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Sample records for activity molecular modeling

  1. The activation strain model and molecular orbital theory

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, Lando P; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The activation strain model is a powerful tool for understanding reactivity, or inertness, of molecular species. This is done by relating the relative energy of a molecular complex along the reaction energy profile to the structural rigidity of the reactants and the strength of their mutual interactions: ΔE(ζ) = ΔEstrain(ζ) + ΔEint(ζ). We provide a detailed discussion of the model, and elaborate on its strong connection with molecular orbital theory. Using these approaches, a causal relationship is revealed between the properties of the reactants and their reactivity, e.g., reaction barriers and plausible reaction mechanisms. This methodology may reveal intriguing parallels between completely different types of chemical transformations. Thus, the activation strain model constitutes a unifying framework that furthers the development of cross-disciplinary concepts throughout various fields of chemistry. We illustrate the activation strain model in action with selected examples from literature. These examples demonstrate how the methodology is applied to different research questions, how results are interpreted, and how insights into one chemical phenomenon can lead to an improved understanding of another, seemingly completely different chemical process. WIREs Comput Mol Sci 2015, 5:324–343. doi: 10.1002/wcms.1221 PMID:26753009

  2. MODELING THE MOLECULAR COMPOSITION IN AN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Nanase; Thompson, Todd A.; Herbst, Eric

    2013-03-10

    We use a high-temperature chemical network to derive the molecular abundances in axisymmetric accretion disk models around active galactic nuclei (AGNs) within 100 pc using simple radial and vertical density and temperature distributions motivated by more detailed physical models. We explore the effects of X-ray irradiation and cosmic-ray ionization on the spatial distribution of the molecular abundances of CO, CN, CS, HCN, HCO{sup +}, HC{sub 3}N, C{sub 2}H, and c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} using a variety of plausible disk structures. These simple models have molecular regions with an X-ray-dominated region layer, a midplane without the strong influence of X-rays, and a high-temperature region in the inner portion with moderate X-ray flux where families of polyynes (C{sub n}H{sub 2}) and cyanopolyynes can be enhanced. For the high midplane density disks we explore, we find that cosmic rays produced by supernovae do not significantly affect the regions unless the star formation efficiency significantly exceeds that of the Milky Way. We highlight molecular abundance observations and ratios that may distinguish among theoretical models of the density distribution in AGN disks. Finally, we assess the importance of the shock crossing time and the accretion time relative to the formation time for various chemical species. Vertical column densities are tabulated for a number of molecular species at both the characteristic shock crossing time and steady state. Although we do not attempt to fit any particular system or set of observations, we discuss our models and results in the context of the nearby AGN NGC 1068.

  3. Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-06-01

    Molecular modeling has trickled down from the realm of pharmaceutical and research laboratories into the realm of undergraduate chemistry instruction. It has opened avenues for the visualization of chemical concepts that previously were difficult or impossible to convey. I am sure that many of you have developed exercises using the various molecular modeling tools. It is the desire of this Journal to become an avenue for you to share these exercises among your colleagues. It is to this end that Ron Starkey has agreed to edit such a column and to publish not only the description of such exercises, but also the software documents they use. The WWW is the obvious medium to distribute this combination and so accepted submissions will appear online as a feature of JCE Internet. Typical molecular modeling exercise: finding conformation energies. Molecular Modeling Exercises and Experiments is the latest feature column of JCE Internet, joining Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Hal's Picks, and Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum. JCE Internet continues to seek submissions in these areas of interest and submissions of general interest. If you have developed materials and would like to submit them, please see our Guide to Submissions for more information. The Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Equipment Buyers Guide, and WWW Site Review would also like to hear about chemistry textbooks and software, equipment, and WWW sites, respectively. Please consult JCE Internet Features to learn more about these resources at JCE Online. Email Announcements Would you like to be informed by email when the latest issue of the Journal is available online? when a new JCE Software title is shipping? when a new JCE Internet article has been published or is available for Open Review? when your subscription is about to expire? A new feature of JCE Online makes this possible. Visit our Guestbook to learn how. When

  4. Interpretation of biological activity data of bacterial endotoxins by simple molecular models of mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Frecer, V; Ho, B; Ding, J L

    2000-02-01

    Lipid A moiety has been identified as the bioactive component of bacterial endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides). However, the molecular mechanism of biological activity of lipid A is still not fully understood. This paper contributes to understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of bacterial endotoxins by comparing molecular modelling results for two possible mechanisms with the underlying experimental data. Mechanisms of action involving specific binding of lipid A to a protein receptor as well as nonspecific intercalation into phospholipid membrane of a host cell were modelled and analysed. As the cellular receptor for endotoxin has not been identified, a model of a peptidic pseudoreceptor was proposed, based on molecular structure, symmetry of the lipid A moiety and the observed character of endotoxin-binding sites in proteins. We have studied the monomeric form of lipid A from Escherichia coli and its seven synthetic analogues with varying numbers of phosphate groups and correlated them with known biological activities determined by the Limulus assay. Gibbs free energies associated with the interaction of lipid A with the pseudoreceptor model and intercalation into phospholipid membrane calculated by molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics methods were used to compare the two possible mechanisms of action. The results suggest that specific binding of lipid A analogues to the peptidic pseudoreceptor carrying an amphipathic cationic binding pattern BHPHB (B, basic; H, hydrophobic; P, polar residue, respectively) is energetically more favourable than intercalation into the phospholipid membrane. In addition, binding affinities of lipid A analogues to the best minimum binding sequence KFSFK of the pseudoreceptor correlated with the experimental Limulus activity parameter. This correlation enabled us to rationalize the observed relationship between the number and position of the phosphate groups in the lipid A moiety and its biological activity in terms of

  5. [Cytotoxic activity and molecular modeling of progestins - pregna-D'-pentarans].

    PubMed

    Scherbakov, A M; Levina, I S; Kulikova, L E; Fedyushkina, I V; Skvortsov, V S; Veselovsky, A V; Kuznetsov, Y V; Zavarzin, I V

    2016-03-01

    The cytotoxic activity of synthetic progestins (pregna-D'-pentaranes) II-V full agonists of the progesterone receptor (PR) for PR-positive and PR-negative cells of human breast carcinoma was studied. These compounds were more active in the PR-positive MCF-7 cells than in the PR-negative MDA-MB-453 cells. Cytotoxic effects of tested compounds against normal epithelial MDCK cells were not found. Molecular modeling of studied steroids with PR showed that all progestins with close energy values can bind to the ligand binding domain (LBD) of PR and the magnitude of the energy exceeds the value estimated for the progesterone molecule. Thus, the studied progestins are active against different molecular subtypes of breast cancer and represent a promising class of chemical compounds for oncology. PMID:27420621

  6. A molecular model for the active site of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Yeh, J C; Borchardt, R T; Vedani, A

    1991-06-01

    S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase (AdoHcy hydrolase, EC 3.3.1.1), a specific target for antiviral drug design, catalyzes the hydrolysis of AdoHcy to adenosine (Ado) and homocysteine (Hcy) as well as the synthesis of AdoHcy from Ado and Hcy. The enzyme isolated from different sources has been shown to contain tightly bound NAD+. Based on the 2.0 A-resolution X-ray crystal structure of dogfish lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), which is functionally homologous to AdoHcy hydrolase, and the primary sequence of rat liver AdoHcy hydrolase, we have derived a molecular model of an extended active site for AdoHcy hydrolase. The computational mutation was performed using the software MUTAR (Yeh et al., University of Kansas, Lawrence), followed by molecular mechanics optimizations using the programs AMBER (Singh et al., University of California, San Francisco) and YETI (Vedani, University of Kansas). Solvation of the model structure was achieved by use of the program SOLVGEN (Jacober, University of Kansas); 56 water molecules were explicitly included in all refinements. Some of these may be involved in the catalytic reaction. We also studied a model of the complex of AdoHcy hydrolase with NAD+, as well as the ternary complexes of the enzyme, NAD+, and substrate or inhibitor molecules. Our refined model is capable of explaining part of the redox reaction catalyzed by AdoHcy hydrolase and has been used to differentiate the relative binding strength of inhibitors.

  7. Molecular Modeling Analysis of the Inhibition of Mitochondrial Cytochrome BC1 Complex Activity by Tocol Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Awantika; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Compadre, Cesar M.; Kumar, K. Sree

    2011-06-01

    The biological functions of vitamin E related compounds have been of interest in biomedical research for several decades. Among those compounds, α-, β-, δ-, and γ-tocopherols and their oxidation products, α-, β-, δ-, γ-tocopherylquinone and their analogs α-TQo, γ-TQo, TMC20 and TMC40 were recently shown to inhibit the mitochondrial cytochrome bc1 complex. In this investigation the effects of the structural variation on the inhibition of the mitochondrial cytochrome bc1 complex were analyzed using Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA). CoMFA performed using steric and electrostatic molecular fields produced a very good correlation. The best CoMFA models were obtained using the manual alignment of 12 compounds with 5 components (q2 = 0.589, SPRESS = 0.515, r2 = 0.992, s = 0.068 and F value = 156.520). The resulting contour maps produced by the best CoMFA model were helpful in identifying the structural features required for the biological activity of compounds under study. These results would be helpful for predicting the activity of new compounds, and they could be used for guiding the design, synthesis and development of new and more effective agents.

  8. The Use of Molecular Modeling as "Pseudoexperimental" Data for Teaching VSEPR as a Hands-On General Chemistry Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Christopher B.; Vandehoef, Crissie; Cook, Allison

    2015-01-01

    A hands-on activity appropriate for first-semester general chemistry students is presented that combines traditional VSEPR methods of predicting molecular geometries with introductory use of molecular modeling. Students analyze a series of previously calculated output files consisting of several molecules each in various geometries. Each structure…

  9. Molecular modeling and snake venom phospholipase A2 inhibition by phenolic compounds: Structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Iqbal; Alam, Mohammed A; Alam, Ozair; Nargotra, Amit; Taneja, Subhash Chandra; Koul, Surrinder

    2016-05-23

    In our earlier study, we have reported that a phenolic compound 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde from Janakia arayalpatra root extract was active against Viper and Cobra envenomations. Based on the structure of this natural product, libraries of synthetic structurally variant phenolic compounds were studied through molecular docking on the venom protein. To validate the activity of eight selected compounds, we have tested them in in vivo and in vitro models. The compound 21 (2-hydroxy-3-methoxy benzaldehyde), 22 (2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde) and 35 (2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylalcohol) were found to be active against venom-induced pathophysiological changes. The compounds 20, 15 and 35 displayed maximum anti-hemorrhagic, anti-lethal and PLA2 inhibitory activity respectively. In terms of SAR, the presence of a formyl group in conjunction with a phenolic group was seen as a significant contributor towards increasing the antivenom activity. The above observations confirmed the anti-venom activity of the phenolic compounds which needs to be further investigated for the development of new anti-snake venom leads. PMID:26986086

  10. Preparation, characterization and molecular modeling of PEGylated human growth hormone with agonist activity.

    PubMed

    Khameneh, Bahman; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Hassanzadeh-Khayyat, Mohammad; Varasteh, AbdolReza; Chamani, JamshidKhan; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Mohammadpanah, Hamid; Abnous, Khalil; Saberi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-09-01

    In this study, site-specific PEGylated human growth hormone (hGH) was prepared by microbial transglutaminase, modeled and characterized. To this end, the effects of different reaction parameters including reaction media, PEG:protein ratios, reaction time and pH value were investigated. PEG-hGH was purified by size exclusion chromatography method and analyzed by SDS-PAGE, BCA, peptide mapping, ESI and MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectroscopy methods. Biophysical and biological properties of PEG-hGH were evaluated. Molecular simulation was utilized to provide molecular insight into the protein-receptor interaction. The optimum conditions that were obtained for PEGylation were phosphate buffer with pH of 7.4, 48 h of stirring and PEG:protein ratio of 40:1. By this method, mono-PEG-hGH with high reaction yield was obtained and PEGylation site was at Gln-40 residue. The circular dichroism and fluorescence spectrum indicated that PEGylation did not change the secondary structure while tertiary structure was altered. Upon enzymatic PEGylation, agonistic activity of hGH was preserved; however, Somavert(®), which is prepared by chemical PEGylation, is an antagonist form of protein. These data were confirmed by the total energy of affinity obtained by computational protein-receptor interaction. In conclusion, PEGylation of hGH was led to prepare a novel form of hormone with an agonist activity which merits further investigations. PMID:26116386

  11. Study on the activity of non-purine xanthine oxidase inhibitor by 3D-QSAR modeling and molecular docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peizhen; Tian, Yueli; Zhai, Honglin; Deng, Fangfang; Xie, Meihong; Zhang, Xiaoyun

    2013-11-01

    Non-purine derivatives have been shown to be promising novel drug candidates as xanthine oxidase inhibitors. Based on three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) methods including comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA), two 3D-QSAR models for a series of non-purine xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitors were established, and their reliability was supported by statistical parameters. Combined 3D-QSAR modeling and the results of molecular docking between non-purine xanthine oxidase inhibitors and XO, the main factors that influenced activity of inhibitors were investigated, and the obtained results could explain known experimental facts. Furthermore, several new potential inhibitors with higher activity predicted were designed, which based on our analyses, and were supported by the simulation of molecular docking. This study provided some useful information for the development of non-purine xanthine oxidase inhibitors with novel structures.

  12. Synthesis and molecular modeling studies of anti-inflammatory active 1H-pyrrolizine-5-carboxamides.

    PubMed

    Barsoum, Flora F

    2011-01-01

    A variety of N-aryl-7-cyano-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolizine-5-carboxamides 5, 6, 8, and 9 were synthesized via reaction of the 2-amino derivatives 4 with acid chlorides and aromatic aldehydes. Meanwhile, 4a,b were obtained through the reaction of 2-pyrrolidinylidenepropanedinitrile 1 with chloroacetanilides 2a,b. In addition, the tricyclic pyrimido[5,4-a]pyrrolizines were formed through conducting the reaction of 4a,b with 90% formic acid. Anti-inflammatory activity screening of some synthesized compounds utilizing in vivo acute carrageenan-induced paw edema standard method in rats exhibited that the prepared heterocycles possess considerable pharmacological properties especially, 4a, 4b, 10a, and 10b which reveal remarkable activities relative to diclofenac sodium (reference standard). Ulcerogenic liability of the highly promising synthesized anti-inflammatory active agents were evaluated and 4a and 4b showed ulcerogenic liability lower than that of the standard used drug. Molecular modeling studies were initiated herein in order to validate the attained pharmacological data and provide understandable evidence for the observed anti-inflammatory behavior.

  13. Use of Molecular Models for Active Learning in Biochemistry Lecture Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hageman, James H.

    2010-01-01

    The pedagogical value of having biochemistry and organic chemistry students build and manipulate physical models of chemical species is well established in the literature. Nevertheless, for the most part, the use of molecular models is generally limited to several laboratory exercises or to demonstrations in the classroom setting. A simple…

  14. Quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mutagenicity by classification methods based on holistic theoretical molecular descriptors.

    PubMed

    Gramatica, Paola; Papa, Ester; Marrocchi, Assunta; Minuti, Lucio; Taticchi, Aldo

    2007-03-01

    Various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), ubiquitous environmental pollutants, are recognized mutagens and carcinogens. A homogeneous set of mutagenicity data (TA98 and TA100,+S9) for 32 benzocyclopentaphenanthrenes/chrysenes was modeled by the quantitative structure-activity relationship classification methods k-nearest neighbor and classification and regression tree, using theoretical holistic molecular descriptors. Genetic algorithm provided the selection of the best subset of variables for modeling mutagenicity. The models were validated by leave-one-out and leave-50%-out approaches and have good performance, with sensitivity and specificity ranges of 90-100%. Mutagenicity assessment for these PAHs requires only a few theoretical descriptors of their molecular structure.

  15. Open Source Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Pirhadi, Somayeh; Sunseri, Jocelyn; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The success of molecular modeling and computational chemistry efforts are, by definition, dependent on quality software applications. Open source software development provides many advantages to users of modeling applications, not the least of which is that the software is free and completely extendable. In this review we categorize, enumerate, and describe available open source software packages for molecular modeling and computational chemistry. PMID:27631126

  16. Chemometric Analysis of Some Biologically Active Groups of Drugs on the Basis Chromatographic and Molecular Modeling Data.

    PubMed

    Stasiak, Jolanta; Koba, Marcin; Baczek, Tomasz; Bucinski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    In this work, three different groups of drugs such as 12 analgesic drugs, 11 cardiovascular system drugs and 36 "other" compounds, respectively, were analyzed with cluster analysis (CA), principal component analysis (PCA) and factor analysis (FA) methods. All chemometric analysis were based on the chromatographic parameters (logk and logk(w)) determined by means of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and also by molecular modeling descriptors calculated using various computer programs (HyperChem, Dragon, and the VCCLAB). The clustering of compounds were obtained by CA (using various algorithm as e.g. Ward method or unweighted pair-group method using arithmetic averages as well as Euclidean or Manhattan distance), and allowed to build dendrograms linked drugs with similar physicochemical and pharmacological properties were discussed. Moreover, the analysis performed for analyzed groups of compounds with the use of FA or PCA methods indicated that almost all information reached in input chromatographic parameters as well as in molecular modeling descriptors can be explained by first two factors. Additionally, all analyzed drugs were clustered according to their chemical structure and pharmacological activity. Summarized, the performed classification analysis of studied drugs was focused on similarities and differences in methods being used for chemometric analysis as well as focused abilities to drugs classification (clustering) according to their molecular structures and pharmacological activity performed on the basis of chromatographic experimental and molecular modeling data. Thus, the most important application of statistically important molecular descriptors taken from QSRR models to classification analysis allow detailed biological (pharmacological) classification of analyzed drugs.

  17. Synthesis and inhibitory activity of ureidophosphonates, against acetylcholinesterase: pharmacological assay and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Kaboudin, Babak; Arefi, Marzban; Emadi, Saeed; Sheikh-Hasani, Vahid

    2012-01-01

    A novel method has been developed for the synthesis of 1-ureidophosphonates through a three components condensation of aldehyde with amine and diethylphosphite in the presence of sulfanilic acid as catalyst followed by subsequent reaction of the product with isocyanate. This method is easy, rapid, and good yielding. The anticholinesterase (AChE) activities (inhibition potency through IC(50)) of newly synthesized 1-ureidophosphonates were also investigated. The activities of the synthesized compounds toward the enzyme AChE were determined and compared in terms of their molecular structures and it was found, through molecular docking simulations, that the most potent derivative (compound 3i) inhibited the enzyme through binding to the peripheral anionic site (PAS) and not to its acylation site (A site).

  18. Molecular modeling studies of 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline ribonucleosides with anti-HSV-1 activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane Diniz; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Leal, Kátia Zaccur; Seidl, Peter Rudolf; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca

    2011-12-01

    Eight human herpes viruses ( e.g., herpes simplex, varicella-zoster, Epstein-Barr, cytomegalovirus, Kaposi's sarcoma) are responsible for several diseases from sub-clinic manifestations to fatal infections, mostly in immunocompromised patients. The major limitations of the currently available antiviral drug therapy are drug resistance, host toxicity, and narrow spectrum of activity. However, some non-nucleoside 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline derivatives ( e.g., PNU-183792) [4] shows broad spectrum antiviral activity. We have developed molecular modeling studies, including molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations, based on a model proposed by Liu and co-workers [14] in order to understand the mechanism of action of a 6-chloro substituted 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline ribonucleoside, synthesized by the synthetic group, which showed anti-HSV-1 activity [9]. The molecular docking simulations confirmed the Liu's model showing that the ligand needs to dislocate template residues from the active site in order to interact with the viral DNA polymerase enzyme, reinforcing that the interaction with the Val823 residue is pivotal for the inhibitory activity of non-nucleoside 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline derivatives, such as PNU-183792, with the HSV-1. The molecular dynamics simulations showed that the 6-chloro-benzyl group of PNU-183792 maintains its interaction with residues of the HSV-1 DNA polymerase hydrophobic pocket, considered important according to the Liu's model, and also showed that the methyl group bounded to the nitrogen atom from PNU-183792 is probably contributing to a push-pull effect with the carbonyl group.

  19. Open source molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Pirhadi, Somayeh; Sunseri, Jocelyn; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-09-01

    The success of molecular modeling and computational chemistry efforts are, by definition, dependent on quality software applications. Open source software development provides many advantages to users of modeling applications, not the least of which is that the software is free and completely extendable. In this review we categorize, enumerate, and describe available open source software packages for molecular modeling and computational chemistry. An updated online version of this catalog can be found at https://opensourcemolecularmodeling.github.io.

  20. Open source molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Pirhadi, Somayeh; Sunseri, Jocelyn; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-09-01

    The success of molecular modeling and computational chemistry efforts are, by definition, dependent on quality software applications. Open source software development provides many advantages to users of modeling applications, not the least of which is that the software is free and completely extendable. In this review we categorize, enumerate, and describe available open source software packages for molecular modeling and computational chemistry. An updated online version of this catalog can be found at https://opensourcemolecularmodeling.github.io. PMID:27631126

  1. A modified active Brownian dynamics model using asymmetric energy conversion and its application to the molecular motor system.

    PubMed

    Park, Pyeong Jun; Lee, Kong-Ju-Bock

    2013-06-01

    We consider a modified energy depot model in the overdamped limit using an asymmetric energy conversion rate, which consists of linear and quadratic terms in an active particle's velocity. In order to analyze our model, we adopt a system of molecular motors on a microtubule and employ a flashing ratchet potential synchronized to a stochastic energy supply. By performing an active Brownian dynamics simulation, we investigate effects of the active force, thermal noise, external load, and energy-supply rate. Our model yields the stepping and stalling behaviors of the conventional molecular motor. The active force is found to facilitate the forwardly processive stepping motion, while the thermal noise reduces the stall force by enhancing relatively the backward stepping motion under external loads. The stall force in our model decreases as the energy-supply rate is decreased. Hence, assuming the Michaelis-Menten relation between the energy-supply rate and the an ATP concentration, our model describes ATP-dependent stall force in contrast to kinesin-1.

  2. Design, synthesis, antimicrobial activity and molecular modeling studies of novel benzofuroxan derivatives against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Salomão Dória; Masunari, Andrea; Rangel-Yagui, Carlota Oliveira; Pasqualoto, Kerly Fernanda Mesquita; Tavares, Leoberto Costa

    2009-04-15

    Molecular modification is a quite promising strategy in the design and development of drug analogs with better bioavailability, higher intrinsic activity and less toxicity. In the search of new leads with potential antimicrobial activity, a new series of 14 4-substituted [N'-(benzofuroxan-5-yl)methylene]benzohydrazides, nifuroxazide derivatives, were synthesized and tested against standard and multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. The selection of the substituent groups was based on physicochemical properties, such as hydrophobicity and electronic effect. These properties were also evaluated through the lipophilic and electrostatic potential maps, respectively, considering the compounds with better biological profile. Twelve compounds exhibited similar bacteriostatic activity against standard and multidrug-resistant strains. The most active compound was the 4-CF(3) substituted derivative, which presented a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 14.6-13.1 microg/mL, and a ClogP value of 1.87. The results highlight the benzofuroxan derivatives as potential leads for designing new future antimicrobial drug candidates. PMID:19324556

  3. Molecular Models in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Richard E.

    1970-01-01

    Describes types of molecular models (ball-and-stick, framework, and space-filling) and evaluates commercially available kits. Gives instructions for constructive models from polystyrene balls and pipe-cleaners. Models are useful for class demonstrations although not sufficiently accurate for research use. Illustrations show biologically important…

  4. Quantitative modeling of the molecular steps underlying shut-off of rhodopsin activity in rod phototransduction

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Timothy W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the predictions of alternative models for the stochastic shut-off of activated rhodopsin (R*) and their implications for the interpretation of experimentally recorded single-photon responses (SPRs) in mammalian rods. Theory We analyze the transitions that an activated R* molecule undergoes as a result of successive phosphorylation steps and arrestin binding. We consider certain simplifying cases for the relative magnitudes of the reaction rate constants and derive the probability distributions for the time to arrestin binding. In addition to the conventional model in which R* catalytic activity declines in a graded manner with successive phosphorylations, we analyze two cases in which the activity is assumed to occur not via multiple small steps upon each phosphorylation but via a single large step. We refer to these latter two cases as the binary R* shut-off and three-state R* shut-off models. Methods We simulate R*’s stochastic reactions numerically for the three models. In the simplifying cases for the ratio of rate constants in the binary and three-state models, we show that the probability distribution of the time to arrestin binding is accurately predicted. To simulate SPRs, we then integrate the differential equations for the downstream reactions using a standard model of the rod outer segment that includes longitudinal diffusion of cGMP and Ca2+. Results Our simulations of SPRs in the conventional model of graded shut-off of R* conform closely to the simulations in a recent study. However, the gain factor required to account for the observed mean SPR amplitude is higher than can be accounted for from biochemical experiments. In addition, a substantial minority of the simulated SPRs exhibit features that have not been reported in published experiments. Our simulations of SPRs using the model of binary R* shut-off appear to conform closely to experimental results for wild type (WT) mouse rods, and the required gain factor conforms to

  5. Modelling molecular structures for computer-assisted studies of drug structure-activity relations

    SciTech Connect

    Jerman-Blazic, B.; Randic, M.

    1983-01-01

    The characterizations of structure by selected graph invariant is used as an element for model building in the study of quantitative structure activity relations. The path numbers Pi were adopted as the basic graph invariants. Euclidian distance between two sequences of path numbers, which are considered as position vectors in an n-dimensional space, was the measure of similarity between the two structures. The results, which proceeded from the application of the method on a set of 38 substituted barbituratic acids show that path enumeration model offer suitable basis for QSAR analysis and deserve further attention.

  6. An expedient synthesis, acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity, and molecular modeling study of highly functionalized hexahydro-1,6-naphthyridines.

    PubMed

    Almansour, Abdulrahman I; Kumar, Raju Suresh; Arumugam, Natarajan; Basiri, Alireza; Kia, Yalda; Ali, Mohamed Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    A series of hexahydro-1,6-naphthyridines were synthesized in good yields by the reaction of 3,5-bis[(E)-arylmethylidene]tetrahydro-4(1H)-pyridinones with cyanoacetamide in the presence of sodium ethoxide under simple mixing at ambient temperature for 6-10 minutes and were assayed for their acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity using colorimetric Ellman's method. Compound 4e with methoxy substituent at ortho-position of the phenyl rings displayed the maximum inhibitory activity with IC50 value of 2.12 μM. Molecular modeling simulation of 4e was performed using three-dimensional structure of Torpedo californica AChE (TcAChE) enzyme to disclose binding interaction and orientation of this molecule into the active site gorge of the receptor. PMID:25710037

  7. An Expedient Synthesis, Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Activity, and Molecular Modeling Study of Highly Functionalized Hexahydro-1,6-naphthyridines

    PubMed Central

    Almansour, Abdulrahman I.; Suresh Kumar, Raju; Arumugam, Natarajan; Basiri, Alireza; Kia, Yalda; Ashraf Ali, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    A series of hexahydro-1,6-naphthyridines were synthesized in good yields by the reaction of 3,5-bis[(E)-arylmethylidene]tetrahydro-4(1H)-pyridinones with cyanoacetamide in the presence of sodium ethoxide under simple mixing at ambient temperature for 6–10 minutes and were assayed for their acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity using colorimetric Ellman's method. Compound 4e with methoxy substituent at ortho-position of the phenyl rings displayed the maximum inhibitory activity with IC50 value of 2.12 μM. Molecular modeling simulation of 4e was performed using three-dimensional structure of Torpedo californica AChE (TcAChE) enzyme to disclose binding interaction and orientation of this molecule into the active site gorge of the receptor. PMID:25710037

  8. Pharmacophore modeling, molecular docking, QSAR, and in silico ADMET studies of gallic acid derivatives for immunomodulatory activity.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Dharmendra Kumar; Khan, Feroz; Negi, Arvind Singh

    2012-06-01

    Immunomodulation refers to an alteration in the immune response due to the intrusion of foreign molecules into the body. In the present communication, QSAR and docking studies of gallic acid derivatives were performed in relation to their immunomodulatory activities. Screening through the use of a QSAR model suggested that the compounds G-4, G-7, G-9, G-10, G-12, and G-13 possess immunomodulatory activity. Activity was predicted using a statistical model developed by the forward stepwise multiple linear regression method. The correlation coefficient (r(2)) and the prediction accuracy (rCV(2)) of the QSAR model were 0.99 and 0.96, respectively. The QSAR study indicated that chemical descriptors-dipole moment, steric energy, amide group count, λ(max) (UV-visible) and molar refractivity-are well correlated with activity, while decreases in the dipole moment, steric energy, and molar refractivity were negatively correlated. A molecular docking study showed that the compounds had high binding affinities for the INFα-2, IL-6, and IL-4 receptors. Binding site residues formed H-bonds with the designed gallic acid derivatives G-3, G-4, G-5, G-6, G-7, and G-10. Moreover, based on screening for oral bioavailability, in silico ADME, and toxicity risk assessment, we concluded that compound G-7 exhibits marked immunomodulatory activity, comparable to levamisole.

  9. Elucidating modes of activation and herbicide resistance by sequence assembly and molecular modelling of the Acetolactate synthase complex in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Lloyd Evans, Dyfed; Joshi, Shailesh Vinay

    2016-10-21

    Acetolactate synthase (ALS) catalyzes the first portion of the biosynthetic pathway leading to the generation of branched-chain amino acids. As such it is essential for plant health and is a major target for herbicides. ALS is a very poorly characterized molecule in sugarcane. The enzyme is activated and inhibited by a regulatory subunit (known as VAT1 in plants) whose mode of action is entirely unknown. Using Saccharum halepense as a template we have assembled the ALS gene of sugarcane (Saccharum hybrid) and have modelled the structure of ALS based on an Arabidopsis template (the first ALS model for a monocot). We have also assembled the ALS regulatory proteins (VAT1 and VAT2) from sugarcane and show that VAT2 is specific to true grasses. Employing a bacterial model, we have generated a structural model for VAT1, which explains why the separate domains of the proteins bind to either leucine or valine but not both. Using co-evolution studies we have determined molecular contacts by which we modelled the docking of VAT1 to ALS. In conclusion, we demonstrate how the binding of VAT1 to ALS activates ALS and show how VAT1 can also confer feedback inhibition to ALS. We validate our ALS model against biochemical data and employ this model to explain the function of a novel herbicide binding mutant in sugarcane. PMID:27452529

  10. Structure–Activity Relationships and Molecular Modeling of Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and evaluation of the potency of new isoform-selective inhibitors of sphingosine kinases 1 and 2 (SK1 and SK2), the enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of d-erythro-sphingosine to produce the key signaling lipid, sphingosine 1-phosphate, are described. Recently, we reported that 1-(4-octylphenethyl)piperidin-4-ol (RB-005) is a selective inhibitor of SK1. Here we report the synthesis of 43 new analogues of RB-005, in which the lipophilic tail, polar headgroup, and linker region were modified to extend the structure–activity relationship profile for this lead compound, which we explain using modeling studies with the recently published crystal structure of SK1. We provide a basis for the key residues targeted by our profiled series and provide further evidence for the ability to discriminate between the two isoforms using pharmacological intervention. PMID:24164513

  11. Structure-activity relationships and molecular modeling of sphingosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Baek, Dong Jae; MacRitchie, Neil; Anthony, Nahoum G; Mackay, Simon P; Pyne, Susan; Pyne, Nigel J; Bittman, Robert

    2013-11-27

    The design, synthesis, and evaluation of the potency of new isoform-selective inhibitors of sphingosine kinases 1 and 2 (SK1 and SK2), the enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of d-erythro-sphingosine to produce the key signaling lipid, sphingosine 1-phosphate, are described. Recently, we reported that 1-(4-octylphenethyl)piperidin-4-ol (RB-005) is a selective inhibitor of SK1. Here we report the synthesis of 43 new analogues of RB-005, in which the lipophilic tail, polar headgroup, and linker region were modified to extend the structure-activity relationship profile for this lead compound, which we explain using modeling studies with the recently published crystal structure of SK1. We provide a basis for the key residues targeted by our profiled series and provide further evidence for the ability to discriminate between the two isoforms using pharmacological intervention.

  12. The activation strain model and molecular orbital theory: understanding and designing chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Israel; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2014-07-21

    In this Tutorial Review, we make the point that a true understanding of trends in reactivity (as opposed to measuring or simply computing them) requires a causal reactivity model. To this end, we present and discuss the Activation Strain Model (ASM). The ASM establishes the desired causal relationship between reaction barriers, on one hand, and the properties of reactants and characteristics of reaction mechanisms, on the other hand. In the ASM, the potential energy surface ΔE(ζ) along the reaction coordinate ζ is decomposed into the strain ΔEstrain(ζ) of the reactants that become increasingly deformed as the reaction proceeds, plus the interaction ΔEint(ζ) between these deformed reactants, i.e., ΔE(ζ) = ΔEstrain(ζ) + ΔEint(ζ). The ASM can be used in conjunction with any quantum chemical program. An analysis of the method and its application to problems in organic and organometallic chemistry illustrate the power of the ASM as a unifying concept and a tool for rational design of reactants and catalysts.

  13. Simple thermodynamic model of unassisted proton shuttle uncoupling and prediction of activity from calculated speciation, lipophilicity, and molecular geometry.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Louis C

    2012-06-21

    A mechanistic model of uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by lipophilic weak acids (i.e. proton shuttles) was developed for the purposes of predicting the relative activity of xenobiotics of widely varying structure and of guiding the design of optimized derivatives. The model is based on thermodynamic premises not formulated elsewhere that allow for the calculation of steady-state conditions and of rate of energy dissipation on the basis of acid-dissociation and permeability behavior, the later estimated from partitioning behavior and geometric considerations. Moreover, permeability of either the neutral or of the ionized species is proposed to be effectively enhanced under conditions of asymmetrical molecular distribution. Finally, special considerations were developed to accommodate multi-protic compounds. The comparison of predicted to measured activity for a diverse testset of 48 compounds of natural origin spanning a wide range of activity yielded a Spearman's rho of 0.90. The model was used to tentatively identify several novel proton shuttles, as well as to elucidate core structures particularly conducive to proton shuttle activity from which optimized derivatives can be designed. Principles of design were formulated and examples of derivatives projected to be active at concentrations on the order of 10(-7)M are proposed. Among these are di-protic compounds predicted to shuttle two protons per cycle iteration and proposed to maximally exploit the proton shuttle mechanism. This work promotes the design of highly active, yet easily-metabolized uncouplers for therapeutic applications, namely the indirect activation of AMP-kinase, as well as for various industrial applications where low persistence is desirable.

  14. Insights into the Thiamine Diphosphate Enzyme Activation Mechanism: Computational Model for Transketolase Using a Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Method.

    PubMed

    Nauton, Lionel; Hélaine, Virgil; Théry, Vincent; Hecquet, Laurence

    2016-04-12

    We propose the first computational model for transketolase (TK), a thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme, using a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method on the basis of crystallographic TK structures from yeast and Escherichia coli, together with experimental kinetic data reported in the literature with wild-type and mutant TK. This model allowed us to define a new route for ThDP activation in the enzyme environment. We evidenced a strong interaction between ThDP and Glu418B of the TK active site, itself stabilized by Glu162A. The crucial point highlighted here is that deprotonation of ThDP C2 is not performed by ThDP N4' as reported in the literature, but by His481B, involving a HOH688A molecule bridge. Thus, ThDP N4' is converted from an amino form to an iminium form, ensuring the stabilization of the C2 carbanion or carbene. Finally, ThDP activation proceeds via an intermolecular process and not by an intramolecular one as reported in the literature. More generally, this proposed ThDP activation mechanism can be applied to some other ThDP-dependent enzymes and used to define the entire TK mechanism with donor and acceptor substrates more accurately.

  15. Developing sensor activity relationships for the JPL electronic nose sensors using molecular modeling and QSAR techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevade, A. V.; Ryan, M. A.; Homer, M. L.; Jewell, A. D.; Zhou, H.; Manatt, K.; Kisor, A. K.

    2005-01-01

    We report a Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) study using Genetic Function Approximations (GFA) to describe the polymer-carbon composite sensor activities in the JPL Electronic Nose, when exposed to chemical vapors at parts-per-million concentration levels.

  16. Novel series of tacrine-tianeptine hybrids: Synthesis, cholinesterase inhibitory activity, S100B secretion and a molecular modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Ceschi, Marco Antonio; da Costa, Jessie Sobieski; Lopes, João Paulo Bizarro; Câmara, Viktor Saraiva; Campo, Leandra Franciscato; Borges, Antonio César de Amorim; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto Saraiva; de Souza, Daniela Fraga; Konrath, Eduardo Luis; Karl, Ana Luiza Martins; Guedes, Isabella Alvim; Dardenne, Laurent Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    Tianeptine was linked to various 9-aminoalkylamino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridines using EDC·HCl/HOBt to afford a series of tacrine-tianeptine hybrids. The hybrids were tested for their ability to inhibit AChE and BuChE and IC50 values in the nanomolar concentration scale were obtained. AChE molecular modeling studies of these hybrids indicated that tacrine moiety interacts in the bottom of the gorge with the catalytic active site (CAS) while tianeptine binds to peripheral anionic site (PAS). Furthermore, the compounds 2g and 2e were able to reduce the in vitro basal secretion of S100B, suggesting its therapeutic action in some cases or stages of Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Novel series of tacrine-tianeptine hybrids: Synthesis, cholinesterase inhibitory activity, S100B secretion and a molecular modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Ceschi, Marco Antonio; da Costa, Jessie Sobieski; Lopes, João Paulo Bizarro; Câmara, Viktor Saraiva; Campo, Leandra Franciscato; Borges, Antonio César de Amorim; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto Saraiva; de Souza, Daniela Fraga; Konrath, Eduardo Luis; Karl, Ana Luiza Martins; Guedes, Isabella Alvim; Dardenne, Laurent Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    Tianeptine was linked to various 9-aminoalkylamino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridines using EDC·HCl/HOBt to afford a series of tacrine-tianeptine hybrids. The hybrids were tested for their ability to inhibit AChE and BuChE and IC50 values in the nanomolar concentration scale were obtained. AChE molecular modeling studies of these hybrids indicated that tacrine moiety interacts in the bottom of the gorge with the catalytic active site (CAS) while tianeptine binds to peripheral anionic site (PAS). Furthermore, the compounds 2g and 2e were able to reduce the in vitro basal secretion of S100B, suggesting its therapeutic action in some cases or stages of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27392529

  18. Novel Oxazolidinone-Based Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Agonists: Molecular Modeling, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fresno, N; Macías-González, M; Torres-Zaguirre, A; Romero-Cuevas, M; Sanz-Camacho, P; Elguero, J; Pavón, F J; Rodríguez de Fonseca, F; Goya, P; Pérez-Fernández, R

    2015-08-27

    A series of new peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) chiral ligands have been designed following the accepted three-module structure comprising a polar head, linker, and hydrophobic tail. The majority of the ligands incorporate the oxazolidinone moiety as a novel polar head, and the nature of the hydrophobic tail has also been varied. Docking studies using the crystal structure of an agonist bound to the ligand binding domain of the PPARα receptor have been performed as a tool for their design. Suitable synthetic procedures have been developed, and compounds with different stereochemistries have been prepared. Evaluation of basal and ligand-induced activity proved that several compounds showed agonist activity at the PPARα receptor, thus validating the oxazolidinone template for PPAR activity. In addition, two compounds, 2 and 4, showed dual PPARα/PPARγ agonism and interesting food intake reduction in rats.

  19. Synthesis, anti-breast cancer activity, and molecular modeling of some benzothiazole and benzoxazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Abdelgawad, Mohamed A; Belal, Amany; Omar, Hany A; Hegazy, Lamees; Rateb, Mostafa E

    2013-07-01

    A new series of benzothiazoles and benzoxazoles was synthesized using 4-benzothiazol-2-yl-phenylamine and 4-benzoxazol-2-yl-phenylamine as starting materials. All the prepared compounds were evaluated for their antitumor activities against human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-231, using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell viability analysis. Almost all the tested compounds revealed potent antitumor activity, especially the N-methyl piperazinyl substituted derivatives 6f and 6c, which displayed the most potent inhibitory activity with IC50 values ranging from 8 to 17 nM. Docking the synthesized compounds into the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is highly expressed in breast cancer, was employed to explore the possible interactions of these compounds with the EGFR. The activity of the reported compounds supports its clinical promise as a component of therapeutic strategies for cancer, for which high concentrations of chemotherapeutic agents are always a major limitation.

  20. Comparative modeling and molecular dynamics suggest high carboxylase activity of the Cyanobium sp. CACIAM14 RbcL protein.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Andrei Santos; Lima, Alex Ranieri Jerônimo; Dall'Agnol, Leonardo Teixeira; de Azevedo, Juliana Simão Nina; da Silva Gonçalves Vianez, João Lídio; Gonçalves, Evonnildo Costa

    2016-03-01

    Rubisco catalyzes the first step reaction in the carbon fixation pathway, bonding atmospheric CO2/O2 to ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate; it is therefore considered one of the most important enzymes in the biosphere. Genetic modifications to increase the carboxylase activity of rubisco are a subject of great interest to agronomy and biotechnology, since this could increase the productivity of biomass in plants, algae and cyanobacteria and give better yields in crops and biofuel production. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize in silico the catalytic domain of the rubisco large subunit (rbcL gene) of Cyanobium sp. CACIAM14, and identify target sites to improve enzyme affinity for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. A three-dimensional model was built using MODELLER 9.14, molecular dynamics was used to generate a 100 ns trajectory by AMBER12, and the binding free energy was calculated using MM-PBSA, MM-GBSA and SIE methods with alanine scanning. The model obtained showed characteristics of form-I rubisco, with 15 beta sheets and 19 alpha helices, and maintained the highly conserved catalytic site encompassing residues Lys175, Lys177, Lys201, Asp203, and Glu204. The binding free energy of the enzyme-substrate complexation of Cyanobium sp. CACIAM14 showed values around -10 kcal mol(-1) using the SIE method. The most important residues for the interaction with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate were Arg295 followed by Lys334. The generated model was successfully validated, remaining stable during the whole simulation, and demonstrated characteristics of enzymes with high carboxylase activity. The binding analysis revealed candidates for directed mutagenesis sites to improve rubisco's affinity.

  1. Estimation of Inhibitory Effect against Tyrosinase Activity through Homology Modeling and Molecular Docking

    PubMed Central

    Nokinsee, Daungkamon; Shank, Lalida; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Nimmanpipug, Piyarat

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosinase is a key enzyme in melanogenesis. Generally, mushroom tyrosinase from A. bisporus had been used as a model in skin-whitening agent tests employed in the cosmetic industry. The recently obtained crystal structure of bacterial tyrosinase from B. megaterium has high similarity (33.5%) to the human enzyme and thus it was used as a template for constructing of the human model. Binding of tyrosinase to a series of its inhibitors was simulated by automated docking calculations. Docking and MD simulation results suggested that N81, N260, H263, and M280 are involved in the binding of inhibitors to mushroom tyrosinase. E195 and H208 are important residues in bacterial tyrosinase, while E230, S245, N249, H252, V262, and S265 bind to inhibitors and are important in forming pi interaction in human tyrosinase. PMID:26788364

  2. Pyrrolo[1,3]benzothiazepine-based atypical antipsychotic agents. Synthesis, structure-activity relationship, molecular modeling, and biological studies.

    PubMed

    Campiani, Giuseppe; Butini, Stefania; Gemma, Sandra; Nacci, Vito; Fattorusso, Caterina; Catalanotti, Bruno; Giorgi, Gianluca; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Goegan, Mara; Mennini, Tiziana; Minetti, Patrizia; Di Cesare, M Assunta; Mastroianni, Domenico; Scafetta, Nazzareno; Galletti, Bruno; Stasi, M Antonietta; Castorina, Massimo; Pacifici, Licia; Ghirardi, Orlando; Tinti, Ornella; Carminati, Paolo

    2002-01-17

    The prototypical dopamine and serotonin antagonist (+/-)-7-chloro-9-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-9,10-dihydropyrrolo[2,1-b][1,3]benzothiazepine (5) was resolved into its R and S enantiomers via crystallization of the diastereomeric tartaric acid salts. Binding studies confirmed that the (R)-(-)-enantiomer is a more potent D(2) receptor antagonist than the (S)-(+)-enantiomer, with almost identical affinity at the 5-HT(2) receptor ((S)-(+)-5, log Y = 4.7; (R)-(-)-5, log Y = 7.4). These data demonstrated a significant stereoselective interaction of 5 at D(2) receptors. Furthermore, enantiomer (S)-(+)-5 (ST1460) was tested on a panel of receptors; this compound showed an intriguing binding profile characterized by high affinity for H(1) and the alpha(1) receptor, a moderate affinity for alpha(2) and D(3) receptors, and low affinity for muscarinic receptors. Pharmacological and biochemical investigation confirmed an atypical pharmacological profile for (S)-(+)-5. This atypical antipsychotic lead has low propensity to induce catalepsy in rat. It has minimal effect on serum prolactin levels, and it has been selected for further pharmacological studies. (S)-(+)-5 increases the extracellular levels of dopamine in the rat striatum after subcutaneous administration. By use of 5 as the lead compound, a novel series of potential atypical antipsychotics has been developed, some of them being characterized by a stereoselective interaction at D(2) receptors. A number of structure-activity relationships trends have been identified, and a possible explanation is advanced in order to account for the observed stereoselectivity of the enantiomer of (+/-)-5 for D(2) receptors. The molecular structure determination of the enantiomers of 5 by X-ray diffraction and molecular modeling is reported. PMID:11784139

  3. The effect of various atomic partial charge schemes to elucidate consensus activity-correlating molecular regions: a test case of diverse QSAR models.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sivakumar Prasanth; Jha, Prakash C; Jasrai, Yogesh T; Pandya, Himanshu A

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of atomic partial charges of the small molecules to calculate molecular interaction fields (MIFs) is an important process in field-based quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR). Several studies showed the influence of partial charge schemes that drastically affects the prediction accuracy of the QSAR model and focused on the selection of appropriate charge models that provide highest cross-validated correlation coefficient ([Formula: see text] or q(2)) to explain the variation in chemical structures against biological endpoints. This study shift this focus in a direction to understand the molecular regions deemed to explain SAR in various charge models and recognize a consensus picture of activity-correlating molecular regions. We selected eleven diverse dataset and developed MIF-based QSAR models using various charge schemes including Gasteiger-Marsili, Del Re, Merck Molecular Force Field, Hückel, Gasteiger-Hückel, and Pullman. The generalized resultant QSAR models were then compared with Open3DQSAR model to interpret the MIF descriptors decisively. We suggest the regions of activity contribution or optimization can be effectively determined by studying various charge-based models to understand SAR precisely.

  4. Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    2002-01-03

    This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

  5. Molecular Modeling of Heme Proteins Using MOE: Bio-Inorganic and Structure-Function Activity for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Gigi B.; Cook, J. Whitney

    2005-01-01

    A biochemical molecular modeling project on heme proteins suitable for an introductory Biochemistry I class has been designed with a 2-fold objective: i) to reinforce the correlation between protein three-dimensional structure and function through a discovery oriented project, and ii) to introduce students to the fields of bioinorganic and…

  6. Benzimidazole-Based Quinazolines: In Vitro Evaluation, Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship, and Molecular Modeling as Aurora Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alka; Luxami, Vijay; Saxena, Sanjai; Paul, Kamaldeep

    2016-03-01

    A series of benzimidazole-based quinazoline derivatives with different substitutions of primary and secondary amines at the C2 position (1-12) were evaluated for their Aurora kinase inhibitory activities. All compounds except for 3 and 6 showed good activity against Aurora kinase inhibitors, with IC50 values in the range of 0.035-0.532 μM. The ligand efficiency (LE) of the compounds with Aurora A kinase was also determined. The structure-activity relationship and the quantitative structure-activity relationship revealed that the Aurora inhibitory activities of these derivatives primarily depend on the different substitutions of the amine present at the C2 position of the quinazoline core. Molecular docking studies in the active binding site also provided theoretical support for the experimental biological data acquired. The current study identifies a novel class of Aurora kinase inhibitors, which can further be used for the treatment of cancer.

  7. Synthesis, in vitro evaluation, and molecular modeling investigation of benzenesulfonimide peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ammazzalorso, Alessandra; Carrieri, Antonio; Verginelli, Fabio; Bruno, Isabella; Carbonara, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Alessandra; De Filippis, Barbara; Fantacuzzi, Marialuigia; Florio, Rosalba; Fracchiolla, Giuseppe; Giampietro, Letizia; Giancristofaro, Antonella; Maccallini, Cristina; Cama, Alessandro; Amoroso, Rosa

    2016-05-23

    Recent evidences suggest a moderate activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs) could be favorable in metabolic diseases, reducing side effects given from full agonists. PPAR partial agonists and antagonists represent, to date, interesting tools to better elucidate biological processes modulated by these receptors. In this work are reported new benzenesulfonimide compounds able to block PPARα, synthesized and tested by transactivation assays and gene expression analysis. Some of these compounds showed a dose-dependent antagonistic behavior on PPARα, submicromolar potency, different profiles of selectivity versus PPARγ, and a repressive effect on CPT1A expression. Dockings and molecular dynamics on properly selected benzenesulfonimide derivatives furnished fresh insights into the molecular determinant most likely responsible for PPARα antagonism. PMID:26974385

  8. Structural and functional effects of benzimidazole/thioether-copper complexes with antitumor activity on cell membranes and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ivan; Suwalsky, Mario; Gallardo, María José; Troncoso, Valentina; Sánchez-Eguía, Brenda N; Santiago-Osorio, Edelmiro; Aguiñiga, Itzen; González-Ugarte, Ana K

    2016-03-01

    Two cytotoxic copper(II) complexes with N-H and N-methylated benzimidazole-derived ligands (Cu-L(2) and Cu-L(2Me)) were synthesized and made to interact with human erythrocytes and molecular models of their plasmatic membranes. The latter consisted in lipid bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), lipids of the types present in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Initial assessment of the interaction of the complexes with DMPC and DMPE consisted of X-ray diffraction studies, which showed preferential interactions with the former. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of erythrocytes incubated with solutions of the Cu(II) complexes evidenced deformation of the cells to stomatocytes and knizocytes by Cu-L(2) and Cu-L(2Me) due to interactions with the inner and outer leaflets of the cell membranes, respectively. This was further confirmed by real-time observation of the dose-dependent effects of the complexes on live erythrocytes by defocusing microscopy (DM). The combined observations, including the increased antiproliferative activity of the N-methylated complex Cu-L(2Me) over that of Cu-L(2) is rationalized based on the higher lipophilicity of the former. This property would facilitate passive diffusion of Cu-L(2Me) through the cell membrane, particularly in the initial stages when the DMPC-rich outer leaflet is involved. In contrast, the benzimidazole N-H groups of Cu-L(2) may participate in hydrogen bonding with DMPE polar groups; this result is consistent with the formation of stomatocyte induced by the latter complex. PMID:26775279

  9. Exploring Shifts in Middle School Learners' Modeling Activity While Generating Drawings, Animations, and Computational Simulations of Molecular Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson-Jerde, Michelle H.; Gravel, Brian E.; Macrander, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Modeling and using technology are two practices of particular interest to K-12 science educators. These practices are inextricably linked among professionals, who engage in modeling activity with and across a variety of representational technologies. In this paper, we explore the practices of five sixth-grade girls as they generated models of…

  10. Syntheses of new 3-thiazolyl coumarin derivatives, in vitro α-glucosidase inhibitory activity, and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Salar, Uzma; Taha, Muhammad; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Ismail, Nor Hadiani; Imran, Syahrul; Perveen, Shahnaz; Gul, Sahib; Wadood, Abdul

    2016-10-21

    3-Thiazolylcoumarin derivatives 1-14 were synthesized via one-pot two step reactions, and screened for in vitro α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. All compounds showed inhibitory activity in the range of IC50 = 0.12 ± 0.01-16.20 ± 0.23 μM as compared to standard acarbose (IC50 = 38.25 ± 0.12 μM), and also found to be nontoxic. Molecular docking study was carried out in order to establish the structure-activity relationship (SAR) which demonstrated that electron rich centers at one and electron withdrawing centers at the other end of the molecules showed strong inhibitory activity. All the synthesized compounds were characterized by spectroscopic techniques such as EI-MS, HREI-MS, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR. CHN analysis was also performed.

  11. Molecular characteristics versus biological activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Applegate, Vernon C.; Smith, Manning A.; Willeford, Bennett R.

    1967-01-01

    The molecular characteristics of mononitrophenols containing halogens not only play a key role in their biological activity but provide a novel example of selective toxicity among vertebrate animals. It has been reported that efforts to control the parasitic sea lamprey in the Great Lakes are directed at present to the applications of a selective toxicant to streams inhabited by lamprey larvae. Since 1961, the larvicide that has been used almost exclusively in the control program has been 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM). However, this is only one of about 15 closely related compounds, all halogen-containing mononitrophenols, that display a selectively toxic action upon lampreys. Although not all of the halogenated mononitrophenols are selectively toxic to lampreys (in fact, fewer than half of those tested), no other group of related compounds has displayed any useful larvicidal activity except for the substituted nitrosalicylanilides.

  12. Novel potent and selective bile acid derivatives as TGR5 agonists: biological screening, structure-activity relationships, and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Thomas, Charles; Gioiello, Antimo; Une, Mizuho; Hofmann, Alan F; Saladin, Régis; Schoonjans, Kristina; Pellicciari, Roberto; Auwerx, Johan

    2008-03-27

    TGR5, a metabotropic receptor that is G-protein-coupled to the induction of adenylate cyclase, has been recognized as the molecular link connecting bile acids to the control of energy and glucose homeostasis. With the aim of disclosing novel selective modulators of this receptor and at the same time clarifying the molecular basis of TGR5 activation, we report herein the biological screening of a collection of natural occurring bile acids, bile acid derivatives, and some steroid hormones, which has resulted in the discovery of new potent and selective TGR5 ligands. Biological results of the tested collection of compounds were used to extend the structure-activity relationships of TGR5 agonists and to develop a binary classification model of TGR5 activity. This model in particular could unveil some hidden properties shared by the molecular shape of bile acids and steroid hormones that are relevant to TGR5 activation and may hence be used to address the design of novel selective and potent TGR5 agonists.

  13. Exploring Shifts in Middle School Learners' Modeling Activity While Generating Drawings, Animations, and Computational Simulations of Molecular Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson-Jerde, Michelle H.; Gravel, Brian E.; Macrander, Christopher A.

    2015-04-01

    Modeling and using technology are two practices of particular interest to K-12 science educators. These practices are inextricably linked among professionals, who engage in modeling activity with and across a variety of representational technologies. In this paper, we explore the practices of five sixth-grade girls as they generated models of smell diffusion using drawing, stop-motion animation, and computational simulation during a multi-day workshop. We analyze video, student discourse, and artifacts to address the questions: In what ways did learners' modeling practices, reasoning about mechanism, and ideas about smell shift as they worked across this variety of representational technologies? And, what supports enabled them to persist and progress in the modeling activity? We found that the girls engaged in two distinct modeling cycles that reflected persistence and deepening engagement in the task. In the first, messing about, they focused on describing and representing many ideas related to the spread of smell at once. In the second, digging in, they focused on testing and revising specific mechanisms that underlie smell diffusion. Upon deeper analysis, we found these cycles were linked to the girls' invention of "oogtom," a representational object that encapsulated many ideas from the first cycle and allowed the girls to restart modeling with the mechanistic focus required to construct simulations. We analyze the role of activity design, facilitation, and technological infrastructure in this pattern of engagement over the course of the workshop and discuss implications for future research, curriculum design, and classroom practice.

  14. Diarylsulfonamides and their bioisosteres as dual inhibitors of alkaline phosphatase and carbonic anhydrase: Structure activity relationship and molecular modelling studies.

    PubMed

    Al-Rashida, Mariya; Ejaz, Syeda Abida; Ali, Sharafat; Shaukat, Aisha; Hamayoun, Mehwish; Ahmed, Maqsood; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2015-05-15

    The effect of bioisosteric replacement of carboxamide linking group with sulfonamide linking group, on alkaline phosphatase (AP) and carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibition activity of aromatic benzenesulfonamides was investigated. A series of carboxamide linked aromatic benzenesulfonamides 1a-1c, 2a-2d and their sulfonamide linked bioisosteres 3a-3d, 4a-4d was synthesized and evaluated for inhibitory activity against bovine tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) and bCA II. A significant increase in CA inhibition activity was observed upon bioisosteric replacement of carboxamide linking group with a sulfonamide group. Some of these compounds were identified as highly potent and selective AP inhibitors. Compounds 1b, 2b, 3d, 4d 5b and 5c were found to be selective bTNAP inhibitors, whereas compounds 1a, 1c, 2a, 2c, 2d, 3a, 3c, 4a, 4b, 4c, 5a were found to be selective bIAP inhibitors. For most active AP inhibitor 3b, detailed kinetic studies indicated a competitive mode of inhibition against tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) and non-competitive mode of inhibition against intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP). Molecular docking studies were carried out to rationalize important binding site interactions. PMID:25865133

  15. Diarylsulfonamides and their bioisosteres as dual inhibitors of alkaline phosphatase and carbonic anhydrase: Structure activity relationship and molecular modelling studies.

    PubMed

    Al-Rashida, Mariya; Ejaz, Syeda Abida; Ali, Sharafat; Shaukat, Aisha; Hamayoun, Mehwish; Ahmed, Maqsood; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2015-05-15

    The effect of bioisosteric replacement of carboxamide linking group with sulfonamide linking group, on alkaline phosphatase (AP) and carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibition activity of aromatic benzenesulfonamides was investigated. A series of carboxamide linked aromatic benzenesulfonamides 1a-1c, 2a-2d and their sulfonamide linked bioisosteres 3a-3d, 4a-4d was synthesized and evaluated for inhibitory activity against bovine tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) and bCA II. A significant increase in CA inhibition activity was observed upon bioisosteric replacement of carboxamide linking group with a sulfonamide group. Some of these compounds were identified as highly potent and selective AP inhibitors. Compounds 1b, 2b, 3d, 4d 5b and 5c were found to be selective bTNAP inhibitors, whereas compounds 1a, 1c, 2a, 2c, 2d, 3a, 3c, 4a, 4b, 4c, 5a were found to be selective bIAP inhibitors. For most active AP inhibitor 3b, detailed kinetic studies indicated a competitive mode of inhibition against tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) and non-competitive mode of inhibition against intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP). Molecular docking studies were carried out to rationalize important binding site interactions.

  16. Molecular Analysis of a Multistep Lung Cancer Model Induced by Chronic Inflammation Reveals Epigenetic Regulation of p16 and Activation of the DNA Damage Response Pathway12

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, David; Vicent, Silvestre; Fraga, Mario F; Fernandez-Garcia, Ignacio; Freire, Javier; Lujambio, Amaia; Esteller, Manel; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos; Pio, Ruben; Lecanda, Fernando; Montuenga, Luis M

    2007-01-01

    The molecular hallmarks of inflammation-mediated lung carcinogenesis have not been fully clarified, mainly due to the scarcity of appropriate animal models. We have used a silica-induced multistep lung carcinogenesis model driven by chronic inflammation to study the evolution of molecular markers and genetic alterations. We analyzed markers of DNA damage response (DDR), proliferative stress, and telomeric stress: γ-H2AX, p16, p53, and TERT. Lung cancer-related epigenetic and genetic alterations, including promoter hypermethylation status of p16(CDKN2A), APC, CDH13, Rassf1, and Nore1A, as well as mutations of Tp53, epidermal growth factor receptor, K-ras, N-ras, and c-H-ras, have been also studied. Our results showed DDR pathway activation in preneoplastic lesions, in association with inducible nitric oxide synthase and p53 induction. p16 was also induced in early tumorigenic progression and was inactivated in bronchiolar dysplasias and tumors. Remarkably, lack of mutations of Ras and epidermal growth factor receptor, and a very low frequency of Tp53 mutations suggest that they are not required for tumorigenesis in this model. In contrast, epigenetic alterations in p16(CDKN2A), CDH13, and APC, but not in Rassf1 and Nore1A, were clearly observed. These data suggest the existence of a specific molecular signature of inflammation-driven lung carcinogenesis that shares some, but not all, of the molecular landmarks of chemically induced lung cancer. PMID:17971904

  17. A molecular signaling model of platelet phosphoinositide and calcium regulation during homeostasis and P2Y1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Purvis, Jeremy E.; Chatterjee, Manash S.; Brass, Lawrence F.

    2008-01-01

    To quantify how various molecular mechanisms are integrated to maintain platelet homeostasis and allow responsiveness to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), we developed a computational model of the human platelet. Existing kinetic information for 77 reactions, 132 fixed kinetic rate constants, and 70 species was combined with electrochemical calculations, measurements of platelet ultrastructure, novel experimental results, and published single-cell data. The model accurately predicted: (1) steady-state resting concentrations for intracellular calcium, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol phosphate, and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate; (2) transient increases in intracellular calcium, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and Gq-GTP in response to ADP; and (3) the volume of the platelet dense tubular system. A more stringent test of the model involved stochastic simulation of individual platelets, which display an asynchronous calcium spiking behavior in response to ADP. Simulations accurately reproduced the broad frequency distribution of measured spiking events and demonstrated that asynchronous spiking was a consequence of stochastic fluctuations resulting from the small volume of the platelet. The model also provided insights into possible mechanisms of negative-feedback signaling, the relative potency of platelet agonists, and cell-to-cell variation across platelet populations. This integrative approach to platelet biology offers a novel and complementary strategy to traditional reductionist methods. PMID:18596227

  18. γ-Benzylidene digoxin derivatives synthesis and molecular modeling: Evaluation of anticancer and the Na,K-ATPase activity effect.

    PubMed

    Alves, Silmara L G; Paixão, Natasha; Ferreira, Letícia G R; Santos, Felipe R S; Neves, Luiza D R; Oliveira, Gisele C; Cortes, Vanessa F; Salomé, Kahlil S; Barison, Andersson; Santos, Fabio V; Cenzi, Gisele; Varotti, Fernando P; Oliveira, Soraya M F; Taranto, Alex G; Comar, Moacyr; Silva, Luciana M; Noël, François; Quintas, Luis Eduardo M; Barbosa, Leandro A; Villar, José A F P

    2015-08-01

    Cardiotonic steroids (CS), natural compounds with traditional use in cardiology, have been recently suggested to exert potent anticancer effects. However, the repertoire of molecules with Na,K-ATPase activity and anticancer properties is limited. This paper describes the synthesis of 6 new digoxin derivatives substituted (on the C17-butenolide) with γ-benzylidene group and their cytotoxic effect on human fibroblast (WI-26 VA4) and cancer (HeLa and RKO) cell lines as well as their effect on Na,K-ATPase activity and expression. As digoxin, compound BD-4 was almost 100-fold more potent than the other derivatives for cytotoxicity with the three types of cells used and was also the only one able to fully inhibit the Na,K-ATPase of HeLa cells after 24h treatment. No change in the Na,K-ATPase α1 isoform protein expression was detected. On the other hand it was 30-40 fold less potent for direct Na,K-ATPase inhibition, when compared to the most potent derivatives, BD-1 and BD-3, and digoxin. The data presented here demonstrated that the anticancer effect of digoxin derivatives substituted with γ-benzylidene were not related with their inhibition of Na,K-ATPase activity or alteration of its expression, suggesting that this classical molecular mechanism of CS is not involved in the cytotoxic effect of our derivatives.

  19. An evolutionary model for collapsing molecular clouds and their star formation activity. II. Mass dependence of the star formation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora-Avilés, Manuel; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the evolution and dependence on cloud mass of the star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE) of star-forming molecular clouds (MCs) within the scenario that clouds are undergoing global collapse and that the SFR is controlled by ionization feedback. We find that low-mass clouds (M {sub max} ≲ 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}) spend most of their evolution at low SFRs, but end their lives with a mini-burst, reaching a peak SFR ∼10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1}, although their time-averaged SFR is only (SFR) ∼ 10{sup 2} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1}. The corresponding efficiencies are SFE{sub final} ≲ 60% and (SFE) ≲ 1%. For more massive clouds (M {sub max} ≳ 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}), the SFR first increases and then reaches a plateau because the clouds are influenced by stellar feedback since earlier in their evolution. As a function of cloud mass, (SFR) and (SFE) are well represented by the fits (SFR) ≈ 100(1 + M {sub max}/1.4 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}){sup 1.68} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1} and (SFE) ≈ 0.03(M {sub max}/2.5 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}){sup 0.33}, respectively. Moreover, the SFR of our model clouds follows closely the SFR-dense gas mass relation recently found by Lada et al. during the epoch when their instantaneous SFEs are comparable to those of the clouds considered by those authors. Collectively, a Monte Carlo integration of the model-predicted SFR(M) over a Galactic giant molecular cloud mass spectrum yields values for the total Galactic SFR that are within half an order of magnitude of the relation obtained by Gao and Solomon. Our results support the scenario that star-forming MCs may be in global gravitational collapse and that the low observed values of the SFR and SFE are a result of the interruption of each SF episode, caused primarily by the ionizing feedback from massive stars.

  20. A supermolecular curcumin for enhanced antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities: molecular characteristics, computer modeling and in vivo pharmacokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qunyou; Wu, Jianyong; Li, Yi; Mei, Hu; Zhao, Chunjing; Zhang, Jingqing

    2013-01-01

    The supermolecular curcumin (SMCCM) exhibiting remarkably improved solubility and release characteristics was fabricated to increase the oral bioavailability in rat as well as the antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities of curcumin (CCM) against human lung adenocarcinoma cell A549. SMCCM was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, morphology and structure, aqueous solubility, and release behavior in vitro. Computer modeling of the supermolecular structure was performed. The pharmacokinetics, antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities of SMCCM were evaluated. The mechanisms by which SMCCM inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis were identified. The formation of SMCCM was testified and the supermolecular structure was studied by a computer modeling technique. Compared to free CCM, SMCCM with much higher aqueous solubility exhibited obviously enhanced release and more favorable pharmacokinetic profiles, and, furthermore, SMCCM showed higher anticancer efficacy, enhanced induction of G2/M-phase arrest and apoptosis in A549 cells, which might be involved with the increases in reactive oxygen species production and intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. SMCCM remarkably enhanced not only the oral bioavailability but also the antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities of CCM along with improved solubility and release characteristics of CCM.

  1. Molecular Modeling of Cardiac Troponin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Edward P.

    The cardiac thin filament regulates interactions of actin and myosin, the force-generating elements of muscular contraction. Over the past several decades many details have been discovered regarding the structure and function of the cardiac thin filament and its components, including cardiac troponin (cTn). My hypothesis is that signal propagation occurs between distant ends of the cardiac troponin complex through calcium-dependent alterations in the dynamics of cTn and tropomyosin (Tm). I propose a model of the thin filament that encompasses known structures of cTn, Tm and actin to gain insight into cardiac troponin's allosteric regulation of thin filament dynamics. By performing molecular dynamics simulations of cTn in conjunction with overlapping Tm in two conditions, with and without calcium bound to site II of cardiac troponin C (cTnC), I found a combination of calcium-dependent changes in secondary structure and dynamics throughout the cTn-Tm complex. I then applied this model to investigate familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC), a disease of the sarcomere that is one of the most commonly occurring genetic causes of heart disease. Approximately 15% of known FHC-related mutations are found in cardiac troponin T (cTnT), most of which are in or flank the alpha-helical N-tail domain TNT1. TNT1 directly interacts with overlapping Tm coiled coils. Using this model I identified effects of TNT1 mutations that propagate to the cTn core where site II of cTnC, the regulatory site of calcium binding in the thin filament, is located. Specifically, I found that mutations in TNT1 alter the flexibility of TNT1 and that the flexibility of TNT1 is inversely proportional to the cooperativity of calcium activation of the thin filament. Further, I identified a pathway of propagation of structural and dynamic changes linking TNT1 to site II of cTnC. Mutation-induced changes at site II cTnC alter calcium coordination which corresponds to biophysical measurements of calcium

  2. Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Modeling: An Integration to Teach Drug Structure-Activity Relationship and the Molecular Basis of Drug Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Ivone; Borges, Aurea D. L.; Bernardes, Lilian S. C.

    2005-01-01

    The use of computational chemistry and the protein data bank (PDB) to understand and predict the chemical and molecular basis involved in the drug-receptor interactions is discussed. A geometrical and chemical overview of the great structural similarity in the substrate and inhibitor is provided.

  3. Molecular model for chirality phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latinwo, Folarin; Stillinger, Frank H.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    2016-10-01

    Chirality is a hallmark feature for molecular recognition in biology and chemical physics. We present a three-dimensional continuum model for studying chirality phenomena in condensed phases using molecular simulations. Our model system is based upon a simple four-site molecule and incorporates non-trivial kinetic behavior, including the ability to switch chirality or racemize, as well as thermodynamics arising from an energetic preference for specific chiral interactions. In particular, we introduce a chiral renormalization parameter that can locally favor either homochiral or heterochiral configurations. Using this model, we explore a range of chirality-specific phenomena, including the kinetics of chiral inversion, the mechanism of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in the liquid, chirally driven liquid-liquid phase separation, and chiral crystal structures.

  4. Principal component analysis of HPLC retention data and molecular modeling structural parameters of cardiovascular system drugs in view of their pharmacological activity.

    PubMed

    Stasiak, Jolanta; Koba, Marcin; Bober, Leszek; Baczek, Tomasz

    2010-07-09

    Evaluation of relationships between molecular modeling structural parameters and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) retention data of 11 cardiovascular system drugs by principal component analysis (PCA) in relation to their pharmacological activity was performed. The six retention data parameters were determined on three different HPLC columns (Nucleosil C18 AB with octadecylsilica stationary phase, IAM PC C10/C3 with chemically bounded phosphatidylcholine, and Nucleosil 100-5 OH with chemically bounded propanodiole), and using isocratically acetonitrile: Britton-Robinson buffer as the mobile phase. Additionally, molecular modeling studies were performed with the use of HyperChem software and MM+ molecular mechanics with the semi-empirical AM1 method deriving 20 structural descriptors. Factor analysis obtained with the use of various sets of parameters: structural parameters, HPLC retention data, and all 26 considered parameters, led to the extraction of two main factors. The first principal component (factor 1) accounted for 44-57% of the variance in the data. The second principal component (factor 2) explained 29-33% of data variance. Moreover, the total data variance explained by the first two factors was at the level of 73-90%. More importantly, the PCA analysis of the HPLC retention data and structural parameters allows the segregation of circulatory system drugs according to their pharmacological (cardiovascular) properties as shown by the distribution of the individual drugs on the plane determined by the two principal components (factors 1 and 2).

  5. Modeling chemical interaction profiles: II. Molecular docking, spectral data-activity relationship, and structure-activity relationship models for potent and weak inhibitors of cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 isozyme.

    PubMed

    Tie, Yunfeng; McPhail, Brooks; Hong, Huixiao; Pearce, Bruce A; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Ge, Weigong; Buzatu, Dan A; Wilkes, Jon G; Fuscoe, James C; Tong, Weida; Fowler, Bruce A; Beger, Richard D; Demchuk, Eugene

    2012-03-15

    Polypharmacy increasingly has become a topic of public health concern, particularly as the U.S. population ages. Drug labels often contain insufficient information to enable the clinician to safely use multiple drugs. Because many of the drugs are bio-transformed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, inhibition of CYP activity has long been associated with potentially adverse health effects. In an attempt to reduce the uncertainty pertaining to CYP-mediated drug-drug/chemical interactions, an interagency collaborative group developed a consensus approach to prioritizing information concerning CYP inhibition. The consensus involved computational molecular docking, spectral data-activity relationship (SDAR), and structure-activity relationship (SAR) models that addressed the clinical potency of CYP inhibition. The models were built upon chemicals that were categorized as either potent or weak inhibitors of the CYP3A4 isozyme. The categorization was carried out using information from clinical trials because currently available in vitro high-throughput screening data were not fully representative of the in vivo potency of inhibition. During categorization it was found that compounds, which break the Lipinski rule of five by molecular weight, were about twice more likely to be inhibitors of CYP3A4 compared to those, which obey the rule. Similarly, among inhibitors that break the rule, potent inhibitors were 2-3 times more frequent. The molecular docking classification relied on logistic regression, by which the docking scores from different docking algorithms, CYP3A4 three-dimensional structures, and binding sites on them were combined in a unified probabilistic model. The SDAR models employed a multiple linear regression approach applied to binned 1D ¹³C-NMR and 1D ¹⁵N-NMR spectral descriptors. Structure-based and physical-chemical descriptors were used as the basis for developing SAR models by the decision forest method. Thirty-three potent inhibitors and 88 weak

  6. Inhibition of Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation by Adenosine and Inosine: Studies on Their Relative Contribution and Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Pereira, Jaime; Mezzano, Diego; Alarcón, Marcelo; Caballero, Julio; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background The inhibitory effect of adenosine on platelet aggregation is abrogated after the addition of adenosine-deaminase. Inosine is a naturally occurring nucleoside degraded from adenosine. Objectives The mechanisms of antiplatelet action of adenosine and inosine in vitro and in vivo, and their differential biological effects by molecular modeling were investigated. Results Adenosine (0.5, 1 and 2 mmol/L) inhibited phosphatidylserine exposure from 52±4% in the control group to 44±4 (p<0.05), 29±2 (p<0.01) and 20±3% (p<0.001). P-selectin expression in the presence of adenosine 0.5, 1 and 2 mmol/L was inhibited from 32±4 to 27±2 (p<0.05), 14±3 (p<0.01) and 9±3% (p<0.001), respectively. At the concentrations tested, only inosine to 4 mmol/L had effect on platelet P-selectin expression (p<0.05). Adenosine and inosine inhibited platelet aggregation and ATP release stimulated by ADP and collagen. Adenosine and inosine reduced collagen-induced platelet adhesion and aggregate formation under flow. At the same concentrations adenosine inhibited platelet aggregation, decreased the levels of sCD40L and increased intraplatelet cAMP. In addition, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent adenosine receptor A2A antagonist) attenuated the effect of adenosine on platelet aggregation induced by ADP and intraplatelet level of cAMP. Adenosine and inosine significantly inhibited thrombosis formation in vivo (62±2% occlusion at 60 min [n = 6, p<0.01] and 72±1.9% occlusion at 60 min, [n = 6, p<0.05], respectively) compared with the control (98±2% occlusion at 60 min, n = 6). A2A is the adenosine receptor present in platelets; it is known that inosine is not an A2A ligand. Docking of adenosine and inosine inside A2A showed that the main difference is the formation by adenosine of an additional hydrogen bond between the NH2 of the adenine group and the residues Asn253 in H6 and Glu169 in EL2 of the A2A receptor. Conclusion Therefore

  7. Molecular basis of the low activity of antitumor anthracenediones, mitoxantrone and ametantrone, in oxygen radical generation catalyzed by NADH dehydrogenase. Enzymatic and molecular modelling studies.

    PubMed

    Tarasiuk, Jolanta; Mazerski, Jan; Tkaczyk-Gobis, Katarzyna; Borowski, Edward

    2005-04-01

    Synthetic antitumor anthracenedione drugs, in contrast to anthracycline antibiotics, are ineffective in free radical formation in NADH dehydrogenase system. Our results have indicated that neither the reduction potential nor the side chain conformation and the energies of border orbitals (HOMO and LUMO) determine the ability of anthracenediones to stimulate reactive oxygen species formation in NADH dehydrogenase system. It was shown that the distribution of the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), around the quinone system was crucial for this ability. We have found for non-stimulating anthracenediones that the clouds of positive MEP cover the quinone carbon atoms while for agents effective in stimulating reactive oxygen species formation the clouds of negative MEP cover continuously the aromatic core together with the quinone system.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and molecular modelling of a novel dipyridamole supramolecule - X-ray structure, quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics study to comprehend the hydrogen bond structure-activity relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vepuri, Suresh B.; Devarajegowda, H. C.; Soliman, Mahmoud E.

    2016-02-01

    Hydrochloride salt formation for Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs) is the primary choice to impart aqueous solubility and to promote dissolution. Dipyridamole (DIP) is a cardiovascular drug which is practically insoluble in water. We discovered a new form of DIP called as dipyridamole hydrochloride trihydrate (DIPHT), which was prepared by an unusual method of reacting the DIP with hydrated hydrochloric acid (HCl) that was liberated in situ by the reaction of ferric chloride with water. The liberated HCl was consumed as reagent in situ by the scavenger (API) and was converted to a hydrochloride trihydrate. The product was characterized by FTIR, mass spectroscopy, PXRD and DSC. Supramolecular structure of this novel DIPHT was revealed by single crystal XRD. A sustained intramolecular hydrogen bond alliance was found in DIP and the DIPHT. Stability of this hydrogen bond was further evaluated by means of molecular modelling studies. We performed electron calculations using quantum mechanics (QM) on both the base and salt structures to compare their geometry and molecular orbital energy levels. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were also conducted in explicit solvent models to provide more insights into the hydrogen bond strength and conformational preferences of the base and salt structure. Together with QM and MD, we were able to explain the influence of hydrogen bonds on proton uptake activity of DIP and stability of DIP and DIPHT. DIPHT which can dissolve faster than DIP in water may enhance the dissolution and bioavailability of the drug. As the current drug development research is shifting to repurpose the existing drugs in order to subside the untoward risks in new drug development, we believe that DIPHT with its intrinsic aqueous solubility could bring more application for DIP and generate interest within the pharmaceutical industry.

  9. Interactive Modelling of Molecular Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, J. R.; Kreylos, O.; Hamann, B.

    2004-12-01

    The "Nanotech Construction Kit" (NCK) [1] is a new project aimed at improving the understanding of molecular structures at a nanometer-scale level by visualization and interactive manipulation. Our very first prototype is a virtual-reality program allowing the construction of silica and carbon structures from scratch by assembling them one atom at a time. In silica crystals or glasses, the basic building block is an SiO4 unit, with the four oxygen atoms arranged around the central silicon atom in the shape of a regular tetrahedron. Two silicate units can connect to each other by their silicon atoms covalently bonding to one shared oxygen atom. Geometrically, this means that two tetrahedra can link at their vertices. Our program is based on geometric representations and uses simple force fields to simulate the interaction of building blocks, such as forming/breaking of bonds and repulsion. Together with stereoscopic visualization and direct manipulation of building blocks using wands or data gloves, this enables users to create realistic and complex molecular models in short amounts of time. The NCK can either be used as a standalone tool, to analyze or experiment with molecular structures, or it can be used in combination with "traditional" molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In a first step, the NCK can create initial configurations for subsequent MD simulation. In a more evolved setup, the NCK can serve as a visual front-end for an ongoing MD simulation, visualizing changes in simulation state in real time. Additionally, the NCK can be used to change simulation state on-the-fly, to experiment with different simulation conditions, or force certain events, e.g., the forming of a bond, and observe the simulation's reaction. [1] http://graphics.cs.ucdavis.edu/~okreylos/ResDev/NanoTech

  10. Towards understanding the mechanism of action of antibacterial N-alkyl-3-hydroxypyridinium salts: Biological activities, molecular modeling and QSAR studies.

    PubMed

    Dolezal, Rafael; Soukup, Ondrej; Malinak, David; Savedra, Ranylson M L; Marek, Jan; Dolezalova, Marie; Pasdiorova, Marketa; Salajkova, Sarka; Korabecny, Jan; Honegr, Jan; Ramalho, Teodorico C; Kuca, Kamil

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we have carried out a combined experimental and computational investigation to elucidate several bred-in-the-bone ideas standing out in rational design of novel cationic surfactants as antibacterial agents. Five 3-hydroxypyridinium salts differing in the length of N-alkyl side chain have been synthesized, analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography, tested for in vitro activity against a panel of pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains, computationally modeled in water by a SCRF B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method, and evaluated by a systematic QSAR analysis. Given the results of this work, the hypothesis suggesting that higher positive charge of the quaternary nitrogen should increase antimicrobial efficacy can be rejected since 3-hydroxyl group does increase the positive charge on the nitrogen but, simultaneously, it significantly derogates the antimicrobial activity by lowering the lipophilicity and by escalating the desolvation energy of the compounds in comparison with non-hydroxylated analogues. Herein, the majority of the prepared 3-hydroxylated substances showed notably lower potency than the parent pyridinium structures, although compound 8 with C12 alkyl chain proved a distinctly better antimicrobial activity in submicromolar range. Focusing on this anomaly, we have made an effort to reveal the reason of the observed activity through a molecular dynamics simulation of the interaction between the bacterial membrane and compound 8 in GROMACS software.

  11. Towards understanding the mechanism of action of antibacterial N-alkyl-3-hydroxypyridinium salts: Biological activities, molecular modeling and QSAR studies.

    PubMed

    Dolezal, Rafael; Soukup, Ondrej; Malinak, David; Savedra, Ranylson M L; Marek, Jan; Dolezalova, Marie; Pasdiorova, Marketa; Salajkova, Sarka; Korabecny, Jan; Honegr, Jan; Ramalho, Teodorico C; Kuca, Kamil

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we have carried out a combined experimental and computational investigation to elucidate several bred-in-the-bone ideas standing out in rational design of novel cationic surfactants as antibacterial agents. Five 3-hydroxypyridinium salts differing in the length of N-alkyl side chain have been synthesized, analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography, tested for in vitro activity against a panel of pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains, computationally modeled in water by a SCRF B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method, and evaluated by a systematic QSAR analysis. Given the results of this work, the hypothesis suggesting that higher positive charge of the quaternary nitrogen should increase antimicrobial efficacy can be rejected since 3-hydroxyl group does increase the positive charge on the nitrogen but, simultaneously, it significantly derogates the antimicrobial activity by lowering the lipophilicity and by escalating the desolvation energy of the compounds in comparison with non-hydroxylated analogues. Herein, the majority of the prepared 3-hydroxylated substances showed notably lower potency than the parent pyridinium structures, although compound 8 with C12 alkyl chain proved a distinctly better antimicrobial activity in submicromolar range. Focusing on this anomaly, we have made an effort to reveal the reason of the observed activity through a molecular dynamics simulation of the interaction between the bacterial membrane and compound 8 in GROMACS software. PMID:27341309

  12. Abstract models of molecular walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Oleg

    Recent advances in single-molecule chemistry have led to designs for artificial multi-pedal walkers that follow tracks of chemicals. The walkers, called molecular spiders, consist of a rigid chemically inert body and several flexible enzymatic legs. The legs can reversibly bind to chemical substrates on a surface, and through their enzymatic action convert them to products. We study abstract models of molecular spiders to evaluate how efficiently they can perform two tasks: molecular transport of cargo over tracks and search for targets on finite surfaces. For the single-spider model our simulations show a transient behavior wherein certain spiders move superdiffusively over significant distances and times. This gives the spiders potential as a faster-than-diffusion transport mechanism. However, analysis shows that single-spider motion eventually decays into an ordinary diffusive motion, owing to the ever increasing size of the region of products. Inspired by cooperative behavior of natural molecular walkers, we propose a symmetric exclusion process (SEP) model for multiple walkers interacting as they move over a one-dimensional lattice. We show that when walkers are sequentially released from the origin, the collective effect is to prevent the leading walkers from moving too far backwards. Hence, there is an effective outward pressure on the leading walkers that keeps them moving superdiffusively for longer times. Despite this improvement the leading spider eventually slows down and moves diffusively, similarly to a single spider. The slowdown happens because all spiders behind the leading spiders never encounter substrates, and thus they are never biased. They cannot keep up with leading spiders, and cannot put enough pressure on them. Next, we investigate search properties of a single and multiple spiders moving over one- and two-dimensional surfaces with various absorbing and reflecting boundaries. For the single-spider model we evaluate by how much the

  13. In Silico Calculation of Infinite Dilution Activity Coefficients of Molecular Solutes in Ionic Liquids: Critical Review of Current Methods and New Models Based on Three Machine Learning Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Paduszyński, Kamil

    2016-08-22

    The aim of the paper is to address all the disadvantages of currently available models for calculating infinite dilution activity coefficients (γ(∞)) of molecular solutes in ionic liquids (ILs)-a relevant property from the point of view of many applications of ILs, particularly in separations. Three new models are proposed, each of them based on distinct machine learning algorithm: stepwise multiple linear regression (SWMLR), feed-forward artificial neural network (FFANN), and least-squares support vector machine (LSSVM). The models were established based on the most comprehensive γ(∞) data bank reported so far (>34 000 data points for 188 ILs and 128 solutes). Following the paper published previously [J. Chem. Inf. Model 2014, 54, 1311-1324], the ILs were treated in terms of group contributions, whereas the Abraham solvation parameters were used to quantify an impact of solute structure. Temperature is also included in the input data of the models so that they can be utilized to obtain temperature-dependent data and thus related thermodynamic functions. Both internal and external validation techniques were applied to assess the statistical significance and explanatory power of the final correlations. A comparative study of the overall performance of the investigated SWMLR/FFANN/LSSVM approaches is presented in terms of root-mean-square error and average absolute relative deviation between calculated and experimental γ(∞), evaluated for different families of ILs and solutes, as well as between calculated and experimental infinite dilution selectivity for separation problems benzene from n-hexane and thiophene from n-heptane. LSSVM is shown to be a method with the lowest values of both training and generalization errors. It is finally demonstrated that the established models exhibit an improved accuracy compared to the state-of-the-art model, namely, temperature-dependent group contribution linear solvation energy relationship, published in 2011 [J. Chem

  14. In Silico Calculation of Infinite Dilution Activity Coefficients of Molecular Solutes in Ionic Liquids: Critical Review of Current Methods and New Models Based on Three Machine Learning Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Paduszyński, Kamil

    2016-08-22

    The aim of the paper is to address all the disadvantages of currently available models for calculating infinite dilution activity coefficients (γ(∞)) of molecular solutes in ionic liquids (ILs)-a relevant property from the point of view of many applications of ILs, particularly in separations. Three new models are proposed, each of them based on distinct machine learning algorithm: stepwise multiple linear regression (SWMLR), feed-forward artificial neural network (FFANN), and least-squares support vector machine (LSSVM). The models were established based on the most comprehensive γ(∞) data bank reported so far (>34 000 data points for 188 ILs and 128 solutes). Following the paper published previously [J. Chem. Inf. Model 2014, 54, 1311-1324], the ILs were treated in terms of group contributions, whereas the Abraham solvation parameters were used to quantify an impact of solute structure. Temperature is also included in the input data of the models so that they can be utilized to obtain temperature-dependent data and thus related thermodynamic functions. Both internal and external validation techniques were applied to assess the statistical significance and explanatory power of the final correlations. A comparative study of the overall performance of the investigated SWMLR/FFANN/LSSVM approaches is presented in terms of root-mean-square error and average absolute relative deviation between calculated and experimental γ(∞), evaluated for different families of ILs and solutes, as well as between calculated and experimental infinite dilution selectivity for separation problems benzene from n-hexane and thiophene from n-heptane. LSSVM is shown to be a method with the lowest values of both training and generalization errors. It is finally demonstrated that the established models exhibit an improved accuracy compared to the state-of-the-art model, namely, temperature-dependent group contribution linear solvation energy relationship, published in 2011 [J. Chem

  15. Molecular modeling of auxin transport inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, G.; Black-Schaefer, C.; Bures, M.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Molecular modeling techniques have been used to study the chemical and steric properties of auxin transport inhibitors. These bind to a specific site on the plant plasma membrane characterized by its affinity for N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). A three-dimensional model was derived from critical features of ligands for the NPA receptor, and a suggested binding conformation is proposed. This model, along with three-dimensional structural searching techniques, was then used to search the Abbott corporate database of chemical structures. Of the 467 compounds that satisfied the search criteria, 77 representative molecules were evaluated for their ability to compete for ({sup 3}H)NPA binding to corn microsomal membranes. Nineteen showed activity that ranged from 16 to 85% of the maximum NPA binding. Four of the most active of these, from chemical classes not included in the original compound set, also inhibited polar auxin transport through corn coleoptile sections.

  16. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of activated hepatic stellate cells with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide targeting integrin αvβ3 for staging liver fibrosis in rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Caiyuan; Liu, Huanhuan; Cui, Yanfen; Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, Zhongyang; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Dengbin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the expression level of integrin αvβ3 on activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) at different stages of liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in rat model and the feasibility to stage liver fibrosis by using molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide modified ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (USPIO) specifically targeting integrin αvβ3. Materials and methods All experiments received approval from our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Thirty-six rats were randomly divided into three groups of 12 subjects each, and intraperitoneally injected with CCl4 for either 3, 6, or 9 weeks. Controls (n=10) received pure olive oil. The change in T2* relaxation rate (ΔR2*) pre- and postintravenous administration of RGD-USPIO or naked USPIO was measured by 3.0T clinical MRI and compared by one-way analysis of variance or the Student’s t-test. The relationship between expression level of integrin αvβ3 and liver fibrotic degree was evaluated by Spearman’s ranked correlation. Results Activated HSCs were confirmed to be the main cell types expressing integrin αvβ3 during liver fibrogenesis. The protein level of integrin αv and β3 subunit expressed on activated HSCs was upregulated and correlated well with the progression of liver fibrosis (r=0.954, P<0.001; r=0.931, P<0.001, respectively). After injection of RGD-USPIO, there is significant difference in ΔR2* among rats treated with 0, 3, 6, and 9 weeks of CCl4 (P<0.001). The accumulation of iron particles in fibrotic liver specimen is significantly greater for RGD-USPIO than naked USPIO after being injected with equal dose of iron. Conclusion Molecular MRI of integrin αvβ3 expressed on activated HSCs by using RGD-USPIO may distinguish different liver fibrotic stages in CCl4 rat model and shows promising to noninvasively monitor the progression of the liver fibrosis and therapeutic response to

  17. Molecular modeling of fluoropropene refrigerants.

    PubMed

    Raabe, Gabriele

    2012-05-17

    Different fluoropropenes are currently considered as refrigerants, either as pure compounds or as components in low GWP (global warming potential) refrigerant mixtures. Due to their limited commercial production, experimental data for the thermophysical properties of fluoropropenes and their mixtures are in general rare, which hampers the exploration of their performance in technical applications. In principle, molecular simulation can be used to predict the relevant properties of refrigerants and refrigerant blends, provided that adequate intermolecular potential functions ("force fields") are available. In our earlier work (Raabe, G.; Maginn, E. J., J. Phys. Chem. B2010, 114, 10133-10142), we introduced a transferable force field for fluoropropenes comprising the compounds 3,3,3-trifluoro-1-propene (HFO-1243zf), 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoro-1-propene (HFO-1234yf), and hexafluoro-1-propene (HFO-1216). In this paper, we provide an extension of the force field model to the trans- and cis-1,3,3,3-tetrafluoro-1-propene (HFO-1234ze(E), HFO-1234ze) and the cis-1,2,3,3,3-pentafluoro-1-propene (HFO-1225ye(Z)) as well as revised simulation results for HFO-1216. We present Gibbs ensemble simulation results on the vapor pressures, saturated densities, and heats of vaporization of these compounds in comparison with experimental results. The simulation results show that the force field model enables reliable predictions of the properties of the different fluoropropenes and also reproduces well the differing vapor-liquid coexistence and vapor pressure curve of the cis- and trans-isomers of 1,3,3,3-tetrafluoro-1-propene, HFO-1234ze and HFO-1234ze(E). For these two isomers, we also present molecular dynamics simulation studies on their local structure.

  18. Aspergillus niger lipase: Heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris, molecular modeling prediction and the importance of the hinge domains at both sides of the lid domain to interfacial activation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Zhengyu; Duan, Mojie; Yang, Jiangke; Xu, Li; Yan, Yunjun

    2009-01-01

    Aspergillus niger lipase (ANL) is an important biocatalyst in the food processing industry. However, there is no report of its detailed three-dimensional structure because of difficulties in crystallization. In this article, based on experimental data and bioinformational analysis results, the structural features of ANL were simulated. Firstly, two recombinant ANLs expressed in Pichia pastoris were purified to homogeneity and their corresponding secondary structure compositions were determined by circular dichroism spectra. Secondly, the primary structure, the secondary structure and the three-dimensional structure of ANL were modeled by comparison with homologous lipases with known three-dimensional structures using the BioEdit software, lipase engineering database (http://www.led.uni-stuttgart.de/), PSIPRED server and SwissModel server. The predicted molecular structure of ANL presented typical features of the alpha/beta hydrolase fold including positioning of the putative catalytic triad residues and the GXSXG signature motif. Comparison of the predicted three-dimensional structure of ANL with the X-ray three-dimensional structure of A. niger feruloyl esterase showed that the functional difference of interfacial activation between lipase and esterase was concerned with the difference in position of the lid. Our three-dimensional model of ANL helps to modify lipase structure by protein engineering, which will further expand the scope of application of ANL. PMID:19248178

  19. Molecular analysis and structure-activity relationship modeling of the substrate/inhibitor interaction site of plasma membrane monoamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Ho, Horace T B; Pan, Yongmei; Cui, Zhiyi; Duan, Haichuan; Swaan, Peter W; Wang, Joanne

    2011-11-01

    Plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) is a new polyspecific transporter that interacts with a wide range of structurally diverse organic cations. To map the physicochemical descriptors of cationic compounds that allow interaction with PMAT, we systematically analyzed the interactions between PMAT and three series of structural analogs of known organic cation substrates including phenylalkylamines, n-tetraalkylammonium (n-TAA) compounds, and β-carbolines. Our results showed that phenylalkylamines with a distance between the aromatic ring and the positively charged amine nitrogen atom of ∼6.4 Å confer optimal interactions with PMAT, whereas studies with n-TAA compounds revealed an excellent correlation between IC(50) values and hydrophobicity. The five β-carbolines that we tested, which possess a pyridinium-like structure and are structurally related to the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, inhibited PMAT with high affinity (IC(50) values of 39.1-65.5 μM). Cytotoxicity analysis further showed that cells expressing PMAT are 14- to 15-fold more sensitive to harmalan and norharmanium, suggesting that these two β-carbolines are also transportable substrates of PMAT. We then used computer-aided modeling to generate qualitative and quantitative three-dimensional pharmacophore models on the basis of 23 previously reported and currently identified PMAT inhibitors and noninhibitors. These models are characterized by a hydrogen bond donor and two to three hydrophobic features with distances between the hydrogen bond donor and hydrophobic features ranging between 5.20 and 7.02 Å. The consistency between the mapping results and observed PMAT affinity of a set of test compounds indicates that the models performed well in inhibitor prediction and could be useful for future virtual screening of new PMAT inhibitors. PMID:21816955

  20. Molecular modeling studies and synthesis of novel quinoxaline derivatives with potential anticancer activity as inhibitors of c-Met kinase.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Hebat-Allah S; Al-Marhabi, Aisha R; Eissa, Sally I; Ammar, Yousry A

    2015-10-15

    In an effort to develop potent anti-cancer agents, we have synthesized some substituted quinoxaline derivatives. Reaction of 6-bromo-3-methylquinoxalin-2(1H)-one 1 with aromatic aldehydes furnished the styryl derivatives 2a-e. Alkylation of 1 with ethyl chloroacetate produced the N-alkyl derivatives 3. Hydrazinolysis of the ester derivative 3 with hydrazine hydrate afforded the hydrazide derivative 4. In addition, chlorination of 1 with phosphorus oxychloride afforded the 2-chloro derivative 5 which was used as a key intermediate for the synthesis of substituted quinoxaline derivatives 6-8, N-pyrazole derivative 9, tetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline derivative 10 and Schiff base derivatives 13, 15 via reaction with several nucleophiles reagents. Docking methodologies were used to predict their binding conformation to explain the differences of their tested biological activities. All the tested compounds were screened in vitro for their cytotoxic effect on three tumor cell lines. Some new quinoxaline derivatives were studied as inhibitors of c-Met kinase, a receptor associated with high tumor grade and poor prognosis in a number of human cancers. Compounds 2e, 4, 7a, 12a, 12b and 13 showed the highest binding affinity with CDOCKER energy score, while showed the lowest IC50 values against three types of cancer cell lines. It is worth to mention that, compounds 2e, 7a, 12b and 13 showed comparable inhibition activity to the reference drug, while compounds 4 and 12a showed a more potent inhibition activity than Doxorubicin.

  1. Molecular modelling studies, synthesis and biological activity of a series of novel bisnaphthalimides and their development as new DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Filosa, Rosanna; Peduto, Antonella; Micco, Simone Di; Caprariis, Paolo de; Festa, Michela; Petrella, Antonello; Capranico, Giovanni; Bifulco, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    A series of bisnaphthalimide derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for growth-inhibitory property against HT-29 human colon carcinoma. The N,N'-bis[2-(5-nitro-1,3-dioxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-benz[de]-isoquinolin-2-yl)]propane-2-ethanediamine (9) and the N,N'-Bis[2-(5-nitro-1,3-dioxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-benz[de]-isoquinolin-2-yl)]butylaminoethyl]-2-propanediamine (12) derivatives emerged as the most potent compounds of this series. Molecular modelling studies indicated that the high potency of 12, the most cytotoxic compound of the whole series, could be due to larger number of intermolecular interactions and to the best position of the naphthalimido rings, which favours pi-pi stacking interactions with purine and pyrimidine bases in the DNA active site. Moreover, 12 was designed as a DNA topoisomerase II poison and biochemical studies showed its effect on human DNA topoisomerase II. We then selected the compounds with a significant cytotoxicity for apoptosis assay. Derivative 9 was able to induce significantly apoptosis (40%) at 0.1 microM concentration, and we demonstrated that the effect on apoptosis in HT-29 cells is mediated by caspases activation.

  2. Substituted quinazolines, part 3. Synthesis, in vitro antitumor activity and molecular modeling study of certain 2-thieno-4(3H)-quinazolinone analogs.

    PubMed

    Al-Obaid, Abdulrahman M; Abdel-Hamide, Sami G; El-Kashef, Hassan A; Abdel-Aziz, Alaa A-M; El-Azab, Adel S; Al-Khamees, Hamad A; El-Subbagh, Hussein I

    2009-06-01

    The synthesis of some new 2-thieno-4(3H)-quinazolinone derivatives and their biological evaluation as antitumor agents using the National Cancer Institute (NCI) disease oriented antitumor screen protocol are investigated. Compounds 2-(2-thienylcarbonylamino)-5-iodo-N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-benzamide (16), 2-(2-thieno)-6-iodo-3-phenylamino-3,4-dihydro-quina-zolin-4-one (26), and 2-(2-thieno)-4-[4-sulfonamidobenzylamino]-6-iodo-quinazoline (42), with GI(50) values of 12.7, 10.3, 16.9 microM, respectively, proved to be the most active members in this study, as compared to the known drug 5-FU. Conformational analysis of the most active molecules using molecular modeling and QSAR techniques enabled the understanding of the pharmacophoric requirements for 2-thieno-quinzolinone derivatives as antitumor agents. These three quinazolinone analogs (16, 26, 42) could be considered as useful templates for future development to obtain more potent antitumor agents.

  3. 3D Printing of Molecular Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Adam; Olson, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Physical molecular models have played a valuable role in our understanding of the invisible nano-scale world. We discuss 3D printing and its use in producing models of the molecules of life. Complex biomolecular models, produced from 3D printed parts, can demonstrate characteristics of molecular structure and function, such as viral self-assembly,…

  4. Synthesis, spectral characterization, molecular modeling and antimicrobial activity of new potentially N2O2 Schiff base complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adly, Omima M. I.; Taha, Ali; Fahmy, Shery A.

    2013-12-01

    Metal complexes of a new potentially tetradentate symmetrical Schiff base ligand (H2L) with Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), VO(IV), Zn(II), Cd(II), Ce(III), Fe(III) and UO2(VI) metal ions have been synthesized and characterized based on their elemental analyses, spectral (IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR and mass spectra), magnetic and molar conductance studies as well as thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The synthesized complexes have the general formula [MHxL(H2O)yXn]: x = 0-1, y = 0-4 and n = 0-1; where: L = dianion of 6-hydroxy-5-[N-(2-{[(1E)-1-(6-hydroxy-2,4-dioxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,3-thiazin-5-yl)ethylidene]amino}ethyl) ethanimidoyl]-2H-1,3-thiazine-2,4(3H)-dione and X = nitrate or sulphate anion. The ligand behaves as diabasic tetradentate N2O2 sites, except in cases of Co(II), VO(IV) and UO2(VI) metal ions, it behaves as monobasic tetradentate Schiff base ligand. The metal complexes exhibited square planar, square-pyramidal and octahedral geometrical arrangements except for Ce(III) and UO2(VI) complexes, they are octa-coordinated. The Coats-Redfern equation was used to calculate the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the different thermal decomposition stages of some complexes. Structural parameters of the ligand and its metal complexes have been theoretically computed on the basis of semiemperical PM3 level, and the results were correlated with their experimental data. The antimicrobial activities of the ligand and its metal complexes were tested against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; and fungus strain and the results were discussed.

  5. [Molecular mechanisms regulating the activity of macrophages].

    PubMed

    Onoprienko, L V

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews modern concepts of the most common types of macrophage activation: classical, alternative, and type II. Molecular mechanisms of induction and regulation of these three types of activation are discussed. Any population of macrophages was shown to change its properties depending on its microenvironment and concrete biological situation (the "functional plasticity of macrophages"). Many intermediate states of macrophages were described along with the most pronounced and well-known activation types (classical activation, alternative activation, and type II activation). These intermediate states are characterized by a variety of combinations of their biological properties, including elements of the three afore mentioned types of activation. Macrophage activity is regulated by a complex network of interrelated cascade mechanisms.

  6. Visible-Light-Activated Molecular Switches.

    PubMed

    Bléger, David; Hecht, Stefan

    2015-09-21

    The ability to influence key properties of molecular systems by using light holds much promise for the fields of materials science and life sciences. The cornerstone of such systems is molecules that are able to reversibly photoisomerize between two states, commonly referred to as photoswitches. One serious restriction to the development of functional photodynamic systems is the necessity to trigger switching in at least one direction by UV light, which is often damaging and penetrates only partially through most media. This review provides a summary of the different conceptual strategies for addressing molecular switches in the visible and near-infrared regions of the optical spectrum. Such visible-light-activated molecular switches tremendously extend the scope of photoswitchable systems for future applications and technologies.

  7. Molecular modeling of human alkaline sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Panneer Selvam; Olubiyi, Olujide; Thirunavukkarasu, Chinnasamy; Strodel, Birgit; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Alkaline sphingomyelinase, which is expressed in the human intestine and hydrolyses sphingomyelin, is a component of the plasma and the lysosomal membranes. Hydrolase of sphingomyelin generates ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate that have regulatory effects on vital cellular functions such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The enzyme belongs to the Nucleotide Pyrophosphatase/Phosphodiesterase family and it differs in structural similarity with acidic and neutral sphingomyelinase. In the present study we modeled alkaline sphingomyelinase using homology modeling based on the structure of Nucleotide Pyrophosphatase/Phosphodiesterase from Xanthomonas axonopodis with which it shares 34% identity. Homology modeling was performed using Modeller9v7. We found that Cys78 and Cys394 form a disulphide bond. Further analysis shows that Ser76 may be important for the function of this enzyme, which is supported by the findings of Wu et al. (2005), that S76F abolishes the activity completely. We found that the residues bound to Zn(2+) are conserved and geometrically similar with the template. Molecular Dynamics simulations were carried out for the modeled protein to observe the effect of Zinc metal ions. It was observed that the metal ion has little effect with regard to the stability but induces increased fluctuations in the protein. These analyses showed that Zinc ions play an important role in stabilizing the secondary structure and in maintaining the compactness of the active site. PMID:21544170

  8. Computerized molecular modeling of carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computerized molecular modleing continues to increase in capability and applicability to carbohydrates. This chapter covers nomenclature and conformational aspects of carbohydrates, perhaps of greater use to carbohydrate-inexperienced computational chemists. Its comments on various methods and studi...

  9. A simple molecular model of neurulation.

    PubMed

    Kerszberg, M; Changeux, J P

    1998-09-01

    A molecular model for the morphogenesis of the central nervous system is built and solved by computer. The formalism rests on molecular-biological data gathered from insects and vertebrates during neural differentiation and neuronal fate specification. Two genetic, hierarchically organized switches are introduced, one associated with f1p4al tissue formation, and the other with neuronal specification. The model switches evolve in time, setting up very similar "prepatterns" of genetic activity in both insects and vertebrates, as observed experimentally. We introduce the hypothesis that cell adhesion and motion are regulated by the switches. If cell motion is turned on by the neural switch, the whole neural tissue (neural plate) thickens, buckles, and folds, ultimately creating a closed neural tube (primary neurulation). When mitoses are more frequent in neural plate tissue, ingression of a neural cell mass takes place instead (secondary neurulation). If cell motions are controlled by the neuronal switch, rather than by the neural one, the differentiation of isolated neuroblasts is observed, which delaminate individually (as in insect neural cord formation). The model thus displays the three major known patterns of neurogenesis; the transition between the vertebrate and insect cases is predicted to result from changes in genetic regulation downstream of the switch genes, and affecting cell adhesion and motility properties. Little is known experimentally about the concerned pathways: their importance as a fruitful area for future investigation is emphasized by our theoretical results.

  10. Molecular Modeling of Estrogen Receptor Using Molecular Operating Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Urmi; Luck, Linda A.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular modeling is pervasive in the pharmaceutical industry that employs many of our students from Biology, Chemistry and the interdisciplinary majors. To expose our students to this important aspect of their education we have incorporated a set of tutorials in our Biochemistry class. The present article describes one of our tutorials where…

  11. The cognitive life of mechanical molecular models.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, Mathieu

    2013-12-01

    The use of physical models of molecular structures as research tools has been central to the development of biochemistry and molecular biology. Intriguingly, it has received little attention from scholars of science. In this paper, I argue that these physical models are not mere three-dimensional representations but that they are in fact very special research tools: they are cognitive augmentations. Despite the fact that they are external props, these models serve as cognitive tools that augment and extend the modeler's cognitive capacities and performance in molecular modeling tasks. This cognitive enhancement is obtained because of the way the modeler interacts with these models, the models' materiality contributing to the solving of the molecule's structure. Furthermore, I argue that these material models and their component parts were designed, built and used specifically to serve as cognitive facilitators and cognitive augmentations.

  12. Students' Understanding Is Enhanced through Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.

    2004-01-01

    Integration of molecular modeling into General Chemistry lab encourages students to dually process molecular concepts both verbally and pictorially. When students are tested utilizing questions not previously encountered the dual processing of information can contribute to a transfer to knowledge. General Chemistry students utilized molecular…

  13. Modeling the Hydrogen Bond within Molecular Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lykos, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen bond is elucidated within the framework of molecular dynamics based on the model of Rahman and Stillinger (R-S) liquid water treatment. Thus, undergraduates are exposed to the powerful but simple use of classical mechanics to solid objects from a molecular viewpoint.

  14. Informing Mechanistic Toxicology with Computational Molecular Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational molecular models of chemicals interacting with biomolecular targets provides toxicologists a valuable, affordable, and sustainable source of in silico molecular level information that augments, enriches, and complements in vitro and in vivo effo...

  15. Theoretical Modelling of Synthetic Molecular Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbu, Corina; Sofo, Jorge; Crespi, Vincent

    2004-03-01

    Synthetic molecular motors with sizes of few nanometers offer prospects to control molecular-scale mechanical motion. Motors with electric dipoles designed into their structure can undergo conformational changes in response to an external electric field and thereby, in principle, perform mechanical work. The synthetic rotary motor of our interest consists of a molecular caltrop with a three-legged base for attachment to a substrate and a molecular shaft functionalized with a molecular rotor at the upper end. Both the static dipole and the electric field-induced dipole of the molecular rotor are relevant to producing rotation. Also, the combination of external electrostatic torque and the internal thermal fluctuations must be sufficient to overcome any rotational barriers on experimentally relevant timescales. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/TZV level coupled to analytical modelling reveal the dynamical response of the motor.

  16. Reasoning with Atomic-Scale Molecular Dynamic Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallant, Amy; Tinker, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    The studies reported in this paper are an initial effort to explore the applicability of computational models in introductory science learning. Two instructional interventions are described that use a molecular dynamics model embedded in a set of online learning activities with middle and high school students in 10 classrooms. The studies indicate…

  17. Molecular emission in chemically active protostellar outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.

    2011-12-01

    Protostellar outflows play an important role in the dynamical and chemical evolution of cloud through shocks. The Herschel Space Observatory (HSO) brings new insight both on the molecular content and the physical conditions in protostellar shocks through high spectral and angular resolution studies of the emission of major gas cooling agents and hydrides. The Herschel/CHESS key-program is carrying out an in depth study of the prototypical shock region L1157-B1. Analysis of the line profiles detected allows to constrain the formation/destruction route of various molecular species, in relation with the predictions of MHD shock models. The Herschel/WISH key-program investigates the properties and origin of water emission in a broad sample of protostellar outflows and envelopes. Implications of the first results for future studies on mass-loss phenomena are discussed.

  18. Structure-activity relationships and molecular modelling of new 5-arylidene-4-thiazolidinone derivatives as aldose reductase inhibitors and potential anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Maccari, Rosanna; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Ottanà, Rosaria; Rocchiccioli, Marco; Marrazzo, Agostino; Cardile, Venera; Graziano, Adriana Carol Eleonora; Amodeo, Pietro; Mura, Umberto; Del Corso, Antonella

    2014-06-23

    A series of 5-(carbamoylmethoxy)benzylidene-2-oxo/thioxo-4-thiazolidinone derivatives (6-9) were synthesized as inhibitors of aldose reductase (AR), enzyme which plays a crucial role in the development of diabetes complications as well as in the inflammatory processes associated both to diabetes mellitus and to other pathologies. In vitro inhibitory activity indicated that compounds 6-9a-d were generally good AR inhibitors. Acetic acid derivatives 8a-d and 9a-d were shown to be the best enzyme inhibitors among the tested compounds endowed with significant inhibitory ability levels reaching submicromolar IC50 values. Moreover, some representative AR inhibitors (7a, 7c, 9a, 9c, 9d) were assayed in cultures of human keratinocytes in order to evaluate their capability to reduce NF-kB activation and iNOS expression. Compound 9c proved to be the best derivative endowed with both interesting AR inhibitory effectiveness and ability to reduce NF-kB activation and iNOS expression. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were undertaken to investigate the binding modes of selected compounds into the active site of AR in order to rationalize the inhibitory effectiveness of these derivatives.

  19. Mixed ligand complexation of some transition metal ions in solution and solid state: Spectral characterization, antimicrobial, antioxidant, DNA cleavage activities and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobana, Sutha; Dharmaraja, Jeyaprakash; Selvaraj, Shanmugaperumal

    2013-04-01

    Equilibrium studies of Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) mixed ligand complexes involving a primary ligand 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; A) and imidazoles viz., imidazole (him), benzimidazole (bim), histamine (hist) and L-histidine (his) as co-ligands(B) were carried out pH-metrically in aqueous medium at 310 ± 0.1 K with I = 0.15 M (NaClO4). In solution state, the stoichiometry of MABH, MAB and MAB2 species have been detected. The primary ligand(A) binds the central M(II) ions in a monodentate manner whereas him, bim, hist and his co-ligands(B) bind in mono, mono, bi and tridentate modes respectively. The calculated Δ log K, log X and log X' values indicate higher stability of the mixed ligand complexes in comparison to binary species. Stability of the mixed ligand complex equilibria follows the Irving-Williams order of stability. In vitro biological evaluations of the free ligand(A) and their metal complexes by well diffusion technique show moderate activities against common bacterial and fungal strains. Oxidative cleavage interaction of ligand(A) and their copper complexes with CT DNA is also studied by gel electrophoresis method in the presence of oxidant. In vitro antioxidant evaluations of the primary ligand(A), CuA and CuAB complexes by DPPH free radical scavenging model were carried out. In solid, the MAB type of M(II)sbnd 5-FU(A)sbnd his(B) complexes were isolated and characterized by various physico-chemical and spectral techniques. Both the magnetic susceptibility and electronic spectral analysis suggest distorted octahedral geometry. Thermal studies on the synthesized mixed ligand complexes show loss of coordinated water molecule in the first step followed by decomposition of the organic residues subsequently. XRD and SEM analysis suggest that the microcrystalline nature and homogeneous morphology of MAB complexes. Further, the 3D molecular modeling and analysis for the mixed ligand MAB complexes have also been carried out.

  20. Synthesis, antiproliferative activity and molecular docking of Colchicine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Huczyński, Adam; Majcher, Urszula; Maj, Ewa; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Janczak, Jan; Moshari, Mahshad; Tuszynski, Jack A; Bartl, Franz

    2016-02-01

    In order to create more potent anticancer agents, a series of five structurally different derivatives of Colchicine have been synthesised. These compounds were characterised spectroscopically and structurally and their antiproliferative activity against four human tumour cell lines (HL-60, HL-60/vinc, LoVo, LoVo/DX) was evaluated. Additionally the activity of the studied compounds was calculated using computational methods involving molecular docking of the Colchicine derivatives to β-tubulin. The experimental and computational results are in very good agreement indicating that the antimitotic activity of Colchicine derivatives can be readily predicted using computational modeling methods.

  1. Design, synthesis, anti-tumor activity, and molecular modeling of quinazoline and pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives targeting epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ju; Wan, Shanhe; Wang, Guangfa; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Zhonghuang; Tian, Yuanxin; Yu, Yonghuan; Wu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Jiajie

    2016-08-01

    Three series of novel quinazoline and pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit EGFR tyrosine kinase and a panel of five human cancer cell lines (MCF-7, A549, BT-474, SK-BR-3, and MDA-MB-231). Bioassay results indicated that five of these prepared compounds (12c-12e and 13c-13d) exhibited remarkably higher inhibitory activities against EGFR and SK-BR-3 cell line. Compounds 12c and 12e displayed the most potent EGFR inhibitory activity (IC50 = 2.97 nM and 3.58 nM, respectively) and good anti-proliferative effect against SK-BR-3 cell with the IC50 values of 3.10 μM and 5.87 μM, respectively. Furthermore, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies verified that compound 12c and 12e shared similar binding pattern with gefitinib in the binding pocket of EGFR. MM-GBSA binding free energy revealed that the compound 12c and 12e have almost the same inhibitory activity against EGFR as gefitinib, and that the dominating effect of van der Waals interactions drives the binding process. PMID:27132165

  2. Design, synthesis, anti-tumor activity, and molecular modeling of quinazoline and pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives targeting epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ju; Wan, Shanhe; Wang, Guangfa; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Zhonghuang; Tian, Yuanxin; Yu, Yonghuan; Wu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Jiajie

    2016-08-01

    Three series of novel quinazoline and pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit EGFR tyrosine kinase and a panel of five human cancer cell lines (MCF-7, A549, BT-474, SK-BR-3, and MDA-MB-231). Bioassay results indicated that five of these prepared compounds (12c-12e and 13c-13d) exhibited remarkably higher inhibitory activities against EGFR and SK-BR-3 cell line. Compounds 12c and 12e displayed the most potent EGFR inhibitory activity (IC50 = 2.97 nM and 3.58 nM, respectively) and good anti-proliferative effect against SK-BR-3 cell with the IC50 values of 3.10 μM and 5.87 μM, respectively. Furthermore, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies verified that compound 12c and 12e shared similar binding pattern with gefitinib in the binding pocket of EGFR. MM-GBSA binding free energy revealed that the compound 12c and 12e have almost the same inhibitory activity against EGFR as gefitinib, and that the dominating effect of van der Waals interactions drives the binding process.

  3. Activation kinetics of zipper molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tracy W; Chen, Juan; Burgess, Laura; Wilson, Brian C; Zheng, Gang; Zhan, Lixin; Liu, Wing-Ki; Ha, Bae-Yeun

    2015-01-01

    Proteases play key roles in the regulation of normal cellular function, and thus, their deregulation leads to many disease states. Molecular beacons are promising protease-imaging probes for the detection and characterization of disease as well as for the evaluation of treatment. Inspired by this, we examined the efficiency of zipper molecular beacons (ZMBs) as imaging probes. First, we showed experimentally that the symmetrical ZMB (zip5e5r), bearing 5-arginine and 5-glutamate arms, is as efficient as the asymmetrical zip5e8r in enhancing cell uptake but without the dark toxicity exhibited by the asymmetric zipper. Also, zip5e5r was shown to dissociate more efficiently at pH’s greater than 5. Using a simple two-state binding model, we attributed this to a larger number of charge-pair conformations for zip5e8r. We then measured the ability of soluble matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) to cleave zip5e5r, and compared their cleavage efficiency with the original photodynamic molecular beacon (PMB). Finally, as a first step toward understanding our observations quantitatively, we simulated the native structures of the peptides GPLGLARK and EGPLGLARRK with charged termini NH3(+) and COO(-) that approximate the PMB and ZMB (with one pair of arginine/glutamate electrostatic zipper), respectively. We concluded that inclusion of the zipper changes the native structure of the MBs, altering the cleavage efficiency of different MMPs.

  4. Structures in Molecular Clouds: Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J O; Mizuta, A; Pound, M W; Remington, B A; Ryutov, D D

    2006-04-20

    We attempt to predict the observed morphology, column density and velocity gradient of Pillar II of the Eagle Nebula, using Rayleigh Taylor (RT) models in which growth is seeded by an initial perturbation in density or in shape of the illuminated surface, and cometary models in which structure is arises from a initially spherical cloud with a dense core. Attempting to mitigate suppression of RT growth by recombination, we use a large cylindrical model volume containing the illuminating source and the self-consistently evolving ablated outflow and the photon flux field, and use initial clouds with finite lateral extent. An RT model shows no growth, while a cometary model appears to be more successful at reproducing observations.

  5. Synthesis, spectral characterization, molecular modeling and antimicrobial activity studies on 2-aminopyridine-cyclodiphosph(V)azane derivative and its homo-binuclear zinc(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghaz, Abdel-Nasser M. A.

    2014-06-01

    Complexes of zinc(II) of general composition [Zn2(L)X2(H2O)4]nH2O have been synthesized [L = 1,3-dipyridyl-2,4-dioxo-2‧,4‧-bis(2-iminopyridine)cyclodi-phosph(V)azane and X = NO3-; n = 2, OAc-; n = 1, SO42-; n = 2 and Cl-; n = 2]. The elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, mass, IR, UV, NMR (1H and 31P), TGA, DTA, SEM and XRD spectral studies of the compounds led to the conclusion that the cyclodiphosph(V)azane ligand (H2L) acts as a bidentate manner per zinc ion. The cyclodiphosph(V)azane ligand forms hexa-coordinated complexes having octahedral geometry for Zn(II) complexes. The elemental analyses and mass spectral data have justified the [Zn2(L)X2(H2O)4]nH2O composition of complexes. Infrared spectra of the zinc complexes indicate deprotonation and coordination of the imine NH. It also confirms that nitrogen atoms of the pyridine group contribute to the complexation. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) was performed of [Zn2L(SO4)2(H2O)4]2H2O complex. The XRD patterns indicate crystalline nature for the [Zn2L(SO4)2(H2O)4]2H2O complex. The measured low molar conductance values in dimethylformamide indicate that the complexes are non-electrolyte nature. The surface morphology (SEM) of the cyclodiphosph(V)azane ligand and the [Zn2L(NO3)2(H2O)4]2H2O complex were studied by SEM. The thermal studies suggested that the complexes are more stable as compared to ligand. In molecular modeling the geometries of cyclodiphosph(V)azane ligand H2L and its zinc(II) complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31G basis set. The cyclodiphosph(V)azane ligand and the zinc(II) complexes have been measured in vitro to judge their antibacterial (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) and antifungal (Aspergillus niger and Pencillium chrysogenum) activities.

  6. Markov state models and molecular alchemy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütte, Christof; Nielsen, Adam; Weber, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, Markov state models (MSMs) have attracted a considerable amount of attention with regard to modelling conformation changes and associated function of biomolecular systems. They have been used successfully, e.g. for peptides including time-resolved spectroscopic experiments, protein function and protein folding , DNA and RNA, and ligand-receptor interaction in drug design and more complicated multivalent scenarios. In this article, a novel reweighting scheme is introduced that allows to construct an MSM for certain molecular system out of an MSM for a similar system. This permits studying how molecular properties on long timescales differ between similar molecular systems without performing full molecular dynamics simulations for each system under consideration. The performance of the reweighting scheme is illustrated for simple test cases, including one where the main wells of the respective energy landscapes are located differently and an alchemical transformation of butane to pentane where the dimension of the state space is changed.

  7. Mesoscale modeling of dislocations in molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Lei; Koslowski, Marisol

    2011-02-01

    Understanding the inelastic deformation of molecular crystals is of fundamental importance to the modeling of the processing of drugs in the pharmaceutical industry as well as to the initiation of detonation in high energy density materials. In this work, we present dislocation dynamics simulations of the deformation of two molecular crystals of interest in the pharmaceutical industry, sucrose and paracetamol. The simulations calculate the yield stress of sucrose and paracetamol in good agreement with experimental observation and predict the anisotropy in the mechanical response observed in these materials. Our results show that dislocation dynamics is an effective tool to study plastic deformation in molecular crystals.

  8. Exploring Organic Mechanistic Puzzles with Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Gail; Schwartz, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The molecular modeling was used to reinforce more general skills such as deducing and drawing reaction mechanisms, analyzing reaction kinetics and thermodynamics and drawing reaction coordinate energy diagrams. This modeling was done through the design of mechanistic puzzles, involving reactions not familiar to the students.

  9. Animal Models of Depression: Molecular Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Vaishnav; Nestler, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Much of the current understanding about the pathogenesis of altered mood, impaired concentration and neurovegetative symptoms in major depression has come from animal models. However, because of the unique and complex features of human depression, the generation of valid and insightful depression models has been less straightforward than modeling other disabling diseases like cancer or autoimmune conditions. Today’s popular depression models creatively merge ethologically valid behavioral assays with the latest technological advances in molecular biology and automated video-tracking. This chapter reviews depression assays involving acute stress (e.g., forced swim test), models consisting of prolonged physical or social stress (e.g., social defeat), models of secondary depression, genetic models, and experiments designed to elucidate the mechanisms of antidepressant action. These paradigms are critically evaluated in relation to their ease, validity and replicability, the molecular insights that they have provided, and their capacity to offer the next generation of therapeutics for depression. PMID:21225412

  10. Synthesis, pharmacological activity and molecular modeling of 1-aryl-7- hydroxy-2,3-dihydroimidazo[1,2-a]pyrimidine-5(1H)-ones and their 6-substituted derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rzadkowska, Marzena; Szacon, Elzbieta; Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Fidecka, Sylwia; Kedzierska, Ewa; Matosiuk, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Pain management is an important medical problem with social and economic consequences. Opioid receptors are among the most important molecular targets involved in antinociception. We have previously reported several series of antinociceptive compounds with the affinity to opioid receptors. In search for novel compounds acting on central nervous system with antinociceptive activity we synthesized a series of 1-aryl-7-hydroxy-2,3-dihydroimidazo[1,2- a]pyrimidine-5(1H)-ones and their 6-phenyl derivatives. The novel compounds were subjected to extensive pharmacological studies to assess their effect on motor coordination, body temperature, clonic seizures and tonic convulsions and their antinociceptive activity. In the writhing test the antinociceptive activity of some derivatives was reversed by naloxone, thus we can assume that their activity may be associated with opioid system. We also used molecular modeling to describe active conformations of the studied compounds and to build a pharmacophore model. As in the previously reported series of the compounds, the studied substances exerted antinociceptive activity probably associated with the opioid system without possessing a protonable nitrogen atom. Furthermore, we calculated structural, electronic and ADMET parameters (volume, surface area, polar surface area, ovality, dipole moment, HOMO and LUMO energies, polarizaibility, molar refractivity, lipophilicity, the charges on the heteroatoms, aqueous solubility, and blood-brain barrier permeation parameter) for novel compounds in order to address the observed structure-activity relationship. PMID:24286393

  11. Identification of essential residues for binding and activation in the human 5-HT7(a) serotonin receptor by molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Impellizzeri, Agata Antonina Rita; Pappalardo, Matteo; Basile, Livia; Manfra, Ornella; Andressen, Kjetil Wessel; Krobert, Kurt Allen; Messina, Angela; Levy, Finn Olav; Guccione, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The human 5-HT7 receptor is expressed in both the central nervous system and peripheral tissues and is a potential drug target in behavioral and psychiatric disorders. We examined molecular determinants of ligand binding and G protein activation by the human 5-HT7(a) receptor. The role of several key residues in the 7th transmembrane domain (TMD) and helix 8 were elucidated combining in silico and experimental mutagenesis. Several single and two double point mutations of the 5-HT7(a) wild type receptor were made (W7.33V, E7.35T, E7.35R, E7.35D, E7.35A, R7.36V, Y7.43A, Y7.43F, Y7.43T, R8.52D, D8.53K; E7.35T-R7.36V, R8.52D-D8.53K), and their effects upon ligand binding were assessed by radioligand binding using a potent agonist (5-CT) and a potent antagonist (SB269970). In addition, the ability of the mutated 5-HT7(a) receptors to activate G protein after 5-HT-stimulation was determined through activation of adenylyl cyclase. In silico investigation on mutated receptors substantiated the predicted importance of TM7 and showed critical roles of residues E7.35, W7.33, R7.36 and Y7.43 in agonist and antagonist binding and conformational changes of receptor structure affecting adenylyl cyclase activation. Experimental data showed that mutants E7.35T and E7.35R were incapable of ligand binding and adenylyl cyclase activation, consistent with a requirement for a negatively charged residue at this position. The mutant R8.52D was unable to activate adenylyl cyclase, despite unaffected ligand binding, consistent with the R8.52 residue playing an important role in the receptor-G protein interface. The mutants Y7.43A and Y7.43T displayed reduced agonist binding and AC agonist potency, not seen in Y7.43F, consistent with a requirement for an aromatic residue at this position. Knowledge of the molecular interactions important in h5-HT7 receptor ligand binding and G protein activation will aid the design of selective h5-HT7 receptor ligands for potential pharmacological use. PMID

  12. Anthocyanidins inhibit activator protein 1 activity and cell transformation: structure-activity relationship and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hou, De-Xing; Kai, Keiko; Li, Jian-Jian; Lin, Shigang; Terahara, Norihiko; Wakamatsu, Mika; Fujii, Makoto; Young, Mattew R; Colburn, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Anthocyanins are the chemical components that give the intense color to many fruits and vegetables, such as blueberries, red cabbages and purple sweet potatoes. Extensive studies have indicated that anthocyanins have strong antioxidant activities. To investigate the mechanism of anthocyanidins as an anticancer food source, six kinds of anthocyanidins representing the aglycons of most anthocyanins, were used to examine their effects on tumor promotion in mouse JB6 cells, a validated model for screening cancer chemopreventive agents and elucidating the molecular mechanisms. Of the six anthocyanins tested, only those with an ortho-dihydroxyphenyl structure on the B-ring suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced cell transformation and activator protein-1 transactivation, suggesting that the ortho-dihydroxyphenyl may contribute to the inhibitory action. Delphinidin, but not peonidin, blocked the phosphorylation of protein kinases in the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway at early times and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway at later times. p38 kinase was not inhibited by delphinidin. Furthermore, two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) specific inhibitors (SP600125 for JNK and UO126 for ERK) could specifically block the activation of JNK and ERK and cell transformation. Those results demonstrate that anthocyanidins contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis by blocking activation of the MAPK pathway. These findings provide the first molecular basis for the anticarcinogenic action of anthocyanidins. PMID:14514663

  13. Anthocyanidins inhibit activator protein 1 activity and cell transformation: structure-activity relationship and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hou, De-Xing; Kai, Keiko; Li, Jian-Jian; Lin, Shigang; Terahara, Norihiko; Wakamatsu, Mika; Fujii, Makoto; Young, Mattew R; Colburn, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Anthocyanins are the chemical components that give the intense color to many fruits and vegetables, such as blueberries, red cabbages and purple sweet potatoes. Extensive studies have indicated that anthocyanins have strong antioxidant activities. To investigate the mechanism of anthocyanidins as an anticancer food source, six kinds of anthocyanidins representing the aglycons of most anthocyanins, were used to examine their effects on tumor promotion in mouse JB6 cells, a validated model for screening cancer chemopreventive agents and elucidating the molecular mechanisms. Of the six anthocyanins tested, only those with an ortho-dihydroxyphenyl structure on the B-ring suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced cell transformation and activator protein-1 transactivation, suggesting that the ortho-dihydroxyphenyl may contribute to the inhibitory action. Delphinidin, but not peonidin, blocked the phosphorylation of protein kinases in the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway at early times and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway at later times. p38 kinase was not inhibited by delphinidin. Furthermore, two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) specific inhibitors (SP600125 for JNK and UO126 for ERK) could specifically block the activation of JNK and ERK and cell transformation. Those results demonstrate that anthocyanidins contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis by blocking activation of the MAPK pathway. These findings provide the first molecular basis for the anticarcinogenic action of anthocyanidins.

  14. Pyrrolo[1,3]benzothiazepine-based serotonin and dopamine receptor antagonists. Molecular modeling, further structure-activity relationship studies, and identification of novel atypical antipsychotic agents.

    PubMed

    Campiani, Giuseppe; Butini, Stefania; Fattorusso, Caterina; Catalanotti, Bruno; Gemma, Sandra; Nacci, Vito; Morelli, Elena; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Mereghetti, Ilario; Mennini, Tiziana; Carli, Miriana; Minetti, Patrizia; Di Cesare, M Assunta; Mastroianni, Domenico; Scafetta, Nazzareno; Galletti, Bruno; Stasi, M Antonietta; Castorina, Massimo; Pacifici, Licia; Vertechy, Mario; Di Serio, Stefano; Ghirardi, Orlando; Tinti, Ornella; Carminati, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    Recently we reported the pharmacological characterization of the 9,10-dihydropyrrolo[1,3]benzothiazepine derivative (S)-(+)-8 as a novel atypical antipsychotic agent. This compound had an optimum pK(i) 5-HT(2A)/D(2) ratio of 1.21 (pK(i) 5-HT(2A) = 8.83; pK(i) D(2) = 7.79). The lower D(2) receptor affinity of (S)-(+)-8 compared to its enantiomer was explained by the difficulty in reaching the conformation required to optimally fulfill the D(2) pharmacophore. With the aim of finding novel atypical antipsychotics we further investigated the core structure of (S)-(+)-8, synthesizing analogues with specific substituents; the structure-activity relationship (SAR) study was also expanded with the design and synthesis of other analogues characterized by a pyrrolo[2,1-b][1,3]benzothiazepine skeleton, substituted on the benzo-fused ring or on the pyrrole system. On the 9,10-dihydro analogues the substituents introduced on the pyrrole ring were detrimental to affinity for dopamine and for 5-HT(2A) receptors, but the introduction of a double bond at C-9/10 on the structure of (S)-(+)-8 led to a potent D(2)/5-HT(2A) receptor ligand with a typical binding profile (9f, pK(i) 5-HT(2A)/D(2) ratio of 1.01, log Y = 8.43). Then, to reduce D(2) receptor affinity and restore atypicality on unsaturated analogues, we exploited the effect of specific substitutions on the tricyclic system of 9f. Through a molecular modeling approach we generated a novel series of potential atypical antipsychotic agents, with optimized 5HT(2A)/D(2) receptor affinity ratios and that were easier to synthesize and purify than the reference compound (S)-(+)-8. A number of SAR trends were identified, and among the analogues synthesized and tested in binding assays, 9d and 9m were identified as the most interesting, giving atypical log Y scores respectively 4.98 and 3.18 (pK(i) 5-HT(2A)/D(2) ratios of 1.20 and 1.30, respectively). They had a multireceptor affinity profile and could be promising atypical agents

  15. Molecular Imaging of the ATM Kinase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Terence M.; Nyati, Shyam; Ross, Brian D.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine kinase critical to the cellular DNA-damage response, including from DNA double-strand breaks. ATM activation results in the initiation of a complex cascade of events including DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoint control, and survival. We sought to create a bioluminescent reporter that dynamically and noninvasively measures ATM kinase activity in living cells and subjects. Methods and Materials: Using the split luciferase technology, we constructed a hybrid cDNA, ATM-reporter (ATMR), coding for a protein that quantitatively reports on changes in ATM kinase activity through changes in bioluminescence. Results: Treatment of ATMR-expressing cells with ATM inhibitors resulted in a dose-dependent increase in bioluminescence activity. In contrast, induction of ATM kinase activity upon irradiation resulted in a decrease in reporter activity that correlated with ATM and Chk2 activation by immunoblotting in a time-dependent fashion. Nuclear targeting improved ATMR sensitivity to both ATM inhibitors and radiation, whereas a mutant ATMR (lacking the target phosphorylation site) displayed a muted response. Treatment with ATM inhibitors and small interfering (si)RNA-targeted knockdown of ATM confirm the specificity of the reporter. Using reporter expressing xenografted tumors demonstrated the ability of ATMR to report in ATM activity in mouse models that correlated in a time-dependent fashion with changes in Chk2 activity. Conclusions: We describe the development and validation of a novel, specific, noninvasive bioluminescent reporter that enables monitoring of ATM activity in real time, in vitro and in vivo. Potential applications of this reporter include the identification and development of novel ATM inhibitors or ATM-interacting partners through high-throughput screens and in vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies of ATM inhibitors in preclinical models.

  16. Hierarchical Molecular Modelling with Ellipsoids

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N

    2004-03-29

    Protein and DNA structures are represented at varying levels of details using ellipsoidal RGBA textured splats. The splat texture at each level is generated by rendering its children in a hierarchical model, from a distribution of viewing directions, and averaging the result. For rendering, the ellipsoids to be used are chosen adaptively, depending on the distance to the viewpoint. This technique is applied to visualize DNA coiling around nucleosomes in chromosomes.

  17. MODELING MOLECULAR HYPERFINE LINE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Keto, Eric; Rybicki, George

    2010-06-20

    In this paper, we discuss two approximate methods previously suggested for modeling hyperfine spectral line emission for molecules whose collisional transition rates between hyperfine levels are unknown. Hyperfine structure is seen in the rotational spectra of many commonly observed molecules such as HCN, HNC, NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and C{sup 17}O. The intensities of these spectral lines can be modeled by numerical techniques such as {Lambda}-iteration that alternately solve the equations of statistical equilibrium and the equation of radiative transfer. However, these calculations require knowledge of both the radiative and collisional rates for all transitions. For most commonly observed radio frequency spectral lines, only the net collisional rates between rotational levels are known. For such cases, two approximate methods have been suggested. The first method, hyperfine statistical equilibrium, distributes the hyperfine level populations according to their statistical weight, but allows the population of the rotational states to depart from local thermal equilibrium (LTE). The second method, the proportional method, approximates the collision rates between the hyperfine levels as fractions of the net rotational rates apportioned according to the statistical degeneracy of the final hyperfine levels. The second method is able to model non-LTE hyperfine emission. We compare simulations of N{sub 2}H{sup +} hyperfine lines made with approximate and more exact rates and find that satisfactory results are obtained.

  18. [Molecular mechanism at the presynaptic active zone].

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Toshihisa

    2011-07-01

    Our higher brain functions such as learning and memory, emotion, and consciousness depend on the precise regulation of complicated neural networks in the brain. Neurons communicate with each other through the synapse, which comprise 3 regions: the presynapse, synaptic cleft, and postsynapse. The active zone (AZ) beneath the presynaptic membrane is the principal site for Ca2+ -dependent neurotransmitter release: AZ is involved in determining the site for docking and synaptic vesicle fusion. Presently, the full molecular composition of AZ is unclear, but it is known to contain several AZ-specific proteins, including cytomatrix of the active zone-associated protein (CAST)/ERC2, ELKS, RIM1, Munc13-1, Piccolo/Aczonin, and Bassoon. CAST and ELKS are novel active zone proteins that directly bind to Rab3-interacting molecules (RIMs), Bassoon, and Piccolo, and are thought to play a role in neurotransmitter release by binding these to AZ proteins. In this review, current advances in studies on AZ structure and function have been summarized, and the focus is mainly on protein-protein interactions among the AZ proteins.

  19. Chemical modelling of molecular sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejad, L. A. M.; Millar, T. J.

    1987-09-01

    The authors present detailed results of a chemical kinetic model of the outer envelope (1016cm to 1018cm) of the carbon-rich star IRC +10216. The chemistry is driven by a combination of cosmic-ray ionization and ultraviolet radiation and, starting from 7 parent molecules injected into the envelope, the authors find that a complex chemistry ensues. Ion-molecule reactions can efficiently build hydrocarbon species and account for the observed abundances of CH3CN and HNC. Reactions involving CO may lead to observable abundances of oxygen-bearing molecules such as C3O, CH2CO and HCO+.

  20. Molecular Modeling of Water Interfaces: From Molecular Spectroscopy to Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yuki; Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Backus, Ellen H G; Bonn, Mischa

    2016-04-28

    Understanding aqueous interfaces at the molecular level is not only fundamentally important, but also highly relevant for a variety of disciplines. For instance, electrode-water interfaces are relevant for electrochemistry, as are mineral-water interfaces for geochemistry and air-water interfaces for environmental chemistry; water-lipid interfaces constitute the boundaries of the cell membrane, and are thus relevant for biochemistry. One of the major challenges in these fields is to link macroscopic properties such as interfacial reactivity, solubility, and permeability as well as macroscopic thermodynamic and spectroscopic observables to the structure, structural changes, and dynamics of molecules at these interfaces. Simulations, by themselves, or in conjunction with appropriate experiments, can provide such molecular-level insights into aqueous interfaces. In this contribution, we review the current state-of-the-art of three levels of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation: ab initio, force field, and coarse-grained. We discuss the advantages, the potential, and the limitations of each approach for studying aqueous interfaces, by assessing computations of the sum-frequency generation spectra and surface tension. The comparison of experimental and simulation data provides information on the challenges of future MD simulations, such as improving the force field models and the van der Waals corrections in ab initio MD simulations. Once good agreement between experimental observables and simulation can be established, the simulation can be used to provide insights into the processes at a level of detail that is generally inaccessible to experiments. As an example we discuss the mechanism of the evaporation of water. We finish by presenting an outlook outlining four future challenges for molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous interfacial systems. PMID:27010817

  1. Molecular characterization of hepatocarcinogenesis using mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Wei Wei; Xie, Min; Vijayaraghavan, Aadhitthya; Yaligar, Jadegoud; Tong, Wei Min; Goh, Liang Kee; Sabapathy, Kanaga

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a deadly disease, often unnoticed until the late stages, when treatment options become limited. Thus, there is a crucial need to identify biomarkers for early detection of developing HCC, as well as molecular pathways that would be amenable to therapeutic intervention. Although analysis of human HCC tissues and serum components may serve these purposes, inability of early detection also precludes possibilities of identification of biomarkers or pathways that are sequentially perturbed at earlier phases of disease progression. We have therefore explored the option of utilizing mouse models to understand in a systematic and longitudinal manner the molecular pathways that are progressively deregulated by various etiological factors in contributing to HCC formation, and we report the initial findings in characterizing their validity. Hepatitis B surface antigen transgenic mice, which had been exposed to aflatoxin B1 at various stages in life, were used as a hepatitis model. Our findings confirm a synergistic effect of both these etiological factors, with a gender bias towards males for HCC predisposition. Time-based aflatoxin B1 treatment also demonstrated the requirement of non-quiescent liver for effective transformation. Tumors from these models with various etiologies resemble human HCCs histologically and at the molecular level. Extensive molecular characterization revealed the presence of an 11-gene HCC-expression signature that was able to discern transformed human hepatocytes from primary cells, regardless of etiology, and from other cancer types. Moreover, distinct molecular pathways appear to be deregulated by various etiological agents en route to formation of HCCs, in which common pathways converge, highlighting the existence of etiology-specific as well as common HCC-specific molecular perturbations. This study therefore highlights the utility of these mouse models, which provide a rich resource for the

  2. Mathematical modeling of molecular diffusion through mucus

    PubMed Central

    Cu, Yen; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2008-01-01

    The rate of molecular transport through the mucus gel can be an important determinant of efficacy for therapeutic agents delivered by oral, intranasal, intravaginal/rectal, and intraocular routes. Transport through mucus can be described by mathematical models based on principles of physical chemistry and known characteristics of the mucus gel, its constituents, and of the drug itself. In this paper, we review mathematical models of molecular diffusion in mucus, as well as the techniques commonly used to measure diffusion of solutes in the mucus gel, mucus gel mimics, and mucosal epithelia. PMID:19135488

  3. Simple soluble molecular ionization model

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, Gerald V.; Gauthier, Christopher S.

    2004-05-01

    We present a simple exact analytical solution, using the Weyl-Titchmarsh-Kodaira spectral theorem, for the spectral function of the one-dimensional diatomic molecule model consisting of two attractive {delta}-function wells in the presence of a static external electric field. For sufficiently deep and far apart wells, this molecule supports both an even and an odd state, and the introduction of a static electric field turns these bound states into quasibound states which are Stark-shifted and broadened. The continuum spectrum also inherits an intricate pattern of resonances which reflect the competition between resonant scattering between the two atomic wells and between the linear potential and one or both atomic well(s). All results are analytic and can be easily plotted. The relation between the large orders of the divergent perturbative Stark-shift series and the nonperturbative widths of quasibound levels is studied.

  4. Simple soluble molecular ionization model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Gerald V.; Gauthier, Christopher S.

    2004-05-01

    We present a simple exact analytical solution, using the Weyl-Titchmarsh-Kodaira spectral theorem, for the spectral function of the one-dimensional diatomic molecule model consisting of two attractive δ -function wells in the presence of a static external electric field. For sufficiently deep and far apart wells, this molecule supports both an even and an odd state, and the introduction of a static electric field turns these bound states into quasibound states which are Stark-shifted and broadened. The continuum spectrum also inherits an intricate pattern of resonances which reflect the competition between resonant scattering between the two atomic wells and between the linear potential and one or both atomic well(s). All results are analytic and can be easily plotted. The relation between the large orders of the divergent perturbative Stark-shift series and the nonperturbative widths of quasibound levels is studied.

  5. Influence of a nanorod molecular layer on the biological activity of neuronal cells. A semiclassical model for complex solid/liquid interfaces with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mezzasalma, Stefano A

    2011-08-15

    A general account of electric effects is given for a biological phase interacting with a nanorod molecular layer by means of the formed hard-soft and solid-liquid interfaces. In particular, the frequency enhancement previously detected for the spontaneous activity of neuronal cultures interfaced with carbon nanotubes is quantitatively explained upon a quantum/semiclassical description, where the duration of a biological signal is viewed as the (average) lifetime of a decaying state (or population of states), and the effect of the carbon phase as a linewidth broadening. Four contributions were principally accounted for, one biological, for the synaptic strength, one electrochemical, for the overall capacitance increase implied by the nanotube double layers, one geometric, for the typical scales ruling the electron and ion conduction mechanisms, and one electromagnetic-like, translating the membrane polarization changes. These calculations predict an enhancement factor equal on average to ≃6.39, against a former experimental value ≃6.08.

  6. Molecular Models for Conductance in Junctions and Electrochemical Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazinani, Shobeir Khezr Seddigh

    This thesis develops molecular models for electron transport in molecular junctions and intra-molecular electron transfer. The goal is to identify molecular descriptors that afford a substantial simplification of these electronic processes. First, the connection between static molecular polarizability and the molecular conductance is examined. A correlation emerges whereby the measured conductance of a tunneling junction decreases as a function of the calculated molecular polarizability for several systems, a result consistent with the idea of a molecule as a polarizable dielectric. A model based on a macroscopic extension of the Clausius-Mossotti equation to the molecular domain and Simmon's tunneling model is developed to explain this correlation. Despite the simplicity of the theory, it paves the way for further experimental, conceptual and theoretical developments in the use of molecular descriptors to describe both conductance and electron transfer. Second, the conductance of several biologically relevant, weakly bonded, hydrogen-bonded systems is systematically investigated. While there is no correlation between hydrogen bond strength and conductance, the results indicate a relation between the conductance and atomic polarizability of the hydrogen bond acceptor atom. The relevance of these results to electron transfer in biological systems is discussed. Hydrogen production and oxidation using catalysts inspired by hydrogenases provides a more sustainable alternative to the use of precious metals. To understand electrochemical and spectroscopic properties of a collection of Fe and Ni mimics of hydrogenases, high-level density functional theory calculations are described. The results, based on a detailed analysis of the energies, charges and molecular orbitals of these metal complexes, indicate the importance of geometric constraints imposed by the ligand on molecular properties such as acidity and electrocatalytic activity. Based on model calculations of

  7. Unraveling the differences of the hydrolytic activity of Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase and Trypanosoma rangeli sialidase: a quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics modeling study.

    PubMed

    Bueren-Calabuig, Juan A; Pierdominici-Sottile, Gustavo; Roitberg, Adrian E

    2014-06-01

    Chagas' disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a lethal, chronic disease that currently affects more than 10 million people in Central and South America. The trans-sialidase from Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi, TcTS) is a crucial enzyme for the survival of this parasite: sialic acids from the host are transferred to the cell surface glycoproteins of the trypanosome, thereby evading the host's immune system. On the other hand, the sialidase of T. rangeli (TrSA), which shares 70% sequence identity with TcTS, is a strict hydrolase and shows no trans-sialidase activity. Therefore, TcTS and TrSA represent an excellent framework to understand how different catalytic activities can be achieved with extremely similar structures. By means of combined quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QM/MM, SCC-DFTB/Amberff99SB) calculations and umbrella sampling simulations, we investigated the hydrolysis mechanisms of TcTS and TrSA and computed the free energy profiles of these reactions. The results, together with our previous computational investigations, are able to explain the catalytic mechanism of sialidases and describe how subtle differences in the active site make TrSA a strict hydrolase and TcTS a more efficient trans-sialidase.

  8. Potential Activity of Fevicordin-A from Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff) Boerl. Seeds as Estrogen Receptor Antagonist Based on Cytotoxicity and Molecular Modelling Studies

    PubMed Central

    Muchtaridi, Muchtaridi; Yusuf, Muhammad; Diantini, Ajeng; Choi, Sy Bing; Al-Najjar, Belal O.; Manurung, Jerry V.; Subarnas, Anas; Achmad, Tri H.; Wardhani, Savitri R.; Wahab, Habibah A.

    2014-01-01

    Fevicordin-A (FevA) isolated from Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff) Boerl. seeds was evaluated for its potential anticancer activity by in vitro and in silico approaches. Cytotoxicity studies indicated that FevA was selective against cell lines of human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) with an IC50 value of 6.4 μM. At 11.2 μM, FevA resulted in 76.8% cell death of T-47D human breast cancer cell lines. Critical pharmacophore features amongst human Estrogen Receptor-α (hERα) antagonists were conserved in FevA with regard to a hypothesis that they could make notable contributions to its pharmacological activity. The binding stability as well as the dynamic behavior of FevA towards the hERα receptor in agonist and antagonist binding sites were probed using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation approach. Analysis of MD simulation suggested that the tail of FevA was accountable for the repulsion of the C-terminal of Helix-11 (H11) in both agonist and antagonist receptor forms. The flexibility of loop-534 indicated the ability to disrupt the hydrogen bond zipper network between H3 and H11 in hERα. In addition, MM/GBSA calculation from the molecular dynamic simulations also revealed a stronger binding affinity of FevA in antagonistic action as compared to that of agonistic action. Collectively, both the experimental and computational results indicated that FevA has potential as a candidate for an anticancer agent, which is worth promoting for further preclinical evaluation. PMID:24776765

  9. Potential activity of fevicordin-A from Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff) Boerl. seeds as estrogen receptor antagonist based on cytotoxicity and molecular modelling studies.

    PubMed

    Muchtaridi, Muchtaridi; Yusuf, Muhammad; Diantini, Ajeng; Choi, Sy Bing; Al-Najjar, Belal O; Manurung, Jerry V; Subarnas, Anas; Achmad, Tri H; Wardhani, Savitri R; Wahab, Habibah A

    2014-01-01

    Fevicordin-A (FevA) isolated from Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff) Boerl. seeds was evaluated for its potential anticancer activity by in vitro and in silico approaches. Cytotoxicity studies indicated that FevA was selective against cell lines of human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) with an IC50 value of 6.4 µM. At 11.2 µM, FevA resulted in 76.8% cell death of T-47D human breast cancer cell lines. Critical pharmacophore features amongst human Estrogen Receptor-α (hERα) antagonists were conserved in FevA with regard to a hypothesis that they could make notable contributions to its pharmacological activity. The binding stability as well as the dynamic behavior of FevA towards the hERα receptor in agonist and antagonist binding sites were probed using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation approach. Analysis of MD simulation suggested that the tail of FevA was accountable for the repulsion of the C-terminal of Helix-11 (H11) in both agonist and antagonist receptor forms. The flexibility of loop-534 indicated the ability to disrupt the hydrogen bond zipper network between H3 and H11 in hERα. In addition, MM/GBSA calculation from the molecular dynamic simulations also revealed a stronger binding affinity of FevA in antagonistic action as compared to that of agonistic action. Collectively, both the experimental and computational results indicated that FevA has potential as a candidate for an anticancer agent, which is worth promoting for further preclinical evaluation. PMID:24776765

  10. Toward Understanding the Molecular Bases of Stretch Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sanfelice, Domenico; Sanz-Hernández, Máximo; de Simone, Alfonso; Bullard, Belinda; Pastore, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    Muscles are usually activated by calcium binding to the calcium sensory protein troponin-C, which is one of the three components of the troponin complex. However, in cardiac and insect flight muscle activation is also produced by mechanical stress. Little is known about the molecular bases of this calcium-independent activation. In Lethocerus, a giant water bug often used as a model system because of its large muscle fibers, there are two troponin-C isoforms, called F1 and F2, that have distinct roles in activating the muscle. It has been suggested that this can be explained either by differences in structural features or by differences in the interactions with other proteins. Here we have compared the structural and dynamic properties of the two proteins and shown how they differ. We have also mapped the interactions of the F2 isoform with peptides spanning the sequence of its natural partner, troponin-I. Our data have allowed us to build a model of the troponin complex and may eventually help in understanding the specialized function of the F1 and F2 isoforms and the molecular mechanism of stretch activation. PMID:27226601

  11. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    ) experience with methods of protein purification; (iii) incorporation of appropriate controls into experiments; (iv) use of basic statistics in data analysis; (v) writing papers and grant proposals in accepted scientific style; (vi) peer review; (vii) oral presentation of results and proposals; and (viii) introduction to molecular modeling. Figure 1 illustrates the modular nature of the lab curriculum. Elements from each of the exercises can be separated and treated as stand-alone exercises, or combined into short or long projects. We have been able to offer the opportunity to use sophisticated molecular modeling in the final module through funding from an NSF-ILI grant. However, many of the benefits of the research proposal can be achieved with other computer programs, or even by literature survey alone. Figure 1.Design of project-based biochemistry laboratory. Modules (projects, or portions of projects) are indicated as boxes. Each of these can be treated independently, or used as part of a larger project. Solid lines indicate some suggested paths from one module to the next. The skills and knowledge required for protein purification and design are developed in three units: (i) an introduction to critical assays needed to monitor degree of purification, including an evaluation of assay parameters; (ii) partial purification by ion-exchange techniques; and (iii) preparation of a grant proposal on protein design by mutagenesis. Brief descriptions of each of these units follow, with experimental details of each project at the end of this paper. Assays for Lysozyme Activity and Protein Concentration (4 weeks) The assays mastered during the first unit are a necessary tool for determining the purity of the enzyme during the second unit on purification by ion exchange. These assays allow an introduction to the concept of specific activity (units of enzyme activity per milligram of total protein) as a measure of purity. In this first sequence, students learn a turbidimetric assay

  12. Regioselective synthesis and molecular modeling study of vasorelaxant active 7,9-dioxa-1,2-diaza-spiro[4.5]dec-2-ene-6,10-diones.

    PubMed

    Girgis, Adel S; Ismail, Nasser S M; Farag, Hanaa; el-Eraky, Wafaa I; Saleh, Dalia O; Tala, Srinivasa R; Katritzky, Alan R

    2010-09-01

    Nitrilimines (PhC(-):N(+):NR') generated in situ from hydrazonoyl chlorides 2a,b reacted regioselectively with 5-arylidene-2,2-dimethyl[1,3]dioxane-4,6-diones 1a-f to afford 1,3,4-triaryl-8,8-dimethyl-7,9-dioxa-1,2-diaza-spiro[4.5]dec-2-ene-6,10-diones 3a-l. In vitro vasodilation activity screening of the synthesized compounds using isolated thoracic aortic rings of male Wister rats pre-contracted with norepinephrine hydrochloride revealed considerable vasodilation activity; compounds 3f and 3j had IC(50) (concentration necessary for 50% reduction of maximal norepinephrine hydrochloride induced contracture) of 0.325, 0.321 mM, respectively. Molecular modeling, including fitting to a 3D-pharmacophore model using Discovery studio 2.1 programs and their docking into optimized alpha(1)-AR homology models as alpha(1)-AR antagonist showed high-docking score and fit values. The experimental in vitro vasodilation activity of compounds 3a-l was consistent with the molecular modeling. PMID:20615586

  13. Trends in substitution models of molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Arenas, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Substitution models of evolution describe the process of genetic variation through fixed mutations and constitute the basis of the evolutionary analysis at the molecular level. Almost 40 years after the development of first substitution models, highly sophisticated, and data-specific substitution models continue emerging with the aim of better mimicking real evolutionary processes. Here I describe current trends in substitution models of DNA, codon and amino acid sequence evolution, including advantages and pitfalls of the most popular models. The perspective concludes that despite the large number of currently available substitution models, further research is required for more realistic modeling, especially for DNA coding and amino acid data. Additionally, the development of more accurate complex models should be coupled with new implementations and improvements of methods and frameworks for substitution model selection and downstream evolutionary analysis. PMID:26579193

  14. Trends in substitution models of molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Substitution models of evolution describe the process of genetic variation through fixed mutations and constitute the basis of the evolutionary analysis at the molecular level. Almost 40 years after the development of first substitution models, highly sophisticated, and data-specific substitution models continue emerging with the aim of better mimicking real evolutionary processes. Here I describe current trends in substitution models of DNA, codon and amino acid sequence evolution, including advantages and pitfalls of the most popular models. The perspective concludes that despite the large number of currently available substitution models, further research is required for more realistic modeling, especially for DNA coding and amino acid data. Additionally, the development of more accurate complex models should be coupled with new implementations and improvements of methods and frameworks for substitution model selection and downstream evolutionary analysis. PMID:26579193

  15. Mobile modeling in the molecular sciences

    EPA Science Inventory

    The art of modeling in the molecular sciences is highly dependent on both the available computational technology, underlying data, and ability to collaborate. With the ever increasing market share of mobile devices, it is assumed by many that tablets will overtake laptops as the...

  16. Synthesis, characterization, molecular modeling and antibacterial activity of N1‧, N2‧-bis[1-(pyridin-2-yl)ethylidene]oxalohydrazide and its metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gammal, O. A.; El-Shazly, R. M.; El-Morsy, F. E.; El-Asmy, A. A.

    2011-07-01

    New complexes of N 1',N 2'-bis[1-(pyridin-2-yl)ethylidene]oxalohydrazide (H 2L) with Cr 3+, Mn 2+, Fe 3+, Co 2+, Ni 2+, Cu 2+, Cd 2+, VO 2+ and Ag + have been prepared and characterized. The ligand has 10-12 buffering range and pK's of 4.62, 7.78 and 9.45. The IR spectra showed the neutral, (mono- or dibasic) bidentate, tridentate or tetradentate of H 2L. The molar conductance values, in DMSO, are in the range of nonelectrolytes. An octahedral geometry is proposed for the Cr 3+, Mn 2+, Fe 3+, Ni 2+; VO 2+ complexes and square-planar for the Co 2+ and Cu 2+ complexes. The ESR spectra support the mononuclear species for [VO(H 2L)SO 4-(H 2O) 2]·H 2O and [Cu(H 2L)(OAc) 2]·H 2O. The molecular parameters have been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligand and its complexes. The ligand and some complexes were screened against Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) as Gram positive and Pseudomonas aeuroginosa (Pa) as Gram negative bacteria using the inhibitory zone diameter. The data showed no effect for the complexes on Pa bacteria growth except [Ag(H 2L)(NO 3)]H 2O which had a high activity. Cu 2+, VO 2+ and Ag + complexes exhibit activity against BT; Cu 2+complex is the highest one.

  17. Molecular model for hydrated biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Erika Tiemi; Rocha, Alexandre Reily; de Carvalho, Luis Felipe das Chagas e. Silva; Almeida, Janete Dias; Martinho, Herculano

    2015-06-01

    A density-functional microscopic model for soft tissues (STmod) is presented. The model was based on a prototype molecular structure from experimentally resolved type I collagen peptide residues and water clusters treated in periodic boundary conditions. We obtained the optimized geometry, binding and coupling energies, dipole moments, and vibrational frequencies. The results concerning the stability of the confined water clusters, the water-water, and water-collagen interactions were successfully correlated to some important experimental trends of normal and inflammatory tissues.

  18. Molecular Ice Nucleation Activity of Birch Pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felgitsch, Laura; Bichler, Magdalena; Häusler, Thomas; Weiss, Victor U.; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation plays a major part in ecosystem and climate. Due to the triggering of ice cloud formation it influences the radiation balance of the earth, but also on the ground it can be found to be important in many processes of nature. So far the process of heterogeneous ice nucleation is not fully understood and many questions remain to be answered. Biological ice nucleation is hereby from great interest, because it shows the highest freezing temperatures. Several bacteria and fungi act as ice nuclei. A famous example is Pseudomonas syringae, a bacterium in commercial use (Snomax®), which increases the freezing from homogeneous freezing temperatures of approx. -40° C (for small volumes as in cloud droplets) to temperatures up to -2° C. In 2001 it was found that birch pollen can trigger ice nucleation (Diehl et al. 2001; Diehl et al. 2002). For a long time it was believed that this is due to macroscopic features of the pollen surface. Recent findings of Bernhard Pummer (2012) show a different picture. The ice nuclei are not attached on the pollen surface directly, but on surface material which can be easily washed off. This shows that not only the surface morphology, but also specific molecules or molecular structures are responsible for the ice nucleation activity of birch pollen. With various analytic methods we work on elucidating the structure of these molecules as well as the mechanism with which they trigger ice nucleation. To solve this we use various instrumental analytic techniques like Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS), and Gas-phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis (GEMMA). Also standard techniques like various chromatographic separation techniques and solvent extraction are in use. We state here that this feature might be due to the aggregation of small molecules, with agglomerates showing a specific surface structure. Our results

  19. The role of molecular modeling in bionanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Lu, Deyu; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Shih, Amy Y; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo; Freddolino, Peter L; Arkhipov, Anton; Schulten, Klaus

    2006-03-01

    Molecular modeling is advocated here as a key methodology for research and development in bionanotechnology. Molecular modeling provides nanoscale images at atomic and even electronic resolution, predicts the nanoscale interaction of unfamiliar combinations of biological and inorganic materials, and evaluates strategies for redesigning biopolymers for nanotechnological uses. The methodology is illustrated in this paper through reviewing three case studies. The first one involves the use of single-walled carbon nanotubes as biomedical sensors where a computationally efficient, yet accurate, description of the influence of biomolecules on nanotube electronic properties through nanotube-biomolecule interactions was developed; this development furnishes the ability to test nanotube electronic properties in realistic biological environments. The second case study involves the use of nanopores manufactured into electronic nanodevices based on silicon compounds for single molecule electrical recording, in particular, for DNA sequencing. Here, modeling combining classical molecular dynamics, material science and device physics, described the interaction of biopolymers, e.g., DNA, with silicon nitrate and silicon oxide pores, furnished accurate dynamic images of pore translocation processes, and predicted signals. The third case study involves the development of nanoscale lipid bilayers for the study of embedded membrane proteins and cholesterol. Molecular modeling tested scaffold proteins, redesigned apolipoproteins found in mammalian plasma that hold the discoidal membranes in the proper shape, and predicted the assembly as well as final structure of the nanodiscs. In entirely new technological areas such as bionanotechnology, qualitative concepts, pictures and suggestions are sorely needed; these three case studies document that molecular modeling can serve a critical role in this respect, even though it may still fall short on quantitative precision.

  20. The role of molecular modeling in bionanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Deyu; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Shih, Amy Y.; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo; Freddolino, Peter L.; Arkhipov, Anton; Schulten, Klaus

    2006-03-01

    Molecular modeling is advocated here as a key methodology for research and development in bionanotechnology. Molecular modeling provides nanoscale images at atomic and even electronic resolution, predicts the nanoscale interaction of unfamiliar combinations of biological and inorganic materials, and evaluates strategies for redesigning biopolymers for nanotechnological uses. The methodology is illustrated in this paper through reviewing three case studies. The first one involves the use of single-walled carbon nanotubes as biomedical sensors where a computationally efficient, yet accurate, description of the influence of biomolecules on nanotube electronic properties through nanotube-biomolecule interactions was developed; this development furnishes the ability to test nanotube electronic properties in realistic biological environments. The second case study involves the use of nanopores manufactured into electronic nanodevices based on silicon compounds for single molecule electrical recording, in particular, for DNA sequencing. Here, modeling combining classical molecular dynamics, material science and device physics, described the interaction of biopolymers, e.g., DNA, with silicon nitrate and silicon oxide pores, furnished accurate dynamic images of pore translocation processes, and predicted signals. The third case study involves the development of nanoscale lipid bilayers for the study of embedded membrane proteins and cholesterol. Molecular modeling tested scaffold proteins, redesigned apolipoproteins found in mammalian plasma that hold the discoidal membranes in the proper shape, and predicted the assembly as well as final structure of the nanodiscs. In entirely new technological areas such as bionanotechnology, qualitative concepts, pictures and suggestions are sorely needed; these three case studies document that molecular modeling can serve a critical role in this respect, even though it may still fall short on quantitative precision.

  1. Predicting anti-androgenic activity of bisphenols using molecular docking and quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xianhai; Liu, Huihui; Yang, Qian; Liu, Jining; Chen, Jingwen; Shi, Lili

    2016-11-01

    Both in vivo and in vitro assay indicated that bisphenols can inhibit the androgen receptor. However, the underlying antagonistic mechanism is unclear. In this study, molecular docking was employed to probe the interaction mechanism between bisphenols and human androgen receptor (hAR). The binding pattern of ligands in hAR crystal structures was also analyzed. Results show that hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions are the dominant interactions between the ligands and hAR. The critical amino acid residues involved in forming hydrogen bonding between bisphenols and hAR is Asn 705 and Gln 711. Furthermore, appropriate molecular structural descriptors were selected to characterize the non-bonded interactions. Stepwise multiple linear regressions (MLR) analysis was employed to develop quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for predicting the anti-androgenic activity of bisphenols. Based on the QSAR development and validation guideline issued by OECD, the goodness-of-fit, robustness and predictive ability of constructed QSAR model were assessed. The model application domain was characterized by the Euclidean distance and Williams plot. The mechanisms of the constructed model were also interpreted based on the selected molecular descriptors i.e. the number of hydroxyl groups (nROH), the most positive values of the molecular surface potential (Vs,max) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy (ELUMO). Finally, based on the model developed, the data gap for other twenty-six bisphenols on their anti-androgenic activity was filled. The predicted results indicated that the anti-androgenic activity of seven bisphenols was higher than that of bisphenol A. PMID:27561732

  2. Simple model of a coherent molecular photocell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernzerhof, Matthias; Bélanger, Marc-André; Mayou, Didier; Nemati Aram, Tahereh

    2016-04-01

    Electron transport in molecular electronic devices is often dominated by a coherent mechanism in which the wave function extends from the left contact over the molecule to the right contact. If the device is exposed to light, photon absorption in the molecule might occur, turning the device into a molecular photocell. The photon absorption promotes an electron to higher energy levels and thus modifies the electron transmission probability through the device. A model for such a molecular photocell is presented that minimizes the complexity of the problem while providing a non-trivial description of the device mechanism. In particular, the role of the molecule in the photocell is investigated. It is described within the Hückel method and the source-sink potential approach [F. Goyer, M. Ernzerhof, and M. Zhuang, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 144104 (2007)] is used to eliminate the contacts in favor of complex-valued potentials. Furthermore, the photons are explicitly incorporated into the model through a second-quantized field. This facilitates the description of the photon absorption process with a stationary state calculation, where eigenvalues and eigenvectors are determined. The model developed is applied to various generic molecular photocells.

  3. Simple model of a coherent molecular photocell.

    PubMed

    Ernzerhof, Matthias; Bélanger, Marc-André; Mayou, Didier; Nemati Aram, Tahereh

    2016-04-01

    Electron transport in molecular electronic devices is often dominated by a coherent mechanism in which the wave function extends from the left contact over the molecule to the right contact. If the device is exposed to light, photon absorption in the molecule might occur, turning the device into a molecular photocell. The photon absorption promotes an electron to higher energy levels and thus modifies the electron transmission probability through the device. A model for such a molecular photocell is presented that minimizes the complexity of the problem while providing a non-trivial description of the device mechanism. In particular, the role of the molecule in the photocell is investigated. It is described within the Hückel method and the source-sink potential approach [F. Goyer, M. Ernzerhof, and M. Zhuang, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 144104 (2007)] is used to eliminate the contacts in favor of complex-valued potentials. Furthermore, the photons are explicitly incorporated into the model through a second-quantized field. This facilitates the description of the photon absorption process with a stationary state calculation, where eigenvalues and eigenvectors are determined. The model developed is applied to various generic molecular photocells. PMID:27059557

  4. Realistic molecular model of kerogen's nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Bousige, Colin; Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Vix-Guterl, Cathie; Pomerantz, Andrew E; Suleimenova, Assiya; Vaughan, Gavin; Garbarino, Gaston; Feygenson, Mikhail; Wildgruber, Christoph; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-01

    Despite kerogen's importance as the organic backbone for hydrocarbon production from source rocks such as gas shale, the interplay between kerogen's chemistry, morphology and mechanics remains unexplored. As the environmental impact of shale gas rises, identifying functional relations between its geochemical, transport, elastic and fracture properties from realistic molecular models of kerogens becomes all the more important. Here, by using a hybrid experimental-simulation method, we propose a panel of realistic molecular models of mature and immature kerogens that provide a detailed picture of kerogen's nanostructure without considering the presence of clays and other minerals in shales. We probe the models' strengths and limitations, and show that they predict essential features amenable to experimental validation, including pore distribution, vibrational density of states and stiffness. We also show that kerogen's maturation, which manifests itself as an increase in the sp(2)/sp(3) hybridization ratio, entails a crossover from plastic-to-brittle rupture mechanisms.

  5. Realistic molecular model of kerogen's nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousige, Colin; Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Vix-Guterl, Cathie; Pomerantz, Andrew E.; Suleimenova, Assiya; Vaughan, Gavin; Garbarino, Gaston; Feygenson, Mikhail; Wildgruber, Christoph; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-01

    Despite kerogen's importance as the organic backbone for hydrocarbon production from source rocks such as gas shale, the interplay between kerogen's chemistry, morphology and mechanics remains unexplored. As the environmental impact of shale gas rises, identifying functional relations between its geochemical, transport, elastic and fracture properties from realistic molecular models of kerogens becomes all the more important. Here, by using a hybrid experimental-simulation method, we propose a panel of realistic molecular models of mature and immature kerogens that provide a detailed picture of kerogen's nanostructure without considering the presence of clays and other minerals in shales. We probe the models' strengths and limitations, and show that they predict essential features amenable to experimental validation, including pore distribution, vibrational density of states and stiffness. We also show that kerogen's maturation, which manifests itself as an increase in the sp2/sp3 hybridization ratio, entails a crossover from plastic-to-brittle rupture mechanisms.

  6. Realistic molecular model of kerogen's nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Bousige, Colin; Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Vix-Guterl, Cathie; Pomerantz, Andrew E; Suleimenova, Assiya; Vaughan, Gavin; Garbarino, Gaston; Feygenson, Mikhail; Wildgruber, Christoph; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-01

    Despite kerogen's importance as the organic backbone for hydrocarbon production from source rocks such as gas shale, the interplay between kerogen's chemistry, morphology and mechanics remains unexplored. As the environmental impact of shale gas rises, identifying functional relations between its geochemical, transport, elastic and fracture properties from realistic molecular models of kerogens becomes all the more important. Here, by using a hybrid experimental-simulation method, we propose a panel of realistic molecular models of mature and immature kerogens that provide a detailed picture of kerogen's nanostructure without considering the presence of clays and other minerals in shales. We probe the models' strengths and limitations, and show that they predict essential features amenable to experimental validation, including pore distribution, vibrational density of states and stiffness. We also show that kerogen's maturation, which manifests itself as an increase in the sp(2)/sp(3) hybridization ratio, entails a crossover from plastic-to-brittle rupture mechanisms. PMID:26828313

  7. Chemistry in the Molecular Disks of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Nanase; Herbst, Eric

    2010-06-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are the centers of galaxies with supermassive blackholes whose accretion of mass causes very high luminosities of L˜1044-46erg s-1. An accretion disk has a molecular component that extends to hundreds of pc from the central AGN core. The question of how much central illumination affects the disk and how much star formation is present near the core have been astrophysical interests. Rotational lines from these disks at a sub-kpc scale have been observed for molecules such as CO, HCO+, HCN, and HNC. When ALMA becomes fully operational, it will be able to resolve these disks at much higher resolution than currently. Molecular observations at higher resolution may give some hints on the physics in the molecular disk. We modeled the chemical composition of a molecular disk in an AGN on a scale of tens of pc. To do this, we extended our standard gas-phase OSU network to include important processes at much higher temperatures, approaching 1000 K. We used the density model of Thompson et al., and determined the temperature by the blackbody approximation from the luminosity of the AGN core. The ionization by X-rays from the AGN core, by cosmic-rays from the AGN core, supernovae and stellar winds, and by UV-photons from OB stars are considered. We will briefly mention the effects from other factors that may change the molecular abundances such as shock waves and inhomogeneity of the density of the disk. T. Thompson, E. Quataert, and N. Murray, Astrophysical J. 630, 167 (2005)

  8. An approach towards molecular imaging of activated platelets allows imaging of symptomatic human carotid plaques in a new model of a tissue flow chamber.

    PubMed

    von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Meissner, Mirko; Peter, Karlheinz; Paul, Dominik; Meixner, Fabian; Neudorfer, Irene; Merkle, Annette; Harloff, Andreas; Zirlik, Andreas; Schöllhorn, Joachim; Markl, Michael; Hennig, Jürgen; Bode, Christoph; von zur Muhlen, Constantin

    2012-01-01

    The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents targeting epitopes in atherosclerosis is of general interest. In particular, early detection of activated platelets as key players in plaque rupture could provide improved triage of patients. However, so far the efficiency of contrast agents targeting human pathologies can only be examined in animal experiments, which do not necessarily reflect human in vivo conditions. We therefore describe application of a contrast agent targeting activated human platelets in an MRI tissue flow chamber, allowing detection and characterization of contrast agent binding. Microparticles of iron oxide (MPIO) were conjugated to an antibody targeting ligand-induced binding sites (LIBS) on the activated platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa-receptor or to control antibody, resulting in LIBS-MPIO or control-MPIO contrast agent. Human endarterectomy specimens from patients with acute stroke or transient ischemic attack were imaged ex vivo before and after contrast agent perfusion using a 9.4 T MRI system. Specimens were measured under static (n = 18) or flow conditions (n = 18) in a specially designed flow chamber setup, simulating physiological conditions in a stenosed vessel. A significant MPIO-induced negative contrast was achieved in MRI by LIBS-MPIO in specimens under static and flow conditions (LIBS-MPIO vs control-MPIO: p < 0.01), and the location of LIBS-MPIO binding corresponded well between histology and MRI (p < 0.05). The number of MPIOs per platelet area on endarterectomy specimens in histology was significantly higher with LIBS-MPIO (p < 0.001). Furthermore, the intensity of contrast agent binding and signal change showed the potential to reflect the severity of clinical symptoms. LIBS-MPIO allows the detection of activated platelets on the surface of symptomatic atherosclerotic human plaques using molecular MRI. Furthermore, the MRI tissue flow chamber setup described could help to evaluate

  9. Optical models of the molecular atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuev, V. E.; Makushkin, Y. S.; Mitsel, A. A.; Ponomarev, Y. N.; Rudenko, V. P.; Firsov, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    The use of optical and laser methods for performing atmospheric investigations has stimulated the development of the optical models of the atmosphere. The principles of constructing the optical models of molecular atmosphere for radiation with different spectral composition (wideband, narrowband, and monochromatic) are considered in the case of linear and nonlinear absorptions. The example of the development of a system which provides for the modeling of the processes of optical-wave energy transfer in the atmosphere is presented. Its physical foundations, structure, programming software, and functioning were considered.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Inflammasome Activation during Microbial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Broz, Petr; Monack, Denise M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The innate immune system plays a crucial role in the rapid recognition and elimination of invading microbes. Detection of microbes relies on germ-line encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize essential bacterial molecules, so-called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). A subset of PRRs, belonging to the NOD-like receptor (NLR) and the PYHIN protein families, detects viral and bacterial pathogens in the cytosol of host cells and induces the assembly of a multi-protein signaling platform called the inflammasome. The inflammasome serves as an activation platform for the mammalian cysteine protease caspase-1, a central mediator of innate immunity. Active caspase-1 promotes the maturation and release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 as well as protein involved in cytoprotection and tissue repair. In addition, caspase-1 initiates a novel form of cell death called pyroptosis. Here we discuss latest advances and our insights on inflammasome stimulation by two model intracellular pathogens, Francisella tularensis and Salmonella typhimurium. Recent studies on these pathogens have significantly shaped our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of inflammasome activation and how microbes can evade or manipulate inflammasome activity. In addition, we review the role of the inflammasome adapter ASC in the caspase-1 autoproteolysis and new insights into the structure of the inflammasome complex. PMID:21884176

  11. Molecular dynamics modelling of solidification in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.; Belak, J.; Glosli, J.

    1997-12-31

    Molecular dynamics modeling is used to study the solidification of metals at high pressure and temperature. Constant pressure MD is applied to a simulation cell initially filled with both solid and molten metal. The solid/liquid interface is tracked as a function of time, and the data are used to estimate growth rates of crystallites at high pressure and temperature in Ta and Mg.

  12. Molecular model and ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulation of coal vitrinite pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Zhu, Yan-ming; Wang, Geoff; Wang, Yang; Liu, Yu

    2015-08-01

    Vitrinite in coal, the mainly generating methane maceral, plays an important role in hydrocarbon generation of coal. This study aims at obtaining products formation mechanism of vitrinite pyrolysis, and hence determining the chemical bond, molecular liquefaction activity, and reactions mechanism of methane and C2-4 during pyrolysis. The ReaxFF molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was carried out at temperature of 1500 K in order to investigate the mechanism of vitrinite pyrolysis. Initially, a minimum energy conformational structure model was constrained by a combination of elemental and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR) literature data. The model analysis shows the chemical and physical parameters of vitrinite pyrolysis are broadly consistent with the experimental data. Based on the molecular model, ReaxFF MD simulations further provide information of unimolecule such as bond length, and chemical shift, and hence the total population and energy of main products. Molecules bond and pyrolysis fragments, based on active bond analyzed, revealed pyrolysis products of single vitrinite molecule with aliphatic C-C bond, especially ring and chain aliphatic as liquefaction activity. The molecular cell whose density is 0.9 g/cm(3) with lowest energy accords with the experimental density 1.33 g/cm(3). The content of main products after pyrolysis, classifying as CH4, H2O, and H2, was changed along with the increasing temperature. The gas molecule, fragments and generation pathways of CO2, H2, CH4, and C2H6 were also elucidated. These results show agreement with experimental observations, implying that MD simulation can provide reasonable explanation for the reaction processes involved in coal vitrinite pyrolysis. Thus the mechanism of coal hydrocarbon generation was revealed at the molecular level.

  13. Applications of molecular modeling in coal research

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, G.A.; Faulon, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past several years, molecular modeling has been applied to study various characteristics of coal molecular structures. Powerful workstations coupled with molecular force-field-based software packages have been used to study coal and coal-related molecules. Early work involved determination of the minimum-energy three-dimensional conformations of various published coal structures (Given, Wiser, Solomon and Shinn), and the dominant role of van der Waals and hydrogen bonding forces in defining the energy-minimized structures. These studies have been extended to explore various physical properties of coal structures, including density, microporosity, surface area, and fractal dimension. Other studies have related structural characteristics to cross-link density and have explored small molecule interactions with coal. Finally, recent studies using a structural elucidation (molecular builder) technique have constructed statistically diverse coal structures based on quantitative and qualitative data on coal and its decomposition products. This technique is also being applied to study coalification processes based on postulated coalification chemistry.

  14. Molecular model for hydrated biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Sato, Erika Tiemi; Rocha, Alexandre Reily; de Carvalho, Luis Felipe das Chagas e Silva; Almeida, Janete Dias; Martinho, Herculano

    2015-06-01

    A density-functional microscopic model for soft tissues (STmod) is presented. The model was based on a prototype molecular structure from experimentally resolved type I collagen peptide residues and water clusters treated in periodic boundary conditions. We obtained the optimized geometry, binding and coupling energies, dipole moments, and vibrational frequencies. The results concerning the stability of the confined water clusters, the water-water, and water-collagen interactions were successfully correlated to some important experimental trends of normal and inflammatory tissues. PMID:26172825

  15. X-Ray Spectral Model of Reprocess by Smooth and Clumpy Molecular Tori in Active Galactic Nuclei with the Framework MONACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furui, Shun'ya; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Ohno, Masanori; Hayashi, Kazuma

    2016-02-01

    We construct an X-ray spectral model of reprocessing by a torus in an active galactic nucleus (AGN) with the Monte Carlo simulation framework MONACO. Two torus geometries of smooth and clumpy cases are considered and compared. In order to reproduce a Compton shoulder accurately, MONACO includes not only free electron scattering but also bound electron scattering. Raman and Rayleigh scattering are also treated, and scattering cross sections dependent on chemical states of hydrogen and helium are included. Doppler broadening by turbulence velocity can be implemented. Our model gives results consistent with other available models, such as MYTorus, except for differences due to different physical parameters and assumptions. We studied the dependence on torus parameters for a Compton shoulder, and found that a intensity ratio of a Compton shoulder to the line core mainly depends on column density, inclination angle, and metal abundance. For instance, an increase of metal abundance makes a Compton shoulder relatively weak. Also, the shape of a Compton shoulder depends on the column density. Furthermore, these dependences become different between smooth and clumpy cases. Then, we discuss the possibility of ASTRO-H/SXS spectroscopy of Compton shoulders in AGN reflection spectra.

  16. Relation between cooperative molecular motors and active Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    Touya, Clément; Schwalger, Tilo; Lindner, Benjamin

    2011-05-01

    Active Brownian particles (ABPs), obeying a nonlinear Langevin equation with speed-dependent drift and noise amplitude, are well-known models used to describe self-propelled motion in biology. In this paper we study a model describing the stochastic dynamics of a group of coupled molecular motors (CMMs). Using two independent numerical methods, one based on the stationary velocity distribution of the motors and the other one on the local increments (also known as the Kramers-Moyal coefficients) of the velocity, we establish a connection between the CMM and the ABP models. The parameters extracted for the ABP via the two methods show good agreement for both symmetric and asymmetric cases and are independent of N, the number of motors, provided that N is not too small. This indicates that one can indeed describe the CMM problem with a simpler ABP model. However, the power spectrum of velocity fluctuations in the CMM model reveals a peak at a finite frequency, a peak which is absent in the velocity spectrum of the ABP model. This implies richer dynamic features of the CMM model which cannot be captured by an ABP model.

  17. Molecular hydrogen suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingni; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Misawa, Nobuaki; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Akio; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is effective for many diseases. However, molecular bases of H2 have not been fully elucidated. Cumulative evidence indicates that H2 acts as a gaseous signal modulator. We found that H2 suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by promoting phosphorylation and degradation οf β-catenin. Either complete inhibition of GSK3 or mutations at CK1- and GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin abolished the suppressive effect of H2. H2 did not increase GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, indicating that H2 has no direct effect on GSK3 itself. Knock-down of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or Axin1, which form the β-catenin degradation complex, minimized the suppressive effect of H2 on β-catenin accumulation. Accordingly, the effect of H2 requires CK1/GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin, as well as the β-catenin degradation complex comprised of CK1, GSK3, APC, and Axin1. We additionally found that H2 reduces the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Oral intake of H2 water tended to ameliorate cartilage degradation in a surgery-induced rat osteoarthritis model through attenuating β-catenin accumulation. We first demonstrate that H2 suppresses abnormally activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which accounts for the protective roles of H2 in a fraction of diseases. PMID:27558955

  18. Molecular hydrogen suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yingni; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Misawa, Nobuaki; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Akio; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is effective for many diseases. However, molecular bases of H2 have not been fully elucidated. Cumulative evidence indicates that H2 acts as a gaseous signal modulator. We found that H2 suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by promoting phosphorylation and degradation οf β-catenin. Either complete inhibition of GSK3 or mutations at CK1- and GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin abolished the suppressive effect of H2. H2 did not increase GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, indicating that H2 has no direct effect on GSK3 itself. Knock-down of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or Axin1, which form the β-catenin degradation complex, minimized the suppressive effect of H2 on β-catenin accumulation. Accordingly, the effect of H2 requires CK1/GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin, as well as the β-catenin degradation complex comprised of CK1, GSK3, APC, and Axin1. We additionally found that H2 reduces the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Oral intake of H2 water tended to ameliorate cartilage degradation in a surgery-induced rat osteoarthritis model through attenuating β-catenin accumulation. We first demonstrate that H2 suppresses abnormally activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which accounts for the protective roles of H2 in a fraction of diseases. PMID:27558955

  19. Activation of molecular catalysts using semiconductor quantum dots

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Thomas J.; Sykora, Milan; Klimov, Victor I.

    2011-10-04

    Photocatalytic materials based on coupling of semiconductor nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQD) and molecular catalysts. These materials have capability to drive or catalyze non-spontaneous chemical reactions in the presence of visible radiation, ultraviolet radiation, or both. The NQD functions in these materials as a light absorber and charge generator. Following light absorption, the NQD activates a molecular catalyst adsorbed on the surface of the NQD via transfer of one or more charges (either electrons or electron-holes) from the NQD to the molecular catalyst. The activated molecular catalyst can then drive a chemical reaction. A photoelectrolytic device that includes such photocatalytic materials is also described.

  20. Molecular modelling of miraculin: Structural analyses and functional hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Paladino, Antonella; Costantini, Susan; Colonna, Giovanni; Facchiano, Angelo M

    2008-02-29

    Miraculin is a plant protein that displays the peculiar property of modifying taste by swiching sour into a sweet taste. Its monomer is flavourless at all pH as well as at high concentration; the dimer form elicits its taste-modifying activity at acidic pH; a tetrameric form is also reported as active. Two histidine residues, located in exposed regions, are the main responsible of miraculin activity, as demonstrated by mutagenesis studies. Since structural data of miraculin are not available, we have predicted its three-dimensional structure and simulated both its dimer and tetramer forms by comparative modelling and molecular docking techniques. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations at different pH conditions have indicated that at acidic pH the dimer assumes a widely open conformation, in agreement with the hypotheses coming from other studies. PMID:18158914

  1. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    ) experience with methods of protein purification; (iii) incorporation of appropriate controls into experiments; (iv) use of basic statistics in data analysis; (v) writing papers and grant proposals in accepted scientific style; (vi) peer review; (vii) oral presentation of results and proposals; and (viii) introduction to molecular modeling. Figure 1 illustrates the modular nature of the lab curriculum. Elements from each of the exercises can be separated and treated as stand-alone exercises, or combined into short or long projects. We have been able to offer the opportunity to use sophisticated molecular modeling in the final module through funding from an NSF-ILI grant. However, many of the benefits of the research proposal can be achieved with other computer programs, or even by literature survey alone. Figure 1.Design of project-based biochemistry laboratory. Modules (projects, or portions of projects) are indicated as boxes. Each of these can be treated independently, or used as part of a larger project. Solid lines indicate some suggested paths from one module to the next. The skills and knowledge required for protein purification and design are developed in three units: (i) an introduction to critical assays needed to monitor degree of purification, including an evaluation of assay parameters; (ii) partial purification by ion-exchange techniques; and (iii) preparation of a grant proposal on protein design by mutagenesis. Brief descriptions of each of these units follow, with experimental details of each project at the end of this paper. Assays for Lysozyme Activity and Protein Concentration (4 weeks) The assays mastered during the first unit are a necessary tool for determining the purity of the enzyme during the second unit on purification by ion exchange. These assays allow an introduction to the concept of specific activity (units of enzyme activity per milligram of total protein) as a measure of purity. In this first sequence, students learn a turbidimetric assay

  2. A Series of Molecular Dynamics and Homology Modeling Computer Labs for an Undergraduate Molecular Modeling Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Donald E.; Guayasamin, Ryann C.; Kieffer, Madeleine E.

    2010-01-01

    As computational modeling plays an increasingly central role in biochemical research, it is important to provide students with exposure to common modeling methods in their undergraduate curriculum. This article describes a series of computer labs designed to introduce undergraduate students to energy minimization, molecular dynamics simulations,…

  3. A realistic molecular model of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Kushima, Akihiro; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-01-01

    Despite decades of studies of calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H), the structurally complex binder phase of concrete, the interplay between chemical composition and density remains essentially unexplored. Together these characteristics of C-S-H define and modulate the physical and mechanical properties of this “liquid stone” gel phase. With the recent determination of the calcium/silicon (C/S = 1.7) ratio and the density of the C-S-H particle (2.6 g/cm3) by neutron scattering measurements, there is new urgency to the challenge of explaining these essential properties. Here we propose a molecular model of C-S-H based on a bottom-up atomistic simulation approach that considers only the chemical specificity of the system as the overriding constraint. By allowing for short silica chains distributed as monomers, dimers, and pentamers, this C-S-H archetype of a molecular description of interacting CaO, SiO2, and H2O units provides not only realistic values of the C/S ratio and the density computed by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation of water adsorption at 300 K. The model, with a chemical composition of (CaO)1.65(SiO2)(H2O)1.75, also predicts other essential structural features and fundamental physical properties amenable to experimental validation, which suggest that the C-S-H gel structure includes both glass-like short-range order and crystalline features of the mineral tobermorite. Additionally, we probe the mechanical stiffness, strength, and hydrolytic shear response of our molecular model, as compared to experimentally measured properties of C-S-H. The latter results illustrate the prospect of treating cement on equal footing with metals and ceramics in the current application of mechanism-based models and multiscale simulations to study inelastic deformation and cracking. PMID:19805265

  4. Genome wide survey and molecular modeling of hypothetical proteins containing 2Fe-2S and FMN binding domains suggests Rieske Dioxygenase Activity highlighting their potential roles in bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Sathyanarayanan, Nitish; Nagendra, Holenarsipur Gundurao

    2014-01-01

    'Conserved hypothetical' proteins pose a challenge not just for functional genomics, but also to biology in general. As long as there are hundreds of conserved proteins with unknown function in model organisms such as Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis or Saccharomyces cerevisiae, any discussion towards a 'complete' understanding of these biological systems will remain a wishful thinking. Insilico approaches exhibit great promise towards attempts that enable appreciating the plausible roles of these hypothetical proteins. Among the majority of genomic proteins, two-thirds in unicellular organisms and more than 80% in metazoa, are multi-domain proteins, created as a result of gene duplication events. Aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases, also called Rieske dioxygenases (RDOs), are class of multi-domain proteins that catalyze the initial step in microbial aerobic degradation of many aromatic compounds. Investigations here address the computational characterization of hypothetical proteins containing Ferredoxin and Flavodoxin signatures. Consensus sequence of each class of oxidoreductase was obtained by a phylogenetic analysis, involving clustering methods based on evolutionary relationship. A synthetic sequence was developed by combining the consensus, which was used as the basis to search for their homologs via BLAST. The exercise yielded 129 multidomain hypothetical proteins containing both 2Fe-2S (Ferredoxin) and FNR (Flavodoxin) domains. In the current study, 17 proteins with N-terminus FNR domain and C-terminus 2Fe-2S domain are characterized, through homology modelling and docking exercises which suggest dioxygenase activity indicate their plausible roles in degradation of aromatic moieties. PMID:24616557

  5. Monitoring helicase activity with molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Belon, Craig A; Frick, David N

    2008-10-01

    A high-throughput, fluorescence-based helicase assay using molecular beacons is described. The assay is tested using the NS3 helicase encoded by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and is shown to accurately monitor helicase action on both DNA and RNA. In the assay, a ssDNA oligonucleotide molecular beacon, featuring a fluorescent moiety attached to one end and a quencher attached to the other, is annealed to a second longer DNA or RNA oligonucleotide. Upon strand separation by a helicase and ATP, the beacon strand forms an intramolecular hairpin that brings the tethered fluorescent and quencher molecules into juxtaposition, quenching fluorescence. Unlike currently available real-time helicase assays, the molecular beacon-based helicase assay is irreversible. As such, it does not require the addition of extra DNA strands to prevent products from re-annealing. Several variants of the new assay are described and experimentally verified using both Cy3 and Cy5 beacons, including one based on a sequence from the HCV genome. The HCV genome-based molecular beacon helicase assay is used to demonstrate how such an assay can be used in high-throughput screens and to analyze HCV helicase inhibitors.

  6. Molecular Models of Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajshekhar

    Liquid crystal elastomers combine the elastic properties of conventional rubbers with the optical properties of liquid crystals. This dual nature gives rise to unusual physical properties, including the stress induced transition from a polydomain state, consisting of multiple nematic regions with independent orientations, to a monodomain state consisting of a single nematic region with a uniform director. We propose several molecular-scale coarse-grained models of liquid crystal elastomers with varying degrees of resolution. The models employ the Gay-Berne soft potential, and exhibit the chain connectivity of a diamond network. Simulation results show that these models are able to capture the polydomain state exhibited by liquid crystal elastomers in the absence of any external stress. When subjected to uniaxial stress, our models exhibit a polydomain to monodomain transition. We explain that the polydomain state occurs through the aggregation of liquid crystal molecules assisted by crosslinking sites, and conclude that the transition mechanism to the monodomain state is based on the reorientation of nematic domains along the direction of applied stress. Our modeling efforts are primarily focused on three models. The first two models consider the effects of rigid and flexible crosslinkers in liquid crystal elastomers with a diamond topology for chain connectivity. The third model deviates from the diamond network topology and adopts a random network topology.

  7. Development of versatile molecular transport model for modeling spacecraft contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chien W.; Kannenberg, Keith; Chidester, Michael H.

    2010-08-01

    This paper describes a MATLAB-based molecular transport model developed for modeling contamination of spacecraft and optical instruments in space. The model adopts the Gebhart inverse-matrix theory for thermal radiation to analyze mass (molecular) transfer due to direct and reflected flux processes by balancing the mass fluxes instead of heat fluxes among surfaces with prescribed boundary conditions (contamination sticking fractions). The model can easily input view factor results from current thermal tools as well as measured outgassing data from ASTM E 1559 tests or vacuum bake-outs of flight components. Application examples of a geosynchronous satellite and an optical telescope are given to demonstrate versatile applications of the developed model.

  8. Powerful Molecular Outflows in Nearby Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain; Meléndez, Marcio

    2014-07-01

    We report the results from a systematic search for molecular (OH 119 μm) outflows with Herschel-PACS† in a sample of 43 nearby (z < 0.3) galaxy mergers, mostly ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and QSOs. We find that the character of the OH feature (strength of the absorption relative to the emission) correlates with that of the 9.7-μm silicate feature, a measure of obscuration in ULIRGs. Unambiguous evidence for molecular outflows, based on the detection of OH absorption profiles with median velocities more blueshifted than -50 km s-1, is seen in 26 (70%) of the 37 OH-detected targets, suggesting a wide-angle (~ 145°) outflow geometry. Conversely, unambiguous evidence for molecular inflows, based on the detection of OH absorption profiles with median velocities more redshifted than +50 km s-1, is seen in only 4 objects, suggesting a planar or filamentary geometry for the inflowing gas. Terminal outflow velocities of ~ -1000 km s-1 are measured in several objects, but median outflow velocities are typically ~ -200 km s-1. While the outflow velocities show no statistically significant dependence on the star formation rate, they are distinctly more blueshifted among systems with large AGN fractions and luminosities [log (L AGN/L ⊙) >= 11.8 +/- 0.3]. The quasars in these systems play a dominant role in driving the molecular outflows. In contrast, the most AGN dominated systems, where OH is seen purely in emission, show relatively modest OH line widths, despite their large AGN luminosities, perhaps indicating that molecular outflows subside once the quasar has cleared a path through the obscuring material.

  9. Glycolic acid inhibits enzymatic, hemorrhagic and edema-inducing activities of BaP1, a P-I metalloproteinase from Bothrops asper snake venom: insights from docking and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Pereañez, Jaime Andrés; Patiño, Arley Camilo; Rey-Suarez, Paola; Núñez, Vitelbina; Henao Castañeda, Isabel Cristina; Rucavado, Alexandra

    2013-09-01

    Glycolic acid (GA) (2-Hydroxyethanoic acid) is widely used as chemical peeling agent in Dermatology and, more recently, as a therapeutic and cosmetic compound in the field of skin care and disease treatment. In this work we tested the inhibitory ability of glycolic acid on the enzymatic, hemorrhagic and edema-inducing activities of BaP1, a P-I metalloproteinase from Bothrops asper venom, which induces a variety of toxic actions. Glycolic acid inhibited the proteolytic activity of BaP1 on azocasein, with an IC₅₀ of 1.67 mM. The compound was also effective at inhibiting the hemorrhagic activity of BaP1 in skin and muscle in experiments involving preincubation of enzyme and inhibitor prior to injection. When BaP1 was injected i.m. and then, at the same site, different concentrations of glycolic acid were administered at either 0 or 5 min, 7 mM solutions of the inhibitor partially abrogated hemorrhagic activity when administered at 0 min. Moreover, glycolic acid inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, edema-forming activity of BaP1 in the footpad. In order to have insights on the mode of action of glycolic acid, UV-vis and intrinsic fluorescence studies were performed. Results of these assays suggest that glycolic acid interacts directly with BaP1 and chelates the Zn²⁺ ion at the active site. These findings were supported by molecular docking results, which suggested that glycolic acid forms hydrogen bonds with residues Glu143, Arg110 and Ala111 of the enzyme. Additionally, molecular modeling results suggest that the inhibitor chelates Zn²⁺, with a distance of 3.58 Å, and may occupy part of substrate binding cleft of BaP1. Our results suggest that glycolic acid is a candidate for the development of inhibitors to be used in snakebite envenomation.

  10. Molecular Sieve Bench Testing and Computer Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamadinejad, Habib; DaLee, Robert C.; Blackmon, James B.

    1995-01-01

    The design of an efficient four-bed molecular sieve (4BMS) CO2 removal system for the International Space Station depends on many mission parameters, such as duration, crew size, cost of power, volume, fluid interface properties, etc. A need for space vehicle CO2 removal system models capable of accurately performing extrapolated hardware predictions is inevitable due to the change of the parameters which influences the CO2 removal system capacity. The purpose is to investigate the mathematical techniques required for a model capable of accurate extrapolated performance predictions and to obtain test data required to estimate mass transfer coefficients and verify the computer model. Models have been developed to demonstrate that the finite difference technique can be successfully applied to sorbents and conditions used in spacecraft CO2 removal systems. The nonisothermal, axially dispersed, plug flow model with linear driving force for 5X sorbent and pore diffusion for silica gel are then applied to test data. A more complex model, a non-darcian model (two dimensional), has also been developed for simulation of the test data. This model takes into account the channeling effect on column breakthrough. Four FORTRAN computer programs are presented: a two-dimensional model of flow adsorption/desorption in a packed bed; a one-dimensional model of flow adsorption/desorption in a packed bed; a model of thermal vacuum desorption; and a model of a tri-sectional packed bed with two different sorbent materials. The programs are capable of simulating up to four gas constituents for each process, which can be increased with a few minor changes.

  11. An undergraduate laboratory activity on molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Spitznagel, Benjamin; Pritchett, Paige R; Messina, Troy C; Goadrich, Mark; Rodriguez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Vision and Change [AAAS, 2011] outlines a blueprint for modernizing biology education by addressing conceptual understanding of key concepts, such as the relationship between structure and function. The document also highlights skills necessary for student success in 21st century Biology, such as the use of modeling and simulation. Here we describe a laboratory activity that allows students to investigate the dynamic nature of protein structure and function through the use of a modeling technique known as molecular dynamics (MD). The activity takes place over two lab periods that are 3 hr each. The first lab period unpacks the basic approach behind MD simulations, beginning with the kinematic equations that all bioscience students learn in an introductory physics course. During this period students are taught rudimentary programming skills in Python while guided through simple modeling exercises that lead up to the simulation of the motion of a single atom. In the second lab period students extend concepts learned in the first period to develop skills in the use of expert MD software. Here students simulate and analyze changes in protein conformation resulting from temperature change, solvation, and phosphorylation. The article will describe how these activities can be carried out using free software packages, including Abalone and VMD/NAMD.

  12. An undergraduate laboratory activity on molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Spitznagel, Benjamin; Pritchett, Paige R; Messina, Troy C; Goadrich, Mark; Rodriguez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Vision and Change [AAAS, 2011] outlines a blueprint for modernizing biology education by addressing conceptual understanding of key concepts, such as the relationship between structure and function. The document also highlights skills necessary for student success in 21st century Biology, such as the use of modeling and simulation. Here we describe a laboratory activity that allows students to investigate the dynamic nature of protein structure and function through the use of a modeling technique known as molecular dynamics (MD). The activity takes place over two lab periods that are 3 hr each. The first lab period unpacks the basic approach behind MD simulations, beginning with the kinematic equations that all bioscience students learn in an introductory physics course. During this period students are taught rudimentary programming skills in Python while guided through simple modeling exercises that lead up to the simulation of the motion of a single atom. In the second lab period students extend concepts learned in the first period to develop skills in the use of expert MD software. Here students simulate and analyze changes in protein conformation resulting from temperature change, solvation, and phosphorylation. The article will describe how these activities can be carried out using free software packages, including Abalone and VMD/NAMD. PMID:26751047

  13. Interfacial activation-based molecular bioimprinting of lipolytic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Mingarro, I; Abad, C; Braco, L

    1995-01-01

    Interfacial activation-based molecular (bio)-imprinting (IAMI) has been developed to rationally improve the performance of lipolytic enzymes in nonaqueous environments. The strategy combinedly exploits (i) the known dramatic enhancement of the protein conformational rigidity in a water-restricted milieu and (ii) the reported conformational changes associated with the activation of these enzymes at lipid-water interfaces, which basically involves an increased substrate accessibility to the active site and/or an induction of a more competent catalytic machinery. Six model enzymes have been assayed in several model reactions in nonaqueous media. The results, rationalized in light of the present biochemical and structural knowledge, show that the IAMI approach represents a straightforward, versatile method to generate manageable, activated (kinetically trapped) forms of lipolytic enzymes, providing under optimal conditions nonaqueous rate enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude. It is also shown that imprintability of lipolytic enzymes depends not only on the nature of the enzyme but also on the "quality" of the interface used as the template. PMID:7724558

  14. Active shape models unleashed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, Matthias; Wesarg, Stefan

    2011-03-01

    Active Shape Models (ASMs) are a popular family of segmentation algorithms which combine local appearance models for boundary detection with a statistical shape model (SSM). They are especially popular in medical imaging due to their ability for fast and accurate segmentation of anatomical structures even in large and noisy 3D images. A well-known limitation of ASMs is that the shape constraints are over-restrictive, because the segmentations are bounded by the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) subspace learned from the training data. To overcome this limitation, we propose a new energy minimization approach which combines an external image energy with an internal shape model energy. Our shape energy uses the Distance From Feature Space (DFFS) concept to allow deviations from the PCA subspace in a theoretically sound and computationally fast way. In contrast to previous approaches, our model does not rely on post-processing with constrained free-form deformation or additional complex local energy models. In addition to the energy minimization approach, we propose a new method for liver detection, a new method for initializing an SSM and an improved k-Nearest Neighbour (kNN)-classifier for boundary detection. Our ASM is evaluated with leave-one-out tests on a data set with 34 tomographic CT scans of the liver and is compared to an ASM with standard shape constraints. The quantitative results of our experiments show that we achieve higher segmentation accuracy with our energy minimization approach than with standard shape constraints.nym

  15. Application of Molecular Modeling to Urokinase Inhibitors Development

    PubMed Central

    Sulimov, V. B.; Katkova, E. V.; Oferkin, I. V.; Sulimov, A. V.; Romanov, A. N.; Roschin, A. I.; Beloglazova, I. B.; Plekhanova, O. S.; Tkachuk, V. A.; Sadovnichiy, V. A.

    2014-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays an important role in the regulation of diverse physiologic and pathologic processes. Experimental research has shown that elevated uPA expression is associated with cancer progression, metastasis, and shortened survival in patients, whereas suppression of proteolytic activity of uPA leads to evident decrease of metastasis. Therefore, uPA has been considered as a promising molecular target for development of anticancer drugs. The present study sets out to develop the new selective uPA inhibitors using computer-aided structural based drug design methods. Investigation involves the following stages: computer modeling of the protein active site, development and validation of computer molecular modeling methods: docking (SOL program), postprocessing (DISCORE program), direct generalized docking (FLM program), and the application of the quantum chemical calculations (MOPAC package), search of uPA inhibitors among molecules from databases of ready-made compounds to find new uPA inhibitors, and design of new chemical structures and their optimization and experimental examination. On the basis of known uPA inhibitors and modeling results, 18 new compounds have been designed, calculated using programs mentioned above, synthesized, and tested in vitro. Eight of them display inhibitory activity and two of them display activity about 10 μM. PMID:24967388

  16. Homology modeling, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics simulations elucidated α-fetoprotein binding modes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An important mechanism of endocrine activity is chemicals entering target cells via transport proteins and then interacting with hormone receptors such as the estrogen receptor (ER). α-Fetoprotein (AFP) is a major transport protein in rodent serum that can bind and sequester estrogens, thus preventing entry to the target cell and where they could otherwise induce ER-mediated endocrine activity. Recently, we reported rat AFP binding affinities for a large set of structurally diverse chemicals, including 53 binders and 72 non-binders. However, the lack of three-dimensional (3D) structures of rat AFP hinders further understanding of the structural dependence for binding. Therefore, a 3D structure of rat AFP was built using homology modeling in order to elucidate rat AFP-ligand binding modes through docking analyses and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Methods Homology modeling was first applied to build a 3D structure of rat AFP. Molecular docking and Molecular Mechanics-Generalized Born Surface Area (MM-GBSA) scoring were then used to examine potential rat AFP ligand binding modes. MD simulations and free energy calculations were performed to refine models of binding modes. Results A rat AFP tertiary structure was first obtained using homology modeling and MD simulations. The rat AFP-ligand binding modes of 13 structurally diverse, representative binders were calculated using molecular docking, (MM-GBSA) ranking and MD simulations. The key residues for rat AFP-ligand binding were postulated through analyzing the binding modes. Conclusion The optimized 3D rat AFP structure and associated ligand binding modes shed light on rat AFP-ligand binding interactions that, in turn, provide a means to estimate binding affinity of unknown chemicals. Our results will assist in the evaluation of the endocrine disruption potential of chemicals. PMID:24266910

  17. Kinetic modelling of molecular hydrogen transport in microporous carbon materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Hankel, M.; Zhang, H.; Nguyen, T. X.; Bhatia, S. K.; Gray, S. K.; Smith, S. C.

    2011-01-01

    The proposal of kinetic molecular sieving of hydrogen isotopes is explored by employing statistical rate theory methods to describe the kinetics of molecular hydrogen transport in model microporous carbon structures. A Lennard-Jones atom-atom interaction potential is utilized for the description of the interactions between H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} and the carbon framework, while the requisite partition functions describing the thermal flux of molecules through the transition state are calculated quantum mechanically in view of the low temperatures involved in the proposed kinetic molecular sieving application. Predicted kinetic isotope effects for initial passage from the gas phase into the first pore mouth are consistent with expectations from previous modeling studies, namely, that at sufficiently low temperatures and for sufficiently narrow pore mouths D{sub 2} transport is dramatically favored over H{sub 2}. However, in contrast to expectations from previous modeling, the absence of any potential barrier along the minimum energy pathway from the gas phase into the first pore mouth yields a negative temperature dependence in the predicted absolute rate coefficients - implying a negative activation energy. In pursuit of the effective activation barrier, we find that the minimum potential in the cavity is significantly higher than in the pore mouth for nanotube-shaped models, throwing into question the common assumption that passage through the pore mouths should be the rate-determining step. Our results suggest a new mechanism that, depending on the size and shape of the cavity, the thermal activation barrier may lie in the cavity rather than at the pore mouth. As a consequence, design strategies for achieving quantum-mediated kinetic molecular sieving of H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} in a microporous membrane will need, at the very least, to take careful account of cavity shape and size in addition to pore-mouth size in order to ensure that the selective step, namely passage

  18. Molecular Abundances in the Disk of AN Active Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, N.; Thompson, T. A.; Herbst, E.

    2011-06-01

    There are galactic nuclei that emit high luminosities L˜1044-46 erg S-1 including luminosity produced by X-rays from high mass accretion onto the central black holes. These nuclei are called active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and they are accompanied by molecular disks. Observations show high abundances of CN and HCN in the disks; the molecules are proposed to be probes of X-ray dominated regions (XDRs) created by the X-rays from AGNs. We have constructed a spatially-dependent chemical-abundance model of the molecular disk in NGC 1068, a typical AGN-dominated galaxy. Recently, new observations of CN and HCN have been made at much higher spatial resolution, and there are also detections of polyatomic molecules such as HC3N, c-C3H2, and C2H. We discuss how these observations and our simulations can help us to better understand the physical conditions, the disk structure, and conditions for star formation within molecular disks, which are still uncertain. We also include a comparison with other types of galaxies such as (ultra-) luminous infrared galaxies. Usero et al.Astronomy and Astrophysics. 419 (897), 2004. Initial results were presented at the International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy 2010, RF05 Garcia-Burillo et al. Astronomy and Astrophysics. 519 (2), 2010. Garcia-Burillo et al. Journal of Physics Conference Series, 131 (12031), 2008. Costagliola et al. ArXiv e-print arXiv:1101.2122, 2011. Nakajima et al. Astrophysical Journal Letters 728 (L38), 2008.

  19. Deterministic Modelling of BAK Activation Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grills, C.; Chacko, A.; Crawford, N.; Johnston, P. G.; Fennell, D. A.; O'Rourke, S. F. C.

    2009-08-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying mitochondrial BAK activation during apoptosis remains highly controversial. Two seemingly conflicting models have been proposed. In the activation model, BAK requires so-called activating BH3 only proteins (aBH3) to initiate its conformation change. In the other, displacement from inhibitory pro-survival BCL-2 proteins (PBPs) and monomerization of BAK by PBP restricted dissociator BH3-only proteins (dBH3) is sufficient. To better understand the kinetic implications of these models and reconcile these conflicting but highly evidence-based models, we have employed dynamical systems analysis to explore the kinetics underlying BAK activation as a non-linear reaction system. Our findings accommodate both pure agonism and dissociation as mutually exclusive mechanisms capable of initiating BAK activation. In addition we find our work supports a modelling based approach for predicting resistance to therapeutically relevant small molecules BH3 mimetics.

  20. Modeling ion sensing in molecular electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Caroline J.; Smeu, Manuel Ratner, Mark A.

    2014-02-07

    We examine the ability of molecules to sense ions by measuring the change in molecular conductance in the presence of such charged species. The detection of protons (H{sup +}), alkali metal cations (M{sup +}), calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}), and hydronium ions (H{sub 3}O{sup +}) is considered. Density functional theory (DFT) is used within the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function framework (NEGF) to model electron transport properties of quinolinedithiol (QDT, C{sub 9}H{sub 7}NS{sub 2}), bridging Al electrodes. The geometry of the transport region is relaxed with DFT. The transport properties of the device are modeled with NEGF-DFT to determine if this device can distinguish among the M{sup +} + QDT species containing monovalent cations, where M{sup +} = H{sup +}, Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, or K{sup +}. Because of the asymmetry of QDT in between the two electrodes, both positive and negative biases are considered. The electron transmission function and conductance properties are simulated for electrode biases in the range from −0.5 V to 0.5 V at increments of 0.1 V. Scattering state analysis is used to determine the molecular orbitals that are the main contributors to the peaks in the transmission function near the Fermi level of the electrodes, and current-voltage relationships are obtained. The results show that QDT can be used as a proton detector by measuring transport through it and can conceivably act as a pH sensor in solutions. In addition, QDT may be able to distinguish among different monovalent species. This work suggests an approach to design modern molecular electronic conductance sensors with high sensitivity and specificity using well-established quantum chemistry.

  1. A Comparative Study of Successful Central Nervous System Drugs Using Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hyosub; Sulaimon, Segun; Menezes, Sandra; Son, Anne; Menezes, Warren J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular modeling is a powerful tool used for three-dimensional visualization and for exploring electrostatic forces involved in drug transport. This tool enhances student understanding of structure-property relationships, as well as actively engaging them in class. Molecular modeling of several central nervous system (CNS) drugs is used to…

  2. A Molecular Communications Model for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Femminella, Mauro; Reali, Gianluca; Vasilakos, Athanasios V

    2015-12-01

    This paper considers the scenario of a targeted drug delivery system, which consists of deploying a number of biological nanomachines close to a biological target (e.g., a tumor), able to deliver drug molecules in the diseased area. Suitably located transmitters are designed to release a continuous flow of drug molecules in the surrounding environment, where they diffuse and reach the target. These molecules are received when they chemically react with compliant receptors deployed on the receiver surface. In these conditions, if the release rate is relatively high and the drug absorption time is significant, congestion may happen, essentially at the receiver site. This phenomenon limits the drug absorption rate and makes the signal transmission ineffective, with an undesired diffusion of drug molecules elsewhere in the body. The original contribution of this paper consists of a theoretical analysis of the causes of congestion in diffusion-based molecular communications. For this purpose, it is proposed a reception model consisting of a set of pure loss queuing systems. The proposed model exhibits an excellent agreement with the results of a simulation campaign made by using the Biological and Nano-Scale communication simulator version 2 (BiNS2), a well-known simulator for molecular communications, whose reliability has been assessed through in vitro experiments. The obtained results can be used in rate control algorithms to optimally determine the optimal release rate of molecules in drug delivery applications.

  3. Modeling a crowdsourced definition of molecular complexity.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Robert P; Zorn, Nicolas; Sherer, Edward C; Campeau, Louis-Charles; Chang, Charlie Zhenyu; Cumming, Jared; Maddess, Matthew L; Nantermet, Philippe G; Sinz, Christopher J; O'Shea, Paul D

    2014-06-23

    This paper brings together the concepts of molecular complexity and crowdsourcing. An exercise was done at Merck where 386 chemists voted on the molecular complexity (on a scale of 1-5) of 2681 molecules taken from various sources: public, licensed, and in-house. The meanComplexity of a molecule is the average over all votes for that molecule. As long as enough votes are cast per molecule, we find meanComplexity is quite easy to model with QSAR methods using only a handful of physical descriptors (e.g., number of chiral centers, number of unique topological torsions, a Wiener index, etc.). The high level of self-consistency of the model (cross-validated R(2) ∼0.88) is remarkable given that our chemists do not agree with each other strongly about the complexity of any given molecule. Thus, the power of crowdsourcing is clearly demonstrated in this case. The meanComplexity appears to be correlated with at least one metric of synthetic complexity from the literature derived in a different way and is correlated with values of process mass intensity (PMI) from the literature and from in-house studies. Complexity can be used to differentiate between in-house programs and to follow a program over time.

  4. In vivo imaging of intraperitoneally disseminated tumors in model mice by using activatable fluorescent small-molecular probes for activity of cathepsins.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Tomohiko; Kamiya, Mako; Urano, Yasuteru

    2014-10-15

    It is difficult to completely remove carcinomas in unguided ablative surgery because they cannot be distinguished with the unaided human eye. Therefore, in order to precisely visualize tiny tumors and the borders between cancerous lesions and normal tissues, we have been developing fluorescence probes activatable only in cancer cells. We previously reported the hydroxymethylrhodamine green (HMRG)-based fluorescence probe gGlu-HMRG for γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), which is overexpressed in a variety of cancer cells, and we showed that it enables in vivo rapid detection of human ovarian cancer SHIN-3 nodules with a high tumor-to-background (T/B) fluorescence ratio in model mice. However, cancer cell lines with low GGT expression could hardly be detected with gGlu-HMRG. Here we developed two new HMRG-based fluorescence probes for the cathepsin family of cysteine proteases, including cathepsin B (CatB) and cathepsin L (CatL), which show increased expression and/or activity, secretion, and altered localization in many kinds of cancer cells. The developed probes, Z-Phe-Arg-HMRG and Z-Arg-Arg-HMRG, are colorless and nonfluorescent at the physiological pH of 7.4, but are hydrolyzed to HMRG upon reaction with purified cathepsins, resulting in a more than 200-fold fluorescence increase. These probes could visualize human ovarian cancer cell lines SHIN-3, SK-OV-3, and OVCAR-3, of which the latter two were hardly detectable with gGlu-HMRG. Z-Phe-Arg-HMRG showed higher applicability than Z-Arg-Arg-HMRG for in vivo imaging, and we confirmed that 0.5-mm-sized SK-OV-3 tumor nodules disseminated on the mesentery in a mouse model could be rapidly visualized by Z-Phe-Arg-HMRG, with a T/B fluorescence ratio of 4.2. Further, intraperitoneally disseminated tumor could be visualized in real time in vivo by fluorescence endoscopy after spraying Z-Phe-Arg-HMRG, with a T/B ratio of 3. In conclusion, our HMRG-based activatable probes targeted to cathepsins have expanded the detectable range

  5. Molecular determinants of ligand binding modes in the histamine H(4) receptor: linking ligand-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models to in silico guided receptor mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Istyastono, Enade P; Nijmeijer, Saskia; Lim, Herman D; van de Stolpe, Andrea; Roumen, Luc; Kooistra, Albert J; Vischer, Henry F; de Esch, Iwan J P; Leurs, Rob; de Graaf, Chris

    2011-12-01

    The histamine H(4) receptor (H(4)R) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that plays an important role in inflammation. Similar to the homologous histamine H(3) receptor (H(3)R), two acidic residues in the H(4)R binding pocket, D(3.32) and E(5.46), act as essential hydrogen bond acceptors of positively ionizable hydrogen bond donors in H(4)R ligands. Given the symmetric distribution of these complementary pharmacophore features in H(4)R and its ligands, different alternative ligand binding mode hypotheses have been proposed. The current study focuses on the elucidation of the molecular determinants of H(4)R-ligand binding modes by combining (3D) quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), protein homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, and site-directed mutagenesis studies. We have designed and synthesized a series of clobenpropit (N-(4-chlorobenzyl)-S-[3-(4(5)-imidazolyl)propyl]isothiourea) derivatives to investigate H(4)R-ligand interactions and ligand binding orientations. Interestingly, our studies indicate that clobenpropit (2) itself can bind to H(4)R in two distinct binding modes, while the addition of a cyclohexyl group to the clobenpropit isothiourea moiety allows VUF5228 (5) to adopt only one specific binding mode in the H(4)R binding pocket. Our ligand-steered, experimentally supported protein modeling method gives new insights into ligand recognition by H(4)R and can be used as a general approach to elucidate the structure of protein-ligand complexes.

  6. A Molecular Model for Chiral Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latinwo, Folarin; Stillinger, Frank; Debenedetti, Pablo

    In this work, we present a new class of molecular models for chiral phenomena in condensed matter systems. A key feature of these models is the ability of the four-site (tetramer) ``molecules'' to inter-convert between two distinct chiral forms (enantiomers). Given this feature, we use analytical theory and computer simulations to investigate the emergent chiral properties (including symmetry breaking) over a range of conditions. In particular, we consider the single-molecule level and condensed-phase behavior of our model system. Interestingly, we find that our liquid-phase predictions are in excellent agreement with recent experimental reports on chiral self-sorting in isotropic liquids. From this perspective, our model demonstrates accurate predictive capabilities, as well as a platform for understanding the microscopic origins of a variety of chiral phenomena. In a broader context, we anticipate that this class of models will be relevant to chirality-dominated areas such as the pharmaceutical industry and pre-biotic geochemistry.

  7. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics studies of hydralazine with human DNA methyltransferase 1.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narender; Dueñas-González, Alfonso; Lyko, Frank; Medina-Franco, Jose L

    2009-05-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) are a family of enzymes that methylate DNA at the C5 position of cytosine residues, and their inhibition is a promising strategy for the treatment of various developmental and proliferative diseases, particularly cancers. In the present study, a binding model for hydralazine, with a validated homology model of human DNMT, was developed by the use of automated molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The docking protocol was validated by predicting the binding mode of 2'-deoxycytidine, 5-azacytidine, and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. The inhibitory activity of hydralazine toward DNMT may be rationalized at the molecular level by similar interactions within the binding pocket (e.g., by a similar pharmacophore) as established by substrate-like deoxycytidine analogues. These interactions involve a complex network of hydrogen bonds with arginine and glutamic acid residues that also play a major role in the mechanism of DNA methylation. Despite the different scaffolds of other non-nucleoside DNMT inhibitors such as procaine and procainamide, the current modeling work reveals that these drugs exhibit similar interactions within the DNMT1 binding site. These findings are valuable in guiding the rational design and virtual screening of novel DNMT inhibitors.

  8. Some Reflections on the Use and Abuse of Molecular Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Quentin R.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the historical applications of molecular models and the controversies which they produced. The author discusses types of molecular models from the van't Hoff and Kekule models to the more recently developed ones. He presents a new model which was constructed to overcome the disadvantages of (1) falling apart, (2) inaccurate angles, (3)…

  9. Ab Initio Modeling of Molecular Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Schwenke, David

    2014-01-01

    Radiative emission from excited states of atoms and molecules can comprise a significant fraction of the total heat flux experienced by spacecraft during atmospheric entry at hypersonic speeds. For spacecraft with ablating heat shields, some of this radiative flux can be absorbed by molecular constituents in the boundary layer that are formed by the ablation process. Ab initio quantum mechanical calculations are carried out to predict the strengths of these emission and absorption processes. This talk will describe the methods used in these calculations using, as examples, the 4th positive emission bands of CO and the 1g+ 1u+ absorption in C3. The results of these calculations are being used as input to NASA radiation modeling codes like NeqAir, HARA and HyperRad.

  10. Assessing Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Solvatochromism Modeling.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Tobias

    2015-08-20

    For the modeling of solvatochromism with an explicit representation of the solvent molecules, the quality of preceding molecular dynamics simulations is crucial. Therefore, the possibility to apply force fields which are derived with as little empiricism as possible seems desirable. Such an approach is tested here by exploiting the sensitive solvatochromism of p-nitroaniline, and the use of reliable excitation energies based on approximate second-order coupled cluster results within a polarizable embedding scheme. The quality of the various MD settings for four different solvents, water, methanol, ethanol, and dichloromethane, is assessed. In general, good agreement with the experiment is observed when polarizable force fields and special treatment of hydrogen bonding are applied. PMID:26220273

  11. Modeling Molecular Pathways of Neuronal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Taxin, Zachary H.; Neymotin, Samuel A.; Mohan, Ashutosh; Lipton, Peter; Lytton, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal ischemia, the consequence of a stroke (cerebrovascular accident), is a condition of reduced delivery of nutrients to brain neurons. The brain consumes more energy per gram of tissue than any other organ, making continuous blood flow critical. Loss of nutrients, most critically glucose and O2, triggers a large number of interacting molecular pathways in neurons and astrocytes. The dynamics of these pathways take place over multiple temporal scales and occur in multiple interacting cytosolic and organelle compartments: in mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and nucleus. The complexity of these relationships suggests the use of computer simulation to understand the interplay between pathways leading to reversible or irreversible damage, the forms of damage, and interventions that could reduce damage at different stages of stroke. We describe a number of models and simulation methods that can be used to further our understanding of ischemia. PMID:24560148

  12. First Principles Quantitative Modeling of Molecular Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zhanyu

    In this thesis, we report theoretical investigations of nonlinear and nonequilibrium quantum electronic transport properties of molecular transport junctions from atomistic first principles. The aim is to seek not only qualitative but also quantitative understanding of the corresponding experimental data. At present, the challenges to quantitative theoretical work in molecular electronics include two most important questions: (i) what is the proper atomic model for the experimental devices? (ii) how to accurately determine quantum transport properties without any phenomenological parameters? Our research is centered on these questions. We have systematically calculated atomic structures of the molecular transport junctions by performing total energy structural relaxation using density functional theory (DFT). Our quantum transport calculations were carried out by implementing DFT within the framework of Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF). The calculated data are directly compared with the corresponding experimental measurements. Our general conclusion is that quantitative comparison with experimental data can be made if the device contacts are correctly determined. We calculated properties of nonequilibrium spin injection from Ni contacts to octane-thiolate films which form a molecular spintronic system. The first principles results allow us to establish a clear physical picture of how spins are injected from the Ni contacts through the Ni-molecule linkage to the molecule, why tunnel magnetoresistance is rapidly reduced by the applied bias in an asymmetric manner, and to what extent ab initio transport theory can make quantitative comparisons to the corresponding experimental data. We found that extremely careful sampling of the two-dimensional Brillouin zone of the Ni surface is crucial for accurate results in such a spintronic system. We investigated the role of contact formation and its resulting structures to quantum transport in several molecular

  13. Oriented active shape models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiamin; Udupa, Jayaram K

    2009-04-01

    Active shape models (ASM) are widely employed for recognizing anatomic structures and for delineating them in medical images. In this paper, a novel strategy called oriented active shape models (OASM) is presented in an attempt to overcome the following five limitations of ASM: 1) lower delineation accuracy, 2) the requirement of a large number of landmarks, 3) sensitivity to search range, 4) sensitivity to initialization, and 5) inability to fully exploit the specific information present in the given image to be segmented. OASM effectively combines the rich statistical shape information embodied in ASM with the boundary orientedness property and the globally optimal delineation capability of the live wire methodology of boundary segmentation. The latter characteristics allow live wire to effectively separate an object boundary from other nonobject boundaries with similar properties especially when they come very close in the image domain. The approach leads to a two-level dynamic programming method, wherein the first level corresponds to boundary recognition and the second level corresponds to boundary delineation, and to an effective automatic initialization method. The method outputs a globally optimal boundary that agrees with the shape model if the recognition step is successful in bringing the model close to the boundary in the image. Extensive evaluation experiments have been conducted by utilizing 40 image (magnetic resonance and computed tomography) data sets in each of five different application areas for segmenting breast, liver, bones of the foot, and cervical vertebrae of the spine. Comparisons are made between OASM and ASM based on precision, accuracy, and efficiency of segmentation. Accuracy is assessed using both region-based false positive and false negative measures and boundary-based distance measures. The results indicate the following: 1) The accuracy of segmentation via OASM is considerably better than that of ASM; 2) The number of landmarks

  14. Molecular mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Kim, Jin Kyung; Shin, Dong-Min; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multi-protein signaling complexes that trigger the activation of inflammatory caspases and the maturation of interleukin-1β. Among various inflammasome complexes, the NLRP3 inflammasome is best characterized and has been linked with various human autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Thus, the NLRP3 inflammasome may be a promising target for anti-inflammatory therapies. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the mechanisms by which the NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in the cytosol. We also describe the binding partners of NLRP3 inflammasome complexes activating or inhibiting the inflammasome assembly. Our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating NLRP3 inflammasome signaling and how these influence inflammatory responses offers further insight into potential therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory diseases associated with dysregulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:26549800

  15. Model For Dense Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Steven D.; Neufeld, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical model for the thermal balance, chemistry, and radiative transfer within quiescent dense molecular cloud cores that contain a central protostar. In the interior of such cores, we expect the dust and gas temperatures to be well coupled, while in the outer regions CO rotational emissions dominate the gas cooling and the predicted gas temperature lies significantly below the dust temperature. Large spatial variations in the gas temperature are expected to affect the gas phase chemistry dramatically; in particular, the predicted water abundance varies by more than a factor of 1000 within cloud cores that contain luminous protostars. Based upon our predictions for the thermal and chemical structure of cloud cores, we have constructed self-consistent radiative transfer models to compute the line strengths and line profiles for transitions of (12)CO, (13)CO, C(18)O, ortho- and para-H2(16)O, ortho- and para-H2(18)O, and O I. We carried out a general parameter study to determine the dependence of the model predictions upon the parameters assumed for the source. We expect many of the far-infrared and submillimeter rotational transitions of water to be detectable either in emission or absorption with the use of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite. Quiescent, radiatively heated hot cores are expected to show low-gain maser emission in the 183 GHz 3(sub 13)-2(sub 20) water line, such as has been observed toward several hot core regions using ground-based telescopes. We predict the (3)P(sub l) - (3)P(sub 2) fine-structure transition of atomic oxygen near 63 micron to be in strong absorption against the continuum for many sources. Our model can also account successfully for recent ISO observations of absorption in rovibrational transitions of water toward the source AFGL 2591.

  16. Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Weinan E

    2012-03-29

    The main bottleneck in modeling transport in molecular devices is to develop the correct formulation of the problem and efficient algorithms for analyzing the electronic structure and dynamics using, for example, the time-dependent density functional theory. We have divided this task into several steps. The first step is to developing the right mathematical formulation and numerical algorithms for analyzing the electronic structure using density functional theory. The second step is to study time-dependent density functional theory, particularly the far-field boundary conditions. The third step is to study electronic transport in molecular devices. We are now at the end of the first step. Under DOE support, we have made subtantial progress in developing linear scaling and sub-linear scaling algorithms for electronic structure analysis. Although there has been a huge amount of effort in the past on developing linear scaling algorithms, most of the algorithms developed suffer from the lack of robustness and controllable accuracy. We have made the following progress: (1) We have analyzed thoroughly the localization properties of the wave-functions. We have developed a clear understanding of the physical as well as mathematical origin of the decay properties. One important conclusion is that even for metals, one can choose wavefunctions that decay faster than any algebraic power. (2) We have developed algorithms that make use of these localization properties. Our algorithms are based on non-orthogonal formulations of the density functional theory. Our key contribution is to add a localization step into the algorithm. The addition of this localization step makes the algorithm quite robust and much more accurate. Moreover, we can control the accuracy of these algorithms by changing the numerical parameters. (3) We have considerably improved the Fermi operator expansion (FOE) approach. Through pole expansion, we have developed the optimal scaling FOE algorithm.

  17. Modelling spin Hamiltonian parameters of molecular nanomagnets.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Tulika; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2016-07-12

    Molecular nanomagnets encompass a wide range of coordination complexes possessing several potential applications. A formidable challenge in realizing these potential applications lies in controlling the magnetic properties of these clusters. Microscopic spin Hamiltonian (SH) parameters describe the magnetic properties of these clusters, and viable ways to control these SH parameters are highly desirable. Computational tools play a proactive role in this area, where SH parameters such as isotropic exchange interaction (J), anisotropic exchange interaction (Jx, Jy, Jz), double exchange interaction (B), zero-field splitting parameters (D, E) and g-tensors can be computed reliably using X-ray structures. In this feature article, we have attempted to provide a holistic view of the modelling of these SH parameters of molecular magnets. The determination of J includes various class of molecules, from di- and polynuclear Mn complexes to the {3d-Gd}, {Gd-Gd} and {Gd-2p} class of complexes. The estimation of anisotropic exchange coupling includes the exchange between an isotropic metal ion and an orbitally degenerate 3d/4d/5d metal ion. The double-exchange section contains some illustrative examples of mixed valance systems, and the section on the estimation of zfs parameters covers some mononuclear transition metal complexes possessing very large axial zfs parameters. The section on the computation of g-anisotropy exclusively covers studies on mononuclear Dy(III) and Er(III) single-ion magnets. The examples depicted in this article clearly illustrate that computational tools not only aid in interpreting and rationalizing the observed magnetic properties but possess the potential to predict new generation MNMs. PMID:27366794

  18. Final Report for Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2013-08-28

    In collaboration with researchers at Vanderbilt University, North Carolina State University, Princeton and Oakridge National Laboratory we developed multiscale modeling and simulation methods capable of modeling the synthesis, assembly, and operation of molecular electronics devices. Our role in this project included the development of coarse-grained molecular and mesoscale models and simulation methods capable of simulating the assembly of millions of organic conducting molecules and other molecular components into nanowires, crossbars, and other organized patterns.

  19. Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Jerzy Bernholc

    2011-02-03

    will some day reach a miniaturization limit, forcing designers of Si-based electronics to pursue increased performance by other means. Any other alternative approach would have the unenviable task of matching the ability of Si technology to pack more than a billion interconnected and addressable devices on a chip the size of a thumbnail. Nevertheless, the prospects of developing alternative approaches to fabricate electronic devices have spurred an ever-increasing pace of fundamental research. One of the promising possibilities is molecular electronics (ME), self-assembled molecular-based electronic systems composed of single-molecule devices in ultra dense, ultra fast molecular-sized components. This project focused on developing accurate, reliable theoretical modeling capabilities for describing molecular electronics devices. The participants in the project are given in Table 1. The primary outcomes of this fundamental computational science grant are publications in the open scientific literature. As listed below, 62 papers have been published from this project. In addition, the research has also been the subject of more than 100 invited talks at conferences, including several plenary or keynote lectures. Many of the goals of the original proposal were completed. Specifically, the multi-disciplinary group developed a unique set of capabilities and tools for investigating electron transport in fabricated and self-assembled nanostructures at multiple length and time scales.

  20. Synthesis, spectral characterization, molecular modeling, biological activity and potentiometric studies of 4-amino-5-mercapto-3-methyl-S-triazole Schiff's base complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghaz, Abdel-Nasser M. A.; Zayed, Mohamed E.; Alharbi, Suliman A.

    2015-03-01

    The Schiff's base derived from condensation of s-triazole (4-amino-5-mercapto-3-methyl-S-triazole) with pyridine-2-aldehyde and their corresponding Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes have been synthesized. The isolated solid complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance, spectral (IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR, mass), magnetic moment and thermal measurements. The IR spectral data suggest that the ligand coordinate in a tridentate manner (SNN) via the one thiol (SH), one pyridine ring and the azomethine (Cdbnd N) groups. The data show that the complexes have composition of ML2 type. The activation of thermodynamic parameters are calculated using Coats-Redfern, Horowitz-Metzger (HM), and Piloyan-Novikova (PN). The octahedral geometry of the complexes is confirmed using DFT method from DMOL3 calculations and ligand field parameters. Protonation constants of Schiff base and stability constants of their binary metal complexes have been determined potentiometrically in 50% DMSO-water media at 25 °C and ionic strength 0.10 M potassium nitrate. The biological activity of these compounds against various fungi has been investigated.

  1. Detection of DNA methyltransferase activity using allosteric molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiting; Zu, Xiaolong; Song, Yanling; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2016-01-21

    Abnormal DNA methylation patterns caused by altered DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity are closely associated with cancer. Herein, using DNA adenine methylation methyltransferase (Dam MTase) as a model analyte, we designed an allosteric molecular beacon (aMB) for sensitive detection of Dam MTase activity. When the specific site in an aMB is methylated by Dam MTase, the probe can be cut by the restriction nuclease DpnI to release a fluorophore labeled aptamer specific for streptavidin (SA) which will bind to SA beads to generate highly fluorescent beads for easy signal readout by a microscope or flow cytometer. However, aMBs maintain a hairpin structure without the binding ability to SA beads in the absence of Dam MTase, leading to weakly fluorescent SA beads. Unlike the existing signal amplified assays, our method is simpler and more convenient. The high performance of the aptamer and the easy bead separation process make this probe superior to other methods for the detection of MTase in complex biological systems. Overall, the proposed method with a detection limit of 0.57 U mL(-1) for Dam MTase shows great potential for further applications in the detection of other MTases, screening of MTase inhibitors, and early diagnosis of cancer.

  2. Synthesis, characterization, molecular modeling and antioxidant activity of Girard‧s T thiosemicarbazide and its complexes with some transition metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gammal, O. A.; Mostafa, M. M.

    2014-06-01

    The chelation behavior of N-{[(allylamino) thiomethyl] hydrazinocarbonylmethyl} trimethylammonium chloride (H3ATHC) towards VO2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and UO22+ ions have been studied. The structures of the complexes were elucidated using elemental analyses, spectral (IR, UV-visible, 1H NMR and ESR and mass) as well as magnetic and thermal measurements. The ligand acted as ON bidentate, ONS tridentate donor forming mononuclear complexes. A tetrahedral geometry for Co2+, square-planar for Ni2+ and Cu2+, an octahedral for Zn2+ and a square-pyramidal arrangement for VO2+ complexes were proposed, respectively. The EPR spectra of Cu2+ and VO2+ complexes confirmed the suggested geometries with values of α2 and β2 indicating that the in-plane σ-bonding and in-plane π-bonding are appreciably covalent, and were consistent with very strong in-plane σ bonding in the complexes. Also, the bond length, bond angle, HOMO, LUMO, dipole moment and charges on the atoms have been calculated. Also, the thermal behavior and kinetic parameters were determined using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. Furthermore, the synthesized compounds were screened for their superoxide-scavenging activity in the PMS/NADH-NBT system as well as their scavenging effect on ABTS (2,2‧-azino-bis(3-ethyl benzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl(DPPH) radicals. Among these compounds, the ligand and Zn2+ complex, exhibited the potent ABTS (2,2‧-azino-bis(3-ethyl benzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical scavenging activity, comparable to that of vitamin C.

  3. A molecular-thermodynamic model for polyelectrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.; Liu, H.; Hu, Y.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte solutions are modeled as freely tangent-jointed, charged hard-sphere chains and corresponding counterions in a continuum medium with permitivity {var_epsilon}. By adopting the sticky-point model, the Helmholtz function for polyelectrolyte solutions is derived through the r-particle cavity-correlation function (CCF) for chains of sticky, charged hard spheres. The r-CCF is approximated by a product of effective nearest-neighbor two-particle CCFs; these are determined from the hypernetted-chain and mean-spherical closures (HNC/MSA) inside and outside the hard core, respectively, for the integral equation theory for electrolytes. The colligative properties are given as explicit functions of a scaling parameter {Gamma} that can be estimated by a simple iteration procedure. Osmotic pressures, osmotic coefficients, and activity coefficients are calculated for model solutions with various chain lengths. They are in good agreement with molecular simulation and experimental results. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. A molecular-thermodynamic model for polyelectrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jianwen; Liu, Honglai; Hu, Ying; Prausnitz, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte solutions are modeled as freely tangent-jointed, charged hard-sphere chains and corresponding counterions in a continuum medium with permitivity ɛ. By adopting the sticky-point model, the Helmholtz function for polyelectrolyte solutions is derived through the r-particle cavity-correlation function (CCF) for chains of sticky, charged hard spheres. The r-CCF is approximated by a product of effective nearest-neighbor two-particle CCFs; these are determined from the hypernetted-chain and mean-spherical closures (HNC/MSA) inside and outside the hard core, respectively, for the integral equation theory for electrolytes. The colligative properties are given as explicit functions of a scaling parameter Γ that can be estimated by a simple iteration procedure. Osmotic pressures, osmotic coefficients, and activity coefficients are calculated for model solutions with various chain lengths. They are in good agreement with molecular simulation and experimental results.

  5. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Modelling of a DNA packaging motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jun; Xie, Ping; Xue, Xiao-Guang; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2009-11-01

    During the assembly of many viruses, a powerful molecular motor packages the genome into a preassembled capsid. The Bacillus subtilis phage phi29 is an excellent model system to investigate the DNA packaging mechanism because of its highly efficient in vitro DNA packaging activity and the development of a single-molecule packaging assay. Here we make use of structural and biochemical experimental data to build a physical model of DNA packaging by the phi29 DNA packaging motor. Based on the model, various dynamic behaviours such as the packaging rate, pause frequency and slip frequency under different ATP concentrations, ADP concentrations, external loads as well as capsid fillings are studied by using Monte Carlo simulation. Good agreement is obtained between the simulated and available experimental results. Moreover, we make testable predictions that should guide future experiments related to motor function.

  6. Fluctuation driven active molecular transport in passive channel proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosztin, Ioan

    2006-03-01

    Living cells interact with their extracellular environment through the cell membrane, which acts as a protective permeability barrier for preserving the internal integrity of the cell. However, cell metabolism requires controlled molecular transport across the cell membrane, a function that is fulfilled by a wide variety of transmembrane proteins, acting as either passive or active transporters. In this talk it is argued that, contrary to the general belief, in active cell membranes passive and spatially asymmetric channel proteins can act as active transporters by consuming energy from nonequilibrium fluctuations fueled by cell metabolism. This assertion is demonstrated in the case of the E. coli aquaglyceroporin GlpF channel protein, whose high resolution crystal structure is manifestly asymmetric. By calculating the glycerol flux through GlpF within the framework of a stochastic model, it is found that, as a result of channel asymmetry, glycerol uptake driven by a concentration gradient is enhanced significantly in the presence of non-equilibrium fluctuations. Furthermore, the enhancement caused by a ratchet-like mechanism is larger for the outward, i.e., from the cytoplasm to the periplasm, flux than for the inward one, suggesting that the same non-equilibrium fluctuations also play an important role in protecting the interior of the cell against poisoning by excess uptake of glycerol. Preliminary data on water and sugar transport through aquaporin and maltoporin channels, respectively, are indicative of the universality of the proposed nonequilibrium-fluctuation-driven active transport mechanism. This work was supported by grants from the Univ. of Missouri Research Board, the Institute for Theoretical Sciences and the Department of Energy (DOE Contract W-7405-ENG-36), and the National Science Foundation (FIBR-0526854).

  7. Phase Behavior of Active Swimmers in Depletants: Molecular Dynamics and Integral Equation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subir K.; Egorov, Sergei A.; Trefz, Benjamin; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    We study the structure and phase behavior of a binary mixture where one of the components is self-propelling in nature. The interparticle interactions in the system are taken from the Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures for which the phase diagram is known. In the current model version, the colloid particles are made active using the Vicsek model for self-propelling particles. The resultant active system is studied by molecular dynamics methods and integral equation theory. Both methods produce results consistent with each other and demonstrate that the Vicsek model-based activity facilitates phase separation, thus, broadening the coexistence region.

  8. Phase behavior of active swimmers in depletants: molecular dynamics and integral equation theory.

    PubMed

    Das, Subir K; Egorov, Sergei A; Trefz, Benjamin; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2014-05-16

    We study the structure and phase behavior of a binary mixture where one of the components is self-propelling in nature. The interparticle interactions in the system are taken from the Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures for which the phase diagram is known. In the current model version, the colloid particles are made active using the Vicsek model for self-propelling particles. The resultant active system is studied by molecular dynamics methods and integral equation theory. Both methods produce results consistent with each other and demonstrate that the Vicsek model-based activity facilitates phase separation, thus, broadening the coexistence region. PMID:24877969

  9. Model calculations for diffuse molecular clouds. [interstellar hydrogen cloud model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Langer, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    A steady state isobaric cloud model is developed. The pressure, thermal, electrical, and chemical balance equations are solved simultaneously with a simple one dimensional approximation to the equation of radiative transfer appropriate to diffuse clouds. Cooling is mainly by CII fine structure transitions, and a variety of heating mechanisms are considered. Particular attention is given to the abundance variation of H2. Inhomogeneous density distributions are obtained because of the attenuation of the interstellar UV field and the conversion from atomic to molecular hyrodgen. The effects of changing the model parameters are described and the applicability of the model to OAO-3 observations is discussed. Good qualitative agreement with the fractional H2 abundance determinations has been obtained. The observed kinetic temperatures near 80 K can also be achieved by grain photoelectron heating. The problem of the electron density is solved taking special account of the various hydrogen ions as well as heavier ones.

  10. Insights from the Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Cellobiohydrolase Cel6A Molecular Structural Model from Aspergillus fumigatus NITDGPKA3.

    PubMed

    Dodda, Subba Reddy; Sarkar, Nibedita; Aikat, Kaustav; Krishnaraj, Navanietha R; Bhattacharjee, Sanchari; Bagchi, Angshuman; Mukhopadhyay, Sudit S

    2016-01-01

    Global demand for bioethanol is increasing tremendously as it could help to replace the conventional fossil fuel and at the same time supporting the bioremediation of huge volume of cellulosic wastes generated from different sources. Ideal genetic engineering approaches are essential to improve the efficacy of the bioethanol production processes for real time applications. A locally isolated fungal strain Aspergillus fumigatus NITDGPKA3 was used in our laboratory for the hydrolysis of lignocellulose with good cellulolytic activity when compared with other contemporary fungal strains. An attempt is made to sequence the cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) of A. fumigatus NITDGPKA3, model its structure to predict its catalytic activity towards improving the protein by genetic engineering approaches. Herein, the structure of the sequenced Cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) of A. fumigatus NITDGPKA3, modelled by homology modelling and its validation is reported. Further the catalytic activity of the modelled CBH enzyme was assessed by molecular docking analysis. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CBH from A. fumigatus NITDGPKA3 belongs to the Glycohydro 6 (Cel6A) super family. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulation suggest the structural and functional mechanism of the enzyme. The structures of both the cellulose binding (CBD) and catalytic domain (CD) have been compared with most widely studied CBH of Trichoderma reesei. The molecular docking with cellulose suggests that Gln 248, Pro 287, Val236, Asn284, and Ala288 are the main amino acids involved in the hydrolysis of the β, 1-4, glycosidic bonds of cellulose. PMID:27109185

  11. Molecular modeling studies of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase nonnucleoside inhibitors: total energy of complexation as a predictor of drug placement and activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kroeger Smith, M. B.; Rouzer, C. A.; Taneyhill, L. A.; Smith, N. A.; Hughes, S. H.; Boyer, P. L.; Janssen, P. A.; Moereels, H.; Koymans, L.; Arnold, E.

    1995-01-01

    Computer modeling studies have been carried out on three nonnucleoside inhibitors complexed with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT), using crystal coordinate data from a subset of the protein surrounding the binding pocket region. Results from the minimizations of solvated complexes of 2-cyclopropyl-4-methyl-5,11-dihydro-5H-dipyrido[3,2-b :2',3'-e][1,4] diazepin-6-one (nevirapine), alpha-anilino-2, 6-dibromophenylacetamide (alpha-APA), and 8-chloro-tetrahydro-imidazo(4,5,1-jk)(1,4)-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thi one (TIBO) show that all three inhibitors maintain a very similar conformational shape, roughly overlay each other in the binding pocket, and appear to function as pi-electron donors to aromatic side-chain residues surrounding the pocket. However, side-chain residues adapt to each bound inhibitor in a highly specific manner, closing down around the surface of the drug to make tight van der Waals contacts. Consequently, the results from the calculated minimizations reveal that only when the inhibitors are modeled in a site constructed from coordinate data obtained from their particular RT complex can the calculated binding energies be relied upon to predict the correct orientation of the drug in the pocket. In the correct site, these binding energies correlate with EC50 values determined for all three inhibitors in our laboratory. Analysis of the components of the binding energy reveals that, for all three inhibitors, solvation of the drug is endothermic, but solvation of the protein is exothermic, and the sum favors complex formation. In general, the protein is energetically more stable and the drug less stable in their complexes as compared to the reactant conformations. For all three inhibitors, interaction with the protein in the complex is highly favorable. Interactions of the inhibitors with individual residues correlate with crystallographic and site-specific mutational data. pi-Stacking interactions are important in

  12. Molecular modeling studies of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase nonnucleoside inhibitors: total energy of complexation as a predictor of drug placement and activity.

    PubMed

    Kroeger Smith, M B; Rouzer, C A; Taneyhill, L A; Smith, N A; Hughes, S H; Boyer, P L; Janssen, P A; Moereels, H; Koymans, L; Arnold, E

    1995-10-01

    Computer modeling studies have been carried out on three nonnucleoside inhibitors complexed with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT), using crystal coordinate data from a subset of the protein surrounding the binding pocket region. Results from the minimizations of solvated complexes of 2-cyclopropyl-4-methyl-5,11-dihydro-5H-dipyrido[3,2-b :2',3'-e][1,4] diazepin-6-one (nevirapine), alpha-anilino-2, 6-dibromophenylacetamide (alpha-APA), and 8-chloro-tetrahydro-imidazo(4,5,1-jk)(1,4)-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thi one (TIBO) show that all three inhibitors maintain a very similar conformational shape, roughly overlay each other in the binding pocket, and appear to function as pi-electron donors to aromatic side-chain residues surrounding the pocket. However, side-chain residues adapt to each bound inhibitor in a highly specific manner, closing down around the surface of the drug to make tight van der Waals contacts. Consequently, the results from the calculated minimizations reveal that only when the inhibitors are modeled in a site constructed from coordinate data obtained from their particular RT complex can the calculated binding energies be relied upon to predict the correct orientation of the drug in the pocket. In the correct site, these binding energies correlate with EC50 values determined for all three inhibitors in our laboratory. Analysis of the components of the binding energy reveals that, for all three inhibitors, solvation of the drug is endothermic, but solvation of the protein is exothermic, and the sum favors complex formation. In general, the protein is energetically more stable and the drug less stable in their complexes as compared to the reactant conformations. For all three inhibitors, interaction with the protein in the complex is highly favorable. Interactions of the inhibitors with individual residues correlate with crystallographic and site-specific mutational data. pi-Stacking interactions are important in

  13. The molecular medicine informatics model (MMIM).

    PubMed

    Hibbert, Marienne; Gibbs, Peter; O'Brien, Terence; Colman, Peter; Merriel, Robert; Rafael, Naomi; Georgeff, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In 2005 a major collaboration in Melbourne, Australia successfully implemented a major medical informatics infrastructure. The convergence of life sciences, healthcare, and information technology is now driving research into the fundamentals of disease causation and toward tailoring individualized treatment. The Molecular Medicine Informatics Model (MMIM) is a 'virtual' research repository of clinical, laboratory and genetic data sets. Integrated data, physically located within independent hospital and research organisations can be searched and queried seamlessly via a federated data integrator. Researchers must gain authorisation to access data, and obtain permission from the data owners before the data can be accessed. The legal and ethical issues surrounding the use of this health data have been addressed so data complies with privacy requirements. The MMIM platform also record links individual cases across multiple institutions and multiple clinical specialties. Significant research outcomes in epilepsy and colorectal cancer have already been enabled by the MMIM research platform. The infrastructure of MMIM enables discovery research to be accessible via the Web with security, intellectual property and privacy addressed.

  14. New models and molecular markers in evaluation of developmental toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Huuskonen, Hannele . E-mail: hannele.huuskonen@sttv.fi

    2005-09-01

    Mammalian and non-mammalian embryos and embryonic stem cells may be used as models in mechanistic studies and in testing embryotoxicity of compounds. In addition to conventional culture methods, genetic modifications and use of molecular markers offer significant advantages in mechanistic studies as well as in developing new test methods for embryotoxicity. Zebrafish model has been used for a long time and at present several applications are available. It is an easy vertebral non-mammalian model, whose genome is largely known and several genetic modifications are easily constructed to study gene expression or knocked down genes. Fluorescent marker proteins can be used also in zebrafish to indicate gene activation in transgenic models. Chemical genetics approach has been developed using zebrafish model. This is a new approach to screen small molecules that regulate signaling pathways. Embryonic stem cells have been used in mechanistic studies and mouse embryonic stem cell test has been validated to study embryotoxicity in vitro. This method has been improved using quantitative measurements of molecular endpoints by real-time RT-PCR or fluorescent activated cell sorting methods (FACS). Methods facilitating differentiation to several different cell types are available. We have studied preimplantation mouse embryos as a possible model for in vitro testing. In this method, superovulated and in vivo fertilized preimplantation embryos were collected at morula stage and cultured up to blastocysts. The mouse preimplantation culture test was improved by quantitative gene expression measurement using two-step real-time RT-PCR methods. New endpoints improve the tests of in vitro embryotoxicity because subjective assessments are replaced by objective measurements. In addition, automation is possible and less time is needed for analysis. Thus, high throughput screening will come possible to test large numbers of compounds.

  15. 4,6-Diphenylpyridines as Promising Novel Anti-Influenza Agents Targeting the PA-PB1 Protein-Protein Interaction: Structure-Activity Relationships Exploration with the Aid of Molecular Modeling.

    PubMed

    Trist, Iuni M L; Nannetti, Giulio; Tintori, Cristina; Fallacara, Anna Lucia; Deodato, Davide; Mercorelli, Beatrice; Palù, Giorgio; Wijtmans, Maikel; Gospodova, Tzveta; Edink, Ewald; Verheij, Mark; de Esch, Iwan; Viteva, Lilia; Loregian, Arianna; Botta, Maurizio

    2016-03-24

    Influenza is an infectious disease that represents an important public health burden, with high impact on the global morbidity, mortality, and economy. The poor protection and the need of annual updating of the anti-influenza vaccine, added to the rapid emergence of viral strains resistant to current therapy make the need for antiviral drugs with novel mechanisms of action compelling. In this regard, the viral RNA polymerase is an attractive target that allows the design of selective compounds with reduced risk of resistance. In previous studies we showed that the inhibition of the polymerase acidic protein-basic protein 1 (PA-PB1) interaction is a promising strategy for the development of anti-influenza agents. Starting from the previously identified 3-cyano-4,6-diphenyl-pyridines, we chemically modified this scaffold and explored its structure-activity relationships. Noncytotoxic compounds with both the ability of disrupting the PA-PB1 interaction and antiviral activity were identified, and their mechanism of target binding was clarified with molecular modeling simulations. PMID:26924568

  16. Synthesis, spectral characterization, molecular modeling and in vitro antibacterial activity of complexes designed from O2, NO and NO donor Schiff-base ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gammal, Ola A.; Abu El-Reash, G.; Ahmed, S. F.

    2015-01-01

    A new chelating agent, N‧-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-2-oxo-2-(phenylamino)acetohydrazide (H2OMPH) and its complexes with Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Hg(II) and U(IV)O22+ ions have been prepared and characterized by conventional techniques. The spectral data indicated that the ligand coordinates as neutral bidentate with Cu(II), Mn(II), U(IV)O22+ and Hg(II), neutral tridentate with Ni(II), mononegative tridentate with Co(II) and binegative tetradentate with Zn(II) ions. On basis of magnetic and electronic spectral data an octahedral geometry for Mn(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes and a square planar geometry for Cu(II) complex have been proposed and confirmed by applying geometry optimization and conformational analysis. The protonation constants of H2OMPH and the stepwise stability constants of its complexes are calculated at 298, 308 and 318 k as well as their thermodynamic parameters. Also, the Kinetic parameters (Ea, A, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG*) were determined for each thermal degradation stage of some complexes using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. Moreover, the ligand and some complexes were screened for in vitro antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus epidermalies (St. epid); Streptococcus pyagenies (Strp. py.) as Gram +ve bacteria and Escherichia coli (E. coli); Klebsiella spp. (kleb. spp.) as Gram -ve bacteria using inhibition zone diameter.

  17. Synthesis, spectral characterization, molecular modeling and in vitro antibacterial activity of complexes designed from OO, NO and NN donor Schiff-base ligand [corrected].

    PubMed

    El-Gammal, Ola A; Abu El-Reash, G; Ahmed, S F

    2015-01-25

    A new chelating agent, N'-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-2-oxo-2-(phenylamino)acetohydrazide (H2OMPH) and its complexes with Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Hg(II) and U(IV)O2(2+) ions have been prepared and characterized by conventional techniques. The spectral data indicated that the ligand coordinates as neutral bidentate with Cu(II), Mn(II), U(IV)O2(2+) and Hg(II), neutral tridentate with Ni(II), mononegative tridentate with Co(II) and binegative tetradentate with Zn(II) ions. On basis of magnetic and electronic spectral data an octahedral geometry for Mn(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes and a square planar geometry for Cu(II) complex have been proposed and confirmed by applying geometry optimization and conformational analysis. The protonation constants of H2OMPH and the stepwise stability constants of its complexes are calculated at 298, 308 and 318 k as well as their thermodynamic parameters. Also, the Kinetic parameters (Ea, A, ΔH(*), ΔS(*) and ΔG(*)) were determined for each thermal degradation stage of some complexes using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. Moreover, the ligand and some complexes were screened for in vitro antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus epidermalies (St. epid); Streptococcus pyagenies (Strp. py.) as Gram +ve bacteria and Escherichia coli (E. coli); Klebsiella spp. (kleb. spp.) as Gram -ve bacteria using inhibition zone diameter.

  18. Fluorescence molecular tomography resolves protease activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Tung, Ching-Hsuan; Bremer, Christoph; Weissleder, Ralph

    2002-07-01

    Systematic efforts are under way to develop novel technologies that would allow molecular sensing in intact organisms in vivo. Using near-infrared fluorescent molecular beacons and inversion techniques that take into account the diffuse nature of photon propagation in tissue, we were able to obtain three-dimensional in vivo images of a protease in orthopic gliomas. We demonstrate that enzyme-activatable fluorochromes can be detected with high positional accuracy in deep tissues, that molecular specificities of different beacons towards enzymes can be resolved and that tomography of beacon activation is linearly related to enzyme concentration. The tomographic imaging method offers a range of new capabilities for studying biological function; for example, identifying molecular-expression patterns by multispectral imaging or continuously monitoring the efficacy of therapeutic drugs.

  19. Metal based pharmacologically active agents: Synthesis, structural characterization, molecular modeling, CT-DNA binding studies and in vitro antimicrobial screening of iron(II) bromosalicylidene amino acid chelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.; Ismael, Mohamed; Seleem, Amin Abdou

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, great interest has been focused on Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes as cytotoxic and antitumor drugs. Thus a series of new iron(II) complexes based on Schiff bases amino acids ligands have been designed and synthesized from condensation of 5-bromosalicylaldehyde (bs) and α-amino acids (L-alanine (ala), L-phenylalanine (phala), L-aspartic acid (aspa), L-histidine (his) and L-arginine (arg)). The structure of the investigated iron(II) complexes was elucidated using elemental analyses, infrared, ultraviolet-visible, thermogravimetric analysis, as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Moreover, the stoichiometry and the stability constants of the prepared complexes have been determined spectrophotometrically. The results suggest that 5-bromosalicylaldehyde amino acid Schiff bases (bs:aa) behave as dibasic tridentate ONO ligands and coordinate to Fe(II) in octahedral geometry according to the general formula [Fe(bs:aa)2]ṡnH2O. The conductivity values between 37 and 64 ohm-1 mol-1 cm2 in ethanol imply the presence of nonelectrolyte species. The structure of the complexes was validated using quantum mechanics calculations based on accurate DFT methods. Geometry optimization of the Fe-Schiff base amino acid complexes showed that all complexes had octahedral coordination. In addition, the interaction of these complexes with (CT-DNA) was investigated at pH = 7.2, by using UV-vis absorption, viscosity and agarose gel electrophoresis measurements. Results indicated that the investigated complexes strongly bind to calf thymus DNA via intercalative mode and showed a different DNA binding according to the sequence: bsari > bshi > bsali > bsasi > bsphali. Moreover, the prepared compounds are screened for their in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity against three types of bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus and three types of anti fungal cultures, Penicillium purpurogenium, Aspergillus

  20. Metal based pharmacologically active agents: synthesis, structural characterization, molecular modeling, CT-DNA binding studies and in vitro antimicrobial screening of iron(II) bromosalicylidene amino acid chelates.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H; El-Khatib, Rafat M; Nassr, Lobna A E; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M; Ismael, Mohamed; Seleem, Amin Abdou

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, great interest has been focused on Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes as cytotoxic and antitumor drugs. Thus a series of new iron(II) complexes based on Schiff bases amino acids ligands have been designed and synthesized from condensation of 5-bromosalicylaldehyde (bs) and α-amino acids (L-alanine (ala), L-phenylalanine (phala), L-aspartic acid (aspa), L-histidine (his) and L-arginine (arg)). The structure of the investigated iron(II) complexes was elucidated using elemental analyses, infrared, ultraviolet-visible, thermogravimetric analysis, as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Moreover, the stoichiometry and the stability constants of the prepared complexes have been determined spectrophotometrically. The results suggest that 5-bromosalicylaldehyde amino acid Schiff bases (bs:aa) behave as dibasic tridentate ONO ligands and coordinate to Fe(II) in octahedral geometry according to the general formula [Fe(bs:aa)2]·nH2O. The conductivity values between 37 and 64 ohm(-1) mol(-1) cm(2) in ethanol imply the presence of nonelectrolyte species. The structure of the complexes was validated using quantum mechanics calculations based on accurate DFT methods. Geometry optimization of the Fe-Schiff base amino acid complexes showed that all complexes had octahedral coordination. In addition, the interaction of these complexes with (CT-DNA) was investigated at pH=7.2, by using UV-vis absorption, viscosity and agarose gel electrophoresis measurements. Results indicated that the investigated complexes strongly bind to calf thymus DNA via intercalative mode and showed a different DNA binding according to the sequence: bsari>bshi>bsali>bsasi>bsphali. Moreover, the prepared compounds are screened for their in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity against three types of bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus and three types of anti fungal cultures, Penicillium purpurogenium, Aspergillus flavus

  1. Digital Learning Material for Model Building in Molecular Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, Tinri; Janssen, Fred; Hartog, Rob; Bisseling, Ton

    2005-01-01

    Building models to describe processes forms an essential part of molecular biology research. However, in molecular biology curricula little attention is generally being paid to the development of this skill. In order to provide students the opportunity to improve their model building skills, we decided to develop a number of digital cases about…

  2. Molecular modeling of PMR-15 polyimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkada Ravindranath, Pruthul

    PMR-15 polyimide is a polymer that is used as a matrix in composites. These composites with PMR-15 matrices are called advanced polymer matrix composite that is abundantly used in the aerospace and electronics industries because of its high temperature resistivity. Apart from having high temperature sustainability, PMR-15 composites also display good thermal-oxidative stability, mechanical properties, processability and low costs, which makes it a suitable material for manufacturing aircraft structures. PMR-15 uses the reverse Diels-Alder (RDA) method for crosslinking which provides it with the groundwork for its distinctive thermal stability and a range of 280--300°C use temperature. Regardless of such desirable properties, this material has a number of limitations that compromises its application on a large scale basis. PMR-15 composites has been known to be very vulnerable to micro-cracking at inter and intra-laminar cracking. But the major factor that hinders its demand is PMR-15's carcinogenic constituent, methylene dianilineme (MDA), also a liver toxin. The necessity of providing a safe working environment during its production adds up to the cost of this material. In this study, Molecular Dynamics and Energy Minimization techniques are utilized to simulate a structure of PMR-15 at a given density of 1.324 g/cc and an attempt to recreate the polyimide to reduce the number of experimental testing and hence subdue the health hazards as well as the cost involved in its production. Even though this study does not involve in validating any mechanical properties of the model, it could be used in future for the validation of its properties and further testing for different properties like aging, microcracking, creep etc.

  3. The Molecular Medicine Informatics Model (MMIM).

    PubMed

    Hibbert, Marienne; Gibbs, Peter; O'Brien, Terence; Colman, Peter; Merriel, Robert; Rafael, Naomi; Georgeff, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, a major collaboration in Melbourne Australia successfully completed implementing a major medical informatics infrastructure - this is now being used for discovery research and has won significant expansion funding for 2006 - 2009. The convergence of life sciences, healthcare, and information technology is now driving research into the fundamentals of disease causation. Key to enabling this is collating data in sufficient numbers of patients to ensure studies are adequately powered. The Molecular Medicine Informatics Model (MMIM) is a 'virtual' research repository of clinical, laboratory and genetic data sets. Integrated data, physically located within independent hospital and research organisations can be searched and queried seamlessly via a federated data integrator. Researchers must gain authorisation to access data, and inform/obtain permission from the data owners, before the data can be accessed. The legal and ethical issues surrounding the use of this health data have been addressed so data complies with privacy requirements. The MMIM platform has also solved the issue of record linking individual cases and integrating data sources across multiple institutions and multiple clinical specialties. Significant research outcomes already enabled by the MMIM research platform include epilepsy seizure analyses for responders / non responders to therapy; sensitivity of faecal occult blood testing for asymptomatic colorectal cancer and advanced adenomas over a 25-year experience in colorectal cancer screening; subsite-specific colorectal cancer in diabetic and non diabetic patients; and the influence of language spoken on colorectal cancer diagnosis, management and outcomes. Ultimately the infrastructure of MMIM enables discovery research to be accessible via the Web with security, intellectual property and privacy addressed.

  4. Deciphering molecular mechanism underlying hypolipidemic activity of echinocystic Acid.

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Lai, Peng; Du, Jun-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study showed that a triterpene mixture, consisting of echinocystic acid (EA) and oleanolic acid (OA) at a ratio of 4 : 1, dose-dependently ameliorated the hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with high fat/high cholesterol diets. This study was aimed at exploring the mechanisms underlying antihyperlipidemic effect of EA. Molecular docking simulation of EA was performed using Molegro Virtual Docker (version: 4.3.0) to investigate the potential targets related to lipid metabolism. Based on the molecular docking information, isotope labeling method or spectrophotometry was applied to examine the effect of EA on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) in rat liver microsomes. Our results revealed a strong affinity of EA towards ACAT and DGAT in molecular docking analysis, while low binding affinity existed between EA and HMG-CoA reductase as well as between EA and cholesteryl ester transfer protein. Consistent with the results of molecular docking, in vitro enzyme activity assays showed that EA inhibited ACAT and DGAT, with IC50 values of 103 and 139  μ M, respectively, and exhibited no significant effect on HMG-CoA reductase activity. The present findings suggest that EA may exert hypolipidemic effect by inhibiting the activity of ACAT and DGAT. PMID:24669228

  5. Homology Modeling and Molecular Docking for the Science Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    McDougal, Owen M.; Comia, Nic; Sambasivarao, S.V.; Remm, Andrew; Mallory, Chris; Oxford, Julia Thom; Maupin, C. Mark; Andersen, Tim

    2015-01-01

    DockoMatic 2.0 is a powerful open source software program (downloadable from sourceforge.net) that simplifies the exploration of computational biochemistry. This manuscript describes a practical tutorial for use in the undergraduate curriculum that introduces students to macromolecular structure creation, ligand binding calculations, and visualization of docking results. A student procedure is provided that illustrates use of DockoMatic to create a homology model for the amino propeptide region (223 amino acids with two disulfide bonds) of collagen α1 (XI), followed by molecular docking of the commercial drug Arixtra® to the homology model of the amino propeptide domain of collagen α1 (XI), and finally, analysis of the results of the docking experiment. The activities and supplemental materials described are intended to educate students in the use of computational tools to create and investigate homology models for other systems of interest and to train students to be proficient with molecular docking and analyzing results. The tutorial also serves as a foundation for investigators seeking to explore the viability of using computational biochemistry to study their receptor-ligand binding motifs. PMID:24376157

  6. Modeling Natural Anti-Inflammatory Compounds by Molecular Topology

    PubMed Central

    Galvez-Llompart, María; Zanni, Riccardo; García-Domenech, Ramón

    2011-01-01

    One of the main pharmacological problems today in the treatment of chronic inflammation diseases consists of the fact that anti-inflammatory drugs usually exhibit side effects. The natural products offer a great hope in the identification of bioactive lead compounds and their development into drugs for treating inflammatory diseases. Computer-aided drug design has proved to be a very useful tool for discovering new drugs and, specifically, Molecular Topology has become a good technique for such a goal. A topological-mathematical model, obtained by linear discriminant analysis, has been developed for the search of new anti-inflammatory natural compounds. An external validation obtained with the remaining compounds (those not used in building up the model), has been carried out. Finally, a virtual screening on natural products was performed and 74 compounds showed actual anti-inflammatory activity. From them, 54 had been previously described as anti-inflammatory in the literature. This can be seen as a plus in the model validation and as a reinforcement of the role of Molecular Topology as an efficient tool for the discovery of new anti-inflammatory natural compounds. PMID:22272145

  7. Modeling Complex Workflow in Molecular Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Gomah, Mohamed E.; Turley, James P.; Lu, Huimin; Jones, Dan

    2010-01-01

    One of the hurdles to achieving personalized medicine has been implementing the laboratory processes for performing and reporting complex molecular tests. The rapidly changing test rosters and complex analysis platforms in molecular diagnostics have meant that many clinical laboratories still use labor-intensive manual processing and testing without the level of automation seen in high-volume chemistry and hematology testing. We provide here a discussion of design requirements and the results of implementation of a suite of lab management tools that incorporate the many elements required for use of molecular diagnostics in personalized medicine, particularly in cancer. These applications provide the functionality required for sample accessioning and tracking, material generation, and testing that are particular to the evolving needs of individualized molecular diagnostics. On implementation, the applications described here resulted in improvements in the turn-around time for reporting of more complex molecular test sets, and significant changes in the workflow. Therefore, careful mapping of workflow can permit design of software applications that simplify even the complex demands of specialized molecular testing. By incorporating design features for order review, software tools can permit a more personalized approach to sample handling and test selection without compromising efficiency. PMID:20007844

  8. Charge separation promoted activation of molecular oxygen by neutral gold clusters.

    PubMed

    Woodham, Alex P; Meijer, Gerard; Fielicke, André

    2013-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles and sub-nanoparticles famously act as highly efficient and selective low-temperature oxidation catalysts with molecular oxygen, in stark contrast to the nobility of the bulk phase. The origins of this activity and the nature of the active species remain open questions. Gas-phase studies of isolated gold clusters hold promise for disentangling these problems. Here we address the interaction of neutral gold clusters (Au(n); 4 ≤ n ≤ 21) with molecular oxygen by probing the highly characteristic O-O vibrational stretch frequencies. This reveals that for selected cluster sizes the oxygen is highly activated with respect to the free moiety. Complementary quantum chemical calculations provide evidence for substantial electron transfer to the O(2) unit and concomitant rearrangement of the parent gold cluster structure upon binding and activation. This gives evidence for a model of the interaction between neutral gold clusters and molecular oxygen.

  9. Molecular imaging of macrophage enzyme activity in cardiac inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad; Pulli, Benjamin; Chen, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is highly advantageous as various insidious inflammatory events can be imaged in a serial and quantitative fashion. Combined with the conventional imaging modalities like computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) and nuclear imaging, it helps us resolve the extent of ongoing pathology, quantify inflammation and predict outcome. Macrophages are increasingly gaining importance as an imaging biomarker in inflammatory cardiovascular diseases. Macrophages, recruited to the site of injury, internalize necrotic or foreign material. Along with phagocytosis, activated macrophages release proteolytic enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cathepsins into the extracellular environment. Pro-inflammatory monocytes and macrophages also induce tissue oxidative damage through the inflammatory enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO). In this review we will highlight recent advances in molecular macrophage imaging. Particular stress will be given to macrophage functional and enzymatic activity imaging which targets phagocytosis, proteolysis and myeloperoxidase activity imaging. PMID:24729833

  10. Understanding polycaroboxylate interactions with counterions: A molecular modeling approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzwater, S.; Freeman, M.B.

    1993-12-31

    Low molecular weight polycarboyxlates, such as poly(acrylic acid), have utility as dispersants in a variety of commercial applications including home laundry detergents, mineral processing and water treatment. In general, counterions (Ca, Mg, Fe, etc.) are unavoidable in these applications and often dictate the polymer composition and molecular weight necessary for successful performance. The authors have been investigating the interaction of polycarboxylates with counterions in order to better understand how that interaction impacts on the dispersant properties of a polymer. Using computer modeling, it can be seen how molecular geometry, molecular dynamics, and the shape/polarity of the molecular surface are affected by counterion binding and polymer composition. The authors can then combine information from the modeling with experimental information and literature concepts to provide a direction toward the synthesis of improved low molecular weight polycarboxylate dispersants.

  11. Fluctuation theorem for the flashing ratchet model of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, D.; Mallick, K.

    2009-08-01

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy derived from the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into mechanical energy. A well-studied model of a molecular motor is the flashing ratchet model. We show that this model exhibits a fluctuation relation known as the Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry. Our study highlights the fact that the symmetry is present only if the chemical and mechanical degrees of freedom are both included in the description.

  12. GPU-Accelerated Molecular Modeling Coming Of Age

    PubMed Central

    Stone, John E.; Hardy, David J.; Ufimtsev, Ivan S.

    2010-01-01

    Graphics processing units (GPUs) have traditionally been used in molecular modeling solely for visualization of molecular structures and animation of trajectories resulting from molecular dynamics simulations. Modern GPUs have evolved into fully programmable, massively parallel co-processors that can now be exploited to accelerate many scientific computations, typically providing about one order of magnitude speedup over CPU code and in special cases providing speedups of two orders of magnitude. This paper surveys the development of molecular modeling algorithms that leverage GPU computing, the advances already made and remaining issues to be resolved, and the continuing evolution of GPU technology that promises to become even more useful to molecular modeling. Hardware acceleration with commodity GPUs is expected to benefit the overall computational biology community by bringing teraflops performance to desktop workstations and in some cases potentially changing what were formerly batch-mode computational jobs into interactive tasks. PMID:20675161

  13. Molecular Modeling and Computational Chemistry at Humboldt State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paselk, Richard A.; Zoellner, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a molecular modeling and computational chemistry (MM&CC) facility for undergraduate instruction and research at Humboldt State University. This facility complex allows the introduction of MM&CC throughout the chemistry curriculum with tailored experiments in general, organic, and inorganic courses as well as a new molecular modeling…

  14. Nanoindentation of virus capsids in a molecular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Robbins, Mark O.

    2010-01-01

    A molecular-level model is used to study the mechanical response of empty cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) and cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsids. The model is based on the native structure of the proteins that constitute the capsids and is described in terms of the Cα atoms. Nanoindentation by a large tip is modeled as compression between parallel plates. Plots of the compressive force versus plate separation for CCMV are qualitatively consistent with continuum models and experiments, showing an elastic region followed by an irreversible drop in force. The mechanical response of CPMV has not been studied, but the molecular model predicts an order of magnitude higher stiffness and a much shorter elastic region than for CCMV. These large changes result from small structural changes that increase the number of bonds by only 30% and would be difficult to capture in continuum models. Direct comparison of local deformations in continuum and molecular models of CCMV shows that the molecular model undergoes a gradual symmetry breaking rotation and accommodates more strain near the walls than the continuum model. The irreversible drop in force at small separations is associated with rupturing nearly all of the bonds between capsid proteins in the molecular model, while a buckling transition is observed in continuum models.

  15. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning Macrophage Activation during Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Amy F.; Miron, Veronique E.

    2016-01-01

    Remyelination is an example of central nervous system (CNS) regeneration, whereby myelin is restored around demyelinated axons, re-establishing saltatory conduction and trophic/metabolic support. In progressive multiple sclerosis, remyelination is limited or fails altogether which is considered to contribute to axonal damage/loss and consequent disability. Macrophages have critical roles in both CNS damage and regeneration, such as remyelination. This diverse range in functions reflects the ability of macrophages to acquire tissue microenvironment-specific activation states. This activation is dynamically regulated during efficient regeneration, with a switch from pro-inflammatory to inflammation-resolution/pro-regenerative phenotypes. Although, some molecules and pathways have been implicated in the dynamic activation of macrophages, such as NFκB, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning plasticity of macrophage activation are unclear. Identifying mechanisms regulating macrophage activation to pro-regenerative phenotypes may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis. PMID:27446913

  16. Insights from molecular modeling and dynamics simulation of pathogen resistance (R) protein from brinjal

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Dipty; Nain, Vikrant; Sahi, Shakti; Verma, Anju; Sharma, Priyanka; Sharma, Prakash Chand; Kumar, Polumetla Ananda

    2011-01-01

    Resistance (R) protein recognizes molecular signature of pathogen infection and activates downstream hypersensitive response signalling in plants. R protein works as a molecular switch for pathogen defence signalling and represent one of the largest plant gene family. Hence, understanding molecular structure and function of R proteins has been of paramount importance for plant biologists. The present study is aimed at predicting structure of R proteins signalling domains (CC-NBS) by creating a homology model, refining and optimising the model by molecular dynamics simulation and comparing ADP and ATP binding. Based on sequence similarity with proteins of known structures, CC-NBS domains were initially modelled using CED- 4 (cell death abnormality protein) and APAF-1 (apoptotic protease activating factor) as multiple templates. The final CC-NBS structural model was built and optimized by molecular dynamic simulation for 5 nanoseconds (ns). Docking of ADP and ATP at active site shows that both ligand bind specifically with same residues and with minor difference (1 Kcal/mol) in binding energy. Sharing of binding site by ADP and ATP and low difference in their binding site makes CC-NBS suitable for working as molecular switch. Furthermore, structural superimposition elucidate that CC-NBS and CARD (caspase recruitment domains) domain of CED-4 have low RMSD value of 0.9 A° Availability of 3D structural model for both CC and NBS domains will . help in getting deeper insight in these pathogen defence genes. PMID:21383919

  17. Meet the Molecules in Chocolate: Informal Opportunities for Building Thematic Molecular Models with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amey, Jennifer R.; Fletcher, Matthew D.; Fletcher, Rachael V.; Jones, Alison; Roberts, Erica W.; Roberts, Ieuan O.

    2008-01-01

    We describe the development and use of a molecular model building activity with a chocolate theme, suitable for a public presentation of chemistry through interaction with visitors to science festivals and museums, and as a special classroom activity during science weeks, and so forth. (Contains 3 figures.)

  18. Antibacterial kaolinite/urea/chlorhexidine nanocomposites: Experiment and molecular modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holešová, Sylva; Valášková, Marta; Hlaváč, Dominik; Madejová, Jana; Samlíková, Magda; Tokarský, Jonáš; Pazdziora, Erich

    2014-06-01

    Clay minerals are commonly used materials in pharmaceutical production both as inorganic carriers or active agents. The purpose of this study is the preparation and characterization of clay/antibacterial drug hybrids which can be further included in drug delivery systems for treatment oral infections. Novel nanocomposites with antibacterial properties were successfully prepared by ion exchange reaction from two types of kaolinite/urea intercalates and chlorhexidine diacetate. Intercalation compounds of kaolinite were prepared by reaction with solid urea in the absence of solvents (dry method) as well as with urea aqueous solution (wet method). The antibacterial activity of two prepared samples against Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was evaluated by finding the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Antibacterial studies of both samples showed the lowest MIC values (0.01%, w/v) after 1 day against E. faecalis, E. coli and S. aureus. A slightly worse antibacterial activity was observed against P. aeruginosa (MIC 0.12%, w/v) after 1 day. Since samples showed very good antibacterial activity, especially after 1 day of action, this means that these samples can be used as long-acting antibacterial materials. Prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The experimental data are supported by results of molecular modelling.

  19. Molecular dissection of AKT activation in lung cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanan; Du, Jinyan; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2013-01-01

    AKT is a critical signaling node downstream of PI3K, which is often activated in cancer. We analyzed the state of activation of AKT in 80 human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines under serum starvation conditions. We identified 13 lines which showed persistent AKT activation in the absence of serum. In 12 of the 13 lines, AKT activation could be attributed to loss of PTEN, activating mutation in EGFR or PIK3CA, or amplification of ERBB2. HCC2429 was the only cell line that had no alterations in those genes, but had high phospho-AKT(Ser473) levels under serum starvation conditions. However, the activation of AKT in HCC2429 was PI3K- and mTORC2-dependent based upon use of specific inhibitors. Kinome tyrosine phosphorylation profiling showed that both Notch and SRC were highly activated in this cell line. Despite the activation of Notch, AKT activation and cell survival were not affected by Notch inhibitors DAPT or Compound E. In contrast, SRC inhibitors PP2 and dasatinib both significantly decreased pAKT(Ser473) levels and reduced cell survival by inducing apoptosis. Further, a combination of SRC and mTOR inhibition synergistically blocked activation of AKT and induced apoptosis. Over-expression of SRC has been identified previously in human lung cancers, and these results suggest that a combination of SRC and mTOR inhibitors may have unique therapeutic benefit for a subset of lung cancers with these molecular features. PMID:23319332

  20. Cellular automata with object-oriented features for parallel molecular network modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Wu, Yinghui; Huang, Sui; Sun, Yan; Dhar, Pawan

    2005-06-01

    Cellular automata are an important modeling paradigm for studying the dynamics of large, parallel systems composed of multiple, interacting components. However, to model biological systems, cellular automata need to be extended beyond the large-scale parallelism and intensive communication in order to capture two fundamental properties characteristic of complex biological systems: hierarchy and heterogeneity. This paper proposes extensions to a cellular automata language, Cellang, to meet this purpose. The extended language, with object-oriented features, can be used to describe the structure and activity of parallel molecular networks within cells. Capabilities of this new programming language include object structure to define molecular programs within a cell, floating-point data type and mathematical functions to perform quantitative computation, message passing capability to describe molecular interactions, as well as new operators, statements, and built-in functions. We discuss relevant programming issues of these features, including the object-oriented description of molecular interactions with molecule encapsulation, message passing, and the description of heterogeneity and anisotropy at the cell and molecule levels. By enabling the integration of modeling at the molecular level with system behavior at cell, tissue, organ, or even organism levels, the program will help improve our understanding of how complex and dynamic biological activities are generated and controlled by parallel functioning of molecular networks. Index Terms-Cellular automata, modeling, molecular network, object-oriented. PMID:16117022

  1. Molecular structure descriptors in the computer-aided design of biologically active compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raevsky, Oleg A.

    1999-06-01

    The current state of description of molecular structure in computer-aided molecular design of biologically active compounds by means of descriptors is analysed. The information contents of descriptors increases in the following sequence: element-level descriptors-structural formulae descriptors-electronic structure descriptors-molecular shape descriptors-intermolecular interaction descriptors. Each subsequent class of descriptors normally covers information contained in the previous-level ones. It is emphasised that it is practically impossible to describe all the features of a molecular structure in terms of any single class of descriptors. It is recommended to optimise the number of descriptors used by means of appropriate statistical procedures and characteristics of structure-property models based on these descriptors. The bibliography includes 371 references.

  2. Constructing Molecular Models with Low-Cost Toy Beads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Pun-hon; Wong, Siu-ling; Mak, Se-yuen

    2012-01-01

    In teaching the science of the nano world, ball-and-stick molecular models are frequently used as 3D representations of molecules. Unlike a chemical formula, a molecular model allows us to visualise the 3D shape of the molecule and the relative positions of its atoms, the bonds between atoms and why a pair of mirror isomers with the same atoms,…

  3. A dynamic styrofoam-ball model for simulating molecular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Se-yuen; Cheung, Derek

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a simple styrofoam-ball model that can be used for simulating molecular motion in all three states. As the foam balls are driven by a vibrator that is in turn driven by a signal generator, the frequency and the amplitude of vibration can be adjusted independently. Thus, the model is appropriate for simulating molecular motion in the liquid state, which is a combination of vibration and meandering motion.

  4. Incorporation of small molecular weight active agents into polymeric components.

    PubMed

    Iconomopoulou, Sofia M; Kallitsis, Joannis K; Voyiatzis, George A

    2008-01-01

    The incorporation of small molecular weight active agents into polymeric matrixes bearing controlled release characteristics represents an interesting strategy with numerous useful applications. Antimicrobials, biocides, fungicides or drugs, encapsulated into erodible or non-erodible polymeric micro-spheres, micro-capsules and micro-shells or/and embedded into continuous polymeric matrixes, are controlled released either by particular degradation routes or/and by specific stimuli. Cross-linking, curing or micro-porosity generating agents acting during polymerization impart additional controlled encapsulation characteristics to the active substances. Release modulating agents, like retardants or carrier materials used as vehicles are often encapsulated into microspheres or dispersed within polymeric compositions for the controlled introduction of an active agent into a liquid-based medium. The aim of this review is to reveal relevant strategies reported in recent patents on the encapsulation or incorporation of low molecular weight active agents into the matrix of polymers bearing controlled release characteristics. The inventions described implicate the formation of both erodible and non erodible polymer microparticles that contain active ingredients. Modification of polymer matrix and inorganic porous carriers represent pertinent major strategies that have been also developed and patented.

  5. Modeling approaches for active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, Sven; Atzrodt, Heiko; Mayer, Dirk; Thomaier, Martin

    2006-03-01

    To solve a wide range of vibration problems with the active structures technology, different simulation approaches for several models are needed. The selection of an appropriate modeling strategy is depending, amongst others, on the frequency range, the modal density and the control target. An active system consists of several components: the mechanical structure, at least one sensor and actuator, signal conditioning electronics and the controller. For each individual part of the active system the simulation approaches can be different. To integrate the several modeling approaches into an active system simulation and to ensure a highly efficient and accurate calculation, all sub models must harmonize. For this purpose, structural models considered in this article are modal state-space formulations for the lower frequency range and transfer function based models for the higher frequency range. The modal state-space formulations are derived from finite element models and/or experimental modal analyses. Consequently, the structure models which are based on transfer functions are directly derived from measurements. The transfer functions are identified with the Steiglitz-McBride iteration method. To convert them from the z-domain to the s-domain a least squares solution is implemented. An analytical approach is used to derive models of active interfaces. These models are transferred into impedance formulations. To couple mechanical and electrical sub-systems with the active materials, the concept of impedance modeling was successfully tested. The impedance models are enhanced by adapting them to adequate measurements. The controller design strongly depends on the frequency range and the number of modes to be controlled. To control systems with a small number of modes, techniques such as active damping or independent modal space control may be used, whereas in the case of systems with a large number of modes or with modes that are not well separated, other control

  6. Noninvasive Molecular Imaging of Disease Activity in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dweck, Marc R; Aikawa, Elena; Newby, David E; Tarkin, Jason M; Rudd, James H F; Narula, Jagat; Fayad, Zahi A

    2016-07-01

    Major focus has been placed on the identification of vulnerable plaques as a means of improving the prediction of myocardial infarction. However, this strategy has recently been questioned on the basis that the majority of these individual coronary lesions do not in fact go on to cause clinical events. Attention is, therefore, shifting to alternative imaging modalities that might provide a more complete pan-coronary assessment of the atherosclerotic disease process. These include markers of disease activity with the potential to discriminate between patients with stable burnt-out disease that is no longer metabolically active and those with active atheroma, faster disease progression, and increased risk of infarction. This review will examine how novel molecular imaging approaches can provide such assessments, focusing on inflammation and microcalcification activity, the importance of these processes to coronary atherosclerosis, and the advantages and challenges posed by these techniques. PMID:27390335

  7. Pseudoceramide stimulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α expression in a murine model of atopic dermatitis: molecular basis underlying the anti-inflammatory effect and the preventive effect against steroid-induced barrier impairment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Eun; Jung, Min Kyung; Oh, Seung Joon; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Lee, Seung Hun

    2015-11-01

    Topical pseudoceramides are successfully used in skin barrier repair therapy for atopic dermatitis (AD) and demonstrated to reduce the adverse effects of topical glucocorticoids (GC). However, the molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood. We investigated whether PC-9S (myristoyl/palmitoyloxostearamide/arachamide MEA, Neopharm, Daejeon, Korea), one of the synthetic pseudoceramides, could stimulate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α expression in a hapten [oxazolone (oxa)]-induced AD murine model (oxa-AD mice) and subsequently improved permeability barrier, reduced inflammation, and increased antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) expression. Normal hairless mice and oxa-AD mice were topically treated twice daily with either PC-9S-containing physiologic lipid mixture (PLM), vehicle (PLM), or PPARα agonist for 4 days. Topical PC-9S significantly increased PPARα expression in mouse epidermis in vivo and in oxa-AD mice skin comparable with PPARα agonist. Topical PC-9S-containing PLM significantly reduced basal trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL), surface pH, and mast cell infiltrates and prevented the decline of AMPs expression in oxa-AD mice, which were abrogated by PPARα antagonist. Then, oxa-AD mice were treated with super-potent topical GC twice daily for 4 days with or without PC-9S co-applications. Co-treatment with PC-9S-containing PLM suppressed GC-induced increase in basal TEWL, epidermal thinning, reduced loricrin expression, and impaired barrier recovery and these effects were attenuated by PPARα antagonist. Collectively, our findings suggest that pseudoceramide PC-9S-induced stimulation of PPARα expression provides a new mechanism by which pseudoceramides show anti-inflammatory property, improve the permeability and antimicrobial barrier function, and prevent the negative effects of topical GC.

  8. [Comparison study on adsorption of middle molecular substances with multiwalled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Li, Guifeng; Wan, Jianxin; Huang, Xiangqian; Zeng, Qiao; Tang, Jing

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCTs) are very favorable to the adsorption of middle molecular substances in the hemoperfusion because of their multiporous structure, large surface area and high reactivity, which are beneficial to the excellent absorption properties. The purpose of this study was to study the MWCTs on the adsorption capacity of the middle molecular substances. Vitamin B12 (VB12) was selected as a model of the middle molecular substances. The morphologies of MWCTs and activated carbon from commercial "carbon kidney" were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The adsorption behavior of VB12 was compared to each other with UV-visible absorption spectra. The MWCTs formed a sophistaicate gap structure, and compared to the activated carbon, MWCTs had a larger surface area. By Langmuir equation and Freundlich equation fitting analysis, VB12 adsorption on MWCTs is fit for multi-molecular layer adsorption, and the adsorption type of activated carbon is more inclined to the model corresponding to Langmuir monolayer adsorption. The adsorption rate of MWCTs is faster than that of the activated carbon and the adsorption capacity is greater, which could be expected to become the new adsorbent in the hemoperfusion. PMID:21936376

  9. Molecular modeling of responsive polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Calvo, Ernesto J; Szleifer, Igal

    2010-06-29

    In this perspective, we have shown three different cases of responsive polymers at surfaces where the properties of the surface can be varied in response to cues from the bulk solution or in the presence of an external field. The most important conclusion in all three cases is that the chemical reaction equilibrium, physical interactions and molecular organization are strongly coupled, and it is imperative to consider the global and local changes that occur to the surface structure and properties due to this coupling. In particular acid-base and redox equilibrium are very different in polymer-modified surfaces than in the corresponding bulk solutions. Moreover, the definition of ‘‘apparent redox potentials’’ and ‘‘apparent pKa’’results from the averaging over highly inhomogeneous values,and, therefore, they do not necessarily represent the state of the layer and the local values and their variation are very important for the design of functional surfaces. The very large variation on chemical equilibrium results from the optimization of all the interactions. The picture that emerges is that trying to deduce what the final state of the system is by looking at the individual optimization of each contribution leads to qualitative incorrect assumptions and only the minimization of the complete free energy leads to the proper behavior in these complex systems.In the cases where domain formation is possible in grafted weak polyacid layers charge regulation may lead to regimes of coexistence between aggregates with relatively low fraction of charged polymer segments surrounded by highly stretched chains that have a relatively high fraction of charged groups.Therefore, one can control the state of charge, local electrostatic potential and local pH in all three dimensions with im-portant gradients on length scales of nanometers. For hydrophobic redox polymers we show how the application of an electrode potential can lead to changes in the structure

  10. Quantitative and logic modelling of gene and molecular networks

    PubMed Central

    Le Novère, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Behaviours of complex biomolecular systems are often irreducible to the elementary properties of their individual components. Explanatory and predictive mathematical models are therefore useful for fully understanding and precisely engineering cellular functions. The development and analyses of these models require their adaptation to the problems that need to be solved and the type and amount of available genetic or molecular data. Quantitative and logic modelling are among the main methods currently used to model molecular and gene networks. Each approach comes with inherent advantages and weaknesses. Recent developments show that hybrid approaches will become essential for further progress in synthetic biology and in the development of virtual organisms. PMID:25645874

  11. Mean ionic activity coefficients in aqueous NaCl solutions from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mester, Zoltan; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2015-01-28

    The mean ionic activity coefficients of aqueous NaCl solutions of varying concentrations at 298.15 K and 1 bar have been obtained from molecular dynamics simulations by gradually turning on the interactions of an ion pair inserted into the solution. Several common non-polarizable water and ion models have been used in the simulations. Gibbs-Duhem equation calculations of the thermodynamic activity of water are used to confirm the thermodynamic consistency of the mean ionic activity coefficients. While the majority of model combinations predict the correct trends in mean ionic activity coefficients, they overestimate their values at high salt concentrations. The solubility predictions also suffer from inaccuracies, with all models underpredicting the experimental values, some by large factors. These results point to the need for further ion and water model development.

  12. Investigating Molecular Hydrogen in Active Regions with IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeggli, Sarah A.; Saar, Steven H.; Daw, Adrian N.; Innes, Davina

    2014-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen should be the most abundant molecular species in sunspots, but recent observations with IRIS show that its florescent signature is absent from above the sunspot umbra, but appears brightly during flares. In this poster we continue the analysis of FUV observations of H2 in active regions, examining the correlation between the intensity of the H2 lines and the lines of C II and Si IV which are responsible for their excitation. We particularly focus on differentiating places where H2 is abundant, holes in the chromospheric opacity where FUV photons can enter more deeply into the solar atmosphere, and places where the FUV radiation field is intense, as in flares.

  13. Molecular candidates for cardiac stretch-activated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Alistair; Kohl, Peter; Peyronnet, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    The heart is a mechanically-active organ that dynamically senses its own mechanical environment. This environment is constantly changing, on a beat-by-beat basis, with additional modulation by respiratory activity and changes in posture or physical activity, and further overlaid with more slowly occurring physiological (e.g. pregnancy, endurance training) or pathological challenges (e.g. pressure or volume overload). Far from being a simple pump, the heart detects changes in mechanical demand and adjusts its performance accordingly, both via heart rate and stroke volume alteration. Many of the underlying regulatory processes are encoded intracardially, and are thus maintained even in heart transplant recipients. Over the last three decades, molecular substrates of cardiac mechanosensitivity have gained increasing recognition in the scientific and clinical communities. Nonetheless, the processes underlying this phenomenon are still poorly understood. Stretch-activated ion channels (SAC) have been identified as one contributor to mechanosensitive autoregulation of the heartbeat. They also appear to play important roles in the development of cardiac pathologies – most notably stretch-induced arrhythmias. As recently discovered, some established cardiac drugs act, in part at least, via mechanotransduction pathways suggesting SAC as potential therapeutic targets. Clearly, identification of the molecular substrate of cardiac SAC is of clinical importance and a number of candidate proteins have been identified. At the same time, experimental studies have revealed variable–and at times contrasting–results regarding their function. Further complication arises from the fact that many ion channels that are not classically defined as SAC, including voltage and ligand-gated ion channels, can respond to mechanical stimulation. Here, we summarise what is known about the molecular substrate of the main candidates for cardiac SAC, before identifying potential further

  14. Unveiling the molecular mechanism of brassinosteroids: Insights from structure-based molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Lei, Beilei; Liu, Jiyuan; Yao, Xiaojun

    2015-12-01

    Brassinosteroid (BR) phytohormones play indispensable roles in plant growth and development. Brassinolide (BL) and 24-epibrassinolide (24-epiBL) are the most active ones among the BRs reported thus far. Unfortunately, the extremely low natural content and intricate synthesis process limit their popularization in agricultural production. Earlier reports to discover alternative compounds have resulted in molecules with nearly same scaffold structure and without diversity in chemical space. In the present study, receptors structure based BRs regulation mechanism was analyzed. First, we examined the detailed binding interactions and their dynamic stability between BL and its receptor BRI1 and co-receptor BAK1. Then, the binding modes and binding free energies for 24-epiBL and a series of representative BRs binding with BRI1 and BRI1-BAK1 were carried out by molecular docking, energy minimization and MM-PBSA free energy calculation. The obtained binding structures and energetic results provided vital insights into the structural factors affecting the activity from both receptors and BRs aspects. Subsequently, the obtained knowledge will serve as valuable guidance to build pharmacophore models for rational screening of new scaffold alternative BRs.

  15. Molecular model for the rheology of polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picu, Catalin; Sarvestani, Alireza

    2006-03-01

    In this work we develop a molecular model for the rheology of entangled monodisperse homopolymers filled with nanoparticles at low filling volume fraction. This research is the continuation of our ongoing effort towards establishing a connection between the macroscopic time-dependent behavior of polymer nanocomposites and their molecular structure. The model is developed based on insight gained from molecular simulations, regarding the structure and dynamics of polymeric chains confined between nanoparticles. These simulations provide physically relevant parameters for the rheological model. The model accounts for reptation, chain stretch and contour length fluctuations. It also accounts for the short-range energetic interactions between polymers and fillers. Its predictions are compared with experimental data. The rheological model is implemented in a FEM package to simulate nanocomposite processing.

  16. Molecular modeling studies, synthesis and biological evaluation of dabigatran analogues as thrombin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ming-Hui; Chen, Hai-Feng; Ren, Yu-Jie; Shao, Fang-Ming

    2016-01-15

    In this work, 48 thrombin inhibitors based on the structural scaffold of dabigatran were analyzed using a combination of molecular modeling techniques. We generated three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models based on three alignments for both comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity index analysis (CoMSIA) to highlight the structural requirements for thrombin protein inhibition. In addition to the 3D-QSAR study, Topomer CoMFA model also was established with a higher leave-one-out cross-validation q(2) and a non-cross-validation r(2), which suggest that the three models have good predictive ability. The results indicated that the steric, hydrophobic and electrostatic fields play key roles in QSAR model. Furthermore, we employed molecular docking and re-docking simulation explored the binding relationship of the ligand and the receptor protein in detail. Molecular docking simulations identified several key interactions that were also indicated through 3D-QSAR analysis. On the basis of the obtained results, two compounds were designed and predicted by three models, the biological evaluation in vitro (IC50) demonstrated that these molecular models were effective for the development of novel potent thrombin inhibitors.

  17. A Novel Network Model for Molecular Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Ying-Wooi; Bose, Swetha; Denvir, James; Guo, Nancy Lan

    2015-01-01

    Network-based genome-wide association studies (NWAS) utilize the molecular interactions between genes and functional pathways in biomarker identification. This study presents a novel network-based methodology for identifying prognostic gene signatures to predict cancer recurrence. The methodology contains the following steps: 1) Constructing genome-wide coexpression networks for different disease states (metastatic vs. non-metastatic). Prediction logic is used to induct valid implication relations between each pair of gene expression profiles in terms of formal logic rules. 2) Identifying differential components associated with specific disease states from the genome-wide coexpression networks. 3) Dissecting network modules that are tightly connected with major disease signal hallmarks from the disease specific differential components. 4) Identifying most significant genes/probes associated with clinical outcome from the pathway connected network modules. Using this methodology, a 14-gene prognostic signature was identified for accurate patient stratification in early stage lung cancer. PMID:26005718

  18. A Student Evaluation of Molecular Modeling in First Year College Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluates first-year college students' perceptions of molecular modeling. Examines the effectiveness, integration with course content, interests, benefits, advantages, and disadvantages of molecular modeling. (Author/CCM)

  19. Molecular Modeling on the PC (by Matthew F. Schlecht)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Reviewed Frank

    2000-06-01

    "Computeraided molecular modeling doesn't exist for its own sake, but to contribute to scientific endeavor, and enable the scientist to work smarter." This is the last sentence of Schlecht's preface and it says something very important about contemporary scientific research in the academic and industrial venues. Owing to the accelerating improvement in computer technology (hardware and software) and its widespread availability, molecular modeling has become a reliable and important tool in chemical research. Consequently, experimentalists have incorporated molecular modeling techniques in their research, and partnerships with computational chemists have become common. This is a wellorganized and thorough monograph that devotes its attention to one type of molecular modeling, molecular mechanics, and one molecular modeling software package, PCMODEL. Schlecht targets two reader-user groups, the novice and the journeyman modeler, and articulates three goals. He wants to provide the novice with an introduction to molecular mechanics, and after that with some practical examples of the use of empirical force field calculations. His third goal is to provide the journeyman modeler with a reference work that will aid "further study and practice". These are potentially conflicting goals, but Schlecht is, in my opinion, successful because of the way his book is organized. A comprehensive treatment such as this one is not meant to be read from cover to cover, because it is both an exposition of basic principles and a user's manual. Therefore, the novice and the experienced modeler will undoubtedly use this book in different ways. For example, a novice modeler might be advised to read the Preface and Chapter 1, which together provide a broad introduction to the historical development and goals of molecular mechanics. From there the novice could go to Chapter 5 and read section 5.1 on the components of the molecular mechanics force field, which is presented in 22 pages with

  20. Molecular details of the activation of the μ opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jihyun; Coop, Andrew; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2013-07-01

    Molecular details of μ opioid receptor activations were obtained using molecular dynamics simulations of the receptor in the presence of three agonists, three antagonists, and a partial agonist and on the constitutively active T279K mutant. Agonists have a higher probability of direct interactions of their basic nitrogen (N) with Asp147 as compared with antagonists, indicating that direct ligand-Asp147 interactions modulate activation. Medium-size substituents on the basic N of antagonists lead to steric interactions that perturb N-Asp147 interactions, while additional favorable interactions occur with larger basic N substituents, such as in N-phenethylnormorphine, restoring N-Asp147 interactions, leading to agonism. With the orvinols, the increased size of the C19 substituent in buprenorphine over diprenorphine leads to increased interactions with residues adjacent to Asp147, partially overcoming the presence of the cyclopropyl N substituent, such that buprenorphine is a partial agonist. Results also indicate different conformational properties of the intracellular regions of the transmembrane helices in agonists versus antagonists. PMID:23758404

  1. Antituberculosis activity of the molecular libraries screening center network library.

    PubMed

    Maddry, Joseph A; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Goldman, Robert C; Hobrath, Judith V; Kwong, Cecil D; Maddox, Clinton; Rasmussen, Lynn; Reynolds, Robert C; Secrist, John A; Sosa, Melinda I; White, E Lucile; Zhang, Wei

    2009-09-01

    There is an urgent need for the discovery and development of new antitubercular agents that target novel biochemical pathways and treat drug-resistant forms of the disease. One approach to addressing this need is through high-throughput screening of drug-like small molecule libraries against the whole bacterium in order to identify a variety of new, active scaffolds that will stimulate additional biological research and drug discovery. Through the Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network, the NIAID Tuberculosis Antimicrobial Acquisition and Coordinating Facility tested a 215,110-compound library against Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv. A medicinal chemistry survey of the results from the screening campaign is reported herein.

  2. Nanoplasmonic molecular ruler for nuclease activity and DNA footprinting

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Fanqing Frank; Liu, Gang L; Lee, Luke P

    2013-10-29

    This invention provides a nanoplasmonic molecular ruler, which can perform label-free and real-time monitoring of nucleic acid (e.g., DNA) length changes and perform nucleic acid footprinting. In various embodiments the ruler comprises a nucleic acid attached to a nanoparticle, such that changes in the nucleic acid length are detectable using surface plasmon resonance. The nanoplasmonic ruler provides a fast and convenient platform for mapping nucleic acid-protein interactions, for nuclease activity monitoring, and for other footprinting related methods.

  3. Molecular model for the anticlinic smectic-C(A) phase

    PubMed

    Osipov; Fukuda

    2000-09-01

    Both phenomenological and molecular-statistical theories of the anticlinic smectic-C(A) phase (Sm-C(A)) are considered in detail. The anticlinic structure produces antiferroelectricity in the chiral smectic-C(A) phase (Sm-C(A)*). The molecular theory is based on a simple model potential which stabilizes Sm-C(A) with respect to the synclinic smectic-C phase (Sm-C). Conventional dispersion and steric interactions between mesogenic molecules generally do not promote Sm-C(A). It may be stabilized by interlayer orientational correlations between transverse molecular dipoles located in the flexible chains. Such correlations are not sensitive to molecular handedness (chirality), and thus the theory accounts for the formation of the anticlinic phase in racemic mixtures. The model is also confirmed by other experimental data. Finally a simple phase diagram of the perfectly ordered smectic liquid crystal is presented which contains Sm-A, Sm-C, and Sm-C(A).

  4. Turning aluminium into a noble-metal-like catalyst for low-temperature activation of molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Irinder S; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Veyan, Jean François; Chabal, Yves J

    2011-11-01

    Activation of molecular hydrogen is the first step in producing many important industrial chemicals that have so far required expensive noble-metal catalysts and thermal activation. We demonstrate here that aluminium doped with very small amounts of titanium can activate molecular hydrogen at temperatures as low as 90 K. Using an approach that uses CO as a probe molecule, we identify the atomistic arrangement of the catalytically active sites containing Ti on Al(111) surfaces, combining infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and first-principles modelling. CO molecules, selectively adsorbed on catalytically active sites, form a complex with activated hydrogen that is removed at remarkably low temperatures (115 K; possibly as a molecule). These results provide the first direct evidence that Ti-doped Al can carry out the essential first step of molecular hydrogen activation under nearly barrierless conditions, thereby challenging the monopoly of noble metals in hydrogen activation. PMID:21946610

  5. Adaptive modelling of structured molecular representations for toxicity prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertinetto, Carlo; Duce, Celia; Micheli, Alessio; Solaro, Roberto; Tiné, Maria Rosaria

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the possibility of modelling structure-toxicity relationships by direct treatment of the molecular structure (without using descriptors) through an adaptive model able to retain the appropriate structural information. With respect to traditional descriptor-based approaches, this provides a more general and flexible way to tackle prediction problems that is particularly suitable when little or no background knowledge is available. Our method employs a tree-structured molecular representation, which is processed by a recursive neural network (RNN). To explore the realization of RNN modelling in toxicological problems, we employed a data set containing growth impairment concentrations (IGC50) for Tetrahymena pyriformis.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations and modelling of the residue interaction networks in the BRAF kinase complexes with small molecule inhibitors: probing the allosteric effects of ligand-induced kinase dimerization and paradoxical activation.

    PubMed

    Verkhivker, G M

    2016-10-20

    Protein kinases are central to proper functioning of cellular networks and are an integral part of many signal transduction pathways. The family of protein kinases represents by far the largest and most important class of therapeutic targets in oncology. Dimerization-induced activation has emerged as a common mechanism of allosteric regulation in BRAF kinases, which play an important role in growth factor signalling and human diseases. Recent studies have revealed that most of the BRAF inhibitors can induce dimerization and paradoxically stimulate enzyme transactivation by conferring an active conformation in the second monomer of the kinase dimer. The emerging connections between inhibitor binding and BRAF kinase domain dimerization have suggested a molecular basis of the activation mechanism in which BRAF inhibitors may allosterically modulate the stability of the dimerization interface and affect the organization of residue interaction networks in BRAF kinase dimers. In this work, we integrated structural bioinformatics analysis, molecular dynamics and binding free energy simulations with the protein structure network analysis of the BRAF crystal structures to determine dynamic signatures of BRAF conformations in complexes with different types of inhibitors and probe the mechanisms of the inhibitor-induced dimerization and paradoxical activation. The results of this study highlight previously unexplored relationships between types of BRAF inhibitors, inhibitor-induced changes in the residue interaction networks and allosteric modulation of the kinase activity. This study suggests a mechanism by which BRAF inhibitors could promote or interfere with the paradoxical activation of BRAF kinases, which may be useful in informing discovery efforts to minimize the unanticipated adverse biological consequences of these therapeutic agents.

  7. The Electron-Pair Repulsion Model for Molecular Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    Describes how the electron-pair repulsion model qualitatively explains the size and shape of molecular orbitals. Briefly discusses trigonal bipyramidal molecules, three-center bonds, and transition elements. Describes cluster compounds and finishes with a discussion of the exceptions to the model and effects of ligand-ligand repulsions. (RR)

  8. Molecular modeling of nucleic Acid structure: electrostatics and solvation.

    PubMed

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand its structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as a way of sampling conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. This discussion highlighted the major limitations with modeling in general. When sampling conformational space effectively, difficult issues are encountered, such as multiple minima or conformational sampling problems, and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These subjects are discussed in detail in this unit. PMID:25631536

  9. Fast molecular evolution associated with high active metabolic rates in poison frogs.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juan C

    2012-08-01

    Molecular evolution is simultaneously paced by mutation rate, genetic drift, and natural selection. Life history traits also affect the speed of accumulation of nucleotide changes. For instance, small body size, rapid generation time, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and high resting metabolic rate (RMR) are suggested to be associated with faster rates of molecular evolution. However, phylogenetic correlation analyses failed to support a relationship between RMR and molecular evolution in ectotherms. In addition, RMR might underestimate the metabolic budget (e.g., digestion, reproduction, or escaping predation). An alternative is to test other metabolic rates, such as active metabolic rate (AMR), and their association with molecular evolution. Here, I present comparative analyses of the associations between life history traits (i.e., AMR, RMR, body mass, and fecundity) with rates of molecular evolution of and mitochondrial loci from a large ectotherm clade, the poison frogs (Dendrobatidae). My results support a strong positive association between mass-specific AMR and rates of molecular evolution for both mitochondrial and nuclear loci. In addition, I found weaker and genome-specific covariates such as body mass and fecundity for mitochondrial and nuclear loci, respectively. No direct association was found between mass-specific RMR and rates of molecular evolution. Thus, I provide a mechanistic hypothesis of the link between AMRs and the rate of molecular evolution based on an increase in ROS within germ line cells during periodic bouts of hypoxia/hyperoxia related to aerobic exercise. Finally, I propose a multifactorial model that includes AMR as a predictor of the rate of molecular evolution in ectothermic lineages.

  10. Molecular modeling: An open invitation for applied mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezey, Paul G.

    2013-10-01

    Molecular modeling methods provide a very wide range of challenges for innovative mathematical and computational techniques, where often high dimensionality, large sets of data, and complicated interrelations imply a multitude of iterative approximations. The physical and chemical basis of these methodologies involves quantum mechanics with several non-intuitive aspects, where classical interpretation and classical analogies are often misleading or outright wrong. Hence, instead of the everyday, common sense approaches which work so well in engineering, in molecular modeling one often needs to rely on rather abstract mathematical constraints and conditions, again emphasizing the high level of reliance on applied mathematics. Yet, the interdisciplinary aspects of the field of molecular modeling also generates some inertia and perhaps too conservative reliance on tried and tested methodologies, that is at least partially caused by the less than up-to-date involvement in the newest developments in applied mathematics. It is expected that as more applied mathematicians take up the challenge of employing the latest advances of their field in molecular modeling, important breakthroughs may follow. In this presentation some of the current challenges of molecular modeling are discussed.

  11. Modelling refractive index changes due to molecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Manoj

    2016-03-01

    There are a large number of sensing techniques which use optical changes to monitor interactions between molecules. In the absence of fluorophores or other labels, the basic signal transduction mechanism relies on refractive index changes arising from the interactions of the molecules involved. A quantitative model incorporating molecular transport, reaction kinetics and optical mixing is presented which reveals important insights concerning the optimal detection of molecular interactions optically. Although conceptually simple, a comprehensive model such as this has not been reported anywhere. Specifically, we investigate the pros and cons of detecting molecular interactions in free solution relative to detecting molecular interactions on surfaces using surface bound receptor molecules such as antibodies. The model reveals that the refractive index change produced in surface based sensors is 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than that from interactions in free solution. On the other hand, the model also reveals that it is indeed possible to distinguish specific molecular interactions from non-specific ones based on free-solution bulk refractometry without any washing step necessary in surface based sensors. However, the refractive index change for free solution interactions predicted by the model is smaller than 10-7 RIU, even for large proteins such as IgG in sufficiently high concentrations. This value is smaller than the typical 10-6 RIU detection limit of most state of the art optical sensing techniques therefore requiring techniques with substantially higher index sensitivity such as Back Scattering Interferometry.

  12. Corn Storage Protein - A Molecular Genetic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Messing, Joachim

    2013-05-31

    Corn is the highest yielding crop on earth and probably the most valuable agricultural product of the United States. Because it converts sun energy through photosynthesis into starch and proteins, we addressed energy savings by focusing on protein quality. People and animals require essential amino acids derived from the digestion of proteins. If proteins are relatively low in certain essential amino acids, the crop becomes nutritionally defective and has to be supplemented. Such deficiency affects meat and fish production and countries where corn is a staple. Because corn seed proteins have relatively low levels of lysine and methionine, a diet has to be supplemented with soybeans for the missing lysine and with chemically synthesized methionine. We therefore have studied genes expressed during maize seed development and their chromosomal organization. A critical technical requirement for the understanding of the molecular structure of genes and their positional information was DNA sequencing. Because of the length of sequences, DNA sequencing methods themselves were insufficient for this type of analysis. We therefore developed the so-called “DNA shotgun sequencing” strategy, where overlapping DNA fragments were sequenced in parallel and used to reconstruct large DNA molecules via overlaps. Our publications became the most frequently cited ones during the decade of 1981-1990 and former Associate Director of Science for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Patricia M. Dehmer presented our work as one of the great successes of this program. A major component of the sequencing strategy was the development of bacterial strains and vectors, which were also used to develop the first biotechnology crops. These crops possessed new traits thanks to the expression of foreign genes in plants. To enable such expression, chimeric genes had to be constructed using our materials and methods by the industry. Because we made our materials and methods freely available to

  13. Modeling Cytoskeletal Active Matter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Robert

    Active networks of filamentous proteins and crosslinking motor proteins play a critical role in many important cellular processes. One of the most important microtubule-motor protein assemblies is the mitotic spindle, a self-organized active liquid-crystalline structure that forms during cell division and that ultimately separates chromosomes into two daughter cells. Although the spindle has been intensively studied for decades, the physical principles that govern its self-organization and function remain mysterious. To evolve a better understanding of spindle formation, structure, and dynamics, I investigate course-grained models of active liquid-crystalline networks composed of microtubules, modeled as hard spherocylinders, in diffusive equilibrium with a reservoir of active crosslinks, modeled as hookean springs that can adsorb to microtubules and and translocate at finite velocity along the microtubule axis. This model is investigated using a combination of brownian dynamics and kinetic monte carlo simulation. I have further refined this model to simulate spindle formation and kinetochore capture in the fission yeast S. pombe. I then make predictions for experimentally realizable perturbations in motor protein presence and function in S. pombe.

  14. Molecular Remodeling of the Presynaptic Active Zone of Drosophila Photoreceptors via Activity-Dependent Feedback.

    PubMed

    Sugie, Atsushi; Hakeda-Suzuki, Satoko; Suzuki, Emiko; Silies, Marion; Shimozono, Mai; Möhl, Christoph; Suzuki, Takashi; Tavosanis, Gaia

    2015-05-01

    Neural activity contributes to the regulation of the properties of synapses in sensory systems, allowing for adjustment to a changing environment. Little is known about how synaptic molecular components are regulated to achieve activity-dependent plasticity at central synapses. Here, we found that after prolonged exposure to natural ambient light the presynaptic active zone in Drosophila photoreceptors undergoes reversible remodeling, including loss of Bruchpilot, DLiprin-α, and DRBP, but not of DSyd-1 or Cacophony. The level of depolarization of the postsynaptic neurons is critical for the light-induced changes in active zone composition in the photoreceptors, indicating the existence of a feedback signal. In search of this signal, we have identified a crucial role of microtubule meshwork organization downstream of the divergent canonical Wnt pathway, potentially via Kinesin-3 Imac. These data reveal that active zone composition can be regulated in vivo and identify the underlying molecular machinery.

  15. Extended master equation models for molecular communication networks.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chun Tung

    2013-06-01

    We consider molecular communication networks consisting of transmitters and receivers distributed in a fluidic medium. In such networks, a transmitter sends one or more signaling molecules, which are diffused over the medium, to the receiver to realize the communication. In order to be able to engineer synthetic molecular communication networks, mathematical models for these networks are required. This paper proposes a new stochastic model for molecular communication networks called reaction-diffusion master equation with exogenous input (RDMEX). The key idea behind RDMEX is to model the transmitters as time series of signaling molecule counts, while diffusion in the medium and chemical reactions at the receivers are modeled as Markov processes using master equation. An advantage of RDMEX is that it can readily be used to model molecular communication networks with multiple transmitters and receivers. For the case where the reaction kinetics at the receivers is linear, we show how RDMEX can be used to determine the mean and covariance of the receiver output signals, and derive closed-form expressions for the mean receiver output signal of the RDMEX model. These closed-form expressions reveal that the output signal of a receiver can be affected by the presence of other receivers. Numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the properties of the model.

  16. Data-mining of potential antitubercular activities from molecular ingredients of traditional Chinese medicines

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Salma

    2014-01-01

    Background. Traditional Chinese medicine encompasses a well established alternate system of medicine based on a broad range of herbal formulations and is practiced extensively in the region for the treatment of a wide variety of diseases. In recent years, several reports describe in depth studies of the molecular ingredients of traditional Chinese medicines on the biological activities including anti-bacterial activities. The availability of a well-curated dataset of molecular ingredients of traditional Chinese medicines and accurate in-silico cheminformatics models for data mining for antitubercular agents and computational filters to prioritize molecules has prompted us to search for potential hits from these datasets. Results. We used a consensus approach to predict molecules with potential antitubercular activities from a large dataset of molecular ingredients of traditional Chinese medicines available in the public domain. We further prioritized 160 molecules based on five computational filters (SMARTSfilter) so as to avoid potentially undesirable molecules. We further examined the molecules for permeability across Mycobacterial cell wall and for potential activities against non-replicating and drug tolerant Mycobacteria. Additional in-depth literature surveys for the reported antitubercular activities of the molecular ingredients and their sources were considered for drawing support to prioritization. Conclusions. Our analysis suggests that datasets of molecular ingredients of traditional Chinese medicines offer a new opportunity to mine for potential biological activities. In this report, we suggest a proof-of-concept methodology to prioritize molecules for further experimental assays using a variety of computational tools. We also additionally suggest that a subset of prioritized molecules could be used for evaluation for tuberculosis due to their additional effect against non-replicating tuberculosis as well as the additional hepato-protection offered by

  17. Recent insights into the molecular mechanisms of the NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Próchnicki, Tomasz; Mangan, Matthew S; Latz, Eicke

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are high-molecular-weight protein complexes that are formed in the cytosolic compartment in response to danger- or pathogen-associated molecular patterns. These complexes enable activation of an inflammatory protease caspase-1, leading to a cell death process called pyroptosis and to proteolytic cleavage and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Along with caspase-1, inflammasome components include an adaptor protein, ASC, and a sensor protein, which triggers the inflammasome assembly in response to a danger signal. The inflammasome sensor proteins are pattern recognition receptors belonging either to the NOD-like receptor (NLR) or to the AIM2-like receptor family. While the molecular agonists that induce inflammasome formation by AIM2 and by several other NLRs have been identified, it is not well understood how the NLR family member NLRP3 is activated. Given that NLRP3 activation is relevant to a range of human pathological conditions, significant attempts are being made to elucidate the molecular mechanism of this process. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the molecular events that lead to activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to a range of K (+) efflux-inducing danger signals. We also comment on the reported involvement of cytosolic Ca (2+) fluxes on NLRP3 activation. We outline the recent advances in research on the physiological and pharmacological mechanisms of regulation of NLRP3 responses, and we point to several open questions regarding the current model of NLRP3 activation. PMID:27508077

  18. Recent insights into the molecular mechanisms of the NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Próchnicki, Tomasz; Mangan, Matthew S.; Latz, Eicke

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are high-molecular-weight protein complexes that are formed in the cytosolic compartment in response to danger- or pathogen-associated molecular patterns. These complexes enable activation of an inflammatory protease caspase-1, leading to a cell death process called pyroptosis and to proteolytic cleavage and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Along with caspase-1, inflammasome components include an adaptor protein, ASC, and a sensor protein, which triggers the inflammasome assembly in response to a danger signal. The inflammasome sensor proteins are pattern recognition receptors belonging either to the NOD-like receptor (NLR) or to the AIM2-like receptor family. While the molecular agonists that induce inflammasome formation by AIM2 and by several other NLRs have been identified, it is not well understood how the NLR family member NLRP3 is activated. Given that NLRP3 activation is relevant to a range of human pathological conditions, significant attempts are being made to elucidate the molecular mechanism of this process. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the molecular events that lead to activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to a range of K + efflux-inducing danger signals. We also comment on the reported involvement of cytosolic Ca 2+ fluxes on NLRP3 activation. We outline the recent advances in research on the physiological and pharmacological mechanisms of regulation of NLRP3 responses, and we point to several open questions regarding the current model of NLRP3 activation. PMID:27508077

  19. Energetics of molecular-beam epitaxy models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Srinivasan; Berding, M. A.; Sher, A.; Chen, A.-B.

    1990-01-01

    The removal energies of constituent atoms from various unreconstructed semiconductor surfaces are calculated using a Green function method. An efficient difference-equation approach within the second-neighbor tight-binding model is employed. For a compound AB, binding energies for the A and B atoms on the (111), (-1 -1 -1), (100), and (110) surfaces are calculated. Analyses are made of the energy to remove an atom from the nearly full surface and from the nearly empty surface. Results are presented for Si, GaAs, CdTe, and HgTe; and the surface sublimation energies are found to depend on surface coverage and do not display a simple linear relationship to the number of bonds broken, as is often assumed in modeling growth by MBE.

  20. The emerging role of cloud computing in molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Ebejer, Jean-Paul; Fulle, Simone; Morris, Garrett M; Finn, Paul W

    2013-07-01

    There is a growing recognition of the importance of cloud computing for large-scale and data-intensive applications. The distinguishing features of cloud computing and their relationship to other distributed computing paradigms are described, as are the strengths and weaknesses of the approach. We review the use made to date of cloud computing for molecular modelling projects and the availability of front ends for molecular modelling applications. Although the use of cloud computing technologies for molecular modelling is still in its infancy, we demonstrate its potential by presenting several case studies. Rapid growth can be expected as more applications become available and costs continue to fall; cloud computing can make a major contribution not just in terms of the availability of on-demand computing power, but could also spur innovation in the development of novel approaches that utilize that capacity in more effective ways.

  1. Decarboxylation of Δ 9-tetrahydrocannabinol: Kinetics and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrotin-Brunel, Helene; Buijs, Wim; van Spronsen, Jaap; van Roosmalen, Maaike J. E.; Peters, Cor J.; Verpoorte, Rob; Witkamp, Geert-Jan

    2011-02-01

    Efficient tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ 9-THC) production from cannabis is important for its medical application and as basis for the development of production routes of other drugs from plants. This work presents one of the steps of Δ 9-THC production from cannabis plant material, the decarboxylation reaction, transforming the Δ 9-THC-acid naturally present in the plant into the psychoactive Δ 9-THC. Results of experiments showed pseudo-first order reaction kinetics, with an activation barrier of 85 kJ mol -1 and a pre-exponential factor of 3.7 × 10 8 s -1. Using molecular modeling, two options were identified for an acid catalyzed β-keto acid type mechanism for the decarboxylation of Δ 9-THC-acid. Each of these mechanisms might play a role, depending on the actual process conditions. Formic acid proved to be a good model for a catalyst of such a reaction. Also, the computational idea of catalysis by water to catalysis by an acid, put forward by Li and Brill, and Churchev and Belbruno was extended, and a new direct keto-enol route was found. A direct keto-enol mechanism catalyzed by formic acid seems to be the best explanation for the observed activation barrier and the pre-exponential factor of the decarboxylation of Δ 9-THC-acid. Evidence for this was found by performing an extraction experiment with Cannabis Flos. It revealed the presence of short chain carboxylic acids supporting this hypothesis. The presented approach is important for the development of a sustainable production of Δ 9-THC from the plant.

  2. Molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and structure-based 3D-QSAR studies on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonistic activity of hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fu; Li, Xiaolin; Ye, Li; Xie, Yuwei; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Shi, Wei; Qian, Xiangping; Zhu, Yongliang; Yu, Hongxia

    2013-09-01

    The binding interactions between hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (HO-PCBs) and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) are suspected of causing toxic effects. To understand the binding mode between HO-PCBs and AhR, and to explore the structural characteristics that influence the AhR agonistic activities of HO-PCBs, the combination of molecular docking, three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations was performed. Using molecular docking, the HO-PCBs were docked into the binding pocket of AhR, which was generated by homology modeling. Comparative molecular similarity index analysis (CoMSIA) models were subsequently developed from three different alignment rules. The optimum 3D-QSAR model showed good predictive ability (q(2)=0.583, R(2)=0.913) and good mechanism interpretability. The statistical reliability of the CoMSIA model was also validated. In addition, molecular docking and MD simulations were applied to explore the binding modes between the ligands and AhR. The results obtained from this study may lead to a better understanding of the interaction mechanism between HO-PCBs and AhR.

  3. A molecular model for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Gigek, C O; Chen, E S; Ota, V K; Maussion, G; Peng, H; Vaillancourt, K; Diallo, A B; Lopez, J P; Crapper, L; Vasuta, C; Chen, G G; Ernst, C

    2015-01-01

    Genes implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) important in cognition and behavior may have convergent function and several cellular pathways have been implicated, including protein translational control, chromatin modification, and synapse assembly and maintenance. Here, we test the convergent effects of methyl-CpG binding domain 5 (MBD5) and special AT-rich binding protein 2 (SATB2) reduced dosage in human neural stem cells (NSCs), two genes implicated in 2q23.1 and 2q33.1 deletion syndromes, respectively, to develop a generalized model for NDDs. We used short hairpin RNA stably incorporated into healthy neural stem cells to supress MBD5 and SATB2 expression, and massively parallel RNA sequencing, DNA methylation sequencing and microRNA arrays to test the hypothesis that a primary etiology of NDDs is the disruption of the balance of NSC proliferation and differentiation. We show that reduced dosage of either gene leads to significant overlap of gene-expression patterns, microRNA patterns and DNA methylation states with control NSCs in a differentiating state, suggesting that a unifying feature of 2q23.1 and 2q33.1 deletion syndrome may be a lack of regulation between proliferation and differentiation in NSCs, as we observed previously for TCF4 and EHMT1 suppression following a similar experimental paradigm. We propose a model of NDDs whereby the balance of NSC proliferation and differentiation is affected, but where the molecules that drive this effect are largely specific to disease-causing genetic variation. NDDs are diverse, complex and unique, but the optimal balance of factors that determine when and where neural stem cells differentiate may be a major feature underlying the diverse phenotypic spectrum of NDDs.

  4. A molecular model for neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gigek, C O; Chen, E S; Ota, V K; Maussion, G; Peng, H; Vaillancourt, K; Diallo, A B; Lopez, J P; Crapper, L; Vasuta, C; Chen, G G; Ernst, C

    2015-01-01

    Genes implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) important in cognition and behavior may have convergent function and several cellular pathways have been implicated, including protein translational control, chromatin modification, and synapse assembly and maintenance. Here, we test the convergent effects of methyl-CpG binding domain 5 (MBD5) and special AT-rich binding protein 2 (SATB2) reduced dosage in human neural stem cells (NSCs), two genes implicated in 2q23.1 and 2q33.1 deletion syndromes, respectively, to develop a generalized model for NDDs. We used short hairpin RNA stably incorporated into healthy neural stem cells to supress MBD5 and SATB2 expression, and massively parallel RNA sequencing, DNA methylation sequencing and microRNA arrays to test the hypothesis that a primary etiology of NDDs is the disruption of the balance of NSC proliferation and differentiation. We show that reduced dosage of either gene leads to significant overlap of gene-expression patterns, microRNA patterns and DNA methylation states with control NSCs in a differentiating state, suggesting that a unifying feature of 2q23.1 and 2q33.1 deletion syndrome may be a lack of regulation between proliferation and differentiation in NSCs, as we observed previously for TCF4 and EHMT1 suppression following a similar experimental paradigm. We propose a model of NDDs whereby the balance of NSC proliferation and differentiation is affected, but where the molecules that drive this effect are largely specific to disease-causing genetic variation. NDDs are diverse, complex and unique, but the optimal balance of factors that determine when and where neural stem cells differentiate may be a major feature underlying the diverse phenotypic spectrum of NDDs. PMID:25966365

  5. Activation of Extrasynaptic NMDARs at Individual Parallel Fiber–Molecular Layer Interneuron Synapses in Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Nahir, Ben

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) expressed by cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs) are not activated by single exocytotic events but can respond to glutamate spillover following coactivation of adjacent parallel fibers (PFs), indicating that NMDARs are perisynaptic. Several types of synaptic plasticity rely on these receptors but whether they are activated at isolated synapses is not known. Using a combination of electrophysiological and optical recording techniques in acute slices of rat cerebellum, along with modeling, we find that repetitive activation of single PF–MLI synapses can activate NMDARs in MLIs. High-frequency stimulation, multivesicular release (MVR), or asynchronous release can each activate NMDARs. Frequency facilitation was found at all PF–MLI synapses but, while some showed robust MVR with increased release probability, most were limited to univesicular release. Together, these results reveal a functional diversity of PF synapses, which use different mechanisms to activate NMDARs. PMID:24107963

  6. The Molecular Mechanism of P2Y1 Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H. C. Stephen; Vogel, Horst; Filipek, Slawomir

    2016-01-01

    Human purinergic G protein-coupled receptor P2Y1 (P2Y1R) is activated by adenosine 5’-diphosphate (ADP) to induce platelet activation and thereby serves as an important antithrombotic drug target. Crystal structures of P2Y1R revealed that one ligand (MRS2500) binds to the extracellular vestibule of this GPCR, whereas another (BPTU) occupies the surface between transmembrane (TM) helices TM2 and TM3. We introduced a total of 20 µs all-atom long-timescale molecular dynamic (MD) simulations to inquire why two molecules in completely different locations both serve as antagonists while ADP activates the receptor. Our results indicate that BPTU acts as an antagonist by stabilizing extracellular helix bundles leading to an increase of the lipid order, whereas MRS2500 blocks signaling by occupying the ligand binding site. Both antagonists stabilize an ionic lock within the receptor. However, binding of ADP breaks this ionic lock, forming a continuous water channel that leads to P2Y1R activation. PMID:27460867

  7. Quantum interference in thermoelectric molecular junctions: A toy model perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Nozaki, Daijiro E-mail: research@nano.tu-dresden.de; Avdoshenko, Stas M.; Sevinçli, Hâldun; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2014-08-21

    Quantum interference (QI) phenomena between electronic states in molecular circuits offer a new opportunity to design new types of molecular devices such as molecular sensors, interferometers, and thermoelectric devices. Controlling the QI effect is a key challenge for such applications. For the development of single molecular devices employing QI effects, a systematic study of the relationship between electronic structure and the quantum interference is needed. In order to uncover the essential topological requirements for the appearance of QI effects and the relationship between the QI-affected line shape of the transmission spectra and the electronic structures, we consider a homogeneous toy model where all on-site energies are identical and model four types of molecular junctions due to their topological connectivities. We systematically analyze their transmission spectra, density of states, and thermoelectric properties. Even without the degree of freedom for on-site energies an asymmetric Fano peak could be realized in the homogeneous systems with the cyclic configuration. We also calculate the thermoelectric properties of the model systems with and without fluctuation of on-site energies. Even under the fluctuation of the on-site energies, the finite thermoelectrics are preserved for the Fano resonance, thus cyclic configuration is promising for thermoelectric applications. This result also suggests the possibility to detect the cyclic configuration in the homogeneous systems and the presence of the QI features from thermoelectric measurements.

  8. Molecular modeling of protein-glycosaminoglycan interactions.

    PubMed

    Cardin, A D; Weintraub, H J

    1989-01-01

    Forty-nine regions in 21 proteins were identified as potential heparin-binding sites based on the sequence organizations of their basic and nonbasic residues. Twelve known heparin-binding sequences in vitronectin, apolipoproteins E and B-100, and platelet factor 4 were used to formulate two search strings for identifying potential heparin-binding regions in other proteins. Consensus sequences for glycosaminoglycan recognition were determined as [-X-B-B-X-B-X-] and [-X-B-B-B-X-X-B-X-] where B is the probability of a basic residue and X is a hydropathic residue. Predictions were then made as to the heparin-binding domains in endothelial cell growth factor, purpurin, and antithrombin-III. Many of the natural sequences conforming to these consensus motifs show prominent amphipathic periodicities having both alpha-helical and beta-strand conformations as determined by predictive algorithms and circular dichroism studies. The heparin-binding domain of vitronectin was modeled and formed a hydrophilic pocket that wrapped around and folded over a heparin octasaccharide, yielding a complementary structure. We suggest that these consensus sequence elements form potential nucleation sites for the recognition of polyanions in proteins and may provide a useful guide in identifying heparin-binding regions in other proteins. The possible relevance of protein-glycosaminoglycans interactions in atherosclerosis is discussed. PMID:2463827

  9. Kinetic modeling of molecular motors: pause model and parameter determination from single-molecule experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, José A.; Ibarra, Borja; Cao, Francisco J.

    2016-05-01

    Single-molecule manipulation experiments of molecular motors provide essential information about the rate and conformational changes of the steps of the reaction located along the manipulation coordinate. This information is not always sufficient to define a particular kinetic cycle. Recent single-molecule experiments with optical tweezers showed that the DNA unwinding activity of a Phi29 DNA polymerase mutant presents a complex pause behavior, which includes short and long pauses. Here we show that different kinetic models, considering different connections between the active and the pause states, can explain the experimental pause behavior. Both the two independent pause model and the two connected pause model are able to describe the pause behavior of a mutated Phi29 DNA polymerase observed in an optical tweezers single-molecule experiment. For the two independent pause model all parameters are fixed by the observed data, while for the more general two connected pause model there is a range of values of the parameters compatible with the observed data (which can be expressed in terms of two of the rates and their force dependencies). This general model includes models with indirect entry and exit to the long-pause state, and also models with cycling in both directions. Additionally, assuming that detailed balance is verified, which forbids cycling, this reduces the ranges of the values of the parameters (which can then be expressed in terms of one rate and its force dependency). The resulting model interpolates between the independent pause model and the indirect entry and exit to the long-pause state model

  10. Exploring the Molecular Basis of Qo bc1 Complex Inhibitors Activity to Find Novel Antimalarials Hits.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Marta P; Gut, Jiri; Rodrigues, Tiago; Ribeiro, Maria H L; Lopes, Francisca; Rosenthal, Philip J; Moreira, Rui; Dos Santos, Daniel J V A

    2013-07-01

    Cytochrome bc1 complex is a crucial element in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, being indispensable for the survival of several species of Plasmodia that cause malaria and, therefore, it is a promising target for antimalarial drug development. We report a molecular docking study building on the most recently obtained X-ray structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae bc1 complex (PDB code: 3CX5) using several reported inhibitors with experimentally determined IC50 values against the Plasmodium falciparum bc1 complex. We produced a molecular docking model that correlated the calculated binding free energy with the experimental inhibitory activity of each compound. This Qo model was used to search the drug-like database included in the MOE package for novel potential bc1 complex inhibitors. Twenty three compounds were chosen to be tested for their antimalarial activity and four of these compounds demonstrated activity against the chloroquine-resistant W2 strain of P. falciparum. The most active compounds were also active against the atovaquone-resistant P. falciparum FCR3 strain and S. cerevisiae. Our study suggests the validity of the yeast bc1 complex structure as a model for the discovery of new antimalarial hits.

  11. Stochastic interaction between neural activity and molecular cues in the formation of topographic maps

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Melinda T.; Feldheim, David A.; Stryker, Michael P.; Triplett, Jason W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Topographic maps in visual processing areas maintain the spatial order of the visual world. Molecular cues and neuronal activity both play critical roles in map formation, but their interaction remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that when molecular- and activity-dependent cues are rendered nearly equal in force, they drive topographic mapping stochastically. The functional and anatomical representation of azimuth in the superior colliculus of heterozygous Islet2-EphA3 knock-in (Isl2EphA3/+) mice is variable: maps may be single, duplicated, or a combination of the two. This heterogeneity is not due to genetic differences, since map organizations in individual mutant animals often differ between colliculi. Disruption of spontaneous waves of retinal activity resulted in uniform map organization in Isl2EphA3/+ mice, demonstrating that correlated spontaneous activity is required for map heterogeneity. Computational modeling replicates this heterogeneity, revealing that molecular- and activity-dependent forces interact simultaneously and stochastically during topographic map formation. PMID:26402608

  12. Modeling Activities in Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Kathy

    2014-05-01

    Students usually find science to be quite abstract. This is especially true of disciplines like Earth Science where it is difficult for the students to conduct and design hands-on experiments in areas such as Plate Tectonics that would allow them to develop predictive models. In the United States the new Next Generation Science Standards explicitly requires students to experience the science disciplines via modeling based activities. This poster presentation will discuss an activity that demonstrates how modeling, plate tectonics and student discourse converge in the earth science classroom. The activities featured on the poster will include using cardboard and shaving cream to demonstrate convergent plate boundaries, a Milky Way candy bar to demonstrate divergent boundaries and silly putty to demonstrate a strike slip boundary. I will discuss how students report back to the group about the findings from the lab and the techniques that can be used to heighten the student discourse. The activities outlined in this poster were originally designed for a middle school Earth Science class by Suzi Shoemaker for a graduate thesis at Arizona State University.

  13. Modeling crystal and molecular deformation in regenerated cellulose fibers.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, Stephen J; Young, Robert J; Davies, Geoffrey R

    2005-01-01

    Experimental deformation micromechanics of regenerated cellulose fibers using Raman spectroscopy have been widely reported. Here we report on computer modeling simulations of Raman band shifts in modes close to the experimentally observed 1095 cm(-1) band, which has previously been shown to shift toward a lower wavenumber upon application of external fiber deformation. A molecular mechanics approach is employed using a previously published model structure of cellulose II. Changing the equilibrium c-spacing of this structure and then performing a minimization routine mimics tensile deformation. Normal-mode analysis is then performed on the minimized structure to predict the Raman-intensive vibrations. By using a dot-product analysis on the predicted eigenvectors it is shown that some Raman active modes close to the 1095 cm(-1) band interchange at certain strain levels. Nevertheless, when this is taken into account it is shown that it is possible to find reasonable agreement between theory and experiment. The effect of the experimentally observed broadening of the Raman bands is discussed in terms of crystalline and amorphous regions of cellulose, and this is compared to the lack of X-ray broadening to explain why discrepancies between theory and experiment are present. A hybrid model structure with a series-parallel arrangement of amorphous and misaligned amorphous-crystalline domains is proposed which is shown to agree with what is observed experimentally. Finally, the theoretical crystal modulus for cellulose II is reported as 98 GPa, which is shown to be in agreement with other studies and with an experimental measurement using synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

  14. How Cells Feel: Stochastic Model for a Molecular Mechanosensor

    PubMed Central

    Escudé, Matteo; Rigozzi, Michelle K.; Terentjev, Eugene M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding mechanosensitivity (i.e., how cells sense the stiffness of their environment) is very important, yet there is a fundamental difficulty in understanding its mechanism: to measure an elastic modulus one requires two points of application of force—a measuring and a reference point. The cell in contact with substrate has only one (adhesion) point to work with, and thus a new method of measurement needs to be invented. The aim of this theoretical work is to develop a self-consistent physical model for mechanosensitivity, a process by which a cell detects the mechanical stiffness of its environment (e.g., a substrate it is attached to via adhesion points) and generates an appropriate chemical signaling to remodel itself in response to this environment. The model uses the molecular mechanosensing complex of latent TGF-β attached to the adhesion point as the biomarker. We show that the underlying Brownian motion in the substrate is the reference element in the measuring process. The model produces a closed expression for the rate of release of active TGF-β, which depends on the substrate stiffness and the pulling force coming from the cell in a subtle and nontrivial way. It is consistent with basic experimental data showing an increase in signal for stiffer substrates and higher pulling forces. In addition, we find that for each cell there is a range of stiffness where a homeostatic configuration of the cell can be achieved, outside of which the cell either relaxes its cytoskeletal forces and detaches from the very weak substrate, or generates an increasingly strong pulling force through stress fibers with a positive feedback loop on very stiff substrates. In this way, the theory offers the underlying mechanism for the myofibroblast conversion in wound healing and smooth muscle cell dysfunction in cardiac disease. PMID:24411244

  15. Molecular Interaction between Magainin 2 and Model Membranes in Situ

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khoi; Le Clair, Stéphanie V.; Ye, Shuji; Chen, Zhan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the molecular interactions of Magainin 2 with model cell membranes using Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and Attenuated Total Reflectance – Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Symmetric 1-Palmitoyl-2-Oleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-[Phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (POPG) and 1-Palmitoyl-2-Oleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (POPC) bilayers, which model the bacterial and mammalian cell membranes respectively, were used in the studies. It was observed by SFG that Magainin 2 orients relatively parallel to the POPG lipid bilayer surface at low solution concentrations, around 200 nM. When increasing the Magainin 2 concentration to 800 nM, both SFG and ATR-FTIR results indicate that Magainin 2 molecules insert into the POPG bilayer and adopt a transmembrane orientation with an angle of about 20 degrees from the POPG bilayer normal. For the POPC bilayer, even at a much higher peptide concentration of 2.0 µM, no ATR-FTIR signal was detected. For this concentration on POPC, SFG studies indicated that Magainin 2 molecules adopt an orientation nearly parallel to the bilayer surface, with an orientation angle of 75 degrees from the surface normal. This shows that SFG has a much better detection limit than ATR-FTIR and can therefore be applied to study interfacial molecules with much lower surface coverage. This Magainin 2 orientation study and further investigation of the lipid bilayer SFG signals support the proposed toroidal pore model for the antimicrobial activity of Magainin 2. PMID:19728722

  16. A molecular beacon assay for measuring base excision repair activities.

    PubMed

    Maksimenko, Andrei; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Sanz, Guenhaël; Laval, Jacques; Elder, Rhoderick H; Saparbaev, Murat K

    2004-06-18

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway plays a key role in protecting the genome from endogenous DNA damage. Current methods to measure BER activities are indirect and cumbersome. Here, we introduce a direct method to assay DNA excision repair that is suitable for automation and industrial use, based on the fluorescence quenching mechanism of molecular beacons. We designed a single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide labelled with a 5'-fluorescein (F) and a 3'-Dabcyl (D) in which the fluorophore, F, is held in close proximity to the quencher, D, by the stem-loop structure design of the oligonucleotide. Following removal of the modified base or incision of the oligonucleotide, the fluorophore is separated from the quencher and fluorescence can be detected as a function of time. Several modified beacons have been used to validate the assay on both cell-free extracts and purified proteins. We have further developed the method to analyze BER in cultured cells. As described, the molecular beacon-based assay can be applied to all DNA modifications processed by DNA excision/incision repair pathways. Possible applications of the assay are discussed, including high-throughput real-time DNA repair measurements both in vitro and in living cells.

  17. SPECTRAFACTORY.NET: A DATABASE OF MOLECULAR MODEL SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Cami, J.; Van Malderen, R.; Markwick, A. J. E-mail: Andrew.Markwick@manchester.ac.uk

    2010-04-01

    We present a homogeneous database of synthetic molecular absorption and emission spectra from the optical to mm wavelengths for a large range of temperatures and column densities relevant for various astrophysical purposes, but in particular for the analysis, identification, and first-order analysis of molecular bands in spectroscopic observations. All spectra are calculated in the LTE limit from several molecular line lists, and are presented at various spectral resolving powers corresponding to several specific instrument simulations. The database is available online at http://www.spectrafactory.net, where users can freely browse, search, display, and download the spectra. We describe how additional model spectra can be requested for (automatic) calculation and inclusion. The database already contains over half a million model spectra for 39 molecules (96 different isotopologues) over the wavelength range 350 nm-3 mm ({approx}3-30000 cm{sup -1})

  18. Interaction of methotrexate with trypsin analyzed by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanqing; Zhang, Hongmei; Cao, Jian; Zhou, Qiuhua

    2013-11-01

    Trypsin is one of important digestive enzymes that have intimate correlation with human health and illness. In this work, the interaction of trypsin with methotrexate was investigated by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. The results revealed that methotrexate could interact with trypsin with about one binding site. Methotrexate molecule could enter into the primary substrate-binding pocket, resulting in inhibition of trypsin activity. Furthermore, the thermodynamic analysis implied that electrostatic force, hydrogen bonding, van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions were the main interactions for stabilizing the trypsin-methotrexate system, which agreed well with the results from the molecular modeling study.

  19. Antituberculosis Activity of the Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network Library

    PubMed Central

    MADDRY, JOSEPH A.; ANANTHAN, SUBRAMANIAM; GOLDMAN, ROBERT C.; HOBRATH, JUDITH V.; KWONG, CECIL D.; MADDOX, CLINTON; RASMUSSEN, LYNN; REYNOLDS, ROBERT C.; SECRIST, JOHN A.; SOSA, MELINDA I.; WHITE, E. LUCILE; ZHANG, WEI

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY There is an urgent need for the discovery and development of new antitubercular agents that target novel biochemical pathways and treat drug-resistant forms of the disease. One approach to addressing this need is through high-throughput screening of drug-like small molecule libraries against the whole bacterium in order to identify a variety of new, active scaffolds that will stimulate additional biological research and drug discovery. Through the Molecular Libraries Screening Center Network, the NIAID Tuberculosis Antimicrobial Acquisition and Coordinating Facility tested a 215,110-compound library against M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv. A medicinal chemistry survey of the results from the screening campaign is reported herein. PMID:19783214

  20. United polarizable multipole water model for molecular mechanics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Rui; Wang, Lee-Ping; Wang, Qiantao; Pande, Vijay S.; Ren, Pengyu

    2015-07-01

    We report the development of a united AMOEBA (uAMOEBA) polarizable water model, which is computationally 3-5 times more efficient than the three-site AMOEBA03 model in molecular dynamics simulations while providing comparable accuracy for gas-phase and liquid properties. In this coarse-grained polarizable water model, both electrostatic (permanent and induced) and van der Waals representations have been reduced to a single site located at the oxygen atom. The permanent charge distribution is described via the molecular dipole and quadrupole moments and the many-body polarization via an isotropic molecular polarizability, all located at the oxygen center. Similarly, a single van der Waals interaction site is used for each water molecule. Hydrogen atoms are retained only for the purpose of defining local frames for the molecular multipole moments and intramolecular vibrational modes. The parameters have been derived based on a combination of ab initio quantum mechanical and experimental data set containing gas-phase cluster structures and energies, and liquid thermodynamic properties. For validation, additional properties including dimer interaction energy, liquid structures, self-diffusion coefficient, and shear viscosity have been evaluated. The results demonstrate good transferability from the gas to the liquid phase over a wide range of temperatures, and from nonpolar to polar environments, due to the presence of molecular polarizability. The water coordination, hydrogen-bonding structure, and dynamic properties given by uAMOEBA are similar to those derived from the all-atom AMOEBA03 model and experiments. Thus, the current model is an accurate and efficient alternative for modeling water.

  1. United polarizable multipole water model for molecular mechanics simulation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Rui; Wang, Lee-Ping; Wang, Qiantao; Pande, Vijay S; Ren, Pengyu

    2015-07-01

    We report the development of a united AMOEBA (uAMOEBA) polarizable water model, which is computationally 3-5 times more efficient than the three-site AMOEBA03 model in molecular dynamics simulations while providing comparable accuracy for gas-phase and liquid properties. In this coarse-grained polarizable water model, both electrostatic (permanent and induced) and van der Waals representations have been reduced to a single site located at the oxygen atom. The permanent charge distribution is described via the molecular dipole and quadrupole moments and the many-body polarization via an isotropic molecular polarizability, all located at the oxygen center. Similarly, a single van der Waals interaction site is used for each water molecule. Hydrogen atoms are retained only for the purpose of defining local frames for the molecular multipole moments and intramolecular vibrational modes. The parameters have been derived based on a combination of ab initio quantum mechanical and experimental data set containing gas-phase cluster structures and energies, and liquid thermodynamic properties. For validation, additional properties including dimer interaction energy, liquid structures, self-diffusion coefficient, and shear viscosity have been evaluated. The results demonstrate good transferability from the gas to the liquid phase over a wide range of temperatures, and from nonpolar to polar environments, due to the presence of molecular polarizability. The water coordination, hydrogen-bonding structure, and dynamic properties given by uAMOEBA are similar to those derived from the all-atom AMOEBA03 model and experiments. Thus, the current model is an accurate and efficient alternative for modeling water.

  2. United polarizable multipole water model for molecular mechanics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Rui; Wang, Qiantao; Ren, Pengyu; Wang, Lee-Ping; Pande, Vijay S.

    2015-07-07

    We report the development of a united AMOEBA (uAMOEBA) polarizable water model, which is computationally 3–5 times more efficient than the three-site AMOEBA03 model in molecular dynamics simulations while providing comparable accuracy for gas-phase and liquid properties. In this coarse-grained polarizable water model, both electrostatic (permanent and induced) and van der Waals representations have been reduced to a single site located at the oxygen atom. The permanent charge distribution is described via the molecular dipole and quadrupole moments and the many-body polarization via an isotropic molecular polarizability, all located at the oxygen center. Similarly, a single van der Waals interaction site is used for each water molecule. Hydrogen atoms are retained only for the purpose of defining local frames for the molecular multipole moments and intramolecular vibrational modes. The parameters have been derived based on a combination of ab initio quantum mechanical and experimental data set containing gas-phase cluster structures and energies, and liquid thermodynamic properties. For validation, additional properties including dimer interaction energy, liquid structures, self-diffusion coefficient, and shear viscosity have been evaluated. The results demonstrate good transferability from the gas to the liquid phase over a wide range of temperatures, and from nonpolar to polar environments, due to the presence of molecular polarizability. The water coordination, hydrogen-bonding structure, and dynamic properties given by uAMOEBA are similar to those derived from the all-atom AMOEBA03 model and experiments. Thus, the current model is an accurate and efficient alternative for modeling water.

  3. Animal models of osteoarthritis in an era of molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Bendele, A M

    2002-12-01

    Animal models of osteoarthritis (OA) are used to study the pathogenesis of cartilage degeneration and to evaluate potential anti-arthritic drugs for clinical use. In general, these models fall into 2 categories, spontaneous and induced (surgical instability or genetic manipulation). Animal models of naturally occurring OA occur in knee joints of guinea pigs, mice and Syrian hamsters. Commonly utilized surgical instability models include medial meniscal tear in guinea pigs and rats, medial or lateral partial meniscectomy in rabbits, medial partial or total meniscectomy or anterior cruciate transection in dogs. Transgenic models have been developed in mice. These models all have potential use in the study of molecular mechanisms associated with OA development via use of immunohistochemistry, biochemistry and molecular probes to identify altered matrix molecules at different stages in disease progression. Testing of specific types of inhibitors developed through evaluation of matrix changes in the disease process will ultimately help identify key processes which initiate and perpetuate the disease and will lead to discovery of new disease modifying pharmaceutical agents for OA patients. This paper will focus on the discussion of several models which are likely to be useful in the molecular dissection of processes involved in cartilage degeneration. PMID:15758375

  4. Atomic and molecular physics and data activities for astrophysics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery, D.J.; Kristic, P.S.; Liu, W.; Schultz, D.R.; Stancil, P.C.

    1998-04-01

    The atomic astrophysics group at ORNL produces, collects, evaluates, and disseminates atomic and molecular data relevant to astrophysics and actively models various astrophysical environments utilizing this information. With the advent of the World Wide Web, these data are also being placed on-line to facilitate their use by end-users. In this brief report, the group`s recent activities in data production and in modeling are highlighted. For example, the authors describe recent calculations of elastic and transport cross sections relevant to ionospheric and heliospheric studies, charge transfer between metal ions and metal atoms and novel supernova nebular spectra modeling, ion-molecule collision data relevant to planetary atmospheres and comets, and data for early universe modeling.

  5. Restricted dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in activated carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Saha, Dipendu; Gallego, Nidia C; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Bhat, Vinay V

    2012-01-01

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering was used for characterization of dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in narrow nanopores of two activated carbon materials: PFAC (derived from polyfurfuryl alcohol) and UMC (ultramicroporous carbon). Fast, but incomplete ortho-para conversion was observed at 10 K, suggesting that scattering originates from the fraction of unconverted ortho isomer which is rotation-hindered because of confinement in nanopores. Hydrogen molecules entrapped in narrow nanopores (<7 ) were immobile below 22-25 K. Mobility increased rapidly with temperature above this threshold, which is 8 K higher than the melting point of bulk hydrogen. Diffusion obeyed fixed-jump length mechanism, indistinguishable between 2D and 3D processes. Thermal activation of diffusion was characterized between ~22 and 37 K, and structure-dependent differences were found between the two carbons. Activation energy of diffusion was higher than that of bulk solid hydrogen. Classical notions of liquid and solid do not longer apply for H2 confined in narrow nanopores.

  6. Structural basis for the antifolding activity of a molecular chaperone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengdong; Rossi, Paolo; Saio, Tomohide; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2016-09-01

    Molecular chaperones act on non-native proteins in the cell to prevent their aggregation, premature folding or misfolding. Different chaperones often exert distinct effects, such as acceleration or delay of folding, on client proteins via mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here we report the solution structure of SecB, a chaperone that exhibits strong antifolding activity, in complex with alkaline phosphatase and maltose-binding protein captured in their unfolded states. SecB uses long hydrophobic grooves that run around its disk-like shape to recognize and bind to multiple hydrophobic segments across the length of non-native proteins. The multivalent binding mode results in proteins wrapping around SecB. This unique complex architecture alters the kinetics of protein binding to SecB and confers strong antifolding activity on the chaperone. The data show how the different architectures of chaperones result in distinct binding modes with non-native proteins that ultimately define the activity of the chaperone.

  7. Chemical and thermal modulation of molecular motor activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Weili

    Molecular motors of kinesin and dynein families are responsible for various intracellular activities, from long distance movement of organelles, vesicles, protein complexes, and mRNAs to powering mitotic processes. They can take nanometer steps using chemical energy from the hydrolysis of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), and their dysfunction is involved in many neurodegenerative diseases that require long distance transport of cargos. Here I report on the study of the properties of molecular motors at a single-molecule level using optical trappings. I first studied the inhibition properties of kinesin motors by marine natural compound adociasulfates. I showed that adociasulfates compete with microtubules for binding to kinesins and thus inhibit kinesins' activity. Although adociasulfates are a strong inhibitor for all kinesin members, they show a much higher inhibition effect for conventional kinesins than for mitotic kinesins. Thus adociasulfates can be used to specifically inhibit conventional kinesins. By comparing the inhibition of kinesins by two structurally similar adociasulfates, one can see that the negatively charged sulfate residue of adociasulfates can be replaced by other negative residues and thus make it possible for adociasulfate-derived compounds to be more cell permeable. Kinesins and dyneins move cargos towards opposite directions along a microtubule. Cargos with both kinesins and dyneins attached often move bidirectionally due to undergoing a tug-of-war between the oppositely moving kinesin and dynein motors. Here I studied the effect of temperature on microtubule-based kinesin and dynein motor transport. While kinesins' and dyneins' velocities are closely matched above 15 °C, below this temperature the dyneins' velocity decreases much faster than the kinesins'. The kinesins' and dyneins' forces do not measurably change with temperature. The results suggest that temperature has significant effects on bidirectional transport and can be used to

  8. The Use of Molecular Modeling Programs in Medicinal Chemistry Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrold, Marc W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates the use of a molecular modeling computer program (Alchemy II) in a pharmaceutical education program. Provided are the hardware requirements and basic program features as well as several examples of how this program and its features have been applied in the classroom. (GLR)

  9. Promoting Representational Competence with Molecular Models in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stull, Andrew T.; Gainer, Morgan; Padalkar, Shamin; Hegarty, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Mastering the many different diagrammatic representations of molecules used in organic chemistry is challenging for students. This article summarizes recent research showing that manipulating 3-D molecular models can facilitate the understanding and use of these representations. Results indicate that students are more successful in translating…

  10. Fischer and Schrock Carbene Complexes: A Molecular Modeling Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    An exercise in molecular modeling that demonstrates the distinctive features of Fischer and Schrock carbene complexes is presented. Semi-empirical calculations (PM3) demonstrate the singlet ground electronic state, restricted rotation about the C-Y bond, the positive charge on the carbon atom, and hence, the electrophilic nature of the Fischer…

  11. Bio-AIMS Collection of Chemoinformatics Web Tools based on Molecular Graph Information and Artificial Intelligence Models.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Cristian R; Gonzalez-Diaz, Humberto; Garcia, Rafael; Loza, Mabel; Pazos, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The molecular information encoding into molecular descriptors is the first step into in silico Chemoinformatics methods in Drug Design. The Machine Learning methods are a complex solution to find prediction models for specific biological properties of molecules. These models connect the molecular structure information such as atom connectivity (molecular graphs) or physical-chemical properties of an atom/group of atoms to the molecular activity (Quantitative Structure - Activity Relationship, QSAR). Due to the complexity of the proteins, the prediction of their activity is a complicated task and the interpretation of the models is more difficult. The current review presents a series of 11 prediction models for proteins, implemented as free Web tools on an Artificial Intelligence Model Server in Biosciences, Bio-AIMS (http://bio-aims.udc.es/TargetPred.php). Six tools predict protein activity, two models evaluate drug - protein target interactions and the other three calculate protein - protein interactions. The input information is based on the protein 3D structure for nine models, 1D peptide amino acid sequence for three tools and drug SMILES formulas for two servers. The molecular graph descriptor-based Machine Learning models could be useful tools for in silico screening of new peptides/proteins as future drug targets for specific treatments.

  12. Markov models of molecular kinetics: generation and validation.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Jan-Hendrik; Wu, Hao; Sarich, Marco; Keller, Bettina; Senne, Martin; Held, Martin; Chodera, John D; Schütte, Christof; Noé, Frank

    2011-05-01

    Markov state models of molecular kinetics (MSMs), in which the long-time statistical dynamics of a molecule is approximated by a Markov chain on a discrete partition of configuration space, have seen widespread use in recent years. This approach has many appealing characteristics compared to straightforward molecular dynamics simulation and analysis, including the potential to mitigate the sampling problem by extracting long-time kinetic information from short trajectories and the ability to straightforwardly calculate expectation values and statistical uncertainties of various stationary and dynamical molecular observables. In this paper, we summarize the current state of the art in generation and validation of MSMs and give some important new results. We describe an upper bound for the approximation error made by modeling molecular dynamics with a MSM and we show that this error can be made arbitrarily small with surprisingly little effort. In contrast to previous practice, it becomes clear that the best MSM is not obtained by the most metastable discretization, but the MSM can be much improved if non-metastable states are introduced near the transition states. Moreover, we show that it is not necessary to resolve all slow processes by the state space partitioning, but individual dynamical processes of interest can be resolved separately. We also present an efficient estimator for reversible transition matrices and a robust test to validate that a MSM reproduces the kinetics of the molecular dynamics data.

  13. Gradient Models in Molecular Biophysics: Progress, Challenges, Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P.

    2014-01-01

    In the interest of developing a bridge between researchers modeling materials and those modeling biological molecules, we survey recent progress in developing nonlocal-dielectric continuum models for studying the behavior of proteins and nucleic acids. As in other areas of science, continuum models are essential tools when atomistic simulations (e.g. molecular dynamics) are too expensive. Because biological molecules are essentially all nanoscale systems, the standard continuum model, involving local dielectric response, has basically always been dubious at best. The advanced continuum theories discussed here aim to remedy these shortcomings by adding features such as nonlocal dielectric response, and nonlinearities resulting from dielectric saturation. We begin by describing the central role of electrostatic interactions in biology at the molecular scale, and motivate the development of computationally tractable continuum models using applications in science and engineering. For context, we highlight some of the most important challenges that remain and survey the diverse theoretical formalisms for their treatment, highlighting the rigorous statistical mechanics that support the use and improvement of continuum models. We then address the development and implementation of nonlocal dielectric models, an approach pioneered by Dogonadze, Kornyshev, and their collaborators almost forty years ago. The simplest of these models is just a scalar form of gradient elasticity, and here we use ideas from gradient-based modeling to extend the electrostatic model to include additional length scales. The paper concludes with a discussion of open questions for model development, highlighting the many opportunities for the materials community to leverage its physical, mathematical, and computational expertise to help solve one of the most challenging questions in molecular biology and biophysics. PMID:25505358

  14. Pomegranate Extracts and Cancer Prevention: Molecular and Cellular Activities

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Deeba N.; Chamcheu, Jean-Christopher; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    There is increased appreciation by the scientific community that dietary phytochemicals can be potential weapons in the fight against cancer. Emerging data has provided new insights into the molecular and cellular framework needed to establish novel mechanism-based strategies for cancer prevention by selective bioactive food components. The unique chemical composition of the pomegranate fruit, rich in antioxidant tannins and flavonoids has drawn the attention of many investigators. Polyphenol rich fractions derived from the pomegranate fruit have been studied for their potential chemopreventive and/or cancer therapeutic effects in several animal models. Although data from in vitro and in vivo studies look convincing, well designed clinical trials in humans are needed to ascertain whether pomegranate can become part of our armamentarium against cancer. This review summarizes the available literature on the effects of pomegranate against various cancers. PMID:23094914

  15. Phase Transitions in Model Active Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redner, Gabriel S.

    materials, leading to beautiful and surprising behaviors including the spontaneous generation of topological defect pairs which stream through the system and later annihilate, yielding a complex, seemingly chaotic dynamical steady-state. Here, we describe the emergence of order from this chaos in the form of previously unknown broken-symmetry phases in which the topological defects themselves undergo orientational ordering. We have identified these defect-ordered phases in two realizations of an active nematic: first, a suspension of extensile bundles of microtubules and molecular motor proteins, and second, a computational model of extending hard rods. We will describe the defect-stabilized phases that manifest in these systems, our current understanding of their origins, and discuss whether such phases may be a general feature of extensile active nematics.

  16. Molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and structure-based 3D-QSAR studies on estrogenic activity of hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolin; Ye, Li; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Wang, Xinzhou; Liu, Hongling; Qian, Xiangping; Zhu, Yongliang; Yu, Hongxia

    2012-12-15

    Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (HO-PCBs), major metabolites of PCBs, have been reported to present agonist or antagonist interactions with estrogen receptor α (ERα) and induce ER-mediated responses. In this work, a multistep framework combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and structure-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies were performed to explore the influence of structural features on the estrogenic activities of HO-PCBs, and to investigate the molecular mechanism of ERα-ligand interactions. The CoMSIA (comparative molecular similarity indices analysis) model was developed from the conformations obtained from molecular docking. The model exhibited statistically significant results as the cross-validated correlation coefficient q² was 0.648, the non-cross-validated correlation coefficient r² was 0.968, and the external predictive correlation coefficient r(pred)² was 0.625. The key amino acid residues were identified by molecular docking, and the detailed binding modes of the compounds with different activities were determined by MD simulations. The binding free energies correlated well with the experimental activity. An energetic analysis, MM-GBSA energy decomposition, revealed that the van der Waals interaction was the major driving force for the binding of compounds to ERα. The hydrogen bond interactions between the ligands and residue His524 help to stabilize the conformation of ligands at the binding pocket. These results are expected to be beneficial to predict estrogenic activities of other HO-PCB congeners and helpful for understanding the binding mechanism of HO-PCBs and ERα. PMID:23137989

  17. Molecular-orbital model for metal-sapphire interfacial strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. H.; Pepper, S. V.

    1982-01-01

    Self-consistent-field X-Alpha scattered-wave cluster molecular-orbital models have been constructed for transition and noble metals (Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ag) in contact with a sapphire (Al2O3) surface. It is found that a chemical bond is established between the metal d-orbital electrons and the nonbonding 2p-orbital electrons of the oxygen anions on the Al2O3 surface. An increasing number of occupied metal-sapphire antibonding molecular orbitals explains qualitatively the observed decrease of contact shear strength through the series Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ag.

  18. QSAR prediction of HIV-1 protease inhibitory activities using docking derived molecular descriptors.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, Mohammad H; Heidari, Afsane; Gharaghani, Sajjad

    2015-03-21

    In this study, application of a new hybrid docking-quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) methodology to model and predict the HIV-1 protease inhibitory activities of a series of newly synthesized chemicals is reported. This hybrid docking-QSAR approach can provide valuable information about the most important chemical and structural features of the ligands that affect their inhibitory activities. Docking studies were used to find the actual conformations of chemicals in active site of HIV-1 protease. Then the molecular descriptors were calculated from these conformations. Multiple linear regression (MLR) and least square support vector machine (LS-SVM) were used as QSAR models, respectively. The obtained results reveal that statistical parameters of the LS-SVM model are better than the MLR model, which indicate that there are some non-linear relations between selected molecular descriptors and anti-HIV activities of interested chemicals. The correlation coefficient (R), root mean square error (RMSE) and average absolute error (AAE) for LS-SVM are: R=0.988, RMSE=0.207 and AAE=0.145 for the training set, and R=0.965, RMSE=0.403 and AAE=0.338 for the test set. Leave one out cross validation test was used for assessment of the predictive power and validity of models which led to cross-validation correlation coefficient QUOTE of 0.864 and 0.850 and standardized predicted relative error sum of squares (SPRESS) of 0.553 and 0.581 for LS-SVM and MLR models, respectively.

  19. A log-normal distribution model for the molecular weight of aquatic fulvic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cabaniss, S.E.; Zhou, Q.; Maurice, P.A.; Chin, Y.-P.; Aiken, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    The molecular weight of humic substances influences their proton and metal binding, organic pollutant partitioning, adsorption onto minerals and activated carbon, and behavior during water treatment. We propose a lognormal model for the molecular weight distribution in aquatic fulvic acids to provide a conceptual framework for studying these size effects. The normal curve mean and standard deviation are readily calculated from measured M(n) and M(w) and vary from 2.7 to 3 for the means and from 0.28 to 0.37 for the standard deviations for typical aquatic fulvic acids. The model is consistent with several types of molecular weight data, including the shapes of high- pressure size-exclusion chromatography (HP-SEC) peaks. Applications of the model to electrostatic interactions, pollutant solubilization, and adsorption are explored in illustrative calculations.The molecular weight of humic substances influences their proton and metal binding, organic pollutant partitioning, adsorption onto minerals and activated carbon, and behavior during water treatment. We propose a log-normal model for the molecular weight distribution in aquatic fulvic acids to provide a conceptual framework for studying these size effects. The normal curve mean and standard deviation are readily calculated from measured Mn and Mw and vary from 2.7 to 3 for the means and from 0.28 to 0.37 for the standard deviations for typical aquatic fulvic acids. The model is consistent with several type's of molecular weight data, including the shapes of high-pressure size-exclusion chromatography (HP-SEC) peaks. Applications of the model to electrostatic interactions, pollutant solubilization, and adsorption are explored in illustrative calculations.

  20. Molecular Mechanisms and Timing of Cortical Immune Activation in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Volk, David W.; Chitrapu, Anjani; Edelson, Jessica R.; Roman, Kaitlyn M.; Moroco, Annie E.; Lewis, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Immune-related abnormalities are commonly reported in schizophrenia, including higher mRNA levels for the viral restriction factor interferon-induced transmembrane protein (IFITM) in the prefrontal cortex. The authors sought to clarify whether higher IFITM mRNA levels and other immune-related disturbances in the prefrontal cortex are the consequence of an ongoing molecular cascade contributing to immune activation or the reflection of a long-lasting maladaptive response to an in utero immune-related insult. Method Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was employed to measure mRNA levels for immune-related cytokines and transcriptional regulators, including those reported to regulate IFITM expression, in the prefrontal cortex from 62 schizophrenia and 62 healthy subjects and from adult mice exposed prenatally to maternal immune activation or in adulthood to the immune stimulant poly(I:C). Results Schizophrenia subjects had markedly higher mRNA levels for interleukin 6 (IL-6) (+379%) and interferon-β (+29%), which induce IFITM expression; lower mRNA levels for Schnurri-2 (−10%), a transcriptional inhibitor that lowers IFITM expression; and higher mRNA levels for nuclear factor-κB (+86%), a critical transcription factor that mediates cytokine regulation of immune-related gene expression. In adult mice that received daily poly(I:C) injections, but not in offspring with prenatal exposure to maternal immune activation, frontal cortex mRNA levels were also markedly elevated for IFITM (+304%), multiple cytokines including IL-6 (+493%), and nuclear factor-κB (+151%). Conclusions These data suggest that higher prefrontal cortex IFITM mRNA levels in schizophrenia may be attributable to adult, but not prenatal, activation of multiple immune markers and encourage further investigation into the potential role of these and other immune markers as therapeutic targets in schizophrenia. PMID:26133963

  1. Derivatives of Ergot-alkaloids: Molecular structure, physical properties, and structure-activity relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Bojidarka B.; Spiteller, Michael

    2012-09-01

    A comprehensive screening of fifteen functionalized Ergot-alkaloids, containing bulk aliphatic cyclic substituents at D-ring of the ergoline molecular skeleton was performed, studying their structure-active relationships and model interactions with α2A-adreno-, serotonin (5HT2A) and dopamine D3 (D3A) receptors. The accounted high affinity to the receptors binding loops and unusual bonding situations, joined with the molecular flexibility of the substituents and the presence of proton accepting/donating functional groups in the studied alkaloids, may contribute to further understanding the mechanisms of biological activity in vivo and in predicting their therapeutic potential in central nervous system (CNS), including those related the Schizophrenia. Since the presented correlation between the molecular structure and properties, was based on the comprehensively theoretical computational and experimental physical study on the successfully isolated derivatives, through using routine synthetic pathways in a relatively high yields, marked these derivatives as 'treasure' for further experimental and theoretical studied in areas such as: (a) pharmacological and clinical testing; (b) molecular-drugs design of novel psychoactive substances; (c) development of the analytical protocols for determination of Ergot-alkaloids through a functionalization of the ergoline-skeleton, and more.

  2. Chemical graphs, molecular matrices and topological indices in chemoinformatics and quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Ivanciuc, Ovidiu

    2013-06-01

    Chemical and molecular graphs have fundamental applications in chemoinformatics, quantitative structureproperty relationships (QSPR), quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR), virtual screening of chemical libraries, and computational drug design. Chemoinformatics applications of graphs include chemical structure representation and coding, database search and retrieval, and physicochemical property prediction. QSPR, QSAR and virtual screening are based on the structure-property principle, which states that the physicochemical and biological properties of chemical compounds can be predicted from their chemical structure. Such structure-property correlations are usually developed from topological indices and fingerprints computed from the molecular graph and from molecular descriptors computed from the three-dimensional chemical structure. We present here a selection of the most important graph descriptors and topological indices, including molecular matrices, graph spectra, spectral moments, graph polynomials, and vertex topological indices. These graph descriptors are used to define several topological indices based on molecular connectivity, graph distance, reciprocal distance, distance-degree, distance-valency, spectra, polynomials, and information theory concepts. The molecular descriptors and topological indices can be developed with a more general approach, based on molecular graph operators, which define a family of graph indices related by a common formula. Graph descriptors and topological indices for molecules containing heteroatoms and multiple bonds are computed with weighting schemes based on atomic properties, such as the atomic number, covalent radius, or electronegativity. The correlation in QSPR and QSAR models can be improved by optimizing some parameters in the formula of topological indices, as demonstrated for structural descriptors based on atomic connectivity and graph distance. PMID:23701000

  3. Multi-level molecular modelling for plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogaerts, Annemie; Khosravian, Narjes; Van der Paal, Jonas; Verlackt, Christof C. W.; Yusupov, Maksudbek; Kamaraj, Balu; Neyts, Erik C.

    2016-02-01

    Modelling at the molecular or atomic scale can be very useful for obtaining a better insight in plasma medicine. This paper gives an overview of different atomic/molecular scale modelling approaches that can be used to study the direct interaction of plasma species with biomolecules or the consequences of these interactions for the biomolecules on a somewhat longer time-scale. These approaches include density functional theory (DFT), density functional based tight binding (DFTB), classical reactive and non-reactive molecular dynamics (MD) and united-atom or coarse-grained MD, as well as hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. Specific examples will be given for three important types of biomolecules, present in human cells, i.e. proteins, DNA and phospholipids found in the cell membrane. The results show that each of these modelling approaches has its specific strengths and limitations, and is particularly useful for certain applications. A multi-level approach is therefore most suitable for obtaining a global picture of the plasma-biomolecule interactions.

  4. Modeling Electrically Active Viscoelastic Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sitikantha; Brownell, William E.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    The membrane protein prestin is native to the cochlear outer hair cell that is crucial to the ear's amplification and frequency selectivity throughout the whole acoustic frequency range. The outer hair cell exhibits interrelated dimensional changes, force generation, and electric charge transfer. Cells transfected with prestin acquire unique active properties similar to those in the native cell that have also been useful in understanding the process. Here we propose a model describing the major electromechanical features of such active membranes. The model derived from thermodynamic principles is in the form of integral relationships between the history of voltage and membrane resultants as independent variables and the charge density and strains as dependent variables. The proposed model is applied to the analysis of an active force produced by the outer hair cell in response to a harmonic electric field. Our analysis reveals the mechanism of the outer hair cell active (isometric) force having an almost constant amplitude and phase up to 80 kHz. We found that the frequency-invariance of the force is a result of interplay between the electrical filtering associated with prestin and power law viscoelasticity of the surrounding membrane. Paradoxically, the membrane viscoelasticity boosts the force balancing the electrical filtering effect. We also consider various modes of electromechanical coupling in membrane with prestin associated with mechanical perturbations in the cell. We consider pressure or strains applied step-wise or at a constant rate and compute the time course of the resulting electric charge. The results obtained here are important for the analysis of electromechanical properties of membranes, cells, and biological materials as well as for a better understanding of the mechanism of hearing and the role of the protein prestin in this mechanism. PMID:22701528

  5. Molecular mechanism of APC/C activation by mitotic phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suyang; Chang, Leifu; Alfieri, Claudio; Zhang, Ziguo; Yang, Jing; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, Mark; Barford, David

    2016-04-27

    In eukaryotes, the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C, also known as the cyclosome) regulates the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of specific cell-cycle proteins to coordinate chromosome segregation in mitosis and entry into the G1 phase. The catalytic activity of the APC/C and its ability to specify the destruction of particular proteins at different phases of the cell cycle are controlled by its interaction with two structurally related coactivator subunits, Cdc20 and Cdh1. Coactivators recognize substrate degrons, and enhance the affinity of the APC/C for its cognate E2 (refs 4-6). During mitosis, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) and polo-like kinase (Plk) control Cdc20- and Cdh1-mediated activation of the APC/C. Hyperphosphorylation of APC/C subunits, notably Apc1 and Apc3, is required for Cdc20 to activate the APC/C, whereas phosphorylation of Cdh1 prevents its association with the APC/C. Since both coactivators associate with the APC/C through their common C-box and Ile-Arg tail motifs, the mechanism underlying this differential regulation is unclear, as is the role of specific APC/C phosphorylation sites. Here, using cryo-electron microscopy and biochemical analysis, we define the molecular basis of how phosphorylation of human APC/C allows for its control by Cdc20. An auto-inhibitory segment of Apc1 acts as a molecular switch that in apo unphosphorylated APC/C interacts with the C-box binding site and obstructs engagement of Cdc20. Phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory segment displaces it from the C-box-binding site. Efficient phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory segment, and thus relief of auto-inhibition, requires the recruitment of Cdk-cyclin in complex with a Cdk regulatory subunit (Cks) to a hyperphosphorylated loop of Apc3. We also find that the small-molecule inhibitor, tosyl-l-arginine methyl ester, preferentially suppresses APC/C(Cdc20) rather than APC/C(Cdh1), and interacts with the binding sites of both the C-box and Ile-Arg tail motifs. Our

  6. Molecular Dynamics of "Fuzzy" Transcriptional Activator-Coactivator Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Scholes, Natalie S.; Weinzierl, Robert O. J.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional activation domains (ADs) are generally thought to be intrinsically unstructured, but capable of adopting limited secondary structure upon interaction with a coactivator surface. The indeterminate nature of this interface made it hitherto difficult to study structure/function relationships of such contacts. Here we used atomistic accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations to study the conformational changes of the GCN4 AD and variants thereof, either free in solution, or bound to the GAL11 coactivator surface. We show that the AD-coactivator interactions are highly dynamic while obeying distinct rules. The data provide insights into the constant and variable aspects of orientation of ADs relative to the coactivator, changes in secondary structure and energetic contributions stabilizing the various conformers at different time points. We also demonstrate that a prediction of α-helical propensity correlates directly with the experimentally measured transactivation potential of a large set of mutagenized ADs. The link between α-helical propensity and the stimulatory activity of ADs has fundamental practical and theoretical implications concerning the recruitment of ADs to coactivators. PMID:27175900

  7. Nanoplasmonic molecular ruler for nuclease activity and DNAfootprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Fanqing Frank; Liu, Gang L.; Yin, Yadong; Gerion, Daniele; Kunchakarra, Siri; Mukherjee, Bipasha; Jett, Stephen D.; Bear, David G.; Alivisatos, Paul; Lee, Luke P.

    2006-08-15

    We have constructed a nanoplasmonic molecular ruler, which can perform label-free and real-time monitoring of DNA length changes and perform DNA footprinting. The ruler was created by tethering double-stranded DNA to single Au nanoparticles. The scattering spectra of Au-DNA nanoconjugates showed red-shifted peak plasmon resonance wavelength dependent on DNA length, which can be measured with sub-nanometer axial resolution, averaging {approx}1.24 nm peak wavelength shift per DNA base pair. The spectra of individual Au-DNA nanoconjugates in the presence of nuclease showed a time-resolved dependence on the reaction dynamics, allowing quantitative, kinetic and real-time measurement of nuclease activity. The ruler was further developed into a new DNA footprinting platform. We showed the specific binding of a protein to DNA and the accurate mapping of its footprint. This work promises a very fast and convenient platform for mapping DNA-protein interactions, for nuclease activity monitoring, and for other DNA size-based methods.

  8. Synthetic Molecular Machines for Active Self-Assembly: Prototype Algorithms, Designs, and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabby, Nadine L.

    behaviors. This class of behaviors includes any behavior where a passive physical system simply does not have enough physical energy to perform the specified tasks in the requisite amount of time. As we will demonstrate and prove, a sufficiently expressive implementation of an "active" molecular self-assembly approach can achieve these behaviors. Using an external source of fuel solves part of the problem, so the system is not "energetically incomplete." But the programmable system also needs to have sufficient expressive power to achieve the specified behaviors. Perhaps surprisingly, some of these systems do not even require Turing completeness to be sufficiently expressive. Building on a large variety of work by other scientists in the fields of DNA nanotechnology, chemistry and reconfigurable robotics, this thesis introduces several research contributions in the context of active self-assembly. We show that simple primitives such as insertion and deletion are able to generate complex and interesting results such as the growth of a linear polymer in logarithmic time and the ability of a linear polymer to treadmill. To this end we developed a formal model for active-self assembly that is directly implementable with DNA molecules. We show that this model is computationally equivalent to a machine capable of producing strings that are stronger than regular languages and, at most, as strong as context-free grammars. This is a great advance in the theory of active self-assembly as prior models were either entirely theoretical or only implementable in the context of macro-scale robotics. We developed a chain reaction method for the autonomous exponential growth of a linear DNA polymer. Our method is based on the insertion of molecules into the assembly, which generates two new insertion sites for every initial one employed. The building of a line in logarithmic time is a first step toward building a shape in logarithmic time. We demonstrate the first construction of a synthetic

  9. Drug repositioning by kernel-based integration of molecular structure, molecular activity, and phenotype data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongcui; Chen, Shilong; Deng, Naiyang; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Computational inference of novel therapeutic values for existing drugs, i.e., drug repositioning, offers the great prospect for faster and low-risk drug development. Previous researches have indicated that chemical structures, target proteins, and side-effects could provide rich information in drug similarity assessment and further disease similarity. However, each single data source is important in its own way and data integration holds the great promise to reposition drug more accurately. Here, we propose a new method for drug repositioning, PreDR (Predict Drug Repositioning), to integrate molecular structure, molecular activity, and phenotype data. Specifically, we characterize drug by profiling in chemical structure, target protein, and side-effects space, and define a kernel function to correlate drugs with diseases. Then we train a support vector machine (SVM) to computationally predict novel drug-disease interactions. PreDR is validated on a well-established drug-disease network with 1,933 interactions among 593 drugs and 313 diseases. By cross-validation, we find that chemical structure, drug target, and side-effects information are all predictive for drug-disease relationships. More experimentally observed drug-disease interactions can be revealed by integrating these three data sources. Comparison with existing methods demonstrates that PreDR is competitive both in accuracy and coverage. Follow-up database search and pathway analysis indicate that our new predictions are worthy of further experimental validation. Particularly several novel predictions are supported by clinical trials databases and this shows the significant prospects of PreDR in future drug treatment. In conclusion, our new method, PreDR, can serve as a useful tool in drug discovery to efficiently identify novel drug-disease interactions. In addition, our heterogeneous data integration framework can be applied to other problems.

  10. Molecular pathway activation features linked with transition from normal skin to primary and metastatic melanomas in human.

    PubMed

    Shepelin, Denis; Korzinkin, Mikhail; Vanyushina, Anna; Aliper, Alexander; Borisov, Nicolas; Vasilov, Raif; Zhukov, Nikolay; Sokov, Dmitry; Prassolov, Vladimir; Gaifullin, Nurshat; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive and dangerous type of skin cancer, but its molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. For transcriptomic data of 478 primary and metastatic melanoma, nevi and normal skin samples, we performed high-throughput analysis of intracellular molecular networks including 592 signaling and metabolic pathways. We showed that at the molecular pathway level, the formation of nevi largely resembles transition from normal skin to primary melanoma. Using a combination of bioinformatic machine learning algorithms, we identified 44 characteristic signaling and metabolic pathways connected with the formation of nevi, development of primary melanoma, and its metastases. We created a model describing formation and progression of melanoma at the level of molecular pathway activation. We discovered six novel associations between activation of metabolic molecular pathways and progression of melanoma: for allopregnanolone biosynthesis, L-carnitine biosynthesis, zymosterol biosynthesis (inhibited in melanoma), fructose 2, 6-bisphosphate synthesis and dephosphorylation, resolvin D biosynthesis (activated in melanoma), D-myo-inositol hexakisphosphate biosynthesis (activated in primary, inhibited in metastatic melanoma). Finally, we discovered fourteen tightly coordinated functional clusters of molecular pathways. This study helps to decode molecular mechanisms underlying the development of melanoma. PMID:26624979

  11. Molecular pathway activation features linked with transition from normal skin to primary and metastatic melanomas in human

    PubMed Central

    Shepelin, Denis; Korzinkin, Mikhail; Vanyushina, Anna; Aliper, Alexander; Borisov, Nicolas; Vasilov, Raif; Zhukov, Nikolay; Sokov, Dmitry; Prassolov, Vladimir; Gaifullin, Nurshat; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive and dangerous type of skin cancer, but its molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. For transcriptomic data of 478 primary and metastatic melanoma, nevi and normal skin samples, we performed high-throughput analysis of intracellular molecular networks including 592 signaling and metabolic pathways. We showed that at the molecular pathway level, the formation of nevi largely resembles transition from normal skin to primary melanoma. Using a combination of bioinformatic machine learning algorithms, we identified 44 characteristic signaling and metabolic pathways connected with the formation of nevi, development of primary melanoma, and its metastases. We created a model describing formation and progression of melanoma at the level of molecular pathway activation. We discovered six novel associations between activation of metabolic molecular pathways and progression of melanoma: for allopregnanolone biosynthesis, L-carnitine biosynthesis, zymosterol biosynthesis (inhibited in melanoma), fructose 2, 6-bisphosphate synthesis and dephosphorylation, resolvin D biosynthesis (activated in melanoma), D-myo-inositol hexakisphosphate biosynthesis (activated in primary, inhibited in metastatic melanoma). Finally, we discovered fourteen tightly coordinated functional clusters of molecular pathways. This study helps to decode molecular mechanisms underlying the development of melanoma. PMID:26624979

  12. Molecular pathway activation features linked with transition from normal skin to primary and metastatic melanomas in human.

    PubMed

    Shepelin, Denis; Korzinkin, Mikhail; Vanyushina, Anna; Aliper, Alexander; Borisov, Nicolas; Vasilov, Raif; Zhukov, Nikolay; Sokov, Dmitry; Prassolov, Vladimir; Gaifullin, Nurshat; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive and dangerous type of skin cancer, but its molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. For transcriptomic data of 478 primary and metastatic melanoma, nevi and normal skin samples, we performed high-throughput analysis of intracellular molecular networks including 592 signaling and metabolic pathways. We showed that at the molecular pathway level, the formation of nevi largely resembles transition from normal skin to primary melanoma. Using a combination of bioinformatic machine learning algorithms, we identified 44 characteristic signaling and metabolic pathways connected with the formation of nevi, development of primary melanoma, and its metastases. We created a model describing formation and progression of melanoma at the level of molecular pathway activation. We discovered six novel associations between activation of metabolic molecular pathways and progression of melanoma: for allopregnanolone biosynthesis, L-carnitine biosynthesis, zymosterol biosynthesis (inhibited in melanoma), fructose 2, 6-bisphosphate synthesis and dephosphorylation, resolvin D biosynthesis (activated in melanoma), D-myo-inositol hexakisphosphate biosynthesis (activated in primary, inhibited in metastatic melanoma). Finally, we discovered fourteen tightly coordinated functional clusters of molecular pathways. This study helps to decode molecular mechanisms underlying the development of melanoma.

  13. Molecular dynamics modeling and characterization of graphene/polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Rezwanur

    The current work focuses on the characterization of graphene based nanocomposites using molecular dynamic simulation and multiscale modeling approaches. Both graphene-epoxy and graphene-cellulose nanocomposites were considered in this study. A hierarchical multiscale modeling approach has been proposed using peridynamics and molecular dynamics simulation. Firstly, the mechanical properties of crosslinked graphene/epoxy (G-Ep) nanocomposites were investigated by molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The influence of graphene's weight concentration, aspect ratio and dispersion on stress-strain response and elastic properties were studied. The results show significant improvement in Young's modulus and shear modulus for the G-Ep system in comparison to the neat epoxy resin. It appears that the RDF, molecular energy and aspect ratios are influenced by both graphene concentrations and aspect ratios. The graphene concentrations in the range of 1-3% are seen to improve Young's modulus and shorter graphenes are observed to be more effective than larger ones. In addition, the dispersed graphene system is more promising in enhancing in-plane elastic modulus than the agglomerated graphene system. The cohesive and pullout forces versus displacements data were plotted under normal and shear modes in order to characterize interfacial properties. The cohesive force is significantly improved by attaching the graphene with a chemical bond at the graphene-epoxy interface. In the second part of the work, cellulose was considered to study the mechanical properties of graphene-cellulose bionanocomposite. Similar to graphene-epoxy systems, the effect of graphene dispersion and agglomeration were studied in the stress-strain plots of graphene-cellulose system. A pcff forcefield was used to define intermolecular and intramolecular interactions. The effect of graphene's aspect ratio and weight concentration on the structural property of each unitcell was

  14. Screening of photosynthetic pigments for herbicidal activity with a new computational molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Krishnaraj, R Navanietha; Chandran, Saravanan; Pal, Parimal; Berchmans, Sheela

    2013-12-01

    There is an immense interest among the researchers to identify new herbicides which are effective against the herbs without affecting the environment. In this work, photosynthetic pigments are used as the ligands to predict their herbicidal activity. The enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase is a good target for the herbicides. Homology modeling of the target enzyme is done using Modeler 9.11 and the model is validated. Docking studies were performed with AutoDock Vina algorithm to predict the binding of the natural pigments such as β-carotene, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, phycoerythrin and phycocyanin to the target. β-carotene, phycoerythrin and phycocyanin have higher binding energies indicating the herbicidal activity of the pigments. This work reports a procedure to screen herbicides with computational molecular approach. These pigments will serve as potential bioherbicides in the future. PMID:24050696

  15. SWIFT MODELLER: a Java based GUI for molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Abhinav; Shankaracharya; Vidyarthi, Ambarish S

    2011-10-01

    MODELLER is command line argument based software which requires tedious formatting of inputs and writing of Python scripts which most people are not comfortable with. Also the visualization of output becomes cumbersome due to verbose files. This makes the whole software protocol very complex and requires extensive study of MODELLER manuals and tutorials. Here we describe SWIFT MODELLER, a GUI that automates formatting, scripting and data extraction processes and present it in an interactive way making MODELLER much easier to use than before. The screens in SWIFT MODELLER are designed keeping homology modeling in mind and their flow is a depiction of its steps. It eliminates the formatting of inputs, scripting processes and analysis of verbose output files through automation and makes pasting of the target sequence as the only prerequisite. Jmol (3D structure visualization tool) has been integrated into the GUI which opens and demonstrates the protein data bank files created by the MODELLER software. All files required and created by the software are saved in a folder named after the work instance's date and time of execution. SWIFT MODELLER lowers the skill level required for the software through automation of many of the steps in the original software protocol, thus saving an enormous amount of time per instance and making MODELLER very easy to work with.

  16. Combined 3D-QSAR, molecular docking and molecular dynamics study on thyroid hormone activity of hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers to thyroid receptors β

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaolin; Ye, Li; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Wang, Xinzhou; Liu, Hongling; Zhu, Yongliang; Yu, Hongxia

    2012-12-15

    Several recent reports suggested that hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (HO-PBDEs) may disturb thyroid hormone homeostasis. To illuminate the structural features for thyroid hormone activity of HO-PBDEs and the binding mode between HO-PBDEs and thyroid hormone receptor (TR), the hormone activity of a series of HO-PBDEs to thyroid receptors β was studied based on the combination of 3D-QSAR, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) methods. The ligand- and receptor-based 3D-QSAR models were obtained using Comparative Molecular Similarity Index Analysis (CoMSIA) method. The optimum CoMSIA model with region focusing yielded satisfactory statistical results: leave-one-out cross-validation correlation coefficient (q{sup 2}) was 0.571 and non-cross-validation correlation coefficient (r{sup 2}) was 0.951. Furthermore, the results of internal validation such as bootstrapping, leave-many-out cross-validation, and progressive scrambling as well as external validation indicated the rationality and good predictive ability of the best model. In addition, molecular docking elucidated the conformations of compounds and key amino acid residues at the docking pocket, MD simulation further determined the binding process and validated the rationality of docking results. -- Highlights: ► The thyroid hormone activities of HO-PBDEs were studied by 3D-QSAR. ► The binding modes between HO-PBDEs and TRβ were explored. ► 3D-QSAR, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) methods were performed.

  17. Modeling of Switching and Hysteresis in Molecular Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanta, Manoj P.; Partridge, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The conventional way of modeling current transport in two and three terminal molecular devices could be inadequate for certain cases involving switching and hysteresis. Here we present an alternate approach. Contrary to the regular way where applied bias directly modulates the conducting energy levels of the molecule, our method introduces a nonlinear potential energy surface varying with the applied bias as a control parameter. A time-dynamics is also introduced properly accounting for switching and hysteresis behavior. Although the model is phenomenological at this stage, we believe any detailed model would contain similar descriptions at its core.

  18. Molecular Models for DSMC Simulations of Metal Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Venkattraman, A.; Alexeenko, A. A.

    2011-05-20

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is applied here to model the electron-beam (e-beam) physical vapor deposition of copper thin films. A suitable molecular model for copper-copper interactions have been determined based on comparisons with experiments for a 2D slit source. The model for atomic copper vapor is then used in axi-symmetric DSMC simulations for analysis of a typical e-beam metal deposition system with a cup crucible. The dimensional and non-dimensional mass fluxes obtained are compared for two different deposition configurations with non-uniformity as high as 40% predicted from the simulations.

  19. Rational Design of Antimalarial Drugs Using Molecular Modeling and Statistical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Cleydson Breno Rodrigues dos; Lobato, Cleison Carvalho; Braga, Francinaldo Sarges; Costa, Josivan da Silva; Favacho, Hugo Alexandre Silva; Carvalho, Jose Carlos Tavares; Macedo, Williams Jorge da Cruz; Brasil, Davi Do Socorro Barros; Silva, Carlos Henrique Tomich de Paula da; Silva Hage-Melim, Lorane Izabel da

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinin is an antimalarial compound isolated from Artemisia annua L. that is effective against Plasmodium falciparum. This paper proposes the development of new antimalarial derivatives of artemisinin from a SAR study and statistical analysis by multiple linear regression (MLR). The HF/6-31G** method was used to determine the molecular properties of artemisinin and 10 derivatives with antimalarial action. MEP maps and molecular docking were used to study the interface between ligand and receptor (heme). The Pearson correlation was used to choose the most important properties interrelated to the antimalarial activity: Hydration Energy (HE), Energy of the Complex (Ecplex), bond length (FeO1), and maximum index of R/Electronegativity of Sanderson (RTe+). After the Pearson correlation, 72 MLR models were built between antimalarial activity and molecular properties; the statistical quality of the models was evaluated by means of correlation coefficient (r), squared correlation coefficient (r(2)), explained variance (adjusted R(2)), standard error of estimate (SEE), and variance ratio (F), and only four models showed predictive ability. The selected models were used to predict the antimalarial activity of ten new artemisinin derivatives (test set) with unknown activity, and only eight of these compounds were predicted to be more potent than artemisinin, and were therefore subjected to theoretical studies of pharmacokinetic and toxicological properties. The test set showed satisfactory results for six new artemisinin compounds which is a promising factor for future synthesis and biological assays. PMID:26017698

  20. Insights into the molecular interactions between aminopeptidase and amyloid beta peptide using molecular modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Dhanavade, Maruti J; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2014-08-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The accumulation of Aβ peptides in AD brain was caused due to overproduction or insufficient clearance and defects in the proteolytic degradation of Aβ peptides. Hence, Aβ peptide degradation could be a promising therapeutic approach in AD treatment. Recent experimental report suggests that aminopeptidase from Streptomyces griseus KK565 (SGAK) can degrade Aβ peptides but the interactive residues are yet to be known in detail at the atomic level. Hence, we developed the three-dimensional model of aminopeptidase (SGAK) using SWISS-MODEL, Geno3D and MODELLER. Model built by MODELLER was used for further studies. Molecular docking was performed between aminopeptidase (SGAK) with wild-type and mutated Aβ peptides. The docked complex of aminopeptidase (SGAK) and wild-type Aβ peptide (1IYT.pdb) shows more stability than the other complexes. Molecular docking and MD simulation results revealed that the residues His93, Asp105, Glu139, Glu140, Asp168 and His255 are involved in the hydrogen bonding with Aβ peptide and zinc ions. The interactions between carboxyl oxygen atoms of Glu139 of aminopeptidase (SGAK) with water molecule suggest that the Glu139 may be involved in the nucleophilic attack on Ala2-Glu3 peptide bond of Aβ peptide. Hence, amino acid Glu139 of aminopeptidase (SGAK) might play an important role to degrade Aβ peptides, a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Reveal the Mechanisms of Allosteric Activation of Hsp90 by Designed Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Vettoretti, Gerolamo; Moroni, Elisabetta; Sattin, Sara; Tao, Jiahui; Agard, David A.; Bernardi, Anna; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Controlling biochemical pathways through chemically designed modulators may provide novel opportunities to develop therapeutic drugs and chemical tools. The underlying challenge is to design new molecular entities able to act as allosteric chemical switches that selectively turn on/off functions by modulating the conformational dynamics of their target protein. We examine the origins of the stimulation of ATPase and closure kinetics in the molecular chaperone Hsp90 by allosteric modulators through atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and analysis of protein-ligand interactions. In particular, we focus on the cross-talk between allosteric ligands and protein conformations and its effect on the dynamic properties of the chaperone’s active state. We examine the impact of different allosteric modulators on the stability, structural and internal dynamics properties of Hsp90 closed state. A critical aspect of this study is the development of a quantitative model that correlates Hsp90 activation to the presence of a certain compound, making use of information on the dynamic adaptation of protein conformations to the presence of the ligand, which allows to capture conformational states relevant in the activation process. We discuss the implications of considering the conformational dialogue between allosteric ligands and protein conformations for the design of new functional modulators. PMID:27032695

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Reveal the Mechanisms of Allosteric Activation of Hsp90 by Designed Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettoretti, Gerolamo; Moroni, Elisabetta; Sattin, Sara; Tao, Jiahui; Agard, David A.; Bernardi, Anna; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    Controlling biochemical pathways through chemically designed modulators may provide novel opportunities to develop therapeutic drugs and chemical tools. The underlying challenge is to design new molecular entities able to act as allosteric chemical switches that selectively turn on/off functions by modulating the conformational dynamics of their target protein. We examine the origins of the stimulation of ATPase and closure kinetics in the molecular chaperone Hsp90 by allosteric modulators through atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and analysis of protein-ligand interactions. In particular, we focus on the cross-talk between allosteric ligands and protein conformations and its effect on the dynamic properties of the chaperone’s active state. We examine the impact of different allosteric modulators on the stability, structural and internal dynamics properties of Hsp90 closed state. A critical aspect of this study is the development of a quantitative model that correlates Hsp90 activation to the presence of a certain compound, making use of information on the dynamic adaptation of protein conformations to the presence of the ligand, which allows to capture conformational states relevant in the activation process. We discuss the implications of considering the conformational dialogue between allosteric ligands and protein conformations for the design of new functional modulators.

  3. On the coalescence-dispersion modeling of turbulent molecular mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Kosaly, George

    1987-01-01

    The general coalescence-dispersion (C/D) closure provides phenomenological modeling of turbulent molecular mixing. The models of Curl and Dopazo and O'Brien appear as two limiting C/D models that bracket the range of results one can obtain by various models. This finding is used to investigate the sensitivtiy of the results to the choice of the model. Inert scalar mixing is found to be less model-sensitive than mixing accompanied by chemical reaction. Infinitely fast chemistry approximation is used to relate the C/D approach to Toor's earlier results. Pure mixing and infinite rate chemistry calculations are compared to study further a recent result of Hsieh and O'Brien who found that higher concentration moments are not sensitive to chemistry.

  4. Structural Modeling and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Actin Filament

    SciTech Connect

    Splettstoesser, Thomas; Holmes, Kenneth; Noe, Frank; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    Actin is a major structural protein of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and enables cell motility. Here, we present a model of the actin filament (F-actin) that not only incorporates the global structure of the recently published model by Oda et al. but also conserves internal stereochemistry. A comparison is made using molecular dynamics simulation of the model with other recent F-actin models. A number of structural determents such as the protomer propeller angle, the number of hydrogen bonds, and the structural variation among the protomers are analyzed. The MD comparison is found to reflect the evolution in quality of actin models over the last 6 years. In addition, simulations of the model are carried out in states with both ADP or ATP bound and local hydrogen-bonding differences characterized.

  5. Supporting Students' Knowledge Transfer in Modeling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piksööt, Jaanika; Sarapuu, Tago

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates ways to enhance secondary school students' knowledge transfer in complex science domains by implementing question prompts. Two samples of students applied two web-based models to study molecular genetics--the model of genetic code (n = 258) and translation (n = 245). For each model, the samples were randomly divided into…

  6. Derivation of Distributed Models of Atomic Polarizability for Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Soteras, Ignacio; Curutchet, Carles; Bidon-Chanal, Axel; Dehez, François; Ángyán, János G; Orozco, Modesto; Chipot, Christophe; Luque, F Javier

    2007-11-01

    The main thrust of this investigation is the development of models of distributed atomic polarizabilities for the treatment of induction effects in molecular mechanics simulations. The models are obtained within the framework of the induced dipole theory by fitting the induction energies computed via a fast but accurate MP2/Sadlej-adjusted perturbational approach in a grid of points surrounding the molecule. Particular care is paid in the examination of the atomic quantities obtained from models of implicitly and explicitly interacting polarizabilities. Appropriateness and accuracy of the distributed models are assessed by comparing the molecular polarizabilities recovered from the models and those obtained experimentally and from MP2/Sadlej calculations. The behavior of the models is further explored by computing the polarization energy for aromatic compounds in the context of cation-π interactions and for selected neutral compounds in a TIP3P aqueous environment. The present results suggest that the computational strategy described here constitutes a very effective tool for the development of distributed models of atomic polarizabilities and can be used in the generation of new polarizable force fields.

  7. Anti-AIDS agents 79. Design, synthesis, molecular modeling and structure-activity relationships of novel dicamphanoyl-2',2'-dimethyldihydropyranochromone (DCP) analogs as potent anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ting; Shi, Qian; Chen, Chin-Ho; Zhu, Hao; Huang, Li; Ho, Phong; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2010-09-15

    In a continued study, 23 3'R,4'R-di-O-(-)-camphanoyl-2',2'-dimethyldihydropyrano[2,3-f]chromone (DCP) derivatives (5-27) were synthesized, and screened for anti-HIV activity against both a non-drug-resistant NL4-3 strain and multiple reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor-resistant (RTMDR-1) strain, using 2-EDCP (4) and 2-MDCP (35) as controls. New DCP analogs 5, 9, 14, and 22 exhibited potent anti-HIV activity against HIVNL4-3 with EC50 and therapeutic index (TI) values ranging from 0.036 microM to 0.14 microM and from 110 to 420, respectively. Compounds 5 and 9 also exhibited good activity against RTMDR-1 (EC50 0.049 and 0.054 microM; TI 310 and 200, respectively), and were twofold more potent than the leads 4 and 35 (EC50 0.11 and 0.19 microM; TI 60 and 58, respectively). Evaluation of water solubility showed that 5 and 22 were 5-10 times more water soluble than 4. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling results were first performed on this compound type, and the models should aid in design of future anti-HIV DCP analogs and potential clinical drug candidates.

  8. Potential human cholesterol esterase inhibitor design: benefits from the molecular dynamics simulations and pharmacophore modeling studies.

    PubMed

    John, Shalini; Thangapandian, Sundarapandian; Lee, Keun Woo

    2012-01-01

    Human pancreatic cholesterol esterase (hCEase) is one of the lipases found to involve in the digestion of large and broad spectrum of substrates including triglycerides, phospholipids, cholesteryl esters, etc. The presence of bile salts is found to be very important for the activation of hCEase. Molecular dynamic simulations were performed for the apoform and bile salt complexed form of hCEase using the co-ordinates of two bile salts from bovine CEase. The stability of the systems throughout the simulation time was checked and two representative structures from the highly populated regions were selected using cluster analysis. These two representative structures were used in pharmacophore model generation. The generated pharmacophore models were validated and used in database screening. The screened hits were refined for their drug-like properties based on Lipinski's rule of five and ADMET properties. The drug-like compounds were further refined by molecular docking simulation using GOLD program based on the GOLD fitness score, mode of binding, and molecular interactions with the active site amino acids. Finally, three hits of novel scaffolds were selected as potential leads to be used in novel and potent hCEase inhibitor design. The stability of binding modes and molecular interactions of these final hits were re-assured by molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:22292952

  9. Kinetics of model high molecular weight organic compounds biodegradation in soil aquifer treatment.

    PubMed

    Fox, Peter; Makam, Roshan

    2011-10-01

    Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT) is a process where treated wastewater is purified during transport through unsaturated and saturated zones. Easily biodegradable compounds are rapidly removed in the unsaturated zone and the residual organic carbon is comprised of primarily high molecular weight compounds. This research focuses on flow in the saturated zone where flow conditions are predictable and high molecular weight compounds are degraded. Flow through the saturated zone was investigated with 4 reactors packed with 2 different particle sizes and operated at 4 different flow rates. The objective was to evaluate the kinetics of transformation for high molecular weight organics during SAT. Dextran was used as a model compound to eliminate the complexity associated with studying a mixture of high molecular weight organics. The hydrolysis products of dextran are easily degradable sugars. Batch experiments with media taken from the reactors were used to determine the distribution of microbial activity in the reactors. Zero-order kinetics were observed for the removal of dextran in batch experiments which is consistent with hydrolysis of high molecular weight organics where extracellular enzymes limit the substrate utilization rate. Biomass and microbial activity measurements demonstrated that the biomass was independent of position in the reactors. A Monod based substrate/biomass growth kinetic model predicted the performance of dextran removal in the reactors. The rate limiting step appears to be hydrolysis and the overall rate was not affected by surface area even though greater biomass accumulation occurred as the surface area decreased. PMID:21723581

  10. Kinetics of model high molecular weight organic compounds biodegradation in soil aquifer treatment.

    PubMed

    Fox, Peter; Makam, Roshan

    2011-10-01

    Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT) is a process where treated wastewater is purified during transport through unsaturated and saturated zones. Easily biodegradable compounds are rapidly removed in the unsaturated zone and the residual organic carbon is comprised of primarily high molecular weight compounds. This research focuses on flow in the saturated zone where flow conditions are predictable and high molecular weight compounds are degraded. Flow through the saturated zone was investigated with 4 reactors packed with 2 different particle sizes and operated at 4 different flow rates. The objective was to evaluate the kinetics of transformation for high molecular weight organics during SAT. Dextran was used as a model compound to eliminate the complexity associated with studying a mixture of high molecular weight organics. The hydrolysis products of dextran are easily degradable sugars. Batch experiments with media taken from the reactors were used to determine the distribution of microbial activity in the reactors. Zero-order kinetics were observed for the removal of dextran in batch experiments which is consistent with hydrolysis of high molecular weight organics where extracellular enzymes limit the substrate utilization rate. Biomass and microbial activity measurements demonstrated that the biomass was independent of position in the reactors. A Monod based substrate/biomass growth kinetic model predicted the performance of dextran removal in the reactors. The rate limiting step appears to be hydrolysis and the overall rate was not affected by surface area even though greater biomass accumulation occurred as the surface area decreased.

  11. Molecular Evidence for Metabolically Active Bacteria in the Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Klein, Ann M; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Jaffe, Daniel A; Levin, David A; Green, Jessica L

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial metabolisms are responsible for critical chemical transformations in nearly all environments, including oceans, freshwater, and soil. Despite the ubiquity of bacteria in the atmosphere, little is known about the metabolic functioning of atmospheric bacterial communities. To gain a better understanding of the metabolism of bacterial communities in the atmosphere, we used a combined empirical and model-based approach to investigate the structure and composition of potentially active bacterial communities in air sampled at a high elevation research station. We found that the composition of the putatively active bacterial community (assayed via rRNA) differed significantly from the total bacterial community (assayed via rDNA). Rare taxa in the total (rDNA) community were disproportionately active relative to abundant taxa, and members of the order Rhodospirillales had the highest potential for activity. We developed theory to explore the effects of random sampling from the rRNA and rDNA communities on observed differences between the communities. We found that random sampling, particularly in cases where active taxa are rare in the rDNA community, will give rise to observed differences in community composition including the occurrence of "phantom taxa", taxa which are detected in the rRNA community but not the rDNA community. We show that the use of comparative rRNA/rDNA techniques can reveal the structure and composition of the metabolically active portion of bacterial communities. Our observations suggest that metabolically active bacteria exist in the atmosphere and that these communities may be involved in the cycling of organic compounds in the atmosphere.

  12. Molecular Evidence for Metabolically Active Bacteria in the Atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Ann M.; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.; Jaffe, Daniel A.; Levin, David A.; Green, Jessica L.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial metabolisms are responsible for critical chemical transformations in nearly all environments, including oceans, freshwater, and soil. Despite the ubiquity of bacteria in the atmosphere, little is known about the metabolic functioning of atmospheric bacterial communities. To gain a better understanding of the metabolism of bacterial communities in the atmosphere, we used a combined empirical and model-based approach to investigate the structure and composition of potentially active bacterial communities in air sampled at a high elevation research station. We found that the composition of the putatively active bacterial community (assayed via rRNA) differed significantly from the total bacterial community (assayed via rDNA). Rare taxa in the total (rDNA) community were disproportionately active relative to abundant taxa, and members of the order Rhodospirillales had the highest potential for activity. We developed theory to explore the effects of random sampling from the rRNA and rDNA communities on observed differences between the communities. We found that random sampling, particularly in cases where active taxa are rare in the rDNA community, will give rise to observed differences in community composition including the occurrence of “phantom taxa”, taxa which are detected in the rRNA community but not the rDNA community. We show that the use of comparative rRNA/rDNA techniques can reveal the structure and composition of the metabolically active portion of bacterial communities. Our observations suggest that metabolically active bacteria exist in the atmosphere and that these communities may be involved in the cycling of organic compounds in the atmosphere. PMID:27252689

  13. 24 CFR 1006.225 - Model activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Model activities. 1006.225 Section... NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.225 Model activities. NHHBG funds may be used for housing activities under model programs that are: (a) Designed to carry out...

  14. 24 CFR 1006.225 - Model activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Model activities. 1006.225 Section... NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.225 Model activities. NHHBG funds may be used for housing activities under model programs that are: (a) Designed to carry out...

  15. 24 CFR 1006.225 - Model activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Model activities. 1006.225 Section... NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.225 Model activities. NHHBG funds may be used for housing activities under model programs that are: (a) Designed to carry out...

  16. 24 CFR 1006.225 - Model activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Model activities. 1006.225 Section... NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.225 Model activities. NHHBG funds may be used for housing activities under model programs that are: (a) Designed to carry out...

  17. Wind from the black-hole accretion disk driving a molecular outflow in an active galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.; Meléndez, M.; Veilleux, S.; Reeves, J. N.; González-Alfonso, E.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2015-03-01

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei are often thought to affect the evolution of both supermassive black holes and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the close relationship between black holes and galaxies. Recent observations of large-scale molecular outflows in ultraluminous infrared galaxies support this quasar-feedback idea, because they directly trace the gas from which stars form. Theoretical models suggest that these outflows originate as energy-conserving flows driven by fast accretion-disk winds. Proposed connections between large-scale molecular outflows and accretion-disk activity in ultraluminous galaxies were incomplete because no accretion-disk wind had been detected. Conversely, studies of powerful accretion-disk winds have until now focused only on X-ray observations of local Seyfert galaxies and a few higher-redshift quasars. Here we report observations of a powerful accretion-disk wind with a mildly relativistic velocity (a quarter that of light) in the X-ray spectrum of IRAS F11119+3257, a nearby (redshift 0.189) optically classified type 1 ultraluminous infrared galaxy hosting a powerful molecular outflow. The active galactic nucleus is responsible for about 80 per cent of the emission, with a quasar-like luminosity of 1.5 × 1046 ergs per second. The energetics of these two types of wide-angle outflows is consistent with the energy-conserving mechanism that is the basis of the quasar feedback in active galactic nuclei that lack powerful radio jets (such jets are an alternative way to drive molecular outflows).

  18. Wind from the black-hole accretion disk driving a molecular outflow in an active galaxy.

    PubMed

    Tombesi, F; Meléndez, M; Veilleux, S; Reeves, J N; González-Alfonso, E; Reynolds, C S

    2015-03-26

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei are often thought to affect the evolution of both supermassive black holes and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the close relationship between black holes and galaxies. Recent observations of large-scale molecular outflows in ultraluminous infrared galaxies support this quasar-feedback idea, because they directly trace the gas from which stars form. Theoretical models suggest that these outflows originate as energy-conserving flows driven by fast accretion-disk winds. Proposed connections between large-scale molecular outflows and accretion-disk activity in ultraluminous galaxies were incomplete because no accretion-disk wind had been detected. Conversely, studies of powerful accretion-disk winds have until now focused only on X-ray observations of local Seyfert galaxies and a few higher-redshift quasars. Here we report observations of a powerful accretion-disk wind with a mildly relativistic velocity (a quarter that of light) in the X-ray spectrum of IRAS F11119+3257, a nearby (redshift 0.189) optically classified type 1 ultraluminous infrared galaxy hosting a powerful molecular outflow. The active galactic nucleus is responsible for about 80 per cent of the emission, with a quasar-like luminosity of 1.5 × 10(46) ergs per second. The energetics of these two types of wide-angle outflows is consistent with the energy-conserving mechanism that is the basis of the quasar feedback in active galactic nuclei that lack powerful radio jets (such jets are an alternative way to drive molecular outflows). PMID:25810204

  19. Wind from the black-hole accretion disk driving a molecular outflow in an active galaxy.

    PubMed

    Tombesi, F; Meléndez, M; Veilleux, S; Reeves, J N; González-Alfonso, E; Reynolds, C S

    2015-03-26

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei are often thought to affect the evolution of both supermassive black holes and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the close relationship between black holes and galaxies. Recent observations of large-scale molecular outflows in ultraluminous infrared galaxies support this quasar-feedback idea, because they directly trace the gas from which stars form. Theoretical models suggest that these outflows originate as energy-conserving flows driven by fast accretion-disk winds. Proposed connections between large-scale molecular outflows and accretion-disk activity in ultraluminous galaxies were incomplete because no accretion-disk wind had been detected. Conversely, studies of powerful accretion-disk winds have until now focused only on X-ray observations of local Seyfert galaxies and a few higher-redshift quasars. Here we report observations of a powerful accretion-disk wind with a mildly relativistic velocity (a quarter that of light) in the X-ray spectrum of IRAS F11119+3257, a nearby (redshift 0.189) optically classified type 1 ultraluminous infrared galaxy hosting a powerful molecular outflow. The active galactic nucleus is responsible for about 80 per cent of the emission, with a quasar-like luminosity of 1.5 × 10(46) ergs per second. The energetics of these two types of wide-angle outflows is consistent with the energy-conserving mechanism that is the basis of the quasar feedback in active galactic nuclei that lack powerful radio jets (such jets are an alternative way to drive molecular outflows).

  20. Fueling active galactic nuclei. II. Spatially resolved molecular inflows and outflows

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, R. I.; Erwin, P.; Burtscher, L.; Lin, M.; Orban de Xivry, G.; Rosario, D. J.; Schnorr-Müller, A.; Maciejewski, W.; Hicks, E. K. S.; Emsellem, E.; Dumas, G.; Malkan, M. A.; Müller-Sánchez, F.; Tran, A.

    2014-09-10

    We analyze the two-dimensional distribution and kinematics of the stars as well as molecular and ionized gas in the central few hundred parsecs of five active and five matched inactive galaxies. The equivalent widths of the Brγ line indicate that there is no ongoing star formation in their nuclei, although recent (terminated) starbursts are possible in the active galaxies. The stellar velocity fields show no signs of non-circular motions, while the 1-0 S(1) H{sub 2} kinematics exhibit significant deviations from simple circular rotation. In the active galaxies the H{sub 2} kinematics reveal inflow and outflow superimposed on disk rotation. Steady-state circumnuclear inflow is seen in three active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and hydrodynamical models indicate it can be driven by a large-scale bar. In three of the five AGNs, molecular outflows are spatially resolved. The outflows are oriented such that they intersect, or have an edge close to, the disk, which may be the source of molecular gas in the outflow. The relatively low speeds imply the gas will fall back onto the disk, and with moderate outflow rates, they will have only a local impact on the host galaxy. H{sub 2} was detected in two inactive galaxies. These exhibit chaotic circumnuclear dust morphologies and have molecular structures that are counter-rotating with respect to the main gas component, which could lead to gas inflow in the near future. In our sample, all four galaxies with chaotic dust morphology in the circumnuclear region exist in moderately dense groups with 10-15 members where accretion of stripped gas can easily occur.

  1. Fueling Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Spatially Resolved Molecular Inflows and Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, R. I.; Maciejewski, W.; Hicks, E. K. S.; Emsellem, E.; Erwin, P.; Burtscher, L.; Dumas, G.; Lin, M.; Malkan, M. A.; Müller-Sánchez, F.; Orban de Xivry, G.; Rosario, D. J.; Schnorr-Müller, A.; Tran, A.

    2014-09-01

    We analyze the two-dimensional distribution and kinematics of the stars as well as molecular and ionized gas in the central few hundred parsecs of five active and five matched inactive galaxies. The equivalent widths of the Brγ line indicate that there is no ongoing star formation in their nuclei, although recent (terminated) starbursts are possible in the active galaxies. The stellar velocity fields show no signs of non-circular motions, while the 1-0 S(1) H2 kinematics exhibit significant deviations from simple circular rotation. In the active galaxies the H2 kinematics reveal inflow and outflow superimposed on disk rotation. Steady-state circumnuclear inflow is seen in three active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and hydrodynamical models indicate it can be driven by a large-scale bar. In three of the five AGNs, molecular outflows are spatially resolved. The outflows are oriented such that they intersect, or have an edge close to, the disk, which may be the source of molecular gas in the outflow. The relatively low speeds imply the gas will fall back onto the disk, and with moderate outflow rates, they will have only a local impact on the host galaxy. H2 was detected in two inactive galaxies. These exhibit chaotic circumnuclear dust morphologies and have molecular structures that are counter-rotating with respect to the main gas component, which could lead to gas inflow in the near future. In our sample, all four galaxies with chaotic dust morphology in the circumnuclear region exist in moderately dense groups with 10-15 members where accretion of stripped gas can easily occur.

  2. Pharmacophore modeling, in silico screening, molecular docking and molecular dynamics approaches for potential alpha-delta bungarotoxin-4 inhibitors discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R. Barani; Suresh, M. Xavier; Priya, B. Shanmuga

    2015-01-01

    Background: The alpha-delta bungartoxin-4 (α-δ-Bgt-4) is a potent neurotoxin produced by highly venomous snake species, Bungarus caeruleus, mainly targeting neuronal acetylcholine receptors (nAchRs) and producing adverse biological malfunctions leading to respiratory paralysis and mortality. Objective: In this study, we predicted the three-dimensional structure of α-δ-Bgt-4 using homology modeling and investigated the conformational changes and the key residues responsible for nAchRs inhibiting activity. Materials and Methods: From the selected plants, which are traditionally used for snake bites, the active compounds are taken and performed molecular interaction studies and also used for modern techniques like pharmacophore modeling and mapping and absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination and toxicity analysis which may increase the possibility of success. Results: Moreover, 100's of drug-like compounds were retrieved and analyzed through computational virtual screening and allowed for pharmacokinetic profiling, molecular docking and dynamics simulation. Conclusion: Finally the top five drug-like compounds having competing level of inhibition toward α-δ-Bgt-4 toxin were suggested based on their interaction with α-δ-Bgt-4 toxin. PMID:26109766

  3. Assessing High School Chemistry Students' Modeling Sub-Skills in a Computerized Molecular Modeling Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dori, Yehudit Judy; Kaberman, Zvia

    2012-01-01

    Much knowledge in chemistry exists at a molecular level, inaccessible to direct perception. Chemistry instruction should therefore include multiple visual representations, such as molecular models and symbols. This study describes the implementation and assessment of a learning unit designed for 12th grade chemistry honors students. The organic…

  4. The molecular basis of social behavior: models, methods and advances.

    PubMed

    LeBoeuf, Adria C; Benton, Richard; Keller, Laurent

    2013-02-01

    Elucidating the molecular and neural basis of complex social behaviors such as communal living, division of labor and warfare requires model organisms that exhibit these multi-faceted behavioral phenotypes. Social insects, such as ants, bees, wasps and termites, are attractive models to address this problem, with rich ecological and ethological foundations. However, their atypical systems of reproduction have hindered application of classical genetic approaches. In this review, we discuss how recent advances in social insect genomics, transcriptomics, and functional manipulations have enhanced our ability to observe and perturb gene expression, physiology and behavior in these species. Such developments begin to provide an integrated view of the molecular and cellular underpinnings of complex social behavior. PMID:22995551

  5. Buckling induced delamination of graphene composites through hybrid molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranford, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of graphene-based composites relies on mechanical stability and cooperativity, whereby separation of layers (i.e., delamination) can severely hinder performance. Here we study buckling induced delamination of mono- and bilayer graphene-based composites, utilizing a hybrid full atomistic and coarse-grained molecular dynamics approach. The coarse-grain model allows exploration of an idealized model material to facilitate parametric variation beyond any particular molecular structure. Through theoretical and simulation analyses, we show a critical delamination condition, where ΔD∝kL4, where ΔD is the change in bending stiffness (eV), k the stiffness of adhesion (eV/Å4), and L the length of the adhered section (Å).

  6. Model-free simulation approach to molecular diffusion tensors.

    PubMed

    Chevrot, Guillaume; Hinsen, Konrad; Kneller, Gerald R

    2013-10-21

    In the present work, we propose a simple model-free approach for the computation of molecular diffusion tensors from molecular dynamics trajectories. The method uses a rigid body trajectory of the molecule under consideration, which is constructed a posteriori by an accumulation of quaternion-based superposition fits of consecutive conformations. From the rigid body trajectory, we compute the translational and angular velocities of the molecule and by integration of the latter also the corresponding angular trajectory. All quantities can be referred to the laboratory frame and a molecule-fixed frame. The 6 × 6 diffusion tensor is computed from the asymptotic slope of the tensorial mean square displacement and, for comparison, also from the Kubo integral of the velocity correlation tensor. The method is illustrated for two simple model systems - a water molecule and a lysozyme molecule in bulk water. We give estimations of the statistical accuracy of the calculations. PMID:24160503

  7. Molecular modeling of the affinity chromatography of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Paloni, Matteo; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Molecular modeling is a methodology that offers the possibility of studying complex systems such as protein-ligand complexes from an atomistic point of view, making available information that can be difficultly obtained from experimental studies. Here, a protocol for the construction of molecular models of the interaction between antibodies and ligands that can be used for an affinity chromatography process is presented. The outlined methodology focuses mostly on the description of a procedure that may be adopted to determine the structure and free energy of interaction between the antibody and the affinity ligand. A procedure to extend the proposed methodology to include the effect of the environment (buffer solution, spacer, support matrix) is also briefly outlined. PMID:25749965

  8. Model-free simulation approach to molecular diffusion tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrot, Guillaume; Hinsen, Konrad; Kneller, Gerald R.

    2013-10-01

    In the present work, we propose a simple model-free approach for the computation of molecular diffusion tensors from molecular dynamics trajectories. The method uses a rigid body trajectory of the molecule under consideration, which is constructed a posteriori by an accumulation of quaternion-based superposition fits of consecutive conformations. From the rigid body trajectory, we compute the translational and angular velocities of the molecule and by integration of the latter also the corresponding angular trajectory. All quantities can be referred to the laboratory frame and a molecule-fixed frame. The 6 × 6 diffusion tensor is computed from the asymptotic slope of the tensorial mean square displacement and, for comparison, also from the Kubo integral of the velocity correlation tensor. The method is illustrated for two simple model systems - a water molecule and a lysozyme molecule in bulk water. We give estimations of the statistical accuracy of the calculations.

  9. Experiments with a universe for molecular modelling of biological processes.

    PubMed

    Jedruch, W T; Barski, M

    1990-01-01

    A computer simulation program and results of preliminary simulations of an abstract two-dimensional universe are presented, in which biological and physical processes can be modelled at the molecular level. Two types of permanent elements (atoms) occupy squares of the universe: called 0 and 1. Atoms sharing a common square form a particle, with properties determined by its component atoms. Atoms, particles, and complexes of particles move and collide according to rules like those of classical mechanics. At a higher level of organization, the string of atoms in a particle is viewed as a program, whose execution can affect the space around the particle. The computer program (written in Turbo-Pascal language) can simulate the evolution of the universe starting from any given initial configuration of the particles. Three examples of simulations, showing the development of ordered spatial structures from initial sets of randomly distributed particles, illustrate the universe's potential in modelling various molecular processes.

  10. Antiaging activity of low molecular weight peptide from Paphia undulate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Cai, Bingna; Chen, Hua; Pan, Jianyu; Chen, Deke; Sun, Huili

    2013-05-01

    Low molecular weight peptide (LMWP) was prepared from clam Paphia undulate and its antiaging effect on D-galactose-induced acute aging in rats, aged Kunming mice, ultraviolet-exposed rats, and thermally injured rats was investigated. P. undulate flesh was homogenized and digested using papain under optimal conditions, then subjected to Sephadex G-25 chromatography to isolate the LMWP. Administration of LMWP significantly reversed D-galactose-induced oxidative stress by increasing the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT), and by decreasing the level of malondialdehyde (MDA). This process was accompanied by increased collagen synthesis. The LMWP prevented photoaging and promoted dermis recovery and remission of elastic fiber hyperplasia. Furthermore, treatment with the LMWP helped to regenerate elastic fibers and the collagen network, increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the serum and significantly decreased MDA. Thermal scald-induced inflammation and edema were also relieved by the LWMP, while wound healing in skin was promoted. These results suggest that the LMWP from P. undulate could serve as a new antiaging substance in cosmetics.

  11. Effect of bead and illustrations models on high school students' achievement in molecular genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotbain, Yosi; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Stavy, Ruth

    2006-05-01

    Our main goal in this study was to explore whether the use of models in molecular genetics instruction in high school can contribute to students' understanding of concepts and processes in genetics. Three comparable groups of 11th and 12th graders participated: The control group (116 students) was taught in the traditional lecture format, while the others received instructions which integrated a bead model (71 students), or an illustration model (71 students). Similar instructions and the same guiding questions accompanied the two models. We used three instruments: a multiple-choice and an open-ended written questionnaire, as well as personal interviews. Five of the multiple-choice questions were also given to students before receiving their genetics instruction (pretest). We found that students who used one of the two types of models improved their knowledge in molecular genetics compared to the control group. However, the open-ended questions revealed that bead model activity was significantly more effective than illustration activity. On the basis of these findings we conclude that, though it is advisable to use a three-dimensional model, such as the bead model, engaging students in activities with illustrations can still improve their achievement in comparison to traditional instruction.

  12. Two Models of Magnetic Support for Photoevaporated Molecular Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D; Kane, J; Mizuta, A; Pound, M; Remington, B

    2004-05-05

    The thermal pressure inside molecular clouds is insufficient for maintaining the pressure balance at an ablation front at the cloud surface illuminated by nearby UV stars. Most probably, the required stiffness is provided by the magnetic pressure. After surveying existing models of this type, we concentrate on two of them: the model of a quasi-homogeneous magnetic field and the recently proposed model of a ''magnetostatic turbulence''. We discuss observational consequences of the two models, in particular, the structure and the strength of the magnetic field inside the cloud and in the ionized outflow. We comment on the possible role of reconnection events and their observational signatures. We mention laboratory experiments where the most significant features of the models can be tested.

  13. Mechanistic modeling confronts the complexity of molecular cell biology.

    PubMed

    Phair, Robert D

    2014-11-01

    Mechanistic modeling has the potential to transform how cell biologists contend with the inescapable complexity of modern biology. I am a physiologist-electrical engineer-systems biologist who has been working at the level of cell biology for the past 24 years. This perspective aims 1) to convey why we build models, 2) to enumerate the major approaches to modeling and their philosophical differences, 3) to address some recurrent concerns raised by experimentalists, and then 4) to imagine a future in which teams of experimentalists and modelers build-and subject to exhaustive experimental tests-models covering the entire spectrum from molecular cell biology to human pathophysiology. There is, in my view, no technical obstacle to this future, but it will require some plasticity in the biological research mind-set.

  14. Mechanistic modeling confronts the complexity of molecular cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Phair, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistic modeling has the potential to transform how cell biologists contend with the inescapable complexity of modern biology. I am a physiologist–electrical engineer–systems biologist who has been working at the level of cell biology for the past 24 years. This perspective aims 1) to convey why we build models, 2) to enumerate the major approaches to modeling and their philosophical differences, 3) to address some recurrent concerns raised by experimentalists, and then 4) to imagine a future in which teams of experimentalists and modelers build—and subject to exhaustive experimental tests—models covering the entire spectrum from molecular cell biology to human pathophysiology. There is, in my view, no technical obstacle to this future, but it will require some plasticity in the biological research mind-set. PMID:25368428

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation study on the molecular structures of the amylin fibril models.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weixin; Su, Haibin; Zhang, John Z H; Mu, Yuguang

    2012-12-01

    The structural characterization of amyloid fibers is one of the most investigated areas in structural biology. Recently, protofibril models for amylin, i.e., the 37-residue human islet amyloid polypeptide or hIAPP were suggested by two groups based on NMR (Biochemistry 2007, 46, 13505-13522) and X-ray (Protein Sci. 2008, 17, 1467-1474) techniques. However, there are significant differences in the two models which maybe originate from the polymorphic nature of amylin fibrils. To obtain further insights into the packing and stability features of the different models, we performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations on them. Our analysis showed that even pairs of β-sheets composed of a limited number of β-strands are stable in the 100-ns simulations, which suggests that steric zipper interactions at a β-sheet-β-sheet interface strongly contribute to the stability of these amyloid aggregates. For both models, outer strands are more flexible, which might coincide with the dynamical requirement that outer strands act as growing sites facilitating conformational changes of new incoming chains. Moreover, simulation results showed that the X-ray models are structurally more compact than the NMR models and have more intimate patterns, which lead to more rigid amyloid models. As a result, the X-ray models are energetically more stable than the NMR models. Further modeling analyses verify the most likely amylin fibril model among both NMR and X-ray models. Upon further study of the force-induced dissociation of a single chain from the protofibrils, the binding energy and the mechanical stability of the fibril models are revealed. On these bases, it is possible to reconcile the crystallographic and the NMR data on the basic amylin fiber unit. PMID:23145779

  16. Characterization, molecular modeling and antimicrobial activity of metal complexes of tridentate Schiff base derived from 5-acetyl-4-hydroxy-2H-1,3-thiazine-2,6(3H)-dione and 2-aminophenol.

    PubMed

    Adly, Omima M I

    2012-09-01

    Metal complexes of Ni(II), Co(II), Cd(II), VO(IV) and UO(2)(VI) as well as several Cu(II) salts, including Cl(-),NO(3)(-),AcO(-),ClO(4)(-) and SO(4)(-2) with a tridentate O(2)N donor Schiff base ligand (H(2)L), synthesized by condensation of 5-acetyl-4-hydroxy-2H-1,3-thiazine-2,6(3H)-dione with 2-aminophenol, were prepared and characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, spectral, magnetic, molar conductance and thermal gravimetric analysis. Square planar, tetrahedral and octahedral geometries have been assigned to the prepared complexes. Molecular parameters of the ligand and its metal complexes have been calculated and correlated with the experimental data, and the changes of bond lengths are linearly correlated with IR data. The antimicrobial activities of the synthesized compounds were tested in vitro against the sensitive organisms Staphylococcus aureus as Gram positive bacteria, Proteus vulgaris as Gram negative bacteria and Candida albicans as fungus strain, and the results are discussed.

  17. Characterization, molecular modeling and antimicrobial activity of metal complexes of tridentate Schiff base derived from 5-acetyl-4-hydroxy-2H-1,3-thiazine-2,6(3H)-dione and 2-aminophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adly, Omima M. I.

    Metal complexes of Ni(II), Co(II), Cd(II), VO(IV) and UO2(VI) as well as several Cu(II) salts, including Cl,NO3-,AcO,ClO4- and SO4-2 with a tridentate O2N donor Schiff base ligand (H2L), synthesized by condensation of 5-acetyl-4-hydroxy-2H-1,3-thiazine-2,6(3H)-dione with 2-aminophenol, were prepared and characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, spectral, magnetic, molar conductance and thermal gravimetric analysis. Square planar, tetrahedral and octahedral geometries have been assigned to the prepared complexes. Molecular parameters of the ligand and its metal complexes have been calculated and correlated with the experimental data, and the changes of bond lengths are linearly correlated with IR data. The antimicrobial activities of the synthesized compounds were tested in vitro against the sensitive organisms Staphylococcus aureus as Gram positive bacteria, Proteus vulgaris as Gram negative bacteria and Candida albicans as fungus strain, and the results are discussed.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Fracture of Model Epoxies

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-01-18

    The failure of thermosetting polymer adhesives is an important problem which particularly lacks understanding from the molecular viewpoint. While linear elastic fracture mechanics works well for such polymers far from the crack tip, the method breaks down near the crack tip where large plastic deformation occurs and the molecular details become important [1]. Results of molecular dynamics simulations of highly crosslinked polymer networks bonded to a solid surface are presented here. Epoxies are used as the guide for modeling. The focus of the simulations is the network connectivity and the interfacial strength. In a random network, the bond stress is expected to vary, and the most stressed bonds will break first [2]. Crack initiation should occur where a cluster of highly constrained bonds exists. There is no reason to expect crack initiation to occur at the interface. The results to be presented show that the solid surface limits the interfacial bonding resulting in stressed interfacial bonds and interfacial fracture. The bonds in highly-crosslinked random networks do not become stressed as expected. The sequence of molecular structural deformations that lead to failure has been determined and found to be strongly dependent upon the network connectivity. The structure of these networks and its influence on the stress-strain behavior will be discussed in general. A set of ideal, ordered networks have been constructed to manipulate the deformation sequence to achieve different fracture modes (i.e. cohesive vs. adhesive).

  19. Pharmacological activities in thermal proteins: relationships in molecular evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Hefti, F.; Hartikka, J.; Junard, E.; Przybylski, A. T.; Vaughan, G.

    1987-01-01

    The model of protobiological events that has been presented in these pages has increasing relevance to pharmacological research. The thermal proteins that function as key substances in the proteinoid theory have recently been found to prolong the survival of rat forebrain neurons in culture and to stimulate the growth of neurites. A search for such activity in thermal proteins added to cultures of modern neurons was suggested by the fact that some of the microspheres assembled from proteinoids rich in hydrophobic amino acids themselves generate fibrous outgrowths.

  20. Pharmacological activities in thermal proteins: relationships in molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Fox, S W; Hefti, F; Hartikka, J; Junard, E; Przybylski, A T; Vaughan, G

    1987-01-01

    The model of protobiological events that has been presented in these pages has increasing relevance to pharmacological research. The thermal proteins that function as key substances in the proteinoid theory have recently been found to prolong the survival of rat forebrain neurons in culture and to stimulate the growth of neurites. A search for such activity in thermal proteins added to cultures of modern neurons was suggested by the fact that some of the microspheres assembled from proteinoids rich in hydrophobic amino acids themselves generate fibrous outgrowths.

  1. Towards synthetic molecular motors: a model elastic-network study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Amartya; Flechsig, Holger; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-04-01

    Protein molecular motors play a fundamental role in biological cells and development of their synthetic counterparts is a major challenge. Here, we show how a model motor system with the operation mechanism resembling that of muscle myosin can be designed at the concept level, without addressing the implementation aspects. The model is constructed as an elastic network, similar to the coarse-grained descriptions used for real proteins. We show by numerical simulations that the designed synthetic motor can operate as a deterministic or Brownian ratchet and that there is a continuous transition between such two regimes. The motor operation under external load, approaching the stall condition, is also analysed.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Models of Shaped Particles Using Filling Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Carolyn L.; Anderson, Joshua A.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    Algorithms such as molecular dynamics are useful computational methods for generating trajectories for studying kinetics and nonequilibrium, as well as equilibrium, problems involving ensembles of nano- and colloidal particles. Highly coarse-grained representations of complex particles can be created by rigidly connecting beads into a compos- ite particle. Here we show that by permitting the beads to vary in radii and to overlap, particles can be modeled with more complicated shapes, approaching perfect polygons and polyhedra in two and three dimensions, respectively. The positions and radii of the beads correspond to afilling solution of the very short-range repulsive shape of the modeled nanoparticle.

  3. Pharmacophore Modeling and Molecular Docking Studies on Pinus roxburghii as a Target for Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Pawan; Lal Khokra, Sukhbir; Rana, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    The present study attempts to establish a relationship between ethnopharmacological claims and bioactive constituents present in Pinus roxburghii against all possible targets for diabetes through molecular docking and to develop a pharmacophore model for the active target. The process of molecular docking involves study of different bonding modes of one ligand with active cavities of target receptors protein tyrosine phosphatase 1-beta (PTP-1β), dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV), aldose reductase (AR), and insulin receptor (IR) with help of docking software Molegro virtual docker (MVD). From the results of docking score values on different receptors for antidiabetic activity, it is observed that constituents, namely, secoisoresinol, pinoresinol, and cedeodarin, showed the best docking results on almost all the receptors, while the most significant results were observed on AR. Then, LigandScout was applied to develop a pharmacophore model for active target. LigandScout revealed that 2 hydrogen bond donors pointing towards Tyr 48 and His 110 are a major requirement of the pharmacophore generated. In our molecular docking studies, the active constituent, secoisoresinol, has also shown hydrogen bonding with His 110 residue which is a part of the pharmacophore. The docking results have given better insights into the development of better aldose reductase inhibitor so as to treat diabetes related secondary complications. PMID:25114678

  4. Pharmacophore Modeling and Molecular Docking Studies on Pinus roxburghii as a Target for Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Pawan; Lal Khokra, Sukhbir; Rana, A C; Kaushik, Dhirender

    2014-01-01

    The present study attempts to establish a relationship between ethnopharmacological claims and bioactive constituents present in Pinus roxburghii against all possible targets for diabetes through molecular docking and to develop a pharmacophore model for the active target. The process of molecular docking involves study of different bonding modes of one ligand with active cavities of target receptors protein tyrosine phosphatase 1-beta (PTP-1β), dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV), aldose reductase (AR), and insulin receptor (IR) with help of docking software Molegro virtual docker (MVD). From the results of docking score values on different receptors for antidiabetic activity, it is observed that constituents, namely, secoisoresinol, pinoresinol, and cedeodarin, showed the best docking results on almost all the receptors, while the most significant results were observed on AR. Then, LigandScout was applied to develop a pharmacophore model for active target. LigandScout revealed that 2 hydrogen bond donors pointing towards Tyr 48 and His 110 are a major requirement of the pharmacophore generated. In our molecular docking studies, the active constituent, secoisoresinol, has also shown hydrogen bonding with His 110 residue which is a part of the pharmacophore. The docking results have given better insights into the development of better aldose reductase inhibitor so as to treat diabetes related secondary complications. PMID:25114678

  5. Activity Prediction and Molecular Mechanism of Bovine Blood Derived Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Nie, Shaoping; Liu, Boqun; Yu, Yiding; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Jingbo

    2015-01-01

    Development of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE, EC 3.4.15.1) inhibitory peptides from food protein is under extensive research as alternative for the prevention of hypertension. However, it is difficult to identify peptides released from food sources. To accelerate the progress of peptide identification, a three layer back propagation neural network model was established to predict the ACE-inhibitory activity of pentapeptides derived from bovine hemoglobin by simulated enzyme digestion. The pentapeptide WTQRF has the best predicted value with experimental IC50 23.93 μM. The potential molecular mechanism of the WTQRF / ACE interaction was investigated by flexible docking. PMID:25768442

  6. Activity prediction and molecular mechanism of bovine blood derived angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Nie, Shaoping; Liu, Boqun; Yu, Yiding; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Jingbo

    2015-01-01

    Development of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE, EC 3.4.15.1) inhibitory peptides from food protein is under extensive research as alternative for the prevention of hypertension. However, it is difficult to identify peptides released from food sources. To accelerate the progress of peptide identification, a three layer back propagation neural network model was established to predict the ACE-inhibitory activity of pentapeptides derived from bovine hemoglobin by simulated enzyme digestion. The pentapeptide WTQRF has the best predicted value with experimental IC50 23.93 μM. The potential molecular mechanism of the WTQRF / ACE interaction was investigated by flexible docking. PMID:25768442

  7. Molecular models need to be tested: the case of a solar flares discoidal HDL model.

    PubMed

    Shih, Amy Y; Sligar, Stephen G; Schulten, Klaus

    2008-06-01

    In the absence of atomic structures of high-density lipoproteins in their lipid-bound states, many molecular models have been produced based on experimental data. Using molecular dynamics, we show that a recently proposed "solar-flares" model of discoidal high-density lipoprotein is implausible. Our simulations show a collapse of the protruding solar-flare loops and a notable protein rearrangement due to an energetically unfavorable orientation of the hydrophobic protein surface toward the aqueous solvent.

  8. Modelling of Cosmic Molecular Masers: Introduction to a Computation Cookbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, Andrej M.; Gray, Malcolm D.

    2012-07-01

    Numerical modeling of molecular masers is necessary in order to understand their nature and diagnostic capabilities. Model construction requires elaboration of a basic description which allows computation, that is a definition of the parameter space and basic physical relations. Usually, this requires additional thorough studies that can consist of the following stages/parts: relevant molecular spectroscopy and collisional rate coefficients; conditions in and around the masing region (that part of space where population inversion is realized); geometry and size of the masing region (including the question of whether maser spots are discrete clumps or line-of-sight correlations in a much bigger region) and propagation of maser radiation. Output of the maser computer modeling can have the following forms: exploration of parameter space (where do inversions appear in particular maser transitions and their combinations, which parameter values describe a `typical' source, and so on); modeling of individual sources (line flux ratios, spectra, images and their variability); analysis of the pumping mechanism; predictions (new maser transitions, correlations in variability of different maser transitions, and the like). Described schemes (constituents and hierarchy) of the model input and output are based mainly on the experience of the authors and make no claim to be dogmatic.

  9. Three dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships of sulfonamides binding monoclonal antibody by comparative molecular field analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) model of sulfonamide analogs, binding a monoclonal antibody (MabSMR) produced against sulfamerazine was carried out by comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA). The affinities of MabSMR, expressed as Log10IC50, for 17 ...

  10. Coumarins as Potential Antioxidant Agents Complemented with Suggested Mechanisms and Approved by Molecular Modeling Studies.

    PubMed

    Al-Majedy, Yasameen K; Al-Duhaidahawi, Dunya L; Al-Azawi, Khalida F; Al-Amiery, Ahmed A; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2016-01-01

    Syntheses of coumarins, which are a structurally interesting antioxidant activity, was done in this article. The modification of 7-hydroxycoumarin by different reaction steps was done to yield target compounds. Molecular structures were characterized by different spectroscopical techniques (Fourier transformation infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance). Antioxidant activities were performed by using various in vitro spectrophometric assays against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). All compounds exhibited high efficiency as antioxidants compared to ascorbic acid. The highest efficiency scavenging activity was found for compound 3 (91.0 ± 5.0), followed by compounds 2 and 4 (88.0 ± 2.00; and 87.0 ± 3.00). Ascorbic acid C was used as a standard drug with a percentage inhibition of 91.00 ± 1.5. The mechanism of the synthesized compounds as antioxidants was also studied. Hartree-Fock-based quantum chemical studies have been carried out with the basis set to 3-21G, in order to obtain information about the three-dimensional (3D) geometries, electronic structure, molecular modeling, and electronic levels, namely HOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital) and LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital), to understand the antioxidant activity for the synthesized compounds. PMID:26805811

  11. Molecular catchers for pharmacologically active substances in wastewaters, a theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar Valencia, P. J.; Pérez Merchancano, S. T.; Paredes, H.; Bolívar Marinez, L. E.

    2016-08-01

    A basic and pressing need in the treatment of residual waste waters for urban and rural centers is the removal of pharmacological active residues from them, these resides are originated in a wide array of domestic, agricultural and industrial sources and can't be removed in the residual waters treatment plants by conventional methods, the result is the incorporation of them into the ecosystem altering the physiology and behavior of living organisms. Among the most active pharmacological substances found in very high concentration in residual waters is paracetamol, an analgesic of very wide excessive use due to its ease of access and low cost [1]. No pharmacological substance is entirely absorbed by the human organism and therefore a wide family of molecular residues is excreted by the urinary tract. In this work we have used the AM1 (Austin Model 1), PM3 (Parametric Method 3) and ZINDO/CI semiempirical methods, from the NDO (Neglect Differential Overlap) family [2] to study and observe the structural, electronic and optical characteristics of paracetamol while immersed in different basic and acidic aqueous environments, either alone or interacting with lignosulphonates. We have previously found that lignosulphonates, a lignin derivatives of wide industrial applications, can be engineered as a binding and flocculant agent and acts as molecular catchers therefore showing the potential to be used as a mean to filter and eliminate molecular residues from the residual waters [3].

  12. Interpretation of pH-activity profiles for acid-base catalysis from molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Dissanayake, Thakshila; Swails, Jason M; Harris, Michael E; Roitberg, Adrian E; York, Darrin M

    2015-02-17

    The measurement of reaction rate as a function of pH provides essential information about mechanism. These rates are sensitive to the pK(a) values of amino acids directly involved in catalysis that are often shifted by the enzyme active site environment. Experimentally observed pH-rate profiles are usually interpreted using simple kinetic models that allow estimation of "apparent pK(a)" values of presumed general acid and base catalysts. One of the underlying assumptions in these models is that the protonation states are uncorrelated. In this work, we introduce the use of constant pH molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent (CpHMD) with replica exchange in the pH-dimension (pH-REMD) as a tool to aid in the interpretation of pH-activity data of enzymes and to test the validity of different kinetic models. We apply the methods to RNase A, a prototype acid-base catalyst, to predict the macroscopic and microscopic pK(a) values, as well as the shape of the pH-rate profile. Results for apo and cCMP-bound RNase A agree well with available experimental data and suggest that deprotonation of the general acid and protonation of the general base are not strongly coupled in transphosphorylation and hydrolysis steps. Stronger coupling, however, is predicted for the Lys41 and His119 protonation states in apo RNase A, leading to the requirement for a microscopic kinetic model. This type of analysis may be important for other catalytic systems where the active forms of the implicated general acid and base are oppositely charged and more highly correlated. These results suggest a new way for CpHMD/pH-REMD simulations to bridge the gap with experiments to provide a molecular-level interpretation of pH-activity data in studies of enzyme mechanisms.

  13. Molecular Imaging of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Gargiulo, Sara; Gramanzini, Matteo; Mancini, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by intimal plaques of the arterial vessels that develop slowly and, in some cases, may undergo spontaneous rupture with subsequent heart attack or stroke. Currently, noninvasive diagnostic tools are inadequate to screen atherosclerotic lesions at high risk of acute complications. Therefore, the attention of the scientific community has been focused on the use of molecular imaging for identifying vulnerable plaques. Genetically engineered murine models such as ApoE−/− and ApoE−/−Fbn1C1039G+/− mice have been shown to be useful for testing new probes targeting biomarkers of relevant molecular processes for the characterization of vulnerable plaques, such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1, VEGFR-2, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, P-selectin, and integrins, and for the potential development of translational tools to identify high-risk patients who could benefit from early therapeutic interventions. This review summarizes the main animal models of vulnerable plaques, with an emphasis on genetically altered mice, and the state-of-the-art preclinical molecular imaging strategies. PMID:27618031

  14. Molecular Imaging of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques in Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Gargiulo, Sara; Gramanzini, Matteo; Mancini, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by intimal plaques of the arterial vessels that develop slowly and, in some cases, may undergo spontaneous rupture with subsequent heart attack or stroke. Currently, noninvasive diagnostic tools are inadequate to screen atherosclerotic lesions at high risk of acute complications. Therefore, the attention of the scientific community has been focused on the use of molecular imaging for identifying vulnerable plaques. Genetically engineered murine models such as ApoE(-/-) and ApoE(-/-)Fbn1C1039G(+/-) mice have been shown to be useful for testing new probes targeting biomarkers of relevant molecular processes for the characterization of vulnerable plaques, such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1, VEGFR-2, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, P-selectin, and integrins, and for the potential development of translational tools to identify high-risk patients who could benefit from early therapeutic interventions. This review summarizes the main animal models of vulnerable plaques, with an emphasis on genetically altered mice, and the state-of-the-art preclinical molecular imaging strategies. PMID:27618031

  15. Multiscale model for photoinduced molecular motion in azo polymers.

    PubMed

    Juan, Mathieu L; Plain, Jérôme; Bachelot, Renaud; Royer, Pascal; Gray, Stephen K; Wiederrecht, Gary P

    2009-06-23

    Light-induced isomerization processes in azobenzene-containing polymers produce mass transport that is of much interest for nanoscale imaging and lithography. Yet, despite the development of numerous models to simulate the mass transport mechanism, no model precisely describes all the experimental observations. We develop a new statistical approach that correctly reproduces light-driven mass motion in azobenzene-containing polymers with a high degree of accuracy. Comparisons with experiments show that our model predicts the nanoscale topographic modifications for many different incident field configurations, including optical near-fields produced by plasmonic structures with complex polarization states. In particular, the model allows the detailed molecular motions that lead to these topographic modifications to be identified.

  16. Micro- and Nanostructured Materials for Active Devices and Molecular Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.; Graff, Gordon L.; Gross, Mark E.; Burrows, Paul E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Mast, Eric S.; Hall, Michael G.; Bonham, Charles C.; Zumhoff, Mac R.; Williford, Rick E.

    2003-10-01

    Traditional single layer barrier coatings are not adequate in preventing degradation of the performance of organic molecular electronic and other active devices. Most advanced devices used in display technology now consist of micro and nanostructured small molecule, polymer and inorganic coatings with thin high reactive group 1A metals. This includes organic electronics such as organic light emitting devices (OLED). The lifetimes of these devices rapidly degrades when they are exposed to atmospheric oxygen and water vapor. Thin film photovoltaics and batteries are also susceptible to degradation by moisture and oxygen. Using in-line coating techniques we apply a composite nanostructured inorganic/polymer thin film barrier that restricts moisture and oxygen permeation to undetectable levels using conventional permeation test equipment. We describe permeation mechanisms for this encapsulation coating and flat panel display and other device applications. Permeation through the multilayer barrier coating is defect and pore limited and can be described by Knudsen diffusion involving a long and tortuous path. Device lifetime is also enhanced by the long lag times required to reach the steady state flux regime. Permeation rates in the range of 10-6 cc,g/m2/d have been achieved and OLED device lifetimes. The structure is robust, yet flexible. The resulting device performance and lifetimes will also be described. The barrier film can be capped with a thin film of transparent conductive oxide yielding an engineered nanostructured device for next generation, rugged, lightweight or flexible displays. This enables, for the first time, thin film encapsulation of emissive organic displays.

  17. Molecular basis of thrombomodulin activation of slow thrombin

    PubMed Central

    ADAMS, T.E.; LI, W.; HUNTINGTON, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Coagulation is a highly regulated process where the ability to prevent blood loss after injury is balanced against the maintenance of blood fluidity. Thrombin is at the center of this balancing act. It is the critical enzyme for producing and stabilizing a clot, but when complexed with thrombomodulin (TM) it is converted to a powerful anticoagulant. Another cofactor that may play a role in determining thrombin function is the monovalent cation Na+. Its apparent affinity suggests that half of the thrombin generated is in a Na+-free ‘slow’ state and half is in a Na+-coordinated ‘fast’ state. While slow thrombin is a poor procoagulant enzyme, when complexed to TM it is an effective anticoagulant. Methods To better understand this molecular transformation we solved a 2.4 Å structure of thrombin complexed with EGF domains 4–6 of TM in the absence of Na+ and other cofactors or inhibitors. Results We find that TM binds as previously observed, and that the thrombin component resembles structures of the fast form. The Na+ binding loop is observed in a conformation identical to the Na+-bound form, with conserved water molecules compensating for the missing ion. Using the fluorescent probe p-aminobenzamidine we show that activation of slow thrombin by TM principally involves the opening of the primary specificity pocket. Conclusions These data show that TM binding alters the conformation of thrombin in a similar manner as Na+ coordination, resulting in an ordering of the Na+ binding loop and an opening of the adjacent S1 pocket. We conclude that other, more subtle subsite changes are unlikely to influence thrombin specificity toward macromolecular substrates. PMID:19656282

  18. Phase computations and phase models for discrete molecular oscillators

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biochemical oscillators perform crucial functions in cells, e.g., they set up circadian clocks. The dynamical behavior of oscillators is best described and analyzed in terms of the scalar quantity, phase. A rigorous and useful definition for phase is based on the so-called isochrons of oscillators. Phase computation techniques for continuous oscillators that are based on isochrons have been used for characterizing the behavior of various types of oscillators under the influence of perturbations such as noise. Results In this article, we extend the applicability of these phase computation methods to biochemical oscillators as discrete molecular systems, upon the information obtained from a continuous-state approximation of such oscillators. In particular, we describe techniques for computing the instantaneous phase of discrete, molecular oscillators for stochastic simulation algorithm generated sample paths. We comment on the accuracies and derive certain measures for assessing the feasibilities of the proposed phase computation methods. Phase computation experiments on the sample paths of well-known biological oscillators validate our analyses. Conclusions The impact of noise that arises from the discrete and random nature of the mechanisms that make up molecular oscillators can be characterized based on the phase computation techniques proposed in this article. The concept of isochrons is the natural choice upon which the phase notion of oscillators can be founded. The isochron-theoretic phase computation methods that we propose can be applied to discrete molecular oscillators of any dimension, provided that the oscillatory behavior observed in discrete-state does not vanish in a continuous-state approximation. Analysis of the full versatility of phase noise phenomena in molecular oscillators will be possible if a proper phase model theory is developed, without resorting to such approximations. PMID:22687330

  19. cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase HSPDE4D3 mutants which mimic activation and changes in rolipram inhibition triggered by protein kinase A phosphorylation of Ser-54: generation of a molecular model.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, R; Wilkinson, I R; McCallum, J F; Engels, P; Houslay, M D

    1998-01-01

    Ser-13 and Ser-54 were shown to provide the sole sites for the protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the human cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase isoform HSPDE4D3. The ability of PKA to phosphorylate and activate HSPDE4D3 was mimicked by replacing Ser-54 with either of the negatively charged amino acids, aspartate or glutamate, within the consensus motif of RRES54. The PDE4 selective inhibitor rolipram ¿4-[3-(cyclopentoxy)-4-methoxyphenyl]-2-pyrrolidone¿ inhibited both PKA-phosphorylated HSPDE4D3 and the Ser-54-->Asp mutant, with an IC50 value that was approximately 8-fold lower than that seen for the non-PKA-phosphorylated enzyme. Lower IC50 values for inhibition by rolipram were seen for a wide range of non-activated residue 54 mutants, except for those which had side-chains able to serve as hydrogen-bond donors, namely the Ser-54-->Thr, Ser-54-->Tyr and Ser-54-->Cys mutants. The Glu-53-->Ala mutant exhibited an activity comparable with that of the PKA phosphorylated native enzyme and the Ser-54-->Asp mutant but, in contrast to the native enzyme, was insensitive to activation by PKA, despite being more rapidly phosphorylated by this protein kinase. The activated Glu-53-->Ala mutant exhibited a sensitivity to inhibition by rolipram which was unchanged from that of the native enzyme. The double mutant, Arg-51-->Ala/Arg-52-->Ala, showed no change in either enzyme activity or rolipram inhibition from the native enzyme and was incapable of providing a substrate for PKA phosphorylation at Ser-54. No difference in inhibition by dipyridamole was seen for the native enzyme and the Ser-54-->Asp and Ser-54-->Ala mutants. A model is proposed which envisages that phosphorylation by PKA triggers at least two distinct conformational changes in HSPDE4D3; one of these gives rise to enzyme activation and another enhances sensitivity to inhibition by rolipram. Activation of HSPDE4D3 by PKA-mediated phosphorylation is suggested to involve disruption of an ion

  20. An optimized molecular inclusion complex of diferuloylmethane: enhanced physical properties and biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Qunyou; Li, Yi; Wu, Jianyong; Mei, Hu; Zhao, Chunjing; Zhang, Jingqing

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to explore and evaluate the enhanced physical properties and biological activity of a molecular inclusion complex (MICDH) comprising diferuloylmethane (DFM) and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin. Methods The preparation conditions of MICDH were optimized using an orthogonal experimental design. The solubility, in vitro release and model fitting, microscopic morphology, molecular structure simulation, anti-lung cancer activity, and action mechanism of MICDH were evaluated. Results The solubility of DFM was improved 4400-fold upon complexation with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin. The release rate of DFM was significantly higher from MICDH than from free DFM. MICDH exhibited higher antitumor activity against human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells than free DFM. More cells were arrested in the S/G2 phase of the cell cycle or were induced to undergo apoptosis when treated with MICDH than when treated with free DFM. Furthermore, increased reactive oxygen species and intracellular calcium ion levels and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential were observed in cells treated with MICDH. Conclusion MICDH markedly improved the physical properties and antitumor activity of DFM. MICDH may prove to be a preferred alternative to free DFM as a formulation for DFM delivery in lung cancer treatment. PMID:23091376

  1. Accurate Model Selection of Relaxed Molecular Clocks in Bayesian Phylogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Baele, Guy; Li, Wai Lok Sibon; Drummond, Alexei J.; Suchard, Marc A.; Lemey, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Recent implementations of path sampling (PS) and stepping-stone sampling (SS) have been shown to outperform the harmonic mean estimator (HME) and a posterior simulation-based analog of Akaike’s information criterion through Markov chain Monte Carlo (AICM), in Bayesian model selection of demographic and molecular clock models. Almost simultaneously, a Bayesian model averaging approach was developed that avoids conditioning on a single model but averages over a set of relaxed clock models. This approach returns estimates of the posterior probability of each clock model through which one can estimate the Bayes factor in favor of the maximum a posteriori (MAP) clock model; however, this Bayes factor estimate may suffer when the posterior probability of the MAP model approaches 1. Here, we compare these two recent developments with the HME, stabilized/smoothed HME (sHME), and AICM, using both synthetic and empirical data. Our comparison shows reassuringly that MAP identification and its Bayes factor provide similar performance to PS and SS and that these approaches considerably outperform HME, sHME, and AICM in selecting the correct underlying clock model. We also illustrate the importance of using proper priors on a large set of empirical data sets. PMID:23090976

  2. Staphylococcal SplB Serine Protease Utilizes a Novel Molecular Mechanism of Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Pustelny, Katarzyna; Zdzalik, Michal; Stach, Natalia; Stec-Niemczyk, Justyna; Cichon, Przemyslaw; Czarna, Anna; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Mak, Pawel; Drag, Marcin; Salvesen, Guy S.; Wladyka, Benedykt; Potempa, Jan; Dubin, Adam; Dubin, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcal SplB protease belongs to the chymotrypsin family. Chymotrypsin zymogen is activated by proteolytic processing at the N terminus, resulting in significant structural rearrangement at the active site. Here, we demonstrate that the molecular mechanism of SplB protease activation differs significantly and we characterize the novel mechanism in detail. Using peptide and protein substrates we show that the native signal peptide, or any N-terminal extension, has an inhibitory effect on SplB. Only precise N-terminal processing releases the full proteolytic activity of the wild type analogously to chymotrypsin. However, comparison of the crystal structures of mature SplB and a zymogen mimic show no rearrangement at the active site whatsoever. Instead, only the formation of a unique hydrogen bond network, distant form the active site, by the new N-terminal glutamic acid of mature SplB is observed. The importance of this network and influence of particular hydrogen bond interactions at the N terminus on the catalytic process is demonstrated by evaluating the kinetics of a series of mutants. The results allow us to propose a consistent model where changes in the overall protein dynamics rather than structural rearrangement of the active site are involved in the activation process. PMID:24713703

  3. A Model of How Different Biology Experts Explain Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Caleb M.; Anderson, Trevor R.; Pelaez, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Constructing explanations is an essential skill for all science learners. The goal of this project was to model the key components of expert explanation of molecular and cellular mechanisms. As such, we asked: What is an appropriate model of the components of explanation used by biology experts to explain molecular and cellular mechanisms? Do explanations made by experts from different biology subdisciplines at a university support the validity of this model? Guided by the modeling framework of R. S. Justi and J. K. Gilbert, the validity of an initial model was tested by asking seven biologists to explain a molecular mechanism of their choice. Data were collected from interviews, artifacts, and drawings, and then subjected to thematic analysis. We found that biologists explained the specific activities and organization of entities of the mechanism. In addition, they contextualized explanations according to their biological and social significance; integrated explanations with methods, instruments, and measurements; and used analogies and narrated stories. The derived methods, analogies, context, and how themes informed the development of our final MACH model of mechanistic explanations. Future research will test the potential of the MACH model as a guiding framework for instruction to enhance the quality of student explanations. PMID:25999313

  4. A model of how different biology experts explain molecular and cellular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Caleb M; Anderson, Trevor R; Pelaez, Nancy J

    2015-01-01

    Constructing explanations is an essential skill for all science learners. The goal of this project was to model the key components of expert explanation of molecular and cellular mechanisms. As such, we asked: What is an appropriate model of the components of explanation used by biology experts to explain molecular and cellular mechanisms? Do explanations made by experts from different biology subdisciplines at a university support the validity of this model? Guided by the modeling framework of R. S. Justi and J. K. Gilbert, the validity of an initial model was tested by asking seven biologists to explain a molecular mechanism of their choice. Data were collected from interviews, artifacts, and drawings, and then subjected to thematic analysis. We found that biologists explained the specific activities and organization of entities of the mechanism. In addition, they contextualized explanations according to their biological and social significance; integrated explanations with methods, instruments, and measurements; and used analogies and narrated stories. The derived methods, analogies, context, and how themes informed the development of our final MACH model of mechanistic explanations. Future research will test the potential of the MACH model as a guiding framework for instruction to enhance the quality of student explanations.

  5. Atomistic insights into rhodopsin activation from a dynamic model.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, Irina G; Best, Robert B; Engel, Stanislav; Gershengorn, Marvin C; Hummer, Gerhard; Costanzi, Stefano

    2008-08-01

    Rhodopsin, the light sensitive receptor responsible for blue-green vision, serves as a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Upon light absorption, it undergoes a series of conformational changes that lead to the active form, metarhodopsin II (META II), initiating a signaling cascade through binding to the G protein transducin (G(t)). Here, we first develop a structural model of META II by applying experimental distance restraints to the structure of lumi-rhodopsin (LUMI), an earlier intermediate. The restraints are imposed by using a combination of biased molecular dynamics simulations and perturbations to an elastic network model. We characterize the motions of the transmembrane helices in the LUMI-to-META II transition and the rearrangement of interhelical hydrogen bonds. We then simulate rhodopsin activation in a dynamic model to study the path leading from LUMI to our META II model for wild-type rhodopsin and a series of mutants. The simulations show a strong correlation between the transition dynamics and the pharmacological phenotypes of the mutants. These results help identify the molecular mechanisms of activation in both wild type and mutant rhodopsin. While static models can provide insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and predict ligand affinity, a dynamic model of activation could be applicable to study the pharmacology of other GPCRs and their ligands, offering a key to predictions of basal activity and ligand efficacy.

  6. Scaffolding Students' Online Critiquing of Expert- and Peer-generated Molecular Models of Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsin-Yi; Chang, Hsiang-Chi

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we developed online critiquing activities using an open-source computer learning environment. We investigated how well the activities scaffolded students to critique molecular models of chemical reactions made by scientists, peers, and a fictitious peer, and whether the activities enhanced the students' understanding of science models and chemical reactions. The activities were implemented in an eighth-grade class with 28 students in a public junior high school in southern Taiwan. The study employed mixed research methods. Data collected included pre- and post-instructional assessments, post-instructional interviews, and students' electronic written responses and oral discussions during the critiquing activities. The results indicated that these activities guided the students to produce overall quality critiques. Also, the students developed a more sophisticated understanding of chemical reactions and scientific models as a result of the intervention. Design considerations for effective model critiquing activities are discussed based on observational results, including the use of peer-generated artefacts for critiquing to promote motivation and collaboration, coupled with critiques of scientific models to enhance students' epistemological understanding of model purpose and communication.

  7. Molecular docking and QSAR analyses for understanding the antimalarial activity of some 7-substituted-4-aminoquinoline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Shibi, I G; Aswathy, L; Jisha, R S; Masand, V H; Divyachandran, A; Gajbhiye, J M

    2015-09-18

    The quinoline moiety is one of the widely studied scaffolds for generating derivatives with various pharmacophoric groups due to its potential antimalarial activities. In the present study, a series of 7-substituted-4-aminoquinoline derivatives were selected to understand their antimalarial properties computationally by molecular modeling techniques including 2D QSAR, comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) and molecular docking. The 2D-QSAR model built with four descriptors selected by genetic algorithm technique and CoMFA model showed satisfactory statistical results (Q(2)=0.540, R(2)ncv=0.881, F value=157.09). A reliable CoMSIA model out of the fourteen different combinations has a Q(2) value of 0.638. The molecular docking studies of the compounds for 1CET as the protein target revealed that ten compounds showed maximum interactions with the binding site of the protein. The present study highlights the unique binding signatures of the ligands within the active site groove of the target and it explains the subtle differences in their EC50 values and their mechanism of inhibition.

  8. Physics Beyond the Standard Model from Molecular Hydrogen Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubachs, Wim; Salumbides, Edcel John; Bagdonaite, Julija

    2015-06-01

    The spectrum of molecular hydrogen can be measured in the laboratory to very high precision using advanced laser and molecular beam techniques, as well as frequency-comb based calibration [1,2]. The quantum level structure of this smallest neutral molecule can now be calculated to very high precision, based on a very accurate (10-15 precision) Born-Oppenheimer potential [3] and including subtle non-adiabatic, relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects [4]. Comparison between theory and experiment yields a test of QED, and in fact of the Standard Model of Physics, since the weak, strong and gravitational forces have a negligible effect. Even fifth forces beyond the Standard Model can be searched for [5]. Astronomical observation of molecular hydrogen spectra, using the largest telescopes on Earth and in space, may reveal possible variations of fundamental constants on a cosmological time scale [6]. A study has been performed at a 'look-back' time of 12.5 billion years [7]. In addition the possible dependence of a fundamental constant on a gravitational field has been investigated from observation of molecular hydrogen in the photospheres of white dwarfs [8]. The latter involves a test of the Einsteins equivalence principle. [1] E.J. Salumbides et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 143005 (2011). [2] G. Dickenson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 193601 (2013). [3] K. Pachucki, Phys. Rev. A82, 032509 (2010). [4] J. Komasa et al., J. Chem. Theory Comp. 7, 3105 (2011). [5] E.J. Salumbides et al., Phys. Rev. D87, 112008 (2013). [6] F. van Weerdenburg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 180802 (2011). [7] J. Badonaite et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 071301 (2015). [8] J. Bagdonaite et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 123002 (2014).

  9. A computational kinetic model of diffusion for molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Teo, Ivan; Schulten, Klaus

    2013-09-28

    Regulation of biomolecular transport in cells involves intra-protein steps like gating and passage through channels, but these steps are preceded by extra-protein steps, namely, diffusive approach and admittance of solutes. The extra-protein steps develop over a 10-100 nm length scale typically in a highly particular environment, characterized through the protein's geometry, surrounding electrostatic field, and location. In order to account for solute energetics and mobility of solutes in this environment at a relevant resolution, we propose a particle-based kinetic model of diffusion based on a Markov State Model framework. Prerequisite input data consist of diffusion coefficient and potential of mean force maps generated from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of proteins and their environment that sample multi-nanosecond durations. The suggested diffusion model can describe transport processes beyond microsecond duration, relevant for biological function and beyond the realm of molecular dynamics simulation. For this purpose the systems are represented by a discrete set of states specified by the positions, volumes, and surface elements of Voronoi grid cells distributed according to a density function resolving the often intricate relevant diffusion space. Validation tests carried out for generic diffusion spaces show that the model and the associated Brownian motion algorithm are viable over a large range of parameter values such as time step, diffusion coefficient, and grid density. A concrete application of the method is demonstrated for ion diffusion around and through the Eschericia coli mechanosensitive channel of small conductance ecMscS.

  10. Analysis of conjugation of chloramphenicol and hemoglobin by fluorescence, circular dichroism and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Fei; Liu, Wei; Sun, Ye; Yang, Xin-Ling; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Li

    2012-01-01

    Chloramphenicol is a low cost, broad spectrum, highly active antibiotic, and widely used in the treatment of serious infections, including typhoid fever and other life-threatening infections of the central nervous system and respiratory tract. The purpose of the present study was to examine the conjugation of chloramphenicol with hemoglobin (Hb) and compared with albumin at molecular level, utilizing fluorescence, UV/vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD) as well as molecular modeling. Fluorescence data indicate that drug bind Hb generate quenching via static mechanism, this corroborates UV/vis absorption measurements that the ground state complex formation with an affinity of 10 4 M -1, and the driving forces in the Hb-drug complex are hydrophilic interactions and hydrogen bonds, as derived from computational model. The accurate binding site of drug has been identified from the analysis of fluorescence and molecular modeling, α1β2 interface of Hb was assigned to possess high-affinity for drug, which located at the β-37 Trp nearby. The structural investigation of the complexed Hb by synchronous fluorescence, UV/vis absorption, and CD observations revealed some degree of Hb structure unfolding upon complexation. Based on molecular modeling, we can draw the conclusion that the binding affinity of drug with albumin is superior, compared with Hb. These phenomena can provide salient information on the absorption, distribution, pharmacology, and toxicity of chloramphenicol and other drugs which have analogous configuration with chloramphenicol.

  11. Molecular modeling in scale control -- An experimental verification and its limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Bendiksen, B.; Gill, J.S.

    1996-12-01

    This work centers on the use of molecular modeling to study inhibition of alkaline earth scales such as calcium carbonate and calcium sulfate. The molecular modeling studies have shown the interaction of phosphonates with varied crystal faces of the scales. The software makes it possible to visualize the important crystal faces and match the geometry of the inhibitor to the crystal planes that determine the morphology of the resulting solid. Molecular Dynamics (MD) calculations can reveal specific interactions of inhibitors with scale surfaces. Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSAR) between scale inhibition and calculated quantities have been used to build models that help to predict the structure of new scale inhibitors. Interaction energies of phosphonates over the surfaces of crystals can show differences in binding of phosphonate to specific crystal faces. The relative binding energies can be correlated to effectiveness in scale inhibition, and verified by experiment. However, simple energy calculations do not always explain the complicated process of scale inhibition. Comparison is made of the effectiveness of two phosphonates, hydroxy ethylidene diphosphonic acid (HEDP) and amino methylene phosphonate (AMP), in scale inhibition of CaCO{sub 3} and CaSO{sub 4}. Relative energy (E{sub rel}) calculations are used to demonstrate molecular modeling for scale inhibition studies.

  12. High resolution ALMA observations of dense molecular medium in the central regions of active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Kotaro

    2015-08-01

    I will present recent ALMA results on the dense molecular gas in the central regions of local active galaxies, including NGC 1068, NGC 1097, and NGC 7469, hosting both AGN and circumnuclear starburst regions. Impact of X-ray radiation, outflows, and shocks from active nuclei on the physical and chemical properties of the surrouding dense molecular medium will be discussed.

  13. Laboratory Activities to Support Student Understanding of the Molecular Mechanisms of Mutation & Natural Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubler, Tina; Adams, Patti; Scammell, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis of evolution is an important and challenging concept for students to understand. In a previous article, we provided some of the scientific background necessary to teach this topic. This article features a series of laboratory activities demonstrating that molecular events can alter the genomes of organisms. These activities are…

  14. Combining X-ray crystallography and molecular modeling toward the optimization of pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines as potent c-Src inhibitors active in vivo against neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Tintori, Cristina; Fallacara, Anna Lucia; Radi, Marco; Zamperini, Claudio; Dreassi, Elena; Crespan, Emmanuele; Maga, Giovanni; Schenone, Silvia; Musumeci, Francesca; Brullo, Chiara; Richters, André; Gasparrini, Francesca; Angelucci, Adriano; Festuccia, Claudio; Delle Monache, Simona; Rauh, Daniel; Botta, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    c-Src is a tyrosine kinase belonging to the Src-family kinases. It is overexpressed and/or hyperactivated in a variety of cancer cells, thus its inhibition has been predicted to have therapeutic effects in solid tumors. Recently, the pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine 3 was reported as a dual c-Src/Abl inhibitor. Herein we describe a multidisciplinary drug discovery approach for the optimization of the lead 3 against c-Src. Starting from the X-ray crystal structure of c-Src in complex with 3, Monte Carlo free energy perturbation calculations were applied to guide the design of c-Src inhibitors with improved activities. As a result, the introduction of a meta hydroxyl group on the C4 anilino ring was computed to be particularly favorable. The potency of the synthesized inhibitors was increased with respect to the starting lead 3. The best identified compounds were also found active in the inhibition of neuroblastoma cell proliferation. Furthermore, compound 29 also showed in vivo activity in xenograft model using SH-SY5Y cells.

  15. Molecular cloning of a Poria cocos protein that activates Th1 immune response and allays Th2 cytokine and IgE production in a murine atopic dermatitis model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ya-Ting; Kuan, Yen-Chou; Chang, Hui-Hsin; Sheu, Fuu

    2014-04-01

    Edible fungus Poria cocos (Schw.) Wolf is a cooking material that has myriad health benefits. However, its active constituents have not been well-defined. We previously purified an immunomodulatory protein, PCP, from P. cocos and described its biochemical features and its ability to activate primary macrophage via TLR4. In this study, we cloned the gene of PCP and demonstrated its ability to activate Th1 response in cell cultures and in mice. The complete cDNA sequence of PCP consisted of 807 bp, which included a 579 bp coding sequence that encoded 194 amino acids. With the addition of co-stimulatory CD3/CD28 signals, PCP significantly increased the surface expression of CD44 and CD69 on effector T cells. PCP could also up-regulate T-bet and STAT4 expressions and IFN-γ and IL-2 secretions. Oral administration of PCP suppressed the production of both total and OVA-specific IgG1 in serum and enhanced the amounts of serum and OVA-specific IgG2a and Th1-related cytokine production in BALB/c splenocytes. In addition, oral administration of PCP significantly reduced IL-4 and IgE expressions in a murine model of atopic dermatitis. In conclusion, these results provide evidence that PCP could regulate mammalian immune cells and reveal their pharmaceutical potential in developing therapeutic strategies against Th2-mediated immune disorders. PMID:24625278

  16. Application of Molecular Modeling to Development of New Factor Xa Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sulimov, Vladimir B.; Gribkova, Irina V.; Kochugaeva, Maria P.; Katkova, Ekaterina V.; Sulimov, Alexey V.; Kutov, Danil C.; Shikhaliev, Khidmet S.; Medvedeva, Svetlana M.; Krysin, Michael Yu.; Sinauridze, Elena I.; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I.

    2015-01-01

    In consequence of the key role of factor Xa in the clotting cascade and absence of its activity in the processes that do not affect coagulation, this protein is an attractive target for development of new blood coagulation inhibitors. Factor Xa is more effective and convenient target for creation of anticoagulants than thrombin, inhibition of which may cause some side effects. This study is aimed at finding new inhibitors of factor Xa by molecular computer modeling including docking SOL and postdocking optimization DISCORE programs. After validation of molecular modeling methods on well-known factor Xa inhibitors the virtual screening of NCI Diversity and Voronezh State University databases of ready-made low molecular weight species has been carried out. Seventeen compounds selected on the basis of modeling results have been tested experimentally in vitro. It has been found that 12 of them showed activity against factor Xa (IC50 = 1.8–40 μM). Based on analysis of the results, the new original compound was synthesized and experimentally verified. It shows activity against factor Xa with IC50 value of 0.7 μM. PMID:26484350

  17. Role of Nonspecific Interactions in Molecular Chaperones through Model-Based Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    White, Andrew D.; Huang, Wenjun; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2012-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are large proteins or protein complexes from which many proteins require assistance in order to fold. One unique property of molecular chaperones is the cavity they provide in which proteins fold. The interior surface residues which make up the cavities of molecular chaperone complexes from different organisms has recently been identified, including the well-studied GroEL-GroES chaperonin complex found in Escherichia coli. It was found that the interior of these protein complexes is significantly different than other protein surfaces and that the residues found on the protein surface are able to resist protein adsorption when immobilized on a surface. Yet it remains unknown if these residues passively resist protein binding inside GroEL-GroEs (as demonstrated by experiments that created synthetic mimics of the interior cavity) or if the interior also actively stabilizes protein folding. To answer this question, we have extended entropic models of substrate protein folding inside GroEL-GroES to include interaction energies between substrate proteins and the GroEL-GroES chaperone complex. This model was tested on a set of 528 proteins and the results qualitatively match experimental observations. The interior residues were found to strongly discourage the exposure of any hydrophobic residues, providing an enhanced hydrophobic effect inside the cavity that actively influences protein folding. This work provides both a mechanism for active protein stabilization in GroEL-GroES and a model that matches contemporary understanding of the chaperone protein. PMID:23260050

  18. Building KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel models and probing their interactions by molecular-dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu; Wang, Yuhong; Meng, Xuan-Yu; Zhang, Mei; Jiang, Min; Cui, Meng; Tseng, Gea-Ny

    2013-12-01

    The slow delayed rectifier (I(KS)) channel is composed of KCNQ1 (pore-forming) and KCNE1 (auxiliary) subunits, and functions as a repolarization reserve in the human heart. Design of I(KS)-targeting anti-arrhythmic drugs requires detailed three-dimensional structures of the KCNQ1/KCNE1 complex, a task made possible by Kv channel crystal structures (templates for KCNQ1 homology-modeling) and KCNE1 NMR structures. Our goal was to build KCNQ1/KCNE1 models and extract mechanistic information about their interactions by molecular-dynamics simulations in an explicit lipid/solvent environment. We validated our models by confirming two sets of model-generated predictions that were independent from the spatial restraints used in model-building. Detailed analysis of the molecular-dynamics trajectories revealed previously unrecognized KCNQ1/KCNE1 interactions, whose relevance in I(KS) channel function was confirmed by voltage-clamp experiments. Our models and analyses suggest three mechanisms by which KCNE1 slows KCNQ1 activation: by promoting S6 bending at the Pro hinge that closes the activation gate; by promoting a downward movement of gating charge on S4; and by establishing a network of electrostatic interactions with KCNQ1 on the extracellular surface that stabilizes the channel in a pre-open activated state. Our data also suggest how KCNE1 may affect the KCNQ1 pore conductance.

  19. Improved molecular collision models for nonequilibrium rarefied gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Neal

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method typically used to model thermochemical nonequilibrium rarefied gases requires accurate total collision cross sections, reaction probabilities, and molecular internal energy exchange models. However, the baseline total cross sections are often determined from extrapolations of relatively low-temperature viscosity data, reaction probabilities are defined such that experimentally determined equilibrium reaction rates are replicated, and internal energy relaxation models are phenomenological in nature. Therefore, these models have questionable validity in modeling strongly nonequilibrium gases with temperatures greater than those possible in experimental test facilities. To rectify this deficiency, the Molecular Dynamics/Quasi-Classical Trajectories (MD/QCT) method can be used to accurately compute total collision cross sections, reaction probabilities, and internal energy exchange models based on first principles for hypervelocity collision conditions. In this thesis, MD/QCT-based models were used to improve simulations of two unique nonequilibrium rarefied gas systems: the Ionian atmosphere and hypersonic shocks in Earth's atmosphere. The Jovian plasma torus flows over Io at ≈ 57 km/s, inducing high-speed collisions between atmospheric SO2 and the hypervelocity plasma's O atoms and ions. The DSMC method is well-suited to model the rarefied atmosphere, so MD/QCT studies are therefore conducted to improve DSMC collision models of the critical SO2-O collision pair. The MD/QCT trajectory simulations employed a new potential energy surface that was developed using a ReaxFF fit to a set of ab initio calculations. Compared to the MD/QCT results, the baseline DSMC models are found to significantly under-predict total cross sections, use reaction probabilities that are unrealistically high, and give unphysical internal energies above the dissociation energy for non-reacting inelastic collisions and under-predicts post

  20. Molecular Modeling and Experimental Study of Nonlinear Optical Compounds: Mono-Substituted Derivatives of Dicyanovinylbenzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timofeeva, Tatyana V.; Nesterov, Vladimir N.; Antipin, Mikhael Y.; Clark, R. D.; Sanghadasa, M.; Cardelino, B. H.; Moore, C. E.; Frazier, Donald O.

    2000-01-01

    A search for potential nonlinear optical (NLO) compounds has been performed using the Cambridge Structural Database and molecular modeling. We have studied a series of mono-substituted derivatives of dicyanovinylbenzene as the NLO properties of one of its derivatives (o-methoxy-dicyanovinylbenzene, DIVA) were described earlier. The molecular geometry in the series of the compounds studied was investigated with an X- ray analysis and discussed along with results of molecular mechanics and ab initio quantum chemical calculations. The influence of crystal packing on the molecular planarity has been revealed. Two new compounds from the series studied were found to be active for second harmonic generation (SHG) in the powder. The measurements of SHG efficiency have shown that the o-F- and p-Cl-derivatives of dicyanovinylbenzene are about 10 and 20- times more active than urea, respectively. The peculiarities of crystal structure formation in the framework of balance between the van der Waals and electrostatic interactions have been discussed. The crystal morphology of DIVA and two new SHG-active compounds have been calculated on the basis of their known crystal structures.

  1. Geometric and electrostatic modeling using molecular rigidity functions

    DOE PAGES

    Mu, Lin; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guowei

    2017-03-01

    Geometric and electrostatic modeling is an essential component in computational biophysics and molecular biology. Commonly used geometric representations admit geometric singularities such as cusps, tips and self-intersecting facets that lead to computational instabilities in the molecular modeling. Our present work explores the use of flexibility and rigidity index (FRI), which has a proved superiority in protein B-factor prediction, for biomolecular geometric representation and associated electrostatic analysis. FRI rigidity surfaces are free of geometric singularities. We propose a rigidity based Poisson–Boltzmann equation for biomolecular electrostatic analysis. These approaches to surface and electrostatic modeling are validated by a set of 21 proteins.more » Our results are compared with those of established methods. Finally, being smooth and analytically differentiable, FRI rigidity functions offer excellent curvature analysis, which characterizes concave and convex regions on protein surfaces. Polarized curvatures constructed by using the product of minimum curvature and electrostatic potential is shown to predict potential protein–ligand binding sites.« less

  2. Cross-link guided molecular modeling with ROSETTA.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Abdullah; Herzog, Franz; Leitner, Alexander; Rosenberger, George; Aebersold, Ruedi; Malmström, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Chemical cross-links identified by mass spectrometry generate distance restraints that reveal low-resolution structural information on proteins and protein complexes. The technology to reliably generate such data has become mature and robust enough to shift the focus to the question of how these distance restraints can be best integrated into molecular modeling calculations. Here, we introduce three workflows for incorporating distance restraints generated by chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry into ROSETTA protocols for comparative and de novo modeling and protein-protein docking. We demonstrate that the cross-link validation and visualization software Xwalk facilitates successful cross-link data integration. Besides the protocols we introduce XLdb, a database of chemical cross-links from 14 different publications with 506 intra-protein and 62 inter-protein cross-links, where each cross-link can be mapped on an experimental structure from the Protein Data Bank. Finally, we demonstrate on a protein-protein docking reference data set the impact of virtual cross-links on protein docking calculations and show that an inter-protein cross-link can reduce on average the RMSD of a docking prediction by 5.0 Å. The methods and results presented here provide guidelines for the effective integration of chemical cross-link data in molecular modeling calculations and should advance the structural analysis of particularly large and transient protein complexes via hybrid structural biology methods. PMID:24069194

  3. Towards Accurate Molecular Modeling of Plastic Bonded Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantawansri, T. L.; Andzelm, J.; Taylor, D.; Byrd, E.; Rice, B.

    2010-03-01

    There is substantial interest in identifying the controlling factors that influence the susceptibility of polymer bonded explosives (PBXs) to accidental initiation. Numerous Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of PBXs using the COMPASS force field have been reported in recent years, where the validity of the force field in modeling the solid EM fill has been judged solely on its ability to reproduce lattice parameters, which is an insufficient metric. Performance of the COMPASS force field in modeling EMs and the polymeric binder has been assessed by calculating structural, thermal, and mechanical properties, where only fair agreement with experimental data is obtained. We performed MD simulations using the COMPASS force field for the polymer binder hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene and five EMs: cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine, 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetra-azacyclo-octane, 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexantirohexaazazisowurzitane, 2,4,6-trinitro-1,3,5-benzenetriamine, and pentaerythritol tetranitate. Predicted EM crystallographic and molecular structural parameters, as well as calculated properties for the binder will be compared with experimental results for different simulation conditions. We also present novel simulation protocols, which improve agreement between experimental and computation results thus leading to the accurate modeling of PBXs.

  4. A source model for the L134N molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swade, Daryl A.; Schloerb, F. P.

    1992-01-01

    The dark molecular cloud L134N is observed at millimeter wavelengths in the CS (J = 3-2), OCS (J = 7-6), and HDO (1 sub 11-1 sub 10) transitions. The CS (J = 3-2) transition was observed at four positions within the cloud, while the other two transitions were observed at one position each. Fractional abundances in the LTE approximation are calculated for each emission line detected. L134N appears to have a high-density core characterized by NH3, C3H2, and H(C-13)O(+) emission maps. A lower density envelope characterized by C(0-18), CS (J = 2-1), and SO emission surrounds the core. There appears to be a gas-phase oxygen abundance gradient in L134N with atomic oxygen depleted in the high-density core. Observed molecular distributions within L134N can be explained by a model in which chemical and physical processes in icy-dust-grain mantles influence the gas-phase molecular abundances.

  5. A source model for the L134N molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swade, Daryl A.; Schloerb, F. P.

    1992-06-01

    The dark molecular cloud L134N is observed at millimeter wavelengths in the CS (J = 3-2), OCS (J = 7-6), and HDO (111-1 sub 10) transitions. The CS (J = 3-2) transition was observed at four positions within the cloud, while the other two transitions were observed at one position each. Fractional abundances in the LTE approximation are calculated for each emission line detected. L134N appears to have a high-density core characterized by NH3, C3H2, and H(C-13)O(+) emission maps. A lower density envelope characterized by C(0-18), CS (J = 2-1), and SO emission surrounds the core. There appears to be a gas-phase oxygen abundance gradient in L134N with atomic oxygen depleted in the high-density core. Observed molecular distributions within L134N can be explained by a model in which chemical and physical processes in icy-dust-grain mantles influence the gas-phase molecular abundances.

  6. Coupled continuum and molecular model of flow through fibrous filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shunliu; Povitsky, Alex

    2013-11-01

    A coupled approach combining the continuum boundary singularity method (BSM) and the molecular direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is developed and validated using Taylor-Couette flow and the flow about a single fiber confined between two parallel walls. In the proposed approach, the DSMC is applied to an annular region enclosing the fiber and the BSM is employed in the entire flow domain. The parameters used in the DSMC and the coupling procedure, such as the number of simulated particles, the cell size, and the size of the coupling zone are determined by inspecting the accuracy of pressure drop obtained for the range of Knudsen numbers between zero and unity. The developed approach is used to study flowfield of fibrous filtration flows. It is observed that in the partial-slip flow regime, Kn ⩽ 0.25, the results obtained by the proposed coupled BSM-DSMC method match the solution by BSM combined with the heuristic partial-slip boundary conditions. For transition molecular-to-continuum Knudsen numbers, 0.25 < Kn ⩽ 1, the difference in pressure drop and velocity between these two approaches is significant. This difference increases with the Knudsen number that confirms the usefulness of coupled continuum and molecular methods in numerical modeling of transition low Reynolds number flows in fibrous filters.

  7. Rationalizing three-dimensional activity landscapes and the influence of molecular representations on landscape topology and the formation of activity cliffs.

    PubMed

    Peltason, Lisa; Iyer, Preeti; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2010-06-28

    Activity landscapes are defined by potency and similarity distributions of active compounds and reflect the nature of structure-activity relationships (SARs). Three-dimensional (3D) activity landscapes are reminiscent of topographical maps and particularly intuitive representations of compound similarity and potency distributions. From their topologies, SAR characteristics can be deduced. Accordingly, idealized theoretical landscape models have been utilized to rationalize SAR features, but "true" 3D activity landscapes have not yet been described in detail. Herein we present a computational approach to derive approximate 3D activity landscapes for actual compound data sets and to analyze exemplary landscape representations. These activity landscapes are generated within a consistent reference frame so that they can be compared across different activity classes. We show that SAR features of compound data sets can be derived from the topology of landscape models. A notable correlation is observed between global SAR phenotypes, assigned on the basis of SAR discontinuity scoring, and characteristic landscape topologies. We also show that different molecular representations can substantially alter the topology of activity landscapes for a given data set and modulate the formation of activity cliffs, which represent the most prominent landscape features. Depending on the choice of molecular representations, compounds forming a steep activity cliff in a given landscape might be separated in another and no longer form a cliff. However, comparison of alternative activity landscapes makes it possible to focus on compound subsets having high SAR information content.

  8. Lessons from molecular modeling human α-L-iduronidase.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Danieli Forgiarini; Antunes, Dinler A; Rigo, Maurício M; Mendes, Marcus F A; Silva, Jader P; Mayer, Fabiana Q; Matte, Ursula; Giugliani, Roberto; Vieira, Gustavo F; Sinigaglia, Marialva

    2014-11-01

    Human α-L-iduronidase (IDUA) is a member of glycoside hydrolase family and is involved in the catabolism of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), heparan sulfate (HS) and dermatan sulfate (DS). Mutations in this enzyme are responsible for mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I), an inherited lysosomal storage disorder. Despite great interest in determining and studying this enzyme structure, the lack of a high identity to templates and other technical issues have challenged both bioinformaticians and crystallographers, until the recent publication of an IDUA crystal structure (PDB: 4JXP). In the present work, four alternative IDUA models, generated and evaluated prior to crystallographic determination, were compared to the 4JXP structure. A combined analysis using several viability assessment tools and molecular dynamics simulations highlights the strengths and limitations of different comparative modeling protocols, all of which are based on the same low identity template (only 22%). Incorrect alignment between the target and template was confirmed to be a major bottleneck in homology modeling, regardless of the modeling software used. Moreover, secondary structure analysis during a 50ns simulation seems to be useful for indicating alignment errors and structural instabilities. The best model was achieved through the combined use of Phyre 2 and Modeller, suggesting the use of this protocol for the modeling of other proteins that still lack high identity templates.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Trajectory Compression with a Coarse-Grained Model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi-Ming; Gopal, Srinivasa Murthy; Law, Sean M.; Feig, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories are very data-intensive thereby limiting sharing and archival of such data. One possible solution is compression of trajectory data. Here, trajectory compression based on conversion to the coarse-grained model PRIMO is proposed. The compressed data is about one third of the original data and fast decompression is possible with an analytical reconstruction procedure from PRIMO to all-atom representations. This protocol largely preserves structural features and to a more limited extent also energetic features of the original trajectory. PMID:22025759

  10. Non Equilibrium Quantum Transport in a model of molecular conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiro', Marco; Fabrizio, Michele

    2010-03-01

    We investigate non equilibrium effects in quantum transport through a simple model of molecular conductor where a single electronic level coupled to a vibrational mode is hybridized with biased metallic contacts. Using a recently developed numerical method [1] we compute the time dependent current and extract steady state properties such as I-V characteristic, differential conductance and phonon distribution function. We also discuss transient effects and comment on the onset of bistability in the strong coupling regime. [4pt] [1] M. Schiro', M. Fabrizio, Phys.Rev.B 79 153302 (2009)

  11. Kinetic modeling based probabilistic segmentation for molecular images.

    PubMed

    Saad, Ahmed; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Möller, Torsten; Smith, Ben

    2008-01-01

    We propose a semi-supervised, kinetic modeling based segmentation technique for molecular imaging applications. It is an iterative, self-learning algorithm based on uncertainty principles, designed to alleviate low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and partial volume effect (PVE) problems. Synthetic fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and simulated Raclopride dynamic positron emission tomography (dPET) brain images with excessive noise levels are used to validate our algorithm. We show, qualitatively and quantitatively, that our algorithm outperforms state-of-the-art techniques in identifying different functional regions and recovering the kinetic parameters.

  12. Large scale molecular dynamics modeling of materials fabrication processes

    SciTech Connect

    Belak, J.; Glosli, J.N.; Boercker, D.B.; Stowers, I.F.

    1994-02-01

    An atomistic molecular dynamics model of materials fabrication processes is presented. Several material removal processes are shown to be within the domain of this simulation method. Results are presented for orthogonal cutting of copper and silicon and for crack propagation in silica glass. Both copper and silicon show ductile behavior, but the atomistic mechanisms that allow this behavior are significantly different in the two cases. The copper chip remains crystalline while the silicon chip transforms into an amorphous state. The critical stress for crack propagation in silica glass was found to be in reasonable agreement with experiment and a novel stick-slip phenomenon was observed.

  13. Myosin-V stepping kinetics: a molecular model for processivity.

    PubMed

    Rief, M; Rock, R S; Mehta, A D; Mooseker, M S; Cheney, R E; Spudich, J A

    2000-08-15

    Myosin-V is a molecular motor that moves processively along its actin track. We have used a feedback-enhanced optical trap to examine the stepping kinetics of this movement. By analyzing the distribution of time periods separating discrete approximately 36-nm mechanical steps, we characterize the number and duration of rate-limiting biochemical transitions preceding each such step. These data show that myosin-V is a tightly coupled motor whose cycle time is limited by ADP release. On the basis of these results, we propose a model for myosin-V processivity.

  14. Model morphing and sequence assignment after molecular replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Read, Randy J.; Adams, Paul D.; Brunger, Axel T.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Hung, Li-Wei

    2013-11-01

    A procedure for model building is described that combines morphing a model to match a density map, trimming the morphed model and aligning the model to a sequence. A procedure termed ‘morphing’ for improving a model after it has been placed in the crystallographic cell by molecular replacement has recently been developed. Morphing consists of applying a smooth deformation to a model to make it match an electron-density map more closely. Morphing does not change the identities of the residues in the chain, only their coordinates. Consequently, if the true structure differs from the working model by containing different residues, these differences cannot be corrected by morphing. Here, a procedure that helps to address this limitation is described. The goal of the procedure is to obtain a relatively complete model that has accurate main-chain atomic positions and residues that are correctly assigned to the sequence. Residues in a morphed model that do not match the electron-density map are removed. Each segment of the resulting trimmed morphed model is then assigned to the sequence of the molecule using information about the connectivity of the chains from the working model and from connections that can be identified from the electron-density map. The procedure was tested by application to a recently determined structure at a resolution of 3.2 Å and was found to increase the number of correctly identified residues in this structure from the 88 obtained using phenix.resolve sequence assignment alone (Terwilliger, 2003 ▶) to 247 of a possible 359. Additionally, the procedure was tested by application to a series of templates with sequence identities to a target structure ranging between 7 and 36%. The mean fraction of correctly identified residues in these cases was increased from 33% using phenix.resolve sequence assignment to 47% using the current procedure. The procedure is simple to apply and is available in the Phenix software package.

  15. Molecular docking and 3D-QSAR studies on the glucocorticoid receptor antagonistic activity of hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Luo, Y; Fu, J; Zhou, J; Kyzas, G Z

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonistic activities of hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (HO-PCBs) were recently characterised. To further explore the interactions between HO-PCBs and the GR, and to elucidate structural characteristics that influence the GR antagonistic activity of HO-PCBs, molecular docking and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies were performed. Comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) was performed using both ligand- and receptor-based alignment schemes. Results generated from the receptor-based model were found to be more satisfactory, with q(2) of 0.632 and r(2) of 0.931 compared with those from the ligand-based model. Some internal validation strategies (e.g. cross-validation analysis, bootstrapping analysis and Y-randomisation) and an external validation method were used respectively to further assess the stability and predictive ability of the derived model. Graphical interpretation of the model provided some insights into the structural features that affected the GR antagonistic activity of HO-PCBs. Molecular docking studies revealed that some key residues were critical for ligand-receptor interactions by forming hydrogen bonds (Glu540) and hydrophobic interactions with ligands (Ile539, Val543 and Trp577). Although CoMSIA sometimes depends on the alignment of the molecules, the information provided is beneficial for predicting the GR antagonistic activities of HO-PCB homologues and is helpful for understanding the binding mechanisms of HO-PCBs to GR. PMID:26848875

  16. Synthetic Molecular Machines for Active Self-Assembly: Prototype Algorithms, Designs, and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabby, Nadine L.

    behaviors. This class of behaviors includes any behavior where a passive physical system simply does not have enough physical energy to perform the specified tasks in the requisite amount of time. As we will demonstrate and prove, a sufficiently expressive implementation of an "active" molecular self-assembly approach can achieve these behaviors. Using an external source of fuel solves part of the problem, so the system is not "energetically incomplete." But the programmable system also needs to have sufficient expressive power to achieve the specified behaviors. Perhaps surprisingly, some of these systems do not even require Turing completeness to be sufficiently expressive. Building on a large variety of work by other scientists in the fields of DNA nanotechnology, chemistry and reconfigurable robotics, this thesis introduces several research contributions in the context of active self-assembly. We show that simple primitives such as insertion and deletion are able to generate complex and interesting results such as the growth of a linear polymer in logarithmic time and the ability of a linear polymer to treadmill. To this end we developed a formal model for active-self assembly that is directly implementable with DNA molecules. We show that this model is computationally equivalent to a machine capable of producing strings that are stronger than regular languages and, at most, as strong as context-free grammars. This is a great advance in the theory of active self-assembly as prior models were either entirely theoretical or only implementable in the context of macro-scale robotics. We developed a chain reaction method for the autonomous exponential growth of a linear DNA polymer. Our method is based on the insertion of molecules into the assembly, which generates two new insertion sites for every initial one employed. The building of a line in logarithmic time is a first step toward building a shape in logarithmic time. We demonstrate the first construction of a synthetic

  17. Molecular dioxygen enters the active site of 12/15-lipoxygenase via dynamic oxygen access channels.

    PubMed

    Saam, Jan; Ivanov, Igor; Walther, Matthias; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg; Kuhn, Hartmut

    2007-08-14

    Cells contain numerous enzymes that use molecular oxygen for their reactions. Often, their active sites are buried deeply inside the protein, which raises the question whether there are specific access channels guiding oxygen to the site of catalysis. Choosing 12/15-lipoxygenase as a typical example for such oxygen-dependent enzymes, we determined the oxygen distribution within the protein and defined potential routes for oxygen access. For this purpose, we have applied an integrated strategy of structural modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, site-directed mutagenesis, and kinetic measurements. First, we computed the 3D free-energy distribution for oxygen, which led to identification of four oxygen channels in the protein. All channels connect the protein surface with a region of high oxygen affinity at the active site. This region is localized opposite to the nonheme iron providing a structural explanation for the reaction specificity of this lipoxygenase isoform. The catalytically most relevant path can be obstructed by L367F exchange, which leads to a strongly increased Michaelis constant for oxygen. The blocking mechanism is explained in detail by reordering the hydrogen-bonding network of water molecules. Our results provide strong evidence that the main route for oxygen access to the active site of the enzyme follows a channel formed by transiently interconnected cavities whereby the opening and closure are governed by side chain dynamics. PMID:17675410

  18. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation and detection of molecular diagnostic agents

    DOEpatents

    Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G.; Dees, H.C.

    1998-11-10

    A method for the imaging of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue, wherein the plant or animal tissue contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. The method includes the steps of treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of the photo-active molecular agent contained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, photo-activating at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, thereby producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent, wherein the at least one photo-activated molecular agent emits energy, detecting the energy emitted by the at least one photo-activated molecular agent, and producing a detected energy signal which is characteristic of the particular volume of plant or animal tissue. The present invention is also a method for the imaging of a particular volume of material, wherein the material contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. 13 figs.

  19. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation and detection of molecular diagnostic agents

    DOEpatents

    Wachter, Eric A.; Fisher, Walter G.; Dees, H. Craig

    1998-01-01

    A method for the imaging of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue, wherein the plant or animal tissue contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. The method includes the steps of treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of the photo-active molecular agent contained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, photo-activating at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, thereby producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent, wherein the at least one photo-activated molecular agent emits energy, detecting the energy emitted by the at least one photo-activated molecular agent, and producing a detected energy signal which is characteristic of the particular volume of plant or animal tissue. The present invention is also a method for the imaging of a particular volume of material, wherein the material contains at least one photo-active molecular agent.

  20. Methods for improved selectivity in photo-activation and detection of molecular diagnostic agents

    DOEpatents

    Wachter, Eric A.; Fisher, Walter G.; Dees, H. Craig

    2008-03-18

    A method for the imaging of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue, wherein the plant or animal tissue contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. The method comprises the steps of treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of the photo-active molecular agent contained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, photo-activating at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, thereby producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent, wherein the at least one photo-activated molecular agent emits energy, detecting the energy emitted by the at least one photo-activated molecular agent, and producing a detected energy signal which is characteristic of the particular volume of plant or animal tissue. The present invention also provides a method for the imaging of a particular volume of material, wherein the material contains at least one photo-active molecular agent.

  1. Multiensemble Markov models of molecular thermodynamics and kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Paul, Fabian; Noé, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the general transition-based reweighting analysis method (TRAM), a statistically optimal approach to integrate both unbiased and biased molecular dynamics simulations, such as umbrella sampling or replica exchange. TRAM estimates a multiensemble Markov model (MEMM) with full thermodynamic and kinetic information at all ensembles. The approach combines the benefits of Markov state models—clustering of high-dimensional spaces and modeling of complex many-state systems—with those of the multistate Bennett acceptance ratio of exploiting biased or high-temperature ensembles to accelerate rare-event sampling. TRAM does not depend on any rate model in addition to the widely used Markov state model approximation, but uses only fundamental relations such as detailed balance and binless reweighting of configurations between ensembles. Previous methods, including the multistate Bennett acceptance ratio, discrete TRAM, and Markov state models are special cases and can be derived from the TRAM equations. TRAM is demonstrated by efficiently computing MEMMs in cases where other estimators break down, including the full thermodynamics and rare-event kinetics from high-dimensional simulation data of an all-atom protein–ligand binding model. PMID:27226302

  2. Molecular radiotherapy: The NUKFIT software for calculating the time-integrated activity coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Kletting, P.; Schimmel, S.; Luster, M.; Kestler, H. A.; Hänscheid, H.; Fernández, M.; Lassmann, M.; Bröer, J. H.; Nosske, D.; Glatting, G.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Calculation of the time-integrated activity coefficient (residence time) is a crucial step in dosimetry for molecular radiotherapy. However, available software is deficient in that it is either not tailored for the use in molecular radiotherapy and/or does not include all required estimation methods. The aim of this work was therefore the development and programming of an algorithm which allows for an objective and reproducible determination of the time-integrated activity coefficient and its standard error.Methods: The algorithm includes the selection of a set of fitting functions from predefined sums of exponentials and the choice of an error model for the used data. To estimate the values of the adjustable parameters an objective function, depending on the data, the parameters of the error model, the fitting function and (if required and available) Bayesian information, is minimized. To increase reproducibility and user-friendliness the starting values are automatically determined using a combination of curve stripping and random search. Visual inspection, the coefficient of determination, the standard error of the fitted parameters, and the correlation matrix are provided to evaluate the quality of the fit. The functions which are most supported by the data are determined using the corrected Akaike information criterion. The time-integrated activity coefficient is estimated by analytically integrating the fitted functions. Its standard error is determined assuming Gaussian error propagation. The software was implemented using MATLAB.Results: To validate the proper implementation of the objective function and the fit functions, the results of NUKFIT and SAAM numerical, a commercially available software tool, were compared. The automatic search for starting values was successfully tested for reproducibility. The quality criteria applied in conjunction with the Akaike information criterion allowed the selection of suitable functions. Function fit

  3. The molecular mechanisms and physiological consequences of oxidative stress: lessons from a model bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Imlay, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Oxic environments are hazardous. Molecular oxygen adventitiously abstracts electrons from many redox enzymes, continuously forming intracellular superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. These species can destroy the activities of metalloenzymes and the integrity of DNA, which forces organisms to protect themselves with scavenging enzymes and repair systems. Nevertheless, elevated levels of oxidants quickly poison bacteria, and both microbial competitors and hostile eukaryotic hosts exploit this vulnerability by assaulting them with peroxides or superoxide-forming antibiotics. In response, bacteria activate elegant adaptive strategies. In this Review, I summarize our current knowledge of oxidative stress in Escherichia coli, the model organism for which our understanding of damage and defence is most well-developed. PMID:23712352

  4. Probing the origins of aromatase inhibitory activity of disubstituted coumarins via QSAR and molecular docking

    PubMed Central

    Worachartcheewan, Apilak; Suvannang, Naravut; Prachayasittikul, Supaluk; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) of imidazole derivatives of 4,7-disubstituted coumarins as inhibitors of aromatase, a potential therapeutic protein target for the treatment of breast cancer. Herein, a series of 3,7- and 4,7-disubstituted coumarin derivatives (1-34) with R1 and R2 substituents bearing aromatase inhibitory activity were modeled as a function of molecular and quantum chemical descriptors derived from low-energy conformer geometrically optimized at B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. Insights on origins of aromatase inhibitory activity was afforded by the computed set of 7 descriptors comprising of F10[N-O], Inflammat-50, Psychotic-80, H-047, BELe1, B10[C-O] and MAXDP. Such significant descriptors were used for QSAR model construction and results indicated that model 4 afforded the best statistical performance. Good predictive performance were achieved as verified from the internal (comprising the training and the leave-one-out cross-validation (LOO-CV) sets) and external sets affording the following statistical parameters: R2Tr = 0.9576 and RMSETr = 0.0958 for the training set; Q2CV = 0.9239 and RMSECV = 0.1304 for the LOO-CV set as well as Q2Ext = 0.7268 and RMSEExt = 0.2927 for the external set. Significant descriptors showed correlation with functional substituents, particularly, R1 in governing high potency as aromatase inhibitor. Molecular docking calculations suggest that key residues interacting with the coumarins were predominantly lipophilic or non-polar while a few were polar and positively-charged. Findings illuminated herein serve as the impetus that can be used to rationally guide the design of new aromatase inhibitors. PMID:26417339

  5. Evolution & Phylogenetic Analysis: Classroom Activities for Investigating Molecular & Morphological Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Wilfred A.

    2010-01-01

    In a flexible multisession laboratory, students investigate concepts of phylogenetic analysis at both the molecular and the morphological level. Students finish by conducting their own analysis on a collection of skeletons representing the major phyla of vertebrates, a collection of primate skulls, or a collection of hominid skulls.

  6. Molecular photoacoustic imaging of breast cancer using an actively targeted conjugated polymer

    PubMed Central

    Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Li, Kai; Driessen, Wouter; Dinish, US; Wong, Chi Lok; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Liu, Bin; Olivo, Malini

    2015-01-01

    Conjugated polymers (CPs) are upcoming optical contrast agents in view of their unique optical properties and versatile synthetic chemistry. Biofunctionalization of these polymer-based nanoparticles enables molecular imaging of biological processes. In this work, we propose the concept of using a biofunctionalized CP for noninvasive photoacoustic (PA) molecular imaging of breast cancer. In particular, after verifying the PA activity of a CP nanoparticle (CP dots) in phantoms and the targeting efficacy of a folate-functionalized version of the same (folate-CP dots) in vitro, we systemically administered the probe into a folate receptor-positive (FR+ve) MCF-7 breast cancer xenograft model to demonstrate the possible application of folate-CP dots for imaging FR+ve breast cancers in comparison to CP dots with no folate moieties. We observed a strong PA signal at the tumor site of folate-CP dots-administered mice as early as 1 hour after administration as a result of the active targeting of the folate-CP dots to the FR+ve tumor cells but a weak PA signal at the tumor site of CP-dots-administered mice as a result of the passive accumulation of the probe by enhanced permeability and retention effect. We also observed that folate-CP dots produced ~4-fold enhancement in the PA signal in the tumor, when compared to CP dots. These observations demonstrate the great potential of this active-targeting CP to be used as a contrast agent for molecular PA diagnostic imaging in various biomedical applications. PMID:25609951

  7. Assessment of a Molecular Diffusion Model in MELCOR

    SciTech Connect

    Chang OH; Richard Moore

    2005-06-01

    The MELCOR (version 1.8.5) [1] computer code with INEEL revisions is being improved for the analysis of very high temperature gas-cooled reactors [2]. Following a loss-of-coolant accident, flow through the reactor vessel may initially stagnate due to a non-uniform concentration of helium and air. However, molecular diffusion will eventually result in a uniform concentration of air and helium. The differences in fluid temperatures within the reactor vessel will then result in the establishment of a natural circulation flow that can supply significant amounts of air to the reactor core. The heat released by the resulting oxidation of graphite in the reactor core has the potential to increase the peak fuel temperature. In order to analyze the effects of oxidation on the response of the reactor during accidents, a molecular diffusion model was added to MELCOR. The model is based on Fick's Second Law for spatially uniform pressure and temperature. This paper describes equimolal counter diffusion experiments in a two bulb diffusion cell and the results of the assessment calculations.

  8. Aggregation of model asphaltenes: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, J. L. L. F. S.; Simionesie, D.; Zhang, Z. J.; Mulheran, P. A.

    2016-10-01

    Natural asphaltenes are defined as polyaromatic compounds whose chemical composition and structure are dependent on their geological origin and production history, hence are regarded as complex molecules with aromatic cores and aliphatic tails that occur in the heaviest fraction of crude oil. The aggregation of asphaltenes presents a range of technical challenges to the production and processing of oil. In this work we study the behaviour of the model asphaltene-like molecule hexa-tert-butylhexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HTBHBC) using molecular dynamics simulation. It was found that the regular arrangement of the tert-butyl side chains prevents the formation of strongly-bound dimers by severely restricting the configurational space of the aggregation pathway. In contrast, a modified molecule with only 3 side chains is readily able to form dimers. This work therefore confirms the influence of the molecular structure of polyaromatic compounds on their aggregation mechanism, and reveals the unexpected design rules required for model systems that can mimic the behavior of asphaltenes.

  9. Modeling and Computer Simulation: Molecular Dynamics and Kinetic Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, B.D.; Caturla, M.J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    2000-10-10

    Recent years have witnessed tremendous advances in the realistic multiscale simulation of complex physical phenomena, such as irradiation and aging effects of materials, made possible by the enormous progress achieved in computational physics for calculating reliable, yet tractable interatomic potentials and the vast improvements in computational power and parallel computing. As a result, computational materials science is emerging as an important complement to theory and experiment to provide fundamental materials science insight. This article describes the atomistic modeling techniques of molecular dynamics (MD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC), and an example of their application to radiation damage production and accumulation in metals. It is important to note at the outset that the primary objective of atomistic computer simulation should be obtaining physical insight into atomic-level processes. Classical molecular dynamics is a powerful method for obtaining insight about the dynamics of physical processes that occur on relatively short time scales. Current computational capability allows treatment of atomic systems containing as many as 10{sup 9} atoms for times on the order of 100 ns (10{sup -7}s). The main limitation of classical MD simulation is the relatively short times accessible. Kinetic Monte Carlo provides the ability to reach macroscopic times by modeling diffusional processes and time-scales rather than individual atomic vibrations. Coupling MD and KMC has developed into a powerful, multiscale tool for the simulation of radiation damage in metals.

  10. Aggregation of model asphaltenes: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Costa, J L L F S; Simionesie, D; Zhang, Z J; Mulheran, P A

    2016-10-01

    Natural asphaltenes are defined as polyaromatic compounds whose chemical composition and structure are dependent on their geological origin and production history, hence are regarded as complex molecules with aromatic cores and aliphatic tails that occur in the heaviest fraction of crude oil. The aggregation of asphaltenes presents a range of technical challenges to the production and processing of oil. In this work we study the behaviour of the model asphaltene-like molecule hexa-tert-butylhexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HTBHBC) using molecular dynamics simulation. It was found that the regular arrangement of the tert-butyl side chains prevents the formation of strongly-bound dimers by severely restricting the configurational space of the aggregation pathway. In contrast, a modified molecule with only 3 side chains is readily able to form dimers. This work therefore confirms the influence of the molecular structure of polyaromatic compounds on their aggregation mechanism, and reveals the unexpected design rules required for model systems that can mimic the behavior of asphaltenes. PMID:27465036

  11. Consistent flamelet modeling of differential molecular diffusion for turbulent non-premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haifeng

    2016-03-01

    Treating differential molecular diffusion correctly and accurately remains as a great challenge to the modeling of turbulent non-premixed combustion. The aim of this paper is to develop consistent modeling strategies for differential molecular diffusion in flamelet models. Two types of differential molecular diffusion models are introduced, linear differential diffusion models and nonlinear differential diffusion models. A multi-component turbulent mixing layer problem is analyzed in detail to gain insights into differential molecular diffusion and its characteristics, particularly the dependence of differential molecular diffusion on the Reynolds number and the Lewis number. These characteristics are then used to validate the differential molecular diffusion models. Finally, the new models are applied to the modeling of a series of laboratory-scale turbulent non-premixed jet flames with different Reynolds number (Sandia Flames B, C, and D) to further assess the models' performance.

  12. Interactive display of molecular models using a microcomputer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, J. T.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    A simple, microcomputer-based, interactive graphics display system has been developed for the presentation of perspective views of wire frame molecular models. The display system is based on a TERAK 8510a graphics computer system with a display unit consisting of microprocessor, television display and keyboard subsystems. The operating system includes a screen editor, file manager, PASCAL and BASIC compilers and command options for linking and executing programs. The graphics program, written in USCD PASCAL, involves the centering of the coordinate system, the transformation of centered model coordinates into homogeneous coordinates, the construction of a viewing transformation matrix to operate on the coordinates, clipping invisible points, perspective transformation and scaling to screen coordinates; commands available include ZOOM, ROTATE, RESET, and CHANGEVIEW. Data file structure was chosen to minimize the amount of disk storage space. Despite the inherent slowness of the system, its low cost and flexibility suggests general applicability.

  13. Energetics and efficiency of a molecular motor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogedby, Hans C.; Svane, Axel

    2013-12-01

    The energetics and efficiency of a linear molecular motor model proposed by Mogilner et al are analyzed from an analytical point of view. The model, which is based on protein friction with a track, is described by coupled Langevin equations for the motion in combination with coupled master equations for the ATP hydrolysis. Here the energetics and efficiency of the motor are addressed using a many body scheme with focus on the efficiency at maximum power (EMP). It is found that the EMP is reduced from about 10% in a heuristic description of the motor to about 1 per mille when incorporating the full motor dynamics, owing to the strong dissipation associated with the motor action.

  14. Molecular modeling of pathogenesis-related proteins of family 5.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Claudia E; Fernandes, Cláudia L; de Souza, Osmar N; Salzano, Francisco M; Bonatto, Sandro L; Freitas, Loreta B

    2006-01-01

    The family of pathogenesis-related (PR) 5 proteins have diverse functions, and some of them are classified as thaumatins, osmotins, and inhibitors of alpha-amylase or trypsin. Although the specific function of many PR5 in plants is unknown, they are involved in the acquired systemic resistance and response to biotic stress, causing the inhibition of hyphal growth and reduction of spore germination, probably by a membrane permeabilization mechanism or by interaction with pathogen receptors. We have constructed three-dimensional models of four proteins belonging to the Rosaceae and Fagaceae botanical families by using the technique of comparative molecular modelling by homology. There are four main structural differences between all the PR5, corresponding to regions with replacements of amino acids. Folding and the secondary structures are very similar for all of them. However, the isoelectric point and charge distributions differ for each protein.

  15. A review of molecular modelling of electric double layer capacitors.

    PubMed

    Burt, Ryan; Birkett, Greg; Zhao, X S

    2014-04-14

    Electric double-layer capacitors are a family of electrochemical energy storage devices that offer a number of advantages, such as high power density and long cyclability. In recent years, research and development of electric double-layer capacitor technology has been growing rapidly, in response to the increasing demand for energy storage devices from emerging industries, such as hybrid and electric vehicles, renewable energy, and smart grid management. The past few years have witnessed a number of significant research breakthroughs in terms of novel electrodes, new electrolytes, and fabrication of devices, thanks to the discovery of innovative materials (e.g. graphene, carbide-derived carbon, and templated carbon) and the availability of advanced experimental and computational tools. However, some experimental observations could not be clearly understood and interpreted due to limitations of traditional theories, some of which were developed more than one hundred years ago. This has led to significant research efforts in computational simulation and modelling, aimed at developing new theories, or improving the existing ones to help interpret experimental results. This review article provides a summary of research progress in molecular modelling of the physical phenomena taking place in electric double-layer capacitors. An introduction to electric double-layer capacitors and their applications, alongside a brief description of electric double layer theories, is presented first. Second, molecular modelling of ion behaviours of various electrolytes interacting with electrodes under different conditions is reviewed. Finally, key conclusions and outlooks are given. Simulations on comparing electric double-layer structure at planar and porous electrode surfaces under equilibrium conditions have revealed significant structural differences between the two electrode types, and porous electrodes have been shown to store charge more efficiently. Accurate electrolyte and

  16. Homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations of lymphotactin.

    PubMed Central

    Buyong; Xiong, J.; Lubkowski, J.; Nussinov, R.

    2000-01-01

    We have modeled the structure of human lymphotactin (hLpnt), by homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. This chemokine is unique in having a single disulfide bond and a long C-terminal tail. Because other structural classes of chemokines have two pairs of Cys residues, compared to one in Lpnt, and because it has been shown that both disulfide bonds are required for stability and function, the question arises how the Lpnt maintains its structural integrity. The initial structure of hLpnt was constructed by homology modeling. The first 63 residues in the monomer of hLpnt were modeled using the structure of the human CC chemokine, RANTES, whose sequence appeared most similar. The structure of the long C-terminal tail, missing in RANTES, was taken from the human muscle fatty-acid binding protein. In a Protein Data Bank search, this protein was found to contain a sequence that was most homologous to the long tail. Consequently, the modeled hLpnt C-terminal tail consisted of both alpha-helical and beta-motifs. The complete model of the hLpnt monomer consisted of two alpha-helices located above the five-stranded beta-sheet. Molecular dynamics simulations of the solvated initial model have indicated that the stability of the predicted fold is related to the geometry of Pro78. The five-stranded beta-sheet appeared to be preserved only when Pro78 was modeled in the cis conformation. Simulations were also performed both for the C-terminal truncated forms of the hLpnt that contained one or two (CC chemokine-like) disulfide bonds, and for the chicken Lpnt (cLpnt). Our MD simulations indicated that the turn region (T30-G34) in hLpnt is important for the interactions with the receptor, and that the long C-terminal region stabilizes both the turn (T30-G34) and the five-stranded beta-sheet. The major conclusion from our theoretical studies is that the lack of one disulfide bond and the extension of the C-terminus in hLptn are mutually complementary. It is very likely

  17. Identification of Novel IGF1R Kinase Inhibitors by Molecular Modeling and High-Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Moriev, R.; Vasylchenko, O.; Platonov, M.; Grygorenko, O.; Volkova, K.; Zozulya, S.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify small molecule compounds that inhibit the kinase activity of the IGF1 receptor and represent novel chemical scaffolds, which can be potentially exploited to develop drug candidates that are superior to the existing experimental anti-IGF1R therapeuticals. To this end, targeted compound libraries were produced by virtual screening using molecular modeling and docking strategies, as well as the ligand-based pharmacophore model. High-throughput screening of the resulting compound sets in a biochemical kinase inhibition assay allowed us to identify several novel chemotypes that represent attractive starting points for the development of advanced IGF1R inhibitory compounds. PMID:23819040

  18. Modeling thermal decomposition mechanisms in gaseous and crystalline molecular materials: application to β-HMX.

    PubMed

    Sharia, Onise; Kuklja, Maija M

    2011-11-10

    Exploration of initiation of chemistry in materials is especially challenging when several coexisting chemical mechanisms are possible and many reactions' products are produced. It is even more difficult for complex materials, such as molecular, supramolecular, and hierarchical materials and systems. A strategy to draw a complete picture of the earliest stages of rapid decomposition reactions in molecular materials is presented in this study. The strategy is based on theoretical and computational modeling of chemical decomposition reactions in the gaseous and crystalline molecular material that has been performed by means of combined density functional theory and transition state theory. This study reveals how a crystalline field affects materials chemical degradation. We also demonstrate how incomplete results, which are often used due to difficulties in obtaining comprehensive data, can lead to erroneous conclusions and predictions. We discuss our approach in the context of the obtained reaction energies, activation barriers, structures of transition states, and reaction rates with the example of a representative molecular material, β-HMX, which tends to decompose violently with large energy release upon an external perturbation. The performed analysis helps to provide a consistent interpretation of available experimental data. The article illustrates that the complete picture of decomposition reactions of complex molecular materials, while theoretically challenging and computationally demanding, is possible and even practical at this point in time. PMID:21942331

  19. Modeling the physical and excitation conditions of the molecular envelope of NGC 7027

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santander-García, M.; Bujarrabal, V.; Alcolea, J.

    2012-09-01

    Context. The link between the shaping of bipolar planetary nebulae and the mass ejection activity of their central stars is still poorly understood. Appropriately characterizing the evolution of shells ejected during the late stages of stellar evolution and the interaction between these shells is fundamental to gain insight into the mechanism of nebular shaping. It must include the study of the molecular emission, which tracks the mass-loss history during the late asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and post-AGB stages, when the nebula is being actively shaped. Aims: The Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) aboard Herschel is an invaluable tool because it opens a new window (most of the sub-mm and far-infrared range is only accessible from space) from which to probe warm molecular gas (~50-1000 K). This paper presents a radiative transfer, spatio-kinematic modeling of the molecular envelope of the young planetary nebula NGC 7027 in several high- and low-J12CO and 13CO transitions observed by Herschel/HIFI and the IRAM 30-m radio telescope, and discusses the structure and dynamics of the molecular envelope. Methods: We developed a code that, used along with the SHAPE software, implements spatio-kinematic modeling with accurate non-LTE calculations of line excitation and radiative transfer in molecular species. We used this code to build a relatively simple "Russian doll" model to account for the physical and excitation conditions of the molecular envelope of NGC 7027. Results: The model nebula consists of four nested, mildly bipolar shells plus a pair of high-velocity blobs. The innermost shell is the thinnest and shows a significant increase in physical conditions (temperature, density, abundance and velocity) compared to the adjacent shell. This is a clear indication of a shock front in the system, which may have played a role in shaping the nebula. Each of the high-velocity blobs is divided into two sections with considerably different physical conditions

  20. Neuroprotective potential of molecular hydrogen against perinatal brain injury via suppression of activated microglia.

    PubMed

    Imai, Kenji; Kotani, Tomomi; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Mano, Yukio; Nakano, Tomoko; Ushida, Takafumi; Li, Hua; Miki, Rika; Sumigama, Seiji; Iwase, Akira; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Ohno, Kinji; Toyokuni, Shinya; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Suzumura, Akio; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2016-02-01

    Exposure to inflammation in utero is related to perinatal brain injury, which is itself associated with high rates of long-term morbidity and mortality in children. Novel therapeutic interventions during the perinatal period are required to prevent inflammation, but its pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Activated microglia are known to play a central role in brain injury by producing a variety of pro-inflammatory cytokines and releasing oxidative products. The study is aimed to investigate the preventative potential of molecular hydrogen (H2), which is an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent without mutagenicity. Pregnant ICR mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intraperitoneally on embryonic day 17 to create a model of perinatal brain injury caused by prenatal inflammation. In this model, the effect of maternal administration of hydrogen water (HW) on pups was also evaluated. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, oxidative damage and activation of microglia were determined in the fetal brains. H2 reduced the LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, oxidative damage and microglial activation in the fetal brains. Next, we investigated how H2 contributes to neuroprotection, focusing on microglia, using primary cultured microglia and neurons. H2 prevented LPS- or cytokine-induced generation of reactive oxidative species by microglia and reduced LPS-induced microglial neurotoxicity. Finally, we identified several molecules influenced by H2, involved in the process of activating microglia. These results suggested that H2 holds promise for the prevention of inflammation related to perinatal brain injury. PMID:26709014

  1. Molecular and clinical implementations of ovarian cancer mouse avatar models.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Amira A; Mandrekar, Sumithra J; Haluska, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Innovation in oncology drug development has been hindered by lack of preclinical models that reliably predict clinical activity of novel therapies in cancer patients. Increasing desire for individualize treatment of patients with cancer has led to an increase in the use of patient-derived xenografts (PDX) engrafted into immune-compromised mice for preclinical modeling. Large numbers of tumor-specific PDX models have been established and proved to be powerful tools in pre-clinical testing. A subset of PDXs, referred to as Avatars, establish tumors in an orthotopic and treatment naïve fashion that may represent the most clinical relevant model of individual human cancers. This review will discuss ovarian cancer (OC) PDX models demonstrating the opportunities and limitations of these models in cancer drug development, and describe concepts of clinical trials design in Avatar guided therapy.

  2. Molecular Complexity via C–H Activation: A Dehydrogenative Diels-Alder Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Erik M.; White, M. Christina

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, C–H oxidation reactions install oxidized functionality onto a preformed molecular skeleton, resulting in a local molecular change. The use of C–H activation chemistry to construct complex molecular scaffolds is a new area with tremendous potential in synthesis. We report a Pd(II)/bis-sulfoxide catalyzed dehydrogenative Diels-Alder reaction that converts simple terminal olefins into complex cycloadducts in a single operation. PMID:21842902

  3. Molecular complexity via C-H activation: a dehydrogenative Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Stang, Erik M; White, M Christina

    2011-09-28

    Traditionally, C-H oxidation reactions install oxidized functionality onto a preformed molecular skeleton, resulting in a local molecular change. The use of C-H activation chemistry to construct complex molecular scaffolds is a new area with tremendous potential in synthesis. We report a Pd(II)/bis-sulfoxide-catalyzed dehydrogenative Diels-Alder reaction that converts simple terminal olefins into complex cycloadducts in a single operation.

  4. Use of Computational Modeling to Evaluate Hypotheses About the Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Bystander Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yuchao; Conolly, Rory B; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2006-11-21

    This report describes the development of a computational systems biology approach to evaluate the hypotheses of molecular and cellular mechanisms of adaptive response to low dose ionizing radiation. Our concept is that computational models of signaling pathways can be developed and linked to biologically based dose response models to evaluate the underlying molecular mechanisms which lead to adaptive response. For development of quantitatively accurate, predictive models, it will be necessary to describe tissues consisting of multiple cell types where the different types each contribute in their own way to the overall function of the tissue. Such a model will probably need to incorporate not only cell type-specific data but also spatial information on the architecture of the tissue and on intercellular signaling. The scope of the current model was more limited. Data obtained in a number of different biological systems were synthesized to describe a chimeric, “average” population cell. Biochemical signaling pathways involved in sensing of DNA damage and in the activation of cell cycle checkpoint controls and the apoptotic path were also included. As with any computational modeling effort, it was necessary to develop these simplified initial descriptions (models) that can be iteratively refined. This preliminary model is a starting point which, with time, can evolve to a level of refinement where large amounts of detailed biological information are synthesized and a capability for robust predictions of dose- and time-response behaviors is obtained.

  5. Evaluating a Model of Youth Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Heitzler, Carrie D.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Erickson, Darin J.; Barr-Anderson, Daheia; Sirard, John R.; Story, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between social influences, self-efficacy, enjoyment, and barriers and physical activity. Methods Structural equation modeling examined relationships between parent and peer support, parent physical activity, individual perceptions, and objectively measured physical activity using accelerometers among a sample of youth aged 10–17 years (N=720). Results Peer support, parent physical activity, and perceived barriers were directly related to youth activity. The proposed model accounted for 14.7% of the variance in physical activity. Conclusions The results demonstrate a need to further explore additional individual, social, and environmental factors that may influence youth’s regular participation in physical activity. PMID:20524889

  6. Deciphering the GPER/GPR30-agonist and antagonists interactions using molecular modeling studies, molecular dynamics, and docking simulations.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Luna, D; Martínez-Archundia, M; Maroun, Rachid C; Ceballos-Reyes, G; Fragoso-Vázquez, M J; González-Juárez, D E; Correa-Basurto, J

    2015-01-01

    The G-protein coupled estrogen receptor 1 GPER/GPR30 is a transmembrane seven-helix (7TM) receptor involved in the growth and proliferation of breast cancer. Due to the absence of a crystal structure of GPER/GPR30, in this work, molecular modeling studies have been carried out to build a three-dimensional structure, which was subsequently refined by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (up to 120 ns). Furthermore, we explored GPER/GPR30's molecular recognition properties by using reported agonist ligands (G1, estradiol (E2), tamoxifen, and fulvestrant) and the antagonist ligands (G15 and G36) in subsequent docking studies. Our results identified the E2 binding site on GPER/GPR30, as well as other receptor cavities for accepting large volume ligands, through GPER/GPR30 π-π, hydrophobic, and hydrogen bond interactions. Snapshots of the MD trajectory at 14 and 70 ns showed almost identical binding motifs for G1 and G15. It was also observed that C107 interacts with the acetyl oxygen of G1 (at 14 ns) and that at 70 ns the residue E275 interacts with the acetyl group and with the oxygen from the other agonist whereas the isopropyl group of G36 is oriented toward Met141, suggesting that both C107 and E275 could be involved in the protein activation. This contribution suggest that GPER1 has great structural changes which explain its great capacity to accept diverse ligands, and also, the same ligand could be recognized in different binding pose according to GPER structural conformations.

  7. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation of molecular agents

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Walter G.; Wachter, Eric A.; Dees, H. Craig

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus for the treatment of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue by treating the plant or animal tissue with at least one photo-active molecular agent, wherein the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue retains at least a portion of the at least one photo-active molecular agent, and then treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent retained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, wherein the at least one photo-active molecular agent becomes active in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue.

  8. Molecular mechanism on cadmium-induced activity changes of catalase and superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Rutao; Chen, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium contributes to adverse effects of organisms probably because of its ability to induce oxidative stress via alterations in activities of antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), but their molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We investigated the molecular mechanism of CAT and SOD response under Cd-induced oxidative stress in the liver of zebrafish. The enzyme activity changes observed in vitro were consistent with those seen in vivo, indicating the direct interaction of CAT and SOD with Cd contributes to their activity change in vivo. Further experiments utilizing multiple spectroscopic methods, isothermal titration calorimetry and a molecular docking study were performed to explore the mechanism of molecular interaction of CAT and SOD with Cd. Different interaction patterns were found that resulted in misfolding and changed the enzyme activities. Taken together, we suggest the misfolding of CAT and SOD contributes to their activity change under Cd-induced oxidative stress in vivo.

  9. Lanthanide and transition metal complexes of bioactive coumarins: molecular modeling and spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, I; Mihaylov, Tz; Trendafilova, N

    2014-06-01

    The present paper summarizes theoretical and spectroscopic investigations on a series of active coumarins and their lanthanide and transition metal complexes with application in medicine and pharmacy. Molecular modeling as well as IR, Raman, NMR and electronic spectral simulations at different levels of theory were performed to obtain important molecular descriptors: total energy, formation energy, binding energy, stability, conformations, structural parameters, electron density distribution, molecular electrostatic potential, Fukui functions, atomic charges, and reactive indexes. The computations are performed both in gas phase and in solution with consideration of the solvent effect on the molecular structural and energetic parameters. The investigations have shown that the advanced computational methods are reliable for prediction of the metal-coumarin binding mode, electron density distribution, thermodynamic properties as well as the strength and nature of the metal-coumarin interaction (not experimentally accessible) and correctly interpret the experimental spectroscopic data. Known results from biological tests for cytotoxic, antimicrobial, anti-fungal, spasmolytic and anti-HIV activities on the studied metal complexes are reported and discussed. PMID:24680836

  10. Molecular Modeling Approaches to Study the Binding Mode on Tubulin of Microtubule Destabilizing and Stabilizing Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, Maurizio; Forli, Stefano; Magnani, Matteo; Manetti, Fabrizio

    Tubulin targeting agents constitute an important class of anticancer drugs. By acting either as microtubule stabilizers or destabilizers, they disrupt microtubule dynamics, thus inducing mitotic arrest and, ultimately, cell death by apoptosis. Three different binding sites, whose exact location on tubulin has been experimentally detected, have been identified so far for antimitotic compound targeting microtubules, namely the taxoid, the colchicine and the vinka alkaloid binding site. A number of ligand- and structure-based molecular modeling studies in this field has been reported over the years, aimed at elucidating the binding modes of both stabilizing and destabilizing agent, as well as the molecular features responsible for their efficacious interaction with tubulin. Such studies are described in this review, focusing on information provided by different modeling approaches on the structural determinants of antitubulin agents and the interactions with the binding pockets on tubulin emerged as fundamental for antitumor activity.To describe molecular modeling approaches applied to date to molecules known to bind microtubules, this paper has been divided into two main parts: microtubule destabilizing (Part 1) and stabilizing (Part 2) agents. The first part includes structure-based and ligand-based approaches to study molecules targeting colchicine (1.1) and vinca alkaloid (1.2) binding sites, respectively. In the second part, the studies performed on microtubule-stabilizing antimitotic agents (MSAA) are described. Starting from the first representative compound of this class, paclitaxel, molecular modeling studies (quantitative structure-activity relationships - QSAR - and structure-based approaches), performed on natural compounds acting with the same mechanism of action and temptative common pharmacophoric hypotheses for all of these compounds, are reported.

  11. Quantitative structure-activity relationship correlation between molecular structure and the Rayleigh enantiomeric enrichment factor.

    PubMed

    Jammer, S; Rizkov, D; Gelman, F; Lev, O

    2015-08-01

    It was recently demonstrated that under environmentally relevant conditions the Rayleigh equation is valid to describe the enantiomeric enrichment - conversion relationship, yielding a proportional constant called the enantiomeric enrichment factor, εER. In the present study we demonstrate a quantitative structure-activity relationship model (QSAR) that describes well the dependence of εER on molecular structure. The enantiomeric enrichment factor can be predicted by the linear Hansch model, which correlates biological activity with physicochemical properties. Enantioselective hydrolysis of sixteen derivatives of 2-(phenoxy)propionate (PPMs) have been analyzed during enzymatic degradation by lipases from Pseudomonas fluorescens (PFL), Pseudomonas cepacia (PCL), and Candida rugosa (CRL). In all cases the QSAR relationships were significant with R(2) values of 0.90-0.93, and showed high predictive abilities with internal and external validations providing QLOO(2) values of 0.85-0.87 and QExt(2) values of 0.8-0.91. Moreover, it is demonstrated that this model enables differentiation between enzymes with different binding site shapes. The enantioselectivity of PFL and PCL was dictated by electronic properties, whereas the enantioselectivity of CRL was determined by lipophilicity and steric factors. The predictive ability of the QSAR model demonstrated in the present study may serve as a helpful tool in environmental studies, assisting in source tracking of unstudied chiral compounds belonging to a well-studied homologous series.

  12. Investigation on the protein-binding properties of icotinib by spectroscopic and molecular modeling method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua-xin; Xiong, Hang-xing; Li, Li-wei

    2016-05-15

    Icotinib is a highly-selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor with preclinical and clinical activity in non-small cell lung cancer, which has been developed as a new targeted anti-tumor drug in China. In this work, the interaction of icotinib and human serum albumin (HSA) were studied by three-dimensional fluorescence spectra, ultraviolet spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, molecular probe and molecular modeling methods. The results showed that icotinib binds to Sudlow's site I in subdomain IIA of HSA molecule, resulting in icotinib-HSA complexes formed at ground state. The number of binding sites, equilibrium constants, and thermodynamic parameters of the reaction were calculated at different temperatures. The negative enthalpy change (ΔH(θ)) and entropy change (ΔS(θ)) indicated that the structure of new complexes was stabilized by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals power. The distance between donor and acceptor was calculated according to Förster's non-radiation resonance energy transfer theory. The structural changes of HSA caused by icotinib binding were detected by synchronous spectra and circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Molecular modeling method was employed to unfold full details of the interaction at molecular level, most of which could be supported by experimental results. The study analyzed the probability that serum albumins act as carriers for this new anticarcinogen and provided fundamental information on the process of delivering icotinib to its target tissues, which might be helpful in understanding the mechanism of icotinib in cancer therapy. PMID:26963729

  13. Molecular Characterization of Growth Hormone-producing Tumors in the GC Rat Model of Acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Martín-Rodríguez, Juan F; Muñoz-Bravo, Jose L; Ibañez-Costa, Alejandro; Fernandez-Maza, Laura; Balcerzyk, Marcin; Leal-Campanario, Rocío; Luque, Raúl M; Castaño, Justo P; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso; Cano, David A

    2015-01-01

    Acromegaly is a disorder resulting from excessive production of growth hormone (GH) and consequent increase of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I), most frequently caused by pituitary adenomas. Elevated GH and IGF-I levels results in wide range of somatic, cardiovascular, endocrine, metabolic, and gastrointestinal morbidities. Subcutaneous implantation of the GH-secreting GC cell line in rats leads to the formation of tumors. GC tumor-bearing rats develop characteristics that resemble human acromegaly including gigantism and visceromegaly. However, GC tumors remain poorly characterized at a molecular level. In the present work, we report a detailed histological and molecular characterization of GC tumors using immunohistochemistry, molecular biology and imaging techniques. GC tumors display histopathological and molecular features of human GH-producing tumors, including hormone production, cell architecture, senescence activation and alterations in cell cycle gene expression. Furthermore, GC tumors cells displayed sensitivity to somatostatin analogues, drugs that are currently used in the treatment of human GH-producing adenomas, thus supporting the GC tumor model as a translational tool to evaluate therapeutic agents. The information obtained would help to maximize the usefulness of the GC rat model for research and preclinical studies in GH-secreting tumors. PMID:26549306

  14. Investigation on the protein-binding properties of icotinib by spectroscopic and molecular modeling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua-xin; Xiong, Hang-xing; Li, Li-wei

    2016-05-01

    Icotinib is a highly-selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor with preclinical and clinical activity in non-small cell lung cancer, which has been developed as a new targeted anti-tumor drug in China. In this work, the interaction of icotinib and human serum albumin (HSA) were studied by three-dimensional fluorescence spectra, ultraviolet spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, molecular probe and molecular modeling methods. The results showed that icotinib binds to Sudlow's site I in subdomain IIA of HSA molecule, resulting in icotinib-HSA complexes formed at ground state. The number of binding sites, equilibrium constants, and thermodynamic parameters of the reaction were calculated at different temperatures. The negative enthalpy change (ΔHθ) and entropy change (ΔSθ) indicated that the structure of new complexes was stabilized by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals power. The distance between donor and acceptor was calculated according to Förster's non-radiation resonance energy transfer theory. The structural changes of HSA caused by icotinib binding were detected by synchronous spectra and circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Molecular modeling method was employed to unfold full details of the interaction at molecular level, most of which could be supported by experimental results. The study analyzed the probability that serum albumins act as carriers for this new anticarcinogen and provided fundamental information on the process of delivering icotinib to its target tissues, which might be helpful in understanding the mechanism of icotinib in cancer therapy.

  15. Molecular Characterization of Growth Hormone-producing Tumors in the GC Rat Model of Acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Rodríguez, Juan F.; Muñoz-Bravo, Jose L.; Ibañez-Costa, Alejandro; Fernandez-Maza, Laura; Balcerzyk, Marcin; Leal-Campanario, Rocío; Luque, Raúl M.; Castaño, Justo P.; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso; Cano, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Acromegaly is a disorder resulting from excessive production of growth hormone (GH) and consequent increase of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I), most frequently caused by pituitary adenomas. Elevated GH and IGF-I levels results in wide range of somatic, cardiovascular, endocrine, metabolic, and gastrointestinal morbidities. Subcutaneous implantation of the GH-secreting GC cell line in rats leads to the formation of tumors. GC tumor-bearing rats develop characteristics that resemble human acromegaly including gigantism and visceromegaly. However, GC tumors remain poorly characterized at a molecular level. In the present work, we report a detailed histological and molecular characterization of GC tumors using immunohistochemistry, molecular biology and imaging techniques. GC tumors display histopathological and molecular features of human GH-producing tumors, including hormone production, cell architecture, senescence activation and alterations in cell cycle gene expression. Furthermore, GC tumors cells displayed sensitivity to somatostatin analogues, drugs that are currently used in the treatment of human GH-producing adenomas, thus supporting the GC tumor model as a translational tool to evaluate therapeutic agents. The information obtained would help to maximize the usefulness of the GC rat model for research and preclinical studies in GH-secreting tumors. PMID:26549306

  16. Molecular Characterization of Growth Hormone-producing Tumors in the GC Rat Model of Acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Martín-Rodríguez, Juan F; Muñoz-Bravo, Jose L; Ibañez-Costa, Alejandro; Fernandez-Maza, Laura; Balcerzyk, Marcin; Leal-Campanario, Rocío; Luque, Raúl M; Castaño, Justo P; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Leal-Cerro, Alfonso; Cano, David A

    2015-11-09

    Acromegaly is a disorder resulting from excessive production of growth hormone (GH) and consequent increase of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I), most frequently caused by pituitary adenomas. Elevated GH and IGF-I levels results in wide range of somatic, cardiovascular, endocrine, metabolic, and gastrointestinal morbidities. Subcutaneous implantation of the GH-secreting GC cell line in rats leads to the formation of tumors. GC tumor-bearing rats develop characteristics that resemble human acromegaly including gigantism and visceromegaly. However, GC tumors remain poorly characterized at a molecular level. In the present work, we report a detailed histological and molecular characterization of GC tumors using immunohistochemistry, molecular biology and imaging techniques. GC tumors display histopathological and molecular features of human GH-producing tumors, including hormone production, cell architecture, senescence activation and alterations in cell cycle gene expression. Furthermore, GC tumors cells displayed sensitivity to somatostatin analogues, drugs that are currently used in the treatment of human GH-producing adenomas, thus supporting the GC tumor model as a translational tool to evaluate therapeutic agents. The information obtained would help to maximize the usefulness of the GC rat model for research and preclinical studies in GH-secreting tumors.

  17. Design, synthesis, cytotoxic activity and molecular docking studies of new 20(S)-sulfonylamidine camptothecin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Song, Zi-Long; Wang, Mei-Juan; Li, Lanlan; Wu, Dan; Wang, Yu-Han; Yan, Li-Ting; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Liu, Ying-Qian; Zhao, Yong-Long; Wang, Chih-Ya; Liu, Huanxiang; Goto, Masuo; Liu, Heng; Zhu, Gao-Xiang; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2016-06-10

    In an ongoing investigation of 20-sulfonylamidine derivatives (9, YQL-9a) of camptothecin (1) as potential anticancer agents directly and selectively inhibiting topoisomerase (Topo) I, the sulfonylamidine pharmacophore was held constant, and a camptothecin derivatives with various substitution patterns were synthesized. The new compounds were evaluated for antiproliferative activity against three human tumor cell lines, A-549, KB, and multidrug resistant (MDR) KB subline (KBvin). Several analogs showed comparable or superior antiproliferative activity compared to the clinically prescribed 1 and irinotecan (3). Significantly, the 20-sulfonylamidine derivatives exhibited comparable cytotoxicity against KBvin, while 1 and 3 were less active against this cell line. Among them, compound 15c displayed much better cytotoxic activity than the controls 1, 3, and 9. Novel key structural features related to the antiproliferative activities were identified by structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis. In a molecular docking model, compounds 9 and 15c interacted with Topo I-DNA through a different binding mode from 1 and 3. The sulfonylamidine side chains of 9 and 15c could likely form direct hydrogen bonds with Topo I, while hydrophobic interaction with Topo I and π-π stacking with double strand DNA were also confirmed as binding driving forces. The results from docking models were consistent with the SAR conclusions. The introduction of bulky substituents at the 20-position contributed to the altered binding mode of the compound by allowing them to form new interactions with Topo I residues. The information obtained in this study will be helpful for the design of new derivatives of 1 with most promising anticancer activity.

  18. Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship Models for the Antioxidant Activity of Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Kaiying; Wang, Zhaojing

    2016-01-01

    In this study, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models for the antioxidant activity of polysaccharides were developed with 50% effective concentration (EC50) as the dependent variable. To establish optimum QSAR models, multiple linear regressions (MLR), support vector machines (SVM) and artificial neural networks (ANN) were used, and 11 molecular descriptors were selected. The optimum QSAR model for predicting EC50 of DPPH-scavenging activity consisted of four major descriptors. MLR model gave EC50 = 0.033Ara-0.041GalA-0.03GlcA-0.025PC+0.484, and MLR fitted the training set with R = 0.807. ANN model gave the improvement of training set (R = 0.96, RMSE = 0.018) and test set (R = 0.933, RMSE = 0.055) which indicated that it was more accurately than SVM and MLR models for predicting the DPPH-scavenging activity of polysaccharides. 67 compounds were used for predicting EC50 of the hydroxyl radicals scavenging activity of polysaccharides. MLR model gave EC50 = 0.12PC+0.083Fuc+0.013Rha-0.02UA+0.372. A comparison of results from models indicated that ANN model (R = 0.944, RMSE = 0.119) was also the best one for predicting the hydroxyl radicals scavenging activity of polysaccharides. MLR and ANN models showed that Ara and GalA appeared critical in determining EC50 of DPPH-scavenging activity, and Fuc, Rha, uronic acid and protein content had a great effect on the hydroxyl radicals scavenging activity of polysaccharides. The antioxidant activity of polysaccharide usually was high in MW range of 4000–100000, and the antioxidant activity could be affected simultaneously by other polysaccharide properties, such as uronic acid and Ara. PMID:27685320

  19. Characterizing Warm Molecular Hydrogen in Active Star-Forming Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangwala, Naseem

    2014-10-01

    Herschel observations of nearby star-forming galaxies have determined that the warm component of the molecular gas traced by the high-J CO lines dominates the luminosity (~90% of the total CO luminosity) and hence the energetics of the molecular ISM. At the temperatures (T = 300 - 2000 K) and densities (n_H < 1E6 per cubic cm) typically found in our survey, H2 emission is the dominant gas coolant, much more important than CO. A fundamental assumption of all analyses of CO emission has been that CO emission traces H2 over the entire range of physical conditions in the observed sources. However, a direct observational comparison of spatial distributions and kinematics of CO and H2 has never been made for the warm molecular gas. We propose to observe the warm H2, in S(1) and S(2) transitions, with the SOFIA-EXES instrument in a diverse sample of star-forming systems: NGC 253 (starburst nucleus), NGC 6240 (luminous infrared galaxy), NGC 1068 (Seyfert-2), and SgrB2(M)/(N) (Galactic hot cores). The primary goal is to compare these measurements with the warm CO (J = 6-5 transition) observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to investigate differences in the kinematics and spatial distributions (for the extended targets) of the two molecules and thereby confirm whether CO is a reliable tracer of H2 in the warm gas.

  20. Fracture of Carbon Nanotube - Amorphous Carbon Composites: Molecular Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates for use as reinforcements in next generation structural composite materials because of their extremely high specific stiffness and strength. They cannot, however, be viewed as simple replacements for carbon fibers because there are key differences between these materials in areas such as handling, processing, and matrix design. It is impossible to know for certain that CNT composites will represent a significant advance over carbon fiber composites before these various factors have been optimized, which is an extremely costly and time intensive process. This work attempts to place an upper bound on CNT composite mechanical properties by performing molecular dynamics simulations on idealized model systems with a reactive forcefield that permits modeling of both elastic deformations and fracture. Amorphous carbon (AC) was chosen for the matrix material in this work because of its structural simplicity and physical compatibility with the CNT fillers. It is also much stiffer and stronger than typical engineering polymer matrices. Three different arrangements of CNTs in the simulation cell have been investigated: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. The SWNT and MWNT array systems are clearly idealizations, but the SWNT bundle system is a step closer to real systems in which individual tubes aggregate into large assemblies. The effect of chemical crosslinking on composite properties is modeled by adding bonds between the CNTs and AC. The balance between weakening the CNTs and improving fiber-matrix load transfer is explored by systematically varying the extent of crosslinking. It is, of course, impossible to capture the full range of deformation and fracture processes that occur in real materials with even the largest atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. With this limitation in mind, the simulation results reported here provide a plausible upper limit on

  1. Multi-scale modelling of supercapacitors: From molecular simulations to a transmission line model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pean, C.; Rotenberg, B.; Simon, P.; Salanne, M.

    2016-09-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations of a typical nanoporous-carbon based supercapacitor. The organic electrolyte consists in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium and hexafluorophosphate ions dissolved in acetonitrile. We simulate systems at equilibrium, for various applied voltages. This allows us to determine the relevant thermodynamic (capacitance) and transport (in-pore resistivities) properties. These quantities are then injected in a transmission line model for testing its ability to predict the charging properties of the device. The results from this macroscopic model are in good agreement with non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, which validates its use for interpreting electrochemical impedance experiments.

  2. Understanding Molecular Genetics through a Drawing-Based Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotbain, Yosi; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Stavy, Ruth

    2005-01-01

    The activity uses drawings typically found in textbooks, engaging students in physical and mental activities such as drawing, painting and figure completion--as well as finding missing words and answering guiding questions. The activity deals with three topics: the structure of DNA, DNA replication and protein synthesis. In this study we…

  3. Circadian rhythmicity of active GSK3 isoforms modulates molecular clock gene rhythms in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Besing, Rachel C; Paul, Jodi R; Hablitz, Lauren M; Rogers, Courtney O; Johnson, Russell L; Young, Martin E; Gamble, Karen L

    2015-04-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives and synchronizes daily rhythms at the cellular level via transcriptional-translational feedback loops comprising clock genes such as Bmal1 and Period (Per). Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), a serine/threonine kinase, phosphorylates at least 5 core clock proteins and shows diurnal variation in phosphorylation state (inactivation) of the GSK3β isoform. Whether phosphorylation of the other primary isoform (GSK3α) varies across the subjective day-night cycle is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if the endogenous rhythm of GSK3 (α and β) phosphorylation is critical for rhythmic BMAL1 expression and normal amplitude and periodicity of the molecular clock in the SCN. Significant circadian rhythmicity of phosphorylated GSK3 (α and β) was observed in the SCN from wild-type mice housed in constant darkness for 2 weeks. Importantly, chronic activation of both GSK3 isoforms impaired rhythmicity of the GSK3 target BMAL1. Furthermore, chronic pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 with 20 µM CHIR-99021 enhanced the amplitude and shortened the period of PER2::luciferase rhythms in organotypic SCN slice cultures. These results support the model that GSK3 activity status is regulated by the circadian clock and that GSK3 feeds back to regulate the molecular clock amplitude in the SCN.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Materials Determined Through Molecular Modeling Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    The potential for gains in material properties over conventional materials has motivated an effort to develop novel nanostructured materials for aerospace applications. These novel materials typically consist of a polymer matrix reinforced with particles on the nanometer length scale. In this study, molecular modeling is used to construct fully atomistic models of a carbon nanotube embedded in an epoxy polymer matrix. Functionalization of the nanotube which consists of the introduction of direct chemical bonding between the polymer matrix and the nanotube, hence providing a load transfer mechanism, is systematically varied. The relative effectiveness of functionalization in a nanostructured material may depend on a variety of factors related to the details of the chemical bonding and the polymer structure at the nanotube-polymer interface. The objective of this modeling is to determine what influence the details of functionalization of the carbon nanotube with the polymer matrix has on the resulting mechanical properties. By considering a range of degree of functionalization, the structure-property relationships of these materials is examined and mechanical properties of these models are calculated using standard techniques.

  5. Molecular mechanisms of human IRE1 activation through dimerization and ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Amar; Newbatt, Yvette; McAndrew, P. Craig; Stubbs, Mark; Burke, Rosemary; Richards, Mark W.; Bhatia, Chitra; Caldwell, John J.; McHardy, Tatiana; Collins, Ian; Bayliss, Richard

    2015-01-01

    IRE1 transduces the unfolded protein response by splicing XBP1 through its C-terminal cytoplasmic kinase-RNase region. IRE1 autophosphorylation is coupled to RNase activity through formation of a back-to-back dimer, although the conservation of the underlying molecular mechanism is not clear from existing structures. We have crystallized human IRE1 in a back-to-back conformation only previously seen for the yeast homologue. In our structure the kinase domain appears primed for catalysis but the RNase domains are disengaged. Structure-function analysis reveals that IRE1 is autoinhibited through a Tyr-down mechanism related to that found in the unrelated Ser/Thr protein kinase Nek7. We have developed a compound that potently inhibits human IRE1 kinase activity while stimulating XBP1 splicing. A crystal structure of the inhibitor bound to IRE1 shows an increased ordering of the kinase activation loop. The structures of hIRE in apo and ligand-bound forms are consistent with a previously proposed model of IRE1 regulation in which formation of a back-to-back dimer coupled to adoption of a kinase-active conformation drive RNase activation. The structures provide opportunities for structure-guided design of IRE1 inhibitors. PMID:25968568

  6. Multiscale modeling for materials design: Molecular square catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Debarshi

    In a wide variety of materials, including a number of heterogeneous catalysts, the properties manifested at the process scale are a consequence of phenomena that occur at different time and length scales. Recent experimental developments allow materials to be desi