira, Akira

    1995-04-06

    A calculation method was derived for ionic transport across a bipolar membrane in dialysis systems of mixed salt solutions containing multivalent ions. The calculation of the total membrane potential in the solutions containing KCl alone by this method shows that the potential-salt concentration curve depends both on the direction of the arrangement of the membrane charged layers to the concentration gradient of the salt solutions and on the ratio of the charge densities of the two charged layers. The simulations based on experimentally determined parameters agree with the potential measurements for bipolar membranes produced so that the transport properties depend mainly on their charges. 40 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Polymeric membrane systems of potential use for battery separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    Two membrane systems were investigated that may have potential use as alkaline battery separators. One system comprises two miscible polymers: a support polymer (e.g., polyvinyl formal) and an ion conductor such as polyacrylic acid. The other system involves a film composed of two immiscible polymers: a conducting polymer (e.g., calcium polyacrylate) suspended in an inert polymer support matrix, polyphenylene oxide. Resistivities in 45-percent potassium hydroxide and qualitative mechanical properties are presented for films comprising various proportions of conducting and support polymers. In terms of these parameters, the results are encouraging for optimum ratios of conducting to support polymers.

  3. Dynamical speckles patterns of action potential transmission effects in squid giant axon membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovera-González, Juan J.; Moreno-Yeras, Alfredo B.; Muramatsu, Mikiya; Soga, Diogo; Serra-Toledo, Rolando L.; Magalhães, Daniel S. F.

    2013-11-01

    Undoubtedly the most important result of the investigations in physiology and biophysics was the discovery of the electrochemical mechanism of propagation of the action potential in nerves that was made by Hodgkin and Huxley during the first half of the past century. Since some decades ago diverse experiments about the electro optical properties of the axon membrane there was published using the most diverse optical experimental procedures6-10. In this paper some results of a dynamical speckle technique applied for obtaining microscopic images of a section of a squid giant axon membrane during the activation by electrical impulses and his digital process are presented.

  4. Daptomycin exerts rapid bactericidal activity against Bacillus anthracis without disrupting membrane integrity

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yu-hua; Wang, Wei; Dai, Su-qin; Liu, Ti-yan; Tan, Jun-jie; Qu, Guo-long; Li, Yu-xia; Ling, Yan; Liu, Gang; Fu, Xue-qi; Chen, Hui-peng

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To examine whether the novel cyclic lipopeptide antibiotic daptomycin could be used to treat anthrax and to study the mechanisms underlying its bactericidal action against Bacillus anthracis. Methods: Spore-forming B anthracis AP422 was tested. MIC values of antibiotics were determined. Cell membrane potential was measured using flow cytometric assays with membrane potential-sensitive fluorescent dyes. Cell membrane integrity was detected using To-Pro-3 iodide staining and transmission electron microscopy. K+ efflux and Na+ influx were measured using the fluorescent probes PBFI and SBFI-AM, respectively. Results: Daptomycin exhibited rapid bactericidal activity against vegetative B anthracis with a MIC value of 0.78 μg/mL, which was comparable to those of ciprofloxacin and penicillin G. Furthermore, daptomycin prevented the germinated spores from growing into vegetative bacteria. Daptomycin concentration-dependently dissipated the membrane potential of B anthracis and caused K+ efflux and Na+ influx without disrupting membrane integrity. In contrast, both ciprofloxacin and penicillin G did not change the membrane potential of vegetative bacteria or spores. Penicillin G disrupted membrane integrity of B anthracis, whereas ciprofloxacin had no such effect. Conclusion: Daptomycin exerts rapid bactericidal action against B anthracis via reducing membrane potential without disrupting membrane integrity. This antibiotic can be used as an alternate therapy for B anthracis infections. PMID:24362329

  5. Photosynthesis Activates Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase via Sugar Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Masaki; Inoue, Shin-Ichiro; Kuwata, Keiko; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-05-01

    Plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase acts as a primary transporter via proton pumping and regulates diverse physiological responses by controlling secondary solute transport, pH homeostasis, and membrane potential. Phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine and the subsequent binding of 14-3-3 proteins in the carboxyl terminus of the enzyme are required for H(+)-ATPase activation. We showed previously that photosynthesis induces phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine in the nonvascular bryophyte Marchantia polymorpha However, (1) whether this response is conserved in vascular plants and (2) the process by which photosynthesis regulates H(+)-ATPase phosphorylation at the plasma membrane remain unresolved issues. Here, we report that photosynthesis induced the phosphorylation and activation of H(+)-ATPase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves via sugar accumulation. Light reversibly phosphorylated leaf H(+)-ATPase, and this process was inhibited by pharmacological and genetic suppression of photosynthesis. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses indicated that light-induced phosphorylation of H(+)-ATPase occurred autonomously in mesophyll cells. We also show that the phosphorylation status of H(+)-ATPase and photosynthetic sugar accumulation in leaves were positively correlated and that sugar treatment promoted phosphorylation. Furthermore, light-induced phosphorylation of H(+)-ATPase was strongly suppressed in a double mutant defective in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and triose phosphate/phosphate translocator (adg1-1 tpt-2); these mutations strongly inhibited endogenous sugar accumulation. Overall, we show that photosynthesis activated H(+)-ATPase via sugar production in the mesophyll cells of vascular plants. Our work provides new insight into signaling from chloroplasts to the plasma membrane ion transport mechanism. PMID:27016447

  6. Estimation of time-dependent input from neuronal membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryota; Shinomoto, Shigeru; Lansky, Petr

    2011-12-01

    The set of firing rates of the presynaptic excitatory and inhibitory neurons constitutes the input signal to the postsynaptic neuron. Estimation of the time-varying input rates from intracellularly recorded membrane potential is investigated here. For that purpose, the membrane potential dynamics must be specified. We consider the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck stochastic process, one of the most common single-neuron models, with time-dependent mean and variance. Assuming the slow variation of these two moments, it is possible to formulate the estimation problem by using a state-space model. We develop an algorithm that estimates the paths of the mean and variance of the input current by using the empirical Bayes approach. Then the input firing rates are directly available from the moments. The proposed method is applied to three simulated data examples: constant signal, sinusoidally modulated signal, and constant signal with a jump. For the constant signal, the estimation performance of the method is comparable to that of the traditionally applied maximum likelihood method. Further, the proposed method accurately estimates both continuous and discontinuous time-variable signals. In the case of the signal with a jump, which does not satisfy the assumption of slow variability, the robustness of the method is verified. It can be concluded that the method provides reliable estimates of the total input firing rates, which are not experimentally measurable. PMID:21919789

  7. A Review on the Potential Role of Basement Membrane Laminin in the Pathogenesis of Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    McFadden, J P; Kimber, I

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reviewed alterations to basement membrane laminin in psoriasis and how disruption of this layer could lead to at least some of the pathological changes observed. We here postulate that basement membrane laminin is the key antigen in driving psoriasis, inducing a T cell-mediated autoimmune response. For laminin to be considered as the key autoantigen in psoriasis, it would be reasonable to expect the following to be demonstrable: (1) that autoantigens are present in psoriatic inflammation; (2) that basement membrane laminin is perturbed in involved and uninvolved skin, and that some of the pathological changes associated with psoriasis could be predicted as a sequel to this; (3) that disruption of the basement membrane is among the earliest events in the evolution of psoriatic lesions; (4) that as streptococcal pharyngitis is the most clearly defined event to trigger or exacerbate psoriasis, then a T cell-mediated autoimmune response to laminin should be anticipated as a potential sequelae to streptococcal pharyngitis; (5) that T cells in psoriasis can be shown to react to peptides with homology to laminin; (6) that HLACw6, as the most closely related gene associated with psoriasis and which is involved in antigen expression, should be preferentially expressed within lesional psoriasis towards the basement membrane, together with other proximal associated immune activity; and (7) that there is some association between antilaminin pemphigoid, a humorally mediated autoimmune disease to skin basement membrane laminin, and psoriasis. We here review the data relevant to each of these requirements.

  8. [Nicotine effects on mitochondria membrane potential: participation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors].

    PubMed

    Gergalova, G L; Skok, M V

    2011-01-01

    The effect of nicotine on the mouse liver mitochondria was studied by fluorescent flow cytometry. Mice consumed nicotine during 65 days; alternatively, nicotine was added to isolated mitochondria. Mitochondria of nicotine-treated mice had significantly lower basic levels of membrane potential and granularity as compared to those of the control group. Pre-incubation of the isolated mitochondria with nicotine prevented from dissipation of their membrane potential stimulated with 0.8 microM CaCl2 depending on the dose, and this effect was strengthened by the antagonist of alpha7 nicotinic receptors (alpha7 nAChR) methyllicaconitine. Mitochondria of mice intravenously injected with the antibodies against alpha7 nAChR demonstrated lower levels of membrane potential. Introduction of nicotine, choline, acetylcholine or synthetic alpha7 nAChR agonist PNU 282987 into the incubation medium inhibited Ca2+ accumulation in mitochondria, although the doses of agonists were too low to activate the alpha7 nAChR ion channel. It is concluded that nicotine consumption worsens the functional state of mitochondria by affecting their membrane potential and granularity, and this effect, at least in part, is mediated by alpha7 nAChR desensitization.

  9. Effects of osmotic challenges on membrane potential in human articular chondrocytes from healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Julio C; López-Zapata, Diego F

    2010-01-01

    Changes in external osmolarity arise from variations in mechanical loads on joints and may affect the homeostasis of chondrocytes, which are the only cell type responsible for matrix turnover. Accordingly, variations in membrane potential may affect cartilage production. The present study assessed the effects of variations in external osmolarity on membrane potential and the possible mechanisms responsible for this response. Membrane potential was measured by the patch clamp whole-cell technique using human articular chondrocytes freshly isolated from healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage. The membrane potential was -39±4 mV in articular human chondrocytes from healthy cartilage and -26±4 mV in those from osteoarthritic cartilage. Increasing the osmolarity produced a reversible hyperpolarization mediated by K+ efflux through BKCa channels in both groups of chondrocytes, but the response in osteoarthritic cells was significantly reduced; no other K+ pathways were involved in this effect. Alternatively, decreasing the osmolarity elicited depolarization in healthy chondrocytes but did not produce any response in chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage. The depolarization was dependent on Na+ influx through Gd3+-sensitive stretch-activated cation channels and was independent of external Ca2+. The differential responses observed in chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage suggest that disregulation on the responses to external osmolarity may be involved in the process that leads to the alterations in the cartilage structure observed in osteoarthritis.

  10. Fouling mitigation of anion exchange membrane by zeta potential control.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Soo; Lee, Hong-Joo; Choi, Seok-Ju; Geckeler, Kurt E; Cho, Jaeweon; Moon, Seung-Hyeon

    2003-03-15

    The feasibility of fouling mitigation of anion exchange membranes (AEMs) in the presence of humate was studied by adding three different types of water-soluble polymers, i.e., poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and poly(ethylene imine) (PEI), during electrodialysis (ED) desalination. Measurement of zeta potential of the humate used in this study showed highly negative potential (about -30 mV), implying that the humate had a strong fouling potential on the AEMs in ED. Of the three water-soluble polymers, PEI showed a positive zeta potential (about +14 mV) and is able to form an interpolymer complex with the humate. PAA and PVA hardly formed interpolymer complexes with humate due to electrostatic repulsion. The PEI-humate mixture with a volume ratio of 1:20 (PEI:humate) showed zero zeta potential, and a complexed humate with zero surface charge was formed, resulting in no fouling effects on the AEMs. Accordingly, the desalting ED experiments with PEI showed improved ED performance. Further, black colloids formed in the mixture did not cause the cell resistance to increase. PMID:16256509

  11. Fouling mitigation of anion exchange membrane by zeta potential control.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Soo; Lee, Hong-Joo; Choi, Seok-Ju; Geckeler, Kurt E; Cho, Jaeweon; Moon, Seung-Hyeon

    2003-03-15

    The feasibility of fouling mitigation of anion exchange membranes (AEMs) in the presence of humate was studied by adding three different types of water-soluble polymers, i.e., poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and poly(ethylene imine) (PEI), during electrodialysis (ED) desalination. Measurement of zeta potential of the humate used in this study showed highly negative potential (about -30 mV), implying that the humate had a strong fouling potential on the AEMs in ED. Of the three water-soluble polymers, PEI showed a positive zeta potential (about +14 mV) and is able to form an interpolymer complex with the humate. PAA and PVA hardly formed interpolymer complexes with humate due to electrostatic repulsion. The PEI-humate mixture with a volume ratio of 1:20 (PEI:humate) showed zero zeta potential, and a complexed humate with zero surface charge was formed, resulting in no fouling effects on the AEMs. Accordingly, the desalting ED experiments with PEI showed improved ED performance. Further, black colloids formed in the mixture did not cause the cell resistance to increase.

  12. Dynamics of a membrane interacting with an active wall.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kento; Komura, Shigeyuki; Okamoto, Ryuichi

    2016-05-01

    Active motions of a biological membrane can be induced by nonthermal fluctuations that occur in the outer environment of the membrane. We discuss the dynamics of a membrane interacting hydrodynamically with an active wall that exerts random velocities on the ambient fluid. Solving the hydrodynamic equations of a bound membrane, we first derive a dynamic equation for the membrane fluctuation amplitude in the presence of different types of walls. Membrane two-point correlation functions are calculated for three different cases: (i) a static wall, (ii) an active wall, and (iii) an active wall with an intrinsic time scale. We focus on the mean squared displacement (MSD) of a tagged membrane describing the Brownian motion of a membrane segment. For the static wall case, there are two asymptotic regimes of MSD (∼t^{2/3} and ∼t^{1/3}) when the hydrodynamic decay rate changes monotonically. In the case of an active wall, the MSD grows linearly in time (∼t) in the early stage, which is unusual for a membrane segment. This linear-growth region of the MSD is further extended when the active wall has a finite intrinsic time scale. PMID:27300924

  13. The Structural Basis of Cholesterol Activity in Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Brett N.; Bielska, Agata; Lee, Tiffany; Daily, Michael D.; Covey, Douglas F.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Baker, Nathan A.; Ory, Daniel S.

    2013-10-15

    Although the majority of free cellular cholesterol is present in the plasma membrane, cholesterol homeostasis is principally regulated through sterol-sensing proteins that reside in the cholesterol-poor endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In response to acute cholesterol loading or depletion, there is rapid equilibration between the ER and plasma membrane cholesterol pools, suggesting a biophysical model in which the availability of plasma membrane cholesterol for trafficking to internal membranes modulates ER membrane behavior. Previous studies have predominantly examined cholesterol availability in terms of binding to extramembrane acceptors, but have provided limited insight into the structural changes underlying cholesterol activation. In this study, we use both molecular dynamics simulations and experimental membrane systems to examine the behavior of cholesterol in membrane bilayers. We find that cholesterol depth within the bilayer provides a reasonable structural metric for cholesterol availability and that this is correlated with cholesterol-acceptor binding. Further, the distribution of cholesterol availability in our simulations is continuous rather than divided into distinct available and unavailable pools. This data provide support for a revised cholesterol activation model in which activation is driven not by saturation of membrane-cholesterol interactions but rather by bulk membrane remodeling that reduces membrane-cholesterol affinity.

  14. Excitable Membranes and Action Potentials in Paramecia: An Analysis of the Electrophysiology of Ciliates

    PubMed Central

    Schlaepfer, Charles H.; Wessel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The ciliate Paramecium caudatum possesses an excitable cell membrane whose action potentials (APs) modulate the trajectory of the cell swimming through its freshwater environment. While many stimuli affect the membrane potential and trajectory, students can use current injection and extracellular ionic concentration changes to explore how APs cause reversal of the cell’s motion. Students examine these stimuli through intracellular recordings, also gaining insight into the practices of electrophysiology. Paramecium’s large size of around 150 µm, simple care, and relative ease to penetrate make them ideal model organisms for undergraduate students’ laboratory study. The direct link between behavior and excitable membranes has thought provoking evolutionary implications for the study of paramecia. Recording from the cell, students note a small resting potential around −30 mV, differing from animal resting potentials. By manipulating ion concentrations, APs of the relatively long length of 20–30 ms up to several minutes with depolarizations maxing over 0 mV are observed. Through comparative analysis of membrane potentials and the APs induced by either calcium or barium, students can deduce the causative ions for the APs as well as the mechanisms of paramecium APs. Current injection allows students to calculate quantitative electric characteristics of the membrane. Analysis will follow the literature’s conclusion in a V-Gated Ca++ influx and depolarization resulting in feedback from intracellular Ca++ that inactivates V-Gated Ca++ channels and activates Ca-Dependent K+ channels through a secondary messenger cascade that results in the K+ efflux and repolarization. PMID:26557800

  15. Measurement of ATP-Induced Membrane Potential Changes in IVD cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Silvia; Rodriguez, Brittany; Barrera, Carlos; Huang, Chun-Yuh Charles

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) triggers biological responses in a wide variety of cells and tissues and activates signaling cascades that affect cell membrane potential and excitability. It has been demonstrated that compressive loading promotes ATP production and release by intervertebral disc (IVD) cells, while a high level of extracellular ATP accumulates in the nucleus pulposus (NP) of the IVD. In this study, a noninvasive system was developed to measure ATP-induced changes in the membrane potential of porcine IVD cells using the potential sensitive dye di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (di-8-ANEPPS).The responses of NP and annulus fibrosus (AF) cells to ATP were examined in monolayer and 3-dimensional cultures. It was found that the pattern and magnitude of membrane potential change in IVD cells induced by extracellular ATP depended on cell type, culture condition, and ATP dose. In addition, gene expression of P2X4 purinergic receptor was found in both cell types. Inhibition of the ATP-induced response by pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2', 4'-disulfonate (PPADS), a non-competitive inhibitor of P2 receptors, suggests that ATP may modulate the biological activities of IVD cells via P2 purinergic receptors. PMID:25386223

  16. Cortical membrane potential signature of optimal states for sensory signal detection

    PubMed Central

    McGinley, Matthew J.; David, Stephen V.; McCormick, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The neural correlates of optimal states for signal detection task performance are largely unknown. One hypothesis holds that optimal states exhibit tonically depolarized cortical neurons with enhanced spiking activity, such as occur during movement. We recorded membrane potentials of auditory cortical neurons in mice trained on a challenging tone-in-noise detection task while assessing arousal with simultaneous pupillometry and hippocampal recordings. Arousal measures accurately predicted multiple modes of membrane potential activity, including: rhythmic slow oscillations at low arousal, stable hyperpolarization at intermediate arousal, and depolarization during phasic or tonic periods of hyper-arousal. Walking always occurred during hyper-arousal. Optimal signal detection behavior and sound-evoked responses, at both sub-threshold and spiking levels, occurred at intermediate arousal when pre-decision membrane potentials were stably hyperpolarized. These results reveal a cortical physiological signature of the classically-observed inverted-U relationship between task performance and arousal, and that optimal detection exhibits enhanced sensory-evoked responses and reduced background synaptic activity. PMID:26074005

  17. Development of active-transport membrane devices

    SciTech Connect

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-07-01

    This report introduces the concept of Air Products` AT membranes for the separation of NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} from process gas streams and presents results from the first year fabrication concept development studies.

  18. Active membrane having uniform physico-chemically functionalized ion channels

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E; Ruscic, Katarina J; Sears, Devin N; Smith, Luis J; Klingler, Robert J; Rathke, Jerome W

    2012-09-24

    The present invention relates to a physicochemically-active porous membrane for electrochemical cells that purports dual functions: an electronic insulator (separator) and a unidirectional ion-transporter (electrolyte). The electrochemical cell membrane is activated for the transport of ions by contiguous ion coordination sites on the interior two-dimensional surfaces of the trans-membrane unidirectional pores. One dimension of the pore surface has a macroscopic length (1 nm-1000 .mu.m) and is directed parallel to the direction of an electric field, which is produced between the cathode and the anode electrodes of an electrochemical cell. The membrane material is designed to have physicochemical interaction with ions. Control of the extent of the interactions between the ions and the interior pore walls of the membrane and other materials, chemicals, or structures contained within the pores provides adjustability of the ionic conductivity of the membrane.

  19. Active Spacecraft Potential Control Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkar, K.; Nakamura, R.; Tajmar, M.; Scharlemann, C.; Jeszenszky, H.; Laky, G.; Fremuth, G.; Escoubet, C. P.; Svenes, K.

    2016-03-01

    In tenuous plasma the floating potential of sunlit spacecraft reaches tens of volts, positive. The corresponding field disturbs measurements of the ambient plasma by electron and ion sensors and can reduce micro-channel plate lifetime in electron detectors owing to large fluxes of attracted photoelectrons. Also the accuracy of electric field measurements may suffer from a high spacecraft potential. The Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) neutralizes the spacecraft potential by releasing positive charge produced by indium ion emitters. The method has been successfully applied on other spacecraft such as Cluster and Double Star. Two ASPOC units are present on each spacecraft. Each unit contains four ion emitters, whereby one emitter per instrument is operated at a time. ASPOC for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission includes new developments in the design of the emitters and the electronics. New features include the use of capillaries instead of needles, new materials for the emitters and their internal thermal insulators, an extended voltage and current range of the electronics, both for ion emission and heating purposes, and a more capable control software. This enables lower spacecraft potentials, higher reliability, and a more uniform potential structure in the spacecraft's sheath compared to previous missions. Results from on-ground testing demonstrate compliance with requirements. Model calculations confirm the findings from previous applications that the plasma measurements will not be affected by the beam's space charge. Finally, the various operating modes to adapt to changing boundary conditions are described along with the main data products.

  20. Salt stress in a membrane bioreactor: dynamics of sludge properties, membrane fouling and remediation through powdered activated carbon dosing.

    PubMed

    De Temmerman, L; Maere, T; Temmink, H; Zwijnenburg, A; Nopens, I

    2014-10-15

    Membrane bioreactors are a well-established technology for wastewater treatment. However, their efficiency is adversely impacted by membrane fouling, primarily inciting very conservative operations of installations that makes them less appealing from an economic perspective. This fouling propensity of the activated sludge is closely related to system disturbances. Therefore, improved insight into the impact of fouling is crucial towards increased membrane performance. In this work, the disturbance of a salt shock was investigated with respect to sludge composition and filterability in two parallel lab-scale membrane bioreactors. Several key sludge parameters (soluble microbial products, sludge-bound extracellular polymeric substances, supramicron particle size distributions (PSD), submicron particle concentrations) were intensively monitored prior to, during, and after a disturbance to investigate its impact as well as the potential governing mechanism. Upon salt addition, the supramicron PSD immediately shifted to smaller floc sizes, and the total fouling rate increased. Following a certain delay, an increase in submicron particles, supernatant proteins, and polysaccharides was observed as well as an increase in the irreversible membrane fouling rate. Recovery from the disturbance was evidenced with a simultaneous decrease in the above mentioned quantities. A similar experiment introducing powdered activated carbon (PAC) addition used for remediation resulted in either no or less significant changes in the above mentioned quantities, signifying its potential as a mitigation strategy.

  1. Salt stress in a membrane bioreactor: dynamics of sludge properties, membrane fouling and remediation through powdered activated carbon dosing.

    PubMed

    De Temmerman, L; Maere, T; Temmink, H; Zwijnenburg, A; Nopens, I

    2014-10-15

    Membrane bioreactors are a well-established technology for wastewater treatment. However, their efficiency is adversely impacted by membrane fouling, primarily inciting very conservative operations of installations that makes them less appealing from an economic perspective. This fouling propensity of the activated sludge is closely related to system disturbances. Therefore, improved insight into the impact of fouling is crucial towards increased membrane performance. In this work, the disturbance of a salt shock was investigated with respect to sludge composition and filterability in two parallel lab-scale membrane bioreactors. Several key sludge parameters (soluble microbial products, sludge-bound extracellular polymeric substances, supramicron particle size distributions (PSD), submicron particle concentrations) were intensively monitored prior to, during, and after a disturbance to investigate its impact as well as the potential governing mechanism. Upon salt addition, the supramicron PSD immediately shifted to smaller floc sizes, and the total fouling rate increased. Following a certain delay, an increase in submicron particles, supernatant proteins, and polysaccharides was observed as well as an increase in the irreversible membrane fouling rate. Recovery from the disturbance was evidenced with a simultaneous decrease in the above mentioned quantities. A similar experiment introducing powdered activated carbon (PAC) addition used for remediation resulted in either no or less significant changes in the above mentioned quantities, signifying its potential as a mitigation strategy. PMID:24999116

  2. Membrane Potentials of Vallisneria Leaf Cells and Their Relation to Photosynthesis 1

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Hidde B. A.; Harper, James R.; Higinbotham, Noe

    1980-01-01

    A study has been made of the effects of the inhibitors carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea (DCMU), and of anoxia on the light-sensitive membrane potential of Vallisneria leaf cells. The present results are compared with the known effects of these inhibitors on ion transport and photosynthesis (Prins 1974 Ph.D thesis). The membrane potential is composed of a diffusion potential plus an electrogenic component. The electrogenic potential is about −13 millivolts in the dark and −80 millivolts in the light. The inhibitory effect of DCMU and CCCP on the electrogenic mechanisms strongly depends on the light intensity used, the inhibition being less at a higher light intensity. This is of significance in view of the often conflicting results obtained with these inhibitors. With ion transport in Vallisneria the electrogenic pump derives its energy from phosphorylation; however, the process which causes the initial light-induced hyperpolarization and the process that keeps the membrane potential at a steady hyperpolarized state in the light have different energy requirements. The action of photosystem I alone is sufficient to induce the initial hyperpolarization. For continuous operation in the light the activity of photosystem II also is needed. PMID:16661121

  3. Membrane potentials of vallisneria leaf cells and their relation to photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Prins, H B; Harper, J R; Higinbotham, N

    1980-01-01

    A study has been made of the effects of the inhibitors carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea (DCMU), and of anoxia on the light-sensitive membrane potential of Vallisneria leaf cells. The present results are compared with the known effects of these inhibitors on ion transport and photosynthesis (Prins 1974 Ph.D thesis). The membrane potential is composed of a diffusion potential plus an electrogenic component. The electrogenic potential is about -13 millivolts in the dark and -80 millivolts in the light. The inhibitory effect of DCMU and CCCP on the electrogenic mechanisms strongly depends on the light intensity used, the inhibition being less at a higher light intensity. This is of significance in view of the often conflicting results obtained with these inhibitors. With ion transport in Vallisneria the electrogenic pump derives its energy from phosphorylation; however, the process which causes the initial light-induced hyperpolarization and the process that keeps the membrane potential at a steady hyperpolarized state in the light have different energy requirements. The action of photosystem I alone is sufficient to induce the initial hyperpolarization. For continuous operation in the light the activity of photosystem II also is needed. PMID:16661121

  4. Membrane potentials of vallisneria leaf cells and their relation to photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Prins, H B; Harper, J R; Higinbotham, N

    1980-01-01

    A study has been made of the effects of the inhibitors carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea (DCMU), and of anoxia on the light-sensitive membrane potential of Vallisneria leaf cells. The present results are compared with the known effects of these inhibitors on ion transport and photosynthesis (Prins 1974 Ph.D thesis). The membrane potential is composed of a diffusion potential plus an electrogenic component. The electrogenic potential is about -13 millivolts in the dark and -80 millivolts in the light. The inhibitory effect of DCMU and CCCP on the electrogenic mechanisms strongly depends on the light intensity used, the inhibition being less at a higher light intensity. This is of significance in view of the often conflicting results obtained with these inhibitors. With ion transport in Vallisneria the electrogenic pump derives its energy from phosphorylation; however, the process which causes the initial light-induced hyperpolarization and the process that keeps the membrane potential at a steady hyperpolarized state in the light have different energy requirements. The action of photosystem I alone is sufficient to induce the initial hyperpolarization. For continuous operation in the light the activity of photosystem II also is needed.

  5. Learning of Precise Spike Times with Homeostatic Membrane Potential Dependent Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Albers, Christian; Westkott, Maren; Pawelzik, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Precise spatio-temporal patterns of neuronal action potentials underly e.g. sensory representations and control of muscle activities. However, it is not known how the synaptic efficacies in the neuronal networks of the brain adapt such that they can reliably generate spikes at specific points in time. Existing activity-dependent plasticity rules like Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity are agnostic to the goal of learning spike times. On the other hand, the existing formal and supervised learning algorithms perform a temporally precise comparison of projected activity with the target, but there is no known biologically plausible implementation of this comparison. Here, we propose a simple and local unsupervised synaptic plasticity mechanism that is derived from the requirement of a balanced membrane potential. Since the relevant signal for synaptic change is the postsynaptic voltage rather than spike times, we call the plasticity rule Membrane Potential Dependent Plasticity (MPDP). Combining our plasticity mechanism with spike after-hyperpolarization causes a sensitivity of synaptic change to pre- and postsynaptic spike times which can reproduce Hebbian spike timing dependent plasticity for inhibitory synapses as was found in experiments. In addition, the sensitivity of MPDP to the time course of the voltage when generating a spike allows MPDP to distinguish between weak (spurious) and strong (teacher) spikes, which therefore provides a neuronal basis for the comparison of actual and target activity. For spatio-temporal input spike patterns our conceptually simple plasticity rule achieves a surprisingly high storage capacity for spike associations. The sensitivity of the MPDP to the subthreshold membrane potential during training allows robust memory retrieval after learning even in the presence of activity corrupted by noise. We propose that MPDP represents a biophysically plausible mechanism to learn temporal target activity patterns. PMID:26900845

  6. Aerodynamic Performance of Electro-Active Membrane Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbu, Ioan-Alexandru; de Kat, Roeland; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2014-11-01

    Electro-active polymers offer due to their multivariate compliant nature a great potential for integrating the lift producing system and the control system into one. This work presents the first step in describing both the mechanical and aerodynamic performance of such materials and focuses on both understanding their behaviour in aerodynamic applications and on analysing their aerodynamic performance. Photogrammetry and load measurements are conducted in a wind tunnel for both silicone-based and acrylic-based membranes at zero prestrain supported in a perimeter reinforced frame in electrically passive, active and pulsing conditions. A wide range of fixed voltages and pulsing frequencies are considered. Due to their hyper-viscoelastic nature, both short and long term hysteresis analysis are conducted in terms of aerodynamic performance. Along with these tests, analyses of the effects of the percentage electrode area and silicone content on aerodynamic performance are conducted.

  7. Hyperpolarization of the membrane potential in cardiomyocyte tissue slices by the synchronization modulation electric field.

    PubMed

    Dando, Robin; Fang, Zhihui; Chen, Wei

    2012-02-01

    Our previous studies have shown that a specially designed, so-called synchronization modulation electric field can entrain active transporter Na/K pumps in the cell membrane. This approach was previously developed in a study of single cells using a voltage clamp to monitor the pump currents. We are now expanding our study from isolated single cells to aggregated cells in a 3-dimensional cell matrix, through the use of a tissue slice from the rat heart. The slice is about 150 μm in thickness, meaning the slices contain many cell layers, resulting in a simplified 3-dimensional system. A fluorescent probe was used to identify the membrane potential and the ionic concentration gradients across the cell membrane. In spite of intrinsic cell-to-cell interactions and the difficulty in stimulating cell aggregation in the tissue slice, the oscillating electric field increased the intracellular fluorescent intensity, indicating elevation of the cell ionic concentration and hyperpolarization of the cell membrane. Blockage of these changes by ouabain confirmed that the results are directly related to Na/K pumps. These results along with the backward modulation indicate that the synchronization modulation electric field can influence the Na/K pumps in tissue cells of a 3-dimensional matrix and therefore hyperpolarize the cell membrane.

  8. Membrane fouling potentials and cellular properties of bacteria isolated from fouled membranes in a MBR treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, So; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Ishii, Satoshi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    Membrane fouling remains a major challenge for wider application of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) to wastewater treatment. Membrane fouling is mainly caused by microorganisms and their excreted microbial products. For development of more effective control strategies, it is important to identify and characterize the microorganisms that are responsible for membrane fouling. In this study, 41 bacterial strains were isolated from fouled microfiltration membranes in a pilot-scale MBR treating real municipal wastewater, and their membrane fouling potentials were directly measured using bench-scale cross-flow membrane filtration systems (CFMFSs) and related to their cellular properties. It was found that the fouling potential was highly strain dependent, suggesting that bacterial identification at the strain level is essential to identify key fouling-causing bacteria (FCB). The FCB showed some common cellular properties. The most prominent feature of FCB was that they formed convex colonies having swollen podgy shape and smooth lustrous surfaces with high water, hydrophilic organic matter and carbohydrate content. However, general and rigid biofilm formation potential as determined by microtiter plates and cell surface properties (i.e., hydrophobicity and surface charge) did not correlate with the fouling potential in this study. These results suggest that the fouling potential should be directly evaluated under filtration conditions, and the colony water content could be a useful indicator to identify the FCB. PMID:27232989

  9. Membrane Bioreactor Technology for the Development of Functional Materials from Sea-Food Processing Wastes and Their Potential Health Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Senevirathne, Mahinda

    2011-01-01

    Sea-food processing wastes and underutilized species of fish are a potential source of functional and bioactive compounds. A large number of bioactive substances can be produced through enzyme-mediated hydrolysis. Suitable enzymes and the appropriate bioreactor system are needed to incubate the waste materials. Membrane separation is a useful technique to extract, concentrate, separate or fractionate the compounds. The use of membrane bioreactors to integrate a reaction vessel with a membrane separation unit is emerging as a beneficial method for producing bioactive materials such as peptides, chitooligosaccharides and polyunsaturated fatty acids from diverse seafood-related wastes. These bioactive compounds from membrane bioreactor technology show diverse biological activities such as antihypertensive, antimicrobial, antitumor, anticoagulant, antioxidant and radical scavenging properties. This review discusses the application of membrane bioreactor technology for the production of value-added functional materials from sea-food processing wastes and their biological activities in relation to health benefits. PMID:24957872

  10. Activation of TRPV1 channels inhibits mechanosensitive Piezo channel activity by depleting membrane phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Borbiro, Istvan; Badheka, Doreen; Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-02-10

    Capsaicin is an activator of the heat-sensitive TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) ion channels and has been used as a local analgesic. We found that activation of TRPV1 channels with capsaicin either in dorsal root ganglion neurons or in a heterologous expression system inhibited the mechanosensitive Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels by depleting phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and its precursor phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] from the plasma membrane through Ca(2+)-induced phospholipase Cδ (PLCδ) activation. Experiments with chemically inducible phosphoinositide phosphatases and receptor-induced activation of PLCβ indicated that inhibition of Piezo channels required depletion of both PI(4)P and PI(4,5)P2. The mechanically activated current amplitudes decreased substantially in the excised inside-out configuration, where the membrane patch containing Piezo1 channels is removed from the cell. PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P applied to these excised patches inhibited this decrease. Thus, we concluded that Piezo channel activity requires the presence of phosphoinositides, and the combined depletion of PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P reduces channel activity. In addition to revealing a role for distinct membrane lipids in mechanosensitive ion channel regulation, these data suggest that inhibition of Piezo2 channels may contribute to the analgesic effect of capsaicin.

  11. High Throughput Fluorescent Screening of Membrane Potential under Variable Gravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, F. P. M.

    2013-02-01

    In bilayer and patch-clamp experiments it was shown that the electrophysiological parameters of neuronal cells, as there are ion channel activity, intracellular ion concentrations and membrane potential, respond to gravity changes. Due to technical limitations (e.g. time-consuming manual operations) of electrophysiological techniques the amount of acquired data is limited. Optical techniques as fluorescence and fluorometric measurements can also be used to investigate electrophysiological properties of cells as sensitive fluorescent probes for these properties have been developed. On ground various high-throughput fluorometric systems are commercially available. Such a high throughput system would significantly increase the possible data yield and facilitate a lot of future experiments in micro- and hypergravity research. Therefore a FlexStation® 1 from Molecular Devices, a high-throughput multiwell reader, was adapted to parabolic flight conditions. In a first series of experiments the membrane potential of neuronal cells was investigated to verify the system.

  12. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes inhibit fluorescein extrusion and reduce plasma membrane potential in in vitro human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yonghong; Chen, Xiao; Cheng, Yuli; Xing, Yiqiao

    2010-06-01

    In the study on the interactions of carbon nanotubes with living cells, the cell membrane deserves particular attention as it provides the first interface to initiate CNTs-cell interactions. In the present study, the inhibiting effect of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the extrusion of fluorescein in human glioma cells was demonstrated using two procedures. To provide clues to explanation of this effect, intracellular glutathione content and reactive oxygen species production were determined as fluorescein is a specific substrate of cell membrane multidrug resistance-related protein whose transport activity requires glutathione which can be depleted under oxidative stress. The plasma membrane potential was also probed as the susceptibility of fluorescein efflux to modulation of the plasma membrane potential has been documented. Results showed a remarkable decrease in cellular glutathione level as well as an increase in reactive oxygen species production. Probe staining also indicated decreased plasma membrane potential. The data suggested that multiwalled carbon nanotubes may affect the transport activity of cell membrane multidrug resistance-related protein through reduction of intracellular glutathione content. Hypopolarization of the plasma membrane may also contribute to MWCNTs' effect. Implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:21179943

  13. Calculating event-triggered average synaptic conductances from the membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Pospischil, Martin; Piwkowska, Zuzanna; Rudolph, Michelle; Bal, Thierry; Destexhe, Alain

    2007-03-01

    The optimal patterns of synaptic conductances for spike generation in central neurons is a subject of considerable interest. Ideally such conductance time courses should be extracted from membrane potential (V(m)) activity, but this is difficult because the nonlinear contribution of conductances to the V(m) renders their estimation from the membrane equation extremely sensitive. We outline here a solution to this problem based on a discretization of the time axis. This procedure can extract the time course of excitatory and inhibitory conductances solely from the analysis of V(m) activity. We test this method by calculating spike-triggered averages of synaptic conductances using numerical simulations of the integrate-and-fire model subject to colored conductance noise. The procedure was also tested successfully in biological cortical neurons using conductance noise injected with dynamic clamp. This method should allow the extraction of synaptic conductances from V(m) recordings in vivo.

  14. Killing of Staphylococci by θ-Defensins Involves Membrane Impairment and Activation of Autolytic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wilmes, Miriam; Stockem, Marina; Bierbaum, Gabriele; Schlag, Martin; Götz, Friedrich; Tran, Dat Q.; Schaal, Justin B.; Ouellette, André J.; Selsted, Michael E.; Sahl, Hans-Georg

    2014-01-01

    θ-Defensins are cyclic antimicrobial peptides expressed in leukocytes of Old world monkeys. To get insight into their antibacterial mode of action, we studied the activity of RTDs (rhesus macaque θ-defensins) against staphylococci. We found that in contrast to other defensins, RTDs do not interfere with peptidoglycan biosynthesis, but rather induce bacterial lysis in staphylococci by interaction with the bacterial membrane and/or release of cell wall lytic enzymes. Potassium efflux experiments and membrane potential measurements revealed that the membrane impairment by RTDs strongly depends on the energization of the membrane. In addition, RTD treatment caused the release of Atl-derived cell wall lytic enzymes probably by interaction with membrane-bound lipoteichoic acid. Thus, the premature and uncontrolled activity of these enzymes contributes strongly to the overall killing by θ-defensins. Interestingly, a similar mode of action has been described for Pep5, an antimicrobial peptide of bacterial origin. PMID:25632351

  15. Rapid assessment of Oenococcus oeni activity by measuring intracellular pH and membrane potential by flow cytometry, and its application to the more effective control of malolactic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Bouix, M; Ghorbal, S

    2015-01-16

    The aim of this study is to highlight the changes in the physiological cellular state of Oenococcus oeni during malolactic fermentation (MLF), and to use its cellular parameters to improve existing knowledge of O. oeni behaviour and to more effectively control the performance of the bacteria during MLF in wine. To do this, measurements of intracellular pH, transmembrane potential and vitality were performed using flow cytometry with different fluorescent probes: CFDA-SE and CDCF, DiBAC and CFDA, respectively. The kinetics of the cellular changes in these parameters were determined during MLF in FT80 synthetic medium and in white wine, as were the kinetics of malic acid consumption. pHin measurement throughout the entire growth shows that the pH was equal to the pH of the culture medium during the early stage, increased to pH6 in the exponential phase, and then decreased to equilibrate with the pH of the medium in the late stationary phase. Membrane potential increased in early MLF and then decreased. The decrease in pHin and membrane potential occurred when all of the malic acid was consumed. Finally, we showed that the higher the ΔpH (pHin-pHex) in O. oeni cells was, the shorter the lag phase of the MLF was. To better manage the initiation of MLF in wines, the physiological state of O. oeni cells must be taken into account. These results allow us to understand the sometimes random initiation of MLF in wines inoculated with O. oeni and to suggest ways to improve this control. PMID:25462933

  16. [Computer modeling the hydrostatic pressure characteristics of the membrane potential for polymeric membrane, separated non-homogeneous electrolyte solutions].

    PubMed

    Slezak, Izabella H; Jasik-Slezak, Jolanta; Rogal, Mirosława; Slezak, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of model equation depending the membrane potential deltapsis, on mechanical pressure difference (deltaP), concentration polarization coefficient (zetas), concentration Rayleigh number (RC) and ratio concentration of solutions separated by membrane (Ch/Cl), the characteristics deltapsis = f(deltaP)zetas,RC,Ch/Cl for steady values of zetas, RC and Ch/Cl in single-membrane system were calculated. In this system neutral and isotropic polymeric membrane oriented in horizontal plane, the non-homogeneous binary electrolytic solutions of various concentrations were separated. Nonhomogeneity of solutions is results from creations of the concentration boundary layers on both sides of the membrane. Calculations were made for the case where on a one side of the membrane aqueous solution of NaCl at steady concentration 10(-3) mol x l(-1) (Cl) was placed and on the other aqueous solutions of NaCl at concentrations from 10(-3) mol x l(-1) to 2 x 10(-2) mol x l(-1) (Ch). Their densities were greater than NaCl solution's at 10(-3) mol x l(-1). It was shown that membrane potential depends on hydrodynamic state of a complex concentration boundary layer-membrane-concentration boundary layer, what is controlled by deltaP, Ch/Cl, RC and zetas. PMID:17022155

  17. Visualizing active membrane protein complexes by electron cryotomography

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Vicki A.M.; Ieva, Raffaele; Walter, Andreas; Pfanner, Nikolaus; van der Laan, Martin; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Unravelling the structural organization of membrane protein machines in their active state and native lipid environment is a major challenge in modern cell biology research. Here we develop the STAMP (Specifically TArgeted Membrane nanoParticle) technique as a strategy to localize protein complexes in situ by electron cryotomography (cryo-ET). STAMP selects active membrane protein complexes and marks them with quantum dots. Taking advantage of new electron detector technology that is currently revolutionizing cryotomography in terms of achievable resolution, this approach enables us to visualize the three-dimensional distribution and organization of protein import sites in mitochondria. We show that import sites cluster together in the vicinity of crista membranes, and we reveal unique details of the mitochondrial protein import machinery in action. STAMP can be used as a tool for site-specific labelling of a multitude of membrane proteins by cryo-ET in the future. PMID:24942077

  18. Silver-enhanced block copolymer membranes with biocidal activity.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Poornima; Hong, Pei-Ying; Sougrat, Rachid; Nunes, Suzana P

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles were deposited on the surface and pore walls of block copolymer membranes with highly ordered pore structure. Pyridine blocks constitute the pore surfaces, complexing silver ions and promoting a homogeneous distribution. Nanoparticles were then formed by reduction with sodium borohydride. The morphology varied with the preparation conditions (pH and silver ion concentration), as confirmed by field emission scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Silver has a strong biocide activity, which for membranes can bring the advantage of minimizing the growth of bacteria and formation of biofilm. The membranes with nanoparticles prepared under different pH values and ion concentrations were incubated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and compared with the control. The strongest biocidal activity was achieved with membranes containing membranes prepared under pH 9. Under these conditions, the best distribution with small particle size was observed by microscopy.

  19. On calculation of the electrostatic potential of a phosphatidylinositol phosphate-containing phosphatidylcholine lipid membrane accounting for membrane dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Jonathan C; Martinez, Michael; Wade, Rebecca C

    2014-01-01

    Many signaling events require the binding of cytoplasmic proteins to cell membranes by recognition of specific charged lipids, such as phosphoinositol-phosphates. As a model for a protein-membrane binding site, we consider one charged phosphoinositol phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) embedded in a phosphatidylcholine bilayer. As the protein-membrane binding is driven by electrostatic interactions, continuum solvent models require an accurate representation of the electrostatic potential of the phosphoinositol phosphate-containing membrane. We computed and analyzed the electrostatic potentials of snapshots taken at regular intervals from molecular dynamics simulations of the bilayer. We observe considerable variation in the electrostatic potential of the bilayer both along a single simulation and between simulations performed with the GAFF or CHARMM c36 force fields. However, we find that the choice of GAFF or CHARMM c36 parameters has little effect on the electrostatic potential of a given configuration of the bilayer with a PtdIns(3)P embedded in it. From our results, we propose a remedian averaging method for calculating the electrostatic potential of a membrane system that is suitable for simulations of protein-membrane binding with a continuum solvent model.

  20. Experimental investigation into the transmembrane electrical potential of the forward osmosis membrane process in electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Bian, Lixia; Fang, Yanyan; Wang, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane electrical potential (TMEP) in a forward osmosis membrane process with a single electrolyte solution as the draw and feed solutions was investigated by experiments. The effects of membrane orientation, the electrolyte species (KCl, NaCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2), concentration and concentration ratio of solutions at both sides of membrane on water flux and TMEP were investigated. The results showed that the TMEPs at different membrane orientation cannot completely coincide, which confirmed the effect of membrane asymmetry. The ion diffusion coefficients significantly affected the TMEP across the membrane, with different patterns for different electrolytes and concentrations. PMID:24957177

  1. Experimental Investigation into the Transmembrane Electrical Potential of the Forward Osmosis Membrane Process in Electrolyte Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Lixia; Fang, Yanyan; Wang, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane electrical potential (TMEP) in a forward osmosis membrane process with a single electrolyte solution as the draw and feed solutions was investigated by experiments. The effects of membrane orientation, the electrolyte species (KCl, NaCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2), concentration and concentration ratio of solutions at both sides of membrane on water flux and TMEP were investigated. The results showed that the TMEPs at different membrane orientation cannot completely coincide, which confirmed the effect of membrane asymmetry. The ion diffusion coefficients significantly affected the TMEP across the membrane, with different patterns for different electrolytes and concentrations. PMID:24957177

  2. An Extended Membrane System with Active Membranes to Solve Automatic Fuzzy Clustering Problems.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Wang, Jun; Shi, Peng; Pérez-Jiménez, Mario J; Riscos-Núñez, Agustín

    2016-05-01

    This paper focuses on automatic fuzzy clustering problem and proposes a novel automatic fuzzy clustering method that employs an extended membrane system with active membranes that has been designed as its computing framework. The extended membrane system has a dynamic membrane structure; since membranes can evolve, it is particularly suitable for processing the automatic fuzzy clustering problem. A modification of a differential evolution (DE) mechanism was developed as evolution rules for objects according to membrane structure and object communication mechanisms. Under the control of both the object's evolution-communication mechanism and the membrane evolution mechanism, the extended membrane system can effectively determine the most appropriate number of clusters as well as the corresponding optimal cluster centers. The proposed method was evaluated over 13 benchmark problems and was compared with four state-of-the-art automatic clustering methods, two recently developed clustering methods and six classification techniques. The comparison results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method in terms of effectiveness and robustness. PMID:26790484

  3. Structural model of active Bax at the membrane.

    PubMed

    Bleicken, Stephanie; Jeschke, Gunnar; Stegmueller, Carolin; Salvador-Gallego, Raquel; García-Sáez, Ana J; Bordignon, Enrica

    2014-11-20

    Bax plays a central role in the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Upon activation, cytosolic Bax monomers oligomerize on the surface of mitochondria and change conformation concertedly to punch holes into the outer membrane. The subsequent release of cytochrome c initiates cell death. However, the structure of membrane-inserted Bax and its mechanism of action remain largely unknown. Here, we propose a 3D model of active Bax at the membrane based on double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy in liposomes and isolated mitochondria. We show that active Bax is organized at the membrane as assemblies of dimers. In addition to a stable dimerization domain, each monomer contains a more flexible piercing domain involved in interdimer interactions and pore formation. The most important structural change during Bax activation is the opening of the hairpin formed by helices 5 and 6, which adopts a clamp-like conformation central to the mechanism of mitochondrial permeabilization. PMID:25458844

  4. Structural Model of Active Bax at the Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bleicken, Stephanie; Jeschke, Gunnar; Stegmueller, Carolin; Salvador-Gallego, Raquel; García-Sáez, Ana J.; Bordignon, Enrica

    2016-01-01

    Bax plays a central role in the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Upon activation, cytosolic Bax monomers oligomerize on the surface of mitochondria and change conformation concertedly to punch holes into the outer membrane. The subsequent release of cytochrome c initiates cell death. However, the structure of membrane-inserted Bax and its mechanism of action remain largely unknown. Here, we propose a 3D model of active Bax at the membrane based on double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy in liposomes and isolated mitochondria. We show that active Bax is organized at the membrane as assemblies of dimers. In addition to a stable dimerization domain, each monomer contains a more flexible piercing domain involved in interdimer interactions and pore formation. The most important structural change during Bax activation is the opening of the hairpin formed by helices 5 and 6, which adopts a clamp-like conformation central to the mechanism of mitochondrial permeabilization. PMID:25458844

  5. Effects of amino acids on membrane potential and 86Rb+ fluxes in pancreatic beta-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Henquin, J.C.; Meissner, H.P.

    1981-03-01

    The membrane potential of beta-cells was studied with microelectrodes in mouse islets and their potassium permeability was evaluated by measuring 86Rb+ fluxes in rat islets. In the absence of glucose, L-leucine, its metabolite ketoisocaproate, and its nonmetabolized analogue 2-aminonorbornane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) depolarized beta-cells and triggered bursts of electrical activity like glucose. The effect of leucine was weak, but was potentiated by a low concentration of glucose or by theophylline; the effect of ketoisocaproate was stronger and faster than that of an equimolar concentration of glucose. Arginine alone produced only a fast depolarization of beta-cells, insufficient to trigger electrical activity. Leucine and arginine potentiated the activity induced by glucose. In a glucose-free medium, alanine only slightly depolarized beta cells, whereas isoleucine and phenylalanie had no effect. Leucine, ketoisocaproate, and BCH reversibly decreased 86Rb+ efflux from islets perifused in the absence of glucose and increased 86Rb+ uptake. By contrast, both in the absence or presence of glucose, arginine increased 86Rb+ efflux and decreased 86Rb+ uptake. It is proposed that leucine, ketoisocaproate, and BCH, as glucose, deplolarize beta-cells by decreasing their potassium permeability, whereas arginine acts differently. The appearance of bursts of electrical activity with secretagogues unrelated to glucose suggests that they reflect an intrinsic property of the beta-cell membrane.

  6. Screen for small molecules increasing the mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Montague, Christine R; Fitzmaurice, Aileen; Hover, Bradley M; Salazar, Noe A; Fey, Julien P

    2014-03-01

    The identification of small molecules that positively modulate the mitochondrial respiratory function has broad applications in fundamental research, therapeutic target validation, and drug discovery. We present an approach in which primary screens for mitochondrial function in yeast are used to efficiently identify a subset of high-value compounds that can in turn be rapidly tested against a broad range of mammalian cell lines. The ability of the yeast assay to successfully identify in a high-throughput format hit compounds that increase the mitochondrial membrane potential and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels by as little as 15% was demonstrated. In this study, 14 hits were identified from a collection of 13,680 compounds. Secondary testing with myotubes, fibroblasts, and PC-12 and HepG2 cells identified two compounds increasing ATP levels in hepatocytes and two other compounds increasing ATP in fibroblasts. The effect on hepatocytes was further studied using genomic and mitochondrial proteomic tools to characterize the changes induced by the two compounds. Changes in the accumulation of a series of factors involved in early gene response or apoptosis or linked to metabolic functions (i.e., β-Klotho, RORα, PGC-1α, G6PC, IGFBP1, FTL) were discovered.

  7. Efficient surface reconstruction from noisy data using regularized membrane potentials.

    PubMed

    Jalba, Andrei C; Roerdink, Jos B T M

    2009-05-01

    A physically motivated method for surface reconstruction is proposed that can recover smooth surfaces from noisy and sparse data sets. No orientation information is required. By a new technique based on regularized-membrane potentials the input sample points are aggregated, leading to improved noise tolerability and outlier removal, without sacrificing much with respect to detail (feature) recovery. After aggregating the sample points on a volumetric grid, a novel, iterative algorithm is used to classify grid points as exterior or interior to the surface. This algorithm relies on intrinsic properties of the smooth scalar field on the grid which emerges after the aggregation step. Second, a mesh-smoothing paradigm based on a mass-spring system is introduced. By enhancing this system with a bending-energy minimizing term we ensure that the final triangulated surface is smoother than piecewise linear. In terms of speed and flexibility, the method compares favorably with respect to previous approaches. Most parts of the method are implemented on modern graphics processing units (GPUs). Results in a wide variety of settings are presented, ranging from surface reconstruction on noise-free point clouds to grayscale image segmentation.

  8. Determination of high mitochondrial membrane potential in spermatozoa loaded with the mitochondrial probe 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolyl-carbocyanine iodide (JC-1) by using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H David; Welch, Glenn R

    2008-01-01

    A flow cytometric method was developed to identify viable, energized sperm cells with high mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (Deltapsi(m)), >80-100 mV using the mitochondrial probe 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1) and the impermeant nuclear stain propidium iodine (PI). This flow cytometric method is described in detail here. When in contact with membranes possessing a high Deltapsi(m), JC-1 forms aggregates (J(agg)) that are fluorescent at 590 nm in response to 488 nm excitation. We found that the reactive oxygen species generator, menadione reduced sperm motility and reduced Deltapsi(m) in a dose responsive fashion that was closely correlated with the loss of motility. PMID:19082941

  9. Cannabinoid receptor signalling in neurodegenerative diseases: a potential role for membrane fluidity disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Maccarrone, M; Bernardi, G; Agrò, A Finazzi; Centonze, D

    2011-01-01

    Type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is the most abundant G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) in the brain. CB1 and its endogenous agonists, the so-called ‘endocannabinoids (eCBs)’, belong to an ancient neurosignalling system that plays important functions in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory disorders like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. For this reason, research on the therapeutic potential of drugs modulating the endogenous tone of eCBs is very intense. Several GPCRs reside within subdomains of the plasma membranes that contain high concentrations of cholesterol: the lipid rafts. Here, the hypothesis that changes in membrane fluidity alter function of the endocannabinoid system, as well as progression of particular neurodegenerative diseases, is described. To this end, the impact of membrane cholesterol on membrane properties and hence on neurodegenerative diseases, as well as on CB1 signalling in vitro and on CB1-dependent neurotransmission within the striatum, is discussed. Overall, present evidence points to the membrane environment as a critical regulator of signal transduction triggered by CB1, and calls for further studies aimed at better clarifying the contribution of membrane lipids to eCBs signalling. The results of these investigations might be exploited also for the development of novel therapeutics able to combat disorders associated with abnormal activity of CB1. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-7 PMID:21323908

  10. Synchronous plasma membrane electrochemical potential oscillations during yeast colony development and aging.

    PubMed

    Palková, Zdena; Váchová, Libuse; Gásková, Dana; Kucerová, Helena

    2009-05-01

    Microorganisms that survive in natural environments form organized multicellular communities, biofilms and colonies with specific properties. During stress and nutrient limitation, slow growing and senescent cells in such communities retain vital processes by maintaining plasma membrane integrity and retaining the ability to generate transmembrane electrochemical gradients. We report the use of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae colonial model to show that population growth in a multicellular community depends on nutrient diffusion and that resting cells start to accumulate from the beginning of the second acidic phase of colony development. Despite differentiation of colony members, synchronous transmembrane potential oscillation was detected in the organized colony. The electrochemical membrane potential periodically oscillated at frequencies between those for circadian to infradian rhythms during colony aging and transiently decreased at time points previously linked with rebuilding of yeast metabolism. Despite extensive decreases in the intracellular ATP concentration and in the amount and activity of the plasma membrane proton pump during nutrient limited growth and colony aging, the transmembrane electrochemical potential appeared to be maintained above a level critical for population survival.

  11. A new method to infer higher-order spike correlations from membrane potentials.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Imke C G; Staude, Benjamin; Boucsein, Clemens; Rotter, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    What is the role of higher-order spike correlations for neuronal information processing? Common data analysis methods to address this question are devised for the application to spike recordings from multiple single neurons. Here, we present a new method which evaluates the subthreshold membrane potential fluctuations of one neuron, and infers higher-order correlations among the neurons that constitute its presynaptic population. This has two important advantages: Very large populations of up to several thousands of neurons can be studied, and the spike sorting is obsolete. Moreover, this new approach truly emphasizes the functional aspects of higher-order statistics, since we infer exactly those correlations which are seen by a neuron. Our approach is to represent the subthreshold membrane potential fluctuations as presynaptic activity filtered with a fixed kernel, as it would be the case for a leaky integrator neuron model. This allows us to adapt the recently proposed method CuBIC (cumulant based inference of higher-order correlations from the population spike count; Staude et al., J Comput Neurosci 29(1-2):327-350, 2010c) with which the maximal order of correlation can be inferred. By numerical simulation we show that our new method is reasonably sensitive to weak higher-order correlations, and that only short stretches of membrane potential are required for their reliable inference. Finally, we demonstrate its remarkable robustness against violations of the simplifying assumptions made for its construction, and discuss how it can be employed to analyze in vivo intracellular recordings of membrane potentials.

  12. Stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in isolated rat heart

    SciTech Connect

    Montaigne, David; Marechal, Xavier; Baccouch, Riadh; Modine, Thomas; Preau, Sebastien; Zannis, Konstantinos; Marchetti, Philippe; Lancel, Steve; Neviere, Remi

    2010-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of doxorubicin on left ventricular function and cellular energy state in intact isolated hearts, and, to test whether inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation would prevent doxorubicin-induced mitochondrial and myocardial dysfunction. Myocardial contractile performance and mitochondrial respiration were evaluated by left ventricular tension and its first derivatives and cardiac fiber respirometry, respectively. NADH levels, mitochondrial membrane potential and glucose uptake were monitored non-invasively via epicardial imaging of the left ventricular wall of Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Heart performance was reduced in a time-dependent manner in isolated rat hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 1 muM doxorubicin. Compared with controls, doxorubicin induced acute myocardial dysfunction (dF/dt{sub max} of 105 +- 8 mN/s in control hearts vs. 49 +- 7 mN/s in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). In cardiac fibers prepared from perfused hearts, doxorubicin induced depression of mitochondrial respiration (respiratory control ratio of 4.0 +- 0.2 in control hearts vs. 2.2 +- 0.2 in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05) and cytochrome c oxidase kinetic activity (24 +- 1 muM cytochrome c/min/mg in control hearts vs. 14 +- 3 muM cytochrome c/min/mg in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). Acute cardiotoxicity induced by doxorubicin was accompanied by NADH redox state, mitochondrial membrane potential, and glucose uptake reduction. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening by cyclosporine A largely prevented mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, cardiac energy state and dysfunction. These results suggest that in intact hearts an impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is involved in the development of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity.

  13. Anacardic acid-mediated changes in membrane potential and pH gradient across liposomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Toyomizu, Masaaki; Okamoto, Katsuyuki; Akiba, Yukio; Nakatsu, Tetsuo; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2002-01-01

    We have previously shown that anacardic acid has an uncoupling effect on oxidative phosphorylation in rat liver mitochondria using succinate as a substrate (Life Sci. 66 (2000) 229-234). In the present study, for clarification of the physicochemical characteristics of anacardic acid, we used a cyanine dye (DiS-C3(5)) and 9-aminoacridine (9-AA) to determine changes of membrane potential (DeltaPsi) and pH difference (DeltapH), respectively, in a liposome suspension in response to the addition of anacardic acid to the suspension. The anacardic acid quenched DiS-C3(5) fluorescence at concentrations higher than 300 nM, with the degree of quenching being dependent on the log concentration of the acid. Furthermore, the K(+) diffusion potential generated by the addition of valinomycin to the suspension decreased for each increase in anacardic acid concentration used over 300 nM, but the sum of the anacardic acid- and valinomycin-mediated quenching was additively increasing. This indicates that the anacardic acid-mediated quenching was not due simply to increments in the K(+) permeability of the membrane. Addition of anacardic acid in the micromolar range to the liposomes with DeltaPsi formed by valinomycin-K(+) did not significantly alter 9-AA fluorescence, but unexpectedly dissipated DeltaPsi. The DeltaPsi preformed by valinomycin-K(+) decreased gradually following the addition of increasing concentrations of anacardic acid. The DeltaPsi dissipation rate was dependent on the pre-existing magnitude of DeltaPsi, and was correlated with the logarithmic concentration of anacardic acid. Furthermore, the initial rate of DeltapH dissipation increased with logarithmic increases in anacardic acid concentration. These results provide the evidence for a unique function of anacardic acid, dissimilar to carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone or valinomycin, in that anacardic acid behaves as both an electrogenic (negative) charge carrier driven by DeltaPsi, and a 'proton

  14. Effect of cadmium and lead on the membrane potential and photoelectric reaction of Nitellopsis obtusa cells.

    PubMed

    Kurtyka, Renata; Burdach, Zbigniew; Karcz, Waldemar

    2011-03-01

    The effects of Cd and Pb on membrane potential (E(m)) and photoelectric reaction of Nitellopsis obtusa cells were investigated. It was found that Cd and Pb at 1.0 mM caused a depolarization of the E(m), whereas both metals at lower concentrations changed the E(m) in a different way. Pb at 0.1 mM and 0.01 mM hyperpolarized the E(m), whereas Cd at the same concentrations depolarized and did not change the E(m), respectively. In the presence of 0.01 mM Pb, the light-induced hyperpolarization of the E(m) was by 18% higher as compared to the control, whereas at 1.0 mM Pb it was by 40% lower. Pb at 0.1 mM and Cd at 0.01 mM or 5 × 0.01 mM did not change the light-induced membrane hyperpolarization. However, in the presence of Cd at 0.1 mM and 1.0 mM this hyperpolarization was 2-fold lower or was completely abolished, respectively. These results suggest that at high Cd and Pb concentrations both depolarization of the E(m) and decrease of light-induced membrane hyperpolarization in Nitellopsis obtusa cells are probably due to inhibition of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity, whereas both metals at lower concentrations differ in mechanism of membrane potential changes.

  15. CM2 antigen, a potential novel molecule participating in glucuronide transport on rat hepatocyte canalicular membrane.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Wang, J; Zhou, X; Li, J; Shi, Y; Han, Z; Wang, X; Li, S; Yang, Z; Wang, R; Fan, D; Han, Y

    2012-06-29

    The polarized molecules predominately distributing at hepatocyte canalicular surface play a vital role in disclosing the process of bile formation and etiopathogenisis of cholestatic live diseases. Therefore, it is important to find novel polarized molecules on hepatocyte canalicular membrane. In the present study, canalicular membrane vesicles (CMVs) isolated from rat hepatocyte by density gradient centrifugation were used as immunogens to produce hybridoma and 46 strains of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against CMVs were obtained. With a series of morphological assay methods, including immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscope, the antigens recognized by canalicular mAb1 (CM1) and canalicular mAb2 (CM2) were confirmed to predominately distribute at hepatocyte canalicular membrane. Transport activity assay revealed that CM2 could inhibit ATP-dependent E217βG uptake of rat hepatocyte CMVs. Meanwhile, Western blotting analysis showed that the molecular mass of CM2 antigen was approximately 110kDa, which was much less than Mr 180kDa of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) involved in glucuronide transport. These data indicated that CM2 antigen might be a potential novel molecule participating in glucuronide transport on the hepatocyte canalicular membrane.

  16. Differential Effect of Cholesterol and Its Biosynthetic Precursors on Membrane Dipole Potential

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Sourav; Kanaparthi, Ravi Kumar; Samanta, Anunay; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2012-01-01

    Dipole potential is the potential difference within the membrane bilayer, which originates due to the nonrandom arrangement of lipid dipoles and water molecules at the membrane interface. Cholesterol, a representative sterol in higher eukaryotic membranes, is known to increase membrane dipole potential. In this work, we explored the effects of immediate (7-DHC and desmosterol) and evolutionary (ergosterol) precursors of cholesterol on membrane dipole potential, monitored by the dual wavelength ratiometric approach utilizing the probe di-8-ANEPPS. Our results show that the effect of these precursors on membrane dipole potential is very different from that observed with cholesterol, although the structural differences among them are subtle. These results assume relevance, since accumulation of cholesterol precursors due to defective cholesterol biosynthesis has been reported to result in several inherited metabolic disorders such as the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. Interestingly, cholesterol (and its precursors) has a negligible effect on dipole potential in polyunsaturated membranes. We interpret these results in terms of noncanonical orientation of cholesterol in these membranes. Our results constitute the first report on the effect of biosynthetic and evolutionary precursors of cholesterol on dipole potential, and imply that a subtle change in sterol structure can significantly alter the dipolar field at the membrane interface. PMID:22500756

  17. Redistribution of Cholesterol in Model Lipid Membranes in Response to the Membrane-Active Peptide Alamethicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, William; Qian, Shuo

    2013-03-01

    The cellular membrane is a heterogeneous, dynamic mixture of molecules and macromolecules that self-assemble into a tightly-regulated functional unit that provides a semipermeable barrier between the cell and its environment. Among the many compositional differences between mammalian and bacterial cell membranes that impact its physical properties, one key difference is cholesterol content, which is more prevalent in mammals. Cholesterol is an amphiphile that associates with membranes and serves to maintain its fluidity and permeability. Membrane-active peptides, such as the alpha-helical peptide alamethicin, interact with membranes in a concentration- and composition-dependent manner to form transmembrane pores that are responsible for the lytic action of the peptide. Through the use of small-angle neutron scattering and deuterium labeling, it was possible to observe a redistribution of the lipid and cholesterol in unilamellar vesicles in response to the presence of alamethicin at a peptide-to-lipid ratio of 1/200. The results demonstrate that the membrane remodeling powers of alamethicin reach beyond the membrane thinning effect to altering the localization of specific components in the bilayer, complementing the accepted two-state mechanism of pore formation. Research was supported by U. S. DOE-OBER (CSMB; FWP ERKP291) and the U. S. DOE-BES Scientific User Facilities Division (ORNL's SNS and HFIR).

  18. Potential difference and the distribution of ions across the human red blood cell membrane; a study of the mechanism by which the fluorescent cation, diS-C3-(5) reports membrane potential.

    PubMed Central

    Hladky, S B; Rink, T J

    1976-01-01

    1. The mechanism by which the fluorescent, cationic dye diS-C3-(5) responds to the membrane potential of red blood cells has been investigated. 2. The dye in aqueous solution absorbs most strongly at 650 nm. Addition of white, haemoglobin-free membranes red shifts the absorption maximum ca. 20 nm, while addition of membrane-free cell lysate results in the appearance of a new dye absorption peak at 590 nm. Thus the dye binds both to cell membranes and to cell contents. The component of the cytoplasm which binds the dye is non-dialysable, presumably haemoglobin. 3. Dye added to a suspension of intact cells shows a strong absorption at 590 nm indicating that the dye has bound to the cell contents and that the membrane is permeable to the dye. 4. The amount of dye which partitions into (and on to) the cells can be determined, as reported by Sims, Waggoner, Wang & Hoffman (1974), from the fluorescence of the dye remaining in the supernatant after the cells are centrifuged to the bottom of the suspension. In most conditions the proportion of the cell associated dye which is either free inside the cell or bound to the outside face of the membrane is negligible compared to the proportion bound to the cell contents. 5. On the assumption that the dye is not actively transported, the ratio of the equilibrium dye activities inside and outside the cell, ai/ao, is determined by the membrane potential according to the Nernst relation. Driving the membrane potenial negative then increases the cell associated dye by increasing the activity ratio and hence ai and the amount of dye bound to cell contents. 6. At the known Donnan equilibrium potential the internal dye activity can be calculated from the external activity. An empirical relation between cell associated dye and internal activity has been determined by measuring the dye partition between cells and medium at different external activities. 7. Using this empirial relation, and providing that any changes in cell composition do

  19. Bilayer Membrane Modulation of Membrane Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) Structure and Proteolytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Cerofolini, Linda; Amar, Sabrina; Lauer, Janelle L; Martelli, Tommaso; Fragai, Marco; Luchinat, Claudio; Fields, Gregg B

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface proteolysis is an integral yet poorly understood physiological process. The present study has examined how the pericellular collagenase membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) and membrane-mimicking environments interplay in substrate binding and processing. NMR derived structural models indicate that MT1-MMP transiently associates with bicelles and cells through distinct residues in blades III and IV of its hemopexin-like domain, while binding of collagen-like triple-helices occurs within blades I and II of this domain. Examination of simultaneous membrane interaction and triple-helix binding revealed a possible regulation of proteolysis due to steric effects of the membrane. At bicelle concentrations of 1%, enzymatic activity towards triple-helices was increased 1.5-fold. A single mutation in the putative membrane interaction region of MT1-MMP (Ser466Pro) resulted in lower enzyme activation by bicelles. An initial structural framework has thus been developed to define the role(s) of cell membranes in modulating proteolysis. PMID:27405411

  20. Bilayer Membrane Modulation of Membrane Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) Structure and Proteolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cerofolini, Linda; Amar, Sabrina; Lauer, Janelle L.; Martelli, Tommaso; Fragai, Marco; Luchinat, Claudio; Fields, Gregg B.

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface proteolysis is an integral yet poorly understood physiological process. The present study has examined how the pericellular collagenase membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) and membrane-mimicking environments interplay in substrate binding and processing. NMR derived structural models indicate that MT1-MMP transiently associates with bicelles and cells through distinct residues in blades III and IV of its hemopexin-like domain, while binding of collagen-like triple-helices occurs within blades I and II of this domain. Examination of simultaneous membrane interaction and triple-helix binding revealed a possible regulation of proteolysis due to steric effects of the membrane. At bicelle concentrations of 1%, enzymatic activity towards triple-helices was increased 1.5-fold. A single mutation in the putative membrane interaction region of MT1-MMP (Ser466Pro) resulted in lower enzyme activation by bicelles. An initial structural framework has thus been developed to define the role(s) of cell membranes in modulating proteolysis. PMID:27405411

  1. Rapid novel test for the determination of biofouling potential on reverse osmosis membranes.

    PubMed

    Manalo, Cervinia V; Ohno, Masaki; Okuda, Tetsuji; Nakai, Satoshi; Nishijima, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    A novel method was proposed to determine biofouling potential by direct analysis of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane through fluorescence intensity analysis of biofilm formed on the membrane surface, thereby incorporating fouling tendencies of both feedwater and membrane. Evaluation of the biofouling potential on the RO membrane was done by accelerated biofilm formation through soaking of membranes in high biofouling potential waters obtained by adding microorganisms and glucose in test waters. The biofilm formed on the soaked membrane was quantified by fluorescence intensity microplate analysis. The soaking method's capability in detecting biofilm formation was confirmed when percentage coverage obtained through fluorescence microscopy and intensity values exhibited a linear correlation (R(2) = 0.96). Continuous cross-flow experiments confirmed the ability and reliability of the soaking method in giving biofouling potential on RO membranes when a good correlation (R(2) = 0.87) between intensity values of biofilms formed on the membrane during soaking and filtration conditions was obtained. Applicability of the test developed was shown when three commercially available polyamide (PA) RO membranes were assessed for biofouling potential. This new method can also be applied for the determination of biofouling potential in water with more than 3.6 mg L(-1) easily degradable organic carbon. PMID:27332844

  2. Rapid novel test for the determination of biofouling potential on reverse osmosis membranes.

    PubMed

    Manalo, Cervinia V; Ohno, Masaki; Okuda, Tetsuji; Nakai, Satoshi; Nishijima, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    A novel method was proposed to determine biofouling potential by direct analysis of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane through fluorescence intensity analysis of biofilm formed on the membrane surface, thereby incorporating fouling tendencies of both feedwater and membrane. Evaluation of the biofouling potential on the RO membrane was done by accelerated biofilm formation through soaking of membranes in high biofouling potential waters obtained by adding microorganisms and glucose in test waters. The biofilm formed on the soaked membrane was quantified by fluorescence intensity microplate analysis. The soaking method's capability in detecting biofilm formation was confirmed when percentage coverage obtained through fluorescence microscopy and intensity values exhibited a linear correlation (R(2) = 0.96). Continuous cross-flow experiments confirmed the ability and reliability of the soaking method in giving biofouling potential on RO membranes when a good correlation (R(2) = 0.87) between intensity values of biofilms formed on the membrane during soaking and filtration conditions was obtained. Applicability of the test developed was shown when three commercially available polyamide (PA) RO membranes were assessed for biofouling potential. This new method can also be applied for the determination of biofouling potential in water with more than 3.6 mg L(-1) easily degradable organic carbon.

  3. Antibacterial Activity of Shikimic Acid from Pine Needles of Cedrus deodara against Staphylococcus aureus through Damage to Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jinrong; Wu, Yanping; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhong, Kai; Huang, Yina; Gao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Shikimic acid (SA) has been reported to possess antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, whereas the mode of action of SA is still elusive. In this study, the antibacterial activity and mechanism of SA toward S. aureus by cell membrane damage was investigated. After SA treatment, massive K+ and nucleotide leakage from S. aureus, and a significant change in the membrane potential was observed, suggesting SA may act on the membrane by destroying the cell membrane permeability. Through transmission electron microscopic observations we further confirmed that SA can disrupt the cell membrane and membrane integrity. Meanwhile, SA was found to be capable of reducing the membrane fluidity of the S. aureus cell. Moreover, the fluorescence experiments indicated that SA could quench fluorescence of Phe residues of the membrane proteins, thus demonstrating that SA can bind to S. aureus membrane proteins. Therefore, these results showed the antibacterial activity of SA against S. aureus could be caused by the interactions of SA with S. aureus membrane proteins and lipids, resulting in causing cell membrane dysfunction and bacterial damage or even death. This study reveals the potential use of SA as an antibacterial agent. PMID:26580596

  4. Enterocin P Selectively Dissipates the Membrane Potential of Enterococcus faecium T136

    PubMed Central

    Herranz, C.; Chen, Y.; Chung, H.-J.; Cintas, L. M.; Hernández, P. E.; Montville, T. J.; Chikindas, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    Enterocin P is a pediocin-like, broad-spectrum bacteriocin which displays a strong inhibitory activity against Listeria monocytogenes. The bacteriocin was purified from the culture supernatant of Enterococcus faecium P13, and its molecular mechanism of action against the sensitive strain E. faecium T136 was evaluated. Although enterocin P caused significant reduction of the membrane potential (ΔΨ) and the intracellular ATP pool of the indicator organism, the pH gradient (ΔpH) component of the proton motive force (Δp) was not dissipated. By contrast, enterocin P caused carboxyfluorescein efflux from E. faecium T136-derived liposomes. PMID:11282622

  5. Trichoplaxin - a new membrane-active antimicrobial peptide from placozoan cDNA.

    PubMed

    Simunić, Juraj; Petrov, Dražen; Bouceba, Tahar; Kamech, Nédia; Benincasa, Monica; Juretić, Davor

    2014-05-01

    A method based on the use of signal peptide sequences from antimicrobial peptide (AMP) precursors was used to mine a placozoa expressed sequence tag database and identified a potential antimicrobial peptide from Trichoplax adhaerens. This peptide, with predicted sequence FFGRLKSVWSAVKHGWKAAKSR is the first AMP from a placozoan species, and was named trichoplaxin. It was chemically synthesized and its structural properties, biological activities and membrane selectivity were investigated. It adopts an α-helical structure in contact with membrane-like environments and is active against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial species (including MRSA), as well as yeasts from the Candida genus. The cytotoxic activity, as assessed by the haemolytic activity against rat erythrocytes, U937 cell permeabilization to propidium iodide and MCF7 cell mitochondrial activity, is significantly lower than the antimicrobial activity. In tests with membrane models, trichoplaxin shows high affinity for anionic prokaryote-like membranes with good fit in kinetic studies. Conversely, there is a low affinity for neutral eukaryote-like membranes and absence of a dose dependent response. With high selectivity for bacterial cells and no homologous sequence in the UniProt, trichoplaxin is a new potential lead compound for development of broad-spectrum antibacterial drugs.

  6. Modeling and vibration control of an active membrane mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Eric J.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2009-09-01

    The future of space satellite technology lies in ultra-large mirrors and radar apertures for significant improvements in imaging and communication bandwidths. The availability of optical-quality membranes drives a parallel effort for structural models that can capture the dominant dynamics of large, ultra-flexible satellite payloads. Unfortunately, the inherent flexibility of membrane mirrors wreaks havoc with the payload's on-orbit stability and maneuverability. One possible means of controlling these undesirable dynamics is by embedding active piezoelectric ceramics near the boundary of the membrane mirror. In doing so, active feedback control can be used to eliminate detrimental vibration, perform static shape control, and evaluate the health of the structure. The overall motivation of the present work is to design a control system using distributed bimorph actuators to eliminate any detrimental vibration of the membrane mirror. As a basis for this study, a piezoceramic wafer was attached in a bimorph configuration near the boundary of a tensioned rectangular membrane sample. A finite element model of the system was developed to capture the relevant system dynamics from 0 to 300 Hz. The finite element model was compared against experimental results, and fair agreement found. Using the validated finite element models, structural control using linear quadratic regulator control techniques was then used to numerically demonstrate effective vibration control. Typical results show that less than 12 V of actuation voltage is required to eliminate detrimental vibration of the membrane samples in less than 15 ms. The functional gains of the active system are also derived and presented. These spatially descriptive control terms dictate favorable regions within the membrane domain for placing sensors and can be used as a design guideline for structural control applications. The results of the present work demonstrate that thin plate theory is an appropriate modeling

  7. ENaC-membrane interactions: regulation of channel activity by membrane order.

    PubMed

    Awayda, Mouhamed S; Shao, Weijian; Guo, Fengli; Zeidel, Mark; Hill, Warren G

    2004-06-01

    Recently, it was reported that the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) is regulated by temperature (Askwith, C.C., C.J. Benson, M.J. Welsh, and P.M. Snyder. 2001. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 98:6459-6463). As these changes of temperature affect membrane lipid order and lipid-protein interactions, we tested the hypothesis that ENaC activity can be modulated by membrane lipid interactions. Two approaches were used to modulate membrane anisotropy, a lipid order-dependent parameter. The nonpharmacological approach used temperature changes, while the pharmacological one used chlorpromazine (CPZ), an agent known to decrease membrane order, and Gd+3. Experiments used Xenopus oocytes expressing human ENaC. Methods of impedance analysis were used to determine whether the effects of changing lipid order indirectly altered ENaC conductance via changes of membrane area. These data were further corroborated with quantitative morphology on micrographs from oocytes membranes studied via electron microscopy. We report biphasic effects of cooling (stimulation followed by inhibition) on hENaC conductance. These effects were relatively slow (minutes) and were delayed from the actual bath temperature changes. Peak stimulation occurred at a calculated Tmax of 15.2. At temperatures below Tmax, ENaC conductance was inhibited with cooling. The effects of temperature on gNa were distinct from those observed on ion channels endogenous to Xenopus oocytes, where the membrane conductance decreased monoexponentially with temperature (t = 6.2 degrees C). Similar effects were also observed in oocytes with reduced intra- and extracellular [Na+], thereby ruling out effects of self or feedback inhibition. Addition of CPZ or the mechanosensitive channel blocker, Gd+3, caused inhibition of ENaC. The effects of Gd+3 were also attributed to its ability to partition into the outer membrane leaflet and to decrease anisotropy. None of the effects of temperature, CPZ, or Gd+3 were accompanied by changes of

  8. [Computer modeling the concentration characteristics of the membrane potential for polymeric membrane, separated non-homogeneous electrolyte solutions].

    PubMed

    Slezak, Izabella H; Jasik-Slezak, Jolanta; Rogal, Mirosława; Slezak, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    The influence of the concentration boundary layers on membrane potential (deltapsis) in a single-membrane system on basis of the Kedem-Katchalsky equations was described in cases of horizontally mounted neutral polymeric membrane separates non-homogeneous (mechanically unstirred) binary electrolytic solutions at different concentrations. Results of calculations of deltapsis as a function of ratio solution concentrations (Ch/Cl) at constant values of: concentration Rayleigh number (Rc), concentration polarization coefficient (zetas) and hydrostatic pressure (deltaP) were presented. Calculations were made for the case where on a one side of the membrane aqueous solution of NaCl at steady concentration 10(-3) mol x l(-1) (Cl) was placed and on the other aqueous solutions of NaCl at concentrations from 10(-3) mol x l(-1) to 2 x 10(-2) mol x l(-1) (Ch). Their densities were greater than NaCl solution's at 10(-3) mol x l(-1). It was shown that membrane potential depends on hydrodynamic state of a complex concentration boundary layer-membrane-concentration boundary layer, what is controlled by deltaP, Ch/Cl, Rc and zetas. PMID:17022154

  9. Antimicrobial peptides: natural templates for synthetic membrane-active compounds.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, A; Pirri, G; Bozzi, A; Di Giulio, A; Aschi, M; Rinaldi, A C

    2008-08-01

    The innate immunity of multicellular organisms relies in large part on the action of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) to resist microbial invasion. Crafted by evolution into an extremely diversified array of sequences and folds, AMPs do share a common amphiphilic 3-D arrangement. This feature is directly linked with a common mechanism of action that predominantly (although not exclusively) develops upon interaction of peptides with cell membranes of target cells. This minireview reports on current understanding of the modes of interaction of AMPs with biological and model membranes, especially focusing on recent insights into the folding and oligomerization requirements of peptides to bind and insert into lipid membranes and exert their antibiotic effects. Given the potential of AMPs to be developed into a new class of anti-infective agents, emphasis is placed on how the information on peptide-membrane interactions could direct the design and selection of improved biomimetic synthetic peptides with antibiotic properties.

  10. Dynamic potential and surface morphology study of sertraline membrane sensors

    PubMed Central

    Khater, M.M.; Issa, Y.M.; Hassib, H.B.; Mohammed, S.H.

    2014-01-01

    New rapid, sensitive and simple electrometric method was developed to determine sertraline hydrochloride (Ser-Cl) in its pure raw material and pharmaceutical formulations. Membrane sensors based on heteropolyacids as ion associating material were prepared. Silicomolybdic acid (SMA), silicotungstic acid (STA) and phosphomolybdic acid (PMA) were used. The slope and limit of detection are 50.00, 60.00 and 53.24 mV/decade and 2.51, 5.62 and 4.85 μmol L−1 for Ser-ST, Ser-PM and Ser-SM membrane sensors, respectively. Linear range is 0.01–10.00 for the three sensors. These new sensors were used for the potentiometric titration of Ser-Cl using sodium tetraphenylborate as titrant. The surface morphologies of the prepared membranes with and without the modifier (ion-associate) were studied using scanning and atomic force microscopes. PMID:26257944

  11. Photosynthetic control of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase in Vallisneria leaves. I. Regulation of activity during light-induced membrane hyperpolarization.

    PubMed

    Harada, Akiko; Okazaki, Yoshiji; Takagi, Shingo

    2002-04-01

    In mesophyll cells of the aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria gigantea Graebner, red, blue, or blue plus far-red light induced a typical membrane hyperpolarization, whereas far-red light alone had little effect. Both N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, a potent inhibitor of H+-ATPase, and carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, an uncoupler, produced a considerable membrane depolarization in the dark-adapted cells and a complete suppression of the light-induced hyperpolarization. Although 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), an inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport, did not affect the membrane potential in darkness, it completely inhibited the light-induced membrane hyperpolarization. In vivo illumination of the leaves with red light caused a substantial decrease in the Km for ATP, not only of the vanadate-sensitive ATP-hydrolyzing activity in leaf homogenate, but also of the ATP-dependent H+-transporting activity in plasma membrane (PM) vesicles isolated from the leaves by aqueous polymer two-phase partitioning methods. The effects of red light were negated by the presence of DCMU during illumination. In vivo illumination with far-red light had no effect on the Km for ATP of H+-transporting activity. These results strongly suggest that an electrogenic component in the membrane potential of the mesophyll cell is generated by the PM H+-ATPase, and that photosynthesis-dependent modulation of the enzymatic activity of the PM H+-ATPase is involved in the light-induced membrane hyperpolarization. PMID:11941462

  12. Activation of Raf as a result of recruitment to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Stokoe, D; Macdonald, S G; Cadwallader, K; Symons, M; Hancock, J F

    1994-06-01

    The small guanine nucleotide binding protein Ras participates in a growth promoting signal transduction pathway. The mechanism by which interaction of Ras with the protein kinase Raf leads to activation of Raf was studied. Raf was targeted to the plasma membrane by addition of the COOH-terminal localization signals of K-ras. This modified form of Raf (RafCAAX) was activated to the same extent as Raf coexpressed with oncogenic mutant Ras. Plasma membrane localization rather than farnesylation or the presence of the additional COOH-terminal sequence accounted for the activation of RafCAAX. The activation of RafCAAX was completely independent of Ras; it was neither potentiated by oncogenic mutant Ras nor abrogated by dominant negative Ras. Raf, once recruited to the plasma membrane, was not anchored there by Ras; most activated Raf in cells was associated with plasma membrane cytoskeletal elements, not the lipid bilayer. Thus, Ras functions in the activation of Raf by recruiting Raf to the plasma membrane where a separate, Ras-independent, activation of Raf occurs.

  13. Recent Developments in Graphene-Based Membranes: Structure, Mass-Transport Mechanism and Potential Applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengzhan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei

    2016-03-23

    Significant achievements have been made on the development of next-generation filtration and separation membranes using graphene materials, as graphene-based membranes can afford numerous novel mass-transport properties that are not possible in state-of-art commercial membranes, making them promising in areas such as membrane separation, water desalination, proton conductors, energy storage and conversion, etc. The latest developments on understanding mass transport through graphene-based membranes, including perfect graphene lattice, nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide membranes are reviewed here in relation to their potential applications. A summary and outlook is further provided on the opportunities and challenges in this arising field. The aspects discussed may enable researchers to better understand the mass-transport mechanism and to optimize the synthesis of graphene-based membranes toward large-scale production for a wide range of applications.

  14. Recent Developments in Graphene-Based Membranes: Structure, Mass-Transport Mechanism and Potential Applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengzhan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei

    2016-03-23

    Significant achievements have been made on the development of next-generation filtration and separation membranes using graphene materials, as graphene-based membranes can afford numerous novel mass-transport properties that are not possible in state-of-art commercial membranes, making them promising in areas such as membrane separation, water desalination, proton conductors, energy storage and conversion, etc. The latest developments on understanding mass transport through graphene-based membranes, including perfect graphene lattice, nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide membranes are reviewed here in relation to their potential applications. A summary and outlook is further provided on the opportunities and challenges in this arising field. The aspects discussed may enable researchers to better understand the mass-transport mechanism and to optimize the synthesis of graphene-based membranes toward large-scale production for a wide range of applications. PMID:26797529

  15. G-1-activated membrane estrogen receptors mediate increased contractility of the human myometrium.

    PubMed

    Maiti, K; Paul, J W; Read, M; Chan, E C; Riley, S C; Nahar, P; Smith, R

    2011-06-01

    Estrogens are key mediators of increased uterine contractility at labor. We sought to determine whether membrane-associated estrogen receptors, such as the recently described seven-transmembrane receptor G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30), mediated some of this effect. Using human myometrium obtained at term cesarean section before or after the onset of labor, we demonstrated the presence of GPR30 mRNA and protein using quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. GPR30 receptor was localized to the cell membrane and often colocalized with calveolin-1. Using the specific estrogen membrane receptor agonist G-1 and myometrial explants, we showed that membrane receptor activation led to phosphorylation of MAPK and the actin-modifying small heat shock protein 27. Using myometrial strips incubated with G-1 or vehicle we demonstrated that estrogen membrane receptor activation increased the myometrial contractile response to oxytocin. These data suggest that activation of the plasma membrane estrogen receptor GPR30 likely participates in the physiology of the human myometrium during pregnancy and identifies it as a potential target to modify uterine activity. PMID:21427217

  16. Historical Overview and General Methods of Membrane Potential Imaging.

    PubMed

    Braubach, Oliver; Cohen, Lawrence B; Choi, Yunsook

    2015-01-01

    Voltage imaging was first conceived in the late 1960s and efforts to find better organic voltage sensitive dyes began in the 1970s and continue until today. At the beginning it was difficult to measure an action potential signal from a squid giant axon in a single trial. Now it is possible to measure the action potential in an individual spine. Other chapters will discuss advances in voltage imaging technology and applications in a variety of biological preparations. The development of genetically encoded voltage sensors has started. A genetically encoded sensor could provide cell type specific expression and voltage recording (see Chap. 20). Optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio of an optical recording requires attention to several aspects of the recording apparatus. These include the light source, the optics and the recording device. All three have improved substantially in recent years. Arc lamp, LED, and laser sources are now stable, more powerful, and less expensive. Cameras for recording activity have frames rates above 1 kHz and quantum efficiencies near 1.0 although they remain expensive. The sources of noise in optical recordings are well understood. Both the apparatus and the noise sources are discussed in this chapter.

  17. Imaging Membrane Potential with Two Types of Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Voltage Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungmoo; Piao, Hong Hua; Sepheri-Rad, Masoud; Jung, Arong; Sung, Uhna; Song, Yoon-Kyu; Baker, Bradley J

    2016-02-04

    Genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) have improved to the point where they are beginning to be useful for in vivo recordings. While the ultimate goal is to image neuronal activity in vivo, one must be able to image activity of a single cell to ensure successful in vivo preparations. This procedure will describe how to image membrane potential in a single cell to provide a foundation to eventually image in vivo. Here we describe methods for imaging GEVIs consisting of a voltage-sensing domain fused to either a single fluorescent protein (FP) or two fluorescent proteins capable of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in vitro. Using an image splitter enables the projection of images created by two different wavelengths onto the same charge-coupled device (CCD) camera simultaneously. The image splitter positions a second filter cube in the light path. This second filter cube consists of a dichroic and two emission filters to separate the donor and acceptor fluorescent wavelengths depending on the FPs of the GEVI. This setup enables the simultaneous recording of both the acceptor and donor fluorescent partners while the membrane potential is manipulated via whole cell patch clamp configuration. When using a GEVI consisting of a single FP, the second filter cube can be removed allowing the mirrors in the image splitter to project a single image onto the CCD camera.

  18. The Spatial Variation of Membrane Potential Near a Small Source of Current in a Spherical Cell

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, R. S.; Engel, E.

    1970-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented of the change in membrane potential produced by current supplied by a microelectrode inserted just under the membrane of a spherical cell. The results of the analysis are presented in tabular and graphic form for three wave forms of current: steady, step function, and sinusoidal. As expected from physical reasoning, we find that the membrane potential is nonuniform, that there is a steep rise in membrane potential near the current microelectrode, and that this rise is of particular importance when the membrane resistance is low, or the membrane potential is changing rapidly. The effect of this steep rise in potential on the interpretation of voltage measurements from spherical cells is discussed and practical suggestions for minimizing these effects are made: in particular, it is pointed out that if the current and voltage electrodes are separated by 60°, the change in membrane potential produced by application of current is close to that which would occur if there were no spatial variation of potential. We thus suggest that investigations of the electrical properties of spherical cells using two microelectrodes can best be made when the electrodes are separated by 60°. PMID:5424376

  19. Bacterial porin disrupts mitochondrial membrane potential and sensitizes host cells to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Dian-Lothrop, Elke A; Meinecke, Michael; Kepp, Oliver; Ross, Katharina; Rajalingam, Krishnaraj; Harsman, Anke; Hauf, Eva; Brinkmann, Volker; Günther, Dirk; Herrmann, Ines; Hurwitz, Robert; Rassow, Joachim; Wagner, Richard; Rudel, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    The bacterial PorB porin, an ATP-binding beta-barrel protein of pathogenic Neisseria gonorrhoeae, triggers host cell apoptosis by an unknown mechanism. PorB is targeted to and imported by host cell mitochondria, causing the breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)). Here, we show that PorB induces the condensation of the mitochondrial matrix and the loss of cristae structures, sensitizing cells to the induction of apoptosis via signaling pathways activated by BH3-only proteins. PorB is imported into mitochondria through the general translocase TOM but, unexpectedly, is not recognized by the SAM sorting machinery, usually required for the assembly of beta-barrel proteins in the mitochondrial outer membrane. PorB integrates into the mitochondrial inner membrane, leading to the breakdown of DeltaPsi(m). The PorB channel is regulated by nucleotides and an isogenic PorB mutant defective in ATP-binding failed to induce DeltaPsi(m) loss and apoptosis, demonstrating that dissipation of DeltaPsi(m) is a requirement for cell death caused by neisserial infection. PMID:19851451

  20. Multiphoton Process and Anomalous Potential of Cell Membrane by Laser Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Kaixi; Zhao, Qingxun; Cui, Zhiyun; Zhar, Ping; Dong, Lifang

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, by the use of quantum biology and quantum optics, the laser induced potential variation of cell membrane has been studied. Theoretically, we have found a method of calculating the monophoton and multiphoton processes in the formation of the anomalous potential of cell membrane. In contrast with the experimental results, our numerical result is in the same order. Therefore, we have found the possibility of cancer caused by the laser induced anomalous cell potential.

  1. Zero-current potentials in a large membrane channel: a simple theory accounts for complex behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Zambrowicz, E B; Colombini, M

    1993-01-01

    Flow of ions through large channels is complex because both cations and anions can penetrate and multiple ions can be in the channel at the same time. A modification of the fixed-charge membrane theory of Teorell was reported (Peng, S., E. Blachly-Dyson, M. Forte, and M. Colombini. 1992. Biophys. J. 62:123-135) in which the channel is divided into two compartments: a relatively charged cylindrical shell of solution adjacent to the wall of the pore and a relatively neutral central cylinder of solution. The zero-current (reversal) potential results in current flow in opposite directions in these two compartments. This description accounted rather well for the observed reversal potential changes following site-directed mutations. Here we report the results of systematic tests of this simple theory with the mitochondrial channel, VDAC (isolated from Neurospora crassa), reconstituted into planar phospholipid membranes. The variation of the observed reversal potential with transmembrane activity ratio, ionic strength, ion mobility ratio, and net charge on the wall of the pore are accounted for reasonably well. The Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz theory fails to account for the observations. PMID:7694668

  2. Membrane Thinning and Thickening Induced by Membrane-Active Amphipathic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Grage, Stephan L; Afonin, Sergii; Kara, Sezgin; Buth, Gernot; Ulrich, Anne S

    2016-01-01

    Membrane thinning has been discussed as a fundamental mechanism by which antimicrobial peptides can perturb cellular membranes. To understand which factors play a role in this process, we compared several amphipathic peptides with different structures, sizes and functions in their influence on the lipid bilayer thickness. PGLa and magainin 2 from X. laevis were studied as typical representatives of antimicrobial cationic amphipathic α-helices. A 1:1 mixture of these peptides, which is known to possess synergistically enhanced activity, allowed us to evaluate whether and how this synergistic interaction correlates with changes in membrane thickness. Other systems investigated here include the α-helical stress-response peptide TisB from E. coli (which forms membrane-spanning dimers), as well as gramicidin S from A. migulanus (a natural antibiotic), and BP100 (designer-made antimicrobial and cell penetrating peptide). The latter two are very short, with a circular β-pleated and a compact α-helical structure, respectively. Solid-state (2)H-NMR and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) on oriented phospholipid bilayers were used as complementary techniques to access the hydrophobic thickness as well as the bilayer-bilayer repeat distance including the water layer in between. This way, we found that magainin 2, gramicidin S, and BP100 induced membrane thinning, as expected for amphiphilic peptides residing in the polar/apolar interface of the bilayer. PGLa, on the other hand, decreased the hydrophobic thickness only at very high peptide:lipid ratios, and did not change the bilayer-bilayer repeat distance. TisB even caused an increase in the hydrophobic thickness and repeat distance. When reconstituted as a mixture, PGLa and magainin 2 showed a moderate thinning effect which was less than that of magainin 2 alone, hence their synergistically enhanced activity does not seem to correlate with a modulation of membrane thickness. Overall, the absence of

  3. Membrane Thinning and Thickening Induced by Membrane-Active Amphipathic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Grage, Stephan L.; Afonin, Sergii; Kara, Sezgin; Buth, Gernot; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane thinning has been discussed as a fundamental mechanism by which antimicrobial peptides can perturb cellular membranes. To understand which factors play a role in this process, we compared several amphipathic peptides with different structures, sizes and functions in their influence on the lipid bilayer thickness. PGLa and magainin 2 from X. laevis were studied as typical representatives of antimicrobial cationic amphipathic α-helices. A 1:1 mixture of these peptides, which is known to possess synergistically enhanced activity, allowed us to evaluate whether and how this synergistic interaction correlates with changes in membrane thickness. Other systems investigated here include the α-helical stress-response peptide TisB from E. coli (which forms membrane-spanning dimers), as well as gramicidin S from A. migulanus (a natural antibiotic), and BP100 (designer-made antimicrobial and cell penetrating peptide). The latter two are very short, with a circular β-pleated and a compact α-helical structure, respectively. Solid-state 2H-NMR and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) on oriented phospholipid bilayers were used as complementary techniques to access the hydrophobic thickness as well as the bilayer-bilayer repeat distance including the water layer in between. This way, we found that magainin 2, gramicidin S, and BP100 induced membrane thinning, as expected for amphiphilic peptides residing in the polar/apolar interface of the bilayer. PGLa, on the other hand, decreased the hydrophobic thickness only at very high peptide:lipid ratios, and did not change the bilayer-bilayer repeat distance. TisB even caused an increase in the hydrophobic thickness and repeat distance. When reconstituted as a mixture, PGLa and magainin 2 showed a moderate thinning effect which was less than that of magainin 2 alone, hence their synergistically enhanced activity does not seem to correlate with a modulation of membrane thickness. Overall, the absence of a

  4. The membrane potential of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells microelectrode measurements and their critical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lassen, U V; Nielsen, A M; Pape, L; Simonsen, L O

    1971-12-01

    Intracellular potentials were measured, using a piezoelectric electromechanical transducer to impale Ehrlich ascites tumor cells with capillary microelectrodes. In sodium Ringer's, the potential immediately after the penetration was -24±7 mV, and decayed to a stable value of about -8 mV within a few msec. The peak potentials disappeared in potassium Ringer's and reappeared immediately after resuspension in sodium. Ringer's, whereas the stable potentials were only slightly influenced by the change of medium. The peak potential is in good agreement with the Nernst potential for chloride. This is also the case when cell sodium and potassium have been changed by addition of ouabain. It is concluded that the peak potentials represent the membrane potential of the unperturbed cell, and that chloride is in electrochemical equilibrium across the cell membrane.The membrane potential of about -11 mV previously reported corresponds to the stable potential in this study, and is considered as a junction potential between damaged cells and their environment. Similar potential differences were recorded between a homogenate of cells and Ringer's.The apparent membrane resistance of Ehrlich cells was about 70 Ωcm(2). This is two orders of magnitude less than the value calculated from(36)Cl fluxes, and may, in part, represent a leak in the cell membrane.For comparison, the influence of an eventual leak on measurements in red cells and mitochondria is discussed.

  5. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy for characterisation of membrane protein-ligand interactions and its potential for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2014-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy is a rapidly developing technique for the study of ligand binding interactions with membrane proteins, which are the major molecular targets for validated drugs and for current and foreseeable drug discovery. SPR is label-free and capable of measuring real-time quantitative binding affinities and kinetics for membrane proteins interacting with ligand molecules using relatively small quantities of materials and has potential to be medium-throughput. The conventional SPR technique requires one binding component to be immobilised on a sensor chip whilst the other binding component in solution is flowed over the sensor surface; a binding interaction is detected using an optical method that measures small changes in refractive index at the sensor surface. This review first describes the basic SPR experiment and the challenges that have to be considered for performing SPR experiments that measure membrane protein-ligand binding interactions, most importantly having the membrane protein in a lipid or detergent environment that retains its native structure and activity. It then describes a wide-range of membrane protein systems for which ligand binding interactions have been characterised using SPR, including the major drug targets G protein-coupled receptors, and how challenges have been overcome for achieving this. Finally it describes some recent advances in SPR-based technology and future potential of the technique to screen ligand binding in the discovery of drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Structural and biophysical characterisation of membrane protein-ligand binding.

  6. Ion Permeability of Artificial Membranes Evaluated by Diffusion Potential and Electrical Resistance Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shlyonsky, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    In the present article, a novel model of artificial membranes that provides efficient assistance in teaching the origins of diffusion potentials is proposed. These membranes are made of polycarbonate filters fixed to 12-mm plastic rings and then saturated with a mixture of creosol and "n"-decane. The electrical resistance and potential…

  7. Large-Aperture Membrane Active Phased-Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris; McGrath, William; Leduc, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Large-aperture phased-array microwave antennas supported by membranes are being developed for use in spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar systems. There may also be terrestrial uses for such antennas supported on stationary membranes, large balloons, and blimps. These antennas are expected to have areal mass densities of about 2 kg/sq m, satisfying a need for lightweight alternatives to conventional rigid phased-array antennas, which have typical areal mass densities between 8 and 15 kg/sq m. The differences in areal mass densities translate to substantial differences in total mass in contemplated applications involving aperture areas as large as 400 sq m. A membrane phased-array antenna includes patch antenna elements in a repeating pattern. All previously reported membrane antennas were passive antennas; this is the first active membrane antenna that includes transmitting/receiving (T/R) electronic circuits as integral parts. Other integral parts of the antenna include a network of radio-frequency (RF) feed lines (more specifically, a corporate feed network) and of bias and control lines, all in the form of flexible copper strip conductors on flexible polymeric membranes. Each unit cell of a prototype antenna (see Figure 1) contains a patch antenna element and a compact T/R module that is compatible with flexible membrane circuitry. There are two membrane layers separated by a 12.7-mm air gap. Each membrane layer is made from a commercially available flexible circuit material that, as supplied, comprises a 127-micron-thick polyimide dielectric layer clad on both sides with 17.5-micron-thick copper layers. The copper layers are patterned into RF, bias, and control conductors. The T/R module is located on the back side of the ground plane and is RF-coupled to the patch element via a slot. The T/R module is a hybrid multilayer module assembled and packaged independently and attached to the membrane array. At the time of reporting the information for

  8. Na+/H+ Exchange Activity in the Plasma Membrane of Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Quan-Sheng; Barkla, Bronwyn J.; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Schumaker, Karen S.

    2003-01-01

    In plants, Na+/H+ exchangers in the plasma membrane are critical for growth in high levels of salt, removing toxic Na+ from the cytoplasm by transport out of the cell. The molecular identity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger in Arabidopsis (SOS1) has recently been determined. In this study, immunological analysis provided evidence that SOS1 localizes to the plasma membrane of leaves and roots. To characterize the transport activity of this protein, purified plasma membrane vesicles were isolated from leaves of Arabidopsis. Na+/H+ exchange activity, monitored as the ability of Na to dissipate an established pH gradient, was absent in plants grown without salt. However, exchange activity was induced when plants were grown in 250 mm NaCl and increased with prolonged salt exposure up to 8 d. H+-coupled exchange was specific for Na, because chloride salts of other monovalent cations did not dissipate the pH gradient. Na+/H+ exchange activity was dependent on Na (substrate) concentration, and kinetic analysis indicated that the affinity (apparent Km) of the transporter for Na+ is 22.8 mm. Data from two experimental approaches supports electroneutral exchange (one Na+ exchanged for one proton): (a) no change in membrane potential was measured during the exchange reaction, and (b) Na+/H+ exchange was unaffected by the presence or absence of a membrane potential. Results from this research provide a framework for future studies into the regulation of the plant plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger and its relative contribution to the maintenance of cellular Na+ homeostasis during plant growth in salt. PMID:12805632

  9. Membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins as biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for SLE.

    PubMed

    Das, Nibhriti; Biswas, Bintili; Khera, Rohan

    2013-01-01

    For the last two decades, there had been remarkable advancement in understanding the role of complement regulatory proteins in autoimmune disorders and importance of complement inhibitors as therapeutics. Systemic lupus erythematosus is a prototype of systemic autoimmune disorders. The disease, though rare, is potentially fatal and afflicts women at their reproductive age. It is a complex disease with multiorgan involvement, and each patient presents with a different set of symptoms. The diagnosis is often difficult and is based on the diagnostic criteria set by the American Rheumatology Association. Presence of antinuclear antibodies and more specifically antidouble-stranded DNA indicates SLE. Since the disease is multifactorial and its phenotypes are highly heterogeneous, there is a need to identify multiple noninvasive biomarkers for SLE. Lack of validated biomarkers for SLE disease activity or response to treatment is a barrier to the efficient management of the disease, drug discovery, as well as development of new therapeutics. Recent studies with gene knockout mice have suggested that membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) may critically determine the sensitivity of host tissues to complement injury in autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Case-controlled and followup studies carried out in our laboratory suggest an intimate relation between the level of DAF, MCP, CR1, and CD59 transcripts and the disease activity in SLE. Based on comparative evaluation of our data on these four membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins, we envisaged CR1 and MCP transcripts as putative noninvasive disease activity markers and the respective proteins as therapeutic targets for SLE. Following is a brief appraisal on membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins DAF, MCP, CR1, and CD59 as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for SLE. PMID:23402019

  10. Electrochemiluminescence imaging for parallel single-cell analysis of active membrane cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junyu; Ma, Guangzhong; Chen, Yun; Fang, Danjun; Jiang, Dechen; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2015-08-18

    Luminol electrochemiluminescence (ECL) imaging was developed for the parallel measurement of active membrane cholesterol at single living cells, thus establishing a novel electrochemical detection technique for single cells with high analysis throughput and low detection limit. In our strategy, the luminescence generated from luminol and hydrogen peroxide upon the potential was recorded in one image so that hydrogen peroxide at the surface of multiple cells could be simultaneously analyzed. Compared with the classic microelectrode array for the parallel single-cell analysis, the plat electrode only was needed in our ECL imaging, avoiding the complexity of electrode fabrication. The optimized ECL imaging system showed that hydrogen peroxide as low as 10 μM was visible and the efflux of hydrogen peroxide from cells could be determined. Coupled with the reaction between active membrane cholesterol and cholesterol oxidase to generate hydrogen peroxide, active membrane cholesterol at cells on the electrode was analyzed at single-cell level. The luminescence intensity was correlated with the amount of active membrane cholesterol, validating our system for single-cell cholesterol analysis. The relative high standard deviation on the luminescence suggested high cellular heterogeneities on hydrogen peroxide efflux and active membrane cholesterol, which exhibited the significance of single-cell analysis. This success in ECL imaging for single-cell analysis opens a new field in the parallel measurement of surface molecules at single cells.

  11. Membrane-Active Macromolecules Resensitize NDM-1 Gram-Negative Clinical Isolates to Tetracycline Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Uppu, Divakara S. S. M.; Manjunath, Goutham B.; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Kaviyil, Jyothi E.; Ravikumar, Raju; Paramanandham, Krishnamoorthy; Shome, Bibek R.; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative ‘superbugs’ such as New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (blaNDM-1) producing pathogens have become world’s major public health threats. Development of molecular strategies that can rehabilitate the ‘old antibiotics’ and halt the antibiotic resistance is a promising approach to target them. We report membrane-active macromolecules (MAMs) that restore the antibacterial efficacy (enhancement by >80-1250 fold) of tetracycline antibiotics towards blaNDM-1 Klebsiella pneumonia and blaNDM-1 Escherichia coli clinical isolates. Organismic studies showed that bacteria had an increased and faster uptake of tetracycline in the presence of MAMs which is attributed to the mechanism of re-sensitization. Moreover, bacteria did not develop resistance to MAMs and MAMs stalled the development of bacterial resistance to tetracycline. MAMs displayed membrane-active properties such as dissipation of membrane potential and membrane-permeabilization that enabled higher uptake of tetracycline in bacteria. In-vivo toxicity studies displayed good safety profiles and preliminary in-vivo antibacterial efficacy studies showed that mice treated with MAMs in combination with antibiotics had significantly decreased bacterial burden compared to the untreated mice. This report of re-instating the efficacy of the antibiotics towards blaNDM-1 pathogens using membrane-active molecules advocates their potential for synergistic co-delivery of antibiotics to combat Gram-negative superbugs. PMID:25789871

  12. Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels: Potential Target for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dong, De-Li; Bai, Yun-Long; Cai, Ben-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (KCa) are classified into three subtypes: big conductance (BKCa), intermediate conductance (IKCa), and small conductance (SKCa) KCa channels. The three types of KCa channels have distinct physiological or pathological functions in cardiovascular system. BKCa channels are mainly expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and inner mitochondrial membrane of cardiomyocytes, activation of BKCa channels in these locations results in vasodilation and cardioprotection against cardiac ischemia. IKCa channels are expressed in VSMCs, endothelial cells, and cardiac fibroblasts and involved in vascular smooth muscle proliferation, migration, vessel dilation, and cardiac fibrosis. SKCa channels are widely expressed in nervous and cardiovascular system, and activation of SKCa channels mainly contributes membrane hyperpolarization. In this chapter, we summarize the physiological and pathological roles of the three types of KCa channels in cardiovascular system and put forward the possibility of KCa channels as potential target for cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Role of membrane oxidation in controlling the activity of human group IIa secretory phospholipase A(2) toward apoptotic lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Elizabeth; Nelson, Jennifer; Anderson, Lynn; Brewer, Kelly; Melchor, Stephanie; Judd, Allan M; Bell, John D

    2013-02-01

    The membranes of healthy lymphocytes normally resist hydrolysis by secretory phospholipase A(2). However, they become susceptible during the process of apoptosis. Previous experiments have demonstrated the importance of certain physical changes to the membrane during cell death such as a reduction in membrane lipid order and exposure of phosphatidylserine on the membrane surface. Nevertheless, those investigations also showed that at least one additional factor was required for rapid hydrolysis by the human group IIa phospholipase isozyme. This study was designed to test the possibility that oxidation of membrane lipids is the additional factor. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy with a fluorescent probe of oxidative potential suggested that oxidation of the plasma membrane occurs during apoptosis stimulated by thapsigargin. When oxidative potential was high, the activity of human group IIa secretory phospholipase A(2) was enhanced 30- to 100-fold compared to that observed with conditions sufficient for maximal hydrolysis by other secretory phospholipase A(2) isoforms. Direct oxidation of cell membranes with either of two oxidizing agents also stimulated hydrolysis by secretory phospholipase A(2). Both oxidizers caused externalization of phosphatidylserine, but a change in lipid order did not always occur. These results demonstrated that membrane oxidation strongly stimulates human group IIa secretory phospholipase A(2) activity toward apoptotic cells. Interestingly, the change in membrane order, previously thought to be imperative for high rates of hydrolysis, was not required when membrane lipids were oxidized. Whether phosphatidylserine exposure is still necessary with oxidation remains unresolved since the two events could not be deconvoluted.

  14. Single cell wound generates electric current circuit and cell membrane potential variations that requires calcium influx.

    PubMed

    Luxardi, Guillaume; Reid, Brian; Maillard, Pauline; Zhao, Min

    2014-07-24

    Breaching of the cell membrane is one of the earliest and most common causes of cell injury, tissue damage, and disease. If the compromise in cell membrane is not repaired quickly, irreversible cell damage, cell death and defective organ functions will result. It is therefore fundamentally important to efficiently repair damage to the cell membrane. While the molecular aspects of single cell wound healing are starting to be deciphered, its bio-physical counterpart has been poorly investigated. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes as a model for single cell wound healing, we describe the temporal and spatial dynamics of the wound electric current circuitry and the temporal dynamics of cell membrane potential variation. In addition, we show the role of calcium influx in controlling electric current circuitry and cell membrane potential variations. (i) Upon wounding a single cell: an inward electric current appears at the wound center while an outward electric current is observed at its sides, illustrating the wound electric current circuitry; the cell membrane is depolarized; calcium flows into the cell. (ii) During cell membrane re-sealing: the wound center current density is maintained for a few minutes before decreasing; the cell membrane gradually re-polarizes; calcium flow into the cell drops. (iii) In conclusion, calcium influx is required for the formation and maintenance of the wound electric current circuitry, for cell membrane re-polarization and for wound healing.

  15. Excess chemical potential of small solutes across water--membrane and water--hexane interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    The excess chemical potentials of five small, structurally related solutes, CH4, CH3F, CH2F2, CHF3, and CF4, across the water-glycerol 1-monooleate bilayer and water-hexane interfaces were calculated at 300, 310, and 340 K using the particle insertion method. The excess chemical potentials of nonpolar molecules (CH4 and CF4) decrease monotonically or nearly monotonically from water to a nonpolar phase. In contrast, for molecules that possess permanent dipole moments (CH3F, CH2F, and CHF3), the excess chemical potentials exhibit an interfacial minimum that arises from superposition of two monotonically and oppositely changing contributions: electrostatic and nonelectrostatic. The nonelectrostatic term, dominated by the reversible work of creating a cavity that accommodates the solute, decreases, whereas the electrostatic term increases across the interface from water to the membrane interior. In water, the dependence of this term on the dipole moment is accurately described by second order perturbation theory. To achieve the same accuracy at the interface, third order terms must also be included. In the interfacial region, the molecular structure of the solvent influences both the excess chemical potential and solute orientations. The excess chemical potential across the interface increases with temperature, but this effect is rather small. Our analysis indicates that a broad range of small, moderately polar molecules should be surface active at the water-membrane and water-oil interfaces. The biological and medical significance of this result, especially in relation to the mechanism of anesthetic action, is discussed.

  16. Synchronization modulation of Na/K pump molecules can hyperpolarize the membrane resting potential in intact fibers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Dando, Robin

    2007-02-01

    Previously, we have theoretically studied the possibility of electrical rhythmic entrainment of carrier-mediated ion transporters, and experimentally realized synchronization and acceleration of the Na/K pumping rate in the cell membrane of skeletal muscle fibers by a specially designed synchronization modulation electric field. In these studies we either used cut fibers under a voltage clamp or intact fibers, but in the presence of ion channels blockers. A question remained as to whether the field-induced activation observed in the pump molecules could effectively increase the intracellular ionic concentration and the membrane potential at physiological conditions. In this paper, we studied the effects of the field on intact fibers without any channel blockers. We monitored the field-induced changes in the ionic concentration gradient across the cell membrane and the membrane potential non-invasively by using a fluorescent probe and confocal microscopic imaging techniques. The results clearly show that the entrainment of the pump molecules by the synchronization modulation electric field can effectively increase the ionic concentration gradient, and hence, hyperpolarize the membrane potential.

  17. α-Tocopherols modify the membrane dipole potential leading to modulation of ligand binding by P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Davis, Sterenn; Davis, Benjamin M; Richens, Joanna L; Vere, Kelly-Ann; Petrov, Peter G; Winlove, C Peter; O'Shea, Paul

    2015-08-01

    α-Tocopherol (vitamin E) has attracted considerable attention as a potential protective or palliative agent. In vitro, its free radical-scavenging antioxidant action has been widely demonstrated. In vivo, however, vitamin E treatment exhibits negligible benefits against oxidative stress. α-Tocopherol influences lipid ordering within biological membranes and its derivatives have been suggested to inhibit the multi-drug efflux pump, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). This study employs the fluorescent membrane probe, 1-(3-sulfonatopropyl)-4-[β[2-(di-n-octylamino)-6-naphthyl]vinyl] pyridinium betaine, to investigate whether these effects are connected via influences on the membrane dipole potential (MDP), an intrinsic property of biological membranes previously demonstrated to modulate P-gp activity. α-Tocopherol and its non-free radical-scavenging succinate analog induced similar decreases in the MDP of phosphatidylcholine vesicles. α-Tocopherol succinate also reduced the MDP of T-lymphocytes, subsequently decreasing the binding affinity of saquinavir for P-gp. Additionally, α-tocopherol succinate demonstrated a preference for cholesterol-treated (membrane microdomain enriched) cells over membrane cholesterol-depleted cells. Microdomain disruption via cholesterol depletion decreased saquinavir's affinity for P-gp, potentially implicating these structures in the influence of α-tocopherol succinate on P-gp. This study provides evidence of a microdomain dipole potential-dependent mechanism by which α-tocopherol analogs influence P-gp activity. These findings have implications for the use of α-tocopherol derivatives for drug delivery across biological barriers.

  18. Simulation of P systems with active membranes on CUDA.

    PubMed

    Cecilia, José M; García, José M; Guerrero, Ginés D; Martínez-del-Amor, Miguel A; Pérez-Hurtado, Ignacio; Pérez-Jiménez, Mario J

    2010-05-01

    P systems or Membrane Systems provide a high-level computational modelling framework that combines the structure and dynamic aspects of biological systems in a relevant and understandable way. They are inherently parallel and non-deterministic computing devices. In this article, we discuss the motivation, design principles and key of the implementation of a simulator for the class of recognizer P systems with active membranes running on a (GPU). We compare our parallel simulator for GPUs to the simulator developed for a single central processing unit (CPU), showing that GPUs are better suited than CPUs to simulate P systems due to their highly parallel nature.

  19. Ionophore-Based Voltammetric Ion Activity Sensing with Thin Layer Membranes.

    PubMed

    Cuartero, Maria; Crespo, Gaston A; Bakker, Eric

    2016-02-01

    As shown in recent work, thin layer ion-selective multi-ionophore membranes can be interrogated by cyclic voltammetry to detect the ion activity of multiple species simultaneously and selectively. Additional fundamental evidence is put forward on ion discrimination with thin multi-ionophore-based membranes with thicknesses of 200 ± 25 nm and backside contacted with poly-3-octylthiophene (POT). An anodic potential scan partially oxidizes the POT film (to POT(+)), thereby initiating the release of hydrophilic cations from the membrane phase to the sample solution at a characteristic potential. Varying concentration of added cation-exchanger demonstrates that it limits the ion transfer charge and not the deposited POT film. Voltammograms with multiple peaks are observed with each associated with the transfer of one type of ion (lithium, potassium, and sodium). Experimental conditions (thickness and composition of the membrane and concentration of the sample) are chosen that allow one to describe the system by a thermodynamic rather than kinetic model. As a consequence, apparent stability constants for sodium, potassium, and lithium (assuming 1:1 stoichiometry) with their respective ionophores are calculated and agree well with the values obtained by the potentiometric sandwich membrane technique. As an analytical application, a membrane containing three ionophores was used to determine lithium, sodium, and potassium in artificial samples at the same location and within a single voltammetric scan. Lithium and potassium were also determined in undiluted human plasma in the therapeutic concentration range. PMID:26712342

  20. Age related alterations of adrenoreceptor activity in erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Lomsadze, G; Khetsuriani, R; Arabuli, M; Intskirveli, N; Sanikidze, T

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the study was the investigation of age-related functional alterations of adrenoreceptors and the effect of agonist and antagonist drugs on age related adrenoreceptor activity in erythrocyte membrane. The impact of isopropanol and propanol on functional activity β- adrenergic receptors in red blood cell membrane were studied in 50 practically healthy men--volunteers. (I group--75-89 years old, II group--22-30 years old). The EPR signals S1 and S2 were registered in red blood cell membrane samples after incubation with isopropanol and propanol respectively. It was found that decreasing sensitivity (functional activity) of red blood cells membrane adrenoreceptors comes with aging (S1old

  1. Plasma Membrane Factor XIIIA Transglutaminase Activity Regulates Osteoblast Matrix Secretion and Deposition by Affecting Microtubule Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jallad, Hadil F.; Myneni, Vamsee D.; Piercy-Kotb, Sarah A.; Chabot, Nicolas; Mulani, Amina; Keillor, Jeffrey W.; Kaartinen, Mari T.

    2011-01-01

    Transglutaminase activity, arising potentially from transglutaminase 2 (TG2) and Factor XIIIA (FXIIIA), has been linked to osteoblast differentiation where it is required for type I collagen and fibronectin matrix deposition. In this study we have used an irreversible TG-inhibitor to ‘block –and-track’ enzyme(s) targeted during osteoblast differentiation. We show that the irreversible TG-inhibitor is highly potent in inhibiting osteoblast differentiation and mineralization and reduces secretion of both fibronectin and type I collagen and their release from the cell surface. Tracking of the dansyl probe by Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the inhibitor targets plasma membrane-associated FXIIIA. TG2 appears not to contribute to crosslinking activity on the osteoblast surface. Inhibition of FXIIIA with NC9 resulted in defective secretory vesicle delivery to the plasma membrane which was attributable to a disorganized microtubule network and decreased microtubule association with the plasma membrane. NC9 inhibition of FXIIIA resulted in destabilization of microtubules as assessed by cellular Glu-tubulin levels. Furthermore, NC9 blocked modification of Glu-tubulin into 150 kDa high-molecular weight Glu-tubulin form which was specifically localized to the plasma membrane. FXIIIA enzyme and its crosslinking activity were colocalized with plasma membrane-associated tubulin, and thus, it appears that FXIIIA crosslinking activity is directed towards stabilizing the interaction of microtubules with the plasma membrane. Our work provides the first mechanistic cues as to how transglutaminase activity could affect protein secretion and matrix deposition in osteoblasts and suggests a novel function for plasma membrane FXIIIA in microtubule dynamics. PMID:21283799

  2. The active form of cytochrome c oxidase: effects of detergent, the intact membrane, and radiation inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.A.; Suarez-Villafane, M.; Ferguson-Miller, S.

    1982-01-01

    Cytochrome oxidase is a multisubunit, intrinsic membrane protein with a complex function that includes oxidation of cytochrome c, reduction of oxygen and generation of a membrane potential. To clarify the relationship of its normal function to protein and membrane structure, we have examined the kinetic behavior of rat liver cytochrome oxidase in the intace inner mitochondrial membrane and in detergent solubilized states. Dissolution of rat liver mitochondrial membranes alters the kinetic parameters of the oxidase in a manner dependent in part on the dispersing agent, and characterized by a large increase in maximal activity which is not attributable to exposure of more oxidase or diminished affinity for cytochrome c. The most profound effect of solubilization of the membrane is seen on the low affinity reaction of cytochrome c, suggesting that the electron transfer pathway from this site to oxygen is sensitive to alterations in hydrophobic interactions within the oxidase. Purified rat liver and beef heart oxidase exists predominantly in a monodisperse, 300 kilodalton form in laurylmaltoside (Rosevear et al., 1980). However, a smaller, 130 kd species that exhibits high turnover rates equal to the 300 kd form is detected in some beef heart preparations, implying that the dimer may not be essential for high activity. Radiation inactivation studies on purified oxidase reveal a molecular weight for the functional unit of approx.70 kd. It is concluded that less than a complete set of subunits may be sufficient for both normal bindings of cytochrome c and rapid electron transfer to oxygen.

  3. Active form of cytochrome c oxidase: effects of detergent, the intact membrane, and radiation inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.A.; Suarez-Villafane, M.; Ferguson-Miller, S.

    1982-01-01

    Cytochrome oxidase is a multisubunit, intrinsic membrane protein with a complex function that includes oxidation of cytochrome c, reduction of oxygen and generation of a membrane potential. To clarify the relationship of its normal function to protein and membrane structure, we have examined the kinetic behavior of rat liver cytochrome oxidase in the intact inner mitochondrial membrane and in detergent solubilized states. Dissolution of rat liver mitochondrial membranes alters the kinetic parameters of the oxidase in a manner dependent in part on the dispersing agent, and characterized by a large increase in maximal activity which is not attributable to exposure of more oxidase or diminished affinity for cytochrome c. The most profound effect of solubilization of the membrane is seen on the low affinity reaction of cytochrome c, suggesting that the electron transfer pathway from this site to oxygen is sensitive to alterations in hydrophobic interactions within the oxidase. Purified rat liver and beef heart oxidase exists predominantly in a monodisperse, 300 kilodalton form in laurylmaltoside (Rosevear et al., 1980). However, a smaller, 130 kd species that exhibits high turnover rates equal to the 300 kd form is detected in some beef heart preparations, implying that the dimer may not be essential for high activity. Radiation inactivation studies on purified oxidase reveal a molecular weight for the functional unit of approx.70 kd. It is concluded that less than a complete set of subunits may be sufficient for both normal binding of cytochrome c and rapid electron transfer to oxygen.

  4. Antifungal property of hibicuslide C and its membrane-active mechanism in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji Hong; Jin, Qinglong; Woo, Eun-Rhan; Lee, Dong Gun

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the antifungal activity and mode of action(s) of hibicuslide C derived from Abutilon theophrasti were investigated. Antifungal susceptibility testing showed that hibicuslide C possessed potent activities toward various fungal strains and less hemolytic activity than amphotericin B. To understand the antifungal mechanism(s) of hibicuslide C in Candida albicans, flow cytometric analysis with propidium iodide was done. The results showed that hibicuslide C perturbed the plasma membrane of the C. albicans. The analysis of the transmembrane electrical potential with 3,3'-dipropylthiacarbocyanine iodide [DiSC3(5)] indicated that hibicuslide C induced membrane depolarization. Furthermore, model membrane studies were performed with calcein encapsulating large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) and FITC-dextran (FD) loaded LUVs. These results demonstrated that the antifungal effects of hibicuslide C on the fungal plasma membrane were through the formation of pores with radii between 2.3 nm and 3.3 nm. Finally, in three dimensional flow cytometric contour plots, a reduced cell sizes by the pore-forming action of hibicuslide C were observed. Therefore, the present study suggests that hibicuslide C exerts its antifungal effect by membrane-active mechanism.

  5. Effect of cholesterol on the interaction of the HIV GP41 fusion peptide with model membranes. Importance of the membrane dipole potential.

    PubMed

    Buzón, Víctor; Cladera, Josep

    2006-12-26

    Fusion of viral and cell membranes is a key event in the process by which the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) enters the target cell. Membrane fusion is facilitated by the interaction of the viral gp41 fusion peptide with the cell membrane. Using synthetic peptides and model membrane systems, it has been established that the sequence of events implies the binding of the peptide to the membrane, followed by a conformational change (transformation of unordered and helical structures into beta-aggregates) which precedes lipid mixing. It is known that this process can be influenced by the membrane lipid composition. In the present work we have undertaken a systematic study in order to determine the influence of cholesterol (abundant in the viral membrane) in the sequence of events leading to lipid mixing. Besides its effect on membrane fluidity, cholesterol can affect a less known physical parameter, the membrane dipole potential. Using the dipole potential fluorescent sensor di-8-ANEPPS together with other biophysical techniques, we show that cholesterol increases the affinity of the fusion peptide for the model membranes, and although it lowers the extent of lipid mixing, it increases the mixing rate. The influence of cholesterol on the peptide affinity and the lipid mixing rate are shown to be mainly due to its influence of the membrane dipole potential, whereas the lipid mixing extent and peptide conformational changes seem to be more dependent on other membrane parameters such as membrane fluidity and hydration.

  6. Laminin in the cutaneous basement membrane as a potential target in lewisite vesication.

    PubMed

    King, J R; Peters, B P; Monteiro-Riviere, N A

    1994-05-01

    The epidermal-dermal junction has a complex molecular architecture, with numerous components playing key roles in adhesion of the epidermis to the dermis. The purpose of this study was to examine structural components of the epidermal-dermal junction as potential targets for toxicity by lewisite (dichloro(2-chlorovinyl)arsine). This was accomplished by (1) immunocytochemical mapping of laminin, type IV collagen, and bullous pemphigoid antigen (BPA) in lewisite-treated isolated perfused porcine skin flaps (IPPSF), (2) evaluation of protease activity in IPPSF blister fluid against laminin substrate from murine EHS tumor and human keratinocytes, and (3) examination of human keratinocyte laminin for direct chemical modification by lewisite. Lewisite-induced epidermal-dermal separation was localized to the lamina lucida. Localization of the separation suggested that laminin, a cysteine-rich and highly protease-sensitive adhesive glycoprotein, is a potential target for lewisite action. It was hypothesized that chemical modification of laminin directly (via chemical alkylation of laminin thiols by the arsenical) or indirectly (due to lewisite-induced cytotoxic release of proteases) could result in blister formation. Employing sensitive methodology, no evidence of proteolytic activity against EHS tumor laminin or human keratinocyte laminin was identified in the blister fluid. In addition, no evidence for direct chemical modification of laminin by lewisite was demonstrated. However, up to 36% of the thiol groups in human keratinocyte laminin immunoprecipitates was potentially available for reaction with alkylating agents. While these studies did not demonstrate a lewisite-induced chemical modification of laminin, they do not rule out the possibility that other adhesive molecules of the basement membrane are targets for lewisite action. Further evaluation of the molecular role that these binding modalities play in vesicant-induced separation may provide new insights into

  7. Photodynamic activation of ion transport through lipid membranes and its correlation with an increased dielectric constant of the membrane.

    PubMed

    Killig, Frank; Stark, Günther

    2002-08-19

    Illumination of biological membranes with visible light in the presence of membrane-active sensitizers (e.g. rose bengal) is known to inactivate transport proteins such as ion channels and ion pumps. In some cases, however, illumination gives rise to an activation of transport. This is shown here for ion channels formed by alamethicin in lipid membranes, and for porin channels, which were isolated from the outer membrane of E. coli (OmpC) and from the outer membrane of mitochondria (VDAC) and were reconstituted in lipid membranes. An activation (in the form of an increased conductance) was also observed in the presence of the cation carriers valinomycin and nonactin. The activation phenomena were only present, if the membranes were made from lipids containing unsaturated double bonds. Activation was reduced in the presence of the antioxidant vitamin E. We suggest that the activation of the different transport systems has a common physical basis, namely an increase of the dielectric constant, epsilon(m), of the membrane interior by the presence of polar oxidation products of photodynamically induced lipid peroxidation. Experimental evidence for an enhanced dielectric constant was obtained from the finding of a light-induced increase of the membrane capacitance in the presence of rose bengal.

  8. Investigation of membrane active properties and antiradical activity of gossypol and its derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New asymmetrical derivatives of gossypol were synthesized. The antioxidant activity of gossypol and these derivatives was studied. The interaction of these compounds with modeled lipid membranes was also studied. It was found that the antioxidant effects and ability to interact with membranes was...

  9. Membrane-Active Properties and Antiradical Activity of Gossypol and Its Derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New asymmetrical derivatives of gossypol were synthesized. The antioxidant activity of gossypol and these derivatives was studied. The interaction of these compounds with modeled lipid membranes was also studied. It was found that the antioxidant effects and ability to interact with membranes was...

  10. Membranepotential-omics”: toward voltage imaging at the cell population level in roots of living plants

    PubMed Central

    Matzke, Antonius J. M.; Matzke, Marjori

    2013-01-01

    Genetically encoded voltage-sensitive fluorescent proteins (VSFPs) are being used in neurobiology as non-invasive tools to study synchronous electrical activities in specific groups of nerve cells. Here we discuss our efforts to adapt this “light-based electrophysiology” for use in plant systems. We describe the production of transgenic plants engineered to express different versions of VSFPs that are targeted to the plasma membrane and internal membranes of root cells. The aim is to optically record concurrent changes in plasma membrane potential in populations of cells and at multiple membrane systems within single cells in response to various stimuli in living plants. Such coordinated electrical changes may globally orchestrate cell behavior to elicit successful reactions of the root as a whole to varying and unpredictable environments. Findings from membranepotential-omics” can eventually be fused with data sets from other “omics” approaches to forge the integrated and comprehensive understanding that underpins the concept of systems biology. PMID:23964285

  11. Toxins in botanical dietary supplements: blue cohosh components disrupt cellular respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B; Khan, Ikhlas A; Nagle, Dale G; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-24

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA "black box" warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3), exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage.

  12. Hyperpolarization of the Membrane Potential Caused by Somatostatin in Dissociated Human Pituitary Adenoma Cells that Secrete Growth Hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Naohide; Shibuya, Naohiko; Ogata, Etsuro

    1986-08-01

    Membrane electrical properties and the response to somatostatin were examined in dissociated human pituitary adenoma cells that secrete growth hormone (GH). Under current clamp condition with a patch electrode, the resting potential was -52.4 ± 8.0 mV, and spontaneous action potentials were observed in 58% of the cells. Under voltage clamp condition an outward K+ current, a tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ current, and a Ca2+ current were observed. Cobalt ions suppressed the Ca2+ current. The threshold of Ca2+ current activation was about -60 mV. Somatostatin elicited a membrane hyperpolarization associated with increased membrane permeability in these cells. The reversal potential of somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization was -78.4 ± 4.3 mV in 6 mM K+ medium and -97.2 ± 6.4 mV in 3 mM K+ medium. These reversal potential values and a shift with the external K+ concentration indicated that membrane hyperpolarization was caused by increased permeability to K+. The hyperpolarized membrane potential induced by somatostatin was -63.6 ± 5.9 mV in the standard medium. This level was subthreshold for Ca2+ and Na+ currents and was sufficient to inhibit spontaneous action potentials. Hormone secretion was significantly suppressed by somatostatin and cobalt ions. Therefore, we suggest that Ca2+ entering the cell through voltage-dependent channels are playing an important role for GH secretion and that somatostatin suppresses GH secretion by blocking Ca2+ currents. Finally, we discuss other possibilities for the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on GH secretion.

  13. Proteasome Impairment Induces Recovery of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and an Alternative Pathway of Mitochondrial Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Shirozu, Ryohei; Yashiroda, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are vital and highly dynamic organelles that continuously fuse and divide to maintain mitochondrial quality. Mitochondrial dysfunction impairs cellular integrity and is known to be associated with various human diseases. However, the mechanism by which the quality of mitochondria is maintained remains largely unexplored. Here we show that impaired proteasome function recovers the growth of yeast cells lacking Fzo1, a pivotal protein for mitochondrial fusion. Decreased proteasome activity increased the mitochondrial oxidoreductase protein Mia40 and the ratio of the short isoform of mitochondrial intermembrane protein Mgm1 (s-Mgm1) to the long isoform (l-Mgm1). The increase in Mia40 restored mitochondrial membrane potential, while the increase in the s-Mgm1/l-Mgm1 ratio promoted mitochondrial fusion in an Fzo1-independent manner. Our findings demonstrate a new pathway for mitochondrial quality control that is induced by proteasome impairment. PMID:26552703

  14. Membrane potential dynamics of populations of cortical neurons during auditory streaming.

    PubMed

    Farley, Brandon J; Noreña, Arnaud J

    2015-10-01

    How a mixture of acoustic sources is perceptually organized into discrete auditory objects remains unclear. One current hypothesis postulates that perceptual segregation of different sources is related to the spatiotemporal separation of cortical responses induced by each acoustic source or stream. In the present study, the dynamics of subthreshold membrane potential activity were measured across the entire tonotopic axis of the rodent primary auditory cortex during the auditory streaming paradigm using voltage-sensitive dye imaging. Consistent with the proposed hypothesis, we observed enhanced spatiotemporal segregation of cortical responses to alternating tone sequences as their frequency separation or presentation rate was increased, both manipulations known to promote stream segregation. However, across most streaming paradigm conditions tested, a substantial cortical region maintaining a response to both tones coexisted with more peripheral cortical regions responding more selectively to one of them. We propose that these coexisting subthreshold representation types could provide neural substrates to support the flexible switching between the integrated and segregated streaming percepts.

  15. Ion permeability of artificial membranes evaluated by diffusion potential and electrical resistance measurements.

    PubMed

    Shlyonsky, Vadim

    2013-12-01

    In the present article, a novel model of artificial membranes that provides efficient assistance in teaching the origins of diffusion potentials is proposed. These membranes are made of polycarbonate filters fixed to 12-mm plastic rings and then saturated with a mixture of creosol and n-decane. The electrical resistance and potential difference across these membranes can be easily measured using a low-cost volt-ohm meter and home-made Ag/AgCl electrodes. The advantage of the model is the lack of ionic selectivity of the membrane, which can be modified by the introduction of different ionophores to the organic liquid mixture. A membrane treated with the mixture containing valinomycin generates voltages from -53 to -25 mV in the presence of a 10-fold KCl gradient (in to out) and from -79 to -53 mV in the presence of a bi-ionic KCl/NaCl gradient (in to out). This latter bi-ionic gradient potential reverses to a value from +9 to +20 mV when monensin is present in the organic liquid mixture. Thus, the model can be build stepwise, i.e., all factors leading to the development of diffusion potentials can be introduced sequentially, helping students to understand the quantitative relationships of ionic gradients and differential membrane permeability in the generation of cell electrical signals.

  16. Porous and single-skinned polyethersulfone membranes support the growth of HepG2 cells: a potential biomaterial for bioartificial liver systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Chang; Liu, Tao; Wang, Ying-Jie

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we evaluated a porous and single-layer skin polyethersulfone (PES) membrane as a material for use in hybrid bioartificial liver support systems. The PES membrane has been characterized as a single-layer skin structure, with a rough porous surface. Specifically, we studied the ability of the human hepatoblastoma cell lines (HepG2) to adhere, grow, and spread on the PES membrane. Furthermore, we examined albumin secretion, low-density lipoprotein uptake, and CYP450 activity of HepG2 cells that grew on the membrane. HepG2 cells readily adhered onto the outer surfaces of PES membranes. Over time, HepG2 cells proliferated actively, and confluent monolayer of cells covered the available surface area of the membrane, eventually forming cell clusters and three-dimensional aggregates. Furthermore, HepG2 cells grown on PES membranes maintained highly specific functions, including uptake capability, biosynthesis and biotransformation. These results indicate that PES membranes are potential substrates for the growth of human liver cells and may be useful in the construction of hollow fiber bioreactors. Porous and single-layer skin PES membranes and HepG2 cells may be potential biomaterials for the development of biohybrid liver devices.

  17. FRET-based voltage probes for confocal imaging: membrane potential oscillations throughout pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Andrey; Bindokas, Vytautas P; Marks, Jeremy D; Philipson, Louis H

    2005-07-01

    Insulin secretion is dependent on coordinated pancreatic islet physiology. In the present study, we found a way to overcome the limitations of cellular electrophysiology to optically determine cell membrane potential (V(m)) throughout an islet by using a fast voltage optical dye pair. Using laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), we observed fluorescence (Förster) resonance energy transfer (FRET) with the fluorescent donor N-(6-chloro-7-hydroxycoumarin-3-carbonyl)-dimyristoylphosphatidyl-ethanolamine and the acceptor bis-(1,3-diethylthiobarbiturate) trimethine oxonol in the plasma membrane of essentially every cell within an islet. The FRET signal was approximately linear from V(m) -70 to +50 mV with a 2.5-fold change in amplitude. We evaluated the responses of islet cells to glucose and tetraethylammonium. Essentially, every responding cell in a mouse islet displayed similar time-dependent changes in V(m). When V(m) was measured simultaneously with intracellular Ca2+, all active cells showed tight coupling of V(m) to islet cell Ca2+ changes. Our findings indicate that FRET-based, voltage-sensitive dyes used in conjunction with LSCM imaging could be extremely useful in studies of excitation-secretion coupling in intact islets of Langerhans. PMID:15758044

  18. Antibiofilm activity of Bacillus pumilus SW9 against initial biofouling on microfiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Yu, Xin; Gong, Song; Ye, Chengsong; Fan, Zihong; Lin, Huirong

    2014-02-01

    Membrane biofouling, resulting from biofilm formation on the membrane, has become the main obstacle hindering wider application of membrane technology. Initial biofouling proves to be crucial which involves early stages of microbial adhesion and biofilm formation. Biological control of microbial attachment seems to be a promising strategy due to its high efficiency and eco-friendliness. The present study investigated the effects of a bacterium Bacillus pumilus SW9 on controlling the initial fouling formed by four target bacterial strains which were pioneer species responsible for biofouling in membrane bioreactors, using microfiltration membranes as the abiotic surfaces. The results suggested that strain SW9 exhibited excellent antibiofilm activity by decreasing the attached biomass of target strains. The production of extracellular polysaccharides and proteins by four target strains was also reduced. A distinct improvement of permeate flux in dead-end filtration systems was achieved when introducing strain SW9 to microfiltration experiments. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy were performed to further ascertain significant changes of the biofouling layers. A link between biofilm inhibition and initial biofouling mitigation was thus provided, suggesting an alternatively potential way to control membrane biofouling through bacterial interactions.

  19. Resting membrane potential and potassium currents in cultured parasympathetic neurones from rat intracardiac ganglia.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Z J; Adams, D J

    1992-01-01

    1. Whole-cell K+ currents contributing to the resting membrane potential and repolarization of the action potential were studied in voltage-clamped parasympathetic neurones dissociated from neonatal rat intracardiac ganglia and maintained in tissue culture. 2. Rat intracardiac neurones had a mean resting membrane potential of -52 mV and mean input resistance of 850 M omega. The current-voltage relationship recorded during slow voltage ramps indicated the presence of both leakage and voltage-dependent currents. The contribution of Na+, K+ and Cl- to the resting membrane potential was examined and relative ionic permeabilities PNa/PK = 0.12 and PCl/PK < 0.001 were calculated using the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz voltage equation. Bath application of the potassium channel blockers, tetraethylammonium ions (TEA; 1 mM) or Ba2+ (1 mM) depolarized the neurone by approximately 10 mV. Inhibition of the Na(+)-K+ pump by exposure to K(+)-free medium or by the addition of 0.1 mM ouabain to the bath solution depolarized the neurone by 3-5 mV. 3. In most neurones, depolarizing current pulses (0.5-1 s duration) elicited a single action potential of 85-100 mV, followed by an after-hyperpolarization of 200-500 ms. In 10-15% of the neurones, sustained current injection produced repetitive firing at maximal frequency of 5-8 Hz. 4. Tetrodotoxin (TTX; 300 nM) reduced, but failed to abolish, the action potential. The magnitude and duration of the TTX-insensitive action potential increased with the extracellular Ca2+ concentration, and was inhibited by bath application of 0.1 mM Cd2+. The repolarization rate of the TTX-insensitive action potential was reduced, and after-hyperpolarization was replaced by after-depolarization upon substitution of internal K+ by Cs+. The after-hyperpolarization of the action potential was reduced by bath application of Cd2+ (0.1 mM) and abolished by the addition of Cd2+ and TEA (10 mM). 5. Depolarization-activated outward K+ currents were isolated by adding 300 n

  20. Intracellular calcium store filling by an L-type calcium current in the basolateral amygdala at subthreshold membrane potentials.

    PubMed

    Power, John M; Sah, Pankaj

    2005-01-15

    The long-term changes that underlie learning and memory are activated by rises in intracellular Ca2+ that activate a number of signalling pathways and trigger changes in gene transcription. Ca2+ rises due to influx via L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (L-VDCCs) and release from intracellular Ca2+ stores have been consistently implicated in the biochemical cascades that underlie the final changes in memory formation. Here, we show that pyramidal neurones in the basolateral amygdala express an L-VDCC that is active at resting membrane potentials. Subthreshold depolarization of neurones either by current injection or summating synaptic potentials led to a sustained rise in cytosolic Ca2+ that was blocked by the dihydropyridine nicardipine. Activation of metabotropic receptors released Ca2+ from intracellular Ca2+ stores. At hyperpolarized potentials, metabotropic-evoked store release ran down with repeated stimulation. Depolarization of cells to -50 mV, or maintaining them at the resting membrane potential, restored release from intracellular Ca2+ stores, an effect that was blocked by nicardipine. These results show that Ca2+ influx via a low-voltage-activated L-type Ca2+ current refills inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3))-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores, and maintains Ca2+ release and wave generation by metabotropic receptor activation.

  1. Intracellular calcium store filling by an L-type calcium current in the basolateral amygdala at subthreshold membrane potentials

    PubMed Central

    Power, John M; Sah, Pankaj

    2005-01-01

    The long-term changes that underlie learning and memory are activated by rises in intracellular Ca2+ that activate a number of signalling pathways and trigger changes in gene transcription. Ca2+ rises due to influx via L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (L-VDCCs) and release from intracellular Ca2+ stores have been consistently implicated in the biochemical cascades that underlie the final changes in memory formation. Here, we show that pyramidal neurones in the basolateral amygdala express an L-VDCC that is active at resting membrane potentials. Subthreshold depolarization of neurones either by current injection or summating synaptic potentials led to a sustained rise in cytosolic Ca2+ that was blocked by the dihydropyridine nicardipine. Activation of metabotropic receptors released Ca2+ from intracellular Ca2+ stores. At hyperpolarized potentials, metabotropic-evoked store release ran down with repeated stimulation. Depolarization of cells to −50 mV, or maintaining them at the resting membrane potential, restored release from intracellular Ca2+ stores, an effect that was blocked by nicardipine. These results show that Ca2+ influx via a low-voltage-activated L-type Ca2+ current refills inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores, and maintains Ca2+ release and wave generation by metabotropic receptor activation. PMID:15550460

  2. Antioxidant activities of bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea) protein hydrolysates and their membrane ultrafiltration fractions.

    PubMed

    Arise, Abimbola K; Alashi, Adeola M; Nwachukwu, Ifeanyi D; Ijabadeniyi, Oluwatosin A; Aluko, Rotimi E; Amonsou, Eric O

    2016-05-18

    In this study, the bambara protein isolate (BPI) was digested with three proteases (alcalase, trypsin and pepsin), to produce bambara protein hydrolysates (BPHs). These hydrolysates were passed through ultrafiltration membranes to obtain peptide fractions of different sizes (<1, 1-3, 3-5 and 5-10 kDa). The hydrolysates and their peptide fractions were investigated for antioxidant activities. The membrane fractions showed that peptides with sizes <3 kDa had significantly (p < 0.05) reduced surface hydrophobicity when compared with peptides >3 kDa. This is in agreement with the result obtained for the ferric reducing power, metal chelating and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities where higher molecular weight peptides exhibited better activity (p < 0.05) when compared to low molecular weight peptide fractions. However, for all the hydrolysates, the low molecular weight peptides were more effective diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavengers but not superoxide radicals when compared to the bigger peptides. In comparison with glutathione (GSH), BPHs and their membrane fractions had better (p < 0.05) reducing power and ability to chelate metal ions except for the pepsin hydrolysate and its membrane fractions that did not show any metal chelating activity. However, the 5-10 kDa pepsin hydrolysate peptide fractions had greater (88%) hydroxyl scavenging activity than GSH, alcalase and trypsin hydrolysates (82%). These findings show the potential use of BPHs and their peptide fraction as antioxidants in reducing food spoilage or management of oxidative stress-related metabolic disorders. PMID:27156453

  3. Galactosyltransferase activities in mitochondria outer membrane: biosynthesis of galactosylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Gasnier, F; Louisot, P; Gateau, O

    1989-01-01

    1. Mitochondria outer membranes prepared from mouse livers were purified on a discontinuous sucrose gradient. Control in electron microscopy and marker enzymes assays confirmed purity and homogeneity of this fraction. 2. Purified mitochondria outer membranes exhibited significant UDP-galactose: glycoprotein galactosyltransferase activities when incubated with endogenous or exogenous glycoprotein acceptors in presence of detergent (Nonidet P40). 3. Some properties of two distinct mitochondrial galactosyltransferases, acting respectively on ovomucoid and ovine asialo-mucin were investigated. 4. Transfer of galactose on ovomucoid was maximal for a pH of 7.6 at 33 degrees C whereas asialo-mucin galactosyltransferase exhibited an optimum pH of 5.6 for an optimal temperature of 46 degrees C. 5. These two distinct membrane-bound enzymes were both inhibited by diacylglycerophospholipids whereas lysophospholipids modulated both enzymes in a different way: at 5 mM lysophosphatidylcholine, asialo-mucin galactosyltransferase was slightly stimulated while ovomucoid galactosyltransferase was markedly activated. 6. The most important activating effect on ovomucoid galactosyltransferase was obtained with a phospholipid containing a long aliphatic side chain linked by an ester bond in sn-1 of glycerol, an hydroxyl group or hydrogen atoms in sn-2 and a phosphorylcholine head group in sn-3. PMID:2501112

  4. Old is new again: a chemical probe for targeting mitochondria and monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential in cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Liu, Wenwen; Huang, Xianhong; Zhang, Guanxin; Wang, Xuefei; Wang, Zhuo; Zhang, Deqing; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-09-01

    Here, we explore the new application of an old molecule. We find that the tetraphenylethene-indolium molecule (TPE-indo) can both image the mitochondria (in the aggregated state), and indicate mitochondrial activity by the fluorescence change of TPE-indo. TPE-indo shows good photostability, longer emission wavelength, targeting effect for mitochondria, and better response to the changes of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm).

  5. Amnion and Chorion Membranes: Potential Stem Cell Reservoir with Wide Applications in Periodontics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The periodontal therapy usually aims at elimination of disease causing bacteria and resolution of inflammation. It involves either resective or regenerative surgery to resolve the inflammation associated defects. Over the years, several methods have been used for achievement of periodontal regeneration. One of the oldest biomaterials used for scaffolds is the fetal membrane. The amniotic membranes of developing embryo, that is, amnion (innermost lining) and chorion (a layer next to it), have the properties with significant potential uses in dentistry. This paper reviews the properties, mechanism of action, and various applications of these placental membranes in general and specifically in Periodontics. PMID:26770199

  6. Altered ion channel conductance and ionic selectivity induced by large imposed membrane potential pulse.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W; Lee, R C

    1994-01-01

    The effects of large magnitude transmembrane potential pulses on voltage-gated Na and K channel behavior in frog skeletal muscle membrane were studied using a modified double vaseline-gap voltage clamp. The effects of electroconformational damage to ionic channels were separated from damage to lipid bilayer (electroporation). A 4 ms transmembrane potential pulse of -600 mV resulted in a reduction of both Na and K channel conductivities. The supraphysiologic pulses also reduced ionic selectivity of the K channels against Na+ ions, resulting in a depolarization of the membrane resting potential. However, TTX and TEA binding effects were unaltered. The kinetics of spontaneous reversal of the electroconformational damage of channel proteins was found to be dependent on the magnitude of imposed membrane potential pulse. These results suggest that muscle and nerve dysfunction after electrical shock may be in part caused by electroconformational damage to voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:7948676

  7. VDAC electronics: 2. A new, anaerobic mechanism of generation of the membrane potentials in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial hexokinase (HK) and creatine kinase (CK) known to form complexes with a voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC) have been reported to increase cell death resistance under hypoxia/anoxia. In this work we propose a new, non-Mitchell mechanism of generation of the inner and outer membrane potentials at anaerobic conditions. The driving force is provided by the Gibbs free energy of the HK and CK reactions associated with the VDAC-HK and the ANT (adenine nucleotide translocator)-CK-VDAC complexes, respectively, both functioning as voltage generators. In the absence of oxygen, the cytosolic creatine phosphate can be directly used by the ANT-CK-VDAC contact sites to produce ATP from ADP in the mitochondrial matrix. After that, ATP released through the fraction of unbound ANTs in exchange for ADP is used in the mitochondrial intermembrane space by the outer membrane VDAC-HK electrogenic complexes to convert cytosolic glucose into glucose-6-phosphate. A simple computational model based on the application of Ohm's law to an equivalent electrical circuit showed a possibility of generation of the inner membrane potential up to -160mV, under certain conditions, and of relatively high outer membrane potential without wasting of ATP that normally leads to cell death. The calculated membrane potentials depended on the restriction of ATP/ADP diffusion in narrow cristae and through the cristae junctions. We suggest that high inner membrane potential and calcium extrusion from the mitochondrial intermembrane space by generated positive outer membrane potential prevent mitochondrial permeability transition, thus allowing the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity and cell survival in the absence of oxygen.

  8. Dipole potentials indicate restructuring of the membrane interface induced by gadolinium and beryllium ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ermakov, Y. A.; Averbakh, A. Z.; Yusipovich, A. I.; Sukharev, S.

    2001-01-01

    The dipole component of the membrane boundary potential, phi(d), is an integral parameter that may report on the conformational state of the lipid headgroups and their hydration. In this work, we describe an experimental approach to measurements of the dipole potential changes, Deltaphi(d), and apply it in studies of Be(2+) and Gd(3+) interactions with membranes composed of phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and their mixtures. Deltaphi(d) is determined as the difference between the changes of the total boundary potential, phi(b), measured by the IFC method in planar lipid membranes and the surface potential, phi(s), determined from the electrophoretic mobility of liposomes. The Gouy-Chapman-Stern formalism, combined with the condition of mass balance, well describes the ion equilibria for these high-affinity cations. For the adsorption of Be(2+) and Gd(3+) to PC membranes, and of Mg(2+) to PS membranes, the values of Deltaphi(b) and Deltaphi(s) are the same, indicative of no change of phi(d). Binding of Gd(3+) to PS-containing membranes induces changes of phi(d) of opposite signs depending on the density of ionized PS headgroups in the bilayer. At low density, the induced Deltaphi(d) is negative (-30 mV), consistent with the effect of dehydration of the surface. At maximal density (pure PS, neutral pH), adsorption of Be(2+) or Gd(3+) induces an increase of phi(d) of 35 or 140 mV, respectively. The onset of the strong positive dipole effect on PS membranes with Gd(3+) is observed near the zero charge point and correlates with a six-fold increase of membrane tension. The observed phenomena may reflect concerted reorientation of dipole moments of PS headgroups as a result of ion adsorption and lipid condensation. Their possible implications to in-vivo effects of these high-affinity ions are discussed.

  9. Propagation of the change in the membrane potential using a biocell-model.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yoshinari; Shirai, Osamu; Kitazumi, Yuki; Kano, Kenji

    2016-05-14

    A new model system of nerve conduction, which has two sites (the potential-sending and the potential-receiving sites) was constructed by the use of some liquid-membrane cells which mimic the function of the K(+) and Na(+) channels. The model system setup was such that the membrane potential of the K(+)-channel cell (resting potential) was different from that of the Na(+)-channel cell (action potential). Initially, the K(+)-channel cell at the potential-sending site was connected to that at the potential-receiving site. After switching from the K(+)-channel cell to the Na(+)-channel cell at the potential-sending site, the membrane potential of the K(+)-channel cell at the potential-receiving site began to vary with the generation of the circulating current. By placing several K(+)-channel cells in parallel at the potential-receiving site, the propagation mechanism of the action potential was interpreted and the influence of the resistor and the capacitor on the propagation was evaluated. PMID:27094735

  10. Permeant Ions, Impermeant Ions, Electrogenic Pumps, Cell Volume, and the Resting Membrane Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Charles

    1982-01-01

    Students often have difficulty in understanding the processes responsible for the ionic basis of the membrane potential. Because descriptions in textbooks are not satisfactory and in some cases in error, a discussion of the processes underlying the potential (combining known results) is provided. (Author/JN)

  11. Disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential by ferulenol and restoration by propolis extract: antiapoptotic role of propolis.

    PubMed

    Nadia, Boussenane H; Wided, Kebsa; Kheira, Boutabet; Hassiba, Rouibah; Lamia, Benguedouar; Rhouati, S; Alyane, M; Zellagui, A; Lahouel, M

    2009-12-01

    This paper reports an investigation of the ability of propolis extract (a resinous substance collected by honeybees from various plant sources) to restore the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by ferulenol, a sesquiterpene prenylated coumarin derivative isolated from the plant Ferula vesceritensis . We show that ferulenol was able to induce the permeability transition pore (PTP) opening. This effect is caused by the interaction of the compound with the mitochondrial respiratory chain, more particularly by the fall of membrane potential and the inhibition of complex II. We have previously demonstrated that this inhibition results from a limitation of electron transfers involved in the respiratory chain and initiated by the reduction of ubiquinone. We hypothesized that the protective effect of propolis could be due to a direct action on mitochondrial functions. So we have investigated in vitro the mitochondrial effects of Algerian propolis using rat liver mitochondria, by analysing their effects on membrane potential, mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial swelling. We show that propolis extract was able to restore the fall of mitochondrial membrane potential. Taken together these data reveal that propolis extract may be an interesting inhibitor of PTP and provide an additional mechanism by which the natural product propolis extract may restore the mitochondrial membrane potential and to prevent apoptotic process.

  12. The stimulative effect of diffusion potential on enoxacin uptake across rat intestinal brush-border membranes.

    PubMed

    Hirano, T; Iseki, K; Miyazaki, S; Takada, M; Kobayashi, M; Sugawara, M; Miyazaki, K

    1994-08-01

    Evidence of a membrane potential dependence for enoxacin uptake by rat intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles has been found. The transient overshooting uptake of enoxacin disappeared in the voltage-clamped brush-border membrane vesicles in the presence of an outward H(+)-gradient. Momentary dissipation of the H(+)-gradient itself by carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) did not affect the uptake of enoxacin. In contrast, enoxacin uptake was depressed by an interior positive K(+)-diffusion potential induced by valinomycin. Furthermore, not only the outward H(+)-gradient but also an inward Cl(-)-gradient caused a stimulating effect on enoxacin uptake, and the stimulation by the Cl(-)-gradient was dissipated by using voltage-clamped membrane vesicles. These results indicate that enoxacin transportation across the brush-border membrane is dependent on the ionic diffusion potential. On the other hand, neither Gly-Gly nor guanidine had any effect on enoxacin uptake by the membrane vesicles in the presence of an inward (for Gly-Gly) or outward (for guanidine) H(+)-gradient as a driving force for each transport system. Therefore, it seems that enoxacin transport through the intestinal epithelia does not participate in the carrier-mediated transport systems for Gly-Gly and guanidine.

  13. Photodynamic activity and binding of sulfonated metallophthalocyanines to phospholipid membranes: contribution of metal-phosphate coordination.

    PubMed

    Pashkovskaya, Alina A; Sokolenko, Elena A; Sokolov, Valeri S; Kotova, Elena A; Antonenko, Yuri N

    2007-10-01

    Photosensitized efficacy of tetrasulfonated phthalocyanines of zinc, aluminum and nickel (ZnPcS(4), AlPcS(4) and NiPcS(4), respectively) as studied by gramicidin channel (gA) photoinactivation was compared with adsorption of the dyes on the surface of a bilayer lipid membrane as measured by the inner field compensation method. The adsorption of the negatively charged phthalocyanines on diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) membranes led to formation of a negative boundary potential difference between the membrane/water interfaces. Good correlation was shown between the photodynamic activity and the membrane binding of the three metallophthalocyanines. ZnPcS(4) appeared to be the most potent of these photosensitizers, while NiPcS(4) was completely ineffective. All of these phthalocyanines displayed no binding and negligible gA photoinactivation with membranes formed of glycerol monooleate (GMO), whereas Rose Bengal exhibited significant binding and photodynamic efficacy with GMO membranes. Gramicidin photoinactivation in the presence of AlPcS(4), being insensitive to the ionic strength of the bathing solution, was inhibited by fluoride and attenuated by phosphate ions. A blue shift of the fluorescence peak position of ZnPcS(4) dissolved in ethanol was elicited by phosphate, similarly to fluoride, which was indicative of the coordination interaction of these ions with the central metal atom of the phthalocyanine macrocycle. This interaction was enhanced in the medium modeling the water-membrane interface. The results obtained imply that binding of tetrasulfonated metallophthalocyanines to phospholipid membranes is determined primarily by metal-phosphate coordination.

  14. Effects of troglitazone and pioglitazone on the action potentials and membrane currents of rabbit ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, S; Watanabe, T

    1998-09-18

    The effects of the antidiabetic thiazolidinediones troglitazone and pioglitazone on action potentials and membrane currents were studied in rabbit ventricular myocytes. Troglitazone (10 microM) reversibly reduced excitability of the myocytes and modified their action potential configuration. It significantly increased the stimulation threshold required to elicit action potentials and decreased action potential amplitude and the maximum upstroke velocity of the action potentials. The Inhibition of the maximum upstroke velocity by troglitazone was also significant at 1 microM. Voltage-clamp experiments revealed that troglitazone (10 microM) reversibly inhibited both the slow inward Ca2+ current and the steady-state K+ current. In contrast to troglitazone, pioglitazone (1-10 microM) had no significant effect on the excitability, action potential configuration, or membrane currents of myocytes. These results suggest that troglitazone, but not pioglitazone, modulates Na+, Ca2+ and K+ currents, leading to the changes in excitability and action potential configuration of ventricular myocytes. PMID:9797043

  15. Electrostatics of cell membrane recognition: structure and activity of neutral and cationic rigid push-pull rods in isoelectric, anionic, and polarized lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Sakai, N; Gerard, D; Matile, S

    2001-03-21

    Design, synthesis, and structural and functional studies of rigid-rod ionophores of different axial electrostatic asymmetry are reported. The employed design strategy emphasized presence of (a) a rigid scaffold to minimize the conformational complexity, (b) a unimolecular ion-conducting pathway to minimize the suprastructural complexity and monitor the function, (c) an extended fluorophore to monitor structure, (d) variable axial rod dipole, and (e) variable terminal charges to create axial asymmetry. Studies in isoelectric, anionic, and polarized bilayer membranes confirmed a general increase in activity of uncharged rigid push-pull rods in polarized bilayers. The similarly increased activity of cationic rigid push-pull rods with an electrostatic asymmetry comparable to that of alpha-helical bee toxin melittin (positive charge near negative axial dipole terminus) is shown by fluorescence-depth quenching experiments to originate from the stabilization of transmembrane rod orientation by the membrane potential. The reduced activity of rigid push-pull rods having an electrostatic asymmetry comparable to that in alpha-helical natural antibiotics (a positive charge near the positive axial dipole terminus) is shown by structural studies to originate from rod "ejection" by membrane potentials comparable to that found in mammalian plasma membranes. This structural evidence for cell membrane recognition by asymmetric rods is unprecedented and of possible practical importance with regard to antibiotic resistance.

  16. Calcium Modulation of Plant Plasma Membrane-Bound Atpase Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, C.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetic properties of barley enzyme are discussed and compared with those of other plants. Possibilities for calcium transport in the plasma membrane by proton pump and ATPase-dependent calcium pumps are explored. Topics covered include the ph phase of the enzyme; high affinity of barley for calcium; temperature dependence, activation enthalpy, and the types of ATPase catalytic sites. Attention is given to lipids which are both screened and bound by calcium. Studies show that barley has a calmodulin activated ATPase that is found in the presence of magnesium and calcium.

  17. Flapping tail membrane in bats produces potentially important thrust during horizontal takeoffs and very slow flight.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rick A; Snode, Emily R; Shaw, Jason B

    2012-01-01

    Historically, studies concerning bat flight have focused primarily on the wings. By analyzing high-speed video taken on 48 individuals of five species of vespertilionid bats, we show that the capacity to flap the tail-membrane (uropatagium) in order to generate thrust and lift during takeoffs and minimal-speed flight (<1 m (s-1)) was largely underestimated. Indeed, bats flapped the tail-membrane by extensive dorso-ventral fanning motions covering as much as 135 degrees of arc consistent with thrust generation by air displacement. The degree of dorsal extension of the tail-membrane, and thus the potential amount of thrust generated during platform launches, was significantly correlated with body mass (P = 0.02). Adduction of the hind limbs during upstrokes collapsed the tail-membrane thereby reducing its surface area and minimizing negative lift forces. Abduction of the hind limbs during the downstroke fully expanded the tail-membrane as it was swept ventrally. The flapping kinematics of the tail-membrane is thus consistent with expectations for an airfoil. Timing offsets between the wings and tail-membrane during downstrokes was as much as 50%, suggesting that the tail-membrane was providing thrust and perhaps lift when the wings were retracting through the upstoke phase of the wing-beat cycle. The extent to which the tail-membrane was used during takeoffs differed significantly among four vespertilionid species (P = 0.01) and aligned with predictions derived from bat ecomorphology. The extensive fanning motion of the tail membrane by vespertilionid bats has not been reported for other flying vertebrates.

  18. Flapping Tail Membrane in Bats Produces Potentially Important Thrust during Horizontal Takeoffs and Very Slow Flight

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Rick A.; Snode, Emily R.; Shaw, Jason B.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, studies concerning bat flight have focused primarily on the wings. By analyzing high-speed video taken on 48 individuals of five species of vespertilionid bats, we show that the capacity to flap the tail-membrane (uropatagium) in order to generate thrust and lift during takeoffs and minimal-speed flight (<1 m s−1) was largely underestimated. Indeed, bats flapped the tail-membrane by extensive dorso-ventral fanning motions covering as much as 135 degrees of arc consistent with thrust generation by air displacement. The degree of dorsal extension of the tail-membrane, and thus the potential amount of thrust generated during platform launches, was significantly correlated with body mass (P = 0.02). Adduction of the hind limbs during upstrokes collapsed the tail-membrane thereby reducing its surface area and minimizing negative lift forces. Abduction of the hind limbs during the downstroke fully expanded the tail-membrane as it was swept ventrally. The flapping kinematics of the tail-membrane is thus consistent with expectations for an airfoil. Timing offsets between the wings and tail-membrane during downstrokes was as much as 50%, suggesting that the tail-membrane was providing thrust and perhaps lift when the wings were retracting through the upstoke phase of the wing-beat cycle. The extent to which the tail-membrane was used during takeoffs differed significantly among four vespertilionid species (P = 0.01) and aligned with predictions derived from bat ecomorphology. The extensive fanning motion of the tail membrane by vespertilionid bats has not been reported for other flying vertebrates. PMID:22393378

  19. tBid Undergoes Multiple Conformational Changes at the Membrane Required for Bax Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Shamas-Din, Aisha; Bindner, Scott; Zhu, Weijia; Zaltsman, Yehudit; Campbell, Clinton; Gross, Atan; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David W.; Fradin, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Bid is a Bcl-2 family protein that promotes apoptosis by activating Bax and eliciting mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP). Full-length Bid is cleaved in response to apoptotic stimuli into two fragments, p7 and tBid (p15), that are held together by strong hydrophobic interactions until the complex binds to membranes. The detailed mechanism(s) of fragment separation including tBid binding to membranes and release of the p7 fragment to the cytoplasm remain unclear. Using liposomes or isolated mitochondria with fluorescently labeled proteins at physiological concentrations as in vitro models, we report that the two components of the complex quickly separate upon interaction with a membrane. Once tBid binds to the membrane, it undergoes slow structural rearrangements that result in an equilibrium between two major tBid conformations on the membrane. The conformational change of tBid is a prerequisite for interaction with Bax and is, therefore, a novel step that can be modulated to promote or inhibit MOMP. Using automated high-throughput image analysis in cells, we show that down-regulation of Mtch2 causes a significant delay between tBid and Bax relocalization in cells. We propose that by promoting insertion of tBid via a conformational change at the mitochondrial outer membrane, Mtch2 accelerates tBid-mediated Bax activation and MOMP. Thus the interaction of Mtch2 and tBid is a potential target for therapeutic control of Bid initiated cell death. PMID:23744079

  20. Pharmacological exploration of the resting membrane potential reserve: Impact on atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    van der Heyden, Marcel A G; Jespersen, Thomas

    2016-01-15

    The cardiac action potential arises and spreads throughout the myocardium as a consequence of highly organized spatial and temporal expression of ion channels conducting Na(+), Ca(2+) or K(+) currents. The cardiac Na(+) current is responsible for the initiation and progression of the action potential. Altered Na(+) current has been found implicated in a number of different arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation. In the atrium, the resting membrane potential is more depolarized than in the ventricles, and as cardiac Na(+) channels undergo voltage-dependent inactivation close to this potential, minor changes in the membrane potential have a relatively large impact on the atrial Na(+) current. The atrial resting membrane potential is established following ionic currents through the inwardly rectifying K(+) currents IK1, IK,ACh and IK,Ca and to a lesser extent by other ion channels as well as by exchangers and pumps. This review will focus on the relative and regulated contribution of IK1, IK,ACh and IK,Ca, and on pharmacological modification of the channels underlying these currents in respect to the resting membrane potential, Na(+) channel availability and atrial electrophysiology in health and disease. PMID:26601803

  1. Antiviral activity of squalamine: Role of electrostatic membrane binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckerman, Bernard; Qu, Wei; Mishra, Abhijit; Zasloff, Michael; Wong, Gerard; Luijten, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Recent workootnotetextM. Zasloff et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. (USA) 108, 15978 (2011). has demonstrated that squalamine, a molecule found in the liver of sharks, exhibits broad-spectrum antiviral properties. It has been proposed that this activity results from the charge-density matching of squalamine and phospholipid membranes, causing squalamine to bind to membranes and displace proteins such as Rac1 that are crucial for the viral replication cycle. Here we investigate this hypothesis by numerical simulation of a coarse-grained model for the competition between Rac1 and squalamine in binding affinity to a flat lipid bilayer. We perform free-energy calculations to test the ability of squalamine to condense stacked bilayer systems and thereby displace bulkier Rac1 molecules. We directly compare our findings to small-angle x-ray scattering results for the same setup.

  2. Biological activities of Eikenella corrodens outer membrane and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Progulske, A; Mishell, R; Trummel, C; Holt, S C

    1984-01-01

    Highly purified preparations of the outer membrane and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Eikenella corrodens strain ATCC 23834 and the outer membrane fraction (OMF) of strain 470 were tested in in vitro biological assays. The OMFs of both strains were found to be mitogenic for BDF and C3H/HeJ murine splenocytes. The E. corrodens LPS was mitogenic for BDF spleen cells; however, doses of LPS as high as 50 micrograms/ml failed to stimulate C3H/HeJ cells. When incubated with T-lymphocyte-depleted C3H/HeJ splenocytes, the strain 23834 OMF demonstrated significant mitogenic activity, indicating that the OMF is a B-cell mitogen by a mechanism other than that elicited by conventional LPS. The E. corrodens 23834 OMF and LPS were stimulators of bone resorption when tested in organ cultures of fetal rat long bones. In contrast, the strain 470 OMF was only weakly stimulatory. Both OMFs and LPSs demonstrated "endotoxic" activity, since as little as 0.062 micrograms of E. corrodens LPS and 0.015 micrograms of the OMFs induced gelation in the Limulus amebocyte clotting assay. Thus, despite having a "nonclassical" LPS biochemistry, the E. corrodens LPS elicits classical endotoxic activities. These results also indicate that the surface structures of E. corrodens have significant biological activities as measured in vitro. The expression of such activities in vivo may play an important role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis as well as other E. corrodens infections. PMID:6360893

  3. Activation of the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane dipeptidase upon release from pig kidney membranes by phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Brewis, I A; Turner, A J; Hooper, N M

    1994-10-15

    Incubation of pig kidney microvillar membranes with Bacillus thuringiensis or Staphylococcus aureus phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) resulted in the release of a number of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored hydrolases, including alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1), amino-peptidase P (EC 3.4.11.9), membrane dipeptidase (EC 3.4.13.19), 5'-nucleotidase (EC 3.1.3.5) and trehalase (EC 3.2.1.28). Of these five ectoenzymes only for membrane dipeptidase was there a significant (approx. 100%) increase in enzymic activity upon release from the membrane. Maximal activation occurred at a PI-PLC concentration 10-fold less than that required for maximal release. In contrast solubilization of the membranes with n-octyl beta-D-glucopyranoside had no effect on the enzymic activity of membrane dipeptidase. A competitive e.l.i.s.a. with a polyclonal antiserum to membrane dipeptidase indicated that the increase in enzymic activity was not due to an increase in the amount of membrane dipeptidase protein. Although PI-PLC cleaved the GPI anchor of the affinity-purified amphipathic form of pig membrane dipeptidase there was no concurrent increase in enzymic activity. In the absence of PI-PLC, membrane dipeptidase in the microvillar membranes hydrolysed Gly-D-Phe with a Km of 0.77 mM and a Vmax. of 602 nmol/min per mg of protein. However, in the presence of a concentration of PI-PLC which caused maximal release from the membrane and maximal activation of membrane dipeptidase the Km was decreased to 0.07 mM while the Vmax. remained essentially unchanged at 624 nmol/min per mg of protein. Overall these results suggest that cleavage by PI-PLC of the GPI anchor on membrane dipeptidase may relax conformational constraints on the active site of the enzyme which exist when it is anchored in the lipid bilayer, thus resulting in an increase in the affinity of the active site for substrate.

  4. Membrane-active Compounds Activate the Transcription Factors Pdr1 and Pdr3 Connecting Pleiotropic Drug Resistance and Membrane Lipid Homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Schüller, Christoph; Mamnun, Yasmine M.; Wolfger, Hubert; Rockwell, Nathan; Thorner, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae zinc cluster transcription factors Pdr1 and Pdr3 mediate general drug resistance to many cytotoxic substances also known as pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR). The regulatory mechanisms that activate Pdr1 and Pdr3 in response to the various xenobiotics are poorly understood. In this study, we report that exposure of yeast cells to 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP), benzyl alcohol, nonionic detergents, and lysophospholipids causes rapid activation of Pdr1 and Pdr3. Furthermore, Pdr1/Pdr3 target genes encoding the ATP-binding cassette proteins Pdr5 and Pdr15 confer resistance against these compounds. Genome-wide transcript analysis of wild-type and pdr1Δ pdr3Δ cells treated with DCP reveals most prominently the activation of the PDR response but also other stress response pathways. Polyoxyethylene-9-laurylether treatment produced a similar profile with regard to activation of Pdr1 and Pdr3, suggesting activation of these by detergents. The Pdr1/Pdr3 response element is sufficient to confer regulation to a reporter gene by these substances in a Pdr1/Pdr3-dependent manner. Our data indicate that compounds with potential membrane-damaging or -perturbing effects might function as an activating signal for Pdr1 and Pdr3, and they suggest a role for their target genes in membrane lipid organization or remodeling. PMID:17881724

  5. The interplay of seven subthreshold conductances controls the resting membrane potential and the oscillatory behavior of thalamocortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zagha, Edward; Mato, German; Rudy, Bernardo; Nadal, Marcela S.

    2014-01-01

    The signaling properties of thalamocortical (TC) neurons depend on the diversity of ion conductance mechanisms that underlie their rich membrane behavior at subthreshold potentials. Using patch-clamp recordings of TC neurons in brain slices from mice and a realistic conductance-based computational model, we characterized seven subthreshold ion currents of TC neurons and quantified their individual contributions to the total steady-state conductance at levels below tonic firing threshold. We then used the TC neuron model to show that the resting membrane potential results from the interplay of several inward and outward currents over a background provided by the potassium and sodium leak currents. The steady-state conductances of depolarizing Ih (hyperpolarization-activated cationic current), IT (low-threshold calcium current), and INaP (persistent sodium current) move the membrane potential away from the reversal potential of the leak conductances. This depolarization is counteracted in turn by the hyperpolarizing steady-state current of IA (fast transient A-type potassium current) and IKir (inwardly rectifying potassium current). Using the computational model, we have shown that single parameter variations compatible with physiological or pathological modulation promote burst firing periodicity. The balance between three amplifying variables (activation of IT, activation of INaP, and activation of IKir) and three recovering variables (inactivation of IT, activation of IA, and activation of Ih) determines the propensity, or lack thereof, of repetitive burst firing of TC neurons. We also have determined the specific roles that each of these variables have during the intrinsic oscillation. PMID:24760784

  6. The interplay of seven subthreshold conductances controls the resting membrane potential and the oscillatory behavior of thalamocortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Amarillo, Yimy; Zagha, Edward; Mato, German; Rudy, Bernardo; Nadal, Marcela S

    2014-07-15

    The signaling properties of thalamocortical (TC) neurons depend on the diversity of ion conductance mechanisms that underlie their rich membrane behavior at subthreshold potentials. Using patch-clamp recordings of TC neurons in brain slices from mice and a realistic conductance-based computational model, we characterized seven subthreshold ion currents of TC neurons and quantified their individual contributions to the total steady-state conductance at levels below tonic firing threshold. We then used the TC neuron model to show that the resting membrane potential results from the interplay of several inward and outward currents over a background provided by the potassium and sodium leak currents. The steady-state conductances of depolarizing Ih (hyperpolarization-activated cationic current), IT (low-threshold calcium current), and INaP (persistent sodium current) move the membrane potential away from the reversal potential of the leak conductances. This depolarization is counteracted in turn by the hyperpolarizing steady-state current of IA (fast transient A-type potassium current) and IKir (inwardly rectifying potassium current). Using the computational model, we have shown that single parameter variations compatible with physiological or pathological modulation promote burst firing periodicity. The balance between three amplifying variables (activation of IT, activation of INaP, and activation of IKir) and three recovering variables (inactivation of IT, activation of IA, and activation of Ih) determines the propensity, or lack thereof, of repetitive burst firing of TC neurons. We also have determined the specific roles that each of these variables have during the intrinsic oscillation.

  7. Fibroblast Circadian Rhythms of PER2 Expression Depend on Membrane Potential and Intracellular Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takako; Wang, Connie W.; Pan, Haiyun

    2012-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus synchronizes circadian rhythms of cells and tissues throughout the body. In SCN neurons, rhythms of clock gene expression are suppressed by manipulations that hyperpolarize the plasma membrane or lower intracellular Ca2+. However, whether clocks in other cells also depend on membrane potential and calcium is unknown. In this study, we investigate the effects of membrane potential and intracellular calcium on circadian rhythms in mouse primary fibroblasts. Rhythms of clock gene expression were monitored using a PER2::LUC knockin reporter. We found that rhythms were lost or delayed at lower (hyperpolarizing) K+ concentrations. Bioluminescence imaging revealed that this loss of rhythmicity in cultures was due to loss of rhythmicity of single cells rather than desynchrony among cells. In lower Ca2+ concentrations, rhythms were advanced or had shorter periods. Buffering intracellular Ca2+ by the calcium chelator 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM) or manipulation of IP3-sensitive intracellular calcium stores by thapsigargin delayed rhythms. These results suggest that the circadian clock in fibroblasts, as in SCN neurons, is regulated by membrane potential and Ca2+. Changes in intracellular Ca2+ may mediate the effects of membrane potential that we observed. PMID:22734566

  8. Effect of surface and membrane potentials on IAA (indoleactic acid) uptake and binding by zucchini membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, K.A.; Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1986-08-01

    The polar transport of the endogenous hormone controlling extension growth of plant cells, indoleacetic acid (IAA), is thought to depend on transmembrane pH and electrical gradients resulting in part from the action of proton ATPases in the plasma membrane. Elements of this transport process are permeation of the membrane by the undissociated lipophilic indoleacetic acid (IAAH) from the acidic apoplast, followed by dissociation of the weak acid and accumulation of the IAA anion (IAA/sup -/) in the alkaline cytoplasm; a saturable symport of IAA/sup -/ with one or more protons; a carrier-mediated efflux of IAA/sup -/ down a considerable electrochemical gradient. The efflux is greater from the basal than the apical end of cells and is thought to be responsible for the overall polarity of the process. This step is also the site of action of napthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and herbicides that inhibit polar transport but stimulate net accumulation of auxin by tissues and cells. We are using membrane vesicles as a simplified system for studying the mechanisms involved in the transport and accumulation of auxin. In particular, we are interested in determining the involvement of the transmembrane pH (pH/sub o/ < pH/sub i/) and voltage gradients (K/sup +/ diffusion potential, (K/sup +/)/sub in/ > (K/sup +/)/sub out/) in IAA uptake. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Glycine modulates membrane potential, cell volume, and phagocytosis in murine microglia.

    PubMed

    Komm, Barbara; Beyreis, Marlena; Kittl, Michael; Jakab, Martin; Ritter, Markus; Kerschbaum, Hubert H

    2014-08-01

    Phagocytes form engulfment pseudopodia at the contact area with their target particle by a process resembling cell volume (CV) regulatory mechanisms. We evaluated whether the osmoregulatory active neutral amino acid glycine, which contributes to CV regulation via activation of sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporters (SNATs) improves phagocytosis in isotonic and hypertonic conditions in the murine microglial cell line BV-2 and primary microglial cells (pMG). In BV-2 cells and pMG, RT-PCR analysis revealed expression of SNATs (Slc38a1, Slc38a2), but not of GlyRs (Glra1-4). In BV-2 cells, glycine (5 mM) led to a rapid Na(+)-dependent depolarization of membrane potential (V mem). Furthermore, glycine increased CV by about 9%. Visualizing of phagocytosis of polystyrene microspheres by scanning electron microscopy revealed that glycine (1 mM) increased the number of BV-2 cells containing at least one microsphere by about 13%. Glycine-dependent increase in phagocytosis was suppressed by the SNAT inhibitor α-(methylamino)isobutyric acid (MeAIB), by replacing extracellular Na(+) with choline, and under hypertonic conditions, but not by the GlyR antagonist strychnine or the GlyR agonist taurine. Interestingly, hypertonicity-induced suppression of phagocytosis was rescued by glycine. These findings demonstrate that glycine increases phagocytosis in iso- and hypertonic conditions by activation of SNATs.

  10. Changes in Membrane Receptors and Ion Channels as Potential Biomarkers for Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), a degenerative joint condition, is currently difficult to detect early enough for any of the current treatment options to be completely successful. Early diagnosis of this disease could increase the numbers of patients who are able to slow its progression. There are now several diseases where membrane protein biomarkers are used for early diagnosis. The numbers of proteins in the membrane is vast and so it is a rich source of potential biomarkers for OA but we need more knowledge of these before they can be considered practical biomarkers. How are they best measured and are they selective to OA or even certain types of OA? The first step in this process is to identify membrane proteins that change in OA. Here, we summarize several ion channels and receptors that change in OA models and/or OA patients, and may thus be considered candidates as novel membrane biomarkers of OA. PMID:26648874

  11. Chemical Potentials and Activities: An Electrochemical Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzel, T. L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment which explores the effects of adding inert salts to electrolytic cells and demonstrates the difference between concentration and chemical activity. Examines chemical potentials as the driving force of reactions. Provides five examples of cell potential and concentration change. (JM)

  12. Membrane lipids regulate ganglioside GM2 catabolism and GM2 activator protein activity[S

    PubMed Central

    Anheuser, Susi; Breiden, Bernadette; Schwarzmann, Günter; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Ganglioside GM2 is the major lysosomal storage compound of Tay-Sachs disease. It also accumulates in Niemann-Pick disease types A and B with primary storage of SM and with cholesterol in type C. Reconstitution of GM2 catabolism with β-hexosaminidase A and GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) at uncharged liposomal surfaces carrying GM2 as substrate generated only a physiologically irrelevant catabolic rate, even at pH 4.2. However, incorporation of anionic phospholipids into the GM2 carrying liposomes stimulated GM2 hydrolysis more than 10-fold, while the incorporation of plasma membrane stabilizing lipids (SM and cholesterol) generated a strong inhibition of GM2 hydrolysis, even in the presence of anionic phospholipids. Mobilization of membrane lipids by GM2AP was also inhibited in the presence of cholesterol or SM, as revealed by surface plasmon resonance studies. These lipids also reduced the interliposomal transfer rate of 2-NBD-GM1 by GM2AP, as observed in assays using Förster resonance energy transfer. Our data raise major concerns about the usage of recombinant His-tagged GM2AP compared with untagged protein. The former binds more strongly to anionic GM2-carrying liposomal surfaces, increases GM2 hydrolysis, and accelerates intermembrane transfer of 2-NBD-GM1, but does not mobilize membrane lipids. PMID:26175473

  13. The Relationship between Membrane Potential and Calcium Dynamics in Glucose-Stimulated Beta Cell Syncytium in Acute Mouse Pancreas Tissue Slices

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Evan W.; Slak Rupnik, Marjan

    2013-01-01

    Oscillatory electrical activity is regarded as a hallmark of the pancreatic beta cell glucose-dependent excitability pattern. Electrophysiologically recorded membrane potential oscillations in beta cells are associated with in-phase oscillatory cytosolic calcium activity ([Ca2+]i) measured with fluorescent probes. Recent high spatial and temporal resolution confocal imaging revealed that glucose stimulation of beta cells in intact islets within acute tissue slices produces a [Ca2+]i change with initial transient phase followed by a plateau phase with highly synchronized [Ca2+]i oscillations. Here, we aimed to correlate the plateau [Ca2+]i oscillations with the oscillations of membrane potential using patch-clamp and for the first time high resolution voltage-sensitive dye based confocal imaging. Our results demonstrated that the glucose-evoked membrane potential oscillations spread over the islet in a wave-like manner, their durations and wave velocities being comparable to the ones for [Ca2+]i oscillations and waves. High temporal resolution simultaneous records of membrane potential and [Ca2+]i confirmed tight but nevertheless limited coupling of the two processes, with membrane depolarization preceding the [Ca2+]i increase. The potassium channel blocker tetraethylammonium increased the velocity at which oscillations advanced over the islet by several-fold while, at the same time, emphasized differences in kinetics of the membrane potential and the [Ca2+]i. The combination of both imaging techniques provides a powerful tool that will help us attain deeper knowledge of the beta cell network. PMID:24324777

  14. Tuning of Hemes b Equilibrium Redox Potential Is Not Required for Cross-Membrane Electron Transfer*

    PubMed Central

    Pintscher, Sebastian; Kuleta, Patryk; Cieluch, Ewelina; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-01-01

    In biological energy conversion, cross-membrane electron transfer often involves an assembly of two hemes b. The hemes display a large difference in redox midpoint potentials (ΔEm_b), which in several proteins is assumed to facilitate cross-membrane electron transfer and overcome a barrier of membrane potential. Here we challenge this assumption reporting on heme b ligand mutants of cytochrome bc1 in which, for the first time in transmembrane cytochrome, one natural histidine has been replaced by lysine without loss of the native low spin type of heme iron. With these mutants we show that ΔEm_b can be markedly increased, and the redox potential of one of the hemes can stay above the level of quinone pool, or ΔEm_b can be markedly decreased to the point that two hemes are almost isopotential, yet the enzyme retains catalytically competent electron transfer between quinone binding sites and remains functional in vivo. This reveals that cytochrome bc1 can accommodate large changes in ΔEm_b without hampering catalysis, as long as these changes do not impose overly endergonic steps on downhill electron transfer from substrate to product. We propose that hemes b in this cytochrome and in other membranous cytochromes b act as electronic connectors for the catalytic sites with no fine tuning in ΔEm_b required for efficient cross-membrane electron transfer. We link this concept with a natural flexibility in occurrence of several thermodynamic configurations of the direction of electron flow and the direction of the gradient of potential in relation to the vector of the electric membrane potential. PMID:26858251

  15. Tuning of Hemes b Equilibrium Redox Potential Is Not Required for Cross-Membrane Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Pintscher, Sebastian; Kuleta, Patryk; Cieluch, Ewelina; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-03-25

    In biological energy conversion, cross-membrane electron transfer often involves an assembly of two hemesb The hemes display a large difference in redox midpoint potentials (ΔEm_b), which in several proteins is assumed to facilitate cross-membrane electron transfer and overcome a barrier of membrane potential. Here we challenge this assumption reporting on hemebligand mutants of cytochromebc1in which, for the first time in transmembrane cytochrome, one natural histidine has been replaced by lysine without loss of the native low spin type of heme iron. With these mutants we show that ΔEm_b can be markedly increased, and the redox potential of one of the hemes can stay above the level of quinone pool, or ΔEm_b can be markedly decreased to the point that two hemes are almost isopotential, yet the enzyme retains catalytically competent electron transfer between quinone binding sites and remains functionalin vivo This reveals that cytochromebc1can accommodate large changes in ΔEm_b without hampering catalysis, as long as these changes do not impose overly endergonic steps on downhill electron transfer from substrate to product. We propose that hemesbin this cytochrome and in other membranous cytochromesbact as electronic connectors for the catalytic sites with no fine tuning in ΔEm_b required for efficient cross-membrane electron transfer. We link this concept with a natural flexibility in occurrence of several thermodynamic configurations of the direction of electron flow and the direction of the gradient of potential in relation to the vector of the electric membrane potential.

  16. Tuning of Hemes b Equilibrium Redox Potential Is Not Required for Cross-Membrane Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Pintscher, Sebastian; Kuleta, Patryk; Cieluch, Ewelina; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-03-25

    In biological energy conversion, cross-membrane electron transfer often involves an assembly of two hemesb The hemes display a large difference in redox midpoint potentials (ΔEm_b), which in several proteins is assumed to facilitate cross-membrane electron transfer and overcome a barrier of membrane potential. Here we challenge this assumption reporting on hemebligand mutants of cytochromebc1in which, for the first time in transmembrane cytochrome, one natural histidine has been replaced by lysine without loss of the native low spin type of heme iron. With these mutants we show that ΔEm_b can be markedly increased, and the redox potential of one of the hemes can stay above the level of quinone pool, or ΔEm_b can be markedly decreased to the point that two hemes are almost isopotential, yet the enzyme retains catalytically competent electron transfer between quinone binding sites and remains functionalin vivo This reveals that cytochromebc1can accommodate large changes in ΔEm_b without hampering catalysis, as long as these changes do not impose overly endergonic steps on downhill electron transfer from substrate to product. We propose that hemesbin this cytochrome and in other membranous cytochromesbact as electronic connectors for the catalytic sites with no fine tuning in ΔEm_b required for efficient cross-membrane electron transfer. We link this concept with a natural flexibility in occurrence of several thermodynamic configurations of the direction of electron flow and the direction of the gradient of potential in relation to the vector of the electric membrane potential. PMID:26858251

  17. Membrane Damage Induced by Amyloid Beta and a Potential Link with Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Perez, Eduardo J; Peters, Christian; Aguayo, Luis G

    2016-01-01

    It is well accepted that cortical and hippocampal synaptic densities are reduced in Alzheimer's disease (AD). These alterations in neuronal networking occur at the very onset of AD and may lead to the neuronal loss displayed in later stages of the disease, which is characterized by severe cognitive and behavioral impairments. Many studies suggest that amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers are responsible for synaptic disconnections and neuronal death. The effects of Aβ in different brain regions are pleotropic, thus suggesting a common mechanism for toxicity. One potential site for this mechanism of toxicity is the neuronal membrane. It is recognized that Aβ can associate to the plasma membrane and induce the formation of pores after the interaction with lipids like GM1 and cholesterol, and proteins such as APP and NMDA receptors. After this early event, the membrane increases its permeability allowing the influx of small ions and larger molecules. Thus, one of the main toxic consequences of Aβ oligomer interaction with neurons is an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration that causes alterations in ionic homeostasis. It has been proposed that Aβ perforates the membrane similarly to pore-forming toxins producing a series of effects that include synaptic failure and cell death. These actions of Aβ appear to be potentiated by neuroinflammation, which results in a series of effects that, when prolonged, will affect membrane integrity, pore formation and cellular homeostasis. Here, we will review the most recent data on Aβ actions at the membrane level and how its relationship with neuroinflammation could further potentiate brain impairment in AD. The notion of having drugs acting with dual inhibitory actions, inhibition of membrane damage and inflammation, could serve as a starting conceptual point for the development of new therapies for the disease. PMID:26972288

  18. Influence of fixed electric charges on potential profile across the squid axon membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, C. M.; Cruz, F. A. O.; Silva, D.; Costa, L. F.

    2008-03-01

    The potential profile for a model of squid axon membrane has been determined for two physiological states: resting and action states. The non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation has been solved by considering the volumetric charge densities due to charges dissolved in an electrolytic solution and fixed on both glycocalyx and cytoplasmatic proteins. Results showing the features of the potential profile along the outer electrolytic region are similar for both resting and action states. However, the potential fall along glycocalyx at action state is lower than at resting. A small variation in the Na + concentration drastically affects the surface membrane potentials and vice versa. We conclude that effects on the potential profile due to surface lipidic bilayer charge and contiguous electric double layers are more relevant than those provoked by fixed charges distributed along the cell cytoplasm.

  19. Role of the Na+/K+-ATPase in regulating the membrane potential in rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Friis, U G; Praetorius, H A; Knudsen, T; Johansen, T

    1997-10-01

    1. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the Na+/K+-ATPase on the membrane potential of peritoneal mast cells isolated from male Sprague-Dawley SPF-rats. 2. Experiments were performed at 22-26 degrees C in the tight-seal whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique by use of Sylgard-coated patch pipettes (3-6 M[omega]). High-resolution membrane currents were recorded with an EPC-9 patch-clamp amplifier controlled by the 'E9SCREEN' software. In addition, a charting programme on another computer synchronously recorded at low resolution (2 Hz) membrane potential and holding current (low-pass filtered at 500 Hz). 3. Na+/K+-ATPase activity was measured as the ouabain-sensitive change in the zero-current potential. The zero-current potential in rat peritoneal mast cells measured 2 min after obtaining whole-cell configuration amounted to 1.7 +/- 2.5 mV (n = 21). Ouabain (5 mM), a Na+/K+-ATPase-inhibitor, had only a very minor effect upon the membrane potential under resting conditions (n = 3). 4. When mast cells were superfused with nominal calcium-free external solution, the cells hyperpolarized (delta mV: 20.2 +/- 3.8 mV (n = 5)). In addition, when the mast cells were preincubated in nominal calcium-free external solution for 12 +/- 1.6 min before whole-cell configuration, the membrane potential amounted to -53.7 +/- 9.8 mV (n = 8). A subsequent superfusion with ouabain (5 mM) depolarized the membrane potential (ouabain-sensitive hyperpolarization (delta mV): 23.0 +/- 8.4 mV (n = 8)). 5. A high intracellular concentration of Na+ ([Na+]i) (26.6 mM) also resulted in hyperpolarization (delta mV: 20.2 +/- 9.1 mV (n = 7)), but only when ATP was present. A subsequent superfusion with ouabain (5 mM) repolarized these cells to -1.2 +/- 14 mV (ouabain-sensitive hyperpolarization (delta mV): 19.7 +/- 7.7 mV (n = 7)). 6. The size of the [Na+]i-dependent hyperpolarization was dose-dependent. Low [Na+]i (1 mM) had no effect on membrane potential and these

  20. Influence of the membrane potential on the free energy of an intrinsic protein.

    PubMed Central

    Roux, B

    1997-01-01

    A modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation is developed from statistical mechanical considerations to describe the influence of the transmembrane potential on macromolecular systems. Using a Green's function formalism, the electrostatic free energy of a protein associated with the membrane is expressed as the sum of three terms: a contribution from the energy required to charge the system's capacitance, a contribution corresponding to the interaction of the protein charges with the membrane potential, and a contribution corresponding to a voltage-independent reaction field free energy. The membrane potential, which is due to the polarization interface, is calculated in the absence of the protein charges, whereas the reaction field is calculated in the absence of transmembrane potential. Variations in the capacitive energy associated with typical molecular processes are negligible under physiological conditions. The formulation of the theory is closely related to standard algorithms used to solve the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and only small modifications to current source codes are required for its implementation. The theory is illustrated by examining the voltage-dependent membrane insertion of a simple polyalanine alpha-helix and by computing the electrostatic potential across a 60-A-diameter sphere meant to represent a large intrinsic protein. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:9414213

  1. Double Potential Pulse Chronocoulometry for Detection of Plasma Membrane Cholesterol Efflux at Disk Platinum Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    West, Richard H.; Lu, Hui; Shaw, Kendrick; Chiel, Hillel J.; Kelley, Thomas J.; Burgess, James D.

    2016-01-01

    A double potential pulse scheme is reported for observation of cholesterol efflux from the plasma membrane of a single neuron cell. Capillary Pt disk microelectrodes having a thin glass insulator allow the 10 μm diameter electrode and cell to be viewed under optical magnification. The electrode, covalently functionalized with cholesterol oxidase, is positioned in contact with the cell surface resulting in enzyme catalyzed cholesterol oxidation and efflux of cholesterol from the plasma membrane at the electrode contact site. Enzymatically generated hydrogen peroxide accumulates at the electrode/cell interface during a 5 s hold-time and is oxidized during application of a potential pulse. A second, replicate potential pulse is applied 0.5 s after the first potential pulse to gauge background charge prior to significant accumulation of hydrogen peroxide. The difference in charge passed between the first and second potential pulse provides a measure of hydrogen peroxide generated by the enzyme and is an indication of the cholesterol efflux. Control experiments for bare Pt microelectrodes in contact with the cell plasma membrane show difference charge signals in the range of about 7–10 pC. Enzyme-modified electrodes in contact with the plasma membrane show signals in the range of 16–26 pC. PMID:27330196

  2. Tension moderation and fluctuation spectrum in simulated lipid membranes under an applied electric potential.

    PubMed

    Loubet, Bastien; Lomholt, Michael Andersen; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2013-10-28

    We investigate the effect of an applied electric potential on the mechanics of a coarse grained POPC bilayer under tension. The size and duration of our simulations allow for a detailed and accurate study of the fluctuations. Effects on the fluctuation spectrum, tension, bending rigidity, and bilayer thickness are investigated in detail. In particular, the least square fitting technique is used to calculate the fluctuation spectra. The simulations confirm a recently proposed theory that the effect of an applied electric potential on the membrane will be moderated by the elastic properties of the membrane. In agreement with the theory, we find that the larger the initial tension the larger the effect of the electric potential. Application of the electric potential increases the amplitude of the long wavelength part of the spectrum and the bending rigidity is deduced from the short wavelength fluctuations. The effect of the applied electric potential on the bending rigidity is non-existent within error bars. However, when the membrane is stretched there is a point where the bending rigidity is lowered due to a decrease of the thickness of the membrane. All these effects should prove important for mechanosensitive channels and biomembrane mechanics in general.

  3. Growth hormone activates phospholipase C in proximal tubular basolateral membranes from canine kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, S.A.; Hammerman, M.R. )

    1989-08-01

    To delineate pathways for signal transduction by growth hormone (GH) in proximal tubule, the authors incubated basolateral membranes isolated from canine kidney with human growth hormone (hGH) or human prolactin (hPrl) and measured levels of inositol trisphosphate (InsP{sub 3}) in suspensions and of diacylglycerol extractable from the membranes. Incubation with hGH, but not hPrl, increased levels of InsP{sub 3} and diacylglycerol in a concentration-dependent manner. Half-maximal effects occurred between 0.1 and 1 nM hGH. Increased levels of InsP{sub 3} were measured after as little as 5 sec of incubation with 1 nM hGH, and increase was maximal after 15 sec. Increases were no longer detectable after 60 sec because of dephosphorylation of InsP{sub 3} in membrane suspensions. hGH did not affect rates of dephosphorylation. hGH-stimulated increases in InsP{sub 3} were detectable in membranes suspended in 0, 0.1, and 0.2 {mu}M calcium but not in 0.3 or 1.0 {mu}M calcium. {sup 125}I-labeled hGH-receptor complexes with M{sub r} values of 66,000 and 140,000 were identified in isolated basolateral membranes. The findings establish that GH activates phospholipase C in isolated canine renal proximal tubular basolateral membranes, potentially after binding to a specific receptor. This process could mediate signal transmission by GH across the plasma membrane of the proximal tubular cell and elsewhere.

  4. Theoretical foundations of the sound analog membrane potential that underlies coincidence detection in the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Go; Funabiki, Kazuo; Carr, Catherine E

    2013-01-01

    A wide variety of neurons encode temporal information via phase-locked spikes. In the avian auditory brainstem, neurons in the cochlear nucleus magnocellularis (NM) send phase-locked synaptic inputs to coincidence detector neurons in the nucleus laminaris (NL) that mediate sound localization. Previous modeling studies suggested that converging phase-locked synaptic inputs may give rise to a periodic oscillation in the membrane potential of their target neuron. Recent physiological recordings in vivo revealed that owl NL neurons changed their spike rates almost linearly with the amplitude of this oscillatory potential. The oscillatory potential was termed the sound analog potential, because of its resemblance to the waveform of the stimulus tone. The amplitude of the sound analog potential recorded in NL varied systematically with the interaural time difference (ITD), which is one of the most important cues for sound localization. In order to investigate the mechanisms underlying ITD computation in the NM-NL circuit, we provide detailed theoretical descriptions of how phase-locked inputs form oscillating membrane potentials. We derive analytical expressions that relate presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic factors to the signal and noise components of the oscillation in both the synaptic conductance and the membrane potential. Numerical simulations demonstrate the validity of the theoretical formulations for the entire frequency ranges tested (1-8 kHz) and potential effects of higher harmonics on NL neurons with low best frequencies (<2 kHz). PMID:24265616

  5. Theoretical foundations of the sound analog membrane potential that underlies coincidence detection in the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Go; Funabiki, Kazuo; Carr, Catherine E

    2013-01-01

    A wide variety of neurons encode temporal information via phase-locked spikes. In the avian auditory brainstem, neurons in the cochlear nucleus magnocellularis (NM) send phase-locked synaptic inputs to coincidence detector neurons in the nucleus laminaris (NL) that mediate sound localization. Previous modeling studies suggested that converging phase-locked synaptic inputs may give rise to a periodic oscillation in the membrane potential of their target neuron. Recent physiological recordings in vivo revealed that owl NL neurons changed their spike rates almost linearly with the amplitude of this oscillatory potential. The oscillatory potential was termed the sound analog potential, because of its resemblance to the waveform of the stimulus tone. The amplitude of the sound analog potential recorded in NL varied systematically with the interaural time difference (ITD), which is one of the most important cues for sound localization. In order to investigate the mechanisms underlying ITD computation in the NM-NL circuit, we provide detailed theoretical descriptions of how phase-locked inputs form oscillating membrane potentials. We derive analytical expressions that relate presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic factors to the signal and noise components of the oscillation in both the synaptic conductance and the membrane potential. Numerical simulations demonstrate the validity of the theoretical formulations for the entire frequency ranges tested (1-8 kHz) and potential effects of higher harmonics on NL neurons with low best frequencies (<2 kHz).

  6. Theoretical foundations of the sound analog membrane potential that underlies coincidence detection in the barn owl

    PubMed Central

    Ashida, Go; Funabiki, Kazuo; Carr, Catherine E.

    2013-01-01

    A wide variety of neurons encode temporal information via phase-locked spikes. In the avian auditory brainstem, neurons in the cochlear nucleus magnocellularis (NM) send phase-locked synaptic inputs to coincidence detector neurons in the nucleus laminaris (NL) that mediate sound localization. Previous modeling studies suggested that converging phase-locked synaptic inputs may give rise to a periodic oscillation in the membrane potential of their target neuron. Recent physiological recordings in vivo revealed that owl NL neurons changed their spike rates almost linearly with the amplitude of this oscillatory potential. The oscillatory potential was termed the sound analog potential, because of its resemblance to the waveform of the stimulus tone. The amplitude of the sound analog potential recorded in NL varied systematically with the interaural time difference (ITD), which is one of the most important cues for sound localization. In order to investigate the mechanisms underlying ITD computation in the NM-NL circuit, we provide detailed theoretical descriptions of how phase-locked inputs form oscillating membrane potentials. We derive analytical expressions that relate presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic factors to the signal and noise components of the oscillation in both the synaptic conductance and the membrane potential. Numerical simulations demonstrate the validity of the theoretical formulations for the entire frequency ranges tested (1–8 kHz) and potential effects of higher harmonics on NL neurons with low best frequencies (<2 kHz). PMID:24265616

  7. Hydrodynamic collective effects of active proteins in biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Koyano, Yuki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Mikhailov, Alexander S

    2016-08-01

    Lipid bilayers forming biological membranes are known to behave as viscous two-dimensional fluids on submicrometer scales; usually they contain a large number of active protein inclusions. Recently, it was shown [A. S. Mikhailov and R. Kapral, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 112, E3639 (2015)PNASA60027-842410.1073/pnas.1506825112] that such active proteins should induce nonthermal fluctuating lipid flows leading to diffusion enhancement and chemotaxislike drift for passive inclusions in biomembranes. Here, a detailed analytical and numerical investigation of such effects is performed. The attention is focused on the situations when proteins are concentrated within lipid rafts. We demonstrate that passive particles tend to become attracted by active rafts and are accumulated inside them. PMID:27627343

  8. Hydrodynamic collective effects of active proteins in biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyano, Yuki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-08-01

    Lipid bilayers forming biological membranes are known to behave as viscous two-dimensional fluids on submicrometer scales; usually they contain a large number of active protein inclusions. Recently, it was shown [A. S. Mikhailov and R. Kapral, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 112, E3639 (2015), 10.1073/pnas.1506825112] that such active proteins should induce nonthermal fluctuating lipid flows leading to diffusion enhancement and chemotaxislike drift for passive inclusions in biomembranes. Here, a detailed analytical and numerical investigation of such effects is performed. The attention is focused on the situations when proteins are concentrated within lipid rafts. We demonstrate that passive particles tend to become attracted by active rafts and are accumulated inside them.

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi infection disturbs mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production rate in cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shivali; Bhatia, Vandanajay; Wen, Jian-jun; Wu, Yewen; Huang, Ming-He; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of Trypanosoma cruzi invasion and inflammatory processes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mouse atrial cardiomyocyte line (HL-1) and primary adult rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocytes were incubated with T. cruzi (Tc) trypomastigotes, Tc lysate (TcTL) or Tc secreted proteins (TcSP) for 0-72 h, and ROS measured by amplex red assay. Cardiomyocytes infected by T. cruzi (but not those incubated with TcTL or TcSP) exhibited a linear increase in ROS production during 2-48 h post-infection (max.18-fold increase) which was further enhanced by recombinant cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ). We observed no increase in NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase, and myeloperoxidase activities, and specific inhibitor of these enzymes did not block the increased rate of ROS production in infected cardiomyocytes. Instead, the mitochondrial membrane potential was perturbed, and resulted in inefficient electron transport chain (ETC) activity, and enhanced electron leakage and ROS formation in infected cardiomyocytes. HL-1 rho (ρ) cardiomyocytes lacked a functional ETC, and exhibited no increase in ROS formation in response to T. cruzi. Together, these results demonstrate that invasion by T. cruzi and inflammatory milieu affect mitochondrial integrity and contribute to electron transport chain inefficiency and ROS production in cardiomyocytes. PMID:19686837

  10. Ocean acidification impacts on sperm mitochondrial membrane potential bring sperm swimming behaviour near its tipping point.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Peter; Binet, Monique T; Havenhand, Jonathan N; Doyle, Christopher J; Williamson, Jane E

    2015-04-01

    Broadcast spawning marine invertebrates are susceptible to environmental stressors such as climate change, as their reproduction depends on the successful meeting and fertilization of gametes in the water column. Under near-future scenarios of ocean acidification, the swimming behaviour of marine invertebrate sperm is altered. We tested whether this was due to changes in sperm mitochondrial activity by investigating the effects of ocean acidification on sperm metabolism and swimming behaviour in the sea urchin Centrostephanus rodgersii. We used a fluorescent molecular probe (JC-1) and flow cytometry to visualize mitochondrial activity (measured as change in mitochondrial membrane potential, MMP). Sperm MMP was significantly reduced in ΔpH -0.3 (35% reduction) and ΔpH -0.5 (48% reduction) treatments, whereas sperm swimming behaviour was less sensitive with only slight changes (up to 11% decrease) observed overall. There was significant inter-individual variability in responses of sperm swimming behaviour and MMP to acidified seawater. We suggest it is likely that sperm exposed to these changes in pH are close to their tipping point in terms of physiological tolerance to acidity. Importantly, substantial inter-individual variation in responses of sperm swimming to ocean acidification may increase the scope for selection of resilient phenotypes, which, if heritable, could provide a basis for adaptation to future ocean acidification.

  11. Membrane-Targeting DCAP Analogues with Broad-Spectrum Antibiotic Activity against Pathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Katherine A; Heinrich, Victoria A; Hershfield, Jeremy R; Demons, Samandra T; Weibel, Douglas B

    2015-04-01

    We performed a structure-activity relationship study of 2-((3-(3,6-dichloro-9H-carbazol-9-yl)-2-hydroxypropyl)amino)-2-(hydroxymethyl)propane-1,3-diol (DCAP), which is an antibacterial agent that disrupts the membrane potential and permeability of bacteria. The stereochemistry of DCAP had no effect on the biological activity of DCAP. The aromaticity and electronegativity of the chlorine-substituted carbazole was required for activity, suggesting that its planar and dipolar characteristics orient DCAP in membranes. Increasing the hydrophobicity of the tail region of DCAP enhanced its antibiotic activity. Two DCAP analogues displayed promising antibacterial activity against the BSL-3 pathogens Bacillus anthracis and Francisella tularensis. Codosing DCAP analogues with ampicillin or kanamycin increased their potency. These studies demonstrate that DCAP and its analogues may be a promising scaffold for developing chemotherapeutic agents that bind to bacterial membranes and kill strains of slow-growing or dormant bacteria that cause persistent infections. PMID:25941556

  12. [Study of antioxidant and membrane activity of rosmarinic acid using different model systems].

    PubMed

    Popov, A M; Osipov, A N; Korepanova, E A; Krivoshapko, O N; Artiukov, A A

    2013-01-01

    Rosmarinic acid is found in many species of different families of higher plants and its chemical structure is phenol propanoid with various biological activity. In this paper, we conducted a comparative study of antioxidant (radical-scavenging) properties of rosmarinic acid in systems of 2,2'-azo-bis(2-methylpropionamidin)dihydrochloride-luminol and hemoglobin-hydrogen peroxide-lu- minol, determined its protective potential in preventing peroxidation of linoleic acid, and evaluated the effect on the permeability of planar bilayer lipid membranes. Linoleic acid peroxidation was assessed by iron-thiocyanate method. In these studies, trolox was used as a reference antioxidant, and ascorbic acid, and dihydroquercetin were taken as standards. Rosmarinic acid is significantly superior to trolox, ascorbic acid and dihydroquercetin in the tests for antioxidant activity in the systems studied, as well as in inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation. According to their activity the investigated substances can be arranged in the following order: rosmarinic acid > dihydroquercetin trolox > ascorbic acid. Rosmarinic acid does not cause significant changes in the permeability of planar bilayer membranes in a dose range of 0.5 to 10 mkg/mL. Antioxidant activity of rosmarinic acid is due to the neutralization of reactive oxygen species and/or luminol radicals generated in model systems. The observed features of the antioxidant and membrane activity of rosmarinic acid, which may underlie the previously mentioned pharmacological effects are discussed. PMID:25481945

  13. Lachesana tarabaevi, an expert in membrane-active toxins.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenkov, Alexey I; Sachkova, Maria Y; Kovalchuk, Sergey I; Grishin, Eugene V; Vassilevski, Alexander A

    2016-08-15

    In the present study, we show that venom of the ant spider Lachesana tarabaevi is unique in terms of molecular composition and toxicity. Whereas venom of most spiders studied is rich in disulfide-containing neurotoxic peptides, L. tarabaevi relies on the production of linear (no disulfide bridges) cytolytic polypeptides. We performed full-scale peptidomic examination of L. tarabaevi venom supported by cDNA library analysis. As a result, we identified several dozen components, and a majority (∼80% of total venom protein) exhibited membrane-active properties. In total, 33 membrane-interacting polypeptides (length of 18-79 amino acid residues) comprise five major groups: repetitive polypeptide elements (Rpe), latarcins (Ltc), met-lysines (MLys), cyto-insectotoxins (CIT) and latartoxins (LtTx). Rpe are short (18 residues) amphiphilic molecules that are encoded by the same genes as antimicrobial peptides Ltc 4a and 4b. Isolation of Rpe confirms the validity of the iPQM (inverted processing quadruplet motif) proposed to mark the cleavage sites in spider toxin precursors that are processed into several mature chains. MLys (51 residues) present 'idealized' amphiphilicity when modelled in a helical wheel projection with sharply demarcated sectors of hydrophobic, cationic and anionic residues. Four families of CIT (61-79 residues) are the primary weapon of the spider, accounting for its venom toxicity. Toxins from the CIT 1 and 2 families have a modular structure consisting of two shorter Ltc-like peptides. We demonstrate that in CIT 1a, these two parts act in synergy when they are covalently linked. This finding supports the assumption that CIT have evolved through the joining of two shorter membrane-active peptides into one larger molecule. PMID:27287558

  14. Involvement of membrane potential in alkaline band formation by internodal cells of Chara corallina.

    PubMed

    Shimmen, Teruo; Wakabayashi, Akiko

    2008-10-01

    Internodal cells of Chara corallina form alkaline bands on their surface upon illumination via photosynthesis. In the present study, the effect of KCl on alkaline band formation was analyzed. When the extracellular KCl concentration was increased, alkaline band formation was extensively inhibited. Electrophysiological analysis unequivocally showed the need for inner negative membrane potential for alkaline band formation.

  15. Membrane Potential Simulation Program for IBM-PC-Compatible Equipment for Physiology and Biology Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Peter H.

    1990-01-01

    A graphic, interactive software program that is suitable for teaching students about the measurement and ion dependence of cell membrane potentials is described. The hardware requirements, the aim of the program, how to use the program, other related programs, and its advantages over traditional methods are included. (KR)

  16. A New Computerized Approach for Teaching the Nature of Membrane Potentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vazquez, Jesus

    1991-01-01

    Presents a BASIC program that can be useful in explaining physicochemical phenomena underlying the generation of membrane potential in excitable cells. Its simplicity allows students to understand the nature of these processes through a direct, hands-on approach. Also, the simulated voltage and concentration kinetics agree well with those…

  17. Spike-Threshold Adaptation Predicted by Membrane Potential Dynamics In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Bertrand; Peña, José Luis; Brette, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Neurons encode information in sequences of spikes, which are triggered when their membrane potential crosses a threshold. In vivo, the spiking threshold displays large variability suggesting that threshold dynamics have a profound influence on how the combined input of a neuron is encoded in the spiking. Threshold variability could be explained by adaptation to the membrane potential. However, it could also be the case that most threshold variability reflects noise and processes other than threshold adaptation. Here, we investigated threshold variation in auditory neurons responses recorded in vivo in barn owls. We found that spike threshold is quantitatively predicted by a model in which the threshold adapts, tracking the membrane potential at a short timescale. As a result, in these neurons, slow voltage fluctuations do not contribute to spiking because they are filtered by threshold adaptation. More importantly, these neurons can only respond to input spikes arriving together on a millisecond timescale. These results demonstrate that fast adaptation to the membrane potential captures spike threshold variability in vivo. PMID:24722397

  18. [Modelling of pattern formation and oscillations in pH and transmembrane potential near the cell membrane of Chara corallina].

    PubMed

    Pliusnina, T Iu; Lavrova, A I; Riznichenko, G Iu; Rubin, A B

    2005-01-01

    A mathematical model of potencial-dependent proton transfer across the membrane of Chara corallina cells is considered. To construct the model, partial differential equations describing the system dynamics in time and in space were used. The variables of the model are the proton concentration and membrane potential. The model describes the experimentally observed inhomogeneous distribution of transmembrane potential and pH along the membrane and oscillations of the potential and pH in time. A mechanism of the distribution of pH and membrane potential along the Chara corallina cell is suggested.

  19. Concentration of field and skim latex by microfiltration - membrane fouling and biochemical methane potential of serum.

    PubMed

    Thongmak, Narumol; Sridang, Porntip; Puetpaiboon, Udomphon; Grasmick, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Cross-flow microfiltration was used to concentrate field and skim latex suspensions and recover the smallest compounds (proteins, sugars, etc.) in permeate (serum solutions). The experiments were performed in a lab-scale microfiltration unit equipped with ceramic membranes. In continuous mode, the operations were performed at constant trans-membrane pressure (0.5 bars), constant cross-flow velocity (3 m/s) and constant temperature (28 ± 2°C). In retentate, the volumetric concentration factor was only close to 2 (about 54% of total solid content, TSC) when concentrating the field latex suspensions, and it reached 10 (close to 40% TSC) when concentrating skim latex suspensions. The quality of retentate suspensions let envisage a significant potential of industrial valorization. The membrane fouling rates appeared as an increasing function of dry rubber content suspension, and the main fouling origin (94%) was linked to a reversible accumulation of suspended compounds on the membrane surface. Permeate appeared as a clear yellow solution containing the smallest soluble organic fractions that show a high degree of biodegradability when using biochemical methane potential tests. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was then higher than 92% and the methane production yield was close to 0.29 NLCH4/gCODremoved. The association of a membrane separation step and anaerobic digestion appeared, then, as a relevant solution to recover rubber content from skim latex suspensions and energy from the anaerobic digestion of serum. PMID:25812704

  20. A Rapid and Quantitative Flow Cytometry Method for the Analysis of Membrane Disruptive Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien-Simpson, Neil M.; Pantarat, Namfon; Attard, Troy J.; Walsh, Katrina A.; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a microbial flow cytometry method that quantifies within 3 hours antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity, termed Minimum Membrane Disruptive Concentration (MDC). Increasing peptide concentration positively correlates with the extent of bacterial membrane disruption and the calculated MDC is equivalent to its MBC. The activity of AMPs representing three different membranolytic modes of action could be determined for a range of Gram positive and negative bacteria, including the ESKAPE pathogens, E. coli and MRSA. By using the MDC50 concentration of the parent AMP, the method provides high-throughput, quantitative screening of AMP analogues. A unique feature of the MDC assay is that it directly measures peptide/bacteria interactions and lysed cell numbers rather than bacteria survival as with MIC and MBC assays. With the threat of multi-drug resistant bacteria, this high-throughput MDC assay has the potential to aid in the development of novel antimicrobials that target bacteria with improved efficacy. PMID:26986223

  1. Beyond apoptosis: The mechanism and function of phosphatidylserine asymmetry in the membrane of activating mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Rysavy, Noel M.; Shimoda, Lori M. N.; Dixon, Alyssa M.; Speck, Mark; Stokes, Alexander J.; Turner, Helen; Umemoto, Eric Y.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of plasma membrane asymmetry is a hallmark of apoptosis, but lipid bilayer asymmetry and loss of asymmetry can contribute to numerous cellular functions and responses that are independent of programmed cell death. Exofacial exposure of phosphatidylserine occurs in lymphocytes and mast cells after antigenic stimulation and in the absence of apoptosis, suggesting that there is a functional requirement for phosphatidylserine exposure in immunocytes. In this review we examine current ideas as to the nature of this functional role in mast cell activation. Mechanistically, there is controversy as to the candidate proteins responsible for phosphatidylserine translocation from the internal to external leaflet, and here we review the candidacies of mast cell PLSCR1 and TMEM16F. Finally we examine the potential relationship between functionally important mast cell membrane perturbations and phosphatidylserine exposure during activation. PMID:25759911

  2. A Rapid and Quantitative Flow Cytometry Method for the Analysis of Membrane Disruptive Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Pantarat, Namfon; Attard, Troy J; Walsh, Katrina A; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    We describe a microbial flow cytometry method that quantifies within 3 hours antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity, termed Minimum Membrane Disruptive Concentration (MDC). Increasing peptide concentration positively correlates with the extent of bacterial membrane disruption and the calculated MDC is equivalent to its MBC. The activity of AMPs representing three different membranolytic modes of action could be determined for a range of Gram positive and negative bacteria, including the ESKAPE pathogens, E. coli and MRSA. By using the MDC50 concentration of the parent AMP, the method provides high-throughput, quantitative screening of AMP analogues. A unique feature of the MDC assay is that it directly measures peptide/bacteria interactions and lysed cell numbers rather than bacteria survival as with MIC and MBC assays. With the threat of multi-drug resistant bacteria, this high-throughput MDC assay has the potential to aid in the development of novel antimicrobials that target bacteria with improved efficacy. PMID:26986223

  3. pH regulation of amphotericin B channels activity in the bilayer lipid membrane

    PubMed Central

    Shahmoradi, Tahereh; Sepehry, Hamid; Ashrafpour, Manuchehr

    2016-01-01

    Background: Amphotericin B (AmB) is a polyene antibiotic frequently applied in the treatment of systemic fungal infections in spite of its secondary effects. The pH plays a crucial role in modulating biophysical features of ion channels in the bilayer lipid membranes. Aim: In this study, the role of pH in the regulation of AmB channel was assessed by single channel recording of ion channel incorporated in the artificial membrane. Materials and Methods: Bilayer lipid membrane was formed by phosphatidylcholine in a 350 μm diameter aperture between two chambers, cis and trans contained 200/50 mMKCl solutions, respectively; then AmB was incorporated into the bilayer lipid membrane. Single channel recordings were used to indicate the effects of pH changes on AmB channels activity. The records were analyzed by Clamp fit 10 software. Results: A kinetic analysis of single channel currents indicated a cation ion channel with 500 pS conductance and voltage-dependence of the open probability of the AmB channel (Po). A reduction of cis pH to 6 decreased Po and conductance. This effect was also voltage-dependent, being greater at a more positive above −40. The pH changes in the range of 6-8 had no effect on the reversal potential and ion selectivity. Conclusion: Our data indicated that extracellular acidity can reduce AmB activity. PMID:27003977

  4. Graphene oxide and sulfonated polyanion co-doped hydrogel films for dual-layered membranes with superior hemocompatibility and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    He, Chao; Shi, Zhen-Qiang; Cheng, Chong; Lu, Hua-Qing; Zhou, Mi; Sun, Shu-Dong; Zhao, Chang-Sheng

    2016-10-20

    In this study, a new kind of hemocompatible and antibacterial dual-layered polymeric membrane was fabricated by coating a top layer of graphene oxide and a sulfonated polyanion co-doped hydrogel thin film (GO-SPHF) on a bottom membrane substrate. After a two-step spin-coating of casting solutions on glass plates, dual-layered membranes were obtained by a liquid-liquid phase inversion method. The GO-SPHF composite polyethersulfone (PES) membranes (PES/GO-SPHF) showed top layers with obviously large porous structures. The chemical composition tests indicated that there were abundant hydrophilic groups enriched on the membrane surface. The examination of membrane mechanical properties indicated that the composite membranes exhibited only slightly decreased performance compared to pristine PES membranes. Moreover, to validate the potential applications of this novel dual-layered membrane in diverse fields, we tested the hemocompatibility and antibacterial activity of the membranes, respectively. Notably, the PES/GO-SPHF membranes showed highly improved in vitro hemocompatibility, such as good anti-coagulant activity, suppressed platelet adhesion and activation, low inflammation potential, and good red blood cell compatibility. Furthermore, the dual-layered membranes exhibited robust antibacterial ability after in situ loading of Ag-nanoparticles with excellent bactericidal capability to both Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Due to the integration of the porous membrane structure, good mechanical strength, excellent hemocompatibility, as well as robust bactericidal capability, the GO and sulfonated polyanion co-doped dual-layered membranes may open up a new protocol to greatly demonstrate the potential application of polymeric membranes for clinical hemodialysis and many other biomedical therapies. PMID:27526645

  5. Sensory transduction at the frog semicircular canal: how hair cell membrane potential controls junctional transmission

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Marta; Canella, Rita; Rubbini, Gemma; Fesce, Riccardo; Rossi, Maria Lisa

    2015-01-01

    At the frog semicircular canals, the afferent fibers display high spontaneous activity (mEPSPs), due to transmitter release from hair cells. mEPSP and spike frequencies are modulated by stimulation that activates the hair cell receptor conductance. The relation between receptor current and transmitter release cannot be studied at the intact semicircular canal. To circumvent the problem, we combined patch-clamp recordings at the isolated hair cell and electrophysiological recordings at the cytoneural junction in the intact preparation. At isolated hair cells, the K channel blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA) is shown to block a fraction of total voltage-dependent K-conductance (IKD) that depends on TEA concentration but not on membrane potential (Vm). Considering the bioelectric properties of the hair cell, as previously characterized by this lab, a fixed fractional block of IKD is shown to induce a relatively fixed shift in Vm, provided it lies in the range −30 to −10 mV. The same concentrations of TEA were applied to the intact labyrinth while recording from single afferent fibers of the posterior canal, at rest and during mechanical stimulation. At the peak of stimulation, TEA produced increases in mEPSP rate that were linearly related to the shifts produced by the same TEA concentrations (0.1–3 mM) in hair cell Vm (0.7–5 mV), with a slope of 29.8 Hz/mV. The membrane potential of the hair cell is not linearly related to receptor conductance, so that the slope of quantal release vs. receptor conductance depends on the prevailing Vm (19.8 Hz/nS at −20 mV; 11 Hz/nS at −10 mV). Changes in mEPSP peak size were negligible at rest as well as during stimulation. Since ample spatial summation of mEPSPs occurs at the afferent terminal and threshold-governed spike firing is intrinsically nonlinear, the observed increases in mEPSP frequency, though not very large, may suffice to trigger afferent spike discharge. PMID:26157360

  6. Fibrates inhibit the apoptosis of Batten disease lymphoblast cells via autophagy recovery and regulation of mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Hong, Minho; Song, Ki Duk; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Yi, SunShin; Lee, Yong Seok; Heo, Tae-Hwe; Jun, Hyun Sik; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2016-03-01

    Batten disease (BD; also known as juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis) is a genetic disorder inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and is characterized by blindness, seizures, cognitive decline, and early death resulting from the inherited mutation of the CLN3 gene. Mitochondrial oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, disrupted autophagy, and enhanced apoptosis have been suggested to play a role in BD pathogenesis. Fibrates, a class of lipid-lowering drugs that induce peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) activation, are the most commonly used PPAR agonists. Assuming that fibrates have a neuroprotective effect, we studied the effects of fibrates, fenofibrate, bezafibrate, and gemfibrozil on apoptosis, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane, and defective autophagy in BD lymphoblast cells. The viability of fibrate-treated BD lymphoblast cells increased to levels of normal lymphoblast cells. In addition, treatment with fibrates inhibited depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential in BD lymphoblast cells. Defective autophagy in BD lymphoblast cells was normalized when treated with fibrates as indicated by increased acridine orange staining. The recovery of autophagy in BD lymphoblast cells is most likely attributed to the upregulation of autophagy proteins, lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1), and LC3 I/II, after treatment with fibrates. This study therefore suggests that fibrates may have a therapeutic potential against BD. PMID:26659390

  7. Infrared Laser Activation of Soluble and Membrane Protein Assemblies in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Mikhailov, Victor A; Liko, Idlir; Mize, Todd H; Bush, Matthew F; Benesch, Justin L P; Robinson, Carol V

    2016-07-19

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) is the dominant method for probing intact macromolecular complexes in the gas phase by means of mass spectrometry (MS). The energy obtained from collisional activation is dependent on the charge state of the ion and the pressures and potentials within the instrument: these factors limit CID capability. Activation by infrared (IR) laser radiation offers an attractive alternative as the radiation energy absorbed by the ions is charge-state-independent and the intensity and time scale of activation is controlled by a laser source external to the mass spectrometer. Here we implement and apply IR activation, in different irradiation regimes, to study both soluble and membrane protein assemblies. We show that IR activation using high-intensity pulsed lasers is faster than collisional and radiative cooling and requires much lower energy than continuous IR irradiation. We demonstrate that IR activation is an effective means for studying membrane protein assemblies, and liberate an intact V-type ATPase complex from detergent micelles, a result that cannot be achieved by means of CID using standard collision energies. Notably, we find that IR activation can be sufficiently soft to retain specific lipids bound to the complex. We further demonstrate that, by applying a combination of collisional activation, mass selection, and IR activation of the liberated complex, we can elucidate subunit stoichiometry and the masses of specifically bound lipids in a single MS experiment.

  8. Plasma membrane calcium pump activity is affected by the membrane protein concentration. Evidence for the involvement of the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Vanagas, Laura; Rossi, Rolando C.; Caride, Ariel J.; Filoteo, Adelaida G.; Strehler, Emanuel E.; Rossi, Juan Pablo F.C.

    2007-01-01

    Plasma membrane calcium pumps (PMCAs) are integral membrane proteins that actively expel Ca2+ from the cell. Specific Ca2+-ATPase activity of erythrocyte membranes increased steeply up to 1.5–5 times when the membrane protein concentration decreased from 50 μg/ml to 1 μg/ml. The activation by dilution was also observed for ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake into vesicles from Sf9 over-expressing the PMCA 4b isoform, confirming that it is a property of the PMCA. Dilution of the protein did not modify the activation by ATP, Ca2+ or Ca2+-calmodulin. Treatment with non-ionic detergents did not abolish the dilution effect, suggesting that it was not due to resealing of the membrane vesicles. Pre-incubation of erythrocyte membranes with Cytochalasin D under conditions that promote actin polymerization abolished the dilution effect. Highly-purified, micellar PMCA showed no dilution effect and was not affected by Cytochalasin D. Taken together, these results suggest that the concentration-dependent behavior of the PMCA activity was due to interactions with cytoskeletal proteins. The dilution effect was also observed with different PMCA isoforms, indicating that this is a general phenomenon for all PMCAs. PMID:17481573

  9. Linking oxygen availability with membrane potential maintenance and K+ retention of barley roots: implications for waterlogging stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fanrong; Konnerup, Dennis; Shabala, Lana; Zhou, Meixue; Colmer, Timothy David; Zhang, Guoping; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-10-01

    Oxygen deprivation is a key determinant of root growth and functioning under waterlogging. In this work, changes in net K(+) flux and membrane potential (MP) of root cells were measured from elongation and mature zones of two barley varieties under hypoxia and anoxia conditions in the medium, and as influenced by ability to transport O2 from the shoot. We show that O2 deprivation results in an immediate K(+) loss from roots, in a tissue- and time-specific manner, affecting root K(+) homeostasis. Both anoxia and hypoxia induced transient membrane depolarization; the extent of this depolarization varied depending on severity of O2 stress and was less pronounced in a waterlogging-tolerant variety. Intact roots of barley were capable of maintaining H(+) -pumping activity under hypoxic conditions while disrupting O2 transport from shoot to root resulted in more pronounced membrane depolarization under O2 -limited conditions and in anoxia a rapid loss of the cell viability. It is concluded that the ability of root cells to maintain MP and cytosolic K(+) homeostasis is central to plant performance under waterlogging, and efficient O2 transport from the shoot may enable operation of the plasma membrane H(+) -ATPase in roots even under conditions of severe O2 limitation in the soil solution.

  10. Effects of hydrostatic pressure on lipid bilayer membranes. I. Influence on membrane thickness and activation volumes of lipophilic ion transport.

    PubMed

    Benz, R; Conti, F

    1986-07-01

    Measurements of membrane capacitance, Cm, were performed on lipid bilayers of different lipidic composition (diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine PPhPC, dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine DOPE, glycerylmonooleate GMO) and containing n-decane as solvent. In the same membranes, the absorption of the lipophilic ions dipicrylamine (DPA-) and tetraphenylborate (TPhB-), and the kinetics of their translocation between the two membrane faces have been studied. The data were obtained from charge pulse relaxation measurements. Upon increasing pressure the specific capacity Cm increased in a fully reversible and reproducible way reflecting a thinning of the membrane that is attributed to extrusion of n-decane from the black membrane area. High pressure decreased the rate constant, ki, for lipophilic ion translocation. After correcting for changes in the height of the energy barrier for translocation due to membrane thinning the pressure dependence of ki yields an apparent activation volume for translocation of approximately 14 cm3/mol both for DPA- and TPhB-. Changes in lipophilic ion absorption following a step of pressure developed with a rather slow time course due to diffusion limitations in solution. The stationary concentration of membrane absorbed lipophilic ions increased with pressure according to an apparent volume of absorption of about -10 cm3/mol. The relevance of the results for the interpretation of the effects of pressure on nerve membrane physiology is discussed.

  11. Biophysical significance of the inner mitochondrial membrane structure on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dong Hoon; Park, Jonghyun; Maurer, Laura L.; Lu, Wei; Philbert, Martin A.; Sastry, Ann Marie

    2014-01-01

    The available literature supports the hypothesis that the morphology of the inner mitochondrial membrane is regulated by different energy states, that the three-dimensional morphology of cristae is dynamic and that both are related to biochemical function. Examination of the correlation between the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) structure and mitochondrial energetic function is critical to an understanding of the links between meso-scale morphology and function in progressive mitochondrial dysfunction such as aging, neurodegeneration, and disease. To investigate this relationship, we develop a model to examine the effects of three-dimensional IMM morphology on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria. The 2D axisymmetric finite element method is used to simulate mitochondrial electric potential and proton concentration distribution. This simulation model demonstrates that the proton motive force (PMF) produced on the membranes of cristae can be higher than that on the inner boundary membrane. The model also shows that high proton concentration in cristae can be induced by the morphology-dependent electric potential gradient along the outer side of the IMM. Furthermore, simulation results show that a high PMF is induced by the large surface-to-volume ratio of an individual crista, whereas a high capacity for ATP synthesis can primarily be achieved by increasing the surface area of an individual crista. The mathematical model presented here provides compelling support for the idea that morphology at the meso-scale is a significant driver of mitochondrial function. PMID:24483502

  12. Biophysical significance of the inner mitochondrial membrane structure on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dong Hoon; Park, Jonghyun; Maurer, Laura L.; Lu, Wei; Philbert, Martin A.; Sastry, Ann Marie

    2013-12-01

    The available literature supports the hypothesis that the morphology of the inner mitochondrial membrane is regulated by different energy states, that the three-dimensional morphology of cristae is dynamic, and that both are related to biochemical function. Examination of the correlation between the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) structure and mitochondrial energetic function is critical to an understanding of the links between mesoscale morphology and function in progressive mitochondrial dysfunction such as aging, neurodegeneration, and disease. To investigate this relationship, we develop a model to examine the effects of three-dimensional IMM morphology on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria. The two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method is used to simulate mitochondrial electric potential and proton concentration distribution. This simulation model demonstrates that the proton motive force (Δp) produced on the membranes of cristae can be higher than that on the inner boundary membrane. The model also shows that high proton concentration in cristae can be induced by the morphology-dependent electric potential gradient along the outer side of the IMM. Furthermore, simulation results show that a high Δp is induced by the large surface-to-volume ratio of an individual crista, whereas a high capacity for ATP synthesis can primarily be achieved by increasing the surface area of an individual crista. The mathematical model presented here provides compelling support for the idea that morphology at the mesoscale is a significant driver of mitochondrial function.

  13. The role of cyclic nucleotides in modulation of the membrane potential of the Schwann cell of squid giant nerve fibre.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, P D; Reale, V; Villegas, J

    1985-01-01

    The role of cyclic nucleotides in mediating the effects of nicotine cholinergic receptors has been investigated in Schwann cells of the giant nerve fibre of the squid. Elevation of cyclic AMP levels in this preparation by means of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, theophylline, by the diterpene adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and by cyclic nucleotide analogues mimics the action of activating the nicotinic cholinergic receptors in producing a long-lasting hyperpolarization of the membrane potential of the Schwann cell. Theophylline and forskolin also potentiate the effects of carbachol and of neural stimulation on the Schwann cell. The results suggest that the nicotinic receptor of the squid Schwann cell is likely to mediate its effects via a mechanism that activates adenylate cyclase. The results are discussed in terms of the role of cyclic AMP in the complex multistep interaction between the giant axon of the squid and its surrounding Schwann-cell layer. PMID:2991504

  14. The role of cyclic nucleotides in modulation of the membrane potential of the Schwann cell of squid giant nerve fibre.

    PubMed

    Evans, P D; Reale, V; Villegas, J

    1985-06-01

    The role of cyclic nucleotides in mediating the effects of nicotine cholinergic receptors has been investigated in Schwann cells of the giant nerve fibre of the squid. Elevation of cyclic AMP levels in this preparation by means of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, theophylline, by the diterpene adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and by cyclic nucleotide analogues mimics the action of activating the nicotinic cholinergic receptors in producing a long-lasting hyperpolarization of the membrane potential of the Schwann cell. Theophylline and forskolin also potentiate the effects of carbachol and of neural stimulation on the Schwann cell. The results suggest that the nicotinic receptor of the squid Schwann cell is likely to mediate its effects via a mechanism that activates adenylate cyclase. The results are discussed in terms of the role of cyclic AMP in the complex multistep interaction between the giant axon of the squid and its surrounding Schwann-cell layer.

  15. Potential fluid mechanic pathways of platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Hendabadi, Sahar

    2012-01-01

    Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which plays leading roles in many vascular complications and causes of death. Platelets can be activated by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Mechanically, platelet activation has been shown to be a function of elevated shear stress and exposure time. These contributions can be combined by considering the cumulative stress or strain on a platelet as it is transported. Here we develop a framework for computing a hemodynamic-based activation potential that is derived from a Lagrangian integral of strain rate magnitude. We demonstrate that such a measure is generally maximized along, and near to, distinguished material surfaces in the flow. The connections between activation potential and these structures are illustrated through stenotic flow computations. We uncover two distinct structures that may explain observed thrombus formation at the apex and downstream of stenoses. More broadly, these findings suggest fundamental relationships may exist between potential fluid mechanic pathways for mechanical platelet activation and the mechanisms governing their transport. PMID:22782543

  16. Electrochemical potential releases a membrane-bound secretion intermediate of maltose-binding protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Geller, B L

    1990-01-01

    A secretionary intermediate of the Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein accumulated in the inner membrane when the membrane electrochemical potential was reduced and the cytosolic ATP concentration was normal. The intermediate was mature in size, but maintained a conformation similar to the cytosolic precursor form, and not the mature periplasmic protein, as measured by differences in susceptibility to proteinase K in vitro. The intermediate was located on the periplasmic side of the inner membrane. Restoration of the membrane electrochemical potential resulted in the movement of the intermediate from the inner membrane to the periplasm. In other experiments in which the ATP concentration was reduced by 96% and the electrochemical potential remained normal, no intermediate accumulated. Thus, the final step in the export of maltose-binding protein requires the electrochemical potential of the inner membrane and does not require ATP. Images PMID:2203734

  17. Membrane potential of mitochondria in intact lymphocytes during early mitogenic stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Brand, M D; Felber, S M

    1984-01-01

    The mitochondrial membrane potential (delta psi m) in intact lymphocytes was calculated by measuring the distribution of radiolabelled methyltriphenylphosphonium cation. The value obtained was 120 mV. The pH gradient across the mitochondrial membrane in situ (delta pH m) was estimated to be 73 mV (1.2 pH units). Thus the electrochemical gradient of protons was about 190 mV. Addition of the mitogen concanavalin A did not alter delta psi m, showing that, if movement of Ca2+ across the inner membrane of lymphocyte mitochondria occurs when concanavalin A is added, it is accompanied by charge-compensating ion movements. PMID:6696741

  18. Nonlinear optical measurement of membrane potential around single molecules at selected cellular sites

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, Gadi; Lewis, Aaron; Linial, Michal; Loew, Leslie M.

    1999-01-01

    Membrane potential around single molecules has been measured by using the nonlinear optical phenomenon of second harmonic generation. This advance results from the interaction between a highly dipolar molecule with a selectively directed highly polarizable 1-nm gold particle. With this approach, a second harmonic signal, which is enhanced by the nanoparticle, is detected from a volume of nanometric dimensions. This present work clearly shows that functional cellular imaging around single molecules is possible by selectively directing an antibody with a 1-nm gold label to a specific membrane protein. The results of this work open the way for three-dimensional, high resolution functional imaging of membrane electrophysiology in cells and cellular networks. PMID:10359775

  19. Membrane potential perturbations induced in tissue cells by pulsed electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.S.

    1995-09-01

    Pulsed electric fields directly influence the electrophysiology of tissue cells by transiently perturbing their transmembrane potential. To determine the magnitude and time course of this interaction, electronic cable theory was used to calculate the membrane potential perturbations induced in tissue cells by a spatially uniform, pulsed electric field. Analytic solutions were obtained that predict shifts in membrane potential along the length of cells as a function of time in response to an electrical pulse. For elongated tissue cells, or groups of tissue cells that are couple electronically by gap junctions, significant hyperpolarizations and depolarizations can result form millisecond applications of electric fields with strengths on the order of 10--100 mV/cm. The results illustrate the importance of considering cellular cable parameters in assessing the effects of transient electric fields on biological systems, as well as in predicting the efficacy of pulsed electric fields in medical treatments.

  20. Electric field modulation of the membrane potential in solid-state ion channels.

    PubMed

    Guan, Weihua; Reed, Mark A

    2012-12-12

    Biological ion channels are molecular devices that allow a rapid flow of ions across the cell membrane. Normal physiological functions, such as generating action potentials for cell-to-cell communication, are highly dependent on ion channels that can open and close in response to external stimuli for regulating ion permeation. Mimicking these biological functions using synthetic structures is a rapidly progressing yet challenging area. Here we report the electric field modulation of the membrane potential phenomena in mechanically and chemically robust solid-state ion channels, an abiotic analogue to the voltage-gated ion channels in living systems. To understand the complex physicochemical processes in the electric field regulated membrane potential behavior, both quasi-static and transient characteristics of converting transmembrane ion gradients into electric potential are investigated. It is found that the transmembrane potential can be adequately tuned by an external electrical stimulation, thanks to the unique properties of the voltage-regulated selective ion transport through a nanoscale channel.

  1. Quick and effective hyperpolarization of the membrane potential in intact smooth muscle cells of blood vessels by synchronization modulation electric field.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liping; Fang, Zhihui; Chen, Wei

    2012-06-01

    Blood vessel dilation starts from activation of the Na/K pumps and inward rectifier K channels in the vessel smooth muscle cells, which hyperpolarizes the cell membrane potential and closes the Ca channels. As a result, the intracellular Ca concentration reduces, and the smooth muscle cells relax and the blood vessel dilates. Activation of the Na/K pumps and the membrane potential hyperpolarization plays a critical role in blood vessel functions. Previously, we developed a new technique, synchronization modulation, to control the pump functions by electrically entraining the pump molecules. We have applied the synchronization modulation electric field noninvasively to various intact cells and demonstrated the field-induced membrane potential hyperpolarization. We further applied the electric field to blood vessels and investigated the field induced functional changes of the vessels. In this paper, we report the results in a study of the membrane potential change in the smooth muscle cells of mesenteric blood vessels in response to the oscillating electric field. We found that the synchronization modulation electric field can effectively hyperpolarize the muscle membrane potential quickly in seconds under physiological conditions.

  2. Cassava root membrane proteome reveals activities during storage root maturation.

    PubMed

    Naconsie, Maliwan; Lertpanyasampatha, Manassawe; Viboonjun, Unchera; Netrphan, Supatcharee; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Ogasawara, Naotake; Narangajavana, Jarunya

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is one of the most important crops of Thailand. Its storage roots are used as food, feed, starch production, and be the important source for biofuel and biodegradable plastic production. Despite the importance of cassava storage roots, little is known about the mechanisms involved in their formation. This present study has focused on comparison of the expression profiles of cassava root proteome at various developmental stages using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS. Based on an anatomical study using Toluidine Blue, the secondary growth was confirmed to be essential during the development of cassava storage root. To investigate biochemical processes occurring during storage root maturation, soluble and membrane proteins were isolated from storage roots harvested from 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month-old cassava plants. The proteins with differential expression pattern were analysed and identified to be associated with 8 functional groups: protein folding and degradation, energy, metabolism, secondary metabolism, stress response, transport facilitation, cytoskeleton, and unclassified function. The expression profiling of membrane proteins revealed the proteins involved in protein folding and degradation, energy, and cell structure were highly expressed during early stages of development. Integration of these data along with the information available in genome and transcriptome databases is critical to expand knowledge obtained solely from the field of proteomics. Possible role of identified proteins were discussed in relation with the activities during storage root maturation in cassava.

  3. Salinity-induced noise in membrane potential of Characeae Chara australis: effect of exogenous melatonin.

    PubMed

    Beilby, Mary J; Al Khazaaly, Sabah; Bisson, Mary A

    2015-02-01

    Salt sensitive Characeae Chara australis responds to 50 mM NaCl by a prompt appearance of noise in the trans-membrane potential difference (PD). The noise diminishes with time in saline and PD depolarization, leading to altered current-voltage characteristics that could be modeled with H(+)/OH(-) channels. Beilby and Al Khazaaly (JMB 230:21-34, 2009) suggested that the noise might arise from cooperative transient opening of H(+)/OH(-) channels. Presoaking cells in 10 μM melatonin over 24 h abolished the noise in some cells, postponed its appearance in others or changed its characteristics. As melatonin is a very effective antioxidant, we postulated opening of H(+)/OH(-) channels by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Measurement of ROS using dihydrodichlorofluorescein diacetate confirmed substantial reduction in ROS production in melatonin-treated cells in saline and sorbitol media. However, ROS concentration decreased as a function of time in saline medium. Possible schemes for activation of H(+)/OH(-) channels under salinity stress are considered. PMID:25378124

  4. Membrane potential dynamics of populations of cortical neurons during auditory streaming.

    PubMed

    Farley, Brandon J; Noreña, Arnaud J

    2015-10-01

    How a mixture of acoustic sources is perceptually organized into discrete auditory objects remains unclear. One current hypothesis postulates that perceptual segregation of different sources is related to the spatiotemporal separation of cortical responses induced by each acoustic source or stream. In the present study, the dynamics of subthreshold membrane potential activity were measured across the entire tonotopic axis of the rodent primary auditory cortex during the auditory streaming paradigm using voltage-sensitive dye imaging. Consistent with the proposed hypothesis, we observed enhanced spatiotemporal segregation of cortical responses to alternating tone sequences as their frequency separation or presentation rate was increased, both manipulations known to promote stream segregation. However, across most streaming paradigm conditions tested, a substantial cortical region maintaining a response to both tones coexisted with more peripheral cortical regions responding more selectively to one of them. We propose that these coexisting subthreshold representation types could provide neural substrates to support the flexible switching between the integrated and segregated streaming percepts. PMID:26269558

  5. Salinity-induced noise in membrane potential of Characeae Chara australis: effect of exogenous melatonin.

    PubMed

    Beilby, Mary J; Al Khazaaly, Sabah; Bisson, Mary A

    2015-02-01

    Salt sensitive Characeae Chara australis responds to 50 mM NaCl by a prompt appearance of noise in the trans-membrane potential difference (PD). The noise diminishes with time in saline and PD depolarization, leading to altered current-voltage characteristics that could be modeled with H(+)/OH(-) channels. Beilby and Al Khazaaly (JMB 230:21-34, 2009) suggested that the noise might arise from cooperative transient opening of H(+)/OH(-) channels. Presoaking cells in 10 μM melatonin over 24 h abolished the noise in some cells, postponed its appearance in others or changed its characteristics. As melatonin is a very effective antioxidant, we postulated opening of H(+)/OH(-) channels by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Measurement of ROS using dihydrodichlorofluorescein diacetate confirmed substantial reduction in ROS production in melatonin-treated cells in saline and sorbitol media. However, ROS concentration decreased as a function of time in saline medium. Possible schemes for activation of H(+)/OH(-) channels under salinity stress are considered.

  6. Charge-shift probes of membrane potential. Characterization of aminostyrylpyridinium dyes on the squid giant axon.

    PubMed Central

    Loew, L M; Cohen, L B; Salzberg, B M; Obaid, A L; Bezanilla, F

    1985-01-01

    The characteristics of transmittance and fluorescence changes of 4-(p-aminostyryl)-1-pyridinium dyes in response to voltage-clamp pulses on the squid giant axon were examined. A zwitterionic styryl dye displays transmittance and excitation spectra on the voltage-clamped squid axon with shapes similar to those previously measured on a model membrane system and consistent with a postulated electrochromic mechanism. The speed of the transmittance response is faster than 1.2 microseconds. The size of the fluorescence change is a factor of 40 lower than on the model membrane; this diminution can be rationalized in terms of the background fluorescence from Schwann cells and the nonoptimal geometric arrangement of the axon membrane. When the emission spectrum is dissected from the excitation response, a nonelectrochromic component is found. This component might result from molecular motion during the excited state lifetime. A positively charged dye permeates the axon membrane and displays complex response waveforms dependent on the method of application and the axon holding potential. This contrasts markedly with model membrane results where the behavior of the cationic and zwitterionic dyes were indistinguishable. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:3978192

  7. Potential biological activity of acacia honey.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Aliyu; Odunola, Oyeronke A; Ibrahim, Mohammed A; Sallau, Abdullahi B; Erukainure, Ochuko L; Aimola, Idown A; Malami, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in functional foods-based research have increasingly become an area of major interest because it affects human health and activities. Functional foods are classes of foods with health promoting and disease preventing properties in addition to multiple nutritional values and of such type is honey. Acacia honey is a type of honey produced by bees (Apis mellifera) fed on Acacia flowers, hence the name. This review focuses on the potential biological activities of Acacia honey which includes quality, antioxidant, immuno-modulatory, antiproliferative and neurological properties at in vitro and in vivo levels. Based on our review, Acacia honey used from various researches is of high purity, contains some bioactive compounds ranging from vitamins, phenolics, flavonoids and fatty acids. It's highly nutritional with strong antioxidant and immuno-modulatory potentials which may therefore be considered a potential candidate for both cancer prevention and treatment. Neurologically, it may be considered as a viable therapeutic agent in the management of Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Ling's Adsorption Theory as a Mechanism of Membrane Potential Generation Observed in Both Living and Nonliving Systems.

    PubMed

    Tamagawa, Hirohisa; Funatani, Makoto; Ikeda, Kota

    2016-01-26

    The potential between two electrolytic solutions separated by a membrane impermeable to ions was measured and the generation mechanism of potential measured was investigated. From the physiological point of view, a nonzero membrane potential or action potential cannot be observed across the impermeable membrane. However, a nonzero membrane potential including action potential-like potential was clearly observed. Those observations gave rise to a doubt concerning the validity of currently accepted generation mechanism of membrane potential and action potential of cell. As an alternative theory, we found that the long-forgotten Ling's adsorption theory was the most plausible theory. Ling's adsorption theory suggests that the membrane potential and action potential of a living cell is due to the adsorption of mobile ions onto the adsorption site of cell, and this theory is applicable even to nonliving (or non-biological) system as well as living system. Through this paper, the authors emphasize that it is necessary to reconsider the validity of current membrane theory and also would like to urge the readers to pay keen attention to the Ling's adsorption theory which has for long years been forgotten in the history of physiology.

  9. Ling’s Adsorption Theory as a Mechanism of Membrane Potential Generation Observed in Both Living and Nonliving Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tamagawa, Hirohisa; Funatani, Makoto; Ikeda, Kota

    2016-01-01

    The potential between two electrolytic solutions separated by a membrane impermeable to ions was measured and the generation mechanism of potential measured was investigated. From the physiological point of view, a nonzero membrane potential or action potential cannot be observed across the impermeable membrane. However, a nonzero membrane potential including action potential-like potential was clearly observed. Those observations gave rise to a doubt concerning the validity of currently accepted generation mechanism of membrane potential and action potential of cell. As an alternative theory, we found that the long-forgotten Ling’s adsorption theory was the most plausible theory. Ling’s adsorption theory suggests that the membrane potential and action potential of a living cell is due to the adsorption of mobile ions onto the adsorption site of cell, and this theory is applicable even to nonliving (or non-biological) system as well as living system. Through this paper, the authors emphasize that it is necessary to reconsider the validity of current membrane theory and also would like to urge the readers to pay keen attention to the Ling’s adsorption theory which has for long years been forgotten in the history of physiology. PMID:26821050

  10. Intracellular microelectrode membrane potential measurements in tobacco cell-suspension protoplasts and barley aleurone protoplasts: interpretation and artifacts.

    PubMed

    Van Duijn, B; Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S

    1994-07-13

    Intracellular microelectrode measurements in plant cell protoplasts have been widely used to study hormone signal transduction processes. However, the interpretation and reliability of such measurements are largely dependent on a detailed evaluation of the measurement conditions, as investigated in the present paper. Upon microelectrode penetration of tobacco cell suspension protoplasts and of barley aleurone protoplasts a fast negative going impalement-induced potential transient of less than a few ms duration could be observed. After reaching a steady-state potential at the ms time scale the measured potential hyperpolarized again and, in most cases, subsequently depolarized to a new steady-state value. Analysis of the electrical equivalent circuit of the measurement configuration showed that the occurrence of the impalement-induced potential transient indicates that these measurements suffer from a microelectrode-induced shunt resistance which loads the measurement. In addition, it is shown that the peak-value of the potential transient is the most reliable indicator of the true membrane potential and of true membrane potential changes of the protoplast, since this value is rather membrane resistance independent. For correct interpretation of steady-state measurements of membrane potential and stimulus-induced membrane potential changes data on membrane and shunt resistance are essential. As an example of the measurement of membrane potential changes the effects of 1-NAA on measured potential values in tobacco protoplasts and the effect of extracellular pH changes on barley aleurone protoplasts are analyzed with regard to the above described conclusions.

  11. Ling's Adsorption Theory as a Mechanism of Membrane Potential Generation Observed in Both Living and Nonliving Systems.

    PubMed

    Tamagawa, Hirohisa; Funatani, Makoto; Ikeda, Kota

    2016-01-01

    The potential between two electrolytic solutions separated by a membrane impermeable to ions was measured and the generation mechanism of potential measured was investigated. From the physiological point of view, a nonzero membrane potential or action potential cannot be observed across the impermeable membrane. However, a nonzero membrane potential including action potential-like potential was clearly observed. Those observations gave rise to a doubt concerning the validity of currently accepted generation mechanism of membrane potential and action potential of cell. As an alternative theory, we found that the long-forgotten Ling's adsorption theory was the most plausible theory. Ling's adsorption theory suggests that the membrane potential and action potential of a living cell is due to the adsorption of mobile ions onto the adsorption site of cell, and this theory is applicable even to nonliving (or non-biological) system as well as living system. Through this paper, the authors emphasize that it is necessary to reconsider the validity of current membrane theory and also would like to urge the readers to pay keen attention to the Ling's adsorption theory which has for long years been forgotten in the history of physiology. PMID:26821050

  12. Allosterism and Structure in Thermally Activated Transient Receptor Potential Channels.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Poblete, Horacio; Miño-Galaz, Germán; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-07-01

    The molecular sensors that mediate temperature changes in living organisms are a large family of proteins known as thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. These membrane proteins are polymodal receptors that can be activated by cold or hot temperatures, depending on the channel subtype, voltage, and ligands. The stimuli sensors are allosterically coupled to a pore domain, increasing the probability of finding the channel in its ion conductive conformation. In this review we first discuss the allosteric coupling between the temperature and voltage sensor modules and the pore domain, and then discuss the thermodynamic foundations of thermo-TRP channel activation. We provide a structural overview of the molecular determinants of temperature sensing. We also posit an anisotropic thermal diffusion model that may explain the large temperature sensitivity of TRP channels. Additionally, we examine the effect of several ligands on TRP channel function and the evidence regarding their mechanisms of action. PMID:27297398

  13. Relationship between potential platelet activation and LCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadden, Shawn

    2010-11-01

    In the study of blood flow, emphasis is often directed at understanding shear stress at the vessel wall due to its potentially disruptive influence on the endothelium. However, it is also known that shear stress has a potent effect on platelet activation. Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which in turn is the cause of most forms of death. Since most platelets are contained in the flow domain, it is important to consider stresses acting on the platelet as they are convected. Locations of high stress can correspond to boundaries between different dynamic regions and locations of hyperbolic points in the Eulerian sense. In the computation of LCS, strain in typically considered in the Lagrangian sense. In this talk we discuss the relationship between locations of potential platelet activation due to increased stress and locations of LCS marking increase Lagrangian deformation.

  14. Functional, photochemically active, and chemically asymmetric membranes by interfacial polymerization of derivatized multifunctional prepolymers

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, Harold K.; Wamser, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    The preparation of a novel class of thin film membranes by interfacial polymerization is disclosed, said membranes incorporating as part of their polymeric structure the functionality of monomeric or oligomeric precursors. Specific embodiments include porphyrin and phthalocyanine derivatives that are photochemically or electrochemically active, as well as chemically asymmetric membranes.

  15. Functional, photochemically active, and chemically asymmetric membranes by interfacial polymerization of derivatized multifunctional prepolymers

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, H.K.; Wamser, C.C.

    1990-04-17

    The preparation of a novel class of thin film membranes by interfacial polymerization is disclosed, said membranes incorporating as part of their polymeric structure the functionality of monomeric or oligomeric precursors. Specific embodiments include porphyrin and phthalocyanine derivatives that are photochemically or electrochemically active, as well as chemically asymmetric membranes.

  16. Thinking in Terms of Structure-Activity-Relationships (T-SAR): A Tool to Better Understand Nanofiltration Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, José F.; Jastorff, Bernd; Störmann, Reinhold; Stolte, Stefan; Thöming, Jorg

    2011-01-01

    A frontier to be conquered in the field of membrane technology is related to the very limited scientific base for the rational and task-specific design of membranes. This is especially true for nanofiltration membranes with properties that are based on several solute-membrane interaction mechanisms. “Thinking in terms of Structure-Activity-Relationships” (T-SAR) is a methodology which applies a systematic analysis of a chemical entity based on its structural formula. However, the analysis become more complex with increasing size of the molecules considered. In this study, T-SAR was combined with classical membrane characterization methods, resulting in a new methodology which allowed us not only to explain membrane characteristics, but also provides evidence for the importance of the chemical structure for separation performance. We demonstrate an application of the combined approach and its potential to discover stereochemistry, molecular interaction potentials, and reactivity of two FilmTec nanofiltration membranes (NF-90 and NF-270). Based on these results, it was possible to predict both properties and performance in the recovery of hydrophobic ionic liquids from aqueous solution. PMID:24957730

  17. Red wine activates plasma membrane redox system in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Idolo; Moccia, Stefania; Volpe, Silvestro; Alfieri, Giovanna; Strollo, Daniela; Bilotto, Stefania; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Di Renzo, Massimo; Aquino, Rita P; Russo, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we report that polyphenols present in red wine obtained by a controlled microvinification process are able to protect human erythrocytes from oxidative stress and to activate Plasma Membrane Redox System (PMRS). Human plasma obtained from healthy subjects was incubated in the presence of whole red wine at a concentration corresponding to 9.13-73 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents to verify the capacity to protect against hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-induced plasma oxidation and to minimize chloramine formation. Red wine reduced hemolysis and chloramine formation induced by HOCl of 40 and 35%, respectively. PMRS present on human erythrocytes transfers electrons from intracellular molecules to extracellular electron acceptors. We demonstrated that whole red wine activated PMRS activity in human erythrocytes isolated from donors in a dose-dependent manner with a maximum at about 70-100 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents. We also showed that red wine increased glutathione (GSH) levels and erythrocytic antioxidant capacity, measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) quenching assay. Furthermore, we reported that GSH played a crucial role in regulating PMRS activity in erythrocytes. In fact, the effect of iodoacetamide, an alkylating agent that induces depletion of intracellular GSH, was completely counteracted by red wine. Bioactive compounds present in red wine, such as gallic acid, resveratrol, catechin, and quercetin were unable to activate PMRS when tested at the concentrations normally present in aged red wines. On the contrary, the increase of PMRS activity was associated with the anthocyanin fraction, suggesting the capacity of this class of compounds to positively modulate PMRS enzymatic activity.

  18. Tau accumulation impairs mitophagy via increasing mitochondrial membrane potential and reducing mitochondrial Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-hao; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Xiangnan; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Feng, Qiong; Wang, Qun; Yue, Zhenyu; Chen, Zhong; Ye, Keqiang; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of wild type tau is a hallmark of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying tau toxicity is not fully understood. Here, we detected mitophagy deficits evidenced by the increased levels of mitophagy markers, including COX IV, TOMM20, and the ratio of mtDNA to genomic DNA indexed as mt-Atp6/Rpl13, in the AD brains and in the human wild type full-length tau (htau) transgenic mice. More interestingly, the mitophagy deficit was only shown in the AD patients who had an increased total tau level. Further studies demonstrated that overexpression of htau induced mitophagy deficits in HEK293 cells, the primary hippocampal neurons and in the brains of C57 mice. Upon overexpression of htau, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and the levels of PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and Parkin decreased in the mitochondrial fraction, while upregulation of Parkin attenuated the htau-induced mitophagy deficits. Finally, we detected a dose-dependent allocation of tau proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane fraction along with its cytoplasmic accumulation. These data suggest that intracellular accumulation of htau induces mitophagy deficits by direct inserting into the mitochondrial membrane and thus increasing the membrane potential, which impairs the mitochondrial residence of PINK1/Parkin. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism underlying the htau-induced neuronal toxicities in AD and other tauopathies. PMID:26943044

  19. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase and phospholipdase A activities in plasma membranes from fusing muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kent, C; Vagelos, P R

    1976-06-17

    Plasma membrane from fusing embryonic muscle cells were assayed for phospholipase A activity to determine if this enzyme plays a role in cell fusion. The membranes were assayed under a variety of conditions with phosphatidylcholine as the substrate and no phospholipase A activity was found. The plasma membranes did contain a phosphatidic acid phosphatase which was optimally active in the presence of Triton X-100 and glycerol. The enzyme activity was constant from pH 5.2 to 7.0, and did not require divalent cations. Over 97% of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity was in the particulate fraction. The subcellular distribution of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase was the same as the distributions of the plasma membrane markers, (Na+ + k+)-ATPase and the acetylcholine receptor, which indicates that this phosphatase is located exclusively in the plasma membranes. There was no detectable difference in the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activities of plasma membranes from fusing and non-fusing cells.

  20. Oscillations and multiple steady states in active membrane transport models.

    PubMed

    Vieira, F M; Bisch, P M

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of some non-linear extensions of the six-state alternating access model for active membrane transport is investigated. We use stoichio-metric network analysis to study the stability of steady states. The bifurcation analysis has been done through standard numerical methods. For the usual six-state model we have proved that there is only one steady state, which is globally asymptotically stable. When we added an autocatalytic step we found self-oscillations. For the competition between a monomer cycle and a dimer cycle, with steps of dimer formation, we have also found self-oscillations. We have also studied models involving the formation of a complex with other molecules. The addition of two steps for formation of a complex of the monomer with another molecule does not alter either the number or the stability of steady states of the basic six-state model. The model which combines the formation of a complex with an autocatalytic step shows both self-oscillations and multiple steady states. The results lead us to conclude that oscillations could be produced by active membrane transport systems if the transport cycle contains a sufficiently large number of steps (six in the present case) and is coupled to at least one autocatalytic reaction,. Oscillations are also predicted when the monomer cycle is coupled to a dimer cycle. In fact, the autocatalytic reaction can be seen as a simplification of the model involving competition between monomer and dimer cycles, which seems to be a more realistic description of biological systems. A self-regulation mechanism of the pumps, related to the multiple stationary states, is expected only for a combined effect of autocatalysis and formation of complexes with other molecules. Within the six-state model this model also leads to oscillation.

  1. Macrophage Membrane Potential Changes Associated with γ 2b/γ 1 Fc Receptor-Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, John Ding-E; Unkeless, Jay C.; Kaback, H. Ronald; Cohn, Zanvil A.

    1983-03-01

    We have studied the effects of specific ligands of the receptor for the IgG Fc fragment (FcR) on the membrane potential (Δ Psi ) of the macrophage cell line J774 by the [3H]tetraphenylphosphonium ion equilibration technique. We observe a membrane depolarization with binding of FcR ligands that is dependent on the degree of receptor crosslinking. Binding of the FcR by monovalent ligands is not sufficient to induce a significant drop in Δ Psi , but a sustained depolarization lasting ≈ 20 min occurs with insoluble multivalent ligands. This FcR-mediated depolarization can be inhibited by substitution of Na+ from the cell incubation medium with monovalent choline cation, indicating that depolarization is due to Na+ influx into the cell. The extracellular Ca2+ does not play a significant role in membrane depolarization. The depolarization response is not triggered by monoclonal antibodies directed against three other major macrophage surface antigens. The cell depolarization mediated by FcR ligands is followed by a prolonged hyperpolarization that can be partially blocked by ouabain and quinine, indicating that the hyperpolarization response is a result of a combination of a Na+, K+-ATPase activity and a Ca2+-activated K+ conductance. These data support our hypothesis that the mouse macrophage IgG FcR is a ligand-dependent ion channel.

  2. Hypoosmotic- and pressure-induced membrane stretch activate TRPC5 channels

    PubMed Central

    Gomis, Ana; Soriano, Sergio; Belmonte, Carlos; Viana, Félix

    2008-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels mediate a wide array of sensory functions. We investigated the role of TRPC5, a poorly characterized channel widely expressed in the central and peripheral nervous system, as a potential osmosensory protein. Here we show that hypoosmotic stimulation activates TRPC5 channels resulting in a large calcium influx. The response to osmotically induced membrane stretch is blocked by GsMTx-4, an inhibitor of stretch activated ion channels. Direct hypoosmotic activation of TRPC5 is independent of phospholipase C function. However, the osmotic response is inhibited in a cell line in which PIP2 levels are reduced by regulated overexpression of a lipid phosphatase. The response was restored by increasing intracellular PIP2 levels through the patch pipette. The mechano-sensitivity of the channel was probed in the whole-cell configuration by application of steps of positive pressure through the patch pipette. Pressure-induced membrane stretch also activated TRPC5 channels, suggesting its role as a transducer of osmo-mechanical stimuli. We also demonstrated the expression of TRPC5 in sensory neurones which together with the osmo-mechanical characteristics of TRPC5 channels suggest its putative role in mechanosensory transduction events. PMID:18832422

  3. The Plasma Membrane Potential and the Organization of the Actin Cytoskeleton of Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chifflet, Silvia; Hernández, Julio A.

    2012-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of the polarized epithelial phenotype require a characteristic organization of the cytoskeletal components. There are many cellular effectors involved in the regulation of the cytoskeleton of epithelial cells. Recently, modifications in the plasma membrane potential (PMP) have been suggested to participate in the modulation of the cytoskeletal organization of epithelia. Here, we review evidence showing that changes in the PMP of diverse epithelial cells promote characteristic modifications in the cytoskeletal organization, with a focus on the actin cytoskeleton. The molecular paths mediating these effects may include voltage-sensitive integral membrane proteins and/or peripheral proteins sensitive to surface potentials. The voltage dependence of the cytoskeletal organization seems to have implications in several physiological processes, including epithelial wound healing and apoptosis. PMID:22315611

  4. Membrane Potential Dynamics of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons during Hippocampal Ripples in Awake Mice.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Brad K; Moreaux, Laurent C; Lubenov, Evgueniy V; Siapas, Athanassios G

    2016-02-17

    Ripples are high-frequency oscillations associated with population bursts in area CA1 of the hippocampus that play a prominent role in theories of memory consolidation. While spiking during ripples has been extensively studied, our understanding of the subthreshold behavior of hippocampal neurons during these events remains incomplete. Here, we combine in vivo whole-cell and multisite extracellular recordings to characterize the membrane potential dynamics of identified CA1 pyramidal neurons during ripples. We find that the subthreshold depolarization during ripples is uncorrelated with the net excitatory input to CA1, while the post-ripple hyperpolarization varies proportionately. This clarifies the circuit mechanism keeping most neurons silent during ripples. On a finer timescale, the phase delay between intracellular and extracellular ripple oscillations varies systematically with membrane potential. Such smoothly varying delays are inconsistent with models of intracellular ripple generation involving perisomatic inhibition alone. Instead, they suggest that ripple-frequency excitation leading inhibition shapes intracellular ripple oscillations.

  5. Exploring the Membrane Potential of Simple Dual-Membrane Systems as Models for Gap-Junction Channels.

    PubMed

    Escalona, Yerko; Garate, Jose A; Araya-Secchi, Raul; Huynh, Tien; Zhou, Ruhong; Perez-Acle, Tomas

    2016-06-21

    The conductance of ion channels can be modulated by a transmembrane potential difference, due to alterations on ion-mobility and also by changes in the pore structure. Despite the vast knowledge regarding the influence of voltage on transport properties of ion channels, little attention has been paid to describe, with atomic detail, the modulation of ionic transport in gap-junction channels (GJCs). Hence, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the conductance of simple dual-membrane systems that account for the very basic features of GJCs. In doing so, we studied the influence of different charge distributions in the channel surface on these idealized systems under external electric fields, paying attention to the behavior of the electrostatic potential, ion density, ion currents, and equilibrium properties. Our results demonstrate that the incorporation of a charge distribution akin GJCs decreased anionic currents, favoring the transport of cationic species. Moreover, a thermodynamic characterization of ionic transport in these systems demonstrate the existence of a kinetic barrier that hinders anionic currents, reinforcing the role played by the internal arrangement of charges in GJCs. Overall, our results provide insights at the atomic scale on the effects of charge distributions over ionic transport, constituting a step forward into a better understanding of GJCs. PMID:27332126

  6. Chloride channels activated by swell can regulate the NADPH oxidase generated membrane depolarisation in activated human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2008-01-11

    Chloride channels activated by swell have important functions in many physiological processes. The phagocyte NADPH oxidase is essential for host defence and it generates superoxide by transferring electrons from the donor NADPH to the acceptor O{sub 2}. This electron current, induces a depolarisation of the plasma membrane. In this study, I report that chloride channels activated by swell can counteract the depolarisation induced by the NADPH oxidase. When a chloride conductance was activated by swelling, its inhibition by either 50 {mu}M NPPB or removing external chloride, depolarised the plasma membrane potential to +26 mV {+-} 3.1 (n = 4) and +40 {+-} 1 mV (n = 4), respectively. These channels were partially inhibited by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor AEBSF (1 mM) and potently inhibited by ZnCl{sub 2} (3 mM). These currents were not activated by a phosphorylation step and elevations in intracellular calcium did not appear to activate chloride currents similar to those activated by swell.

  7. [Effect of antidepressive agents on serotonin secretion and membrane potential changes in thrombocytes].

    PubMed

    Pogady, J

    1983-06-01

    Antidepressants (Amitriptylin, Imipramine, Ludiomil, Alival) at the concentrations present in the blood during treatment do not inhibit serotonin secretion by human blood platelets. This also applies for the concentrations at which they are present in the blood during therapy. The same antidepressants do inhibit the changes in membrane potential accompanying serotonin secretion. This suggests that there is a weak interaction between the antidepressants and the secretion mechanism.

  8. Cation Interactions and Membrane Potential Induce Conformational Changes in NaPi-IIb.

    PubMed

    Patti, Monica; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina; Werner, Andreas; Forrest, Lucy R; Forster, Ian C

    2016-09-01

    Voltage-dependence of Na(+)-coupled phosphate cotransporters of the SLC34 family arises from displacement of charges intrinsic to the protein and the binding/release of one Na(+) ion in response to changes in the transmembrane electric field. Candidate coordination residues for the cation at the Na1 site were previously predicted by structural modeling using the x-ray structure of dicarboxylate transporter VcINDY as template and confirmed by functional studies. Mutations at Na1 resulted in altered steady-state and presteady-state characteristics that should be mirrored in the conformational changes induced by membrane potential changes. To test this hypothesis by functional analysis, double mutants of the flounder SLC34A2 protein were constructed that contain one of the Na1-site perturbing mutations together with a substituted cysteine for fluorophore labeling, as expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The locations of the mutations were mapped onto a homology model of the flounder protein. The effects of the mutagenesis were characterized by steady-state, presteady-state, and fluorometric assays. Changes in fluorescence intensity (ΔF) in response to membrane potential steps were resolved at three previously identified positions. These fluorescence data corroborated the altered presteady-state kinetics upon perturbation of Na1, and furthermore indicated concomitant changes in the microenvironment of the respective fluorophores, as evidenced by changes in the voltage dependence and time course of ΔF. Moreover, iodide quenching experiments indicated that the aqueous nature of the fluorophore microenvironment depended on the membrane potential. These findings provide compelling evidence that membrane potential and cation interactions induce significant large-scale structural rearrangements of the protein. PMID:27602725

  9. NPA binding activity is peripheral to the plasma membrane and is associated with the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, D N; Muday, G K

    1994-01-01

    N-1-Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) binding activity is released into the supernatant when plasma membranes are subjected to high-salt treatment, indicating that this activity is peripherally associated with the membrane. Extraction of plasma membrane vesicles with Triton X-100 resulted in retention of NPA binding activity in the detergent-insoluble cytoskeletal pellet. Treatment of this pellet with KI released NPA binding activity, actin, and alpha-tubulin. Dialysis to remove KI led to the repolymerization of cytoskeletal elements and movement of NPA binding activity into an insoluble cytoskeletal pellet. NPA binding activity partitioned into the detergent-insoluble cytoskeletal pellet obtained from both zucchini and maize membranes and was released from these pellets by KI treatment. Treatment of a cytoskeletal pellet with cytochalasin B doubled NPA binding activity in the resulting supernatant. Together, these experiments indicate that NPA binding activity is peripherally associated with the plasma membrane and interacts with the cytoskeleton in vitro. PMID:11536654

  10. Membrane-lipid therapy in operation: the HSP co-inducer BGP-15 activates stress signal transduction pathways by remodeling plasma membrane rafts.

    PubMed

    Gombos, Imre; Crul, Tim; Piotto, Stefano; Güngör, Burcin; Török, Zsolt; Balogh, Gábor; Péter, Mária; Slotte, J Peter; Campana, Federica; Pilbat, Ana-Maria; Hunya, Akos; Tóth, Noémi; Literati-Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Vígh, László; Glatz, Attila; Brameshuber, Mario; Schütz, Gerhard J; Hevener, Andrea; Febbraio, Mark A; Horváth, Ibolya; Vígh, László

    2011-01-01

    Aging and pathophysiological conditions are linked to membrane changes which modulate membrane-controlled molecular switches, causing dysregulated heat shock protein (HSP) expression. HSP co-inducer hydroxylamines such as BGP-15 provide advanced therapeutic candidates for many diseases since they preferentially affect stressed cells and are unlikely have major side effects. In the present study in vitro molecular dynamic simulation, experiments with lipid monolayers and in vivo ultrasensitive fluorescence microscopy showed that BGP-15 alters the organization of cholesterol-rich membrane domains. Imaging of nanoscopic long-lived platforms using the raft marker glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored monomeric green fluorescent protein diffusing in the live Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell plasma membrane demonstrated that BGP-15 prevents the transient structural disintegration of rafts induced by fever-type heat stress. Moreover, BGP-15 was able to remodel cholesterol-enriched lipid platforms reminiscent of those observed earlier following non-lethal heat priming or membrane stress, and were shown to be obligate for the generation and transmission of stress signals. BGP-15 activation of HSP expression in B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells involves the Rac1 signaling cascade in accordance with the previous observation that cholesterol affects the targeting of Rac1 to membranes. Finally, in a human embryonic kidney cell line we demonstrate that BGP-15 is able to inhibit the rapid heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) acetylation monitored during the early phase of heat stress, thereby promoting a prolonged duration of HSF1 binding to heat shock elements. Taken together, our results indicate that BGP-15 has the potential to become a new class of pharmaceuticals for use in 'membrane-lipid therapy' to combat many various protein-misfolding diseases associated with aging.

  11. Neuronal firing sensitivity to morphologic and active membrane parameters.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Christina M; Wearne, Susan L

    2008-01-01

    Both the excitability of a neuron's membrane, driven by active ion channels, and dendritic morphology contribute to neuronal firing dynamics, but the relative importance and interactions between these features remain poorly understood. Recent modeling studies have shown that different combinations of active conductances can evoke similar firing patterns, but have neglected how morphology might contribute to homeostasis. Parameterizing the morphology of a cylindrical dendrite, we introduce a novel application of mathematical sensitivity analysis that quantifies how dendritic length, diameter, and surface area influence neuronal firing, and compares these effects directly against those of active parameters. The method was applied to a model of neurons from goldfish Area II. These neurons exhibit, and likely contribute to, persistent activity in eye velocity storage, a simple model of working memory. We introduce sensitivity landscapes, defined by local sensitivity analyses of firing rate and gain to each parameter, performed globally across the parameter space. Principal directions over which sensitivity to all parameters varied most revealed intrinsic currents that most controlled model output. We found domains where different groups of parameters had the highest sensitivities, suggesting that interactions within each group shaped firing behaviors within each specific domain. Application of our method, and its characterization of which models were sensitive to general morphologic features, will lead to advances in understanding how realistic morphology participates in functional homeostasis. Significantly, we can predict which active conductances, and how many of them, will compensate for a given age- or development-related structural change, or will offset a morphologic perturbation resulting from trauma or neurodegenerative disorder, to restore normal function. Our method can be adapted to analyze any computational model. Thus, sensitivity landscapes, and the

  12. Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by membrane-targeted Raf chimeras is independent of raft localization.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Resh, M D

    2001-09-14

    Binding of proteins to the plasma membrane can be achieved with various membrane targeting motifs, including combinations of fatty acids, isoprenoids, and basic domains. In this study, we investigate whether attachment of different membrane targeting motifs influences the signaling capacity of membrane-bound signal transduction proteins by directing the proteins to different membrane microdomains. We used c-Raf-1 as a model for a signaling protein that is activated when membrane-bound. Three different membrane targeting motifs from K-Ras, Fyn, and Src proteins were fused to the N or C terminus of Raf-1. The ability of the modified Rafs to initiate MAPK signaling was then investigated. All three modified Raf-1 constructs activated MAPK to nearly equivalent levels. The extent of localization of the Raf-1 constructs to membrane microdomains known as rafts did not correlate with the level of MAPK activation. Moreover, treatment of cells with the raft disrupting drug methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbetaCD) caused activation of MAPK to levels equivalent to those achieved with membrane-targeted Raf constructs. The use of pharmacological agents as well as dominant negative mutants revealed that MAPK activation by MbetaCD proceeds via a phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependent mechanism that is Ras/Raf-independent. We conclude that cholesterol depletion from the plasma membrane by MbetaCD constitutes an alternative pathway for activating MAPK.

  13. Membrane potential, chloride exchange, and chloride conductance in Ehrlich mouse ascites tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, E K; Simonsen, L O; Sjøholm, C

    1979-11-01

    1. The steady-state tracer exchange flux of chloride was measured at 10-150 mM external chloride concentration, substituting either lactate or sucrose for chloride. The chloride flux saturates in both cases with a K 1/2 about 50 and 15 mM, respectively. 2. The inhibitory effect of other monovalent anions on the chloride transport was investigated by measuring the 36Cl- efflux into media where either bromide, nitrate, or thiocyanate had been substituted for part of the chloride. The sequence of increasing affinity for the chloride transport system was found to be: Br- less than Cl- less than SCN- = NO3-. 3. The chloride steady-state exchange flux in the presence of nitrate can be described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics with nitrate as a competitive inhibitor of the chloride flux. 4. The apparent activation energy (EA) was determined to be 67 +/- 6.2 kJ/mole, and was constant between 7 and 38 degrees C. 5. The membrane potential (Vm) was measured as a function of the concentration of external K+, substituting K+ for Na+. The transference number of K+ (tK) was estimated from the slope of Vm vs. log10 (K+)e, and tCl and tNa were calculated, neglecting current carried by ions other than Cl-, K+, and Na+. The diffusional net flux of K+ was calculated from the steady-state exchange flux of 42K+, assuming the flux ratio equation to be valid. From this value the K+ conductance and the Na+ and Cl- conductances were calculated. The experiments showed that GCl, GNa, and GK are all about 14 muS/cm2. 6. The net (conductive) chloride permeability derived from the chloride conductance was 4 x 10(-8) cm/sec compared with the apparent permeability of 6 x 10(-7) cm/sec as calculated from the chloride tracer exchange flux. These data suggest that about 95% of the chloride transport is mediated by an electrically silent exchange diffusion. 7. Comparable effects of phloretin (0.25 mM) on the net (conductive) permeability and the apparent permeability to chloride (about 80% inhibition

  14. Leveraging electrokinetics for the active control of dendritic fullerene-1 release across a nanochannel membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Giacomo; Geninatti, Thomas; Hood, R. Lyle; Fine, Daniel; Scorrano, Giovanni; Schmulen, Jeffrey; Hosali, Sharath; Ferrari, Mauro; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    General adoption of advanced treatment protocols such as chronotherapy will hinge on progress in drug delivery technologies that provide precise temporal control of therapeutic release. Such innovation is also crucial to future medicine approaches such as telemedicine. Here we present a nanofluidic membrane technology capable of achieving active and tunable control of molecular transport through nanofluidic channels. Control was achieved through application of an electric field between two platinum electrodes positioned on either surface of a 5.7 nm nanochannel membrane designed for zero-order drug delivery. Two electrode configurations were tested: laser-cut foils and electron beam deposited thin-films, configurations capable of operating at low voltage (<=1.5 V), and power (100 nW). Temporal, reproducible tuning and interruption of dendritic fullerene 1 (DF-1) transport was demonstrated over multi-day release experiments. Conductance tests showed limiting currents in the low applied potential range, implying ionic concentration polarization (ICP) at the interface between the membrane's micro- and nanochannels, even in concentrated solutions (<=1 M NaCl). The ability of this nanotechnology platform to facilitate controlled delivery of molecules and particles has broad applicability to next-generation therapeutics for numerous pathologies, including autoimmune diseases, circadian dysfunction, pain, and stress, among others.General adoption of advanced treatment protocols such as chronotherapy will hinge on progress in drug delivery technologies that provide precise temporal control of therapeutic release. Such innovation is also crucial to future medicine approaches such as telemedicine. Here we present a nanofluidic membrane technology capable of achieving active and tunable control of molecular transport through nanofluidic channels. Control was achieved through application of an electric field between two platinum electrodes positioned on either surface of a 5

  15. Photosynthesis Activates Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase via Sugar Accumulation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Masaki; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Kuwata, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase acts as a primary transporter via proton pumping and regulates diverse physiological responses by controlling secondary solute transport, pH homeostasis, and membrane potential. Phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine and the subsequent binding of 14-3-3 proteins in the carboxyl terminus of the enzyme are required for H+-ATPase activation. We showed previously that photosynthesis induces phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine in the nonvascular bryophyte Marchantia polymorpha. However, (1) whether this response is conserved in vascular plants and (2) the process by which photosynthesis regulates H+-ATPase phosphorylation at the plasma membrane remain unresolved issues. Here, we report that photosynthesis induced the phosphorylation and activation of H+-ATPase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves via sugar accumulation. Light reversibly phosphorylated leaf H+-ATPase, and this process was inhibited by pharmacological and genetic suppression of photosynthesis. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses indicated that light-induced phosphorylation of H+-ATPase occurred autonomously in mesophyll cells. We also show that the phosphorylation status of H+-ATPase and photosynthetic sugar accumulation in leaves were positively correlated and that sugar treatment promoted phosphorylation. Furthermore, light-induced phosphorylation of H+-ATPase was strongly suppressed in a double mutant defective in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and triose phosphate/phosphate translocator (adg1-1 tpt-2); these mutations strongly inhibited endogenous sugar accumulation. Overall, we show that photosynthesis activated H+-ATPase via sugar production in the mesophyll cells of vascular plants. Our work provides new insight into signaling from chloroplasts to the plasma membrane ion transport mechanism. PMID:27016447

  16. Synthesis of polymers with the potential to release H 2S: Polydicyclopentadiene nanoporous membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Tyler Richard

    This thesis discusses two very different projects. In the first project, synthesizing a polymer with the potential to release H2S. This was accomplished through the copolymerization of L-lactide and lactide monomers that has been functionalized with 4-hydroxythiobenzamide which is known to release H2S in vivo. The synthesis of the functionalized monomer required the development of a new method to attach functional groups to a derivative of L-lactide, which involved the addition of a thiol to an alpha- beta-unsaturated lactide using catalytic I2. After polymerization, the molecular weight of the copolymers ranged from 8 to 88 kg mol-1 with PDIs below 1.50. These polymers have the ability to be loaded with different amounts of thiobenzamide by controlling the ratio of the functionalized monomer with L-lactide during polymerization. The copolymers were fabricated into two sizes of microparticles with average diameters of 0.52 and 12 mum. The degradation of the smaller microparticles was studied in a PBS buffered solution at pH 7.4 which showed the slow release of the thiobenzamide over a 4 week period. These microparticles are the first to show potential to deliver H2S over a period of weeks. This research addresses a critical need in the field of H2S in medicine where no method exists to release H2S in vivo at times over a few hours. In the second project dicyclopentadiene was polymerized with Grubbs first generation catalyst and fabricated into highly cross-linked membranes with a thickness of 100 mum. The flux of twenty-one molecules with varying polarities and molecular weights ranging from 101 to 583 g mol-1 were studied. Molecules that permeated these membranes had flux rates of 10 -5 to 10-6 mol cm-2 h-1 but molecules that did not permeate these membranes had flux rates 10 4 to 105 times slower. The large difference in flux did not have a strong correlation to molecular weight or solubility in the membrane. However, there was a strong correlation to the cross

  17. Channel-forming activities of peroxisomal membrane proteins from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Grunau, Silke; Mindthoff, Sabrina; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter; Sormunen, Raija T; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Erdmann, Ralf; Antonenkov, Vasily D

    2009-03-01

    Highly-purified peroxisomes from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown on oleic acid were investigated for the presence of channel (pore)-forming proteins in the membrane of these organelles. Solubilized membrane proteins were reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers and their pore-forming activity was studied by means of multiple-channel monitoring or single-channel analysis. Two abundant pore-forming activities were detected with an average conductance of 0.2 and 0.6 nS in 1.0 m KCl, respectively. The high-conductance pore (0.6 nS in 1.0 m KCl) is slightly selective to cations (P(K+)/P(Cl-) approximately 1.3) and showed an unusual flickering at elevated (> +/-40 mV) holding potentials directed upward relative to the open state of the channel. The data obtained for the properties of the low-conductance pore (0.2 nS in 1.0 m KCl) support the notion that the high-conductance channel represents a cluster of two low-conductance pores. The results lead to conclusion that the yeast peroxisomes contain membrane pore-forming proteins that may aid the transfer of small solutes between the peroxisomal lumen and cytoplasm.

  18. The passive membrane properties and excitatory junction potentials of the guinea pig deferens.

    PubMed Central

    Bywater, R A; Taylor, G S

    1980-01-01

    1. Electrotonic potentials were recorded from the superficial smooth muscle cells of the guinea-pig vas deferens using the method of Abe & Tomita (1968), in response to low-amplitude, long-duration (greater than or equal to 2 sec) pulses. 2. Averaging techniques were used to increase the signal/noise ratio, and the intracellularly recorded electrotonic potentials were corrected for extracellular voltage drop across the bath series resistance. 3. Since the length of tissue in the stimulating and recording compartments affects the time course of electrotonic potentials (see Appendix and Bywater & Redman, 1978) the passive membrane properties were measured with known amounts of tissue in these two compartments. 4. The length constant (lambda) was 0.86 mm and the membrane time constant (tau m) 270 msec. 5. Excitatory junction potentials (e.j.p.s) were recorded and averaged in response to field stimulation of intact branches of the hypogastric nerve. The mean time constant of the exponential decay phase of the e.j.p. (288 msec) was similar to the membrane time constant (tau m = 270 msec). 6. As the e.j.p.s showed little change in amplitude or time constant of decay when recorded up to several millimetres from the stimulating electrode it was assumed that the tissue was isopotential during the e.j.p., and an estimate was made of the time course of the underlying junctional current. 7. The estimated time course of the junctional current during an e.j.p. was similar to the observed time course of a spontaneous junction potential (s.e.j.p.). 8. As the time course of the junctional current during an s.e.j.p.is similar to the time course of the potential change it is likely that the factors which determine the time current underlying the s.e.j.p. also determine the time course of the e.j.p. current. PMID:7381788

  19. Biomineralization of Natural Collagenous Nanofibrous Membranes and Their Potential Use in Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingying; Zhou, Guanshan; Castano-Izquierdo, Harold; Zhu, Ye; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-03-01

    Small intestinal submucosa (SIS) membranes as a decellularized tissue are known to be a natural nanofibrous biomaterial mainly made of type I collagen fibers and containing some growth factors (fibroblast growth factor 2 and transforming growth factor β) desired in tissue engineering. Here we show that the SIS membranes can promote the formation of bone mineral hydroxylapatite (HAP) crystals along the collagen fibers constituting the membranes from a HAP-supersaturated solution. The resultant biomineralized HAP-SIS scaffolds were found to promote the attachment, growth and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in both basal and osteogenic media by the evaluation of osteogenic marker formation. More importantly, the HAP-SIS scaffolds could induce the osteogenic differentiation in the basal media without osteogenic supplements due to the presence of HAP crystals in the scaffolds. Histological characterization of the MSC-seeded scaffolds showed that HAP-SIS scaffolds are biocompatible and promote the formation of new tissue in vitro. The biomineralized SIS membranes mimic some aspects of natural bone in terms of the composition and nanostructures and can find potential use in bone tissue engineering. PMID:25883539

  20. Membrane Potentials, Synaptic Responses, Neuronal Circuitry, Neuromodulation and Muscle Histology Using the Crayfish: Student Laboratory Exercises

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to help develop an understanding of the effects caused by ion gradients across a biological membrane. Two aspects that influence a cell's membrane potential and which we address in these experiments are: (1) Ion concentration of K+ on the outside of the membrane, and (2) the permeability of the membrane to specific ions. The crayfish abdominal extensor muscles are in groupings with some being tonic (slow) and others phasic (fast) in their biochemical and physiological phenotypes, as well as in their structure; the motor neurons that innervate these muscles are correspondingly different in functional characteristics. We use these muscles as well as the superficial, tonic abdominal flexor muscle to demonstrate properties in synaptic transmission. In addition, we introduce a sensory-CNS-motor neuron-muscle circuit to demonstrate the effect of cuticular sensory stimulation as well as the influence of neuromodulators on certain aspects of the circuit. With the techniques obtained in this exercise, one can begin to answer many questions remaining in other experimental preparations as well as in physiological applications related to medicine and health. We have demonstrated the usefulness of model invertebrate preparations to address fundamental questions pertinent to all animals. PMID:21304459

  1. Membrane potentials, synaptic responses, neuronal circuitry, neuromodulation and muscle histology using the crayfish: student laboratory exercises.

    PubMed

    Baierlein, Brittany; Thurow, Alison L; Atwood, Harold L; Cooper, Robin L

    2011-01-18

    The purpose of this report is to help develop an understanding of the effects caused by ion gradients across a biological membrane. Two aspects that influence a cell's membrane potential and which we address in these experiments are: (1) Ion concentration of K+ on the outside of the membrane, and (2) the permeability of the membrane to specific ions. The crayfish abdominal extensor muscles are in groupings with some being tonic (slow) and others phasic (fast) in their biochemical and physiological phenotypes, as well as in their structure; the motor neurons that innervate these muscles are correspondingly different in functional characteristics. We use these muscles as well as the superficial, tonic abdominal flexor muscle to demonstrate properties in synaptic transmission. In addition, we introduce a sensory-CNS-motor neuron-muscle circuit to demonstrate the effect of cuticular sensory stimulation as well as the influence of neuromodulators on certain aspects of the circuit. With the techniques obtained in this exercise, one can begin to answer many questions remaining in other experimental preparations as well as in physiological applications related to medicine and health. We have demonstrated the usefulness of model invertebrate preparations to address fundamental questions pertinent to all animals.

  2. Biomineralization of Natural Collagenous Nanofibrous Membranes and Their Potential Use in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mingying; Zhou, Guanshan; Castano-Izquierdo, Harold; Zhu, Ye; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-01-01

    Small intestinal submucosa (SIS) membranes as a decellularized tissue are known to be a natural nanofibrous biomaterial mainly made of type I collagen fibers and containing some growth factors (fibroblast growth factor 2 and transforming growth factor β) desired in tissue engineering. Here we show that the SIS membranes can promote the formation of bone mineral hydroxylapatite (HAP) crystals along the collagen fibers constituting the membranes from a HAP-supersaturated solution. The resultant biomineralized HAP-SIS scaffolds were found to promote the attachment, growth and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in both basal and osteogenic media by the evaluation of osteogenic marker formation. More importantly, the HAP-SIS scaffolds could induce the osteogenic differentiation in the basal media without osteogenic supplements due to the presence of HAP crystals in the scaffolds. Histological characterization of the MSC-seeded scaffolds showed that HAP-SIS scaffolds are biocompatible and promote the formation of new tissue in vitro. The biomineralized SIS membranes mimic some aspects of natural bone in terms of the composition and nanostructures and can find potential use in bone tissue engineering. PMID:25883539

  3. Treatment of membrane concentrates: phosphate removal and reduction of scaling potential.

    PubMed

    Sperlich, A; Warschke, D; Wegmann, C; Ernst, M; Jekel, M

    2010-01-01

    The widespread application of nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes in wastewater reuse inevitably generates a concentrate stream. Due to high concentrations of phosphate and salts, disposal of membrane concentrates is a problem which seriously constrains the application of this technology, especially in inland applications. There is a need for technologies which facilitate an affordable and environmentally-safe disposal of membrane concentrates. The objectives of this study are to investigate appropriate treatment techniques to (1) increase the recovery of the membrane filtration thus minimising the volume of the concentrate stream, and (2) increase the concentrate quality to enable discharge into surface water bodies. The results show that both adsorption onto granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) and chemical precipitation are generally effective for phosphate removal from NF concentrates. Chemical precipitation by dosing of sodium hydroxide solution is rapid and removes more than 90% of phosphate and calcium ions. By the removal of calcium ions, chemical precipitation can significantly reduce the scaling potential of NF and RO concentrates. This may allow higher recoveries in the NF/RO process.

  4. Real-time imaging of membrane potentials during exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Juergen F.; Frey, Wolfgang; White, Jody A.; Price, R. O.; Blackmore, Peter F.; Beebe, Stephen J.; Joshi, Ravindra P.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2005-04-01

    The charging of mammalian cell plasma membranes in response to ultrashort pulsed electric fields of 60 ns and field strengths up to 100 kV/cm was investigated. Membranes of Jurkat cells were stained with a potential-sensitive dye, Annine-6 and placed in a microreactor mounted on an inverted fluorescence microscope. Images of changes in the fluorescence intensity during the exposure were recorded with a high-sensitivity CCD-camera. A temporal resolution of 5 ns was achieved by illuminating the cells with a 5 ns laser pulse from a dye-laser. The laser pulse was synchronized with the high voltage pulse to record images at specific times before, during and after exposure to the electric field. When exposing Jurkat cells to a 60 ns, 100 kV/cm pulse, each hemisphere of the plasma membrane (as oriented with respect to the electrodes) responded uniquely to the applied field. From these observations it is possible to draw conclusions on the charging time of the membrane, maximum transmembrane voltages and the onset of poration.

  5. Efficient Multiple Object Tracking Using Mutually Repulsive Active Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yi; Coen, Philip; Sun, Mingzhai; Shaevitz, Joshua W.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of social and group behavior in interacting organisms require high-throughput analysis of the motion of a large number of individual subjects. Computer vision techniques offer solutions to specific tracking problems, and allow automated and efficient tracking with minimal human intervention. In this work, we adopt the open active contour model to track the trajectories of moving objects at high density. We add repulsive interactions between open contours to the original model, treat the trajectories as an extrusion in the temporal dimension, and show applications to two tracking problems. The walking behavior of Drosophila is studied at different population density and gender composition. We demonstrate that individual male flies have distinct walking signatures, and that the social interaction between flies in a mixed gender arena is gender specific. We also apply our model to studies of trajectories of gliding Myxococcus xanthus bacteria at high density. We examine the individual gliding behavioral statistics in terms of the gliding speed distribution. Using these two examples at very distinctive spatial scales, we illustrate the use of our algorithm on tracking both short rigid bodies (Drosophila) and long flexible objects (Myxococcus xanthus). Our repulsive active membrane model reaches error rates better than per fly per second for Drosophila tracking and comparable results for Myxococcus xanthus. PMID:23799046

  6. Enzymatically active high-flux selectively gas-permeable membranes

    DOEpatents

    Jiang, Ying-Bing; Cecchi, Joseph L.; Rempe, Susan; FU, Yaqin; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2016-01-26

    An ultra-thin, catalyzed liquid transport medium-based membrane structure fabricated with a porous supporting substrate may be used for separating an object species such as a carbon dioxide object species. Carbon dioxide flux through this membrane structures may be several orders of magnitude higher than traditional polymer membranes with a high selectivity to carbon dioxide. Other gases such as molecular oxygen, molecular hydrogen, and other species including non-gaseous species, for example ionic materials, may be separated using variations to the membrane discussed.

  7. Experimentally induced postinhibitory rebound in rat nucleus ambiguus is dependent on hyperpolarization parameters and membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Dean, J B; Czyzyk-Krzeska, M; Millhorn, D E

    1989-06-01

    Postinhibitory rebound (PIR), a transient depolarization subsequent to release from experimental hyperpolarization, was identified and characterized in 81% of the cells studied in the nucleus ambiguus in slices from medulla of rat. Hyperpolarizing current pulses were administered via the recording microelectrode in the bridge-balanced mode to test for PIR. The voltage trajectory was characterized by a depolarizing sag during the pulse, rebound depolarization (PIR) after the pulse and increased input resistance during rebound. The amplitude and time course of PIR were dependent on prepulse membrane potential, pulse amplitude and pulse duration. These results suggest a potential role of PIR in respiratory rhythmogenesis. PMID:2771207

  8. Effect of stimulation of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis on the membrane potential of cat lumbar motoneurons during sleep and wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Chase, M H; Morales, F R; Boxer, P A; Fung, S J; Soja, P J

    1986-10-29

    The present study was performed in order to determine the effect of electrical stimulation of the medullary nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc) on the membrane potential of spinal cord motoneurons during sleep and wakefulness. Accordingly, intracellular recordings were obtained from lumbar motoneurons in unanesthetized normally respiring cats during naturally occurring states of wakefulness, quiet sleep and active sleep. Electrical stimuli applied to the NRGc evoked synaptic potentials which occurred at short latency (less than 10 ms) and did not exhibit consistent changes in their waveforms during any states of sleep or wakefulness. During wakefulness and quiet sleep, longer latency (greater than 20 ms) low-amplitude hyperpolarizing potentials occasionally followed NRGc stimulation. However, during active sleep, NRGc stimulation produced, in all motoneurons, relatively large hyperpolarizing potentials that were characterized by a mean amplitude of 3.5 +/- 0.4 mV (mean +/- S.E.M.), a mean latency-to-peak of 43.0 +/- 0.8 ms, and an average duration of 34.4 +/- 1.7 ms. These potentials were capable of blocking the generation of orthodromic spikes elicited by sciatic nerve stimulation. When anodal current or chloride was passed through the recording electrode, the hyperpolarizing potentials decreased in amplitude, and in some cases their polarity was reversed. These results indicate that the active sleep-specific hyperpolarizing potentials were inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. Thus, the NRGc possesses the capability of providing a postsynaptic inhibitory drive that is directed toward lumbar motoneurons which is dependent on the occurrence of the behavioral state of active sleep.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3779411

  9. Correlation between membrane potential responses and tentacle movement in the dinoflagellate Noctiluca miliaris.

    PubMed

    Oami, Kazunori

    2004-02-01

    Membrane potential responses and tentacle movement of the marine dinoflagellate Noctiluca miliaris were recorded simultaneously and their time relationships were examined. The food-gathering tentacle of Noctiluca exhibited slow extension-flexion movements in association with the spontaneously recurring membrane potential responses termed the tentacle regulating potentials (TRPs). The flexion of the tentacle began during the slow depolarization of the TRPs. The rate of the flexion increased after the hyperpolarizing (negative) spike following the slow depolarization. The tentacle then extended slowly during the hyperpolarized level of the TRPs. A TRPs-associated flexion did not occur when the external Ca(2+) ions were removed. On the contrary, the tentacle showed conspicuous flexion (coiling) when the external Ca(2+) concentration was raised. In association with the stimulus-evoked action potential, which triggers bioluminescent flash (flash-triggering action potential; FTP), the tentacle coiled quickly. The FTP-associated coiling took place even in the Ca(2+)-deprived condition. The coupling mechanisms of the TRPs-associated and FTP-associated tentacle movements were compared, and their biological significance was discussed.

  10. Characterization of mesenchymal stem cell subpopulations from human amniotic membrane with dissimilar osteoblastic potential.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Leyva, Margarita; Barrera, Lourdes; López-Camarillo, César; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Orozco-Hoyuela, Gabriel; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M; Calderón-Pérez, Jaime; López-Díaz, Annia; Hernandez-Aguilar, Felipe; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Kawa, Simón; Chimal-Monroy, Jesús; Fuentes-Mera, Lizeth

    2013-04-15

    Human fetal mesenchymal stem cells can be isolated from the amniotic membrane (AM-hMSCs) by enzymatic digestion. The biological properties of this cell population have been characterized; however, few studies have focused on the presence of stem cell subpopulations and their differentiation potential. The aim of the present study was to isolate homogeneous AM-hMSC subpopulations based on the coexpression of surface markers. In addition, we aimed to characterize stem cell subpopulations through the detection of typical stem cell markers and its differentiation potential. In this study, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) was used to positively select for the surface markers CD44, CD73, and CD105. Two subpopulations were isolated: CD44+ / CD73+ / CD105+ (CD105+), and CD44+ / CD73+ / CD105- (CD105-). To characterize the cell subpopulations, the expression of pluripotency-associated markers was analyzed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence. Our results showed positive expression of SOX2, SOX3, PAX6, OCT3/4, and NANOG in the CD105+ and CD105(-) cell subpopulations. In contrast, we did not detect expression of SSEA4 or FOXD3 in either subpopulation. Immunophenotypes, such as mesenchymal and hematopoietic markers, were studied by FACS analyses. Our data revealed the expression of the CD49a, CD49d, CD29, integrin α9β1, CD44, CD73, and CD105 antigens in both subpopulations. In contrast, CD90, CD45, CD34, CD14, and HLA-DR expression was not detected. The ability of both subpopulations to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes was evidenced using Alizarin red, Oil-Red, and Alcian blue staining, respectively. Furthermore, neuronal differentiation was demonstrated by the expression of GFAP and NEURO-D. Interestingly, we observed a dissimilar osteoblastic differentiation potential between the subpopulations. CD105- cells showed stronger expression of secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) and

  11. Mitochondrial Ca2+ and membrane potential, an alternative pathway for Interleukin 6 to regulate CD4 cell effector function

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui; Lirussi, Dario; Thornton, Tina M; Jelley-Gibbs, Dawn M; Diehl, Sean A; Case, Laure K; Madesh, Muniswamy; Taatjes, Douglas J; Teuscher, Cory; Haynes, Laura; Rincón, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    IL-6 plays an important role in determining the fate of effector CD4 cells and the cytokines that these cells produce. Here we identify a novel molecular mechanism by which IL-6 regulates CD4 cell effector function. We show that IL-6-dependent signal facilitates the formation of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes to sustain high mitochondrial membrane potential late during activation of CD4 cells. Mitochondrial hyperpolarization caused by IL-6 is uncoupled from the production of ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. However, it is a mechanism to raise the levels of mitochondrial Ca2+ late during activation of CD4 cells. Increased levels of mitochondrial Ca2+ in the presence of IL-6 are used to prolong Il4 and Il21 expression in effector CD4 cells. Thus, the effect of IL-6 on mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial Ca2+ is an alternative pathway by which IL-6 regulates effector function of CD4 cells and it could contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06376.001 PMID:25974216

  12. Regenerative potential of human schneiderian membrane: progenitor cells and epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Derjac-Aramă, A I; Sarafoleanu, C; Manea, C M; Nicolescu, M I; Vrapciu, A D; Rusu, M C

    2015-12-01

    An innate osteogenic potential of the Schneiderian membrane (SM) is progressively assessed in studies ranging from non-human species to human subjects. It has relevance for endosteal placement and osseointegration. Nestin-expressing osteogenic progenitor cells are allegedly involved in bone formation and remodelling. Nestin phenotype was not assessed previously in human SM. We therefore aimed to fill that particular gap in the literature. Bioptic samples of human adult SM were obtained during surgery from eight adult patients, operated for non-malignant pathologies. Immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded tissue samples used primary antibodies against nestin, CD45, CD146, cytokeratin 7 (CK7), and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Nestin expression was consistently found in endothelial cells, and was scarcely encountered in pericytes, putative stromal stem/progenitor cells, as well as in glandular epithelial cells. Moreover, woven bone formation in the periosteal layer of the SM can also be regarded as evidence of the osteogenic potential of this membrane. Nestin and CD45 expression in cells of the primary bone supports the osteogenic potential of SM nestin-expressing cells and a possible involvement of hematopoietic stem cells in maxillary sinus floor remodeling. CD146, a known inducer of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), was expressed in epithelia, as was CK7. Isolated stromal cells were found expressing CD146, CK7 and α-SMA, suggesting that regenerative processes happening in the SM may also involve processes of EMT which generate stem/progenitor cells. This study provides additional evidence for the regenerative potential of the Schneiderian membrane and identifies potential roles for cells of its stem niche in osteogenesis. PMID:26414809

  13. Potential biological activity of acacia honey.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Aliyu; Odunola, Oyeronke A; Ibrahim, Mohammed A; Sallau, Abdullahi B; Erukainure, Ochuko L; Aimola, Idown A; Malami, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in functional foods-based research have increasingly become an area of major interest because it affects human health and activities. Functional foods are classes of foods with health promoting and disease preventing properties in addition to multiple nutritional values and of such type is honey. Acacia honey is a type of honey produced by bees (Apis mellifera) fed on Acacia flowers, hence the name. This review focuses on the potential biological activities of Acacia honey which includes quality, antioxidant, immuno-modulatory, antiproliferative and neurological properties at in vitro and in vivo levels. Based on our review, Acacia honey used from various researches is of high purity, contains some bioactive compounds ranging from vitamins, phenolics, flavonoids and fatty acids. It's highly nutritional with strong antioxidant and immuno-modulatory potentials which may therefore be considered a potential candidate for both cancer prevention and treatment. Neurologically, it may be considered as a viable therapeutic agent in the management of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26709666

  14. Nonbonded interactions in membrane active cyclic biopolymers. IV - Cation dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Srinivasan, S.; Prasad, C. V.; Brinda, S. R.; Macelroy, R. D.; Sundaram, K.

    1980-01-01

    Interactions of valinomycin and form of its analogs in several conformations with the central ions Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+) and Cs(+) are investigated as part of a study of the specific preference of valinomycin for potassium and the mechanisms of carrier-mediated ion transport across membranes. Ion binding energies and conformational potential energies are calculated taking into account polarization energy formulas and repulsive energy between the central ion and the ligand atoms for conformations representing various stages in ion capture and release for each of the two ring chiralities of valinomycin and its analogs. Results allow the prediction of the chirality and conformation most likely to be observed for a given analog, and may be used to synthesize analogs with a desired rigidity or flexibility. The binding energies with the alkali metal cations are found to decrease with increasing ion size, and to be smaller than the corresponding ion hydration energies. It is pointed out that the observed potassium preference may be explainable in terms of differences between binding and hydration energies. Binding energies are also noted to depend on ligand conformation.

  15. EADB: An Estrogenic Activity Database for Assessing Potential Endocrine Activity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine-active chemicals can potentially have adverse effects on both humans and wildlife. They can interfere with the body’s endocrine system through direct or indirect interactions with many protein targets. Estrogen receptors (ERs) are one of the major targets, and many ...

  16. VDAC electronics: 1. VDAC-hexo(gluco)kinase generator of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2014-05-01

    The simplest mechanism of the generation of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential (OMP) by the VDAC (voltage-dependent anion channel)-hexokinase complex (VHC), suggested earlier, and by the VDAC-glucokinase complex (VGC), was computationally analyzed. Even at less than 4% of VDACs bound to hexokinase, the calculated OMP is high enough to trigger the electrical closure of VDACs beyond the complexes at threshold concentrations of glucose. These results confirmed our previous hypothesis that the Warburg effect is caused by the electrical closure of VDACs, leading to global restriction of the outer membrane permeability coupled to aerobic glycolysis. The model showed that the inhibition of the conductance and/or an increase in the voltage sensitivity of a relatively small fraction of VDACs by factors like tubulin potentiate the electrical closure of the remaining free VDACs. The extrusion of calcium ions from the mitochondrial intermembrane space by the generated OMP, positive inside, might increase cancer cell resistance to death. Within the VGC model, the known effect of induction of ATP release from mitochondria by accumulated glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic beta cells might result not only of the known effect of GK dissociation from the VDAC-GK complex, but also of a decrease in the free energy of glucokinase reaction, leading to the OMP decrease and VDAC opening. We suggest that the VDAC-mediated electrical control of the mitochondrial outer membrane permeability, dependent on metabolic conditions, is a fundamental physiological mechanism of global regulation of mitochondrial functions and of cell death.

  17. Fluidity-dependent Mg2(+)-ATPase activity in membranes from Leishmania donovani promastigotes.

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, M; Bandyopadhyay, R; Ghosh, C; Basu, M K

    1990-01-01

    The state of the lipid phase of the membrane plays a key role in the exposure of various receptors, antigens and enzymes on the membrane surface. The fluidity of membranes of Leishmania donovani promastigotes was monitored by two independent methods, i.e. influx of sterol from liposomes and removal of phospholipids by treatment with phospholipase C. The altered sterol/phospholipid ratio, in both cases, provided evidence that the activity of the functionally important membrane-bound enzyme Mg2(+)-ATPase is modulated by the state of the lipid phase of the membrane. PMID:2137691

  18. A protein chip membrane-capture assay for botulinum neurotoxin activity

    SciTech Connect

    Marconi, Severine; Ferracci, Geraldine; Berthomieu, Maelys; Kozaki, Shunji; Miquelis, Raymond; Boucraut, Jose; Seagar, Michael

    2008-12-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins A and B (BoNT/A and B) are neuromuscular blocking agents which inhibit neurotransmission by cleaving the intra-cellular presynaptic SNARE proteins SNAP-25 and VAMP2, localized respectively in plasma membrane and synaptic vesicles. These neurotoxins are both dangerous pathogens and powerful therapeutic agents with numerous clinical and cosmetic applications. Consequently there is a need for in vitro assays of their biological activity to screen for potential inhibitors and to replace the widely used in vivo mouse assay. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was used to measure membrane vesicle capture by antibodies against SNAP-25 and VAMP2. Substrate cleavage by BoNTs modified capture providing a method to assay toxin activity. Firstly using synaptic vesicles as a substrate, a comparison of the EC{sub 50}s for BoNT/B obtained by SPR, ELISA or flow cytometry indicated similar sensitivity although SPR assays were more rapid. Sonication of brain or neuronal cultures generated plasma membrane fragments with accessible intra-cellular epitopes adapted to measurement of BoNT/A activity. SPR responses were proportional to antigen concentration permitting detection of as little as 4 pM SNAP-25 in crude lysates. BoNT/A activity was assayed using monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognize a SNAP-25 epitope generated by the proteolytic action of the toxin. Incubation of intact primary cultured neurons with BoNT/A yielded an EC{sub 50} of 0.5 pM. The SPR biosensor method was sensitive enough to monitor BoNT/A and B activity in cells cultured in a 96-well format providing an alternative to experimental animals for toxicological assays.

  19. Dissipation of the membrane potential in susceptible corn mitochondria by the toxin of Helminthosporium maydis, race T, and toxin analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, M.J.; Sze, H.

    1987-07-01

    The authors have tested directly the effect of Helminthosporium maydis T (Hmt) toxin and various analogs on the membrane potential formed in mitochondria isolated from a Texas (T) cytoplasmic male-sterile and a normal (N) corn. ATP, malate or succinate generated a membrane potential (negative inside) as monitored by the absorbance change of a cationic dye, safranine. The relative membrane potential (..delta.. psi) could also be detected indirectly as /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake. Hmt toxin added to T mitochondria dissipated the steady state delta psi similar to addition of a protonophore, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP). Toxin analogs (Cpd XIII: C/sub 41/H/sub 68/O/sub 12/ and Cpd IV: C/sub 25/H/sub 44/O/sub 6/), reduced native toxin (RT2C: C/sub 41/H/sub 84/O/sub 13/) and Pm toxin (band A: C/sub 33/H/sub 60/O/sub 8/, produced by the fungus, Phyllosticta maydis) were effective in dissipating ..delta.. psi and decreasing Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake with the following order: Pm (100) >> HmT (23-30) > Cpd XIII (11-25) >> RT2C (0.4-1.8) > Cpd IV (0.2-1.0). In contrast, the toxins and analogs had no effect on delta psi formed in N mitochondria. The striking similarities of the HmT toxin (band 1: C/sub 41/H/sub 68/O/sub 13/) and Cpd XIII on T mitochondrial activities provide strong evidence supporting the correctness of the polyketol structure assigned to the native toxin. Since the ..delta.. psi in energized mitochondria is caused mainly by the electrogenic extrusion of H/sup +/, the results support the idea that HmT toxin increases membrane permeability of T mitochondria to H/sup +/. The host specificity of the toxin suggests that an interaction with unique target site(s) on the inner mitochondrial membrane of T corn causes H/sup +/ leakage.

  20. Detergent disruption of bacterial inner membranes and recovery of protein translocation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, K.; Wickner, W.T. )

    1989-11-01

    Isolation of the integral membrane components of protein translocation requires methods for fractionation and functional reconstitution. The authors treated inner-membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli with mixtures of octyl {beta}-D-glucoside, phospholipids, and an integral membrane carrier protein under conditions that extract most of the membrane proteins into micellar solution. Upon dialysis, proteoliposomes were reconstituted that supported translocation of radiochemically pure ({sup 35}S)pro-OmpA (the precursor of outer membrane protein A). Translocation into these proteoliposomes required ATP hydrolysis and membrane proteins, indicating that the reaction is that of the inner membrane. The suspension of membranes in detergent was separated into supernatant and pellet fractions by ultracentrifugation. After reconstitution, translocation activity was observed in both fractions, but processing by leader peptidase of translocated pro-OmpA to OmpA was not detectable in the reconstituted pellet fraction. Processing activity was restored by addition of pure leader peptidase as long as this enzyme was added before detergent removal, indicating that the translocation activity is not associated with detergent-resistant membrane vesicles. These results show that protein translocation activity can be recovered from detergent-disrupted membrane vesicles, providing a first step towards the goal of isolating the solubilized components.

  1. Pneumolysin Activates Macrophage Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization and Executes Apoptosis by Distinct Mechanisms without Membrane Pore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Martin A.; Naughton, Michael; Preston, Julie; Mitchell, Andrea; Holmes, Ashleigh; Marriott, Helen M.; Read, Robert C.; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Whyte, Moira K. B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracellular killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae is complemented by induction of macrophage apoptosis. Here, we show that the toxin pneumolysin (PLY) contributes both to lysosomal/phagolysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), an upstream event programing susceptibility to apoptosis, and to apoptosis execution via a mitochondrial pathway, through distinct mechanisms. PLY is necessary but not sufficient for the maximal induction of LMP and apoptosis. PLY’s ability to induce both LMP and apoptosis is independent of its ability to form cytolytic pores and requires only the first three domains of PLY. LMP involves TLR (Toll-like receptor) but not NLRP3/ASC (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain [Nod]-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing protein 3/apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain) signaling and is part of a PLY-dependent but phagocytosis-independent host response that includes the production of cytokines, including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β). LMP involves progressive and selective permeability to 40-kDa but not to 250-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextran, as PLY accumulates in the cytoplasm. In contrast, the PLY-dependent execution of apoptosis requires phagocytosis and is part of a host response to intracellular bacteria that also includes NO generation. In cells challenged with PLY-deficient bacteria, reconstitution of LMP using the lysomotrophic detergent LeuLeuOMe favored cell necrosis whereas PLY reconstituted apoptosis. The results suggest that PLY contributes to macrophage activation and cytokine production but also engages LMP. Following bacterial phagocytosis, PLY triggers apoptosis and prevents macrophage necrosis as a component of a broad-based antimicrobial strategy. This illustrates how a key virulence factor can become the focus of a multilayered and coordinated innate response by macrophages, optimizing pathogen clearance and limiting inflammation. PMID:25293758

  2. Inhibition of Kv channel expression by NSAIDs depolarizes membrane potential and inhibits cell migration by disrupting calpain signaling.

    PubMed

    Silver, Kristopher; Littlejohn, Alaina; Thomas, Laurel; Marsh, Elizabeth; Lillich, James D

    2015-12-15

    Clinical use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is well known to cause gastrointestinal ulcer formation via several mechanisms that include inhibiting epithelial cell migration and mucosal restitution. The drug-affected signaling pathways that contribute to inhibition of migration by NSAIDs are poorly understood, though previous studies have shown that NSAIDs depolarize membrane potential and suppress expression of calpain proteases and voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel subunits. Kv channels play significant roles in cell migration and are targets of NSAID activity in white blood cells, but the specific functional effects of NSAID-induced changes in Kv channel expression, particularly on cell migration, are unknown in intestinal epithelial cells. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of NSAIDs on expression of Kv1.3, 1.4, and 1.6 in vitro and/or in vivo and evaluated the functional significance of loss of Kv subunit expression. Indomethacin or NS-398 reduced total and plasma membrane protein expression of Kv1.3 in cultured intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6). Additionally, depolarization of membrane potential with margatoxin (MgTx), 40mM K(+), or silencing of Kv channel expression with siRNA significantly reduced IEC-6 cell migration and disrupted calpain activity. Furthermore, in rat small intestinal epithelia, indomethacin and NS-398 had significant, yet distinct, effects on gene and protein expression of Kv1.3, 1.4, or 1.6, suggesting that these may be clinically relevant targets. Our results show that inhibition of epithelial cell migration by NSAIDs is associated with decreased expression of Kv channel subunits, and provide a mechanism through which NSAIDs inhibit cell migration and may contribute to NSAID-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity.

  3. Total nitrogen removal in a hybrid, membrane-aerated activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Downing, Leon S; Nerenberg, Robert

    2008-08-01

    The hybrid (suspended and attached growth) membrane biofilm process (HMBP) is a novel method to achieve total nitrogen removal from wastewater. Air-filled hollow-fiber membranes are incorporated into an activated sludge tank, and a nitrifying biofilm develops on the membranes, producing nitrite and nitrate. By suppressing bulk aeration, the bulk liquid becomes anoxic, and the nitrate/nitrite can be reduced with influent BOD. The key feature that distinguishes the HMBP from other membrane-aerated processes is that it is hybrid; heterotrophic bacteria are kept mainly in suspension by maintaining low bulk liquid BOD concentrations. We investigated the HMBP's performance under a variety of BOD and ammonium loadings, and determined the dominant mechanisms of nitrogen removal. Suspended solids increased with the BOD loadings, maintaining low bulk liquid BOD concentrations. As a result, nitrification rates were insensitive to the BOD loadings, remaining at 1gNm(-2)day(-1) for BOD loadings ranging from 4 to 17gBODm(-2)day(-1). Nitrification rates decreased during short-term spikes in bulk liquid BOD concentrations. Shortcut nitrogen removal was confirmed using microsensor measurements, showing that nitrite was the dominant form of oxidized nitrogen produced by the biofilm. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were dominant throughout the biofilm, while nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were only present in the deeper regions of the biofilm, where the oxygen concentration was above 2mg/L. Denitrification occurred mainly in the suspended phase, instead of in the biofilm, decreasing the potential for biofouling. When influent BOD concentrations were sufficiently high, full denitrification occurred, with total nitrogen (TN) removal approaching 100%. These results suggest that the process is well-suited for achieving concurrent BOD and TN removal in activated sludge.

  4. Preparation, characterization, biological activity, and transport study of polystyrene based calcium-barium phosphate composite membrane.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Mujahid Ali; Rafiuddin

    2013-10-01

    Calcium-barium phosphate (CBP) composite membrane with 25% polystyrene was prepared by co-precipitation method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR), and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to characterize the membrane. The membrane was found to be crystalline in nature with consistent arrangement of particles and no indication of visible cracks. The electrical potentials measured across the composite membrane in contact with univalent electrolytes (KCl, NaCl and LiCl), have been found to increase with decrease in concentrations. Thus the membrane was found to be cation-selective. Transport properties of developed membranes may be utilized for the efficient desalination of saline water and more importantly demineralization process. The antibacterial study of this composite membrane shows good results for killing the disease causing bacteria along with waste water treatment.

  5. Effect of the triaminopyridine flupirtine on calcium uptake, membrane potential and ATP synthesis in rat heart mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Guido; Balakirev, Maxim; Zwicker, Klaus; Hofmann, Michael; Woodcock, Barry G; Pergande, Gabriela

    1998-01-01

    Flupirtine is an analgesic agent which exhibits neuronal cytoprotective activity and may have value in the treatment of conditions involving cell injury and apoptosis. Since flupirtine has no action on known receptor sites we have investigated the effect of this drug on mitochondrial membrane potential, and the changes in intramitochondrial calcium concentration in particular.The findings show that flupirtine increases Ca2+ uptake in mitochondria in vitro. At clinically relevant flupirtine concentrations, corresponding to flupirtine levels in vitro of 0.2 to 10 nmol mg−1 mitochondrial protein, there was a 2 to 3 fold increase in mitochondrial calcium levels (P<0.01). At supra-physiological flupirtine concentrations of 20 nmol mg−1 mitochondrial protein and above, the mitochondrial calcium concentrations were indistinguishable from those in untreated mitochondria.Mitochondrial membrane potential closely paralleled the changes in mitochondrial calcium levels showing a 20% (P<0.01) increase when the flupirtine concentration was raised from 0.2 nmol to 10 nmol mg−1 mitochondrial protein and a return to control values at 20 nmol mg−1 protein.The increase in mitochondrial calcium uptake and membrane potential were accompanied by an increase in mitochondrial ATP synthesis (30%; P<0.05) and a similar percentage reduction in mitochondrial volume.Calcium at 80 and 160 nmol mg−1 mitochondrial protein decreased ATP synthesis by 20–25% (P<0.001). This decrease was prevented or diminished if flupirtine at 10 nmol mg−1 protein was added before the addition of calcium.Since intracellular levels of flupirtine in intact cells never exceeded 10 nmol mg−1 mitochondrial protein, these findings are supportive evidence for an in vivo cytoprotective action of flupirtine at the mitochondrial level. PMID:9559899

  6. Enhanced high-frequency membrane potential fluctuations control spike output in striatal fast-spiking interneurones in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Jan M; Pitcher, Toni L; Savanthrapadian, Shakuntala; Wickens, Jeffery R; Oswald, Manfred J; Reynolds, John N J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Fast-spiking interneurones (FSIs) constitute a prominent part of the inhibitory microcircuitry of the striatum; however, little is known about their recruitment by synaptic inputs in vivo. Here, we report that, in contrast to cholinergic interneurones (CINs), FSIs (n = 9) recorded in urethane-anaesthetized rats exhibit Down-to-Up state transitions very similar to spiny projection neurones (SPNs). Compared to SPNs, the FSI Up state membrane potential was noisier and power spectra exhibited significantly larger power at frequencies in the gamma range (55–95 Hz). The membrane potential exhibited short and steep trajectories preceding spontaneous spike discharge, suggesting that fast input components controlled spike output in FSIs. Spontaneous spike data contained a high proportion (43.6 ± 32.8%) of small inter-spike intervals (ISIs) of <30 ms, setting FSIs clearly apart from SPNs and CINs. Cortical-evoked inputs had slower dynamics in SPNs than FSIs, and repetitive stimulation entrained SPN spike output only if the stimulation was delivered at an intermediate frequency (20 Hz), but not at a high frequency (100 Hz). Pharmacological induction of an activated ECoG state, known to promote rapid FSI spiking, mildly increased the power (by 43 ± 55%, n = 13) at gamma frequencies in the membrane potential of SPNs, but resulted in few small ISIs (<30 ms; 4.3 ± 6.4%, n = 8). The gamma frequency content did not change in CINs (n = 8). These results indicate that FSIs are uniquely responsive to high-frequency input sequences. By controlling the spike output of SPNs, FSIs could serve gating of top-down signals and long-range synchronisation of gamma-oscillations during behaviour. PMID:21746788

  7. Detection of focal adhesion kinase activation at membrane microdomains by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Seong, Jihye; Ouyang, Mingxing; Kim, Taejin; Sun, Jie; Wen, Po-Chao; Lu, Shaoying; Zhuo, Yue; Llewellyn, Nicholas M; Schlaepfer, David D; Guan, Jun-Lin; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2011-07-26

    Proper subcellular localization of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is crucial for many cellular processes. It remains, however, unclear how FAK activity is regulated at subcellular compartments. To visualize the FAK activity at different membrane microdomains, we develop a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based FAK biosensor, and target it into or outside of detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) regions at the plasma membrane. Here we show that, on cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins or stimulation by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), the FRET responses of DRM-targeting FAK biosensor are stronger than that at non-DRM regions, suggesting that FAK activation can occur at DRM microdomains. Further experiments reveal that the PDGF-induced FAK activation is mediated and maintained by Src activity, whereas FAK activation on cell adhesion is independent of, and in fact essential for the Src activation. Therefore, FAK is activated at membrane microdomains with distinct activation mechanisms in response to different physiological stimuli.

  8. Circulating polymerase chain reaction chips utilizing multiple-membrane activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yu; Liao, Chia-Sheng; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Huei-Huang; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports a new micromachined, circulating, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for nucleic acid amplification. The PCR chip is comprised of a microthermal control module and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic control module. The microthermal control modules are formed with three individual heating and temperature-sensing sections, each modulating a specific set temperature for denaturation, annealing and extension processes, respectively. Micro-pneumatic valves and multiple-membrane activations are used to form the microfluidic control module to transport sample fluids through three reaction regions. Compared with other PCR chips, the new chip is more compact in size, requires less time for heating and cooling processes, and has the capability to randomly adjust time ratios and cycle numbers depending on the PCR process. Experimental results showed that detection genes for two pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes, 777 bps) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae, 273 bps), can be successfully amplified using the new circulating PCR chip. The minimum number of thermal cycles to amplify the DNA-based S. pyogenes for slab gel electrophoresis is 20 cycles with an initial concentration of 42.5 pg µl-1. Experimental data also revealed that a high reproducibility up to 98% could be achieved if the initial template concentration of the S. pyogenes was higher than 4 pg µl-1. The preliminary results of the current paper were presented at the 19th IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (IEEE MEMS 2006), Istanbul, Turkey, 22-26 January, 2006.

  9. Quantitative Assessment of the Distributions of Membrane Conductances Involved in Action Potential Backpropagation Along Basal Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Acker, Corey D.; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2009-01-01

    Basal dendrites of prefrontal cortical neurons receive strong synaptic drive from recurrent excitatory synaptic inputs. Synaptic integration within basal dendrites is therefore likely to play an important role in cortical information processing. Both synaptic integration and synaptic plasticity depend crucially on dendritic membrane excitability and the backpropagation of action potentials. We carried out multisite voltage-sensitive dye imaging of membrane potential transients from thin basal branches of prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons before and after application of channel blockers. We found that backpropagating action potentials (bAPs) are predominantly controlled by voltage-gated sodium and A-type potassium channels. In contrast, pharmacologically blocking the delayed rectifier potassium, voltage-gated calcium, or Ih conductance had little effect on dendritic AP propagation. Optically recorded bAP waveforms were quantified and multicompartmental modeling was used to link the observed behavior with the underlying biophysical properties. The best-fit model included a nonuniform sodium channel distribution with decreasing conductance with distance from the soma, together with a nonuniform (increasing) A-type potassium conductance. AP amplitudes decline with distance in this model, but to a lesser extent than previously thought. We used this model to explore the mechanisms underlying two sets of published data involving high-frequency trains of APs and the local generation of sodium spikelets. We also explored the conditions under which IA down-regulation would produce branch strength potentiation in the proposed model. Finally, we discuss the hypothesis that a fraction of basal branches may have different membrane properties compared with sister branches in the same dendritic tree. PMID:19118105

  10. Potential antitumor therapeutic strategies of human amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, N-H; Hwang, K-A; Kim, S U; Kim, Y-B; Hyun, S-H; Jeung, E-B; Choi, K-C

    2012-08-01

    As stem cells are capable of self-renewal and can generate differentiated progenies for organ development, they are considered as potential source for regenerative medicine and tissue replacement after injury or disease. Along with this capacity, stem cells have the therapeutic potential for treating human diseases including cancers. According to the origins, stem cells are broadly classified into two types: embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and adult stem cells. In terms of differentiation potential, ESCs are pluripotent and adult stem cells are multipotent. Amnion, which is a membranous sac that contains the fetus and amniotic fluid and functions in protecting the developing embryo during gestation, is another stem cell source. Amnion-derived stem cells are classified as human amniotic membrane-derived epithelial stem cells, human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells and human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells. They are in an intermediate stage between pluripotent ESCs and lineage-restricted adult stem cells, non-tumorigenic, and contribute to low immunogenicity and anti-inflammation. Furthermore, they are easily available and do not cause any controversial issues in their recovery and applications. Not only are amnion-derived stem cells applicable in regenerative medicine, they have anticancer capacity. In non-engineered stem cells transplantation strategies, amnion-derived stem cells effectively target the tumor and suppressed the tumor growth by expressing cytotoxic cytokines. Additionally, they also have a potential as novel delivery vehicles transferring therapeutic genes to the cancer formation sites in gene-directed enzyme/prodrug combination therapy. Owing to their own advantageous properties, amnion-derived stem cells are emerging as a new candidate in anticancer therapy.

  11. Red blood cell membrane viscoelasticity, agglutination and zeta potential measurements with double optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Fernandes, Heloise P.; Barjas-Castro, Maria L.; de Thomaz, André A.; de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2006-02-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) viscoelastic membrane contains proteins and glycolproteins embedded in, or attached, to a fluid lipid bilayer and are negatively charged, which creates a repulsive electric (zeta) potential between the cells and prevents their aggregation in the blood stream. There are techniques, however, to decrease the zeta potential to allow cell agglutination which are the basis of most of the tests of antigen-antibody interactions in blood banks. This report shows the use of a double optical tweezers to measure RBC membrane viscosity, agglutination and zeta potential. In our technique one of the optical tweezers trap a silica bead that binds strongly to a RBC at the end of a RBCs rouleaux and, at the same time, acts as a pico-Newton force transducer, after calibration through its displacement from the equilibrium position. The other optical tweezers trap the RBC at the other end. To measure the membrane viscosity the optical force is measured as a function of the velocity between the RBCs. To measure the adhesion the tweezers are slowly displaced apart until the RBCs disagglutination happens. The RBC zeta potential is measured in two complimentary ways, by the force on the silica bead attached to a single RBC in response to an applied electric field, and the conventional way, by the measurement of terminal velocity of the RBC after released from the optical trap. These two measurements provide information about the RBC charges and, also, electrolytic solution properties. We believe this can improve the methods of diagnosis in blood banks.

  12. Alginate/chitosan based bi-layer composite membrane as potential sustained-release wound dressing containing ciprofloxacin hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Fei; Dong, Yang; Song, Aihua; Yin, Ran; Li, Sanming

    2014-08-01

    The aims of this research were to develop and evaluate a novel ciprofloxacin hydrochloride loaded bi-layer composite membrane based on alginate and chitosan. In vitro antimicrobial activity, drug permeation study, morphology, cytotoxicity, primary skin irritation and in vivo pharmacodynamics were investigated. Results showed that the membranes could inhibit the growth of microorganisms for longer than 7 days. And there was no significant decrease in the metabolic activity of the Hacat fibroblasts cells were treated with the membranes. No edema and erythema were observed after administration of membranes on the rabbit skin after 14 days. Moreover, the results of pharmacodynamics showed that the membranes were more effective in improving the wound healing process. In conclusion, a novel bi-layer composite membrane was developed and results suggested that it could be exploited as sustained-release wound dressings.

  13. Nature of the charged headgroup determines the fusogenic potential and membrane properties of lithocholic acid phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Priyanshu; Singh, Manish; Sreekanth, Vedagopuram; Bajaj, Avinash

    2014-08-01

    Phospholipids play a crucial role in many cellular processes ranging from selective membrane permeability, to membrane fission and fusion, to cellular signaling. Headgroups of phospholipids determine the membrane properties and fusogenicity of these lipids with target cell membranes. We studied the fusogenic and membrane properties of phospholipids possessing unnatural charged headgroups with model membranes using laurdan based membrane hydration studies, DPH based membrane fluidity, and differential scanning calorimetry. We unravel that fusogenicity, membrane hydration, and fluidity of membranes are strongly contingent on the nature of the phospholipid charged headgroup. Our studies unraveled that introduction of bulky headgroups like dimethylamino pyridine induces maximum membrane hydration and perturbations with high fusogenicity as compared to small headgroup based phospholipids. These phospholipids also have the capability of high retention in DPPC membranes. Hydration and fluidity of these phospholipid-doped DPPC membranes are contingent on the nature of the charged headgroup. This study would help in future design of phospholipid based nanomaterials for effective drug delivery.

  14. [Potential difference across the membrane of subcellular particles. V. Generation of potential differences by mitochondria and submitochondrial particles under anaerobic conditions].

    PubMed

    Liberman, E A; Vladimirova, M A; Tsofina, L M

    1977-01-01

    It is shown by the mehtod of penetrating ions that Site O and I of the respiratory chain of submitochondrial particles are able to generate a membrane potential of the normal value under anaerobic conditons. When succinate is an electron donor and ferricyanide-an acceptor (Site II), the oxygen addition sharply increases the membrane potential at pH above 7.5 and does not change or even decreases it in reaction conditions more acid than pH 6.5. The generation of the membrane potential at low pH and in the absence of oxygen is predicted by the chemielectric hypothesis and cannot be explained by the chemiosmotic one. Mitochondria usually generate the membrane potential without O2 at pH 7.5 in the presence of ferricyanide when the substrate concentration exceeds 5 mM.

  15. Active, capable, and potentially active faults - a paleoseismic perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Machette, M.N.

    2000-01-01

    Maps of faults (geologically defined source zones) may portray seismic hazards in a wide range of completeness depending on which types of faults are shown. Three fault terms - active, capable, and potential - are used in a variety of ways for different reasons or applications. Nevertheless, to be useful for seismic-hazards analysis, fault maps should encompass a time interval that includes several earthquake cycles. For example, if the common recurrence in an area is 20,000-50,000 years, then maps should include faults that are 50,000-100,000 years old (two to five typical earthquake cycles), thus allowing for temporal variability in slip rate and recurrence intervals. Conversely, in more active areas such as plate boundaries, maps showing faults that are <10,000 years old should include those with at least 2 to as many as 20 paleoearthquakes. For the International Lithosphere Programs' Task Group II-2 Project on Major Active Faults of the World our maps and database will show five age categories and four slip rate categories that allow one to select differing time spans and activity rates for seismic-hazard analysis depending on tectonic regime. The maps are accompanied by a database that describes evidence for Quaternary faulting, geomorphic expression, and paleoseismic parameters (slip rate, recurrence interval and time of most recent surface faulting). These maps and databases provide an inventory of faults that would be defined as active, capable, and potentially active for seismic-hazard assessments.

  16. An inner membrane cytochrome required only for reduction of high redox potential extracellular electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Levar, Caleb E.; Chan, Chi Ho; Mehta-Kolte, Misha G.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2014-10-28

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria, such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, transfer electrons beyond their outer membranes to Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, heavy metals, and electrodes in electrochemical devices. In the environment, metal acceptors exist in multiple chelated and insoluble forms that span a range of redox potentials and offer different amounts of available energy. Despite this, metal-reducing bacteria have not been shown to alter their electron transfer strategies to take advantage of these energy differences. Disruption of imcH, encoding an inner membrane c-type cytochrome, eliminated the ability of G. sulfurreducens to reduce Fe(III) citrate, Fe(III)-EDTA, and insoluble Mn(IV) oxides, electron acceptors with potentials greater than 0.1 V versus the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE), but the imcH mutant retained the ability to reduce Fe(III) oxides with potentials of ≤–0.1 V versus SHE. The imcH mutant failed to grow on electrodes poised at +0.24 V versus SHE, but switching electrodes to –0.1 V versus SHE triggered exponential growth. At potentials of ≤–0.1 V versus SHE, both the wild type and the imcH mutant doubled 60% slower than at higher potentials. Electrodes poised even 100 mV higher (0.0 V versus SHE) could not trigger imcH mutant growth. These results demonstrate that G. sulfurreducens possesses multiple respiratory pathways, that some of these pathways are in operation only after exposure to low redox potentials, and that electron flow can be coupled to generation of different amounts of energy for growth. Redox potentials that trigger these behaviors mirror those of metal acceptors common in subsurface environments where Geobacter is found.

  17. Calcium release and sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane potential in frog skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Baylor, S M; Chandler, W K; Marshall, M W

    1984-01-01

    Single twitch fibres were dissected from frog muscle, stretched to a sarcomere spacing greater than or equal to 3.9 micron, then mounted for optical recording. The experiments were carried out at 15-17 degrees C. In some cases D2O Ringer solution was used instead of H2O Ringer solution to reduce movement and any related optical artifacts. Following action potential stimulation, both the amplitude and time course of the change in intrinsic retardation (Baylor & Oetliker's second component, 1975) were found to be approximately independent of wavelength between 480 and 750 nm (D2O Ringer solution). Fibres were injected with the Ca2+-sensitive dye Arsenazo III so that changes in myoplasmic free [Ca2+] could be estimated by measuring changes in dye-related absorbance at 660 nm. The time course of free [Ca2+] was compared with the time course of two other optical signals which have been previously suggested to monitor s.r. (sarcoplasmic reticulum) membrane potential, intrinsic retardation and Nile Blue A fluorescence (Bezanilla & Horowicz, 1975). In D2O Ringer solution the retardation time course was closely similar to that of free [Ca2+] whereas the fluorescence time course was considerably slower. Thus, it is possible that either the retardation signal or Nile Blue A fluorescence (or both) monitors free [Ca2+] rather than s.r. potential. If so, the underlying mechanism which senses Ca2+ must do so very rapidly in the case of retardation and with a delay in the case of Nile Blue A. Changes in Nile Blue A fluorescence were measured in a voltage-clamped fibre (H2O Ringer solution). Only small changes were observed during hyperpolarization or small depolarization whereas relatively large changes were observed near mechanical threshold. These increased e-fold in magnitude every 4-5 mV. This steep voltage dependence, similar to that already shown for intrinsic retardation and [Ca2+], provides additional evidence that Nile Blue A fluorescence monitors a step in excitation

  18. Rapid screening of membrane protein activity: electrophysiological analysis of OmpF reconstituted in proteoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Kreir, Mohamed; Farre, Cecilia; Beckler, Matthias; George, Michael; Fertig, Niels

    2008-04-01

    Solvent-free planar lipid bilayers were formed in an automatic manner by bursting of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) after gentle suction application through micron-sized apertures in a borosilicate glass substrate. Incubation of GUVs with the purified ion channel protein of interest yielded proteoliposomes. These proteoliposomes allow for immediate recording of channel activity after GUV sealing. This approach reduces the time-consuming, laborious and sometimes difficult protein reconstitution processes normally performed after bilayer formation. Bilayer recordings are attractive for investigations of membrane proteins not accessible to patch clamp analysis, like e.g. proteins from organelles. In the presented work, we show the example of the outer membrane protein OmpF from Escherichia coli. We reconstituted OmpF in proteoliposomes and observed the characteristic trimeric conductance levels and the typical gating induced by pH and transmembrane voltage. Moreover, OmpF is the main entrance for beta-lactam antibiotics and we investigated translocation processes of antibiotics and modulation of OmpF by spermine. We suggest that the rapid formation of porin containing lipid bilayers is of potential for the efficient electrophysiological characterization of the OmpF protein, for studying membrane permeation processes and for the rapid screening of antibiotics. PMID:18369514

  19. Leveraging electrokinetics for the active control of dendritic fullerene-1 release across a nanochannel membrane.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Giacomo; Geninatti, Thomas; Hood, R Lyle; Fine, Daniel; Scorrano, Giovanni; Schmulen, Jeffrey; Hosali, Sharath; Ferrari, Mauro; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2015-03-12

    General adoption of advanced treatment protocols such as chronotherapy will hinge on progress in drug delivery technologies that provide precise temporal control of therapeutic release. Such innovation is also crucial to future medicine approaches such as telemedicine. Here we present a nanofluidic membrane technology capable of achieving active and tunable control of molecular transport through nanofluidic channels. Control was achieved through application of an electric field between two platinum electrodes positioned on either surface of a 5.7 nm nanochannel membrane designed for zero-order drug delivery. Two electrode configurations were tested: laser-cut foils and electron beam deposited thin-films, configurations capable of operating at low voltage (≤1.5 V), and power (100 nW). Temporal, reproducible tuning and interruption of dendritic fullerene 1 (DF-1) transport was demonstrated over multi-day release experiments. Conductance tests showed limiting currents in the low applied potential range, implying ionic concentration polarization (ICP) at the interface between the membrane's micro- and nanochannels, even in concentrated solutions (≤1 M NaCl). The ability of this nanotechnology platform to facilitate controlled delivery of molecules and particles has broad applicability to next-generation therapeutics for numerous pathologies, including autoimmune diseases, circadian dysfunction, pain, and stress, among others.

  20. Membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment plants reveal diverse yeast and protist communities of potential significance in biofouling.

    PubMed

    Liébana, Raquel; Arregui, Lucía; Belda, Ignacio; Gamella, Luis; Santos, Antonio; Marquina, Domingo; Serrano, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The yeast community was studied in a municipal full-scale membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment plant (MBR-WWTP). The unexpectedly high diversity of yeasts indicated that the activated sludge formed a suitable environment for them to proliferate, with cellular concentrations of 2.2 ± 0.8 × 10(3) CFU ml(-1). Sixteen species of seven genera were present in the biological reactor, with Ascomycetes being the most prevalent group (93%). Most isolates were able to grow in a synthetic wastewater medium, adhere to polyethylene surfaces, and develop biofilms of variable complexity. The relationship between yeast populations and the protists in the MBR-WWTP was also studied, revealing that some protist species preyed on and ingested yeasts. These results suggest that yeast populations may play a role in the food web of a WWTP and, to some extent, contribute to membrane biofouling in MBR systems. PMID:25588128

  1. Membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment plants reveal diverse yeast and protist communities of potential significance in biofouling.

    PubMed

    Liébana, Raquel; Arregui, Lucía; Belda, Ignacio; Gamella, Luis; Santos, Antonio; Marquina, Domingo; Serrano, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The yeast community was studied in a municipal full-scale membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment plant (MBR-WWTP). The unexpectedly high diversity of yeasts indicated that the activated sludge formed a suitable environment for them to proliferate, with cellular concentrations of 2.2 ± 0.8 × 10(3) CFU ml(-1). Sixteen species of seven genera were present in the biological reactor, with Ascomycetes being the most prevalent group (93%). Most isolates were able to grow in a synthetic wastewater medium, adhere to polyethylene surfaces, and develop biofilms of variable complexity. The relationship between yeast populations and the protists in the MBR-WWTP was also studied, revealing that some protist species preyed on and ingested yeasts. These results suggest that yeast populations may play a role in the food web of a WWTP and, to some extent, contribute to membrane biofouling in MBR systems.

  2. Assessment of the potential for refinery applications of inorganic membrane technology: An identification and screening analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, H.E.; Schulman, B.L.

    1993-05-01

    Commercial application of membrane technology in the separation of gas, liquid, and solid streams has grown to a business with worldwide revenues exceeding $1 billion annually. Use of organic membranes for industrial gas separation, particularly in the refining industry, is one of the major growth areas. However, organic membranes based on polymeric separation barriers, are susceptible to damage by liquids, and careful precautions must be taken to retain the system integrity. Researchers are currently developing small pore sized inorganic membranes which may substantially increase the efficiency and economics in selected refinery separation applications. Expected advantages of these advanced inorganic membranes include high permeability, high selectivity, and low manufacturing cost. SFA Pacific conducted a screening analysis to identify applications for inorganic membrane technology in the petroleum refining industry and their potential cost advantages over competing separation systems. Two meetings were held in connection with this project. Copies of Viewgraphs presented by SFA Pacific at these meetings are attached in Appendices A and C. Potential high priority applications and market impacts of advanced inorganic membrane technology in the refining industry are addressed in this report, and include the following areas: Competitive separation technologies; application of those technologies; incentives for inorganic membranes; market benefits and impacts of inorganic membranes.

  3. Amniotic membrane-derived stem cells: immunomodulatory properties and potential clinical application.

    PubMed

    Insausti, Carmen L; Blanquer, Miguel; García-Hernández, Ana M; Castellanos, Gregorio; Moraleda, José M

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial and mesenchymal cells isolated from the amniotic membrane (AM) possess stem cell characteristics, differentiation potential toward lineages of different germ layers, and immunomodulatory properties. While their expansion and differentiation potential have been well studied and characterized, knowledge about their immunomodulatory properties and the mechanisms involved is still incomplete. These mechanisms have been evaluated on various target cells of the innate and the adaptive system and in animal models of different inflammatory diseases. Some results have evidenced that the immunomodulatory effect of AM-derived cells is dependent on cell-cell contact, but many of them have demonstrated that these properties are mediated through the secretion of suppressive molecules. In this review, we present an update on the described immunomodulatory properties of the derived amniotic cells and some of the proposed involved mechanisms. Furthermore, we describe some assays in animal models of different inflammatory diseases which reveal the potential use of these cells to treat such diseases. PMID:24744610

  4. Antibacterial activity of graphite, graphite oxide, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide: membrane and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaobin; Zeng, Tingying Helen; Hofmann, Mario; Burcombe, Ehdi; Wei, Jun; Jiang, Rongrong; Kong, Jing; Chen, Yuan

    2011-09-27

    Health and environmental impacts of graphene-based materials need to be thoroughly evaluated before their potential applications. Graphene has strong cytotoxicity toward bacteria. To better understand its antimicrobial mechanism, we compared the antibacterial activity of four types of graphene-based materials (graphite (Gt), graphite oxide (GtO), graphene oxide (GO), and reduced graphene oxide (rGO)) toward a bacterial model-Escherichia coli. Under similar concentration and incubation conditions, GO dispersion shows the highest antibacterial activity, sequentially followed by rGO, Gt, and GtO. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and dynamic light scattering analyses show that GO aggregates have the smallest average size among the four types of materials. SEM images display that the direct contacts with graphene nanosheets disrupt cell membrane. No superoxide anion (O(2)(•-)) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is detected. However, the four types of materials can oxidize glutathione, which serves as redox state mediator in bacteria. Conductive rGO and Gt have higher oxidation capacities than insulating GO and GtO. Results suggest that antimicrobial actions are contributed by both membrane and oxidation stress. We propose that a three-step antimicrobial mechanism, previously used for carbon nanotubes, is applicable to graphene-based materials. It includes initial cell deposition on graphene-based materials, membrane stress caused by direct contact with sharp nanosheets, and the ensuing superoxide anion-independent oxidation. We envision that physicochemical properties of graphene-based materials, such as density of functional groups, size, and conductivity, can be precisely tailored to either reducing their health and environmental risks or increasing their application potentials.

  5. Peroxynitrite-mediated nitrosative stress decreases motility and mitochondrial membrane potential in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Uribe, P; Boguen, R; Treulen, F; Sánchez, R; Villegas, J V

    2015-03-01

    Nitrosative stress is produced by high levels of reactive nitrogen species (RNS). The RNS include peroxynitrite, a highly reactive free radical produced from a diffusion-controlled reaction between nitric oxide and superoxide anion. Peroxynitrite causes nitration and oxidation of lipids, proteins and DNA, and is thus considered an important pathogenic mechanism in various diseases. Although high levels of peroxynitrite are associated with astenozoospermia, few reports exist regarding the in vitro effect of high levels of this RNS on human sperm. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effect of nitrosative stress caused by peroxynitrite on the viability, motility and mitochondrial membrane potential of human spermatozoa. To do this, human spermatozoa from healthy donors were exposed in vitro to 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), a molecule that generates peroxynitrite. Incubations were done at 37°C for up to 4 h with SIN-1 concentrations between 0.2 and 1.0 mmol/l. Generation of peroxynitrite was confirmed using dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR) by spectrophotometry and flow cytometry. Sperm viability was assessed by propidium iodide staining; sperm motility was analyzed by CASA, and the state of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) by JC-1 staining. Viability and ΔΨm were measured by flow cytometry. The results showed an increase in DHR oxidation, demonstrating the generation of peroxynitrite through SIN-1. Peroxynitrite decreased progressive and total motility, as well as some sperm kinetic parameters. Mitochondrial membrane potential also decreased. These alterations occurred with no decrease in sperm viability. In conclusion, peroxynitrite-induced nitrosative stress impairs vital functions in the male gamete, possibly contributing to male infertility. PMID:25425609

  6. Electrospun nanofiber membranes for electrically activated shape memory nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fenghua; Zhang, Zhichun; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2014-06-01

    A novel shape memory nanocomposite system, consisting of a thermoplastic Nafion polymer and ultrathin electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbonization nanofiber membranes, is successfully synthesized. PAN-based carbonization nanofiber networks that offer responses to deformations are considered to be an excellent actuation source. Significant improvement in the electrical conductivity of carbon nanofiber membranes is found by adjusting the applied voltage power in the electrospinning PAN process varying from 7.85 to 12.30 S cm-1. The porous structure of the carbon nanofiber membranes provides a large specific surface area and interfacial contact area when combined with the polymer matrix. Shape memory Nafion nanocomposites filled with interpenetrating non-woven electrospun PAN carbonization membranes can be actuated by applying 14 V electrical voltage within 5 s. The results, as demonstrated through morphology, electrical and thermal measurements and a shape recovery test, suggest a valuable route to producing soft nanocomposites.

  7. Backside calibration potentiometry: ion activity measurements with selective supported liquid membranes by calibrating from the inner side of the membrane.

    PubMed

    Malon, Adam; Bakker, Eric; Pretsch, Ernö

    2007-01-15

    In direct potentiometry, the magnitude of the measured potentials is used to determine the composition of the sample. While this places rather formidable demands on the required reproducibility of the associated potential measurements, typically on the order of microvolts, in vitro clinical analyses of blood samples are today successfully performed with direct potentiometry using ion-selective electrodes (ISEs). Unfortunately, most other analytical situations do not permit the sensor to be recalibrated every few minutes, as in environmental monitoring or in vivo measurements, and direct potentiometry is often bound to fail as an accurate method in these circumstances. This paper introduces a novel direction for potentiometric sensing, termed backside calibration potentiometry. Chemical asymmetries across thin supported liquid ISE membranes are assessed by determining the direction of potential drift upon changing the stirring rate on either side of the membrane. Disappearance of this drift indicates the disappearance of concentration gradients across the membrane and is used to determine the sample composition if the solution composition at the backside of the membrane and the interfering ion concentration in the sample are known. For practical determinations, the concentration of either the primary or the interfering ion is varied in the reference solution until the stirring effect disappears. The procedure is demonstrated with a Ca2+-selective membrane using Ba2+ as the dominant interfering ion. Another example includes the determination of Pb2+ in environmental samples where the pH is adjusted to a known level. At pH 4.0, H+ turns out to be the dominant interfering ion. The practical applicability of the method is shown with different environmental water samples, for which the results obtained with the novel method are compared with those obtained by traditional calibration using standard additions. The limitations of the novel method in terms of accuracy and

  8. The force exerted by the membrane potential during protein import into the mitochondrial matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Ghosal, Sandip; Matouschek, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    The force exerted on a targeting sequence by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane is calculated on the basis of continuum electrostatics. The force is found to vary from 3.0 pN to 2.2 pN (per unit elementary charge) as the radius of the inner membrane pore (assumed aqueous) is varied from 6.5 to 12 A, its measured range. In the present model, the decrease in force with increasing pore width arises from the shielding effect of water. Since the pore is not very much wider than the distance between water molecules, the full shielding effect of water may not be present; the extreme case of a purely membranous pore without water gives a force of 3.2 pN per unit charge, which should represent an upper limit. When applied to mitochondrial import experiments on the protein barnase, these results imply that forces between 11 +/- 2 pN and 13.5 +/- 2.5 pN catalyze the unfolding of barnase in those experiments. A comparison of these results with unfolding forces measured using atomic force microscopy is made.

  9. Electrospun nanofibrous SF/P(LLA-CL) membrane: a potential substratum for endothelial keratoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junzhao; Yan, Chenxi; Zhu, Mengyu; Yao, Qinke; Shao, Chunyi; Lu, Wenjuan; Wang, Jing; Mo, Xiumei; Gu, Ping; Fu, Yao; Fan, Xianqun

    2015-01-01

    Background Cornea transplant technology has progressed markedly in recent decades, allowing surgeons to replace diseased corneal endothelium by a thin lamellar structure. A thin, transparent, biocompatible, tissue-engineered substratum with corneal endothelial cells for endothelial keratoplasty is currently of interest. Electrospinning a nanofibrous structure can simulate the extracellular matrix and have beneficial effects for cell culture. Silk fibroin (SF) has good biocompatibility but poor mechanical properties, while poly(l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) (P(LLA-CL)) has good mechanical properties but poor biocompatibility. Blending SF with P(LLA-CL) can maintain the advantages of both these materials and overcome their disadvantages. Blended electrospun nanofibrous membranes may be suitable for regeneration of the corneal endothelium. The aim of this study was to produce a tissue-engineered construct suitable for endothelial keratoplasty. Methods Five scaffolds containing different SF:P(LLA-CL) blended ratios (100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, 0:100) were manufactured. A human corneal endothelial (B4G12) cell line was cultured on the membranes. Light transmission, speed of cell adherence, cell viability (live-dead test), cell proliferation (Ki-67, BrdU staining), and cell monolayer formation were detected on membranes with the different blended ratios, and expression of some functional genes was also detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Different blended ratios of scaffolds had different light transmittance properties. The 25:75 blended ratio membrane had the best transmittance among these scaffolds. All electrospun nanofibrous membranes showed improved speed of cell adherence when compared with the control group, especially when the P(LLA-CL) ratio increased. The 25:75 blended ratio membranes also had the highest cell proliferation. B4G12 cells could form a monolayer on all scaffolds, and most functional genes were also stably expressed on all

  10. Analysis of Light-Induced Transmembrane Ion Gradients and Membrane Potential in Photosystem I Proteoliposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Pennisi, Cristian P.; Greenbaum, Elias; Yoshida, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) complexes can support a light-driven electrochemical gradient for protons, which is the driving force for energy-conserving reactions across biological membranes. In this work, a computational model that enables a quantitative description of the light-induced proton gradients across the membrane of PSI proteoliposomes is presented. Using a set of electrodiffusion equations, a compartmental model of a vesicle suspended in aqueous medium was studied. The light-mediated proton movement was modeled as a single proton pumping step with backpressure of the electric potential. The model fits determinations of pH obtained from PSI proteoliposomes illuminated in the presence of mediators of cyclic electron transport. The model also allows analysis of the proton gradients in relation to the transmembrane ion fluxes and electric potential. Sensitivity analysis enabled a determination of the parameters that have greater influence on steady-state levels and onset/decay rates of transmembrane pH and electric potential. This model could be used as a tool for optimizing PSI proteoliposomes for photo-electrochemical applications.

  11. Analysis of light-induced transmembrane ion gradients and membrane potential in Photosystem I proteoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, Cristian Pablo; Greenbaum, Elias; Yoshida, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) complexes can support a light-driven electrochemical gradient for protons, which is the driving force for energy-conserving reactions across biological membranes. In this work, a computational model that enables a quantitative description of the light-induced proton gradients across the membrane of PSI proteoliposomes is presented. Using a set of electrodiffusion equations, a compartmental model of a vesicle suspended in aqueous medium was studied. The light-mediated proton movement was modeled as a single proton pumping step with backpressure of the electric potential. The model fits determinations of pH obtained from PSI proteoliposomes illuminated in the presence of mediators of cyclic electron transport. The model also allows analysis of the proton gradients in relation to the transmembrane ion fluxes and electric potential. Sensitivity analysis enabled a determination of the parameters that have greater influence on steady-state levels and onset/decay rates of transmembrane pH and electric potential. This model could be used as a tool for optimizing PSI proteoliposomes for photo-electrochemical applications.

  12. Signal-to-noise ratio in the membrane potential of the owl's auditory coincidence detectors

    PubMed Central

    Funabiki, Kazuo; Kuokkanen, Paula T.; Kempter, Richard; Carr, Catherine E.

    2012-01-01

    Owls use interaural time differences (ITDs) to locate a sound source. They compute ITD in a specialized neural circuit that consists of axonal delay lines from the cochlear nucleus magnocellularis (NM) and coincidence detectors in the nucleus laminaris (NL). Recent physiological recordings have shown that tonal stimuli induce oscillatory membrane potentials in NL neurons (Funabiki K, Ashida G, Konishi M. J Neurosci 31: 15245–15256, 2011). The amplitude of these oscillations varies with ITD and is strongly correlated to the firing rate. The oscillation, termed the sound analog potential, has the same frequency as the stimulus tone and is presumed to originate from phase-locked synaptic inputs from NM fibers. To investigate how these oscillatory membrane potentials are generated, we applied recently developed signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analysis techniques (Kuokkanen PT, Wagner H, Ashida G, Carr CE, Kempter R. J Neurophysiol 104: 2274–2290, 2010) to the intracellular waveforms obtained in vivo. Our theoretical prediction of the band-limited SNRs agreed with experimental data for mid- to high-frequency (>2 kHz) NL neurons. For low-frequency (≤2 kHz) NL neurons, however, measured SNRs were lower than theoretical predictions. These results suggest that the number of independent NM fibers converging onto each NL neuron and/or the population-averaged degree of phase-locking of the NM fibers could be significantly smaller in the low-frequency NL region than estimated for higher best-frequency NL. PMID:22933726

  13. Biophysical basis of the sound analog membrane potential that underlies coincidence detection in the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Go; Funabiki, Kazuo; Carr, Catherine E

    2013-01-01

    Interaural time difference (ITD), or the difference in timing of a sound wave arriving at the two ears, is a fundamental cue for sound localization. A wide variety of animals have specialized neural circuits dedicated to the computation of ITDs. In the avian auditory brainstem, ITDs are encoded as the spike rates in the coincidence detector neurons of the nucleus laminaris (NL). NL neurons compare the binaural phase-locked inputs from the axons of ipsi- and contralateral nucleus magnocellularis (NM) neurons. Intracellular recordings from the barn owl's NL in vivo showed that tonal stimuli induce oscillations in the membrane potential. Since this oscillatory potential resembled the stimulus sound waveform, it was named the sound analog potential (Funabiki et al., 2011). Previous modeling studies suggested that a convergence of phase-locked spikes from NM leads to an oscillatory membrane potential in NL, but how presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic factors affect the formation of the sound analog potential remains to be investigated. In the accompanying paper, we derive analytical relations between these parameters and the signal and noise components of the oscillation. In this paper, we focus on the effects of the number of presynaptic NM fibers, the mean firing rate of these fibers, their average degree of phase-locking, and the synaptic time scale. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations show that, provided the total synaptic input is kept constant, changes in the number and spike rate of NM fibers alter the ITD-independent noise whereas the degree of phase-locking is linearly converted to the ITD-dependent signal component of the sound analog potential. The synaptic time constant affects the signal more prominently than the noise, making faster synaptic input more suitable for effective ITD computation. PMID:24265615

  14. An inner membrane cytochrome required only for reduction of high redox potential extracellular electron acceptors

    DOE PAGES

    Levar, Caleb E.; Chan, Chi Ho; Mehta-Kolte, Misha G.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2014-10-28

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria, such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, transfer electrons beyond their outer membranes to Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, heavy metals, and electrodes in electrochemical devices. In the environment, metal acceptors exist in multiple chelated and insoluble forms that span a range of redox potentials and offer different amounts of available energy. Despite this, metal-reducing bacteria have not been shown to alter their electron transfer strategies to take advantage of these energy differences. Disruption of imcH, encoding an inner membrane c-type cytochrome, eliminated the ability of G. sulfurreducens to reduce Fe(III) citrate, Fe(III)-EDTA, and insoluble Mn(IV) oxides, electron acceptors with potentialsmore » greater than 0.1 V versus the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE), but the imcH mutant retained the ability to reduce Fe(III) oxides with potentials of ≤–0.1 V versus SHE. The imcH mutant failed to grow on electrodes poised at +0.24 V versus SHE, but switching electrodes to –0.1 V versus SHE triggered exponential growth. At potentials of ≤–0.1 V versus SHE, both the wild type and the imcH mutant doubled 60% slower than at higher potentials. Electrodes poised even 100 mV higher (0.0 V versus SHE) could not trigger imcH mutant growth. These results demonstrate that G. sulfurreducens possesses multiple respiratory pathways, that some of these pathways are in operation only after exposure to low redox potentials, and that electron flow can be coupled to generation of different amounts of energy for growth. Redox potentials that trigger these behaviors mirror those of metal acceptors common in subsurface environments where Geobacter is found.« less

  15. Biophysical basis of the sound analog membrane potential that underlies coincidence detection in the barn owl

    PubMed Central

    Ashida, Go; Funabiki, Kazuo; Carr, Catherine E.

    2013-01-01

    Interaural time difference (ITD), or the difference in timing of a sound wave arriving at the two ears, is a fundamental cue for sound localization. A wide variety of animals have specialized neural circuits dedicated to the computation of ITDs. In the avian auditory brainstem, ITDs are encoded as the spike rates in the coincidence detector neurons of the nucleus laminaris (NL). NL neurons compare the binaural phase-locked inputs from the axons of ipsi- and contralateral nucleus magnocellularis (NM) neurons. Intracellular recordings from the barn owl's NL in vivo showed that tonal stimuli induce oscillations in the membrane potential. Since this oscillatory potential resembled the stimulus sound waveform, it was named the sound analog potential (Funabiki et al., 2011). Previous modeling studies suggested that a convergence of phase-locked spikes from NM leads to an oscillatory membrane potential in NL, but how presynaptic, synaptic, and postsynaptic factors affect the formation of the sound analog potential remains to be investigated. In the accompanying paper, we derive analytical relations between these parameters and the signal and noise components of the oscillation. In this paper, we focus on the effects of the number of presynaptic NM fibers, the mean firing rate of these fibers, their average degree of phase-locking, and the synaptic time scale. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations show that, provided the total synaptic input is kept constant, changes in the number and spike rate of NM fibers alter the ITD-independent noise whereas the degree of phase-locking is linearly converted to the ITD-dependent signal component of the sound analog potential. The synaptic time constant affects the signal more prominently than the noise, making faster synaptic input more suitable for effective ITD computation. PMID:24265615

  16. Poly(imide)/Organically-Modified Montmorillonite Nanocomposite as a Potential Membrane for Alkaline Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Battirola, Liliane C.; Gasparotto, Luiz H. S.; Rodrigues-Filho, Ubirajara P.; Tremiliosi-Filho, Germano

    2012-01-01

    In this work we evaluated the potentiality of a poly(imide) (PI)/organically-modified montmorillonite (O-MMT) nanocomposite membrane for the use in alkaline fuel cells. Both X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy revealed a good dispersion of O-MMT into the PI matrix and preservation of the O-MMT layered structure. When compared to the pure PI, the addition of O-MMT improved thermal stability and markedly increased the capability of absorbing electrolyte and ionic conductivity of the composite. The results show that the PI/O-MMT nanocomposite is a promising candidate for alkaline fuel cell applications. PMID:24958290

  17. Possible effect of variable membrane potential of a cancer cell on different carcinogenic processes.

    PubMed

    Gogichadze, G; Gogichadze, T; Misabishvili, E; Kamkamidze, G

    2014-09-01

    Cancer cells (unlike normal analogs) have a variable membrane potential on their surface, which depends on the intensity of metabolism of this type of cells and the environmental hydrogen index: in the case of low-pH (acid medium) they are known to have either a low negative or even positive charge, while in the case of high-pH (alkaline medium) - a relatively high negative charge. In this paper we suggest that the processes of metastasis, progression and invasion ongoing in a macro organism can be ascribed to the presence of exactly this variable electric charge in a cancer cell. PMID:25341251

  18. Thylakoid Membrane Maturation and PSII Activation Are Linked in Greening Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Barthel, Sandra; Bernát, Gábor; Seidel, Tobias; Rupprecht, Eva; Kahmann, Uwe; Schneider, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Thylakoid membranes are typical and essential features of both chloroplasts and cyanobacteria. While they are crucial for phototrophic growth of cyanobacterial cells, biogenesis of thylakoid membranes is not well understood yet. Dark-grown Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells contain only rudimentary thylakoid membranes but still a relatively high amount of phycobilisomes, inactive photosystem II and active photosystem I centers. After shifting dark-grown Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells into the light, “greening” of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells, i.e. thylakoid membrane formation and recovery of photosynthetic electron transport reactions, was monitored. Complete restoration of a typical thylakoid membrane system was observed within 24 hours after an initial lag phase of 6 to 8 hours. Furthermore, activation of photosystem II complexes and restoration of a functional photosynthetic electron transport chain appears to be linked to the biogenesis of organized thylakoid membrane pairs. PMID:23922268

  19. Effect of gramicidin A on the dipole potential of phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Shapovalov, V L; Kotova, E A; Rokitskaya, T I; Antonenko, Y N

    1999-01-01

    The effect of channel-forming peptide gramicidin A on the dipole potential of phospholipid monolayers and bilayers has been studied. Surface pressure and surface potential isotherms of monolayers have been measured with a Langmuir trough equipped with a Wilhelmy balance and a surface potential meter (Kelvin probe). Gramicidin has been shown to shift pressure-area isotherms of phospholipids and to reduce their monolayer surface potentials. Both effects increase with the increase in gramicidin concentration and depend on the kind of phosphatidylcholine used. Application of the dual-wavelength ratiometric fluorescence method using the potential-sensitive dye RH421 has revealed that the addition of gramicidin A to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine liposomes leads to a decrease in the fluorescence ratio of RH421. This is similar to the effect of phloretin, which is known to decrease the dipole potential. The comparison of the concentration dependences of the fluorescence ratio for gramicidin and phloretin shows that gramicidin is as potent as phloretin in modifying the membrane dipole potential. PMID:10388758

  20. Developmental changes in ANP-stimulated guanylyl cyclase activity enhanced by ATP in rat lung membrane fractions.

    PubMed Central

    Charoonroje, P; Tokumitsu, Y; Nomura, Y

    1994-01-01

    1. ANP (atrial natriuretic peptides)- or ANP/ATP-stimulated guanylyl cyclase activities were compared in adult (2 month old) and neonatal (5-7 day old) rat lung membrane fractions. 2. The enzyme activities of both membranes depended on the incubation time and ATP concentration: although the activities of both membranes were similar after a short incubation time (4 min), those in adult membranes were lower than those of neonatal membranes after longer incubation times (10 and 30 min) or at lower concentrations of ATP. 3. ANP/ATP gamma S-stimulated guanylyl cyclase activities, which were much higher than ANP/ATP-stimulated activities, were similar in both membranes. 4. ATPase activity of adult membranes was higher than that of neonatal membranes, suggesting that hydrolysis of ATP leads to a decrease of ANP/ATP-guanylyl cyclase activity in adult membranes. Triton X-100 enhanced and diminished ANP/ATP-stimulated guanylyl cyclase activities of adult and neonatal membranes, respectively, and thereby abolished the adult/neonatal difference in the membrane response to ATP. 5. ANP-stimulated activities of both membranes were much more activated by pre-incubation with ATP gamma S than those induced by simultaneous addition of ATP gamma S. The former activities were decreased to levels of the latter by Triton X-100. The latter activities were not affected by Triton X-100. 6. The present results suggested that conformation of lung plasma membranes is related to activation of the ANP receptor/guanylyl cyclase system. PMID:7834209

  1. Relation between cell death progression, reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial membrane potential in fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells under heat-shock conditions.

    PubMed

    Pyatrikas, Darya V; Fedoseeva, Irina V; Varakina, Nina N; Rusaleva, Tatyana M; Stepanov, Alexei V; Fedyaeva, Anna V; Borovskii, Gennadii B; Rikhvanov, Eugene G

    2015-06-01

    Moderate heat shock increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that led to cell death in glucose-grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Conditions that disturb mitochondrial functions such as treatment by uncouplers and petite mutation were shown to inhibit ROS production and protects cell from thermal death. Hence, mitochondria are responsible for ROS production and play an active role in cell death. An increase in ROS production was accompanied by hyperpolarization of inner mitochondrial membrane. All agents suppressing hyperpolarization also suppressed heat-induced ROS production. It was supposed that generation of ROS under moderate heat shock in glucose-grown S. cerevisiae cells is driven by the mitochondrial membrane potential.

  2. Influence of the lipid membrane environment on structure and activity of the outer membrane protein Ail from Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Fujimoto, L Miya; Yao, Yong; Plano, Gregory V; Marassi, Francesca M

    2015-02-01

    The surrounding environment has significant consequences for the structural and functional properties of membrane proteins. While native structure and function can be reconstituted in lipid bilayer membranes, the detergents used for protein solubilization are not always compatible with biological activity and, hence, not always appropriate for direct detection of ligand binding by NMR spectroscopy. Here we describe how the sample environment affects the activity of the outer membrane protein Ail (attachment invasion locus) from Yersinia pestis. Although Ail adopts the correct β-barrel fold in micelles, the high detergent concentrations required for NMR structural studies are not compatible with the ligand binding functionality of the protein. We also describe preparations of Ail embedded in phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs, optimized for NMR studies and ligand binding activity assays. Ail in nanodiscs is capable of binding its human ligand fibronectin and also yields high quality NMR spectra that reflect the proper fold. Binding activity assays, developed to be performed directly with the NMR samples, show that ligand binding involves the extracellular loops of Ail. The data show that even when detergent micelles support the protein fold, detergents can interfere with activity in subtle ways.

  3. Actomyosin dynamics drive local membrane component organization in an in vitro active composite layer

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Kabir; Iljazi, Elda; Bhat, Abrar; Bieling, Peter; Mullins, R. Dyche; Rao, Madan; Mayor, Satyajit

    2016-01-01

    The surface of a living cell provides a platform for receptor signaling, protein sorting, transport, and endocytosis, whose regulation requires the local control of membrane organization. Previous work has revealed a role for dynamic actomyosin in membrane protein and lipid organization, suggesting that the cell surface behaves as an active composite composed of a fluid bilayer and a thin film of active actomyosin. We reconstitute an analogous system in vitro that consists of a fluid lipid bilayer coupled via membrane-associated actin-binding proteins to dynamic actin filaments and myosin motors. Upon complete consumption of ATP, this system settles into distinct phases of actin organization, namely bundled filaments, linked apolar asters, and a lattice of polar asters. These depend on actin concentration, filament length, and actin/myosin ratio. During formation of the polar aster phase, advection of the self-organizing actomyosin network drives transient clustering of actin-associated membrane components. Regeneration of ATP supports a constitutively remodeling actomyosin state, which in turn drives active fluctuations of coupled membrane components, resembling those observed at the cell surface. In a multicomponent membrane bilayer, this remodeling actomyosin layer contributes to changes in the extent and dynamics of phase-segregating domains. These results show how local membrane composition can be driven by active processes arising from actomyosin, highlighting the fundamental basis of the active composite model of the cell surface, and indicate its relevance to the study of membrane organization. PMID:26929326

  4. In skeletal muscle the relaxation of the resting membrane potential induced by K(+) permeability changes depends on Cl(-) transport.

    PubMed

    Geukes Foppen, R J

    2004-01-01

    In resting skeletal muscle the potassium permeability is determined by the permeability of the inwardly potassium rectifier. Continuous resting membrane potential measurements are done to follow the relaxation of the membrane potential upon changes in potassium permeability. Inhibition of the inwardly potassium rectifier, by extracellular application of 80 microM Ba(2+), causes the cell to depolarize with mean time constants as follows: in control 127+/-7 s ( n=23), in the presence of bumetanide, as an inhibitor of the Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter, 182+/-23 s ( n=7), in hypertonic media (340 mosmol/kg) 90.4+/-5 s ( n=7) and in reduced chloride medium 64+/-8 s ( n=5). The depolarizing relaxation of the membrane potential induced by reduction of extracellular potassium produces similar results. These time constants are at least three orders of magnitude slower than the time constants reported in the literature for the inhibition of the inwardly potassium rectifier. Chloride transport affects the relaxation of the membrane potential. A further characterization of chloride transport is done by following the relaxation of the membrane potential upon application of chloride transport modulators. It is argued that the electroneutral cotransporter, for which a flux was preliminarily estimated of 13.4 pmol cm(-2) s(-1), has a considerable role in the processes related to the resting membrane potential.

  5. Quantitative measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential in cultured cells: calcium-induced de- and hyperpolarization of neuronal mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Gerencser, Akos A; Chinopoulos, Christos; Birket, Matthew J; Jastroch, Martin; Vitelli, Cathy; Nicholls, David G; Brand, Martin D

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨM) is a central intermediate in oxidative energy metabolism. Although ΔΨM is routinely measured qualitatively or semi-quantitatively using fluorescent probes, its quantitative assay in intact cells has been limited mostly to slow, bulk-scale radioisotope distribution methods. Here we derive and verify a biophysical model of fluorescent potentiometric probe compartmentation and dynamics using a bis-oxonol-type indicator of plasma membrane potential (ΔΨP) and the ΔΨM probe tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM) using fluorescence imaging and voltage clamp. Using this model we introduce a purely fluorescence-based quantitative assay to measure absolute values of ΔΨM in millivolts as they vary in time in individual cells in monolayer culture. The ΔΨP-dependent distribution of the probes is modelled by Eyring rate theory. Solutions of the model are used to deconvolute ΔΨP and ΔΨM in time from the probe fluorescence intensities, taking into account their slow, ΔΨP-dependent redistribution and Nernstian behaviour. The calibration accounts for matrix:cell volume ratio, high- and low-affinity binding, activity coefficients, background fluorescence and optical dilution, allowing comparisons of potentials in cells or cell types differing in these properties. In cultured rat cortical neurons, ΔΨM is −139 mV at rest, and is regulated between −108 mV and −158 mV by concerted increases in ATP demand and Ca2+-dependent metabolic activation. Sensitivity analysis showed that the standard error of the mean in the absolute calibrated values of resting ΔΨM including all biological and systematic measurement errors introduced by the calibration parameters is less than 11 mV. Between samples treated in different ways, the typical equivalent error is ∼5 mV. PMID:22495585

  6. Power Laws from Linear Neuronal Cable Theory: Power Spectral Densities of the Soma Potential, Soma Membrane Current and Single-Neuron Contribution to the EEG

    PubMed Central

    Pettersen, Klas H.; Lindén, Henrik; Tetzlaff, Tom; Einevoll, Gaute T.

    2014-01-01

    Power laws, that is, power spectral densities (PSDs) exhibiting behavior for large frequencies f, have been observed both in microscopic (neural membrane potentials and currents) and macroscopic (electroencephalography; EEG) recordings. While complex network behavior has been suggested to be at the root of this phenomenon, we here demonstrate a possible origin of such power laws in the biophysical properties of single neurons described by the standard cable equation. Taking advantage of the analytical tractability of the so called ball and stick neuron model, we derive general expressions for the PSD transfer functions for a set of measures of neuronal activity: the soma membrane current, the current-dipole moment (corresponding to the single-neuron EEG contribution), and the soma membrane potential. These PSD transfer functions relate the PSDs of the respective measurements to the PSDs of the noisy input currents. With homogeneously distributed input currents across the neuronal membrane we find that all PSD transfer functions express asymptotic high-frequency power laws with power-law exponents analytically identified as for the soma membrane current, for the current-dipole moment, and for the soma membrane potential. Comparison with available data suggests that the apparent power laws observed in the high-frequency end of the PSD spectra may stem from uncorrelated current sources which are homogeneously distributed across the neural membranes and themselves exhibit pink () noise distributions. While the PSD noise spectra at low frequencies may be dominated by synaptic noise, our findings suggest that the high-frequency power laws may originate in noise from intrinsic ion channels. The significance of this finding goes beyond neuroscience as it demonstrates how power laws with a wide range of values for the power-law exponent α may arise from a simple, linear partial differential equation. PMID:25393030

  7. Potentiating the Activity of Nisin against Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liang; van Heel, Auke J.; Montalban-Lopez, Manuel; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2016-01-01

    Lantibiotics are antimicrobial (methyl)lanthionine-containing peptides produced by various Gram-positive bacteria. The model lantibiotic, nisin, binds lipid II in the cell membrane. Additionally, after binding it can insert into the membrane creating a pore. Nisin can efficiently inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria and resistance is rarely observed. However, the activity of lantibiotics is at least 100-fold lower against certain Gram-negative bacteria. This is caused by the fact that Gram-negative bacteria have an outer membrane that hinders the peptides to reach lipid II, which is located in the inner membrane. Improving the activity of lantibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria could be achieved if the outer membrane traversing efficiency is increased. Here, several anti-Gram-negative peptides (e.g., apidaecin 1b, oncocin), or parts thereof, were fused to the C-terminus of either a truncated version of nisin containing the first three/five rings or full length nisin. The activities of these fusion peptides were tested against Gram-negative pathogens. Our results showed that when an eight amino acids (PRPPHPRL) tail from apidaecin 1b was attached to nisin, the activity of nisin against Escherichia coli CECT101 was increased more than two times. This research presents a new and promising method to increase the anti-Gram-negative activity of lantibiotics. PMID:26904542

  8. VDAC electronics: 1. VDAC-hexo(gluco)kinase generator of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2014-05-01

    The simplest mechanism of the generation of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential (OMP) by the VDAC (voltage-dependent anion channel)-hexokinase complex (VHC), suggested earlier, and by the VDAC-glucokinase complex (VGC), was computationally analyzed. Even at less than 4% of VDACs bound to hexokinase, the calculated OMP is high enough to trigger the electrical closure of VDACs beyond the complexes at threshold concentrations of glucose. These results confirmed our previous hypothesis that the Warburg effect is caused by the electrical closure of VDACs, leading to global restriction of the outer membrane permeability coupled to aerobic glycolysis. The model showed that the inhibition of the conductance and/or an increase in the voltage sensitivity of a relatively small fraction of VDACs by factors like tubulin potentiate the electrical closure of the remaining free VDACs. The extrusion of calcium ions from the mitochondrial intermembrane space by the generated OMP, positive inside, might increase cancer cell resistance to death. Within the VGC model, the known effect of induction of ATP release from mitochondria by accumulated glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic beta cells might result not only of the known effect of GK dissociation from the VDAC-GK complex, but also of a decrease in the free energy of glucokinase reaction, leading to the OMP decrease and VDAC opening. We suggest that the VDAC-mediated electrical control of the mitochondrial outer membrane permeability, dependent on metabolic conditions, is a fundamental physiological mechanism of global regulation of mitochondrial functions and of cell death. PMID:24412217

  9. Comparison of microbial communities of activated sludge and membrane biofilm in 10 full-scale membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sung Jun; Kwon, Hyeokpil; Jeong, So-Yeon; Lee, Chung-Hak; Kim, Tae Gwan

    2016-09-15

    Operation of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for wastewater treatment is hampered by the membrane biofouling resulting from microbial activities. However, the knowledge of the microbial ecology of both biofilm and activated sludge in MBRs has not been sufficient. In this study, we scrutinized microbial communities of biofilm and activated sludge from 10 full-scale MBR plants. Overall, Flavobacterium, Dechloromonas and Nitrospira were abundant in order of abundance in biofilm, whereas Dechloromonas, Flavobacterium and Haliscomenobacter in activated sludge. Community structure was analyzed in either biofilm or activated sludge. Among MBRs, as expected, not only diversity of microbial community but also its composition was different from one another (p < 0.05). Between the biofilm and activated sludge, community composition made significant difference, but its diversity measures (i.e., alpha diversity, e.g., richness, diversity and evenness) did not (p > 0.05). Effects of ten environmental factors on community change were investigated using Spearman correlation. MLSS, HRT, F/M ratio and SADm explained the variation of microbial composition in the biofilm, whereas only MLSS did in the activated sludge. Microbial networks were constructed with the 10 environmental factors. The network results revealed that there were different topological characteristics between the biofilm and activated sludge networks, in which each of the 4 factors had different associations with microbial nodes. These results indicated that the different microbial associations were responsible for the variation of community composition between the biofilm and activated sludge.

  10. Pre & Postsynaptic Tuning of Action Potential Timing by Spontaneous GABAergic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Caillard, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Frequency and timing of action potential discharge are key elements for coding and transfer of information between neurons. The nature and location of the synaptic contacts, the biophysical parameters of the receptor-operated channels and their kinetics of activation are major determinants of the firing behaviour of each individual neuron. Ultimately the intrinsic excitability of each neuron determines the input-output function. Here we evaluate the influence of spontaneous GABAergic synaptic activity on the timing of action potentials in Layer 2/3 pyramidal neurones in acute brain slices from the somatosensory cortex of young rats. Somatic dynamic current injection to mimic synaptic input events was employed, together with a simple computational model that reproduce subthreshold membrane properties. Besides the well-documented control of neuronal excitability, spontaneous background GABAergic activity has a major detrimental effect on spike timing. In fact, GABAA receptors tune the relationship between the excitability and fidelity of pyramidal neurons via a postsynaptic (the reversal potential for GABAA activity) and a presynaptic (the frequency of spontaneous activity) mechanism. GABAergic activity can decrease or increase the excitability of pyramidal neurones, depending on the difference between the reversal potential for GABAA receptors and the threshold for action potential. In contrast, spike time jitter can only be increased proportionally to the difference between these two membrane potentials. Changes in excitability by background GABAergic activity can therefore only be associated with deterioration of the reliability of spike timing. PMID:21789249

  11. Membrane Bound GSK-3 Activates Wnt Signaling through Disheveled and Arrow

    PubMed Central

    Mannava, Anirudh G.; Tolwinski, Nicholas S.

    2015-01-01

    Wnt ligands and their downstream pathway components coordinate many developmental and cellular processes. In adults, they regulate tissue homeostasis through regulation of stem cells. Mechanistically, signal transduction through this pathway is complicated by pathway components having both positive and negative roles in signal propagation. Here we examine the positive role of GSK-3/Zw3 in promoting signal transduction at the plasma membrane. We find that targeting GSK-3 to the plasma membrane activates signaling in Drosophila embryos. This activation requires the presence of the co-receptor Arrow-LRP5/6 and the pathway activating protein Disheveled. Our results provide genetic evidence for evolutionarily conserved, separable roles for GSK-3 at the membrane and in the cytosol, and are consistent with a model where the complex cycles from cytosol to membrane in order to promote signaling at the membrane and to prevent it in the cytosol. PMID:25848770

  12. Glucocorticoid hormones increase the activity of plasma membrane alkaline phosphodiesterase I in rat hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, G G; Amar-Costesec, A; Verhaegen, M; Granner, D K

    1980-01-01

    In rat hepatoma cells the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone causes a 3-fold increase in the activity of the plasma membrane enzyme alkaline phosphodiesterase I (oligonucleat 5'-nucleotidohydrolase, EC 3.1.4.1). The data are consistent with an induction phenomenon mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor involved in tyrosine aminotransferase induction. The effect on alkaline phosphodiesterase I is not a reflection of a general membrane effect of dexamethasone, because the activity of three other enzymes of the plasma membrane is unaffected. On the other hand, nucleoside diphosphatase (nucleoside diphosphate phosphohydrolase acting on ADP) activity is inhibited. Thus, two more enzymes sensitive to glucocorticoids have been identified in a cell line in which these hormones influence only very few gene products. This paper describes enzymatic changes in the plasma membrane of rat hepatoma cells in which glucocorticoids normalize a number of membrane-associated processes that are considered to be characteristic of transformed cells. PMID:6102383

  13. Two-pore domain K⁺ channels regulate membrane potential of isolated human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robert B; Kondo, Colleen; Belke, Darrell D; Giles, Wayne R

    2011-11-01

    Potassium channels that regulate resting membrane potential (RMP) of human articular chondrocytes (HACs) of the tibial joint maintained in short-term (0-3 days) non-confluent cell culture were studied using patch-clamp techniques. Quantitative PCR showed that transcripts of genes for two-pore domain K(+) channels (KCNK1, KCNK5 and KCNK6), and 'BK' Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (KCNMA1) were abundantly expressed. Immunocytological methods detected α-subunits for BK and K(2p)5.1 (TASK-2) K(+) channels. Electrophysiological recordings identified three distinct K(+) currents in isolated HACs: (i) a voltage- and time-dependent 'delayed rectifier', blocked by 100 nM α-dendrotoxin, (ii) a large 'noisy' voltage-dependent current that was blocked by low concentrations of tetraethylammonium (TEA; 50% blocking dose = 0.15 mM) and iberiotoxin (52% block, 100 nM) and (iii) a voltage-independent 'background' K(+) current that was blocked by acidic pH (5.5-6), was increased by alkaline pH (8.5), and was not blocked by TEA, but was blocked by the local anaesthetic bupivacaine (0.25 mM). The RMP of isolated HACs was very slightly affected by 5 mM TEA, which was sufficient to block both voltage-dependent K(+) currents, suggesting that these currents probably contributed little to maintaining RMP under 'resting' conditions (i.e. low internal [Ca(2+)]). Increases in external K(+) concentration depolarized HACs by 30 mV in response to a 10-fold increase in [K(+)], indicating a significant but not exclusive role for K(+) current in determining RMP. Increases in external [K(+)] in voltage-clamped HACs revealed a voltage-independent K(+) current whose inward current magnitude increased with external [K(+)]. Block of this current by bupivacaine (0.25-1 mM) in 5 and 25 mM external [K(+)] resulted in a large (8-25 mV) depolarization of RMP. The biophysical and pharmacological properties of the background K(+) current, together with expression of mRNA and α-subunit protein for TASK-2

  14. Plant plasma membrane aquaporins in natural vesicles as potential stabilizers and carriers of glucosinolates.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria Del Carmen; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Moreno, Diego A; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-07-01

    Their biodegradable nature and ability to target cells make biological vesicles potential nanocarriers for bioactives delivery. In this work, the interaction between proteoliposomes enriched in aquaporins derived from broccoli plants and the glucosinolates was evaluated. The vesicles were stored at different temperatures and their integrity was studied. Determination of glucosinolates, showed that indolic glucosinolates were more sensitive to degradation in aqueous solution than aliphatic glucosinolates. Glucoraphanin was stabilized by leaf and root proteoliposomes at 25°C through their interaction with aquaporins. An extensive hydrogen bond network, including different aquaporin residues, and hydrophobic interactions, as a consequence of the interaction between the linear alkane chain of glucoraphanin and Glu31 and Leu34 protein residues, were established as the main stabilizing elements. Combined our results showed that plasma membrane vesicles from leaf and root tissues of broccoli plants may be considered as suitable carriers for glucosinolate which stabilization can be potentially attributed to aquaporins.

  15. Potentialities of a Membrane Reactor with Laccase Grafted Membranes for the Enzymatic Degradation of Phenolic Compounds in Water

    PubMed Central

    Chea, Vorleak; Paolucci-Jeanjean, Delphine; Sanchez, José; Belleville, Marie-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the degradation of phenolic compounds by laccases from Trametes versicolor in an enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR). The enzymatic membranes were prepared by grafting laccase on a gelatine layer previously deposited onto α-alumina tubular membranes. The 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (DMP) was selected  from among the three different phenolic compounds tested (guaiacol, 4-chlorophenol and DMP) to study the performance of the EMR in dead end configuration. At the lowest feed substrate concentration tested (100 mg·L−1), consumption increased with flux (up to 7.9 × 103 mg·h−1·m−2 at 128 L·h−1·m−2), whereas at the highest substrate concentration (500 mg·L−1), it was shown that the reaction was limited by the oxygen content. PMID:25295628

  16. Acid gradient across plasma membrane can drive phosphate bond synthesis in cancer cells: acidic tumor milieu as a potential energy source.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Gautam; Sen, Suvajit; Chaudhuri, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive cancers exhibit an efficient conversion of high amounts of glucose to lactate accompanied by acid secretion, a phenomenon popularly known as the Warburg effect. The acidic microenvironment and the alkaline cytosol create a proton-gradient (acid gradient) across the plasma membrane that represents proton-motive energy. Increasing experimental data from physiological relevant models suggest that acid gradient stimulates tumor proliferation, and can also support its energy needs. However, direct biochemical evidence linking extracellular acid gradient to generation of intracellular ATP are missing. In this work, we demonstrate that cancer cells can synthesize significant amounts of phosphate-bonds from phosphate in response to acid gradient across plasma membrane. The noted phenomenon exists in absence of glycolysis and mitochondrial ATP synthesis, and is unique to cancer. Biochemical assays using viable cancer cells, and purified plasma membrane vesicles utilizing radioactive phosphate, confirmed phosphate-bond synthesis from free phosphate (Pi), and also localization of this activity to the plasma membrane. In addition to ATP, predominant formation of pyrophosphate (PPi) from Pi was also observed when plasma membrane vesicles from cancer cells were subjected to trans-membrane acid gradient. Cancer cytosols were found capable of converting PPi to ATP, and also stimulate ATP synthesis from Pi from the vesicles. Acid gradient created through glucose metabolism by cancer cells, as observed in tumors, also proved critical for phosphate-bond synthesis. In brief, these observations reveal a role of acidic tumor milieu as a potential energy source and may offer a novel therapeutic target.

  17. Influence of activating hormones on human platelet membrane Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Resink, T.J.; Dimitrov, D.; Stucki, S.; Buehler, F.R.

    1986-07-16

    Intact platelets were pretreated with hormones and thereafter membranes were prepared and Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity determined. Thrombin decreased the V/sub max/ of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase after pretreatment of intact platelets. Platelet activating factor, vasopressin and ADP also decreased Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or A23187 or ionomycin alone had no effect, while the simultaneous pretreatment with TPA and Ca/sup 2 +/-ionophore decreased Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity. cAMP elevating agents prostaglandin E/sub 1/ (PGE/sub 1/) and forskolin had no influence per se on Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase, but antagonized the inhibitory effect of thrombin. The data suggest a close connection between phosphoinositide metabolism and the Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase system.

  18. The electrogenic Na+/HCO3− cotransport modulates resting membrane potential and action potential duration in cat ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Abrille, María C; Petroff, Martín G Vila; Aiello, Ernesto A

    2007-01-01

    Perforated whole-cell configuration of patch clamp was used to determine the contribution of the electrogenic Na+/HCO3− cotransport (NBC) on the shape of the action potential in cat ventricular myocytes. Switching from Hepes to HCO3− buffer at constant extracellular pH (pHo) hyperpolarized resting membrane potential (RMP) by 2.67 ± 0.42 mV (n = 9, P < 0.05). The duration of action potential measured at 50% of repolarization time (APD50) was 35.8 ± 6.8% shorter in the presence of HCO3− than in its absence (n = 9, P < 0.05). The anion blocker SITS prevented and reversed the HCO3−-induced hyperpolarization and shortening of APD. In addition, no HCO3−-induced hyperpolarization and APD shortening was observed in the absence of extracellular Na+. Quasi-steady-state currents were evoked by 8 s duration voltage-clamped ramps ranging from −130 to +30 mV. A novel component of SITS-sensitive current was observed in the presence of HCO3−. The HCO3−-sensitive current reversed at −87 ± 5 mV (n = 7), a value close to the expected reversal potential of an electrogenic Na+/HCO3− cotransport with a HCO3−:Na+ stoichiometry ratio of 2: 1. The above results allow us to conclude that the cardiac electrogenic Na+/HCO3− cotransport has a relevant influence on RMP and APD of cat ventricular cells. PMID:17138608

  19. On the nature of the oscillations of the membrane potential (slow waves) produced by acetylcholine or carbachol in intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Bolton, T B

    1971-07-01

    1. Intracellular recording was made with glass micro-electrodes from cells of the longitudinal muscle of the guinea-pig ileum in isotonic and in hypertonic solution.2. In isotonic solution spontaneous bursts of electrical activity occurred; these consisted of a slow potential component which carried a burst of spike action potentials. Acetylcholine increased the size (and the frequency) of the slow potential component. This had the effect of first reducing and then abolishing the spike potentials; continuous slow wave activity was thus produced. Slow waves were about 1 sec in duration and up to 50 mV in size in isotonic solution.3. In hypertonic solution the membrane potential was stable. There were no spontaneous spikes and no slow potentials. However, spikes, but not slow potentials, were elicited by depolarizing current. Carbachol (or acetylcholine) reduced the membrane potential and initiated spikes and oscillations of the membrane potential (slow waves). Slow waves were 2-5 sec in duration and 10-40 mV in size in hypertonic solution.4. The response to carbachol in hypertonic solution was unaffected by surgical denervation of the tissue, by tetrodotoxin, or by ganglion blocking agents, indicating that muscarinic stimulants produced their effects by acting directly on the smooth muscle cell.5. In hypertonic solution slow waves occurred only in the presence of a muscarinic stimulant and could not be elicited with depolarizing current (unless carbachol was present) nor by increasing the external potassium concentration.6. In hypertonic solution slow waves were abolished by hyperpolarizing the membrane and their rate of rise was proportional to the level of the membrane potential from which they arose. The membrane resistance was reduced at the peak of the slow wave. Slow waves were rapidly abolished by sodium-deficient solutions but spikes were not.7. It is suggested that slow waves represent an inward current through a slow, sodium-sensitive and voltage

  20. One-way membrane trafficking of SOS in receptor-triggered Ras activation.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Sune M; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Jun, Jesse E; Alvarez, Steven; Triplet, Meredith G; Iwig, Jeffrey S; Yadav, Kamlesh K; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Roose, Jeroen P; Groves, Jay T

    2016-09-01

    SOS is a key activator of the small GTPase Ras. In cells, SOS-Ras signaling is thought to be initiated predominantly by membrane recruitment of SOS via the adaptor Grb2 and balanced by rapidly reversible Grb2-SOS binding kinetics. However, SOS has multiple protein and lipid interactions that provide linkage to the membrane. In reconstituted-membrane experiments, these Grb2-independent interactions were sufficient to retain human SOS on the membrane for many minutes, during which a single SOS molecule could processively activate thousands of Ras molecules. These observations raised questions concerning how receptors maintain control of SOS in cells and how membrane-recruited SOS is ultimately released. We addressed these questions in quantitative assays of reconstituted SOS-deficient chicken B-cell signaling systems combined with single-molecule measurements in supported membranes. These studies revealed an essentially one-way trafficking process in which membrane-recruited SOS remains trapped on the membrane and continuously activates Ras until being actively removed via endocytosis. PMID:27501536

  1. Functional, photochemically active, and chemically asymmetric membranes by interfacial polymerization of derivatized multifunctional prepolymers

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, Harold K.; Wamser, Carl C.

    1988-01-01

    The preparation of a novel class of thin film membranes by interfacial polymerization is disclosed, said membanes incorporating as part of their polymeric structure the functionality of monomeric or oligomeric precursors. Specific embodiments include porphyrin and phthalocyanime derivatives that are photochemically or electrochemically active, as well as chemically asymmetric membranes.

  2. One-way membrane trafficking of SOS in receptor-triggered Ras activation.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Sune M; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Jun, Jesse E; Alvarez, Steven; Triplet, Meredith G; Iwig, Jeffrey S; Yadav, Kamlesh K; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Roose, Jeroen P; Groves, Jay T

    2016-09-01

    SOS is a key activator of the small GTPase Ras. In cells, SOS-Ras signaling is thought to be initiated predominantly by membrane recruitment of SOS via the adaptor Grb2 and balanced by rapidly reversible Grb2-SOS binding kinetics. However, SOS has multiple protein and lipid interactions that provide linkage to the membrane. In reconstituted-membrane experiments, these Grb2-independent interactions were sufficient to retain human SOS on the membrane for many minutes, during which a single SOS molecule could processively activate thousands of Ras molecules. These observations raised questions concerning how receptors maintain control of SOS in cells and how membrane-recruited SOS is ultimately released. We addressed these questions in quantitative assays of reconstituted SOS-deficient chicken B-cell signaling systems combined with single-molecule measurements in supported membranes. These studies revealed an essentially one-way trafficking process in which membrane-recruited SOS remains trapped on the membrane and continuously activates Ras until being actively removed via endocytosis.

  3. Lipid composition and sensitivity of Prototheca wickerhamii to membrane-active antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Sud, I J; Feingold, D S

    1979-01-01

    The lipid composition of Prototheca wickerhamii ATCC 16529 is presented and discussed in relation to the unique susceptibility of the organism to drugs of three membrane-active antimicrobial classes: the polyenes, the polymyxins, and the imidazoles. The presence of ergosterol in the neutral lipid fraction of the membrane is likely responsible for the exquisite susceptibility to amphotericin B. The presence of a large quantity of free fatty acids in the membrane appears responsible for imidazole susceptibility. The membrane determinants of polymyxin B susceptibility are less well defined. PMID:518077

  4. Active endocannabinoids are secreted on extracellular membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Martina; Battista, Natalia; Riganti, Loredana; Prada, Ilaria; Antonucci, Flavia; Cantone, Laura; Matteoli, Michela; Maccarrone, Mauro; Verderio, Claudia

    2015-02-01

    Endocannabinoids primarily influence neuronal synaptic communication within the nervous system. To exert their function, endocannabinoids need to travel across the intercellular space. However, how hydrophobic endocannabinoids cross cell membranes and move extracellularly remains an unresolved problem. Here, we show that endocannabinoids are secreted through extracellular membrane vesicles produced by microglial cells. We demonstrate that microglial extracellular vesicles carry on their surface N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA), which is able to stimulate type-1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1), and inhibit presynaptic transmission, in target GABAergic neurons. This is the first demonstration of a functional role of extracellular vesicular transport of endocannabinoids.

  5. Induction of active immunity with membrane fractions from Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed Central

    Burans, J P; Lynn, M; Solotorovsky, M

    1983-01-01

    Using Escherichia coli strain E-1 as a model, we developed procedures for the preparation of outer- and inner-membrane-enriched fractions as structural units. These procedures could be used to prepare relatively pure inner and outer membrane fractions as determined by succinate dehydrogenase activity, ketodeoxyoctonate levels, and polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis. The use of these procedures to fractionate membrane components from Haemophilus influenzae type b strains H-2 and H-E led to good separation of outer- and inner-membrane-enriched fractions as determined by succinate dehydrogenase and ketodeoxyoctonate levels but incomplete separation as determined by polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis. Although there were differences between the electrophoresis profiles of outer membrane fractions of strains H-2 and H-E, immunization with outer membrane of either strain led to the induction of a high degree of immunoprotection against challenge with the H-2 strain. Protection could also be elicited with inner membrane preparations, but such protection may be due to contamination with outer membrane. Extracted membrane protein induced levels of protection that were comparable to those induced by whole membrane fractions. Images PMID:6602769

  6. GST activity and membrane lipid saturation prevents mesotrione-induced cellular damage in Pantoea ananatis.

    PubMed

    Prione, Lilian P; Olchanheski, Luiz R; Tullio, Leandro D; Santo, Bruno C E; Reche, Péricles M; Martins, Paula F; Carvalho, Giselle; Demiate, Ivo M; Pileggi, Sônia A V; Dourado, Manuella N; Prestes, Rosilene A; Sadowsky, Michael J; Azevedo, Ricardo A; Pileggi, Marcos

    2016-12-01

    Callisto(®), containing the active ingredient mesotrione (2-[4-methylsulfonyl-2-nitrobenzoyl]1,3-cyclohenanedione), is a selective herbicide that controls weeds in corn crops and is a potential environmental contaminant. The objective of this work was to evaluate enzymatic and structural changes in Pantoea ananatis, a strain isolated from water, in response to exposure to this herbicide. Despite degradation of mesotrione, probably due a glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pathway in Pantoea ananatis, this herbicide induced oxidative stress by increasing hydrogen peroxide production. Thiol fragments, eventually produced after mesotrione degradation, could be involved in increased GST activity. Nevertheless, there was no peroxidation damage related to this production, as malondialdehyde (MDA) synthesis, which is due to lipid peroxidation, was highest in the controls, followed by the mesotrione- and Callisto(®)-treated cultures at log growth phase. Therefore, P. ananatis can tolerate and grow in the presence of the herbicide, probably due an efficient control of oxidative stress by a polymorphic catalase system. MDA rates depend on lipid saturation due to a pattern change to a higher level of saturation. These changes are likely related to the formation of GST-mesotrione conjugates and mesotrione degradation-specific metabolites and to the presence of cytotoxic adjuvants. These features may shift lipid membrane saturation, possibly providing a protective effect to bacteria through an increase in membrane impermeability. This response system in P. ananatis provides a novel model for bacterial herbicide tolerance and adaptation in the environment. PMID:27620734

  7. GST activity and membrane lipid saturation prevents mesotrione-induced cellular damage in Pantoea ananatis.

    PubMed

    Prione, Lilian P; Olchanheski, Luiz R; Tullio, Leandro D; Santo, Bruno C E; Reche, Péricles M; Martins, Paula F; Carvalho, Giselle; Demiate, Ivo M; Pileggi, Sônia A V; Dourado, Manuella N; Prestes, Rosilene A; Sadowsky, Michael J; Azevedo, Ricardo A; Pileggi, Marcos

    2016-12-01

    Callisto(®), containing the active ingredient mesotrione (2-[4-methylsulfonyl-2-nitrobenzoyl]1,3-cyclohenanedione), is a selective herbicide that controls weeds in corn crops and is a potential environmental contaminant. The objective of this work was to evaluate enzymatic and structural changes in Pantoea ananatis, a strain isolated from water, in response to exposure to this herbicide. Despite degradation of mesotrione, probably due a glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pathway in Pantoea ananatis, this herbicide induced oxidative stress by increasing hydrogen peroxide production. Thiol fragments, eventually produced after mesotrione degradation, could be involved in increased GST activity. Nevertheless, there was no peroxidation damage related to this production, as malondialdehyde (MDA) synthesis, which is due to lipid peroxidation, was highest in the controls, followed by the mesotrione- and Callisto(®)-treated cultures at log growth phase. Therefore, P. ananatis can tolerate and grow in the presence of the herbicide, probably due an efficient control of oxidative stress by a polymorphic catalase system. MDA rates depend on lipid saturation due to a pattern change to a higher level of saturation. These changes are likely related to the formation of GST-mesotrione conjugates and mesotrione degradation-specific metabolites and to the presence of cytotoxic adjuvants. These features may shift lipid membrane saturation, possibly providing a protective effect to bacteria through an increase in membrane impermeability. This response system in P. ananatis provides a novel model for bacterial herbicide tolerance and adaptation in the environment.

  8. Uncoupling the Structure-Activity Relationships of β2 Adrenergic Receptor Ligands from Membrane Binding.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Callum J; Hornak, Viktor; Velez-Vega, Camilo; McKay, Daniel J J; Reilly, John; Sandham, David A; Shaw, Duncan; Fairhurst, Robin A; Charlton, Steven J; Sykes, David A; Pearlstein, Robert A; Duca, Jose S

    2016-06-23

    Ligand binding to membrane proteins may be significantly influenced by the interaction of ligands with the membrane. In particular, the microscopic ligand concentration within the membrane surface solvation layer may exceed that in bulk solvent, resulting in overestimation of the intrinsic protein-ligand binding contribution to the apparent/measured affinity. Using published binding data for a set of small molecules with the β2 adrenergic receptor, we demonstrate that deconvolution of membrane and protein binding contributions allows for improved structure-activity relationship analysis and structure-based drug design. Molecular dynamics simulations of ligand bound membrane protein complexes were used to validate binding poses, allowing analysis of key interactions and binding site solvation to develop structure-activity relationships of β2 ligand binding. The resulting relationships are consistent with intrinsic binding affinity (corrected for membrane interaction). The successful structure-based design of ligands targeting membrane proteins may require an assessment of membrane affinity to uncouple protein binding from membrane interactions. PMID:27239696

  9. Membrane lipids regulate ganglioside GM2 catabolism and GM2 activator protein activity.

    PubMed

    Anheuser, Susi; Breiden, Bernadette; Schwarzmann, Günter; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2015-09-01

    Ganglioside GM2 is the major lysosomal storage compound of Tay-Sachs disease. It also accumulates in Niemann-Pick disease types A and B with primary storage of SM and with cholesterol in type C. Reconstitution of GM2 catabolism with β-hexosaminidase A and GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) at uncharged liposomal surfaces carrying GM2 as substrate generated only a physiologically irrelevant catabolic rate, even at pH 4.2. However, incorporation of anionic phospholipids into the GM2 carrying liposomes stimulated GM2 hydrolysis more than 10-fold, while the incorporation of plasma membrane stabilizing lipids (SM and cholesterol) generated a strong inhibition of GM2 hydrolysis, even in the presence of anionic phospholipids. Mobilization of membrane lipids by GM2AP was also inhibited in the presence of cholesterol or SM, as revealed by surface plasmon resonance studies. These lipids also reduced the interliposomal transfer rate of 2-NBD-GM1 by GM2AP, as observed in assays using Förster resonance energy transfer. Our data raise major concerns about the usage of recombinant His-tagged GM2AP compared with untagged protein. The former binds more strongly to anionic GM2-carrying liposomal surfaces, increases GM2 hydrolysis, and accelerates intermembrane transfer of 2-NBD-GM1, but does not mobilize membrane lipids. PMID:26175473

  10. Membrane lipids regulate ganglioside GM2 catabolism and GM2 activator protein activity.

    PubMed

    Anheuser, Susi; Breiden, Bernadette; Schwarzmann, Günter; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2015-09-01

    Ganglioside GM2 is the major lysosomal storage compound of Tay-Sachs disease. It also accumulates in Niemann-Pick disease types A and B with primary storage of SM and with cholesterol in type C. Reconstitution of GM2 catabolism with β-hexosaminidase A and GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) at uncharged liposomal surfaces carrying GM2 as substrate generated only a physiologically irrelevant catabolic rate, even at pH 4.2. However, incorporation of anionic phospholipids into the GM2 carrying liposomes stimulated GM2 hydrolysis more than 10-fold, while the incorporation of plasma membrane stabilizing lipids (SM and cholesterol) generated a strong inhibition of GM2 hydrolysis, even in the presence of anionic phospholipids. Mobilization of membrane lipids by GM2AP was also inhibited in the presence of cholesterol or SM, as revealed by surface plasmon resonance studies. These lipids also reduced the interliposomal transfer rate of 2-NBD-GM1 by GM2AP, as observed in assays using Förster resonance energy transfer. Our data raise major concerns about the usage of recombinant His-tagged GM2AP compared with untagged protein. The former binds more strongly to anionic GM2-carrying liposomal surfaces, increases GM2 hydrolysis, and accelerates intermembrane transfer of 2-NBD-GM1, but does not mobilize membrane lipids.

  11. The effect of quinine on tension development, membrane potentials and excitation-contraction coupling of crab skeletal muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Huddart, H.

    1971-01-01

    1. The effect of quinine on tension development and membrane potentials of crab skeletal muscle was examined using strain gauges and intracellular electrodes. 2. In low concentrations (0·1-0·5 mM), quinine caused transient potentiation of twitch tension which then rapidly declined along with progressive depression of the tetanus. These actions are correlated with the decline of both action and resting potentials during quinine treatment. 3. In moderate concentrations (1-5 mM), quinine induced phasic contractures, but the attendant depolarization made the muscles refractory to stimulation and potassium activation, but not to caffeine activation. 4. Quinine did not induce contractures in depolarized muscle, which suggests that the action of quinine in inducing calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum may be blocked by potassium depolarization, unlike the calcium-releasing action of caffeine. Quinine appeared to have no effect on the mechanical threshold of crab skeletal muscle fibres. 5. To explain its depression of contractility in crab muscle, it is suggested that quinine may deplete the calcium store of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, leading to extinction of the terminal stages of the excitation—contraction coupling process and loss of contractility. PMID:5565642

  12. Effects of high ambient temperature on fish sperm plasma membrane integrity and mitochondrial activity - A flow cytometric study.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Szabolcs Tamás; Kakasi, Balázs; Pál, László; Havasi, Máté; Bercsényi, Miklós; Husvéth, Ferenc

    2016-06-01

    Local extreme climatic conditions occurring as a result of global climate change may interfere with the reproduction of animals. In the present study fish spermatozoa were incubated at different temperatures (20, 25, 30 and 40 °C) for 10 and 30 minutes, respectively and plasma membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential changes were evaluated with flow cytometry using SYBR-14/PI and Mitotracker Deep Red FM fluorescent dyes. No significant differences were found in plasma membrane integrity at either incubation temperatures or time points. Mitotracker Deep Red FM histogram profiles indicating mitochondrial activity showed significant (p < 0.001) alterations in all cases of higher (25, 30 and 40 °C) temperature treatments as compared to the samples incubated at 20 °C. Our results indicate that fish spermatozoa exposed to high temperatures suffer sublethal damage that cannot be detected with conventional, vital staining techniques. PMID:27165524

  13. A circumscribing active contour model for delineation of nuclei and membranes of megakaryocytes in bone marrow trephine biopsy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tzu-Hsi; Sanchez, Victor; EIDaly, Hesham; Rajpoot, Nasir M.

    2015-03-01

    The assessment of megakaryocytes (MKs) in bone marrow trephine images is an important step in the classification of different subtypes of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). In general, bone marrow trephine images include several types of cells mixed together, which make it quite difficult to visually identify MKs. In order to aid hematopathologists in the identification and study of MKs, we develop an image processing framework with supervised machine learning approaches and a novel circumscribing active contour model to identify potential MKs and then to accurately delineate the corresponding nucleus and membrane. Specifically, a number of color and texture features are used in a nave Bayesian classifier and an Adaboost classifier to locate the regions with a high probability of depicting MKs. A region-based active contour is used on the candidate MKs to accurately delineate the boundaries of nucleus and membrane. The proposed circumscribing active contour model employs external forces not only based on pixel intensities, but also on the probabilities of depicting MKs as computed by the classifiers. Experimental results suggest that the machine learning approach can detect potential MKs with an accuracy of more than 75%. When our circumscribing active contour model is employed on the candidate MKs, the nucleus and membrane boundaries are segmented with an accuracy of more than 80% as measured by the Dice similarity coefficient. Compared to traditional region-based active contours, the use of additional external forces based on the probability of depicting MKs improves segmentation performance and computational time by an average 5%.

  14. A simple route to develop transparent doxorubicin-loaded nanodiamonds/cellulose nanocomposite membranes as potential wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaogang; Zhang, Hao; Cao, Zhenni; Cai, Ning; Xue, Yanan; Yu, Faquan

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to develop transparent porous nanodiamonds/cellulose nanocomposite membranes with controlled release of doxorubicin for potential applications as wound dressings, which were fabricated by tape casting method from dispersing carboxylated nanodiamonds and dissolving cellulose homogeneously in 7 wt% NaOH/12 wt% urea aqueous solution. By adjusting the carboxylated nanodiamonds content, various nanocomposite membranes were obtained. The structure and properties of these membranes have been investigated by light transmittance measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), tensile tests, water loss analyses, etc. The drug loading and release was investigated using doxorubicin hydrochloride as a model drug. In vitro cytotoxicity assay of the membranes was also studied. This work presented a proof-of-concept utility of these membranes for loading and release of bioactive compounds to be employed as a candidate for wound dressing.

  15. Modulation of mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species production by copper in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gyulkhandanyan, Armen V; Feeney, Chris J; Pennefather, Peter S

    2003-10-01

    In monolayers of cultured rat astrocytes a number of agents that induce oxidative stress act synergistically with exposure to copper leading to rapid depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential (Psi m) and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Copper sensitized astrocytes to the action of menadione, an intracellular generator of superoxide anion radical, exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I. However, significant differences were observed in the ability to modulate the copper-enhanced oxidative stress depending on which stressor was used. The inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition cyclosporin A attenuated the effect of copper and rotenone, but had no protective action in the case of H2O2/copper and menadione/copper combinations. The H2O2 scavenger pyruvate was effective at protecting mitochondria against damage associated with the combined exposure to H2O2/copper and menadione/copper but not to the rotenone/copper combination. The antioxidant Trolox was ineffective at protecting against any of these actions and indeed had a damaging effect when combined with copper. The membrane-permeable copper chelator neocuproine combined with sensitizing concentrations of menadione caused a decrease in Psi m, mimicking the action of copper. Penicillamine, a membrane-impermeable copper chelator, was effective at reducing copper sensitization. Endogenous copper, mobilized during periods of oxidative stress, may play a role in the pathophysiology of brain injury. Our results suggest that this might be particularly dangerous in dysfunctional conditions in which the mitochondrial electron transport chain is compromised.

  16. Ionic regulation of the plasma membrane potential of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) spermatozoa: Role in the initiation of sperm motility

    SciTech Connect

    Gatti, J.L.; Billard, R.; Christen, R. )

    1990-06-01

    The ionic dependence of the trout sperm plasma membrane potential was analysed by measuring the accumulation of the lipophilic ions {sup 3}H-tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP) and {sup 14}C-thiocyanate (SCN) following dilution in artificial media isotonic to the seminal fluid. Our data showed that the trout sperm plasma membrane has a mixed conductance: the plasma membrane potential is sensitive upon the transmembrane gradients of K+, Na+, and H+. This potential is negative (less than -40 mV) in a 125 mM choline chloride media (ChM) at pH 8.5. Replacement of choline by sodium has a small depolarizing effect. The membrane potential is about -15 mV in a 125 mM potassium chloride and falls near zero mV only if valinomycin is added. In ChM changing the external pH (pHe) greatly affects the membrane potential: its value rises from less than -40 mV at pHe 9.0 to -17 mV at pHe 5.0. This pH effect is observed also in presence of sodium or potassium. A decrease in the transmembrane proton gradient produced by increasing internal pH without changing pHe induces also a depolarisation of the plasma membrane. In the different media in which trout sperm remain immotile after dilution (media with (K+) greater than 20-40 mM or a pH less than 7.5) the plasma membrane is more depolarized than in media allowing motility, suggesting a relationship between the state of membrane polarization and the intracellular effectors of the axonemal movement.

  17. Membrane Potential and Calcium Dynamics in Beta Cells from Mouse Pancreas Tissue Slices: Theory, Experimentation, and Analysis.

    PubMed

    Dolenšek, Jurij; Špelič, Denis; Klemen, Maša Skelin; Žalik, Borut; Gosak, Marko; Rupnik, Marjan Slak; Stožer, Andraž

    2015-10-28

    Beta cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans are precise biological sensors for glucose and play a central role in balancing the organism between catabolic and anabolic needs. A hallmark of the beta cell response to glucose are oscillatory changes of membrane potential that are tightly coupled with oscillatory changes in intracellular calcium concentration which, in turn, elicit oscillations of insulin secretion. Both membrane potential and calcium changes spread from one beta cell to the other in a wave-like manner. In order to assess the properties of the abovementioned responses to physiological and pathological stimuli, the main challenge remains how to effectively measure membrane potential and calcium changes at the same time with high spatial and temporal resolution, and also in as many cells as possible. To date, the most wide-spread approach has employed the electrophysiological patch-clamp method to monitor membrane potential changes. Inherently, thi